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Sample records for lanthanide oxide nanorods

  1. Photodetachment of Lanthanide Oxide Anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covington, A. M.; Emmons, E. D.; Kraus, R. G.; Thompson, J. S.; Calabrese, D.; Davis, V. T.

    2007-06-01

    Laser photodetached electron spectroscopy (LPES) has been used to study the structure and collision properties of lanthanide oxide anions including LaOn^- and CeOn^-. Preliminary photoelectron spectra from these anions will be presented along with ion beam production data from these and other lanthanide oxide anions.

  2. First observation of enhanced luminescence from single lanthanide chelates on silver nanorods.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Ray, Krishanu; Fu, Yi; Lakowicz, Joseph R

    2014-08-25

    We used near-field interactions with a silver nanorod (AgNR) to greatly enhance luminescence of a lanthanide (Ln) chelate. The enhancement factor was 280-fold, making single lanthanide luminescence detectable. This is also the first observation on single molecule detection (SMD) of a lanthanide dye.

  3. Post-synthesis addition of transition metal ions and lanthanide ions to the surface of anatase titanium (IV) dioxide nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasanthiran, Choumini

    Solar energy utilization is an attractive option for new energy technology and economic development. Our research is the formulation of catalyst materials for solar production of hydrogen from water. Titanium(IV) oxide has been explored for water splitting; however, a major challenge is that titanium(IV) oxide can only absorb UV light. Visible light absorption can be increased by metal ion or anion doping by creating interband states. Most dopant protocols lead to deposition of dopant ions throughout the solid, and interfacial deposition has received very little attention. We have developed a method to selectively attach transition metal ions and lanthanide ions on the surface of titanium(IV) oxide nanorods using metal chlorides as precursors. The present study demonstrates that Cr(III), Mn(II), Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu (II), Eu(III), Ce(III), Pr(III) and Er(III) were coordinated to the surface of oleic acid capped TiO2 nanorods (NRs) by post-synthesis method without any phase or morphology transformation. Metal ion loading could be carefully controlled, and we show a titration curve for addition of transition metal ions and Eu(III) to the nanorod surface. The materials were characterized with UV-visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, elemental analysis, XPS and powder X-ray diffraction. X-ray photoelectron spectra were obtained for a series of M-TiO2 samples in which transition metal (M = Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu) ions are directly attached to the surface of anatase TiO2 nanocrystals. Further, we report sequential, quantitative loading of transition metal ions (Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu) to the surface of rod-shape anatase TiO2 nanocrystals in bimetallic combinations (6C2 = 15). TEM, PXRD, UV-Vis, XPS and elemental analysis characterization show that bimetallic combinations were synthesized successfully.

  4. Photocatalytic paper using zinc oxide nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baruah, Sunandan; Jaisai, Mayuree; Imani, Reza; Nazhad, Mousa M.; Dutta, Joydeep

    2010-10-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods were grown on a paper support prepared from soft wood pulp. The photocatalytic activity of a sheet of paper with ZnO nanorods embedded in its porous matrix has been studied. ZnO nanorods were firmly attached to cellulose fibers and the photocatalytic paper samples were reused several times with nominal decrease in efficiency. Photodegradation of up to 93% was observed for methylene blue in the presence of paper filled with ZnO nanorods upon irradiation with visible light at 963 Wm-2 for 120 min. Under similar conditions, photodegradation of approximately 35% was observed for methyl orange. Antibacterial tests revealed that the photocatalytic paper inhibits the growth of Escherichia coli under room lighting conditions.

  5. Photocatalytic paper using zinc oxide nanorods

    PubMed Central

    Baruah, Sunandan; Jaisai, Mayuree; Imani, Reza; Nazhad, Mousa M; Dutta, Joydeep

    2010-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods were grown on a paper support prepared from soft wood pulp. The photocatalytic activity of a sheet of paper with ZnO nanorods embedded in its porous matrix has been studied. ZnO nanorods were firmly attached to cellulose fibers and the photocatalytic paper samples were reused several times with nominal decrease in efficiency. Photodegradation of up to 93% was observed for methylene blue in the presence of paper filled with ZnO nanorods upon irradiation with visible light at 963 Wm–2 for 120 min. Under similar conditions, photodegradation of approximately 35% was observed for methyl orange. Antibacterial tests revealed that the photocatalytic paper inhibits the growth of Escherichia coli under room lighting conditions. PMID:27877367

  6. Antifouling properties of zinc oxide nanorod coatings.

    PubMed

    Al-Fori, Marwan; Dobretsov, Sergey; Myint, Myo Tay Zar; Dutta, Joydeep

    2014-01-01

    In laboratory experiments, the antifouling (AF) properties of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorod coatings were investigated using the marine bacterium Acinetobacter sp. AZ4C, larvae of the bryozoan Bugula neritina and the microalga Tetraselmis sp. ZnO nanorod coatings were fabricated on microscope glass substrata by a simple hydrothermal technique using two different molar concentrations (5 and 10 mM) of zinc precursors. These coatings were tested for 5 h under artificial sunlight (1060 W m(-2) or 530 W m(-2)) and in the dark (no irradiation). In the presence of light, both the ZnO nanorod coatings significantly reduced the density of Acinetobacter sp. AZ4C and Tetraselmis sp. in comparison to the control (microscope glass substratum without a ZnO coating). High mortality and low settlement of B. neritina larvae was observed on ZnO nanorod coatings subjected to light irradiation. In darkness, neither mortality nor enhanced settlement of larvae was observed. Larvae of B. neritina were not affected by Zn(2+) ions. The AF effect of the ZnO nanorod coatings was thus attributed to the reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by photocatalysis. It was concluded that ZnO nanorod coatings effectively prevented marine micro and macrofouling in static conditions.

  7. Method for providing oxygen ion vacancies in lanthanide oxides

    DOEpatents

    Kay, D. Alan R.; Wilson, William G.

    1989-12-05

    A method for desulfurization of fuel gases resulting from the incomplete combustion of sulfur containing hydrocarbons whereby the gases are treated with lanthanide oxides containing large numbers of oxygen-ion vacancies providing ionic porosity which enhances the ability of the lanthanide oxides to react more rapidly and completely with the sulfur in the fuel gases whereby the sulfur in such gases is reduced to low levels suitable for fuels for firing into boilers of power plants generating electricity with steam turbine driven generators, gas turbines, fuel cells and precursors for liquid fuels such as methanol and the like.

  8. Mixed lanthanide oxide nanoparticles as dual imaging agent in biomedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenlong; Bony, Badrul Alam; Kim, Cho Rong; Baeck, Jong Su; Chang, Yongmin; Bae, Ji Eun; Chae, Kwon Seok; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lee, Gang Ho

    2013-11-01

    There is no doubt that the molecular imaging is an extremely important technique in diagnosing diseases. Dual imaging is emerging as a step forward in molecular imaging technique because it can provide us with more information useful for diagnosing diseases than single imaging. Therefore, diverse dual imaging modalities should be developed. Molecular imaging generally relies on imaging agents. Mixed lanthanide oxide nanoparticles could be valuable materials for dual magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-fluorescent imaging (FI) because they have both excellent and diverse magnetic and fluorescent properties useful for dual MRI-FI, depending on lanthanide ions used. Since they are mixed nanoparticles, they are compact, robust, and stable, which is extremely useful for biomedical applications. They can be also easily synthesized with facile composition control. In this study, we explored three systems of ultrasmall mixed lanthanide (Dy/Eu, Ho/Eu, and Ho/Tb) oxide nanoparticles to demonstrate their usefulness as dual T2 MRI-FI agents.

  9. A Simple Empirical Analysis of the Enthalpies of Formation of Lanthanide Halides and Oxides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Derek W.

    1986-01-01

    Proposes a simple and general method whereby the lattice energies of lanthanide(II) and (IV) compounds are derived directly from those found experimentally for the corresponding lanthanide(III) compounds. The method is applicable to all lanthanide halides and oxides and involves calculations which can be easily and quickly performed by students.…

  10. Magnetic ordering in lanthanide-molybdenum oxide nanostructure arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagmann, Joseph; Le, Son; Schneemeyer, Lynn; Olsen, Patti; Besara, Tiglet; Siegrist, Theo; Seiler, David; Richter, Curt

    Reduced ternary molybdenum oxides, or bronzes, offer an attractive materials platform to study a wide variety of remarkable physical phenomena in a system with highly varied structural chemistry. Interesting electronic behaviors, such as superconductivity, charge density waves, and magnetism, in these materials arise from the strong hybridization of the 4d states of high-valent Mo with O p orbitals. We investigate a series of molybdenum bronze materials with Lanthanide-Mo16O44 composition that can be described as a three-dimensional array of metallic Mo8O32 nanostructures computationally predicted to contain a single charge with spin 1/2 separated by insulating MoO4 tetrahedra. This study reveals novel magnetic ordering in Lanthanide-Mo16O44 systems arising, not from the inclusion of magnetic elements, but rather from an exchange interaction between cubic Mo8O32 units. Here, we report the magnetometry and transport behaviors of a series of Lanthanide-Mo16O44 materials, emphasizing an observed low-temperature phase transition signifying the onset of antiferromagnetic ordering between the arrayed nanostructures, and relate these behaviors to their experimentally-characterized structures to reveal the intriguing physics of these correlated electronic systems.

  11. Praseodymium hydroxide and oxide nanorods and Au/Pr6O11 nanorod catalysts for CO oxidation.

    PubMed

    Huang, P X; Wu, F; Zhu, B L; Li, G R; Wang, Y L; Gao, X P; Zhu, H Y; Yan, T Y; Huang, W P; Zhang, S M; Song, D Y

    2006-02-02

    Praseodymium hydroxide nanorods were synthesized by a two-step approach: First, metallic praseodymium was used to form praseodymium chloride, which reacted subsequently with KOH solution to produce praseodymium hydroxide. In the second step the hydroxide was treated with a concentrated alkaline solution at 180 degrees C for 45 h, yielding nanorods as shown by the scanning and transmission electron microscopy images. The results of X-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy experiments indicate that these nanorods are pure praseodymium hydroxide with a hexagonal structure, which can be converted into praseodymium oxide (Pr6O11) nanorods of a face-centered cubic structure after calcination at 600 degrees C for 2 h in air. Gold was loaded on the praseodymium oxide nanorods using HAuCl4 as the gold source, and NaBH4 was used to reduce the gold species to metallic nanoparticles with sizes of 8-12 nm on the nanorod surface. These Au/Pr6O11 nanorods exhibit superior catalytic activity for CO oxidation.

  12. Electrochemical deposition of zinc oxide nanorods for hybrid solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres Damasco Ty, Jennifer; Yanagi, Hisao

    2015-04-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorod arrays for inorganic/organic hybrid solar cells were electrochemically deposited on indium tin oxide (ITO) substrates with a rotating disk electrode setup. The addition of a ZnO seed layer on the ITO prior to electrochemical deposition improved the morphology of the nanorods, resulting in nanorods with smaller and homogenous diameters as well as a higher degree of vertical orientation on to the substrate. The ZnO films deposited on the seeded ITO substrates had higher optical transmittance and lower concentration of defects. Chronoamperometric transient curves show that nucleation and coalescence occurred later for bare ITO substrates, indicating lower densities of initial nuclei, resulting in the growth of nanorods with larger diameters. The solar cell characteristics of the devices fabricated from the seeded ITO substrates were better. The seed layer also acts as a hole-blocking layer, preventing the direct contact between the hole-transporting polymer material and the ITO.

  13. Carbon nanotubes and tungsten oxide nanorods: Synthesis and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Bing

    Synthesis and applications of two types of one-dimensional nanomaterials, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and tungsten oxide nanorods, are investigated in this dissertation. Multi-walled CNTs have been successfully synthesized using two types of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods: microwave plasma enhanced CVD and atmospheric pressure thermal CVD. CNTs and their synthesis processes are characterized with various analysis techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, and optical emission spectroscopy. Ultra-thin and high quality multi-walled CNTs are discovered in CNT films produced by MPCVD, which exhibit good field emission performance that is found to be dependent on the synthesis conditions, like the growth time and CH4/H2 flow ratio. CNTs grown by thermal CVD have similar field emission performance. Based on silicon surface micromachining techniques and thermal CVD method, a self-aligned method has been developed to fabricate CNT based gated field emitter arrays (FEAs) which demonstrate low turn-on voltage and good emission current. Tungsten oxide nanorods have been synthesized on various tungsten substrates via thermal annealing in argon at atmospheric pressure. Nanorod growth mechanism is proposed based on thermal oxidation of tungsten in gas ambient with a very low partial pressure of oxygen as well as the self-catalytic effect on tungsten surface. The lattice structure and composition of the tungsten oxide nanorods are observed and analyzed using high resolution TEM, selected area electron diffraction (SAD), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS). The analysis results reveal that the lattice structure of the tungsten oxide nanorods is closest to that of the monoclinic WO3 crystal. Tungsten oxide nanorods have been successfully grown on tungsten tips for use in scanning tunneling microscope (STM) as probes which readily produce atomic resolution images on sample surface. Nanorod

  14. Facile growth of barium oxide nanorods: structural and optical properties.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Naushad; Wahab, Rizwan; Alam, Manawwer

    2014-07-01

    This paper reports a large-scale synthesis of barium oxide nanorods (BaO-NRs) by simple solution method at a very low-temperature of - 60 degrees C. The as-grown BaO-NRs were characterized in terms of their morphological, structural, compositional, optical and thermal properties. The morphological characterizations of as-synthesized nanorods were done by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) which confirmed that the synthesized products are rod shaped and grown in high density. The nanorods exhibits smooth and clean surfaces throughout their lengths. The crystalline property of the material was analyzed with X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD). The compositional and thermal properties of synthesized nanorods were observed via Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis which confirmed that the synthesized nanorods are pure BaO and showed good thermal stability. The nanorods exhibited good optical properties as was confirmed from the room-temperature UV-vis spectroscopy. Finally, a plausible mechanism for the formation of BaO-NRs is also discussed in this paper.

  15. Zinc oxide nanorods functionalized paper for protein preconcentration in biodiagnostics.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Sadhana; Vinchurkar, Madhuri; Rao, V Ramgopal; Garnier, Gil

    2017-03-02

    Distinguishing a specific biomarker from a biofluid sample containing a large variety of proteins often requires the selective preconcentration of that particular biomarker to a detectable level for analysis. Low-cost, paper-based device is an emerging opportunity in diagnostics. In the present study, we report a novel Zinc oxide nanorods functionalized paper platform for the preconcentration of Myoglobin, a cardiac biomarker. Zinc oxide nanorods were grown on a Whatman filter paper no. 1 via the standard hydrothermal route. The growth of Zinc oxide nanorods on paper was confirmed by a combination of techniques consisting of X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS,) scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX) analysis. The Zinc oxide nanorods modified Whatman filter paper (ZnO-NRs/WFP) was further tested for use as a protein preconcentrator. Paper-based ELISA was performed for determination of pre-concentration of cardiac marker protein Myoglobin using the new ZnO-NRs/WFP platform. The ZnO-NRs/WFP could efficiently capture the biomarker even from a very dilute solution (Myoglobin < 50 nM). Our ELISA results show a threefold enhancement in protein capture with ZnO-NRs/WFP compared to unmodified Whatman filter paper, allowing accurate protein analysis and showing the diagnostic concept.

  16. Zinc oxide nanorods functionalized paper for protein preconcentration in biodiagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Sadhana; Vinchurkar, Madhuri; Rao, V. Ramgopal; Garnier, Gil

    2017-03-01

    Distinguishing a specific biomarker from a biofluid sample containing a large variety of proteins often requires the selective preconcentration of that particular biomarker to a detectable level for analysis. Low-cost, paper-based device is an emerging opportunity in diagnostics. In the present study, we report a novel Zinc oxide nanorods functionalized paper platform for the preconcentration of Myoglobin, a cardiac biomarker. Zinc oxide nanorods were grown on a Whatman filter paper no. 1 via the standard hydrothermal route. The growth of Zinc oxide nanorods on paper was confirmed by a combination of techniques consisting of X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS,) scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX) analysis. The Zinc oxide nanorods modified Whatman filter paper (ZnO-NRs/WFP) was further tested for use as a protein preconcentrator. Paper-based ELISA was performed for determination of pre-concentration of cardiac marker protein Myoglobin using the new ZnO-NRs/WFP platform. The ZnO-NRs/WFP could efficiently capture the biomarker even from a very dilute solution (Myoglobin < 50 nM). Our ELISA results show a threefold enhancement in protein capture with ZnO-NRs/WFP compared to unmodified Whatman filter paper, allowing accurate protein analysis and showing the diagnostic concept.

  17. Zinc oxide nanorods functionalized paper for protein preconcentration in biodiagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Sadhana; Vinchurkar, Madhuri; Rao, V. Ramgopal; Garnier, Gil

    2017-01-01

    Distinguishing a specific biomarker from a biofluid sample containing a large variety of proteins often requires the selective preconcentration of that particular biomarker to a detectable level for analysis. Low-cost, paper-based device is an emerging opportunity in diagnostics. In the present study, we report a novel Zinc oxide nanorods functionalized paper platform for the preconcentration of Myoglobin, a cardiac biomarker. Zinc oxide nanorods were grown on a Whatman filter paper no. 1 via the standard hydrothermal route. The growth of Zinc oxide nanorods on paper was confirmed by a combination of techniques consisting of X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS,) scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX) analysis. The Zinc oxide nanorods modified Whatman filter paper (ZnO-NRs/WFP) was further tested for use as a protein preconcentrator. Paper-based ELISA was performed for determination of pre-concentration of cardiac marker protein Myoglobin using the new ZnO-NRs/WFP platform. The ZnO-NRs/WFP could efficiently capture the biomarker even from a very dilute solution (Myoglobin < 50 nM). Our ELISA results show a threefold enhancement in protein capture with ZnO-NRs/WFP compared to unmodified Whatman filter paper, allowing accurate protein analysis and showing the diagnostic concept. PMID:28252113

  18. Pentavalent Lanthanide Compounds: Formation and Characterization of Praseodymium(V) Oxides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingnan; Hu, Shu-Xian; Qu, Hui; Su, Jing; Wang, Guanjun; Lu, Jun-Bo; Chen, Mohua; Zhou, Mingfei; Li, Jun

    2016-06-06

    The chemistry of lanthanides (Ln=La-Lu) is dominated by the low-valent +3 or +2 oxidation state because of the chemical inertness of the valence 4f electrons. The highest known oxidation state of the whole lanthanide series is +4 for Ce, Pr, Nd, Tb, and Dy. We report the formation of the lanthanide oxide species PrO4 and PrO2 (+) complexes in the gas phase and in a solid noble-gas matrix. Combined infrared spectroscopic and advanced quantum chemistry studies show that these species have the unprecedented Pr(V) oxidation state, thus demonstrating that the pentavalent state is viable for lanthanide elements in a suitable coordination environment.

  19. Broadband resonances in indium-tin-oxide nanorod arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shi-Qiang; Sakoda, Kazuaki; Ketterson, John B.; Chang, Robert P. H.

    2015-07-01

    There is currently much discussion within the nanophotonics community regarding the origin of wavelength selective absorption/scattering of light by the resonances in nanorod arrays. Here, we report a study of resonances in ordered indium-tin-oxide nanorod arrays resulting from waveguide-like modes. We find that with only a 2.4% geometrical coverage, micron-length nanorod arrays interact strongly with light across a surprisingly wide band from the visible to the mid-infrared, resulting in less than 10% transmission. Simulations show excellent agreement with our experimental observations. The field profile in the vicinity of the rods obtained from simulations shows that the electric field is mainly localized on the surfaces of the nanorods for all resonances. Based on our analysis, the resonances in the visible are different in character from those in the infrared. When light is incident on the array, part of it propagates in the space between the rods and part of it is guided within the rods. The phase difference (interference) at the ends of the rods forms the basis for the resonances in the visible region. The resonances in the infrared are Fabry-Perot-like resonances involving standing surface waves between the opposing ends of the rods. Simple analytical formulae predict the spectral positions of these resonances. It is suggested that these phenomena can be utilized for wavelength-selective photodetectors, modulators, and nanorod-based solar cells.

  20. Oxalic acid capped iron oxide nanorods as a sensing platform.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anshu; Baral, Dinesh; Bohidar, H B; Solanki, Pratima R

    2015-08-05

    A label free impedimetric immunosensor has been fabricated using protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) and monoclonal antibodies against Vibrio cholerae (Ab) functionalized oxalic acid (OA) capped iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanorods for V. cholerae detection. The structural and morphological studies of Fe3O4 and OA-Fe3O4, were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques. The average crystalline size of Fe3O4, OA-Fe3O4 nanorods were obtained as about 29±1 and 39±1nm, respectively. The hydrodynamic radius of nanorods is found as 116nm (OA-Fe3O4) and 77nm (Fe3O4) by DLS measurement. Cytotoxicity of Fe3O4 and OA-Fe3O4 nanorods has been investigated in the presence of human epithelial kidney (HEK) cell line 293 using MTT assay. The cell viability and proliferation studies reveal that the OA-Fe3O4 nanorods facilitate cell growth. The results of electrochemical response studies of the fabricated BSA/Ab/OA-Fe2O3/ITO immunosensor exhibits good linearity in the range of 12.5-500ng mL(-1) with low detection limit of 0.5ng mL(-1), sensitivity 0.1Ωng(-1)ml(-1)cm(-2) and reproducibility more than 11 times.

  1. Nano-rods of zinc oxide in nano-graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Pedro; Chavira, Elizabeth; Monroy, Marel; Elizalde, José; Santiago, Patricia; Sato, Roberto; Tejeda, Adriana; González, Guillermina; Novelo, Omar; Flores, Carlos

    2014-03-01

    It's of great interest to study the devices based on nano-ZnO and graphene, for their electromagnetic and optical properties to increase the efficiency of solar cells. The graphene multilayers synthesis was done by mechanosynthesis, grinding in a mechanical agate mortar. The zinc oxide nano-rods were synthesized from zinc acetate dihydrate, Ace, (Sigma Aldrich) and ethylene diamine, En, (Sigma Aldrich) with a 1:2 ratio of reagents En/Ace. The ZnO nano-rods in nano-tubes graphene were obtained by mechanosynthesis. The X-ray powder diffraction, shows the shift of C with PDF 12-0212 and ZnO, Zincite PDF 36-1451, both with hexagonal unit cell. The grain size and morphology of graphene (multilayers and nano-tubes), ZnO nano-rods and ZnO-graphene mixture (multilayers, nano-tubes) were observed by scanning electron microscope. Transmission electron microscope, corroborates shown in SEM. Raman spectroscopy, shows the shift of multilayer graphene and the ZnO nano-rods. In photoluminescence measurements, observe the change in intensity in the band defects. Magnetic properties characterization was carried out by Vibrating Sample Magnetometry. We conclude that graphite multilayers dislocated by cutting efforts, forming graphene nano-tubes and encapsulated ZnO nano-rods within graphene.

  2. Broadband resonances in indium-tin-oxide nanorod arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shi-Qiang E-mail: r-chang@northwestern.edu; Sakoda, Kazuaki; Ketterson, John B.; Chang, Robert P. H. E-mail: r-chang@northwestern.edu

    2015-07-20

    There is currently much discussion within the nanophotonics community regarding the origin of wavelength selective absorption/scattering of light by the resonances in nanorod arrays. Here, we report a study of resonances in ordered indium-tin-oxide nanorod arrays resulting from waveguide-like modes. We find that with only a 2.4% geometrical coverage, micron-length nanorod arrays interact strongly with light across a surprisingly wide band from the visible to the mid-infrared, resulting in less than 10% transmission. Simulations show excellent agreement with our experimental observations. The field profile in the vicinity of the rods obtained from simulations shows that the electric field is mainly localized on the surfaces of the nanorods for all resonances. Based on our analysis, the resonances in the visible are different in character from those in the infrared. When light is incident on the array, part of it propagates in the space between the rods and part of it is guided within the rods. The phase difference (interference) at the ends of the rods forms the basis for the resonances in the visible region. The resonances in the infrared are Fabry-Perot-like resonances involving standing surface waves between the opposing ends of the rods. Simple analytical formulae predict the spectral positions of these resonances. It is suggested that these phenomena can be utilized for wavelength-selective photodetectors, modulators, and nanorod-based solar cells.

  3. Fast synthesis of cerium oxide nanoparticles and nanorods.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Lu, Qingyi; Komarneni, Sridhar

    2006-12-01

    The microwave-hydrothermal method has been investigated for the fast synthesis of rare earth cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles and nanorods. This approach combines the advantages of both hydrothermal and microwave heating techniques. It is facile, rapid, energy-saving, and environmentally-benign and leads to high-yields. The average sizes of the obtained CeO2 nanoparticles could be adjusted from approximatrly 1.6 nm to approximately 20 nm. Moreover, by changing cerium source and adjusting the amount of the added ammonia water, CeO2 nanorods could be synthesized under microwave-assisted conditions for the first time. No calcination process or surfactant is required in our experiments for both CeO2 nanoparticles and nanorods. The ultraviolet and visible (UV-vis) spectra show the obvious size-dependence of the position of the absorbance peak. The Brunaur Emmett Teller (BET) nitrogen adsorption indicates that these nanoparticles and nanorods have high specific surface areas, which are needed for potential applications in many fields. Compared with conventional hydrothermal method, microwave-assisted hydrothermal method shows its advantages of rapidity, convenience and perhaps cost-effectiveness and could be extended to the synthesis of other nanoparticles and nanorods.

  4. Inkjet printing lanthanide doped nanorods test paper for visual assays of nitroaromatic explosives.

    PubMed

    Hong, Liang; Mei, Qingsong; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Cheng; Liu, Renyong; Han, Mingyong; Zhang, Ruilong; Zhang, Zhongping

    2013-11-13

    The facile and sensitive strategies for detections of nitroaromatic explosives are highly desirable in many challenging environments, especially for homeland security against terrorism. Here, we inkjet printed polyethylenimine (PEI)-coated Ce, Tb co-doped NaGdF4 nanorods (NaGdF4:Ce/Tb NRs) onto common filter paper to construct test paper for visual and instant detections of a typical explosive 2,4,6-trinitrophenol (TNP). Polyethylenimine molecules not only facilitate the formation of uniform NaGdF4 nanorods but also provide specific recognized sites for TNP by the acid-base pairing interaction. The resultant TNP bound at the surface of PEI-coated NaGdF4:Ce/Tb NRs can strongly quench the phosphorescence with a remarkably high quenching constant by the charge transfer mechanism from NaGdF4:Ce/Tb NRs to TNP. By printing of the probe on a piece of filter paper, trace amounts of TNP can be visually detected by the appearance of a dark color against a bright green background under a UV lamp. This test paper can detect TNP as low as 0.45 ng mm(-2) by the naked eye, which provides a potential application in the rapid, on-line detections of explosives.

  5. pH-dependent growth of zinc oxide nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baruah, Sunandan; Dutta, Joydeep

    2009-04-01

    Here we study the effect of pH variation on the dimension and morphology of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods grown through hydrothermal process at temperatures less than 100 °C. ZnO nanorods were grown on pre-seeded glass substrates using zinc nitrate hexahydrate as the source of Zn ions and hexamethylenetetramine as the source of hydroxyl ions. The pH of the reaction bath was found to change gradually from 6.4 to 7.3 in 5 h during the growth process. The growth of the ZnO nanorods was observed to be faster, both laterally and longitudinally, when the growth solution was in basic conditions. However, flower petal like ZnO nanostructures were obtained when the growth process was initiated in basic condition (pH 8-12), indicating that initial acidic conditions were required to obtain nanorods with well-defined hexagonal facets. ZnO is known to erode in acidic condition and the final dimension of the nanorods is determined by a competition between crystal growth and etching. ZnO nanorods of different dimensions, both laterally (diameters ranging from 220 nm to 1 μm) and longitudinally (lengths ranging from 1 to 5.6 μm) were successfully synthesized using the same concentration of zinc nitrate and hexamine in the reaction bath and the same growth duration of 5 h simply through appropriate control of the pH of the reactant solution between 6 and 7.3.

  6. Selected-control synthesis of dysprosium hydroxide and oxide nanorods by adjusting hydrothermal temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Song Xuchun Zheng Yifan; Wang Yun

    2008-05-06

    Dysprosium hydroxide and oxide nanorods were prepared directly from commercial bulk Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystals by facile hydrothermal process at 130 and 210 deg. C, respectively. The as-synthesized dysprosium hydroxide and oxide nanorods were investigated by various techniques of XRD, TEM, SEM, and EDS. In the process, the temperature was found to play important roles in determining produce dysprosium hydroxide and oxide nanorods.

  7. Templated electrodeposition and photocatalytic activity of cuprous oxide nanorod arrays.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Keith M; Perry, Collin M; Rivas, Marlene; Golden, Teresa D; Bazan, Antony; Quintana, Maria; Nesterov, Vladimir N; Berhe, Seare A; Rodríguez, Juan; Estrada, Walter; Youngblood, W Justin

    2015-01-14

    Cuprous oxide (Cu2O) nanorod arrays have been prepared via a novel templated electrodeposition process and were characterized for their photocatalytic behavior in nonaqueous photoelectrochemical cells. Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorod films serve as sacrificial templates for the in situ formation of polymer nanopore membranes on transparent conductive oxide substrates. Nitrocellulose and poly(lactic acid) are effective membrane-forming polymers that exhibit different modes of template formation, with nitrocellulose forming conformal coatings on the ZnO surface while poly(lactic acid) acts as an amorphous pore-filling material. Robust template formation is sensitive to the seeding method used to prepare the precursor ZnO nanorod films. Photoelectrochemical cells prepared from electrodeposited Cu2O films using methyl viologen as a redox shuttle in acetonitrile electrolyte exhibit significant charge recombination that can be partially suppressed by a combination of surface passivation methods. Surface-passivated nanostructured Cu2O films show enhanced photocurrent relative to planar electrodeposited Cu2O films of similar thickness. We have obtained the highest photocurrent ever reported for electrodeposited Cu2O in a nonaqueous photoelectrochemical cell.

  8. The interactions between the sterically demanding trimesitylphosphine oxide and trimesityphosphine with scandium and selected lanthanide ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, Andrew W. G.; Singh, Kuldip

    2016-05-01

    The reactions between lanthanide nitrates, Ln(NO3)3 and scandium and lanthanide trifluoromethane sulfonates, Ln(Tf)3 with trimesitylphosphine oxide, Mes3PO show that coordination to the metal ions does not lead to crystalline complexes. Investigation of the reactions by 31-P NMR spectroscopy shows that weak complexes are formed in solution. The crystal structures of Mes3PO·0.5CH3CN (1) and [Mes3PO]3H3O·2CH3CN·Tf (2), formed in the reaction between ScTf3 and Mes3PO, are reported. Trimesitylphosphine, Mes3P, is protonated by scandium and lanthanide trifluoromethane sulfonates and lanthanide nitrates in CD3CN and the structure of [Mes3PH]Cl·HCl·2H2O (3) is reported.

  9. Patterns in the stability of the lower oxidation states of the actinides and lanthanides

    SciTech Connect

    Mikheev, N.B.; Auerman, L.N.; Ionova, G.V.; Korshunov, B.G.; Spitsyn, V.I.

    1986-09-01

    The authors compare the first half of the lanthanides and the second half of the actinides by considering the specifics of the electronic structure of the valence atoms of the f-, d-, and s-orbitals, consisting of he following: The lanthanides from praseodymium to europium and from dysprosium to ytterbium, as well as the actinides from californium to nobelium, have the same electronic configuration f /SUP n/ s/sub 2/ in the state of free neutral atoms, which corresponds to their divalent state. On the basis of a consideration of the energy characteristics of the valence orbitals of the elements of the lanthanide and actinide famililies and as a result of an experimental determination of the standard oxidation potential of these elements, the authors consider the profound similarity between the elements of the first half of the lanthanide family and the second half of the actinide family to be established.

  10. Luminescent hybrid lanthanide sulfates and lanthanide sulfonate-carboxylates with 1,10-phenanthroline involving in-situ oxidation of 2-mercaptonbenzoic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jie-Cen; Wan, Fang; Sun, Yan-Qiong; Chen, Yi-Ping

    2015-01-01

    A series of lanthanide sulfates and lanthanide sulfonate-carboxylates, [Ln2(phen)2(SO4)3(H2O)2]n (I:Ln=Nd(1a), Sm(1b), Eu(1c), phen=1,10-phenanthroline) and [Ln(phen)(2-SBA)(BZA)]n (II: Ln=Sm(2a), Eu(2b), Dy(2c), 2-SBA=2-sulfobenzoate, BZA=benzoate) have been hydrothermally synthesized from lanthanide oxide, 2-mercaptonbenzoic acid with phen as auxiliary ligand and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, elemental analyses, IR spectra, TG analyses and luminescence spectroscopy. Interestingly, SO4 2 - anions in I came from the in situ deep oxidation of thiol groups of 2-mercaptonbenzoic acid while 2-sulfobenzoate and benzoate ligands in II from the middle oxidation and desulfuration reactions of 2-mercaptonbenzoic acid. Compounds I are organic-inorganic hybrid lanthanide sulfates, which have rare one-dimensional column-like structures. Complexes II are binuclear lanthanide sulfonate-carboxylates with 2-sulfobenzoate and benzoate as bridges and 1,10-phenanthroline as terminal. Photoluminescence studies reveal that complexes I and II exhibit strong lanthanide characteristic emission bands in the solid state at room temperature.

  11. Fungus mediated biosynthesis and characterization of zinc oxide nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesh, K. S.; Palani, N. S.; Krishnamoorthi, S. R.; Thirumal, V.; Ilangovan, R.

    2013-06-01

    Recently nanomaterials have been synthesized through biological approach due to its biocompatibility, inexpensive, eco friendly and it offers easiest experimental protocol and so on. ZnO can be potentially used in various applications. This present study reports the fungus mediated extra-cellular bio synthesis of ZnO nanorods using Fusarium Solani. The dried powder was calcined at 350°C for 1 hour in air. The thermal property of the as synthesized ZnO nanopowder was analyzed through Thermo gravimetric /Differential Thermo gravimetric (TGA / DTG) analysis. The structural and morphological properties of the calcined ZnO nanopowder were studied by XRD and SEM analysis respectively. X ray diffraction result revealed that a peak located at 2θ = 36.2° with (101) plane confirms the presence of Zinc oxide with Hexagonal crystal system. The morphology of the calcined ZnO powder was analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscopy and it clearly indicates the presence of ZnO nanorods. The diameter of the nanorods is in the range of 60 to 95 nm.

  12. Solid-liquid separation of oxidized americium from fission product lanthanides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shehee, T. C.; Martin, L. R.; Nash, K. L.

    2010-03-01

    The separation of americium from the lanthanides and curium is a requirement if transmutation of americium is to be performed in advanced nuclear fuel cycles. Oxidation of Am3+ to AmO2+ or AmO22+ may allow separation of Am from Ln and Cm in one step, since the lanthanides and curium do not have higher oxidation states as accessible. Two possible solid-liquid separation methods have been developed to address this difficult separation. Under acidic conditions using oxone or persulfate, the oxidation and retention of tracer Am in the aqueous phase has been observed with a separation factor of 11 ± 1. Most of these studies have been conducted using 237NpO2(NO3), 233UO2(NO3)2, 238Pu(NO3)4 and 241Am(NO3)3 at radiotracer concentrations. Lanthanides precipitate as the sodium or potassium europium double sulfate salt. Under basic conditions, ozone oxidation of Am(CO3)OH(s) solubilizes Am from a lanthanide carbonate hydroxide solid phase to the aqueous phase as the AmO2(CO3)34-or AmO2(CO3)35- species. For the ozone oxidation of the americium tracer a separation factor of 1.6 ± 0.8 and 47 ± 2 for the oxidation/separation in Na2CO3 and NaHCO3 respectively.

  13. Synthesis and electrochemical capacitance of long tungsten oxide nanorod arrays grown vertically on substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sun Hwa; Kim, Young Heon; Lee, Tae Geol; Shon, Hyun Kyong; Park, Hyun Min; Song, Jae Yong

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: ► Growth of long amorphous tungsten oxide nanorods on a substrate. ► Formation of single-crystalline tungsten oxide nanorods by a heat-treatment. ► High electrochemical pseudocapacitance of 2.8 mF cm{sup −2}. ► Excellent cyclability of psuedocapacitance up to 1000 cycles. -- Abstract: Long tungsten oxide nanorods are vertically grown on Al/W/Ti coated silicon substrates using a two-step anodization process. The first anodization of the Al film forms a mesh-like mask of anodic aluminum oxide, and the second anodization of the W film results in the formation of a buffer layer, a bottom nanorod, and a top nanorod of amorphous tungsten oxide. A pore-widening process prior to the second anodization leads to the enhancement of nanorod length above approximately 500 nm. After a heat-treatment, the tungsten oxide nanorods are crystallized to form a single crystalline structure while the buffer layer forms a polycrystalline structure. The crystalline tungsten oxide nanorods show a cyclic voltammogram retaining the quasi-rectangular shape of an electrochemically reversible faradaic redox reaction, i.e., a typical pseudocapacitive behavior. The maximum electrochemical capacitance per apparent surface area reaches approximately 2.8 mF cm{sup −2} at the voltage scan rate of 20 mV s{sup −1}, and the excellent cyclability of charge–discharge process is maintained up to 1000 cycles.

  14. Multi-modal imaging and cancer therapy using lanthanide oxide nanoparticles: current status and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Park, J Y; Chang, Y; Lee, G H

    2015-01-01

    Biomedical imaging is an essential tool for diagnosis and therapy of diseases such as cancers. It is likely true that medicine has developed with biomedical imaging methods. Sensitivity and resolution of biomedical imaging methods can be improved with imaging agents. Furthermore, it will be ideal if imaging agents could be also used as therapeutic agents. Therefore, one dose can be used for both diagnosis and therapy of diseases (i.e., theragnosis). This will simplify medical treatment of diseases, and will be also a benefit to patients. Mixed (Ln(1x)Ln(2y)O3, x + y = 2) or unmixed (Ln2O3) lanthanide (Ln) oxide nanoparticles (Ln = Eu, Gd, Dy, Tb, Ho, Er) are potential multi-modal imaging and cancer therapeutic agents. The lanthanides have a variety of magnetic and optical properties, useful for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorescent imaging (FI), respectively. They also highly attenuate X-ray beam, useful for X-ray computed tomography (CT). In addition gadolinium-157 ((157)Gd) has the highest thermal neutron capture cross section among stable radionuclides, useful for gadolinium neutron capture therapy (GdNCT). Therefore, mixed or unmixed lanthanide oxide nanoparticles can be used for multi-modal imaging methods (i.e., MRI-FI, MRI-CT, CT-FI, and MRICT- FI) and cancer therapy (i.e., GdNCT). Since mixed or unmixed lanthanide oxide nanoparticles are single-phase and solid-state, they can be easily synthesized, and are compact and robust, which will be beneficial to biomedical applications. In this review physical properties of the lanthanides, synthesis, characterizations, multi-modal imagings, and cancer therapy of mixed and unmixed lanthanide oxide nanoparticles are discussed.

  15. Nanorods of Various Oxides and Hierarchically Structured Mesoporous Silica by Sol-Gel Electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Limmer, Steven J.; Hubler, Timothy L.; Cao, Guozhong

    2003-01-02

    In this paper, we report the template-based growth of nanorods of oxides and hierarchically structured mesoporous silica, formed by means of a combination of sol-gel processing and elecrophoretic deposition. Both single metal oxides (TiO2) and complex oxides (Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3) have been grown by this method. This method has also been applied to the growth of nanorods of mesoporous silica having an ordered pore structure, where the pores are aligned parallel to the long axis of the nanorod. Uniformly sized nanorods of about 125-200 nm in diameter and 10 um in length were grown over large areas with near unidirectional alignment. Appropriate sol preparation yielded the desired stoichiometric chemical composition and crystal structure of the oxide nanorods, with a heat treatment (500-700 C for 15-30 min) for crystallization, densification and any necessary pyrolysis.

  16. Thermal NF3 fluorination/oxidation of cobalt, yttrium, zirconium, and selected lanthanide oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Scheele, Randall D.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Casella, Andrew M.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Neiner, Doinita

    2013-02-01

    This paper presents results of our continuing investigation on the use of nitrogen trifluoride as a fluorination or fluorination/oxidation agent for separating valuable constituents from used nuclear fuels by exploiting the different volatilities of the constituent fission product and actinide fluorides. This article focuses on fission products that do not have volatile fluorides or oxyfluorides at expected operations temperatures. Our thermodynamic calculations show that nitrogen trifluoride has the potential to completely fluorinate fission product oxides to their fluorides. Simultaneous thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses show that the oxides of cobalt, zirconium, and the lanthanides are fluorinated but do not form volatile fluorides when treated with nitrogen trifluoride at temperatures up to 550°C. Our studies of gadolinium-doped commercial nuclear fuel indicate that nitrogen trifluoride can extract uranium from the non-volatile gadolinium.

  17. Hot-pressed silicon nitride with various lanthanide oxides as sintering additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ueno, K.; Toibana, Y.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of addition of various lanthanide oxides and their mixture with Y2O3 on the sintering of Si3N4 were investigated. The addition of simple and mixed lanthanide oxides promoted the densification of Si3N4 in hot-pressing at 1800 C under 300-400kg/ centimeters squared for 60 min. The crystallization of yttrium and lanthanide-silicon oxynitrides which was observed inn the sintered body containing yttrium-lanthanide mixed oxides as additives led to the formation of a highly refractory Si3N4 ceramic having a bending strength of 82 and 84 kg/millimeters squared at room temperature and 1300 C respectively. In a Y2O3+La2O3 system, a higher molar ratio of La2O3 to Y2O3 gave a higher hardness and strength at high temperatures. It was found that 90 min was an optimum sintering time for the highest strength.

  18. Sonochemical synthesis of silver vanadium oxide micro/nanorods: solvent and surfactant effects.

    PubMed

    Mohandes, Fatemeh; Salavati-Niasari, Masoud

    2013-01-01

    In this investigation, a facile sonochemical route has been developed for the preparation of silver vanadium oxide (SVO) micro/nanorods by using silver salicylate and ammonium metavanadate as silver and vanadate precursor, respectively. Here, silver salicylate, [Ag(HSal)], is introduced as a new silver precursor to fabricate AgVO(3) nanorods. The effect of numerous solvents and surfactants on the morphology and sonochemical formation mechanism of AgVO(3) nanorods was studied. AgVO(3) nanorods were characterized by SEM and TEM images, XRD patterns, FT-IR, XPS, and EDS spectroscopy. SEM, TEM, and XRD results showed that AgO nanoparticles were formed onto AgVO(3) nanorods in the presence of ethanol, cyclohexanol, dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), and acetone. By using polyethylene glycol (PEG-6000) and N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) as organic additives, the thickness of AgVO(3) nanorods decreased.

  19. Infrared plasmonics with indium-tin-oxide nanorod arrays.

    PubMed

    Li, Shi Qiang; Guo, Peijun; Zhang, Lingxiao; Zhou, Wei; Odom, Teri W; Seideman, Tamar; Ketterson, John B; Chang, Robert P H

    2011-11-22

    This article reports the study of infrared plasmonics with both random and periodic arrays of indium-tin-oxide (ITO) nanorods (NR). A description is given on the synthesis, patterning, and characterization of physical properties of the ITO NR arrays. A classical scattering model, along with a 3-D finite-element-method and a 3-D finite-difference-time-domain numerical simulation method has been used to interpret the unique light scattering phenomena. It is also shown that the intrinsic plasma frequency can be varied through careful postsynthesis processing of the ITO NRs. Examples are given on how coupled plasmon resonances can be tuned through patterning of the ITO NR arrays. In addition, environment dielectric sensing has been demonstrated through the shift of the resonances as a result of index change surrounding the NRs. These initial results suggest potential for further improvement and opportunities to develop a good understanding of infrared plasmonics using ITO and other transparent conducting oxide semiconducting materials.

  20. Porous Iron oxide nanorods and their photothermal applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, George; Huang, Weijie; Zhao, Yiping; Hunyadi Murph, Simona E.

    2016-09-01

    Iron oxide is a unique semiconductor material, either as a single nanoparticle, or as a component of multifunctional nanoparticles. Its desirable properties, abundance, non-toxicity, and excellent magnetic properties make it a valuable for many applications. Porous iron oxide nanorods are able to transduce light into heat through the photothermal effect. Photothermal heating arises from the energy dissipated during light absorption leading to rapid temperature rise in close proximity to the surface of the nanoparticle. The heating effect can be efficiently harnessed to drive/promote different physical phenomena. In this report, we describe the synthesis and properties of porous Fe3O4 for photothermal applications. We then demonstrate their use as photothermally enhanced and recyclable materials for environmental remediation through sorption processes.

  1. Iron-cobalt bimetal oxide nanorods as efficient and robust water oxidation catalysts.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xichen; Huang, Jingwei; Zhang, Fuming; Zhao, Yukun; Zhang, Yan; Ding, Yong

    2017-03-15

    Cobalt-based oxides are considered as potential water oxidation catalysts for future artificial photosynthetic systems because of their high abundance, strong stability and efficient performance. Herein, a series of cobalt-based oxides, MnCo3-nO4 (M = Mn, Fe, Co) samples, were synthesized through changing the metal sources by a low-temperature coprecipitation method. These catalysts were investigated under photochemical and electrochemical water oxidation conditions. And they all exhibited efficient activity for water oxidation under alkaline, acidic and neutral conditions under visible light irradiation. An excellent O2 yield of 90.4% for Fe-Co bimetal oxide (Fe1.1Co1.9O4) nanorods was obtained under optimal conditions (photoirradiation at λ ≥ 420 nm, [Ru(bpy)3](ClO4)2 as the photosensitizer, Na2S2O8 as the oxidant in borate buffer at pH = 9.0, bpy = 2,2-bipyridine). Among MnCo3-nO4 samples, Fe1.1Co1.9O4 nanorods were proved to be the optimal electrocatalytic water oxidation catalyst as well. Multiple experiments (SEM, FT-IR, XRD, XPS, Bulk electrolysis) were used to test the stability of Fe1.1CO1.9O4 and these results indicate that Fe1.1CO1.9O4 nanorods are highly stable. Furthermore, based on Mott-Schottky and cyclic voltammetry analysis, the best balanced flat-band potential of Fe1.1CO1.9O4 nanorods is just located at the middle position between the oxidation potential of O2/H2O and the half-wave potential of [Ru(bpy)3](3+/2+), which was probably responsible for their superior photocatalytic water oxidation performance.

  2. Anti-Proliferative Effect of Copper Oxide Nanorods Against Human Cervical Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Pandurangan, Muthuraman; Nagajyothi, P C; Shim, Jaesool; Kim, Doo Hwan

    2016-09-01

    Metal oxide nanoparticles have been widely investigated for its use in the pharmacological field. The present study was aimed to investigate the cytotoxicity of copper oxide nanorods in human cervical carcinoma cells. The effect of copper oxide nanorods on cell viability was determined by sulforhodamine-B (SRB) assay. The fluorescence and confocal microscopy analyzes showed the cell rounding and nuclear fragmentation following exposure of copper oxide nanorods. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) was increased and could initiate membrane lipid peroxidation, which in turn regulate cytokinetic movements of cells. The messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of p53 and caspase 3 was increased, which further confirms the occurrence of apoptosis at the transcriptional level. Furthermore, caspase-3 enzyme activity was increased, which also confirms the occurrence of apoptosis in tumor cells at the translational level. Taking all our experimental results together, it may suggest that the copper oxide nanorods could be a potential anti-tumor agent to inhibit cancer cell proliferation.

  3. Gold Nanoparticles Supported on Magnesium Oxide Nanorods for Oxidation of Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Emayavaramban, P; Babu, S Ganesh; Karvembu, R; Kadirvelu, K; Dharmaraj, N

    2016-03-01

    Gold nanoparticles supported on magnesium oxide nanorods (Au-MgO) have been synthesised by a solution based chemical reduction method. Au-MgO nanorods were found to be an efficient heterogeneous catalyst for oxidation of alcohols with hydrogen peroxide in aqueous medium at room temperature. To find out the best reaction conditions for oxidation, optimization of catalyst quantity, solvent, mole equivalence of hydrogen peroxide were carried out. The scope of the reaction was extended to several aromatic and aliphatic alcohols, product yields were quantified by gas chromatography (GC) and GC/mass spectroscopy. Heterogeneity and reusability tests were performed. The use of water as a solvent and hydrogen peroxide as co-catalyst at room temperature makes the reaction interesting from sustainable development point of view.

  4. Synthesis and lanthanide coordination chemistry of trifluoromethyl derivatives of phosphinoylmethyl pyridine N-oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Pailloux, Sylvie; Shirima, Cornel Edicome; Duesler, Eileen N.; Smith, Karen Ann; Paine, Robert T.; Klaehn, John D.; McIlwain, Michael E; Hay, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    A synthetic route for the formation of 2-[bis-(2-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-phosphinoylmethyl]-pyridine N-oxide (1c) and 2-[bis-(3,5-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-phosphinoylmethyl]-pyridine N-oxide (1d) was developed and the new ligands characterized by spectroscopic methods and single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. The coordination chemistry of the ligands was examined with early and late lanthanide ions. The molecular structure of one complex, [Yb(1c)(NO3)3(DMF)](DMF)(H2O)0.5, was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction methods and the ligand found to coordinate in a bidentate fashion. This coordination chemistry is compared against lanthanide coordination chemistry observed for the related ligand, [Ph2P(O)CH2] C5H4NO.

  5. Formation of iron-oxide nanorods on the surface of silicon by using annealing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, Nitin; Kumari, Sarita; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-12-01

    In this article, we report the synthesis of iron-oxide nanorods on silicon (Si) substrates. The nanorods were formed by annealing an iron chloride solution on the surface of a Si at 950 °C in the presence of a reducing gas (H2) and a diluting gas (Ar). The surface morphologies of the nanorods were investigated by using field-emission scanning electron microscopy, and their compositions and structural characterization were investigated by elemental using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), respectively. The HRTEM study shows a crystalline formation of the nanorods. The electron diffraction pattern along the viewing (111) direction and the HRTEM result shows an interplanar distance equal to 2.17 Å, which is nearly equal to the standard value 2.3 Å of FeO. The as-fabricated nanorods can be used for many technological applications.

  6. Patterned growth of tungsten oxide and tungsten oxynitride nanorods from Au-coated W foil.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fang; Fahmi, Amir; Zhao, Yimin; Xia, Yongde; Zhu, Yanqiu

    2012-11-21

    This manuscript first describes a simple synthesis of tungsten oxide (WO(x)) nanorods from templated W foil using a chemical vapour deposition (CVD) technique at 600-750 °C, then presents the formation of tungsten oxynitride (WO(x)N(y)) nanorods via nitridation at 650 °C for different reaction times. The W foil, blade engraved, acid etched, or spin coated with Au-block copolymer composites then plasma etched, was used as a substrate for the nanorod growth. The Au patterns that were created on the surface of a W foil following the removal of the copolymer, led to a reverse patterned growth of WO(x) nanorods on the Au free areas. Consequently, following the oxide-to-nitride conversion, WO(x)N(y) nanorods were obtained with an identical patterned feature as to that of the parental WO(x). Combined techniques including XRD, SEM, TEM and Raman were used to visualise and analyse the resulting WO(x) and WO(x)N(y) nanorods. The diameter, length, and chemical composition of the nanorods are found to vary with reaction time and temperatures, as well as different substrate pre-treatments. This result represents a simple, innovative and efficient process for reverse-patterned growth of new nanomaterials.

  7. Photochemical Oxidative Growth of Iridium Oxide Nanoparticles on CdSe@CdS Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Kalisman, Philip; Nakibli, Yifat; Amirav, Lilac

    2016-02-11

    We demonstrate a procedure for the photochemical oxidative growth of iridium oxide catalysts on the surface of seeded cadmium selenide-cadmium sulfide (CdSe@CdS) nanorod photocatalysts. Seeded rods are grown using a colloidal hot-injection method and then moved to an aqueous medium by ligand exchange. CdSe@CdS nanorods, an iridium precursor and other salts are mixed and illuminated. The deposition process is initiated by absorption of photons by the semiconductor particle, which results with formation of charge carriers that are used to promote redox reactions. To insure photochemical oxidative growth we used an electron scavenger. The photogenerated holes oxidize the iridium precursor, apparently in a mediated oxidative pathway. This results in the growth of high quality crystalline iridium oxide particles, ranging from 0.5 nm to about 3 nm, along the surface of the rod. Iridium oxide grown on CdSe@CdS heterostructures was studied by a variety of characterization methods, in order to evaluate its characteristics and quality. We explored means for control over particle size, crystallinity, deposition location on the CdS rod, and composition. Illumination time and excitation wavelength were found to be key parameters for such control. The influence of different growth conditions and the characterization of these heterostructures are described alongside a detailed description of their synthesis. Of significance is the fact that the addition of iridium oxide afforded the rods astounding photochemical stability under prolonged illumination in pure water (alleviating the requirement for hole scavengers).

  8. Structural, morphological and optical investigations on Sm{sup 3+} doped gadolinium oxide nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Boopathi, G.; Mohan, R.; Raj, S. Gokul; Kumar, G. Ramesh

    2014-04-24

    One dimensional uniform Sm{sup 3+} doped gadolinium hydroxide nanorods have been prepared via simple co– precipitation technique at 60 °C temperature for 1 hour. The samples were calcinated at 750 °C to obtain Sm{sup 3+} doped gadolinium oxide nanorods. The 1D nanorods were then subjected to different characterization techniques to ascertain its structural stability and its morphology were investigated using high–resolution transmission electron microscopy. Photoluminescence (PL) spectrophotometry was investigated and the obtained results were discussed in detail.

  9. Birnessite nanorod-mediated decomposition of methylene blue with common oxidants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, R.; Govindan, K.; Selvaraj, S.; Ravichandiran, P.; Vasanthkumar, S.

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, the birnessite nanorods (BN) were synthesized by microwave-assisted hydrothermal method and was characterized by powder X-ray diffraction measurements (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and surface area (BET) analyzer. These results confirm the formation of birnessite nanorods. The catalytic decomposition profile of methylene blue by birnessite nanorods was tested. The effect of oxidants peroxomonosulfate (PMS) and peroxodisulfate (PDS) was compared with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Among these oxidants, PDS exhibits a high degree of decomposition of more than 80 % mineralization, achieved in 4 h when compared to PMS and H2O2. The decomposition was examined using varying amount of catalyst, which showed the dye decomposition activity to be proportional to the amount of the catalyst. The powder XRD studies showed no changes in the structure of birnessite nanorods, implying that these reactions are surface controlled.

  10. CeO2 nanorods-supported transition metal catalysts for CO oxidation.

    PubMed

    Mock, Samantha A; Sharp, Shannon E; Stoner, Thomas R; Radetic, Michael J; Zell, Elizabeth T; Wang, Ruigang

    2016-03-15

    A catalytically active oxide support in combination with metal catalysts is required in order to achieve better low temperature activity and selectivity. Here, we report that CeO2 nanorods with a superior surface oxygen release/storage capability were used as an active support of transition metal (TM) catalysts (Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu) for CO oxidation reaction. The as-prepared CeO2 nanorods supported 10 wt% TM catalysts were highly active for CO oxidation at low temperature, except for the Fe sample. It is found that the 10%Cu-CeO2 catalyst performed best, and it provided a lower light-off temperature with T50 (50% conversion) at 75 °C and T100 (100% conversion) of CO to CO2 at 194 °C. The atomic level surface structure of CeO2 nanorods was investigated in order to understand the improved low temperature catalytic activity. The richness of surface roughness and various defects (voids, lattice distortion, bending, steps, twinning) on CeO2 nanorods could facilitate oxygen release and storage. According to XRD and Raman analysis, copper species migrate into the bulk CeO2 nanorods to a greater degree. Since CO adsorbed over the surface of the catalyst/support is detrimental to its catalytic activity, the surface defects on the CeO2 nanorods and CeO2-TM interactions were critical to the enhanced activity.

  11. Morphological and electrochemical properties of crystalline praseodymium oxide nanorods.

    PubMed

    Shamshi Hassan, M; Shaheer Akhtar, M; Shim, Kyung-Bo; Yang, O-Bong

    2010-02-05

    Highly crystalline Pr6O11 nanorods were prepared by a simple precipitation method of triethylamine complex at 500°C. Synthesized Pr6O11 nanorods were uniformly grown with the diameter of 12-15 nm and the length of 100-150 nm without any impurities of unstable PrO2 phase. The Pr6O11 nanorod electrodes attained a high electrical conductivity of 0.954 Scm-1 with low activation energy of 0.594 eV at 850°C. The electrochemical impedance study showed that the resistance of electrode was significantly decreased at high temperature, which resulted from its high conductivity and low activation energy. The reduced impedance and high electrical conductivity of Pr6O11 nanorod electrodes are attributed to the reduction of grain boundaries and high space charge width.

  12. Lanthanide-Dependent Regulation of Methanol Oxidation Systems in Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 and Their Contribution to Methanol Growth

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Huong N.; Subuyuj, Gabriel A.; Vijayakumar, Srividhya; Good, Nathan M.; Martinez-Gomez, N. Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 has two distinct types of methanol dehydrogenase (MeDH) enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde. MxaFI-MeDH requires pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) and Ca in its active site, while XoxF-MeDH requires PQQ and lanthanides, such as Ce and La. Using MeDH mutant strains to conduct growth analysis and MeDH activity assays, we demonstrate that M. extorquens AM1 has at least one additional lanthanide-dependent methanol oxidation system contributing to methanol growth. Additionally, the abilities of different lanthanides to support growth were tested and strongly suggest that both XoxF and the unknown methanol oxidation system are able to use La, Ce, Pr, Nd, and, to some extent, Sm. Further, growth analysis using increasing La concentrations showed that maximum growth rate and yield were achieved at and above 1 μM La, while concentrations as low as 2.5 nM allowed growth at a reduced rate. Contrary to published data, we show that addition of exogenous lanthanides results in differential expression from the xox1 and mxa promoters, upregulating genes in the xox1 operon and repressing genes in the mxa operon. Using transcriptional reporter fusions, intermediate expression from both the mxa and xox1 promoters was detected when 50 to 100 nM La was added to the growth medium, suggesting that a condition may exist under which M. extorquens AM1 is able to utilize both enzymes simultaneously. Together, these results suggest that M. extorquens AM1 actively senses and responds to lanthanide availability, preferentially utilizing the lanthanide-dependent MeDHs when possible. IMPORTANCE The biological role of lanthanides is a nascent field of study with tremendous potential to impact many areas in biology. Our studies demonstrate that there is at least one additional lanthanide-dependent methanol oxidation system, distinct from the MxaFI and XoxF MeDHs, that may aid in classifying additional environmental organisms as

  13. Chemical synthesis of zinc oxide nanorods for enhanced hydrogen gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musarrat, Jabeen; Muhammad Azhar, Iqbal; R Vasant, Kumar; Mansoor, Ahmed; Muhammad Tayyeb, Javed

    2014-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods are prepared using equimolar solution of zinc nitrate ((Zn(NO3)2) and hexamethylenetetramine (C6H12N4) by the hydrothermal technique at 80 °C for 12 h. Epitaxial growth is explored by X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns, revealing that the ZnO nanorods have a hexagonal (wurtzite) structure. Absorption spectra of ZnO are measured by UV—visible spectrometer. The surface morphology is investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The synthesized ZnO nanorods are used for detecting the 150 °C hydrogen gas with a concentration over 1000 ppm. The obtained results show a reversible response. The influence of operating temperature on hydrogen gas detecting characteristic of ZnO nanorods is also investigated.

  14. Direct Growth of Crystalline Tungsten Oxide Nanorod Arrays by a Hydrothermal Process and Their Electrochromic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chih-Hao; Hon, Min Hsiung; Leu, Ing-Chi

    2016-12-01

    Transparent crystalline tungsten oxide nanorod arrays for use as an electrochromic layer have been directly prepared on fluorine-doped tin oxide-coated glass via a facile tungsten film-assisted hydrothermal process using aqueous tungsten hexachloride solution. X-ray diffraction analysis and field-emission scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the phase and morphology of the grown nanostructures. Arrays of tungsten oxide nanorods with diameter of ˜22 nm and length of ˜240 nm were obtained at 200°C after 8 h of hydrothermal reaction. We propose a growth mechanism for the deposition of the monoclinic tungsten oxide phase in the hydrothermal environment. The tungsten film was first oxidized to tungsten oxide to provide seed sites for crystal growth and address the poor connection between the growing tungsten oxide and substrate. Aligned tungsten oxide nanorod arrays can be grown by a W thin film-assisted heterogeneous nucleation process with NaCl as a structure-directing agent. The fabricated electrochromic device demonstrated optical modulation (coloration/bleaching) at 632.8 nm of ˜41.2% after applying a low voltage of 0.1 V for 10 s, indicating the potential of such nanorod array films for use in energy-saving smart windows.

  15. Direct Growth of Crystalline Tungsten Oxide Nanorod Arrays by a Hydrothermal Process and Their Electrochromic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chih-Hao; Hon, Min Hsiung; Leu, Ing-Chi

    2017-04-01

    Transparent crystalline tungsten oxide nanorod arrays for use as an electrochromic layer have been directly prepared on fluorine-doped tin oxide-coated glass via a facile tungsten film-assisted hydrothermal process using aqueous tungsten hexachloride solution. X-ray diffraction analysis and field-emission scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the phase and morphology of the grown nanostructures. Arrays of tungsten oxide nanorods with diameter of ˜22 nm and length of ˜240 nm were obtained at 200°C after 8 h of hydrothermal reaction. We propose a growth mechanism for the deposition of the monoclinic tungsten oxide phase in the hydrothermal environment. The tungsten film was first oxidized to tungsten oxide to provide seed sites for crystal growth and address the poor connection between the growing tungsten oxide and substrate. Aligned tungsten oxide nanorod arrays can be grown by a W thin film-assisted heterogeneous nucleation process with NaCl as a structure-directing agent. The fabricated electrochromic device demonstrated optical modulation (coloration/bleaching) at 632.8 nm of ˜41.2% after applying a low voltage of 0.1 V for 10 s, indicating the potential of such nanorod array films for use in energy-saving smart windows.

  16. Graphene Oxide-Promoted Reshaping and Coarsening of Gold Nanorods and Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Hanqing; Low, Serena; Weerasuriya, Nisala; Shon, Young-Seok

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes thermally induced reshaping and coarsening behaviors of gold nanorods and nanoparticles immobilized on the surface of graphene oxide. Cetyltrimethylammonium bromide-stabilized gold nanorods with an aspect ratio of ~3.5 (54:15 nm) and glutathione-capped gold nanoparticles with an average core size of ~3 nm were synthesized and self-assembled onto the surface of graphene oxide. The hybrid materials were then heated at different temperatures ranging from 50 to 300 °C. The effects of heat treatments were monitored using UV–vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These results were directly compared with those of heat-treated free-standing gold nanorods and nanoparticles without graphene oxide to understand the heat-induced morphological changes of the nanohybrids. The obtained results showed that the gold nanorods would undergo a complete reshaping to spherical particles at the temperature of 50 °C when they are assembled on graphene oxide. In comparison, the complete reshaping of free-standing gold nanorods to spherical particles would ultimately require a heating of the samples at 200 °C. In addition, the spherical gold nanoparticles immobilized on graphene oxide would undergo a rapid coarsening at the temperature of 100–150 °C, which was lower than the temperature (150–200 °C) required for visible coarsening of free-standing gold nanoparticles. The results indicated that graphene oxide facilitates the reshaping and coarsening of gold nanorods and nanoparticles, respectively, during the heat treatments. The stripping and spillover of stabilizing ligands promoted by graphene oxide are proposed to be the main mechanism for the enhancements in the heat-induced transformations of nanohybrids. PMID:25611371

  17. Graphene oxide-promoted reshaping and coarsening of gold nanorods and nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hanqing; Low, Serena; Weerasuriya, Nisala; Shon, Young-Seok

    2015-02-11

    This paper describes thermally induced reshaping and coarsening behaviors of gold nanorods and nanoparticles immobilized on the surface of graphene oxide. Cetyltrimethylammonium bromide-stabilized gold nanorods with an aspect ratio of ∼3.5 (54:15 nm) and glutathione-capped gold nanoparticles with an average core size of ∼3 nm were synthesized and self-assembled onto the surface of graphene oxide. The hybrid materials were then heated at different temperatures ranging from 50 to 300 °C. The effects of heat treatments were monitored using UV-vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These results were directly compared with those of heat-treated free-standing gold nanorods and nanoparticles without graphene oxide to understand the heat-induced morphological changes of the nanohybrids. The obtained results showed that the gold nanorods would undergo a complete reshaping to spherical particles at the temperature of 50 °C when they are assembled on graphene oxide. In comparison, the complete reshaping of free-standing gold nanorods to spherical particles would ultimately require a heating of the samples at 200 °C. In addition, the spherical gold nanoparticles immobilized on graphene oxide would undergo a rapid coarsening at the temperature of 100-150 °C, which was lower than the temperature (150-200 °C) required for visible coarsening of free-standing gold nanoparticles. The results indicated that graphene oxide facilitates the reshaping and coarsening of gold nanorods and nanoparticles, respectively, during the heat treatments. The stripping and spillover of stabilizing ligands promoted by graphene oxide are proposed to be the main mechanism for the enhancements in the heat-induced transformations of nanohybrids.

  18. Effect of thermal implying during ageing process of nanorods growth on the properties of zinc oxide nanorod arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, A. S.; Mamat, M. H.; Malek, M. F.; Abdullah, M. A. R.; Sin, M. D.; Rusop, M.

    2016-07-01

    Undoped and Sn-doped Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures have been fabricated using a simple sol-gel immersion method at 95°C of growth temperature. Thermal sourced by hot plate stirrer was supplied to the solution during ageing process of nanorods growth. The results showed significant decrement in the quality of layer produced after the immersion process where the conductivity and porosity of the samples reduced significantly due to the thermal appliance. The structural properties of the samples have been characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) electrical properties has been characterized using current voltage (I-V) measurement.

  19. Computer-Aided Molecular Design of Bis-phosphine Oxide Lanthanide Extractants

    DOE PAGES

    McCann, Billy W.; Silva, Nuwan De; Windus, Theresa L.; ...

    2016-02-17

    Computer-aided molecular design and high-throughput screening of viable host architectures can significantly reduce the efforts in the design of novel ligands for efficient extraction of rare earth elements. This paper presents a computational approach to the deliberate design of bis-phosphine oxide host architectures that are structurally organized for complexation of trivalent lanthanides. Molecule building software, HostDesigner, was interfaced with molecular mechanics software, PCModel, providing a tool for generating and screening millions of potential R2(O)P-link-P(O)R2 ligand geometries. The molecular mechanics ranking of ligand structures is consistent with both the solution-phase free energies of complexation obtained with density functional theory and themore » performance of known bis-phosphine oxide extractants. For the case where link is -CH2-, evaluation of the ligand geometry provides the first characterization of a steric origin for the ‘anomalous aryl strengthening’ effect. The design approach has identified a number of novel bis-phosphine oxide ligands that are better organized for lanthanide complexation than previously studied examples.« less

  20. Computer-Aided Molecular Design of Bis-phosphine Oxide Lanthanide Extractants

    SciTech Connect

    McCann, Billy W.; Silva, Nuwan De; Windus, Theresa L.; Gordon, Mark S.; Moyer, Bruce A.; Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S.; Hay, Benjamin P.

    2016-02-17

    Computer-aided molecular design and high-throughput screening of viable host architectures can significantly reduce the efforts in the design of novel ligands for efficient extraction of rare earth elements. This paper presents a computational approach to the deliberate design of bis-phosphine oxide host architectures that are structurally organized for complexation of trivalent lanthanides. Molecule building software, HostDesigner, was interfaced with molecular mechanics software, PCModel, providing a tool for generating and screening millions of potential R2(O)P-link-P(O)R2 ligand geometries. The molecular mechanics ranking of ligand structures is consistent with both the solution-phase free energies of complexation obtained with density functional theory and the performance of known bis-phosphine oxide extractants. For the case where link is -CH2-, evaluation of the ligand geometry provides the first characterization of a steric origin for the ‘anomalous aryl strengthening’ effect. The design approach has identified a number of novel bis-phosphine oxide ligands that are better organized for lanthanide complexation than previously studied examples.

  1. ZnO Nanorods Grown Electrochemically on Different Metal Oxide Underlays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromyko, I.; Dedova, T.; Krunks, M.; Syritski, V.; Mere, A.; Mikli, V.; Unt, T.; Oja Acik, I.

    2015-03-01

    In this study we present results on electrochemically grown ZnO nanorods on different metal oxide underlays, such as ZnO seed layers with different morphologies, ZnS and TiO2 compact thin films produced by spray pyrolysis on transparent conductive oxide (TCO) substrates. Also in this work we present results on ZnO nanorods directly deposited on some chosen TCO substrates. The relationship between nanorod formation and substrate properties were studied. All ZnO nanorod layers were grown electrochemically using ZnCl2 aqueous solutions (c=0.2 mmol/L) at the bath temperature of 80 °C during one hour. The structural properties and morphology of metal oxide underlays and ZnO nanorods grown on them were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD). Depending on the substrate morphology, ZnO rods with different dimension, orientation, shape and density were obtained. For instance, larger rods (d~200 nm, l~700 nm) were obtained on substrates, such as ITO/glass, FTO/glass and ZnO:In/ITO/glass. Smaller rods (d~60 nm, l~350 nm) were obtained on smooth, uniform and fine-grained underlays, such as ZnS and TiO2.

  2. Formation and bioactivity of HA nanorods on micro-arc oxidized zirconium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lan; Zhu, Shaoyu; Han, Yong; Xiao, Chengzhang; Tang, Wu

    2014-10-01

    A microporous and CaO partially stabilized zirconia (Ca-PSZ) coating covered with hydroxyapatite (HA) nanorods is fabricated on Zr substrate by a hybrid approach of micro-arc oxidation (MAO) and hydrothermal treatment (HT). The effect of P ions in HT solution on the density and morphology of HA was investigated; the hydrophilicity and apatite-forming ability of the Ca-PSZ coating with HA nanorods were also examined. High-density HA nanorods (with a mean diameter of 50 nm and length of 450 nm) grow on the Ca-PSZ coating after HT in a solution containing 0.002 M β-glycerophosphate disodium (β-GP). However, only a few of coarse-grained HA crystallites grow in the MAOed pores after HT in distilled water or in an ammonia aqueous solution with an initial pH value equal to the solution containing 0.002 M β-GP. P ions in the HT solution are thought to significantly promote the formation of HA nanorods. The Ca-PSZ coating covered with HA nanorods displays good hydrophilicity and excellent apatite-inducing ability, and the induced apatite prefers to nucleate on the basal-faceted surfaces of HA nanorods.

  3. Synthesis and Lanthanide Coordination Chemistry of Phosphine Oxide Decorated Dibenzothiophene and Dibenzothiophene Sulfone Platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Rosario-Amorin, Daniel; Ouizem, Sabrina; Dickie, D. A.; Paine, Robert T.; Cramer, Roger E.; Hay, Benjamin; Podair, Julien; Delmau, Laetitia Helene

    2014-01-01

    Syntheses for new ligands based upon dibenzothiophene and dibenzothiophene sulfone platforms, decorated with phosphine oxide and methylphosphine oxide donor groups, are described. Coordination chem. of 4, 6- bis(diphenylphosphinoylmethyl) dibenzothiophene (8) , 4, 6- bis(diphenylphosphinoylmethyl) dibenzothiophene- 5, 5- dioxide (9) and 4, 6- bis(diphenylphosphinoyl) dibenzothiophene- 5, 5- dioxide (10) with lanthanide nitrates, Ln(NO3) 3 (H2O) n is outlined, and crystal structure detns. reveal a range of chelation interactions on Ln(III) ions. The HNO3 dependence of the solvent extn. performance of 9 and 10 in 1, 2- dichloroethane for Eu(III) and Am(III) is described and compared against the extn. behavior of related dibenzofuran ligands (2, 3; R = Ph) and n- octyl(phenyl) - N, N- diisobutylcarbamoylmethyl phosphine oxide (4) measured under identical conditions.

