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Sample records for lantana lilacina desf

  1. Nematicidal triterpenoids from Lantana camara.

    PubMed

    Begum, Sabira; Ayub, Anjum; Shaheen Siddiqui, Bina; Fayyaz, Shahina; Kazi, Firoza

    2015-09-01

    A new triterpene, lancamarolide (1), and seven known triterpenes, oleanonic acid (2), lantadene A (3), 11α-hydroxy-3-oxours-12-en-28-oic acid (4), betulinic acid (5), lantadene B (6), and lantaninilic acid (7) were isolated from the aerial parts of Lantana camara in the course of bioassay-guided isolation, and their nematicidal activities against Meloidogyne incognita, the root knot nematode, were carried out. Oleanonic acid was found to be the most active compound and exhibited 80% mortality after 72 h at 0.0625% concentration, which is comparable with that of the standard furadan.

  2. Anti-Cancer Effects of Protein Extracts from Calvatia lilacina, Pleurotus ostreatus and Volvariella volvacea

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jin-Yi; Chen, Chi-Hung; Chang, Wen-Huei; Chung, King-Thom; Liu, Yi-Wen; Lu, Fung-Jou; Chen, Ching-Hsein

    2011-01-01

    Calvatia lilacina (CL), Pleurotus ostreatus (PO) and Volvariella volvacea (VV) are widely distributed worldwide and commonly eaten as mushrooms. In this study, cell viabilities were evaluated for a human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line (SW480 cells) and a human monocytic leukemia cell line (THP-1 cells). Apoptotic mechanisms induced by the protein extracts of PO and VV were evaluated for SW480 cells. The viabilities of THP-1 and SW480 cells decreased in a concentration-dependent manner after 24 h of treatment with the protein extracts of CL, PO or VV. Apoptosis analysis revealed that the percentage of SW480 cells in the SubG1 phase (a marker of apoptosis) was increased upon PO and VV protein-extract treatments, indicating that oligonucleosomal DNA fragmentation existed concomitantly with cellular death. The PO and VV protein extracts induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, glutathione (GSH) depletion and mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) loss in SW480 cells. Pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine, GSH or cyclosporine A partially prevented the apoptosis induced by PO protein extracts, but not that induced by VV extracts, in SW480 cells. The protein extracts of CL, PO and VV exhibited therapeutic efficacy against human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells and human monocytic leukemia cells. The PO protein extracts induced apoptosis in SW480 cells partially through ROS production, GSH depletion and mitochondrial dysfunction. Therefore, the protein extracts of these mushrooms could be considered an important source of new anti-cancer drugs. PMID:21792367

  3. Leishmanicidal Triterpenes from Lantana camara.

    PubMed

    Begum, Sabira; Ayub, Anjum; Qamar Zehra, Syeda; Shaheen Siddiqui, Bina; Iqbal Choudhary, M; Samreen

    2014-05-01

    Two new natural triterpenes, lantaninilic acid and lantoic acid, along with the known triterpenes lantadene A, and oleanolic, ursolic, betulinic, lantanolic, and camaric acid, were obtained from the aerial parts of Lantana camara through bioassay-guided isolation, monitoring the in vitro antileishmanial activity against promastigotes of Leishmania major. Oleanolic acid (3), ursolic acid (4), lantadene A (5), and lantanilic acid (7) showed significant leishmanicidal activities with IC50 values of 53.0, 12.4, 20.4, and 21.3 μM, respectively. The IC50 value of ursolic acid (4; 12.4 μM) was found to be comparable with that of the standard drugs, pentamidine (IC50 15.0 μM) and amphotericin B (IC50 0.31 μM). The in vitro activities of L. camara and its constituents against promastigotes of Leishmania major are reported here for the first time.

  4. Repellency of Lantana camara (Verbenaceae) flowers against Aedes mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Dua, V K; Gupta, N C; Pandey, A C; Sharma, V P

    1996-09-01

    The repellent effect of Lantana camara flowers was evaluated against Aedes mosquitoes. Lantana flower extract in coconut oil provided 94.5% protection from Aedes albopictus and Ae. aegypti. The mean protection time was 1.9 h. One application of Lantana flower can provide more than 50% protection up to 4 h against the possible bites of Aedes mosquitoes. No adverse effects of the human volunteers were observed through 3 months after the application.

  5. Effects of Lantana camara (Verbenaceae) on rat fertility.

    PubMed

    de Mello, Fernanda Bastos; Jacobus, Daniela; de Carvalho, Kelly Cristina Silva; de Mello, João Roberto Braga

    2003-02-01

    Lantana camara, widely used in folk medicine, possesses several pharmacological properties, including antipyretic, antimicrobial and antimutagenic properties. Lantana poisoning causes livestock mortality and morbidity; and also has adverse effects on humans working in lantana-infested forests, pastures or orchards. We examined the effects of a hydroalcoholic extract from Lantana camara var aculeata leaves on fertility of male rats. The extract did not interfere with overall weight or internal organ weights, but interfered with sperm count, daily sperm production and sperm morphology in a dose-dependent manner.

  6. A review of the hepatotoxic plant Lantana camara.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Om P; Sharma, Sarita; Pattabhi, Vasantha; Mahato, Shashi B; Sharma, Pritam D

    2007-05-01

    Lantana (Lantana camara Linn) is a noxious weed that grows in many tropical and subtropical parts of the world. Ingestion of lantana foliage by grazing animals causes cholestasis and hepatotoxicity. Both ruminants and nonruminant animals such as guinea pigs, rabbits, and female rats are susceptible to the hepatotoxic action of lantana toxins. The hepatotoxins are pentacyclic triterpenoids called lantadenes. Molecular structure of lantadenes has been determined. Green unripe fruits of the plant are toxic to humans. Lantana spp. exert allelopathic action on the neighboring vegetation. The allelochemicals have been identified as phenolics, with umbelliferone, methylcoumarin, and salicylic acid being the most phytotoxic. In addition to phenolics, a recent report indicates lantadene A and B as more potent allelochemicals. Management of lantana toxicosis in animals is achieved by drenching with activated charcoal and supportive therapy. Recent reports on the bilirubin clearance effect of Chinese herbal tea Yin Zhi Huang (decoction of the plant Yin Chin, Artemisia capillaries, and three other herbs) or its active ingredient 6,7-dimethylesculetin, in jaundice are very exciting and warrant investigations on its, possible, ameliorative effects in lantana intoxicated animals. Research is being conducted on new drug discovery based on natural products in different parts of the lantana plant.

  7. Corolla Herbivory, Pollination Success and Fruit Predation in Complex Flowers: An Experimental Study with Linaria lilacina (Scrophulariaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Lafuente, Alfonso M.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Herbivory on floral structures has been postulated to influence the evolution of floral traits in some plant species, and may also be an important factor influencing the occurrence and outcome of subsequent biotic interactions related to floral display. In particular, corolla herbivory may affect structures differentially involved in flower selection by pollinators and fruit predators (specifically, those ovopositing in ovaries prior to fruit development); hence floral herbivores may influence the relationships between these mutualistic and antagonistic agents. Methods The effects of corolla herbivory in Linaria lilacina (Scrophulariaceae), a plant species with complex flowers, were considered in relation to plant interactions with pollinators and fruit predators. Tests were made as to whether experimentally created differences in flower structure (resembling those occurring naturally) may translate into differences in reproductive output in terms of fruit or seed production. Key Results Flowers with modified corollas, particularly those with lower lips removed, were less likely to be selected by pollinators than control flowers, and were less likely to be successfully visited and pollinated. As a consequence, fruit production was also less likely in these modified flowers. However, none of the experimental treatments affected the likelihood of visitation by fruit predators. Conclusions Since floral herbivory may affect pollinator visitation rates and reduce seed production, differences among plants in the proportion of flowers affected by herbivory and in the intensity of the damage inflicted on affected flowers may result in different opportunities for reproduction for plants in different seasons. PMID:17204536

  8. In vivo toxicity study of Lantana camara

    PubMed Central

    Pour, Badakhshan Mahdi; Sasidharan, Sreenivasan

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the toxicity of methanol extract of various parts (Root, Stem, Leaf, Flower and Fruit) of Lantana camara (L. Camara) in Artemia salina. Methods The methanol extracts of L. camara were tested for in vivo brine shrimp lethality assay. Results All the tested extract exhibited very low toxicity on brine shrimp larva. The results showed that the root extract was the most toxic part of L. camara and may have potential as anticancer agent. Conclusions Methanolic extract of L. camara is relatively safe on short-term exposure. PMID:23569765

  9. Phytochemical and termiticidal study of Lantana camara var. aculeata leaves.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rajesh K; Verma, Suman K

    2006-09-01

    Extracts of Lantana camara var. aculeata leaves were studied for their phytochemical constituents and termiticidal effects against adult termite workers. The 5% chloroform extract was found to be significantly effective against termite workers.

  10. Vermicomposting eliminates the toxicity of Lantana (Lantana camara) and turns it into a plant friendly organic fertilizer.

    PubMed

    Hussain, N; Abbasi, Tasneem; Abbasi, S A

    2015-11-15

    In evidently the first study of its kind, vermicompost derived solely from a weed known to possess plant and animal toxicity was used to assess its impact on the germination and early growth of several plant species. No pre-composting or supplementation of animal manure was done to generate the vermicompost in order to ensure that the impact is clearly attributable to the weed. Whereas the weed used in this study, Lantana (Lantana camara), is known to possess strong negative allelopathy, besides plant/animal toxicity in other forms, its vermicompost was seen to be a good organic fertilizer as it increased germination success and encouraged growth of all the three botanical species explored by the authors - green gram (Vigna radiata), ladies finger (Abelmoschus esculentus) and cucumber (Cucumis sativus). In terms of several physical, chemical and biochemical attributes that were studied, the vermicompost appeared plant-friendly, giving best results in general when employed at concentrations of 1.5% in soil (w/w). Fourier transform infrared spectrometry revealed that the phenols and the sesquiterpene lactones that are responsible for the allelopathic impact of Lantana were largely destroyed in the course of vermicomposting. There is also an indication that lignin content of Lantana was reduced during its vermicomposting. The findings open up the possibility that the billions of tons of phytomass that is generated annually by Lantana and other invasives can be gainfully utilized in generating organic fertilizer via vermicomposting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Detoxification of lantana hepatotoxin, lantadene A, using Alcaligenes faecalis.

    PubMed

    Singh, A; Sharma, O P; Kurade, N P; Ojha, S

    2001-01-01

    Detoxification of lantadene A (LA), the hepatotoxin from Lantana camara var. aculeata, by the bacterial strain Alcaligenes faecalis has been investigated. Lantadene A induced hepatotoxicity concomitant with increases in plasma bilirubin, blood plasma enzymes and histopathological lesions that typify lantana toxicity. The extract of fermentation broth in which LA was incubated with A. faecalis did not elicit any alterations in blood enzyme prolife or liver histopathology, which were comparable with the control group. It is concluded that A. faecalis detoxified LA and no noxious product was formed on incubation of LA with A. faecalis.

  12. Antimycobacterial activity of flavonoids from Lantana camara Linn.

    PubMed

    Begum, S; Wahab, A; Siddiqui, B S

    2008-04-15

    Linaroside (1) and lantanoside (2), two flavonoids isolated from Lantana camara and their common acetyl derivative (3) were examined for antimycobacterial activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, strain H(37)Rv. These compounds exhibited 30, 37 and 98% inhibition, respectively at 6.25 microg mL(-1) concentration. Among these flavonoids acetylated compound was found to be the most active.

  13. Kibdelosporangium lantanae sp. nov., isolated from the rhizosphere soil of an ornamental plant, Lantana camara L.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Huang, Yaojian; Song, Siyang; Xue, Ci; Wu, Yingying; Deng, Xianming

    2015-08-01

    Strain XMU 506T, isolated from the rhizosphere soil of an ornamental plant, Lantana camara L., collected from Xiamen City, China, was identified using a polyphasic approach to clarify its taxonomic position. The aerial mycelium of this organism formed long straight or curved chains of spores and sporangium-like structures. The optimum growth occurred at 28-30 °C, pH 7.0 with 0-1% NaCl. Strain XMU 506T showed the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity (96.5%) to Kibdelosporangium philippinense DSM 44226T, and formed a monophyletic clade in the 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic tree together with the type strains of the genus Kibdelosporangium. The chemotaxonomic properties further supported the assignment of strain XMU 506T to the genus Kibdelosporangium: meso-diaminopimelic acid was the diagnostic amino acid in the cell wall peptidoglycan; mycolic acids were not present in the cell wall; the whole-cell hydrolysates contained arabinose, galactose, glucose and ribose. The major menaquinone was MK-9(H4); the phospholipids of the isolate comprised phosphatidylethanolamine, OH-phosphatidylethanolamine, diphosphatidylglycerol and unidentified amino-, glyco- and phospholipids; the major fatty acids of the strain were iso-C16 : 0, C17 : 1 ω6c and iso-C16 : 1 H. The G+C content of genomic DNA was 67.3 mol%. Based on the results of phylogenetic analysis, phenotypic and genotypic characterization, strain XMU 506T represents a novel species in the genus Kibdelosporangium, for which the name Kibdelosporangium lantanae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is XMU 506T ( = KCTC 29675T = MCCC 1K00430T).

  14. Bioactive phenylpropanoids from Daucus crinitus Desf. from Algeria.

    PubMed

    Lanfranchi, Don-Antoine; Laouer, Hocine; El Kolli, Meriem; Prado, Soizic; Maulay-Bailly, Christine; Baldovini, Nicolas

    2010-02-24

    The volatile constituents of Daucus crinitus Desf. from Algeria were analyzed by GC and GC-MS, The main constituent was isochavicol isobutyrate (39.0%), an uncommon phenylpropanoid. By synthesis of a series of homologous esters, it was also possible to determine the presence of small amounts of isochavicol propionate, which has never been described previously as a natural product. The antibacterial and antifungal activities of the whole essential oil, of these two esters, and of isochavicol itself were investigated against a wide range of bacteria and fungi. Additionally, their antimalarial and antiradical properties were also evaluated, showing an interesting antiplasmodial activity of isochavicol.

  15. Lantana camara L. (Verbenaceae) invasion along streams in a heterogeneous landscape.

    PubMed

    Ramaswami, Geetha; Sukumar, Raman

    2014-09-01

    Streams are periodically disturbed due to flooding, act as edges between habitats and also facilitate the dispersal of propagules, thus being potentially more vulnerable to invasions than adjoining regions. We used a landscape-wide transect-based sampling strategy and a mixed effects modelling approach to understand the effects of distance from stream, a rainfall gradient, light availability and fire history on the distribution of the invasive shrub Lantana camara L.(lantana) in the tropical dry forests of Mudumalai in southern India. The area occupied by lantana thickets and lantana stem abundance were both found to be highest closest to streams across this landscape with a rainfall gradient. There was no advantage in terms of increased abundance or area occupied by lantana when it grew closer to streams in drier areas as compared to moister areas. On an average, the area covered by lantana increased with increasing annual rainfall. Areas that experienced greater number of fires during 1989-2010 had lower lantana stem abundance irrespective of distance from streams. In this landscape, total light availability did not affect lantana abundance. Understanding the spatially variable environmental factors in a heterogeneous landscape influencing the distribution of lantana would aid in making informed management decisions at this scale.

  16. Phytochemical components and biological activities of Silene arenarioides Desf.

    PubMed

    Golea, Lynda; Benkhaled, Mohammed; Lavaud, Catherine; Long, Christophe; Haba, Hamada

    2017-02-24

    In this study, six known compounds 1-6 were isolated from the aerial parts of Silene arenarioides Desf. using different chromatographic methods. The structures of these compounds were identified as maltol glycoside (1), soyacerebroside I (2), chrysin (3), apigenin (4), quercetin (5) and stigmasterol glucoside (6). The compounds (1) and (2) are reported for the first time from this genus. The isolated compounds were determined using NMR techniques ((1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, COSY, HSQC and HMBC) and mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS). The antibacterial and antioxidant activities of extracts and of compound (1) have been evaluated. The antioxidant activity was performed by DPPH radical scavenging method, which showed that methanol extract possesses a good antioxidant activity with value of IC50 = 8.064 ± 0.005 μg/mL.

  17. Two new pentacyclic triterpenoids from Lantana camara LINN.

    PubMed

    Begum, Sabira; Zehra, Syeda Qamar; Siddiqui, Bina Shaheen

    2008-09-01

    Two new pentacyclic triterpenoids, namely lantanoic acid (1) and camaranoic acid (2), and six known compounds such as lantic acid, camarinic acid, camangeloyl acid, camarinin, oleanonic acid, and ursonic acid were isolated from the aerial parts of Lantana camara LINN. Structures of the new constituents were elucidated by chemical transformation and spectral studies including 1D ((1)H- and (13)C-NMR) and 2D ((1)H-(1)H correlation spectroscopy (COSY), nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY), (1)H-(1)H total correlation spectroscopy (TOCSY), J-resolved, (1)H-detected heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (HMQC), and heteronuclear multiple bond connectivity (HMBC)) NMR spectroscopy.

  18. Biofabrication of nanogold from the flower extracts of Lantana camara.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Brajesh; Smita, Kumari; Cumbal, Luis

    2016-06-01

    The present investigation was done to explore the potential of Lantana camara (L. camara) flower in the fabrication of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The shape and size of AuNPs have been successfully controlled by introducing small amounts of L. camara flower extract. It produced spherical nanogold of average size 10.6 ± 2.9 nm without any aggregation and showed significant photocatalytic degradation activity of the methylene blue (>62%, 10 mg/L) in the presence of solar light. In addition, the experimental approach is inexpensive, rapid and eco-friendly for industrial scale production of nanoparticles.

  19. Investigation of anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities of Lantana trifolia.

    PubMed

    Silva, Glauce N; Martins, Fabíola R; Matheus, Maria Eline; Leitão, Suzana G; Fernandes, Patricia D

    2005-09-14

    The anti-inflammatory activity of Lantana trifolia (Verbenaceae) was determined by carrageenan, serotonin and histamine-induced rat paw edema and the analgesic activity of this plant was studied by acetic acid-induced writhings and tail flick tests in mice. Lantana trifolia extracts (at 30 mg/kg) inhibited carrageenan and histamine-induced rat paw edema. Although the extracts did not produce any effect on acetic acid-induced writhings, they all develop a significant increase on tail flick antinociceptive index (doses varying between 1 and 30 mg/kg), indicating a spinal antinociceptive effect. These results provide support for the use of Lantana trifolia in relieving inflammatory pain.

  20. Bioefficacy of Lantana camara L. against Some Human Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Sharma, B; Kumar, P

    2009-09-01

    Antimicrobial efficacy of flavonoids (free and bound) and crude alkaloids of Lantana camara L. was determined by disc diffusion assay against three bacteria (Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, and Staphylococcus aureus) and two fungi (Candida albicans and Trichophyton mentagrophytes). Minimum inhibitory concentration, minimum bactericidal/fungicidal concentration and total activity were also studied. Most susceptible microorganism in the present study was C. albicans followed by P. mirabilis, S. aureus, E. coli, and T. mentagrophytes. The range of minimum inhibitory concentration of tested extracts was 0.039-0.625 mg/ml while minimum bactericidal/fungicidal concentration ranged from 0.078-1.25 mg/ml. Six extracts out of eleven tested showed same values of minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal/fungicidal concentration, while rest showed higher values of minimum bactericidal/fungicidal concentration. Highest total activity (120.51 ml/g) was observed for bound flavonoids of root against Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus. Results of the present investigation indicate that Lantana camara has good antimicrobial activity with low range of minimum inhibitory concentration hence can be exploited for future plant based antimicrobial drugs.

  1. Host-plant variety and not climate determines the establishment and performance of Aceria lantanae (Eriophyidae), a biological control agent of Lantana camara in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Mukwevho, Ludzula; Simelane, David; Olckers, Terence

    2017-02-28

    The flower-galling mite Aceria lantanae (Cook) (Trombidiformes: Eriophyidae) was released for the biological control of Lantana camara L. (Verbenaceae) in South Africa in 2007, but has displayed variable and patchy establishment throughout the weed's range. Surveys were undertaken in 2013-2014, both seasonally and during the mite's peak infestation periods, to determine the influence of climatic factors on its performance. Although there were seasonal differences in the percentages of mite-infested inflorescences, these did not differ significantly between altitudinal zones. There were also no significant relationships between the percentages of mite-infested inflorescences and either of annual rainfall, temperature or relative humidity. A field inoculation trial revealed significant differences between 10 common South African L. camara varieties in their susceptibility to A. lantanae. Only three varieties displayed appreciable susceptibility (50-61% of inflorescences infested), whereas six displayed only slight to moderate susceptibility (8-21%) and one displayed a lack of susceptibility (no infestation). These data support the contention that differential varietal susceptibility and not climate is responsible for the variable performance of A. lantanae on L. camara in South Africa. Complementing the current biotype of A. lantanae, originally sourced from Florida (USA), with other biotypes from different L. camara genotypes in Central and South America could increase the mite's impact on the weed.

  2. Antibacterial Activity of Lantana camara Linn and Lantana montevidensis Brig Extracts from Cariri-Ceará, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Barreto, Fs; Sousa, Eo; Campos, Ar; Costa, Jgm; Rodrigues, Ffg

    2010-01-01

    The use of medicinal plants with therapeutics properties represents a secular tradition in different cultures, mainly in underdeveloped countries. Lantana camara Linn and Lantana montevidensis Briq (Verbenaceae) found in tropical and subtropical areas around the world are popularly known as "camará" or "chumbinho." In popular medicines, both plants are used as antipyretic and carminative and in the treatment of respiratory system infections. In this study, the antibacterial activity of the ethanolic extracts of L. camara and L. montevidensis leaves and roots against gram-positive and gram-negative strains standard and multi-resistant bacteria isolated from clinical material are presented. In order to determine the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC), the microdilution method was used. The extracts demonstrated antibacterial activity against all tested bacteria, but the L. montevidensis fresh leaves extract present the best result against P. aeruginosa (MIC 8 μg/mL) and against multi-resistant E. coli (Ec 27) (MIC 16 μg/mL). These results drive new researches with both species in order to isolate the constituents responsible for the activity.

  3. Antibacterial Activity of Lantana camara Linn and Lantana montevidensis Brig Extracts from Cariri-Ceará, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Barreto, FS; Sousa, EO; Campos, AR; Costa, JGM; Rodrigues, FFG

    2010-01-01

    The use of medicinal plants with therapeutics properties represents a secular tradition in different cultures, mainly in underdeveloped countries. Lantana camara Linn and Lantana montevidensis Briq (Verbenaceae) found in tropical and subtropical areas around the world are popularly known as “camará” or “chumbinho.” In popular medicines, both plants are used as antipyretic and carminative and in the treatment of respiratory system infections. In this study, the antibacterial activity of the ethanolic extracts of L. camara and L. montevidensis leaves and roots against gram-positive and gram-negative strains standard and multi-resistant bacteria isolated from clinical material are presented. In order to determine the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC), the microdilution method was used. The extracts demonstrated antibacterial activity against all tested bacteria, but the L. montevidensis fresh leaves extract present the best result against P. aeruginosa (MIC 8 μg/mL) and against multi-resistant E. coli (Ec 27) (MIC 16 μg/mL). These results drive new researches with both species in order to isolate the constituents responsible for the activity. PMID:21331189

  4. Sustainability of wild pistachio (Pistacia atlantica Desf.) in Zagros forests, Iran

    Treesearch

    Morteza Pourreza; John D. Shaw; Hoshang Zangeneh

    2008-01-01

    Wild pistachio (Pistacia atlantica Desf.) is the most economically important tree species in many rural areas in the west of Iran. The species produces resin used for a wide variety of traditional uses. Because the resin can be harvested non-destructively, the trees are maintained until mortality occurs from natural causes. The result is that natural...

  5. Long-Term Environmental Correlates of Invasion by Lantana camara (Verbenaceae) in a Seasonally Dry Tropical Forest

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswami, Geetha; Sukumar, Raman

    2013-01-01

    Invasive species, local plant communities and invaded ecosystems change over space and time. Quantifying this change may lead to a better understanding of the ecology and the effective management of invasive species. We used data on density of the highly invasive shrub Lantana camara (lantana) for the period 1990–2008 from a 50 ha permanent plot in a seasonally dry tropical forest of Mudumalai in southern India. We used a cumulative link mixed-effects regression approach to model the transition of lantana from one qualitative density state to another as a function of biotic factors such as indicators of competition from local species (lantana itself, perennial grasses, invasive Chromolaena odorata, the native shrub Helicteres isora and basal area of native trees) and abiotic factors such as fire frequency, inter-annual variability of rainfall and relative soil moisture. The density of lantana increased substantially during the study period. Lantana density was negatively associated with the density of H. isora, positively associated with basal area of native trees, but not affected by the presence of grasses or other invasive species. In the absence of fire, lantana density increased with increasing rainfall. When fires occurred, transitions to higher densities occurred at low rainfall values. In drier regions, lantana changed from low to high density as rainfall increased while in wetter regions of the plot, lantana persisted in the dense category irrespective of rainfall. Lantana seems to effectively utilize resources distributed in space and time to its advantage, thus outcompeting local species and maintaining a population that is not yet self-limiting. High-risk areas and years could potentially be identified based on inferences from this study for facilitating management of lantana in tropical dry forests. PMID:24167555

  6. Long-term environmental correlates of invasion by Lantana camara (Verbenaceae) in a seasonally dry tropical forest.

    PubMed

    Ramaswami, Geetha; Sukumar, Raman

    2013-01-01

    Invasive species, local plant communities and invaded ecosystems change over space and time. Quantifying this change may lead to a better understanding of the ecology and the effective management of invasive species. We used data on density of the highly invasive shrub Lantana camara (lantana) for the period 1990-2008 from a 50 ha permanent plot in a seasonally dry tropical forest of Mudumalai in southern India. We used a cumulative link mixed-effects regression approach to model the transition of lantana from one qualitative density state to another as a function of biotic factors such as indicators of competition from local species (lantana itself, perennial grasses, invasive Chromolaena odorata, the native shrub Helicteres isora and basal area of native trees) and abiotic factors such as fire frequency, inter-annual variability of rainfall and relative soil moisture. The density of lantana increased substantially during the study period. Lantana density was negatively associated with the density of H. isora, positively associated with basal area of native trees, but not affected by the presence of grasses or other invasive species. In the absence of fire, lantana density increased with increasing rainfall. When fires occurred, transitions to higher densities occurred at low rainfall values. In drier regions, lantana changed from low to high density as rainfall increased while in wetter regions of the plot, lantana persisted in the dense category irrespective of rainfall. Lantana seems to effectively utilize resources distributed in space and time to its advantage, thus outcompeting local species and maintaining a population that is not yet self-limiting. High-risk areas and years could potentially be identified based on inferences from this study for facilitating management of lantana in tropical dry forests.

  7. Effect of vermicast generated from an allelopathic weed lantana (Lantana camara) on seed germination, plant growth, and yield of cluster bean (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba).

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, M; Hussain, N; Gajalakshmi, S; Abbasi, S A

    2014-11-01

    In perhaps the first-ever study of its kind, the effect of vermicompost, derived solely from an allelopathic weed, on the germination, growth, and yield of a botanical species, has been carried out. In test plots, the soil was treated with the vermicompost of lantana (Lantana camara) at the rates of 5, 7.5, and 10 t ha(-1), and cluster bean (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba) was grown on it. The performance of these systems was compared with the systems in which the soil was fortified with inorganic fertilizers (IFs) in concentrations equivalent to those present in the respective vermicompost (VC) treatments. Additionally, a set of control was studied in which the soil was used without fortification by either VC or IF. It was seen that up to 51.5 % greater germination success occurred in the VC treatments compared to controls. VC also supported better plant growth in terms of stem diameter, shoot length, shoot mass, number of leaves, and leaf pigments. The positive impact extended up to fruit yield. In addition, vermicast application enhanced root nodule formation, reduced disease incidence, and allowed for a smaller number of stunted plants. The results indicate that allelopathic ingredients of lantana seem to have been totally eliminated during the course of its vermicomposting and that lantana vermicompost has the potential to support germination, growth, and fruit yield better than equivalent quantities of IFs.

  8. Transformation of toxic and allelopathic lantana into a benign organic fertilizer through vermicomposting.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Naseer; Abbasi, Tasneem; Abbasi, S A

    2016-06-15

    In a first study of its kind, the composition of vermicompost derived solely from the toxic and allelopathic weed lantana has been investigated using UV-visible and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetric (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), gas chromatography-mass spectometry (GC-MS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The studies reveal that a sharp reduction in humification index, substantial mineralization of organic matter and degradation of complex aromatics such as lignin and polyphenols into simpler carbohydrates and lipids occur in the course of vermicomposting. GC-MS analysis shows significant fragmentation, bio-oxidation and molecular rearrangements of chemical compounds in vermicompost in comparison to those in lantana. SEM micrographs of vermicompost reflect strong disaggregation of material compared to the much better formed lantana matrices. The phenols and sesquiterpene lactones which are specifically responsible for the toxicity and allelopathy of lantana are seen to get significantly degraded in the course of vermicomposting - turning it into a plant-friendly organic fertilizer. The study leads to the possibility that the millions of tons of phytomass that is generated annually by lantana can be gainfully utilized in producing organic fertilizer via vermicomposting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Transformation of toxic and allelopathic lantana into a benign organic fertilizer through vermicomposting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Naseer; Abbasi, Tasneem; Abbasi, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    In a first study of its kind, the composition of vermicompost derived solely from the toxic and allelopathic weed lantana has been investigated using UV-visible and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetric (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), gas chromatography-mass spectometry (GC-MS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The studies reveal that a sharp reduction in humification index, substantial mineralization of organic matter and degradation of complex aromatics such as lignin and polyphenols into simpler carbohydrates and lipids occur in the course of vermicomposting. GC-MS analysis shows significant fragmentation, bio-oxidation and molecular rearrangements of chemical compounds in vermicompost in comparison to those in lantana. SEM micrographs of vermicompost reflect strong disaggregation of material compared to the much better formed lantana matrices. The phenols and sesquiterpene lactones which are specifically responsible for the toxicity and allelopathy of lantana are seen to get significantly degraded in the course of vermicomposting - turning it into a plant-friendly organic fertilizer. The study leads to the possibility that the millions of tons of phytomass that is generated annually by lantana can be gainfully utilized in producing organic fertilizer via vermicomposting.

  10. Effects of Lantana camara (Verbenaceae) on general reproductive performance and teratology in rats.

    PubMed

    Mello, Fernanda B; Jacobus, Daniela; Carvalho, Kelly; Mello, João R B

    2005-03-15

    Lantana camara L. (Verbenaceae) possesses several medicinal properties and it is used in folk medicine with antipyretic, antimicrobial and antimutagenic properties. This plant is one of the 10 most noxious weeds in the world. Lantana poisoning have caused severe economic losses and was the major cause of livestock mortality and morbidity. In this article we report the effects of hydroalcoholic extract from Lantana camara var. aculeata leaves on fertility, general reproductive performance and teratology in the rat. The data showed that the extract interfered in the frequency of fetal skeleton anomalies from dams treated with the extract and induced embryotoxicity as indicated by post-implantation loss, without any signs of maternal toxicity. The other parameters evaluated did not suggest modifications.

  11. Kinetic modelling of laccase mediated delignification of Lantana camara.

    PubMed

    Gujjala, Lohit K S; Bandyopadhyay, Tapas K; Banerjee, Rintu

    2016-07-01

    Enzymatic delignification is seen as a green step in biofuels production owing to its specificity towards lignin and its proper understanding requires a kinetic study to decipher intricate details of the process such as thermodynamic parameters viz., activation energy, entropy change and enthalpy change. A system of two coupled kinetic models has been constructed to model laccase mediated delignification of Lantana camara. From the simulated output, activation energy was predicted to be 45.56 and 56.06 kJ/mol, entropy change was observed to be 1.08 × 10(2) and 1.05 × 10(2)cal/mol-K and enthalpy change was determined to be 3.33 × 10(4) and 3.20 × 10(4)cal/mol, respectively from Tessier's and Michaelis Menten model. While comparing the prediction efficiency, it was noticed that Tessier's model gave better performance. Sensitivity analysis was also conducted and it was observed that the model was most sensitive towards temperature dependent kinetic constants.

  12. Lantana camara leaf extract mediated silver nanoparticles: Antibacterial, green catalyst.

    PubMed

    Ajitha, B; Ashok Kumar Reddy, Y; Shameer, Syed; Rajesh, K M; Suneetha, Y; Sreedhara Reddy, P

    2015-08-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been synthesized by Lantana camara leaf extract through simple green route and evaluated their antibacterial and catalytic activities. The leaf extract (LE) itself acts as both reducing and stabilizing agent at once for desired nanoparticle synthesis. The colorless reaction mixture turns to yellowish brown attesting the AgNPs formation and displayed UV-Vis absorption spectra. Structural analysis confirms the crystalline nature and formation of fcc structured metallic silver with majority (111) facets. Morphological studies elicit the formation of almost spherical shaped nanoparticles and as AgNO3 concentration is increased, there is an increment in the particle size. The FTIR analysis evidences the presence of various functional groups of biomolecules of LE is responsible for stabilization of AgNPs. Zeta potential measurement attests the higher stability of synthesized AgNPs. The synthesized AgNPs exhibited good antibacterial activity when tested against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas spp., Bacillus spp. and Staphylococcus spp. using standard Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion assay. Furthermore, they showed good catalytic activity on the reduction of methylene blue by L. camara extract which is monitored and confirmed by the UV-Vis spectrophotometer.

  13. Lantana landfill: A history of environmental management 1965--96

    SciTech Connect

    Statom, R.A.

    1997-08-01

    The Lantana Sanitary Landfill (LSL) is located in central Palm Beach County, Florida. The history of this landfill is a case study of the changes in environmental law, demography, solid waste management, hydrogeology, and public opinion in south Florida in the last 30 years. In 1983 Palm Beach County transferred ownership of the LSL to the Palm Beach County Solid Waste Authority (SWA). Environmental regulation enacted by Florida in the mid 1980`s resulted in negotiations to close the LSL. Closure was completed in 1988 utilizing a synthetic top liner, a landfill gas extraction/flare system, and a stormwater management system. In 1990 a groundwater mitigation system was installed to remediate the eastern plume. Closure of the LSL, extension of municipal water to local residents, and extensive public education by the SWA all served to answer most of the complaints of the local residents. In 1996 the LSL fell under a new series of air regulations and was required to apply for a Title V permit.

  14. Triterpenes of toxic and non-toxic taxa of Lantana camara.

    PubMed

    Hart, N K; Lamberton, J A; Sioumis, A A; Suares, H; Seawright, A A

    1976-04-15

    The taxa of Lantana camara toxic to animals contain lantadene A lantadene B, whereas in two non-toxic taxa other triterpenes predominate. Several new triterpenes have been characterized. Contrary to earlier claims, lantadene A and to a lesser extent lantadene B are toxic when administered intraruminally to sheep.

  15. Lantana montevidensis Essential Oil: Chemical Composition and Mosquito Repellent Activity against Aedes aegypti

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The essential oil (EO) of Lantana montevidensis (Spreng.) Briq. (L. sellowiana Link & Otto) was investigated for its chemical composition and mosquito repellent activity. The essential oil obtained by hydrodistillation of aerial plant parts was analyzed by GC-FID and GC-MS. The major constituents we...

  16. [Determination of 22 inorganic elements in different parts of Lantana camara by ICP-OES].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei-ming; Wang, Ru-yi; Chen, Liu-sheng; Huang, Chuan-bin

    2014-10-01

    To determine the contents of 22 inorganic elements in different parts of Lantana camara by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). HNO3-H2O2 digested system was used to completely decompose the organic compounds effectually by microwave digestion. The 22 inorganic elements such as K, Ca, Mg, Fe, Al, Na, Zn, Mn and Cr were determined by ICP-OES under set up working conditions. The contents of K, Ca and Mg were the most in different parts of Lantana camara; The contents of K, Ca, Mg, Mn, Sr and Cu in the leaf were more those that in the root and branch; The contents of Fe, Na, Cr and Ni in the root were more than those in the leaf and branch; The contents of Mn, Zn, Sr and Cu in the branch were more than those in the root and the leaf; The contents of Pb and Cd were higher than the national standard and Cr had high content in different parts of Lantana camara. The determination method is quick, easy and accurate with high sensitivity, which can determine the contents of 22 inorganic elements accurately in different parts of Lantana camara.

  17. Nematicidal natural products from the aerial parts of Lantana camara Linn.

    PubMed

    Qamar, F; Begum, S; Raza, S M; Wahab, A; Siddiqui, B S

    2005-09-01

    Lantanilic acid, camaric acid and oleanolic acid possessing nematicidal activity were isolated from the methanolic extract of the aerial parts of Lantana camara Linn. through bio-assay guided fractionation. These compounds exhibited 98%, 95% and 70% mortality respectively against root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita at 0.5% concentration. Conventional nematicide furadan showed 100% mortality at this concentration.

  18. Tsetse flies are attracted to the invasive plant Lantana camara.

    PubMed

    Syed, Z; Guerin, P M

    2004-01-01

    In tsetse both sexes feed exclusively on the blood of vertebrates for a few minutes every 2-3 days. Tsetse flies seek cover from high temperatures to conserve energy and plants provide shelter for tsetse in all the biotopes they occupy. Recently, tsetse have taken cover in plantations and under the invasive bush Lantana camara that has invaded large areas of the tsetse fly belt of Africa. Flies from such refugia are implicated in sleeping sickness epidemics. In a wind tunnel we show that both foliage and an extract of volatiles from foliage of L. camara attract three tsetse spp. from different habitats: Glossina fuscipes fuscipes (riverine), G. brevipalpis (sylvatic) and G. pallidipes (savannah). Gas chromatography analysis of volatiles extracted from leaves and flowers of L. camara coupled to electroantennograme recordings show that 1-octen-3-ol and beta-caryophyllene are the major chemostimuli for the antennal receptor cells of the three tsetse spp. studied. A binary mixture of these products attracted these flies in the wind tunnel. The gas chromatography linked electroantennograme analysis of the L. camara extracts also show that the antennal receptor cells of the three tsetse spp. respond similarly to groups of volatiles derived from the major biosynthetic and catabolic pathways of plants, i.e. to mono- and sesquiterpenes, to lipoxidation products and to aromatics. Mixtures of these plant volatiles also attracted tsetse in the wind tunnel. These findings show that tsetse flies have conserved a strong sensitivity to volatile secondary products of plants, underlining the fundamental role of vegetation in tsetse survival.

  19. Chemical composition and nutritive value of lantana and sweet pepper seeds and nabak seed kernels.

    PubMed

    Embaby, Hassan El-Sayed; Mokhtar, Sayed Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    Chemical analysis was carried out on lantana (Lantana camara) and sweet pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) seeds and nabak (Zizyphus spina-christi) seed kernels. The proximate analysis (on dry weight basis) of sweet pepper seeds, lantana seeds, and nabak seed kernels showed the following composition: moisture 70.95%, 17.27%, and 4.22%; ash 4.88%, 1.81%, and 3.51%; fat 19.57%, 11.0%, and 30.19%; crude protein 19.28%, 6.3%, and 38.2%; and carbohydrate 56.3%, 80.9%, and 28.1%, respectively. For minerals, potassium was the most abundant element, followed by phosphorus and sodium. Also, zinc, iron, copper, and manganese were detected. Analysis of amino acids revealed that the first limiting amino acid was valine, for both lantana and sweet pepper seeds, but it was threonine for nabak seed kernels. Antinutritional compounds, including, phytic acid, trypsin inhibitor, and tannins, were detected in all seeds. Results of fatty acid compositions showed that the major fatty acid was oleic acid in both lantana (48.73%) and nabak oils (53.25%), but it was linoleic acid in sweet pepper oil (71.55%). Moreover, the degree of unsaturation of these oils was close to that of common vegetable oils. In all oils, there was absorbance in the ultraviolet (UV)-B and UV-C ranges with potential for use as broad spectrum UV protectants. It can be inferred that the seeds investigated are good sources of crude fat, crude protein, ash, carbohydrate, and some minerals. Furthermore, the oil extracts could be useful as edible oils and for industrial applications. The nutritional composition of the investigated seeds suggested that they could be used to meet part of the nutritional requirements of animal feeds. Also, they could be regarded as good sources of food ingredients and as new sources of edible oils. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  20. Structures of bioactive carexanes from the roots of Carex distachya Desf.

    PubMed

    Fiorentino, Antonio; D'Abrosca, Brigida; Pacifico, Severina; Natale, Angela; Monaco, Pietro

    2006-05-01

    Four metabolites, named carexanes I-L, have been isolated from the roots of Carex distachya Desf, an herbaceous plant living in the Mediterranean maquis, together with three known compounds, already isolated from the aerial part of the plant. All the compounds have been characterized on the basis of their spectroscopic properties. Carexane I derived from the lose of a proton from the C-18 carbon of an intermediate isopropyl cation. Its stereostructure has been elucidated by Mosher's method, NOESY/ROESY experiments and computational calculations. The bioactivity on seed germination and root/shoot growth of Lactuca sativa L. of all the isolated compounds is also reported.

  1. [Evaluation of antifungal and mollusuicidial activities of Moroccan Zizyphus lotus (L.) Desf].

    PubMed

    Lahlou, M; El Mahi, M; Hamamouchi, J

    2002-11-01

    Zizyphus lotus (L.) Desf. is one of the traditional drugs commonly used in folk medicine in Morocco. Extracts obtained from the successive exhaustion in petroleum ether, chloroform, ethyl acetate and methanol were in vitro found active either against nine pathogenic fungi and Bulinus truncatus, the intermediate host and vector of transmission of unitary schistosomiasis in Morocco. Particularly, the chloroform extract appears the most interesting in antifungal tests at lowest concentrations because of its countenance on terpenic compounds. Whereas, methanolic extract was found to possess the strong mollusuicidial activity and exhibited potent "knock-down" effect on molluscans related to its countenance on saponins.

  2. Zizyphus lotus L. (Desf.) modulates antioxidant activity and human T-cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Zizyphus lotus L. (Desf.) also known as Jujube, is a deciduous shrub which belongs to Rhamnaceae family. This plant is used in Algerian traditional medicine for its anti-diabetic, sedative, analgesic, anti-inflammatory and hypoglycaemic activities. In the present study, we determined the concentrations of different vitamins (vitamin A, C and E) and fatty acids in root, stem, leaves, fruit pulp and seed of Zizyphus lotus L. (Desf.) and assessed the effects of their aqueous extracts on antioxidant status and human T-cell proliferation. Methods Aqueous filtrates from different parts, i.e, root, leaf, stem, fruit pulp and seed, of Zizyphus lotus L. (Desf.) were prepared. Vitamin C levels were determined by precipitating with 10% trichloroacetic acid and vitamin A and E were assessed by HPLC. Lipid composition of these extracts was determined by gas-liquid chromatography. Anti-oxidant capacity was evaluated by using anti-radical resistance kit [Kit Radicaux Libres (KRL@; Kirial International SA, Couternon, France)]. T-cell blastogenesis was assessed by the incorporation of 3H-thymidine. IL-2 gene expression was evaluated by RT-qPCR. Results Our results show that fruit pulp contained higher vitamin A and C contents than other parts of the plant. Furthermore, the fruit pulp was the richest source of linoleic acid (18:2n-6), a precursor of n-6 fatty acids. Fruit seeds possessed higher vitamin C levels than leaves, roots and stem. The leaves were the richest source of vitamin E and linolenic acid (18:3n-3), a precursor of n-3 fatty acids. The antioxidant capacity of the different extracts, measured by KRL@ test, was as follows: pulp < seedDesf.) exerted immunosuppressive effects. Conclusion Seed extracts exerted the most potent immunosuppressive effects on T cell proliferation and IL-2 mRNA expression. The results of the present study are

  3. Mechanism of Action of the Des-F(6) Quinolone BMS-284756 Measured by Supercoiling Inhibition and Cleavable Complex Assays

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ping; Lawrence, Laura E.; Denbleyker, Kenneth L.; Barrett, John F.

    2001-01-01

    BMS-284756 (T-3811ME), a novel des-F(6) quinolone, was tested in the supercoiling inhibition and cleavable complex assays against Escherichia coli DNA gyrase, a target of quinolones. The results suggest that BMS-284756 has the same mechanism of action against DNA gyrase as other quinolones and a similar level of potency. PMID:11709365

  4. A new 28-noroleanane triterpenoid from the aerial parts of Lantana camara Linn.

    PubMed

    Begum, Sabira; Zehra, Syeda Qamar; Ayub, Anjum; Siddiqui, Bina Shaheen

    2010-08-01

    A new 28-norolean-12,17-diene triterpene lantigdienone (1) oxidised at C-11 and C-22 has been isolated from the aerial parts of Lantana camara, along with two known compounds, camarinin (2) and camangeloyl acid (3). The structure of compound 1 was elucidated as 3,25-epoxy-3alpha-hydroxy-22beta-[beta,betadimethylacryloyloxy]-11-oxo-28-norolean-12,17-diene, with the help of spectral studies.

  5. Safety assessment and antioxidant activity of Lantana montevidensis leaves: Contribution to its phytochemical and pharmacological activity.

    PubMed

    Barros, Luiz Marivando; Duarte, Antonia Eliene; Pansera Waczuk, Emily; Roversi, Katiane; da Cunha, Francisco Assis Bezerra; Rolon, Mirian; Coronel, Cathia; Gomez, Maria Celeste Vega; de Menezes, Irwin Rose Alencar; da Costa, José Galberto Martins; Boligon, Aline Augusti; Hassan, Waseem; Souza, Diogo Onofre; da Rocha, João Batista Teixeira; Kamdem, Jean Paul

    2017-01-01

    Lantana camara, the widely studied species, and L. montevidensis, the less studied species of the genus Lantana are both used in traditional medicine for the same purpose (anti-asthma, anti-ulcer, anti-tumor, etc). However, little is known about the toxicity of L. montevidensis and there is limited information on its chemical constituents. Here, we investigated for the first time the genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of the ethanolic (EtOH) and aqueous extracts from the leaves of Lantana montevidensis in human leukocytes, as well as their possible interaction with human erythrocyte membranes in vitro. The antioxidant activities of both extracts were also investigated in chemical and biological models. Treatment of leukocytes with EtOH or aqueous extracts (1-480 µg/mL) did not affect DNA damage index, but promoted cytotoxicity at higher concentrations (240-480 µg/mL). Both extracts did not modify the osmotic fragility of human erythrocytes. The extracts scavenged DPPH radical and prevented Fe(2+)-induced lipid peroxidation in rat's brain and liver homogenates, and this was likely not attributed to Fe (II) chelation. The HPLC analysis of the extracts showed different amounts of polyphenolic compounds (isoquercitrin, gallic acid, catechin, ellagic acid, apigenin, kaempferol, caffeic acid, rutin, quercitrin, quercetin, chlorogenic acid, luteolin) that may have contributed to these effects. These results supported information on the functional use of L. montevidensis in folk medicine.

  6. Sensitivity analysis of CLIMEX parameters in modelling potential distribution of Lantana camara L.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Subhashni; Kumar, Lalit

    2012-01-01

    A process-based niche model of L. camara L. (lantana), a highly invasive shrub species, was developed to estimate its potential distribution using CLIMEX. Model development was carried out using its native and invasive distribution and validation was carried out with the extensive Australian distribution. A good fit was observed, with 86.7% of herbarium specimens collected in Australia occurring within the suitable and highly suitable categories. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to identify the model parameters that had the most influence on lantana distribution. The changes in suitability were assessed by mapping the regions where the distribution changed with each parameter alteration. This allowed an assessment of where, within Australia, the modification of each parameter was having the most impact, particularly in terms of the suitable and highly suitable locations. The sensitivity of various parameters was also evaluated by calculating the changes in area within the suitable and highly suitable categories. The limiting low temperature (DV0), limiting high temperature (DV3) and limiting low soil moisture (SM0) showed highest sensitivity to change. The other model parameters were relatively insensitive to change. Highly sensitive parameters require extensive research and data collection to be fitted accurately in species distribution models. The results from this study can inform more cost effective development of species distribution models for lantana. Such models form an integral part of the management of invasive species and the results can be used to streamline data collection requirements for potential distribution modelling.

  7. Climate Change and the Potential Distribution of an Invasive Shrub, Lantana camara L

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Subhashni; Kumar, Lalit; Reid, Nick; Kriticos, Darren J.

    2012-01-01

    The threat posed by invasive species, in particular weeds, to biodiversity may be exacerbated by climate change. Lantana camara L. (lantana) is a woody shrub that is highly invasive in many countries of the world. It has a profound economic and environmental impact worldwide, including Australia. Knowledge of the likely potential distribution of this invasive species under current and future climate will be useful in planning better strategies to manage the invasion. A process-oriented niche model of L. camara was developed using CLIMEX to estimate its potential distribution under current and future climate scenarios. The model was calibrated using data from several knowledge domains, including phenological observations and geographic distribution records. The potential distribution of lantana under historical climate exceeded the current distribution in some areas of the world, notably Africa and Asia. Under future scenarios, the climatically suitable areas for L. camara globally were projected to contract. However, some areas were identified in North Africa, Europe and Australia that may become climatically suitable under future climates. In South Africa and China, its potential distribution could expand further inland. These results can inform strategic planning by biosecurity agencies, identifying areas to target for eradication or containment. Distribution maps of risk of potential invasion can be useful tools in public awareness campaigns, especially in countries that have been identified as becoming climatically suitable for L. camara under the future climate scenarios. PMID:22536408

  8. Sensitivity Analysis of CLIMEX Parameters in Modelling Potential Distribution of Lantana camara L.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Subhashni; Kumar, Lalit

    2012-01-01

    A process-based niche model of L. camara L. (lantana), a highly invasive shrub species, was developed to estimate its potential distribution using CLIMEX. Model development was carried out using its native and invasive distribution and validation was carried out with the extensive Australian distribution. A good fit was observed, with 86.7% of herbarium specimens collected in Australia occurring within the suitable and highly suitable categories. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to identify the model parameters that had the most influence on lantana distribution. The changes in suitability were assessed by mapping the regions where the distribution changed with each parameter alteration. This allowed an assessment of where, within Australia, the modification of each parameter was having the most impact, particularly in terms of the suitable and highly suitable locations. The sensitivity of various parameters was also evaluated by calculating the changes in area within the suitable and highly suitable categories. The limiting low temperature (DV0), limiting high temperature (DV3) and limiting low soil moisture (SM0) showed highest sensitivity to change. The other model parameters were relatively insensitive to change. Highly sensitive parameters require extensive research and data collection to be fitted accurately in species distribution models. The results from this study can inform more cost effective development of species distribution models for lantana. Such models form an integral part of the management of invasive species and the results can be used to streamline data collection requirements for potential distribution modelling. PMID:22815881

  9. Meloidogyne incognita and M. arenaria Reproduction on Dwarf Hollies and Lantana

    PubMed Central

    Williams-Woodward, J. L.; Davis, R. F.

    2001-01-01

    Meloidogyne incognita and M. arenaria reproduction and host plant tolerance were assessed in field and greenhouse experiments on seven holly cultivars including Ilex glabra 'Shamrock', I. vomitoria 'Schelling's Dwarf', I. cornuta 'Carissa', red holly hybrid (Ilex Little Red™), and I. crenata 'Compacta', 'Green Luster', and 'Helleri' as well as Japanese boxwood (Buxus microphylla) and two lantana cultivars (Lantana camara 'Miss Huff' and 'New Gold'). Boxwood had the highest M. arenaria and M. incognita gall rating of any of the plants evaluated. Gall ratings from M. arenaria and M. incognita on I. crenata 'Green Luster' and 'Helleri' were not different from boxwood. Ilex crenata 'Compacta' had less root galling than boxwood, but the roots averaged up to 20% galling by M. incognita and 30% galling by M. arenaria. Ilex glabra 'Shamrock', I. vomitoria 'Schelling's Dwarf', I. cornuta 'Carissa', Ilex Little Red™, and the two lantana cultivars had little or no root galling after 2 years of growth. Neither M. incognita nor M. arenaria affected the growth of any of the plants evaluated in the field or greenhouse. Reproduction of M. incognita was much lower than that of M. arenaria on the holly cultivars. Nematode reproduction in the greenhouse was greatest on the three I. crenata cultivars, followed by Ilex Little Red™ and B. microphylla. Ilex glabra 'Shamrock', I. vomitoria 'Schelling's Dwarf', I. cornuta 'Carissa', and L. camara 'Miss Huff' and 'New Gold' could be useful as Meloidogyne-resistant landscape plants. PMID:19265898

  10. Climate change and the potential distribution of an invasive shrub, Lantana camara L.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Subhashni; Kumar, Lalit; Reid, Nick; Kriticos, Darren J

    2012-01-01

    The threat posed by invasive species, in particular weeds, to biodiversity may be exacerbated by climate change. Lantana camara L. (lantana) is a woody shrub that is highly invasive in many countries of the world. It has a profound economic and environmental impact worldwide, including Australia. Knowledge of the likely potential distribution of this invasive species under current and future climate will be useful in planning better strategies to manage the invasion. A process-oriented niche model of L. camara was developed using CLIMEX to estimate its potential distribution under current and future climate scenarios. The model was calibrated using data from several knowledge domains, including phenological observations and geographic distribution records. The potential distribution of lantana under historical climate exceeded the current distribution in some areas of the world, notably Africa and Asia. Under future scenarios, the climatically suitable areas for L. camara globally were projected to contract. However, some areas were identified in North Africa, Europe and Australia that may become climatically suitable under future climates. In South Africa and China, its potential distribution could expand further inland. These results can inform strategic planning by biosecurity agencies, identifying areas to target for eradication or containment. Distribution maps of risk of potential invasion can be useful tools in public awareness campaigns, especially in countries that have been identified as becoming climatically suitable for L. camara under the future climate scenarios.

  11. Anti-diabetic potential of ursolic acid stearoyl glucoside: a new triterpenic gycosidic ester from Lantana camara.

    PubMed

    Kazmi, Imran; Rahman, Mahfoozur; Afzal, Muhammad; Gupta, Gaurav; Saleem, Shakir; Afzal, Obaid; Shaharyar, Md Adil; Nautiyal, Ujjwal; Ahmed, Sayeed; Anwar, Firoz

    2012-01-01

    A new stearoyl glucoside of ursolic acid, urs-12-en-3β-ol-28-oic acid 3β-D-glucopyranosyl-4'-octadecanoate and other compounds were isolated from the leaves of Lantana camara L. The structure of this new glycoside was elucidated and established by standard spectroscopic methods. In streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats it showed significant reduction in blood glucose level.

  12. Variability in foliar essential oils among different morphotypes of Lantana species complexes, and its taxonomic and ecological significance.

    PubMed

    Love, Amit; Naik, Dattatraya; Basak, Sandip K; Babu, Suresh; Pathak, Namrata; Babu, Cherukuri R

    2009-12-01

    The genus Lantana has many species complexes, and L. camara is one of the aggressive alien weedy species complexes; species delimitation in these complexes is a nightmare for taxonomists. We examined the diversity in the chemical composition of foliar essential oils among morphotypes of Lantana species complexes inhabiting the same ecological gradient, and its taxonomic and ecological significance. The yields of essential oils varied from 0.1 to 0.79% in foliar hydrodistillates of eleven morphotypes, and a total of 39 chemical constituents were detected by GC/MS. The quantitative and qualitative variability in the composition of essential oils among morphotypes was very high, and hence they represent chemotypes. The diversity observed in the composition of essential oils appears to be of genetic origin and thus of taxonomic value. The formation of distinct clusters and sub-clusters at high distance cluster combine values also substantiates that the patterns of distribution of chemical constituents among morphotypes can be used in delimiting species and infraspecific taxa within the species complexes. The presence of beta-caryophyllene and other such compounds, which are known to prevent herbivory, in morphotypes of Lantana species complexes suggest that these compounds may provide selective advantage to Lantana over native species in the invasion of new and disturbed habitats.

  13. Adsorption of Phenol from Aqueous Solution Using Lantana camara, Forest Waste: Kinetics, Isotherm, and Thermodynamic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Girish, C. R.; Ramachandra Murty, V.

    2014-01-01

    The present work investigates the potential of Lantana camara, a forest waste, as an adsorbent for the phenol reduction in wastewater. Batch studies were conducted with adsorbent treated with HCl and KOH to determine the influence of various experimental parameters such as pH, contact time, adsorbent dosage, and phenol concentration. The experimental conditions were optimized for the removal of phenol from wastewater. Equilibrium isotherms for the adsorption of phenol were analyzed by Freundlich, Langmuir, Temkin, and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm models. Thermodynamic parameters like the Gibbs free energy (ΔG°), enthalpy (ΔH°), and entropy (ΔS°) were also determined and they showed that the adsorption process was feasible, spontaneous, and exothermic in the temperature range of 298–328 K. The kinetic data were fitted with pseudo-second-order model. The equilibrium data that followed Langmuir model with the monolayer adsorption capacity was found to be 112.5 mg/g and 91.07 mg/g for adsorbent treated with HCl and KOH, respectively, for the concentration of phenol ranging from 25 to 250 mg/L. This indicates that the Lantana camara was a promising adsorbent for the removal of phenol from aqueous solutions. PMID:27350997

  14. Chemical composition and resistance-modifying effect of the essential oil of Lantana camara Linn

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Erlânio O.; Silva, Natálya F.; Rodrigues, Fabiola F. G.; Campos, Adriana R.; Lima, Sidney G.; Costa, José Galberto M.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, the chemical constituents, antibacterial and modulatory activities of the essential oil of Lantana camara Linn were studied. The essential oil was extracted from the leaves of L. camara by hydrodistillation method using Clevenger's apparatus and its chemical constituents were separated and identified by GC-MS, and the relative content of each constituent was determined by area normalization. Among the 25 identified components, bicyclogermacrene (19.42%), isocaryophyllene (16.70%), valecene (12.94%) and germacrene D (12.34%) were the main constituents. The oil was examined to antibacterial and modulatory activities against the multiresistant strains of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus by microdilution test. The results show an inhibitory activity to E. coli (MIC 512 μg/ml) and S. aureus (MIC 256 μg/ml). The synergism of the essential oil and aminoglycosides was verified too, with significant reduction of MICs (7 ×, 1250-5 μg/ml) against E. coli. It is suggested that the essential oil of Lantana camara Linn could be used as a source of plant-derived natural products with resistance-modifying activity. PMID:20668570

  15. Adsorption of Phenol from Aqueous Solution Using Lantana camara, Forest Waste: Kinetics, Isotherm, and Thermodynamic Studies.

    PubMed

    Girish, C R; Ramachandra Murty, V

    2014-01-01

    The present work investigates the potential of Lantana camara, a forest waste, as an adsorbent for the phenol reduction in wastewater. Batch studies were conducted with adsorbent treated with HCl and KOH to determine the influence of various experimental parameters such as pH, contact time, adsorbent dosage, and phenol concentration. The experimental conditions were optimized for the removal of phenol from wastewater. Equilibrium isotherms for the adsorption of phenol were analyzed by Freundlich, Langmuir, Temkin, and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm models. Thermodynamic parameters like the Gibbs free energy (ΔG°), enthalpy (ΔH°), and entropy (ΔS°) were also determined and they showed that the adsorption process was feasible, spontaneous, and exothermic in the temperature range of 298-328 K. The kinetic data were fitted with pseudo-second-order model. The equilibrium data that followed Langmuir model with the monolayer adsorption capacity was found to be 112.5 mg/g and 91.07 mg/g for adsorbent treated with HCl and KOH, respectively, for the concentration of phenol ranging from 25 to 250 mg/L. This indicates that the Lantana camara was a promising adsorbent for the removal of phenol from aqueous solutions.

  16. Genetic diversity and population structure of Lantana camara in India indicates multiple introductions and gene flow.

    PubMed

    Ray, A; Quader, S

    2014-05-01

    Lantana camara is a highly invasive plant, which has spread over 60 countries and island groups of Asia, Africa and Australia. In India, it was introduced in the early nineteenth century, since when it has expanded and gradually established itself in almost every available ecosystem. We investigated the genetic diversity and population structure of this plant in India in order to understand its introduction, subsequent range expansion and gene flow. A total of 179 individuals were sequenced at three chloroplast loci and 218 individuals were genotyped for six nuclear microsatellites. Both chloroplasts (nine haplotypes) and microsatellites (83 alleles) showed high genetic diversity. Besides, each type of marker confirmed the presence of private polymorphism. We uncovered low to medium population structure in both markers, and found a faint signal of isolation by distance with microsatellites. Bayesian clustering analyses revealed multiple divergent genetic clusters. Taken together, these findings (i.e. high genetic diversity with private alleles and multiple genetic clusters) suggest that Lantana was introduced multiple times and gradually underwent spatial expansion with recurrent gene flow.

  17. Chemical composition and resistance-modifying effect of the essential oil of Lantana camara Linn.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Erlânio O; Silva, Natálya F; Rodrigues, Fabiola F G; Campos, Adriana R; Lima, Sidney G; Costa, José Galberto M

    2010-04-01

    In this work, the chemical constituents, antibacterial and modulatory activities of the essential oil of Lantana camara Linn were studied. The essential oil was extracted from the leaves of L. camara by hydrodistillation method using Clevenger's apparatus and its chemical constituents were separated and identified by GC-MS, and the relative content of each constituent was determined by area normalization. Among the 25 identified components, bicyclogermacrene (19.42%), isocaryophyllene (16.70%), valecene (12.94%) and germacrene D (12.34%) were the main constituents. The oil was examined to antibacterial and modulatory activities against the multiresistant strains of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus by microdilution test. The results show an inhibitory activity to E. coli (MIC 512 mug/ml) and S. aureus (MIC 256 mug/ml). The synergism of the essential oil and aminoglycosides was verified too, with significant reduction of MICs (7 x, 1250-5 mug/ml) against E. coli. It is suggested that the essential oil of Lantana camara Linn could be used as a source of plant-derived natural products with resistance-modifying activity.

  18. Potential distribution of an invasive species under climate change scenarios using CLIMEX and soil drainage: a case study of Lantana camara L. in Queensland, Australia.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Subhashni; Kumar, Lalit

    2013-01-15

    Invasive species pose a major threat to biodiversity which may be intensified by the effects of climate change, particularly if favourable climate conditions allow invasives to spread to new areas. This research explores the combined effects of climate change and soil drainage on the potential future distribution of Lantana camara L. (lantana) in Queensland, Australia. Lantana is an invasive woody shrub species that has a profound economic and environmental impact worldwide. CLIMEX was used to develop a process-based niche model of lantana to estimate its potential distribution under current and future climate. Two Global Climate Models (GCMs), CSIRO-Mk3.0 and MIROC-H, were used to explore the impacts of climate change. These models were run with the A1B and A2 scenarios for 2030, 2070 and 2100. Further refinements of the potential distributions were carried out through the integration of fine scale soil drainage data in a Geographic Information System (GIS). The results from both GCMs show a progressive reduction in climatic suitability for lantana in Queensland. The MIROC-H projects a larger area as remaining at risk of lantana invasion in 2100 compared to CSIRO-Mk3.0. Inclusion of soil drainage data results in a more refined distribution. Overall results show a dramatic reduction in potential distribution of lantana in Queensland in the long term (2100). However, in the short term (2030), areas such as South East Queensland and the Wet Tropics, both regions of significant ecological importance, remain at risk of invasion consistently under both GCMs and with both the climate only and climate and soil drainage models. Management of lantana in these regions will need to be prioritized to protect environmental assets of ecological significance.

  19. Hypericum perforatum-induced hepatotoxicity with possible association with copaiba (Copaifera langsdorffii Desf):case report

    PubMed Central

    Agollo, Marjorie Costa; Miszputen, Sender Jankiel; Diament, Jayme

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of liver damage in an elderly patient after the use of herbal products of Hypericum perforatum and copaiba (Copaifera langsdorffii Desf). Hepatotoxicity related to Hypericum perforatum is anecdotally known, but for copaiba, widely used as anti-inflammatory, there is just experimental data in the national literature. This report aimed to draw attention to the possible toxic effects of this association as well as to the clinical recovery of the patient after discontinuing their use. There is a tendency to suspect of the action of drugs to justify a non-viral acute liver injury, because of the large number of drugs responsible for hepatotoxicity. There are experiments and clinical reports in the literature describing some herbal products, including Hypericum perforatum, as the causative agents of this aggression, and are considered innocuous and used with no restrictions. We must remember that adverse reactions also occur with these substances; hence, they should be investigated when collecting the patient´s history, for leading to severe liver failure. PMID:25167337

  20. Hypericum perforatum-induced hepatotoxicity with possible association with copaiba (Copaifera langsdorffii Desf):case report.

    PubMed

    Agollo, Marjorie Costa; Miszputen, Sender Jankiel; Diament, Jayme

    2014-09-01

    We report a case of liver damage in an elderly patient after the use of herbal products of Hypericum perforatum and copaiba (Copaifera langsdorffii Desf). Hepatotoxicity related to Hypericum perforatum is anecdotally known, but for copaiba, widely used as anti-inflammatory, there is just experimental data in the national literature. This report aimed to draw attention to the possible toxic effects of this association as well as to the clinical recovery of the patient after discontinuing their use. There is a tendency to suspect of the action of drugs to justify a non-viral acute liver injury, because of the large number of drugs responsible for hepatotoxicity. There are experiments and clinical reports in the literature describing some herbal products, including Hypericum perforatum, as the causative agents of this aggression, and are considered innocuous and used with no restrictions. We must remember that adverse reactions also occur with these substances; hence, they should be investigated when collecting the patient´s history, for leading to severe liver failure.

  1. Antioxidant activity and phenolic profile of different organs of Pistacia atlantica Desf. subsp. atlantica from Algeria.

    PubMed

    Toul, Fethi; Belyagoubi-Benhammou, Nabila; Zitouni, Amel; Atik-Bekkara, Fawzia

    2017-03-01

    The present study evaluated the antioxidant activity of 21 extracts prepared from seven parts of Pistacia atlantica Desf. subsp. atlantica. (Fruits, leaves, buds, stems, roots, internal and external trunk barks) collected from Tlemcen, Algeria. Total phenolic, flavonoid and flavonol contents were determined and the antioxidant properties were measured using different assays: 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH), ferric antioxidant reducing power and β-carotene bleaching assay. BHA (butylated hydroxyanisole) was used for comparison purposes. The results showed that the extracts of leaves and buds had the highest phenolic contents with 255.789 ± 4.733 and 233.946 ± 6.205 mg GAE/g DM, respectively. For the antioxidant activity, values of EC50 concentrations ranged from 0.059 to 5.712 mg/mL for DPPH, 0.015 to 3.141 mg/mL for reducing power and 0.068 to 5.021 mg/mL for β-carotene method, for all studied extracts. Analysing the phenolic composition, 10 components were identified in different parts of the plant.

  2. Chemical Variability and Biological Activities of Essential Oils of Micromeria inodora (Desf.) Benth. from Algeria.

    PubMed

    Benomari, Fatima Zahra; Djabou, Nassim; Medbouhi, Ali; Khadir, Abdelmounaim; Bendahou, Mourad; Selles, Chaouki; Desjobert, Jean-Marie; Costa, Jean; Muselli, Alain

    2016-11-01

    The chemical composition of the essential oils isolated from the aerial parts of Micromeria inodora (Desf.) Benth. collected in 24 Algerian localities was investigated from the first time using GC-FID, GC/MS and (13) C-NMR. Altogether, 83 components which accounted for 94.7% of the total oil composition were identified. The main compounds were trans-sesquisabinene hydrate (1; 20.9%), α-terpinyl acetate (2; 19.8%), globulol (3; 4.9%), caryophyllene oxide (4; 4.3%), β-bisabolol (5; 2.9%) and trans-7-epi-sesquisabinene hydrate (6; 2.6%). Comparison with the literature highlighted the originality of the Algerian M. inodora oil and indicated that 1 might be used as taxonomical marker. The study of the chemical variability allowed the discrimination of two main clusters confirming that there is a relation between the essential-oil compositions and the soil nature of the harvest locations. Biological activity of M. inodora essential oil was assessed against fourteen species of microorganisms involved in nosocomial infections using paper disc diffusion and dilution agar assays. The in vitro study demonstrated a good activity against Gram-positive strains such as Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, and Enterococcus faecalis, and moderate activity against Candida albicans. These results might be useful for the future commercial valorization of M. inodora essential oil as a promising source of natural products with potential against various nosocomial community and toxinic infections.

  3. Effects of Lantana camara leaf extract on the activity of superoxide dismutase and accumulation of H2O2 in water hyacinth leaf.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hui-Qiong; Wei, Ning; Wang, Liu-Fa; He, Ping

    2006-04-01

    Water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) is one of the most productive plants, but is also a troublesome weed in the world. In order to protect the public water system from chemical herbicides pollution, biological method has been suggested to control the growth and the reproduction of this weed. Lantana (Lantana camara L.) is an important weed of the family Verbenaceae and its leaf extract is highly toxic to water hyacinth. The results of this study showed that the extract of lantana leaves suppressed the emergence of leaf buds of water hyacinth plant, and caused the decay of its leaves by foliar spraying. In addition, the increase of SOD activity in water hyacinth leaves was in accordance with the accumulation of H(2)O(2) and the increase in degree of membrane peroxidation, while the activity of catalase, which might remove the excessive H(2)O(2) in water hyacinth leaves, was inhibited by treatment with lantana extract. At tissue level, high H(2)O(2) histochemical labeling was detected in guard cells after treatment with lantana extract. This overproduction of H(2)O(2) could kill the leaf cells and cause leaf necrosis in the treated plant. Therefore, the high toxicity of lantana leaf extract to water hyacinth might be due to oxidative stress.

  4. Hydrogeology and simulation of ground-water flow near the Lantana Landfill, Palm Beach County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Russell, G.M.; Wexler, E.J.

    1993-01-01

    The Lantana landfill in Palm Beach County has a surface that is 40 to 50 feet above original ground level and consists of about 250 acres of compacted garbage and trash. Parts of the landfill are below the water table. Surface-resistivity measurements and water-quality analyses indicate that leachate-enriched ground water along the eastern perimeter of the landfill has moved about 500 feet eastward toward an adjacent lake. Concentrations of chloride and nutrients within the leachate-enriched ground water were greater than background concentrations. The surficial aquifer system in the area of the landfill consists primarily of sand of moderate permeability, from land surface to a depth of about 68 feet deep, and consists of sand interbedded with sandstone and limestone of high permeability from a depth of about 68 feet to a depth of 200 feet. The potentiometric surface in the landfill is higher than that in adjacent areas to the east, indicating ground-water movement from the landfill toward a lake to the east. Steady-state simulation of ground-water flow was made using a telescoping-grid technique where a model covering a large area is used to determine boundaries and fluxes for a finer scale model. A regional flow model encompassing a 500-square mile area in southeastern Palm Beach County was used to calculate ground-water fluxes in a 126.5-square mile subregional area. Boundary fluxes calculated by the subregional model were then used to calculate boundary fluxes for a local model of the 3.75-square mile area representing the Lantana landfill site and vicinity. Input data required for simulating ground-water flow in the study area were obtained from the regional flow models, thus, effectively coupling the models. Additional simulations were made using the local flow model to predict effects of possible remedial actions on the movement of solutes in the ground-water system. Possible remedial actions simulated included capping the landfill with an impermeable layer

  5. The Chemical Diversity of Lantana camara: Analyses of Essential Oil Samples from Cuba, Nepal, and Yemen.

    PubMed

    Satyal, Prabodh; Crouch, Rebecca A; Monzote, Lianet; Cos, Paul; Awadh Ali, Nasser A; Alhaj, Mehdi A; Setzer, William N

    2016-03-01

    The aerial parts of Lantana camara L. were collected from three different geographical locations: Artemisa (Cuba), Biratnagar (Nepal), and Sana'a (Yemen). The essential oils were obtained by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. A cluster analysis of 39 L. camara essential oil compositions revealed eight major chemotypes: β-caryophyllene, germacrene D, ar-curcumene/zingiberene, γ-curcumen-15-al/epi-β-bisabolol, (E)-nerolidol, davanone, eugenol/alloaromadendrene, and carvone. The sample from Cuba falls into the group dominated by (E)-nerolidol, the sample from Nepal is a davanone chemotype, and the sample from Yemen belongs to the β-caryophyllene chemotype. The chemical composition of L. camara oil plays a role in the biological activity; the β-caryophyllene and (E)-nerolidol chemotypes showed antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities. © 2016 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  6. Cytogenetic characterization of Lippia alba and Lantana camara (Verbenaceae) from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Aline Dias; Viccini, Lyderson Facio; Salimena, Fátima Regina Gonçalves; Vanzela, André Luiz Laforga; Recco-Pimentel, Shirlei Maria

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the cytogenetic characteristics of Brazilian Lippia alba (Mill) N. E. Brown and Lantana camara Plum. that could be useful for future characterization of these genera. Our analyses revealed that Li. alba has 2n=30 chromosomes consisting of ten metacentric and five submetacentric pairs, while La. camara has 44 metacentric chromosomes. The large blocks of heterochromatin seen in both species suggest an apomorphic condition. Six 45S rDNA sites were detected in both species by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Two and four 5S rDNA sites were observed in Li. alba and La. camara, respectively. Meiotic analysis revealed a normal chromosomal behaviour. The number of chromosomes and the presence of 45S rDNA and 5S rDNA sites do not exclude a possible polyploid origin. The cytogenetic differences between La. camara and Li. alba may be useful markers for differentiating these species.

