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Sample records for lap adhesive composite

  1. Analysis of adhesively bonded composite lap joints

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, L.; Kuruppu, M.; Kelly, D.

    1994-12-31

    A new nonlinear formulation is developed for the governing equations for the shear and peel stresses in adhesively bonded composite double lap joints. The new formulation allows arbitrary nonlinear stress-strain characteristics in both shear and peel behavior. The equations are numerically integrated using a shooting technique and Newton-Raphson method behind a user friendly interface. The failure loads are predicted by utilizing the maximum stress criterion, interlaminar delamination and the energy density failure criteria. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the effect of the nonlinear adhesive behavior on the stress distribution and predict the failure load and the associated mode.

  2. Non destructive evaluation of adhesively bonded carbon fiber reinforced composite lap joints with varied bond quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayakumar, R. L.; Bhat, M. R.; Murthy, C. R. L.

    2012-05-01

    Structural adhesive bonding is widely used to execute assemblies in automobile and aerospace structures. The quality and reliability of these bonded joints must be ensured during service. In this context non destructive evaluation of these bonded structures play an important role. Evaluation of adhesively bonded composite single lap shear joints has been attempted through experimental approach. Series of tests, non-destructive as well as destructive were performed on different sets of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite lap joint specimens with varied bond quality. Details of the experimental investigations carried out and the outcome are presented in this paper.

  3. Optimal tubular adhesive-bonded lap joint of the carbon fiber epoxy composite shaft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ki S.; Kim, Won T.; Lee, Dai G.; Jun, Eui J.

    The effects of the adhesive thickness and the adherend surface roughness on the fatigue strength of a tubular adhesive-bonded single lap joint were investigated using fatigue test specimens whose adherends were made of S45C carbon steel. Results of fatigue tests showed that the optimal arithmetic surface roughness of the adherends is about 2 microns and the optimal adhesive thickness is about 0.15 mm. Using these values, the prototype torsional adhesive joints were manufactured for power transmission shafts of an automotive vehicle or a small helicopter, and static tests under torque were performed on a single-lap joint, a single-lap joint with scarf, a double-lap joint, and a double-lap joint with scarf. It was found that the double-lap joint was superior among the joints, in terms of torque capacity and manufacturing cost.

  4. Multitechnique monitoring of fatigue damage in adhesively bonded composite lap-joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpenko, Oleksii; Koricho, Ermias; Khomenko, Anton; Dib, Gerges; Haq, Mahmoodul; Udpa, Lalita

    2015-03-01

    The requirement for reduced structural weight has driven the development of adhesively bonded joints. However, a major issue preventing their full acceptance is the initiation of premature failure in the form of a disbond between adherends, mainly due to fatigue, manufacturing flaws or impact damage. This work presents the integrated approach for in-situ monitoring of degradation of the adhesive bond in the GFRP composite lap-joint using ultrasonic guided waves and dynamic measurements from strategically embedded FBG sensors. Guided waves are actuated with surface mounted piezoelectric elements and mode tuning is used to provide high sensitivity to the degradation of the adhesive layer parameters. Composite lap-joints are subjected to fatigue loading, and data from piezoceramic transducers are collected at regular intervals to evaluate the progression of damage. Results demonstrate that quasi-static loading affects guided wave measurements considerably, but FBG sensors can be used to monitor the applied load levels and residual strains in the adhesive bond. The proposed technique shows promise for determining the post-damage stiffness of adhesively bonded joints.

  5. A Semi-Analytical Method for Determining the Energy Release Rate of Cracks in Adhesively-Bonded Single-Lap Composite Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Charles; Sun, Wenjun; Tomblin, John S.; Smeltzer, Stanley S., III

    2007-01-01

    A semi-analytical method for determining the strain energy release rate due to a prescribed interface crack in an adhesively-bonded, single-lap composite joint subjected to axial tension is presented. The field equations in terms of displacements within the joint are formulated by using first-order shear deformable, laminated plate theory together with kinematic relations and force equilibrium conditions. The stress distributions for the adherends and adhesive are determined after the appropriate boundary and loading conditions are applied and the equations for the field displacements are solved. Based on the adhesive stress distributions, the forces at the crack tip are obtained and the strain energy release rate of the crack is determined by using the virtual crack closure technique (VCCT). Additionally, the test specimen geometry from both the ASTM D3165 and D1002 test standards are utilized during the derivation of the field equations in order to correlate analytical models with future test results. The system of second-order differential field equations is solved to provide the adherend and adhesive stress response using the symbolic computation tool, Maple 9. Finite element analyses using J-integral as well as VCCT were performed to verify the developed analytical model. The finite element analyses were conducted using the commercial finite element analysis software ABAQUS. The results determined using the analytical method correlated well with the results from the finite element analyses.

  6. Failure strength prediction for adhesively bonded single lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Niat Mahmud

    For adhesively bonded joint, failure strength depends on many factors such as material properties (both adhesive and adherend), specimen geometries, test environments, surface preparation procedures, etc. Failure occurs inside constitutive materials or along joint interfaces. Based on location, adhesively bonded failure mode can be classified as adhesive failure mode, cohesive failure mode and adherend failure mode. Failure mode directly affects the failure strength of joint. For last eight decades, researchers have developed analytical, empirical or semi-empirical methods capable of predicting failure strength for adhesively bonded joints generating either cohesive failure or adherend failure. Applicability of most of the methods is limited to particular cases. In this research, different failure modes for single lap joints (SLJs) were generated experimentally using epoxy based paste adhesive. Based on experimental data and analytical study, simplified failure prediction methods were developed for each failure mode. For adhesive failure mode, it is observed that peel stress distributions concur along interface near crack initiation points. All SLJs for this test endured consistent surface treatments. Geometric parameters of the joints were varied to study their effect on failure strength. Peel stress distributions were calculated using finite analysis (FEA). Based on peel stress distribution near crack initiation point, a failure model is proposed. Numerous analytical, empirical and semi-empirical models are available for predicting failure strengths of SLJs generating cohesive failures. However, most of the methods in the literature failed to capture failure behavior of SLJs having thickness of adhesive layer as variable. Cohesive failure mode was generated experimentally using aluminum as adherend and epoxy adhesive considering thickness of adhesive layers as variable within SLJs. Comparative study was performed among various methods. It was observed that

  7. Adhesive-bonded scarf and stepped-lap joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart-Smith, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    Continuum mechanics solutions are derived for the static load-carrying capacity of scarf and stepped-lap adhesive-bonded joints. The analyses account for adhesive plasticity and adherend stiffness imbalance and thermal mismatch. The scarf joint solutions include a simple algebraic formula which serves as a close lower bound, within a small fraction of a per cent of the true answer for most practical geometries and materials. Digital computer programs were developed and, for the stepped-lap joints, the critical adherend and adhesive stresses are computed for each step. The scarf joint solutions exhibit grossly different behavior from that for double-lap joints for long overlaps inasmuch as that the potential bond shear strength continues to increase with indefinitely long overlaps on the scarf joints. The stepped-lap joint solutions exhibit some characteristics of both the scarf and double-lap joints. The stepped-lap computer program handles arbitrary (different) step lengths and thickness and the solutions obtained have clarified potentially weak design details and the remedies. The program has been used effectively to optimize the joint proportions.

  8. Material characterization of structural adhesives in the lap shear mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sancaktar, E.; Schenck, S. C.

    1983-01-01

    A general method for characterizing structual adhesives in the bonded lap shear mode is proposed. Two approaches in the form of semiempirical and theoretical approaches are used. The semiempirical approach includes Ludwik's and Zhurkov's equations to describe respectively, the failure stresses in the constant strain rate and constant stress loading modes with the inclusion of the temperature effects. The theoretical approach is used to describe adhesive shear stress-strain behavior with the use of viscoelastic or nonlinear elastic constitutive equations. Two different model adhesives are used in the single lap shear mode with titanium adherends. These adhesives (one of which was developed at NASA Langley Research Center) are currently considered by NASA for possible aerospace applications. Use of different model adhesives helps in assessment of the generality of the method.

  9. Lap Shear Testing of Candidate Radiator Panel Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, David; Briggs, Maxwell; McGowan, Randy

    2013-01-01

    During testing of a subscale radiator section used to develop manufacturing techniques for a full-scale radiator panel, the adhesive bonds between the titanium heat pipes and the aluminum face sheets failed during installation and operation. Analysis revealed that the thermal expansion mismatch between the two metals resulted in relatively large shear stresses being developed even when operating the radiator at moderate temperatures. Lap shear testing of the adhesive used in the original joints demonstrated that the two-part epoxy adhesive fell far short of the strength required. A literature review resulted in several candidate adhesives being selected for lap shear joint testing at room temperature and 398 K, the nominal radiator operating temperature. The results showed that two-part epoxies cured at room and elevated temperatures generally did not perform well. Epoxy film adhesives cured at elevated temperatures, on the other hand, did very well with most being sufficiently strong to cause yielding in the titanium sheet used for the joints. The use of an epoxy primer generally improved the strength of the joint. Based upon these results, a new adhesive was selected for the second subscale radiator section.

  10. Nonlinear Analysis of Bonded Composite Single-LAP Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oterkus, E.; Barut, A.; Madenci, E.; Smeltzer, S. S.; Ambur, D. R.

    2004-01-01

    This study presents a semi-analytical solution method to analyze the geometrically nonlinear response of bonded composite single-lap joints with tapered adherend edges under uniaxial tension. The solution method provides the transverse shear and normal stresses in the adhesive and in-plane stress resultants and bending moments in the adherends. The method utilizes the principle of virtual work in conjunction with von Karman s nonlinear plate theory to model the adherends and the shear lag model to represent the kinematics of the thin adhesive layer between the adherends. Furthermore, the method accounts for the bilinear elastic material behavior of the adhesive while maintaining a linear stress-strain relationship in the adherends. In order to account for the stiffness changes due to thickness variation of the adherends along the tapered edges, their in-plane and bending stiffness matrices are varied as a function of thickness along the tapered region. The combination of these complexities results in a system of nonlinear governing equilibrium equations. This approach represents a computationally efficient alternative to finite element method. Comparisons are made with corresponding results obtained from finite-element analysis. The results confirm the validity of the solution method. The numerical results present the effects of taper angle, adherend overlap length, and the bilinear adhesive material on the stress fields in the adherends, as well as the adhesive, of a single-lap joint

  11. Numerical solutions for heat flow in adhesive lap joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, P. A.; Winfree, William P.

    1992-01-01

    The present formulation for the modeling of heat transfer in thin, adhesively bonded lap joints precludes difficulties associated with large aspect ratio grids required by standard FEM formulations. This quasi-static formulation also reduces the problem dimensionality (by one), thereby minimizing computational requirements. The solutions obtained are found to be in good agreement with both analytical solutions and solutions from standard FEM programs. The approach is noted to yield a more accurate representation of heat-flux changes between layers due to a disbond.

  12. Adhesive-bonded double-lap joints. [analytical solutions for static load carrying capacity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart-Smith, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    Explicit analytical solutions are derived for the static load carrying capacity of double-lap adhesive-bonded joints. The analyses extend the elastic solution Volkersen and cover adhesive plasticity, adherend stiffness imbalance and thermal mismatch between the adherends. Both elastic-plastic and bi-elastic adhesive representations lead to the explicit result that the influence of the adhesive on the maximum potential bond strength is defined uniquely by the strain energy in shear per unit area of bond. Failures induced by peel stresses at the ends of the joint are examined. This failure mode is particularly important for composite adherends. The explicit solutions are sufficiently simple to be used for design purposes

  13. Cyclic debonding of adhesively bonded composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Johnson, W. S.; Everett, R. A., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The fatigue behavior of a simple composite to composite bonded joint was analyzed. The cracked lap shear specimen subjected to constant amplitude cyclic loading was studied. Two specimen geometries were tested for each bonded system: (1) a strap adherend of 16 plies bonded to a lap adherend of 8 plies; and (2) a strap adherend of 8 plies bonded to a lap adherend of 16 plies. In all specimens the fatigue failure was in the form of cyclic debonding with some 0 deg fiber pull off from the strap adherend. The debond always grew in the region of adhesive that had the highest mode (peel) loading and that region was close to the adhesive strap interface.

  14. Single-cycle and fatigue strengths of adhesively bonded lap joints

    SciTech Connect

    Metzinger, K.E.; Guess, T.R.

    1998-12-31

    This study considers a composite-to-steel tubular lap joint in which failure typically occurs when the adhesive debonds from the steel adherend. The same basic joint was subjected to compressive and tensile axial loads (single-cycle) as well as bending loads (fatigue). The purpose of these tests was to determine whether failure is more dependent on the plastic strain or the peel stress that develops in the adhesive. For the same joint, compressive and tensile loads of the same magnitude will produce similar plastic strains but peel stresses of opposite signs in the adhesive. In the axial tests, the tensile strengths were much greater than the compressive strengths - indicating that the peel stress is key to predicting the single-cycle strengths. To determine the key parameter(s) for predicting high-cycle fatigue strengths, a test technique capable of subjecting a specimen to several million cycles per day was developed. In these bending tests, the initial adhesive debonding always occurred on the compressive side. This result is consistent with the single-cycle tests, although not as conclusive due to the limited number of tests. Nevertheless, a fatigue test method has been established and future tests are planned.

  15. Material characterization of structural adhesives in the lap shear mode. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenck, S. C.; Sancaktar, E.

    1983-01-01

    A general method for characterizing structural adhesives in the bonded lap shear mode is proposed. Two approaches in the form of semi-empirical and theoretical approaches are used. The semi-empirical approach includes Ludwik's and Zhurkov's equations to describe respectively, the failure stresses in the constant strain rate and constant stress loading modes with the inclusion of the temperature effects. The theoretical approach is used to describe adhesive shear stress-strain behavior with the use of viscoelastic or nonlinear elastic constitutive equations. Three different model adhesives are used in the simple lap shear mode with titanium adherends. These adhesives (one of which was developed at NASA Langley Research Center) are currently considered by NASA for possible aerospace applications. Use of different model adhesives helps in assessment of the generality of the method.

  16. Lap Shear and Impact Testing of Ochre and Beeswax in Experimental Middle Stone Age Compound Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Kozowyk, P R B; Langejans, G H J; Poulis, J A

    2016-01-01

    The production of compound adhesives using disparate ingredients is seen as some of the best evidence of advanced cognition outside of the use of symbolism. Previous field and laboratory testing of adhesives has shown the complexities involved in creating an effective Middle Stone Age glue using Acacia gum. However, it is currently unclear how efficient different adhesive recipes are, how much specific ingredients influence their performance, and how difficult it may have been for those ingredients to be combined to maximum effect. We conducted a series of laboratory-based lap shear and impact tests, following modern adhesion testing standards, to determine the efficacy of compound adhesives, with particular regard to the ingredient ratios. We tested rosin (colophony) and gum adhesives, containing additives of beeswax and ochre in varying ratios. During both lap shear and impact tests compound rosin adhesives performed better than single component rosin adhesives, and pure acacia gum was the strongest. The large difference in performance between each base adhesive and the significant changes in performance that occur due to relatively small changes in ingredient ratios lend further support to the notion that high levels of skill and knowledge were required to consistently produce the most effective adhesives.

  17. Lap Shear and Impact Testing of Ochre and Beeswax in Experimental Middle Stone Age Compound Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The production of compound adhesives using disparate ingredients is seen as some of the best evidence of advanced cognition outside of the use of symbolism. Previous field and laboratory testing of adhesives has shown the complexities involved in creating an effective Middle Stone Age glue using Acacia gum. However, it is currently unclear how efficient different adhesive recipes are, how much specific ingredients influence their performance, and how difficult it may have been for those ingredients to be combined to maximum effect. We conducted a series of laboratory-based lap shear and impact tests, following modern adhesion testing standards, to determine the efficacy of compound adhesives, with particular regard to the ingredient ratios. We tested rosin (colophony) and gum adhesives, containing additives of beeswax and ochre in varying ratios. During both lap shear and impact tests compound rosin adhesives performed better than single component rosin adhesives, and pure acacia gum was the strongest. The large difference in performance between each base adhesive and the significant changes in performance that occur due to relatively small changes in ingredient ratios lend further support to the notion that high levels of skill and knowledge were required to consistently produce the most effective adhesives. PMID:26983080

  18. Lap Shear and Impact Testing of Ochre and Beeswax in Experimental Middle Stone Age Compound Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Kozowyk, P R B; Langejans, G H J; Poulis, J A

    2016-01-01

    The production of compound adhesives using disparate ingredients is seen as some of the best evidence of advanced cognition outside of the use of symbolism. Previous field and laboratory testing of adhesives has shown the complexities involved in creating an effective Middle Stone Age glue using Acacia gum. However, it is currently unclear how efficient different adhesive recipes are, how much specific ingredients influence their performance, and how difficult it may have been for those ingredients to be combined to maximum effect. We conducted a series of laboratory-based lap shear and impact tests, following modern adhesion testing standards, to determine the efficacy of compound adhesives, with particular regard to the ingredient ratios. We tested rosin (colophony) and gum adhesives, containing additives of beeswax and ochre in varying ratios. During both lap shear and impact tests compound rosin adhesives performed better than single component rosin adhesives, and pure acacia gum was the strongest. The large difference in performance between each base adhesive and the significant changes in performance that occur due to relatively small changes in ingredient ratios lend further support to the notion that high levels of skill and knowledge were required to consistently produce the most effective adhesives. PMID:26983080

  19. Lap shear strength and healing capability of self-healing adhesive containing epoxy/mercaptan microcapsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazali, Habibah; Ye, Lin; Zhang, Ming-Qiu

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this work is to develop a self-healing polymeric adhesive formulation with epoxy/mercaptan microcapsules. Epoxy/mercaptan microcapsules were dispersed into a commercialize two-part epoxy adhesive for developing self-healing epoxy adhesive. The influence of different content of microcapsules on the shear strength and healing capability of epoxy adhesive were investigated using single-lap-joints with average thickness of adhesive layer of about 180 µm. This self-healing adhesive was used in bonding of 5000 series aluminum alloys adherents after mechanical and alkaline cleaning surface treatment. The adhesion strength was measured and presented as function of microcapsules loading. The results indicated that the virgin lap shear strength was increased by about 26% with addition of 3 wt% of self-healing microcapsules. 12% to 28% recovery of the shear strength is achieved after self-healing depending on the microcapsules content. Scanning electron microscopy was used to study fracture surface of the joints. The self-healing adhesives exhibit recovery of both cohesion and adhesion properties with room temperature healing.

  20. A Single-Lap Joint Adhesive Bonding Optimization Method Using Gradient and Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeltzer, Stanley S., III; Finckenor, Jeffrey L.

    1999-01-01

    A natural process for any engineer, scientist, educator, etc. is to seek the most efficient method for accomplishing a given task. In the case of structural design, an area that has a significant impact on the structural efficiency is joint design. Unless the structure is machined from a solid block of material, the individual components which compose the overall structure must be joined together. The method for joining a structure varies depending on the applied loads, material, assembly and disassembly requirements, service life, environment, etc. Using both metallic and fiber reinforced plastic materials limits the user to two methods or a combination of these methods for joining the components into one structure. The first is mechanical fastening and the second is adhesive bonding. Mechanical fastening is by far the most popular joining technique; however, in terms of structural efficiency, adhesive bonding provides a superior joint since the load is distributed uniformly across the joint. The purpose of this paper is to develop a method for optimizing single-lap joint adhesive bonded structures using both gradient and genetic algorithms and comparing the solution process for each method. The goal of the single-lap joint optimization is to find the most efficient structure that meets the imposed requirements while still remaining as lightweight, economical, and reliable as possible. For the single-lap joint, an optimum joint is determined by minimizing the weight of the overall joint based on constraints from adhesive strengths as well as empirically derived rules. The analytical solution of the sin-le-lap joint is determined using the classical Goland-Reissner technique for case 2 type adhesive joints. Joint weight minimization is achieved using a commercially available routine, Design Optimization Tool (DOT), for the gradient solution while an author developed method is used for the genetic algorithm solution. Results illustrate the critical design variables

  1. Cyclic debonding of adhesively bonded composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Johnson, W. S.; Everett, R. A., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    To analyze the fatigue behavior of a simple composite-to-composite bonded joint, a combined experimental and analytical study of the cracked-lap-shear specimen subjected to constant-amplitude cyclic loading was undertaken. Two bonded systems were studied: T300/5208 graphite/epoxy adherends bonded with adhesives EC 3445 and with FM-300. For each bonded system, two specimen geometries were tested: (1) a strap adherend of 16 plies bonded to a lap adherend of 8 plies, and (2) a strap adherend of 8 plies bonded to a lap adherend of 16 plies. In all specimens tested, the fatigue failure was in the form of cyclic debonding with some 0 deg fiber pull-off from the strap adherend. The debond always grew in the region of adhesive that had the highest mode I (peel) loading and that region was close to the adhesive-strap interface. Furthermore, the measured cyclic debond growth rates correlated well with total strain energy release rates G(T) as well as with its components G(I) (peel) and G(II) (shear) for the mixed-mode loading in the present study.

  2. Monitoring of fatigue damage in composite lap-joints using guided waves and FBG sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpenko, Oleksii; Khomenko, Anton; Koricho, Ermias; Haq, Mahmoodul; Udpa, Lalita

    2016-02-01

    Adhesive bonding is being increasingly employed in many applications as it offers possibility of light-weighting and efficient multi-material joining along with reduction in time and cost of manufacturing. However, failure initiation and progression in critical components like joints, specifically in fatigue loading is not well understood, which necessitates reliable NDE and SHM techniques to ensure structural integrity. In this work, concurrent guided wave (GW) and fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor measurements were used to monitor fatigue damage in adhesively bonded composite lap-joints. In the present set-up, one FBG sensor was strategically embedded in the adhesive bond-line of a lap-joint, while two other FBGs were bonded on the surface of the adherends. Full spectral responses of FBG sensors were collected and compared at specific intervals of fatigue loading. In parallel, guided waves were actuated and sensed using PZT wafers mounted on the composite adherends. Experimental results demonstrated that time-of-flight (ToF) of the fundamental modes transmitted through the bond-line and spectral response of FBG sensors were sensitive to fatigue loading and damage. Combination of guided wave and FBG measurements provided the desired redundancy and synergy in the data to evaluate the degradation in bond-line properties. Measurements taken in the presence of continuously applied load replicated the in-situ/service conditions. The approach shows promise in understanding the behavior of bonded joints subjected to complex loading.

  3. Low frequency ultrasonic nondestructive inspection of aluminum/adhesive fuselage lap splices

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, T.

    1994-01-04

    This thesis is a collection of research efforts in ultrasonics, conducted at the Center for Aviation Systems Reliability located at Iowa State University, as part of the Federal Aviation Administration`s ``Aging Aircraft Program.`` The research was directed toward the development of an ultrasonic prototype to inspect the aluminum/adhesive fuselage lap splices found on 1970`s vintage Boeing passenger aircraft. The ultrasonic prototype consists of a normal incidence, low frequency inspection technique, and a scanning adapter that allows focused immersion transducers to be operated in a direct contact manner in any inspection orientation, including upside-down. The inspection technique uses a computer-controlled data acquisition system to produce a C-scan image of a radio frequency (RF) waveform created by a low frequency, broadband, focused beam transducer, driven with a spike voltage pulser. C-scans produced by this technique are color representations of the received signal`s peak-to-peak amplitude (voltage) taken over an (x, y) grid. Low frequency, in this context, refers to a wavelength that is greater than the lap splice`s layer thicknesses. With the low frequency technique, interface echoes of the lap splice are not resolved and gating of the signal is unnecessary; this in itself makes the technique simple to implement and saves considerable time in data acquisition. Along with the advantages in data acquisition, the low frequency technique is relatively insensitive to minor surface curvature and to ultrasonic interference effects caused by adhesive bondline thickness variations in the lap splice.

  4. Testing composite-to-metal tubular lap joints

    SciTech Connect

    Guess, T.R.; Reedy, E.D. Jr.; Slavin, A.M.

    1993-11-01

    Procedures were developed to fabricate, nondestructively evaluate, and mechanically test composite-to-metal tubular joints. The axially loaded tubular lap joint specimen consisted of two metal tubes bonded within each end of a fiberglass composite tube. Joint specimens with both tapered and untapered aluminum adherends and a plain weave E-glass/epoxy composite were tested in tension, compression, and flexure. Other specimens with tapered and untapered steel adherends and a triaxially reinforced E-glass/epoxy composite were tested in tension and compression. Test results include joint strength and failure mode data. A finite element analysis of the axially loaded joints explains the effect of adherend geometry and material properties on measured joint strength. The flexural specimen was also analyzed; calculated surface strains are in good agreement with measured values, and joint failure occurs in the region of calculated peak peel stress.

  5. Testing composite-to-metal tubular lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guess, T. R.; Reedy, E. D., Jr.; Slavin, A. M.

    Procedures were developed to fabricate, nondestructively evaluate, and mechanically test composite-to-metal tubular joints. The axially loaded tubular lap joint specimen consisted of two metal tubes bonded within each end of a fiberglass composite tube. Joint specimens with both tapered and untapered aluminum adherends and a plain weave E-glass/epoxy composite were tested in tension, compression, and flexure. Other specimens with tapered and untapered steel adherends and a triaxially reinforced E-glass/epoxy composite were tested in tension and compression. Test results include joint strength and failure mode data. A finite element analysis of the axially loaded joints explains the effect of adherend geometry and material properties on measured joint strength. The flexural specimen was also analyzed; calculated surface strains are in good agreement with measured values, and joint failure occurs in the region of calculated peak peel stress.

  6. A fracture mechanics analysis of adhesive failure in a single lap shear joint.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devries, K. L.; Williams, M. L.; Chang, M. D.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of adhesive fracture of single lap shear joints in terms of a maximum stress criterion and an energy balance. The Goland and Reissner (1944) analysis is used to determine the stress distribution in the adhesive assembly, and the results obtained are introduced into an energy balance to determine the initiation of adhesive fracture. In the stress analysis the loads at the edges of the joint are first determined. This is a problem in which the deformation of the joint sheets must be taken into account and is solved by using the finite-deflection theory of cylindrically bent plates. Then the stress in the joint due to applied loads is determined. This problem is formulated as one in plane strain consisting of two rectangular sheets of equal thickness and unit width. With the aid of this stress analysis and the stresses obtained from the conditions of equilibrium the contributions to the energy change with crack length are calculated. The analysis performed is then compared with a maximum stress criterion for a lap joint.

  7. A study of sandwich T-joints and composite lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turaga, Umamaheswar V. R. S.

    In this study, new efficient designs for adhesive sandwich T-joint and single-lap joint were proposed and investigated. In the proposed new sandwich T-joint, called U-channel joint, the load transfer path at the web-flange interface was modified to include a U-shaped aluminum channel which provides strong path for load transfer. Experimental results show that the new design has 62% more strength than the conventional circular fillet joint. The new U-channel joint was tested in tension, compression and bending to investigate its characteristics. It is found to have good performance in bending also, even though in compression it performs same as the circular fillet joint. An extensive parametric study was carried out to investigate the effect of parameters like flange skin stiffener, foam density, foam thickness in the web, and aluminum attachments. A fracture mechanics criterion based on the strain energy release rate was used to explain the failure modes, apart from the stress analysis explanation. The failure loads of the joints in compression were predicted using a maximum principal stress failure criterion based on the sandwich beam theory. A new single lap joint with attachments was proposed in the second phase of the research. The design was verified using both aluminum and composite materials. The new design was found to have 59% more strength than the single-lap joint. A parametric study was performed to find out the influence of the angle of attachment, thickness of attachment and the length of attachment. By careful consideration of design parameters, the joint can be optimized. Finally, the failure loads of the single lap joints with and without attachments were predicted using different failure criteria.

  8. Wood Composite Adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Bueso, Jose; Haupt, Robert

    The global environment, in which phenolic resins are being used for wood composite manufacture, has changed significantly during the last decade. This chapter reviews trends that are driving the use and consumption of phenolic resins around the world. The review begins with recent data on volume usage and regional trends, followed by an analysis of factors affecting global markets. In a section on environmental factors, the impact of recent formaldehyde emission regulations is discussed. The section on economics introduces wood composite production as it relates to the available adhesive systems, with special emphasis on the technical requirement to improve phenolic reactivity. Advances in composite process technology are introduced, especially in regard to the increased demands the improvements place upon adhesive system performance. The specific requirements for the various wood composite families are considered in the context of adhesive performance needs. The results of research into current chemistries are discussed, with a review of recent findings regarding the mechanisms of phenolic condensation and acceleration. Also, the work regarding alternate natural materials, such as carbohydrates, lignins, tannins, and proteinaceous materials, is presented. Finally, new developments in alternative adhesive technologies are reported.

  9. Composition of matrix in the CR chondrite LAP 02342

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasson, John T.; Rubin, Alan E.

    2009-03-01

    We report evidence of interchondrule matrix heterogeneity on a scale of ˜50 μm in the well-preserved CR2 chondrite LAP 02342. Despite minor effects resulting from asteroidal aqueous alteration, the matrix in this CR chondrite seems to preserve much of the compositional record of nebular fines. We carried out electron-microprobe studies using a 3-μm-diameter beam; we analyzed 10 elements in 36- or 49-point grids on 11 ca. 50 × 50-μm rectangular areas of matrix. Each grid area has a distinct composition, inconsistent with a simple model of matrix material having a uniform composition throughout the nebular formation region of the CR chondrites. On S-Fe, Mg-Si, K-Na and K-Al scatter diagrams, the grid areas (i.e., different matrix patches) are largely separated from each other; plots of means with 95% confidence limits demonstrate that the compositions are resolvable. Five matrix areas were analyzed again in duplicate runs; excellent agreement was observed between duplicate studies. LAP 02342 experienced two forms of mild aqueous alteration - as patchy enrichments in Ca (inferred to reflect CaCO 3) and as regions in which sulfide laths are embedded within phyllosilicates. Despite this evidence of aqueous transport, the effect on the composition of matrix is not resolvable. For example, matrix points that were adjacent to points with high CaCO 3 contents show elemental concentrations similar to those in regions having only one or two points with a Ca enrichment. It appears that secondary minerals are found in areas where there are suitable precursor phases and voids into which new phases could grow unimpeded. Calcium appears to be unique in forming a phase that greatly lowers the Ca ++ content of the aqueous medium, thus enhancing the rate of diffusion. Because chondrules vary widely in bulk composition, the formation of chondrules in small sets (100 or less) could generate "smoke" and mesostasis spray with compositions unique to each set. However, if these

  10. Evaluation of adhesives for adhering carbon/epoxy composites to various metallic substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Bonk, R.B.; Osterndorf, J.F.; Ambrosio, A.M.; Pettenger, B.L.

    1996-12-31

    The strength properties of composite matrix resins and adhesive are dependent on time, temperature, environment, and stress factors. All of these conditions combine to influence the properties of adhesives and composites in ways that are not yet fully known or quantifiable. Therefore, it is important to know the service conditions that structural adhesive bonded composite joints will encounter prior to fielding. This paper details an evaluation of five epoxy adhesives used to adhere a carbon/epoxy composite to 7075-T6 aluminum, 4340 steel and aluminum coated steel. Test results indicate that certain paste adhesives are capable of better lap-shear and peel performance than film adhesives, especially at elevated temperatures.

  11. Adhesive, elastomeric gel impregnating composition

    DOEpatents

    Shaw, David Glenn; Pollard, John Randolph; Brooks, Robert Aubrey

    2002-01-01

    An improved capacitor roll with alternating film and foil layers is impregnated with an adhesive, elastomeric gel composition. The gel composition is a blend of a plasticizer, a polyol, a maleic anhydride that reacts with the polyol to form a polyester, and a catalyst for the reaction. The impregnant composition is introduced to the film and foil layers while still in a liquid form and then pressure is applied to aid with impregnation. The impregnant composition is cured to form the adhesive, elastomeric gel. Pressure is maintained during curing.

  12. Composite-to-metal tubular lap joints: Strength and fatigue resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reedy, E. D., Jr.; Guess, T. R.

    1993-10-01

    The axial strength and fatigue resistance of thick-walled, adhesively bonded E-glass composite-to-aluminum tubular lap joints have been measured for tensile and compressive loadings. The joint specimen bonds a 63 mm OD aluminum tube within each end of a 300 mm long, 6 mm thick E-glass/epoxy tube. Untapered, 12.5 mm thick aluminum adherends were used in all but four of the joint specimens. The aluminum adherends in the remaining four specimens were tapered to a thickness of 1 mm at the inner bond end (the bond end where the aluminum adherend terminates). For all loadings, joint failure initiates at the inner bond end as a crack grows in the adhesive adjacent to the interface. Test results for a tension-tension fatigue loading indicate that fatigue can severely degrade joint performance. Interestingly, measured tensile strength and fatigue resistance for joints with untapered adherends is substantially greater than compressive strength and fatigue resistance. The joint specimen has been analyzed in two different ways: one approach models the adhesive as an uncracked, elastic-perfectly plastic material, while the other approach uses a linear elastic fracture mechanics methodology. Results for the uncracked, elastic-plastic adhesive model indicate that observed bond failure occurs in the region of highest calculated stresses, extensive bond yielding occurs at load levels well below that required to fail the joint, and a tensile peel stress is generated by a compressive joint loading when the aluminum adherends are untapered. This latter result is consistent with the observed joint tensile-compressive strength differential. Results of the linear elastic fracture mechanics analysis of a joint with untapered aluminum adherends are also consistent with the observed differential strength effect since a mode 1 crack loading is predicted for a compressive joint loading. Calculations and a limited number of tests suggest that it may be possible to selectively control the

  13. Effect of adhesive thickness and surface treatment on shear strength on single lap joint Al/CFRP using adhesive of epoxy/Al fine powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diharjo, Kuncoro; Anwar, Miftahul; Tarigan, Roy Aries P.; Rivai, Ahmad

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of adhesive thickness and surface treatment on the shear strength and failure type characteristic of single lap joint (SLJ) CFRP/Al using adhesive epoxy/Al-fine-powder. The CFRP was produced by using hand layup method for 30% of woven roving carbon fiber (w/w) and the resin used was bisphenolic. The adhesive was prepared using 12.5% of aluminum fine powder (w/w) in the epoxy adhesive. The powder was mixed by using a mixing machine at 60 rpm for 6 minutes, and then it was used to join the Al plate-2024 and CFRP. The start time to pressure for the joint process was 20 minutes after the application of adhesive on the both of adherends. The variables in this research are adhesive thickness (i.e. 0.2 mm, 0.4 mm, 0.6 mm, 0.8 mm and 1 mm) and surface treatment of adherends (i.e. acetone, chromate sulphuric acid, caustic etch and tucker's reagent). Before shear testing, all specimens were post-cured at 100 °C for 15 minutes. The result shows that the SLJ has the highest shear strength for 0.4 mm of adhesive thickness. When the adhesive thickness is more than 0.4 mm (0.6-1 mm), the shear strength decreases significantly. It might be caused by the property change of adhesive from ductile to brittle. The acetone surface treatment produces the best bonding between the adhesive and adherends (CFRP and Al-plate 2024), and the highest shear strength is 9.31 MPa. The surface treatment give the humidification effect of adherend surfaces by adhesive. The failure characteristic shows that the mixed failure of light-fiber-tear-failure and cohesive-failure are occurred on the high shear strength of SLJ, and the low shear strength commonly has the adhesive-failure type.

  14. Fracture of composite-adhesive-composite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ripling, E. J.; Santner, J. S.; Crosley, P. B.

    1984-01-01

    This program was undertaken to initiate the development of a test method for testing adhesive joints in metal-adhesive-composite systems. The uniform double cantilever beam (UDCB) and the width tapered beam (WTB) specimen geometries were evaluated for measuring Mode I fracture toughness in these systems. The WTB specimen is the preferred geometry in spite of the fact that it is more costly to machine than the UDCB specimen. The use of loading tabs attached to thin sheets of composites proved to be experimentally unsatisfactory. Consequently, a new system was developed to load thin sheets of adherends. This system allows for the direct measurement of displacement along the load line. In well made joints separation occurred between the plies rather than in the adhesive.

  15. Debonding characteristics of adhesively bonded woven Kevlar composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Johnson, W. S.

    1988-01-01

    The fatigue damage mechanism of an adhesively bonded joint between fabric reinforced composite adherends was investigated with cracked-lap-shear specimens. Two bonded systems were studied: fabric Kevlar 49/5208 epoxy adherends bonded together with either EC 3445 or FM-300 adhesive. For each bonded system, two specimen geometries were tested. In all specimens tested, fatigue damage occurred in the form of cyclic debonding; however, the woven Kevlar specimens gave significantly slower debond growth rates and higher fracture toughness than previously found in the nonwoven adherend specimens. The surfaces for the woven adherends were not smooth; rather, they had regular crests (high spots) and troughs (low spots) due to the weave pattern. Radiographs of the specimens and examination of their failure surfaces revealed that fiber bridging occurred between the crests of the two adherends in the debonded region. The observed improvements in debond growth resistance and static fracture toughness are attributed to this bridging.

  16. Bolted Double-Lap Composite Joints Under Mechanical and Thermal Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kradinov, V.; Barut, A.; Madenci, E.; Walker, Sandra P. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This study concerns the determination of the contact stresses and contact region around bolt holes and the bolt load distribution in single- and double-lap joints of composite laminates with arbitrarily located bolts under general mechanical loading conditions and uniform temperature change. The unknown contact stress distribution and contact region between the bolt and laminates and the interaction among the bolts require the bolt load distribution, as well as the contact stresses, to be as part of the solution. The present method is based on the complex potential theory and the variational formulation in order to account for bolt stiffness, bolt-hole clearance, and finite geometry of the composite laminates.

  17. SEM/XPS analysis of fractured adhesively bonded graphite fibre-reinforced polyimide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devilbiss, T. A.; Messick, D. L.; Wightman, J. P.; Progar, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    The surfaces of the graphite fiber-reinforced polyimide composites presently pretreated prior to bonding with polyimide adhesive contained variable amounts of a fluoropolymer, as determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Lap shear strengths were determined for unaged samples and for those aged over 500- and 1000-hour periods at 177 and 232 C. Unaged sample lap strengths, which were the highest obtained, exhibited no variation with surface pretreatment, but a significant decrease is noted with increasing aging temperature. These thermally aged samples, however, had increased surface fluorine concentration, while a minimal concentration was found in unaged samples. SEM demonstrated a progressive shift from cohesive to adhesive failure for elevated temperature-aged composites.

  18. Ultrasonic Guided Wave Inspection of Adhesive Joints: a Parametric Study for a Step-Lap Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puthillath, Padma Kumar; Kannajosyula, Haraprasad; Lissenden, Cliff J.; Rose, Joseph L.

    2009-03-01

    Adhesively bonded joints are used to connect structural members in aircraft. When subject to loads and environmental conditions these joints undergo deterioration. Being load bearing members, it becomes critical to develop reliable and non-destructive methods for inspecting these adhesive joints. Ultrasonic guided waves, with their mode and frequency tuning possibilities, form an attractive tool for such inspections. Guided wave behavior as observed through dispersion phenomena is dependent on the waveguide dimensions. Since actual structural joints in aircraft involve adherends of different thicknesses and materials, and joints of varied overlap lengths, a robust inspection methodology needs to be tunable for all conditions. A parametric study showing the effect that some key joint parameters, that is the thickness of the adhesive, overlap length, and material parameters, have on the ultrasonic guided wave behavior is presented in this paper. In addition, the influence of defects like cohesive weakness, delamination and kissing bonds and their location on guided wave propagation is investigated. The transmission of ultrasonic guided wave energy is used as a guideline to select optimal conditions for joint inspection.

  19. LAP5 and LAP6 Encode Anther-Specific Proteins with Similarity to Chalcone Synthase Essential for Pollen Exine Development in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Dobritsa, Anna A.; Lei, Zhentian; Nishikawa, Shuh-ichi; Urbanczyk-Wochniak, Ewa; Huhman, David V.; Preuss, Daphne; Sumner, Lloyd W.

    2010-01-01

    Pollen grains of land plants have evolved remarkably strong outer walls referred to as exine that protect pollen and interact with female stigma cells. Exine is composed of sporopollenin, and while the composition and synthesis of this biopolymer are not well understood, both fatty acids and phenolics are likely components. Here, we describe mutations in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) LESS ADHESIVE POLLEN (LAP5) and LAP6 that affect exine development. Mutation of either gene results in abnormal exine patterning, whereas pollen of double mutants lacked exine deposition and subsequently collapsed, causing male sterility. LAP5 and LAP6 encode anther-specific proteins with homology to chalcone synthase, a key flavonoid biosynthesis enzyme. lap5 and lap6 mutations reduced the accumulation of flavonoid precursors and flavonoids in developing anthers, suggesting a role in the synthesis of phenolic constituents of sporopollenin. Our in vitro functional analysis of LAP5 and LAP6 using 4-coumaroyl-coenzyme A yielded bis-noryangonin (a commonly reported derailment product of chalcone synthase), while similar in vitro analyses using fatty acyl-coenzyme A as the substrate yielded medium-chain alkyl pyrones. Thus, in vitro assays indicate that LAP5 and LAP6 are multifunctional enzymes and may play a role in both the synthesis of pollen fatty acids and phenolics found in exine. Finally, the genetic interaction between LAP5 and an anther gene involved in fatty acid hydroxylation (CYP703A2) demonstrated that they act synergistically in exine production. PMID:20442277

  20. Lapping slurry

    DOEpatents

    Simandl, Ronald F.; Upchurch, Victor S.; Leitten, Michael E.

    1999-01-01

    Improved lapping slurries provide for easier and more thorough cleaning of alumina workpieces, as well as inhibit corrosion of the lapping table and provide for easier cleaning of the lapping equipment. The unthickened lapping slurry comprises abrasive grains such as diamond abrasive dispersed in a carrier comprising water, glycerine, and triethanolamine. The thickened lapping slurry comprises abrasive grains such as diamond abrasive dispersed in a carrier comprising water, glycerine, triethanolamine, a water soluble silicate, and acid.

  1. Lapping slurry

    DOEpatents

    Simandl, R.F.; Upchurch, V.S.; Leitten, M.E.

    1999-01-05

    Improved lapping slurries provide for easier and more thorough cleaning of alumina work pieces, as well as inhibit corrosion of the lapping table and provide for easier cleaning of the lapping equipment. The unthickened lapping slurry comprises abrasive grains such as diamond abrasive dispersed in a carrier comprising water, glycerine, and triethanolamine. The thickened lapping slurry comprises abrasive grains such as diamond abrasive dispersed in a carrier comprising water, glycerine, triethanolamine, a water soluble silicate, and acid. 1 fig.

  2. New concepts for strength enhancement of co-cured composite single lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coates, Cameron Wayne

    2001-10-01

    Often the benefits of utilizing composites are diminished by the poor performance of their joint designs. This research examines designs that seek to improve the performance of composite co-cured single lap joints under static and fatigue loading, with only minor alteration to the geometry or lay-up of a base design. The minor alteration criterion was chosen in order to reduce the cost of implementing these designs in replacing existing joints or altering existing manufacturing methods. The approach consisted of two phases, denoted Phase I and II. Phase I consisted of monotonic tests for all the proposed designs as well as Finite Element Analysis of the design showing the most improvement. The objective of Phase I was to determine whether the designs would improve monotonic strength at the joint interface and identify the most effective designs. The designs tested during Phase I may be categorized as Single Nested Overlap, Half Slice, Full Slice and Transverse Layer. The preliminary tests consisted of single lap joint composites with altered and unaltered interfaces tested under uniform extension. The configurations examined include a quasi-isotropic lay-up and a unidirectional lay-up, however the designs are applicable to any lay-up. A comparison of ultimate strengths indicated that these designs offered improvement in strength. During testing, acoustic emission equipment was used to monitor damage progression as well as detect damage initiation and accumulation. The most consistent and practical design improvements were determined to be the Single Nested Overlap and Transverse Layer configurations. A Finite Element Analysis (FEA) of the Reference joint and the Single Nested Overlap joint was performed. FE predictions of the effectiveness of the nested overlap design support the test data through a reduction in shear stress and a reversal of peel stresses.

  3. UV-cured adhesives for carbon fiber composite applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hsiao-Chun

    Carbon fiber composite materials are increasingly used in automobile, marine, and aerospace industries due to their unique properties, including high strength, high stiffness and low weight. However, due to their brittle characteristic, these structures are prone to physical damage, such as a bird strike or impact damage. Once the structure is damaged, it is important to have fast and reliable temporary repair until the permanent repair or replacement can take place. In this dissertation, UV-based adhesives were used to provide a bonding strength for temporary repair. Adhesively bonded patch repair is an efficient and effective method for temporary repair. In this study, precured patches (hard patches) and dry fabric patches with laminating resins (soft patches) were performed. UV-based epoxy adhesives were applied to both patch repair systems. For precured patch repair, the bonding strengths were investigated under different surface treatments for bonding area and different adhesives thicknesses. The shear stresses of different UV exposure times and curing times were tested. Besides, the large patch repair was investigated as well. For soft patch repair, the hand wet lay-up was applied due to high viscosity of UV resins. A modified single lap shear testing (ASTM D5868) was applied to determine the shear stress. The large patches used fiber glass instead of carbon fiber to prove the possibility of repair with UV epoxy resin by hand wet lay-up process. The hand lay-up procedure was applied and assisted by vacuum pressure to eliminate the air bubbles and consolidate the patches. To enhance the bonding strength and effective soft patch repair, vacuum assisted resin transferring molding (VaRTM) is the better option. However, only low viscosity resins can be operated by VaRTM. Hence, new UV-based adhesives were formulated. The new UV-based adhesives included photoinitiator (PI), epoxy and different solvents. Solvents were used to compound the photoinitiator into epoxy

  4. Influence of interface ply orientation on fatigue damage of adhesively bonded composite joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Mall, S.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental study of cracked-lap-shear specimens was conducted to determine the influence of adherend stacking sequence on debond initiation and damage growth in a composite-to-composite bonded joint. Specimens consisted of quasi-isotropic graphite/epoxy adherends bonded together with either FM-300 or EC 3445 adhesives. The stacking sequence of the adherends was varied such that 0 deg, 45 deg, or 90 deg plies were present at the adherend-adhesive interfaces. Fatigue damage initiated in the adhesive layer in those specimens with 0 deg nd 45 deg interface plies. Damage initiated in the form of ply cracking in the strap adherend for the specimens with 90 deg interface plies. The fatigue-damage growth was in the form of delamination within the composite adherends for specimens with the 90 deg and 45 deg plies next to the adhesive, while debonding in the adhesive resulted for the specimens with 0 deg plies next to the adhesive. Those joints with the 0 deg and 45 deg plies next to either adhesive has essentially the same fatigue-damage-initiation stress levels. These stress levels were 13 and 71 percent higher, respectively, than those for specimens with 90 deg plies next to the EC 3445 and FM-300 adhesives.

  5. Influence of interface ply orientation on fatigue damage of adhesively bonded composite joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Mall, S.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental study of cracked-lap-shear specimens was conducted to determine the influence of adherend stacking sequence on debond initiation and damage growth in a composite-to-composite bonded joint. Specimens consisted of quasi-isotropic graphite/epoxy adherends bonded together with either FM-300 or EC 3445 adhesives. The stacking sequence of the adherends was varied such that 0 deg, 45 deg, or 90 deg plies were present at the adherend-adhesive interfaces. Fatigue damage initiated in the adhesive layer in those specimens with 0 deg and 45 deg interface plies. Damaage initiated in the form of ply cracking in the strap adherend for the specimens with 90 deg interface plies. The fatigue-damage growth was in the form of delamination within the composite adherends for specimens with the 90 deg and 45 deg plies next to the adhesive, while debonding in the adhesive resulted for the specimens with 0 deg plies next to the adhesive. Those joints with the 0 deg and 45 deg plies next to either adhesive has essentially the same fatigue-damage-initiation stress levels. These stress levels were 13 and 71 percent higher, respectively, than those for specimens with 90 deg plies next to the EC 3445 and FM-300 adhesives.

  6. Processable polyimide adhesive and matrix composite resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Progar, Donald J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A high temperature polyimide composition prepared by reacting 4,4'-isophthaloyldiphthalic anhydride with metaphenylenediamine is employed to prepare matrix resins, adhesives, films, coatings, moldings, and laminates, especially those showing enhanced flow with retention of mechanical and adhesive properties. It can be used in the aerospace industry, for example, in joining metals to metals or metals to composite structures. One area of application is in the manufacture of lighter and stronger aircraft and spacecraft structures.

  7. Application of atmospheric pressure plasma in polymer and composite adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hang

    carboxyl groups, on the polymer surface after plasma treatment. The resulting strength of the bond based on lap-shear and T-peel tests correlates well with the concentration of oxygen on the polymer surface. The failure modes observed for lap-shear and T-peel tests changed from interfacial to cohesive after the plasma activation. Treating carbon-fiber-reinforced epoxy composites with the atmospheric plasma resulted in the removal of fluorinated contaminants in shallow surface layers. For contaminants that diffused deeply into the composite surface, mechanical abrasion was needed in addition to the plasma treatment to remove the impurities. While cleaning the composite, plasma also generated active oxygen groups on the substrate surface. The presence of these groups improved the adhesive bonding strength of the composite even in the presence of residual fluorine contaminants. Thus, it was speculated that plasma treatment can promote better polymer adhesion with or without fluorine contamination. Carbon nanotube sheets were also treated by the helium oxygen plasma, and the CNT surface turn from super hydrophobic to hydrophilic after a few seconds of exposure. The nanotube surface contained 15% of oxygen in the form of hydroxyl groups. Chemical coupling agents were added to the plasma activated CNT surfaces in order to crosslink the CNTs and to create bonding sites for the resin matrix. Stretched, activated and functionalized CNT was cured with dicyclopentadiene (DCPD) to produce a sheet composite with a tensile strength of 636 MPa, a modulus of 28 GPa, and a density of 1.4 g/cm 3. This may be compared to aerospace-grade aluminum with tensile strength of 572 MPa, modulus of 72 GPa, and density of 2.7 g/cm3. This work demonstrates that new high-strength composite can be produced with the use of atmospheric plasma activation and chemical crosslinking of the fiber matrix.

  8. Adhesive joint and composites modeling in SIERRA.

    SciTech Connect

    Ohashi, Yuki; Brown, Arthur A.; Hammerand, Daniel Carl; Adolf, Douglas Brian; Chambers, Robert S.; Foulk, James W., III

    2005-11-01

    Polymers and fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composites play an important role in many Defense Program applications. Recently an advanced nonlinear viscoelastic model for polymers has been developed and incorporated into ADAGIO, Sandia's SIERRA-based quasi-static analysis code. Standard linear elastic shell and continuum models for fiber-reinforced polymer-matrix composites have also been added to ADAGIO. This report details the use of these models for advanced adhesive joint and composites simulations carried out as part of an Advanced Simulation and Computing Advanced Deployment (ASC AD) project. More specifically, the thermo-mechanical response of an adhesive joint when loaded during repeated thermal cycling is simulated, the response of some composite rings under internal pressurization is calculated, and the performance of a composite container subjected to internal pressurization, thermal loading, and distributed mechanical loading is determined. Finally, general comparisons between the continuum and shell element approaches for modeling composites using ADAGIO are given.

  9. Strengths of composite-to-metal double-lap bolted joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hsien-Tang

    1998-12-01

    A three-dimensional analysis was proposed to study the through-the-thickness clamping effect on the bearing failure of double-lap bolted laminated composite joints. Experiments were first performed to characterize the material response due to bearing failure in composite bolted joints with and without lateral clamp-up supports. Composite plates made of T800H/3900-2 graphite/epoxy were selected in the tests, and various washer sizes and clamping forces were used in the study. The clamping force in the bolt was found to vary with the applied load, and may increase significantly due to a sudden through-the-thickness expansion of the laminate under the washers where bearing failure occurred. Experiments showed that the joint strength and response can be significantly affected by the bolt clamp-up, and the bolt bearing failure is a 3-D phenomenon. In order to facilitate the use of the proposed model with the ABAQUS code, an interface module 3DBOLT was developed. In order to reinforce the incompressibility condition in calculations for bearing-damaged material predicted by the model, the condition was imposed through a penalty method in the frame work of finite element analyses. The module provides a user-friendly input deck, generates automatically a joint mesh, and produces outputs and graphics for displaying the stresses, strains, and deformations of the joints and for simulating the failure progression in joints during loading. Extensive comparisons were made between the test data and model predictions. Overall, the model predicts both the failure load and response of bolted composite joints very well for various clamping forces and washer sizes. The model also predicted very well for joints failed in net-tension and shear-out modes. The predicted bolt clamp-up load as a function of the applied load agreed also very well with the data, which validates that the proposed incompressibility assumption for bearing-damaged material. Based on the model, a parametric study

  10. Ultrasonic Welding of Thermoplastic Composite Coupons for Mechanical Characterization of Welded Joints through Single Lap Shear Testing.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Irene F; Palardy, Genevieve

    2016-02-11

    This paper presents a novel straightforward method for ultrasonic welding of thermoplastic-composite coupons in optimum processing conditions. The ultrasonic welding process described in this paper is based on three main pillars. Firstly, flat energy directors are used for preferential heat generation at the joining interface during the welding process. A flat energy director is a neat thermoplastic resin film that is placed between the parts to be joined prior to the welding process and heats up preferentially owing to its lower compressive stiffness relative to the composite substrates. Consequently, flat energy directors provide a simple solution that does not require molding of resin protrusions on the surfaces of the composite substrates, as opposed to ultrasonic welding of unreinforced plastics. Secondly, the process data provided by the ultrasonic welder is used to rapidly define the optimum welding parameters for any thermoplastic composite material combination. Thirdly, displacement control is used in the welding process to ensure consistent quality of the welded joints. According to this method, thermoplastic-composite flat coupons are individually welded in a single lap configuration. Mechanical testing of the welded coupons allows determining the apparent lap shear strength of the joints, which is one of the properties most commonly used to quantify the strength of thermoplastic composite welded joints.

  11. The Analysis of Adhesively Bonded Advanced Composite Joints Using Joint Finite Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapleton, Scott E.; Waas, Anthony M.

    2012-01-01

    The design and sizing of adhesively bonded joints has always been a major bottleneck in the design of composite vehicles. Dense finite element (FE) meshes are required to capture the full behavior of a joint numerically, but these dense meshes are impractical in vehicle-scale models where a course mesh is more desirable to make quick assessments and comparisons of different joint geometries. Analytical models are often helpful in sizing, but difficulties arise in coupling these models with full-vehicle FE models. Therefore, a joint FE was created which can be used within structural FE models to make quick assessments of bonded composite joints. The shape functions of the joint FE were found by solving the governing equations for a structural model for a joint. By analytically determining the shape functions of the joint FE, the complex joint behavior can be captured with very few elements. This joint FE was modified and used to consider adhesives with functionally graded material properties to reduce the peel stress concentrations located near adherend discontinuities. Several practical concerns impede the actual use of such adhesives. These include increased manufacturing complications, alterations to the grading due to adhesive flow during manufacturing, and whether changing the loading conditions significantly impact the effectiveness of the grading. An analytical study is conducted to address these three concerns. Furthermore, proof-of-concept testing is conducted to show the potential advantages of functionally graded adhesives. In this study, grading is achieved by strategically placing glass beads within the adhesive layer at different densities along the joint. Furthermore, the capability to model non-linear adhesive constitutive behavior with large rotations was developed, and progressive failure of the adhesive was modeled by re-meshing the joint as the adhesive fails. Results predicted using the joint FE was compared with experimental results for various

  12. The analysis of adhesively bonded advanced composite joints using joint finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stapleton, Scott E.

    The design and sizing of adhesively bonded joints has always been a major bottleneck in the design of composite vehicles. Dense finite element (FE) meshes are required to capture the full behavior of a joint numerically, but these dense meshes are impractical in vehicle-scale models where a course mesh is more desirable to make quick assessments and comparisons of different joint geometries. Analytical models are often helpful in sizing, but difficulties arise in coupling these models with full-vehicle FE models. Therefore, a joint FE was created which can be used within structural FE models to make quick assessments of bonded composite joints. The shape functions of the joint FE were found by solving the governing equations for a structural model for a joint. By analytically determining the shape functions of the joint FE, the complex joint behavior can be captured with very few elements. This joint FE was modified and used to consider adhesives with functionally graded material properties to reduce the peel stress concentrations located near adherend discontinuities. Several practical concerns impede the actual use of such adhesives. These include increased manufacturing complications, alterations to the grading due to adhesive flow during manufacturing, and whether changing the loading conditions significantly impact the effectiveness of the grading. An analytical study is conducted to address these three concerns. Furthermore, proof-of-concept testing is conducted to show the potential advantages of functionally graded adhesives. In this study, grading is achieved by strategically placing glass beads within the adhesive layer at different densities along the joint. Furthermore, the capability to model non-linear adhesive constitutive behavior with large rotations was developed, and progressive failure of the adhesive was modeled by re-meshing the joint as the adhesive fails. Results predicted using the joint FE was compared with experimental results for various

  13. A novel composite-to-composite adhesive bond mechanism.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Naotake; Sakamoto, Tominori; Kubota, Yuya; Kondo, Yoshie; Momoi, Yasuko

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if adhesion between various resin composites can occur by a chelation reaction of elemental ions. The surface composition of four commercially available resin composites (Beautifil II, Clearfil AP-X, Estelite Σ Quick and Solare) were measured by X-ray fluorescence analysis. Composite-to-composite adhesion with conventional silane coupling treatment was compared to self-etching primer treatment and evaluated by conventional shear bond strength testing. Our results detected Strontium and Barium (alkaline metallic earth ions) on the surface of Beautifil II and Clearfil AP-X resins. The shear bond strength values of self-etching primer treatments of Beautifil II and Clearfil AP-X was significantly higher than Estelite Σ Quick and Solare. Our data suggest that self-etching primer treatment is effective for adhesion of resin composites, depending on their filler composition, due to the chelation adhesion reaction between the acidic monomer and incorporated alkaline metal ions. PMID:21778602

  14. Guidelines for Direct Adhesive Composite Restoration.

    PubMed

    Society Of Cariology And Endodontology, Chinese Stomatological Association Csa

    2015-01-01

    Direct adhesive composite restoration, a technique to restore tooth defects by bonding composite resin materials, has been widely used in the restoration of dental caries or other tooth defects. Retention of composite resin restoration mainly relies on bonding strength between the materials and dental tissue. The clinical outcomes rely greatly on the regulated clinical practice of dentists. In 2011, the Society of Cariology and Endodontology of Chinese Stomatological Association (CSA) published the 'Practices and evaluation criteria of composite resin bonded restoration (Discussion Version)'. Since then, opinions and comments regarding the 'Discussion Version' have been widely circulated within the Society. The final version of the guideline was based on systematic reviews of scientific literature and requirements for the edit of technical guidelines, and through several rounds of discussions, revisions and supplements. The society recommends this guideline for clinicians to use in their practices, when conducting direct composite restorations.

  15. PLASMA POLYMER FILMS AS ADHESION PROMOTING PRIMERS FOR ALUMINUM. PART II: STRENGTH AND DURABILITY OF LAP JOINTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Plasma polymerized hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) films (~800 A in thickness) were deposited onto 6111-T4 aluminum substrates in radio frequency and microwave powered reactors and used as primers for structural adhesive bonding. Processing variables such as substrate pre-treatment,...

  16. Mixed-mode cyclic debonding of adhesively bonded composite joints. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rezaizadeh, M. A.; Mall, S.

    1985-01-01

    A combined experimental-analytical investigation to characterize the cyclic failure mechanism of a simple composite-to-composite bonded joint is conducted. The cracked lap shear (CLS) specimens of graphite/epoxy adherend bonded with EC-3445 adhesive are tested under combined mode 1 and 2 loading. In all specimens tested, fatigue failure occurs in the form of cyclic debonding. The cyclic debond growth rates are measured. The finite element analysis is employed to compute the mode 1, mode 2, and total strain energy release rates (i.e., GI, GII, and GT). A wide range of mixed-mode loading, i.e., GI/GII ranging from 0.03 to 0.38, is obtained. The total strain energy release rate, G sub T, appeared to be the driving parameter for cyclic debonding in the tested composite bonded system.

  17. Candida albicans adhesion to composite resin materials.

    PubMed

    Bürgers, Ralf; Schneider-Brachert, Wulf; Rosentritt, Martin; Handel, Gerhard; Hahnel, Sebastian

    2009-09-01

    The adhesion of Candida albicans to dental restorative materials in the human oral cavity may promote the occurrence of oral candidosis. This study aimed to compare the susceptibility of 14 commonly used composite resin materials (two compomers, one ormocer, one novel silorane, and ten conventional hybrid composites) to adhere Candida albicans. Differences in the amount of adhering fungi should be related to surface roughness, hydrophobicity, and the type of matrix. Cylindrical specimens of each material were made according to the manufacturers' instructions. Surface roughness R (a) was assessed by perthometer measurements and the degree of hydrophobicity by computerized contact angle analysis. Specimens were incubated with a reference strain of C. albicans (DMSZ 1386), and adhering fungi were quantified by using a bioluminometric assay in combination with an automated plate reader. Statistical differences were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U test. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients were calculated to assess correlations. Median R (a) of the tested composite resin materials ranged between 0.04 and 0.23 microm, median contact angles between 69.2 degrees and 86.9 degrees . The two compomers and the ormocer showed lower luminescence intensities indicating less adhesion of fungi than all tested conventional hybrid composites. No conclusive correlation was found between surface roughness, hydrophobicity, and the amount of adhering C. albicans.

  18. The effects of molecular weight on the single lap shear creep and constant strain rate behavior of thermoplastic polyimidesulfone adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dembosky, Stanley K.; Sancaktar, Erol

    1985-01-01

    The bonded shear creep and constant strain rate behaviors of zero, one, and three percent endcapped thermoplastic polyimidesulfone adhesive were examined at room and elevated temperatures. Endcapping was accomplished by the addition of phthalic anhydrides. The primary objective was to determine the effects of molecular weight on the mechanical properties of the adhesive. Viscoelastic and nonlinear elastic constitutive equations were utilized to model the adhesive. Ludwik's and Crochet's relations were used to describe the experimental failure data. The effects of molecular weight changes on the above mentioned mechanical behavior were assessed. The viscoelastic Chase-Goldsmith and elastic nonlinear relations gave a good fit to the experimental stress strain behavior. Crochet's relations based on Maxwell and Chase-Goldsmith models were fit to delayed failure data. Ludwik's equations revealed negligible rate dependence. Ultimate stress levels and the safe levels for creep stresses were found to decrease as molecular weight was reduced.

  19. Integrating electrostatic adhesion to composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Callum J. C.; Bond, Ian P.; Potter, Kevin D.

    2015-04-01

    Additional functionality within load bearing components holds potential for adding value to a structure, design or product. We consider the adaptation of an established technology, electrostatic adhesion or electroadhesion, for application in glass fibre reinforced polymer (GFRP) composite materials. Electroadhesion uses high potential difference (~2-3 kV) between co-planar electrodes to generate temporary holding forces to both electrically conductive and nonconductive contact surfaces. Using a combination of established fabrication techniques, electroadhesive elements are co-cured within a composite host structure during manufacture. This provides an almost symbiotic relationship between the electroadhesive and the composite structure, with the electroadhesive providing an additional functionality, whilst the epoxy matrix material of the composite acts as a dielectric for the high voltage electrodes of the device. Silicone rubber coated devices have been shown to offer high shear load (85kPa) capability for GFRP components held together using this technique. Through careful control of the connection interface, we consider the incorporation of these devices within complete composite structures for additional functionality. The ability to vary the internal connectivity of structural elements could allow for incremental changes in connectivity between discrete sub-structures, potentially introducing variable stiffness to the global structure.

  20. Shear Pressed Aligned Carbon Nanotubes and their use as Composite and Adhesive Interlayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, James Joseph, III

    fiber nonwoven. A SPS falls into a short fiber nonwoven and is studied as a non-infused, infused, and infused functionalized interleaf in unidirectional carbon fiber composites for GIC improvement over non-interleaved samples. As with traditional interleaving studies it is possible to decrease delamination fracture toughness as well as increase, and the reasons for either are not always clear. While the SPS interleaves are promising to resist delamination, the scatter of the results make it an unreliable method of improvement. While these studies showed significant variability in effect of the interleaf, given the correct morphology of the SPS and precise measurement during the DCB testing it is possible to improve fracture toughness significantly with all SPS interleaves. A unique fabrication method is used to incorporate the SPS interleaves into lap joint and double strap joint geometries using a prepreg lay-up fabrication similar to forming the DCB specimens. This allowed study of the use of the SPS interleaf as an adhesive layer without the need to develop a SPS adhesive film that would not fail prematurely due to poor adhesion to cured composite panels. Results showed that improvement in GIC is not directly translated into improvement in joint strength. Lap joints showed a higher relationship between GIC than double strap joints likely due to the specimen geometry that results in the adhesive layer of lap joints failing in tension rather than shear.

  1. Environmental Aging of Scotch-Weld(TradeMark) AF-555M Structural Adhesive in Composite to Composite Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Tan-Hung; Miner, Gilda A.; Lowther, Sharon E.; Connell, John W.; Baughman, James M.

    2010-01-01

    Fiber reinforced resin matrix composites have found increased usage in recent years. Due to the lack of service history of these relatively new material systems, their long-term aging performance is not well established. In this study, adhesive bonds were prepared by the secondary bonding of Scotch-Weld(TradeMark) AF-555M between pre-cured adherends comprised of T800H/3900-2 uni-directional laminate. The adherends were co-cured with wet peel-ply for surface preparation. Each bond-line of single-lap-shear (SLS) specimen was measured to determine thickness and inspected visually for voids. A three-year environmental aging plan for the SLS specimens at 82 C and 85% relative humidity was initiated. SLS strengths were measured for both controls and aged specimens at room temperature and 82 C. The aging results of strength retention and failure modes to date are reported.

  2. Influence of composition on the adhesive strength and initial viscosity of denture adhesives.

    PubMed

    Han, Jian-min; Hong, Guang; Hayashida, Kentaro; Maeda, Takeshi; Murata, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effect of composition on the initial viscosity and adhesive strength between denture adhesives and the denture base. Two types of water-soluble polymers (methoxy ethylene maleic anhydride copolymer [PVM-MA] and sodium carboxymethyl cellulose [CMC]) were used. Samples were divided into three groups. Group 1 contained only PVM-MA; Group 2 contained only CMC; and Group 3 contained PVM-MA and CMC. The initial viscosity and adhesive strength were measured. For Group 1, the initial viscosity increased significantly as PVM-MA content increased. The adhesive strength of Group 1 lasted longer than Group 2. The adhesive strength of Group 3 varied greatly. The ratio of CMC and PVM-MA has a significant effect on the initial viscosity and adhesive strength of denture adhesives. Our results suggest that it is possible to improve the durability of a denture adhesive by combining different water-soluble polymers.

  3. Investigation of modified cottonseed protein adhesives for wood composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several modified cottonseed protein isolates were studied and compared to corresponding soy protein isolates for their adhesive properties when bonded to wood composites. Modifications included treatments with alkali, guanidine hydrochloride, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and urea. Wood composites...

  4. Enhanced skin adhesive patch with modulus-tunable composite micropillars.

    PubMed

    Bae, Won Gyu; Kim, Doogon; Kwak, Moon Kyu; Ha, Laura; Kang, Seong Min; Suh, Kahp Y

    2013-01-01

    Modulus-tunable composite micropillars are presented by combining replica molding and selective inking for skin adhesive patch in "ubiquitous"-health diagnostic devices. Inspired from hierarchical hairs in the gecko's toe pad, a simple method is presented to form composite polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) micropillars that are highly adhesive (∼1.8 N cm(-2) ) and mechanically robust (∼30 cycles).

  5. Universal adhesive (glue composition) for electrical porcelain products

    SciTech Connect

    Khristoforov, K.K.; Belen'kaya, E.S.; Omel'chenko, Y.A.; Vinogradova, T.K.

    1986-05-01

    The aim of this work is to develop an adhesive for porcelain insulators that exhibits high physicomechanical properties and increased resistance to the simultaneous action of heat and moisture. One method of solving this problem is to introduce special additives possessing hydrophobic (waterrepelling) properties into the adhesive composition during the process of its preparation. The adhesive based on the ED-20 epoxy resin and TEA hardened with 5 parts of AF-2 additive possesses higher resistance to the action of heat and moisture as compared to the adhesive used at the present time for assembling insulators. The improved and stable physiomechanical properties of the developed adhesive permit its use in any climactic conditions.