  4. Tin Oxide Nanorod Array-Based Electrochemical Hydrogen Peroxide Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    SnO2 nanorod array grown directly on alloy substrate has been employed as the working electrode of H2O2 biosensor. Single-crystalline SnO2 nanorods provide not only low isoelectric point and enough void spaces for facile horseradish peroxidase (HRP) immobilization but also numerous conductive channels for electron transport to and from current collector; thus, leading to direct electrochemistry of HRP. The nanorod array-based biosensor demonstrates high H2O2 sensing performance in terms of excellent sensitivity (379 μA mM−1 cm−2), low detection limit (0.2 μM) and high selectivity with the apparent Michaelis–Menten constant estimated to be as small as 33.9 μM. Our work further demonstrates the advantages of ordered array architecture in electrochemical device application and sheds light on the construction of other high-performance enzymatic biosensors. PMID:20596358

  5. Tin Oxide Nanorod Array-Based Electrochemical Hydrogen Peroxide Biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinping; Li, Yuanyuan; Huang, Xintang; Zhu, Zhihong

    2010-07-01

    SnO2 nanorod array grown directly on alloy substrate has been employed as the working electrode of H2O2 biosensor. Single-crystalline SnO2 nanorods provide not only low isoelectric point and enough void spaces for facile horseradish peroxidase (HRP) immobilization but also numerous conductive channels for electron transport to and from current collector; thus, leading to direct electrochemistry of HRP. The nanorod array-based biosensor demonstrates high H2O2 sensing performance in terms of excellent sensitivity (379 μA mM-1 cm-2), low detection limit (0.2 μM) and high selectivity with the apparent Michaelis-Menten constant estimated to be as small as 33.9 μM. Our work further demonstrates the advantages of ordered array architecture in electrochemical device application and sheds light on the construction of other high-performance enzymatic biosensors.

  6. HCOOH hydrogenation over lanthanide-oxide-promoted Rh/Al 2O 3 catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benitez, J. J.; Carrizosa, I.; Odriozola, J. A.

    1993-08-01

    In this report, data corresponding to the hydrogenation of HCOOH adsorbed over a series of lanthanide-oxide-promoted Rh/Al 2O 3 catalysts are presented (Ln xO y, Ln=La, Ce, Sm, Yb, Lu). By comparison to thermal decomposition, it can be observed that the supports are unable to carry out the hydrogenation. Under these conditions, adsorbed formate decomposes through a dehydration mechanism as observed for an inert atmosphere. When rhodium is added to the samples and in the presence of hydrogen, adsorbed formate is eliminated from the surface at a lower temperature and a higher rate than the thermal decomposition. Adsorbed formate hydrogenation produces methane and water in the range 470-510 K, depending on the support employed. The presence of a small amount of gaseous HCOOH during methane production points to a mechanism in which adsorbed formate is converted into formic acid on the support. Its transformation into formic acid allows the adsorbate to reach the metal more easily where it immediately decomposes. The products of this decomposition are further hydrogenated into water and methane. Lewis acidity of the catalyst surface and metal dispersion are essential factors for formic-acid development and both are strongly modified by the presence of lanthanide oxides.

  7. Sensing temperature via downshifting emissions of lanthanide-doped metal oxides and salts. A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dramićanin, Miroslav D.

    2016-12-01

    Temperature is important because it has an effect on even the tiniest elements of daily life and is involved in a broad spectrum of human activities. That is why it is the most commonly measured physical quantity. Traditional temperature measurements encounter difficulties when used in some emerging technologies and environments, such as nanotechnology and biomedicine. The problem may be alleviated using optical techniques, one of which is luminescence thermometry. This paper reviews the state of luminescence thermometry and presents different temperature read-out schemes with an emphasis on those utilizing the downshifting emission of lanthanide-doped metal oxides and salts. The read-out schemes for temperature include those based on measurements of spectral characteristics of luminescence (band positions and shapes, emission intensity and ratio of emission intensities), and those based on measurements of the temporal behavior of luminescence (lifetimes and rise times). This review (with 140 references) gives the basics of the fundamental principles and theory that underlie the methods presented, and describes the methodology for the estimation of their performance. The major part of the text is devoted to those lanthanide-doped metal oxides and salts that are used as temperature probes, and to the comparison of their performance and characteristics.

  8. Newly fabricated magnetic lanthanide oxides core-shell nanoparticles in phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Jabeen, Fahmida; Najam-Ul-Haq, Muhammad; Rainer, Matthias; Güzel, Yüksel; Huck, Christian W; Bonn, Guenther K

    2015-01-01

    Metal oxides show high selectivity and sensitivity toward mass spectrometry based enrichment strategies. Phosphopeptides/phosphoproteins enrichment from biological samples is cumbersome because of their low abundance. Phosphopeptides are of interest in enzymes and phosphorylation pathways which lead to the clinical links of a disease. Magnetic core-shell lanthanide oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4@SiO2-La2O3 and Fe3O4@SiO2-Sm2O3) are fabricated, characterized by SEM, FTIR, and EDX and employed in the enrichment of phosphopeptides. The nanoparticles enrich phosphopeptides from casein variants, nonfat milk, egg yolk, human serum and HeLa cell extract. The materials and enrichment protocols are designed in a way that there are almost no nonspecific bindings. The selectivity is achieved up to 1:8500 using β-casein/BSA mixture and sensitivity down to 1 atto-mole. Batch-to-batch reproducibility is high with the reuse of core-shell nanoparticles up to four cycles. The enrichment followed by MALDI-MS analyses is carried out for the identification of phosphopeptides from serum digest and HeLa cell extract. Characteristic phosphopeptides of phosphoproteins are identified from human serum after the enrichment, which have the diagnostic potential toward prostate cancer. Thus, the lanthanide based magnetic core-shell materials offer a highly selective and sensitive workflow in phosphoproteomics.

  9. Synthesis of reduced graphene oxide/ZnO nanorods composites on graphene coated PET flexible substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Lei Guo, Guilue; Liu, Yang; Chang, Quanhong; Shi, Wangzhou

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • ZnO nanorods synthesized on CVD-graphene and rGO surfaces, respectively. • ZnO/CVD-graphene and ZnO/rGO form a distinctive porous 3D structure. • rGO/ZnO nanostructures possibility in energy storage devices. - Abstract: In this work, reduced graphene oxide (rGO)/ZnO nanorods composites were synthesized on graphene coated PET flexible substrates. Both chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) films were prepared following by hydrothermal growth of vertical aligned ZnO nanorods. Reduced graphene sheets were then spun coated on the ZnO materials to form a three dimensional (3D) porous nanostructure. The morphologies of the ZnO/CVD graphene and ZnO/rGO were investigated by SEM, which shows that the ZnO nanorods grown on rGO are larger in diameters and have lower density compared with those grown on CVD graphene substrate. As a result of fact, the rough surface of nano-scale ZnO on rGO film allows rGO droplets to seep into the large voids of ZnO nanorods, then to form the rGO/ZnO hierarchical structure. By comparison of the different results, we conclude that rGO/ZnO 3D nanostructure is more desirable for the application of energy storage devices.

  10. Sintering behavior of lanthanide-containing glass-ceramic sealants for solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Goel, Ashutosh; Reddy, Allu Amarnath; Pascual, Maria J.; Gremillard, Laurent; Malchere, Annie; Ferreira, Jose M.

    2012-05-01

    This article reports on the influence of different lanthanides (La, Nd, Gd and Yb) on sintering behavior of alkaline-earth aluminosilicate glass-ceramics sealants for their application in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). All the glasses have been prepared by melt-quench technique. The in situ follow up of sintering behavior of glass powders has been done by high temperature - environmental scanning electron microscope (HT-ESEM) and hot-stage microscope (HSM) while the crystalline phase evolution and assemblage has been analyzed by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). All the glass compositions exhibit a glass-in-glass phase separation followed by two stage sintering resulting in well sintered glass powder compacts after heat treatment at 850 C for 1 h. Diopside (CaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}) based phases constituted the major crystalline part in glass-ceramics followed by some minor phases. The increase in lanthanide content in glasses suppressed their tendency towards devitrification, thus, resulting in glass-ceramics with high amount of residual glassy phase (50-96 wt.%) which is expected to facilitate their self-healing behavior during SOFC operation. The electrical conductivity of the investigated glass-ceramics varied between (1.19 and 7.33) x 10{sup -7} S cm{sup -1} (750-800 C), and depended on the ionic field strength of lanthanide cations. Further experimentation with respect to the long term thermal and chemical stability of residual glassy phase under SOFC operation conditions along with high temperature viscosity measurements will be required in order to elucidate the potential of these glass-ceramics as self-healing sealants.

  11. The Thermodynamic Properties of the f-Elements and their Compounds. Part 2. The Lanthanide and Actinide Oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Konings, Rudy J. M. Beneš, Ondrej; Kovács, Attila; Manara, Dario; Sedmidubský, David; Gorokhov, Lev; Iorish, Vladimir S.; Yungman, Vladimir; Shenyavskaya, E.; Osina, E.

    2014-03-15

    A comprehensive review of the thermodynamic properties of the oxide compounds of the lanthanide and actinide elements is presented. The available literature data for the solid, liquid, and gaseous state have been analysed and recommended values are presented. In case experimental data are missing, estimates have been made based on the trends in the two series, which are extensively discussed.

  12. Microwave Synthesis of Zinc Hydroxy Sulfate Nanoplates and Zinc Oxide Nanorods in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dziedzic, Rafal M.; Gillian-Daniel, Anne Lynn; Peterson, Greta M.; Martínez-Herna´ndez, Kermin J.

    2014-01-01

    In this hands-on, inquiry-based lab, high school and undergraduate students learn about nanotechnology by synthesizing their own nanoparticles in a single class period. This simple synthesis of zinc oxide nanorods and zinc hydroxy sulfate nanoplates can be done in 15 min using a household microwave oven. Reagent concentration, reaction…

  13. Structural and optical properties of Nd{sup 3+} doped gadolinium oxide 1D nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Boopathi, G. Mohan, R.; Raj, S. Gokul; Kumar, G. Ramesh

    2014-04-24

    Neodymium doped gadolinium hydroxide [Nd:Gd(OH)3] nanorods were successfully synthesized at 60 °C through co-precipitation method. The dopant percentage was maintained at 5% and calcination was done at 750 °C temperature for 1 hour to form the respective neodymium doped gadolinium oxide [Nd:Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}] nanorods. The as-formed and annealed products were investigated in detail by using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with an energy dispersive X-ray spectrum (EDX), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and photoluminescence (PL) spectrophotometry.

  14. Engineering surface atomic structure of single-crystal cobalt (II) oxide nanorods for superior electrocatalysis

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Tao; Yan, Dong-Yang; Jiao, Yan; Wang, Hui; Zheng, Yao; Zheng, Xueli; Mao, Jing; Du, Xi-Wen; Hu, Zhenpeng; Jaroniec, Mietek; Qiao, Shi-Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Engineering the surface structure at the atomic level can be used to precisely and effectively manipulate the reactivity and durability of catalysts. Here we report tuning of the atomic structure of one-dimensional single-crystal cobalt (II) oxide (CoO) nanorods by creating oxygen vacancies on pyramidal nanofacets. These CoO nanorods exhibit superior catalytic activity and durability towards oxygen reduction/evolution reactions. The combined experimental studies, microscopic and spectroscopic characterization, and density functional theory calculations reveal that the origins of the electrochemical activity of single-crystal CoO nanorods are in the oxygen vacancies that can be readily created on the oxygen-terminated {111} nanofacets, which favourably affect the electronic structure of CoO, assuring a rapid charge transfer and optimal adsorption energies for intermediates of oxygen reduction/evolution reactions. These results show that the surface atomic structure engineering is important for the fabrication of efficient and durable electrocatalysts. PMID:27650485

  15. Engineering surface atomic structure of single-crystal cobalt (II) oxide nanorods for superior electrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Ling, Tao; Yan, Dong-Yang; Jiao, Yan; Wang, Hui; Zheng, Yao; Zheng, Xueli; Mao, Jing; Du, Xi-Wen; Hu, Zhenpeng; Jaroniec, Mietek; Qiao, Shi-Zhang

    2016-09-21

    Engineering the surface structure at the atomic level can be used to precisely and effectively manipulate the reactivity and durability of catalysts. Here we report tuning of the atomic structure of one-dimensional single-crystal cobalt (II) oxide (CoO) nanorods by creating oxygen vacancies on pyramidal nanofacets. These CoO nanorods exhibit superior catalytic activity and durability towards oxygen reduction/evolution reactions. The combined experimental studies, microscopic and spectroscopic characterization, and density functional theory calculations reveal that the origins of the electrochemical activity of single-crystal CoO nanorods are in the oxygen vacancies that can be readily created on the oxygen-terminated {111} nanofacets, which favourably affect the electronic structure of CoO, assuring a rapid charge transfer and optimal adsorption energies for intermediates of oxygen reduction/evolution reactions. These results show that the surface atomic structure engineering is important for the fabrication of efficient and durable electrocatalysts.

  16. Fabrication of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube or Zinc Oxide Nanorod Arrays for Optical Diffraction Gratings.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong; Kim, Sun Il; Cho, Seong-Ho; Hwang, Sungwoo; Lee, Young Hee; Hur, Jaehyun

    2015-11-01

    We report on new fabrication methods for a transparent, hierarchical, and patterned electrode comprised of either carbon nanotubes or zinc oxide nanorods. Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes or zinc oxide nanorod arrays were fabricated by either chemical vapor deposition or hydrothermal growth, in combination with photolithography. A transparent conductive graphene layer or zinc oxide seed layer was employed as the transparent electrode. On the patterned surface defined using photoresist, the vertically grown carbon nanotubes or zinc oxides could produce a concentrated electric field under applied DC voltage. This periodic electric field was used to align liquid crystal molecules in localized areas within the optical cell, effectively modulating the refractive index. Depending on the material and morphology of these patterned electrodes, the diffraction efficiency presented different behavior. From this study, we established the relationship between the hierarchical structure of the different electrodes and their efficiency for modulating the refractive index. We believe that this study will pave a new path for future optoelectronic applications.

  17. The fabrication of high sensitivity gold nanorod H2S gas sensors utilizing the highly uniform anodic aluminum oxide template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chien-Yu; Li, Ciao-Yu; Wu, You-Lin; Hsu, Chung-Ping; Lee, Ming-Ching; Houng, Mau-Phon

    2016-12-01

    Gold nanorod were fabricated using anodic alumina oxide template for H2S gas detection. The nanorod gas sensor exhibits high surface density and contact area, which can increase detection sensitivity. The anodic alumina oxide template contains an array of pores, with a width of 70 nm and a length of 27 μ m . Au nanorod were obtained through electro-deposition under a pulse bias of -1 V. The resistance of the Au nanorod was recorded upon exposure to various concentrations of H2S. The resistance could be attributed to the high electron affinity between sulfide and Au nanorod. Au-sulfide bonds provide strong bonding, which could alter the conductivity of the sensor. The gas sensor exhibits high sensitivity and short response time for H2S detection at room temperature.

  18. Tailoring copper oxide semiconductor nanorod arrays for photoelectrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide to methanol.

    PubMed

    Rajeshwar, Krishnan; de Tacconi, Norma R; Ghadimkhani, Ghazaleh; Chanmanee, Wilaiwan; Janáky, Csaba

    2013-07-22

    Solar photoelectrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide to methanol in aqueous media was driven on hybrid CuO/Cu2O semiconductor nanorod arrays for the first time. A two-step synthesis was designed and demonstrated for the preparation of these hybrid copper oxide one-dimensional nanostructures on copper substrates. The first step consisted in the growth of CuO nanorods by thermal oxidation of a copper foil at 400 °C. In the second step, controlled electrodeposition of p-type Cu2O crystallites on the CuO walls was performed. The resulting nanorod morphology with controllable wall thickness by adjusting the Cu2O electrodeposition time as well as their surface/bulk chemical composition were probed by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Photoelectrosynthesis of methanol from carbon dioxide was demonstrated at -0.2 V vs SHE under simulated AM1.5 solar irradiation on optimized hybrid CuO/Cu2O nanorod electrodes and without assistance of any homogeneous catalyst (such as pyridine or imidazole) in the electrolyte. The hybrid composition, ensuring double pathway for photoelectron injection to CO2, along with high surface area were found to be crucial for efficient performance in methanol generation under solar illumination. Methanol formation, tracked by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, indicated Faradaic efficiencies of ~95%.

  19. Studies on supercritical hydrothermal syntheses of uranium and lanthanide oxide particles and their reaction mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, DongKi; Tsukahara, Takehiko; Tanaka, Kosuke; Osaka, Masahiko; Ikeda, Yasuhisa

    2015-11-01

    In order to develop preparation method of raw metal oxide particles for low decontaminated MOX fuels by supercritical hydrothermal (SH) treatments, we have investigated behavior of aqueous solutions dissolving U(VI), Ln(III) (Ln: lanthanide = Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Tb), Cs(I), and Sr(II) nitrate or chloride compounds under SH conditions (temperature = 400-500 °C, pressure = 30-40 MPa). As a result, it was found that Ln(NO3)3 (Ln = Ce, Pr, Tb) compounds produce LnO2, that Ln(NO3)3 (Ln = Nd, Sm) compounds are hardly converted to their oxides, and that LnCl3 (Ln = Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Tb), CsNO3, and Sr(NO3)2 do not form their oxide compounds. Furthermore, HNO2 species were detected in the liquid phase obtained after treating HNO3 aqueous solutions containing Ln(NO3)3 (Ln = Ce, Pr, Tb) under SH conditions, and also NO2 and NO compounds were found to be produced by decomposition of HNO3. From these results, it was proposed that the Ln oxide (LnO2) particles are directly formed with oxidation of Ln(III) to Ln(IV) by HNO3 and HNO2 species in the SH systems. Moreover, the uranyl ions were found to form U3O8 and UO3 depending on the concentration of HNO3. From these results, it is expected that the raw metal oxide particles for low decontaminated MOX fuels are efficiently prepared by the SH method.

  20. Charge transfer dynamics between photoexcited CdS nanorods and mononuclear Ru water-oxidation catalysts.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Huan-Wei; Wilker, Molly B; Damrauer, Niels H; Dukovic, Gordana

    2013-03-06

    We describe the charge transfer interactions between photoexcited CdS nanorods and mononuclear water oxidation catalysts derived from the [Ru(bpy)(tpy)Cl](+) parent structure. Upon excitation, hole transfer from CdS oxidizes the catalyst (Ru(2+) → Ru(3+)) on a 100 ps to 1 ns timescale. This is followed by 10-100 ns electron transfer (ET) that reduces the Ru(3+) center. The relatively slow ET dynamics may provide opportunities for the accumulation of multiple holes at the catalyst, which is necessary for water oxidation.

  1. Energy transfer mechanisms in heavy metal oxide glasses doped with lanthanide ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragin, Tomasz; Zmojda, Jacek; Kochanowicz, Marcin; Miluski, Piotr; Dorosz, Dominik

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, glasses based on bismuth, germanium, gallium and sodium oxides have been synthesized in terms of low phonon energy (724 cm-1) and high thermal stability (ΔT = 127°C). Synthesis process have been optimized using low vacuum conditions (approx. 60 mBar) to improve the transmittance in the mid-infrared region and decrease the content of hydroxide groups in the material structure. Glass doped with erbium ions has been pumped with high power diode (λexc = 980 nm) to obtain luminescence in the band of 2.7 μm as a result of Er3+: 4I11/2 -> 4I13/2 radiative transition. For analysis of emission properties and energy transfer mechanisms, glasses co-doped with Er3+/Ho3+, Er3+/Pr3+, Er3+/Nd3+ ions have been synthesized. Obtained results indicated energy transfer phenomenon between lanthanide ions and elements forming the glass matrix. This demonstrates that developed heavy metal oxide glass doped with optimal rare earth elements system is an attractive material for mid-infrared applications.

  2. Cobalt-phosphate-assisted photoelectrochemical water oxidation by arrays of molybdenum-doped zinc oxide nanorods.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yan-Gu; Hsu, Yu-Kuei; Chen, Ying-Chu; Lee, Bing-Wei; Hwang, Jih-Shang; Chen, Li-Chyong; Chen, Kuei-Hsien

    2014-09-01

    We report the first demonstration of cobalt phosphate (Co-Pi)-assisted molybdenum-doped zinc oxide nanorods (Zn(1-x)Mo(x)O NRs) as visible-light-sensitive photofunctional electrodes to fundamentally improve the performance of ZnO NRs for photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting. A maximum photoconversion efficiency as high as 1.05% was achieved, at a photocurrent density of 1.4 mA cm(-2). More importantly, in addition to achieve the maximum incident photon to current conversion efficiency (IPCE) value of 86%, it could be noted that the IPCE of Zn(1-x)Mo(x)O photoanodes under monochromatic illumination (450 nm) is up to 12%. Our PEC performances are comparable to those of many oxide-based photoanodes in recent reports. The improvement in photoactivity of PEC water splitting may be attributed to the enhanced visible-light absorption, increased charge-carrier densities, and improved interfacial charge-transfer kinetics due to the combined effect of molybdenum incorporation and Co-Pi modification, contributing to photocatalysis. The new design of constructing highly photoactive Co-Pi-assisted Zn(1-x)Mo(x)O photoanodes enriches knowledge on doping and advances the development of high-efficiency photoelectrodes in the solar-hydrogen field.

  3. Zinc Oxide Nanorods Shielded with an Ultrathin Nickel Layer: Tailoring of Physical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Mudusu, Devika; Nandanapalli, Koteeswara Reddy; Dugasani, Sreekantha Reddy; Park, Sung Ha; Tu, Charles W.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the development of Ni-shielded ZnO nanorod (NR) structures and the impact of the Ni layer on the ZnO NR properties. We developed nickel-capped zinc oxide nanorod (ZnO/Ni NR) structures by e-beam evaporation of Ni and the subsequent annealing of the ZnO/Ni core/shell nanostructures. The core/shell NRs annealed at 400 °C showed superior crystalline and emission properties. More interestingly, with the increase of annealing temperature, the crystallinity of the Ni shells over the ZnO NRs gradually changed from polycrystalline to single crystalline. The presence of the Ni layer as a polycrystalline shell completely hindered the light emission and transmission of the ZnO NR cores. Further, the band gap of ZnO NRs continuously decreased with the increase of annealing temperature. PMID:27334555

  4. Zinc oxide nanorod field effect transistor for long-time cellular force measurement

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Xianli; Zhu, Rong

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical forces generated by cells are known to influence a vast range of cellular functions ranging from receptor signaling and transcription to differentiation and proliferation. We report a novel measurement approach using zinc oxide nanorods as a peeping transducer to monitor dynamic mechanical behavior of cellular traction on surrounding substrate. We develop a ZnO nanorod field effect transistor (FET) as an ultrasensitive force sensor to realize long-time, unstained, and in-situ detection of cell cycle phases, including attachment, spread, and mitosis. Excellent biocompatibility and ultra-sensitivity of the biomechanical measurement is ensured by coating a parylene film on the FET sensor as a concealment, which provides complete electronic isolation between the sensor and cell. With unique features of ultra-sensitivity, label-free, easy handling, and good biocompatibility, the force sensor allows feasible for tracking cellular dynamics in physiological contexts and understanding their contribution to biological processes. PMID:28272551

  5. A novel glutamine biosensor based on zinc oxide nanorod and glutaminase enzyme from Hypocria jecorina.

    PubMed

    Albayrak, Dilruba; Karakuş, Emine

    2016-01-01

    A novel biosensor for determination of L-glutamine in pharmaceutical glutamine powder was developed via immobilizing our produced glutaminase enzyme from Hypocria jecorina onto our prepared zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorod and chitosan. ZnO nanorods were prepared as surface-dependent and surface-independent and both were used. The biosensor is specific for L-glutamine and the peculiar analytical properties (linearity range, reproducibility, and accuracy) of it were experimentally determined. The optimum operating conditions of the biosensor such as buffer concentration, buffer pH, and medium temperature effect on the response of biosensor were studied. Km and Vmax values for the our-producing glutaminase enzyme from Hypocria jecorina immobilized on the biosensor were also determined as 0.29 mM and 208.33 mV/min., respectively, from Lineweaver-Burk plot. The biosensor was then used for the determination of glutamine contained in pharmaceutical formulations.

  6. Simple synthesis of cobalt sulfide nanorods for efficient electrocatalytic oxidation of vanillin in food samples.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, Mani; Sakthivel, Mani; Chen, Shen-Ming

    2017-03-15

    Well-defined CoS nanorods (NR) were synthesized using a simple hydrothermal method, and were tested as an electrode material for electro-oxidation of vanillin. The NR material was characterized with regard to morphology, crystallinity, and electro-activity by use of appropriate analytical techniques. The resulting CoS NR@Nafion modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) exhibited efficient electro-oxidation of vanillin with a considerable linear range of current-vs-concentration (0.5-56μM vanillin) and a detection limit of 0.07μM. Also, food samples containing vanillin were studied to test suitability for commercial applications.

  7. Titania-coated gold nanorods with expanded photocatalytic response. Enzyme-like glucose oxidation under near-infrared illumination.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Liebana, M C; Hueso, J L; Arenal, R; Santamaria, J

    2017-02-02

    Gold nanorods coated with a uniform titanium dioxide nanoshell have been prepared and used as glucose-oxidase surrogates. Remarkably, this core-shell photocatalytic nanostructure has been able to induce complete oxidation of glucose at near room temperature (32-34 °C) in a wide range of pH values with the aid of a near-infrared (NIR) irradiation source. In contrast, the uncoated gold nanorods exhibit negligible photo-oxidation response under identical experimental conditions thereby proving the photoactivity of the titania shell towards glucose oxidation. The process takes place via in situ photo-generation of singlet oxygen or hydroxyl radicals as reactive oxidative species (ROS). This underlines the role played by the core nanorods as plasmonic light harvesters in the NIR range and constitutes the first example of a NIR-activated enzyme-like catalyst.

  8. Carbon nanotube-induced preparation of vanadium oxide nanorods: Application as a catalyst for the partial oxidation of n-butane

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xiaowei; Zhu Zhenping; Haevecker, Michael; Su Dangsheng . E-mail: dangsheng@fhi-berlin.mpg.de; Schloegl, Robert

    2007-02-15

    A vanadium oxide-carbon nanotube composite was prepared by solution-based hydrolysis of NH{sub 4}VO{sub 3} in the presence of carbon nanotubes. The carbon nanotubes induce the nucleation of the 1D vanadium oxide nanostructures, with the nuclei growing into long freestanding nanorods. The vanadium oxide nanorods with the lengths up to 20 {mu}m and the widths of 5-15 nm exhibit a well-ordered crystalline structure. Catalytic tests show that the composite with nanostructured vanadium oxide is active for the partial oxidation of n-butane to maleic anhydride at 300 deg. C.

  9. Position controlled and seed/catalyst free growth of ZnO nanorod arrays on reduced graphene oxide nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hui; Li, Jinliang; Li, Lan; Mo, Zhaojun

    2016-09-01

    A new type of seed/catalyst-free and selective-growth process is developed for in situ grown vertically-aligned ZnO nanorods on the reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanosheets. The dense and single-crystalline ZnO nanorods have been successfully grow on rGO nanosheets with the position- and size-controlled. The effect of rGO layer on the ZnO nanorods and the growth mechanism were investigated. The position of ZnO nanorod arrays correlates well with the size and position of rGO nanosheets, which is determined by dangling bonds such as oxygen-containing groups on rGO surface. Meanwhile, ZnO nanorods could grow laterally to form a continuous arrays with a large coverage on rGO substrates, which is mainly due to the step edges in rGO boundaries. The diameter and density of ZnO nanorods were readily determined by the growth temperature, and the length was easily controlled by the growth time. The absorption and PL spectrums suggest that ZnO nanorods/rGO have a strong UV absorption ranging from 330 to 375 nm and no obvious UV PL emission at room temperature, which indicates that the ZnO nanorods/rGO nanohybrids could be an excellent candidate for application in UV photodetectors. This work represents the success in seed/catalyst-free fabrication of aligned ZnO nanorod arrays directly on rGO nanosheets and the process can be readily scaled up for industrial applications of optoelectronic devices.

  10. Facile synthesis of zinc hydroxide carbonate flowers on zinc oxide nanorods with attractive luminescent and optochemical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Jing; Li, Jia-Jun; Ling, Tao; Liu, Hui; Yang, Jing; Du, Xi-Wen

    2011-06-01

    A simple synthesis route was designed to fabricate a functional composite, zinc hydroxide carbonate (ZHC) flowers on zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods. The hydrolysis of hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) can generate various species which are slowly released and gradually change reaction modes in a Zn(NO3)2/HMT solution. As a result, ZnO nanorods and ZHC flowers can be sequentially synthesized and connect very well under constant experimental conditions. The obtained composite has the advantages of both components and exhibits attractive properties. For instance, ZHC flowers on ZnO nanorods exhibit strong blue emission under the excitation of ultraviolet light, and dye-sensitized solar cells with the annealed composite as photoanode achieve much higher conversion efficiency than pure nanorod arrays.

  11. Large-area zinc oxide nanorod arrays templated by nanoimprint lithography: control of morphologies and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chen; Huang, Xiaohu; Liu, Hongfei; Chua, Soo Jin; Ross, Caroline A.

    2016-12-01

    Vertically aligned, highly ordered, large area arrays of nanostructures are important building blocks for multifunctional devices. Here, ZnO nanorod arrays are selectively synthesized on Si substrates by a solution method within patterns created by nanoimprint lithography. The growth modes of two dimensional nucleation-driven wedding cakes and screw dislocation-driven spirals are inferred to determine the top end morphologies of the nanorods. Sub-bandgap photoluminescence of the nanorods is greatly enhanced by the manipulation of the hydrogen donors via a post-growth thermal treatment. Lasing behavior is facilitated in the nanorods with faceted top ends formed from wedding cakes growth mode. This work demonstrates the control of morphologies of oxide nanostructures in a large scale and the optimization of the optical performance.

  12. Synthesis and Enhanced Photocatalytic Activity of Ce-Doped Zinc Oxide Nanorods by Hydrothermal Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aisah, N.; Gustiono, D.; Fauzia, V.; Sugihartono, I.; Nuryadi, R.

    2017-02-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is a n-type semiconductor material which has a wide direct band gap energy of ∼ 3.3 eV, and other interesting optical properties, hence it’s potentially applied to various fields such as electronics, optoelectronics, sensors, photonic devices, and also photocatalyst. Dopant in ZnO nanostructures is an effective way to improve ZnO’s structural properties in various applications. In this study, undoped and Ce doped ZnO nanorods were synthesized on ITO coated glass substrates by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis for seeding deposition and hydrothermal methods at a temperature of 95 0C for 2 hours for growth. X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), UV-VIS and Photoluminescence spectroscopy were used to characterize the crystal structure, surface morphology and optical properties of ZnO nanorods and the photocatalytic activity test for methylene blue degradation. The experimental results showed that 3% Cerium dopant has produced hexagonal morphology ZnO nanorod growing more uniform on (002) crystal planes, increased the intensity of ultraviolet absorbance thereby increase the degradation speed of methylene blue.

  13. Synthesis of iron oxide nanorods via chemical scavenging and phase transformations of intermediates at ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, Ruchi; Mehra, Anurag; Thaokar, Rochish

    2017-01-01

    Chemically induced shape transformations of isotropic seeds, comprised of iron oxyhydroxides and iron oxide borate into nanorods, is reported. Transient growth studies show that the nanorods are formed via phase transformation and aggregation of various metastable species. Addition of tetra- methyl-ammonium hydroxide (TMAH) to the in situ synthesized seeds ensures a typical reaction pathway that favors formation of magnetite (Fe 3 O 4) via the steps of chemical etching, phase transformation of intermediates, and crystal consolidation. Whereas, with addition of sodium hydroxide (NaOH), either magnetite (Fe 3 O 4) or a mixture of ( γ-Fe 2 O 3 + α-FeOOH) is obtained. The shape with both the additives is always that of nanorods. When the seeds treated with TMAH were aged in an ultrasonication bath, rods with almost twice the length and diameter (length = 2800 nm, diameter = 345 nm) are obtained as compared to the sample aged without ultrasonication (length = 1535 nm, diameter = 172 nm). The morphology of nanostructures depending upon other experimental conditions such as, aging the sample at 60 ∘C, seeds synthesized under ultrasonication/ stirring or externally added are also examined and discussed in detail. All the samples show high coercivity and strong ferromagnetic behavior at room temperature and should be promising candidates as ferro-fluids for various applications.

  14. Synthesis of supported silver nano-spheres on zinc oxide nanorods for visible light photocatalytic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Saoud, Khaled; Alsoubaihi, Rola; Bensalah, Nasr; Bora, Tanujjal; Bertino, Massimo; Dutta, Joydeep

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Synthesis of supported Ag NPs on ZnO nanorods using open vessel microwave reactor. • Use of the Ag/ZnO NPs as an efficient visible light photocatalyst. • Complete degradation of methylene blue in 1 h with 0.5 g/L Ag/ZnO NPs. - Abstract: We report the synthesis of silver (Ag) nano-spheres (NS) supported on zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods through two step mechanism, using open vessel microwave reactor. Direct reduction of ZnO from zinc nitrates was followed by deposition precipitation of the silver on the ZnO nanorods. The supported Ag/ZnO nanoparticles were then characterized by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, FTIR, photoluminescence and UV–vis spectroscopy. The visible light photocatalytic activity of Ag/ZnO system was investigated using a test contaminant, methylene blue (MB). Almost complete removal of MB in about 60 min for doses higher than 0.5 g/L of the Ag/ZnO photocatalyst was achieved. This significant improvement in the photocatalytic efficiency of Ag/ZnO photocatalyst under visible light irradiation can be attributed to the presence of Ag nanoparticles on the ZnO nanoparticles which greatly enhances absorption in the visible range of solar spectrum enabled by surface plasmon resonance effect from Ag nanoparticles.

  15. Synthesis of one-dimensional silver oxide nanoparticle arrays and silver nanorods templated by Langmuir monolayers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-Guo; Xiao, Fei; Wang, Chang-Wei; Xue, Qingbin; Chen, Xiao; Lee, Yong-Ill; Hao, Jingcheng; Jiang, Jianzhuang

    2007-10-01

    One-dimensional (1D) silver oxide nanoparticle arrays were synthesized by illuminating the composite Langmuir-Blodgett monolayers of porphyrin derivatives/Ag(+) and n-hexadecyl dihydrogen phosphate (n-HDP)/Ag(+) deposited on carbon-coated copper grids with daylight and then exposing them to air. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation shows that the nanoparticle size is around 3 nm, with the separation of about 2-3 nm. High-resolution TEM (HRTEM) investigation indicates that the particles are made up of Ag(2)O. Ag nanorods with the width of 15-35 nm and the length of several hundreds of nanometers were synthesized by irradiating the composite Langmuir monolayers of porphyrin derivatives/Ag(+) and n-HDP/Ag(+) by UV-light directly at the air/water interface at room temperature. HRTEM image and selected-area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern indicate that the nanorods are single crystals with the (110) face of the face-centered cubic (fcc) silver parallel to the air/water interface. The formation of the 1D arrays and the nanorods should be attributed to the templating effect of the linear supramolecules formed by porphyrin derivative or n-HDP molecules in Langmuir monolayers through non-covalent interactions.

  16. Impact of Nanosize on Supercapacitance: Study of 1D Nanorods and 2D Thin-Films of Nickel Oxide.

    PubMed

    Patil, Ranjit A; Chang, Cheng-Ping; Devan, Rupesh S; Liou, Yung; Ma, Yuan-Ron

    2016-04-20

    We synthesized unique one-dimensional (1D) nanorods and two-dimensional (2D) thin-films of NiO on indium-tin-oxide thin-films using a hot-filament metal-oxide vapor deposition technique. The 1D nanorods have an average width and length of ∼100 and ∼500 nm, respectively, and the densely packed 2D thin-films have an average thickness of ∼500 nm. The 1D nanorods perform as parallel units for charge storing. However, the 2D thin-films act as one single unit for charge storing. The 2D thin-films possess a high specific capacitance of ∼746 F/g compared to 1D nanorods (∼230 F/g) using galvanostatic charge-discharge measurements at a current density of 3 A/g. Because the 1D NiO nanorods provide more plentiful surface areas than those of the 2D thin-films, they are fully active at the first few cycles. However, the capacitance retention of the 1D nanorods decays faster than that of the 2D thin-films. Also, the 1D NiO nanorods suffer from instability due to the fast electrochemical dissolution and high nanocontact resistance. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy verifies that the low dimensionality of the 1D NiO nanorods induces the unavoidable effects that lead them to have poor supercapacitive performances. On the other hand, the slow electrochemical dissolution and small contact resistance in the 2D NiO thin-films favor to achieve high specific capacitance and great stability.

  17. Folic acid-conjugated iron oxide porous nanorods loaded with doxorubicin for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ping; Xia, Xi-Ming; Wu, Ming; Cui, Can; Zhang, Yang; Liu, Lei; Wu, Bo; Wang, Cai-Xia; Zhang, Liu-Jie; Zhou, Xiang; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; Huang, Shi-Wen

    2014-08-01

    Iron oxide porous nanorods (IOPNR) with lengths ranging from 40nm to 60nm and pore diameters ranging from 5nm to 10nm were prepared, and further modified with NH2-PEG-FA (FA-PEG-IOPNR) for ligand targeting and modified with NH2-PEG-OCH3 (PEG-IOPNR) as a control. Instead of chemical bonding, doxorubicin (DOX), a low water solubility anticancer drug, was loaded in the pores of the modified IOPNR because of their porous structure and high porosity. The release of DOX in acidic PBS solution (pH 5.3) was faster than that in neutral (pH 7.4) solution. The analysis results from TEM, inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and flow cytometry analyses indicated that the presence of FA on the surface of the nanorods increase the cellular uptake of nanorods in the case of HeLa cells, a folate receptor (FR)-positive cell line. In contrast, for COS 7 cells, a FR-negative cell line, FA ligand on the surface of the nanorods showed no effect on the cellular uptake. MTT assay indicated that the cytotoxicity of DOX loaded in FA-PEG-IOPNR to HeLa cells was higher than that of DOX in PEG-IOPNR. In the case of COS 7 cells, no significant difference between the cytotoxicity of DOX loaded in FA-PEG-IOPNR and PEG-IOPNR was found. These results suggested that FA-PEG-IOPNR had the potential for target delivery of chemotherapeutic into cancer cells.

  18. A general method for preparing lanthanide oxide nanoparticles via thermal decomposition of lanthanide(III) complexes with 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid and hydrazine ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parimalagandhi, Karuppannan; Premkumar, Thathan; Vairam, Sundararajan

    2016-09-01

    Six new lanthanide(III) complexes (i.e., [Ln(L)2(NA)1.5]·3H2O, where Ln=La(III), Pr(III), Nd(III), Sm(III), Gd(III), and Ce(III) and L and NA indicate N2H4 and C10H6(1-O)(2-COO), respectively) with 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid [C10H6(1-O)(2-COOH)] and hydrazine (N2H4) as co-ligands were characterized by elemental, FTIR, UV-visible, and XRD techniques. In the FT-IR spectra, the N-N stretching frequency in the range of 981-949 cm-1 demonstrates evidence of the presence of coordinated N2H4, indicating the bidentate bridging nature of hydrazine in the complexes. These complexes show symmetric and asymmetric COO- stretching from 1444 to 1441 cm-1 and 1582 to 1557 cm-1, respectively, indicating bidentate coordination. TG-DTA studies revealed that the compounds underwent endothermic dehydration from 98 to 110 °C. This was followed by the exothermic decomposition of oxalate intermediates to yield the respective metal oxides as the end products. From SEM images, the average size of the metal oxide particles prepared by thermal decomposition of the complexes was determined to be 39-42 nm. The powder X-ray and SEM coupled with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) studies revealed the presence of the respective nano-sized metal oxides. The kinetic parameters of the decomposition of the complexes were calculated using the Coats-Redfern equation.

  19. Chelator free gallium-68 radiolabelling of silica coated iron oxide nanorods via surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Benjamin P.; Baghdadi, Neazar; Kownacka, Alicja E.; Nigam, Shubhanchi; Clemente, Gonçalo S.; Al-Yassiry, Mustafa M.; Domarkas, Juozas; Lorch, Mark; Pickles, Martin; Gibbs, Peter; Tripier, Raphaël; Cawthorne, Christopher; Archibald, Stephen J.

    2015-09-01

    The commercial availability of combined magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/positron emission tomography (PET) scanners for clinical use has increased demand for easily prepared agents which offer signal or contrast in both modalities. Herein we describe a new class of silica coated iron-oxide nanorods (NRs) coated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and/or a tetraazamacrocyclic chelator (DO3A). Studies of the coated NRs validate their composition and confirm their properties as in vivo T2 MRI contrast agents. Radiolabelling studies with the positron emitting radioisotope gallium-68 (t1/2 = 68 min) demonstrate that, in the presence of the silica coating, the macrocyclic chelator was not required for preparation of highly stable radiometal-NR constructs. In vivo PET-CT and MR imaging studies show the expected high liver uptake of gallium-68 radiolabelled nanorods with no significant release of gallium-68 metal ions, validating our innovation to provide a novel simple method for labelling of iron oxide NRs with a radiometal in the absence of a chelating unit that can be used for high sensitivity liver imaging.The commercial availability of combined magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/positron emission tomography (PET) scanners for clinical use has increased demand for easily prepared agents which offer signal or contrast in both modalities. Herein we describe a new class of silica coated iron-oxide nanorods (NRs) coated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and/or a tetraazamacrocyclic chelator (DO3A). Studies of the coated NRs validate their composition and confirm their properties as in vivo T2 MRI contrast agents. Radiolabelling studies with the positron emitting radioisotope gallium-68 (t1/2 = 68 min) demonstrate that, in the presence of the silica coating, the macrocyclic chelator was not required for preparation of highly stable radiometal-NR constructs. In vivo PET-CT and MR imaging studies show the expected high liver uptake of gallium-68 radiolabelled nanorods with no

  20. In situ integration of freestanding zinc oxide nanorods using copper silicide nanobeams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nitin; Parajuli, Omkar; Hahm, Jong-in

    2007-10-01

    In this letter, we describe an in situ integration method to produce freestanding zinc oxide nanorods (ZnO NRs) on copper silicide nanobeams (Cu3Si NBs). The integration of ZnO NRs with Cu3Si NBs is straightforwardly achieved immediately after ZnO NR synthesis by exploiting self-assembled Cu3Si NBs as catalysts. The resulting ZnO NRs on Cu3Si NBs exhibit atomic defect-free structures with superb optical quality which, in turn, can be beneficial when applied in micro- and nanoelectromechanical systems.

  1. Electrochemical and spectroscopic studies of some less stable oxidation states of selected lanthanide and actinide elements

    SciTech Connect

    Hobart, D. E.

    1981-06-01

    Simultaneous observation of electrochemical and spectroscopic properties (spectroelectrochemistry) at optically transparent electrodes (OTE's) was used to study some less stable oxidation states of selected lanthanide and actinide elements. Cyclic voltammetry at microelectrodes was used in conjunction with spectroelectrochemistry for the study of redox couples. Additional analytical techniques were used. The formal reduction potential (E/sup 0/') values of the M(III)/M(II) redox couples in 1 M KCl at pH 6 were -0.34 +- 0.01 V for Eu, -1.18 +- 0.01 V for Yb, and -1.50 +- 0.01 V for Sm. Spectropotentiostatic determination of E/sup 0/' for the Eu(III)/Eu(II) redox couple yielded a value of -0.391 +- 0.005 V. Spectropotentiostatic measurement of the Ce(IV)/Ce(III) redox couple in concentrated carbonate solution gave E/sup 0/' equal to 0.051 +- 0.005 V, which is about 1.7 V less positive than the E/sup 0/' value in noncomplexing solution. This same difference in potential was observed for the E/sup 0/' values of the Pr(IV)/Pr(III) and Tb(IV)/Tb(III) redox couples in carbonate solution, and thus Pr(IV) and Tb(IV) were stabilized in this medium. The U(VI)/U(V)/U(IV) and U(IV)/U(III) redox couples were studied in 1 M KCl at OTE's. Spectropotentiostatic measurement of the Np(VI)/Np(V) redox couple in 1 M HClO/sub 4/ gave an E/sup 0/' value of 1.140 +- 0.005 V. An E/sup 0/' value of 0.46 +- 0.01 V for the Np(VII)/Np(VI) couple was found by voltammetry. Oxidation of Am(III) was studied in concentrated carbonate solution, and a reversible cyclic voltammogram for the Am(IV)/Am(III) couple yielded E/sup 0/' = 0.92 +- 0.01 V in this medium; this value was used to estimate the standard reduction potential (E/sup 0/) of the couple as 2.62 +- 0.01 V. Attempts to oxidize Cm(III) in concentrated carbonate solution were not successful which suggests that the predicted E/sup 0/ value for the Cm(IV)/Cm(III) redox couple may be in error.

  2. A zinc oxide nanorod ammonia microsensor integrated with a readout circuit on-a-chip.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming-Zhi; Dai, Ching-Liang; Wu, Chyan-Chyi

    2011-01-01

    A zinc oxide nanorod ammonia microsensor integrated with a readout circuit on-a-chip fabricated using the commercial 0.35 μm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process was investigated. The structure of the ammonia sensor is composed of a sensitive film and polysilicon electrodes. The ammonia sensor requires a post-process to etch the sacrificial layer, and to coat the sensitive film on the polysilicon electrodes. The sensitive film that is prepared by a hydrothermal method is made of zinc oxide. The sensor resistance changes when the sensitive film adsorbs or desorbs ammonia gas. The readout circuit is used to convert the sensor resistance into the voltage output. Experiments show that the ammonia sensor has a sensitivity of about 1.5 mV/ppm at room temperature.

  3. A Zinc Oxide Nanorod Ammonia Microsensor Integrated with a Readout Circuit on-a-Chip

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ming-Zhi; Dai, Ching-Liang; Wu, Chyan-Chyi

    2011-01-01

    A zinc oxide nanorod ammonia microsensor integrated with a readout circuit on-a-chip fabricated using the commercial 0.35 μm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process was investigated. The structure of the ammonia sensor is composed of a sensitive film and polysilicon electrodes. The ammonia sensor requires a post-process to etch the sacrificial layer, and to coat the sensitive film on the polysilicon electrodes. The sensitive film that is prepared by a hydrothermal method is made of zinc oxide. The sensor resistance changes when the sensitive film adsorbs or desorbs ammonia gas. The readout circuit is used to convert the sensor resistance into the voltage output. Experiments show that the ammonia sensor has a sensitivity of about 1.5 mV/ppm at room temperature. PMID:22247656

  4. Characteristics of zinc oxide nanorod array/titanium oxide film heterojunction prepared by aqueous solution deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ming-Kwei; Hong, Min-Hsuan; Li, Bo-Wei

    2016-07-01

    The characteristics of a ZnO nanorod array/TiO2 film heterojunction were investigated. A TiO2 film was prepared on glass by aqueous solution deposition with precursors of ammonium hexafluorotitanate and boric acid at 40 °C. Then, a ZnO seed layer was prepared on a TiO2 film/glass substrate by RF sputtering. A vertically oriented ZnO nanorod array was grown on a ZnO seed layer/TiO2 film/glass substrate by aqueous solution deposition with precursors of zinc nitrate and hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) at 70 °C. After thermal annealing in N2O ambient at 300 °C, this heterojunction used as an oxygen gas sensor shows much better rise time, decay time, and on/off current ratio than as-grown and annealed ZnO nanorods.

  5. Protein Biosensors Based on Polymer Nanowires, Carbon Nanotubes and Zinc Oxide Nanorods

    PubMed Central

    M., Anish Kumar; Jung, Soyoun; Ji, Taeksoo

    2011-01-01

    The development of biosensors using electrochemical methods is a promising application in the field of biotechnology. High sensitivity sensors for the bio-detection of proteins have been developed using several kinds of nanomaterials. The performance of the sensors depends on the type of nanostructures with which the biomaterials interact. One dimensional (1-D) structures such as nanowires, nanotubes and nanorods are proven to have high potential for bio-applications. In this paper we review these three different kinds of nanostructures that have attracted much attention at recent times with their great performance as biosensors. Materials such as polymers, carbon and zinc oxide have been widely used for the fabrication of nanostructures because of their enhanced performance in terms of sensitivity, biocompatibility, and ease of preparation. Thus we consider polymer nanowires, carbon nanotubes and zinc oxide nanorods for discussion in this paper. We consider three stages in the development of biosensors: (a) fabrication of biomaterials into nanostructures, (b) alignment of the nanostructures and (c) immobilization of proteins. Two different methods by which the biosensors can be developed at each stage for all the three nanostructures are examined. Finally, we conclude by mentioning some of the major challenges faced by many researchers who seek to fabricate biosensors for real time applications. PMID:22163892

  6. Magnesium-doped zinc oxide nanorod-nanotube semiconductor/p-silicon heterojunction diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caglar, Yasemin; Görgün, Kamuran; Ilican, Saliha; Caglar, Mujdat; Yakuphanoğlu, Fahrettin

    2016-08-01

    Nanostructured zinc oxide material is usable in electronic device applications such as light-emitting diodes, heterojunction diode, sensors, solar cell due to its interesting electrical conductivity and optical properties. Magnesium-doped zinc oxide nanorod (NR)-nanotube (NT) films were grown by microwave-assisted chemical bath deposition to fabricate ZnO-based heterojunction diode. It is found that ZnO hexagonal nanorods turn into hexagonal nanotubes when the Mg doping ratio is increased from 1 to 10 %. The values of the optical band gap for 1 % Mg-doped ZnO NR and 10 % Mg-doped ZnO NT films are found to be 3.14 and 3.22 eV, respectively. The n-ZnO:Mg/p-Si heterojunction diodes were fabricated. The diodes exhibited a rectification behavior with ideality factor higher than unity due to the presence of surface states in the junction and series resistance. The obtained results indicate that Mg doping improves the electrical and optical properties of ZnO.

  7. Protein biosensors based on polymer nanowires, carbon nanotubes and zinc oxide nanorods.

    PubMed

    Anish Kumar, M; Jung, Soyoun; Ji, Taeksoo

    2011-01-01

    The development of biosensors using electrochemical methods is a promising application in the field of biotechnology. High sensitivity sensors for the bio-detection of proteins have been developed using several kinds of nanomaterials. The performance of the sensors depends on the type of nanostructures with which the biomaterials interact. One dimensional (1-D) structures such as nanowires, nanotubes and nanorods are proven to have high potential for bio-applications. In this paper we review these three different kinds of nanostructures that have attracted much attention at recent times with their great performance as biosensors. Materials such as polymers, carbon and zinc oxide have been widely used for the fabrication of nanostructures because of their enhanced performance in terms of sensitivity, biocompatibility, and ease of preparation. Thus we consider polymer nanowires, carbon nanotubes and zinc oxide nanorods for discussion in this paper. We consider three stages in the development of biosensors: (a) fabrication of biomaterials into nanostructures, (b) alignment of the nanostructures and (c) immobilization of proteins. Two different methods by which the biosensors can be developed at each stage for all the three nanostructures are examined. Finally, we conclude by mentioning some of the major challenges faced by many researchers who seek to fabricate biosensors for real time applications.

  8. Passivation of hematite nanorod photoanodes with a phosphorus overlayer for enhanced photoelectrochemical water oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Dehua; Li, Wei; Wang, Xiaoguang; Liu, Lifeng

    2016-09-01

    Hematite (i.e., α-Fe2O3) nanorod photoanodes passivated with a phosphorus overlayer have been fabricated by decomposing sodium hypophosphite (NaH2PO2) at a low temperature over the hematite nanorod surface. Extensive scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffractometry and UV-vis spectroscopy characterizations confirm that conformal deposition of an amorphous phosphorus overlayer does not change the crystal structure, morphology, and optical absorption properties of hematite photoanodes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that phosphorus in the deposited overlayer exists in an oxidized state. Comprehensive steady-state polarization, transient photocurrent response, and impedance spectroscopy measurements as well as Mott-Schottky analysis manifest that the phosphorus overlayer is able to effectively passivate surface states and suppress electron-hole recombination, substantially enhancing the photocurrent for water oxidation. Combining the phosphorization treatment with two-step thermal activation, a photocurrent density of 1.1 mA cm-2 is achieved at 1.23 V versus reversible hydrogen electrode under illumination of 100 mW cm-2, ca 55 times higher than that of the non-activated pristine hematite photoanode measured under the same conditions. The simple and fast phosphorization strategy we present here can be readily applied to passivate surfaces of other semiconductor photoelectrodes to improve their photoelectrochemical performance.

  9. Secret lanthanides.

    PubMed

    Sturza, C M

    2014-09-15

    Lanthanides are a group of 15 chemical elements which, together with their salts, have come to be used in the last decade as homoeopathic remedies. The effective introduction of lanthanides and their salts into the clinical use, as homoeopathic remedies was based on the idea of Jan Scholten, MD to relate their physicochemical properties shown in the periodic table of elements to their homoeopathic potential. The lanthanides and their salts were prepared as homoeopathic remedies by Pharmacist Robert Münz.

  10. Comparative electronic structure of a lanthanide and actinide diatomic oxide: Nd versus U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, M.; Stevens, W. J.

    2003-01-01

    Using a modified version of the Alchemy electronic structure code and relativistic pseudopotentials, the electronic structure of the ground and low lying excited states of UO, NdO, and NdO + have been calculated at the Hartree-Fock (HF) and multiconfiguration self-consistent field (MCSCF) levels of theory. Including results from an earlier study of UO + this provides the information for a comparative analysis of a lanthanide and an actinide diatomic oxide. UO and NdO are both described formally as M +2 O -2 and the cations as M +3 O -2 , but the HF and MCSCF calculations show that these systems are considerably less ionic due to large charge back-transfer in the πorbitals. The electronic states putatively arise from the ligand field (oxygen anion) perturbed f 4 , sf 3 , df 3 , sdf 2 , or s 2 f 2 states of M +2 and f 3 , sf 2 or df 2 states of M +3 . Molecular orbital results show a substantial stabilization of the sf 3 or s 2 f 2 configurations relative to the f 4 or df 3 configurations that are the even or odd parity ground states in the M +2 free ion. The compact f and d orbitals are more destabilized by the anion field than the diffuse s orbital. The ground states of the neutral species are dominated by orbitals arising from the M +2 sf 3 term, and all the potential energy curves arising from this configuration are similar, which allows an estimate of the vibrational frequencies for UO and NdO of 862 cm -1 and 836 cm -1 , respectively. For NdO + and UO + the excitation energies for the Ωstates were calculated with a valence configuration interaction method using ab initio effective spin-orbit operators to couple the molecular orbital configurations. The results for NdO + are very comparable with the results for UO + , and show the vibrational and electronic states to be interleaved.

  11. Tailoring the optical and hydrophobic property of zinc oxide nanorod by coating with amorphous graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahari, D.; Das, N. S.; Das, B.; Chattopadhyay, K. K.; Banerjee, D.

    2016-09-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods were synthesized at room temperature on potassium permanganate activated silicon and glass substrate by simple chemical method using zinc acetate as precursor. To modify the surface energy of the as prepared ZnO thin films the samples were coated with amorphous graphene (a-G) synthesized by un-zipping of chemically synthesized amorphous carbon nanotubes (a-CNTs). All the pure and coated samples were characterized by x-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscope, Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy. The roughness analysis of the as prepared samples was done by atomic force microscopic analysis. The detail optical properties of all the samples were studied with the help of a UV-Visible spectrophotometer. The surface energy of the as prepared pure and coated samples was calculated by measuring the contact angle of two different liquids. It is seen that the water repellence of ZnO nanorods got increased after they are being coated with a-Gs. Also even after UV irradiation the contact angle remain same unlike the case for the uncoated sample where the contact angle gets decreased significantly after UV irradiation. Existing Cassie-Wenzel model has been employed along with the Owen's approach to determine the different components of surface energy.

  12. TOPICAL REVIEW: Zinc oxide nanorod based photonic devices: recent progress in growth, light emitting diodes and lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willander, M.; Nur, O.; Zhao, Q. X.; Yang, L. L.; Lorenz, M.; Cao, B. Q.; Zúñiga Pérez, J.; Czekalla, C.; Zimmermann, G.; Grundmann, M.; Bakin, A.; Behrends, A.; Al-Suleiman, M.; El-Shaer, A.; Che Mofor, A.; Postels, B.; Waag, A.; Boukos, N.; Travlos, A.; Kwack, H. S.; Guinard, J.; LeSi Dang, D.

    2009-08-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO), with its excellent luminescent properties and the ease of growth of its nanostructures, holds promise for the development of photonic devices. The recent advances in growth of ZnO nanorods are discussed. Results from both low temperature and high temperature growth approaches are presented. The techniques which are presented include metal-organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD), vapour phase epitaxy (VPE), pulse laser deposition (PLD), vapour-liquid-solid (VLS), aqueous chemical growth (ACG) and finally the electrodeposition technique as an example of a selective growth approach. Results from structural as well as optical properties of a variety of ZnO nanorods are shown and analysed using different techniques, including high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), photoluminescence (PL) and cathodoluminescence (CL), for both room temperature and for low temperature performance. These results indicate that the grown ZnO nanorods possess reproducible and interesting optical properties. Results on obtaining p-type doping in ZnO micro- and nanorods are also demonstrated using PLD. Three independent indications were found for p-type conducting, phosphorus-doped ZnO nanorods: first, acceptor-related CL peaks, second, opposite transfer characteristics of back-gate field effect transistors using undoped and phosphorus doped wire channels, and finally, rectifying I-V characteristics of ZnO:P nanowire/ZnO:Ga p-n junctions. Then light emitting diodes (LEDs) based on n-ZnO nanorods combined with different technologies (hybrid technologies) are suggested and the recent electrical, as well as electro-optical, characteristics of these LEDs are shown and discussed. The hybrid LEDs reviewed and discussed here are mainly presented for two groups: those based on n-ZnO nanorods and p-type crystalline substrates, and those based on n-ZnO nanorods and p-type amorphous substrates. Promising electroluminescence

  13. Thermochromic VO{sub 2} nanorods and other vanadium oxides nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Kam, Kinson C.; Cheetham, Anthony K. . E-mail: cheetham@mrl.ucsb.edu

    2006-05-25

    Thermochromic VO{sub 2} nanorods were prepared via thermal conversion of the metastable VO{sub 2}-B phase synthesized by hydrothermal methods. We observe an increased thermochromic transition temperature to {approx}75-80 deg. C by variable-temperature infrared spectroscopy. Nano- and sub-micron structures of other vanadium oxides (V{sub 3}O{sub 7} (NH{sub 4}){sub 0.5}V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, and V{sub 2}O{sub 5}) were obtained simply by varying the starting materials in the hydrothermal synthesis. We also obtained nanostructures of the high temperature tetragonal rutile phase of VO{sub 2} by thermolysis of single-source vanadium (IV) precursors.

  14. Tungsten oxide nanorods: an efficient nanoplatform for tumor CT imaging and photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhiguo; Kong, Bin; Yu, Chao; Shi, Xiangyang; Wang, Mingwei; Liu, Wei; Sun, Yanan; Zhang, Yingjian; Yang, Hong; Yang, Shiping

    2014-01-13

    We report here a facile thermal decomposition approach to creating tungsten oxide nanorods (WO2.9 NRs) with a length of 13.1 ± 3.6 nm and a diameter of 4.4 ± 1.5 nm for tumor theranostic applications. The formed WO2.9 NRs were modified with methoxypoly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) carboxyl acid via ligand exchange to have good water dispersability and biocompatibility. With the high photothermal conversion efficiency irradiated by a 980 nm laser and the better X-ray attenuation property than clinically used computed tomography (CT) contrast agent Iohexol, the formed PEGylated WO2.9 NRs are able to inhibit the growth of the model cancer cells in vitro and the corresponding tumor model in vivo, and enable effective CT imaging of the tumor model in vivo. Our "killing two birds with one stone" strategy could be extended for fabricating other nanoplatforms for efficient tumor theranostic applications.

  15. Evaluation of oxidative stress induction in rats following exposure to silver nanorods.

    PubMed

    Lingabathula, Harikiran; Yellu, Narsimhareddy

    2017-05-01

    The study investigated the oxidative stress induction by the 10 and 25 nm silver nanorods (SNRs) following intra-tracheal instillation in rats after 1 day, 1 week, 1 month and 3 months post instillation periods at 1 and 5 mg/kg b.w. doses. The blood was withdrawn by retro orbital plexus method after exposure periods and different oxidative stress markers were estimated. The results showed that the both sizes of SNRs induced increased levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and depleted glutathione (GSH) levels after 1 day and 1 week post exposure periods. The 10 and 25 nm SNRs at both doses displayed that significantly reduced levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase following 1 day and 1 week post exposure periods. Also, the results have shown that decrease in total antioxidant capacity (TAC) of both sizes of SNRs significantly following 1 day and 1 week post exposure periods, indicating the oxidative stress induction by SNRs. In spite, there were no significant changes in oxidative stress markers following 1 month and 3 months post exposure periods may be due to recovery. The increased levels of MDA and decreased levels of GSH, SOD, catalase and TAC activity are strongly associated to ROS production and lipid peroxidation, suggesting the induction of oxidative stress in rats. The 10 nm SNRs at 5 mg/kg b.w. dose exposures in rats have shown greater changes in all oxidative stress parameters, indicating the greater induction of oxidative stress when compared with the 25 nm SNRs, representing the size-dose-dependent induction of oxidative stress of SNRs.

  16. Paramagnetic dysprosium oxide nanoparticles and dysprosium hydroxide nanorods as T₂ MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Kattel, Krishna; Park, Ja Young; Xu, Wenlong; Kim, Han Gyeol; Lee, Eun Jung; Bony, Badrul Alam; Heo, Woo Choul; Jin, Seonguk; Baeck, Jong Su; Chang, Yongmin; Kim, Tae Jeong; Bae, Ji Eun; Chae, Kwon Seok; Lee, Gang Ho

    2012-04-01

    We report here paramagnetic dysprosium nanomaterial-based T(2) MRI contrast agents. A large r(2) and a negligible r(1) is an ideal condition for T(2) MR imaging. At this condition, protons are strongly and nearly exclusively induced for T(2) MR imaging. The dysprosium nanomaterials fairly satisfy this because they are found to possess a decent r(2) but a negligible r(1) arising from L + S state 4f-electrons in Dy(III) ion ((6)H(15/2)). Their r(2) will also further increase with increasing applied field because of unsaturated magnetization at room temperature. Therefore, MR imaging and various physical properties of the synthesized d-glucuronic acid coated ultrasmall dysprosium oxide nanoparticles (d(avg) = 3.2 nm) and dysprosium hydroxide nanorods (20 × 300 nm) are investigated. These include hydrodynamic diameters, magnetic properties, MR relaxivities, cytotoxicities, and 3 tesla in vivo T(2) MR images. Here, MR imaging properties of dysprosium hydroxide nanorods have not been reported so far. These two samples show r(2)s of 65.04 and 181.57 s(-1)mM(-1), respectively, with negligible r(1)s at 1.5 tesla and at room temperature, no in vitro cytotoxicity up to 100 μM Dy, and clear negative contrast enhancements in 3 tesla in vivo T(2) MR images of a mouse liver, which will be even more improved at higher MR fields. Therefore, d-glucuronic acid coated ultrasmall dysprosium oxide nanoparticles with renal excretion can be a potential candidate as a sensitive T(2) MRI contrast agent at MR field greater than 3 tesla.

  17. Giant Hollow Heterometallic Polyoxoniobates with Sodalite-Type Lanthanide-Tungsten-Oxide Cages: Discrete Nanoclusters and Extended Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Jin, Lu; Li, Xin-Xiong; Qi, Yan-Jie; Niu, Ping-Ping; Zheng, Shou-Tian

    2016-10-24

    The first series of niobium-tungsten-lanthanide (Nb-W-Ln) heterometallic polyoxometalates {Ln12 W12 O36 (H2 O)24 (Nb6 O19 )12 } (Ln=Y, La, Sm, Eu, Yb) have been obtained, which are comprised of giant cluster-in-cluster-like ({Ln12 W12 }-in-{Nb72 }) structures built from 12 hexaniobate {Nb6 O19 } clusters gathered together by a rare 24-nuclearity sodalite-type heterometal-oxide cage {Ln12 W12 O36 (H2 O)24 }. The Nb-W-Ln clusters present the largest multi-metal polyoxoniobates and a series of rare high-nuclearity 4d-5d-4f multicomponent clusters. Furthermore, the giant Nb-W-Ln clusters may be isolated as discrete inorganic alkali salts and can be used as building blocks to form high-dimensional inorganic-organic hybrid frameworks.

  18. Secret Lanthanides

    PubMed Central

    Sturza, CM

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Lanthanides are a group of 15 chemical elements which, together with their salts, have come to be used in the last decade as homoeopathic remedies. The effective introduction of lanthanides and their salts into the clinical use, as homoeopathic remedies was based on the idea of Jan Scholten, MD to relate their physicochemical properties shown in the periodic table of elements to their homoeopathic potential. The lanthanides and their salts were prepared as homoeopathic remedies by Pharmacist Robert Münz. PMID:25408760

  19. Comparative Study of Optical Properties of Polarizing Oxide Glasses with Silver Nanorods and Chalcogenide Glasses with Copper Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavetskyy, Taras; Stepanov, Andrey L.; Bazarov, Valerii V.; Tsmots, Volodymyr; Ren, Jing; Chen, Guorong; Zhao, Xiujian

    The femtosecond Z-scan measurements with open-aperture of nonlinear absorption of the R2O-B2O3-SiO2 (R = Li, Na, K) polarizing oxide glass containing Ag nanorods at polarizing angle Θ = 0 and 90 degrees are performed and compared with the earlier Z-scan data obtained for the chalcogenide glasses with Cu nanoparticles (Cu:As2S3 and Cu:Ge15.8As21S63.2). The results of the present study reveal that (i) when the polarization of the laser is parallel to the long axis of the Ag nanorods (Θ=0 degrees), the saturated nonlinear absorption takes place; and (ii) when the polarization of light is perpendicular to the long axis of the Ag nanorods (Θ=90 degrees), the saturated nonlinear absorption and two-photon nonlinear absorption are observed likely to Cu:chalcogenide glasses. Ellipsometric measurements show also a dependence of the properties of the investigated polarizing glass on the sample orientation in consistence with Ag nanorod locations.

  20. Partially reduced graphene oxide-gold nanorods composite based bioelectrode of improved sensing performance.

    PubMed

    Nirala, Narsingh R; Abraham, Shiju; Kumar, Vinod; Pandey, Shobhit A; Yadav, Umakant; Srivastava, Monika; Srivastava, S K; Singh, Vidya Nand; Kayastha, Arvind M; Srivastava, Anchal; Saxena, Preeti S

    2015-11-01

    The present work proposes partially reduced graphene oxide-gold nanorods supported by chitosan (CH-prGO-AuNRs) as a potential bioelectrode material for enhanced glucose sensing. Developed on ITO substrate by immobilizing glucose oxidase on CH-prGO-AuNRs composite, these CH-prGO-AuNRs/ITO bioelectrodes demonstrate high sensitivity of 3.2 µA/(mg/dL)/cm(2) and linear range of 25-200 mg/dL with an ability to detect as low as 14.5 mg/dL. Further, these CH-prGO-AuNRs/ITO based electrodes attest synergistiacally enhanced sensing properties when compared to simple graphene oxide based CH-GO/ITO electrode. This is evident from one order higher electron transfer rate constant (Ks) value in case of CH-prGO-AuNRs modified electrode (12.4×10(-2) cm/s), in contrast to CH-GO/ITO electrode (6×10(-3) cm/s). Additionally, very low Km value [15.4 mg/dL(0.85 mM)] ensures better binding affinity of enzyme to substrate which is desirable for good biosensor stability and resistance to environmental interferences. Hence, with better loading capacity, kinetics and stability, the proposed CH-prGO-AuNRs composite shows tremendous potential to detect several bio-analytes in the coming future.

  1. Amperometric Non-Enzymatic Hydrogen Peroxide Sensor Based on Aligned Zinc Oxide Nanorods

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hardan, Naif H.; Abdul Hamid, Muhammad Azmi; Shamsudin, Roslinda; Othman, Norinsan Kamil; Kar Keng, Lim

    2016-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods (NRs) have been synthesized via the hydrothermal process. The NRs were grown over a conductive glass substrate. A non-enzymatic electrochemical sensor for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), based on the prepared ZnO NRs, was examined through the use of current-voltage measurements. The measured currents, as a function of H2O2 concentrations ranging from 10 μM to 700 μM, revealed two distinct behaviours and good performance, with a lower detection limit (LOD) of 42 μM for the low range of H2O2 concentrations (first region), and a LOD of 143.5 μM for the higher range of H2O2 concentrations (second region). The prepared ZnO NRs show excellent electrocatalytic activity. This enables a measurable and stable output current. The results were correlated with the oxidation process of the H2O2 and revealed a good performance for the ZnO NR non-enzymatic H2O2 sensor. PMID:27367693

  2. High dielectric constant, low loss, and low percolation threshold dielectric composites based on polyvinylidene fluoride and ferroferric oxide nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lili; Fu, Qiong; Li, Ya; Li, Weiping

    2016-08-01

    Dielectric super-capacitors call the excellent dielectric materials with high dielectric constant and low dielectric loss, both of which are not easy to obtain at the same time. The work synthesized the high aspect ratio and good crystalline ferroferric oxide (Fe3O4) nanorods by the hydrothermal process and used them as the filler to effectively reduce the percolation threshold value. It was found that the composites here based on the polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) polymer and these Fe3O4 nanorods exhibited ultra-high dielectric constant (>3000) and very low loss (<0.04) at very low filler fraction (0.35%). It was also proved that the high aspect ratio filler could help to improve the dielectric constant and suppress the dielectric loss in the percolative composites.

  3. Electrosynthesis of neodymium oxide nanorods and its nanocomposite with conjugated conductive polymer as a hybrid electrode material for highly capacitive pseudocapacitors.

    PubMed

    Mohammad Shiri, Hamid; Ehsani, Ali

    2017-06-01

    Herein, we report for the first time a facile and cost-efficient synthesis of metal oxide nanostructures comprised of nanorods type without the use of any additive. Nd(OH)3 and Nd2O3 nanorods were obtained by ultrasound wave assisted pulse electrochemical deposition in a Nd(NO3)3·6H2O nitrate bath. In addition, the interconnected nanorods were mesoporous leading to large electrochemical active sites for the redox reaction and fast ion transport within the Nd2O3 nanorods. Furthermore, for improving the electrochemical performance of conductive polymer, hybrid POAP/Nd2O3 films have then been fabricated by POAP electropolymerization in the presence of Nd2O3 nanorods as active electrodes for electrochemical supercapacitors. Surface and electrochemical analyses have been used for characterization of Nd2O3 and POAP/Nd2O3 composite films. Different electrochemical methods including galvanostatic charge discharge experiments, cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy have been applied to study the system performance. Prepared composite film exhibited a significantly high specific capacity, high rate capability and excellent cycling stability. Importantly, electrochemical investigation show that POAP/Nd2O3 nanorods composite material has better properties than POAP without Nd2O3 nanorods, suggesting it can be used as supercapacitor electrode material with excellent specific capacitance (379Fg(-1)) which indicates this material is a promising electrode material for energy storage applications in high-performance pseudocapacitors.

  4. Graphene-zinc oxide nanorods nanocomposite based sensor for voltammetric quantification of tizanidine in solubilized system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Rajeev; Dhanjai; Sinha, Ankita

    2016-04-01

    A new graphene/zinc oxide nanorods modified glassy carbon electrode (GR/ZnORs/GCE) based electrochemical sensor has been developed for the sensitive determination tizanidine (TZ) in solubilized system. The fabricated sensor was characterized by various electrochemical methods. Different kinetic parameters affecting the monitored electrocatalytic response were investigated and optimized for tizanidine determination at fabricated GR/ZnORs/GCE sensor and successfully compared with the results obtained at GR/SiO2/GCE, GR/GCE and at bare GCE. Under optimized conditions the square wave current is linear over the concentration range 0.80 ng mL-1 to 10.0 μg mL-1 with detection limit and quantification limit of 0.10 ng mL-1 and 3.45 ng mL-1 respectively. The applicability of proposed method is further extended to in vitro determination of the drug in pharmaceutical formulation with an acceptable recovery from 97.89% to 101.09%.