  7. Lantana camara Induces Apoptosis by Bcl-2 Family and Caspases Activation.

    PubMed

    Han, Eun Byeol; Chang, Bo Yoon; Jung, Young Suk; Kim, Sung Yeon

    2015-04-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide, and the second most fatal cancer in women after lung cancer. Because there are instances of cancer resistance to existing therapies, studies focused on the identification of novel therapeutic drugs are very important. In this study, we identified a natural anticancer agent from Lantana camara, a flowering plant species of the genus Verbena. The extract obtained from the L. camara exhibited cell death properties in the human breast cancer cell line, MCF-7. We found that the apoptosis induced by treatment with the L. camara extract was regulated by the Bcl-2 family. Bid and Bax was increased and Bcl-2 was decreased by L. camara extract. L. camara extract modulated cleavage of caspase-8, and caspase-9, as well as poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Our results support the potential use of the L. camara extract as an anti-breast cancer drug.

  8. Phytochemical screening and antimicrobial activities of plant extract of Lantana camara.

    PubMed

    Pradeep, B Vishwanath; Tejaswini, M; Nishal, P; Pardhu, G; Shylaja, S; Kumar, Kranthi Ch

    2013-05-01

    Natural products continue to play an important role in the discovery and development of new pharmaceuticals. Several chemical compounds have been extracted and identified from its species known as Lantana camara (L .camara). The present study was designed for phytochemical analysis of L. camara and extraction of bioactive compound by HPLC. This also included the antimicrobial activity of the bioactive compound obtained by crude extract and the column extract. The study showed the presence of the bioactive component parthenin extracted from the HPLC analysis at a peak height of 10.3807 and it was showing antimicrobial activity against E. coli, P. aeruginosa, B. subtilis and E. fecalis, crude (6.8 to 8.1 mm ) and column (4.0 to 6.2 mm) zone of inhibition.

  9. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of enzyme pretreated Lantana camara using S. cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kuila, Arindam; Banerjee, Rintu

    2014-10-01

    Lantana camara, an abundantly available non-edible lignocellulosic biomass has been found to be a potential feedstock for ethanol production. The substrate was first pretreated with laccase followed by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation using cellulase and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, respectively. Laccase was produced from Pleurotus sp. and carbohydratases (cellulase and xylanase) were produced from Trichoderma reesei Rut C30. Using pretreated substrate simultaneous saccharification and fermentation was optimized through central composite design-based response surface methodology. Maximum bioethanol concentration of 5.14 % (v/v) was obtained at optimum process conditions of substrate concentration 17 % (w/v), inoculum volume 9 % (v/v), inoculum age 60 and 144 h of incubation time. To enhance ethanol yield, S. cerevisiae was treated with ethyl methane sulfonate, a chemical mutagenic agent which induced mutagenesis. A maximum bioethanol concentration of 6.01 % (v/v) was obtained using the mutated strain of S. cerevisiae (CM5).

  10. In vitro antioxidant activity potential of lantadene A, a pentacyclic triterpenoid of Lantana plants.

    PubMed

    Grace-Lynn, Chong; Darah, Ibrahim; Chen, Yeng; Latha, Lachimanan Yoga; Jothy, Subramanion L; Sasidharan, Sreenivasan

    2012-09-19

    Lantadenes are pentacyclic triterpenoids present in the leaves of the plant Lantana camara. In the present study, in vitro antioxidant activity and free radical scavenging capacity of lantadene A was evaluated using established in vitro models such as ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH•), hydroxyl radical (OH•), nitric oxide radical (NO•), superoxide anion scavenging activities and ferrous ion chelating assay. Interestingly, lantadene A showed considerable in vitro antioxidant, free radical scavenging capacity activities in a dose dependant manner when compared with the standard antioxidant in nitric oxide scavenging, superoxide anion radical scavenging and ferrous ion chelating assay. These findings show that the lantadene A possesses antioxidant activity with different mechanism of actions towards the different free radicals tested. Since lantadene A is a very popular drug in modern medicine, it is a promising candidate for use as an antioxidant and hepatoprotective agent.

  11. Chemical composition and antibacterial activity of the essential oil of Lantana camara var. moritziana.

    PubMed

    Tesch, Nurby Rios; Mora, Flor; Rojas, Luis; Díaz, Tulia; Velasco, Judith; Yánez, Carlos; Rios, Nahile; Carmona, Juan; Pasquale, Sara

    2011-07-01

    The essential oil obtained from the leaves of Lantana camara var. moritziana (Otto & Dietr.) López-Palacios collected at Rubio, Táchira State, Venezuela, was obtained by hydrodistillation in a Clevenger trap (0.1% yield). The oil was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) on HP GC-MS System, model 5973, identifying 33 compounds (97.1%) of which the major components were germacrene D (31.0%), followed by beta-caryophyllene (14.8%), a-phellandrene (6.7%), limonene (5.7%) and 1,8-cineole (5.2%). Evaluation of the antibacterial activity by agar diffusion method with discs against international reference bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella Typhi, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) showed growing inhibition of E. faecalis and S. aureus at MIC of 350 mg/mL and 400 mg/mL, respectively.

  12. Antioxidant activity of methanol extracts of different parts of Lantana camara

    PubMed Central

    Mahdi-Pour, Badakhshan; Jothy, Subramanion L; Latha, Lachimanan Yoga; Chen, Yeng; Sasidharan, Sreenivasan

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the antioxidant activity of methanolic extracts of Lantana camara (L. camara) various parts and the determination of their total phenolics content. Methods The extract was screened for possible antioxidant activities by free radical scavenging activity(DPPH), xanthine oxidase inhibition activity and Griess-Ilosvay method. Results The results showed that all the plant parts possessed antioxidant properties including radical scavenging, xanthine oxidase inhibition and nitrites scavenging activities. The antioxidative activities were correlated with the total phenol. The leaves extract of L. camara was more effective than that of other parts. Conclusions This study suggests that L. camara extracts exhibit great potential for antioxidant activity and may be useful for their nutritional and medicinal functions. PMID:23593576

  13. Lantana montevidensis Briq improves the aminoglycoside activity against multiresistant Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Erlanio O.; Almeida, Thiago S.; Rodrigues, Fabíola F.G.; Campos, Adriana R.; Lima, Sidney G.; Costa, José G.M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: In this work, we report the antibacterial and modulatory activity of Lantana montevidensis Briq. Materials and Methods: The antibacterial activities of leaf (LELm) and root (RELm) extracts alone or in association with aminoglycosides were determined by a microdilution test. Multiresistant strains of Escherichia coli (Ec 27) and Staphylococcus aureus (Sa 358) were used. Results: The results show the inhibitory activity of LELm against E. coli (minimal inhibitory concentration [MIC] 16 μg/mL) and S. aureus (MIC 128 μg/mL). The synergistic effect of the extracts and aminoglycosides was verified too. The maximum effects were obtained with RELm with gentamicin against E. coli with MIC reduction (312 to 2 μL). Conclusion: The data from this study are indicative of the activity antibacterial of extracts of L. montevidensis and its potential in modifying the resistance of aminoglycosides. PMID:21572654

  14. Essential oil from leaves of Lantana canescens and L. lopez-palacii grown in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Peralta-Bohórquez, Andrés F; Quijano-Célis, Clara; Gaviria, Mauricio; Vanegas-López, Consuelo; Pino, Jorge A

    2011-02-01

    The chemical composition of the volatile compounds from the leaves of Lantana canescens Kunth (Verbenaceae) and L. lopez-palacii Moldenke grown in Colombia were analyzed by GC and GC/MS. One hundred and thirty-nine volatile compounds were identified in L. canescens, of which the major ones were beta-caryophyllene (13.5%), germacrene D (10.3%) and 1-octen-3-ol (8.4%). In the oil obtained from L. lopez-palacii, eighty-three compounds were identified, of which the most prominent were 1-octen-3-ol (24.4%) and beta-caryophyllene (15.2%). The in vitro antibacterial activity of the L. lopez-palacii essential oil was studied against three bacterial strains using the disc diffusion method. No antimicrobial activity was found against Escherichia coli, Enterobacter sakazakii and Listeria monocytogenes.

  15. Assessment of ground-water contamination near Lantana landfill, Southeast Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Russell, G.M.; Higer, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    The Lantana landfill located in Palm Beach County rises 40 to 50 feet above normal ground level and consists of about 250 acres of compacted garbage and trash, some below the water table. Surface-resistivity measurements and water-quality analyses indicate a contaminant plume along the eastern perimeter of the landfill that has migrated about 300 feet eastward toward an adjacent lake. Concentrations of chloride, ammonia, and nitrate were elevated within the plume. The surficial aquifer consists primarily of sand from 0 to about 68 feet, and sand interbedded with sandstone and limestone from 68 to 220 feet. A slight hydraulic gradient exists, indicating ground-water movement from the landfill toward a lake to the east. Analyses of geoelectric, lithologic, and water-quality data indicate that surface geophysical techniques were successful in determining the areal and vertical extent of leachate migration at this location.The Lantana landfill located in Palm Beach County rises 40 to 50 feet above normal ground level and consists of about 250 acres of compacted garbage and trash, some below the water table. Surface-resistivity measurements and water-quality analyses indicate a contaminant plume along the eastern perimeter of the landfill that has migrated about 300 feet eastward toward an adjacent lake. Concentrations of chloride, ammonia, and nitrate were elevated within the plume. The surficial aquifer consists primarily of sand from 0 to about 68 feet, and sand interbedded with sandstone and limestone from 68 to 220 feet. A slight hydraulic gradient exists, indicating ground-water movement from the landfill toward a lake to the east. Analyses of geoelectric, lithologic, and water-quality data indicate that surface geophysical techniques were successful in determining the areal and vertical extent of leachate migration at this location.

  16. Drought-induced changes in photosynthetic apparatus and antioxidant components of wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) varieties.

    PubMed

    Huseynova, Irada M; Rustamova, Samira M; Suleymanov, Saftar Y; Aliyeva, Durna R; Mammadov, Alamdar Ch; Aliyev, Jalal A

    2016-12-01

    Water deficit is a key factor influencing the yield and quality of crops. In the present study, the photosynthetic responses by means of chlorophyll fluorescence of chloroplasts, thylakoid membrane proteins, and antioxidant components were analyzed in wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) plants differing in their tolerance to drought. Two durum winter wheat varieties, Barakatli 95 (drought tolerant) and Garagylchyg 2 (drought sensitive) were grown under field well-watered and drought conditions. It was found that contents of the PS I core (CPI) with Mr of 123 kD and apoprotein P700 with Mr of 63 kD were relatively higher in Barakatli 95 variety under drought stress compared with the control plants. Synthesis of α- and β-subunits of CF1 ATP-synthase complex with Mr of 55 and 53.5 kD also slightly increased in the tolerant Barakatli 95 and decreased in the drought sensitive variety Garagylchyg 2. A decrease in the intensity of 30 kD band and a significant increase were found in the content of the 25-16 kD region in Garagylchyg 2 variety. The synthesis of 60 kD and content of low molecular mass polypeptides (21.5 and 12 kD) were increased in the tolerant genotype Barakatli 95. The intensity of peaks at 687, 695, and 742 nm considerably increases in the fluorescence spectra (77 K) of chloroplasts isolated from the sensitive variety Garagylchyg 2, and there is a stimulation of the ratio of fluorescence band intensity F687/F740. At the same time, higher level of glycine betaine was found in the drought tolerant variety compared with the control one throughout the different periods of growth.

  17. Evaluation of the antifungal activities of various extracts from Pistacia atlantica Desf

    PubMed Central

    Falahati, M; Sepahvand, A; Mahmoudvand, H; Baharvand, P; Jabbarnia, S; Ghojoghi, A; Yarahmadi, M

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Despite the availability of various treatments for fungal diseases, there are some limitations in the management of these conditions due to multiple treatment-related side-effects. The present study was designed to investigate the antifungal properties of different extracts from Pistacia atlantica Desf. Materials and Methods: Different parts of P. atlantica (i.e., dried fruit, fresh fruit and dried leaf) were separately extracted via percolation method with 80% methanol and water. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis was performed to determine the main constituents of leaf and fruit extracts from P. atlantica. In vitro anti-Candida activities of the extracts against Candida albicans, Candida glabrata and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were studied. For this purpose, the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimum fungicidal concentrations (MFCs) were determined, using broth microdilution method, according to the modified M27-A3 protocol on yeasts, proposed by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). Results: Based on GC/MS analysis, the main constituents of P. atlantica fruit extracts were β-myrcene (41.4%), α-pinene (32.48%) and limonene (4.66%), respectively, whereas the major constituents of P. atlantica leaf extracts were trans-caryophyllene (15.18%), α-amorphene (8.1%) and neo-allo-ocimene (6.21%), respectively. As the findings indicated, all the constituents exhibited both fungistatic and fungicidal activities, with MICs ranging from 6.66 to 26.66 mg/mL and MFCs ranging from 13.3 to 37.3 mg/mL, respectively. Among the evaluated extracts, the methanolic fresh fruit extract of P. atlantica was significantly more effective than other extracts (P<0.05). Conclusion: Based on the findings of the present study, novel antifungal agents need to be developed, and use of P. atlantica should be promoted in the traditional treatment of Candida infections. PMID:28680993

  18. Effect of diesel exhaust pollution on cuticular and epidermal features of Lantana camara L. and Syzygium cuminii L. (Skeels. )

    SciTech Connect

    Kulshreshtha, K.; Farooqui, A.; Srivastava, K.; Singh, S.N.; Ahmad, K.J.; Behl, H.M. )

    1994-02-01

    Cuticular and epidermal features of leaves of two common plant species namely, Lantana camara L. and Syzygium cuminii L. (Skeel.) growing in polluted and healthy (control) environments were studied under light and scanning electron microscopes. Polluted leaf samples were collected from the plants growing near a diesel generating set used in running a tube well. The study shows that in polluted populations of Lantana camara, the trichome frequency had increased four fold. In Syzygium cuminii, the stomatal openings were filled with dust and a tendency towards callus formation was also observed. The epidermal cells were comparatively thick walled and were broken at certain places. The changes observed in the cuticular and epidermal features of polluted populations of the investigated species indicate their significance as bioindicators of atmospheric pollution. 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Efficacy of some oils and chemical compounds on Insignorthezia insignis (Browne) (Hemiptera: Ortheziidae) infesting Lantana camara in Alexandria, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Moursi, S Khadiga; Abo-Shanab, A S H; Mesbah, H A; Abdel-Razak, S I; Mourad, A K; Zaghloul, O A; Abdel-Fatah, R S

    2010-01-01

    Field and laboratory experiments were conducted in March, 2008 in El-Nouzha garden, Alexandria governorate. Pre-and post treatment inspections of the insects were examined and recorded before and after (2,4,8, and 12 weeks). Spraying was applied to evaluate the efficiency of the tested compounds, [Mineral oils (KZ oil and Star oil); IGRs (Chlorfluazuron, lufenuron and pyriproxyfen); Neem oil; emamectin benzoate and thiamethoxam]. Percentages of reduction were calculated. The ensign scale insects Insignorthezia insignis (Browne) were collected from treated Lantana camara shrubs to investigate the effect of the tested chemicals on Aspartate transferase (AST), Alanine transferase (ALT) and Alkaline-phosphatase (ALPK) of the insect enzymes activities. From the obtained results, it could be concluded that the tested materials gave good results for controlling both adult and immature stages of the ensign scale insect Insignorthezia insignis (Browne) that infested Lantana camara shrubs, through affecting enzymes activities of the assigned insect pest.

  20. Extraction of Lantana camara essential oil by supercritical carbon dioxide: influence of the grinding and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Marongiu, Bruno; Piras, Alessandra; Porcedda, Silvia; Tuveri, Enrica; Deriu, Antonella; Zanetti, Stefania

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to produce Lantana camara essential oil by SFE and to study the effect of matrix grinding on the yield and/or composition of the extract. Experiments were carried out on grinding matrices (G) and on not grinding matrices (NG). The extracts were analyzed by GC-MS. A comparison with the oil obtained by hydrodistillation is also given. Finally, the antibacterial and antifungal activity of the various extracts has been assayed.

  1. A consensus framework map of durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) suitable for linkage disequilibrium analysis and genome-wide association mapping

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genomics applications in durum (Triticum durum Desf.) wheat have the potential to boost exploitation of genetic resources and to advance understanding of the genetics of important complex traits (e.g. resilience to environmental and biotic stresses). A dense and accurate consensus map specific for ...

  2. Experimental and theoretical investigations of Lantana camara oil diffusion from polyacrylonitrile membrane for pulsatile drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Verma, Vivek; Balasubramanian, K

    2014-08-01

    Porous composite membrane of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and Lantana camara essential oil was synthesized by solvent casting method. Stability of oil in PAN solution was measured by XiGo nano tool indicating constant relaxation time of 1487 time/s. Pore size of few microns confirmed by electron microscopy was supported by atomic force microscopy indicating roughness factor of 0.9 nm. Contact angle of 2° inveterates superhydrophilicity of the composite membrane. Membrane showed excellent antibacterial activity against both Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative Escherichia coli with a 7-10mm zone of inhibition. In vitro release of Lantana oil from the composite membrane was carried out in isotonic phosphate buffer solution (pH=7.4). Lantana oil was released for 9h, lag time of 3h with constant 33% release confirmed PAN membranes as potential system for pulsatile drug delivery applications. Diffusion of E-caryophyllene (antibacterial component of oil) which was studied through molecular simulation using Material Studio software ensued diffusion coefficient value of 1.11∗10(-9) m(2)/s. Biocompatibility of the composite membrane was assessed by mouse embryonic fibroblast cell line (NIH 3T3) through MTT assay indicating more than 91% viable cell even at 200 μg/mL concentration. Such membranes can be efficiently used in biomedical applications as antibacterial and antifungal agent.

  3. A Battle Lost? Report on Two Centuries of Invasion and Management of Lantana camara L. in Australia, India and South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Bhagwat, Shonil A.; Breman, Elinor; Thekaekara, Tarsh; Thornton, Thomas F.; Willis, Katherine J.

    2012-01-01

    Recent discussion on invasive species has invigorated the debate on strategies to manage these species. Lantana camara L., a shrub native to the American tropics, has become one of the worst weeds in recorded history. In Australia, India and South Africa, Lantana has become very widespread occupying millions of hectares of land. Here, we examine historical records to reconstruct invasion and management of Lantana over two centuries and ask: Can we fight the spread of invasive species or do we need to develop strategies for their adaptive management? We carried out extensive research of historical records constituting over 75% of records on invasion and management of this species in the three countries. The records indicate that governments in Australia, India and South Africa have taken aggressive measures to eradicate Lantana over the last two centuries, but these efforts have been largely unsuccessful. We found that despite control measures, the invasion trajectory of Lantana has continued upwards and that post-war land-use change might have been a possible trigger for this spread. A large majority of studies on invasive species address timescales of less than one year; and even fewer address timescales of >10 years. An understanding of species invasions over long time-scales is of paramount importance. While archival records may give only a partial picture of the spread and management of invasive species, in the absence of any other long-term dataset on the ecology of Lantana, our study provides an important insight into its invasion, spread and management over two centuries and across three continents. While the established paradigm is to expend available resources on attempting to eradicate invasive species, our findings suggest that in the future, conservationists will need to develop strategies for their adaptive management rather than fighting a losing battle. PMID:22403653

  4. A battle lost? Report on two centuries of invasion and management of Lantana camara L. in Australia, India and South Africa.

    PubMed

    Bhagwat, Shonil A; Breman, Elinor; Thekaekara, Tarsh; Thornton, Thomas F; Willis, Katherine J

    2012-01-01

    Recent discussion on invasive species has invigorated the debate on strategies to manage these species. Lantana camara L., a shrub native to the American tropics, has become one of the worst weeds in recorded history. In Australia, India and South Africa, Lantana has become very widespread occupying millions of hectares of land. Here, we examine historical records to reconstruct invasion and management of Lantana over two centuries and ask: Can we fight the spread of invasive species or do we need to develop strategies for their adaptive management? We carried out extensive research of historical records constituting over 75% of records on invasion and management of this species in the three countries. The records indicate that governments in Australia, India and South Africa have taken aggressive measures to eradicate Lantana over the last two centuries, but these efforts have been largely unsuccessful. We found that despite control measures, the invasion trajectory of Lantana has continued upwards and that post-war land-use change might have been a possible trigger for this spread. A large majority of studies on invasive species address timescales of less than one year; and even fewer address timescales of >10 years. An understanding of species invasions over long time-scales is of paramount importance. While archival records may give only a partial picture of the spread and management of invasive species, in the absence of any other long-term dataset on the ecology of Lantana, our study provides an important insight into its invasion, spread and management over two centuries and across three continents. While the established paradigm is to expend available resources on attempting to eradicate invasive species, our findings suggest that in the future, conservationists will need to develop strategies for their adaptive management rather than fighting a losing battle.

  5. Development of an Antioxidant Phytoextract of Lantana grisebachii with Lymphoprotective Activity against In Vitro Arsenic Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Soria, Elio A; Quiroga, Patricia L; Albrecht, Claudia; Ramos Elizagaray, Sabina I; Cantero, Juan J; Bongiovanni, Guillermina A

    2014-01-01

    Phytochemicals have been presumed to possess prophylactic and curative properties in several pathologies, such as arsenic- (As-) induced immunosuppression. Our aim was to discover a lymphoprotective extract from Lantana grisebachii Stuck. (Verbenaceae) (LG). We assessed its bioactivity and chemical composition using cell-based assays. Fractions produced from a hexane extract acutely induced nitrite formation in T-activated cell cultures (P < 0.0001). Water extraction released a fraction lacking nitrite inducing activity in both lymphocyte types. Aqueous LG was found to be safe in proliferated and proliferating cells. The infusion-derived extract presented better antioxidant capacity in proportion to phenolic amount in lymphocytes (infusive LG-1i at 100  μ g/mL), which protected them against in vitro As-induced lymphotoxicity (P < 0.0001). This infusive LG phytoextract contained 10.23 ± 0.43 mg/g of phenolics, with 58.46% being flavonoids. Among the phenolics, the only predominant compound was 0.723 mg of chlorogenic acid per gram of dry plant, in addition to 10 unknown minor compounds. A fatty acid profile was assessed. It contained one-third of saturated fatty acids, one-third of ω 9, followed by ω 6 (~24%) and ω 3 (~4%), and scarce ω 7. Summing up, L. grisebachii was a source of bioactive and lymphoprotective compounds, which could counteract As-toxicity. This supports its phytomedical use and research in order to reduce As-related dysfunctions.

  6. Variation in antioxidant and antimicrobial activities in Lantana camara L. flowers in relation to extraction methods.

    PubMed

    Manzoor, Madiha; Anwar, Farooq; Sultana, Bushra; Mushtaq, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    The present work was designed to appraise how different extraction solvents and techniques affect the extractability of antioxidant and antimicrobial components from Lantana camara (L. camard) flowers. Four extraction solvents including 100% methanol, 80% methanol, 100% ethanol and 80% ethanol coupled with three extraction techniques namely stirring, microwave-assisted stirring and ultrasonic-assisted stirring employed to isolate extractable components from the flowers of L. camara. The extracts produced were evaluated for their antioxidant and antimicrobial attributes. The yield of extractable components varied over a wide range 4.87-30.00% in relation to extraction solvent and techniques. The extracts produced contained considerable amounts of total phenolics (8.28-52.34 mg GAE/100 g DW) and total flavonoids (1.24-7.88 mg CE/100 g DW). Furthermore, a promising antioxidant activity in terms of DPPH° scavenging, inhibition of linoleic acid peroxidation and reducing power, as well as antimicrobial potential of the extracts were recorded against the selected bacterial and fungal strains. It was concluded that both extraction solvent and techniques employed affected the antioxidant and antimicrobial attributes of the extracts from L. camara flowers. With few exceptions, overall methanolic extracts produced by ultrasonic-assisted stirring offered superior activities followed by the microwave-assisted stirring and then stirring. The results advocate the use of appropriate extraction strategies to recover potent antioxidant and antimicrobial agents from the flowers of L. camara for nutraceutical and therapeutic.

  7. Digalacturonide flavones from Egyptian Lantana camara flowers with in vitro antioxidant and in vivo hepatoprotective activities.

    PubMed

    Abou El-Kassem, Lamia T; Mohammed, Reda S; El Souda, Sahar S; El-Anssary, Amira A; Hawas, Usama W; Mohmoud, Khaled; Farrag, Abdel Razik H

    2012-01-01

    A new digalacturonide flavone, luteolin 7-O-beta-galacturonyl-(2 --> 1)-O-beta-galacturonide (1), was isolated along with nine known flavone glycosides from the aqueous methanolic extract of Lantana camara (L.) flowers. Their structures were determined on the basis of the spectral data. The extract of L. camara was evaluated for antioxidant and hepatoprotective properties in the acetaminophen-induced mouse liver damage model. 1 exhibited significant antioxidant activity in the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging assay with an IC50 value of 27.2 microM. Pre-treatment with L. camara extract (25 and 75 mg/ kg body weight) decreased the activities of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (SGOT), and serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase (SGPT) enzyme levels that were elevated by acetaminophen. Both doses of the L. camara extract ameliorated the histopathological and histochemical alterations induced by acetaminophen. The results indicate that the L. camara extract possesses hepatoprotective activity against acetaminophen-induced liver damage.

  8. Development of an Antioxidant Phytoextract of Lantana grisebachii with Lymphoprotective Activity against In Vitro Arsenic Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Soria, Elio A.; Quiroga, Patricia L.; Albrecht, Claudia; Ramos Elizagaray, Sabina I.; Cantero, Juan J.; Bongiovanni, Guillermina A.

    2014-01-01

    Phytochemicals have been presumed to possess prophylactic and curative properties in several pathologies, such as arsenic- (As-) induced immunosuppression. Our aim was to discover a lymphoprotective extract from Lantana grisebachii Stuck. (Verbenaceae) (LG). We assessed its bioactivity and chemical composition using cell-based assays. Fractions produced from a hexane extract acutely induced nitrite formation in T-activated cell cultures (P < 0.0001). Water extraction released a fraction lacking nitrite inducing activity in both lymphocyte types. Aqueous LG was found to be safe in proliferated and proliferating cells. The infusion-derived extract presented better antioxidant capacity in proportion to phenolic amount in lymphocytes (infusive LG-1i at 100 μg/mL), which protected them against in vitro As-induced lymphotoxicity (P < 0.0001). This infusive LG phytoextract contained 10.23 ± 0.43 mg/g of phenolics, with 58.46% being flavonoids. Among the phenolics, the only predominant compound was 0.723 mg of chlorogenic acid per gram of dry plant, in addition to 10 unknown minor compounds. A fatty acid profile was assessed. It contained one-third of saturated fatty acids, one-third of ω9, followed by ω6 (~24%) and ω3 (~4%), and scarce ω7. Summing up, L. grisebachii was a source of bioactive and lymphoprotective compounds, which could counteract As-toxicity. This supports its phytomedical use and research in order to reduce As-related dysfunctions. PMID:25002868

  9. Global Invasion of Lantana camara: Has the Climatic Niche Been Conserved across Continents?

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Milén; Bustamante, Ramiro O.; Lampo, Margarita; Velásquez, Grisel; Sharma, Gyan P.; García-Rangel, Shaenandhoa

    2014-01-01

    Lantana camara, a native plant from tropical America, is considered one of the most harmful invasive species worldwide. Several studies have identified potentially invasible areas under scenarios of global change, on the assumption that niche is conserved during the invasion process. Recent studies, however, suggest that many invasive plants do not conserve their niches. Using Principal Components Analyses (PCA), we tested the hypothesis of niche conservatism for L. camara by comparing its native niche in South America with its expressed niche in Africa, Australia and India. Using MaxEnt, the estimated niche for the native region was projected onto each invaded region to generate potential distributions there. Our results demonstrate that while L. camara occupied subsets of its original native niche in Africa and Australia, in India its niche shifted significantly. There, 34% of the occurrences were detected in warmer habitats nonexistent in its native range. The estimated niche for India was also projected onto Africa and Australia to identify other vulnerable areas predicted from the observed niche shift detected in India. As a result, new potentially invasible areas were identified in central Africa and southern Australia. Our findings do not support the hypothesis of niche conservatism for the invasion of L. camara. The mechanisms that allow this species to expand its niche need to be investigated in order to improve our capacity to predict long-term geographic changes in the face of global climatic changes. PMID:25343481

  10. Phytochemical screening, antioxidants and antimicrobial potential of Lantana camara in different solvents

    PubMed Central

    Naz, Rabia; Bano, Asghari

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the antioxidant activity, hydrogen peroxide radicals scavenging activity, reducing power, the total phenolic and flavonoids contents, and antimicrobial and antifungal activities of methanol, ethanol and water extracts of leaves of Lantana camara (L. camara). Methods Methanol, ethanol and water extracts were evaluated against four Gram positive and Gram negative bacterial isolates (Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Bacillus subtilis) and two fungal strains (Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus flavus). Methanol extract at different concentrations was tested for antioxidant potential and phytochemicals were determined by using spectrophotometric method. Results The total phenolic content was (40.859±0.017) mg gallic acid/g in the leaves of L. camara, while the total flavonoids was (53.112±0.199) mg/g dry weight. Methanol leaf extract of L. camara showed maximum antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and was also effective against other bacterial strains as compared to ethanol and aqueous extracts of leaves. The methanol leaf extract of L. camara exhibited significant inhibition (71%) and (66%) against Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus flavus respectively. Conclusions The methanol extract of the L. camara leaves is effective against selected bacterial and fungal strains. Its phytochemical contents have broad antimicrobial properties and the plant might be a novel source of antimicrobial drug.

  11. Green synthesis and characterization of silver nanoparticles using Lantana camara leaf extract.

    PubMed

    Ajitha, B; Ashok Kumar Reddy, Y; Sreedhara Reddy, P

    2015-04-01

    In this work, we have investigated on Lantana camara mediated silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with different leaf extract (LE) quantity for the evaluation of efficient bactericidal activity. The AgNPs were prepared by simple, capable, eco-friendly and biosynthesis method using L. camara LE. This method allowed the synthesis of crystalline nanoparticles, which was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis confirmed the formation of metallic silver and elucidates the surface state composition of AgNPs. UV-vis spectra of AgNPs and visual perception of brownish yellow color from colorless reaction mixture confirmed the AgNP formation. Involvement of functional groups of L. camara leaf extract in the reduction and capping process of nanoparticles was well displayed in Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Decrement of particle size with an increment of leaf extract volume was evident in AFM, TEM images and also through a blue shift in the UV-vis spectra. The rate of formation and size of AgNPs were dependent on LE quantity. Meanwhile, these AgNPs exhibited effective antibacterial activity with the decrement of particle size against all tested bacterial cultures.

  12. Chemical Characterization and Trypanocidal, Leishmanicidal and Cytotoxicity Potential of Lantana camara L. (Verbenaceae) Essential Oil.

    PubMed

    Barros, Luiz Marivando; Duarte, Antonia Eliene; Morais-Braga, Maria Flaviana Bezerra; Waczuk, Emily Pansera; Vega, Celeste; Leite, Nadghia Figueiredo; de Menezes, Irwin Rose Alencar; Coutinho, Henrique Douglas Melo; Rocha, João Batista Teixeira; Kamdem, Jean Paul

    2016-02-10

    Drug resistance in the treatment of neglected parasitic diseases, such as leishmaniasis and trypanosomiasis, has led to the search and development of alternative drugs from plant origins. In this context, the essential oil extracted by hydro-distillation from Lantana camara leaves was tested against Leishmania braziliensis and Trypanosoma cruzi. The results demonstrated that L. camara essential oil inhibited T. cruzi and L. braziliensis with IC50 of 201.94 μg/mL and 72.31 μg/mL, respectively. L. camara essential oil was found to be toxic to NCTC929 fibroblasts at 500 μg/mL (IC50 = 301.42 μg/mL). The composition of L. camara essential oil analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) revealed large amounts of (E)-caryophyllene (23.75%), biciclogermacrene (15.80%), germacrene D (11.73%), terpinolene (6.1%), and sabinene (5.92%), which might be, at least in part, responsible for its activity. Taken together, our results suggest that L. camara essential oil may be an important source of therapeutic agents for the development of alternative drugs against parasitic diseases.

  13. [Antifeeding effects of crude lantadene from Lantana camara on Plutella xylostella and Spodoptera litura larvae].

    PubMed

    Dong, Yizhi; Zhang, Maoxin; Ling, Bing

    2005-12-01

    In this study, crude lantadene was extracted from Lantana canmara leaves, and its antifeeding effects on Plutella xylostella and Spodoptera litura larvae were tested. In no-choice test, crude lantadene at 1.6 mg x ml(-1) concentration had antifeeding effects on the 2nd instar P. xylostella larvae and 1st instar S. litura larvae, with the antifeeding rate being 62.4% and 33.1%, respectively within 48 h. In choice test, even a low concentration (0.4 mg x ml(-1)) crude lantadene still had anti-feeding effects on the 2nd instar P. xylostella larvae, and the antifeeding rate at 0.4, 0.8 and 1.6 mg x ml(-1) concentration was 52.7%, 55.5% and 78.9%, respectively. Crude lantadene only at 1.6 mg x ml(-1) concentration had anti-feeding effects on the 1st instar S. litura larvae, and the antifeeding rate was 33.0%. For the 2nd instar S. litura larvae, crude lantadene had no antifeeding effects both in no-choice and in choice test.

  14. Pentacyclic triterpenoids from the aerial parts of Lantana camara and their nematicidal activity.

    PubMed

    Begum, Sabira; Zehra, Syeda Qamar; Siddiqui, Bina Shaheen; Fayyaz, Shahina; Ramzan, Musarrat

    2008-09-01

    Two new olean-12-ene triterpenoids, camarolic acid (1) and lantrigloylic acid (2), have been isolated from the aerial parts of Lantana camara, along with ten known triterpenes, namely, camaric acid, lantanolic acid, lantanilic acid, pomolic acid, camarinic acid, lantoic acid, camarin, lantacin, camarinin, and ursolic acid. The new compounds have been characterized as 3,25-epoxy-3alpha-hydroxy-22beta-{[(S)-3-hydroxy-2-methylidenebutanoyl]oxy}olean-12-en-28-oic acid (1) and 3,25-epoxy-3alpha-hydroxy-22beta-[(3-methylbut-2-enoyl)oxy]olea-9(11),12-dien-28-oic acid (2) through spectroscopic studies and a chemical transformation. Seven of the constituents, namely pomolic acid, lantanolic acid, lantoic acid, camarin, lantacin, camarinin, and ursolic acid, were tested for nematicidal activity against root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita. Pomolic acid, lantanolic acid, and lantoic acid showed 100% mortality at 1 mg/ml concentration after 24 h, while camarin, lantacin, camarinin, and ursolic acid exhibited 100% mortality at this concentration after 48 h. These results are comparable to those obtained with the conventional nematicide furadan (100% mortality at 1 mg/ml concentration after 24 h).

  15. Effect of culture conditions on synthesis of triterpenoids in suspension cultures of Lantana camara L.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Priyanka; Sisodia, Vikash; Chaturvedi, Rakhi

    2011-01-01

    Present report is aimed to study the batch kinetics of Lantana camara. Dynamic changes of parameters, such as pH, conductivity, wet and dry cell concentrations, consumption of major nutrients, carbon source and agitation speeds were investigated to understand the culture characteristics of suspended cells grown on MS + BAP + 2,4-D + NAA in shake flasks. Results indicated that the consumption of phosphate resulted in the onset of stationary phase in cultures. Maltose as carbon source resulted in production of maximum triterpenoid content (31.08 mg/L) while the least was found on glucose (10.69 mg/L). Notably, both did not support accumulation of betulinic acid. Sucrose, although stood second in terms of quantity (21.6 mg/L), supported the production of all the three triterpenoids-oleanolic, ursolic and betulinic acids. Maximum viable cultures were obtained at a rotation speed of 120 rpm. The present finding will form a background for further scale-up related studies.

  16. Repellent, antifeedant, and toxic activities of Lantana camara leaf extract against Reticulitermes flavipes (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae).

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhonglin; Hu, Xing Ping

    2012-12-01

    This study investigated biological activity of chloroform extract of dry Lantana camara 'Mozelle' leaves against the eastern subterranean termite, Reticulitermes flavipes (Kollar), an important structural pest. Repellent activity was assessed using a paper-disc choice test and a sand arena choice test. Antifeedant and toxic properties were assessed using a no-choice paper test and a topical application method. In the choice tests, significantly fewer termites made contact with treated paper-discs at test concentrations > or = 0.016 mg/cm2 (equivalent to 0.0023 wt:wt) or tunneled into treated sand at test concentrations > or = 0.125 mg/g, compared with control. In the no-choice tests, termite feeding activity was significantly reduced and termite mortality was greatly increased in treatments than control. Exposure to filter paper treated at 0.212 and 0.106 mg/cm2 (equivalent to 0.03 and 0.015 wt:wt) resulted in > 90% mortality and 78% reduction in feeding, and approximately 52% mortality and 40% reduction in feeding, respectively. Top-dorsal application led to > 60% mortality at 4 microg/termite. This study showed that the chloroform leaf extract of L. camara had excellent repellent and moderate toxic and antifeedant activities.

  17. Global invasion of Lantana camara: has the climatic niche been conserved across continents?

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Estefany; Herrera, Ileana; Duarte, Milén; Bustamante, Ramiro O; Lampo, Margarita; Velásquez, Grisel; Sharma, Gyan P; García-Rangel, Shaenandhoa

    2014-01-01

    Lantana camara, a native plant from tropical America, is considered one of the most harmful invasive species worldwide. Several studies have identified potentially invasible areas under scenarios of global change, on the assumption that niche is conserved during the invasion process. Recent studies, however, suggest that many invasive plants do not conserve their niches. Using Principal Components Analyses (PCA), we tested the hypothesis of niche conservatism for L. camara by comparing its native niche in South America with its expressed niche in Africa, Australia and India. Using MaxEnt, the estimated niche for the native region was projected onto each invaded region to generate potential distributions there. Our results demonstrate that while L. camara occupied subsets of its original native niche in Africa and Australia, in India its niche shifted significantly. There, 34% of the occurrences were detected in warmer habitats nonexistent in its native range. The estimated niche for India was also projected onto Africa and Australia to identify other vulnerable areas predicted from the observed niche shift detected in India. As a result, new potentially invasible areas were identified in central Africa and southern Australia. Our findings do not support the hypothesis of niche conservatism for the invasion of L. camara. The mechanisms that allow this species to expand its niche need to be investigated in order to improve our capacity to predict long-term geographic changes in the face of global climatic changes.

  18. Behavioral foraging responses by the butterfly Heliconius melpomene to Lantana camara floral scent.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Susanna; Dobson, Heidi E M

    2003-10-01

    Floral color has been shown to influence flower selection by butterflies, but few studies have investigated the role of floral scent. In this study, adults of Heliconius melpomene L. (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae: Heliconiinae) were tested in two-choice bioassays to investigate their ability to distinguish floral scent of the butterfly pollinated plant Lantana camara L. (Verbenaceae) from other plant scents. The relative importance of floral scent vs. color was also studied. Butterfly foraging behavior was measured as probing with proboscis. This probing, on floral models varying in scent and color, was timed. When given a choice of floral and vegetative scents of L. camara, newly emerged butterflies preferred floral scent, indicating an innate response to floral scents. When butterflies were conditioned to L. camara floral scent by offering the scent with yellow color and sugar water, yellow color elicited stronger feeding responses than did the floral scent. However, the floral scent of L. camara was preferred to that of the novel species Philadelphus coronarius L. (Hydrangiaceae). The floral scent of L. camara was dominated by tepenoid compounds, while that of P. coronarius by fatty acid derivatives, thus demonstrating totally different compositions. It is concluded that, while H. melpomene butterflies often use visual floral traits when selecting which flowers to visit, floral scents elicit behavioral responses that initiate and maintain foraging on flowers.

  19. Evaluation of wound healing activity of Lantana camara L. - a preclinical study.

    PubMed

    Nayak, B Shivananda; Raju, S Sivachandra; Eversley, Mathew; Ramsubhag, Adash

    2009-02-01

    Lantana camara is used in herbal medicine for the treatment of skin itches, as an antiseptic for wounds, and externally for leprosy and scabies. The objective of our study was to investigate excision wound healing activity of the leaf extract of L. camara in rats. The animals were divided into two groups of 12 each in both the models. The test group animals were treated with the aqueous extract of L. camara (100 mg/kg/day) topically and the control group animals were left untreated. Wound healing efficacy was measured by determining the morphological and biochemical parameters. Wound healing time, wound contraction and synthesis of collagen were monitored periodically. Antimicrobial activities of the extract against the microorganisms were also assessed. Treatment of the wounds with extract enhanced significantly the rate of wound contraction (98%), synthesis of collagen and decreased mean wound healing time. These studies demonstrate that L. camara is effective in healing excision wounds in the experimental animal and could be evaluated as a therapeutic agent in tissue repair processes associated with skin injuries.

  20. [Inhibitory effects of Lantana camera and its contained phenolic compounds in Eichhornia crassipes growth].

    PubMed

    Yi, Zhen; Zhang, Maoxin; Ling, Bing; Xu, Di; Ye, Jingzhong

    2006-09-01

    This paper studied the effects of Lantana camera fresh leaves aqueous extract and its contained phenolic compounds on the growth and physiologic-biochemical indexes of Eichhornia crassipes. The results showed that this extract had obvious inhibitory effects on the growth and development of E. crassipes. When the concentration was higher than 30 g FW x L(-1), it could kill E. crassipes after 6 days treatment. A total of seven phenolic compounds in the abstract were identified by HPLC, which were salicylic acid, gentisic acid, beta-resorcylic acid , coumarin, ferulic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid and 6-methyl coumarin, with the concentrations being, 50.95, 13.46, 5.28, 3.36, 2.92, 2.19 and 0.34 mg x L(-1), respectively. The mixture of the seven compounds had the strongest inhibitory effect, followed by salicylic acid, 6-methyl coumarin, coumarin, and p-hydroxybenzoic acid, while the effects of beta-resorcylic acid and gentisic acid were not significant.

  1. Climate warming may facilitate invasion of the exotic shrub Lantana camara.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiaoying; Zhang, Yunchun; Peng, Shaolin; Zobel, Kristjan

    2014-01-01

    Plant species show different responses to the elevated temperatures that are resulting from global climate change, depending on their ecological and physiological characteristics. The highly invasive shrub Lantana camara occurs between the latitudes of 35 °N and 35 °S. According to current and future climate scenarios predicted by the CLIMEX model, climatically suitable areas for L. camara are projected to contract globally, despite expansions in some areas. The objective of this study was to test those predictions, using a pot experiment in which branch cuttings were grown at three different temperatures (22 °C, 26 °C and 30 °C). We hypothesized that warming would facilitate the invasiveness of L. camara. In response to rising temperatures, the total biomass of L. camara did increase. Plants allocated more biomass to stems and enlarged their leaves more at 26 °C and 30 °C, which promoted light capture and assimilation. They did not appear to be stressed by higher temperatures, in fact photosynthesis and assimilation were enhanced. Using lettuce (Lactuca sativa) as a receptor plant in a bioassay experiment, we also tested the phytotoxicity of L. camara leachate at different temperatures. All aqueous extracts from fresh leaves significantly inhibited the germination and seedling growth of lettuce, and the allelopathic effects became stronger with increasing temperature. Our results provide key evidence that elevated temperature led to significant increases in growth along with physiological and allelopathic effects, which together indicate that global warming facilitates the invasion of L. camara.

  2. Growth, root colonization and nutrient status of Helianthemum sessiliflorum Desf. inoculated with a desert truffle Terfezia boudieri Chatin.

    PubMed

    Slama, Awatef; Gorai, Mustapha; Fortas, Zohra; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Neffati, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of inoculation using Terfezia boudieri Chatin ascospores (ectomycorrhizal fungus) on growth, root colonization and nutrient status of Helianthemum sessiliflorum Desf. seedlings grown in pots on two-soil types (gypseous and sandy loam). Mycorrhizal seedlings had significantly increased their height and leaf number compared to non-mycorrhizal ones. Regardless of mycorrhizal inoculation treatments, the plants growing on gypseous soil showed higher growth as compared to sandy loam one. It appears that inoculation with T. boudieri changed root morphology, increasing branching of first-order lateral roots of H. sessiliflorum seedlings. The highest root mycorrhizal colonization was recorded in inoculated seedlings on sandy loam soil (89%) when compared to gypseous one (52%). N, P and K concentrations in mycorrhizal seedlings were significantly improved by fungal inoculation. It can be concluded that inoculation of H. sessiliflorum with T. boudieri increased growth attributes and improved plant nutritional status.

  3. Characterization of volatile compounds of Daucus crinitus Desf. Headspace Solid Phase Microextraction as alternative technique to Hydrodistillation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Traditionally, the essential oil of aromatic herbs is obtained using hydrodistillation (HD). Because the emitted volatile fraction plays a fundamental role in a plant's life, various novel techniques have been developed for its extraction from plants. Among these, headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) can be used to obtain a rapid fingerprint of a plant's headspace. Daucus crinitus Desf. is a wild plant that grows along the west coast of Algeria. Only a single study has dealt with the chemical composition of the aerial part oils of Algerian D. crinitus, in which isochavicol isobutyrate (39.0%), octyl acetate (12.3%), and β-caryophyllene (5.4%) were identified. Using GC-RI and GC-MS analysis, the essential oils and the volatiles extracted from separated organs of D. crinitus Desf. were studied using HS-SPME. Results GC-RI and GC-MS analysis identified 72 and 79 components in oils extracted using HD and in the volatile fractions extracted using SPME, respectively. Two types of essential oils were produced by the plant: the root oils had aliphatic compounds as the main component (87.0%-90.1%), and the aerial part oils had phenylpropanoids as the main component (43.1%-88.6%). HS-SPME analysis showed a more precise distribution of compounds in the organs studied: oxygenated aliphatic compounds were well represented in the roots (44.3%-84.0%), hydrocarbon aliphatic compounds were in the leaves and stems (22.2%-87.9%), and phenylpropanoids were in the flowers and umbels (47.9%-64.2%). Moreover, HS-SPME allowed the occurrence of isochavicol (29.6 - 34.7%) as main component in D. crinitus leaves, but it was not detected in the oils, probably because of its solubility in water. Conclusions This study demonstrates that HD and HS-SPME modes could be complimentary extraction techniques in order to obtain the complete characterization of plant volatiles. PMID:20858266

  4. Evaluation of the in vitro effect of a Lantana camara extract on the labeling of blood constituents of rats with technetium-99m.

    PubMed

    Maiworm, A I; Santos-Filho, S D; Presta, G A; Giani, T S; Paoli, S; Bernardo-Filho, M

    2008-03-01

    Blood constituents labeled with technetium-99m (99mTc) have been used in nuclear medicine procedures and drugs are capable to interfere on this labeling. Lantana camara (lantana) has medicinal properties and it has been used in folk medicine. The aim is to verify the effect of a lantana extract on the labeling of blood constituents with 99mTc. Blood of rats was incubated with extract, stannous chloride and 99mTc, as sodium pertechnetate. Plasma (P) and blood cells (BC) were isolated, also precipitated with trichloroacetic acid and soluble (SF) and insoluble fractions (IF) were separated. The % of radioactivity (%ATI) in these samples was calculated. Samples of labeled BC were washed and the %ATI maintained (%ATI-M) in the BC was determined. The results showed that lantana extract decreased significantly (p < 0.05) in the IF-P from 70.24 +/- 2.59 to 11.95 +/- 3.07. This effect was not observed in the BC and IF-BC. The BC-%ATI-M was significantly (p < 0.05) decreased in all concentrations tested when the BC was washed. This fact was not observed in the control. Substances present on the extract should have redoxi action decreasing the concentration of the stannous ion and this condition could justify the effect on the IF-P. The results about the BC-%ATI-M should indicate a possible effect on the transport of ions through the erythrocyte membrane.

  5. Climate Warming May Facilitate Invasion of the Exotic Shrub Lantana camara

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiaoying; Zhang, Yunchun; Peng, Shaolin; Zobel, Kristjan

    2014-01-01

    Plant species show different responses to the elevated temperatures that are resulting from global climate change, depending on their ecological and physiological characteristics. The highly invasive shrub Lantana camara occurs between the latitudes of 35°N and 35°S. According to current and future climate scenarios predicted by the CLIMEX model, climatically suitable areas for L. camara are projected to contract globally, despite expansions in some areas. The objective of this study was to test those predictions, using a pot experiment in which branch cuttings were grown at three different temperatures (22°C, 26°C and 30°C). We hypothesized that warming would facilitate the invasiveness of L. camara. In response to rising temperatures, the total biomass of L. camara did increase. Plants allocated more biomass to stems and enlarged their leaves more at 26°C and 30°C, which promoted light capture and assimilation. They did not appear to be stressed by higher temperatures, in fact photosynthesis and assimilation were enhanced. Using lettuce (Lactuca sativa) as a receptor plant in a bioassay experiment, we also tested the phytotoxicity of L. camara leachate at different temperatures. All aqueous extracts from fresh leaves significantly inhibited the germination and seedling growth of lettuce, and the allelopathic effects became stronger with increasing temperature. Our results provide key evidence that elevated temperature led to significant increases in growth along with physiological and allelopathic effects, which together indicate that global warming facilitates the invasion of L. camara. PMID:25184224

  6. Adulticidal activity of essential oil of Lantana camara leaves against mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Dua, V K; Pandey, A C; Dash, A P

    2010-03-01

    Development of insect resistance to synthetic pesticides, high operational cost and environmental pollution have created the need for developing alternative approaches to control vector-borne diseases. In the present study we have investigated the insecticidal activity of essential oil isolated from the leaves of Lantana camara against mosquito vectors. Essential oil was isolated from the leaves of L. camara using hydro-distillation method. Bioassay test was carried out by WHO method for determination of adulticidal activity against mosquitoes. Different compounds were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. LD(50) values of the oil were 0.06, 0.05, 0.05, 0.05 and 0.06 mg/cm(2) while LD(90) values were 0.10, 0.10, 0.09, 0.09 and 0.10 mg/cm(2) against Ae. aegypti, Cx. quinquefasciatus, An. culicifacies, An. fluvialitis and An. stephensi respectively. KDT(50) of the oil were 20, 18, 15, 12, and 14 min and KDT(90) values were 35, 28 25, 18, 23 min against Ae. aegypti, Cx. quinquefasciatus, An. culicifacies, An. fluviatilis and An. stephensi, respectively on 0.208 mg/cm(2) impregnated paper. Studies on persistence of essential oil of L. camara on impregnated paper revealed that it has more adulticidal activity for longer period at low storage temperature. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis of essential oil showed 45 peaks. Caryophyllene (16.37%), eucalyptol (10.75%), alpha-humelene (8.22%) and germacrene (7.41%) were present in major amounts and contributed 42.75 per cent of the total constituents. Essential oil from the leaves of L. camara possesses adulticidal activity against different mosquito species that could be utilized for development of oil-based insecticide as supplementary to synthetic insecticides.

  7. Chemical composition and antibacterial activity of essential oils of Lantana camara, Ageratum houstonianum and Eupatorium adenophorum.

    PubMed

    Kurade, Nitin P; Jaitak, Vikas; Kaul, Vijay K; Sharma, Om P

    2010-05-01

    Essential oils have applications in folk medicine, food preservation, and as feed additives. The essential oils of Lantana camara Linn. (Verbenaceae), Ageratum houstonianum Mill. (Asteraceae) and Eupatorium adenophorum Spreng. (Asteraceae) were analyzed by Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS). In L. camara oil, of the total identified (83.91%) volatile constituents, five constituents [3,7,11-trimethyl-1,6,10-dodecatriene (28.86%), beta-caryophyllene (12.28%), zingiberene (7.63%), gamma-curcumene (7.50%) and alpha-humulene (3.99%)] represented the major ones. In A. houstonianum oil, among the total identified volatile constituents (94.51%), three [precocene-II (52.64%), precocene-I (22.45%) and beta-caryophyllene (9.66%)] represented the major ones. In E. adenophorum oil, of the total identified volatile constituents (84.95%), six [1-napthalenol (17.50%), alpha-bisabolol (9.53%), bornyl acetate (8.98%), beta-bisabolene (6.16%), germacrene-D (5.74%) and alpha- phellandrene (3.85%)] represented the major ones. The antibacterial activity expressed as Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC) (microg/mL) was determined by the broth dilution method. The essential oil of E. adenophorum had antibacterial activity against Arthrobacter protophormiae, Escherichia coli, Micrococcus luteus, Rhodococcus rhodochrous, and Staphylococcus aureus with MBC values of 200, 100, 100, 12.5, and 200, respectively. The essential oil of A. houstonianum showed antibacterial activity against M. luteus and R. rhodochrous with MBC of 100 and 12.5, but not against A. protophormiae, E. coli, and S. aureus. The essential oil of L. camara showed antibacterial activity against A. protophormiae, M. luteus, R. rhodochrous and S. aureus with MBC of 50, 25, 12.5, and 200, respectively, but not against E. coli. MBC was lowest for R. rhodochrous for all the three essential oils.

  8. Toxicity of apolar and polar Lantana camara L. crude extracts in mice.

    PubMed

    Bevilacqua, A H V; Suffredini, I B; Romoff, P; Lago, J H G; Bernardi, M M

    2011-02-01

    Lantana camara L, widely used in folk medicine, presents toxicity for farm animals. The acute poisoning effects of the apolar and polar L. camara L. extracts in mice were done. The percentage of death during 7 days after treatment, the acute signs of toxicity as well as the general activity observed in open field were assessed. The extracts were administered by i.p. route at 1.5, 3.0 and 5.0 g/kg. Animals were evaluated during the first 2 h after the treatments to assess the acute signs of toxicity and daily observations were done for the presence of death. In the end of the experiment, at day 7, or immediately after death the animals had their organs removed, weighted and observed for macroscopic alterations. (1)H NMR and TLC analysis suggest the presence of triterpenoids in the apolar phase but not in the polar phase. Results showed also that both extracts produced similar percentage of death, mainly after 2 days of treatment; only the apolar extract presented a dose-dependent increased lethality. At necropsy, mice treated by both apolar and polar extracts were severely icteric, dehydrated and constipated, with hepatosis, showed congested heart and lung, and nephrosis; no skin lesions were shown. The main signs of toxicity revealed a decreased spontaneous general activity. In addition, it was observed a decreased duration of locomotion and animal rearing parallel to an increased immobility in the open field. The similarity of the signs related to the acute toxicity for both apolar and polar extracts suggested that the extracts have some of the active toxic principles in common. Data from open field behavior and spontaneous signs of toxicity suggest that the toxic principles have depressive properties on central nervous system.

  9. Chemical characterization of volatile compounds of Lantana camara L. and L. radula Sw. and their antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Passos, Juliana Lanna; Barbosa, Luiz Claudio Almeida; Demuner, Antonio Jacinto; Alvarenga, Elson Santiago; da Silva, Cleiton Moreira; Barreto, Robert Weingart

    2012-09-27

    A comparative study of the chemical composition of essential oils of two very similar species of the Verbenaceae family (Lantana camara and L. radula) revealed that the main components of essential oil of L. camara were germacrene-D (19.8%) and E-caryophyllene (19.7%), while those of L. radula were E-caryophyllene (25.3%), phytol (29.2%) and E-nerolidol (19.0%). We have hypothesized that the observed differences could contribute to the differentiated reaction of the two species of Lantana to the attack of the phytopathogenic fungi Corynespora cassiicola. An experiment, involving C. cassiicola cultivation in culture media containing volatile oils of the two species demonstrated that the oils of L. radula were more fungistatic than the oils of L. camara, in accordance with the in vivo observations. It is likely that E-nerolidol and phytol, only found in the oil of L. radula, play a significant role in the effects of L. radula on C. cassiicola.

  10. Mineral composition of different parts of Capparis ovata Desf. var. canescens (Coss.) Heywood growing wild in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Musa

    2005-01-01

    Major and minor mineral contents of young shoots, flower buds, caperberries (fruit), and seeds of Capparis ovata Desf. var. canescens (Coss.) Heywood, used as a pickling product in Turkey, were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. Twenty-one minerals were assayed in samples. All materials contained high amounts of Ca, K, Mg, Na, P, Pb, and Zn. The highest levels of Ca (598.34-16,947.1 ppm), K (3,093.1-28,163.9 ppm), Na (57.9-444.3 ppm), P (1,690.5-4,153.9 ppm), and Zn (21.1-35.6 ppm) were found in flower buds. The content of K was high in most cases and ranged from 28,163.9 ppm (flower bud) to 3,093.1 ppm (caper seed). Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Li, Ni, Pb, and Se contents of caper plant organs were found to be very low. Consequently, caper parts were rich in minerals, and they may be valuable for food uses. The results may also be useful for the evaluation of nutritional information.

  11. [Analgesic activity of different nonvolatile extracts of Nepeta atlantica Ball and Nepeta Tuberosa L. ssp. reticulata (Desf.) Maire].

    PubMed

    Bouidida, El Houcine; Alaoui, Katim; Cherrah, Yahia; Chammache, Malika; Il Idrissi, Abdelkader

    2008-01-01

    Different extracts of Nepeta atlantica Ball and Nepeta tuberosa L. ssp. reticulata (Desf.) Maire contain mainly secondary metabolites with iridoïd lactonic and glucosidic type, also with triterpine lupan type.The aerial part of each species is crushed, then extracted in methanol by cold maceration, called global extracts. The global extracts will be extracted through various solvents: initially by hexane, then by dichloromethane, after that by ethyl acetate and at the end by buthanol. Each one of the obtained extracts will be used for the following trials: i) Tail flick trial on the rat for central morphine-like analgesic activity; ii) Koster trial on the mouse for peripheral analgesic activity. The evaluation of the central and peripheral analgesic activities for the pre-cited extracts was realized after optimal doses determination of the global extracts activities for both species.The peripheral analgesic activity test on the mouse showed that, for 60 mg/kg intra peritoneum (IP), the hexanic, dichloromethanic, ethyl acetate and butanic extracts have a protection power against abdominal cramp respectively around 89.78%, 81.73%, 70.9% et 69.05% for Nepeta atlantica Ball, and around 89.16%, 82.98%, 71.52% et 70.27% for Nepeta tuberosa L. ssp. reticulata.Central morphine-like analgesic activity on the rat showed that, for both spices under 60 mg/kg IP, the central analgesic activity effect is significantly for two extracts only: dichloromethane and ethyl acetate.

  12. Non-Oxygenated Sesquiterpenes in the Essential Oil of Copaifera langsdorffii Desf. Increase during the Day in the Dry Season

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Luiz Fernando Rolim; Portella, Roberto de Oliveira; Bufalo, Jennifer; Marques, Márcia Ortiz Mayo; Facanali, Roselaine; Frei, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of seasonal and diurnal events on the chemical profile of the essential oil obtained from the leaves of Copaifera langsdorffii Desf. This study was performed in a Brazilian savanna named Cerrado. We identified the best harvesting period for obtaining the highest amount of compounds used for commercial and industrial purposes. The chemical profile of the essential oils was evaluated by GC-FID and GC-MS, and the results were assessed through multivariate analyses. The data showed that the time of day and seasonal variations affect the quality of the essential oil obtained. Leaves harvested at the end of the day (5:00 pm) in the dry season resulted in richer essential oils with higher amounts of non-oxygenated sesquiterpenes. To the best of our knowledge, environmental conditions induce metabolic responses in the leaves of C. langsdorffii, which changes the patterns of sesquiterpene production. Therefore, these factors need to be considered to obtain better concentrations of bioactive compounds for pharmacological studies. PMID:26886431

  13. Accelerated hydrolysis method to estimate the amino acid content of wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) flour using microwave irradiation.

    PubMed

    Kabaha, Khaled; Taralp, Alpay; Cakmak, Ismail; Ozturk, Levent

    2011-04-13

    The technique of microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis was applied to wholegrain wheat (Triticum durum Desf. cv. Balcali 2000) flour in order to speed the preparation of samples for analysis. The resultant hydrolysates were chromatographed and quantified in an automated amino acid analyzer. The effect of different hydrolysis temperatures, times and sample weights was examined using flour dispersed in 6 N HCl. Within the range of values tested, the highest amino acid recoveries were generally obtained by setting the hydrolysis parameters to 150 °C, 3 h and 200 mg sample weight. These conditions struck an optimal balance between liberating amino acid residues from the wheat matrix and limiting their subsequent degradation or transformation. Compared to the traditional 24 h reflux method, the hydrolysates were prepared in dramatically less time, yet afforded comparable ninhydrin color yields. Under optimal hydrolysis conditions, the total amino acid recovery corresponded to at least 85.1% of the total protein content, indicating the efficient extraction of amino acids from the flour matrix. The findings suggest that this microwave-assisted method can be used to rapidly profile the amino acids of numerous wheat grain samples, and can be extended to the grain analysis of other cereal crops.

  14. C15271. The Chemical Diversity of Lantana camara: Analyses of Essential Oil Samples from Cuba, Nepal, and Yemen.

    PubMed

    Satyal, Prabodh; Crouch, Rebecca A; Monzote, Lianet; Cos, Paul; Awadh Ali, Nasser A; Alhaj, Mehdi A; Setzer, William N

    2016-02-10

    The aerial parts of Lantana camara L. were collected from three different geographical locations: Artemisa (Cuba), Biratnagar (Nepal), and Sana'a (Yemen). The essential oils were obtained by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry. A cluster analysis of 39 L. camara essential oil compositions revealed eight major chemotypes: β-caryophyllene, germacrene D, ar-curcumene/zingiberene, γ-curcumen-15-al/epi-β-bisabolol, (E)-nerolidol, davanone, eugenol/alloaromadendrene, and carvone. The sample from Cuba falls into the group dominated by (E)-nerolidol, the sample from Nepal is a davanone chemotype, and the sample from Yemen belongs to the β-caryophyllene chemotype. The chemical composition of L. camara oil plays a role in the biological activity; the β-caryophyllene and (E)-nerolidol chemotypes showed antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Lantana camara Linn leaf extract mediated green synthesis of gold nanoparticles and study of its catalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, Shib Shankar; Bag, Braja Gopal; Hota, Poulami

    2015-03-01

    A facile one-step green synthesis of stable gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) has been described using chloroauric acid (HAuCl4) and the leaf extract of Lantana camara Linn (Verbenaceae family) at room temperature. The leaf extract enriched in various types of plant secondary metabolites is highly efficient for the reduction of chloroaurate ions into metallic gold and stabilizes the synthesized AuNPs without any additional stabilizing or capping agents. Detailed characterizations of the synthesized gold nanoparticles were carried out by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, Zeta potential, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy studies. The synthesized AuNPs have been utilized as a catalyst for the sodium borohydride reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol in water at room temperature under mild reaction condition. The kinetics of the reduction reaction has been studied spectrophotometrically.

  16. Lantana camara Linn root extract-mediated gold nanoparticles and their in vitro antioxidant and cytotoxic potentials.

    PubMed

    Ramkumar, Rajendiran; Balasubramani, Govindasamy; Raja, Ramalingam Karthik; Raja, Manickam; Govindan, Raji; Girija, Easwaradas Kreedapathy; Perumal, Pachiappan

    2017-01-09

    The Lantana camara Linn root extract derived gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) were characterized by Ultraviolet-Visible spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, fourier transform-infrared, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction pattern and energy dispersive X-ray analyses. In DPPH assay, the inhibitory concentration (IC50) of Au NPs and gallic acid was 24.17 and 5.39 μg/ml, whereas, for cytotoxicity assay, the IC50 of Au NPs was 17.72 and 32.98 μg/ml on MBA-MB-231 and Vero cells, respectively. Thus, the Au NPs possess significant in vitro antioxidant and cytotoxic properties which could be considered as potential alternate for the development of anticancer drug in future.

  17. Acetylcholinesterase inhibition by biofumigant (Coumaran) from leaves of Lantana camara in stored grain and household insect pests.

    PubMed

    Rajashekar, Yallappa; Raghavendra, Anjanappa; Bakthavatsalam, Nandagopal

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies proved that the biofumigants could be an alternative to chemical fumigants against stored grain insect pests. For this reason, it is necessary to understand the mode of action of biofumigants. In the present study the prospectus of utilising Lantana camara as a potent fumigant insecticide is being discussed. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) by Coumaran, an active ingredient extracted from the plant L. camara, was studied. The biofumigant was used as an enzyme inhibitor and acetylthiocholine iodide as a substrate along with Ellman's reagent to carry out the reactions. The in vivo inhibition was observed in both dose dependent and time dependent in case of housefly, and the nervous tissue (ganglion) and the whole insect homogenate of stored grain insect exposed to Coumaran. The possible mode of action of Coumaran as an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor is discussed.

  18. Acetylcholinesterase Inhibition by Biofumigant (Coumaran) from Leaves of Lantana camara in Stored Grain and Household Insect Pests

    PubMed Central

    Raghavendra, Anjanappa; Bakthavatsalam, Nandagopal

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies proved that the biofumigants could be an alternative to chemical fumigants against stored grain insect pests. For this reason, it is necessary to understand the mode of action of biofumigants. In the present study the prospectus of utilising Lantana camara as a potent fumigant insecticide is being discussed. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) by Coumaran, an active ingredient extracted from the plant L. camara, was studied. The biofumigant was used as an enzyme inhibitor and acetylthiocholine iodide as a substrate along with Ellman's reagent to carry out the reactions. The in vivo inhibition was observed in both dose dependent and time dependent in case of housefly, and the nervous tissue (ganglion) and the whole insect homogenate of stored grain insect exposed to Coumaran. The possible mode of action of Coumaran as an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor is discussed. PMID:25025036

  19. Comparison of antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of tilia (Tilia argentea Desf ex DC), sage (Salvia triloba l.), and black tea (Camellia sinensis) extracts.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, A; Mavi, A; Oktay, M; Kara, A A; Algur, O F; Bilaloglu, V

    2000-10-01

    The antioxidant activity of the water extract of Tilia argentea Desf ex DC was determined by the thiocyanate method. The antioxidant activity of the water extract increased with the increasing amount of lyophilized extract (50-400 microg) added into the linoleic acid emulsion. Statistically significant effect was determined in 100 microg and higher amounts. Antioxidant activities of water extracts of tilia (Tilia argentea Desf ex DC), sage (Salvia triloba L.), and two Turkish black teas commercially called Rize tea and young shoot tea (Camellia sinensis) were compared. For comparison studies, 100 microg portions of extracts were added into test samples. All samples were able to show statistically significant antioxidant effect. Both of the tea extracts showed highest antioxidant activities, nevertheless, differences between tilia and sage and tilia and tea were not statistically significant (for both cases p > 0.05). Like antioxidant activity, the reducing power of water extract of Tilia argentea Desf ex DC was also concentration dependent. Even in the presence of 50 microg of extract, the reducing power was significantly higher than that of the control (p < 0.05) in which there was no extract. Unlike antioxidant activity, the highest reducing power activity was shown by sage extract. Among the tea extracts, young shoot extract was the most effective one, however, it had significantly lower activity than sage (p < 0.05). Although tea flower had the lowest reducing power activity, it was higher than that of tilia. But this difference was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). From these results, we could suggest that although the reducing power of a substance may be an indicator of its potential antioxidant activity, there may not always be a linear correlation between these two activities. In addition, antimicrobial activities of each of the above extracts were studied by disk diffusion methods on different test microorganisms. None of the extracts showed

  20. In Vitro and In Vivo Antimicrobial Activities of T-3811ME, a Novel Des-F(6)-Quinolone

    PubMed Central

    Takahata, Masahiro; Mitsuyama, Junichi; Yamashiro, Yoshiko; Yonezawa, Minoru; Araki, Harumi; Todo, Yozo; Minami, Shinzaburo; Watanabe, Yasuo; Narita, Hirokazu

    1999-01-01

    The in vitro and in vivo activities of T-3811ME, a novel des-F(6)-quinolone, were evaluated in comparison with those of some fluoroquinolones, including a newly developed one, trovafloxacin. T-3811, a free base of T-3811ME, showed a wide range of antimicrobial spectra, including activities against Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In particular, T-3811 exhibited potent activity against various gram-positive cocci, with MICs at which 90% of the isolates are inhibited (MIC90s) of 0.025 to 6.25 μg/ml. T-3811 was the most active agent against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and streptococci, including penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae (PRSP). T-3811 also showed potent activity against quinolone-resistant gram-positive cocci with GyrA and ParC (GrlA) mutations. The activity of T-3811 against members of the family Enterobacteriaceae and nonfermentative gram-negative rods was comparable to that of trovafloxacin. In common with other fluoroquinolones, T-3811 was highly active against Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and Legionella sp., with MIC90s of 0.0125 to 0.1 μg/ml. T-3811 showed a potent activity against anaerobic bacteria, such as Bacteroides fragilis and Clostridium difficile. T-3811 was the most active agent against C. trachomatis (MIC, 0.008 μg/ml) and M. pneumoniae (MIC90, 0.0313 μg/ml). The activity of T-3811 against M. tuberculosis (MIC90, 0.0625 μg/ml) was potent and superior to that of trovafloxacin. In experimental systemic infection with a GrlA mutant of S. aureus and experimental pneumonia with PRSP in mice, T-3811ME showed excellent therapeutic efficacy in oral and subcutaneous administrations. PMID:10223917

  1. Evaluation of liver function impairment and lipid peroxidation induced by lantana camara leaf powder administration in adult rat serum and liver.

    PubMed

    Saini, N; Singh, J; Sehgal, R; Ojha, S

    2007-05-30

    Lantana camara is a common weed and certain medicinal properties have been attributed to this plant, but most varieties of this plant are reported to be highly toxic to animals. The plant is a native of America but a few varieties are indigenous to tropical Asia and Africa. The present investigation was done to study the hepatotoxic and lipid peroxidative effects of this noxious weed on female Wistar rats. Eighty four percent (84%) increase was observed in the activity of AST in group B and 120% increase was noted in group C in serum. In, liver tissue this increase was 66% and 258%. In the case of ALT, 165% increase was observed in group B and 219% increase was observed in group C in serum. In, liver there was 46% increase in group B and 216% increase in group C in the ALT activity. Similarly, 30% and 50% increase in group B and 120% and 300% increase in group C in the activity of ALP was observed with respect to control group. The overall protein concentration was increased in serum and decreased in liver tissue. Lipid peroxidation in liver tissue was inhibited by 22% in group B and 55% in group C. Thus Lantana camara is a toxic plant which produces severe hepatotoxicity in rats, but it also prevented lipid peroxidation that may suggest that Lantana camara may be acting as antioxidant but, exactly which of its component is responsible for this activity is not known and needs future investigations.

  2. Suppression Substractive Hybridization and NGS Reveal Differential Transcriptome Expression Profiles in Wayfaring Tree (Viburnum lantana L.) Treated with Ozone

    PubMed Central

    Gottardini, Elena; Cristofori, Antonella; Pellegrini, Elisa; La Porta, Nicola; Nali, Cristina; Baldi, Paolo; Sablok, Gaurav

    2016-01-01

    Tropospheric ozone (O3) is a global air pollutant that causes high economic damages by decreasing plant productivity. It enters the leaves through the stomata, generates reactive oxygen species, which subsequent decrease in photosynthesis, plant growth, and biomass accumulation. In order to identify genes that are important for conferring O3 tolerance or sensitivity to plants, a suppression subtractive hybridization analysis was performed on the very sensitive woody shrub, Viburnum lantana, exposed to chronic O3 treatment (60 ppb, 5 h d−1 for 45 consecutive days). Transcript profiling and relative expression assessment were carried out in asymptomatic leaves, after 15 days of O3 exposure. At the end of the experiment symptoms were observed on all treated leaves and plants, with an injured leaf area per plant accounting for 16.7% of the total surface. Cloned genes were sequenced by 454-pyrosequencing and transcript profiling and relative expression assessment were carried out on sequenced reads. A total of 38,800 and 12,495 high quality reads obtained in control and O3-treated libraries, respectively (average length of 319 ± 156.7 and 255 ± 107.4 bp). The Ensembl transcriptome yielded a total of 1241 unigenes with a total sequence length of 389,126 bp and an average length size of 389 bp (guanine-cytosine content = 49.9%). mRNA abundance was measured by reads per kilobase per million and 41 and 37 ensembl unigenes showed up- and down-regulation respectively. Unigenes functionally associated to photosynthesis and carbon utilization were repressed, demonstrating the deleterious effect of O3 exposure. Unigenes functionally associated to heat-shock proteins and glutathione were concurrently induced, suggesting the role of thylakoid-localized proteins and antioxidant-detoxification pathways as an effective strategy for responding to O3. Gene Ontology analysis documented a differential expression of co-regulated transcripts for several functional categories, including

  3. Antistaphylococcal activity of DX-619, a new des-F(6)-quinolone, compared to those of other agents.

    PubMed

    Bogdanovich, Tatiana; Esel, Duygu; Kelly, Linda M; Bozdogan, Bülent; Credito, Kim; Lin, Gengrong; Smith, Kathy; Ednie, Lois M; Hoellman, Dianne B; Appelbaum, Peter C

    2005-08-01

    The in vitro activity of DX-619, a new des-F(6)-quinolone, was tested against staphylococci and compared to those of other antimicrobials. DX-619 had the lowest MIC ranges/MIC(50)s/MIC(90)s (microg/ml) against 131 Staphylococcus aureus strains (32), and ciprofloxacin (>32/>32). Raised quinolone MICs were associated with mutations in GyrA (S84L) and single or double mutations in GrlA (S80F or Y; E84K, G, or V) in all S. aureus strains tested. A recent vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (VRSA) strain (Hershey) was resistant to available quinolones and was inhibited by DX-619 at 0.25 microg/ml and sitafloxacin at 1.0 microg/ml. Vancomycin (except VRSA), linezolid, ranbezolid, tigecycline, and quinupristin-dalfopristin were active against all strains, and teicoplanin was active against S. aureus but less active against coagulase-negative staphylococci. DX-619 produced resistant mutants with MICs of 1 to >32 microg/ml after <50 days of selection compared to 16 to >32 microg/ml for ciprofloxacin, sitafloxacin, moxifloxacin, and gatifloxacin. DX-619 and sitafloxacin were also more active than other tested drugs against selected mutants and had the lowest mutation frequencies in single-step resistance selection. DX-619 and sitafloxacin were bactericidal against six quinolone-resistant (including the VRSA) and seven quinolone-susceptible strains tested, whereas gatifloxacin, moxifloxacin, levofloxacin, and ciprofloxacin were bactericidal against 11, 10, 7, and 5 strains at 4x MIC after 24 h, respectively. DX-619 was also bactericidal against one other VRSA strain, five

  4. In vitro effects of Coriandrum sativum, Tagetes minuta, Alpinia zerumbet and Lantana camara essential oils on Haemonchus contortus.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Iara Tersia Freitas; de Oliveira, Lorena Mayana Beserra; Camurça-Vasconcelos, Ana Lourdes Fernandes; Ribeiro, Wesley Lyeverton Correia; dos Santos, Jessica Maria Leite; de Morais, Selene Maia; de Paula, Haroldo Cesar Beserra; Bevilaqua, Claudia Maria Leal

    2013-01-01

    Phytotherapy can be an alternative for the control of gastrointestinal parasites of small ruminants. This study evaluated the efficacy of Alpinia zerumbet, Coriandrum sativum, Tagetes minuta and Lantana camara essential oils by two in vitro assays on Haemonchus contortus, an egg hatch test (EHT) and larval development test (LDT). No effect was observed for L. camara in the EHT. A. zerumbet, C. sativum and T. minuta essential oils exhibited a dose-dependent effect in the EHT, inhibiting 81.2, 99 and 98.1% of H. contortus larvae hatching, respectively, at a concentration of 2.5 mg mL-1. The effective concentration to inhibit 50% (EC50) of egg hatching was 0.94, 0.63 and 0.53 mg mL-1 for A. zerumbet, C. sativum and T. minuta essential oils, respectively. In LDT, L. camara, A. zerumbet, C. sativum and T. minuta at concentration of 10 mg mL-1 inhibited 54.9, 94.2, 97.8 and 99.5% of H. contortus larval development, presenting EC50 values of 6.32, 3.88, 2.89 and 1.67 mg mL-1, respectively. Based on the promising results presented in this in vitro model, it may be possible use of these essential oils to control gastrointestinal nematodes. However, their anthelmintic activity should be confirmed in vivo.

