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Sample records for laparoscopic ventral hernia

  1. Current Trends in Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Patapis, Paul; Zavras, Nick; Tzanetis, Panagiotis; Machairas, Anastasios

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The purpose of this study was to analyze the surgical technique, postoperative complications, and possible recurrence after laparoscopic ventral hernia repair (LVHR) in comparison with open ventral hernia repair (OVHR), based on the international literature. Database: A Medline search of the current English literature was performed using the terms laparoscopic ventral hernia repair and incisional hernia repair. Conclusions: LVHR is a safe alternative to the open method, with the main advantages being minimal postoperative pain, shorter recovery, and decreased wound and mesh infections. Incidental enterotomy can be avoided by using a meticulous technique and sharp dissection to avoid thermal injury. PMID:26273186

  2. Single-Incision Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair with Suprapubic Incision

    PubMed Central

    Turingan, Isidro; Tran, Mai

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Although natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery promises truly scarless surgery, this has not progressed beyond the experimental setting and a few clinical cases in the field of ventral hernia repair. This is mainly because of the problem of sterilizing natural orifices, which prevents the use of any prosthetic material because of unacceptable risks of infection. Single-incision laparoscopic ventral hernia repair has gained more widespread acceptance by specialized hernia centers. Even so, there is a special subset of patients who are young and/or scar conscious and find any visible scar unacceptable. This study illustrates an innovative way of performing single-incision laparoscopic ventral hernia repair by a transverse suprapubic incision below the pubic hair/bikini line in 2 young male patients who had both umbilical and epigastric hernias as well as attenuated linea alba in the upper abdomen. Case Description: Both patients underwent successful laparoscopic repair, and both were highly satisfied with the procedure, which produced no visible scars on their abdomen. Discussion: Willingness to adopt new innovative procedures, such as single-incision laparoscopic surgery, has allowed modification of the incision site to produce invisible scars and hence become highly attractive to the young and scar-phobic segment of the population. PMID:23925028

  3. Primary fascial closure with laparoscopic ventral hernia repair: systematic review.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duyen H; Nguyen, Mylan T; Askenasy, Erik P; Kao, Lillian S; Liang, Mike K

    2014-12-01

    Laparoscopic ventral hernia repair (LVHR) has grown in popularity. Typically, this procedure is performed with a mesh bridge technique that results in high rates of seroma, eventration (bulging), and patient dissatisfaction. In an effort to avoid these complications, there is growing interest in the role of laparoscopic primary fascial closure with intraperitoneal mesh placement. This systematic review evaluated the outcomes of closure of the central defect during LVHR. A literature search of PubMed, Cochrane databases, and Embase was conducted using PRISMA guidelines. MINORS was used to assess the methodologic quality. Primary outcome was hernia recurrence. Secondary outcomes were surgical-site infection, seroma formation, bulging, and patient-centered items (satisfaction, chronic pain, functional status). Eleven studies were identified, eight of which were case series (level 4 data). Three comparative studies examined the difference between closure and nonclosure of the fascial defect during laparoscopic ventral incisional hernia repairs (level 3 and 4 data). These studies suggested that primary fascial closure (n = 138) compared to nonclosure (n = 255) resulted in lower recurrence rates (0-5.7 vs. 4.8-16.7 %) and seroma formation rates (5.6-11.4 vs. 4.3-27.8 %). Follow-up periods for both groups were similar (1-108 months). Only one study evaluated patient function and clinical bulging. It showed better outcomes with primary fascial closure. Closure of the central defect during LVHR resulted in less recurrence, bulging, and seroma than nonclosure. Patients with closure were more satisfied with the results and had better functional status. The quality of the data was poor, however. A randomized controlled trial to evaluate the role of closure of the central defect during LVHR is warranted.

  4. Simplified technique of mesh fixation during laparoscopic repair of abdominal ventral hernia.

    PubMed

    Piskun, G; Shaftan, G; Fogler, R

    1999-04-01

    The current techniques for intraperitoneal mesh fixation are complex and time-consuming. We present here a simple technique for the fixation of the mesh during laparoscopic intraperitoneal ventral hernia repair.

  5. Laparoscopic Repair Reduces Incidence of Surgical Site Infections for All Ventral Hernias

    PubMed Central

    Arita, Nestor A.; Nguyen, Mylan T.; Nguyen, Duyen H.; Berger, Rachel L.; Lew, Debbie F.; Suliburk, James T.; Askenasy, Erik P.; Kao, Lillian S.; Liang, Mike K.

    2014-01-01

    Background The role of laparoscopic repair of ventral hernias remains incompletely defined. We hypothesize that laparoscopy, compared to open repair with mesh, decreases surgical site infection (SSI) for all ventral hernia types. Methods MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases were reviewed to identify studies evaluating outcomes of laparoscopic versus open repair with mesh of ventral hernias and divided into groups (primary or incisional). Studies with high risk of bias were excluded. Primary outcomes of interest were recurrence and SSI. Fixed effects model was used unless significant heterogeneity, assessed with the Higgins I-square (I2), was encountered. Results There were five and fifteen studies for primary and incisional cohorts. No difference was seen in recurrence between laparoscopic and open repair in the two hernia groups. SSI was more common with open repair in both hernia groups: primary (OR 4.17, 95%CI [2.03–8.55]) and incisional (OR 5.16, 95%CI [2.79–9.57]). Conclusions Laparoscopic repair, compared to open repair with mesh, decreases rates of SSI in all types of ventral hernias with no difference in recurrence. This data suggests that laparoscopic approach may be the treatment of choice for all types of ventral hernias. PMID:25294541

  6. Ventral hernia repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... Philadelphia. PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:539-545. Nagle AP, Soper NJ. Laparoscopic ventral hernia repair. In: Khatri ... Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow us Disclaimers Copyright Privacy Accessibility Quality Guidelines Viewers & Players ...

  7. Pain and convalescence following laparoscopic ventral hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Jens Ravn

    2011-12-01

    Severe pain is usual after laparoscopic ventral hernia repair (LVHR). Mesh fixation with titanium tacks may play a key role in the development of acute and chronic pain and alternative fixation methods should therefore be investigated. This PhD thesis was based on three studies and aimed too: 1) assess the intensity and impact of postoperative pain by detailed patient-reported description of pain and convalescence after LVHR (Study I), 2) evaluate the feasibility of fibrin sealant (FS) for mesh fixation in an experimental pig model (Study II), and 3) investigate FS vs. tacks for mesh fixation in LVHR in a randomised, double-blinded, clinical controlled study with acute postoperative pain as the primary outcome (Study III). In Study I - a prospective descriptive study - 35 patients were prospectively included and underwent LVHR. Scores of pain, quality of life, convalescence, fatigue, and general well-being were obtained from each patient. Follow-up was six months. Average pain from postoperative day (POD) 0-2 and POD 0-6 measured on a 0-100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS) was 61 and 48, respectively. Pain scores reached preoperative values at POD 30. The incidence of severe chronic pain was 7%. No parameter predicted postoperative pain significantly. Significant correlations were found between pain, and general well-being (rS= -0.8, p < 0.001), satisfaction (rS= -0.67, p < quality of life score (rS= -0.63, p < 0.001) six months postoperatively. Patients resumed normal daily activity at POD 14. In Study II - a randomised experimental study in pigs - nine pigs were operated laparoscopically with insertion of two different meshes fixed with either FS or tacks. All pigs were euthanized on POD 30. The primary outcome parameter was strength of ingrowth between the mesh and the anterior abdominal wall. A mechanical peel test was performed for each tissue sample. The secondary outcome parameters were grade and strength of adhesions to the mesh, shrinkage and displacement

  8. Laparoscopic incisional and ventral hernia repair in a district general hospital

    PubMed Central

    Mann, CD; Luther, A; Hart, C

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The laparoscopic approach to repairing ventral and incisional hernias has gained increasing popularity worldwide. We reviewed the experience of laparoscopic ventral hernia repair at a district general hospital in the UK with particular reference to patients with massive defects (diameter ≥15cm) and the morbidly obese. Methods A total of 144 patients underwent laparoscopic ventral (incisional or umbilical/paraumbilical) hernia repair between April 2007 and September 2012. Results The prevalence of conversion to open surgery was 2.8%. The prevalence of postoperative complications was 3.5%. Median postoperative follow-up was 30.2 months. A total of 5.6% cases suffered late complications and 2.8% developed recurrence. Thirty-four patients underwent repair of defects ≥10cm in diameter with a prevalence of recurrence of 5.6%. Sixteen patients underwent repair of ‘massive’ incisional hernia (diameter ≥15cm) with a prevalence of recurrence of 12.5%. Sixteen patients with a body mass index (BMI) ≥40kg/m2 (range, 40–61kg/m2) underwent laparoscopic repair with a prevalence of recurrence of 6.3% (p>0.05 vs BMI <40kg/m2). Conclusions Laparoscopic ventral hernia repair can be carried out safely with a low prevalence of recurrence. It may have advantages in morbidly obese patients in whom open repair would represent a significant undertaking. Laparoscopic ventral hernia repair may be used in cases of large and massive hernias, in which the risk of recurrence increases but is comparable with open repair and associated with low morbidity. PMID:25519261

  9. A Comparative Analysis Between Laparoscopic and Open Ventral Hernia Repair at a Tertiary Care Center

    PubMed Central

    DAVIES, STEPHEN W.; TURZA, KRISTIN C.; SAWYER, ROBERT G.; SCHIRMER, BRUCE D.; HALLOWELL, PETER T.

    2012-01-01

    Laparoscopic ventral hernia repair reportedly yields lower postoperative complications than open repair. We hypothesized that patients undergoing laparoscopic repair would have lower postoperative infectious outcomes. Also, certain preoperative patient characteristics and preoperative hernia characteristics are hypothesized to increase complication risk in both groups. All ventral hernia repairs performed at University of Virginia from January 2004 to January 2006 were reviewed. Primary outcomes included wound healing complications and hernia recurrence. Categorical data were analyzed with χ2 and Fisher’s exact tests. Continuous variables were evaluated with independent t tests and Mann-Whitney U tests. Multivariable logistic regression was performed. A total of 268 repairs (110 open, 158 laparoscopic) were evaluated. Patient and hernia characteristics were similar between groups, though the percents of wound contamination (5.4% vs 0.6%; P = 0.02) and simultaneous surgery (7.2% vs 0%; P = 0.001) were greater in the open procedures. Univariate analysis also revealed that open cases had a greater incidence of postoperative superficial surgical site infection (SSI) (30.0% vs 10.7%; P < 0.0001). Multivariable analysis revealed that both diabetes and open repair were associated with an increased risk of superficial SSI (P = 0.019; odds ratio = 3.512; 95% confidence interval = 1.229–10.037 and P = 0.001; odds ratio = 4.6; 95% confidence interval = 1.9–11.2, respectively). Laparoscopic ventral hernia repair yielded lower rates of postoperative superficial SSI than open surgery. Other pre-operative patient characteristics and preoperative hernia characteristics, with the exception of diabetes, were not found to be associated with an increased risk of postoperative complications. PMID:22856497

  10. Laparoscopic repair of incisional and ventral hernias with the new type of meshes: randomized control trial

    PubMed Central

    Grubnik, Aleksandra V.; Vorotyntseva, Kseniya O.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Laparoscopic incisional and ventral hernia repair (LIVHR) was first reported by Le Blanc and Booth in 1993. Many studies are available in the literature that have shown that laparoscopic repair of incisional and ventral hernia is preferred over open repair because of lower recurrence rates (less than 10%), less wound morbidity, less pain, and early return to work. Aim To identify the long-term outcomes between the different types of meshes and two techniques of mesh fixation, i.e., tacks (method Double crown) and transfascial polypropylene sutures. Material and methods A total of 92 patients underwent LIVHR at our department between January 2009 and August 2012. The hernias were umbilical in 26 patients, paraumbilical in 15 patients and incisional in 51 patients. All patients admitted for LIVHR were randomized to either group I (tacker fixation of ePTFE meshes) or group II (suture fixation of meshes with nitinol frame) using computer-generated random numbers with block randomization and sealed envelopes for concealed allocation. Results The mean mesh fixation time was significantly higher in the tacker fixation group (117 ±15 min vs. 72 ±6 min, p < 0.01). There were no conversions in either group. The median postoperative hospital stay was 3.5 ±1.5 days. All patients were followed up at 1, 3, 6, 12 and every 6 months thereafter postoperatively. There were 5 recurrences in the study population. In group I there were 4 patients with recurrence, and only 1 patient in the group with meshes with a nitinol frame. Conclusions Meshes of the new generation with a nitinol framework can significantly improve laparoscopic ventral hernia repair. The fixation of these meshes is very simple using 3–4 transfascial sutures. The absence of shrinkage of these meshes makes the probability of recurrence minimal. Absence of tackers allows postoperative pain to be minimized. We consider that these new meshes can significantly improve laparoscopic ventral hernia repair

  11. Effect of prosthetic material on adhesion formation after laparoscopic ventral hernia repair in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Borrazzo, E C; Belmont, M F; Boffa, D; Fowler, D L

    2004-05-01

    Intraperitoneal placement of prosthetic mesh causes adhesion formation after laparoscopic incisional hernia repair. A prosthesis that prevents or reduces adhesion formation is desirable. In this study, 21 pigs were randomized to receive laparoscopic placement of plain polypropylene mesh (PPM), expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE), or polypropylene coated on one side with a bioresorbable adhesion barrier (PPM/HA/CMC). The animals were sacrificed after 28 days and evaluated for adhesion formation. Mean area of adhesion formation was 14% (SD+/-15) in the PPM/HA/CMC group, 40% (SD+/-17) in the PPM group, and 41% (SD+/-39) in the ePTFE group. The difference between PPM/HA/CMC and PPM was significant ( P=0.013). A new visceral layer of mesothelium was present in seven out of seven PPM/HA/CMC cases, six out of seven PPM cases, and two out of seven ePTFE cases. Thus, laparoscopic placement of PPM/HA/CMC reduces adhesion formation compared to other mesh types used for laparoscopic ventral hernia repairs.

  12. Pseudoaneurysm of the inferior epigastric artery: a rare complication of laparoscopic ventral hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Nichols-Totten, Kysha; Pollema, Travis; Moncure, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Pseudoaneurysm of the inferior epigastric artery (IEA) is a recognized complication of surgery; however, it is a very rare clinical occurrence. The anatomic position of the IEA subjects patients to possible IEA injury during abdominal wall procedures that are close to the artery, such as insertions of drains, Tenckhoff catheters, laparoscopic trocars, or paracentesis. Treatment options include open surgery, percutaneous coil embolization, embolization with N-butyl cyanoacrylate, sonographic-guided thrombin injection, or sonographic-guided compression. We report the first case of a pseudoaneurysm arising from the IEA after a laparoscopic ventral hernia repair. To our knowledge, 17 IEA pseudoaneurysms have been reported, only 3 of which were spontaneous. The pseudoaneurysm in our patient was successfully treated by percutaneous injection of thrombin by interventional radiology.

  13. Magnetic Resonance–Visible Meshes for Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Pallwein-Prettner, Leo; Koch, Oliver Owen; Luketina, Ruzica Rosalia; Lechner, Michael; Emmanuel, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: We aimed to evaluate the first human use of magnetic resonance–visible implants for intraperitoneal onlay repair of incisional hernias regarding magnetic resonance presentability. Methods: Ten patients were surgically treated with intraperitoneally positioned superparamagnetic flat meshes. A magnetic resonance investigation with a qualified protocol was performed on postoperative day 1 and at 3 months postoperatively to assess mesh appearance and demarcation. The total magnetic resonance–visible mesh surface area of each implant was calculated and compared with the original physical mesh size to evaluate potential reduction of the functional mesh surfaces. Results: We were able to show a precise mesh demarcation, as well as accurate assessment of the surrounding tissue, in all 10 cases. We documented a significant decrease in the magnetic resonance–visualized total mesh surface area after release of the pneumoperitoneum compared with the original mesh size (mean, 190 cm2 vs 225 cm2; mean reduction of mesh area, 35 cm2; P < .001). At 3 months postoperatively, a further reduction of the surface area due to significant mesh shrinkage could be observed (mean, 182 cm2 vs 190 cm2; mean reduction of mesh area, 8 cm2; P < .001). Conclusion: The new method of combining magnetic resonance imaging and meshes that provide enhanced signal capacity through direct integration of iron particles into the polyvinylidene fluoride base material allows for detailed mesh depiction and quantification of structural changes. In addition to a significant early postoperative decrease in effective mesh surface area, a further considerable reduction in size occurred within 3 months after implantation. PMID:25848195

  14. Laparoscopic-assisted Ventral Hernia Repair: Primary Fascial Repair with Polyester Mesh versus Polyester Mesh Alone.

    PubMed

    Karipineni, Farah; Joshi, Priya; Parsikia, Afshin; Dhir, Teena; Joshi, Amit R T

    2016-03-01

    Laparoscopic-assisted ventral hernia repair (LAVHR) with mesh is well established as the preferred technique for hernia repair. We sought to determine whether primary fascial closure and/or overlap of the mesh reduced recurrence and/or complications. We conducted a retrospective review on 57 LAVHR patients using polyester composite mesh between August 2010 and July 2013. They were divided into mesh-only (nonclosure) and primary fascial closure with mesh (closure) groups. Patient demographics, prior surgical history, mesh overlap, complications, and recurrence rates were compared. Thirty-nine (68%) of 57 patients were in the closure group and 18 (32%) in the nonclosure group. Mean defect sizes were 15.5 and 22.5 cm(2), respectively. Participants were followed for a mean of 1.3 years [standard deviation (SD) = 0.7]. Recurrence rates were 2/39 (5.1%) in the closure group and 1/18 (5.6%) in the nonclosure group (P = 0.947). There were no major postoperative complications in the nonclosure group. The closure group experienced four (10.3%) complications. This was not a statistically significant difference (P = 0.159). The median mesh-to-hernia ratio for all repairs was 15.2 (surface area) and 3.9 (diameter). Median length of stay was 14.5 hours (1.7-99.3) for patients with nonclosure and 11.9 hours (6.9-90.3 hours) for patients with closure (P = 0.625). In conclusion, this is one of the largest series of LAVHR exclusively using polyester dual-sided mesh. Our recurrence rate was about 5 per cent. Significant mesh overlap is needed to achieve such low recurrence rates. Primary closure of hernias seems less important than adequate mesh overlap in preventing recurrence after LAVHR.

  15. Evaluation of ECHO PS Positioning System in a Porcine Model of Simulated Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Erin M.; Voeller, Guy R.; Roth, J. Scott; Scott, Jeffrey R.; Gagne, Darcy H.; Iannitti, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Operative efficiency improvements for laparoscopic ventral hernia repair (LVHR) have focused on reducing operative time while maintaining overall repair efficacy. Our objective was to evaluate procedure time and positioning accuracy of an inflatable mesh positioning device (Echo PS Positioning System), as compared to a standard transfascial suture technique, using a porcine model of simulated LVHR. Methods. The study population consisted of seventeen general surgeons (n = 17) that performed simulated LVHR on seventeen (n = 17) female Yorkshire pigs using two implantation techniques: (1) Ventralight ST Mesh + Echo PS Positioning System (Echo PS) and (2) Ventralight ST Mesh + transfascial sutures (TSs). Procedure time and mesh centering accuracy overtop of a simulated surgical defect were evaluated. Results. Echo PS demonstrated a 38.9% reduction in the overall procedure time, as compared to TS. During mesh preparation and positioning, Echo PS demonstrated a 60.5% reduction in procedure time (P < 0.0001). Although a trend toward improved centering accuracy was observed for Echo PS (16.2%), this was not significantly different than TS. Conclusions. Echo PS demonstrated a significant reduction in overall simulated LVHR procedure time, particularly during mesh preparation/positioning. These operative time savings may translate into reduced operating room costs and improved surgeon/operating room efficiency. PMID:23762628

  16. Strategies to Minimize Adhesions to Intraperitoneally Placed Mesh in Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Saliba, Lucia; Chandratnam, Edward; Turingan, Isidro; Hawthorne, Wayne

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Adhesions to mesh/tacks in laparoscopic ventral hernia repair are often cited as reasons not to adopt its evidence-based superiority over conventional open methods. This pilot study assessed the occurrence of adhesions to full-sized Polypropylene and Gore-tex DualMesh Plus meshes and the possibility for adhesion prevention using fibrin sealant. Methods: Two 10-cm to 15-cm pieces of mesh were placed and fixed laparoscopically in pigs (25kg to 55kg). Group I: 2 animals with Polypropylene mesh on one side and DualMesh on other side. Group II: 2 animals with DualMesh on each side with fibrin sealant applied to the periphery of mesh and staples to one side. Group III: 1 animal with 2 pieces of Polypropylene mesh with fibrin sealant applied to the entire mesh. All animals underwent laparoscopy 3 months later to assess the extent of adhesions, and full-thickness specimens were removed for histological evaluation. Results: More Polypropylene mesh was involved in adhesions than DualMesh. However, with the DualMesh involved in adhesions, more of the surface area was involved in forming adhesions than with Polypropylene mesh. None of the implanted DualMesh had visceral adhesions, while 2 out of 3 Polypropylene meshes had adhesions to both the liver and spleen but none to the bowel. Implanted Polypropylene mesh with fibrin sealant had no adhesions. DualMesh had shrunk more significantly than Polypropylene mesh. Histological evaluation showed absence of acute inflammatory response, significantly more chronic inflammatory response to DualMesh compared to Polypropylene and complete mesothelialization with both meshes. There was extensive collagen deposition between Polypropylene mesh fibers, while fibrosis occurred on both sides of DualMesh with synovial metaplasia over its peritoneal surface akin to encapsulation. Conclusions: DualMesh caused fewer omental and visceral adhesions than Polypropylene mesh did. Fibrin sealant eliminated adhesions to DualMesh and

  17. Guidelines for laparoscopic treatment of ventral and incisional abdominal wall hernias (International Endohernia Society (IEHS)-part 1.

    PubMed

    Bittner, R; Bingener-Casey, J; Dietz, U; Fabian, M; Ferzli, G S; Fortelny, R H; Köckerling, F; Kukleta, J; Leblanc, K; Lomanto, D; Misra, M C; Bansal, V K; Morales-Conde, S; Ramshaw, B; Reinpold, W; Rim, S; Rohr, M; Schrittwieser, R; Simon, Th; Smietanski, M; Stechemesser, B; Timoney, M; Chowbey, P

    2014-01-01

    Guidelines are increasingly determining the decision process in day-to-day clinical work. Guidelines describe the current best possible standard in diagnostics and therapy. They should be developed by an international panel of experts, whereby alongside individual experience, above all, the results of comparative studies are decisive. According to the results of high-ranking scientific studies published in peer-reviewed journals, statements and recommendations are formulated, and these are graded strictly according to the criteria of evidence-based medicine. Guidelines can therefore be valuable in helping particularly the young surgeon in his or her day-to-day work to find the best decision for the patient when confronted with a wide and confusing range of options. However, even experienced surgeons benefit because by virtue of a heavy workload and commitment, they often find it difficult to keep up with the ever-increasing published literature. All guidelines require regular updating, usually every 3 years, in line with progress in the field. The current Guidelines focus on technique and perioperative management of laparoscopic ventral hernia repair and constitute the first comprehensive guidelines on this topic. In this issue of Surgical Endoscopy, the first part of the Guidelines is published including sections on basics, indication for surgery, perioperative management, and key points of technique. The next part (Part 2) of the Guidelines will address complications and comparisons between open and laparoscopic techniques. Part 3 will cover mesh technology, hernia prophylaxis, technique-related issues, new technologic developments, lumbar and other unusual hernias, and training/education.

  18. Laparoscopic Inguinal Hernia Repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... Some hernia repairs are performed using a small telescope known as a laparoscope. If your surgeon has ... in the abdominal wall (muscle) using small incisions, telescopes and a patch (mesh). Laparoscopic repair offers a ...

  19. Parietex™ Composite mesh versus DynaMesh(®)-IPOM for laparoscopic incisional and ventral hernia repair: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Tandon, A; Shahzad, K; Pathak, S; Oommen, C M; Nunes, Q M; Smart, N

    2016-11-01

    INTRODUCTION Laparoscopic incisional and ventral hernia repair (LIVHR) is widely accepted and safe but the type of mesh used is still debated. We retrospectively compared postoperative outcomes with two different meshes commonly used in LIVHR. METHODS This is a retrospective study of patients who underwent incisional hernia repair between January 2008 and December 2010. Two meshes were used: Parietex™ Composite (Covidien, New Haven, CT, USA) and the DynaMesh(®)-IPOM (FEG Textiltechnik mbH, Aachen, Germany). The two groups were compared with respect to recurrence rates, incidence of seroma and intestinal obstruction. RESULTS Among the 88 patients who underwent LIVHR, 75 patients (85.2%) presented with primary incisional hernia, 10 (11.4%) presented with a first recurrence and 3 (3.4%) presented with a second recurrence. Median follow-up was 53.6 months (range 40-61 months). 12.9% of patients had recurrence in the Parietex™ Composite mesh group (n=62) in comparison to 3.8% in the DynaMesh(®)-IPOM mesh group (n=26; P=0.20). DynaMesh(®)-IPOM was associated with a significantly higher incidence of intestinal obstruction secondary to adhesions (11.5% vs. 0%, P=0.006) and lower incidence of seroma and haematoma formation compared to Parietex™ composite mesh group (0% vs. 6.4% of patients; P=0.185). CONCLUSIONS LIVHR is a safe and feasible technique. Dynamesh(®)-IPOM is associated with a significantly higher incidence of adhesion related bowel obstruction, albeit with a lower incidence of recurrence, seroma and haematoma formation compared with Parietex™ Composite mesh. However, there is a need for further well-designed, multicentre randomised controlled studies to investigate the use of these meshes.

  20. Laparoscopic repair of femoral hernia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernia is mini-invasive and has confirmed effects. Femoral hernia could be repaired through the laparoscopic procedures for inguinal hernia. These procedures have clear anatomic view in the operation and preoperatively undiagnosed femoral hernia could be confirmed and treated. Lower recurrence ratio was reported in laparoscopic procedures compared with open procedures for repair of femoral hernia. The technical details of laparoscopic repair of femoral hernia, especially the differences to laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernia are discussed in this article. PMID:27826574

  1. Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... GASTROINTESTINAL AND ENDOSCOPIC SURGEONS (SAGES) 11300 West Olympic Blvd., Suite 600 Los Angeles, CA 90064 Tel: (310) ... American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons 11300 W. OIympic Blvd Suite 600 Los Angeles, CA 90064 USA webmaster@ ...

  2. Laparoscopic hernioplasty of hiatal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xuefei; Hua, Rong; He, Kai; Shen, Qiwei

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic surgery is a good choice for surgical treatment of hiatal hernia because of its mini-invasive nature and intraperitoneal view and operating angle. This article will talk about the surgical procedures, technical details, precautions and complications about laparoscopic hernioplasty of hiatal hernia. PMID:27761447

  3. Laparoscopic repair of parastomal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xuefei; He, Kai; Hua, Rong; Shen, Qiwei

    2017-01-01

    Parastomal hernia is one of the most common long-term complications after abdominal ostomy. Surgical treatment for parastomal hernia is the only cure but a fairly difficult field because of the problems of infection, effects, complications and recurrence. Laparoscopic repair operations are good choices for Parastomal hernia because of their mini-invasive nature and confirmed effects. There are several major laparoscopic procedures for parastomal hernioplasty. The indications, technical details and complications of them will be introduced and discussed in this article. PMID:28251124

  4. Laparoscopic repair of recurrent hernias.

    PubMed

    Felix, E L; Michas, C A; McKnight, R L

    1995-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of a laparoscopic approach to recurrent inguinal hernia repair which dissected the entire inguinal floor and repaired all potential areas of recurrence without producing tension. Both a transabdominal preperitoneal and a totally extraperitoneal laparoscopic approach were utilized. Ninety recurrent hernias were repaired in 81 patients. The patients had 26 indirect, 36 direct, and 26 pantaloon recurrent hernias of which eight had a femoral component. In all but one patient the primary operations were open anterior repairs. The median follow-up was 14 months, ranging from 1 to 28 months. Patients returned to normal activities in an average of 1 week. The only recurrence observed was in the one patient whose primary repair was laparoscopic. When the entire inguinal floor of the recurrent hernia was redissected and buttressed with mesh, early recurrence was eliminated and recovery was shortened.

  5. Laparoscopic management of Spigelian hernia.

    PubMed

    Novell, F; Sanchez, G; Sentis, J; Visa, J; Novell, J; Novell Costa, F

    2000-12-01

    Spigelian hernia (SH) is an uncommon abdominal wall hernia. Its clinical symptoms are not characteristic, and the preoperative diagnosis is often difficult because SH can simulate the symptoms of more classical lower quadrant abdominal diseases. We report a case of SH in an 80-year-old woman that was complicated by incarceration and diagnosed by physical examination and ultrasound. At the time of presentation, she had an abdominal mass that was soft and occasionally painful, and aggravated by movements that increase intraabdominal pressure. Laparoscopic examination of the abdominal cavity identified the incarcerate jejunum ansae. The defect was a large opening in the peritoneum along the lateral margin of the rectus abdominis muscle. After dissection of the intestinal adhesions, a prosthetic polypropylene mesh was introduced and fixed with staples into the lateral abdominal wall. There were no postoperative complications. We conclude that the laparoscopic approach is a feasible alternative to the conventional open technique that is easy, safe, and allows excellent operative visualization.

  6. Anatomy essentials for laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair is performed more and more nowadays. The anatomy of these procedures is totally different from traditional open procedures because they are performed from different direction and in different space. The important anatomy essentials for laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair will be discussed in this article. PMID:27826575

  7. Laparoscopic repair of adult Bochdalek's hernia

    PubMed Central

    Husain, Musharraf; Hajini, Firdoos Farooq; Ganguly, Pavitra; Bukhari, Syed

    2013-01-01

    Bochdalek's hernia is a type of congenital diaphragmatic hernia occurring in approximately 1 in 2200–12 500 live births. It is considered to be extremely rare in adults and poses a diagnostic challenge. We present a case of a young man who was diagnosed as a case of congenital Bochdalek's hernia and underwent laparoscopic mesh repair. PMID:23761496

  8. Laparoscopic repair of abdominal incisional hernia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal incisional hernia is a common complication after open abdominal operations. Laparoscopic procedures have obvious mini-invasive advantages for surgical treatment of abdominal incisional hernia, especially to cases with big hernia defect. Laparoscopic repair of incisional hernia has routine mode but the actual operations will be various according to the condition of every hernia. Key points of these operations include design of the position of trocars, closure of defects and fixation of meshes. The details of these issues and experiences of perioperative evaluation and treatment will be talked about in this article. PMID:27761446

  9. Sir Ganga Ram Hospital classification of groin and ventral abdominal wall hernias

    PubMed Central

    Chowbey, Pradeep K; Khullar, Rajesh; Mehrotra, Magan; Sharma, Anil; Soni, Vandana; Baijal, Manish

    2006-01-01

    Background: Numerous classifications for groin and ventral hernias have been proposed over the past five to six decades. The old, simple classification of groin hernia in to direct, inguinal and femoral components is no longer adequate to understand the complex pathophysiology and management of these hernias. The most commonly followed classification for ventral hernias divide them into congenital, acquired, incisional and traumatic, which also does not convey any information regarding the predicted level of difficulty. Aim: All the previous classification systems were based on open hernia repairs and have their own fallacies particularly for uncommon hernias that cannot be classified in these systems. With the advent of laparoscopic/ endoscopic approach, surgical access to the hernia as well as the functional anatomy viewed by the surgeon changed. This change in the surgical approach and functional anatomy opened the doors for newer classifications. The authors have thus proposed a classification system based on the expected level of intraoperative difficulty for endoscopic hernia repair. Classification: In the proposed classification higher grades signify increasing levels of expected intraoperative difficulty. This functional classification grades groin hernias according to the: a) Pre -operative predictive level of difficulty of endoscopic surgery, and b) Intraoperative factors that lead to a difficult repair. Pre operative factors include multiple or pantaloon hernias, recurrent hernias, irreducible and incarcerated hernias. Intraoperative factors include reducibility at operation, degree of descent of the hernial sac and previous hernia repairs. Hernial defects greater than 7 cm in diameter are categorized one grade higher. Conclusion: Though there have been several classification systems for groin or inguinal hernias, none have been described for total classification of all ventral hernias of the abdomen. The system proposed by us includes all abdominal wall

  10. Laparoscopic Repair of Incidentally Found Spigelian Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Nickloes, Todd; Mancini, Greg; Solla, Julio A.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives: A Spigelian hernia is a rare type of hernia that occurs through a defect in the anterior abdominal wall adjacent to the linea semilunaris. Estimation of its incidence has been reported as 0.12% of all abdominal wall hernias. Traditionally, the method of repair has been an open approach. Herein, we discuss a series of laparoscopic repairs. Methods: Case series and review of the literature. Cases: Three patients are presented. All were evaluated and taken to surgery initially for a different disease process, and all were incidentally found to have a spigelian hernia. These patients underwent laparoscopic repair of their hernias; 2 were repaired intraperitoneally and one was repaired totally extraperitoneally. Two patients initially underwent a mesh repair, while the third had an attempted primary repair. Conclusions: There is evidence that supports the use of laparoscopy for both diagnosis and repair of spigelian hernias. There are also reports of successful repairs both primarily and with mesh. In our experience with the preceding 3 patients, we found that laparoscopic repair of incidentally discovered spigelian hernias is a viable option, and we also found that implantation of mesh, when possible, resulted in satisfactory results and no recurrence. PMID:21902949

  11. Laparoscopic repair of strangulated Morgagni hernia

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Michael D

    2007-01-01

    A 73 year old man presented with vomiting and pain due to a strangulated Morgagni hernia containing a gastric volvulus. Laparoscopic operation allowed reduction of the contents, excision of necrotic omentum and the sac, with mesh closure of the large defect. A brief review of the condition is presented along with discussion of the technique used. PMID:17935621

  12. Laparoscopic repair of recurrent groin hernias.

    PubMed

    Felix, E L; Michas, C; McKnight, R L

    1994-06-01

    Between November 1991 and May 1993, 54 recurrent groin hernias were laparoscopically repaired in 50 patients. Forty-eight were men and two were women. Forty-six recurrent hernias were unilateral and four bilateral. Twenty-five were direct, 19 indirect, 10 pantaloon, and two had a femoral component. In only 10 patients was the contralateral side normal. In 27 patients, the other side had been previously repaired, and in 13 they had a new contralateral hernia. A transabdominal preperitoneal technique was used to dissect and repair the entire floor in all patients. A single sheet of polypropylene mesh was used in the repair of the women patients, and a double-buttress technique with the first sheet slitted for the cord was used for the men. Patients were examined every 3 months for the first year and at 6-month intervals thereafter. Follow-up ranged from 1 to 18 months with a mean of 8 months. No patient was lost to follow-up, and no recurrence was observed. Patients returned to normal activity in an average of 1 week. Seroma, which resolved spontaneously, was the most common complication. The overall short-term results suggested that a laparoscopic mesh buttressed repair of recurrent groin hernias is technically feasible and can eliminate early rerecurrence of the hernia so commonly seen after repair of recurrent hernias.

  13. Dynamic intermittent strain can rapidly impair ventral hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Kallinowski, Friedrich; Baumann, Elena; Harder, Felix; Siassi, Michael; Mahn, Axel; Vollmer, Matthias; Morlock, Michael M

    2015-11-26

    Ventral hernia repair fails frequently despite advanced mesh inserting surgery. A model for dynamic intermittent straining (DIS) of ventral hernia repairs was developed. The influence of phospholipids, position, overlap, fixation and tissue quality of various meshes on the durability of hernia repair was studied. DIS comprises the repetition of submaximal impacts delivered via a hydraulically driven plastic containment. Pig tissues simulate a ventral hernia with a standardized 5cm defect. Commercially available meshes strengthened with tacks, glue and sutures were used to bridge this defect in an underlay (IPOM) or sublay (retromuscular) position starting with a 5cm overlap in all directions. We tested 35 different ways of ventral hernia repair with up to 425 submaximal intermittent dynamic impacts until mesh dislocation occurred 10 times or a maximum of 4000 impacts each were withstood. The likelihood of a failing repair was related to the mesh, the lubricants, the position, the overlap, the fixation and the tissue quality. Most meshes dislocated easily and required fixation. One of the meshes tested was stable without fixation with a 5cm overlap and failed after reducing the overlap. Phospholipids exerted a strong influence on the biomaterial tested. The sublay position was about 10% more durable in comparison to the IPOM position. DIS revealed distinct degrees of stability with primarily stable, intermediate and primarily unstable repairs. Based on the DIS results available, the currently used ventral hernia repair options can be classified. In the future, DIS investigations can improve the durability of hernia repair.

  14. Laparoscopic Total Extraperitoneal Hernia Repair Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Bresnahan, Erin R.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair has become increasingly popular as an alternative to open surgery. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the laparoscopic total extraperitoneal procedure with the use of staple fixation and polypropylene mesh. Methods: A retrospective chart review examined outcomes of 1240 laparoscopic hernia operations in 783 patients, focusing on intraoperative and early postoperative complications, pain, and time until return to work and normal physical activities. Results: There were no intraoperative complications in this series; 106 patients experienced early postoperative complications across 8 evaluated categories: urinary retention (4.1%), seroma (3.0%), testicular/hemiscrotal swelling (1.9%), testicular atrophy (0%), hydrocele (0.6%), mesh infection (0.1%), and neurological symptoms (transient, 1.0%; persistent, 0.2%). Patients used an average of 5.6 Percocet pills after the procedure, and mean times until return to work and normal activities, including their routine exercise regimen, were 3.0 and 3.8 days, respectively. Conclusion: Complication rates and convalescence times were considered equivalent or superior to those found in other studies assessing both laparoscopic and open techniques. The usage of multiple Endostaples did not result in increased neurologic complications in the early postoperative period when compared with findings in the literature. In the hands of an experienced surgeon, total extraperitoneal repair is a safe, effective alternative to open inguinal hernia repair. PMID:27493471

  15. Laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernia in adults

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernia is mini-invasive and has confirmed effects. The procedures include intraperitoneal onlay mesh (IPOM) repair, transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) repair and total extraperitoneal (TEP) repair. These procedures have totally different anatomic point of view, process and technical key points from open operations. The technical details of these operations are discussed in this article, also the strategies of treatment for some special conditions. PMID:27867954

  16. Female Gender and Diabetes Mellitus Increase the Risk of Recurrence after Laparoscopic Incisional Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, FD; Coleman, M; Ahmed, Z; Bunni, J; Bunting, D; Elshaer, M; Evans, V; Kimble, A; Kostalas, M; Page, G; Singh, J; Szczebiot, L; Wienand-Barnett, S; Wilkins, A; Williams, O; Newell, P

    2015-01-01

    Background Laparoscopic hernia repair is used widely for the repair of incisional hernias. Few case studies have focussed on purely ‘incisional’ hernias. This multicentre series represents a collaborative effort and employed statistical analyses to provide insight into the factors predisposing to recurrence of incisional hernia after laparoscopic repair. A specific hypothesis (ie, laterality of hernias as well as proximity to the xyphoid process and pubic symphysis predisposes to recurrence) was also tested. Methods This was a retrospective study of all laparoscopic incisional hernias undertaken in six centres from 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2010. It comprised a comprehensive review of case notes and a follow-up using a structured telephone questionnaire. Patient demographics, previous medical/surgical history, surgical procedure, postoperative recovery, and perceived effect on quality of life were recorded. Repairs undertaken for primary ventral hernias were excluded. A logistic regression analysis was then fitted with recurrence as the primary outcome. Results A total of 186 cases (91 females) were identified. Median follow-up was 42 months. Telephone interviews were answered by 115/186 (62%) of subjects. Logistic regression analyses suggested that only female sex (odds ratio (OR) 3.53; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.39–8.97) and diabetes mellitus (3.54; 1–12.56) significantly increased the risk of recurrence. Position of the defect had no statistical effect. Conclusions These data suggest an increased risk of recurrence after laparoscopic incisional hernia repair in females and subjects with diabetes mellitus. These data will help inform surgeons and patients when considering laparoscopic management of incisional hernias. We recommend a centrally hosted, prospectively maintained national/international database to carry out additional research. PMID:25723687

  17. Long term recurrence, pain and patient satisfaction after ventral hernia mesh repair

    PubMed Central

    Langbach, Odd; Bukholm, Ida; Benth, Jūratė Šaltytė; Røkke, Ola

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare long term outcomes of laparoscopic and open ventral hernia mesh repair with respect to recurrence, pain and satisfaction. METHODS: We conducted a single-centre follow-up study of 194 consecutive patients after laparoscopic and open ventral hernia mesh repair between March 2000 and June 2010. Of these, 27 patients (13.9%) died and 12 (6.2%) failed to attend their follow-up appointment. One hundred and fifty-three (78.9%) patients attended for follow-up and two patients (1.0%) were interviewed by telephone. Of those who attended the follow-up appointment, 82 (52.9%) patients had received laparoscopic ventral hernia mesh repair (LVHR) while 73 (47.1%) patients had undergone open ventral hernia mesh repair (OVHR), including 11 conversions. The follow-up study included analyses of medical records, clinical interviews, examination of hernia recurrence and assessment of pain using a 100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS) ruler anchored by word descriptors. Overall patient satisfaction was also determined. Patients with signs of recurrence were examined by magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography scan. RESULTS: Median time from hernia mesh repair to follow-up was 48 and 52 mo after LVHR and OVHR respectively. Overall recurrence rates were 17.1% after LVHR and 23.3% after OVHR. Recurrence after LVHR was associated with higher body mass index. Smoking was associated with recurrence after OVHR. Chronic pain (VAS > 30 mm) was reported by 23.5% in the laparoscopic cohort and by 27.8% in the open surgery cohort. Recurrence and late complications were predictors of chronic pain after LVHR. Smoking was associated with chronic pain after OVHR. Sixty point five percent were satisfied with the outcome after LVHR and 49.3% after OVHR. Predictors for satisfaction were absence of chronic pain and recurrence. Old age and short time to follow-up also predicted satisfaction after LVHR. CONCLUSION: LVHR and OVHR give similar long term results for recurrence, pain and

  18. Tissue Expanders in Skin Deficient Ventral Hernias Utilizing Component Separation

    PubMed Central

    Molinar, Vanessa E.; Molinar, Alonso; Palladino, Humberto

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Skin deficient complex ventral hernias are complicated surgical cases that have multimodal approaches. There is no current consensus on the management of those patients who also have concomitant stomas or enterocutaneous fistula. We present 2 cases in which the senior authors were able to apply tissue expanders above and between the abdominal wall in patients with an enterocutaneous fistula or stoma. After expansion and final closure, the patients did not experience recurrent hernias. PMID:26893988

  19. Day-case laparoscopic hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Evans, D S; Ghaneh, P; Khan, I M

    1996-10-01

    Some 114 patients (median age 52 years) underwent laparoscopic hernia repair as a day-case procedure. Twenty-one patients had bilateral and 11 recurrent hernias. Some 113 patients underwent transabdominal preperitoneal mesh repair but one required conversion to open operation. Mean operating time was 24 min for unilateral and 38 min for bilateral repair. In an operating session of 3.5 h, up to five patients (mean 4.4) underwent surgery and as many as seven hernias were repaired. More than 10 per cent of patients were found to have a previously undiagnosed hernia on the opposite side. A total of 111 patients were discharged home on the day of surgery. Major complications included one omental bleed and one small bowel obstruction. Seroma was the commonest minor complication and occurred in 7 per cent of patients. More than 35 per cent of patients needed no postoperative analgesia. To date there has been one recurrence (follow-up range 2-18 months).

  20. Definitive Surgical Treatment of Infected or Exposed Ventral Hernia Mesh

    PubMed Central

    Szczerba, Steven R.; Dumanian, Gregory A.

    2003-01-01

    Objective To discuss the difficulties in dealing with infected or exposed ventral hernia mesh, and to illustrate one solution using an autogenous abdominal wall reconstruction technique. Summary Background Data The definitive treatment for any infected prosthetic material in the body is removal and substitution. When ventral hernia mesh becomes exposed or infected, its removal requires a solution to prevent a subsequent hernia or evisceration. Methods Eleven patients with ventral hernia mesh that was exposed, nonincorporated, with chronic drainage, or associated with a spontaneous enterocutaneous fistula were referred by their initial surgeons after failed local wound care for definitive management. The patients were treated with radical en bloc excision of mesh and scarred fascia followed by immediate abdominal wall reconstruction using bilateral sliding rectus abdominis myofascial advancement flaps. Results Four of the 11 patients treated for infected mesh additionally required a bowel resection. Transverse defect size ranged from 8 to 18 cm (average 13 cm). Average procedure duration was 3 hours without bowel repair and 5 hours with bowel repair. Postoperative length of stay was 5 to 7 days without bowel repair and 7 to 9 days with bowel repair. Complications included hernia recurrence in one case and stitch abscesses in two cases. Follow-up ranges from 6 to 54 months (average 24 months). Conclusions Removal of infected mesh and autogenous flap reconstruction is a safe, reliable, and one-step surgical solution to the problem of infected abdominal wall mesh. PMID:12616130

  1. Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair: is the enthusiasm justified?

    PubMed

    Cooper, S S; McAlhany, J C

    1997-01-01

    One surgeon repaired 72 inguinal hernias in 61 patients by a transabdominal preperitoneal laparoscopic placement of prosthetic mesh. There were 58 male and 3 female patients; the mean age was 47.9 years. Thirty-six unilateral inguinal hernias (either direct or indirect), 11 bilateral inguinal hernias, 12 recurrent inguinal hernias, and 2 unilateral pantaloon inguinal hernias were repaired. There were no operative mortalities. The mean follow-up was 21 months, with a range of 6 to 42 months. Ten hernia recurrences (13.8%) were documented 3 to 24 months postoperatively (mean, 12 months). There were six direct hernia recurrences, two indirect hernia recurrences, and two recurrences of recurrent hernia repairs. Thirteen patients (21.3%) experienced morbidity: seromas in eight, a hematoma in one, an ileus in one, hematuria in one, and neuropathy in two. In our opinion, the significant morbidity and early recurrence rate of a laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair are unacceptable. Enthusiasm for laparoscopic technique to repair inguinal hernias is not justified if similar morbidity and recurrence rates are documented within the surgical community.

  2. Laparoscopic repair of abdominal wall hernia: one-year experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavic, Michael S.

    1993-05-01

    In this study, 101 consecutive laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal hernia repairs (LTPR) were performed in 62 patients by a single surgeon. The series was begun in April 1991, and involved repair of 49 direct, 41 indirect, 4 femoral, 3 umbilical, 3 sliding, and 1 incisional hernias. Twelve cases were bilateral, eleven hernias were incarcerated, and fifteen hernias were recurrent. There were no intraoperative complications, and none of the procedures required conversion to open surgery. Patients experienced the following postoperative complications: transient testicular pain (1), transient anterior thigh paresthesias (2), urinary retention requiring TURP (1), and hernia recurrences (2). Follow up has ranged from 4 - 15 months and initial results have been encouraging.

  3. Laparoscopic Repair of Internal Transmesocolic Hernia of Transverse Colon

    PubMed Central

    Kishiki, Tomokazu; Mori, Toshiyuki; Hashimoto, Yoshikazu; Matsuoka, Hiroyoshi; Abe, Nobutsugu; Masaki, Tadahiko; Sugiyama, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Internal hernias are often misdiagnosed because of their rarity, with subsequent significant morbidity. Case Presentation. A 61-year-old Japanese man with no history of surgery was referred for intermittent abdominal pain. CT suggested the presence of a transmesocolic internal hernia. The patient underwent a surgical procedure and was diagnosed with transmesocolic internal hernia. We found internal herniation of the small intestine loop through a defect in the transverse mesocolon, without any strangulation of the small intestine. We were able to complete the operation laparoscopically. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 6. Discussion. Transmesocolic hernia of the transverse colon is very rare. Transmesocolic hernia of the sigmoid colon accounts for 60% of all other mesocolic hernias. Paraduodenal hernias are difficult to distinguish from internal mesocolic transverse hernias. We can rule out paraduodenal hernias with CT. Conclusion. The patient underwent a surgical procedure and was diagnosed with transmesocolic internal hernia. We report a case of a transmesocolic hernia of the transverse colon with intestinal obstruction that was diagnosed preoperatively and for which laparoscopic surgery was performed. PMID:26246930

  4. Symposium on the management of inguinal hernias: 3. Laparoscopic groin hernia surgery: the TAPP procedure

    PubMed Central

    Litwin, Demetrius E.M.; Pham, Quynh N.; Oleniuk, Fredrick H.; Kluftinger, Andreas M.; Rossi, Ljubomir

    1997-01-01

    Objective To describe the technique and results of laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) hernia repair. Design A case series, with a detailed description of the operative technique. Setting A university affiliated hospital. Patients A consecutive series of 554 patients (494 male, 60 female) who underwent laparoscopic hernia repair in a single institution. The mean follow-up was 14 months. Interventions Laparoscopic TAPP hernia repair was performed in almost all patients. Simple closure was performed in a patient with a strangulated hernia, and a mesh-based repair was used in a patient with bilateral obturator hernias. Main outcome measures Complications and recurrence. Results The laparoscopic TAPP repair was successful in 550 of the 554 patients who underwent 632 hernia repairs. Conversion was necessary in 4 patients. Complications were infrequent and there were no recurrences. Only 3.4% of patients were lost to follow-up. The most frequent complications were urinary retention (27) and hematoma and seroma (38) in the early postoperative period. Neuralgia (11) and hydrocele (10) also occurred. Mesh infection occurred in only 1 patient and port-site hernias in 3 patients. There was 1 death from an acute myocardial infarction. Conclusion Laparoscopic TAPP hernia repair is associated with an exceedingly low recurrence rate and an acceptable complication rate. PMID:9194780

  5. [Some aspects of surgical treatment of postoperative ventral hernia].