  5. Tungsten Oxide Nanorods: An Efficient Nanoplatform for Tumor CT Imaging and Photothermal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhiguo; Kong, Bin; Yu, Chao; Shi, Xiangyang; Wang, Mingwei; Liu, Wei; Sun, Yanan; Zhang, Yingjian; Yang, Hong; Yang, Shiping

    2014-01-01

    We report here a facile thermal decomposition approach to creating tungsten oxide nanorods (WO2.9 NRs) with a length of 13.1 ± 3.6 nm and a diameter of 4.4 ± 1.5 nm for tumor theranostic applications. The formed WO2.9 NRs were modified with methoxypoly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) carboxyl acid via ligand exchange to have good water dispersability and biocompatibility. With the high photothermal conversion efficiency irradiated by a 980 nm laser and the better X-ray attenuation property than clinically used computed tomography (CT) contrast agent Iohexol, the formed PEGylated WO2.9 NRs are able to inhibit the growth of the model cancer cells in vitro and the corresponding tumor model in vivo, and enable effective CT imaging of the tumor model in vivo. Our “killing two birds with one stone” strategy could be extended for fabricating other nanoplatforms for efficient tumor theranostic applications. PMID:24413483

  6. Importance of Plasmonic Heating on Visible Light Driven Photocatalysis of Gold Nanoparticle Decorated Zinc Oxide Nanorods

    PubMed Central

    Bora, Tanujjal; Zoepfl, David; Dutta, Joydeep

    2016-01-01

    Herein we explore the role of localized plasmonic heat generated by resonantly excited gold (Au) NPs on visible light driven photocatalysis process. Au NPs are deposited on the surface of vertically aligned zinc oxide nanorods (ZnO NRs). The localized heat generated by Au NPs under 532 nm continuous laser excitation (SPR excitation) was experimentally probed using Raman spectroscopy by following the phonon modes of ZnO. Under the resonant excitation the temperature at the surface of the Au-ZnO NRs reaches up to about 300 °C, resulting in almost 6 times higher apparent quantum yield (AQY) for photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB) compared to the bare ZnO NRs. Under solar light irradiation the Au-ZnO NRs demonstrated visible light photocatalytic activity twice that of what was achieved with bare ZnO NRs, while significantly reduced the activation energy required for the photocatalytic reactions allowing the reactions to occur at a faster rate. PMID:27242172

  7. Unique spatiotemporal biomolecular emission profiles on single zinc oxide nanorods and applications in ultrasensitive biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Manpreet

    There has been longstanding interest in improving the optical detection capabilities of fluorescence spectroscopy to achieve ultrahigh resolution and sensitivity in chemical and biological sensing applications. To promote these efforts, I present my work characterizing and developing zinc oxide nanorods (ZnO NRs) as advanced optical detection platforms that can enable enhanced intensity and stability of adsorbed fluorophore-coupled biomolecules. First, I present my unique findings profiling the temporal and spatial characteristics of biomolecular fluorescence on individual ZnO NRs in which I've identified highly localized, non-linear optical phenomena of fluorescence intensification on nanorod ends (FINE) and enhanced photostability. Using combined experimental and computational strategies, I elucidate the fundamental physicochemical origins of these optical phenomena by systematically decoupling various biomolecular, chemical, and nanomaterial factors. On the biomolecular side, I evaluate the roles of fluorophores with varying spectroscopic properties and concentrations as well as facet-selective biomolecular adsorption on the unique spatiotemporal optical responses on single ZnO NRs. From the chemical/nanomaterial context, I profile the biomolecular emission behaviors on single ZnO NRs as a function of varying NR physical dimensions, NR orientations, and positions along the NR long axis I also present the results of employing finite-difference time domain (FDTD) simulations to corroborate my multifold experimental findings. The FDTD results further clarify the passive waveguiding capacity of the ZnO NRs to couple the radiation of surface-adsorpbed emitters and form evanescent waves that propagate to the NR ends before final emission into the far-field, confirming the experimental manifestation of FINE.. I also present an application exploiting the optical enhancement enabled by ZnO NRs in which I've engineered and validated a novel biosensing assay for the

  8. Porous Co₃O₄ nanorods-reduced graphene oxide with intrinsic peroxidase-like activity and catalysis in the degradation of methylene blue.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhe; Hao, Jinhui; Yang, Wenshu; Lu, Baoping; Ke, Xi; Zhang, Bailin; Tang, Jilin

    2013-05-01

    A facile two step process was developed for the synthesis of porous Co3O4 nanorods-reduced graphene oxide (PCNG) hybrid materials based on the hydrothermal treatment cobalt acetate tetrahydrate and graphene oxide in a glycerol-water mixed solvent, followed by annealing the intermediate of reduced graphene oxide-supported Co(CO3)0.5(OH)·0.11H2O nanorods in a N2 atmosphere. The morphology and microstructure of the composites were examined by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. It is shown that the obtained PCNG have intrinsic peroxidase-like activity. The PCNG are utilized for the catalytic degradation of methylene blue. The good catalytic performance of the composites could be attributed to the synergy between the functions of porous Co3O4 nanorods and reduced graphene oxide.

  9. Piezoelectric nanogenerator based on zinc oxide nanorods grown on textile cotton fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Azam; Ali Abbasi, Mazhar; Hussain, Mushtaque; Hussain Ibupoto, Zafar; Wissting, Jonas; Nur, Omer; Willander, Magnus

    2012-11-01

    This investigation explores piezoelectricity generation from ZnO nanorods, which were grown on silver coated textile cotton fabrics using the low temperature aqueous chemical growth method. The morphology and crystal structure studies were carried out by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopic and high resolution transmission electron microscopic techniques, respectively. ZnO nanorods were highly dense, well aligned, uniform in spatial distribution and exhibited good crystal quality. The generation of piezoelectricity from fabricated ZnO nanorods grown on textile cotton fabrics was measured using contact mode atomic force microscopy. The average output voltage generated from ZnO nanorods was measured to be around 9.5 mV. This investigation is an important achievement regarding the piezoelectricity generation on textile cotton fabric substrate. The fabrication of this device provides an alternative approach for a flexible substrate to develop devices for energy harvesting and optoelectronic technology on textiles.

  10. Zinc oxide nanorod growth on gold islands prepared by microsphere lithography on silicon and quartz.

    PubMed

    Blackledge, Charles W; Szarko, Jodi M; Dupont, Aurélie; Chan, George H; Read, Elizabeth L; Leone, Stephen R

    2007-09-01

    Gold islands, vapor deposited on silicon and quartz by microsphere lithography patterning, are used to nucleate arrays of ZnO nanorods. ZnO is grown on approximately 0.32 microm2 Au islands by carbothermal reduction in a tube furnace. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive atomic X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) confirm that the gold effectively controls the sites of nucleation of ZnO. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) shows that approximately 30 nm diameter nanorods grow horizontally, along the surface. Alloy droplets that are characteristic of the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism are observed at the tips of the nanorods. The spatial growth direction of VLS catalyzed ZnO nanorods is along the substrate when they nucleate from gold islands on silicon and quartz. The energy of adhesion of the VLS droplet to the surface can account for the horizontal growth.

  11. Dissolution of cerium(IV)-lanthanide(III) oxides: Comparative effect of chemical composition, temperature, and acidity

    SciTech Connect

    Horlait, D.; Clavier, N.; Szenknect, S.; Dacheux, N.; Dubois, V.

    2012-03-15

    The dissolution of Ce{sub 1-x}Ln{sub x}O{sub 2-x/2} solid solutions was undertaken in various acid media in order to evaluate the effects of several physicochemical parameters such as chemical composition, temperature, and acidity on the reaction kinetics. The normalized dissolution rates (R{sub L,0}) were found to be strongly modified by the trivalent lanthanide incorporation rate, due to the presence of oxygen vacancies decreasing the samples cohesion. Conversely, the nature of the trivalent cation considered only weakly impacted the R{sub L,0} values. The dependence of the normalized dissolution rates on the temperature then appeared to be of the same order of magnitude than that of chemical composition. Moreover, it allowed determining the corresponding activation energy (E{sub A} ≅ 60-85 kJ.mol{sup -1}) which accounts for a dissolution driven by surface-controlled reactions. A similar conclusion was made regarding the acidity of the solution: the partial order related to (H{sub 3}O{sup +}) reaching about 0.7. Finally, the prevailing effect of the incorporation of aliovalent cations in the fluorite-type CeO{sub 2} matrix on the dissolution kinetics precluded the observation of slight effects such as those linked to the complexing agents or to the crystal structure of the samples. (authors)

  12. Dissolution of metal oxides and separation of uranium from lanthanides and actinides in supercritical carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Quach, D.L.; Wai, C.M.; Mincher, B.J.

    2013-07-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of extracting and separating uranium from lanthanides and other actinides by using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (sc-CO{sub 2}) as a solvent modified with tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) for the development of a counter current stripping technique, which would be a more efficient and environmentally benign technology for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing compared to traditional solvent extraction. Several actinides (U, Pu, and Np) and europium were extracted in sc-CO{sub 2} modified with TBP over a range of nitric acid concentrations and then the actinides were exposed to reducing and complexing agents to suppress their extractability. According to this study, uranium/europium and uranium/plutonium extraction and separation in sc-CO{sub 2} modified with TBP is successful at nitric acid concentrations of less than 6 M and at nitric acid concentrations of less than 3 M with acetohydroxamic acid or oxalic acid, respectively. A scheme for recycling uranium from spent nuclear fuel by using sc-CO{sub 2} and counter current stripping columns is presented. (authors)

  13. DISSOLUTION OF METAL OXIDES AND SEPARATION OF URANIUM FROM LANTHANIDES AND ACTINIDES IN SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE

    SciTech Connect

    Donna L. Quach; Bruce J. Mincher; Chien M. Wai

    2013-10-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of extracting and separating uranium from lanthanides and other actinides by using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (sc-CO2) as a solvent modified with tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) for the development of a counter current stripping technique, which would be a more efficient and environmentally benign technology for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing compared to traditional solvent extraction. Several actinides (U, Pu, and Np) and europium were extracted in sc-CO2 modified with TBP over a range of nitric acid concentrations and then the actinides were exposed to reducing and complexing agents to suppress their extractability. According to this study, uranium/europium and uranium/plutonium extraction and separation in sc-CO2 modified with TBP is successful at nitric acid concentrations of less than 6 M and at nitric acid concentrations of less than 3 M with acetohydroxamic acid or oxalic acid, respectively. A scheme for recycling uranium from spent nuclear fuel by using sc-CO2 and counter current stripping columns is presented.

  14. Comparison of the toxicity of aluminum oxide nanorods with different aspect ratio.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Jung; Lee, Gwang-Hee; Shim, Jae-Hun; Cho, Myung-Haing; Lee, Byoung-Seok; Kim, Yong-Bum; Kim, Jae-Ho; Kim, Younghun; Kim, Dong-Wan

    2015-10-01

    Aluminum oxide nanoparticles are listed among 14 high-priority nanomaterials published by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, but limited information is available on their potential hazards. In this study, we compared the toxicity of two different aluminum oxide nanorods (AlNRs) commercially available in vivo and in vitro. Considering aspect ratio, one was 6.2 ± 0.6 (long-AlNRs) and the other was 2.1 ± 0.4 (short-AlNRs). In mice, long-AlNRs induced longer and stronger inflammatory responses than short-AlNRs, and the degree reached the maximum on day 7 for both types and decreased with time. In addition, in vitro tests were performed on six cell lines derived from potential target organs for AlNPs, HEK-293 (kidney), HACAT (skin), Chang (liver), BEAS-2B (lung), T98G (brain), and H9C2 (heart), using MTT assay, ATP assay, LDH release, and xCELLigence system. Long-AlNRs generally produced stronger toxicity than short-AlNRs, and HEK-293 cells were the most sensitive for both AlNRs, followed by BEAS-2B cells, although results from 4 kinds of toxicity tests conflicted among the cell lines. Based on these results, we suggest that toxicity of AlNRs may be related to aspect ratio (and resultant surface area). Furthermore, novel in vitro toxicity testing methods are needed to resolve questionable results caused by the unique properties of nanoparticles.

  15. Lattice strain alteration and activation energy of phase transformation of TiO2 nanorods doped with silver and iron oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riazian, M.

    2013-10-01

    TiO2 nanorods are synthesized by a thermal corrosion. In present work, synthesis of TiO2 nanorods in anatase, rutile and Ti8O15 phases, TiO2 nanorods embedded with silver and iron oxides as dopant by using the sol-gel method and alkaline corrosion are reported. The morphologies and crystal structures of TiO2 nanorods are characterized by use of field emission scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and X-ray diffractometer techniques. The obtained results illustrate an aggregative structure at high calcined temperatures with production of spherical particles. The effects of chemical compositions and calcined temperatures on surface topography and crystallization of phases are studied. Moreover, activation energy of nanoparticles formation in pure and doped state are calculated during thermal treatment.

  16. Confined Formation of Ultrathin ZnO Nanorods/Reduced Graphene Oxide Mesoporous Nanocomposites for High-Performance Room-Temperature NO2 Sensors.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yi; Wang, Jing; Xu, Jian-Long; Li, Xian; Xie, Dan; Xiang, Lan; Komarneni, Sridhar

    2016-12-28

    Here we demonstrate high-performance room-temperature NO2 sensors based on ultrathin ZnO nanorods/reduced graphene oxide (rGO) mesoporous nanocomposites. Ultrathin ZnO nanorods were loaded on rGO nanosheets by a facile two-step additive-free solution synthesis involving anchored seeding followed by oriented growth. The ZnO nanorod diameters were simply controlled by the seed diameters associated with the spatial confinement effects of graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets. Compared to the solely ZnO nanorods and rGO-based sensors, the optimal sensor based on ultrathin ZnO nanorods/rGO nanocomposites exhibited higher sensitivity and quicker p-type response to parts per million level of NO2 at room temperature, and the sensitivity to 1 ppm of NO2 was 119% with the response and recovery time being 75 and 132 s. Moreover, the sensor exhibited full reversibility, excellent selectivity, and a low detection limit (50 ppb) to NO2 at room temperature. In addition to the high transport capability of rGO as well as excellent NO2 adsorption ability derived from ultrathin ZnO nanorods and mesoporous structures, the superior sensing performance of the nanocomposites was attributed to the synergetic effect of ZnO and rGO, which was realized by the electron transfer across the ZnO-rGO interfaces through band energy alignment.

  17. TiO2 anatase nanorods with non-equilibrium crystallographic {001} facets and their coatings exhibiting high photo-oxidation of NO gas.

    PubMed

    Habran, Margarita; Krambrock, Klaus; Maia da Costa, M E H; Morgado, Edisson; Marinkovic, Bojan A

    2017-03-08

    Development of highly active photocatalysts is mandatory for more widespread application of this alternative environmental technology. Synthesis of photocatalysts, such as anatase TiO2, with more reactive, non-equilibrium, crystallographic facets is theoretically justified by a more efficient interfacial charge transfer to reactive adsorbed species, increasing quantum efficiency of photocatalyst. Air and vacuum calcinations of protonated trititanate nanotubes lead to their transformation to anatase nanorods. The nanorods synthesized by air calcination demonstrate photo-oxidation of NO gas more than three times superior to the one presented by the benchmark P-25 photocatalyst. This performance has been explained in terms of 50% higher specific surface area and, more importantly, through the predominance of more reactive, non-equilibrium, {001} crystallographic facets of the anatase nanorods. These facets present a high density of undercoordinated Ti cations, which favors adsorption of reactant species, and strained Ti-O-Ti bonds, leading to more efficient photo-oxidation reactions. Reduced Ti species, such as Ti(3+), were not observed in the as-obtained nanorods, while reactive adsorbed molecules are scarce on the nanorods obtained through vacuum calcination. Dip-coating of TiO2 anatase nanorods (air calcined) over soda-lime glass plates was used to prepare visible light transparent, superhydrophilic and highly adherent photocatalytic coatings with homogenously distributed nanopores.

  18. Reduced graphene oxide-induced recrystallization of NiS nanorods to nanosheets and the improved Na-storage properties.

    PubMed

    Pan, Qin; Xie, Jian; Zhu, Tiejun; Cao, Gaoshao; Zhao, Xinbing; Zhang, Shichao

    2014-04-07

    Preparation of two-dimensional (2D) graphene-like materials is currently an emerging field in materials science since the discovery of single-atom-thick graphene prepared by mechanical cleavage. In this work, we proposed a new method to prepare 2D NiS, where reduced graphene oxide (rGO) was found to induce the recrystallization of NiS from nanorods to nanosheets in a hydrothermal process. The process and mechanism of recrystallization have been clarified by various characterization techniques, including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) mapping, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The characterization of ex situ NiS/rGO products by SEM and EDS mapping indicates that the recrystallization of NiS from nanorods to nanosheets is realized actually through an exfoliation process, while the characterization of in situ NiS/rGO products by SEM, TEM, and EDS mapping reveals the exfoliation process. The XPS result demonstrates that hydrothermally assisted chemical bonding occurs between NiS and rGO, which induces the exfoliation of NiS nanorods into nanosheets. The obtained NiS/rGO composite shows promising Na-storage properties.

  19. Amplified photoacoustic performance and enhanced photothermal stability of reduced graphene oxide coated gold nanorods for sensitive photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hyungwon; Kumar, Dinesh; Kim, Haemin; Sim, Changbeom; Chang, Jin-Ho; Kim, Jung-Mu; Kim, Hyuncheol; Lim, Dong-Kwon

    2015-03-24

    We report a strongly amplified photoacoustic (PA) performance of the new functional hybrid material composed of reduced graphene oxide and gold nanorods. Due to the excellent NIR light absorption properties of the reduced graphene oxide coated gold nanorods (r-GO-AuNRs) and highly efficient heat transfer process through the reduced graphene oxide layer, r-GO-AuNRs exhibit excellent photothermal stability and significantly higher photoacoustic amplitudes than those of bare-AuNRs, nonreduced graphene oxide coated AuNRs (GO-AuNRs), or silica-coated AuNR, as demonstrated in both in vitro and in vivo systems. The linear response of PA amplitude from reduced state controlled GO on AuNR indicates the critical role of GO for a strong photothermal effect of r-GO-AuNRs. Theoretical studies with finite-element-method lab-based simulation reveal that a 4 times higher magnitude of the enhanced electromagnetic field around r-GO-AuNRs can be generated compared with bare AuNRs or GO-AuNRs. Furthermore, the r-GO-AuNRs are expected to be a promising deep-tissue imaging probe because of extraordinarily high PA amplitudes in the 4-11 MHz operating frequency of an ultrasound transducer. Therefore, the r-GO-AuNRs can be a useful imaging probe for highly sensitive photoacoustic images and NIR sensitive therapeutics based on a strong photothermal effect.

  20. Boiling Method-Based Zinc Oxide Nanorods for Enhancement of Adipose-Derived Stem Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Su-Eon; Ahn, Hyo-Sun; Kim, Ji Hye; Arai, Yoshie; Lee, Soo-Hong; Yoon, Tae-Jong; Hwang, Sung-Joo; Sung, Jong-Hyuk

    2016-09-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) are typically expanded to acquire large numbers of cells for therapeutic applications. Diverse stimuli such as sphingosylphosphocholine and vitamin C have been used to increase the production yield and regenerative potential of ASCs. In the present study, we hypothesized that ZnO nanorods have promising potential for the enhancement of ASC proliferation. ZnO nanorods were prepared using three different methods: grinding and boiling at low temperature with and without surfactant. The physicochemical properties of the nanorods such as their crystallinity, morphology, size, and solvent compatibility were evaluated, and then, the ability of the synthesized ZnO nanorods to enhance ASC proliferation was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy images of all of the ZnO powders showed rod-shaped nanoflakes with lengths of 200-500 nm. Notably, although ZnO-G produced by the grinding method was well dispersed in ethanol, atomic force microscopy images of dispersions of both ZnO-B from boiling methods and ZnO-G indicated the presence of clusters of ZnO nanorods. In contrast, ZnO-B was freely dispersible in 5% dextrose of water and dimethyl sulfoxide, whereas ZnO-G and ZnO-M, produced by boiling with ethanolamine, were not. All three types of ZnO nanorods increased the proliferation of ASCs in a dose-dependent manner. These results collectively suggest that ZnO nanorods have promising potential for use as an agent for the enhancement of ASC proliferation.

  1. Facile fabrication of controllable zinc oxide nanorod clusters on polyacrylonitrile nanofibers via repeatedly alternating immersion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ying; Li, Xia; Yu, Hou-Yong; Hu, Guo-Liang; Yao, Ju-Ming

    2016-12-01

    Polyacrylonitrile/zinc oxide (PAN/ZnO) composite nanofiber membranes with different ZnO morphologies were fabricated by repeatedly alternating hot-cold immersion and single alternating hot-cold immersion methods. The influence of the PAN/ZnCl2 ratio and different immersion methods on the morphology, microstructure, and properties of the nanofiber membranes was investigated by using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy. A possible mechanism for different morphologies of PAN/ZnO nanofiber membranes with different PAN/ZnCl2 ratio through different immersion processes was presented, and well-dispersed ZnO nanorod clusters with smallest average dimeter of 115 nm and hexagonal wurtzite structure were successfully anchored onto the PAN nanofiber surface for R-7/1 nanofiber membrane. Compared to S-5/1 prepared by single alternating hot-cold immersion method, the PAN/ZnO nanofiber membrane fabricated by repeatedly alternating hot-cold immersion method (especially for R-7/1) showed improved thermal stability and high photocatalytic activity for methylene blue (MB). Compared to S-5/1, decomposition temperature at 5% weight loss ( T 5%) was increased by 43 °C from 282 to 325 °C for R-7/1; meanwhile, R-7/1 showed higher photocatalytic degradation ratio of approximately 100% (after UV light irradiation for 8 h) than 65% for S-5/1 even after irradiation for 14 h. Moreover, the degradation efficiency of R-7/1 with good reuse stability remained above 94% after 3 cycles.

  2. Self-assembly and dynamics of oxide nano-rods on NiAl(110).

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, John P.; McCarty, Kevin F.

    2004-10-01

    We observe the spontaneous formation of parallel oxide rods upon exposing a clean NiAl(110) surface to oxygen at elevated temperatures (850-1350 K). By following the self-assembly of individual nanorods in real time with low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM), we are able to investigate the processes by which the rods lengthen along their axes and thicken normal to the surface of the substrate. At a fixed temperature and O{sub 2} pressure, the rods lengthen along their axes at a constant rate. The exponential temperature dependence of this rate yields an activation energy for growth of 1.2 {+-} 0.1 eV. The rod growth rates do not change as their ends pass in close proximity (<40 nm) to each other, which suggests that they do not compete for diffusing flux in order to elongate. Both LEEM and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) studies show that the rods can grow vertically in layer-by-layer fashion. The heights of the rods are extremely bias dependent in STM images, but occur in integer multiples of approximately 2-{angstrom}-thick oxygen-cation layers. As the rods elongate from one substrate terrace to the next, we commonly see sharp changes in their rates of elongation that result from their tendency to gain (lose) atomic layers as they descend (climb) substrate steps. Diffraction analysis and dark-field imaging with LEEM indicate that the rods are crystalline, with a lattice constant that is well matched to that of the substrate along their length. We discuss the factors that lead to the formation of these highly anisotropic structures.

  3. Understanding the Chemistry of Uncommon Americium Oxidation States for Application to Actinide/Lanthanide Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh Martin; Bruce J. Mincher; Nicholas C. Schmitt

    2007-09-01

    A spectroscopic study of the stability of Am(V) and Am(VI) produced by oxidizing Am(III) with sodium bismuthate is presented, varying the initial americium concentration, temperature and length of the oxidation was seen to have profound effects on the resultant solutions.

  4. Baize-like CeO2 and NiO/CeO2 nanorod catalysts prepared by dealloying for CO oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaolong; Li, Kun; Shi, Wenyu; Wei, Caihua; Song, Xiaoping; Yang, Sen; Sun, Zhanbo

    2017-01-01

    Baize-like monolithic CeO2 and NiO/CeO2 nanorod catalysts were prepared by combined dealloying and calcination and the catalytic activities were evaluated using CO catalytic oxidation. The CeO2 catalysts were composed of nanorods and exhibited a three-dimensional supporting structure with pores. After introduction of NiO, dispersed NiO nanosheets and nanoparticles were supported on the surface of CeO2 nanorods and they were not well-crystallined due to CeO2 inhibiting the NiO crystallization. The Raman and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses revealed that the introduction of NiO species into CeO2 generated more coordinate unsaturated Ni atoms, oxygen vacancies, defects and active sites for CO catalytic reactions. The reaction activation energy of NiO/CeO2 nanorod catalyst prepared from the Al83Ce10Ni7 precursor alloy was just 31.2 kJ mol-1 and the CO conversion can reach up to 97% at 240 °C, which was superior to that of pure CeO2 and nanoporous NiO. The enhanced catalytic activity of baize-like NiO/CeO2 nanorods can be attributed to the strong synergistic effects between finely dispersed NiO species and surface oxygen vacancies in CeO2 nanorods.

  5. Baize-like CeO2 and NiO/CeO2 nanorod catalysts prepared by dealloying for CO oxidation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaolong; Li, Kun; Shi, Wenyu; Wei, Caihua; Song, Xiaoping; Yang, Sen; Sun, Zhanbo

    2017-01-27

    Baize-like monolithic CeO2 and NiO/CeO2 nanorod catalysts were prepared by combined dealloying and calcination and the catalytic activities were evaluated using CO catalytic oxidation. The CeO2 catalysts were composed of nanorods and exhibited a three-dimensional supporting structure with pores. After introduction of NiO, dispersed NiO nanosheets and nanoparticles were supported on the surface of CeO2 nanorods and they were not well-crystallined due to CeO2 inhibiting the NiO crystallization. The Raman and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses revealed that the introduction of NiO species into CeO2 generated more coordinate unsaturated Ni atoms, oxygen vacancies, defects and active sites for CO catalytic reactions. The reaction activation energy of NiO/CeO2 nanorod catalyst prepared from the Al83Ce10Ni7 precursor alloy was just 31.2 kJ mol(-1) and the CO conversion can reach up to 97% at 240 °C, which was superior to that of pure CeO2 and nanoporous NiO. The enhanced catalytic activity of baize-like NiO/CeO2 nanorods can be attributed to the strong synergistic effects between finely dispersed NiO species and surface oxygen vacancies in CeO2 nanorods.

  6. Porous cobalt oxide (Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanorods: Facile syntheses, optical property and application in lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Rui; Wang Jiawei; Li Qiuyu; Sun Guoying; Wang Enbo; Li Siheng; Gu Jianmin; Ju Mingliang

    2009-11-15

    We developed a facile synthetic route of porous cobalt oxide (Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanorods via a microemulsion-based method in combination with subsequent calcination process. The porous structure was formed by controlled decomposition of the microemulsion-synthesized precursor CoC{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanorods without destruction of the original morphology. The as-prepared Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanorods, consisting of small nanoparticles with diameter of 80-150 nm, had an average diameter of 200 nm and a length of 3-5 {mu}m. The morphology and structure of synthesized samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The phase and composition were investigated by X-ray powder diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The optical property of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanorods was investigated. Moreover, the porous Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanorods exhibited high electrochemical performance when applied as cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries, which gives them good potential applications. - Graphical abstract: The porous Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanorods synthesized via a microemulsion-based method in combination with subsequent calcination were applied in the negative electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries and exhibited high electrochemical performance.

  7. Ultraviolet photodetectors based on ZnO nanorods-seed layer effect and metal oxide modifying layer effect.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hai; Fang, Guojia; Liu, Nishuang; Zhao, Xingzhong

    2011-02-15

    Pt/ZnO nanorod (NR) and Pt/modified ZnO NR Schottky barrier ultraviolet (UV) photodetectors (PDs) were prepared with different seed layers and metal oxide modifying layer materials. In this paper, we discussed the effect of metal oxide modifying layer on the performance of UV PDs pre- and post-deposition annealing at 300°C, respectively. For Schottky barrier UV PDs with different seed layers, the MgZnO seed layer-PDs without metal oxide coating showed bigger responsivity and larger detectivity (Dλ*) than those of PDs with ZnO seed layer, and the reason was illustrated through energy band theory and the electron transport mechanism. Also the ratio of D254* to D546* was calculated above 8 × 102 for all PDs, which demonstrated that our PDs showed high selectivity for detecting UV light with less influence of light with long wavelength.

  8. Hydra as a model organism to decipher the toxic effects of copper oxide nanorod: Eco-toxicogenomics approach

    PubMed Central

    Murugadas, Anbazhagan; Zeeshan, Mohammed; Thamaraiselvi, Kaliannan; Ghaskadbi, Surendra; Akbarsha, Mohammad Abdulkader

    2016-01-01

    Nanotechnology has emerged as a powerful field of applied research. However, the potential toxicity of nano-materials is a cause of concern. A thorough toxicological investigation is required before a nanomaterial is evaluated for application of any kind. In this context, there is concerted effort to find appropriate test systems to assess the toxicity of nanomaterials. Toxicity of a nanomaterial greatly depends on its physicochemical properties and the biological system with which it interacts. The present research was carried out with a view to generate data on eco-toxicological impacts of copper oxide nanorod (CuO NR) in Hydra magnipapillata 105 at organismal, cellular and molecular levels. Exposure of hydra to CuO NR resulted in severe morphological alterations in a concentration- as well as duration-dependent manner. Impairment of feeding, population growth, and regeneration was also observed. In vivo and in vitro analyses revealed induction of oxidative stress, genotoxicity, and molecular machinery of apoptotic cell death, accompanied by disruption of cell cycle progression. Taken together, CuO nanorod is potentially toxic to the biological systems. Also, hydra offers potential to be used as a convenient model organism for aquatic ecotoxicological risk assessment of nanomaterials. PMID:27417574

  9. Role of bonding mechanisms during transfer hydrogenation reaction on heterogeneous catalysts of platinum nanoparticles supported on zinc oxide nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Alawi, Reem A.; Laxman, Karthik; Dastgir, Sarim; Dutta, Joydeep

    2016-07-01

    For supported heterogeneous catalysis, the interface between a metal nanoparticle and the support plays an important role. In this work the dependency of the catalytic efficiency on the bonding chemistry of platinum nanoparticles supported on zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods is studied. Platinum nanoparticles were deposited on ZnO nanorods (ZnO NR) using thermal and photochemical processes and the effects on the size, distribution, density and chemical state of the metal nanoparticles upon the catalytic activities are presented. The obtained results indicate that the bonding at Pt-ZnO interface depends on the deposition scheme which can be utilized to modulate the surface chemistry and thus the activity of the supported catalysts. Additionally, uniform distribution of metal on the catalyst support was observed to be more important than the loading density. It is also found that oxidized platinum Pt(IV) (platinum hydroxide) provided a more suitable surface for enhancing the transfer hydrogenation reaction of cyclohexanone with isopropanol compared to zero valent platinum. Photochemically synthesized ZnO supported nanocatalysts were efficient and potentially viable for upscaling to industrial applications.

  10. Hydra as a model organism to decipher the toxic effects of copper oxide nanorod: Eco-toxicogenomics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugadas, Anbazhagan; Zeeshan, Mohammed; Thamaraiselvi, Kaliannan; Ghaskadbi, Surendra; Akbarsha, Mohammad Abdulkader

    2016-07-01

    Nanotechnology has emerged as a powerful field of applied research. However, the potential toxicity of nano-materials is a cause of concern. A thorough toxicological investigation is required before a nanomaterial is evaluated for application of any kind. In this context, there is concerted effort to find appropriate test systems to assess the toxicity of nanomaterials. Toxicity of a nanomaterial greatly depends on its physicochemical properties and the biological system with which it interacts. The present research was carried out with a view to generate data on eco-toxicological impacts of copper oxide nanorod (CuO NR) in Hydra magnipapillata 105 at organismal, cellular and molecular levels. Exposure of hydra to CuO NR resulted in severe morphological alterations in a concentration- as well as duration-dependent manner. Impairment of feeding, population growth, and regeneration was also observed. In vivo and in vitro analyses revealed induction of oxidative stress, genotoxicity, and molecular machinery of apoptotic cell death, accompanied by disruption of cell cycle progression. Taken together, CuO nanorod is potentially toxic to the biological systems. Also, hydra offers potential to be used as a convenient model organism for aquatic ecotoxicological risk assessment of nanomaterials.

  11. Miniaturized pH Sensors Based on Zinc Oxide Nanotubes/Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Fulati, Alimujiang; Ali, Syed M Usman; Riaz, Muhammad; Amin, Gul; Nur, Omer; Willander, Magnus

    2009-01-01

    ZnO nanotubes and nanorods grown on gold thin film were used to create pH sensor devices. The developed ZnO nanotube and nanorod pH sensors display good reproducibility, repeatability and long-term stability and exhibit a pH-dependent electrochemical potential difference versus an Ag/AgCl reference electrode over a large dynamic pH range. We found the ZnO nanotubes provide sensitivity as high as twice that of the ZnO nanorods, which can be ascribed to the fact that small dimensional ZnO nanotubes have a higher level of surface and subsurface oxygen vacancies and provide a larger effective surface area with higher surface-to-volume ratio as compared to ZnO nanorods, thus affording the ZnO nanotube pH sensor a higher sensitivity. Experimental results indicate ZnO nanotubes can be used in pH sensor applications with improved performance. Moreover, the ZnO nanotube arrays may find potential application as a novel material for measurements of intracellular biochemical species within single living cells.

  12. Synthesis and optical characteristics of yttrium-doped zinc oxide nanorod arrays grown by hydrothermal method.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyunggil; Kim, Younggyu; Ji, Iksoo; Lee, Sang-Heon; Kim, Jin Soo; Kim, Jin Soo; Leem, Jae-Young

    2014-11-01

    Yttrium-doped ZnO (YZO) nanorods were synthesized by hydrothermal growth on a quartz substrate with various post-annealing temperatures. To investigate the effects of post-annealing on the optical properties and parameters of the nanorods, X-ray diffractometry (XRD), photoluminescence (PL) measurement, and ultraviolet (UV)-visible spectroscopy were used. From the XRD investigation, the full width at half maximum (FWHM) and the dislocation density of the nanorods was found to increase with an increase in the post-annealing temperature. In the PL spectra, the intensity of the near band edge (NBE) emission peak in the UV region also increases with an increase in the temperature of post-annealing. The deep level emission (DLE) peak in the visible region changes with various post-annealing temperatures, and its intensity increases remarkably with post-annealing at 800 degrees C. In this paper, changes in the optical parameters of the nanorods caused by variation in the behavior of Y during post-annealing was investigated, with properties such as absorption coefficients, refractive indices, and dispersion parameters being obtained from transmittance and reflectance analysis.

  13. Organized Nanorod-Superconductor Composites.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    34 Preparation of Carbide Nanorods", 08/814,745, patent pending. 3. CM. Lieber and P. Yang, "Method of Producing Metal Oxide Nanorods", 08/790,824, patent...Growth of Nanowires Using Laser-Generated Nanoclusters ", Gordon Research Conference on Laser Interactions with Materials, Andover, NH, June 1998...to prepare MgO nanorods; (2) the preparation of MgO nanorod/HTS bulk composites with HTS = Bi2Sr2CaCu208 (BSCCO-2212) and Bi^Ca^O,,, (BSCCO-2223); (3

  14. Novel lanthanide-labeled metal oxide nanoparticles improve the measurement of in vivo clearance and translocation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The deposition, clearance and translocation of europium-doped gadolinium oxide nanoparticles in a mouse lung were investigated experimentally. Nanoparticles were synthesized by spray flame pyrolysis. The particle size, crystallinity and surface properties were characterized. Following instillation, the concentrations of particles in organs were determined with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The protein corona coating the nanoparticles was found to be similar to the coating on more environmentally relevant nanoparticles such as iron oxide. Measurements of the solubility of the nanoparticles in surrogates of biological fluids indicated very little propensity for dissolution, and the elemental ratio of particle constituents did not change, adding further support to the contention that intact nanoparticles were measured. The particles were intratracheally instilled into the mouse lung. After 24 hours, the target organs were harvested, acid digested and the nanoparticle mass in each organ was measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The nanoparticles were detected in all the studied organs at low ppb levels; 59% of the particles remained in the lung. A significant amount of particles was also detected in the feces, suggesting fast clearance mechanisms. The nanoparticle system used in this work is highly suitable for quantitatively determining deposition, transport and clearance of nanoparticles from the lung, providing a quantified measure of delivered dose. PMID:23305071

  15. Photoelectrochemical characteristics of TiO2 nanorod arrays grown on fluorine doped tin oxide substrates by the facile seeding layer assisted hydrothermal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Mei-rong; Han, Cui-ping; Gu, Xiu-quan; Wang, Yong; Tang, Lu; Tang, Hui

    2016-05-01

    TiO2 nanorod arrays (NRAs) were prepared on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) substrates by a facile two-step hydrothermal method. The nanorods were selectively grown on the FTO regions which were covered with TiO2 seeding layer. It took 5 h to obtain the compact arrays with the nanorod length of ~2 μm and diameter of ~50 nm. The photoelectrochemical (PEC) properties of TiO2 NRAs are also investigated. It is demonstrated that the TiO2 NRAs indicate the good photoelectric conversion ability with an efficiency of 0.22% at a full-wavelength irradiation. A photocurrent density of 0.21 mA/cm2 is observed at 0.7 V versus the saturated calomel electrode (SCE). More evidences suggest that the charge transferring resistance is lowered at an irradiation, while the flat-band potential ( V fb) is shifted towards the positive side.

  16. Influence of Atomic Hydrogen, Band Bending, and Defects in the Top Few Nanometers of Hydrothermally Prepared Zinc Oxide Nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Saadi, Mubarak J.; Al-Harthi, Salim H.; Kyaw, Htet H.; Myint, Myo T. Z.; Bora, Tanujjal; Laxman, Karthik; Al-Hinai, Ashraf; Dutta, Joydeep

    2017-01-01

    We report on the surface, sub-surface (top few nanometers) and bulk properties of hydrothermally grown zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods (NRs) prior to and after hydrogen treatment. Upon treating with atomic hydrogen (H*), upward and downward band bending is observed depending on the availability of molecular H2O within the structure of the NRs. In the absence of H2O, the H* treatment demonstrated a cleaning effect of the nanorods, leading to a 0.51 eV upward band bending. In addition, enhancement in the intensity of room temperature photoluminescence (PL) signals due to the creation of new surface defects could be observed. The defects enhanced the visible light activity of the ZnO NRs which were subsequently used to photocatalytically degrade aqueous phenol under simulated sunlight. On the contrary, in the presence of H2O, H* treatment created an electronic accumulation layer inducing downward band bending of 0.45 eV ( 1/7th of the bulk ZnO band gap) along with the weakening of the defect signals as observed from room temperature photoluminescence spectra. The results suggest a plausible way of tailoring the band bending and defects of the ZnO NRs through control of H2O/H* species.

  17. Influence of Atomic Hydrogen, Band Bending, and Defects in the Top Few Nanometers of Hydrothermally Prepared Zinc Oxide Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Al-Saadi, Mubarak J; Al-Harthi, Salim H; Kyaw, Htet H; Myint, Myo T Z; Bora, Tanujjal; Laxman, Karthik; Al-Hinai, Ashraf; Dutta, Joydeep

    2017-12-01

    We report on the surface, sub-surface (top few nanometers) and bulk properties of hydrothermally grown zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods (NRs) prior to and after hydrogen treatment. Upon treating with atomic hydrogen (H*), upward and downward band bending is observed depending on the availability of molecular H2O within the structure of the NRs. In the absence of H2O, the H* treatment demonstrated a cleaning effect of the nanorods, leading to a 0.51 eV upward band bending. In addition, enhancement in the intensity of room temperature photoluminescence (PL) signals due to the creation of new surface defects could be observed. The defects enhanced the visible light activity of the ZnO NRs which were subsequently used to photocatalytically degrade aqueous phenol under simulated sunlight. On the contrary, in the presence of H2O, H* treatment created an electronic accumulation layer inducing downward band bending of 0.45 eV (~1/7th of the bulk ZnO band gap) along with the weakening of the defect signals as observed from room temperature photoluminescence spectra. The results suggest a plausible way of tailoring the band bending and defects of the ZnO NRs through control of H2O/H* species.

  18. Solution-processed zinc oxide field-effect transistors based on self-assembly of colloidal nanorods.

    PubMed

    Sun, Baoquan; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2005-12-01

    Colloidal zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocrystals are attractive candidates for a low-temperature and solution-processible semiconductor for high-performance thin-film field-effect transistors (TFTs). Here we show that by controlling the shape of the nanocrystals from spheres to rods the semiconducting properties of spin-coated ZnO films can be much improved as a result of increasing particle size and self-alignment of the nanorods along the substrate. Postdeposition hydrothermal growth in an aqueous zinc ion solution has been found to further enhance grain size and connectivity and improve device performance. TFT devices made from 65-nm-long and 10-nm-wide nanorods deposited by spin coating have been fabricated at moderate temperatures of 230 degrees C with mobilities of 0.61 cm(2)V(-1)s(-1) and on/off ratios of 3 x 10(5) after postdeposition growth, which is comparable to the characteristics of TFTs fabricated by traditional sputtering methods.

  19. New types of lanthanide complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Kahwa, I.A.K.

    1986-01-01

    Three new types of lanthanide (Ln) complexes, namely, the first examples of homodinuclear macrocyclic lanthanide complexes, novel binary and ternary gaseous polyatomic lanthanide oxides and new lanthanide oxalato complexes are described in chapters one, two and three respectively. The homodinuclear complexes are 2:2 condensation products of 2,6-diformyl-p-cresol and triethylenetetramine templated by Ln(NO/sub 3/)/sub 3/ and Ln(ClO/sub 4/)/sub 3/. The complexes are dimorphic, and are off-white (the more stable form) when they are obtained from dilute solutions and orange if they arise from more concentrated reactants. The complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry (FAB MS), electronic absorption and IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetry along with preliminary spectroscopic studies using electron paramagnetic resonance, magnetic susceptibility and luminescence. The orange complexes exhibit more antiferromagnetic exchange interactions, low Ln/sup 3 +/magnetic moments and multi-exponential luminescence decay kinetics, whereas the off-white complexes show single exponential luminescence decay and free ion magnetic moments. At low temperatures and in presence of excess triethylenetetramine, solvated light lanthanide mononuclear complexes of a 1:1 acyclic Schiff base acetal were isolated and the structure of one of these was confirmed by single crystal x-ray diffraction crystallography.

  20. Zinc Oxide nanorod/Au composite arrays and their enhanced photocatalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xueqin; Li, Zhen; Zhao, Wen; Zhao, Caixin; Yang, Jianbo; Wang, Yang

    2014-10-15

    In this paper, a high-performance photocatalyst of ZnO nanorod/Au composite arrays (ZAs) was synthesized via a facile low-temperature wet chemical method. The samples were characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), photoluminescence (PL) emission spectroscopy and ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorption. The unique nanostructured composite showed great adsorptivity of dyes, extended light absorption range, and efficient charge separation properties simultaneously. Hence, a significant enhancement in the photocatalytic properties in comparison with pure ZnO as demonstrated in photodegradation of methyl orange due to the incorporation of Au nanoparticles in ZnO nanorods.

  1. Lanthanide amidinates and guanidinates: from laboratory curiosities to efficient homogeneous catalysts and precursors for rare-earth oxide thin films.

    PubMed

    Edelmann, Frank T

    2009-08-01

    For decades, the organometallic chemistry of the rare earth elements was largely dominated by the cyclopentadienyl ligand and its ring-substituted derivatives. A hot topic in current organolanthanide chemistry is the search for alternative ligand sets which are able to satisfy the coordination requirements of the large lanthanide cations. Among the most successful approaches in this field is the use of amidinate ligands of the general type [RC(NR')(2)](-) (R = H, alkyl, aryl; R' = alkyl, cycloalkyl, aryl, SiMe(3)) which can be regarded as steric cyclopentadienyl equivalents. Closely related are the guanidinate anions of the general type [R(2)NC(NR')(2)](-) (R = alkyl, SiMe(3); R' = alkyl, cycloalkyl, aryl, SiMe(3)). Two amidinate or guanidinate ligands can coordinate to a lanthanide ion to form a metallocene-like coordination environment which allows the isolation and characterization of stable though very reactive amide, alkyl, and hydride species. Mono- and trisubstituted lanthanide amidinate and guanidinate complexes are also readily available. Various rare earth amidinates and guanidinates have turned out to be very efficient homogeneous catalysts e.g. for ring-opening polymerization reactions. Moreover, certain alkyl-substituted lanthanide tris(amidinates) and tris(guanidinates) were found to be highly volatile and could thus be promising precursors for ALD (= Atomic Layer Deposition) and MOCVD (= Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition) processes in materials science and nanotechnology. This tutorial review covers the success story of lanthanide amidinates and guanidinates and their transition from mere laboratory curiosities to efficient homogeneous catalysts as well as ALD and MOCVD precursors.

  2. Nanorod niobium oxide as powerful catalysts for an all vanadium redox flow battery.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Gu, Meng; Nie, Zimin; Wei, Xiaoliang; Wang, Chongmin; Sprenkle, Vincent; Wang, Wei

    2014-01-08

    A powerful low-cost electrocatalyst, nanorod Nb2O5, is synthesized using the hydrothermal method with monoclinic phases and simultaneously deposited on the surface of a graphite felt (GF) electrode in an all vanadium flow battery (VRB). Cyclic voltammetry (CV) study confirmed that Nb2O5 has catalytic effects toward redox couples of V(II)/V(III) at the negative side and V(IV)/V(V) at the positive side to facilitate the electrochemical kinetics of the vanadium redox reactions. Because of poor conductivity of Nb2O5, the performance of the Nb2O5 loaded electrodes is strongly dependent on the nanosize and uniform distribution of catalysts on GF surfaces. Accordingly, an optimal amount of W-doped Nb2O5 nanorods with minimum agglomeration and improved distribution on GF surfaces are established by adding water-soluble compounds containing tungsten (W) into the precursor solutions. The corresponding energy efficiency is enhanced by ∼10.7% at high current density (150 mA·cm(-2)) as compared with one without catalysts. Flow battery cyclic performance also demonstrates the excellent stability of the as prepared Nb2O5 catalyst enhanced electrode. These results suggest that Nb2O5-based nanorods, replacing expensive noble metals, uniformly decorating GFs holds great promise as high-performance electrodes for VRB applications.

  3. Photo- and electroluminescence properties of lanthanide tungstate-doped porous anodic aluminum oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staninski, Krzysztof; Piskuła, Zbigniew; Kaczmarek, Małgorzata

    2017-02-01

    A new cathode material for the potential use in light-emitting devices, based on porous anodic alumina (PAA), aluminum and ITO layers has been synthesized. Porous alumina samples with ordered pore arrays were prepared electrochemically from high purity Al sheet in H2SO4 and H3PO4. To be able to apply the matrix obtained in the electroluminescence cell, the thickness of the barrier layer of aluminum oxide was decreased by slow reduction of the anodization voltage to zero. The luminescence and electroluminescence (EL) properties of the Al2O3 matrix admixtured with Eu3+ and Tb3+ ions as well as europium and terbium tungstates, were determined. The particles of inorganic luminophore were synthesized on the walls of the matrix cylindrical nanopores in the two-step process of immersion in solutions of TbCl3 or EuCl3 and Na2WO4. The effect of the nanopores diameter and the thickness of the porous Al2O3 layer on the intensity and relative yield of electroluminescence was analyzed, the best results were obtained for 80-90 μm PAA layers with 140 nm nanopores.

  4. Harnessing the Cancer Radiation Therapy by Lanthanide-Doped Zinc Oxide Based Theranostic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ghaemi, Behnaz; Mashinchian, Omid; Mousavi, Tayebeh; Karimi, Roya; Kharrazi, Sharmin; Amani, Amir

    2016-02-10

    In this paper, doping of europium (Eu) and gadolinium (Gd) as high-Z elements into zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) was designed to optimize restricted energy absorption from a conventional radiation therapy by X-ray. Gd/Eu-doped ZnO NPs with a size of 9 nm were synthesized by a chemical precipitation method. The cytotoxic effects of Eu/Gd-doped ZnO NPs were determined using MTT assay in L929, HeLa, and PC3 cell lines under dark conditions as well as exposure to ultraviolet, X-ray, and γ radiation. Doped NPs at 20 μg/mL concentration under an X-ray dose of 2 Gy were as efficient as 6 Gy X-ray radiation on untreated cells. It is thus suggested that the doped NPs may be used as photoinducers to increase the efficacy of X-rays within the cells, consequently, cancer cell death. The doped NPs also could reduce the received dose by normal cells around the tumor. Additionally, we evaluated the diagnostic efficacy of doped NPs as CT/MRI nanoprobes. Results showed an efficient theranostic nanoparticulate system for simultaneous CT/MR imaging and cancer treatment.

  5. First Principles and Genetic Algorithm Studies of Lanthanide Metal Oxides for Optimal Fuel Cell Electrolyte Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Arif

    As the demand for clean and renewable energy sources continues to grow, much attention has been given to solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) due to their efficiency and low operating temperature. However, the components of SOFCs must still be improved before commercialization can be reached. Of particular interest is the solid electrolyte, which conducts oxygen ions from the cathode to the anode. Samarium-doped ceria (SDC) is the electrolyte of choice in most SOFCs today, due mostly to its high ionic conductivity at low temperatures. However, the underlying principles that contribute to high ionic conductivity in doped ceria remain unknown, and so it is difficult to improve upon the design of SOFCs. This thesis focuses on identifying the atomistic interactions in SDC which contribute to its favourable performance in the fuel cell. Unfortunately, information as basic as the structure of SDC has not yet been found due to the difficulty in experimentally characterizing and computationally modelling the system. For instance, to evaluate 10.3% SDC, which is close to the 11.1% concentration used in fuel cells, one must investigate 194 trillion configurations, due to the numerous ways of arranging the Sm ions and oxygen vacancies in the simulation cell. As an exhaustive search method is clearly unfeasible, we develop a genetic algorithm (GA) to search the vast potential energy surface for the low-energy configurations, which will be most prevalent in the real material. With the GA, we investigate the structure of SDC for the first time at the DFT+U level of theory. Importantly, we find key differences in our results from prior calculations of this system which used less accurate methods, which demonstrate the importance of accurately modelling the system. Overall, our simulation results of the structure of SDC agree with experimental measurements. We identify the structural significance of defects in the doped ceria lattice which contribute to oxygen ion conductivity. Thus

  6. Polystyrene-catalytic indium-tin-oxide nanorods grown on green light-emitting diodes for enhancing light extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Zhina; Li, Qiang; Li, Yufeng; Xiong, Han; Liu, Hao; Wang, Shuai; Zhang, Ye; Guo, Maofeng; Yun, Feng

    2016-08-01

    A novel technique for fabricating indium-tin-oxide (ITO) nanorods (NRs) on hexagonal-pyramid-surface green vertical light-emitting diodes (VLEDs) is demonstrated using electron-beam deposition with polystyrene spheres catalysis. The ITO NRs have high optical transmittance (>90%) in green wavelength and good crystal quality with a cubic structure. The VLED with ITO NRs has a 31% enhancement of light output power at 200 mA, compared with those without ITO NRs. Finite-difference time-domain simulations suggest that the power enhancement is attributed to the gradient refractive indices of the ITO NRs, and that the light extraction enhancement is caused by changes in ITO NR heights.

  7. Phosphate modified N/Si co-doped rutile TiO2 nanorods for photoelectrochemical water oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaofan; Zhang, Bingyan; Luo, Yanping; Lv, Xiaowei; Shen, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Surface modification of TiO2 film provides possibilities to improve photoelectrochemical (PEC) activity. In this study, we report on phosphate modified N/Si co-doped TiO2 nanorods films (Pi-N/Si-TiO2 NRs) for PEC water oxidation. Compared to the pristine TiO2 NRs, the Pi-N/Si-TiO2 NRs photoanode shows a 4.65-fold enhanced photocurrent density (1.44 mA cm-2) under light illumination. This significant improvement can be attributed to the synergistic effect of phosphate modification and the N and Si co-dopants. In addition to the improvement of ultraviolet and visible light response by N and Si co-dopants, phosphate modification is mainly responsible for charge transfer at the interface of the photoanode/electrolyte.

  8. A novel fabrication methodology for sulfur-doped ZnO nanorods as an active photoanode for improved water oxidation in visible-light regime.

    PubMed

    Khan, A; Ahmed, M I; Adam, A; Azad, A-M; Qamar, M

    2017-02-03

    Incorporation of foreign moiety in the lattice of semiconductors significantly alters their optoelectronic behavior and opens a plethora of new applications. In this paper, we report the synthesis of sulfur-doped zinc oxide (S-doped ZnO) nanorods by reacting ZnO nanorods with diammonium sulfide in vapor phase. Microscopic investigation revealed that the morphological features, such as, the length (2-4 μm) and width (100-250 nm) of the original hexagonal ZnO nanorods remained intact post-sulfidation. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of the sulfide sample confirmed the incorporation of sulfur into ZnO lattice. The optical measurements suggested the extension of absorption threshold into visible region upon sulfidation. Photoelectrochemical (PEC) activities of pure and S-doped ZnO nanorods were compared for water oxidation in visible light (λ > 420 nm), which showed several-fold increment in the performance of S-doped ZnO sample; the observed amelioration in the PEC activity was rationalized in terms of preferred visible light absorption and low resistance of sulfide sample, as evidenced by optical and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

  9. Facile and Mild Strategy to Construct Mesoporous CeO2-CuO Nanorods with Enhanced Catalytic Activity toward CO Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guozhu; Xu, Qihui; Yang, Ying; Li, Cuncheng; Huang, Taizhong; Sun, Guoxin; Zhang, Shuxiang; Ma, Dongling; Li, Xu

    2015-10-28

    CeO2-CuO nanorods with mesoporous structure were synthesized by a facile and mild strategy, which involves an interfacial reaction between Ce2(SO4)3 precursor and NaOH ethanol solution at room temperature to obtain mesoporous CeO2 nanorods, followed by a solvothermal treatment of as-prepared CeO2 and Cu(CH3COO)2. Upon solvothermal treatment, CuO species is highly dispersed onto the CeO2 nanorod surface to form CeO2-CuO composites, which still maintain the mesoporous feature. A preliminary CO catalytic oxidation study demonstrated that the CeO2-CuO samples exhibited strikingly high catalytic activity, and a high CO conversion rate was observed without obvious loss in activity even after thermal treatment at a high temperature of 500 °C. Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and hydrogen temperature-programmed reduction (H2-TPR) analysis revealed that there is a strong interaction between CeO2 and CuO. Moreover, it was found that the introduction of CuO species into CeO2 generates oxygen vacancies, which is highly likely to be responsible for high catalytic activity toward CO oxidation of the mesoporous CeO2-CuO nanorods.

  10. A novel fabrication methodology for sulfur-doped ZnO nanorods as an active photoanode for improved water oxidation in visible-light regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, A.; Ahmed, M. I.; Adam, A.; Azad, A.-M.; Qamar, M.

    2017-02-01

    Incorporation of foreign moiety in the lattice of semiconductors significantly alters their optoelectronic behavior and opens a plethora of new applications. In this paper, we report the synthesis of sulfur-doped zinc oxide (S-doped ZnO) nanorods by reacting ZnO nanorods with diammonium sulfide in vapor phase. Microscopic investigation revealed that the morphological features, such as, the length (2-4 μm) and width (100-250 nm) of the original hexagonal ZnO nanorods remained intact post-sulfidation. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of the sulfide sample confirmed the incorporation of sulfur into ZnO lattice. The optical measurements suggested the extension of absorption threshold into visible region upon sulfidation. Photoelectrochemical (PEC) activities of pure and S-doped ZnO nanorods were compared for water oxidation in visible light (λ > 420 nm), which showed several-fold increment in the performance of S-doped ZnO sample; the observed amelioration in the PEC activity was rationalized in terms of preferred visible light absorption and low resistance of sulfide sample, as evidenced by optical and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

  11. Features of the Thermodynamics of Trivalent Lanthanide/Actinide Distribution Reactions by Tri-n-Octylphosphine Oxide and Bis(2-EthylHexyl) Phosphoric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Travis S. Grimes; Peter R. Zalupski

    2014-11-01

    A new methodology has been developed to study the thermochemical features of the biphasic transfer reactions of trisnitrato complexes of lanthanides and americium by a mono-functional solvating ligand (tri-n-octyl phosphine oxide - TOPO). Stability constants for successive nitrato complexes (M(NO3)x3-x (aq) where M is Eu3+, Am3+ or Cm3+) were determined to assist in the calculation of the extraction constant, Kex, for the metal ions under study. Enthalpies of extraction (?Hextr) for the lanthanide series (excluding Pm3+) and Am3+ by TOPO have been measured using isothermal titration calorimetry. The observed ?Hextr were found to be constant at ~29 kJ mol-1across the series from La3+-Er3+, with a slight decrease observed from Tm3+-Lu3+. These heats were found to be consistent with enthalpies determined using van ’t Hoff analysis of temperature dependent extraction studies. A complete set of thermodynamic parameters (?G, ?H, ?S) was calculated for Eu(NO3)3, Am(NO3)3 and Cm(NO3)3 extraction by TOPO and Am3+ and Cm3+ extraction by bis(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (HDEHP). A discussion comparing the energetics of these systems is offered. The measured biphasic extraction heats for the transplutonium elements, ?Hextr, presented in these studies are the first ever direct measurements offered using two-phase calorimetric techniques.

  12. Materials discovery by crystal growth: Lanthanide metal containing oxides of the platinum group metals (Ru, Os, Ir, Rh, Pd, Pt) from molten alkali metal hydroxides

    SciTech Connect

    Mugavero, Samuel J.; Gemmill, William R.; Roof, Irina P.; Loye, Hans-Conrad zur

    2009-07-15

    This review addresses the process of materials discovery via crystal growth, specifically of lanthanide metal containing oxides of the platinum group metals (Ru, Os, Ir, Rh, Pd, Pt). It provides a detailed overview of the use of hydroxide fluxes for crystal growth. The melt chemistry of hydroxide fluxes, specifically, the extensive acid base chemistry, the metal cation solubility, and the ability of hydroxide melts to oxidize metals are described. Furthermore, a general methodology for the successful crystal growth of oxides is provided, including a discussion of experimental considerations, suitable reaction vessels, reaction profiles and temperature ranges. Finally, a compilation of complex platinum group metal oxides recently synthesized using hydroxide melts, focusing on their crystal growth and crystal structures, is included. - Graphical abstract: A review that addresses the process of materials discovery via crystal growth using hydroxide fluxes. It provides a detailed overview of the use of hydroxide fluxes for crystal growth and describes the melt chemistry of hydroxide fluxes, specifically, the extensive acid base chemistry, the metal cation solubility, and the ability of hydroxide melts to oxidize metals. In addition, a compilation of complex platinum group metal oxides recently synthesized using hydroxide melts is included.

  13. Photochemical Synthesis of Shape-Controlled Nanostructured Gold on Zinc Oxide Nanorods as Photocatalytically Renewable Sensors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jia-Quan; Duo, Huan-Huan; Zhang, Yu-Ge; Zhang, Xin-Wei; Fang, Wei; Liu, Yan-Ling; Shen, Ai-Guo; Hu, Ji-Ming; Huang, Wei-Hua

    2016-04-05

    Biosensors always suffer from passivation that prevents their reutilization. To address this issue, photocatalytically renewable sensors composed of semiconductor photocatalysts and sensing materials have emerged recently. In this work, we developed a robust and versatile method to construct different kinds of renewable biosensors consisting of ZnO nanorods and nanostructured Au. Via a facile and efficient photochemical reduction, various nanostructured Au was obtained successfully on ZnO nanorods. As-prepared sensors concurrently possess excellent sensing capability and desirable photocatalytic cleaning performance. Experimental results demonstrate that dendritic Au/ZnO composite has the strongest surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) enhancement, and dense Au nanoparticles (NPs)/ZnO composite has the highest electrochemical activity, which was successfully used for electrochemical detection of NO release from cells. Furthermore, both of the SERS and electrochemical sensors can be regenerated efficiently for renewable applications via photodegrading adsorbed probe molecules and biomolecules. Our strategy provides an efficient and versatile method to construct various kinds of highly sensitive renewable sensors and might expand the application of the photocatalytically renewable sensor in the biosensing area.

  14. Ergonomic Synthesis Suitable for Industrial Production of Silver-Festooned Zinc Oxide Nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, G. R.; Khan, R. A.

    2015-07-01

    For maximizing productivity, minimizing cost, time-boxing process and optimizing human effort, a single-step, cost-effective, ultra-fast and environmentally benign synthesis suitable for industrial production of nanocrystalline ZnO, and Ag-doped ZnO has been reported in this paper. The synthesis based on microwave-supported aqueous solution method used zinc acetate dehydrate and silver nitrate as precursors for fabrication of nanorods. The synthesized products were characterized by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy and UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy. The undoped and Ag-doped ZnO nanorods crystallized in a hexagonal wurtzite structure having spindle-like morphology. The blue shift occurred at absorption edge of Ag-doped ZnO around 260 nm compared to 365 nm of bulk ZnO. The red shift occurred at Raman peak site of 434 cm-1 compared to characteristic wurtzite phase peak of ZnO (437 cm-1). The bandgap energies were found to be 3.10 eV, 3.11 eV and 3.18 eV for undoped, 1% Ag-doped, and 3% Ag-doped ZnO samples, respectively. The TEM results provided average particle sizes of 17 nm, 15 nm and 13 nm for undoped, and 1% and 3% Ag-doped ZnO samples, respectively.

  15. Ag modified LaMnO3 nanorods-reduced graphene oxide composite applied in the photocatalytic discoloration of direct green

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jie; Liu, Yuanyuan; Men, Jie; Zhang, Liang; Huang, Hao

    2016-11-01

    A new nanostructure photocatalyst, incorporating Ag and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) with LaMnO3-nanorods have been fabricated via two-step synthetic approaches by using Cetyltrimethyl Ammonium Bromide (CTAB) as a template via a simple hydrothermal reaction and the decoration of Ag nanoparticles is through a traditional silver mirror reaction. The characteristic of the materials are examined by XRD, TEM, FE-SEM and XPS. The results confirm that the LaMnO3 nanorods are perovskite phase and uniform dispersed on the surface of rGO. The Ag nanoparticles is deposited the surface of LaMnO3-nanorods with its metal form. The Ag/LaMnO3-nanorods/rGO exhibit an excellent performance in the photo-degradation of Direct Green BE under the UV-vis irradiation. As an electron capture agent, metal Ag can capture the e- that transported along the LMO-NR, thereby leading to effective separation of the e--h+ pairs and accelerate the transfer of surface charge, which is further demonstrated by the Photoluminescence (PL) spectra, cyclic voltammetry (CV) and AC impedance spectra.

  16. Lanthanide-containing polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St. Clair, Anne K.

    1987-01-01

    The preparation of a variety of lanthanide-containing polyimide films is described, and results of their characterization are presented. The properties investigated include the glass transition temperature, thermooxidative stability, magnetic susceptibility, and electrical conductivity of the polymer. Films containing lanthanide chlorides, fluorides, and sulfides are flexible, but those containing lanthanide nitrates are extremely brittle. The addition of lanthanide acetates and acetylacetonates caused immediate gelation of two of the synthesis-mixture ingredients. It was found that, in general, the addition of lanthanide to the polyimide increases the density and glass transition temperature of the polymer but slightly decreases the thermooxidative stability.

  17. Immobilization of a Molecular Ruthenium Catalyst on Hematite Nanorod Arrays for Water Oxidation with Stable Photocurrent.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ke; Li, Fusheng; Wang, Lei; Daniel, Quentin; Chen, Hong; Gabrielsson, Erik; Sun, Junliang; Sun, Licheng

    2015-10-12

    Photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells for light-driven water splitting are prepared using hematite nanorod arrays on conductive glass as the photoanode. These devices improve the photocurrent of the hematite-based photoanode for water splitting, owing to fewer surface traps and decreased electron recombination resulting from the one-dimensional structure. By employing a molecular ruthenium co-catalyst, which contains a strong 2,6-pyridine-dicarboxylic acid anchoring group at the hematite photoanode, the photocurrent of the PEC cell is enhanced with high stability for over 10 000 s in a 1 m KOH solution. This approach can pave a route for combining one-dimensional nanomaterials and molecular catalysts to split water with high efficiency and stability.

  18. Highly aligned epitaxial nanorods with a checkerboard pattern in oxide films.

    PubMed

    Park, S; Horibe, Y; Asada, T; Wielunski, L S; Lee, N; Bonanno, P L; O'Malley, S M; Sirenko, A A; Kazimirov, A; Tanimura, M; Gustafsson, T; Cheong, S-W

    2008-02-01

    One of the central challenges of nanoscience is fabrication of nanoscale structures with well-controlled architectures using planar thin-film technology. Herein, we report that ordered nanocheckerboards in ZnMnGaO4 films were grown epitaxially on single-crystal MgO substrates by utilizing a solid-state method of the phase separation-induced self-assembly. The films consist of two types of chemically distinct and regularly spaced nanorods with mutually coherent interfaces, approximately 4 x 4 x 750 nm3 in size and perfectly aligned along the film growth direction. Surprisingly, a significant in-plane strain, more than 2%, from the substrate is globally maintained over the entire film thickness of about 820 nm. The strain energy from Jahn-Teller distortions and the film-substrate lattice mismatch induce the coherent three-dimensional (3D) self-assembled nanostructure, relieving the volume strain energy while suppressing the formation of dislocations.

  19. Enhanced Photoelectrocatalytic Activity of BiOI Nanoplate-Zinc Oxide Nanorod p-n Heterojunction.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Pan-Yong; Ran, Jing-Run; Liu, Zhao-Qing; Wang, Hong-Juan; Li, Nan; Su, Yu-Zhi; Jin, Yong-Gang; Qiao, Shi-Zhang

    2015-10-19

    The development of highly efficient and robust photocatalysts has attracted great attention for solving the global energy crisis and environmental problems. Herein, we describe the synthesis of a p-n heterostructured photocatalyst, consisting of ZnO nanorod arrays (NRAs) decorated with BiOI nanoplates (NPs), by a facile solvothermal method. The product thus obtained shows high photoelectrochemical water splitting performance and enhanced photoelectrocatalytic activity for pollutant degradation under visible light irradiation. The p-type BiOI NPs, with a narrow band gap, not only act as a sensitizer to absorb visible light and promote electron transfer to the n-type ZnO NRAs, but also increase the contact area with organic pollutants. Meanwhile, ZnO NRAs provide a fast electron-transfer channel, thus resulting in efficient separation of photoinduced electron-hole pairs. Such a p-n heterojunction nanocomposite could serve as a novel and promising catalyst in energy and environmental applications.

  20. Thermal annealing studies of the deep level emission in solution-grown zinc oxide nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbulanga, Crispin Munyelele; Urgessa, Z. N.; Tankio Djiokap, S. R.; Botha, J. R.

    2017-02-01

    In this report, the effects of thermal annealing on the room temperature (RT) photoluminescence characteristics of solution-grown ZnO nanorods (ZNs) are presented. It is shown that the near surface regions of as-grown ZNs are rich in Zn. Within the detection limit of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), it is confirmed that the environment of annealing affects indeed the activation of intrinsic defects. Furthermore, thermal treatment at high temperatures removes H-related defects as expected; and this removal process is found to affect significantly the RT luminescence properties of ZNs, especially when ZNs are annealed sequentially from 300 °C to 700 °C. Specifically, the passivation of vacancy-related defects by H is demonstrated following thermal treatment in this temperature range. Finally, the green luminescence ( 500 nm) that evolves following annealing above 800 °C is assigned to Zn vacancy defects.

  1. Identification of emissive lanthanide complexes suitable for cellular imaging that resist quenching by endogenous anti-oxidants.

    PubMed

    Poole, Robert A; Montgomery, Craig P; New, Elizabeth J; Congreve, Aileen; Parker, David; Botta, Mauro

    2007-07-07

    Excited state quenching by urate and ascorbate of selected europium and terbium(III) macrocyclic complexes has been assessed and related to the ease of complex visualisation by optical microscopy inside various living cells, e.g. CHO, COS and NIH 3T3. It is the relative insensitivity of certain sterically encumbered complexes to dynamic quenching by urate that favours their usage for in cellulo applications. Non-covalent binding of the complex by protein also shields the excited lanthanide(III) ion from collisional quenching; this effect is most marked for a cationic triamide complex, [Ln.1](3+), consistent with its ease of visualisation by luminescence microscopy.

  2. Controllable growth of vertically aligned Bi-doped TiO2 nanorod arrays for all-oxide solid-state DSSCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asemi, Morteza; Ghanaatshoar, Majid

    2016-09-01

    In this study, vertically aligned Bi-doped TiO2 nanorod arrays as photoanodes were successfully grown on the fluorine-doped tin oxide by hydrothermal method. Structural analysis showed that bismuth was successfully incorporated into the TiO2 lattice at low concentration, but at higher concentration, phase segregation of Bi2O3 in the TiO2 matrix was occurred. TiO2 nanorods with 3 % bismuth concentration had minimum electrical resistivity. As the solid-state electrolyte, Mg-doped CuCrO2 nanoparticles with p-type conductivity were synthesized by sol-gel method. The fabricated all-oxide solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells with Bi-doped TiO2 nanorods displayed better photovoltaic performance due to the presence of Bi. The improved cell performance was correlated with the higher dye loading, slower charge recombination rate and the higher electrical conductivity of the photoanodes. After mechanical pressing, the all-oxide solid-state DSSC exhibited enhanced photovoltaic performance due to the formation of the large neck between adjacent nanoparticles by mechanical sintering. The open-circuit photovoltage decay measurement of the devices and electrical conductivity of the nanoparticles before and after pressing revealed that the mechanical pressing technique reduces charge recombination rate and facilitates electron transport through the interconnected nanoparticles.

  3. Graphene oxide-dispersed pristine CNTs support for MnO2 nanorods as high performance supercapacitor electrodes.

    PubMed

    You, Bo; Li, Na; Zhu, Hongying; Zhu, Xiaolan; Yang, Jun

    2013-03-01

    A MnO2 -CNT-graphene oxide (MCGO) nanocomposite is fabricated using graphene oxide (GO) as a surfactant to directly disperse pristine carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for the subsequent deposition of MnO2 nanorods. The resulting MCGO nanocomposite is used as a supercapacitor electrode that shows ideal capacitive behavior (i.e., rectangular-shaped cyclic voltammograms), large specific capacitance (4.7 times higher than that of free MnO2 ) even at high mass loading (3.0 mg cm(-2) ), high energy density (30.4-14.2 Wh kg(-1) ), large power density (2.6-50.5 kW kg(-1) ), and still retains approximately 94 % of the initial specific capacitance after 1000 cycles. The advanced capacity, rate capability, and cycling stability may be attributed to the unique architecture, excellent ion wettability of GO with enriched oxygen-containing functional groups, high conductivity of CNTs, and their synergistic effects when combined with the other components. The results suggest that the MnO2 -CNT-GO hybrid nanocomposite architecture is very promising for next generation high-performance energy storage devices.