  5. Quantification of vitamin D3 and its hydroxylated metabolites in waxy leaf nightshade (Solanum glaucophyllum Desf.), tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) and bell pepper (Capsicum annuum L.).

    PubMed

    Jäpelt, Rie Bak; Silvestro, Daniele; Smedsgaard, Jørn; Jensen, Poul Erik; Jakobsen, Jette

    2013-06-01

    Changes in vitamin D(3) and its metabolites were investigated following UVB- and heat-treatment in the leaves of Solanum glaucophyllum Desf., Solanum lycopersicum L. and Capsicum annuum L. The analytical method used was a sensitive and selective liquid chromatography electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) method including Diels-Alder derivatisation. Vitamin D(3) and 25-hydroxy vitamin D(3) were found in the leaves of all plants after UVB-treatment. S. glaucophyllum had the highest content, 200 ng vitamin D(3)/g dry weight and 31 ng 25-hydroxy vitamin D(3)/g dry weight, and was the only plant that also contained 1,25 dihydroxy vitamin D(3) in both free (32 ng/g dry weight) and glycosylated form (17 ng/g dry weight).

  6. Antiurolithiatic Activity of Extract and Oleanolic Acid Isolated from the Roots of Lantana camara on Zinc Disc Implantation Induced Urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Narendra; Argal, Ameeta

    2013-01-01

    The present study was done to evaluate the antiurolithiatic activity of ethanolic extract of roots (ELC 200 mg/kg) and oleanolic acid (OA 60 mg/kg, O.A. 80 mg/kg, O.A. 100 mg/kg) isolated from roots of Lantana camara in albino wistar male rats using zinc disc implantation induced urolithiatic model. The group in which only zinc disc was implanted without any treatment showed increase in calcium output (23  ± 2.7 mg/dL). Cystone receiving animals showed significant protection from such change (P < 0.01). Treatment with OA and ELC significantly reduced the calcium output at a dose of OA 60 mg/kg (P < 0.01), OA 80 mg/kg (P < 0.01), ELC 200 mg/kg (P < 0.01), and OA 100 mg/kg (P < 0.001), as compared with zinc disc implanted group. The average weight of zinc discs along with the deposited crystals in the only disc implanted group was found to be 111 ± 8.6 mg. Group that received Cystone 500 mg/kg showed significant reduction in the depositions (P < 0.001). Similarly, the rats which received OA and ELC showed reduced formation of depositions around the zinc disc (P < 0.001). The X-ray images of rats also showed significant effect of OA and ELC on urolitiasis. Thus, OA and ELC showed promising antiurolithiatic activity in dose dependant manner.

  7. Effect of earthworms on plant Lantana camara Pb-uptake and on bacterial communities in root-adhering soil.

    PubMed

    Jusselme, My Dung; Poly, Franck; Miambi, Edouard; Mora, Philippe; Blouin, Manuel; Pando, Anne; Rouland-Lefèvre, Corinne

    2012-02-01

    The present study aimed to assess the potential abilities of Lantana camara, an invasive plant species for phytoremediation in the presence of earthworm Pontoscolex corethrurus. Effects of earthworm on growth and lead (Pb) uptake by L. camara plant were studied in soil artificially contaminated at 500 or 1000mg of Pb kg(-1) soil. This species has a promising value for phytoremediation because it can uptake as much as 10% of 1000mgkg(-1) of Pb per year. Moreover, the presence of earthworms enhanced plant biomass by about 1.5-2 times and increased the uptake of lead by about 2-3 times. In the presence of earthworm, L. camara was thus able to uptake up 20% of Pb presence in the soil, corresponding to remediation time of 5 years if all organs are removed. As soil microorganisms are known to mediate many interactions between earthworms and plants, we documented the effect of earthworms on the bacterial community of root-adhering soil of L. camara. Cultivable bacterial biomass of root-adhering soil increased in the presence of earthworms. Similar trend was observed on bacterial metabolic activities. The increase of lead concentrations from 500 to 1000mgkg(-1) did not have any significant effect either on plant growth or on bacterial biomass and global activities but affected the structure and functional diversity of the bacterial community. These results showed that we should broaden the ecological context of phytoremediation by considering plant/microbial community/earthworm interactions that influence the absorption of heavy metals.

  8. Chemical composition and insecticidal activity of the volatile oils of leaves and flowers of Lantana camara L. cultivated in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Hady, Nevein M; Abdei-Halim, Azza S; Al-Ghadban, Al-Mewafy A

    2005-08-01

    GC and GC/MS analysis of the hydrodistilled volatile oils of the leaves and flowers of Lantana camara L. cv. flava (Verbenaceae) cultivated in Egypt revealed both qualitative and quantitative variations. Experimentally, twenty-nine and twenty-two components were identified in the volatile oils of leaves and flowers representing 91.91% and 95.24% of the total composition of both oils respectively. The major constituents of the leaves volatile oil were caryophyllene (9.76%), cineol <1.8-> (9.37%) and pinene (8.15%). The flowers volatile oils were caryophyllene (18.20%), humulene (12.22 %) and bicyclegermacrene (10.33%). Comparing the chemical composition of the volatile oils of the leaves and flowers of L. canara cv., flava from different origins, seasons and even experimental conditions revealed that there are significant qualitative and quantitative variations. The larvicidal effect of the volatile oils of L. camara cv., flava leaves and flowers of was tested against the maturation of Musca domestica L. larvae in the laboratory at concentrations (0.0125%, 0.025%. 0.05%, 0.1% and 0.2%). They showed mortality rate ranged from 80%- 100%. On the other hand, 10-20% of the developed pupae emerged to adults. Adults' fecundity was in larvae given a concentration of 0.0125%. In conclusion, the volatile oils of the leaves and flowers of L. camara cv., flava can be safely recommended in controlling M. domestica 3rd stage larvae.

  9. In vitro activity of Lantana camara, Alpinia zerumbet, Mentha villosa and Tagetes minuta decoctions on Haemonchus contortus eggs and larvae.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Iara T F; Bevilaqua, Claudia M L; de Oliveira, Lorena M B; Camurça-Vasconcelos, Ana L F; Morais, Selene M; Machado, Lyeghyna K A; Ribeiro, Wesley L C

    2012-12-21

    The resistance of gastrointestinal nematodes to anthelmintics has increased the need to evaluate natural products that can replace or assist current strategies to control gastrointestinal nematodes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of decoctions of Lantana camara (DLc), Alpinia zerumbet (DAz), Mentha villosa (DMv) and Tagetes minuta (DTm) on Haemonchus contortus by two in vitro tests. The effects of increasing concentrations of lyophilized decoctions (0.31 to 10mg/ml) were assessed using the egg hatch test (EHT). The decoctions were then tested in the larval artificial exsheathment assay. H. contortus third stage larvae (L3) were exposed to 0.31 mg/ml A. zerumbet and M. villosa decoctions and 0.62 mg/ml T. minuta and L. camara decoctions for 3h and then exsheathment procedure at 10 min intervals. An inhibitor of tannins, polyvinyl polypyrrolidone (PVPP), was used to study if tannins were responsible for the inhibitory effect on hatching and exsheathment of larvae. A. zerumbet, M. villosa and T. minuta showed a dose-dependent effect in the EHT, which did not disappear after the addition of PVPP. No effect was observed for L. camara in the EHT. However, the decoctions inhibited the process of larval exsheathment, which may be related to tannin action because the addition of PVPP reversed the inhibitory effect. A. zerumbet, M. villosa and T. minuta decoctions showed inhibitory activity on H. contortus larvae hatching and exsheathing. The decoctions of these plants could be used to control gastrointestinal nematodes following confirmation of their anthelmintic activity in vivo.

  10. Vermicomposting of toxic weed--Lantana camara biomass: chemical and microbial properties changes and assessment of toxicity of end product using seed bioassay.

    PubMed

    Suthar, Surindra; Sharma, Priyanka

    2013-09-01

    This work illustrates the results of vermicomposting trials of noxious weed - Lantana camara (LL) leaf litter spiked with cow dung (CD) in different ratios (0%, 20%, 40%, 60% and 80%) using Eisenia fetida. A total of five treatments were established and changes in chemical and microbial properties of vermibeds have been observed for 60 days. In all treatments, a decrease in pH (19.5-30.7%), total organic carbon (TOC) (12-23%) and C:N ratio (25-35%), but increase in ash content (16-40%), total N(N(tot)) (11-32%), available phosphorous (P(avail)) (445-629%), exchangeable potassium (K(exch)) (63-156%) exchangeable calcium (Ca(exch)) (67-94%),and N-NO3(-) (164-499%) was recorded. Vermibeds with 40-60% LL (T2 and T3) showed better mineralization rate. The number of fungi, bacteria and actinomycetes showed 0.33-1.67-fold, 0.72-2.33-fold and 2.03-2.99-fold increase, respectively after vermicomposting process. The germination index (GI) was between 47% and 83% in all vermicomposts as indicated by seed bioassay test. Results thus suggested that Lantana may be a potential source for vermicompost production for sustainable agriculture. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Negative effect of litter of invasive weed Lantana camara on structure and composition of vegetation in the lower Siwalik Hills, northern India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harminder Pal; Batish, Daizy R; Dogra, Kuldip Singh; Kaur, Shalinder; Kohli, Ravinder Kumar; Negi, Anjana

    2014-06-01

    Lantana camara, an aromatic shrub, native to tropical America, was introduced into India for ornamental hedging, but later escaped and became a serious invasive weed. This study assessed the quantitative and qualitative status of plant community richness and diversity in areas invaded by L. camara in the Siwalik Hills (Himachal Pradesh, India), and explored allelopathy as a possible mechanism of interference. We measured species diversity, richness and evenness of the vegetation in areas invaded and uninvaded by L. camara. Allelopathic effects of L. camara rhizosphere soil and litter were assessed against two native plants-Achyranthes aspera (a herb) and Albizia lebbeck (a tree). Density, biomass and indices of diversity, richness and evenness were reduced by L. camara, indicating a significant alteration in composition and structure of native communities. Seedling growth of the test species was reduced in L. camara rhizosphere- and litter-amended soil. The inhibitory effect was ameliorated by the addition of activated charcoal, indicating the presence of organic inhibitors (quantified as phenolics) in the soil. Lantana invasion greatly reduces the density and diversity of the vegetation in the invaded area, and chemical interference of its litter plays an important role in invasion.

  12. Chemical constituents and antifilarial activity of Lantana camara against human lymphatic filariid Brugia malayi and rodent filariid Acanthocheilonema viteae maintained in rodent hosts.

    PubMed

    Misra, Namita; Sharma, Mithilesh; Raj, Kanwal; Dangi, Anil; Srivastava, Sudhir; Misra-Bhattacharya, Shailja

    2007-02-01

    Lymphatic filariasis continues to be a major health problem in tropical and subtropical countries. A macrofilaricidal agent capable of eliminating adult filarial parasites is urgently needed. In the present study, we report the antifilarial activity in the extract of stem portion of the plant Lantana camara. The crude extract at 1 g/kg for 5 days by oral route killed 43.05% of the adult Brugia malayi parasites and sterilized 76% of surviving female worms in the rodent model Mastomys coucha. A 34.5% adulticidal activity along with sterilization of 66% of female worms could be demonstrated in the chloroform fraction. Remarkable antifilarial activity was observed in the adult B. malayi transplanted gerbil model where up to 80% of the adult worms could be killed at the same dose and all the surviving female parasites were found sterilized. The extract was also found effective against a subcutaneous rodent filariid Acanthocheilonema viteae maintained in Mastomys coucha, where it exerted strong microfilaricidal (95.04%) and sterilization (60.66%) efficacy with mild macrofilaricidal action. Two compounds, oleanonic acid and oleanolic acid, isolated from hexane and chloroform fractions showed LC100 at 31.25 and 62.5 mug/ml, respectively, on B. malayi in vitro. This is the first ever report on the antifilarial efficacy of Lantana camara.

  13. [Microscopic anatomy and volatile secondary metabolites at three stages of development of the inflorescences of Lantana camara (Verbenaceae)].

    PubMed

    Caroprese Araque, José Fernando; Parra Garcés, María Isabel; Arrieta Prieto, Dagoberto; Stashenko, Elena

    2011-03-01

    Plants of the Verbenaceae family, like L. camara, have called the attention of researchers, not only because of its high diversity and its distribution around the world, but also for its variable use as popular medicine to treat diseases like tetanus, rheumatism and malaria, and as bactericide and insecticide. To assess this, the morphology and ontogeny of the inflorescences of Lantana camara and the chemical composition of volatile secondary metabolites were analyzed at three different ontogeny stages. Plants were collected from the experimental crop area in CENIVAM, Bucaramanga, Colombia. Fresh inflorescence stages were established and analyzed using a stereoscopic microscope, fixed in FAA and included in parafine. Transversal and longitudinal 10 microm thick sections were prepared using a rotative microtome, safranine-fastgreen stained and were observed and photographed using a light microscope. The chemical composition of volatile secondary metabolites were analyzed for each stage. The analytes, obtained from 0.7 g of plant, were isolated by solid phase micro-extraction in the headspace mode (HS-SPME) and were placed in 20 ml vials. The components were analyzed by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Stage I was microscopically characterized by an immature development in which the meristematic differentiation begins with a mass of cells. In Stage II, the morphogenetic movement gives way to the formation of the respective floral sexual structures, calyx and corolla. In Stage III, the different organs are conspicuous: four stamens epipetals and didynamous, monocarpelar, biloculate and globose gynoecium, upper ovary and lateral stigma; the flowers are hermaphroditic. The main secondary metabolites detected by GC-MS were bicyclosesquiphellandrene, E-beta-farnesene, E-beta-caryophyllene, gamma-muurolene + gamma-curcumene and alpha-zingiberene. Nevertheless, this study reports for the first time in plant species alpha-gurjunene, gamma

  14. Interaction between Uroplata girardi (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) and Ophiomyia camarae (Diptera: Agromyzidae) on a shared host Lantana camara (Verbenaceae).

    PubMed

    April, Vuyokazi; Robertson, Mark P; Simelane, David O

    2011-10-01

    Multiple releases of insect agents intended to target a single plant pest species could result in competitive interactions that in turn might affect the community structure of the phytophagous insects. Two leaf-feeding biological control agents, Uroplata girardi Pic (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) and Ophiomyia camarae Spencer (Dipetera: Agromyzidae), were released against the weed Lantana camara L. (Verbenaceae) in South Africa in the 1970s and 2001, respectively. Since the population explosion of O. camarae in 2005, a decline of U. girardi populations had been observed in KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) humid coast, leading to speculation that negative interaction may be operating between the agents. The study therefore was conducted to determine the competitive effect of O. camarae on U. girardi. The study showed that 76% of O. camarae larval mines were formed on uninfested (clean) compared with only 24% formed on U. girardi-infested leaves, suggesting that the fly chose to lay more eggs on clean leaves. Almost the same number of U. girardi larval mines was formed on both O. camarae-infested and clean leaves, indicating that U. girardi females in this case oviposited indiscriminately on the two types of leaves. The survival of U. girardi was 53.8% when reared on clean leaves compared with only 14.6% survival on O. camarae-infested leaves. At the end of the sampling period, densities of U. girardi was over two times higher in single-species than in combined-species treatment. Releasing both agents together did not significantly affect O. camarae densities during the sampling period. In the field, O. camarae densities increased rapidly from spring to autumn, whereas those of U. girardi remained consistently low during the same period. The bias toward oviposition on clean leaves in O. camarae enables its larvae to avoid unfavorable encounters with U. girardi larvae, thus enhancing its development and survival. The apparent inability of U. girardi to distinguish between suitable

  15. Physical and chemical properties of soils under some wild Pistachio (Pistacia atlantica Desf) canopies in a semi-arid ecosystem, southwestern Iran.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owliaie, Hamidreza

    2010-05-01

    Pistacia atlantica Desf. is one of the most important wild species in Zagros forests which is of high economical and environmental value. Sustainability of these forests primarily depends on soil quality and water availability. Study the relationships between trees and soil is one of the basic factors in management and planning of forests. Hence, this study was undertaken with the objective of assessing the effect of tree species on soil physical and chemical properties in a semi-arid region (Kohgilouye Province) in the southwestern part of Iran. The experimental design was a factorial 4×2 (4 depths and 2 distances) in a randomized complete block design with six replications. Soil samples (0-20, 20-40, 40-60 and 60-80 cm depth) were taken from beneath the tree crowns and adjacent open areas. Soil samples were analyzed for physical and chemical properties. The results showed that wild pistachio canopy increased mostly organic carbon, hydraulic conductivity, total N, SP, available K+, P (olsen), EC, EDTA extractable Fe2+ and Mn2+, while bulk density, CCE and DTPA extractable Cu2+ were decreased. Pistachio canopy had no significant effect on soil texture, Zn2+ and pH.

  16. Morphological leaf variability in natural populations of Pistacia atlantica Desf. subsp. atlantica along climatic gradient: new features to update Pistacia atlantica subsp. atlantica key.

    PubMed

    El Zerey-Belaskri, Asma; Benhassaini, Hachemi

    2016-04-01

    The effect of bioclimate range on the variation in Pistacia atlantica Desf. subsp. atlantica leaf morphology was studied on 16 sites in Northwest Algeria. The study examined biometrically mature leaves totaling 3520 compound leaves. Fifteen characters (10 quantitative and 5 qualitative) were assessed on each leaf. For each quantitative character, the nested analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to examine relative magnitude of variation at each level of the nested hierarchy. The correlation between the climatic parameters and the leaf morphology was examined. The statistical analysis applied on the quantitative leaf characters showed highly significant variation at the within-site level and between-site variation. The correlation coefficient (r) showed also an important correlation between climatic parameters and leaf morphology. The results of this study exhibited several values reported for the first time on the species, such as the length and the width of the leaf (reaching up to 24.5 cm/21.9 cm), the number of leaflets (up to 18 leaflets/leaf), and the petiole length of the terminal leaflet (reaching up to 3.4 cm). The original findings of this study are used to update the P. atlantica subsp. atlantica identification key.

  17. In vitro assessment of the anthelmintic activity of Hedysarum carnosum Desf. at different phenological stages and from six locations in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Aissa, A; Manolaraki, F; Ben Salem, H; Hoste, H; Kraiem, K

    2016-05-01

    Gastrointestinal nematodes are compromising productivity of grazing sheep and goats. Therefore, scientists have been looking for cost-effective alternative options. Forage legumes (Fabacea Family) contain tannins that could improve livestock performance and their health as well. The present study aimed to (i) determine the in vitro anthelmintic (AH) activity of 19 acetonic extracts of Hedysarum carnosum Desf on Haemonchus contortus by a larval exsheathment assay (LEA); (ii) test the anthelmintic activity of condensed tannins using a deactivating reagent, polyvinylpolypyrrolidone (PVPP); (iii) study the effect of location and the phenological stage on the percentage of exsheathment. The LEA was used at different concentrations (150, 300, 600, 1200 µg mL-1 of acetonic extract/mL of purified buffer solution (PBS)). The larval exsheathment is concentration, location, phenological stage dependent. All extracts, caused a delay of the percentage of exsheathment over 50% so the AH activity of H. carnosum was confirmed. After addition of PVPP, the % exsheathment was similar to the 150 µg mL-1 concentration. The biplot showed that Loc1(S), Loc4(B), Loc 5(PF), Loc 6(BM) and Loc 6(PF) were isolated from other plant extract sample. Our in vitro study showed that H. carnosum seems to be a promising alternative to AH drugs.

  18. Expression, purification and refolding of active durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) secretory phospholipase A2 from inclusion bodies of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Verlotta, Angelo; Trono, Daniela

    2014-09-01

    Recently, a durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) secretory phospholipase A2 (TdsPLA2III) was identified in leaves as potentially involved in plant responses to conditions of limiting water supply. Therefore, to allow future functional studies on TdsPLA2III and shed further light on the involvement of sPLA2 isoforms in specific plant functions, here we report a protocol for the overexpression of TdsPLA2III in Escherichia coli in the form of inclusion bodies, and for its purification and refolding. The use of the Gateway system (Invitrogen) allows the expression of a large quantity of the mature form (without the signal peptide) of TdsPLA2III with an N-terminal 6×His-tag, for purification using Ni-affinity chromatography. The purified recombinant 6×His-TdsPLA2III fusion protein is then refolded using a step-wise dialysis approach. About 40mg purified and active protein was obtained from 1L of cell culture. This recombinant 6×His-TdsPLA2III protein shows PLA2 activity, as it can hydrolyze linoleate from the sn-2 position of 1-palmitoyl-2-linoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. Moreover, it has some features that are typical of other known plant sPLA2s: Ca(2+)-dependence, inhibition by the disulfide bond reducing agent dithiothreitol, and resistance to high temperature. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Cytotoxic pentacyclic triterpenoids from Combretum sundaicum and Lantana camara as inhibitors of Bcl-xL/BakBH3 domain peptide interaction.

    PubMed

    Litaudon, Marc; Jolly, Claire; Le Callonec, Catherine; Cuong, Dao Din; Retailleau, Pascal; Nosjean, Olivier; Nguyen, Van Hung; Pfeiffer, Bruno; Boutin, Jean A; Guéritte, Françoise

    2009-07-01

    In an effort to discover potent inhibitors of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-xL, a systematic in vitro evaluation was undertaken on extracts prepared from various parts of Vietnamese plants. The ethyl acetate extracts obtained from the leaves and flowers of Combretum sundaicum and the leaves of Lantana camara were selected for their interaction with the Bcl-xL/Bak association. Bioassay-guided purification of these species led to the isolation of 15 pentacyclic triterpenoids (1-15) possessing olean-12-en-28-oic acid and olean-12-en-29-oic acid aglycons, of which compounds 1-6 and 8-10 are new. Five compounds exhibited binding activity with K(i) values between 5.3 and 17.8 microM. The cytotoxic activity of 1-15 was also evaluated on various cancer cell lines.

  20. Quality Characteristics of Wholemeal Flour and Bread from Durum Wheat (Triticum turgidum L subsp. durum Desf.) after Field Treatment with Plant Water Extracts.

    PubMed

    Carrubba, Alessandra; Comparato, Andrea; Labruzzo, Andrea; Muccilli, Serena; Giannone, Virgilio; Spina, Alfio

    2016-09-01

    The use of selected plant water extracts to control pests and weeds is gaining growing attention in organic and sustainable agriculture, but the effects that such extracts may exert on the quality aspects of durum wheat are still unexplored. In 2014, 5 plant water extracts (Artemisia arborescens, Euphorbia characias, Rhus coriaria, Thymus vulgaris, Lantana camara) were prepared and distributed on durum wheat cv Valbelice to evaluate their potential herbicidal effects. After crop harvesting, the major physicochemical and technological parameters of wholemeal flours obtained from each treatment were measured and compared with those from chemical weeding and untreated controls. A baking test was also performed to evaluate the breadmaking quality. In wholemeal flours obtained after the treatment with plant extracts protein and dry gluten content were higher than in control and chemical weeding. Wholemeal flours obtained after chemical weeding reached the highest Mixograph parameters, and that from durum wheat treated with R. coriaria extract demonstrated a very high α-amylase activity. We concluded that the treatments with plant water extracts may influence many quality traits of durum wheat. This occurrence must be taken into account in overall decisions concerning the use of plant extracts in pest and weed management practice.

  1. Water deficit effects on solute contribution to osmotic adjustment as a function of leaf ageing in three durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) cultivars performing differently in arid conditions.

    PubMed

    Bajji, M; Lutts, S; Kinet, J -M.

    2001-03-01

    A greenhouse study was carried out using three durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) cultivars differing in their field performances under arid conditions (Kabir 1, poor yield stability; Omrabi 5, high yield stability and Haurani, landrace well adapted to drought). Water stress was imposed by withholding water at the seedling stage. Water potential (Psi(w)), relative water content (RWC), stomatal resistance (SR), and changes in solute concentrations were quantified: (1) as a function of leaf development during the stress period; and (2) in young expanded and growing leaves harvested at the end of the stress treatment. Psi(w), RWC and SR were almost unaffected by leaf age in controls. In contrast, solute concentrations appeared to vary in the course of leaf development. During the stress treatment, Psi(w) and RWC decreased and SR increased in all cultivars; the changes were most often largest in Omrabi 5, lowest in Haurani and intermediate in Kabir 1. Water stress also increased sugar and proline concentrations and decreased nitrate levels. Young expanded and growing leaves differed in terms of Psi(w), RWC and osmotic adjustment (OA). The capacity of OA was greater in growing than in expanded leaves, especially in the two cultivars best adapted to aridity, and allowed turgor maintenance in these genotypes. Sugars were the main solutes that contributed to OA particularly in growing leaves followed by proline and then quaternary ammonium compounds. The contributions of these organic solutes to OA tended to be higher in Omrabi 5 and in Haurani than in Kabir 1. Inorganic solutes, however, did not seem to play an important role in OA despite their high proportion in total solutes.

  2. [Acute toxicity and analgesic activity of the global extracts of Nepeta atlantica Ball and Nepeta tuberosa L. ssp. reticulata (Desf.) Maire].

    PubMed

    Bouidida, El Houcine; Alaoui, Katim; Cherrah, Yahia; Fkih-Tetouani, Souad; Idrissi, Abdelkader Il

    2006-01-01

    The global extracts of Nepeta atlantica Ball and Nepeta tuberosa L. ssp. reticulata (Desf.) Maire are especially rich in secondary metabolites of the type iridoid lactonique and glucosidique and of type lupane triterpine. The aerial part of each species is crushed, and then extracted by cold maceration in methanol. These total extracts are in the form of suspension in Arabic gum with 5%, they are tested on the mice for the tests of acute toxicity like for the peripheral analgesic activity according to the test of Koster; and also on the rats for the central analgesic activity of the morphine type based on the test "Tail Flick". The acute toxicity evaluation of these extracts follows upon the determination of the lethal amounts 50% of essential oils from these two species, already given it is specified here by the lethal dose 50% (DL50) of 1672 +/- 232 mg/kg with confidence limits [1030 - 2320] mg/kg for Nepeta atlantica and 1401 +/- 97.29 mg/kg with confidence limits [1130 - 1670] mg/kg for Nepeta tuberosa L. ssp. reticulata. The tests of Koster in the mouse and the "Tail Flik" in the rat showed that the global extracts of the studied species have all two greatly peripheral analgesic activity with an important protection against abdominal cramp 67.91% and 75.53% for 60 mg/kg IP respectively for Nepeta atlantica and Nepeta tuberosa L. ssp. Reticulata, which rise up to 90.10% and 92.89% for 120 mg/kg IP. A central morphine like analgesic activity is record with 120 mg/kg IP for the two species.

  3. GC-MS profiling of the phytochemical constituents of the oleoresin from Copaifera langsdorffii Desf. and a preliminary in vivo evaluation of its antipsoriatic effect.

    PubMed

    Gelmini, Fabrizio; Beretta, Giangiacomo; Anselmi, Cecilia; Centini, Marisanna; Magni, Paolo; Ruscica, Massimiliano; Cavalchini, Alberto; Maffei Facino, Roberto

    2013-01-20

    Copaiba is the oleoresin (OR) obtained from Copaifera (Fabaceae), a neotropical tree which grows in Amazon regions. The balsam, constituted by an essential oil and a resinous fraction is used as folkloristic remedy in the treatment of several inflammatory diseases and for its antioxidant and antibacterial properties. Aim of this work was (a) to carry out a characterization by GC-MS of the volatile and nonvolatile constituents of Copaifera langsdorffii Desf. oleoresin (OR); (b) to investigate the mechanism of its anti-inflammatory activity; (c) to evaluate its antipsoriatic effect after oral intake/topical application. The volatile fraction (yield: 22.51%, w/w) shows: α-bergamotene (48.38%), α-himachalene (11.17%), β-selinene (5.00%) and β-caryophyllene (5.47%). The OR residue (77.49%, w/w), after derivatization, showed as main constituents the following compounds: copalic, abietic, daniellic, lambertinic, labd-7-en-15-oic, pimaric, isopimaric acids and kaur16-en18-oic acid. Preincubation of LPS-stimulated human THP-1 monocytes with increasing concentrations of the OR purified fraction (OR-PF), containing diterpene acids, diterpenes and sesquiterpenes, reduced the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα) in a dose-range of 0.1-10 μM. In addition, in cell culture system of human THP-1 monocytes, 1 μM OR-PF counteracts LPS-driven NF-κB nuclear translocation. In a preliminary clinical trial three patients affected by chronic psoriasis, treated with oral intake or topical application of the OR, exhibited a significant improvement of the typical signs of this disease, i.e. erythema, skin thickness, and scaliness. In conclusion, the results of this work, beside an extensive analytical characterization of the OR chemical composition, provide strong evidences that its anti-inflammatory activity is related to the inhibition of the NF-κB nuclear translocation, and consequently of proinflammatory cytokines secretion.

  4. A consensus framework map of durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) suitable for linkage disequilibrium analysis and genome-wide association mapping.

    PubMed

    Maccaferri, Marco; Cane', Maria Angela; Sanguineti, Maria C; Salvi, Silvio; Colalongo, Maria C; Massi, Andrea; Clarke, Fran; Knox, Ron; Pozniak, Curtis J; Clarke, John M; Fahima, Tzion; Dubcovsky, Jorge; Xu, Steven; Ammar, Karim; Karsai, Ildikó; Vida, Gyula; Tuberosa, Roberto

    2014-10-07

    Durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) is a tetraploid cereal grown in the medium to low-precipitation areas of the Mediterranean Basin, North America and South-West Asia. Genomics applications in durum wheat have the potential to boost exploitation of genetic resources and to advance understanding of the genetics of important complex traits (e.g. resilience to environmental and biotic stresses). A dense and accurate consensus map specific for T. durum will greatly facilitate genetic mapping, functional genomics and marker-assisted improvement. High quality genotypic data from six core recombinant inbred line populations were used to obtain a consensus framework map of 598 simple sequence repeats (SSR) and Diversity Array Technology® (DArT) anchor markers (common across populations). Interpolation of unique markers from 14 maps allowed us to position a total of 2,575 markers in a consensus map of 2,463 cM. The T. durum A and B genomes were covered in their near totality based on the reference SSR hexaploid wheat map. The consensus locus order compared to those of the single component maps showed good correspondence, (average Spearman's rank correlation rho ρ value of 0.96). Differences in marker order and local recombination rate were observed between the durum and hexaploid wheat consensus maps. The consensus map was used to carry out a whole-genome search for genetic differentiation signatures and association to heading date in a panel of 183 accessions adapted to the Mediterranean areas. Linkage disequilibrium was found to decay below the r2 threshold=0.3 within 2.20 cM, on average. Strong molecular differentiations among sub-populations were mapped to 87 chromosome regions. A genome-wide association scan for heading date from 27 field trials in the Mediterranean Basin and in Mexico yielded 50 chromosome regions with evidences of association in multiple environments. The consensus map presented here was used as a reference for genetic diversity and mapping

  5. In Vitro Pharmacological Activities and GC-MS Analysis of Different Solvent Extracts of Lantana camara Leaves Collected from Tropical Region of Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Swamy, Mallappa Kumara; Akhtar, Mohd. Sayeed

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect of different solvents (ethyl acetate, methanol, acetone, and chloroform) on the extraction of phytoconstituents from Lantana camara leaves and their antioxidant and antibacterial activities. Further, GC-MS analysis was carried out to identify the bioactive chemical constituents occurring in the active extract. The results revealed the presence of various phytocompounds in the extracts. The methanol solvent recovered higher extractable compounds (14.4% of yield) and contained the highest phenolic (92.8 mg GAE/g) and flavonoid (26.5 mg RE/g) content. DPPH radical scavenging assay showed the IC50 value of 165, 200, 245, and 440 μg/mL for methanol, ethyl acetate, acetone, and chloroform extracts, respectively. The hydroxyl scavenging activity test showed the IC50 value of 110, 240, 300, and 510 μg/mL for methanol, ethyl acetate, acetone, and chloroform extracts, respectively. Gram negative bacterial pathogens (E. coli and K. pneumoniae) were more susceptible to all extracts compared to Gram positive bacteria (M. luteus, B. subtilis, and S. aureus). Methanol extract had the highest inhibition activity against all the tested microbes. Moreover, methanolic extract of L. camara contained 32 bioactive components as revealed by GC-MS study. The identified major compounds included hexadecanoic acid (5.197%), phytol (4.528%), caryophyllene oxide (4.605%), and 9,12,15-octadecatrienoic acid, methyl ester, (Z,Z,Z)- (3.751%). PMID:26783409

  6. In vivo redox effects of Aspidosperma quebracho-blanco Schltdl., Lantana grisebachii Stuck and Ilex paraguariensis A. St.-Hil. on blood, thymus and spleen of mice.

    PubMed

    Canalis, A M; Cittadini, M C; Albrecht, C; Soria, E A

    2014-09-01

    Argentinian native plants Aspidosperma quebracho-blanco, Lantana grisebachii and Ilex paraguariensis are known to have antiinflammatory and antioxidant properties. We demonstrated it in vivo by the redox changes in murine hemolymphatic tissues after infusive extract intake of these plants as revealed in organic trophism, tissue phenolics, hydroperoxides, superoxide, nitrites and gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase in thymus, blood and spleen. A. quebracho-blanco reduced hydroperoxidation in blood and spleen of both sexes, with gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase negativization in lymphatic organs and thymic nitrosative up-regulation. Males have shown increased phenolic content in blood after treatment. L. grisebachii and I. paraguariensis treatment exhibited incomplete antioxidation and oxidative induction in the studied tissues. Different results according to sex were found in redox response to phenolics and their kinetics, with males showing antioxidant effects, whereas females showed oxidative susceptibility. A. quebracho-blanco exhibited protection of murine tissues against oxidation in both sexes and modulation of their trophism, supporting its therapeutic uses in inflammatory diseases. Also, gender had significant influence in phenolic biodistribution and redox response.

  7. Leaves of Lantana camara Linn. (Verbenaceae) as a potential insecticide for the management of three species of stored grain insect pests.

    PubMed

    Rajashekar, Y; Ravindra, K V; Bakthavatsalam, N

    2014-11-01

    Insects cause extensive damage to stored grains and their value added products. Among the stored grain pests Sitophilus oryzae (L.) Callosobruchus chinensis (Fab.) and Tribolium castaneum (Herbst.) are considered as destructive pests in India. Plants may provide alternatives to currently used insect control agents as they constitute rich source in bioactive molecules. Lantana camara, an erect shrub, which grows widely in the tropics, exhibits insecticidal activity against several insects. The methanol extract from leaves of L. camara has fumigant and contact toxicity against S. oryzae, C. chinesis and T. castaneum. In fumigant assays, The LC50 for S. oryzae was 128 μl/L(1), C. chinensis 130.3 μl/L(1), and T. castaneum 178.7 μl/L(1). The LD50 values for S. oryzae C. chinensis and T. castaneum in contact toxicity were 0.158, 0.140 and 0.208 mg/cm(2), respectively. For grain treatment, a concentration of 500 mg/L(1) and 7 days exposure were needed to obtain 90 - 100 % population extinction in all three insects. Probit analysis showed that C. chinensis were more susceptible than S. oryzae and T. castaneum. Gaschromatography-Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) studies for extracts indicated the presence of potent fumigant molecules in L. camara. The prospect of utilizing L. camara as potent fumigant insecticide is discussed.

  8. In Vitro Pharmacological Activities and GC-MS Analysis of Different Solvent Extracts of Lantana camara Leaves Collected from Tropical Region of Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Swamy, Mallappa Kumara; Sinniah, Uma Rani; Akhtar, Mohd Sayeed

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect of different solvents (ethyl acetate, methanol, acetone, and chloroform) on the extraction of phytoconstituents from Lantana camara leaves and their antioxidant and antibacterial activities. Further, GC-MS analysis was carried out to identify the bioactive chemical constituents occurring in the active extract. The results revealed the presence of various phytocompounds in the extracts. The methanol solvent recovered higher extractable compounds (14.4% of yield) and contained the highest phenolic (92.8 mg GAE/g) and flavonoid (26.5 mg RE/g) content. DPPH radical scavenging assay showed the IC50 value of 165, 200, 245, and 440 μg/mL for methanol, ethyl acetate, acetone, and chloroform extracts, respectively. The hydroxyl scavenging activity test showed the IC50 value of 110, 240, 300, and 510 μg/mL for methanol, ethyl acetate, acetone, and chloroform extracts, respectively. Gram negative bacterial pathogens (E. coli and K. pneumoniae) were more susceptible to all extracts compared to Gram positive bacteria (M. luteus, B. subtilis, and S. aureus). Methanol extract had the highest inhibition activity against all the tested microbes. Moreover, methanolic extract of L. camara contained 32 bioactive components as revealed by GC-MS study. The identified major compounds included hexadecanoic acid (5.197%), phytol (4.528%), caryophyllene oxide (4.605%), and 9,12,15-octadecatrienoic acid, methyl ester, (Z,Z,Z)- (3.751%).

  9. The composition and relationships between trace element levels in inhalable atmospheric particles (PM10) and in leaves of Nerium oleander L. and Lantana camara L.

    PubMed

    Fernández Espinosa, A J; Rossini Oliva, S

    2006-03-01

    In order to evaluate the composition of inhalable atmospheric particles and to study the relationship between trace element levels in PM10 and in leaves of two plant species, the amount of Ba, Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb, Ti and V were analysed in PM10 and in Nerium oleander L. and Lantana camara L. leaves from two sites in the city of Seville and one remote control site. In PM10, the Cu and Fe content was significantly lower (p<0.05) in the control site than in the other sites. No correlations between leaf content and air content were found for the elements in L. camara. On the contrary, positive and significant correlations (p<0.05) were found between leaf content of N. oleander and PM10 content for Cu and Fe. The data suggest that N. oleander can be used in atmospheric biomonitoring studies, because it is especially useful for Cu and Fe, N. oleander being a better indicator than L. camara.

  10. Lantana macrophylla Schauer (Verbenaceae) ethanolic extract induces activation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPKs pathway and Ca2+ imbalance in human trophoblasts derived cell lines.

    PubMed

    da Conceição, Aline O; de Oliveira, Fernando F; de Oliveira, Rosilene A; de J da S Junior, Ademir; Takser, Larissa; Reyes-Moreno, Carlos; Lafond, Julie

    2012-03-01

    Lantana macrophylla Schauer (Verbenaceae) a medicinal plant used to treat menstrual and respiratory disorders was investigated. The ethanolic extract from leaves was subjected to phytochemical and biological analysis. BeWo and JEG-3 cells were used to evaluate human chorionic gonadotropin hormone (hCG) production, syncytial formation, Ca2+ uptake and Ca2+ handling protein expression. The cAMP production and the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) phosphorylation were also investigated. Phytochemical analysis yield three triterpenes: oleanolic, ursolic and latonolic acid. Viability assay showed no significant cytotoxic effect. A significant decrease in hCG production but not a disturbance on BeWo cell fusion were observed. The cAMP pathway was not affected by L. macrophylla extract alone; although the cAMP production inducted by forskolin was diminished. Both ERK1/2 and p38 MAPKs pathways were activated. Increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) was observed after 24 h treatment in a time and dose dependent manner; however only L. macrophylla at 10 μg/mL induced increased [Ca2+]i after 10 min treatment. CaBP28K and PMCA1/4 were modulated at protein and mRNA levels, respectively. This study showed for the first time the effect of triterpenoids from L. macrophylla leaves on trophoblasts-like cells and indicates a potential toxic effect of this plant in the placental development and fetal growth.

  11. The mosquitocidal activity of methanolic extracts of Lantana cramera root and Anacardium occidentale leaf: role of glutathione S-transferase in insecticide resistance.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, Asima; Samanta, Luna; Das, Sachidananda; Parida, Sarat K; Marai, Neetisheel; Hazra, Rupenansu K; Mallavdani, U V; Kar, Santanu K; Mahapatra, Namita

    2011-03-01

    Larvicidal activity of methanolic plant extracts of Lantana cramera (P1) root and Anacardium occidentale (P2) leaf was investigated against the larvae of the three mosquito species (Culex quinquefasciatus, Anopheles stephensi, and Aedes aegypti reared in the laboratory), and the respective glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity was analyzed as an index of protection against the extracts. The LC50 (extract concentration that shows 50% mortality) values of P1 extract for An. stephensi, Ae. aegypti, and Cx. quinquefasciatus were 132.55, 27.82, and 11.68 ppm, respectively, whereas those of P2 extract were 56.81, 912, and 10.79 ppm, respectively. In general, in the untreated groups, the level of GST activity was significantly higher in Ae. aegypti in comparison with An. stephesi and Cx. quinquefasciatus. However, the enzyme activity failed to show any response when treated with either of the plant extracts in Ae. aegypti. However, an increase in the GST activity was recorded in extract-treated larvae of both An. stephensi and Cx. quinquefasciatus. The results of the current study suggest that both the plant extracts show species-specific mosquitocidal potential. Induction of GST activities in survived An. stephensi and Cx. quinquefasciatus larvae suggests the role of this enzyme in conferring resistance to the plant extracts.

  12. Evaluation of the antibacterial activity of Ventilago madraspatana Gaertn., Rubia cordifolia Linn. and Lantana camara Linn.: isolation of emodin and physcion as active antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Basu, Subhalakshmi; Ghosh, Abhijit; Hazra, Banasri

    2005-10-01

    The antibacterial activity of the extracts of Ventilago madraspatana stem-bark, Rubia cordifolia root and Lantana camara root-bark, prepared with solvents of different polarity, was evaluated by the agar-well diffusion method. Twelve bacteria, six each of gram-positive and gram-negative strains, were used in this study. Chloroform and ethanol extracts of V. madraspatana showed broad-spectrum activity against most of the bacteria except S. aureus, E. coli and V. cholerae. On the other hand, the activity of the chloroform and methanol extracts of R. cordifolia and L. camara was found to be more specific towards the gram-positive strains, although gram-negative P. aeruginosa was also inhibited by the methanol extracts of both these plants in a dose dependent manner. The water extracts of V. madraspatana and L. camara were found to be inactive, while that of R. cordifolia was significantly active against B. subtilis and S. aureus compared with streptomycin and penicillin G used as standards. In the course of bio-assay guided fractionation, emodin and physcion were isolated for the first time from the stem-bark of V. madraspatana. It was noteworthy to find the MICs of emodin in the range 0.5-2.0 microg/mL against three Bacillus sp. Both the anthraquinonoid compounds inhibited P. aeruginosa, emodin being more effective, showing an MIC of 70 microg/mL.

  13. Cytotoxic, Antiproliferative and Pro-Apoptotic Effects of 5-Hydroxyl-6,7,3′,4′,5′-Pentamethoxyflavone Isolated from Lantana ukambensis

    PubMed Central

    Sawadogo, Wamtinga Richard; Cerella, Claudia; Al-Mourabit, Ali; Moriou, Céline; Teiten, Marie-Hélène; Guissou, Innocent Pierre; Dicato, Mario; Diederich, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Lantana ukambensis (Vatke) Verdc. is an African food and medicinal plant. Its red fruits are eaten and highly appreciated by the rural population. This plant was extensively used in African folk medicinal traditions to treat chronic wounds but also as anti-leishmanial or cytotoxic remedies, especially in Burkina Faso, Tanzania, Kenya, or Ethiopia. This study investigates the in vitro bioactivity of polymethoxyflavones extracted from a L. ukambensis as anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic agents. We isolated two known polymethoxyflavones, 5,6,7,3′,4′,5′-hexamethoxyflavone (1) and 5-hydroxy-6,7,3′,4′,5′-pentamethoxyflavone (2) from the whole plant of L. ukambensis. Their chemical structures were determined by spectroscopic analysis and comparison with published data. These molecules were tested for the anti-proliferative, cytotoxic and pro-apoptotic effects on human cancer cells. Among them, 5-hydroxy-6,7,3′,4′,5′-pentamethoxyflavone (2) was selectively cytotoxic against monocytic lymphoma (U937), acute T cell leukemia (Jurkat), and chronic myelogenous leukemia (K562) cell lines, but not against peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy donors, at all tested concentrations. Moreover, this compound exhibited significant anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects against U937 acute myelogenous leukemia cells. This study highlights the anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects of 5-hydroxy-6,7,3′,4′,5′-pentamethoxyflavone (2) and provides a scientific basis of traditional use of L. ukambensis. PMID:26690473

  14. Increased lead availability and enzyme activities in root-adhering soil of Lantana camara during phytoextraction in the presence of earthworms.

    PubMed

    Jusselme, My Dung; Miambi, Edouard; Mora, Philippe; Diouf, Michel; Rouland-Lefèvre, Corinne

    2013-02-15

    Earthworms are known to increase availability of heavy metals in soils and also play an important role in maintaining the structure and quality of soil. The introduction of earthworms into soils contaminated with metals in the presence of a potential hyperaccumulator has been suggested as an aid for phytoremediation processes. The present study was conducted to evaluate: (i) the effects of earthworms on lead availability in artificially contaminated soil at 500 and 1000 mg kg(-1) Pb in the presence of Lantana camara, a hyperaccumulator, (ii) the effects of earthworms and lead on soil properties such as pH, cation exchange capacity (CEC), organic matter (OM), total and available N, P and K and (iii) soil enzyme activities. Earthworms increased the bioavailable Pb in root-adhering soil by a factor of 2 to 3 in the contaminated soils at concentrations of 500 to 1000 mg Pb kg(-1), respectively. In lead contaminated soils, the presence of earthworms led to a significant decrease in soil pH by about 0.2 but increased CEC by 17% and OM by more than 30%. Earthworm activities also increased the activities of N-acetylglucosamidase, β-glucosidase, cellulase, xylanase, alkaline and acid phosphatase, urease and fluorescein diacetate assay (FDA). These results indicate that the ecological context for phytoremediation should be broadened by considering plant-soil-earthworm interactions as they influence both plant health and absorption of heavy metals. They also showed that the enzyme activities monitored could serve as useful proxies for phytoremediation capability and, more generally, for soil quality as a whole. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Creams Formulated with Ocimum gratissimum L. and Lantana camara L. Crude Extracts and Fractions as Mosquito Repellents Against Aedes aegypti L. (Diptera: Culicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Keziah, Ezeike Amarachi; Nukenine, Elias Nchiwan; Danga, Simon Pierre Yinyang; Younoussa, Lame; Esimone, Charles Okechukwu

    2015-01-01

    Mosquitoes are the most deadly vectors of parasites that cause diseases such as malaria, yellow fever, and filariasis. In view of the recent increased interest in developing plant origin insecticides as an alternative to chemical insecticides, the objective of this study was to determine the repellent activity of creams formulated with methanol crude extract (MCE), hexane fraction (HF), and ethyl acetate fractions (EAFs) of Ocimum gratissimum and Lantana camara leaves in single and combined actions against female Aedes aegypti. Evaluation was carried out in the net cages (30 by 30 by 30 cm) containing 60 blood-starved female mosquitoes each and were assayed in the laboratory condition following World Health Organization 2009 protocol. All formulations (single and mixture) were applied at 2, 4, 6, and 8 mg/cm2 in the exposed area of human hands. Only acetone + white soft paraffin served as negative control and odomos (12% DEET) as positive control. All the formulations presented good protection against mosquito bites without any allergic reaction by the human volunteers. The repellent activity was dependent on the strength of the extracts and fractions. Among the tested formulations, the maximum protection time was observed in MCE (120 min) and EAF (150 min) of O. gratissimum; MCE:MCE (150 min) and HF:HF (120 min) mixtures of both plants. In addition, MCE:MCE and HF:HF mixtures from both plants showed possible synergistic effect. From the results, the combination of O. gratissimum and L. camara to formulate natural mosquito repellent using small amount of extracts can be encouraging to be an alternative to conventional DEET. PMID:25881633

  16. Creams formulated with Ocimum gratissimum L. and Lantana camara L. crude extracts and fractions as mosquito repellents against Aedes aegypti L. (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Keziah, Ezeike Amarachi; Nukenine, Elias Nchiwan; Danga, Simon Pierre Yinyang; Younoussa, Lame; Esimone, Charles Okechukwu

    2015-01-01

    Mosquitoes are the most deadly vectors of parasites that cause diseases such as malaria, yellow fever, and filariasis. In view of the recent increased interest in developing plant origin insecticides as an alternative to chemical insecticides, the objective of this study was to determine the repellent activity of creams formulated with methanol crude extract (MCE), hexane fraction (HF), and ethyl acetate fractions (EAFs) of Ocimum gratissimum and Lantana camara leaves in single and combined actions against female Aedes aegypti. Evaluation was carried out in the net cages (30 by 30 by 30 cm) containing 60 blood-starved female mosquitoes each and were assayed in the laboratory condition following World Health Organization 2009 protocol. All formulations (single and mixture) were applied at 2, 4, 6, and 8 mg/cm(2) in the exposed area of human hands. Only acetone + white soft paraffin served as negative control and odomos (12% DEET) as positive control. All the formulations presented good protection against mosquito bites without any allergic reaction by the human volunteers. The repellent activity was dependent on the strength of the extracts and fractions. Among the tested formulations, the maximum protection time was observed in MCE (120 min) and EAF (150 min) of O. gratissimum; MCE:MCE (150 min) and HF:HF (120 min) mixtures of both plants. In addition, MCE:MCE and HF:HF mixtures from both plants showed possible synergistic effect. From the results, the combination of O. gratissimum and L. camara to formulate natural mosquito repellent using small amount of extracts can be encouraging to be an alternative to conventional DEET.

  17. Differential response of NADP-dehydrogenases and carbon metabolism in leaves and roots of two durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) cultivars (Karim and Azizi) with different sensitivities to salt stress.

    PubMed

    Bouthour, Donia; Kalai, Tawba; Chaffei, Haouari C; Gouia, Houda; Corpas, Francisco J

    2015-05-01

    Wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) is a common Mediterranean species of considerable agronomic importance. Salinity is one of the major threats to sustainable agricultural production mainly because it limits plant productivity. After exposing the Karim and Azizi durum wheat cultivars, which are of agronomic significance in Tunisia, to 100mM NaCl salinity, growth parameters (dry weight and length), proline content and chlorophylls were evaluated in their leaves and roots. In addition, we analyzed glutathione content and key enzymatic activities, including phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP-ICDH), NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH), involved in the carbon metabolism and NADPH-generating system. The sensitivity index indicates that cv Karim was more tolerant to salinity than cv Azizi. This higher tolerance was corroborated at the biochemical level, as cv Karim showed a greater capacity to accumulate proline, especially in leaves, while the enzyme activities studied were differentially regulated in both organs, with NADP-ICDH being the only activity to be unaffected in all organs. In summary, the data indicate that higher levels of proline accumulation and the differential responses of some key enzymes involved in the carbon metabolism and NADPH regeneration contribute to the salinity tolerance mechanism and lead to increased biomass accumulation in cv Karim.

  18. Antifungal activity of essential oils extract from Origanum floribundum Munby, Rosmarinus officinalis L. and Thymus ciliatus Desf. against Candida albicans isolated from bovine clinical mastitis.

    PubMed

    Ksouri, S; Djebir, S; Bentorki, A A; Gouri, A; Hadef, Y; Benakhla, A

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study is to limit the antibiotic use in mastitis treatment and to find other alternatives. The antifungal activity of the essential oils from Origanum floribundum Munby., Rosmarinus officinalis L. and Thymus ciliatus Desf. is studied in the present work against a Candida albicans reference strain and ten C. albicans isolated strains from bovine clinical mastitis. Essential oils were extracted by hydrodistillation technique using Clevenger apparatus. Their chromatographic analysis was performed with a Gas Chromatograph/Mass Spectrometer (GC/MS). Antifungal activities of essential oils were investigated by macrobroth method of dilution in tubes to determine the Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (MIC 80%). Analysis of the essential oil showed chemical profile dominated by thymol (50.47 and 62.41%) and P-cymene (24.22 and 15.51%) in the oregano and the thyme respectively, 1, 8-cineol (31.50%) and α-pinene (18.33%) in Rosemary. The three essential oils revealed highly effective anticandidal activity, with an MIC of 80% values ranged from 15.02 to 31.08μg/mL. These results suggest that essential oils studied can be real alternatives in the control of mastitis fungi but deserving studies more in-depth and detailed on their application in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Influence of soil texture, moisture, and surface cracks on the performance of a root-feeding flea beetle, Longitarsus bethae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), a biological control agent for Lantana camara (Verbenaceae).

    PubMed

    Simelane, David O

    2007-06-01

    Laboratory studies were conducted to determine the influence of soil texture, moisture and surface cracks on adult preference and survival of the root-feeding flea beetle, Longitarsus bethae Savini and Escalona (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), a natural enemy of the weed, Lantana camara L. (Verbenaceae). Adult feeding, oviposition preference, and survival of the immature stages of L. bethae were examined at four soil textures (clayey, silty loam, sandy loam, and sandy soil), three soil moisture levels (low, moderate, and high), and two soil surface conditions (with or without surface cracks). Both soil texture and moisture had no influence on leaf feeding and colonization by adult L. bethae. Soil texture had a significant influence on oviposition, with adults preferring to lay on clayey and sandy soils to silty or sandy loam soils. However, survival to adulthood was significantly higher in clayey soils than in other soil textures. There was a tendency for females to deposit more eggs at greater depth in both clayey and sandy soils than in other soil textures. Although oviposition preference and depth of oviposition were not influenced by soil moisture, survival in moderately moist soils was significantly higher than in other moisture levels. Development of immature stages in high soil moisture levels was significantly slower than in other soil moisture levels. There were no variations in the body size of beetles that emerged from different soil textures and moisture levels. Females laid almost three times more eggs on cracked than on noncracked soils. It is predicted that clayey and moderately moist soils will favor the survival of L. bethae, and under these conditions, damage to the roots is likely to be high. This information will aid in the selection of suitable release sites where L. bethae would be most likely to become established.

  20. Influence of temperature, photoperiod and humidity on oviposition and egg hatch of the root-feeding flea beetle Longitarsus bethae (Chrysomelidae: Alticinae), a natural enemy of the weed Lantana camara (Verbenaceae).

    PubMed

    Simelane, D O

    2007-04-01

    The root-feeding flea beetle Longitarsus bethae Savini & Escalona, was introduced into South Africa as a candidate biological control agent for the noxious and invasive weed, Lantana camara L. As part of the study to predict the beetles' survival in its new range, the influence of climatic conditions on its egg development and reproductive performance were investigated in the laboratory. The threshold temperature (T degrees) and degree-days (DD) required for egg hatch were determined after exposing the eggs to various constant temperatures (12, 17, 22, 27 and 32 degrees C) in separate growth chambers. The DD required for egg hatch was 178.6, and the temperature threshold required for egg hatch was 11.3 degrees C. Survival of eggs varied from 27 to 56% at 32 and 17 degrees C, respectively, and was optimum between 17 and 25 degrees C. Oviposition was examined under high and low relative humidity (RH) regimes while egg hatch was determined at six RH levels, each maintained in a separate controlled growth chamber set at a constant temperature (25 degrees C). Whilst RH had no influence on oviposition, eggs were highly susceptible to aridity, and continuous exposure to relative humidity below 63% for more than three days was wholly lethal at 25 degrees C. Optimum egg hatch occurred at RH between 85 and 95% for up to 12 days. The effect of day length on oviposition and subsequent egg hatch was investigated under two photoperiod regimes. Neither oviposition nor subsequent egg hatch was influenced by photoperiod. The knowledge obtained will be useful for mass rearing as well as field release programmes for L. bethae.

  1. WholeTree as a Substrate for Lantana camara

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    As forestry production has been cut back in the U.S. and moved away from tree processing at mills and toward in-field harvesting of trees, the supply of pine bark available to nursery growers has and will continue to steadily decrease. Competition for pine bark from various other industries and high...

  2. Ethnobotany and antibacterial activity of some plants used in traditional medicine of Zapotitlán de las Salinas, Puebla (México).

    PubMed

    Hernández, T; Canales, M; Avila, J G; Duran, A; Caballero, J; Romo de Vivar, A; Lira, R

    2003-10-01

    The village of Zapotitlán de las Salinas is situated in the Valley of Tehuacán-Cuicatlán, Puebla, Mexico. Plant species used by the local inhabitants to treat gastrointestinal diseases were identified using ethnobotanical, ethnographic and taxonomic methods. Out of 119 interviews, 44 plant species were registered, of which the following are the most frequently used (listed in descending order): Lippia graveolens H.B. et K. (Verbenaceae), Lantana achyranthifolia Desf. (Verbenaceae), Turnera diffusa (Willd.) ex Schult. (Turneraceae), Lippia oaxacana Rob. et Greenm. (Verbenaceae), Gymnolaena oaxacana (Greenm.) Rydb. (Asteraceae), Cordia curassavica (Jacq.) Roem. et Schult. (Boraginaceae), Lantana camara L. (Verbenaceae) and Acalypha hederacea Torrey (Euphorbiaceae). From these plants, hexane, chloroform and ethanol extracts were prepared in order to assess their antibacterial activity against 14 bacterial strains causing the most common gastrointestinal diseases in Mexican population. All hexane extracts showed antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. There is a correlation between the frequency of mention (of plant use) and the antibacterial activity. In conclusion, the knowledge of plants most frequently used for gastrointestinal infections in Zapotitlán de las Salinas is supported by scientific rationale.

  3. Contribution of trehalose biosynthetic pathway to drought stress tolerance of Capparis ovata Desf.

    PubMed

    Ilhan, S; Ozdemir, F; Bor, M

    2015-03-01

    Trehalose and the trehalose biosynthetic pathway are important contributors and regulators of stress responses in plants. Among recent findings for trehalose and its metabolism, the role of signalling in the regulation of growth and development and its potential for use as a storage energy source can be listed. The xerophytic plant Capparis ovata (caper) is well adapted to drought and high temperature stress in arid and semi-arid regions of the Mediterranean. The contribution of trehalose and the trehalose biosynthetic pathway to drought stress responses and tolerance in C. ovata are not known. We investigated the effects of PEG-mediated drought stress in caper plants and analysed physiological parameters and trehalose biosynthetic pathway components, trehalose-6-phosphate synthase (TPS), trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase (TPP), trehalase activity, trehalose and proline content in drought stress-treated and untreated plants. Our results indicated that trehalose and the trehalose biosynthetic pathway contributed to drought stress tolerance of C. ovata. Overall growth and leaf water status were not dramatically affected by drought, as both high relative growth rate and relative water content were recorded even after 14 days of drought stress. Trehalose accumulation increased in parallel to induced TPS and TPP activities and decreased trehalase activity in caper plants on day 14. Constitutive trehalose levels were 28.75 to 74.75 μg·g·FW(-1) , and drought stress significantly induced trehalose accumulation (385.25 μg·g·FW(-1) on day 14) in leaves of caper. On day 14 of drought, proline levels were lower than on day 7. Under drought stress the discrepancy between trehalose and proline accumulation trends might result from the mode of action of these osmoprotectant molecules in C. ovata. © 2014 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  4. Phytochemical screening and in vitro antimicrobial activity of Thymus lanceolatus Desf. from Algeria

    PubMed Central

    Benbelaïd, Fethi; Khadir, Abdelmounaïm; Abdoune, Mohamed Amine; Bendahou, Mourad

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the antimicrobial activity of an endemic Thyme, Thymus lanceolatus (T. lanceolatus), against a large number of pathogens. Methods Four solvent extracts were evaluated for antimicrobial activity using disc diffusion method and MIC determination on twenty-one strains. Results T. lanceolatus extracts showed a broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, especially ethanol extract with inhibition zone diameters ranging from 14 to 32 mm, and MIC values from 0.052 to 0.500 mg/mL. Chloroform extract was more active against Gram-positive bacteria, since it has an inhibitory potency on Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis at only 31 µg/mL. While, hexane and water extracts were less effective since they were inactive against several strains. Conclusions The findings of this study indicate that T. lanceolatus has a strong antimicrobial potential, which justifies its use in folk medicine for treatment of infectious diseases. Since this species is poorly investigated, further refined studies on it pure secondary metabolites are needed and very important, in the perspective to identify new antimicrobial molecules from this endemic plant.

  5. Proteomic analysis of Holm oak (Quercus ilex subsp. ballota [Desf.] Samp.) pollen.

    PubMed

    Valero Galván, José; Valledor, Luis; González Fernandez, Raquel; Navarro Cerrillo, Rafael M; Jorrín-Novo, Jesus V

    2012-05-17

    This paper presents an analysis of Holm oak pollen proteome, together with an evaluation of the potentiality that a proteomic approach may have in the provenance variability assessment. Proteins were extracted from pollen of four Holm oak provenances, and they were analyzed by gel-based (1- and 2-DE in combination with MALDI-TOF/TOF) and gel-free (nLC-LTQ Orbitrap MS) approaches. A comparison of 1- and 2-DE protein profiles of the four provenances revealed significant differences, both qualitative and quantitative, in abundance (18 bands and 16 spots, respectively). Multivariate statistical analysis carried out on bands and spots clearly showed distinct associations between provenances, which highlight their geographical origins. A total of 100 spots selected from the 402 spots observed on 2-DE gels were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF. Moreover, a complementary gel-free shotgun approach was performed by nLC-LTQ Orbitrap MS. The identified proteins were classified according to biological processes, and most proteins in both approaches were related to metabolism and defense/stress processes. The nLC-LTQ Orbitrap MS analysis allowed us the identification of proteins belonging to the cell wall and division, transport and translation categories. Besides providing the first reference map of Holm oak pollen, our results confirm previous studies based on morphological observations and acorn proteomic analysis. Moreover, our data support the valuable use of proteomic techniques as phylogenetic tool in plant studies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparative morphology of leaf epidermis in eight populations of Atlas Pistachio (Pistacia atlantica Desf., Anacardiaceae).

    PubMed

    Belhadj, Safia; Derridj, Arezki; Aigouy, Thierry; Gers, Charles; Gauquelin, Thierry; Mevy, Jean-Philippe

    2007-10-01

    A comparative analysis was undertaken to conduct a micromorphological study of Pistacia atlantica leaves by comparing different populations grown under different climatic conditions. Leaf epidermis of eight wild populations was investigated under scanning electron microscope. Micromorphological characteristics (epidermis ornament, stomata type, waxes as well as trichomes) of the adaxial and abaxial leaf surfaces were examined. The epidermis ornament varied among populations and leaf surface, the abaxial leaf surface is reticulate with a striate surface. Messaad site shows a smooth uneven surface. The adaxial leaf surface is smooth but several ornamentations can be seen. The leaflet is amphistomatic; the stomata appeared to be slightly sunken. A variety of stomatal types were recorded; actinocytic and anomocytic types are the most frequent. The indumentum consisted of glandular and nonglandular trichomes. Unicellular glandular trichomes are recorded for P. atlantica leaves in this study. Their density is higher in Oued safene site, located at the highest altitude in comparison with the other populations. The wax occurred in all the sites and its pattern varied according to the populations studied, particularly between Berriane and Messaad. The morphological variability exhibited by the eight populations of P. atlantica may be interpreted as relevant to the ecological plasticity and the physiological mechanisms involved are discussed in this report.

  7. Photoperiod insensitive Ppd-A1a mutations in tetraploid wheat (Triticum durum Desf.).

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Edward P; Turner, Adrian S; Laurie, David A

    2009-01-01

    Variation in photoperiod response plays an important role in adapting crops to agricultural environments. In hexaploid wheat, mutations conferring photoperiod insensitivity (flowering after a similar time in short or long days) have been mapped on the 2B (Ppd-B1) and 2D (Ppd-D1) chromosomes in colinear positions to the 2H Ppd-H1 gene of barley. No A genome mutation is known. On the D genome, photoperiod insensitivity is likely to be caused by deletion of a regulatory region that causes misexpression of a member of the pseudo-response regulator (PRR) gene family and activation of the photoperiod pathway irrespective of day length. Photoperiod insensitivity in tetraploid (durum) wheat is less characterized. We compared pairs of near-isogenic lines that differ in photoperiod response and showed that photoperiod insensitivity is associated with two independent deletions of the A genome PRR gene that cause altered expression. This is associated with induction of the floral regulator FT. The A genome deletions and the previously described D genome deletion of hexaploid wheat remove a common region, suggesting a shared mechanism for photoperiod insensitivity. The identification of the A genome mutations will allow characterization of durum wheat germplasm and the construction of genotypes with novel combinations of photoperiod insensitive alleles.

  8. [Hybrids of Aegilops cylindrica Host with Triticum durum Desf. and T. aestivum L].

    PubMed

    Avsenin, V I; Motsnyĭ, A I; Rybalka, A I; Faĭt, V I

    2003-01-01

    The hybrids of durum and bread wheat with Ae. cylindrica have been obtained without using an embryo rescue technique. The hybrid output (of pollinated flower number) in the field conditions scored 1.0, 15.3 and 10.0% in the crosses T. durum x Ae. cylindrica, Ae. cylindrica x T. durum and T. aestivum x Ae. cylindrica, respectively. A high level of meiotic chromosome pairing between homologous D genomes of bread wheat and Aegilops has been revealed (c = 80.0-83.7%). The possibility of homoeological pairing between wheat and Ae. cylindrica chromosomes has been shown. Herewith, the correlation between the levels of homological and homoeological pairing is absent. The possibilities of genetic material interchange, including between the tetraploid species, as well as the using of Ae. cylindrica cytoplasm for durum wheat breeding are discussed.

  9. SNP-based association analysis for seedling traits in durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L. durum (Desf.)).

    PubMed

    Sabiel, Salih A I; Huang, Sisi; Hu, Xin; Ren, Xifeng; Fu, Chunjie; Peng, Junhua; Sun, Dongfa

    2017-03-01

    In the present study, 150 accessions of worldwide originated durum wheat germplasm (Triticum turgidum spp. durum) were observed for major seedling traits and their growth. The accessions were evaluated for major seedling traits under controlled conditions of hydroponics at the 13(th), 20(th), 27(th) and 34(th) day-after germination. Biomass traits were measured at the 34(th) day-after germination. Correlation analysis was conducted among the seedling traits and three field traits at maturity, plant height, grain weight and 1000-grain weight observed in four consecutive years. Associations of the measured seedling traits and SNP markers were analyzed based on the mixed linear model (MLM). The results indicated that highly significant genetic variation and robust heritability were found for the seedling and field mature traits. In total, 259 significant associations were detected for all the traits and four growth stages. The phenotypic variation explained (R2) by a single SNP marker is higher than 10% for most (84%) of the significant SNP markers. Forty-six SNP markers associated with multiple traits, indicating non-neglectable pleiotropy in seedling stage. The associated SNP markers could be helpful for genetic analysis of seedling traits, and marker-assisted breeding of new wheat varieties with strong seedling vigor.

  10. SNP-based association analysis for seedling traits in durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L. durum (Desf.))

    PubMed Central

    Sabiel, Salih A. I.; Huang, Sisi; Hu, Xin; Ren, Xifeng; Fu, Chunjie; Peng, Junhua; Sun, Dongfa

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, 150 accessions of worldwide originated durum wheat germplasm (Triticum turgidum spp. durum) were observed for major seedling traits and their growth. The accessions were evaluated for major seedling traits under controlled conditions of hydroponics at the 13th, 20th, 27th and 34th day-after germination. Biomass traits were measured at the 34th day-after germination. Correlation analysis was conducted among the seedling traits and three field traits at maturity, plant height, grain weight and 1000-grain weight observed in four consecutive years. Associations of the measured seedling traits and SNP markers were analyzed based on the mixed linear model (MLM). The results indicated that highly significant genetic variation and robust heritability were found for the seedling and field mature traits. In total, 259 significant associations were detected for all the traits and four growth stages. The phenotypic variation explained (R2) by a single SNP marker is higher than 10% for most (84%) of the significant SNP markers. Forty-six SNP markers associated with multiple traits, indicating non-neglectable pleiotropy in seedling stage. The associated SNP markers could be helpful for genetic analysis of seedling traits, and marker-assisted breeding of new wheat varieties with strong seedling vigor. PMID:28588384

  11. Association of Agronomic Traits with SNP Markers in Durum Wheat (Triticum turgidum L. durum (Desf.)).

    PubMed

    Hu, Xin; Ren, Jing; Ren, Xifeng; Huang, Sisi; Sabiel, Salih A I; Luo, Mingcheng; Nevo, Eviatar; Fu, Chunjie; Peng, Junhua; Sun, Dongfa

    2015-01-01

    Association mapping is a powerful approach to detect associations between traits of interest and genetic markers based on linkage disequilibrium (LD) in molecular plant breeding. In this study, 150 accessions of worldwide originated durum wheat germplasm (Triticum turgidum spp. durum) were genotyped using 1,366 SNP markers. The extent of LD on each chromosome was evaluated. Association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) markers with ten agronomic traits measured in four consecutive years was analyzed under a mix linear model (MLM). Two hundred and one significant association pairs were detected in the four years. Several markers were associated with one trait, and also some markers were associated with multiple traits. Some of the associated markers were in agreement with previous quantitative trait loci (QTL) analyses. The function and homology analyses of the corresponding ESTs of some SNP markers could explain many of the associations for plant height, length of main spike, number of spikelets on main spike, grain number per plant, and 1000-grain weight, etc. The SNP associations for the observed traits are generally clustered in specific chromosome regions of the wheat genome, mainly in 2A, 5A, 6A, 7A, 1B, and 6B chromosomes. This study demonstrates that association mapping can complement and enhance previous QTL analyses and provide additional information for marker-assisted selection.

  12. Behavior of Triticum durum Desf. arabinoxylans and arabinogalactan peptides during industrial pasta processing.

    PubMed

    Ingelbrecht, J A; Verwimp, T; Grobet, P J; Delcour, J A

    2001-04-01

    Three industrial pasta processing lines for different products (macaroni, capellini and instant noodles) were sampled at three subsequent stages (semolina, extruded, and dried end products) in the process. Arabinoxylans (AX) and arabinogalactan peptides (AGP) were analyzed. Although very low endoxylanase activities were measured, the level of water-extractable AX (WE-AX) increased, probably because of mechanical forces. No change was observed in the level and structural characteristics of AGP. The WE-AX molecular weight (MW) profiles showed a very small shift toward lower MW profiles; those of AGP revealed no changes as a result of the production process. After separation of WE-AX and AGP, (1)H NMR analysis and gas chromatography of the alditol acetates obtained following hydrolysis, reduction, and acetylation revealed no changes in the arabinose substitution profile of the WE-AX samples during pasta processing. At optimal cooking times, WE-AX losses in the cooking water are small (maximally 5.9%). However, the loss of AGP is more pronounced (maximally 25.0%). Overcooking led to more losses of both components.

  13. Durum wheat (Triticum Durum Desf.) lines show different abilities to form masked mycotoxins under greenhouse conditions.