    PubMed

    Lukomskiĭ, G I; Shulutko, A M; Antropova, N V; Moiseev, A Iu; El-Said, A Kh

    1995-01-01

    The results of surgical treatment of of 392 patients with postoperative ventral hernia are discussed. The algorithm of treatment of patients with large hernias was developed. Special preoperative management by dosed pneumocompression in an antioverload costume makes it possible to avoid menacing complications after the operation, which are caused by increased intraabdominal pressure. Test for tolerance to increase of intraabodominal pressure allowed prognostication of the character of the operative intervention: with or without decrease of the volume of the abdominal cavity (autoplasty or alloplasty, respectively). Prevention of wound complications consisted in control of infection, improvement of operative techniques, and use of modern surgical instruments. The prevention of recurrent hernias should be directed at correct choice of the method of plastics and removal of wound complications.

  6. Laparoscopic features and repair of a combined left Spigelian hernia and left Morgagni diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Chamary, S L; Chamary, V L

    2015-03-01

    Both Spigelian and Morgagni hernias cause serious morbidity so early diagnosis and timely treatment are necessary. These two types of hernia are more commonly found on the right side of patients. They are rare individually in adults and even rarer in combination. So far, an association between the two hernias has only been reported on the right. We describe the first case of a Spigelian hernia and a Morgagni hernia in a 62-year-old woman, both occurring on the left side. Our accompanying video describes several laparoscopic features that will help lead to early detection and diagnosis.

  7. Laparoscopic Features and Repair of a Combined left Spigelian Hernia and left Morgagni Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Chamary, SL

    2015-01-01

    Both Spigelian and Morgagni hernias cause serious morbidity so early diagnosis and timely treatment are necessary. These two types of hernia are more commonly found on the right side of patients. They are rare individually in adults and even rarer in combination. So far, an association between the two hernias has only been reported on the right. We describe the first case of a Spigelian hernia and a Morgagni hernia in a 62-year-old woman, both occurring on the left side. Our accompanying video describes several laparoscopic features that will help lead to early detection and diagnosis. PMID:25723678

  8. Laparoscopic Incisional Hernia Repair With Fibrin Glue in Select Patients

    PubMed Central

    Stefano, Olmi; Luca, Saguatti; Claudio, Pagano; Giuseppe, Vittoria; Enrico, Croce

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objective: Laparoscopic treatment of incisional hernias can be performed using different types of fixation devices and prosthesis. We present a case series of 19 patients with incisional hernias with a diameter of <6cm, who underwent laparoscopic repair using Hi-tex dual-side mesh, positioned intraperitoneally, fixed to the abdominal wall by fibrin glue (Tissucol). Methods: Nineteen patients with incisional hernias <6cm in diameter were enrolled in this study and treated laparoscopically with Hi-tex and Tissucol. Surgical complications and patient outcomes were assessed with a clinical follow-up. Results: Laparoscopic repair of incisional hernias by using Hi-tex mesh affixed to the parietal wall with fibrin glue was feasible and easy in patients with parietal defects <6cm in diameter. Mean operating time was 30 minutes. Mean hospital stay was 1.5 days. Almost no postoperative pain, major surgical complications, seroma formation, relapses, or prosthesis infection occurred during a mean follow-up of 20 months. Conclusions: In select patients, Hi-tex mesh affixed using fibrin glue allows laparoscopic repair of incisional hernias with very good patient outcomes, especially in terms of postoperative pain and seroma formation. PMID:20932376

  9. Laparoscopic Repair of a Traumatic Intrapericardial Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Kuy, SreyRam; Weigelt, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Intrapericardial diaphragmatic hernia is a rare injury. We present a case of an intrapericardial diaphragmatic hernia from blunt trauma. In this report we will review the current literature and also describe the first report of a primary laparoscopic repair of the defect. Case Description: A 38-year-old unrestrained male passenger had blunt chest and abdominal trauma from a motor vehicle collision. Two months later, on a computed tomography scan, he was found to have an intrapericardial diaphragmatic hernia. The defect was repaired primarily through a laparoscopic approach. Discussion: Symptoms of intrapericardial diaphragmatic hernia are chest pain, upper abdominal pain, dysphagia, and dyspnea. Chest computed tomography is the most useful diagnostic test to define the defect. Even when the injury is diagnosed late, laparoscopy can be used for primary and patch repair. PMID:24960502

  10. Oral, intestinal, and skin bacteria in ventral hernia mesh implants

    PubMed Central

    Langbach, Odd; Kristoffersen, Anne Karin; Abesha-Belay, Emnet; Enersen, Morten; Røkke, Ola; Olsen, Ingar

    2016-01-01

    Background In ventral hernia surgery, mesh implants are used to reduce recurrence. Infection after mesh implantation can be a problem and rates around 6–10% have been reported. Bacterial colonization of mesh implants in patients without clinical signs of infection has not been thoroughly investigated. Molecular techniques have proven effective in demonstrating bacterial diversity in various environments and are able to identify bacteria on a gene-specific level. Objective The purpose of this study was to detect bacterial biofilm in mesh implants, analyze its bacterial diversity, and look for possible resemblance with bacterial biofilm from the periodontal pocket. Methods Thirty patients referred to our hospital for recurrence after former ventral hernia mesh repair, were examined for periodontitis in advance of new surgical hernia repair. Oral examination included periapical radiographs, periodontal probing, and subgingival plaque collection. A piece of mesh (1×1 cm) from the abdominal wall was harvested during the new surgical hernia repair and analyzed for bacteria by PCR and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. From patients with positive PCR mesh samples, subgingival plaque samples were analyzed with the same techniques. Results A great variety of taxa were detected in 20 (66.7%) mesh samples, including typical oral commensals and periodontopathogens, enterics, and skin bacteria. Mesh and periodontal bacteria were further analyzed for similarity in 16S rRNA gene sequences. In 17 sequences, the level of resemblance between mesh and subgingival bacterial colonization was 98–100% suggesting, but not proving, a transfer of oral bacteria to the mesh. Conclusion The results show great bacterial diversity on mesh implants from the anterior abdominal wall including oral commensals and periodontopathogens. Mesh can be reached by bacteria in several ways including hematogenous spread from an oral site. However, other sites such as gut and skin may also serve as sources for the

  11. Laparoscopic Repair of Sportman's Hernia - The Trinidad Experience.

    PubMed

    Gopeesingh, Anyl; Dan, Dilip; Naraynsingh, Vijay; Hariharan, Seetharaman; Seetahal, Shiva

    2014-01-01

    Sportman's hernia: (Athletic pubalgia) is an uncommon and poorly understood condition afflicting athletic individuals. Sufferers complain of chronic groin pain and often present diagnostic dilemmas to physicians and physiotherapists. We present a series of cases illustrating the varying presentations of sportman's hernia and diagnostic approaches that can be utilized to exclude common differentials. We also describe laparoscopic mesh repair as an effective treatment option for this condition.

  12. Laparoscopic Hernia: Umbilical-Pubis Length Versus Technical Difficulty

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, Pierre; Kassir, Radwan; Atger, Jérôme

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopic hernia repair is more difficult than open hernia repair. The totally extraperitoneal procedure with 3 trocars on the midline is more comfortable for the surgeon. We studied the impact of the length between the umbilicus and the pubis on the totally extraperitoneal procedure (95 hernias operated on in 70 patients). This length did not influence the totally extraperitoneal procedure in this study. Background: The laparoscopic repair of hernias is considered to be difficult especially for the totally extra-peritoneal technique (TEP) due to a limited working space and different appreciation of the usual anatomical landmarks seen through an anterior approach. The aim of our study has been to answer a question: does the umbilical-pubic distance, which influences the size of the mesh, affect the TEP technique used in the treatment of inguinal hernias? Methods: From January 2001 to May 2011, the umbilical-pubic (UP) distance was measured with a sterile ruler graduated in centimeters in all patients who underwent a symptomatic inguinal hernia by the TEP technique in two hernia surgery centers. The sex, age, BMI, hernia type, UP distance, operation time, hospital stay and complications were prospectively examined based on the medical records. Results: Seventy patients underwent 95 inguinal hernia repairs by the TEP technique. The umbilical-pubic distance average was 14 cm (10 to 22) and a 25 kg/m2 (16–30) average concerning the body mass index (BMI). Seventy percent of patients were treated on an outpatient basis. The postoperative course was very simple. There was no recurrence of hernia within this early postoperative period. Conclusion: The umbilical-pubic distance had no influence on the production of TEP with 3 trocars on the midline in this study. PMID:25392661

  13. The analgesic efficacy of pre-operative bilateral erector spinae plane (ESP) blocks in patients having ventral hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Chin, K J; Adhikary, S; Sarwani, N; Forero, M

    2017-04-01

    Laparoscopic ventral hernia repair is an operation associated with significant postoperative pain, and regional anaesthetic techniques are of potential benefit. The erector spinae plane (ESP) block performed at the level of the T5 transverse process has recently been described for thoracic surgery, and we hypothesised that performing the ESP block at a lower vertebral level would provide effective abdominal analgesia. We performed pre-operative bilateral ESP blocks with 20-30 ml ropivacaine 0.5% at the level of the T7 transverse process in four patients undergoing laparoscopic ventral hernia repair. Median (range) 24-h opioid consumption was 18.7 mg (0.0-43.0 mg) oral morphine. The highest and lowest median (range) pain scores in the first 24 h were 3.5 (3.0-5.0) and 2.5 (0.0-3.0) on an 11-point numerical rating scale. We also performed the block in a fresh cadaver and assessed the extent of injectate spread using computerised tomography. There was radiographic evidence of spread extending cranially to the upper thoracic levels and caudally as far as the L2-L3 transverse processes. We conclude that the ESP block is a promising regional anaesthetic technique for laparoscopic ventral hernia repair and other abdominal surgery when performed at the level of the T7 transverse process. Its advantages are the ability to block both supra-umbilical and infra-umbilical dermatomes with a single-level injection and its relative simplicity.

  14. Evaluation of the Rebound Hernia Repair Device for Laparoscopic Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Villalobos, Gonzalo; Sorcic, Laura; Ruth, George R.; Andrade, Rafael; Martin-del-Campo, Luis A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The characteristics of the ideal type of mesh are still being debated. Mesh shrinkage and fixation have been associated with complications. Avoiding shrinkage and fixation would improve hernia recurrence rates and complications. To our knowledge, this is the first study of a device with a self-expanding frame for laparoscopic hernia repair. Methods: Six Rebound Hernia Repair Devices were placed laparoscopically in pigs. This device is a condensed polypropylene, super-thin, lightweight, macro-porous mesh with a self-expanding Nitinol frame. The devices were assessed for adhesions, shrinkage, and histological examination. Laboratory and radiologic evaluations were also performed. Results: The handling properties of the devices facilitated their laparoscopic placement. They were easily identified with simple x-rays. The mesh was firmly integrated within the surrounding tissue. One device was associated with 3 small adhesions. The other 5 HRDs had no adhesions. We noted no shrinkage or folding. All devices preserved their original size and shape. Conclusions: At this evaluation stage, we found that the Rebound Hernia Repair Device may serve for laparoscopic hernia repair and has favorable handling properties. It prevents folding and shrinkage of the mesh. It may eliminate the need for fixation, thus preventing chronic pain. The Nitinol frame also allowed radiologic evaluation for gross movement. Further studies will be needed to evaluate its clinical application. PMID:20529534

  15. Abdominal adhesions in laparoscopic hernia repair. An experimental study.

    PubMed

    Eller, R; Twaddell, C; Poulos, E; Jenevein, E; McIntire, D; Russell, S

    1994-03-01

    Laparoscopic herniorrhaphy is becoming an increasingly common procedure. The possible creation of intraperitoneal adhesions during laparoscopic herniorrhaphy has not been examined. For the transperitoneal hernia repair to be an acceptable option, the hypothesis that this approach will incite significant adhesions must be rejected. To test this hypothesis, 21 pigs underwent laparoscopic herniorrhaphy using a standard procedure with the implantation of a polypropylene mesh graft on one side while a sham procedure was performed on the other. These animals were later examined laparoscopically for adhesion formation and the condition of the graft. None of the 21 animals developed adhesions to the trocar sites, 12 animals developed adhesions to the area of the polypropylene mesh, and 3 developed adhesions to the side of the sham procedure. There were no adhesions involving the small intestine. It is therefore concluded that the hypothesis should be rejected and that laparoscopic herniorrhaphy does not incite significant adhesions.

  16. Laparoscopic repair of paraesophageal hernias: a Canadian experience

    PubMed Central

    Boushey, Robin P.; Moloo, Husein; Burpee, Stephen; Schlachta, Christopher M.; Poulin, Eric C.; Haggar, Fatima; Trottier, Daniel C.; Mamazza, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Background The surgical approach to paraesophageal hernias (PEH) has changed with the advent of laparoscopic techniques. Variation in both perioperative outcomes and hernia recurrence rates are reported in the literature. We sought to evaluate the short-and intermediate-term outcomes with laparoscopic PEH repair. Methods We performed a retrospective review of patients having laparoscopic repair of PEH between June 1998 and September 2002. We included patients with more than 120 days of follow-up. Results A total of 58 patients with a mean age of 60.4 (standard deviation [SD] 15.0) years had a laparoscopic procedure to repair a primary PEH, as well as adequate follow-up, during the study period. The types of PEH included type II (n = 13), III (n = 44) and IV (n = 1). The most common symptoms were epigastric pain (57%), dysphagia (40%), heartburn (31%) and vomiting (28%). Associated procedures included 56 (96%) Nissen fundoplications and 2 (4%) gastropexies. We closed all crural defects either with or without pledgets, and 2 patients required the use of mesh. There was 1 conversion to open surgery owing to intraoperative bleeding secondary to a consumptive coagulopathy; we observed no other major intraoperative emergencies. Minor or major complications occurred in 15 patients (26%). Late postoperative complications included 1 umbilical hernia. The mean length of stay in hospital was 3.8 (SD 2.5) days. After surgery, 19 patients were completely asymptomatic, and the majority of the remaining patients (83%) described marked symptom improvement. Upper gastrointestinal series performed in symptomatic patients in the postoperative setting identified 5 recurrent paraesophageal hernias (8.6%) and 5 small sliding hernias (9%). Conclusion Laparoscopic repair of PEH is associated with improved long-term symptom relief, low morbidity and acceptable recurrence rates when performed in an experienced centre. PMID:18841230

  17. Laparoscopic Repair of Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Satendra; Afaque, Yusuf; Bhartia, Abhishek Kumar; Bhartia, Vishnu Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background, Aims, and Objectives. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia typically presents in childhood but in adults is extremely rare entity. Surgery is indicated for symptomatic and asymptomatic patients who are fit for surgery. It can be done by laparotomy, thoracotomy, thoracoscopy, or laparoscopy. With the advent of minimal access techniques, the open surgical repair for this hernia has decreased and results are comparable with early recovery and less hospital stay. The aim of this study is to establish that laparoscopic repair of congenital diaphragmatic hernia is a safe and effective modality of surgical treatment. Materials and Methods. A retrospective study of laparoscopic diaphragmatic hernia repair done during May 2011 to Oct 2014. Total n = 13 (M/F: 11/2) cases of confirmed diaphragmatic hernia on CT scan, 4 cases Bochdalek hernia (BH), 8 cases of left eventration of the diaphragm (ED), and one case of right-sided eventration of the diaphragm (ED) were included in the study. Largest defect found on the left side was 15 × 6 cm and on the right side it was 15 × 8 cm. Stomach, small intestine, transverse colon, and omentum were contents in the hernial sac. The contents were reduced with harmonic scalpel and thin sacs were usually excised. The eventration was plicated and hernial orifices were repaired with interrupted horizontal mattress sutures buttressed by Teflon pieces. A composite mesh was fixed with nonabsorbable tackers. All patients had good postoperative recovery and went home early with normal follow-up and were followed up for 2 years. Conclusion. The laparoscopic repair is a safe and effective modality of surgical treatment for congenital diaphragmatic hernia in experienced hands. PMID:28074156

  18. Laparoscopic Hiatal Hernia Repair in 221 Patients: Outcomes and Experience

    PubMed Central

    Thackeray, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Hiatal hernia is a common condition often associated with symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The objectives of this study were to examine the efficacy and safety of laparoscopic hiatal hernia repair (LHHR) with biologic mesh to reduce and/or alleviate GERD symptoms and associated hiatal hernia recurrence. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed consecutive LHHR procedures with biologic mesh performed by a single surgeon from July 2009 to October 2014. The primary efficacy outcome measures were relief from GERD symptoms, as measured according to the GERD–health-related quality-of-life (GERD-HRQL) scale and hiatal hernia recurrence. A secondary outcome measure was overall safety of the procedure. Results: A total of 221 patients underwent LHHR with biologic mesh during the study period, and pre- and postoperative GERD-HRQL studies were available for 172 of them. At baseline (preoperative), the mean GERD-HRQL score for all procedures was 18.5 ± 14.4. At follow-up (mean, 14.5 ± 11.0 months [range, 2.0–56.0]), the score showed a statistically significant decline to a mean of 4.4 ± 7.5 (P < .0001). To date, 8 patients (3.6%, 8/221) have had a documented anatomic hiatal hernia recurrence. However, a secondary hiatal hernia repair reoperation was necessary in only 1 patient. Most complications were minor (dysphagia, nausea and vomiting). However, there was 1 death caused by a hemorrhage that occurred 1 week after surgery. Conclusions: Laparoscopic hiatal hernia repair using biologic mesh, both with and without a simultaneous bariatric or antireflux procedure, is an efficacious and safe therapeutic option for management of hiatal hernia, prevention of recurrence, and relief of symptomatic GERD. PMID:26884676

  19. Serial tightening of Prolene mesh in the repair of a large ventral hernia.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anurag

    2006-04-01

    A 9-month-old female baby was brought to our hospital with a large ventral hernia which had developed after conservative treatment of an exomphalos. A hitherto undescribed technique involving serial tightening of a Prolene mesh was utilised to close the ventral hernia. We were able to achieve a good result within a short period of 2 weeks, without resorting to ventilation. We propose this procedure as an alternative to other existing techniques in similar situations.

  20. Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair: a prospective evaluation at Eastern Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Shakya, Vikal Chandra; Sood, Shasank; Bhattarai, Bal Krishna; Agrawal, Chandra Shekhar; Adhikary, Shailesh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Inguinal hernias have been treated traditionally with open methods of herniorrhaphy or hernioplasty. But the trends have changed in the last decade with the introduction of minimal access surgery. Methods This study was a prospective descriptive study in patients presenting to Surgery Department of B. P. Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Dharan, Nepal with reducible inguinal hernias from January 2011 to June 2012. All patients >18 years of age presenting with inguinal hernias were given the choice of laparoscopic repair or open repair. Those who opted for laparoscopic repair were included in the study. Results There were 50 patients, age ranged from 18 to 71 years with 34 being median age at presentation. In 41 patients, totally extraperitoneal repair was attempted. Of these, 2 (4%) repairs were converted to transabdominal repair and 2 to open mesh repair (4%). In 9 patients, transabdominal repair was done. The median total hospital stay was 4 days (range 3-32 days), the mean postoperative stay was 3.38±3.14 days (range 2-23 days), average time taken for full ambulation postoperatively was 2.05±1.39 days (range 1-10 days), and median time taken to return for normal activity was 5 days (range 2-50 days). One patient developed recurrence (2%). None of the patients who had laparoscopic repair completed complained of neuralgias in the follow-up. Conclusion Laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernias could be contemplated safely both via totally extra peritoneal as well as transperitoneal route even in our setup of a developing country with modifications. PMID:25170385

  1. Laparoscopic Repair of Morgagni Hernia Using Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) Mesh.

    PubMed

    Godazandeh, Gholamali; Mortazian, Meysam

    2012-10-01

    We report the cases of two patients diagnosed with Morgagni hernia who presented with nonspecific abdominal symptoms. Both underwent laparoscopic surgery that used a dual-sided mesh, polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF; Dynamesh IPOM®). The procedures were successful and both patients were discharged with no complications. There was no recurrence in 18 months of follow up.Herein is the report of these cases and a literature review.

  2. Laparoscopic Repair of Morgagni Hernia Using Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) Mesh

    PubMed Central

    Godazandeh, Gholamali; Mortazian, Meysam

    2012-01-01

    We report the cases of two patients diagnosed with Morgagni hernia who presented with nonspecific abdominal symptoms. Both underwent laparoscopic surgery that used a dual-sided mesh, polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF; Dynamesh IPOM®). The procedures were successful and both patients were discharged with no complications. There was no recurrence in 18 months of follow up.Herein is the report of these cases and a literature review. PMID:24829663

  3. Planned ventral hernia. Staged management for acute abdominal wall defects.

    PubMed Central

    Fabian, T C; Croce, M A; Pritchard, F E; Minard, G; Hickerson, W L; Howell, R L; Schurr, M J; Kudsk, K A

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Analysis of a staged management scheme for initial and definitive management of acute abdominal wall defects is provided. METHODS: A four-staged scheme for managing acute abdominal wall defects consists of the following stages: stage I--prosthetic insertion; stage II--2 to 3 weeks after prosthetic insertion and wound granulation, the prosthesis is removed; stage III--2 to 3 days later, planned ventral hernia (split thickness skin graft [STSG] or full-thickness skin and subcutaneous fat); stage IV--6 to 12 months later, definitive reconstruction. Cases were evaluated retrospectively for benefits and risks of the techniques employed. RESULTS: Eighty-eight cases (39 visceral edema, 27 abdominal sepsis, 22 abdominal wall resection) were managed during 8.5 years. Prostheses included polypropylene mesh in 45 cases, polyglactin 910 mesh in 27, polytetrafluorethylene in 10, and plastic in 6. Twenty-four patients died from their initial disease. The fistula rates associated with prosthetic management was 9%; no wound-related mortality occurred. Most wounds had split thickness skin graft applied after prosthetic removal. Definitive reconstruction was undertaken in 21 patients in the authors' institution (prosthetic mesh in 12 and modified components separation in 9). Recurrent hernias developed in 33% of mesh reconstructions and 11% of the components separation technique. CONCLUSIONS: The authors concluded that 1) this staged approach was associated with low morbidity and no technique-related mortality; 2) prostheses placed for edema were removed with fascial approximation accomplished in half of those cases; 3) absorbable mesh provided the advantages of reasonable durability, ease of removal, and relatively low cost--it has become the prosthesis of choice; and 4) the modified components separation technique of reconstruction provided good results in patients with moderate sized defects. Images Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. PMID:8203973

  4. Initial outcomes of laparoscopic paraesophageal hiatal hernia repair with mesh.

    PubMed

    Gebhart, Alana; Vu, Steven; Armstrong, Chris; Smith, Brian R; Nguyen, Ninh T

    2013-10-01

    The use of mesh in laparoscopic paraesophageal hiatal hernia repair (LHR) may reduce the risk of late hernia recurrence. The aim of this study was to evaluate initial outcomes and recurrence rate of 92 patients who underwent LHR reinforced with a synthetic bioabsorbable mesh. Surgical approaches included LHR and Nissen fundoplication (n = 64), LHR without fundoplication (n = 10), reoperative LHR (n = 9), LHR with a bariatric operation (n = 6), and emergent LHR (n = 3). The mean length of hospital stay was 2 ± 3 days (range, 1 to 30 days). There were no conversions to open laparotomy and no intraoperative complications. One of 92 patients (1.1%) required intensive care unit stay. The 90-day mortality was zero. Minor complications occurred in 3.3 per cent, major complications in 2.2 per cent, and late complications in 5.5 per cent of patients. There were no perforations or early hernia recurrence. The 30-day reoperation rate was 1.1 per cent. For patients with available 1-year follow-up, the overall recurrence rate was 18.5 per cent with a mean follow-up of 30 months (range, 12 to 51 months). LHR repair with mesh is associated with low perioperative morbidity and no mortality. The use of bioabsorbable mesh appears to be safe with no early hiatal hernia recurrence or late mesh erosion. Longer follow-up is needed to determine the long-term rate of hernia recurrence associated with LHR with mesh.

  5. Laparoscopic Repair of Morgagni Hernia: Three-Case Presentation and the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Godazandeh, Gholamali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Morgagni hernia is a rare form of congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Case Presentation. We present three cases of Morgagni hernia with GI symptoms treated by laparoscopic surgery. Discussion. Hernial sac was excised in two cases and left in situ in one case. There was no recurrence in symptoms after 30 months from surgery. PMID:27957378

  6. Minimally Invasive Spigelian Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Baucom, Catherine; Nguyen, Quan D.; Hidalgo, Marco

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Spigelian hernia is an uncommon ventral hernia characterized by a defect in the linea semilunaris. Repair of spigelian hernia has traditionally been accomplished via an open transverse incision and primary repair. The purpose of this article is to present 2 case reports of incarcerated spigelian hernia that were successfully repaired laparoscopically using Gortex mesh and to present a review of the literature regarding laparoscopic repair of spigelian hernias. Methods: Retrospective chart review and Medline literature search. Results: Two patients underwent laparoscopic mesh repair of incarcerated spigelian hernias. Both were started on a regular diet on postoperative day 1 and discharged on postoperative days 2 and 3. One patient developed a seroma that resolved without intervention. There was complete resolution of preoperative symptoms at the 12-month follow-up. Conclusion: Minimally invasive repair of spigelian hernias is an alternative to the traditional open surgical technique. Further studies are needed to directly compare the open and the laparoscopic repair. PMID:19660230

  7. Clinical outcomes of single incision laparoscopic surgery and conventional laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal inguinal hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Ece, Ilhan; Yilmaz, Huseyin; Yormaz, Serdar; Sahin, Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic surgery has been a frequently performed method for inguinal hernia repair. Studies have demonstrated that the laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) approach is an appropriate choice for inguinal hernia repair. Single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) was developed to improve the cosmetic effects of conventional laparoscopy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and feasibility of SILS-TAPP compared with TAPP technique. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 148 patients who underwent TAPP or SILS-TAPP in our surgery clinic between December 2012 and January 2015 were enrolled. Data including patient demographics, hernia characteristics, operative time, intraoperative and postoperative complications, length of hospital stay and recurrence rate were retrospectively collected. RESULTS: In total, 60 SILS-TAPP and 88 TAPP procedures were performed in the study period. The two groups were similar in terms of gender, type of hernia, and American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification score. The patients in the SILS-TAPP group were younger when compared the TAPP group. Port site hernia (PSH) rate was significantly high in the SILS-TAPP group, and all PSHs were recorded in patients with severe comorbidities. The mean operative time has no significant difference in two groups. All SILS procedures were completed successfully without conversion to conventional laparoscopy or open repair. No intraoperative complication was recorded. There was no recurrence during the mean follow-up period of 15.2 ± 3.8 months. CONCLUSION: SILS TAPP for inguinal hernia repair seems to be a feasible, safe method, and is comparable with TAPP technique. However, randomized trials are required to evaluate long-term clinical outcomes. PMID:27251835

  8. Adhesions to Mesh after Ventral Hernia Mesh Repair Are Detected by MRI but Are Not a Cause of Long Term Chronic Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Langbach, Odd; Holmedal, Stein Harald; Grandal, Ole Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The aim of the present study was to perform MRI in patients after ventral hernia mesh repair, in order to evaluate MRI's ability to detect intra-abdominal adhesions. Materials and Methods. Single-center long term follow-up study of 155 patients operated for ventral hernia with laparoscopic (LVHR) or open mesh repair (OVHR), including analyzing medical records, clinical investigation with patient-reported pain (VAS-scale), and MRI. MRI was performed in 124 patients: 114 patients (74%) after follow-up, and 10 patients referred for late complaints after ventral mesh repair. To verify the MRI-diagnosis of adhesions, laparoscopy was performed after MRI in a cohort of 20 patients. Results. MRI detected adhesions between bowel and abdominal wall/mesh in 60% of the patients and mesh shrinkage in 20–50%. Adhesions were demonstrated to all types of meshes after both LVHR and OVHR with a sensitivity of 70%, specificity of 75%, positive predictive value of 78%, and negative predictive value of 67%. Independent predictors for formation of adhesions were mesh area as determined by MRI and Charlson index. The presence of adhesions was not associated with more pain. Conclusion. MRI can detect adhesions between bowel and abdominal wall in a fair reliable way. Adhesions are formed both after open and laparoscopic hernia mesh repair and are not associated with chronic pain. PMID:26819601

  9. Incisional hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Millikan, Keith W

    2003-10-01

    Incisional ventral hernias are a common problem encountered by surgeons, with over 100,000 repairs being performed annually in the United States. Although many predisposing factors for incisional ventral hernia are patient-related, some factors such as type of primary closure and materials used may reduce the overall incidence of incisional ventral hernia. With the advent of prosthetic meshes being used for incisional ventral hernia repair, the recurrence rate has dropped to approximately 10%. More recently, with the development of prosthetic mesh that is now safe to place intraperitoneally, the recurrence rate has dropped to under 5%. The current controversies that exist for incisional ventral hernia repair are which approach to use (open versus laparoscopic) and what type of fixation (partial- versus full-thickness abdominal muscular/fascial wall) is necessary to stabilize the position of the mesh while tissue ingrowth occurs. During the next decade the answers to these controversies should be available in the surgical literature.

  10. [Laparoscopic repair of incarcerated diaphragmatic hernia as a late complication of laparoscopic right hepatectomy: a case report].

    PubMed

    Yonemura, Yusuke; Umeda, Kenji; Kumashiro, Ryuichi; Mashino, Kohjiro; Ogawa, Tadashi; Adachi, Eisuke; Saeki, Hiroshi; Uchiyama, Hideaki; Kawanaka, Hirofumi; Ikeda, Tetsuo; Tashiro, Hideya; Sakata, Hisanobu; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2013-12-01

    Incarcerated diaphragmatic hernia after laparoscopic right hepatectomy is very rare. An 81-year-old man underwent laparoscopic right hepatectomy for giant hepatic hemangioma. Twenty months after the surgery, he began to complain of nausea and abdominal pain and was brought to our hospital. Chest X-ray showed an abdominal gas shadow above the right diaphragm and computed tomography showed herniation of the colon into the right thoracic cavity. We diagnosed ileus due to incarcerated diaphragmatic hernia and performed emergency operation under laparoscopic surgery. After successfully reducing the prolapsed colon back to the abdominal cavity, the diaphragmatic hernia orifice was repaired. Incarcerated diaphragmatic hernia sometimes causes the fatal state. Clinicians must therefore consider such findings a late complication of laparoscopic hepatectomy.

  11. Biologic Prosthesis Reduces Recurrence After Laparoscopic Paraesophageal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Oelschlager, Brant K.; Pellegrini, Carlos A.; Hunter, John; Soper, Nathaniel; Brunt, Michael; Sheppard, Brett; Jobe, Blair; Polissar, Nayak; Mitsumori, Lee; Nelson, James; Swanstrom, L

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Laparoscopic paraesophageal hernia repair (LPEHR) is associated with a high recurrence rate. Repair with synthetic mesh lowers recurrence but can cause dysphagia and visceral erosions. This trial was designed to study the value of a biologic prosthesis, small intestinal submucosa (SIS), in LPEHR. Methods: Patients undergoing LPEHR (n = 108) at 4 institutions were randomized to primary repair −1° (n = 57) or primary repair buttressed with SIS (n = 51) using a standardized technique. The primary outcome measure was evidence of recurrent hernia (≥2 cm) on UGI, read by a study radiologist blinded to the randomization status, 6 months after operation. Results: At 6 months, 99 (93%) patients completed clinical symptomatic follow-up and 95 (90%) patients had an UGI. The groups had similar clinical presentations (symptom profile, quality of life, type and size of hernia, esophageal length, and BMI). Operative times (SIS 202 minutes vs. 1° 183 minutes, P = 0.15) and perioperative complications did not differ. There were no operations for recurrent hernia nor mesh-related complications. At 6 months, 4 patients (9%) developed a recurrent hernia >2 cm in the SIS group and 12 patients (24%) in the 1° group (P = 0.04). Both groups experienced a significant reduction in all measured symptoms (heartburn, regurgitation, dysphagia, chest pain, early satiety, and postprandial pain) and improved QOL (SF-36) after operation. There was no difference between groups in either pre or postoperative symptom severity. Patients with a recurrent hernia had more chest pain (2.7 vs. 1.0, P = 0.03) and early satiety (2.8 vs. 1.3, P = 0.02) and worse physical functioning (63 vs. 72, P = 0.03 per SF-36). Conclusions: Adding a biologic prosthesis during LPEHR reduces the likelihood of recurrence at 6 months, without mesh-related complications or side effects. PMID:16998356

  12. Pericecal hernia manifesting as a small bowel obstruction successfully treated with laparoscopic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ogami, Takuya; Honjo, Hirotaka; Kusanagi, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    A pericecal hernia is a type of internal hernia, which rarely causes small bowel obstruction (SBO). At our institution, a 92-year-old man presented with vomiting and abdominal pain. He was conservatively treated with a diagnosis of SBO. After 2 weeks of copious drainage output, he was taken to the operating room. Laparoscopy revealed a pericecal hernia that was successfully reduced. We conclude that laparoscopic surgery is an effective way to treat SBOs secondary to pericecal hernias. PMID:26933000

  13. The laparoscopic approach for repair of indirect inguinal hernias in infants and children

    PubMed Central

    Juang, David; Fraser, Jason D.

    2016-01-01

    Repair of an indirect inguinal hernia is one of the most common operations performed around the world by pediatric surgeons. Until the last 15 years, most inguinal hernia repairs were performed using an inguinal crease incision and extraperitoneal ligation of the patent processes vaginalis. However, since 2000, the laparoscopic approach has gained popularity and there have been increasing descriptions about various techniques for laparoscopic hernia (LH) repair. At our institution, we have transitioned the majority of inguinal hernia repairs to the laparoscopic approach. In this article, we will describe the technique that is utilized at Children’s Mercy Hospital in Kansas City, Missouri (USA) and express our thoughts on the current debate regarding laparoscopic versus open inguinal hernia repair in infants and children. PMID:27867843

  14. Mesh erosion into urinary bladder following laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Arjun Singh; Kumar, Ameet; Kumar, Bharath N.

    2017-01-01

    Along with advantages, evolving surgical techniques bring unique complications. A young male developed urinary symptoms a few months after undergoing laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair. On evaluation, mesh erosion into the urinary bladder was found. Removal of mesh with repair of bladder was done. A vesico-cutaneous fistula resulted which was managed with repeat surgery. We review all such cases reported in literature; discuss the etiopathogenesis, presentation, management and possible preventive measures. To the best of our knowledge, this is only the 12th case being reported. PMID:28281479

  15. Local and General Anesthesia in the Laparoscopic Preperitoneal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Ferzli, George

    2000-01-01

    Objective: The extraperitoneal laparoscopic approach (EXTRA) has been shown to be an effective and safe repair for primary (PIH), recurrent (RIH) and bilateral hernia (BIH). There is very little data examining the merits of laparoscopic repair for hernias under local anesthesia. In this paper, we compare EXTRA performed under both general and local anesthesia. Methods: This nonrandomized prospective study was performed selectively on a male population only. Patients with associated pulmonary disease and high risk for general surgery were selected. Patients with recurrence and previous abdominal operations were excluded to decrease confounding variables in the study. A Prolene mesh was used in all patients. Results: Between May 1997 and September 1998, 92 male patients underwent the repair of 107 groin hernias using the EXTRA technique. The procedure was explained to them, and different anesthesia options were given. Fourteen of these repairs were performed under local anesthesia and 93 under general anesthesia. Of the 10 patients who underwent a repair under local anesthesia, there were 8 indirect, 5 direct and 1 pantaloon. The mean age was 53 years. In the group of general anesthesia, the types of hernias repaired were 45 indirect, 30 direct and 11 pantaloon. The mean age was 45 years. The mean follow-up was 15 months. Each patient was sent home the same day. Two peritoneal tears were recorded in the first group. The operative time was longer in the local group (47 ± 11 vs 18 ± 3). None of the patients required conversion to an open technique or change of anesthesia. No recurrences were found in either group. The average time of return to work and regular activity was 3.5 ± 1 and 3 ± 1 days, respectively. Conclusion: There appears to be no significant difference in recurrence and complication rates when the EXTRA is performed under local anesthesia as compared to general. Blunt dissection of the preperitoneal space does not trigger pain and does not require

  16. [Treatment of medial ventral hernias with the use of synthetic endoprosthesis].

    PubMed

    Pushkin, S Iu; Belokonev, V I

    2010-01-01

    350 patients with medial ventral hernias were operated on. 307 of them had various concurrent diseases; 177 required simultaneous surgery on that account. Endoprosthesis (synthetic mesh) was fixed using an "inlay-sub-lay" technique. Local complications were detected in 19.4% of patients, 5.4% developed common complications. 1.1% of patients had died. Long-term hernia recurrence was registered in 1.1%.

  17. [Plastic repair using the demineralized matrix of flat allogeneic bone in an operation for ventral hernia].

    PubMed

    Isaĭchev, B A; Chikaleva, V I

    1990-11-01

    Investigations were performed in experiments on 36 dogs. Clinico-morphological results of plasty of artificial defects of the anterior abdominal wall by demineralized matrix of a flat allogeneic bone have shown good taking by tissues. In clinic the demineralized matrix of flat allogeneic bone (scapula, skull fornix) was used in ventral hernias in 36 patients. No recurrent hernias were noted in these patients within 20 months after operation.

  18. Surgical mesh for ventral incisional hernia repairs: Understanding mesh design

    PubMed Central

    Rastegarpour, Ali; Cheung, Michael; Vardhan, Madhurima; Ibrahim, Mohamed M; Butler, Charles E; Levinson, Howard

    2016-01-01

    Surgical mesh has become an indispensable tool in hernia repair to improve outcomes and reduce costs; however, efforts are constantly being undertaken in mesh development to overcome postoperative complications. Common complications include infection, pain, adhesions, mesh extrusion and hernia recurrence. Reducing the complications of mesh implantation is of utmost importance given that hernias occur in hundreds of thousands of patients per year in the United States. In the present review, the authors present the different types of hernia meshes, discuss the key properties of mesh design, and demonstrate how each design element affects performance and complications. The present article will provide a basis for surgeons to understand which mesh to choose for patient care and why, and will explain the important technological aspects that will continue to evolve over the ensuing years. PMID:27054138

  19. Hiatal hernia in pediatric patients: laparoscopic versus open approaches

    PubMed Central

    Namgoong, Jung-Man; Kim, Seong-Chul; Hwang, Ji-Hee

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the surgical outcomes of laparoscopic approach for hiatal hernia (HH) in pediatric patients. Methods This was a retrospective study of 33 patients younger than 18 years who underwent an operation for HH between January 1999 and December 2012. Results The HH symptoms were various and included regurgitation, vomiting, weight loss, cough, hoarseness, and cyanosis. Among the 33 patients, there were 25 sliding types, 1 paraesophageal type, and 7 mixed types. Open surgery (OS) and laparoscopic surgery (LS) were used in 16 and 17 patients, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in sex, age, or body weight between the groups. The median operating time was longer in the LS group (150 minutes; range, 90-250 minutes vs. 125 minutes; range, 66-194 minutes; P = 0.028). Time to oral intake was shorter in the LS group than in the OS group (1 day; range, 1-3 days vs. 2 days; range, 1-7 days; P = 0.001) and time to full feeding was shorter in the LS group than in the OS group (6 days; range, 3-16 days vs. 10 days; range, 3-33 days; P = 0.048). There were no differences in length of hospital stay and complications between the two groups. There was no perioperative mortality or recurrence of HH. Conclusion A good surgical outcome for laparoscopic correction of HH was seen in pediatric patients. PMID:24851228

  20. Non-intubated laparoscopic repair of giant Morgagni’s hernia for a young man

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Miao; Wang, Heng; Liu, Dong; Pan, Xuefeng; Wu, Wenbin; Hu, Zhengqun

    2016-01-01

    An asymptomatic patient was admitted as his chest photograph and computed tomography scans showed a giant Morgagni’s hernia (MH). And it was repaired by laparoscopic approach under epidural anesthesia without endotracheal intubation. The hernia content of omentum was repositioned back into the abdominal cavity, and the diaphragmatic defect was repaired with composite mesh. Which indicated that non-intubated laparoscopic mesh repair via epidural anesthesia is reliable and satisfactory for MH. PMID:27621903

  1. Single-incision laparoscopic total extraperitoneal repair for a Grynfeltt hernia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction A superior lumbar hernia, which is also known as a Grynfeltt hernia, is a rare abdominal wall defect that can be primary or secondary to trauma or orthopedic surgery. The anatomic location of a lumbar hernia makes diagnosis and repair challenging. We successfully repaired a lumbar hernia using a single-incision laparoscopic total extraperitoneal approach. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the use of this surgical technique in the treatment of a primary Grynfeltt hernia. Case presentation A 76-year-old Taiwanese man presented to our hospital with a left lower bulging mass noted for over three months. Abdominal computed tomography revealed a left Grynfeltt hernia. We performed a single-incision laparoscopic total extraperitoneal repair. Our patient was discharged uneventfully on the fourth day after the operation. There was no evidence of recurrence after six months of follow-up. Conclusion A laparoscopic total extraperitoneal repair for a lumbar hernia provides an excellent operative view and minimal invasiveness. The single-incision technique also provides better cosmetic outcomes. Our experience suggests that the single-incision laparoscopic total extraperitoneal approach may be a feasible and safe alterative to conventional approaches in lumbar hernia repair. PMID:24428946

  2. Incidence of Port-Site Incisional Hernia After Single-Incision Laparoscopic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rainville, Harvey; Ikedilo, Ojinika; Vemulapali, Pratibha

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Single-incision laparoscopic surgery is gaining popularity among minimally invasive surgeons and is now being applied to a broad number of surgical procedures. Although this technique uses only 1 port, the diameter of the incision is larger than in standard laparoscopic surgery. The long-term incidence of port-site hernias after single-incision laparoscopic surgery has yet to be determined. Methods: All patients who underwent a single-incision laparoscopic surgical procedure from May 2008 through May 2009 were included in the study. Single-incision laparoscopic surgical operations were performed either by a multiport technique or with a 3-trocar single-incision laparoscopic surgery port. The patients were seen at 30 to 36 months' follow-up, at which time they were examined for any evidence of port-site incisional hernia. Patients found to have hernias on clinical examination underwent repairs with mesh. Results: A total of 211 patients met the criteria for inclusion in the study. The types of operations included were cholecystectomy, appendectomy, sleeve gastrectomy, gastric banding, Nissen fundoplication, colectomy, and gastrojejunostomy. We found a port-site hernia rate of 2.9% at 30 to 36 months' follow-up. Conclusion: Port-site incisional hernia after single-incision laparoscopic surgical procedures remains a major setback for patients. The true incidence remains largely unknown because most patients are asymptomatic and therefore do not seek surgical aid. PMID:24960483

  3. Economic evaluation of open versus laparoscopic hernia repair: some pragmatic considerations for the measurement of costs.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, E; Donaldson, C; Grant, A

    1998-12-01

    Laparoscopic hernia repair costs more than open repair. This increase in cost largely is because of the use of disposables. Indirect cost benefits of laparoscopic procedure because of a more rapid return to normal activity are different to calculate but may be present for select groups of patients.

  4. Laparoscopic Transabdominal Preperitoneal Inguinal Hernia Repair Using Memory-Ring Mesh: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Tsutomu; Matsuda, Akihisa; Takao, Yoshimune

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the feasibility, safety, and effectiveness of laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) inguinal hernia repair using a memory-ring patch (Polysoft™ mesh). Patients and Methods. Between April 2010 and March 2013, a total of 76 inguinal hernias underwent TAPP repair using Polysoft mesh in 67 adults under general anesthesia. Three different senior resident surgeons performed TAPP repair under the instruction of a specialist surgeon. Nine patients had bilateral hernias. The 76 hernias included 37 indirect inguinal hernias, 29 direct hernias, 1 femoral hernia, 1 pantaloon hernia (combined direct/indirect inguinal hernia), and 8 recurrent hernias after open anterior hernia repair. The immediate postoperative outcomes as well as the short-term outcomes (mainly recurrence and incidence of chronic pain) were studied. Results. There was no conversion from TAPP repair to anterior open repair. The mean operation time was 109 minutes (range, 40–132) for unilateral hernia repair. Scrotal seroma was diagnosed at the operation site in 5 patients. No patient had operation-related orchitis, testicle edema, trocar site infection, or chronic pain during follow-up. Conclusions. The use of Polysoft mesh for TAPP inguinal hernia repair does not seem to adversely affect the quality of repair. The use of this mesh is therefore feasible and safe and may reduce postoperative pain. PMID:27635414

  5. Laparoscopic Transabdominal Preperitoneal Inguinal Hernia Repair Using Memory-Ring Mesh: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Matsutani, Takeshi; Nomura, Tsutomu; Hagiwara, Nobutoshi; Matsuda, Akihisa; Takao, Yoshimune; Uchida, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the feasibility, safety, and effectiveness of laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) inguinal hernia repair using a memory-ring patch (Polysoft™ mesh). Patients and Methods. Between April 2010 and March 2013, a total of 76 inguinal hernias underwent TAPP repair using Polysoft mesh in 67 adults under general anesthesia. Three different senior resident surgeons performed TAPP repair under the instruction of a specialist surgeon. Nine patients had bilateral hernias. The 76 hernias included 37 indirect inguinal hernias, 29 direct hernias, 1 femoral hernia, 1 pantaloon hernia (combined direct/indirect inguinal hernia), and 8 recurrent hernias after open anterior hernia repair. The immediate postoperative outcomes as well as the short-term outcomes (mainly recurrence and incidence of chronic pain) were studied. Results. There was no conversion from TAPP repair to anterior open repair. The mean operation time was 109 minutes (range, 40-132) for unilateral hernia repair. Scrotal seroma was diagnosed at the operation site in 5 patients. No patient had operation-related orchitis, testicle edema, trocar site infection, or chronic pain during follow-up. Conclusions. The use of Polysoft mesh for TAPP inguinal hernia repair does not seem to adversely affect the quality of repair. The use of this mesh is therefore feasible and safe and may reduce postoperative pain.

  6. Laparoscopic repair of hiatal hernia with mesenterioaxial volvulus of the stomach.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Kazuki; Sakurai, Yoichi; Isogaki, Jun; Komori, Yoshiyuki; Uyama, Ichiro

    2011-04-21

    Although mesenterioaxial gastric volvulus is an uncommon entity characterized by rotation at the transverse axis of the stomach, laparoscopic repair procedures have still been controversial. We reported a case of mesenterioaxial intrathoracic gastric volvulus, which was successfully treated with laparoscopic repair of the diaphragmatic hiatal defect using a polytetrafluoroethylene mesh associated with Toupet fundoplication. A 70-year-old Japanese woman was admitted to our hospital because of sudden onset of upper abdominal pain. An upper gastrointestinal series revealed an incarcerated intrathoracic mesenterioaxial volvulus of the distal portion of the stomach and the duodenum. The complete laparoscopic approach was used to repair the volvulus. The laparoscopic procedures involved the repair of the hiatal hernia using polytetrafluoroethylene mesh and Toupet fundoplication. This case highlights the feasibility and effectiveness of the laparoscopic procedure, and laparoscopic repair of the hiatal defect using a polytetrafluoroethylene mesh associated with Toupet fundoplication may be useful for preventing postoperative recurrence of hiatal hernia, volvulus, and gastroesophageal reflux.

  7. Integrating a novel shape memory polymer into surgical meshes to improve device performance during laparoscopic hernia surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimkowski, Michael M.

    biocompatibility to function as suitable ventral hernia repair mesh, while offering a reduction in surgical operating time and improving mesh placement characteristics. Future work will include ball-burst tests similar to ASTM D3787-07, direct surgeon feedback studies, and a 30 day chronic porcine model to evaluate the SMP surgical mesh in a realistic hernia repair environment, using laparoscopic techniques for typical ventral hernia repair.

  8. Safety and Efficacy of Single Incision Laparoscopic Surgery for Total Extraperitoneal Inguinal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Almost 20 years after the first laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair was performed, single incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS™) is set to revolutionize minimally invasive surgery. However, the loss of triangulation must be overcome before the technique can be popularized. This study reports the first 100 laparoscopic total extraperitoneal hernia repairs using a single incision. The study cohort comprised 68 patients with a mean age of 44 (range, 18 to 83): 36 unilateral and 32 bilateral hernias. Twelve patients also underwent umbilical hernia repair with the Ventralex patch requiring no additional incisions. A 2.5-cm to 3-cm crescentic incision within the confines of the umbilicus was performed. Standard dissecting instruments and 52-cm/5.5-mm/300 laparoscope were used. Operation times were 50 minutes for unilateral and 80 minutes for bilateral. There was one conversion to conventional 3-port laparoscopic repair and none to open surgery. Outpatient surgery was achieved in all (except one). Analgesic requirements were minimal: 8 Dextropropoxyphene tablets (range, 0 to 20). There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications with a high patient satisfaction score. Single-incision laparoscopic hernia repair is safe and efficient simply by modifying dissection techniques (so-called “inline” and “vertical”). Comparable success can be obtained while negating the risks of bowel and vascular injuries from sharp trocars and achieving improved cosmetic results. PMID:21902942

  9. Biomimetic collagen/elastin meshes for ventral hernia repair in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Minardi, Silvia; Taraballi, Francesca; Wang, Xin; Cabrera, Fernando J; Van Eps, Jeffrey L; Robbins, Andrew B; Sandri, Monica; Moreno, Michael R; Weiner, Bradley K; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2017-03-01

    Ventral hernia repair remains a major clinical need. Herein, we formulated a type I collagen/elastin crosslinked blend (CollE) for the fabrication of biomimetic meshes for ventral hernia repair. To evaluate the effect of architecture on the performance of the implants, CollE was formulated both as flat sheets (CollE Sheets) and porous scaffolds (CollE Scaffolds). The morphology, hydrophylicity and in vitro degradation were assessed by SEM, water contact angle and differential scanning calorimetry, respectively. The stiffness of the meshes was determined using a constant stretch rate uniaxial tensile test, and compared to that of native tissue. CollE Sheets and Scaffolds were tested in vitro with human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (h-BM-MSC), and finally implanted in a rat ventral hernia model. Neovascularization and tissue regeneration within the implants was evaluated at 6weeks, by histology, immunofluorescence, and q-PCR. It was found that CollE Sheets and Scaffolds were not only biomechanically sturdy enough to provide immediate repair of the hernia defect, but also promoted tissue restoration in only 6weeks. In fact, the presence of elastin enhanced the neovascularization in both sheets and scaffolds. Overall, CollE Scaffolds displayed mechanical properties more closely resembling those of native tissue, and induced higher gene expression of the entire marker genes tested, associated with de novo matrix deposition, angiogenesis, adipogenesis and skeletal muscles, compared to CollE Sheets. Altogether, this data suggests that the improved mechanical properties and bioactivity of CollE Sheets and Scaffolds make them valuable candidates for applications of ventral hernia repair.