  6. Functionally Graded Adhesives for Composite Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapleton, Scott E.; Waas, Anthony M.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Adhesives with functionally graded material properties are being considered for use in adhesively bonded joints to reduce the peel stress concentrations located near adherend discontinuities. Several practical concerns impede the actual use of such adhesives. These include increased manufacturing complications, alterations to the grading due to adhesive flow during manufacturing, and whether changing the loading conditions significantly impact the effectiveness of the grading. An analytical study is conducted to address these three concerns. An enhanced joint finite element, which uses an analytical formulation to obtain exact shape functions, is used to model the joint. Furthermore, proof of concept testing is conducted to show the potential advantages of functionally graded adhesives. In this study, grading is achieved by strategically placing glass beads within the adhesive layer at different densities along the joint.

  7. Adhesion study of thermoplastic polyimides with Ti-6Al-4V alloy and PEEK-graphite composites

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon Taeho.

    1991-01-01

    High glass transition (e.g. 360C) melt processable thermoplastic polyimide homopolymers and poly(imide-siloxane) segmented copolymers were prepared from a number of diamines and dianhydrides via solution imidization, polydimethylsilxane segment incorporation and molecular weight control with non-reactive phthalimide end-groups. The adhesive bond performance of these polyimides was investigated as a function of molecular weight, siloxane incorporation, residual solvent, test temperature, and polyimide structure via single-lap shear samples prepared from treated Ti-6Al-4V alloy adherends and compression-molded film adhesives of scrim-cloth adhesives. The adhesive bond strengths increased greatly with siloxane-segment incorporation at 10, 20 and 30 wt% and decreased slightly with total polymer molecular weight. As the test temperature was increased, adhesive bond strength increased, decreased or showed a maximum at some temperatures depending on the polyimide structure and siloxane content. The poly(imide-30% siloxane) segmented copolymer and a miscible poly(ether-imide) also demonstrated excellent adhesive bond strength with poly(arylene ether ketone) PEEK{reg sign}-graphite composites.

  8. Tubular lap joints for wind turbine applications

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, E.D. Jr.; Guess, T.R.

    1990-01-01

    A combined analytical/experimental study of the strength of thick- walled, adhesively bonded PMMA-to-aluminum and E-glass/epoxy composite-to-aluminum tubular lap joints under axial load has been conducted. Test results include strength and failure mode data. Moreover, strain gages placed along the length of the outer tubular adherend characterize load transfer from one adherend to the other. The strain gage data indicate that load transfer is nonuniform and that the relatively compliant PMMA has the shorter load transfer length. Strains determined by a finite element analysis of the tested joints are in excellent agreement with those measured. Calculated bond stresses are highest in the region of observed failure, and extensive bond yielding is predicted in the E- glass/epoxy composite-to-aluminum joint prior to joint failure. 4 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Effects of surface preparation on the long-term durability of adhesively bonded composite joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardis, Jason Dante

    The long-term durability of adhesively bonded composite joints is critical to modern aircraft structures, which are increasingly adopting bonding as an alternative option to mechanical fastening. The effects of the surface preparation of the adherends are critical, affecting initial strength, long-term durability, fracture toughness, and failure modes of bonded joints. In this study, several potential factors are evaluated, with focus on the following: (1) Effects of possible chemical contamination from release fabrics, release films, and peel plies during adherend cure. (2) Chemical and mechanical effects of abrasion on the fracture toughness and failure mode. (3) Characterization of paste and film adhesives. There are several standard test methods used to evaluate specimen fracture, but the majority concentrate on bonded metals and interlaminar composite fracture. Testing concentrated on mode I tests; a custom double cantilever beam specimen was devised and utilized, and two forms of a wedge crack test (traveling and static) were also used. Additionally, single lap shear tests were run to contrast the mode I tests. Non-destructive testing included X-ray photography of crack fronts, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy surface chemistry analyses, and scanning electron microscope imaging of prepared surfaces. All mode I test methods tended to be in agreement in the ranking of different surface preparation methods. Test results revealed that release agents deposited on adherend surfaces during their cure cycle prevented proper adhesion. While mechanical abrasion did improve their fracture toughness and lower their contamination greatly, the test values did not reach the levels of samples that were not contaminated before bonding, and the interfacial modes of failure did not always change to desirable modes.

  10. Surface modifications of nylon/carbon fiber composite for improving joint adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, R.; Liao, S.L.; Tong, T.S.; Young, J.T.

    1996-12-31

    Various methods were used to modify the nylon/carbon fiber composite surfaces, including grit blasting, flame and plasma pretreatments. The surfaces of nylon composites after pretreatments were characterized by contact angle measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XPS results show that several functional groups were formed after plasma and flame pretreatments. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) photographs suggest that the blasting pretreatment increased the surface roughness of nylon composites. All these surface pretreatments dramatically increased the lap shear strength if proper operation conditions were used. The reasons for the increase of lap shear strength were explained.

  11. Adhesive-Bonded Composite Joint Analysis with Delaminated Surface Ply Using Strain-Energy Release Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chadegani, Alireza; Yang, Chihdar; Smeltzer, Stanley S. III

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical model to determine the strain energy release rate due to an interlaminar crack of the surface ply in adhesively bonded composite joints subjected to axial tension. Single-lap shear-joint standard test specimen geometry with thick bondline is followed for model development. The field equations are formulated by using the first-order shear-deformation theory in laminated plates together with kinematics relations and force equilibrium conditions. The stress distributions for the adherends and adhesive are determined after the appropriate boundary and loading conditions are applied and the equations for the field displacements are solved. The system of second-order differential equations is solved to using the symbolic computation tool Maple 9.52 to provide displacements fields. The equivalent forces at the tip of the prescribed interlaminar crack are obtained based on interlaminar stress distributions. The strain energy release rate of the crack is then determined by using the crack closure method. Finite element analyses using the J integral as well as the crack closure method are performed to verify the developed analytical model. It has been shown that the results using the analytical method correlate well with the results from the finite element analyses. An attempt is made to predict the failure loads of the joints based on limited test data from the literature. The effectiveness of the inclusion of bondline thickness is justified when compared with the results obtained from the previous model in which a thin bondline and uniform adhesive stresses through the bondline thickness are assumed.

  12. Characterization of adhesive from oysters: A structural and compositional study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberts, Erik

    The inability for man-made adhesives to set in wet or humid environments is an ongoing challenging the design of biomedical and marine adhesive materials. However, we see that nature has already overcome this challenge. Mussels, barnacles, oysters and sandcastle worms all have unique mechanisms by which they attach themselves to surfaces. By understanding what evolution has already spent millions of years perfecting, we can design novel adhesive materials inspired by nature's elegant designs. The well-studied mussel is currently the standard for design of marine inspired biomimetic polymers. In the work presented here, we aim to provide new insights into the adhesive produced by the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica. Unlike the mussel, which produces thread-like plaques comprised of DOPA containing-protein, the oyster secretes an organic-inorganic hybrid adhesive as it settles and grows onto a surface. This form of adhesion renders the oyster to be permanently fixed in place. Over time, hundreds of thousands of oyster grow and agglomerate to form extensive reef structures. These reefs are not only essential to survival of the oyster, but are also vital to intertidal ecosystems. While the shell of the oyster has been extensively studied, curiously, only a few conflicting insights have been made into the nature of the adhesive and contact zone between shell and substrate, and even lesfs information has been ascertained on organic and inorganic composition. In this work, we provide microscopy and histochemical studies to characterize the structure and composition of the adhesive, using oyster in the adult and juvenile stages of life. Preliminary work on extracting and characterizing organic components through collaborative help with solid-state NMR (SSNMR) and proteomics are also detailed here. We aim to provide a full, comprehensive characterization of oyster adhesive so that in the future, we may apply what we learn to the design of new materials.

  13. Critical appraisal: adhesive-composite incompatibility, part I.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Ricardo M; Garcia, Fernanda Cristina P; E Silva, Safira M A; Castro, Fabrício L A

    2005-01-01

    Apart from some questions related to the repairability of resin composite restorations, dentists have always assumed that methacrylate-based resins are compatible with each other. For example, there is no clinically relevant problem in using a microfilled composite to laminate a Class IV restoration made with a hybrid composite, even if they are not of the same brand or manufacturer. In the context of adhesive systems, we have always believed that resin composites, regardless of their type or composition, bond well to all types of bonding agents. However, unexpected debonding of self-cured, core buildup composites that had been bonded with single-bottle adhesive systems was reported about 5 years ago. Subsequent studies demonstrated that there were, indeed, compatibility problems between simplified adhesive systems and self- or dual-cured resin composites. Apparently, when such combinations are used, reduced bond strengths and subsequent failures at the resin-adhesive interface can occur because of adverse reactions between the acidic resin monomers, an integral part of the simplified adhesive systems, and the chemicals involved in the polymerization mechanism of the self- or dual-cured composites, particularly the basic tertiary amines. At least one research group has expanded the information on this issue by further investigating the mechanisms involved in this phenomenon. This group demonstrated that not only adverse chemical reactions but also the permeability of such simplified systems contribute to the compromised bonding. This issue has profound clinical implications in view of the wide use of self- and dual-cured composites as core buildup materials and in the bonding of indirect restorations and endodontic posts. Some of the most representative studies of this group are described in this Critical Appraisal. Part II will appear in the next issue of the Journal.

  14. Adhesive bonding of composite aircraft structures: Challenges and recent developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantelakis, Sp.; Tserpes, K. I.

    2014-01-01

    In this review paper, the challenges and some recent developments of adhesive bonding technology in composite aircraft structures are discussed. The durability of bonded joints is defined and presented for parameters that may influence bonding quality. Presented is also, a numerical design approach for composite joining profiles used to realize adhesive bonding. It is shown that environmental ageing and pre-bond contamination of bonding surfaces may degrade significantly fracture toughness of bonded joints. Moreover, it is obvious that additional research is needed in order to design joining profiles that will enable load transfer through shearing of the bondline. These findings, together with the limited capabilities of existing non-destructive testing techniques, can partially explain the confined use of adhesive bonding in primary composite aircraft structural parts.

  15. Adhesive and Composite Properties of a New Phenylethynyl Terminated Imide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, C. M.; Connell, J. W.; Hergenrother, P. M.

    2002-01-01

    A relatively new phenylethynyl terminated imide oligomer (PETI) from the reaction of 2,3,',4'- biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride, 4,4'-oxydianiline and endcapped with 4- phenylethynylphthalic anhydride at a calculated number average molecular weight of 5000 g/mole was evaluated as an adhesive and composite matrix. The asymmetric dianhydride imparts a low melt viscosity to the oligomer and a high glass transition temperature to the cured resin. Preliminary adhesive work with titanium (6Al-4V) adherend gave good room temperature (RT) tensile shear strengths and excellent retention of RT strength at 260 C. Preliminary composite work using unsized IM7 carbon fiber provided moderate to high mechanical properties. The chemistry, mechanical, and physical properties of the new PETI in neat resin, adhesive and composite form are presented.

  16. Adhesive Bonding Characterization of Composite Joints for Cryogenic Usage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, Neil A.; Schieleit, Gregory F.; Biggs, Robert

    2000-01-01

    The development of polymer composite cryogenic tanks is a critical step in creating the next generation of launch vehicles. Future reusable launch vehicles need to minimize the gross liftoff weight (GLOW). This weight reduction is possible due to the large reduction in weight that composite materials can provide over current aluminum technology. In addition to composite technology, adhesively bonded joints potentially have several benefits over mechanically fastened joints, such as weight savings and cryogenic fluid containment. Adhesively bonded joints may be used in several areas of these cryogenic tanks, such as in lobe-to-lobe joints (in a multi-lobe concept), skirt-to-tank joint, strut-to-tank joint, and for attaching stringers and ring frames. The bonds, and the tanks themselves, must be able to withstand liquid cryogenic fuel temperatures that they contain. However, the use of adhesively bonded composite joints at liquid oxygen and hydrogen temperatures is largely unknown and must be characterized. Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company, Michoud Operations performed coupon-level tests to determine effects of material selection, cure process parameters, substrate surface preparation, and other factors on the strength of these composite joints at cryogenic temperatures. This led to the selection of a material and process that would be suitable for a cryogenic tank. KEY WORDS: Composites, Adhesive Bonding, Cryogenics

  17. Three-Dimensional Adhesion Map Based on Surface and Interfacial Cutting Analysis System for Predicting Adhesion Properties of Composite Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyuman; Byun, Seoungwoo; Cho, Inseong; Ryou, Myung-Hyun; Lee, Yong Min

    2016-09-14

    Using a surface and interfacial cutting analysis system (SAICAS) that can measure the adhesion strength of a composite electrode at a specific depth from the surface, we can subdivide the adhesion strength of a composite electrode into two classes: (1) the adhesion strength between the Al current collector and the cathode composite electrode (FAl-Ca) and (2) the adhesion strength measured at the mid-depth of the cathode composite electrode (Fmid). Both adhesion strengths, FAl-Ca and Fmid, increase with increasing electrode density and loading level. From the SAICAS measurement, we obtain a mathematical equation that governs the adhesion strength of the composite electrodes. This equation revealed a maximum accuracy of 97.2% and 96.1% for FAl-Ca and Fmid, respectively, for four randomly chosen composite electrodes varying in electrode density and loading level. PMID:27398829

  18. Design of adhesive bonded composite-to-titanium cylindrical joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depasquale, F.; Ciranna, M.; Ciavatta, G.; Vittori, A.

    1993-02-01

    The ASTER composite-case solid-rocket motor (SRM) development program has addressed the problem posed by the requirement of adhesively bonding a metallic dome attach ring to the filament-wound composite case. An account is given of the numerical and experimental activities undertaken to optimize and verify the design solution, whose full opening at the aft end of the motor case facilitates mandrel extraction and propellant grain shape flexibility.

  19. High-performance adhesive systems for polymer composite bonding applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klug, Jeremy Hager

    Adhesive films are utilized for polymeric composite bonding in numerous high-performance products including aerospace structures. These films must provide high bond strengths over the life-cycle of the part while not compromising the thermal or mechanical performance of the overall system. Currently, epoxy materials are most often employed in commercial adhesive films because of their versatility, cost, processing characteristics, and performance. However, there still exists a desire to improve these materials so that highly robust systems capable of optimized thermal, mechanical, and fracture resistance properties can be realized. In order to create these improved systems, a better understanding of the fundamental characteristics important in adhesion between dissimilar resin systems is needed. The goal of this research was to provide a means for obtaining this knowledge using an engineering approach. A methodology was developed by which model adhesive systems could be designed to explore processing-structure-property relationships. These model systems were designed to be characteristically similar and not chemically identical to commercial adhesive films. The methodology included a simulation engineering step to characterize the commercial product and develop the model system and a re-engineering step that occurs with the material manufacturer and customer to produce an improved product. The methodology was used to explore several issues for toughened epoxy adhesives including the adducting influence on performance, flexibilized liquid elastomer content importance, the relation between elastomer dispersed phase conversion and properties, the feasibility and performance of hybrid toughened resins, and the microcracking behavior of layered composite materials. Collectively, this research created a process that was applied to explore and identify important material parameters and provided information that can be used to design improved film adhesives.

  20. Structural Health Monitoring of Adhesively Bonded Composite Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib, Fady

    In recent years, many aerospace organizations have researched and implemented composite materials to achieve better fuel efficiency as well as reduced maintenance cost. In addition to the use of composites, manufacturers are investigating the use of adhesive bonded joints and composite patch bonded repairs to extend the life of their in-service aircraft. Adhesive joints are superior to traditional mechanical fasteners as they reduce stress concentration zones and overall part count. However, the integrity of an adhesive joint is difficult to inspect. Inspection of adhesive joints may be carried out using interrogation technology such as Structural Health Monitoring (SHM). This thesis focuses on the evaluation of Acoustic-Ultrasonic (AU) SHM technique for the detection of crack and disbond growth. In addition to AU, Capacitance Disbond Detection Technique (CDDT) and the Surface Mountable Crack Detection System (SMCDS) were evaluated for the detection disbonds. Results of the AU system demonstrated that AU technology may be used to detect and quantify crack and disbond growth. It was also found that SMCDS and CDDT both complement each other, as SMCDS identified the location of disbond while CDDT quantify disbond.

  1. Simplified procedures for designing adhesively bonded composite joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.

    1989-01-01

    Procedures for the preliminary design of composite adhesive joints are described. Typical joints, their respective free body diagrams, and approximate equations for estimating the stresses in each of these typical joints are summarized. Equations are also presented to check the critical conditions of the joint such as minimum length, maximum adhesive shear stress, and peel-off stress. To illustrate the procedure, sample designs are described in step-by-step fashion for a butt joint with single doubler subjected to static loads, cyclic loads, and environmental effects. The results show that unsymmetric adhesive joints are inefficient and should be avoided, and hygrothermal environments and cyclic loads dramatically reduce the structural integrity of the joint and require several joint lengths compared with those for static load with no environmental effects.

  2. Adhesive Characterization and Progressive Damage Analysis of Bonded Composite Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girolamo, Donato; Davila, Carlos G.; Leone, Frank A.; Lin, Shih-Yung

    2014-01-01

    The results of an experimental/numerical campaign aimed to develop progressive damage analysis (PDA) tools for predicting the strength of a composite bonded joint under tensile loads are presented. The PDA is based on continuum damage mechanics (CDM) to account for intralaminar damage, and cohesive laws to account for interlaminar and adhesive damage. The adhesive response is characterized using standard fracture specimens and digital image correlation (DIC). The displacement fields measured by DIC are used to calculate the J-integrals, from which the associated cohesive laws of the structural adhesive can be derived. A finite element model of a sandwich conventional splice joint (CSJ) under tensile loads was developed. The simulations indicate that the model is capable of predicting the interactions of damage modes that lead to the failure of the joint.

  3. The Effects of Temperature, Humidity and Aircraft Fluid Exposure on T800H/3900-2 Composites Bonded with AF-555M Adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, Gilda A.; Hou, Tan-Hung; Lowther, Sharon E.; Thibeault, Sheila A.; Connell, John W.; Blasini, Sheila Roman

    2010-01-01

    Fiber reinforced resin matrix composites and structural adhesives have found increased usage on commercial and military aircraft in recent years. Due to the lack of service history of these relatively new material systems, their long-term aging performance has not been well established. In this study, single lap shear specimens (SLS) were fabricated by secondary bonding of Scotch-Weld(TradeMark) AF-555M between pre-cured adherends comprised of T800H/3900-2 uni-directional laminates. The adherends were co-cured with wet peel-ply for surface preparation. Each bond-line of the SLS specimen was measured to determine thickness and inspected visually using an optical microscope for voids. A three-year environmental aging plan for the SLS specimens at 82 C (180 F) and 85% relative humidity was initiated. SLS strengths were measured for both controls and aged specimens at room temperature and 82 C. The effect of this exposure on lap shear strength and failure modes to date is reported. In addition, the effects of water, saline water, deicing fluid, JP-5 jet fuel and hydraulic fluid on both the composite material and the adhesive bonds were investigated. The up to date results on the effects of these exposures will be discussed.

  4. SEM/XPS analysis of fractured adhesively bonded graphite fibre surface resin-rich/graphite fibre composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devilbiss, T. A.; Wightman, J. P.; Progar, D. J.

    1988-01-01

    Samples of graphite fiber-reinforced polyimide were fabricated allowing the resin to accumulate at the composite surface. These surface resin-rich composites were then bonded together and tested for lap shear strength both before and after thermal aging. Lap shear strength did not appear to show a significant improvement over that previously recorded for resin-poor samples and was shown to decrease with increasing aging time and temperature.

  5. Cariogenic bacteria degrade dental resin composites and adhesives.

    PubMed

    Bourbia, M; Ma, D; Cvitkovitch, D G; Santerre, J P; Finer, Y

    2013-11-01

    A major reason for dental resin composite restoration replacement is related to secondary caries promoted by acid production from bacteria including Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans). We hypothesized that S. mutans has esterase activities that degrade dental resin composites and adhesives. Standardized specimens of resin composite (Z250), total-etch (Scotchbond Multipurpose, SB), and self-etch (Easybond, EB) adhesives were incubated with S. mutans UA159 or uninoculated culture medium (control) for up to 30 days. Quantification of the BisGMA-derived biodegradation by-product, bishydroxy-propoxy-phenyl-propane (BisHPPP), was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Surface analysis of the specimens was performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). S. mutans was shown to have esterase activities in levels comparable with those found in human saliva. A trend of increasing BisHPPP release throughout the incubation period was observed for all materials and was more elevated in the presence of bacteria vs. control medium for EB and Z250, but not for SB (p < .05). SEM confirmed the increased degradation of all materials with S. mutans UA159 vs. control. S. mutans has esterase activities at levels that degrade resin composites and adhesives; degree of degradation was dependent on the material's chemical formulation. This finding suggests that the resin-dentin interface could be compromised by oral bacteria that contribute to the progression of secondary caries. PMID:24026951

  6. Cariogenic bacteria degrade dental resin composites and adhesives.

    PubMed

    Bourbia, M; Ma, D; Cvitkovitch, D G; Santerre, J P; Finer, Y

    2013-11-01

    A major reason for dental resin composite restoration replacement is related to secondary caries promoted by acid production from bacteria including Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans). We hypothesized that S. mutans has esterase activities that degrade dental resin composites and adhesives. Standardized specimens of resin composite (Z250), total-etch (Scotchbond Multipurpose, SB), and self-etch (Easybond, EB) adhesives were incubated with S. mutans UA159 or uninoculated culture medium (control) for up to 30 days. Quantification of the BisGMA-derived biodegradation by-product, bishydroxy-propoxy-phenyl-propane (BisHPPP), was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Surface analysis of the specimens was performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). S. mutans was shown to have esterase activities in levels comparable with those found in human saliva. A trend of increasing BisHPPP release throughout the incubation period was observed for all materials and was more elevated in the presence of bacteria vs. control medium for EB and Z250, but not for SB (p < .05). SEM confirmed the increased degradation of all materials with S. mutans UA159 vs. control. S. mutans has esterase activities at levels that degrade resin composites and adhesives; degree of degradation was dependent on the material's chemical formulation. This finding suggests that the resin-dentin interface could be compromised by oral bacteria that contribute to the progression of secondary caries.

  7. Fis overexpression enhances Pseudomonas putida biofilm formation by regulating the ratio of LapA and LapF.

    PubMed

    Moor, Hanna; Teppo, Annika; Lahesaare, Andrio; Kivisaar, Maia; Teras, Riho

    2014-12-01

    Bacteria form biofilm as a response to a number of environmental signals that are mediated by global transcription regulators and alarmones. Here we report the involvement of the global transcription regulator Fis in Pseudomonas putida biofilm formation through regulation of lapA and lapF genes. The major component of P. putida biofilm is proteinaceous and two large adhesive proteins, LapA and LapF, are known to play a key role in its formation. We have previously shown that Fis overexpression enhances P. putida biofilm formation. In this study, we used mini-Tn5 transposon mutagenesis to select potential Fis-regulated genes involved in biofilm formation. A total of 90 % of the studied transposon mutants carried insertions in the lap genes. Since our experiments showed that Fis-enhanced biofilm is mostly proteinaceous, the amounts of LapA and LapF from P. putida cells lysates were quantified using SDS-PAGE. Fis overexpression increases the quantity of LapA 1.6 times and decreases the amount of LapF at least 4 times compared to the wild-type cells. The increased LapA expression caused by Fis overexpression was confirmed by FACS analysis measuring the amount of LapA-GFP fusion protein. Our results suggest that the profusion of LapA in the Fis-overexpressed cells causes enhanced biofilm formation in mature stages of P. putida biofilm and LapF has a minor role in P. putida biofilm formation.

  8. Electrostatic adhesion for added functionality of composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Callum J. C.; Bond, Ian P.; Potter, Kevin D.

    2016-02-01

    Electrostatic adhesion can be used as a means of reversible attachment. The incorporation of electrostatic adhesion into fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) composite structures could provide significant value added functionality. Imparting large potential differences (∼2 kV) across electrodes generates an attractive force, thus providing a means of attachment. This could be used as a reversible latching mechanism or as a means of controllable internal connectivity. Varying the connectivity for discrete elements of a substructure of a given design allows for control of internal load paths and moment of area of the cross section. This could facilitate variable stiffness (both in bending and torsion). Using a combination of existing fabrication techniques, functional electrodes have been integrated within a FRP. Copper polyimide thin film laminate material has been both co-cured with carbon fibre reinforced epoxy and bonded to PVC closed cell foam core material to provide a range of structural configurations with integrated electrodes. The ability of such integrated devices to confer variations in global bending stiffness of basic beam structures is investigated. Through the application of 4 kV across integrated electrostatic adhesive devices, a 112% increase in flexural stiffness has been demonstrated for a composite sandwich structure.

  9. NR-150B2 adhesive development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blatz, P. S.

    1978-01-01

    Adhesive based polyimide solutions which are more easily processed than conventional aromatic polyimide systems and show potential for use for extended times at 589K are discussed. The adhesive system is based on a solution containing diglyme as the solvent and 2,2 bis(3',4'-dicarboxyphenyl)hexafluoropropane, paraphenylenediamine, and oxydianiline. The replacement of N-methylpyrrolidone with diglyme as the solvent was found to improve the adhesive strengths of lap shear samples and simplify the processing conditions for bonding both titanium and graphite fiber/polyimide matrix resin composites. Information was obtained on the effects of various environments including high humidity, immersion in jet fuel and methylethylketone on aluminum filled adhesive bonds. The adhesive was also evaluated in wide area bonds and flatwise tensile specimens using titanium honeycomb and composite face sheets. It was indicated that the developed adhesive system has the potential for use in applications requiring long term exposure to at least 589K (600 F).

  10. Shear bond strength of new self-adhesive flowable composite resins.

    PubMed

    Wajdowicz, Michael N; Vandewalle, Kraig S; Means, Mark T

    2012-01-01

    Recently, new self-adhesive flowable composite resin systems have been introduced to the market. These new composite resin systems reportedly bond to dentin and enamel without the application of an adhesive bonding agent. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength to enamel of two new self-adhesive flowable composites with and without the use of an etch-and-rinse bonding agent. The new self-adhesive flowable composites had significantly lower bond strengths to enamel compared to a traditional adhesively bonded flowable composite. Both self-adhesive flowable composites had a significant increase in bond strength to enamel with the use of a phosphoric acid-etch and adhesive bonding agent. PMID:22414513

  11. Adhesive and composite evaluation of acetylene-terminated phenylquinoxaline resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, P. M.

    1981-01-01

    A series of acetylene-terminated phenylquinoxaline (ATPQ) oligomers of various molecular weights were prepared and subsequently chain extended by the thermally induced reaction of the ethynyl groups. The processability and thermal properties of these oligomers and their cured resins were compared with that of a relatively high molecular weight linear polyphenylquinoxaline (PPQ) with the same chemical backbone. The ATPQ oligomers exhibited significantly better processability than the linear PPQ but the PPQ displayed substantially better thermooxidative stability. Adhesive (Ti/Ti) and composite (graphite filament reinforcement) work was performed to evaluate the potential of these materials for structural applications. The PPQ exhibited better retention of adhesive and laminate properties than the ATPQ resins at 260 C after aging for 500 hr at 260 C in circulating air.

  12. Lap seat belt injuries.

    PubMed

    Hingston, G R

    1996-08-01

    Over a 4 month period, three patients presented acutely to Whangarei Area Hospital after receiving severe abdominal injuries caused directly by lap seat belts. They were involved in road traffic crashes and were all seated in the middle rear seat of the car. The aim of this paper is to alert people to the injuries that can occur from two point lap belts. To this end, the patients and injuries sustained are described and a review of the literature is presented.

  13. Effect of different adhesion strategies on bond strength of resin composite to composite-dentin complex.

    PubMed

    Özcan, M; Pekkan, G

    2013-01-01

    Service life of discolored and abraded resin composite restorations could be prolonged by repair or relayering actions. Composite-composite adhesion can be achieved successfully using some surface conditioning methods, but the most effective adhesion protocol for relayering is not known when the composite restorations are surrounded with dentin. This study evaluated the effect of three adhesion strategies on the bond strength of resin composite to the composite-dentin complex. Intact maxillary central incisors (N=72, n=8 per subgroup) were collected and the coronal parts of the teeth were embedded in autopolymerized poly(methyl tfr54methacrylate) surrounded by a polyvinyl chloride cylinder. Cylindrical cavities (diameter: 2.6 mm; depth: 2 mm) were opened in the middle of the labial surfaces of the teeth using a standard diamond bur, and the specimens were randomly divided into three groups. Two types of resin composite, namely microhybrid (Quadrant Anterior Shine; AS) and nanohybrid (Grandio; G), were photo-polymerized incrementally in the cavities according to each manufacturer's recommendations. The composite-enamel surfaces were ground finished to 1200-grit silicone carbide paper until the dentin was exposed. The surfaces of the substrate composites and the surrounding dentin were conditioned according to one of the following adhesion protocols: protocol 1: acid-etching (dentin) + silica coating (composite) + silanization (composite) + primer (dentin) + bonding agent (dentin + composite); protocol 2: silica coating (composite) + acid-etching (dentin) + silanization (composite) + primer (dentin) + bonding agent (dentin + composite); and protocol 3: acid-etching (dentin) + primer (dentin) + silanization (composite) + bonding agent (dentin + composite). Applied primer and bonding agents were the corresponding materials of the composite manufacturer. Silica coating (CoJet sand, 30 μm) was achieved using a chairside air-abrasion device (distance: 10 mm; duration

  14. Effect of different adhesion strategies on bond strength of resin composite to composite-dentin complex.

    PubMed

    Özcan, M; Pekkan, G

    2013-01-01

    Service life of discolored and abraded resin composite restorations could be prolonged by repair or relayering actions. Composite-composite adhesion can be achieved successfully using some surface conditioning methods, but the most effective adhesion protocol for relayering is not known when the composite restorations are surrounded with dentin. This study evaluated the effect of three adhesion strategies on the bond strength of resin composite to the composite-dentin complex. Intact maxillary central incisors (N=72, n=8 per subgroup) were collected and the coronal parts of the teeth were embedded in autopolymerized poly(methyl tfr54methacrylate) surrounded by a polyvinyl chloride cylinder. Cylindrical cavities (diameter: 2.6 mm; depth: 2 mm) were opened in the middle of the labial surfaces of the teeth using a standard diamond bur, and the specimens were randomly divided into three groups. Two types of resin composite, namely microhybrid (Quadrant Anterior Shine; AS) and nanohybrid (Grandio; G), were photo-polymerized incrementally in the cavities according to each manufacturer's recommendations. The composite-enamel surfaces were ground finished to 1200-grit silicone carbide paper until the dentin was exposed. The surfaces of the substrate composites and the surrounding dentin were conditioned according to one of the following adhesion protocols: protocol 1: acid-etching (dentin) + silica coating (composite) + silanization (composite) + primer (dentin) + bonding agent (dentin + composite); protocol 2: silica coating (composite) + acid-etching (dentin) + silanization (composite) + primer (dentin) + bonding agent (dentin + composite); and protocol 3: acid-etching (dentin) + primer (dentin) + silanization (composite) + bonding agent (dentin + composite). Applied primer and bonding agents were the corresponding materials of the composite manufacturer. Silica coating (CoJet sand, 30 μm) was achieved using a chairside air-abrasion device (distance: 10 mm; duration

  15. Composites with improved fiber-resin interfacial adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cizmecioglu, Muzaffer (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The adhesion of fiber reinforcement such as high modulus graphite to a matrix resin such as polycarbonate is greatly enhanced by applying a very thin layer, suitably from 50 Angstroms to below 1000 Angstroms, to the surface of the fiber such as by immersing the fiber in a dilute solution of the matrix resin in a volatile solvent followed by draining to remove excess solution and air drying to remove the solvent. The thin layer wets the fiber surface. The very dilute solution of matrix resin is able to impregnate multifilament fibers and the solution evenly flows onto the surface of the fibers. A thin uniform layer is formed on the surface of the fiber after removal of the solvent. The matrix resin coated fiber is completely wetted by the matrix resin during formation of the composite. Increased adhesion of the resin to the fibers is observed at fracture. At least 65 percent of the surface of the graphite fiber is covered with polycarbonate resin at fracture whereas uncoated fibers have very little matrix resin adhering to their surfaces at fracture and epoxy sized graphite fibers exhibit only slightly higher coverage with matrix resin at fracture. Flexural modulus of the composite containing matrix resin coated fibers is increased by 50 percent and flexural strength by 37 percent as compared to composites made with unsized fibers.

  16. Laser Surface Preparation for Adhesive Bonding of Aerospace Structural Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcher, M. A.; Wohl, C. J.; Hopkins, J. W.; Connell, J. W.

    2010-01-01

    Adhesive bonds are critical to the integrity of built-up structures. Disbonds can often be detected but the strength of adhesion between surfaces in contact is not obtainable without destructive testing. Typically the number one problem in a bonded structure is surface contamination, and by extension, surface preparation. Standard surface preparation techniques, including grit blasting, manual abrasion, and peel ply, are not ideal because of variations in their application. Etching of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) panels using a neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser appears to be a highly precise and promising way to both clean a composite surface prior to bonding and provide a bond-promoting patterned surface akin to peel ply without the inherent drawbacks from the same (i.e., debris and curvature). CFRP surfaces prepared using laser patterns conducive to adhesive bonding were compared to typical pre-bonding surface treatments through optical microscopy, contact angle goniometry, and post-bonding mechanical testing.

  17. Characterization of the structure and composition of gecko adhesive setae.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, N W; Gardner, K H; Walls, D J; Keiper-Hrynko, N M; Ganzke, T S; Hallahan, D L

    2006-06-22

    The ability of certain reptiles to adhere to vertical (and hang from horizontal) surfaces has been attributed to the presence of specialized adhesive setae on their feet. Structural and compositional studies of such adhesive setae will contribute significantly towards the design of biomimetic fibrillar adhesive materials. The results of electron microscopy analyses of the structure of such setae are presented, indicating their formation from aggregates of proteinaceous fibrils held together by a matrix and potentially surrounded by a limiting proteinaceous sheath. Microbeam X-ray diffraction analysis has shown conclusively that the only ordered protein constituent in these structures exhibits a diffraction pattern characteristic of beta-keratin. Raman microscopy of individual setae, however, clearly shows the presence of additional protein constituents, some of which may be identified as alpha-keratins. Electrophoretic analysis of solubilized setal proteins supports these conclusions, indicating the presence of a group of low-molecular-weight beta-keratins (14-20 kDa), together with alpha-keratins, and this interpretation is supported by immunological analyses.

  18. Mimicking mussel adhesion to improve interfacial properties in composites.

    PubMed

    Hamming, L M; Fan, X W; Messersmith, P B; Brinson, L C

    2008-07-01

    The macroscale properties of polymer-matrix composites depend immensely on the quality of the interaction between the reinforcement phase and the bulk polymer. This work presents a method to improve the interfacial adhesion between metal-oxides and a polymer matrix by performing surface-initiated polymerization (SIP) by way of a biomimetic initiator. The initiator was modeled after 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (dopa), an amino acid that is highly concentrated in mussel foot adhesive proteins. Mechanical pull out tests of NiTi and Ti-6Al-4V wires from poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) were performed to directly test the interfacial adhesion. These tests demonstrated improvements in maximum interfacial shear stress of 116% for SIP-modified NiTi wires and 60% for SIP-modified Ti-6Al-4V wires over unmodified specimens. Polymer chain growth from the metal oxides was validated using x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), ellipsometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and contact angle analysis. PMID:19578545

  19. Adhesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... as the shoulder Eyes Inside the abdomen or pelvis Adhesions can become larger or tighter over time. ... Other causes of adhesions in the abdomen or pelvis include: Appendicitis , most often when the appendix breaks ...

  20. Tuneable nanoparticle-nanofiber composite substrate for improved cellular adhesion.

    PubMed

    Nicolini, Ariana M; Toth, Tyler D; Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2016-09-01

    This work presents a novel technique using a reverse potential electrospinning mode for fabricating nanoparticle-embedded composites that can be tailored to represent various fiber diameters, surface morphologies, and functional groups necessary for improved cellular adhesion. Polycaprolactone (PCL) nanofibers were electrospun in both traditional positive (PP) and reverse potential (RP) electrical fields. The fibers were incorporated with 300nm polystyrene (PS) fluorescent particles, which contained carboxyl, amine groups, and surfactants. In the unconventional RP, the charged colloidal particles and surfactants were shown to have an exaggerated effect on Taylor cone morphology and fiber diameter caused by the changes in charge density and surface tension of the bulk solution. The RP mode was shown to lead to a decrease in fiber diameter from 1200±100nm (diameter±SE) for the nanofibers made with PCL alone to 440±80nm with the incorporation of colloidal particles, compared to the PP mode ranging from 530±90nm to 350±50nm, respectively. The nanoparticle-nanofiber composite substrates were cultured with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and evaluated for cellular viability and adhesion for up to 5 days. Adhesion to the nanofibrous substrates was improved by 180±10% with the addition of carboxylated particles and by 480±60% with the functionalization of an RGD ligand compared to the PCL nanofibers. The novel approach of electrospinning in the RP mode with the addition of colloids in order to alter charge density and surface tension could be utilized towards many applications, one being implantable biomaterials and tissue engineered scaffolds as demonstrated in this work. PMID:27315331

  1. Indirect aesthetic adhesive restoration with fibre-reinforced composite resin.

    PubMed

    Corona, S A M; Garcia, P P N S; Palma-Dibb, R G; Chimello, D T

    2004-10-01

    This paper describes the restoration of an endodontically treated upper first molar with a fibre-reinforced onlay indirect composite resin restoration. The clinical and radiographic examination confirmed that the tooth had suffered considerable loss of structure. Therefore, an indirect restoration was indicated. First, a core was built with resin-modified glass ionomer cement, followed by onlay preparation, mechanical/chemical gingival retraction and impression with addition-cured silicone. After the laboratory phase, the onlay was tried in, followed by adhesive bonding and occlusal adjustment. It can be concluded that fibre-reinforced aesthetic indirect composite resin restoration represented, in the present clinical case, an aesthetic and conservative treatment option. However, the use of fibres should be more extensively studied to verify the real improvement in physical and mechanical properties.

  2. Adhesion enhancement of Al coatings on carbon/epoxy composite surfaces by atmospheric plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulon, J. F.; Tournerie, N.; Maillard, H.

    2013-10-01

    Adhesion strengths between aluminium thin film coatings and manufactured carbon/epoxy composite surfaces were measured by assessing fracture tensile strengths using pull-off tests. The effect of the substrate roughness (nm to μm) of these composite surfaces on adhesion was studied by examining the surface free energies and adhesion strengths. The adhesion strengths of the coatings varied significantly. To improve the coating adhesion, each composite surface was treated with atmospheric plasma prior to deposition, which resulted in an increase in the surface free energy from approximately 40 mJ/m2 to 70 mJ/m2 because the plasma pretreatment led to the formation of hydrophilic Csbnd O and Cdbnd O bonds on the composite surfaces, as demonstrated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses. The adhesion strengths of the coatings were enhanced for all surface roughnesses studied. In our study, the effect of mechanical adhesion due to roughness was separated from the effect of modifying the chemical bonds with plasma activation. The adhesion ability of the pure resin was relatively weak. Increasing the surface roughness largely improved the adhesion of the resin surface. Plasma treatment of the pure resin also increased the surface adhesion. Our study shows that plasma activation effectively enhances the adhesion of manufactured composites, even when the surface roughness is on the order of microns. The ageing of the surface activation was also investigated, and the results demonstrate that atmospheric plasma has potential for use in the pretreatment of composite materials.

  3. Chemistry, Adhesive and Composite Properties of Low Molecular Weight Phenylethynyl Terminated Oligomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W.

    2004-01-01

    PETI-5 (1250 and 2500 g/mole) were prepared and characterized. Neat resin, adhesive and composite properties were determined and compared with those of PETI-5 (5000 g/mole). Relative to PETI-5 (5000 g/mole), PETI-5 (2500 g/mole) exhibited improved processability and equivalency in the adhesive and composite properties measured thus far. This resin, in both adhesive film and prepreg form, has the potential to offer significant improvements in the processing of complex structural composite parts.

  4. Effects of mechanical properties of adhesive resin cements on stress distribution in fiber-reinforced composite adhesive fixed partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Daiichiro; Shinya, Akikazu; Gomi, Harunori; Vallittu, Pekka K; Shinya, Akiyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Using finite element analysis (FEA), this study investigated the effects of the mechanical properties of adhesive resin cements on stress distributions in fiber-reinforced resin composite (FRC) adhesive fixed partial dentures (AFPDs). Two adhesive resin cements were compared: Super-Bond C&B and Panavia Fluoro Cement. The AFPD consisted of a pontic to replace a maxillary right lateral incisor and retainers on a maxillary central incisor and canine. FRC framework was made of isotropic, continuous, unidirectional E-glass fibers. Maximum principal stresses were calculated using finite element method (FEM). Test results revealed that differences in the mechanical properties of adhesive resin cements led to different stress distributions at the cement interfaces between AFPD and abutment teeth. Clinical implication of these findings suggested that the safety and longevity of an AFPD depended on choosing an adhesive resin cement with the appropriate mechanical properties. PMID:22447051

  5. Experimental determination of the effects of moisture on composite-to-composite adhesive joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deiasi, R. J.; Schulte, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    The primary mode of moisture ingress into bonded composite joints is determined using a nuclear probe for deuterium (NPD) to measure the localized D2O content along the length of the adhesive (FM-300 and EA-9601) and through the thickness of bonded composite speciments. Calculated diffusivities and NPD measured equilibrium moisture contents are used to predict the moisture profiles along the length of the adhesives as a function of exposure time, temperature, and relative humidity. These results are compared with the observed moisture profiles to evaluate the extent of enhanced edge diffusion. The FM-300 adhesive exhibits good agreement between measured and predicted profiles at 49 C, 70% and 90% RH, and 77 C, 70% RH. At 77 C, 90% RH, the measured moisture content near the adhesive edge is substantially larger than the predicted level. The EA-9601 adhesive also shows good agreement at 49 C, 70% and 90% RH, but at 77 C, the concentration of D20 near the edges is enhanced at each humidity level. The effect of moisture content on the bond shear strength at room temperature and at elevated temperature is evaluated.

  6. Permeability testing of composite material and adhesive bonds for the DC-XA composite feedline program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T.

    1995-01-01

    Hercules IM7/8552 carbon/epoxy and Hysol EA 9394 epoxy adhesive bonded between composite/titanium were tested for permeability after various numbers of thermal cycles between 100 C and liquid nitrogen (-196 C). The specimens were quenched from the 100 C temperature into liquid nitrogen to induce thermal shock into the material. Results showed that the carbon/epoxy system was practically impermeable even after 12 thermal cycles. The EA 9394 adhesive bondline was more permeable than the carbon/epoxy, but vacuum mixing minimized the permeability and kept it within allowable limits. Thermal cycling had little effect on the permeability values of the bondline specimens.

  7. Influence of interphase morphology on adhesion and composite durability in semicrystalline polymer matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.L. Jr.; Kander, R.G.

    1996-12-31

    The microstructure of the interphase in semicrystalline polymer matrix composites has a dramatic influence on their mechanical properties. Studies have been performed to alter this region and to correlate various interphase morphologies with changes in fiber-matrix adhesion. A reinforced nylon 66 composite, when subjected to specific thermal histories, contains an interphase composed of transcrystallinity. This region has been altered by coating fibers with a diluent, poly(vinyl pyrrolidone), and/or adding the diluent to the matrix material in very small quantities. Interphase morphology was investigated with optical microscopy, and adhesion was measured using a modified fiber pull-out test. It was found that transcrystallinity increases the interfacial shear strength. The effect different interphase morphologies have on the durability of bulk composite samples is currently under investigation.

  8. Interfacial adhesion in rayon/nylon sheath/core composite fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Tao Weiying.

    1991-01-01

    The fibers with enhanced adhesion were produced using a wire coating type process. One objective was to determine an effective coupling agent and the most-appropriate application conditions for maximum interfacial adhesion in the rayon/nylon bicomponent fibers. The second objective was to characterize the interfacial adhesion between the core fiber and the rayon skin. After removal of the spin finish by water washing, the nylon core fibers were pretreated with fumaric acid (FA) as an adhesion promoter and then were coated with viscose rayon. The results indicated that the interfacial adhesion in the rayon/nylon composite fibers was significantly improved under the application conditions of 1.0% with 36 second pretreatment time, 1.5% with 18 second pretreatment, and 2% with 9 second pretreatment time. A fiber pull adhesion test method was developed to test the interfacial adhesion. This method effectively determined the adhesion between the core and the skin.

  9. New primers for adhesive bonding of aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burrell, B. W.; Port, W. S.

    1971-01-01

    Synthetic polypeptide adhesive primers are effective, with high temperature epoxy resins, at temperatures from 100 deg to 300 deg C. Lap-shear failure loads and lap-shear strength of both primers are discussed.

  10. AMORPHOUS CALCIUM PHOSPHATE COMPOSITES AND THEIR EFFECT ON COMPOSITE-ADHESIVE-DENTIN BONDING

    PubMed Central

    Antonucci, J.M.; O’Donnell, J.N.R.; Schumacher, G.E.; Skrtic, D.

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluates the bond strength and related properties of photo-polymerizable, remineralizing amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) polymeric composite-adhesive systems to dentin after various periods of aqueous aging at 37 °C. An experimental ACP base and lining composite was made from a photo-activated resin comprising 2,2-bis[p-(2’-hydroxy-3’-methacryloxypropoxy)phenyl]propane (Bis-GMA), triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA), 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and zirconyl dimethacrylate (ZrDMA); designated BTHZ. An experimental orthodontic composite was formulated from a photo-activated resin comprising ethoxylated bisphenol A dimethacrylate (EBPADMA), TEGDMA, HEMA and methacryloxyethyl phthalate (MEP); designated ETHM. In both composite series three fillers were compared: 1) freshly precipitated zirconium-modified ACP freshly precipitated (as-prepared Zr-ACP), 2) milled Zr-ACP and 3) an ion-leachable fluoride glass. In addition to the shear bond strength (SBS), work to fracture and failure modes of the orthodontic composites were determined. The SBS of the base and lining ACP composites appeared unaffected by filler type or immersion time. In the orthodontic ACP composite series, milled ACP composites showed initial mechanical advantages over as-prepared ACP composites, and produced higher incidence of a failure mode consistent with stronger adhesion. After six months of aqueous exposure, 80 % of specimens failed at the dentin-primer interface, with a 42 % overall reduction in bond strength. BTHZ and ETHM based ACP composites are potentially effective anti-demineralizing-remineralizing agents with possible clinical utility as protective base-liners and orthodontic cements, respectively. The analysis of the bond strength and failure modalities suggests that milled ACP composites may offer greater potential in clinical applications. PMID:19696914

  11. Viscoelastic properties of collagen-adhesive composites under water-saturated and dry conditions.

    PubMed

    Singh, Viraj; Misra, Anil; Parthasarathy, Ranganathan; Ye, Qiang; Spencer, Paulette

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the time- and rate-dependent mechanical properties of collagen-adhesive composites, creep and monotonic experiments are performed under dry and wet conditions. The composites are prepared by infiltration of dentin adhesive into a demineralized bovine dentin. Experimental results show that for small stress level under dry conditions, both the composite and the neat adhesive have similar behavior. On the other hand, in wet conditions, the composites are significantly soft and weak compared to the neat adhesives. The behavior in the wet condition is found to be affected by the hydrophilicity of both the adhesive and the collagen. As the adhesive-collagen composites are a part of the complex construct that forms the adhesive-dentin interface, their presence will affect the overall performance of the restoration. We find that Kelvin-Voigt model with at least four elements is required to fit the creep compliance data, indicating that the adhesive-collagen composites are complex polymers with several characteristic time scales whose mechanical behavior will be significantly affected by loading rates and frequencies. Such mechanical properties have not been investigated widely for these types of materials. The derived model provides an additional advantage that it can be exploited to extract other viscoelastic properties which are, generally, time consuming to obtain experimentally. The calibrated model is utilized to obtain stress relaxation function, frequency-dependent storage and loss modulus, and rate-dependent elastic modulus.

  12. Viscoelastic Properties of Collagen-Adhesive Composites under Water Saturated and Dry Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Viraj; Misra, Anil; Parthasarathy, Ranganathan; Ye, Qiang; Spencer, Paulette

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the time and rate dependent mechanical properties of collagen-adhesive composites, creep and monotonic experiments are performed under dry and wet conditions. The composites are prepared by infiltration of dentin adhesive into a demineralized bovine dentin. Experimental results show that for small stress level under dry conditions, both the composite and neat adhesive have similar behavior. On the other hand, in wet conditions, the composites are significantly soft and weak compared to the neat adhesives. The behavior in the wet condition is found to be affected by the hydrophilicity of both the adhesive and collagen. Since the adhesive-collagen composites area part of the complex construct that forms the adhesive-dentin interface, their presence will affect the overall performance of the restoration. We find that Kelvin-Voigt model with at least 4-elements is required to fit the creep compliance data, indicating that the adhesive-collagen composites are complex polymers with several characteristics time-scales whose mechanical behavior will be significantly affected by loading rates and frequencies. Such mechanical properties have not been investigated widely for these types of materials. The derived model provides an additional advantage that it can be exploited to extract other viscoelastic properties which are, generally, time consuming to obtain experimentally. The calibrated model is utilized to obtain stress relaxation function, frequency-dependent storage and loss modulus, and rate dependent elastic modulus. PMID:24753362

  13. A novel addition polyimide adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, T. L.; Progar, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    An addition polyimide adhesive, LARC 13, was developed which shows promise for bonding both titanium and composites for applications which require service temperatures in excess of 533 K. The LARC 13 is based on an oligomeric bis nadimide containing a meta linked aromatic diamine. The adhesive melts prior to polymerization due to its oligomeric nature, thereby allowing it to be processed at 344 kPa or less. Therefore, LARC 13 is ideal for the bonding of honeycomb sandwich structures. After melting, the resin thermosets during the cure of the nadic endcaps to a highly crosslinked system. Few volatiles are evolved, thus allowing large enclosed structures to be bonded. Preparation of the adhesive as well as bonding, aging, and testing of lap shear and honeycomb samples are discussed.

  14. The effect of delayed placement of composite and double application of single-bottle adhesives on microleakage of composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Kiomarsi, Nazanin; Alavi, Ali Asghar

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of delayed placement of composite and double application of adhesive on microleakage of two-step, total-etch (single-bottle) adhesives. Standard Class V cavities were prepared in 140 sound premolars and randomly assigned into 10 groups (n = 14). Excite, Optibond Solo Plus, and Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (as a control) were used. After the first layer of single-bottle adhesive was photocured, the adhesive was reapplied and photocured in four of the groups. A microhybrid composite was applied in five of the groups immediately after the adhesive was photocured; in the other five groups, the composite was placed after a three-minute delay. After 24 hours of storage in distilled water and thermocycling, the samples were placed in 1% methylene blue. All samples then were sectioned longitudinally and evaluated for microleakage at the occlusal and gingival margins under a stereomicroscope at 20x magnification. Data were analyzed using nonparametric tests. Delayed placement of composite significantly increased leakage at the gingival margins when single-bottle adhesives were used (p < 0.05). Double application of the single-bottle adhesives significantly reduced leakage at the gingival margin when placement of the composite was delayed. There was no significant difference between single and double application when the composite was placed immediately (p < 0.05).

  15. Bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to composite submitted to different surface pretreatments

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Victor Hugo; Griza, Sandro; de Moraes, Rafael Ratto

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Extensively destroyed teeth are commonly restored with composite resin before cavity preparation for indirect restorations. The longevity of the restoration can be related to the proper bonding of the resin cement to the composite. This study aimed to evaluate the microshear bond strength of two self-adhesive resin cements to composite resin. Materials and Methods Composite discs were subject to one of six different surface pretreatments: none (control), 35% phosphoric acid etching for 30 seconds (PA), application of silane (silane), PA + silane, PA + adhesive, or PA + silane + adhesive (n = 6). A silicone mold containing a cylindrical orifice (1 mm2 diameter) was placed over the composite resin. RelyX Unicem (3M ESPE) or BisCem (Bisco Inc.) self-adhesive resin cement was inserted into the orifices and light-cured. Self-adhesive cement cylinders were submitted to shear loading. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p < 0.05). Results Independent of the cement used, the PA + Silane + Adhesive group showed higher microshear bond strength than those of the PA and PA + Silane groups. There was no difference among the other treatments. Unicem presented higher bond strength than BisCem for all experimental conditions. Conclusions Pretreatments of the composite resin surface might have an effect on the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to this substrate. PMID:24516824

  16. Reverse adhesion of a gecko-inspired synthetic adhesive switched by an ion-exchange polymer-metal composite actuator.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dong-Jie; Liu, Rui; Cheng, Yu; Zhang, Hao; Zhou, Li-Ming; Fang, Shao-Ming; Elliott, Winston Howard; Tan, Wei

    2015-03-11

    Inspired by how geckos abduct, rotate, and adduct their setal foot toes to adhere to different surfaces, we have developed an artificial muscle material called ion-exchange polymer-metal composite (IPMC), which, as a synthetic adhesive, is capable of changing its adhesion properties. The synthetic adhesive was cast from a Si template through a sticky colloid precursor of poly(methylvinylsiloxane) (PMVS). The PMVS array of setal micropillars had a high density of pillars (3.8 × 10(3) pillars/mm(2)) with a mean diameter of 3 μm and a pore thickness of 10 μm. A graphene oxide monolayer containing Ag globular nanoparticles (GO/Ag NPs) with diameters of 5-30 nm was fabricated and doped in an ion-exchanging Nafion membrane to improve its carrier transfer, water-saving, and ion-exchange capabilities, which thus enhanced the electromechanical response of IPMC. After being attached to PMVS micropillars, IPMC was actuated by square wave inputs at 1.0, 1.5, or 2.0 V to bend back and forth, driving the micropillars to actively grip or release the surface. To determine the adhesion of the micropillars, the normal adsorption and desorption forces were measured as the IPMC drives the setal micropillars to grip and release, respectively. Adhesion results demonstrated that the normal adsorption forces were 5.54-, 14.20-, and 23.13-fold higher than the normal desorption forces under 1.0, 1.5, or 2.0 V, respectively. In addition, shear adhesion or friction increased by 98, 219, and 245%, respectively. Our new technique provides advanced design strategies for reversible gecko-inspired synthetic adhesives, which might be used for spiderman-like wall-climbing devices with unprecedented performance.

  17. Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... surfaces so they can shift easily as the body moves. Adhesions cause tissues and organs to stick together. They might connect the loops of the intestines to each other, to nearby ... can occur anywhere in the body. But they often form after surgery on the ...

  18. Composition and Humidity Response of the Black Widow Spider's Gumfoot Silk and its Implications on Adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Dharamdeep; Zhang, Ci; Cool, Lydia Rose; Blackledge, Todd. A.; Wesdemiotis, Chrys; Miyoshi, Toshikazu; Dhinojwala, Ali

    Humidity plays an important part in the performance of biomaterials such as pollen, gecko toe, wheat awns, bird feathers and dragline silk. Capture silk produced by web building spiders form an interesting class of humidity responsive biological glues. The adhesive properties of the widely studied `viscid silk' produced by orbweb-weaving spiders is highly humidity sensitive. On the other hand, relatively less is known about the dependence of composition and humidity response towards adhesion for `gumfoot' silk produced by cobweb-weaving spiders. In the present study, we investigate the gumfoot silk produced by Black Widow using adhesion mechanics, microscopy and spectroscopic methods. The results show the presence of hygroscopic salts, glycoproteins and previously known spider coating peptides in silk and their importance in the humidity response and adhesion. The current study elucidates the role of constituents of capture silk in its adhesion mechanism and offers insights to novel ways for fabricating bio-inspired adhesives.

  19. Characterization of mode 1 and mixed-mode failure of adhesive bonds between composite adherends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Johnson, W. S.

    1985-01-01

    A combined experimental and analytical investigation of an adhesively bonded composite joint was conducted to characterize both the static and fatigue beyond growth mechanism under mode 1 and mixed-mode 1 and 2 loadings. Two bonded systems were studied: graphite/epoxy adherends bonded with EC 3445 and FM-300 adhesives. For each bonded system, two specimen types were tested: a double-cantilever-beam specimen for mode 1 loading and a cracked-lapshear specimen for mixed-mode 1 and 2 loading. In all specimens tested, failure occurred in the form of debond growth. Debonding always occurred in a cohesive manner with EC 3445 adhesive. The FM-300 adhesive debonded in a cohesive manner under mixed-mode 1 and 2 loading, but in a cohesive, adhesive, or combined cohesive and adhesive manner under mode 1 loading. Total strain-energy release rate appeared to be the driving parameter for debond growth under static and fatigue loadings.

  20. Characterization of mode I and mixed-mode failure of adhesive bonds between composite adherends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Johnson, W. S.

    1986-01-01

    A combined experimental and analytical investigation of an adhesively bonded composite joint was conducted to characterize both the static and fatigue beyond growth mechanism under mode 1 and mixed-mode 1 and 2 loadings. Two bonded systems were studied: graphite/epoxy adherends bonded with EC 3445 and FM-300 adhesives. For each bonded system, two specimen types were tested: a double-cantilever-beam specimen for mode 1 loading and a cracked-lapshear specimen for mixed-mode 1 and 2 loading. In all specimens tested, failure occurred in the form of debond growth. Debonding always occurred in a cohesive manner with EC 3445 adhesive. The FM-300 adhesive debonded in a cohesive manner under mixed-mode 1 and 2 loading, but in a cohesive, adhesive, or combined cohesive and adhesive manner under mode 1 loading. Total strain-energy release rate appeared to be the driving parameter for debond growth under static and fatigue loadings.

  1. Structural and compositional characterization of the adhesive produced by reef building oysters.

    PubMed

    Alberts, Erik M; Taylor, Stephen D; Edwards, Stephanie L; Sherman, Debra M; Huang, Chia-Ping; Kenny, Paul; Wilker, Jonathan J

    2015-04-29

    Oysters have an impressive ability to overcome difficulties of life within the stressful intertidal zone. These shellfish produce an adhesive for attaching to each other and building protective reef communities. With their reefs often exceeding kilometers in length, oysters play a major role in balancing the health of coastal marine ecosystems. Few details are available to describe oyster adhesive composition or structure. Here several characterization methods were applied to describe the nature of this material. Microscopy studies indicated that the glue is comprised of organic fiber-like and sheet-like structures surrounded by an inorganic matrix. Phospholipids, cross-linking chemistry, and conjugated organics were found to differentiate this adhesive from the shell. Symbiosis in material synthesis could also be present, with oysters incorporating bacterial polysaccharides into their adhesive. Oyster glue shows that an organic-inorganic composite material can provide adhesion, a property especially important when constructing a marine ecosystem. PMID:25843147

  2. Structural and compositional characterization of the adhesive produced by reef building oysters.

    PubMed

    Alberts, Erik M; Taylor, Stephen D; Edwards, Stephanie L; Sherman, Debra M; Huang, Chia-Ping; Kenny, Paul; Wilker, Jonathan J

    2015-04-29

    Oysters have an impressive ability to overcome difficulties of life within the stressful intertidal zone. These shellfish produce an adhesive for attaching to each other and building protective reef communities. With their reefs often exceeding kilometers in length, oysters play a major role in balancing the health of coastal marine ecosystems. Few details are available to describe oyster adhesive composition or structure. Here several characterization methods were applied to describe the nature of this material. Microscopy studies indicated that the glue is comprised of organic fiber-like and sheet-like structures surrounded by an inorganic matrix. Phospholipids, cross-linking chemistry, and conjugated organics were found to differentiate this adhesive from the shell. Symbiosis in material synthesis could also be present, with oysters incorporating bacterial polysaccharides into their adhesive. Oyster glue shows that an organic-inorganic composite material can provide adhesion, a property especially important when constructing a marine ecosystem.

  3. Analysis of the Static and Fatigue Strenght of a Damage Tolerant 3D-Reinforced Joining Technology on Composite Single Lap Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogueira, A. C.; Drechsler, K.; Hombergsmeier, E.

    2012-07-01

    The increasing usage of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) in aerospace together with the constant drive for fuel efficiency and lightweight design have imposed new challenges in next generation structural assemblies and load transfer efficient joining methods. To address this issue, an innovative technology, denominated Redundant High Efficiency Assembly (RHEA) joints, is introduced as a high-performance lightweight joint that combines efficient load transfer with good damage tolerance. A review of the ongoing research involving the RHEA joint technology, its through-thickness reinforcement concept and the results of quasi-static and fatigue tensile investigations of single lap shear specimens are exposed and discussed. Improvements in ultimate static load, maximum joint deformation, damage tolerance and fatigue life are encountered when comparing the performance of the RHEA lap shear joints to co-bonded reference specimens.

  4. Lap belt injuries in children.

    PubMed

    McGrath, N; Fitzpatrick, P; Okafor, I; Ryan, S; Hensey, O; Nicholson, A J

    2010-01-01

    The use of adult seat belts without booster seats in young children may lead to severe abdominal, lumbar or cervical spine and head and neck injuries. We describe four characteristic cases of lap belt injuries presenting to a tertiary children's hospital over the past year in addition to a review of the current literature. These four cases of spinal cord injury, resulting in significant long-term morbidity in the two survivors and death in one child, arose as a result of lap belt injury. These complex injuries are caused by rapid deceleration characteristic of high impact crashes, resulting in sudden flexion of the upper body around the fixed lap belt, and consequent compression of the abdominal viscera between the lap belt and spine. This report highlights the dangers of using lap belts only without shoulder straps. Age-appropriate child restraint in cars will prevent these injuries.

  5. Fracture surface analysis in composite and titanium bonding: Part 1: Titanium bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanderson, K. A.; Wightman, J. P.

    1985-01-01

    Fractured lap shear Ti 6-4 adherends bonded with polyphenyquinoxaline (PPQ) and polysulfone were analyzed. The effects of adherend pretreatment, stress level, thermal aging, anodizing voltage, and modified adhesive of Ti 6-4 adherend bonded with PPQ on lap shear strength were studied. The effect of adherend pretreatment on lap shear strength was investigated for PS samples. Results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) used to study the surface topography and surface composition are also discussed.

  6. Effect of thermal shock loadings on stability of dentin-composite polymer material adhesive interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessudnova, Nadezda O.; Shlyapnikova, Olga A.; Venig, Sergey B.; Gribov, Andrey N.

    2015-03-01

    In the past several decades the problem of longevity and durability of adhesive interfaces between hard tooth tissues and composite resin-based materials are of great interest among dental researchers and clinicians. These parameters are partially determined by adhesive system mechanical properties. In the present research project nanoindentation has been examined to test hardness of dental adhesive systems. A series of laboratory experiments was performed to study the effect of light curing time and oxygen inhibition phenomenon on light-cured adhesive material hardness. An adhesive system AdperTM Single Bond (3M ESPE) was selected as a material for testing. The analysis of experimental data revealed that the maximum values of hardness were observed after the material had been light-cured for 20 seconds, as outlined in guidelines for polymerization time of the adhesive system. The experimental studies of oxygen inhibition influence on adhesive system hardness pointed out to the fact that the dispersive layer removal led to increase in adhesive system hardness. A long - time exposure of polymerized material of adhesive system at open air at room temperature resulted in no changes in its hardness, which was likely to be determined by the mutual effect of rival processes of air oxygen inhibition and directed light curing.

  7. Rapid adhesive bonding concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, B. A.; Tyeryar, J. R.; Hodges, W. T.

    1984-01-01

    Adhesive bonding in the aerospace industry typically utilizes autoclaves or presses which have considerable thermal mass. As a consequence, the rates of heatup and cooldown of the bonded parts are limited and the total time and cost of the bonding process is often relatively high. Many of the adhesives themselves do not inherently require long processing times. Bonding could be performed rapidly if the heat was concentrated in the bond lines or at least in the adherends. Rapid adhesive bonding concepts were developed to utilize induction heating techniques to provide heat directly to the bond line and/or adherends without heating the entire structure, supports, and fixtures of a bonding assembly. Bonding times for specimens are cut by a factor of 10 to 100 compared to standard press bonding. The development of rapid adhesive bonding for lap shear specimens (per ASTM D1003 and D3163), for aerospace panel bonding, and for field repair needs of metallic and advanced fiber reinforced polymeric matrix composite structures are reviewed.

  8. Effect of interfacial chemical bonding and surface topography on adhesion in carbon fiber/epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Drzal, L.T.; Sugiura, N.; Hook, D. |

    1994-12-31

    A series of PAN-based IM6 carbon fibers having varying amounts of surface treatment were, pretreated with compounds representing the constituents encountered in epoxy composites to pre-react any groups on the fiber surface before composite fabrication in order to determine the effect of chemical bonding on fiber-matrix adhesion. Chemical bonding was quantified using XPS. Chemical bonding between reactive groups in amine cured epoxy matrices and the surface groups present on IN46 carbon fibers as a result of commercial surface treatments has been detected although the absolute amount of chemical bonding is low (1-3%). It was found that reaction with monofunctional epoxy groups having hydrocarbon functionalities blocked the surface from further reaction and reduced the adhesion that could be attained to its lowest value. Prereaction with difunctional amines had little effect on adhesion when compared to normal composite fabrication procedures. Prereaction with difunctional epoxy groups did enhance adhesion levels over the level attained in normal composite fabrication methods. These results showed that chemical bonding between epoxy and the carbon fiber surface could increases the adhesion between fiber and matrix about 25% while between the amino group and the carbon fiber surface about 15%. Quantitative measurements of the fiber surface microtopography were made with scanning tunneling microscopy. An increase in roughness was detected with increasing surface treatment. It was concluded that surface roughness also accounted for a significant increase in fiber-matrix adhesion.

  9. Compositional design and optimization of dentin adhesive with neutralization capability

    PubMed Central

    Song, Linyong; Ye, Qiang; Ge, Xueping; Spencer, Paulette

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this work was to investigate the polymerization behavior, neutralization capability, and mechanical properties of dentin adhesive formulations with the addition of the tertiary amine co-monomer, 2-N-morpholinoethyl methacrylate (MEMA). Methods A co-monomer mixture based on HEMA/BisGMA (45/55, w/w) was used as a control adhesive. Compared with the control formulation, the MEMA-containing adhesive formulations were characterized comprehensively with regard to water miscibility of liquid resin, water sorption and solubility of cured polymer, real-time photopolymerization kinetics, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), and modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC). The neutralization capacity was characterized by monitoring the pH shift of 1 mM lactic acid (LA) solution, in which the adhesive polymers were soaked. Results With increasing MEMA concentrations, experimental copolymers showed higher water sorption, lower glass transition temperature and lower crosslinking density compared to the control. The pH values of LA solution gradually increased from 3.5 to about 6.0–6.5 after 90 days. With the increase in crosslinking density of the copolymers, the neutralization rate was depressed. The optimal MEMA concentration was between 20 and 40 wt%. Conclusions As compared to the control, the results indicated that the MEMA-functionalized copolymer showed neutralization capability. The crosslinking density of the copolymer networks influenced the neutralization rate. PMID:26144189

  10. Preliminary evaluation of adhesion strength measurement devices for ceramic/titanium matrix composite bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohlchuck, Bobby; Zeller, Mary V.

    1992-01-01

    The adhesive bond between ceramic cement and a titanium matrix composite substrate to be used in the National Aerospace Plane program is evaluated. Two commercially available adhesion testers, the Sebastian Adherence Tester and the CSEM REVETEST Scratch Tester, are evaluated to determine their suitability for quantitatively measuring adhesion strength. Various thicknesses of cements are applied to several substrates, and bond strengths are determined with both testers. The Sabastian Adherence Tester has provided limited data due to an interference from the sample mounting procedure, and has been shown to be incapable of distinguishing adhesion strength from tensile and shear properties of the cement itself. The data from the scratch tester has been found to be difficult to interpret due to the porosity and hardness of the cement. Recommendations are proposed for a more reliable adhesion test method.

  11. Effect of laser preparation on adhesion of a self-adhesive flowable composite resin to primary teeth.

    PubMed

    Memarpour, Mahtab; Shafiei, Fereshteh; Razmjoei, Faranak; Kianimanesh, Nasrin

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the adhesion of a self-adhering flowable composite resin to primary tooth enamel and dentin after silicon carbide paper (SiC) and laser pretreatment. Adhesive properties were evaluated as shear bond strength (SBS) and scanning electron microscopic (SEM) characteristics. A total 120 primary canine teeth were randomly divided into two groups to study enamel and dentin. Each group was divided into 6 subgroups (n = 10) according to type of surface preparation (SiC or Er:YAG laser) of enamel or dentin. Three methods were used to build cylinders of restoration on tooth surface: OptiBond All-In-One + Premise Flowable composite, OptiBond All-In-One + Vertise Flow and Vertise flow. After restoration, samples were tested for SBS and failure mode. Twenty eight samples were examined by SEM. The results of the study showed SBS of Vertise Flow was lower than others in enamel and dentin samples pretreated with SiC and in dentin samples pretreated with laser (P < 0.001). Compared to SiC pretreatment, laser pretreatment led to a significantly higher SBS with Vertise Flow on enamel (P < 0.001). Vertise Flow associated with the adhesive led to a higher SBS in enamel and dentin compared to Vertise Flow alone. Adhesive and mixed failure modes were observed more frequently in Vertise Flow groups. SEM images showed that Vertise Flow led to more irregularities on enamel and more open dentinal tubules after laser ablation compared SiC pretreatment. PMID:26888173

  12. Effect of new adhesion promoter and mechanical interlocking on bonding strength in metal-polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuberth, A.; Göring, M.; Lindner, T.; Töberling, G.; Puschmann, M.; Riedel, F.; Scharf, I.; Schreiter, K.; Spange, S.; Lampke, T.