    PubMed

    Cirlini, Martina; Generotti, Silvia; Dall'Erta, Andrea; Lancioni, Pietro; Ferrazzano, Gianluca; Massi, Andrea; Galaverna, Gianni; Dall'Asta, Chiara

    2013-12-24

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is the most prevalent trichothecene in Europe and its occurrence is associated with infections of Fusarium graminearum and F. culmorum, causal agents of Fusarium head blight (FHB) on wheat. Resistance to FHB is a complex character and high variability occurs in the relationship between DON content and FHB incidence. DON conjugation to glucose (DON-3-glucoside, D3G) is the primary plant mechanism for resistance towards DON accumulation. Although this mechanism has been already described in bread wheat and barley, no data are reported so far about durum wheat, a key cereal in the pasta production chain. To address this issue, the ability of durum wheat to detoxify and convert deoxynivalenol into D3G was studied under greenhouse controlled conditions. Four durum wheat varieties (Svevo, Claudio, Kofa and Neodur) were assessed for DON-D3G conversion; Sumai 3, a bread wheat variety carrying a major QTL for FHB resistance (QFhs.ndsu-3B), was used as a positive control. Data reported hereby clearly demonstrate the ability of durum wheat to convert deoxynivalenol into its conjugated form, D3G.

  14. Durum Wheat (Triticum Durum Desf.) Lines Show Different Abilities to Form Masked Mycotoxins under Greenhouse Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Cirlini, Martina; Generotti, Silvia; Dall’Erta, Andrea; Lancioni, Pietro; Ferrazzano, Gianluca; Massi, Andrea; Galaverna, Gianni; Dall’Asta, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is the most prevalent trichothecene in Europe and its occurrence is associated with infections of Fusarium graminearum and F. culmorum, causal agents of Fusarium head blight (FHB) on wheat. Resistance to FHB is a complex character and high variability occurs in the relationship between DON content and FHB incidence. DON conjugation to glucose (DON-3-glucoside, D3G) is the primary plant mechanism for resistance towards DON accumulation. Although this mechanism has been already described in bread wheat and barley, no data are reported so far about durum wheat, a key cereal in the pasta production chain. To address this issue, the ability of durum wheat to detoxify and convert deoxynivalenol into D3G was studied under greenhouse controlled conditions. Four durum wheat varieties (Svevo, Claudio, Kofa and Neodur) were assessed for DON-D3G conversion; Sumai 3, a bread wheat variety carrying a major QTL for FHB resistance (QFhs.ndsu-3B), was used as a positive control. Data reported hereby clearly demonstrate the ability of durum wheat to convert deoxynivalenol into its conjugated form, D3G. PMID:24368326

  15. [Competitiveness of hard wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) varieties against ripgut brome (Bromus rigidus Roth)].

    PubMed

    Hamal, A; Benbella, M; Rzozi, S B; Bouhache, M; Msatef, Y

    2001-01-01

    Varieties with an excellent competitiveness against ripgut brome (Bromus rigidus Roth.) would be very important to reinforce others methods to control ripgut brome weed. This study was carried out in 1999-2000 season in a greenhouse experiment to test the aggressiveness degree of six varieties of hard wheat (Oum Rabia, Isly, Marzak, Karim, Sebou, and Massa) combined with ripgut brome. Plant density was fixed at 16 plants of wheat or Bromus for pure crop and 8 plants for wheat and 8 for Bromus mixture. The results showed that the numbers of kernels/spikes were higher in the mixture for on pure composition. For the kernel weight, the result was opposite except for Isly and Marzak varieties. Karim and Isly varieties obtained the highest grain yield and were more competitive in mixture composition but Sebou and Massa varieties were less competitive against ripgut brome. Results of ripgut brome productivity and water use efficiency were similar and were used to determine the aggressiveness coefficient of hard wheat varieties against ripgut brome. The reduction of the shoot dry matter of brome was 22 to 56% at flowering. The grain yield of brome was reduced from 57 to 81%.

  16. Loss of desiccation tolerance in Copaifera langsdorffii Desf. seeds during germination.

    PubMed

    Pereira, W V S; Faria, J M R; Tonetti, O A O; Silva, E A A

    2014-05-01

    This study evaluated the loss of desiccation tolerance in C. langsdorffii seeds during the germination process. Seeds were imbibed for 24, 48, 72, 96, 120 and 144 hours and dried to the initial moisture content, kept in this state for 3 days after which they were submitted to pre-humidification and rehydration. Ultraestructural evaluations were done aiming to observe the cell damage caused by the dry process. Desiccation tolerance was evaluated in terms of the percentage of normal seedlings. Seeds not submitted to the drying process presented 61% of normal seedlings, and after 24 hours of imbibition, followed by drying, the seeds presented the same percentage of survival. However, after 48 hours of imbibition, seeds started to lose the desiccation tolerance. There was twenty six percent of normal seedlings formed from seeds imbibed for 96 hours and later dried and rehydrated. Only 5% of seeds imbibed for 144 hours, dried and rehydrated formed normal seedlings. At 144 hours of imbibition followed the dry process, there was damage into the cell structure, indicating that the seeds were unable to keep the cell structure during the drying process. Copaifera langsdorffii seeds loses the desiccation tolerance at the start of Phase 2 of imbibition.

  17. Essential Oil Composition and Antibacterial Activity of Origanum vulgare subsp. glandulosum Desf. at Different Phenological Stages

    PubMed Central

    Chaabane, Hédia; Jemli, Maroua; Boulila, Abdennacer; Boussaid, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Variation in the quantity and quality of the essential oil (EO) of wild population of Origanum vulgare at different phenological stages, including vegetative, late vegetative, and flowering set, is reported. The oils of air-dried samples were obtained by hydrodistillation. The yield of oils (w/w%) at different stages were in the order of late vegetative (2.0%), early vegetative (1.7%), and flowering (0.6%) set. The oils were analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and GC–mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In total, 36, 33, and 16 components were identified and quantified in vegetative, late vegetative, and flowering set, representing 94.47%, 95.91%, and 99.62% of the oil, respectively. Carvacrol was the major compound in all samples. The ranges of major constituents were as follows: carvacrol (61.08–83.37%), p-cymene (3.02–9.87%), and γ-terpinene (4.13–6.34%). Antibacterial activity of the oils was tested against three Gram-positive and two Gram-negative bacteria by the disc diffusion method and determining their diameter of inhibition and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values. The inhibition zones and MIC values for bacterial strains, which were sensitive to the EO of O. vulgare subsp. glandulosum, were in the range of 9–36 mm and 125–600 μg/mL, respectively. The oils of various phenological stages showed high activity against all tested bacteria, of which Bacillus subtilis was the most sensitive and resistant strain, respectively. Thus, they represent an inexpensive source of natural antibacterial substances that exhibited potential for use in pathogenic systems. PMID:24320986

  18. Association of Agronomic Traits with SNP Markers in Durum Wheat (Triticum turgidum L. durum (Desf.))

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xin; Ren, Jing; Ren, Xifeng; Huang, Sisi; Sabiel, Salih A. I.; Luo, Mingcheng; Nevo, Eviatar; Fu, Chunjie; Peng, Junhua; Sun, Dongfa

    2015-01-01

    Association mapping is a powerful approach to detect associations between traits of interest and genetic markers based on linkage disequilibrium (LD) in molecular plant breeding. In this study, 150 accessions of worldwide originated durum wheat germplasm (Triticum turgidum spp. durum) were genotyped using 1,366 SNP markers. The extent of LD on each chromosome was evaluated. Association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) markers with ten agronomic traits measured in four consecutive years was analyzed under a mix linear model (MLM). Two hundred and one significant association pairs were detected in the four years. Several markers were associated with one trait, and also some markers were associated with multiple traits. Some of the associated markers were in agreement with previous quantitative trait loci (QTL) analyses. The function and homology analyses of the corresponding ESTs of some SNP markers could explain many of the associations for plant height, length of main spike, number of spikelets on main spike, grain number per plant, and 1000-grain weight, etc. The SNP associations for the observed traits are generally clustered in specific chromosome regions of the wheat genome, mainly in 2A, 5A, 6A, 7A, 1B, and 6B chromosomes. This study demonstrates that association mapping can complement and enhance previous QTL analyses and provide additional information for marker-assisted selection. PMID:26110423

  19. Clean Chip Residual Amended with Composted Poultry Litter as a Substrate for Lantana camara

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The rising costs for containerized nursery crop substrates (pine bark and peat) have driven the need for substrate research. Among the potential media resources is Clean Chip Residual (CCR), a by-product of the forestry industry. This material is produced during the harvest of “clean chips” for use ...

  20. Bioethanol production from Lantana camara (red sage): Pretreatment, saccharification and fermentation.

    PubMed

    Kuhad, Ramesh Chander; Gupta, Rishi; Khasa, Yogender Pal; Singh, Ajay

    2010-11-01

    Lantanacamara contains 61.1% (w/w) holocellulose and can serve as a low-cost feedstock for bioethanol production. Acid hydrolysis (3.0%, v/v H(2)SO(4), 120 degrees C for 45 min) of L. camara produced 187.14 mg/g total sugars along with fermentation inhibitors such as phenolics (8.2mg/g), furfurals (5.1mg/g) and hydroxy methyl furfurals (6.7 mg/g). Sequential application of overliming (pH 10.0) and activated charcoal (1.5%, w/v) adsorption was used to remove these toxic compounds from the acid hydrolysate. The acid-pretreated biomass of L. camara was further delignified through combined pretreatment of sodium sulphite (5.0% w/v) and sodium chlorite (3.0% w/v), which resulted in about 87.2% lignin removal. The enzymatic hydrolysis of delignified cellulosic substrate showed 80.0% saccharification after 28 h incubation at 50 degrees C and pH 5.0. Fermentation of acid and enzymatic hydrolysates with Pichiastipitis and Saccharomycescerevisiae gave rise to 5.16 and 17.7 g/L of ethanol with corresponding yields of 0.32 and 0.48 g/g after 24 and 16 h, respectively.

  1. Physiological and proteomics analyses of Holm oak (Quercus ilex subsp. ballota [Desf.] Samp.) responses to Phytophthora cinnamomi.

    PubMed

    Sghaier-Hammami, Besma; Valero-Galvàn, José; Romero-Rodríguez, M Cristina; Navarro-Cerrillo, Rafael Ma; Abdelly, Chedly; Jorrín-Novo, Jesús

    2013-10-01

    Phytophthora cinnamomi is one of the agents that trigger the decline syndrome in Quercus spp., this being a serious threat to Mediterranean Holm oak forest sustainability and reforestation programs. Quercus ilex responses to Phytophthora cinnamomi have been studied in one-year olds seedlings from two Andalucía provenances, assessing the physiological water status and photosynthesis-related parameters. Upon inoculation with mycelium a reduction in water content, chlorophyll fluorescence, stomatal conductance and gas exchange was observed along a 90 days post inoculation period in both provenances. The reduction was higher in the most susceptible (SSA) provenance, than in the most tolerant (PCO), being these typical plant responses to drought stress. Leaf protein profiles were analyzed in non-inoculated and inoculated seedlings from the two provenances by using a 2-DE coupled to MS proteomics strategy. Ninety seven proteins changing in abundance in response to the inoculation were successfully identified after MALDI-TOF-TOF analyses. The largest group of variable identified proteins were chloroplasts ones, and they were involved in the photosynthesis, Calvin cycle and carbohydrate metabolism. It was noted that a general tendency was a decrease in the protein abundance as a consequence of the inoculation, being it less accused in the least susceptible, the Northern provenance (PCO), than in the most susceptible, the Southern provenance (SSA). This trend is clearly manifested in photosynthesis, amino acid metabolism and stress/defence proteins. On the contrary, some proteins related to starch biosynthesis, glycolysis and stress related peroxiredoxin showed an increase upon inoculation. These changes in protein abundance were correlated to the estimated physiological parameters and have been frequently observed in plants subjected to drought stress.

  2. Differential CO2 effect on primary carbon metabolism of flag leaves in durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.).

    PubMed

    Aranjuelo, Iker; Erice, Gorka; Sanz-Sáez, Alvaro; Abadie, Cyril; Gilard, Françoise; Gil-Quintana, Erena; Avice, Jean-Christophe; Staudinger, Christiana; Wienkoop, Stefanie; Araus, Jose L; Bourguignon, Jacques; Irigoyen, Juan J; Tcherkez, Guillaume

    2015-12-01

    C sink/source balance and N assimilation have been identified as target processes conditioning crop responsiveness to elevated CO2 . However, little is known about phenology-driven modifications of C and N primary metabolism at elevated CO2 in cereals such as wheat. Here, we examined the differential effect of elevated CO2 at two development stages (onset of flowering, onset of grain filling) in durum wheat (Triticum durum, var. Sula) using physiological measurements (photosynthesis, isotopes), metabolomics, proteomics and (15) N labelling. Our results show that growth at elevated CO2 was accompanied by photosynthetic acclimation through a lower internal (mesophyll) conductance but no significant effect on Rubisco content, maximal carboxylation or electron transfer. Growth at elevated CO2 altered photosynthate export and tended to accelerate leaf N remobilization, which was visible for several proteins and amino acids, as well as lysine degradation metabolism. However, grain biomass produced at elevated CO2 was larger and less N rich, suggesting that nitrogen use efficiency rather than photosynthesis is an important target for improvement, even in good CO2 -responsive cultivars.

  3. Bactericidal activities of BMS-284756, a novel Des-F(6)-quinolone, against Staphylococcus aureus strains with topoisomerase mutations.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Laura E; Frosco, MaryBeth; Ryan, Brenda; Chaniewski, Susan; Yang, Hyekyung; Hooper, David C; Barrett, John F

    2002-01-01

    The antistaphylococcal activities of BMS-284756 (T-3811ME), levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, and ciprofloxacin were compared against wild-type and grlA and grlA/gyrA mutant strains of Staphylococcus aureus. BMS-284756 was the most active quinolone tested, with MICs and minimal bactericidal concentrations against S. aureus wild-type strain MT5, grlA mutant MT5224c4, and grlA/gyrA mutant EN8 of 0.03 and 0.06, 0.125 and 0.125, and 4 and 4 microg/ml, respectively. In the time-kill studies, BMS-284756 and levofloxacin exhibited rapid killing against all strains. Ciprofloxacin, however, was not bactericidal for the double mutant, EN8. BMS-284756 and levofloxacin were bactericidal (3 log(10) decrease in CFU/ml) against the MT5 and MT5224c4 strains at two and four times the MIC within 2 to 4 h. Against EN8, BMS-284756 was bactericidal within 4 h at two and four times the MIC, and levofloxacin achieved similar results within 4 to 6 h. Both the wild-type strain MT5 and grlA mutant MT5224c4 should be considered susceptible to both BMS-284756 and levofloxacin, and both quinolones are predicted to have clinical efficacy. The in vivo efficacy of BMS-284756, levofloxacin, and moxifloxacin against S. aureus strain ISP794 and its single mutant 2C6(1)-1 directly reflected the in vitro activity: increased MICs correlated with decreased in vivo efficacy. The 50% protective doses of BMS-284756 against wild-type and mutant strains were 2.2 and 1.6 mg/kg of body weight/day, respectively, compared to the levofloxacin values of 16 and 71 mg/kg/day and moxifloxacin values of 4.7 and 61.6 mg/kg/day. BMS-284756 was more potent than levofloxacin and equipotent with moxifloxacin against ISP794 both in vitro and in vivo, while BMS-284756 was more potent than levofloxacin and moxifloxacin against 2C6(1)-1.

  4. Fatty acids composition of Tunisian Ziziphus lotus L. (Desf.) fruits and variation in biological activities between leaf and fruit extracts.

    PubMed

    Ghazghazi, Hanene; Aouadhi, Chedia; Riahi, Leila; Maaroufi, Abderrazak; Hasnaoui, Brahim

    2014-01-01

    This study was conceived to evaluate the essential fatty acids, secondary metabolites, antiradical and antimicrobial activities of unexploited Tunisian Ziziphus lotus L. The obtained results indicated that the major components of fatty acids were oleic acid (88.12%) and elaidic acid (7.88%). Leaves contained higher amount of total phenols, flavonoids and tannins than fruits, although both methanolic extracts had significant antioxidant activities. Significant correlations were observed between the total phenol or flavonoid contents in methanolic extracts and antioxidant activity estimated by using both 2,2'-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl and 2,2'-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic radical-scavenging methods. In addition, both methanolic extracts exhibited strong antibacterial and antifungal activities. The inhibition zone diameters and the minimal inhibition concentration values were in the range of 10-17 mm and 3.1-50 mg/mL, respectively.

  5. Glucosinolates and fatty acid, sterol, and tocopherol composition of seed oils from Capparis spinosa Var. spinosa and Capparis ovata Desf. Var. canescens (Coss.) Heywood.

    PubMed

    Matthäus, Bertrand; Ozcan, Musa

    2005-09-07

    Seed oils of 11 samples of Capparis ovata and Capparis spinosa from different locations in Turkey were characterized with regard to the composition of fatty acids, tocopherols, and sterols as well as the content of glucosinolates. The oil content of the seeds ranged from 27.3 to 37.6 g/100 g (C. spinosa) and from 14.6 to 38.0 g/100 g (C. ovata). The dominating fatty acid of both species was linoleic acid, which accounted for 26.9-55.3% in C. ovata seed oils and for 24.6-50.5% in C. spinosa seed oils. Oleic acid and its isomer, vaccenic acid, were both found in the seed oils in concentrations between 10 and 30%, respectively. The seed oils of both species were rich in tocopherols with the following composition: gamma-tocopherol, 124.3-1944.9 mg/100 g; delta-tocopherol, 2.7-269.5 mg/100 g; and alpha-tocopherol, 0.6-13.8 mg/100 g. The concentration of total sterols ranged from 4875.5 to 12189.1 mg/kg (C. ovata) and from 4961.8 to 10009.1 mg/kg (C. spinosa), respectively. In addition to sitosterol, which amounted to approximately 60% of the total amount of sterols, campesterol and stigmasterol accounted for 16 and 10% of the total sterols, respectively. The seed oils showed remarkably high contents of Delta5-avenasterol (between 138.8 and 599.4 mg/kg). The total content of glucosinolates of C. ovata and C. spinosa samples was determined as 34.5-84.6 micromol/g for C. ovata and 42.6-88.9 micromol/g for C. spinosa, respectively, on a dry weight basis, with >95% as glucocapperin.

  6. Skin Wound Healing Potential and Mechanisms of the Hydroalcoholic Extract of Leaves and Oleoresin of Copaifera langsdorffii Desf. Kuntze in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gushiken, Lucas Fernando Sérgio; Rozza, Ariane Leite; Beserra, Fernando Pereira; Vieira, Ana Júlia; Padovani, Carlos Roberto; Lemos, Marivane; Polizello Junior, Maurilio; da Silva, Jonas Joaquim Mangabeira; Nóbrega, Rafael Henrique; Martinez, Emanuel Ricardo Monteiro

    2017-01-01

    The wound healing is a complex process which, sometimes, can be a problem in public health because of the possibility of physical disability or even death. Due to the lack of a gold standard drug in skin wound treatment and aiming at the discovery of new treatments in skin repair and the mechanisms involved in the process, we used oleoresin (OR) from Copaifera langsdorffii and hydroalcoholic extract of the leaves (EH) to treat rat skin wounds. For that, male Wistar rats were divided into groups (n = 8): Lanette, Collagenase, 10% EH, or 10% OR and, after anesthesia, one wound of 2 cm was made in the back of animals. The wounds were treated once a day for 3, 7, or 14 days and the wound areas were measured. The rats were euthanized and skin samples destined to biochemical, molecular, and immunohistochemical analysis. The results showed a macroscopic retraction of the wounds of 10% EH and 10% OR creams and both treatments showed anti-inflammatory activity. Molecular and immunohistochemical results demonstrated the activity of Copaifera langsdorffii creams in angiogenesis, reepithelialization, wound retraction, and remodeling mechanisms. PMID:28928790

  7. Ethnobotany of Heracleum persicum Desf. ex Fisch., an invasive species in Norway, or how plant names, uses, and other traditions evolve.

    PubMed

    Alm, Torbjørn

    2013-06-24

    Heracleum persicum was introduced to Norway as an ornamental in the 1830's. Towards the end of the 19th century, it started spreading outside gardens, later to become a frequent sight in the major towns and settlements of North Norway - and a veritable pest plant. During the last 100 years or so, a substantial ethnobotanical tradition related to the species has evolved, demonstrating that folk knowledge is not only forgotten and lost, but also charting new terrain. This survey is based on data extracted from all relevant publications, including botanical literature, travel accounts, newspaper notes, etc., as far as they have come to my attention. In addition, information on vernacular names and various uses of the H. persicum in Norway has been extracted from my own, substantial archive of interviews, questionnaires, and correspondence related to the ethnobotany of Norway. Where extant, H. persicum tends to be known to everyone, even by city dwellers who otherwise generally neglect plants. People tend to love or hate it, and in Tromsø, the largest town of northern Norway, the species has become more or less emblematic of the city. Both here and in other areas of northern Norway, it is referred to by a variety of vernacular names, partly borrowed from other species, partly derived from the Latin genus name, and partly coined for this species only. In the latter group, tromsøpalme ('the palm of Tromsø') has proved by far the most popular invention. It was seemingly first used (and coined) by German soldiers during the World War II occupation of Norway, but now largely replaces other vernacular names. The plant is still popular with children, who frequently play in and with it, whereas adults have been more prone to speculate on its origins - and how to get rid of it. Salt is the most popular "herbicide" for this purpose. Over the years, H. persicum has accumulated at least twenty different vernacular names in Norway, and a variety of other traditions. By necessity, all these traditions are less than 180 years old, showing that even modern and urban societies may produce a substantial body of plant lore, which certainly merits ethnobotanical attention.

  8. Comparison of bed planting-furrow irrigation with conventional planting-flood irrigation in durum wheat (T. durum Desf) in southeastern Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ozberk, Irfan; Coskun, Yalçin; Ilkhan, Ali; Köten, Mehmet; Karli, Bahri; Ryan, John

    2009-05-15

    There is no clear consensus regarding the advantages of bed planting with furrow irrigation over conventionally irrigated cropping. This 3-year study from Southeastern Turkey aimed to assess the limits to some input savings in bed planting-furrow irrigation in terms of yields and profitability of durum wheat. Field trials were carried out using a randomized complete block design with six treatments and tree replications: T1: Conventional Planting-Flood Irrigation (CP-FI) with recommended practices for seed rate, chemical fertilizers and chemical weed control; T2: Bed Planting and Furrow Irrigation (BP-FI) with recommended input rates as in T2; T3: BP-FI with 10% input reduction; T4: BP-FI with 20% input reduction; T5: BP-FI with 30% input reduction; T6: BP-FI with 40% input reduction. The trial had four replications at each location over three cropping seasons, i.e., Akçakale (2004-05, 2005-06) and Koruklu (2006-2007). Individual and combined analysis of variance were performed for grain yields, market prices based on quality assessment, protein content and both 1000-kernel and hectoliter weights. Profitability was assessed with partial budget analysis. Except for yields, there was little effect of treatments on the other variables. Based on yields and economic analysis, the conventional system with flood irrigation was superior to the bed and furrow system, even when the inputs were reduced in such a system. The work demonstrates the site-specific nature of any new technology as there are several local biological and economical factors to be considered.

  9. The existence of phospholipase A(2) activity in plant mitochondria and its activation by hyperosmotic stress in durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.).

    PubMed

    Trono, Daniela; Soccio, Mario; Laus, Maura N; Pastore, Donato

    2013-02-01

    The activity of mitochondrial phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) was shown for the first time in plants. It was observed in etiolated seedlings from durum wheat, barley, tomato, spelt and green seedlings of maize, but not in potato and topinambur tubers and lentil etiolated seedlings. This result was achieved by a novel spectrophotometric assay based on the coupled PLA(2)/lipoxygenase reactions using 1-palmitoyl-2-linoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine as substrate; the mitochondrial localisation was assessed by checking recovery of marker enzymes. Durum wheat mitochondrial PLA(2) (DWM-PLA(2)) showed maximal activity at pH 9.0 and 1mM Ca(2+), hyperbolic kinetics (K(m)=90±6μM, V(max)=29±1nmolmin(-1)mg(-1) of protein) and inhibition by methyl arachidonyl fluorophosphonate, 5-(4-benzyloxyphenyl)-4S-(7-phenylheptanoylamino)pentanoic acid and palmityl trifluoromethyl ketone. Reactive oxygen species had no effect on DWM-PLA(2), that instead was activated by about 50% and 95%, respectively, under salt (0.21M NaCl) and osmotic (0.42M mannitol) stress imposed during germination. Contrarily, a secondary Ca(2+)-independent activity, having optimum at pH 7.0, was stress-insensitive. We propose that the activation of DWM-PLA(2) is responsible for the strong increase of free fatty acids recently measured in mitochondria under the same stress conditions [Laus, et al., J. Exp. Bot. 62 (2011) 141-154] that, in turn, activate potassium channel and uncoupling protein, able to counteract hyperosmotic stress.

  10. Development of COS-SNP and HRM markers for high-throughput and reliable haplotype-based detection of Lr14a in durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.).

    PubMed

    Terracciano, Irma; Maccaferri, Marco; Bassi, Filippo; Mantovani, Paola; Sanguineti, Maria C; Salvi, Silvio; Simková, Hana; Doležel, Jaroslav; Massi, Andrea; Ammar, Karim; Kolmer, James; Tuberosa, Roberto

    2013-04-01

    Leaf rust (Puccinia triticina Eriks. & Henn.) is a major disease affecting durum wheat production. The Lr14a-resistant gene present in the durum wheat cv. Creso and its derivative cv. Colosseo is one of the best characterized leaf-rust resistance sources deployed in durum wheat breeding. Lr14a has been mapped close to the simple sequence repeat markers gwm146, gwm344 and wmc10 in the distal portion of the chromosome arm 7BL, a gene-dense region. The objectives of this study were: (1) to enrich the Lr14a region with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and high-resolution melting (HRM)-based markers developed from conserved ortholog set (COS) genes and from sequenced Diversity Array Technology (DArT(®)) markers; (2) to further investigate the gene content and colinearity of this region with the Brachypodium and rice genomes. Ten new COS-SNP and five HRM markers were mapped within an 8.0 cM interval spanning Lr14a. Two HRM markers pinpointed the locus in an interval of <1.0 cM and eight COS-SNPs were mapped 2.1-4.1 cM distal to Lr14a. Each marker was tested for its capacity to predict the state of Lr14a alleles (in particular, Lr14-Creso associated to resistance) in a panel of durum wheat elite germplasm including 164 accessions. Two of the most informative markers were converted into KASPar(®) markers. Single assay markers ubw14 and wPt-4038-HRM designed for agarose gel electrophoresis/KASPar(®) assays and high-resolution melting analysis, respectively, as well as the double-marker combinations ubw14/ubw18, ubw14/ubw35 and wPt-4038-HRM-ubw35 will be useful for germplasm haplotyping and for molecular-assisted breeding.

  11. Characterization and quantitation of the polyphenolic compounds detected in methanol extracts of Pistacia atlantica Desf. fruits from the Guelmim region of Morocco.

    PubMed

    Khallouki, Farid; Breuer, Andrea; Merieme, Elzemzoumi; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Owen, Robert W

    2017-02-05

    High performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS) was used for the identification of the major phenolic compounds in mature P. atlantica fruits from the Guelmim region (southeast of Morocco). In this study twenty seven polyphenolic compounds are identified and quantitated. To date, this is the most comprehensive report on the polyphenolic content of Pistacia fruits. The profiles comprise, three major polyphenolic classes, namely gallates (18.76g/kg; 63.92%), flavonoids (10.12g/kg; 34.48%) and ellagic acid derivatives (0.47g/kg; 1.60%) with a total of 29.35g/kg detected. The major gallate was pentagalloyl glucoside (5.0g/kg; 17.04% of total polyphenolics), the major flavonoid luteolin (3.18g/kg; 10.83% of total polyphenolics) and the major ellagic acid derivative ellagic acid (0.25g/kg; 0.85% of total polyphenolics). Identification of galloyl quinate, digalloyl quinates (x 2), galloyl glucoside, digalloyl glucosides (x 2), trigalloyl glucoside, tetragalloyl glucosides (x 2), pentagalloyl glucoside, 2″-O-galloyl-quercetin-3-O-galactoside, quercetin-3-O-rhamnogalactoside, quercetin-3-O-galactoside, ellagic acid diglucoside, luteolin-4'-O-glucoside, 2″-O-galloyl-luteolin-4'-O-glucoside, quercetin-3-O-glucuronide, kaempferol-3-O-glucoside, eriodictyol, apigenin, ellagic acid diglucoside, ellagic acid glucoside, methyl ellagic acid glucoside, and ellagic acid are described as phytochemical components of Pistacia fruits for the first time.

  12. Performance and carcass measurements of ewe lambs reared in a feedlot and fed wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) middlings total mixed rations in the summer season.

    PubMed

    Tufarelli, Vincenzo; Khan, Rifat Ullah; Mazzei, Domenico; Laudadio, Vito

    2012-04-01

    The effect of total mixed ratios containing wheat middlings (WM) as a corn grain substitute on the growth performance and carcass traits of Comisana ewe lambs was evaluated. Forty ewe lambs, with average live body weight of 13 ± 0.3 kg (mean ± SEM), were allocated randomly to two isocaloric and isonitrogenous diets for 50 days. Control diet contained 400 g/kg of dry matter (DM) of corn as the main starchy source, whereas experimental diet contained 600 g/kg DM of WM. In vivo nutrient apparent digestibility of the two diets was determined using Comisana rams (mean body weight, 65 ± 2.3 kg) and indicated significant (P < 0.05) differences for neutral detergent fibre, acid detergent fibre, cellulose and hemicellulose fractions. Results from the trial using Comisana ewe lambs showed that growth traits were unaffected by dietary treatments as well as none of the carcass measurements examined (P > 0.05). These findings indicate that WM results as a suitable feed ingredient for growing ewe lambs that can be a satisfactory substitute to conventional grain source.

  13. Low levels of realized seed and pollen gene flow and strong spatial genetic structure in a small, isolated and fragmented population of the tropical tree Copaifera langsdorffii Desf

    PubMed Central

    Sebbenn, A M; Carvalho, A C M; Freitas, M L M; Moraes, S M B; Gaino, A P S C; da Silva, J M; Jolivet, C; Moraes, M L T

    2011-01-01

    Over the past century, the Brazilian Atlantic forest has been reduced to small, isolated fragments of forest. Reproductive isolation theories predict a loss of genetic diversity and increases in inbreeding and spatial genetic structure (SGS) in such populations. We analysed eight microsatellite loci to investigate the pollen and seed dispersal patterns, genetic diversity, inbreeding and SGS of the tropical tree Copaifera langsdorffii in a small (4.8 ha), isolated population. All 112 adult trees and 128 seedlings found in the stand were sampled, mapped and genotyped. Seedlings had significantly lower levels of genetic diversity (A=16.5±0.45, mean±95% s.e.; He=0.838±0.006) than did adult trees (A=23.2±0.81; He=0.893±0.030). Parentage analysis did not indicate any seed immigration (mseeds=0) and the pollen immigration rate was very low (mpollen=0.047). The average distance of realized pollen dispersal within the stand was 94 m, with 81% of the pollen travelling <150 m. A significant negative correlation was found between the frequency and distance of pollen dispersal (r=−0.79, P<0.01), indicating that short-distance pollinations were more frequent. A significant SGS for both adults (∼50 m) and seedlings (∼20 m) was also found, indicating that most of the seeds were dispersed over short distances. The results suggested that the spatial isolation of populations by habitat fragmentation can restrict seed and pollen gene flow, increase SGS and affect the genetic diversity of future generations. PMID:20372183

  14. Effects of sodium alginate bead encapsulation on the storage stability of durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) bran oil extracted by supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    Durante, Miriana; Lenucci, Marcello S; Laddomada, Barbara; Mita, Giovanni; Caretto, Sofia

    2012-10-24

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of encapsulation on the storage stability of oil extracted by supercritical carbon dioxide from a micronized durum wheat bran fraction. Wheat bran oil was encapsulated in 2% (w/v) sodium alginate beads. Encapsulated and unencapsulated oil samples were stored at 4 or 25 °C, in daylight or darkness, over 90 days, and, at defined time points, subjected to stability evaluation based on fatty acid hydroperoxide production and tocopherol (α, β, and γ forms), tocotrienol (α, β, and γ forms) and carotenoid (lutein, zeaxanthin, and β-carotene) degradation. The encapsulation of the oil into alginate beads significantly increased stability, optimally when stored at 4 °C, maintaining high levels of isoprenoids and low content of fatty acid hydroperoxides over 30 days of storage.

  15. Folate distribution in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and durum wheat (Triticum turgidum durum Desf.) pearled fractions.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Debora; Reyneri, Amedeo; Blandino, Massimo

    2016-03-30

    Wholegrain cereals are an important source of folates. In this study, total folate was analysed in pearled fractions of barley and wheat cultivars employing AOAC Official Method 2004.05. In particular, the distribution of folate in the kernels was evaluated in three barley cultivars (two hulled types and a hulless one as well as two- and six-row types) and in a common and a durum wheat cultivar. A noticeable variation in the folate content was observed between the barley [653-1033 ng g(-1) dry matter (DM)] and wheat cultivars (1024-1119 ng g(-1) DM). The highest folate content was detected in the hulless barley cultivar (1033 ng g(-1) DM). A significant reduction in total folate, from 63% to 86%, was observed in all cultivars from the outermost to the innermost pearled fractions. Results proved that folates are mainly present in the germ and in the outer layers of the kernel. This is the first study reporting the folate distribution in kernels of both common and durum wheat and in a hulless barley cultivar. Results suggest that the pearling process could be useful for the selection of intermediate fractions that could be used in order to develop folate-enhanced ingredients and products. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. The ozone-like syndrome in durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.): Mechanisms underlying the different symptomatic responses of two sensitive cultivars.

    PubMed

    Picchi, Valentina; Monga, Robert; Marzuoli, Riccardo; Gerosa, Giacomo; Faoro, Franco

    2017-03-01

    Colombo and Sculptur are two modern durum wheat cultivars that, in previous studies, proved to be very sensitive to ozone injury in terms of eco-physiological parameters and significant grain yield loss. Nevertheless, their response regarding leaf visible symptoms was very different; Sculptur showed almost no symptoms, even after several weeks of ozone exposure, whereas Colombo showed in a few weeks typical ozone-like symptoms (chlorotic/necrotic spots). The mechanisms underlying this different response has been studied with a biochemical and microscopical approach. Plants were grown in Open-Top Chambers (OTCs) and exposed to charcoal filtered and ozone enriched air. Flag leaves were analyzed at two phenological stages (pre- and post-anthesis). At pre-anthesis the ascorbate pool was significantly lower in Colombo, which also underwent an increase in the oxidized glutathione content and abundant H2O2 deposition in mesophyll cells around the substomatal chamber. No or scarce H2O2 was found at both phenological stages in ozone exposed leaf tissues of Sculptur, where stomata appeared often closed. In this cultivar, transmission electron microscopy showed that chloroplasts in apparently undamaged mesophyll cells were slightly swollen and presented numerous plastoglobuli, as a result of a mild oxidative stress. These results suggest that Sculptur leaves remains symptomless as a consequence of the higher content of constitutive ascorbate pool and the synergistic effect of stomata closure. Instead, Colombo shows chlorotic/necrotic symptoms because of the lower ROS (Reactive Oxygen Species) scavenging capacity and the less efficient stomata closure that lead to severe damages of groups of the mesophyll cells, however leaving the surrounding photosynthetic tissue functional. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of golpar (Heracleum persicum Desf.) and probiotics in drinking water on performance, carcass characteristics, organ weights, blood plasma constituents, and immunity of broilers.

    PubMed

    Jamshidparvar, Ali; Javandel, Faramin; Seidavi, Alireza; Peña Blanco, Francisco; Martínez Marín, Andrés L; Avilés Ramírez, Carmen; Agüera Buendía, Estrella; Núñez-Sánchez, Nieves

    2017-08-29

    Increasing levels of Heracleum persicum (golpar) in drinking water were studied in broilers. Two hundred and forty-one-day-old male chickens were allocated to one of six treatments: control, without added phytogenics nor probiotics in drinking water, and probiotics at recommended manufacturer's level (P) or 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 ml/l of golpar extract solution (G1, G1.5, G2, and G2.5 treatments, respectively) in drinking water. As a result of this study, no linear or quadratic trends in the feed intake (FI) and feed conversion rate (FCR) due to golpar supplementation were found. Body weight gain, final body weight, and relative carcass weight showed a positive linear response with increasing levels of golpar supplementation. Neither golpar nor probiotics had effects on the percentages of edible parts of the carcass. Golpar supplementation levels caused a linear negative response of the albumin content in blood plasma, whereas both abdominal fat as percentage of carcass weight and uric acid levels in blood plasma linearly increased. The effects on Ig responses were only observed at 42 days of age and were similar in probiotics and the highest level of golpar supplementation. Based on our results, both probiotics and golpar supplementation could improve broiler performance and immune function.

  18. Ethnobotany of Heracleum persicum Desf. ex Fisch., an invasive species in Norway, or how plant names, uses, and other traditions evolve

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Heracleum persicum was introduced to Norway as an ornamental in the 1830′s. Towards the end of the 19th century, it started spreading outside gardens, later to become a frequent sight in the major towns and settlements of North Norway – and a veritable pest plant. During the last 100 years or so, a substantial ethnobotanical tradition related to the species has evolved, demonstrating that folk knowledge is not only forgotten and lost, but also charting new terrain. Methods This survey is based on data extracted from all relevant publications, including botanical literature, travel accounts, newspaper notes, etc., as far as they have come to my attention. In addition, information on vernacular names and various uses of the H. persicum in Norway has been extracted from my own, substantial archive of interviews, questionnaires, and correspondence related to the ethnobotany of Norway. Results Where extant, H. persicum tends to be known to everyone, even by city dwellers who otherwise generally neglect plants. People tend to love or hate it, and in Tromsø, the largest town of northern Norway, the species has become more or less emblematic of the city. Both here and in other areas of northern Norway, it is referred to by a variety of vernacular names, partly borrowed from other species, partly derived from the Latin genus name, and partly coined for this species only. In the latter group, tromsøpalme (‘the palm of Tromsø’) has proved by far the most popular invention. It was seemingly first used (and coined) by German soldiers during the World War II occupation of Norway, but now largely replaces other vernacular names. The plant is still popular with children, who frequently play in and with it, whereas adults have been more prone to speculate on its origins – and how to get rid of it. Salt is the most popular “herbicide” for this purpose. Conclusions Over the years, H. persicum has accumulated at least twenty different vernacular names in Norway, and a variety of other traditions. By necessity, all these traditions are less than 180 years old, showing that even modern and urban societies may produce a substantial body of plant lore, which certainly merits ethnobotanical attention. PMID:23800181

  19. Development of COS-SNP and HRM markers for cost efficient and reliable haplotype-based detection of Lr14a in durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Leaf rust (Puccinia triticina Eriks. & Henn.) is a major disease affecting durum wheat production. The Lr14a leaf rust resistant gene present in the durum wheat cv. Creso and its derivative Colosseo is one of the best characterized leaf rust resistance sources presently deployed in durum wheat breed...

  20. On the nymphs of lantana lace bug Teleonemia scrupulosa Stål (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Tingidae: Tinginae): ontogenetic features of integumentary structures highlighted.

    PubMed

    Guidoti, Marcus; Barcellos, Aline

    2013-02-11

    The five instars of Teleonemia scrupulosa Stål are described. The postembryonic ontogenetic development of integumentary structures is emphasized, with a discussion on its potential use in cladistic studies within Tingidae.

  1. The anti-mycobacterial activity of Lantana camara a plant traditionally used to treat symptoms of tuberculosis in South-western Uganda.

    PubMed

    Kirimuhuzya, Claude; Waako, Paul; Joloba, Moses; Odyek, Olwa

    2009-03-01

    Tuberculosis continues to be a devastating public health problem. Many communities in Uganda use medicinal plants to treat various infections, including respiratory tract infections. There are claims that some can treat tuberculosis. Verifying some of these claims could lead to discovery of lead compounds for development of a TB drug. Chloroform and methanol extracts of L. camara collected from South-western Uganda were screened against three strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis using the agar-well diffusion method. H37Rv, the rifampicin-resistant TMC-331 and a non-resistant wild strain (28-25271). The MIC and MBC were determined using the Agar dilution method on Middle brook 7H11. The methanol extract showed the highest activity against all the three strains used, with zones of inhibition of 18.0-22.5 mm and MIC values of 20 µg/ml for H37Rv and 15 µg/ml for both TMC-331 and wild stain. The values for rifampicin were 1.0 µg/ml for both H37Rv and wild strain but rifampicin hardly showed any activity on TMC-331. The MBC value for the methanol extract of L. camara was 30µg/ml for the H37Rv, and 20µg/ml for both the TMC-331 and wild strains of M. tuberculosis. The MBC for rifampicin was 2.0µg/ml for both H37Rv and the wild strain. We conclude that L. camara contains principles active against M. tuberculosis, which merit further research.

  2. Colour-scent associations in a tropical orchid: three colours but two odours.

    PubMed

    Delle-Vedove, Roxane; Juillet, Nicolas; Bessière, Jean-Marie; Grison, Claude; Barthes, Nicolas; Pailler, Thierry; Dormont, Laurent; Schatz, Bertrand

    2011-06-01

    Colour and scent are the major pollinator attractants to flowers, and their production may be linked by shared biosynthetic pathways. Species with polymorphic floral traits are particularly relevant to study the joint evolution of floral traits. We used in this study the tropical orchid Calanthe sylvatica from Réunion Island. Three distinct colour varieties are observed, presenting lilac, white or purple flowers, and named respectively C. sylvaticavar.lilacina (hereafter referred as var. lilacina), C. sylvaticavar. alba (var. alba) and C. sylvatica var. purpurea (var. purpurea). We investigated the composition of the floral scent produced by these colour varieties using the non-invasive SPME technique in the wild. Scent emissions are dominated by aromatic compounds. Nevertheless, the presence of the terpenoid (E)-4,8-dimethylnona-1,3,7-triène (DMNT) is diagnostic of var. purpurea, with the volatile organic compounds (VOC) produced by some individuals containing up to 60% of DMNT. We evidence specific colour-scent associations in C. sylvatica, with two distinct scent profiles in the three colour varieties: the lilacina-like profile containing no or very little DMNT (<2%) and the purpurea-like profile containing DMNT (>2%). Calanthe sylvatica var. alba individuals group with one or the other scent profile independently of their population of origin. We suggest that white-flowered individuals have evolved at least twice, once from var. lilacina and at least once from var. purpurea after the colonisation of la Réunion. White-flowered individuals may have been favoured by the particular pollinator fauna characterising the island. These flowering varieties of C. sylvatica, which display three colours but two scents profiles prove that colour is not always a good indicator of odour and that colour-scent associations may be complex, depending on pollination ecology of the populations concerned. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Multiplex staining of 2-DE gels for an initial phosphoproteome analysis of germinating seeds and early grown seedlings from a non-orthodox specie: Quercus ilex L. subsp. ballota [Desf.] Samp.

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Rodríguez, M. Cristina; Abril, Nieves; Sánchez-Lucas, Rosa; Jorrín-Novo, Jesús V.

    2015-01-01

    As a preliminary step in the phosphoproteome analysis of germinating seeds (0 and 24 h after seed imbibition) and early grown seedlings (216 h after seed imbibition) from a non-orthodox sp. Quercus ilex, a multiplex (SYPRO-Ruby and Pro-Q DPS) staining of high-resolution 2-DE gels was used. By using this protocol it was possible to detect changes in protein-abundance and/or phosphorylation status. This simple approach could be a good complementary alternative to the enrichment protocols used in the search for phosphoprotein candidates. While 482 spots were visualized with SYPRO-Ruby, 222 were with Pro-Q DPS. Statistically significant differences in spot intensity were observed among samples, these corresponding to 85 SYPRO-Ruby-, 20 Pro-Q-DPS-, and 35 SYPRO-Ruby and Pro-Q-DPS-stained spots. Fifty-five phosphoprotein candidates showing qualitative or quantitative differences between samples were subjected to MALDI-TOF-TOF MS analysis, with 20 of them being identified. Identified proteins belonged to five different functional categories, namely: carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism, defense, protein folding, and oxidation-reduction processes. With the exception of a putative cyclase, the other 19 proteins had at least one orthologous phosphoprotein in Arabidopsis thaliana, Medicago truncatula, N. tabacum, and Glycine max. Out of the 20 identified, seven showed differences in intensity in Pro-Q-DPS but not in SYPRO-Ruby-stained gels, including enzymes of the glycolysis and amino acid metabolism. This bears out that theory the regulation of these enzymes occurs at the post-translational level by phosphorylation with no changes at the transcriptional or translational level. This is different from the mechanism reported in orthodox seeds, in which concomitant changes in abundance and phosphorylation status have been observed for these enzymes. PMID:26322061

  4. Two new species of Centris (Aphemisia) Ayala, 2002 from Colombia with a synopsis of the subgenus for the country (Hymenoptera: Apidae: Centridini).

    PubMed

    Vivallo, Felipe; Vélez, Danny; Fernández, Fernando

    2016-03-21

    A synopsis of the species of Centris subgenus Aphemisia Ayala in Colombia is presented. A total of six species were recognized: C. lilacina Cockerell, C. mocsaryi Friese, C. plumipes Smith and C. quadrimaculata Packard, including C. celadonia n. sp. and C. vallecaucensis n. sp., two new species described from the Departments of Huila and Valle del Cauca, respectively. Diagnoses, descriptions, information on geographical distribution and an identification key to all species are provided. The previously unknown male of C. plumipes is described for the first time.

  5. [Studies on the medicinal plant in the "Sambutsu-cho" of Higo Province possessed by the Kumamoto clan (II): on the medicina herbs].

    PubMed

    Hamada, T

    1993-01-01

    In the previous report, I studied the medicinal trees contained in the Sambutsu-cho of the Kumamoto clan in Higo Province. In this report, I studied the medicinal herbs contained in the same book. There were 439 names in the herbal part. I identified 214 species and found 129 species as the medicinal plants. The ratio of the medicinal plants was 60%. the famous medicinal plants were as follows: Atractilodes japonica, platycodon grandiflorum, prunella vulgaris var. lilacina, pharbitis nil, cnidium officinale, angelica acutiloba, bplerum falcatum, pueraria lobata, sophora flavescens, sinomenium acutum, akebia quinata, paeonia lactiflora, paeonia suffruticosa, achyranthes fauriei, houttuynia cordata, ophiopogon japonica, pinellia ternata and cyperus rotundus.

  6. Effects of an exotic plant invasion on native understory plants in a tropical dry forest.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Ayesha E

    2010-06-01

    The dry forests of southern India, which are endangered tropical ecosystems and among the world's most important tiger (Panthera tigris) habitats, are extensively invaded by exotic plants. Yet, experimental studies exploring the impacts of these invasions on native plants in these forests are scarce. Consequently, little is known about associated implications for the long-term conservation of tigers and other biodiversity in these habitats. I studied the impacts of the exotic plant Lantana camara on understory vegetation in a dry-forest tiger habitat in southern India. I compared the richness, composition, and abundance of tree seedlings, herbs, and shrubs and the abundance of grass among plots in which Lantana was cleared or left standing. These plots were distributed across two blocks-livestock free and livestock grazed. Removal of Lantana had an immediate positive effect on herb-shrub richness in the livestock-free block, but had no effect on that of tree seedlings in either livestock block. Tree-seedling and herb-shrub composition differed significantly between Lantana treatment and livestock block, and Lantana removal significantly decreased survival of tree seedlings. Nevertheless, the absence of trees, in any stage between seedling and adult, indicates that Lantana may stall tree regeneration. Lantana removal decreased the abundance of all understory strata, probably because forage plants beneath Lantana are less accessible to herbivores, and plants in Lantana-free open plots experienced greater herbivory. Reduced access to forage in invaded habitats could negatively affect ungulate populations and ultimately compromise the ability of these forests to sustain prey-dependent large carnivores. Additional research focused on understanding and mitigating threats posed by exotic plants may be crucial to the long-term protection of these forests as viable tiger habitats.

  7. Interactive effects of nitrogen fertilization and irrigation on grain yield, canopy temperature, and nitrogen use efficiency in overhead sprinkler-irrigated Durum Wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nitrogen and irrigation management are crucial in the production of high protein irrigated durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) in arid regions. However, as the availability of irrigation water decreases and potential costs and regulation of nitrogen (N) increase, there is a need to understand how ir...

  8. Bioactive clerodane diterpenes from roots of Carex distachya.

    PubMed

    Fiorentino, Antonio; D'Abrosca, Brigida; Pacifico, Severina; Izzo, Angelina; D'Angelo, Grazia; Monaco, Pietro

    2010-10-01

    Two new clerodane diterpenes were isolated from roots of Carex distachya Desf., a perennial plant widely distributed in the coastal area of the Mediterranean basin. Chemical characterization of the metabolites was carried out mainly by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy. The isolated compounds influenced either positively or negatively the plant growth (root and shoot elongation) of three coexisting herbaceous species.

  9. Association Mapping of Leaf Rust Response in Durum Wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Resistance to leaf rust (Puccinia triticina Eriks.) is a main objective for durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) breeding.Association mapping on germplasm collections is now being used as an additional approach for the discovery and validation of major genes/QTLs. In this study, a collection of 164 el...

  10. Photoperiod and vernalization effect on anthesis date in winter-sown spring wheat regions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Accurate prediction of phenology is required to guide crop management decisions and to predict crop growth and yield. However, the relative importance of photoperiod and vernalization in predicting anthesis dates for spring bread and durum wheat (Triticum aestivum L. and T. durum Desf.) grown as a w...

  11. Discovery of a novel stem rust resistance allele in durum wheat that exhibits differential reactions to Ug99 isolates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wheat stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici Erikss. & E. Henn, can incur yield losses on susceptible cultivars of durum wheat, Triticum turgidum ssp. durum (Desf.) Husnot. Though several durum cultivars possess the stem rust resistance gene Sr13, additional genes in durum wheat effec...

  12. Crop yield and quality, weeds, insects, and water use of durum and selected brassicaceae oilseeds in two-year rotations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cool-season oilseeds are potential feedstock for biofuel production, but few studies have compared oilseed-durum (Triticum durum Desf.) rotations. We conducted a field trial under dryland conditions for 2007-2010 near Froid, Montana, comparing productivity, water balance, and key weed and arthropod...

  13. First report of Fusarium hostae causing crown rot of wheat (Triticum spp.) in Turkey

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Crown rot disease of wheat is caused by a complex of Fusarium species. To identify species associated with crown rot in Turkey, crowns and stems of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and durum wheat (T. durum Desf.) were collected from the Central and Southeast Anatolia, Black Sea, Aegean, Mediterr...

  14. Creative Photography - Wildlife

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-03-25

    A black swallowtail butterfly enjoys a snack from a blooming lantana plant at Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge in Florida. NASA’s Kennedy Space Center shares boundaries with the refuge, which is home to more than 330 native and migratory bird species, along with 25 mammal, 117 fish, and 65 amphibian and reptile species.

  15. 7 CFR 319.56-40 - Peppers from certain Central American countries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., tomato fruit borer, lantana mealybug, passionvine mealybug, melon thrips, bacterial wilt, the rust fungus..., melon thrips, bacterial wilt, the rust fungus Puccinia pampeana, Andean potato mottle virus, and tomato..., melon thrips bacterial wilt, the rust fungus Puccinia pampeana, Andean potato mottle virus, and tomato...

  16. 75 FR 44792 - Update to Notice of Financial Institutions for Which the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-29

    ... any institutions which have been placed in liquidation, please visit the Corporation Web site at http://www.fdic.gov/bank/individual/failed/banklist.html or contact the Manager of Receivership Oversight in...USA Bank Las Vegas NV 7/23/2010 10268 Sterling Bank Lantana FL 7/23/2010 10269 Thunder Bank Sylvan...

  17. Functional attributes of two subtropical shrubs and implications for the distribution and management of endangered bird habitat

    Treesearch

    G. M. Fleming; J. M. Wunderle; D. N. Ewert; J. J. O' Brien; E. H. Helmer

    2015-01-01

    Aims The fruits of Erithalis fruticosa L. and Lantana involucrata L. are important in the diet of US federally endangered Kirtland’s Warblers (Setophaga kirtlandii) wintering in the Bahamas archipelago. These two shrubs occur in tropical and subtropical dry forests, including forests that have been subjected to recent disturbance. Despite their importance to the...

  18. 7 CFR 319.56-40 - Peppers from certain Central American countries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., tomato fruit borer, lantana mealybug, passionvine mealybug, melon thrips, bacterial wilt, the rust fungus..., melon thrips, bacterial wilt, the rust fungus Puccinia pampeana, Andean potato mottle virus, and tomato..., melon thrips bacterial wilt, the rust fungus Puccinia pampeana, Andean potato mottle virus, and tomato...

  19. 7 CFR 319.56-40 - Peppers from certain Central American countries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., tomato fruit borer, lantana mealybug, passionvine mealybug, melon thrips, bacterial wilt, the rust fungus..., melon thrips, bacterial wilt, the rust fungus Puccinia pampeana, Andean potato mottle virus, and tomato..., melon thrips bacterial wilt, the rust fungus Puccinia pampeana, Andean potato mottle virus, and tomato...

  20. Comparing Pixel and Object-Based Approaches to Map an Understorey Invasive Shrub in Tropical Mixed Forests

    PubMed Central

    Niphadkar, Madhura; Nagendra, Harini; Tarantino, Cristina; Adamo, Maria; Blonda, Palma

    2017-01-01

    The establishment of invasive alien species in varied habitats across the world is now recognized as a genuine threat to the preservation of biodiversity. Specifically, plant invasions in understory tropical forests are detrimental to the persistence of healthy ecosystems. Monitoring such invasions using Very High Resolution (VHR) satellite remote sensing has been shown to be valuable in designing management interventions for conservation of native habitats. Object-based classification methods are very helpful in identifying invasive plants in various habitats, by their inherent nature of imitating the ability of the human brain in pattern recognition. However, these methods have not been tested adequately in dense tropical mixed forests where invasion occurs in the understorey. This study compares a pixel-based and object-based classification method for mapping the understorey invasive shrub Lantana camara (Lantana) in a tropical mixed forest habitat in the Western Ghats biodiversity hotspot in India. Overall, a hierarchical approach of mapping top canopy at first, and then further processing for the understorey shrub, using measures such as texture and vegetation indices proved effective in separating out Lantana from other cover types. In the first method, we implement a simple parametric supervised classification for mapping cover types, and then process within these types for Lantana delineation. In the second method, we use an object-based segmentation algorithm to map cover types, and then perform further processing for separating Lantana. The improved ability of the object-based approach to delineate structurally distinct objects with characteristic spectral and spatial characteristics of their own, as well as with reference to their surroundings, allows for much flexibility in identifying invasive understorey shrubs among the complex vegetation of the tropical forest than that provided by the parametric classifier. Conservation practices in tropical mixed

  1. Comparing Pixel and Object-Based Approaches to Map an Understorey Invasive Shrub in Tropical Mixed Forests.

    PubMed

    Niphadkar, Madhura; Nagendra, Harini; Tarantino, Cristina; Adamo, Maria; Blonda, Palma

    2017-01-01

    The establishment of invasive alien species in varied habitats across the world is now recognized as a genuine threat to the preservation of biodiversity. Specifically, plant invasions in understory tropical forests are detrimental to the persistence of healthy ecosystems. Monitoring such invasions using Very High Resolution (VHR) satellite remote sensing has been shown to be valuable in designing management interventions for conservation of native habitats. Object-based classification methods are very helpful in identifying invasive plants in various habitats, by their inherent nature of imitating the ability of the human brain in pattern recognition. However, these methods have not been tested adequately in dense tropical mixed forests where invasion occurs in the understorey. This study compares a pixel-based and object-based classification method for mapping the understorey invasive shrub Lantana camara (Lantana) in a tropical mixed forest habitat in the Western Ghats biodiversity hotspot in India. Overall, a hierarchical approach of mapping top canopy at first, and then further processing for the understorey shrub, using measures such as texture and vegetation indices proved effective in separating out Lantana from other cover types. In the first method, we implement a simple parametric supervised classification for mapping cover types, and then process within these types for Lantana delineation. In the second method, we use an object-based segmentation algorithm to map cover types, and then perform further processing for separating Lantana. The improved ability of the object-based approach to delineate structurally distinct objects with characteristic spectral and spatial characteristics of their own, as well as with reference to their surroundings, allows for much flexibility in identifying invasive understorey shrubs among the complex vegetation of the tropical forest than that provided by the parametric classifier. Conservation practices in tropical mixed

  2. Activity against multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Mexican plants used to treat respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Arellanes, Adelina; Meckes, Mariana; Ramirez, Raquel; Torres, Javier; Luna-Herrera, Julieta

    2003-09-01

    The increase of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB) demands the search for alternative antimycobacterial drugs. The aim of this study was to evaluate plants used in Mexican traditional medicine to treat respiratory diseases for activity against MDR-TB. A group of 22 plants was screened for activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv and Mycobacterium avium at concentrations from 50 to 200 microg/mL. The antimycobacterial effect was determined by a microcolorimetric assay with Alamar blue dye. None of the aqueous extracts had antimycobacterial activity. Hexane extracts from Artemisia ludoviciana, Chamaedora tepejilote, Lantana hispida, Juniperus communis and Malva parviflora, and methanol extracts from Artemisia ludoviciana and Juniperus communis inhibited the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Mycobacterium avium was inhibited by Juniperus communis hexane extract and by Malva parviflora methanol extract. The active extracts were tested against monoresistant variants of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv (isoniazid, rifampin, streptomycin and ethambutol resistant) and the hexane extract of Lantana hispida showed the best activity. Lantana hispida hexane extract was also active against a group of MDR-TB clinical isolates. In contrast, it did not inhibit the growth of non-tuberculous mycobacteria. The hexane extract of Lantana hispida was fractionated by column chromatography and one of its fractions (FVI) inhibited the growth of all the MDR-TB clinical isolates at concentrations up to 25 microg/mL. This study supports the fact that selecting plants by ethnobotanical criteria enhances the probability of finding species with activity against mycobacteria, and our results point to Lantana hispida as an important source of potential compounds against MDR-TB.

  3. Repellent Plants Provide Affordable Natural Screening to Prevent Mosquito House Entry in Tropical Rural Settings—Results from a Pilot Efficacy Study

    PubMed Central

    Mng'ong'o, Frank C.; Sambali, Joseph J.; Sabas, Eustachkius; Rubanga, Justine; Magoma, Jaka; Ntamatungiro, Alex J.; Turner, Elizabeth L.; Nyogea, Daniel; Ensink, Jeroen H. J.; Moore, Sarah J.

    2011-01-01

    Sustained malaria control is underway using a combination of vector control, prompt diagnosis and treatment of malaria cases. Progress is excellent, but for long-term control, low-cost, sustainable tools that supplement existing control programs are needed. Conventional vector control tools such as indoor residual spraying and house screening are highly effective, but difficult to deliver in rural areas. Therefore, an additional means of reducing mosquito house entry was evaluated: the screening of mosquito house entry points by planting the tall and densely foliated repellent plant Lantana camara L. around houses. A pilot efficacy study was performed in Kagera Region, Tanzania in an area of high seasonal malaria transmission, where consenting families within the study village planted L. camara (Lantana) around their homes and were responsible for maintaining the plants. Questionnaire data on house design, socioeconomic status, malaria prevention knowledge, attitude and practices was collected from 231 houses with Lantana planted around them 90 houses without repellent plants. Mosquitoes were collected using CDC Light Traps between September 2008 and July 2009. Data were analysed with generalised negative binomial regression, controlling for the effect of sampling period. Indoor catches of mosquitoes in houses with Lantana were compared using the Incidence Rate Ratio (IRR) relative to houses without plants in an adjusted analysis. There were 56% fewer Anopheles gambiae s.s. (IRR 0.44, 95% CI 0.28–0.68, p<0.0001); 83% fewer Anopheles funestus s.s. (IRR 0.17, 95% CI 0.09–0.32, p<0.0001), and 50% fewer mosquitoes of any kind (IRR 0.50, 95% CI 0.38–0.67, p<0.0001) in houses with Lantana relative to controls. House screening using Lantana reduced indoor densities of malaria vectors and nuisance mosquitoes with broad community acceptance. Providing sufficient plants for one home costs US $1.50 including maintenance and labour costs, (30 cents per person). L. camara

  4. Repellent plants provide affordable natural screening to prevent mosquito house entry in tropical rural settings--results from a pilot efficacy study.

    PubMed

    Mng'ong'o, Frank C; Sambali, Joseph J; Sabas, Eustachkius; Rubanga, Justine; Magoma, Jaka; Ntamatungiro, Alex J; Turner, Elizabeth L; Nyogea, Daniel; Ensink, Jeroen H J; Moore, Sarah J

    2011-01-01

    Sustained malaria control is underway using a combination of vector control, prompt diagnosis and treatment of malaria cases. Progress is excellent, but for long-term control, low-cost, sustainable tools that supplement existing control programs are needed. Conventional vector control tools such as indoor residual spraying and house screening are highly effective, but difficult to deliver in rural areas. Therefore, an additional means of reducing mosquito house entry was evaluated: the screening of mosquito house entry points by planting the tall and densely foliated repellent plant Lantana camara L. around houses. A pilot efficacy study was performed in Kagera Region, Tanzania in an area of high seasonal malaria transmission, where consenting families within the study village planted L. camara (Lantana) around their homes and were responsible for maintaining the plants. Questionnaire data on house design, socioeconomic status, malaria prevention knowledge, attitude and practices was collected from 231 houses with Lantana planted around them 90 houses without repellent plants. Mosquitoes were collected using CDC Light Traps between September 2008 and July 2009. Data were analysed with generalised negative binomial regression, controlling for the effect of sampling period. Indoor catches of mosquitoes in houses with Lantana were compared using the Incidence Rate Ratio (IRR) relative to houses without plants in an adjusted analysis. There were 56% fewer Anopheles gambiae s.s. (IRR 0.44, 95% CI 0.28-0.68, p<0.0001); 83% fewer Anopheles funestus s.s. (IRR 0.17, 95% CI 0.09-0.32, p<0.0001), and 50% fewer mosquitoes of any kind (IRR 0.50, 95% CI 0.38-0.67, p<0.0001) in houses with Lantana relative to controls. House screening using Lantana reduced indoor densities of malaria vectors and nuisance mosquitoes with broad community acceptance. Providing sufficient plants for one home costs US $1.50 including maintenance and labour costs, (30 cents per person). L. camara mode

  5. Plant Species Recovery on a Compacted Skid Road.

    PubMed

    Demir, Murat; Makineci, Ender; Gungor, Beyza Sat

    2008-05-15

    This study was executed to determine the plant species of herbaceous cover in a skid road subjected to soil compaction due to timber skidding in a beech (Fagus orientalis Lipsky.) stand. Our previous studies have shown that ground based timber skidding destroys the soils extremely, and degradations on ecosystem because of the timber skidding limit recovery and growth of plant cover on skid roads. However, some plant species show healthy habitat, recovery and they can survive after the extreme degradation in study area. We evaluated composition of these plant species and their cover-abundance scales in 100 m x 3 m transect. 15 plant species were determined belongs to 12 plant families and Liliaceae was the highest representative plant family. Smilax aspera L., Epimedium pubigerum (DC.) Moren et Decaisne, Carex distachya Desf. var. distachya Desf., Pteridium aquilinum (L.) Kuhn., Trachystemon orientalis (L.) G. Don, Hedera helix L. have the highest coverabundance scale overall of determined species on compacted skid road.

  6. Actions to Abate Critical Threats, Such as Encroachment and Invasive Species, Using GIS and Conservation Area Planning Across the Gulf Coastal Plain Ecosystem Partnership (GCPEP) Landscape, Phase 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-22

    Hog 3 Feral Cat 3 Red Fox 2 Coyote 1 Tropical Gecko Cactus Moth Through the ranking process a number of additional issues...Inability to distribute dead hogs to food banks because of liability and health issues Coyotes / Red Foxes / Feral Cats Note: these pertain...Fern ? ? No None 4. Coyote Throughout Unknown No None 5. Feral Cats Edge Unknown No None (rx burning) 6. Lantana Edge > 10 sq. m Yes None 7

  7. In vitro antibacterial and antitumor activities of some medicinal plant extracts, growing in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Arzu Birinci; Karakas, Fatma Pehlivan; Turker, Arzu Ucar

    2013-08-01

    To investigate antibacterial and antitumor activities of 51 different extracts prepared with 3 types of solvents (water, ethanol and methanol) of 16 different plant species (Ajuga reptans (A. reptans) L., Phlomis pungens (P. pungens) Willd., Marrubium astracanicum (M. astracanicum) Jacq., Nepeta nuda (N. nuda) L., Stachys annua (S. annua) L., Genista lydia (G. lydia) Boiss., Nuphar lutea (N. lutea) L., Nymphaea alba (N. alba) L., Vinca minor (V. minor) L., Stellaria media (S. media) L., Capsella bursa-pastoris (C. bursa-pastoris) L., Galium spurium (G. spurium) L., Onosma heterophyllum (O. heterophyllum) Griseb., Reseda luteola (R. luteola) L., Viburnum lantana (V. lantana) L. and Mercurialis annua (M. annua) L.) grown in Turkey was conducted. Antibacterial activity was evaluated with 10 bacteria including Streptococcus pyogenes (S. pyogenes), Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis), Escheria coli (E. coli), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa), Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium), Serratia marcescens (S. marcescens), Proteus vulgaris (P. vulgaris), Enterobacter cloacae (E. cloacea), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae) by using disc diffusion method. Antitumor activity was evaluated with Agrobacterium tumefaciens (A. tumefaciens)-induced potato disc tumor assay. Best antibacterial activity was obtained with ethanolic extract of P. pungens against S. pyogenes. Ethanolic and methanolic extract of N. alba and ethanolic extract of G. lydia also showed strong antibacterial activities. Results indicated that alcoholic extracts especially ethanolic extracts exhibited strong antibacterial activity against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Best antitumor activity was obtained with methanolic extracts of N. alba and V. lantana (100% tumor inhibition). Ethanolic extract of N. alba, alcoholic extracts of N. lutea, A. reptans and V. minor flowers, methanolic extracts of G. lydia and O. heterophyllum and ethanolic

  8. Ozone air pollution effects on tree-ring growth, delta(13)C, visible foliar injury and leaf gas exchange in three ozone-sensitive woody plant species.

    PubMed

    Novak, Kristopher; Cherubini, Paolo; Saurer, Matthias; Fuhrer, Jürg; Skelly, John M; Kräuchi, Norbert; Schaub, Marcus

    2007-07-01

    We assessed the effects of ambient tropospheric ozone on annual tree-ring growth, delta(13)C in the rings, leaf gas exchange and visible injury in three ozone-sensitive woody plant species in southern Switzerland. Seedlings of Populus nigra L., Viburnum lantana L. and Fraxinus excelsior L. were exposed to charcoal-filtered air (CF) and non-filtered air (NF) in open-top chambers, and to ambient air (AA) in open plots during the 2001 and 2002 growing seasons. Ambient ozone exposures in the region were sufficient to cause visible foliar injury, early leaf senescence and premature leaf loss in all species. Ozone had significant negative effects on net photosynthesis and stomatal conductance in all species in 2002 and in V. lantana and F. excelsior in 2001. Water-use efficiency decreased and intercellular CO(2) concentrations increased in all species in response to ozone in 2002 only. The width and delta(13)C of the 2001 and 2002 growth rings were measured for all species at the end of the 2002 growing season. Compared with CF seedlings, mean ring width in the AA and NF P. nigra seedlings was reduced by 52 and 46%, respectively, in 2002, whereas in V. lantana and F. excelsior, ring width showed no significant reductions in either year. Although delta(13)C was usually more negative in CF seedlings than in AA and NF seedlings, with the exception of F. excelsior in 2001, ozone effects on delta(13)C were significant only for V. lantana and P. nigra in 2001. Among species, P. nigra exhibited the greatest response to ozone for the measured parameters as well as the most severe foliar injury and was the only species to show a significant reduction in ring width in response to ozone exposure, despite significant negative ozone effects on leaf gas exchange and the development of visible foliar injury in V. lantana and F. excelsior. Thus, significant ozone-induced effects at the leaf level did not correspond to reduced tree-ring growth or increased delta(13)C in all species

  9. The ethnobotany of Christ's Thorn Jujube (Ziziphus spina-christi) in Israel

    PubMed Central

    Dafni, Amots; Levy, Shay; Lev, Efraim

    2005-01-01

    This article surveys the ethnobotany of Ziziphus spina-christi (L.) Desf. in the Middle East from various aspects: historical, religious, philological, literary, linguistic, as well as pharmacological, among Muslims, Jews, and Christians. It is suggested that this is the only tree species considered "holy" by Muslims (all the individuals of the species are sanctified by religion) in addition to its status as "sacred tree " (particular trees which are venerated due to historical or magical events related to them, regardless of their botanical identity) in the Middle East. It has also a special status as "blessed tree" among the Druze. PMID:16270941

  10. Decontamination Systems Information and Research Program. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    Progress reports are presented for the following projects: systematic assessment of the state of hazardous waste clean-up technologies; site remediation technologies--drain-enhanced soil flushing (DESF) for organic contaminants removal; excavation systems for hazardous waste sites; chemical destruction of polychlorinated biphenyls; development of organic sensors--monolayer and multilayer self-assembled films for chemical sensors; Winfield Lock and Dam remediation; Winfield cleanup survey; assessment of technologies for hazardous waste site remediation--non-treatment technologies and pilot scale test facility implementation; assessment of environmental remediation storage technology; assessment of environmental remediation excavation technology; assessment of environmental remediation monitoring technology; and remediation of hazardous sites with steam reforming.

  11. A review of the genus Orionis Shaw (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Euphorinae) and first records of the genus from South America and the Oriental Region.

    PubMed

    Bortoni, Marco Aurélio; Shimbori, Eduardo Mitio; Shaw, Scott Richard; Souza-Gessner, Carolina DA Silva; Penteado-Dias, Angélica Maria

    2016-12-16

    Orionis is a small Neotropical euphorine genus, currently in the tribe Perilitini. Although the biology of the genus is unknown, Orionis eximius (Muesebeck) was described from a single female specimen reared from a cocoon associated with Lantana camara. Here, we present a taxonomic revision of Orionis and the first records of the genus from South America and Thailand, with descriptions of three new species: O. brasiliensis sp. nov., O. ecuadoriensis sp. nov. and O. orientalis sp. nov. We also report the first record of O. eximius from South America (Ecuador). A revised key for the described species is presented.

  12. Assessment of Anti-Quorum Sensing Activity for Some Ornamental and Medicinal Plants Native to Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Zaki, Ahmed A.; Shaaban, Mona I.; Hashish, Nadia E.; Amer, Mohamed A.; Lahloub, Mohamed-Farid

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of some plant extracts on the bacterial communication system, expressed as quorum sensing (QS) activity. Quorum sensing has a directly proportional effect on the amount of certain compounds, such as pigments, produced by the bacteria. Alcohol extracts of 23 ornamental and medicinal plants were tested for anti-QS activity by the Chromobacterium violaceum assay using the agar cup diffusion method. The screening revealed the anti-QS activity of six plants; namely the leaves of Adhatoda vasica Nees, Bauhinia purpurea L., Lantana camara L., Myoporum laetum G. Forst.; the fruits of Piper longum L.; and the aerial parts of Taraxacum officinale F.H. Wigg. PMID:23641343

  13. Plant Species Recovery on a Compacted Skid Road

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Murat; Makineci, Ender; Gungor, Beyza Sat

    2008-01-01

    This study was executed to determine the plant species of herbaceous cover in a skid road subjected to soil compaction due to timber skidding in a beech (Fagus orientalis Lipsky.) stand. Our previous studies have shown that ground based timber skidding destroys the soils extremely, and degradations on ecosystem because of the timber skidding limit recovery and growth of plant cover on skid roads. However, some plant species show healthy habitat, recovery and they can survive after the extreme degradation in study area. We evaluated composition of these plant species and their cover-abundance scales in 100 m x 3 m transect. 15 plant species were determined belongs to 12 plant families and Liliaceae was the highest representative plant family. Smilax aspera L., Epimedium pubigerum (DC.) Moren et Decaisne, Carex distachya Desf. var. distachya Desf., Pteridium aquilinum (L.) Kuhn., Trachystemon orientalis (L.) G. Don, Hedera helix L. have the highest cover-abundance scale overall of determined species on compacted skid road. PMID:27879869

  14. Virucidal activity and chemical composition of essential oils from aromatic plants of central west Argentina.

    PubMed

    García, Cybele C; Acosta, Eliana G; Carro, Ana C; Fernández Belmonte, María C; Bomben, Renata; Duschatzky, Claudia B; Perotti, Marina; Schuff, Carola; Damonte, Elsa B

    2010-08-01

    The essential oils of seven aromatic plants from central west Argentina were isolated by steam distillation and analyzed by a gas chromatography/mass spectrometry technique. The oils were screened for cytotoxicity and in vitro inhibitory activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), dengue virus type 2 (DENV-2) and Junin virus (JUNV). The oils showed a variable virucidal action according to the virus. JUNV was the least susceptible virus in comparison with HSV-1 and DENV-2. The better relationship between cytotoxicity and inhibitory activity was observed for the essential oil of Lantana grisebachiii (Seckt.) var. grisebachii against DENV-2 and HSV-1 with IC50 (inhibitory concentration 50%) values of 21.1 and 26.1 ppm, respectively. This effect was specific since the selectivity indices (ratio cytotoxicity/virucidal activity) were > 23.7 and > 19.1 for DENV-2 and HSV-1, respectively. Furthermore, the oil from L. grisebachii was also an effective inhibitor of HSV-2 and acyclovir resistant variants of herpes virus. This study demonstrates the effective and selective inhibitory activity of the essential oil from Lantana grisebachii against HSV and DENV by direct virus inactivation.