  10. Percutaneous suturing technique and single-site umbilical laparoscopic repair of a Morgagni hernia: Review of three cases.

    PubMed

    Zouari, M; Jallouli, M; Bendhaou, M; Zitouni, H; Mhiri, R

    2015-12-01

    Morgagni hernias are uncommon, accounting for only 1-2% of all congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Minimally invasive surgery is today the gold standard treatment. We present a technique using percutaneous suturing and single-site umbilical laparoscopic repair of Morgagni hernia in three children. Recovery was uneventful in all three patients. There was no recurrence and the chest radiograph remained normal during the postoperative follow-up. The percutaneous suturing technique and single-site umbilical laparoscopic repair of a Morgagni hernia is an easy and effective alternative to standard laparoscopic repair.

  11. Laparoscopic Repair of Inguinal Hernia Using Surgisis Mesh and Fibrin Sealant

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Objective: We tested the hypothesis that laparoscopic inguinal herniorrhaphy using Surgisis mesh secured with fibrin sealant is an effective long-term treatment for repair of inguinal hernia. This case series involved 38 adult patients with 51 inguinal hernias treated in a primary care center. Methods: Between December 2002 and May 2005, 38 patients with 45 primary and 6 recurrent inguinal hernias were treated with laparoscopic repair by the total extra-peritoneal mesh placement (TEP) technique using Surgisis mesh secured into place with fibrin sealant. Postoperative complications, incidence of pain, and recurrence were recorded, as evaluated at 2 weeks, 6 weeks, 1 year, and with a follow-up questionnaire and telephone interview conducted in May and June 2005. Results: The operations were successfully performed on all patients with no complications or revisions to an open procedure. Average follow-up was 13 months (range, 1 to 30). One hernia recurred (second recurrence of unilateral direct hernia), indicating a 2% recurrence rate. Conclusions: Laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernia using Surgisis mesh secured with fibrin sealant can be effectively used to treat primary, recurrent, direct, indirect, and bilateral inguinal hernias in adults without complications and minimal recurrence within 1-year of follow-up. PMID:17575758

  12. Anesthetic management for repair of adult Bochdalek hernia by laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Takeyama, Kazuhide; Nakahara, Yumi; Ando, Satoko; Hasegawa, Keiichiro; Suzuki, Toshiyasu

    2005-01-01

    This report describes anesthetic management of a case (a 64-year-old man) who was originally diagnosed as paraesophageal hernia before surgery and later diagnosed as Bochdalek hernia during laparoscopic surgery. Anesthesia was started with oxygen, nitrous oxide, and sevoflurane, and respiration was managed using controlled mechanical ventilation. Although left pneumothorax was noticed during laparoscopic surgery (aeroperitonia pressure: 10 cmH2O), the surgery was performed using the same anesthesia procedure, because hardly any changes were observed on the monitor and vital signs were stable. The surgery was completed without incident. However, postoperative chest X-rays revealed the residual large pneumothorax. A chest drain tube was inserted immediately, after which the pneumothorax was improved. Pneumothorax is considered to be inevitable in cases of laparoscopic repair of Bochdalek hernia. To prevent exacerbation of pneumothorax, anesthetic management should consist of discontinuing the use of nitrous oxide and lowering the aeroperitonia pressure concomitently with the use of positive airway pressure.

  13. Laparoscopic surgery in the treatment of incarcerated indirect inguinal hernia in children

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yiyu; Zhang, Hongwei; Zhang, Xiang; Sun, Fang; Zou, Huaxin; Cao, Hui; Wen, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to explore the feasibility and the safety of the laparoscopic surgery for incarcerated indirect inguinal hernia (IIH) in children. From January 2012 to December 2014, 64 children were enrolled into this study. All 64 patients received laparoscopic surgery and we reviewed their perioperative and postoperative follow-up studies. In addition, we enrolled 60 cases of children who received traditional surgery of IIH administered through minimally invasive surgery as the control group. Results from the present study showed that the mean operation time for the laparoscopic group was 41.5 min (range, 15–80 min) which was significantly shorter than the control group. Nine cases developed incarcerated intestine necrosis, expanded umbilical incision and parallel resection anastomosis. They received laparoscopic hernia sac high ligation. Only 5 cases developed scrotum edema after the surgery. The postoperative length of the stay ranged from 2 to 7 days (average, 3.2). The postoperative follow-up was from 6 months to 1 year and no relapse or secondary testicular atrophy was observed in the laparoscopic group. The operation time, incidence of postoperative complications and length of stay in the laparoscopic group were decreased compared to the control group, and differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). In conclusion, laparoscopic surgery treatment for incarcerated inguinal hernia is safe and feasible and produced better results compared with the alternative. PMID:28105089

  14. Cyanoacrylate surgical glue for mesh fixation in laparoscopic total extraperitoneal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Vallejo, Luis; Couto-Gonzalez, Ivan; Concheiro-Coello, Pablo; Brea-Garcia, Beatriz; Taboada-Suarez, Antonio

    2014-06-01

    In an attempt to find the ideal surgical technique for mesh fixation during laparoscopic total extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repair, we evaluate the use of a synthetic surgical glue (N-butyl-cyanoacrylate-Glubran 2) in an effort to reduce postoperative pain and the complications associated with the use of staples. We have prospectively evaluated 61 consecutive patients (73 hernias) with a minimum follow-up period of 18 months and an average of 29.7 months, without any significant complications present. The majority (59%) only required low dosages of painkillers during the first 24 hours after surgery and have not experienced any cases of chronic pain or recurring hernias in the time period described. On the basis of this initial experience, the use of the surgical glue used to repair inguinal hernias with the laparoscopic total extraperitoneal technique has been proved to be a simple and effective surgical method for mesh fixation.

  15. COPAIBA OIL INFLUENCES VENTRAL HERNIA REPAIR WITH VICRYL® MESH?

    PubMed Central

    YASOJIMA, Edson Yuzur; TEIXEIRA, Renan Kleber Costa; HOUAT, Abdallah de Paula; COSTA, Felipe Lobato da Silva; YAMAKI, Vitor Nagai; FEITOSA-JUNIOR, Denilson José Silva; SILVA, Carlos Augusto Moreira; BRITO, Marcus Vinicius Henriques

    2015-01-01

    Background: The use of meshes in hernia surgical repair promoted revolution in the surgical area; however, some difficulties had come, such as a large area of fibrosis, greater postoperative pain and risk of infection. The search for new substances that minimize these effects should be encouraged. Medicinal plants stand out due possible active ingredients that can act on these problems. Aim: To check the copaiba oil influence in the repair of abdominal defects in rats corrected with Vicryl(c) mesh. Method: Twenty-four Wistar rats were submitted to an abdominal defect and corrected with Vicryl(c) mesh. They were distributed into two groups: control and copaíba via gavage, administered for seven days after surgery. The analysis of the animals took place on 8, 15 and 22 postoperative days. It analyzed the amount of adhesions and microscopic analysis of the mesh. Results: There was no statistical difference regarding the amount of adhesions. All animals had signs of acute inflammation. In the control group, there were fewer macrophages in animals of the 8th compared to other days and greater amount of necrosis on day 8 than on day 22. In the copaiba group, the number of gigantocytes increased compared to the days analyzed. Conclusion: Copaiba oil showed an improvement in the inflammatory response accelerating its beginning; however, did not affect the amount of abdominal adhesions or collagen fibers. PMID:26537143

  16. [Treatment of postoperative ventral hernias with device closure of aponeurotic defect].

    PubMed

    Izmaĭlov, S G; Lazarev, V M; Kapustin, K V

    2003-01-01

    A new method of treatment of postoperative ventral hernias was developed. During surgery under control over intraabdominal pressure hernial defect is closed with special devices for closure of wound margins. Plastic repair with local tissues in the form of duplication with uninterruptedly-recurrent suture (1st variant) or by contact method ("in join") with auto- or alloplasty on suture line (2nd variant) are performed when intraabdominal pressure doesn't change. If intraabdominal pressure increases, closure of the wound is stopped and polypropylene net or autodermal transplant (3rd variant) are sutured to margins of the wound. One hundred and sixty-eight patients with postoperative ventral hernias underwent surgeries with this method. Control group consisted of 110 patients. Recurrence of hernia was seen in 33 (30%) patients. There were no recurrences in the study group after the 2nd and 3rd variant of the surgery. In the 1st variant recurrence was seen in 6% cases. The method is recommended for surgical departments. Device immobilization permits to decrease tension in sutured tissue, creates optimal conditions for wound closure and prevents suture insufficiency.

  17. Single-Port Onlay Mesh Repair of Recurrent Inguinal Hernias after Failed Anterior and Laparoscopic Repairs

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Kim; Zajkowska, Marta; Lam, Vincent; Hawthorne, Wayne J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Despite the exponential increase in the use of laparoscopic inguinal herniorrhaphy, overall recurrence rates have remained unchanged. Therefore, a growing number of patients are presenting with recurrent hernias after conventional anterior and laparoscopic repairs have failed. This study reports our experience with single-incision laparoscopic (SIL) intraperitoneal onlay mesh (IPOM) repair of these hernias. Methods: Patients referred with two or more recurrences of inguinal hernia underwent SIL-IPOM from November 1, 2009, to June 24, 2014. A 2.5-cm infraumbilical incision was made, and an SIL port was placed intraperitoneally. Modified dissection techniques were used: chopstick and inline dissection, 5.5-mm/52-cm/30° angled laparoscope, and conventional straight dissecting instruments. The peritoneum was incised above the pubic symphysis, and dissection was continued laterally and proximally, raising the inferior flap below the previous extraperitoneal mesh while reducing any direct, indirect, femoral, or cord lipoma before placement of antiadhesive mesh, which was fixed to the pubic ramus, as well as superiorly, with nonabsorbable tacks before the inferior border was fixed with fibrin sealant. The inferior peritoneal flap was then tacked back onto the mesh. Results: Nine male patients underwent SIL-IPOM. Their mean age was 53 years and mean body mass index was 26.8 kg/m2. Mean mesh size was 275 cm2. Mean operation time was 125 minutes, with a hospital stay of 1 day. The umbilical scar length was 23 mm at the 6-week follow-up. There were no intra-/postoperative complications, port-site hernias, chronic groin pain, or recurrence of the hernia during a mean follow-up of 24 months. Conclusion: Inguinal hernias recurring after two or more failed conventional anterior and laparoscopic repairs can be safely and efficiently treated with SIL-IPOM. PMID:25848186

  18. The learning curve in laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair for the community general surgeon

    PubMed Central

    Voitk, Andrus J.

    1998-01-01

    Objective To determine the learning curve (number of operations required) to stabilize operating times and complication rates for a general surgeon doing laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair in a community practice. Design A prospective analysis. Setting A 256-bed secondary-care community hospital. Patients Ninety-eight consecutive patients booked for elective laparoscopic hernia repair on an outpatient basis. Interventions Using the transabdominal preperitoneal approach, 100 operations were carried out to repair 138 groins and a total of 164 separate hernial defects. Outcome measures The number of operations required to decrease operative times and complication rates to a steady level. Results There were no deaths. There were 5 conversions and 10 admissions, all occurring between the 1st and 46th operations. Two reoperations for reasons other than recurrence were required between the 45th and 55th operations. There were 24 other complications. Complications and surgical times began to level off after 50 operations. The 1 readmission was after the 42nd operation. There were 4 recurrences (2.9% recurrence rate), 2 in each group of 50 operations. Both groups of 2 recurrences occurred within the first 10 operations involving the use of a new stapler. Twenty-two other patients had open hernia repairs because laparoscopy was unsuitable for them. Conclusion The learning curve for laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair in the hands of a general surgeon in community practice who is experienced in open herniorraphy and laparoscopic cholecystectomy is at least 50 operations. PMID:9854534

  19. A complication to remember: stitch sinus following laparoscopic umbilical hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Rabiu, Abdul-Rasheed; Tan, Lam Chin

    2016-01-01

    This report describes a diagnostic dilemma and what we believe to be a previously unreported case of a stitch sinus caused by the presence of a non-absorbable centring suture used during laparoscopic mesh repair of an umbilical hernia. Successful treatment was achieved through umbilical excision and removal of the offending suture; the patient's recovery thereafter was uneventful. Surgeons should be aware of this complication when consenting patients and should consider the use of absorbable sutures to minimize such risk in similar procedures. In addition, clinicians may add this to their list of differential diagnoses in a patient presenting with pain, discharge or what appears to be a recurrence of their hernia following laparoscopic mesh repair of an umbilical hernia. PMID:27572679

  20. Enterocutaneous fistula as a postoperative complication of laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Klein, A M; Banever, T C

    1999-01-01

    Trocar injuries to the small bowel during laparoscopic hernia repair are a rare complication, the most common complications being postoperative neuralgias, scrotal swelling, scrotal ecchymosis, and hematoma. A 15-year-old boy was admitted 5 days status-post transabdominal laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair of a symptomatic right pantaloon hernia, with signs and symptoms of a retrocecal abscess. Despite laparotic intervention and appendectomy, the next 2 years passed with almost daily, purulent, right lower quadrant wound drainage, in an otherwise asymptomatic patient. Superficial wound exploration and sinogram in 1996 revealed a sinus tract in direct communication with the small bowel. Elective laparotomy in December 1997 involved a successful resection of a 2.5-cm fistula with involved mesh, and the communicating small bowel through a midline incision, followed by a primary closure of the small-bowel opening. The patient has recovered without complications.

  1. Mesh Location in Open Ventral Hernia Repair: A Systematic Review and Network Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Holihan, Julie L; Nguyen, Duyen H; Nguyen, Mylan T; Mo, Jiandi; Kao, Lillian S; Liang, Mike K

    2016-01-01

    There is no consensus on the ideal location for mesh placement in open ventral hernia repair (OVHR). We aim to identify the mesh location associated with the lowest rate of recurrence following OVHR using a systematic review and meta-analysis. A search was performed for studies comparing at least two of four locations for mesh placement during OVHR (onlay, inlay, sublay, and underlay). Outcomes assessed were hernia recurrence and surgical site infection (SSI). Pairwise meta-analysis was performed to compare all direct treatment of mesh locations. A multiple treatment meta-analysis was performed to compare all mesh locations in the Bayesian framework. Sensitivity analyses were planned for the following: studies with a low risk of bias, incisional hernias, by hernia size, and by mesh type (synthetic or biologic). Twenty-one studies were identified (n = 5,891). Sublay placement of mesh was associated with the lowest risk for recurrence [OR 0.218 (95% CI 0.06-0.47)] and was the best of the four treatment modalities assessed [Prob (best) = 94.2%]. Sublay was also associated with the lowest risk for SSI [OR 0.449 (95% CI 0.12-1.16)] and was the best of the 4 treatment modalities assessed [Prob (best) = 77.3%]. When only assessing studies at low risk of bias, of incisional hernias, and using synthetic mesh, the probability that sublay had the lowest rate of recurrence and SSI was high. Sublay mesh location has lower complication rates than other mesh locations. While additional randomized controlled trials are needed to validate these findings, this network meta-analysis suggests the probability of sublay being the best location for mesh placement is high.

  2. Single-Incision Laparoscopic Intraperitoneal Onlay Mesh Repair for the Treatment of Multiple Recurrent Inguinal Hernias

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Kim; Zajkowska, Marta; Lam, Vincent; Hawthorne, Wayne

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Despite an exponential rise in laparoscopic surgery for inguinal herniorrhaphy, overall recurrence rates have remained unchanged. Therefore, an increasing number of patients present with recurrent hernias after having failed anterior and laparoscopic repairs. This study reports our experience with single-incision laparoscopic (SIL) intraperitoneal onlay mesh (IPOM) repair for these hernias. Materials and methods: All patients referred with multiply recurrent inguinal hernias underwent SIL-IPOM from November 1 2009 to October 30 2013. A 2.5-cm infraumbilical incision was made and a SIL surgical port was placed intraperitoneally. Modified dissection techniques, namely, “chopsticks” and “inline” dissection, 5.5 mm/52 cm/30° angled laparoscope and conventional straight dissecting instruments were used. The peritoneum was incised above the symphysis pubis and dissection continued laterally and proximally raising an inferior flap, below a previous extraperitoneal mesh, while reducing any direct/indirect/femoral/cord lipoma before placement of antiadhesive mesh that was fixed into the pubic ramus as well as superiorly with nonabsorbable tacks before fixing its inferior border with fibrin sealant. The inferior peritoneal flap was then tacked back onto the mesh. Results: There were 9 male patients who underwent SIL-IPOM. Mean age was 55 years old and mean body mass index was 26.8 kg/m2. Mean mesh size was 275 cm2. Mean operation time was 125 minutes with hospital stay of 1 day and umbilical scar length of 21 mm at 4 weeks' follow-up. There were no intraoperative/postoperative complications, port-site hernias, chronic groin pain, or recurrence with mean follow-up of 20 months. Conclusions: Multiply recurrent inguinal hernias after failed conventional anterior and laparoscopic repairs can be treated safely and efficiently with SIL-IPOM. PMID:25392643

  3. Prospective analysis of ventral hernia repair using the Ventralight™ ST hernia patch.

    PubMed

    Tollens, Tim; Topal, Halit; Ovaere, Sander; Beunis, Anthony; Vermeiren, Koen; Aelvoet, Chris

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the current prospective study was to show the results of a new type of medium-weight monofilament polypropylene mesh covered with a hydrogel barrier on the visceral side. Between July 2011 and April 2013 prospectively collected data on 30 consecutive patients who underwent abdominal wall hernia repair using a medium-weight mesh covered with carboxymethylcellulose-sodiumhyaluronate coating (Ventralight™ ST mesh, Davol Inc, Subsidary of C. R. Bard, Inc. Warwick, RI) were analyzed. Out of these patients, those who had a follow-up of at least 12 months were selected. Short- and long-term outcomes were described. Meanwhile, registration continues up to completion of a series with 100 included patients. A total of 17 patients were selected (men/women ratio 11/6). Median follow-up was 12 months (range 12-21). Mean hernia diameter was 7 cm x 5 cm (craniocaudal x laterolateral) (range 1.5 x 1.5 to 20 x 15). Mean length of hospital stay was 6.1 days. Postoperative Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) at last follow-up was significantly lower than the preoperative VAS (P = 0.017) There were no intraoperative complications. Four patients (23%) developed minor complications. Two patients had mild discomfort, another two patients developed a seroma. No recurrences were observed. This intermediate study shows good results using a biofilm coated mesh and confirm the positive results obtained in the Sasse clinical trial.

  4. Diagnosis of a Strangulated Laparoscopic Incisional Hernia with Point-of-Care Ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Argintaru, Niran; Al-Den, Ahmed; Chenkin, Jordan

    2015-01-01

    The use of point-of-care ultrasound for the diagnosis of bowel obstructions and hernias is becoming increasingly common in the emergency department (ED). Using a relatively rare case of an incisional port hernia, we demonstrate the ultrasound findings of a strangulated hernia causing a partial small bowel obstruction. A 46-year-old female presented four days following a laparoscopic surgery complaining of abdominal pain, nausea and lack of bowel movements. There was a palpable mass in the left lower quadrant under the 12mm trocar port incision. ED point-of-care ultrasound revealed herniated akinetic loops of bowel through her laparoscopy incision. This is the first case report to describe the use of point-of-care ultrasound for the diagnosis of a strangulated incisional port hernia at the bedside. PMID:25987928

  5. Iatrogenic diaphragmatic hernia following laparoscopic left colectomy for splenic flexure cancer An unusual complication.

    PubMed

    Dell'Abate, Paolo; Bertocchi, Elisa; Dalla Valle, Raffaele; Viani, Lorenzo; Del Rio, Paolo; Sianesi, Mario

    2016-11-03

    Iatrogenic diaphragmatic hernia following laparoscopic left colectomy for splenic flexure cancer. An unusual complication Diaphragmatic hernias are a migration of abdominal structures into the thorax via a diaphragmatic defect; they may be classified as congenital or acquired and acquired hernias can be hiatal, traumatic or iatrogenic, generally complications of thoracic or abdominal surgery. We report a case of iatrogenic diaphragmatic hernia after a laparoscopic left colectomy for splenic flexure tumor; to our knowledge, in literature this case is the first reported. A 51-years-old woman was readmitted to our Hospital on 11th post-operative day for bowel occlusion and a CT - scan revealed left diaphragmatic herniation with fluid dilatation of the small bowel that appeared in the left hemithorax. Laparoscopic surgery resolution was decided and after the reduction of the small bowel in the abdomen we closed the defect using two direct absorbable auto-block hemi-continuous sutures that were covered by a synthetic absorbable mesh. Probably we didn't notice a minimal injury of the left diaphragm caused by ultrasonic scalpel and we can suppose that this delay in presentation may be a result of the gradual enlargement of a microscopic lesion. Patient's gas exchanges were good during surgery and during post-operative course.

  6. Laparoscopic Reduction and Closure of an Internal Hernia Secondary to Gynecologic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kawarai Lefor, Alan

    2017-01-01

    Internal hernia is a rare cause of bowel obstruction which often requires emergent surgery. In general, the preoperative diagnosis of internal hernia is difficult. The pelvic cavity has various spaces with the potential to result in a hernia, especially in females. In this report, we describe a patient with an internal hernia secondary to previous gynecologic surgery. A 49-year-old woman presented with acute abdominal pain and a history of previous right oophorectomy for a benign ovarian cyst. Computed tomography scan of the abdomen showed obstruction with strangulation and emergent laparoscopic exploration was performed. Intraoperatively, there was an incarcerated internal hernia in the pelvis, located in the vesicouterine pouch, which was reduced. The orifice of the hernia was a 2 cm defect caused by adhesions between the uterus and bladder. The defect was closed with a continuous suture. The herniated bowel was viable, and the operation was completed without intestinal resection. She was discharged four days after surgery without complications. Laparoscopy is useful to diagnose bowel obstruction in selected patients and may also be used for definitive therapy. It is important to understand pelvic anatomy and consider an internal hernia of the pelvic cavity in females, in the differential diagnosis of bowel obstruction, especially those with a history of gynecological surgery.

  7. Efficacy of Transversus Abdominis Plane Block and Rectus Sheath Block in Laparoscopic Inguinal Hernia Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Takebayashi, Katsushi; Matsumura, Masakata; Kawai, Yasuhiro; Hoashi, Takahiko; Katsura, Nagato; Fukuda, Seijun; Shimizu, Kenji; Inada, Takuji; Sato, Masugi

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to assess the efficacy of transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block and rectus sheath (RS) block in patients undergoing laparoscopic inguinal hernia surgery. Few studies have addressed the efficacy and safety associated with TAP block and RS block for laparoscopic surgery. Thirty-two patients underwent laparoscopic inguinal hernia surgery, either with TAP and RS block (Block+ group, n = 18) or without peripheral nerve block (Block− group, n = 14). Preoperatively, TAP and RS block were performed through ultrasound guidance. We evaluated postoperative pain control and patient outcomes. The mean postoperative hospital stays were 1.56 days (Block+ group) and 2.07 days (Block− group; range, 1–3 days in both groups; P = 0.0038). A total of 11 patients and 1 patient underwent day surgery in the Block+ and Block− groups, respectively (P = 0.0012). Good postoperative pain control was more commonly observed in the Block+ group than in the Block− group (P = 0.011). TAP and RS block was effective in reducing postoperative pain and was associated with a fast recovery in patients undergoing laparoscopic inguinal hernia surgery. PMID:25875548

  8. Trocar site hernia after laparoscopic colectomy: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Pamela, Delmonaco; Roberto, Cirocchi; Francesco, La Mura; Umberto, Morelli; Carla, Migliaccio; Vincenzo, Napolitano; Stefano, Trastulli; Eriberto, Farinella; Daniele, Giuliani; Angelo, Desol; Diego, Milani; Micol Sole, Di Patrizi; Alessandro, Spizzirri; Maurizio, Bravetti; Vito, Sciannameo; Nicola, Avenia; Francesco, Sciannameo

    2011-01-01

    Background. Trocar Site Hernia (TSH) is defined as an incisional hernia which occurs after minimally invasive surgery on the trocar incision site.In 2004 Tonouchi classified trocar site hernias into 3 types: Early onset type; Late onset type; Special type. Case Report. We report the case of a 76-year old woman that underwent an emergency explorative laparotomy on the 10th p.o. day after a laparoscopic left hemicolectomy. Surgery showed a small bowel herniation through the 12 mm trocar incision site; the intestinal loop appeared necrotic and had to be resected, and the hernia orifice was repaired. We carried out a review of literature about this topic. Discussion. The clinical onset of a trocar site hernia is usually early, occurring within the 30th post operative day and it is caused by the omentum or small bowel entrapment into the trocar orifice. The clinical presentation is insidious, with progression to an acute abdomen, and an emergency surgical approach is often required. Conclusions. TSH is a severe complication of operative laparoscopy especially with large-bore trocar ports. The incidence of TSH resulting from our review ranges from 0.007% to 22% with an average of 1.85%. Prevention of TSH appears to be more effective when trocar insertion through the abdominal wall is tangential, the closure of both the fascia and the peritoneum is performed if the incision is greater than 7 mm, the suture of extra umbilical port site is performed under laparoscopic vision.

  9. Laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal approach for recurrent inguinal hernia: A randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Saber, Aly; Hokkam, Emad N.; Ellabban, Goda M.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The repair of the recurrent hernia is a daunting task because of already weakened tissues and distorted anatomy. Open posterior preperitoneal approach gives results far superior to those of the anterior approach. Laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) inguinal hernia repair is an evolving technique associated with advantages of a minimally invasive approach. The present work aimed at comparing these three approaches for repair of recurrent inguinal hernia regarding complications and early recurrence. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 180 patients were divided randomly into three equal groups: A, B, and C. Group A patients were subjected to open posterior preperitoneal approach , those of group B were subjected to transinguinal anterior tension-free repair and group C patients were subjected to TAPP. The primary end point was recurrence and the secondary end points were time off from work, postoperative pain, scrotal swelling, and wound infections. RESULTS: The mean hospital stay, the mean time to return to work and the mean time off from work were less in group C then A and B. Chronic postoperative pain was observed in eight patients in group A (13.33%), in 18 patients in group B (30%) and six patients in group C (10%). The overall complication rate was 19.7% in both groups A and C and 34.36% in group B. CONCLUSION: In recurrent inguinal hernia, the laparoscopic and open posterior approaches are equally effective in term of operative outcome. The open preperitoneal hernia repair is inexpensive, has a low recurrence rate. Postoperative recovery is short and postoperative pain is minimal. This approach gives results far superior to those of the commonly used anterior approach. However, while laparoscopic hernia repair requires a lengthy learning curve and is difficult to learn and perform, it has advantages of less post-operative pain, early recovery with minimal hospital stay, low post-operative complications and recurrence. Trial

  10. Complications and recurrences associated with laparoscopic repair of groin hernias. A multi-institutional retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Tetik, C; Arregui, M E; Dulucq, J L; Fitzgibbons, R J; Franklin, M E; McKernan, J B; Rosin, R D; Schultz, L S; Toy, F K

    1994-11-01

    Although the laparoscopic technique is a new approach to groin hernia, it is becoming more widely accepted as an alternative to traditional open techniques. This study is a preliminary review of complications and recurrences. A questionnaire specific for complications was sent to each investigator. From 12/89 to 4/93, 1,514 hernias were repaired; 119 (7.8%) were bilateral and 192 (12.7%) recurrent. There were 860 indirect, 560 direct, 43 pantaloon, 37 femoral, and 6 obturator hernias, and 8 were not specified; 553 were repaired using a transabdominal preperitoneal mesh technique (TAPP), 457 with a total extraperitoneal technique (TEP), 320 with intraperitoneal onlay mesh (IPOM), 102 by ring closure, and 82 involved plug and patch technique. Eighteen intraoperative and 188 postoperative complications were seen. The total complication rate was 13.6%, of which 1.2% were intraoperative. Of the intraoperative complications, 12 were related to the laparoscopic technique, three were related to the hernia repair, and one was related to anesthesia. The rate of conversion to open was 0.8%. Of the postoperative complications, there were 95 local, 25 neurologic, 23 testicular, 23 urinary, 10 mesh, and 12 miscellaneous. There were 34 recurrences after the 1,514 hernia repairs (2.2%). The follow-up was reported in 825 patients for an average of 13 months. The recurrence rate varied drastically with the technique: A 22% recurrence rate after the plug and patch vs 3%, 2.2%, 0.7%, and 0.4% with the ring closure, IPOM, TAPP, and TEP, respectively. Laparoscopic repair of groin hernia can be safely performed. Complications, mostly minor, diminish with experience. The recurrence rate is less with large mesh which is anchored.

  11. Totally laparoscopic gastrectomy for early gastric cancer accompanied by huge hiatal hernia: A case report.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Chie; Yajima, Kazuhito; Iwasaki, Yoshiaki; Oohinata, Ryouki; Yuu, Ken; Ishiyama, Satoshi; Amaki, Misato; Nakano, Daisuke; Yamaguchi, Tatsuro; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Keiichi

    2016-02-01

    We herein present a case in which we used a totally laparoscopic approach for early gastric cancer accompanied by a huge hiatal hernia. An 80-year-old Japanese woman was referred with a chief complaint of dysphagia. A clinical diagnosis of early gastric cancer, T1b (SM) N0M0, stage IA, accompanied by hiatal hernia, was made. Distal gastrectomy with D1 plus lymphadenectomy was carried out. After the gastrectomy, the hernial sac was excised and the hernial orifice was closed. Reconstruction using the Roux-en-Y method was selected. The postoperative course was uneventful and she was discharged on postoperative day 10.

  12. Unusual cause of pneumomediastinum in a laparoscopic extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Tze Yeong; Lau, Cheryl Chien-Li

    2014-01-01

    Pneumomediastinum is an extremely rare complication after laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair. Very few cases have been reported in the surgical literature to date and most reports indicate pneumoperitoneum from the transabdominal preperitoneal approach as a causative factor. This case report describes a patient in whom an elective total extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repair was complicated by a pneumomediastinum without concomitant pneumoperitoneum, and identifies the tracking of air along the anterior extraperitoneal space and endothoracic fascia as a cause. Previous case reports were reviewed and possible etiologies are discussed. PMID:25348336

  13. Infection of laparoscopically inserted inguinal hernia repair mesh following subsequent emergency open surgery: a report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Panagiotopoulou, IG; Richardson, C; Gurunathan-Mani, S; Lagattolla, NRF

    2012-01-01

    We present two cases of laparoscopically inserted mesh for inguinal hernia repair that became infected following emergency open bowel surgery. We believe that there is an increased risk of infection due to the larger size of mesh used in the laparoscopic repair but also due to the patient not volunteering the information because of the minimally invasive nature of the procedure. PMID:22524902

  14. LAPAROSCOPIC GASTROPEXY FOR CORRECTION OF A HIATAL HERNIA IN A NORTHERN ELEPHANT SEAL (MIROUNGA ANGUSTIROSTRIS).

    PubMed

    Greene, Rebecca; Van Bonn, William G; Dennison, Sophie E; Greig, Denise J; Gulland, Frances M D

    2015-06-01

    A female northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris) weaned pup presented with malnutrition. During rehabilitation, the seal developed regurgitation and reduced lung sounds on auscultation. Radiographs and endoscopy performed under sedation suggested a diaphragmatic hernia. A Type I (or sliding) hiatal hernia was confirmed with a positive contrast upper gastrointestinal study, revealing varying degrees of herniation of the gastric fundus through the diaphragm into the caudal thorax as well as esophageal reflux. The animal was treated preoperatively with an H2 antagonist and antinausea medication. A laparoscopic gastropexy was performed under general anesthesia. The animal recovered well postoperatively and resolution of clinical signs was achieved. The animal was released back into the wild 21 kg above admit weight. To our knowledge, we report here the first surgical correction of a hiatal hernia in a marine mammal.

  15. Ventral hernia--darning with prolene: a cost-effective management.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sasanka Sekhar; Majumdar, B K; Sarkar, Arindam; Bose, Sandip

    2009-10-01

    Fifty-three cases of ventral hernia admitted between 15th July, 1993 and 31st December, 2001 in the IPGME&R, Kolkata is being presented with analysis of causes, method of repair and complications. The study was intended to find a simple, universal cost-effective repair of the deformity. Most cases can be repaired with a method of closure consisting of plication of the inner layer and 2 to 3 layered darning in the outer layer with '0' prolene. The main factor appears to be a tensionless closure and avoidance of postoperative infection and stress like cough and constipation. While in the west, use of prolene mesh has become a routine, the authors feel that darning is not only less expensive but reduces the amount of foreign body introduced.

  16. Incarceration of Meckel's diverticulum through a ventral incisional defect: a rare presentation of Littre's hernia.

    PubMed

    Salemis, N S

    2009-08-01

    Meckel's diverticulum is the most common congenital abnormality of the gastrointestinal tract and is the result of the incomplete obliteration of the omphalomesenteric duct. Herniation of Meckel's diverticulum is called Littre's hernia and is a rare occurrence. Herein is described an extremely rare case of incarcerated and strangulated Meckel's diverticulum through an incisional ventral defect in a 59-year-old female patient, who presented with manifestations of acute surgical abdomen. At emergency laparotomy, a strangulated small-bowel loop containing a Meckel's diverticulum was found, which had migrated through the subcutaneous tissues to the right iliac fossa, where a painful mass was palpated on admission. Segmental resection of the ischemic ileum was performed and the abdomen was closed without the use of a prosthetic mesh. Histopathological findings were suggestive of a true diverticulum containing heterotopic gastric mucosa.

  17. Laparoscopic treatment of Bochdalek hernia without the use of a mesh.

    PubMed

    Brusciano, L; Izzo, G; Maffettone, V; Rossetti, G; Renzi, A; Napolitano, V; Russo, G; Del Genio, A

    2003-09-01

    Bochdalek hernia is a rare pathology. The preoperative diagnosis is difficult, and few reports are available regarding its treatment. Herein we report the case of a 25-year-old woman referred for symptoms of dyspepsia, dysphagia, and thoracic pain exacerbated by pregnancy. Preoperative radiography, EGD, and CT scan revealed a paraesophageal hiatal hernia. Laparoscopic exploration showed the complete thoracic migration of the stomach through a left posterolateral diaphragmatic foramen. The diagnosis of a Bochdalek hernia was then made. The diaphragmatic defect was repaired without inserting a prosthesis, using five separate non-reabsorbable stitches (Rieder technique). The procedure was completed with a Nissen-Rossetti fundoplication. The duration of the procedure was 150 min. Hospital stay was 12 days. There were no complications. Postoperative Gastrografin radiography of the esophagus and stomach showed a normal-shaped fundoplication and confirmed the subdiaphragmatic location of the stomach. We conclude that the laparoscopic approach represents the gold standard for the diagnosis and treatment of Bochdalek hernia and any associated complications.

  18. Evaluation of conventional laparoscopic versus robot-assisted laparoscopic redo hiatal hernia and antireflux surgery: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Tolboom, Robert C; Draaisma, Werner A; Broeders, Ivo A M J

    2016-03-01

    Surgery for refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and hiatal hernia leads to recurrence or persisting dysphagia in a minority of patients. Redo antireflux surgery in GERD and hiatal hernia is known for higher morbidity and mortality. This study aims to evaluate conventional versus robot-assisted laparoscopic redo antireflux surgery, with the objective to detect possible advantages for the robot-assisted approach. A single institute cohort of 75 patients who underwent either conventional laparoscopic or robot-assisted laparoscopic redo surgery for recurrent GERD or severe dysphagia between 2008 and 2013 were included in the study. Baseline characteristics, symptoms, medical history, procedural data, hospital stay, complications and outcome were prospectively gathered. The main indications for redo surgery were dysphagia, pyrosis or a combination of both in combination with a proven anatomic abnormality. The mean time to redo surgery was 1.9 and 2.0 years after primary surgery for the conventional and robot-assisted groups, respectively. The number of conversions was lower in the robot-assisted group compared to conventional laparoscopy (1/45 vs. 5/30, p = 0.035) despite a higher proportion of patients with previous surgery by laparotomy (9/45 vs. 1/30, p = 0.038). Median hospital stay was reduced by 1 day (3 vs. 4, p = 0.042). There were no differences in mortality, complications or outcome. Robotic support, when available, can be regarded beneficial in redo surgery for GERD and hiatal hernia. Results of this observational study suggest technical feasibility for minimal-invasive robot-assisted redo surgery after open primary antireflux surgery, a reduced number of conversions and shorter hospital stay.

  19. Early endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography after laparoscopic cholecystectomy can strain the occurrence of trocar site hernia

    PubMed Central

    Sumer, Fatih; Kayaalp, Cuneyt; Yagci, Mehmet Ali; Otan, Emrah; Kocaaslan, Huseyin

    2014-01-01

    This study reports a 69-year-old, obese, female patient presenting with a biliary leakage after laparoscopic cholecystectomy for cholelithiasis. Closure of the umbilical trocar site had been neglected during the laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Early, on postoperative day five, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) requirement after laparoscopic cholecystectomy resolved the biliary leakage problem but resulted with a more complicated clinical picture with an intestinal obstruction and severe abdominal pain. Computed tomography revealed a strangulated hernia from the umbilical trocar site. Increased abdominal pressure during ERCP had strained the weak umbilical trocar site. Emergency surgical intervention through the umbilicus revealed an ischemic small bowel segment which was treated with resection and anastomosis. This report demonstrates that negligence of trocar site closure can result in very early herniation, particularly if an endoscopic intervention is required in the early postoperative period. PMID:25400872

  20. Early endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography after laparoscopic cholecystectomy can strain the occurrence of trocar site hernia.

    PubMed

    Sumer, Fatih; Kayaalp, Cuneyt; Yagci, Mehmet Ali; Otan, Emrah; Kocaaslan, Huseyin

    2014-11-16

    This study reports a 69-year-old, obese, female patient presenting with a biliary leakage after laparoscopic cholecystectomy for cholelithiasis. Closure of the umbilical trocar site had been neglected during the laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Early, on postoperative day five, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) requirement after laparoscopic cholecystectomy resolved the biliary leakage problem but resulted with a more complicated clinical picture with an intestinal obstruction and severe abdominal pain. Computed tomography revealed a strangulated hernia from the umbilical trocar site. Increased abdominal pressure during ERCP had strained the weak umbilical trocar site. Emergency surgical intervention through the umbilicus revealed an ischemic small bowel segment which was treated with resection and anastomosis. This report demonstrates that negligence of trocar site closure can result in very early herniation, particularly if an endoscopic intervention is required in the early postoperative period.

  1. Transabdominal preperitoneal laparoscopic approach for incarcerated inguinal hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shuo; Zhang, Guangyong; Jin, Cuihong; Cao, Jinxin; Zhu, Yilin; Shen, Yingmo; Wang, Minggang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the efficacy, key technical points, and complication management of the transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) approach for incarcerated inguinal hernia repair. Seventy-three patients with incarcerated inguinal hernias underwent TAPP surgery in our department between Jan 2010 and Dec 2015. A retrospective review was performed by analyzing the perioperative data from these patients. The operation was successfully completed in all 73 patients. Operation time was 54.0 ± 18.8 minutes (range, 35–100 minutes). Length of stay was 3.9 ± 1.1 days (range, 3–9 days). There was 1 case of incisional infection, 32 cases of seroma, and 3 cases of postoperative pain during follow-up. All patients recovered after the appropriate treatment. No recurrence or fistula was observed. The TAPP approach represents a safe and effective technique for incarcerated inguinal hernia repair because of its potential in assessment of hernia content and decreasing incisional infection rate. However, it requires experienced surgeons to ensure safety with special attention paid to the key technical points as well as complication management. PMID:28033260

  2. Comparison of the outcomes between laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal repair and prolene hernia system for inguinal hernia; review of one surgeon's experience

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon Young; Han, Sun Wook; Bae, Sang Ho; Kim, Sung Yong; Hur, Kyung Yul

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To compare the outcomes between laparoscopic total extraperitoneal (TEP) repair and prolene hernia system (PHS) repair for inguinal hernia. Methods A retrospective analysis of 237 patients scheduled for laparoscopic TEP or PHS repair of groin hernia from 2005 to 2009 was performed. Results The mean age was 52.3 years in TEP group and 55.7 years in PHS group. Of 119 TEP cases, 98 were indirect inguinal hernia, 15 direct type, 5 femoral hernia and 1 complex hernia; Of 118 PHS cases, 100 indirect, 18 direct type. All in TEP group were performed under general anesthesia and 64% of PHS group were performed under spinal or epidural anesthesia. Preoperatively, 10 cases of recurrent inguinal hernia were involved in our study (4 in TEP, 6 in PHS group). The mean operative time was similar in both groups (74.8 in TEP, 71.2 in PHS group), however mean hospital stay (1.6 days in TEP, 3.2 days in PHS group, P = 0.018) and mean usage of analgesics (0.54 times in TEP, 2.03 times in PHS group, P < 0.01), complications (36 cases in TEP, 6 cases in PHS group, P < 0.01) showed statistical differences. There is only 1 case of postoperative recurrence inguinal hernia in PHS group but it has no statistical significance (P = 0.314). Conclusion Compared to PHS repair, laparoscopic TEP repair has some advantages; shorter hospital stay, less frequent need of analgesics; as well as more postoperative complications such as hematoma, seroma, scrotal swelling. PMID:22324045

  3. Extrusion properties of porcine intestines and surrogate materials for ventral hernia modelling.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Mathew; Winter, Des C; Simms, Ciaran K

    2013-02-01

    A physical model of the abdomen can be a clean and cheap surrogate environment to assess new and existing closure solutions for post-laparoscopic wound closure, but a particular challenge is finding a surrogate material to replicate intestines which may protrude through a hernia. The literature shows no focus on this topic, and this paper therefore presents an investigation of the extrusion properties of fresh porcine intestines compared to a number of potential surrogate materials: silicone, edible gelatine, dough and reconstituted powdered potatoes (RPP). An extrusion rig was developed to simulate the mechanical environment of a post-operative hernia formation. Displacement controlled extrusion tests were performed, and the force-extrusion relationships at different extrusion velocities were compared for the intestines and the surrogate materials. The intestines showed a peak extrusion force ranging from 9 N to 14.8 N when pushed through a 13 mm hole, and similar extrusion properties between cleaned and uncleaned fresh porcine intestines were observed. The tests on surrogate materials showed that the surface tension properties of silicone gel resulted in high friction, that edible gelatine extruded like a liquid and that dough is very stiff, rendering all three materials unsuitable for use as surrogates. However, the RPP mix showed very similar force-extrusion properties compared to both the cleaned and uncleaned intestines. Viscoelastic testing (7.5 mm/min, 15 mm/min and 30 mm/min) showed little rate dependency in the extrusion properties for either the porcine intestines or the RPP. Despite the complexity of intestinal tissue and the obvious physical differences between intestine and RPP, it was found that there is no statistical difference between the yield strength of intestines and RPP (P values ranged between 0.14 and 0.3) at the rates tested.

  4. Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair in children using the percutaneous internal ring suturing technique – own experience

    PubMed Central

    Patkowski, Dariusz

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Percutaneous internal ring suturing (PIRS) is a method of laparoscopic herniorrhaphy, i.e. percutaneous closure of the internal inguinal ring under the control of a telescope placed in the umbilicus. Aim To evaluate the usefulness of the PIRS technique. Material and methods Fifty-five children (39 girls and 16 boys) underwent surgery using this method in our institution between 2008 and 2010. Results In 10 cases the presence of an open inguinal canal on the opposite side was also noted during surgery, and umbilical hernia was recognized in 2 patients. In 5 cases it was necessary to convert to the open surgery because of the inability to continue the laparoscopic procedure. In 1 case, male pseudohermaphroditism was diagnosed during surgery. Recurrent inguinal hernia required a conventional method of surgery in 1 child. Other children did not exhibit the characteristics of hernia recurrence. The inguinal canals were followed up with postoperative ultrasound examination in 29 children. In 23 children, the ultrasound examination showed no dilatation of the inguinal canal. In the other 6 children dilatation of the inguinal canal or the presence of fluid within the inguinal canal was observed during ultrasound. In 6 children symptoms such as swelling and soreness around the inguinal canal developed within 3 to 6 months after surgery. Conclusions Inguinal hernia surgery using the PIRS procedure is an alternative, effective, minimally invasive method of surgery. Visualization of the peritoneal cavity allows for detection of other abnormalities, as well as for performing other procedures during the same session (such as closing the contralateral inguinal canal or umbilical hernia surgery). PMID:24729810

  5. Laparoscopic management of foramen of Winslow incarcerated hernia.

    PubMed

    Daher, Ronald; Montana, Laura; Abdullah, Jarrah; d'Alessandro, Antonio; Chouillard, Elie

    2016-12-01

    Foramen of Winslow hernia (FWH) is a rare and often overlooked diagnosis with a high mortality rate. Widespread availability of cross-sectional imaging allows early diagnosis and prompt management. In this setting, before ischemia occurs, explorative laparoscopy would be the most suitable approach. Experience, however, remains sparse, and technical difficulties may be encountered. This is the case of a 38-year-old Caucasian woman who presented to the emergency department for a sudden epigastric pain. Physical exam was unremarkable, and routine blood tests were within normal range. An abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan confirmed the diagnosis of ileocaecal herniation through the foramen of Winslow. Under urgent laparoscopy, the caecum appeared viable but incarcerated in the lesser sac. Caecal puncture was the key to achieving atraumatic reduction of the hernia and bowel salvage.

  6. Single port laparoscopic repair of paediatric inguinal hernias: Our experience at a secondary care centre

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ameet; Ramakrishnan, T S

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Congenital inguinal hernias are a common paediatric surgical problem and herniotomy through a groin incision is the gold standard. Over the last 2 decades minimally invasive surgery (MIS) has challenged this conventional surgery. Over a period, MIS techniques have evolved to making it more minimally invasive – from 3 to 2 and now single port technique. All studies using single port technique are from tertiary care centres. We used a modification of the technique described by Ozgediz et al. and reviewed the clinical outcome of this novel procedure and put forth our experience at a secondary level hospital. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Prospective review of 37 hernias in 31 children (29 male and 2 female) (8 months - 13 years) performed laparoscopically by a single surgeon at a single centre between September 2007 and June 2010. Under laparoscopic guidance, the internal ring was encircled extraperitoneally using a 2-0 non-absorbable suture and knotted extraperitoneally. Data analyzed included operating time, ease of procedure, occult patent processus vaginalis (PPV), complications, and cosmesis. RESULTS: Sixteen right (52%), 14 left (45%) and 1 bilateral hernia (3%) were repaired. Five unilateral hernias (16.66%), all left, had a contralateral PPV that was repaired (P = 0.033). Mean operative time for a unilateral and bilateral repair were 13.20 (8–25) and 20.66 min (17 -27 min) respectively. Only one of the repairs (2.7%) recurred and another had a post operative hydrocoele (2.7%). One case (2.7%) needed an additional port placement due to inability to reduce the contents of hernia completely. There were no stitch abscess/granulomas, obvious spermatic cord injuries, testicular atrophy, or nerve injuries. CONCLUSION: Single port laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair can be safely done in the paediatric population. It permits extension of benefits of minimal access surgery to patients being managed at secondary level hospitals with limited resources. The

  7. A new technique for minimally invasive abdominal wall reconstruction of complex incisional hernias: totally laparoscopic component separation and incisional hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Moazzez, Ashkan; Mason, Rodney J; Katkhouda, Namir

    2010-10-01

    Since Ramirez et al. presented the first case of component separation for abdominal wall hernias in 1990, it has undergone multiple modifications. This technique, which has been mainly used for large hernias where primary closure of the abdominal wall is not feasible, or for staged management of patients with open abdomens, results in multiple wound complications. In 2007, Rosen et al. reported on the laparoscopic approach to component separation that is associated with less subcutaneous dissection and the consequent advantage of a decreased risk of flap necrosis and wound infection. Here we discuss our totally laparoscopic approach to abdominal wall reconstruction. A minimally invasive abdominal wall reconstruction consists of a bilateral component separation, an intra-abdominal adhesiolysis, primary approximation of rectus muscles, and placement of an intraperitoneal mesh for reinforcing the repair, all performed laparoscopically. Patient-selection criteria, detailed operative technique, tips in preventing and managing the potential pitfalls, and postoperative care are discussed.