  4. Zinc Oxide Nanorods-Decorated Graphene Nanoplatelets: A Promising Antimicrobial Agent against the Cariogenic Bacterium Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Zanni, Elena; Chandraiahgari, Chandrakanth Reddy; De Bellis, Giovanni; Montereali, Maria Rita; Armiento, Giovanna; Ballirano, Paolo; Polimeni, Antonella; Sarto, Maria Sabrina; Uccelletti, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials are revolutionizing the field of medicine to improve the quality of life due to the myriad of applications stemming from their unique properties, including the antimicrobial activity against pathogens. In this study, the antimicrobial and antibiofilm properties of a novel nanomaterial composed by zinc oxide nanorods-decorated graphene nanoplatelets (ZNGs) are investigated. ZNGs were produced by hydrothermal method and characterized through field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. The antimicrobial activity of ZNGs was evaluated against Streptococcus mutans, the main bacteriological agent in the etiology of dental caries. Cell viability assay demonstrated that ZNGs exerted a strikingly high killing effect on S. mutans cells in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, FE-SEM analysis revealed relevant mechanical damages exerted by ZNGs at the cell surface of this dental pathogen rather than reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. In addition, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) measurements showed negligible zinc dissolution, demonstrating that zinc ion release in the suspension is not associated with the high cell mortality rate. Finally, our data indicated that also S. mutans biofilm formation was affected by the presence of graphene-zinc oxide (ZnO) based material, as witnessed by the safranin staining and growth curve analysis. Therefore, ZNGs can be a remarkable nanobactericide against one of the main dental pathogens. The potential applications in dental care and therapy are very promising. PMID:28335307

  5. Plasmonic enhancement of blue emission from ZnO nanorods grown on the anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norek, Małgorzata; Łuka, Grzegorz; Godlewski, Marek; Płociński, Tomasz; Michalska-Domańska, Marta; Stępniowski, Wojciech J.

    2013-04-01

    Luminescent properties of ZnO nanorods covered with Ag nanoparticles are examined. Nanorods were synthesized on AAO templates using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) technique. Two types of the samples were prepared with different arrangement of ZnO nanorods and doping conditions. Nanorods of the second type were codoped with Al, to stimulate defect-related emissions. The ZnO material fills heterogeneously the interior of the AAO nanopores and has hexagonal, wurtzite structure. Both types of structures exhibit a broad defect-related emission at about 440 nm, most probably related to recombination at zinc interstitial (Zni) defects. This emission in samples with a random distribution of ZnO:Al nanorods and finer Ag nanoparticles is enhanced by factor of ˜2.5 upon Ag deposition. The so-obtained material is interesting from the point of view of its application in blue range emitting diodes.

  6. Improved method for extracting lanthanides and actinides from acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Kalina, D.G.; Kaplan, L.; Mason, G.W.

    1983-07-26

    A process for the recovery of actinide and lanthanide values from aqueous acidic solutions uses a new series of neutral bi-functional extractants, the alkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialkylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxides. The process is suitable for the separation of actinide and lanthanide values from fission product values found together in high-level nuclear reprocessing waste solutions.

  7. Free-standing Pt@RuO2·xH2O nanorod arrays on Si wafers as electrodes for methanol electro-oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guangyu; Zhang, Li; Sun, Kening; Li, Hulin

    2014-01-01

    RuO2·xH2O nanorod arrays free-standing on Si wafers are prepared by an anodic aluminum oxide template assistant method. Pt nanograins in the size of 3-5 nm are deposited on the RuO2·xH2O nanorod arrays uniformly by a cool sputtering approach. Electrochemical measurements indicate that, the Pt@RuO2·xH2O nanorod arrays have larger electrochemical active areas (EAAs) and better poisoning resistant ability for methanol electro-oxidation, compared with Pt nanograins that deposited on Ti wafers directly (named Pt/Ti). The EAAs of Pt@RuO2·xH2O and Pt/Ti electrodes are 40.6 and 31.1 m2 g-1, respectively. The poisoning rate of Pt@RuO2·xH2O arrays is 8.9 × 10-4% per second, much smaller than that of Pt/Ti electrodes (3.4 × 10-3% per second).

  8. Physiological investigation of gold nanorods toward watermelon.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yujie; Li, Junli; Ren, Hongxuan; Huang, Jin; Yuan, Hong

    2014-08-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the phytotoxicity and oxidant stress of the gold nanorods toward watermelon, and hence give a quantitative risk assessment of both seeds and plants phase. The seed germination, the activity of antioxidant enzymes, and the contents of soluble protein and malondialdehyde (MDA) have been measured while the plant roots were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was found that the gold nanorods significantly promoted the root elongation. Furthermore, the results on the enzymes activities of plant indicated that oxidative stress happened in the plant treated with gold nanorods. However, the gold nanorods resulted in the phytotoxicity toward plant especially at high concentration. The TEM images of the plant roots with and without the treatment of gold nanorods showed the significant different size of starch granules. In conclusion, significant physiological changes of plant occurred after treatment with the gold nanorods.

  9. Enhancement at the junction of silver nanorods.

    PubMed

    Gu, Geun Hoi; Suh, Jung Sang

    2008-08-19

    The enhancement of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) at the junction of linearly joined silver nanorods (31 nm in diameter) deposited in the pores of anodic aluminum oxide templates was studied systematically by excitation with a 632.8 nm laser line. The single and joined silver nanorod arrays showed a similar extinction spectrum when their length was the same. Maximum enhancement was observed from the junction system of two nanorods of the same size with a total length of 62 nm. This length also corresponded to the optimum length of single nanorods for SERS by excitation with a 632.8 nm laser line. The enhancement at the junction was approximately 40 times higher than that of the 31 nm single nanorod, while it was 4 times higher than that of the 62 nm single nanorod. The enhancement factor at the junction after oxide removal was approximately 3.9 x 10 (9).

  10. Role of sensitivity of zinc oxide nanorods (ZnO-NRs) based photosensitizers in hepatocellular site of biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atif, M.; Fakhar-E-Alam, M.; Alsalhi, M. S.

    2011-11-01

    Zinc oxide nanorods (ZnO-NRs) with high surface to volume ratio and bio compatibility are used as an efficient photosensitizer carrier system for achievement of Hepatocellular cancer cell (HepG2) necrosis within few minutes. Present study highlights the role of effectiveness of ZnO-NRs in photodynamic therapy (PDT). We have grown the ZnO-NRs on the tip of borosilicate glass capillaries (0.5 μm diameter). The grown ZnO-NRs were conjugated using Photofrin® and ALA for the efficient intracellular drug delivery, which produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) via photochemical reactions leading to cell death within few minutes after exposing UV light (240 nm). Viability of controlled and treated HepG2 cells with optimum dose of light (UV-visible) has been assessed by neutral red assay (NRA). The results were verified by staining of mitochondria using Mitotracker® red as an efficient dye as well as ROS detection. ZnO-NRs based Phogem® (PG) treated normal liver tissues of Sprague-Dawley rats were used as comparative experimental model. Morphological apoptotic changes in liver tissue of Sprague-Dawley rats before and after ZnO-NRs conjugated with photosensitizer (PS)-mediated PDT were investigated by microscopic examination.

  11. Electrocatalytic Behavior of Hemoglobin Oxidation of Hydrazine Based on ZnO Nano-rods with Carbon Nanofiber Modified Electrode.

    PubMed

    Wu, Min; Ding, Wen; Meng, Junli; Ni, Henmei; Li, Ying; Ma, Quanhong

    2015-01-01

    A novel biosensor was developed by immobilizing hemoglobin (Hb) on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) modified with a composite of ZnO nano-rods and carbon nanofiber (CNF), a strong reducer, hydrazine, was firstly used to evaluate the electrochemical behavior of Hb on Hb/ZnO/CNF/GCE. UV-vis and circular dichroism (CD) spectra indicated the conformational structure of Hb interaction with ZnO/CNF was predominantly an α-helical structure. The modified electrodes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and cyclic voltammetry. Electrocatalytic mechanism of Hb to oxidation reaction of hydrazine was suggested. The bioelectrocatalytic activity, kinetic parameters of Michaelis-Menten constant (Km), stability and reproducibility were also investigated. A linear dependence of peak currents to the concentrations of hydrazine was observed in the range from 1.98 × 10(-5) to 1.71 × 10(-3) mol L(-1) with a correlation coefficient of 0.998, and a detection limit (S/N = 3) of 6.60 μmol L(-1) was estimated.

  12. Zinc Oxide Nanorods Grown on Printed Circuit Board for Extended-Gate Field-Effect Transistor pH Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Thanh, Pham; Nhu, Le Thi Quynh; Mai, Hong Hanh; Tuyen, Nguyen Viet; Doanh, Sai Cong; Viet, Nguyen Canh; Kien, Do Trung

    2017-02-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods (NRs) were grown directly on printed circuit boards with a 35-μm-thick copper layer using a seedless galvanic-cell hydrothermal process. The hexagonal structure of the synthesized ZnO NRs was observed by scanning electron microscopy. The microstructural characteristics of the as-grown ZnO NRs were investigated by x-ray diffraction analysis, revealing preferred (002) growth direction. Raman and photoluminescence spectra confirmed the high crystalline quality of the ZnO NRs. As-grown ZnO NRs were then grown for 7 h using the galvanic effect for use as the pH membrane of an extended-gate field-effect transistor pH sensor (pH-EGFET). The current-voltage characteristics showed sensitivity of 15.4 mV/pH and 0.26 (μA)1/2/pH in the linear and saturated region, respectively. Due to their cost effectiveness, low-temperature processing, and ease of fabrication, such devices are potential candidates for use as flexible, low-cost, disposable biosensors.

  13. Effect of platinum-nanodendrite modification on the glucose-sensing properties of a zinc-oxide-nanorod electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul Razak, Khairunisak; Neoh, Soo Huan; Ridhuan, N. S.; Mohamad Nor, Noorhashimah

    2016-09-01

    The properties of ZnO nanorods (ZnONRs) decorated with platinum nanodendrites (PtNDs) were studied. Various sizes of PtNDs were synthesized and spin coated onto ZnONRs, which were grown on indium-titanium-oxide (ITO) substrates through a low-temperature hydrothermal method. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses were conducted to analyze the morphology and structural properties of the electrodes. The effects of PtND size, glucose concentration, and Nafion amount on glucose-sensing properties were investigated. The glucose-sensing properties of electrodes with immobilized glucose oxidase (GOx) were measured using cyclic voltammetry. The bio-electrochemical properties of Nafion/GOx/42 nm PtNDs/ZnONRs/ITO glucose sensor was observed with linear range within 1-18 mM, with a sensitivity value of 5.85 μA/mM and a limit of detection of 1.56 mM. The results of this study indicate that PtNDs/ZnONRs/ITO has potential in glucose sensor applications.

  14. Electrochemical cortisol immunosensors based on sonochemically synthesized zinc oxide 1D nanorods and 2D nanoflakes.

    PubMed

    Vabbina, Phani Kiran; Kaushik, Ajeet; Pokhrel, Nimesh; Bhansali, Shekhar; Pala, Nezih

    2015-01-15

    We report on label free, highly sensitive and selective electrochemical immunosensors based on one-dimensional 1D ZnO nanorods (ZnO-NRs) and two-dimensional 2D ZnO nanoflakes (ZnO-NFs) which were synthesized on Au-coated substrates using simple one step sonochemical approach. Selective detection of cortisol using cyclic voltammetry (CV) is achieved by immobilizing anti-cortisol antibody (Anti-C(ab)) on the ZnO nanostructures (NSs). 1D ZnO-NRs and 2D ZnO-NFs provide unique sensing advantages over bulk materials. While 1D-NSs boast a high surface area to volume ratio, 2D-NSs with large area in polarized (0001) plane and high surface charge density could promote higher Anti-C(ab) loading and thus better sensing performance. Beside large surface area, ZnO-NSs also exhibit higher chemical stability, high catalytic activity, and biocompatibility. TEM studies showed that both ZnO-NSs are single crystalline oriented in (0001) plane. The measured sensing parameters are in the physiological range with a sensitivity of 11.86 µA/M exhibited by ZnO-NRs and 7.74 µA/M by ZnO-NFs with the lowest detection limit of 1 pM which is 100 times better than conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbant immunoassay (ELISA). ZnO-NSs based cortisol immunosensors were tested on human saliva samples and the performance were validated with conventional (ELISA) method which exhibits a remarkable correlation. The developed sensors can be integrated with microfluidic system and miniaturized potentiostat for point-of-care cortisol detection and such developed protocol can be used in personalized health monitoring/diagnostic.

  15. Synthesis of praseodymium hydroxide (Pr(OH)3) and praseodymium oxide (Pr6O11) nanorods via room temperature aging.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Aaron

    2013-02-15

    In this study, room-temperature aging has been investigated as an alternative to high-temperature hydrothermal processing for manufacturing Pr(OH)(3) nanorods. It was found that a simple process consisting of precipitation, washing, and room-temperature aging results in the formation of Pr(OH)(3) nanorods that are structurally different to those synthesized by hydrothermal processing. Rather than single crystals, the nanorods were found to consist of crystals viewed down the [12¯10] and [11¯00] axes sharing a common [0001] growth direction. Subsequent calcination yielded Pr(6)O(11) nanorods consisting of cubic crystals viewed down the [11¯0] and [11¯2¯] directions. The constituent crystals shared a common [110] direction parallel with the longitudinal rod axis.

  16. Amplification of raman scattering by localized plasmons in silver nanoparticles on the surface of zinc oxide nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaidashev, V. E.; Lyanguzov, N. V.; Yuzyuk, Yu. I.; Kaidashev, E. M.

    2012-10-01

    The magnetron sputtering of Ag nanoparticles onto ZnO nanorod arrays is studied. The lateral faces of the nanorods are coated with nanoparticles at a much lower density as compared to the flat faces at comparable sputtering times. The silver density is high on the edges of the lateral faces of the nanorods. The plasmon absorption in the synthesized arrays of nanorods coated with individual Ag nanoparticles is maximal at 450-500 nm. The appearance of local plasmon excitations increases the intensity of the multiphonon processes with the participation of ZnO polar modes in Raman spectra. The cross section of resonance Raman scattering for A 1(LO) phonon overtones increases with the equivalent Ag film thickness.

  17. Exceptional capability of nanosized CeO(2) materials to "dissolve" lanthanide oxides established by time-gated excitation and emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tiseanu, Carmen; Parvulescu, Vasile; Avram, Daniel; Cojocaru, Bogdan; Sanchez-Dominguez, Margarita

    2014-05-28

    The atomic scale homogeneity of Ce and Zr oxygen bonds represents the main reason for enhanced total oxygen storage capability of CeO2-ZrO2 (Ce/Zr = 1) as compared to that of CeO2. Here, we demonstrate that the addition of 10% Eu(3+) by wet impregnation on preformed nanosized CeO2-ZrO2 (Ce/Zr = 1) followed by calcination induces a remarkable homogeneity of 10% Eu(3+)-CeO2-ZrO2 solid solution. By use of time-resolved emission and excitation spectroscopies, the improvement of the nanoscale chemical and structural homogeneity of 10% Eu(3+)-CeO2-ZrO2 calcined at 1000 as compared to sample calcined at 750 °C is demonstrated. Based on the comparison of luminescence properties of 10% Eu(3+) impregnated on preformed nanosized CeO2-ZrO2 and CeO2, we also show that the presence of zirconium does not only preserve the ability of cerium oxide to "dissolve" lanthanide oxide, but also determines an important stabilization of defects (oxygen vacancies) generated upon Eu(3+) doping.

  18. Selective Oxidizing Gas Sensing and Dominant Sensing Mechanism of n-CaO-Decorated n-ZnO Nanorod Sensors.

    PubMed

    Sun, Gun-Joo; Lee, Jae Kyung; Choi, Seungbok; Lee, Wan In; Kim, Hyoun Woo; Lee, Chongmu

    2017-03-08

    In this work, we investigated the NO2 and CO sensing properties of n-CaO-decorated n-ZnO nanorods and the dominant sensing mechanism in n-n heterostructured one-dimensional (1D) nanostructured multinetworked chemiresistive gas sensors utilizing the nanorods. The CaO-decorated n-ZnO nanorods showed stronger response to NO2 than most other ZnO-based nanostructures, including the pristine ZnO nanorods. Many researchers have attributed the enhanced sensing performance of heterostructured sensors to the modulation of the conduction channel width or surface depletion layer width. However, the modulation of the conduction channel width is not the true cause of the enhanced sensing performance of n-n heterostructured 1D gas sensors, because the radial modulation of the conduction channel width is not intensified in these sensors. In this work, we demonstrate that the enhanced performance of the n-CaO-decorated n-ZnO nanorod sensor is mainly due to a combination of the enhanced modulation of the potential barrier height at the n-n heterojunctions, the larger surface-area-to-volume ratio and the increased surface defect density of the decorated ZnO nanorods, not the enhanced modulation of the conduction channel width.

  19. Separation of actinides from lanthanides

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Barbara F.; Jarvinen, Gordon D.; Ryan, Robert R.

    1989-01-01

    An organic extracting solution and an extraction method useful for separating elements of the actinide series of the periodic table from elements of the lanthanide series, where both are in trivalent form. The extracting solution consists of a primary ligand and a secondary ligand, preferably in an organic solvent. The primary ligand is a substituted monothio-1,3-dicarbonyl, which includes a substituted 4-acyl-2-pyrazolin-5-thione, such as 4-benzoyl-2,4-dihydro-5-methyl-2-phenyl-3H-pyrazol-3-thione (BMPPT). The secondary ligand is a substituted phosphine oxide, such as trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO).

  20. Zinc oxide nanorod assisted rapid single-step process for the conversion of electrospun poly(acrylonitrile) nanofibers to carbon nanofibers with a high graphitic content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nain, Ratyakshi; Singh, Dhirendra; Jassal, Manjeet; Agrawal, Ashwini K.

    2016-02-01

    The effect of incorporation of rigid zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures on carbonization behavior of electrospun special acrylic fiber grade poly(acrylonitrile) (PAN-SAF) nanofibers was investigated. ZnO nanorods with high aspect ratios were incorporated into a PAN-N,N-dimethylformamide system and the composite nanofibers reinforced with aligned ZnO rods up to 50 wt% were successfully electrospun, and subsequently, carbonized. The morphology and the structural analysis of the resultant carbon nanofibers revealed that the rigid ZnO nanorods, present inside the nanofibers, possibly acted as scaffolds (temporary support structures) for immobilization of polymer chains and assisted in uniform heat distribution. This facilitated rapid and efficient conversion of the polymer structure to the ladder, and subsequently, the graphitized structure. At the end of the process, the ZnO nanorods were found to completely separate from the carbonized fibers yielding pure carbon nanofibers with a high graphitic content and surface area. The approach could be used to eliminate the slow, energy intensive stabilization step and achieve fast conversion of randomly laid carbon nanofiber webs in a single step to carbon nanofibers without the application of external tension or internal templates usually employed to achieve a high graphitic content in such systems.The effect of incorporation of rigid zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures on carbonization behavior of electrospun special acrylic fiber grade poly(acrylonitrile) (PAN-SAF) nanofibers was investigated. ZnO nanorods with high aspect ratios were incorporated into a PAN-N,N-dimethylformamide system and the composite nanofibers reinforced with aligned ZnO rods up to 50 wt% were successfully electrospun, and subsequently, carbonized. The morphology and the structural analysis of the resultant carbon nanofibers revealed that the rigid ZnO nanorods, present inside the nanofibers, possibly acted as scaffolds (temporary support structures) for

  1. Exceptional performance of photoelectrochemical water oxidation of single-crystal rutile TiO2 nanorods dependent on the hole trapping of modified chloride.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuliang; Cui, Haiqin; Humayun, Muhammad; Qu, Yang; Fan, Naiying; Sun, Xiaojun; Jing, Liqiang

    2016-02-24

    It is highly desired to effectively trap photogenerated holes for efficient photoelectrochemical (PEC) water oxidation to evolve O2 on oxide semiconductors. Herein, it is found for the first time mainly based on the time-resolved- and atmosphere-controlled- surface photovoltage responses that the modified chloride would effectively trap photogenerated holes so as to prolong the charge lifetime and hence promote charge separation of single-crystal rutile TiO2 nanorods. Its strong capacity to trap holes, comparable to the widely-used methanol and Co(II) phosphate, is well responsible for the exceptional photoactivities for PEC water oxidation to evolve O2 on rutile nanorods with a proper amount of chloride modified, about 2.5-time high as that on the resulting anatase nanoparticles, even 10-time if the surface area is considered. Moreover, it is suggested that the hole trapping role of chemically-adsorbed chloride is related to its lonely-pair electrons, and to the subsequently-produced intermediate Cl atoms with proper electronegativity for evolving O2. Interestingly, this finding is also applicable to the chloride-modified anatase TiO2. This work will provide a feasible strategy to design high-activity nanostructured semiconductor photoanodes for PEC water oxidation, even for overall water splitting.

  2. Exceptional performance of photoelectrochemical water oxidation of single-crystal rutile TiO2 nanorods dependent on the hole trapping of modified chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuliang; Cui, Haiqin; Humayun, Muhammad; Qu, Yang; Fan, Naiying; Sun, Xiaojun; Jing, Liqiang

    2016-02-01

    It is highly desired to effectively trap photogenerated holes for efficient photoelectrochemical (PEC) water oxidation to evolve O2 on oxide semiconductors. Herein, it is found for the first time mainly based on the time-resolved- and atmosphere-controlled- surface photovoltage responses that the modified chloride would effectively trap photogenerated holes so as to prolong the charge lifetime and hence promote charge separation of single-crystal rutile TiO2 nanorods. Its strong capacity to trap holes, comparable to the widely-used methanol and Co(II) phosphate, is well responsible for the exceptional photoactivities for PEC water oxidation to evolve O2 on rutile nanorods with a proper amount of chloride modified, about 2.5-time high as that on the resulting anatase nanoparticles, even 10-time if the surface area is considered. Moreover, it is suggested that the hole trapping role of chemically-adsorbed chloride is related to its lonely-pair electrons, and to the subsequently-produced intermediate Cl atoms with proper electronegativity for evolving O2. Interestingly, this finding is also applicable to the chloride-modified anatase TiO2. This work will provide a feasible strategy to design high-activity nanostructured semiconductor photoanodes for PEC water oxidation, even for overall water splitting.

  3. Exceptional performance of photoelectrochemical water oxidation of single-crystal rutile TiO2 nanorods dependent on the hole trapping of modified chloride

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuliang; Cui, Haiqin; Humayun, Muhammad; Qu, Yang; Fan, Naiying; Sun, Xiaojun; Jing, Liqiang

    2016-01-01

    It is highly desired to effectively trap photogenerated holes for efficient photoelectrochemical (PEC) water oxidation to evolve O2 on oxide semiconductors. Herein, it is found for the first time mainly based on the time-resolved- and atmosphere-controlled- surface photovoltage responses that the modified chloride would effectively trap photogenerated holes so as to prolong the charge lifetime and hence promote charge separation of single-crystal rutile TiO2 nanorods. Its strong capacity to trap holes, comparable to the widely-used methanol and Co(II) phosphate, is well responsible for the exceptional photoactivities for PEC water oxidation to evolve O2 on rutile nanorods with a proper amount of chloride modified, about 2.5-time high as that on the resulting anatase nanoparticles, even 10-time if the surface area is considered. Moreover, it is suggested that the hole trapping role of chemically-adsorbed chloride is related to its lonely-pair electrons, and to the subsequently-produced intermediate Cl atoms with proper electronegativity for evolving O2. Interestingly, this finding is also applicable to the chloride-modified anatase TiO2. This work will provide a feasible strategy to design high-activity nanostructured semiconductor photoanodes for PEC water oxidation, even for overall water splitting. PMID:26906953

  4. Multispectral Emissions of Lanthanide-Doped Gadolinium Oxide Nanophosphors for Cathodoluminescence and Near-Infrared Upconversion/Downconversion Imaging.

    PubMed

    Thi Kim Dung, Doan; Fukushima, Shoichiro; Furukawa, Taichi; Niioka, Hirohiko; Sannomiya, Takumi; Kobayashi, Kaori; Yukawa, Hiroshi; Baba, Yoshinobu; Hashimoto, Mamoru; Miyake, Jun

    2016-09-06

    Comprehensive imaging of a biological individual can be achieved by utilizing the variation in spatial resolution, the scale of cathodoluminescence (CL), and near-infrared (NIR), as favored by imaging probe Gd₂O₃ co-doped lanthanide nanophosphors (NPPs). A series of Gd₂O₃:Ln(3+)/Yb(3+) (Ln(3+): Tm(3+), Ho(3+), Er(3+)) NPPs with multispectral emission are prepared by the sol-gel method. The NPPs show a wide range of emissions spanning from the visible to the NIR region under 980 nm excitation. The dependence of the upconverting (UC)/downconverting (DC) emission intensity on the dopant ratio is investigated. The optimum ratios of dopants obtained for emissions in the NIR regions at 810 nm, 1200 nm, and 1530 nm are applied to produce nanoparticles by the homogeneous precipitation (HP) method. The nanoparticles produced from the HP method are used to investigate the dual NIR and CL imaging modalities. The results indicate the possibility of using Gd₂O₃ co-doped Ln(3+)/Yb(3+) (Ln(3+): Tm(3+), Ho(3+), Er(3+)) in correlation with NIR and CL imaging. The use of Gd₂O₃ promises an extension of the object dimension to the whole-body level by employing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

  5. Multispectral Emissions of Lanthanide-Doped Gadolinium Oxide Nanophosphors for Cathodoluminescence and Near-Infrared Upconversion/Downconversion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Thi Kim Dung, Doan; Fukushima, Shoichiro; Furukawa, Taichi; Niioka, Hirohiko; Sannomiya, Takumi; Kobayashi, Kaori; Yukawa, Hiroshi; Baba, Yoshinobu; Hashimoto, Mamoru; Miyake, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive imaging of a biological individual can be achieved by utilizing the variation in spatial resolution, the scale of cathodoluminescence (CL), and near-infrared (NIR), as favored by imaging probe Gd2O3 co-doped lanthanide nanophosphors (NPPs). A series of Gd2O3:Ln3+/Yb3+ (Ln3+: Tm3+, Ho3+, Er3+) NPPs with multispectral emission are prepared by the sol-gel method. The NPPs show a wide range of emissions spanning from the visible to the NIR region under 980 nm excitation. The dependence of the upconverting (UC)/downconverting (DC) emission intensity on the dopant ratio is investigated. The optimum ratios of dopants obtained for emissions in the NIR regions at 810 nm, 1200 nm, and 1530 nm are applied to produce nanoparticles by the homogeneous precipitation (HP) method. The nanoparticles produced from the HP method are used to investigate the dual NIR and CL imaging modalities. The results indicate the possibility of using Gd2O3 co-doped Ln3+/Yb3+ (Ln3+: Tm3+, Ho3+, Er3+) in correlation with NIR and CL imaging. The use of Gd2O3 promises an extension of the object dimension to the whole-body level by employing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). PMID:28335291

  6. Ionization Energies of Lanthanides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Peter F.; Smith, Barry C.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes how data are used to analyze the pattern of ionization energies of the lanthanide elements. Different observed pathways of ionization between different ground states are discussed, and the effects of pairing, exchange, and orbital interactions on ionization energies of the lanthanides are evaluated. When all the above…

  7. Magnetic-plasmonic multilayered nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thumthan, Orathai

    Multilayered nanorods which consist of alternating magnetic layers separated by Au layers combine two distinctive properties, magnetic properties and surface plasmonic resonance (SPR) properties into one nano-entity. Their magnetic properties are tunable by changing the layer thickness, varying from single domain to superparamagnetic state. Superparamagnetic is a key requirement for magnetic nanoparticles for bioapplications. Superparamagnetic nanoparticles exhibit high magnetic moments at low applied magnetic field while retain no magnetic moments when magnetic field is removed preventing them from aggregation due to magnetic attraction. Au layers in the nanorods provide anchorage sites for functional group attachment. Also, Au nanodisks exhibit SPR properties. The SPR peak can be tuned from 540 nm to 820 nm by controlling the thickness of magnetic segments while keeping Au thickness constant. In this research, there are three types of multilayered nanorod have been fabricated: Au/NiFe nanorods, Au/Fe nanorods, and Au/Co nanorods. These magnetic nanorods were fabricated by templated electrodeposition into the channels in Anodic Aluminum Oxide (AAO) membrane. The setup for AAO fabrication was developed as a part of this research. Our fabricated AAO membrane has channels with a diameter ranging from 40nm to 80 nm and a thickness of 10um to 12um. Magnetic properties of nanorods such as saturation field, saturation moment, coercivity and remanence are able to manipulate through their shape anisotropy. The magnetization will be easier in long axis rather than short axis of particle. In addition, Au nanodisks in the nanorod structure are not only serving as anchorage sites for functional groups but also provide SPR properties. Under irradiation of light Au nanodisks strongly absorb light at SPR frequency which ranging from 540 nm to 820 nm by controlling the thickness of magnetic segments while keeping Au thickness constant. The SPR tunability of nanorods in near

  8. Synthesis and characterization of zinc oxide nanorods and its photocatalytic activities towards degradation of 2,4-D.

    PubMed

    Meenakshi, G; Sivasamy, A

    2017-01-01

    Semiconductor zinc oxide nanorods (NRZnO) were prepared by sol-gel technique using zinc acetate as the precursor and ammonia as the precipitating agent. The prepared photocatalyst were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), UV-Visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV-Vis-DRS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), High Resolution-Tunneling Microscope (HR-TEM), Brunauer, Emmett and Teller (BET) and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) analysis. Particle size of the prepared photocatalyst was established by XRD and FE-SEM analysis. The morphology and the formation of uniform NRZnO was controlled by the temperature, entire concentration of precursors, duration of aging process. High surface roughness and porosity confirmed by AFM analysis. Band gap energy of the synthesized photocatalyst (3.2eV) was determined by using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The in-situ production of OH radicals by the prepared photocatalyst was confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) spin trapping technique. The photocatalytic activity of prepared NRZnO was evaluated by photo degradation of 2, 4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2, 4-D) under UV and visible light irradiations. Experimental parameter such as effect of pH, catalyst dosage, initial 2, 4- D concentrations and addition of different electrolytes on the degradation of 2, 4-D was also studied in detail. Neutral pH was found to be the optimum and catalyst dosage of 30mg/10ml resulted in higher percentage of degradation. The photo degraded samples were analyzed by chemical oxygen demand (COD) analysis, UV-Visible spectroscopy. Reusability of the prepared photocatalyst was tested upto three cycles without affecting its performance. The experimental shown the rate of degradation follows pseudo-first order rate kinetics with respect to 2, 4 D.

  9. Ultratrace Level Determination and Quantitative Analysis of Kidney Injury Biomarkers in Patient Samples Attained by Zinc Oxide Nanorods

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Manpreet; Alabanza, Anginelle; Gonzalez, Lorelis E.; Wang, Weiwei; Reeves, W. Brian; Hahm, Jong-in

    2016-01-01

    Determining ultratrace amounts of protein biomarkers in patient samples in a straightforward and quantitative manner is extremely important for early disease diagnosis and treatment. Here, we successfully demonstrate the novel use of zinc oxide nanorods (ZnO NRs) in the ultrasensitive and quantitative detection of two acute kidney injury (AKI)-related protein biomarkers, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-8, directly from patient samples. We first validate the ZnO NRs-based IL-8 results via comparison with those obtained from using a conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent method in samples from 38 individuals. We further assess the full detection capability of the ZnO NRs-based technique by quantifying TNF-α, whose levels in human urine are often below the detection limits of conventional methods. Using the ZnO NR platforms, we determine the TNF-α concentrations of all 46 patient samples tested, down to the fg/mL level. Subsequently, we screen for TNF-α levels in approximately 50 additional samples collected from different patient groups in order to demonstrate a potential use of the ZnO NRs-based assay in assessing cytokine levels useful for further clinical monitoring. Our research efforts demonstrate that ZnO NRs can be straightforwardly employed in the rapid, ultrasensitive, quantitative, and simultaneous detection of multiple AKI-related biomarkers directly in patient urine samples, providing an unparalleled detection capability beyond those of conventional analysis methods. Additional key advantages of the ZnO NRs-based approach include a fast detection speed, low-volume assay condition, multiplexing ability, and easy automation/integration capability to existing fluorescence instrumentation. Therefore, we anticipate that our ZnO NRs-based detection method will be highly beneficial for overcoming the frequent challenges in early biomarker development and treatment assessment, pertaining to the facile and ultrasensitive quantification of

  10. Superior asymmetric supercapacitor based on Ni-Co oxide nanosheets and carbon nanorods

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rutao; Yan, Xingbin

    2014-01-01

    Nickel and cobalt (Ni-Co) binary oxide nanosheets with mesoporous structure are prepared by a facile approach based on the formation and disassociation of nickel/cobalt-citrate complex, and they show an ultra-high Faradaic capacitance up to 1846 F g−1 and excellent rate capability. On this basic, advanced aqueous asymmetric supercapacitors (AASs) are successfully built by using the Ni-Co oxide as the positive electrode and three kinds of activated carbons respectively as the negative electrode. As-made AASs are able to work reversibly in a full operated voltage region of 0–1.6 V and exhibit outstanding electrochemical performance. Among them, activated polyaniline-derived carbon (APDC)//Ni-Co oxide AASs shows the highest specific capacitance of 202 F g−1, the maximum energy density of 71.7 Wh kg−1, and superior combination of high energy and power density (a energy density of 41.6 Wh kg−1 at a high power density of 16 kW kg−1). PMID:24429842

  11. Investigation of reaction conditions on morphology and optical properties of Zinc Oxide Nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almodarresiyeh, H. A.; Abakshonok, A. V.; Agabekov, V. E.; Eryomin, A. N.; Shahab, S. N.

    2014-08-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) were synthesized by precipitation method in the presence of various polymers. Rod shaped ZnO NPs (length ~ 1 micron) were obtained at 70 °C in a reaction medium containing 10-20 mM of zinc nitrate hexahydrate (Zn(NO3)2·6H2O), 0.05-0.1 mg/ml of polyethylenimine (PEI) and 20 mM of hexamethylenetetramine (HMT). Properties of ZnO NPs were characterized by fluorescence, UV-visible spectroscopy, atomic force and transmission electron microscopy.

  12. Extraction of trivalent lanthanides and actinides by ``CMPO-like`` calixarenes

    SciTech Connect

    Delmau, L.H.; Simon, N.; Schwing-Weill, M.J.

    1999-04-01

    Extractive properties of calix[4]arenes bearing carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide moieties on their upper rim toward trivalent lanthanide and actinide cations were investigated. The study revealed that these molecules selectively extract light lanthanides and actinides from heavy lanthanides. All parameters present in the extraction system were varied to determine the origin of the selectivity. It was found that this selectivity requires a calix[4]arene platform and acetamidophosphine oxide groups containing phenyl substituents on the four phosphorus atoms.

  13. Synthesis of hierarchical NiCo2O4 hollow nanorods via sacrificial-template accelerate hydrolysis for electrochemical glucose oxidation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiao; Cho, Misuk; Lee, Youngkwan

    2016-01-15

    Hierarchical NiCo2O4 hollow nanorods (HR) were directly grown on stainless steel via a sacrificial template accelerated hydrolysis and post calcination using ZnO nanorod as a template. The composition of the NiCo2O4 HR electrode was determined using X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The morphology of the NiCo2O4 HR is comprised of nanoflakes that were characterized with scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The mixed-valence metal oxide and hollow structure provided high chemical reactivity and a large surface area for glucose oxidation in an alkaline solution. Under an optimal applied potential of +0.6 V, the developed NiCo2O4 HR electrode showed a broad detection range of 0.0003–1.0 mM, a sensitivity of 1685.1 μA mM−1 cm−2, and a low detection limit of 0.16 μM. These results represent a significant improvement over both NiO and Co3O4 HR. The developed NiCo2O4 HR electrode not only demonstrated excellent selectivity in the presence of several electro-active species, but also exhibited high stability following a 200 cycles voltammetry test.

  14. Pressure Regulations on the Surface Properties of CeO2 Nanorods and Their Catalytic Activity for CO Oxidation and Nitrile Hydrolysis Reactions.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Zhang, Zhiyun; Gao, Wei; Zhang, Sai; Ma, Yuanyuan; Qu, Yongquan

    2016-09-07

    Surface properties of nanoscale CeO2 catalysts in terms of the surface Ce(3+) fraction and concentration of oxygen vacancy can affect their catalytic performance significantly. Continual adjustment on surface properties of CeO2 with the morphological preservation has not been realized by synthetic methods. The revisited studies show that surface properties of CeO2 nanorods can be effectively regulated by synthetic pressures while the rodlike morphology is well-preserved. Such phenomena are ascribed to the contact possibility between Ce(3+) species and dissolved O2, which is balanced by the rapidly increased and gradually saturated dissolution/recrystallization rate of Ce(OH)3 and linearly increased concentration of dissolved O2 with the increase of total air pressure or partial pressure of O2. Surface-property-dependent catalytic activity of CeO2 nanorods synthesized under various pressures was also demonstrated in two benchmark reactions-catalytic oxidation of CO and hydrolysis of nitrile. Such a finding of the pressure regulation on the reducible metal oxides provides an effective approach to rationally design novel catalysts for specific reactions, where ceria are supports, promoters, or actives.

  15. Development of diamond-lanthanide metal oxide affinity composites for the selective capture of endogenous serum phosphopeptides.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Dilshad; Musharraf, Syed Ghulam; Najam-ul-Haq, Muhammad

    2016-02-01

    Development of affinity materials for the selective enrichment of phosphopeptides has attracted attention during the last decade. In this work, diamond-lanthanum oxide and diamond-samarium oxide composites have been fabricated via the hydrothermal method. The composites are characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-Ray spectroscopy (EDAX), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The analyses confirm the size and composition of the nanocomposites. They have been applied to selectively capture phosphorylated peptides from standard proteins (β-casein and BSA). Selectivity is calculated as 1:3000 and 1:1500 while sensitivity down to 1 and 20 fmol for diamond-lanthanum oxide and diamond-samarium oxide nanocomposites, respectively. Enrichment efficiency has also been evaluated for non-fat milk digest where 18 phosphopeptides are enriched. Total of 213 and 187 phosphopeptides are captured from tryptic digest of HeLa cells extracted proteins by diamond-lanthanum oxide and diamond-samarium oxide, respectively. Finally, human serum, without any pre-treatment, is applied and nanocomposites capture the endogenous serum phosphopeptides.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of reduced graphene oxide decorated with CeO2-doped MnO2 nanorods for supercapacitor applications.

    PubMed

    Ojha, Gunendra Prasad; Pant, Bishweshwar; Park, Soo-Jin; Park, Mira; Kim, Hak-Yong

    2017-05-15

    A novel and efficient CeO2-doped MnO2 nanorods decorated reduced graphene oxide (CeO2-MnO2/RGO) nanocomposite was successfully synthesized via hydrothermal method. The growth of the CeO2 doped MnO2 nanorods over GO sheets and reduction of GO were simultaneously carried out under hydrothermal treatment. The morphology and structure of as-synthesized nanocomposite were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Raman spectroscopy, which revealed the formation of CeO2-MnO2 decorated RGO nanocomposites. The electrochemical performance of as-prepared CeO2-MnO2/RGO nanocomposites as an active electrode material for supercapacitor was evaluated by cyclic voltammetry, charge-discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) methods in 2M alkaline medium. The obtained results revealed that as-synthesized CeO2-MnO2/RGO nanocomposite exhibited higher specific capacitance (648F/g) as compared to other formulations (MnO2/RGO nanocomposites: 315.13 F/g and MnO2 nanorods: 228.5 F/g) at the scan rate of 5mV/s. After 1000 cycles, it retained ∼90.4%, exhibiting a good stability. The high surface area, enhanced electrical conductivity, and good stability possess by the nanocomposite make this material a promising candidate to be applied as a supercapacitor electrode.

  17. Enhanced thermal stability of Ag nanorods through capping

    SciTech Connect

    Bachenheimer, Lou; Elliott, Paul; Stagon, Stephen; Huang, Hanchen

    2014-11-24

    Ag nanorods may serve as sensors in the detection of trace amounts of chemical agents, even single molecules, through surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). However, thermal coarsening of Ag nanorods near room temperature limits their applications. This letter proposes the use of a thin oxide capping layer to enhance the thermal stability of Ag nanorods beyond 100 °C. Using electron microscopy characterization and SERS tests, the authors show that the proposed method is effective in stabilizing both morphology and sensitivity of Ag nanorods. The results of this work extend the applicability of Ag nanorods as chemical sensors to higher temperatures.

  18. Ultratrace level determination and quantitative analysis of kidney injury biomarkers in patient samples attained by zinc oxide nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Manpreet; Alabanza, Anginelle; Gonzalez, Lorelis E.; Wang, Weiwei; Reeves, W. Brian; Hahm, Jong-In

    2016-02-01

    Determining ultratrace amounts of protein biomarkers in patient samples in a straightforward and quantitative manner is extremely important for early disease diagnosis and treatment. Here, we successfully demonstrate the novel use of zinc oxide nanorods (ZnO NRs) in the ultrasensitive and quantitative detection of two acute kidney injury (AKI)-related protein biomarkers, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-8, directly from patient samples. We first validate the ZnO NRs-based IL-8 results via comparison with those obtained from using a conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent method in samples from 38 individuals. We further assess the full detection capability of the ZnO NRs-based technique by quantifying TNF-α, whose levels in human urine are often below the detection limits of conventional methods. Using the ZnO NR platforms, we determine the TNF-α concentrations of all 46 patient samples tested, down to the fg per mL level. Subsequently, we screen for TNF-α levels in approximately 50 additional samples collected from different patient groups in order to demonstrate a potential use of the ZnO NRs-based assay in assessing cytokine levels useful for further clinical monitoring. Our research efforts demonstrate that ZnO NRs can be straightforwardly employed in the rapid, ultrasensitive, quantitative, and simultaneous detection of multiple AKI-related biomarkers directly in patient urine samples, providing an unparalleled detection capability beyond those of conventional analysis methods. Additional key advantages of the ZnO NRs-based approach include a fast detection speed, low-volume assay condition, multiplexing ability, and easy automation/integration capability to existing fluorescence instrumentation. Therefore, we anticipate that our ZnO NRs-based detection method will be highly beneficial for overcoming the frequent challenges in early biomarker development and treatment assessment, pertaining to the facile and ultrasensitive quantification

  19. Studies on the structural and optical properties of zinc oxide nanobushes and Co-doped ZnO self-aggregated nanorods synthesized by simple thermal decomposition route

    SciTech Connect

    Freedsman, Joseph J.; Kennedy, L. John; Kumar, R. Thinesh; Sekaran, G.; Vijaya, J. Judith

    2010-10-15

    Pure and Co-doped zinc oxide nanomaterials were prepared by a simple low temperature synthesis and were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high resolution-transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), diffused reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques. The results showed the formation of nanobushes that consists of several nanowires for pure ZnO and the nanorods formed by self-aggregation for Co-doped ZnO. The presence of Co{sup 2+} ions replacing some of the Zn{sup 2+} in the ZnO lattice was confirmed by EPR and DRS studies. The mechanism for the formation of self-aggregated and self-aligned ZnO rods after the incorporation of cobalt in the lattice by the building block units is discussed in this study. Morphological studies were carried out using SEM and HR-TEM, which supports the validity of the proposed mechanism for the formation of ZnO nanobushes and Co-doped ZnO nanorods. The synthesized nanomaterials were found to have good optoelectronic properties.

  20. Manganese Oxide Nanorod-Decorated Mesoporous ZSM-5 Composite as a Precious-Metal-Free Electrode Catalyst for Oxygen Reduction.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiangzhi; Hua, Zile; Chen, Lisong; Zhang, Xiaohua; Chen, Hangrong; Shi, Jianlin

    2016-05-10

    A precious-metal-free cathode catalyst, MnO2 nanorod-decorated mesoporous ZSM-5 zeolite nanocomposite (MnO2 / m-ZSM-5), has been successfully synthesized by a hydrothermal and electrostatic interaction approach for efficient electrochemical catalysis of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The active MnOOH species, that is, Mn(4+) /Mn(3+) redox couple and Brønsted acid sites on the mesoporous ZSM-5 matrix facilitate an approximately 4 e(-) process for the catalysis of the ORR comparable to commercial 20 wt % Pt/C. Stable electrocatalytic activity with 90 % current retention after 5000 cycles, and more importantly, excellent methanol tolerance is observed. Synergetic catalytic effects between the MnO2 nanorods and the mesoporous ZSM-5 matrix are proposed to account for the high electrochemical catalytic performance.

  1. Trade-off between Zr Passivation and Sn Doping on Hematite Nanorod Photoanodes for Efficient Solar Water Oxidation: Effects of a ZrO2 Underlayer and FTO Deformation.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Arunprabaharan; Annamalai, Alagappan; Lee, Hyun Hwi; Choi, Sun Hee; Ryu, Jungho; Park, Jung Hee; Jang, Jum Suk

    2016-08-03

    Herein we report the influence of a ZrO2 underlayer on the PEC (photoelectrochemical) behavior of hematite nanorod photoanodes for efficient solar water splitting. Particular attention was given to the cathodic shift in onset potential and photocurrent enhancement. Akaganite (β-FeOOH) nanorods were grown on ZrO2-coated FTO (fluorine-doped tin oxide) substrates. Sintering at 800 °C transformed akaganite to the hematite (α-Fe2O3) phase and induced Sn diffusion into the crystal structure of hematite nanorods from the FTO substrates and surface migration, shallow doping of Zr atoms from the ZrO2 underlayer. The ZrO2 underlayer-treated photoanode showed better water oxidation performance compared to the pristine (α-Fe2O3) photoanode. A cathodic shift in the onset potential and photocurrent enhancement was achieved by surface passivation and shallow doping of Zr from the ZrO2 underlayer, along with Sn doping from the FTO substrate to the crystal lattice of hematite nanorods. The Zr based hematite nanorod photoanode achieved 1 mA/cm(2) at 1.23 VRHE with a low turn-on voltage of 0.80 VRHE. Sn doping and Zr passivation, as well as shallow doping, were confirmed by XPS, Iph, and M-S plot analyses. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy revealed that the presence of a ZrO2 underlayer decreased the deformation of FTO substrate, improved electron transfer at the hematite/FTO interface and increased charge-transfer resistance at the electrolyte/hematite interface. This is the first systematic investigation of the effects of Zr passivation, shallow doping, and Sn doping on hematite nanorod photoanodes through application of a ZrO2 underlayer on the FTO substrate.

  2. Lanthanide Chemistry: From Coordination in Chemical Complexes Shaping Our Technology to Coordination in Enzymes Shaping Bacterial Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Gomez, Norma Cecilia; Vu, Huong N; Skovran, Elizabeth

    2016-10-17

    Lanthanide chemistry has only been extensively studied for the last 2 decades, when it was recognized that these elements have unusual chemical characteristics including fluorescent and potent magnetic properties because of their unique 4f electrons.1,2 Chemists are rapidly and efficiently integrating lanthanides into numerous compounds and materials for sophisticated applications. In fact, lanthanides are often referred to as "the seeds of technology" because they are essential for many technological devices including smartphones, computers, solar cells, batteries, wind turbines, lasers, and optical glasses.3-6 However, the effect of lanthanides on biological systems has been understudied. Although displacement of Ca(2+) by lanthanides in tissues and enzymes has long been observed,7 only a few recent studies suggest a biological role for lanthanides based on their stimulatory properties toward some plants and bacteria.8,9 Also, it was not until 2011 that the first biochemical evidence for lanthanides as inherent metals in bacterial enzymes was published.10 This forum provides an overview of the classical and current aspects of lanthanide coordination chemistry employed in the development of technology along with the biological role of lanthanides in alcohol oxidation. The construction of lanthanide-organic frameworks will be described. Examples of how the luminescence field is rapidly evolving as more information about lanthanide-metal emissions is obtained will be highlighted, including biological imaging and telecommunications.11 Recent breakthroughs and observations from different exciting areas linked to the coordination chemistry of lanthanides that will be mentioned in this forum include the synthesis of (i) macrocyclic ligands, (ii) antenna molecules, (iii) coordination polymers, particularly nanoparticles, (iv) hybrid materials, and (v) lanthanide fuel cells. Further, the role of lanthanides in bacterial metabolism will be discussed, highlighting the

  3. Ce(0.6)Zr(0.3)Y(0.1)O(2) nanorod supported gold and palladium alloy nanoparticles: high-performance catalysts for toluene oxidation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wei; Deng, Jiguang; Xie, Shaohua; Yang, Huanggen; Jiang, Yang; Guo, Guangsheng; Dai, Hongxing

    2015-05-14

    The Ce0.6Zr0.3Y0.1O2 (CZY) nanorods and their supported gold and palladium alloy (zAuxPdy/CZY; z = 0.80-0.93 wt%; x or y = 0, 1, 2) nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared using the cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide-assisted hydrothermal and polyvinyl alcohol-protected reduction methods, respectively. Physicochemical properties of the samples were characterized by means of numerous analytical techniques, and their catalytic activities were evaluated for the oxidation of toluene. It is shown that the CZY in zAuxPdy/CZY was cubic in crystal structure, surface areas of CZY and zAuxPdy/CZY were in the range 68-77 m(2) g(-1), and the Au-Pd NPs with a size of 4.6-5.6 nm were highly dispersed on the surface of CZY nanorods. Among all the samples, 0.90Au1Pd2/CZY possessed the highest adsorbed oxygen concentration and the best low-temperature reducibility, and performed the best: T50% and T90% (temperatures required for achieving toluene conversions of 50 and 90%) were 190 and 218 °C at a space velocity of 20 000 mL (g h)(-1), respectively. The partial deactivation due to water vapor introduction was reversible. The active sites might be the surface oxygen vacancies on CZY, oxidized noble metal NPs, and/or interfaces between noble metal NPs and CZY. The apparent activation energies (37-43 kJ mol(-1)) obtained over 0.90-0.93AuxPdy/CZY were much lower than that (88 kJ mol(-1)) obtained over CZY for toluene oxidation. It is concluded that the excellent catalytic performance of 0.90Au1Pd2/CZY was associated with its high adsorbed oxygen species concentration, good low-temperature reducibility, and strong interaction between Au-Pd NPs and CZY nanorods as well as good dispersion of Au-Pd NPs.

  4. Dynamic tests for actinide/lanthanide separation by CMPO solvent in fluorinated diluents

    SciTech Connect

    Tkachenko, L.; Babain, V.; Alyapyshev, M.; Vizniy, A.; Il'in, A.; Shadrin, A.

    2013-07-01

    Actinide and lanthanide extraction by new solvent: 0.2 M phenyl-octyl-N,N-diiso-butylcarbamoyl-phosphine oxide (CMPO) + 30% TBP + formal of octafluoro-pentanol was studied. A dynamic test with this solvent was performed. It was shown that americium and lanthanides are effectively extracted from PUREX process raffinate. The separation of americium from light lanthanides was confirmed in the modified SETFICS flowsheet with this new solvent. (authors)

  5. Acylpyrazolones: Synthesis, self-assembly and lanthanide metal ion separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun

    The central hypothesis that nanoscale self-assemblies can provide excellent metal ion recognition has been substantiated by employing acylpyrazolones and trivalent lanthanide metal ions as model systems. Several novel acylpyrazolones and their amphiphilic analogs have been designed, synthesized, and characterized. Their lanthanide metal ion recognition efficacies have been demonstrated through baseline separations of a mixture of light, middle, and heavy lanthanide metal ions by employing them in the aqueous mobile phase of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with octadecylsilanized silica (ODS) as the stationary phase. The complex separation mechanism is influenced by the structures of acylpyrazolone and amphiphilic moieties, and spontaneous self-assembly of the ligand in the aqueous and on the stationary phases. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of the ligand self-assemblies in the aqueous phase in the absence and presence of lanthanide metal ions reveal spherical, dendritic, and linear (nanofibers, nanorods, and nanotubes) nanoscale structures. Such structures have also been observed when chloromethylated acylpyrazolones are stimulated to self-assemble by a base in nonaqueous solvents and when silica nanoparticles derivatized with them spontaneously self-assemble in aqueous and nonaqueous solvents.

  6. Silver nanorod arrays for photocathode applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilayurganapathy, Subramanian; Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Joly, Alan G.; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Varga, Tamas; Coffey, Greg; Schwenzer, Birgit; Pandey, Archana; Kayani, Asghar; Hess, Wayne P.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2013-10-01

    We explore the use of plasmonic Ag nanorod arrays featuring enhanced photoemission as high-brightness photocathode material. Silver nanorod arrays are synthesized by the direct current electrodeposition method and their dimensionality, uniformity, crystallinity, and oxide/impurity content are characterized. The yielded arrays exhibit greatly enhanced two-photon photoemission under 400 nm femtosecond pulsed laser excitation. Plasmonic field enhancement in the array produces photoemission hot spots that are mapped using photoemission electron microscopy. The relative photoemission enhancement of nanorod hot spots relative to that of a flat Ag thin film is found to range between 102 and 3 × 103.

  7. Thin films of metal oxides grown by chemical vapor deposition from volatile transition metal and lanthanide metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, Kimberly Dona

    1998-08-01

    This thesis describes the synthesis and characterization of novel volatile metal-organic complexes for the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of metal oxides. Monomeric tantalum complexes, lbrack Ta(OEt)sb4(beta-diketonate)) are prepared by the acid-base reaction of lbrack Tasb2(OEt)sb{10}rbrack with a beta-diketone, (RC(O)CHsb2C(O)Rsp' for R = CHsb3, Rsp' = CFsb3; R = Rsp'=C(CHsb3)sb3; R = Csb3Fsb7,\\ Rsp'=C(CHsb3)sb3;\\ R=Rsp'=CFsb3; and R = Rsp' = CHsb3). The products are characterized spectroscopically. Thermal CVD using these complexes as precursors gave good quality Tasb2Osb5 thin films which are characterized by XPS, SEM, electrical measurements, and XRD. Factors affecting the film deposition such as the type of carrier gas and the temperature of the substrate were considered. Catalyst-enhanced CVD reactions with each of the precursors and a palladium catalyst, ((2-methylallyl)Pd(acac)), were studied as a lower temperature route to good quality Tasb2Osb5 films. The decomposition mechanism at the hot substrate surface was studied. Precursors for the formation of yttria by CVD were examined. New complexes of the form (Y(hfac)sb3(glyme)), (hfac = \\{CFsb3C(O)CHC(O)CFsb3\\}sp-,\\ glyme=CHsb3O(CHsb2CHsb2O)sb{n}CHsb3 for n = 1-4) were synthesized and characterized spectroscopically. X-ray structural determinations of three new complexes were obtained. CVD reaction conditions were determined which give YOF films and, with catalyst-enhanced CVD, reaction conditions which give selective formation of Ysb2Osb3, YOF, or YFsb3. The films were studied by XPS, SEM, and XRD. Decomposition mechanisms which lead to film formation, together with a possible route for fluorine atom transfer from the ligand to the metal resulting in fluorine incorporation, were studied by analysis of exhaust products using GC-MS. Novel precursors of the form lbrack Ce(hfac)sb3(glyme)rbrack,\\ (hfac=\\{CFsb3C(O)CHC(O)CFsb3\\}sp-,\\ glyme=CHsb3O(CHsb2CHsb2O)sb{n}CHsb3, n = 1-4) for CVD of ceria were

  8. Luminescent macrocyclic lanthanide complexes

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Kenneth N [Berkeley, CA; Corneillie, Todd M [Campbell, CA; Xu, Jide [Berkeley, CA

    2012-05-08

    The present invention provides a novel class of macrocyclic compounds as well as complexes formed between a metal (e.g., lanthanide) ion and the compounds of the invention. Preferred complexes exhibit high stability as well as high quantum yields of lanthanide ion luminescence in aqueous media without the need for secondary activating agents. Preferred compounds incorporate hydroxy-isophthalamide moieties within their macrocyclic structure and are characterized by surprisingly low, non-specific binding to a variety of polypeptides such as antibodies and proteins as well as high kinetic stability. These characteristics distinguish them from known, open-structured ligands.

  9. Luminescent macrocyclic lanthanide complexes

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Kenneth N; Corneillie, Todd M; Xu, Jide

    2014-05-20

    The present invention provides a novel class of macrocyclic compounds as well as complexes formed between a metal (e.g., lanthanide) ion and the compounds of the invention. Preferred complexes exhibit high stability as well as high quantum yields of lanthanide ion luminescence in aqueous media without the need for secondary activating agents. Preferred compounds incorporate hydroxy-isophthalamide moieties within their macrocyclic structure and are characterized by surprisingly low, non-specific binding to a variety of polypeptides such as antibodies and proteins as well as high kinetic stability. These characteristics distinguish them from known, open-structured ligands.

  10. Two series of reactant's ratio-dependent lanthanide organic frameworks derived from nicotinic acid N-oxide and oxalate: synthesis, crystal structures and luminescence properties.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yanyan; Zhang, Lijuan; Zhou, Yunshan; Zuhra, Zareen

    2015-03-14

    Two series of lanthanide(III)–organic frameworks with the molecular formula [Ln2(NNO)2(OX)2(H2O)4]n (Ln = Eu 1, Tb 2, Sm 3, Dy 4, Gd 5) and [Ln2(NNO)4(OX)(H2O)2]n (Ln = Eu 6, Tb 7, Sm 8, Dy 9, Gd 10) were synthesized successfully under the same hydrothermal conditions with nicotinic N-oxide (HNNO) and oxalic acid (H2OX) as the mixed ligands merely through varying the molar ratio of the reactants. The compounds were characterized by IR, elemental analysis, UV, TG-DTA and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD). X-ray single-crystal diffraction analyses of compounds 1 and 7 selected as representatives and powder XRD analysis of the compounds revealed that both the series of compounds feature three-dimensional (3-D) open frameworks, and crystallize in the triclinic P1 space group while with different unit cell parameters. In compound 1, pairs of Eu(3+) ions and pairs of NNO(−) ligands connect with each other alternately to form a 1-D infinite Eu-NNO double chain, the adjacent 1-D double-chains are then joined together through OX(2−) ligands leading to a 2D layer, the 2-D layers are further ‘pillared’ by OX(2−) ligands resulting in a 3-D framework. In compound 7, the 1-D Tb-NNO infinite chain and its 2-D layer are formed in an almost similar fashion to that in compound 1. The difference between the structures of the two compounds 1 and 7 is that the adjacent 2-D layers in compound 7 are further connected by NNO(−) ligands resulting in a 3-D framework. The photoluminescence properties and energy transfer mechanism of the compounds were studied systematically. The energy level of the lowest triplet states of the HNNO ligand (23148 cm(−1)) was determined based on the phosphorescence spectrum of compound 5 at 77 K. The (5)D0 (Eu(3+)) and (5)D4 (Tb(3+)) emission lifetimes are 0.46 ms, 0.83 ms, 0.69 ms and 0.89 ms and overall quantum yields are 1.03%, 3.29%, 2.58% and 3.78% for the compounds 1, 2, 6 and 7, respectively.

  11. In vivo toxicity studies of europium hydroxide nanorods in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Patra, Chitta Ranjan Abdel Moneim, Soha S.; Wang, Enfeng; Dutta, Shamit; Patra, Sujata; Eshed, Michal; Mukherjee, Priyabrata; Gedanken, Aharon; Shah, Vijay H.; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2009-10-01

    Lanthanide nanoparticles and nanorods have been widely used for diagnostic and therapeutic applications in biomedical nanotechnology due to their fluorescence and pro-angiogenic properties to endothelial cells, respectively. Recently, we have demonstrated that europium (III) hydroxide [Eu{sup III}(OH){sub 3}] nanorods, synthesized by the microwave technique and characterized by several physico-chemical techniques, can be used as pro-angiogenic agents which introduce future therapeutic treatment strategies for severe ischemic heart/limb disease, and peripheral ischemic disease. The toxicity of these inorganic nanorods to endothelial cells was supported by several in vitro assays. To determine the in vivo toxicity, these nanorods were administered to mice through intraperitoneal injection (IP) everyday over a period of seven days in a dose dependent (1.25 to 125 mg kg{sup -1} day{sup -1}) and time dependent manner (8-60 days). Bio-distribution of europium elements in different organs was analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). Short-term (S-T) and long-term (L-T) toxicity studies (mice euthanized on days 8 and 60 for S-T and L-T, respectively) show normal blood hematology and serum clinical chemistry with the exception of a slight elevation of liver enzymes. Histological examination of nanorod-treated vital organs (liver, kidney, spleen and lungs) showed no or only mild histological changes that indicate mild toxicity at the higher dose of nanorods.

  12. Enhanced photoelectrochemical property of ZnO nanorods array synthesized on reduced graphene oxide for self-powered biosensing application.

    PubMed

    Kang, Zhuo; Gu, Yousong; Yan, Xiaoqin; Bai, Zhiming; Liu, Yichong; Liu, Shuo; Zhang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Zheng; Zhang, Xueji; Zhang, Yue

    2015-02-15

    We have realized the direct synthesis of ZnO nanorods (ZnO NRs) array on reduced graphene layer (rGO), and demonstrated the enhanced photoelectrochemical (PEC) property of the rGO/ZnO based photoanode under UV irradiation compared with the pristine ZnO NRs array. The introduction of the rGO layer resulted in a favorable energy band structure for electron migration, which finally led to the efficient photoinduced charge separation. Such nanostructure was subsequently employed for self-powered PEC biosensing of glutathione in the condition of 0 V bias, with a linear range from 10 to 200 µM, a detection limit of 2.17 µM, as well as excellent selectivity, reproducibility and stability. The results indicated the rGO/ZnO nanostructure is a competitive candidate in the PEC biosensing field.

  13. In vitro cytotoxicity of gold nanorods in A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ying; Shen, Yafeng; Huang, Libin; Lv, Gaojian; Lei, Changhai; Fan, Xiaoyan; Lin, Fangxing; Zhang, Yuxia; Wu, Lihui; Yang, Yongji

    2015-03-01

    Gold nanoparticles, which have unique physicochemical characteristics, are being used for an increasingly wide range of applications in biomedical research. In this study, gold nanorods (width of 25 nm, length of 52 nm) were found to be internalized by A549 cells and were primarily localized in the lysosomes and membranous vesicles. The integrity of the membranes of A549 cells exposed to gold nanorods for 4h was damaged, as indicated by laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM). Increased lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage and decreased cell viability further indicated the concentration-dependent cytotoxicity of the gold nanorods to the A549 cells. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was induced in the A549 cells by the gold nanorods, and this effect was positively correlated with the concentration of the gold nanorods. The results of this study indicated that exposure to gold nanorods caused dose-dependent cytotoxicity in A549 cells and that oxidative stress may be the main factor causing cytotoxicity.

  14. Improved electron-hole separation and migration in anatase TiO2 nanorod/reduced graphene oxide composites and their influence on photocatalytic performance.

    PubMed

    Žerjav, Gregor; Arshad, Muhammad Shahid; Djinović, Petar; Junkar, Ita; Kovač, Janez; Zavašnik, Janez; Pintar, Albin

    2017-03-30

    The as-synthesized TiO2 nanorods a-TNR (amorphous TiO2 layer covering the crystalline anatase TiO2 core) and TNR (fully crystalline anatase TiO2) were decorated with reduced graphene oxide (rGO) to synthesize two series of TiO2 + rGO composites with different nominal loadings of GO (from 4 to 20 wt%). The structural, surface and electronic properties of the obtained TiO2 + rGO composites were analyzed and correlated to their performance in the photocatalytic oxidation of aqueous bisphenol A solution. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses revealed that charge separation in TiO2 + rGO composites is improved due to the perfect matching of TiO2 and rGO valence band maxima (VBM). Cyclic voltammetry (CV) experiments revealed that the peak-to-peak separations (ΔEp) are the lowest and the oxidation current densities are the highest for composites with a nominal 10 wt% GO content, meaning that it is much easier for the charge carriers to percolate through the solid, resulting in improved charge migration. Due to the high charge carrier mobility in rGO and perfect VBM matching between TiO2 and rGO, the electron-hole recombination in composites was suppressed, resulting in more electrons and holes being able to participate in the photocatalytic reaction. rGO amounts above 10 wt% decreased the photocatalytic activity; thus, it is critical to optimize its amount in the TiO2 + rGO composites for achieving the highest photocatalytic activity. BPA degradation rates correlated completely with the results of the CV measurements, which directly evidenced improved charge separation and migration as the crucial parameters governing photocatalysis.

  15. Fungus-promoted transformation of lanthanides during the biooxidation of divalent manganese

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Qianqian; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Tanaka, Kazuya; Kozai, Naofumi; Yamasaki, Shinya; Sakamoto, Fuminori; Tani, Yukinori

    2016-02-01

    Although microorganisms possess high sorption capability for lanthanides, the effect of their biological response on lanthanides migration is unclear. Using active fungus Acremonium strictum KR21-2, supplied with nutrients, this study compared the transformation of lanthanides during the biooxidation of Mn(II) in the absence and presence of trisodium citrate. In the absence of trisodium citrate, lanthanides were rapidly sorbed on fungal cells within 24 h, followed by the preferential desorption of Ce over other lanthanides as Mn oxide formed. Most of the desorbed Ce was in the colloidal phase and associated with a biomolecule produced by the active fungus. In contrast, neither desorption of Ce nor release of this biomolecule occurred in the presence of trisodium citrate. Most importantly, the Ce-binding biomolecule was not found to associate with any other trivalent lanthanides tested or with Fe. The biomolecule was characterized as c.a. 4700 Da in size, and it contains saccharides that differed from those non-nuclide-specific organic substances released from resting cells, as reported previously. This study highlights the importance of biotic reactions between lanthanides and microbial cells, which may affect the migration of lanthanides at the water-Mn oxide interface.

  16. Preparation and characterization of bionanocomposite film based on tapioca starch/bovine gelatin/nanorod zinc oxide.

    PubMed

    Marvizadeh, Mohammad Mehdi; Oladzadabbasabadi, Nazila; Mohammadi Nafchi, Abdorreza; Jokar, Maryam

    2017-02-20

    To exploring a nano-packaging materials for using as coating or edible films, tapioca starch/gelatin/nanorod ZnO (ZnON) bionanocomposites were prepared via solution casting technique. The effects of nanofiller addition on the mechanical, physicochemical, and crystalline structures, as well as the barrier properties of bionanocomposite films were investigated. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the bionanocomposite film incorporated with ZnON at a concentration of 3.5% w/w exhibited high intensity peaks compared with control samples. Results of UV-vis spectra analysis showed that incorporation of ZnON into the films can absorb the whole UV light. Tensile strength of the films was increased from 14 to 18MPa whereas elongation at breaks decreased from 18 to 8 percent and oxygen permeability decreased from 151.03 to 91.52cm(3)μm/(m(2)-day) by incorporation of 3.5% ZnON into biopolymer matrix. In summary combined starch/gelatin films supported by ZnON showed better properties compared to starch or gelatin alone. Thus, the bionanocomposite films can be used in food, medicine, and pharmaceutical packaging.

  17. Enhanced photocatalytic H2 production on CdS nanorod using cobalt-phosphate as oxidation cocatalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di, Tingmin; Zhu, Bicheng; Zhang, Jun; Cheng, Bei; Yu, Jiaguo

    2016-12-01

    Employing visible light responsive semiconductor for photocatalytic hydrogen production by water splitting is an efficient way for utilizing renewable solar energy to solve the depletion of fossil fuel and environmental contamination. Herein, we report enhanced photocatalytic H2-production performance over CdS nanorod using cobalt-phosphate (Co-Pi) as a water oxdation cocatalyst. The optimal Co-Pi modified CdS nanocomposite photocatalyst with the Co-Pi content of 8.4 mol% has a superior visible light H2-production rate of 13.3 mmol h-1 g-1 with an apparent quantum efficiency of 24.3% at 420 nm, which is even higher than that of 1 wt% Pt-CdS (11.3 mmol h-1 g-1) under the same conditions. The enhanced visible-light photocatalytic H2 production activity was attributed to the hole trapping and collecting ability of Co-Pi cocatalyst, which could effectively suppress the recombination of photogenerated electron-hole pairs and increase the electron density for hydrogen production. This work shows a possibility of using earth-abundant Co-Pi as cocatalyst for enhancing photocatalytic H2 production.

  18. Ultrasound and modulation assisted synthesis of {[Cu2(BDC-NH2)2(dabco)]DMF.3H2O} nanostructures: new precursor to prepare nanorods and nanotubes of copper(II) oxide.

    PubMed

    Alavi, Mohammad Amin; Morsali, Ali; Joo, Sang Woo; Min, Bong-Ki

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructures of porous coordination polymer {[Cu2(BDC-NH2)2(dabco)]DMF.3H2O} (1) have been synthesized in the presence of acetic acid as a modulator via sonochemical method. Different concentrations of metal ions, organic linkers, modulator reagent and also different sonication times were held to improve the quality and distribution of nanostructures. Ultrasound irradiation helps to nucleation step of the oriented attachment of modulation method and nanorods of compound 1 has been prepared. Compound 1 was calcinated at 500°C to prepare nanorods and nanotubes of copper(II) oxide. Compound 1 and CuO nanostructures were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA).

  19. Aromatic triamide-lanthanide complexes

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Kenneth N; Petoud, Stephane; Xu, Jide

    2013-10-08

    The present invention provides luminescent lanthanide metal chelates comprising a metal ion of the lanthanide series and a complexing agent comprising at least one phthalamidyl moiety. Also provided are probes incorporating the phthalamidyl ligands of the invention and methods utilizing the ligands of the invention and probes comprising the ligands of the invention.

  20. Effect of precursor solutions stirring on deep level defects concentration and spatial distribution in low temperature aqueous chemical synthesis of zinc oxide nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Alnoor, Hatim Chey, Chan Oeurn; Pozina, Galia; Willander, Magnus; Nur, Omer; Liu, Xianjie; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2015-08-15

    Hexagonal c-axis oriented zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods (NRs) with 120-300 nm diameters are synthesized via the low temperature aqueous chemical route at 80 °C on silver-coated glass substrates. The influence of varying the precursor solutions stirring durations on the concentration and spatial distributions of deep level defects in ZnO NRs is investigated. Room temperature micro-photoluminesnce (μ-PL) spectra were collected for all samples. Cathodoluminescence (CL) spectra of the as-synthesized NRs reveal a significant change in the intensity ratio of the near band edge emission (NBE) to the deep-level emission (DLE) peaks with increasing stirring durations. This is attributed to the variation in the concentration of the oxygen-deficiency with increasing stirring durations as suggested from the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. Spatially resolved CL spectra taken along individual NRs revealed that stirring the precursor solutions for relatively short duration (1-3 h), which likely induced high super saturation under thermodynamic equilibrium during the synthesis process, is observed to favor the formation of point defects moving towards the tip of the NRs. In contrary, stirring for longer duration (5-15 h) will induce low super saturation favoring the formation of point defects located at the bottom of the NRs. These findings demonstrate that it is possible to control the concentration and spatial distribution of deep level defects in ZnO NRs by varying the stirring durations of the precursor solutions.

  1. Sequential Drug Release and Enhanced Photothermal and Photoacoustic Effect of Hybrid Reduced Graphene Oxide-Loaded Ultrasmall Gold Nanorod Vesicles for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jibin; Yang, Xiangyu; Jacobson, Orit; Lin, Lisen; Huang, Peng; Niu, Gang; Ma, Qingjie; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2017-01-01

    We report a hybrid reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-loaded ultrasmall plasmonic gold nanorod vesicle (rGO-AuNRVe) (~65 nm in size) with remarkably amplified photoacoustic (PA) performance and photothermal effects. The hybrid vesicle also exhibits a high loading capacity of doxorubicin (DOX), as both the cavity of the vesicle and the large surface area of the encapsulated rGO can be used for loading DOX, making it an excellent drug carrier. The loaded DOX is released sequentially: near-infrared photothermal heating induces DOX release from the vesicular cavity, and an intracellular acidic environment induces DOX release from the rGO surface. Positron emission tomography imaging showed high passive U87MG tumor accumulation of 64Cu-labeled rGO-AuNRVes (~9.7% ID/g at 24 h postinjection) and strong PA signal in the tumor region. Single intravenous injection of rGO-AuNRVe-DOX followed by low-power-density 808 nm laser irradiation (0.25 W/cm2) revealed effective inhibition of tumor growth due to the combination of chemo- and photothermal therapies. The rGO-AuNRVe-DOX capable of sequential DOX release by laser light and acid environment may have the potential for clinical translation to treat cancer patients with tumors accessible by light. PMID:26308265

  2. Multiplexed enzyme-free electrochemical immunosensor based on ZnO nanorods modified reduced graphene oxide-paper electrode and silver deposition-induced signal amplification strategy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guoqiang; Zhang, Lina; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Hongmei; Ma, Chao; Ge, Shenguang; Yan, Mei; Yu, Jinghua; Song, Xianrang

    2015-09-15

    Herein, an origami multiplexed enzyme-free electrochemical (EC) immunodevice is developed for the first time. Typically, ZnO nanorods (ZNRs) modified reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-paper electrode is used as a sensor platform, in which rGO improves the electronic transmission rate and ZNRs provide abundant sites for capture probes binding. Furthermore, by combining the large surface area of rGO and high catalytic activity of bovine serum protein (BSA)-stabilized silver nanoparticles (Ag@BSA) toward H2O2 reduction, rGO/Ag@BSA composites can be used as an excellent signal labels. The current signal is generated from the reduction of H2O2 and further amplified by a subsequent signal labels-promoted deposition of silver. Under optimal conditions, the proposed immunoassays exhibit excellent precision, high sensitivity and a wide linear range of 0.002-120 mIU mL(-1) for human chorionic gonadotropin, 0.001-110 ng mL(-1) for prostate-specific antigen, and 0.001-100 ng mL(-1) for carcinoembryonic antigen. The results for real sample analysis demonstrate that the newly constructed immunosensor arrays provide a simple and cost-effective method for clinical applications.