  15. In vitro antibacterial activity of selected medicinal plants from lower Himalayas.

    PubMed

    Zulqarnain; Rahim, Abdur; Ahmad, Khalid; Ullah, Faizan; Ullah, Hamid; Nishan, Umar

    2015-03-01

    The present studies cover antibacterial activity of the crude methanolic extracts of 11 medicinal plants viz. Adhatoda vasica, Bauhenia variegate, Bombax ceiba, Carrisa opaca, Caryopteris grata, Debregeasia salicifolia, Lantana camara, Melia azedarach, Phyllanthus emblica, Pinus roxburghii and Olea ferruginea collected from lower Himalayas against two Gram positive (Staphylococcus aureus, Micrococcus luteus) and two Gram negative (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aureginosa) bacterial strains. The extracts were applied at four different concentrations (120 mg/mL, 90mg/mL, 60mg/mL and 30mg/mL) in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) by using agar well diffusion method. Antibacterial activities against Staphylococcus aureus and Micrococcus luteus were observed formethanolic extracts of all the above mentioned plants. Greater antibacterial activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa was only exhibited by Phyllanthus emblica, Pinus roxburghii, Debregeasia salicifolia and Lantana camara. Escherichia coli was highly resistant to all the plant extracts at all concentrations. It is inferred that methanolic crude extracts of the above mentioned plantsexhibitantibacterial activities against pathogenic bacteria, which proved the ethnobotanical importance of the selected plants that indigenous people use for cure against various diseases.

  16. Antimicrobial agents from selected medicinal plants in Libya.

    PubMed

    Muhaisen, Hasan M H; Ab-Mous, Miftah Mailoud; Ddeeb, Fadel A; Rtemi, Aboclaid Ali; Taba, Omer M; Parveen, Mehtab

    2016-03-01

    To test the in vitro antimicrobial efficacy of water and methanol extracts of 23 plant species that are commonly used in Libyan folk medicine. The antimicrobial activity was determined using the well-diffusion method. Four test microorganisms were used namely, Escherichia coli, Salmonella species, Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined for the high biologically active crude plant extracts. Among 23 medicinal plants used in the study, only 5 methanolic extracts [Rosmarinus offcinalis L., Carduus marianium L., Lantana camara L., Rhus tripartite (ueria) Grande, and Thymus capitatus (L.) Hoffm (link)] showed the highest antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis and Salmonella species, while 22 methanolic and aqueous extracts showed moderate to weak antimicrobial activity on all tested organisms. However 19 of the extracts showed no activity at all against Gram-ve and Gram +ve microorganisms. MIC was found to be 1.25 mg/mL (Thymus capitatus), 3 mg/mL (Rhus tripartite), 4 mg/mL (Carduus marianium), 5 mg/mL (Rosamarinus officinalis) and 5 mg/mL (Lantana camara), respectively. The present results revealed that, crude methanolic extracts of the investigated Libyan folk medicinal plants exhibited mild to high in vitro antibacterial activities against Gram-positive and Gram-negative microorganisms.

  17. Investigation on the mineral contents of capers (Capparis spp.) seed oils growing wild in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, M Musa

    2008-09-01

    Minor and major mineral contents of seed oils of Capparis ovata Desf. var. canescens (Coss.) Heywood and Capparis spinosa var. spinosa used as pickling products in Turkey were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. The seed oils contained Al, P, Na, Mg, Fe, and Ca, in addition to fatty acids. The highest mineral concentrations measured were 14.91-118.81 mg/kg Al, 1,489.34-11,523.74 mg/kg P, 505.78-4,489.51 mg/kg Na, 102.15-1,655.33 mg/kg Mg, 78.83-298.14 mg/kg Fe, and 1.04-76.39 mg/kg Ca. The heavy metal concentrations were less than the limit of detection in all oil samples. The results may also be useful for the evaluation of nutritional information.

  18. Glucosinolate composition of young shoots and flower buds of capers (Capparis species) growing wild in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Matthäus, Bertrand; Ozcan, Musa

    2002-12-04

    The content and glucosinolate composition of young shoots and raw flower buds of Capparis spinosa var. spinosa and Capparis ovata Desf. var. canescens at three different sizes (x 13 mm) were investigated by HPLC with UV detection. Samples were harvested in August 2001 in Turkey. Twelve different glucosinolates were identified in the young shoots and buds of both species. Total content of glucosinolates ranged from 6.55 micromol/g (large buds of C. spinosa) to 45.56 micromol/g (young shoots of C. ovata). The main glucosinolate was glucocapperin, which amounted to approximately 90% of the total glucosinolates. In both species the total glucosinolate content varied in dependence on the bud size, whereas a greater variability was given for buds from C. spinosa.

  19. Characterization of four wild edible Carduus species from the Mediterranean region via phytochemical and biomolecular analyses.

    PubMed

    Marengo, Arianna; Maxia, Andrea; Sanna, Cinzia; Bertea, Cinzia M; Bicchi, Carlo; Ballero, Mauro; Cagliero, Cecilia; Rubiolo, Patrizia

    2017-10-01

    Carduus species (Compositae) are widely distributed in the Mediterranean area, and traditionally used for both food and medicinal purposes. The hydroalcoholic extracts of four wild edible Carduus species collected in Sardinia (Carduus argyroa Biv., Carduus nutans subsp. macrocephalus (Desf.) Nyman, Carduus pycnocephalus L., Carduus cephalanthus Viv.) were analyzed and characterized by HPLC-PDA-MS/MS and PCR-RFLP of the nrDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS). Flavonoids and caffeoylquinic acid derivatives were the predominant classes of secondary metabolites characterizing the extracts. The ITS region was sequenced in parallel, and a PCR-RFLP method was applied with three selective restriction enzymes. Statistical analyses, on both chemical and biomolecular results, revealed that individuals clustered according to their taxonomic classification. The combination of the two techniques discriminates the four species within the genus, giving further information on these little-investigated plants, traditionally used in the Mediterranean area and in Sardinia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Proteotyping of Holm oak (Quercus ilex subsp. ballota) provenances through proteomic analysis of acorn flour.

    PubMed

    Galván, José Valero; Fernández, Raquel González; Valledor, Luis; Cerrillo, Rafael Ma Navarro; Jorrin-Novo, Jesus V

    2014-01-01

    Proteomics has become a powerful tool to characterize biodiversity and natural variability in plant species, as well as to catalogue and establish phylogenetic relationships and distances among populations, provenances or ecotypes. In this chapter, we describe the standard proteomics workflow that we currently use in cataloguing Holm oak (Quercus ilex subsp. ballota [Desf.] Samp.) populations. Proteins are extracted from acorn flour or pollen by TCA/acetone or TCA/acetone-phenol methods, resolved by one- or two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and gel images are captured and analyzed by appropriate software and statistical packages. Quantitative or qualitative variable bands or spots are subjected to MS analysis in order to identify them and correlate differences in the protein profile with the phenotypes or environmental conditions.

  1. Elemental mapping of biofortified wheat grains using micro X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, I.; Pataco, I. M.; Mourinho, M. P.; Lidon, F.; Reboredo, F.; Pessoa, M. F.; Carvalho, M. L.; Santos, J. P.; Guerra, M.

    2016-06-01

    Micro X-ray fluorescence has been used to obtain elemental maps of biofortified wheat grains. Two varieties of wheat were used in the study, Triticum aestivum L. and Triticum durum desf. Two treatments, with different nutrient concentration, were applied to the plants during the whole plant growth cycle. From the obtained elemental maps it was possible to extract information regarding the plant's physiological processes under the biofortification procedures. Both macro and micronutrients were mapped, providing useful insight into the posterior food processing mechanisms of this biofortified staple food. We have also shown that these kind of studies can now be performed with laboratory benchtop apparatus, rather than using synchrotron radiation, increasing the overall attractiveness of micro X-ray fluorescence in the study of highly heterogeneous biological samples.

  2. Levels, spatial variation and compartmentalization of trace elements in brown algae Cystoseira from marine protected areas of Crimea (Black Sea).

    PubMed

    Kravtsova, Alexandra V; Milchakova, Nataliya A; Frontasyeva, Marina V

    2015-08-15

    Levels of Al, Sc, V, Co, Ni, As, Br, Rb, Sr, Ag, Sb, I, Cs, Ba, Th and U that were rarely or never studied, as well as the concentrations of classically investigated Mn, Fe and Zn in brown algae Cystoseira barbata C. Ag. and Cystoseira crinita (Desf.) Bory from the coastal waters of marine protected areas (Crimea, Black Sea), were determined using neutron activation analysis. Spatial variation and compartmentalization were studied for all 19 trace elements (TE). Concentrations of most TE were higher in "branches" than in "stems". Spatial variations of V, Co, Ni and Zn can be related to anthropogenic activities while Al, Sc, Fe, Rb, Cs, Th and U varied depending on chemical peculiarities of the coastal zone rocks. TE concentrations in C. crinita from marine protected areas near Tarkhankut peninsula and Cape Fiolent, identified as the most clean water areas, are submitted as the background concentrations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Flavonoids with antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities from the leaves of Tilia argentea (silver linden).

    PubMed

    Toker, Gülnur; Küpeli, Esra; Memisoğlu, Merve; Yesilada, Erdem

    2004-12-01

    Silver linden, Tilia argentea Desf. ex DC (Tiliaceae) leaves are used in the treatment of common cold and bronchitis. In order to evaluate this information, antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of the two main flavonoid glycosides: kaempferol-3,7-O-alpha-dirhamnoside and quercetin-3,7-O-alpha-dirhamnoside isolated from the leaves, were investigated. For the antinociceptive activity, p-benzoquinone-induced writhing test and for the anti-inflammatory activity, carrageenan-induced hind paw edema model in mice were used. Both compounds were shown to possess potent antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activity at 50 mg/kg dose, per os, without inducing any apparent acute toxicity as well as gastric damage.

  4. Comparative activity of garenoxacin and other agents by susceptibility and time-kill testing against Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes and respiratory pathogens.

    PubMed

    Noviello, Silvana; Ianniello, Filomena; Leone, Sebastiano; Esposito, Silvano

    2003-11-01

    Garenoxacin is a novel des-F(6)quinolone that has shown excellent antimicrobial activity against a wide range of clinically important microorganisms. In this study, its activity was examined, in comparison with that of other antimicrobial agents, by susceptibility and time-kill testing against Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes and respiratory pathogens. Overall, 200 bacterial strains were tested. The antimicrobial activity of garenoxacin was compared with that of ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, amoxicillin, co-amoxiclav, cefuroxime, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, imipenem, erythromycin and clarithromycin. In addition, the bactericidal activity of garenoxacin, moxifloxacin, levofloxacin and ciprofloxacin was evaluated by time-kill analysis against four strains each of staphylococci [two methicillin-susceptible (MSSA) and two methicillin-resistant (MRSA)], pneumococci (two penicillin-susceptible and two penicillin-resistant) and Streptococcus pyogenes (two erythromycin-susceptible and two erythromycin-resistant). Antibiotics were tested at concentrations 1-8 x MIC. MIC90 values of garenoxacin for the MSSA and MRSA strains were 0.03 and 2 mg/L, respectively. Among all the quinolones tested, garenoxacin yielded the lowest MIC values against all pneumococci (MIC90 0.12 mg/L) irrespective of macrolide resistance; the rank order of activity was garenoxacin> moxifloxacin>levofloxacin>ciprofloxacin. Excellent activity was shown also against Haemophilus influenzae (MIC90 or= 3 log10 decrease in viable counts (cfu/mL) within 3 h at 4 x MIC, whereas a moderate, slower killing rate was observed versus streptococci. This investigational des-F(6)quinolone represents a

  5. Torrefaction of invasive alien plants: Influence of heating rate and other conversion parameters on mass yield and higher heating value.

    PubMed

    Mundike, Jhonnah; Collard, François-Xavier; Görgens, Johann F

    2016-06-01

    With the aim of controlling their proliferation, two invasive alien plants, Lantana camara (LC) and Mimosa pigra (MP), both widespread in Africa, were considered for torrefaction for renewable energy applications. Using thermogravimetric analysis, the influence of heating rate (HR: 2.18-19.82°Cmin(-1)) together with variable temperature and hold time on char yield and HHV (in a bomb calorimeter) were determined. Statistically significant effects of HR on HHV with optima at 10.5°Cmin(-1) for LC and 20°Cmin(-1) for MP were obtained. Increases of HHV up to 0.8MJkg(-1) or energy yield greater than 10%, together with a 3-fold reduction in torrefaction conversion time could be achieved by optimisation of HR. Analysis of the torrefaction volatiles by TG-MS showed that not only hemicelluloses, but also lignin conversion, could influence the optimum HR value.

  6. Preferences and non-preferences for nectar constituents inOrnithoptera priamus poseidon (Lepidoptera, Papilionidae).

    PubMed

    Erhardt, Andreas

    1992-07-01

    Preferences for nectar sugars and amino acids ofOrnithoptera priamus butterflies were tested experimentally. Both male and female butterflies clearly preferred a sucrose solution over a glucose solution of equal concentration (25%, weight to total weight) and equally a fructose solution over a glucose solution. A significant trend of males to prefer fructose over sucrose and of females to prefer sucrose over fructose was detected. However, neither males nor females discriminated between a mimic ofLantana camara nectar containing amino acids and a corresponding plain sugar solution. These results suggest that butterflies select against glucose in floral nectar but do not support the hypothesis that butterflies select for high levels of amino acids in nectar. The rather unspecific response ofOrnithoptera priamus butterflies to the tested nectar constituents may reflect a generalist feeding strategy of these long-lived and spectacular butterflies.

  7. Rapid nectar-meal effects on a predator's capacity to kill mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Carvell, Georgina E.; Kuja, Josiah O.; Jackson, Robert R.

    2015-01-01

    Using Evarcha culicivora, an East African jumping spider (Salticidae), we investigate how nectar meals function in concert with predation specifically at the juvenile stage between emerging from the egg sac and the first encounter with prey. Using plants and using artificial nectar consisting of sugar alone or sugar plus amino acids, we show that the plant species (Lantana camara, Ricinus communis, Parthenium hysterophorus), the particular sugars in the artificial nectar (sucrose, fructose, glucose, maltose), the concentration of sugar (20%, 5%, 1%) and the duration of pre-feeding fasts (3 days, 6 days) influence the spider's prey-capture proficiency on the next day after the nectar meal. However, there were no significant effects of amino acids. Our findings suggest that benefits from nectar feeding are derived primarily from access to particular sugars, with fructose and sucrose being the most beneficial, glucose being intermediate and maltose being no better than a water-only control. PMID:26064651

  8. Contrasting ozone sensitivity in related evergreen and deciduous shrubs.

    PubMed

    Calatayud, Vicent; Marco, Francisco; Cerveró, Júlia; Sánchez-Peña, Gerardo; Sanz, María José

    2010-12-01

    Plant responses to enhanced ozone levels have been studied in two pairs of evergreen-deciduous species (Pistacia terebinthus vs. P. lentiscus; Viburnum lantana vs. V. tinus) in Open Top Chambers. Ozone induced widespread visible injury, significantly reduced CO(2) assimilation and stomatal conductance (g(s)), impaired Rubisco efficiency and regeneration capacity (V(c,max,)J(max)) and altered fluorescence parameters only in the deciduous species. Differences in stomatal conductance could not explain the observed differences in sensitivity. In control plants, deciduous species showed higher superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity than their evergreen counterparts, suggesting metabolic differences that could make them more prone to redox imbalances. Ozone induced increases in SOD and/or peroxidase activities in all the species, but only evergreens were able to cope with the oxidative stress. The relevancy of these results for the effective ozone flux approach and for the current ozone Critical Levels is also discussed.

  9. Growth and Landscape Performance of Ten Herbaceous Species in Response to Saline Water Irrigation1

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Genhua; Rodriguez, Denise S.; Aguiniga, Lizzie

    2009-01-01

    Ten herbaceous perennials and groundcovers were grown in raised beds from June to September in a dry, hot desert environment and micro-spray drip irrigated with synthesized saline solutions at electrical conductivity of 0.8 (tap water), 3.2, or 5.4 dS/m. Plant height and two perpendicular widths were recorded monthly to calculate the growth index. Landscape performance was assessed monthly by visual scores. Salinity did not affect the visual scores in Achillea millefolium L., Gaillardia aristata Pursh, Lantana x hybrida ‘New Gold’, Lonicera japonica Thunb. ‘Halliana’, and Rosmarinus officinalis L. ‘Huntington Carpet’ throughout the experiment. Glandularia canadensis (L.) Nutt. ‘Homestead Purple’ performed better than Glandularia x hybrida (Grönland & Rümpler) G. L. Nesom & Pruski. Lantana montevidensis (Spreng.) Brig. had lower visual scores at 5.4 dS/m compared to the control and 3.2 dS/m. Most plants of Rudbeckia hirta L. did not survive when irrigated at 3.2 dS/m or 5.4 dS/m. Shoot biomass of A. millefolium, G. aristata, L. x hybrida, L. japonica, R. officinalis, and V. macdougalii was not influenced by the salinity of irrigation water. Therefore, A. millefolium, G. aristata, L. x hybrida, L. japonica, and R. officinalis can be irrigated with non-potable water at salinity up to 5.4 dS/m with little reduction in growth and aesthetic appearance. PMID:20585473

  10. Longitudinal evaluation of Ocimum and other plants effects on the feeding behavioral response of mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) in the field in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Kweka, Eliningaya J; Mosha, Franklin W; Lowassa, Asanterabi; Mahande, Aneth M; Mahande, Michael J; Massenga, Charles P; Tenu, Filemoni; Lyatuu, Ester E; Mboya, Michael A; Temu, Emmanuel A

    2008-01-01

    Background The use of repellent materials from plants against nuisance insects is common with great potential to compliment existing malaria control programmes and this requires evaluation in the field. Ocimum plant species, Ocimum suave (Willd) and O. kilimandscharicum (Guerke) materials and their essential oils extracted by steam distillation were evaluated in the field and experimental huts for repellence, exophily and feeding inhibition effects against three mosquito species, Anopheles arabiensis (Patton), An. gambiae ss (Giles) and Culex quinquefasciatus (Say). The protective effect of essential oils from Ocimum plants were compared with N, N-diethly-3- methylbenzamide (DEET), a standard synthetic repellent. Also, the protective effect of fumigation by burning of repellent plants; Ocimum suave, Ocimum kilimandscharicum, Azadirachta indica, Eucalyptus globules and Lantana camara were tested in experimental huts and selected local houses. Results In the field, protection by Ocimum plants from mosquito bites was high and there was small variation among different mosquito species. Protection efficiency was 93.4%, 91.98% and 89.75% for An. arabiensis while for Cx. quinquefaciatus it was 91.30%, 88.65% and 90.50% for DEET, Ocimum suave and O. kilimandscharicum respectively. In the experimental hut, deterrence induced by burning of Ocimum and other plants ranged from 73.1.0% to 81.9% for An. arabiensis and 56.5% to 67.8% for Cx. quinquefaciatus, while feeding inhibition was 61.1% to 100% for An. arabiensis and 50% to 100% for Cx. quinquefaciatus. Evaluations under field conditions confirmed high protective efficacy, enhanced feeding inhibition and house entry inhibition (Deterrence). Conclusion This study shows the potential of Ocimum suave and Ocimum kilimandscharicum crude extracts and whole plants of Ocimum suave, Ocimum kilimandscharicum, Azadirachta indica, Eucalyptus globules and Lantana camara for use in protecting against human biting while the burning of

  11. Longitudinal evaluation of Ocimum and other plants effects on the feeding behavioral response of mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) in the field in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Kweka, Eliningaya J; Mosha, Franklin W; Lowassa, Asanterabi; Mahande, Aneth M; Mahande, Michael J; Massenga, Charles P; Tenu, Filemoni; Lyatuu, Ester E; Mboya, Michael A; Temu, Emmanuel A

    2008-10-22

    The use of repellent materials from plants against nuisance insects is common with great potential to compliment existing malaria control programmes and this requires evaluation in the field. Ocimum plant species, Ocimum suave (Willd) and O. kilimandscharicum (Guerke) materials and their essential oils extracted by steam distillation were evaluated in the field and experimental huts for repellence, exophily and feeding inhibition effects against three mosquito species, Anopheles arabiensis (Patton), An. gambiae ss (Giles) and Culex quinquefasciatus (Say). The protective effect of essential oils from Ocimum plants were compared with N, N-diethly-3- methylbenzamide (DEET), a standard synthetic repellent. Also, the protective effect of fumigation by burning of repellent plants; Ocimum suave, Ocimum kilimandscharicum, Azadirachta indica, Eucalyptus globules and Lantana camara were tested in experimental huts and selected local houses. In the field, protection by Ocimum plants from mosquito bites was high and there was small variation among different mosquito species. Protection efficiency was 93.4%, 91.98% and 89.75% for An. arabiensis while for Cx. quinquefaciatus it was 91.30%, 88.65% and 90.50% for DEET, Ocimum suave and O. kilimandscharicum respectively. In the experimental hut, deterrence induced by burning of Ocimum and other plants ranged from 73.1.0% to 81.9% for An. arabiensis and 56.5% to 67.8% for Cx. quinquefaciatus, while feeding inhibition was 61.1% to 100% for An. arabiensis and 50% to 100% for Cx. quinquefaciatus. Evaluations under field conditions confirmed high protective efficacy, enhanced feeding inhibition and house entry inhibition (Deterrence). This study shows the potential of Ocimum suave and Ocimum kilimandscharicum crude extracts and whole plants of Ocimum suave, Ocimum kilimandscharicum, Azadirachta indica, Eucalyptus globules and Lantana camara for use in protecting against human biting while the burning of plants reduces significantly the

  12. Metal phytoremediation potential of naturally growing plants on fly ash dumpsite of Patratu thermal power station, Jharkhand, India.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Shikha Kumari; Bhattacharya, Tanushree; Chakraborty, Sukalyan

    2016-01-01

    Three naturally growing plants Ipomoea carnea, Lantana camara, and Solanum surattense were found in fly ash dumpsite of Patratu thermal power station, Jharkhand, India. They were assessed for their metal uptake potential. The fly ash was slightly alkaline with very less nitrogen and organic carbon but enriched with phosphorus and heavy metals. Lantana camara and Ipomoea carnea showed good translocation from root to shoot for most of the metals except Mn and Pb. The order of metal accumulation in stem of both the plants were Fe(205mg/kg)>Mn(65mg/kg)>Cu(22.35mg/kg)>Pb(6.6mg/kg)>Cr(3.05mg/kg)>Ni(1 mg/kg)>Cd(0.5 mg/kg) and Fe(741 mg/kg)>Mn(154.05 mg/kg)>Cu(20.75 mg/kg)>Pb(6.75 mg/kg)>Ni(4.0 mg/kg)>Cr(3.3mg/kg)>Cd(0.05mg/kg), respectively. But Solanum surattense accumulated most of the metals in roots. The order was in the following order, Mn (382.2mg/kg) >Fe (264.1mg/kg) > Cu (25.35mg/kg) >Pb (5.95 mg/kg) > Ni (1.9 mg/kg) > Cr (1.8mg/kg) > Cd (0.55 mg/kg). The order of Bioconcentration factor (BCF) in root and shoot followed almost the same order as, Mn>Fe>Ni>Pb>Cu>Cr≈ Cd in all the three species. ANOVA showed significant variation in metal accumulation by root and stem between the species. Finally, it can be concluded that Solanum surattense can be used as phytostabilizer and other two species as phytoextractor of metal for fly ash dumpsite reclamation.

  13. High molecular weight glutenin subunits in some durum wheat cultivars investigated by means of mass spectrometric techniques.

    PubMed

    Muccilli, Vera; Lo Bianco, Marisol; Cunsolo, Vincenzo; Saletti, Rosaria; Gallo, Giulia; Foti, Salvatore

    2011-11-23

    The primary structures of high molecular weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS) of 5 Triticum durum Desf. cultivars (Simeto, Svevo, Duilio, Bronte, and Sant'Agata), largely cultivated in the south of Italy, and of 13 populations of the old spring Sicilian durum wheat landrace Timilia (Triticum durum Desf.) (accession nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 8, 9, 13, 14, 15, SG1, SG2, and SG3) were investigated using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS) and reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography/nanoelectrospray ionization mass spectrometry (RP-HPLC/nESI-MS/MS). M(r) of the intact proteins determined by MALDI mass spectrometry showed that all the 13 populations of Timilia contained the same two HMW-GS with 75.2 kDa and 86.4 kDa, whereas the other durum wheat cultivars showed the presence of the expected HMW-GS 1By8 and 1Bx7 at 75.1 kDa and 83.1 kDa, respectively. By MALDI mass spectrometry of the tryptic digestion peptides of the isolated HMW-GS of Timilia, the 1Bx and 1By subunits were identified as the NCBInr Acc. No AAQ93629, and AAQ93633, respectively. Sequence verification for HMW-GS 1Bx and 1By both in Simeto and Timilia was obtained by MALDI mass mapping and HPLC/nESI-MSMS of the tryptic peptides. The Bx subunit of Timila presents a sequence similarity of 96% with respect to Simeto, with differences in the insertion of 3 peptides of 5, 9, and 15 amino acids, for a total insertion of 29 amino acids and 25 amino acid substitutions. These differences in the amino acidic sequence account for the determined Δm of 3294 Da between the M(r) of the 1Bx subunits in Timilia and Simeto. Sequence alignment between the two By subunits shows 10 amino acid substitutions and is consistent with the Δm of 148 Da found in the MALDI mass spectra of the intact subunits.

  14. Ethnobotanical investigations on plants used in folk medicine in the regions of Constantine and Mila (North-East of Algeria).

    PubMed

    Ouelbani, Rayene; Bensari, Souheir; Mouas, Toma Nardjes; Khelifi, Douadi

    2016-12-24

    Constantine and Mila regions have been investigated in an ethnobotanical study for the first time. A total of 102 medicinal plants have been cited to treat human ailments. Twenty-eight new species of 31 common plants with 151 new therapeutic applications and 12 new cited species including one endemic specie Zygophyllum cornutum Coss were found as compared to other Algerian regions. In addition, to the best of our knowledge, 369 new medicinal uses of 75 known plants, were reported for the first time in the Mediterranean basin. This study is aimed at contributing to safeguard world cultural heritage and document ethnomedicinal uses of plants in Algeria and the Mediterranean basin; data on the national and global uses in the world were obtained to extract new potential species for further phytochemical and clinical investigations. The survey was carried out in two cities in the northeast of Algeria: Constantine and Mila. It was based on semi-structured interviews of 79 local informants. Data were analyzed using quantitative indices, namely, informant consensus factor, fidelity level (FL), use value (UV), and relative frequency citation (RFC), to evaluate the reliability and richness of herbal knowledge in the region. The interviewed persons used 102 plant species belonging to 90 genera and distributed among 53 families, represented mainly by Lamiaceae, Apiaceae, and Asteraceae (30%, 13%, and 10%, respectively), which were used to treat 14 ailment categories. The category of most frequent ailments (16%) was digestive disorders (diarrhea, constipation, and stomach bloating). The highest RFC was found for Origanum glandulosum Desf. With regard to the fidelity level, a higher FL was found for Tilia cordata Mill. (100%), followed by Artemisia herba alba Asso. with an FL of 95.74% and Punica granatum L. with an FL of 93.09%) to treat gastrointestinal system diseases, and Aloe sp. L. with an FL of 96.67% for skin diseases. The highest UV was found for Origanum glandulosum

  15. Ethnomedicinal uses of plants in the treatment of paediatric geohelminth infections in Kalat district of Northern Balochistan, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Bibi, Tahira; Ahmad, Mushtaq; Edwards, Sarah E; Tareen, Niaz Mohammad; Jabeen, Rukhsana; Abdullah, Irum

    2016-05-13

    Rech.f., Plantago ciliata Desf., Pistacia atlantica Desf., Seriphidium quettense (Podlech) Y.R.Ling and Thymus linearis Benth. are reported here as anthelmintics for the first time. Detailed studies on the anthelmintic activity of chemical constituents of these species are lacking from existing literature. Further phytochemical, pharmacological and toxicity studies are required in order to evaluate the efficacy and safety of these newly reported anthelmintic species. These plants may provide a source of novel anthelmintic drug leads, which are urgently required due to the problem of global anthelmintic resistance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Antinociceptive effect of methanol extract of Capparis ovata in mice.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Rana; Bektas, Nurcan

    2010-10-01

    Capparis ovata Desf. (Capparaceae) grows widely in Turkey. Flower buds and fruits of the plant are used in folk medicine for their analgesic, antirheumatismal, and diuretic effects. This study evaluated the possible antinociceptive effect of the methanol extract of C. ovata (CME) in mice. The antinociceptive effect of methanol extract, prepared with the C. ovata flower buds, was studied at the doses of 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg (i.p.) using tail-immersion, hot-plate, and writhing tests in mice. Morphine sulfate (5 mg/kg; i.p.) and dipyrone (100 mg/kg; i.p.) were used as reference analgesic agents. Naloxone (5 mg/kg; i.p.) was also tested. It was observed that the C. ovata extract had a significant antinociceptive effect in these tests. In the hot-plate and tail-immersion test results, the doses of 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg increased the percentage of the maximum possible effect (MPE%) value for nociception significantly according to the control value (P < 0.001). All doses of the extract decreased the number of acetic acid-induced abdominal constrictions in mice when compared with control group (P < 0.001). These effects were inhibited by pretreatment with naloxone. Based on the results obtained, it can be concluded that CME is a potentially antinociceptive agent which acts as both at the peripheral and central levels.

  17. A systematic assessment of the state of hazardous waste clean-up technologies. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, M.T.; Reed, B.E.; Gabr, M.

    1993-07-01

    West Virginia University (WVU) and the US DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) entered into a Cooperative Agreement on August 29, 1992 entitled ``Decontamination Systems Information and Research Programs.`` Stipulated within the Agreement is the requirement that WVU submit to METC a series of Technical Progress Report for Year 1 of the Agreement. This report reflects the progress and/or efforts performed on the following nine technical projects encompassed by the Year 1 Agreement for the period of April 1 through June 30, 1993: Systematic assessment of the state of hazardous waste clean-up technologies; site remediation technologies -- drain-enhanced soil flushing (DESF) for organic contaminants removal; site remediation technologies -- in situ bioremediation of organic contaminants; excavation systems for hazardous waste sites; chemical destruction of polychlorinated biphenyls; development of organic sensors -- monolayer and multilayer self-assembled films for chemical sensors; Winfield lock and dam remediation; Assessments of Technologies for hazardous waste site remediation -- non-treatment technologies and pilot scale test facility implementation; and remediation of hazardous sites with stream reforming.

  18. Lipid Composition and Protein Dynamics in Thylakoids of Two Wheat Cultivars Differently Sensitive to Drought.

    PubMed Central

    Quartacci, M. F.; Pinzino, C.; Sgherri, CLM.; Navari-Izzo, F.

    1995-01-01

    Two wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) cultivars with different sensitivities to drought were either grown under regular irrigation or subjected to water deficit by withholding water for 14 d. Water-stressed plants of both cultivars underwent similar decreases in leaf water potential, but the drought-tolerant cultivar showed higher relative water content and turgor. Neither osmotic nor elastic adjustment mechanisms appeared to be active under the conditions described here. Thylakoids isolated from the stressed, drought-tolerant wheat showed an increase in lipid-to-protein ratio, in comparison with the control, whereas this ratio remained unchanged in the sensitive wheat. In both cultivars, water deficit determined different rearrangements in the composition of the thylakoid individual polar lipids, but their unsaturation level remained unaffected with the exception of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol. In the drought-sensitive cultivar, an accumulation of free fatty acids together with a reduction in polar lipid amount was observed. Electron paramagnetic resonance measurements of spin-labeled proteins of stressed plants from the sensitive cv Adamello showed a higher spin label rotational correlation time together with lower sulphydryl group and mobile proteic portion levels, in comparison with the control. In the tolerant cv Ofanto, the first two parameters changed to a lesser extent following water depletion, and the mobile proteic portion was not altered. PMID:12228463

  19. Physiological Characterization of Two Genes for Na+ Exclusion in Durum Wheat, Nax1 and Nax21

    PubMed Central

    James, Richard A.; Davenport, Romola J.; Munns, Rana

    2006-01-01

    Durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L. subsp. durum Desf.) Line 149 contains two novel major genes for excluding Na+ from leaf blades, named Nax1 and Nax2. The genes were separated into families containing a single gene and near-isogenic homozygous lines were selected. Lines containing either Nax1 or Nax2 had lower rates of Na+ transport from roots to shoots than their near-isogenic pairs due to lower rates of net loading of the xylem, not to lower rates of net uptake from the soil or higher rates of retranslocation in the phloem. Nax1 and Nax2 lines also had higher rates of K+ transport from root to shoot, resulting in an enhanced discrimination of K+ over Na+. Lines containing Nax1 differed from those containing Nax2 by unloading Na+ from the xylem as it entered the shoot so that Na+ was retained in the base of the leaf, leading to a high sheath to blade ratio of Na+ concentration. Gradients in tissue concentrations of Na+ along the leaf suggested that Na+ was continually removed from the xylem. The Nax2 line did not retain Na+ in the base of the leaf, suggesting that it functioned only in the root. The Nax2 gene therefore has a similar function to Kna1 in bread wheat (Triticum aestivum). PMID:17028150

  20. Susceptibility of different European populations of Tribolium confusum (coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) to five diatomaceous earth formulations.

    PubMed

    Vayias, B J; Athanassiou, C G; Kavallieratos, N G; Buchelos, C Th

    2006-10-01

    Laboratory bioassays were conducted to evaluate the susceptibility of seven populations (strains) of the confused flour beetle, Tribolium confusum Jacquelin du Val (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), to five commercially available diatomaceous earth (DE) formulations: Insecto, Protect-It, Protector, PyriSec, and SilicoSec. These DEs were applied on wheat, Triticum durum Desf., at two dose rates, 500 and 1000 ppm. The six beetle strains were obtained from Denmark, United Kingdom, Greece, Germany, Italy, and Portugal, whereas a seventh strain came from the Greek strain after laboratory selection with SilicoSec-treated wheat for six generations. Adults of the above-mentioned strains were exposed for 7 d to wheat treated with each DE formulation, and mortality was assessed after exposure. For all DE-dose combinations, significant differences were noted in mortality levels among strains. Generally, the strains from Denmark, United Kingdom, and Germany were the most susceptible to the DEs used, whereas the strain from Portugal was the least susceptible. No significant differences were noted in susceptibility level between the initial Greek strain and the laboratory-selected Greek strain, with the exception of Protector, where the selected strain was significantly more tolerant than the initial strain for both dose rates tested.

  1. Development of a method for the direct fermentation of semolina by selected sourdough lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Alfonzo, Antonio; Urso, Valeria; Corona, Onofrio; Francesca, Nicola; Amato, Gaetano; Settanni, Luca; Di Miceli, Giuseppe

    2016-12-19

    Three obligately heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains (Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis PON100336, Leuconostoc citreum PON10079 and Weissella cibaria PON10030) were used in this study as a multi-species starter culture for sourdough production. The starter inoculum was prepared and propagated in sterile semolina extract (SSE) broth. Acidification kinetics, microbiological counts detected on specific media for sourdough LAB, polymorphic profile comparison and species-specific PCRs evidenced a stability of the liquid inoculum over time determining its suitability for direct addition to semolina. In order to validate this innovative method for the production of durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf) sourdoughs, 15 semolinas (from ten old and five modern genotypes cultivated in Sicily, southern Italy) were used to prepare the SSEs and to produce sourdoughs and finally breads. Chemical and microbiological analyses of the sourdoughs and the evaluation of the quality parameters (weight loss, height, crumb and crust colour, image analysis and volatile organic compound generation) of the resulting breads indicated that the direct addition of the liquid inocula propagated in SSE is a valuable method to stabilise the production of sourdoughs. The differences registered during the technological characterisation of the breads were underlined by the sensory tests and the multivariate analysis and are mainly imputable to the type of semolina.

  2. Lutein and lutein esters in whole grain flours made from 75 genotypes of 5 triticum species grown at multiple sites.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Jochen U; Wahl, Sabine; Würschum, Tobias; Longin, C Friedrich H; Carle, Reinhold; Schweiggert, Ralf M

    2015-05-27

    Concentrations of lutein and lutein esters were determined in an ample collection of 75 wheat genotypes comprising bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), durum (Triticum durum Desf.), spelt (Triticum spelta L.), emmer (Triticum dicoccum Schrank), and einkorn (Triticum monococcum L.) grown in five different environments. Einkorn genotypes showed the highest total amounts of lutein (4.5-7.8 μg/g dry matter), followed by durum (2.0-4.6 μg/g), spelt (0.9-2.0 μg/g), emmer (0.8-1.9 μg/g), and bread wheat (0.7-2.0 μg/g). Due to the observed highly significant genetic variance and high heritability, lutein contents of wheat genotypes may be increased by future plant breeding. Detailed HPLC-DAD-APCI(±)-MS(n) data allowing the identification of six lutein monoesters and nine diesters are presented. Linoleic, palmitic, and oleic acids were the most abundant fatty acids in both the lutein esters and total free lipid fractions. Lutein esters were virtually absent in the tetraploid durum and emmer species, whereas their concentrations considerably differed among the genotypes belonging to the other species.

  3. Factors Controlling Carbon Metabolism and Humification in Different Soil Agroecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Doni, S.; Macci, C.; Peruzzi, E.; Ceccanti, B.; Masciandaro, G.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the processes that control humic carbon sequestration in soil. Three experimental sites differing in terms of management system and climate were selected: (i) Abanilla-Spain, soil treated with municipal solid wastes in Mediterranean semiarid climate; (ii) Puch-Germany, soil under intensive tillage and conventional agriculture in continental climate; and (iii) Alberese-Italy, soil under organic and conventional agriculture in Mediterranean subarid climate. The chemical-structural and biochemical soil properties at the initial sampling time and one year later were evaluated. The soils under organic (Alberese, soil cultivated with Triticum durum Desf.) and nonintensive management practices (Puch, soil cultivated with Triticum aestivum L. and Avena sativa L.) showed higher enzymatically active humic carbon, total organic carbon, humification index (B/E3s), and metabolic potential (dehydrogenase activity/water soluble carbon) if compared with conventional agriculture and plough-based tillage, respectively. In Abanilla, the application of municipal solid wastes stimulated the specific β-glucosidase activity (extracellular β-glucosidase activity/extractable humic carbon) and promoted the increase of humic substances with respect to untreated soil. The evolution of the chemical and biochemical status of the soils along a climatic gradient suggested that the adoption of certain management practices could be very promising in increasing SOC sequestration potential. PMID:25614887

  4. Effect of garenoxacin on eubacteria in the normal intestinal microflora when administered concomitantly with digoxin.

    PubMed

    Nord, C E; Meurling, L; Russo, R L; Bello, A; Grasela, D M; Gajjar, D A

    2003-06-01

    Garenoxacin is a new des-F(6)-quinolone with a broad antimicrobial spectrum. It has been reported that antibiotics may raise digoxin concentrations in the plasma of patients who are taking these agents concurrently, possibly due to the effect on the digoxin-metabolizing intestinal microflora. Sixteen healthy subjects were given a loading dose of digoxin (0.25 mg orally, q 6 h) on Day 1 followed by once-daily doses of 0.25 mg on Days 2 through 14. The subjects also received garenoxacin 600 mg orally, q 24 h, on Days 8 through 14. The number of enterococci, bacilli, corynebacteria, enterobacteria, bifidobacteria, lactobacilli, clostridia and bacteroides decreased whereas the number of eubacteria increased in the intestinal microflora. Eubacterium lentum strains increased during the administration of garenoxacin and returned towards normal levels within 14 days after the last dose of garenoxacin. The fecal concentrations of garenoxacin varied between 14.0-310.0 mg/kg. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of garenoxacin against the isolated E. lentum strains were >64 mg/L. There was no degradation of digoxin by the E. lentum strains.

  5. Salicylic Acid and Calcium Treatments Improves Wheat Vigor, Lipids and Phenolics Under High Salinity.

    PubMed

    Yücel Candan, Nilgün; Heybet Elif, Haklı

    2016-12-01

    Seed vigor is a complex physiological trait required to ensure the rapid and uniform emergence of plants in the field under different environmental conditions. Therefore, salicylic acid (SA, 0.5 mM) and calcium (Ca2+, 50 mM) priming were used as exogenous growth enhancers to stimulate wheat (Triticum durum Desf. cv. Yelken) seed vigor under high salinity. The main aim was to address whether priming of wheat with SA, Ca2+ and SA+Ca (SA, 0.5 mM + Ca2+, 50 mM; their combination) could bring about supplementary agronomic benefits particularly under stressful environments such as salinity. Exogenous application of SA or Ca2+ alone improved plant behavior in the presence of salinity stress. Nevertheless, the best results in terms of growth, seed vigor and total phenolic - flavonoids, chlorophyll - carotenoids contents and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), ascorbic acide oxidase (AAO) activities and lipid peroxidation levels (LPO) were obtained in response to the combined SA+Ca treatment.

  6. Mutations in Durum Wheat SBEII Genes affect Grain Yield Components, Quality, and Fermentation Responses in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hazard, Brittany; Zhang, Xiaoqin; Naemeh, Mahmoudreza; Hamilton, M. Kristina; Rust, Bret; Raybould, Helen E.; Newman, John W.; Martin, Roy; Dubcovsky, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Increased amylose in wheat (Triticum ssp.) starch is associated with increased resistant starch, a fermentable dietary fiber. Fermentation of resistant starch in the large intestine produces short-chain fatty acids that are associated with human health benefits. Since wheat foods are an important component of the human diet, increases in amylose and resistant starch in wheat grains have the potential to deliver health benefits to a large number of people. In three replicated field trials we found that mutations in starch branching enzyme II genes (SBEIIa and SBEIIb) in both A and B genomes (SBEIIa/b-AB) of durum wheat [T. turgidum L. subsp. durum (Desf.) Husn.] resulted in large increases of amylose and resistant starch content. The presence of these four mutations was also associated with an average 5% reduction in kernel weight (P = 0.0007) and 15% reduction in grain yield (P = 0.06) compared to the wild type. Complete milling and pasta quality analysis showed that the mutant lines have an acceptable quality with positive effects on pasta firmness and negative effects on semolina extraction and pasta color. Positive fermentation responses were detected in rats (Rattus spp.) fed with diets incorporating mutant wheat flour. This study quantifies benefits and limitations associated with the deployment of the SBEIIa/b-AB mutations in durum wheat and provides the information required to develop realistic strategies to deploy durum wheat varieties with increased levels of amylose and resistant starch. PMID:27134286

  7. A wheat lipid transfer protein (TdLTP4) promotes tolerance to abiotic and biotic stress in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Safi, Hela; Saibi, Walid; Alaoui, Meryem Mrani; Hmyene, Abdelaziz; Masmoudi, Khaled; Hanin, Moez; Brini, Faïçal

    2015-04-01

    Lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are members of the family of pathogenesis-related proteins (PR-14) that are believed to be involved in plant defense responses. In this study, we report the isolation and characterization of a novel gene TdLTP4 encoding an LTP protein from durum wheat [Triticum turgidum L. subsp. Durum Desf.]. Molecular Phylogeny analyses of wheat TdLTP4 gene showed a high identity to other plant LTPs. Predicted three-dimensional structural model revealed the presence of six helices and nine loop turns. Expression analysis in two local durum wheat varieties with marked differences in salt and drought tolerance, revealed a higher transcript accumulation of TdLTP4 under different stress conditions in the tolerant variety, compared to the sensitive one. The overexpression of TdLTP4 in Arabidopsis resulted in a promoted plant growth under various stress conditions including NaCl, ABA, JA and H2O2 treatments. Moreover, the LTP-overexpressing lines exhibit less sensitivity to jasmonate than wild-type plants. Furthermore, detached leaves from transgenic Arabidopsis expressing TdLTP4 gene showed enhanced fungal resistance against Alternaria solani and Botrytis cinerea. Together, these data provide the evidence for the involvement of TdLTP4 gene in the tolerance to both abiotic and biotic stresses in crop plants.

  8. Redox agents and N-ethylmaleimide affect protein polymerization during laboratory scale dry pasta production and cooking.

    PubMed

    Bruneel, Charlotte; Buggenhout, Joke; Lagrain, Bert; Brijs, Kristof; Delcour, Jan A

    2016-04-01

    Durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) semolina gluten proteins consist of monomeric gliadin and polymeric glutenin and determine the quality of pasta products made therefrom. During pasta drying, glutenin starts polymerizing already below 60 °C (65% relative humidity (RH)), whereas gliadin only is incorporated in the protein network at temperatures exceeding 68 °C (68% RH) through thiol (SH)/disulfide (SS) exchange reactions. Removal of free SH groups in glutenin by adding 2.3 μmol KBrO3 or KIO3 per g dry matter semolina protein (g protein) or 13.8 μmol N-ethylmaleimide/g protein reduces gliadin-glutenin cross-linking during pasta drying and/or cooking and yields cooked pasta of high quality. Introducing free SH groups by adding 13.8 μmol glutathione/g protein increases gliadin-glutenin cross-linking during pasta processing, resulting in cooked pasta of lower quality. We hypothesize that too much gliadin incorporation in the glutenin network during pasta processing tightens the protein network and results in lower cooking quality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Characterization of Proteins from Grain of Different Bread and Durum Wheat Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Žilić, Slađana; Barać, Miroljub; Pešić, Mirjana; Dodig, Dejan; Ignjatović-Micić, Dragana

    2011-01-01

    The classical Osborne wheat protein fractions (albumins, globulins, gliadins, and glutenins), as well as several proteins from each of the four subunits of gliadin using SDS-PAGE analyses, were determined in the grain of five bread (T. aestivum L.) and five durum wheat (T. durum Desf.) genotypes. In addition, content of tryptophan and wet gluten were analyzed. Gliadins and glutenins comprise from 58.17% to 65.27% and 56.25% to 64.48% of total proteins and as such account for both quantity and quality of the bread and durum wheat grain proteins, respectively. The ratio of gliadin/total glutenin varied from 0.49 to 1.01 and 0.57 to 1.06 among the bread and durum genotypes, respectively. According to SDS-PAGE analysis, bread wheat genotypes had a higher concentration of α + β + γ-subunits of gliadin (on average 61.54% of extractable proteins) than durum wheat (on average 55.32% of extractable proteins). However, low concentration of ω-subunit was found in both bread (0.50% to 2.53% of extractable proteins) and durum (3.65% to 6.99% of extractable proteins) wheat genotypes. On average, durum wheat contained significantly higher amounts of tryptophan and wet gluten (0.163% dry weight (d.w.) and 26.96% d.w., respectively) than bread wheat (0.147% d.w. and 24.18% d.w., respectively). PMID:22016634

  10. Characterization of Morphology, Volatile Profiles, and Molecular Markers in Edible Desert Truffles from the Negev Desert.

    PubMed

    Kamle, Madhu; Bar, Einat; Lewinsohn, Dalia; Shavit, Elinoar; Roth-Bejerano, Nurit; Kagan-Zur, Varda; Barak, Ze'ev; Guy, Ofer; Zaady, Eli; Lewinsohn, Efraim; Sitrit, Yaron

    2017-03-28

    Desert truffles are mycorrhizal, hypogeous fungi considered a delicacy. On the basis of morphological characters, we identified three desert truffle species that grow in the same habitat in the Negev desert. These include Picoa lefebvrei (Pat.), Tirmania nivea (Desf.) Trappe, and Terfezia boudieri (Chatain), all associated with Helianthemum sessiliflorum. Their taxonomy was confirmed by PCR-RFLP. The main volatiles of fruit bodies of T. boudieri and T. nivea were 1-octen-3-ol and hexanal; however, volatiles of the latter species further included branched-chain amino acid derivatives such as 2-methylbutanal and 3-methylbutanal, phenylalanine derivatives such as benzaldehyde and benzenacetaldehyde, and methionine derivatives such as methional and dimethyl disulfide. The least aromatic truffle, P. lefebvrei, contained low levels of 1-octen-3-ol as the main volatile. Axenic mycelia cultures of T. boudieri displayed a simpler volatile profile compared to its fruit bodies. This work highlights differences in the volatile profiles of desert truffles and could hence be of interest for selecting and cultivating genotypes with the most likable aroma.

  11. Lethal and sublethal effects of essential oils from Eucalyptus camaldulensis and Heracleum persicum against the adults of Callosobruchus maculatus.

    PubMed

    Izakmehri, Khadijeh; Saber, Moosa; Mehrvar, Ali; Hassanpouraghdam, Mohammad Bagher; Vojoudi, Samad

    2013-01-01

    The cowpea weevil, Callosobruchus maculatus F. (Coleoptera: Bruchidae), is an important pest of stored cowpea, Vigna ungiculata (L.) Walpers (Fabales: Fabaceae), with ample distribution in tropical and subtropical regions. Many plant essential oils have a broad-spectrum activity against pest insects, and these oils traditionally have been used in the protection of stored products. In this study, the lethal and sublethal effects of essential oils from Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehnh. (Myrtales: Myrtaceae) and Heracleum persicum Desf. (Apiales: Apiaceae) were evaluated on the adults of C. maculatus at 26 ± 1° C, 70 ± 5% RH, and a photoperiod of 16:8 L:D. The LC50 values of E. camaldulensis and H. persicum were 56.7 and 219.4 µL/L air after 12 hr and 26.1 and 136.4 µL/L air after 24 hr of exposure, respectively. The LT50 values of E. camaldulensis and H.persicum were 6.3 and 10.9 hr, respectively. The results showed that low lethal concentration (LC20) of essential oils negatively affected the longevity, fecundity, and fertility of female adults. The sex ratio of C. maculatus offspring was not significantly affected by essential oils. Therefore, these essential oils can be suggested for controlling C. maculatus in storage systems. The introduction of essential oils into storage systems could potentially decrease seed losses.

  12. Assessment of heavy metals accumulation by spontaneous vegetation: Screening for new accumulator plant species grown in Kettara mine-Marrakech, Southern Morocco.

    PubMed

    Midhat, Laila; Ouazzani, Naaila; Esshaimi, Mouhsine; Ouhammou, Ahmed; Mandi, Laila

    2017-02-01

    The present paper aims to perform a screening of native plants growing in Kettara mine-Marrakech (Southern Morocco) for its phytoremediation. Plants and soil samples were collected and analyzed for Pb, Zn, Cu and Cd concentrations at several sites in the mine. The results showed that the soil in the vicinity of Kettara mine is deficient in major elements and contain toxic levels of metals. Spontaneously growing native plants were botanically identified and then classified into 21 species and 14 families. Significant difference was observed among the average concentrations of four heavy metals (Pb, Zn, Cu and Cd) in plants (p ≤ 0.05). Six plants of 21 species namely Hammada scoparia (Pomel) Iljin, Hirschfeldia incana (L.) Lagreze-Fossat, Lamarckia aurea (L.) Moench, Calendula algeriensis Boiss. & Reuter, Aizoon hispanicum L. and Melilotus sulcata Desf. were considered as the best-performing specimens due to their high ability to accumulate multiple metals in their shoots and roots without sustaining toxicity. This was confirmed by the transfer factors generally higher than 1. Using the most common criteria to classify the hyperaccumulator plants, these species can be classified as new accumulator plants of many heavy metals and be potentially used as remediation tools of metal-contaminated sites.

  13. Genetic variability in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi compatibility supports the selection of durum wheat genotypes for enhancing soil ecological services and cropping systems in Canada.

    PubMed

    Singh, A K; Hamel, C; Depauw, R M; Knox, R E

    2012-03-01

    Crop nutrient- and water-use efficiency could be improved by using crop varieties highly compatible with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). Two greenhouse experiments demonstrated the presence of genetic variability for this trait in modern durum wheat ( Triticum turgidum L. var. durum Desf.) germplasm. Among the five cultivars tested, 'AC Morse' had consistently low levels of AM root colonization and DT710 had consistently high levels of AM root colonization, whereas 'Commander', which had the highest colonization levels under low soil fertility conditions, developed poor colonization levels under medium fertility level. The presence of genetic variability in durum wheat compatibility with AMF was further evidenced by significant genotype × inoculation interaction effects in grain and straw biomass production; grain P, straw P, and straw K concentrations under medium soil fertility level; and straw K and grain Fe concentrations at low soil fertility. Mycorrhizal dependency was an undesirable trait of 'Mongibello', which showed poor growth and nutrient balance in the absence of AMF. An AMF-mediated reduction in grain Cd under low soil fertility indicated that breeding durum wheat for compatibility with AMF could help reduce grain Cd concentration in durum wheat. Durum wheat genotypes should be selected for compatibility with AMF rather than for mycorrhizal dependency.

  14. High-throughput SNP genotyping of modern and wild emmer wheat for yield and root morphology using a combined association and linkage analysis.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Stuart J; Salantur, Ayten; Yazar, Selami; Budak, Hikmet

    2017-05-26

    Durum wheat (Triticum turgidum var. durum Desf.) is a major world crop that is grown primarily in areas of the world that experience periodic drought, and therefore, breeding climate-resilient durum wheat is a priority. High-throughput single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping techniques have greatly increased the power of linkage and association mapping analyses for bread wheat, but as yet there is no durum wheat-specific platform available. In this study, we evaluate the new 384HT Wheat Breeders Array for its usefulness in tetraploid wheat breeding by genotyping a breeding population of F6 hybrids, derived from multiple crosses between T. durum cultivars and wild and cultivated emmer wheat accessions. Using a combined linkage and association mapping approach, we generated a genetic map including 1345 SNP markers, and identified markers linked to 6 QTLs for coleoptile length (2), heading date (1), anthocyanin accumulation (1) and osmotic stress tolerance (2). We also developed a straightforward approach for combining genetic data from multiple families of limited size that will be useful for evaluating and mapping pre-existing breeding material.

  15. In vitro susceptibility study of BMS-284756 against Legionella species.

    PubMed

    Dubois, J; St-Pierre, C

    2001-01-01

    Legionella organisms are often associated with respiratory infections, and Legionella pneumonia results in significant mortality unless it is promptly and effectively treated. The present study was undertaken to compare the in vitro activity of BMS-284756 (T-3811ME), a novel des-F(6)-quinolone, against Legionella species versus the activity of other fluoroquinolones (levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, and ciprofloxacin) and of the macrolides erythromycin, clarithromycin, and azithromycin. The most potent agents tested against Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1, the largest group tested, were BMS-284756, moxifloxacin, and levofloxacin (MIC(90) = 0.016 mg/L). The MIC(90) range for BMS-284756 was 0.008-0.03 mg/L against the total panel of L pneumophila serogroups 1-9 and 12, with the lowest MIC(90) observed for serogroup 7 and the highest for serogroup 2. BMS-284756 was one of the most potent agents tested against isolates of L micdadei, L longbeachae, and other Legionella species (MIC(90) range: 0.008-0.06 mg/L). These results and the high intrinsic activity of BMS-284756 against other respiratory pathogens support its use as empiric monotherapy for a wide range of respiratory infections.

  16. Effects of Heat Stress on Metabolite Accumulation and Composition, and Nutritional Properties of Durum Wheat Grain

    PubMed Central

    de Leonardis, Anna Maria; Fragasso, Mariagiovanna; Beleggia, Romina; Ficco, Donatella Bianca Maria; de Vita, Pasquale; Mastrangelo, Anna Maria

    2015-01-01

    Durum wheat (Triticum turgidum (L.) subsp. turgidum (L.) convar. durum (Desf.)) is momentous for human nutrition, and environmental stresses can strongly limit the expression of yield potential and affect the qualitative characteristics of the grain. The aim of this study was to determine how heat stress (five days at 37 °C) applied five days after flowering affects the nutritional composition, antioxidant capacity and metabolic profile of the grain of two durum wheat genotypes: “Primadur”, an elite cultivar with high yellow index, and “T1303”, an anthocyanin-rich purple cultivar. Qualitative traits and metabolite evaluation (by gas chromatography linked to mass spectrometry) were carried out on immature (14 days after flowering) and mature seeds. The effects of heat stress were genotype-dependent. Although some metabolites (e.g., sucrose, glycerol) increased in response to heat stress in both genotypes, clear differences were observed. Following the heat stress, there was a general increase in most of the analyzed metabolites in “Primadur”, with a general decrease in “T1303”. Heat shock applied early during seed development produced changes that were observed in immature seeds and also long-term effects that changed the qualitative and quantitative parameters of the mature grain. Therefore, short heat-stress treatments can affect the nutritional value of grain of different genotypes of durum wheat in different ways. PMID:26703576

  17. Mutations in Durum Wheat SBEII Genes affect Grain Yield Components, Quality, and Fermentation Responses in Rats.

    PubMed

    Hazard, Brittany; Zhang, Xiaoqin; Naemeh, Mahmoudreza; Hamilton, M Kristina; Rust, Bret; Raybould, Helen E; Newman, John W; Martin, Roy; Dubcovsky, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Increased amylose in wheat (Triticum ssp.) starch is associated with increased resistant starch, a fermentable dietary fiber. Fermentation of resistant starch in the large intestine produces short-chain fatty acids that are associated with human health benefits. Since wheat foods are an important component of the human diet, increases in amylose and resistant starch in wheat grains have the potential to deliver health benefits to a large number of people. In three replicated field trials we found that mutations in starch branching enzyme II genes (SBEIIa and SBEIIb) in both A and B genomes (SBEIIa/b-AB) of durum wheat [T. turgidum L. subsp. durum (Desf.) Husn.] resulted in large increases of amylose and resistant starch content. The presence of these four mutations was also associated with an average 5% reduction in kernel weight (P = 0.0007) and 15% reduction in grain yield (P = 0.06) compared to the wild type. Complete milling and pasta quality analysis showed that the mutant lines have an acceptable quality with positive effects on pasta firmness and negative effects on semolina extraction and pasta color. Positive fermentation responses were detected in rats (Rattus spp.) fed with diets incorporating mutant wheat flour. This study quantifies benefits and limitations associated with the deployment of the SBEIIa/b-AB mutations in durum wheat and provides the information required to develop realistic strategies to deploy durum wheat varieties with increased levels of amylose and resistant starch.

  18. Identification of Early Represented Gluten Proteins during Durum Wheat Grain Development.

    PubMed

    Mazzeo, Maria Fiorella; Di Stasio, Luigia; D'Ambrosio, Chiara; Arena, Simona; Scaloni, Andrea; Corneti, Simona; Ceriotti, Aldo; Tuberosa, Roberto; Siciliano, Rosa Anna; Picariello, Gianluca; Mamone, Gianfranco

    2017-04-19

    The time course of biosynthesis and accumulation of storage proteins in developing grains of durum wheat (Triticum turgidum ssp. durum (Desf.) Husn.) pasta-quality reference cv. Svevo was investigated at the protein level for the first time. Seeds were harvested at key kernel developmental stages, namely, 3 (seed increase 3-fold in size), 5 (kernel development, water-ripe stage), 11 (kernel development, water-ripe stage), 16 (kernel full development, water-ripe stage), 21 (milk-ripe stage), and 30 (dough stage) days postanthesis (dpa). Gliadins and glutenins were fractionated according to their different solubility and individually analyzed after fractionation by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Proteins were identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry of proteolytic peptides. The α- and γ-gliadin were already detected at 3 dpa. The biosynthesis of high molecular mass glutenin Bx7 was slightly delayed (11 dpa). Most of the gluten proteins accumulated rapidly between 11 and 21 dpa, with a minor further increase up to 30 dpa. The expression pattern of gluten proteins in Triticum durum at the early stages of synthesis provides reference data sets for future applications in crop breeding and growth monitoring.

  19. [Herbological studies on the Chinese crude drug ma-huang--part 2--on the confusion between ma-huang, Ephedrae Herba, and Equisetum plants in Medieval China and Japan].

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Chieko; Kitade, Makiko; Mikage, Masayuki

    2006-01-01

    As we previously reported, ma-huang ([Chinese characters: see text], Ephedrae Herba) has been sometimes used together with mu-zei ([Chinese characters: see text], Equiseti Herba) in medieval China and Japan. We herbologically studied this confusion and found that, in China, the confusion was found in literature in the Song dynasty, and Li Shi-Zhen recorded in Ben-cao-gang-mu that both drugs were morphologically and medicinally the same in the Ming dynasty. Though the main reason why the plant of the genus Equisetum, especially E. ramosissimum Desf., had been substituted for Ephedra plants is thought to be their morphological similarity, the doctors who lived in the area where no Ephedra plants grew might have used Equisetum plants as ma-huang based on Li's description. Owing to this confusion in China, the plants of E. ramosissimum were sometimes imported to Japan as ma-huang, and it caused the tentative use of E. ramosissimum as ma-huang in the middle of the Edo era in Japan.

  20. Water stress and cell wall polysaccharides in the apical root zone of wheat cultivars varying in drought tolerance.

    PubMed

    Leucci, Maria Rosaria; Lenucci, Marcello Salvatore; Piro, Gabriella; Dalessandro, Giuseppe

    2008-07-31

    Glycosyl composition and linkage analysis of cell wall polysaccharides were examined in apical root zones excised from water-stressed and unstressed wheat seedlings (Triticum durum Desf.) cv. Capeiti ("drought-tolerant") and cv. Creso ("drought sensitive"). Wall polysaccharides were sequentially solubilized to obtain three fractions: CDTA+Na(2)CO(3) extract, KOH extract and the insoluble residue (alpha-cellulose). A comparison between the two genotypes showed only small variations in the percentages of matrix polysaccharides (CDTA+Na(2)CO(3) plus KOH extract) and of the insoluble residues (alpha-cellulose) in water-stressed and unstressed conditions. Xylosyl, glucosyl and arabinosyl residues represented more than 90 mol% of the matrix polysaccharides. The linkage analysis of matrix polysaccharides showed high levels of xyloglucans (23-39 mol%), and arabinoxylans (38-48 mol%) and a low amount of pectins and (1-->3), (1-->4)-beta-D-glucans. The high level of xyloglucans was supported by the release of the diagnostic disaccharide isoprimeverose after Driselase digestion of KOH-extracted polysaccharides. In the "drought-tolerant" cv. Capeiti the mol% of side chains of rhamnogalacturonan I and II significantly increased in response to water stress, whereas in cv. Creso, this increase did not occur. The results support a role of the pectic side chains during water stress response in a drought-tolerant wheat cultivar.

  1. Free Radical Scavenging Fingerprints of Selected Aromatic and Medicinal Tunisian Plants Assessed by Means of TLC-DPPH(•) Test and Image Processing.

    PubMed

    El Euch, Salma Kammoun; Cieśla, Łukasz; Bouzouita, Nabiha

    2014-01-01

    Aqueous-methanol extracts prepared from 10 Tunisian plant species were analyzed for the presence of potent direct antioxidants. The analyzed species included: Anacyclus clavatus Desf., Erica multiflora L., Cistus salvifolius L., Centaurium erythraea Rafn., Marrubium vulgare L., Lavandula stoechas L., Artemisia campestris L., Origanum majorana L., Salvia officinalis L., and Pistacia lentiscus L. All the extracts were chromatographed on the RP18 W plates with methanol-water-acetic acid (48 + 47 + 5, v/v/v) mobile phase. Upon completion of the chromatographic development and the drying step, the plates were stained with a chloroform solution of 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH(•)). An image processing protocol, with use of Sorbfil TLC Videodensitometer, was applied to quantitatively measure the activity of polyphenols and to screen complex samples for the presence of free radical scavengers. The activity of the individual compounds was compared with that of rutin, used as a standard. The TLC-DPPH(•) test showed that C. salvifolius had the most potent antioxidant activity, as it possessed the highest activity coefficient (calculated as the sum of the areas under the peaks of all active compounds/area under peak of rutin). The proposed procedure may be used to differentiate potent chain-breaking antioxidants and compounds propagating radical chain reactions.

  2. Production of aneuhaploid and euhaploid sporocytes by meiotic restitution in fertile hybrids between durum wheat Langdon chromosome substitution lines and Aegilops tauschii.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lianquan; Chen, Qijiao; Yuan, Zhongwei; Xiang, Zhiguo; Zheng, Youliang; Liu, Dengcai

    2008-10-01

    Fertile F(1) hybrids were obtained between durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) Langdon (LDN) and its 10 disomic substitution (LDN DS) lines with Aegilops tauschii accession AS60 without embryo rescue. Selfed seedset rates for hybrids of LDN with AS60 were 36.87% and 49.45% in 2005 and 2006, respectively. Similar or higher selfed seedset rates were observed in the hybrids of 1D (1A), 1D (1B), 3D (3A), 4D (4B), 7D (7A), and 2D (2B) with AS60, while lower in hybrids of 3D (3B) + 3BL, 5D (5A) + 5AL, 5D (5B) + 5B and 6D (6B) + 6BS with AS60 compared with the hybrids of LDN with AS60. Observation of male gametogenesis showed that meiotic restitution, both first-division restitution (FDR) and single-division meiosis (SDM) resulted in the formation of functional unreduced gametes, which in turn produced seeds. Both euhaploid and aneuhaploid gametes were produced in F(1) hybrids. This suggested a strategy to simultaneously transfer and locate major genes from the ancestral species T. turgidum or Ae. tauschii. Moreover, there was no significant difference in the aneuhaploid rates between the F(1) hybrids of LDN and LDN DS lines with AS60, suggesting that meiotic pairing between the two D chromosomes in the hybrids of LDN DS lines with AS60 did not promote the formation of aneuhaploid gametes.

  3. Grassland fire effect on soil organic carbon reservoirs in a semiarid environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novara, A.; Gristina, L.; Rühl, J.; Pasta, S.; D'Angelo, G.; La Mantia, T.; Pereira, P.

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of an experimental fire used for grassland management on soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks. The study was carried out on Hyparrhenia hirta (L.) Stapf (Hh) grassland and Ampelodesmos mauritanicus (Desf.) T. Durand & Schinz (Am) grasslands located in the north of Sicily. Soil samples were collected at 0-5 cm before and after the experimental fire, and SOC was measured. During the grassland fire, soil surface temperature was monitored. Biomass of both grasses was analysed in order to determine dry weight and its chemical composition. The results showed that SOC varied significantly with vegetation type, while it is not affected in the short term by grassland fire. Am grassland stored more SOC compared with Hh grassland thanks to lower content in the biomass of the labile carbon pool. No significant difference was observed in SOC before and after fire, which could be caused by several factors: first, in both grassland types the measured soil temperature during fire was low due to thin litter layers; second, in a semiarid environment, a higher mineralization rate results in a lower soil carbon labile pool; and third, the SOC stored in the finest soil fractions, physically protected, is not affected by fire.

  4. Grassland fire effect on soil organic carbon reservoirs in semiarid environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novara, A.; Gristina, L.; Rühl, J.; Pasta, S.; D'Angelo, G.; La Mantia, T.; Pereira, P.

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of a experimental fire, used for grassland management, on soil organic carbon (SOC) reservoirs. The study was carried out on Hyparrhenia hirta (L.) Stapf (Hh) grassland and Ampelodesmos mauritanicus (Desf.) T. Durand and Schinz (Am) grasslands, located in the north of Sicily. Soil samples were collected at 0-5 cm before and after experimental fire and SOC was measured. During grassland fire soil surface temperature was monitored. Biomass of both grasses was analyzed in order to determine dry weight and its chemical composition. The results showed that SOC varied significantly with vegetation cover, while it is not affected in the short period by grassland fire. Am grassland stored more SOC compared with Hh grassland thanks to lower content in biomass of labile carbon pool. No significant difference was observed in SOC before and after fire which could be caused by several factors: first, in both grassland types the measured soil temperature during fire was low due to thin litter layers; second, in semiarid environment higher mineralization rate results in lower soil carbon labile pool; and third, the C stored in the finest soil fractions, physical protected, is not affected by fire.

  5. Glutathione reductase in wheat grain. 1. Isolation and characterization.

    PubMed

    de Lamotte, F; Vianey-Liaud, N; Duviau, M P; Kobrehel, K

    2000-10-01

    Durum wheat (Triticum durum, Desf.) endosperm of mature kernels contained a single form of glutathione reductase (GR); it appeared about the 18th day after anthesis while another isoform, present at the early stages of grain development, disappeared between the 20th and 30th days after flowering. The form that was present at grain maturity was isolated and characterized. It was composed of two monomers, each one having an apparent molecular mass of about 60 kDa. The K(m) values for NADPH and for GSSG were 3.7 and 9.1 microM, respectively, and the V(m) values for NADPH and for GSSG were 594 and 575 microkat.mg(-)(1) protein, respectively. The pH(i) of the enzyme was situated between pH 4.4 and 4.5. At a constant temperature of 25 degrees C, the optimum GR activity was found to be between pH 7.5 and 8.0. It was relatively resistant to high temperatures and was very resistant to very low temperatures.

  6. Characterization of natural habitats and diversity of Libyan desert truffles.

    PubMed

    Bouzadi, Mozidi; Grebenc, Tine; Turunen, Ossi; Kraigher, Hojka; Taib, Hassan; Alafai, Abdulhafied; Sbissi, Imed; Assad, Mamdouh El Haj; Bedade, Dattatray; Shamekh, Salem

    2017-10-01

    Desert truffles have traditionally been used as food in Libya. Desert truffle grows and gives fruit sporadically when adequate and properly distributed rainfall occurs with existence of suitable soil and mycorrhizal host plant. The present study aimed to identify and characterize two kinds of wild desert truffles from ecological and nutritional points that were collected from the studied area. The truffle samples were identified as Terfezia (known as red or black truffle) and Tirmania (known as white truffle). The nutritional values (protein, lipid and carbohydrate) of both Libyan wild truffle (Terfezia and Tirmania) were determined on a dry weight basis and result showed that Tirmania and Terfezia contained 16.3 and 18.5% protein, 6.2 and 5.9% lipid, 67.2 and 65% carbohydrate, respectively, in ascocarp biomass. The soil pH of the upper and lower regions of the Hamada Al-Hamra ranged between 8.2 and 8.5 giving suitable conditions for fructification. The plants, Helianthemum kahiricum and Helianthemum lippii were the dominant plants in Hamada Al-Hamra region found to form a mycorrhiza with desert truffles. The phylogenetic analysis of the genomic rDNA ITS region showed that, out of five collections three represented Tirmania pinoyi (Maire) Malencon, one Tirmania nivea (Desf.) Trappe, and one Terfezia boudieri Chatin.

  7. An immunochemical approach to species relationship in Triticum and some related species.

    PubMed

    Bozzini, A; Cantagalli, P; Piazzi, S E; Sordi, S

    1970-01-01

    An immunological reaction, precipitation in gel, was produced using a rabbit antiserum directed to a specific protein constantly present in bread wheats (T. aestivum, genome AABBDD), but absent in durum wheat (T. durum Desf., genome AABB). This protein was isolated in the soluble-protein fraction of bread wheat caryopses by combined biochemical and immunological techniques.The availability of such a specific anti-bread wheat serum made possible the analysis of a series of varieties and species of wheat and of some closely related (Secale, Aegilops) and less closely related (Hordeum, Haynaldia) taxa to determine whether the protein was present or absent. Hordeum vulgare, Haynaldia villosa, Triticum monoccocum and Triticum turgidum gave a negative result, while positive results were obtained in T. aestivum, T. timopheevi, T. zhukovskyi, Secale cereale, Aegilops speltoides, Ae. mutica, Ae. comosa, Ae. caudata, Ae. umbellulata, Ae. squarrosa, and also in the artificial amphiploids (Ae. speltoides x T. monococcum) and (Ae. caudata x T. monococcum).It is concluded that these results agree closely with the classification of Triticum proposed by MacKey in 1966. The investigated protein not only permits the differentiation of T. aestivum from T. turgidum, but also T. turgidum from T. timopheevi at tetraploid level and T. monococcum from all the diploid species of Aegilops.

  8. Soil warming and trace gas fluxes: experimental design and preliminary flux results.

    PubMed

    Peterjohn, William T; Melillo, Jerry M; Bowles, Francis P; Steudler, Paul A

    1993-02-01

    We conducted several experiments to determine a procedure for uniformly warming soil 5° C above ambient using a buried heating cable. These experiments produced a successful design that could: 1) maintain a temperature difference of 5° C over a wide range of environmental conditions; 2) reduce inter-cable temperture variability to ca. 1.5° C; 3) maintain a temperature difference of 5° C near the edges of the plot; and 4) respond rapidly to changes in the environment. In addition, this design required electrical power only 42% of the time. Preliminary measurements indicate that heating increased CO2 emission by a factor of ca. 1.6 and decreased the C concentration in the O soil horizon by as much as 36%. In addition, warming the soil accelerated the emergence and early growth of the wild lily of the valley (Maianthemum canadense Desf.). The relationship between CO2 flux and soil temperature derived from our soil warming experiment was consistent with data from other hardwood forests around the world. Since the other hardwood forests were warmed naturally, it appears that for soil respiration, warming the soil with buried heating cables differs little from natural, aboveground warming. By warming soil beyond the range of natural variability, a multi-site, long-term soil warming experiment may be valuable in helping us understand how ecosystems will respond to global warming.