  8. National Outcomes for Open Ventral Hernia Repair Techniques in Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ross, Samuel W; Oommen, Bindhu; Huntington, Ciara; Walters, Amanda L; Lincourt, Amy E; Kercher, Kent W; Augenstein, Vedra A; Heniford, B Todd

    2015-08-01

    Modern adjuncts to complex, open ventral hernia repair often include component separation (CS) and/or panniculectomy (PAN). This study examines nationwide data to determine how these techniques impact postoperative complications. The National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database was queried from 2005 to 2013 for inpatient, elective open ventral hernia repairs (OVHR). Cases were grouped by the need for and type of concomitant advancement flaps: OVHR alone (OVHRA), OVHR with CS, OVHR with panniculectomy (PAN), or both CS and PAN (BOTH). Multivariate regression to control for confounding factors was conducted. There were 58,845 OVHR: 51,494 OVHRA, 5,357 CS, 1,617 PAN, and 377 BOTH. Wound complications (OVHRA 8.2%, CS 12.8%, PAN 14.4%, BOTH 17.5%), general complications (15.2%, 24.9%, 25.2%, 31.6%), and major complications (6.9%, 11.4%, 7.2%, 13.5%) were different between groups (P < 0.0001). There was no difference in mortality. Multivariate regression showed CS had higher odds of wound [odds ratio (OR) 1.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.5-2.0], general (OR 1.5, 95% CI: 1.3-1.8), and major complications (OR 2.1, 95%, CI: 1.8-2.4), and longer length of stay by 2.3 days. PAN had higher odds of wound (OR 1.5, 95%, CI: 1.3-1.8) and general complications (OR 1.7, 95%CI: 1.5-2.0). Both CS and PAN had higher odds of wound (OR 2.2, 95%, CI: 1.5-3.2), general (OR 2.5, 95%, CI: 1.8-3.4), and major complications (OR 2.2, 95%CI: 1.4-3.4), and two days longer length of stay. In conclusion, patients undergoing OVHR that require CS or PAN have a higher independent risk of complications, which increases when the procedures are combined.

  9. Laparoscopic management of mesh erosion into small bowel and urinary bladder following total extra-peritoneal repair of inguinal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Sandeep; Praneeth, Kokkula; Rathore, Yashwant; Waran, Vignesh; Singh, Prabhjot

    2016-01-01

    Mesh erosion into visceral organs is a rare complication following laparoscopic mesh repair for inguinal hernia with only 15 cases reported in English literature. We report the first case of complete laparoscopic management of mesh erosion into small bowel and urinary bladder. A 62-year-male underwent laparoscopic total extra-peritoneal repair of left inguinal hernia at another centre in April 2012. He presented to our centre 21 months later with persistent lower urinary tract infection (UTI). On evaluation mesh erosion into bowel and urinary bladder was suspected. At laparoscopy, a small bowel loop was adhered to the area of inflammation in the left lower abdomen. After adhesiolysis, mesh was seen to be eroding into small bowel. The entire infected mesh was pulled out from the pre-peritoneal space and urinary bladder wall using gentle traction. The involved small bowel segment was resected, and bowel continuity restored using endoscopic linear cutter. The resected bowel along with the mesh was extracted in a plastic bag. Intra-operative test for leak from urinary bladder was found to be negative. The patient recovered uneventfully and is doing well at 12 months follow-up with resolution of UTI. Laparoscopic approach to mesh erosion is feasible as the plane of mesh placement during laparoscopic hernia repair is closer to peritoneum than during open hernia repair. PMID:26917927

  10. Previous appendicitis may affect peritoneal overlap of the mesh in laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Vecchio, R; Di Martino, M; Lipari, G; Sambataro, L

    2002-02-01

    Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair is now increasingly performed in bilateral and recurrent groin hernias. The avoidance of direct exposure of the commonly used meshes to the abdominal viscera is considered essential to reduce the risk of bowel adhesions. We report a case of bilateral inguinal hernia repair in a patients who had had an appendectomy performed 8 years earlier for a perforated appendicitis. Probably as a result of previous inflammation, any attempt to dissect the preperitoneal layer in the right side resulted in peritoneal lacerations. Since the peritoneum could not be used to cover the mesh, we decided to position an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE) mesh to avoid postoperative adhesions. The mesh was fixed with tacks to the symphysis pubis, Cooper's ligament, the ilio-pubic tract, and the transversalis fascia 2 cm above the hernia defect. This case suggests that in patient with previous appendicitis, a difficult preperitoneal dissection can be expected. In such cases, especially in young patients for whom future surgical operations cannot be excluded, any attempt to reduce adhesions is justified. At the present time, the use of e-PTFE meshes, which induce no tissue reaction, is a good option in this situation.

  11. Current status of laparoscopic and robotic ventral mesh rectopexy for external and internal rectal prolapse

    PubMed Central

    van Iersel, Jan J; Paulides, Tim J C; Verheijen, Paul M; Lumley, John W; Broeders, Ivo A M J; Consten, Esther C J

    2016-01-01

    External and internal rectal prolapse with their affiliated rectocele and enterocele, are associated with debilitating symptoms such as obstructed defecation, pelvic pain and faecal incontinence. Since perineal procedures are associated with a higher recurrence rate, an abdominal approach is commonly preferred. Despite the description of greater than three hundred different procedures, thus far no clear superiority of one surgical technique has been demonstrated. Ventral mesh rectopexy (VMR) is a relatively new and promising technique to correct rectal prolapse. In contrast to the abdominal procedures of past decades, VMR avoids posterolateral rectal mobilisation and thereby minimizes the risk of postoperative constipation. Because of a perceived acceptable recurrence rate, good functional results and low mesh-related morbidity in the short to medium term, VMR has been popularized in the past decade. Laparoscopic or robotic-assisted VMR is now being progressively performed internationally and several articles and guidelines propose the procedure as the treatment of choice for rectal prolapse. In this article, an outline of the current status of laparoscopic and robotic ventral mesh rectopexy for the treatment of internal and external rectal prolapse is presented. PMID:27275090

  12. Reconstruction of an infected recurrent ventral hernia after a mesh repair using a pedicled tensor fascia lata flap: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Hayami, Shinya; Hotta, Tsukasa; Takifuji, Katsunari; Iwahashi, Makoto; Mitani, Yasuyuki; Yamaue, Hiroki

    2009-01-01

    Recently, the use of prosthetic mesh has revolutionized the repair of ventral hernias. However, the occurrence of infection related with the use of this prosthesis remains an important complication, which may result in occurrence of fistula formation of the skin or intestine, sepsis, or reoccurrence of ventral hernia. This report presents two cases where a pedicled musculocutaneous flap using the tensor fascia lata (pedicled TFL flap) was effective as a treatment for an infectious large abdominal hernia, and reviews the previous literature. Two Japanese men aged 61 and 78 years old underwent a ventral hernia repair using Composix Kugel mesh. They both developed a wound infection with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Conservative therapy was not successful and the defect in the abdominal wall of two patients measured 12 x 21 cm and 7 x 10 cm in length, respectively. Reoperations were performed by removing the infectious mesh and then reconstructing the abdominal wall with the bilateral and left-side pedicled TFL flaps, respectively. No recurrence of the ventral hernia has been recognized for 50 months and 7 months after reoperation, respectively. A review of previous studies showed that no patients treated with a pedicled TFL flap experienced a recurrent hernia. Therefore, the pedicled TFL flap was considered to be effective for infectious large abdominal recurrent hernia.

  13. Laparoscopic Repair of a Diaphragmatic Hernia Associated with Radiofrequency Ablation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Lessons from a Case and the Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Ryohei; Tokumura, Hiromi; Furihata, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    We describe the case of a patient with a diaphragmatic hernia associated with radiofrequency ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma who was successfully treated by laparoscopic surgery. A 62-year-old man with a long history of hepatitis C-induced liver cirrhosis was admitted to our institution because of recurrent postprandial periumbilical pain. Eight years earlier, he had undergone radiofrequency ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma at hepatic segment VIII. Computed tomography, gastrografin enema examination revealed transverse colon obstruction because of a diaphragmatic hernia. We diagnosed diaphragmatic hernia associated with the prior radiofrequency ablation treatment. The patient underwent laparoscopic repair of the diaphragmatic hernia. Though the patient experienced the recurrence once, relaparoscopic treatment has improved the patient's conditions. Thus, diaphragmatic hernia can develop as a complication of radiofrequency ablation treatment. A laparoscopic approach is safe, feasible, and minimally invasive, even in patients with cirrhosis who develop iatrogenic diaphragmatic hernia as a complication of radiofrequency ablation treatment. PMID:25058770

  14. Laparoscopic repair of a diaphragmatic hernia associated with radiofrequency ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma: lessons from a case and the review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Ryohei; Tokumura, Hiromi; Furihata, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    We describe the case of a patient with a diaphragmatic hernia associated with radiofrequency ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma who was successfully treated by laparoscopic surgery. A 62-year-old man with a long history of hepatitis C-induced liver cirrhosis was admitted to our institution because of recurrent postprandial periumbilical pain. Eight years earlier, he had undergone radiofrequency ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma at hepatic segment VIII. Computed tomography, gastrografin enema examination revealed transverse colon obstruction because of a diaphragmatic hernia. We diagnosed diaphragmatic hernia associated with the prior radiofrequency ablation treatment. The patient underwent laparoscopic repair of the diaphragmatic hernia. Though the patient experienced the recurrence once, relaparoscopic treatment has improved the patient's conditions. Thus, diaphragmatic hernia can develop as a complication of radiofrequency ablation treatment. A laparoscopic approach is safe, feasible, and minimally invasive, even in patients with cirrhosis who develop iatrogenic diaphragmatic hernia as a complication of radiofrequency ablation treatment.

  15. Elastic bandaging facilitates primary closure of large ventral hernias due to giant omphaloceles.

    PubMed

    Sander, S; Eliçevik, M; Unal, M

    2001-11-01

    Large ventral hernias (VH) following conservative treatment of a giant omphalocele are a major challenge for pediatric surgeons. Although primary closure is accepted as the ideal procedure, these defects often require multi-staged operations, prosthetic support, and postoperative mechanical ventilation. Between 1990 and 2000, 34 patients with omphaloceles were admitted to our unit and 6 of them (17.6%) who had giant omphaloceles were treated conservatively. In the same period, a 5-year-old girl was admitted with a huge VH following application of subcutaneous tissue expanders in another center. In these 7 patients (6 girls, 1 boy, average age 20 months) we used preoperative elastic bandaging for facilitating primary closure. In all cases primary closure was successful following 3 to 6 weeks of bandaging. We did not use prosthetic material or postoperative mechanical ventilation in any case. Follow-up periods ranged from 2 to 10 years, and there were no recurrences or other problems. Out limited experience reveals that preoperative elastic bandaging is a safe and effective procedure for facilitating primary closure of the large VHs.

  16. Comparison between laparoscopic paraesophageal hernia repair with sleeve gastrectomy and paraesophageal hernia repair alone in morbidly obese patients.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Aziz M; Cook, Michael W; Srinivasan, Jahnavi; Davis, S Scott; Sweeney, John F; Lin, Edward

    2009-07-01

    Treatment options for morbidly obese patients with complications from large paraesophageal hernias (PEH) are limited. Simple repair of the PEH has a high recurrence rate and may be associated with poor gastric function. We compared a series of patients who underwent repair of large PEH plus gastrostomy tube gastropexy (PEH-GT) with PEH plus sleeve gastrectomy (PEH-SG). Retrospective review of patients undergoing PEH-SG and patients with PEH-GT was performed. We assessed symptoms of delayed gastric emptying and reflux postoperatively. In selected patients, gastric-emptying studies and upper gastrointestinal contrast studies were also obtained. All patients with large PEH were repaired laparoscopically with sac resection, primary crural closure using pledgeted sutures, and biologic patch onlay. SG for patients undergoing concomitant weight loss surgery (PEH-SG) was performed with linear endoscopic staplers and staple line reinforcement. Patients undergoing PEH repair alone had a gastrostomy tube gastropexy (PEH-GT). Patients had intraoperative endoscopic evaluation and postoperative contrast swallow studies. In a 12-month period, five patients underwent laparoscopic PEH-SG; two of five had previous antireflux surgery and one of five with a previous diagnosis of delayed gastric emptying. Postoperatively, two patients undergoing PEH-SG had readmission for dehydration and odynophagia. Six-month follow-up body mass index was 32 kg/m2 for the PEH-SG group with no hernia recurrence and complete resolution of gastroesophageal reflux disorder symptoms. Six patients underwent PEH-GT, one for acute incarceration and anemia and four with previous antireflux surgery. Follow up at 8 months demonstrated one recurrence, four of six had severe delayed gastric emptying and reflux, three of six had additional hospitalization for poor oral intake, and three of six underwent reoperation for delayed gastric emptying. There were no perforations, leaks, or deaths in either group. Combined

  17. A laparoscopic intraperitoneal onlay mesh technique for the repair of an indirect inguinal hernia.

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgibbons, R J; Salerno, G M; Filipi, C J; Hunter, W J; Watson, P

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study was done (1) to determine whether congenital indirect inguinal hernias in male pigs could be repaired by placing a polypropylene mesh prosthesis over the defect intra-abdominally, (2) to measure the incidence of adhesions between intra-abdominal viscera and the prosthesis with and without the adhesion barrier oxidized regenerated cellulose, (3) to determine the incidence of other complications, and (4) to assess the effect on fertility. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Several techniques for laparoscopic inguinal herniorrhaphy are currently being evaluated to determine whether there are advantages over conventional inguinal herniorrhaphy. Perhaps the most controversial is the intraperitoneal onlay mesh procedure (IPOM). Its advantage is its simplicity (in that the repair is accomplished by placing a prosthesis over the hernia defect intra-abdominally, avoiding a groin dissection). Its disadvantage is the potential for complications because the prosthesis is in contact with the intra-abdominal viscera. METHODS: In male pigs, polypropylene mesh alone or polypropylene mesh plus the adhesion barrier oxidized regenerated cellulose (composite prosthesis) was fixed to the peritoneum surrounding the hernia defect. In phase 1 (6-week follow-up), two groups of 13 pigs each underwent herniorrhaphy at laparotomy or laparoscopy. In phase 2 (7.1-month follow-up), 21 pigs underwent laparoscopic herniorrhaphy. RESULTS: All IPOM herniorrhaphies were successful. The prostheses adhered most frequently to the bladder, followed by small bowel, peritoneum, and cord structures. Prosthetic erosion into these organs was not observed. Laparoscopically placed prostheses in phases 1 and 2 had significantly less surface covered by adhesions (13% +/- 13% and 19% +/- 27%, respectively) and a lower adhesion tenacity grade (1.5 +/- 0.9 and 1.3 +/- 1.1, respectively) than those placed at laparotomy (44% +/- 27% and 2.5 +/- 0.7, respectively; p < 0.01). In phase 1, a histologic

  18. Pneumothorax as a complication of laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Ferzli, G S; Kiel, T; Hurwitz, J B; Davidson, P; Piperno, B; Fiorillo, M A; Hayek, N E; Riina, L L; Sayad, P

    1997-02-01

    Pneumothorax was identified as a complication of endoscopic hernia repair in two patients with insufflation pressures of 15 mmHg and operating times exceeding 2 h. These patients also showed intraoperative perturbations in both oxygen saturation and end-tidal CO2 production. A prospective study was undertaken to determine whether similar complications would arise if preperitoneal insufflation pressures were limited to 10 mmHg. Postoperative chest x-rays were obtained on all patients to check for pneumothoraces, even clinically occult ones. Fifty patients were studied, with average operating times of 67 min. No patient demonstrated any hemodynamic or ventilatory changes, and none had any evidence of pneumothorax on x-ray. We conclude that these complications were not present when insufflation pressure was maintained at 10 mmHg and that routine x-ray is not warranted. Larger randomized trials of insufflation pressures are needed.

  19. Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair in the Armed Forces: A 5-year single centre study

    PubMed Central

    Jakhmola, C.K.; Kumar, Ameet

    2015-01-01

    Background Surgery for inguinal hernia continues to evolve. The most recent development in the field of surgery for inguinal hernia is the emergence of laparoscopic inguinal hernia surgery (LIHS) which is challenging the gold standard Lichtenstein's tension free mesh repair. Our centre has the largest series of LIHS from any Armed Forces hospital. The aim of this study was to analyze the short and long term outcomes at our center since its inception. Methods Retrospective review of prospectively maintained data base of 501 LIHS done in 434 patients by a single surgeon between April 2008 and October 2013. Preoperative, intraoperative, postoperative and follow-up data was analyzed with emphasis on the recurrence rates and the incidence of inguinodynia. Results 402 (92.6%) patients had primary hernias and 367 (84.6%) patients had unilateral hernias. Of the 501 repairs, 453 (90.4 %) were done totally extraperitoneal approach and 48 (9.6 %) were done by the transabdominal preperitoneal approach. The mean operative time for unilateral and bilateral repairs was 40.9 ± 11.2 and 76.2 ± 15.0 minutes, respectively. The conversion rate to open surgery was 0.6%. The intraoperative, and early and late postoperative complication rates were 1.7%, 6.2% and 3%, respectively. The incidence of chronic groin pain was 0.7% and the recurrence rate was 1.6%. The median hospital stay was 1 day (1–5 days). Conclusion We, in this series of over 500 repairs have demonstrated that feasibility as well as safety of LIHS at our centre with good short and long term outcomes. PMID:26663957

  20. Complete transection of the urethra and corpora cavernosa: a complication after laparoscopic repair (TEP) of an inguinal hernia.

    PubMed

    Rehme, C; Rübben, H; Heß, J

    2016-06-01

    Complete transection of both corpora cavernosa and the urethra is a very rare condition in urology. We report the case of a 59-year-old man with complete transection of the corpora cavernosa and the urethra during a laparoscopic repair of a recurrent inguinal hernia.

  1. Laparoscopically assisted repair of an acute traumatic diaphragmatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    Safdar, G; Slater, R; Garner, J P

    2013-01-01

    A 60-year-old man with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and a heavy smoker and drinker presented to the emergency department with left-sided thoracoabdominal pain after falling down the stairs. Initial clinical findings were left-sided chest tenderness with no clinical evidence of subcutaneous emphysema. Twenty-four hours later the patient's respiratory distress increased—repeat chest X-ray showed a left gastrothorax indicative of a ruptured left hemi diaphragm. Diagnostic laparoscopy in the supine position via an umbilical port confirmed the presence of the stomach, spleen and splenic flexure of the colon in the left chest. Laparoscopic reduction of the stomach and colon was performed, but a small upper midline incision was required to reduce the spleen without injury. The diaphragmatic tear was repaired by direct open suture. The patient required a brief period of postoperative ventilation via a tracheostomy. The patient remained well at a 3-month follow-up visit. PMID:23813999

  2. Gasless laparoscopic surgery plus abdominal wall lifting for giant hiatal hernia-our single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiang-Hong; Wu, Ji-Xiang; Yu, Lei; Li, Jian-Ye

    2016-12-01

    Giant hiatal hernia (GHH) comprises 5% of hiatal hernia and is associated with significant complications. The traditional operative procedure, no matter transthoracic or transabdomen repair of giant hiatal hernia, is characteristic of more invasion and more complications. Although laparoscopic repair as a minimally invasive surgery is accepted, a part of patients can not tolerate pneumoperitoneum because of combination with cardiopulmonary diseases or severe posterior mediastinal and neck emphesema during operation. The aim of this article was to analyze our experience in gasless laparoscopic repair with abdominal wall lifting to treat the giant hiatal hernia. We performed a retrospective review of patients undergoing gasless laparoscopic repair of GHH with abdominal wall lifting from 2012 to 2015 at our institution. The GHH was defined as greater than one-third of the stomach in the chest. Gasless laparoscopic repair of GHH with abdominal wall lifting was attempted in 27 patients. Mean age was 67 years. The results showed that there were no conversions to open surgery and no intraoperative deaths. The mean duration of operation was 100 min (range: 90-130 min). One-side pleura was injured in 4 cases (14.8%). The mean postoperative length of stay was 4 days (range: 3-7 days). Median follow- up was 26 months (range: 6-38 months). Transient dysphagia for solid food occurred in three patients (11.1%), and this symptom disappeared within three months. There was one patient with recurrent hiatal hernia who was reoperated on. Two patients still complained of heartburn three months after surgery. Neither reoperation nor endoscopic treatment due to signs of postoperative esophageal stenosis was required in any patient. Totally, satisfactory outcome was reported in 88.9% patients. It was concluded that the gasless laparoscopic approach with abdominal wall lifting to the repair of GHH is feasible, safe, and effective for the patients who cannot tolerate the pneumoperitoneum.

  3. The regionalization of ventral hernia repair: occurrence and outcomes over a decade.

    PubMed

    Colavita, Paul D; Walters, Amanda L; Tsirline, Victor B; Belyansky, Igor; Lincourt, Amy E; Kercher, Kent W; Sing, Ronald F; Heniford, B Todd

    2013-07-01

    Ventral hernia repairs (VHRs) have always been considered standard general surgery cases. Recently, there has been a call for "Centers of Excellence." We sought to investigate outcomes and trends between high- and low-volume centers. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) data were analyzed from 1998-1999 (T1) and 2008-2009 (T2) for all VHRs. Hospitals were stratified into high-, medium-, and low-volume centers (HVC/MVC/LVC). Demographics, comorbidities, and outcomes were compared. Surgical cases totaled 22,771 in T1 and 37,044 in T2. In T1, 34.3 per cent were performed in HVC versus 64.2 per cent in T2 (P < 0.0001). LVC cases decreased between eras: 32.6 versus 16.1 per cent (P < 0.0001). Comorbidities and emergent admissions increased with time (P < 0.0001). Mortality was similar in both eras and between volume centers. Length of stay was less in LVC in T2 only (4.2 vs 4.8 days, P < 0.0001). Total charges were higher in HVCs in both eras (P < 0.0001). These remained significant in T2 in multivariate regression (MVR). Hospital volume was not associated with most complications or death in either era with MVR. Charlson comorbidity score, age, and emergent admission were predictors of complications and death. Regionalization has occurred for VHRs. However, most complication and mortality rates are unrelated to volume and are linked to comorbidities, age, and emergencies.

  4. Cardiac complications after laparoscopic large hiatal hernia repair. Is it related with staple fixation of the mesh? -Report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Maria del Carmen; Diaz, María; López, Fernando; Martí-Obiol, Roberto; Ortega, J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Laparoscopic Nissen operation with mesh reinforcement remains being the most popular operation for large hiatal hernia repair. Complications related to mesh placement have been widely described. Cardiac complications are rare, but have a fatal outcome if they are misdiagnosed. Presentation of cases We sought to outline our institutional experience of three patients who developed cardiac complications following a laparoscopic Nissen operation for large hiatal hernia repair. Discussion Laparoscopic hiatoplasty and Nissen fundoplication are safe and effective procedures for the hiatal hernia repair, but they are not exempt from complications. Fixation technique and material used must be taken into account. We have conducted a review of the literature on complications related to these procedures. Conclusion In the differential diagnosis of hemodynamic instability after laparoscopic hiatal hernia repair, cardiac tamponade and other cardiac complications should be considered. PMID:26635954

  5. Ultrasonic energy device versus monopolar energy device in laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Shimpei; Kaneoka, Yuji; Maeda, Atsuyuki; Takayama, Yuichi; Fukami, Yasuyuki; Onoe, Shunsuke

    2017-03-01

    Laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) is gaining popularity as an approach to repairing of inguinal hernia. In many institutions, a disposable ultrasonic energy device is used in the TAPP repair procedure. However, the benefit and necessity of an ultrasonic device are unclear. We have switched to use of a reusable monopolar energy device, and we conducted a retrospective study comparing the surgical results obtained with each of the energy devices. Our study group comprised 241 adults who underwent TAPP repair for inguinal hernia between November 2012 and December 2014. We compared clinical characteristics, and surgical outcomes between patients in whom a disposable ultrasonic energy device was used (n = 116, U group) and those in whom a reusable monopolar energy device (n = 125, M group) was used. There was no statistically significant difference between the 2 groups in age, sex, body mass index, or hernia type. In cases of unilateral hernia, operation time was significantly longer in the U group than in the M group (71.4 vs. 59.4 min, respectively, p < 0.001). No significant difference was found in intraoperative blood loss (2.3 vs 3.9 ml, p = 0.329), postoperative morbidity (5.2 vs 4.0%, p = 0.663), or postoperative hospital stay (2.1 vs 2.2 days, p = 0.336). Our experience and increased competence with the monopolar energy device lead us to conclude that the ultrasonic energy device is unnecessary for simple TAPP repair.

  6. Total extraperitoneal laparoscopic hernia repair: a modified technique associated with few complications and a low early recurrence rate.

    PubMed

    Kakkis, J L; Brunicardi, F C

    1996-10-01

    Laparoscopic hernia repairs have been demonstrated to be safe and effective, with less postoperative pain and earlier return to work than with open repairs. Modifications of the laparoscopic technique are evolving that attempt to reduce the overall complication rate while maintaining an effective repair. From January 1994 through July 1995, 67 inguinal hernias on 40 patients were repaired using the total extraperitoneal approach at UCLA Medical Center. Of the 67 hernias, four (6%) were pantaloon, 16 (24%) were indirect, and the remainder (70%) were direct. Three patients of 40 (7.5%) had complications that included seromas (two patients) and urinary retention (one patient). The early recurrence rate is zero, with a mean follow-up period of 6 months. The average time taken off from work was 2 days, with a range of zero to 10 days. Total extraperitoneal laparoscopic hernia repair is a modified technique associated with low early recurrence and few complications. In addition, earlier return to work results in less patient inconvenience, greater productivity, and reduction in medical disability expenses.

  7. Comparison of the Clinical Outcome and Complications in Laparoscopic Hernia Repair of Inguinal Hernia With Mesh Fixation Using Fibrin Glue vs Tacker.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Prasant; Phalgune, Deepak; Shah, Shashank

    2016-12-01

    Although laparoscopic repair offers a quick and less morbid way of treating hernias, complications like hematoma, seroma, neuralgia, recurrence, mesh infection, hydrocele, etc. are known. The present study was undertaken to compare various clinical outcomes between mesh fixation using fibrin glue and mesh fixation with tacker in a 3-months follow-up. One hundred patients aged 18 to 60 years having inguinal hernia admitted in Poona Hospital and Research Centre, Pune, between October 2012 and November 2014 for laparoscopic hernia surgery and ready to participate in this study were included. All of them underwent laparoscopic repair of hernia by total extra peritoneal (TEP) method following sample surgical protocol in all of them except for method of mesh fixation. Mean time calculated from insertion of the first trocar to beginning of skin suturing was 54.9 min in tacker group and 50.3 min in fibrin glue group with no statistically significant difference between the two. The incidence of urinary retention was significantly higher in tacker (34 %) as compared to fibrin glue (12 %) group. Incidence of hematoma was significantly higher in tacker group in 15-day follow-up, but there was no significant difference in hematoma formation at hernial sites in both groups after 15 days of follow-up. The incidence of neuralgia was significantly higher in the tacker group (24 %) compared with the fibrin glue group (2 %). Significantly, more number of people in the fibrin glue group 68 and 90 %, respectively, returned to work during 15 and 30 days follow-up as compared to the tacker group 46 and 64 %. Fibrin glue can be considered as an alternative to tacker for mesh fixation.

  8. Laparoscopic management of a strangulated internal hernia underneath the left external iliac artery☆

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Karl-Andreas; Wexels, Jan Cyril

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Internal herniation of a small bowel behind pelvic vessels is a rare complication seen after pelvic lymphadenectomy. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 56-year-old woman was operated due to a gynecological cancer. 4 years thereafter she presented with a 2 days history of abdominal pain and vomiting. Clinical and radiological findings indicated a small bowel obstruction. A loop of small bowel had herniated behind the left external iliac artery. Using laparoscopic technique the herniated bowel was reduced. Due to limited peritoneum around the area and skeletonized vessel, we decided not to do any repair of the hernia orifice. The postoperative recovery was uneventful, bowel activity returned to normal and she was discharged the next day. Follow-up was done at 1 month and the latest at 10 months. She didn’t experience pain or discomfort after the operation. DISCUSSION Due to limited peritoneum around the skeletonized vessel, we decided to leave the hernia orifice unrepaired. We found it hazardous to do any direct suture of the orifice or use a free peritoneal graft to repair the defect as the fibrosis and inflammatory process might have compromised the artery or the vein. A longer follow-up of the patient is needed to clearly conclude if this simple procedure has been sufficient. We agreed that if the patient would experience any sign of recurrence and need another operation we would close the defect at that time. CONCLUSION 4 years after pelvic lymphadenectomy a small bowel herniation behind an external iliac artery occurred. The patient was successfully treated with reduction of the small bowel using laparoscopic technique. A quick recovery with minimal discomfort and no sign of recurrence after 10 months made our approach an acceptable surgical option. PMID:24121051

  9. Laparoscopic Repair and Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy to Treat Giant Esophageal Hiatal Hernia with Gastric Obstruction: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Hamai, Yoichi; Hihara, Jun; Tanabe, Kazuaki; Furukawa, Takaoki; Yamakita, Ichiko; Ibuki, Yuta; Okada, Morihito

    2015-06-01

    We describe a 74-year-old man with repeated aspiration pneumonia who developed gastric obstruction due to giant esophageal hiatal hernia (EHH). We repaired the giant EHH by laparoscopic surgery and subsequently anchored the stomach to the abdominal wall by percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) using gastrofiberscopy. Thereafter, the patient resumed oral intake and was discharged on postoperative day 21. At two years after these procedures, the patient has adequate oral intake and lives at home. Because this condition occurs more frequently in the elderly with comorbidities, laparoscopic surgery contributes to minimally invasive treatment. Furthermore, the procedure combined with concurrent gastropexy via PEG is useful for treating patients who have difficulty swallowing and for preventing recurrent hernia.

  10. The laparoscopic hiatoplasty with antireflux surgery is a safe and effective procedure to repair giant hiatal hernia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although minimally invasive repair of giant hiatal hernias is a very surgical challenge which requires advanced laparoscopic learning curve, several reports showed that is a safe and effective procedure, with lower morbidity than open approach. In the present study we show the outcomes of 13 patients who underwent a laparoscopic repair of giant hiatal hernia. Methods A total of 13 patients underwent laparoscopic posterior hiatoplasty and Nissen fundoplication. Follow-up evaluation was done clinically at intervals of 3, 6 and 12 months after surgery using the Gastro-oesophageal Reflux Health-Related Quality of Life scale, a barium swallow study, an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, an oesophageal manometry, a combined ambulatory 24-h multichannel impedance pH and bilirubin monitoring. Anatomic recurrence was defined as any evidence of gastric herniation above the diaphragmatic edge. Results There were no intraoperative complications and no conversions to open technique. Symptomatic GORD-HQL outcomes demonstrated a statistical significant decrease of mean value equal to 3.2 compare to 37.4 of preoperative assessment (p < 0.0001). Combined 24-h multichannel impedance pH and bilirubin monitoring after 12 months did not show any evidence of pathological acid or non acid reflux. Conclusion All patients were satisfied of procedure and no hernia recurrence was recorded in the study group, treated respecting several crucial surgical principles, e.g., complete sac excision, appropriate crural closure, also with direct hiatal defect where possible, and routine use of antireflux procedure. PMID:24401085

  11. "Wrap technique": a new operative procedure using a self-adhesive prosthesis for laparoscopic ventral rectopexy.

    PubMed

    Gravié, J-F; Maigné, C

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe and assess a new method of fixation using a self-adhesive prosthesis (Adhesix(™)) in laparoscopic ventral rectopexy (LVR). The technical principles are based on a very low dissection and the adhesive properties of the prosthesis which can be applied to the rectum without stitches or staples. The prosthesis is made from polypropylene coated with a synthetic hydrogel. The binding of the prosthesis to rectum and vagina takes place in a wet environment after a few minutes and enables the shaping of the mesh on the surface of the rectum (wrap effect). Between March 2010 and March 2013, 41 patients were operated on using LVR with a self-adhesive prosthesis. The effectiveness of prosthesis fixation was evaluated in a subset of 27 patients suffering from complete rectal prolapse. With a median follow-up of 30 months, there were no major complications and no recurrence. In this initial experience, LVR with a self-adhesive prosthesis does not increase the risk of recurrence. No undesirable effects were associated with the prosthesis.

  12. Impact of concomitant laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and hiatal hernia repair on gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in morbidly obese patients

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Harshit; Vigneshwaran, Balasubiramaniyan; Aggarwal, Sandeep; Ahuja, Vineet

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to analyse the impact of hiatal hernia repair (HHR) on gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in morbidly obese patients with hiatus hernia undergoing laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG). MATERIALS AND METHODS: It is a retrospective study involving ten morbidly obese patients with large hiatus hernia diagnosed on pre-operative endoscopy who underwent LSG and simultaneous HHR. The patients were assessed for symptoms of GERD using a Severity symptom score (SS) questionnaire and anti-reflux medications. RESULTS: Of the ten patients, five patients had GERD preoperatively. At the mean follow-up of 11.70 ± 6.07 months after surgery, four patients (80%) showed complete resolution while one patient complained of persistence of symptoms. Endoscopy in this patient revealed resolution of esophagitis indicating that the persistent symptoms were not attributable to reflux. The other five patients without GERD remained free of any symptom attributable to GERD. Thus, in all ten patients, repair of hiatal hernia (HH) during LSG led to either resolution of GERD or prevented any new onset symptom related to GER. CONCLUSION: In morbidly obese patients with HH with or without GERD undergoing LSG, repair of the hiatus hernia helps in amelioration of GERD and prevents any new onset GER. Thus, the presence of HH should not be considered as a contraindication for LSG. PMID:28281472

  13. Comparative efficacy of Prolene and Prolene-Vicryl composite mesh for experimental ventral hernia repair in dogs.

    PubMed

    Anjum, H; Bokhari, S G; Khan, M A; Awais, M; Mughal, Z U; Shahzad, H K; Ijaz, F; Siddiqui, M I; Khan, I U; Chaudhry, A S; Akhtar, R; Aslam, S; Akbar, H; Asif, M; Maan, M K; Khan, M A; Noor, A; Khan, W A; Ullah, A; Hayat, M A

    2016-01-01

    In this study, efficacy of two hernia mesh implants viz. conventional Prolene and a novel Prolene-Vicryl composite mesh was assessed for experimental ventral hernia repair in dogs. Twelve healthy mongrel dogs were selected and randomly divided into three groups, A, Band C (n=4). In all groups, an experimental laparotomy was performed; thereafter, the posterior rectus sheath and peritoneum were sutured together, while, a 5 × 5 cm defect was created in the rectus muscle belly and anterior rectus sheath. For sublay hernioplasty, the hernia mesh (Prolene: group A; Prolene-Vicryl composite mesh: group B), was implanted over the posterior rectus sheath. In group C (control), mesh was not implanted; instead the laparotomy incision was closed after a herniorrhaphy. Post-operative pain, mesh shrinkage and adhesion formation were assessed as short term complications. Post-operatively, pain at surgical site was significantly less (P<0.001) in group B (composite mesh); mesh shrinkage was also significantly less in group B (21.42%, P<0.05) than in group A (Prolene mesh shrinkage: 58.18%). Group B (composite mesh) also depicted less than 25% adhesions (Mean ± SE: 0.75 ± 0.50 scores, P≤0.013) when assessed on the basis of a Quantitative Modified Diamond scale; a Qualitative Adhesion Tenacity scale also depicted either no adhesions (n=2), or, only flimsy adhesions (n=2) in group B (composite mesh), in contrast to group A (Prolene), which manifested greater adhesion formation and presence of dense adhesions requiring blunt dissection. Conclusively, the Prolene-Vicryl composite mesh proved superior to the Prolene mesh regarding lesser mesh contraction, fewer adhesions and no short-term follow-up complications.

  14. Self-gripping mesh versus fibrin glue fixation in laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair: a randomized prospective clinical trial in young and elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Bindi, Marco; Rivelli, Matteo; Solej, Mario; Enrico, Stefano; Martino, Valter

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal inguinal hernia repair is a safe and effective technique. In this study we tested the hypothesis that self-gripping mesh used with the laparoscopic approach is comparable to polypropylene mesh in terms of perioperative complications, against a lower overall cost of the procedure. We carried out a prospective randomized trial comparing a group of 30 patients who underwent laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair with self-gripping mesh versus a group of 30 patients who received polypropylene mesh with fibrin glue fixation. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups with regard to intraoperative variables, early or late intraoperative complications, chronic pain or recurrence. Self-gripping mesh in transabdominal hernia repair was found to be a valid alternative to polypropylene mesh in terms of complications, recurrence and postoperative pain. The cost analysis and comparability of outcomes support the preferential use of self-gripping mesh. PMID:28352842

  15. Use of fibrin glue in preventing pseudorecurrence after laparoscopic total extraperitoneal repair of large indirect inguinal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Sürgit, Önder; Çavuşoğlu, Nadir Turgut; Ünal, Yılmaz; Koşar, Pınar Nergis; İçen, Duygu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Seroma is among the most common complications of laparoscopic total extraperitoneal (TEP) for especially large indirect inguinal hernia, and may be regarded as a recurrence by some patients. A potential area localized behind the mesh and extending from the inguinal cord into the scrotum may be one of the major etiological factors of this complication. Our aim is to describe a novel technique in preventing pseudorecurrence by using fibrin sealant to close that potential dead space. Methods Forty male patients who underwent laparoscopic TEP for indirect inguinal hernia with at least 100-mL volume were included in this prospective clinical study. While fibrin sealant was used to close the potential dead space in the study group, nothing was used in the control group. The volume of postoperative fluid collection on ultrasound was compared between the groups. Results Patient characteristics and the volumes of hernia sac were similar between the 2 groups. The mean volume of postoperative fluid collection was found as 120.2 mL in the control group and 53.7 mL in the study group, indicating a statistical significance (P < 0.001). Conclusion Minimizing the potential dead space with a fibrin sealant can reduce the amount of postoperative fluid collection, namely the incidence of pseudorecurrence. PMID:27617253

  16. Laparoscopic ventral mesh rectopexy for complete rectal prolapse: A retrospective study evaluating outcomes in North Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Abhijit; Kumar, Saket; Maurya, Ajeet Pratap; Gupta, Vishal; Gupta, Vivek; Rahul

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the outcomes of laparoscopic ventral mesh rectopexy in the management of complete rectal prolapse (CRP) in North Indian patients with inherent bulky and redundant colon. METHODS: The study was conducted at a tertiary health care center of North India. Between January 2010 and October 2014, 15 patients who underwent laparoscopic ventral mesh repair for CRP, were evaluated in the present study. Perioperative outcomes, improvement in bowel dysfunction or appearance of new complications were documented from the hospital records maintained prospectively. RESULTS: Fifteen patients (9 female) with a median age of 50 years (range, 15-68) were included in the study. The median operative time was 200 min (range, 180-350 min) and the median post-operative stay was 4 d (range, 3-21 d). No operative mortality occurred. One patient with inadvertent small bowel injury required laparotomy on post-operative day 2. At a median follow-up of 22 mo (range, 4-54 mo), no prolapse recurrence was reported. No mesh-related complication was encountered. Wexner constipation score improved significantly from the preoperative value of 17 (range, 5-24) to 6 (range, 0-23) (P < 0.001) and the fecal incontinence severity index score from 24 (range, 0-53) to 2 (range, 0-53) (P = 0.007). No de novo constipation or fecal incontinence was recorded during the follow-up. On personal conversation, all patients expressed satisfaction with the outcome of their treatment. CONCLUSION: Our experience indicates that laparoscopic ventral mesh rectopexy is an effective surgical option for CRP in North Indian patients having a bulky redundant colon. PMID:27152139

  17. Ultrasound detection of visceral adhesion after intraperitoneal ventral hernia treatment: a comparative study of protected versus unprotected meshes.

    PubMed

    Arnaud, J P; Hennekinne-Mucci, S; Pessaux, P; Tuech, J J; Aube, C

    2003-06-01

    Intraperitoneal (IP) ventral hernia repair has been proposed with the advantages of reducing dissection, operative time, and postoperative pain. The IP position of the mesh is suspected of increasing the risk of visceral adhesion and inducing complications. To overcome these drawbacks, a mesh protected on one side by a hydrophilic resorbable film (Parietex Composite) has been validated. Using a previously described ultrasound procedure, the purpose of this study was to compare the rate of visceral adhesion after intraperitoneal placement of a polyester mesh versus this protected mesh. Fifty-one patients who received a Parietex Composite mesh were prospectively compared to a retrospective series of 22 consecutive asymptomatic patients who received a Mersilene mesh. To objectively assess visceral adhesion toward the abdominal wall, an ultrasound (US) specific examination was firstly validated and secondly used to evaluate the adhesion incidence in both groups. Both groups were equivalent in terms of inclusion criteria and body mass index (BMI). Pre-operative US versus perioperative macroscopical findings determined the following parameters: sensitivity 83%, accuracy 78%, negative predictive value 81%. Using this procedure, 77% of the patients exhibited visceral adhesion to the mesh in the Mersilene group, against 18% in the Parietex Composite group (P<0.001, chi-square). US examination represents a suitable tool to evaluate postoperative adhesions to the abdominal wall. Using this procedure, a significant reduction of visceral adhesion in the Parietex Composite group was shown.

  18. Five-year prospective follow-up of 430 laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repairs in 275 patients

    PubMed Central

    Messenger, DE; Aroori, S; Vipond, MN

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Favourable short-term results, with respect to less postoperative pain and earlier return to physical activity, have been demonstrated with laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal (TEP) hernia repair compared with open mesh repair. However, there is limited data regarding long-term results. PATIENTS AND METHODS The study cohort consisted of 275 consecutive patients undergoing TEP repair between 1996 and 2002. Patient demographics, details of surgery, postoperative complications, recurrence and chronic pain were collected from patient records and from a prospective database. All patients were seen at 6 weeks and then annually for 5 years following surgery. RESULTS A total of 430 repairs were performed in the 275 patients (median age, 56 years; range, 20–94 years; men, 97.5%). Bilateral repair was performed in 168 patients (61.1%) and recurrent hernia repair in 79 patients (28.7%). Two patients were converted to an open procedure. Five-year follow-up was achieved in 72% of patients. Eleven patients (4%) died during the follow-up period due to unrelated causes. Hernia recurrence rate at 5 years was 1.1% per patient (three repairs). Recurrences were noted at 7 months, 2 years and 4 years following surgery. Chronic groin pain was reported by 21 patients (7.6%), seven of whom required referral to the pain team. CONCLUSIONS TEP hernia repair is associated with a recurrence rate of 1% at 5 years in this series. Chronic groin symptoms are also acceptably few. This recurrence rate following TEP repair compares extremely favourably with open mesh repair, particularly as it includes a high proportion of recurrent repairs. As well as the proven early benefits, TEP repair can be considered a safe and durable procedure with excellent long-term results. PMID:20412671

  19. Adhesions after laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair. A comparison of extra versus intra peritoneal placement of a polypropylene mesh in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Attwood, S E; Caldwell, M T; Marks, P; McDermott, M; Stephens, R B

    1994-07-01

    Prosthetic mesh for laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair has become popular but the method of its placement is controversial. Mesh placed within the peritoneum may cause adhesion formation and further complications. The aim of this study was to examine the laparoscopic placement of a mesh, comparing intraperitoneal vs extraperitoneal insertion. In a porcine model (n = 15) a polypropylene mesh was placed laparoscopically over the anterior abdominal wall. On the left side the mesh was stapled on the parietal peritoneum. On the right side the peritoneum was incised, an extraperitoneal space was dissected, the mesh was inserted, and the peritoneum was closed over it. The animals were maintained for 2 weeks. At postmortem there were adhesions in two of those placed extraperitoneally and five of those placed intraperitoneally (P = 0.19, Fisher's exact test). The adhesions comprised fibrous peritoneal bands to loops of small intestine. Both methods of laparoscopic mesh placement were associated with a small but significant incidence of adhesion formation.

  20. Multicenter, Prospective, Longitudinal Study of the Recurrence, Surgical Site Infection, and Quality of Life After Contaminated Ventral Hernia Repair Using Biosynthetic Absorbable Mesh

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Michael J.; Bauer, Joel J.; Harmaty, Marco; Carbonell, Alfredo M.; Cobb, William S.; Matthews, Brent; Goldblatt, Matthew I.; Selzer, Don J.; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Hansson, Bibi M. E.; Rosman, Camiel; Chao, James J.; Jacobsen, Garth R.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate biosynthetic absorbable mesh in single-staged contaminated (Centers for Disease Control class II and III) ventral hernia (CVH) repair over 24 months. Background: CVH has an increased risk of postoperative infection. CVH repair with synthetic or biologic meshes has reported chronic biomaterial infections and high hernia recurrence rates. Methods: Patients with a contaminated or clean-contaminated operative field and a hernia defect at least 9 cm2 had a biosynthetic mesh (open, sublay, retrorectus, or intraperitoneal) repair with fascial closure (n = 104). Endpoints included overall Kaplan-Meier estimates for hernia recurrence and postoperative wound infection rates at 24 months, and the EQ-5D and Short Form 12 Health Survey (SF-12). Analyses were conducted on the intent-to-treat population, and health outcome measures evaluated using paired t tests. Results: Patients had a mean age of 58 years, body mass index of 28 kg/m2, 77% had contaminated wounds, and 84% completed 24-months follow-up. Concomitant procedures included fistula takedown (n = 24) or removal of infected previously placed mesh (n = 29). Hernia recurrence rate was 17% (n = 16). At the time of CVH repair, intraperitoneal placement of the biosynthetic mesh significantly increased the risk of recurrences (P ≤ 0.04). Surgical site infections (19/104) led to higher risk of recurrence (P < 0.01). Mean 24-month EQ-5D (index and visual analogue) and SF-12 physical component and mental scores improved from baseline (P < 0.05). Conclusions: In this prospective longitudinal study, biosynthetic absorbable mesh showed efficacy in terms of long-term recurrence and quality of life for CVH repair patients and offers an alternative to biologic and permanent synthetic meshes in these complex situations. PMID:28009747

  1. Early assessment of bilateral inguinal hernia repair: A comparison between the laparoscopic total extraperitoneal and Stoppa approaches

    PubMed Central

    Utiyama, Edivaldo Massazo; Damous, Sérgio Henrique Bastos; Tanaka, Eduardo Yassushi; Yoo, Jin Hwan; de Miranda, Jocielle Santos; Ushinohama, Adriano Zuardi; Faro, Mario Paulo; Birolini, Claudio Augusto Vianna

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The present clinical trial was designed to compare the results of bilateral inguinal hernia repair between patients who underwent the conventional Stoppa technique and laparoscopic total extraperitoneal repair (LTE) with a single mesh and without staple fixation. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This controlled, randomised clinical trial was conducted at General Surgery and Trauma of the Clinics Hospital, Medical School, the University of São Paulo between September 2010 and February 2011. Totally, 50 male patients, with a bilateral inguinal hernia, older than 25 years were considered eligible for the study. The following parameters were analysed during the early post-operative period: (1) The intensity of surgical trauma, operation time, C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, white blood cell count, bleeding and pain intensity; (2) quality of life assessment; and (3) post-operative complications. RESULTS: LTE procedure was longer than the Stoppa procedure (134.6 min ± 38.3 vs. 90.6 min ± 41.3; P < 0.05). The levels of CRP were higher in the Stoppa group (P < 0.05) but the number of leucocytes, haematocrit, and haemoglobin were similar between the groups (P > 0.05). There was no difference in pain during the 1st and 7th post-operative, physical functioning, physical limitation, the impact of pain on daily activities, and the Carolinas Comfort Scale during the 7th and 15th post-operative (P > 0.05). Complications occurred in 88% of Stoppa group (22 patients) and 64% in LTE group (16 patients) (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: The comparative study between the Stoppa and LTE approaches for the bilateral inguinal hernia repair demonstrated that: (1) The LTE approach showed less surgical trauma despite the longer operation time; (2) Quality of life during the early post-operative period were similar; and (3) Complication rates were higher in the Stoppa group. PMID:27279401

  2. Use of Mesh in Laparoscopic Paraesophageal Hernia Repair: A Meta-Analysis and Risk-Benefit Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gondan, Matthias; Stock, Christian; Linke, Georg R.; Fritz, Franziska; Nickel, Felix; Diener, Markus K.; Gutt, Carsten N.; Wente, Moritz; Büchler, Markus W.; Fischer, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Mesh augmentation seems to reduce recurrences following laparoscopic paraesophageal hernia repair (LPHR). However, there is an uncertain risk of mesh-associated complications. Risk-benefit analysis might solve the dilemma. Materials and Methods A systematic literature search was performed to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and observational clinical studies (OCSs) comparing laparoscopic mesh-augmented hiatoplasty (LMAH) with laparoscopic mesh-free hiatoplasty (LH) with regard to recurrences and complications. Random effects meta-analyses were performed to determine potential benefits of LMAH. All data regarding LMAH were used to estimate risk of mesh-associated complications. Risk-benefit analysis was performed using a Markov Monte Carlo decision-analytic model. Results Meta-analysis of 3 RCTs and 9 OCSs including 915 patients revealed a significantly lower recurrence rate for LMAH compared to LH (pooled proportions, 12.1% vs. 20.5%; odds ratio (OR), 0.55; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.34 to 0.89; p = 0.04). Complication rates were comparable in both groups (pooled proportions, 15.3% vs. 14.2%; OR, 1.02; 95% CI, 0.63 to 1.65; p = 0.94). The systematic review of LMAH data yielded a mesh-associated complication rate of 1.9% (41/2121; 95% CI, 1.3% to 2.5%) for those series reporting at least one mesh-associated complication. The Markov Monte Carlo decision-analytic model revealed a procedure-related mortality rate of 1.6% for LMAH and 1.8% for LH. Conclusions Mesh application should be considered for LPHR because it reduces recurrences at least in the mid-term. Overall procedure-related complications and mortality seem to not be increased despite of potential mesh-associated complications. PMID:26469286

  3. Formation of a chronic pain syndrome due to mesh shrinkage after laparoscopic intraperitoneal onlay mesh (IPOM).

    PubMed

    Klein, Fritz; Ospina, Carlos; Rudolph, Birgit; Wüstefeld, Joost; Denecke, Timm; Neuhaus, Peter; Schmidt, Sven-Christian

    2012-10-01

    The case of a 58-year-old male patient who developed a chronic pain syndrome after laparoscopic intraperitoneal onlay mesh for treatment of a large symptomatic umbilical hernia combined with rectus diastasis is reported. Twelve months after an uncomplicated initial surgery, the patient presented with progressive signs of a foreign body sensation and pain in the anterior abdominal wall. Computed tomography examination revealed no pathologic findings but a marked shrinkage of the mesh implant. Because of further progressive symptoms, explorative laparotomy was performed. Mesh shrinkage and adhesions with a surrounding chronic tissue reaction were found as the cause of the pain syndrome. This case demonstrates a case of a chronic pain syndrome due to mesh shrinkage 12 months after initial ventral hernia repair. Mesh shrinkage should therefore be taken into consideration in patients with progressive pain chronic syndromes after laparoscopic ventral hernia repair.