    2016-03-01

    There are various opportunities to improve the adhesion between polymer and metal in metal-plastic composites. The addition of a bonding agent which reacts with both joining components at the interfaces of the composite can enhance the bonding strength. An alternative method for the adjustment of interfaces in metal-plastic composites is the specific surface structuring of the joining partners in order to exploit the mechanical interlock effect. In this study the potential of using an adhesion promoter based on twin polymerization for metal-plastic composites in combination with different methods of mechanical surface treatment is evaluated by using the tensile shear test. It is shown that the new adhesion promoter has a major effect when applied on smooth metal surfaces. A combination of both mechanical and chemical surface treatment of the metal part is mostly just as effective as the application of only one of these surface treatment methods.

  13. Thermal nondestructive testing (TNDT) of adhesively bonded composite reinforcements applied to concrete civil structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burleigh, Douglas D.; Bohner, Richard

    1999-02-01

    Thermographic nondestructive testing was performed on composite reinforcements applied to two concrete civil structures. Information on the types of defects which occur in these structures and their locations has led to process improvements in the application of adhesively bonded laminated composites to steel reinforce concrete structures.

  14. Film/Adhesive Processing Module for Fiber-Placement Processing of Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulcher, A. Bruce

    2007-01-01

    An automated apparatus has been designed and constructed that enables the automated lay-up of composite structures incorporating films, foils, and adhesives during the automated fiber-placement process. This apparatus, denoted a film module, could be used to deposit materials in film or thin sheet form either simultaneously when laying down the fiber composite article or in an independent step.

  15. Does the use of a novel self-adhesive flowable composite reduce nanoleakage?

    PubMed Central

    Naga, Abeer Abo El; Yousef, Mohammed; Ramadan, Rasha; Fayez Bahgat, Sherif; Alshawwa, Lana

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study reported here was to evaluate the performance of a self-adhesive flowable composite and two self-etching adhesive systems, when subjected to cyclic loading, in preventing the nanoleakage of Class V restorations. Methods Wedge-shape Class V cavities were prepared (4×2×2 mm [length × width × depth]) on the buccal surfaces of 90 sound human premolars. Cavities were divided randomly into three groups (n=30) according to the used adhesive (Xeno® V [self-etching adhesive system]) and BOND-1® SF (solvent-free self-etching adhesive system) in conjunction with Artiste® Nano Composite resin, and Fusio™ Liquid Dentin (self-adhesive flowable composite), consecutively. Each group was further divided into three subgroups (n=10): (A) control, (B) subjected to occlusal cyclic loading (90N for 5,000 cycles), and (C) subjected to occlusal cyclic loading (90N for 10,000 cycles). Teeth then were coated with nail polish up to 1 mm from the interface, immersed in 50% silver nitrate solution for 24 hours and tested for nanoleakage using the environmental scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive analysis X-ray analysis. Data were statistically analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and Tukey’s post hoc tests (P≤0.05). Results The Fusio Liquid Dentin group showed statistically significant lower percentages of silver penetration (0.55 μ) compared with the BOND-1 SF (3.45 μ) and Xeno V (3.82 μ) groups, which were not statistically different from each other, as they both showed higher silver penetration. Conclusion Under the test conditions, the self-adhesive flowable composite provided better sealing ability. Aging of the two tested adhesive systems, as a function of cyclic loading, increased nanoleakage. PMID:25848318

  16. Stress ratio effect on cyclic debonding in adhesively bonded composite joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Ramamurthy, G.; Rezaizdeh, M. A.

    1987-01-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the stress ratio effect on cyclic debond growth behavior in adhesively bonded composite joints. The system studied consisted of graphite/epoxy adherends bonded with a toughened epoxy adhesive. This study showed that the strain energy release rate range was the driving factor for cyclic debonding of the tested bonded system when subjected to cyclic loads with different stress ratios for both mode I and mixed mode I-II loadings.

  17. Adhesion to root canal dentine using one and two-step adhesives with dual-cure composite core materials.

    PubMed

    Foxton, R M; Nakajima, M; Tagami, J; Miura, H

    2005-02-01

    The regional tensile bond strengths of two dual-cure composite resin core materials to root canal dentine using either a one or two-step self-etching adhesive were evaluated. Extracted premolar teeth were decoronated and their root canals prepared to a depth of 8 mm and a width of 1.4 mm. In one group, a one-step self-etching adhesive (Unifil Self-etching Bond) was applied to the walls of the post-space and light-cured for 10 s. After which, the post-spaces were filled with the a dual-cure composite resin (Unifil Core) and then half the specimens were light-cured for 60 s and the other half placed in darkness for 30 min. In the second group, a self-etching primer (ED Primer II) was applied for 30 s, followed by an adhesive resin (Clearfil Photo Bond), which was light-cured for 10 s. The post-spaces were filled with a dual-cure composite resin (DC Core) and then half the specimens were light-cured for 60 s and the other half placed in darkness for 30 min. Chemical-cure composite resin was placed on the outer surfaces of all the roots, which were then stored in water for 24 h. They were serially sliced perpendicular to the bonded interface into 8, 0.6 mm-thick slabs, and then transversely sectioned into beams, approximately 8 x 0.6 x 0.6 mm, for the microtensile bond strength test (muTBS). Data were divided into two (coronal/apical half of post-space) and analysed using three-way anova and Scheffe's test (P < 0.05). Failure modes were observed under an scanning electron microscope (SEM) and statistically analysed. Specimens for observation of the bonded interfaces were prepared in a similar manner as for bond strength testing, cut in half and embedded in epoxy resin. They were then polished to a high gloss, gold sputter coated, and after argon ion etching, observed under an SEM. For both dual-cure composite resins and curing strategies, there were no significant differences in muTBS between the coronal and apical regions (P > 0.05). In addition, both dual

  18. Influence of artificial ageing on surface properties and Streptococcus mutans adhesion to dental composite materials.

    PubMed

    Hahnel, Sebastian; Henrich, Anne; Rosentritt, Martin; Handel, Gerhard; Bürgers, Ralf

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the influence of artificial ageing on the surface properties and early Streptococcus mutans adhesion to current dental composites for the direct restoration of class II defects. Three hundred and thirty specimens each were prepared from five dental composites, and were randomly allotted to various artificial ageing protocols (storage in distilled water/ethanol/artificial saliva for 7/90/365 days; thermal cycling, 6,000 cycles 5/55 degrees C). Prior and after each treatment, surface roughness (R(a)) and hydrophobicity were determined, and S. mutans adhesion (ATCC 25175; 2.5 h, 37 degrees C) was simulated with and without prior exposition to human whole saliva (2 h, 37 degrees C). Adherence of S. mutans was determined fluorometrically. Means and standard deviations were calculated, and analyzed using three-way ANOVA and post-hoc analysis (alpha = 0.05). For both R(a) and S. mutans adherence to uncoated and saliva-coated specimens, significant influences of the composite material, the ageing medium and the ageing duration have been observed; for surface hydrophobicity, significant influences of the composite material and the ageing duration were found. For uncoated specimens, significant increases in S. mutans adhesion were observed with prolonged artificial ageing, whereas significant decreases in S. mutans adhesion were found for the saliva-coated specimens. The data indicate influences of the artificial ageing method on surface parameters such as R(a) and hydrophobicity as well as microbial adhesion. The results underline the relevance of saliva coating on the outcome of studies simulating microbial adhesion, and highlight differences in the susceptibility of dental composites for the adhesion of oral bacteria.

  19. Nanotechnology strategies for antibacterial and remineralizing composites and adhesives to tackle dental caries.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lei; Zhang, Ke; Weir, Michael D; Melo, Mary Anne S; Zhou, Xuedong; Xu, Hockin H K

    2015-03-01

    Dental caries is the most widespread disease and an economic burden. Nanotechnology is promising to inhibit caries by controlling biofilm acids and enhancing remineralization. Nanoparticles of silver were incorporated into composites/adhesives, along with quaternary ammonium methacrylates (QAMs), to combat biofilms. Nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) released calcium/phosphate ions, remineralized tooth-lesions and neutralized acids. By combining nanoparticles of silver/QAM/NACP, a new class of composites and adhesives with antibacterial and remineralization double benefits was developed. Various other nanoparticles including metal and oxide nanoparticles such as ZnO and TiO2, as well as polyethylenimine nanoparticles and their antibacterial capabilities in dental resins were also reviewed. These nanoparticles are promising for incorporation into dental composites/cements/sealants/bases/liners/adhesives. Therefore, nanotechnology has potential to significantly improve restorative and preventive dentistry. PMID:25723095

  20. Nanotechnology strategies for antibacterial and remineralizing composites and adhesives to tackle dental caries.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lei; Zhang, Ke; Weir, Michael D; Melo, Mary Anne S; Zhou, Xuedong; Xu, Hockin H K

    2015-03-01

    Dental caries is the most widespread disease and an economic burden. Nanotechnology is promising to inhibit caries by controlling biofilm acids and enhancing remineralization. Nanoparticles of silver were incorporated into composites/adhesives, along with quaternary ammonium methacrylates (QAMs), to combat biofilms. Nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) released calcium/phosphate ions, remineralized tooth-lesions and neutralized acids. By combining nanoparticles of silver/QAM/NACP, a new class of composites and adhesives with antibacterial and remineralization double benefits was developed. Various other nanoparticles including metal and oxide nanoparticles such as ZnO and TiO2, as well as polyethylenimine nanoparticles and their antibacterial capabilities in dental resins were also reviewed. These nanoparticles are promising for incorporation into dental composites/cements/sealants/bases/liners/adhesives. Therefore, nanotechnology has potential to significantly improve restorative and preventive dentistry.

  1. Nanotechnology strategies for antibacterial and remineralizing composites and adhesives to tackle dental caries

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Lei; Zhang, Ke; Weir, Michael D; Melo, Mary Anne S; Zhou, Xuedong; Xu, Hockin HK

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries is the most widespread disease and an economic burden. Nanotechnology is promising to inhibit caries by controlling biofilm acids and enhancing remineralization. Nanoparticles of silver were incorporated into composites/adhesives, along with quaternary ammonium methacrylates (QAMs), to combat biofilms. Nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) released calcium/phosphate ions, remineralized tooth-lesions and neutralized acids. By combining NAg/QAM/NACP, a new class of composites and adhesives with antibacterial and remineralization double benefits was developed. Various other nanoparticles including metal and oxide nanoparticles such as ZnO and TiO2, as well as polyethylenimine nanoparticles and their antibacterial capabilities in dental resins were also reviewed. These nanoparticles are promising for incorporation into dental composites/cements/sealants/bases/liners/adhesives. Therefore, nanotechnology has potential to significantly improve restorative and preventive dentistry. PMID:25723095

  2. Effect of indirect composite treatment microtensile bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements

    PubMed Central

    Escribano, Nuria; Baracco, Bruno; Romero, Martin; Ceballos, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Background No specific indications about the pre-treatment of indirect composite restorations is provided by the manufacturers of most self-adhesive resin cements. The potential effect of silane treatment to the bond strength of the complete tooth/indirect restoration complex is not available.The aim of this study was to determine the contribution of different surface treatments on microtensile bond strength of composite overlays to dentin using several self-adhesive resin cements and a total-etch one. Material and Methods Composite overlays were fabricated and bonding surfaces were airborne-particle abraded and randomly assigned to two different surface treatments: no treatment or silane application (RelyX Ceramic Primer) followed by an adhesive (Adper Scotchbond 1 XT). Composite overlays were luted to flat dentin surfaces using the following self-adhesive resin cements: RelyX Unicem, G-Cem, Speedcem, Maxcem Elite or Smartcem2, and the total-etch resin cement RelyX ARC. After 24 h, bonded specimens were cut into sticks 1 mm thick and stressed in tension until failure. Two-way ANOVA and SNK tests were applied at α=0.05. Results Bond strength values were significantly influenced by the resin cement used (p<0.001). However, composite surface treatment and the interaction between the resin cement applied and surface treatment did not significantly affect dentin bond strength (p>0.05). All self-adhesive resin cements showed lower bond strength values than the total-etch RelyX ARC. Among self-adhesive resin cements, RelyX Unicem and G-Cem attained statistically higher bond strength values. Smartcem2 and Maxcem Elite exhibited 80-90% of pre-test failures. Conclusions The silane and adhesive application after indirect resin composite sandblasting did not improve the bond strength of dentin-composite overlay complex. Selection of the resin cement seems to be a more relevant factor when bonding indirect composites to dentin than its surface treatment. Key words

  3. Natural polysaccharides promote chondrocyte adhesion and proliferation on magnetic nanoparticle/PVA composite hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Hou, Ruixia; Nie, Lei; Du, Gaolai; Xiong, Xiaopeng; Fu, Jun

    2015-08-01

    This paper aims to investigate the synergistic effects of natural polysaccharides and inorganic nanoparticles on cell adhesion and growth on intrinsically cell non-adhesive polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) hydrogels. Previously, we have demonstrated that Fe2O3 and hydroxyapatite (nHAP) nanoparticles are effective in increasing osteoblast growth on PVA hydrogels. Herein, we blended hyaluronic acid (HA) and chondroitin sulfate (CS), two important components of cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM), with Fe2O3/nHAP/PVA hydrogels. The presence of these natural polyelectrolytes dramatically increased the pore size and the equilibrium swelling ratio (ESR) while maintaining excellent compressive strength of hydrogels. Chondrocytes were seeded and cultured on composite PVA hydrogels containing Fe2O3, nHAP and Fe2O3/nHAP hybrids and Fe2O3/nHAP with HA or CS. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay consistently confirmed that the addition of HA or CS promotes chondrocyte adhesion and growth on PVA and composite hydrogels. Particularly, the combination of HA and CS exhibited further promotion to cell adhesion and proliferation compared with any single polysaccharide. The results demonstrated that the magnetic composite nanoparticles and polysaccharides provided synergistic promotion to cell adhesion and growth. Such polysaccharide-augmented composite hydrogels may have potentials in biomedical applications.

  4. Natural polysaccharides promote chondrocyte adhesion and proliferation on magnetic nanoparticle/PVA composite hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Hou, Ruixia; Nie, Lei; Du, Gaolai; Xiong, Xiaopeng; Fu, Jun

    2015-08-01

    This paper aims to investigate the synergistic effects of natural polysaccharides and inorganic nanoparticles on cell adhesion and growth on intrinsically cell non-adhesive polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) hydrogels. Previously, we have demonstrated that Fe2O3 and hydroxyapatite (nHAP) nanoparticles are effective in increasing osteoblast growth on PVA hydrogels. Herein, we blended hyaluronic acid (HA) and chondroitin sulfate (CS), two important components of cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM), with Fe2O3/nHAP/PVA hydrogels. The presence of these natural polyelectrolytes dramatically increased the pore size and the equilibrium swelling ratio (ESR) while maintaining excellent compressive strength of hydrogels. Chondrocytes were seeded and cultured on composite PVA hydrogels containing Fe2O3, nHAP and Fe2O3/nHAP hybrids and Fe2O3/nHAP with HA or CS. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay consistently confirmed that the addition of HA or CS promotes chondrocyte adhesion and growth on PVA and composite hydrogels. Particularly, the combination of HA and CS exhibited further promotion to cell adhesion and proliferation compared with any single polysaccharide. The results demonstrated that the magnetic composite nanoparticles and polysaccharides provided synergistic promotion to cell adhesion and growth. Such polysaccharide-augmented composite hydrogels may have potentials in biomedical applications. PMID:26037704

  5. New restoration and direct pulp capping systems using adhesive composite resin.

    PubMed

    Kashiwada, T; Takagi, M

    1991-12-01

    There have been many arguments on the irritating mechanisms of the composite resin on the dental pulp. While the direct irritative effect of the resin has been preferred, some authors considered that the marginal microleakage and the resulting bacterial infection play a more important role in inducing the complicating pulp irritation. We developed a new filling technique, called the direct inlay restoration method, which could prevent the marginal leakage associated with the polymerization shrinkage of the adhesive composite resin. In this study, we tried to apply our method clinically. None of the 440 cases which were filled with the adhesive composite resin and 60 cases out of 64 cases in which the pulps were directly capped with the adhesive composite resin developed any signs and symptoms of pulp irritation. The other 4 cases developed signs of pulp irritation. Two of those 4 cases were pulpectomized due to spontaneous pain and the other 2 cases turned out to be well after re-restoration. With the informed consent of the patients, the direct pulp capping using the adhesive composite resin was experimentally performed on 6 caries-free 3rd molars and the histopathological examination of these capped molars revealed that neither significant degenerative nor inflammatory changes were brought about in the dental pulp. These clinical and histopathological observation suggest that the dental pulp irritation after resin filling is not induced by the composite resin itself. PMID:1764760

  6. Relevance of in vitro tests of adhesive and composite dental materials. A review in 3 parts. Part 3: in vitro tests of adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Heintze, Siegward D; Zimmerli, Brigitte

    2011-01-01

    In the third part of this review of laboratory testing, methods of testing adhesive systems are evaluated. Test set-ups that are used to analyze the restorative material in combination with the adhesive system are presented. Currently, there is no standardized protocol available for the evaluation of adhesives. This complicates any direct comparisons of values between different testing institutes. Therefore, the statistically evaluated ranking of the different adhesives is more important than mean values. Depending on the testing institute, a correlation between bond strength measurements and clinical outcomes may exist. Qualitative analysis of adhesive/tooth interaction can help explain the functioning of a system, but the depth of penetration of the adhesive cannot predict bond strength. Indirect bond measurements or analyses of the interactions of adhesive and composite materials, such as dye penetration or marginal analysis, do not correlate or correlate only partially with clinical findings. Adhesive systems should be tested in vitro and compared to a well-known standard adhesive before they are used in the clinic. Water storage of specimens for several months before testing increases the predictability of the bonding performance of the tested adhesive.

  7. Global-Local Finite Element Analysis of Bonded Single-Lap Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilic, Bahattin; Madenci, Erdogan; Ambur, Damodar R.

    2004-01-01

    Adhesively bonded lap joints involve dissimilar material junctions and sharp changes in geometry, possibly leading to premature failure. Although the finite element method is well suited to model the bonded lap joints, traditional finite elements are incapable of correctly resolving the stress state at junctions of dissimilar materials because of the unbounded nature of the stresses. In order to facilitate the use of bonded lap joints in future structures, this study presents a finite element technique utilizing a global (special) element coupled with traditional elements. The global element includes the singular behavior at the junction of dissimilar materials with or without traction-free surfaces.

  8. Adhesive bonding via exposure to microwave radition and resulting mechanical evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Paulauskas, F.L.; Warren, C.D.; Meek, T.T.

    1996-04-01

    Adhesive bonding/joining through microwave radiation curing has been evaluated as an alternative processing technology. This technique significantly reduces the required curing time for the adhesive while maintaining equivalent physical characteristics as the adhesive material is polymerized (crosslinked). This results in an improvement in the economics of the process. Testing of samples cured via microwave radiation for evaluation of mechanical properties indicated that the obtained values from the single lap-shear test are in the range of the conventionally cured samples. In general, the ultimate tensile strength, {sigma}{sub B}, for the microwave processed samples subjected to this single lap-shear test was slightly higher than for conventionally cured samples. This technology shows promise for being applicable to a wide range of high volume, consumer goods industries, where plastics and polymer composites will be processed.

  9. Influence of superconductor film composition on adhesion strength of coated conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Kesgin, Ibrahim; Khatri, Narayan; Liu, Yuhao; Delgado, Louis; Galstyan, Eduard; Selvamanickam, Venkat

    2015-11-20

    The effect of high temperature superconductor (HTS) film composition on the adhesion strength of rare- earth barium copper oxide coated conductors (CCs) has been studied. It has been found that the mechanical integrity of the superconductor layer is very susceptible to the defects especially those along the ab plane, probably due to the weak interfaces between the defects and the matrix. Gd and Y in the standard composition were substituted with Sm and the number of in-plane defects was drastically reduced. Consequently, a four-fold increase in adhesion or peeling strength in Sm-based CCs was achieved compared to the standard GdYBCO samples.

  10. Materials research for High Speed Civil Transport and generic hypersonics: Adhesive durability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Mark R.

    1995-01-01

    This report covers a portion of an ongoing investigation of the durability of adhesives for the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) program. Candidate HSCT adhesives need to possess the high-temperature capability required for supersonic flight. This program was designed to initiate an understanding of the behavior of candidate HSCT materials when subjected to combined mechanical and thermal loads. Two adhesives (K3A and FM57) and two adherends (IM7/K3B polymeric composite and the titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V) were used to fabricate thick adherend lap shear specimens. Due to processing problems, only the FM57/titanium bonds could be fabricated successfully. These are currently undergoing thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) testing. There is an acute need for an adhesive to secondarily bond polymeric composite adherends or, alternately, polymeric composites that remain stable at the processing temperatures of today's adhesives.

  11. An EMAT-based shear horizontal (SH) wave technique for adhesive bond inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arun, K.; Dhayalan, R.; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan; Maxfield, Bruce; Peres, Patrick; Barnoncel, David

    2012-05-01

    The evaluation of adhesively bonded structures has been a challenge over the several decades that these structures have been used. Applications within the aerospace industry often call for particularly high performance adhesive bonds. Several techniques have been proposed for the detection of disbonds and cohesive weakness but a reliable NDE method for detecting interfacial weakness (also sometimes called a kissing bond) has been elusive. Different techniques, including ultrasonic, thermal imaging and shearographic methods, have been proposed; all have had some degree of success. In particular, ultrasonic methods, including those based upon shear and guided waves, have been explored for the assessment of interfacial bond quality. Since 3-D guided shear horizontal (SH) waves in plates have predominantly shear displacement at the plate surfaces, we conjectured that SH guided waves should be influenced by interfacial conditions when they propagate between adhesively bonded plates of comparable thickness. This paper describes a new technique based on SH guided waves that propagate within and through a lap joint. Through mechanisms we have yet to fully understand, the propagation of an SH wave through a lap joint gives rise to a reverberation signal that is due to one or more reflections of an SH guided wave mode within that lap joint. Based upon a combination of numerical simulations and measurements, this method shows promise for detecting and classifying interfacial bonds. It is also apparent from our measurements that the SH wave modes can discriminate between adhesive and cohesive bond weakness in both Aluminum-Epoxy-Aluminum and Composite-Epoxy-Composite lap joints. All measurements reported here used periodic permanent magnet (PPM) Electro-Magnetic Acoustic Transducers (EMATs) to generate either or both of the two lowest order SH modes in the plates that comprise the lap joint. This exact configuration has been simulated using finite element (FE) models to

  12. Improving adhesion of powder coating on PEEK composite: Influence of atmospheric plasma parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuis, Aurélie; Ho, Thu Huong; Fahs, Ahmad; Lafabrier, Aurore; Louarn, Guy; Bacharouche, Jalal; Airoudj, Aissam; Aragon, Emmanuel; Chailan, Jean-François

    2015-12-01

    In aeronautic industries, powder coatings are increasingly used because of environmental considerations. During the deposition of such a coating on a substrate piece, the main objective is to obtain a good coating/substrate adhesion. In this study, the targeted substrate is a Poly-(Ether EtherKetone)-(PEEK) based composite material. Due to the poor surface energy of PEEK, a surface treatment is necessary in order to enhance its adhesion with the coating. In this purpose, atmospheric plasma treatment has been chosen and the influence of plasma parameters has been studied. Four scan speed nozzles and three gases (Air, N2 and Argon) plasma has been tested. The increase of adhesion with increasing wettability, polarity and nanoroughness has been evidenced. A particular study of the type of grafted polar functionalities according to gas nature allowed to better understand the plasma mechanism and the cross-impact of polarity and nanoroughness in adhesion enhancement.

  13. [Stress profile during curing contraction of composite resin adhesives].

    PubMed

    Kunzelmann, K H; Hickel, R

    1990-11-01

    The wall-to-wall curing contraction of thin composite resin layers was recorded with a tensometer. The composite resin was applied to cylindrically shaped ceramic sample holders with diameters of 3 mm, 4 mm and 8 mm. The distances of the sample holders was set at 50 microns, 100 microns, 150 microns, 200 microns and 300 microns. The shrinkage stress recordings clearly show that the shrinkage forces are governed by the distance of the sample holders and not by the volume or the configuration factor of the composite resin layers.

  14. Hemp-Fiber-Reinforced Unsaturated Polyester Composites: Optimization of Processing and Improvement of Interfacial Adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Qui, Renhui; Ren, Xiaofeng; Fifield, Leonard S.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Li, Kaichang

    2011-02-25

    The processing variables for making hemp-fiber-reinforced unsaturated polyester (UPE) composites were optimized through orthogonal experiments. It was found that the usage of initiator, methyl ethyl ketone peroxide, had the most significant effect on the tensile strength of the composites. The treatment of hemp fibers with a combination of 1, 6-diisocyanatohexane (DIH) and 2-hydroxylethyl acrylate (HEA) significantly increased tensile strength, flexural modulus of rupture and flexural modulus of elasticity, and water resistance of the resulting hemp-UPE composites. FTIR spectra revealed that DIH and HEA were covalently bonded to hemp fibers. Scanning electronic microscopy graphs of the fractured hemp-UPE composites demonstrated that treatment of hemp fibers with a combination of DIH and HEA greatly improved the interfacial adhesion between hemp fibers and UPE. The mechanism of improving the interfacial adhesion is proposed.

  15. Adhesive/Dentin interface: the weak link in the composite restoration.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Paulette; Ye, Qiang; Park, Jonggu; Topp, Elizabeth M; Misra, Anil; Marangos, Orestes; Wang, Yong; Bohaty, Brenda S; Singh, Viraj; Sene, Fabio; Eslick, John; Camarda, Kyle; Katz, J Lawrence

    2010-06-01

    Results from clinical studies suggest that more than half of the 166 million dental restorations that were placed in the United States in 2005 were replacements for failed restorations. This emphasis on replacement therapy is expected to grow as dentists use composite as opposed to dental amalgam to restore moderate to large posterior lesions. Composite restorations have higher failure rates, more recurrent caries, and increased frequency of replacement as compared to amalgam. Penetration of bacterial enzymes, oral fluids, and bacteria into the crevices between the tooth and composite undermines the restoration and leads to recurrent decay and premature failure. Under in vivo conditions the bond formed at the adhesive/dentin interface can be the first defense against these noxious, damaging substances. The intent of this article is to review structural aspects of the clinical substrate that impact bond formation at the adhesive/dentin interface; to examine physico-chemical factors that affect the integrity and durability of the adhesive/dentin interfacial bond; and to explore how these factors act synergistically with mechanical forces to undermine the composite restoration. The article will examine the various avenues that have been pursued to address these problems and it will explore how alterations in material chemistry could address the detrimental impact of physico-chemical stresses on the bond formed at the adhesive/dentin interface.

  16. Work of Adhesion in Al/SiC Composites with Alloying Element Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xin; Fan, Tongxiang; Zhang, Di

    2013-11-01

    In the current work, a general methodology was proposed to demonstrate how to calculate the work of adhesion in a reactive multicomponent alloy/ceramic system. Applying this methodology, the work of adhesion of Al alloy/SiC systems and the influence of different alloying elements were predicted. Based on the thermodynamics of interfacial reaction and calculation models for component activities, the equilibrium compositions of the melts in Al alloy/SiC systems were calculated. Combining the work of adhesion models for reactive metal/ceramic systems, the work of adhesion in Al alloy/SiC systems both before and after the reaction was calculated. The results showed that the addition of most alloying elements, such as Mg, Si, and Mn, could increase the initial work of adhesion, while Fe had a slightly decreasing effect. As for the equilibrium state, the additions of Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Ti, and La could increase the equilibrium work of adhesion, but the additions of Mg and Zn had an opposite effect. Si was emphasized due to its suppressing effect on the interfacial reaction.

  17. Polyelectrolytes Multilayers to Modulate Cell Adhesion: A Study of the Influence of Film Composition and Polyelectrolyte Interdigitation on the Adhesion of the A549 Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Muzzio, Nicolás E; Pasquale, Miguel A; Gregurec, Danijela; Diamanti, Eleftheria; Kosutic, Marija; Azzaroni, Omar; Moya, Sergio E

    2016-04-01

    Polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) with different polycation/polyanion pairs are fabricated by the layer-by-layer technique employing synthetic, natural, and both types of polyelectrolytes. The impact of the chemical composition of PEMs on cell adhesion is assessed by studying cell shape, spreading area, focal contacts, and cell proliferation for the A549 cell line. Cells exhibit good adhesion on PEMs containing natural polycations and poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS) as polyanion, but limited adhesion is observed on PEMs fabricated from both natural polyelectrolytes. PEMs are then assembled, depositing a block of natural polyelectrolytes on top of a stiffer block with PSS as polyanion. Cell adhesion is enhanced on top of the diblock PEMs compared to purely natural PEMs. This fact could be explained by the interdigitation between polyelectrolytes from the two blocks. Diblock PEM assembly provides a simple means to tune cell adhesion on biocompatible PEMs.

  18. Molecular mechanistic origin of the toughness of natural adhesives, fibres and composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Bettye L.; Schäffer, Tilman E.; Viani, Mario; Thompson, James B.; Frederick, Neil A.; Kindt, Johannes; Belcher, Angela; Stucky, Galen D.; Morse, Daniel E.; Hansma, Paul K.

    1999-06-01

    Natural materials are renowned for their strength and toughness,,,,. Spider dragline silk has a breakage energy per unit weight two orders of magnitude greater than high tensile steel,, and is representative of many other strong natural fibres,,. The abalone shell, a composite of calcium carbonate plates sandwiched between organic material, is 3,000 times more fracture resistant than a single crystal of the pure mineral,. The organic component, comprising just a few per cent of the composite by weight, is thought to hold the key to nacre's fracture toughness,. Ceramics laminated with organic material are more fracture resistant than non-laminated ceramics,, but synthetic materials made of interlocking ceramic tablets bound by a few weight per cent of ordinary adhesives do not have a toughness comparable to nacre. We believe that the key to nacre's fracture resistance resides in the polymer adhesive, and here we reveal the properties of this adhesive by using the atomic force microscope to stretch the organic molecules exposed on the surface of freshly cleaved nacre. The adhesive fibres elongate in a stepwise manner as folded domains or loops are pulled open. The elongation events occur for forces of a few hundred piconewtons, which are smaller than the forces of over a nanonewton required to break the polymer backbone in the threads. We suggest that this `modular' elongation mechanism might prove to be quite general for conveying toughness to natural fibres and adhesives, and we predict that it might be found also in dragline silk.

  19. Effect of silorane-based adhesive system on bond strength between composite and dentin substrate

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Jefferson Ricardo; Júnior, Lindomar Corrêa; de Souza Almeida, Mauro; do Valle, Accácio Lins; Honório, Heitor Marques; Vidotti, Hugo Alberto; De Souza, Grace Mendonca

    2015-01-01

    Context: The complexities of the oral environment, the dentin substrate, and the different bond and composite resin systems represent a challenge to the maintenance of reasonable bond between the composite resin and the tooth structure. Aims: To evaluate the effect of the adhesive system on bond strength between silorane-based composite resin and dentin. Materials and Methods: Fourteen human molars extracted were selected and vertically cut into 3 dentin fragments, randomly divided among the experimental groups and restored with Z250 and P90 composite resin using different adhesive protocols (Adper Single Bond 2, Silorano primer, Adper SE Plus, and Scotchbond Multiuse). Two composite resin cylinders were built up on each dentin surface (n = 10) and subjected to a micro-shear bond strength test. Statistical Analysis Used: Kruskal–Wallis one-way analysis of variance and Tukey test (P = 0.05). Results: According to the results, Kruskal–Wallis test evidenced at least one statistical significant difference (P = 0.001). The Tukey test showed statistically significant differences among the group (P < 0.05). Group PSM8 (P90 + SM) showed statically significant higher results when compared with groups PSP4 (P90 + SP), PSB2 (P90 + SB), and ZSE5 (Z250 + SE). Conclusion: The results evidenced that the monomer of the adhesive system has an effect on bond strength between the composite resin and dentin. PMID:26752846

  20. Human cartilage repair with a photoreactive adhesive-hydrogel composite.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Blanka; Fermanian, Sara; Gibson, Matthew; Unterman, Shimon; Herzka, Daniel A; Cascio, Brett; Coburn, Jeannine; Hui, Alexander Y; Marcus, Norman; Gold, Garry E; Elisseeff, Jennifer H

    2013-01-01

    Surgical options for cartilage resurfacing may be significantly improved by advances and application of biomaterials that direct tissue repair. A poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogel was designed to support cartilage matrix production, with easy surgical application. A model in vitro system demonstrated deposition of cartilage-specific extracellular matrix in the hydrogel biomaterial and stimulation of adjacent cartilage tissue development by mesenchymal stem cells. For translation to the joint environment, a chondroitin sulfate adhesive was applied to covalently bond and adhere the hydrogel to cartilage and bone tissue in articular defects. After preclinical testing in a caprine model, a pilot clinical study was initiated where the biomaterials system was combined with standard microfracture surgery in 15 patients with focal cartilage defects on the medial femoral condyle. Control patients were treated with microfracture alone. Magnetic resonance imaging showed that treated patients achieved significantly higher levels of tissue fill compared to controls. Magnetic resonance spin-spin relaxation times (T(2)) showed decreasing water content and increased tissue organization over time. Treated patients had less pain compared with controls, whereas knee function [International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC)] scores increased to similar levels between the groups over the 6 months evaluated. No major adverse events were observed over the study period. With further clinical testing, this practical biomaterials strategy has the potential to improve the treatment of articular cartilage defects. PMID:23303605

  1. Polymer Composition and Substrate Influences on the Adhesive Bonding of a Biomimetic, Cross-Linking Polymer

    PubMed Central

    Matos-Pérez, Cristina R.; White, James D.; Wilker, Jonathan J.

    2012-01-01

    Hierarchical biological materials such as bone, sea shells, and marine bioadhesives are providing inspiration for the assembly of synthetic molecules into complex structures. The adhesive system of marine mussels has been the focus of much attention in recent years. Several catechol-containing polymers are being developed to mimic the cross-linking of proteins containing 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) used by shellfish for sticking to rocks. Many of these biomimetic polymer systems have been shown to form surface coatings or hydrogels, however bulk adhesion is demonstrated less often. Developing adhesives requires addressing design issues including finding a good balance between cohesive and adhesive bonding interactions. Despite the growing number of mussel mimicking polymers, there has been little effort to generate structure-property relations and gain insights on what chemical traits give rise to the best glues. In this report, we examined the simplest of these biomimetic polymers, poly[(3,4-dihydroxystyrene)-co-styrene]. Pendant catechol groups (i.e., 3,4-dihydroxystyrene) were distributed throughout a polystyrene backbone. Several polymer derivatives were prepared, each with a different 3,4-dihyroxystyrene content. Bulk adhesion testing showed where the optimal middle ground of cohesive and adhesive bonding resides. Adhesive performance was benchmarked against commercial glues as well as the genuine material produced by live mussels. In the best case, bonding was similar to cyanoacrylate “Krazy” or “Super” glue. Performance was also examined using low (e.g., plastics) and high (e.g., metals, wood) energy surfaces. Adhesive bonding of poly[(3,4-dihydroxystyrene)-co-styrene] may be the strongest of reported mussel protein mimics. These insights should help us to design future biomimetic systems, thereby bringing us closer to development of bone cements, dental composites, and surgical glues. PMID:22582754

  2. Elastomer toughened polyimide adhesives. [bonding metal and composite material structures for aircraft and spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, A. K.; St.clair, T. L. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A rubber-toughened, addition-type polyimide composition is disclosed which has excellent high temperature bonding characteristics in the fully cured state and improved peel strength and adhesive fracture resistance physical property characteristics. The process for making the improved adhesive involves preparing the rubber-containing amic acid prepolymer by chemically reacting an amine-terminated elastomer and an aromatic diamine with an aromatic dianhydride with which a reactive chain stopper anhydride has been mixed, and utilizing solvent or mixture of solvents for the reaction.

  3. Interaction of mixed mode loading on cyclic debonding in adhesively bonded composite joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Rezaizadeh, M. A.; Ramamurthy, G.

    1985-01-01

    A combined experimental and analytical investigation of an adhesively-bonded composite joint was conducted to characterize the fracture mode dependence of cyclic debonding. The system studied consisted of graphite/epoxy adherends bonded with EC 3445 adhesive. Several types of specimens are tested which provide the cyclic debond growth rate measurements under various load conditions: mode 1, mixed mode 1 to 2, and mostly mode 2. This study shows that the total strain-energy-release rate is the governing factor for cyclic debonding.

  4. Adhesive Bonding of Titanium to Carbon-Carbon Composites for Heat Rejection Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cerny, Jennifer; Morscher, Gregory

    2006-01-01

    High temperature adhesives with good thermal conductivity, mechanical performance, and long term durability are crucial for the assembly of heat rejection system components for space exploration missions. In the present study, commercially available adhesives were used to bond high conductivity carbon-carbon composites to titanium sheets. Bonded pieces were also exposed to high (530 to 600 Kelvin for 24 hours) and low (liquid nitrogen 77K for 15 minutes) temperatures to evaluate the integrity of the bonds. Results of the microstructural characterization and tensile shear strengths of bonded specimens will be reported. The effect of titanium surface roughness on the interface microstructure will also be discussed.

  5. Purification, composition, and structure of macrophage adhesion molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Remold-O'Donnell, E.; Savage, B.

    1988-01-12

    Macrophage adhesion molecule (MAM) is a surface heterodimer consisting of the trypsin- and plasmin-sensitive glycopeptide gp160 (MAM-..cap alpha..) and the glycopeptide gp93 (MAM-..beta..). MAM, which is the guinea pig analog of Mo1 and Mac-1, was purified from detergent lysates of peritoneal neutrophils by lentil lectin chromatography and M2-antibody chromatography. The pure heterodimer molecule was dissociated by acidic conditions (pH 3.5), and MAM-..cap alpha.. and MAM-..beta.. were separated by M7-antibody chromatography. MAM-..beta.. is an approx. 640 amino acid residue polypeptide with exceptionally high cysteine content. At 7.2 residues per 100 amino acids, Cys/2 of MAM-..beta.. is more than 3 times the mean for 200 purified proteins. Reactivity with six ..beta..-subunit-specific /sup 125/I-labeled monoclonal antibodies recognizing at least four epitopes demonstrated that intrapeptide disulfide bonds are required to maintain the structure of MAM-..beta... All six antibodies failed to react when MAM-..beta.. was treated with reducing agents. MAM-..beta.. is 18% carbohydrate; the major monosaccharides are mannose, N-acetylglucosamine, galactose, and sialic acid. MAM-..beta.. is estimated to contain five to six N-linked carbohydrate units. MAM-..cap alpha.. is an approx. 1100-residue polypeptide with lower Cys/2 content (2.0 residues per 100 amino acid residues). MAM-..cap alpha.. is 21% carbohydrate. The major monosaccharides are mannose, N-acetylglucosamine, galactose, and sialic acid; the mannose content is higher in MAM-..cap alpha.. than MAM-..beta.. is estimated to contain 12 N-linked carbohydrate units.

  6. Adhesively bonded steel and composites-durability in substitute ocean water

    SciTech Connect

    Aartun, L.; Dillard, J.G.

    1996-12-31

    Ocean water, marine life and certain oil-well fluids constitute a highly aggressive environment for most metals. In the offshore oil industry, the economic driving force to seek new materials points towards polymeric composites which offer reduction of weight and elimination of corrosion. However, a combined use of steel and composites creates a joining problem. Exposure to humid air and liquid water affects adhesive bonds in a negative manner, and adhesively bonded metal systems are even less durable in marine than in non-ocean environments. In marine environments and sea coast atmospheres, marine life and salts can contribute to the degradation process. On an operating oil rig, repair and replacements involving adhesive bonding are forced to be carried out under non-ideal conditions because of environmental regulations (affecting surface treatments) and safety requirements (affecting the curing method). The objective of this work is to develop environmentally friendly surface preparations and to study, the influence of salt water on the durability of adhesively bonded steel/composite systems.

  7. [Bond strength to dentin of resin composites associated with filled and unfilled adhesive systems].

    PubMed

    Youssef, J A; Turbino, M L; Youssef, M N; Matson, E

    2001-01-01

    This study analyzed in vitro two brands of one-step adhesive systems of fourth generation (Optisolo--Kerr, filled; and Single Bond--3M, unfilled) and two composite resins (Prodigy--Kerr and Z100--3M), aiming at evaluating their bond strength to dentin. Eighty human extracted molars were embedded in acrylic resin and grounded until dentin was exposed in longitudinal direction. The specimens were divided in 4 groups. Composite resin cones were bonded to the specimens using the mentioned adhesive systems, following the instructions of the manufacturers. The test-specimens were submitted to tensile tests using a 4442 Universal Mini-Instron Machine with the speed of 0.5 mm/min. The results were converted into MPa, according to the area of adhesion, and submitted to statistical analysis with ANOVA. There was significant statistical difference (p < 0.01) between the adhesive systems (F = 7.24). Optisolo (m = 11.03 +/- 4.23) showed better bond strength than Single Bond (m = 8.37 +/- 4.54). There was no significant statistical difference (p > 0.05) between the composites (F = 0.43).

  8. Adhesive Cementation of Indirect Composite Inlays and Onlays: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    D'Arcangelo, Camillo; Vanini, Lorenzo; Casinelli, Matteo; Frascaria, Massimo; De Angelis, Francesco; Vadini, Mirco; D'Amario, Maurizio

    2015-09-01

    The authors conducted a literature review focused on materials and techniques used in adhesive cementation for indirect composite resin restorations. It was based on English language sources and involved a search of online databases in Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, Google Scholar, and Scopus using related topic keywords in different combinations; it was supplemented by a traditional search of peer-reviewed journals and cross-referenced with the articles accessed. The purpose of most research on adhesive systems has been to learn more about increased bond strength and simplified application methods. Adherent surface treatments before cementation are necessary to obtain high survival and success rates of indirect composite resin. Each step of the clinical and laboratory procedures can have an impact on longevity and the esthetic results of indirect restorations. Cementation seems to be the most critical step, and its long-term success relies on adherence to the clinical protocols. The authors concluded that in terms of survival rate and esthetic long-term outcomes, indirect composite resin techniques have proven to be clinically acceptable. However, the correct management of adhesive cementation protocols requires knowledge of adhesive principles and adherence to the clinical protocol in order to obtain durable bonding between tooth structure and restorative materials.

  9. Adhesive Cementation of Indirect Composite Inlays and Onlays: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    D'Arcangelo, Camillo; Vanini, Lorenzo; Casinelli, Matteo; Frascaria, Massimo; De Angelis, Francesco; Vadini, Mirco; D'Amario, Maurizio

    2015-09-01

    The authors conducted a literature review focused on materials and techniques used in adhesive cementation for indirect composite resin restorations. It was based on English language sources and involved a search of online databases in Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, Google Scholar, and Scopus using related topic keywords in different combinations; it was supplemented by a traditional search of peer-reviewed journals and cross-referenced with the articles accessed. The purpose of most research on adhesive systems has been to learn more about increased bond strength and simplified application methods. Adherent surface treatments before cementation are necessary to obtain high survival and success rates of indirect composite resin. Each step of the clinical and laboratory procedures can have an impact on longevity and the esthetic results of indirect restorations. Cementation seems to be the most critical step, and its long-term success relies on adherence to the clinical protocols. The authors concluded that in terms of survival rate and esthetic long-term outcomes, indirect composite resin techniques have proven to be clinically acceptable. However, the correct management of adhesive cementation protocols requires knowledge of adhesive principles and adherence to the clinical protocol in order to obtain durable bonding between tooth structure and restorative materials. PMID:26355440

  10. Cashier/Checker Learning Activity Packets (LAPs).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    Twenty-four learning activity packets (LAPs) are provided for six areas of instruction in a cashier/checker program. Section A, Orientation, contains an LAP on exploring the job of cashier-checker. Section B, Operations, has nine LAPs, including those on operating the cash register, issuing trading stamps, and completing the cash register balance…

  11. Tensile bond strength of indirect composites luted with three new self-adhesive resin cements to dentin

    PubMed Central

    TÜRKMEN, Cafer; DURKAN, Meral; CİMİLLİ, Hale; ÖKSÜZ, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aims of this study were to evaluate the tensile bond strengths between indirect composites and dentin of 3 recently developed self-adhesive resin cements and to determine mode of failure by SEM. Material and Methods Exposed dentin surfaces of 70 mandibular third molars were used. Teeth were randomly divided into 7 groups: Group 1 (control group): direct composite resin restoration (Alert) with etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Bond 1 primer/adhesive), Group 2: indirect composite restoration (Estenia) luted with a resin cement (Cement-It) combined with the same etch-and-rinse adhesive, Group 3: direct composite resin restoration with self-etch adhesive system (Nano-Bond), Group 4: indirect composite restoration luted with the resin cement combined with the same self-etch adhesive, Groups 5-7: indirect composite restoration luted with self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem, Maxcem, and Embrace WetBond, respectively) onto the non-pretreated dentin surfaces. Tensile bond strengths of groups were tested with a universal testing machine at a constant speed of 1 mm/min using a 50 kgf load cell. Results were statistically analyzed by the Student's t-test. The failure modes of all groups were also evaluated. Results The indirect composite restorations luted with the self-adhesive resin cements (groups 5-7) showed better results compared to the other groups (p<0.05). Group 4 showed the weakest bond strength (p>0.05). The surfaces of all debonded specimens showed evidence of both adhesive and cohesive failure. Conclusion The new universal self-adhesive resins may be considered an alternative for luting indirect composite restorations onto non-pretreated dentin surfaces. PMID:21710095

  12. The effects of physico-chemical interactions and polymer grafting on interfacial adhesion in thermoplastic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghavendra, Venkat Krishna

    The effects of physico-chemical interactions between the carbon fiber and Bisphenol-A polycarbonate matrix was investigated to understand the factors governing the interfacial adhesion in thermoplastic matrix composites. It was found that, the changes in the amount of oxygen functionality achieved through electrochemical oxidative surface treatment of the carbon fibers didn't affect the level of adhesion, indicating negligible polar and hydrogen bond formation. Composites fabricated from these fibers that were subsequently passivated through thermal hydrogenation up to 1000°C, which removed all the oxygen functionality without affecting the fiber topography, indicated that the mechanical interlocking between the fiber and the matrix didn't have a strong influence on the interfacial adhesion. Grafting low molecular weight BPA-PC and high molecular weight PMMA on to the fiber surface improved the interfacial adhesion. However, the level of improvement was observed to be independent of the fiber surface treatment and the molecular weight of the grafted chains. These results are consistent with the cohesive zone models proposed for the chain pull out and chain scission observed in block copolymers.

  13. Influence of Copolyester Composition on Adhesion to Soda-Lime Glass via Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Ben; Hofmann, John; Pasquinelli, Melissa A

    2016-06-01

    Copolyesters are a subset of polymers that have the desirable properties of strength and clarity while retaining chemical resistance, and are thus potential candidates for enhancing the impact resistance of soda-lime glass. Adhesion between the polymer and the glass relates to the impact performance of the system, as well as the longevity of the bond between the polymer and the glass under various conditions. Modifying the types of diols and diacids present in the copolyester provides a method for fine-tuning the physical properties of the polymer. In this study, we used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to examine the influence of the chemical composition of the polymers on adhesion of polymer film laminates to two soda-lime glass surfaces, one tin-rich and one oxygen-rich. By calculating properties such as adhesion energies and contact angles, these results provide insights into how the polymer-glass interaction is impacted by the polymer composition, temperature, and other factors such as the presence of free volume or pi stacking. These results can be used to optimize the adhesion of copolyester films to glass surfaces.

  14. Additive manufacturing of tools for lapping glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Wesley B.

    2013-09-01

    Additive manufacturing technologies have the ability to directly produce parts with complex geometries without the need for secondary processes, tooling or fixtures. This ability was used to produce concave lapping tools with a VFlash 3D printer from 3D Systems. The lapping tools were first designed in Creo Parametric with a defined constant radius and radial groove pattern. The models were converted to stereolithography files which the VFlash used in building the parts, layer by layer, from a UV curable resin. The tools were rotated at 60 rpm and used with 120 grit and 220 grit silicon carbide lapping paste to lap 0.750" diameter fused silica workpieces. The samples developed a matte appearance on the lapped surface that started as a ring at the edge of the workpiece and expanded to the center. This indicated that as material was removed, the workpiece radius was beginning to match the tool radius. The workpieces were then cleaned and lapped on a second tool (with equivalent geometry) using a 3000 grit corundum aluminum oxide lapping paste, until a near specular surface was achieved. By using lapping tools that have been additively manufactured, fused silica workpieces can be lapped to approach a specified convex geometry. This approach may enable more rapid lapping of near net shape workpieces that minimize the material removal required by subsequent polishing. This research may also enable development of new lapping tool geometry and groove patterns for improved loose abrasive finishing.

  15. ADHESION OF AMORPHOUS CALCIUM PHOSPHATE COMPOSITES BONDED TO DENTIN: A STUDY IN FAILURE MODALITY

    PubMed Central

    O’Donnell, J.N.R.; Schumacher, G.E.; Antonucci, J.M.; Skrtic, D.

    2009-01-01

    Aims As a bioactive filler capable of remineralizing tooth structures, the main disadvantage of as-made amorphous calcium phosphate (am-ACP) are its large agglomerates. The objective of this study was to mill ACP, and compare the adhesive strength to dentin, work to fracture, and failure modes of both groups to glass-filled composites and one commercial compomer after 24 h, 1 week, 1, 3 and 6 months of exposure to simulated saliva solution (SLS). Flat dentin surfaces were acid-etched, primed, and photopolymerized. Composites were applied, photo-cured, and debonded in shear. The resin used in each composite was identical: ethoxylated bisphenol A dimethacrylate, triethylene glycol dimethacrylate, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and methacryloxyethyl phthalate. Fillers consisted of am-ACP and milled ACP (m-ACP), and a strontium-containing glass (Sr-glass) at respective mass fractions of (40, 60, and 75) %. Findings 90 % of the fracture surfaces in this study showed adhesive failure, with most of these occurring at the dentin/primer interface. 52 % of failures after 24 h immersion occurred at the primer/composite interface. After six months of SLS exposure, 80 % of specimens failed at the dentin/primer interface, with a 42 % overall reduction in bond strength. Conclusions Milled ACP composites showed initial mechanical advantages over am-ACP composites and the compomer, and produced a higher incidence of a failure mode consistent with stronger adhesion. Evidence is provided which suggests that milled ACP composites may offer enhanced potential in clinical bonding applications. PMID:19107798

  16. Microleakage of Posterior Composite Restorations with Fiber Inserts Using two Adhesives after ging

    PubMed Central

    Sharafeddin, F; Yousefi, H; Modiri, Sh; Tondari, A; Safaee Jahromi, SR

    2013-01-01

    Statement of Problem: Microleakage is one of the most frequent problems associated with resin composites, especially at the gingival margin of posterior restorations. Insertion of fibers in composite restorations can reduce the total amount of composite and help to decrease the shrinkage. Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of polyethylene fiber inserts on gingival microleakage of class II composite restorations using two different adhesive systems. Materials and Method: In this experimental study, class II cavities were prepared on 60 premolars. The gingival floor was located 1.0 mm below the CEJ. Dimension of each cavity were 3 mm buccolingually and 1.5 mm in axial depth. The specimens were divided into 4 groups according to the adhesive type and fiber insert (n=4). Single bond and Clearfill SE bond and Filtek p60 were used to restore the cavities. In groups without fiber inserts composite was adapted onto cavities using layering technique. For cavities with fiber inserts, 3 mm piece of fiber insert was placed onto the composite increment and cured. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37oC for 6 months. All specimens were subjected to 3000 thermo-cycling. The tooth surfaces except for 1 mm around the restoration margins covered with two layers of nail varnish .The teeth were immersed in 2% Basic Fuchsin for 24 hours, then rinsed and sectioned mesiodistally. The microleakage was determined under a stereomicroscope (40X). Data were statistically analyzed by Kruskal-wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests (p< 0.05). Results: The Kruskal-Wallis test revealed no significant differences in mean microleakage scores among all groups (p= 0.281). Conclusion: Use of polyethylene fiber inserts and etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives had no effect on microleakage in class II resin composite restorations with gingival margins below the CEJ after 6- month water storage. PMID:24724129

  17. Temperature Gradient Measurements by Using Thermoelectric Effect in CNTs-Silicone Adhesive Composite

    PubMed Central

    Chani, Muhammad Tariq Saeed; Karimov, Kh. S.; Asiri, Abdullah M.; Ahmed, Nisar; Bashir, Muhammad Mehran; Khan, Sher Bahadar; Rub, Malik Abdul; Azum, Naved

    2014-01-01

    This work presents the fabrication and investigation of thermoelectric cells based on composite of carbon nanotubes (CNT) and silicone adhesive. The composite contains CNT and silicon adhesive 1∶1 by weight. The current-voltage characteristics and dependences of voltage, current and Seebeck coefficient on the temperature gradient of cell were studied. It was observed that with increase in temperature gradient the open circuit voltage, short circuit current and the Seebeck coefficient of the cells increase. Approximately 7 times increase in temperature gradient increases the open circuit voltage and short circuit current up to 40 and 5 times, respectively. The simulation of experimental results is also carried out; the simulated results are well matched with experimental results. PMID:24748375

  18. Damage prognosis of adhesively-bonded joints in laminated composite structural components of unmanned aerial vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, Charles R; Gobbato, Maurizio; Conte, Joel; Kosmatke, John; Oliver, Joseph A

    2009-01-01

    The extensive use of lightweight advanced composite materials in unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) drastically increases the sensitivity to both fatigue- and impact-induced damage of their critical structural components (e.g., wings and tail stabilizers) during service life. The spar-to-skin adhesive joints are considered one of the most fatigue sensitive subcomponents of a lightweight UAV composite wing with damage progressively evolving from the wing root. This paper presents a comprehensive probabilistic methodology for predicting the remaining service life of adhesively-bonded joints in laminated composite structural components of UAVs. Non-destructive evaluation techniques and Bayesian inference are used to (i) assess the current state of damage of the system and, (ii) update the probability distribution of the damage extent at various locations. A probabilistic model for future loads and a mechanics-based damage model are then used to stochastically propagate damage through the joint. Combined local (e.g., exceedance of a critical damage size) and global (e.g.. flutter instability) failure criteria are finally used to compute the probability of component failure at future times. The applicability and the partial validation of the proposed methodology are then briefly discussed by analyzing the debonding propagation, along a pre-defined adhesive interface, in a simply supported laminated composite beam with solid rectangular cross section, subjected to a concentrated load applied at mid-span. A specially developed Eliler-Bernoulli beam finite element with interlaminar slip along the damageable interface is used in combination with a cohesive zone model to study the fatigue-induced degradation in the adhesive material. The preliminary numerical results presented are promising for the future validation of the methodology.

  19. Flame Sprayed Al-12Si Coatings for the Improvement of the Adhesion of Composite Casting Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voyer, Joël; Peterlechner, Christian; Noster, Ulf

    2008-12-01

    In this study, flame sprayed Al-12Si coatings were produced on the surface of inlays (aluminum profiles) of composite castings parts. The aim was to enhance the strength between the joining partners inlay and cast. Due to the high surface roughness and the presence of pores in the coatings, combined with the formation of an intermetallic phase at the interface, the adhesion of flame sprayed inlays could be enhanced by a factor of 2 compared to blank inlays and by a factor of 1.3 when compared to sand-blasted inlays. However, results also show that gaps are present, mostly at the interface between the inlays and the flame sprayed coatings, and these gaps have a negative effect on the joining strength of the composite casting parts. Therefore, optimizing the adhesion of the coating on the Al profiles via an improvement in both the sand-blasting and the flame spraying parameters would be beneficial for further enhancement of the adhesion of composite casting parts.

  20. The Effect of Composite Patches on the Failure of Adhesively-Bonded Joints Under Bending Moment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akpinar, Salih

    2013-12-01

    In this study, it was aimed to compare mechanical behavior of double-strap joints with aluminum (AA2024-T3) or 16-ply laminate of carbon/epoxy composite (T300/934) patches of different orientation angles at their overlap area subjected to bending moment. For this purpose, AA2024-T3 aluminum was used as adherend, while the adhesive was a two-part paste (DP 460). Six different types of joint samples were subjected to bending moment. The effect of patch material on failure load and stress distribution was examined experimentally and numerically. In the numerical analysis, the composite patches were assumed to behave linearly elastic, while adherend and adhesive layers were assumed to be nonlinear. It was found that the data obtained from 3-D finite element analysis were coherent with experimental results. Meanwhile, experiments showed that fiber orientation angles of the patches markedly affected the failure load of joints, failure mode and stress distributions appeared in adhesive and composite.

  1. An investigation of adhesive/adherend and fiber/matrix interactions. Part B: SEM/ESCA analysis of fracture surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, B.; Widyani, E.; Wightman, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    Adhesion was studied with emphasis on the characterization of surface oxide layers, the analysis of fracture surfaces, and the interaction of matrices and fibers. A number of surface features of the fractured lap shear samples were noted in the SEM photomicrographs including the beta phase alloy of the Ti 6-4 adherend, the imprint of the adherend on the adhesive failure surface, increased void density for high temperature samples, and the alumina filler particles. Interfacial failure of some of the fractured lap shear samples is invariably characterized by the appearance of an ESCA oxygen photopeak at 530.3 eV assigned to the surface oxide layer of Ti 6-4 adherend. The effect of grit blasting on carbon fiber composites is evident in the SEM analysis. A high surface fluorine concentration on the composite surface is reduced some ten fold by grit blasting.

  2. Ultrasonic Evaluation of Thermal Degradation in Adhesive Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Mal, Ajit K.; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    1994-01-01

    The critical role played by adhesive bonds in lap joints is well known. A good knowledge of the mechanical properties of adhesive bonds in lap joints is a prerequisite to the design and reliable prediction of the performance of these bonded structures. Furthermore, the lap joint may be subject to high-temperature environments in service. Early detection of the degree of thermal degradation in adhesive bonds is required under these circumstances. A variety of ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques can be used to determine the thickness and the elastic moduli of adhesively bonded joints. In this paper we apply a previously developed technique based on the leaky Lamb wave (LLW) experiment to investigate the possibility of characterizing the thermal degradation of adhesive bonds in lap joints. The degradation of the adhesive bonds is determined through comparison between experimental data and theoretical calculations.

  3. Changes in membrane sphingolipid composition modulate dynamics and adhesion of integrin nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Eich, Christina; Manzo, Carlo; de Keijzer, Sandra; Bakker, Gert-Jan; Reinieren-Beeren, Inge; García-Parajo, Maria F; Cambi, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Sphingolipids are essential constituents of the plasma membrane (PM) and play an important role in signal transduction by modulating clustering and dynamics of membrane receptors. Changes in lipid composition are therefore likely to influence receptor organisation and function, but how this precisely occurs is difficult to address given the intricacy of the PM lipid-network. Here, we combined biochemical assays and single molecule dynamic approaches to demonstrate that the local lipid environment regulates adhesion of integrin receptors by impacting on their lateral mobility. Induction of sphingomyelinase (SMase) activity reduced sphingomyelin (SM) levels by conversion to ceramide (Cer), resulting in impaired integrin adhesion and reduced integrin mobility. Dual-colour imaging of cortical actin in combination with single molecule tracking of integrins showed that this reduced mobility results from increased coupling to the actin cytoskeleton brought about by Cer formation. As such, our data emphasizes a critical role for the PM local lipid composition in regulating the lateral mobility of integrins and their ability to dynamically increase receptor density for efficient ligand binding in the process of cell adhesion. PMID:26869100

  4. Changes in membrane sphingolipid composition modulate dynamics and adhesion of integrin nanoclusters

    PubMed Central

    Eich, Christina; Manzo, Carlo; Keijzer, Sandra de; Bakker, Gert-Jan; Reinieren-Beeren, Inge; García-Parajo, Maria F.; Cambi, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Sphingolipids are essential constituents of the plasma membrane (PM) and play an important role in signal transduction by modulating clustering and dynamics of membrane receptors. Changes in lipid composition are therefore likely to influence receptor organisation and function, but how this precisely occurs is difficult to address given the intricacy of the PM lipid-network. Here, we combined biochemical assays and single molecule dynamic approaches to demonstrate that the local lipid environment regulates adhesion of integrin receptors by impacting on their lateral mobility. Induction of sphingomyelinase (SMase) activity reduced sphingomyelin (SM) levels by conversion to ceramide (Cer), resulting in impaired integrin adhesion and reduced integrin mobility. Dual-colour imaging of cortical actin in combination with single molecule tracking of integrins showed that this reduced mobility results from increased coupling to the actin cytoskeleton brought about by Cer formation. As such, our data emphasizes a critical role for the PM local lipid composition in regulating the lateral mobility of integrins and their ability to dynamically increase receptor density for efficient ligand binding in the process of cell adhesion. PMID:26869100

  5. Effect of curing unit and adhesive system on marginal adaptation of composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Casselli, Denise Sa Maia; Faria-e-Silva, Andre Luis; Casselli, Henrique; Martins, Luis Roberto Marcondes

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to evaluate how a curing unit and adhesive system affected the marginal adaptation of resin composite restorations. Class V cavities were prepared in bovine teeth with a gingival margin in dentin and an incisal margin in enamel. The cavities were restored with a micro-hybrid resin composite using one of four adhesives: Single Bond 2, Prime & Bond NT, Clearfil SE Bond, Xeno IV. The light-activations were performed using a quartz-tungsten-halogen (QTH) lamp or a second-generation light-emitting diode (LED). Restorations were finished and polished and epoxy replicas were prepared. Marginal adaptation was analyzed by using scanning electronic microscopy (magnification 500X). The widest gaps in each margin were recorded, and data were submitted to Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney, and Wilcoxon tests (α = 0.05). Differences between the adhesives were observed only when the dentin margins were evaluated: Clearfil SE Bond demonstrated better marginal adaptation than Prime & Bond NT or Single Bond 2 (which demonstrated the widest gaps in the dentin margin). The type of curing unit only affected the results for Xeno IV when the enamel margin was analyzed; the LED lamp promoted smaller gaps than the QTH lamp. PMID:23220321

  6. Composite generalized Langevin equation for Brownian motion in different hydrodynamic and adhesion regimes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hsiu-Yu; Eckmann, David M; Ayyaswamy, Portonovo S; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2015-05-01

    We present a composite generalized Langevin equation as a unified framework for bridging the hydrodynamic, Brownian, and adhesive spring forces associated with a nanoparticle at different positions from a wall, namely, a bulklike regime, a near-wall regime, and a lubrication regime. The particle velocity autocorrelation function dictates the dynamical interplay between the aforementioned forces, and our proposed methodology successfully captures the well-known hydrodynamic long-time tail with context-dependent scaling exponents and oscillatory behavior due to the binding interaction. Employing the reactive flux formalism, we analyze the effect of hydrodynamic variables on the particle trajectory and characterize the transient kinetics of a particle crossing a predefined milestone. The results suggest that both wall-hydrodynamic interactions and adhesion strength impact the particle kinetics.

  7. Characterization of debond growth mechanism in adhesively bonded composites under mode II static and fatigue loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Kochhar, N. K.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental investigation of adhesively bonded composite joint was conducted to characterize the debond growth mechanism under mode II static and fatigue loadings. For this purpose, end-notched flexure specimens of graphite/epoxy (T300/5208) adherends bonded with EC 3445 adhesive were tested. In all specimen tested, the fatigue failure occurred in the form of cyclic debonding. The present study confirmed the result of previous studies that total strain-energy-release rate is the driving parameter for cyclic debonding. Further, the debond growth resistance under cyclic loading with full shear reversal (i.e., stress ratio, R = -1) is drastically reduced in comparison to the case when subjected to cyclic shear loading with no shear reversal (i.e., R = 0.1).

  8. Adhesion at the interface in cured graphite fiber epoxy-amine resin composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Needles, Howard L.; Alger, Kenneth W.; Okamoto, Robert

    1987-01-01

    The effect of high temperature curing on the interface between unsized or epoxy-sized graphite fiber tow and epoxy-amine resin was examined by scanning electron microscopy of compression and freeze fractured specimens. Little or no adhesion was found between the unsized graphite fiber tows and the epoxy-amine resin on curing at 165 C for 17 hrs. Epoxy-sized graphite fibers showed a similar lack of adhesion between the fiber tows and the epoxy-amine resin at 3 and 17 hr cures, although good penetration of the resin into the sized fiber tows had occurred. Interfacial bond strengths for the composites could not be effectively measured by compression fracture of specimens.

  9. In situ synthesis of mesoporous polyvinyl alcohol/hydroxyapatite composites for better biomedical coating adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Riaz; Tabassum, Sobia; Gilani, Mazhar Amjad; Ahmed, Ejaz; Sharif, Ahsan; Manzoor, Faisal; Shah, Asma Tufail; Asif, Anila; Sharif, Faiza; Iqbal, Farasat; Siddiqi, Saadat Anwar

    2016-02-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) shows diverse biomedical applications as bone filler and coating material for metal implants to enhance osteoconduction. Four different PVAHA composites were synthesized in situ by an economical co-precipitation wet methodology. The FTIR spectra of PVAHA composites showed characteristic signals of HA and PVA. The BET surface area of PVAHA composites were in range of 41.3-63.7 m2/g. The composites showed type IV nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherm, a characteristic for mesoporous material. The pore diameter range (6.3-8.1 nm) of PVAHA composites also confirmed their mesoporous nature. The Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) pore size distribution curves indicated a narrow pore size distribution. To obtain a homogeneous crack free coating with EPD on stainless steel (SS) plates, different parameters such as PVA percentages in PVAHA composites, solvent, deposition time and voltage were optimized. The PVAHA composites were stable after EPD as confirmed by FTIR spectra recorded before and after EPD. The SEM images of the coating showed a homogeneous morphology. The thickness of the coating was controlled by varying voltage and time. The best results were obtained with c-PVAHA composite at 30 volts for 5-10 min and current density was around 4.5 to 5 mA. The adhesion strength of c-PVAHA coating was measured by using ASTM standard F1044-99. The average value was approximately 9.328 ± 1.58 MPa.

  10. Loose abrasive slurries for optical glass lapping

    SciTech Connect

    Neauport, Jerome; Destribats, Julie; Maunier, Cedric; Ambard, Chrystel; Cormont, Philippe; Pintault, B.; Rondeau, Olivier

    2010-10-20

    Loose abrasive lapping is widely used to prepare optical glass before its final polishing. We carried out a comparison of 20 different slurries from four different vendors. Slurry particle sizes and morphologies were measured. Fused silica samples were lapped with these different slurries on a single side polishing machine and characterized in terms of surface roughness and depth of subsurface damage (SSD). Effects of load, rotation speed, and slurry concentration during lapping on roughness, material removal rate, and SSD were investigated.

  11. Reduction of bacterial adhesion on dental composite resins by silicon-oxygen thin film coatings.

    PubMed

    Mandracci, Pietro; Mussano, Federico; Ceruti, Paola; Pirri, Candido F; Carossa, Stefano

    2015-01-29

    Adhesion of bacteria on dental materials can be reduced by modifying the physical and chemical characteristics of their surfaces, either through the application of specific surface treatments or by the deposition of thin film coatings. Since this approach does not rely on the use of drugs or antimicrobial agents embedded in the materials, its duration is not limited by their possible depletion. Moreover it avoids the risks related to possible cytotoxic effects elicited by antibacterial substances released from the surface and diffused in the surrounding tissues. In this work, the adhesion of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus mitis was studied on four composite resins, commonly used for manufacturing dental prostheses. The surfaces of dental materials were modified through the deposition of a-SiO(x) thin films by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The chemical bonding structure of the coatings was analyzed by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The morphology of the dental materials before and after the coating deposition was assessed by means of optical microscopy and high-resolution mechanical profilometry, while their wettability was investigated by contact angle measurements. The sample roughness was not altered after coating deposition, while a noticeable increase of wettability was detected for all the samples. Also, the adhesion of S. mitis decreased in a statistically significant way on the coated samples, when compared to the uncoated ones, which did not occur for S. mutans. Within the limitations of this study, a-SiO(x) coatings may affect the adhesion of bacteria such as S. mitis, possibly by changing the wettability of the composite resins investigated.