  9. Crossing the divide: gene flow produces intergeneric hybrid in feral transgenic creeping bentgrass population.

    PubMed

    Zapiola, María L; Mallory-Smith, Carol A

    2012-10-01

    Gene flow is the most frequently expressed public concern related to the deregulation of transgenic events (Snow 2002; Ellstrand 2003). However, assessing the potential for transgene escape is complex because it depends on the opportunities for unintended gene flow, and establishment and persistence of the transgene in the environment (Warwick et al. 2008). Creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.), a turfgrass species widely used on golf courses, has been genetically engineered to be resistant to glyphosate, a nonselective herbicide. Outcrossing species, such as creeping bentgrass (CB), which have several compatible species, have greater chances for gene escape and spontaneous hybridization (i.e. natural, unassisted sexual reproduction between taxa in the field), which challenges transgene containment. Several authors have emphasized the need for evidence of spontaneous hybridization to infer the potential for gene flow (Armstrong et al. 2005). Here we report that a transgenic intergeneric hybrid has been produced as result of spontaneous hybridization of a feral-regulated transgenic pollen receptor (CB) and a nontransgenic pollen donor (rabbitfoot grass, RF, Polypogon monspeliensis (L.) Desf.). We identified an off-type transgenic seedling and confirmed it to be CB × RF intergeneric hybrid. This first report of a transgenic intergeneric hybrid produced in situ with a regulated transgenic event demonstrates the importance of considering all possible avenues for transgene spread at the landscape level before planting a regulated transgenic crop in the field. Spontaneous hybridization adds a level of complexity to transgene monitoring, containment, mitigation and remediation programmes.

  10. Antischistosomal Activity of Two Active Constituents Isolated from the Leaves of Egyptian Medicinal Plants

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Sanaa A; El-Regal, Nagy S; Saeed, Samar M

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the role of two active constituents isolated from the leaves of Egyptian medicinal plants. D-mannitol a naturally occurring sugar isolated from the leaves Ixora undulata Roxb., and the pectin a linear chain homogalacturonan (HG) polysaccharide isolated from the leaves of Linum grandiflorum Desf. (scarlet flax). Both are evaluated for their therapeutic effect against schistosomiasis with biochemical and histochemical evaluations and compared with praziquantel, a reference drug. Biochemical studies of hepatic glucose, the glycogen content, and total serum protein were carried out, and histochemical evaluations through serum protein fractions separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with different molecular weights (260–10 kDa) were made in all groups, in addition to liver and body weight. D-mannitol and pectin show a remarkable effect in enhancing liver and kidney functions through enhancing most protein fractions in the serum of mice infected with Schistosoma mansoni. Also, the glucose and glycogen content in injured liver tissues improved, in addition liver and body weight in the infected groups. Thus they may be of therapeutic potential in the treatment hepatoxicity and nephrotoxicity. PMID:26124666

  11. Comparative germination responses to water potential across different populations of Aegilops geniculata and cultivar varieties of Triticum durum and Triticum aestivum.

    PubMed

    Orsenigo, S; Guzzon, F; Abeli, T; Rossi, G; Vagge, I; Balestrazzi, A; Mondoni, A; Müller, J V

    2017-03-01

    Crop Wild Relatives are often used to improve crop quality and yields because they contain genetically important traits that can contribute to stress resistance and adaptation. Seed germination of different populations of Aegilops geniculata Roth collected along a latitudinal gradient was studied under different drought stress in order to find populations suitable for improving drought tolerance in wheat. Different accessions of Aegilops neglecta Req. ex Bertol., Triticum aestivum L. and T. durum Desf. were used as comparison. Under full hydration, germination was high in all populations, but increasing drought stress led to reduced and delayed germination. Significant differences in final germination and mean time to germinate were detected among populations. Wheat, durum wheat and the southern population of Ae. geniculata were not significantly affected by drought stress, germinating similarly under all treatments. However, seed germination of the northern populations of Ae. geniculata was significantly reduced under high water stress treatment. Differences between populations of the same species could not be explained by annual rainfall across populations' distributions, but by rainfall during seed development and maturation. Differences in the germination responses to drought found here highlight the importance of source populations as criteria for genotype selection for pre-breeders.

  12. Decontamination Systems Information and Research Program. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    West Virginia University (WVU) and the US DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) entered into a Cooperative Agreement on August 29, 1992 entitled ``Decontamination Systems Information and Research Programs.`` Stipulated within the Agreement is the requirement that WVU submit to METC a series of Technical Progress Reports on a quarterly basis. This report comprises the first Quarterly Technical Progress Report for Year 2 of the Agreement. This report reflects the progress and/or efforts performed on the sixteen (16) technical projects encompassed by the Year 2 Agreement for the period of January 1 through March 31, 1994. In situ bioremediation of chlorinated organic solvents; Microbial enrichment for enhancing in-situ biodegradation of hazardous organic wastes; Treatment of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using biofilters; Drain-enhanced soil flushing (DESF) for organic contaminants removal; Chemical destruction of chlorinated organic compounds; Remediation of hazardous sites with steam reforming; Soil decontamination with a packed flotation column; Use of granular activated carbon columns for the simultaneous removal of organics, heavy metals, and radionuclides; Monolayer and multilayer self-assembled polyion films for gas-phase chemical sensors; Compact mercuric iodide detector technology development; Evaluation of IR and mass spectrometric techniques for on-site monitoring of volatile organic compounds; A systematic database of the state of hazardous waste clean-up technologies; Dust control methods for insitu nuclear and hazardous waste handling; Winfield Lock and Dam remediation; and Socio-economic assessment of alternative environmental restoration technologies.

  13. Technological properties of bakers' yeasts in durum wheat semolina dough.

    PubMed

    Giannone, Virgilio; Longo, Chiara; Damigella, Arcangelo; Raspagliesi, Domenico; Spina, Alfio; Palumbo, Massimo

    2010-04-01

    Properties of 13 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains isolated from different sources (traditional sourdoughs, industrial baking yeasts etc.) were studied in dough produced with durum wheat (Sicilian semolina, variety Mongibello). Durum wheat semolina and durum wheat flour are products prepared from grain of durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) by grinding or milling processes in which the bran and germ are essentially removed and the remainder is comminuted to a suitable degree of fineness. Acidification and leavening properties of the dough were evaluated. Strains isolated from traditional sourdoughs (DSM PST18864, DSM PST18865 and DSM PST18866) showed higher leavening power, valuable after the first and second hours of fermentation, than commercial baking yeasts. In particular the strain DSM PST 18865 has also been successfully tested in bakery companies for the improvement of production processes. Baking and staling tests were carried out on five yeast strains to evaluate their fermentation ability directly and their resistance to the staling process. Amplified fragment length polymorphism (fAFLP) was used to investigate genetic variations in the yeast strains. This study showed an appreciable biodiversity in the microbial populations of both wild and commercial yeast strains.

  14. Phytotoxic, clastogenic and bioaccumulation effects of the environmental endocrine disruptor bisphenol A in various crops grown hydroponically.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Giuseppe; Loffredo, Elisabetta; Senesi, Nicola

    2006-04-01

    The effects of the endocrine disruptor bisphenol A (BPA) at concentrations of 10 and 50 mg l(-1) were evaluated on the germination and morphology, micronuclei (MN) content in root tip cells and BPA bioaccumulation of hydroponic seedlings of broad bean (Vicia faba L.), tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.), durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) after 6 and 21 days of growth. In general, BPA at any dose used did not inhibit germination and early growth (6 days) of seedlings of the species examined, with the exception of primary root length of tomato which decreased at the higher BPA dose. In contrast, an evident phytotoxicity was induced by BPA in all species after 21 days of growth with evident morphological anomalies and significant reductions of the lengths and fresh and dry weights of shoots and roots of seedlings. With respect to the nutrient medium without seedlings, BPA concentration decreased markedly during the growth period in the presence of broad bean and tomato seedlings, and limitedly in the presence of durum wheat and, especially, lettuce. Further, the presence of BPA measured in roots and shoots of broad bean and tomato after 21-day growth indicated that bioaccumulation of BPA had occurred. The number of MN in broad bean and durum wheat root tip cells increased markedly by treatment with BPA at both concentrations, thus suggesting a potential clastogenic activity of BPA in these species.

  15. Lethal and Sublethal Effects of Essential Oils from Eucalyptus camaldulensis and Heracleum persicum Against the Adults of Callosobruchus Maculatus

    PubMed Central

    Izakmehri, Khadijeh; Saber, Moosa; Mehrvar, Ali; Hassanpouraghdam, Mohammad Bagher; Vojoudi, Samad

    2013-01-01

    The cowpea weevil, Callosobruchus maculatus F. (Coleoptera: Bruchidae), is an important pest of stored cowpea, Vigna ungiculata (L.) Walpers (Fabales: Fabaceae), with ample distribution in tropical and subtropical regions. Many plant essential oils have a broad-spectrum activity against pest insects, and these oils traditionally have been used in the protection of stored products. In this study, the lethal and sublethal effects of essential oils from Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehnh. (Myrtales: Myrtaceae) and Heracleum persicum Desf. (Apiales: Apiaceae) were evaluated on the adults of C. maculatus at 26 ± 1° C, 70 ± 5% RH, and a photoperiod of 16:8 L:D. The LC50 values of E. camaldulensis and H. persicum were 56.7 and 219.4 µL/L air after 12 hr and 26.1 and 136.4 µL/L air after 24 hr of exposure, respectively. The LT50 values of E. camaldulensis and H.persicum were 6.3 and 10.9 hr, respectively. The results showed that low lethal concentration (LC20) of essential oils negatively affected the longevity, fecundity, and fertility of female adults. The sex ratio of C. maculatus offspring was not significantly affected by essential oils. Therefore, these essential oils can be suggested for controlling C. maculatus in storage systems. The introduction of essential oils into storage systems could potentially decrease seed losses. PMID:24773362

  16. Pentaploid Wheat Hybrids: Applications, Characterisation, and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Padmanaban, Sriram; Zhang, Peng; Hare, Ray A.; Sutherland, Mark W.; Martin, Anke

    2017-01-01

    Interspecific hybridisation between hexaploid and tetraploid wheat species leads to the development of F1 pentaploid hybrids with unique chromosomal constitutions. Pentaploid hybrids derived from bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and durum wheat (Triticum turgidum spp. durum Desf.) crosses can improve the genetic background of either parent by transferring traits of interest. The genetic variability derived from bread and durum wheat and transferred into pentaploid hybrids has the potential to improve disease resistance, abiotic tolerance, and grain quality, and to enhance agronomic characters. Nonetheless, pentaploid wheat hybrids have not been fully exploited in breeding programs aimed at improving crops. There are several potential barriers for efficient pentaploid wheat production, such as low pollen compatibility, poor seed set, failed seedling establishment, and frequent sterility in F1 hybrids. However, most of the barriers can be overcome by careful selection of the parental genotypes and by employing the higher ploidy level genotype as the maternal parent. In this review, we summarize the current research on pentaploid wheat hybrids and analyze the advantages and pitfalls of current methods used to assess pentaploid-derived lines. Furthermore, we discuss current and potential applications in commercial breeding programs and future directions for research into pentaploid wheat. PMID:28367153

  17. Factors controlling carbon metabolism and humification in different soil agroecosystems.

    PubMed

    Doni, S; Macci, C; Peruzzi, E; Ceccanti, B; Masciandaro, G

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the processes that control humic carbon sequestration in soil. Three experimental sites differing in terms of management system and climate were selected: (i) Abanilla-Spain, soil treated with municipal solid wastes in Mediterranean semiarid climate; (ii) Puch-Germany, soil under intensive tillage and conventional agriculture in continental climate; and (iii) Alberese-Italy, soil under organic and conventional agriculture in Mediterranean subarid climate. The chemical-structural and biochemical soil properties at the initial sampling time and one year later were evaluated. The soils under organic (Alberese, soil cultivated with Triticum durum Desf.) and nonintensive management practices (Puch, soil cultivated with Triticum aestivum L. and Avena sativa L.) showed higher enzymatically active humic carbon, total organic carbon, humification index (B/E(3)s), and metabolic potential (dehydrogenase activity/water soluble carbon) if compared with conventional agriculture and plough-based tillage, respectively. In Abanilla, the application of municipal solid wastes stimulated the specific β-glucosidase activity (extracellular β-glucosidase activity/extractable humic carbon) and promoted the increase of humic substances with respect to untreated soil. The evolution of the chemical and biochemical status of the soils along a climatic gradient suggested that the adoption of certain management practices could be very promising in increasing SOC sequestration potential.

  18. Gradient x Isocratic Elution CCC on the Isolation of Verbascoside and Other Phenylethanoids: Influence of the Complexity of the Matrix.

    PubMed

    Leitão, Gilda Guimarães; Pinto, Shaft Correa; de Oliveira, Danilo Ribeiro; Timoteo, Patrícia; Guimarães, Michelle Guedes; Cordova, Wilmer H Perera; Leitão, Suzana Guimarães

    2015-11-01

    Verbascoside is a phenylethanoid glycoside widely distributed in nature, especially among the order Lamiales, occurring in numerous plants that are constituents of folk medicine preparations. This natural compound, previously isolated by our group from the ethyl acetate extract of Lantana trifolia using the gradient approach in countercurrent chromatography, was now isolated from the butanol extract of the same plant and from Lippia alba f. intermedia (Verbenaceae) using countercurrent chromatography in either gradient or isocratic elution modes. The ethyl acetate extract of L. alba, rich in phenylethanoids and flavonoids, was fractionated using countercurrent chromatography in the step-gradient elution approach. The four-step solvent system was composed of n-hexane-ethyl acetate-n-butanol-water (4 : 10 : X : 10), where X = 1 (solvent system A), 3 (solvent system B), 5 (solvent system C), and 7 (solvent system D), and allowed for the isolation of verbascoside along with other phenylethanoids and flavonoids from both plants. Verbascoside and 2'-O-β-apiosylverbascoside were further isolated from the n-butanol extract of L. trifolia using the solvent system ethyl acetate-n-butanol-water 10 : 2 : 10 on an isocratic run. The difference in the complexity of the two plant extracts demanded different purification steps, which included a second high-speed countercurrent chromatography purification using the isocratic elution mode. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Seed dispersal networks in the Galápagos and the consequences of alien plant invasions.

    PubMed

    Heleno, Ruben H; Olesen, Jens M; Nogales, Manuel; Vargas, Pablo; Traveset, Anna

    2013-01-07

    Alien plants are a growing threat to the Galápagos unique biota. We evaluated the impact of alien plants on eight seed dispersal networks from two islands of the archipelago. Nearly 10 000 intact seeds from 58 species were recovered from the droppings of 18 bird and reptile dispersers. The most dispersed invaders were Lantana camara, Rubus niveus and Psidium guajava, the latter two likely benefiting from an asynchronous fruit production with most native plants, which facilitate their consumption and spread. Lava lizards dispersed the seeds of 27 species, being the most important dispersers, followed by small ground finch, two mockingbirds, the giant tortoise and two insectivorous birds. Most animals dispersed alien seeds, but these formed a relatively small proportion of the interactions. Nevertheless, the integration of aliens was higher in the island that has been invaded for longest, suggesting a time-lag between alien plant introductions and their impacts on seed dispersal networks. Alien plants become more specialized with advancing invasion, favouring more simplified plant and disperser communities. However, only habitat type significantly affected the overall network structure. Alien plants were dispersed via two pathways: dry-fruited plants were preferentially dispersed by finches, while fleshy fruited species were mostly dispersed by other birds and reptiles.

  20. Seed dispersal networks in the Galápagos and the consequences of alien plant invasions

    PubMed Central

    Heleno, Ruben H.; Olesen, Jens M.; Nogales, Manuel; Vargas, Pablo; Traveset, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Alien plants are a growing threat to the Galápagos unique biota. We evaluated the impact of alien plants on eight seed dispersal networks from two islands of the archipelago. Nearly 10 000 intact seeds from 58 species were recovered from the droppings of 18 bird and reptile dispersers. The most dispersed invaders were Lantana camara, Rubus niveus and Psidium guajava, the latter two likely benefiting from an asynchronous fruit production with most native plants, which facilitate their consumption and spread. Lava lizards dispersed the seeds of 27 species, being the most important dispersers, followed by small ground finch, two mockingbirds, the giant tortoise and two insectivorous birds. Most animals dispersed alien seeds, but these formed a relatively small proportion of the interactions. Nevertheless, the integration of aliens was higher in the island that has been invaded for longest, suggesting a time-lag between alien plant introductions and their impacts on seed dispersal networks. Alien plants become more specialized with advancing invasion, favouring more simplified plant and disperser communities. However, only habitat type significantly affected the overall network structure. Alien plants were dispersed via two pathways: dry-fruited plants were preferentially dispersed by finches, while fleshy fruited species were mostly dispersed by other birds and reptiles. PMID:23173203

  1. Orientation of Anopheles gambiae (Diptera: Culicidae) to Plant-Host Volatiles in a Novel Diffusion-Cage Olfactometer.

    PubMed

    Otienoburu, Philip E; Nikbakhtzadeh, Mahmood R; Foster, Woodbridge A

    2016-01-01

    A novel diffusion-cage olfactometer tested the responses of Anopheles gambiae Giles to plant volatiles. Green-leaf volatiles are often released from cut or injured plant tissue and may alter the headspace of plants used in olfactometer assays. The diffusion-cage olfactometer is designed for use with whole, intact plants, hence giving a more realistic behavioral assay. Its simple plastic construction, ease of assembly, and accommodation to whole plants makes it a useful tool for measuring mosquito orientation to plant volatiles within large enclosures. We compared its performance to that of the more commonly used T-tube wind-tunnel olfactometer, by testing the orientation of mosquitoes to volatiles of a few prevalent plants of eastern Africa reportedly utilized by An. gambiae for sugar: Parthenium hysterophorus (Asteraceae), Ricinus communis (Euphorbiaceae), Lantana camara (Verbenaceae), and Senna occidentalis (Fabaceae). Results indicate that the diffusion-cage olfactometer is an effective alternative to conventional wind-tunnel olfactometers, to test mosquito orientation to plant volatiles under seminatural conditions. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Orientation of Anopheles gambiae (Diptera: Culicidae) to Plant-Host Volatiles in a Novel Diffusion-Cage Olfactometer

    PubMed Central

    Otienoburu, Philip E.; Nikbakhtzadeh, Mahmood R.; Foster, Woodbridge A.

    2016-01-01

    A novel diffusion-cage olfactometer tested the responses of Anopheles gambiae Giles to plant volatiles. Green-leaf volatiles are often released from cut or injured plant tissue and may alter the headspace of plants used in olfactometer assays. The diffusion-cage olfactometer is designed for use with whole, intact plants, hence giving a more realistic behavioral assay. Its simple plastic construction, ease of assembly, and accommodation to whole plants makes it a useful tool for measuring mosquito orientation to plant volatiles within large enclosures. We compared its performance to that of the more commonly used T-tube wind-tunnel olfactometer, by testing the orientation of mosquitoes to volatiles of a few prevalent plants of eastern Africa reportedly utilized by An. gambiae for sugar: Parthenium hysterophorus (Asteraceae), Ricinus communis (Euphorbiaceae), Lantana camara (Verbenaceae), and Senna occidentalis (Fabaceae). Results indicate that the diffusion-cage olfactometer is an effective alternative to conventional wind-tunnel olfactometers, to test mosquito orientation to plant volatiles under seminatural conditions. PMID:26502752

  3. Silver nanoparticles synthesised using plant extracts show strong antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Avnesh; Guliani, Anika; Singla, Rubbel; Yadav, Ramdhan; Yadav, Sudesh Kumar

    2015-06-01

    In this study, three plants Populus alba, Hibiscus arboreus and Lantana camara were explored for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles (SNPs). The effect of reaction temperature and leaf extract (LE) concentration of P. alba, H. arboreus and L. camara was evaluated on the synthesis and size of SNPs. The SNPs were characterised by ultra-violet-visible spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The synthesis rate of SNPs was highest with LE of L. camara followed by H. arboreus and P. alba under similar conditions. L. camara LE showed maximum potential of smaller size SNPs synthesis, whereas bigger particles were formed by H. arboreous LE. The size and shape of L. camara LE synthesised SNPs were analysed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). TEM analysis revealed the formation of SNPs of average size 17±9.5 nm with 5% LE of L. camara. The SNPs synthesised by LE of L. camara showed strong antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli. The results document that desired size SNPs can be synthesised using these plant LEs at a particular temperature for applications in the biomedical field.

  4. Olfactory search-image use by a mosquito-eating predator

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Fiona R.; Jackson, Robert R.

    2010-01-01

    By choosing blood-carrying mosquitoes as prey, Evarcha culicivora, an East African salticid spider, specializes at feeding indirectly on vertebrate blood. It also has an exceptionally complex mate-choice system. An earlier study revealed that search-image use assists E. culicivora in finding prey and mates when restricted to using vision alone. Here we show that search-image use assists E. culicivora in finding prey and mates when restricted to using olfaction alone. After being primed with prey odour or mate odour (control: not primed with odour), spiders were transferred to an olfactometer designed to test ability to find a prey-odour or mate-odour source that was either ‘cryptic’ (i.e. accompanied by a masking odour source, Lantana camara) or ‘conspicuous’ (no L. camara odour). When tested with conspicuous odour, the identity of the priming odour had no significant effect on how many spiders found the odour source. However, when tested with cryptic odour, significantly more spiders found the odour source when primed with congruent odour and significantly fewer spiders found the odour source when primed with incongruent odour. PMID:20504813

  5. Emission of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from tropical plant species in India.

    PubMed

    Padhy, P K; Varshney, C K

    2005-06-01

    Foliar emission of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from common Indian plant species was measured. Dynamic flow enclosure technique was used and the gas samples were collected onto Tenax-GC/Carboseive cartridges. The Tenax-GC/Carboseive cartridges were attached to the thermal disorber sample injection system and the gas sample was analysed using gas chromatography (GC) with flame ionisation detection (FID). Fifty-one local plant species were screened, out of which 36 species were found to emit VOC (4 high emitter; 28 moderate emitter; and 4 low-emitter), while in the remaining 15 species no VOC emission was detected or the levels of emission were below detection limit (BDL). VOC emission was found to vary from one species to another. There was a marked seasonal and diurnal variation in VOC emission. The minimum and maximum VOC emission values were < 0.1 and 87 microgg(-1) dry leaf h(-1) in Ficus infectoria and Lantana camara respectively. Out of the 51 plant species studied, 13 species are reported here for the first time. Among the nine tree species (which were selected for detailed study), the highest average hourly emission (9.69+/-8.39 microgg(-1) dry leaf) was observed in Eucalyptus species and the minimum in Syzygium jambolanum (1.89+/-2.48 microgg(-1) dry leaf). An attempt has been made to compare VOC emission from different plant species between present study and the literature (tropical and other regions).

  6. Weedy lignocellulosic feedstock and microbial metabolic engineering: advancing the generation of 'Biofuel'.

    PubMed

    Chandel, Anuj K; Singh, Om V

    2011-03-01

    Lignocellulosic materials are the most abundant renewable organic resources (~200 billion tons annually) on earth that are readily available for conversion to ethanol and other value-added products, but they have not yet been tapped for the commercial production of fuel ethanol. The lignocellulosic substrates include woody substrates such as hardwood (birch and aspen, etc.) and softwood (spruce and pine, etc.), agro residues (wheat straw, sugarcane bagasse, corn stover, etc.), dedicated energy crops (switch grass, and Miscanthus etc.), weedy materials (Eicchornia crassipes, Lantana camara etc.), and municipal solid waste (food and kitchen waste, etc.). Despite the success achieved in the laboratory, there are limitations to success with lignocellulosic substrates on a commercial scale. The future of lignocellulosics is expected to lie in improvements of plant biomass, metabolic engineering of ethanol, and cellulolytic enzyme-producing microorganisms, fullest exploitation of weed materials, and process integration of the individual steps involved in bioethanol production. Issues related to the chemical composition of various weedy raw substrates for bioethanol formation, including chemical composition-based structural hydrolysis of the substrate, need special attention. This area could be opened up further by exploring genetically modified metabolic engineering routes in weedy materials and in biocatalysts that would make the production of bioethanol more efficient.

  7. Characterization of biochar obtained from weeds and its effect on soil properties of North Eastern Region of India.

    PubMed

    Mandal, S; Verma, B C; Ramkrushna, G I; Singh, R K; Rajkhowa, D J

    2015-03-01

    In the global climate change scenario, application of biochar in soil has become one of the important management practices for carbon sequestration, soil health improvement and climate change mitigation. In this study, an attempt was made to see the effect of biochar prepared from weed biomass on soil properties in subtropical northeast India. Biochar were prepared from seven locally available weed biomass viz. Ageratum conyzoides, Lantana camera, Gynura sp., Setaria sp., Avena fatua, Maize stalk, Pine needles and were characterised. Apot experiment was conducted with maize, where biochar was applied alone and in combination with fertilizers. Results revealed that biochar had significant impact on soil pH, SOC, and available nutrients like N, P and K. It also had significant impact on maize biomass yield. All biochar contained more than 50% stable carbon. Increase in soil pH was in the range of 0.26 to 0.3 and that of SOC from 1.62% in control to 1.74% in biochar added treatments. Biochars alone improved the available nitrogen ranging from 4.5 to 21.3 mg kg(-1), available P from 3.32 to 3.68 mg kg(-1) and increased K content by 20% above control. Weed biomass can be potential alternative to enhance soil and crop productivity through conversion into biochar.

  8. Essential Oils from Ugandan Aromatic Medicinal Plants: Chemical Composition and Growth Inhibitory Effects on Oral Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Ocheng, Francis; Bwanga, Freddie; Joloba, Moses; Softrata, Abier; Azeem, Muhammad; Pütsep, Katrin; Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin; Obua, Celestino; Gustafsson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The study assessed the growth inhibitory effects of essential oils extracted from ten Ugandan medicinal plants (Bidens pilosa, Helichrysum odoratissimum, Vernonia amygdalina, Hoslundia opposita, Ocimum gratissimum, Cymbopogon citratus, Cymbopogon nardus, Teclea nobilis, Zanthoxylum chalybeum, and Lantana trifolia) used traditionally in the management of oral diseases against oral pathogens. Chemical compositions of the oils were explored by GC-MS. Inhibitory effects of the oils were assessed on periodontopathic Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and cariogenic Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus using broth dilution methods at concentrations of 1%, 0.1%, and 0.01%. The most sensitive organism was A. actinomycetemcomitans. Its growth was markedly inhibited by six of the oils at all the concentrations tested. Essential oil from C. nardus exhibited the highest activity with complete growth inhibition of A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis at all the three concentrations tested, the major constituents in the oil being mainly oxygenated sesquiterpenes. Most of the oils exhibited limited effects on L. acidophilus. We conclude that essential oils from the studied plants show marked growth inhibitory effects on periodontopathic A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis, moderate effects on cariogenic S. mutans, and the least effect on L. acidophilus. The present study constitutes a basis for further investigations and development of certain oils into alternative antiplaque agents. PMID:26170872

  9. Essential Oils from Ugandan Aromatic Medicinal Plants: Chemical Composition and Growth Inhibitory Effects on Oral Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Ocheng, Francis; Bwanga, Freddie; Joloba, Moses; Softrata, Abier; Azeem, Muhammad; Pütsep, Katrin; Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin; Obua, Celestino; Gustafsson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The study assessed the growth inhibitory effects of essential oils extracted from ten Ugandan medicinal plants (Bidens pilosa, Helichrysum odoratissimum, Vernonia amygdalina, Hoslundia opposita, Ocimum gratissimum, Cymbopogon citratus, Cymbopogon nardus, Teclea nobilis, Zanthoxylum chalybeum, and Lantana trifolia) used traditionally in the management of oral diseases against oral pathogens. Chemical compositions of the oils were explored by GC-MS. Inhibitory effects of the oils were assessed on periodontopathic Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and cariogenic Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus using broth dilution methods at concentrations of 1%, 0.1%, and 0.01%. The most sensitive organism was A. actinomycetemcomitans. Its growth was markedly inhibited by six of the oils at all the concentrations tested. Essential oil from C. nardus exhibited the highest activity with complete growth inhibition of A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis at all the three concentrations tested, the major constituents in the oil being mainly oxygenated sesquiterpenes. Most of the oils exhibited limited effects on L. acidophilus. We conclude that essential oils from the studied plants show marked growth inhibitory effects on periodontopathic A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis, moderate effects on cariogenic S. mutans, and the least effect on L. acidophilus. The present study constitutes a basis for further investigations and development of certain oils into alternative antiplaque agents.

  10. Tortricid Moths Reared from the Invasive Weed Mexican Palo Verde, Parkinsonia aculeata, with Comments on their Host Specificity, Biology, Geographic Distribution, and Systematics

    PubMed Central

    Brown, John W.; Segura, Ricardo; Santiago-Jiménez, Quiyari; Rota, Jadranka; Heard, Tim A.

    2011-01-01

    As part of efforts to identify native herbivores of Mexican palo verde, Parkinsonia aculeata L. (Leguminosae: Caesalpinioideae), as potential biological control agents against this invasive weed in Australia, ten species of Tortricidae (Lepidoptera) were reared from Guatemala, Mexico, Nicaragua, and Venezuela: Amorbia concavana (Zeller), Platynota rostrana (Walker), Platynota helianthes (Meyrick), Platynota stultana Walsingham (all Tortricinae: Sparganothini), Rudenia leguminana (Busck), Cochylis sp. (both Tortricinae: Cochylini), Ofatulena duodecemstriata (Walsingham), O. luminosa Heinrich, Ofatulena sp. (all Olethreutinae: Grapholitini), and Crocidosema lantana Busck (Olethreutinae: Eucosmini). Significant geographic range extensions are provided for O. duodecemstriata and R. leguminana. These are the first documented records of P. aculeata as a host plant for all but O. luminosa. The four species of Sparganothini are polyphagous; in contrast, the two Cochylini and three Grapholitini likely are specialists on Leguminosae. Ofatulena luminosa is possibly host specific on P. aculeata. Host trials with Rudenia leguminana also provide some evidence of specificity, in contrast to historical rearing records. To examine the possibility that R. leguminana is a complex of species, two data sets of molecular markers were examined: (1) a combined data set of two mitochondrial markers (a 781-basepair region of cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) and a 685-basepair region of cytochrome c oxidase II) and one nuclear marker (a 531-basepair region of the 28S domain 2); and (2) the 650-basepair “barcode” region of COI. Analyses of both data sets strongly suggest that individuals examined in this study belong to more than one species. PMID:21521138

  11. Search for antibacterial and antifungal agents from selected Indian medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Kumar, V Prashanth; Chauhan, Neelam S; Padh, Harish; Rajani, M

    2006-09-19

    A series of 61 Indian medicinal plants belonging to 33 different families used in various infectious disorders, were screened for their antimicrobial properties. Screening was carried out at 1000 and 500 microg/ml concentrations by agar dilution method against Bacillus cereus var mycoides, Bacillus pumilus, Bacillus subtilis, Bordetella bronchiseptica, Micrococcus luteus, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus faecalis, Candida albicans, Aspergillus niger and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Twenty-eight plant extracts showed activity against at least one of the test organisms used in the screening. On the basis of the results obtained, we conclude that the crude extracts of Dorema ammoniacum, Sphaeranthus indicus, Dracaena cinnabari, Mallotus philippinensis, Jatropha gossypifolia, Aristolochia indica, Lantana camara, Nardostachys jatamansi, Randia dumetorum and Cassia fistula exhibited significant antimicrobial activity and properties that support folkloric use in the treatment of some diseases as broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents. This probably explains the use of these plants by the indigenous people against a number of infections.

  12. Attenuation of palmitate induced insulin resistance in muscle cells by harmala, clove and river red gum.

    PubMed

    Ghaffar, Safina; Afridi, Shabbir Khan; Aftab, Meha Fatima; Murtaza, Munazza; Syed, Saqib Ali; Begum, Sabira; Waraich, Rizwana Sanaullah

    2016-09-01

    The present study aimed to decipher the mechanism of action of selected anti-diabetic plants extracts on palmitic acid mediated insulin resistance in muscle cells. Our results showed that extract from Peganum harmala seeds, Eucalyptus camaldulensis and Syzygium aromaticum leaves, showed significant antioxidant activity. We found that these extracts were able to affect stress signalling by reducing p-38 MAP kinase phosphorylation. They also reduced phosphorylation of substrate for insulin receptor (IRS) at serine residues and increased its phosphorylation at tyrosine residues and also enhanced PKB phosphorylation. Glucose uptake was also enhanced in muscle cells after treatment with these extracts. Extracts from Lantana camara, Psidium gujava fruit and different parts of Cassia alata did not affect FFA mediated down-regulation of insulin signalling. The study conclude that seeds of Peganum harmala and leaves of Eucalyptus camaldulensis and Syzygium aromaticum enhanced insulin signal transduction and glucose uptake in muscle cells via reducing oxidative stress. As a result, these herbal extracts may be considered useful to protect from insulin resistance.

  13. Scalariform-to-simple transition in vessel perforation plates triggered by differences in climate during the evolution of Adoxaceae

    PubMed Central

    Lens, Frederic; Vos, Rutger A.; Charrier, Guillaume; van der Niet, Timo; Merckx, Vincent; Baas, Pieter; Aguirre Gutierrez, Jesus; Jacobs, Bart; Chacon Dória, Larissa; Smets, Erik; Delzon, Sylvain; Janssens, Steven B.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Angiosperms with simple vessel perforations have evolved many times independently of species having scalariform perforations, but detailed studies to understand why these transitions in wood evolution have happened are lacking. We focus on the striking difference in wood anatomy between two closely related genera of Adoxaceae, Viburnum and Sambucus, and link the anatomical divergence with climatic and physiological insights. Methods After performing wood anatomical observations, we used a molecular phylogenetic framework to estimate divergence times for 127 Adoxaceae species. The conditions under which the genera diversified were estimated using ancestral area reconstruction and optimization of ancestral climates, and xylem-specific conductivity measurements were performed. Key Results Viburnum, characterized by scalariform vessel perforations (ancestral), diversified earlier than Sambucus, having simple perforations (derived). Ancestral climate reconstruction analyses point to cold temperate preference for Viburnum and warm temperate for Sambucus. This is reflected in the xylem-specific conductivity rates of the co-occurring species investigated, showing that Viburnum lantana has rates much lower than Sambucus nigra. Conclusions The lack of selective pressure for high conductive efficiency during early diversification of Viburnum and the potentially adaptive value of scalariform perforations in frost-prone cold temperate climates have led to retention of the ancestral vessel perforation type, while higher temperatures during early diversification of Sambucus have triggered the evolution of simple vessel perforations, allowing more efficient long-distance water transport. PMID:27498812

  14. Antibacterial activities of extracts from Ugandan medicinal plants used for oral care.

    PubMed

    Ocheng, Francis; Bwanga, Freddie; Joloba, Moses; Borg-Karlson, Ann-Karin; Gustafsson, Anders; Obua, Celestino

    2014-08-08

    Medicinal plants are widely used for treatment of oral/dental diseases in Uganda. To investigate antibacterial activities of 16 commonly used medicinal plants on microorganisms associated with periodontal diseases (PD) and dental caries (DC). Pulp juice and solvent extracts (hexane, methanol and water) from the plants were tested against Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia associated with PD and Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, Lactobacillus acidophilus associated with DC. Tests were done using agar well-diffusion (pulp juice) and agar-dilution (Solvent extracts) assays. Pulp juice from Zanthoxylum chalybeum and Euclea latidens showed activity against all the bacteria, Zanthoxylum chalybeum being most active. Hexane extract from aerial part of Helichrysum odoratissimum was most active (MIC: 0.125-0.5 mg/ml). Methanol extract from leaves of Lantana trifolia showed activity against all bacteria (MIC: 0.25-1 mg/ml). Several of the tested plants showed antibacterial activities against bacteria associated with PD and DC, meriting further investigations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of nitric oxide scavenging activity, in vitro and ex vivo, of selected medicinal plants traditionally used in inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Basu, Subhalakshmi; Hazra, Banasri

    2006-10-01

    Steroidal and non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs, despite their various side effects, are in great demand worldwide. Alternatively, herbal formulations provide relief to a large percentage of the population suffering from inflammatory diseases. Therefore, such practices need to be rationalized through a mechanistic approach. Thus, four traditional medicinal plants, namely Ventilago madraspatana Gaertn., Rubia cordifolia Linn., Lantana camara Linn. and Morinda citrifolia Linn. were selected for a study on the inhibition of nitric oxide (NO*), a key mediator in the phenomenon of inflammation, signifying the presence of effective antiinflammatory constituents therein. Plant samples were extracted with different solvents for evaluation of their inhibitory activity on NO* produced in vitro from sodium nitroprusside, and in LPS-activated murine peritoneal macrophages, ex vivo. Further, the inhibition of NO* synthesis was correlated with the reduction of iNOS protein expression through Western blot. Notable NO* scavenging activity was exhibited in vitro by some extracts of V. madraspatana, R. cordifolia and L. camara (IC(50) < 0.2 mg/mL). Most of them showed marked inhibition (60%-80%), ex vivo, at a dose of 80 microg/mL without appreciable cytotoxic effect on the cultured macrophages. Immunoblot analysis confirmed that the modulatory effect of the samples had occurred through suppression of iNOS protein.

  16. Relative changes in phosphatase activities as influenced by source and application rate of organic composts in field crops.

    PubMed

    Saha, Supradip; Mina, B L; Gopinath, K A; Kundu, S; Gupta, H S

    2008-04-01

    Potential impact of different levels and sources of organic composts on activities of phosphatases (acid and alkaline phosphatase, phosphodiesterase, and inorganic pyrophosphatase) was studied after three years of continuous application. Enzyme activities were compared with microbial biomass P and available P. Experimental plots were divided based on the organic source into three groups: those receiving farmyard manure (FYM), vermicompost (VC) and Lantana compost (LC). Microbial biomass P (11.7 g kg(-1) soil), available P (24.0 g kg(-1) soil) and acid phosphatase (1.3 mg g(-1) p-NP g(-1) soil h(-1)) was highest in highest dose of VC. Acid phosphatase activity was high in all plots, including those where microbial biomass P levels were low. Most of the phosphatase activities were significantly correlated with available P in FYM and VC. These relationships were negative for LC treatments. Results showed that application of earthworm casts is helpful in faster transformation of organic P by facilitating better environment to microbes and plant roots.

  17. Effects of oral phytoextract intake on phenolic concentration and redox homeostasis in murine encephalic regions.

    PubMed

    Cittadini, M C; Canalis, A M; Albrecht, C; Soria, E A

    2015-10-01

    Vegetable infusions (VI) are one of the main phenolic sources for humans. They may act as antioxidants in the central nervous system, but data about their effect are insufficient. The main objective of the study was to determinate the effects of oral VI of Argentinean plants on phenolic concentration and redox homeostasis in different murine encephalic regions. Redox changes (peroxides -HP-, anion superoxide -SO- and γ-glutamyltranspeptidase activity) and tissue phenolics were assessed in Balb/c mice of both sexes treated with the following VI extracts: Lantana grisebachii Seckt. var. grisebachii (Verbenaceae) (LG), Aspidosperma quebracho-blanco Schltdl. (Apocynaceae) (AQB), and Ilex paraguariensis A. St.-Hil. (Aquifoliaceae) (IP). Brain (telencephalon and diencephalon), midbrain, brainstem, and cerebellum were studied (analysis of variance, P < 0.05). A redox homeostasis depending on an appropriate phenolic balance was detected after marker analysis. Under situations without exogenous challenges, the excessive or deficient levels were deleterious on each region. This finding was confirmed independently of the utilized phytoextracts. LG and AQB caused such phenolic imbalance and triggered oxidative stress. IP group showed region-specific differential redox effects. Overall, the last extract exhibited the best redox profile when the complete encephalon was analyzed. Since this plant has sanitary impact due to its high human intake, new studies about it are warranted.

  18. Evaluation of the Larvicidal Efficacy of Five Indigenous Weeds against an Indian Strain of Dengue Vector, Aedes aegypti L. (Diptera: Culicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Aarti; Kumar, Sarita; Tripathi, Pushplata

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Aedes aegypti, dengue fever mosquito, is primarily associated with the transmission of dengue and chikungunya in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. The present investigations were carried out to assess the larvicidal efficiency of five indigenous weeds against Ae. aegypti. Methods. The 1,000 ppm hexane and ethanol extracts prepared from the leaves and stem of five plants (Achyranthes aspera, Cassia occidentalis, Catharanthus roseus, Lantana camara, and Xanthium strumarium) were screened for their larvicidal activity against early fourth instars of dengue vector. The extracts which could cause 80–100% mortality were further investigated for their efficacy. Results. The preliminary screening established the efficacy of hexane extracts as compared to the ethanol extracts. Further investigations revealed the highest larvicidal potential of A. aspera extracts exhibiting LC50 value of 82.555 ppm and 68.133 ppm, respectively. Further, their leaf extracts showed 5–85.9% higher larvicidal activity and stem extracts exhibited 0.23- to 0.85-fold more efficiency than the other four extracts. Conclusion. The present investigations suggest the possible use of A. aspera as an ideal ecofriendly, larvicidal agent for the control of dengue vector, Ae. aegypti. Future studies are, however, required to explore and identify the bioactive component involved and its mode of action. PMID:26941996

  19. Heavy metal contamination by Al-fabrication plants in Hong Kong

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, N.F.Y.; Wong, Y.S.; Wong, M.H.

    1988-01-01

    Leaf samples of six plant species collected from locations near the Al-fabrication plants in Sai Kung, Hong Kong were found to be heavily contaminated by Al, Cd, Pb, Ni, Cu and Zn, as determined by inductively-coupled plasma emission spectrophotometer (ICP). Studies using scanning electron microscope incorporated with X-ray microanalyzer showed that significant amounts of dust, with elevated concentrations of heavy metals, were deposited on the leaf surface. The stomatal pores were partially plugged and the guard cells were distorted. The amount of dust deposition and metal contamination varied significantly among different species. Lantana camara had the highest concentration of all metals. Washing with deionized waster could remove the surficial dust particles and reduce the metal contamination, with a degree of effectiveness depending on plant species and metal species. About 50% of Al and other metals were removed from leaves of L. camara and Fiscus variegata by washing, whereas only 20% removal was recorded in Bauhina variegata, the species had the least dust deposition. The soil samples and Al wastes collected from the same sites also exhibited higher values of total metal concentrations than the control. However, the contents of extractable metals were extremely low and were almost below the limits of detection. Experimental data further suggested that the source of leaf metals was mainly accumulated from metal-enriched aerosols, either from Al-fabrication plants or from automobile exhausts, and contribution from soil was relatively unimportant.

  20. Medicinal plants from the Yanesha (Peru): evaluation of the leishmanicidal and antimalarial activity of selected extracts.

    PubMed

    Valadeau, Céline; Pabon, Adriana; Deharo, Eric; Albán-Castillo, Joaquina; Estevez, Yannick; Lores, Fransis Augusto; Rojas, Rosario; Gamboa, Dionicia; Sauvain, Michel; Castillo, Denis; Bourdy, Geneviève

    2009-06-25

    Ninety-four ethanolic extracts of plants used medicinally by the Yanesha, an Amazonian Peruvian ethnic group, for affections related to leishmaniasis and malaria were screened in vitro against Leishmania amazonensis amastigotes and against a Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistant strain. The viability of Leishmania amazonensis amastigote stages was assessed by the reduction of tetrazolium salt (MTT) while the impact on Plasmodium falciparum was determined by measuring the incorporation of radio-labelled hypoxanthine. Six plant species displayed good activity against Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistant strain (IC(50) < 10 microg/ml): a Monimiaceae, Siparuna aspera (Ruiz & Pavon), A. DC., two Zingiberaceae, Renealmia thyrsoidea (Ruiz & Pavon) Poepp. & Endl. and Renealmia alpinia (Rottb.), two Piperaceae (Piper aduncum L. and Piper sp.) and the leaves of Jacaranda copaia (Aubl.) D. Don (Bignoniaceae). Eight species displayed interesting leishmanicidal activities (IC50 < 10 microg/ml): Carica papaya L. (Caricaceae), Piper dennisii Trel (Piperaceae), Hedychium coronarium J. König (Zingiberaceae), Cestrum racemosum Ruiz & Pav. (Solanaceae), Renealmia alpinia (Rottb.) Zingiberaceae, Lantana sp. (Verbenaceae), Hyptis lacustris A. St.-Hil. ex Benth. (Lamiaceae) and Calea montana Klat. (Asteraceae). Most of them are used against skin affections by Yanesha people. Results are discussed herein, according to the traditional use of the plants and compared with data obtained from the literature.

  1. Particulate matter on foliage of 13 woody species: deposition on surfaces and phytostabilisation in waxes--a 3-year study.

    PubMed

    Popek, Robert; Gawrońska, Helena; Wrochna, Mariola; Gawroński, Stanisław W; Saebø, Arne

    2013-01-01

    Particulate matter (PM) as an air pollutant can be harmful for human health through allergic, mutagenic and carcinogenic effects. Although the main focus is on decreasing air pollution, after PM has been emitted to the atmosphere, one ofthe realistic options to decrease it's concentrations in urbanized area will be phytoremediation. This study compared the capacity to capture PM from air of seven tree species commonly cultivated in Poland (Catalpa bignonioides Walter, Corylus colurna L., Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh., Ginkgo biloba L., Platanus x hispanica Mill. ex Muenchh., Quercus rubra L., Tilia tomentosa Moench 'Brabant') and six shrub species (Acer tataricum subsp, ginnala (Maxim.) Wesm., Sambucus nigra L., Sorbaria sorbifolia (L) A.Br., Spiraea japonica L.f., Syringe meyeri C.K. Schneid. 'Palibin', Viburnum lantana L.). Significant differences were found between species in mass of total PM accumulation for two PM categories and three size fractions determined and in amount of waxes. A positive correlation was found between in-wax PM of diameter 2.5-10 microm and amount of waxes, but not between amount of waxes and amount of total PM or of any size fraction.

  2. Tortricid moths reared from the invasive weed Mexican palo verde, Parkinsonia aculeata, with comments on their host specificity, biology, geographic distribution, and systematics.

    PubMed

    Brown, John W; Segura, Ricardo; Santiago-Jiménez, Quiyari; Rota, Jadranka; Heard, Tim A

    2011-01-01

    As part of efforts to identify native herbivores of Mexican palo verde, Parkinsonia aculeata L. (Leguminosae: Caesalpinioideae), as potential biological control agents against this invasive weed in Australia, ten species of Tortricidae (Lepidoptera) were reared from Guatemala, Mexico, Nicaragua, and Venezuela: Amorbia concavana (Zeller), Platynota rostrana (Walker), Platynota helianthes (Meyrick), Platynota stultana Walsingham (all Tortricinae: Sparganothini), Rudenia leguminana (Busck), Cochylis sp. (both Tortricinae: Cochylini), Ofatulena duodecemstriata (Walsingham), O. luminosa Heinrich, Ofatulena sp. (all Olethreutinae: Grapholitini), and Crocidosema lantana Busck (Olethreutinae: Eucosmini). Significant geographic range extensions are provided for O. duodecemstriata and R. leguminana. These are the first documented records of P. aculeata as a host plant for all but O. luminosa. The four species of Sparganothini are polyphagous; in contrast, the two Cochylini and three Grapholitini likely are specialists on Leguminosae. Ofatulena luminosa is possibly host specific on P. aculeata. Host trials with Rudenia leguminana also provide some evidence of specificity, in contrast to historical rearing records. To examine the possibility that R. leguminana is a complex of species, two data sets of molecular markers were examined: (1) a combined data set of two mitochondrial markers (a 781-basepair region of cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) and a 685-basepair region of cytochrome c oxidase II) and one nuclear marker (a 531-basepair region of the 28S domain 2); and (2) the 650-basepair "barcode" region of COI. Analyses of both data sets strongly suggest that individuals examined in this study belong to more than one species.

  3. Screening of medicinal plants from Reunion Island for antimalarial and cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Jonville, M C; Kodja, H; Humeau, L; Fournel, J; De Mol, P; Cao, M; Angenot, L; Frédérich, M

    2008-12-08

    Nine plants from Reunion Island, selected using ethnopharmacology and chemotaxonomy, were investigated for their potential antimalarial value. Thirty-eight extracts were prepared by maceration using CH(2)Cl(2) and MeOH, and were tested for in vitro activity against the 3D7 and W2 strain of Plasmodium falciparum. The most active extracts were then tested for in vitro cytotoxicity on human WI-38 fibroblasts to determine the selectivity index. Those extracts were also investigated in vivo against Plasmodium berghei infected mice. Most active of the extracts tested were the dichloromethane leaves extracts of Nuxia verticillata Lam. (Buddlejaceae), Psiadia arguta Voigt. (Asteraceae), Lantana camara L. (Verbenaceae), the methanol extracts from Aphloia theiformis (Vahl) Benn. (Aphloiaceae) bark, and Terminalia bentzoe L. (Combretaceae) leaves displaying in vitro IC(50) values ranging from 5.7 to 14.1mug/ml. Extracts from Psiadia, Aphloia at 200mg/(kgday) and Teminalia at 50mg/(kgday) also exhibited significant (p<0.0005) parasite inhibition in mice: 75.5%, 65.6% and 83.5%, respectively. Two plants showed interesting antimalarial activity with good selectivity: Aphloia theiformis and Terminalia bentzoe. Nuxia verticillata still needs to be tested in vivo, with a new batch of plant material.

  4. Integrating conventional classifiers with a GIS expert system to increase the accuracy of invasive species mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masocha, Mhosisi; Skidmore, Andrew K.

    2011-06-01

    Mapping the cover of invasive species using remotely sensed data alone is challenging, because many invaders occur as mid-level canopy species or as subtle understorey species and therefore contribute little to the spectral signatures captured by passive remote sensing devices. In this study, two common non-parametric classifiers namely, the neural network and support vector machine were used to map four cover classes of the invasive shrub Lantana camara in a protected game reserve and the adjacent area under communal land management in Zimbabwe. These classifiers were each combined with a geographic information system (GIS) expert system, in order to test whether the new hybrid classifiers yielded significantly more accurate invasive species cover maps than the single classifiers. The neural network, when used on its own, mapped the cover of L. camara with an overall accuracy of 71% and a Kappa index of agreement of 0.61. When the neural network was combined with an expert system, the overall accuracy and Kappa index of agreement significantly increased to 83% and 0.77, respectively. Similarly, the support vector machine achieved an overall accuracy of 64% with a Kappa index of agreement of 0.52, whereas the hybrid support vector machine and expert system classifier achieved a significantly higher overall accuracy of 76% and a Kappa index of agreement of 0.67. These results suggest that integrating conventional image classifiers with an expert system increases the accuracy of invasive species mapping.

  5. In vitro antileishmanial activity of Mexican medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Altamirano, Ronna; Monzote, Lianet; Piñón-Tápanes, Abel; Vibrans, Heike; Rivero-Cruz, J Fausto; Ibarra-Alvarado, César; Rojas-Molina, Alejandra

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the anti-leishmanial activity and cytotoxicity of aqueous and organic extracts of ten plants used in Mexican traditional medicine as anti-parasitics. For the organic extracts, plant material was macerated in dichloromethane (CH2Cl2) and dichloromethane/methanol (CH2Cl2/MeOH) (1:1) during two weeks; the aqueous extracts were prepared by infusion. The extracts were tested against promastigotes and intracellular amastigotes of Leishmania amazonensis. The cytotoxicity was assayed in parallel on peritoneal macrophages of BALB/c mice. Four of the thirty extracts tested were active and selective against L. amazonensis promastigotes: Schinus molle (CH2Cl2 and CH2Cl2/MeOH), Lantana camara (CH2Cl2) and Prosopis laevigata (aqueous). These extracts had a median inhibitory concentration (IC50) against intracellular amastigotes under 50 μg/mL and a selectivity index (SI) higher than 5, which indicates that they constitute valuable candidates to obtain secondary metabolites with leishmanicidal activity. The results derived from this study indicate that L. camara, P. laevigata, and S. molle might provide interesting new leads for the development of antileishmanial drugs.

  6. Pastoralism versus Agriculturalism—How Do Altered Land-Use Forms Affect the Spread of Invasive Plants in the Degraded Mutara Rangelands of North-Eastern Rwanda?

    PubMed Central

    Wronski, Torsten; Bariyanga, Jean Damascene; Sun, Ping; Plath, Martin; Apio, Ann

    2017-01-01

    Lantana camara L. (Verbenaceae) originates from tropical Central and South America and has become invasive in about 50 countries. It causes problems when invading rangelands due to its toxicity to livestock and its tendency to form dense, monotonous thickets. Its invasiveness can partly be explained by the high tannin content largely protecting the species from being browsed, its tolerance to a wide range of environmental conditions, as well as its general preference for anthropogenically disturbed habitats. The dispersal of L. camara is facilitated by birds and other animals consuming its drupes (endozoochory), and so both wild and domestic ungulates could contribute to its spread. In our study, we investigated the distribution of L. camara in the Mutara rangelands of north-eastern Rwanda, an area that faced dramatic landscape changes in recent decades. We assessed 23 ecological factors and factors related to land-use and conservation-political history. Major effects on the local abundance of L. camara were found in that the relative canopy cover of L. camara was negatively correlated with the occurrence of other shrubs (suggesting competition for space and nutrients), while encounter rates of houses, ‘living fences’ (Euphorbia tirucalli L.) and cattle tracks were positively correlated with L. camara cover. Hence, the spread of non-native L. camara in the Mutara rangelands appears to be linked to landscape alterations arising from the transformation of rangelands supporting traditional pastoralist communities to other agricultural land-use forms. PMID:28498334

  7. Spatial variation of tick abundance and seroconversion rates of indigenous cattle to Anaplasma marginale, Babesia bigemina and Theileria parva infections in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Magona, J W; Walubengo, J; Olaho-Mukani, W; Jonsson, N N; Welburn, S W; Eisler, M C

    2011-10-01

    Tick abundance and seroconversion rates of 640 indigenous cattle in a mixed crop-livestock system in Uganda were investigated in a 14 months longitudinal study. Up to 100% of the cattle in Buyimini, Kubo, Nanjeho, Ojilai and Sitengo villages (high tick challenge zone) were consistently infested with Rhipicephalus appendiculatus, whereas on average 50% of the cattle in Bunghaji, Hitunga and Magoje villages (low tick challenge zone) were inconsistently infested. Likewise, up to 50% of the cattle in Buyimini, Kubo, Nanjeho, Ojilai and Sitengo villages were consistently infested with R. (Boophilus) decoloratus ticks, while on average 30% of the cattle in Bunghaji, Hitunga and Magoje were inconsistently infested. Seroconversion rates of cattle to Anaplasma marginale infection under low tick challenge were higher than those under high tick challenge, but the reverse was true for Babesia bigemina infection. For Theileria parva infection, seroconversion rates of cattle older than 6 months under low tick challenge were significantly higher than those under high tick challenge (P < 0.05). However, the likelihood of occurrence of theileriosis cases among calves (0-6 m) under high tick challenge was 6 times (Odds ratio = 5.82 [1.30-36.37]) higher than under low tick challenge. The high density of anti-tick plants Lantana camara and Ocimum suave that were widespread in villages with low tick challenge, among other factors, was probably the cause for unfavourable tick survival.

  8. Estimation of Anticipated Performance Index and Air Pollution Tolerance Index and of vegetation around the marble industrial areas of Potwar region: bioindicators of plant pollution response.

    PubMed

    Noor, Mehwish Jamil; Sultana, Shazia; Fatima, Sonia; Ahmad, Mushtaq; Zafar, Muhammad; Sarfraz, Maliha; Balkhyour, Masour A; Safi, Sher Zaman; Ashraf, Muhammad Aqeel

    2015-06-01

    Mitigating industrial air pollution is a big challenge, in such scenario screening of plants as a bio monitor is extremely significant. It requires proper selection and screening of sensitive and tolerant plant species which are bio indicator and sink for air pollution. The present study was designed to evaluate the Air Pollution Tolerance Index (APTI) and Anticipated Performance Index (API) of the common flora. Fifteen common plant species from among trees, herb and shrubs i.e. Chenopodium album (Chenopodiaceae), Parthenium hysterophorus (Asteraceae), Amaranthus viridis (Amaranthaceae), Lantana camara (Verbenaceaea), Ziziphus nummulari (Rhamnaceae), Silibum merianum (Asteraceae), Cannabis sativa (Cannabinaceae), Calatropis procera (Asclepediaceae), Ricinus communis (Euphorbiaceae), Melia azadirachta (Meliaceae), Psidium guajava (Myrtaceae), Eucalyptus globules (Myrtaceae), Broussonetia papyrifera (Moraceae), Withania somnifera (Solanaceae) and Sapium sabiferum (Euphorbiaceae) were selected growing frequently in vicinity of Marble industries in Potwar region. APTI and API of selected plant species were analyzed by determining important biochemical parameter i.e. total chlorophyll, ascorbic acid, relative water content and pH etc. Furthermore the selected vegetation was studied for physiological, economic, morphological and biological characteristics. The soil of studied sites was analyzed. It was found that most the selected plant species are sensitive to air pollution. However B. papyrifera, E. globulus and R. communis shows the highest API and therefore recommended for plantation in marble dust pollution stress area.

  9. A synopsis of the scolytine ambrosia beetles of Thailand (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae).

    PubMed

    Beaver, R A; Sittichaya, W; Liu, L-Y

    2014-10-21

    The present state of knowledge of the scolytine ambrosia beetles of Thailand is summarised to provide a basis for future studies of the fauna and its economic importance in forestry, timber production and crop tree plantations. A checklist of the fauna is provided with information on local and world distribution, host trees, biology and taxonomy. Six faunal elements based on geographical distribution, and the host tree and altitudinal preferences of species are discussed. One hundred and sixty-one species are recorded from Thailand, 67 of them for the first time. The following new synonym is proposed: Euwallacea wallacei (Blandford) (= Xyleborus barbatomorphus Schedl n.syn.). The following new combinations are given: Ambrosiophilus cristatulus (Schedl), Ambrosiophilus latisulcatus (Eggers), Beaverium dihingensis (Eggers), Beaverium lantanae (Eggers) and Immanus desectus (Eggers) are transferred from their present position in Ambrosiodmus; Ancipitis depressus (Eggers) and Ancipitis punctatissimus (Eichhoff) are transferred from Leptoxyleborus; Cyclorhipidion armipenne (Schedl), Cyclorhipidion inarmatum (Eggers), Euwallacea semiermis (Schedl), Fortiborus macropterus (Schedl), Microperus nudibrevis (Schedl) and Wallacellus minutus (Blandford) are transferred from Xyleborus.

  10. Evaluation of biomass of some invasive weed species as substrate for oyster mushroom (Pleurotus spp.) cultivation.

    PubMed

    Mintesnot, Birara; Ayalew, Amare; Kebede, Ameha

    2014-01-15

    This study assessed the bioconversion of Agriculture wastes like invasive weeds species (Lantana camara, Prosopis juliflora, Parthenium hysterophorus) as a substrate for oyster mushroom (Pleurotus species) cultivation together with wheat straw as a control. The experiment was laid out in factorial combination of substrates and three edible oyster mushroom species in a Completely Randomized Design (CRD) with three replications. Pleurotus ostreatus gave significantly (p < 0.01) total yield of 840 g kg(-1) on P. hysterophorus, Significantly (p < 0.01) biological efficiency (83.87%) and production rate of 3.13 was recorded for P. ostreatus grown on P. hysterophorus. The highest total ash content (13.90%) was recorded for P. florida grown on L. camara. while the lowest (6.92%) was for P. sajor-caju grown on the P. juliflora. Crude protein ranged from 40.51-41.48% for P. florida grown on P. hysterophorus and L. camara. Lowest crude protein content (30.11%) was recorded for P. ostreatus grown on wheat straw. The crude fiber content (12.73%) of P. sajor-caju grown on wheat straw was the highest. The lowest crude fiber (5.19%) was recorded for P. ostreatus on P. juliflora. Total yield had a positive and significant correlation with biological efficiency and production. Utilization of the plant biomass for mushroom cultivation could contribute to alleviating ecological impact of invasive weed species while offering practical option to mitigating hunger and malnutrition in areas where the invasive weeds became dominant.

  11. Cultivation of Pleurotus ostreatus on weed plants.

    PubMed

    Das, Nirmalendu; Mukherjee, Mina

    2007-10-01

    Oyster mushroom, Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq.:Fr.) Kumm. ITCC 3308 (collected from Indian Type Culture Collection, IARI, New Delhi, India, 110012) was grown on dry weed plants, Leonotis sp, Sida acuta, Parthenium argentatum, Ageratum conyzoides, Cassia sophera, Tephrosia purpurea and Lantana camara. Leonotis sp. was the best substrate in fruit body production of P. ostreatus when it was mixed with rice straw (1:1, wet wt/wet wt) for mushroom cultivation. The fruiting time for P. ostreatus was also less on Leonotis sp. than on any other weed substrates tested in the present investigation. T. purpurea was the least suited weed for oyster mushroom cultivation. The main problem of oyster mushroom cultivation on weed substrates was found to be low yield in the second flush that could be overcome by blending weed plants with rice straw. The protein contents of the fruit bodies obtained from Cassia sophera, Parthenium argentatum and Leonotis sp. were not only better than rice straw but also from the rice straw supplemented weeds.

  12. Biological screening of araripe basin medicinal plants using Artemia salina Leach and pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, José Galberto M.; Campos, Adriana R.; Brito, Samara A.; Pereira, Carla Karine B.; Souza, Erlânio O.; Rodrigues, Fabíola Fernandes G.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Many medicinal plant species from the Araripe Basin are widely known and used in folk medicine and for commercial manufacturing of phytotherapeutic products. Few ethnobotanical and pharmacological studies have been undertaken in this region, however, in spite of the great cultural and biological diversity found there. Materials and Methods: Extracts of 11 plant species collected from Ceará state, Brazil, were subjected to the brine shrimp lethality test in order to detect potential sources of novel cytotoxic, antitumor compounds. The larvicidal activity, based on the percentage of larval mortality, was evaluated after 24 h exposure to the treatments. Results: All species tested showed good larvicidal activity as compared to a reference compound and literature data. The extract from Vanillosmopsis arborea was the most active with an LC50 of 3.9 μg/ml. Best results were shown by Lantana montevidensis against Pseudomonas aeruginosa [minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) 8μg/ml] and Escherichia coli (MIC 32 μg/ml), Zanthoxylum rhoifolium against E. coli (MIC, 256 μg/ml) and Staphylococcus aureus (MIC 64 μg/ml) and Croton zenhtneri against S. aureus (MIC 64 μg/ml). Conclusion: Chemical tests indicated that a wide variety of natural product classes was present in those extracts that showed significant activities in the bioassays. PMID:21120038

  13. Alien plant invasions of protected areas in Java, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Padmanaba, Michael; Tomlinson, Kyle W; Hughes, Alice C; Corlett, Richard T

    2017-08-24

    Alien plants are invading protected areas worldwide, but there is little information from tropical Asia. Java has the longest record of human occupation in Asia and today supports 145 m people. Remnants of natural ecosystems survive in 12 small National Parks surrounded by dense human populations, making them highly vulnerable to invasions. We surveyed eight of these, along a rainfall gradient from lowland rainforest with >3000 mm annual rainfall to savanna with <1500 mm, and a 0-3158 m altitudinal gradient, using 403 10 × 5 m plots along trails. We found 67 invasive alien plant species, of which 33 occurred in only one park and two (Chromolaena odorata and Lantana camara) in all. Historical factors relating to plant introduction appeared to be as important as environmental factors in determining which species occurred in which park, while within parks canopy cover and altitude were generally most influential. Spread away from trails was only evident in open habitats, including natural savannas in Baluran National Park, threatened by invasion of Acacia nilotica. Existing control attempts for invasive aliens are reactive, localized, and intermittent, and insufficient resources are currently available for the early detection, prompt action, and continued monitoring that are needed.

  14. Rapid divergence of ecotypes of an invasive plant

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Avik; Ray, Rajasri

    2014-01-01

    Invasive species demonstrate rapid evolution within a very short period of time allowing one to understand the underlying mechanism(s). Lantana camara, a highly invasive plant of the tropics and subtropics, has expanded its range and successfully established itself almost throughout India. In order to uncover the processes governing the invasion dynamics, 218 individuals from various locations across India were characterized with six microsatellites. By integrating genetic data with niche modelling, we examined the effect of drift and environmental selection on genetic divergence. We found multiple genetic clusters that were non-randomly distributed across space. Spatial autocorrelation revealed a strong fine-scale structure, i.e. isolation by distance. In addition, we obtained evidence of inhibitory effects of selection on gene flow, i.e. isolation by environmental distance. Perhaps, local adaptation in response to selection is offsetting gene flow and causing the populations to diverge. Niche models suggested that temperature and precipitation play a major role in the observed spatial distribution of this plant. Based on a non-random distribution of clusters, unequal gene flow among them and different bioclimatic niche requirements, we concluded that the emergence of ecotypes represented by two genetic clusters is underway. They may be locally adapted to specific climatic conditions, and perhaps at the very early stages of ecological divergence. PMID:25165061

  15. In vitro antifugal activity of medicinal plant extract against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici race 3 the causal agent of tomato wilt.

    PubMed

    Isaac, G S; Abu-Tahon, M A

    2014-03-01

    Medicinal plant extracts of five plants; Adhatoda vasica, Eucalyptus globulus, Lantana camara, Nerium oleander and Ocimum basilicum collected from Cairo, Egypt were evaluated against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici race 3 in vitro conditions using water and certain organic solvents. The results revealed that cold distilled water extracts of O. basilicum and E. globulus were the most effective ones for inhibiting the growth of F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici. Butanolic and ethanolic extracts of the tested plants inhibited the pathogen growth to a higher extent than water extracts. Butanolic extract of O. basilicum completely inhibited the growth of F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici at concentrations 1.5 and 2.0% (v/v). Butanolic extracts (2.0%) of tested plants had a strong inhibitory effect on hydrolytic enzymes; β-glucosidase, pectin lyase and protease of F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici. This study has confirmed that the application of plant extracts, especially from O. basilicum for controlling F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici is environmentally safe, cost effective and does not disturb ecological balance. Investigations are in progress to test the efficacy of O. basilicum extract under in vivo conditions.

  16. Antinociceptive activity of methanol extract of fruits of Capparis ovata in mice.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Rana; Bektas, Nurcan; Ozturk, Yusuf

    2010-08-19

    Capparis ovata Desf. and Capparis spinosa L. have wide natural distribution in Turkey and they are consumed in pickled form. Flower buds, root bark, and fruits of the plant are used in folk medicine due to their analgesic, wound healing, cell regeneration, tonic, and diuretic effects. In this study, we attempted to identify the possible antinociceptive action of methanol extract prepared from fruits of Capparis ovata. Using tail immersion, hot plate and writhing tests, the antinociceptive effect of the methanol extract of Capparis ovata (MEC) fruits was assessed after intraperitoneal administration into mice. Morphine sulfate (5mg/kg; i.p.) and diclofenac (10mg/kg; i.p.) were used as reference analgesic agents. Naloxone (5mg/kg; i.p.) was also tested. MEC was studied at the doses of 50, 100, and 200mg/kg (i.p.) and exhibited significant antinociceptive activities in all tests used. The above-mentioned doses of the extract reduced the writhing responses by 32.21, 55.70, and 68.36%, respectively. MPE% were increased by 7.27, 12.07, 14.60% in the tail immersion, and 7.88, 11.71, 16.73% in the hot plate test at the tested doses, respectively. Naloxone antagonized antinociceptive effect at the doses of 100 and 200mg/kg whereas partially antagonized the effect of MEC at the dose of 50mg/kg. Based on the results obtained, it can be concluded that MEC has antinociceptive effects both at the peripheral and central levels. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Investigation for anti-inflammatory and anti-thrombotic activities of methanol extract of Capparis ovata buds and fruits.

    PubMed

    Bektas, Nurcan; Arslan, Rana; Goger, Fatih; Kirimer, Nese; Ozturk, Yusuf

    2012-06-26

    Capparis ovata Desf. has wide natural distribution in Turkey and it is consumed in pickled form. Flower buds, root bark, and fruits of the plant are used traditionally due to their analgesic, anti-inflammatory, wound healing, anti-rheumatismal, tonic, and diuretic effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible anti-inflammatory and anti-thrombotic effects of methanol extracts prepared from flower buds (CBE) and fruits (CFE) of C. ovata. Anti-inflammatory effects of CBE and CFE were assessed using carrageenan-induced and prostaglandin E₂-induced mouse paw edema models. For the anti-thrombotic effect evaluation, carrageenan-induced tail thrombosis model was performed in mice. The extracts were administered intraperitonally (i.p.) at the doses of 100, 200, and 300 mg/kg. The anti-inflammatory effect of Capparis extracts were tested in comparison to 10 mg/kg diclofenac and anti-thrombotic activity to 10 and 100 IU heparin. CBE at the doses of 200, and 300 mg/kg and CFE at the doses of 100, 200, and 300 mg/kg showed significant anti-inflammatory activity and CFE reached therapeutic concentration early than CBE in carrageenan inflammation model. In prostaglandin E₂ inflammation model, CBE and CFE exhibited significant inhibitory effects. The C. ovata extracts did not show remarkable anti-thrombotic effect. Based on the results obtained, it can be concluded that fruits of C. ovata have more potent anti-inflammatory effect than flower buds. It has been suggested that inhibition of cyclooxygenase pathway is one of the mechanisms of the activity. C. ovata may be potentially used as therapeutic agents for inflammatory diseases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Stomatal responses to drought at a Mediterranean site: a comparative study of co-occurring woody species differing in leaf longevity.

    PubMed

    Mediavilla, Sonia; Escudero, Alfonso

    2003-10-01

    We studied stomatal responses to decreasing predawn water potential (Psipd) and increasing leaf-to-air water vapor pressure difference (VPD) of co-occurring woody Mediterranean species with contrasting leaf habits and growth form. The species included two evergreen oaks (Quercus ilex subsp. ballota (Desf.) Samp. and Q. suber L.), two deciduous oaks (Q. faginea Lam. and Q. pyrenaica Willd.) and two deciduous shrubs (Pyrus bourgaeana Decne. and Crataegus monogyna Jacq.). Our main objective was to determine if stomatal sensitivity is related to differences in leaf life span and leaf habit. The deciduous shrubs had the least conservative water-use characteristics, with relatively high stomatal conductance and low stomatal sensitivity to soil and atmospheric drought. As a result, Psipd decreased greatly in both species during the growing season, resulting in early leaf abscission in the summer. The deciduous oaks showed intermediate water-use characteristics, having maximum stomatal conductances and CO2 assimilation rates similar to or even higher than those of the deciduous shrubs. However, they had greater stomatal sensitivity to soil drying and showed less negative Psipd values than the deciduous shrubs. The evergreen oaks, and especially the species with the greatest leaf longevity, Q. ilex, exhibited the most conservative water-use behavior, having lower maximum stomatal conductances and greater sensitivity to VPD than the deciduous species. As a result, Psipd decreased less during the growing season in the evergreens than in the deciduous species, which may contribute to greater leaf longevity by avoiding irreversible damage during the summer drought. However, the combination of low maximum CO2 assimilation rates and high stomatal sensitivity to drought must have a negative impact on the final carbon budget of leaves with a long life span.

  19. Potential food additives from Carex distachya roots: identification and in vitro antioxidant properties.

    PubMed

    Fiorentino, Antonio; Ricci, Andreina; D'Abrosca, Brigida; Pacifico, Severina; Golino, Annunziata; Letizia, Marianna; Piccolella, Simona; Monaco, Pietro

    2008-09-10

    In the present study, the chemical composition and antioxidant properties of root methanol extract of Carex distachya Desf. (Cyperaceae) were assessed to use this plant as sources of food additives and nutraceuticals. The IC50 of the extract (4.2 microg/mL), derived from the DPPH radical scavenging capacity assay, was similar to those of ascorbic acid, alpha-tocopherol, and BHT. These results revealed a strong antioxidant activity because of the presence of an extraordinary quantity of bioactive phytochemicals. The phytochemical study of the root extract led to the isolation and identification of new and known polyphenols, most of them common constituents of plant foods. A total of 16 polyphenols, identified on the basis of spectroscopic data as 7 lignans, 4 phenylethanoids, 3 resveratrol derivatives, a monolignol, and a secoiridoid glucoside, were isolated. The tentative structural elucidation of the new metabolites 5'-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyloxy-3,3'-dimethoxy-7,9'-epoxylignan-4,8',9-triol and 3,5-bis-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyloxy-3'-methoxy-trans-stilben-4'-ol have been performed by a combined approach using ESI/TQ/MS techniques and 1D and 2D NMR experiments. All of the compounds have been tested for their antioxidant activity using six different antioxidant and radical scavenging tests. Interestingly, the extract contained high quantities of polyphenols, most of them reported as constituents of edible plants, such as grape and olive, suggesting that the methanol root extract of this plant could be used as a source of natural antioxidants useful as potential food additives.

  20. Effect of wheat middlings-based total mixed ration on milk production and composition responses of lactating dairy ewes.

    PubMed

    Tufarelli, V; Laudadio, V

    2011-01-01

    The effect of feeding pelleted total mixed ration (TMR) containing wheat middlings (WM) from durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf. cv. Appulo) as a corn grain substitute on milk yield and composition performance was measured in Comisana×Leccese crossbred lactating ewes. Forty ewes were divided into 2 equal groups and fed 1 of the 2 experimental diets for 18 wk. The control diet contained 255 g of corn/kg of dry matter (DM) as the main starch source, whereas the experimental diet contained 500 g of WM/kg of DM. To evaluate the in vivo digestibility of pelleted TMR, 4 adult rams were placed in metabolic cages and their individual feces and urine were collected. In the performance trial, ewe milk yield was recorded daily and individual milk samples were analyzed weekly for milk composition and to determine milk renneting parameters. The ewes fed both diets showed similar DM, crude protein, and neutral detergent fiber intakes. Digestibility of DM, organic matter, and crude protein of the 2 TMR was similar, but neutral detergent fiber digestibility was higher in the WM diet. In the milking trial, the WM diet increased milk fat percentage and yield but had no effect on milk yield, protein, lactose, and clotting properties compared with the control diet. Our findings indicate that WM can be fed to lactating ewes as an alternative to more traditional concentrate sources such as corn. Feeding 50% of WM in a lactation diet supported milking performance in a manner similar a corn-based diet. Moreover, the results may be applied in countries where corn cultivation is adversely affected by the high cost of production.