  4. Hematocele After Laparoscopic Appendectomy

    PubMed Central

    Bhullar, Jasneet Singh; Subhas, Gokulakrishna; Mittal, Vijay K.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Laparoscopic appendectomy is one of the most common laparoscopic surgeries performed. We report an unusual complication of hematocele after laparoscopic appendectomy. Case Description: A 48-y-old male presented with swelling and discomfort in his right scrotum 11 d after he underwent laparoscopic appendectomy for acute appendicitis. Before the surgery, he had no scrotal swelling or inguinal hernia. PMID:23484582

  5. Randomized Prospective Trial on the Occurrence of Laparoscopic Trocar Site Hernias

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-11-12

    The Aim of the Study is to Analyze the Incidence of Trocar Site Hernia (TSH); in Orifices Created by Trocars Measuring ≥10 mm in Diameter,; and to Determine Whether Closure of the External Fascial Layer Prevents; TSH and Potential Related Complications.

  6. [Median incisional hernias and coexisting parastomal hernias : new surgical strategies and an algorithm for simultaneous repair].

    PubMed

    Köhler, G

    2014-08-01

    The co-occurrence of incisional and parastomal hernias (PSH) remains a surgical challenge. Standardized treatment guidelines are missing, and the patients concerned require an individualized surgical approach. The laparoscopic techniques can be performed with incised and/or stoma-lateralizing flat meshes with intraperitoneal onlay placement. The purely laparoscopic and laparoscopic-assisted approaches with 3-D meshes offer advantages regarding the complete coverage of the edges of the stomal areas and the option of equilateral or contralateral stoma relocation in cases of PSH, which are difficult to handle due to scarring, adhesions, and large fascial defects > 5 cm with intestinal hernia sac contents. A relevant stoma prolapse can be relocated by tunnel-like preformed 3-D meshes and shortening the stoma bowel. The positive effect on prolapse prevention arises from the dome of the 3-D mesh, which is directed toward the abdominal cavity and tightly fits to the bowel. In cases of large incisional hernias (> 8-10 cm in width) or young patients with higher physical demands, an open abdominal wall reconstruction in sublay technique is required. Component separation techniques that enable tension-free ventral fascial closure should be preferred to mesh-supported defect bridging methods. The modified posterior component separation with transversus abdominis release (TAR) and the minimally invasive anterior component separation are superior to the original Ramirez technique with respect to wound morbidity. By using 3-D textile implants, which were specially designed for parastomal hernia prevention, the stoma can be brought out through the lateral abdominal wall without increased risk of parastomal hernia or prolapse development. An algorithm for surgical treatment, in consideration of the complexity of combined hernias, is introduced for the first time.

  7. A prospective randomised controlled trial comparing chronic groin pain and quality of life in lightweight versus heavyweight polypropylene mesh in laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Pradeep; Bansal, Virinder Kumar; Misra, Mahesh Chandra; Babu, Divya; Sagar, Rajesh; Krishna, Asuri; Kumar, Subodh; Rewari, Vimi; Subramaniam, Rajeshwari

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of our study was to compare chronic groin pain and quality of life (QOL) after laparoscopic lightweight (LW) and heavyweight (HW) mesh repair for groin hernia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred and forty adult patients with uncomplicated inguinal hernia were randomised into HW mesh group or LW mesh group. Return to activity, chronic groin pain and recurrence rates were assessed. Short form-36 v2 health survey was used for QOL analysis. RESULTS: One hundred and thirty-one completed follow-up of 3 months, 66 in HW mesh group and 65 in LW mesh group. Early post-operative convalescence was better in LW mesh group in terms of early return to walking (P = 0.01) and driving (P = 0.05). The incidence of early post-operative pain, chronic groin pain and QOL and recurrences were comparable. CONCLUSION: Outcomes following laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair using HW and LW mesh are comparable in the short-term as well as long-term. PMID:27073309

  8. Component Separation vs. Bridged Repair for Large Ventral Hernias: A Multi-Institutional Risk-Adjusted Comparison, Systematic Review, and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Askenasy, Eric P.; Greenberg, Jacob A.; Keith, Jerrod N.; Martindale, Robert G.; Roth, J. Scott; Mo, Jiandi; Ko, Tien C.; Kao, Lillian S.; Liang, Mike K.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Repair of large ventral hernia defects is associated with high rates of surgical site occurrences (SSO), including surgical site infection (SSI), site dehiscence, seroma, hematoma, and site necrosis. Two common operative strategies exist: Component separation (CS) with primary fascial closure and mesh reinforcement (PFC-CS) and bridged repair (mesh spanning the hernia defect). We hypothesized that: (1) ventral hernia repair (VHR) of large defects with bridged repair is associated with more SSOs than is PFC, and (2) anterior CS is associated with more SSOs than is endoscopic, perforator-sparing, or posterior CS. Methods: Part I of this study was a review of a multi-center database of patients who underwent VHR of a defect ≥8 cm from 2010–2011 with at least one month of follow-up. The primary outcome was SSO. The secondary outcome was recurrence. Part II of this study was a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies comparing bridged repair with PFC and studies comparing different kinds of CS. Results: A total of 108 patients were followed for a median of 16 months (range 1–50 months), of whom 84 underwent PFC-CS and 24 had bridged repairs. Unadjusted results demonstrated no differences between the groups in SSO or recurrence; however, the study was underpowered for this purpose. On meta-analysis, PFC was associated with a lower risk of SSO (odds ratio [OR] = 0.569; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.34–0.94) and recurrence (OR = 0.138; 95% CI = 0.08–0.23) compared with bridged repair. On multiple-treatments meta-analysis, both endoscopic and perforator-sparing CS were most likely to be the treatments with the lowest risk of SSO and recurrence. Conclusions: Bridged repair was associated with more SSOs than was PFC, and PFC should be used whenever feasible. Endoscopic and perforator-sparing CS were associated with the fewest complications; however, these conclusions are limited by heterogeneity between studies and

  9. A comparative study on trans-umbilical single-port laparoscopic approach versus conventional repair for incarcerated inguinal hernia in children

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Zhang; Juntao, Ge; Shuli, Liu; Li, Long

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to determine whether singleport laparoscopic repair (SLR) for incarcerated inguinal hernia in children is superior toconventional repair (CR) approaches. METHOD: Between March 2013 and September 2013, 126 infants and children treatedwere retrospectively reviewed. All the patients were divided into three groups. Group A (48 patients) underwent trans-umbilical SLR, group B (36 patients) was subjected to trans-umbilical conventional two-port laparoscopic repair (TLR) while the conventional open surgery repair (COR) was performed in group C (42 patients). Data regarding the operating time, bleeding volume, post-operative hydrocele formation, testicular atrophy, cosmetic results, recurrence rate, and duration of hospital stay of the patients were collected. RESULT: All the cases were completed successfully without conversion. The mean operative time for group A was 15 ± 3.9 min and 24 ± 7.2 min for unilateral hernia and bilateral hernia respectively, whereas for group B, it was 13 ± 6.7 min and 23 ± 9.2 min. The mean duration of surgery in group C was 35 ± 5.2 min for unilateral hernia. The recurrence rate was 0% in all the three groups. There were statistically significant differences in theoperating time, bleeding volume, post-operative hydrocele formation, cosmetic results and duration hospital stay between the three groups (P < 0.001). No statistically significant differences between SLR and TLR were observed except the more cosmetic result in SLR. CONCLUSION: SLR is safe and effective, minimally invasive, and is a new technology worth promoting. PMID:27073306

  10. Combined procedures in laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Atul; Chowbey, Pradeep K; Sharma, Anil; Khullar, Rajesh; Soni, Vandana; Baijal, Manish

    2003-12-01

    With advancements in minimal access surgery, combined laparoscopic procedures are now being performed for treating coexisting abdominal pathologies at the same surgery. In our center, we performed 145 combined surgical procedures from January 1999 to December 2002. Of the 145 procedures, 130 were combined laparoscopic/endoscopic procedures and 15 were open procedures combined with endoscopic procedures. The combination included laparoscopic cholecystectomy, various hernia repairs, and gynecological procedures like hysterectomy, salpingectomy, ovarian cystectomy, tubal ligation, urological procedures, fundoplication, splenectomy, hemicolectomy, and cystogastrostomy. In the same period, 40 patients who had undergone laparoscopic cholecystectomy and 40 patients who had undergone ventral hernia repair were randomly selected for comparison of intraoperative outcomes with a combined procedure group. All the combined surgical procedures were performed successfully. The most common procedure was laparoscopic cholecystectomy with another endoscopic procedure in 129 patients. The mean operative time was 100 minutes (range 30-280 minutes). The longest time was taken for the patient who had undergone laparoscopic splenectomy with renal transplant (280 minutes). The mean hospital stay was 3.2 days (range 1-21 days). The pain experienced in the postoperative period measured on the visual analogue scale ranged from 2 to 5 with a mean of 3.1. Of 145 patients who underwent combined surgical procedures, 5 patients developed fever in the immediate postoperative period, 7 patients had port site hematoma, 5 patients developed wound sepsis, and 10 patients had urinary retention. As long as the basic surgical principles and indications for combined procedures are adhered to, more patients with concomitant pathologies can enjoy the benefit of minimal access surgery. Minimal access surgery is feasible and appears to have several advantages in simultaneous management of two different

  11. [Damage to the inguino-femoral nerves in the treatment of hernias. An anatomical hazard of traditional and laparoscopic techniques].

    PubMed

    Chevallier, J M; Wind, P; Lassau, J P

    1996-01-01

    Laparoscopic techniques currently constitute an alternative proposed for the repair of hernias of the inguinofemoral region. Nerve injuries have led some teams to recommend technical principles based on the anatomical relations of these nerves with the subperitoneal fascia transversalis and inguinal fossae. An anatomical study consisting of dissection of nonembalmed cadavres, allowed, after evisceration, dissection of the lumbar plexus and its terminal branches, particularly those supplying the inguinofemoral region: iliohypogastric and ilio-inguinal nerves, the genitofemoral nerve, the femoral nerve and the lateral cutaneous nerve of the thigh. Via transperitoneal laparoscopy, the posterior surface of the anterior abdominal wall is centered on the deep inguinal ring, containing testicular vessels and the vas deferens. This deep inguinal ring receives the genitofemoral nerve. Medially, the anterior parietal peritoneum describes three folds formed by the outline of the epigastric artery, umbilical artery and urachus on the midline. The outline of Hesselbach's ligament separates the deep inguinal ring from Hesselbach's triangle, the zone of weakness of direct inguinal hernia. The iliac psoas muscle pass laterally underneath the inguinal ligament, while the external iliac vessels, subsequently becoming the femoral vessels, are located medially. Pectineal ligament lies on the posterior surface of the femoral ring between the umbilical artery and the epigastric artery. Installation of an abdominal wall prosthesis, either transperitoneally or retroperitoneally, must be centered on the deep inguinal ring, and its solid sutures are located medially to the pectineal ligament and anterior abdominal wall. On the other hand, the nerves at risk of being damaged are situated laterally: the ilio-inguinal and ilio-hypogastric nerves in the plane between external oblique and internal oblique above the anterior superior iliac spine, lateral cutaneous nerve of the thigh under the

  12. Laparoscopic repair of a late-presenting Bochdalek diaphragmatic hernia with acute gastric volvulus

    PubMed Central

    Hadjittofi, Christopher; Matter, Ibrahim; Eyal, Ori; Slijper, Nadav

    2013-01-01

    An otherwise healthy 17-year-old boy presented to the paediatric emergency department with acute severe epigastric pain. An admission abdominal radiograph demonstrated gastric dilation, associated with an elevated left hemidiaphragm. Subsequent barium contrast imaging confirmed the diagnosis of organoaxial acute gastric volvulus (AGV). Emergent exploratory laparoscopy revealed AGV with migration of the stomach, spleen, pancreatic tail, splenic flexure, left kidney and adrenal through a left-sided Bochdalek diaphragmatic hernia. Following careful mobilisation of the displaced structures, a mesh closure of the diaphragmatic defect was performed. The patient's postoperative chest radiograph was unremarkable, and he was discharged on the sixth postoperative day after an uneventful recovery. At 2 months the patient was well and asymptomatic, with normal barium contrast imaging results. PMID:23519514

  13. QUALITY OF LIFE OF IN PATIENTS SUBMITTED TO ANTERIOR ABDOMINAL WALL LAPAROSCOPIC HERNIOPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    ABDALLA, Ricardo Zugaib; GARCIA, Rodrigo Biscuola; SAID, Danniel Frade; ABDALLA, Beatrice Martinez Zugaib

    2014-01-01

    Background The laparoscopic ventral hernia repair technique made possible surgeries with smaller skin incisions and smaller dissection of the soft tissue around the hernia, therefore with a better wound, a quicker postoperative recovery and a lower complication rate. Aim To evaluate the applicability of a quality of life survey based on the molds of the American Hernia Society, European Hernia Society and Carolinas Equation for Quality of Life, through telephone in patients submitted to laparoscopic hernioplasty by IPOM technique. Methods A retrospective cohort study was made to evaluate the quality of life of 21 patients that underwent anterior abdominal wall laparoscopic hernioplasty by intraperitoneal onlay mesh technique. Questionnaire was applied through telephone. Results Of the 21 patients, 19% felt that the hernia recurred. Also 19% passed through another abdominal wall surgery, and among these, 75% was related to the previously hernia correction. Finally, 81% of patients did not undergo any other abdominal wall surgery. Conclusion It was possible to apply the quality of life questionnary by telephone on patients who underwent an anterior abdominal wall. The results, in its turn, were satisfactory and showed that patients, in general, were satisfied with the surgical procedure. PMID:24676295

  14. No Need of Fascia Closure to Reduce Trocar Site Hernia Rate in Laparoscopic Surgery: A Prospective Study of 200 Non-Obese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Singal, Rikki; Zaman, Muzzafar; Mittal, Amit; Singal, Samita; Sandhu, Karamjot; Mittal, Anshu

    2016-01-01

    Background Laparoscopy is widely practiced and offers realistic benefits over conventional surgery. Port closure is important after a laparoscopic procedure to prevent port site incisional hernia. Larger port size and increasing numbers of ports needed to perform more complex laparoscopic procedures are likely to increase the incidence of port site hernias (PSHs). PSHs tend to develop more frequently at umbilical and midline port sites due to the thinness of the umbilical skin and weaknesses in the linea alba. More than 90% of PSHs occur through 10 mm and large ports can occur through 5 mm ports also. The aim was to study the outcomes and complications in laparoscopic surgery without fascial sheath closure of port site. We compared the results with another group in which fascial closure was done by a standard method. Methods This was a prospective study carried out in the Department of Surgery, MMIMSR, Mullana, Ambala, from August 2013 to 2015 in a single unit by a single surgeon. A total of 200 patients were selected randomly for the different laparoscopic procedures. Patients were divided into group A (only skin closure was done without fascia closure) and group B (fascial closure of the port in addition to skin closure). In both groups, we used blunt trocar for the 10 mm port. Skin of the 5 mm port was closed simply. The results in two groups were compared in terms of complications like PSH, bleeding, and wound infection. Results The outcomes in two groups were compared with and without fascia closure of 10 mm trocar port site. Patients operated for lap cholecystectomy were 170 (85%), 10 (5%) for lap appendicectomy, and 20 (10%) for lap hernia. The study compared the results in two groups mainly for PSH formation. The P value was insignificant and Fischer’s exact test result came as 1.00. There were no significant differences between the two groups in terms of PSH, bleeding and infection in non-obese cases. Conclusion In both groups, blunt trocar was

  15. Pneumatic positioning and mesh fixation in laparoscopic ventral/incisional hernia repair. New surgical technique and a new device.

    PubMed

    Darecchio, Antonio; Bocchi, Paolo; Kukleta, Jan F

    2015-01-01

    Oggetto di questa pubblicazione è la descrizione di una nuova tecnica chirurgica per la riparazione videolaparoscopica di laparoceli ed ernie della parete addominale anteriore. Tale tecnica è strettamente dipendente dall’utilizzo di un nuovo strumento pneumatico per il posizionamento della protesi. Attualmente esistono in commercio svariati tipi di protesi intraperitoneali con valide caratteristiche strutturali. Tuttavia lo scoglio concettuale rimane sui metodi e sui mezzi di fissaggio delle protesi. I mezzi meccanici di qualsiasi conformazione per il fatto stesso di essere dei mezzi meccanici (spirali metalliche ancorette e viti) espongono al pericolo di danno iatrogeno le strutture vascolari nervose che possono incontrare nel loro percorso. La nuova tecnica proposta mira alla perfetta distensione delle protesi per utilizzo intraperitoneale ed ai loro ottimale fissaggio con adesivo chirurgico in condizioni di sicurezza per le strutture circostanti. Tale tecnica è stata eseguita su cadavere di suino* con protesi intraperitoneali di poliestere-gel-collageno e cyanoacrylate come adesivo chirurgico ma non è esclusa la fattibilità con altri tipi di colle, di protesi, protesi auto-adesive già esistenti in commercio o che potrebbero essere appositamente prodotte.

  16. Sciatic hernia clinically mimicking obturator hernia, missed by ultrasonography: case report.

    PubMed

    Rather, Shiraz Ahmad; Dar, Tanveer Iqbal; Malik, Aijaz Ahmad; Parray, Fazal Q; Ahmad, Mukhtar; Asrar, Syed

    2011-05-01

    Sciatic hernia is a rare pelvic floor hernia that occurs through the greater or lesser sciatic foramen. Sciatic hernias often present as pelvic pain, particularly in women, and diagnosis can be difficult. Sciatic hernia is one of the rarest forms of internal hernia, which can present as signs and symptoms of small bowel obstruction, swelling in the respective gluteal region or pelvic pain. Transabdominal and transgluteal operative approaches, including laparoscopic repair, have been reported. We present a case of left-sided sciatic hernia with incarcerated small bowel as its contents. The hernia was missed by ultrasonography and plain abdominal radiography, but the clinical features were suggestive of an obturator hernia.

  17. Laparoscopic repair of Morgagni hernia and cholecystectomy in a 40-year-old male with Down's sindrome. Report of a case.

    PubMed

    De Paolis, P; Mazza, L; Maglione, V; Fronda, G R

    2007-06-01

    Morgagni-Larrey hernia (MH) is an unusual diaphragmatic hernia of the retrosternal region. Few cases of MH, treated laparoscopically, associated with Down's syndrome (DS) have been reported in literature. On October 2004, a DS 40-year-old male was admitted to our Department with mild abdominal pain and nausea. Hematochemical tests were within the normal range. Ultrasonography showed biliary sludge and multiple gallstones. Chest X-ray revealed a right-sided paracardiac mass that appeared as MH after a thoraco-abdominal computed tomography (CT). Four trocars were placed as a routinary cholecystectomy. Abdominal exploration confirmed the presence of a voluminous hernia through a wide diaphragmatic defect (12 cm) on the left side of the falciform ligament, containing the last 20 cm ileal loops and right colon with the third lateral of transverse. After retrograde cholecystectomy and reduction of the herniated ileo-colonic tract from multiple adherences, the defect was repaired with an interrupted 2/0 silk suture and then a running 2/0 polypropylene suture. Postoperative course was complicated by pulmonary edema but subsequently the patient was discharged without further complications and has no recurrence after 2 years. In conclusion, surgery is necessary for symptomatic MH and to prevent possible severe complications. We preferred laparoscopy for the reduced morbidity compared to laparotomy, even if in our case the postoperative course was not uneventful. There are still few comparative data about the modality of closure of the defect between primary repair with nonabsorbable suture material, in case of small defects, or continuous monofilament suture or prosthesis in case of large defects.

  18. Acute incarcerated external abdominal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue-Fei

    2014-01-01

    External abdominal hernia occurs when abdominal organs or tissues leave their normal anatomic site and protrude outside the skin through the congenital or acquired weakness, defects or holes on the abdominal wall, including inguinal hernia, umbilical hernia, femoral hernia and so on. Acute incarcerated hernia is a common surgical emergency. With advances in minimally invasive devices and techniques, the diagnosis and treatment have witnessed major changes, such as the use of laparoscopic surgery in some cases to achieve minimally invasive treatment. However, strict adherence to the indications and contraindications is still required. PMID:25489584

  19. An Unusual Trocar Site Hernia after Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Trocar site hernias are rare complications after laparoscopic surgery but most commonly occur at larger trocar sites placed at the umbilicus. With increased utilization of the laparoscopic approach the incidence of trocar site hernia is increasing. We report a case of a trocar site hernia following an otherwise uncomplicated robotic prostatectomy at a 12 mm right lower quadrant port. The vermiform appendix was incarcerated within the trocar site hernia. Subsequent appendectomy and primary repair of the hernia were performed without complication. PMID:27648335

  20. Laparoscopic treatment for inguinal hernia combined with cryptorchidism: Totally extraperitoneal repair with orchiectomy under the same operative view

    PubMed Central

    Fujishima, Hajime; Sasaki, Atsushi; Takeuchi, Yu; Morimoto, Akio; Inomata, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Approximately 7% of child patients with inguinal hernias also present with cryptorchidism. On the other hand, combined adult cases are uncommon. Here we report two adult cases of inguinal hernia combined with intra-canalicular cryptorchidism who underwent totally extraperitoneal (TEP) repair with orchiectomy under the same operative view. Presentation of cases We treated two patients (49- and 38-year-old men) with right indirect inguinal hernias and cryptorchidism. Both patients underwent TEP repair with orchiectomy. In operative findings, an atrophic testis was drawn out with a hernia sac from the internal inguinal ring. After the testis was separated from the sac and cord structure was sheared, it was removed. The procedure did not require special techniques and devices. In both patients, the postoperative courses were satisfactory. Discussion To our knowledge, there has been only one such reported case till date which demonstrated the feasibility of TEP repair accompanied by orchiectomy. Conclusions TEP repair with orchiectomy under the same operative view could be safely performed in adults with an inguinal hernia combined with extra-abdominal cryptorchidism. This procedure could be an option for the treatment of such adult patients. PMID:26581081

  1. Life-threatening Petersen's hernia following open Beger's procedure

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Yan Li; Haworth, Alexander; Wilson, Jeremy; Magee, Conor J.

    2016-01-01

    Petersen's hernia (an internal hernia between the transverse mesocolon and Roux limb following Roux-en-Y reconstruction) is well described following laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery. We describe a Petersen-type hernia in a patient who had undergone complex open upper gastrointestinal surgery for chronic pancreatitis. PMID:26994105

  2. Gallbladder removal - laparoscopic - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Cholecystectomy laparoscopic - discharge; Cholelithiasis - laparoscopic discharge; Biliary calculus - laparoscopic discharge; Gallstones - laparoscopic discharge; Cholecystitis - laparoscopic discharge

  3. Risk of Late-Onset Adhesions and Incisional Hernia Repairs after Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bensley, Rodney P; Schermerhorn, Marc L; Hurks, Rob; Sachs, Teviah; Boyd, Christopher A; O’Malley, A James; Cotterill, Philip; Landon, Bruce E

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Long-term adhesion-related complications and incisional hernias after abdominal surgery are common and costly. There are few data on the risk of these complications after different abdominal operations. STUDY DESIGN We identified Medicare beneficiaries who underwent endovascular repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm from 2001–2008 who presumably are not at risk for laparotomy-related complications. We identified all laparoscopic and open operations involving the abdomen, pelvis, or retroperitoneum and categorized them into 5 groups according to invasiveness. We then identified laparotomy-related complications for up to 5 years after the index operation and compared these with the baseline rate of complications in a control group of patients who did not undergo an abdominal operation. RESULTS We studied 85,663 patients, 7,513 (8.8%) of which underwent a laparotomy, including 2,783 major abdominal operations, 709 minor abdominal operations, 963 ventral hernia repairs, 493 retroperitoneal/pelvic operations, and 2,565 laparoscopic operations. Mean age was 76.7 years and 82.0% were male. Major abdominal operations carried the highest risk for adhesion-related complications (14.3% and 25.0% at 2 and 5 years compared with 4.0% and 7.8% for the control group; p < 0.001) and incisional hernias (7.8% and 12.0% compared with 0.6% and 1.2% for the control group; p < 0.001). Laparoscopic operations (4.6% and 10.7% for adhesions, 1.9% and 3.2% for incisional hernias) carried the lowest risk. CONCLUSIONS Late-onset laparotomy-related complications are frequent and their risk extends through 5 years beyond the perioperative period. With the advancement and expansion of laparoscopic techniques and its attendant lower risk for long-term complications, these results can alter the risk-to-benefit profile of various types of abdominal operations and can also strengthen the rationale for additional development of laparoscopic approaches to abdominal operations. PMID

  4. Postoperative interstitial hernia as a cause of obscure incisional wound site pain.

    PubMed

    Modrzejewski, Andrzej; Smietański, Maciej

    2012-03-01

    An interstitial hernia is one in which the hernia sac is located between the layers of the abdominal wall. The analysis of contemporary literature shows that interstitial hernias are most often seen in children as a type of inguinal hernia and often accompany undescended testis. The hernia sac is usually located between the external-oblique and internal-oblique muscles in a lateral-cephalic direction. The authors present 3 cases of interstitial hernia found during laparoscopic exploration of the front abdominal wall done due to incisional wound site pain. No previous diagnosis of hernia was considered in all the cases. Hernias were found as complications of appendectomy and wound healing after radiotherapy of uterine and cervical cancer. In conclusion, in obscure wound site pain, the presence of an interstitial postoperative hernia should be considered as a possible reason for the complaint. Laparoscopic examination of the anterior abdominal wall during adhesiolysis in patients with abdominal pain enables proper diagnosis and treatment.

  5. Parastomal hernia repair. An update.

    PubMed

    Wara, P

    2011-04-01

    Repair of parastomal hernia remains controversial. Open suture repair of the fascial defect or stoma resiting are both associated with high morbidity and unacceptably high recurrence rates and are no longer recommended for routine use. Mesh repair appears to provide the best results. Following the first anectodal reports there are accumulating evidence that laparoscopic mesh repair is feasible and has a promising potential in the management of parastomal hernia. Two laparoscopic techniques have emerged, the use of a mesh with a slit and a central keyhole and a mesh without a slit, the latter often termed as a modified Sugarbaker. Published series, however, are observational and often with a short length of follow-up. Most series suffer from small sample size and controlled trials are lacking. The limited data, therefore, make it difficult to draw conclusions. At present none of the methods of open or laparoscopic mesh repair has proved superior. In spite of this laparoscopic repair has gained increasing acceptance. A polypropylene based mesh with an anti-adhesive layer covering the visceral side seems to be applicable using the keyhole technique with a slit as well as the modified Sugarbaker technique. A PTFE mesh should preferably be used with the modified Sugarbaker technique. If a PTFE mesh is used with the keyhole technique parastomal hernia is likely to recur.

  6. Single incision endoscopic surgery for lumbar hernia.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Masahiko; Ishikawa, Norihiko; Shimizu, Satsuki; Shin, Hisato; Matsunoki, Aika; Watanabe, Go

    2011-01-01

    Single Incision Endoscopic Surgery (SIES) has emerged as a less invasive surgery among laparoscopic surgeries, and this approach for incisional hernia was reported recently. This is the first report of SIES for an incisional lumbar hernia. A 66-year-old Japanese woman was referred to our institution because of a left flank hernia that developed after left iliac crest bone harvesting. A 20-mm incision was created on the left side of the umbilicus and all three trocars (12, 5, and 5 mm) were inserted into the incision. The hernial defect was 14 × 9 cm and was repaired with intraperitoneal onlay mesh and a prosthetic graft. The postoperative course was uneventful. SIES for lumbar hernia offers a safe and effective outcome equivalent compared to laparoscopic surgery. In addition, SIES is less invasive and has a cosmetic benefit.

  7. Hiatal Hernia

    MedlinePlus

    A hiatal hernia is a condition in which the upper part of the stomach bulges through an opening in the ... up into the esophagus. When you have a hiatal hernia, it's easier for the acid to come up. ...

  8. Inguinal hernia as a presentation of testicular feminization.

    PubMed

    Gibor, Udit; Ohana, Eric; Elena, Dubilet; Kirshtein, Boris

    2015-08-01

    We present a case of a 20-year-old female who was admitted to our department for an elective inguinal hernia repair. An oval-shaped mass was found in the hernia sac during the surgery that was suspected to be an ovary. Histological examination revealed testicular tissue. Further evaluation confirmed testicular feminization. She underwent laparoscopic orchiectomy and hernia repair from the contralateral side 3 months later.

  9. Rare variant of inguinal hernia, interparietal hernia and ipsilateral abdominal ectopic testis, mimicking a spiegelian hernia. Case report.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Takeshi; Ueno, Shigeru

    2013-07-20

    We report a case in which the combination of an interparietal inguinal hernia and ipsilateral ectopic testicle mimicked a spigelian hernia. The patient was a 22-day-old boy who presented with a reducible mass that extended from the right lumbar region to the iliac fossa region. The right testis was palpable in the right lumbar region. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed that a small bowel had herniated through the inguinal region below the external oblique aponeurosis. Surgery was performed when the patient was 23 months old. Laparoscopic examination to identify the hernia orifice revealed that it was the deep inguinal ring, and the testicular vessels and the vas deferens passed beneath the hernia sac. An inguinal incision was made, and a hernia sac was observed passing through the deep inguinal ring and extending superiorly below the aponeurosis. The testis was found in the hernia sac. Traditional inguinal herniorrhaphy and traditional orchidopexy were performed, and the postoperative course was uneventful. It is difficult to understand the surgical anatomy of interparietal hernias, but once the surgical anatomy is understood, surgical repair is simple. We report the case with a review of the literature and also emphasize that laparoscopic exploration is helpful during surgery.

  10. Open versus laparoscopic approach in the treatment of abdominal emergencies in elderly population

    PubMed Central

    COCORULLO, G.; FALCO, N.; TUTINO, R.; FONTANA, T.; SCERRINO, G.; SALAMONE, G.; LICARI, L.; GULOTTA, G.

    2016-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the role of laparoscopy in the treatment of surgical emergency in old population. Patients and Methods Over-70 years-old patients submitted to emergency abdominal surgery from January 2013 to December 2014 were collected and grouped according to admission diagnoses. These accounted small bowel obstruction, colonic acute disease, appendicitis, ventral hernia, gastro-duodenal perforation, biliary disease. In each group it was analyzed the operation time (OT), the morbidity rate and the mortality rate comparing open and laparoscopic management using T-test and Chi-square test. Results 159 over 70-years-old patients underwent emergency surgery in the General and Emergency surgery Operative Unit (O.U.) of the Policlinic of Palermo. 75 patients were managed by a laparoscopic approach and 84 underwent traditional open emergency surgery. T-Test for OT and Chi-square test for morbidity rate and mortality rate showed no differences in small bowel emergencies (p=0,4; 0,25ventral hernia (p=0,12; p>0,9; p>0,95) and in gastro-duodenal perforation (p=0,9; p>0.9; p>0.95). In cholecystitis, laparoscopy group showed lower OT (T-Test: p= 0,0002) while Chi-square test for morbidity rate (0,1laparoscopic management as an alternative to open surgery in surgical emergencies in elderly population. PMID:27734793

  11. Laparoscopic hernioplasty update.

    PubMed

    Toy, F K; Smoot, R T

    1992-10-01

    The Toy-Smoot laparoscopic hernioplasty has been performed on 75 patients with a total of 83 hernioplasties over the past 20 months. Sixty-nine patients were male and six were female. The age range was 20 to 75 years with an average age of 51.5 years. Twelve of the patients had bilateral hernias repaired: 55 direct hernias, 16 indirect hernias, and 5 pantaloon hernias. Eleven of the repairs were for recurrent hernias. The procedure was performed under general anesthesia. The abdomen was insufflated with carbon dioxide, establishing the pneumoperitoneum. Three 11 mm trocars were inserted, the first via the umbilicus, into which the 0 degrees endoscope was inserted. Two additional trocars were inserted at the level of the umbilicus at the anterior axillary lines. The hernia sacs were left in situ. The medial umbilical ligament was dissected medially, so as to identify directly the pubic tubercle and the Cooper's ligament. An expanded PTFE soft tissue patch, 1 mm thick and 7.5 x 10 cm in size, was attached to the Nanticoke Endo-patch spreader and introduced via the contralateral trocar and positioned over the hernia defect. The Endopath EMS stapler was then used to secure the PTFE patch over the hernia defect. This required secure anatomical fixation to the transversalis fascia anteriorly and laterally, the pubic tubercle, and the posterior rectus sheath, medially, Cooper's ligament, posteromedially, and the endoabdominal fascia, posterolaterally. There were a total of seven different complications, one major, which was a bladder injury that required an open repair of the bladder and then an open, conventional hernioplasty.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. [Treatment of paracolostomic hernias using polypropylene mesh].

    PubMed

    Grigoriuk, A A; Ishchenko, V N; Matveev, A V; Kovalev, V A; Krasnobaev, A E; Stuzhin, S A

    2015-01-01

    It was analyzed the results of treatment of 23 patients with large paracolostomic hernias. Twenty patients underwent colostomy suturing and hernial ring Onlay-plasty with polypropylene mesh without tension. Onlay-plasty of hernial ring with own tissues and polypropylene mesh and colostomy reconstruction outside of implant were performed in 3 patients. Onlay-alloplasty with polypropylene mesh "PROLENE" is effective method of treatment of postoperative paracolostomic ventral hernias with colostomy closing as well as with its reconstruction outside of implant.

  13. Bilateral Morgagni Hernia: A Unique Presentation of a Rare Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Randy

    2016-01-01

    Morgagni hernia is an unusual congenital herniation of abdominal content through the triangular parasternal gaps of the anterior diaphragm. They are commonly asymptomatic and right-sided. We present a case of a bilateral Morgagni hernia resulting in delayed growth in a 10-month-old boy. The presentation was unique due to its bilateral nature and its symptomatic compression of the mediastinum. Diagnosis was made by 3D reconstructed CT angiogram. The patient underwent medical optimization until he was safely able to tolerate laparoscopic surgical repair of his hernia. Upon laparoscopy, the CT findings were confirmed and the hernia was repaired. PMID:27403367

  14. Laparoscopic surgery - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... performed laparoscopically, including gallbladder removal (laparoscopic cholecystectomy), esophageal surgery (laparoscopic fundoplication), colon surgery (laparoscopic colectomy), and surgery on ...

  15. Bladder hernia.

    PubMed

    Nicola, Massimiliano; De Luca, Francesco

    2006-06-01

    Bladder hernia is a rare condition, but crural herniation of the bladder into the scrotum is very rare. A case of bladder hernia presenting with urological symptoms is described. A 71-year-old man presented to the urological ward complaining for persistent frequency and nocturia associated with loss offorce and decrease of caliber of the urinary stream and the presence of a large mass of the right scrotum. An IVP (intra venous pyelography) showed a large herniation of the bladder through the right inguinal canal into the scrotum. An inguinal incision was made and a crural hernia was identified. The hernia sac, containing bowel and bladder, was dissectedfreefrom the spermatic cord and the testis and the hernia defect was repaired.

  16. [Diaphragmatic hernia].

    PubMed

    Osmak, Liliana; Cougard, Patrick

    2003-10-15

    A diaphragmatic hernia is the protrusion of abdominal contents into the thoracic cavity, via a hole in the diaphragm, which either presence or size is abnormal. Congenital hernias are rare and often diagnosed at birth. Adults are diagnosed accidentally. Symptoms can be digestive or respiratory, and the risk of volvulus calls for surgery. Diaphragmatic ruptures are seen more often, and are a consequence of violent thoraco-abdominal trauma, or penetrating wound. They should be treated surgically in emergency, but the operation can be delayed if they are not diagnosed at once. Videosurgery has been used more and more often recently to treat diaphragmatic hernias.

  17. Epigastric Hernia.

    PubMed

    Suarez Acosta, Carlos Enrique; Romero Fernandez, Esperanza; Calvo Manuel, Elpidio

    2015-08-01

    Epigastric hernia is a common condition, mostly asymptomatic although sometimes their unusual clinical presentation still represents a diagnostic dilemma for clinician. The theory of extra tension in the epigastric region by the diaphragm is the most likely theory of epigastric hernia formation. A detailed history and clinical examination in our thin, elderly male patient who presented with abdominal pain and constipation of 5 days of evolution was crucial in establishing a diagnosis. Noninvasive radiologic modalities such as ultrasonographic studies in the case of our patient can reliably confirm the diagnosis of epigastric hernia.

  18. Laparoscopic versus open adhesiolysis for small bowel obstruction - a multicenter, prospective, randomized, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Laparoscopic adhesiolysis is emerging as an alternative for open surgery in adhesive small bowel obstruction. Retrospective studies suggest that laparoscopic approach shortens hospital stay and reduces complications in these patients. However, no prospective, randomized, controlled trials comparing laparoscopy to open surgery have been published. Methods/Design This is a multicenter, prospective, open label, randomized, controlled trial comparing laparoscopic adhesiolysis to open surgery in patients with computed-tomography diagnosed adhesive small bowel obstruction that is not resolving with conservative management. The primary study endpoint is the length of postoperative hospital stay in days. Sample size was estimated based on preliminary retrospective cohort, which suggested that 102 patients would provide 80% power to detect a difference of 2.5 days in the length of postoperative hospital stay with significance level of 0.05. Secondary endpoints include passage of stool, commencement of enteral nutrition, 30-day mortality, complications, postoperative pain, and the length of sick leave. Tertiary endpoints consist of the rate of ventral hernia and the recurrence of small bowel obstruction during long-term follow-up. Long-term follow-up by letter or telephone interview will take place at 1, 5, and 10 years. Discussion To the best of our knowledge, this trial is the first one aiming to provide level Ib evidence to assess the use of laparoscopy in the treatment of adhesive small bowel obstruction. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01867528. Date of registration May 26th 2013. PMID:25306234

  19. Umbilical Hernia

    MedlinePlus

    ... complicated umbilical hernia with liver cirrhosis and ascites. International Journal of Surgery. 2014;12:181. Cameron JL, et al. In: Current Surgical Therapy. 11th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; ...

  20. Femoral hernia

    MedlinePlus

    ... or strain. Sometimes, the first symptoms are: Sudden groin pain Abdominal pain Nausea Vomiting This may mean that ... present with the hernia. If you feel sudden pain in your groin, a piece of intestine may be stuck in ...

  1. Laparoscopic approach in gastrointestinal emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez Rodriguez, Rosa M; Segura-Sampedro, Juan José; Flores-Cortés, Mercedes; López-Bernal, Francisco; Martín, Cristobalina; Diaz, Verónica Pino; Ciuro, Felipe Pareja; Ruiz, Javier Padillo

    2016-01-01

    This review focuses on the laparoscopic approach to gastrointestinal emergencies and its more recent indications. Laparoscopic surgery has a specific place in elective procedures, but that does not apply in emergency situations. In specific emergencies, there is a huge range of indications and different techniques to apply, and not all of them are equally settle. We consider that the most controversial points in minimally invasive procedures are indications in emergency situations due to technical difficulties. Some pathologies, such as oesophageal emergencies, obstruction due to colon cancer, abdominal hernias or incarcerated postsurgical hernias, are nearly always resolved by conventional surgery, that is, an open approach due to limited intraabdominal cavity space or due to the vulnerability of the bowel. These technical problems have been solved in many diseases, such as for perforated peptic ulcer or acute appendectomy for which a laparoscopic approach has become a well-known and globally supported procedure. On the other hand, endoscopic procedures have acquired further indications, relegating surgical solutions to a second place; this happens in cholangitis or pancreatic abscess drainage. This endoluminal approach avoids the need for laparoscopic development in these diseases. Nevertheless, new instruments and new technologies could extend the laparoscopic approach to a broader array of potentials procedures. There remains, however, a long way to go. PMID:26973409

  2. [Impaired lung function and anemia from large hiatal hernia: a case report].

    PubMed

    Suppa, Marianna; Colzi, Marina; Magnanelli, Elisa; Migliozzi, Elisa; Negri, Silvia; Millarelli, Federica; Coppola, Alessandro

    2013-05-01

    We present the clinical case of a 54 years old man who accessed for dyspnea and severe anemia. After being transfused, he underwent to gastroscopy, which showed an erosive gastritis with large hiatal hernia. The hernia was surgically reduced with laparoscopic hiatoplastic and Nissen-Rossetti fundoplication. In conclusion, dyspnea is not merely a medical competence but also a surgical one.

  3. Sports hernia and femoroacetabular impingement in athletes: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Munegato, Daniele; Bigoni, Marco; Gridavilla, Giulia; Olmi, Stefano; Cesana, Giovanni; Zatti, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the association between sports hernias and femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) in athletes. METHODS: PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, and Google Scholar databases were electronically searched for articles relating to sports hernia, athletic pubalgia, groin pain, long-standing adductor-related groin pain, Gilmore groin, adductor pain syndrome, and FAI. The initial search identified 196 studies, of which only articles reporting on the association of sports hernia and FAI or laparoscopic treatment of sports hernia were selected for systematic review. Finally, 24 studies were reviewed to evaluate the prevalence of FAI in cases of sports hernia and examine treatment outcomes and evidence for a common underlying pathogenic mechanism. RESULTS: FAI has been reported in as few as 12% to as high as 94% of patients with sports hernias, athletic pubalgia or adductor-related groin pain. Cam-type impingement is proposed to lead to increased symphyseal motion with overload on the surrounding extra-articular structures and muscle, which can result in the development of sports hernia and athletic pubalgia. Laparoscopic repair of sports hernias, via either the transabdominal preperitoneal or extraperitoneal approach, has a high success rate and earlier recovery of full sports activity compared to open surgery or conservative treatment. For patients with FAI and sports hernia, the surgical management of both pathologies is more effective than sports pubalgia treatment or hip arthroscopy alone (89% vs 33% of cases). As sports hernias and FAI are typically treated by general and orthopedic surgeons, respectively, a multidisciplinary approach for diagnosis and treatment is recommended for optimal treatment of patients with these injuries. CONCLUSION: The restriction in range of motion due to FAI likely contributes to sports hernias; therefore, surgical treatment of both pathologies represents an optimal therapy. PMID:26380829

  4. Single-incision total laparoscopic hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rakesh; Sundaram, Meenakshi; Mahajan, Chaitali; Raje, Shweta; Kadam, Pratima; Rao, Gayatri; Shitut, Prachi

    2011-01-01

    Single-incision laparoscopic surgery is an alternative to conventional multiport laparoscopy. Single-access laparoscopy using a transumbilical port affords maximum cosmetic benefits because the surgical incision is hidden in the umbilicus. The advantages of single-access laparoscopic surgery may include less bleeding, infection, and hernia formation and better cosmetic outcome and less pain. The disadvantages and limitations include longer surgery time, difficulty in learning the technique, and the need for specialized instruments. Ongoing refinement of the surgical technique and instrumentation is likely to expand its role in gynecologic surgery in the future. We perform single-incision total laparoscopic hysterectomy using three ports in the single transumbilical incision.

  5. Single-incision total laparoscopic hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Rakesh; Sundaram, Meenakshi; Mahajan, Chaitali; Raje, Shweta; Kadam, Pratima; Rao, Gayatri; Shitut, Prachi

    2011-01-01

    Single-incision laparoscopic surgery is an alternative to conventional multiport laparoscopy. Single-access laparoscopy using a transumbilical port affords maximum cosmetic benefits because the surgical incision is hidden in the umbilicus. The advantages of single-access laparoscopic surgery may include less bleeding, infection, and hernia formation and better cosmetic outcome and less pain. The disadvantages and limitations include longer surgery time, difficulty in learning the technique, and the need for specialized instruments. Ongoing refinement of the surgical technique and instrumentation is likely to expand its role in gynecologic surgery in the future. We perform single-incision total laparoscopic hysterectomy using three ports in the single transumbilical incision. PMID:21197248

  6. Sportsman hernia; the review of current diagnosis and treatment modalities

    PubMed Central

    Paksoy, Melih; Sekmen, Ümit

    2016-01-01

    Groin pain is an important clinical entity that may affect a sportsman’s active sports life. Sportsman’s hernia is a chronic low abdominal and groin pain syndrome. Open and laparoscopic surgical treatment may be chosen in case of conservative treatment failure. Studies on sportsman’s hernia, which is a challenging situation in both diagnosis and treatment, are ongoing in many centers. We reviewed the treatment results of 37 patients diagnosed and treated as sportsman’s hernia at our hospital between 2011–2014, in light of current literature. PMID:27436937

  7. Sportsman hernia; the review of current diagnosis and treatment modalities.

    PubMed

    Paksoy, Melih; Sekmen, Ümit

    2016-01-01

    Groin pain is an important clinical entity that may affect a sportsman's active sports life. Sportsman's hernia is a chronic low abdominal and groin pain syndrome. Open and laparoscopic surgical treatment may be chosen in case of conservative treatment failure. Studies on sportsman's hernia, which is a challenging situation in both diagnosis and treatment, are ongoing in many centers. We reviewed the treatment results of 37 patients diagnosed and treated as sportsman's hernia at our hospital between 2011-2014, in light of current literature.

  8. Ultrasound Prenatal Diagnosis of Inguinal Scrotal Hernia and Contralateral Hydrocele

    PubMed Central

    Massaro, G.; Sglavo, G.; Cavallaro, A.; Pastore, G.; Nappi, C.; Di Carlo, C.

    2013-01-01

    Fetal inguinal scrotal hernia is a rare condition resulting in an abnormal embryonic process of the tunica vaginalis. We report a case of ultrasound prenatal diagnosis of inguinal scrotal hernia associated with contralateral hydrocele in a woman at 37 weeks of gestation, referred to our clinic for a scrotal mass. Differential diagnosis includes hydrocele, teratoma, hemangiomas, solid tumours of testis, bowel herniation, and testicular torsion. Bowel peristalsis is an important ultrasound sign and it allowed us to make diagnosis of inguinal scrotal hernia. Diagnosis was confirmed at birth and a laparoscopic hernia repair was performed without complications on day 10. During surgery, a bilateral defect of canal inguinal was seen and considered as the cause of scrotal inguinal hernia and contralateral hydrocele observed in utero. PMID:24455356

  9. Laparoscopic herniorrhaphy. Transabdominal preperitoneal floor repair.

    PubMed

    Felix, E L; Michas, C A; McKnight, R L

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of a laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) approach to inguinal hernia repair which dissected the entire inguinal floor and repaired the indirect, direct, and femoral areas in all patients without tension. In our series, 183 patients had 205 hernia repairs and were followed for more than 6 months. Of this group, 128 hernias were indirect, 55 direct, 22 pantaloon, 26 recurrent, and 22 bilateral. All 12 females and the first 11 males had a single-buttress repair with polypropylene mesh. The other 160 male patients had a double-buttress repair. With median follow-up of 12 months, ranging from 6 to 21 months, no recurrences were found. Patients returned to normal activity in an average of 1 week. Dissection and buttressing of the entire inguinal floor with mesh appeared to solve the problem of early recurrence first seen in laparoscopic herniorrhaphy.

  10. Hernias (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... usually required within a few days to prevent development of another incarcerated hernia. The most serious type of hernia is a strangulated hernia, in which the normal blood supply is cut off from the trapped tissue. ...

  11. Diaphragmatic Hernia Masquerading as a Pulmonary Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Appiah, S; Tcherveniakov, P; Krysiak, P

    2015-01-01

    Iatrogenic injury accounts for the second most common cause of acquired diaphragmatic hernias after penetrating trauma. An increased incidence of these hernias has been observed with the widespread use of laparoscopic surgery. We present the case of a 65-year-old woman who initially underwent sigmoid resection for an adenocarcinoma and a subsequent liver resection for metastasis. She was noted to have a left lower lobe pulmonary nodule on surveillance computed tomography, for which she underwent a mini-thoracotomy for a planned resection. At the time of surgery, the pulmonary nodule was discovered to be a diaphragmatic hernia, most probably of iatrogenic origin. We discuss the difficulty in diagnosis given her history and the location of such a lesion. PMID:25723679

  12. Hiatal hernia

    MedlinePlus

    ... page, please enable JavaScript. Hiatal hernia is a condition in which part of the stomach extends through an opening of the diaphragm into ... occurs often in people over 50 years. This condition may cause reflux ... acid from the stomach into the esophagus. Children with this condition are ...