  12. Reduction of bacterial adhesion on dental composite resins by silicon-oxygen thin film coatings.

    PubMed

    Mandracci, Pietro; Mussano, Federico; Ceruti, Paola; Pirri, Candido F; Carossa, Stefano

    2015-02-01

    Adhesion of bacteria on dental materials can be reduced by modifying the physical and chemical characteristics of their surfaces, either through the application of specific surface treatments or by the deposition of thin film coatings. Since this approach does not rely on the use of drugs or antimicrobial agents embedded in the materials, its duration is not limited by their possible depletion. Moreover it avoids the risks related to possible cytotoxic effects elicited by antibacterial substances released from the surface and diffused in the surrounding tissues. In this work, the adhesion of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus mitis was studied on four composite resins, commonly used for manufacturing dental prostheses. The surfaces of dental materials were modified through the deposition of a-SiO(x) thin films by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The chemical bonding structure of the coatings was analyzed by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The morphology of the dental materials before and after the coating deposition was assessed by means of optical microscopy and high-resolution mechanical profilometry, while their wettability was investigated by contact angle measurements. The sample roughness was not altered after coating deposition, while a noticeable increase of wettability was detected for all the samples. Also, the adhesion of S. mitis decreased in a statistically significant way on the coated samples, when compared to the uncoated ones, which did not occur for S. mutans. Within the limitations of this study, a-SiO(x) coatings may affect the adhesion of bacteria such as S. mitis, possibly by changing the wettability of the composite resins investigated. PMID:25634298

  13. Pediatric lap belt injuries: care and prevention.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, B L; Ose, M

    1997-01-01

    Motor vehicle collisions are the leading cause of death from injury during childhood. As children outgrow their toddler car seats, they are often restrained by two-point lap belts, which are fashioned for adult body proportions. Those children restrained by two-point lap belts are at risk for intraabdominal and spinal injury during an auto collision. This article explores the mechanisms of injury and identification of "lap belt syndrome." Aspects of nursing care and prevention strategies will be discussed. A case study illustrates and summarizes the cogent aspects of lap belt related injury and child/family care.

  14. Develop, demonstrate, and verify large area composite structural bonding with polyimide adhesives. [adhesively bonding graphite-polyimide structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhombal, B. D.; Wykes, D. H.; Hong, K. C.; Stenersen, A. A.

    1982-01-01

    The technology required to produce graphite-polyimide structural components with operational capability at 598 K (600 F) is considered. A series of polyimide adhesives was screened for mechanical and physical properties and processibility in fabricating large midplane bonded panels and honeycomb sandwich panels in an effort to fabricate a structural test component of the space shuttle aft body flap. From 41 formulations, LaRC-13, FM34B-18, and a modified LaRC-13 adhesive were selected for further evaluation. The LaRC-13 adhesive was rated as the best of the three adhesives in terms of availability, cost, processibility, properties, and ability to produce void fee large area (12" x 12") midplane bonds. Surface treatments and primers for the adhesives were evaluated and processes were developed for the fabrication of honeycomb sandwich panels of very good quality which was evidenced by rupture in the honeycomb core rather than in the facesheet bands on flatwise tensile strength testing. The fabrication of the adhesively bonded honeycomb sandwich cover panels, ribs, and leading edge covers of Celion graphite/LARC-160 polyimide laminates is described.

  15. Streptococcus mutans biofilm adhesion on composite resin surfaces after different finishing and polishing techniques.

    PubMed

    Pereira, C A; Eskelson, E; Cavalli, V; Liporoni, P C S; Jorge, A O C; do Rego, M A

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated Streptococcus mutans biofilm adhesion on the surface of three composite resins (nanofilled, Filtek Z350, 3M ESPE, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; nanohybrid, Vit-1-escence, Ultradent Products, South Jordan, UT, USA; and microhybrid, Esthet X, Dentsply, Milford, DE, USA) following different finishing and polishing techniques. Sixty standardized samples (6 × 3 mm) of each composite were produced and randomly divided into three finishing and polishing treatments (n=20): 1) control group: composite resin surface in contact with Mylar matrix strips with no finishing or polishing performed, 2) Sof-Lex aluminum oxide disc technique (3M ESPE, and 3) carbide bur finishing and Astrobrush polishing technique (Ultradent). Half the samples of each group were incubated in human saliva for 1 hour, and all the samples were subjected to S mutans (ATCC 35688) biofilm development. The mean log of CFU/mL present in the S mutans biofilm was calculated, and data were statistically analyzed by three-way analysis of variance and the Tukey test (p<0.05). Human saliva incubation promoted a significant increase of bacterial adherence on all three of the composites' surfaces, regardless of the polishing treatment performed (p<0.05). Of the three, the nanofilled composite (Filtek Z350) had the lowest bacterial adherence with each of the finishing and polishing techniques despite the presence or absence of human saliva (p<0.05). Mylar matrix strips (control group) promoted the lowest bacterial adhesion on the surface of the microhybrid and nanofilled composites in the absence of human saliva. PMID:21740238

  16. Special element approach for calculating the vibratory response of adhesively bonded and composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, N. E.; Griffin, J. H.

    1994-02-01

    An approach is presented that may be used to calculate the natural frequencies and loss factors of composite sandwich beams or beams containing adhesively bonded joints. The approach uses special finite elements to represent either composite or joint elements and the modal strain energy method to calculate the loss factor for each vibratory mode of interest. The special element represents a section of the composite beam or the overlap joint as an element with four nodes. Its properties are calculated by using a generalization of the shape function concept from finite elements in which the shape function (displacement fields) in the special elements are determined by performing static stress analysis on the special element's substructure. The resulting special element has only a small number of degrees of freedom and, yet, accurately represents the geometrically complex substructure. Results obtained using this approach on sandwich beams compare well with an analytical solution published in the literature. In addition, it correlates reasonably well with data taken from tests on adhesively bonded beams.

  17. Micro-measurements of mechanical properties for adhesives and composites using digital imaging technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinson, Hal F.

    1994-01-01

    The need for a constituent based durability or accelerated life prediction procedure to be used for the engineering design of polymer matrix composites is discussed in the light of current plans for the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) concerns about the U.S. infrastructure (bridges, pipelines, etc.) and other technological considerations of national concern. It is pointed out that good measurement procedures for insitu resin properties are needed for both adhesives and composites. A double cantilever beam (DCB) specimen which shows promise for the easy determination of adhesive shear properties is presented and compared with measurements of strains within the bondline using a new optical digital imaging micro-measurement system (DIMMS). The DCB specimen is also used to assess damage in a bonded joint using a dynamic mechanical thermal analysis system (DMTA). The possible utilization of the same DIMMS and DMTA procedures to determine the insitu properties of the resin in a composite specimen are discussed as well as the use of the procedures to evaluate long term mechanical and physical aging. Finally, a discussion on the state-of-the art of the measurement of strains in micron and sub-micron domains is given.

  18. Adhesive Wear Performance of CFRP Multilayered Polyester Composites Under Dry/wet Contact Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danaelan, D.; Yousif, B. F.

    The tribo-performance of a new engineering composite material based on coconut fibers was investigated. In this work, coconut fibers reinforced polyester (CFRP) composites were developed. The tribo-experiments were conducted by using pin-on-disc machine under dry and wet sliding contact condition against smooth stainless steel counterface. Worn surfaces were observed using optical microscope. Friction coefficient and specific wear rate were presented as a function of sliding distance (0-0.6 km) at different sliding velocities (0.1-0.28 m/s). The effect of applied load and sliding velocity was evaluated. The results showed that all test parameters have significant influence on friction and wear characteristics of the composites. Moreover, friction coefficient increased as the normal load and speed increased, the values were about 0.7-0.9 under dry contact condition. Meanwhile, under wet contact condition, there was a great reduction in the friction coefficient, i.e. the values were about 0.1-0.2. Furthermore, the specific wear rates were found to be around 2-4 (10-3) mm3/Nm under dry contact condition and highly reduced under wet condition. In other words, the presence of water as cleaner and polisher assisted to enhance the adhesive wear performance of CFRP by about 10%. The images from optical microscope showed evidence of adhesive wear mode with transition to abrasive wear mode at higher sliding velocities due to third body abrasion. On the other hand, optical images for wet condition showed less adhesive wear and smooth surfaces.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of high temperature curable poly(arylene ether) structural adhesive and composite matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Mecham, S.J.; Jayaraman, S.; Bobbitt, M.M.

    1996-12-31

    Crosslinked poly(arylene ether) systems are projected to display many desirable properties suitable for aerospace structural adhesive and composite matrix applications. The synthesis and characterization of a series of processable high temperature curing poly(arylene ether) oligomers incorporating terminally reactive phenylethynyl endgroups will be discussed. Characterization of the oligomers includes NMR, intrinsic viscosity, parallel plate rheological behavior, TGA, and DSC. Curing of these oligomers was conducted at or above 380{degrees}C, providing a large processing window. Thermal stability is very good and the melt viscosity of the oligomers in the processing temperature range is exceptionally low.

  20. Shear bond strength of fibre-reinforced composite nets using two different adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Sfondrini, Maria Francesca; Cacciafesta, Vittorio; Scribante, Andrea

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of two different adhesive systems (Tetric Flow and Transbond XT) in combination with fibre-reinforced composites (FRC) net (Ever Stick) on the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets. Eighty bovine permanent mandibular incisors were randomly divided into four equal groups. Stainless steel maxillary central incisor brackets with a 0.018 inch slot (DB Leone) were bonded to the teeth using the two different adhesive systems. Fifty per cent of the brackets were bonded without and 50 per cent with a FRC net under the bracket base. After bonding, all samples were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 24 hours and subsequently tested for SBS. Analysis of variance indicated significant differences among the various groups. Brackets bonded with FRC nets under the base showed a significantly lower SBS than those bonded without nets (P < 0.05). Moreover, teeth bonded with Transbond XT showed a significantly higher SBS than the other groups. Additionally, significant differences in debond locations [adhesive remnant index (ARI) score] were found among the various groups. Transbond XT can successfully be used for direct bonding of FRC nets, thus improving their SBS values. PMID:20573712

  1. Stem cell adhesion and proliferation on hydrolyzed poly(butylene succinate)/β-tricalcium phosphate composites.

    PubMed

    Patntirapong, Somying; Singhatanadgit, Weerachai; Meesap, Preeyapan; Theerathanagorn, Tharinee; Toso, Montree; Janvikul, Wanida

    2015-02-01

    Although poly(butylene succinate)/β-tricalcium phosphate (PBSu/TCP) composites are biocompatible and allow the growth and osteogenic differentiation of stem cells, cell attachment and adhesion to the PBSu-based substrates is often limited. To enhance cell adhesion and proliferation, we used a sodium hydroxide (NaOH) hydrolysis technique to generate a different degree of roughness on PBSu/TCP substrates with different PBSu:TCP ratios. The results showed that NaOH hydrolysis increased surface roughness of PBSu/TCP substrates in a concentration-dependent manner. Substrates with higher ratios of TCP:PBSu provided more porous topography after NaOH hydrolysis, with a substrate containing 40 wt % TCP (PBSu/TCP-6040) hydrolyzed with 1.5M NaOH (HPBSu/TCP-6040-1.5) showing the highest degree of roughness. As with the roughness, PBSu/TCP surface hydrophilicity was positively affected by the increasing NaOH concentration and TCP incorporation. Stem cells adhered best on HPBSu/TCP-6040-1.5 with three-dimensionally elongated cell extensions. Moreover, the HPBSu/TCP-6040-1.5 substrate most significantly facilitated stem cell actin cytoskeleton reorganization and vinculin-positive focal adhesion formation when compared with the other substrates tested. HPBSu/TCP-6040-1.5 also demonstrated the greatest increase in cell proliferation when compared with the other substrates studied. In conclusion, the results have shown that among various substrates tested, HPBSu/TCP-6040-1.5 provided the best support for stem cell adhesion and proliferation, suggesting its potential use in bone engineering.

  2. Petrography of Lunar Meteorite LAP 02205, a New Low-Ti Basalt Possibly Launch Paired with NWA 032

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jolliff, B. L.; Zeigler, R. A.; Korotev, R. L.

    2004-01-01

    Lunar meteorite LAP 02205 is a 1.23 kg basalt collected during the 2002 field season in the La- Paz ice field, Antarctica [1]. We present a petrographic description including mineral modes and compositions, and the major-element composition of the bulk meteorite. LAP 02205 is an Fe-rich, moderately low-Ti mare basalt that is similar in composition, mineralogy, and mineral chemistry to the NWA 032 basaltic lunar meteorite. LAP 02205 is yet another of the moderately low- Ti basaltic meteorites that are underrepresented among Apollo and Luna samples but that appear from remote sensing to be the most common basalt type on the Moon.

  3. Sealing of adhesive systems in ferric sulfate-contaminated dentinal margins in class V composite resin restorations.

    PubMed

    Shadman, Niloofar; Farzin Ebrahimi, Shahram; Mollaie, Najmeh

    2016-01-01

    Background. Hemostatic agents are applied to prepare an isolated bleeding-free condition during dental treatments and can influence adhesive restorations. This study evaluated the effect of a hemostatic agent (ViscoStat) on microleakage of contaminated dentinal margin of class V composite resin restorations with three adhesives. Methods. Sixty freshly extracted human molars were selected and class V cavities (3×3×1.5 mm) were prepared on buccal and lingual surfaces. Gingival margins of the cavities were placed below the cementoenamel junction. The teeth were divided into six groups randomly. The adhesives were Excite, AdheSE and AdheSE One. In three groups, the gingival walls of the cavities were contaminated with ViscoStat and then rinsed. The cavities were restored with composite resin and light-cured. After storage in distilled water (37°C) for 24 hours and polishing, the samples were thermocycled and sealed with nail varnish. Then they were stored in 1% basic fuchsin for 24 hours, rinsed and mounted in self-cured acryl resin, followed by sectioning buccolingually. Dye penetration was observed under a stereomicroscope and scored. Data were statistically analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. P<0.05 was set as the level of significance. Results. Only in the Excite group, contamination did not have adverse effects on dentin microleakage (P > 0.05). In the contaminated groups, Excite had significantly less microleakage than the others (P = 0.003). AdheSE and AdheSE One did not exhibit significant difference in microleakage (P > 0.05). Conclusion. ViscoStat hemostatic agent increased dentinal microleakage in AdheSE and AdheSE One adhesives with no effect on Excite. PMID:27092210

  4. Sealing of adhesive systems in ferric sulfate-contaminated dentinal margins in class V composite resin restorations

    PubMed Central

    Shadman, Niloofar; Farzin Ebrahimi, Shahram; Mollaie, Najmeh

    2016-01-01

    Background. Hemostatic agents are applied to prepare an isolated bleeding-free condition during dental treatments and can influence adhesive restorations. This study evaluated the effect of a hemostatic agent (ViscoStat) on microleakage of contaminated dentinal margin of class V composite resin restorations with three adhesives. Methods. Sixty freshly extracted human molars were selected and class V cavities (3×3×1.5 mm) were prepared on buccal and lingual surfaces. Gingival margins of the cavities were placed below the cementoenamel junction. The teeth were divided into six groups randomly. The adhesives were Excite, AdheSE and AdheSE One. In three groups, the gingival walls of the cavities were contaminated with ViscoStat and then rinsed. The cavities were restored with composite resin and light-cured. After storage in distilled water (37°C) for 24 hours and polishing, the samples were thermocycled and sealed with nail varnish. Then they were stored in 1% basic fuchsin for 24 hours, rinsed and mounted in self-cured acryl resin, followed by sectioning buccolingually. Dye penetration was observed under a stereomicroscope and scored. Data were statistically analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. P<0.05 was set as the level of significance. Results. Only in the Excite group, contamination did not have adverse effects on dentin microleakage (P > 0.05). In the contaminated groups, Excite had significantly less microleakage than the others (P = 0.003). AdheSE and AdheSE One did not exhibit significant difference in microleakage (P > 0.05). Conclusion. ViscoStat hemostatic agent increased dentinal microleakage in AdheSE and AdheSE One adhesives with no effect on Excite. PMID:27092210

  5. Fabrication of micro nickel/diamond abrasive pellet array lapping tools using a LIGA-like technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Sheng-Yih; Yu, Tsung-Han; Hu, Yuh-Chung

    2007-06-01

    A manufacturing process of micro nickel/diamond abrasive pellet array lapping tools using a LIGA-like technology is reported here. The thickness of JSR THB-151N resist coated on an aluminum alloy substrate for micro lithography can reach up to 110 µm. During the lithography, different geometrical photomasks were used to create specific design patterns of the resist mold on the substrate. Micro roots, made by electrolytic machining on the substrate with guidance of the resist mold, can improve the adhesion of micro nickel abrasive pellets electroplated on the substrate. During the composite electroforming, the desired hardness of the nickel matrix inside the micro diamond abrasive pellets can be obtained by the addition of leveling and stress reducing agents. At moderate blade agitation and ultrasonic oscillation, higher concentration and more uniform dispersion of diamond powders deposited in the nickel matrix can be achieved. With these optimal experiment conditions of this fabrication process, the production of micro nickel/diamond abrasive pellet array lapping tools is demonstrated.

  6. Bonding and nondestructive evaluation of graphite/PEEK composite and titanium adherends with thermoplastic adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, W. T.; Tyeryar, J. R.; Berry, M.

    1985-01-01

    Bonded single overlap shear specimens were fabricated from Graphite/PEEK (Polyetheretherketone) composite adherends and titanium adherends. Six advanced thermoplastic adhesives were used for the bonding. The specimens were bonded by an electromagnetic induction technique producing high heating rates and high-strength bonds in a few minutes. This contrasts with conventionally heated presses or autoclaves that take hours to process comparable quality bonds. The Graphite/PEEK composites were highly resistant to delamination during the testing. This allowed the specimen to fail exclusively through the bondline, even at very high shear loads. Nondestructive evaluation of bonded specimens was performed ultrasonically by energizing the entire thickness of the material through the bondline and measuring acoustic impedance parameters. Destructive testing confirmed the unique ultrasonic profiles of strong and weak bonds, establishing a standard for predicting relative bond strength in subsequent specimens.

  7. Nano-scale composition of commercial white powders for development of latent fingerprints on adhesives.

    PubMed

    Jones, B J; Reynolds, A J; Richardson, M; Sears, V G

    2010-09-01

    Titanium dioxide based powders are regularly used in the development of latent fingerprints on dark surfaces. For analysis of prints on adhesive tapes, the titanium dioxide can be suspended in a surfactant and used in the form of a powder suspension. Commercially available products, whilst having nominally similar composition, show varying levels of effectiveness of print development, with some powders adhering to the background as well as the print. X-ray fluorescence (XRF), analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and laser particle sizing of the fingerprint powders show TiO(2) particles with a surrounding coating, tens of nanometres thick, consisting of Al and Si rich material, with traces of sodium and sulphur. Such aluminosilicates are commonly used as anti-caking agents and to aid adhesion or functionality of some fingerprint powders; however, the morphology, thickness, coverage and composition of the aluminosilicates are the primary differences between the white powder formulations and could be related to variation in the efficacy of print development.

  8. [Study of tensile bond strength of 3 different adhesive systems associated with composites on dentinal surfaces].

    PubMed

    Matos, A B; Saraceni, C H; Jacobs, M M; Oda, M

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the tensile bond strength of 3 different bonding systems, associated to composite resins, bonded to dentinal surfaces. Forty-four dentinal surfaces were obtained from recently extracted human molars. A standardized smear layer was obtained and the surfaces were divided in 3 groups: G1) self etch + microhybrid composite; G2) single-component adhesive + phosphoric acid + microhybrid composite and G3) conventional system (acid + primer + bond) + microhybrid composite. Specimens made of composite resin were constructed in the shape of an inverted truncated cone with 3 mm of diameter. Tensile bond strength test was performed at the speed of 0.5 mm/min, and the results were expressed in MPa. The analysis of variance ANOVA (p < 0.05) determined that the type of bonding system used influenced tensile bond strength. Tukey's test, however, showed that the results of the comparison between G2 and G3 were the only statistically significant ones, with G2 showing greater values of tensile bond strength.

  9. Composites containing albumin protein or cyanoacrylate adhesives and biodegradable scaffolds: I. Acute wound closure study in a rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Grant T.; Soller, Eric C.; Heintzelman, Douglas L.; Duffy, Mark T.; Bloom, Jeffrey N.; Gilmour, Travis M.; Gonnerman, Krista N.; McNally-Heintzelman, Karen M.

    2004-07-01

    Composite adhesives composed of biodegradable scaffolds impregnated with a biological or synthetic adhesive were investigated for use in wound closure as an alternative to using either one of the adhesives alone. Two different scaffold materials were investigated: (i) a synthetic biodegradable material fabricated from poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid); and (ii) a biological material, small intestinal sub mucosa, manufactured by Cook BioTech. The biological adhesive was composed of 50%(w/v) bovine serum albumin solder and 0.5mg/ml indocyanine green dye mixed in deionized water, and activated with an 808-nm diode laser. The synthetic adhesive was Ethicon's Dermabond, a 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate. The tensile strength of skin incisions repaired ex vivo in a rat model, by adhesive alone or in combination with a scaffold, as well as the time-to-failure, were measured and compared. The tensile strength of repairs formed using the scaffold-enhanced biological adhesives were on average, 80% stronger than their non-enhanced counterparts, with an accompanying increase in the time-to-failure of the repairs. These results support the theory that a scaffold material with an irregular surface that bridges the wound provides a stronger, more durable and consistent adhesion, due to the distribution of the tensile stress forces over the many micro-adhesions provided by the irregular surface, rather than the one large continuous adhesive contact. This theory is also supported by several previous ex vivo experiments demonstrating enhanced tensile strength of irregular versus smooth scaffold surfaces in identical tissue repairs performed on bovine thoracic aorta, liver, spleen, small intestine and lung tissue.

  10. Quadruple Lap Shear Processing Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, Tony N.; McCool, A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Thiokol, Science and Engineering Huntsville Operations (SEHO) Laboratory has previously experienced significant levels of variation in testing Quadruple Lap Shear (QLS) specimens. The QLS test is used at Thiokol / Utah for the qualification of Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) nozzle flex bearing materials. A test was conducted to verify that process changes instituted by SEHO personnel effectively reduced variability, even with normal processing variables introduced. A test matrix was designed to progress in a series of steps; the first establishing a baseline, then introducing additional solvents or other variables. Variables included normal test plan delay times, pre-bond solvent hand-wipes and contaminants. Each condition tested utilized standard QLS hardware bonded with natural rubber, two separate technicians and three replicates. This paper will report the results and conclusions of this investigation.

  11. Shear Bond Strengths of Methacrylate- and Silorane-based Composite Resins to Feldspathic Porcelain using Different Adhesive Systems.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Narmin; Shakur Shahabi, Maryam; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Pournagi Azar, Fatemeh; Ebrahimi Chaharom, Mohammad Esmaeel

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Use of porcelain as inlays, laminates and metal-ceramic and all-ceramic crowns is common in modern dentistry. The high cost of ceramic restorations, time limitations and difficulty of removing these restorations result in delays in replacing fractured restorations; therefore, their repair is indicated. The aim of the present study was to compare the shear bond strengths of two types of composite resins (methacrylate-based and silorane-based) to porcelain, using three adhesive types. Materials and methods. A total of 156 samples of feldspathic porcelain surfaces were prepared with air-abrasion and randomly divided into 6 groups (n=26). In groups 1-3, Z250 composite resin was used to repair porcelain samples with Ad-per Single Bond 2 (ASB), Clearfil SE Bond (CSB) and Silorane Adhesive (SA) as the bonding systems, afterapplication of silane, respectively. In groups 4-6, the same adhesives were used in the same manner with Filtek Silorane composite resin. Finally, the shear bond strengths of the samples were measured. Two-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests were used to compare bond strengths between the groups with different adhesives at P<0.05. Results. There were significant differences in the mean bond strength values in terms of the adhesive type (P<0.001). In addition, the interactive effect of the adhesive type and composite resin type had no significant effect on bond strength (P=0.602). Conclusion. The results of the present study showed the highest repair bond strength values to porcelain with both composite resin types with the application of SA and ASB. PMID:26697151

  12. Shear Bond Strengths of Methacrylate- and Silorane-based Composite Resins to Feldspathic Porcelain using Different Adhesive Systems

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Narmin; Shakur Shahabi, Maryam; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Pournagi Azar, Fatemeh; Ebrahimi Chaharom, Mohammad Esmaeel

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Use of porcelain as inlays, laminates and metal-ceramic and all-ceramic crowns is common in modern dentistry. The high cost of ceramic restorations, time limitations and difficulty of removing these restorations result in delays in replacing fractured restorations; therefore, their repair is indicated. The aim of the present study was to compare the shear bond strengths of two types of composite resins (methacrylate-based and silorane-based) to porcelain, using three adhesive types. Materials and methods. A total of 156 samples of feldspathic porcelain surfaces were prepared with air-abrasion and randomly divided into 6 groups (n=26). In groups 1-3, Z250 composite resin was used to repair porcelain samples with Ad-per Single Bond 2 (ASB), Clearfil SE Bond (CSB) and Silorane Adhesive (SA) as the bonding systems, afterapplication of silane, respectively. In groups 4-6, the same adhesives were used in the same manner with Filtek Silorane composite resin. Finally, the shear bond strengths of the samples were measured. Two-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests were used to compare bond strengths between the groups with different adhesives at P<0.05. Results. There were significant differences in the mean bond strength values in terms of the adhesive type (P<0.001). In addition, the interactive effect of the adhesive type and composite resin type had no significant effect on bond strength (P=0.602). Conclusion. The results of the present study showed the highest repair bond strength values to porcelain with both composite resin types with the application of SA and ASB. PMID:26697151

  13. Supersonic Retropulsion Surface Preparation of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Composites for Adhesive Bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmieri, Frank L.; Belcher, Marcus A.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Blohowiak, Kay Y.; Connell, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Surface preparation is widely recognized as a key step to producing robust and predictable bonds in a precise and reproducible manner. Standard surface preparation techniques, including grit blasting, manual abrasion, and peel ply, can lack precision and reproducibility, which can lead to variation in surface properties and subsequent bonding performance. The use of a laser to ablate composite surface resin can provide an efficient, precise, and reproducible means of preparing composite surfaces for adhesive bonding. Advantages include elimination of physical waste (i.e., grit media and sacrificial peel ply layers that ultimately require disposal), reduction in process variability due to increased precision (e.g. increased reproducibility), and automation of surface preparation, all of which improve reliability and process control. This paper describes a Nd:YAG laser surface preparation technique for composite substrates and the mechanical performance and failure modes of bonded laminates thus prepared. Additionally, bonded specimens were aged in a hot, wet environment for approximately one year and subsequently mechanically tested. The results of a one year hygrothermal aging study will be presented.

  14. Active Metal Brazing and Adhesive Bonding of Titanium to C/C Composites for Heat Rejection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Shpargel, Tarah; Cerny, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    Robust assembly and integration technologies are critically needed for the manufacturing of heat rejection system (HRS) components for current and future space exploration missions. Active metal brazing and adhesive bonding technologies are being assessed for the bonding of titanium to high conductivity Carbon-Carbon composite sub components in various shapes and sizes. Currently a number of different silver and copper based active metal brazes and adhesive compositions are being evaluated. The joint microstructures were examined using optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). Several mechanical tests have been employed to ascertain the effectiveness of different brazing and adhesive approaches in tension and in shear that are both simple and representative of the actual system and relatively straightforward in analysis. The results of these mechanical tests along with the fractographic analysis will be discussed. In addition, advantages, technical issues and concerns in using different bonding approaches will also be presented.

  15. Effect of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Treatment on Surface Characteristics and Adhesive Bond Quality of Peel Ply Prepared Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tracey, Ashley C.

    The purpose of this research was to investigate if atmospheric pressure plasma treatment could modify peel ply prepared composite surfaces to create strong adhesive bonds. Two peel ply surface preparation composite systems previously shown to create weak bonds (low fracture energy and adhesion failure) that were potential candidates for plasma treatment were Toray T800/3900-2 carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) prepared with Precision Fabrics Group, Inc. (PFG) 52006 nylon peel ply and Hexcel T300/F155 CFRP prepared with PFG 60001 polyester peel ply. It was hypothesized that atmospheric pressure plasma treatment could functionalize and/or remove peel ply remnants left on the CFRP surfaces upon peel ply removal. Surface characterization measurements and double cantilever beam (DCB) testing were used to determine the effects of atmospheric pressure plasma treatment on surface characteristics and bond quality of peel ply prepared CFRP composites. Previous research showed that Toray T800/3900-2 carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites prepared with PFG 52006 peel ply and bonded with Cytec MetlBond 1515-3M structural film adhesive failed in adhesion at low fracture energies when tested in the DCB configuration. Previous research also showed that DCB samples made of Hexcel T300/F155 carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites prepared with PFG 60001 peel ply and bonded with Henkel Hysol EA 9696 structural film adhesive failed in adhesion at low fracture energies. Recent research suggested that plasma treatment could be able to activate these "un-bondable" surfaces and result in good adhesive bonds. Nylon peel ply prepared 177 °C cure and polyester peel ply prepared 127 °C cure CFRP laminates were treated with atmospheric pressure plasma after peel ply removal prior to bonding. Atmospheric pressure plasma treatment was capable of significantly increasing fracture energies and changing failure modes. For Toray T800/3900-2 laminates prepared with PFG 52006 and bonded with

  16. Direct Pen Writing of Adhesive Particle-Free Ultrahigh Silver Salt-Loaded Composite Ink for Stretchable Circuits.

    PubMed

    Hu, Mingjun; Cai, Xiaobing; Guo, Qiuquan; Bian, Bin; Zhang, Tengyuan; Yang, Jun

    2016-01-26

    In this article, we describe a writable particle-free ink for fast fabrication of highly conductive stretchable circuits. The composite ink mainly consists of soluble silver salt and adhesive rubber. Low toxic ketone was employed as the main solvent. Attributed to ultrahigh solubility of silver salt in short-chain ketone and salt-assisted dissolution of rubber, the ink can be prepared into particle-free transparent solution. As-prepared ink has a good chemical stability and can be directly filled into ballpoint pens and use to write on different substrates to form well adhesive silver salt-based composite written traces as needed. As a result of high silver salt loading, the trace can be converted into highly conductive silver nanoparticle-based composites after in situ reduction. Because of the introduction of adhesive elastomeric rubber, the as-formed conductive composite written trace can not only maintain good adhesion to various substrates but also show good conductivity under various deformations. The conductivity of written traces can be enhanced by repeated writing-reduction cycles. Different patterns can be fabricated by either direct handwriting or hand-copying. As proof-of-concept demonstrations, a typical handwriting heart-like circuit was fabricated to show its capability to work under different deformations, and a pressure-sensitive switch was also manufactured to present pressure-dependent change of resistance. PMID:26624508

  17. Direct Pen Writing of Adhesive Particle-Free Ultrahigh Silver Salt-Loaded Composite Ink for Stretchable Circuits.

    PubMed

    Hu, Mingjun; Cai, Xiaobing; Guo, Qiuquan; Bian, Bin; Zhang, Tengyuan; Yang, Jun

    2016-01-26

    In this article, we describe a writable particle-free ink for fast fabrication of highly conductive stretchable circuits. The composite ink mainly consists of soluble silver salt and adhesive rubber. Low toxic ketone was employed as the main solvent. Attributed to ultrahigh solubility of silver salt in short-chain ketone and salt-assisted dissolution of rubber, the ink can be prepared into particle-free transparent solution. As-prepared ink has a good chemical stability and can be directly filled into ballpoint pens and use to write on different substrates to form well adhesive silver salt-based composite written traces as needed. As a result of high silver salt loading, the trace can be converted into highly conductive silver nanoparticle-based composites after in situ reduction. Because of the introduction of adhesive elastomeric rubber, the as-formed conductive composite written trace can not only maintain good adhesion to various substrates but also show good conductivity under various deformations. The conductivity of written traces can be enhanced by repeated writing-reduction cycles. Different patterns can be fabricated by either direct handwriting or hand-copying. As proof-of-concept demonstrations, a typical handwriting heart-like circuit was fabricated to show its capability to work under different deformations, and a pressure-sensitive switch was also manufactured to present pressure-dependent change of resistance.

  18. Bond strength evaluation in adhesive joints using NDE and DIC methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poudel, Anish

    Adhesive bonding of graphite epoxy composite laminates to itself or traditional metal alloys in modern aerospace and aircraft structural applications offers an excellent opportunity to use the most efficient and intelligent combination of materials available thus providing an attractive package for efficient structural designs. However, one of the major issues of adhesive bonding is the occasional formation of interfacial defects such as kissing or weak bonds in the bondline interface. Also, there are shortcomings of existing non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methods to non-destructively detect/characterize these interfacial defects and reliably predicting the bond shear strength. As a result, adhesive bonding technology is still not solely implemented in primary structures of an aircraft. Therefore, there is a greater demand for a novel NDE tool that can meet the existing aerospace requirement for adhesive bondline characterization. This research implemented a novel Acoustography ultrasonic imaging and digital image correlation (DIC) technique to detect and characterize interfacial defects in the bondline and determine bond shear strength in adhesively bonded composite-metal joints. Adhesively bonded Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) laminate and 2024-T3 Aluminum single lap shear panels subjected to various implanted kissing/weak bond defects were the primary focus of this study. Kissing/weak bonds were prepared by controlled surface contamination in the composite bonding surface and also by improperly mixing the adhesive constituent. SEM analyses were also conducted to understand the surface morphology of substrates and their interaction with the contaminants. Morphological changes were observed in the microscopic scale and the chemical analysis confirmed the stability of the contaminant at or very close to the interface. In addition, it was also demonstrated that contaminants migrated during the curing of the adhesive from CFRP substrate which caused a

  19. LAPS Grid generation and adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagliantini, Cecilia; Delzanno, Gia Luca; Guo, Zehua; Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Tang, Xianzhu; Chacon, Luis

    2011-10-01

    LAPS uses a common-data framework in which a general purpose grid generation and adaptation package in toroidal and simply connected domains is implemented. The initial focus is on implementing the Winslow/Laplace-Beltrami method for generating non-overlapping block structured grids. This is to be followed by a grid adaptation scheme based on Monge-Kantorovich optimal transport method [Delzanno et al., J. Comput. Phys,227 (2008), 9841-9864], that equidistributes application-specified error. As an initial set of applications, we will lay out grids for an axisymmetric mirror, a field reversed configuration, and an entire poloidal cross section of a tokamak plasma reconstructed from a CMOD experimental shot. These grids will then be used for computing the plasma equilibrium and transport in accompanying presentations. A key issue for Monge-Kantorovich grid optimization is the choice of error or monitor function for equi-distribution. We will compare the Operator Recovery Error Source Detector (ORESD) [Lapenta, Int. J. Num. Meth. Eng,59 (2004) 2065-2087], the Tau method and a strategy based on the grid coarsening [Zhang et al., AIAA J,39 (2001) 1706-1715] to find an ``optimal'' grid. Work supported by DOE OFES.

  20. Effect of bioactive extruded PLA/HA composite films on focal adhesion formation of preosteoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Persson, Maria; Lorite, Gabriela S; Kokkonen, Hanna E; Cho, Sung-Woo; Lehenkari, Petri P; Skrifvars, Mikael; Tuukkanen, Juha

    2014-09-01

    The quality of the initial cell attachment to a biomaterial will influence any further cell function, including spreading, proliferation, differentiation and viability. Cell attachment is influenced by the material's ability to adsorb proteins, which is related to the surface chemistry and topography of the material. In this study, we incorporated hydroxyapatite (HA) particles into a poly(lactic acid) (PLA) composite and evaluated the surface structure and the effects of HA density on the initial cell attachment in vitro of murine calvarial preosteoblasts (MC3T3-EI). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) showed that the HA particles were successfully incorporated into the PLA matrix and located at the surface which is of importance in order to maintain the bioactive effect of the HA particles. SEM and AFM investigation revealed that the HA density (particles/area) as well as surface roughness increased with HA loading concentration (i.e. 5, 10, 15 and 20wt%), which promoted protein adsorption. Furthermore, the presence of HA on the surface enhanced cell spreading, increased the formation of actin stress fibers and significantly improved the expression of vinculin in MC3T3-E1 cells which is a key player in the regulation of cell adhesion. These results suggest the potential utility of PLA/HA composites as biomaterials for use as a bone substitute material and in tissue engineering applications. PMID:24986753

  1. An experimental study on infrared drying kinetics of an aqueous adhesive supported by polymer composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allanic, Nadine; Le Bideau, Pascal; Glouannec, Patrick; Deterre, Rémi

    2016-04-01

    The infrared drying of an aqueous polymer emulsion spread on a thin composite flat film is experimentally studied. The composite film is composed of polyamide fibers supported by a poly(vinyl fluoride) film. The aqueous polymer is an Ethylene Vinyl Acetate emulsion playing the role of adhesive. It is spread over the film with a low thickness, about one hundred micrometers. The aim of this work is to understand the effects of the presence of fibers on the drying of this thin-layer product. With this in mind, a specific laboratory set up composed of a near infrared heater is used in order to get the drying kinetics. First, incident heat fluxes received at the product surface and transmittances of materials (semi-transparent medium) are measured with an ad-hoc heat flux sensor. Then, many experiments are performed with and without fibers. For linking the final moisture content to the fibers thermal and hydric behavior, a microscopic analysis of the dried samples is investigated. This analysis is performed for two thicknesses of polymer corresponding to two covering rates of fibers.

  2. Shock adhesion test for composite bonded assembly using a high pulsed power generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gay, E.; Berthe, L.; Buzaud, E.; Boustie, M.; Arrigoni, M.

    2013-07-01

    In a context of the rising use of composite assemblies in aeronautic or defense fields, the assessment of their strength is a key issue. The method developed in this study attempts to provide solutions. A shock adhesion test based on short compressive loads, obtained by a high pulsed power generator, is proposed as a proof test to ensure the quality of composite bonded assemblies. A calibrated load induces a local tensile stress able to damage the bond interface. The high pulsed power source is the GEnerateur de Pression Isentropique device (Isentropic Pressure Generator), used to generate the required stresses, with a 450 ns pulse duration to test assemblies above the mm thickness range. The understanding of the mechanisms of wave propagation and tensile stress generation within these multilayer assemblies are scientific challenges. The ability of the technique to induce a tensile stress able to disbond the laminates and the assemblies is demonstrated. This paper details the response of carbon epoxy laminates and their bonded assemblies to a shock loading near the damage threshold.

  3. Effect of food and oral simulating fluids on structure of adhesive composite systems.

    PubMed

    Lee, S Y; Greener, E H; Mueller, H J

    1995-02-01

    This work evaluates the degradation of three adhesive/composite systems (Tenure/Marathon One. Scotchbond Multi-Purpose/Z100 and Optibond/Herculite XRV) upon immersion in 75% ethanol solution and in an artificial saliva (Moi-Stir). Shear bond strength (SBS) and diametral tensile strength (DTS) specimens were employed for this study. For the SBS specimens, the bonded interface and composite were exposed to food and oral simulating fluids at 37 degrees C for up to 30 days. A similar control series was stored in air. DTS specimens were stored in 75% ethanol at 37 degrees C for up to 30 days. The SBS specimens were sheared to failure. Small quantities of bonding resin were removed from the tooth side of the fractured surface and from the non-fractured fractured end of the composite for Fourier transform infrared microscopic evaluation. Similar scrapings were taken from DTS specimen surfaces. The infrared absorbance intensity (AI) of the major peaks was measured as a function of storage time and ratioed against the aromatic C = C (1609.4 cm-1) peak. The data were analysed using ANOVA and the Tukey LSD test. The AI of major peaks was similar for the materials stored either in air or in Moi-Stir for all testing periods. Storage in ethanol caused the AI of aliphatic C = C (1638 cm-1) and of O-H (approximately 3500 cm-1) bonds to significantly decrease (30-50%) for specimens of bonding resin while the AI of C = O bonds (1730 cm-1) increased (60-120%).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. One step deposition of highly adhesive diamond films on cemented carbide substrates via diamond/β-SiC composite interlayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Zhuang, Hao; Jiang, Xin

    2015-12-01

    Deposition of adherent diamond films on cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide substrates has been realized by application of diamond/beta-silicon carbide composite interlayers. Diamond top layers and the interlayers were deposited in one single process by hot filament chemical vapor deposition technique. Two different kinds of interlayers have been employed, namely, gradient interlayer and interlayer with constant composition. The distribution of diamond and beta-silicon carbide phases was precisely controlled by manipulating the gas phase composition. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were employed to determine the existence of diamond, beta-silicon carbide and cobalt silicides (Co2Si, CoSi) phases, as well as the quality of diamond crystal and the residual stress in the films. Rockwell-C indentation tests were carried out to evaluate the film adhesion. It is revealed that the adhesion of the diamond film is drastically improved by employing the interlayer. This is mainly influenced by the residual stress in the diamond top layer, which is induced by the different thermal expansion coefficient of the film and the substrate. It is even possible to further suppress the stress by manipulating the distribution of diamond and beta-silicon carbide in the interlayer. The most adhesive diamond film on cemented carbide is thus obtained by employing a gradient composite interlayer.

  5. Effects of non-thermal atmospheric pressure pulsed plasma on the adhesion and durability of resin composite to dentin.

    PubMed

    Han, Geum-Jun; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Chung, Sung-No; Chun, Bae-Hyeock; Kim, Chang-Keun; Seo, Deog-Gyu; Son, Ho-Hyun; Cho, Byeong-Hoon

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the effect of low-power, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma (NT-APP) treatments, in pulsed and conventional modes, on the adhesion of resin composite to dentin and on the durability of the bond between resin composite and dentin. A pencil-type NT-APP jet was applied in pulsed and conventional modes to acid-etched dentin. The microtensile bond strength (MTBS) of resin composite to dentin was evaluated at 24 h and after thermocycling in one control group (no plasma) and in two experimental groups (pulsed plasma and conventional plasma groups) using the Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus Adhesive System. Data were analyzed using two-factor repeated-measures anova and Weibull statistics. Fractured surfaces and the bonded interfaces were evaluated using a field-emission scanning electron microscope. Although there were no significant differences between the plasma treatment groups, the plasma treatment improved the MTBS compared with the control group. After thermocycling, the MTBS did not decrease in the control or conventional plasma group but increased in the pulsed plasma group. Thermocycling increased the Weibull moduli of plasma-treated groups. In conclusion, plasma treatment using NT-APP improved the adhesion of resin composite to dentin. Using a pulsed energy source, the energy delivered to the dentin was effectively reduced without any reduction in bond strength or durability. PMID:25311730

  6. Effects of non-thermal atmospheric pressure pulsed plasma on the adhesion and durability of resin composite to dentin.

    PubMed

    Han, Geum-Jun; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Chung, Sung-No; Chun, Bae-Hyeock; Kim, Chang-Keun; Seo, Deog-Gyu; Son, Ho-Hyun; Cho, Byeong-Hoon

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the effect of low-power, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma (NT-APP) treatments, in pulsed and conventional modes, on the adhesion of resin composite to dentin and on the durability of the bond between resin composite and dentin. A pencil-type NT-APP jet was applied in pulsed and conventional modes to acid-etched dentin. The microtensile bond strength (MTBS) of resin composite to dentin was evaluated at 24 h and after thermocycling in one control group (no plasma) and in two experimental groups (pulsed plasma and conventional plasma groups) using the Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus Adhesive System. Data were analyzed using two-factor repeated-measures anova and Weibull statistics. Fractured surfaces and the bonded interfaces were evaluated using a field-emission scanning electron microscope. Although there were no significant differences between the plasma treatment groups, the plasma treatment improved the MTBS compared with the control group. After thermocycling, the MTBS did not decrease in the control or conventional plasma group but increased in the pulsed plasma group. Thermocycling increased the Weibull moduli of plasma-treated groups. In conclusion, plasma treatment using NT-APP improved the adhesion of resin composite to dentin. Using a pulsed energy source, the energy delivered to the dentin was effectively reduced without any reduction in bond strength or durability.

  7. Effect of adherend thickness and mixed mode loading on debond growth in adhesively bonded composite joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangalgiri, P. D.; Johnson, W. S.; Everett, R. A., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Symmetric and unsymmetric double cantilever beam (DCB) specimens were tested and analyzed to assess the effect of: (1) adherend thickness, and (2) a predominantly mode I mixed mode loading on cyclic debond growth and static fracture toughness. The specimens were made of unidirectional composite (T300/5208) adherends bonded together with EC3445 structural adhesive. The thickness was 8, 16, or 24 plies. The experimental results indicated that the static fracture toughness increases and the cyclic debond growth rate decreases with increasing adherend thickness. This behavior was related to the length of the plastic zone ahead of the debond tip. For the symmetric DCB specimens, it was further found that displacement control tests resulted in higher debond growth rates than did load control tests. While the symmetric DCB tests always resulted in cohesive failures in the bondline, the unsymmetric DCB tests resulted in the debond growing into the thinner adherend and the damage progressing as delamination in that adherend. This behavior resulted in much lower fracture toughness and damage growth rates than found in the symmetric DCB tests.

  8. Personal electronics printing via tapping mode composite liquid metal ink delivery and adhesion mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yi; He, Zhi-Zhu; Yang, Jun; Liu, Jing

    2014-04-01

    Printed electronics is becoming increasingly important in a variety of newly emerging areas. However, restricted to the rather limited conductive inks and available printing strategies, the current electronics manufacture is usually confined to industry level. Here, we show a highly cost-effective and entirely automatic printing way towards personal electronics making, through introducing a tapping-mode composite fluid delivery system. Fundamental mechanisms regarding the reliable printing, transfer and adhesion of the liquid metal inks on the substrate were disclosed through systematic theoretical interpretation and experimental measurements. With this liquid metal printer, a series of representative electronic patterns spanning from single wires to desired complex configurations such as integrated circuit (IC), printed-circuits-on-board (PCB), electronic paintings, or more do-it-yourself (DIY) devices, were demonstrated to be printed out with high precision in a moment. And the total machine cost already reached personally affordable price. This is hard to achieve by a conventional PCB technology which generally takes long time and is material, water and energy consuming, while the existing printed electronics is still far away from the real direct printing goal. The present work opens the way for large scale personal electronics manufacture and is expected to generate important value for the coming society.

  9. Loading Analysis of Composite Wind Turbine Blade for Fatigue Life Prediction of Adhesively Bonded Root Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salimi-Majd, Davood; Azimzadeh, Vahid; Mohammadi, Bijan

    2015-06-01

    Nowadays wind energy is widely used as a non-polluting cost-effective renewable energy resource. During the lifetime of a composite wind turbine which is about 20 years, the rotor blades are subjected to different cyclic loads such as aerodynamics, centrifugal and gravitational forces. These loading conditions, cause to fatigue failure of the blade at the adhesively bonded root joint, where the highest bending moments will occur and consequently, is the most critical zone of the blade. So it is important to estimate the fatigue life of the root joint. The cohesive zone model is one of the best methods for prediction of initiation and propagation of debonding at the root joint. The advantage of this method is the possibility of modeling the debonding without any requirement to the remeshing. However in order to use this approach, it is necessary to analyze the cyclic loading condition at the root joint. For this purpose after implementing a cohesive interface element in the Ansys finite element software, one blade of a horizontal axis wind turbine with 46 m rotor diameter was modelled in full scale. Then after applying loads on the blade under different condition of the blade in a full rotation, the critical condition of the blade is obtained based on the delamination index and also the load ratio on the root joint in fatigue cycles is calculated. These data are the inputs for fatigue damage growth analysis of the root joint by using CZM approach that will be investigated in future work.

  10. Aminophenoxycyclotriphosphazene cured epoxy resins and the composites, laminates, adhesives and structures thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Devendra (Inventor); Fohlen, George M. (Inventor); Parker, John A. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Aminophenoxy cyclotriphosphazenes such as hexakis (4-aminophenoxy) cyclotriphosphazene and tris (4-aminophenoxy)-tris phenoxy cyclotriphosphazene are used as curing agents for epoxy resins. These 1,2-epoxy resins are selected from di- or polyepoxide containing organic moieties of the formula (CH2-CHO-CH2) m-W-R-W- (CH2CH-CH2O)m where R is diphenyl dimethylmethane, diphenylmethane; W is a nitrogen or oxygen atom; and m is 1 when W is oxygen and 2 when W is nitrogen. The resins are cured thermally in stages at between about 110 to 135 C for between about 1 and 10 min, then at between about 175 to 185 C for between 0.5 to 10 hr and post cured at between about 215 and 235 C for between 0.1 and 2 hr. These resins are useful for making fire resistant elevated temperature stable composites, laminates, molded parts, and adhesives and structures, usually for aircraft secondary structures and for spacecraft construction.

  11. Personal electronics printing via tapping mode composite liquid metal ink delivery and adhesion mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yi; He, Zhi-Zhu; Yang, Jun; Liu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Printed electronics is becoming increasingly important in a variety of newly emerging areas. However, restricted to the rather limited conductive inks and available printing strategies, the current electronics manufacture is usually confined to industry level. Here, we show a highly cost-effective and entirely automatic printing way towards personal electronics making, through introducing a tapping-mode composite fluid delivery system. Fundamental mechanisms regarding the reliable printing, transfer and adhesion of the liquid metal inks on the substrate were disclosed through systematic theoretical interpretation and experimental measurements. With this liquid metal printer, a series of representative electronic patterns spanning from single wires to desired complex configurations such as integrated circuit (IC), printed-circuits-on-board (PCB), electronic paintings, or more do-it-yourself (DIY) devices, were demonstrated to be printed out with high precision in a moment. And the total machine cost already reached personally affordable price. This is hard to achieve by a conventional PCB technology which generally takes long time and is material, water and energy consuming, while the existing printed electronics is still far away from the real direct printing goal. The present work opens the way for large scale personal electronics manufacture and is expected to generate important value for the coming society. PMID:24699375

  12. Personal electronics printing via tapping mode composite liquid metal ink delivery and adhesion mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yi; He, Zhi-Zhu; Yang, Jun; Liu, Jing

    2014-04-04

    Printed electronics is becoming increasingly important in a variety of newly emerging areas. However, restricted to the rather limited conductive inks and available printing strategies, the current electronics manufacture is usually confined to industry level. Here, we show a highly cost-effective and entirely automatic printing way towards personal electronics making, through introducing a tapping-mode composite fluid delivery system. Fundamental mechanisms regarding the reliable printing, transfer and adhesion of the liquid metal inks on the substrate were disclosed through systematic theoretical interpretation and experimental measurements. With this liquid metal printer, a series of representative electronic patterns spanning from single wires to desired complex configurations such as integrated circuit (IC), printed-circuits-on-board (PCB), electronic paintings, or more do-it-yourself (DIY) devices, were demonstrated to be printed out with high precision in a moment. And the total machine cost already reached personally affordable price. This is hard to achieve by a conventional PCB technology which generally takes long time and is material, water and energy consuming, while the existing printed electronics is still far away from the real direct printing goal. The present work opens the way for large scale personal electronics manufacture and is expected to generate important value for the coming society.

  13. Effect of atmospheric pressure plasma treatment condition on adhesion of ramie fibers to polypropylene for composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Manolache, Sorin; Qiu, Yiping; Sarmadi, Majid

    2016-02-01

    In order to improve the interfacial adhesion between hydrophilic ramie fibers and hydrophobic polypropylene (PP) matrices, ramie fibers are modified by atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma with our continuous ethanol flow technique in helium environment. A central composite design of experiments with different plasma processing parameter combinations (treatment current, treatment time and ethanol flow rate) is applied to find the most influential parameter and to obtain the best modification effect. Field emission scanning electron microscope (SEM) shows the roughened surfaces of ramie fibers from the treated groups due to plasma etching effect. Dynamic contact angle analysis (DCAA) demonstrates that the wettability of the treated fibers drastically decreases. Microbond pullout test shows that the interfacial shear strength (IFSS) between treated ramie fibers and PP matrices increases significantly. Residual gas analysis (RGA) confirms the creation of ethyl groups during plasma treatment. This study shows that our continuous ethanol flow technique is effective in the plasma modification process, during which the ethanol flow rate is the most influential parameter but all parameters have simultaneous influence on plasma modification effect of ramie fibers.

  14. Influence of methyl mercaptan on the repair bond strength of composites fabricated using self-etch adhesives.

    PubMed

    Yokokawa, Miho; Rikuta, Akitomo; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Tsuchiya, Kenji; Shibasaki, Syo; Matsuyoshi, Saki; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2015-02-01

    The influence of methyl mercaptan on the repair bond strength of composites fabricated using self-etch adhesives was investigated. The surface free-energies were determined by measuring the contact angles of test liquids placed on composites that had been immersed in different concentrations of methyl mercaptan (0.01, 0.1, and 1.0 M). To determine the repair bond strength, self-etch adhesives were applied to the aged composite, and then newly added composites were condensed. Ten samples of each specimen were subjected to shear testing at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm min(-1). Samples were analyzed using two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's honestly significant difference (HSD) test. Although the dispersion force of the composites remained relatively constant, their polar force increased slightly as the concentration of methyl mercaptan increased. The hydrogen-bonding forces were significantly higher after immersion in 1.0 M methyl mercaptan, leading to higher surface-free energies. However, the repair bond strengths for the repair restorations prepared from composites immersed in 1.0 M methyl mercaptan were significantly lower than for those immersed in 0.01 and 0.10 M methyl mercaptan. Considering the results of this study, it can be concluded that the repair bond strengths of both the aged and newly added composites were affected by immersion in methyl mercaptan solutions.

  15. Role of surface chemistry in adhesion between ZnO nanowires and carbon fibers in hybrid composites.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Gregory J; Galan, Ulises; Sodano, Henry A

    2013-02-01

    Low interface strength is a persistent problem in composite materials and cascades to limit a variety of bulk material properties such as lamina shear strength. Whiskerization has long been pursued as a method to reinforce the interphase and improve both the single fiber interface strength as well as the bulk properties. Recent developments have shown that ZnO nanowire whiskerization can effectively improve the properties of a bulk composite without requiring the high temperatures that previous deposition processes needed. Although the efficacy of a ZnO nanowire interphase has been established, the mechanism for adhesion of the interphase to the fiber has not been identified. Specifically, the addition of the ZnO nanowires to the surface of the fibers requires that the ZnO nanowires have strong chemical adhesion to the fiber surface. This work will create a variety of chemical environments on the surface of the fibers through new and common chemical functionalization procedures and quantify the surface chemistry through X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The effect of fiber surface chemistry on the adhesion of the ZnO is assessed through single fiber fragmentation testing. The interface strength is found to strongly correlate with the concentration of ketone groups on the surface of the fibers. Following the experimental observations, liftoff of a ZnO crystal from a graphene surface was simulated with a variety of surface functionalizations. The computational models confirm the preference for ketone groups in promoting adhesion between ZnO and graphite.

  16. The effect of acrylic latex-based polymer on cow blood adhesive resins for wood composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, J.; Lin, H. L.; Feng, G. Z.; Gunasekaran, S.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, alkali-modified cow blood adhesive (BA) and blood adhesive/acrylic latex-based adhesive (BA/ALB) were prepared. The physicochemical and adhesion properties of cow blood adhesive such as UV- visible spectra, particle size, viscosity were evaluated; share strength, water resistance were tested. UV- visible spectra indicates that the strong bonding strength of BA/ALB appeared after incorporating; the particle size of adhesive decreased with the increase of ALB concentration, by mixing ALB and BA, hydrophilic polymer tends locate or extand the protein chains and provide stability of the particles; viscosity decreased as shear rate increased in concordance with a pseudoplastic behavior; both at dry and soak conditions, BA and ALB/BA show significant difference changes when mass fraction of ALB in blend adhesive was over 30% (p < 0.05). ALB/ BA (ALB30%) is not significant different than that of phenol formaldehyde which was used as control. A combination of cow blood and acrylic latex-based adhesive significantly increased the strength and water resistance of the resulting wood.

  17. Highly Multiplexed Imaging Uncovers Changes in Compositional Noise within Assembling Focal Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Harizanova, Jana; Fermin, Yessica; Malik-Sheriff, Rahuman S.; Wieczorek, Jakob; Ickstadt, Katja; Grecco, Hernán E.; Zamir, Eli

    2016-01-01

    Integrin adhesome proteins bind each other in alternative manners, forming within the cell diverse cell-matrix adhesion sites with distinct properties. An intriguing question is how such modular assembly of adhesion sites is achieved correctly solely by self-organization of their components. Here we address this question using high-throughput multiplexed imaging of eight proteins and two phosphorylation sites in a large number of single focal adhesions. We found that during the assembly of focal adhesions the variances of protein densities decrease while the correlations between them increase, suggesting reduction in the noise levels within these structures. These changes correlate independently with the area and internal density of focal adhesions, but not with their age or shape. Artificial neural network analysis indicates that a joint consideration of multiple components improves the predictability of paxillin and zyxin levels in internally dense focal adhesions. This suggests that paxillin and zyxin densities in focal adhesions are fine-tuned by integrating the levels of multiple other components, thus averaging-out stochastic fluctuations. Based on these results we propose that increase in internal protein densities facilitates noise suppression in focal adhesions, while noise suppression enables their stable growth and further density increase—hence forming a feedback loop giving rise to a quality-controlled assembly. PMID:27519053

  18. Highly Multiplexed Imaging Uncovers Changes in Compositional Noise within Assembling Focal Adhesions.

    PubMed

    Harizanova, Jana; Fermin, Yessica; Malik-Sheriff, Rahuman S; Wieczorek, Jakob; Ickstadt, Katja; Grecco, Hernán E; Zamir, Eli

    2016-01-01

    Integrin adhesome proteins bind each other in alternative manners, forming within the cell diverse cell-matrix adhesion sites with distinct properties. An intriguing question is how such modular assembly of adhesion sites is achieved correctly solely by self-organization of their components. Here we address this question using high-throughput multiplexed imaging of eight proteins and two phosphorylation sites in a large number of single focal adhesions. We found that during the assembly of focal adhesions the variances of protein densities decrease while the correlations between them increase, suggesting reduction in the noise levels within these structures. These changes correlate independently with the area and internal density of focal adhesions, but not with their age or shape. Artificial neural network analysis indicates that a joint consideration of multiple components improves the predictability of paxillin and zyxin levels in internally dense focal adhesions. This suggests that paxillin and zyxin densities in focal adhesions are fine-tuned by integrating the levels of multiple other components, thus averaging-out stochastic fluctuations. Based on these results we propose that increase in internal protein densities facilitates noise suppression in focal adhesions, while noise suppression enables their stable growth and further density increase-hence forming a feedback loop giving rise to a quality-controlled assembly. PMID:27519053

  19. Adhesion of resin composite to hydrofluoric acid-exposed enamel and dentin in repair protocols.

    PubMed

    Saracoglu, A; Ozcan, M; Kumbuloglu, O; Turkun, M

    2011-01-01

    Intraoral repairs of ceramic fixed-dental-prostheses (FDP) often include cervical recessions that require pretreatment of the exposed tooth surfaces either before or after the ceramic is conditioned with hydrofluoric (HF) acid gel. The sequence of repair protocol may cross-contaminate the exposed etched enamel or dentin surfaces during the application or rinsing process and thereby affect the adhesion. This study evaluated the influence of HF acid gel with two concentrations on bond strengths of composite to enamel and dentin. Human third molars (N=100, n=10 per group) with similar sizes were selected and randomly divided into 10 groups. Flat surfaces of enamel and dentin were created by wet ground finishing. Before or after the enamel (E) or dentin (D) was conditioned with phosphoric acid (P), substrate surfaces were conditioned with either 9.5% HF (HF(9.5)) or 5% HF (HF(5)). Subsequently, a bonding agent (B) was applied. The experimental groups by conditioning sequence were as follows where the first letter of the group abbreviation represents the substrate (E or D) followed by the acid type and concentration: group 1 (EPHF(9.5)), group 2 (EPHF(5)), group 3 (EHF(9.5)P), group 4 (EHF(5)P), group 5 (DPHF(9.5)), group 6 (DPHF(5)), group 7 (DHF(9.5)P), and group 8 (DHF(5)P). Group 9 (EPB) and group 10 (DPB) acted as the control groups. Repair resin was adhered incrementally onto the conditioned enamel and dentin in polyethylene molds. Each layer was photo-polymerized for 40 seconds. All specimens were thermocycled (×1000, 5°-55°C) and subjected to shear test (universal testing machine, 1 mm/min). Specimens that debonded during thermocycling were considered as 0 MPa. The bond strength data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test and failure types using the chi-square test (α=0.05). Overall, the bond results (MPa) were lower on dentin than on enamel (p<0.01). EPB (25.6 ± 6.6) and DPB (20.2 ± 4.9) control groups showed significantly higher results than those of

  20. Adhesion of resin composite to hydrofluoric acid-exposed enamel and dentin in repair protocols.

    PubMed

    Saracoglu, A; Ozcan, M; Kumbuloglu, O; Turkun, M

    2011-01-01

    Intraoral repairs of ceramic fixed-dental-prostheses (FDP) often include cervical recessions that require pretreatment of the exposed tooth surfaces either before or after the ceramic is conditioned with hydrofluoric (HF) acid gel. The sequence of repair protocol may cross-contaminate the exposed etched enamel or dentin surfaces during the application or rinsing process and thereby affect the adhesion. This study evaluated the influence of HF acid gel with two concentrations on bond strengths of composite to enamel and dentin. Human third molars (N=100, n=10 per group) with similar sizes were selected and randomly divided into 10 groups. Flat surfaces of enamel and dentin were created by wet ground finishing. Before or after the enamel (E) or dentin (D) was conditioned with phosphoric acid (P), substrate surfaces were conditioned with either 9.5% HF (HF(9.5)) or 5% HF (HF(5)). Subsequently, a bonding agent (B) was applied. The experimental groups by conditioning sequence were as follows where the first letter of the group abbreviation represents the substrate (E or D) followed by the acid type and concentration: group 1 (EPHF(9.5)), group 2 (EPHF(5)), group 3 (EHF(9.5)P), group 4 (EHF(5)P), group 5 (DPHF(9.5)), group 6 (DPHF(5)), group 7 (DHF(9.5)P), and group 8 (DHF(5)P). Group 9 (EPB) and group 10 (DPB) acted as the control groups. Repair resin was adhered incrementally onto the conditioned enamel and dentin in polyethylene molds. Each layer was photo-polymerized for 40 seconds. All specimens were thermocycled (×1000, 5°-55°C) and subjected to shear test (universal testing machine, 1 mm/min). Specimens that debonded during thermocycling were considered as 0 MPa. The bond strength data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test and failure types using the chi-square test (α=0.05). Overall, the bond results (MPa) were lower on dentin than on enamel (p<0.01). EPB (25.6 ± 6.6) and DPB (20.2 ± 4.9) control groups showed significantly higher results than those of

  1. Crown and post-free adhesive restorations for endodontically treated posterior teeth: from direct composite to endocrowns.

    PubMed

    Rocca, Giovanni Tommaso; Krejci, Ivo

    2013-01-01

    Coronal rehabilitation of endodontically treated posterior teeth is still a controversial issue. Although the classical crown supported by radicular metal posts remains widely spread in dentistry, its invasiveness has been largely criticized. New materials and therapeutic options based entirely on adhesion are nowadays available. They allow performing a more conservative, faster and less expensive dental treatment. All clinical cases presented in this paper are solved by using these modern techniques, from direct composite restorations to indirect endocrowns.

  2. A two-dimensional stress analysis of single lap joints subjected to external bending moments

    SciTech Connect

    Sawa, Toshiyuki; Nakano, Katsuyuki; Toratani, Hiroshi

    1995-11-01

    The stress distribution of single lap adhesive joints subjected to external bending moments are analyzed as a three-body contact problem by using a two-dimensional theory of elasticity. In the analysis, two similar adherends and an adhesive are replaced by finite strips, respectively. In the numerical calculations, the effects of the ratio of Young;s modulus of adherends to that of adhesive and the adhesive thickness on the stress distribution at the interface are examined. As the results, it is seen that the stress singularity causes at the edges of the interfaces and the peel stress at the edges of the interface increases with a decrease of Young`s modulus of the adherends. In addition, photoelastic experiments are carried out. A fairly good agreement is seen between the analytical and the experimental results.

  3. Effect of dentin dehydration and composite resin polymerization mode on bond strength of two self-etch adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Samimi, Pooran; Alizadeh, Mehdi; Shirban, Farinaz; Davoodi, Amin; Khoroushi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dual-cured composite resins are similar to self-cured composite resins in some of their clinical applications due to inadequate irradiation, lack of irradiation, or delayed irradiation. Therefore, incompatibility with self-etch adhesives (SEAs) should be taken into account with their use. On the other, the extent of dentin dehydration has a great role in the quality of adhesion of these resin materials to dentin. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of dentin dehydration and composite resin polymerization mode on bond strength of two SEAs. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 dentinal specimens were prepared from extracted intact third molars. Half of the samples were dehydrated in ethanol with increasing concentrations. Then Clearfil SE Bond (CSEB) and Prompt L-Pop (PLP) adhesives were applied in the two groups. Cylindrical composite resin specimens were cured using three polymerization modes: (1) Immediate light-curing, (2) delayed light-curing after 20 min, and (3) self-curing. Bond strength was measured using universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Duncan post hoc tests. Statistical significance was defined at P < 0.05. Results: There were no significant differences for CSEB subgroups with hydrated and dehydrated dentin samples between the three different curing modes (P > 0.05). PLP showed significant differences between subgroups with the lowest bond strength in hydrated dentin with delayed light-curing and self-cured mode of polymerization. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, a delay in composite resin light-curing or using chemically cured composite resin had a deleterious effect on dentin bond strength of single-step SEAs used in the study. PMID:27041894

  4. 49 CFR 230.30 - Lap-joint seam boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Inspection and Repair § 230.30 Lap-joint seam boilers. Every boiler having lap-joint longitudinal seams... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Lap-joint seam boilers. 230.30 Section...

  5. 49 CFR 230.30 - Lap-joint seam boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Inspection and Repair § 230.30 Lap-joint seam boilers. Every boiler having lap-joint longitudinal seams... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lap-joint seam boilers. 230.30 Section...

  6. 49 CFR 230.30 - Lap-joint seam boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Inspection and Repair § 230.30 Lap-joint seam boilers. Every boiler having lap-joint longitudinal seams... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Lap-joint seam boilers. 230.30 Section...

  7. 49 CFR 230.30 - Lap-joint seam boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Inspection and Repair § 230.30 Lap-joint seam boilers. Every boiler having lap-joint longitudinal seams... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lap-joint seam boilers. 230.30 Section...

  8. 49 CFR 230.30 - Lap-joint seam boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Inspection and Repair § 230.30 Lap-joint seam boilers. Every boiler having lap-joint longitudinal seams... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lap-joint seam boilers. 230.30 Section...

  9. Pseudomonas fluorescens adhesion and transport through porous media are affected by lipopolysaccharide composition.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, V; Fletcher, M

    1996-01-01

    The objectives of this work were (i) to use transposon mutagenesis to produce mutants of Pseudomonas fluorescens that were altered in adhesion ability and transport through porous media and (ii) to identify the alterations in surface characteristics that were responsible for the changes in attachment. Mutants of P. fluorescens were generated with TnphoA, which enabled identification of mutants that were altered in surface proteins. Transposon mutants were screened for alterations in adhesion ability by attachment assays on hydrophobic polystyrene and water-wettable polystyrene. Four TnphoA mutants with increased adhesion to the hydrophobic surface and decreased adhesion to the water-wettable surface were obtained. Transport of the strains through porous media was evaluated by passing suspensions of each mutant and the parent through columns containing quartz sand and determining the number of cells retained in the columns. The mutants all demonstrated increased adhesion and retention in the columns. Southern analysis demonstrated two types of mutants with separate transposon insertion sites. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the strains demonstrated that the O antigen on the lipopolysaccharide was either attenuated or absent. Lack of this polysaccharide, and the consequent increased exposure of the lipid moiety of the lipopolysaccharide, is probably responsible for the increase in adhesion to the hydrophobic substrata and retention in the sand column. This work combined with previous studies of attachment of P. fluorescens demonstrates that more than one type of polymer can mediate the adhesion of this organism to nonbiological surfaces. PMID:8572686

  10. Macroscale adhesion of gecko setae reflects nanoscale differences in subsurface composition.

    PubMed

    Loskill, Peter; Puthoff, Jonathan; Wilkinson, Matt; Mecke, Klaus; Jacobs, Karin; Autumn, Kellar

    2013-01-01

    Surface energies are commonly used to determine the adhesion forces between materials. However, the component of surface energy derived from long-range forces, such as van der Waals forces, depends on the material's structure below the outermost atomic layers. Previous theoretical results and indirect experimental evidence suggest that the van der Waals energies of subsurface layers will influence interfacial adhesion forces. We discovered that nanometre-scale differences in the oxide layer thickness of silicon wafers result in significant macroscale differences in the adhesion of isolated gecko setal arrays. Si/SiO(2) bilayer materials exhibited stronger adhesion when the SiO(2) layer is thin (approx. 2 nm). To further explore how layered materials influence adhesion, we functionalized similar substrates with an octadecyltrichlorosilane monolayer and again identified a significant influence of the SiO(2) layer thickness on adhesion. Our theoretical calculations describe how variation in the SiO(2) layer thickness produces differences in the van der Waals interaction potential, and these differences are reflected in the adhesion mechanics. Setal arrays used as tribological probes provide the first empirical evidence that the 'subsurface energy' of inhomogeneous materials influences the macroscopic surface forces.