  3. Effect of precursor solutions stirring on deep level defects concentration and spatial distribution in low temperature aqueous chemical synthesis of zinc oxide nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alnoor, Hatim; Chey, Chan Oeurn; Pozina, Galia; Liu, Xianjie; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr; Willander, Magnus; Nur, Omer

    2015-08-01

    Hexagonal c-axis oriented zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods (NRs) with 120-300 nm diameters are synthesized via the low temperature aqueous chemical route at 80 °C on silver-coated glass substrates. The influence of varying the precursor solutions stirring durations on the concentration and spatial distributions of deep level defects in ZnO NRs is investigated. Room temperature micro-photoluminesnce (μ-PL) spectra were collected for all samples. Cathodoluminescence (CL) spectra of the as-synthesized NRs reveal a significant change in the intensity ratio of the near band edge emission (NBE) to the deep-level emission (DLE) peaks with increasing stirring durations. This is attributed to the variation in the concentration of the oxygen-deficiency with increasing stirring durations as suggested from the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. Spatially resolved CL spectra taken along individual NRs revealed that stirring the precursor solutions for relatively short duration (1-3 h), which likely induced high super saturation under thermodynamic equilibrium during the synthesis process, is observed to favor the formation of point defects moving towards the tip of the NRs. In contrary, stirring for longer duration (5-15 h) will induce low super saturation favoring the formation of point defects located at the bottom of the NRs. These findings demonstrate that it is possible to control the concentration and spatial distribution of deep level defects in ZnO NRs by varying the stirring durations of the precursor solutions.

  4. A TRUEX-based separation of americium from the lanthanides

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce J. Mincher; Nicholas C. Schmitt; Mary E. Case

    2011-03-01

    Abstract: The inextractability of the actinide AnO2+ ions in the TRUEX process suggests the possibility of a separation of americium from the lanthanides using oxidation to Am(V). The only current method for the direct oxidation of americium to Am(V) in strongly acidic media is with sodium bismuthate. We prepared Am(V) over a wide range of nitric acid concentrations and investigated its solvent extraction behavior for comparison to europium. While a separation is achievable in principal, the presence of macro amounts of cerium competes for the sparingly soluble oxidant and the oxidant itself competes for CMPO complexation. These factors conspire to reduce the Eu/Am separation factor from ~40 using tracer solutions to ~5 for extractions from first cycle raffinate simulant solution. To separate pentavalent americium directly from the lanthanides using the TRUEX process, an alternative oxidizing agent will be necessary.

  5. Remarkable luminescence properties of lanthanide complexes with asymmetric dodecahedron structures.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Kohei; Nakagawa, Tetsuya; Kawakami, Ryuhei; Kita, Yuki; Sugimoto, Katsufumi; Nakashima, Takuya; Harada, Takashi; Kawai, Tsuyoshi; Hasegawa, Yasuchika

    2011-01-10

    The distorted coordination structures and luminescence properties of novel lanthanide complexes with oxo-linked bidentate phosphane oxide ligands--4,5-bis(diphenylphosphoryl)-9,9-dimethylxanthene (xantpo), 4,5-bis(di-tert-butylphosphoryl)-9,9-dimethylxanthene (tBu-xantpo), and bis[(2-diphenylphosphoryl)phenyl] ether (dpepo)--and low-vibrational frequency hexafluoroacetylacetonato (hfa) ligands are reported. The lanthanide complexes exhibit characteristic square antiprism and trigonal dodecahedron structures with eight-coordinated oxygen atoms. The luminescence properties of these complexes are characterized by their emission quantum yields, emission lifetimes, and their radiative and nonradiative rate constants. Lanthanide complexes with dodecahedron structures offer markedly high emission quantum yields (Eu: 55-72 %, Sm: 2.4-5.0 % in [D(6)]acetone) due to enhancement of the electric dipole transition and suppression of vibrational relaxation. These remarkable luminescence properties are elucidated in terms of their distorted coordination structures.

  6. An electrochemical nanobiosensor for plasma miRNA-155, based on graphene oxide and gold nanorod, for early detection of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Azimzadeh, Mostafa; Rahaie, Mahdi; Nasirizadeh, Navid; Ashtari, Khadijeh; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein

    2016-03-15

    Circulating miRNAs are emerging as novel reliable biomarkers for early detection of cancer diseases. Through combining the advantages of electrochemical methods and nanomaterials with the selectivity of the oligo-hybridization-based biosensors, a novel electrochemical nanobiosensor for plasma miR-155 detection have demonstrated here, based on thiolated probe-functionalized gold nanorods (GNRs) decorated on the graphene oxide (GO) sheet on the surface of the glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The reduction signals of a novel intercalating label Oracet Blue (OB), were measured by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) method. The transmission electron microscope (TEM) imaging, UV-vis spectrophotometry, cyclic voltammetry (CV), field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) imaging and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) were proved the right synthesis of the GNRs and correct assembly of the modified electrode. The electrochemical signal had a linear relationship with the concentration of the target miRNA ranging from 2.0 fM to 8.0 pM, and the detection limit was 0.6 fM. Furthermore, the nanobiosensor showed high Specificity, and was able to discriminate sharply between complementary target miRNA, single-, three-base mismatch, and non-complementary miRNA. Alongside the outstanding sensitivity and selectivity, this nanobiosensor had great storage ability, reproducibility, and showed a decent response in the real sample analysis with plasma. In conclusion, the proposed electrochemical nanobiosensor could clinically be used in the early detection of the breast cancer, by direct detection of the plasma miR-155 in real clinical samples, without a need for sample preparation, RNA extraction and/or amplification.

  7. Electrochemical Synthesis of ZnO Nanorods/Nanotubes/Nanopencils on Transparent Aluminium-Doped Zinc Oxide Thin Films for Photocatalytic Applications.

    PubMed

    Le, Thi Ngoc Tu; Pham, Tan Thi; Ngo, Quang Minh; Vu, Thi Hanh Thu

    2015-09-01

    We report an electrochemical synthesis of homogeneous and well-aligned ZnO nanorods (NRs) on transparent conducting aluminium-doped zinc oxide (AZO) thin films as electrodes. The selected ZnO NRs was then chemically corroded in HCl and KCl aqueous solutions to form nanopencils (NPs), and nanotubes (NTs), respectively. A DC magnetron sputtering was employed to fabricate AZO thin films at various thicknesses. The obtained AZO thin films have a c-direction orientation, transmittance above 80% in visible region, and sheet resistance approximately 40 Ω/sq. They are considered to be relevant as electrodes and seeding layers for electrochemical. The ZnO NRs are directly grown on the AZOs without a need of catalysts or additional seeding layers at temperature as low as 85 degrees C. Their shapes are strongly associated with the AZO thickness that provides a valuable way to control the diameter of ZnO NRs grown atop. With the addition of HCI and KCl aqueous solutions, ZnO NRs were modified their shape to NPs and NTs with the reaction time, respectively. All the ZnO NRs, NPs, and NTs are preferred to grow along c-direction that indicates a lattice matching between AZO thin films and ZnO nanostructrures. Photoluminescence spectra and XRD patterns show that they have good crystallinities. A great photocatalytic activity of ZnO nanostructures promises potential application in environmental treatment and protection. The ZnO NTs exhibits a higher photocatalysis than others possibly due to the oxygen vacancies on the surface and the polarizability of Zn2+ and O2-.

  8. Surface plasmon spectroscopy study of electron exchange between single gold nanorods and metal oxide matrix during hydrogen gas sensing (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cittadini, Michela; Collins, Sean; Mulvaney, Paul; Martucci, Alessandro

    2015-08-01

    The direct optical monitoring of electron exchange on single plasmonic nanoparticles, involved in chemical reactions with gas molecules, is one of the main challenges in the heterogeneous catalysis and gas sensing fields. Catalysts are substances that speed up reactions by providing an alternative pathway with lower activation energy than that required for the uncatalysed reaction. A lot of research, both fundamental and applied, has been carried out to investigate how catalysts work and to increase their efficiency. The present work shows how the use of Dark Field Microscopy (DFM) coupled with surface plasmon spectroscopy, enables the direct observation of the kinetics of H2 gas interaction with single gold nanorods (NR) coupled with Pt nanoparticles (NPs) and/or with metal oxide matrices. The plasmonic particles, gold NRs, act as optical probes, and enable the monitoring of the electron exchange through the measurement of their surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band shift. To improve the redox reaction kinetics, the Au NRs have been coupled with Pt NPs and embedded also into a TiO2 or ZnO low scattering matrix. The Au NRs, the Pt, TiO2 and ZnO NPs have been synthetized by colloid chemistry. Several samples made of bare Au NRs, or Au NRs coupled with only Pt NPs or with Pt and TiO2 NPs or with Pt and TiO2 have been deposited by spin coating on silica substrates. The longitudinal Au SPR band shift has been monitored by DFM looking at the variation of the scattering spectrum of a single Au NRs in the presence of H2. Time-resolved measurements have been also conducted at fixed wavelength in order to monitor the kinetics of the H2 reaction. With such measurements it was possible to elucidate the importance of the adsorbed oxygen and the TiO2 matrix on the H2 reaction with the Pt NPs.

  9. Directing the deposition of ferromagnetic cobalt onto Pt-tipped CdSe@CdS nanorods: synthetic and mechanistic insights.

    PubMed

    Hill, Lawrence J; Bull, Mathew M; Sung, Younghun; Simmonds, Adam G; Dirlam, Philip T; Richey, Nathaniel E; DeRosa, Sean E; Shim, In-Bo; Guin, Debanjan; Costanzo, Philip J; Pinna, Nicola; Willinger, Marc-Georg; Vogel, Walter; Char, Kookheon; Pyun, Jeffrey

    2012-10-23

    A methodology providing access to dumbbell-tipped, metal-semiconductor and metal oxide-semiconductor heterostructured nanorods has been developed. The synthesis and characterization of CdSe@CdS nanorods incorporating ferromagnetic cobalt nanoinclusions at both nanorod termini (i.e., dumbbell morphology) are presented. The key step in the synthesis of these heterostructured nanorods was the decoration of CdSe@CdS nanorods with platinum nanoparticle tips, which promoted the deposition of metallic CoNPs onto Pt-tipped CdSe@CdS nanorods. Cobalt nanoparticle tips were then selectively oxidized to afford CdSe@CdS nanorods with cobalt oxide domains at both termini. In the case of longer cobalt-tipped nanorods, heterostructured nanorods were observed to self-organize into complex dipolar assemblies, which formed as a consequence of magnetic associations of terminal CoNP tips. Colloidal polymerization of these cobalt-tipped nanorods afforded fused nanorod assemblies from the oxidation of cobalt nanoparticle tips at the ends of nanorods via the nanoscale Kirkendall effect. Wurtzite CdS nanorods survived both the deposition of metallic CoNP tips and conversion into cobalt oxide phases, as confirmed by both XRD and HRTEM analysis. A series of CdSe@CdS nanorods of four different lengths ranging from 40 to 174 nm and comparable diameters (6-7 nm) were prepared and modified with both cobalt and cobalt oxide tips. The total synthesis of these heterostructured nanorods required five steps from commercially available reagents. Key synthetic considerations are discussed, with particular emphasis on reporting isolated yields of all intermediates and products from scale up of intermediate precursors.

  10. Graded core/shell semiconductor nanorods and nanorod barcodes

    DOEpatents

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Scher, Erik C.; Manna, Liberato

    2010-12-14

    Graded core/shell semiconductor nanorods and shaped nanorods are disclosed comprising Group II-VI, Group III-V and Group IV semiconductors and methods of making the same. Also disclosed are nanorod barcodes using core/shell nanorods where the core is a semiconductor or metal material, and with or without a shell. Methods of labeling analytes using the nanorod barcodes are also disclosed.

  11. Graded core/shell semiconductor nanorods and nanorod barcodes

    SciTech Connect

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Scher, Erik C.; Manna, Liberato

    2013-03-26

    Graded core/shell semiconductor nanorods and shapped nanorods are disclosed comprising Group II-VI, Group III-V and Group IV semiconductors and methods of making the same. Also disclosed are nanorod barcodes using core/shell nanorods where the core is a semiconductor or metal material, and with or without a shell. Methods of labeling analytes using the nanorod barcodes are also disclosed.

  12. Transition Metal and Lanthanide Compounds.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    hexamethylbenzene niobium and tantalum derivatives; and lanthanide nitrate complexes of certain macrocyclic polyethers and the use of macrocyclic polyether columns for lanthanide separations....New research results in the following areas are briefly described: The synthesis of polyphosphines and their metal complexes including polyphosphines...with terminal methyl and neopentyl groups; reactions of polypyrazolylborates with the metal complexes C5H5Co(CO)(R(f)I(R(f)= perfluoroalkyl group

  13. Synthesis, crystal and band structures, and optical properties of a new lanthanide-alkaline earth tellurium(IV) oxide: La{sub 2}Ba(Te{sub 3}O{sub 8})(TeO{sub 3}){sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Hailong; Kong Fang; Mao Jianggao

    2007-05-15

    A new quaternary lanthanide alkaline-earth tellurium(IV) oxide, La{sub 2}Ba(Te{sub 3}O{sub 8})(TeO{sub 3}){sub 2}, has been prepared by the solid-state reaction and structurally characterized. The compound crystallizes in monoclinic space group C2/c with a=19.119(3), b=5.9923(5), c=13.2970(19) A, {beta}=107.646(8){sup o}, V=1451.7(3) A{sup 3} and Z=4. La{sub 2}Ba(Te{sub 3}O{sub 8})(TeO{sub 3}){sub 2} features a 3D network structure in which the cationic [La{sub 2}Ba(TeO{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sup 4+} layers are cross-linked by Te{sub 3}O{sub 8} {sup 4-} anions. Both band structure calculation by the DFT method and optical diffuse reflectance spectrum measurements indicate that La{sub 2}Ba(Te{sub 3}O{sub 8})(TeO{sub 3}){sub 2} is a wide band-gap semiconductor. - Graphical abstract: A new quaternary lanthanide alkaline-earth tellurium(IV) oxide, La{sub 2}Ba(Te{sub 3}O{sub 8})(TeO{sub 3}){sub 2}, has been prepared by the solid-state reaction and structurally characterized. The structure of La{sub 2}Ba(Te{sub 3}O{sub 8})(TeO{sub 3}){sub 2} is 3D network in which the cationic [La{sub 2}Ba(TeO{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sup 4+} layers are cross-linked by Te{sub 3}O{sub 8} {sup 4-} anions. Both band structure calculation by the DFT method and optical diffuse reflectance spectrum measurements indicate that La{sub 2}Ba(Te{sub 3}O{sub 8})(TeO{sub 3}){sub 2} is a wide band-gap semiconductor.

  14. The separation of lanthanides and actinides in supercritical fluid carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Mincher, Bruce J.; Wai, Chien M.; Fox, Robert V.; Baek, Donna L.; Yen, Clive; Case, Mary E.

    2015-10-28

    Supercritical fluid carbon dioxide presents an attractive alternative to conventional solvents for recovery of the actinides and lanthanides. Carbon dioxide is a good solvent for fluorine and phosphate-containing ligands, including the traditional tributylphosphate ligand used in process-scale uranium separations. Actinide and lanthanide oxides may even be directly dissolved in carbon dioxide containing the complexes formed between these ligands and mineral acids, obviating the need for large volumes of acids for leaching and dissolution, and the corresponding organic liquid–liquid solvent extraction solutions. As a result, examples of the application of this novel technology for actinide and lanthanide separations are presented.

  15. Calibration beads containing luminescent lanthanide ion complexes

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reliability of lanthanide luminescence measurements, by both flow cytometry and digital microscopy, will be enhanced by the availability of narrow-band emitting lanthanide calibration beads. These beads can also be used to characterize spectrographic instruments, including mi...

  16. Unusual attempt to direct the growth of bimetallic Ag@Pt nanorods on electrochemically reduced graphene oxide nanosheets by electroless exchange of Cu by Pt for an efficient alcohol oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeena, S. E.; Gnanaprakasam, P.; Selvaraju, T.

    2017-01-01

    A simple and an efficient tool for the direct growth of bimetallic Ag@Pt nanorods (NRDs) on electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO) nanosheets was developed at glassy carbon electrode (GCE). Initially, Cu shell was grown on Ag core as Ag@Cu NRD by the seed-mediated growth method. Accordingly, Cu shell has been successfully replaced by Pt using the electroless galvanic replacement method with ease by effective functionalization of L-tryptophan on ERGO surface (L-ERGO), which eventually plays an important role in the direct growth of one-dimensional bimetallic NRDs. As a result, the synthesized Ag@Pt NRD-supported L-ERGO nanosheets (Ag@Pt NRDs/L-ERGO/GCE) were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) and Raman spectroscopy. Anodic stripping voltammetry was used to explore its electrochemical properties. Finally, the developed bimetallic Ag@Pt NRDs/L-ERGO/GCEs were studied as a better electrocatalyst compared to the commercial catalysts such as Pt40/C or Pt20/C-loaded electrode for the oxidation of ethanol or methanol with a high tolerance level and an enhanced current density. In addition, the long-term stability was studied using chronoamperometry for 1000 s at the bimetallic NRD electrode for alcohol oxidation which impedes the fouling properties. The unfavourable and favourable electrooxidation of ethanol at Ag@Cu NRDs/L-ERGO/GCE (a) and Ag@Pt NRDs/L-ERGO/GCE (b) is discussed. The synergistic effect of Ag core and catalytic properties of Pt shell at Ag@Pt NRDs/L-ERGO/GCE tend to strongly minimize the CO poisoning effect and enhanced ethanol electrooxidation.

  17. The Crystal Structure of Lanthanide Zirconates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, Richard; Kennedy, Brendan; Ling, Christopher; Stampfl, Anton P. J.

    2010-03-01

    The lanthanide zirconates of composition Ln2Zr2O7 (Ln = La-Gd) are of interest for use in inert matrix fuels and nuclear wasteforms. The series undergoes a pyrochlore to fluorite phase transition as a function of the Ln atomic radii. The phase transition has been attributed to disordering of both the cation and the anion [1]. We have undertaken a synthesis of the lanthanide zirconate series Ln2Zr2O7 (Ln = La-Gd), Ln0.2Zr0.8O1.9 (Ln = Tb-Yb) and NdxHo2-xZr2O7 (0oxide technique. We have performed neutron powder diffraction on selections of the series, using ANSTO's new high resolution powder diffractometer Echidna, in order to obtain accurate data on atomic displacement parameters and O 48f position across the series. These results will be presented, along with details of the analysis and synthetic techniques used.

  18. Ultrasonic relaxations in lanthanide phosphate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carini, G.; D'angelo, G.; Federico, M.; Tripodo, G.; Saunders, G. A.; Senin, H. B.

    1994-08-01

    The attenuation and velocity of ultrasonic waves of frequencies in the range of 10 to 90 MHz have been measured in La2O3-P2O5 and Sm2O3-P2O5 glasses with high lanthanide concentrations as a function of temperature between 1.5 and 400 K. Two distinct features characterize the attenuation behavior: (i) a plateau at temperatures below 15 K and (ii) a broad high-temperature peak. The former feature is interpreted in terms of the phonon-assisted relaxation of two-level systems and the latter by assuming the existence of a distribution of thermally activated relaxing centers. For both these mechanisms the product of the deformation potential squared and the density of relaxing particles decreases with increasing lanthanide-ion concentration. This result, taken together with previous observations of the properties of oxide glasses, provides physical insight into the microscopic origin of the relaxation effects and suggests that the source of the low- and high-temperature attenuation mechanisms is the same. At temperatures below 100 K, the sound velocity, after the subtraction of the relaxation and anharmonic contributions, follows a linear law as predicted by the soft-potential model for the relaxation of soft harmonic oscillators. An encouraging agreement is obtained between the parameters regulating this mechanism and those determined from the acoustic attenuation plateau.

  19. The lanthanide contraction beyond coordination chemistry

    DOE PAGES

    Ferru, Geoffroy; Reinhart, Benjamin; Bera, Mrinal K.; ...

    2016-04-06

    Lanthanide chemistry is dominated by the ‘lanthanide contraction’, which is conceptualized traditionally through coordination chemistry. Here we break this mold, presenting evidence that the lanthanide contraction manifests outside of the coordination sphere, influencing weak interactions between groups of molecules that drive mesoscale-assembly and emergent behavior in an amphiphile solution. Furthermore, changes in these weak interactions correlate with differences in lanthanide ion transport properties, suggesting new forces to leverage rare earth separation and refining. Our results show that the lanthanide contraction paradigm extends beyond the coordination sphere, influencing structure and properties usually associated with soft matter science.

  20. Luminescence properties of lanthanide and ytterbium lanthanide titanate thin films grown by atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Per-Anders Fjellvåg, Helmer; Nilsen, Ola; Finstad, Terje G.

    2016-01-15

    Lanthanide based luminescent materials are highly suitable as down conversion materials in combination with a UV-absorbing host material. The authors have used TiO{sub 2} as the UV-absorbing host material and investigated the energy transfer between TiO{sub 2} and 11 different lanthanide ions, Ln{sup 3+} (Ln = La, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb) in thin films grown by atomic layer deposition. They have also investigated the possibility to improve the overall energy transfer from TiO{sub 2} to Yb{sup 3+} with a second Ln{sup 3+}, in order to enhance down conversion. The films were grown at a substrate temperature of 300 °C, using the Ln(thd){sub 3}/O{sub 3} (thd = 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedione) and TiCl{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O precursor pairs. The focus of the work is to explore the energy transfer from TiO{sub 2} to Ln{sup 3+} ions, and the energy transfer between Ln{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} ions, which could lead to efficient down conversion. The samples have been characterized by x-ray diffraction, x-ray fluorescence, spectroscopic ellipsometry, and photoluminescence. All films were amorphous as deposited, and the samples have been annealed at 600, 800, and 1000 °C in order to investigate the correlation between the crystallinity and luminescence. The lanthanum titanium oxide samples showed a weak and broad emission centered at 540 nm, which was absent in all the other samples, indicating energy transfer from TiO{sub 2} to Ln{sup 3+} in all other lanthanide samples. In the amorphous phase, all samples, apart from La, Tb, and Tm, showed a typical f-f emission when excited by a 325 nm HeCd laser. None of the samples showed any luminescence after annealing at 1000 °C due to the formation of Ln{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}. Samples containing Nd, Sm, and Eu show a change in emission spectrum when annealed at 800 °C compared to the as-deposited samples, indicating that the smaller lanthanides crystallize in a different manner than the larger

  1. Unique polarized light-matter interaction in single one-dimensional semiconducting oxide nanomaterials and applications of indium tin oxide nanorod networks as surface enhanced raman spectroscopy and photodetection platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Daniel So Ri

    With increasing demand of miniaturized optoelectronic, photonic, sensors and biodetection platforms, understanding and elucidating the fundamental material properties at nanoscale is crucial for development and advancement of these devices. Specifically, one-dimensional (1D) semiconducting oxide (SCO) materials have drawn considerable interest in these fields as said materials exhibit unique, as well as highly advantageous optical and electronic properties compared to their bulk counterparts. As SCOs of interests are typically wide bandgap materials, most of the research has focused on these materials' interaction with short wavelength light in the near UV regime. Thusly, materials' interaction with sub-bandgap light, primarily those in the visible region, is seldom investigated. This report presents a systematic study of elastic light scattering of four 1D SCO materials of indium tin oxide (ITO), tin oxide (SnO2), zinc tin oxide (ZTO), and zinc oxide (ZnO) with visible light as the incident radiation source. The light-matter interaction is investigated by introducing incident light of a fixed polarization to a single, orientation- and position- controlled nanomaterial, then analyzing the scattered signals along the materials' long axis as a function of the analyzer angles. The results show that under constant irradiation of polarized light, nanomaterials of all four SCO types show material independent, orientation dependent behavior previously not reported. Furthermore, material dependent scattering phenomenon from single nanorods is validated by observing the change in the polarization state of the scattered light from one end of the NR to the other end. Lastly, two different devices are fabricated from an array of these 1D, SCO materials to assess their potential as a surface enhanced Raman (SER) platform and a photodetector of the visible light. First, the ITO NR array as a SERS platform is established by introducing two ubiquitous fluorescing biomarkers of

  2. Surfactant-directed synthesis of silver nanorods and characteristic spectral changes occurred by their morphology evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen; Hu, Guansong; Zhang, Wanzhong; Qiao, Xueliang; Wu, Kai; Chen, Qingyuan; Cai, Yuchun

    2014-11-01

    Silver nanorods with different polydispersity were synthesized in the cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) rod-shaped micelles by inducing the orientation growth of silver seeds and adjusting the volumes of CTAB. The reaction for the formation of silver nanorods had basically finished in 10 min. A suitable volume of CTAB (i.e., 15.0 mL of 0.1 M CTAB) is beneficial to obtain high-quality silver nanorods in the given reaction system. That is, the volume of added CTAB is a key factor to determine the polydispersity of the formed nanorods. The aging time plays a critical role in the morphology evolution of silver nanorods due to the oxidation of silver nanorods with Br-, O2 and the Ostwald ripening of the nanoparticles. As a result, the characteristic spectral changes occurred due to the morphology evolution of silver nanorods. The ablation in the top ends of the longer nanorods is often accompanied by the growth of some shorter nanorods and nanospheres. The size distribution of silver nanorods might be more uniform in the early aging stage. All the nanorods in the colloidal solution should turn into the near-spherical nanoparticles with larger sizes and thus the characteristic absorption should change to single peak centered at about 400 nm. Based on the research results, mathematical models are proposed for explaining the formation and morphology changes of silver nanorods. The morphology evolution of silver nanorods may be important and can be used as a reference for preparing silver nanorods, nanowires and other anisotropic nanomaterials.

  3. Aligned CuO nanorod arrays: fabrication and anisotropic ferromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liqing; Hong, Kunquan; Ge, Xing; Xu, Mingxiang

    2014-06-01

    Copper oxide (CuO) is a p-type semiconductor with a band gap of 1.2 eV, which is well known in high-temperature superconductor and antiferromagnetic (AFM) materials through Cu-O-Cu super-exchange interaction. In this paper, we report the strong anisotropic ferromagnetism (FM) in aligned CuO nanorod arrays synthesized by a microwave-assisted hydrothermal method. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image shows that the CuO nanorod consists of a large number of smaller nanorods with almost the same growth direction. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern indicates that the CuO nanorods are well crystallized with highly preferred orientation of the [020] direction. These CuO nanorod arrays show room-temperature ferromagnetism, with strong magnetic anisotropy when the magnetic field is applied perpendicular or parallel to the rod axis. This phenomenon of room-temperature ferromagnetism in those aligned CuO nanorods might originate from uncompensated surface spins and shape anisotropy of the nanorods.

  4. The TRUSPEAK Concept: Combining CMPO and HDEHP for Separating Trivalent Lanthanides from the Transuranic Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Gelis, Artem V.; Braley, Jenifer C.; Carter, Jennifer C.; Pittman, Jonathan W.; Warner, Marvin G.; Vandegrift, George F.

    2013-04-08

    Combining octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutyl-carbamoylmethyl-phosphine oxide (CMPO) and bis-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (HDEHP) into a single process solvent for separating transuranic elements from liquid high-level waste is explored. Co-extraction of americium and the lanthanide elements from nitric acid solution is possible with a solvent mixture consisting of 0.1-M CMPO plus 1-M HDEHP in n-dodecane. Switching the aqueous-phase chemistry to a citrate-buffered solution of diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) allows for selective stripping of americium, separating it from the lanthanide elements. Potential strategies for managing molybdenum and zirconium (both of which co-extract with americium and the lanthanides) have been developed. The work presented here demonstrates the feasibility of combining CMPO and HDEHP into a single extraction solvent for recovering americium from high-level waste and its separation from the lanthanides.

  5. Vapor phase growth and photoluminescence of oriented-attachment Zn2GeO4 nanorods array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Haiping; Zhu, Xingda; He, Haiping

    2016-10-01

    We carry out one-step vapor phase growth of high quality Zn2GeO4 nanorods array to provide insights into the growth mechanism of such ternary oxide nanostructures. The morphology and microstructure of these nanorods are investigated carefully. Under certain conditions, the nanorods follow the oriented-attachment growth which is unusual in vapor-based growth. Each nanorod consists of many nanocrystals aligned along the [110] direction. The nanorods show strong deep ultraviolet absorption around 260 nm and broad longlife green luminescence around 490 nm.

  6. Three-dimensional nitrogen-doped graphene frameworks anchored with bamboo-like tungsten oxide nanorods as high performance anode materials for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Xinyuan; Wu, Feilong; Lei, Bingbing; Wang, Jing; Chen, Ziliang; Xie, Kai; Song, Yun; Sun, Dalin; Sun, Lixian; Zhou, Huaiying; Fang, Fang

    2016-07-01

    Bamboo-like WO3 nanorods were anchored on three-dimensional nitrogen-doped graphene frameworks (r-WO3/3DNGF) by a facile one-step hydrothermal synthesis plus heating processes. There is a strong dependence of the obtained r-WO3/3DNGF nanostructures on the content of 3DNGF. The composite with 20 wt% 3DNGF content shows the most favorable structure where bamboo-like WO3 nanorods lie flat on the surface of fungus-like 3DNGF, and exhibits a high discharge capacity of 828 mAh g-1 over 100 cycles at 80 mA g-1 with the largest capacity retention of 73.9% for WO3 and excellent rate capacities of 719, 665, 573, 453 and 313 mAh g-1 at 80, 160, 400, 800 and 1600 mA g-1, respectively. The electrochemical performance is better than most of reported WO3-based carbonaceous composites, which can be attributed to the synergistic effects of the following actions: i) WO3 nanorods effectively shorten the diffusion path of Li+; ii) mechanically strong 3DNGF alleviates the huge volume change of WO3 upon Li+ intercalation/extraction; and iii) nitrogen-doping in 3D graphene frameworks improves electronic conductivity and provides large numbers of lithium ion diffusion channels.

  7. Biodegradation-tunable mesoporous silica nanorods for controlled drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Bum; Joo, Young-Ho; Kim, Hyunryung; Ryu, WonHyoung; Park, Yong-il

    2015-05-01

    Mesoporous silica in the forms of micro- or nanoparticles showed great potentials in the field of controlled drug delivery. However, for precision control of drug release from mesoporous silica-based delivery systems, it is critical to control the rate of biodegradation. Thus, in this study, we demonstrate a simple and robust method to fabricate "biodegradation-tunable" mesoporous silica nanorods based on capillary wetting of anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template with an aqueous alkoxide precursor solution. The porosity and nanostructure of silica nanorods were conveniently controlled by adjusting the water/alkoxide molar ratio of precursor solutions, heat-treatment temperature, and Na addition. The porosity and biodegradation kinetics of the fabricated mesoporous nanorods were analyzed using N2 adsorption/desorption isotherm, TGA, DTA, and XRD. Finally, the performance of the mesoporous silica nanorods as drug delivery carrier was demonstrated with initial burst and subsequent "zero-order" release of anti-cancer drug, doxorubicin.

  8. Facile synthesis and photocatalytic properties of ZnO core/ZnS-CdS solid solution shell nanorods grown vertically on reductive graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jimeng; Sang, Huanxin; Wang, Xitao; Wang, Kang

    2015-05-28

    In the present study, ZnS-CdS solid solution sensitized ZnO nanorods were anchored on graphene sheets by combining a hydrothermal process and ion exchange technique, and the significant influence of CdS content in the shell on photo absorption and photocatalytic performance were investigated. Electron microscopic images reveal that the as-prepared nanocomposites display a sandwich-like 3D structure, consisting of ZnO nanorods with a ZnxCd1-xS or CdS shell grown vertically on both sides of the graphene sheets. UV/Vis DRS shows that the solid solution sensitized nanocomposites have enhanced visible light absorption and also exhibited a red-shift of the band-edge as compared to RGO/ZnO and RGO/ZnO@ZnS. Fluorescence emission spectra indicate that the deposition of CdS on the shell with an appropriate CdS/ZnS ratio and the incorporation of graphene causes improved charge separation. The photocatalytic experiments demonstrate that the RGO/ZnO@ZnxCd1-xS nanocomposites possess much higher photocatalytic activity for H2 evolution than the RGO/ZnO nanorods and RGO/ZnO@ZnS core/shell nanorods. Under the irradiation of a 300 W Xe lamp, the highest photocatalytic hydrogen production rate of 1865 μmol h(-1) g(-1) is observed over the RGO/ZnO@Zn0.6Zn0.4S sample, which is about 2.1 and 1.4 times more active than RGO/ZnO and RGO/ZnO@ZnS, respectively. Under the irradiation of visible light (>420 nm), the RGO/ZnO and RGO/ZnO@ZnS nanorods are barely active, whereas RGO/ZnO@Zn0.6Zn0.4S displays a hydrogen production rate of 160 μmol h(-1) g(-1). The highly improved performance of the composites can be ascribed to the increased light absorption and efficient charge separation.

  9. Facile preparation of hybrid core-shell nanorods for photothermal and radiation combined therapy.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yaoyao; Li, Erdong; Cheng, Xiaju; Zhu, Jing; Lu, Shuanglong; Ge, Cuicui; Gu, Hongwei; Pan, Yue

    2016-02-21

    The hybrid platinum@iron oxide core-shell nanorods with high biocompatibility were synthesized and applied for combined therapy. These hybrid nanorods exhibit a good photothermal effect on cancer cells upon irradiation with a NIR laser. Furthermore, due to the presence of a high atomic number element (platinum core), the hybrid nanorods show a synergistic effect between photothermal and radiation therapy. Therefore, the as-prepared core-shell nanorods could play an important role in facilitating synergistic therapy between photothermal and radiation therapy to achieve better therapeutic efficacy.

  10. Biological toxicity of lanthanide elements on algae.

    PubMed

    Tai, Peidong; Zhao, Qing; Su, Dan; Li, Peijun; Stagnitti, Frank

    2010-08-01

    The biological toxicity of lanthanides on marine monocellular algae was investigated. The specific objective of this research was to establish the relationship between the abundance in the seawater of lanthanides and their biological toxicities on marine monocellular algae. The results showed that all single lanthanides had similar toxic effects on Skeletonema costatum. High concentrations of lanthanides (29.04+/-0.61 micromol L(-1)) resulted in 50% reduction in growth of algae compared to the controls (0 micromol L(-1)) after 96 h (96 h-EC50). The biological toxicity of 13 lanthanides on marine monocellular algae was unrelated with the abundance of different lanthanide elements in nature, and the "Harkins rule" was not appropriate for the lanthanides. A mixed solution that contained equivalent concentrations of each lanthanide element had the same inhibition effect on algae cells as each individual lanthanide element at the same total concentration. This phenomenon is unique compared to the groups of other elements in the periodic table. Hence, we speculate that the monocellular organisms might not be able to sufficiently differentiate between the almost chemically identical lanthanide elements.

  11. Energetics of CO oxidation on lanthanide-free perovskite systems: the case of Co-doped SrTiO3.

    PubMed

    Carlotto, Silvia; Natile, Marta Maria; Glisenti, Antonella; Paul, Jean-François; Blanck, Dimitri; Vittadini, Andrea

    2016-12-07

    The energetics of the catalytic oxidation of CO on a complex metal oxide are investigated for the first time via density functional theory calculations. The catalyst, Co-doped SrTiO3, is modelled using periodically repeated slabs based on the SrTiO3(100) surface. The comparison of the energy profiles obtained for the pure host and the Co-doped material reveals the actual pathway followed by the reaction, and shows that Co doping enhances the catalytic properties of SrTiO3 by reducing the energy cost for the formation of oxygen vacancies.

  12. Direct Low-Temperature Growth of Single-Crystalline Anatase TiO2 Nanorod Arrays on Transparent Conducting Oxide Substrates for Use in PbS Quantum-Dot Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hyun Suk; Han, Gill Sang; Park, So Yeon; Shin, Hee-Won; Ahn, Tae Kyu; Jeong, Sohee; Cho, In Sun; Jung, Hyun Suk

    2015-05-20

    We report on the direct growth of anatase TiO2 nanorod arrays (A-NRs) on transparent conducting oxide (TCO) substrates that can be directly applied to various photovoltaic devices via a seed layer mediated epitaxial growth using a facile low-temperature hydrothermal method. We found that the crystallinity of the seed layer and the addition of an amine functional group play crucial roles in the A-NR growth process. The A-NRs exhibit a pure anatase phase with a high crystallinity and preferred growth orientation in the [001] direction. Importantly, for depleted heterojunction solar cells (TiO2/PbS), the A-NRs improve both electron transport and injection properties, thereby largely increasing the short-circuit current density and doubling their efficiency compared to TiO2 nanoparticle-based solar cells.

  13. Enhancement of Anion Binding in Lanthanide Optical Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Cable, Morgan L.; Kirby, James P.; Gray, Harry B.; Ponce, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    be established from the ionization energy of Ln3+ → Ln4+. These results account for the order Tb3+ > Dy3+ > Eu3+ ≈ Sm3+. As with many lanthanide properties, ranging from hydration enthalpy to vaporization energy, this AL-induced enhancement shows a large discrepancy between Tb3+ and Eu3+ despite their similarity in size, a phenomenon known as the ‘gadolinium break.’ This discrepancy, based on the unusual stabilities of the Eu2+ and Tb4+ oxidation states, results from the half-shell effect, as both of these ions have half-filled 4f-shells. The high polarizability of Tb3+ explains the extraordinarily large increase in the binding affinity of anions for terbium compared to other lanthanides. We recommend that researchers consider this AL-induced enhancement when designing lanthanide-macrocycle optical sensors. Ancillary ligands also can reduce the impact of interfering species such as phosphate) commonly found in environmental and physiological samples. PMID:24032446

  14. Enhancement of anion binding in lanthanide optical sensors.

    PubMed

    Cable, Morgan L; Kirby, James P; Gray, Harry B; Ponce, Adrian

    2013-11-19

    established from the ionization energy of Ln(3+) → Ln(4+). These results account for the order Tb(3+) > Dy(3+) > Eu(3+) ≈ Sm(3+). As with many lanthanide properties, ranging from hydration enthalpy to vaporization energy, this AL-induced enhancement shows a large discrepancy between Tb(3+) and Eu(3+) despite their similarity in size, a phenomenon known as the "gadolinium break". This discrepancy, based on the unusual stabilities of the Eu(2+) and Tb(4+) oxidation states, results from the half-shell effect, as both of these ions have half-filled 4f-shells. The high polarizability of Tb(3+) explains the extraordinarily large increase in the binding affinity of anions for terbium compared to other lanthanides. We recommend that researchers consider this AL-induced enhancement when designing lanthanide-macrocycle optical sensors. Ancillary ligands also can reduce the impact of interfering species such as phosphate commonly found in environmental and physiological samples.

  15. Investigation of Gravity Lanthanide Separation Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Rosara F.; Schulte, Shannon M.; Douglas, Matthew; Friese, Judah I.; Farmer, Orville T.; Finn, Erin C.

    2011-03-01

    Lanthanides are common fission products and the ability to separate and quantify these elements is critical to rapid radiochemistry applications. Published lanthanide separations using Eichrom Ln Spec resin utilize an HCl gradient. Here it is shown that the efficacy and resolution of the separation is improved when a nitric acid gradient is used instead. The described method allows parallel processing of many samples in 1.5 hours followed by 60 minute counting for quantification of 9 isotopes of 7 lanthanide elements.

  16. Strategy for photostable proximity bioassays using lanthanides

    PubMed Central

    Haushalter, Jeanne P.; Faris, Gregory W.

    2011-01-01

    We report initial findings for research aimed at creating photostable lanthanide chelate reporters for proximity assays. These reporters take advantage of the nanometer scale distance dependence of fluorescence enhancement for molecules in the vicinity of noble metal nanoparticles and also capitalize on some unique properties of lanthanide chelates. This approach promises to lead to proximity assays that do not suffer from photobleaching and offer very high on/off enhancement ratios. Results for lanthanide chelates on silver island films and in colloidal suspensions are reported. Enhancement factors range from 1 to 2 orders of magnitude, with larger enhancements for strongly quenched lanthanides. PMID:17356638

  17. Fracture-resistant lanthanide scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Doty, F. Patrick

    2011-01-04

    Lanthanide halide alloys have recently enabled scintillating gamma ray spectrometers comparable to room temperature semiconductors (<3% FWHM energy resolutions at 662 keV). However brittle fracture of these materials upon cooling hinders the growth of large volume crystals. Efforts to improve the strength through non-lanthanide alloy substitution, while preserving scintillation, have been demonstrated. Isovalent alloys having nominal compositions of comprising Al, Ga, Sc, Y, and In dopants as well as aliovalent alloys comprising Ca, Sr, Zr, Hf, Zn, and Pb dopants were prepared. All of these alloys exhibit bright fluorescence under UV excitation, with varying shifts in the spectral peaks and intensities relative to pure CeBr.sub.3. Further, these alloys scintillate when coupled to a photomultiplier tube (PMT) and exposed to .sup.137Cs gamma rays.

  18. Lanthanide-based luminescence biolabelling.

    PubMed

    Sy, Mohamadou; Nonat, Aline; Hildebrandt, Niko; Charbonnière, Loïc J

    2016-04-14

    Luminescent lanthanide complexes display unrivalled spectroscopic properties, which place them in a special category in the luminescent toolbox. Their long-lived line-like emission spectra are the cornerstones of numerous analytical applications ranging from ultrasensitive homogeneous fluoroimmunoassays to the study of molecular interactions in living cells with multiplexed microscopy. However, achieving such minor miracles is a result of years of synthetic efforts and spectroscopic studies to understand and gather all the necessary requirements for the labels to be efficient. This feature article intends to survey these criteria and to discuss some of the most important examples reported in the literature, before explaining in detail some of the applications of luminescent lanthanide labels to bioanalysis and luminescence microscopy. Finally, the emphasis will be put on some recent applications that hold great potential for future biosensing.

  19. Facet control of gold nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qingfeng; Han, Lili; Jing, Hao; Blom, Douglas A.; Lin, Ye; Xin, Huolin L.; Wang, Hui

    2016-01-21

    While great success has been achieved in fine-tuning the aspect ratios and thereby the plasmon resonances of cylindrical Au nanorods, facet control with atomic level precision on the highly curved nanorod surfaces has long been a significantly more challenging task. The intrinsic structural complexity and lack of precise facet control of the nanorod surfaces remain the major obstacles for the atomic-level elucidation of the structure–property relationships that underpin the intriguing catalytic performance of Au nanorods. Here we demonstrate that the facets of single-crystalline Au nanorods can be precisely tailored using cuprous ions and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as a unique pair of surface capping competitors to guide the particle geometry evolution during nanorod overgrowth. By deliberately maneuvering the competition between cuprous ions and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, we have been able to create, in a highly controllable and selective manner, an entire family of nanorod-derived anisotropic multifaceted geometries whose surfaces are enclosed by specific types of well-defined high-index and low-index facets. This facet-controlled nanorod overgrowth approach also allows us to fine-tune the particle aspect ratios while well-preserving all the characteristic facets and geometric features of the faceted Au nanorods. Furthermore, taking full advantage of the combined structural and plasmonic tunability, we have further studied the facet-dependent heterogeneous catalysis on well-faceted Au nanorods using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy as an ultrasensitive spectroscopic tool with unique time-resolving and molecular finger-printing capabilities.

  20. Ratiometric Time-Gated Luminescence Probe for Nitric Oxide Based on an Apoferritin-Assembled Lanthanide Complex-Rhodamine Luminescence Resonance Energy Transfer System.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lu; Dai, Zhichao; Liu, Xiangli; Song, Bo; Ye, Zhiqiang; Yuan, Jingli

    2015-11-03

    Using apoferritin (AFt) as a carrier, a novel ratiometric luminescence probe based on luminescence resonance energy transfer (LRET) between a Tb(3+) complex (PTTA-Tb(3+)) and a rhodamine derivative (Rh-NO), PTTA-Tb(3+)@AFt-Rh-NO, has been designed and prepared for the specific recognition and time-gated luminescence detection of nitric oxide (NO) in living samples. In this LRET probe, PTTA-Tb(3+) encapsulated in the core of AFt is the energy donor, and Rh-NO, a NO-responsive rhodamine derivative, bound on the surface of AFt is the energy acceptor. The probe only emits strong Tb(3+) luminescence because the emission of rhodamine is switched off in the absence of NO. Upon reaction with NO, accompanied by the turn-on of rhodamine emission, the LRET from Tb(3+) complex to rhodamine occurs, which results in the remarkable increase and decrease of the long-lived emissions of rhodamine and PTTA-Tb(3+), respectively. After the reaction, the intensity ratio of rhodamine emission to Tb(3+) emission, I565/I539, is ∼24.5-fold increased, and the dose-dependent enhancement of I565/I539 shows a good linearity in a wide concentration range of NO. This unique luminescence response allowed PTTA-Tb(3+)@AFt-Rh-NO to be conveniently used as a ratiometric probe for the time-gated luminescence detection of NO with I565/I539 as a signal. Taking advantages of high specificity and sensitivity of the probe as well as its good water-solubility, biocompatibility, and cell membrane permeability, PTTA-Tb(3+)@AFt-Rh-NO was successfully used for the luminescent imaging of NO in living cells and Daphnia magna. The results demonstrated the efficacy of the probe and highlighted it's advantages for the ratiometric time-gated luminescence bioimaging application.

  1. ITP of lanthanides in microfluidic PMMA chip.

    PubMed

    Cong, Yongzheng; Bottenus, Danny; Liu, Bingwen; Clark, Sue B; Ivory, Cornelius F

    2014-03-01

    An ITP separation of eight lanthanides on a serpentine PMMA microchip with a tee junction and a 230-mm-long serpentine channel is described. The cover of the PMMA chip is 175 μm thick so that a C(4) D in microchip mode can be used to detect the lanthanides as they migrate through the microchannel. Acetate and α-hydroxyisobutyric acid are used as complexing agents to increase the electrophoretic mobility difference between the lanthanides. Eight lanthanides are concentrated within ∼ 6 min by ITP in the microchip using 10 mM ammonium acetate at pH 4.5 as the leading electrolyte and 10 mM acetic acid at ∼ pH 3.0 as the terminating electrolyte. In addition, a 2D numerical simulation of the lanthanides undergoing ITP in the microchip is compared with experimental results using COMSOL Multiphysics v4.3a.

  2. Process of in situ forming well-aligned zinc oxide nanorod arrays on wood substrate using a two-step bottom-up method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongzhuang; Fu, Yanchun; Yu, Haipeng; Liu, Yixing

    2013-10-01

    A good nanocrystal covering layer on wood can serve as a protective coating and present some new surface properties. In this study, well-aligned ZnO nanorods (NRs) arrays were successfully grown on wood surface through a two-step bottom-up growth process. The process involved pre-sow seeds and subsequently their growing into NRs under hydrothermal environment. The interface incorporation between wood and ZnO colloid particles in the precursor solution during the seeding process was analyzed and demonstrated through a schematic. The growth process of forming well-aligned ZnO NRs was analyzed by field-emission scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, which showed that the NRs elongated with increased reaction time. The effects of ZnO crystal form and capping agent on the growth process were studied through different viewpoints.

  3. Lanthanide corroles: a new class of macrocyclic lanthanide complexes.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Heather L; Anstey, Mitchell R; Gryko, Daniel T; Arnold, John

    2013-04-18

    The first examples of lanthanide corroles are prepared by two synthetic routes. (Mes2(p-OMePh)corrole)La·4.5DME (1·4.5DME) and (Mes2(p-OMePh)corrole)Tb·4DME (2·4DME) are prepared from the free base corrole and Ln((NSiMe3)2)3, while (Mes2(p-OMePh)corrole)Gd·TACNMe3 (3·TACNMe3) is prepared by metathesis of the recently reported Li3 corrole and GdCl3.

  4. Characterization of individual barium titanate nanorods and their assessment as building blocks of new circuit architectures.

    PubMed

    Zagar, Kristina; Hernandez-Ramirez, Francisco; Prades, Joan Daniel; Morante, Joan Ramon; Rečnik, Aleksander; Ceh, Miran

    2011-09-23

    In this work, we report on the integration of individual BaTiO(3) nanorods into simple circuit architectures. Polycrystalline BaTiO(3) nanorods were synthesized by electrophoretic deposition (EPD) of barium titanate sol into aluminium oxide (AAO) templates and subsequent annealing. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations revealed the presence of slabs of hexagonal polymorphs intergrown within cubic grains, resulting from the local reducing atmosphere during the thermal treatment. Electrical measurements performed on individual BaTiO(3) nanorods revealed resistivity values between 10 and 100 Ω cm, which is in good agreement with typical values reported in the past for oxygen-deficient barium titanate films. Consequently the presence of oxygen vacancies in their structure was indirectly validated. Some of these nanorods were tested as proof-of-concept humidity sensors. They showed reproducible responses towards different moisture concentrations, demonstrating that individual BaTiO(3) nanorods may be integrated in complex circuit architectures with functional capacities.

  5. Hydrothermally grown ZnO nanorods on self-source substrate and their field emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J. P.; Xu, C. X.; Zhu, G. P.; Li, X.; Cui, Y. P.; Yang, Y.; Sun, X. W.

    2007-04-01

    Vertically aligned zinc oxide nanorod arrays were grown directly using a zinc foil as both source and substrate in pure water at low temperature by a simple hydrothermal reaction. The morphology and crystal structure of the ZnO nanorod arrays were examined by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction, respectively. The nanorods grew along the [0 0 0 1] direction and were 80 nm in diameter and almost 2 µm in length. Directly employing the zinc foil substrate as cathode, the field emission (FE) of the ZnO nanorods presented a two-stage slope behaviour in a ln(J/E2)-1/E plot according to the Fowler-Nordheim equation. The FE behaviour was investigated by considering the action of the defects in ZnO nanorods based on the measurement of the photoluminescence.

  6. Method for extracting lanthanides and actinides from acid solutions by modification of Purex solvent

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Kalina, D.G.

    1984-05-21

    A process has been developed for the extraction of multivalent lanthanide and actinide values from acidic waste solutions, and for the separation of these values from fission product and other values, which utilizes a new series of neutral bi-functional extractants, the alkyl(phenyl)-N, N-dialkylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxides, in combination with a phase modifier to form an extraction solution. The addition of the extractant to the Purex process extractant, tri-n-butylphosphate in normal paraffin hydrocarbon diluent, will permit the extraction of multivalent lanthanide and actinide values from 0.1 to 12.0 molar acid solutions.

  7. Development of a physical and electronic model for RuO 2 nanorod rectenna devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dao, Justin

    Ruthenium oxide (RuO2) nanorods are an emergent technology in nanostructure devices. As the physical size of electronics approaches a critical lower limit, alternative solutions to further device miniaturization are currently under investigation. Thin-film nanorod growth is an interesting technology, being investigated for use in wireless communications, sensor systems, and alternative energy applications. In this investigation, self-assembled RuO2 nanorods are grown on a variety of substrates via a high density plasma, reactive sputtering process. Nanorods have been found to grow on substrates that form native oxide layers when exposed to air, namely silicon, aluminum, and titanium. Samples were analyzed with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) techniques. Conductive Atomic Force Microscopy (C-AFM) measurements were performed on single nanorods to characterize structure and electrical conductivity. The C-AFM probe tip is placed on a single nanorod and I-V characteristics are measured, potentially exhibiting rectifying capabilities. An analysis of these results using fundamental semiconductor physics principles is presented. Experimental data for silicon substrates was most closely approximated by the Simmons model for direct electron tunneling, whereas that of aluminum substrates was well approximated by Fowler-Nordheim tunneling. The native oxide of titanium is regarded as a semiconductor rather than an insulator and its ability to function as a rectifier is not strong. An electronic model for these nanorods is described herein.

  8. Synthesis and magnetic properties of single-crystalline Na2-xMn8O16 nanorods

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The synthesis of single-crystalline hollandite-type manganese oxides Na2-xMn8O16 nanorods by a simple molten salt method is reported for the first time. The nanorods were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer. The magnetic measurements indicated that the nanorods showed spin glass behavior and exchange bias effect at low temperatures. The low-temperature magnetic behaviors can be explained by the uncompensated spins on the surface of the nanorods. PMID:21711626

  9. Nanorod Material Developed for Use as an Optical Sensor Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bencic, Timothy J.

    2005-01-01

    Optical sensors are becoming increasingly important in the development of new nonintrusive or embedded sensors. The use of light and material optical properties helps us measure unknown parameters such as temperature, pressure, flow, or chemical species. The focus of this work is to develop new nanostructure platforms upon which optical sensors can be constructed. These nanorods are synthesized oxides that form a base structure to which luminescent sensing dyes or dopants can be attached or embedded. The nanorod structure allows for a much greater open area than closed or polymer-based sensors do, enabling a much faster contact of the measured species with the luminescent sensor and, thus, a potentially faster measurement.

  10. Photoelectrochemical and photosensing behaviors of hydrothermally grown ZnO nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Majumder, T.; Hmar, J. J. L.; Roy, J. N.; Mondal, S. P. E-mail: suvra.phy@nita.ac.in; Debnath, K.; Gogurla, N.; Ray, S. K.

    2014-07-21

    ZnO nanorods have been grown on indium-tin-oxide coated glass substrates by a low cost chemical process. Current-voltage characteristics have been studied using ZnO nanorods as photoanode in an electrochemical cell. The flat band voltage shift and depletion width of ZnO nanorods/electrolyte interface have been estimated from Mott-Schottky (MS) characteristics. The electrochemical impedance measurements have been carried out to study the charge transport mechanism at the semiconductor-electrolyte interface under dark and white light (100 mW/cm{sup 2}) illumination. The doping concentration of nanorods has been extracted from MS plot. Photoresponse behavior of ZnO nanorods is found to be enhanced than seed layers with the incident of white light. Spectral dependent photovoltage of ZnO nanorods has been carried out using monochromatic light of wavelength 250–600 nm. The photopotential recovery time has been estimated for nanorods and seed layers. The stability of ZnO nanorods as a photoanode has been investigated.

  11. Novel design of highly [110]-oriented barium titanate nanorod array and its application in nanocomposite capacitors.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lingmin; Pan, Zhongbin; Zhai, Jiwei; Chen, Haydn H D

    2017-03-23

    Nanocomposites in capacitors combining highly aligned one dimension ferroelectric nanowires with polymer would be more desirable for achieving higher energy density. However, the synthesis of the well-isolated ferroelectric oxide nanorod arrays with a high orientation has been rather scant, especially using glass-made substrates. In this study, a novel design that is capable of fabricating a highly [110]-oriented BaTiO3 (BT) nanorod array was proposed first, using a three-step hydrothermal reaction on glass-made substrates. The details for controlling the dispersion of the nanorod array, the orientation and the aspect ratio are also discussed. It is found that the alkaline treatment of the TiO2 (TO) nanorod array, rather than the completing transformation into sodium titanate, favors the transformation of the TO into the BT nanorod array, as well as protecting the glass-made substrate. The dispersity of the nanorod array can be controlled by the introduction of a glycol ether-deionized water mixed solvent and soluble salts. Moreover, the orientation of the nanorod arrays could be tuned by the ionic strength of the solution. This novel BT nanorod array was used as a filler in a nanocomposite capacitor, demonstrating that a large energy density (11.82 J cm(-3)) can be achieved even at a low applied electric field (3200 kV cm(-1)), which opens us a new application in nanocomposite capacitors.

  12. Kinetics-controlled growth of bimetallic RhAg on Au nanorods and their catalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Ye, Wei; Guo, Xia; Xie, Fang; Zhu, Rui; Zhao, Qing; Yang, Jian

    2014-04-21

    Controlled growth of hybrid metallic nanocomposites for a desirable structure in a combination of selected components is highly important for their applications. Herein, the controllable growth of RhAg on the gold nanorods is achieved from the dumbbell-like RhAg-tipped nanorods to the brushy RhAg-coated nanorods, or the rod-like Au@Ag-Rh nanorattles. These different growth modes of RhAg on the gold nanorods are correlated with the reducing kinetics of RhCl₃ and AgNO₃. In view of the promising catalytic properties of Rh, the gold nanorods modified by RhAg in different structures are examined as catalysts for the oxidation of o-phenylenediamine. It is found that brushy RhAg-coated nanorods present a higher catalytic efficiency than dumbbell-like RhAg-tipped nanorods and rod-like Au@Ag-Rh nanorattles. These results would benefit the overgrowth control on the one-dimensional metallic nanorods and the rational design of new generation heterogeneous catalysts and optical devices.

  13. Facet control of gold nanorods

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Qingfeng; Han, Lili; Jing, Hao; ...

    2016-01-21

    While great success has been achieved in fine-tuning the aspect ratios and thereby the plasmon resonances of cylindrical Au nanorods, facet control with atomic level precision on the highly curved nanorod surfaces has long been a significantly more challenging task. The intrinsic structural complexity and lack of precise facet control of the nanorod surfaces remain the major obstacles for the atomic-level elucidation of the structure–property relationships that underpin the intriguing catalytic performance of Au nanorods. Here we demonstrate that the facets of single-crystalline Au nanorods can be precisely tailored using cuprous ions and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as a unique pair ofmore » surface capping competitors to guide the particle geometry evolution during nanorod overgrowth. By deliberately maneuvering the competition between cuprous ions and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, we have been able to create, in a highly controllable and selective manner, an entire family of nanorod-derived anisotropic multifaceted geometries whose surfaces are enclosed by specific types of well-defined high-index and low-index facets. This facet-controlled nanorod overgrowth approach also allows us to fine-tune the particle aspect ratios while well-preserving all the characteristic facets and geometric features of the faceted Au nanorods. Furthermore, taking full advantage of the combined structural and plasmonic tunability, we have further studied the facet-dependent heterogeneous catalysis on well-faceted Au nanorods using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy as an ultrasensitive spectroscopic tool with unique time-resolving and molecular finger-printing capabilities.« less

  14. Multiple Surface Plasmon Modes for Gold/Silver Alloy Nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Bok, Hye-Mi; Shuford, Kevin L; Kim, Sungwan; Kim, Seong Kyu; Park, Sungho

    2009-01-01

    Alloy nanorods consisting of bimetallic gold and silver are synthesized by employing the electrochemical codeposition of Au/Ag alloy materials into the pores of anodized aluminum oxide templates. This paper presents the variation of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) modes of the Au{sub x}/Ag{sub 1-x} alloy nanorods as a function of relative compositions of Au and Ag. Transverse and multiple longitudinal modes were observed when the length was longer than ca. 300 nm. For a given length, the transverse LSPR mode systematically blue-shifted as the Ag portion increased, while there was little variation in peak positions of the longitudinal LSPR modes. The optical properties of the Au{sub x}/Ag{sub 1-x} alloy nanorods were calculated using the discrete dipole approximation and showed a good agreement with the experimental measurements.

  15. Effective PEGylation of gold nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, F.; Friedrich, W.; Hoppe, K.; Vossmeyer, T.; Weller, H.; Lange, H.

    2016-03-01

    Standard procedures to coat gold nanorods (AuNR) with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based ligands are not reliable and high PEG-grafting densities are not achieved. In this work, the ligand exchange of AuNR with PEGMUA, a tailored PEG-ligand bearing a C10 alkylene spacer, is studied. PEGMUA provides AuNR with very high stability against oxidative etching with cyanide. This etching reaction is utilized to study the ligand exchange in detail. Ligand exchange is faster, less ligand consuming and more reproducible with assisting chloroform extraction. Compared to PEG ligands commonly used, PEGMUA provides much higher colloidal and chemical stability. Further analyses based on NMR-, IR- and UV/Vis-spectroscopy reveal that significantly higher PEG-grafting densities, up to ~3 nm-2, are obtained with PEGMUA. This demonstrates how the molecular structure of the PEG ligand can be used to dramatically improve the ligand exchange and to synthesize PEGylated AuNR with high chemical and colloidal stability and high PEG grafting densities. Such AuNR are especially interesting for applications in nanomedicine.Standard procedures to coat gold nanorods (AuNR) with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based ligands are not reliable and high PEG-grafting densities are not achieved. In this work, the ligand exchange of AuNR with PEGMUA, a tailored PEG-ligand bearing a C10 alkylene spacer, is studied. PEGMUA provides AuNR with very high stability against oxidative etching with cyanide. This etching reaction is utilized to study the ligand exchange in detail. Ligand exchange is faster, less ligand consuming and more reproducible with assisting chloroform extraction. Compared to PEG ligands commonly used, PEGMUA provides much higher colloidal and chemical stability. Further analyses based on NMR-, IR- and UV/Vis-spectroscopy reveal that significantly higher PEG-grafting densities, up to ~3 nm-2, are obtained with PEGMUA. This demonstrates how the molecular structure of the PEG ligand can be used to

  16. Nanoscale Fluidics: Using magnetic nanorods as model cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Jing; Ben, Wilde; Jeremy, Cribb; Chris, Dwyer; Jay, Fisher; Kalpit, Desai; Leandra, Vicci; Russell, M. Taylor, II; Richard, Superfine

    2003-11-01

    The beating of cilia and flagella, slender cylinders 250 nanometers in diameter with lengths from 7 to 50 microns, is ubiquitous in biology. The fluid dynamics produced by the cilia or flagella motion is responsible for organism feeding, propulsion, for bacterial clearance in the lungs and for the right-left asymmetry in vertebrates. We are developing a model system for cilia beating through the use of magnetic nanorods. Using anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes as templates, magnetic rods of permalloy with a diameter of 100 and 200 nm have been fabricated. We will describe the details of fabrication and characterization, and discuss methods used to study the hydrodynamic behavior of these nanorods in aqueous solutions under applied magnetic fields. Movies of these nanorods in oscillating 3-D magnetic fields generated by our 3-dimensional force microscopy (3DFM) clearly show bead motion in vortices around the nanorod. Deliberately transporting beads near the rods by laser trap, we can reproducibly study the hydrodynamic behavior around the nanorods and the influence of local rheological properties.

  17. Synthetic beta-K(0.33)V2O5 nanorods: a metal-insulator transition in vanadium oxide bronze.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Yan, Wensheng; Xie, Yi

    2011-12-02

    We found a linear relationship between the metal-insulator transition (MIT) temperature and the A(+) ionic radius of the beta-A(0.33)V(2)O(5) bronze family, leading our attention to beta-K(0.33)V(2)O(5) which has been neglected for a long time. We have introduced a facile hydrothermal method to obtain the single-crystalline beta-K(0.33)V(2)O(5) nanorods. As expected, both the temperature-dependence of the resistivity and magnetization demonstrated MITs at about 72 K for beta-K(0.33)V(2)O(5), thus matching well with the linear relationship described above. The beta-K(0.33)V(2)O(5) was assigned as a new member of the beta-A(0.33)V(2)O(5) bronze family for their similar crystal and electronic structures and their MIT property; this addition enriches the beta-A(0.33)V(2)O(5) bronze family.

  18. Sorption speciation of lanthanides/actinides on minerals by TRLFS, EXAFS and DFT studies: a review.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiaoli; Fang, Ming; Wang, Xiangke

    2010-11-17

    Lanthanides/actinides sorption speciation on minerals and oxides by means of time resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS), extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) and density functional theory (DFT) is reviewed in the field of nuclear disposal safety research. The theoretical aspects of the methods are concisely presented. Examples of recent research results of lanthanide/actinide speciation and local atomic structures using TRLFS, EXAFS and DFT are discussed. The interaction of lanthanides/actinides with oxides and minerals as well as their uptake are also of common interest in radionuclide chemistry. Especially the sorption and inclusion of radionuclides into several minerals lead to an improvement in knowledge of minor components in solids. In the solid-liquid interface, the speciation and local atomic structures of Eu(III), Cm(III), U(VI), and Np(IV/VI) in several natural and synthetic minerals and oxides are also reviewed and discussed. The review is important to understand the physicochemical behavior of lanthanides/actinides at a molecular level in the natural environment.

  19. How Robust are Semiconductor Nanorods? Investigating the Stability and Chemical Decomposition Pathways of Photoactive Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Reichert, Malinda D; Lin, Chia-Cheng; Vela, Javier

    2014-07-08

    Anisotropic II–VI semiconductor nanostructures are important photoactive materials for various energy conversion and optical applications. However, aside from the many available surface chemistry studies and from their ubiquitous photodegradation under continuous illumination, the general chemical reactivity and thermal stability (phase and shape transformations) of these materials are poorly understood. Using CdSe and CdS nanorods as model systems, we have investigated the behavior of II–VI semiconductor nanorods against various conditions of extreme chemical and physical stress (acids, bases, oxidants, reductants, and heat). CdSe nanorods react rapidly with acids, becoming oxidized to Se or SeO2. In contrast, CdSe nanorods remain mostly unreactive when treated with bases or strong oxidants, although bases do partially etch the tips of the nanorods (along their axis). Roasting (heating in air) of CdSe nanorods results in rock-salt CdO, but neither CdSe nor CdO is easily reduced by hydrogen (H2). Another reductant, n-BuLi, reduces CdSe nanorods to metallic Cd. Variable temperature X-ray diffraction experiments show that axial annealing and selective axial melting of the nanorods precede particle coalescence. Furthermore, thermal analysis shows that the axial melting of II–VI nanorods is a ligand-dependent process. In agreement with chemical reactivity and thermal stability observations, silica-coating experiments show that the sharpest (most curved) II–VI surfaces are most active against heterogeneous nucleation of a silica shell. These results provide valuable insights into the fate and possible ways to enhance the stability and improve the use of II–VI semiconductor nanostructures in the fields of optics, magnetism, and energy conversion.

  20. Luminescent lanthanide chelates and methods of use

    SciTech Connect

    Selvin, Paul R.; Hearst, John

    1997-01-01

    The invention provides lanthanide chelates capable of intense luminescence. The celates comprise a lanthanide chelator covalently joined to a coumarin-like or quinolone-like sensitizer. Exemplary sensitzers include 2- or 4-quinolones, 2- or 4-coumarins, or derivatives thereof e.g. carbostyril 124 (7-amino-4-methyl-2-quinolone), coumarin 120 (7-amino-4-methyl-2-coumarin), coumarin 124 (7-amino-4-(trifluoromethyl)-2-coumarin), aminomethyltrimethylpsoralen, etc. The chelates form high affinity complexes with lanthanides, such as terbium or europium, through chelator groups, such as DTPA. The chelates may be coupled to a wide variety of compounds to create specific labels, probes, diagnostic and/or therapeutic reagents, etc. The chelates find particular use in resonance energy transfer between chelate-lanthanide complexes and another luminescent agent, often a fluorescent non-metal based resonance energy acceptor. The methods provide useful information about the structure, conformation, relative location and/or interactions of macromolecules.

  1. The role of lanthanides in optical materials

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, M.J.

    1995-05-01

    A survey is presented of the use of the lanthanides as chemical components in transmitting optical materials and as activators in materials for luminescent, electro-optic, magneto-optic, and various photosensitive applications.

  2. Self-catalytic solution-liquid-liquid-solid (SLLS) growth of tapered SnS nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Ki-Hyun; Sung, Yun-Mo

    2013-04-01

    Taper-shaped SnS nanorods were synthesized via mild chemistry, and the self-catalytic solution-liquid-liquid-solid (SLLS) process was proposed as a crystal growth mechanism. There exists a distinct difference in our SLLS growth compared to the well-known SLS growth in that we injected Sn precursors into a hot trioctylphosphine sulfide (TOPS) solution, which is a reverse process of the general SLS growth. This reverse process could prevent the oxidation of Sn precursors and thus it could facilitate the growth of SnS nanorods, since the surface of Sn clusters and droplets could be momentarily passivated by TOPS molecules. Without addition of extra catalyst nanoparticles, the nucleation and growth of SnS nanorods was induced by liquid Sn droplets. Spherical Sn tips existing at the top of the nanorods evidence the self-catalytic growth. The SLLS growth was proposed based upon the large Sn clusters existing at the bottom of the SnS nanorods in an intermediate stage (5 s) of the growth and the tapered morphology of the nanorods. The growth of SnS nanorods could progress by the upward diffusion of Sn atoms from large liquid Sn clusters along the surface of the SnS nanorods to the interfacial liquid layers (neck area) and the diffusion of S decomposed from TOPS in the solution to the neck area. SnS nanorods showed a direct energy band gap of ~1.6 eV, determined by using the Kubelka-Munk transformation of UV-visible spectra. This self-catalytic SLLS growth produced high-quality and single crystalline SnS nanorods within only 15 s at 290 °C.Taper-shaped SnS nanorods were synthesized via mild chemistry, and the self-catalytic solution-liquid-liquid-solid (SLLS) process was proposed as a crystal growth mechanism. There exists a distinct difference in our SLLS growth compared to the well-known SLS growth in that we injected Sn precursors into a hot trioctylphosphine sulfide (TOPS) solution, which is a reverse process of the general SLS growth. This reverse process could

  3. Pt-content-controlled synthesis of Pd nanohollows/Pt nanorods core/shell composites with enhanced electrocatalytic activities for the methanol oxidation reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Shiqin; Fu, Chenglin; Chen, Yongxiang; Yu, Xiang; Lai, Xuandi; Ye, Cui; Hu, Jianqiang

    2015-01-01

    Pd nanohollows/Pt nanorods (PdNHs/PtNRs) core/shell composites have been synthesized by a multistep crystalline growth method, in which Pt NRs grow on the exterior surface of hollow Pd nanospheres in order. Moreover, the size and quantity of the Pt NRs in the PdNHs/PtNRs can be easily tailored and thus ameliorate Pt utilization efficiency through varying H2PtCl6 concentrations. By comparing with Pt NPs and commercial Pt/C (JM), the PdNHs/PtNRs prepared using 2.50 mL 0.02 M H2PtCl6 have larger surface area, better anti-CO poisoning ability and more excellent catalytic performance. Moreover, the catalytic properties of the PdNHs/PtNRs can be well tunable by modifying the Pt contents. Our studies indicate that the PdNHs/PtNRs prepared using 2.50 mL 0.02 M H2PtCl6, in which Pd NHs are nearly completely covered with Pt NRs, have the largest surface area, best antitoxic ability and most excellent catalytic performance, indicative of high Pt utilization efficiency of the PdNHs/PtNRs relative to Pt/C (JM), Pt NPs and other PdNHs/PtNRs prepared using other H2PtCl6 concentrations. Therefore, the strategy to the size and content control of the PdNHs/PtNRs nanocomposites can facilitate optimized design of Pt-based catalysts for direct methanol fuel cells.

  4. Increasing the luminescence of lanthanide complexes.

    PubMed

    Leif, Robert C; Vallarino, Lidia M; Becker, Margie C; Yang, Sean

    2006-08-01

    This review compares the chemical and physical properties of lanthanide ion complexes and of other narrow-emitting species that can be used as labels for cytometry. A series of luminescent lanthanide ion macrocyclic complexes, Quantum Dyes, which do not release or exchange their central lanthanide ion, do accept energy transfer from ligands, and are capable of covalent binding to macromolecules, including proteins and nucleic acids, is described and their properties are discussed. Two methods are described for increasing the luminescence intensity of lanthanide ion complexes, which intrinsically is not as high as that of standard fluorophores or quantum dots. One method consists of adding a complex of a second lanthanide ion in a micellar solution (columinescence); the other method produces dry preparations by evaporation of a homogeneous solution containing an added complex of a second lanthanide ion or an excess of an unbound antenna ligand. Both methods involve the Resonance Energy Transfer Enhanced Luminescence, RETEL, effect as the mechanism for the luminescence enhancement.