  13. Perforated sigmoid diverticulitis in a lumbar hernia after iliac crest bone graft - a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The combination of perforated diverticulitis in a lumbar hernia constitutes an extremely rare condition. Case presentation We report a case of a 66 year old Caucasian woman presenting with perforated sigmoid diverticulitis localized in a lumbar hernia following iliac crest bone graft performed 18 years ago. Emergency treatment consisted of laparoscopic peritoneal lavage. Elective sigmoid resection was scheduled four months later. At the same time a laparoscopic hernia repair with a biologic mesh graft was performed. Conclusion This case shows a very seldom clinical presentation of lumbar hernia. Secondary colonic resection and concurrent hernia repair with a biologic implant have proven useful in treating this rare condition. PMID:25051974

  14. Inguinal hernia repair: are the results from a general hospital comparable to those from dedicated hernia centres?

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Kai Xiong; Lo, Hong Yee; Neo, Jun Xiang Andy; Appasamy, Vijayan; Chiu, Ming Terk

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION We aimed to report the outcomes of inguinal hernia repair performed at Tan Tock Seng Hospital and compare them with those performed at dedicated hernia centres. METHODS We retrospectively analysed the medical records and telephone interviews of 520 patients who underwent inguinal hernia repair in 2010. RESULTS The majority of the patients were male (498 [95.8%] men vs. 22 [4.2%] women). The mean age was 59.9 ± 15.7 years. Most patients (n = 445, 85.6%) had unilateral hernias (25.8% direct, 64.3% indirect, 9.9% pantaloon). The overall recurrence rate was 3.8%, with a mean time to recurrence of 12.0 ± 8.6 months. Risk factors for recurrence included contaminated wounds (odds ratio [OR] 50.325; p = 0.004), female gender (OR 8.757; p = 0.003) and pantaloon hernias (OR 5.059; p = 0.013). Complication rates were as follows: chronic pain syndrome (1.2%), hypoaesthesia (5.2%), wound dehiscence (0.4%), infection (0.6%), haematoma/seroma (4.8%), urinary retention (1.3%) and intraoperative visceral injury (0.6%). Most procedures were open repairs (67.7%), and laparoscopic repair constituted 32.3% of all the inguinal hernia repairs. Open repairs resulted in longer operating times than laparoscopic repairs (86.6 mins vs. 71.6 mins; p < 0.001), longer hospital stays (2.7 days vs. 0.7 days; p = 0.020) and a higher incidence of post-repair hypoaesthesia (6.8% vs. 1.8%; p = 0.018). However, there were no significant differences in recurrence or other complications between open and laparoscopic repair. CONCLUSION A general hospital with strict protocols and teaching methodologies can achieve inguinal hernia repair outcomes comparable to those of dedicated hernia centres. PMID:24763834

  15. Endometriosis in a spigelian hernia sac: an unexpected finding.

    PubMed

    Moris, Demetrios; Michalinos, Adamantios; Vernadakis, Spiridon

    2015-01-01

    Describes the existence of endometrioma in a spigelian hernia sac. Spigelian Hernia is a rare ventral hernia, presenting difficulties in diagnosis and carrying a high incarceration and obstruction risk. Endometriomas occur due to implantation of endometrial cells into a surgical wound, most often after a cesarean delivery. A 37-year-old woman presented to our department with persistent abdominal pain, exacerbating during menses, and vomiting for 2 days. Physical examination revealed a mass-like lesion in the border between the left-upper and left-lower quadrant. Ultrasound examination was inconclusive and a computed tomography scan of the abdomen revealed an abdominal wall mass. During surgery, a spigelian hernia was found 5 to 7 cm above a previous cesarean incision. Tissue like "chocolate cysts" was present at the hernia sac. Hernia was repaired while tissue was excised and sent for histological examination that confirmed the diagnosis. Spigelian hernia is a hernia presenting difficulties in diagnosis and treatment. Endometrioma in a spigelian hernia sac is a rare diagnosis, confirmed only histologically. Clinical suspicion can be posed only through symptoms and thorough investigation.

  16. Spigelian hernias: repair and outcome for 81 patients.

    PubMed

    Larson, David W; Farley, David R

    2002-10-01

    Spigelian hernia is a rare partial abdominal wall defect. The frequent lack of physical findings along with vague associated abdominal complaints makes the diagnosis elusive. A retrospective review of Mayo Clinic patients was performed to find all patients who had undergone surgical repair of a Spigelian hernia from 1976 to 1997. Patients were scrutinized for presentation, work-up, therapy, and outcome. The goal of this study was to obtain long-term outcome. The study was set in a tertiary referral center. There were 76 patients in whom 81 Spigelian hernias were repaired. Symptoms most commonly included an intermittent mass (n = 29), pain (n = 20), pain with a mass (n = 22), and bowel obstruction (n = 5). Five patients were asymptomatic. Preoperative imaging was performed in 21 patients and correctly diagnosed the hernia in 15. Spigelian hernias were repaired by primary suture closure (n = 75), mesh (n = 5), and laparoscopic (n = 1) techniques. Eight patients (10%) required emergent operations. Thirteen hernias (17%) were found to be incarcerated at the time of the operation. Overall mean follow-up for the 76 patients was 8 years, with three hernia recurrences identified. Spigelian hernia is rare and requires a high index of suspicion given the lack of consistent symptoms and signs. An astute physician may couple a proper history and physical examination with preoperative imaging to secure the diagnosis. Mesh and laparoscopic repairs are viable alternatives to the durable results of standard primary closure. Given the high rate of incarceration/strangulation, the diagnosis of Spigelian hernia is an indication for surgical repair.

  17. Hospital Costs Associated With Laparoscopic and Open Inguinal Herniorrhaphy

    PubMed Central

    Quereshy, Fayez; Camilotti, Bruna G.; Pitzul, Kristen; Kwong, Josephine; Jackson, Timothy; Penner, Todd; Okrainec, Allan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the total hospital costs associated with elective laparoscopic and open inguinal herniorrhaphy. Methods: A prospectively maintained database was used to identify patients who underwent elective inguinal herniorrhaphy from April 2009 to March 2011. A retrospective review of electronic patient records was performed along with a standardized case-costing analysis using data from the Ontario Case Costing Initiative. The main outcomes were operating room (OR) and total hospital costs. Results: Two hundred eleven patients underwent elective unilateral inguinal herniorrhaphy (117 open and 94 laparoscopic), and 33 patients underwent elective bilateral inguinal herniorrhaphy (9 open and 24 laparoscopic). OR and total hospital costs for open unilateral inguinal hernia repair were significantly lower than for the laparoscopic approach (median total cost, $3207.15 vs $3723.66; P < .001). OR and total hospital costs for repair of elective bilateral inguinal hernias were similar between the open and laparoscopic approaches (median total cost, $4574.02 vs $4662.89; P = .827). Conclusions: In the setting of a Canadian academic hospital, when considering the repair of an elective unilateral inguinal hernia, the OR and total hospital costs of open surgery were significantly lower than for the laparoscopic techniques. There was no statistical difference between OR and total hospital costs when comparing open surgery and laparoscopic techniques for the repair of bilateral inguinal hernias. Given the perioperative benefits of laparoscopy, further studies incorporating hernia-specific outcomes are necessary to determine the cost-effectiveness of each approach and to define the optimal treatment strategy. PMID:25392677

  18. Symptomatic Right-Sided Diaphragmatic Hernia in the Third Trimester of Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Graham; Moore, B. Todd; Serrone, Rosemarie

    2013-01-01

    Background: Laparoscopic repair of incarcerated diaphragmatic hernias is widely recognized as both safe and effective. However, symptomatic diaphragmatic hernias encountered in the setting of pregnancy, while rare, present a significant surgical challenge. Furthermore, right-sided diaphragmatic hernias account for only 13% of cases. Here, we present a case in which a symptomatic, posterior right-sided diaphragmatic hernia, presenting in the later stages of pregnancy, was successfully repaired using a laparoscopic approach. Methods: Our patient is a 42-y-old gravid woman who, at 27 wk gestation, was admitted to the gynecology service with a 2-d history of right upper quadrant abdominal pain, right shoulder pain, abdominal distension, and obstipation. Results: Computed tomography of the chest demonstrated an incarcerated right diaphragmatic hernia. Surgical consultation was obtained, and the patient was taken to the operating room urgently for repair. Intraoperatively, the cecum was reduced and the diaphragm repaired primarily using a laparoscopic approach. The patient recovered well and was discharged home on postoperative day 8 with no complications to the patient or the pregnancy. Conclusion: Laparoscopic reduction and repair of symptomatic incarcerated diaphragmatic hernia can be safely performed in the third trimester of pregnancy. PMID:23925038

  19. Preperitoneal Surgery Using a Self-Adhesive Mesh for Inguinal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Oguntodu, Olakunle F.; Rodriguez, Francisco; Rassadi, Roozbeh; Haley, Michael; Shively, Cynthia J.; Dzandu, James K.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Laparoscopic preperitoneal hernia repair with mesh has been reported to result in improved patient outcomes. However, there are few published data on the use of a totally extraperitoneal (TEP) approach. The purpose of this study was to present our experience and evaluate early outcomes of TEP inguinal hernia repair with self-adhesive mesh. Methods: This cohort study was a retrospective review of patients who underwent laparoscopic TEP inguinal hernial repair from April 4, 2010, through July 22, 2014. Data assessed were age, sex, body mass index (BMI), hernia repair indications, hernia type, pain, paresthesia, occurrence (bilateral or unilateral), recurrence, and patient satisfaction. Descriptive and regression analyses were performed. Results: Six hundred forty patients underwent laparoscopic preperitoneal hernia surgery with self-adhesive mesh. The average age was 56 years, nearly all were men (95.8%), and the mean BMI was 26.2 kg/m2. Cases involved primary hernia more frequently than recurrent hernia (94% vs 6%; P < .05). After surgery, 92% of the patients reported no more than minimal pain, <1% reported paresthesia, and 0.2% had early recurrence. There were 7 conversions to an open procedure. The patients had no adverse reactions to anesthesia and no bladder injury. Postoperative acute pain or recurrence was not explained by demographics, BMI, or preoperative pain. There were significant associations of hernia side, recurrence, occurrence, and sex with composite end points. Nearly all patients (98%) were satisfied with the outcome. Conclusion: The use of self-adhesive, Velcro-type mesh in laparoscopic TEP inguinal hernia repair is associated with reduced pain; low rates of early recurrence, infection, and hematoma; and improved patient satisfaction. PMID:25587212

  20. Pain after laparoscopic antireflux surgery

    PubMed Central

    Szczebiot, L; Peyser, PM

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The benefits of antireflux surgery are well established. Laparoscopic techniques have been shown to be generally safe and effective. The aim of this paper was to review the subject of pain following laparoscopic antireflux surgery. Methods A systematic review of the literature was conducted using the PubMed database to identify all studies reporting pain after laparoscopic antireflux surgery. Publications were included for the main analysis if they contained at least 30 patients. Operations in children, Collis gastroplasty procedures, endoluminal fundoplication and surgery for paraoesophageal hernias were excluded. The frequency of postoperative pain was calculated and the causes/management were reviewed. An algorithm for the investigation of patients with pain following laparoscopic fundoplication was constructed. Results A total of 17 studies were included in the main analysis. Abdominal pain and chest pain following laparoscopic fundoplication were reported in 24.0% and 19.5% of patients respectively. Pain was mild or moderate in the majority and severe in 4%. Frequency of pain was not associated with operation type. The authors include their experience in managing patients with persistent, severe epigastric pain following laparoscopic anterior fundoplication. Conclusions Pain following laparoscopic antireflux surgery occurs in over 20% of patients. Some have an obvious complication or a diagnosis made through routine investigation. Most have mild to moderate pain with minimal effect on quality of life. In a smaller proportion of patients, pain is severe, persistent and can be disabling. In this group, diagnosis is more difficult but systematic investigation can be rewarding, and can enable appropriate and successful treatment. PMID:24780664

  1. Spontaneous Transomental Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Hun

    2016-01-01

    A transomental hernia through the greater or lesser omentum is rare, accounting for approximately 4% of internal hernias. Transomental hernias are generally reported in patients aged over fifty. In such instances, acquired transomental hernias are usual, are commonly iatrogenic, and result from surgical interventions or from trauma or peritoneal inflammation. In rare cases, such as the one described in this study, internal hernias through the greater or lesser omentum occur spontaneously as the result of senile atrophy without history of surgery, trauma, or inflammation. A transomental hernia has a high postoperative mortality rate of 30%, and emergency diagnosis and treatment are critical. We report a case of a spontaneous transomental hernia of the small intestine causing intestinal obstruction. An internal hernia with strangulation of the small bowel in the lesser sac was suspected from the image study. After an emergency laparotomy, a transomental hernia was diagnosed. PMID:26962535

  2. A pseudo-TEP repair of an incarcerated obturator hernia

    PubMed Central

    Maricevich, Marco; Farley, David

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Obturator hernia (OH) is a rare condition and difficult to diagnose. While they account for as few as 0.073% of all hernias, mortality can be as high as 70%. The typical clinical presentation for OH is small bowel obstruction. Computed tomography is the diagnostic tool of choice. Surgical repair is mandatory in virtually all cases of OH and traditionally consists of performing an exploratory laparotomy. Presentation of case A 90-year-old female was admitted to our surgical service with signs of small bowel obstruction and a CT scan revealing incarcerated fatty tissue and small bowel within a left OH. Discussion The role of laparoscopic surgery in the management of OH has been limited to elective repairs; most reports detail that the OH was found serendipitously during laparoscopic inguinal hernia operations or other pelvic procedures. A few reports describe the use of laparoscopy to treat OH associated with bowel obstruction in an emergency setting using a TAPP approach. A strict TEP hernia repair is not indicated for all patients with OH, and should rarely be performed in emergency situations given its limitation to assess or resect bowel if necessary. In selected cases, a formal exploratory laparoscopy that is negative for compromised bowel can be safely followed by a TEP repair using the same umbilical access as shown in our patient. Conclusion A 90-year-old female with a small bowel obstruction related to an incarcerated OH was treated effectively with an extraperitoneal laparoscopic approach. PMID:22096757

  3. Laparoscopic management of transverse testicular ectopia with persistent mullerian duct syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kamble, R S; Gupta, R K; Gupta, A R; Kothari, P R; Dikshit, K V; Kesan, K K

    2015-01-01

    A 4-month-old male child presented with right undescended testis and left inguinal hernia with funiculitis. Ultrasonography showed funiculitis on the left side testis along with presence of 1.5 × 1 cm testis like structure just above left testis and empty right scrotal sac without any evidence of mullerian structures. On diagnostic laparoscopy, right testicular vessels were crossing from right to left and had uterus with both testes in left hernia sac. Mobilization of vessels, division of uterus, and hernia repair was done laparoscopically. On the review of literature, there is only one case report of total laparoscopic repair of transversetesticular ectopia (TTE) with hernia without persistent mullerian duct (PMDS). The uniqueness of our case is that it had TTE with hernia and PMDS, which were totally managed by laparoscopy. On 6 months of follow-up, both the testes are palpable in scrotum.

  4. Laparoscopic management of transverse testicular ectopia with persistent mullerian duct syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kamble, RS; Gupta, RK; Gupta, AR; Kothari, PR; Dikshit, KV; Kesan, KK

    2015-01-01

    A 4-month-old male child presented with right undescended testis and left inguinal hernia with funiculitis. Ultrasonography showed funiculitis on the left side testis along with presence of 1.5 × 1 cm testis like structure just above left testis and empty right scrotal sac without any evidence of mullerian structures. On diagnostic laparoscopy, right testicular vessels were crossing from right to left and had uterus with both testes in left hernia sac. Mobilization of vessels, division of uterus, and hernia repair was done laparoscopically. On the review of literature, there is only one case report of total laparoscopic repair of transversetesticular ectopia (TTE) with hernia without persistent mullerian duct (PMDS). The uniqueness of our case is that it had TTE with hernia and PMDS, which were totally managed by laparoscopy. On 6 months of follow-up, both the testes are palpable in scrotum. PMID:26195884

  5. Short bowel syndrome after laparoscopic procedures.

    PubMed

    McBride, Corrigan L; Oleynikov, Dmitry; Sudan, Debra; Thompson, Jon S

    2014-04-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a potential postoperative complication after intra-abdominal procedures. Whether the laparoscopic approach is as likely to result in SBS or the causative mechanisms are similar to open procedures is unknown. Our aim was to evaluate potential mechanisms of SBS after laparoscopic procedures. The records of 175 adult patients developing SBS as a postoperative complication were reviewed. One hundred forty-seven patients had open procedures and 28 laparoscopic. Colectomy (39%), hysterectomy (11%), and appendectomy (11%) were the most common open procedures. SBS followed laparoscopic gastric bypass (46%) and cholecystectomy (32%) most frequently. The mechanisms of SBS were different: adhesive obstruction (57 vs 22%, P < 0.05) was more common in the open group, whereas volvulus (18 vs 46%, P < 0.05) was more common after laparoscopy. Overall, ischemia (25 vs 32%) was similar but significantly more laparoscopic patients had postoperative hypoperfusion (32 vs 67%, P < 0.05). Eleven of the 13 laparoscopic bariatric procedures had internal hernias and volvulus. Of the nine patients undergoing cholecystectomy, four developed ischemia early postoperatively presumably secondary to pneumoperitoneum. SBS is an increasingly recognized complication of laparoscopic procedures. The mechanisms of intestinal injury differ from open procedures with a higher incidence of volvulus and more frequent ischemia from hypoperfusion.

  6. Composite mesh and gluteal fasciocutaneous rotation flap for perineal hernia repair after abdominoperineal resection: a novel technique.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Marios; Hübner, Gunnar; Bednarek, Marzena; Arafkas, Mohamed

    2017-03-01

    Perineal hernia is an uncommon complication following abdominoperineal rectum resection. Several surgical procedures have been proposed for perineal hernia repair, including perineal, laparoscopic and abdominal approaches. Repair techniques can be classified into primary suture techniques, mesh placements and repairs with autogenous tissue. We report a 68-year-old man with a perineal hernia, who underwent a pelvic floor reconstruction with a transperineal composite mesh and a gluteal fasciocutaneous rotation flap. We conclude that a combined approach with transperineal mesh reconstruction and gluteal fasciocutaneous flap could be an alternative choice in perineal hernia repair after abdominoperineal resection.

  7. Dynamic ultrasound with postural change facilitated the detection of an incisional hernia in a case with negative MRI findings.

    PubMed

    Wongsithichai, Patcharaporn; Chang, Ke-Vin; Hung, Chen-Yu; Wang, Tyng-Guey

    2015-09-01

    Incisional hernias commonly develop after abdominal surgeries with a lower incidence in patients receiving laparoscopy. Diagnosis through a non-surgical approach is usually made by computed tomography or magnetic resonance images (MRI) but both image modalities require patients to be examined in a supine position. We reported a case noticing a mass over her right lower abdomen after a laparoscopic liver segmentectomy with negative findings of hernia on MRI. A hernia sac was found by ultrasound with the patient being standing, highlighting the utility of dynamic ultrasound with postural change in investigation of incisional hernias.

  8. Sports Hernia (Athletic Pubalgia)

    MedlinePlus

    .org Sports Hernia (Athletic Pubalgia) Page ( 1 ) A sports hernia is a painful, so tissue injury that occurs in ... groin area. It most o en occurs during sports that require sudden changes of direction or intense ...

  9. Current options in inguinal hernia repair in adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Kulacoglu, H

    2011-01-01

    Inguinal hernia is a very common problem. Surgical repair is the current approach, whereas asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic hernias may be good candidate for watchful waiting. Prophylactic antibiotics can be used in centers with high rate of wound infection. Local anesthesia is a suitable and economic option for open repairs, and should be popularized in day-case setting. Numerous repair methods have been described to date. Mesh repairs are superior to "nonmesh" tissue-suture repairs. Lichtenstein repair and endoscopic/laparoscopic techniques have similar efficacy. Standard polypropylene mesh is still the choice, whereas use of partially absorbable lightweight meshes seems to have some advantages. PMID:22435019

  10. Laparoscopic reversal of Hartmann's procedure.

    PubMed

    Fiscon, Valentino; Portale, Giuseppe; Mazzeo, Antonio; Migliorini, Giovanni; Frigo, Flavio

    2014-12-01

    Reestablishing continuity after a Hartmann's procedure is considered a major surgical procedure with high morbidity/mortality. The aim of this study was to assess the short-/long-term outcome of laparoscopic restoration of bowel continuity after HP. A prospectively collected database of colorectal laparoscopic procedures (>800) performed between June 2005 and June 2013 was used to identify 20 consecutive patients who had undergone laparoscopic reversal of Hartmann's procedure (LHR). Median age was 65.4. Ten patients (50 %) had undergone surgery for perforated diverticulitis, 3 (15 %) for cancer, and 7 (35 %) for other reasons (volvulus, posttraumatic perforation, and sigmoid perforation from foreign body). Previous HP had been performed laparoscopically in only 3 patients. Median operative time was 162.5 min. All the procedures were completed laparoscopically. Intraoperative complication rate was nil. Post-operative mortality and morbidity were respectively 0 and 10 % (1 pneumonia, 1 bowel obstruction from post-anastomotic stenosis which required resection and redo of the anastomosis). Median time to first flatus was 3 days, to normal diet 5 days. Median hospital stay was 9 days without readmissions. We followed up the patients for a median of 44 months: when asked, all 20 (100 %) said they would undergo the operation (LHR) again; 3 (15 %) had been re-operated of laparoscopic mesh repair for incisional hernia. When performed by experienced surgeons, LHR is a feasible, safe, reproducible operation, which allows early return of bowel function, early discharge and fast return to work for the patient. It has a low morbidity rate.

  11. [Learning curve and his consequences in laparoscopic antireflux surgery].

    PubMed

    Cristian, D; Sgarbură, Olivia; Jitea, N; Burcoş, T

    2005-01-01

    The laparoscopic fundoplication became the gold standard of the laparoscopic antireflux surgery (LARS). Our aim is to indicate the evolution of the learning curve as well as its consequences on the patient's outcome. We studied the gastro-esophageal reflux (GER) cases treated laparoscopically in Colţea University Hospital throughout 6 years. We gathered a group of 40 patients with an average age of 54, 57 years and a sex ratio F:M = 1.67. The patients had either a simple GER disease, small and medium hiatal hernias (21 cases) or giant hiatal hernias (GHH--19 cases). Two equal groups resulted: group 1 consisted of the first 20 patients operated from 1999 to 2002, group 2 consisted of the rest of the patients. Operating time, hospital time, complication rate and postoperatory endoscopy were compared. The average of the operating time was calculated. For giant hiatal hernias, a separate average was also taken into account. The total operating time for GER, small and medium hiatal hernias was 115 min in group 1 and 80 min in group 2 meanwhile for GHH it was 143 min vs. 130 min. The average operatory time was 129 min vs. 105 min. All these differences were statistically significant but there were no differences concerning complication rate and post-operatory endoscopy. Although the learning of the laparoscopic fundoplication requires practice, the learning curve does not have influence on the patients' outcome.

  12. Retrosternal (Morgagni) diaphragmatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    Lojszczyk–Szczepaniak, Anna; Komsta, Renata; Debiak, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    This study presents the case of a shih tzu puppy, in which a rare congenital Morgagni diaphragmatic hernia was diagnosed. The diagnosis was based on abdominal and thoracic radiographs, including a contrast study of the gastrointestinal tract, which revealed a co-existing umbilical hernia. Both hernias were repaired by surgery. PMID:22294795

  13. [Laparoscopic adrenalectomy].

    PubMed

    Fariña Pérez, L A

    2006-05-01

    Laparoscopic extirpation of the suprarenal gland is considered the 'gold standard' of surgery for benign conditions, but its indication in suprarenal cancer is still controversial. In this article, we review the pros and cons of the laparoscopic approach in the different disorders that affect the adrenal gland, pheochromocytoma, cancer, partial and bilateral adrenalectomy, etc.

  14. Primary lumbar hernia: A rarely encountered hernia

    PubMed Central

    Sundaramurthy, Sharada; Suresh, H.B.; Anirudh, A.V.; Prakash Rozario, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Lumbar hernia is an uncommon abdominal wall hernia, making its diagnosis and management a challenge to the treating surgeon. Presentation may be misleading and diagnosis often missed. An imaging study forms an indispensable aid in the diagnosis and surgery is the only treatment option. Presentation of case A 42 year old male presented with history of pain in lower back of 4 years duration and was being treated symptomatically over 4 years with analgesics and physiotherapy. He had noticed a swelling over the left side of his mid-back and consequently on examination was found to have a primary acquired lumbar hernia arising from the deep superior lumbar triangle of Grynfelt. Diagnosis was confirmed by Computed Tomographic imaging. Discussion A lumbar hernia may be primary or secondary with only about 300 cases of primary lumbar hernia reported in literature. Lumbar hernias manifest through two possible defects in the posterior abdominal wall, the superior being more common. Management remains surgical with various techniques emerging over the years. The patient at our center underwent an open sublay mesh repair with excellent outcome. Conclusion A surgeon may encounter a primary lumbar hernia perhaps once in his lifetime making it an interesting surgical challenge. Sound anatomical knowledge and adequate imaging are indispensable. Inspite of advances in minimally invasive surgery, it cannot be universally applied to patients with lumbar hernia and management requires a more tailored approach. PMID:26812667

  15. Operation hernia: humanitarian hernia repairs in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Sanders, D L; Kingsnorth, A N

    2007-10-01

    Ghana has a high incidence of inguinal hernias and the healthcare system is unable to deliver an adequate repair rate. This results in morbidity and mortality and has a knock-on effect on the local economy. A project has been set up to try and reduce the burden of these hernias by establishing Africa's first Hernia Centre. This is supported by structured visits by European surgeons to the centre. In October 2006, a team of four surgeons, two specialist registrars, one hernia nurse specialist, and three nurses was assembled in order to open the Hernia Centre, which will provide a base for the delivery of hernia services in the West of Ghana. A 2-year teaching programme has been formulated, tailored to the needs of local surgeons and nurses, with the aim of developing an integrated team that will initially deliver up to 50 hernia repairs each month. It is planned that the centre will be supported by structured periodic visits from surgeons and nurses based in Plymouth, the European Hernia Society, and any other volunteers wishing to support the link.

  16. Synchronically performed laparoscopic cholecystectomy and hernioplasty.

    PubMed

    Simon, E; Kelemen, O; Knausz, J; Bodnár, S; Bátorfi, J

    1999-01-01

    Cholecystectomies and hernioplasties are the two most frequently performed surgical interventions. The laparoscopic technique can be offered for the simultaneous treatment with both operating indications. The synchronical operation can give all the advantages of the minimally invasive technique. Authors had performed laparoscopic cholecystectomy with laparoscopic hernioplasty in five cases. Two inguinal and three postoperative hernias were reconstructed. The cholecystectomy was performed with a "three punction method", and the hernioplasty by using the same approach, completed by inserting a fourth assisting trocar as required. The hernial ring was covered with an intraperitoneally placed mesh, which was fixed by staplers (the so-called "IPOM-method": intraperitoneal on-lay mesh). There was no intra-, nor postoperative complication. The hernioplasty combined with laparoscopic cholecystectomy did not have effect on postoperative pain and nursing time. The return to the normal physical activity was short, similar to laparoscopic hernioplasty (in 1-2 weeks). Authors conclude that the simultaneous, synchronous laparoscopic cholecystectomy and hernioplasty is recommended and should be the method of choice because it is more advantageous for patients.

  17. Laparoscopic Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgeon’s perspective, laparoscopic surgery may allow for easier dissection of abdominal scar tissue (adhesions), less surgical trauma, ... on Facebook About ACG ACG Store ACG Patient Education & Resource Center Home GI Health and Disease Recursos ...

  18. Inguinal hernia repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... This repair can be done with open or laparoscopic surgery. You and your surgeon can discuss which type ... the repair, the cuts are stitched closed. In laparoscopic surgery: The surgeon makes three to five small cuts ...

  19. Surgical treatment of para-oesophageal hiatal hernia.

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, M. L.; Duffy, J. P.; Beggs, F. D.; Salama, F. D.; Knowles, K. R.; Morgan, W. E.

    2001-01-01

    The development of laparoscopic antireflux surgery has stimulated interest in laparoscopic para-oesophageal hiatal hernia repair. This review of our practice over 10 years using a standard transthoracic technique was undertaken to establish the safety and effectiveness of the open technique to allow comparison. Sixty patients with para-oesophageal hiatal hernia were operated on between 1989 and 1999. There were 38 women and 22 men with a median age of 69.5 years. There were 47 elective and 13 emergency presentations. Operation consisted of a left thoracotomy, hernia reduction and crural repair. An antireflux procedure was added in selected patients. There were no deaths among the elective cases and one among the emergency cases. Median follow-up time was 19 months. There was one recurrence (1.5%). Seven patients (12%) required a single oesophagoscopy and dilatation up to 2 years postoperatively but have been asymptomatic since. Two patients (3%) developed symptomatic reflux which has been well controlled on proton-pump inhibitors. Transthoracic para-oesophageal hernia repair can be safely performed with minimal recurrence. PMID:11777134

  20. Lesser omental hernia after total colectomy: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Takanori; Morita, Yasuhiro; Takanishi, Kijuro; Nitta, Jun; Matsumoto, Jun; Miyazaki, Masaru

    2014-07-01

    Lesser omental hernia is a rare type of hernia that can cause intestinal obstruction. To our knowledge, there are only 16 documented cases of lesser omental hernia, including the present case. The subject of this case report was a 42-year-old man with a history of total colectomy for colon perforation caused by Crohn's disease 15 years earlier, who presented with epigastralgia and vomiting. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed a distended bowel loop ventral to the stomach and convergence of mesenteric vessels at the lesser curvature of the stomach. Based on a diagnosis of intestinal obstruction caused by a lesser omental hernia, he underwent emergency surgery, which revealed a 150-cm jejunal segment herniating through a 5-cm defect in the lesser omentum from the retrogastric space. We reduced the herniated loop and closed the hernial orifice successfully. We describe the characteristic CT findings, which allowed us to make the preoperative diagnosis, and speculate how the past total colectomy, in which the gastrocolic ligament was isolated and the transverse colon was resected, probably caused by this hernia. This case serves to demonstrate that lesser omental hernia could be a postoperative complication of total colectomy.

  1. Anesthetic implications of laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, A. J.

    1998-01-01

    Minimally invasive therapy aims to minimize the trauma of any interventional process but still achieve a satisfactory therapeutic result. The development of "critical pathways," rapid mobilization and early feeding have contributed towards the goal of shorter hospital stay. This concept has been extended to include laparoscopic cholecystectomy and hernia repair. Reports have been published confirming the safety of same day discharge for the majority of patients. However, we would caution against overenthusiastic ambulatory laparoscopic cholecystectomy on the rational but unproven assumption that early discharge will lead to occasional delays in diagnosis and management of postoperative complications. Intraoperative complications of laparoscopic surgery are mostly due to traumatic injuries sustained during blind trocar insertion and physiologic changes associated with patient positioning and pneumoperitoneum creation. General anesthesia and controlled ventilation comprise the accepted anesthetic technique to reduce the increase in PaCO2. Investigators have recently documented the cardiorespiratory compromise associated with upper abdominal laparoscopic surgery, and particular emphasis is placed on careful perioperative monitoring of ASA III-IV patients during insufflation. Setting limits on the inflationary pressure is advised in these patients. Anesthesiologists must maintain a high index of suspicion for complications such as gas embolism, extraperitoneal insufflation and surgical emphysema, pneumothorax and pneumomediastinum. Postoperative nausea and vomiting are among the most common and distressing symptoms after laparoscopic surgery. A highly potent and selective 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, ondansetron, has proven to be an effective oral and IV prophylaxis against postoperative emesis in preliminary studies. Opioids remain an important component of the anesthesia technique, although the introduction of newer potent NSAIDs may diminish their use. A preoperative

  2. Pilot Study on Laparoscopic Surgery in Port-Harcourt, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ray-Offor, E; Okoro, PE; Gbobo, I; Allison, AB

    2014-01-01

    Background: Video-laparoscopic surgery has long been practiced in western countries; however documented practice of this minimal access surgical technique are recently emanating from Nigeria. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first documented study on laparoscopic surgery from the Niger Delta region. Aim: To evaluate the feasibility of laparoscopy as a useful tool for management of common surgical abdominal conditions in our environment. Patients and Methods: This was a prospective outcome study of all consecutive surgical patients who had laparoscopic procedures in general and pediatric surgery units of our institution from August 2011 to December 2012. Data on patient's age, gender, indication for surgery, duration of hospital stay and outcome of surgery were collected and analyzed. Results: A total of 15 laparoscopic procedures were performed during this study period with age range of 2-65 years; mean: 32.27 ± 17.86 years. There were 11 males and four females. Six laparoscopic appendicectomies, one laparoscopy-assisted orchidopexy, five diagnostic laparoscopy ± biopsy, one laparoscopic trans-abdominal pre-peritoneal herniorrhaphy for bilateral indirect inguinal hernia and two laparoscopic adhesiolysis for small bowel obstruction were performed. All were successfully completed except one conversion (6.7%) for uncontrollable bleeding in an intra-abdominal tumor. Conclusion: The practice of laparoscopic surgery in our environment is feasible and safe despite the numerous, but surmountable challenges. There is the need for adequate training of the support staff and a dedicated theatre suite. PMID:24665198

  3. Laparoscopic reversal of Hartmann’s procedure: safety and feasibility

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Daniel C.K.; Guarino, Salvatore; Yau, Steven L.C.; Fok, Benny K.L.; Cheung, Hester Y.S.; Li, Michael K.W.; Tang, C.N.

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The present study aimed to compare the surgical outcomes of patients receiving laparoscopic reversal of Hartmann’s procedure (RHP) with those receiving open surgery. Methods: Records of all patients with RHP performed in our unit (including laparoscopic and open surgery) between 2000 and 2012 were retrieved. Data were retrospectively reviewed and compared. Results: Eighty-two RHPs were performed between 2000 and 2012. Thirty-five were performed with an open approach and 47 with a laparoscopic approach. Conversion rate was 28% in the laparoscopic group. There was no difference, between the two groups, in operation time or blood loss. The median length of stay was significantly shorter in the laparoscopic group (12 vs 14 days, P = 0.002) and fewer patients in the laparoscopic group had complications with post-operative paralytic ileus (2 vs 17%, P = 0.038). None of the patients in the laparoscopic group developed incisional hernia at the conclusion of follow-up, as opposed to five in the open group (0 vs 14%, P = 0.012). Conclusion: Laparoscopic RHP is safe and feasible, with more favorable surgical outcomes, when compared with open surgery. Conversion rate is acceptable. It should be the technique of choice for patients undergoing RHP. PMID:24759821

  4. Wireless live streaming video of laparoscopic surgery: a bandwidth analysis for handheld computers.

    PubMed

    Gandsas, Alex; McIntire, Katherine; George, Ivan M; Witzke, Wayne; Hoskins, James D; Park, Adrian

    2002-01-01

    Over the last six years, streaming media has emerged as a powerful tool for delivering multimedia content over networks. Concurrently, wireless technology has evolved, freeing users from desktop boundaries and wired infrastructures. At the University of Kentucky Medical Center, we have integrated these technologies to develop a system that can wirelessly transmit live surgery from the operating room to a handheld computer. This study establishes the feasibility of using our system to view surgeries and describes the effect of bandwidth on image quality. A live laparoscopic ventral hernia repair was transmitted to a single handheld computer using five encoding speeds at a constant frame rate, and the quality of the resulting streaming images was evaluated. No video images were rendered when video data were encoded at 28.8 kilobytes per second (Kbps), the slowest encoding bitrate studied. The highest quality images were rendered at encoding speeds greater than or equal to 150 Kbps. Of note, a 15 second transmission delay was experienced using all four encoding schemes that rendered video images. We believe that the wireless transmission of streaming video to handheld computers has tremendous potential to enhance surgical education. For medical students and residents, the ability to view live surgeries, lectures, courses and seminars on handheld computers means a larger number of learning opportunities. In addition, we envision that wireless enabled devices may be used to telemonitor surgical procedures. However, bandwidth availability and streaming delay are major issues that must be addressed before wireless telementoring becomes a reality.

  5. Pulmonary Embolism Following Laparoscopic Antireflux Surgery: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Luketich, James D.; Friedman, David M.; Ikramuddin, Sayeed; Schauer, Phil R.

    1999-01-01

    Deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism are concerning causes of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing general surgical procedures. Laparoscopic surgery has gained rapid acceptance in the past several years and is now a commonly performed procedure by most general surgeons. Multiple anecdotal reports of pulmonary embolism following laparoscopic cholecystectomy have been reported, but the true incidence of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery is not known. We present a case of pulmonary embolism following laparoscopic repair of paraesophageal hernia. The literature is then reviewed regarding the incidence of pulmonary embolism following laparoscopic surgery, the mechanism of deep venous thrombosis formation, and the recommendations for deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis in patients undergoing laparoscopic procedures. PMID:10444017

  6. Hiatal hernia repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100028.htm Hiatal hernia repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Hiatal Hernia A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  7. Laparoscopic management of persistent mullerian duct syndrome.

    PubMed

    Parelkar, Sandesh V; Gupta, Rahul Kumar; Oak, Sanjay; Sanghvi, Beejal; Kaltari, Deepak; Patil, Raj Shekhar; Prakash, Advait; Shimoga, Pradeep

    2009-09-01

    Persistent mullerian duct syndrome (PMDS), characterized by the presence of mullerian structures in a virilized male, frequently presents as undescended testis, either intraabdominal or within a hernial sac. We describe a 10-month-old infant with PMDS successfully managed by the laparoscopic approach. At the age of 1.5 months, the patient presented with a left inguinal hernia and bilateral nonpalpable gonads in another center and underwent left inguinal exploration. The uterus and a gonadlike structure along with the hernia sac were found in the inguinal canal. Left inguinal herniotomy was performed after reduction of the uterus and gonadlike structure. No gonadal biopsy was obtained. The patient was further investigated in the same center. His karyotype was 46,XY. Magnetic resonance imaging of the abdomen and pelvis revealed a uterinelike structure posterior to the urinary bladder, but neither testis nor ovaries were visualized. At 10 months of age, he was referred to our department for further management. A laparoscopic single-stage orchiopexy was performed. Both testes were identified and brought to the scrotum by splitting the uterus in the midline and then bringing the testes with the vas and attached uterine tissue into the scrotum. The aim of placement of well-vascularized testes in the scrotum was achieved as confirmed on follow-up color Doppler ultrasound study 6 months postoperatively, which showed normal vascularity. Laparoscopic surgical techniques for this condition are also discussed.

  8. Changes in the Frequencies of Abdominal Wall Hernias and the Preferences for Their Repair: A Multicenter National Study From Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Şeker, Gaye; Kulacoglu, Hakan; Öztuna, Derya; Topgül, Koray; Akyol, Cihangir; Çakmak, Atıl; Karateke, Faruk; Özdoğan, Mehmet; Ersoy, Eren; Gürer, Ahmet; Zerbaliyev, Elbrus; Seker, Duray; Yorgancı, Kaya; Pergel, Ahmet; Aydın, İbrahim; Ensari, Cemal; Bilecik, Tuna; Kahraman, İzzettin; Reis, Erhan; Kalaycı, Murat; Canda, Aras Emre; Demirağ, Alp; Kesicioğlu, Tuğrul; Malazgirt, Zafer; Gündoğdu, Haldun; Terzi, Cem

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal wall hernias are a common problem in the general population. A Western estimate reveals that the lifetime risk of developing a hernia is about 2%.1–3 As a result, hernia repairs likely comprise the most frequent general surgery operations. More than 20 million hernias are estimated to be repaired every year around the world.4 Numerous repair techniques have been described to date however tension-free mesh repairs are widely used today because of their low hernia recurrence rates. Nevertheless, there are some ongoing debates regarding the ideal approach (open or laparoscopic),5,6 the ideal anesthesia (general, local, or regional),7,8 and the ideal mesh (standard polypropylene or newer meshes).9,10 PMID:25216417

  9. Treatment of a giant inguinal hernia using transabdominal pre-peritoneal repair

    PubMed Central

    Momiyama, Masato; Mizutani, Fumitoshi; Yamamoto, Tatsuyoshi; Aoyama, Yoshinori; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a male Japanese patient with a giant inguinal hernia that extended to his knees while standing. A transabdominal pre-peritoneal (TAPP) repair was performed under general anesthesia. Complete reduction of the contents of the hernia was achieved within 2 h 50 min. A blood loss of approximately 700 ml was noted. The patient was discharged from the hospital on post-operative Day 12, with no recurrence of the hernia 6 months post-surgery. Factors contributing to the successful outcomes included preparation of several reduction methods before surgery, use of a large size mesh and implementation of pre-operative measures to prevent abdominal compartment syndrome. Further studies are required to evaluate the feasibility of laparoscopic repair in the management of giant inguinal hernia. PMID:27672103

  10. Recurrent groin hernia

    PubMed Central

    Cox, P. J.; Leach, R. D.; Ellis, Harold

    1981-01-01

    One hundred consecutive recurrences following repair of inguinal hernias have been studied; 62 were direct, 30 indirect, 7 pantaloon and one a femoral hernia. Half the indirect recurrences occurred within a year of repair and probably represented failure to detect a small indirect sac. Later indirect recurrences probably represented failure to repair the internal ring. Nine of the direct hernias were medial funicular recurrences and represented failure to anchor the darn medially. The rest of the direct recurrences were attributable to tissue insufficiency and could probably have been averted by larger tissue bites. Recurrences following inguinal herniorrhaphy remain an all too common problem but can be reduced by meticulous surgical technique. PMID:7339602

  11. Athletic pubalgia (sports hernia).

    PubMed

    Litwin, Demetrius E M; Sneider, Erica B; McEnaney, Patrick M; Busconi, Brian D

    2011-04-01

    Athletic pubalgia or sports hernia is a syndrome of chronic lower abdomen and groin pain that may occur in athletes and nonathletes. Because the differential diagnosis of chronic lower abdomen and groin pain is so broad, only a small number of patients with chronic lower abdomen and groin pain fulfill the diagnostic criteria of athletic pubalgia (sports hernia). The literature published to date regarding the cause, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of sports hernias is confusing. This article summarizes the current information and our present approach to this chronic lower abdomen and groin pain syndrome.

  12. Diaphragmatic hernia repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... presentations/100014.htm Diaphragmatic hernia repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... Overview The chest cavity includes the heart and lungs. The abdominal cavity includes the liver, the stomach, ...

  13. Recurrent inguinal hernia.

    PubMed Central

    Postlethwait, R W

    1985-01-01

    An analysis of 584 operations for recurrent inguinal hernia was made in an attempt to determine the cause of the recurrence based on the anatomic findings. The recurrence was indirect in 300, direct in 241, and various other in 43 operations. The causes of the indirect recurrences appeared to be an unrecognized hernia, incomplete dissection or improper ligation of the sac, failure to narrow the cord, or inadequate reconstruction of the internal ring. No cause for the diffuse direct recurrences was apparent. Of the 241 hernias in Hesselbach's triangle, 144 were small localized defects, usually (112) just lateral to the symphysis. These were considered to be caused by the cutting action of a suture placed under tension. On the basis of these findings, suggestions are made for primary inguinal hernia operations. PMID:4073990

  14. Hernia Surgical Mesh Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... repaired hernia. Absorbable mesh will degrade and lose strength over time. It is not intended to provide long-term reinforcement to the repair site. As the material degrades, new tissue growth is intended to provide ...

  15. Paraesophageal Hernia Repair With Partial Longitudinal Gastrectomy in Obese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, John; El-Hayek, Kevin; Brethauer, Stacy; Schauer, Philip; Zelisko, Andrea; Chand, Bipan; O'Rourke, Colin; Kroh, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) with hiatal hernia in obese patients has proven difficult, as studies demonstrate poor symptom control and high failure rates in this patient population. Recent data have shown that incorporating weight loss procedures into the treatment of reflux may improve overall outcomes. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 28 obese and morbidly obese patients who presented from December 2007 through July 2013 with large or recurrent type 3 or 4 paraesophageal hernia. All of the patients underwent combined paraesophageal hernia repair and partial longitudinal gastrectomy. Charts were retrospectively reviewed, and the patients were contacted to determine symptomatic relief. Results: Mean preoperative body mass index was 38.1 ± 4.9 kg/m2. Anatomic failure of prior fundoplication occurred in 7 patients (25%). The remaining 21 had primary paraesophageal hernia, 3 of which were type 4. Postoperative complications included pulmonary embolism (n = 1), pulmonary decompensation (n = 2), and wound infection (n = 1). Mean hospital stay was 5 ± 3 days. Upper gastrointestinal esophagogram was performed in 21 patients with no immediate recurrence or staple line dehiscence. Mean excess weight loss was 44 ± 25%. All of the patients surveyed experienced near to total resolution of their preoperative symptoms within the first month. At 1 year, symptom scores decreased significantly. At 27 months, however, there was a mild increase in the scores. Return of severe symptoms occurred in 2 patients, both of whom underwent conversion to gastric bypass. Conclusions: Combined laparoscopic paraesophageal hernia repair with longitudinal partial gastrectomy offers a safe, feasible approach to the management of large or recurrent paraesophageal hernia in well-selected obese and morbidly obese patients. Short-term results were promising; however, intermediate results showed increasing rates of reflux symptoms that required

  16. Resorbable biosynthetic mesh for crural reinforcement during hiatal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Alicuben, Evan T; Worrell, Stephanie G; DeMeester, Steven R

    2014-10-01

    The use of mesh to reinforce crural closure during hiatal hernia repair is controversial. Although some studies suggest that using synthetic mesh can reduce recurrence, synthetic mesh can erode into the esophagus and in our opinion should be avoided. Studies with absorbable or biologic mesh have not proven to be of benefit for recurrence. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of hiatal hernia repair with modern resorbable biosynthetic mesh in combination with adjunct tension reduction techniques. We retrospectively analyzed all patients who had crural reinforcement during repair of a sliding or paraesophageal hiatal hernia with Gore BioA resorbable mesh. Objective follow-up was by videoesophagram and/or esophagogastroduodenoscopy. There were 114 patients. The majority of operations (72%) were laparoscopic primary repairs with all patients receiving a fundoplication. The crura were closed primarily in all patients and reinforced with a BioA mesh patch. Excessive tension prompted a crural relaxing incision in four per cent and a Collis gastroplasty in 39 per cent of patients. Perioperative morbidity was minor and unrelated to the mesh. Median objective follow-up was one year, but 18 patients have objective follow-up at two or more years. A recurrent hernia was found in one patient (0.9%) three years after repair. The use of crural relaxing incisions and Collis gastroplasty in combination with crural reinforcement with resorbable biosynthetic mesh is associated with a low early hernia recurrence rate and no mesh-related complications. Long-term follow-up will define the role of these techniques for hiatal hernia repair.

  17. Antibiotic Coating of Hernia Meshes: The Next Step Toward Preventing Mesh Infection.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Arnab; Neupane, Ruel; Novitsky, Yuri W

    2015-11-01

    Mesh bacterial colonization/infection remains a critical issue in complex ventral hernia repair. Despite the recent emergence of biologic meshes, current strategies to prevent and treat mesh infection are largely ineffective, often leading to device failure and subsequent explantation along with the associated costs and effect on patient welfare. Unacceptably high rates of morbidity and hernia recurrence following mesh infection highlight the need for innovation in the area of hernia repair for the complex patient. One recent strategy to address such shortcomings is local antibiosis in the form of polymer coatings applied to the mesh itself. Current literature regarding the use of antibiotic-coated hernia mesh is limited but does illustrate the ability of these devices to inhibit bacterial growth and prevent mesh infection in both in vitro and in vivo studies. Although there is a paucity of literature regarding long-term clinical efficacy, this provides opportunity for further inquiry into a promising new development to combat mesh infective complications.

  18. [New aspects in hernia surgery].

    PubMed

    Lammers, B J; Goretzki, P E; Otto, T

    2005-07-01

    In the last 10 years in Germany we have seen a lot of hernia repairs using mesh.Meta-analysis shows the advantages of using meshes in hernia surgery; recurrence rates in inguinal hernia surgery are less than 3% in studies. There is some discussion about minimally invasive surgery in Germany.In incisional hernia surgery there is no discussion about using meshes. The role of minimally invasive surgery has not yet been defined.

  19. Clinical presentation and operative repair of hernia of Morgagni

    PubMed Central

    Loong, T; Kocher, H

    2005-01-01

    A 77 year old woman who presented with an incarcerated hernia of Morgagni was successfully treated without complications. A Medline search (1996 to date) along with cross referencing was done to quantify the number of acute presentations in adults compared to children. Different investigating modalities—for example, lateral chest and abdominal radiography, contrast studies or, in difficult cases, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging—can be used to diagnose hernia of Morgagni. The favoured method of repair—laparotomy or laparoscopy—is also discussed. A total of 47 case reports on children and 93 case reports on adults were found. Fourteen percent of children (seven out of 47) presented acutely compared with 12% of adults (12 out of 93). Repair at laparotomy was the method of choice but if uncertain, laparoscopy would be a useful diagnostic tool before attempted repair. Laparoscopic repair was favoured in adults especially in non-acute cases. PMID:15640427

  20. Two Different Surgical Approaches for Strangulated Obturator Hernias

    PubMed Central

    Sze Li, Siow; Kenneth Kher Ti, Voon

    2012-01-01

    Obturator hernia is a rare condition that may present in an acute or subacute setting in correlation with the degree of small-bowel obstruction. Pre-operative diagnosis is difficult, as symptoms are often non-specific. A high index of suspicion should be maintained for emaciated elderly women with small-bowel obstruction without a previous abdominal operation and a positive Howship–Romberg sign. When diagnosis is in doubt, computed tomography scan of the abdomen and the pelvis (if available) or laparotomy should be performed immediately, as high mortality rate is related to the perforation of gangrenous bowels. We present 2 cases of strangulated obturator hernia, managed differently with both open and laparoscopic approaches. The diagnostic accuracy of computed tomography scan is highlighted followed by a brief literature review with an emphasis placed on surgical management. PMID:22977378

  1. Para-oesophageal and parahiatal hernias in an Asian acute care tertiary hospital: an underappreciated surgical condition

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Ye Xin; Ong, Lester Wei Lin; Lee, June; Wong, Andrew Siang Yih

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The prevalence of hiatal hernias and para-oesophageal hernias (PEHs) is lower in Asian populations than in Western populations. Progressive herniation can result in giant PEHs, which are associated with significant morbidity. This article presents the experience of an Asian acute care tertiary hospital in the management of giant PEH and parahiatal hernia. METHODS Surgical records dated between January 2003 and January 2013 from the Department of Surgery, Changi General Hospital, Singapore, were retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS Ten patients underwent surgical repair for giant PEH or parahiatal hernia during the study period. Open surgery was performed for four patients with giant PEH who presented emergently, while elective laparoscopic repair was performed for six patients with either giant PEH or parahiatal hernia (which were preoperatively diagnosed as PEH). Anterior 180° partial fundoplication was performed in eight patients, and mesh reinforcement was used in six patients. The electively repaired patients had minimal or no symptoms during presentation. Gastric volvulus was observed in five patients. There were no cases of mortality. The median follow-up duration was 16.3 months. There were no cases of mesh erosion, complaints of dysphagia or recurrence of PEH in all patients. CONCLUSION Giant PEH and parahiatal hernia are underdiagnosed in Asia. Most patients with giant PEH or parahiatal hernia are asymptomatic; they often present emergently or are incidentally diagnosed. Although surgical outcomes are favourable even with a delayed diagnosis, there should be greater emphasis on early diagnosis and elective repair of these hernias. PMID:26778633

  2. The History of Hiatal Hernia Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Stylopoulos, Nicholas; Rattner, David W.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This review addresses the historical evolution of hiatal hernia (HH) repair and reports in a chronological fashion the major milestones in HH surgery before the laparoscopic era. Methods: The medical literature and the collections of the History of Medicine Division of the National Library of Medicine were searched. Secondary references from all sources were studied. The senior author's experience and personal communications are also reported. Results: The first report of HH was published in 1853 by Bowditch. Rokitansky in 1855 demonstrated that esophagitis was due to gastroesophageal reflux, and Hirsch in 1900 diagnosed an HH using x-rays. Eppinger diagnosed an HH in a live patient, and Friedenwald and Feldman related the symptoms to the presence of an HH. In 1926, Akerlund proposed the term hiatus hernia and classified HH into the 3 types that we use today. The first elective surgical repair was reported in 1919 by Soresi. The physiologic link between HH and gastroesophageal reflux was made at the second half of the 20th century by Allison and Barrett. In the midst of a physiologic revolution, Nissen and Belsey developed their famous operations. In 1957, Collis published his innovative operation. Thal described his technique in 1965, and in 1967, Hill published his procedure. Many modifications of these procedures were published by Pearson and Henderson, Orringer and Sloan, Rossetti, Dor, and Toupet. Donahue and Demeester significantly improved Nissen's operation, and they were the first to truly understand its physiologic mechanism. Conclusion: Hiatal hernia surgery has evolved from anatomic repair to physiological restoration. PMID:15622007

  3. Single incision laparoscopic surgery in general surgery: a review.

    PubMed

    Greaves, N; Nicholson, J

    2011-09-01

    Single incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) is a rapidly developing field that may represent the future of laparoscopic surgery. The major advantage of SILS over standard laparoscopic surgery is in cosmesis, with surgery becoming essentially scarless if the incision is hidden within the umbilicus. Only one incision is required so the risk of potential complications like port site hernias, haematomas and wound infection is reduced. The trade-off for this is a technically more challenging procedure with different underlying principles to that of traditional laparoscopic surgery. A wide variety of new equipment has been developed to support SILS and the range of procedures that are amenable to the technique is increasing. To date most of the published data relating to SILS are in the form of case series, with the first large randomised controlled trials due to be completed by the end of 2012. The existing evidence suggests that SILS is similar to standard laparoscopic surgery in terms of complication rates, completion rates and post-operative pain scores. However, the duration of SILS is longer than equivalent laparoscopic procedures. This article discusses SILS with regard to its applications in general surgery and reviews the evidence currently available.