  11. A fundamental approach to adhesion: Synthesis, surface analysis, thermodynamics and mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwight, D. W.; Wightman, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    The ability of SEM/EDAX to determine the physical and chemical composition of very small areas was used to study several diverse types of samples representative of NASA-LaRC technology. More systematic investigation was carried out on differences in the results of grit-blasting Ti 6-4 adherends and the presence of extraneous elements, primarily silicon, in some polymer/HT-S fiber composites. Initial results were obtained from a fractured (ILS) short-beam shear specimen, and from Ti 6-4 alloy, before and after a proprietary Boeing anodizing surface preparation for adhesive bonding. Photomicrographs and EDAX spectra were also obtained from new, fractured lap shear strength specimens that employed PPQ and LARC-13 adhesives.

  12. Select aspects of FEM analysis for bonded joints of polymer composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudawska, A.

    2015-07-01

    The paper presents selected aspects of modelling bonded joints of polymer composite materials by finite element method. The shear-loaded adhesive lap joints made of epoxy-graphite and epoxy-glass composite materials were investigated. The research objective was to determine correct modelling of adhesive layers using cohesive elements and of bonded joints for selected epoxy composite materials with different mechanical properties (e.g. Young's modulus) and geometrical dimensions, using, however, the same type of adhesive. The numerical analysis was performed based on experimental tests. A comparison is made between the distribution of reduced stress in the examined joint models according to the H-M- H hypothesis and that determined according to the maximum principal stress hypothesis. The finite elements analysis was performed in ABAQUS software and the traction-separation failure criterion was used for the damage onset and growth in the adhesive layer.

  13. The development of autoclave processable, thermally stable adhesives for titanium alloy and graphite composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, R. W.; Jones, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    The A-type polyimide adhesive resin P11B was modified by use of mixed diamines (thio-dianiline and meta phenylene diamine) which provided the desired autoclave processability. This new resin was termed P11BA. It was shown that copolymeric blends of P11BA and Amoco AI-1137 amide-imide resin provided improved adhesive properties when autoclave processed over the properties obtained previously by press bonding with P11B based copolymeric blended adhesives. Properties of bonded assemblies are presented for long-term aging at both elevated and low temperatures, and also stress-rupture tests at elevated temperature.

  14. Shear Bond Strength of Calcium Enriched Mixture Cement and Mineral Trioxide Aggregate to Composite Resin with Two Different Adhesive Systems

    PubMed Central

    Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Bahari, Mahmoud; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Motahhari, Paria; Eghbal, Mohammad Jafar; Asgary, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Immediate restoration after vital pulp therapy is essential in order to create and maintain effective coronal seal. Purpose of Study: The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of recently used pulp capping materials: white mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), and calcium enriched mixture cement (CEM) to composite resin with the use of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive systems and compare them with the bond strength of commonly used resin modified glass ionomer (RMGI) cement. Materials and Methods: Forty specimens from each test material were fabricated, measuring 4 mm in diameter and 2 mm in depth. The specimens of each material were divided into 2 groups of 20 specimens according to the adhesive system (Single Bond vs. Clearfil SE Bond) used for bonding of resin composite. The shear bond strength values were measured at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min and fractured surfaces were examined. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and a post hoc Tukey’s test (P<0.05). Results: Analysis of data showed a significantly higher bond strength for RMGI compared to MTA and CEM (P<0.001); however, no significant differences were observed in the bond strength values of MTA and CEM (P=0.9). Furthermore, there were no significant differences in relation to the type of the adhesive system irrespective of the type of the material used (P=0.95) All the failures were of cohesive type in RMGI, MTA and CEM. Conclusion: Bond strength of RMGI cement to composite resin was higher than that of MTA or CEM cement irrespective of the type of the adhesive system. PMID:25628696

  15. Thermal shock testing of lapped optical glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yingrui; Wu, Yuansun; Liu, Han; Lambropoulos, John C.

    2007-09-01

    We have measured and modeled the thermal shock fracture of the commercially available BK-7 borosilicate crown optical glass as a function of surface finish prior to thermal shock testing. For surfaces lapped with alumina abrasives in the range 5 μm to 40 μm, the critical temperature drop for fracture in thin disk samples increases with diminishing abrasive size, and changes from 123.7+/-1.1 °C (for surfaces lapped with 40 μm abrasives) to 140.2+/-2.8 °C (for surfaces lapped with 5 μm abrasives.) We correlate the measured thermal shock (critical) temperature drop with the glass thermal and mechanical properties, including the fracture toughness, and the depth of surface cracks induced by the lapping process. We distinguish between "severe" and "mild" thermal shock conditions in terms of the applicable heat transfer coefficient and Biot number. We estimate that the depth of the strength controlling cracks on the edge of the disk samples was about 55-70 μm.

  16. Fatigue strength of a single lap joint SPR-bonded

    SciTech Connect

    Di Franco, G.; Fratini, L.; Pasta, A.

    2011-05-04

    In the last years, hybrid joints, meaning with this the joints which consist in combining a traditional mechanical joint to a layer of adhesive, are gradually attracting the attention of various sectors of the construction of vehicles and transportation industries, for their better performance compared to just mechanical joints (self-piercing riveting SPR, riveting, and so on) or just to bonded joints.The paper investigates the fatigue behavior of a single lap joint self-piercing riveted (SPR) and bonded throughout fatigue tests. The considered geometric configuration allowed the use of two rivets placed longitudinally; an epoxy resin was used as adhesive. In the first part of the work static characterization of the joints was carried out through tensile tests. Then fatigue tests were made with the application of different levels of load. The fatigue curves were also obtained at the varying the distance between the two rivets in order to better assess the joint strength for a given length of overlap.

  17. Composites for Advanced Space Transportation Systems - (CASTS). [graphite fiber/polyimide matrix composites and polyimide adhesives for the space shuttle orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. G., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The CASTS Project initiated to develop graphite fiber/polyimide matrix (GR/PI) composite structures with 589K operational capability for aerospace vehicles is described. Near term tasks include screening composites and adhesives for 589K service, developing fabrication procedures and specifications, developing design allowables test methods and data, design and test of structural elements, and construction of a full scale aft body flap for the space shuttle orbiter vehicle for ground testing. Far term tasks include research efforts directed at new materials, manufacturing procedures and design/analysis methodology. Specific results discussed include: (1) identification of four GR/PI composites and three PI adhesives with 589K service potential for periods ranging from 125 to 500 hours; (2) development of an adhesive formulation suitable for bonding reusable surface insulation (RSI) titles to 589K (GR/PI) substructure; (3) the capability to fabricate and nondestructively inspect laminates, hat section shaped stiffeners, honeycomb sandwich panels, and chopped fiber moldings; and (4) test methods for measuring design allowables at 117K.

  18. Effect of hydrofluoric acid etching on shear bond strength of an indirect resin composite to an adhesive cement.

    PubMed

    Hori, Sayaka; Minami, Hiroyuki; Minesaki, Yoshito; Matsumura, Hideo; Tanaka, Takuo

    2008-07-01

    This study evaluated the effect of 1% hydrofluoric acid (HF) treatment on the bonding of an adhesive cement (Panavia F 2.0) to an indirect resin composite (Estenia C&B). Pairs of composite disks (10 and 8 mm in diameter by 3 mm thickness) were prepared. Adhesive surfaces were pretreated with either airborne particle abrasion or HF etching before being soaked for 30 seconds, five minutes or 10 minutes, with or without application of silane coupling agent. Adhesive specimens were fabricated by cementing a pair of treated disks. Shear bond strength was determined before and after 50,000 times of thermocycling (4 and 60 degrees C). All data were statistically analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Bonferroni's test (a=0.05). Bond strength achieved with five minutes of HF etching (18.3+/-1.1 MPa) was significantly higher (P=0.0025) than that obtained with airborne particle abrasion followed by application of silane coupling agent (14.3+/-1.8 MPa) after thermocycling.

  19. Flexible fiber-reinforced composites with improved interfacial adhesion by mussel-inspired polydopamine and poly(methyl methacrylate) coating.

    PubMed

    Yi, Mi; Sun, Hongyang; Zhang, Hongcheng; Deng, Xuliang; Cai, Qing; Yang, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    To obtain a kind of light-curable fiber-reinforced composite for dental restoration, an excellent interfacial adhesion between the fiber and the acrylate resin matrix is quite essential. Herein, surface modification on glass fibers were carried out by coating them with poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), polydopamine (PDA), or both. The PMMA or PDA coating was performed by soaking fibers in PMMA/acetone solution or dopamine aqueous solution. PDA/PMMA co-coated glass fibers were obtained by further soaking PDA-coated fibers in PMMA/acetone solution. These modified fibers were impregnated with bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (Bis-GMA)/triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) (5:5, w/w) dental resin at a volume fraction of 75%, using unmodified fibers as reference. Light-cured specimens were submitted to evaluations including flexural properties, morphological observation, dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) and pull-out test. In comparison with unmodified glass fibers, all the modified glass fibers showed enhancements in flexural strength and modulus of Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin composites. Results of DMTA and pull-out tests confirmed that surface modification had significantly improved the interfacial adhesion between the glass fiber and the resin matrix. Particularly, the PDA/PMMA co-coated glass fibers displayed the most efficient reinforcement and the strongest interfacial adhesion due to the synergetic effects of PDA and PMMA. It indicated that co-coating method was a promising approach in modifying the interfacial compatibility between inorganic glass fiber and organic resin matrix.

  20. Micro-tensile bond strength of different adhesive systems on sound dentin and resin-based composite: An in-vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Mallick, Rashmirekha; Sarangi, Priyanka; Mohanty, Sandhyarani; Behera, Subasish; Nanda, Soumyaranjan; Satapathy, Sukanta Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To analyze the difference in the micro-tensile bond strength of specimens made with two different adhesive systems and compare them with two homogenous substrates. Materials and Methods: Sixty permanent mandibular molars were mounted in acrylic blocks and sectioned with exposed dentin surfaces. Samples were then divided into four groups. To Group-I Adper Single Bond 2 and to Group-II Adper Self-Etch plus bonding agents were applied. For Group-I and Group-II beams consisted of resin composite in the upper half and dentin in the lower half. In Group-III beams were made of only dentin. In Group-IV beams were made of only composite. Fifteen specimens of each group were taken for the micro-tensile bond strength test. Statistical Analysis: The results are analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Critical Difference test. Results: The interface bonded with the two adhesive systems had lower micro-tensile bond strength than those of dentin and resin composite and the self-etching adhesive Adper Self-Etch plus had comparable bond strength with total-etch adhesive Adper Single Bond 2. Conclusion: The bond strength values for current adhesive systems cannot be compared to the micro-tensile bond strength of dentin and resin composite, and self-etching adhesives have comparable bond strength with total-etch adhesives. PMID:26430301

  1. Effect of different adhesives combined with two resin composite cements on shear bond strength to polymeric CAD/CAM materials.

    PubMed

    Bähr, Nora; Keul, Christine; Edelhoff, Daniel; Eichberger, Marlis; Roos, Malgorzata; Gernet, Wolfgang; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    2013-01-01

    This study tested the impact of different adhesives and resin composite cements on shear bond strength (SBS) to polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)- and composite-based CAD/CAM materials. SBS specimens were fabricated and divided into five main groups (n=30/group) subject to conditioning: 1. Monobond Plus/Heliobond (MH), 2. Visio.link (VL), 3. Ambarino P60 (AM), 4. exp. VP connect (VP), and 5. no conditioning-control group (CG). All cemented specimens using a. Clearfil SA Cement and b. Variolink II were stored in distilled water for 24 h at 37 °C. Additionally, one half of the specimens were thermocycled for 5,000 cycles (5 °C/55 °C, dwell time 20 s). SBS was measured; data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, four- and one-way ANOVA, unpaired two-sample t-test and Chi(2)-test. CAD/CAM materials without additional adhesives showed no bond to resin composite cements. Highest SBS showed VL with Variolink II on composite-based material, before and after thermocycling.

  2. Laser ablation of enamel and composite using 355-nm laser pulses: influence of fluoride and laser treatment on adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Michael D.; Gardner, Andrew K.; Staninec, Michal; Fried, Daniel

    2006-02-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that Q-switched 355-nm laser pulses can be used to remove composite sealants and restorations from tooth surfaces without significant damage to sound tooth surfaces and have also shown that 355-nm lasers pulses can also be used to selectively etch the interprismatic protein of enamel to increase the effectiveness of topical fluoride for inhibiting decay and increase the bond strength to restorative materials without acid-etching. The first aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that topical fluoride can be applied after laser irradiation before composite resin placement without significantly reducing the bond-strength. The second aim was to test the hypothesis that thermal damage to existing composite due to laser irradiation does not compromise the adhesion of newly applied composite. There was a slight but significant reduction in the magnitude of the shear-bond strength of laser-treated surfaces with and without fluoride application. There was no significant difference in the magnitude of the bond strength between laser irradiated and non-laser irradiated aged composite to newly applied composite. These results suggest that after composite removal with 355-nm laser pulses fluoride can be subsequently applied to inhibit secondary caries before placement of composite restorative materials and that 355-nm laser pulses can be used for the repair of existing restorations.

  3. Use of high and low frequency dielectric measurements in the NDE of adhesively bonded composite joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pethrick, R. A.; Hayward, D.; McConnell, B. K.; Crane, R. L.

    2005-05-01

    Dielectric spectroscopy has been developed as a non-destructive technique for assessment of moisture content and structural integrity of adhesively bonded joints. Knowledge of these parameters is particularly crucial for the aerospace industry, since environmental degradation of adhesive joints presents a major limit on their utilization. High and low frequency measurements have been carried out on joints assembled from CFRP adherend, and a commercially available adhesive (AF 163-2K). The samples have been aged in deionised water at 75oC to chart the effect water ingress has on bond durability. In addition, some joints have been exposed to cryogenic temperatures to mimic the conditions joints experience whilst an aircraft is in flight. In this way it has been possible to determine the extent of degradation caused by freezing of water within the joint structure. Dielectric behaviour of the joints was studied in both the frequency and in the time domain. Frequency domain analysis allows the amount and effects of moisture ingress in the bondline to be assessed, whereas the time domain highlights the onset of joint defects with increasing exposure time. Mechanical testing of the joints has been carried out to enable correlation between changes in strength and failure mechanism due to moisture ingress, with changes in the dielectric data. In addition, dielectric studies of the neat adhesive have been undertaken, as have gravimetric and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis. These have helped reveal the effects of ageing upon the adhesive layer itself.

  4. Rapid adhesive bonding and field repair of aerospace materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, B. A.

    1985-01-01

    Adhesive bonding in the aerospace industry typically utilizes autoclaves or presses which have considerable thermal mass. As a consequence, the rates of heatup and cooldown of the bonded parts are limited and the total time and cost of the bonding process are often relatively high. Many of the adhesives themselves do not inherently require long processing times. Bonding could be performed rapidly if the heat was concentrated in the bond lines or at least in the adherends. Rapid Adhesive Bonding concepts are developed to utilize induction heating techniques to provide heat directly to the bond line and/or adherends without heating the entire structure, supports, and fixtures of a bonding assembly. Bonding times for specimens can be cut by a factor of 10 to 100 compared to standard press or autoclave bonding. The development of Rapid Adhesive Bonding for lap shear specimens (per ASTM D1002 and D3163), for aerospace panel or component bonding, and for field repair needs of metallic and advanced fiber reinforced polymeric-matrix composite structures is reviewed. Equipment and procedures are described for bonding and repairing thin sheets, simple geometries, and honeycomb core panels.

  5. Pseudomonas putida Fis Binds to the lapF Promoter In Vitro and Represses the Expression of LapF

    PubMed Central

    Lahesaare, Andrio; Moor, Hanna; Kivisaar, Maia; Teras, Riho

    2014-01-01

    The biofilm matrix of the rhizospheric bacterium Pseudomonas putida consists mainly of a proteinaceous component. The two largest P. putida proteins, adhesins LapA and LapF, are involved in biofilm development but prevail in different developmental stages of the biofilm matrix. LapA is abundant in the initial stage of biofilm formation whereas LapF is found in the mature biofilm. Although the transcriptional regulation of the adhesins is not exhaustively studied, some factors that can be involved in their regulation have been described. For example, RpoS, the major stress response sigma factor, activates, and Fis represses LapF expression. This study focused on the LapF expression control by Fis. Indeed, using DNase I footprint analysis a Fis binding site Fis-F2 was located 150 bp upstream of the lapF gene coding sequence. The mapped 5′ end of the lapF mRNA localized the promoter to the same region, overlapping with the Fis binding site Fis-F2. Monitoring the lapF promoter activity by a β-galactosidase assay revealed that Fis overexpression causes a 4-fold decrease in the transcriptional activity. Furthermore, mutations that diminished Fis binding to the Fis-F2 site abolished the repression of the lapF promoter. Thus, these data suggest that Fis is involved in the biofilm regulation via repression of LapF expression. PMID:25545773

  6. Adhesive analysis of voids in class II composite resin restorations at the axial and gingival cavity walls restored under in vivo versus in vitro conditions

    PubMed Central

    Purk, John H.; Dusevich, Vladimir; Glaros, Alan; Eick, J. David

    2007-01-01

    Objectives Adhesive analysis, under the scanning electron microscope of microtensile specimens that failed through the adhesive interface, was conducted to evaluate the amount of voids present at the axial versus gingival cavity walls of class II composite restorations restored under in vivo and in vitro conditions. Methods Five patients received class II resin composite restorations, under in vivo and in vitro conditions. A total of 14 premolar teeth yielded 59 (n = 59) microtensile adhesive specimens that fractured through the adhesive interface. The fractured surfaces of all specimens were examined and the % area of voids was measured. Results Voids at the adhesive joint were highly predictive of bond strengths. An increase in the number of voids resulted in a decrease in the microtensile bond strength. The area of voids at the adhesive interface was as follows: in vivo axial 13.6 ± 25.6% (n = 12); in vivo gingival 48.8 ± 29.2% (n = 12); in vitro axial 0.0 ± 0.0% (n = 19) and in vitro gingival 11.7 ± 17.6% (n = 16). Significance Composite resin may bond differently to dentin depending upon the amount of voids and the cavity wall involved. The bond to the gingival wall was not as reliable as the bond to the axial wall. An increase in the amount of surface voids was a major factor for reducing microtensile bond strengths of adhesive to dentin. PMID:16950506

  7. Adhesive plasters

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.; Swain, Ronald L.; Banker, John G.; Edwards, Charlene C.

    1978-01-01

    Adhesive plaster compositions are provided by treating particles of Y.sub.2 O.sub.3, Eu.sub.2 O.sub.3, Gd.sub.2 O.sub.3 or Nd.sub.2 O.sub.3 with dilute acid solutions. The resulting compositions have been found to spontaneously harden into rigid reticulated masses resembling plaster of Paris. Upon heating, the hardened material is decomposed into the oxide, yet retains the reticulated rigid structure.

  8. Resistance heating releases structural adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glemser, N. N.

    1967-01-01

    Composite adhesive package bonds components together for testing and enables separation when testing is completed. The composite of adhesives, insulation and a heating element separate easily when an electrical current is applied.

  9. Effect of light-curing unit and adhesive system on marginal adaptation of class v composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Maia-Casseli, Denise S; Faria-e-Silva, André L; Cavalcanti, Andréa N; Romani, Eliene A O N; Martins, Luis R M

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of light-curing units (LED or halogen) on the marginal adaptation of composite restorations performed with etch-and-rinse and self-etching adhesive. Class V cavities were prepared on bovine teeth with the gingival margin on dentin and the incisal margin on enamel. The cavities were restored with a micro-hybrid resin composite using an etch-and-rinse (Single Bond 2--SB) or a self-etching adhesive (Clearfil SE Bond--CL). The light-activations were performed using halogen lamp (Optilux 501--QTH) or second-generation light-emitting diode (Radii-Cal--LED) (n = 10). After finishing and polishing the restorations, epoxy replicas were prepared. The marginal adaptation was analyzed under scanning electronic microscopy with 500x of magnification. The greatest gap width at each margin was recorded. Data were submitted to Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon tests (a = 0.05). SB and CL showed similar behavior of enamel margins when the light-activations were performed with QTH. The same was observed for dentin margins with LED. When the LED was used, higher gap measurements at enamel margins were observed with CL, while higher gap values in dentin were observed for SB within QTH. No significant difference between substrates was found when CL was used. However, SB had significantly higher gap measurements in dentin. The light-curing unit seems to affect the marginal adaptation of resin composite restorations. However this effect was dependent on the adhesive and the location of the margin. PMID:22928384

  10. Large-scale Advanced Propfan (LAP) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagerser, D. A.; Ludemann, S. G.

    1985-01-01

    The propfan is an advanced propeller concept which maintains the high efficiencies traditionally associated with conventional propellers at the higher aircraft cruise speeds associated with jet transports. The large-scale advanced propfan (LAP) program extends the research done on 2 ft diameter propfan models to a 9 ft diameter article. The program includes design, fabrication, and testing of both an eight bladed, 9 ft diameter propfan, designated SR-7L, and a 2 ft diameter aeroelastically scaled model, SR-7A. The LAP program is complemented by the propfan test assessment (PTA) program, which takes the large-scale propfan and mates it with a gas generator and gearbox to form a propfan propulsion system and then flight tests this system on the wing of a Gulfstream 2 testbed aircraft.

  11. Analysis of lap times in international swimming competitions.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Eileen; Pyne, David; Hopkins, Will; Anson, Judith

    2009-02-15

    Swimming performances were analysed for the top 16 finishers (semi-finalists, finalists) in nine international competitions over a 7-year period (1530 males, 1527 female). Total race time and intermediate lap times were log-transformed and analysed for effects of sex (male, female), stroke (freestyle, form strokes, individual medley), event (100, 200, and 400 m), and place (1-16). Between-athlete correlations characterized the relationship of each lap to final time, and within-athlete estimates quantified the effect of lap time on improvements in final time. Finalists exhibited very large correlations (r = 0.7-0.9) with final time in the second 50-m lap of 100-m events and the middle two 50-m and 100-m laps of 200-m and 400-m events respectively. For an individual swimmer, an achievable change in lap time was associated with an approximate 0.4-0.8% improvement in final time for finalists and an approximate 0.5-1.1% improvement in final time for semi-finalists, depending on sex, stroke, and event. The pattern of lap times was similar for the top 16 swimmers and between the best and worst swims for finalists. These findings indicate that substantial improvements can be made via the final lap in sprints and the middle two laps of 200- to 400-m events, but the overall pattern of lap times should not be changed. PMID:19214862

  12. Spider's super-glue: thread anchors are composite adhesives with synergistic hierarchical organization.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Jonas O; Grawe, Ingo; Wirth, Marina; Karstedt, André; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2015-03-28

    Silk is a key innovation in spiders, fascinating both biologists and material scientists. However, to fulfil their biological function silken threads must be strongly fastened to substrates or other threads. The majority of modern spiders produce a unique and rather unexplored bio-adhesive: the two-compound pyriform secretion, which is spun into elaborate patterns (so called attachment discs) and used to anchor silken threads to substrates. Strong adhesion is achieved on a high variety of surfaces with a minimum of material consumption. Pyriform threads polymerize under ambient conditions, become functional within less than a second and can remain stable for years. They are biodegradable, biocompatible and highly versatile - the adhesion and the overall toughness of the attachment disc can be controlled by spinneret movements on a macroscopic level (ref. 1: V. Sahni et al., Nat. Commun., 2012, 3, 1106, DOI: 10.1038/ncomms2099). We found that the pyriform thread is a silk fibre that is coated with glue-like cement consisting of aligned nanofibrils, lipid enclosures and a dense, isotropic boundary layer. The threads are spun in a meshwork pattern that promotes stress distribution and crack arresting. Our results demonstrate, that hierarchical organization and fibre embedding may explain the high adhesive strength and flaw tolerance of a structure made by the same, rather simple type of silk glands.

  13. Effect of different adhesive strategies on the post-operative sensitivity of class I composite restorations

    PubMed Central

    Sancakli, Hande Sar; Yildiz, Esra; Bayrak, Isil; Ozel, Sevda

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the post-operative sensitivity of occlusal restorations using different dentin adhesives performed by an undergraduate and a post-doctorate dentist. Materials and Methods: One hundred and eighty-eight molar occlusal restorations were placed in 39 patients (ages between 18 and 30) using 3 different kind of adhesive systems; Optibond FL (OBF), Clearfil Protect Bond (CPB), and iBond (IB) by a post-doctorate dentist or a fifth-year dental student according to the manufacturers’ instructions. Post-operative sensitivity to cold and air was evaluated using a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) after 24 hours, 30, 90, and 180 days. Data were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U and Friedman tests (P < 0.05). Results: Post-operative sensitivity scores for OBF and CPB were higher for the dental student (P < 0.05), while IB scores did not differ statistical significantly according to the operator (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Operator skill and experience appears to play a role in determining the outcome of post-operative sensitivity of multi-step adhesive systems although the post-operative sensitivity was low. It is suggested that the less experienced clinicians (rather than experienced clinicians) should better use the self-etching dentin bonding systems with reduced application steps to minimize the potential risk of post-operative sensitivity of dental adhesives. PMID:24966741

  14. Homologs of the LapD-LapG c-di-GMP Effector System Control Biofilm Formation by Bordetella bronchiseptica.

    PubMed

    Ambrosis, Nicolás; Boyd, Chelsea D; O Toole, George A; Fernández, Julieta; Sisti, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm formation is important for infection by many pathogens. Bordetella bronchiseptica causes respiratory tract infections in mammals and forms biofilm structures in nasal epithelium of infected mice. We previously demonstrated that cyclic di-GMP is involved in biofilm formation in B. bronchiseptica. In the present work, based on their previously reported function in Pseudomonas fluorescens, we identified three genes in the B. bronchiseptica genome likely involved in c-di-GMP-dependent biofilm formation: brtA, lapD and lapG. Genetic analysis confirmed a role for BrtA, LapD and LapG in biofilm formation using microtiter plate assays, as well as scanning electron and fluorescent microscopy to analyze the phenotypes of mutants lacking these proteins. In vitro and in vivo studies showed that the protease LapG of B. bronchiseptica cleaves the N-terminal domain of BrtA, as well as the LapA protein of P. fluorescens, indicating functional conservation between these species. Furthermore, while BrtA and LapG appear to have little or no impact on colonization in a mouse model of infection, a B. bronchiseptica strain lacking the LapG protease has a significantly higher rate of inducing a severe disease outcome compared to the wild type. These findings support a role for c-di-GMP acting through BrtA/LapD/LapG to modulate biofilm formation, as well as impact pathogenesis, by B. bronchiseptica. PMID:27380521

  15. Homologs of the LapD-LapG c-di-GMP Effector System Control Biofilm Formation by Bordetella bronchiseptica

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosis, Nicolás; Boyd, Chelsea D.; O´Toole, George A.; Fernández, Julieta; Sisti, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm formation is important for infection by many pathogens. Bordetella bronchiseptica causes respiratory tract infections in mammals and forms biofilm structures in nasal epithelium of infected mice. We previously demonstrated that cyclic di-GMP is involved in biofilm formation in B. bronchiseptica. In the present work, based on their previously reported function in Pseudomonas fluorescens, we identified three genes in the B. bronchiseptica genome likely involved in c-di-GMP-dependent biofilm formation: brtA, lapD and lapG. Genetic analysis confirmed a role for BrtA, LapD and LapG in biofilm formation using microtiter plate assays, as well as scanning electron and fluorescent microscopy to analyze the phenotypes of mutants lacking these proteins. In vitro and in vivo studies showed that the protease LapG of B. bronchiseptica cleaves the N-terminal domain of BrtA, as well as the LapA protein of P. fluorescens, indicating functional conservation between these species. Furthermore, while BrtA and LapG appear to have little or no impact on colonization in a mouse model of infection, a B. bronchiseptica strain lacking the LapG protease has a significantly higher rate of inducing a severe disease outcome compared to the wild type. These findings support a role for c-di-GMP acting through BrtA/LapD/LapG to modulate biofilm formation, as well as impact pathogenesis, by B. bronchiseptica PMID:27380521

  16. Homologs of the LapD-LapG c-di-GMP Effector System Control Biofilm Formation by Bordetella bronchiseptica.

    PubMed

    Ambrosis, Nicolás; Boyd, Chelsea D; O Toole, George A; Fernández, Julieta; Sisti, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm formation is important for infection by many pathogens. Bordetella bronchiseptica causes respiratory tract infections in mammals and forms biofilm structures in nasal epithelium of infected mice. We previously demonstrated that cyclic di-GMP is involved in biofilm formation in B. bronchiseptica. In the present work, based on their previously reported function in Pseudomonas fluorescens, we identified three genes in the B. bronchiseptica genome likely involved in c-di-GMP-dependent biofilm formation: brtA, lapD and lapG. Genetic analysis confirmed a role for BrtA, LapD and LapG in biofilm formation using microtiter plate assays, as well as scanning electron and fluorescent microscopy to analyze the phenotypes of mutants lacking these proteins. In vitro and in vivo studies showed that the protease LapG of B. bronchiseptica cleaves the N-terminal domain of BrtA, as well as the LapA protein of P. fluorescens, indicating functional conservation between these species. Furthermore, while BrtA and LapG appear to have little or no impact on colonization in a mouse model of infection, a B. bronchiseptica strain lacking the LapG protease has a significantly higher rate of inducing a severe disease outcome compared to the wild type. These findings support a role for c-di-GMP acting through BrtA/LapD/LapG to modulate biofilm formation, as well as impact pathogenesis, by B. bronchiseptica.

  17. The peel test in experimental adhesive fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, G. P.; Devries, K. L.; Williams, M. L.

    1974-01-01

    Several testing methods have been proposed for obtaining critical energy release rate or adhesive fracture energy in bond systems. These tests include blister, cone, lap shear, and peel tests. Peel tests have been used for many years to compare relative strengths of different adhesives, different surface preparation techniques, etc. The present work demonstrates the potential use of the peel test for obtaining adhesive fracture energy values.

  18. Systematic Construction of Real Lapped Tight Frame Transforms

    PubMed Central

    Sandryhaila, Aliaksei; Chebira, Amina; Milo, Christina; Kovčcević, Jelena; Püschel, Markus

    2010-01-01

    We present a constructive algorithm for the design of real lapped equal-norm tight frame transforms. These transforms can be efficiently implemented through filter banks and have recently been proposed as a redundant counterpart to lapped orthogonal transforms, as well as an infinite-dimensional counterpart to harmonic tight frames. The proposed construction consists of two parts: First, we design a large class of new real lapped orthogonal transforms derived from submatrices of the discrete Fourier transform. Then, we seed these to obtain real lapped tight frame transforms corresponding to tight, equal-norm frames. We identify those frames that are maximally robust to erasures, and show that our construction leads to a large class of new lapped orthogonal transforms as well as new lapped tight frame transforms. PMID:20607116

  19. Dogs lap using acceleration-driven open pumping

    PubMed Central

    Gart, Sean; Socha, John J.; Vlachos, Pavlos P.; Jung, Sunghwan

    2015-01-01

    Dogs lap because they have incomplete cheeks and cannot suck. When lapping, a dog’s tongue pulls a liquid column from the bath, suggesting that the hydrodynamics of column formation are critical to understanding how dogs drink. We measured lapping in 19 dogs and used the results to generate a physical model of the tongue’s interaction with the air–fluid interface. These experiments help to explain how dogs exploit the fluid dynamics of the generated column. The results demonstrate that effects of acceleration govern lapping frequency, which suggests that dogs curl the tongue to create a larger liquid column. Comparing lapping in dogs and cats reveals that, despite similar morphology, these carnivores lap in different physical regimes: an unsteady inertial regime for dogs and steady inertial regime for cats. PMID:26668382

  20. Dogs lap using acceleration-driven open pumping.

    PubMed

    Gart, Sean; Socha, John J; Vlachos, Pavlos P; Jung, Sunghwan

    2015-12-29

    Dogs lap because they have incomplete cheeks and cannot suck. When lapping, a dog's tongue pulls a liquid column from the bath, suggesting that the hydrodynamics of column formation are critical to understanding how dogs drink. We measured lapping in 19 dogs and used the results to generate a physical model of the tongue's interaction with the air-fluid interface. These experiments help to explain how dogs exploit the fluid dynamics of the generated column. The results demonstrate that effects of acceleration govern lapping frequency, which suggests that dogs curl the tongue to create a larger liquid column. Comparing lapping in dogs and cats reveals that, despite similar morphology, these carnivores lap in different physical regimes: an unsteady inertial regime for dogs and steady inertial regime for cats.

  1. Flexible fiber-reinforced composites with improved interfacial adhesion by mussel-inspired polydopamine and poly(methyl methacrylate) coating.

    PubMed

    Yi, Mi; Sun, Hongyang; Zhang, Hongcheng; Deng, Xuliang; Cai, Qing; Yang, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    To obtain a kind of light-curable fiber-reinforced composite for dental restoration, an excellent interfacial adhesion between the fiber and the acrylate resin matrix is quite essential. Herein, surface modification on glass fibers were carried out by coating them with poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), polydopamine (PDA), or both. The PMMA or PDA coating was performed by soaking fibers in PMMA/acetone solution or dopamine aqueous solution. PDA/PMMA co-coated glass fibers were obtained by further soaking PDA-coated fibers in PMMA/acetone solution. These modified fibers were impregnated with bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (Bis-GMA)/triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) (5:5, w/w) dental resin at a volume fraction of 75%, using unmodified fibers as reference. Light-cured specimens were submitted to evaluations including flexural properties, morphological observation, dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) and pull-out test. In comparison with unmodified glass fibers, all the modified glass fibers showed enhancements in flexural strength and modulus of Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin composites. Results of DMTA and pull-out tests confirmed that surface modification had significantly improved the interfacial adhesion between the glass fiber and the resin matrix. Particularly, the PDA/PMMA co-coated glass fibers displayed the most efficient reinforcement and the strongest interfacial adhesion due to the synergetic effects of PDA and PMMA. It indicated that co-coating method was a promising approach in modifying the interfacial compatibility between inorganic glass fiber and organic resin matrix. PMID:26478367

  2. Recombinant Probiotic Expressing Listeria Adhesion Protein Attenuates Listeria monocytogenes Virulence In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Ok Kyung; Amalaradjou, Mary Anne Roshni; Bhunia, Arun K.

    2012-01-01

    Background Listeria monocytogenes, an intracellular foodborne pathogen, infects immunocompromised hosts. The primary route of transmission is through contaminated food. In the gastrointestinal tract, it traverses the epithelial barrier through intracellular or paracellular routes. Strategies to prevent L. monocytogenes entry can potentially minimize infection in high-risk populations. Listeria adhesion protein (LAP) aids L. monocytogenes in crossing epithelial barriers via the paracellular route. The use of recombinant probiotic bacteria expressing LAP would aid targeted clearance of Listeria from the gut and protect high-risk populations from infection. Methodology/Principal Findings The objective was to investigate the ability of probiotic bacteria or LAP-expressing recombinant probiotic Lactobacillus paracasei (LbpLAP) to prevent L. monocytogenes adhesion, invasion, and transwell-based transepithelial translocation in a Caco-2 cell culture model. Several wild type probiotic bacteria showed strong adhesion to Caco-2 cells but none effectively prevented L. monocytogenes infection. Pre-exposure to LbpLAP for 1, 4, 15, or 24 h significantly (P<0.05) reduced adhesion, invasion, and transepithelial translocation of L. monocytogenes in Caco-2 cells, whereas pre-exposure to parental Lb. paracasei had no significant effect. Similarly, LbpLAP pre-exposure reduced L. monocytogenes translocation by as much as 46% after 24 h. LbpLAP also prevented L. monocytogenes-mediated cell damage and compromise of tight junction integrity. Furthermore, LbpLAP cells reduced L. monocytogenes-mediated cell cytotoxicity by 99.8% after 1 h and 79% after 24 h. Conclusions/Significance Wild type probiotic bacteria were unable to prevent L. monocytogenes infection in vitro. In contrast, LbpLAP blocked adhesion, invasion, and translocation of L. monocytogenes by interacting with host cell receptor Hsp60, thereby protecting cells from infection. These data show promise for the use of recombinant

  3. Influence of Binder Adhesion Ability on the Performance of Silicon/Carbon Composite as Li-Ion Battery Anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kierzek, Krzysztof

    2016-06-01

    A series of anodes for Li-ion battery was prepared by conventional homogenization of active material, percolator, and Na-CMC or several kinds of PVDF as a binder. Si/C composite was synthesized by embedding micro-sized silicon and synthetic battery-grade graphite in a pitch-derived carbon matrix and taken as active material. Adhesion strength of anodic film to a current collector was determined by peeling test. Thermal relaxation (120-180 °C) after calendering of PVDF-based anode slightly increases the adhesion of the film to the collector. The highest peeling strength was recorded for ultrahigh molecular weight PVDF (~0.05 N cm-1) but without advantage for cycling stability of the cell. An initial reversible capacity of 512 mAh g-1, with average capacity decay only of 0.5% per cycle, was achieved for CMC-based anode of moderate peeling strength (~0.035 N cm-1). Such good performance was attributed to a specific Si/C composite structure as well as profitable physicochemical properties of the binder.

  4. The Influence of the Particle Size on the Adhesion Between Ceramic Particles and Metal Matrix in MMC Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarzabek, Dariusz M.; Chmielewski, Marcin; Dulnik, Judyta; Strojny-Nedza, Agata

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the influence of the particle size on the adhesion force between ceramic particles and metal matrix in ceramic-reinforced metal matrix composites. The Cu-Al2O3 composites with 5 vol.% of ceramic phase were prepared by a powder metallurgy process. Alumina oxide powder as an electrocorundum (Al2O3) powder with different particle sizes, i.e., fine powder <3 µm and coarse powder of 180 µm was used as a reinforcement. Microstructural investigations included analyses using scanning electron microscopy with an integrated EDS microanalysis system and transmission microscopy. In order to measure the adhesion force (interface strength), we prepared the microwires made of the investigated materials and carried out the experiments with the use of the self-made tensile tester. We have observed that the interface strength is higher for the sample with coarse particles and is equal to 74 ± 4 MPa and it is equal to 68 ± 3 MPa for the sample with fine ceramic particles.

  5. The Influence of the Particle Size on the Adhesion Between Ceramic Particles and Metal Matrix in MMC Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarzabek, Dariusz M.; Chmielewski, Marcin; Dulnik, Judyta; Strojny-Nedza, Agata

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated the influence of the particle size on the adhesion force between ceramic particles and metal matrix in ceramic-reinforced metal matrix composites. The Cu-Al2O3 composites with 5 vol.% of ceramic phase were prepared by a powder metallurgy process. Alumina oxide powder as an electrocorundum (Al2O3) powder with different particle sizes, i.e., fine powder <3 µm and coarse powder of 180 µm was used as a reinforcement. Microstructural investigations included analyses using scanning electron microscopy with an integrated EDS microanalysis system and transmission microscopy. In order to measure the adhesion force (interface strength), we prepared the microwires made of the investigated materials and carried out the experiments with the use of the self-made tensile tester. We have observed that the interface strength is higher for the sample with coarse particles and is equal to 74 ± 4 MPa and it is equal to 68 ± 3 MPa for the sample with fine ceramic particles.

  6. Novel Epoxy Particulate Composites for Mitigation of Insect Residue Adhesion on Future Aircraft Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohl, Christopher J.; Smith, Joseph G., Jr.; Gardner, John M.; Penner, Ronald K.; Connell, John W.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2014-01-01

    Drag is reduced significantly for airflow over surfaces when laminar flow can be maintained over greater chord lengths, the distance from the leading edge of an airfoil.1 However, surface imperfections, such as chipped paint, scratches, and events that change topography on a microscopic scale can introduce airflow instabilities resulting in premature transition to turbulent flow.1 Although many of these surface imperfections can be avoided with proper maintenance, advanced materials, and advanced manufacturing practices, topographical surface anomalies arising during flight from insect impacts cannot be controlled and can influence laminar flow stability. Practical solutions to this operational challenge need to be developed for future aircraft to have full advantage of laminar flow designs that improve fuel efficiency.2 Researchers have investigated various methods to mitigate insect residue adhesion for decades.3 Although several techniques have demonstrated efficacy including mechanical scrapers, active liquid discharge systems, and sacrificial paper coatings, they have not been commercially implemented due to increased manufacturing and operational complexity, environmental impact, and weight penalties. Coatings offer a simple route for passive insect residue adhesion prevention without many of the challenges associated with maintenance of laminar flow.4 In our previous work, we determined that most commercially available materials were not effective at insect residue adhesion.5 We also identified improvements when both surface energy could be controlled by surface modifying agents and the topography could be altered through the use of micron-sized and nanometer-sized filler materials.6 In this work, these general principles were applied to an epoxy system to evaluate the behavior of the surface modifying agent, a fluorinated alkyl ether oligomer, on surface energy and insect residue adhesion properties.

  7. Assessment of the Shear Bond Strength between Nanofilled Composite Bonded to Glass-ionomer Cement Using Self-etch Adhesive with Different pHs and Total-Etch Adhesive

    PubMed Central

    Sharafeddin, Farahnaz; Choobineh, Mohammad Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem In the sandwich technique, the undesirable bond between the composite resin and glass-ionomer cement (GIc) is one of the most important factors which lead to the failure of restoration. Total-etch and self-etch adhesives may improve the bond strength based on their pH. Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength between the nanofilled composite resin and GIc using different adhesives. Materials and Method In this experimental study, 40 specimens (6×6mm) in 4 groups (n=10) were prepared in acrylic mold. Each specimen contained conventional GI ChemFil Superior with a height of 3mm, bonded to Z350 composite resin with a height measured 3mm. In order to bond the composite to the GI, the following adhesives were used, respectively: A: mild Clearfil SE Bond self-etch (pH=2), B: intermediate OptiBond self-etch (pH=1.4), C: strong Adper Prompt L-Pop (pH=1), and D: Adper Single Bond 2 total-etch (pH=7.2). The shear bond strength was measured by using universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 1mm/min. One-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test were used to analyze the data (p< 0.05). Results The shear bond strength in group A was significantly higher than group B (p= 0.002), C (p< 0.001), and D (p< 0.001). Moreover, the shear bond strength of groups A and B (self-etch) was significantly different from group D (total-etch) (p< 0.001); and C (self-etch) with D (p= 0.024). Conclusion The results of this study showed that applying the mild self-etch adhesive between the composite and the GIc results in stronger shear bond strength compared to intermediate and strong self-etch adhesives. Moreover, the self-etch adhesive increased the shear bond strength between composite resin and GIc more significantly than total-etch adhesive. PMID:26966701

  8. New design deforming controlling system of the active stressed lap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Li; Wang, Daxing

    2008-07-01

    A 450mm diameter active stressed lap has been developed in NIAOT by 2003. We design a new lap in 2007. This paper puts on emphases on introducing the new deforming control system of the lap. Aiming at the control characteristic of the lap, a new kind of digital deforming controller is designed. The controller consists of 3 parts: computer signal disposing, motor driving and force sensor signal disposing. Intelligent numeral PID method is applied in the controller instead of traditional PID. In the end, the result of new deformation are given.

  9. Weld bonding of titanium with polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, R. W.; Sheppard, C. H.; Orell, M. K.

    1975-01-01

    A conductive adhesive primer and a capillary flow adhesive were developed for weld bonding titanium alloy joints. Both formulations contained ingredients considered to be non-carcinogenic. Lap-shear joint test specimens and stringer-stiffened panels were weld bonded using a capillary flow process to apply the adhesive. Static property information was generated for weld bonded joints over the temperature range of 219K (-65 F) to 561K (550 F). The capillary flow process was demonstrated to produce weld bonded joints of equal strength to the weld through weld bonding process developed previously.

  10. Diamond machine tool face lapping machine

    DOEpatents

    Yetter, H.H.

    1985-05-06

    An apparatus for shaping, sharpening and polishing diamond-tipped single-point machine tools. The isolation of a rotating grinding wheel from its driving apparatus using an air bearing and causing the tool to be shaped, polished or sharpened to be moved across the surface of the grinding wheel so that it does not remain at one radius for more than a single rotation of the grinding wheel has been found to readily result in machine tools of a quality which can only be obtained by the most tedious and costly processing procedures, and previously unattainable by simple lapping techniques.

  11. High temperature adhesive silicone foam composition, foam generating system and method of generating foam

    DOEpatents

    Mead, Judith W.; Montoya, Orelio J.; Rand, Peter B.; Willan, Vernon O.

    1984-01-01

    Access to a space is impeded by generation of a sticky foam from a silicone polymer and a low boiling solvent such as a halogenated hydrocarbon. In a preferred aspect, the formulation is polydimethylsiloxane gel mixed with F502 Freon as a solvent and blowing agent, and pressurized with CO.sub.2 in a vessel to about 250 PSI, whereby when the vessel is opened, a sticky and solvent resistant foam is deployed. The foam is deployable, over a wide range of temperatures, adhering to wet surfaces as well as dry, is stable over long periods of time and does not propagate flame or lose adhesive properties during an externally supported burn.

  12. Improvement of Interfacial Adhesion in Bamboo Polymer Composite Enhanced with Micro-Fibrillated Cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, Kazuya; Fujii, Toru; Yamashita, Naoya

    Current study presents one of effective techniques to improve mechanical properties of PLA (Poly-Lactic Acid)-based bamboo fiber composite. Commercially available Micro-Fibrillated Cellulose (MFC) obtained from wood pulp was applied as an enhancer to the composite. The bamboo fibers were extracted by steam explosion method and they were also rubbed in water to remove xylem (soft-wall cells). The liquid-based MFC, PLA and the bamboo fiber were mixed in water for several minutes and they were filtrated under vacuum pressure. To fabricate the composite, remained sheets were then hot pressed after dry. Three-point bending strength and Mode I fracture toughness of the composite were significantly improved, even when 10% of the MFC was added into the PLA/BF composite in weight. If small amount of MFC added into the bamboo fiber composite, tangled MFC fibers prevented the growth of micro crack along the interface between bamboo fiber and matrix.

  13. Sodium alginate/heparin composites on PVC surfaces inhibit the thrombosis and platelet adhesion: applications in cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wenqing; Lin, Tingting; Li, Tong; Yu, Meili; Hu, Xiaomin; Duan, Dawei

    2013-01-01

    Thrombosis and hemocyte damage are the main problems of applied non-coated biomaterials to cardiac surgery that remain unsolved. The present study is aimed at the chemical modification of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) for applications in cardiac surgery and the biological property assessment of modified PVC. Sodium alginate (SA)/heparin (HEP) composites were covalently immobilized onto the surface of the PVC pipeline. The surface grafting density and protein adsorption were determined by ultraviolet spectrophotometry. The surface contact angles were evaluated by contact-angle measurement, whereas the surface characteristics were evaluated by Fouriertransform infrared spectroscopy. Blood coagulation time and platelet adhesion were measured using an automated blood coagulation analyzer and a hemocytometer, respectively. Surface morphologies of the thrombus and platelets were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. The immobilization of SA/HEP reduced the contact angles of the coated surface. Protein adsorption was reduced by the immobilization of SA. The activated partial thrombin time and thrombin time of the coated PVC were significantly prolonged as compared with the non-coated PVC. Platelet adhesion and thrombus formation were all reduced by the immobilization of HEP. The results revealed that the SA/HEP coating can improve the antithrombogenicity of the PVC pipeline, as well as improve its biocompatibility and hemocompatibility, which are essential for cardiac pulmonary bypass surgery.

  14. A review of the development of radical photopolymerization initiators used for designing light-curing dental adhesives and resin composites.

    PubMed

    Ikemura, Kunio; Endo, Takeshi

    2010-10-01

    This paper reviews our recent studies on radical photopolymerization initiators, which are used in the design of light-curing dental adhesives and resin composites, by collating information of related studies from original scientific papers, reviews, and patent literature. The photopolymerization reactivities of acylphosphine oxide (APO) and bisacylphosphine oxide (BAPO) derivatives, and D,L-camphorquinone (CQ)/tertiary amine were investigated, and no significant differences in degree of conversion (DC) were found between BAPO and CQ/amine system (p>0.05). In addition, a novel 7,7-dimethyl-2,3-dioxobicyclo[2.2.1]heptane-1-carbonyldiphenyl phosphine oxide (DOHC-DPPO=CQ-APO) was synthesized and its ultraviolet and visible (UV-VIS) spectral behavior was investigated. CQ-APO possessed two maximum absorption wavelengths (λmax) at 350-500 nm [372 nm (from APO group) and 475 nm (from CQ moiety)], and CQ-APO-containing resins exhibited good photopolymerization reactivity, excellent color tone, relaxed operation time, and high mechanical strength. It was also found that a newly synthesized, water-soluble photoinitiator (APO-Na) improved adhesion to ground dentin. PMID:20859059

  15. Effect of surface treatments on the flexural properties and adhesion of glass fiber-reinforced composite post to self-adhesive luting agent and radicular dentin.

    PubMed

    Elnaghy, Amr M; Elsaka, Shaymaa E

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of different surface treatments on the flexural properties and adhesion of glass fiber post to self-adhesive luting agent and radicular dentin. Seventy-five single-rooted human teeth were prepared to receive a glass fiber post (Reblida). The posts were divided into five groups according to the surface treatment: Gr C (control; no treatment), Gr S (silanization for 60 s), Gr AP (airborne-particle abrasion), Gr HF (etching with 9 % hydrofluoric acid for 1 min), and Gr M10 (etching with CH2Cl2 for 10 min). Dual-cure self-adhesive luting agent (Rely X Unicem) was applied to each group for testing the adhesion using micropush-out test. Failure types were examined with stereomicroscope and surface morphology of the posts was characterized using a scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Flexural properties of posts were assessed using a three-point bending test. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test. Statistical significance was set at the 0.05 probability level. Groups treated with M10 showed significantly higher bond strength than those obtained with other surface treatments (P < 0.05). In general, improvements in bond strength (MPa) were found in the following order: M10 > C > S > AP > HF. Most failure modes were adhesive type of failures between dentin and luting agent (48.2%). SEM analysis revealed that the fiber post surfaces were modified after surface treatments. The surface treatments did not compromise the flexural properties of fiber posts. Application of M10 to the fiber post surfaces enhanced the adhesion to self-adhesive luting agent and radicular dentin. PMID:25424595

  16. How lamina-associated polypeptide 1 (LAP1) activates Torsin

    PubMed Central

    Sosa, Brian A; Demircioglu, F Esra; Chen, James Z; Ingram, Jessica; Ploegh, Hidde L; Schwartz, Thomas U

    2014-01-01

    Lamina-associated polypeptide 1 (LAP1) resides at the nuclear envelope and interacts with Torsins, poorly understood endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-localized AAA+ ATPases, through a conserved, perinuclear domain. We determined the crystal structure of the perinuclear domain of human LAP1. LAP1 possesses an atypical AAA+ fold. While LAP1 lacks canonical nucleotide binding motifs, its strictly conserved arginine 563 is positioned exactly where the arginine finger of canonical AAA+ ATPases is found. Based on modeling and electron microscopic analysis, we propose that LAP1 targets Torsin to the nuclear envelope by forming an alternating, heterohexameric (LAP1-Torsin)3 ring, in which LAP1 acts as the Torsin activator. The experimental data show that mutation of arginine 563 in LAP1 reduces its ability to stimulate TorsinA ATPase hydrolysis. This knowledge may help scientists understand the etiology of DYT1 primary dystonia, a movement disorder caused by a single glutamate deletion in TorsinA. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03239.001 PMID:25149450

  17. How dogs lap: open pumping driven by acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gart, Sean; Socha, John; Vlachos, Pavlos; Jung, Sunghwan

    2015-11-01

    Dogs drink by lapping because they have incomplete cheeks and cannot suck fluids into the mouth. When lapping, a dog's tongue pulls a liquid column from a bath, which is then swallowed, suggesting that the hydrodynamics of column formation are critical to understanding how dogs drink. We measured the kinematics of lapping from nineteen dogs and used the results to generate a physical model of the tongue's interaction with the air-fluid interface. These experiments with an accelerating rod help to explain how dogs exploit the fluid dynamics of the generated column. The results suggest that effects of acceleration govern lapping frequency, and that dogs curl the tongue ventrally (backwards) and time their bite on the column to increase fluid intake per lap. Comparing lapping in dogs and cats reveals that though they both lap with the same frequency scaling with respect to body mass and have similar morphology, these carnivores lap in different physical regimes: a high-acceleration regime for dogs and a low-acceleration regime for cats.

  18. Learning Activity Package, Chemistry I, (LAP) Study 29.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Naomi

    Presented is a Learning Activity Package (LAP) study concerned with carbon and its compounds. This LAP in chemistry includes a rationale for studying the chemical element of carbon, a list of student objectives (stated in behavioral terms), of activities (reading, laboratory experiments, model construction, etc.), a two-page worksheet, a…

  19. Effect of vacuum conditions and plasma concentration on the chemical composition and adhesion of vacuum-plasma coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, D. P.; Kuznetsov, V. M.; Slabodchikov, V. A.

    2015-11-01

    The paper reports on the chemical composition of titanium nitride (TiN) and silicon (Si) coatings deposited with a new technological vacuum plasma setup which comprises magnetron sputtering systems, arc evaporators, and an efficient plasma generator. It is shown that due to highly clean vacuum conditions and highly clean surface treatment in the gas discharge plasma, both the coating-substrate interface and the coatings as such are almost free from oxygen and carbon. It is found that the coating-substrate interface represents a layer of thickness ≥ 60 nm formed through vacuum plasma mixing of the coating and substrate materials. The TiN coatings obtained on the new equipment display a higher adhesion compared to brass coatings deposited by industrial technologies via intermediate titanium oxide layers. It is concluded that the designed vacuum plasma equipment allows efficient surface modification of materials and articles by vacuum plasma immersion processes.

  20. Fracture Analysis of Double-Side Adhesively Bonded Composite Repairs to Cracked Aluminium Plate Using Line Spring Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Yong; Su, Weiguo

    2016-06-01

    A line spring model is developed for analyzing the fracture problem of cracked metallic plate repaired with the double-sided adhesively bonded composite patch. The restraining action of the bonded patch is modeled as continuous distributed linear springs bridging the crack faces provided that the cracked plate is subjected to extensional load. The effective spring constant is determined from 1-D bonded joint theory. The hyper-singular integral equation (HSIE), which can be solved using the second kind Chebyshev polynomial expansion method, is applied to determine the crack opening displacements (COD) and the crack tip stress intensity factors (SIF) of the repaired cracked plate. The numerical result of SIF for the crack-tip correlates very well with the finite element (FE) computations based on the virtual crack closure technique (VCCT). The present analysis approaches and mathematical techniques are critical to the successful design, analysis and implementation of crack patching.

  1. Experimental dynamic deformation analysis of active stressed lap.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongshen; Li, Xiaojin; Fan, Bin; Zeng, Zhige

    2016-02-20

    We introduce a method to measure the dynamic surface deformation of an active stressed lap for fabricating a 4  mf/1.5  mirror. Lap surface accuracy working in some typical deformation velocities is put forward. Experimental results indicate that dynamic lap surface accuracy is worse than that of a static surface, and dynamic surface accuracy gets worse if deformation velocity increases, while the difference of lap surface error RMS is less than 1 μm. An optimization of the processing strategy is feasible through changing the deformation velocity of the active stressed lap depending on the processing schedule. After optimizing the grinding and polishing strategy, efficiency is expected to have a significant increase. PMID:26906568

  2. Kevlar fiber-epoxy adhesion and its effect on composite mechanical and fracture properties by plasma and chemical treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Shyu, S.S.; Wu, S.R.; Sheu, G.S.

    1996-12-31

    Kevlar 49 fibers were surface modified by gas (ammonia, oxygen, and water vapor) plasmas etching and chlorosulfonation and subsequent reaction with some reagents (glycine, deionized water, ethylenediamine, and 1-butanol) to improve the adhesion to epoxy resin. After these treatments, the changes in fiber topography, chemical compositions of the fiber surfaces and the surface functional groups introduced to the surface of fibers were identified by SEM XPS and static SIMS. Interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) and T-peel strength between the fiber and epoxy resin were markedly improved by gas plasma and chlorosulfonation (0.1% and 0.25% ClSO{sub 3}H at 30 s). However, it is clear from the similar G{sub IC} values of the treated and untreated fiber composites that the fiber/matrix interfacial bond strength is only a minor contributor to G{sub IC}. SEM was also used to study the surface topography of the fracture surfaces of composites in T-peel test.

  3. Effects of dentin surface treatments on the fracture toughness and tensile bond strength of a dentin-composite adhesive interface.

    PubMed

    Tam, L E; Pilliar, R M

    1994-09-01

    It has been proposed that the fracture toughness test provides an appropriate method for assessing the fracture resistance of the dentin-composite interface. The plane-strain fracture toughness test was therefore applied to a dentin-composite interface, with use of a specific dentinal adhesive, so that the effects of various dentin surface treatments on dentin-bond integrity could be studied. Interfacial fracture toughness (KIC) values were determined following 24h and 180 days of specimen aging in distilled water at 37 degrees C. Tensile bond strength (TBS) results following 24-hour aging were also obtained for comparison with the 24-hour KIC results. In general, the fracture resistance of the dentin-composite interface was highest when the dentin surface was conditioned with acid but not air-dried, intermediate when the dentin surface was conditioned with acid and subsequently air-dried, and lowest when the dentin was not conditioned with acid. The tensile bond strength results differed from the fracture toughness results in indicating differences in surface preparation effects and the type of interfacial failure observed.

  4. Tamarindus indica pectin blend film composition for coating tablets with enhanced adhesive force strength.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Rajneet; Singh, Kuldeep; Sapra, Bharti; Tiwary, A K; Rana, Vikas

    2014-02-15

    Tablet coating is the most useful method to improve tablet texture, odour and mask taste. Thus, the present investigation was aimed at developing an industrially acceptable aqueous tablet coating material. The physico-chemical, electrical and SEM investigations ensures that blending of Tamarindus indica (Linn.) pectin (TP) with chitosan gives water resistant film texture. Therefore, CH-TP (60:40) spray coated tablets were prepared. The evaluation of CH-TP coated tablets showed enhanced adhesive force strength (between tablet surface to coat) and negligible cohesive force strength (between two tablets) both evaluated using texture analyzer. The comparison of CH-TP coated tablets with Eudragit coated tablets further supported superiority of the former material. Thus, the findings pointed towards the potential of CH-TP for use as a tablet coating material in food as well as pharmaceutical industry.

  5. Effect of bond thickness on fracture and fatigue strength of adhesively bonded composite joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Ramamurthy, G.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental investigation of composite to composite bonded joints was undertaken to study the effect of bond thickness on debond growth rate under cyclic loading and critical strain energy release rate under static loading. Double cantilever beam specimens of graphite/epoxy adherends bonded with EC 3445 were tested under mode I loading. A different behavior of fracture and fatigue strength was observed with variation of bondline thickness.

  6. Influence of wool and thermo-binder fibers relative fractions on the adhesion of non-woven Alfa fibers reinforced unsaturated polyester hybrid composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin Omri, Med; Triki, A.; Ben Hassen, Med; Arous, M.; Bulou, A.

    2016-10-01

    Alfa/wool/thermo-binder fibers hybrid composites were investigated in order to analyze adhesion state. Bearing in mind the chemical structure of wool and thermo-binder fibers, this study revealed a good compatibility between the reinforcement and the matrix. Dielectric measurements revealed the presence of two dielectric relaxations in the composite. The first relaxation was attributed to the α mode relaxation and the second one was associated with the conductivity noted for high temperature. This study allowed the analysis of the interfacial polarization effect using the Havrilliak-Negami model in the electric modulus formalism. The lowness of this relaxation intensity revealed a good adhesion of the fibers in the matrix. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) showed a slow decrease of the Tg glass transition temperature compared to the matrix, which could be explained by the existence of interactions between the fibers and the matrix. Vibrational analysis, based on FTIR measurements, showed a less hydrophilic character of Alfa fibers owing to a basic dissociation that occurs between the wool fibers and the water molecules associated with Alfa fibers. Furthermore, adhesion mechanism in the composite material was established by covalent and hydrogen bonds. Tensile testing performed on this composite confirmed that such adhesion was improved by increasing the thermo-binder fibers relative fraction.

  7. The behavior of bonded doubler splices for composite sandwich panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeller, T. A.; Weisahaar, T. A.

    1980-01-01

    The results of an investigation into the behavior of adhesively bonded doubler splices of two composite material sandwich panels are presented. The splices are studied from three approaches: analytical; numerical (finite elements); and experimental. Several parameters that characterize the splice are developed to determine their influence upon joint strength. These parameters are: doubler overlap length; core stiffness; laminate bending stiffness; the size of the gap between the spliced sandwich panels; and room and elevated temperatures. Similarities and contrasts between these splices and the physically similar single and double lap joints are discussed. The results of this investigation suggest several possible approaches to improving the strength of the sandwich splices.

  8. Identification of a Novel Human LAP1 Isoform That Is Regulated by Protein Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Mariana; Domingues, Sara C.; Costa, Patrícia; Muller, Thorsten; Galozzi, Sara; Marcus, Katrin; da Cruz e Silva, Edgar F.; da Cruz e Silva, Odete A.; Rebelo, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Lamina associated polypeptide 1 (LAP1) is an integral protein of the inner nuclear membrane that is ubiquitously expressed. LAP1 binds to lamins and chromatin, probably contributing to the maintenance of the nuclear envelope architecture. Moreover, LAP1 also interacts with torsinA and emerin, proteins involved in DYT1 dystonia and X-linked Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy disorder, respectively. Given its relevance to human pathological conditions, it is important to better understand the functional diversity of LAP1 proteins. In rat, the LAP1 gene (TOR1AIP1) undergoes alternative splicing to originate three LAP1 isoforms (LAP1A, B and C). However, it remains unclear if the same occurs with the human TOR1AIP1 gene, since only the LAP1B isoform had thus far been identified in human cells. In silico analysis suggested that, across different species, potential new LAP1 isoforms could be generated by alternative splicing. Using shRNA to induce LAP1 knockdown and HPLC-mass spectrometry analysis the presence of two isoforms in human cells was described and validated: LAP1B and LAP1C; the latter is putatively N-terminal truncated. LAP1B and LAP1C expression profiles appear to be dependent on the specific tissues analyzed and in cultured cells LAP1C was the major isoform detected. Moreover, LAP1B and LAP1C expression increased during neuronal maturation, suggesting that LAP1 is relevant in this process. Both isoforms were found to be post-translationally modified by phosphorylation and methionine oxidation and two LAP1B/LAP1C residues were shown to be dephosphorylated by PP1. This study permitted the identification of the novel human LAP1C isoform and partially unraveled the molecular basis of LAP1 regulation. PMID:25461922

  9. Study of joint designing on composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazushi, Haruna

    In this paper, strength design techniques of CFRP mechanical joints and adhesively bonded joints were examined. Remarkable stress concentration generates at the mechanical hole edge and the adhesive edge, therefore an unskillful design of joints often causes a reduction in the strength of composite structures. In mechanical joints, a study on predicting the joint strength has been performed, but bearing failure that is most important failure mode for designing joints can not be predicted. So in this paper, the strength prediction method in consideration with bearing failure was examined. On the other hand, the criterion using the intensity of stress singularity was suggested in adhesive joints, but it was clarified in this paper, that this method can not be applied the prediction of the final failure strength. So the critical stress distribution of single-lap adhesive bonded carbon/epoxy joints was examined to obtain the failure criterion of the final failure. Moreover the simulation method for an internal stress generated by cure shrinkage of adhesive was also examined. In the proposed method for mechanical joint, 2-parameter criterion, that is combined the characteristic length with the Yamada-Sun criterion, was applied and the characteristic length for compression was determined from "bearing failure test" that was newly conceived to take bearing failure into consideration. In case of adhesive joints, it was thought that 2-parameter criterion was effective. So the prediction method using 2-parameter criterion was applied to other adhesive joints. Good agreement was obtained between predicted and experimental results in both mechanical and adhesive joints. And it was cleared that an internal stress could be simulated by the proposed method. Moreover, in mechanical joints, the most suitable stacking sequence, the reduction technique of interlaminar stress, and the elevation of joint strength by application of high toughness matrix were also shown. Consequently

  10. Thermal cycling effects on adhesion of resin-bovine enamel junction among different composite resins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Cheng; Ko, Chia-Ling; Wu, Hui-Yu; Lai, Pei-Ling; Shih, Chi-Jen

    2014-10-01

    Thermal cycling is used to mimic the changes in oral cavity temperature experienced by composite resins when used clinically. The purpose of this study is to assess the thermal cycling effects of in-house produced composite resin on bonding strength. The dicalcium phosphate anhydrous filler surfaces are modified using nanocrystals and silanization (w/NP/Si). The resin is compared with commercially available composite resins Filtek Z250, Z350, and glass ionomer restorative material GIC Fuji-II LC (control). Different composite resins were filled into the dental enamel of bovine teeth. The bond force and resin-enamel junction graphical structures of the samples were determined after thermal cycling between 5 and 55°C in deionized water for 600 cycles. After thermal cycling, the w/NP/Si 30wt%, 50wt% and Filtek Z250, Z350 groups showed higher shear forces than glass ionomer GIC, and w/NP/Si 50wt% had the highest shear force. Through SEM observations, more of the fillings with w/NP/Si 30wt% and w/NP/Si 50wt% groups flowed into the enamel tubule, forming closed tubules with the composite resins. The push-out force is proportional to the resin flow depth and uniformity. The push-out tubule pore and resin shear pattern is the most uniform and consistent in the w/NP/Si 50wt% group. Accordingly, this developed composite resin maintains great mechanical properties after thermal cycling. Thus, it has the potential to be used in a clinical setting when restoring non-carious cervical lesions.

  11. Effects of Temperature and Forming Speed on Plastic Bending of Adhesively Bonded Sheet Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takiguchi, Michihiro; Yoshida, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Fusahito

    This paper deals with the temperature and rate-dependent elasto-viscoplasticity behaviour of a highly ductile acrylic adhesive and its effect on plastic bending of adhesively bonded sheet metals. Tensile lap shear tests of aluminium single-lap joints were performed at various temperature of 10-40°C at several tensile speeds. Based on the experimental results, a new constitutive model of temperature and rate-dependent elasto-viscoplasticity of the adhesive is presented. From V-bending experiments and the corresponding numerical simulation, it was found that the gull-wing bend is suppressed by high-speed forming at a lower temperature.

  12. The role of damage-softened material behavior in the fracture of composites and adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungsuwarungsri, T.; Knauss, W. G.

    1986-01-01

    Failure mechanisms of materials under very high strains experienced at and ahead of the crack tip such as formation, growth, and interaction of microvoids in ductile materials, microcracks in brittle solids or crazes in polymers and adhesives are represented by one-dimensional, nonlinear stress-strain relations possessing different ways by which the material loses capacity to carry load up to fracture or total separation. A double cantilever beam (DCB) type specimen is considered. The nonlinear material is confined to a thin strip between the two elastic beams loaded by a wedge. The problem is first modeled as a beam on a nonlinear foundation. The pertinent equation is solved numerically as a two-point boundary value problem for both the stationary and the quasi-stationay propagating crack. A finite element model is then used to model the problem in more detail in order to assess the adequacy of the beam model for the reduction of experimental data to determine in-situ properties of the thin interlayer.

  13. Evaluation of microshear bond strength of resin composites to enamel of dental adhesive systems associated with Er,Cr:YSGG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassimiro-Silva, Patricia F.; Zezell, Denise M.; Monteiro, Gabriela Q. d. M.; Benetti, Carolina; de Paula Eduardo, Carlos; Gomes, Anderson S. L.