  1. Long-distance dispersal in a fire- and livestock-protected savanna

    PubMed Central

    Tarazi, Roberto; Sebbenn, Alexandre M; Kageyama, Paulo Y; Vencovsky, Roland

    2013-01-01

    Savannas are highly diverse and dynamic environments that can shift to forest formations due to protection policies. Long-distance dispersal may shape the genetic structure of these new closed forest formations. We analyzed eight microsatellite loci using a single-time approach to understand contemporary pollen and effective seed dispersal of the tropical tree, Copaifera langsdorffii Desf. (Fabaceae), occurring in a Brazilian fire- and livestock-protected savanna. We sampled all adult trees found within a 10.24 ha permanent plot, young trees within a subplot of 1.44 ha and open-pollinated seeds. We detected a very high level of genetic diversity among the three generations in the studied plot. Parentage analysis revealed high pollen immigration rate (0.64) and a mean contemporary pollen dispersal distance of 74 m. In addition, half-sib production was 1.8 times higher than full-sibs in significant higher distances, indicating foraging activity preference for different trees at long distances. There was a significant and negative correlation between diameter at breast height (DBH) of the pollen donor with the number of seeds (r = −0.640, P-value = 0.032), suggesting that pollen donor trees with a higher DBH produce less seeds. The mean distance of realized seed dispersal (recruitment kernel) was 135 m due to the large home range dispersers (birds and mammals) in the area. The small magnitude of spatial genetic structure found in young trees may be a consequence of overlapping seed shadows and increased tree density. Our results show the positive side of closed canopy expansion, where animal activities regarding pollination and seed dispersal are extremely high. PMID:23610640

  2. Differential exudation of two benzoxazinoids--one of the determining factors for seedling allelopathy of Triticeae species.

    PubMed

    Belz, Regina G; Hurle, Karl

    2005-01-26

    Benzoxazinoids (Bx) are natural phytotoxins that function as chemical defense compounds in several species. The release of Bx by intact plant roots associated these compounds with root allelopathy in Triticeae species; however, the significance of exudate concentrations of Bx for plant-plant interactions is still a controversial question. A biological screening of 146 cultivars of four Triticeae species (Triticum aestivum L., Triticum durum Desf., Triticum spelta L., and Secale cereale L.) demonstrated a high cultivar dependence to suppress the root growth of Sinapis alba L. by root allelopathy in a dose-response bioassay. Only a few cultivars possessed a marked high or low allelopathic activity, whereby high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection analysis of root exudates revealed that these cultivars differed considerably in their ability to exude the two Bx aglucones, DIBOA [2,4-dihydroxy-2H-1,4-benzoxazin-3(4H)-one] and DIMBOA [2,4-dihydroxy-7-methoxy-2H-1,4-benzoxazin-3(4H)-one]. The total amount of DIBOA and DIMBOA exuded showed a significant correlation to the growth inhibition in bioassay with a statistically estimated contribution to the overall allelopathic effect of 48-72%. In a bioassay with pure phytotoxins, Bx concentrations consistent with the amounts quantified in the screening bioassay caused detrimental effects on S. alba and almost reproduced the statistically estimated contribution. The observed causal association between the allelopathic activity under laboratory conditions and the exudate concentrations of Bx suggests that this association might have implications for the interference of Triticeae species in natural plant communities.

  3. Agriculture intensification decreases soil C content and respiration activity in a Mediterranean Vertisol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farina, Roberta; Francaviglia, Rosa; Felici, Barbara; Renzi, Gianluca; Troccoli, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Adoption of intensive and non-conservative farming practices in Mediterranean areas, often causes a strong reduction of soil organic C, with major side effects on soil functioning and CO2 emissions to atmosphere. The purpose of our research was to evaluate the effect of durum wheat-(Triticum durum Desf.) (DW) based rotations, common in Southern Italy, on soil organic C content and soil potential respiration, after 19 years of cultivation. The rotation experiment was carried out since 1992 in Foggia (Apulia, Italy) at the experimental farm of the Cereal Research Centre in a clayey vertisol. Here we report results concerning two rotations, among seven: continuous durum wheat (CDW) and bare fallow-durum wheat-durum wheat- (BF-DW-DW) compared with an adjoining soil, covered with permanent grassland undisturbed, since 1972, considered at steady state. Results showed a negative trend of soil C in both rotations. The C reduction respect to the undisturbed soil (14.5 g C kg-1 of soil) were 0.15 and 0.13% for CDW and BF-DW-DW, respectively. Daily soil potential respiration was always higher in the undisturbed soil: it was 13.65, 10.46 and 8.64 mg C-CO2/kg soil day-1, for undisturbed soil, BF-DW-DW and DWC respectively. The cumulative respiration in 28 days for CDW and BF-DW-DW rotations compared with undisturbed soil was lower by 23 and 32%, respectively. Among the two rotations compared, BF-DW-DW showed to be slightly more conservative than the DWC rotation for soil C, even though none of the two rotations was able to keep the soil C level at values comparable to steady state, due both to soil disturbance and to lower C inputs respect to the permanent cover.

  4. Discovery of a Novel Stem Rust Resistance Allele in Durum Wheat That Exhibits Differential Reactions to Ug99 Isolates.

    PubMed

    Nirmala, Jayaveeramuthu; Saini, Jyoti; Newcomb, Maria; Olivera, Pablo; Gale, Sam; Klindworth, Daryl; Elias, Elias; Talbert, Luther; Chao, Shiaoman; Faris, Justin; Xu, Steven; Jin, Yue; Rouse, Matthew N

    2017-08-29

    Wheat stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici Erikss. & E. Henn, can incur yield losses on susceptible cultivars of durum wheat, Triticum turgidum ssp. durum (Desf.) Husnot. Though several durum cultivars possess the stem rust resistance gene Sr13, additional genes in durum wheat effective against emerging virulent races have not been described. Durum line 8155-B1 confers resistance against the P. graminis f. sp. tritici race TTKST, the variant race of the Ug99 race group with additional virulence to wheat stem rust resistance gene Sr24 However, 8155-B1 does not confer resistance to the first-described race in the Ug99 race group: TTKSK. We mapped a single gene conferring resistance in 8155-B1 against race TTKST, Sr8155B1, to chromosome arm 6AS by utilizing Rusty/8155-B1 and Rusty*2/8155-B1 populations and the 90K Infinium iSelect Custom bead chip supplemented by KASP assays. One marker, KASP_6AS_IWB10558, cosegregated with Sr8155B1 in both populations and correctly predicted Sr8155B1 presence or absence in 11 durum cultivars tested. We confirmed the presence of Sr8155B1 in cultivar Mountrail by mapping in the population Choteau/Mountrail. The marker developed in this study could be used to predict the presence of resistance to race TTKST in uncharacterized durum breeding lines and also to combine Sr8155B1 with resistance genes effective to Ug99 such as Sr13 The map location of Sr8155B1 cannot rule out the possibility that this gene is an allele at the Sr8 locus. However, race specificity indicates that Sr8155B1 is different from the known alleles Sr8a and Sr8b. Copyright © 2017, G3: Genes, Genomes, Genetics.

  5. Metabolomics Suggests That Soil Inoculation with Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi Decreased Free Amino Acid Content in Roots of Durum Wheat Grown under N-Limited, P-Rich Field Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Saia, Sergio; Ruisi, Paolo; Fileccia, Veronica; Di Miceli, Giuseppe; Amato, Gaetano; Martinelli, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) have a major impact on plant nutrition, defence against pathogens, a plant’s reaction to stressful environments, soil fertility, and a plant’s relationship with other microorganisms. Such effects imply a broad reprogramming of the plant’s metabolic activity. However, little information is available regarding the role of AMF and their relation to other soil plant growth—promoting microorganisms in the plant metabolome, especially under realistic field conditions. In the present experiment, we evaluated the effects of inoculation with AMF, either alone or in combination with plant growth–promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR), on the metabolome and changes in metabolic pathways in the roots of durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) grown under N-limited agronomic conditions in a P-rich environment. These two treatments were compared to infection by the natural AMF population (NAT). Soil inoculation with AMF almost doubled wheat root colonization by AMF and decreased the root concentrations of most compounds in all metabolic pathways, especially amino acids (AA) and saturated fatty acids, whereas inoculation with AMF+PGPR increased the concentrations of such compounds compared to inoculation with AMF alone. Enrichment metabolomics analyses showed that AA metabolic pathways were mostly changed by the treatments, with reduced amination activity in roots most likely due to a shift from the biosynthesis of common AA to γ-amino butyric acid. The root metabolome differed between AMF and NAT but not AMF+PGPR and AMF or NAT. Because the PGPR used were potent mineralisers, and AMF can retain most nitrogen (N) taken as organic compounds for their own growth, it is likely that this result was due to an increased concentration of mineral N in soil inoculated with AMF+PGPR compared to AMF alone. PMID:26067663

  6. Impact of microbial inoculation on biomass accumulation by Sulla carnosa provenances, and in regulating nutrition, physiological and antioxidant activities of this species under non-saline and saline conditions.

    PubMed

    Hidri, R; Barea, J M; Mahmoud, O Metoui-Ben; Abdelly, C; Azcón, Rosario

    2016-08-20

    Bacteria (Pseudomonas sp. and Bacillus sp.) and/or the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Rhizophagus intraradices were able to improve growth, physiological and biochemical characteristics of four Sulla carnosa Desf. provenances (Sidi khlif, Thelja, Kalbia and Kerker) from Tunisia under both saline and non-saline conditions. S. carnosa is a salt-tolerant legume plant, native from North Africa. The intrinsic bacterial characteristics evidenced the fitness of these bacteria to support salt stress and to stimulate plant growth. Bacillus sp. produced more indol acetic acid (IAA) than Pseudomonas sp. and showed a great surviving capacity under salt conditions supporting its capacity to improve plant growth under stress conditions. The microorganisms applied also have a different potential to increase the nutritional and related plant growth parameters. It is noticeable that some provenances reached the highest level of growth when inoculated with Bacillus sp. in Sidi khlif or by Bacillus plus AMF in Kalbia, which increased shoot by 318% and root by 774%. In contrast, in Thelja and Kerker the impact of the test microorganisms was mainly evidenced at increasing nutritional and physiological functions. Salinity reduced some growth and physiological variables as stomatal conductance, photosynthetic pigments and photosynthetic efficiency and increased electrolyte leakage. However, the microbial inoculants compensated these detrimental effects in a degree depending on the S. carnosa provenance. These microorganisms also orchestrate antioxidant activities involved in adaptative responses in S. carnosa provenances. The intrinsic ability of inoculants allow us to select the provenance/microorganism combination which maximizes S. carnosa growth, nutrition and physiological/biochemical responses under salt and non-salt conditions. The results obtained support that the target microbial inocula are beneficial for the ecological stability if this Mediterranean legume. Copyright

  7. Essential oils and crude extracts from Chrysanthemum trifurcatum leaves, stems and roots: chemical composition and antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Sassi, Ahlem Ben; Skhiri, Fethia Harzallah; Chraief, Imed; Bourgougnon, Nathalie; Hammami, Mohamed; Aouni, Mahjoub

    2014-01-01

    The essential oils from the leaves, stems and roots of Chrysanthemum trifurcatum (Desf.) Batt. and Trab. var. macrocephalum (viv.) were obtained by hydrodistillation and their chemical compositions were analysed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), in order to get insight into similarities and differences as to their active composition. A total of fifty compounds were identified, constituting 97.84%, 99.02% and 98.20% of total oil composition of the leaves, stems and roots, respectively. Monoterpene hydrocarbons were shown to be the main group of constituents of the leaves and stems parts in the ratio of 67.88% and 51.29%, respectively. But, the major group in the roots oil was found to be sesquiterpene hydrocarbons (70.30%). The main compounds in leaves oil were limonene (26.83%), γ-terpinene (19.68%), α-pinene (9.7%) and α-terpenyl acetate (7.16%). The stems oil, contains mainly limonene (32.91%), 4-terpenyl acetate (16.33%) and γ-terpinene (5.93%), whereas the main compounds in roots oil were α-calacorene (25.98%), α-cedrene (16.55%), β-bourbobene (14.91%), elemol (7.45%) and 2-hexenal (6.88%). The crude organic extracts of leaves, stems and roots, obtained by maceration with solvents of increasing polarity: petroleum ether, ethyl acetate and methanol, contained tannins, flavonoids and alkaloids. Meanwhile, essential oils and organic extracts were tested for antibacterial activities against eight Gram-positive and Gram-negative strains, using a microdilution method. The oil and methanolic extact from C. trifurcatum leaves showed a great potential of antibacterial effect against Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus epidermidis, with an IC50 range of 31.25-62.5 µg/ml.

  8. Effects of antimony and arsenic on antioxidant enzyme activities of two steppic plant species in an old antimony mining area.

    PubMed

    Benhamdi, Asma; Bentellis, Alima; Rached, Oualida; Du Laing, Gijs; Mechakra, Aicha

    2014-04-01

    The present work was undertaken to determine strategies and antioxidant enzyme activities involved in the adaptation of two wild steppic plants (Hedysarum pallidum Desf. and Lygeum spartum L.) to the toxic environment of the abandoned antimony mining area of Djebel Hamimat (Algeria). For this purpose, soils and plants were collected in different zones coinciding with a Sb and As concentrations gradient in the soil. Antimony (Sb) and arsenic (As) were analyzed by ICP-OES in the soils and the aboveground parts and roots of the plants. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and antioxidant enzyme activities were measured by spectrometry. Results show levels of Sb and As exceptionally high in most soil and plant samples. The two species accumulate differently Sb and As in their above and belowground parts. MDA levels, in the two parts of both species, increase significantly with increasing soil Sb and As concentrations, but they are significantly higher in H. pallidum than in L. spartum. The activities of antioxidant enzymes differ significantly according to the soil metalloid concentrations, the plant species considered and the plant part. Apart from superoxide dismutase (SOD) whose activity is, overall, higher in H. pallidum than in L. spartum, the activities of all the other enzymes studied (glutathione S-transferase (GST), catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX)) are generally higher in L. spartum than in H. pallidum. For both species, APX and GST are overall more active in the upper parts than in the roots, while it is the reverse for SOD and CAT. POD is more active in the upper parts than in the roots of L. spartum and the reverse applies to H. pallidum. It appears that the two studied plant species use different tolerance strategies to protect themselves against elevated As and Sb concentrations.

  9. Investigations on some aspects of chemical ecology of cogongrass,Imperata cylindrica (L.) Beauv.

    PubMed

    Inderjit; Dakshini, K M

    1991-02-01

    To understand the interference mechanism of the weed, cogongrass,Imperata cylindrica (L.) Beauv., its effect on nutrient availability and mycoflora of its soil rhizosphere as well as nodule characteristics, root length, and root/shoot ratio of Melilotus parviflora Desf. were investigated. Additionally, the effect of the leachates of leaves and root/rhizome of cogongrass on seed germination and seedling characteristics of radish, mustard, fenugreek, and tomato were examined. Furthermore, to assess the qualitative and quantitative differences in phytochemical components, the leachates and the soils from three sampling sites (with cogongrass and 1.5 m and 3 m away from cogongrass) were analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) on a C18 column. No significant difference in nutrient availability was found, but qualitative and quantitative differences in phenolic fractions were recorded in the three sampling sites. Furthermore, of the 19 fungi recorded in the soils, decreases in the number of colonies (per gram of soil) ofAspergillus fumigatus, A. niger, A. candidus, and an increase of A. flavus was recorded in the soils with cogongrass. The inhibition in nodule number, weight, nitrogen fixation (acetylene reduction activity), root length, and root/shoot ratio of Melilotus parviflora were noted. Percent seed germination, root and shoot length, fresh and dry weight of seedlings of different seeds were affected by the leachates of leaves and root/rhizome. It was found that root/rhizome leachate was more inhibitory than leaf leachate. However, the inhibition was higher in soil+leaves leachate than soil+root/rhizome leachate. HPLC analysis established that four compounds were contributed by the weed to the soil system even though their relative concentration varies in various leachates. It is surmised that these compounds cause allelopathic inhibition of growth characteristics of seeds tested. Significance of the data vis-a-vis the interference potential of

  10. Effects of Heterogeniety on Spatial Pattern Analysis of Wild Pistachio Trees in Zagros Woodlands, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erfanifard, Y.; Rezayan, F.

    2014-10-01

    Vegetation heterogeneity biases second-order summary statistics, e.g., Ripley's K-function, applied for spatial pattern analysis in ecology. Second-order investigation based on Ripley's K-function and related statistics (i.e., L- and pair correlation function g) is widely used in ecology to develop hypothesis on underlying processes by characterizing spatial patterns of vegetation. The aim of this study was to demonstrate effects of underlying heterogeneity of wild pistachio (Pistacia atlantica Desf.) trees on the second-order summary statistics of point pattern analysis in a part of Zagros woodlands, Iran. The spatial distribution of 431 wild pistachio trees was accurately mapped in a 40 ha stand in the Wild Pistachio & Almond Research Site, Fars province, Iran. Three commonly used second-order summary statistics (i.e., K-, L-, and g-functions) were applied to analyse their spatial pattern. The two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov goodness-of-fit test showed that the observed pattern significantly followed an inhomogeneous Poisson process null model in the study region. The results also showed that heterogeneous pattern of wild pistachio trees biased the homogeneous form of K-, L-, and g-functions, demonstrating a stronger aggregation of the trees at the scales of 0-50 m than actually existed and an aggregation at scales of 150-200 m, while regularly distributed. Consequently, we showed that heterogeneity of point patterns may bias the results of homogeneous second-order summary statistics and we also suggested applying inhomogeneous summary statistics with related null models for spatial pattern analysis of heterogeneous vegetations.

  11. Wild food plants used in traditional vegetable mixtures in Italy.

    PubMed

    Guarrera, P M; Savo, V

    2016-06-05

    Mixtures of wild food plants, part of the Mediterranean diet, have potential benefits for their content in bioactive compounds, minerals and fibers. In Italy, wild plants are still consumed in various ways, for their taste, effects on health and nutritional value. In this paper, we provide a list of wild plants used in vegetable mixtures, indicating their phytochemical and nutritional profile, highlighting those not yet studied. We provide a first complete review of traditional uses of wild food plants used as vegetables and their preparations (e.g., salads, soups, rustic pies). We also highlight their phytochemical constituents. We carried out an extensive literature review of ethnobotanical publications from 1894 to date for finding plants used in traditional vegetable mixtures. We also performed an online search for scientific papers providing the phytochemical profile of plants that were cited at least twice in recipes found in the literature. We list a total of 276 wild taxa used in traditional vegetable mixtures, belonging to 40 families. Among these, the most represented are Asteraceae (88), Brassicaceae (33), Apiaceae (21), Amaranthaceae (12). Many plants are cited in many recipes across several Italian regions. Among the most cited plant we note: Reichardia picroides (L.) Roth, Sanguisorba minor Scop., Taraxacum campylodes G. E. Haglund, Urtica dioica L. Tuscany is the region with the highest number of food recipes that incorporate wild plants used as vegetables. We also list the phytochemical constituents and some pharmacological activities of the plants cited at least twice. Finally, we discuss topics such as the taste of plants used in the recipes. Nineteen edible wild plants, such as Asparagus albus L., Campanula trachelium L., Hypochaeris laevigata (L.) Benth. & Hook f., Phyteuma spicatum L., Scolymus grandiflorus Desf., are not yet studied as regards their phytochemical and nutritional profile. Some plants should be avoided due to the presence of

  12. Cluster analysis of intradiurnal holm oak pollen cycles at peri-urban and rural sampling sites in southwestern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Ceballos, M. A.; García-Mozo, H.; Galán, C.

    2015-08-01

    The impact of regional and local weather and of local topography on intradiurnal variations in airborne pollen levels was assessed by analysing bi-hourly holm oak ( Quercus ilex subsp. ballota (Desf.) Samp.) pollen counts at two sampling stations located 40 km apart, in southwestern Spain (Cordoba city and El Cabril nature reserve) over the period 2010-2011. Pollen grains were captured using Hirst-type volumetric spore traps. Analysis of regional weather conditions was based on the computation of backward trajectories using the HYSPLIT model. Sampling days were selected on the basis of phenological data; rainy days were eliminated, as were days lying outside a given range of percentiles (P95-P5). Analysis of cycles for the study period, as a whole, revealed differences between sampling sites, with peak bi-hourly pollen counts at night in Cordoba and at midday in El Cabril. Differences were also noted in the influence of surface weather conditions (temperature, relative humidity and wind). Cluster analysis of diurnal holm oak pollen cycles revealed the existence of five clusters at each sampling site. Analysis of backward trajectories highlighted specific regional air-flow patterns associated with each site. Findings indicated the contribution of both nearby and distant pollen sources to diurnal cycles. The combined use of cluster analysis and meteorological analysis proved highly suitable for charting the impact of local weather conditions on airborne pollen-count patterns. This method, and the specific tools used here, could be used not only to study diurnal variations in counts for other pollen types and in other biogeographical settings, but also in a number of other research fields involving airborne particle transport modelling, e.g. radionuclide transport in emergency preparedness exercises.

  13. 2-DE proteomics analysis of drought treated seedlings of Quercus ilex supports a root active strategy for metabolic adaptation in response to water shortage

    PubMed Central

    Simova-Stoilova, Lyudmila P.; Romero-Rodríguez, Maria C.; Sánchez-Lucas, Rosa; Navarro-Cerrillo, Rafael M.; Medina-Aunon, J. Alberto; Jorrín-Novo, Jesús V.

    2015-01-01

    Holm oak is a dominant tree in the western Mediterranean region. Despite being well adapted to dry hot climate, drought is the main cause of mortality post-transplanting in reforestation programs. An active response to drought is critical for tree establishment and survival. Applying a gel-based proteomic approach, dynamic changes in root proteins of drought treated Quercus ilex subsp. Ballota [Desf.] Samp. seedlings were followed. Water stress was applied on 20 day-old holm oak plantlets by water limitation for a period of 10 and 20 days, each followed by 10 days of recovery. Stress was monitored by changes in water status, plant growth, and electrolyte leakage. Contrary to leaves, holm oak roots responded readily to water shortage at physiological level by growth inhibition, changes in water status and membrane stability. Root proteins were extracted using trichloroacetate/acetone/phenol protocol and separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis. Coomassie colloidal stained gel images were analyzed and spot intensity data subjected to multivariate statistical analysis. Selected consistent spots in three biological replicas, presenting significant changes under stress, were subjected to MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (peptide mass fingerprinting and MS/MS). For protein identification, combined search was performed with MASCOT search engine over NCBInr Viridiplantae and Uniprot databases. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002484. Identified proteins were classified into functional groups: metabolism, protein biosynthesis and proteolysis, defense against biotic stress, cellular protection against abiotic stress, intracellular transport. Several enzymes of the carbohydrate metabolism decreased in abundance in roots under drought stress while some related to ATP synthesis and secondary metabolism increased. Results point at active metabolic adjustment and mobilization of the defense system in roots to actively counteract drought stress. PMID

  14. Spatial associations of insects and mites in stored wheat.

    PubMed

    Athanassiou, Christos G; Kavallieratos, Nickolas G; Sciarretra, Andrea; Palyvos, Nickolas E; Trematerra, Pasquale

    2011-10-01

    The spatial association pattern of insect and mite populations in a steel bin containing stored wheat, Triticum durum Desf., in central Greece, was studied using the Spatial Analysis by Distance IndicEs (SADIE). The monitoring was carried out for 7 mo by using grain trier samples and probe traps. The most abundant insect species were Cryptolestes ferrugineus (Stephens) (Coleoptera: Laemophloeidae) and Plodia interpunctella (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae). For mites, the most abundant species were the phytophagous Lepidoglyphus destructor (Schrank) (Acari: Glycyphagidae) and the predator Blattisocius tarsalis (Berlese) (Mesostigmata: Ascidae). Both for P. interpunctella and C. ferrugineus, trap catches were associated with numbers of individuals in the trier samples, but the overall association index calculated among trap and sample counts was significant only in the 33% of trap-sample pairs of values. Generally, P. interpunctella had the main patch areas in the central part of the bin, with few exceptions, during the entire monitoring period. Similar trends also were noted in the case of C. ferrugineus, which was clearly aggregated in the center of the grain mass. Spatial association maps indicated a stable positive association in the central part of the bin, but in most of the other sampling zones the association was negative. However, distribution of L. destructor, based on trier samples, indicated increased presence in peripheral zones of the grain sampling area. Moreover, B. tarsalis presented the most dispersed distribution among all four species. For each species, the association between two consecutive samplings was significant in the majority of cases, indicating a stable spatial pattern. Finally, B. tarsalis was spatially associated to a higher degree with the insects found rather than with L. desctructor. Moreover, there was no association of insect and mite presence with grain temperature and moisture content. The results of the current study suggest

  15. ChlR Protein of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 Is a Transcription Activator That Uses an Oxygen-sensitive [4Fe-4S] Cluster to Control Genes involved in Pigment Biosynthesis*

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Marcus; Pandelia, Maria-Eirini; Chew, Chyue Yie; Zhang, Bo; Golbeck, John H.; Krebs, Carsten; Bryant, Donald A.

    2014-01-01

    Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 and many other cyanobacteria have two genes that encode key enzymes involved in chlorophyll a, biliverdin, and heme biosynthesis: acsFI/acsFII, ho1/ho2, and hemF/hemN. Under atmospheric O2 levels, AcsFI synthesizes 3,8-divinyl protochlorophyllide from Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester, Ho1 oxidatively cleaves heme to form biliverdin, and HemF oxidizes coproporphyrinogen III to protoporphyrinogen IX. Under microoxic conditions, another set of genes directs the synthesis of alternative enzymes AcsFII, Ho2, and HemN. In Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, open reading frame SynPCC7002_A1993 encodes a MarR family transcriptional regulator, which is located immediately upstream from the operon comprising acsFII, ho2, hemN, and desF (the latter encodes a putative fatty acid desaturase). Deletion and complementation analyses showed that this gene, denoted chlR, is a transcriptional activator that is essential for transcription of the acsFII-ho2-hemN-desF operon under microoxic conditions. Global transcriptome analyses showed that ChlR controls the expression of only these four genes. Co-expression of chlR with a yfp reporter gene under the control of the acsFII promoter from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 in Escherichia coli demonstrated that no other cyanobacterium-specific components are required for proper functioning of this regulatory circuit. A combination of analytical methods and Mössbauer and EPR spectroscopies showed that reconstituted, recombinant ChlR forms homodimers that harbor one oxygen-sensitive [4Fe-4S] cluster. We conclude that ChlR is a transcriptional activator that uses a [4Fe-4S] cluster to sense O2 levels and thereby control the expression of the acsFII-ho2-hemN-desF operon. PMID:24782315

  16. Plants and other natural products used in the management of oral infections and improvement of oral health.

    PubMed

    Chinsembu, Kazhila C

    2016-02-01

    Challenges of resistance to synthetic antimicrobials have opened new vistas in the search for natural products. This article rigorously reviews plants and other natural products used in oral health: Punica granatum L. (pomegranate), Matricaria recutita L. (chamomile), Camellia sinensis (L.) Kuntze (green tea), chewing sticks made from Diospyros mespiliformis Hochst. ex A.D.C., Diospyros lycioides Desf., and Salvadora persica L. (miswak), honey and propolis from the manuka tree (Leptospermum scoparium J.R. Forst. & G. Forst.), rhein from Rheum rhabarbarum L. (rhubarb), dried fruits of Vitis vinifera L. (raisins), essential oils, probiotics and mushrooms. Further, the review highlights plants from Africa, Asia, Brazil, Mexico, Europe, and the Middle East. Some of the plants' antimicrobial properties and chemical principles have been elucidated. While the use of natural products for oral health is prominent in resource-poor settings, antimicrobial testing is mainly conducted in the following countries (in decreasing order of magnitude): India, South Africa, Brazil, Japan, France, Egypt, Iran, Mexico, Kenya, Switzerland, Nigeria, Australia, Uganda, and the United Kingdom. While the review exposes a dire gap for more studies on clinical efficacy and toxicity, the following emerging trend was noted: basic research on plants for oral health is mainly done in Brazil, Europe and Australia. Brazil, China, India and New Zealand generally conduct value addition of natural products for fortification of toothpastes. African countries focus on bioprospecting and primary production of raw plants and other natural products with antimicrobial efficacies. The Middle East and Egypt predominantly research on plants used as chewing sticks. More research and funding are needed in the field of natural products for oral health, especially in Africa where oral diseases are fuelled by human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B

  17. Garenoxacin activity against isolates form patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia and multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ronald N; Sader, Helio S; Stilwell, Matthew G; Fritsche, Thomas R

    2007-05-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) continues to cause significant morbidity worldwide, and the principal bacterial pathogens (Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae) have acquired numerous resistance mechanisms over the last few decades. CAP treatment guidelines have suggested the use of broader spectrum agents, such as antipneumococcal fluoroquinolones as the therapy for at-risk patient population. In this report, we studied 3087 CAP isolates from the SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program (1999-2005) worldwide and all respiratory tract infection (RTI) isolate population of pneumococci (14665 strains) grouped by antibiogram patterns against a new des-F(6)-quinolone, garenoxacin. Results indicated that garenoxacin was highly active against CAP isolates of S. pneumoniae (MIC(90), 0.06 microg/mL) and H. influenzae (MIC(90), < or =0.03 microg/mL). This garenoxacin potency was 8- to 32-fold greater than gatifloxacin, levofloxacin, and ciprofloxacin against the pneumococci and >99.9% of strains were inhibited at < or =1 microg/mL (proposed susceptible breakpoint). Garenoxacin MIC values were not affected by resistances among S. pneumoniae strains to penicillin or erythromycin; however, coresistances were high among the beta-lactams (penicillins and cephalosporins), macrolides, tetracyclines, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. Analysis of S. pneumoniae isolates with various antimicrobial resistance patterns to 6 drug classes demonstrated that garenoxacin was active against >99.9% (MIC, < or =1 microg/mL) of strains, and the most resistant pneumococci (6-drug resistance, 1051 strains or 7.2% of all isolates) were completely susceptible (100.0% at < or =1 microg/mL) to garenoxacin (MIC(90), 0.06 microg/mL). These results illustrate the high activity of garenoxacin against contemporary CAP isolates and especially against multidrug-resistant (MDR) S. pneumoniae that have created therapeutic dilemmas for all RTI presentations. Garenoxacin appears to be a

  18. Prophylactic and curative anti-ulcerogenic activity and the possible mechanisms of action of some desert plants.

    PubMed

    El-Meligy, Reham M; Awaad, Amani S; Soliman, Gamal A; Kenawy, Sanaa A; Alqasoumi, Saleh I

    2017-03-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the anti-ulcerogenic activities and the possible mechanisms of action of seven desert plants from different families. Conyza dioscoridis (L.) Desf. (Asteraceae), Euphorbia hirta L. (Euphorpiaceae), Origanum syriacum L., Salvia lanigera L. (Lamiaceae), Sisymbrium irio L., Solanum nigrum Linn. (Solanaceae) and Solenostemma arghel (Del.) Hayne. (Asclepiadaceae), were tested using prophylactic and curative models of absolute ethanol-induced ulcer, at three doses (125, 250 & 500 mg/kg) of each extract. The investigated extracts possessed dose dependent anti-ulcerogenic activities in both models, with LD50 higher than 5 g/kg. The most effective extracts were C. dioscoridis and S. irio with percent protection of control ulcer; 91.1% and 85.4% respectively. The antisecretory activity of both C. dioscoridis and S. irio appears to be mainly related to the suppression of gastrin release. The in vitro potential radical (DPPH) scavenging activities of the investigated extracts were well supported with the reduction in gastric MDA (50.6% and 43.3%) and enhancing the level of reduced GSH (2.84, 2.59 mg/g tissue) for C. dioscoridis and S. irio respectively. In addition, suppression of the inflammatory mediator TNF-α may be one of the possible mechanisms of action. The alcohol extracts of C. dioscoridis and S. irio showed no alteration on liver and kidney functions. Phytochemical screening of the investigated extracts revealed the presence of flavonoids, tannins and sterols which could be related to the activities.

  19. Cluster analysis of intradiurnal holm oak pollen cycles at peri-urban and rural sampling sites in southwestern Spain.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Ceballos, M A; García-Mozo, H; Galán, C

    2015-08-01

    The impact of regional and local weather and of local topography on intradiurnal variations in airborne pollen levels was assessed by analysing bi-hourly holm oak (Quercus ilex subsp. ballota (Desf.) Samp.) pollen counts at two sampling stations located 40 km apart, in southwestern Spain (Cordoba city and El Cabril nature reserve) over the period 2010-2011. Pollen grains were captured using Hirst-type volumetric spore traps. Analysis of regional weather conditions was based on the computation of backward trajectories using the HYSPLIT model. Sampling days were selected on the basis of phenological data; rainy days were eliminated, as were days lying outside a given range of percentiles (P95-P5). Analysis of cycles for the study period, as a whole, revealed differences between sampling sites, with peak bi-hourly pollen counts at night in Cordoba and at midday in El Cabril. Differences were also noted in the influence of surface weather conditions (temperature, relative humidity and wind). Cluster analysis of diurnal holm oak pollen cycles revealed the existence of five clusters at each sampling site. Analysis of backward trajectories highlighted specific regional air-flow patterns associated with each site. Findings indicated the contribution of both nearby and distant pollen sources to diurnal cycles. The combined use of cluster analysis and meteorological analysis proved highly suitable for charting the impact of local weather conditions on airborne pollen-count patterns. This method, and the specific tools used here, could be used not only to study diurnal variations in counts for other pollen types and in other biogeographical settings, but also in a number of other research fields involving airborne particle transport modelling, e.g. radionuclide transport in emergency preparedness exercises.

  20. Sulla carnosa modulates root invertase activity in response to the inhibition of long-distance sucrose transport under magnesium deficiency.

    PubMed

    Farhat, N; Smaoui, A; Maurousset, L; Porcheron, B; Lemoine, R; Abdelly, C; Rabhi, M

    2016-11-01

    Being the principal product of photosynthesis, sucrose is involved in many metabolic processes in plants. As magnesium (Mg) is phloem mobile, an inverse relationship between Mg shortage and sugar accumulation in leaves is often observed. Mg deficiency effects on carbohydrate contents and invertase activities were determined in Sulla carnosa Desf. Plants were grown hydroponically at different Mg concentrations (0.00, 0.01, 0.05 and 1.50 mM Mg) for one month. Mineral analysis showed that Mg contents were drastically diminished in shoots and roots mainly at 0.01 and 0.00 mM Mg. This decline was adversely associated with a significant increase of sucrose, fructose and mainly glucose in shoots of plants exposed to severe deficiency. By contrast, sugar contents were severely reduced in roots of these plants indicating an alteration of carbohydrate partitioning between shoots and roots of Mg-deficient plants. Cell wall invertase activity was highly enhanced in roots of Mg-deficient plants, while the vacuolar invertase activity was reduced at 0.00 mM Mg. This decrease of vacuolar invertase activity may indicate the sensibility of roots to Mg starvation resulting from sucrose transport inhibition. (14) CO2 labeling experiments were in accordance with these findings showing an inhibition of sucrose transport from source leaves to sink tissues (roots) under Mg depletion. The obtained results confirm previous findings about Mg involvement in photosynthate loading into phloem and add new insights into mechanisms evolved by S. carnosa to cope with Mg shortage in particular the increase of the activity of cell wall invertase.

  1. Seasonal changes in photosynthesis and photoprotection in a Quercus ilex subsp. ballota woodland located in its upper altitudinal extreme in the Iberian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Corcuera, L; Morales, F; Abadía, A; Gil-Pelegrín, E

    2005-05-01

    Quercus ilex L. subsp. ballota (Desf.) Samp., a Mediterranean evergreen species growing in a continental Mediterranean climate, did not experience water stress and showed greater sensitivity to winter stress than to summer stress over a 12-month period. Net CO2 assimilation rates and photosystem II (PSII) efficiency decreased markedly during the cold months and recovered completely in spring. Lutein, neoxanthin and beta-carotene to chlorophyll (Chl) molar ratios all showed the same trend throughout the year, increasing from September to March. This increase was a result of increases in carotenoid concentrations, because Chl concentration per unit leaf area remained stable, and was higher at the end than at the beginning of the first growing season. Lutein-epoxide was a minor component of the total lutein pool. Thermal energy dissipation and non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) were associated with the de-epoxidated forms of the xanthophyll cycle pigments in the warm months. Photosynthetic rates decreased slightly at midday in summer. These changes were accompanied by decreases in maximum potential PSII efficiency (which recovered during the night), actual and intrinsic PSII efficiencies, photochemical quenching and increases in NPQ. Overall, our data indicate down-regulation of photosynthesis during the summer. The diurnal de-epoxidation of violaxanthin to antheraxanthin and zeaxanthin occurred throughout the year, except in January. Antioxidant enzymatic activity increased in the winter months, especially during the coldest months, highlighting its key role in photoprotection against photo-oxidation. Structural and functional modifications protected PSII from permanent damage and allowed 1-year-old leaves to photosynthesize at high rates when temperatures increased in spring.

  2. Accelerated Burn Wound Closure in Mice with a New Formula Based on Traditional Medicine.

    PubMed

    Mehrabani, Mehrnaz; Seyyedkazemi, Seyyed Mohsen; Nematollahi, Mohammad Hadi; Jafari, Elham; Mehrabani, Mitra; Mehdipour, Mohammad; Sheikhshoaee, Zahra; Mandegary, Ali

    2016-11-01

    A combination of the oils of sesame, hemp, wild pistachio, and walnut has been used for treatment of skin disorders, including wound burns, in some parts of Kerman, Iran. Evaluation of this remedy in the form of a pharmaceutical formulation in animal models can pave the way for its future application in wound burn healing in humans. This experimental study investigated the healing potential of a new formula (NF) based on folk medicine from Iran for the treatment of third degree burns in mice. The formula was a combination of the oils of four plants: sesame (Sesamum indicum L.), wild pistachio (Pistacia atlantica Desf.), hemp (Cannabis sativa L.), and walnut (Juglans regia L.). Twenty-four mice were selected based on simple random sampling. Twenty-five percent of the total body surface area was burned by exposure to boiling water, according to the Walker-Mason method. NF and silver sulfadiazine (the positive control) were applied topically twice a day for 21 days. The burned area in the negative control group was left untreated. Epithelialization time and the percent of wound contraction were measured during the treatment period. The process of wound repairing was evaluated using histological (H and E and trichrome staining) and immunohistological (anti-pancytokeratin) methods. When compared to the controls, NF significantly improved wound contraction after day 10. Epithelialization time in the NF group was significantly faster than in the other groups (20 vs. 25.5 days) (P < 0.001). Histopathological and immunohistochemical findings confirmed the efficacy of the NF. A new therapeutic remedy was introduced for the treatment of burn wounds. Further clinical and molecular studies are suggested to determine the exact mechanism(s) involved in the burn wound healing effect of NF.

  3. Accelerated Burn Wound Closure in Mice with a New Formula Based on Traditional Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Mehrabani, Mehrnaz; Seyyedkazemi, Seyyed Mohsen; Nematollahi, Mohammad Hadi; Jafari, Elham; Mehrabani, Mitra; Mehdipour, Mohammad; Sheikhshoaee, Zahra; Mandegary, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background A combination of the oils of sesame, hemp, wild pistachio, and walnut has been used for treatment of skin disorders, including wound burns, in some parts of Kerman, Iran. Evaluation of this remedy in the form of a pharmaceutical formulation in animal models can pave the way for its future application in wound burn healing in humans. Objectives This experimental study investigated the healing potential of a new formula (NF) based on folk medicine from Iran for the treatment of third degree burns in mice. The formula was a combination of the oils of four plants: sesame (Sesamum indicum L.), wild pistachio (Pistacia atlantica Desf.), hemp (Cannabis sativa L.), and walnut (Juglans regia L.) Methods Twenty-four mice were selected based on simple random sampling. Twenty-five percent of the total body surface area was burned by exposure to boiling water, according to the Walker-Mason method. NF and silver sulfadiazine (the positive control) were applied topically twice a day for 21 days. The burned area in the negative control group was left untreated. Epithelialization time and the percent of wound contraction were measured during the treatment period. The process of wound repairing was evaluated using histological (H and E and trichrome staining) and immunohistological (anti-pancytokeratin) methods. Results When compared to the controls, NF significantly improved wound contraction after day 10. Epithelialization time in the NF group was significantly faster than in the other groups (20 vs. 25.5 days) (P < 0.001). Histopathological and immunohistochemical findings confirmed the efficacy of the NF. Conclusions A new therapeutic remedy was introduced for the treatment of burn wounds. Further clinical and molecular studies are suggested to determine the exact mechanism(s) involved in the burn wound healing effect of NF. PMID:28191338

  4. Hydrogen peroxide generation and antioxidant enzyme activities in the leaves and roots of wheat cultivars subjected to long-term soil drought stress.

    PubMed

    Huseynova, Irada M; Aliyeva, Durna R; Mammadov, Alamdar Ch; Aliyev, Jalal A

    2015-08-01

    The dynamics of the activity of catalase, ascorbate peroxidase, guaiacol peroxidase, and benzidine peroxidase, as well as the level of hydrogen peroxide in the vegetative organs of durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) cultivars was studied under long-term soil drought conditions. It was established that hydrogen peroxide generation occurred at early stages of stress in the tolerant variety Barakatli-95, whereas in the susceptible variety Garagylchyg-2 its significant amounts were accumulated only at later stages. Garagylchyg-2 shows a larger reduction of photochemical activity of PS II in both genotypes at all stages of ontogenesis under drought stress than Barakatli-95. The highest activity of catalase which plays a leading role in the neutralization of hydrogen peroxide was observed in the leaves and roots of the drought-tolerant variety Barakatli-95. Despite the fact that the protection system also includes peroxidases, the activity of these enzymes even after synthesis of their new portions is substantially lower compared with catalase. Native PAGE electrophoresis revealed the presence of one isoform of CAT, seven isoforms of APX, three isoforms of GPO, and three isoforms of BPO in the leaves, and also three isoforms of CAT, four isoforms of APX, two isoforms of GPO, and six isoforms of BPO in the roots of wheat. One isoform of CAT was found in the roots when water supply was normal and three isoforms were observed under drought conditions. Stress associated with long-term soil drought in the roots of wheat has led to an increase in the heterogeneity due to the formation of two new sedentary forms of catalase: CAT2 and CAT3.

  5. Metabolomics Suggests That Soil Inoculation with Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi Decreased Free Amino Acid Content in Roots of Durum Wheat Grown under N-Limited, P-Rich Field Conditions.

    PubMed

    Saia, Sergio; Ruisi, Paolo; Fileccia, Veronica; Di Miceli, Giuseppe; Amato, Gaetano; Martinelli, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) have a major impact on plant nutrition, defence against pathogens, a plant's reaction to stressful environments, soil fertility, and a plant's relationship with other microorganisms. Such effects imply a broad reprogramming of the plant's metabolic activity. However, little information is available regarding the role of AMF and their relation to other soil plant growth-promoting microorganisms in the plant metabolome, especially under realistic field conditions. In the present experiment, we evaluated the effects of inoculation with AMF, either alone or in combination with plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR), on the metabolome and changes in metabolic pathways in the roots of durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) grown under N-limited agronomic conditions in a P-rich environment. These two treatments were compared to infection by the natural AMF population (NAT). Soil inoculation with AMF almost doubled wheat root colonization by AMF and decreased the root concentrations of most compounds in all metabolic pathways, especially amino acids (AA) and saturated fatty acids, whereas inoculation with AMF+PGPR increased the concentrations of such compounds compared to inoculation with AMF alone. Enrichment metabolomics analyses showed that AA metabolic pathways were mostly changed by the treatments, with reduced amination activity in roots most likely due to a shift from the biosynthesis of common AA to γ-amino butyric acid. The root metabolome differed between AMF and NAT but not AMF+PGPR and AMF or NAT. Because the PGPR used were potent mineralisers, and AMF can retain most nitrogen (N) taken as organic compounds for their own growth, it is likely that this result was due to an increased concentration of mineral N in soil inoculated with AMF+PGPR compared to AMF alone.

  6. 2-DE proteomics analysis of drought treated seedlings of Quercus ilex supports a root active strategy for metabolic adaptation in response to water shortage.

    PubMed

    Simova-Stoilova, Lyudmila P; Romero-Rodríguez, Maria C; Sánchez-Lucas, Rosa; Navarro-Cerrillo, Rafael M; Medina-Aunon, J Alberto; Jorrín-Novo, Jesús V

    2015-01-01

    Holm oak is a dominant tree in the western Mediterranean region. Despite being well adapted to dry hot climate, drought is the main cause of mortality post-transplanting in reforestation programs. An active response to drought is critical for tree establishment and survival. Applying a gel-based proteomic approach, dynamic changes in root proteins of drought treated Quercus ilex subsp. Ballota [Desf.] Samp. seedlings were followed. Water stress was applied on 20 day-old holm oak plantlets by water limitation for a period of 10 and 20 days, each followed by 10 days of recovery. Stress was monitored by changes in water status, plant growth, and electrolyte leakage. Contrary to leaves, holm oak roots responded readily to water shortage at physiological level by growth inhibition, changes in water status and membrane stability. Root proteins were extracted using trichloroacetate/acetone/phenol protocol and separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis. Coomassie colloidal stained gel images were analyzed and spot intensity data subjected to multivariate statistical analysis. Selected consistent spots in three biological replicas, presenting significant changes under stress, were subjected to MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (peptide mass fingerprinting and MS/MS). For protein identification, combined search was performed with MASCOT search engine over NCBInr Viridiplantae and Uniprot databases. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002484. Identified proteins were classified into functional groups: metabolism, protein biosynthesis and proteolysis, defense against biotic stress, cellular protection against abiotic stress, intracellular transport. Several enzymes of the carbohydrate metabolism decreased in abundance in roots under drought stress while some related to ATP synthesis and secondary metabolism increased. Results point at active metabolic adjustment and mobilization of the defense system in roots to actively counteract drought stress.

  7. Water and nitrogen conditions affect the relationships of Delta13C and Delta18O to gas exchange and growth in durum wheat.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Bosquet, Llorenç; Molero, Gemma; Nogués, Salvador; Araus, José Luis

    2009-01-01

    Whereas the effects of water and nitrogen (N) on plant Delta(13)C have been reported previously, these factors have scarcely been studied for Delta(18)O. Here the combined effect of different water and N regimes on Delta(13)C, Delta(18)O, gas exchange, water-use efficiency (WUE), and growth of four genotypes of durum wheat [Triticum turgidum L. ssp. durum (Desf.) Husn.] cultured in pots was studied. Water and N supply significantly increased plant growth. However, a reduction in water supply did not lead to a significant decrease in gas exchange parameters, and consequently Delta(13)C was only slightly modified by water input. Conversely, N fertilizer significantly decreased Delta(13)C. On the other hand, water supply decreased Delta(18)O values, whereas N did not affect this parameter. Delta(18)O variation was mainly determined by the amount of transpired water throughout plant growth (T(cum)), whereas Delta(13)C variation was explained in part by a combination of leaf N and stomatal conductance (g(s)). Even though the four genotypes showed significant differences in cumulative transpiration rates and biomass, this was not translated into significant differences in Delta(18)O(s). However, genotypic differences in Delta(13)C were observed. Moreover, approximately 80% of the variation in biomass across growing conditions and genotypes was explained by a combination of both isotopes, with Delta(18)O alone accounting for approximately 50%. This illustrates the usefulness of combining Delta(18)O and Delta(13)C in order to assess differences in plant growth and total transpiration, and also to provide a time-integrated record of the photosynthetic and evaporative performance of the plant during the course of crop growth.

  8. Registration of Durum Wheat Germplasm Lines with Combined Mutations in SBEIIa and SBEIIb Genes Conferring Increased Amylose and Resistant Starch.

    PubMed

    Hazard, Brittany; Zhang, Xiaoqin; Naemeh, Mahmoudreza; Dubcovsky, Jorge

    2014-08-25

    Durum wheat [Triticum turgidum L. subsp. durum (Desf.) Husn.], used in pasta, couscous, and flatbread production, is an important source of starch food products worldwide. The amylose portion of the starch forms resistant starch complexes that resist digestion and contribute to dietary fiber. Increasing the amount of amylose and resistant starch in wheat by mutating the STARCH BRANCHING ENZYME II (SBEII) genes has potential to provide human health benefits. Ethyl methane sulfonate mutations in the linked SBEIIa and SBEIIb paralogs were combined on chromosomes 2A (SBEIIa/b-A; Reg. No. GP-968, PI 670159), 2B (SBEIIa/b-B; Reg. No. GP-970, PI 670161), and on both chromosomes (SBEIIa/b-AB; Reg. No. GP-969, PI 670160) in the tetraploid wheat cultivar Kronos, a semidwarf durum wheat cultivar that has high yield potential and excellent pasta quality. These three double and quadruple SBEII-mutant lines were compared with a control sib line with no SBEII mutations in two field locations in California. The SBEIIa/b-AB line with four mutations showed dramatic increases in amylose (average 66%) and resistant starch (average 753%) relative to the control. However, the SBEIIa/b-AB line also showed an average 7% decrease in total starch and an 8% decrease in kernel weight. The release by the University of California-Davis of the durum wheat germplasm combining four SBEIIa and SBEIIb mutations will accelerate the deployment of these mutations in durum wheat breeding programs and the development of durum wheat varieties with increased resistant starch.

  9. Registration of Durum Wheat Germplasm Lines with Combined Mutations in SBEIIa and SBEIIb Genes Conferring Increased Amylose and Resistant Starch

    PubMed Central

    Hazard, Brittany; Zhang, Xiaoqin; Naemeh, Mahmoudreza; Dubcovsky, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Durum wheat [Triticum turgidum L. subsp. durum (Desf.) Husn.], used in pasta, couscous, and flatbread production, is an important source of starch food products worldwide. The amylose portion of the starch forms resistant starch complexes that resist digestion and contribute to dietary fiber. Increasing the amount of amylose and resistant starch in wheat by mutating the STARCH BRANCHING ENZYME II (SBEII) genes has potential to provide human health benefits. Ethyl methane sulfonate mutations in the linked SBEIIa and SBEIIb paralogs were combined on chromosomes 2A (SBEIIa/b-A; Reg. No. GP-968, PI 670159), 2B (SBEIIa/b-B; Reg. No. GP-970, PI 670161), and on both chromosomes (SBEIIa/b-AB; Reg. No. GP-969, PI 670160) in the tetraploid wheat cultivar Kronos, a semidwarf durum wheat cultivar that has high yield potential and excellent pasta quality. These three double and quadruple SBEII-mutant lines were compared with a control sib line with no SBEII mutations in two field locations in California. The SBEIIa/b-AB line with four mutations showed dramatic increases in amylose (average 66%) and resistant starch (average 753%) relative to the control. However, the SBEIIa/b-AB line also showed an average 7% decrease in total starch and an 8% decrease in kernel weight. The release by the University of California–Davis of the durum wheat germplasm combining four SBEIIa and SBEIIb mutations will accelerate the deployment of these mutations in durum wheat breeding programs and the development of durum wheat varieties with increased resistant starch. PMID:27110322

  10. Evaluation of 15 Local Plant Species as Larvicidal Agents Against an Indian Strain of Dengue Fever Mosquito, Aedes aegypti L. (Diptera: Culicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sarita; Wahab, Naim; Mishra, Monika; Warikoo, Radhika

    2012-01-01

    The adverse effects of chemical insecticides-based intervention measures for the control of mosquito vectors have received wide public apprehension because of several problems like insecticide resistance, resurgence of pest species, environmental pollution, toxic hazards to humans, and non-target organisms. These problems have necessitated the need to explore and develop alternative strategies using eco-friendly, environmentally safe, bio-degradable plant products which are non-toxic to non-target organisms too. In view of this, 15 plant species were collected from local areas in New Delhi, India. Different parts of these plants were separated, dried, mechanically grinded, and sieved to get fine powder. The 200 g of each part was soaked in 1000 mL of different solvents separately and the crude extracts, thus formed, were concentrated using a vacuum evaporator at 45°C under low pressure. Each extract was screened to explore its potential as a mosquito larvicidal agent against early fourth instars of dengue vector, Aedes aegypti using WHO protocol. The preliminary screening showed that only 10 plants possessed larvicidal potential as they could result in 100% mortality at 1000 ppm. Further evaluation of the potential larvicidal extracts established the hexane leaf extract of Lantana camara to be most effective extract exhibiting a significant LC50 value of 30.71 ppm while the Phyllanthus emblica fruit extract was found to be least effective with an LC50 value of 298.93 ppm. The extracts made from different parts of other five plants; Achyranthes aspera, Zingiber officinalis, Ricinus communis, Trachyspermum ammi, and Cassia occidentalis also possessed significant larvicidal potential with LC50 values ranging from 55.0 to 74.67 ppm. Other three extracts showed moderate toxicity against A. aegypti larvae. Further investigations would be needed to isolate and identify the primary component responsible for the larvicidal efficiency of the effective plants

  11. In search for evidence: combining ad hoc survey, monitoring, and modeling to estimate the potential and actual impact of ground level ozone on forests in Trentino (Northern Italy).

    PubMed

    Gottardini, Elena; Cristofolini, Fabiana; Cristofori, Antonella; Ferretti, Marco

    2017-09-27

    A 5-year project was carried out over the period 2007-2011 to estimate the potential and actual ozone effect on forests in Trentino, Northern Italy (6207 km(2)) (Ozone EFFORT). The objective was to provide explicit answers to three main questions: (i) is there a potential risk placed by ozone to vegetation? (ii) are there specific ozone symptoms on vegetation, and are they related to ozone levels? (iii) are there ozone-related effects on forest health and growth? Different methods and techniques were adopted as follows: monitoring ozone levels, ad hoc field survey for symptoms on vegetation and chlorophyll-related measurements, modeling to upscale ozone measurements, ozone flux estimation, statistical analysis, and modeling to detect whether a significant effect attributable to ozone exists. Ozone effects were assessed on an ad hoc-introduced bioindicator, on spontaneous woody species, and on forest trees. As for question (i), the different ozone-risk critical levels for both exposure and stomatal flux were largely exceeded in Trentino, evidencing a potentially critical situation for vegetation. As for question (ii), specific ozone foliar symptoms related to ozone exposure levels were observed on the introduced supersensitive Nicotiana tabacum L. cv Bel-W3 and on the spontaneous, ozone-sensitive Viburnum lantana L., but not on other 33 species surveyed in the field studies. Regarding question (iii), statistical analyses on forest health (in terms of defoliation) and growth (in terms of basal area increment) measured at 15 forest monitoring plots and tree rings (at one site) revealed no significant relationship with ozone exposure and flux. Instead, a set of factors related to biotic and abiotic causes, foliar nutrients, age, and site were identified as the main drivers of forest health and growth. In conclusion, while ozone levels and fluxes in the investigated region were much higher than current critical levels, evidence of impact on vegetation-and on forest

  12. Ethnobotanical knowledge on botanical repellents employed in the African region against mosquito vectors - A review.

    PubMed

    Pavela, Roman; Benelli, Giovanni

    2016-08-01

    Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) represent a huge threat for millions of humans and animals worldwide, since they act as vectors for important parasites and pathogens, including malaria, filariasis and important arboviruses, such as dengue, West Nile and Zika virus. No vaccines or other specific treatments are available against the arboviruses transmitted by mosquitoes, and avoidance of mosquito bites remains the best strategy. African regions are usually hit most whose inhabitants are poor, and the use of repellent plants is the only efficient protection against vectors they have. Ethnobotanical knowledge of such plants and their use is usually passed on orally from one generation to another. However, it is also important to preserve this information in a written form, as well. Ethnobotanical research projects carried out in the regions of today's Ethiopia, South Africa, Nigeria, Kenya, and Tanzania indicate that the native inhabitants of the African study regions traditionally use 64 plant species, belonging to 30 families. Aromatic plants (i.e., Citrus spp., Eucalyptus spp., Lantana camara, Ocimum spp. and Lippia javanica) the most commonly used in all the study regions. Native people know three major methods of using repellent plants: (i) production of repellent smoke from burning plants, (ii) hanging plants inside the house or sprinkling leaves on the floor, (iii) the use of plant oils, juices from crushed fresh parts of the plants, or various prepared extracts applied on uncovered body parts. Overall, this review covers studies conducted only in a limited part of the African continent, highlighting the importance to undertake further research efforts to preserve the unique knowledge and traditions of the native tribes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Snails and slugs damaging the cut foliage, Cordyline fruticosa and use of biorationals towards their management.

    PubMed

    Karthiga, S; Jegathambigai, V; Karunarathne, M D S D; Svinningen, A; Mikunthan, G

    2012-01-01

    Snails and slugs became a serious molluscan pests and damaging leaves of purple compacta, Cordyline fruticosa extensively grown for export at Green Farm Ltd, Sri Lanka. The export quality of leaves of C. fruticosa is lowered due to feeding of snails, Achantina fulica (Bowditch), Opeas pyrgula Schmacker and Boettgerx and Helix aspersa Muller and slugs incurring great loss to cut foliage industry. Paucity of information is available to understand snails and slugs damage and their host range that limits to develop suitable management practices. Therefore this study was aimed to determine damage, alternate hosts and to develop possible management practices. Snails and slugs damaged mainly fresh leaves of C. fruticosa. The severity of damage was 44.5% in infested field based on the visual rating method. Leaves of cassava, sting bean, okra, cucumber, passion fruit, papaya, Glyricidia and shoe flower were identified as alternate hosts and neem, Ixora and Dracaena spp were not served as alternate hosts. Among the plant materials tested for their repellence against snails and slugs revealed that neem seed powder was an irritant; neem leaves, mint leaves and Lantana leaves were acted as anti-feedant and Salt as chemical repellent. Among the barrier and bait experiments Bordeaux mixture exhibited a significant barrier effect against horizontal movement of snails. Baits made out of Metaldehyde bait, vegetables bait and jaggery had a strong effect in repelling the snails and slugs. Mulching with Madhuca longifolia punnac was the best to reduce the snails and slugs population compared to M. longifolia seed kernel powder. Oil from M. longifolia failed to reduce their population. Hence the results revealed that saponin containing M. longifolia punnac helped to eliminate snails and slugs when used as mulch. Metaldehyde, vegetable and jaggery baits are also useful to minimize their colonization further. Hence combination of these methods will help to prevent snails and slugs from

  14. Effect of crude plant extracts from some Oaxacan flora on two deleterious fungal phytopathogens and extract compatibility with a biofertilizer strain

    PubMed Central

    Lira-De León, Karla I.; Ramírez-Mares, Marco V.; Sánchez-López, Vladimir; Ramírez-Lepe, Mario; Salas-Coronado, Raúl; Santos-Sánchez, Norma F.; Valadez-Blanco, Rogelio; Hernández-Carlos, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of 12 plant extracts was tested against the phytopathogens Alternaria alternata and Fusarium solani. In addition, the compatibility of the extracts toward Bacillus liqueniformis, a biofertilizer and a non-target microorganism, was assessed. Plants tested belong to the Euphorbiaceae, Asteraceae, Crassulaceae, Rubiaceae, Convolvulaceae, Verbenaceae, Orchidaceae, Nyctaginaceae, Boraginaceae, and Tiliaceae families and were collected in the State of Oaxaca. The antifungal activity of the plant extracts (50–100 mg/mL) against A. alternata and F. solani, was determined by measuring the mycelium radial growth and obtaining the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of fungal growth. In addition, with the aim of finding plant extracts which are compatible with a B. licheniformis biofertilizer strain and to test the non-toxic nature of the treatments, the toxicity of the extracts toward this strain was evaluated using the agar diffusion method. Azoxystrobin (12 μg) and chloramphenicol (30 μg) were used as positive controls for the pathogens and for the non-target bacteria, respectively. Plant extracts inhibited fungal growth in the ranges of 0.76–56.17% against F. solani and 2.02–69.07% against A. alternata. The extracts of Acalypha subviscida, Ipomoea murucoides, Tournefortia densiflora and Lantana achyranthifolia showed MIC values between 5.77–12.5 mg/mL for at least one of the fungal species. The best treatment, Adenophyllum aurantium, exhibited a maximum inhibition for both F. solani (56.17%, MIC = 7.78 mg/mL) and A. alternata (68.64% MIC = 7.78 mg/mL), and resulted innocuous toward B. licheniformis. Therefore, this plant has an outstanding potential for the agroecological control of fungal phytopathogens in industrial crops. PMID:25147544

  15. Predicting Incursion of Plant Invaders into Kruger National Park, South Africa: The Interplay of General Drivers and Species-Specific Factors

    PubMed Central

    Jarošík, Vojtěch; Pyšek, Petr; Foxcroft, Llewellyn C.; Richardson, David M.; Rouget, Mathieu; MacFadyen, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    Background Overcoming boundaries is crucial for incursion of alien plant species and their successful naturalization and invasion within protected areas. Previous work showed that in Kruger National Park, South Africa, this process can be quantified and that factors determining the incursion of invasive species can be identified and predicted confidently. Here we explore the similarity between determinants of incursions identified by the general model based on a multispecies assemblage, and those identified by species-specific models. We analyzed the presence and absence of six invasive plant species in 1.0×1.5 km segments along the border of the park as a function of environmental characteristics from outside and inside the KNP boundary, using two data-mining techniques: classification trees and random forests. Principal Findings The occurrence of Ageratum houstonianum, Chromolaena odorata, Xanthium strumarium, Argemone ochroleuca, Opuntia stricta and Lantana camara can be reliably predicted based on landscape characteristics identified by the general multispecies model, namely water runoff from surrounding watersheds and road density in a 10 km radius. The presence of main rivers and species-specific combinations of vegetation types are reliable predictors from inside the park. Conclusions The predictors from the outside and inside of the park are complementary, and are approximately equally reliable for explaining the presence/absence of current invaders; those from the inside are, however, more reliable for predicting future invasions. Landscape characteristics determined as crucial predictors from outside the KNP serve as guidelines for management to enact proactive interventions to manipulate landscape features near the KNP to prevent further incursions. Predictors from the inside the KNP can be used reliably to identify high-risk areas to improve the cost-effectiveness of management, to locate invasive plants and target them for eradication. PMID:22194893

  16. Effect of crude plant extracts from some Oaxacan flora on two deleterious fungal phytopathogens and extract compatibility with a biofertilizer strain.

    PubMed

    Lira-De León, Karla I; Ramírez-Mares, Marco V; Sánchez-López, Vladimir; Ramírez-Lepe, Mario; Salas-Coronado, Raúl; Santos-Sánchez, Norma F; Valadez-Blanco, Rogelio; Hernández-Carlos, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of 12 plant extracts was tested against the phytopathogens Alternaria alternata and Fusarium solani. In addition, the compatibility of the extracts toward Bacillus liqueniformis, a biofertilizer and a non-target microorganism, was assessed. Plants tested belong to the Euphorbiaceae, Asteraceae, Crassulaceae, Rubiaceae, Convolvulaceae, Verbenaceae, Orchidaceae, Nyctaginaceae, Boraginaceae, and Tiliaceae families and were collected in the State of Oaxaca. The antifungal activity of the plant extracts (50-100 mg/mL) against A. alternata and F. solani, was determined by measuring the mycelium radial growth and obtaining the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of fungal growth. In addition, with the aim of finding plant extracts which are compatible with a B. licheniformis biofertilizer strain and to test the non-toxic nature of the treatments, the toxicity of the extracts toward this strain was evaluated using the agar diffusion method. Azoxystrobin (12 μg) and chloramphenicol (30 μg) were used as positive controls for the pathogens and for the non-target bacteria, respectively. Plant extracts inhibited fungal growth in the ranges of 0.76-56.17% against F. solani and 2.02-69.07% against A. alternata. The extracts of Acalypha subviscida, Ipomoea murucoides, Tournefortia densiflora and Lantana achyranthifolia showed MIC values between 5.77-12.5 mg/mL for at least one of the fungal species. The best treatment, Adenophyllum aurantium, exhibited a maximum inhibition for both F. solani (56.17%, MIC = 7.78 mg/mL) and A. alternata (68.64% MIC = 7.78 mg/mL), and resulted innocuous toward B. licheniformis. Therefore, this plant has an outstanding potential for the agroecological control of fungal phytopathogens in industrial crops.

  17. Chromium Accumulation in Medicinal Plants Growing Naturally on Tannery Contaminated and Non-contaminated Soils.

    PubMed

    Jaison, S; Muthukumar, T

    2017-01-01

    Herbal preparations used to treat human ailments globally can be contaminated with various heavy metals (HMs) originating from the raw materials or from the manufacturing processes. Therefore, we assessed 22 medicinal plants growing naturally on tannery pollutant contaminated (Site-C) and non-contaminated (Site-NC) sites for their ability to accumulate chromium (Cr). The Cr contents in soil and various plant parts were estimated using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Translocation and bioconcentration factors were calculated. The soil at Site-C had 27-fold higher concentration of total Cr than at Site-NC. Chromium accumulation is reported for the first time in 50 % of the medicinal plants examined and varied significantly among the sites. Shoots of Ricinus communis and Amaranthus viridis had maximum concentrations of Cr at Site-C, whereas in Site-NC, none of the plants had Cr accumulation >30 ppm. Ricinus communis, Amaranthus viridis, and Amaranthus spinosus had translocation factor (TF) greater than the one in the Site-C and Lantana camara had TF >1 in Site-NC. The bioconcentration factor (BCF) was >1 only for Ricinus communis at both the sites. The majority of the medicinal plants at Site-NC had Cr content exceeding the permissible limit of 2 ppm suggested for herbal raw material. The results of the study clearly emphasize the need for screening plants of therapeutic value for the presence of HMs even when collected from non-contaminated soils. Moreover, proportional allocation of Cr in different plant parts provided an insight on the safety of these parts when specifically used in herbal preparations.

  18. Bio-control potential of Cladosporium sp. (MCPL-461), against a noxious weed Parthenium hysterophorus L.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anuj; Verma, V C; Gond, S K; Kumar, V; Kharwar, R N

    2009-03-01

    The phenological survey of Parthenium hysterophorus L., in and around the campus of Banaras Hindu University (BHU) was done for about two years (2004-06). During Nov 2004, a few Parthenium plants were found diseased, and symptoms were restricted to the flowers, buds, and inflorescences. The disease causes sterility and reduces seed viability, which was observed with seed germination test from infected and healthy plants. The fungal pathogen was isolated and identified as Cladosporium sp. (MCPL-461). The severity of pathogen to the reproductive organs led to serious damages of the Parthenium plants. Thus in vitro and in vivo experiments were conducted to determine the bio-control potential of Cladosporium sp. (MCPL 461) against Parthenium weed. A combinatorial effort of Cladosporium sp. (MCPL 461) bio-control potential was evaluated with different culture media, incubation periods and spores strength. Spore suspension of 10(5) to 10(12) spores ml(-1) were used to spray on healthy Parthenium plants, and it was found that severe infection symptoms were appeared at 10(10) to 10(12) spores ml(-1) suspension. LD50 was found at 10(7) spores ml(-1). To enhance the myco-herbicide activity 3% sucrose was added to the spore suspension, which further resolute the bio-control efficacy of the isolates. Only 20-30% seeds of infected plants could germinate. However the safety of non-targeted and wild plants was also tested with Lantana camera, Chromolaena odorata and found that suspension up to 10(12) spores ml(-1) were not sufficient for disease outbreak in them.

  19. [Analysis of tissue bioavailability of total polyphenols by Folin Ciocalteu and Fast Blue BB techniques in organs of BALB/C/c mice].

    PubMed

    Miranda, A R; Albrecht, C; Soria, E A

    2017-01-01

    Biomedical potential of polyphenols lies in their ability to modulate redox balance and the mechanisms involved in the development of chronic noncommunicable diseases. The aim of this study was to determine the concentration of total polyphenols in different murine organs by assaying analytical techniques of Folin Ciocalteu (FC) and Fast Blue BB (FBBB). Balb/c female mice (n≥3) received for 15 days 100 mg/kg/d of extract of Lantana grisebachii (LG), Aspidosperma quebracho-blanco (AQB) or Ilex paraguariensis (IP) and control group (treated with water without extract). Polyphenolic concentrations were measured in telencephalon, diencephalon, midbrain, brainstem, cerebellum, spleen, thymus and cardiopulmonary tissue by FC and FBBB methods. Results were compared by ANOVA followed by Tukey test (p<0.05). FBBB method reported higher detections than FC (4.5 fold in telencephalon, 8.4 in midbrain, 5 in brainstem, 7.2 in spleen, 68.5 in thymus and 4 in cardiopulmonary tissue). Regarding the treatments, the group that received AQB showed to have increased polyphenolic bioavailability in brainstem (p<0.02). With FBBB, a decrease on thymic polyphenol content after treatment with IP was detected (p<0.005). In cerebellum of the groups treated with IP and telencephalon of the control group showed significant differences when these were analyzed with FC (p<0.05, p<0.0035 respectively). FBBB method showed higher estimations of polyphenolic bioavailability than FC, and this could be related to higher specificity of the technique to react with phenolic compounds.

  20. Interactions of light intensity, insecticide concentration, and time on the efficacy of systemic insecticides in suppressing populations of the sweetpotato whitefly (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) and the citrus mealybug (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae).

    PubMed

    Cloyd, Raymond A; Williams, Kimberly A; Byrne, Frank J; Kemp, Kenneth E

    2012-04-01

    The impact of light intensity on the uptake and persistence of the systemic neonicotinoid insecticides, imidacloprid and dinotefuran, were evaluated in poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima Willd.) and yellow sage (Lantana camara L.). Insecticide residues were measured in leaves sampled from the treated plants at four time intervals after treatment to determine the relationship between insecticide concentration and efficacy against two insect pests: sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci Gennadius, and the citrus mealybug, Planococcus citri Risso. The insecticides were evaluated at their respective label rate and at the comparable label rate of the other insecticide under two different light environments: ambient and shade. The uptake of dinotefuran into yellow sage was more rapid at both treatment rates than both rates of imidacloprid, resulting in higher percent mortality of whitefly nymphs (89.8-100) compared with imidacloprid (14.1-89.2) across all 4 wk. Additionally, plants that received both rates of dinotefuran had fewer whitefly pupae (< 1.0) at week 4 compared with imidacloprid-treated plants (23.7-25.3). The uptake of dinotefuran into poinsettia plants was also more rapid and resulted in quicker and higher percent mortality of whitefly nymphs (89.5-99.6) compared with imidacloprid (14.1-89.2) across all 4 wk. However, despite efficient uptake, the efficacy of both systemic insecticides was less for citrus mealybug where percent mortality values were <50% among all the treatments across the 4 wk. The use of the two systemic insecticides evaluated in regards to pest management in horticultural cropping systems is discussed.

  1. EVALUATION OF ANTICANCER POTENTIAL OF EIGHT VEGETAL SPECIES FROM THE STATE OF OAXACA

    PubMed Central

    León, Karla Isabel Lira-De; Herrera-Martínez, Mayra; Ramirez-Mares, Marco Vinicio; Hernández-Carlos, Beatriz

    2017-01-01

    Background: Eight plant species from Oaxaca, some of them used in traditional medicine, were subjected to screening of several biological activities to provide data regarding their anticancer potential, although no scientific information is available about their pharmacological effects. Materials and methods: Methanol extracts from stems or roots of the eight plants were tested for antioxidant activity by the DPPH- method. Antimicrobial activity was determined using the agar diffusion method and the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was obtained by broth dilution method. Antitopoisomerase activity was assessed using mutant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae JN362a, JN394, JN394t-1, JN394t2.4 and JN394t2-5. The mutagenic activity was evaluated using the Ames test (Salmonella typhimurium TA1535). Results: No extract showed significant antioxidant activity. The best antimicrobial activity was observed for Salpianthus arenarius (MIC 56.25 μg/mL) and Lantana achyranthifolia (MIC 78.12 μg/mL) against Staphylococcus aureus. Extracts of Acalypha cuspidata, Alloispermum integrifolium and L. achyranthifolia stems showed antitopoisomerase II activity with JN394t-1 growth of -30.88±0.0%, -38.11±4.95%, and -70.97±12.02% respectively. Galium mexicanum stem extract showed antitopoisomerase I activity with growth of 35.31±6.36% on the same mutant strain. All plant extracts were non-mutagenic. Fractionation of A. cuspidata extract led to identification of two subfractions with antitopoisomerase I and II activity at 154μg/mL (Positive controls 50 and 100μg/mL). Conclusion: Methanol extracts of A. cuspidata, A. integrifolium, G. mexicanum, and L. achyranthifolia stems showed antitopoisomerase and non-mutagenic activities, and consequently could be promising as a source of anticancer drugs. PMID:28480417

  2. EVALUATION OF ANTICANCER POTENTIAL OF EIGHT VEGETAL SPECIES FROM THE STATE OF OAXACA.

    PubMed

    León, Karla Isabel Lira-De; Herrera-Martínez, Mayra; Ramirez-Mares, Marco Vinicio; Hernández-Carlos, Beatriz

    2017-01-01

    Eight plant species from Oaxaca, some of them used in traditional medicine, were subjected to screening of several biological activities to provide data regarding their anticancer potential, although no scientific information is available about their pharmacological effects. Methanol extracts from stems or roots of the eight plants were tested for antioxidant activity by the DPPH- method. Antimicrobial activity was determined using the agar diffusion method and the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was obtained by broth dilution method. Antitopoisomerase activity was assessed using mutant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae JN362a, JN394, JN394t-1, JN394t2.4 and JN394t2-5. The mutagenic activity was evaluated using the Ames test (Salmonella typhimurium TA1535). No extract showed significant antioxidant activity. The best antimicrobial activity was observed for Salpianthus arenarius (MIC 56.25 μg/mL) and Lantana achyranthifolia (MIC 78.12 μg/mL) against Staphylococcus aureus. Extracts of Acalypha cuspidata, Alloispermum integrifolium and L. achyranthifolia stems showed antitopoisomerase II activity with JN394t-1 growth of -30.88±0.0%, -38.11±4.95%, and -70.97±12.02% respectively. Galium mexicanum stem extract showed antitopoisomerase I activity with growth of 35.31±6.36% on the same mutant strain. All plant extracts were non-mutagenic. Fractionation of A. cuspidata extract led to identification of two subfractions with antitopoisomerase I and II activity at 154μg/mL (Positive controls 50 and 100μg/mL). Methanol extracts of A. cuspidata, A. integrifolium, G. mexicanum, and L. achyranthifolia stems showed antitopoisomerase and non-mutagenic activities, and consequently could be promising as a source of anticancer drugs.