  4. Shouldice inguinal hernia repair in the male adult: the gold standard? A multicenter controlled trial in 1578 patients.

    PubMed Central

    Hay, J M; Boudet, M J; Fingerhut, A; Poucher, J; Hennet, H; Habib, E; Veyrières, M; Flamant, Y

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hernia repair is the second most frequently performed operation in France and in the United States, the prevalence being 36 for every 1000 males. Lowering the recurrence rate by 1% would mean 1000 fewer operations for hernia repair per year in France. METHODS: Between 1983 and 1989, 1578 adult males with a total of 1706 nonrecurrent inguinal hernias were prospectively and randomly allotted to undergo either a Bassini's repair, Cooper's ligament, or Shouldice repair with polypropylene or a Shouldice repair with stainless steel for determination of which technique was associated with the lowest recurrence rate. Fifty-nine hernia repairs were withdrawn after inclusion. Of the 1647 remaining hernias, 52.2% were indirect, 25.6% were direct, and 23.2% were combined. Patients were seen every 6 months for 3 years and then every year. Median follow-up was 5 years 8 months (range, 3 months-8.5 years). RESULTS: At 8.5 years, 5.6% of hernias were lost to follow-up. Ninety-seven hernia repairs failed, 50% during the first 2 years. The actuarial recurrence rate was 7.94% at 8.5 years. The Shouldice repair (stainless steel or polypropylene) was associated with fewer recurrences (6.1%) than either the Bassini's (8.6%) or Cooper's ligament repair (11.2%) technique (p < 0.001). This difference remained significant even when the maximal bias test was used. Fewer recurrences (5.9%) were observed with the stainless steel wire Shouldice repair than with polypropylene version (6.5%), but the difference was not significant. CONCLUSIONS: Shouldice hernia repair provides the patient with the best chances of nonrecurrence regardless of the anatomical type of hernia. The Shouldice hernia repair should be the gold standard for inguinal hernia repair in men and serves as the basis for comparison with all other techniques, be they prosthetic or laparoscopic. PMID:8526578

  5. Herniation of Duodenum into the Right Ventral Hepatic Peritoneal Cavity with Groove Formation at the Ventral Hepatic Surface in a 2-Week-Old Chicken

    PubMed Central

    HARIDY, Mohie; SASAKI, Jun; GORYO, Masanobu

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Internal hernia in avian species is very rare. A necropsy of a 2-week-old SPF White Leghorn chicken revealed that a loop of the duodenum and part of the pancreas (4 × 2 × 1 cm) was protruding through the abnormal foramen (2.5 cm in diameter) in the right posthepatic septum into the right ventral hepatic peritoneal cavity. The herniated loop was located underneath the ventral hepatic surface, leaving a groove on the right hepatic lobe (2 × 1.5 × 0.4 cm). The part of the pancreas involved in the hernia was grossly enlarged. Microscopically, a zone of pressure atrophy of hepatic tissue was characterized by crowdedness of hepatocytes with pyknotic nuclei and faint eosinophilic cytoplasm and indistinct narrow sinusoids. The pancreas revealed hypertrophy of the acinar cells with an increase in the secretory granules and basophilic cytoplasm. This is the first report of duodenum herniation into the right ventral hepatic peritoneal cavity resulting in groove formation on the ventral hepatic surface in a 2-week-old chicken. PMID:23759688

  6. Grynfeltt Hernia: A Deceptive Lumbar Mass with a Lipoma-Like Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Zadeh, Jonathan R.; Buicko, Jessica L.; Patel, Chetan; Kozol, Robert; Lopez-Viego, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    The Grynfeltt-Lesshaft hernia is a rare posterior abdominal wall defect that allows for the herniation of retro- and intraperitoneal structures through the upper lumbar triangle. While this hernia may initially present as a small asymptomatic bulge, the defect typically enlarges over time and can become symptomatic with potentially serious complications. In order to avoid that outcome, it is advisable to electively repair Grynfeltt hernias in patients without significant contraindications to surgery. Due to the limited number of lumbar hernioplasties performed, there has not been a large study that definitively identifies the best repair technique. It is generally accepted that abdominal hernias such as these should be repaired by tension-free methods. Both laparoscopic and open techniques are described in modern literature with unique advantages and complications for each. We present the case of an unexpected Grynfeltt hernia diagnosed following an attempted lipoma resection. We chose to perform an open repair involving a combination of fascial approximation and dual-layer polypropylene mesh placement. The patient's recovery was uneventful and there has been no evidence of recurrence at over six months. Our goal herein is to increase awareness of upper lumbar hernias and to discuss approaches to their surgical management. PMID:26697256

  7. Obstructive Jaundice Caused by Hepatic Torsion in an Infant with Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Jan, Iftikhar Ahmad; Al Hamoudi, Basmah; AlJunaibi, Abdulla; Mussa, Abdelmatlub Ben

    2017-01-01

    Right sided congenital diaphragmatic hernia may cause biliary obstruction. We present a 2 months female infant who had respiratory distress and persistent jaundice since birth. Investigations suggested direct hyperbilirubinemia, right-sided diaphragmatic hernia with liver herniation in the thorax, and intra- and extrahepatic biliary dilatation. Laparotomy showed herniation of liver in the chest with hepatic torsion of about 180° causing obstruction of bile ducts. Liver torsion was corrected and liver relocated in the abdomen. An operative cholangiogram confirmed free passage of contrast to the intestine after correction of hepatic torsion. Repair of the diaphragmatic hernia was performed. Only skin closure was performed leaving a ventral hernia to avoid abdominal compartment syndrome. Postoperatively, the baby was kept on ventilator for 2 days and then extubated. She showed rapid recovery and was discharged in a stable condition. The ventral hernia was repaired at the age of 6 months. Her total bilirubin levels dropped gradually from 12.50 mg/dl into its normal values within 3 months. PMID:28082781

  8. Bilateral Laparoscopic Totally Extraperitoneal Repair Without Mesh Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, Brandon; Johna, Samir; Yamanishi, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Mesh fixation during laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal repair is thought to be necessary to prevent recurrence. However, mesh fixation may increase postoperative chronic pain. This study aimed to describe the experience of a single surgeon at our institution performing this operation. Methods: We performed a retrospective review of the medical records of all patients who underwent bilateral laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal repair without mesh fixation for inguinal hernia from January 2005 to December 2011. Demographic, operative, and postoperative data were obtained for analysis. Results: A total of 343 patients underwent simultaneous bilateral laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal repair of 686 primary and recurrent inguinal hernias from January 2005 to December 2011. The mean operative time was 33 minutes. One patient was converted to an open approach (0.3%), and 1 patient had intraoperative bladder injury. Postoperative hematoma/seroma occurred in 5 patients (1.5%), wound infection in 1 (0.3%), hematuria in 2 (0.6%), and acute myocardial infarction in 1 (0.3%). Chronic pain developed postoperatively in 9 patients (2.6%); 3 of them underwent re-exploration. All patients were discharged home a few hours after surgery except for 3 patients. Among the 686 hernia repairs, there were a total of 20 recurrences (2.9%) in 18 patients (5.2%). Two patients had bilateral recurrences, whereas 16 had unilateral recurrences. Twelve of the recurrences occurred after 1 year (60%). Fourteen recurrences occurred among direct hernias (70%). Conclusion: Compared with the literature, our patients had fewer intraoperative and postoperative complications, less chronic pain, and no increase in operative time or length of hospital stay but had a slight increase in recurrence rate. PMID:25392633

  9. Laparoscopic Adrenal Gland Removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... malignant. Laparoscopic Adrenal Gland Removal What are the Advantages of Laparoscopic Adrenal Gland Removal? In the past, ... of procedure and the patients overall condition. Common advantages are: Less postoperative pain Shorter hospital stay Quicker ...

  10. Laparoscopic Spine Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Opportunities Exhibit Opportunities Sponsorship Opportunities Log In Laparoscopic Spine Surgery Patient Information from SAGES Download PDF Find a SAGES Surgeon Laparoscopic Spine Surgery Your spine surgeon has determined that you ...

  11. Randomized Prospective Study of Totally Extraperitoneal Inguinal Hernia Repair: Fixation Versus No Fixation of Mesh

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Cody A.; Greenlee, Susan M.; Larson, Dirk R.; Harrington, Jeffrey R.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Fixation of the mesh during laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal (TEP) inguinal hernia repair is thought to be necessary to prevent recurrence. However, mesh fixation may increase postoperative pain and lead to an increased risk of complications. We questioned whether elimination of fixation of the mesh during TEP inguinal hernia repair leads to decreased postoperative pain or complications, or both, without an increased rate of recurrence. Methods: A randomized prospective single-blinded study was carried out in 40 patients who underwent laparoscopic TEP inguinal hernia repair with (Group A=20) or without (Group B=20) fixation of the mesh. Results: Patients in whom the mesh was not fixed had shorter hospital length of stay (8.3 vs 16.0 hours, P=0.01), were less likely to be admitted to the hospital (P=0.001), used less postoperative narcotic analgesia in the PACU (P=0.01), and were less likely to develop urinary retention (P=0.04). No significant differences occurred in the level of pain, time to return to normal activity, or the difficulty of the operation between the 2 groups. No hernia recurrences were observed in either group (follow-up range, 6 to 30 months, median=19). Conclusions: Elimination of tack fixation of mesh during laparoscopic TEP inguinal hernia repair significantly reduces the use of postoperative narcotic analgesia, hospital length of stay, and the development of postoperative urinary retention but does not lead to a significant reduction in postoperative pain. Eliminating tacks does not lead to an increased rate of recurrence. PMID:17575757

  12. Direct radionuclide cystography imaging in colovesical fistula due to inguinal hernia operation complication.

    PubMed

    Tamam, Muge; Yavuz, Hatice Sümeyye; Hacimahmutoğlu, Serafettin; Mülazimoğlu, Mehmet; Kacar, Tulay; Ozpacaci, Tevfik

    2009-09-01

    Colovesical fistula is an abnormal connection between the enteric and urinary systems, usually sigmoid colon, caused by various conditions. One cause of colovesical fistula is iatrogenic injury, such as induced by inguinal hernia surgery. We present a case of colovesical fistula. A 57-year-old male was admitted to a local hospital with complaints of dysuria and pneumaturia. He had a past history of total extraperitoneal laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair operation 7 years previously for bilateral inguinal hernia. The case was assessed with radiologic and scintigraphic techniques. Radiologic techniques (plain abdominal radiography, intravenous pyelogram, ultrasound examination, double-contrast barium enema, CT, MRI) were inadequate to determine the colovesical fistula. The colovesical fistula was visualized with direct radionuclide voiding cystography as an alternative scintigraphic method.

  13. Parastomal Hernia Repair and Reinforcement: The Role of Biologic and Synthetic Materials

    PubMed Central

    Gillern, Suzanne; Bleier, Joshua I. S.

    2014-01-01

    Parastomal hernia is a prevalent problem and treatment can pose difficulties due to significant rates of recurrence and morbidities of the repair. The current standard of care is to perform parastomal hernia repair with mesh whenever possible. There exist multiple options for mesh reinforcement (biologic and synthetic) as well as surgical techniques, to include type of repair (keyhole and Sugarbaker) and position of mesh placement (onlay, sublay, or intraperitoneal). The sublay and intraperitoneal positions have been shown to be superior with a lower incidence of recurrence. This procedure may be performed open or laparoscopically, both having similar recurrence and morbidity results. Prophylactic mesh placement at the time of stoma formation has been shown to significantly decrease the rates of parastomal hernia formation. PMID:25435825

  14. Richter’s Hernia and Sir Frederick Treves: An Original Clinical Experience, Review, and Historical Overview

    PubMed Central

    Steinke, Wolfgang; Zellweger, René

    2000-01-01

    Objective To describe the clinical recognition, pathology, and management of Richter’s hernia and to review the relevant literature of the past 400 years. Summary Background Data The earliest known reported case of Richter’s hernia occurred in 1598 and was described by Fabricius Hildanus. The first scientific description of this particular hernia was given by August Gottlob Richter in 1778, who presented it as “the small rupture.” In 1887, Sir Frederick Treves gave an excellent overview on the topic and proposed the title “Richter’s hernia.” To his work—a cornerstone to modern understanding—hardly any new aspects can be added today. Since then, only occasional case reports or small series of retrospectively collected Richter’s hernias have been published. Methods The authors draw on their experience with 18 prospectively collected cases treated in the ICRC Lopiding Hospital for War Surgery in northern Kenya between February and December 1998 and review the relevant literature of the past 400 years. Results The classic features of Richter’s hernia were confirmed in all case studies of patients: only part of the circumference of the bowel is entrapped and strangulated in the hernial orifice. The involved segment may rapidly pass into gangrene, yet signs of intestinal obstruction are often absent. The death rate in the authors’ collective was 17%. Conclusion Richter’s hernia is a deceptive entity whose high death rate can be reduced by accurate diagnosis and early surgery. Considering the increasing incidence at laparoscope insertion sites, awareness of this special type of hernia with its misleading clinical appearance is important and of general interest. PMID:11066144

  15. Sports Hernia Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Economopoulos, Kostas J.; Milewski, Matthew D.; Hanks, John B.; Hart, Joseph M.; Diduch, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The minimal repair technique for sports hernias repairs only the weak area of the posterior abdominal wall along with decompressing the genitofemoral nerve. This technique has been shown to return athletes to competition rapidly. This study compares the clinical outcomes of the minimal repair technique with the traditional modified Bassini repair. Hypothesis: Athletes undergoing the minimal repair technique for a sports hernia would return to play more rapidly compared with athletes undergoing the traditional modified Bassini repair. Methods: A retrospective study of 28 patients who underwent sports hernia repair at the authors’ institution was performed. Fourteen patients underwent the modified Bassini repair, and a second group of 14 patients underwent the minimal repair technique. The 2 groups were compared with respect to time to return to sport, return to original level of competition, and clinical outcomes. Results: Patients in the minimal repair group returned to sports at a median of 5.6 weeks (range, 4-8 weeks), which was significantly faster compared with the modified Bassini repair group, with a median return of 25.8 weeks (range, 4-112 weeks; P = 0.002). Thirteen of 14 patients in the minimal repair group returned to sports at their previous level, while 9 of 14 patients in the Bassini group were able to return to their previous level of sport (P = 0.01). Two patients in each group had recurrent groin pain. One patient in the minimal repair group underwent revision hernia surgery for recurrent pain, while 1 patient in the Bassini group underwent hip arthroscopy for symptomatic hip pain. Conclusion: The minimal repair technique allows athletes with sports hernias to return to play faster than patients treated with the modified Bassini. PMID:24427419

  16. Transfusion-Dependent Anaemia: An Overlooked Complication of Paraoesophageal Hernias

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Garett S.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. A paraoesophageal hernia (PH) may be one reason for iron-deficiency anaemia (IDA) but is often overlooked as a cause. We aimed to assess the incidence and resolution of transfusion-dependent IDA in patients presenting for hiatal hernia surgery. Methods. We analysed a prospective database of patients undergoing laparoscopic hiatal repair in order to identify patients with severe IDA requiring red cell/iron transfusion. Results. Of 138 patients with PH managed over a 4-year period, 7 patients (5.1%; M : F 2 : 5; median age 62 yrs (range 57–82)) with IDA requiring red cell/iron transfusion were identified. Preoperatively, 3/7 patients underwent repetitive and unnecessary diagnostic endoscopic investigations prior to surgery. Only 2/7 ever demonstrated gastric mucosal erosions (Cameron ulcers). All patients were cured from anaemia postoperatively. Discussion. PH is an important differential diagnosis in patients with IDA, even those with marked anaemia and no endoscopically identifiable mucosal lesions. Early recognition can avoid unnecessary additional diagnostic endoscopies. Laparoscopic repair is associated with low morbidity and results in resolution of anaemia. PMID:27379280

  17. Laparoscopic Herniorrhaphy with Porcine Small Intestinal Submucosa: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    Introduction: Using mesh or a synthetic prosthesis during the laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernias has been demonstrated to be safe and effective. A new material, porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS mesh), has been successfully used in canine and rodent animal models with excellent results. This mesh is degradable and resorbable with a marked decrease in the possibility of becoming infected. However, the amount of fibroblast ingrowth is equal to that with polypropylene mesh. Methods: A comparison was made between this new SIS mesh to repair 15 inguinal hernias in 12 patients and polypropylene mesh used in 12 similar patients. A preperitoneal approach with balloon dissection was used in all patients. Results: Demographics were similar in both groups. The results were excellent and compared equally. Complications (seroma, discomfort) were minimal in both groups and were similar. Conclusions: Porcine small intestinal submucosa, SIS mesh, can be used for laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernias. Long-term follow-up will be necessary to confirm these preliminary results. PMID:12166756

  18. Laparoscopic inguinal herniorrhaphy in a swine model. Third place winner of the Conrad Jobst Award in the Gold Medal paper competition.

    PubMed

    Layman, T S; Burns, R P; Chandler, K E; Russell, W L; Cook, R G

    1993-01-01

    A simplified method of laparoscopic inguinal herniorrhaphy using prosthetic materials was evaluated in a swine hernia model. The goals of this study were to determine 1) effectiveness of repair in a rapidly growing animal, 2) effectiveness and extent of adhesion formation of different prosthetic materials, 3) the effect of repair on testicular growth, and 4) histologic effects on the hernia site and surrounding structures. In a prospective randomized study, 30 juvenile male swine (average, 23 kg) with 35 congenital indirect inguinal hernias underwent laparoscopic herniorrhaphy using one of three prosthetic materials: Group 1 (polytetrafluoroethylene/Gore-Tex), N = 10; Group 2 (polypropylene mesh/Marlex), N = 10; Group 3 (polypropylene mesh/Prolene), N = 10. A standardized laparoscopic herniorrhaphy technique consisting of stapling prosthetic material over the hernia defect without peritoneal dissection was employed. During the 3-month postoperative period, animals were sequentially examined for normal growth and development, normal testicular development, and signs of hernia recurrence. Clinically apparent complications related to herniorrhaphy occurred in five animals (17%) during the observation period (one with repair failure, one with testicular torsion, two with repair failure and bowel obstruction, and one with intestinal obstruction secondary to adhesions). All three animals with bowel obstruction died. At 90 days after surgery all remaining animals (N = 27) were euthanized (Group 1 = 9, Group 2 = 8, Group 3 = 10). Average weight was 84 kg. Necropsy findings included no additional hernia recurrences, and one mesh erosion into the urinary bladder.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. [Experience with ventral hernioplasties according to Chevrel with "on-lay" prolene mesh].

    PubMed

    Hut'an, M ml; Hut'an, M

    2008-04-01

    The authors present a retrospective study including 85 patients with ventral hernias Chevrel technique repairs. The study group included 33 males and 52 females, the mean age was 56.09 years. The procedure was indicated for incisional hernias in 58.8 % and for supraumbilical (epigastric) hernias in 25.9%. The aim of the retrospective study was to assess the Chevrel methodology in our patients. The following parametres were assessed: postoperative quality of life, patient satisfaction rates, complication rates and relaps rates. Furthermore, the authors intended to compare the outcomes of the Chevrel repair method with other, commonly used repair methods. The analysis had a form of questionnaires, with 39 (45.8%) patient respondents. The questionnaires were evaluated using a modified table and contingent tables in MS Excel. The authors focused, primarily, on the preoperative period and the postoperative quality of life. On average, the patients noticed the developed hernias 23.48 months prior to their surgery. In 72% of the patients, the hernia developed after surgeries, the mean time was 21.51 months after the preceding procedure. Over a half of the cases of incisional hernias included incisional hernias after appendectomies and cholecystectomies. The majority of postoperative complications included inflammation and incisional pain. 61.5% of the patients used abdominal belts after the procedure, 5% of the patients had to change their jobs and retired due to their invalidity. The patients assessed their quality of life on the following scale: 1 (the worst) to 10 (the best). 71.8 % of the patients reported postoperative improvement in their quality of life. 59 % of the patients reported complete satisfaction with the procedure, 79.5% of the patients reported overall satisfaction (7 - 10/10). The results clearly showed that the patient satisfaction rate depended on a surgeon, which makes the choice of a surgeon the risk factor of the procedure. In the study group, the

  20. Bilateral Inguinal Hernias Containing Ovaries

    PubMed Central

    Basrur, Gurudutt Bhaskar

    2015-01-01

    Inguinal hernias are rare in females. The authors report a case of bilateral inguinal hernias in a 10-year-old female. On exploration, the patient was found to be having a sliding hernia containing incarcerated ovary as contents on both sides. Peroperatively the contents were reduced, the sac was transfixed at its base and the redundant sac was excised. The repair of this form of hernias is more difficult because of adhesions between the contents and the wall of the sac and risk of damage during dissection. A description of this clinical presentation in the pre operative assessment and operative management are discussed in this report. PMID:25918632

  1. [Morgagni hernia causing cardiac tamponade].

    PubMed

    S Breinig; Paranon, S; Le Mandat, A; Galinier, P; Dulac, Y; Acar, P

    2010-10-01

    Morgagni hernia is a rare malformation (3% of diaphragmatic hernias). This hernia is usually asymptomatic in children. We report on a case revealed by an unusual complication. Severe cyanosis was due to right-to-left atrial shunt through the foramen ovale assessed by 2D echocardiography. Diagnosis of the Morgagni hernia was made with CT scan. The intrathoracic liver compressed the right chambers of the heart causing tamponade. Cardiac compression was reversed after surgery and replacement of the liver in the abdomen. Six months after the surgery, the infant was symptom-free with normal size right chambers of the heart.

  2. Diagnosis of Type-I hiatal hernia: a comparison of high-resolution manometry and endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Khajanchee, Y S; Cassera, M A; Swanström, L L; Dunst, C M

    2013-01-01

    Sliding Type-I hiatal hernia is commonly diagnosed using upper endoscopy, barium swallow or less commonly, esophageal manometry. Current data suggest that endoscopy is superior to barium swallow or esophageal manometry. Recently, high-resolution manometry has become available for the assessment of esophageal motility. This novel technology is capable of displaying spatial and topographic pressure profiles of gastroesophageal junction and crural diaphragm in real time. The objective of the current study was to compare the specificity and sensitivity of high-resolution manometry and endoscopy in the diagnosis of sliding hiatal hernia in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Data were analyzed retrospectively for 83 consecutive patients (61% females, mean age 52 ± 13.2 years) with objective gastroesophageal reflux disease who were considered for laparoscopic antireflux surgery between January 2006 and January 2009 and had preoperative high-resolution manometry and endoscopy. Manometrically, hiatal hernia was defined as separation of the gastroesophageal junction >2.0 cm from the crural diaphragm. Intraoperative diagnosis of hiatal hernia was used as the gold standard. Sensitivity, specificity and likelihood ratios of a positive test and a negative test were used to compare the performance of the two diagnostic modalities. Forty-two patients were found to have a Type-I sliding hiatal hernia (>2 cm) during surgery. Twenty-two patients had manometric criteria for a hiatal hernia by high-resolution manometry, and 36 patients were described as having a hiatal hernia by preoperative endoscopy. False positive results were significantly fewer (higher specificity) with high-resolution manometry as compared with endoscopy (4.88% vs. 31.71%, P= 0.01). There were no significant differences in the false negative results (sensitivity) between the two diagnostic modalities (47.62% vs. 45.24%, P= 0.62). Analysis of likelihood ratios of a positive and negative test

  3. Fibrin sealing versus stapling of hernia meshes in an onlay model in the rat.

    PubMed

    Petter-Puchner, Alexander H; Fortelny, R; Mittermayr, R; Ohlinger, W; Redl, H

    2005-12-01

    Incisional and inguinal hernia repair are among the most common procedures of general surgery. Mesh fixation by means of staples or sutures may lead to severe complications. The use of fibrin sealant (FS) has been suggested as alternative, but data on biocompatibility and adhesive strength of FS in combination with macroporous meshes is limited. Ventral hernia (n = 8 per group) was treated in rats in onlay technique with two types of meshes, fibrin sealed or stapled. TI-Mesh (TMxl) extralight and VYPROII (VPII) were tested 17 days post op. No failure in mechanical tests (tensile and burst strength) occurred in sealed or stapled meshes. Histology revealed equally good tissue integration and neovascularization in all groups. Fibrin sealant yields excellent fixation in experimental hernia repair. This rat model is suitable for testing meshes and fixation techniques.

  4. Delayed traumatic diaphragmatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jing; Wang, Bo; Che, Xiangming; Li, Xuqi; Qiu, Guanglin; He, Shicai; Fan, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Traumatic diaphragmatic hernias (TDHs) are sometimes difficult to identify at an early stage and can consequently result in diagnostic delays with life-threatening outcomes. It is the aim of this case study to highlight the difficulties encountered with the earlier detection of traumatic diaphragmatic hernias. Methods: Clinical data of patients who received treatment for delayed traumatic diaphragmatic hernias in registers of the First Affiliated Hospital of Xi’an Jiaotong University from 1998 to 2014 were analyzed retrospectively. Results: Six patients were included in this study. Left hemidiaphragm was affected in all of them. Most of the patients had a history of traffic accident and 1 a stab-penetrating injury. The interval from injury to developing symptoms ranged from 2 to 11 years (median 5 years). The hernial contents included the stomach, omentum, small intestine, and colon. Diaphragmatic injury was missed in all of them during the initial managements. All patients received operations once the diagnosis of delayed TDH was confirmed, and no postoperative mortality was detected. Conclusions: Delayed TDHs are not common, but can lead to serious consequences once occurred. Early detection of diaphragmatic injuries is crucial. Surgeons should maintain a high suspicion for injuries of the diaphragm in cases with abdominal or lower chest traumas, especially in the initial surgical explorations. We emphasize the need for radiographical follow-up to detect diaphragmatic injuries at an earlier stage. PMID:27512848

  5. Vesicocutaneous fistula after sliding hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Varun; Kapoor, Rakesh; Sureka, Sanjoy

    2016-01-01

    Sliding inguinal hernias are usually direct inguinal hernias containing various abdominal viscera. The incidence of bladder forming a part of an inguinal hernia, called as “scrotal cystocele,” is 1–4%. The risk of bladder injury is as high as 12% when repairing this type of hernia. This case report emphasizes this aspect in a 65-year-old man who presented with urinary leak through the scrotal wound following right inguinal hernia repair. PMID:26941501

  6. Management of large para-esophageal hiatal hernias.

    PubMed

    Collet, D; Luc, G; Chiche, L

    2013-12-01

    Para-esophageal hernias are relatively rare and typically occur in elderly patients. The various presenting symptoms are non-specific and often occur in combination. These include symptoms of gastro-esophageal reflux (GERD) in 26 to 70% of cases, microcytic anemia in 17 to 47%, and respiratory symptoms in 9 to 59%. Respiratory symptoms are not completely resolved by surgical intervention. Acute complications such as gastric volvulus with incarceration or strangulation are rare (estimated incidence of 1.2% per patient per year) but gastric ischemia leading to perforation is the main cause of mortality. Only patients with symptomatic hernias should undergo surgery. Prophylactic repair to prevent acute incarceration should only be undertaken in patients younger than 75 in good condition; surgical indications must be discussed individually beyond this age. The laparoscopic approach is now generally accepted. Resection of the hernia sac is associated with a lower incidence of recurrence. Repair of the hiatus can be reinforced with prosthetic material (either synthetic or biologic), but the benefit of prosthetic repair has not been clearly shown. Results of prosthetic reinforcement vary in different studies; it has been variably associated with four times fewer recurrences or with no measurable difference. A Collis type gastroplasty may be useful to lengthen a foreshortened esophagus, but no objective criteria have been defined to support this approach. The anatomic recurrence rate can be as high as 60% at 12years. But most recurrences are asymptomatic and do not affect the quality of life index. It therefore seems more appropriate to evaluate functional results and quality of life measures rather than to gauge success by a strict evaluation of anatomic hernia reduction.

  7. Needlescopic Surgery Versus Single-port Laparoscopy for Inguinal Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Hollinsky, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: In recent years, 2 modifications of laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) inguinal hernia repair—needlescopic (nTAPP) surgery and single-port (sTAPP) surgery—have greatly improved patient outcomes over traditional approaches. For a comparison of these 2 modifications, we sought to investigate and compare the extent of surgical trauma and postoperative consequences for the abdominal wall in these two procedures. Methods: In a retrospective study, 50 nTAPP and 35 sTAPP procedures occurring at a community hospital from November 1, 2009, through July 31, 2012 were reviewed. Intraoperative data, including length of the umbilical skin incision and operative time, were recorded. A follow-up evaluation included investigation of hernia recurrence, postoperative pain, abdominal wall mobility, cosmetic satisfaction, and period of sick leave. Results: The mean umbilical skin incision was 13 ± 4 mm in nTAPP vs 27 ± 3 mm in sTAPP (P < .001). The nTAPP procedure required less operating time than the sTAPP procedure (54.8 ± 16.9 minutes vs 85.9 ± 19.7 minutes; P < .001). The mean immediate postoperative pain score on the visual analog scale was 2.7 ± 2.1 in the nTAPP group and 4.4 ± 1.9 in the sTAPP group (P = .016). In addition, patients who underwent nTAPP had a shorter period of sick leave (11.2 ± 8.4 days vs 24.1 ± 20.1 days; P = .02). At the follow-up evaluation after approximately 30 months, abdominal wall mobility and cosmetic satisfaction were equally positive, with no hernia recurrence. Conclusion: In patients with uncomplicated inguinal hernia, the nTAPP procedure, with less surgical trauma and operating time, has distinct advantages in reduction of immediate postoperative pain and sick leave time. PMID:26229421

  8. Evolution and future of laparoscopic colorectal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Andreas M

    2014-01-01

    The advances of laparoscopic surgery since the early 1990s have caused one of the largest technical revolutions in medicine since the detection of antibiotics (1922, Flemming), the discovery of DNA structure (1953, Watson and Crick), and solid organ transplantation (1954, Murray). Perseverance through a rocky start and increased familiarity with the chop-stick surgery in conjunction with technical refinements has resulted in a rapid expansion of the indications for minimally invasive surgery. Procedure-related factors initially contributed to this success and included the improved postoperative recovery and cosmesis, fewer wound complications, lower risk for incisional hernias and for subsequent adhesion-related small bowel obstructions; the major breakthrough however came with favorable long-term outcomes data on oncological parameters. The future will have to determine the specific role of various technical approaches, define prognostic factors of success and true progress, and consider directing further innovation while potentially limiting approaches that do not add to patient outcomes. PMID:25386060

  9. [Total extraperitoneal endoscopic hernioplasty (TEP) in the treatment of incarcerated and irreponible inguinal and femoral hernias].

    PubMed

    Mainik, F; Flade-Kuthe, R; Kuthe, A

    2005-12-01

    To estimate the value of TEP in the treatment of incarcerated and irreponible inguinal and femoral hernias more exactly we prospectively collected and evaluated the data of our clinic for the period of Oct. 1999 until Dec. 2003. In this period we performed in total 1 671 hernia repairs including 79 patients suffering from an incarcerated (n = 33) or irreponible (n = 46) inguinal or femoral hernia. Using only the TEP-technique we treated mainly the irreponible hernias (46 patients). In the combination of LAP (laparoscopy) and TEP (27 patients) the laparoscopy provided the possibility to classify as well the incarcerated tissue as the result of the reposition. With this combined technique we treated the majority of the incarcerated hernias. To confirm the recovery of the incarcerated tissue laparoscopy can be of high value at the end of the combined LAP + TEP (2 patients). Thus TEP was performed in 92 % of the cases. In 2 cases we performed a conventional hernioplasty and one operation was finished conventionally after switching from endoscopic to conventional procedure. In 2 patients we performed a laparoscopically supported resection of the incarcerated tissue without patch implantation. 1 patient acquired TAPP. The use of different operative techniques and their combinations demonstrates as well the possibility as the necessity of a differentiated and case adapted proceeding in the treatment of incarcerated hernias. Lethality with 1.2 % and early postoperative morbidity with only 5.0 % were low. The hospitalisation period was 4.7 d on average. Our results are comparable to results of literature and show that TEP-technique and combined TEP + LAP-technique are possible and reasonable for the treatment of incarcerated and irreponible hernias.

  10. Obscure Overt Gastrointestinal Bleeding Secondary to Ventral Hernioplasty Mesh Small Bowel Perforation Visualized With Video Capsule Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mendez-Ishizaki, Yumi

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 79-year-old female presenting with hematemesis and melena 9 years after ventral hernioplasty with mesh. After initial normal endoscopy and colonoscopy, video capsule endoscopy revealed a metallic wire mesh perforating the jejunum. Abdominal computed tomography did not identify a perforation although metallic mesh was visualized close to the small bowel. We present the first ventral hernia mesh perforation diagnosed via video capsule endoscopy. Such a finding emphasizes the importance of a complete diagnostic workup when approaching a patient with obscure overt gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:28008400

  11. Laparoscopic dissecting instruments.

    PubMed

    Park, A E; Mastrangelo, M J; Gandsas, A; Chu, U; Quick, N E

    2001-03-01

    The authors provide an overview of laparoscopic dissecting instruments and discuss early development, surgical options, and special features. End effectors of different shapes and functions are described. A comparison of available energy sources for laparoscopic instruments includes discussion of thermal dissection, ultrasonic dissection, and water-jet dissection. The ergonomic risks and challenges inherent in the use of current laparoscopic instruments are outlined, as well as ergonomic issues for the design of future instruments. New directions that laparoscopic instrumentation may take are considered in connection with developing technology in robotics, haptic feedback, and MicroElectroMechanical Systems.

  12. Diagnosis and treatment of atypical presentations of hiatal hernia following bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Flanagin, Brody A; Mitchell, Myrosia T; Thistlethwaite, William A; Alverdy, John C

    2010-03-01

    Bariatric surgery dramatically alters the normal stomach anatomy resulting in a significant incidence of hiatal hernia and gastroesophageal reflux disease. Although the majority of patients remain asymptomatic, many complain of severe heartburn refractory to medical management and additional highly atypical symptoms. Here, we describe the diagnosis and treatment regarding four cases of symptomatic hiatal hernia following bariatric surgery presenting with atypical symptoms in the University Hospital, USA. Four patients presented following laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass or duodenal switch/pancreaticobiliary bypass (DS) with disabling and intractable midepigastric abdominal pain characterized as severe and radiating to the jaw, left shoulder, and midscapular area. The pain in all cases was described as paroxysmal and not necessarily associated with eating. All four patients also experienced nausea, vomiting, and failure to thrive at various intervals following laparoscopic bariatric surgery. Routine workup failed to produce any clear mechanical cause of these symptoms. However, complimentary use of multidetector CT and upper gastrointestinal contrast studies eventually revealed the diagnosis of hiatal hernia. Exploration identified the presence of a type I hiatal hernia in all four patients, with the stomach staple lines densely adherent to the diaphragm and parietal peritoneum. Operative intervention led to immediate and complete resolution of symptoms. The presence of a hiatal hernia following bariatric surgery can present with highly atypical symptoms that do not resolve without operative intervention. Recognition of this problem should lead to the consideration of surgery in cases where patients are dependent on artificial nutritional support and whose symptoms are poorly controlled with medication alone.

  13. Epidermoid cyst at a rare location, as a content of inguinal hernia: A case report with a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Meher, Sadananda; Baijal, Manish; Soni, Vandana; Sharma, Anil; Khullar, Rajesh; Chowbey, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    Epidermoid cysts can occur in a variety of locations including the face, trunk, neck, extremities, and scalp. No case of epidermoid cyst as content of inguinal hernia has been reported so far; however, cases with dermoid, teratoma, lipoma, lymphangioma and leiomyoma as content of inguinal canal have been reported. A 29-year-old female presented with a lump in the left inguinal region that was clinically diagnosed as left inguinal hernia. The patient was planned for laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair after routine investigation. Intraoperatively, a cystic mass was found to be attached to the left round ligament that was excised completely. Histopathological report was consistent with epidermal inclusion cyst. Inguinal epidermoid cyst mimicking inguinal hernia is a rare entity. If such a cyst is encountered during operation, it should be completely excised. PMID:27279405

  14. Fully laparoscopic left-sided donor hepatectomy is safe and associated with shorter hospital stay and earlier return to work: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Samstein, Benjamin; Griesemer, Adam; Cherqui, Daniel; Mansour, Tarek; Pisa, Joseph; Yegiants, Anna; Fox, Alyson N; Guarrera, James V; Kato, Tomoaki; Halazun, Karim J; Emond, Jean

    2015-06-01

    Living donor liver transplantation has failed to become a major means of transplantation in the United States, where <5% of the transplants are performed with living donors. At least 30% to 50% of the complications of donor hepatectomy appear to be related to abdominal wall trauma, including hernia, bowel obstruction, and chronic abdominal discomfort. We analyzed our experience with laparoscopically procured donor hepatectomy. We compared 22 full laparoscopic donor hepatectomies to 20 open/hybrid hepatectomies over an 11-year period. Donor and recipient demographics, complications, and graft and recipient outcomes were analyzed. All 22 laparoscopically procured liver allografts were transplanted successfully. The laparoscopically procured grafts took longer to procure (7 hours 58 minutes versus 6 hours 38 minutes; P < 0.001). The laparoscopically procured cases had lower blood loss (177.3 versus 3753 cc; P < 0.001), a shorter length of stay, and significantly reduced days off work (P = .01). The 1-year graft survival was not different (90% in the laparoscopic group and 85% in the open group; P = 0.70). The 1-year patient survival was not different (95% in the laparoscopic group and 85% in the open group; P = 0.32). There was a trend toward lower wound issues in the laparoscopic group, but this did not reach significance (the hybrid/open group had a 15% hernia rate versus 5% for the laparoscopic group). In experienced living donor centers, laparoscopic liver donation appears to be feasible for all pediatric recipients and some adult recipients. Outcomes for the recipients of laparoscopically procured grafts do not appear significantly different from outcomes with hybrid/open techniques.

  15. Laparoscopic revision surgery for gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Celasin, Haydar; Genc, Volkan; Celik, Suleyman Utku; Turkcapar, Ahmet Gökhan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Laparoscopic antireflux surgery is a frequently performed procedure for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux in surgical clinics. Reflux can recur in between 3% and 30% of patients on whom antireflux surgery has been performed, and so revision surgery can be required due to recurrent symptoms or dysphagia in approximately 3% to 6% of the patients. The objective of this study is to evaluate the mechanism of recurrences after antireflux surgery and to share our results after revision surgery in recurrent cases. From 2001 to 2014, revision surgery was performed on 43 patients (31 men, 12 women) between the ages of 24 and 70 years. The technical details of the first operation, recurrence symptoms, endoscopy, and manometry findings were evaluated. The findings of revision surgery, surgical techniques, morbidity rates, length of hospitalization, and follow-up period were also recorded and evaluated. The first operation was Nissen fundoplication in 34 patients and Toupet fundoplication in 9 patients. Mesh hiatoplasty was performed for enforcement in 18 (41.9%) of these patients. The period between the first operation and the revision surgery ranged from 4 days to 60 months. The most common finding was slipped fundoplication and presence of hiatal hernia during revision surgery. Revision fundoplication and hernia repair with mesh reinforcement were used in 33 patients. The other techniques were Collis gastroplasty, revision fundoplication, and hernia repair without mesh. The range of follow-up period was from 2 to 134 months. Recurrence occurred in 3 patients after revision surgery (6.9%). Although revision surgery is difficult and it has higher morbidity, it can be performed effectively and safely in experienced centers. PMID:28072725

  16. Obturator hernia: A diagnostic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Sanjeev R.; Punamiya, Aditya R.; Naniwadekar, Ramchandra G.; Janugade, Hemant B.; Chotai, Tejas D.; Vimal Singh, T.; Natchair, Arafath

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Obturator hernia is an extremely rare type of hernia with relatively high mortality and morbidity. Its early diagnosis is challenging since the signs and symptoms are non specific. PRESENTATION OF CASE Here in we present a case of 70 years old women who presented with complaints of intermittent colicky abdominal pain and vomiting. Plain radiograph of abdomen showed acute dilatation of stomach. Ultrasonography showed small bowel obstruction at the mid ileal level with evidence of coiled loops of ileum in pelvis. On exploration, Right Obstructed Obturator hernia was found. The obstructed Intestine was reduced and resected and the obturator foramen was closed with simple sutures. Postoperative period was uneventful. DISCUSSION Obturator hernia is a rare pelvic hernia and poses a diagnostic challenge. Obturator hernia occurs when there is protrusion of intra-abdominal contents through the obturator foramen in the pelvis. The signs and symptoms are non specific and generally the diagnosis is made during exploration for the intestinal obstruction, one of the four cardinal features. Others are pain on the medial aspect of thigh called as Howship Rombergs sign, repeated attacks of Intestinal Obstruction and palpable mass on the medial aspect of thigh. CONCLUSION Obturator hernia is a rare but significant cause of intestinal obstruction especially in emaciated elderly woman and a diagnostic challenge for the Doctors. CT scan is valuable to establish preoperative diagnosis. Surgery either open or laproscopic, is the only treatment. The need for the awareness is stressed and CT scan can be helpful. PMID:23708307

  17. Feasibility and Validation of Single-Port Laparoscopic Surgery for Simple-Adhesive or Nonadhesive Ileus

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Hirotaka; Maruyama, Suguru; Wakana, Hiroyuki; Kawashima, Kenji; Fukasawa, Toshio; Fujii, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A single incisional laparoscopic surgery (SILS) approach is increasingly being used, taking advantage of the minimally invasive technique. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and the validation of SILS procedure for small bowel obstruction (SBO). Sixteen consecutive patients with SBO who underwent SILS release of ileus between April 2010 and March 2015 were compared with the conventional multiport laparoscopic treatment group of 16 patients matched for age, gender, and surgical procedure. Laparoscopic treatment was completed in a total of 14 patients in SILS group and 13 in multiport laparoscopic group. Two cases and 3 cases were converted to multiport laparoscopic surgery or open surgery. Eight patients with nonscar and nonadhesive ileus, such as internal hernia, obturator hernia, gallstone ileus, and intestinal invagination, were treated successfully in the laparoscopic procedure. There was no mortality in either of the groups. The mean procedural time was 105 minutes in the SILS group and 116 minutes in the multiport laparoscopic group. The mean amount of blood loss was not statistically different in either of groups (15 ml vs. 23 ml). Patients resumed oral intake after a mean of 2 days in the SILS and 3 days in the multiport groups with the statistically difference. The length of hospital stay was shorter in the SILS group (5 days vs. 7 days) with no statistically difference. Perioperative morbidity was seen in 2 patients in the SILS group and 3 patients in the multiport group. SILS approach has superior and/or similar perioperative outcomes to multiport approach for SBO. SILS release of ileus as an ultra-minimal invasion technique is feasible, effective, and offers benefits with cosmesis in simple adhesive or scar-less nonadhesive ileus patients. PMID:26825912

  18. Sonographic imaging of Spigelian hernias

    PubMed Central

    Kołaczyk, Katarzyna; Lubiński, Jan; Bojko, Stefania; Gałdyńska, Maria; Bernatowicz, Elżbieta

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the work was to present clinical material referring to rarely occurring abdominal cavity hernias in semilunar line – Spigelian hernias diagnosed with the help of ultrasound. Material and methods In the period from 1995 to 2001 785 anterior abdominal wall hernias were diagnosed including 11 Spigelian hernias (1.4%) diagnosed in 10 patients (7 women and 3 men) aged from 38 to 65 years old (average age 48). Eight patients complained of spastic pain in abdomen, in 5 of them it was accompanied by bloating and sometimes loud peristalsis. All the patients had been observing the mentioned symptoms from 2 to 5 years. Each of them had had colonoscopy and abdominal cavity ultrasound examination performed, some of them even three times. In 3 women with uterine fibroid the uterus was removed which did not eliminate the symptoms. The ultrasound examination of the abdominal integument was performed mainly with the use of linear transducers of the frequency of 7–12 MHz; in obese patients also convex transducers were used (3,5–6 MHz). Each examination of abdominal integument included the assessment of the following areas: linea alba from xiphoid process to pubic symphysis including umbilicus, both semilunar lines from costal margins to pubic bones, and also inguinal areas. Moreover, all types of postoperative scars were examined. Each hernia was assessed in terms of size (the greatest dimension), hernia sac contents, width of the ring and reducibility under the compression of the transducer. Moreover, cough test and Valsalva's maneuver were performed. Generally, the examination was performed in a standing position. Results In 9 patients hernias were localized unilaterally, in one patient bilaterally. In 7 cases the hernia sac contained small bowel, in 2 cases the preperitoneal and omental fat, and in 2 cases preperitoneal fat only. Eight patients presenting with clinical symptoms underwent operative repair. Conclusion Ultrasound examination is beneficial in

  19. Significant improvement of biocompatibility of polypropylene mesh for incisional hernia repair by using poly-ε-caprolactone nanofibers functionalized with thrombocyte-rich solution.