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the microshear bond strength (μSBS) of resin composite to enamel etching by Er,Cr:YSGG laser with the use of two differents adhesives systems. Fifty freshly extracted human molars halves were embedded in acrylic resin before preparation for the study, making a total of up to 100 available samples. The specimens were randomly assigned into six groups (η=10) according to substrate pre-treatment and adhesive system on the enamel. A two-step self-etching primer system (Clearfil SE Bond) and a universal adhesive used as an etch-andrinse adhesive (Adper Single Bond Universal) were applied to the nonirradiated enamel surface according to manufacturer's instructions, as control groups (Control CF and Control SB, respectively). For the other groups, enamel surfaces were previously irradiated with the Er,Cr:YSGG laser with 0.5 W, 75 mJ and 66 J/cm2 (CF 5 Hz and SB 5 Hz) and 1.25 W, 50 mJ and 44 J/cm2 (CF 15 Hz and SB 15 Hz). Irradiation was performed under air (50%) and water (50%) cooling. An independent t-test was performed to compare the adhesive systems. Mean μSBS ± sd (MPa) for each group was 16.857 +/- 2.61, 17.87 +/- 5.83, 12.23 +/- 2.02, 9.88 +/- 2.26, 15.94 +/- 1.98, 17.62 +/- 2.10, respectively. The control groups and the 50 mJ laser groups showed no statistically significant differences, regardless of the adhesive system used. The results obtained lead us to affirm that the bonding interaction of adhesives to enamel depends not only on the morphological aspects of the dental surface, but also on the characteristics of the adhesive employed and the parameters of the laser.

  14. Temperature Rise during Primer, Adhesive, and Composite Resin Photopolymerization of a Low-Shrinkage Composite Resin under Caries-Like Dentin Lesions.

    PubMed

    Mousavinasab, Sayed-Mostafa; Khoroushi, Maryam; Moharreri, Mohammadreza

    2012-01-01

    Objective. This study evaluated temperature rise of low-shrinkage (LS) self-etch primer (P), LS self-etch adhesive (A), and P90 silorane-based composite resin systems, photopolymerized under normal and artificially demineralized dentin. Methods. Forty 1.5 mm-thick dentin discs were prepared from sound human molars, half of which were demineralized. Temperature rise was measured during photopolymerization using a K-type thermocouple under the discs: 10 s and 40 s irradiation of the discs (controls/groups 1 and 2); 10 s irradiation of primer (P), 10 s irradiation of adhesive (A), 40 s irradiation of P90 without P and A, and 40 s irradiation of P90 with P and A (groups 3 to 6, resp.). The samples were photopolymerized using an LED unit under 550 mW/cm(2) light intensity. Data was analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA and paired-sample t-test (α = 0.05). Results. There were no significant differences in temperature rise means between the two dentin samples for each irradiation duration (P > 0.0001), with significant differences between the two irradiation durations (P > 0.0001). Temperature rise measured with 40 s irradiation was significantly higher than that of 10 s duration for undemineralized and demineralized dentin P < 0.0001). Conclusions. Light polymerization of P90 low-shrinkage composite resin resulted in temperature rise approaching threshold value under artificially demineralized and undemineralized dentin. PMID:23320185

  15. Adhesive evaluation of new polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stclair, Terry L.; Progar, Donald J.

    1987-01-01

    During the past 10 to 15 years, the Materials Division at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has developed several novel high temperature polyimide adhesives for anticipated needs of the aerospace industry. These developments have resulted from fundamental studies of structure-property relationships in polyimides. Recent research at LaRC has involved the synthesis and evaluation of copolyimides which incorporate both flexibilizing bridging groups and meta-linked benzene rings. The purpose was to develop systems based on low cost, readily available monomers. Two of these copolyimides evaluated as adhesives for bonding titanium alloy, Ti(6Al-4V), are identified as LARC-STPI and STPI-LARC-2. Lap shear strength (LSS) measurements were used to determine the strength and durability of the adhesive materials. LSS results are presented for LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI lap shear specimens thermally exposed in air at 232 C for up to 5000 hrs. LARC-TPI was shown to perform better than the copolymer LARC-STPI which exhibited poor thermooxidative performance possibly due to the amines used which would tend to oxidize easier than the benzophenone system in LARC-TPI.

  16. Development of a shock wave adhesion test for composite bonds by pulsed laser and mechanical impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ecault, R.; Boustie, M.; Touchard, F.; Arrigoni, M.; Berthe, L.

    2014-05-01

    Evaluating the bonding quality of composite material is becoming one of the main challenges faced by aeronautic industries. This work aims to the development of a technique using shock wave, which would enable to quantify the bonding mechanical quality. Laser shock experiments were carried out. This technique enables high tensile stress generation in the thickness of composite bonds. The resulting damage has been quantified using different methods such as confocal microscopy, ultrasound and cross section observation. The discrimination between a correct bond and a weak bond was possible thanks to these experiments. Nevertheless, laser sources are not well adapted for optimization of such a test because of often fixed settings. That is why mechanical impacts on bonded composites were also performed in this work. By changing the thickness of aluminum projectiles, the generated tensile stresses by the shock wave propagation were moved toward the composite/bond interface. The made observations prove that the technique optimization is possible. The key parameters for the development of a bonding test using shock waves have been identified.

  17. Development of a shock wave adhesion test for composite bonds by laser pulsed and mechanical impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ecault, Romain; Boustie, Michel; Touchard, Fabienne; Arrigoni, Michel; Berthe, Laurent; CNRS Collaboration

    2013-06-01

    Evaluating the bonding quality of composite material is becoming one of the main challenges faced by aeronautic industries. This work aims the development of a technique using shock wave, which would enable to quantify the bonding mechanical quality. Laser shock experiments were carried out. This technique enables high tensile stress generation in the thickness of composite bond without any mechanical contact. The resulting damage has been quantified using different method such as confocal microscopy, ultrasound and cross section observation. The discrimination between a correct bond and a weak bond was possible thanks to these experiments. Nevertheless, laser sources are not well adapted for optimization of such a test since it has often fixed parameters. That is why mechanical impacts bonded composites were also performed in this work. By changing the thickness of aluminum projectiles, the tensile stresses generated by the shock wave propagation were moved toward the composite/bond interface. The observations made prove that the optimization of the technique is possible. The key parameters for the development of a bonding test using shock wave have been identified.

  18. Controllable degradation of medical magnesium by electrodeposited composite films of mussel adhesive protein (Mefp-1) and chitosan.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ping-Li; Hou, Rui-Qing; Chen, Cheng-Dong; Sun, Lan; Dong, Shi-Gang; Pan, Jin-Shan; Lin, Chang-Jian

    2016-09-15

    To control the degradation rate of medical magnesium in body fluid environment, biocompatible films composed of Mussel Adhesive Protein (Mefp-1) and chitosan were electrodeposited on magnesium surface in cathodic constant current mode. The compositions and structures of the films were characterized by atomic force microscope (AFM), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS). And the corrosion protection performance was investigated using electrochemical measurements and immersion tests in simulated body fluid (Hanks' solution). The results revealed that Mefp-1 and chitosan successfully adhered on the magnesium surface and formed a protective film. Compared with either single Mefp-1 or single chitosan film, the composite film of chitosan/Mefp-1/chitosan (CPC (chitosan/Mefp-1/chitosan)) exhibited lower corrosion current density, higher polarization resistance and more homogenous corrosion morphology and thus was able to effectively control the degradation rate of magnesium in simulated body environment. In addition, the active attachment and spreading of MC3T3-E1 cells on the CPC film coated magnesium indicated that the CPC film was significantly able to improve the biocompatibility of the medical magnesium. PMID:27309944

  19. Adhesive force measurement between HOPG and zinc oxide as an indicator for interfacial bonding of carbon fiber composites.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Brendan A; Galan, Ulises; Sodano, Henry A

    2015-07-22

    Vertically aligned zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires have recently been utilized as an interphase to increase the interfacial strength of carbon fiber composites. It was shown that the interaction between the carbon fiber and the ZnO nanowires was a critical parameter in adhesion; however, fiber based testing techniques are dominated by local defects and cannot be used to effectively study the bonding interaction directly. Here, the strength of the interface between ZnO and graphitic carbon is directly measured with atomic force microscopy (AFM) using oxygen plasma treated highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and an AFM tip coated with ZnO nanoparticles. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis is used to compare the surface chemistry of HOPG and carbon fiber and to quantify the presence of various oxygen functional groups. An indirect measurement of the interfacial strength is then performed through single fiber fragmentation testing (SFF) on functionalized carbon fibers coated with ZnO nanowires to validate the AFM measurements. The SFF and AFM methods showed the same correlation, demonstrating the capacity of the AFM method to study the interfacial properties in composite materials. Additionally, the chemical interactions between oxygen functional groups and the ionic structure of ZnO suggest that intermolecular forces at the interface are responsible for the strong interface.

  20. Effect of fiber-matrix adhesion on the creep behavior of CF/PPS composites: temperature and physical aging characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motta Dias, M. H.; Jansen, K. M. B.; Luinge, J. W.; Bersee, H. E. N.; Benedictus, R.

    2016-06-01

    The influence of fiber-matrix adhesion on the linear viscoelastic creep behavior of `as received' and `surface modified' carbon fibers (AR-CF and SM-CF, respectively) reinforced polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) composite materials was investigated. Short-term tensile creep tests were performed on ±45° specimens under six different isothermal conditions, 40, 50, 60, 65, 70 and 75 °C. Physical aging effects were evaluated on both systems using the short-term test method established by Struik. The results showed that the shapes of the curves were affected neither by physical aging nor by the test temperature, allowing then superposition to be made. A unified model was proposed with a single physical aging and temperature-dependent shift factor, a_{T,te}. It was suggested that the surface treatment carried out in SM-CF/PPS had two major effects on the creep response of CF/PPS composites at a reference temperature of 40 °C: a lowering of the initial compliance of about 25 % and a slowing down of the creep response of about 1.1 decade.

  1. Deformations and strains in adhesive joints by moire interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, D.; Czarnek, R.; Wood, J.; John, D.; Lubowinski, S.

    1984-01-01

    Displacement fields in a thick adherend lap joint and a cracked lap shear specimen were measured by high sensitivity moire interferometry. Contour maps of in-plane U and V displacements were obtained across adhesive and adherent surfaces. Loading sequences ranged from modest loads to near-failure loads. Quantitative results are given for displacements and certain strains in the adhesive and along the adhesive/adherend boundary lines. The results show nonlinear displacements and strains as a function of loads or stresses and they show viscoelastic or time-dependent response. Moire interferometry is an excellent method for experimental studies of adhesive joint performance. Subwavelength displacement resolution of a few micro-inches, and spatial resolution corresponding to 1600 fringes/inch (64 fringes/mm), were obtained in these studies. The whole-field contour maps offer insights not available from local measurements made by high sensitivity gages.

  2. New mathematical model for error reduction of stressed lap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Pu; Yang, Shuming; Sun, Lin; Shi, Xinyu; Liu, Tao; Jiang, Zhuangde

    2016-05-01

    Stressed lap, compared to traditional polishing methods, has high processing efficiency. However, this method has disadvantages in processing nonsymmetric surface errors. A basic-function method is proposed to calculate parameters for a stressed-lap polishing system. It aims to minimize residual errors and is based on a matrix and nonlinear optimization algorithm. The results show that residual root-mean-square could be >15% after one process for classical trefoil error. The surface period errors close to the lap diameter were removed efficiently, up to 50% material removal.

  3. Nano-hydroxyapatite-coated metal-ceramic composite of iron-tricalcium phosphate: Improving the surface wettability, adhesion and proliferation of mesenchymal stem cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Surmeneva, Maria A; Kleinhans, Claudia; Vacun, Gabriele; Kluger, Petra Juliane; Schönhaar, Veronika; Müller, Michaela; Hein, Sebastian Boris; Wittmar, Alexandra; Ulbricht, Mathias; Prymak, Oleg; Oehr, Christian; Surmenev, Roman A

    2015-11-01

    Thin radio-frequency magnetron sputter deposited nano-hydroxyapatite (HA) films were prepared on the surface of a Fe-tricalcium phosphate (Fe-TCP) bioceramic composite, which was obtained using a conventional powder injection moulding technique. The obtained nano-hydroxyapatite coated Fe-TCP biocomposites (nano-HA-Fe-TCP) were studied with respect to their chemical and phase composition, surface morphology, water contact angle, surface free energy and hysteresis. The deposition process resulted in a homogeneous, single-phase HA coating. The ability of the surface to support adhesion and the proliferation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) was studied using biological short-term tests in vitro. The surface of the uncoated Fe-TCP bioceramic composite showed an initial cell attachment after 24h of seeding, but adhesion, proliferation and growth did not persist during 14 days of culture. However, the HA-Fe-TCP surfaces allowed cell adhesion, and proliferation during 14 days. The deposition of the nano-HA films on the Fe-TCP surface resulted in higher surface energy, improved hydrophilicity and biocompatibility compared with the surface of the uncoated Fe-TCP. Furthermore, it is suggested that an increase in the polar component of the surface energy was responsible for the enhanced cell adhesion and proliferation in the case of the nano-HA-Fe-TCP biocomposites. PMID:26277713

  4. Adhesively-Bonded Structural Composite Joint Utilizing Shoulder-Centered Sleeves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lukowski, Florian P., Jr. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A composite joint includes a first member having a groove therein, a second member adjacent to the first member, and a connector member disposed between the second member and the first member. The connector member is received in the groove so as to bias a load path between the first member and the second member from a peripheral portion to a central portion of the connector member.

  5. Amine Enrichment of Thin-Film Composite Membranes via Low Pressure Plasma Polymerization for Antimicrobial Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Reis, Rackel; Dumée, Ludovic F; He, Li; She, Fenghua; Orbell, John D; Winther-Jensen, Bjorn; Duke, Mikel C

    2015-07-15

    Thin-film composite membranes, primarily based on poly(amide) (PA) semipermeable materials, are nowadays the dominant technology used in pressure driven water desalination systems. Despite offering superior water permeation and salt selectivity, their surface properties, such as their charge and roughness, cannot be extensively tuned due to the intrinsic fabrication process of the membranes by interfacial polymerization. The alteration of these properties would lead to a better control of the materials surface zeta potential, which is critical to finely tune selectivity and enhance the membrane materials stability when exposed to complex industrial waste streams. Low pressure plasma was employed to introduce amine functionalities onto the PA surface of commercially available thin-film composite (TFC) membranes. Morphological changes after plasma polymerization were analyzed by SEM and AFM, and average surface roughness decreased by 29%. Amine enrichment provided isoelectric point changes from pH 3.7 to 5.2 for 5 to 15 min of plasma polymerization time. Synchrotron FTIR mappings of the amine-modified surface indicated the addition of a discrete 60 nm film to the PA layer. Furthermore, metal affinity was confirmed by the enhanced binding of silver to the modified surface, supported by an increased antimicrobial functionality with demonstrable elimination of E. coli growth. Essential salt rejection was shown minimally compromised for faster polymerization processes. Plasma polymerization is therefore a viable route to producing functional amine enriched thin-film composite PA membrane surfaces. PMID:26083007

  6. Amine Enrichment of Thin-Film Composite Membranes via Low Pressure Plasma Polymerization for Antimicrobial Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Reis, Rackel; Dumée, Ludovic F; He, Li; She, Fenghua; Orbell, John D; Winther-Jensen, Bjorn; Duke, Mikel C

    2015-07-15

    Thin-film composite membranes, primarily based on poly(amide) (PA) semipermeable materials, are nowadays the dominant technology used in pressure driven water desalination systems. Despite offering superior water permeation and salt selectivity, their surface properties, such as their charge and roughness, cannot be extensively tuned due to the intrinsic fabrication process of the membranes by interfacial polymerization. The alteration of these properties would lead to a better control of the materials surface zeta potential, which is critical to finely tune selectivity and enhance the membrane materials stability when exposed to complex industrial waste streams. Low pressure plasma was employed to introduce amine functionalities onto the PA surface of commercially available thin-film composite (TFC) membranes. Morphological changes after plasma polymerization were analyzed by SEM and AFM, and average surface roughness decreased by 29%. Amine enrichment provided isoelectric point changes from pH 3.7 to 5.2 for 5 to 15 min of plasma polymerization time. Synchrotron FTIR mappings of the amine-modified surface indicated the addition of a discrete 60 nm film to the PA layer. Furthermore, metal affinity was confirmed by the enhanced binding of silver to the modified surface, supported by an increased antimicrobial functionality with demonstrable elimination of E. coli growth. Essential salt rejection was shown minimally compromised for faster polymerization processes. Plasma polymerization is therefore a viable route to producing functional amine enriched thin-film composite PA membrane surfaces.

  7. The semi-interpenetrating polymer network matrix of fiber-reinforced composite and its effect on the surface adhesive properties.

    PubMed

    Lastumäki, T M; Lassila, L V J; Vallittu, P K

    2003-09-01

    This aim of this study was to examine the effect of further-impregnation time of polymer pre-impregnated fiber-reinforcement on polymer matrix structure of the fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) used in dental applications. In addition, shear bond strength between the FRC and veneering composite after various length of further-impregnation was studied. Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) pre-impregnated glass fiber-reinforcement was further-impregnated with a diacrylate monomer resin by using five lengths of further-impregnation from 10 min to 24 h. The test specimens (n=5) from each five groups were treated with the solvent tetrahydrofuran and examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to determinate the existence of linear PMMA in the polymer matrix of the FRC. The same lengths of further-impregnation were used to form an adhesive substrate for veneering composite and to measure the shear bond strength (n=8). The SEM examination showed that linear PMMA-polymer and cross-linked diacrylate polymer formed two independent networks for the polymer matrix of FRC. The highest mean shear bond strength value (18.7+/-2.9 MPa) was achieved when the fiber reinforcement was further-impregnated for 24 h. The shortest further-impregnation, 10 min, resulted in the lowest mean shear bond strength (12.7+/-2.9 MPa). A correlation between increased shear bond strength and longer further-impregnation was found (0.689, p<0.001). The results revealed that linear PMMA network of the polymer matrix of the FRC remained in the structure regardless of the various lengths of the further-impregnation with diacrylate resin. PMID:15348401

  8. Silorane adhesive system: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ruschel, Vanessa Carla; Baratieri, Luiz Narciso; Monteiro Júnior, Sylvio; Andrada, Mauro Amaral Caldeira de

    2014-01-01

    Silorane-based composite resin requires a specific adhesive system: a 2-step self-etching adhesive. Clinical protocols are well established and are based on the principles of adhesion to mineralized dental tissues. In this paper, we present a clinical application of the silorane adhesive system in a class-II restoration using silorane-based composite resin.

  9. Addition polyimide adhesives containing ATBN and silicone elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saint Clair, A. K.; Saint Clair, T. L.

    1981-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of added elastomers on the thermal stability, adhesive strength, and fracture toughness of LARC-13, a high-temperature addition polyimide adhesive. Various butadiene/acrylonitrile and silicon elastomers were incorporated into the polyimide resin either as physical polyblends, or by chemically reacting the elastomers with the polyimide backbone. Adhesive single lap-shear and T-peel strengths were measured before and after ageing at elevated temperature. A tapered double-cantilever beam specimen was used to determine the fracture toughness of the elastomer-modified polyimide adhesives.

  10. Bending effects of unsymmetric adhesively bonded composite repairs on cracked aluminum panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arendt, Cory; Sun, C. T.

    1994-01-01

    The bending effects of unsymmetrically bonded composite repairs on cracked aluminum panels were quantified using a plate linear finite element model. Stress intensity factors and strain energy release rates were obtained from the model twice, once with out-of-plane displacement suppressed and another time without these restrictions. Several configurations were examined, crack growth stability was identified, and the effect of a debond was considered. The maximum stress intensity factor was also analyzed. Previous work by other authors was found to underpredict the bending effect.

  11. Non-destructive Evaluation of Bonds Between Fiberglass Composite and Metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Selina; Sonta, Kestutis; Perey, Daniel F.; Cramer, K. E.; Berger, Libby

    2015-01-01

    To assess the integrity and reliability of an adhesive joint in an automotive composite component, several non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methodologies are correlated to lap shear bond strengths. A glass-fabric-reinforced composite structure was bonded to a metallic structure with a two-part epoxy adhesive. Samples were subsequently cut and tested in shear, and flaws were found in some areas. This study aims to develop a reliable and portable NDE system for service-level adhesive inspection in the automotive industry. The results of the experimental investigation using several NDE methods are presented and discussed. Fiberglass-to-metal bonding is the ideal configuration for NDE via thermography using excitation with induction heating, due to the conductive metal and non-conductive glass-fiber-reinforced composites. Excitation can be either by a research-grade induction heater of highly defined frequency and intensity, or by a service-level heater, such as would be used for sealing windshields in a body shop. The thermographs thus produced can be captured via a high-resolution infrared camera, with principal component analysis and 2D spatial Laplacian processing. Alternatively, the thermographs can be captured by low resolution thermochromic microencapsulated liquid crystal film imaging, which needs no post-processing and can be very inexpensive. These samples were also examined with phased-array ultrasound. The NDE methods are compared to the lap shear values and to each other for approximate cost, accuracy, and time and level of expertise needed.

  12. Low Pressure DC Glow Discharge Air Plasma Surface Treatment of Polyethylene (PE) Film for Improvement of Adhesive Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnasamy Navaneetha, Pandiyaraj; Vengatasamy, Selvarajan; Rajendrasing, R. Deshmukh; Paramasivam, Yoganand; Suresh, Balasubramanian; Sundaram, Maruthamuthu

    2013-01-01

    The present work deals with the change in surface properties of polyethylene (PE) film using DC low pressure glow discharge air plasma and makes it useful for technical applications. The change in hydrophilicity of the modified PE film surface was investigated by measuring contact angle and surface energy as a function of exposure time. Changes in the morphological and chemical composition of PE films were analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The improvement in adhesion was studied by measuring T-peel and lap-shear strength. The results show that the wettability and surface energy of the PE film has been improved due to the introduction of oxygen-containing polar groups and an increase in surface roughness. The XPS result clearly shows the increase in concentration of oxygen content and the formation of polar groups on the polymer surface. The AFM observation on PE film shows that the roughness of the surface increased due to plasma treatment. The above morphological and chemical changes enhanced the adhesive properties of the PE film surfaces, which was confirmed by T-peel and lap-shear tests.

  13. Adhesive strength of bone-implant interfaces and in-vivo degradation of PHB composites for load-bearing applications.

    PubMed

    Meischel, M; Eichler, J; Martinelli, E; Karr, U; Weigel, J; Schmöller, G; Tschegg, E K; Fischerauer, S; Weinberg, A M; Stanzl-Tschegg, S E

    2016-01-01

    Aim of this study was to evaluate the response of bone to novel biodegradable polymeric composite implants in the femora of growing rats. Longitudinal observation of bone reaction at the implant site (BV/TV) as well as resorption of the implanted pins were monitored using in vivo micro-focus computed tomography (µCT). After 12, 24 and 36 weeks femora containing the implants were explanted, scanned with high resolution ex vivo µCT, and the surface roughness of the implants was measured to conclude on the ingrowth capability for bone tissue. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) were used to observe changes on the surface of Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) during degradation and cell ingrowth. Four different composites with zirconium dioxide (ZrO2) and Herafill(®) were compared. After 36 weeks in vivo, none of the implants did show significant degradation. The PHB composite with ZrO2 and a high percentage (30%) of Herafill® as well as the Mg-alloy WZ21 showed the highest values of bone accumulation (increased BV/TV) around the implant. The lowest value was measured in PHB with 3% ZrO2 containing no Herafill®. Roughness measurements as well as EDX and SEM imaging could not reveal any changes on the PHB composites׳ surfaces. Biomechanical parameters, such as the adhesion strength between bone and implant were determined by measuring the shear strength as well as push-out energy of the bone-implant interface. The results showed that improvement of these mechanical properties of the studied PHBs P3Z, P3Z10H and P3Z30H is necessary in order to obtain appropriate load-bearing material. The moduli of elasticity, tensile strength and strain properties of the PHB composites are close to that of bone and thus promising. Compared to clinically used PLGA, PGA and PLA materials, their additional benefit is an unchanged local pH value during degradation, which makes them well tolerated by cells and immune system. They might be used

  14. An Investigation of the Tensile Strength of a Composite-To-Metal Adhesive Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsouvalis, Nicholas G.; Karatzas, Vassilios A.

    2011-04-01

    The present study examines the feasibility of a simple concept composite-to-metal butt joint through the performance of both numerical and experimental studies. The composite part is made of glass/epoxy unidirectional layers made with the vacuum bag method. The geometry of the joint is typical for marine applications and corresponds to a low stiffness ratio. Two major parameters are investigated, namely the overlap length and the surface preparation of the steel adherent. Manufacturing of specimens and the procedure of the tensile tests are described in detail, giving hints for obtaining a better quality joint. Axial elongation and strains at various places of the joint were monitored and also numerically calculated. The tests revealed that the joint is quite effective, irrespectively of the steel surface preparation method. The failure loads are comparable and in some cases superior to other corresponding values found in the literature. The numerical models proved to adequately predict the structural response of the joint up to the loading where debonding starts.

  15. Reduction of Moisture Effects During the Cure of Epoxy Adhesives Used in Composite Repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Augl, J. M.; Sivy, G. T.

    1985-01-01

    The requirements for repair work on Naval aircraft composite wing skins that can be performed under depot conditions (or still worse, under field conditions) are quite restrictive. Equipment that can be used is rather limited as are the available repair space and time. The procedures must be simple enough so that they can be performed satisfactorily by personnel without special knowledge in composite materials technology. Repairs of small holes should not require more than perhaps a short predrying cycle (with heat guns) and a subsequent patch bonding using a heating blanket, held in place by applying a vacuum. However, it has been observed during simulated experimental repair work that the glue lines frequently show a high content of pores and bubbles which are attributed to evaporation of moisture during the curing cycle. (Of course, other volatile materials such as residual solvent would act similarly). The purpose of this paper is to give some detailed analysis of the problem of moisture transport as a function of repair conditions, and to discuss some preliminary work to reduce the effect of moisture by removing moisture chemically with carbodiimides before it reaches a critical level for bubble formations.

  16. Cell adhesive and growth behavior on electrospun nanofibrous scaffolds by designed multifunctional composites.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ding; Wu, Yi-Pan; Fu, Zhi-Feng; Tian, Yuan; Li, Cong-Ju; Gao, Chun-Ying; Chen, Zhong-Liang; Feng, Xi-Zeng

    2011-05-01

    Nanostructured biocomposite scaffolds of poly(l-lactide) (PLLA) blended with collagen (coll) or hydroxyapatite (HA), or both for tissue engineering application, were fabricated by electrospinning. The electrospun scaffolds were characterized for the morphology, chemical and tensile properties by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), water contact angle (WCA), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) measurement, and tensile testing. Electrospun biocomposite scaffolds of PLLA and collagen or (and) HA in the diameter range of 200-700 nm mimic the nanoscale structure of the extracellular matrix (ECM) with a well-interconnection pore network structure. The presence of collagen in the scaffolds increased their hydrophility, and enhanced cell attachment and proliferation, while HA improved the tensile properties of the scaffolds. The biocompatibility of the electrospun scaffolds and the viability of contacting cells were evaluated by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride (DAPI) nuclear staining and by fluorescein diacetate (FDA) and propidium iodide (PI) double staining methods. The results support the conclusion that 293T cells grew well on composite scaffolds. Compared with pure PLLA scaffolds a greater density of viable cells was seen on the composites, especially the PLLA/HA/collagen scaffolds. PMID:21227659

  17. INTERIOR OF WEST SPAN LOOKING WEST (SHADOW OF VERTICAL LAPS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR OF WEST SPAN LOOKING WEST (SHADOW OF VERTICAL LAPS PLACED ON ZONE III; ASPHALT ZONE IX) - Honey Run Bridge, Spanning Butte Creek, bypassed section of Honey Run Road (originally Carr Hill Road), Paradise, Butte County, CA

  18. FRICTION STIR LAP WELDING OF ALUMINUM - POLYMER USING SCRIBE TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyay, Piyush; Hovanski, Yuri; Fifield, Leonard S.; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2015-02-16

    Friction Stir Scribe (FSS) technology is a relatively new variant of Friction Stir Welding (FSW) which enables lap joining of dissimilar material with very different melting points and different high temperature flow behaviors. The cutter scribe attached at the tip of FSW tool pin effectively cuts the high melting point material such that a mechanically interlocking feature is created between the dissimilar materials. The geometric shape of this interlocking feature determines the shear strength attained by the lap joint. This work presents first use of scribe technology in joining polymers to aluminum alloy. Details of the several runs of scribe welding performed in lap joining of ~3.175mm thick polymers including HDPE, filled and unfilled Nylon 66 to 2mm thick AA5182 are presented. The effect of scribe geometry and length on weld interlocking features is presented along with lap shear strength evaluations.

  19. Bond strength of composite to dentin: effect of acid etching and laser irradiation through an uncured self-etch adhesive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, F. L. A.; Carvalho, J. G.; Andrade, M. F.; Saad, J. R. C.; Hebling, J.; Lizarelli, R. F. Z.

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluated the effect on micro-tensile bond strength (µ-TBS) of laser irradiation of etched/unetched dentin through an uncured self-etching adhesive. Dentinal surfaces were treated with Clearfil SE Bond Adhesive (CSE) either according to the manufacturer’s instructions (CSE) or without applying the primer (CSE/NP). The dentin was irradiated through the uncured adhesive, using an Nd:YAG laser at 0.75 or 1 W power settings. The adhesive was cured, composite crowns were built up, and the teeth were sectioned into beams (0.49 mm2) to be stressed under tension. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey statistics (α = 5%). Dentin of the fractured specimens and the interfaces of untested beams were observed under scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that non-etched irradiated surfaces presented higher µ-TBS than etched and irradiated surfaces (p < 0.05). Laser irradiation alone did not lead to differences in µ-TBS (p > 0.05). SEM showed solidification globules on the surfaces of the specimens. The interfaces were similar on irradiated and non-irradiated surfaces. Laser irradiation of dentin through the uncured adhesive did not lead to higher µ-TBS when compared to the suggested manufacturer’s technique. However, this treatment brought benefits when performed on unetched dentin, since bond strengths were higher when compared to etched dentin.

  20. Double-Lap Shear Test For Honeycomb Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.; Hodge, Andrew J.

    1992-01-01

    Double-lap test measures shear strength of panel made of honeycomb core with 8-ply carbon-fiber/epoxy face sheets. Developed to overcome three principal disadvantages of prior standard single-lap shear test: specimen had to be more than 17 in. long; metal face sheets had to be used; and test introduced torque, with consequent bending and peeling of face sheets and spurious tensile or compressive loading of honeycomb.

  1. Effect Of Molecular Weight On Adhesive Properties Of The Phenylethynyl-Terminated Polyimide LARC(sup TM)-PETI-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cano, Roberto J.; Jensen, Brian J.

    1994-01-01

    Future civilian aircraft will require the use of advanced adhesive systems with high temperature capabilities. One such material has been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center, a phenylethynyl-terminated polyimide given the designation LARC(sup TM)-PETI-5. Recent work has shown the advantages of similar phenylethynyl-terminated polyimides as films, moldings, adhesives, and composite matrix resins. Phenylethynyl-terminated oligomers provide greater processing windows than materials which incorporate simple ethynyl endcaps. Since these low molecular weight, low melt viscosity oligomers thermally cure without the evolution of volatile by-products, they provide an excellent means of producing polymers with high glass transition temperatures, excellent solvent resistance, and high mechanical properties. Three different versions of LARC(sup TM)-PETI-5 with theoretical number average molecular weights (M(sub n)s) of 250, 5000, and 10000 g/mol were synthesized in this work. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) measurements were performed on the dry powder form of these materials to establish cure conditions which result in high glass transition temperatures (T(sub g)s). Lap shear specimens were prepared from adhesive tape made from each material and with the thermal cure conditions determined from the DSC data. The tensile shear data established processing conditions which provided the best adhesive strengths. Further testing was performed to establish the properties of LARC(sup TM)-PETI-5 as an adhesive material and to determine its solvent resistance.

  2. Molten pool characterization of laser lap welded copper and aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Zhiqing; Hu, Shengsun; Zuo, Di; Cai, Wayne; Lee, Dongkyun; Elijah, Kannatey-Asibu, Jr.

    2013-12-01

    A 3D finite volume simulation model for laser welding of a Cu-Al lap joint was developed using ANSYS FLUENT to predict the weld pool temperature distribution, velocity field, geometry, alloying element distribution and transition layer thickness—all key attributes and performance characteristics for a laser-welded joint. Melting and solidification of the weld pool was simulated with an enthalpy-porosity formulation. Laser welding experiments and metallographic examination by SEM and EDX were performed to investigate the weld pool features and validate the simulated results. A bowl-shaped temperature field and molten pool, and a unique maximum fusion zone width were observed near the Cu-Al interface. Both the numerical simulation and experimental results indicate an arch-shaped intermediate layer of Cu and Al, and a gradual transition of Cu concentration from the aluminum plate to the copper plate with high composition gradient. For the conditions used, welding with Cu on top was found to result in a better weld joint.

  3. [Composite, non-resorbable parietal prosthesis with polyethylene terephtalate-polyurethane (HI-TEX PARP NT): prevention of intraperitoneal adhesions. Experimental study in rabbits].

    PubMed

    Sodji, M; Rogier, R; Durand-Fontanier, S; Lachachi, F; Cheynel, N; Lombin, L; de Laclause, B P; Valleix, D; Descottes, B

    2001-07-01

    The authors report an experimental study in the rabbit with a new composite non absorbable mesh in Polyethylene Terephtalate-Polyurethane used for incisional hernia repair in intraperitoneal positioning. This new mesh has one permeable side in polyethylene terephtalate for rapid tissue fixation and another side in polyruethane, hydrophob in order to avoid cell penetration. Eighteen rabbits were operated. A wound was created in aponeurose, muscle and peritoneal abdominal wall. The mesh was placed in intraperitoneal positioning and was taken off at 4, 9 and 13 months for histologic examination and electronic microscopical examination. Tolerance, adhesion, tissular reaction and neoperitoneum formation have been studied. All the meshes were well integrated and without sepsis. In 18% of cases small and monocclusive intraperitoneal adhesions were found. This new composite mesh in intraperitoneal positioning gave good results at medium-term in the rabbit. It's an attractive alternative for incision hernias repair with intraperitoneal mesh. PMID:11486538

  4. Evaluation of bisphenol E cyanate ester for the resin-injection repair of advanced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lio, Wilber Yaote

    Polymer matrix composites (PMCs) are susceptible to impacts that often result in microcracks and delaminations that can greatly reduce their mechanical integrity. Current injection repair techniques are limited to low glass transition temperature (Tg) composites due to the temperature and viscosity limitations of current repair resins. Bisphenol E cyanate ester (BECy) has both a high Tg and low prepolymer viscosity that makes it an ideal resin for the injection repair of high temperature PMCs. In addition, alumina nanoparticles have been shown to increase the strengths of some adhesives as well as impart shear thinning properties in suspension; both of which are desirable effects for injection repair. Lap shear tests were performed to evaluate adhesive properties of BECy and BECy-alumina nanocomposites. Effects of substrate, temperature, nanoparticle loading, and moisture were investigated. A resin-injection process was developed and the efficiency of BECy in repairing bismaleimide-carbon fiber composite plates was studied through ultrasonic evaluation and compression-after-impact tests.

  5. Temperature Effects on Adhesive Bond Strengths and Modulus for Commonly Used Spacecraft Structural Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ojeda, Cassandra E.; Oakes, Eric J.; Hill, Jennifer R.; Aldi, Dominic; Forsberg, Gustaf A.

    2011-01-01

    A study was performed to observe how changes in temperature and substrate material affected the strength and modulus of an adhesive bondline. Seven different adhesives commonly used in aerospace bonded structures were tested. Aluminum, titanium and Invar adherends were cleaned and primed, then bonded using the manufacturer's recommendations. Following surface preparation, the coupons were bonded with the adhesives. The single lap shear coupons were then pull tested per ASTM D 1002 Standard Test Method for Apparent Shear Strength of Single- Lap-Joint over a temperature range from -150 deg C up to +150 deg C. The ultimate strength was calculated and the resulting data were converted into B-basis design allowables. Average and Bbasis results were compared. Results obtained using aluminum adherends are reported. The effects of using different adherend materials and temperature were also studied and will be reported in a subsequent paper. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) was used to study variations in adhesive modulus with temperature. This work resulted in a highly useful database for comparing adhesive performance over a wide range of temperatures, and has facilitated selection of the appropriate adhesive for spacecraft structure applications.

  6. Enhancement of adhesion on polyether etherketone (PEEK) by excimer laser treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Sadras, B.; Laurens, P.; Decobert, F.; Arefi, F.; Amouroux, J.

    1996-12-31

    Due to its important chemical stability, polyether-etherketone (PEEK) thermoplastic presents poor adhesive bonding properties. The possibilities of enhancing the PEEK adhesive properties by excimer laser pretreatments are investigated. Surface modifications are characterized, depending on the experimental working conditions, using SEM, profilometry, XPS, wettability and mechanical tests. Lap shear strength values show that excimer laser irradiation improve PEEK adhesion bonding properties for all treatment conditions (energy, atmosphere).

  7. Research on the design of surface acquisition system of active lap based on FPGA and FX2LP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hongshen; Li, Xiaojin; Fan, Bin; Zeng, Zhige

    2014-08-01

    In order to research the dynamic surface shape changes of active lap during the processing, this paper introduces a dynamic surface shape acquisition system of active lap using FPGA and USB communication. This system consists of high-precision micro-displacement sensor array, acquisition board, PC computer composition, and acquisition circuit board includes six sub-boards based on FPGA, a hub-board based on FPGA and USB communication. A sub-board is responsible for a number of independent channel sensors' data acquisition; hub-board is responsible for creating encoder simulation tools to active lap deformation control system with location information, sending synchronization information to latch the sensor data in all of the sub-boards for a time, while addressing the sub-boards to gather the sensor data in each sub-board one by one and transmitting all the sensor data together with location information via the USB chip FX2LP to the host computer. Experimental results show that the system is capable of fixing the location and speed of active lap, meanwhile the control of surface transforming and dynamic surface data acquisition at a certain location in the processing is implemented.

  8. Flaw Tolerance in Lap Shear Brazed Joints. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, Yury; Wang, Li-Qin

    2003-01-01

    Furnace brazing is a joining process used in the aerospace and other industries to produce strong permanent and hermetic structural joints. As in any joining process, brazed joints have various imperfections and defects. At the present time, our understanding of the influence of the internal defects on the strength of the brazed joints is not adequate. The goal of this 3-part investigation is to better understand the properties and failure mechanisms of the brazed joints containing defects. This study focuses on the behavior of the brazed lap shear joints because of their importance in manufacturing aerospace structures. In Part 1, an average shear strength capability and failure modes of the single lap joints are explored. Stainless steel specimens brazed with pure silver are tested in accordance with the AWS C3.2 standard. Comparison of the failure loads and the ultimate shear strength with the Finite Element Analysis (FEA) of the same specimens as a function of the overlap widths shows excellent correlation between the experimental and calculated values for the defect-free lap joints. A damage zone criterion is shown to work quite well in understanding the failure of the braze joints. In Part 2, the findings of the Part 1 will be verified on the larger test specimens. Also, various flaws will be introduced in the test specimens to simulate lack of braze coverage in the lap joints. Mechanical testing and FEA will be performed on these joints to verify that behavior of the flawed ductile lap joints is similar to joints with a reduced braze area. Finally, in Part 3, the results obtained in Parts 1 and 2 will be applied to the actual brazed structure to evaluate the load-carrying capability of a structural lap joint containing discontinuities. In addition, a simplified engineering procedure will be offered for the laboratory testing of the lap shear specimens.

  9. Stress analysis of the cracked lap shear specimens: An ASTM round robin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.

    1986-01-01

    This ASTM Round Robin was conducted to evaluate the state of the art in stress analysis of adhesively bonded joint specimens. Specifically, the participants were asked to calculate the strain-energy-release rate for two different geometry cracked lap shear (CLS) specimens at four different debond lengths. The various analytical techniques consisted of 2- and 3-dimensional finite element analysis, beam theory, plate theory, and a combination of beam theory and finite element analysis. The results were examined in terms of the total strain-energy-release rate and the mode I to mode II ratio as a function of debond length for each specimen geometry. These results basically clustered into two groups: geometric linear or geometric nonlinear analysis. The geometric nonlinear analysis is required to properly analyze the CLS specimens. The 3-D finite element analysis gave indications of edge closure plus some mode III loading. Each participant described his analytical technique and results. Nine laboratories participated.

  10. Stress analysis of the cracked-lap-shear specimen - An ASTM round-robin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.

    1987-01-01

    This ASTM Round Robin was conducted to evaluate the state of the art in stress analysis of adhesively bonded joint specimens. Specifically, the participants were asked to calculate the strain-energy-release rate for two different geometry cracked lap shear (CLS) specimens at four different debond lengths. The various analytical techniques consisted of 2- and 3-dimensional finite element analysis, beam theory, plate theory, and a combination of beam theory and finite element analysis. The results were examined in terms of the total strain-energy-release rate and the mode I to mode II ratio as a function of debond length for each specimen geometry. These results basically clustered into two groups: geometric linear or geometric nonlinear analysis. The geometric nonlinear analysis is required to properly analyze the CLS specimens. The 3-D finite element analysis gave indications of edge closure plus some mode III loading. Each participant described his analytical technique and results. Nine laboratories participated.

  11. STPI/LARC: A 200 deg C polyimide adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, D. J.; St.clair, T. L.

    1985-01-01

    A copolyimide, STPI/LARC, was prepared from the reaction of 3,3'4'benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride (BTDA), equimolar quantities of m-phenylenediamine and 4,4'-oxydianiline, and a small amount of phthalic anhydride to control the molecular weight. The processability and adhesive properties of STPI/LARC were compared to those of a commercially available form of LARC-TPI. LARC-TPI, a thermoplastic polyimide, from the reaction of BTDA and 3,3'-diaminobenzophenone, had previously shown promise as a high temperature structural adhesive. Lap shear specimens were fabricated using adhesive tape prepared from each of the two polymers. Lap shear tests were performed at room temperature, 177 C, and 204 C before and after exposure to a 72-hour water-boil and to aging at 204 C.

  12. Use of two-dimensional transmission photoelastic models to study stresses in double-lap bolted joints: Load transfer and stresses in the inner lap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.

    1980-01-01

    The determination of the stress distribution in the inner lap of double-lap, double-bolt joints using photoelastic models of the joint is discussed. The principal idea is to fabricate the inner lap of a photoelastic material and to use a photoelastically sensitive material for the two outer laps. With this setup, polarized light transmitted through the stressed model responds principally to the stressed inner lap. The model geometry, the procedures for making and testing the model, and test results are described.

  13. Investigation of the Viability, Adhesion, and Migration of Human Fibroblasts in a Hyaluronic Acid/Gelatin Microgel-Reinforced Composite Hydrogel for Vocal Fold Tissue Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Heris, Hossein K; Daoud, Jamal; Sheibani, Sara; Vali, Hojatollah; Tabrizian, Maryam; Mongeau, Luc

    2016-01-21

    The potential use of a novel scaffold biomaterial consisting of cross-linked hyaluronic acid (HA)-gelatin (Ge) composite microgels is investigated for use in treating vocal fold injury and scarring. Cell adhesion integrins and kinematics of cell motion are investigated in 2D and 3D culture conditions, respectively. Human vocal fold fibroblast (hVFF) cells are seeded on HA-Ge microgels attached to a HA hydrogel thin film. The results show that hVFF cells establish effective adhesion to HA-Ge microgels through the ubiquitous expression of β1 integrin in the cell membrane. The microgels are then encapsulated in a 3D HA hydrogel for the study of cell migration. The cells within the HA-Ge microgel-reinforced composite hydrogel (MRCH) scaffold have an average motility speed of 0.24 ± 0.08 μm min(-1) . The recorded microscopic images reveal features that are presumably associated with lobopodial and lamellipodial cell migration modes within the MRCH scaffold. Average cell speed during lobopodial migration is greater than that during lamellipodial migration. The cells move faster in the MRCH than in the HA-Ge gel without microgels. These findings support the hypothesis that HA-Ge MRCH promotes cell adhesion and migration; thereby they constitute a promising biomaterial for vocal fold repair.

  14. Evaluation of sealing ability two self-etching adhesive systems and a glass ionomer lining LC under composite restoration in primary tooth: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Pragasam, Ananda Xavier; Duraisamy, Vinola; Nayak, Ullal Anand; Reddy, Venugopal; Rao, Arun Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: To evaluate the sealing ability of two self-etching adhesive systems and glass ionomer cement (GIC) lining Light cure (LC) under composite restorations in primary teeth. Materials and Methods: Class V cavities are prepared on the cervical third of the facial and lingual surfaces of primary molars. The specimens are then assigned into four experimental groups. The restored primary molars are stored in distilled water and subjected to thermocycling. Each section was examined using a stereomicroscope to assess dye penetration at the margin of the restoration and evaluated via pictures. Statistical Analysis Used: The degree of microleakage was analyzed using Kruskal–Wallis test and the intergroup significance by multiple comparison analysis. Results: The mean rank of the groups are Group I (Adper Prompt™ + Z−100) 19.44, Group II (UniFil BOND + Solare) 5.38, Group III (GIC lining LC + Z−100) 20.06, and Group IV (GIC lining LC + Solare) 21.13 with the P < 0.001. Conclusion: Composite resin restorations bonded with two-step self-etching adhesive system (UniFil Bond) exhibited lesser microleakage than one-step self-etching adhesive system (Adperprompt™) in primary teeth. PMID:26538910

  15. A comparative study of the hydroxy acids from the Murchison, GRA 95229 and LAP 02342 meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzarello, Sandra; Wang, Yi; Chaban, Galina M.

    2010-11-01

    The hydroxy acid suites extracted from the Murchison (MN), GRA 95229 (GRA) and LAP 02342 (LAP) meteorites have been investigated for their molecular, chiral and isotopic composition. Substantial amounts of the compounds have been detected in all three meteorites, with a total abundance that is lower than that of the amino acids in the same stones. Overall, their molecular distributions mirror closely that of the corresponding amino acids and most evidently so for the LAP meteorite. A surprising L-lactic acid enantiomeric excess was found present in all three stones, which cannot be easily accounted by terrestrial contamination; all other compounds of the three hydroxy acid suites were found racemic. The branched-chain five carbon and the diastereomer six-carbon hydroxy acids were also studied vis-a-vis the corresponding amino acids and calculated ab initio thermodynamic data, with the comparison allowing the suggestion that meteoritic hydroxyacid at these chain lengths formed under thermodynamic control and, possibly, at a later stage than the corresponding amino acids. 13C and D isotopic enrichments were detected for many of the meteoritic hydroxy acids and found to vary between molecular species with trends that also appear to correlate to those of amino acids; the highest δD value (+3450‰) was displayed by GRA 2-OH-2-methylbutyric acid. The data suggest that, while the amino- and hydroxy acids likely relate to common presolar precursor, their final distribution in meteorites was determined to large extent by the overall composition of the environments that saw their formation, with ammonia being the determining factor in their final abundance ratios.

  16. Composites containing albumin protein or cyanoacrylate adhesives and biodegradable scaffolds: II. In vivo wound closure study in a rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNally-Heintzelman, Karen M.; Heintzelman, Douglas L.; Duffy, Mark T.; Bloom, Jeffrey N.; Soller, Eric C.; Gilmour, Travis M.; Hoffman, Grant T.; Edward, Deepak

    2004-07-01

    Our Scaffold-Enhanced Biological Adhesive (SEBA) system was investigated as an alternative to sutures or adhesives alone for repair of wounds. Two scaffold materials were investigated: (i) a synthetic biodegradable material fabricated from poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid); and (ii) a biologic material, small intestinal submucosa, manufactured by Cook BioTech. Two adhesive materials were also investigated: (i) a biologic adhesive composed of 50%(w/v) bovine serum albumin solder and 0.5mg/ml indocyanine green dye mixed in deionized water, and activated with an 808-nm diode laser; and (ii) Ethicon"s Dermabond, a 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate. The tensile strength and time-to-failure of skin incisions repaired in vivo in a rat model were measured at seven days postoperative. Incisions closed by protein solder alone, by Dermabond alone, or by suture, were also tested for comparison. The tensile strength of repairs formed using the SEBA system were 50% to 65% stronger than repairs formed by suture or either adhesive alone, with significantly less variations within each experimental group (average standard deviations of 15% for SEBA versus 38% for suture and 28% for adhesive alone). In addition, the time-to-failure curves showed a longevity not previously seen with the suture or adhesive alone techniques. The SEBA system acts to keep the dermis in tight apposition during the critical early phase of wound healing when tissue gaps are bridged by scar and granulation tissue. It has the property of being more flexible than either of the adhesives alone and may allow the apposed edges to move in conjunction with each other as a unit for a longer period of time and over a greater range of stresses than adhesives alone. This permits more rapid healing and establishment of integrity since the microgaps between the dermis edges are significantly reduced. By the time the scaffolds are sloughed from the wound site, there is greater strength and healing than that produced by adhesive alone or

  17. Lap time optimisation of a racing go-kart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lot, Roberto; Dal Bianco, Nicola

    2016-02-01

    The minimum lap time optimal control problem has been solved for a go-kart model. The symbolic algebra software Maple has been used to derive equations of motion and an indirect method has been adopted to solve the optimal control problem. Simulation has been successfully performed on a full track lap with a multibody model endowed with seven degrees of freedom. Geometrical and mechanical characteristics of a real kart have been measured by a lab test to feed the mathematical model. Telemetry recorded in an entire lap by a professional driver has been compared to simulation results in order to validate the model. After the reliability of the optimal control model was proved, the simulation has been used to study the peculiar dynamics of go-karts and focus to tyre slippage dynamics, which is highly affected by the lack of differential.

  18. Initial and long-term bond strengths of one-step self-etch adhesives with silane coupling agent to enamel-dentin-composite in combined situation.

    PubMed

    Mamanee, Teerapong; Takahashi, Masahiro; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Foxton, Richard M; Tagami, Junji

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of adding silane coupling agent on initial and long-term bond strengths of one-step self-etch adhesives to enamel-dentin-composite in combined situation. Cervical cavities were prepared on extracted molars and filled with Clearfil AP-X. After water-storage for one-week, the filled teeth were sectioned in halves to expose enamel, dentin and composite surfaces and then enamel-dentin-composite surface was totally applied with one of adhesive treatments (Clearfil SE One, Clearfil SE One with Clearfil Porcelain Bond Activator, Beautibond Multi, Beautibond Multi with Beautibond Multi PR Plus and Scotchbond Universal). After designed period, micro-shear bond strengths (µSBSs) to each substrate were determined. For each period of water-storage, additive silane treatments significantly increased µSBS to composite (p<0.001). On the other hand, they significantly decreased µSBS to dentin (p<0.001), although did not have adverse effect on µSBS to enamel (p>0.05). Moreover, the stability of µSBS was depended on materials and substrates used.

  19. [Investigation of characteristic microstructures of adhesive interface in wood/bamboo composite material by synchrotron radiation X-ray phase contrast microscopy].

    PubMed

    Peng, Guan-Yun; Wang, Yu-Rong; Ren, Hai-Qing; Yang, Shu-Min; Ma, Hong-Xia; Xie, Hong-Lan; Deng, Biao; Du, Guo-Hao; Xiao, Ti-Qiao

    2013-03-01

    Third-generation synchrotron radiation X-ray phase-contrast microscopy(XPCM)can be used for obtaining image with edge enhancement, and achieve the high contrast imaging of low-Z materials with the spatial coherence peculiarity of X-rays. In the present paper, the characteristic microstructures of adhesive at the interface and their penetration in wood/bamboo composite material were investigated systematically by XPCM at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF). And the effect of several processing techniques was analyzed for the adhesive penetration in wood/bamboo materials. The results show that the synchrotron radiation XPCM is expected to be one of the important precision detection methods for wood-based panels.

  20. Comparison of adhesive gut bacteria composition, immunity, and disease resistance in juvenile hybrid tilapia fed two different Lactobacillus strains.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenshu; Ren, Pengfei; He, Suxu; Xu, Li; Yang, Yaling; Gu, Zemao; Zhou, Zhigang

    2013-07-01

    This study compares the effects of two Lactobacillus strains, highly adhesive Lactobacillus brevis JCM 1170 (HALB) and less-adhesive Lactobacillus acidophilus JCM 1132 (LALB), on the survival and growth, adhesive gut bacterial communities, immunity, and protection against pathogenic bacterial infection in juvenile hybrid tilapia. During a 5-week feeding trial the fish were fed a diet containing 0 to 10(9) cells/g feed of the two Lactobacillus strains. Samples of intestine, kidney, and spleen were taken at the start and at 10, 20, and 35 days for analysis of stress tolerance and cytokine gene mRNA levels and to assess the diversity of adhesive gut bacterial communities. A 14-day immersion challenge with Aeromonas hydrophila NJ-1 was also performed following the feeding trial. The results showed no significant differences in survival rate, weight gain, or feed conversion in the different dietary treatments. The adhesive gut bacterial communities were strikingly altered in the fish fed either the HALB or the LALB, but the response was more rapid and substantial with the adhesive strain. The two strains induced similar changes in the patterns (upregulation or downregulation) of intestinal, splenic or kidney cytokine expression, but they differed in the degree of response for these genes. Changes in intestinal HSP70 expression levels coincided with changes in the similarity coefficient of the adhesive gut bacterial communities between the probiotic treatments. The highest dose of the HALB appeared to protect against the toxic effects of immersion in A. hydrophila (P < 0.05). In conclusion, the degree to which Lactobacillus strains adhere to the gut may be a favorable criterion in selecting probiotic strain for aquaculture.

  1. Effect of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement lining and composite layering technique on the adhesive interface of lateral wall

    PubMed Central

    AZEVEDO, Larissa Marinho; CASAS-APAYCO, Leslie Carol; VILLAVICENCIO ESPINOZA, Carlos Andres; WANG, Linda; NAVARRO, Maria Fidela de Lima; ATTA, Maria Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Interface integrity can be maintained by setting the composite in a layering technique and using liners. Objective The aim of this in vitro study was to verify the effect of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC) lining and composite layering technique on the bond strength of the dentin/resin adhesive interface of lateral walls of occlusal restorations. Material and Methods Occlusal cavities were prepared in 52 extracted sound human molars, randomly assigned into 4 groups: Group 2H (control) – no lining + two horizontal layers; Group 4O: no lining + four oblique layers; Group V-2H: RMGIC lining (Vitrebond) + two horizontal layers; and Group V-4O: RMGIC lining (Vitrebond) + four oblique layers. Resin composite (Filtek Z250, 3M ESPE) was placed after application of an adhesive system (Adper™ Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE) dyed with a fluorescent reagent (Rhodamine B) to allow confocal microscopy analysis. The teeth were stored in deionized water at 37oC for 24 hours before being sectioned into 0.8 mm slices. One slice of each tooth was randomly selected for Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM) analysis. The other slices were sectioned into 0.8 mm x 0.8 mm sticks to microtensile bond strength test (MPa). Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Fisher’s test. Results There was no statistical difference on bond strength among groups (p>0.05). CLSM analysis showed no significant statistical difference regarding the presence of gap at the interface dentin/resin among groups. Conclusions RMGIC lining and composite layering techniques showed no effect on the microtensile bond strength and gap formation at the adhesive interface of lateral walls of high C-factor occlusal restorations. PMID:26221927

  2. Characterization studies on the additives mixed L-arginine phosphate monohydrate (LAP) crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haja Hameed, A. S.; Karthikeyan, C.; Ravi, G.; Rohani, S.

    2011-04-01

    L-arginine phosphate monohydrate (LAP), potassium thiocyanate (KSCN) mixed LAP (LAP:KSCN) and sodium sulfite (Na 2SO 3) mixed LAP (LAP:Na 2SO 3) single crystals were grown by slow cooling technique. The effect of microbial contamination and coloration on the growth solutions was studied. The crystalline powders of the grown crystals were examined by X-ray diffraction and the lattice parameters of the crystals were estimated. From the FTIR spectroscopic analysis, various functional group frequencies associated with the crystals were assigned. Vickers microhardness studies were done on {1 0 0} faces for pure and additives mixed LAP crystals. From the preliminary surface second harmonic generation (SHG) results, it was found that the SHG intensity at (1 0 0) face of LAP:KSCN crystal was much stronger than that of pure LAP.

  3. RPC-LAP: The Rosetta Langmuir Probe Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, A. I.; Boström, R.; Gill, R.; Åhlén, L.; Jansson, S.-E.; Wahlund, J.-E.; André, M.; Mälkki, A.; Holtet, J. A.; Lybekk, B.; Pedersen, A.; Blomberg, L. G.

    2007-02-01

    The Rosetta dual Langmuir probe instrument, LAP, utilizes the multiple powers of a pair of spherical Langmuir probes for measurements of basic plasma parameters with the aim of providing detailed knowledge of the outgassing, ionization, and subsequent plasma processes around the Rosetta target comet. The fundamental plasma properties to be studied are the plasma density, the electron temperature, and the plasma flow velocity. However, study of electric fields up to 8 kHz, plasma density fluctuations, spacecraft potential, integrated UV flux, and dust impacts is also possible. LAP is fully integrated in the Rosetta Plasma Consortium (RPC), the instruments of which together provide a comprehensive characterization of the cometary plasma.

  4. Catechol-Functionalized Synthetic Polymer as a Dental Adhesive to Contaminated Dentin Surface for a Composite Restoration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Bae; González-Cabezas, Carlos; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Kuroda, Kenichi

    2015-08-10

    This study reports a synthetic polymer functionalized with catechol groups as dental adhesives. We hypothesize that a catechol-functionalized polymer functions as a dental adhesive for wet dentin surfaces, potentially eliminating the complications associated with saliva contamination. We prepared a random copolymer containing catechol and methoxyethyl groups in the side chains. The mechanical and adhesive properties of the polymer to dentin surface in the presence of water and salivary components were determined. It was found that the new polymer combined with an Fe(3+) additive improved bond strength of a commercial dental adhesive to artificial saliva contaminated dentin surface as compared to a control sample without the polymer. Histological analysis of the bonding structures showed no leakage pattern, probably due to the formation of Fe-catechol complexes, which reinforce the bonding structures. Cytotoxicity test showed that the polymers did not inhibit human gingival fibroblast cells proliferation. Results from this study suggest a potential to reduce failure of dental restorations due to saliva contamination using catechol-functionalized polymers as dental adhesives.

  5. Catechol-Functionalized Synthetic Polymer as a Dental Adhesive to Contaminated Dentin Surface for a Composite Restoration

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This study reports a synthetic polymer functionalized with catechol groups as dental adhesives. We hypothesize that a catechol-functionalized polymer functions as a dental adhesive for wet dentin surfaces, potentially eliminating the complications associated with saliva contamination. We prepared a random copolymer containing catechol and methoxyethyl groups in the side chains. The mechanical and adhesive properties of the polymer to dentin surface in the presence of water and salivary components were determined. It was found that the new polymer combined with an Fe3+ additive improved bond strength of a commercial dental adhesive to artificial saliva contaminated dentin surface as compared to a control sample without the polymer. Histological analysis of the bonding structures showed no leakage pattern, probably due to the formation of Fe–catechol complexes, which reinforce the bonding structures. Cytotoxicity test showed that the polymers did not inhibit human gingival fibroblast cells proliferation. Results from this study suggest a potential to reduce failure of dental restorations due to saliva contamination using catechol-functionalized polymers as dental adhesives. PMID:26176305

  6. Effect of adhesive interleaving and discontinuous plies on failure of composite laminates subject to transverse normal loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, Dawn C.

    1989-01-01

    Results of a series of tests to determine the effects of adhesive interleaving and discontinuous plies (plies with end-to-end gaps) on the displacements, failure loads and failure modes of graphite-epoxy laminates subjected to transverse normal loads are presented. Adhesive interleaving can be used to contain local damage within a group of plies, i.e., to arrest crack propagation on the interlaminate level, and it can increase the amount of normal displacement the laminate can withstand before failure. However, the addition of adhesive interleaving to a laminate does not significantly increase its load carrying capability. A few discontinuous plies in a laminate can reduce the normal displacement and load at failure by 10 to 40 percent compared to a laminate with no discontinuous plies, but the presence of the ply discontinuities does not generally change the failure location or the failure mode of the laminate.

  7. Influence of endodontic sealer composition and time of fiber post cementation on sealer adhesiveness to bovine root dentin.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Ricardo Abreu da; Barreto, Mirela Sangoi; Moraes, Rafael do Amaral; Broch, Juliana; Bier, Carlos Alexandre Souza; Só, Marcus Vinícius Reis; Kaizer, Osvaldo Bazzan; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the influence of the type of endodontic sealer (salicylate resin-based sealer vs. two endodontic sealers) and the time of fiber post cementation after root filling on the post adhesion to bovine root dentin. Sixty bovine roots were assigned to six groups (n=10), considering an experimental design with two factors (factorial 3x2): endodontic sealer factor in three levels [epoxy resin-based sealer (AH Plus), eugenol-based sealer (Endofill), and salicylate resin-based sealer plus mineral trioxide aggregate - MTA (MTA Fillapex)] and time for post cementation factor in two levels (immediate post cementation or 15 days after root canal filling). After post cementation, 2-mm-thick slices were produced and submitted to push-out test. The failure modes were analyzed under a 40× stereomicroscope and scored as: adhesive at cement/dentin interface; adhesive at cement/post interface; cement cohesive; post cohesive; dentin cohesive; or mixed. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc tests (α=0.05). When the fiber posts were cemented immediately after the root canal filling, the bond strengths were similar, independent of the endodontic sealer type. However, after 15 days, the epoxy resin-based sealer presented higher bond strength than the other sealers (p<0.05). Comparison between each sealer in different experimental times did not reveal any differences. The main failure type was adhesive at dentin/cement interface (89.4%). The time elapsed between the root canal filling and post cementation has no influence on post/root dentin adhesion. On the contrary, the type of endodontic sealer can influence the adhesion between fiber posts and root dentin.

  8. Auto Mechanics I. Learning Activity Packets (LAPs). Section C--Engine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This document contains five learning activity packets (LAPs) that outline the study activities for the "engine" instructional area for an Auto Mechanics I course. The five LAPs cover the following topics: basic engine principles, cooling system, engine lubrication system, exhaust system, and fuel system. Each LAP contains a cover sheet that…

  9. Adhesives from modified soy protein

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Susan; Wang, Donghai; Zhong, Zhikai; Yang, Guang

    2008-08-26

    The, present invention provides useful adhesive compositions having similar adhesive properties to conventional UF and PPF resins. The compositions generally include a protein portion and modifying ingredient portion selected from the group consisting of carboxyl-containing compounds, aldehyde-containing compounds, epoxy group-containing compounds, and mixtures thereof. The composition is preferably prepared at a pH level at or near the isoelectric point of the protein. In other preferred forms, the adhesive composition includes a protein portion and a carboxyl-containing group portion.

  10. Switchable bio-inspired adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroner, Elmar

    2015-03-01

    Geckos have astonishing climbing abilities. They can adhere to almost any surface and can run on walls and even stick to ceilings. The extraordinary adhesion performance is caused by a combination of a complex surface pattern on their toes and the biomechanics of its movement. These biological dry adhesives have been intensely investigated during recent years because of the unique combination of adhesive properties. They provide high adhesion, allow for easy detachment, can be removed residue-free, and have self-cleaning properties. Many aspects have been successfully mimicked, leading to artificial, bio-inspired, patterned dry adhesives, and were addressed and in some aspects they even outperform the adhesion capabilities of geckos. However, designing artificial patterned adhesion systems with switchable adhesion remains a big challenge; the gecko's adhesion system is based on a complex hierarchical surface structure and on advanced biomechanics, which are both difficult to mimic. In this paper, two approaches are presented to achieve switchable adhesion. The first approach is based on a patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer, where adhesion can be switched on and off by applying a low and a high compressive preload. The switch in adhesion is caused by a reversible mechanical instability of the adhesive silicone structures. The second approach is based on a composite material consisting of a Nickel- Titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy and a patterned adhesive PDMS layer. The NiTi alloy is trained to change its surface topography as a function of temperature, which results in a change of the contact area and of alignment of the adhesive pattern towards a substrate, leading to switchable adhesion. These examples show that the unique properties of bio-inspired adhesives can be greatly improved by new concepts such as mechanical instability or by the use of active materials which react to external stimuli.

  11. 3D-finite element analyses of cusp movements in a human upper premolar, restored with adhesive resin-based composites.

    PubMed

    Ausiello, P; Apicella, A; Davidson, C L; Rengo, S

    2001-10-01

    The combination of diverse materials and complex geometry makes stress distribution analysis in teeth very complicated. Simulation in a computerized model might enable a study of the simultaneous interaction of the many variables. A 3D solid model of a human maxillary premolar was prepared and exported into a 3D-finite element model (FEM). Additionally, a generic class II MOD cavity preparation and restoration was simulated in the FEM model by a proper choice of the mesh volumes. A validation procedure of the FEM model was executed based on a comparison of theoretical calculations and experimental data. Different rigidities were assigned to the adhesive system and restorative materials. Two different stress conditions were simulated: (a) stresses arising from the polymerization shrinkage and (b) stresses resulting from shrinkage stress in combination with vertical occlusal loading. Three different cases were analyzed: a sound tooth, a tooth with a class II MOD cavity, adhesively restored with a high (25 GPa) and one with a low (12.5GPa) elastic modulus composite. The cusp movements induced by polymerization stress and (over)-functional occlusal loading were evaluated. While cusp displacement was higher for the more rigid composites due to the pre-stressing from polymerization shrinkage, cusp movements turned out to be lower for the more flexible composites in case the restored tooth which was stressed by the occlusal loading. This preliminary study by 3D FEA on adhesively restored teeth with a class II MOD cavity indicated that Young's modulus values of the restorative materials play an essential role in the success of the restoration. Premature failure due to stresses arising from polymerization shrinkage and occlusal loading can be prevented by proper selection and combination of materials. PMID:11522306

  12. Adhesion behaviors on superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huan; Guo, Zhiguang; Liu, Weimin

    2014-04-18

    The adhesion behaviors of superhydrophobic surfaces have become an emerging topic to researchers in various fields as a vital step in the interactions between materials and organisms/materials. Controlling the chemical compositions and topological structures via various methods or technologies is essential to fabricate and modulate different adhesion properties, such as low-adhesion, high-adhesion and anisotropic adhesion on superhydrophobic surfaces. We summarize the recent developments in both natural superhydrophobic surfaces and artificial superhydrophobic surfaces with various adhesions and also pay attention to superhydrophobic surfaces switching between low- and high-adhesion. The methods to regulate or translate the adhesion of superhydrophobic surfaces can be considered from two perspectives. One is to control the chemical composition and change the surface geometric structure on the surfaces, respectively or simultaneously. The other is to provide external stimulations to induce transitions, which is the most common method for obtaining switchable adhesions. Additionally, adhesion behaviors on solid-solid interfaces, such as the behaviors of cells, bacteria, biomolecules and icing on superhydrophobic surfaces are also noticeable and controversial. This review is aimed at giving a brief and crucial overview of adhesion behaviors on superhydrophobic surfaces.

  13. Learning Activity Package, Physical Science 92, LAPs 1-9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, G. J.

    This set of nine teacher-prepared Learning Activity Packages (LAPs) for individualized instruction in physical science covers the topics of scientific equipment and procedures; measure of time, length, area, and volume; water; oxygen and oxidation; atmospheric pressure; motion; machines; carbon; and light and sound. Each unit contains a rationale…

  14. Insights: A LAP on Moles: Teaching an Important Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ihde, John

    1985-01-01

    Describes a learning activity packet (LAP) designed to help students understand the basic concept of the mole as a chemical unit; know relationships between the mole and atomic weights in the periodic table; and solve basic conversion problems involving moles, atoms, and molecules. (JN)

  15. Learning Activity Package, Algebra 124, LAPs 46-55.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, Bill

    A series of 10 teacher-prepared Learning Activity Packages (LAPs) in advanced algebra and trigonometry, these units cover absolute value, inequalities, exponents, radicals, and complex numbers; functions; higher degree equations and the derivative; the trigonometric functions; graphs and applications of the trigonometric functions; sequences and…

  16. Improvement of interfacial adhesion and nondestructive damage evaluation for plasma-treated PBO and Kevlar fibers/epoxy composites using micromechanical techniques and surface wettability.