  3. In-vitro antibacterial activity of selected medicinal plants from Longisa region of Bomet district, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Cheruiyot, K R; Olila, D; Kateregga, J

    2009-08-01

    Current strategies to overcome the global problem of antimicrobial resistance include research in finding new and innovative antimicrobials from plants. This study was carried out to determine the antibacterial activity of plant extracts of Olea africana stem-bark, Psidium guajava leaves, Vernonia amygdalina leaves, Lantana camara leaves and Mangifera indica leaves which are used in folklore medicine to treat infections of microbial origin in Longisa region of Bomet District, Kenya. Methanol extracts were derived and screened. Standard cultures of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 were used in the study. The antibacterial tests used were the agar well diffusion assays at concentration 1 gm/ml. Minimum Inhibition Concentration (MIC) was determined in the plant extract that showed some efficacy against the tested microorganisms. Gentamicin (10 microg) was used as a positive control. The methanol extracts showed weak antibacterial activity against the study organisms compared to Gentamicin. All extracts exhibited a significant bactericidal activity against S. aureus while L. camara and V. amygdalina lacked efficacy against P.aeruginosa and E. coli. O. africana and P. guajava presented the lowest MIC against S.aureus (62.5 mg/ml and 250 mg/ml respectively P. guajava and M. indica showed analogous MICs against P.aeruginosa (250 mg/ml). P. guajava exhibited a better MIC against E.coli (500 mg/ml). This in-vitro study corroborated the antimicrobial activity of the selected plants used in folklore medicine. The plants could be potential sources of new antimicrobial agent.

  4. Ursolic and oleanolic acids as antimicrobial and immunomodulatory compounds for tuberculosis treatment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background New alternatives for the treatment of Tuberculosis (TB) are urgently needed and medicinal plants represent a potential option. Chamaedora tepejilote and Lantana hispida are medicinal plants from Mexico and their hexanic extracts have shown antimycobacterial activity. Bioguided investigation of these extracts showed that the active compounds were ursolic acid (UA) and oleanolic acid (OA). Methods The activity of UA and OA against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv, four monoresistant strains, and two drug-resistant clinical isolates were determined by MABA test. The intracellular activity of UA and OA against M. tuberculosis H37Rv and a MDR clinical isolate were evaluated in a macrophage cell line. Finally, the antitubercular activity of UA and OA was tested in BALB/c mice infected with M. tuberculosis H37Rv or a MDR strain, by determining pulmonary bacilli loads, tissue damage by automated histomorphometry, and expression of IFN-γ, TNF-α, and iNOS by quantitative RT-PCR. Results The in vitro assay showed that the UA/OA mixture has synergistic activity. The intracellular activity of these compounds against M. tuberculosis H37Rv and a MDR clinical isolate in a macrophage cell line showed that both compounds, alone and in combination, were active against intracellular mycobacteria even at low doses. Moreover, when both compounds were used to treat BALB/c mice with TB induced by H37Rv or MDR bacilli, a significant reduction of bacterial loads and pneumonia were observed compared to the control. Interestingly, animals treated with UA and OA showed a higher expression of IFN-γ and TNF-α in their lungs, than control animals. Conclusion UA and OA showed antimicrobial activity plus an immune-stimulatory effect that permitted the control of experimental pulmonary TB. PMID:24098949

  5. Ecosystems effects 25 years after Chernobyl: pollinators, fruit set and recruitment.

    PubMed

    Møller, Anders Pape; Barnier, Florian; Mousseau, Timothy A

    2012-12-01

    Animals are assumed to play a key role in ecosystem functioning through their effects on seed set, seed consumption, seed dispersal, and maintenance of plant communities. However, there are no studies investigating the consequences of animal scarcity on seed set, seed consumption and seed dispersal at large geographical scales. We exploited the unprecedented scarcity of pollinating bumblebees and butterflies in the vicinity of Chernobyl, Ukraine, linked to the effects of radiation on pollinator abundance, to test for effects of pollinator abundance on the ecosystem. There were considerably fewer pollinating insects in areas with high levels of radiation. Fruit trees and bushes (apple Malus domestica, pear Pyrus communis, rowan Sorbus aucuparia, wild rose Rosa rugosa, twistingwood Viburnum lantana, and European cranberry bush Viburnum opulus) that are all pollinated by insects produced fewer fruit in highly radioactively contaminated areas, partly linked to the local reduction in abundance of pollinators. This was the case even when controlling for the fact that fruit trees were generally smaller in more contaminated areas. Fruit-eating birds like thrushes and warblers that are known seed dispersers were less numerous in areas with lower fruit abundance, even after controlling for the effects of radiation, providing a direct link between radiation, pollinator abundance, fruit abundance and abundance of frugivores. Given that the Chernobyl disaster happened 25 years ago, one would predict reduced local recruitment of fruit trees if fruit set has been persistently depressed during that period; indeed, local recruitment was negatively related to the level of radiation and positively to the local level of fruit set. The patterns at the level of trees were replicated at the level of villages across the study site. This study provides the first large-scale study of the effects of a suppressed pollinator community on ecosystem functioning.

  6. Repellent Activities of Essential Oils of Some Plants Used Traditionally to Control the Brown Ear Tick, Rhipicephalus appendiculatus

    PubMed Central

    Hassanali, Ahmed; Mukabana, Wolfgang Richard; Takken, Willem

    2014-01-01

    Essential oils of eight plants, selected after an ethnobotanical survey conducted in Bukusu community in Bungoma County, western Kenya (Tagetes minuta, Tithonia diversifolia, Juniperus procera, Solanecio mannii, Senna didymobotrya, Lantana camara, Securidaca longepedunculata, and Hoslundia opposita), were initially screened (at two doses) for their repellence against brown ear tick, Rhipicephalus appendiculatus, using a dual-choice climbing assay. The oils of T. minuta and T. diversifolia were then selected for more detailed study. Dose-response evaluations of these oils showed that T. minuta oil was more repellent (RD50 = 0.0021 mg) than that of T. diversifolia (RD50 = 0.263 mg). Gas chromatography-linked mass spectrometric (GC-MS) analyses showed different compositions of the two oils. T. minuta oil is comprised mainly of cis-ocimene (43.78%), dihydrotagetone (16.71%), piperitenone (10.15%), trans-tagetone (8.67%), 3,9-epoxy-p-mentha-1,8(10)diene (6.47%), β-ocimene (3.25%), and cis-tagetone (1.95%), whereas T. diversifolia oil is comprised mainly of α-pinene (63.64%), β-pinene (15.00%), isocaryophyllene (7.62%), nerolidol (3.70%), 1-tridecanol (1.75%), limonene (1.52%), and sabinene (1.00%). The results provide scientific rationale for traditional use of raw products of these plants in controlling livestock ticks by the Bukusu community and lay down some groundwork for exploiting partially refined products such as essential oils of these plants in protecting cattle against infestations with R. appendiculatus. PMID:24693417

  7. Description of Kibdelosporangium banguiense sp. nov., a novel actinomycete isolated from soil of the forest of Pama, on the plateau of Bangui, Central African Republic.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Javier; González, Ignacio; Estévez, Mar; Benito, Patricia; Trujillo, Martha E; Genilloud, Olga

    2016-05-01

    A novel actinomycete strain F-240,109(T) from the MEDINA collection was isolated from a soil sample collected in the forest of Pama, on the plateau of Bangui, Central African Republic. The strain was identified according to its 16S rRNA gene sequence as a new member of the genus Kibdelosporangium, being closely related to Kibdelosporangium aridum subsp. aridum (98.6 % sequence similarity), Kibledosporangium phytohabitans (98.3 %), Kibdelosporangium aridum subsp. largum (97.7 %), Kibdelosporangium philippinense (97.6 %) and Kibledosporangium lantanae (96.9 %). In order to resolve its precise taxonomic status, the strain was characterised through a polyphasic approach. The strain is a Gram-stain positive, aerobic, non-motile and catalase-positive actinomycete characterised by formation of extensively branched substrate mycelia and sparse brownish grey aerial mycelia with sporangium-like globular structures. The chemotaxonomic characterisation of strain F-240,109(T) corroborated its affiliation into the genus Kibdelosporangium. The peptidoglycan contains meso-diaminopimelic acid; the major menaquinone is MK-9(H4); the phospholipid profile contains high amounts of phosphatidylethanolamine, hydroxyphosphatidylethanolamine, diphosphatidylglycerol and an unidentified phospholipid; and the predominant cellular fatty acid methyl esters are iso-C16:0, iso-C14:0, iso-C15:0 and 2OH iso-C16:0. However, some key phenotypic differences regarding to its close relatives and DNA-DNA hybridization values indicate that strain F-240,109(T) represents a novel Kibdelosporangium species, for which the name Kibdelosporangium banguiense sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is strain F-240,109(T) (=DSM 46670(T), =LMG 28181(T)).

  8. Discriminative feeding behaviour of Anopheles gambiae s.s. on endemic plants in western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Manda, H.; Gouagna, L. C.; Nyandat, E.; Kabiru, E. W.; Jackson, R. R.; Foster, W. A.; Githure, J. I.; Beier, J. C.; Hassanali, A.

    2009-01-01

    Anopheles gambiae Giles s.s. (Diptera: Culicidae) is known to feed on plant sugars, but this is the first experimental study to consider whether it discriminates between plant species. Thirteen perennial plant species were selected on the basis of their local availability within the vicinity of human dwellings and larval habitats of An. gambiae s.s. in western Kenya. Groups of 100 or 200 mosquitoes were released into cages either with a cutting of one plant type at a time (single-plant assay) or with cuttings of all 13 plants simultaneously (choice assay), respectively, and left overnight. In the choice assay, direct observations of the percentages of mosquitoes perching or feeding on each plant were recorded over four 1-h periods each night. For both types of assay, mosquitoes were recaptured and the percentage that had fed on plants was assessed by testing them individually for the presence of fructose. To identify which plants the choice-assay mosquitoes had fed on, gas chromatography (GC) profiles of samples of mosquito homogenates were compared with GC profiles of extracts from relevant parts of each plant. Four of the plants that were observed to have been fed on most frequently in the choice assay (Parthenium hysterophorus L., Tecoma stans L., Ricinus communis L., and Senna didymobotrya Fresen) were also shown to have been ingested most often by mosquitoes in both types of assay, suggesting that An. gambiae is differentially responsive to this range of plants, regardless of whether the plants were presented singly or mixed together. Significantly more females than males fed on plants, with the exception of P. hysterophorus L., one of the plants most frequently fed on. For most plant species (ten of 13), GC profiles indicated that An. gambiae obtained sugars primarily from flowers. The exceptions were P. hysterophorus L., Lantana camara L. and R. communis L., on which An. gambiae fed more often from leaves and stems than from flowers. PMID:17373953

  9. In vitro antihelmintic effect of fifteen tropical plant extracts on excysted flukes of Fasciola hepatica.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Mercado, José Manuel; Ibarra-Velarde, Froylán; Alonso-Díaz, Miguel Ángel; Vera-Montenegro, Yolanda; Avila-Acevedo, José Guillermo; García-Bores, Ana María

    2015-02-27

    Fasciolosis due to Fasciola hepatica is the most important hepatic disease in veterinary medicine. Its relevance is important because of the major economical losses to the cattle industry such as: reduction in milk, meat and wool production; miscarriages, anemia, liver condemnation and occasionally deaths, are estimated in billons of dollars. The emergence of fluke resistance due to over or under dosing of fasciolides as well as environmental damage produced by the chemicals eliminated in field have stimulated the need for alternative methods to control Fasciola hepatica. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro anthelmintic effect of fifteen tropical plant extracts used in tradicional Mexican medicine, on newly excysted flukes of Fasciola hepatica. The flukes were exposed in triplicate at 500, 250 and 125 mg/L to each extract. The efficacy was assessed as the mortality rate based on the number of live and dead flukes after 24, 48 and 72 h post-exposure. The plants with anthelmintic effect were evaluated once again with a concentration of 375 mg/L in order to confirm the results and to calculate lethal concentrations at 50%, 90% and 99% (LC(50), LC(90), and LC(99)). Plant extracts of Lantana camara, Bocconia frutescens, Piper auritum, Artemisia mexicana and Cajanus cajan had an in vitro anthelmintic effect (P <0.05). The LC(50), LC(90) and LC(99) to A. mexicana, C. cajan and B. frutescens were 92.85, 210.44 and 410.04 mg/L, 382.73, 570.09 and 788.9 mg/L and 369.96, 529.94 and 710.34 mg/L, respectively. It is concluded that five tropical plant extracts had promising anthelmintic effects against F. hepatica. Further studies on toxicity and in vivo biological evaluation in ruminant models might help to determine the anthelmintic potential of these plant extracts.

  10. Kenyan endemic bird species at home in novel ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Habel, Jan Christian; Teucher, Mike; Rödder, Dennis; Bleicher, Marie-Therese; Dieckow, Claudia; Wiese, Anja; Fischer, Christina

    2016-04-01

    Riparian thickets of East Africa harbor a large number of endemic animal and plant species, but also provide important ecosystem services for the human being settling along streams. This creates a conflicting situation between nature conservation and land-use activities. Today, most of this former pristine vegetation is highly degraded and became replaced by the invasive exotic Lantana camara shrub species. In this study, we analyze the movement behavior and habitat use of a diverse range of riparian bird species and model the habitat availability of each of these species. We selected the following four riparian bird species: Bare-eyed Thrush Turdus tephronotus, Rufous Chatterer Turdoides rubiginosus, Zanzibar Sombre Greenbul Andropadus importunus insularis, and the Kenyan endemic Hinde's Babbler Turdoides hindei. We collected telemetric data of 14 individuals during a 2 months radio-tracking campaign along the Nzeeu River in southeast Kenya. We found that (1) all four species had similar home-range sizes, all geographically restricted and nearby the river; (2) all species mainly use dense thicket, in particular the invasive L. camara; (3) human settlements were avoided by the bird individuals observed; (4) the birds' movement, indicating foraging behavior, was comparatively slow within thickets, but significantly faster over open, agricultural areas; and (5) habitat suitability models underline the relevance of L. camara as suitable surrogate habitat for all understoreyed bird species, but also show that the clearance of thickets has led to a vanishing of large and interconnected thickets and thus might have negative effects on the population viability in the long run.

  11. Whole-plant allocation to storage and defense in juveniles of related evergreen and deciduous shrub species.

    PubMed

    Wyka, T P; Karolewski, P; Żytkowiak, R; Chmielarz, P; Oleksyn, J

    2016-05-01

    In evergreen plants, old leaves may contribute photosynthate to initiation of shoot growth in the spring. They might also function as storage sites for carbohydrates and nitrogen (N). We hence hypothesized that whole-plant allocation of carbohydrates and N to storage in stems and roots may be lower in evergreen than in deciduous species. We selected three species pairs consisting of an evergreen and a related deciduous species: Mahonia aquifolium (Pursh) Nutt. and Berberis vulgaris L. (Berberidaceae), Prunus laurocerasus L. and Prunus serotina Ehrh. (Rosaceae), and Viburnum rhytidophyllum Hemsl. and Viburnum lantana L. (Adoxaceae). Seedlings were grown outdoors in pots and harvested on two dates during the growing season for the determination of biomass, carbohydrate and N allocation ratios. Plant size-adjusted pools of nonstructural carbohydrates in stems and roots were lower in the evergreen species of Berberidaceae and Adoxaceae, and the slope of the carbohydrate pool vs plant biomass relationship was lower in the evergreen species of Rosaceae compared with the respective deciduous species, consistent with the leading hypothesis. Pools of N in stems and roots, however, did not vary with leaf habit. In all species, foliage contained more than half of the plant's nonstructural carbohydrate pool and, in late summer, also more than half of the plant's N pool, suggesting that in juvenile individuals of evergreen species, leaves may be a major storage site. Additionally, we hypothesized that concentration of defensive phenolic compounds in leaves should be higher in evergreen than in deciduous species, because the lower carbohydrate pool in stems and roots of the former restricts their capacity for regrowth following herbivory and also because of the need to protect their longer-living foliage. Our results did not support this hypothesis, suggesting that evergreen plants may rely predominantly on structural defenses. In summary, our study indicates that leaf habit has

  12. Evaluation of some aromatic plant extracts for mosquito larvicidal potential against Culex quinquefasciatus, Aedes aegypti, and Anopheles stephensi.

    PubMed

    Jayaraman, M; Senthilkumar, A; Venkatesalu, V

    2015-04-01

    In the present investigation, larvicidal potential of hexane, choloroform, ethyl acetate, acetone, and methanol extracts of seven aromatic plants, viz., Blumea mollis, Chloroxylon swietenia, Clausena anisata, Feronia limnonia, Lantana camera, Plectranthus amboinicus, and Tagetes erecta were screened against Culex quinquefasciatus, Aedes aegypti, and Anopheles stephensi. The larval mortality was observed after 12 and 24 h of exposure period. The results revealed that all the extracts showed varied levels of larvicidal activity against the mosquito species tested. However, the ethyl acetate extract of Chloroxylon swietenia showed the remarkable larvicidal activity against C. quinquefasciatus, Ae. aegypti, and An. stephensi. After 12 h of exposure period, the larvicidal activity was LC50 = 194.22 and LC90 = 458.83 ppm (C. quinquefasciatus), LC50 = 173.04 and LC90 = 442.73 ppm (Ae. aegypti), and LC50 = 167.28 and LC90 = 433.07 ppm (An. stephensi), and the larvicidal activity after 24-h exposure period was LC50 = 94.12 and LC90 = 249.83 ppm (C. quinquefasciatus), LC50 = 80.58 and LC90 = 200.96 ppm (Ae. aegypti), and LC50 = 76.24 and LC90 = 194.51 ppm (An. stephensi). The larvicidal potential of other plant extracts were in order of ethyl acetate extract of Clausena anisata > methanol extract of P. amboinicus > acetone extract of F. limonia > methanol extract of T. erecta > methanol extract of B. mollis > and methanol extract of L. camera. The results of the present study offer a possible way for further investigations to find out the active molecule responsible for the activity.

  13. Antennal responses to floral scents in the butterfly Heliconius melpomene.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Susanna; Dobson, Heidi E M

    2003-10-01

    Floral scent, together with visual floral cues, are important signals to adult butterflies searching for food-rewarding plants. To identify which compounds in a floral scent are more attractive and, thus, of biological importance to foraging butterflies, we applied electrophysiological methods. Antennal responses of male and female adults of the tropical butterfly Heliconius melpomene L. (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae: Heliconiinae) to individual compounds of natural floral scents and synthetic floral scent mixtures were investigated using gas chromatography-electroantennographic detection (GC-EAD). The natural floral scents included those of two tropical plant species, Lantana camara L. (Verbenaceae) and Warszewiczia coccinea (Vahl) Kl. (Rubiaceae), and two temperate species, Buddleja davidii Franchet (Loganiaceae) and Cirsium arvense (L.) Scop. (Asteraceae). The two synthetic floral scent mixtures contained many of the compounds found in the natural scents, but all in equal quantities. Compounds both present in relatively high abundance in the floral scents and detected exclusively in the floral parts of the plant, such as linalool, linalool oxide (furanoid) I and II, oxoisophoroneoxide, and phenylacetaldehyde, elicited the strongest antennal responses, suggesting that they may reflect adaptations by the plant to attract butterfly pollinators. However, other compounds also present in high abundance in the floral scent, but detected in the vegetative as well as floral plant parts, either elicited strong antennal responses, such as trans-beta-ocimene and benzaldehyde, or failed to elicit antennal responses, such as the sesquiterpenes beta-caryophyllene and alpha-humulene from L. camara. The most volatile monoterpene alkenes in the synthetic scent mixtures elicited only low or no responses. Furthermore, the overall antennal responses were stronger in females than in males. The findings suggest that several floral scent volatiles, especially those of exclusively floral

  14. Water relations of seedlings of three Quercus species: variations across and within species grown in contrasting light and water regimes.

    PubMed

    Castro-Díez, Pilar; Navarro, Javier

    2007-07-01

    We compared seedling water relations of three Mediterranean Quercus species (the evergreen shrub Q. coccifera L., the evergreen tree Q. ilex L. subsp. ballota (Desf.) Samp. and the deciduous or marcescent tree Q. faginea L.). We also explored seedling potential for acclimation to contrasting growing conditions. In March, 1-year-old seedlings of the three species were planted in pots and grown outdoors in a factorial combination of two irrigation regimes (daily (HW) and alternate day watering (LW)) and two irradiances (43 and 100% of full sunlight). At the end of July, predawn and midday water potentials (Psi(pd), Psi(md)) were measured, and pressure-volume (P-V) curves were obtained for mature current-year shoots. Species exhibited similar Psi(pd) and Psi(md) values, but differed in leaf morphology and water relations. The evergreens possessed larger leaf mass per area (LMA) and were able to maintain positive turgor pressure at lower water potentials than the deciduous species because of their lower osmotic potential at full turgor. However, the three species had similar relative water contents at the turgor loss point because Q. faginea compensated for its higher osmotic potential with greater cell wall elasticity. Values of Psi(pd) had a mean of -1.12 MPa in LW and -0.63 MPa in HW, and Psi(md) had a mean of -1.13 MPa in full sunlight and -1.64 MPa in shade, where seedlings exhibited lower LMA. However, the P-V curve traits were unaffected by the treatments. Our results suggest that Q. faginea seedlings combine the water-use characteristics of mesic deciduous oak and the drought-tolerance of xeric evergreen oak. The ability of Q. coccifera to colonize drier sites than Q. ilex was not a result of higher drought tolerance, but rather may be associated with other dehydration postponement mechanisms including drought-induced leaf shedding. The lack of treatment effects may reflect a relatively low contrast between treatment regimes, or a low inherent responsiveness of

  15. Antioxidant activity of free and bound compounds in quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) seeds in comparison with durum wheat and emmer.

    PubMed

    Laus, Maura N; Gagliardi, Anna; Soccio, Mario; Flagella, Zina; Pastore, Donato

    2012-11-01

    Antioxidant activity (AA) of quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) seeds, as well as of durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L. ssp. durum Desf.) and of emmer (T. turgidum L. ssp. dicoccum Schübler) grains, was evaluated by studying hydrophilic (H), lipophilic (L), free-soluble (FSP) and insoluble-bound (IBP) phenolic extracts using the new lipoxygenase/4-nitroso-N,N-dimethylaniline (LOX/RNO) method, able to simultaneously detect different antioxidant mechanisms, as well as using the Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC) and the Trolox Equivalent Antioxidant Capacity (TEAC) assays, which measure the scavenging activity against peroxyl and ABTS [2,2'-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate)] radicals, respectively. The species under study were compared with respect to the sum of AA values of H, L and FSP extracts (AA(H+L+FSP)), containing freely solvent-soluble antioxidants, and AA values of IBP extracts (AA(IBP)), representing the phenolic fraction ester-linked to insoluble cell wall polymers. The LOX/RNO and ORAC methods measured in quinoa flour a remarkable AA(H+L+FSP) higher than durum wheat, although lower than emmer; according to the same assays, the IBP component of quinoa resulted less active than the durum wheat and emmer ones. The TEAC protocol also revealed a high AA(H+L+FSP) for quinoa. Interestingly, the ratio AA(H+L+FSP)/AA(H+L+FSP+IBP), as evaluated by the LOX/RNO and ORAC assays, resulted in quinoa higher than that of both durum wheat and emmer, and much higher than durum wheat, according to the TEAC protocol. This may suggest that antioxidants from quinoa seeds may be more readily accessible with respect to that of both the examined wheat species. Quinoa seeds may represent an excellent source of natural antioxidant compounds and, in particular, of the free-soluble antioxidant fraction. These compounds may improve nutritive and health-beneficial properties of quinoa-based gluten-free products, thus expanding interest for quinoa utilization from

  16. Selenium removal and mass balance in a constructed flow-through wetland system.

    PubMed

    Gao, S; Tanji, K K; Lin, Z Q; Terry, N; Peters, D W

    2003-01-01

    A field study on the removal of Se from agricultural subsurface drainage was conducted from May 1997 to February 2001 in the Tulare Lake Drainage District (TLDD) of San Joaquin Valley, California. A flow-through wetland system was constructed consisting of ten 15- x 76-m unlined cells that were continuously flooded and planted with either a monotype or combination of plants, including sturdy bulrush [Schoenoplectus robustus (Pursh) M.T. Strong], baltic rush (Juncus balticus Willd.), smooth cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora Loisel.), rabbitsfoot grass [Polypogon monspeliensis (L.) Desf.], salt-grass lDistichlis spicata (L.) Greene], cattail (Typha latifolia L.), tule [Schoenoplectus acutus (Muhl. ex Bigelow) A. Löve & D. Löve], and widgeon grass (Ruppia maritima L.). One cell had no vegetation planted. The objectives of this research were to evaluate Se removal efficiency of each wetland cell and to carry out a mass balance on Se. The inflow drainage water to the cells had average annual Se concentrations of 19 to 22 microg L(-1) dominated by selenate [Se(VI), 95%]. Average weekly water residence time varied from about 3 to 15 d for Cells 1 through 7 (target 7 d), 19 to 33 d for Cells 8 and 9 (target 21 d), and 13 to 18 d for Cell 10 (target 14 d). Average weekly Se concentration ratios of outflow to inflow ranged from 0.45 to 0.79 and mass ratio (concentration x water volume) from 0.24 to 0.52 for year 2000, that is, 21 to 55% reduction in Se concentration and 48 to 76% Se removal in mass by the wetland, respectively. The nonvegetated cell showed the least Se removal both in concentration and in mass. The global mass balance showed that on the average about 59% of the total inflow Se was retained within the cells and Se outputs were outflow (35%), seepage (4%), and volatilization (2%). Independent measurements of the Se retained in the cells totaled 53% of the total Se inflow: 33% in the surface (0-20 cm) sediment, 18% in the organic detrital layer above the

  17. Effect of ultraviolet radiation on chlorophyll, carotenoid, protein and proline contents of some annual desert plants.

    PubMed

    Salama, Hediat M H; Al Watban, Ahlam A; Al-Fughom, Anoud T

    2011-01-01

    Investigation was carried out to find whether enhanced ultraviolet radiation influences the Malva parviflora L., Plantago major L., Rumex vesicarius L. and Sismbrium erysimoids Desf. of some annual desert plants. The seeds were grown in plastic pots equally filled with a pre-sieved normal sandy soil for 1 month. The planted pots from each species were randomly divided into equal groups (three groups). Plants of the first group exposed to white-light tubes (400-700 nm) 60 w and UV (365 nm) 8 w tubes. The second group was exposed to white-light tubes (400-700 nm) 60 w and UV (302 nm) 8 w tubes. The third group was exposed to white-light tubes (400-700 nm) 60 w and UV (254 nm) 8 w tubes, respectively, for six days. The results indicated that the chlorophyll contents were affected by enhanced UV radiation. The chlorophyll a, b, and total contents were decreased compared with the control values and reduced with the enhanced UV radiation, but the carotenoid was increased compared with the control and also reduced with the enhanced UV radiation. So, the contents of chlorophylls varied considerably. M. parviflora showed the highest constitutive levels of accumulated chlorophyll a, b, and total chlorophyll (0.463, 0.307 and 0.774 mg g(-1) f w) among the investigated plant species. P. major showed the lowest constitutive levels of the chloroplast pigments, 0.0036, 0.0038 and 0.0075 mg g(-1) f w for chlorophyll a, b, and total chlorophyll at UV-365 nm, respectively. The protein content was decreased significantly in both root and shoot systems compared with the control values but, it was increased with increasing wave lengths of UV-radiation of all tested plants. R. vesicarius showed the highest protein contents among the investigated plants; its content was 3.8 mg g(-1) f w at UV-365 nm in shoot system. On the other hand, decreasing ultraviolet wave length induced a highly significant increase in the level of proline in both root and shoot of all

  18. Prioritizing quantitative trait loci for root system architecture in tetraploid wheat.

    PubMed

    Maccaferri, Marco; El-Feki, Walid; Nazemi, Ghasemali; Salvi, Silvio; Canè, Maria Angela; Colalongo, Maria Chiara; Stefanelli, Sandra; Tuberosa, Roberto

    2016-02-01

    Optimization of root system architecture (RSA) traits is an important objective for modern wheat breeding. Linkage and association mapping for RSA in two recombinant inbred line populations and one association mapping panel of 183 elite durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L. var. durum Desf.) accessions evaluated as seedlings grown on filter paper/polycarbonate screening plates revealed 20 clusters of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for root length and number, as well as 30 QTLs for root growth angle (RGA). Divergent RGA phenotypes observed by seminal root screening were validated by root phenotyping of field-grown adult plants. QTLs were mapped on a high-density tetraploid consensus map based on transcript-associated Illumina 90K single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) developed for bread and durum wheat, thus allowing for an accurate cross-referencing of RSA QTLs between durum and bread wheat. Among the main QTL clusters for root length and number highlighted in this study, 15 overlapped with QTLs for multiple RSA traits reported in bread wheat, while out of 30 QTLs for RGA, only six showed co-location with previously reported QTLs in wheat. Based on their relative additive effects/significance, allelic distribution in the association mapping panel, and co-location with QTLs for grain weight and grain yield, the RSA QTLs have been prioritized in terms of breeding value. Three major QTL clusters for root length and number (RSA_QTL_cluster_5#, RSA_QTL_cluster_6#, and RSA_QTL_cluster_12#) and nine RGA QTL clusters (QRGA.ubo-2A.1, QRGA.ubo-2A.3, QRGA.ubo-2B.2/2B.3, QRGA.ubo-4B.4, QRGA.ubo-6A.1, QRGA.ubo-6A.2, QRGA.ubo-7A.1, QRGA.ubo-7A.2, and QRGA.ubo-7B) appear particularly valuable for further characterization towards a possible implementation of breeding applications in marker-assisted selection and/or cloning of the causal genes underlying the QTLs. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  19. Prioritizing quantitative trait loci for root system architecture in tetraploid wheat

    PubMed Central

    Maccaferri, Marco; El-Feki, Walid; Nazemi, Ghasemali; Salvi, Silvio; Canè, Maria Angela; Colalongo, Maria Chiara; Stefanelli, Sandra; Tuberosa, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Optimization of root system architecture (RSA) traits is an important objective for modern wheat breeding. Linkage and association mapping for RSA in two recombinant inbred line populations and one association mapping panel of 183 elite durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L. var. durum Desf.) accessions evaluated as seedlings grown on filter paper/polycarbonate screening plates revealed 20 clusters of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for root length and number, as well as 30 QTLs for root growth angle (RGA). Divergent RGA phenotypes observed by seminal root screening were validated by root phenotyping of field-grown adult plants. QTLs were mapped on a high-density tetraploid consensus map based on transcript-associated Illumina 90K single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) developed for bread and durum wheat, thus allowing for an accurate cross-referencing of RSA QTLs between durum and bread wheat. Among the main QTL clusters for root length and number highlighted in this study, 15 overlapped with QTLs for multiple RSA traits reported in bread wheat, while out of 30 QTLs for RGA, only six showed co-location with previously reported QTLs in wheat. Based on their relative additive effects/significance, allelic distribution in the association mapping panel, and co-location with QTLs for grain weight and grain yield, the RSA QTLs have been prioritized in terms of breeding value. Three major QTL clusters for root length and number (RSA_QTL_cluster_5#, RSA_QTL_cluster_6#, and RSA_QTL_cluster_12#) and nine RGA QTL clusters (QRGA.ubo-2A.1, QRGA.ubo-2A.3, QRGA.ubo-2B.2/2B.3, QRGA.ubo-4B.4, QRGA.ubo-6A.1, QRGA.ubo-6A.2, QRGA.ubo-7A.1, QRGA.ubo-7A.2, and QRGA.ubo-7B) appear particularly valuable for further characterization towards a possible implementation of breeding applications in marker-assisted selection and/or cloning of the causal genes underlying the QTLs. PMID:26880749

  20. Does ear C sink strength contribute to overcoming photosynthetic acclimation of wheat plants exposed to elevated CO2?

    PubMed Central

    Aranjuelo, Iker; Cabrera-Bosquet, Llorenç; Morcuende, Rosa; Avice, Jean Christophe; Nogués, Salvador; Araus, José Luis; Martínez-Carrasco, Rafael; Pérez, Pilar

    2011-01-01

    Wheat plants (Triticum durum Desf., cv. Regallo) were grown in the field to study the effects of contrasting [CO2] conditions (700 versus 370 μmol mol−1) on growth, photosynthetic performance, and C management during the post-anthesis period. The aim was to test whether a restricted capacity of sink organs to utilize photosynthates drives a loss of photosynthetic capacity in elevated CO2. The ambient 13C/12C isotopic composition (δ13C) of air CO2 was changed from –10.2‰ in ambient [CO2] to –23.6‰ under elevated [CO2] between the 7th and the 14th days after anthesis in order to study C assimilation and partitioning between leaves and ears. Elevated [CO2] had no significant effect on biomass production and grain filling, and caused an accumulation of C compounds in leaves. This was accompanied by up-regulation of phosphoglycerate mutase and ATP synthase protein content, together with down-regulation of adenosine diphosphate glucose pyrophosphatase protein. Growth in elevated [CO2] negatively affected Rubisco and Rubisco activase protein content and induced photosynthetic down-regulation. CO2 enrichment caused a specific decrease in Rubisco content, together with decreases in the amino acid and total N content of leaves. The C labelling revealed that in flag leaves, part of the C fixed during grain filling was stored as starch and structural C compounds whereas the rest of the labelled C (mainly in the form of soluble sugars) was completely respired 48 h after the end of labelling. Although labelled C was not detected in the δ13C of ear total organic matter and respired CO2, soluble sugar δ13C revealed that a small amount of labelled C reached the ear. The 12CO2 labelling suggests that during the beginning of post-anthesis the ear did not contribute towards overcoming flag leaf carbohydrate accumulation, and this had a consequent effect on protein expression and photosynthetic acclimation. PMID:21511906

  1. Gleditsia species: An ethnomedical, phytochemical and pharmacological review.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-Ping; Tian, Xin-Hui; Yang, Yong-Xun; Liu, Qing-Xin; Wang, Qun; Chen, Li-Ping; Li, Hui-Liang; Zhang, Wei-Dong

    2016-02-03

    The plants in the genus Gleditsia, mainly distributed in central and Southeast Asia and North and South America, have been used as local and traditional medicines in many regions, especially in China, for the treatment of measles, indigestion, whooping, smallpox, arthrolithiasis, constipation, diarrhea, hematochezia, dysentery, carbuncle, etc. This present paper systemically reviews the miscellaneous information surrounding its traditional use, phytochemistry and pharmacology to provide opportunities and recommendations for the future research. The scientific literatures were systematically searched from scientific databases (PubMed, Scopus, Elsevier, SpringerLink, SciFinder, Google Scholar and others). In addition, the ethnopharmacological information on this genus was mainly acquired from Chinese and Korean herbal classics, and library catalogs. More than 60 compounds including triterpenes, sterols, flavonoids, alkaloids, phenolics and their derivatives were isolated from Gleditsia japonica Miq., Gleditsia sinensis Lam., Gleditsia caspica Desf. and Gleditsia triacanthos L. Among these compounds, triterpenoid saponins were the main constituents of Gleditsia species. Moreover, the crude extracts and purified molecules were tested, revealing diverse biological activities such as anti-tumor, anti-inflammatory, anti-allergic, anti-hyperlipidemic, analgesic, antimutagenic, antioxidant, anti-HIV, antibacterial, antifungal activities, etc. Among these biological studies, the possible mechanisms of antitumor action are stressed in this review, and these include causing cytotoxicity to cancer cells, inhibition of proliferation of cancer cells by affecting their growth, regeneration and apoptosis, inhibition of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and nitric oxide (NO), modulation of the oncogenic expression and telomerase activity results, inhibition of the expression of pro-angiogenic proteins, as well as down-regulation of intra/extracellular proangiogenic modulators

  2. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis mitigates the negative effects of salinity on durum wheat.

    PubMed

    Fileccia, Veronica; Ruisi, Paolo; Ingraffia, Rosolino; Giambalvo, Dario; Frenda, Alfonso Salvatore; Martinelli, Federico

    2017-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis is generally considered to be effective in ameliorating the plant tolerance to salt stress. Unfortunately, the comprehension of the mechanisms implicated in salinity stress alleviation by AM symbiosis is far from being complete. Thus, an experiment was performed by growing durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) plants under salt-stress conditions to evaluate the influence of AM symbiosis on both the plant growth and the regulation of a number of genes related to salt stress and nutrient uptake. Durum wheat plants were grown outdoors in pots in absence or in presence of salt stress and with or without AM fungi inoculation. The inoculum consisted of a mixture of spores of Rhizophagus irregularis (formerly Glomus intraradices) and Funneliformis mosseae (formerly G. mosseae). Results indicate that AM symbiosis can alleviate the detrimental effects of salt stress on the growth of durum wheat plants. In fact, under salt stress conditions mycorrhizal plants produced more aboveground and root biomass, had higher N uptake and aboveground N concentration, and showed greater stability of plasma membranes compared to non-mycorrhizal plants. Inoculation with AM fungi had no effect on the expression of the N transporter genes AMT1.1, AMT1.2, and NAR2.2, either under no-stress or salt stress conditions, probably due to the fact that plants were grown under optimal N conditions; on the contrary, NRT1.1 was always upregulated by AM symbiosis. Moreover, the level of expression of the drought stress-related genes AQP1, AQP4, PIP1, DREB5, and DHN15.3 observed in the mycorrhizal stressed plants was markedly lower than that observed in the non-mycorrhizal stressed plants and very close to that observed in the non-stressed plants. Our hypothesis is that, in the present study, AM symbiosis did not increase the plant tolerance to salt stress but instead generated a condition in which plants were subjected to a level of salt stress lower than that of non

  3. Interspecific variation in vitamin E levels and the extent of lipid peroxidation in pioneer and non-pioneer species used in tropical forest restoration.

    PubMed

    Contin, Daniele R; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2016-09-01

    Reforestation projects have gained interest over recent years due to the loss of biodiversity in tropical regions as a result of large deforestation by anthropogenic actions. However, better knowledge on the tolerance of plant species to environmental stresses is needed for reforestation success. Here, we evaluated the photoprotective and antioxidant capacity, in terms of vitamin E accumulation, of five pioneer (Platypodium elegans Vogel, Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi, Lafoensia pacari A. St.-Hil, Cecropia pachystachya Trécul. and Aegiphila sellowiana Cham.) and five non-pioneer (Myracrodruon urundeuva Allemão, Cedrela fissilis Vell., Genipa americana L., Copaifera langsdorffii Desf. and Hymenaea courbaril L.) species, in relation to the extent of lipid peroxidation in leaves. Furthermore, we examined differences between sun and shade leaves on vitamin E accumulation and the extent of lipid peroxidation. Pioneer plants showed on average 33% higher malondialdehyde levels, an indicator of lipid peroxidation, than non-pioneer species, but no significant differences in vitamin E contents. In contrast, a marked interspecific variation was observed in the levels of α-tocopherol and its precursor, γ-tocopherol. Natural variation revealed interesting relationships between vitamin E levels and the extent of lipid peroxidation in leaves. The pioneer species, P. elegans, did not accumulate α-tocopherol and displayed the highest levels of malondialdehyde. Sun and shade leaves accumulated vitamin E levels to a similar extent, except for the pioneer L. pacari and the non-pioneer C. langsdorffii, the former accumulating more α-tocopherol in sun leaves and the latter in shade leaves. We conclude that interspecific variation is higher than both leaf type and successional-group variation in terms of vitamin E accumulation and the extent of lipid peroxidation, and that vitamin E levels, particularly those of α-tocopherol, negatively correlate with the extent of lipid

  4. Molecular characterization and chromosome-specific TRAP-marker development for Langdon durum D-genome disomic substitution lines.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Klindworth, D L; Shireen, F; Cai, X; Hu, J; Xu, S S

    2006-12-01

    The aneuploid stocks of durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L. subsp. durum (Desf.) Husnot) and common wheat (T. aestivum L.) have been developed mainly in 'Langdon' (LDN) and 'Chinese Spring' (CS) cultivars, respectively. The LDN-CS D-genome chromosome disomic substitution (LDN-DS) lines, where a pair of CS D-genome chromosomes substitute for a corresponding homoeologous A- or B-genome chromosome pair of LDN, have been widely used to determine the chromosomal locations of genes in tetraploid wheat. The LDN-DS lines were originally developed by crossing CS nulli-tetrasomics with LDN, followed by 6 backcrosses with LDN. They have subsequently been improved with 5 additional backcrosses with LDN. The objectives of this study were to characterize a set of the 14 most recent LDN-DS lines and to develop chromosome-specific markers, using the newly developed TRAP (target region amplification polymorphism)-marker technique. A total of 307 polymorphic DNA fragments were amplified from LDN and CS, and 302 of them were assigned to individual chromosomes. Most of the markers (95.5%) were present on a single chromosome as chromosome-specific markers, but 4.5% of the markers mapped to 2 or more chromosomes. The number of markers per chromosome varied, from a low of 10 (chromosomes 1A and 6D) to a high of 24 (chromosome 3A). There was an average of 16.6, 16.6, and 15.9 markers per chromosome assigned to the A-, B-, and D-genome chromosomes, respectively, suggesting that TRAP markers were detected at a nearly equal frequency on the 3 genomes. A comparison of the source of the expressed sequence tags (ESTs), used to derive the fixed primers, with the chromosomal location of markers revealed that 15.5% of the TRAP markers were located on the same chromosomes as the ESTs used to generate the fixed primers. A fixed primer designed from an EST mapped on a chromosome or a homoeologous group amplified at least 1 fragment specific to that chromosome or group, suggesting that the fixed primers

  5. Activities of garenoxacin against quinolone-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae strains in vitro and in a mouse pneumonia model.

    PubMed

    Azoulay-Dupuis, E; Bédos, J P; Mohler, J; Peytavin, G; Isturiz, R; Moine, P; Rieux, V; Cherbuliez, C; Péchère, J C; Fantin, B; Köhler, T

    2004-03-01

    Garenoxacin is a novel des-F(6) quinolone with enhanced in vitro activities against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. We compared the activity of garenoxacin with that of trovafloxacin (TVA) against Streptococcus pneumoniae, together with their efficacies and their capacities to select for resistant mutants, in a mouse model of acute pneumonia. In vitro, garenoxacin was more potent than TVA against wild-type S. pneumoniae and against a mutant with a single mutation (parC), a mutant with double mutations (gyrA and parC), and a mutant with triple mutations (gyrA, parC, and parE). Swiss mice were infected with 10(5) CFU of virulent, encapsulated S. pneumoniae strain P-4241 or its derived isogenic parC, gyrA, gyrA parC, and efflux mutants and 10(7) CFU of poorly virulent clinical strains carrying a parE mutation or gyrA, parC, and parE mutations. The drugs were administered six times, every 12 h, beginning at either 3 or 18 h postinfection. The pulmonary pharmacokinetic parameters in mice infected with strain P-4241 and treated with garenoxacin or TVA (25 mg/kg of body weight) were as follows: maximum concentration of drug in serum (C(max); 17.3 and 21.2 micro g/ml, respectively), C(max)/MIC ratio (288 and 170, respectively), area under the concentration-time curve (AUC; 48.5 and 250 microg. h/ml, respectively), and AUC/MIC ratio (808 and 2000, respectively). Garenoxacin at 25 and 50 mg/kg was highly effective (survival rates, 85 to 100%) against the wild-type strain and mutants harboring a single mutation. TVA was as effective as garenoxacin against these strains. TVA at 200 mg/kg and garenoxacin at 50 mg/kg were ineffective against the mutant with the parC and gyrA double mutations and the mutant with the gyrA, parC, and parE triple mutations. The efficacy of garenoxacin was reduced only when strains bore several mutations for quinolone resistance.

  6. Effect of climate change on soil carbon dynamics under three wheat based rotation in a Mediterranean semiarid site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farina, Roberta; Troccoli, Antonio; Francaviglia, Rosa

    2014-05-01

    Adoption of intensive and not sustainable farming practices has caused a severe reduction of soil organic C in Mediterranean regions, with major side effects on soil functioning. The purpose of our research was to simulate the effect of different wheat-based rotations, commonly used in Southern Italy, on soil organic carbon dynamics under climate change. C dynamics simulation was performed with RothC10N, a version of RothC modified to increase the simulation accuracy in dry regions (Farina et al., 2013). The baseline climate and the two climate change scenarios ensembles (C4IRCA_A1B and CNMI_RACMO A1B), for two time periods each (2011-30 and 2031-50, short and medium term respectively) were obtained using the climate generator LARSWG5 (Semenov and Stratonovitch, 2010) based on 50 years of measured climatic data. Data for C model validation were obtained by a rotation experiment carried out since 1992 in Foggia (Apulia, Italy) at the experimental farm of the Cereal Research Centre in a clayey vertisol. Rotations were continuous durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) (CW), wheat- fallow (WF) and wheat -irrigated tomato (WT) (Lycopersicon esculentum L.). Results showed a negative trend of soil C in all rotations and in all climates and periods. Under baseline conditions, compared with the initial C content, after 30 years there was a decrease of 15.6, 19.2 and 31.9 % for CW, WF and WT respectively. Under C4IRCA, in the short term, the two rainfed rotations (CW and WF) lost 0.23 and 0.35 t ha-1y-1 while WT C losses were 0.71 t ha-1y-1; in the medium term CW and WF C losses increased by 46 and 25% respectively while WT losses increased only by 10%. Under CNMI_RACMO trends are similar to those described above but losses are slightly higher (0.43-0.60 and 0.58-0.68 t ha-1y-1 for CW and WF) in the short and medium term periods respectively. Instead no increase of losses was registered for WT rotation. Therefore, in Mediterranean semiarid areas, the traditional wheat based

  7. Effect of discriminative plant-sugar feeding on the survival and fecundity of Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Manda, Hortance; Gouagna, Louis C; Foster, Woodbridge A; Jackson, Robert R; Beier, John C; Githure, John I; Hassanali, Ahmed

    2007-01-01

    Background A previous study showed for Anopheles gambiae s.s. a gradation of feeding preference on common plant species growing in a malaria holoendemic area in western Kenya. The present follow-up study determines whether there is a relationship between the mosquito's preferences and its survival and fecundity. Methods Groups of mosquitoes were separately given ad libitum opportunity to feed on five of the more preferred plant species (Hamelia patens, Parthenium hysterophorus, Ricinus communis, Senna didymobotrya, and Tecoma stans) and one of the less preferred species (Lantana camara). The mosquitoes were monitored daily for survival. Sugar solution (glucose 6%) and water were used as controls. In addition, the fecundity of mosquitoes on each plant after (i) only one blood meal (number of eggs oviposited), and (ii) after three consecutive blood meals (proportion of females ovipositing, number of eggs oviposited and hatchability of eggs), was determined. The composition and concentration of sugar in the fed-on parts of each plant species were determined using gas chromatography. Using SAS statistical package, tests for significant difference of the fitness values between mosquitoes exposed to different plant species were conducted. Results and Conclusion Anopheles gambiae that had fed on four of the five more preferred plant species (T. stans, S. didymobotrya, R. communis and H. patens, but not P. hysterophorus) lived longer and laid more eggs after one blood meal, when compared with An. gambiae that had fed on the least preferred plant species L. camara. When given three consecutive blood-meals, the percentage of females that oviposited, but not the number of eggs laid, was significantly higher for mosquitoes that had previously fed on the four more preferred plant species. Total sugar concentration in the preferred plant parts was significantly correlated with survival and with the proportion of females that laid eggs. This effect was associated mainly with

  8. A revision of the Australian species of Trimma (Actinopterygii, Gobiidae), with descriptions of six new species and redescriptions of twenty-three valid species.

    PubMed

    Winterbottom, Richard; Hoese, Douglass F

    2015-03-17

    The gobiid genus Trimma currently contains 75 valid species, with another 20-30 known but undescribed species. There are 29 species in Australian waters (six undescribed). This paper describes the six new species, and provides redescriptions of most of the 23 previously described species known from the region, as well as a key for all the species. The six new species are: T. insularum (endemic to Cocos (Keeling) Islands), T. kitrinum (Fiji to Great Barrier Reef), T. meristum (Cape York to the Bismark Archipelago and Fiji), T. pentherum (Great Barrier Reef to Fiji and the South-West Islands of Palau), T. readerae (Australia to Japan), and T. xanthum (Palau to Fiji, Great Barrier Reef to Christmas Island). The following 23 species have been recorded from Australian waters, and most are redescribed here: T. anaima (Comores to Fiji), T. annosum (Maldives to the Phoenix Islands, Taiwan to the southern Great Barrier Reef), T. benjamini (southern Vietnam to the Marshall Islands, Samoa and southern Barrier Reef), T. caesiura (Ryukyus through the Marshall Islands to Samoa and Elizabeth Reef on the Lord Howe Rise), T. capostriatum (New Caledonia to eastern Australia and Papua New Guinea), T. maiandros (Java to the Ryukyus, Marshalls to Great Barrier Reef), T. emeryi (Comores to Ryukyus and Samoa), T. fangi (western South China Sea through to the Solomons), T. flavatrum (Ryukyu Islands to Western Australia and Samoa), T. hoesei (Chagos Archipelago, central Indian Ocean to Palau and Solomons), T. lantana (Australia, Solomons, northern New Guinea, South-West Islands of Palau), T. macrophthalmus (Ryukyu Islands to Cocos (Keeling) Islands and Samoa), T. milta (Taiwan to Western Australia, Society Islands and Hawaii), T. nasa (Sumbawa, Indonesia to Fiji), T. necopinum (northern tip of Cape York to Sydney), T. nomurai (Japan to northern Australia and New Caledonia), T. okinawae (western Thailand to Japan and the Phoenix Islands, north-west Australia to the Great Barrier Reef), T

  9. An experimental test of whether habitat corridors affect pollen transfer.

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, Patricia A.; Levey, Douglas J.

    2005-02-01

    Abstract. Negative effects of habitat fragmentation are thought to be diminished when habitat patches are joined by a corridor. A key assumption is that corridors facilitate exchange rates of organisms between otherwise isolated patches. If the organisms are pollinators, corridors may be important for maintaining genetically viable populations of the plants that they pollinate. We tested the hypothesis that corridors increase the movement of insect pollinators into patches of habitat and thereby increase pollen transfer for two species of plants, one pollinated by butterflies (Lantana camara) and the other by bees and wasps (Rudbeckia hirta). We worked in an experimental landscape consisting of 40 greater than or equal to 1-ha patches of early-successional habitat in a matrix of forest. Within each of eight experimental units, two patches were connected by a corridor (150 X 25 m), and three were not. Patch shape varied to control for the area added by the presence of a corridor. Differences in patch shape also allowed us to test alternative hypotheses of how corridors might function. The Traditional Corridor Hypothesis posits that corridors increase immigration and emigration by functioning as movement conduits between patches. The Drift Fence Hypothesis posits that corridors function by ‘‘capturing’’ organisms dispersing through the matrix, redirecting them into associated habitat patches. Using fluorescent powder to track pollen, we found that pollen transfer by butterflies between patches connected by a corridor was significantly higher than between unconnected patches (all values mean plus or minus 1 SE: 59% plus or minus 9.2% vs. 25% plus or minus 5.2% of flowers receiving pollen). Likewise, pollen transfer by bees and wasps was significantly higher between connected patches than between unconnected patches (30% plus or minus 4.2% vs. 14.5% plus or minus 2.2%). These results support the Traditional Corridor Hypothesis. There was little support, however

  10. Temperature-dependent growth of Botrytis cinerea isolates from potted plants.

    PubMed

    Martínez, J A; Gómez-Bellot, M J; Bañón, S

    2009-01-01

    Botrytis cinereo is a common aggressive saprophyte fungus which also invades injured plant tissues, causing Botrytis blight (Grey mould) in many ornamental plants, including potted flowering plants. Several B. cinerea isolates from potted plants (Pelargonium x hortorum, Lantana camara, Lonicera japonica, Hydrangea macrophylla, and Cyclamen persicum) affected by Botrytis blight in the south of Spain were studied and identified by PCR. The isolates showed phenotypic differences between them, as previously reported by the authors. In this work we demonstrate that these isolates show different temperature-dependent growth phenomena, expressed as mycelial growth rates, conidiation (measured as the number of conidia per colony and time of appearance), mass of both aerial and submerged mycelia, and sclerotia production. Growth rates were assessed from differences in colony area and mass of both aerial and submerged mycelium growing in potato dextrose agar culture medium (PDA). Three temperatures were used to measure these variables (6, 16, and 26 degrees C) and to establish the differences among isolates by modelling the effects of temperature on the growth variables. B. cinerea showed a high degree of phenotypic variability and differences in its growth kinetics, depending on temperature and isolate in question. The isolate from P. x hortorum showed the greatest conidiation although this process did not depend on the temperatures assayed. The growth rate of the isolates from P. x hortorum was the highest. The growth rates in all the isolates were determined and the growth kinetics could be fitted to a typical equation of fungi growing on solid culture medium. The isolate from P. x hortorum was the most vigorous, while the least vigorous was the isolate from L. japonica. A relationship between mycelial growth rate, conidiation and aerial mycelium could be established. A temperature of 26 degrees C accelerated sclerotia production, but only in the isolate from C. persicum

  11. Chewing-Stick Practices Using Plants with Anti-Streptococcal Activity in a Ugandan Rural Community

    PubMed Central

    Odongo, Charles Okot; Musisi, Nathan Lubowa; Waako, Paul; Obua, Celestino

    2011-01-01

    Background: The high dental disease burden in developing countries has created a need to explore and develop cheap and accessible methods of dental disease prevention. Traditional toothbrushes (chewing-sticks) prepared from specific plants have been used for dental hygiene for generations. When properly used, chewing-sticks may be as effective as synthetic toothbrushes. This study set out to describe traditional chewing-stick practices in a Ugandan rural community, and evaluate the antibacterial activity of two most commonly used plants. Methods: Interviews were done to identify chewing-stick plants and obtain socio-cultural information relating to the practice in two villages in rural Uganda. Field walks were done to pick and voucher the plants, for taxonomical identification and storage. For the two most reported plants, aqueous extracts were prepared and tested for antibacterial activity against Streptococcus mutans using the agar-well diffusion method. Results: Of the 21 key informants interviewed, all were using or had used chewing-sticks in the past. A total of eight plants were identified as sources of chewing-sticks, with Rhus vulgaris and Lantana trifolia most commonly mentioned. Chewing-sticks were preferred over synthetic tooth brushes because they were less likely to traumatize the gums. Their use has been limited of recent due to scarcity of some plants. R. vulgaris and L. trifolia aqueous extracts showed antibacterial activity against S. mutans with mean diameters of inhibition of 24.33 ± 0.58 and 14.17 ± 0.29 mm on Blood agar respectively, compared to benzyl penicillin control 30.67 ± 0.29 mm. Conclusion: R. vulgaris and L. trifolia are the most common sources of chewing-sticks for cleaning teeth in this community. The plants contain compounds that are active against S. mutans. These plants merit further studies as they are possible sources of cheap dental health care for the rural poor. PMID:21687508

  12. Whole-plant allocation to storage and defense in juveniles of related evergreen and deciduous shrub species

    PubMed Central

    Wyka, T.P.; Karolewski, P.; Żytkowiak, R.; Chmielarz, P.; Oleksyn, J.

    2016-01-01

    In evergreen plants, old leaves may contribute photosynthate to initiation of shoot growth in the spring. They might also function as storage sites for carbohydrates and nitrogen (N). We hence hypothesized that whole-plant allocation of carbohydrates and N to storage in stems and roots may be lower in evergreen than in deciduous species. We selected three species pairs consisting of an evergreen and a related deciduous species: Mahonia aquifolium (Pursh) Nutt. and Berberis vulgaris L. (Berberidaceae), Prunus laurocerasus L. and Prunus serotina Ehrh. (Rosaceae), and Viburnum rhytidophyllum Hemsl. and Viburnum lantana L. (Adoxaceae). Seedlings were grown outdoors in pots and harvested on two dates during the growing season for the determination of biomass, carbohydrate and N allocation ratios. Plant size-adjusted pools of nonstructural carbohydrates in stems and roots were lower in the evergreen species of Berberidaceae and Adoxaceae, and the slope of the carbohydrate pool vs plant biomass relationship was lower in the evergreen species of Rosaceae compared with the respective deciduous species, consistent with the leading hypothesis. Pools of N in stems and roots, however, did not vary with leaf habit. In all species, foliage contained more than half of the plant’s nonstructural carbohydrate pool and, in late summer, also more than half of the plant’s N pool, suggesting that in juvenile individuals of evergreen species, leaves may be a major storage site. Additionally, we hypothesized that concentration of defensive phenolic compounds in leaves should be higher in evergreen than in deciduous species, because the lower carbohydrate pool in stems and roots of the former restricts their capacity for regrowth following herbivory and also because of the need to protect their longer-living foliage. Our results did not support this hypothesis, suggesting that evergreen plants may rely predominantly on structural defenses. In summary, our study indicates that leaf habit

  13. Evaluation of the antibacterial and anticancer activities of some South African medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Bisi-Johnson, Mary A; Obi, Chikwelu L; Hattori, Toshio; Oshima, Yoshiteru; Li, Shenwei; Kambizi, Learnmore; Eloff, Jacobus N; Vasaikar, Sandeep D

    2011-02-17

    Several herbs are traditionally used in the treatment of a variety of ailments particularly in the rural areas of South Africa where herbal medicine is mainly the source of health care system. Many of these herbs have not been assessed for safety or toxicity to tissue or organs of the mammalian recipients. This study evaluated the cytotoxicity of some medicinal plants used, inter alia, in the treatment of diarrhoea, and stomach disorders. Six selected medicinal plants were assessed for their antibacterial activities against ampicillin-resistant and kanamycin-resistant strains of Escherichia coli by the broth micro-dilution methods. The cytotoxicities of methanol extracts and fractions of the six selected plants were determined using a modified tetrazolium-based colorimetric assay (3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol)-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay). The average minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of the plants extracts ranged from 0.027 mg/mℓ to 2.5 mg/mℓ after 24 h of incubation. Eucomis autumnalis and Cyathula uncinulata had the most significant biological activity with the least MIC values. The in vitro cytotoxicity assay on human hepatocarcinoma cell line (Huh-7) revealed that the methanol extract of E. autumnalis had the strongest cytotoxicity with IC(50) of 7.8 μg/mℓ. Ethyl acetate and butanol fractions of C. uncinulata, Hypoxis latifolia, E. autumnalis and Lantana camara had lower cytotoxic effects on the cancer cell lines tested with IC(50) values ranging from 24.8 to 44.1 μg/mℓ; while all the fractions of Aloe arborescens and A. striatula had insignificant or no cytotoxic effects after 72 h of treatment. Our results indicate that the methanol fraction of E. autumnalis had a profound cytotoxic effect even though it possessed very significant antibacterial activity. This puts a query on its safety and hence a call for caution in its usage, thus a product being natural is not tantamount to being entirely safe. However, the antibacterial

  14. Evaluation of the antibacterial and anticancer activities of some South African medicinal plants

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Several herbs are traditionally used in the treatment of a variety of ailments particularly in the rural areas of South Africa where herbal medicine is mainly the source of health care system. Many of these herbs have not been assessed for safety or toxicity to tissue or organs of the mammalian recipients. Methods This study evaluated the cytotoxicity of some medicinal plants used, inter alia, in the treatment of diarrhoea, and stomach disorders. Six selected medicinal plants were assessed for their antibacterial activities against ampicillin-resistant and kanamycin-resistant strains of Escherichia coli by the broth micro-dilution methods. The cytotoxicities of methanol extracts and fractions of the six selected plants were determined using a modified tetrazolium-based colorimetric assay (3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol)-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay). Results The average minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of the plants extracts ranged from 0.027 mg/mℓ to 2.5 mg/mℓ after 24 h of incubation. Eucomis autumnalis and Cyathula uncinulata had the most significant biological activity with the least MIC values. The in vitro cytotoxicity assay on human hepatocarcinoma cell line (Huh-7) revealed that the methanol extract of E. autumnalis had the strongest cytotoxicity with IC50 of 7.8 μg/mℓ. Ethyl acetate and butanol fractions of C. uncinulata, Hypoxis latifolia, E. autumnalis and Lantana camara had lower cytotoxic effects on the cancer cell lines tested with IC50 values ranging from 24.8 to 44.1 μg/mℓ; while all the fractions of Aloe arborescens and A. striatula had insignificant or no cytotoxic effects after 72 h of treatment. Conclusions Our results indicate that the methanol fraction of E. autumnalis had a profound cytotoxic effect even though it possessed very significant antibacterial activity. This puts a query on its safety and hence a call for caution in its usage, thus a product being natural is not tantamount to being

  15. Ethnobotanical study of some of mosquito repellent plants in north-eastern Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Kweka, Eliningaya J; Mosha, Franklin; Lowassa, Asanterabi; Mahande, Aneth M; Kitau, Jovin; Matowo, Johnson; Mahande, Michael J; Massenga, Charles P; Tenu, Filemoni; Feston, Emmanuel; Lyatuu, Ester E; Mboya, Michael A; Mndeme, Rajabu; Chuwa, Grace; Temu, Emmanuel A

    2008-01-01

    Background The use of plant repellents against nuisance biting insects is common and its potential for malaria vector control requires evaluation in areas with different level of malaria endemicity. The essential oils of Ocimum suave and Ocimum kilimandscharicum were evaluated against malaria vectors in north-eastern Tanzania. Methodology An ethnobotanical study was conducted at Moshi in Kilimanjaro region north-eastern Tanzania, through interviews, to investigate the range of species of plants used as insect repellents. Also, bioassays were used to evaluate the protective potential of selected plants extracts against mosquitoes. Results The plant species mostly used as repellent at night are: fresh or smoke of the leaves of O. suave and O. kilimandscharicum (Lamiaceae), Azadirachta indica (Meliaceae), Eucalyptus globules (Myrtaceae) and Lantana camara (Verbenaceae). The most popular repellents were O. kilimandscharicum (OK) and O. suave (OS) used by 67% out of 120 households interviewed. Bioassay of essential oils of the two Ocimum plants was compared with citronella and DEET to study the repellence and feeding inhibition of untreated and treated arms of volunteers. Using filter papers impregnated with Ocimum extracts, knockdown effects and mortality was investigated on malaria mosquito Anopheles arabiensis and Anopheles gambiae, including a nuisance mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus. High biting protection (83% to 91%) and feeding inhibition (71.2% to 92.5%) was observed against three species of mosquitoes. Likewise the extracts of Ocimum plants induced KD90 of longer time in mosquitoes than citronella, a standard botanical repellent. Mortality induced by standard dosage of 30 mg/m2 on filter papers, scored after 24 hours was 47.3% for OK and 57% for OS, compared with 67.7% for citronella. Conclusion The use of whole plants and their products as insect repellents is common among village communities of north-eastern Tanzania and the results indicate that the use of

  16. Multiple-Dose Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Oral Garenoxacin in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Gajjar, D. A.; Bello, A.; Ge, Z.; Christopher, L.; Grasela, D. M.

    2003-01-01

    Garenoxacin (T-3811ME, BMS-284756) is a novel des-F(6) quinolone that has been shown to be effective in vitro against a wide range of clinically important pathogens, including gram-positive and gram-negative aerobes and anaerobes. This study was conducted to evaluate the safety and tolerability of multiple oral doses (100 to 1,200 mg/day) of garenoxacin in healthy subjects and to determine its multiple-dose pharmacokinetics. Forty healthy male and female subjects (18 to 45 years of age) were enrolled in this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, sequential, multiple- and ascending-dose study. Each subject received a once-daily oral dose of garenoxacin (100, 200, 400, 800, or 1,200 mg) or a placebo for 14 days. Blood and urine samples were collected for measurements of garenoxacin by validated liquid chromatography with dual mass spectrometry, and plasma garenoxacin concentration-time data were analyzed by noncompartmental methods. The effects of garenoxacin on Helicobacter pylori, psychometric test performance, and electrocardiograms were assessed, as was drug safety. Over the 14 days of dosing, geometric mean peak concentrations of garenoxacin in plasma (Cmax) at the 100- and 1,200-mg doses were within the ranges of 1.2 to 1.6 and 16.3 to 24 μg/ml, respectively. The corresponding values for the geometric mean area under the concentration-time curve over the dosing interval (AUCτ) for garenoxacin in plasma at the 100- and 1,200-mg doses were within the ranges of 11.5 to 15.7 and 180 to 307 μg · h/ml, respectively. Increases in systemic exposure to garenoxacin in terms of AUC and Cmax were approximately dose proportional over the 100- to 400-mg dose range but demonstrated increases that were somewhat greater than the dose increments at the 800- and 1,200-mg doses. Median values for the time to achieve Cmax were in the range of 1.13 to 2.50 h for all doses. The mean elimination half-life for garenoxacin in plasma appeared to be independent of dose and

  17. Evaluating ancient Egyptian prescriptions today: Anti-inflammatory activity of Ziziphus spina-christi.

    PubMed

    Kadioglu, Onat; Jacob, Stefan; Bohnert, Stefan; Naß, Janine; Saeed, Mohamed E M; Khalid, Hassan; Merfort, Irmgard; Thines, Eckhard; Pommerening, Tanja; Efferth, Thomas

    2016-03-15

    Ziziphus spina-christi (L.) Desf. (Christ's Thorn Jujube) is a wild tree today found in Jordan, Israel, Egypt, and some parts of Africa, which was already in use as a medicinal plant in Ancient Egypt. In ancient Egyptian prescriptions, it was used in remedies against swellings, pain, and heat, and thus should have anti-inflammatory effects. Nowadays, Z. spina-christi, is used in Egypt (by Bedouins, and Nubians), the Arabian Peninsula, Jordan, Iraq, and Morocco against a wide range of illnesses, most of them associated with inflammation. Pharmacological research undertaken to date suggests that it possesses anti-inflammatory, hypoglycemic, hypotensive and anti-microbial effects. The transcription factor NF-κB (nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells) is critical in inflammation, proliferation and involved in various types of cancer. Identification of new anti-inflammatory compounds might be an effective strategy to target inflammatory disorders and cancer. Therefore, extracts from Z. spina-christi are investigated in terms of their anti-inflammatory effects. Our intention is to evaluate the effects of Z. spina-christi described in ancient Egyptian papyri, and to show whether the effects can be proven with modern pharmacological methods. Furthermore, we determine the active ingredients in crude extracts for their inhibitory activity toward NF-κB pathway. To determine the active ingredients of Z. spina-christi, we fractionated the extracts for bioassays and identified the active compounds. Epigallocatechin, gallocatechin, spinosin, 6''' feruloylspinosin and 6''' sinapoylspinosin and crude extracts of seed, leaf, root or stem were analyzed for their effect on NF-κB DNA binding by electromobility shift assay (EMSA) and nuclear translocation of NF-κB-p65 by Western blot analysis. The binding mode of the compounds to NF-κB pathway proteins was compared with the known inhibitor, MG-132, by in silico molecular docking calculations. Log10IC50

  18. An ethnobotanical study of medicinal plants used by the local people of Alaşehir (Manisa) in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Sargın, Seyid Ahmet; Akçicek, Ekrem; Selvi, Selami

    2013-12-12

    This paper represents the first large-scale ethnobotanical study in the Alaşehir and its surrounding (Manisa/Turkey). There are scarcely any studies for using plants. There is urgency in recording such data. This is the first ethnobotanical study in which statistical calculations about plants are done by ICF (Informant Consensus Factor) method. This study aimed to identify plants collected for medicinal purposes by the local people of Alaşehir, located in the Aegean Region of Turkey, and to document the traditional names, preparation and uses of these plants. Field study was carried out over a period of approximately 2 years (2010-2012) in Alaşehir. During this period, 137 vascular plant specimens were collected. Demographic characteristics of participants, local plant names, utilized parts and preparation methods of the plants were investigated and recorded. In the scope of the study, medicinal plant species and related information were collected; herbarium materials were prepared; and the specimens were entitled. Field research was conducted by collecting ethnobotanical information during structured and semi-structured interviews with native knowledgeable people in territory. In addition, the relative importance value of species was determined and ICF was calculated for the medicinal plants included in the study. A total of 137 medicinal plants belonging to 58 families were identified in the region. Among them, 105 species are wild and 32 species are cultivated plant. The most dominant medicinal plant families were Asteraceae (>13%), Lamiaceae (>11%), Rosaceae (>7%), and Fabaceae (>4%), again; the most common preparations were infusion and decoction. It was found that Origanum onites L., Urtica urens, Thymus zygioides Griseb., Matricaria chamomilla L., Salvia tomentosa Mill., Cerasus avium (L.), Tilia argentea Desf. ex DC., Hyoscyamus niger L., Urtica pilulifera L., Anethum graveolens L., Euphorbia rigida Bieb., Hypericum perforatum L., Paliurus spina

  19. Use of local pastoral species to increase fodder production of the saline rangelands in southern Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tlili, Abderrazak; Tarhouni, Mohamed; Cardà, Artemi; Neffati, Mohamed

    2017-04-01

    Climate changes associated with multiple destructive human activities accelerate the degradation process of the natural rangelands around the world and especially the vulnerable areas such as the dryland ecosystems (Anaya-Romero et al., 2015; Eskandari et al., 2016; Muños Rojas et al., 2016; Vicente-Serrano et al., 2016). The vegetation cover and the biomass production of these ecosystems are decreasing and this is resulting in land degradation due to the soil erosion and changes in soil quality due to the abuse and misuse of the soil resources (Cerdà et al., 2016; Prosdocimi et al., 2016; Keesstra et al., 2016). To cope with such threats, it is necessary to develop some management techniques (restoration, plantation…) to enhance the biomass production and the carbon sequestration of the degraded rangelands (Muñoz-Rojas et al., 2016; Tarhouni et al., 2016). The valorization of saline water by planting pastoral halophyte species in salt-affected soils as well as the marginal areas are considered among the valuable tools to increase the rangeland production in dry areas. In this work, the ability of four plants (Atriplex halimus L. (Amaranthaceae), Atriplex mollis Desf. (Amaranthaceae), Lotus creticus L. (Fabaceae) and Cenchrus ciliaris L. (Poaceae)) to grow and to produce are tested under a field saline conditions (water and soil). Non-destructive method (Vegmeasure) is used to estimate the biomass production of these species. Chemical (crude protein, moisture and ash contents) and biochemical analyses (sugars, tannins and polyphenols contents) are also undertaken. Two years after plantation, the obtained results showed the ability of the four species to survive and to grow under high salinity degree. A strong positive correlation was obtained between the canopy cover and the dry biomass of the four studied species. Hence, the restoration of saline soils can be ensured by planting local halophytes. Acknowledgements. The research leading to these results has

  20. Climate Change and Projected Impacts in Agriculture: an Example on Mediterranean Crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrise, R.; Moriondo, M.; Bindi, M.

    2009-04-01

    Recently, the availability of multi-model ensemble prediction methods has permitted the assignment of likelihoods to future climate projections. This allowed moving from the scenario-based approach to the risk-based approach in assessing the effects of climate change, thus providing more useful information for decision-makers that, as reported by Schneider (2001), need probability estimates to assess the seriousness of the projected impacts. The probabilistic approach to evaluate crop response to climate change mainly consists in applying an impact model (such as crop growth model) to a very large number of climate projections so to provide a probabilistic distribution of the variable selected to evaluate the impact. By comparing the outputs of the multi-simulation with a critical threshold (such as minimum yield below which it is not admissible to fall), it is possible to evaluate the risk related to future climate conditions. Unfortunately, such an approach is a time-consuming process due to the large number of model runs needed for such a procedure. An alternative method relies on the set up of impact response surfaces (RS) with respect to key climatic variables on which a probabilistic representation of projected changes in the same climatic variables may be overlaid (Fronzek et al. 2008). This approach was exploited within the ENSEMBLES EU Project aiming at assessing climate change impact on typical Mediterranean crops. This work presents the results of the project with a particular concerning about the assessment of risk, of durum wheat (T. turgidum L. subsp. durum (Desf.) Husn) and grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) yield falling below fixed thresholds, using probabilistic information about future climate. Methodology The simple mechanistic crop growth models, SIRIUS Quality (Jamieson et al., 1998) and VITE-model (Bindi et al., 1997a,b), were selected to respectively simulate durum wheat and grapevine yields in present and future scenarios. SIRIUS Quality is a