  5. Crystallographic, luminescence and photoconductive characteristics of chemically tailored ZnO nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Bayan, Sayan Chakraborty, Purushottam

    2014-04-24

    The optoelectronic properties of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods synthesized using two different chemical methods have been explored in the light of microstructural features. The presence/absence of band edge emission in the luminescence spectra of the nanorods is found to be governed by the crystallographic properties. Moreover, we observed a pronounced effect of variation in crystallite size on the UV photoconductivity of the nanorods. Understanding the influence of microstructural aspects on the optical and electronic properties of the nanostructures may help in the fabrication of prototype, miniaturized optoelectronic devices.

  6. LANTHANIDE ENHANCE LUMINESCENCE (LEL) WITH ONE AND TWO PHOTON EXCITATION OF QUANTUM DYES LANTHANIDE (III) - MACROCYCLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Title: Lanthanide Enhance Luminescence (LEL) with one and two photon excitation of Quantum Dyes? Lanthanide(III)-Macrocycles
    Principal Author:
    Robert C. Leif, Newport Instruments
    Secondary Authors:
    Margie C. Becker, Phoenix Flow Systems
    Al Bromm, Virginia Commonw...

  7. Self-catalytic solution-liquid-liquid-solid (SLLS) growth of tapered SnS nanorods.

    PubMed

    Cho, Ki-Hyun; Sung, Yun-Mo

    2013-05-07

    Taper-shaped SnS nanorods were synthesized via mild chemistry, and the self-catalytic solution-liquid-liquid-solid (SLLS) process was proposed as a crystal growth mechanism. There exists a distinct difference in our SLLS growth compared to the well-known SLS growth in that we injected Sn precursors into a hot trioctylphosphine sulfide (TOPS) solution, which is a reverse process of the general SLS growth. This reverse process could prevent the oxidation of Sn precursors and thus it could facilitate the growth of SnS nanorods, since the surface of Sn clusters and droplets could be momentarily passivated by TOPS molecules. Without addition of extra catalyst nanoparticles, the nucleation and growth of SnS nanorods was induced by liquid Sn droplets. Spherical Sn tips existing at the top of the nanorods evidence the self-catalytic growth. The SLLS growth was proposed based upon the large Sn clusters existing at the bottom of the SnS nanorods in an intermediate stage (5 s) of the growth and the tapered morphology of the nanorods. The growth of SnS nanorods could progress by the upward diffusion of Sn atoms from large liquid Sn clusters along the surface of the SnS nanorods to the interfacial liquid layers (neck area) and the diffusion of S decomposed from TOPS in the solution to the neck area. SnS nanorods showed a direct energy band gap of ∼1.6 eV, determined by using the Kubelka-Munk transformation of UV-visible spectra. This self-catalytic SLLS growth produced high-quality and single crystalline SnS nanorods within only 15 s at 290 °C.

  8. Purification of lanthanides for double beta decay experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polischuk, O. G.; Barabash, A. S.; Belli, P.; Bernabei, R.; Boiko, R. S.; Cappella, F.; Cerulli, R.; Danevich, F. A.; Incicchitti, A.; Laubenstein, M.; Mokina, V. M.; Nisi, S.; Poda, D. V.; Tretyak, V. I.

    2013-08-01

    There are several potentially double beta active isotopes among the lanthanide elements. However, even high purity grade lanthanide compounds contain 238U, 226Ra and 232,228Th typically on the level of ˜ (0.1 - 1) Bq/kg. The liquid-liquid extraction technique was used to remove traces of U, Ra and Th from CeO2, Nd2O3 and Gd2O3. The radioactive contamination of the samples before and after the purification was tested by using ultra-low-background HPGe γ spectrometry at the underground Gran Sasso National Laboratories of the INFN (Italy). After the purification the radioactive contamination of gadolinium oxide by Ra and Th was decreased at least one order of magnitude. The efficiency of the approach to purify cerium oxide from Ra was on same level, while the radioactive contamination of neodymium sample before and after the purification is below the sensitivity of analytical methods. The purification method is much less efficient for chemically very similar radioactive elements like lanthanum, lutetium and actinium. R&D of the methods to remove the pollutions with improved efficiency is in progress.

  9. Purification of lanthanides for double beta decay experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Polischuk, O. G.; Barabash, A. S.; Belli, P.; Bernabei, R.; Boiko, R. S.; Danevich, F. A.; Mokina, V. M.; Poda, D. V.; Tretyak, V. I.; Cappella, F.; Incicchitti, A.; Cerulli, R.; Laubenstein, M.; Nisi, S.

    2013-08-08

    There are several potentially double beta active isotopes among the lanthanide elements. However, even high purity grade lanthanide compounds contain {sup 238}U, {sup 226}Ra and {sup 232,228}Th typically on the level of ∼ (0.1 - 1) Bq/kg. The liquid-liquid extraction technique was used to remove traces of U, Ra and Th from CeO{sub 2}, Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The radioactive contamination of the samples before and after the purification was tested by using ultra-low-background HPGe γ spectrometry at the underground Gran Sasso National Laboratories of the INFN (Italy). After the purification the radioactive contamination of gadolinium oxide by Ra and Th was decreased at least one order of magnitude. The efficiency of the approach to purify cerium oxide from Ra was on same level, while the radioactive contamination of neodymium sample before and after the purification is below the sensitivity of analytical methods. The purification method is much less efficient for chemically very similar radioactive elements like lanthanum, lutetium and actinium. R and D of the methods to remove the pollutions with improved efficiency is in progress.

  10. A Selective Blocking Method To Control the Overgrowth of Pt on Au Nanorods

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A method for the preparation of smooth deposits of Pt on Au nanorods is described, involving sequential deposition steps with selective blocking of surface sites that reduces Pt-on-Pt deposition. The Au–Pt nanorods prepared by this method have higher long-term stability than those prepared by standard Pt deposition. Electrochemical data show that the resulting structure has more extended regions of Pt surface and enhanced activity toward the carbon monoxide oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions. PMID:23594230

  11. Light propagation in nanorod arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahachou, A. I.; Zozoulenko, I. V.

    2007-03-01

    We study the propagation of TM- and TE-polarized light in two-dimensional arrays of silver nanorods of various diameters in a gelatin background. We calculate the transmittance, reflectance and absorption of arranged and disordered nanorod arrays and compare the exact numerical results with the predictions of the Maxwell-Garnett effective-medium theory. We show that interactions between nanorods, multipole contributions and formations of photonic gaps affect strongly the transmittance spectra that cannot be accounted for in terms of the conventional effective-medium theory. We also demonstrate and explain the degradation of the transmittance in arrays with randomly located rods as well as the weak influence of their fluctuating diameter. For TM modes we outline the importance of the skin effect, which causes the full reflection of the incoming light. We then illustrate the possibility of using periodic arrays of nanorods as high-quality polarizers.

  12. Nonaqueous method for dissolving lanthanide and actinide metals

    DOEpatents

    Crisler, L.R.

    1975-11-11

    Lanthanide and actinide beta-diketonate complex molecular compounds are produced by reacting a beta-diketone compound with a lanthanide or actinide element in the elemental metallic state in a mixture of carbon tetrachloride and methanol.

  13. Synthesis of non-aggregated nicotinic acid coated magnetite nanorods via hydrothermal technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attallah, Olivia A.; Girgis, E.; Abdel-Mottaleb, Mohamed M. S. A.

    2016-02-01

    Non-aggregated magnetite nanorods with average diameters of 20-30 nm and lengths of up to 350 nm were synthesized via in situ, template free hydrothermal technique. These nanorods capped with different concentrations (1, 1.5, 2 and 2.5 g) of nicotinic acid (vitamin B3); possessed good magnetic properties and easy dispersion in aqueous solutions. Our new synthesis technique maintained the uniform shape of the nanorods even with increasing the coating material concentration. The effect of nicotinic acid on the shape, particle size, chemical structure and magnetic properties of the prepared nanorods was evaluated using different characterization methods. The length of nanorods increased from 270 nm to 350 nm in nicotinic acid coated nanorods. Goethite and magnetite phases with different ratios were the dominant phases in the coated samples while a pure magnetite phase was observed in the uncoated one. Nicotinic acid coated magnetic nanorods showed a significant decrease in saturation magnetization than uncoated samples (55 emu/g) reaching 4 emu/g in 2.5 g nicotinic acid coated sample. The novel synthesis technique proved its potentiality to prepare coated metal oxides with one dimensional nanostructure which can function effectively in different biological applications.

  14. Photocatalytic synthesis and photovoltaic application of Ag-TiO2 nanorod composites.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qipeng; Lu, Zhenda; Lu, Yunzhang; Lv, Longfeng; Ning, Yu; Yu, Hongxia; Hou, Yanbing; Yin, Yadong

    2013-01-01

    A photocatalytic strategy has been developed to synthesize colloidal Ag-TiO2 nanorod composites in which each TiO2 nanorod contains a single Ag nanoparticle on its surface. In this rational synthesis, photoexcitation of TiO2 nanorods under UV illumination produces electrons that reduce Ag(I) precursor and deposit multiple small Ag nanoparticles on the surface of TiO2 nanorods. Prolonged UV irradiation induces an interesting ripening process, which dissolves the smaller nanoparticles by photogenerated oxidative species and then redeposits Ag onto one larger and more stable particle attached to each TiO2 nanorod through the reduction of photoexcited electrons. The size of the Ag nanoparticles can be precisely controlled by varying the irradiation time and the amount of alcohol additive. The Ag-TiO2 nanorod composites were used as electron transport layers in the fabrication of organic solar cells and showed notable enhancement in power conversion efficiency (6.92%) than pure TiO2 nanorods (5.81%), as well as higher external quantum efficiency due to improved charge separation and transfer by the presence of Ag nanoparticles.

  15. Photoelectrochemical water splitting properties of hydrothermally-grown ZnO nanorods with controlled diameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, Eadi Sunil; Hong, Soon-Ku; Vo, Thanh Son; Jeong, Jong-Ryul; Cho, Hyung Koun

    2015-01-01

    The effect of diameter change on photoelectrochemical water splitting was investigated in depth for ZnO nanorods. ZnO nanorods were grown on SiO2/Si and indium tin-oxide substrates by the hydrothermal growth method. By controlling the concentration ratio between zinc nitrate hexahydrate (ZNT) and hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) nanorod diameters were changed from 45 to 275 nm, in which the diameter decreased with decreasing the ratio. Photoelectrochemical properties of ZnO nanorods with diameters from 45 to 255 nm were investigated under ultraviolet (UV) and visible light illumination. The maximum photoconversion efficiency of 45.3% was obtained from ZnO nanorods with 45 nm diameter under 365 nm UV light illumination. The photoconversion efficiency of 0.42% was obtained under Air Mass 1.5 Global simulated solar light illumination. Higher photoconversion efficiency for smaller diameter nanorods is attributed to the increase in the light absorption with decreasing the diameter that is confirmed by our simulation using finite-difference time domain. The length change of nanorods showed relatively negligible effects compared to the diameter change in our system.

  16. Selective growth of ZnO nanorods by the hydrothermal technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozaki, Shinji; Sarangi, Sachin N.; Sahu, Surendra N.; Uchida, Kazuo

    2013-03-01

    Zinc oxide nanorods were selectively grown on engineered substrates, Ag-patterned and photoresist-patterned substrates, by the hydrothermal technique using zinc nitrate (Zn(NO3)2) and hexamethylenetetramine ((CH2)6N4). The nanorod growth was affected by the substrate to be used. The nanorods were vertically grown on a GaN substrate but not on a Si substrate because of lattice mismatch. However, since the nanorods were grown on a thick Ag film no matter what substrate was used, a thick Ag film was deposited on a Si substrate to prepare the Ag-patterned substrate. Accordingly, the nanorods were grown only on the Ag pads. When the sizes of Ag pads were small such as 100 nm × 100 nm, one single nanorod was grown on an Ag pad. As another engineered substrate, the photoresist was patterned to prepare an array of holes on a GaN-on-sapphire substrate by e-beam lithography. When the hole size was 10 nm × 10 nm and higher, concentrations of Zn(NO3)2 and ((CH2)6N4) were employed, all holes were successfully filled with a single nanorod. Invited talk at the 6th International Workshop on Advanced Materials Science and Nanotechnology IWAMSN2012, 30 October 2 November 2012, Ha Long, Vietnam.

  17. Effect of lanthanides on Porphyromonas gingivalis proteases.

    PubMed

    Sunkara, Sasi K; Ciancio, Sebastian G; Sojar, Hakimuddin T

    2010-01-01

    Host and bacterial proteases play a vital role in periodontitis. Inhibitors of these proteases are necessary for control of this disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of lanthanides on proteins from Porphyromonas gingivalis, a major pathogen in periodontitis. Benzoyl-L-Arg-p-nitroanilide (BAPNA); H-Gly-Pro-pNA x HCl and gelatin were used to evaluate the activity of P. gingivalis proteins in the presence of lanthanides. Proteins extracted from cell surfaces and culture media of P. gingivalis were assessed for activity in the presence of different lanthanides by BAPNA assay. Only gadolinium chloride was used for H-Gly-Pro-pNA x HCl assay and gelatin-zymography. Concentration-dependent reduction of absorbance was observed in the presence of lanthanides with BAPNA and a similar observation was made with gadolinium chloride using H-Gly-Pro-pNa. Collagenolytic activity in cell surface extracts and culture media-precipitated proteins was absent in the presence of gadolinium chloride. These results suggest that the lanthanide gadolinium can be a potential inhibitor of P. gingivalis proteases.

  18. Cathodoluminescence spectra of gallium nitride nanorods

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Gallium nitride [GaN] nanorods grown on a Si(111) substrate at 720°C via plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy were studied by field-emission electron microscopy and cathodoluminescence [CL]. The surface topography and optical properties of the GaN nanorod cluster and single GaN nanorod were measured and discussed. The defect-related CL spectra of GaN nanorods and their dependence on temperature were investigated. The CL spectra along the length of the individual GaN nanorod were also studied. The results reveal that the 3.2-eV peak comes from the structural defect at the interface between the GaN nanorod and Si substrate. The surface state emission of the single GaN nanorod is stronger as the diameter of the GaN nanorod becomes smaller due to an increased surface-to-volume ratio. PMID:22168896

  19. Cathodoluminescence spectra of gallium nitride nanorods.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chia-Chang; Li, Guan-Hua; Lin, Yuan-Ting; Chang, Ching-Wen; Wadekar, Paritosh; Chen, Quark Yung-Sung; Rigutti, Lorenzo; Tchernycheva, Maria; Julien, François Henri; Tu, Li-Wei

    2011-12-14

    Gallium nitride [GaN] nanorods grown on a Si(111) substrate at 720°C via plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy were studied by field-emission electron microscopy and cathodoluminescence [CL]. The surface topography and optical properties of the GaN nanorod cluster and single GaN nanorod were measured and discussed. The defect-related CL spectra of GaN nanorods and their dependence on temperature were investigated. The CL spectra along the length of the individual GaN nanorod were also studied. The results reveal that the 3.2-eV peak comes from the structural defect at the interface between the GaN nanorod and Si substrate. The surface state emission of the single GaN nanorod is stronger as the diameter of the GaN nanorod becomes smaller due to an increased surface-to-volume ratio.

  20. High Resolution Fluorescence Imaging of Cancers Using Lanthanide Ion-Doped Upconverting Nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Naccache, Rafik; Rodríguez, Emma Martín; Bogdan, Nicoleta; Sanz-Rodríguez, Francisco; de la Cruz, Maria del Carmen Iglesias; de la Fuente, Ángeles Juarranz; Vetrone, Fiorenzo; Jaque, Daniel; Solé, José García; Capobianco, John A.

    2012-01-01

    During the last decade inorganic luminescent nanoparticles that emit visible light under near infrared (NIR) excitation (in the biological window) have played a relevant role for high resolution imaging of cancer. Indeed, semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and metal nanoparticles, mostly gold nanorods (GNRs), are already commercially available for this purpose. In this work we review the role which is being played by a relatively new class of nanoparticles, based on lanthanide ion doped nanocrystals, to target and image cancer cells using upconversion fluorescence microscopy. These nanoparticles are insulating nanocrystals that are usually doped with small percentages of two different rare earth (lanthanide) ions: The excited donor ions (usually Yb3+ ion) that absorb the NIR excitation and the acceptor ions (usually Er3+, Ho3+ or Tm3+), that are responsible for the emitted visible (or also near infrared) radiation. The higher conversion efficiency of these nanoparticles in respect to those based on QDs and GNRs, as well as the almost independent excitation/emission properties from the particle size, make them particularly promising for fluorescence imaging. The different approaches of these novel nanoparticles devoted to “in vitro” and “in vivo” cancer imaging, selective targeting and treatment are examined in this review. PMID:24213500

  1. Template synthesis and characterizations of nickel nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, T.; Satpati, B.

    2012-06-05

    Template assisted Ni nanorods were grown using electro-deposition process and investigated using an Analytical Transmission Electron Microscope. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) images and diffraction patterns reveal the polycrystalline nature of grown Ni nanorods and the composition of these nanorods were verified using energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. The morphology of the grown nanorods was also characterized using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM).

  2. Quantifying the structural integrity of nanorod arrays.

    PubMed

    Thöle, Florian; Xue, Longjian; HEß, Claudia; Hillebrand, Reinald; Gorb, Stanislav N; Steinhart, Martin

    2017-02-01

    Arrays of aligned nanorods oriented perpendicular to a support, which are accessible by top-down lithography or by means of shape-defining hard templates, have received increasing interest as sensor components, components for nanophotonics and nanoelectronics, substrates for tissue engineering, surfaces having specific adhesive or antiadhesive properties and as surfaces with customized wettability. Agglomeration of the nanorods deteriorates the performance of components based on nanorod arrays. A comprehensive body of literature deals with mechanical failure mechanisms of nanorods and design criteria for mechanically stable nanorod arrays. However, the structural integrity of nanorod arrays is commonly evaluated only visually and qualitatively. We use real-space analysis of microscopic images to quantify the fraction of condensed nanorods in nanorod arrays. We suggest the number of array elements apparent in the micrographs divided by the number of array elements a defect-free array would contain in the same area, referred to as integrity fraction, as a measure of structural array integrity. Reproducible procedures to determine the imaged number of array elements are introduced. Thus, quantitative comparisons of different nanorod arrays, or of one nanorod array at different stages of its use, are possible. Structural integrities of identical nanorod arrays differing only in the length of the nanorods are exemplarily analysed.

  3. Switchable sensitizers stepwise lighting up lanthanide emissions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Jiao, Peng-Chong; Xu, Hai-Bing; Tang, Ming-Jing; Yang, Xiao-Ping; Huang, Shaoming; Deng, Jian-Guo

    2015-03-20

    Analagous to a long-ranged rocket equipped with multi-stage engines, a luminescent compound with consistent emission signals across a large range of concentrations from two stages of sensitizers can be designed. In this approach, ACQ, aggregation-caused quenching effect of sensitizers, would stimulate lanthanide emission below 10(-4) M, and then at concentrations higher than 10(-3) M, the "aggregation-induced emission" (AIE) effect of luminophores would be activated with the next set of sensitizers for lanthanide emission. Simultaneously, the concentration of the molecules could be monitored digitally by the maximal excitation wavelengths, due to the good linear relationship between the maximal excitation wavelengths and the concentrations {lg(M)}. This model, wherein molecules are assembled with two stages (both AIE and ACQ effect) of sensitizers, may provide a practicable strategy for design and construction of smart lanthanide bioprobes, which are suitable in complicated bioassay systems in which concentration is variable.

  4. Electronic Structure of Small Lanthanide Containing Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafader, Jared O.; Ray, Manisha; Topolski, Josey E.; Chick Jarrold, Caroline

    2016-06-01

    Lanthanide-based materials have unusual electronic properties because of the high number of electronic degrees of freedom arising from partial occupation of 4f orbitals, which make these materials optimal for their utilization in many applications including electronics and catalysis. Electronic spectroscopy of small lanthanide molecules helps us understand the role of these 4f electrons, which are generally considered core-like because of orbital contraction, but are energetically similar to valence electrons. The spectroscopy of small lanthanide-containing molecules is relatively unexplored and to broaden this understanding we have completed the characterization of small cerium, praseodymium, and europium molecules using photoelectron spectroscopy coupled with DFT calculations. The characterization of PrO, EuH, EuO/EuOH, and CexOy molecules have allowed for the determination of their electron affinity, the assignment of numerous anion to neutral state transitions, modeling of anion/neutral structures and electron orbital occupation.

  5. Separations of actinides, lanthanides and other metals

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Barbara F.; Jarvinen, Gordon D.; Ensor, Dale D.

    1995-01-01

    An organic extracting solution comprised of a bis(acylpyrazolone or a substituted bis(acylpyrazolone) and an extraction method useful for separating certain elements of the actinide series of the periodic table having a valence of four from one other, and also from one or more of the substances in a group consisting of hexavalent actinides, trivalent actinides, trivalent lanthanides, trivalent iron, trivalent aluminum, divalent metals, and monovalent metals and also from one or more of the substances in a group consisting of hexavalent actinides, trivalent actinides, trivalent lanthanides, trivalent iron, trivalent aluminum, divalent metals, and monovalent metals and also useful for separating hexavalent actinides from one or more of the substances in a group consisting of trivalent actinides, trivalent lanthanides, trivalent iron, trivalent aluminum, divalent metals, and monovalent metals.

  6. MxaY regulates the lanthanide-mediated methanol dehydrogenase switch in Methylomicrobium buryatense

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Frances; Beck, David A.C.

    2016-01-01

    Many methylotrophs, microorganisms that consume carbon compounds lacking carbon–carbon bonds, use two different systems to oxidize methanol for energy production and biomass accumulation. The MxaFI methanol dehydrogenase (MDH) contains calcium in its active site, while the XoxF enzyme contains a lanthanide in its active site. The genes encoding the MDH enzymes are differentially regulated by the presence of lanthanides. In this study, we found that the histidine kinase MxaY controls the lanthanide-mediated switch in Methylomicrobium buryatense 5GB1C. MxaY controls the transcription of genes encoding MxaFI and XoxF at least partially by controlling the transcript levels of the orphan response regulator MxaB. We identify a constitutively active version of MxaY, and identify the mutated residue that may be involved in lanthanide sensing. Lastly, we find evidence to suggest that tight control of active MDH production is required for wild-type growth rates. PMID:27651996

  7. Multishell Au/Ag/SiO2 nanorods with tunable optical properties as single particle orientation and rotational tracking probes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuangcai; Lin, Chia-Cheng; Vela, Javier; Fang, Ning

    2015-04-21

    Three-layer core-shell plasmonic nanorods (Au/Ag/SiO2-NRs), consisting of a gold nanorod core, a thin silver shell, and a thin silica layer, were synthesized and used as optical imaging probes under a differential interference contrast microscope for single particle orientation and rotational tracking. The localized surface plasmon resonance modes were enhanced upon the addition of the silver shell, and the anisotropic optical properties of gold nanorods were maintained. The silica coating enables surface functionalization with silane coupling agents and provides enhanced stability and biocompatibility. Taking advantage of the longitudinal LSPR enhancement, the orientation and rotational information of the hybrid nanorods on synthetic lipid bilayers and on live cell membranes were obtained with millisecond temporal resolution using a scientific complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor camera. The results demonstrate that the as-synthesized hybrid nanorods are promising imaging probes with improved sensitivity and good biocompatibility for single plasmonic particle tracking experiments in biological systems.

  8. Actinide Lanthanide Separation Process – ALSEP

    SciTech Connect

    Gelis, Artem V.; Lumetta, Gregg J.

    2014-01-29

    Separation of the minor actinides (Am, Cm) from the lanthanides at an industrial scale remains a significant technical challenge for closing the nuclear fuel cycle. To increase the safety of used nuclear fuel (UNF) reprocessing, as well as reduce associated costs, a novel solvent extraction process has been developed. The process allows for partitioning minor actinides, lanthanides and fission products following uranium/plutonium/neptunium removal; minimizing the number of separation steps, flowsheets, chemical consumption, and waste. This new process, Actinide Lanthanide SEParation (ALSEP), uses an organic solvent consisting of a neutral diglycolamide extractant, either N,N,N',N'-tetra(2 ethylhexyl)diglycolamide (T2EHDGA) or N,N,N',N'-tetraoctyldiglycolamide (TODGA), and an acidic extractant 2-ethylhexylphosphonic acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester (HEH[EHP]), dissolved in an aliphatic diluent (e.g. n-dodecane). The An/Ln co-extraction is conducted from moderate-to-strong nitric acid, while the selective stripping of the minor actinides from the lanthanides is carried out using a polyaminocarboxylic acid/citrate buffered solution at pH anywhere between 3 and 4.5. The extraction and separation of the actinides from the fission products is very effective in a wide range of HNO3 concentrations and the minimum separation factors for lanthanide/Am exceed 30 for Nd/Am, reaching > 60 for Eu/Am under some conditions. The experimental results presented here demonstrate the great potential for a combined system, consisting of a neutral extractant such as T2EHDGA or TODGA, and an acidic extractant such as HEH[EHP], for separating the minor actinides from the lanthanides.

  9. Comparison of photovoltaic properties of TiO2 electrodes prepared with nanoparticles and nanorods.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sang-Hun; Ju, Dong-Woo; Boo, Jin-Hyo

    2014-12-01

    In this report, single crystalline rutile TiO2 nanoparticles and nanorods were synthesized via the hydrothermal method using titanium tetra-isopropoxide as a precursor then, these were coated on top of a fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) substrate by using a doctor blade and direct deposition, respectively. Consequently, TiO2 nanorods-based dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC) exhibit a J(sc) of 3.37 mA/cm2, a V(oc) of 0.82 V and fill factor of 60.1% with an overall conversion efficiency of 1.66%. This result shows an increase of around 38% for current density and 35% for conversion efficiency. Also, with respect to the impedance data, TiO2 nanorods-based DSSCs had smaller semicircles than did the nanoparticles-based DSSCs. These results demonstrate that the nanorod structure can have fast electron transport and reduced charge recombination.

  10. Freestanding polyaniline nanorods grown on graphene for highly capacitive energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zijiong; Qin, Zhen; Yang, Baocheng; Guo, Jian; Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Weiyang; Lv, Xiaowei; Stack, Alison

    2015-02-01

    Freestanding polyaniline (PANI) nanorods grown in situ on microwave-expanded graphene oxide (MEGO) sheets were prepared through a facile solution method. The morphological characterization indicates that large quantity of free-standing PANI nanorods with average diameter of 50 nm were uniformly deposited onto the double sides of the MEGO nanosheets to form a sandwich structure. The hybrid of PANI/MEGO (GPANI) exhibit high specific surface area and high electrical conductivity, compared with pristine PANI nanorods. When evaluated as electrodes for supercapacitors, the GPANI demonstrate high specific capacitance of 628 F g-1 at a current density of 1.1 A g-1, high-rate performance, and excellent cycle stability compared to individual component. Such excellent electrochemical performance should be attributed to the combined double-layer capacitance and pseudo -capacitance mechanisms from the MEGO sheets and PANI nanorods.

  11. Low temperature plasma synthesis of mesoporous Fe3O4 nanorods grafted on reduced graphene oxide for high performance lithium storage.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Quan; Zhao, Zongbin; Wang, Zhiyu; Dong, Yanfeng; Wang, Xuzhen; Gogotsi, Yury; Qiu, Jieshan

    2014-02-21

    Transition metal oxide coupling with carbon is an effective method for improving electrical conductivity of battery electrodes and avoiding the degradation of their lithium storage capability due to large volume expansion/contraction and severe particle aggregation during the lithium insertion and desertion process. In our present work, we develop an effective approach to fabricate the nanocomposites of porous rod-shaped Fe3O4 anchored on reduced graphene oxide (Fe3O4/rGO) by controlling the in situ nucleation and growth of β-FeOOH onto the graphene oxide (β-FeOOH/GO) and followed by dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) hydrogen plasma treatment. Such well-designed hierarchical nanostructures are beneficial for maximum utilization of electrochemically active matter in lithium ion batteries and display superior Li uptake with high reversible capacity, good rate capability, and excellent stability, maintaining 890 mA h g(-1) capacity over 100 cycles at a current density of 500 mA g(-1).

  12. Shear viscosity coefficient of liquid lanthanides

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, H. P. Thakor, P. B. Prajapati, A. V.; Sonvane, Y. A.

    2015-05-15

    Present paper deals with the computation of shear viscosity coefficient (η) of liquid lanthanides. The effective pair potential v(r) is calculated through our newly constructed model potential. The Pair distribution function g(r) is calculated from PYHS reference system. To see the influence of local field correction function, Hartree (H), Tailor (T) and Sarkar et al (S) local field correction function are used. Present results are compared with available experimental as well as theoretical data. Lastly, we found that our newly constructed model potential successfully explains the shear viscosity coefficient (η) of liquid lanthanides.

  13. Method bacterial endospore quantification using lanthanide dipicolinate luminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponce, Adrian (Inventor); Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J. (Inventor); Kirby, James Patrick (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A lanthanide is combined with a medium to be tested for endospores. The dipicolinic acid released from the endospores binds the lanthanides, which have distinctive emission (i.e., luminescence) spectra, and are detected using photoluminescence. The concentration of spores is determined by preparing a calibration curve generated from photoluminescence spectra of lanthanide complex mixed with spores of a known concentration. A lanthanide complex is used as the analysis reagent, and is comprised of lanthanide ions bound to multidentate ligands that increase the dipicolinic acid binding constant through a cooperative binding effect with respect to lanthanide chloride. The resulting combined effect of increasing the binding constant and eliminating coordinated water and multiple equilibria increase the sensitivity of the endospore assay by an estimated three to four orders of magnitude over prior art of endospore detection based on lanthanide luminescence.

  14. Preparation of Lanthanide-Polymer Composite Material via Click Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Wen, Guian; Wu, Jiajie; Feng, Jiachun

    2015-10-01

    Covalently attaching lanthanide complexes to the polymer backbone can effectively reduce the clustering of lanthanides and thus become an important strategy to fully unleash their potential. In this Communication, a metal-free click reaction is used for the first time to link a lanthanide complex to the polymer matrix. A diene-bearing copolymer with anthracenylmethyl methacrylate as a monomer and a dienophile-bearing lanthanide complex with 5-maleimido-1,10-phenanthroline as the second ligand are synthesized and coupled together through a Diels-Alder cycloaddition (DA). A comparative investigation demonstrates that the composite material prepared by DA click reaction shows the highest quantum yields in the same lanthanide concentration as compared to materials prepared by widely used "directly doping" and "in situ coordinating lanthanide ions with macromolecular ligand" approaches. This work suggests that the "metal-free" DA click reaction can be a promising tool in the synthesis of high efficient lanthanide functionalized polymeric materials.

  15. Two-stage epitaxial growth of vertically-aligned SnO2 nano-rods on (001) ceria

    SciTech Connect

    Solovyov, VF; Wu, LJ; Rupich, MW; Sathyamurthy, S; Li, XP; Li, Q

    2014-12-15

    Growth of high-aspect ratio oriented tin oxide, SnO2, nano-rods is complicated by a limited choice of matching substrates. We show that a (001) cerium oxide, CeO2, surface uniquely enables epitaxial growth of tin-oxide nano-rods via a two-stage process. First, (100) oriented nano-wires coat the ceria surface by lateral growth, forming a uniaxially-textured SnO2 deposit. Second, vertical SnO2 nano-rods nucleate on the deposit by homoepitaxy. We demonstrate growth of vertically oriented 1-2 mu m long nano-rods with an average diameter of approximate to 20 nm. 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Two-stage epitaxial growth of vertically-aligned SnO2 nano-rods on(001) ceria

    DOE PAGES

    Solovyov, Vyacheslav F.; Wu, Li-jun; Rupich, Martin W.; ...

    2014-09-20

    Growth of high-aspect ratio oriented tin oxide, SnO2, nano-rods is complicated by a limited choice of matching substrates. We show that a (001) cerium oxide, CeO2, surface uniquely enables epitaxial growth of tin-oxide nano-rods via a two-stage process. First, (100) oriented nano-wires coat the ceria surface by lateral growth, forming a uniaxially-textured SnO2 deposit. Second, vertical SnO2nano-rods nucleate on the deposit by homoepitaxy. We demonstrate growth of vertically oriented 1-2 μm long nano-rods with an average diameter of ≈20 nm.

  17. Solution-Processed Hybrid Light-Emitting Devices Comprising TiO2 Nanorods and WO3 Layers as Carrier-Transporting Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Tsung-Yan; Yan, Po-Ruei; Yang, Sheng-Hsiung

    2016-11-01

    The goal of this research is to prepare inverted light-emitting devices with improved performance by combining titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanorods and tungsten trioxide (WO3) layer. TiO2 nanorods with different lengths were established directly on the fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) substrates by the hydrothermal method. The prepared TiO2 nanorods with lengths shorter than 200 nm possess transmittance higher than 80% in the visible range. Inverted light-emitting devices with the configuration of FTO/TiO2 nanorods/ionic PF/MEH-PPV/PEDOT:PSS/WO3/Au were constructed. The best device based on 100-nm-height TiO2 nanorods achieved a max brightness of 4493 cd/m2 and current efficiency of 0.66 cd/A, revealing much higher performance compared with those using TiO2 compact layer or nanorods with longer lengths as electron-transporting layers.

  18. DIAMIDE DERIVATIVES OF DIPICOLINIC ACID AS ACTINIDE AND LANTHANIDE EXTRACTANTS IN A VARIATION OF THE UNEX PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    D. R. Peterman; R. S. Herbst; J. D. Law; R. D. Tillotson; T. G. Garn; T. A. Todd; V. N. Romanovskiy; V. A. Babain; M. Yu. Alyapyshev; I. V. Smirnov

    2007-09-01

    The Universal Extraction (UNEX) process has been developed for simultaneous extraction of cesium, strontium, and actinides from acidic solutions. This process utilizes an extractant consisting of 0.08 M chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide (HCCD), 0.007-0.02 M polyethylene glycol (PEG-400), and 0.02 M diphenyl-N,N-di-n-butylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (Ph2CMPO) in the diluent trifluoromethylphenyl sulfone (CF3C6H5SO2, designated FS-13) and provides simultaneous extraction of Cs, Sr, actinides, and lanthanides from HNO3 solutions. The UNEX process is of limited utility for processing acidic solutions containing large quantities of lanthanides and/or actinides, such as dissolved spent nuclear fuel solutions. These constraints are primarily attributed to the limited concentrations of CMPO (a maximum of ~0.02 M) in the organic phase and limited solubility of the CMPO-metal complexes. As a result, alternative actinide and lanthanide extractants are being investigated for use with HCCD as an improvement for waste processing and for applications where higher concentrations of the metals are present. Our preliminary results indicate that diamide derivatives of dipicolinic acid may function as efficient actinide and lanthanide extractants. The results to be presented indicate that, of the numerous diamides studied to date, the tetrabutyldiamide of dipicolinic acid, TBDPA, shows the most promise as an alternative actinide/lanthanide extractant in the UNEX process.

  19. Polymer-grafted gold nanorods in polymer thin films: Dispersion and plasmonic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hore, Michael-Jon Ainsley

    This dissertation describes complementary experimental and theoretical studies to deter- mine the thermodynamic factors that affect the dispersion of polymer-grafted Au nanorods within polymer thin films. Au nanorods exhibit a uniform dispersion with a regular spacing for favorable brush / matrix interactions, such as poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-Au / poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and polystyrene (PS)-Au / poly(2,6-dimethyl-p-phenylene oxide) (PPO). For PEG-Au / PMMA, the nanorods are locally oriented and their dispersion is independent of the ratio of the degree of polymerization of the matrix (P) to that of the brush (N), α = P/N, whereas for chemically similar brush / matrix combinations, such as PS-Au / PS and PEG-Au / poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO), nanorods are randomly dispersed for α 2. For aggregated systems (α > 2), nanorods are found primarily within aggregates containing side-by-side aligned nanorods with a spacing that scales with N. UV-visible spectroscopy and discrete dipole approximation (DDA) calculations demonstrate that coupling between surface plasmons within the aggregates leads to a blue shift in the optical absorption as α increases, indicating the sensitivity of spectroscopy for determining nanorod dispersion in polymer nanocomposite films. Self-consistent field theory (SCFT) calculations and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations show that the aggregation of nanorods for α > 2 can be attributed to depletion-attraction forces caused by autophobic dewetting of the brush and matrix. Finally, miscible blends of PS and PPO are investigated as a route to control depletion-attraction interactions between PS-Au nanorods. Initially, nanorods aggregate in matrices having 50 vol. % PPO and then gradually disperse as PPO becomes the majority component. The brush and matrix density profiles, determined by SCFT, show that PPO segregates into the PS brush, and acts as a compatibilizer, which improves dispersion. As dispersion improves, coupling between surface

  20. Gold nanorod plasmonic upconversion microlaser.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ce; Soltani, Soheil; Armani, Andrea M

    2013-01-01

    Plasmonic-photonic interactions have stimulated significant interdisciplinary interest, leading to rapid innovations in solar design and biosensors. However, the development of an optically pumped plasmonic laser has failed to keep pace due to the difficulty of integrating a plasmonic gain material with a suitable pump source. In the present work, we develop a method for coating high quality factor toroidal optical cavities with gold nanorods, forming a photonic-plasmonic laser. By leveraging the two-photon upconversion capability of the nanorods, lasing at 581 nm with a 20 μW threshold is demonstrated.

  1. Luminogenic "clickable" lanthanide complexes for protein labeling.

    PubMed

    Candelon, Nicolas; Hădade, Niculina D; Matache, Mihaela; Canet, Jean-Louis; Cisnetti, Federico; Funeriu, Daniel P; Nauton, Lionel; Gautier, Arnaud

    2013-10-14

    Development of lanthanide-based luminescent "switch-on" systems via azide-alkyne [3+2] cycloaddition is described. We used these for non-specific protein labeling and as tags for specific and selective activity-based protein labeling.

  2. Pyrolytic synthesis and luminescence of porous lanthanide Eu-MOF.

    PubMed

    Jin, Guangya; Liu, Zhijian; Sun, Hongfa; Tian, Zhiyong

    2016-02-01

    A lanthanide metal coordination polymer [Eu2(BDC)3(DMSO)(H2O)] was synthesized by the reaction of europium oxide with benzene-1,3-dicarboxylic acid (H2BDC) in a mixed solution of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and water under hydrothermal conditions. The crystal structure of Eu2(BDC)3(DMSO)(H2O) was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Thermo-gravimetric analysis of Eu2(BDC)3(DMSO)(H2O) indicated that coordinated DMSO and H2O molecules could be removed to create Eu2(BDC)3(DMSO)(H2O)-py with permanent microporosity, which was also verified by powder XRD (PXRD) and elemental analysis. Both Eu2(BDC)3(DMSO)(H2O) and Eu2(BDC)3(DMSO)(H2O)-py showed mainly Eu-based luminescence and had characteristic emissions in the range 550-700 nm.

  3. Biological and Clinical Aspects of Lanthanide Coordination Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Sudhindra N.; M., Indira Devi; Shukla, Ram S.

    2004-01-01

    The coordinating chemistry of lanthanides, relevant to the biological, biochemical and medical aspects, makes a significant contribution to understanding the basis of application of lanthanides, particularly in biological and medical systems. The importance of the applications of lanthanides, as an excellent diagnostic and prognostic probe in clinical diagnostics, and an anticancer material, is remarkably increasing. Lanthanide complexes based X-ray contrast imaging and lanthanide chelates based contrast enhancing agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are being excessively used in radiological analysis in our body systems. The most important property of the chelating agents, in lanthanide chelate complex, is its ability to alter the behaviour of lanthanide ion with which it binds in biological systems, and the chelation markedly modifies the biodistribution and excretion profile of the lanthanide ions. The chelating agents, especially aminopoly carboxylic acids, being hydrophilic, increase the proportion of their complex excreted from complexed lanthanide ion form biological systems. Lanthanide polyamino carboxylate-chelate complexes are used as contrast enhancing agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Conjugation of antibodies and other tissue specific molecules to lanthanide chelates has led to a new type of specific MRI contrast agents and their conjugated MRI contrast agents with improved relaxivity, functioning in the body similar to drugs. Many specific features of contrast agent assisted MRI make it particularly effective for musculoskeletal and cerebrospinal imaging. Lanthanide-chelate contrast agents are effectively used in clinical diagnostic investigations involving cerebrospinal diseases and in evaluation of central nervous system. Chelated lanthanide complexes shift reagent aided 23Na NMR spectroscopic analysis is used in cellular, tissue and whole organ systems. PMID:18365075

  4. X-ray spectral diagnostics of synthetic lanthanide silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravtsova, A. N.; Guda, A. A.; Soldatov, A. V.; Goettlicher, J.; Taroev, V. K.; Kashaev, A. A.; Suvorova, L. F.; Tauson, V. L.

    2015-12-01

    Potassium and rare-earth (Eu, Sm, Yb, Ce) silicate and aluminosilicate crystals are hydrothermally synthesized under isothermal conditions at 500°C and a pressure of 100 MPa. The chemical and structural formulas of the synthesized compounds HK6Eu[Si10O25], K7Sm3[Si12O32], K2Sm[AlSi4O12] · 0.375H2O, K4Yb2[Si8O21], and K4Ce2[Al2Si8O24] are determined. In addition, a synthesis product with Eu, in which the dominant phase is assumed to be K3Eu3+[Si6O15] · 2H2O, is studied. The oxidation state of lanthanides in the silicates under study is determined based on X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy. The Eu L 3-, Sm L 3-, Yb L 3-, and Ce L 3-edge X-ray absorption spectra of the studied silicates and reference samples are recorded using a Rigaku R-XAS laboratory spectrometer. As reference samples, Eu2+S, Eu3+F3, Eu 2 3+ O3, Sm 2 3+ O3, Yb 2 3+ O3, Yb3+F3, Yb3+Cl3, Ce 2 3+ O3, and Ce4+O2 are used. Comparison of the absorption edge energies of lanthanide silicates and reference samples shows that Eu, Sm, Yb, and Ce in all the samples studied are in the oxidation state 3+. The synthesized silicates will supplement our knowledge of possible rare-earth minerals existing in hydrothermal systems, which is important for analyzing the distribution spectra of rare elements, which are widely used for diagnostics of geochemical processes and determination of sources of ore materials.

  5. Hydrothermal synthesis of highly crystalline ZnO nanorod arrays: Dependence of morphology and alignment on growth conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzez, Shrook A.; Hassan, Z.; Hassan, J. J.; Alimanesh, M.; Rasheed, Hiba S.; Sabah, Fayroz A.; Abdulateef, Sinan A.

    2016-07-01

    Highly oriented zinc oxide nanorod were successfully grown on seeded p-type silicone substrate by hydrothermal methode. The morphology and the crystallinty of ZnO c-axis (002) arrays were systematically studied using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) methods. The effect of seed layer pre-annealing on nanorods properties was explained according to the nucleation site of ZnO nanoparticles on silicon substrate. In addition, the variation of the equal molarity of zinc nitrate hexahydrate and hexamine concentrations in the reaction vessel play a crucial role related to the ZnO nanorods.

  6. Charge Transfer Dynamics in Complexes of Light-Absorbing CdS Nanorods and Redox Catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilker, Molly Bea

    The use of photoexcited electrons and holes in semiconductor nanocrystals as reduction and oxidation reagents is an intriguing way of harvesting photon energy to drive chemical reactions. This dissertation describes research efforts to understand the photoexcited charge transfer kinetics in complexes of colloidal CdS nanorods coupled with either a water oxidation or reduction catalyst. The first project focuses on the charge transfer interactions between photoexcited CdS nanorods and a mononuclear water oxidation catalyst derived from the [Ru(bpy)(tpy)Cl]+ parent structure. The second project details the electron transfer kinetics in complexes of CdS nanorods coupled with [FeFe]-hydrogenase, which catalyzes H+ reduction. These complexes photochemically produce H2 with quantum yields of up to 20%. Kinetics of electron transfer from CdS nanorods to hydrogenase play a critical role in the overall photochemical reactivity, as the quantum efficiency of electron transfer defines the upper limit on the quantum yield of H 2 generation. Insights from these time-resolved spectroscopic studies are used to discuss the intricate kinetic pathways involved in photochemical H2 generation and the mechanism for electron transfer from photoexcited nanorods to hydrogenase in photocatalytic complexes.

  7. Structural and chemical characterization of BaTiO{sub 3} nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Zagar, K.; Recnik, A.; Sturm, S.; Gajovic, A.; Ceh, M.

    2011-03-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Polycrystalline BaTiO{sub 3} nanorods were synthesized with EPD into AAO templates. {yields} Nanorods are composed of crystalline, nanosized grains with pseudo-cubic structure. {yields} Integrowth of hexagonal BaTiO{sub 3} polymorph within pseudo-cubic structure was observed. -- Abstract: An electron-microscopy investigation was performed on BaTiO{sub 3} nanorods that were processed by sol-gel electrophoretic deposition (EPD) into anodic aluminium oxide (AAO) membranes. The BaTiO{sub 3} nanorods grown within the template membranes had diameters ranging from 150 to 200 nm, with an average length of 10-50 {mu}m. By using various electron-microscopy techniques we showed that the processed BaTiO{sub 3} nanorods were homogeneous in their chemical composition. The BaTiO{sub 3} nanorods were always polycrystalline and were composed of well-crystallized, defect-free, pseudo-cubic BaTiO{sub 3} grains, ranging from 10 to 30 nm. No intergranular phases were observed between the BaTiO{sub 3} grains. A low-temperature hexagonal polymorph that is coherently intergrown with the BaTiO{sub 3} perovskite matrix was also observed as a minor phase. When annealing the AAO templates containing the BaTiO{sub 3} sol in an oxygen atmosphere the presence of the hexagonal polymorph was diminished.

  8. Solvothermal preparation of phthalocyanine nanorod/rGO composites and their application to visible-light-responsive photocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuai; Lu, Yongting; Zhang, Fan; Qu, Jie; Lin, Bencai; Yuan, Ningyi; Fang, Bijun; Ding, Jian-Ning

    2016-09-01

    Phthalocyanine (Pc) nanorod/reduced graphene oxide (rGO) composites were prepared by a simple solvothermal method, in which Pc nanosheet and graphene oxide (GO) suspensions were mixed in methanol. As characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and selected area electron diffraction, Pc nanorods with an amorphous structure and an average diameter of 250nm are partially covered by rGO sheets. In the photodegradation experiments, all the composites with different rGO content show enhanced photocatalytic activity for Rhodamine B decomposition under visible-light compared to pure Pc nanorods or rGO sheets. The enhanced photocatalytic activity shall be ascribed to the large surface area offered by rGO and the charge-transfer from Pc to rGO as indicated by the photoluminescence measurement, in which fluorescence intensity of the composites is much weaker than that of Pc nanorods.

  9. Solvothermal Preparation of ZnO Nanorods as Anode Material for Improved Cycle Life Zn/AgO Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, Shafiq; Ahmed, Fiaz; Badshah, Amin; Ali Altaf, Ataf; Raza, Ramsha; Lal, Bhajan; Hussain, Rizwan

    2013-01-01

    Nano materials with high surface area increase the kinetics and extent of the redox reactions, thus resulting in high power and energy densities. In this study high surface area zinc oxide nanorods have been synthesized by surfactant free ethylene glycol assisted solvothermal method. The nanorods thus prepared have diameters in the submicron range (300∼500 nm) with high aspect ratio. They have uniform geometry and well aligned direction. These nanorods are characterized by XRD, SEM, Specific Surface Area Analysis, solubility in alkaline medium, EDX analysis and galvanostatic charge/discharge studies in Zn/AgO batteries. The prepared zinc oxide nanorods have low solubility in alkaline medium with higher structural stability, which imparts the improved cycle life stability to Zn/AgO cells. PMID:24146807

  10. Solvothermal preparation of ZnO nanorods as anode material for improved cycle life Zn/AgO batteries.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Shafiq; Ahmed, Fiaz; Badshah, Amin; Ali Altaf, Ataf; Raza, Ramsha; Lal, Bhajan; Hussain, Rizwan

    2013-01-01

    Nano materials with high surface area increase the kinetics and extent of the redox reactions, thus resulting in high power and energy densities. In this study high surface area zinc oxide nanorods have been synthesized by surfactant free ethylene glycol assisted solvothermal method. The nanorods thus prepared have diameters in the submicron range (300 ~ 500 nm) with high aspect ratio. They have uniform geometry and well aligned direction. These nanorods are characterized by XRD, SEM, Specific Surface Area Analysis, solubility in alkaline medium, EDX analysis and galvanostatic charge/discharge studies in Zn/AgO batteries. The prepared zinc oxide nanorods have low solubility in alkaline medium with higher structural stability, which imparts the improved cycle life stability to Zn/AgO cells.

  11. In situ fabrication and characterization of cobalt ferrite nanorods/graphene composites

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Min; Jiao, Qingze; Zhao, Yun

    2013-12-15

    Cobalt ferrite nanorods/graphene composites were prepared by a one-step hydrothermal process using NaHSO{sub 3} as the reducing agent and 1-propyl-3-hexadecylimidazolium bromide as the structure growth-directing template. The reduction of graphene oxide and the in situ formation of cobalt ferrite nanorods were accomplished in a one-step reaction. The structure and morphology of as-obtained composites were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscope, X-ray diffractometer, Fourier transform infrared spectra, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Uniform rod-like cobalt ferrites with diameters of about 100 nm and length of about 800 nm were homogeneously distributed on the graphene sheets. The hybrid materials showed a saturation magnetization of 42.5 emu/g and coercivity of 495.1 Oe at room temperature. The electromagnetic parameters were measured using a vector network analyzer. A minimum reflection loss (RL) of − 25.8 dB was observed at 16.1 GHz for the cobalt ferrite nanorods/graphene composites with a thickness of 2 mm, and the effective absorption frequency (RL < − 10 dB) ranged from 13.5 to 18.0 GHz. The composites exhibited better absorbing properties than the cobalt ferrite nanorods and the mixture of cobalt ferrite nanorods and graphene. - Highlights: • Reduction of GO and formation of ferrites were accomplished in a one-step reaction. • Ionic liquid was used to control 1D growth of ferrite nanorods for the first time. • Cobalt ferrite nanorods/graphene composites showed dielectric and magnetic loss. • Cobalt ferrite nanorods/graphene composites exhibited better absorbing properties.

  12. Novel Biomimatic Synthesis of ZnO Nanorods Using Egg White (Albumen) and Their Antibacterial Studies.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Faheem; Arshi, Nishat; Jeong, Yeong Seung; Anwar, M S; Dwivedi, Saurabh; Alsharaeh, Edreese; Koo, B H

    2016-06-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is well-recognized as a biocompatible multifunctional material with outstanding properties as well as low toxicity and biodegradability. In this work, a simple and versatile technique was developed to prepare highly crystalline ZnO nanorods by introducing egg white to a bio-inspired approach. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern results indicated that the ZnO nanorods have single phase nature with the wurtzite structure. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results showed the nanometer dimension of the nanorods. Raman, FTIR, and TGA/DTA analyses revealed the formation of wurtzite ZnO. The antibacterial properties of ZnO nanorods were investigated using both Gram-positive and Gram-negative microorganisms. These studies demonstrate that ZnO nanorods have a wide range of antibacterial activities toward various microorganisms that are commonly found in environmental settings. Survival ratio of bacteria decreased with increasing powder concentration, i.e., increase in antibacterial activity. The antibacterial activity of the ZnO nanorods toward Pseudomonas aeruginosa was stronger than that of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Surprisingly, the antibacterial activity did not require specific UV activation using artificial lamps, rather activation was achieved under ambient lighting conditions. Overall, the experimental results suggest that ZnO nanorods could be developed as antibacterial agents against a wide range of microorganisms to control and prevent the spreading and persistence of bacterial infections. This research introduces a new concept to synthesize ZnO nanorods by using egg white as a biological template for various applications including food science, animal science, biochemistry, microbiology and medicine.

  13. Enhanced Optical Absorption Induced by Dense Nanocavities Inside Titania Nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Han,W.; Wu, L.; Klie, R.; Zhu, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Titania, a wide band gap semiconductor, can generate powerful oxidants and reductants by absorbing photon energies. Titania has been extensively used in photoelectrochemical systems, such as dye-sensitized titania, a wide band gap semiconductor, can generate powerful oxidants and reductants by absorbing photon energies. To improve the photoreactivity of titania, several approaches, including doping and metal loading have been proposed. Nanocavities are isolated entities inside a solid and hence are very different from nanoporous, whose pores (often amorphous and irregular) connect together and open to the surface. Dense polyhedral nanocavities inside single-crystalline anatase titania nanorods were successfully synthesized by simply heating titanate nanorods. The size of the nanocavities is typically about 10 nm. The surfaces of the nanocavity polyhedron are determined to be the crystallographic low-index planes of the titania crystal. We found that these dense nanocavities significantly enhance the optical absorption coefficient of titania in the near-ultraviolet region, thereby providing a new approach to increasing the photoreactivity of the titania nanorods in the applications related to absorbing photons.

  14. Copper nanorod array assisted silicon waveguide polarization beam splitter.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangsik; Qi, Minghao

    2014-04-21

    We present the design of a three-dimensional (3D) polarization beam splitter (PBS) with a copper nanorod array placed between two silicon waveguides. The localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of a metal nanorod array selectively cross-couples transverse electric (TE) mode to the coupler waveguide, while transverse magnetic (TM) mode passes through the original input waveguide without coupling. An ultra-compact and broadband PBS compared to all-dielectric devices is achieved with the LSPR. The output ports of waveguides are designed to support either TM or TE mode only to enhance the extinction ratios. Compared to silver, copper is fully compatible with complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology.

  15. Copper nanorod array assisted silicon waveguide polarization beam splitter

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sangsik; Qi, Minghao

    2014-01-01

    We present the design of a three-dimensional (3D) polarization beam splitter (PBS) with a copper nanorod array placed between two silicon waveguides. The localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of a metal nanorod array selectively cross-couples transverse electric (TE) mode to the coupler waveguide, while transverse magnetic (TM) mode passes through the original input waveguide without coupling. An ultra-compact and broadband PBS compared to all-dielectric devices is achieved with the LSPR. The output ports of waveguides are designed to support either TM or TE mode only to enhance the extinction ratios. Compared to silver, copper is fully compatible with complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology. PMID:24787839

  16. Electrodeposition of Pd Nanowires and Nanorods on Carbon Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Bliznakov, S.; Vukmirovic, M.; Sutter, E.; Adzic, R.

    2011-06-01

    We report on the method for synthesizing palladium nanowires and nanorods involving the electrodeposition on oxidized amorphous carbon nanoparticles from chloride containing solutions. The effect of the deposition overpotential and the concentration of palladium ions on the morphology of the Pd electrodeposits have been established. Palladium grows predominately in the shape of nanowires if electrodeposited at potentials in the H underpotential deposition potential (UPD) range, where chloride ions are adsorbed only at the edges of nucleated monolayer-thick clusters on the carbon surface. The effect of the concentration of palladium ions on deposits morphology is also discussed. The mechanism of electrodeposition of Pd nanowires and nanorods in the H UPD potential range has been proposed.

  17. Synthesis and luminescence properties of hybrid organic-inorganic transparent titania thin film activated by in-situ formed lanthanide complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yige; Wang Li; Li Huanrong Liu Peng; Qin Dashan; Liu Binyuan; Zhang Wenjun; Deng Ruiping; Zhang Hongjie

    2008-03-15

    Stable transparent titania thin films were fabricated at room temperature by combining thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA)-modified titanium precursors with amphiphilic triblock poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO-PPO-PEO, P123) copolymers. The obtained transparent titania thin films were systematically investigated by IR spectroscopy, PL emission and excitation spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. IR spectroscopy indicates that TTFA coordinates the titanium center during the process of hydrolysis and condensation. Luminescence spectroscopy confirms the in-situ formation of lanthanide complexes in the transparent titania thin film. TEM image shows that the in-situ formed lanthanide complexes were homogeneously distributed throughout the whole thin film. The quantum yield and the number of water coordinated to lanthanide metal center have been theoretically determined based on the luminescence data. - Graphical abstract: Novel stable luminescent organic-inorganic hybrid titania thin film with high transparency activated by in-situ formed lanthanide complexes have been obtained at room temperature via a simple one-pot synthesis approach by using TTFA-modified titanium precursor with amphiphilic triblock copolymer P123. The obtained hybrid thin film displays bright red (or green), near-monochromatic luminescence due to the in-situ formed lanthanide complex.

  18. Enhanced dual contrast agent, Co(2+)-doped NaYF4:Yb(3+),Tm(3+) nanorods, for near infrared-to-near infrared upconversion luminescence and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ao; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Jun; Deng, Yunyun; Chen, Qiang; Wu, Shishan; Huang, Xiaohua; Shen, Jian

    2014-11-01

    Dual-modality imaging with magnetic resonance (MR) and upconversion luminescence (UCL) is a promising technique for molecular imaging in biomedical research. Multifunctional lanthanide-based nanoparticles have been widely investigated as agents for contrast enhanced MR and fluorescence imaging. However, the use of rare earth fluoride nanoparticles for dual-modality imaging of T2-weighted MR and UCL is rarely reported. We find that NaYF4:Yb(3+),Tm(3+),Co(2+) (MUC) nanorods can be applied as a high-performance dual contrast agent for both T2-weighted MR and UCL dual-modality imaging. After modification with 6-O-carboxymethyl chitosan (OCC), MUC nanorods can be endocytosed by cells without showing signs of cytotoxicity. High-quality UCL images of living cells incubated with MUC-OCC nanorods were acquired on a near-infrared (NIR) confocal microscopy under the excitation at 980 nm. Moreover, MUC-OCC nanorods display high transverse (r2) relaxivities in vitro. The application of low-dose MUC-OCC nanorods for NIR-to-NIR UCL and MR dual-modality in vivo imaging was also carried out successfully. In addition, the toxicity of MUC-OCC nanorods was evaluated by MTT assay, serological tests and histological analysis of visceral organs.

  19. Experimental Findings On Minor Actinide And Lanthanide Separations Using Ion Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D. T.; Shehee, T. C.; Clearfield, A.

    2013-09-17

    This project seeks to determine if inorganic or hybrid inorganic ion-exchange materials can be exploited to provide effective americium and curium separations. Specifically, we seek to understand the fundamental structural and chemical factors responsible for the selectivity of the tested ion-exchange materials for actinide and lanthanide ions. During FY13, experimental work focused in the following areas: (1) investigating methods to oxidize americium in dilute nitric acid with subsequent ion-exchange performance measurements of ion exchangers with the oxidized americium and (2) synthesis, characterization and testing of ion-exchange materials. Ion-exchange materials tested included alkali titanates, alkali titanosilicates, carbon nanotubes and group(IV) metal phosphonates. Americium oxidation testing sought to determine the influence that other redox active components may have on the oxidation of Am(III). Experimental findings indicated that Pu(IV) is oxidized to Pu(VI) by peroxydisulfate, but there are no indications that the presence of plutonium affects the rate or extent of americium oxidation at the concentrations of peroxydisulfate being used. Tests also explored the influence of nitrite on the oxidation of Am(III). Given the formation of Am(V) and Am(VI) in the presence of nitrite, it appears that nitrite is not a strong deterrent to the oxidation of Am(III), but may be limiting Am(VI) by quickly reducing Am(VI) to Am(V). Interestingly, additional absorbance peaks were observed in the UV-Vis spectra at 524 and 544 nm in both nitric acid and perchloric acid solutions when the peroxydisulfate was added as a solution. These peaks have not been previously observed and do not correspond to the expected peak locations for oxidized americium in solution. Additional studies are in progress to identify these unknown peaks. Three titanosilicate ion exchangers were synthesized using a microwave-accelerated reaction system (MARS) and determined to have high affinities

  20. Lanthanide doped strontium-barium cesium halide scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Bizarri, Gregory; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Borade, Ramesh B.; Gundiah, Gautam; Yan, Zewu; Hanrahan, Stephen M.; Chaudhry, Anurag; Canning, Andrew

    2015-06-09

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising an optionally lanthanide-doped strontium-barium, optionally cesium, halide, useful for detecting nuclear material.

  1. Strong Exchange Coupling Between the Lanthanide Ions and Phthalocyaniato Ligand Radical in Bis(phthalocyaninato)Lanthanide Sandwich Compounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-06

    trstonQeai n Report ~1 ,fero 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Strong Exchange Coupling Between the Lanthanide Ions and Phthalocyaniato Ligand...Radical in N00014-92-J-1637 Bis(phthalocyaninato) lanthanide Sandwich Compoun s 6. AUTHOR(S) Kathleen L. Trojan, Jonathan L. Kendall, Keith Kepler and...200 words) A series of lanthanide phthalocyanine sandwich compounds with the formula [ (Pc 2")Ln 1 (Pc ’ ) ] have been synthesized and characterized

  2. Lanthanide Enhanced Luminescence (LEL) with One and Two Photon Excitation of Quantum Dyes(copyright) Lanthanide(III)-Macrocycles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    Quagliano, and L. M. Vallarino, The Addition of a Second Lanthanide Ion to Increase the Luminescence of Europium(IIl) Macrocyclic Complexes ...Increasing the Luminescence of Lanthanide (III) Macrocyclic Complexes , 2002, and United States Patent Application 20020132992, September 19, 2002. 3. J...R. Quagliano, R. C. Leif, L. M. Vallarino, and S. A. Williams, Methods to Increase the Luminescence of Lanthanide (III) Macrocyclic Complexes , Optical

  3. Lanthanide-halide based humidity indicators

    DOEpatents

    Beitz, James V.; Williams, Clayton W.

    2008-01-01

    The present invention discloses a lanthanide-halide based humidity indicator and method of producing such indicator. The color of the present invention indicates the humidity of an atmosphere to which it is exposed. For example, impregnating an adsorbent support such as silica gel with an aqueous solution of the europium-containing reagent solution described herein, and dehydrating the support to dryness forms a substance with a yellow color. When this substance is exposed to a humid atmosphere the water vapor from the air is adsorbed into the coating on the pore surface of the silica gel. As the water content of the coating increases, the visual color of the coated silica gel changes from yellow to white. The color change is due to the water combining with the lanthanide-halide complex on the pores of the gel.

  4. The Actinide-Lanthanide Separation Process

    SciTech Connect

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Gelis, Artem V.; Carter, Jennifer C.; Niver, Cynthia M.; Smoot, Margaret R.

    2014-02-21

    The Actinide-Lanthanide SEParation (ALSEP) process is described. The process uses an extractant phase consisting of either N,N,N',N'-tetraoctyldiglycolamide (TODGA) or N,N,N',N'-tetra(2 ethylhexyl)diglycolamide (T2EHDGA) combined with 2-ethylhexylphosphonic acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester (HEH[EHP]). The neutral TODGA or T2EHDGA serves to co-extract the trivalent actinide and lanthanide ions from nitric acid media. Switching the aqueous phase chemistry to a citrate buffered diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) solution at pH 2.5 to 4 results in selective transfer of the actinides to the aqueous phase, thus resulting in separation of these two groups of elements.

  5. Giant exchange interaction in mixed lanthanides

    PubMed Central

    Vieru, Veacheslav; Iwahara, Naoya; Ungur, Liviu; Chibotaru, Liviu F.

    2016-01-01

    Combining strong magnetic anisotropy with strong exchange interaction is a long standing goal in the design of quantum magnets. The lanthanide complexes, while exhibiting a very strong ionic anisotropy, usually display a weak exchange coupling, amounting to only a few wavenumbers. Recently, an isostructural series of mixed (Ln = Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er) have been reported, in which the exchange splitting is estimated to reach hundreds wavenumbers. The microscopic mechanism governing the unusual exchange interaction in these compounds is revealed here by combining detailed modeling with density-functional theory and ab initio calculations. We find it to be basically kinetic and highly complex, involving non-negligible contributions up to seventh power of total angular momentum of each lanthanide site. The performed analysis also elucidates the origin of magnetization blocking in these compounds. Contrary to general expectations the latter is not always favored by strong exchange interaction. PMID:27087470

  6. Synthesis of Ag-Mn3O4 core-shell nanorods and Mn3O4 nanotubes from sacrificial Ag nanorod templates.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hyunbae; Koh, Eoi Kwan; Lee, Sang-Yup

    2009-11-01

    Our research focuses on the preparation of Ag-Mn3O4 core-shell nanorods and Mn3O4 nanotubes which have various engineering applications. Hausmannite manganese oxide (Mn3O4) nanotubes were synthesized via a galvanic replacement reaction at mild reaction conditions. The Mn3O4 nanotubes were prepared by solidification of manganese ions on a sacrificial silver nanorod due to the standard reduction potential difference between solid silver and manganese ions. The Mn ions were reduced to solid while the solid Ag rod was oxidized to ions. Ag-Mn3O4 core-shell nanorods and Mn3O4 nanotubes were simply prepared by changing the amount of manganese ions. The Mn3O4 layer in the nanorods and nanotubes had a Hausmannite crystalline structure and showed weak hysteresis of magnetism. This weak magnetism is likely due to the diamagnetic property of silver and multiple magnetic domain of Mn3O4. This simple replacement reaction could be applied to various oxide nanotube fabrications with exact shape control.

  7. Multifunctional particles: Magnetic nanocrystals and gold nanorods coated with fluorescent dye-doped silica shells

    SciTech Connect

    Heitsch, Andrew T.; Smith, Danielle K.; Patel, Reken N.; Ress, David; Korgel, Brian A.

    2008-07-15

    Multifunctional colloidal core-shell nanoparticles of magnetic nanocrystals (of iron oxide or FePt) or gold nanorods encapsulated in silica shells doped with the fluorescent dye, Tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)dichlororuthenium(II) hexahydrate (Rubpy) were synthesized. The as-prepared magnetic nanocrystals are initially hydrophobic and were coated with silica using a microemulsion approach, while the as-prepared gold nanorods are hydrophilic and were coated with silica using a Stoeber type of process. Each approach yielded monodisperse nanoparticles with uniform fluorescent dye-doped silica shells. These colloidal heterostructures have the potential to be used as dual-purpose tags-exhibiting a fluorescent signal that could be combined with either dark-field optical contrast (in the case of the gold nanorods), or enhanced contrast in magnetic resonance images (in the case of magnetic nanocrystal cores). The optical and magnetic properties of the fluorescent silica-coated gold nanorods and magnetic nanocrystals are reported. - Graphical abstract: Colloidal gold nanorods and iron platinum and iron oxide nanocrystals were encapsulated with fluorescent dye-doped silica shells using a generic coating strategy. These heterostructures are promising contrast agents for dual-mode medical imaging. Their optical and magnetic properties were studied and are reported here.

  8. Graded core/shell semiconductor nanorods and nanorod barcodes

    DOEpatents

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Scher, Erik C.; Manna, Liberato

    2009-05-19

    Disclosed herein is a graded core/shell semiconductor nanorod having at least a first segment of a core of a Group II-VI, Group III-V or a Group IV semiconductor, a graded shell overlying the core, wherein the graded shell comprises at least two monolayers, wherein the at least two monolayers each independently comprise a Group II-VI, Group III-V or a Group IV semiconductor.

  9. Rapid fluorophosphate nerve agent detection with lanthanides.

    PubMed

    Menzel, E Roland; Menzel, Laird W; Schwierking, Jake R

    2005-08-15

    We explore the detection of vapors of diisopropylfluorophosphate, a model compound for nerve agents such as Sarin, by means of photoluminescence quenching of filter paper impregnated with sensitized complexes of lanthanides, involving thenoyltrifluoroacetone and 1,10-phenanthroline as sensitizing ligands. We find that the presence of the fluorophosphate vapor is detectable in as little as 2s, by simple visual observation under illumination with a hand-held low intensity ultraviolet lamp.

  10. Hexaaza macrocyclic complexes of the lanthanides

    SciTech Connect

    De Cola, L.; Smailes, D.L.; Vallarino, L.M.

    1986-05-07

    The authors systematically investigate the conditions leading to the metal-templated macrocyclic synthesis and obtain by an appropriate combination of counterions and experimental conditions, two series of complexes of the macrocyclic ligand L = C/sub 22/H/sub 26/N/sub 6/, with every lanthanide(III) ion except radioactive Pm. Their synthesis, characterization, and properties are described here. 13 references, 2 figures.

  11. Morphological and structural characterization of single-crystal ZnO nanorod arrays on flexible and non-flexible substrates.

    PubMed

    Farhat, Omar F; Halim, Mohd M; Abdullah, Mat J; Ali, Mohammed K M; Allam, Nageh K

    2015-01-01

    We report a facile synthesis of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorod arrays using an optimized, chemical bath deposition method on glass, PET and Si substrates. The morphological and structural properties of the ZnO nanorod arrays were investigated using various techniques such as field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, which revealed the formation of dense ZnO nanorods with a single crystal, hexagonal wurtzite structure. The aspect ratio of the single-crystal ZnO nanorods and the growth rate along the (002) direction was found to be sensitive to the substrate type. The lattice constants and the crystallite size of the fabricated ZnO nanorods were calculated based on the XRD data. The obtained results revealed that the increase in the crystallite size is strongly associated with the growth conditions with a minor dependence on the type of substrate. The Raman spectroscopy measurements confirmed the existence of a compressive stress in the fabricated ZnO nanorods. The obtained results illustrated that the growth of high quality, single-crystal ZnO nanorods can be realized by adjusting the synthesis conditions.

  12. Comparative study of photocatalytic activities of hydrothermally grown ZnO nanorod on Si(001) wafer and FTO glass substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Eun Hee; Yang, Sena; Kim, Yeonwoo; Kim, Namdong; Shin, Hyun-Joon; Baik, Jaeyoon; Kim, Hyun Sung; Lee, Hangil

    2015-09-01

    ZnO nanorods have been grown on Si(001) wafer and fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) glass substrates for 1 and 4 h with the hydrothermal methods. The morphologies and photocatalytic activities of the ZnO nanorods were found to depend on the substrates. We investigated their properties by using spectroscopic analysis and demonstrated that the shape of nanorod and the ratios of external defects can be controlled by varying the substrates. Our experiments revealed that the nanorods grown on Si(001) have a single-crystalline wurtzite structure with (002) facets and that the number of surface oxygen defects increases with their length as the growth time increases. The nanorods grown on Si(001) have different facets, in particular wider (002) facets, and a higher ratio of the oxygen defect than the nanorods on FTO glass substrate. Moreover, the photocatalytic activities with respect to 2-aminothiophenol (2-ATP) of these nanorods were investigated with high-resolution photoemission spectroscopy (HRPES). We demonstrated that their photocatalytic activity is influenced by the ratios of surface oxygen defects, which varies with the substrate surface.

  13. Characterization and adsorption performance of Pb(II) on CuO nanorods synthesized by the hydrothermal method

    SciTech Connect

    Arfaoui, Lobna; Kouass, Salah; Dhaouadi, Hassouna; Jebali, Raouf; Touati, Fathi

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The nanorods of CuO were synthesized by a hydrothermal route without any surfactant. • X-ray diffraction showed monoclinic structure with space group C{sub 2/c}. • The nanorods show relatively high adsorption capacity for the removal of Pb(II). • The adsorption kinetics could be fitted well by the pseudo-second-order model. • The equilibrium data can be fitted well using the Langmuir isotherm model - Abstract: Copper oxide (CuO) nanorods were synthesized by hydrothermal method. The detailed structural, compositional and optical characterization of this material was also evaluated with XRD, FT-IR, EDS, and UV–vis spectroscopy, which confirmed that the obtained nanorods are well-crystallized CuO and possess good optical properties. SEM and TEM studies revealed that the as-synthesized CuO nanorods are uniform with an average diameter of 17 nm. The adsorption activity of the CuO nanostructures was studied. The adsorption results showed that the CuO nanorods are an effective and efficient adsorbent for the removal of Pb(II) ions. The influence of various operational parameters such as the pH of the solution, the contact time and the initial concentrations were also studied and the results were discussed. The estimated maximum lead ion adsorption capacity of the CuO nanorods was found to be 188.67 mg g{sup −1} at an optimum pH of 6.