    PubMed

    Park, Joung-Man; Kim, Dae-Sik; Kim, Sung-Ryong

    2003-08-15

    Comparison of interfacial properties and microfailure mechanisms of oxygen-plasma treated poly(p-phenylene-2,6-benzobisoxazole (PBO, Zylon) and poly(p-phenylene terephthalamide) (PPTA, Kevlar) fibers/epoxy composites were investigated using a micromechanical technique and nondestructive acoustic emission (AE). The interfacial shear strength (IFSS) and work of adhesion, Wa, of PBO or Kevlar fiber/epoxy composites increased with oxygen-plasma treatment, due to induced hydrogen and covalent bondings at their interface. Plasma-treated Kevlar fiber showed the maximum critical surface tension and polar term, whereas the untreated PBO fiber showed the minimum values. The work of adhesion and the polar term were proportional to the IFSS directly for both PBO and Kevlar fibers. The microfibril fracture pattern of two plasma-treated fibers appeared obviously. Unlike in slow cooling, in rapid cooling, case kink band and kicking in PBO fiber appeared, whereas buckling in the Kevlar fiber was observed mainly due to compressive and residual stresses. Based on the propagation of microfibril failure toward the core region, the number of AE events for plasma-treated PBO and Kevlar fibers increased significantly compared to the untreated case. The results of nondestructive AE were consistent with microfailure modes.

  17. Improvement of interfacial adhesion and nondestructive damage evaluation for plasma-treated PBO and Kevlar fibers/epoxy composites using micromechanical techniques and surface wettability.

    PubMed

    Park, Joung-Man; Kim, Dae-Sik; Kim, Sung-Ryong

    2003-08-15

    Comparison of interfacial properties and microfailure mechanisms of oxygen-plasma treated poly(p-phenylene-2,6-benzobisoxazole (PBO, Zylon) and poly(p-phenylene terephthalamide) (PPTA, Kevlar) fibers/epoxy composites were investigated using a micromechanical technique and nondestructive acoustic emission (AE). The interfacial shear strength (IFSS) and work of adhesion, Wa, of PBO or Kevlar fiber/epoxy composites increased with oxygen-plasma treatment, due to induced hydrogen and covalent bondings at their interface. Plasma-treated Kevlar fiber showed the maximum critical surface tension and polar term, whereas the untreated PBO fiber showed the minimum values. The work of adhesion and the polar term were proportional to the IFSS directly for both PBO and Kevlar fibers. The microfibril fracture pattern of two plasma-treated fibers appeared obviously. Unlike in slow cooling, in rapid cooling, case kink band and kicking in PBO fiber appeared, whereas buckling in the Kevlar fiber was observed mainly due to compressive and residual stresses. Based on the propagation of microfibril failure toward the core region, the number of AE events for plasma-treated PBO and Kevlar fibers increased significantly compared to the untreated case. The results of nondestructive AE were consistent with microfailure modes. PMID:16256662

  18. Formation mechanism and adhesive strength of a hydroxyapatite/TiO2 composite coating on a titanium surface prepared by micro-arc oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shimin; Li, Baoe; Liang, Chunyong; Wang, Hongshui; Qiao, Zhixia

    2016-01-01

    A hydroxyapatite (HA)/TiO2 composite coating was prepared on a titanium surface by one-step micro-arc oxidation (MAO). The formation mechanism of the composite coating was investigated and the adhesion of the coating to the substrate was also measured. The results showed that flocculent structures could be obtained during the early stages of treatment. As the treatment period extended, increasing amounts of Ca-P precipitate appeared on the surface, and the flocculent morphology transformed into a plate-like morphology. Then the plate-like calcium and phosphate salt self-assembled to form flower-like apatite. The Ca/P atomic ratio gradually decreased, indicating that the amounts of Ca2+ ions which diffused into the coating decreased more rapidly than that of PO43- or HPO42-. The adhesive strength between the apatite and TiO2 coating was improved. This improvement is attributed to the interlocking effect between the apatite and TiO2 layer which formed simultaneously during the early stages of the one-step MAO. This study shows that it is a promising method to prepare bioactive coating on a titanium surface.

  19. Evaluation of adhesive materials used on the Long Duration Exposure Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dursch, H. W.; Keough, B. K.; Pippin, H. G.

    1995-01-01

    The adhesive and adhesive-like materials flown on LDEF included epoxies and silicones (including lap shear specimens), conformal coatings, potting compounds, and several tapes and transfer films. With the exception of the lap shear specimens, these materials were used in the fabrication and assembly of the experiments such as bonding thermal control surfaces to other hardware and holding individual specimens in place, similar to applications on other spacecraft. Typically, the adhesives were not exposed to solar radiation or atomic oxygen. Only one adhesive system was used in a structural application. This report documents all results of the Materials and Systems SIG investigation into the effect of long term low Earth orbit (LEO) exposure of these materials. Results of this investigation show that if the material was shielded from exposure to LDEF's external environment, the 69 month exposure to LEO had, in most cases, minimal effect on the material.

  20. Surface characterization in composite and titanium bonding: Carbon fiber surface treatments for improved adhesion to thermoplastic polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devilbiss, T. A.; Wightman, J. P.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of anodization in NaOH, H2SO4, and amine salts on the surface chemistry of carbon fibers was examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The surfaces of carbon fibers after anodization in NaOH and H2SO4 were examined by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), angular dependent XPS, UV absorption spectroscopy of the anodization bath, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and polar/dispersive surface energy analysis. Hercules AS-4, Dexter Hysol XAS, and Union Carbide T-300 fibers were examined by STEM, angular dependent XPS, and breaking strength measurement before and after commercial surface treatment. Oxygen and nitrogen were added to the fiber surfaces by anodization in amine salts. Analysis of the plasmon peak in the carbon 1s signal indicated that H2SO4 anodization affected the morphological structure of the carbon fiber surface. The work of adhesion of carbon fibers to thermoplastic resins was calculated using the geometric mean relationship. A correlation was observed between the dispersive component of the work of adhesion and the interfacial adhesion.

  1. High-temperature adhesives for bonding polyimide film. [bonding Kapton film for solar sails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, A. K.; Slemp, W. S.; St.clair, T. L.

    1980-01-01

    Experimental polyimide resins were developed and evaluated as potential high temperature adhesives for bonding Kapton polyimide film. Lap shear strengths of Kapton/Kapton bonds were obtained as a function of test temperature, adherend thickness, and long term aging at 575 K (575 F) in vacuum. Glass transition temperatures of the polyimide/"Kapton" bondlines were monitored by thermomechanical analysis.

  2. Structural Features of the Pseudomonas fluorescens Biofilm Adhesin LapA Required for LapG-Dependent Cleavage, Biofilm Formation, and Cell Surface Localization

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Chelsea D.; Smith, T. Jarrod; El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Newell, Peter D.; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2014-01-01

    The localization of the LapA protein to the cell surface is a key step required by Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 to irreversibly attach to a surface and form a biofilm. LapA is a member of a diverse family of predicted bacterial adhesins, and although lacking a high degree of sequence similarity, family members do share common predicted domains. Here, using mutational analysis, we determine the significance of each domain feature of LapA in relation to its export and localization to the cell surface and function in biofilm formation. Our previous work showed that the N terminus of LapA is required for cleavage by the periplasmic cysteine protease LapG and release of the adhesin from the cell surface under conditions unfavorable for biofilm formation. We define an additional critical region of the N terminus of LapA required for LapG proteolysis. Furthermore, our results suggest that the domains within the C terminus of LapA are not absolutely required for biofilm formation, export, or localization to the cell surface, with the exception of the type I secretion signal, which is required for LapA export and cell surface localization. In contrast, deletion of the central repetitive region of LapA, consisting of 37 repeats of 100 amino acids, results in an inability to form a biofilm. We also used single-molecule atomic force microscopy to further characterize the role of these domains in biofilm formation on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces. These studies represent the first detailed analysis of the domains of the LapA family of biofilm adhesin proteins. PMID:24837291

  3. Evaluation of high temperature structural adhesives for extended service. [supersonic cruise aircraft research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, S. G.

    1981-01-01

    Eight different Ti-6Al-4V surface treatments were investigated for each of 10 candidate resins. Primers (two for each resin) were studied for appropriate cure and thickness and initial evaluation of bond joints began using various combinations of the adhesive resins and surface treatments. Surface failure areas of bonded titanium coupons were analyzed by electron microscopy and surface chemical analysis techniques. Results of surface characterization and failure analysis are described for lap shear bond joints occurring with adhesive systems consisting of: (1) LARC-13 adhesive, Pasa jell surface treatment; (2) LARC-13 adhesive, 10 volt CAA treatment; (3) PPQ adhesive, 10 volt CAA treatment; and (4) PPQ adhesive, 5 volt CAA treatment. The failure analysis concentrated on the 10,000 hr 505K (450 F) exposed specimens which exhibited adhesive failure. Environmental exposure data being generated on the PPQ-10 volt CAA and the LARC-TPI-10 volt CAA adhesive systems is included.

  4. Non-destructive testing techniques based on nonlinear methods for assessment of debonding in single lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarselli, G.; Ciampa, F.; Ginzburg, D.; Meo, M.

    2015-04-01

    Nonlinear ultrasonic non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methods can be used for the identification of defects within adhesive bonds as they rely on the detection of nonlinear elastic features for the evaluation of the bond strength. In this paper the nonlinear content of the structural response of a single lap joint subjected to ultrasonic harmonic excitation is both numerically and experimentally evaluated to identify and characterize the defects within the bonded region. Different metallic samples with the same geometry were experimentally tested in order to characterize the debonding between two plates by using two surface bonded piezoelectric transducers in pitch-catch mode. The dynamic response of the damaged samples acquired by the single receiver sensor showed the presence of higher harmonics (2nd and 3rd) and subharmonics of the fundamental frequencies. These nonlinear elastic phenomena are clearly due to nonlinear effects induced by the poor adhesion between the two plates. A new constitutive model aimed at representing the nonlinear material response generated by the interaction of the ultrasonic waves with the adhesive joint is also presented. Such a model is implemented in an explicit FE software and uses a nonlinear user defined traction-displacement relationship implemented by means of a cohesive material user model interface. The developed model is verified for the different geometrical and material configurations. Good agreement between the experimental and numerical nonlinear response showed that this model can be used as a simple and useful tool for understanding the quality of the adhesive joint.

  5. FRICTION-STIR-LAP-WELDS OF AA6111 ALUMINUM ALLOY

    SciTech Connect

    Yadava, Manasij; Mishra, Rajiv S.; Chen, Y. L.; Gayden, X.; Grant, Glenn J.

    2007-01-09

    Lap joints of 1 mm thick AA6111 aluminum sheets were made by friction stir welding, using robotic and conventional machines. Welds were made for advancing as well as retreating side loading. Thinning in welds was quantified. Lap shear test of welds was conducted in as-welded and paint-baked conditions. Conventional machine welds showed less thinning and better strength than robotic machine welds. Process forces in conventional machine welding were higher. Paint bake treatment improved the weld strength; but the improvement varied with process parameters. Advancing side loaded welds achieved higher strength than the retreating side loaded welds. Fracture location was found to occur on the loaded side of the weld and along the thinning defect.

  6. The impact of lubricants on the precision lapping process.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xionghua; Chen, Zhenxing; Wolfram, Joy; Wei, Zhongxian; Shen, Yuqiu; Yang, Zhizhou

    2014-12-01

    The impact of lubricants on pole-tip recession and surface morphology of hard disk drive heads in the precision lapping process was investigated with atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and auger electron spectroscopy. In particular, the effects of deionized water, hydrocarbon oil, ethanediol, isopropanol, and ethanol lubricants were evaluated. The results reveal that proper selection of lubricant is critical for achieving optimal performance in the lapping process. A mixture of 68% hydrocarbon oil, 30% isopropanol, and 2% octadecenoic acid was found to yield the most favorable results, displaying a writer shield recession, first shield of reader recession, and surface roughness of 0.423, 0.581, and 0.242 nm, respectively. PMID:25387606

  7. High temperature adhesive silicone foam composition, foam generating system and method of generating foam. [For access denial

    DOEpatents

    Mead, J.W.; Montoya, O.J.; Rand, P.B.; Willan, V.O.

    1983-12-21

    Access to a space is impeded by generation of a sticky foam from a silicone polymer and a low boiling solvent such as a halogenated hydrocarbon. In a preferred aspect, the formulation is polydimethylsiloxane gel mixed with F502 Freon as a solvent and blowing agent, and pressurized with CO/sub 2/ in a vessel to about 250 PSI, whereby when the vessel is opened, a sticky and solvent resistant foam is deployed. The foam is deployable, over a wide range of temperatures, adhering to wet surfaces as well as dry, is stable over long periods of time and does not propagate flame or lose adhesive properties during an externally supported burn.

  8. Traditional Glue, Adhesive and Poison Used for Composite Weapons by Ju/'hoan San in Nyae Nyae, Namibia. Implications for the Evolution of Hunting Equipment in Prehistory.

    PubMed

    Wadley, Lyn; Trower, Gary; Backwell, Lucinda; d'Errico, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Ju/'hoan hunters from Nyae Nyae, near Tsumkwe in Namibia, demonstrate the manufacture of three fixative pastes made from plant extracts, and poison made from grubs and plant extracts. Ammocharis coranica and Terminalia sericea produce simple glue. Ozoroa schinzii latex mixed with carbonized Aristeda adscensionis grass is a compound adhesive. Composite poison is made from Chrysomelid grub viscera mixed with salivary extracts of Acacia mellifera inner bark and the tuber sap of Asparagus exuvialis. In order to document potential variability in the chaîne opératoire, and to eliminate inherent biases associated with unique observations, we studied manufacturing processes in three separate Nyae Nyae villages. Although there are methodological similarities in the Nyae Nyae area, we observed a few differences in contemporary traditions of poison manufacture. For example, some hunters make powder from Asparagus exuvialis tuber sap by boiling, reducing, hardening and grinding it, while others simply use heated sap. The Ju/'hoan hunting kit provides insights for archaeologists, but we must exercise caution when looking for continuity between prehistoric and historical technical systems. Some traditions have been lost to modern hunters, while others are new. We should also expect variability in the Stone Age because of geographically restricted resources. Simple glue, compound adhesive, and poison recipes identified in the Stone Age have no modern equivalents. By about 60,000 years ago at Diepkloof, simple glue was used for hafting tools, but at similarly-aged Sibudu there are recipes that combine red ochre powder with plant and/or animal ingredients. At Border Cave, novel poisons and compound adhesives were used in the Early Later Stone Age. It is possible that the complexity that we record in the manufacture of fixative pastes and poison used by Ju/'hoan hunters represents a hafting system both similar to and different from that observed at the Stone Age sites of Diepkloof

  9. Traditional Glue, Adhesive and Poison Used for Composite Weapons by Ju/’hoan San in Nyae Nyae, Namibia. Implications for the Evolution of Hunting Equipment in Prehistory

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ju/’hoan hunters from Nyae Nyae, near Tsumkwe in Namibia, demonstrate the manufacture of three fixative pastes made from plant extracts, and poison made from grubs and plant extracts. Ammocharis coranica and Terminalia sericea produce simple glue. Ozoroa schinzii latex mixed with carbonized Aristeda adscensionis grass is a compound adhesive. Composite poison is made from Chrysomelid grub viscera mixed with salivary extracts of Acacia mellifera inner bark and the tuber sap of Asparagus exuvialis. In order to document potential variability in the chaîne opératoire, and to eliminate inherent biases associated with unique observations, we studied manufacturing processes in three separate Nyae Nyae villages. Although there are methodological similarities in the Nyae Nyae area, we observed a few differences in contemporary traditions of poison manufacture. For example, some hunters make powder from Asparagus exuvialis tuber sap by boiling, reducing, hardening and grinding it, while others simply use heated sap. The Ju/’hoan hunting kit provides insights for archaeologists, but we must exercise caution when looking for continuity between prehistoric and historical technical systems. Some traditions have been lost to modern hunters, while others are new. We should also expect variability in the Stone Age because of geographically restricted resources. Simple glue, compound adhesive, and poison recipes identified in the Stone Age have no modern equivalents. By about 60,000 years ago at Diepkloof, simple glue was used for hafting tools, but at similarly-aged Sibudu there are recipes that combine red ochre powder with plant and/or animal ingredients. At Border Cave, novel poisons and compound adhesives were used in the Early Later Stone Age. It is possible that the complexity that we record in the manufacture of fixative pastes and poison used by Ju/’hoan hunters represents a hafting system both similar to and different from that observed at the Stone Age sites of

  10. Traditional Glue, Adhesive and Poison Used for Composite Weapons by Ju/'hoan San in Nyae Nyae, Namibia. Implications for the Evolution of Hunting Equipment in Prehistory.

    PubMed

    Wadley, Lyn; Trower, Gary; Backwell, Lucinda; d'Errico, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Ju/'hoan hunters from Nyae Nyae, near Tsumkwe in Namibia, demonstrate the manufacture of three fixative pastes made from plant extracts, and poison made from grubs and plant extracts. Ammocharis coranica and Terminalia sericea produce simple glue. Ozoroa schinzii latex mixed with carbonized Aristeda adscensionis grass is a compound adhesive. Composite poison is made from Chrysomelid grub viscera mixed with salivary extracts of Acacia mellifera inner bark and the tuber sap of Asparagus exuvialis. In order to document potential variability in the chaîne opératoire, and to eliminate inherent biases associated with unique observations, we studied manufacturing processes in three separate Nyae Nyae villages. Although there are methodological similarities in the Nyae Nyae area, we observed a few differences in contemporary traditions of poison manufacture. For example, some hunters make powder from Asparagus exuvialis tuber sap by boiling, reducing, hardening and grinding it, while others simply use heated sap. The Ju/'hoan hunting kit provides insights for archaeologists, but we must exercise caution when looking for continuity between prehistoric and historical technical systems. Some traditions have been lost to modern hunters, while others are new. We should also expect variability in the Stone Age because of geographically restricted resources. Simple glue, compound adhesive, and poison recipes identified in the Stone Age have no modern equivalents. By about 60,000 years ago at Diepkloof, simple glue was used for hafting tools, but at similarly-aged Sibudu there are recipes that combine red ochre powder with plant and/or animal ingredients. At Border Cave, novel poisons and compound adhesives were used in the Early Later Stone Age. It is possible that the complexity that we record in the manufacture of fixative pastes and poison used by Ju/'hoan hunters represents a hafting system both similar to and different from that observed at the Stone Age sites of Diepkloof

  11. Investigation into Interface Lifting Within FSW Lap Welds

    SciTech Connect

    K. S. Miller; C. R. Tolle; D. E. Clark; C. I. Nichol; T. R. McJunkin; H. B. Smartt

    2008-06-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is rapidly penetrating the welding market in many materials and applications, particularly in aluminum alloys for transportation applications. As this expansion outside the research laboratory continues, fitness for service issues will arise, and process control and NDE methods will become important determinants of continued growth. The present paper describes research into FSW weld nugget flaw detection within aluminum alloy lap welds. We present results for two types of FSW tool designs: a smooth pin tool and a threaded pin tool. We show that under certain process parameters (as monitored during welding with a rotating dynamometer that measures x, y, z, and torque forces) and tooling designs, FSW lap welds allow significant nonbonded interface lifting of the lap joint, while forming a metallurgical bond only within the pin region of the weld nugget. These lifted joints are often held very tightly together even though unbonded, and might be expected to pass cursory NDE while representing a substantial compromise in joint mechanical properties. The phenomenon is investigated here via radiographic and ultrasonic NDE techniques, with a copper foil marking insert (as described elsewhere) and by the tensile testing of joints. As one would expect, these results show that tool design and process parameters significantly affect plactic flow and this lifted interface. NDE and mechanical strength ramifications of this defect are discussed.

  12. Residual Strength Analyses of Riveted Lap-Splice Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seshadri, B. R.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to analyze the crack-linkup behavior in riveted-stiffened lap-splice joint panels with small multiple-site damage (MSD) cracks at several adjacent rivet holes. Analyses are based on the STAGS (STructural Analysis of General Shells) code with the critical crack-tip-opening angle (CTOA) fracture criterion. To account for high constraint around a crack front, the "plane strain core" option in STAGS was used. The importance of modeling rivet flexibility with fastener elements that accurately model load transfer across the joint is discussed. Fastener holes are not modeled but rivet connectivity is accounted for by attaching rivets to the sheet on one side of the cracks that simulated both the rivet diameter and MSD cracks. Residual strength analyses made on 2024-T3 alloy (1.6-mm thick) riveted-lap-splice joints with a lead crack and various size MSD cracks were compared with test data from Boeing Airplane Company. Analyses were conducted for both restrained and unrestrained buckling conditions. Comparison of results from these analyses and results from lap-splice-joint test panels, which were partially restrained against buckling indicate that the test results were bounded by the failure loads predicted by the analyses with restrained and unrestrained conditions.

  13. The effectiveness of an adhesively bonded composite patch repair as applied to a transport aircraft lower wing skin

    SciTech Connect

    Ruschau, J.J.; Coate, J.E.

    1996-12-31

    Specimens were machined from lower wing skin extrusions of a transport aircraft, precracked under fatigue loading, repaired with a boron/epoxy patch, and subsequently fatigue tested under simulated flight loading conditions to evaluate the effectiveness of an adhesively bonded repair patch. Testing was performed at RT and -54{degrees}C for two configurations: one with the crack running up the integral stiffener (riser), the other running down the riser towards the outer skin surface. Cracks were initiated from a single 6.35 mm diameter hole located in the riser portion of the 7075-T6 wing skin material. Ultrasonic inspections were performed during fatigue loading to determine crack growth and damage underneath the patch. Limited results show the adhesively bonded patch was successful in stopping or greatly reducing any further crack growth. Under laboratory air conditions, no crack growth occurred following 30,000 equivalent flight hours, double the expected life of the patched structure. Similarly at -54{degrees}C, no crack growth was observed for a patched crack growing up the riser following 15,000 EFH. For the case of a crack growing down the riser at the lower test temperature, some crack growth was measured, though at a greatly reduced rate.

  14. Preparation and properties of silane-endcapped polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maudgal, S.; St. Clair, T. L.

    1984-01-01

    Silane-endcapped polyimide high temperature adhesive formulations were prepared by reacting anhydride-terminated poly(amic acid), obtained from benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride and a diamine (3,3'-, 3,4'- or 4,4'-diaminodiphenylmethane and 3,3', 3,4'- or 4,4'-diaminobenzophenone) with varying amounts of gama-aminopropyltriethoxysilane in dimethylacetamide. Resin properties were evaluated by torsional braid analysis and thermogravimetric analysis. Lap shear strengths of some of the adhesive bonds were determined at room temperature and at 177 C before and after ageing at 200 C for 2500 h and after boiling in water for 72 h.

  15. Assembly of Lipopolysaccharide in Escherichia coli Requires the Essential LapB Heat Shock Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Gracjana; Kobylak, Natalia; Lindner, Buko; Stupak, Anna; Raina, Satish

    2014-01-01

    Here, we describe two new heat shock proteins involved in the assembly of LPS in Escherichia coli, LapA and LapB (lipopolysaccharide assembly protein A and B). lapB mutants were identified based on an increased envelope stress response. Envelope stress-responsive pathways control key steps in LPS biogenesis and respond to defects in the LPS assembly. Accordingly, the LPS content in ΔlapB or Δ(lapA lapB) mutants was elevated, with an enrichment of LPS derivatives with truncations in the core region, some of which were pentaacylated and exhibited carbon chain polymorphism. Further, the levels of LpxC, the enzyme that catalyzes the first committed step of lipid A synthesis, were highly elevated in the Δ(lapA lapB) mutant. Δ(lapA lapB) mutant accumulated extragenic suppressors that mapped either to lpxC, waaC, and gmhA, or to the waaQ operon (LPS biosynthesis) and lpp (Braun's lipoprotein). Increased synthesis of either FabZ (3-R-hydroxymyristoyl acyl carrier protein dehydratase), slrA (novel RpoE-regulated non-coding sRNA), lipoprotein YceK, toxin HicA, or MurA (UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 1-carboxyvinyltransferase) suppressed some of the Δ(lapA lapB) defects. LapB contains six tetratricopeptide repeats and, at the C-terminal end, a rubredoxin-like domain that was found to be essential for its activity. In pull-down experiments, LapA and LapB co-purified with LPS, Lpt proteins, FtsH (protease), DnaK, and DnaJ (chaperones). A specific interaction was also observed between WaaC and LapB. Our data suggest that LapB coordinates assembly of proteins involved in LPS synthesis at the plasma membrane and regulates turnover of LpxC, thereby ensuring balanced biosynthesis of LPS and phospholipids consistent with its essentiality. PMID:24722986

  16. Assembly of lipopolysaccharide in Escherichia coli requires the essential LapB heat shock protein.

    PubMed

    Klein, Gracjana; Kobylak, Natalia; Lindner, Buko; Stupak, Anna; Raina, Satish

    2014-05-23

    Here, we describe two new heat shock proteins involved in the assembly of LPS in Escherichia coli, LapA and LapB (lipopolysaccharide assembly protein A and B). lapB mutants were identified based on an increased envelope stress response. Envelope stress-responsive pathways control key steps in LPS biogenesis and respond to defects in the LPS assembly. Accordingly, the LPS content in ΔlapB or Δ(lapA lapB) mutants was elevated, with an enrichment of LPS derivatives with truncations in the core region, some of which were pentaacylated and exhibited carbon chain polymorphism. Further, the levels of LpxC, the enzyme that catalyzes the first committed step of lipid A synthesis, were highly elevated in the Δ(lapA lapB) mutant. Δ(lapA lapB) mutant accumulated extragenic suppressors that mapped either to lpxC, waaC, and gmhA, or to the waaQ operon (LPS biosynthesis) and lpp (Braun's lipoprotein). Increased synthesis of either FabZ (3-R-hydroxymyristoyl acyl carrier protein dehydratase), slrA (novel RpoE-regulated non-coding sRNA), lipoprotein YceK, toxin HicA, or MurA (UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 1-carboxyvinyltransferase) suppressed some of the Δ(lapA lapB) defects. LapB contains six tetratricopeptide repeats and, at the C-terminal end, a rubredoxin-like domain that was found to be essential for its activity. In pull-down experiments, LapA and LapB co-purified with LPS, Lpt proteins, FtsH (protease), DnaK, and DnaJ (chaperones). A specific interaction was also observed between WaaC and LapB. Our data suggest that LapB coordinates assembly of proteins involved in LPS synthesis at the plasma membrane and regulates turnover of LpxC, thereby ensuring balanced biosynthesis of LPS and phospholipids consistent with its essentiality.

  17. The Amphibole-Bearing Chondrite Meteorite LAP04840: Metamorphism and `Tectonics' in a Hydrous Asteroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treiman, A. H.; McCanta, M. C.; Essene, E. J.

    2006-12-01

    LAP04840 is an R-chondrite found in Antarctica, and is unique among meteorites in containing abundant amphibole and biotite. Its chondrules (>500 μm diam) sit in a granoblastic matrix of grains ~20 μm across. Amphibole and biotite grains are anhedral to subhedral, to ~100 μm, and concentrated in chondrules. Commonly, they fit among the olivine and opx grains in regions that would (in anhydrous chondrules) have been occupied by cpx, mesostasis, or glass. Minerals are unzoned, and have constant compositions: olivine Fo62Fa38, Opx En60Wo01, plagioclase An07Ab90, magnesio-hornblende, (Ca1.52Na0.81K0.44) (Mg3.60Fe1.27Mn0.01Ti0.04Cr0.08) (Si6.95Al1.02Fe0.03) O22 (OH1.94?F0.05Cl0.01), sodian phlogopite (low Ti, F, Cl), magnetite (Mt63Chr28Sp05Usp04) and Fe-Ni sulfides. This assemblage is consistent with amphibolite facies equilibrium. Amph-plg thermometry (Holland &Blundy, 1994) gives 675°C, which is consistent with limits of ~600LAP are dry and contain strongly metamorphosed clasts (but no melt rocks). Depending on bulk composition, heating can continue to and beyond the basalt solidus, with core formation and widespread melting and differentiation. An asteroid in the outer belt would accrete abundant ice, which would dilute ^{26}Al and sink much of its heat in melting and vaporization even cores of large asteroids (100+ km radius) would barely reach 675

  18. Apparatus and method for lapping an edge surface of an object

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossi, Vito N. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An apparatus for lapping an edge surface of an object comprises a block having a side adapted to engage a wide surface of an object, adjustable spacers disposed on the block and adapted to engage a lap plate, and a weighted spring disposed on the block for urging the spacers and the object edge surface towards the lap plate. A method for lapping comprises setting surfaces of adjustable spacers disposed on a block to be substantially the same distance from the block, affixing a wide surface of an object to the block, urging an edge surface of the object and the spacers towards a lap plate, lapping the edge of the object, inspecting the edge for parallelism to a reference line, resetting the spacers and relapping the edge surface.

  19. Improvement in endothelial cell adhesion and retention under physiological shear stress using a laminin–apatite composite layer on titanium

    PubMed Central

    He, Fupo; Wang, Xiupeng; Maruyama, Osamu; Kosaka, Ryo; Sogo, Yu; Ito, Atsuo; Ye, Jiandong

    2013-01-01

    Apatite (Ap), laminin–apatite composite (L5Ap, L10Ap, L20Ap and L40Ap) and albumin–apatite (AlbAp) composite layers were prepared on titanium (Ti) using a supersaturated calcium phosphate solution supplemented with laminin (0, 5, 10, 20 and 40 μg ml−1) or albumin (800 μg ml−1). With an increase in the concentrations of laminin in the supersaturated calcium phosphate solutions, the amounts of laminin immobilized on the Ti increased. The number of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) adhered to the laminin–apatite composite layers were remarkably higher than those to the untreated Ti, Ap layer and AlbAp composite layer. The number of cells adhered to the L40Ap was 4.3 times the untreated Ti. Moreover, cells adhered to the laminin–apatite composite layers showed significantly higher cell retention under the physiological shear stress for 1 h and 2 h than those to the untreated Ti, Ap layer and AlbAp composite layer. The number of cells remaining on the L40Ap under the physiological shear stress for 2 h was 9.5 times that of the untreated Ti. The laminin–apatite composite layer is a promising interfacial layer for endothelialization of blood-contacting materials. PMID:23407573

  20. Adhesive flexible barrier film, method of forming same, and organic electronic device including same

    DOEpatents

    Blizzard, John Donald; Weidner, William Kenneth

    2013-02-05

    An adhesive flexible barrier film comprises a substrate and a barrier layer disposed on the substrate. The barrier layer is formed from a barrier composition comprising an organosilicon compound. The adhesive flexible barrier film also comprises an adhesive layer disposed on the barrier layer and formed from an adhesive composition. A method of forming the adhesive flexible barrier film comprises the steps of disposing the barrier composition on the substrate to form the barrier layer, disposing the adhesive composition on the barrier layer to form the adhesive layer, and curing the barrier layer and the adhesive layer. The adhesive flexible barrier film may be utilized in organic electronic devices.

  1. Carbon/Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) Composites from Green Pellets Contain CNTs and Self-adhesive Carbon Grains from Fibres of Oil Palm Empty Fruit Bunch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deraman, Mohamad; Saad, Siti Khatijah Md.; Ishak, Maria M.; Awitdrus, Taer, Erman; Talib, Ibrahim; Omar, Ramli; Jumali, Mohammad Hafizuddin Hj.

    2010-10-01

    Nano composites green pellets (GPs) were prepared from the mixtures of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) at varying percentage (0, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10%) and self-adhesive carbon grains (SACG) from fibres of oil palm empty fruit bunch. These GPs were carbonized and CO2 activated to produce activated carbon/CNTs composites in the form of pellets (ACPs). It was found that the density (ρ) and electrical conductivity (σ) of the ACPs varied nonlinearly with CNTs content; as for the CNTs content of 3-5%, we observed the peak values of ρ and σ at 1.3781 gcm-3 and 3.4146 (Ωcm)-1 respectively. The presence of the agglomerated and individual particles of CNTs in the pores of the ACPs was clearly shown by the micrograph of the Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM). The nitrogen adsorption isotherm data showed the decrease in surface area, volume and diameter of pores due to the effect of CNTs. The effect of CNTs on the electrochemical behavior of the ACPs were investigated from the supercapacitor cells fabricated using the ACPs as composite electrodes. It was found that the specific capacitance, energy density and power density of the supercapacitor with electrodes containing 10% CNTs were lower than that with electrodes without CNTs. This result is consistent with the change of pores characteristic due to the presence of CNTs in the ACPs, suggesting the need to optimize the pore characteristic for improving the supercapacitor performance.

  2. Elastomer toughened polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, A. K.; St.clair, T. L. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A rubber-toughened addition-type polyimide composition is disclosed which has excellent high temperature bonding characteristics in the fully cured state, and improved peel strength and adhesive fracture resistance physical property characteristics. The process for making the improved adhesive involves preparing the rubber containing amic acid prepolymer by chemically reacting an amine-terminated elastomer and an aromatic diamine with an aromatic dianhydride with which a reactive chain stopper anhydride was mixed, and utilizing solvent or mixture of solvents for the reaction.

  3. Adhesion in hydrogel contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, J. R.; Jay, G. D.; Kim, K.-S.; Bothun, G. D.

    2016-05-01

    A generalized thermomechanical model for adhesion was developed to elucidate the mechanisms of dissipation within the viscoelastic bulk of a hyperelastic hydrogel. Results show that in addition to the expected energy release rate of interface formation, as well as the viscous flow dissipation, the bulk composition exhibits dissipation due to phase inhomogeneity morphological changes. The mixing thermodynamics of the matrix and solvent determines the dynamics of the phase inhomogeneities, which can enhance or disrupt adhesion. The model also accounts for the time-dependent behaviour. A parameter is proposed to discern the dominant dissipation mechanism in hydrogel contact detachment.

  4. Plasma treatment of aluminum for adhesive bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Catherine Elizabeth

    Plasma polymerized silicon-containing films were deposited onto aluminum coupons and used as primers for structural adhesive bonding. Hexamethyldisiloxane was polymerized within radio frequency (RF) and microwave (MW) plasmas to deposit coatings that were less than 1000 A thick. Substrate pre-treatments, carrier gas, excitation frequency, and plasma post-treatments were varied to produce films that performed well as primers. These plasma polymerized films were characterized with reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and ellipsometry. Lap joints were used to measure the strength and durability of the bonding between pre-treated aluminum, the primer and the epoxy adhesive. Lap joints were placed under load and subjected to 24 hour cycles of immersion in salt water, heat and humidity to test corrosion resistance. The interface between the aluminum oxide on the substrate surface and the plasma polymerized primer was investigated with RAIR and XPS depth profiling techniques. Changes in processing variables were related to differences in the chemical structure of the plasma polymerized films and to their performance as primers. Siloxane-like coatings, deposited in the RF reactor with argon as a carrier gas, did not bond well to the epoxy adhesive, performing poorly as primers. An oxygen plasma post-treatment resulted in a more wettable surface which enhanced this bonding. However, the siloxane-like films proved to be mechanically weak. Silica-like primers deposited in the RF and MW reactors onto acid etched, Ar plasma pre-treated aluminum were excellent primers forming strong, durable bonds to the aluminum substrate and the epoxy adhesive. The plasma pre-treatment of the aluminum coupons was found to be important for durability. Ar and Ar/Hsb2 plasma pre-treatments removed some hydrocarbon contamination and adsorbed water, hydroxyl and oxyhydroxide groups from the aluminum surface

  5. Verification of surface preparation for adhesive bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Rodney S.

    1995-01-01

    A survey of solid rocket booster (SRB) production operations identified potential contaminants which might adversely affect bonding operations. Lap shear tests quantified these contaminants' effects on adhesive strength. The most potent contaminants were selected for additional studies on SRB thermal protection system (TPS) bonding processes. Test panels were prepared with predetermined levels of contamination, visually inspected using white and black light, then bonded with three different TPS materials over the unremoved contamination. Bond test data showed that white and black light inspections are adequate inspection methods for TPS bonding operations. Extreme levels of contamination (higher than expected on flight hardware) had an insignificant effect on TPS bond strengths because of the apparent insensitivity of the adhesive system to contamination effects, and the comparatively weak cohesive strength of the TPS materials.

  6. Evaluation of Er,Cr:YSGG Laser Effect on Microshear Bond Strength of a Self-Adhesive Flowable Composite in the Dentin of Permanent Molar: An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Moslemi, Masoumeh; Fotouhi Ardakani, Faezeh; Javadi, Fatemeh; Khalili Sadrabad, Zahra; Shadkar, Zahra; Shadkar, Mohammad Saeid

    2016-01-01

    Aim and Background. Recently, new restorative materials such as self-adhesive flowable composites, because of their simple use and no need to bonding and etching, are considered important, particularly in pediatric dentistry. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of Er,Cr:YSGG laser on microshear bond strength of self-adhesive flowable composite on permanent teeth dentin in vitro. Material and Methods. In this experimental study, 40 dentin sections were prepared from healthy third molars and divided into two groups according to their surface preparation by Er,Cr:YSGG laser or without laser, only with silicon carbide paper. In each group, two groups of 10 teeth were treated with self-adhesive flowable composite (Dyad) and conventional flowable composite (acid etch and bonding). Samples were stored in normal saline and after 48 hours their bond strength was measured. The failure mode of samples was observed on stereomicroscope. In order to analyse the results, the one way ANOVA and Tukey's test for multiple comparisons were used. Result. The maximum bond strength was related to conventional flowable composite with laser preparation group (24/21 Mpa). The lowest one was seen in Dyad composite without laser emitting (9/89 Mpa). The statistical difference between this two groups was significant (P value = 0/0038). The microshear bond strength differences between Dyad composite groups with laser preparation (mean = 16/427 ± 1/79) and without laser preparation (mean = 12/85 ± 1/90) were statistically significant too (P value = 0/01). Conclusion. Self-adhesive flowable composite has lower microshear bond strength than conventional flowable composite. Moreover, the laser irradiation as a surface treatment can improve this bond strength.

  7. Evaluation of Er,Cr:YSGG Laser Effect on Microshear Bond Strength of a Self-Adhesive Flowable Composite in the Dentin of Permanent Molar: An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Moslemi, Masoumeh; Fotouhi Ardakani, Faezeh; Javadi, Fatemeh; Khalili Sadrabad, Zahra; Shadkar, Zahra; Shadkar, Mohammad Saeid

    2016-01-01

    Aim and Background. Recently, new restorative materials such as self-adhesive flowable composites, because of their simple use and no need to bonding and etching, are considered important, particularly in pediatric dentistry. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of Er,Cr:YSGG laser on microshear bond strength of self-adhesive flowable composite on permanent teeth dentin in vitro. Material and Methods. In this experimental study, 40 dentin sections were prepared from healthy third molars and divided into two groups according to their surface preparation by Er,Cr:YSGG laser or without laser, only with silicon carbide paper. In each group, two groups of 10 teeth were treated with self-adhesive flowable composite (Dyad) and conventional flowable composite (acid etch and bonding). Samples were stored in normal saline and after 48 hours their bond strength was measured. The failure mode of samples was observed on stereomicroscope. In order to analyse the results, the one way ANOVA and Tukey's test for multiple comparisons were used. Result. The maximum bond strength was related to conventional flowable composite with laser preparation group (24/21 Mpa). The lowest one was seen in Dyad composite without laser emitting (9/89 Mpa). The statistical difference between this two groups was significant (P value = 0/0038). The microshear bond strength differences between Dyad composite groups with laser preparation (mean = 16/427 ± 1/79) and without laser preparation (mean = 12/85 ± 1/90) were statistically significant too (P value = 0/01). Conclusion. Self-adhesive flowable composite has lower microshear bond strength than conventional flowable composite. Moreover, the laser irradiation as a surface treatment can improve this bond strength. PMID:27493829

  8. Evaluation of Er,Cr:YSGG Laser Effect on Microshear Bond Strength of a Self-Adhesive Flowable Composite in the Dentin of Permanent Molar: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Moslemi, Masoumeh; Javadi, Fatemeh; Khalili Sadrabad, Zahra; Shadkar, Zahra; Shadkar, Mohammad Saeid

    2016-01-01

    Aim and Background. Recently, new restorative materials such as self-adhesive flowable composites, because of their simple use and no need to bonding and etching, are considered important, particularly in pediatric dentistry. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of Er,Cr:YSGG laser on microshear bond strength of self-adhesive flowable composite on permanent teeth dentin in vitro. Material and Methods. In this experimental study, 40 dentin sections were prepared from healthy third molars and divided into two groups according to their surface preparation by Er,Cr:YSGG laser or without laser, only with silicon carbide paper. In each group, two groups of 10 teeth were treated with self-adhesive flowable composite (Dyad) and conventional flowable composite (acid etch and bonding). Samples were stored in normal saline and after 48 hours their bond strength was measured. The failure mode of samples was observed on stereomicroscope. In order to analyse the results, the one way ANOVA and Tukey's test for multiple comparisons were used. Result. The maximum bond strength was related to conventional flowable composite with laser preparation group (24/21 Mpa). The lowest one was seen in Dyad composite without laser emitting (9/89 Mpa). The statistical difference between this two groups was significant (P value = 0/0038). The microshear bond strength differences between Dyad composite groups with laser preparation (mean = 16/427 ± 1/79) and without laser preparation (mean = 12/85 ± 1/90) were statistically significant too (P value = 0/01). Conclusion. Self-adhesive flowable composite has lower microshear bond strength than conventional flowable composite. Moreover, the laser irradiation as a surface treatment can improve this bond strength. PMID:27493829

  9. Stresses in adhesively bonded joints - A closed-form solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delale, F.; Erdogan, F.; Aydinoglu, M. N.

    1981-01-01

    The general plane strain problem of adhesively bonded structures consisting of two different, orthotropic adherends is considered, under the assumption that adherend thicknesses are constant and small in relation to the lateral dimensions of the bonded region, so that they may be treated as plates. The problem is reduced to a system of differential equations for the adhesive stresses which is solved in closed form, with a single lap joint and a stiffened plate under various loading conditions being considered as examples. It is found that the plate theory used in the analysis not only predicts the correct trend for adhesive stresses but gives surprisingly accurate results, the solution being obtained by assuming linear stress-strain relations for the adhesive.

  10. Dextran and gelatin based photocrosslinkable tissue adhesive.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Nie, Jun; Yang, Dongzhi

    2012-11-01

    A two-component tissue adhesive based on biocompatible and bio-degradable polymers (oxidized urethane dextran (Dex-U-AD) and gelatin) was prepared and photocrosslinked under the ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. The adhesive could adhere to surface of gelatin, which simulated the human tissue steadily. The structures of above Dex-U-AD were characterized by FTIR, (1)H NMR spectroscopy and XRD. The adhesion property of result products was evaluated by lap-shear test. The maximum adhesion strength could reach to 4.16±0.72 MPa which was significantly higher than that of fibrin glue. The photopolymerization process of Dex-U-AD/gelatin was monitored by real time infrared spectroscopy (RTIR). It took less than 5 min to complete the curing process. The cytotoxicity of Dex-U-AD/gelatin also was evaluated which indicated that Dex-U-AD/gelatin gels were nontoxic to L929 cell. The relationship between all the above-mentioned properties and degree of oxidization of Dex-U-AD was assessed. The obtained products have the potential to serve as tissue adhesive in the future.

  11. Mechanical Behavior of Lithium-Ion Batteries and Fatigue Behavior of Ultrasonic Weld-Bonded Lap-Shear Specimens of Dissimilar Magnesium and Steel Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Wei-Jen

    The mechanical behaviors of LiFePO4 battery cell and module specimens under in-plane constrained compression were investigated for simulations of battery cells, modules and packs under crush conditions. The experimental stress-strain curves were correlated to the deformation patterns of battery cell and module specimens. Analytical solutions were developed to estimate the buckling stresses and to provide a theoretical basis for future design of representative volume element cell and module specimens. A physical kinematics model for formation of kinks and shear bands in battery cells was developed to explain the deformation mechanism for layered battery cells under in-plane constrained compression. A small-scale module constrained punch indentation test was also conducted to benchmark the computational results. The computational results indicate that macro homogenized material models can be used to simulate battery modules under crush conditions. Fatigue behavior and failure modes of ultrasonic spot welds in lap-shear specimens of magnesium and steel sheets with and without adhesive were investigated. For ultrasonic spot welded lap-shear specimens, the failure mode changes from the partial nugget pullout mode under low-cycle loading conditions to the kinked crack failure mode under high-cycle loading conditions. For adhesive-bonded and weld-bonded lap-shear specimens, the test results show the near interface cohesive failure mode and the kinked crack failure mode under low-cycle and high-cycle loading conditions, respectively. Next, the analytical effective stress intensity factor solutions for main cracks in lap-shear specimens of three dissimilar sheets under plane strain conditions were developed and the solutions agreed well with the computational results. The analytical effective stress intensity factor solutions for kinked cracks were compared with the computational results at small kink lengths. The results indicate that the computational results approach to

  12. System integration and demonstration of adhesive bonded high temperature aluminum alloys for aerospace structure, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falcone, Anthony; Laakso, John H.

    1993-01-01

    Adhesive bonding materials and processes were evaluated for assembly of future high-temperature aluminum alloy structural components such as may be used in high-speed civil transport aircraft and space launch vehicles. A number of candidate high-temperature adhesives were selected and screening tests were conducted using single lap shear specimens. The selected adhesives were then used to bond sandwich (titanium core) test specimens, adhesive toughness test specimens, and isothermally aged lap shear specimens. Moderate-to-high lap shear strengths were obtained from bonded high-temperature aluminum and silicon carbide particulate-reinforced (SiC(sub p)) aluminum specimens. Shear strengths typically exceeded 3500 to 4000 lb/in(sup 2) and flatwise tensile strengths exceeded 750 lb/in(sup 2) even at elevated temperatures (300 F) using a bismaleimide adhesive. All faceskin-to-core bonds displayed excellent tear strength. The existing production phosphoric acid anodize surface preparation process developed at Boeing was used, and gave good performance with all of the aluminum and silicon carbide particulate-reinforced aluminum alloys investigated. The results of this program support using bonded assemblies of high-temperature aluminum components in applications where bonding is often used (e.g., secondary structures and tear stoppers).

  13. Mussel-inspired soft-tissue adhesive based on poly(diol citrate) with catechol functionality.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yali; Ji, Ting; Liang, Kai; Zhu, Lei

    2016-02-01

    Marine mussels tightly adhering to various underwater surfaces inspires human to design adhesives for wet tissue adhesion in surgeries. Characterization of mussel adhesive plaques describes a matrix of proteins containing 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), which provides strong adhesion in aquatic conditions. Several synthetic polymer systems have been developed based on this DOPA chemistry. Herein, a citrate-based tissue adhesives (POEC-d) was prepared by a facile one-pot melt polycondensation of two diols including 1,8-octanediol and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO), citric acid (CA) and dopamine, and the effects of hydrophilic and soft PEO on the properties of adhesives were studied. It was found that the obtained adhesives exhibited water-soluble when the mole ratio of PEO to 1,8-octanediol was 70%, and the equilibrium swelling percentage of cured adhesive was about 144%, and degradation rate was in the range of 1-2 weeks. The cured adhesives demonstrated soft rubber-like behavior. The lap shear adhesion strength measured by bonding wet pig skin was in the range of 21.7-33.7 kPa, which was higher than that of commercial fibrin glue (9-15 kPa). The cytotoxicity tests showed the POEC-d adhesives had a low cytotoxicity. Our results supports that POEC-d adhesives, which combined strong wet adhesion with good biodegradability, acceptable swelling ratio, good elasticity and low cytotoxicity, have potentials in surgeries where surgical tissue adhesives, sealants, and hemostatic agents are used. PMID:26704547

  14. Particle Arrangement Design for Predicting the Percolation Threshold of Silver/Epoxy Composite for Electrically Conductive Adhesive Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulkarnain, M.; Husaini, Muhammad; Mariatti, M.; Azid, I. A.

    2015-11-01

    The early use of electrically conductive adhesives (ECAs) provided an alternative to solder because of their several advantages, such as good electrical conductivity, low cost, extendability to fine pitch of interconnecting material and environmental friendliness. According to previous works, an optimal particle volume fraction became a major objective of many researchers in order to obtain highly conductive ECAs, realizing that the need for transitions from an insulator to a conductor is controlled by the geometric arrangement of particles. In the current study, particle arrangement models of ECAs are developed by establishing the effects of van der Waals' attraction energy and particle motion, which act as a kind of particle interaction to generate a conducting structure. The methodology is divided into three major parts: the formulation of a particle arrangement technique, and numerical and experimental studies. The formulation of particle arrangement is developed in an epoxy colloidal system. During verification, the particle arrangement model is validated by the theoretical fractal dimension and guided by a morphological study of the experimental assessments. The model was simulated through representative volume elements with the volume fraction factor, which was set in the range of 2-8 vol.%, while electrical conductivity was an observed parameter. The numerical results showed good agreement with the experiments in which the percolation threshold occurred between 4 and 6% of the volume of filler loading.

  15. [Morphologic evaluation of the bonding between adhesive/composite resin and dentin irradiated with Er:YAG and Nd:YAG lasers: comparative study using scanning microscopy].

    PubMed

    Oda, M; Oliveira, D C; Liberti, E A

    2001-01-01

    Since bonding systems were introduced in the restorative procedures carried out with esthetic materials, the treatment of dentin surfaces has been widely studied in order to establish the ideal technique. The application of 37% phosphoric acid on dentin is still the best known method. However, alternative methods for treating the dentin surface have been discussed in the literature, including the utilization of some kinds of laser irradiation. The purpose of this research was to morphologically evaluate the bond between adhesive materials and the dentin treated with Er:YAG and Nd:YAG lasers, in a comparative study by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Irradiation either substituted acid etching, or was associated to it. Recently extracted bovine incisors were utilized. They received class V cavity preparations and were restored with a bonding system and a light-cured composite resin. Meanwhile, some of the teeth underwent irradiation with Er:YAG laser or Nd:YAG laser before the application of the bonding agent and the composite resin. The samples were selected, prepared for SEM and submitted to morphological analysis. Data were registered in photomicrographs. Based on the microscopic observations, we concluded that only in the dentin surfaces submitted to irradiation with Er:YAG laser and to acid conditioning there was penetration of resin into the dentine. With the Nd:YAG laser treatment, there was only visual superposition of resin over the dentin surface, which suggests that there was only occlusion of the tubules, with characteristics of fusion in the superficial dentine.

  16. Mixed-mode fatigue fracture of adhesive joints in harsh environments and nonlinear viscoelastic modeling of the adhesive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzoumanidis, Alexis Gerasimos

    A four point bend, mixed-mode, reinforced, cracked lap shear specimen experimentally simulated adhesive joints between load bearing composite parts in automotive components. The experiments accounted for fatigue, solvent and temperature effects on a swirled glass fiber composite adherend/urethane adhesive system. Crack length measurements based on compliance facilitated determination of da/dN curves. A digital image processing technique was also utilized to monitor crack growth from in situ images of the side of the specimen. Linear elastic fracture mechanics and finite elements were used to determine energy release rate and mode-mix as a function of crack length for this specimen. Experiments were conducted in air and in a salt water bath at 10, 26 and 90°C. Joints tested in the solvent were fully saturated. In air, both increasing and decreasing temperature relative to 26°C accelerated crack growth rates. In salt water, crack growth rates increased with increasing temperature. Threshold energy release rate is shown to be the most appropriate design criteria for joints of this system. In addition, path of the crack is discussed and fracture surfaces are examined on three length scales. Three linear viscoelastic properties were measured for the neat urethane adhesive. Dynamic tensile compliance (D*) was found using a novel extensometer and results were considerably more accurate and precise than standard DMTA testing. Dynamic shear compliance (J*) was determined using an Arcan specimen. Dynamic Poisson's ratio (nu*) was extracted from strain gage data analyzed to include gage reinforcement. Experiments spanned three frequency decades and isothermal data was shifted by time-temperature superposition to create master curves spanning thirty decades. Master curves were fit to time domain Prony series. Shear compliance inferred from D* and nu* compared well with measured J*, forming a basis for finding the complete time dependent material property matrix for this

  17. Improved Adhesion and Compliancy of Hierarchical Fibrillar Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Li, Yasong; Gates, Byron D; Menon, Carlo

    2015-08-01

    The gecko relies on van der Waals forces to cling onto surfaces with a variety of topography and composition. The hierarchical fibrillar structures on their climbing feet, ranging from mesoscale to nanoscale, are hypothesized to be key elements for the animal to conquer both smooth and rough surfaces. An epoxy-based artificial hierarchical fibrillar adhesive was prepared to study the influence of the hierarchical structures on the properties of a dry adhesive. The presented experiments highlight the advantages of a hierarchical structure despite a reduction of overall density and aspect ratio of nanofibrils. In contrast to an adhesive containing only nanometer-size fibrils, the hierarchical fibrillar adhesives exhibited a higher adhesion force and better compliancy when tested on an identical substrate.

  18. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite bonded to three different liners: TheraCal LC, Biodentine, and resin-modified glass ionomer cement using universal adhesive: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Deepa, Velagala L; Dhamaraju, Bhargavi; Bollu, Indira Priyadharsini; Balaji, Tandri S

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To compare and evaluate the bonding ability of resin composite (RC) to three different liners: TheraCal LC™ (TLC), a novel resin-modified (RM) calcium silicate cement, Biodentine™ (BD), and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) using an universal silane-containing adhesive and characterizing their failure modes. Materials and Methods: Thirty extracted intact human molars with occlusal cavity (6-mm diameter and 2-mm height) were mounted in acrylic blocks and divided into three groups of 10 samples each based on the liner used as Group A (TLC), Group B (BD), and Group C (RMGIC). Composite post of 3 mm diameter and 3 mm height was then bonded to each sample using universal adhesive. Shear bond strength (SBS) analysis was performed at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was performed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc test using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 20. Results: No significant difference was observed between group A and group C (P = 0.573) while group B showed the least bond strength values with a highly significant difference (P = 0.000). The modes of failure were predominantly cohesive in Groups A and B (TLC and BD) while RMGIC showed mixed and adhesive failures. Conclusions: Hence, this present study concludes that the bond strength of composite resin to TLC and RMGIC was similar and significantly higher than that of BD following application of universal adhesive. PMID:27099425

  19. Effect of thione primers on adhesive bonding between an indirect composite material and Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy.

    PubMed

    Imai, Hideyuki; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Shimoe, Saiji; Hirata, Isao; Matsumura, Hideo; Nikawa, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    The current study evaluated the effect of primers on the shear bond strength of an indirect composite material joined to a silverpalladium-copper-gold (Ag-Pd-Cu-Au) alloy (Castwell). Disk specimens were cast from the alloy and were air-abraded with alumina. Eight metal primers were applied to the alloy surface. A light-polymerized indirect composite material (Solidex) was bonded to the alloy. Shear bond strength was determined both before and after the application of thermocycling. Two groups primed with Metaltite (thione) and M. L. Primer (sulfide) showed the greatest post-thermocycling bond strength (8.8 and 6.5 MPa). The results of the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) analysis suggested that the thione monomer (MTU-6) in the Metaltite primer was strongly adsorbed onto the Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy surface even after repeated cleaning with acetone. The application of either the thione (MTU-6) or sulfide primer is effective for enhancing the bonding between a composite material and Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy.

  20. An adhesive bond state classification method for a composite skin-to-spar joint using chaotic insonification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasel, Timothy R.; Todd, Michael D.

    2010-07-01

    The combination of chaotically amplitude-modulated ultrasonic waves and time series prediction algorithms has shown the ability to locate and classify various bond state damage conditions of a composite bonded joint. This study examines the ability of a new two-part supervised learning classification scheme not only to classify disbond size but also to classify whether a bond for which there is no baseline data is undamaged or has some form of disbond. This classification is performed using data from a similarly configured composite bond for which baseline data are available. The test structures are analogous to a wing skin-to-spar bonded joint. An active excitation signal is imparted to the structure through a macro fiber composite (MFC) patch on one side of the bonded joint and sensed using an equivalent MFC patch on the opposite side of the joint. There is an MFC actuator/sensor pair for each bond condition to be identified. The classification approach compares features derived from an autoregressive (AR) model coefficient vector cross-assurance criterion.

  1. Modified carbon fibers to improve composite properties. [sizing fibers for reduced electrical conductivity and adhesion during combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepler, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Thin coatings, 5 to 10 wt. percent, were applied to PAN-based carbon fibers. These coatings were intended to make the carbon fibers less electrically conductive or to cause fibers to stick together when a carbon fiber/epoxy composite burned. The effectiveness of the coatings in these regards was evaluated in burn tests with a test rig designed to simulate burning, impact and wind conditions which might release carbon fibers. The effect of the coatings on fiber and composite properties and handling was also investigated. Attempts at sizing carbon fibers with silicon dioxide, silicon carbide and boron nitride meet with varying degrees of success; however, none of these materials provided an electrically nonconductive coating. Coatings intended to stick carbon fibers together after a composite burned were sodium silicate, silica gel, ethyl silicate, boric acid and ammonium borate. Of these, only the sodium silicate and silica gel provided any sticking together of fibers. The amount of sticking was insufficient to achieve the desired objectives.

  2. Auto Mechanics I. Learning Activity Packets (LAPs). Section A--Orientation and Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This document contains seven learning activity packets (LAPs) that outline the study activities for the orientation and safety instructional area for an Auto Mechanics I course. The seven LAPs cover the following topics: orientation, safety, hand tools, arc welding, oxyacetylene cutting, oxyacetylene fusion welding, and oxyacetylene braze welding.…

  3. Improvement of transformer core magnetic properties using the step-lap design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valkovic, Z.; Rezic, A.

    1992-07-01

    Magnetic properties of the step-lap joints have been investigated experimentally on two three-phase three-leg transformer cores. Using the step-lap joint design, a reduction of the total core loss of 2 to 4.4% and of the exciting power of 31 to 37% has been obtained.

  4. Mechanistic Features of Nanodiamonds in the Lapping of Magnetic Heads

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xionghua; Chen, Zhenxing; Wolfram, Joy; Yang, Zhizhou

    2014-01-01

    Nanodiamonds, which are the main components of slurry in the precision lapping process of magnetic heads, play an important role in surface quality. This paper studies the mechanistic features of nanodiamond embedment into a Sn plate in the lapping process. This is the first study to develop mathematical models for nanodiamond embedment. Such models can predict the optimum parameters for particle embedment. From the modeling calculations, the embedded pressure satisfies p0 = (3/2)·(W/πa2) and the indentation depth satisfies δ=k1P/HV. Calculation results reveal that the largest embedded pressure is 731.48 GPa and the critical indentation depth δ is 7 nm. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) were used to carry out surface quality detection and analysis of the disk head. Both the formation of black spots on the surface and the removal rate have an important correlation with the size of nanodiamonds. The results demonstrate that an improved removal rate (21 nm·min−1) can be obtained with 100 nm diamonds embedded in the plate. PMID:25045730

  5. Large-Scale Advanced Prop-Fan (LAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degeorge, C. L.

    1988-01-01

    In recent years, considerable attention has been directed toward improving aircraft fuel efficiency. Analytical studies and research with wind tunnel models have demonstrated that the high inherent efficiency of low speed turboprop propulsion systems may now be extended to the Mach .8 flight regime of today's commercial airliners. This can be accomplished with a propeller, employing a large number of thin highly swept blades. The term Prop-Fan has been coined to describe such a propulsion system. In 1983 the NASA-Lewis Research Center contracted with Hamilton Standard to design, build and test a near full scale Prop-Fan, designated the Large Scale Advanced Prop-Fan (LAP). This report provides a detailed description of the LAP program. The assumptions and analytical procedures used in the design of Prop-Fan system components are discussed in detail. The manufacturing techniques used in the fabrication of the Prop-Fan are presented. Each of the tests run during the course of the program are also discussed and the major conclusions derived from them stated.

  6. Ultrasonic guided wave inspection of Inconel 625 brazed lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comot, Pierre; Bocher, Philippe; Belanger, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    The aerospace industry has been investigating the use of brazing for structural joints, as a mean of reducing cost and weight. There therefore is a need for a rapid, robust, and cost-effective non-destructive testing method for evaluating the structural integrity of the joints. The mechanical strength of brazed joints depends mainly on the amount of brittle phases in their microstructure. Ultrasonic guided waves offer the possibility of detecting brittle phases in joints using spatio-temporal measurements. Moreover, they offer the opportunity to inspect complex shape joints. This study focused on the development of a technique based on ultrasonic guided waves for the inspection of Inconel 625 lap joints brazed with BNi-2 filler metal. A finite element model of a lap joint was used to optimize the inspection parameters and assess the feasibility of detecting the amount of brittle phases in the joint. A finite element parametric study simulating the input signal shape, the center frequency, and the excitation direction was performed. The simulations showed that the ultrasonic guided wave energy transmitted through, and reflected from, the joints was proportional to the amount of brittle phases in the joint.

  7. Factors Affecting the Processing of Epoxy Film Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pike, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    The increasing awareness that adhesive performance is controlled not only by the condition of the adherend surface but also the condition or state of the adhesive and the process parameters used during fabrication is expected to result in improved reliability, as well as bond performance. The critical process variables which have been found to control adhesive bond formation and ultimate bond strength in 250F and 350F curing epoxy adhesives are described in terms of fabrication parameters and adhesive characteristics. These include the heat-up rate and cure temperature during processing and the adhesive moisture content and age condition (degree of advancement). The diagnostic methods used to delineate the effects of these process variables on adhesive performance are illustrated. These are dielectric, thermomechanical (TMA) and dynamic mechanical (DMA) analyses. Correlation of test results with measured mechanical tensile lap shear strengths of bonded joints is presented and the results briefly discussed in terms of the additives and hardeners used in the adhesive systems.

  8. Fatigue behavior of adhesively bonded joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.

    1983-01-01

    The fatigue damage mechanism of composite to composite adhesively bonded joints was characterized. The mechanics of the possible modes of fatigue damage propagation in these joints when subjected to constant amplitude cyclic mechanical loading were investigated. The possible failure modes in composite bonded joints may be cyclic debonding (i.e., progressive separation of the adhesive), interlaminar damage (delamination), adherend fatigue or a combination of these. Two composite systems - graphite/epoxy adhesively bonded to graphite/epoxy and Kevlar 49/epoxy adhesively bonded to Kevlar 49/epoxy were investigated. Both composite systems consisted of quasi-isotropic lay-ups, i.e., 0 deg/-45 deg/+45 deg/90 degs. The two adhesives, employed in the study were (1) EC 3445 with cure temperature of 250 F for secondary bonding and (2) FM 300 with cure temperature of 350 F for co-cure bonding.

  9. Photoresist substrate having robust adhesion

    DOEpatents

    Dentinger, Paul M.

    2005-07-26

    A substrate material for LIGA applications w hose general composition is Ti/Cu/Ti/SiO.sub.2. The SiO.sub.2 is preferably applied to the Ti/Cu/Ti wafer as a sputtered coating, typically about 100 nm thick. This substrate composition provides improved adhesion for epoxy-based photoresist materials, and particularly the photoresist material SU-8.

  10. The Teacher's Lap--A Site of Emotional Well-Being for the Younger Children in Day-Care Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hännikäinen, Maritta

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on a particular relationship between teachers and one- to three-year-old children: the child in the teacher's lap. When, in what situations, does this happen? Who are the children in the teacher's lap? Why are they there? How do children express emotional well-being when in the teacher's lap? Relational, sociocultural and…

  11. [FTIR spectroscopic studies of facial prosthetic adhesives].

    PubMed

    Kang, Biao; Yang, Qing-fang; Liang, Jian-feng; Zhao, Yi-min

    2008-10-01

    According to the composition of the traditional facial prosthetic adhesives, most of adhesives can be classified into two categories: acrylic polymer-based adhesive and silicone-based adhesive. In previous studies, measurements of various mechanical bond strengths were carried out, whereas the functional groups of the adhesives were evaluated seldom during the adhesion. In the present study the analysis of two facial prosthetic adhesives (Epithane and Secure Adhesive) was carried out by using infrared spectroscopy. Two adhesives in the form of fluid or semisolid were submitted to FTIR spectroscopy, respectively. The results showed that water and ammonia residue volatilized during the solidification of Epithane, and absorption peak reduction of carbonyl was due to the volatilization of acetate vinyl from Secure Adhesive. Similar silicone functional groups both in the silicone-based adhesive and in silicone elastomer could be the key to higher bond strength between silicone elastomer and skin with silicone-based adhesive. The position, shape of main absorption peaks of three adhesives didn't change, which showing that their main chemicals and basic structures didn't change during solidification. PMID:19123392

  12. Adhesive bonding of resin composite to various titanium surfaces using different metal conditioners and a surface modification system

    PubMed Central

    ALMILHATTI, Hercules Jorge; NEPPELENBROEK, Karin Hermana; VERGANI, Carlos Eduardo; MACHADO, Ana Lúcia; PAVARINA, Ana Cláudia; GIAMPAOLO, Eunice Teresinha

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated the effect of three metal conditioners on the shear bond strength (SBS) of a prosthetic composite material to cpTi grade I having three surface treatments. Material and Methods One hundred sixty eight rivet-shaped specimens (8.0x2.0 mm) were cast and subjected to polishing (P) or sandblasting with either 50 mm (50SB) or 250 mm (250SB) Al2O3. The metal conditioners Metal Photo Primer (MPP), Cesead II Opaque Primer (OP), Targis Link (TL), and one surface modification system Siloc (S), were applied to the specimen surfaces, which were covered with four 1-mm thick layers of resin composite. The resin layers were exposed to curing light for 90 s separately. Seven specimens from each experimental group were stored in water at 37ºC for 24 h while the other 7 specimens were subjected to 5,000 thermal cycles consisting of water baths at 4ºC and 60ºC (n=7). All specimens were subjected to SBS test (0.5 mm/min) until failure occurred, and further 28 specimens were analyzed using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Data were analyzed by 3-way ANOVA followed by post-hoc Tukey's test (α=0.05). Results On 50SB surfaces, OP groups showed higher SBS means than MPP (P<0.05), while no significant difference was found among OP, S, and TL groups. On 250SB surfaces, OP and TL groups exhibited higher SBS than MPP and S (P<0.05). No significant difference in SBS was found between OP and TL groups nor between MPP and S groups. The use of conditioners on 250SB surfaces resulted in higher SBS means than the use of the same products on 50SB surfaces (P<0.05). Conclusion Sandblasting associated with the use of metal conditioners improves SBS of resin composites to cpTi. PMID:24473727

  13. C/EBPβ-LAP*/LAP Expression Is Mediated by RSK/eIF4B-Dependent Signalling and Boosted by Increased Protein Stability in Models of Monocytic Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Christmann, Martin; Friesenhagen, Judith; Westphal, Andreas; Pietsch, Daniel; Brand, Korbinian

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor C/EBPβ plays a key role in monocytic differentiation and inflammation. Its small isoform LIP is associated with proliferation at early premonocytic developmental stages and regulated via mTOR-dependent signalling. During later stages of (pre)monocytic differentiation there is a considerable increase in the large C/EBPβ isoforms LAP*/LAP which inhibit proliferation thus supporting terminal differentiation. Here, we showed in different models of monocytic differentiation that this dramatic increase in the LAP*/LAP protein and LAP/LIP ratio was accompanied by an only modest/retarded mRNA increase suggesting an important role for (post)translational mechanisms. We found that LAP*/LAP formation was induced via MEK/RSK-dependent cascades, whereas mTOR/S6K1 were not involved. Remarkably, LAP*/LAP expression was dependent on phosphorylated eIF4B, an acceleratory protein of RNA helicase eIF4A. PKR inhibition reduced the expression of eIF4B and C/EBPβ in an eIF2α-independent manner. Furthermore, under our conditions a marked stabilisation of LAP*/LAP protein occurred, accompanied by reduced chymotrypsin-like proteasome/calpain activities and increased calpastatin levels. Our study elucidates new signalling pathways inducing LAP*/LAP expression and indicates new alternative PKR functions in monocytes. The switch from mTOR- to RSK-mediated signalling to orchestrate eIF4B-dependent LAP*/LAP translation, accompanied by increased protein stability but only small mRNA changes, may be a prototypical example for the regulation of protein expression during selected processes of differentiation/proliferation. PMID:26646662

  14. Development of critical molecular weight-property specifications for high performance polymers used as adhesives and composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kranbuehl, D. E.

    1982-01-01

    The polyimide resin, LARC-160, was prepared from diethyl-3, 3', 4,4'-benzophenone tetracarboxylate, ethyl-5-norbornene-2,3-dicarboxylate and Jeffamine AP-22. The imidization reactions of NE and BTDE were studied by HPLC, C-13-NMR and IR. NE imidizes slowly at 12 C; BTDE imidizes when the resin is heated above 100 C. Both imidization reactions proceed directly to the imide. Neither amic acid is present in significant quantities at any stage of the imidization reactions. The monomer mixture was stored at 12 C for periods up to 14 months. The effects of resin aging at this temperature on the chemical composition of the resin monomer mixture and the imidized polymer formed on curing were investigated. Aging the resin monomer mixture has the effect of partially advancing the imidization reaction. The average size of the cured polymer increases slightly with resin age.