  14. Switchable sensitizers stepwise lighting up lanthanide emissions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Jiao, Peng-Chong; Xu, Hai-Bing; Tang, Ming-Jing; Yang, Xiao-Ping; Huang, Shaoming; Deng, Jian-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Analagous to a long-ranged rocket equipped with multi-stage engines, a luminescent compound with consistent emission signals across a large range of concentrations from two stages of sensitizers can be designed. In this approach, ACQ, aggregation-caused quenching effect of sensitizers, would stimulate lanthanide emission below 10−4 M, and then at concentrations higher than 10−3 M, the “aggregation-induced emission” (AIE) effect of luminophores would be activated with the next set of sensitizers for lanthanide emission. Simultaneously, the concentration of the molecules could be monitored digitally by the maximal excitation wavelengths, due to the good linear relationship between the maximal excitation wavelengths and the concentrations {lg(M)}. This model, wherein molecules are assembled with two stages (both AIE and ACQ effect) of sensitizers, may provide a practicable strategy for design and construction of smart lanthanide bioprobes, which are suitable in complicated bioassay systems in which concentration is variable. PMID:25791467

  15. Actinide and lanthanide separation process (ALSEP)

    DOEpatents

    Guelis, Artem V.

    2013-01-15

    The process of the invention is the separation of minor actinides from lanthanides in a fluid mixture comprising, fission products, lanthanides, minor actinides, rare earth elements, nitric acid and water by addition of an organic chelating aid to the fluid; extracting the fluid with a solvent comprising a first extractant, a second extractant and an organic diluent to form an organic extractant stream and an aqueous raffinate. Scrubbing the organic stream with a dicarboxylic acid and a chelating agent to form a scrubber discharge. The scrubber discharge is stripped with a simple buffering agent and a second chelating agent in the pH range of 2.5 to 6.1 to produce actinide and lanthanide streams and spent organic diluents. The first extractant is selected from bis(2-ethylhexyl)hydrogen phosphate (HDEHP) and mono(2-ethylhexyl)2-ethylhexyl phosphonate (HEH(EHP)) and the second extractant is selected from N,N,N,N-tetra-2-ethylhexyl diglycol amide (TEHDGA) and N,N,N',N'-tetraoctyl-3-oxapentanediamide (TODGA).

  16. Nanometrization of Lanthanide-Based Coordination Polymers.

    PubMed

    Neaime, Chrystelle; Daiguebonne, Carole; Calvez, Guillaume; Freslon, Stéphane; Bernot, Kevin; Grasset, Fabien; Cordier, Stéphane; Guillou, Olivier

    2015-11-23

    Heteronuclear lanthanide-based coordination polymers are microcrystalline powders, the luminescence properties of which can be precisely tuned by judicious choice of the rare-earth ions. In this study, we demonstrate that such materials can also be obtained as stable solutions of nanoparticles in non-toxic polyols. Bulk powders of the formula [Ln2-2x Ln'2x (bdc)3 ⋅4 H2 O]∞ (where H2 bdc denotes 1,4-benzene-dicarboxylic acid, 0≤x≤1, and Ln and Ln' denote lanthanide ions of the series La to Tm plus Y) afford nanoparticles that have been characterized by dynamic light-scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements. Their luminescence properties are similar to those of the bulk materials. Stabilities versus time and versus dilution with another solvent have been studied. This study has revealed that it is possible to tune the size of the nanoparticles. This process offers a reliable means of synthesizing suspensions of nanoparticles with tunable luminescence properties and tunable size distributions in a green solvent (glycerol). The process is also extendable to other coordination polymers and other solvents (ethylene glycol, for example). It constitutes a new route for the facile solubilization of lanthanide-based coordination polymers.

  17. Acidic 1,3-propanediaminetetraacetato lanthanides with luminescent and catalytic ester hydrolysis properties

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Mao-Long; Shi, Yan-Ru; Yang, Yu-Chen; Zhou, Zhao-Hui

    2014-11-15

    In acidic solution, a serials of water-soluble coordination polymers (CPs) were isolated as zonal 1D-CPs 1,3-propanediaminetetraacetato lanthanides [Ln(1,3-H{sub 3}pdta)(H{sub 2}O){sub 5}]{sub n}·2Cl{sub n}·3nH{sub 2}O [Ln=La, 1; Ce, 2; Pr, 3; Nd, 4; Sm, 5] (1,3-H{sub 4}pdta=1,3-propanediaminetetraacetic acid, C{sub 11}H{sub 18}N{sub 2}O{sub 8}) in high yields. When 1 eq. mol potassium hydroxide was added to the solutions of 1D-CPs, respectively, two 1D-CPs [Ln(1,3-H{sub 2}pdta)(H{sub 2}O){sub 3}]{sub n}·Cl{sub n}·2nH{sub 2}O [Ln=Sm, 6; Gd, 7] were isolated at room temperature and seven 2D-CPs [Ln(1,3-H{sub 2}pdta)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub n}·Cl{sub n}·2nH{sub 2}O [Ln=La, 8; Ce, 9; Pr, 10; Nd, 11; Sm, 12; Eu, 13; Gd, 14] were isolated at 70 °C. When the crystals of 1–4 were hydrothermally heated at 180 °C with 1–2 eq. mol potassium hydroxide, four 3D-CPs [Ln(1,3-Hpdta)]{sub n}·nH{sub 2}O [Ln=La, 15; Ce, 16; Pr, 17; Nd, 18] were obtained. The two 2D-CPs [Ln(1,3-Hpdta)(H{sub 2}O)]{sub n}·4nH{sub 2}O (Sm, 19; Eu, 20) were isolated in similar reaction conditions. With the increments of pH value in the solution and reaction temperature, the structure becomes more complicated. 1–5 are soluble in water and 1 was traced by solution {sup 13}C({sup 1}H) NMR technique, the water-soluble lanthanides 1 and 5 show catalytic activity to ester hydrolysis reaction respectively, which indicate their important roles in the hydrolytic reaction. The europium complexes 13 and 20 show visible fluorescence at an excitation of 394 nm. The structure diversity is mainly caused by the variation of coordinated ligand in different pH values and lanthanide contraction effect. Acidic conditions are favorable for the isolations of lanthanide complexes in different structures and this may helpful to separate different lanthanides. The thermal stability investigations reveal that acidic condition is favorable to obtain the oxides at a lower temperature. - Graphical abstract: A series

  18. Highly sensitive plasmonic silver nanorods.

    PubMed

    Jakab, Arpad; Rosman, Christina; Khalavka, Yuriy; Becker, Jan; Trügler, Andreas; Hohenester, Ulrich; Sönnichsen, Carsten

    2011-09-27

    We compare the single-particle plasmonic sensitivity of silver and gold nanorods with similar resonance wavelengths by monitoring the plasmon resonance shift upon changing the environment from water to 12.5% sucrose solution. We find that silver nanoparticles have 1.2 to 2 times higher sensitivity than gold, in good agreement with simulations based on the boundary-elements-method (BEM). To exclude the effect of particle volume on sensitivity, we test gold rods with increasing particle width at a given resonance wavelength. Using the Drude-model of optical properties of metals together with the quasi-static approximation (QSA) for localized surface plasmons, we show that the dominant contribution to higher sensitivity of silver is the lower background polarizability of the d-band electrons and provide a simple formula for the sensitivity. We improve the reversibility of the silver nanorod sensors upon repeated cycles of environmental changes by blocking the high energy parts of the illumination light.

  19. Polarized light emission by deposition of aligned semiconductor nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadimasoudi, Mohammad; Penninck, Lieven; Aubert, Tangi; Gomes, Raquel; Hens, Zeger; Strubbe, Filip; Neyts, Kristiaan

    2014-08-01

    The ability to control the position and orientation of nanorods in a device is interesting both from a scientific and a technological point of view. Because semiconductor nanorods exhibit anisotropic absorption, and spontaneous and stimulated emission, aligning individual NRs to a preferred axis is attractive for many applications in photonics such as solar cells, light-emitting devices, optical sensors, switches, etc. Electric-field-driven deposition from colloidal suspensions has proven to be an efficient method for the controlled positioning and alignment of anisotropic particles. In this work, we present a novel technique for the homogeneous deposition and alignment of CdSe/CdS NRs on a glass substrate patterned with transparent indium tin oxide interdigitated electrodes, with a spacing of a few micrometers. This method is based on applying a strong AC electric field over the electrodes during a dip-coating procedure and subsequent evaporation of the solvent. The reproducible and homogeneous deposition on large substrates is required for large size applications such as solar cells or OLEDs. The accumulation, alignment, and polarized fluorescence of the nanorods as a function of the electrical field during deposition are investigated. A preferential alignment with an order parameter of 0.92 has been achieved.

  20. Phthalamide-lanthanide complexes for use as luminescent markers

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Petoud, Stephane; Cohen, Seth M.; Xu, Jide

    2005-03-08

    The present invention provides luminescent lanthanide metal chelates comprising a metal ion of the lanthanide series and a complexing agent comprising at least one phthalamidyl moiety. Also provided are probes incorporating the phthalamidyl ligands of the invention and methods utilizing the ligands of the invention and probes comprising the ligands of the invention.

  1. Salicylamide-lanthanide complexes for use as luminescent markers

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Petoud, Stephane; Cohen, Seth; Xu, Jide

    2006-03-28

    The present invention provides luminescent lanthanide metal chelates comprising a metal ion of the lanthanide series and a complexing agent comprising at least one salicylamidyl moiety. Also provided are probes incorporating the salicylamidyl ligands of the invention and methods utilizing the ligands of the invention and probes comprising the ligands of the invention.

  2. Phthalamide-lanthanide complexes for use as luminescent markers

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Petoud, Stephane; Cohen, Seth; Xu, Jide

    2008-10-28

    The present invention provides luminescent lanthanide metal chelates comprising a metal ion of the lanthanide series and a complexing agent comprising at least one phthalamidyl moiety. Also provided are probes incorporating the phthalamidyl ligands of the invention and methods utilizing the ligands of the invention and probes comprising the ligands of the invention.

  3. End-to-end azido-pinned interlocking lanthanide squares.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Lei; Wu, Jianfeng; Zhao, Lang; Shi, Wei; Cheng, Peng; Tang, Jinkui

    2017-03-09

    A rare end-to-end azido-pinned interlocking lanthanide square was self-assembled using a ditopic Schiff-base (H2L) and NaN3 as ligands. Obvious ferromagnetic interaction and a record anisotropy barrier of 152(4) K among lanthanide azido-bridged SMMs in a zero dc field were observed.

  4. Salicylamide-lanthanide complexes for use as luminescent markers

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Petoud, Stephane; Cohen, Seth; Xu, Jide

    2008-07-29

    The present invention provides luminescent lanthanide metal chelates comprising a metal ion of the lanthanide series and a complexing agent comprising at least one salicylamidyl moiety. Also provided are probes incorporating the salicylamidyl ligands of the invention and methods utilizing the ligands of the invention and probes comprising the ligands of the invention.

  5. Phthalamide lanthanide complexes for use as luminescent markers

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Petoud, Stephane; Cohen, Seth M.; Xu, Jide

    2003-01-01

    The present invention provides luminescent lanthanide metal chelates comprising a metal ion of the lanthanide series and a complexing agent comprising at least one phthalamidyl moiety. Also provided are probes incorporating the phthalamidyl ligands of the invention and methods utilizing the ligands of the invention and probes comprising the ligands of the invention.

  6. Salicylamide-lanthanide complexes for use as luminescent markers

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Petoud, Stephane; Cohen, Seth; Xu, Jide

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides luminescent lanthanide metal chelates comprising a metal ion of the lanthanide series and a complexing agent comprising at least one salicylamidyl moiety. Also provided are probes incorporating the salicylamidyl ligands of the invention and methods utilizing the ligands of the invention and probes comprising the ligands of the invention.

  7. One-dimensional simulation of lanthanide isotachophoresis using COMSOL.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Derek R; Clark, Sue B; Ivory, Cornelius F

    2012-03-01

    Electrokinetic separations can be used to quickly separate rare earth metals to determine their forensic signature. In this work, we simulate the concentration and separation of trivalent lanthanide cations by isotachophoresis. A one-dimensional simulation is developed using COMSOL v4.0a, a commercial finite element simulator, to represent the isotachophoretic separation of three lanthanides: lanthanum, terbium, and lutetium. The binding ligand chosen for complexation with the lanthanides is α-hydroxyisobutyric acid (HIBA) and the buffer system includes acetate, which also complexes with the lanthanides. The complexes formed between the three lanthanides, HIBA, and acetate are all considered in the simulation. We observe that the presence of only lanthanide:HIBA complexes in a buffer system with 10 mM HIBA causes the slowest lanthanide peak (lutetium) to split from the other analytes. The addition of lanthanide:acetate complexes into the simulation of the same buffer system eliminates this splitting. Decreasing the concentration of HIBA in the buffer to 7 mM causes the analyte stack to migrate faster through the capillary.

  8. Determination of critical diameters for intrinsic carrier diffusion-length of GaN nanorods with cryo-scanning near-field optical microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y. T.; Karlsson, K. F.; Birch, J.; Holtz, P. O.

    2016-01-01

    Direct measurements of carrier diffusion in GaN nanorods with a designed InGaN/GaN layer-in-a-wire structure by scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) were performed at liquid-helium temperatures of 10 K. Without an applied voltage, intrinsic diffusion lengths of photo-excited carriers were measured as the diameters of the nanorods differ from 50 to 800 nm. The critical diameter of nanorods for carrier diffusion is concluded as 170 nm with a statistical approach. Photoluminescence spectra were acquired for different positions of the SNOM tip on the nanorod, corresponding to the origins of the well-defined luminescence peaks, each being related to recombination-centers. The phenomenon originated from surface oxide by direct comparison of two nanorods with similar diameters in a single map has been observed and investigated. PMID:26876009

  9. Responsivity optimization of methane gas sensor through the modification of hexagonal nanorod and reduction of defect states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Argha; Maity, Santanu; Bhunia, Chandan Tilak; Sahu, Partha Pratim

    2017-02-01

    A hydrothermal growth technique is introduced to synthesize hexagonal high sensitive zinc oxide (ZnO) with a large surface to volume ratio. Pre and post treatments are carried out to obtain suitable resistive performance, which enhanced sensing performance of the device. The morphological structure of synthesized ZnO under different conditions (such as reaction time solution concentrations) is characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM). X ray diffraction (XRD) verifies the crystallinity in fabricated ZnO nanorod. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is performed to measure the elemental composition corresponding to binding energy before and after treatment. Optical properties for as-grown sample and uniform ZnO nanorod are characterized through Photoluminescence (PL). Sensing properties depending on the shape, size, distribution of hexagonal nanorod, position of the IDE and temperature are investigated. The highest sensor response is achieved for the hexagonal nanorod which is uniform in shape, distribution and for the position of IDE below the sensing layer.

  10. Biocompatible and high-performance amino acids-capped MnWO4 nanocasting as a novel non-lanthanide contrast agent for X-ray computed tomography and T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Kai; Liu, Zhen; Liu, Jianhua; Huang, Sa; Li, Zhenhua; Yuan, Qinghai; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2014-01-01

    -weighted MR imaging capabilities. As an alternative to T2-weighted MRI and CT dual-modality contrast agents, the nanoprobes can provide a positive contrast signal, which prevents confusion with the dark signals from hemorrhage and blood clots. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that a non-lanthanide imaging nanoprobe is applied for CT and T1-weighted MRI simultaneously. Moreover, comparing with gadolinium-based T1-weighted MRI and CT dual-modality contrast agents that were associated with nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), our contrast agents have superior biocompatibility, which is proved by a detailed study of the pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, and in vivo toxicology. Together with excellent dispersibility, high biocompatibility and superior contrast efficacy, these nanoprobes provide detailed and complementary information from dual-modality imaging over traditional single-mode imaging and bring more opportunities to the new generation of non-lanthanide nanoparticulate-based contrast agents. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: TEM images of MnWO4 nanoparticles synthesized at pH = 7, 180 °C pH = 9, 180 °C pH = 6, 200 °C with various amino acid molecules as capped agents, survey XPS spectra, FTIR spectrum of glycine capped MnWO4 nanorods, photos of glycine capped MnWO4 nanorods in various solutions including PBS, DMEM cell medium, and FBS, in vivo coronal view CT images of a rat before and after intravenous injection of iobitridol at different timed intervals, in vivo CT imaging of the rat one month after intravenous injection of MnWO4 nanorods, CT values of the heart, liver, spleen and kidney of a rat before and after intravenous administration of MnWO4 nanorods and iobitridol at different time intervals, hematology analysis and blood biochemical assay. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr05455a

  11. Controlled synthesis of vertically aligned hematite on conducting substrate for photoelectrochemical cells: nanorods versus nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Mao, Aiming; Shin, Kahee; Kim, Jung Kyu; Wang, Dong Hwan; Han, Gui Young; Park, Jong Hyeok

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes two different processes to synthesize vertically aligned hematite nanorod and nanotube arrays, respectively, on a conductive substrate by the electrochemical deposition method with the help of an anodized aluminum oxide nanotemplate. The two types of nanostructured hematite were used as the photoanode for photoelectrochemical cells. The hematite nanotubes exhibited much higher photoelectrochemical activity than the hematite nanorods, including an improved photocurrent density, more negative onset potential, better photon harvesting, and better charge carrier transfer ability. The observed behavior may offer new information to enhance the photocatalytic ability of hematite, which is considered to be one of the best photoanode materials in the research field of photoelectrochemical cells.

  12. Nitride tuning of lanthanide chromites.

    PubMed

    Black, Ashley P; Johnston, Hannah E; Oró-Solé, Judith; Bozzo, Bernat; Ritter, Clemens; Frontera, Carlos; Attfield, J Paul; Fuertes, Amparo

    2016-03-21

    LnCrO(3-x)N(x) perovskites with Ln = La, Pr and Nd and nitrogen contents up to x = 0.59 have been synthesised through ammonolysis of LnCrO4 precursors. These new materials represent one of the few examples of chromium oxynitrides. Hole-doping through O(2-)/N(3-) anion substitution suppresses the magnetic transition far less drastically than Ln(3+)/M(2+) (M = Ca, Sr) cation substitutions because of the greater covalency of metal-nitride bonds. Hence, nitride-doping is a more benign method for doping metal oxides without suppressing electronic transitions.

  13. Paleotransport of lanthanides and strontium recorded in calcite compositions from tuffs at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaniman, David T.; Chipera, Steve J.

    1996-11-01

    Secondary calcite occurs in both saturated and unsaturated hydrologic zones (SZ and UZ, respectively) in the tuffs at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA. In the upper UZ, the major constituents of the calcite crystal structure (C, O) have surface origins. At greater depth there is a “barren zone,” straddling the water table, where calcite is rare and mixing of surface and subsurface sources may occur. Deep in the SZ, distinctive Mn calcites reflect deep sources, including Ca released as analcime or albite formed and carbonates derived from underlying Paleozoic rocks. In the UZ and in the barren zone, above the deep Mn calcites, variations in calcite lanthanide chemistry can be used to distinguish rhyolitic from quartz-latitic sources. Lanthanide ratios and Sr contents of calcites record the chemical evolution of waters flowing through the UZ and upper SZ. Variations in calcite chemistry in the UZ and in the barren zone show that (1) Sr, which is readily exchanged with clays or zeolites, is essentially removed from some flowpaths that are in contact with these minerals and (2) traces of Mn oxides found in the tuffs have a significant effect on groundwater chemistry in the UZ and in the barren zone by removing almost all Ce from solution (evidenced by characteristic Ce depletions in calcite throughout this zone). Extreme Ce removal may be a result of Ce oxidation (Ce 3+→ Ce 4+) at the surfaces of some Mn oxides, particularly rancieite. Higher Sr contents and lack of Ce depletions in the deeper Mn calcites reflect different ages, origins, and transport systems. The calcite record of lanthanide and Sr transport in the UZ shows that minor minerals (clays and zeolites) and even trace minerals (Mn oxides) will affect the compositions of groundwaters that flow over distances greater than a few tens of meters.

  14. Nanocrystalline lanthanide-doped Lu3Ga5O12 garnets: interesting materials for light-emitting devices.

    PubMed

    Venkatramu, V; Giarola, M; Mariotto, G; Enzo, S; Polizzi, S; Jayasankar, C K; Piccinelli, F; Bettinelli, M; Speghini, A

    2010-04-30

    Nanocrystalline Lu(3)Ga(5)O(12), with average particle sizes of 40 nm, doped with a wide variety of luminescent trivalent lanthanide ions have been prepared using a sol-gel technique. The structural and morphological properties of the powders have been investigated by x-ray powder diffraction, high resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Structural data have been refined and are presented for Pr(3+), Eu(3+), Gd(3+), Ho(3+), Er(3+) and Tm(3+) dopants, while room temperature excited luminescence spectra and emission decay curves of Eu(3+)-, Tm(3+)- and Ho(3+)-doped Lu(3)Ga(5)O(12) nanocrystals have been measured and are discussed. The Eu(3+) emission spectrum shows typical bands due to 5D(0)-->7F(J) (J = 0, 1, 2, 3, 4) transitions and the broadening of these emission bands with the non-exponential behaviour of the decay curves indicates the presence of structural disorder around the lanthanide ions. Lanthanide-doped nanocrystalline Lu(3)Ga(5)O(12) materials show better luminescence intensities compared to Y(2)O(3), Gd(3)Ga(5)O(12) and Y(3)Al(5)O(12) nanocrystalline hosts. Moreover, the upconversion emission intensity in the blue-green region for the Tm(3+)- and Ho(3+)-doped samples shows a significant increase upon 647.5 nm excitation with respect to other common oxide hosts doped with the same lanthanide ions.

  15. Influence of Y-doped induced defects on the optical and magnetic properties of ZnO nanorod arrays prepared by low-temperature hydrothermal process.

    PubMed

    Kung, Chung-Yuan; Young, San-Lin; Chen, Hone-Zern; Kao, Ming-Cheng; Horng, Lance; Shih, Yu-Tai; Lin, Chen-Cheng; Lin, Teng-Tsai; Ou, Chung-Jen

    2012-07-07

    One-dimensional pure zinc oxide (ZnO) and Y-doped ZnO nanorod arrays have been successfully fabricated on the silicon substrate for comparison by a simple hydrothermal process at the low temperature of 90°C. The Y-doped nanorods exhibit the same c-axis-oriented wurtzite hexagonal structure as pure ZnO nanorods. Based on the results of photoluminescence, an enhancement of defect-induced green-yellow visible emission is observed for the Y-doped ZnO nanorods. The decrease of E2(H) mode intensity and increase of E1(LO) mode intensity examined by the Raman spectrum also indicate the increase of defects for the Y-doped ZnO nanorods. As compared to pure ZnO nanorods, Y-doped ZnO nanorods show a remarked increase of saturation magnetization. The combination of visible photoluminescence and ferromagnetism measurement results indicates the increase of oxygen defects due to the Y doping which plays a crucial role in the optical and magnetic performances of the ZnO nanorods.

  16. Hydrophobic metallic nanorods with Teflon nanopatches.

    PubMed

    Khudhayer, Wisam J; Sharma, Rajesh; Karabacak, Tansel

    2009-07-08

    Introducing a hydrophobic property to vertically aligned hydrophilic metallic nanorods was investigated experimentally and theoretically. The platinum nanorod arrays were deposited on flat silicon substrates using a sputter glancing angle deposition technique (GLAD). Then a thin layer of Teflon (nanopatch) was partially deposited on the tips of platinum nanorods at a glancing angle of theta(dep) = 85 degrees for different deposition times. Teflon deposition on Pt nanorods at normal incidence (theta(dep) = 0 degrees) was also performed for comparison. Morphology and elemental analysis of Pt/Teflon nanocomposite structures were carried out using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDAX), respectively. It was found that the GLAD technique is capable of depositing ultrathin isolated Teflon nanostructures on selective regions of nanorod arrays due to the shadowing effect during obliquely incident deposition. Contact angle measurements on nanocomposite Pt nanorods with Teflon nanopatches exhibited contact angle values as high as 138 degrees, indicating a significant increase in the hydrophobicity of originally hydrophilic Pt nanostructures that had an angle of about 52 degrees. The enhanced hydrophobicity of the Pt nanorod/Teflon nanopatch composite is attributed to the presence of nanostructured Teflon coating, which imparted a low surface energy. Surface energy calculations were performed on Pt nanorods, Teflon thin film, and Pt/Teflon composite using the two-liquid method to confirm the contact angle measurements. Furthermore, a new contact angle model utilizing Cassie and Baxter theory for heterogeneous surfaces was developed in order to explain the enhanced hydrophobicity of Pt/Teflon nanorods. According to our model, it is predicted that the solid-liquid interface is mainly at the Teflon tips when the composite nanorods are in contact with water.

  17. Hydrophobic metallic nanorods with Teflon nanopatches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khudhayer, Wisam J.; Sharma, Rajesh; Karabacak, Tansel

    2009-07-01

    Introducing a hydrophobic property to vertically aligned hydrophilic metallic nanorods was investigated experimentally and theoretically. The platinum nanorod arrays were deposited on flat silicon substrates using a sputter glancing angle deposition technique (GLAD). Then a thin layer of Teflon (nanopatch) was partially deposited on the tips of platinum nanorods at a glancing angle of θdep = 85° for different deposition times. Teflon deposition on Pt nanorods at normal incidence (θdep = 0°) was also performed for comparison. Morphology and elemental analysis of Pt/Teflon nanocomposite structures were carried out using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDAX), respectively. It was found that the GLAD technique is capable of depositing ultrathin isolated Teflon nanostructures on selective regions of nanorod arrays due to the shadowing effect during obliquely incident deposition. Contact angle measurements on nanocomposite Pt nanorods with Teflon nanopatches exhibited contact angle values as high as 138°, indicating a significant increase in the hydrophobicity of originally hydrophilic Pt nanostructures that had an angle of about 52°. The enhanced hydrophobicity of the Pt nanorod/Teflon nanopatch composite is attributed to the presence of nanostructured Teflon coating, which imparted a low surface energy. Surface energy calculations were performed on Pt nanorods, Teflon thin film, and Pt/Teflon composite using the two-liquid method to confirm the contact angle measurements. Furthermore, a new contact angle model utilizing Cassie and Baxter theory for heterogeneous surfaces was developed in order to explain the enhanced hydrophobicity of Pt/Teflon nanorods. According to our model, it is predicted that the solid-liquid interface is mainly at the Teflon tips when the composite nanorods are in contact with water.

  18. NH3 sensing properties polyaniline: TiO2 nanorods heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, U. V.; Ramgir, Niranjan S.; Debnath, A. K.; Karmakar, N.; Aswal, D. K.; Kothari, D. C.; Gupta, S. K.

    2016-05-01

    NH3 sensing properties of polyaniline: TiO2 nanorods heterostructures have been investigated. TiO2 nanorods were synthesized using hydrothermal method. Thin layer of polyanilene was deposited by in-situ oxidative polymerization of aniline over TiO2 nanorods film. The heterostructure film exhibited an enhanced sensor response towards NH3 at room temperature. For example, heterostructure films exhibited a sensor response of 610% towards 100 ppm of NH3 with a response and recovery times of 40 and 60 s, respectively. This response and response kinetics is better than pure PANI films that exhibited a response of 210% with a response and recovery time of 21 and 160 s, respectively.

  19. Compact hematite buffer layer as a promoter of nanorod photoanode performances

    PubMed Central

    Milan, R.; Cattarin, S.; Comisso, N.; Baratto, C.; Kaunisto, K.; Tkachenko, N. V.; Concina, I.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of a thin α-Fe2O3 compact buffer layer (BL) on the photoelectrochemical performances of a bare α-Fe2O3 nanorods photoanode is investigated. The BL is prepared through a simple spray deposition onto a fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) conducting glass substrate before the growth of a α-Fe2O3 nanorods via a hydrothermal process. Insertion of the hematite BL between the FTO and the nanorods markedly enhances the generated photocurrent, by limiting undesired losses of photogenerated charges at the FTO||electrolyte interface. The proposed approach warrants a marked improvement of material performances, with no additional thermal treatment and no use/dispersion of rare or toxic species, in agreement with the principles of green chemistry. PMID:27733756

  20. Compact hematite buffer layer as a promoter of nanorod photoanode performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milan, R.; Cattarin, S.; Comisso, N.; Baratto, C.; Kaunisto, K.; Tkachenko, N. V.; Concina, I.

    2016-10-01

    The effect of a thin α-Fe2O3 compact buffer layer (BL) on the photoelectrochemical performances of a bare α-Fe2O3 nanorods photoanode is investigated. The BL is prepared through a simple spray deposition onto a fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) conducting glass substrate before the growth of a α-Fe2O3 nanorods via a hydrothermal process. Insertion of the hematite BL between the FTO and the nanorods markedly enhances the generated photocurrent, by limiting undesired losses of photogenerated charges at the FTO||electrolyte interface. The proposed approach warrants a marked improvement of material performances, with no additional thermal treatment and no use/dispersion of rare or toxic species, in agreement with the principles of green chemistry.

  1. Preparation of gold/silver/titania trilayered nanorods and their photocatalytic activities.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Yoshimasa; Kanda, Takashi; Torigoe, Kanjiro; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko

    2014-01-28

    Gold/silver/titania trilayered nanorods have been prepared by the successive deposition of silver and titania layers on gold nanorod cores, and their photocatalytic activities were investigated under visible-light illumination (λ > 420 nm). The photocatalytic activity of the trilayered nanorods in the oxidation of 2-propanol depends on both the Au/Ag composition and the thickness of the TiO2 shell. It increases with increasing Ag content up to [Au]/[Ag] = 1:5 (molar ratio) and then decreases with further increasing Ag content. The photocatalytic activity also increases with increasing TiO2 shell thickness up to 10 nm and then decreases with further increases in the shell thickness. These effects were explained by electron-transfer and energy-transfer mechanisms.

  2. Ethanol-Sensing Characteristics of Nanostructured ZnO: Nanorods, Nanowires, and Porous Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quy, Chu Thi; Hung, Chu Manh; Van Duy, Nguyen; Hoa, Nguyen Duc; Jiao, Mingzhi; Nguyen, Hugo

    2017-01-01

    The morphology and crystalline size of metal oxide-sensing materials are believed to have a strong influence on the performance of gas sensors. In this paper, we report a comparative study on the ethanol-sensing characteristics of ZnO nanorods, nanowires, and porous nanoparticles. The porous ZnO nanoparticles were prepared using a simple thermal decomposition of a sheet-like hydrozincite, whereas the nanorods and nanowires were grown by hydrothermal and chemical vapor deposition methods, respectively. The morphology and crystal structure of the synthesized materials were characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. Ethanol gas-sensing characteristics were systematically studied at different temperatures. Our findings show that for ethanol gas-sensing applications, ZnO porous nanoparticles exhibited the best sensitivity, followed by the nanowires and nanorods. Gas-sensing properties were also examined with respect to the role of crystal growth orientation, crystal size, and porosity.

  3. Fabrication of tunable hydrophobic surface of ZnO nanorods with Cu doping

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Mohua; Thangavel, R.

    2015-08-28

    In this work, tunable wettability of the Zinc Oxide (ZnO) nanorod surface with Cu doping prepared by a hydrothermal method. These grown samples were characterized by XRD, FESEM, AFM and water contact angle measurements. The wettability of the ZnO nanorods surface area was controlled and tuned by different concentration of copper doping. It was found that the hydrophobic surface of doped ZnO Nanorods shows a maximum and minimum contact angle of about 156.60° and 136.36° was achieved with doping concentration of 10 and 20 M % respectively. Further, the surface properties such as surface energy and work of adhesion were calculated for undoped and Cu doped ZnO nanostructure surfaces. These nanosructures can be potentially applicable to enlarge time honoured application of ZnO based electronic devices.

  4. Hydrothermally Processed Photosensitive Field-Effect Transistor Based on ZnO Nanorod Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ashish; Bhargava, Kshitij; Dixit, Tejendra; Palani, I. A.; Singh, Vipul

    2016-11-01

    Formation of a stable, reproducible zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorod-network-based photosensitive field-effect transistor using a hydrothermal process at low temperature has been demonstrated. K2Cr2O7 additive was used to improve adhesion and facilitate growth of the ZnO nanorod network over the SiO2/Si substrate. Transistor characteristics obtained in the dark resemble those of the n-channel-mode field-effect transistor (FET). The devices showed I on/ I off ratio above 8 × 102 under dark condition, field-effect mobility of 4.49 cm2 V-1 s-1, and threshold voltage of -12 V. Further, under ultraviolet (UV) illumination, the FET exhibited sensitivity of 2.7 × 102 in off-state (-10 V) versus 1.4 in on-state (+9.7 V) of operation. FETs based on such nanorod networks showed good photoresponse, which is attributed to the large surface area of the nanorod network. The growth temperature for ZnO nanorod networks was kept at 110°C, enabling a low-temperature, cost-effective, simple approach for high-performance ZnO-based FETs for large-scale production. The role of network interfaces in the FET performance is also discussed.

  5. One-dimensional copper hydroxide nitrate nanorods and nanobelts for radiochemical applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin

    2012-11-21

    I report a facile wet-chemical method for the synthesis of one-dimensional copper hydroxide nitrate nanostructures in 2-propanol under solvothermal conditions. Single-crystalline nearly monodispersed copper hydroxide nitrate nanorods and nanobelts with selected breadths in the range of 100 nm to 1 μm have been successfully prepared by a solvothermal method through controlling the experimental parameters, including initial concentrations of reagents, reaction temperature, solvent and reaction time. The resultant nanorods and nanobelts were characterized using FESEM, TEM, XRD, FTIR and TGA techniques. Upon thermal calcination, the copper hydroxide nitrate nanorods and nanobelts self-assemble into one-dimensional arrays (rods, belts or tubes) of copper oxide nanoparticles. The as-prepared copper hydroxide nitrate nanorods and nanobelts were tested as ion exchangers for removal of long-lived radioactive anions such as (129)I(-) and (99)TcO(4)(-). The copper hydroxide nitrate nanorods or nanobelts were over two times more active in the removal of anion species than copper hydroxide nitrate nanoplatelets.

  6. Facile synthesis of polyaniline "sunflowers" with arrays of oriented nanorods.

    PubMed

    Wang, Taoqing; Zhong, Wenbin; Ning, Xutao; Wang, Yongxin; Yang, Wantai

    2009-06-01

    Polyaniline (PANI) "sunflowers" made of arrays of oriented nanorods were synthesized by chemical oxidative polymerization of aniline in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and suitable concentration of HNO3 at about 0 degrees C (ice bath). The reaction conditions, such as the concentration of reagents and reaction temperature were systematically investigated and controlled on the preparation of PANI "sunflowers". The results also suggest that HNO3 probably plays a key role in forming PANI "sunflowers". A possible forming mechanism of the PANI nanostructures is offered.

  7. Structure and Magnetic Properties of Lanthanide Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Dickerson, James Henry

    2014-06-01

    We have had considerable success on this project, particularly in the understanding of the relationship between nanostructure and magnetic properties in lanthanide nanocrystals. We also have successfully facilitated the doctoral degrees of Dr. Suseela Somarajan, in the Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Dr. Melissa Harrison, in the Materials Science Program. The following passages summarize the various accomplishments that were featured in 9 publications that were generated based on support from this grant. We thank the Department of Energy for their generous support of our research efforts in this area of materials science, magnetism, and electron microscopy.

  8. Multicoordinate ligands for actinide/lanthanide separations.

    PubMed

    Dam, Henk H; Reinhoudt, David N; Verboom, Willem

    2007-02-01

    In nuclear waste treatment processes there is a need for improved ligands for the separation of actinides (An(III)) and lanthanides (Ln(III)). Several research groups are involved in the design and synthesis of new An(III) ligands and in the confinement of these and existing An(III) ligands onto molecular platforms giving multicoordinate ligands. The preorganization of ligands considerably improves the An(III) extraction properties, which are largely dependent on the solubility and rigidity of the platform. This tutorial review summarizes the most important An(III) ligands with emphasis on the preorganization strategy using (macrocyclic) platforms.

  9. Understanding stability trends along the lanthanide series.

    PubMed

    Regueiro-Figueroa, Martín; Esteban-Gómez, David; de Blas, Andrés; Rodríguez-Blas, Teresa; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos

    2014-04-01

    The stability trends across the lanthanide series of complexes with the polyaminocarboxylate ligands TETA(4-) (H4TETA=2,2',2'',2'''-(1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane-1,4,8,11-tetrayl)tetraacetic acid), BCAED(4-) (H4BCAED=2,2',2'',2'''-{[(1,4-diazepane-1,4-diyl)bis(ethane-2,1-diyl)]bis(azanetriyl)}tetraacetic acid), and BP18C6(2-) (H2BP18C6=6,6'-[(1,4,10,13-tetraoxa-7,16-diazacyclooctadecane-7,16-diyl)bis(methylene)]dipicolinic acid) were investigated using DFT calculations. Geometry optimizations performed at the TPSSh/6-31G(d,p) level, and using a 46+4f(n) ECP for lanthanides, provide bond lengths of the metal coordination environments in good agreement with the experimental values observed in the X-ray structures. The contractions of the Ln(3+) coordination spheres follow quadratic trends, as observed previously for different isostructural series of complexes. We show here that the parameters obtained from the quantitative analysis of these data can be used to rationalize the observed stability trends across the 4f period. The stability trends along the lanthanide series were also evaluated by calculating the free energy for the reaction [La(L)](n+/-)(sol)+Ln(3+)(sol)→[Ln(L)](n+/-)(sol)+La(3+)(sol). A parameterization of the Ln(3+) radii was performed by minimizing the differences between experimental and calculated standard hydration free energies. The calculated stability trends are in good agreement with the experimental stability constants, which increase markedly across the series for BCAED(4-) complexes, increase smoothly for the TETA(4-) analogues, and decrease in the case of BP18C6(2-) complexes. The resulting stability trend is the result of a subtle balance between the increased binding energies of the ligand across the lanthanide series, which contribute to an increasing complex stability, and the increase in the absolute values of hydration energies along the 4f period.

  10. Polymer Nanocomposite Films: Dispersion of Polymer Grafted Nanorods and Optical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Composto, Russell

    2013-03-01

    The thermodynamic factors that affect the dispersion of polymer-brush grafted gold nanorods (NR) in polymer matrix films have been studied by experiment and theory. When brush and matrix have a favorable interaction, such as poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO)-NR/ poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and polystyrene (PS)-NR / poly(2,6-dimethyl-p-phenylene oxide) (PPO), nanorods are uniformly dispersed. For PEO-NRs in PMMA, the NRs are regularly spaced and well dispersed, independent of the ratio of the degree of polymerization of the matrix (P) to that of the brush (N), namely P/N. As the NR volume fraction increases, the local orientation of the nanorods increases, whereas the macroscopic orientation remains isotropic. When the brush and matrix are similar (i.e., PS-NR / PS and PEO-NR / PEO), the nanorods randomly disperse for P/N < 2 (i.e., wet brush), but align side-by-side in aggregates for P/N > 2. UV-visible spectroscopy and discrete dipole approximation (DDA) calculations demonstrate that surface plasmon coupling leads to a blue shift in the longitudinal surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) as P/N increases. For P/N > 2, self-consistent field theory (SCFT) calculations and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations indicate that nanorod aggregation is caused by depletion-attraction forces. Starting with a dry brush system, namely, a PS matrix where P/N = 30, these attractive forces can be mediated by adding a compatibilizing agent (e.g., PPO) that drives the NRs to disperse. Finally, dry and wet brush behavior is observed for NR aspect ratios varying from 2.5 to 7. However, compared at the same volume fraction, long rods for the dry case exhibit much better local order than lower aspect ratio nanorods, suggesting that long rods may exhibit nematic-like ordering at higher loadings. NSF Polymer and CEMRI Programs.

  11. Relationship between lanthanide contents in aquatic turtles and environmental exposures.

    PubMed

    Censi, P; Randazzo, L A; D'Angelo, S; Saiano, F; Zuddas, P; Mazzola, S; Cuttitta, A

    2013-05-01

    Trace elements released in the environment during agricultural practices can be incorporated and accumulated in biological fluids and tissues of living organisms. The assessment of these exposures were carried out investigating lanthanide distributions in blood and exoskeleton samples collected from Emys trinacris turtle specimens coming from sites with anthropogenic discharge in western and south Sicily, along migration paths of many bird species from Africa to Europe. The data show a significant (Rxy=0.72; Rxy>0.67; α=0.025) linear relationship between the size of turtle specimens and the lanthanide contents in blood lower than 0.4 μg L(-1) whereas this relationship disappears in blood with higher lanthanide contents. Comparative evaluations of normalised concentrations show that lanthanides fractionate between blood and exoskeleton inducing antithetical lanthanide patterns therein. These features are more evident in specimens with high lanthanide contents in blood, suggesting that lanthanide accumulations in the exoskeleton can represent the physiological response of E. trinacris to environmental and the further confirmation of relationship occurring between the environmental and the biological fluids.

  12. Lanthanide Complexes as a Test for Evidence of Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benavides, Jeannette

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this research is to advance the understanding of the interaction of lanthanide metals with biological organic molecules and to develop a technique to detect these compounds in the solid state and in situ in Mars and other planetary bodies. The detection of these complexes should provide evidence of life past or present. In addition, detection of the metals alone will provide important information about the geological history of a planetary body. Lanthanides were chosen as our focus of interest because they form very stable complexes with organic molecules in solution and they produce intense luminescence in the ultraviolet and visible spectra. The rare earth complexes available are mostly synthetic for diverse applications in medicine. There is not much work done on the complexes that form in nature. Lanthanides have many applications and they are mined aR over the world, however, since the interest has been only in the elements, the analytical techniques employed destroy any organic ligands that may be present. In order to determine if and which lanthanide complexes form in nature and their concentration, soil samples have been collected from areas rich in soluble lanthanide compounds like phosphates and also rich in vegetation. The soil samples will be analyzed and the lanthanide complexes if present will be isolated and characterized. A spectrometer to detect the lanthanide complexes in situ and in the solid state will be designed. In this workshop, the research approach and its implications will be discussed.

  13. Spectral studies of Lanthanide interactions with membrane surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Karukstis, K.K.; Kao, M.Y.; Savin, D.A.; Bittker, R.A.; Kaphengst, K.J.; Emetarom, C.M.; Naito, N.R.; Takamoto, D.Y.

    1995-03-23

    We have monitored the interactions of the series of trivalent lanthanide cations with the thylakoid membrane surface of spinach chloroplasts using two complementary spectral techniques. Measurements of the fluorescence emission of the extrinsic probe 2-p-toluidinonaphthalene-6-sulfonate (TNS) and the absorbance of the intrinsic chromophore chlorophyll provide two sensitive means of characterizing the dependence of the cation-membrane interaction on the nature of the cation. In these systems, added lanthanide cations adsorb onto the membrane surface to neutralize exposed segments of membrane-embedded protein complexes. The lanthanide-induced charge neutralization increases the proximity of added TNS anion to the membrane surface as evidenced by variations in the TNS fluorescence level and wavelength of maximum emission. Our results reveal a strong dependence of TNS fluorescence parameters on both lanthanide size and total orbital angular momentum L value. Lanthanides with greater charge density (small size and/or low L value) enhance the TNS fluorescence level to a greater extent. A possible origin for the lanthanide-dependent TNS fluorescence levels is suggested in terms of a heterogeneity in the number and type of TNS binding sites. The data are consistent with the proposal that larger lanthanides with smaller enthalpies of hydration induce more significant membrane appression. 59 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Coupling of the 4f Electrons in Lanthanide Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kazhdan, Daniel

    2008-09-01

    (C5Me5)2LnOTf where Ln = La, Ce, Sm, Gd, and Yb have been synthesized and these derivatives are good starting materials for the synthesis of (C5Me5)2LnX derivatives. (C5Me5)2Ln(2,2'-bipyridine), where Ln = La, Ce, Sm, and Gd, along with several methylated bipyridine analogues have been synthesized and their magnetic moments have been measured as a function of temperature. In lanthanum, cerium, and gadolinium complexes the bipyridine ligand ligand is unequivocally the radical anion, and the observed magnetic moment is the result of intramolecular coupling of the unpaired electron on the lanthanide fragment with the unpaired electron on the bipyridine along with the intermolecular coupling between radicals. Comparison with the magnetic moments of the known compounds (C5Me5)2Sm(2,2'-bipyridine) and (C5Me5)2Yb(2,2'-bipyridine) leads to an understanding of the role of the SmII/SmIII and YbII/YbIII couple in the magnetic properties of (C5Me5)2Sm(2,2'-bipyridine) and (C5Me5)2Yb(2,2'-bipyridine). In addition, crystal structures of (C5Me5)2Ln(2,2'-bipyridine) and [(C5Me5)2Ln(2,2'-bipyridine)][BPh4](Ln= Ce and Gd), where the lanthanide is unequivocally in the +3 oxidation state, give the crystallographic characteristics of bipyridine as an anion and as a neutral ligand in the same coordination environment, respectively. Substituted bipyridine ligands coordinated to (C5Me5)2Yb are studied to further understand how the magnetic coupling in (C5Me5)2Yb(2,2'-bipyridine) changes with substitutions. In the cases of (C5Me5)2Yb(5,5'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine) and (C5Me5

  15. Lanthanide coordination polymers: Synthesis, diverse structure and luminescence properties

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Xue-Qin Lei, Yao-Kun; Wang, Xiao-Run; Zhao, Meng-Meng; Peng, Yun-Qiao; Cheng, Guo-Quan

    2014-10-15

    The new semirigid exo-bidentate ligand incorporating furfurysalicylamide terminal groups, namely, 1,4-bis([(2′-furfurylaminoformyl)phenoxyl]methyl)-2,5-bismethylbenzene (L) was synthesized and used as building blocks for constructing lanthanide coordination polymers with luminescent properties. The series of lanthanide nitrate complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction analysis. The semirigid ligand L, as a bridging ligand, reacts with lanthanide nitrates forming three distinct structure types: chiral noninterpenetrated two-dimensional (2D) honeycomblike (6,3) (hcb, Schläfli symbol 6{sup 3}, vertex symbol 6 6 6) topological network as type I, 1D zigzag chain as type II and 1D trapezoid ladder-like chain as type III. The structural diversities indicate that lanthanide contraction effect played significant roles in the structural self-assembled process. The luminescent properties of Eu{sup III}, Tb{sup III} and Dy{sup III} complexes are discussed in detail. Due to the good match between the lowest triplet state of the ligand and the resonant energy level of the lanthanide ion, the lanthanide ions in Eu{sup III}, Tb{sup III} and Dy{sup III} complexes can be efficiently sensitized by the ligand. - Graphical abstract: We present herein six lanthanide coordination polymers of a new semirigid exo-bidentate ligand which not only display diverse structures but also possess strong luminescence properties. - Highlights: • We present lanthanide coordination polymers of a new semirigid exo-bidentate ligand. • The lanthanide coordination polymers exhibit diverse structures. • The luminescent properties of Tb{sup III}, Eu{sup III} and Dy{sup III} complexes are discussed in detail.

  16. Surface modification of ZnO nanorods with Hamilton receptors.

    PubMed

    Zeininger, Lukas; Klaumünzer, Martin; Peukert, Wolfgang; Hirsch, Andreas

    2015-04-13

    A new prototype of a Hamilton receptor suitable for the functionalization of inorganic nanoparticles was synthesized and characterized. The hydrogen bonding receptor was coupled to a catechol moiety, which served as anchor group for the functionalization of metal oxides, in particular zinc oxide. Synthesized zinc oxide nanorods [ZnO] were used for surface functionalization. The wet-chemical functionalization procedure towards monolayer-grafted particles [ZnO-HR] is described and a detailed characterization study is presented. In addition, the detection of specific cyanurate molecules is demonstrated. The hybrid structures [ZnO-HR-CA] were stable towards agglomeration and exhibited enhanced dispersability in apolar solvents. This observation, in combination with several spectroscopic experiments gave evidence of the highly directional supramolecular recognition at the surface of nanoparticles.

  17. Lanthanide-transition heterometallic extended structures with novel orthogonal metalloligand as building block.

    PubMed

    He, Zheng; He, Cheng; Gao, En-Qing; Wang, Zhe-Ming; Yang, Xiao-Fan; Liao, Chun-Sheng; Yan, Chun-Hua

    2003-04-07

    One-dimensional lanthanide-transition heterometallic chains of squares, [LnNi(2)L(3)(HL)(DMF)(4)(ClO(4))(4).S]( infinity ) (Ln = Gd and Tb; HL is the Schiff base obtained by the condensation of 2-pyridylaldehyde with isonicotinic hydrazide N-oxide; S = solvent) and [LnNi(2)L(4)(DMF)(4)(ClO(4))(3).S]( infinity ) (Ln = Dy; S = solvent), were synthesized by self-assembly between well-designed orthogonal metalloligands [Ni(HL)L](+) and the Ln(III) ions, which act as the bridging units and nodes, respectively.

  18. Picosecond dynamics from lanthanide chloride melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalampounias, Angelos G.

    2012-12-01

    The picosecond dynamics of molten lanthanide chlorides is studied by means of vibrational spectroscopy. Polarized Raman spectra of molten LaCl3, NdCl3, GdCl3, DyCl3, HoCl3 and YCl3 are fitted to a model enabling to obtain the times of vibrational dephasing, tν and vibrational frequency modulation tω. Our aim is to find possible sensitive indicators of short-time dynamics. It has been found that all lanthanide chlorides exhibit qualitative similarities in the vibrational relaxation and frequency modulation times in the molten state. It appears that the vibrational correlation functions of all melts comply with the Rothschild approach assuming that the environmental modulation is described by a stretched exponential decay. The evolution of the dispersion parameter α indicates the deviation of the melts from the model simple liquid and the similar local environment in which the oscillator is placed and with which it is coupled. The "packing" of the anions around central La3+ cation seems to be the key factor for the structure and the dynamics of the melts. The results are discussed in the framework of the current phenomenological status of the field.

  19. Ab Initio Crystal Field for Lanthanides.

    PubMed

    Ungur, Liviu; Chibotaru, Liviu F

    2017-03-13

    An ab initio methodology for the first-principle derivation of crystal-field (CF) parameters for lanthanides is described. The methodology is applied to the analysis of CF parameters in [Tb(Pc)2 ](-) (Pc=phthalocyanine) and Dy4 K2 ([Dy(4) K(2) O(OtBu)(12) ]) complexes, and compared with often used approximate and model descriptions. It is found that the application of geometry symmetrization, and the use of electrostatic point-charge and phenomenological CF models, lead to unacceptably large deviations from predictions based on ab initio calculations for experimental geometry. It is shown how the predictions of standard CASSCF (Complete Active Space Self-Consistent Field) calculations (with 4f orbitals in the active space) can be systematically improved by including effects of dynamical electronic correlation (CASPT2 step) and by admixing electronic configurations of the 5d shell. This is exemplified for the well-studied Er-trensal complex (H3 trensal=2,2',2"-tris(salicylideneimido)trimethylamine). The electrostatic contributions to CF parameters in this complex, calculated with true charge distributions in the ligands, yield less than half of the total CF splitting, thus pointing to the dominant role of covalent effects. This analysis allows the conclusion that ab initio crystal field is an essential tool for the decent description of lanthanides.

  20. Luminescent lanthanide complexes for advanced photonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puntus, Lada N.; Sergeeva, Elena V.; Antonov, Dmitrii Y.; Lyssenko, Konstantin A.; Kajzar, Francois

    2010-10-01

    The lanthanide compounds containing unsymmetrical β-diketone with [2.2]paracyclophane moiety in particular the europium complex with three [1-(4-[2.2]paracyclophanyl)]-3-phenylpropane-1,3-dione and 1,10-phenanthroline has been synthesized for the first time. The optical properties of [2.2]paracyclophane-derived ligands (symmetrical β-diketones and their respective N-phenylimines) as well as those of the europium complex were studied by UV-visible and luminescence spectroscopy. The diastereomers (racemic chiral, (R*,R*)- and achiral meso, (R,S)-) of the β-diketones and their respective N-phenylimines exhibit quite identical absorption spectra with intense broad band centered at 360 and 380 nm, respectively. The designed blue-emitting unsymmetrical β-diketone acts as a very efficient sensitizer of the EuIII emission and does so in the near-UV region. The introduction of [2.2]paracyclophane moiety in the β-diketones allows to expand the excitation wavelength of the lanthanide complex up to 500 nm and to obtain the relatively high overall quantum yield for the europium ion.

  1. Ion exchange in hydroxyapatite with lanthanides.

    PubMed

    Cawthray, Jacqueline F; Creagh, A Louise; Haynes, Charles A; Orvig, Chris

    2015-02-16

    Naturally occurring hydroxyapatite, Ca5(PO4)3(OH) (HAP), is the main inorganic component of bone matrix, with synthetic analogues finding applications in bioceramics and catalysis. An interesting and valuable property of both natural and synthetic HAP is the ability to undergo cationic and anionic substitution. The lanthanides are well-suited for substitution for the Ca(2+) sites within HAP, because of their similarities in ionic radii, donor atom requirements, and coordination geometries. We have used isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to investigate the thermodynamics of ion exchange in HAP with a representative series of lanthanide ions, La(3+), Sm(3+), Gd(3+), Ho(3+), Yb(3+) and Lu(3+), reporting the association constant (Ka), ion-exchange thermodynamic parameters (ΔH, ΔS, ΔG), and binding stoichiometry (n). We also probe the nature of the La(3+):HAP interaction by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance ((31)P NMR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), in support of the ITC results.

  2. Some aspects of the geochemistry of yttrium and the lanthanides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleischer, Michael

    1965-01-01

    Recent data on the relative abundances of the lanthanides and yttrium in meteorites, basaltic rocks, granitic rocks and sedimentary rocks are reviewed. It is shown that the data are inadequate to substantiate or to disprove Taylor's derivation from these data of a 1:1 abundance ratio of basaltic to granitic rocks in the continental crust. Graphs are given to illustrate the variation of lanthanides in minerals with paragenesis. Both the paragenesis and the crystal chemistry of minerals affect the composition of the lanthanides.

  3. Ferromagnetism in α-Mn nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwary, Chandra Sekhar; Bhowmick, Somnath; Prakash, Abhinav; Chakrabarti, Ramananda; Biswas, Krishanu; Chattopadhyay, Kamanio

    2017-02-01

    The present investigation reports the first experimental evidence of ferromagnetism in the cryomilled pure α-Mn nano-rods. Cryomilling of Mn powder at liquid nitrogen temperature leads to the formation of long nanorods of α-Mn. The detailed electron microscopy reveals that the nanorods grow along [ 1 1 ¯ 2 ] directions with surfaces bounded by {110} planes of FCC α-Mn. The magnetic measurements indicate ferromagnetic hysteresis loops, suggesting typical ferromagnetic order. The ab-initio density functional theory calculations indicate that the ferromagnetic response originates from the under coordinated surface atoms.

  4. Plasmonics of Gold Nanorods. Considerations for Biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liz-Marzán, Luis M.; Pérez-Juste, Jorge; Pastoriza-Santos, Isabel

    In this chapter, we explore the sensitivity of gold nanorods toward changes in the dielectric constant of the surrounding medium. Experimental data for pure and silica-coated nanorods with varying shell thickness are compared to calculations based on the boundary element method (BEM). They indicate that anisotropy and sharp tips make nanoparticles more environmentally sensitive. We also find that sensitivity decreases as silica shell thickness increases, as expected from a dielectric screening effect. Even when coated with thin shells, gold nanorods are found to be excellent candidates for biosensing applications.

  5. Size and dielectric-environment dependence of transversal resonance modes of localized surface plasmons in silver nanorods.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jie; Zhang, Junxi; Zhang, Lide; Jia, Junhui; Xu, Wei; Wang, Junfeng; Fei, Guangtao

    2016-06-20

    Tuning transversal resonance modes of localized surface plasmons (LSPs) by the size and the ambient dielectric medium of Ag nanorods is presented. It is found that the resonance wavelength and intensity of the transversal modes of LSPs are closely related to the dimensions of the Ag nanorods embedded in anodic aluminum oxide membranes. The transversal resonance peak exhibits obvious redshifts from 365 to 396 nm with increasing nanorod diameter from 40 to 80 nm, and the resonance intensity remarkably enhances with increasing nanorod diameter. In addition, it is observed that the transversal resonance modes of LSPs in Ag nanorods are strongly sensitive to their surrounding dielectric medium such as water, ethanol, and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, and the transversal resonance peak distinctly redshifts from 422 to 467 nm when the refractive index of the dielectric medium increases from 1.342 to 1.435. As a result, a refractive index sensitivity of up to 484 nm/RIU can be achieved based on the transversal resonance modes. The transverse resonance modes of LSPs in the Ag nanorods can be used for sensitive quantification of chemical and biological species.

  6. Ag nanoparticles-decorated ZnO nanorod array on a mechanical flexible substrate with enhanced optical and antimicrobial properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi; Tse, Wai Hei; Chen, Longyan; Zhang, Jin

    2015-03-01

    Heteronanostructured zinc oxide nanorod (ZnO NR) array are vertically grown on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) through a hydrothermal method followed by an in situ deposition of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) through a photoreduction process. The Ag-ZnO heterostructured nanorods on PDMS are measured with an average diameter of 160 nm and an average length of 2 μm. ZnO NRs measured by high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) shows highly crystalline with a lattice fringe of 0.255 nm, which corresponds to the (0002) planes in ZnO crystal lattice. The average diameter of the Ag NPs in situ deposited on the ZnO NRs is estimated at 22 ± 2 nm. As compared to the bare ZnO NRs, the heterostructured Ag-ZnO nanorod array shows enhanced ultraviolet (UV) absorption at 440 nm, and significant emission in the visible region (λem = 542 nm). In addition, the antimicrobial efficiency of Ag-ZnO heterostructured nanorod array shows obvious improvement as compared to bare ZnO nanorod array. The cytotoxicity of ZnO nanorod array with and without Ag NPs was studied by using 3 T3 mouse fibroblast cell line. No significant toxic effect is imposed on the cells.

  7. The stabilization and targeting of surfactant-synthesized gold nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostro-Kohanloo, Betty C.; Bickford, Lissett R.; Payne, Courtney M.; Day, Emily S.; Anderson, Lindsey J. E.; Zhong, Meng; Lee, Seunghyun; Mayer, Kathryn M.; Zal, Tomasz; Adam, Liana; Dinney, Colin P. N.; Drezek, Rebekah A.; West, Jennifer L.; Hafner, Jason H.

    2009-10-01

    The strong cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) surfactant responsible for the synthesis and stability of gold nanorod solutions complicates their biomedical applications. The critical parameter to maintain nanorod stability is the ratio of CTAB to nanorod concentration. The ratio is approximately 740 000 as determined by chloroform extraction of the CTAB from a nanorod solution. A comparison of nanorod stabilization by thiol-terminal PEG and by anionic polymers reveals that PEGylation results in higher yields and less aggregation upon removal of CTAB. A heterobifunctional PEG yields nanorods with exposed carboxyl groups for covalent conjugation to antibodies with the zero-length carbodiimide linker EDC. This conjugation strategy leads to approximately two functional antibodies per nanorod according to fluorimetry and ELISA assays. The nanorods specifically targeted cells in vitro and were visible with both two-photon and confocal reflectance microscopies. This covalent strategy should be generally applicable to other biomedical applications of gold nanorods as well as other gold nanoparticles synthesized with CTAB.

  8. Functionalized gold nanorod solution via reverse micelle based polyacrylate coating.

    PubMed

    Basiruddin, S K; Saha, Arindam; Pradhan, Narayan; Jana, Nikhil R

    2010-05-18

    Functionalization of gold nanorods is a key issue for their biomedical application, and currently it is performed via either electrostatic interaction or thiol based strategy. We have developed a polyacrylate based coating chemistry for gold nanorods that can be used in deriving a variety of functional nanorods with high colloidal stability. The coating processes can introduce primary amines, fluorescein, or poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) on the nanorod surface in one step process. While fluorescein incorporation can produce fluorescent nanorods, primary amine groups can be used for further functionalization. Various functional nanorods have been successfully synthesized from these coated nanorods and used in different applications. Glucose and biotin functionalized nanorods are used for protein detection, and oleyl functionalized nanorods with fluorescein incorporated in the polymer shell are used for fluorescence based cell labeling.

  9. Structural and morphology of ZnO nanorods synthesized using ZnO seeded growth hydrothermal method and its properties as UV sensing.

    PubMed

    Ridhuan, Nur Syafinaz; Razak, Khairunisak Abdul; Lockman, Zainovia; Abdul Aziz, Azlan

    2012-01-01

    In this study, zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorod arrays were synthesized using a simple hydrothermal reaction on ZnO seeds/n-silicon substrate. Several parameters were studied, including the heat-treatment temperature to produce ZnO seeds, zinc nitrate concentration, pH of hydrothermal reaction solution, and hydrothermal reaction time. The optimum heat-treatment temperature to produce uniform nanosized ZnO seeds was 400°C. The nanorod dimensions depended on the hydrothermal reaction parameters. The optimum hydrothermal reaction parameters to produce blunt tip-like nanorods (770 nm long and 80 nm in top diameter) were 0.1 M zinc nitrate, pH 7, and 4 h of growth duration. Phase analysis studies showed that all ZnO nanorods exhibited a strong (002) peak. Thus, the ZnO nanorods grew in a c-axis preferred orientation. A strong ultraviolet (UV) emission peak was observed for ZnO nanorods grown under optimized parameters with a low, deep-level emission peak, which indicated high optical property and crystallinity of the nanorods. The produced ZnO nanorods were also tested for their UV-sensing properties. All samples responded to UV light but with different sensing characteristics. Such different responses could be attributed to the high surface-to-volume ratio of the nanorods that correlated with the final ZnO nanorods morphology formed at different synthesis parameters. The sample grown using optimum synthesis parameters showed the highest responsivity of 0.024 A/W for UV light at 375 nm under a 3 V bias.

  10. Optical forces in nanorod metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Bogdanov, Andrey A; Shalin, Alexander S; Ginzburg, Pavel

    2015-10-30

    Optomechanical manipulation of micro and nano-scale objects with laser beams finds use in a large span of multidisciplinary applications. Auxiliary nanostructuring could substantially improve performances of classical optical tweezers by means of spatial localization of objects and intensity required for trapping. Here we investigate a three-dimensional nanorod metamaterial platform, serving as an auxiliary tool for the optical manipulation, able to support and control near-field interactions and generate both steep and flat optical potential profiles. It was shown that the 'topological transition' from the elliptic to hyperbolic dispersion regime of the metamaterial, usually having a significant impact on various light-matter interaction processes, does not strongly affect the distribution of optical forces in the metamaterial. This effect is explained by the predominant near-fields contributions of the nanostructure to optomechanical interactions. Semi-analytical model, approximating the finite size nanoparticle by a point dipole and neglecting the mutual re-scattering between the particle and nanorod array, was found to be in a good agreement with full-wave numerical simulation. In-plane (perpendicular to the rods) trapping regime, saddle equilibrium points and optical puling forces (directed along the rods towards the light source), acting on a particle situated inside or at the nearby the metamaterial, were found.

  11. Plasmonic nanorod metamaterials for biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabashin, A. V.; Evans, P.; Pastkovsky, S.; Hendren, W.; Wurtz, G. A.; Atkinson, R.; Pollard, R.; Podolskiy, V. A.; Zayats, A. V.

    2009-11-01

    Label-free plasmonic biosensors rely either on surface plasmon polaritons or on localized surface plasmons on continuous or nanostructured noble-metal surfaces to detect molecular-binding events. Despite undisputed advantages, including spectral tunability, strong enhancement of the local electric field and much better adaptability to modern nanobiotechnology architectures, localized plasmons demonstrate orders of magnitude lower sensitivity compared with their guided counterparts. Here, we demonstrate an improvement in biosensing technology using a plasmonic metamaterial that is capable of supporting a guided mode in a porous nanorod layer. Benefiting from a substantial overlap between the probing field and the active biological substance incorporated between the nanorods and a strong plasmon-mediated energy confinement inside the layer, this metamaterial provides an enhanced sensitivity to refractive-index variations of the medium between the rods (more than 30,000nm per refractive-index unit). We demonstrate the feasibility of our approach using a standard streptavidin-biotin affinity model and record considerable improvement in the detection limit of small analytes compared with conventional label-free plasmonic devices.

  12. Lanthanide complexes of azidophenacyl-DO3A as new synthons for click chemistry and the synthesis of heterometallic lanthanide arrays.

    PubMed

    Tropiano, Manuel; Kenwright, Alan M; Faulkner, Stephen

    2015-04-07

    Lanthanide complexes of azidophenacyl DO3A are effective substrates for click reactions with ethyne derivatives, giving rise to aryl triazole appended lanthanide complexes, in which the aryl triazole acts as an effective sensitising chromophore for lanthanide luminescence. They also undergo click chemistry with propargylDO3A derivatives, giving rise to heterometallic complexes.

  13. Gold nanorod-templated synthesis of polymetallic hollow nanostructures with enhanced electrocatalytic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xia; Ye, Wei; Zhu, Rui; Wang, Wenxin; Xie, Fang; Sun, Hongyan; Zhao, Qing; Ding, Yi; Yang, Jian

    2014-09-01

    Anisotropic polymetallic hollow nanostructures are highly desired for many applications because of their unique morphology, large specific surface areas and attractive electronic effects. Here, a simple method using gold nanorods as a self-sacrificed template has been developed for the fabrication of hollow dumbbell-like nanorods of Au@PtAg. The formation of the hollow structures involves the growth of another metallic shell first, and then the etching of gold nanorods, which is induced by oxygen and ascorbic acid. The lattice mismatch and cohesive energy of the shell, along with its surface passivation, greatly affect the subsequent etching and the resulting products, as has been demonstrated by a positive control in the case of Rh and a negative control in the case of Pd. Hollow dumbbell-like nanorods of Au@PtAg show great enhancement for the dehydrogenation pathway in the oxidation of formic acid, as compared to solid Au@PtAg nanorods, PtAu nanotubes and commercial Pt/C.Anisotropic polymetallic hollow nanostructures are highly desired for many applications because of their unique morphology, large specific surface areas and attractive electronic effects. Here, a simple method using gold nanorods as a self-sacrificed template has been developed for the fabrication of hollow dumbbell-like nanorods of Au@PtAg. The formation of the hollow structures involves the growth of another metallic shell first, and then the etching of gold nanorods, which is induced by oxygen and ascorbic acid. The lattice mismatch and cohesive energy of the shell, along with its surface passivation, greatly affect the subsequent etching and the resulting products, as has been demonstrated by a positive control in the case of Rh and a negative control in the case of Pd. Hollow dumbbell-like nanorods of Au@PtAg show great enhancement for the dehydrogenation pathway in the oxidation of formic acid, as compared to solid Au@PtAg nanorods, PtAu nanotubes and commercial Pt/C. Electronic

  14. Ultrasmall lanthanide-doped nanoparticles as multimodal platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yust, Brian G.; Pedraza, Francisco J.; Sardar, Dhiraj K.

    2014-03-01

    Recently, there has been a great amount of interest in nanoparticles which are able to provide a platform with high contrast for multiple imaging modalities in order to advance the tools available to biomedical researchers and physicians. However, many nanoparticles do not have ideal properties to provide high contrast in different imaging modes. In order to address this, ultrasmall lanthanide doped oxide and fluoride nanoparticles with strong NIR to NIR upconversion fluorescence and a strong magnetic response for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been developed. Specifically, these nanoparticles incorporate gadolinium, dysprosium, or a combination of both into the nano-crystalline host to achieve the magnetic properties. Thulium, erbium, and neodymium codopants provide the strong NIR absorption and emission lines that allow for deeper tissue imaging since near infrared light is not strongly absorbed or scattered by most tissues within this region. This also leads to better image quality and lower necessary excitation intensities. As a part of the one pot synthesis, these nanoparticles are coated with peg, pmao, or d-glucuronic acid to make them water soluble, biocompatible, and bioconjugable due to the available carboxyl or amine groups. Here, the synthesis, morphological characterization, magnetic response, NIR emission, and the quantum yield will be discussed. Cytotoxicity tested through cell viability at varying concentrations of nanoparticles in growth media will also be discussed.

  15. Lanthanide contraction effect on crystal structures of lanthanide coordination polymers with cyclohexanocucurbit[6]uril ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Li-Mei; Liu, Jing-Xin

    2017-01-01

    A series of compounds based on the macrocyclic ligand cyclohexanocucurbit[6]uril (Cy6Q[6]) with formulas {Ln(H2O)6Cy6Q[6]}·2(CdCl4)·H3O·xH2O [isomorphous with Ln=La (1), Ce (2), Pr (3) and Nd (4), x=11 (1), 11 (2), 10 (3) and 11 (4)], {Sm(H2O)5Cy6Q[6]}·2(CdCl4)·H3O·10H2O (5) and {Ln(H2O)5(NO3)@Cy6Q[6]}·2(CdCl4)·2H3O·xH2O [isomorphous with Ln=Gd (6), Tb (7) and Dy (8), x=8 (6), 6 (7) and 6 (8)], have been successfully synthesized by the self-assembly of Cy6Q[6] with the corresponding lanthanide nitrate under hydrochloric acid aqueous solution in the presence of CdCl2. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses revealed that compounds 1-8 all crystallize in monoclinic space group P21/c, and display 1D coordination polymer structures. The lanthanide contraction effect on the structures of 1-8 has also been investigated and discussed in detail. In contrast, the reaction of Cy6Q[6] with the Ho(NO)3, Tm(NO)3, Yb(NO)3 under the same conditions resulted in the compounds 9-11 with formulas Cy6Q[6]·2(CdCl4)·2H3O·xH2O [isomorphous with x=10 (9), 10 (10), and 9 (11)], in which no lanthanide cations are observed. The structural difference of these compounds indicates that the Cy6Q[6] may be used in the separation of lanthanide cations.

  16. Investigation of the phototoxic effect of ZnO nanorods on fibroblasts and melanoma human cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishwar, S.; Siddique, M.; Israr-Qadir, M.; Nur, O.; Willander, M.; Öllinger, K.

    2014-11-01

    Photocytotoxic effects of as-grown and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods coated with 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) have been studied on human cells, i.e. melanoma and foreskin fibroblast, under dark and ultraviolet light exposures. Zinc oxide nanorods have been grown on the very sharp tip (diameter = 700 nm) of borosilicate glass pipettes and then were coated by the photosensitizer for targeted investigations inside human cells. The coated glass pipette’s tip with photosensitizer has been inserted inside the cells with the help of a micro-manipulator and irradiated through ultraviolet light (UVA), which reduces the membrane potential of the mitochondria leading to cell death. Cell viability loss has been detected by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction assay when exposed to the dissolved ZnO nanorods and the production of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been detected along with the enhanced cytotoxic effect under UVA irradiation. Additionally, the influence of the lipid soluble antioxidant vitamin E and water-soluble N-acetyl-cysteine toward the enhancement or reduction of the toxicity has been investigated. A comparative analysis of the toxic nature of ZnO nanorods has been drawn between normal human fibroblast and melanoma cells, which can be favorable for understanding the clinical setting for killing tumor cells.

  17. Lasing action in gallium nitride quasicrystal nanorod arrays.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shih-Pang; Sou, Kuok-Pan; Chen, Chieh-Han; Cheng, Yuh-Jen; Huang, Ji-Kai; Lin, Chung-Hsiang; Kuo, Hao-Chung; Chang, Chun-Yen; Hsieh, Wen-Feng

    2012-05-21

    We report the observation of lasing action from an optically pumped gallium nitride quasicrystal nanorod arrays. The nanorods were fabricated from a GaN substrate by patterned etching, followed by epitaxial regrowth. The nanorods were arranged in a 12-fold symmetric quasicrystal pattern. The regrowth grew hexagonal crystalline facets and core-shell multiple quantum wells (MQWs) on nanorods. Under optical pumping, multiple lasing peaks resembling random lasing were observed. The lasing was identified to be from the emission of MQWs on the nanorod sidewalls. The resonant spectrum and mode field of the 12-fold symmetric photonic quasicrystal nanorod arrays is discussed.

  18. Fabrication of fluoroalkylsilane modified ZnO nanorod films for electrode protection of electrophoretic displays.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhengyuan; Meng, Xianwei; Tang, Fangqiong

    2011-11-01

    The electrode protection has gained importance because of its positive robust role for the long term display quality of electrophoretic displays. A simple method of zinc oxide nanorod films prepared by electrochemical deposition and coupling with fluoroalkylsilane (FAS) is introduced to fabricate electrode protection films for Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) electrodes. The surface microstructures of zinc oxide films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, showing a regular nanorods array. After treated by FAS the surface showed extremely low surface free energy with a water contact angle of 148.0 +/- 2.0 degrees. The settlement of pigments was considerably reduced according to the reflectance measurement by ultraviolet spectrophotometer. A weight experiment further confirmed that 90% of the pigment conglutination was prevented by the surface modification. This research can provide an economical approach to improve reliability and long-term image quality of the electrophoretic displays.

  19. Electronic Structure Engineering of Cu2O Film/ZnO Nanorods Array All-Oxide p-n Heterostructure for Enhanced Photoelectrochemical Property and Self-powered Biosensing Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Zhuo; Yan, Xiaoqin; Wang, Yunfei; Bai, Zhiming; Liu, Yichong; Zhang, Zheng; Lin, Pei; Zhang, Xiaohui; Yuan, Haoge; Zhang, Xueji; Zhang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    We have engineered the electronic structure at the interface between Cu2O and ZnO nanorods (NRs) array, through adjusting the carrier concentration of Cu2O. The electrodeposition of Cu2O at pH 11 acquired the highest carrier concentration, resulting in the largest interfacial electric field between Cu2O and ZnO, which finally led to the highest separation efficiency of photogenerated charge carriers. The optimized Cu2O/ZnO NRs array p-n heterostructures exhibited enhanced PEC performance, such as elevated photocurrent and photoconversion efficiency, as well as excellent sensing performance for the sensitive detection of glutathione (GSH) in PBS buffer even at applied bias of 0 V which made the device self-powered. Besides, the favorable selectivity, high reproducibility and extremely wide detection range, make such heterostructure a promising candidate for PEC biosensing applications, probably for the extended field of PEC water splitting or other solar photovoltaic beacons.

  20. Can Nanorods Emulsify Immiscible Polymer Blends?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hore, Michael J. A.

    2005-03-01

    The addition of nanoscale rods to immiscible binary polymer blends has a pronounced effect on the dynamics of phase separation. The results of computer simulations of the Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) model in three dimensions (3D) indicate that when nanorods prefer one of two components in an immiscible binary polymer blend, the rate of phase separation decreases when the volume fraction of nanorods is increased, or as the aspect ratio (L/D) of the rods is increased. Interestingly, anisotropic nanoparticles have a much more pronounced effect on phase separation dynamics in the system when compared to the effects of spherical nanoparticles, which, generically, do not alter the characteristics of the kinetics in the system. In particular, it may be the case that at high volume fractions -- or alternatively, low volume fractions and large aspect ratio of nanorods -- the system may undergo micro-phase separation only, indicating that the nanorods may be excellent emulsifying agents.

  1. Hybrid nanorod-polymer solar cells.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Wendy U; Dittmer, Janke J; Alivisatos, A Paul

    2002-03-29

    We demonstrate that semiconductor nanorods can be used to fabricate readily processed and efficient hybrid solar cells together with polymers. By controlling nanorod length, we can change the distance on which electrons are transported directly through the thin film device. Tuning the band gap by altering the nanorod radius enabled us to optimize the overlap between the absorption spectrum of the cell and the solar emission spectrum. A photovoltaic device consisting of 7-nanometer by 60-nanometer CdSe nanorods and the conjugated polymer poly-3(hexylthiophene) was assembled from solution with an external quantum efficiency of over 54% and a monochromatic power conversion efficiency of 6.9% under 0.1 milliwatt per square centimeter illumination at 515 nanometers. Under Air Mass (A.M.) 1.5 Global solar conditions, we obtained a power conversion efficiency of 1.7%.

  2. Tailoring terahertz plasmons with silver nanorod arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Wei; Song, Chunyuan; Lanier, Thomas E.; Singh, Ranjan; O'Hara, John F.; Dennis, William M.; Zhao, Yiping; Zhang, Weili

    2013-05-01

    Plasmonic materials that strongly interact with light are ideal candidates for designing subwavelength photonic devices. We report on direct coupling of terahertz waves in metallic nanorods by observing the resonant transmission of surface plasmon polariton waves through lithographically patterned films of silver nanorod (100 nm in diameter) micro-hole arrays. The best enhancement in surface plasmon resonant transmission is obtained when the nanorods are perfectly aligned with the electric field direction of the linearly polarized terahertz wave. This unique polarization-dependent propagation of surface plasmons in structures fabricated from nanorod films offers promising device applications. We conclude that the anisotropy of nanoscale metallic rod arrays imparts a material anisotropy relevant at the microscale that may be utilized for the fabrication of plasmonic and metamaterial based devices for operation at terahertz frequencies.

  3. Separation of Minor Actinides from Lanthanides by Dithiophosphinic Acid Extractants

    SciTech Connect

    D. R. Peterman; M. R. Greenhalgh; R. D. Tillotson; J. R. Klaehn; M. K. Harrup; T. A. Luther; J. D. Law; L. M. Daniels

    2008-09-01

    The selective extraction of the minor actinides (Am(III) and Cm(III)) from the lanthanides is an important part of advanced reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. This separation would allow the Am/Cm to be fabricated into targets and recycled to a reactor and the lanthanides to be dispositioned. This separation is difficult to accomplish due to the similarities in the chemical properties of the trivalent actinides and lanthanides. Research efforts at the Idaho National Laboratory have identified an innovative synthetic pathway yielding new regiospecific dithiophosphinic acid (DPAH) extractants. The synthesis provides DPAH derivatives that can address the issues concerning minor actinide separation and extractant stability. For this work, two new symmetric DPAH extractants have been prepared. The use of these extractants for the separation of minor actinides from lanthanides will be discussed.

  4. Separation of actinides from lanthanides utilizing molten salt electrorefining

    SciTech Connect

    Grimmett, D.L.; Fusselman, S.P.; Roy, J.J.; Gay, R.L.; Krueger, C.L.; Storvick, T.S.; Inoue, T.; Hijikata, T.; Takahashi, N.

    1996-10-01

    TRUMP-S (TRansUranic Management through Pyropartitioning Separation) is a pyrochemical process being developed to separate actinides form fission products in nuclear waste. A key process step involving molten salt electrorefining to separate actinides from lanthanides has been studied on a laboratory scale. Electrorefining of U, Np, Pu, Am, and lanthanide mixtures from molten cadmium at 450 C to a solid cathode utilizing a molten chloride electrolyte resulted in > 99% removal of actinides from the molten cadmium and salt phases. Removal of the last few percent of actinides is accompanied by lowered cathodic current efficiency and some lanthanide codeposition. Actinide/lanthanide separation ratios on the cathode are ordered U > Np > Pu > Am and are consistent with predictions based on equilibrium potentials.

  5. Luminescent lanthanide nanomaterials: an emerging tool for theranostic applications.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Shashi; Jayakumar, Muthu Kumara Gnanasammandhan; Zhang, Yong

    2015-05-01

    Lanthanide materials have been gaining popularity for use in various theranostic applications, primarily due to their unique optical properties such as narrow emission bands, multiple emission wavelengths, emission tunability, long fluorescence lifetime and large Stokes shift. Apart from these, some lanthanide materials also exhibit magnetic and light-up conversion properties. Such nanomaterials have been used for a wide range of applications ranging from detection of biomarkers, in vitro and in vivo imaging to therapeutic applications. Recently, combined modalities of lanthanide nanomaterials for simultaneous detection/imaging and delivery of therapeutic agents (termed 'theranostics') have been explored. The various advantages and disadvantages of using lanthanide nanomaterials as theranostic agents and potential areas for future development have been discussed in this review.

  6. Advanced Extraction Methods for Actinide/Lanthanide Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, M.J.

    2005-12-01

    The separation of An(III) ions from chemically similar Ln(III) ions is perhaps one of the most difficult problems encountered during the processing of nuclear waste. In the 3+ oxidation states, the metal ions have an identical charge and roughly the same ionic radius. They differ strictly in the relative energies of their f- and d-orbitals, and to separate these metal ions, ligands will need to be developed that take advantage of this small but important distinction. The extraction of uranium and plutonium from nitric acid solution can be performed quantitatively by the extraction with the TBP (tributyl phosphate). Commercially, this process has found wide use in the PUREX (plutonium uranium extraction) reprocessing method. The TRUEX (transuranium extraction) process is further used to coextract the trivalent lanthanides and actinides ions from HLLW generated during PUREX extraction. This method uses CMPO [(N, N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethyl) octylphenylphosphineoxide] intermixed with TBP as a synergistic agent. However, the final separation of trivalent actinides from trivalent lanthanides still remains a challenging task. In TRUEX nitric acid solution, the Am(III) ion is coordinated by three CMPO molecules and three nitrate anions. Taking inspiration from this data and previous work with calix[4]arene systems, researchers on this project have developed a C3-symmetric tris-CMPO ligand system using a triphenoxymethane platform as a base. The triphenoxymethane ligand systems have many advantages for the preparation of complex ligand systems. The compounds are very easy to prepare. The steric and solubility properties can be tuned through an extreme range by the inclusion of different alkoxy and alkyl groups such as methyoxy, ethoxy, t-butoxy, methyl, octyl, t-pentyl, or even t-pentyl at the ortho- and para-positions of the aryl rings. The triphenoxymethane ligand system shows promise as an improved extractant for both tetravalent and trivalent actinide recoveries form

  7. Lighting up cells with lanthanide self-assembled helicates

    PubMed Central

    Bünzli, Jean-Claude G.

    2013-01-01

    Lanthanide bioprobes and bioconjugates are ideal luminescent stains in view of their low propensity to photobleaching, sharp emission lines and long excited state lifetimes permitting time-resolved detection for enhanced sensitivity. We show here how the interplay between physical, chemical and biochemical properties allied to microfluidics engineering leads to self-assembled dinuclear lanthanide luminescent probes illuminating live cells and selectively detecting biomarkers expressed by cancerous human breast cells. PMID:24511387

  8. Fabrication and NO2 gas sensing performance of TeO2-core/CuO-shell heterostructure nanorod sensors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    TeO2-nanostructured sensors are seldom reported compared to other metal oxide semiconductor materials such as ZnO, In2O3, TiO2, Ga2O3, etc. TeO2/CuO core-shell nanorods were fabricated by thermal evaporation of Te powder followed by sputter deposition of CuO. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction showed that each nanorod consisted of a single crystal TeO2 core and a polycrystalline CuO shell with a thickness of approximately 7 nm. The TeO2/CuO core-shell one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures exhibited a bamboo leaf-like morphology. The core-shell nanorods were 100 to 300 nm in diameter and up to 30 μm in length. The multiple networked TeO2/CuO core-shell nanorod sensor showed responses of 142% to 425% to 0.5- to 10-ppm NO2 at 150°C. These responses were stronger than or comparable to those of many other metal oxide nanostructures, suggesting that TeO2 is also a promising sensor material. The responses of the core-shell nanorods were 1.2 to 2.1 times higher than those of pristine TeO2 nanorods over the same NO2 concentration range. The underlying mechanism for the enhanced NO2 sensing properties of the core-shell nanorod sensor can be explained by the potential barrier-controlled carrier transport mechanism. PACS 61.46. + w; 07.07.Df; 73.22.-f PMID:25489289

  9. Functionalized CdS nanospheres and nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyeokjin; Yang, Heesun; Holloway, Paul H.

    2009-12-01

    Functionalized nanoparticles are discussed. Surfaces of CdS:Mn/ZnS core/shell nanospheres (Qdots) were converted from hydrophobic to hydrophilic by growth of a SiO 2 shell. The colloidal dispersion was stabilize by adding a surfactant with a negative surface charge, and a cell-penetrating-peptide, TAT, was attached through a primary amine group. The TAT functionalized Qdots were shown to pass the blood-brain-barrier and luminescence in the infused half of the brain. In addition, nanorods of S 2- rich CdS were synthesized by reaction of excess S with Cd precursors in the presence of ethylene diamine. The photoluminescence (PL) peak from the S 2- rich CdS nanorods was broad with a maximum at ∼710 nm, which was 40 nm longer in wavelength than the PL peak from Cd 2+ rich CdS (∼670 nm) nanorods. The influence of surface electron or hole trap states on the luminescent pathway of CdS nanorods were used to explain these shifts in wavelength. Nanocrystals of Au with ∼2 nm diameters were grown on S 2- rich surfaces of CdS nanorods. Significant quenching of photoluminescence was observed from Au nanocrystals on CdS nanorods due to interfacial charge separation. Charge separation by Au nanocrystals on CdS resulted in enhanced UV photocatalytic degradation of Procion red mix-5B (PRB) dye in aqueous solution.

  10. Tough photoluminescent hydrogels doped with lanthanide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mei Xiang; Yang, Can Hui; Liu, Zhen Qi; Zhou, Jinxiong; Xu, Feng; Suo, Zhigang; Yang, Jian Hai; Chen, Yong Mei

    2015-03-01

    Photoluminescent hydrogels have emerged as novel soft materials with potential applications in many fields. Although many photoluminescent hydrogels have been fabricated, their scope of usage has been severely limited by their poor mechanical performance. Here, a facile strategy is reported for preparing lanthanide (Ln)-alginate/polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogels with both high toughness and photoluminescence, which has been achieved by doping Ln(3+) ions (Ln = Eu, Tb, Eu/Tb) into alginate/PAAm hydrogel networks, where Ln(3+) ions serve as both photoluminescent emitters and physical cross-linkers. The resulting hydrogels exhibit versatile advantages including excellent mechanical properties (∼ MPa strength, ≈ 20 tensile strains, ≈ 10(4) kJ m(-3) energy dissipation), good photoluminescent performance, tunable emission color, excellent processability, and cytocompatibility. The developed tough photoluminescent hydrogels hold great promises for expanding the usage scope of hydrogels.

  11. Bending Gold Nanorods with Light.

    PubMed

    Babynina, Anastasia; Fedoruk, Michael; Kühler, Paul; Meledin, Alexander; Döblinger, Markus; Lohmüller, Theobald

    2016-10-12

    V-shaped gold nanoantennas are the functional components of plasmonic metasurfaces, which are capable of manipulating light in unprecedented ways. Designing a metasurface requires the custom arrangement of individual antennas with controlled shape and orientation. Here, we show how highly crystalline gold nanorods in solution can be bent, one-by-one, into a V-shaped geometry and printed to the surface of a solid support through a combination of plasmonic heating and optical force. Significantly, we demonstrate that both the bending angle and the orientation of each rod-antenna can be adjusted independent from each other by tuning the laser intensity and polarization. This approach is applicable for the patterning of V-shaped plasmonic antennas on almost any substrate, which holds great potential for the fabrication of ultrathin optical components and devices.

  12. Methods of making functionalized nanorods

    DOEpatents

    Gur, Ilan [San Francisco, CA; Milliron, Delia [Berkeley, CA; Alivisatos, A Paul [Oakland, CA; Liu, Haitao [Berkeley, CA

    2012-01-10

    A process for forming functionalized nanorods. The process includes providing a substrate, modifying the substrate by depositing a self-assembled monolayer of a bi-functional molecule on the substrate, wherein the monolayer is chosen such that one side of the bi-functional molecule binds to the substrate surface and the other side shows an independent affinity for binding to a nanocrystal surface, so as to form a modified substrate. The process further includes contacting the modified substrate with a solution containing nanocrystal colloids, forming a bound monolayer of nanocrystals on the substrate surface, depositing a polymer layer over the monolayer of nanocrystals to partially cover the monolayer of nanocrystals, so as to leave a layer of exposed nanocrystals, functionalizing the exposed nanocrystals, to form functionalized nanocrystals, and then releasing the functionalized nanocrystals from the substrate.

  13. Temperature-dependent adsorption of surfactant molecules and associated crystallization kinetics of noncentrosymmetric Fe(IO{sub 3}){sub 3} nanorods in microemulsions

    SciTech Connect

    El-Kass, Moustafa; Ladj, Rachid; Mugnier, Yannick; Le Dantec, Ronan; Hadji, Rachid; Marty, Jean-Christophe; Rouxel, Didier; Durand, Christiane; Fontvieille, Dominique; Rogalska, Ewa; and others

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Crystallization of Fe(IO{sub 3}){sub 3} in microemulsions probed by hyper-Rayleigh scattering. • A faster growth and a better shape control of nanorods are obtained at 80 °C. • Different persistent cell deformations are related to the crystallization kinetics. • A temperature-dependent adsorption of surfactants on nanorods is suggested. - Abstract: Aggregation-induced crystallization of iron iodate nanorods within organic–inorganic aggregates of primary amorphous precursors is probed by time-dependent hyper-Rayleigh scattering measurements in Triton X-100 based-microemulsions. In the context of a growing interest of noncentrosymmetric oxide nanomaterials in multi-photon bioimaging, we demonstrate by a combination of X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy that an increase in the synthesis of temperature results in faster crystallization kinetics and in a better shape-control of the final Fe(IO{sub 3}){sub 3} nanorods. For initial microemulsions of fixed composition, room-temperature synthesis leads to bundles of 1–3 μm long nanorods, whereas shorter individual nanorods are obtained when the temperature is increased. Results are interpreted in terms of kinetically unfavorable mesoscale transformations due to the strong binding interactions with Triton molecules. The interplay between the nanorod crystallization kinetics and their corresponding unit cell deformation, evidenced by lattice parameter refinements, is attributed to a temperature-dependent adsorption of surfactants molecules at the organic–inorganic interface.

  14. Development and Testing of an Americium/Lanthanide Separation Flowsheet Using Sodium Bismuthate

    SciTech Connect

    Jack Law; Bruce Mincher; Troy Garn; Mitchell Greenhalgh; Nicholas Schmitt; Veronica Rutledge

    2014-04-01

    The separation of Am from the lanthanides and curium is a key step in proposed advanced fuel cycle scenarios. The partitioning and transmutation of Am is desirable to minimize the long-term heat load of material interred in a future high-level waste repository. A separation process amenable to process scale-up remains elusive. Given only subtle chemistry differences within and between the ions of the trivalent actinide and lanthanide series this separation is challenging ; however, higher oxidation states of americium can be prepared using sodium bismuthate and separated via solvent extraction using diamylamylphosphonate (DAAP) extraction. Among the other trivalent metals only Ce is also oxidized and extracted. Due to the long-term instability of Am(VI) , the loaded organic phase is readily selectively stripped to partition the actinide to a new acidic aqueous phase. Batch extraction distribution ratio measurements were used to design a flowsheet to accomplish this separation. Additionally, crossflow filtration was investigated as a method to filter the bismuthate solids from the feed solution prior to extraction. Results of the filtration studies, flowsheet development work and flowsheet performance testing using a centrifugal contactor are detailed.

  15. Bio-Functional Au/Si Nanorods for Pathogen Detection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Technical Abstract Nanotechnology applications for food safety and biosecurity, especially development of nanoscale sensors for foodborne pathogen measurement are emerging. A novel bio-functional nanosensor for Salmonella detection was developed using hetero-nanorods. The silica nanorods were fabr...

  16. Manipulation of cadmium selenide nanorods with an atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Tranvouez, E; Orieux, A; Boer-Duchemin, E; Devillers, C H; Huc, V; Comtet, G; Dujardin, G

    2009-04-22

    We have used an atomic force microscope (AFM) to manipulate and study ligand-capped cadmium selenide nanorods deposited on highly oriented pyrolitic graphite (HOPG). The AFM tip was used to manipulate (i.e., translate and rotate) the nanorods by applying a force perpendicular to the nanorod axis. The manipulation result was shown to depend on the point of impact of the AFM tip with the nanorod and whether the nanorod had been manipulated previously. Forces applied parallel to the nanorod axis, however, did not give rise to manipulation. These results are interpreted by considering the atomic-scale interactions of the HOPG substrate with the organic ligands surrounding the nanorods. The vertical deflection of the cantilever was recorded during manipulation and was combined with a model in order to estimate the value of the horizontal force between the tip and nanorod during manipulation. This horizontal force is estimated to be on the order of a few tens of nN.

  17. Single and multi-layered core-shell structures based on ZnO nanorods obtained by aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Sáenz-Trevizo, A.; Amézaga-Madrid, P.; Pizá-Ruiz, P.; Antúnez-Flores, W.; Ornelas-Gutiérrez, C.; Miki-Yoshida, M.

    2015-07-15

    Core–shell nanorod structures were prepared by a sequential synthesis using an aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition technique. Several samples consisting of ZnO nanorods were initially grown over TiO{sub 2} film-coated borosilicate glass substrates, following the synthesis conditions reported elsewhere. Later on, a uniform layer consisting of individual Al, Ni, Ti or Fe oxides was grown onto ZnO nanorod samples forming the so-called single MO{sub x}/ZnO nanorod core–shell structures, where MO{sub x} was the metal oxide shell. Additionally, a three-layer core–shell sample was developed by growing Fe, Ti and Fe oxides alternately, onto the ZnO nanorods. The microstructure of the core–shell materials was characterized by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy was employed to corroborate the formation of different metal oxides. X-ray diffraction outcomes for single core–shell structures showed solely the presence of ZnO as wurtzite and TiO{sub 2} as anatase. For the multi-layered shell sample, the existence of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} as hematite was also detected. Morphological observations suggested the existence of an outer material grown onto the nanorods and further microstructural analysis by HR-STEM confirmed the development of core–shell structures in all cases. These studies also showed that the individual Al, Fe, Ni and Ti oxide layers are amorphous; an observation that matched with X-ray diffraction analysis where no apparent extra oxides were detected. For the multi-layered sample, the development of a shell consisting of three different oxide layers onto the nanorods was found. Overall results showed that no alteration in the primary ZnO core was produced during the growth of the shells, indicating that the deposition technique used herein was and it is suitable for the synthesis of homogeneous and complex nanomaterials high in quality and purity. In addition

  18. Property enchancement of polyimide films by way of the incorporation of lanthanide metal ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David W.

    1993-01-01

    Lanthanide metal ions were incorporated into the polyimide derived from 2,2-bis(3,4-dicarboxyphenyl) hexafluoropropane dianhydride (6FDA) and 1,3-bis(aminophenoxy) benzene (APB) in an attempt to produce molecular level metal-polymer composites. The lanthanide series of metal ions (including aluminum, scandium, and yttrium) provide discrete and stable metal ions in the 3+ oxidation state. Throughout the series there is a uniform variation in ionic size ranging from 50 pm for aluminum to a maximum of 103.4 pm for cerium and gradually decreasing again to 84.8 pm for lutetium. The high charge-to-size ratio for these ions as well as the ability to obtain large coordination numbers makes them excellent candidates for interacting with the polymer substructure. The distinct lack of solubility of simple lanthanide salts such as the acetates and halides has made it difficult to obtain metal ions distributed in the polymer framework as discrete ions or metal complexes rather than microcomposites of metal clusters. (Lanthanum nitrates are quite soluble, but the presence of the strongly oxidizing nitrate ion leads to serious degradation of the polymer upon thermal curing. This work was successful at extending the range of soluble metals salts by using chelating agents derived from the beta-diketones dipivaloylmethane, dibenzoylmethane, trifluoroacetylacetone, and hexafluoroacetylacetone. Metal acetates which are insoluble in dimethylacetamide dissolve readily in the presence of the diketones. Addition of the polyimide yields a homogeneous resin which is then cast into a clear film. Upon curing clear films were obtained with the dibenzoylmethane and trifluoroacetylacetone ligands. The dipavaloylmethane precipitates the metal during the film casting process, and hexafluoroacetylacetone gives cured films which are deformed and brittle. These clear films are being evaluated for the effect of the metal ions on the coefficient of thermal expansion, resistance to atomic oxygen, and on

  19. Hydrogen peroxide generation and photocatalytic degradation of estrone by microstructural controlled ZnO nanorod arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yangsi; Han, Jie; Qiu, Wei; Gao, Wei

    2012-12-01

    The strong oxidant, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), generated by ZnO nanorod arrays under UV light irradiation was monitored by fluorescence analysis. The ZnO nanorod arrays were synthesized via a low temperature hydrothermal method and their dimensions, i.e., diameter and height, can be controlled by adjusting the concentration of zinc nitrate (Zn(NO3)2·6H2O) and hexamethylenetetramine (HMT). The morphology, nanostructure, surface roughness and optical property were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmittance spectra, respectively. The ZnO nanorod arrays were applied in the degradation of estrone, which is an emerging steroid estrogen contaminant. The results revealed that the ZnO nanorod array produced from 25 mM Zn2+ and HMT had the highest aspect ratio, the largest surface roughness and the lowest band gap energy, which was beneficial to the efficiency of UV light utilization, photocatalytic degradation of estrone and H2O2 generation.

  20. Multifunctional Particles: Magnetic Nanocrystals and Gold Nanorods Coated with Fluorescent Dye-Doped Silica Shells

    PubMed Central

    Heitsch, Andrew T.; Smith, Danielle K.; Patel, Reken E.; Ress, David; Korgel, Brian A.

    2008-01-01

    Multifunctional colloidal core-shell nanoparticles of magnetic nanocrystals (of iron oxide or FePt) or gold nanorods encapsulated in silica shells doped with the fluorescent dye, Tris(2,2′-bipyridyl)dichlororuthenium(II) hexahydrate (Rubpy) were synthesized. The as-prepared magnetic nanocrystals are initially hydrophobic and were coated with silica using a microemulsion approach, while the as-prepared gold nanorods are hydrophilic and were coated with silica using a Stöber-type of process. Each approach yielded monodisperse nanoparticles with uniform fluorescent dye-doped silica shells. These colloidal heterostructures have the potential to be used as dual-purpose tags—exhibiting a fluorescent signal that could be combined with either dark-field optical contrast (in the case of the gold nanorods), or enhanced contrast in magnetic resonance images (in the case of magnetic nanocrystal cores). The optical and magnetic properties of the fluorescent silica-coated gold nanorods and magnetic nanocrystals are reported. PMID:19578476

  1. Lithium storage capability of CuGeO{sub 3} nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, JinKui; Lai, Man On; Lu, Li

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: ► We synthesized nanosized CuGeO{sub 3} by a facial hydrothermal method for Li battery. ► A high capacity of 690 mAh g{sup −1} at 50 cycles is achieved. ► The capacity is remarkably higher than that of the GeO{sub 2} electrode. ► The nanosized CuGeO{sub 3} also shows good cyclability. -- Abstract: Copper metagermanate (CuGeO{sub 3}) nanorods were synthesized through a low temperature hydrothermal method at 180 °C. The as-synthesized CuGeO{sub 3} nanorods show a well crystallined nanostructure with diameters in the range from 40 to 70 nm, and a length from 250 to 350 nm. Electrochemical measurements demonstrate that the CuGeO{sub 3} nanorods exhibit a first charge capacity of 924 mAh g{sup −1} and 690 mAh g{sup −1} after 50 cycles, which is remarkably improved than the pure nanosize GeO{sub 2} electrode. This investigation indicates that CuGeO{sub 3} nanorods could be utilized as a high capacity anode material in lithium-ion batteries by reducing particle size and metal oxide addition. The lithium storage mechanisms for the improved capacity retention were also studied.

  2. Synthesis of uniform polyaniline nanorods with the assistance of ethylene glycol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Wei; Ma, Li; Gan, Mengyu; Yan, Jun; Zeng, Shu; Li, Zhitao; Bai, Youqian

    2014-04-01

    The uniform polyaniline (PANI) nanorods were prepared by the chemical method with the assistance of ethylene glycol (EG) medium. The morphology and structure of the PANI nanorods were characterized by SEM, TEM, FTIR, and UV-vis technique, and the effects of stirring on the morphology, structure, electrical conductivity, and electrochemical behavior of PANI were investigated. The results showed that as-synthesized PANI can be facilely dispersed in water and ethanol to form colloids. During the reaction, the H-bonding between molecules of PANI and EG plays a key role for the one-dimensional. In the presence of stirring, uniform PANI nanorods with diameters of 50-80 nm and length up to 400-800 nm can be obtained, and the aspect ratio is about 4. While in the absence of stirring, the aspect ratio of nanorods increases to more than 10, the diameter and length are 20-60 nm and 0.2-1 μm, respectively. In addition, the stirring can result in a higher doping level, conductivity, and degree of oxidation. Based on these results, a possible formation mechanism of PANI nanostructures is presented.

  3. Room temperature synthesis and high temperature frictional study of silver vanadate nanorods.

    PubMed

    Singh, D P; Polychronopoulou, K; Rebholz, C; Aouadi, S M

    2010-08-13

    We report the room temperature (RT) synthesis of silver vanadate nanorods (consisting of mainly beta-AgV O(3)) by a simple wet chemical route and their frictional study at high temperatures (HT). The sudden mixing of ammonium vanadate with silver nitrate solution under constant magnetic stirring resulted in a pale yellow coloured precipitate. Structural/microstructural characterization of the precipitate through x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed the high yield and homogeneous formation of silver vanadate nanorods. The length of the nanorods was 20-40 microm and the thickness 100-600 nm. The pH variation with respect to time was thoroughly studied to understand the formation mechanism of the silver vanadate nanorods. This synthesis process neither demands HT, surfactants nor long reaction time. The silver vanadate nanomaterial showed good lubrication behaviour at HT (700 degrees C) and the friction coefficient was between 0.2 and 0.3. HT-XRD revealed that AgV O(3) completely transformed into silver vanadium oxide (Ag(2)V(4)O(11)) and silver with an increase in temperature from RT to 700 degrees C.

  4. Abnormal Cathodic Photocurrent Generated on an n-Type FeOOH Nanorod-Array Photoelectrode.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongjun; Lyu, Miaoqiang; Liu, Gang; Wang, Lianzhou

    2016-03-24

    A simple, wet-chemical method for the synthesis of an FeOOH nanorod-array photoelectrode on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) glass is reported. Nanorods of diameter about 35 nm and length about 300 nm have been vertically grown on an FTO substrate. Upon calcination, the FeOOH phase could be easily converted to a hematite structure while maintaining the shape of the nanorod array. An interesting abnormal cathodic photocurrent is generated on the FeOOH nanorod-array photoelectrode under illumination, which is totally different from that obtained on a calcined hematite photoelectrode under the same experimental conditions. The cathodic photocurrent density generated on the FeOOH photoelectrode can also be tuned by applying an electrochemical anodic or cathodic treatment. Detailed analysis has revealed that higher valence state Fe(IV) species in the FeOOH photoelectrode play an important role in sacrificing the photoexcited electrons for generation of the cathodic photocurrent. Comparison between the FeOOH and hematite photoelectrodes allows for a better understanding of the interplay between crystal structure, surface reactions, and photocurrent. The findings on this new abnormal phenomenon could also provide guidance for the design of new types of semiconducting photoelectrochemical devices.

  5. Controlled growth of well-aligned ZnO nanorod arrays by hydrothermal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihailova, I.; Gerbreders, V.; Bulanovs, A.; Tamanis, E.; Sledevskis, E.; Ogurcovs, A.; Sarajevs, P.

    2014-10-01

    The application prospect of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures largely relies on the ability to grow nanoobjects with necessary geometry. In this study well-aligned ZnO nanorod arrays with a high density and uniformity were successfully synthesized on the glass substrates by a hydrothermal method at low-temperature. The aqueous solutions of zinc nitrate hexahydrate and hexamethylenetetramine was used. The effect of seed layer (obtained by electrochemical method and by vacuum deposition method) on the alignment of ZnO nanorods has been investigated. The morphological properties of the ZnO nanorods were also examined in accordance with varying the magnetron sputtering angle for ZnO seeds deposition. It is also shown that the electric field can control the direction of the growth of ZnO nanorods. Morphological, structural and compositional characterizations of obtained films were carried out by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis methods.

  6. Electrical characteristics of ZnO nanorods reinforced polymer nanocomposite thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, Snigdha; Roy, Asim

    2015-05-15

    ZnO nanorods have been prepared by simple chemical method, which is used to fabricate organic bistable devices (OBDs). OBDs are fabricated by incorporating different weight percent (wt %) of chemically synthesized Zinc Oxide (ZnO) nanorods into polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). Current-voltage (I-V) measurements of the spin coated ZnO+PMMA nanocomopsite thin film on indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate showed current hysteresis behaviour, which is an indication of memory effect. The samples exhibit two distinct resistance states, ON and OFF states, characterised by relatively low and high resistance of the OBDs, respectively. It is also observed that with change in ZnO dopant concentration the value of ON/OFF current changes. Higher ON/OFF current ratio is desired for practical applications. Current conduction mechanism of the devices has been explained invoking various existing models, and it has been found that the trapped-charge-limited conduction mechanism was dominant in our samples.

  7. Room temperature synthesis of needle-shaped ZnO nanorods via sonochemical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahab, Rizwan; Ansari, S. G.; Kim, Young-Soon; Seo, Hyung-Kee; Shin, Hyung-Shik

    2007-07-01

    Single crystalline needle-shaped zinc oxide nanorods were synthesized via sonochemical methods using zinc acetate dihydrate and sodium hydroxide at room temperature. Morphological investigation revealed that the nanoneedles are of hexagonal surfaces along the length. The typical diameter and length vary from 120 to 160 nm and 3 to 5 μm, respectively. Sonication time appears to be a critical parameter for the shape determination. Detailed structural characterization confirmed that the nanorods are single crystalline with wurtzite hexagonal phase. A standard peak of zinc oxide was observed at 520 cm -1 from the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The ultra-violet visible and room temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopic results demonstrate that the synthesized material has good optical properties.

  8. Detection of label-free H2O2 based on sensitive Au nanorods as sensor.

    PubMed

    Shan, Guiye; Zheng, Shujing; Chen, Shaopeng; Chen, Yanwei; Liu, Yichun

    2013-02-01

    A rapid, reproducible, cost-effective approaches for the detection of hydrogen peroxide has been developed based on the change of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) peak of Au nanorods (NRs). Au NRs were prepared by silver ion-assisted seed-mediated method, which are characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The longitudinal plasmon band of Au nanorods is highly sensitive to their aspect ratios so that LSPR peak of Au NRs was shift with change of their aspect ratios. Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) with high oxidation potential can decompose Au NRs. As a result, Au NRs can be shortened through an oxidation reaction by H(2)O(2). After shortening Au NRs, the LSPR peaks show blue shift. The LSPR peak of Au NRs displays the dependence of spectral shift on concentration of H(2)O(2). It provides a more simple and sensitive method for detecting H(2)O(2).

  9. Template-assisted fabrication of free-standing nanorod arrays of a hole-conducting cross-linked triphenylamine derivative: toward ordered bulk-heterojunction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Haberkorn, Niko; Gutmann, Jochen S; Theato, Patrick

    2009-06-23

    Free-standing nanorod arrays of a thermally cross-linked semiconducting triphenylamine were fabricated on conductive ITO/glass substrates via an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template-assisted approach. By using a solution wetting method combined with a subsequent thermal imprinting step to fill the nanoporous structure of the template with a cross-linkable triphenylamine derivative, a polymeric replication of the AAO was obtained after thermal curing and selective removal of the template. To obtain well-aligned and free-standing nanorod arrays, aggregation and collapse of the nanorods were prevented by optimizing their aspect ratio and applying a freeze-drying technique to remove the aqueous medium after the etching step. Because of their electrochemical properties and their resistance against organic solvents after curing, these high density nanorod arrays have potential application in organic photovoltaics.

  10. Controlling Au Nanorod Dispersion in Thin Film Polymer Blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hore, Michael J. A.; Composto, Russell J.

    2012-02-01

    Dispersion of Au nanorods (Au NRs) in polymer thin films is studied using a combination of experimental and theoretical techniques. Here, we incorporate small volume fractions of polystyrene-functionalized Au NRs (φrod 0.05) into polystyrene (PS) thin films. By controlling the ratio of the brush length (N) to that of the matrix polymers (P), we can selectively obtain dispersed or aggregated Au NR structures in the PS-Au(N):PS(P) films. A dispersion map of these structures allows one to choose N and P to obtain either uniformly dispersed Au NRs or aggregates of closely packed, side-by-side aligned Au NRs. Furthermore, by blending poly(2,6-dimethyl-p-phenylene oxide) (PPO) into the PS films, we demonstrate that the Au nanorod morphology can be further tuned by reducing depletion-attraction forces and promoting miscibility of the Au NRs. These predictable structures ultimately give rise to tunable optical absorption in the films resulting from surface plasmon resonance coupling between the Au NRs. Finally, self-consistent field theoretic (SCFT) calculations for both the PS-Au(N):PS(P) and PS-Au(N):PS(P):PPO systems provide insight into the PS brush structure, and allow us to interpret morphology and optical property results in terms of wet and dry PS brush states.

  11. Electronic Structure Engineering of Cu2O Film/ZnO Nanorods Array All-Oxide p-n Heterostructure for Enhanced Photoelectrochemical Property and Self-powered Biosensing Application

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Zhuo; Yan, Xiaoqin; Wang, Yunfei; Bai, Zhiming; Liu, Yichong; Zhang, Zheng; Lin, Pei; Zhang, Xiaohui; Yuan, Haoge; Zhang, Xueji; Zhang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    We have engineered the electronic structure at the interface between Cu2O and ZnO nanorods (NRs) array, through adjusting the carrier concentration of Cu2O. The electrodeposition of Cu2O at pH 11 acquired the highest carrier concentration, resulting in the largest interfacial electric field between Cu2O and ZnO, which finally led to the highest separation efficiency of photogenerated charge carriers. The optimized Cu2O/ZnO NRs array p-n heterostructures exhibited enhanced PEC performance, such as elevated photocurrent and photoconversion efficiency, as well as excellent sensing performance for the sensitive detection of glutathione (GSH) in PBS buffer even at applied bias of 0 V which made the device self-powered. Besides, the favorable selectivity, high reproducibility and extremely wide detection range, make such heterostructure a promising candidate for PEC biosensing applications, probably for the extended field of PEC water splitting or other solar photovoltaic beacons. PMID:25600940

  12. White-light-controlled resistive switching chearacteristics of TiO2/Cu2O composite nanorods array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bai; Liu, Yonghong; Lou, Fangming; Chen, Peng

    2015-08-01

    TiO2/Cu2O composite nanorods array were grown on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) substrate by hydrothermal process, and white-light-controlled resistive switching characteristics of Ag/[TiO2/Cu2O]/FTO structure were further investigated. The current-voltage characteristics of the composite nanorods array represent a good rectifying property and bipolar resistive switching behavior. Specially, the resistive switching behavior can be regulated by white-light illuminating at room temperature. This study is helpful for exploring the memory materials and their applications in nonvolatile light-controlled memory devices.

  13. Growth process for gallium nitride porous nanorods

    DOEpatents

    Wildeson, Isaac Harshman; Sands, Timothy David

    2015-03-24

    A GaN nanorod and formation method. Formation includes providing a substrate having a GaN film, depositing SiN.sub.x on the GaN film, etching a growth opening through the SiN.sub.x and into the GaN film, growing a GaN nanorod through the growth opening, the nanorod having a nanopore running substantially through its centerline. Focused ion beam etching can be used. The growing can be done using organometallic vapor phase epitaxy. The nanopore diameter can be controlled using the growth opening diameter or the growing step duration. The GaN nanorods can be removed from the substrate. The SiN.sub.x layer can be removed after the growing step. A SiO.sub.x template can be formed on the GaN film and the GaN can be grown to cover the SiO.sub.x template before depositing SiN.sub.x on the GaN film. The SiO.sub.x template can be removed after growing the nanorods.

  14. Plasmonic nanorod absorbers as orientation sensors

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wei-Shun; Ha, Ji Won; Slaughter, Liane S.; Link, Stephan

    2010-01-01

    Nanoparticles are actively exploited as biological imaging probes. Of particular interest are gold nanoparticles because of their nonblinking and nonbleaching absorption and scattering properties that arise from the excitation of surface plasmons. Nanoparticles with anisotropic shapes furthermore provide information about the probe orientation and its environment. Here we show how the orientation of single gold nanorods (25 × 73 nm) can be determined from both the transverse and longitudinal surface plasmon resonance by using polarization-sensitive photothermal imaging. By measuring the orientation of the same nanorods separately using scanning electron microscopy, we verified the high accuracy of this plasmon-absorption-based technique. However, care had to be taken when exciting the transverse plasmon absorption using a large numerical aperture objective as out-of-plane plasmon oscillations were also excited then. For the size regime studied here, being able to establish the nanorod orientation from the transverse mode is unique to photothermal imaging and almost impossible with conventional dark-field scattering spectroscopy. This is important because the transverse surface plasmon resonance is mostly insensitive to the medium refractive index and nanorod aspect ratio allowing nanorods of any length to be used as orientation sensors without changing the laser frequency. PMID:20133646

  15. Hydroquinone Based Synthesis of Gold Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Picciolini, Silvia; Mehn, Dora; Ojea-Jiménez, Isaac; Gramatica, Furio; Morasso, Carlo

    2016-08-10

    Gold nanorods are an important kind of nanoparticles characterized by peculiar plasmonic properties. Despite their widespread use in nanotechnology, the synthetic methods for the preparation of gold nanorods are still not fully optimized. In this paper we describe a new, highly efficient, two-step protocol based on the use of hydroquinone as a mild reducing agent. Our approach allows the preparation of nanorods with a good control of size and aspect ratio (AR) simply by varying the amount of hexadecyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and silver ions (Ag(+)) present in the "growth solution". By using this method, it is possible to markedly reduce the amount of CTAB, an expensive and cytotoxic reagent, necessary to obtain the elongated shape. Gold nanorods with an aspect ratio of about 3 can be obtained in the presence of just 50 mM of CTAB (versus 100 mM used in the standard protocol based on the use of ascorbic acid), while shorter gold nanorods are obtained using a concentration as low as 10 mM.

  16. Effect of structure and thermodynamic stability on the response of lanthanide stannate pyrochlores to ion beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Lian, J; Helean, K B; Kennedy, B J; Wang, L M; Navrotsky, A; Ewing, R C

    2006-02-09

    The lanthanide stannates, Ln2Sn2O7, Ln=La-Lu and Y, have the isometric pyrochlore structure, A2B2O7, and their structural properties have been refined by Rietveld analysis of powder neutron and synchrotron X-ray diffraction data. In this study, the enthalpies of formation of selected stannate pyrochlores, Ln=La, Nd, Sm, Eu, Dy, and Yb, were measured by high-temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry. Their radiation response was determined by 1 MeV Kr2+ ion irradiation combined with in situ TEM observation over the temperature range of 25 to 1000 K. The enthalpy of formation from binary oxides of stannate pyrochlores became more endothermic (from -145 to -40 kJ/mol) as the size of the lanthanide in the A-site decreases. A more exothermic trend of the enthalpy of formation was observed in stannate pyrochlores with larger lanthanide ions, particularly La, possibly as a result of increased covalency in the Sn-O bond. In contrast to lanthanide titanate pyrochlores, Ln2Ti2O7, that are generally susceptible to radiation-induced amorphization and zirconate pyrochlores, Ln2Zr2O7, that are generally resistant to radiation-induced amorphization, the lanthanide stannate pyrochlores show a much greater variation in their response to ion irradiation. La, Nd, and Gd stannates experience the radiation-induced transformation to the aperiodic state, and the critical amorphization temperatures are approximately 960, 700, and 350 K, respectively. Y and Er stannate pyrochlores cannot be amorphized by ion beam irradiation, even at 25 K, and instead disorder to a defect fluorite structure. Comparison of the calorimetric and ion irradiation data for titanate, zirconate, and stannate pyrochlores reveals a strong correlation among subtle changes in crystal structure with changing composition, the energetics of the disordering process, and the temperature above which the material can no longer be amorphized. In summary, as the structure approaches the ideal, ordered pyrochlore structure

  17. A DNA-Assembled Fe3O4@Ag Nanorod in Silica Matrix for Cholesterol Biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satvekar, R. K.; Tiwari, A. P.; Rohiwal, S. S.; Tiwale, B. M.; Pawar, S. H.

    2015-12-01

    A novel nanocomposite having DNA-assembled Fe3O4@Ag nanorods in silica matrix has been proposed for fabrication of bienzymatic cholesterol nanobiosensor. Cholesterol oxidase and horseradish peroxidase have been co-encapsulated in Silica/Fe3O4@Ag-DNA nanocomposite deposited on the indium tin oxide electrode. Cyclic voltammetry was employed for the electrochemical behavior of proposed biosensor and used to estimate cholesterol with a linear range of 5-195 mg/dL.

  18. Chemical effects of lanthanides and actinides in glasses determined with electron energy loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fortner, J.A.; Buck, E.C.; Ellison, A.J.G.; Bates, J.K.

    1996-07-01

    Chemical and structural environments of f-electron elements in glasses are the origin of many of the important properties of materials with these elements; thus oxidation state and chemical coordination of lanthanides and actinides in host materials is an important design consideration in optically active glasses, magnetic materials, perovskite superconductors, and nuclear waste materials. We have made use of the line shapes of Ce to determine its oxidation state in alkali borosilicate glasses being developed for immobilization of Pu. Examination of several prototype waste glass compositions with EELS shows that the redox state of Ce doped to 7 wt% could be varied by suitable choice of alkali elements. EELS for a Pu-doped glass illustrate the small actinide N{sub 4}/N{sub 5} intensity ratio and show that the Pu-N{sub 4,5} white line cross section is comparable to that of Gd M{sub 4,5}.

  19. Luminescent chiral lanthanide(III) complexes as potential molecular probes

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Gilles

    2009-01-01

    This perspective gives an introduction into the design of luminescent lanthanide(III)-containing complexes possessing chiral properties and used to probe biological materials. The first part briefly describes general principles, focusing on the optical aspect (i.e. lanthanide luminescence, sensitization processes) of the most emissive trivalent lanthanide ions, europium and terbium, incorporated into molecular luminescent edifices. This is followed by a short discussion on the importance of chirality in the biological and pharmaceutical fields. The second part is devoted to the assessment of the chiroptical spectroscopic tools available (typically circular dichroism and circularly polarized luminescence) and the strategies used to introduce a chiral feature into luminescent lanthanide(III) complexes (chiral structure resulting from a chiral arrangement of the ligand molecules surrounding the luminescent center or presence of chiral centers in the ligand molecules). Finally, the last part illustrates these fundamental principles with recent selected examples of such chiral luminescent lanthanide-based compounds used as potential probes of biomolecular substrates. PMID:19885510

  20. Development of the Actinide-Lanthanide Separation (ALSEP) Process

    SciTech Connect

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Carter, Jennifer C.; Niver, Cynthia M.; Gelis, Artem V.

    2014-09-30

    Separating the minor actinide elements (Am and Cm) from acidic high-level raffinates arising from the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuel is an important step in closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Most proposed approaches to this problem involve two solvent extraction steps: 1) co-extraction of the trivalent lanthanides and actinides, followed by 2) separation of the actinides from the lanthanides. The objective of our work is to develop a single solvent-extraction process for isolating the minor actinide elements. We report here a solvent containing N,N,N',N'-tetra(2 ethylhexyl)diglycolamide (T2EHDGA) combined with 2-ethylhexylphosphonic acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester (HEH[EHP]) that can be used to separate the minor actinides in a single solvent-extraction process. T2EHDGA serves to co-extract the trivalent actinide and lanthanide ions from nitric acid solution. Switching the aqueous phase chemistry to a citrate buffered solution of N-(2-hydroxyethyl)ethylenediamine-N,N',N'-triacetic acid at pH 2.5 to 4 results in selective transfer of the actinides to the aqueous phase, thus affecting separation of the actinides from the lanthanides. Separation factors between the lanthanides and actinides are approximately 20 in the pH range of 3 to 4, and the distribution ratios are not highly dependent on the pH in this system.

  1. Lanthanide-doped hollow nanomaterials as theranostic agents.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xiaojiao; Li, Chunxia; Cheng, Ziyong; Ma, Ping'an; Hou, Zhiyao; Lin, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The field of theranostics has sprung up to achieve personalized medicine. The theranostics fuses diagnostic and therapeutic functions, empowering early diagnosis, targeted drug delivery, and real-time monitoring of treatment effect into one step. One particularly attractive class of nanomaterials for theranostic application is lanthanide-doped hollow nanomaterials (LDHNs). Because of the existence of lanthanide ions, LDHNs show outstanding fluorescent and paramagnetic properties, enabling them to be used as multimodal bioimaging agents. Synchronously, the huge interior cavities of LDHNs are able to be applied as efficacious tools for storage and delivery of therapeutic agents. The LDHNs can be divided into two types based on difference of component: single-phase lanthanide-doped hollow nanomaterials and lanthanide-doped hollow nanocomposites. We describe the synthesis of first kind of nanomaterials by use of hard template, soft template, template-free, and self-sacrificing template method. For lanthanide-doped hollow nanocomposites, we divide the preparation strategies into three kinds (one-step, two-step, and multistep method) according to the synthetic procedures. Furthermore, we also illustrate the potential bioapplications of these LDHNs, including biodetection, imaging (fluorescent imaging and magnetic resonance imaging), drug/gene delivery, and other therapeutic applications.

  2. Energy transfer between a biological labelling dye and gold nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racknor, Chris; Singh, Mahi R.; Zhang, Yinan; Birch, David J. S.; Chen, Yu

    2014-03-01

    We have demonstrated energy transfer between a biological labelling dye (Alexa Fluor 405) and gold nanorods experimentally and theoretically. The fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and density matrix method are used to study a hybrid system of dye and nanorods under one- and two-photon excitations. Energy transfer between dye and nanorods via the dipole-dipole interaction is found to cause a decrease in the fluorescence lifetime change. Enhanced energy transfer from dye to nanorods is measured in the presence of an increased density of nanorods. This study has potential applications in fluorescence lifetime-based intra-cellular sensing of bio-analytes as well as nuclear targeting cancer therapy.

  3. Revealing and tuning the core, structure, properties and function of polymer micelles with lanthanide-coordination complexes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junyou; Groeneveld, Andrea; Oikonomou, Maria; Prusova, Alena; Van As, Henk; van Lent, Jan W M; Velders, Aldrik H

    2016-01-07

    Controlling self-assembly processes is of great interest in various fields where multifunctional and tunable materials are designed. We here present the versatility of lanthanide-complex-based micelles (Ln-C3Ms) with tunable coordination structures and corresponding functions (e.g. luminescence and magnetic relaxation enhancement). Micelles are prepared by charge-driven self-assembly of a polycationic-neutral diblock copolymer and anionic coordination complexes formed by Ln(III) ions and the bis-ligand L2EO4, which contains two dipicolinic acid (DPA) ligand groups (L) connected by a tetra-ethylene oxide spacer (EO4). By varying the DPA/Ln ratio, micelles are obtained with similar size but with different stability, different aggregation numbers and different oligomeric and polymeric lanthanide(III) coordination structures in the core. Electron microscopy, light scattering, luminescence spectroscopy and magnetic resonance relaxation experiments provide an unprecedented detailed insight into the core structures of such micelles. Concomitantly, the self-assembly is controlled such that tunable luminescence or magnetic relaxation with Eu-C3Ms, respectively, Gd-C3Ms is achieved, showing potential for applications, e.g. as contrast agents in (pre)clinical imaging. Considering the various lanthanide(III) ions have unique electron configurations with specific physical chemical properties, yet very similar coordination chemistry, the generality of the current coordination-structure based micellar design shows great promise for development of new materials such as, e.g., hypermodal agents.

  4. Effect of surface modifications on ZnO nanorod arrays electrode for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zi; Huang, Yunhua; Liao, Qingliang; Zhang, Zheng; Zhang, Yue

    2012-01-01

    High quality, large area and well-oriented ZnO nanorod arrays electrodes were successfully synthesized on conductive transparent oxide substrates by low-temperature hydrothermal methods for dye-sensitized solar cells. Aiming at getting further enhancement and study the effect of the surface modification on cell performance, ZnO thin film and ZnO nanoparticles are carried out to modify the as-grown ZnO nanorod arrays. The morphology, structure and photoluminescence property of the modified ZnO electrodes are characterized in detail. Furthermore, the I-V characterization result shows that these modification methods have distinct influences on the performance of the cell based on ZnO nanorod arrays electrode. The overall conversion efficiency can be optimized by choosing the suitable modification route.

  5. Doping-free bandgap tuning in one-dimensional Magnéli-phase nanorods of Mo4O11.

    PubMed

    Pham, Duy Van; Patil, Ranjit A; Lin, Jin-Han; Lai, Chien-Chih; Liou, Yung; Ma, Yuan-Ron

    2016-03-14

    We synthesized one-dimensional (1D) Magnéli-phase nanorods of Mo4O11 using the hot filament metal-oxide vapor deposition technique. The 1D Magnéli-phase Mo4O11 nanorods synthesized at 1000, 1050, 1100, 1150, and 1200 °C contain varying combinations of two orthorhombic (α) and monoclinic (η) phases, and various mixtures of Mo(4+), Mo(5+) and Mo(6+) cations, while those synthesized at a higher temperature look bluer. The shifts of the transmittance maximum and absorbance minimum of the 1D Magnéli-phase Mo4O11 nanorods are inversely and linearly proportional to the elevated temperature, verifying that the bandgaps (Eg) are inversely proportional to the elevated temperature. The bandgap (Eg) of the 1D Magnéli-phase Mo4O11 nanorods can be tuned by simply controlling the synthesis temperature without doping with other materials, giving the 1D Magnéli-phase Mo4O11 nanorods good potential for use in optoelectronic nanodevices and bandgap engineering.

  6. Multishell Au/Ag/SiO2 nanorods with tunable optical properties as single particle orientation and rotational tracking probes

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Kuangcai; Lin, Chia -Cheng; Vela, Javier; ...

    2015-04-07

    In this study, three-layer core–shell plasmonic nanorods (Au/Ag/SiO2–NRs), consisting of a gold nanorod core, a thin silver shell, and a thin silica layer, were synthesized and used as optical imaging probes under a differential interference contrast microscope for single particle orientation and rotational tracking. The localized surface plasmon resonance modes were enhanced upon the addition of the silver shell, and the anisotropic optical properties of gold nanorods were maintained. The silica coating enables surface functionalization with silane coupling agents and provides enhanced stability and biocompatibility. Taking advantage of the longitudinal LSPR enhancement, the orientation and rotational information of the hybridmore » nanorods on synthetic lipid bilayers and on live cell membranes were obtained with millisecond temporal resolution using a scientific complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor camera. The results demonstrate that the as-synthesized hybrid nanorods are promising imaging probes with improved sensitivity and good biocompatibility for single plasmonic particle tracking experiments in biological systems.« less

  7. One-step in situ synthesis of graphene–TiO{sub 2} nanorod hybrid composites with enhanced photocatalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Mingxuan Li, Weibin; Sun, Shanfu; He, Jia; Zhang, Qiang; Shi, Yuying

    2015-01-15

    Chemically bonded graphene/TiO{sub 2} nanorod hybrid composites with superior dispersity were synthesized by a one-step in situ hydrothermal method using graphene oxide (GO) and TiO{sub 2} (P25) as the starting materials. The as-prepared samples were characterized by XRD, XPS, TEM, FE-SEM, EDX, Raman, N{sub 2} adsorption, and UV–vis DRS techniques. Enhanced light absorption and a red shift of absorption edge were observed for the composites in the ultraviolet–visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV–vis DRS). Their effective photocatalytic activity was evaluated by the photodegradation of methylene blue under visible light irradiation. An enhancement of photocatalytic performance was observed over graphene/TiO{sub 2} nanorod hybrid composite photocatalysts, as 3.7 times larger than that of pristine TiO{sub 2} nanorods. This work demonstrated that the synthesis of TiO{sub 2} nanorods and simultaneous conversion of GO to graphene “without using reducing agents” had shown to be a rapid, direct and clean approach to fabricate chemically bonded graphene/TiO{sub 2} nanorod hybrid composites with enhanced photocatalytic performance.

  8. Nanoparticle Optics of Complex Nanorod Architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Shuford, Kevin L; Park, Sungho

    2009-01-01

    Computational studies on the optical properties of nanorods with unique compositions and exotic surface structure are presented. The distinctive architectures investigated-and compared to smooth Au rods-include Ni/Au multiblock rods and nanoporous Au rods. The surface plasmon resonances are extremely dependent upon the morphology and makeup of the nanorods. For a rod with a given aspect ratio, the resonance structure is sensitive to attributes such as the size of Ni sections of multiblock rods and pore structure of nanoporous rods. These studies indicate that control of the optical properties of nanorods is possible via characteristics other than the aspect ratio and suggest that a broader range of tunability is attainable.

  9. Multifunctional nanorods for gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, Aliasger K.; Searson, Peter C.; Leong, Kam W.

    2003-10-01

    The goal of gene therapy is to introduce foreign genes into somatic cells to supplement defective genes or provide additional biological functions, and can be achieved using either viral or synthetic non-viral delivery systems. Compared with viral vectors, synthetic gene-delivery systems, such as liposomes and polymers, offer several advantages including ease of production and reduced risk of cytotoxicity and immunogenicity, but their use has been limited by the relatively low transfection efficiency. This problem mainly stems from the difficulty in controlling their properties at the nanoscale. Synthetic inorganic gene carriers have received limited attention in the gene-therapy community, the only notable example being gold nanoparticles with surface-immobilized DNA applied to intradermal genetic immunization by particle bombardment. Here we present a non-viral gene-delivery system based on multisegment bimetallic nanorods that can simultaneously bind compacted DNA plasmids and targeting ligands in a spatially defined manner. This approach allows precise control of composition, size and multifunctionality of the gene-delivery system. Transfection experiments performed in vitro and in vivo provide promising results that suggest potential in genetic vaccination applications.

  10. Low cost stable air electrode material for high temperature solid oxide electrolyte electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Kuo, Lewis J. H.; Singh, Prabhakar; Ruka, Roswell J.; Vasilow, Theodore R.; Bratton, Raymond J.

    1997-01-01

    A low cost, lanthanide-substituted, dimensionally and thermally stable, gas permeable, electrically conductive, porous ceramic air electrode composition of lanthanide-substituted doped lanthanum manganite is provided which is used as the cathode in high temperature, solid oxide electrolyte fuel cells and generators. The air electrode composition of this invention has a much lower fabrication cost as a result of using a lower cost lanthanide mixture, either a natural mixture or an unfinished lanthanide concentrate obtained from a natural mixture subjected to incomplete purification, as the raw material in place of part or all of the higher cost individual lanthanum. The mixed lanthanide primarily contains a mixture of at least La, Ce, Pr, and Nd, or at least La, Ce, Pr, Nd and Sm in its lanthanide content, but can also include minor amounts of other lanthanides and trace impurities. The use of lanthanides in place of some or all of the lanthanum also increases the dimensional stability of the air electrode. This low cost air electrode can be fabricated as a cathode for use in high temperature, solid oxide fuel cells and generators.

  11. Low cost stable air electrode material for high temperature solid oxide electrolyte electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Kuo, L.J.H.; Singh, P.; Ruka, R.J.; Vasilow, T.R.; Bratton, R.J.

    1997-11-11

    A low cost, lanthanide-substituted, dimensionally and thermally stable, gas permeable, electrically conductive, porous ceramic air electrode composition of lanthanide-substituted doped lanthanum manganite is provided which is used as the cathode in high temperature, solid oxide electrolyte fuel cells and generators. The air electrode composition of this invention has a much lower fabrication cost as a result of using a lower cost lanthanide mixture, either a natural mixture or an unfinished lanthanide concentrate obtained from a natural mixture subjected to incomplete purification, as the raw material in place of part or all of the higher cost individual lanthanum. The mixed lanthanide primarily contains a mixture of at least La, Ce, Pr, and Nd, or at least La, Ce, Pr, Nd and Sm in its lanthanide content, but can also include minor amounts of other lanthanides and trace impurities. The use of lanthanides in place of some or all of the lanthanum also increases the dimensional stability of the air electrode. This low cost air electrode can be fabricated as a cathode for use in high temperature, solid oxide fuel cells and generators. 4 figs.

  12. Structural Effects of Lanthanide Dopants on Alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Ketan; Blair, Victoria; Douglas, Justin; Dai, Qilin; Liu, Yaohua; Ren, Shenqiang; Brennan, Raymond

    2017-01-01

    Lanthanide (Ln3+) doping in alumina has shown great promise for stabilizing and promoting desirable phase formation to achieve optimized physical and chemical properties. However, doping alumina with Ln elements is generally accompanied by formation of new phases (i.e. LnAlO3, Ln2O3), and therefore inclusion of Ln-doping mechanisms for phase stabilization of the alumina lattice is indispensable. In this study, Ln-doping (400 ppm) of the alumina lattice crucially delays the onset of phase transformation and enables phase population control, which is achieved without the formation of new phases. The delay in phase transition (θ → α), and alteration of powder morphology, particle dimensions, and composition ratios between α- and θ-alumina phases are studied using a combination of solid state nuclear magnetic resonance, electron microscopy, digital scanning calorimetry, and high resolution X-ray diffraction with refinement fitting. Loading alumina with a sparse concentration of Ln-dopants suggests that the dopants reside in the vacant octahedral locations within the alumina lattice, where complete conversion into the thermodynamically stable α-domain is shown in dysprosium (Dy)- and lutetium (Lu)-doped alumina. This study opens up the potential to control the structure and phase composition of Ln-doped alumina for emerging applications.

  13. Structural Effects of Lanthanide Dopants on Alumina

    DOE PAGES

    Patel, Ketan; Blair, Victoria; Douglas, Justin; ...

    2017-01-06

    Lanthanide (Ln3+) doping in alumina has shown great promise for stabilizing and promoting desirable phase formation to achieve optimized physical and chemical properties. However, doping alumina with Ln elements is generally accompanied by formation of new phases (i.e. LnAlO3, Ln2O3), and therefore inclusion of Ln-doping mechanisms for phase stabilization of the alumina lattice is indispensable. In this study, Ln-doping (400 ppm) of the alumina lattice crucially delays the onset of phase transformation and enables phase population control, which is achieved without the formation of new phases. In addition, the delay in phase transition (θ → α), and alteration of powdermore » morphology, particle dimensions, and composition ratios between α- and θ-alumina phases are studied using a combination of solid state nuclear magnetic resonance, electron microscopy, digital scanning calorimetry, and high resolution X-ray diffraction with refinement fitting. Loading alumina with a sparse concentration of Ln-dopants suggests that the dopants reside in the vacant octahedral locations within the alumina lattice, where complete conversion into the thermodynamically stable α-domain is shown in dysprosium (Dy)- and lutetium (Lu)-doped alumina. Lastly, this study opens up the potential to control the structure and phase composition of Ln-doped alumina for emerging applications.« less

  14. Structural Effects of Lanthanide Dopants on Alumina

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ketan; Blair, Victoria; Douglas, Justin; Dai, Qilin; Liu, Yaohua; Ren, Shenqiang; Brennan, Raymond

    2017-01-01

    Lanthanide (Ln3+) doping in alumina has shown great promise for stabilizing and promoting desirable phase formation to achieve optimized physical and chemical properties. However, doping alumina with Ln elements is generally accompanied by formation of new phases (i.e. LnAlO3, Ln2O3), and therefore inclusion of Ln-doping mechanisms for phase stabilization of the alumina lattice is indispensable. In this study, Ln-doping (400 ppm) of the alumina lattice crucially delays the onset of phase transformation and enables phase population control, which is achieved without the formation of new phases. The delay in phase transition (θ → α), and alteration of powder morphology, particle dimensions, and composition ratios between α- and θ-alumina phases are studied using a combination of solid state nuclear magnetic resonance, electron microscopy, digital scanning calorimetry, and high resolution X-ray diffraction with refinement fitting. Loading alumina with a sparse concentration of Ln-dopants suggests that the dopants reside in the vacant octahedral locations within the alumina lattice, where complete conversion into the thermodynamically stable α-domain is shown in dysprosium (Dy)- and lutetium (Lu)-doped alumina. This study opens up the potential to control the structure and phase composition of Ln-doped alumina for emerging applications. PMID:28059121

  15. Bio-functional Au/Si nanorods for pathogen detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Bosoon; Fu, Junxue; Zhao, Yiping; Siragusa, Gregory R.; Cho, Yong-Jin; Lawrence, Kurt C.; Windham, William R.

    2007-09-01

    Nanotechnology applications for food safety and biosecurity, especially development of nanoscale sensors for foodborne pathogen measurement are emerging. A novel bio-functional nanosensor for Salmonella detection was developed using hetero-nanorods. The silica nanorods were fabricated by glancing angle deposition method and the gold was sputtered onto the silica nanorods. Alexa488-succinimide dye was immobilized onto the annealed Si nanorods via the attachment between dye ester and primary amine group supplied by the 3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane. The anti-Salmonella was conjugated to gold via Dithiobis[succinimidylpropionate] self-assembly monolayer. Due to the high aspect ratio nature of the Si nanorods, hundreds or thousands of dye molecules attached to the Si nanorods produced enhanced fluorescence signal. These biologically functionalized nanorods can be used to detect Salmonella with fluorescent microscopic imaging. This new nanoscale biosensor will be able to detect other foodborne pathogenic bacteria for food safety and security applications.

  16. Two-stage epitaxial growth of vertically-aligned SnO2 nano-rods on(001) ceria

    SciTech Connect

    Solovyov, Vyacheslav F.; Wu, Li-jun; Rupich, Martin W.; Sathyamurthy, Srivatsan; Li, Xiaoping; Li, Qiang

    2014-09-20

    Growth of high-aspect ratio oriented tin oxide, SnO2, nano-rods is complicated by a limited choice of matching substrates. We show that a (001) cerium oxide, CeO2, surface uniquely enables epitaxial growth of tin-oxide nano-rods via a two-stage process. First, (100) oriented nano-wires coat the ceria surface by lateral growth, forming a uniaxially-textured SnO2 deposit. Second, vertical SnO2nano-rods nucleate on the deposit by homoepitaxy. We demonstrate growth of vertically oriented 1-2 μm long nano-rods with an average diameter of ≈20 nm.

  17. Nanorod Mobility within Entangled Wormlike Micelle Solutions

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, Jonghun; Grein-Iankovski, Aline; Narayanan, Suresh; ...

    2016-12-20

    In the semi-dilute regime, wormlike micelles form an isotropic entangled microstructure that is similar to that of an entangled polymer solution with a characteristic, nanometer-scale entanglement mesh size. We report a combined x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) and rheology study to investigate the translational dynamics of gold nanorods in semi-dilute solutions of entangled wormlike micelles formed by the surfactant cetylpyridinium chloride (CPyCl) and the counter-ion sodium salicylate (NaSal). The CPyCl concentration is varied to tune the entanglement mesh size over a range that spans from approximately equal to the nanorod diameter to larger than the nanorod length. The NaSal concentrationmore » is varied along with the CPyCl concentration so that the solutions have the maximum viscosity for given CPyCl concentration. On short time scales the nanorods are localized on a length scale matching that expected from the high-frequency elastic modulus of the solutions as long as the mesh size is smaller than the rod length. On longer time scales, the nanorods undergo free diffusion. At the highest CPyCl concentrations, the nanorod diffusivity approaches the value expected based on the macroscopic viscosity of the solutions, but it increases with decreasing CPyCl concentration more rapidly than expected from the macroscopic viscosity. A recent model by Cai et al. [Cai, L.-H.; Panyukov, S.; Rubinstein, M. Macromolecules 2015, 48, 847-862.] for nanoparticle “hopping” diffusion in entangled polymer solutions accounts quantitatively for this enhanced diffusivity.« less

  18. Nanorod Mobility within Entangled Wormlike Micelle Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jonghun; Grein-Iankovski, Aline; Narayanan, Suresh; Leheny, Robert L.

    2016-12-20

    In the semi-dilute regime, wormlike micelles form an isotropic entangled microstructure that is similar to that of an entangled polymer solution with a characteristic, nanometer-scale entanglement mesh size. We report a combined x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) and rheology study to investigate the translational dynamics of gold nanorods in semi-dilute solutions of entangled wormlike micelles formed by the surfactant cetylpyridinium chloride (CPyCl) and the counter-ion sodium salicylate (NaSal). The CPyCl concentration is varied to tune the entanglement mesh size over a range that spans from approximately equal to the nanorod diameter to larger than the nanorod length. The NaSal concentration is varied along with the CPyCl concentration so that the solutions have the maximum viscosity for given CPyCl concentration. On short time scales the nanorods are localized on a length scale matching that expected from the high-frequency elastic modulus of the solutions as long as the mesh size is smaller than the rod length. On longer time scales, the nanorods undergo free diffusion. At the highest CPyCl concentrations, the nanorod diffusivity approaches the value expected based on the macroscopic viscosity of the solutions, but it increases with decreasing CPyCl concentration more rapidly than expected from the macroscopic viscosity. A recent model by Cai et al. [Cai, L.-H.; Panyukov, S.; Rubinstein, M. Macromolecules 2015, 48, 847-862.] for nanoparticle “hopping” diffusion in entangled polymer solutions accounts quantitatively for this enhanced diffusivity.

  19. DNA Base Pair Resolution Measurements Using Resonance Energy Transfer Efficiency in Lanthanide Doped Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Delplanque, Aleksandra; Wawrzynczyk, Dominika; Jaworski, Pawel; Matczyszyn, Katarzyna; Pawlik, Krzysztof; Buckle, Malcolm; Nyk, Marcin; Nogues, Claude; Samoc, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Lanthanide-doped nanoparticles are of considerable interest for biodetection and bioimaging techniques thanks to their unique chemical and optical properties. As a sensitive luminescence material, they can be used as (bio) probes in Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) where trivalent lanthanide ions (La3+) act as energy donors. In this paper we present an efficient method to transfer ultrasmall (ca. 8 nm) NaYF4 nanoparticles dispersed in organic solvent to an aqueous solution via oxidation of the oleic acid ligand. Nanoparticles were then functionalized with single strand DNA oligomers (ssDNA) by inducing covalent bonds between surface carboxylic groups and a 5’ amine modified-ssDNA. Hybridization with the 5’ fluorophore (Cy5) modified complementary ssDNA strand demonstrated the specificity of binding and allowed the fine control over the distance between Eu3+ ions doped nanoparticle and the fluorophore by varying the number of the dsDNA base pairs. First, our results confirmed nonradiative resonance energy transfer and demonstrate the dependence of its efficiency on the distance between the donor (Eu3+) and the acceptor (Cy5) with sensitivity at a nanometre scale. PMID:25748446

  20. Mixed monofunctional extractants for trivalent actinide/lanthanide separations: TALSPEAK-MME

    DOE PAGES

    Johnson, Aaron T.; Nash, Kenneth L.

    2015-08-20

    The basic features of an f-element extraction process based on a solvent composed of equimolar mixtures of Cyanex-923 (a mixed trialkyl phosphine oxide) and 2-ethylhexylphosphonic acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester (HEH[EHP]) extractants in n-dodecane are investigated in this report. This system, which combines features of the TRPO and TALSPEAK processes, is based on co-extraction of trivalent lanthanides and actinides from 0.1 to 1.0 M HNO3 followed by application of a buffered aminopolycarboxylate solution strip to accomplish a Reverse TALSPEAK selective removal of actinides. This mixed-extractant medium could enable a simplified approach to selective trivalent f-element extraction and actinide partitioning in a singlemore » process. As compared with other combined process applications in development for more compact actinide partitioning processes (DIAMEX-SANEX, GANEX, TRUSPEAK, ALSEP), this combination features only monofunctional extractants with high solubility limits and comparatively low molar mass. Selective actinide stripping from the loaded extractant phase is done using a glycine-buffered solution containing N-(2-hydroxyethyl)ethylenediaminetriacetic acid (HEDTA) or triethylenetetramine-N,N,N',N'',N''',N'''-hexaacetic acid (TTHA). Lastly, the results reported provide evidence for simplified interactions between the two extractants and demonstrate a pathway toward using mixed monofunctional extractants to separate trivalent actinides (An) from fission product lanthanides (Ln).« less