  15. Direct Tensile Strength and Characteristics of Dentin Restored with All-Ceramic, Resin-Composite, and Cast Metal Prostheses Cemented with Resin Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Piemjai, Morakot; Nakabayashi, Nobuo

    2015-01-01

    A dentin-cement-prosthesis complex restored with either all-porcelain, cured resin-composite, or cast base metal alloy and cemented with either of the different resin cements was trimmed into a mini-dumbbell shape for tensile testing. The fractured surfaces and characterization of the dentin-cement interface of bonded specimens were investigated using a Scanning Electron Microscope. A significantly higher tensile strength of all-porcelain (12.5 ± 2.2 MPa) than that of cast metal (9.2 ± 3.5 MPa) restorations was revealed with cohesive failure in the cement and failure at the prosthesis-cement interface in Super-Bond C&B group. No significant difference in tensile strength was found among the types of restorations using the other three cements with adhesive failure on the dentin side and cohesive failure in the cured resin. SEM micrographs demonstrated the consistent hybridized dentin in Super-Bond C&B specimens that could resist degradation when immersed in hydrochloric acid followed by NaOCl solutions whereas a detached and degraded interfacial layer was found for the other cements. The results suggest that when complete hybridization of resin into dentin occurs tensile strength at the dentin-cement is higher than at the cement-prosthesis interfaces. The impermeable hybridized dentin can protect the underlying dentin and pulp from acid demineralization, even if detachment of the prosthesis has occurred. PMID:26539520

  16. Direct Tensile Strength and Characteristics of Dentin Restored with All-Ceramic, Resin-Composite, and Cast Metal Prostheses Cemented with Resin Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Piemjai, Morakot; Nakabayashi, Nobuo

    2015-01-01

    A dentin-cement-prosthesis complex restored with either all-porcelain, cured resin-composite, or cast base metal alloy and cemented with either of the different resin cements was trimmed into a mini-dumbbell shape for tensile testing. The fractured surfaces and characterization of the dentin-cement interface of bonded specimens were investigated using a Scanning Electron Microscope. A significantly higher tensile strength of all-porcelain (12.5 ± 2.2 MPa) than that of cast metal (9.2 ± 3.5 MPa) restorations was revealed with cohesive failure in the cement and failure at the prosthesis-cement interface in Super-Bond C&B group. No significant difference in tensile strength was found among the types of restorations using the other three cements with adhesive failure on the dentin side and cohesive failure in the cured resin. SEM micrographs demonstrated the consistent hybridized dentin in Super-Bond C&B specimens that could resist degradation when immersed in hydrochloric acid followed by NaOCl solutions whereas a detached and degraded interfacial layer was found for the other cements. The results suggest that when complete hybridization of resin into dentin occurs tensile strength at the dentin-cement is higher than at the cement-prosthesis interfaces. The impermeable hybridized dentin can protect the underlying dentin and pulp from acid demineralization, even if detachment of the prosthesis has occurred.

  17. The LAPS Project : A live 1D Radiative-Convective Model to explore the possible climates of terrestrial planets and exoplanets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turbet, Martin; Forget, Francois; Schott, Cédric

    2016-10-01

    The LAPS (Live Atmospheres-of-Planets Simulator) is a live 1D version of the LMD Global Climate Model that provides an accelerated and interactive simulation of the climate of terrestrial planets and exoplanets.This tool was designed for students to explore the «Classical Habitable Zone», defined as the range of orbital distances within which a planet can maintain liquid water on its surface. The model faithfully reproduces both the inner edge and the outer edge limits of the Habitable Zone, and their dependencies to the type of star and the gas composition.Furthermore, it provides a "hands on" experiment by showing how the surface and atmospheric temperatures as well as the profile of water vapor evolve through time when the external forcing (insolation, star spectrum, ...) or the planet (quantity of CO2, initial amount of water reservoir, ...) is modified.The tool is available at http://laps.lmd.jussieu.fr/ .

  18. Shear bond strength of resin composite bonded with two adhesives: Influence of Er: YAG laser irradiation distance

    PubMed Central

    Shirani, Farzaneh; Birang, Reza; Malekipour, Mohammad Reza; Hourmehr, Zahra; Kazemi, Shantia

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dental surfaces prepared with different Er:YAG laser distance may have different characteristics compared with those prepared with conventional instruments. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Er:YAG laser irradiation distance from enamel and dentin surfaces on the shear bond strength of composite with self-etch and etch and rinse bonding systems compared with conventional preparation method. Materials and Methods: Two hundred caries-free human third molars were randomly divided into twenty groups (n = 10). Ten groups were designated for enamel surface (E1-E10) and ten for dentin surface (D1-D10). Er: YAG laser (2940 nm) was used on the E1-E8 (240 mJ, 25 Hz) and D1-D8 (140 mJ, 30 Hz) groups at four different distances of 0.5 (standard), 2, 4 and 11 mm. Control groups (E9, E10, D9 and D10) were ground with medium grit diamond bur. The enamel and dentin specimens were divided into two subgroups that were bonded with either Single Bond or Clearfil SE Bond. Resin composite (Z100) was dispensed on prepared dentin and enamel. The shear bond strengths were tested using a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed by SPSS12 statistical software using three way analysis of variance, Tukey and independent t-test. P < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: There was a significant difference between enamel and dentin substrates (P < 0.001) and between lased and un-lased groups; the un-lased group had significantly higher bond strength (P < 0.001). Shear bond strength increased significantly with an increase in the laser irradiation distance (P < 0.05) on enamel surfaces (in both bonding agent subgroups) and on dentin surfaces (in the Single Bond subgroup). Conclusion: Laser irradiation decreases shear bond strength. Irradiation distance affects shear bond strength and increasing the distance would decrease the negative effects of laser irradiation. PMID:25540665

  19. Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, John G.

    The Composites market is arguably the most challenging and profitable market for phenolic resins aside from electronics. The variety of products and processes encountered creates the challenges, and the demand for high performance in critical operations brings value. Phenolic composite materials are rendered into a wide range of components to supply a diverse and fragmented commercial base that includes customers in aerospace (Space Shuttle), aircraft (interiors and brakes), mass transit (interiors), defense (blast protection), marine, mine ducting, off-shore (ducts and grating) and infrastructure (architectural) to name a few. For example, phenolic resin is a critical adhesive in the manufacture of honeycomb sandwich panels. Various solvent and water based resins are described along with resin characteristics and the role of metal ions for enhanced thermal stability of the resin used to coat the honeycomb. Featured new developments include pultrusion of phenolic grating, success in RTM/VARTM fabricated parts, new ballistic developments for military vehicles and high char yield carbon-carbon composites along with many others. Additionally, global regional market resin volumes and sales are presented and compared with other thermosetting resin systems.

  20. Lapped Block Image Analysis via the Method of Legendre Moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Fadili, Hakim; Zenkouar, Khalid; Qjidaa, Hassan

    2003-12-01

    Research investigating the use of Legendre moments for pattern recognition has been performed in recent years. This field of research remains quite open. This paper proposes a new technique based on block-based reconstruction method (BBRM) using Legendre moments compared with the global reconstruction method (GRM). For alleviating the blocking artifact involved in the processing, we propose a new approach using lapped block-based reconstruction method (LBBRM). For the problem of selecting the optimal number of moment used to represent a given image, we propose the maximum entropy principle (MEP) method. The main motivation of the proposed approaches is to allow fast and efficient reconstruction algorithm, with improvement of the reconstructed images quality. A binary handwritten musical character and multi-gray-level Lena image are used to demonstrate the performance of our algorithm.

  1. Shoulder-lap seat belts and thoracic transection.

    PubMed

    Byard, R W

    2002-06-01

    While seat belt usage significantly decreases mortality and morbidity from traffic accidents, specific injuries may also occur. Two cases are described in adults where the wearing of three point restraints (shoulder-lap belts) in a serious high-speed vehicle accident resulted in fatal injuries to both a driver and a passenger. 'Mirror image' fractures of the sternum, rib cage and clavicles, with separation of the two halves of the rib cages and underlying trauma to the hearts and thoracic aortae resulted in death in both victims. Profound life-threatening internal injuries may be caused by seat belts in the absence of significant cutaneous injury. The pattern of internal trauma can also be useful in determining whether a seat belt was worn at the time of the accident, and on which side of the vehicle the deceased was sitting.

  2. Large-Scale Advanced Prop-Fan (LAP) blade design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Violette, John A.; Sullivan, William E.; Turnberg, Jay E.

    1984-01-01

    This report covers the design analysis of a very thin, highly swept, propeller blade to be used in the Large-Scale Advanced Prop-Fan (LAP) test program. The report includes: design requirements and goals, a description of the blade configuration which meets requirements, a description of the analytical methods utilized/developed to demonstrate compliance with the requirements, and the results of these analyses. The methods described include: finite element modeling, predicted aerodynamic loads and their application to the blade, steady state and vibratory response analyses, blade resonant frequencies and mode shapes, bird impact analysis, and predictions of stalled and unstalled flutter phenomena. Summarized results include deflections, retention loads, stress/strength comparisons, foreign object damage resistance, resonant frequencies and critical speed margins, resonant vibratory mode shapes, calculated boundaries of stalled and unstalled flutter, and aerodynamic and acoustic performance calculations.

  3. Lamina Associated Polypeptide 1 (LAP1) Interactome and Its Functional Features

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Joana B.; da Cruz e Silva, Odete A. B.; Rebelo, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Lamina-associated polypeptide 1 (LAP1) is a type II transmembrane protein of the inner nuclear membrane encoded by the human gene TOR1AIP1. LAP1 is involved in maintaining the nuclear envelope structure and appears be involved in the positioning of lamins and chromatin. To date, LAP1’s precise function has not been fully elucidated but analysis of its interacting proteins will permit unraveling putative associations to specific cellular pathways and cellular processes. By assessing public databases it was possible to identify the LAP1 interactome, and this was curated. In total, 41 interactions were identified. Several functionally relevant proteins, such as TRF2, TERF2IP, RIF1, ATM, MAD2L1 and MAD2L1BP were identified and these support the putative functions proposed for LAP1. Furthermore, by making use of the Ingenuity Pathways Analysis tool and submitting the LAP1 interactors, the top two canonical pathways were “Telomerase signalling” and “Telomere Extension by Telomerase” and the top functions “Cell Morphology”, “Cellular Assembly and Organization” and “DNA Replication, Recombination, and Repair”. Once again, putative LAP1 functions are reinforced but novel functions are emerging. PMID:26784240

  4. P-LAP/IRAP-induced cell proliferation and glucose uptake in endometrial carcinoma cells via insulin receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Kiyosumi; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Ino, Kazuhiko; Nawa, Akihiro; Nomura, Seiji; Mizutani, Shigehiko; Kikkawa, Fumitaka

    2007-01-01

    Background Hyperglycemia or hyperinsulinemia contributes to poorer endometrial cancer survival. It was shown that P-LAP/IRAP translocates to the plasma membrane in response to insulin stimulation. Recently, we demonstrated that P-LAP/IRAP is associated with a poor prognosis in endometrial adenocarcinoma patients. The aim of this study was to examine whether the malignant potential of endometrial cancer enhanced by P-LAP/IRAP is due to increased glucose uptake via the P-LAP/IRAP-mediated activation of insulin signaling. Methods We transfected P-LAP/IRAP cDNA into A-MEC cells (endometrial adenocarcinoma cell line), and A-MEC-LAP cells expressed a remarkably high level of GLUT4 proteins. Results 3H-2-deoxyglucose uptake which responds to insulin in A-MEC-LAP cells was significantly higher than that of A-MEC-pc cells. A-MEC-LAP cells exhibited a significant growth-stimulatory effect compared to A-MEC-pc cells. A-MEC-LAP cells expressed a remarkably high level of p85PI3K protein compared to A-MEC-pc cells, and showed a higher degree of AKT phosphorylation by insulin stimulation. Conclusion In summary, P-LAP/IRAP was involved in the increasing malignant potential of endometrial cancer mediated by insulin. P-LAP/IRAP was suggested to be a potential new target of molecular-targeted therapy for endometrial cancer. PMID:17233921

  5. Fiber-matrix interface studies on bioabsorbable composite materials for internal fixation of bone fractures. I. Raw material evaluation and measurement of fiber-matrix interfacial adhesion.

    PubMed

    Slivka, M A; Chu, C C; Adisaputro, I A

    1997-09-15

    The objective of this study was to characterize and evaluate the performance of various fiber-matrix composite systems by studying the mechanical, thermal, and physical properties of the fiber and matrix components, and by studying the fiber-matrix interface adhesion strength using both microbond and fragmentation methods. The composites studies were poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) matrix reinforced with continuous fibers of either nonabsorbable AS4 carbon (C), absorbable calcium phosphate (CaP), poly(glycolic acid) (PGA), or chitin. Carbon and CaP single fibers had high Young's moduli and failed in a brittle manner. PGA and chitin single fibers had relatively lower Young's moduli and relatively higher ductility. Upon in vitro hydrolysis, CaP fibers retained 17% of their tensile strength and 39% of their Young's modulus after 12 h, PCA fibers retained 10% of their tensile strength and 52% of their Young's modulus after 16 days, and chitin fibers retained 87% of their tensile strength and 130% of their Young's modulus after 25 days. PLLA films had much lower strength and Young's moduli, but much higher ductility relative to the single fibers. Using the microbond method, the initial fiber-matrix interfacial shear strength (IFSS) of C/PLLA and CaP/PLLA microcomposites was 33.9 and 12.6 MPa, respectively. Upon in vitro hydrolysis, C/PLLA retained 49% of IFSS after 15 days and CaP/PLLA retained 46% of IFSS after 6 h. Using a fiber fragmentation method, the initial IFSS of C/PLLA, CaP/PLLA, and chitin/ PLLA was 22.2, 15.6, and 28.3 MPa, respectively. The performance of carbon fibers and C/PLLA composites was superior to the other fibers and fiber/PLLA systems, but the carbon fiber was nonabsorbable. CaP had the most suitable modulus of the absorbable fibers for fixing cortical bone fracture, but its rapid deterioration of mechanical properties and loss of IFSS limits its use. PGA and chitin fibers had suitable mechanical properties and their retention for fixing cancellous

  6. Deformation verification and surface improvement of active stressed lap for 4  m-class primary mirror fabrication.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongshen; Li, Xiaojin; Fan, Bin; Zeng, Zhige

    2015-04-01

    The surface shape accuracy of the active stressed lap impacts the performance of grinding and polishing in the fabrication of large mirrors. We introduce a model of active stressed lap for the fabrication of a 4 m f/1.5 mirror based on finite element analysis (FEA), and the lap surface accuracy achieves RMS<1.8  μm in the FEA method. Using the lap surface measurement system, experimental verification is put forward, and the RMS of the measured lap surface is within 2 μm in practice. A general improvement in lap surface accuracy using the Zernike polynomial is shown. After compensating the calculation errors, the lap surface accuracy is improved by 8%-23%, and achieves RMS<1.5  μm, which is appropriate for practical grinding and polishing. PMID:25967173

  7. Electromechanical behaviour of REBCO tape lap splices under transverse compressive loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grether, A.; Scheuerlein, C.; Ballarino, A.; Bottura, L.

    2016-07-01

    We have studied the influence of transverse compressive stress on the resistance and critical current (I c ) of soldered REBCO tape lap splices. Internal contact resistances dominate the overall REBCO lap splice resistances. Application of transverse compressive stress up to 250 MPa during the resistance measurements does not alter the resistance and I c of the soldered REBCO splices that were studied. The resistance of unsoldered REBCO tape lap splices depends strongly on the contact pressure. At a transverse compressive stress of 100 MPa, to which Roebel cables are typically exposed in high field magnets, the crossover splice contact resistance is comparable to the internal tape resistances.

  8. Lumbar Chance fracture associated with use of the lap belt restraint in an adolescent.

    PubMed

    Walsh, A; Sheehan, E; Walsh, M G

    2003-05-01

    The use of the 2-point seat belt or lap belt in motor vehicles, particularly to restrain young rear seat passengers, remains an issue of some concern. The occurrence of lumbar spinal flexion-distraction injuries in lap belt restrained children and adolescents during road traffic accidents is a well known phenomenon, but is still occurring. High velocity paediatric Chance fractures are frequently associated with significant intra-abdominal trauma. We present the case of a Chance fracture sustained by a 15 year old girl, involved in a motor vehicle collision, while wearing a lap belt. We emphasise the need to develop safer seat belt designs for juvenile car passengers.

  9. Seat belt induced transection of the trachea in a child on the lap of an adult.

    PubMed

    Uemura, K; Yoshida, K

    2001-05-01

    As a victim of his parents' suicide, a three-year-old boy was found dead on the lap of the passenger in the left front seat of a car that dove from the wharf and crashed into the sea. He died from the transection of trachea due to shoulder belt in the absence of the signs of drowning. The seat belt paradoxically injured the child on the passenger's lap in the traffic accident. The popular custom of Japanese parents of holding their children on their laps in cars is dangerous, while another custom of killing their children upon suicide of parents or couples should be socially and legally controlled.

  10. Machine imparting complex rotary motion for lapping a spherical inner diameter

    DOEpatents

    Carroll, T.A.; Yetter, H.H.

    1985-01-30

    An apparatus for imparting complex rotary motion is used to lap an inner spherical diameter surface of a workpiece. A lapping tool consists of a dome and rod mounted along the dome's vertical axis. The workpiece containing the lapping tool is held in a gimbal which uses power derived from a secondary takeoff means to impart rotary motion about a horizontal axis. The gimbal is rotated about a vertical axis by a take means while mounted at a radially outward position on a rotating arm.

  11. Machine imparting complex rotary motion for lapping a spherical inner diameter

    DOEpatents

    Carroll, Thomas A.; Yetter, Harold H.

    1986-01-01

    An apparatus for imparting complex rotary motion is used to lap an inner spherical diameter surface of a workpiece. A lapping tool consists of a dome and rod mounted along the dome's vertical axis. The workpiece containing the lapping tool is held in a gimbal which uses power derived from a secondary takeoff means to impart rotary motion about a horizontal axis. The gimbal is rotated about a vertical axis by a take means while mounted at a radially outward position on a rotating arm.

  12. The effect of diamond powder characteristics on lapping of sintered silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosczyk, Benjamin; Burkam, Eric; Titov, Artem; Onyenemezu, Clement; Benea, Ion C.

    2015-10-01

    In Automotive applications, sintered Silicon Carbide has been used in applications such as seal pump faces. The surface of sintered SiC, when lapped or polished for sealing to another surface, must be free of blemishes and mechanical defects. Lapping and polishing processes therefore must be well defined and controlled assuring minimal variation and production scrap. In this study, we related the characteristics of different diamond powders (particle size distribution, particle shape and surface) to their performance in lapping of sintered silicon carbide material, expressed as removal rate and surface finish.

  13. Relevance of in vitro tests of adhesive and composite dental materials, a review in 3 parts. Part 1: Approval requirements and standardized testing of composite materials according to ISO specifications.

    PubMed

    Heintze, Siegward D; Zimmerli, Brigitte

    2011-01-01

    The first part of this three-part review on the relevance of laboratory testing of composites and adhesives deals with approval requirements for composite materials. We compare the in vivo and in vitro literature data and discuss the relevance of in vitro analyses. The standardized ISO protocols are presented, with a focus on the evaluation of physical parameters. These tests all have a standardized protocol that describes the entire test set-up. The tests analyse flexural strength, depth of cure, susceptibility to ambient light, color stability, water sorption and solubility, and radiopacity. Some tests have a clinical correlation. A high flexural strength, for instance, decreases the risk of fractures of the marginal ridge in posterior restorations and incisal edge build-ups of restored anterior teeth. Other tests do not have a clinical correlation or the threshold values are too low, which results in an approval of materials that show inferior clinical properties (e.g., radiopacity). It is advantageous to know the test set-ups and the ideal threshold values to correctly interpret the material data. Overall, however, laboratory assessment alone cannot ensure the clinical success of a product.

  14. Adhesion and growth of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on precise-geometry 3D organic-inorganic composite scaffolds for bone repair.

    PubMed

    Chatzinikolaidou, Maria; Rekstyte, Sima; Danilevicius, Paulius; Pontikoglou, Charalampos; Papadaki, Helen; Farsari, Maria; Vamvakaki, Maria

    2015-03-01

    Engineering biomaterial scaffolds that promote attachment and growth of mesenchymal stem cells in three dimensions is a crucial parameter for successful bone tissue engineering. Towards this direction, a lot of research effort has focused recently into the development of three-dimensional porous scaffolds, aiming to elicit positive cellular behavior. However, the fabrication of three-dimensional tissue scaffolds with a precise geometry and complex micro- and nano-features, supporting cell in-growth remains a challenge. In this study we report on a positive cellular response of human bone marrow-derived (BM) mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) onto hybrid material scaffolds consisting of methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane, zirconium propoxide, and 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA). First, we use Direct fs Laser Writing, a 3D scaffolding technology to fabricate the complex structures. Subsequently, we investigate the morphology, viability and proliferation of BM-MSCs onto the hybrid scaffolds and examine the cellular response from different donors. Finally, we explore the effect of the materials' chemical composition on cell proliferation, employing three different material surfaces: (i) a hybrid consisting of methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane, zirconium propoxide and 50mol% DMAEMA, (ii) a hybrid material comprising methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane and zirconium propoxide, and (iii) a purely organic polyDMAEMA. Our results show a strong adhesion of BM-MSCs onto the hybrid material containing 50% DMAEMA from the first 2h after seeding, and up to several days, and a proliferation increase after 14 and 21days, similar to the polystyrene control, independent of cell donor. These findings support the potential use of our proposed cell-material combination in bone tissue engineering.

  15. Marginal microleakage of cervical composite resin restorations bonded using etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives: two dimensional vs. three dimensional methods

    PubMed Central

    Khoroushi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study was evaluated the marginal microleakage of two different adhesive systems before and after aging with two different dye penetration techniques. Materials and Methods Class V cavities were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of 48 human molars. Clearfil SE Bond and Single Bond (self-etching and etch-and-rinse systems, respectively) were applied, each to half of the prepared cavities, which were restored with composite resin. Half of the specimens in each group underwent 10,000 cycles of thermocycling. Microleakage was evaluated using two dimensional (2D) and three dimensional (3D) dye penetration techniques separately for each half of each specimen. Data were analyzed with SPSS 11.5 (SPSS Inc.), using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests (α = 0.05). Results The difference between the 2D and 3D microleakage evaluation techniques was significant at the occlusal margins of Single bond groups (p = 0.002). The differences between 2D and 3D microleakage evaluation techniques were significant at both the occlusal and cervical margins of Clearfil SE Bond groups (p = 0.017 and p = 0.002, respectively). The difference between the 2D and 3D techniques was significant at the occlusal margins of non-aged groups (p = 0.003). The difference between these two techniques was significant at the occlusal margins of the aged groups (p = 0.001). The Mann-Whitney test showed significant differences between the two techniques only at the occlusal margins in all specimens. Conclusions Under the limitations of the present study, it can be concluded that the 3D technique has the capacity to detect occlusal microleakage more precisely than the 2D technique. PMID:27200275

  16. Preparation and testing of plant seed meal-based wood adhesives.

    PubMed

    He, Zhongqi; Chapital, Dorselyn C

    2015-03-05

    Recently, the interest in plant seed meal-based products as wood adhesives has steadily increased, as these plant raw materials are considered renewable and environment-friendly. These natural products may serve as alternatives to petroleum-based adhesives to ease environmental and sustainability concerns. This work demonstrates the preparation and testing of the plant seed-based wood adhesives using cottonseed and soy meal as raw materials. In addition to untreated meals, water washed meals and protein isolates are prepared and tested. Adhesive slurries are prepared by mixing a freeze-dried meal product with deionized water (3:25 w/w) for 2 hr. Each adhesive preparation is applied to one end of 2 wood veneer strips using a brush. The tacky adhesive coated areas of the wood veneer strips are lapped and glued by hot-pressing. Adhesive strength is reported as the shear strength of the bonded wood specimen at break. Water resistance of the adhesives is measured by the change in shear strength of the bonded wood specimens at break after water soaking. This protocol allows one to assess plant seed-based agricultural products as suitable candidates for substitution of synthetic-based wood adhesives. Adjustments to the adhesive formulation with or without additives and bonding conditions could optimize their adhesive properties for various practical applications.

  17. Adhesive Properties of Cured Phenylethynyl containing Imides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Alice C.

    1997-01-01

    As part of a program to develop structural adhesives for high performance aerospace applications, several phenylethynyl containing oligomer blends of Larc(TM) MPEI and a reactive plasticizer designated LaRC LV-1 21 were prepared and evaluated. The fully imidized blends exhibited minimum melt viscosity as low as 1000 poise at 371 C. Ti/Ti lap shear specimens fabricated at 316 C under 15 psi gave RT strength of approx. 4300 psi and no change in strength was observed at 177 C. The chemistry and properties of this new MPEI as well as some blends of MPEI with LV-121 are presented and compared to the linear version, LARC(TM)-PETI-5.

  18. Stresses in adhesively bonded joints: A closed form solution. [plate theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delale, F.; Erdogan, F.; Aydinoglu, M. N.

    1980-01-01

    The plane strain of adhesively bonded structures which consist of two different orthotropic adherents is considered. Assuming that the thicknesses of the adherends are constant and are small in relation to the lateral dimensions of the bonded region, the adherends are treated as plates. The transverse shear effects in the adherends and the in-plane normal strain in the adhesive are taken into account. The problem is reduced to a system of differential equations for the adhesive stresses which is solved in closed form. A single lap joint and a stiffened plate under various loading conditions are considered as examples. To verify the basic trend of the solutions obtained from the plate theory a sample problem is solved by using the finite element method and by treating the adherends and the adhesive as elastic continua. The plate theory not only predicts the correct trend for the adhesive stresses but also gives rather surprisingly accurate results.

  19. Coordinated Analysis of Two Graphite Grains from the CO3.0 LAP 031117 Meteorite: First Identification of a CO Nova Graphite and a Presolar Iron Sulfide Subgrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haenecour, Pierre; Floss, Christine; José, Jordi; Amari, Sachiko; Lodders, Katharina; Jadhav, Manavi; Wang, Alian; Gyngard, Frank

    2016-07-01

    Presolar grains constitute the remnants of stars that existed before the formation of the solar system. In addition to providing direct information on the materials from which the solar system formed, these grains provide ground-truth information for models of stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis. Here we report the in situ identification of two unique presolar graphite grains from the primitive meteorite LaPaz Icefield 031117. Based on these two graphite grains, we estimate a bulk presolar graphite abundance of {5}-3+7 ppm in this meteorite. One of the grains (LAP-141) is characterized by an enrichment in 12C and depletions in 33,34S, and contains a small iron sulfide subgrain, representing the first unambiguous identification of presolar iron sulfide. The other grain (LAP-149) is extremely 13C-rich and 15N-poor, with one of the lowest 12C/13C ratios observed among presolar grains. Comparison of its isotopic compositions with new stellar nucleosynthesis and dust condensation models indicates an origin in the ejecta of a low-mass CO nova. Grain LAP-149 is the first putative nova grain that quantitatively best matches nova model predictions, providing the first strong evidence for graphite condensation in nova ejecta. Our discovery confirms that CO nova graphite and presolar iron sulfide contributed to the original building blocks of the solar system.

  20. A characterization of the LAP Aquarius Phantom for external LAP laser alignment and magnetic resonance geometric distortion verification for stereotactic radiation surgery patient simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergara, Daniel

    The Thesis explores additional applications of LAP's Aquarius external laser alignment verification Phantom by examining geometric accuracy of magnetic resonance images commonly used for planning intracranial stereotactic radiation surgery (ICSRS) cases. The scans were performed with MRI protocols used for ICSRS, and head and neck diagnosis, and their images fused to computerized tomographic (CT) images. The geometric distortions (GDs) were measured against the CT in all axial, sagittal, and coronal directions at different levels. Using the Aquarius Phantom, one is able to detect GD in ICSRS planning MRI acquisitions, and align the external LAP patient alignment lasers, by following the LAP QA protocol. GDs up to about 2 mm are observed at the distal regions of the longitudinal axis in the SRS treatment planning MR images. Based on the results, one may recommend the use of the Aquarius Phantom to determine if margins should be included for SRS treatment planning.

  1. Alteration of Sulphides in the Rumuruti Chondrite La Paz Icefield (LAP) 031275

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steer, E. D.; Treiman, A. H.

    2014-09-01

    Pyrrhotite in LAP 03175 (R5) has altered to a fine-grained mineral mixture. New data (optical, chemical, and Raman) suggest the mixture includes violarite and tochilinite, but not (as suggested earlier) graphite, hematite, and/or jarosite.

  2. On the water lapping of felines and the water running of lizards: A unifying physical perspective.

    PubMed

    Aristoff, Jeffrey M; Stocker, Roman; Reis, Pedro M; Jung, Sunghwan

    2011-03-01

    We consider two biological phenomena taking place at the air-water interface: the water lapping of felines and the water running of lizards. Although seemingly disparate motions, we show that they are intimately linked by their underlying hydrodynamics and belong to a broader class of processes called Froude mechanisms. We describe how both felines and lizards exploit inertia to defeat gravity, and discuss water lapping and water running in the broader context of water exit and water entry, respectively.

  3. Growth and investigation of new non-linear optical crystals of LAP family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosyan, A. M.; Sukiasyan, R. P.; Karapetyan, H. A.; Terzyan, S. S.; Feigelson, R. S.

    2000-05-01

    The possibility of preparing new analogs of L-arginine phosphate monohydrate, (LAP), has been investigated. Single crystals of the compound L-Arg·HCOOH, which had earlier been obtained in powdered form, were successfully grown during the course of this investigation. In addition, we have found that there is a class of compounds having the Arg·2Ax composition, (where Ax is one of several inorganic or organic acids). Such compounds (Arg·2HIO 3, Arg·2HNO 3, Arg·2H 3PO 4, Arg·2HF, Arg·2HCl·H 2O, and Arg·2HBr·H 2O) have been synthesized and single crystals grown. The crystals grown in this investigation were studied by IR and X-ray diffraction methods. The influence of the different amino acid groups on crystal symmetry and the influence of this symmetry on non-linear optical properties are discussed.

  4. Growth kinetics of Al–Fe intermetallic compounds during annealing treatment of friction stir lap welds

    SciTech Connect

    Movahedi, M.; Kokabi, A.H.; Seyed Reihani, S.M.; Najafi, H.; Farzadfar, S.A.; Cheng, W.J.; Wang, C.J.

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we explored the growth kinetics of the Al–Fe intermetallic (IM) layer at the joint interface of the St-12/Al-5083 friction stir lap welds during post-weld annealing treatment at 350, 400 and 450 °C for 30 to 180 min. Optical microscope (OM), field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FEG-SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) were employed to investigate the structure of the weld zone. The thickness and composition of the IM layers were evaluated using image analysis system and electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD), respectively. Moreover, kernel average misorientation (KAM) analysis was performed to evaluate the level of stored energy in the as-welded state. The results showed that the growth kinetics of the IM layer was not governed by a parabolic diffusion law. Presence of the IM compounds as well as high stored energy near the joint interface of the as-welded sample was recognized to be the origin of the observed deviation from the parabolic diffusion law. - Highlights: • This work provided a new insight into growth kinetics of Al–Fe IM thickness. • The growth kinetics of IM layer was not governed by a parabolic diffusion law. • IM near the joint interface was the origin of deviation from the parabolic law. • High stored energy at joint interface was origin of deviation from parabolic law.

  5. Adhesion performance of UHMWPE after different surface modification techniques.

    PubMed

    Oosterom, R; Ahmed, T J; Poulis, J A; Bersee, H E N

    2006-05-01

    A novel design of an ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) glenoid component has been proposed, based on adhesion to PMMA bone cement. However, due to the non-polar nature of UHMWPE, surface modification techniques are needed to obtain good adhesion and thus for the design to be viable. The aim of the study is to investigate adhesion of UHMWPE after different surface treatments. Three gas-phase surface modification techniques were investigated, namely UV/Ozone, corona discharge and radio frequency glow discharge plasma, as well as abrasion. The surface treated samples were examined using water contact angle, surface energy and roughness measurements, as well as single lap-joint shear testing using polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement and methylmethacrylate (MMA) adhesive. The effect of aging on bonded samples has also been investigated. Corona and glow discharge treatments were found to activate the surface as shown by an increase in surface energy of over 100% in an order of less than a minute, corresponding to an increase in ultimate shear stress from 0.12 to 0.40 MPa. In contrast, UV/Ozone required exposure times in the order of minutes to have an effect that was still incomparable to the other gas-phase treatments examined. Abrasion produced slightly better adhesion properties for single lap-joints bonded with PMMA compared to the corona treatment. The best treatment was found to be a combined treatment of surface roughening for 10 s, and subsequently a 90 s glow discharge treatment, resulting in failure of the UHMWPE sheet material.

  6. Adhesion performance of UHMWPE after different surface modification techniques.

    PubMed

    Oosterom, R; Ahmed, T J; Poulis, J A; Bersee, H E N

    2006-05-01

    A novel design of an ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) glenoid component has been proposed, based on adhesion to PMMA bone cement. However, due to the non-polar nature of UHMWPE, surface modification techniques are needed to obtain good adhesion and thus for the design to be viable. The aim of the study is to investigate adhesion of UHMWPE after different surface treatments. Three gas-phase surface modification techniques were investigated, namely UV/Ozone, corona discharge and radio frequency glow discharge plasma, as well as abrasion. The surface treated samples were examined using water contact angle, surface energy and roughness measurements, as well as single lap-joint shear testing using polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement and methylmethacrylate (MMA) adhesive. The effect of aging on bonded samples has also been investigated. Corona and glow discharge treatments were found to activate the surface as shown by an increase in surface energy of over 100% in an order of less than a minute, corresponding to an increase in ultimate shear stress from 0.12 to 0.40 MPa. In contrast, UV/Ozone required exposure times in the order of minutes to have an effect that was still incomparable to the other gas-phase treatments examined. Abrasion produced slightly better adhesion properties for single lap-joints bonded with PMMA compared to the corona treatment. The best treatment was found to be a combined treatment of surface roughening for 10 s, and subsequently a 90 s glow discharge treatment, resulting in failure of the UHMWPE sheet material. PMID:16118059

  7. The effect of elastomer chain length on properties of silicone-modified polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, A. K.; St.clair, T. L.; Ezzell, S.

    1981-01-01

    A series of polyimides containing silicone elastomers was synthesized in order to study the effects of the elastomer chain length on polymer properties. The elastomer with repeat units varying from n=10 to 105 was chemically reacted into the backbone of an addition polyimide oligomer via reactive aromatic amine groups. Glass transition temperatures of the elastomer and polyimide phases were observed by torsional braid analysis. The elastomer-modified polyimides were tested as adhesives for bonding titanium in order to determine their potential for aerospace applications. Adhesive lap shear tests were performed before and after aging bonded specimens at elevated temperatures.

  8. Laser Surface Preparation for Adhesive Bonding of Ti-6Al-4V

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcher, Marcus A.; List, Martina S.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Ghose, Sayata; Watson, Kent A.; Hopkins, John W.; Connell, John W.

    2010-01-01

    Adhesively bonded structures are potentially lighter in weight than mechanically fastened ones, but existing surface treatments are often considered unreliable. Two main problems in achieving reproducible and durable adhesive bonds are surface contamination and variability in standard surface preparation techniques. In this work three surface pretreatments were compared: laser etching with and without grit blasting and conventional Pasa-Jell treatment. Ti-6Al-4V surfaces were characterized by contact angle goniometry, optical microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Laser -etching was found to produce clean surfaces with precisely controlled surface topographies and PETI-5 lap shear strengths and durabilities were equivalent to those produced with Pasa-Jell.

  9. Apoptosis in the lens anlage of the heritable lens aplastic mouse (lap mouse).

    PubMed

    Aso, S; Tashiro, M; Baba, R; Sawaki, M; Noda, S; Fujita, M

    1998-08-01

    Adult homozygous lap mice show various eye abnormalities, such as aphakia, retinal disorganization, and dysplasia of the cornea and anterior chamber. In the fetal eye of a homozygous lap mouse, the lens placode seems to develop normally. However, the lens vesicle progresses abnormally to form a mass of cells without a cavity, and the mass vanishes soon afterward. We examined cell death in the lens anlage of this mutant. The lens anlagen of homozygous lap and normal mice from days 10 to 12 of gestation were observed by light microscopy after DNA end-labeling by immunohistochemistry and by transmission electron microscopy. By light microscopy, a slight frequency of cell death was detected in the lens anlage encircling the surface ectoderm and in the anlage or in the anlage of both homozygous lap mice and normal mice at day 10 of gestation. Cell death was seen in the lens anlage encircling the surface ectoderm in the normal mouse and sporadically in the anlage of the homozygous lap mouse at day 10.5 of gestation. Cell death was visible at the area of the lens vesicle attached to the surface ectoderm and encircling the surrounding surface ectoderm in the normal mouse, and in the lens anlage encircling the surface ectoderm and the apex areas of the lens anlage in the homozygous lap mouse at day 11 of gestation. At day 12 of gestation, almost no cell death was observed in the lens anlage of the normal mouse. However, extensive areas of cell death were still seen in the lens anlage at its apex, at the inner region, and encircling the surface ectoderm in the homozygous lap mouse. Electron microscopic observation showed that the dead cells observed in the lens anlagen by light microscopy in normal and lap mice are the result of apoptosis. In lap mice, cells with cytoplasmic condensation were observed mainly at days 10 and 10.5 of gestation. Many apoptotic bodies which had been phagocytosed by adjacent cells were seen predominantly at day 11 of gestation. At day 12 of

  10. Measurement of adhesive joint fracture properties as a function of environmental degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Wylde, J.W.; Spelt, J.K.

    1996-12-31

    The increased use of structural adhesives in industry would benefit from a comprehensive failure load prediction tool to ensure competent design. The work of Fernlund and Spelt has proposed a fracture envelope that relates the critical strain energy release rate to the nominal phase angle of loading. The work of Plasinus and Spelt extended this work to incorporate the viscoelastic effect of the adhesive. The objective of the present research is to incorporate the effects of temperature and water absorption into the prediction of adhesive joint fracture. Ample evidence exists to demonstrate the notion that absorbed water has an effect predominantly detrimental, on the strength of an adhesive joint. Past work was concentrated on degrading typical, in service joints such as the Single Lap Shear (SLS) joint or the Cracked Lap Shear (CLS) joint. Since water is absorbed through the exposed edges, typically small in area compared to the volume of the joint, degradation times are usually long and the water concentration varies both with time and spatially throughout the joint. In this research, a novel method of degrading adhesive fracture specimens to a spatially constant degradation condition is being used to incorporate environmental effects into the fracture load prediction tool of Spelt et al.

  11. Isolation and biochemical characterization of underwater adhesives from diatoms.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Nicole; Kröger, Nils; Harrington, Matthew J; Brunner, Eike; Paasch, Silvia; Buhmann, Matthias T

    2014-01-01

    Many aquatic organisms are able to colonize surfaces through the secretion of underwater adhesives. Diatoms are unicellular algae that have the capability to colonize any natural and man-made submerged surfaces. There is great technological interest in both mimicking and preventing diatom adhesion, yet the biomolecules responsible have so far remained unidentified. A new method for the isolation of diatom adhesive material is described and its amino acid and carbohydrate composition determined. The adhesive materials from two model diatoms show differences in their amino acid and carbohydrate compositions, but also share characteristic features including a high content of uronic acids, the predominance of hydrophilic amino acid residues, and the presence of 3,4-dihydroxyproline, an extremely rare amino acid. Proteins containing dihydroxyphenylalanine, which mediate underwater adhesion of mussels, are absent. The data on the composition of diatom adhesives are consistent with an adhesion mechanism based on complex coacervation of polyelectrolyte-like biomolecules.

  12. Modified Phenylethynyl Containing Imides for Secondary Bonding: Non-Autoclave, Low Temperature Processable Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dezern, James F. (Technical Monitor); Chang, Alice C.

    1999-01-01

    As part of a program to develop structural adhesives for high performance aerospace applications, research continued on the development of modified phenylethynyl containing imides, LaRC(trademark)MPEIs. In previous reports, the polymer properties were controlled by varying the molecular weight, the amount of branching, and the phenylethynyl content and by blending with low molecular weight materials. This research involves changing the flexibility in the copolyimide backbone of the branched, phenylethynyl terminated adhesives. These adhesives exhibit excellent processability at pressures as low as 15 psi and temperatures as low as 288 C. The Ti/Ti lap shear specimens are processable in an autoclave or a temperature programmable oven under a vacuum bag at 288-300 C without external pressure. The cured polymers exhibit high mechanical properties and excellent solvent resistance. The chemistry and properties of these adhesives are presented.

  13. Large-scale Advanced Prop-fan (LAP) high speed wind tunnel test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, William A.; Wainauski, Harold S.; Arseneaux, Peter J.

    1988-01-01

    High Speed Wind Tunnel testing of the SR-7L Large Scale Advanced Prop-Fan (LAP) is reported. The LAP is a 2.74 meter (9.0 ft) diameter, 8-bladed tractor type rated for 4475 KW (6000 SHP) at 1698 rpm. It was designated and built by Hamilton Standard under contract to the NASA Lewis Research Center. The LAP employs thin swept blades to provide efficient propulsion at flight speeds up to Mach .85. Testing was conducted in the ONERA S1-MA Atmospheric Wind Tunnel in Modane, France. The test objectives were to confirm that the LAP is free from high speed classical flutter, determine the structural and aerodynamic response to angular inflow, measure blade surface pressures (static and dynamic) and evaluate the aerodynamic performance at various blade angles, rotational speeds and Mach numbers. The measured structural and aerodynamic performance of the LAP correlated well with analytical predictions thereby providing confidence in the computer prediction codes used for the design. There were no signs of classical flutter throughout all phases of the test up to and including the 0.84 maximum Mach number achieved. Steady and unsteady blade surface pressures were successfully measured for a wide range of Mach numbers, inflow angles, rotational speeds and blade angles. No barriers were discovered that would prevent proceeding with the PTA (Prop-Fan Test Assessment) Flight Test Program scheduled for early 1987.

  14. Evaluation of pediatric use patterns and performance of lap shoulder belt systems in the center rear.

    PubMed

    Arbogast, Kristy B; Durbin, Dennis R; Kallan, Michael J; Winston, Flaura K

    2004-01-01

    Lap and shoulder belts have been required in rear outboard positions since 1989. A recent congressional mandate encouraged the requirement of a lap and shoulder belt in the center rear seat position. This study utilized Data from the Partners for Child Passenger Safety study, a large-scale child-focused crash surveillance system, to quantify changes in seating patterns for children in vehicles that already have this feature compared to those which do not and measured the safety benefit associated with the provision of a shoulder belt in the center rear seat position. The data demonstrate that the presence of a shoulder belt in the center rear seating position influences seating practices only when there is a single child occupant in the vehicle. Belted children in the center rear of vehicles equipped with a lap shoulder belt are at an 81% reduction in risk of injury than those belted in the center rear equipped with a lap only belt. The data suggest that by requiring lap shoulder belts in the center rear, benefits would be realized to belted children, specifically the 4-8 year old group.

  15. Application of the lag-after-pulsed-separation (LAPS) flow meter to different protein solutions.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Shramik; Mahmud, Goher; Chiou, Daniel J; Ziaie, Babak; Barocas, Victor H

    2005-02-01

    A lag after pulsed separation (LAPS) meter was previously developed to measure flow rates of protein solutions. The LAPS meter operates on the time-of-flight principle. An upstream event (electrophoretic concentration of the particles in one section of the device) is detected downstream (by change in ac resistance). The time lag between the event and its detection is inversely proportional to the fluid flow rate. We demonstrate the ability of the LAPS meter to measure the flow rate of solutions containing one or more charged biomacromolecules or particles. A prototype of the LAPS meter was used to measure flow rates of solutions of model proteins [bovine serum albumin (BSA), lysozyme and hemoglobin] and mixtures of BSA and lysozyme. Flow rates of 10-50 microl min(-1)(average velocities of 0.24-1.2 mm s(-1)) were measured. When a single ac measurement was used, the results were solution-dependent, which we attribute to the interface between the protein solution and the ac electrodes. A differential mode, in which the signal from a positive and a negative dc pulse were subtracted from each other, eliminated interfacial effects and led to a single universal (solution-independent) calibration curve. The LAPS meter can be used as a non-invasive, no-moving-parts flow sensor in any microfluidic system (such as drug delivery devices or micro-reactor arrays) where one needs to measure the flow rate of a solution or a suspension containing charged species such as proteins or cells.

  16. A fracture mechanics approach for designing adhesively bonded joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Mall, S.

    1983-01-01

    An analytical and experimental investigation was undertaken to determine if the adhesive debond initiation stress could be predicted for arbitrary joint geometries. The analysis was based upon a threshold total strain-energy-release rate (Gth) concept. Two bonded systems were tested: T300/5208 graphite/epoxy adherends bonded with either EC-3445 or FM-300 adhesive. The Gth for each adhesive was determined from cracked-lap-shear (CLS) specimens by initiation tests. Finite-element analyses of various tapered CLS specimen geometries predicted the specimen stress at which the total strain-energy-release rate (GT) equaled Gth at the joint tip. Experiments verified the predictions. The approach described herein predicts the maximum stress at which an adhesive joint can be cycled yet not debond. Furthermore, total strain-energy-release rate appeared to be the driving parameter for cyclic debonding and debond initiation in structural adhesives. In addition, debond initiation and growth were found to occur with virtually no peel stress present.

  17. A fracture mechanics approach for designing adhesively bonded joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Mall, S.

    1985-01-01

    An analytical and experimental investigation was undertaken to determine if the adhesive debond initiation stress could be predicted for arbitrary joint geometries. The analysis was based upon a threshold total strain-energy-release rate (Gth) concept. Two bonded systems were tested: T300/5208 graphite/epoxy adherends bonded with either EC-3445 or FM-300 adhesive. The Gth for each adhesive was determined from cracked-lap-shear (CLS) specimens by initiation tests. Finite-element analyses of various tapered CLS specimen geometries predicted the specimen stress at which the total strain-energy-release rate (GT) equaled Gth at the joint tip. Experiments verified the predictions. The approach described herein predicts the maximum stress at which an adhesive joint can be cycled yet not debond. Furthermore, total strain-energy-release rate appeared to be the driving parameter for cyclic debonding and debond initiation in structural adhesives. In addition, debond initiation and growth were found to occur with virtually no peel stress present.

  18. [Fiber-reinforced adhesive partial dentures].

    PubMed

    Kreulen, C M

    2003-06-01

    Dental applications of fiber-reinforced polymers include adhesive partial dentures. Dental resin composite materials can be reinforced by several types of fibres. Fiber orientation, proper wetting of the fibers by the resin and fiber volume are important. An application of fiber reinforced composites is the composite inlay bridge. This paper deals with some aspects of this type of adhesive partial denture. Advantages include the satisfactory esthetics and the minimally invasive character. Not clear yet is the long-term survival. The adhesive properties of fiber-reinforced adhesive partial dentures require an adaptation of the current dental philosophy, in which direct and indirect restorative techniques can be combined. An increase in knowledge and experience is needed to determine the dental applications. PMID:12852063

  19. Thermal Characterization of Adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spomer, Ken A.

    1999-01-01

    The current Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) nozzle adhesive bond system is being replaced due to obsolescence. Down-selection and performance testing of the structural adhesives resulted in the selection of two candidate replacement adhesives, Resin Technology Group's Tiga 321 and 3M's EC2615XLW. This paper describes rocket motor testing of these two adhesives. Four forty-pound charge motors were fabricated in configurations that would allow side by side comparison testing of the candidate replacement adhesives and the current RSRM adhesives. The motors provided an environment where the thermal performance of adhesives in flame surface bondlines was compared. Results of the FPC testing show that: 1) The phenolic char depths on radial bond lines is approximately the same and vary depending on the position in the blast tube regardless of which adhesive was used; 2) The adhesive char depth of the candidate replacement adhesives is less than the char depth of the current adhesives; 3) The heat-affected depth of the candidate replacement adhesives is less than the heat-affected depth of the current adhesives; and 4) The ablation rates for both replacement adhesives are slower than that of the current adhesives.

  20. Lap belt iliac wing fracture: a predictor of bowel injury in children.

    PubMed

    Emery, Kathleen H

    2002-12-01

    Lap belt restraints in motor vehicle collisions have been associated with a variety of injuries, mainly bowel and lumbar spine. Cephalad positioning of the belt over the intended position across the anterior superior iliac spines (which typically occurs in younger children) is thought to be responsible for the observed bowel injuries. We report two pediatric patients, both restrained by lap belts in high-speed collisions, who suffered iliac wing fractures in addition to bowel injuries. Unexplained free peritoneal fluid was the sole CT finding in one patient (a teenage girl) who had a delay in diagnosis of bowel perforation. These cases illustrate the high frequency of bowel injury in pediatric patients with iliac wing fractures associated with lap belt use.

  1. Measurements of fuselage skin strains and displacements near a longitudinal lap joint in a pressurized aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Edward P.; Britt, Vicki O.

    1991-01-01

    Strains and displacements in a small area near a longitudinal lap joint in the fuselage skin of a B737 aircraft were measured during a pressurization cycle to a differential pressure of 6.2 psi while the aircraft was on the ground. It was found that hoop strains were higher than longitudinal strains at each location; membrane strains in the unreinforced skin were higher than in the joint; membrane strains in the hoop direction, as well as radial displacements, tended to be highest at the mid-bay location between skin reinforcements; significant bending in the hoop direction occurred in the joint and in the skin near the joint, and the bending was unsymmetrically distributed about the stringer at the middle of the joint; and radial displacements were unsymmetrically distributed across the lap joint. The interpretation of the strain gage data for locations on the bonded and riveted lap joint assumed that the joint did not contain disbonded areas.

  2. Large-scale Advanced Prop-fan (LAP) technology assessment report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degeorge, C. L.

    1988-01-01

    The technologically significant findings and accomplishments of the Large Scale Advanced Prop-Fan (LAP) program in the areas of aerodynamics, aeroelasticity, acoustics and materials and fabrication are described. The extent to which the program goals related to these disciplines were achieved is discussed, and recommendations for additional research are presented. The LAP program consisted of the design, manufacture and testing of a near full-scale Prop-Fan or advanced turboprop capable of operating efficiently at speeds to Mach .8. An aeroelastically scaled model of the LAP was also designed and fabricated. The goal of the program was to acquire data on Prop-Fan performance that would indicate the technology readiness of Prop-Fans for practical applications in commercial and military aviation.

  3. Grain decoration in aluminum oxynitride (ALON) from polishing on bound abrasive laps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, Leslie L.; Marino, Anne E.; Hayes, Jennifer C.; Jacobs, Stephen D.

    2004-01-01

    Aluminum oxynitride (ALON) is a polycrystalline material that has proven difficult to polish due to its grain structure. Bound abrasives are an effective means for polishing ALON, and work is being done with them to obtain good surfaces, with reasonable removal rates. Laps consisting of abrasives bound in epoxy matrices were created for polishing ALON. The effects of varying abrasive type, abrasive concentration, lap shape, coolant and load were studied. Metrology procedures were developed to monitor different aspects of the grain structure and numerically evaluate grain boundary decoration. Strategies were developed to polish ALON at acceptable rates with reasonably good surface quality. Work is directed toward finding optimal bound abrasive lap formulations that can be fabricated into ring and/or contour tools for testing on CNC machining platforms.

  4. Grain decoration in aluminum oxynitride (ALON) from polishing on bound abrasive laps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Anne E.; Hayes, Jennifer; Gregg, Leslie L.; Jacobs, Stephen D.

    2003-05-01

    Aluminum oxynitride (ALON) is a material with desirable qualities for a variety of applications that has proven difficult to polish because of its grain structure. Bound abrasives may prove to be an effective means of polishing it, and work is being done with them to obtain good surfaces on ALON, with reasonable removal rates. Laps consisting of abrasives bound in epoxy matrices have been created for polishing ALON. The effects of varying abrasive type, abrasive concentration, lap shape, coolant and load are being studied. Metrology procedures are being developed to monitor different aspects of the grain structure and numerically evaluate its decoration. Strategies have been developed to polish ALON at acceptable rates with reasonably good surface quality. Work is directed toward finding optimal bound abrasive lap formulations that can be fabricated into ring and/or contour tools for testing on CNC machining platforms.

  5. EFFECT OF TOOL FEATURE ON THE JOINT STRENGTH OF DISSIMILAR FRICTION STIR LAP WELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Jana, Saumyadeep; Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J.; Mattlin, Karl F.

    2011-04-25

    Several variations of friction stir tools were used to investigate the effects on the joint strengths of dissimilar friction stir lap welds. In the present lap weld configuration the top sheet was a 2.32 mm thick Mg (AZ 31) alloy. The bottom sheet consisted of two different steels, a (i) 0.8 mm thick electro-galvanized (EG) mild steel, or a (ii) 1.5 mm thick hot dip galvanized (HDG) high strength low alloy (HSLA) steel. Initially the tool shape was modified to accommodate the material, at which point the tool geometry was fixed. With a fixed tool geometry an additional feature was added to the pin bottom on one of the tools by incorporating a short hard insert, which would act as a stronger bottom sheet cutter. The effects of such modification on the unguided lap shear strength, and associated microstructural changes are discussed in this study.

  6. Modeling of fracture and durability of paste-bonded composite joints subjected to hygro-thermal-mechanical loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, David Lee

    The objective of the research is to characterize the behavior of composite/composite joints with paste adhesive using both experimental testing and analytical modeling. In comparison with the conventional tape adhesive, joining composites using paste adhesive provides several advantages. The carbon fiber laminate material systems employed in this study included IM7 carbon fibers and 977-3 epoxy matrix assembled in prepreg tape, and AS4 carbon fibers and 977-3 epoxy matrix as a five-harness satin weave. The adhesive employed was EA 9394 epoxy. All laminates and test specimens were fabricated and inspected by Boeing using their standard propriety procedures. Three types of test specimens were used in the program. They were bonded double-lap shear (DLS), bonded double cantilever beam (DCB) and bonded interlaminar tension (ILT) specimens. A group of specimens were conditioned at elevated temperature and humidity in an environmental chamber at Boeing's facility and their moisture absorption recorded with time. Specimens were tested at room temperature dry and elevated temperatures. DCB and DLS specimens were tested in fatigue as well as static conditions. Two-dimensional finite element models of the three configurations were developed for determining stresses and strains using the ABAQUS finite element package code. Due to symmetry, only the one-half of the specimen needed to be considered thus reducing computational time. The effect of the test fixture is not taken into account instead equivalent distributed stresses are applied directly on the composite laminates. For each of the specimen, the distribution of Mises stress and the first strain invariant J1 are obtained to identify potential failure locations within a specimen.

  7. Principles of adhesion.

    PubMed

    Baier, R E

    1992-01-01

    Understanding interfacial phenomena has been of direct relevance and practical benefit to extending the use of dental adhesives. Both surface physics, which describes properties of the inorganic materials' interfacial zones from their actual phase boundaries toward the bulk phases of the solids, and surface chemistry, which describes phenomena at the solid/biological interface and beyond it into the variable organic environment, have been important. High-energy materials include solids that are very hard, have high melting points, strong intermolecular forces, and basically crystalline structures, such as dental enamel. Low-energy materials, such as dentinal collagen, salivary films, and the organic resins of restorative materials, are softer, lower melting, and have weaker intermolecular forces, poorer crystallinity, and surface energies generally less than 100 ergs/cm. It has been a properly renewed emphasis on wetting of dental surfaces and their modification by primer coats, displacing or mixing with water and adsorbed proteinaceous films, that has promoted the success of many recently developed fourth-generation dentin adhesives. Their improved wettability for biological phases correlates directly with their better infiltration and anchoring of composites.

  8. The relationship between the adhesion work, the wettability and composition of the surface layer in the systems polymer/aqueous solution of anionic surfactants and alcohol mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdziennicka, Anna; Jańczuk, Bronisław

    2010-11-01

    Measurements of advancing contact angle ( θ) were carried out on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) for aqueous solution of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDDS) mixtures with methanol, ethanol and propanol in the range of SDDS concentration from 10 -5 to 10 -2 M, and for sodium hexadecyl sulfonate (SHS) with the same alcohols at the SHS concentration ranging from 10 -5 to 8 × 10 -4 M at 293 K. The concentration of methanol, ethanol and propanol used for measurements varied from 0 to 21.1, 11.97 and 6.67 M, respectively. On the basis of the contact angles the critical surface tension of PTFE and PMMA wetting was determined by using for this purpose the relationship between the adhesion and the surface tension and cos θ and surface tension both at constant alcohol and surfactant concentration, respectively. The obtained contact angles were also used in the Young Dupre' equation for calculations of the adhesion work of aqueous solution of mixtures of anionic surfactants and short chain alcohols to PTFE and PMMA surface. The adhesion work calculated in this way was compared to that of the particular components of aqueous solution to these surfaces determined on the basis of the surface tension components and parameters of the surface tension of the surface active agents, water, PTFE and PMMA from van Oss et al. equation. The calculated adhesion work was discussed in the light of the concentration of surface active agents at polymer-water and water-air interface determined from Lucassen-Reynders, Gibbs and Guggenheim-Adam equations.

  9. HA95 and LAP2 beta mediate a novel chromatin-nuclear envelope interaction implicated in initiation of DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Martins, Sandra; Eikvar, Sissel; Furukawa, Kazuhiro; Collas, Philippe

    2003-01-20

    HA95 is a chromatin-associated protein that interfaces the nuclear envelope (NE) and chromatin. We report an interaction between HA95 and the inner nuclear membrane protein lamina-associated polypeptide (LAP) 2 beta, and a role of this association in initiation of DNA replication. Precipitation of GST-LAP2 beta fusion proteins and overlays of immobilized HA95 indicate that a first HA95-binding region lies within amino acids 137-242 of LAP2 beta. A second domain sufficient to bind HA95 colocalizes with the lamin B-binding domain of LAP2beta at residues 299-373. HA95-LAP2 beta interaction is not required for NE formation. However, disruption of the association of HA95 with the NH2-terminal HA95-binding domain of LAP2 beta abolishes the initiation, but not elongation, of DNA replication in purified G1 phase nuclei incubated in S-phase extract. Inhibition of replication initiation correlates with proteasome-mediated proteolysis of Cdc6, a component of the prereplication complex. Rescue of Cdc6 degradation with proteasome inhibitors restores replication. We propose that an interaction of LAP2beta, or LAP2 proteins, with HA95 is involved in the control of initiation of DNA replication. PMID:12538639

  10. CrossLaps and beta-glucuronidase in peri-implant and gingival crevicular fluid.

    PubMed

    Schubert, U; Kleber, B M; Strietzel, F P; Dörfling, P

    2001-01-01

    Collagen degradation products of the carboxyterminal region possibly reflect bone and attachment loss. In the present study, the Serum CrossLaps One-Step enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to determine a specific part of the carboxyterminal region of type I collagen, the CrossLaps. Samples of peri-implant and gingival crevicular fluid of 111 implants and 53 teeth from 47 partially or completely edentulous patients were examined in reference to levels of CrossLaps and beta-glucuronidase (beta G), an established marker of periodontal disease. Clinical probing pocket depth (PPD), bleeding on probing (BOP), plaque accumulation, mobility, radiographic bone loss, and the occurrence of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Prevotella intermedia were assessed. The mean values were: for PPD at implants 3.76 +/- 1.41 mm, at teeth 3.44 +/- 0.88 mm; for beta G at implants 0.364 +/- 0.392 pU/min, at teeth 0.314 +/- 0.209 pU/min; for CrossLaps at implants 0.069 +/- 0.059 pmol/min, at teeth 0.082 +/- 0.053 pmol/min. Bleeding on probing was significantly higher on implants than on teeth (McNemar test, P = .004). No significant difference of beta G levels was found between teeth and implants (Wilcoxon test). A negative correlation was found between beta G levels and CrossLaps levels at teeth (Pearson-rank correlation, P = .002). On implants, no significant correlation of these 2 parameters was seen, but significant correlations were found between sulcus fluid flow rate and PPD (P = .012), beta G levels and bone loss (P < 0.0005), and CrossLaps levels and PPD (P = .011). CrossLaps can be detected in both gingival and peri-implant crevicular fluid. While rising levels of beta G may indicate acute peri-implantitis, CrossLaps may not, but could play a role as a marker of ongoing attachment loss.

  11. Lap-belt injury with complete avulsion of the spinal cord and cauda equina.

    PubMed

    Tubbs, R Shane; Golden, Blake; Doyle, Scott; Grabb, Paul A; Oakes, W Jerry

    2006-10-01

    The authors report a child who was involved in an automobile accident. The patient was restrained by a rear seat lap belt. Radiological examination revealed an L4 Chance-type fracture and ligamentous disruption at the L4-L5 interval. During superficial dissection of the paraspinal muscles for a spinal fusion procedure, the cauda equina and the lower spinal cord (several centimeters) were visible, completely transected and herniated into the extraspinal space through a disrupted thoracolumbar fascia. The clinician should be aware of the potentially devastating results following a lap-belt injury in which a Chance fracture is produced.

  12. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Roberto, Francisco F.

    2007-01-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are water-impervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion. PMID:17990038

  13. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    H. G. Silverman; F. F. Roberto

    2007-12-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are waterimpervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion.

  14. A LASER INTERFERENCE-BASED SURFACE TREATMENT OF AL AND CARBON FIBER POLYMER COMPOSITES FOR ENHANCED BONDING

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S; Warren, Charles David; ERDMAN III, DONALD L; Daniel, Claus; Skszek, Timothy; Caruso-Dailey, Mary M.

    2016-01-01

    Due to its increased use in the automotive and aerospace industries, joining of Carbon Fiber-reinforced Polymer matrix Composites (CFPC) to metals demands enhanced surface preparation and control of surface morphology prior to joining. In this study, surfaces of both composite and aluminum were prepared for joining using a new laser based technique, in which the laser interference power profile was created by splitting the beam and guiding those beams to the sample surface by overlapping each other with defined angles to each other. Results were presented for the overlap shear testing of single-lap joints made with Al 5182 and CFPC specimens whose surfaces prepared by (a) surface abrasion and solvent cleaning; and (b) laser-interference structured surfaces by rastering with a 4 mm laser beam at approximately 3.5 W power. CFPC specimens of T700S carbon fiber, Prepreg T70 epoxy, 4 or 5 ply thick, 0/90o plaques were used. Adhesive DP810 was used to bond Al and CFPC. The bondline was 0.25mm and the bond length was consistent among all joints produced. First, the effect of the laser speed on the joint performance was evaluated by laser-interference structure Al and CFPC surfaces with a beam angle of 3o and laser beam speeds of 3, 5, and 10 mm/s. For this sensitivity study, 3 joint specimens were used per each joint type. Based on the results for minimum, maximum, and mean values for the shear lap strength and maximum load for all the 9 joint types, two joint types were selected for further evaluations. Six additional joint specimens were prepared for these two joint types in order to obtain better statistics and the shear test data was presented for the range, mean, and standard deviation. The results for the single-lap shear tests obtained for six joint specimens, indicate that the shear lap strength, maximum load, and displacement at maximum load for those joints made with laser-interference structured surfaces were increased by approximately 14.8%, 16%, and 100

  15. Analytical and Numerical Results for an Adhesively Bonded Joint Subjected to Pure Bending

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeltzer, Stanley S., III; Lundgren, Eric

    2006-01-01

    A one-dimensional, semi-analytical methodology that was previously developed for evaluating adhesively bonded joints composed of anisotropic adherends and adhesives that exhibit inelastic material behavior is further verified in the present paper. A summary of the first-order differential equations and applied joint loading used to determine the adhesive response from the methodology are also presented. The method was previously verified against a variety of single-lap joint configurations from the literature that subjected the joints to cases of axial tension and pure bending. Using the same joint configuration and applied bending load presented in a study by Yang, the finite element analysis software ABAQUS was used to further verify the semi-analytical method. Linear static ABAQUS results are presented for two models, one with a coarse and one with a fine element meshing, that were used to verify convergence of the finite element analyses. Close agreement between the finite element results and the semi-analytical methodology were determined for both the shear and normal stress responses of the adhesive bondline. Thus, the semi-analytical methodology was successfully verified using the ABAQUS finite element software and a single-lap joint configuration subjected to pure bending.

  16. Bonded and Stitched Composite Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalewski, Bart F. (Inventor); Dial, William B. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method of forming a composite structure can include providing a plurality of composite panels of material, each composite panel having a plurality of holes extending through the panel. An adhesive layer is applied to each composite panel and a adjoining layer is applied over the adhesive layer. The method also includes stitching the composite panels, adhesive layer, and adjoining layer together by passing a length of a flexible connecting element into the plurality of holes in the composite panels of material. At least the adhesive layer is cured to bond the composite panels together and thereby form the composite structure.

  17. An investigation of plasma pretreatments and plasma polymerized thin films for titanium/polyimide adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Difelice, Ronald Attilio

    Plasma pretreatments are environmentally benign and energy efficient processes for modifying the surface chemistry of materials. In an effort to improve the strength of the titanium alloy/FM-5 polyimide adhesive joint for aerospace applications, oxygen plasma pretreatments and novel thin plasma polymerized (PP) films were investigated as adhesion promoters. Plasma treatments were carried out using custom-built, low pressure, radio frequency, inductively coupled plasma reactors. Ti-6Al-4V coupons were plasma treated and used to prepare miniature single lap shear (SLS) joints. The effects of plasma pretreatments on surface chemistry were studied using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), Fourier transform infrared analysis (FTIR), and contact angle measurements. Relationships between composition, mechanical properties, and adhesion of PP films on Ti-6Al-4V and silicon wafers were investigated. The nanomechanical properties (modulus, hardness and adhesion) were studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM) nanoindentation and nanoscratch testing. A design of experiments (DOE) three factorial model was used to optimize the parameters for oxygen plasma treatments. Oxygen plasma pretreatments enhanced joint strength by cleaning the titanium surface and creating an extended oxide layer. Nanoindentation of oxygen plasma treated substrates showed no change in the surface mechanical properties due to the oxygen plasma treatment. This suggested that the improved SLS strength of the oxygen plasma pretreated substrates was due to the cleaning of the substrate and the removal of carbonaceous contaminants, rather than any changes in the morphology of the oxide layer. PP acetylene films were predominantly carbon, with oxygen as the other main constituent (incorporated mostly as C-O and C=O). For all SLS specimens tested, the adhesion between PP acetylene and FM-5 adhesive was adequate. However, the strength of SLS joints was limited by the

  18. Evaluation of high temperature structural adhesives for extended service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, S. G.; Peters, P. D.; Hendricks, C. L.

    1982-01-01

    The evaluation, selection, and demonstration of structural adhesive systems for supersonic cruise research applications, and establishment of environmental durability of selected systems for up to 20,000 hours is described. Ten candidate adhesives were initially evaluated. During screening and evaluation, these candidates were narrowed to three of the most promising for environmental durability testing. The three adhesives were LARC-13, PPQ, and NR056X. The LARC-13 was eliminated because of a lack of stability at 505 K. The NRO56X was removed from the market. The LARC-TPI was added after preliminary evaluation and an abbreviated screening test. Only PPQ and LARC-TPI remained as the reasonable candidates late into the durability testing. Large area bond panels were fabricated to demonstrate the processibility of the selected systems. Specifications were prepared to assure control over critical material and process parameters. Surface characterization concentrated primarily upon titanium surface treatments of 10 volt chronic acid anodize, 5 volt chromic acid anodize and PASA-JELL. Failure analysis was conducted on lap shear adhesive bond failures which occurred in PPQ and LARC-13 test specimens after 10,000 hours at 505 K.

  19. Learning Activity Package, Biology, LAPs 20, 30, 31, 32, and 33.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhoden, Bruce

    Included is a set of five teacher-prepared Learning Activity Packages (LAPs) for individualized instruction in topics in biology. The units cover the topics of genetic continuity, methods of investigation, cell biology, genetics, and animal physiology. Each unit contains a rationale for the material; a list of behavioral objectives for the unit; a…

  20. Learning Activity Package, Algebra 93-94, LAPs 12-22.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Diane

    A set of 11 teacher-prepared Learning Activity Packages (LAPs) in beginning algebra, these units cover sets, properties of operations, operations over real numbers, open expressions, solution sets of equations and inequalities, equations and inequalities with two variables, solution sets of equations with two variables, exponents, factoring and…