    PubMed

    Plencner, Martin; Prosecká, Eva; Rampichová, Michala; East, Barbora; Buzgo, Matej; Vysloužilová, Lucie; Hoch, Jiří; Amler, Evžen

    2015-01-01

    Incisional hernia is the most common postoperative complication, affecting up to 20% of patients after abdominal surgery. Insertion of a synthetic surgical mesh has become the standard of care in ventral hernia repair. However, the implementation of a mesh does not reduce the risk of recurrence and the onset of hernia recurrence is only delayed by 2-3 years. Nowadays, more than 100 surgical meshes are available on the market, with polypropylene the most widely used for ventral hernia repair. Nonetheless, the ideal mesh does not exist yet; it still needs to be developed. Polycaprolactone nanofibers appear to be a suitable material for different kinds of cells, including fibroblasts, chondrocytes, and mesenchymal stem cells. The aim of the study reported here was to develop a functionalized scaffold for ventral hernia regeneration. We prepared a novel composite scaffold based on a polypropylene surgical mesh functionalized with poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) nanofibers and adhered thrombocytes as a natural source of growth factors. In extensive in vitro tests, we proved the biocompatibility of PCL nanofibers with adhered thrombocytes deposited on a polypropylene mesh. Compared with polypropylene mesh alone, this composite scaffold provided better adhesion, growth, metabolic activity, proliferation, and viability of mouse fibroblasts in all tests and was even better than a polypropylene mesh functionalized with PCL nanofibers. The gradual release of growth factors from biocompatible nanofiber-modified scaffolds seems to be a promising approach in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  20. Unusual Diaphragmatic Hernias Mimicking Cardiac Masses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Si Hun; Kim, Myoung Gun; Kim, Su Ji; Moon, Jeonggeun; Kang, Woong Chol; Shin, Mi-Seung

    2015-01-01

    Hiatal hernia and Morgagni hernia are sorts of diaphragmatic hernias that are rarely detected on transthoracic echocardiography. Although echocardiographic findings have an important role for differential diagnosis of cardiac masses, we often might overlook diaphragmatic hernia. We report three cases of diaphragmatic hernias having specific features. The first case is huge hiatal hernia that encroaches left atrium with internal swirling flow on transthoracic echocardiography. The second case is a hiatal hernia that encroaches on both atria, incidentally detected on preoperative echocardiography. The third case is Morgagni hernia which encroaches on the right atrium only. So, we need to consider possibility of diaphragmatic hernia when we find a cardiac mass with specific echocardiographic features. PMID:26140154

  1. Multiple Layer Closure of Myoma Bed in Laparoscopic Myomectomy

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Nutan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess the feasibility and outcome of laparoscopic myomectomy and multiple layer closure of the myoma bed, for management of myomas, at a tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: From September 2005 to September 2010, 417 patients, with large and moderate size myomas, were managed by laparoscopic myomectomy. Indications were subfertility, menorrhagia, and abdominal mass. Preoperative evaluation included history, clinical examination, and sonographic mapping. The myomas were enucleated and retrieved laparoscopically. Myoma beds were sutured in multiple layers by endoscopic intracorporeal suturing. Results: Three hundred and fifteen patients presented with subfertility, 45 with menorrhagia, and 57 with abdominal mass. The average maximum diameter of a myoma was 9 cm. The mean duration of surgery was 120 minutes. The mean postoperative stay was 24 hours. No intraoperative complication occurred and the hospital course was uncomplicated. In one case, a minilap incision was performed for retrieval of the myoma with suturing of the bed. Two patients had minor delayed wound healing of the morcellator port site. The patients did not report any complaints during the follow-up, except one patient who developed omental hernia at the morcellator port site. There was no rupture of the scar and very low adhesion scores in the subsequent cesarean sections or second-look scopies. Conclusion: With proper multilayer closure of the myoma bed, laparoscopic myomectomy was feasible for moderate and even large myomas and had excellent outcomes. PMID:22442535

  2. Multiple Layer Closure of Myoma Bed in Laparoscopic Myomectomy

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Nutan; Sahni, Priyanka

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess the feasibility and outcome of laparoscopic Myomectomy and multiple layer closure of myoma bed for management of myomas at a tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: Four hundred and seventeen patients from September 2005 to September 2010 with large and moderate size myomas were managed by laparoscopic Myomectomy. Indications were subfertility, menorrhagia and abdominal mass. Pre-operative evaluation included history, clinical examination and sonographic mapping. Myomas were enucleated and retrieved laparoscopically. Myoma beds were sutured in multiple layers by endoscopic intracorporeal suturing. Results: Three hundred and fifteen patients presented with subfertility, 45 with menorrhagia and 57 with abdominal mass. The average maximum diameter of myoma was 9 cm. The mean duration of surgery was 120 min. The mean post-operative stay was 24 h. No intra-operative complication occurred and hospital course was uncomplicated. In one case, minilap incision was given for retrieval of myoma and suturing of the bed. Two patients had minor delayed wound healing of the morcellator port site. The patients did not report any complaints during follow-up except one patient who developed omental hernia at morcellator port site. There was no rupture of scar and very low adhesion scores in subsequent caesarian sections or second look scopies. Conclusion: With proper multilayer closure of the myoma bed, laparoscopic Myomectomy is feasible for moderate and even large myomas and has excellent outcomes. PMID:26085750

  3. Laparoscopic Surgery - What Is It?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery - What is it? Laparoscopic Surgery - What is it? Laparoscopic Surgery - What is it? | ASCRS WHAT IS LAPAROSCOPIC SURGERY? Laparoscopic or “minimally ... information about the management of the conditions addressed. It should be recognized that these brochures should not ...

  4. Metamers of the ventral stream

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Jeremy; Simoncelli, Eero P.

    2011-01-01

    The human capacity to recognize complex visual patterns emerges in a sequence of brain areas known as the ventral stream, beginning with primary visual cortex (V1). We develop a population model for mid-ventral processing, in which non-linear combinations of V1 responses are averaged within receptive fields that grow with eccentricity. To test the model, we generate novel forms of visual metamers — stimuli that differ physically, but look the same. We develop a behavioral protocol that uses metameric stimuli to estimate the receptive field sizes in which the model features are represented. Because receptive field sizes change along the ventral stream, the behavioral results can identify the visual area corresponding to the representation. Measurements in human observers implicate V2, providing a new functional account of this area. The model explains deficits of peripheral vision known as “crowding”, and provides a quantitative framework for assessing the capabilities of everyday vision. PMID:21841776

  5. Single site multiport umbilical laparoscopic appendicectomy versus conventional multiport laparoscopic appendicectomy in acute settings

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, SP

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Although conventional multiport laparoscopic appendicectomy (CMLA) is preferred for managing acute appendicitis, the recently developed transumbilical laparoscopic approach is rapidly gaining popularity. However, its wide dissemination seems restricted by technical/technological issues. In this regard, a newly developed method of single site multiport umbilical laparoscopic appendicectomy (SMULA) was compared prospectively with CMLA to assess the former’s efficacy and the technical advantages in acute scenarios. Methods Overall, 430 patients were studied: 212 in the SMULA group and 218 in the CMLA group. The same surgeon performed all the procedures using routine laparoscopic instruments. The SMULA technique entailed three ports inserted directly at the umbilical mound through three distinct strategically placed mini-incisions without raising the umbilical flap. The CMLA involved the traditional three-port technique. Results Both groups were comparable in terms of demographic criteria, indications for surgery, intraoperative blood loss, time to ambulation, length of hospital stay and umbilical morbidity. Although the mean operative time was marginally longer in the SMULA group (43.35 minutes, standard deviation [SD]: 21.16 minutes) than in the CMLA group (42.28 minutes, SD: 21.41 minutes), this did not reach statistical significance. Conversely, the mean pain scores on day 0 and the cosmetic outcomes differed significantly and favoured the SMULA technique. None of the patients developed port site hernias over the follow-up period (mean 2.9 years). Conclusions The favourable outcomes for the SMULA technique are likely to be due to the three small segregated incisions at one place and better trocar ergonomics. The SMULA technique is safe in an acute setting and may be considered of value among the options for transumbilical appendicectomy. PMID:25198978

  6. Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH) is defined by the presence of an orifice in the diaphragm, more often left and posterolateral that permits the herniation of abdominal contents into the thorax. The lungs are hypoplastic and have abnormal vessels that cause respiratory insufficiency and persistent pulmonary hypertension with high mortality. About one third of cases have cardiovascular malformations and lesser proportions have skeletal, neural, genitourinary, gastrointestinal or other defects. CDH can be a component of Pallister-Killian, Fryns, Ghersoni-Baruch, WAGR, Denys-Drash, Brachman-De Lange, Donnai-Barrow or Wolf-Hirschhorn syndromes. Some chromosomal anomalies involve CDH as well. The incidence is < 5 in 10,000 live-births. The etiology is unknown although clinical, genetic and experimental evidence points to disturbances in the retinoid-signaling pathway during organogenesis. Antenatal diagnosis is often made and this allows prenatal management (open correction of the hernia in the past and reversible fetoscopic tracheal obstruction nowadays) that may be indicated in cases with severe lung hypoplasia and grim prognosis. Treatment after birth requires all the refinements of critical care including extracorporeal membrane oxygenation prior to surgical correction. The best hospital series report 80% survival but it remains around 50% in population-based studies. Chronic respiratory tract disease, neurodevelopmental problems, neurosensorial hearing loss and gastroesophageal reflux are common problems in survivors. Much more research on several aspects of this severe condition is warranted. PMID:22214468

  7. New minimally invasive technique of parastomal hernia repair – methods and review

    PubMed Central

    Skoneczny, Paweł; Przywózka, Alicja; Czyżewski, Piotr; Bury, Kamil

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Parastomal hernia is described as the most common complication in patients with ostomy. It is reported that its incidence varies from 3% to 39% for colostomies and 0 to 6% for ileostomies. Surgical repair remains the treatment of choice. There are three types of surgical treatment – fascial repair, stoma relocation and repair using prosthetic mesh via a laparoscopic or open approach. Recently there have been several meta-analyses and systematic reviews aiming to compare the results of surgical treatment, and the authors agreed that the quality of evidence precludes firm conclusions. Aim To describe the novel concept of parastomal hernia repair – HyPER/SPHR technique (hybrid parastomal endoscopic re-do/Szczepkowski parastomal hernia repair) and its early results in 12 consecutive cases. Material and methods Twelve consecutive patients were operated on due to parastomal hernia using the new HyPER hybrid technique between June 2013 and May 2014. The patients’ condition was evaluated during the perioperative period, 6 weeks and then every 3 months after surgery. Results After 6 weeks of follow-up we have not observed any mesh-related complications. All 12 patients were examined 3 months and 6 months after repair surgery for evaluation. No recurrence, stoma site infection or stoma-related problems were found. None of the patients complained of pain and none of them needed to be hospitalized again. Reported quality of life on a 0–10 scale after 6 weeks of follow-up was 8 (range: 7–10). Conclusions The HyPER procedure for treatment of parastomal hernias proposed by the authors is a safe and feasible surgical technique with a high patient satisfaction rate and a low number of complications. The hybrid procedure seems to be a promising method for parastomal hernia repair. PMID:25960785

  8. Laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication.

    PubMed Central

    Jamieson, G G; Watson, D I; Britten-Jones, R; Mitchell, P C; Anvari, M

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors laparoscopic approach for a Nissen fundoplication is presented. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The technique has been undertaken in 155 patients over 29 months, with 137 patients having been observed for more than 3 months. METHODS: Three hundred sixty degree fundoplication was undertaken using three or four sutures to secure the wrap. Short gastric vessels were not divided, and the anterior wall of the stomach was used to construct the wrap around the esophagus with a large bougie in position. RESULTS: The operation was not completed laparoscopically in 19 patients because a satisfactory wrap could not be achieved. Ten patients undergoing laparoscopic fundoplication underwent a subsequent operation related to the laparoscopic procedure within 6 months, and there was one postoperative death. Seven other patients were readmitted to the hospital several days subsequent to their discharge, four because of pulmonary emboli. Of 137 patients who have been observed for more than 3 months, 133 patients are well and currently are free from reflux symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: In uncomplicated cases, laparoscopic fundoplication has similar advantages to laparoscopic cholecystectomy. In spite of the fact that it has not yet achieved the overall usefulness of open fundoplication, it seems likely that laparoscopic fundoplication will be used increasingly in the treatment of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Images Figure 7. Figure 8. PMID:8053735

  9. Laparoscopic total pancreatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Li, Yongbin; Cai, Yunqiang; Liu, Xubao; Peng, Bing

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Laparoscopic total pancreatectomy is a complicated surgical procedure and rarely been reported. This study was conducted to investigate the safety and feasibility of laparoscopic total pancreatectomy. Patients and Methods: Three patients underwent laparoscopic total pancreatectomy between May 2014 and August 2015. We reviewed their general demographic data, perioperative details, and short-term outcomes. General morbidity was assessed using Clavien–Dindo classification and delayed gastric emptying (DGE) was evaluated by International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery (ISGPS) definition. Diagnosis and Outcomes: The indications for laparoscopic total pancreatectomy were intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) (n = 2) and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (PNET) (n = 1). All patients underwent laparoscopic pylorus and spleen-preserving total pancreatectomy, the mean operative time was 490 minutes (range 450–540 minutes), the mean estimated blood loss was 266 mL (range 100–400 minutes); 2 patients suffered from postoperative complication. All the patients recovered uneventfully with conservative treatment and discharged with a mean hospital stay 18 days (range 8–24 days). The short-term (from 108 to 600 days) follow up demonstrated 3 patients had normal and consistent glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level with acceptable quality of life. Lessons: Laparoscopic total pancreatectomy is feasible and safe in selected patients and pylorus and spleen preserving technique should be considered. Further prospective randomized studies are needed to obtain a comprehensive understanding the role of laparoscopic technique in total pancreatectomy. PMID:28099344

  10. The first laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, W

    2001-01-01

    Prof Dr Med Erich Mühe of Böblingen, Germany, performed the first laparoscopic cholecystectomy on September 12, 1985. The German Surgical Society rejected Mühe in 1986 after he reported that he had performed the first laparoscopic cholecystectomy, yet in 1992 he received their highest award, the German Surgical Society Anniversary Award. In 1990 in Atlanta, at the Society of American Gastrointestinal Surgeons (SAGES) Convention, Perissat, Berci, Cuschieri, Dubois, and Mouret were recognized by SAGES for performing early laparoscopic cholecystectomies, but Mühe was not. However, in 1999 he was recognized by SAGES for having performed the first laparoscopic cholecystectomy-SAGES invited Mühe to present the Storz Lecture. In Mühe's presentation, titled "The First Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy," which he gave in March 1999 in San Antonio, Texas, he described the first procedure. Finally, Mühe had received the worldwide acclaim that he deserved for his pioneering work. One purpose of this article is to trace the development of the basic instruments used in laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The other purpose is to give Mühe the recognition he deserves for being the developer of the laparoscopic cholecystectomy procedure.

  11. Lymphoma Diagnosed at Inguinal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Veal, David R; Hammill, Chet W

    2010-01-01

    Tumors presenting in the inguinal hernia sac are considered to be extremely rare, with the more common neoplasms metastasizing from the gastrointestinal tract, ovary and prostate. We report the case of Mantle cell lymphoma identified in the inguinal hernia sac following hernia repair. While the hernia sac appeared normal to the surgeon, evaluation by the pathologist showed subtle gross irregularities, with subsequent histologic and immunochemical diagnosis of Mantle cell lymphoma. Twelve previous cases of a lymphoma diagnosed during hernia repair have been described in the English literature. This is the first report of Mantle cell lymphoma found in the hernia sac. This case illustrates the value of routine microscopic evaluation of hernia sacs found from inguinal/femoral herniorrhaphies, as it may be the primary presentation of an asymptomatic metastatic lymphoma. Additionally, it underscores the importance of the surgeon's role in screening hernia sacs if the practice of submitting only macroscopically abnormal specimens for microscopic evaluation is adopted. PMID:20358722

  12. Small bowel obstruction caused by self-anchoring suture used for peritoneal closure following robotic inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Khan, Faraz A; Hashmi, Asra; Edelman, David A

    2016-06-23

    Laparoscopic inguinal herniorraphy is a commonly performed procedure given the reported decrease in pain and earlier return to activity when compared with the open approach. Moreover, robotic assistance offers the operating surgeon considerable ergonomic advantages, making it an attractive alternative to conventional laparoscopic herniorraphy. Robotic herniorraphy utilizes the transabdominal preperitoneal approach where following repair peritoneal closure is necessary to avoid mesh exposure to the viscera. Self-anchoring sutures are frequently used to this end given the ease of use and knotless application. We present an unusual case of post-operative small bowel obstruction following robotic inguinal hernia repair caused by the self-anchoring suture used for peritoneal closure. This patient presented 3 days post-procedure with symptoms and cross-sectional imaging indicative of small bowel obstruction with a clear transition point. Underwent laparoscopic lysis of a single adhesive band originating from the loose intraperitoneal end of the suture leading to resolution of symptoms.

  13. 21 CFR 876.5970 - Hernia support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hernia support. 876.5970 Section 876.5970 Food and... GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5970 Hernia support. (a) Identification. A hernia... contents. This generic type of device includes the umbilical truss. (b) Classification. Class I...

  14. Sliding indirect hernia containing both ovaries.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Carol L

    2005-09-01

    Although sliding indirect inguinal hernias containing the ipsilateral ovary and fallopian tube are not uncommon in infant girls, sliding hernias containing both ovaries are rare. This report describes a large indirect inguinal hernia in a 1-year-old infant girl that contained the left uterine fundus, left bladder ear, as well as both ovaries and fallopian tubes.

  15. Laparoscopic Colon Resection

    MedlinePlus

    ... inches to complete the procedure. What are the Advantages of Laparoscopic Colon Resection? Results may vary depending ... type of procedure and patient’s overall condition. Common advantages are: Less postoperative pain May shorten hospital stay ...

  16. Laparoscopic gastric banding

    MedlinePlus

    ... adjustable gastric banding; Bariatric surgery - laparoscopic gastric banding; Obesity - gastric banding; Weight loss - gastric banding ... gastric banding is not a "quick fix" for obesity. It will greatly change your lifestyle. You must ...

  17. Obesity increases the odds of acquiring and incarcerating noninguinal abdominal wall hernias.

    PubMed

    Lau, Briana; Kim, Hanjoo; Haigh, Philip I; Tejirian, Talar

    2012-10-01

    The current data available describing the relationship of obesity and abdominal wall hernias is sparse. The objective of this study was to investigate the current prevalence of noninguinal abdominal wall hernias and their correlation with body mass index (BMI) and other demographic risk factors. Patients with umbilical, incisional, ventral, epigastric, or Spigelian hernias with or without incarceration were identified using the regional database for 14 hospitals over a 3-year period. Patients were stratified based on their BMI. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to distinguish other significant risk factors associated with the hernias. Of 2,807,414 patients, 26,268 (0.9%) had one of the specified diagnoses. Average age of the patients was 52 years and 61 per cent were male. The majority of patients had nonincarcerated umbilical hernias (74%). Average BMI was 32 kg/m2. Compared with patients with a normal BMI, the odds of having a hernia increased with BMI: BMI of 25 to 29.9 kg/m2 odds ratio (OR) 1.63, BMI of 30 to 39.9 kg/m2 OR 2.62, BMI 40 to 49.9 kg/m2 OR 3.91, BMI 50 to 59.9 kg/m2 OR 4.85, and BMI greater than 60 kg/m2 OR 5.17 (P<0.0001). Age older than 50 years was associated with a higher risk for having a hernia (OR, 2.12; 95% [CI], 2.07 to 2.17), whereas female gender was associated with a lower risk (OR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.52 to 0.55). Those with incarcerated hernias had a higher average BMI (32 kg/m2 vs 35 kg/m2; P<0.0001). Overall, BMI greater than 40 kg/m2 showed an increased chance of incarceration, and a BMI greater than 60 kg/m2 had the highest chance of incarceration, OR 12.7 (P<0.0001). Age older than 50 years and female gender were also associated with a higher risk of incarceration (OR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.59 and OR, 1.80; CI, 1.45 to 2.24). Increasing BMI and increasing age are associated with a higher prevalence and an increased risk of incarceration of noninguinal abdominal wall hernias.

  18. Laparoscopic Total Mesorectum Excision

    PubMed Central

    Quilici, F.A.; Cordeiro, F.; Reis, J.A.; Kagohara, O.; Simões Neto, J.

    2002-01-01

    The main controversy of colon-rectal laparoscopic surgery comes from its use as a cancer treatment. Two points deserve special attention: the incidence of portsite tumor implantation and the possibility of performing radical cancer surgery, such as total mesorectum excision. Once these points are addressed, the laparoscopic approach will be used routinely to treat rectal cancer. To clarify these points, 32 patients with cancer of the lower rectum participated in a special protocol that included preoperative radiotherapy and laparoscopic total mesorectum excision. All data were recorded. At the same time, all data recorded from the experience of a multicenter laparoscopic group (Brazilian Colorectal Laparoscopic Surgeons – 130 patients with tumor of the lower rectum) were analyzed and compared with the data provided by our patients. Analysis of the results suggests that a laparoscopic approach allows the same effective resection as that of conventional surgery and that preoperative irradiation does not influence the incidence of intraoperative complications. The extent of lymph nodal excision is similar to that obtained with open surgery, with an average of 12.3 lymph nodes dissected per specimen. The rate of local recurrence was 3.12%. No port site implantation of tumor was noted in this series of patients with cancer of the lower rectum. PMID:12113422

  19. Laparoscopic Distal Pancreatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Melotti, Gianluigi; Butturini, Giovanni; Piccoli, Micaela; Casetti, Luca; Bassi, Claudio; Mullineris, Barbara; Lazzaretti, Maria Grazia; Pederzoli, Paolo

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To describe the clinical characteristics, indications, technical procedures, and outcome of a consecutive series of laparoscopic distal pancreatic resections performed by the same surgical team. Summary Background Data: Laparoscopic distal pancreatic resection has increasingly been described as a feasible and safe procedure, although accompanied by a high rate of conversion and morbidity. Methods: A consecutive series of patients affected by solid and cystic tumors were selected prospectively to undergo laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy performed by the same surgical team. Clinical characteristics as well as diagnostic preoperative assessment and intra- and postoperative data were prospectively recorded. A follow-up of at least 3 months was available for all patients. Results: Fifty-eight patients underwent laparoscopic resection between May 1999 and November 2005. All procedures were successfully performed laparoscopically, and no patient required intraoperative blood transfusion. Splenic vessel preservation was possible in 84.4% of spleen-preserving procedures. There were no mortalities. The overall median hospital stay was 9 days, while it was 10.5 days for patients with postoperative pancreatic fistulae (27.5% of all cases). Follow-up was available for all patients. Conclusions: Our experience in 58 consecutive patients was characterized by the lack of conversions and by acceptable rates of postoperative pancreatic fistulae and morbidity. Laparoscopy proved especially beneficial in patients with postoperative complications as they had a relatively short hospital stay. Solid and cystic tumors of the distal pancreas represent a good indication for laparoscopic resection whenever possible. PMID:17592294

  20. Acute small bowel obstruction due to a large intraluminal blood clot after laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass

    PubMed Central

    Green, Jessica; Ikuine, Tomoko; Hacker, Shoshana; Urrego, Hernan; Tuggle, Karleena

    2016-01-01

    Small bowel obstructions (SBOs) are a known perioperative complication of laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and common etiologies include internal hernia, port site hernia, jejunojejunostomy stricture, ileus and adhesions. Less commonly, SBO can be caused by superior mesenteric artery syndrome, intussusception and intraluminal blood clot. We present a case of SBO caused by intraluminal blood clot from jejunojejunostomy staple line bleeding in a patient with a normal coagulation profile. Computed tomography was used to elucidate the cause of perioperative SBO, and diagnostic laparoscopy was used to both diagnose and treat the complication. In this case, the intraluminal clot was evacuated laparoscopically by enterotomy, thrombectomy and primary closure without anastomotic revision since there was no evidence of continued bleeding. Administration of enoxaparin and Toradol post-operatively may have exacerbated mild intraluminal bleeding occurring at the stapled jejunojejunal anastomosis. Prompt recognition and treatment of perioperative SBO can prevent catastrophic consequences related to bowel perforation. PMID:27554828

  1. Giant congenital diaphragmatic hernia in an adult

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Bochdalek hernia is the most common type of congenital diaphragmatic hernia. It appears frequently in infants but rarely in adults. We present the case of a 50-year-old female han patient with tremendous left-sided congenital posterolateral diaphragmatic hernia (Bochdalek hernia) who also has a pair of supernumerary breasts and pulmonary hypoplasia of the lower-left lobe. The patient had an experience of misdiagnosis and she was treated for bronchitis for one year until being admitted to our hospital. This case study emphasizes the rare presentation of Bochdalek hernia in adults and the necessity of high clinical attention to similar cases. PMID:24512974

  2. Ventral Pallidum Roles in Reward and Motivation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kyle S.; Tindell, Amy J.; Aldridge, J. Wayne; Berridge, Kent C.

    2008-01-01

    In recent years the ventral pallidum has become a focus of great research interest as a mechanism of reward and incentive motivation. As a major output for limbic signals, the ventral pallidum was once associated primarily with motor functions rather than regarded as a reward structure in its own right. However, ample evidence now suggests that ventral pallidum function is a major mechanism of reward in the brain. We review data indicating that 1) an intact ventral pallidum is necessary for normal reward and motivation, 2) stimulated activation of ventral pallidum is sufficient to cause reward and motivation enhancements, and 3) activation patterns in ventral pallidum neurons specifically encode reward and motivation signals via phasic bursts of excitation to incentive and hedonic stimuli. We conclude that the ventral pallidum may serve as an important ‘limbic final common pathway’ for mesocorticolimbic processing of many rewards. PMID:18955088

  3. Laparoscopic total extraperitoneal repair under spinal anesthesia versus general anesthesia: a randomized prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Donmez, Turgut; Erdem, Vuslat Muslu; Sunamak, Oguzhan; Erdem, Duygu Ayfer; Avaroglu, Huseyin Imam

    2016-01-01

    Background Laparoscopic total extraperitoneal (TEP) inguinal hernia repair is a well-known approach to inguinal hernia repair that is usually performed under general anesthesia (GA). To date, no reports compare the efficacy of spinal anesthesia (SA) with that of GA for laparoscopic hernia repairs. The purpose of this study was to compare the surgical outcome of TEP inguinal hernia repair performed when the patient was treated under SA with that performed under GA. Materials and methods Between July 2015 and July 2016, 50 patients were prospectively randomized to either the GA TEP group (Group I) or the SA TEP group (Group II). Propofol, fentanyl, rocuronium, sevoflurane, and tracheal intubation were used for GA. Hyperbaric bupivacaine (15 mg) and fentanyl (10 µg) were used for SA to achieve a sensorial level of T3. Intraoperative events related to SA, operative and anesthesia times, postoperative complications, and pain scores were recorded. Each patient was asked to evaluate the anesthetic technique by using a direct questionnaire filled in 3 months after the operation. Results All the procedures were completed by the allocated method of anesthesia as there were no conversions from SA to GA. Pain was significantly less for 1 h (P<0.0001) and 4 h (P=0.002) after the procedure for the SA and GA groups, respectively. There was no difference between the two groups regarding complications, hospital stay, recovery, or surgery time. Generally, patients were more satisfied with SA than GA (P<0.020). Conclusion TEP inguinal hernia repair can be safely performed under SA, and SA was associated with less postoperative pain, better recovery, and better patient satisfaction than GA. PMID:27822053

  4. Appendico-cutaneous fistula 20 years after groin hernia repair with a polypropylene plug

    PubMed Central

    Wijers, Olivier; Conijn, Anne; Wiese, Hans; Sjer, Mike

    2013-01-01

    The formation of an appendico-cutaneous fistula is rare. Few case reports have been published; most describe the formation of a fistula after appendicitis. Here we describe the case of a 79-year-old woman presenting with an appendico-cutaneous fistula after groin hernia repair. She was referred to our outpatient department with a painful mass in the right groin. An ultrasound showed a fluid containing mass. Incision and drainage was performed. After 9 weeks she was referred again with a persisting open wound. Fistulogram and CT scan showed a fistuleous tract involving the appendix. Wound culture showed Escherichia coli. Diagnostic laparoscopy showed an appendix stuck to the ventral wall of the abdomen without any sign of previous infection. After an appendectomy, pathological investigation revealed an appendix sana. After operation, the fistula persisted due to a polypropylene plug from the previous groin hernia correction. The (infected) plug was removed and the fistula healed. PMID:23921697

  5. Intragastric pressure: Useful indicator in the management of congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Kartik Chandra; Halder, Pankaj; Barman, Shibsankar; Kumar, Rajarshi; Mukhopadhyay, Biswanath; Shukla, Ram Mohan

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To assess the role of measuring of intragastric pressure (IGP) during closure of congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Materials and Methods: Thirty-two cases were included in the study (August 2008 to February 2014), and IGP has been measured intraoperatively during closure. Result: Patients were categorized in group A (15 patients), group B (14 patients) and group C (3 patients). In group C, IGP was more than 30 cm of water pressure and all of tehm required creation of ventral hernia and ventilator support. Conclusion: Measurement of IGP as an objective, noninvasive and simple method to evaluate intra-abdominal pressure and prevention of abdominal compartment syndrome and intraoperative IGP value determines the types of abdominal closure. PMID:27695209

  6. [Modern principles of treatment of patient with lateral and anteriolateral hernias of the abdomen].

    PubMed

    Pushkin, S Iu; Belokonev, V I; Ponomareva, Iu V; Volova, L T

    2010-01-01

    Among 88 patients with ventral hernias of the lateral and anteriolateral localization in 32 patients tension methods were used, in 56 patients non-tension combined methods of plasty with the lay-sub lay-on lay position of the implant. In the first group local and general complications were diagnosed in 2 (6.3%), in the second in 6 (10.7%) patients. Recurrent hernias in the long-term periods developed in the 1st group in 20 (62.5%) patients, in the 2nd--in 3 (5.4%). There were no lethal outcomes. The non-tension combined methods of plasty of the abdominal wall are thought to be preferable.

  7. Laparoscopic surgery in weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, M. R.; Billica, R. D.; Jennings, R.; Johnston, S. 3rd

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Performing a surgical procedure in weightlessness has been shown not to be any more difficult than in a 1g environment if the requirements for the restraint of the patient, operator, and surgical hardware are observed. The feasibility of performing a laparoscopic surgical procedure in weightlessness, however, has been questionable. Concerns have included the impaired visualization from the lack of gravitational retraction of the bowel and from floating debris such as blood. METHODS: In this project, laparoscopic surgery was performed on a porcine animal model in the weightlessness of parabolic flight. RESULTS: Visualization was unaffected due to the tethering of the bowel by the elastic mesentery and the strong tendency for debris and blood to adhere to the abdominal wall due to surface tension forces. CONCLUSIONS: There are advantages to performing a laparoscopic instead of an open surgical procedure in a weightless environment. These will become important as the laparoscopic support hardware is miniaturized from its present form, as laparoscopic technology becomes more advanced, and as more surgically capable crew medical officers are present in future long-duration space-exploration missions.

  8. Single-Incision Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy: our experience and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    ZANGHÌ, G.; LEANZA, V.; VECCHIO, R.; MALAGUARNERA, M.; ROMANO, G.; RINZIVILLO, N.M.A.; CATANIA, V.; BASILE, F.

    2015-01-01

    Aim After the revolution in the surgery of gallbladder stones represented by the laparoscopic cholecystectomy, we tried a new technique that further maximize the aesthetic results and that at the same time is of easy learning for young surgeons. Patients and methods From January 2011 to December 2012 we performed at our department 320 cholecystectomy: 27 in laparotomy and 293 in laparoscopy. Of these, 88 underwent to Single Incision Laparoscopic Surgery (SILS), namely the Single Incision Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy (SILC), in recruited patients aged between 19–65 years; 56 patients were females and 32 were males. Results The laparoscopic cholecystectomy with the SILS methodology is a safe technique. Respect to multi-port Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy (LC), we have cosmetic advances. The pain is less in extra-umbilical sites, and the major umbilical pain can be prevented by local anaesthesia. The times are slightly longer, especially at the beginning of training, but after a few of operations it is reduced to about one hour. We didn’t found any other difference in vantage and advantage between the two technics, only a case of postoperative umbilical hernia in SILS. Conclusion We found the SILS a safe and effective technique for the cholecystectomy. PMID:26888698

  9. [Image tracking system. A new technique for safe and cost-saving laparoscopic operation].

    PubMed

    Niebuhr, H; Born, O

    2000-05-01

    The potential for improvement of the results of laparoscopic operations as well as necessity of enhanced efficiency in the health-care systems are the main reasons for development and practical use of robotic systems in the field of laparoscopic surgery. While robotic systems imitate the human camera-holder the Image Tracking System (ImagTrac, Olympus, Tokio) is based on another principle: A voice-activated zoom function allows change between overview and detailed view. In the zoom-in position it is possible to select four different fields of view. The results of a clinical trial with control group show that the system: 1. Makes it possible to dispense with the human camera-holder without compromising patient safety, sometimes at greater convenience to the surgeon. 2. Makes it possible for routine laparoscopic operations such as laparoscopic cholecystectomy and laparoscopic hernia repair to be performed (as solo surgery) by a team of a surgeon and a nurse only. 3. Is more cost-effective than robotic systems with a similar range of features.

  10. The Feasibility of Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy in Patients with Previous Abdominal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Diez, J.; Delbene, R.; Ferreres, A.

    1998-01-01

    A retrospective study was carried in 1500 patients submitted to elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy to ascertain its feasibility in patients with previous abdominal surgery. In 411 patients (27.4%) previous infraumbilical intraperitoneal surgery had been performed, and 106 of them (7.06%) had 2 or more operations. Twenty five patients (1.66%) had previous supraumbilical intraperitoneal operations (colonic resection, hydatid liver cysts, gastrectomies, etc.) One of them had been operated 3 times. In this group of 25 patients the first trocar and pneumoperitoneum were performed by open laparoscopy. In 2 patients a Marlex mesh was present from previous surgery for supraumbilical hernias. Previous infraumbilical intraperitoneal surgery did not interfere with laparoscopic cholecystectomy, even in patients with several operations. There was no morbidity from Verres needle or trocars. In the 25 patients with supraumbilical intraperitoneal operations, laparoscopic cholecystectomy was completed in 22. In 3, adhesions prevented the visualization of the gallbladder and these patients were converted to an open procedure. In the 2 patients Marlex mesh prevented laparoscopic cholecystectomy because of adhesions to abdominal organs. We conclude that in most instances previous abdominal operations are no contraindication to laparoscopic cholecystectomy. PMID:9515231

  11. Diaphragmatic hernia: an unusual presentation

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Neha; Fernandes, Roland; Thakrar, Amit; Rozati, Hamoun

    2013-01-01

    A 53-year-old lady presented to A&E with a 3-day history of severe epigastric pain and vomiting. This was preceded by a 3-month history of generalised abdominal discomfort, early satiety and increasing shortness of breath. A CT scan showed a left-sided posterior diaphragmatic defect. Urgent repair of the hernia showed herniation of three-quarter of the stomach, half of the transverse colon, the 13 cm spleen and the pancreas in the chest. There were no postoperative complications. Traumatic diaphragmatic hernias are known to be a complication of major trauma. However, the patient in this case report presented acutely, after mild physical trauma related to using a rowing machine. This exercise, when not performed correctly can raise intra-abdominal pressure. It is plausible that this trauma, although mild, was sufficient in causing the lady's diaphragmatic hernia. This case would suggest that the trauma required to cause a diaphragmatic hernia need not be as severe as originally thought. PMID:23616319

  12. Simulation in laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    León Ferrufino, Felipe; Varas Cohen, Julián; Buckel Schaffner, Erwin; Crovari Eulufi, Fernando; Pimentel Müller, Fernando; Martínez Castillo, Jorge; Jarufe Cassis, Nicolás; Boza Wilson, Camilo

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays surgical trainees are faced with a more reduced surgical practice, due to legal limitations and work hourly constraints. Also, currently surgeons are expected to dominate more complex techniques such as laparoscopy. Simulation emerges as a complementary learning tool in laparoscopic surgery, by training in a safe, controlled and standardized environment, without jeopardizing patient' safety. Simulation' objective is that the skills acquired should be transferred to the operating room, allowing reduction of learning curves. The use of simulation has increased worldwide, becoming an important tool in different surgical residency programs and laparoscopic training courses. For several countries, the approval of these training courses are a prerequisite for the acquisition of surgeon title certifications. This article reviews the most important aspects of simulation in laparoscopic surgery, including the most used simulators and training programs, as well as the learning methodologies and the different key ways to assess learning in simulation.

  13. Incidental Non-Inguinals Hernias in Totally Extra-Peritoneal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Old, OJ; Kulkarni, SR; Hardy, TJ; Slim, FJ; Emerson, LG; Bulbulia, RA; Whyman, MR

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Totally extra-peritoneal (TEP) inguinal hernia repair allows identification and repair of incidental non-inguinal groin hernias. We assessed the prevalence of incidental hernias during TEP inguinal hernia repair and identified the risk factors for incidental hernias. Materials and Methods Consecutive patients undergoing TEP repair from May 2005 to November 2012 were the study cohort. Inspection for ipsilateral femoral, obturator and rarer varieties of hernia was undertaken during TEP repair. Patient characteristics and operative findings were recorded on a prospectively collected database. Results A total of 1,532 TEP repairs were undertaken in 1,196 patients. Ninety-three patients were excluded due to incomplete data, leaving 1,103 patients and 1,404 hernias for analyses (1,380 male; 802 unilateral and 301 bilateral repairs; median age, 59 years). Among the 37 incidental hernias identified (2.6% of cases), the most common type of incidental hernia was femoral (n=32, 2.3%) followed by obturator (n=2, 0.1%). Increasing age was associated with an increased risk of incidental hernia, with a significant linear trend (p<0.01). The risk for patients >60 years of age was 4.0% vs 1.4% for those aged <60 years (p<0.01). Incidental hernias were found in 29.2% of females vs 2.2% of males, (p<0.0001). Risk of incidental hernia in those with a recurrent inguinal hernia was 3.0% vs 2.6% for primary repair (p=0.79). Conclusions Incidental hernias during TEP inguinal hernia repair were found in 2.6% of cases and, though infrequent, could cause complications if left untreated. The risk of incidental hernia increased with age and was significantly higher in patients aged >60 years and in females. PMID:25723688

  14. Laparoscopic versus conventional appendectomy.

    PubMed Central

    Vallina, V L; Velasco, J M; McCulloch, C S

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to prospectively define the impact of laparoscopy on the management of patients with a presumed diagnosis of appendicitis. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: While the role of laparoscopy in the management of cholelithiasis is well established, its impact on the management of acute appendicitis needs to be objectively defined and compared to that of conventional management. Several authors have predicted that laparoscopic appendectomy will become the preferred treatment for appendicitis. METHODS: Two groups of consecutive patients with similar clinical characteristics of acute appendicitis were compared. Data on the laparoscopic group were compiled prospectively on standardized forms; data on the conventional group were collected retrospectively. Operative time, hospital stay, analgesia, cost, and return to normal activities were noted. RESULTS: Seventeen consecutive patients who underwent appendectomy were compared to 18 consecutive patients who underwent laparoscopy (16 of these 18 had laparoscopic appendectomy). There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of clinical characteristics and appendiceal histopathology. The mean operative times were 61 +/- 4.1 minutes and 46 +/- 2.9 minutes for the laparoscopy and conventional groups, respectively (p < 0.01). Hospital stay was significantly shorter in the laparoscopic appendectomy group, with 81% of patients being discharged on their first postoperative day (p < 0.001). The laparoscopic appendectomy patients required significantly less narcotic analgesia (p < 0.02). Return to normal activity was not significantly different between the two groups. The average total cost of laparoscopic appendectomy was 30% greater than that of conventional appendectomy. CONCLUSIONS: Laparoscopy is a useful adjunct to the management of patients with a presumed clinical diagnosis of acute appendicitis. PMID:8239785

  15. Amyand's hernia in infant: a rare entity.

    PubMed

    Upadhyaya, V D; Kumar, V; Srivastava, P; Gangopadhyaya, A N

    2009-01-01

    The chance of vermiform appendix lying with in a hernial sac is 1% or less and is known as Amyand's hernia and it is very rare in infant and neonate. Till date, only twenty cases had been reported in English literature. We are reporting a rare case of Amyand's hernia where appendix was present in right inguinal sac of non-obstructed inguinal hernia in a seven month old male infant during operation. The appendectomy was done along with right inguinal herniotomy. In most of the reported cases, appendix was inflamed or perforated, expect in one case where appendix was not inflamed but patient presented with inguinal hernia. This case is reported because of the rarity of Amyand's hernia in infant, the appendix was not inflamed, hernia was not obstructed, and whether in such types of cases appendix should be preserved or not.

  16. Atropine: A Cure for Persistent Post Laparoscopic Pyloromyotomy Emesis?

    PubMed Central

    Cubas, Robert Frank; Longshore, Shannon; Rodriguez, Samuel; Tagge, Edward; Baerg, Joanne; Moores, Donald

    2017-01-01

    Background: Atropine has been used as a successful primary medical treatment for hypertrophic pyloric stenosis. Several authors have reported a higher rate of incomplete pyloromyotomy with the laparoscopic approach compared to open. In this study, we evaluated the use of atropine as a medical treatment for infants with emesis persisting greater than 48 hours after a laparoscopic pyloromyotomy. Materials and Methods: We performed a retrospective chart review of infants receiving a laparoscopic pyloromyotomy between November 1998 and November 2012. Infants with emesis that persisted beyond 48 hours postoperatively were given 0.01mg/kg of oral atropine 10 minutes prior to feeding. Infants remained inpatient until they tolerated two consecutive feedings without emesis. Results: 965 patients underwent laparoscopic pyloromyotomy; 816 (84.6%) male and 149 (15.4%) female. Twenty-four (2.5%) received oral atropine. The mean length of stay for patients who received atropine was 5.6 ± 2.6 days, an average of 3 additional days. They were discharged home with a one-month supply of oral atropine. Follow up evaluation did not reveal any complications from receiving atropine. The median follow up was 21 days. None returned to the operating room for incomplete pyloromyotomy. There were 17 (1.8%) operative complications in our series; 9 mucosal perforations, 2 duodenal perforations, and 6 conversions to open for equipment failure or poor exposure. There were 4 (0.4%) post-operative complications: 2 episodes of apnea requiring reintubation and 2 incisional hernias that required a second operation. There were no deaths. Conclusion: Oral atropine is a viable treatment for persistent emesis after a pyloromyotomy and reduces the need for a second operation due to incomplete pyloromyotomy. PMID:28083488

  17. Laparoscopic robotic-assisted gastrointestinal surgery: the Geneva experience.

    PubMed

    Soravia, Claudio; Schwieger, Ian; Witzig, Jacques-Alain; Wassmer, Frank-Alain; Vedrenne, Thierry; Sutter, Pierre; Dufour, Jean-Philippe; Racloz, Yves

    2008-01-01

    The continuing development of robotic surgery supports its use in laparoscopic gastrointestinal surgery. Our study retrospectively reviewed the surgical outcome and patient's satisfaction of gastrointestinal laparoscopic robotic procedures. From January 2003 to September 2007, 94 patients (27 women, 67 men) with a mean age of 53 years (range 19-84 years) underwent laparoscopic surgery with a da Vinci robotic system. There were 40 colorectal cases (43%), 31 anti-reflux surgery cases (33%) and 14 obesity surgery cases (15%); the remaining cases consisted of gastric and gallbladder surgery, intra-abdominal tumour excisions, and hepatic cyst resections. The majority of the cases (88, 94%) were performed for benign disease. The mean operative time was 153 min (range 60-330 min). One patient needed a blood transfusion. The mean body mass index was 25 (range 16-47). No death occurred. Five cases (5.3%) were converted to conventional laparoscopic surgery (n = 3) or to laparotomy (n = 2). Morbidity consisted of one Nissen redo surgery to loosen a tight anti-reflux valve 6 days after robotic surgery, a robotic left ureter repair and pelvic haemorrhage following proctectomy requiring re-operation to control haemostasis and to remove pelvic haematoma. Mean follow-up time was 11 months (range 15 days to 34 months). One case of incisional trocar hernia needed re-operation. Overall patient's satisfaction was high: few scars were cheloïd, while functional surgical outcome was rated high by most of the patients. Our preliminary experience was encouraging, with minimal morbidity and very high acceptance by patients.

  18. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy in an adult with agenesis of right hemidiaphragm and limb reduction defects: First report in literature

    PubMed Central

    Sagiroglu, Julide; Tombalak, Ercument; Yilmaz, Sarenur Basaran; Balyemez, Fikret; Eren, Tunc; Alimoglu, Orhan

    2016-01-01

    The importance of the complete absence of a hemidiaphragm or unilateral diaphragmatic agenesis in adulthood in relation to performing laparoscopic procedures has not been well documented. This article reports for the first time in literature a case of successful laparoscopic cholecystectomy in an adult with previously undiagnosed unilateral diaphragmatic agenesis. A 36-year-old female complaining of stubborn right upper abdominal pain radiating to her upper back was diagnosed as having cholelithiasis and was scheduled for laparoscopic cholecystectomy. There were also bilateral upper extremity malformations to a certain level. Routine diagnostic tests demonstrated that her entire liver and some bowel loops were in the right hemithorax, suggesting right-sided diaphragmatic hernia. Laparoscopic procedure was performed with the insertion of four trocars. Exploration of abdomen revealed total absence of the right hemidiaphragm. Cholecystectomy was completed laparoscopically in about 45 minutes without need for additional trocars. Patient had an uneventful recovery and was discharged on the second postoperative day without any complaint. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy in adults with diaphragmatic agenesis and intrathoracic abdominal viscera can be performed successfully. Nevertheless, any bile duct aberrations must be documented prior to surgery, and the surgeon should be able to convert to open procedure if necessary. PMID:28058404

  19. Usage of a self-adhesive mesh in TAPP hernia repair: A prospective study based on Herniamed Register

    PubMed Central

    Klobusicky, Pavol; Feyerherd, Peter

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Inguinal hernia repair is one of the most frequently performed surgical procedures worldwide in general surgery. The transabdominal laparoscopic (TAPP) approach in the therapy of inguinal hernia seems to be a suitable alternative to classical open inguinal hernia repair mainly in the hands of an experienced surgeon. TAPP repair offers the possibility of gentle dissection with implantation of the mesh and the possibility of non-invasive fixation of the implanted mesh. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data analysis encompassed all patients who underwent inguinal hernia surgery at our Surgical Department within the period from July 1, 2012 to September 30, 2014 and who fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The standard surgical technique was used. Data were entered and subsequently analysed on the Herniamed platform. Herniamed is an Internet-based register in German and English, and includes all data of outpatient and hospitalised patients who underwent surgery for some type of hernia. All relevant patient data are collected via Internet. RESULTS: There were 241 patients enrolled in the group and there were 396 inguinal hernias repaired in total. Standard long-term follow-up after 12 months was evaluated in 205 patients (85.06%), and in the rest of the patients during the closing of the study, but at least 6 months after operation. The mean follow-up was at 19.69 months. At the 1-year assessment, mild discomfort was reported in the groin in 10 patients (4.88%) [1-3 on the visual analogue scale (VAS)]. Post-operative pain lasting over 12 months in the groin of moderate degree (4-6 VAS) was reported in two cases (0.97%). There was no recurrence and no chronic post-operative pain of severe degree reported. CONCLUSION: Our study demonstrates that laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair using the TAPP technique with the implantation of a self-fixation mesh is fast, effective, reliable and economically advantageous method in experienced hands and, according to our results

  20. Acute pancreatitis secondary to incarcerated paraesophageal hernia.

    PubMed

    Kafka, N J; Leitman, I M; Tromba, J

    1994-05-01

    Paraesophageal hiatus hernia can be a morbid and even lethal condition. Although many complications from this entity have been described, they almost always involve gastric incarceration and its related complications. Occasionally, the transverse colon or spleen may be involved in the hernia, causing additional symptoms. An unusual case of paraesophageal hiatus hernia involving incarceration of the pylorus, proximal duodenum, and pancreatic head is described. The patient's presentation, operative management, and perioperative course are discussed to emphasize the importance of early elective repair of paraesophageal hiatus hernia before the development of such occurrences.

  1. Acute Scrotum Caused by Hernia Sac Torsion.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Shinji; Aoki, Katsuya; Shimada, Keiji; Samma, Shoji

    2016-03-01

    A 9-year-old boy was referred to us with an acute pain attack of the left scrotal contents. Ultrasonography showed a normal blood supply to the left testis, suggesting an incarcerated left inguinal hernia. Surgical exploration did not demonstrate an incarcerated left inguinal hernia. After exploration of the left testis, a dark red pedunculated cystic mass, separate from the left testis, was found to be twisted. Immunohistochemical studies of the excised cyst demonstrated torsion of the hernia sac of the peritoneum. In conclusion, we encountered a case of acute scrotum which was probably caused by torsion of the hernia sac.

  2. Prospective Observational Study of Single-Site Multiport Per-umbilical Laparoscopic Endosurgery versus Conventional Multiport Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy: Critical Appraisal of a Unique Umbilical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Jategaonkar, Priyadarshan Anand; Yadav, Sudeep Pradeep

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. This prospective observational study compares an innovative approach of Single-Site Multi-Port Per-umbilical Laparoscopic Endo-surgery (SSMPPLE) cholecystectomy with the gold standard—Conventional Multi-port Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy (CMLC)—to assess the feasibility and efficacy of the former. Methods. In all, 646 patients were studied. SSMPPLE cholecystectomy utilized three ports inserted through three independent mini-incisions at the umbilicus. Only the day-to-day rigid laparoscopic instruments were used in all cases. The SSMPPLE cholecystectomy group had 320 patients and the CMLC group had 326 patients. The outcomes were statistically compared. Results. SSMPPLE cholecystectomy had average operative time of 43.8 min and blood loss of 9.4 mL. Their duration of hospitalization was 1.3 days (range, 1–5). Six patients (1.9%) of this group were converted to CMLC. Eleven patients had controlled gallbladder perforations at dissection. The Visual Analogue Scores for pain on postoperative days 0 and 7, the operative time, and the scar grades were significantly better for SSMPPLE than CMLC. However, umbilical sepsis and seroma outcomes were similar. We had no bile-duct injuries or port-site hernias in this study. Conclusion. SSMPPLE cholecystectomy approach complies with the principles of laparoscopic triangulation; it seems feasible and safe method of minimally invasive cholecystectomy. Overall, it has a potential to emerge as an economically viable alternative to single-port surgery. PMID:24876955

  3. Garengeot’s hernia: two case reports with CT diagnosis and literature review

    PubMed Central

    De la Plaza, Roberto; Arteaga, Vladimir; Lopez-Marcano, Aylhin; Ramia, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Garengeot’s hernia (GH) is defined as the presence of the appendix inside a femoral hernia. It occurs in 0.9% of femoral hernias and is usually an incidental finding during surgery. Its treatment is controversial and the aim of this article is to review the diagnostic methods and surgical considerations. We report two cases diagnosed preoperatively by contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and discuss the treatment options based on a review of the literature published in PubMed updated on 1 December, 2015. Fifty articles reporting 64 patients (50 women, mean age 70 years) with GH were included in the analysis. Diagnosis was performed by preoperative CT in only 24 cases, including our two. The treatment of GH is emergency surgery. Several options are available laparoscopic or open approach: insertion of a mesh or simple herniorrhaphy, with or without appendectomy. Conslusion The preoperative diagnosis with CT can guide the choice of treatment. Appendectomy and hernioplasty should be performed via inguinotomy, if there is no perforation or abscess formation. PMID:28352820

  4. Laparoscopic hysterectomy with bilateral orchidectomy for Persistent Mullerian duct syndrome with seminoma testes: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Palanisamy, Senthilnathan; Patel, Nikunj D.; Sabnis, Sandeep C.; Palanisamy, Nalankilli; Vijay, Anand; Chinnusamy, Palanivelu

    2015-01-01

    Persistent Mullerian duct syndrome (PMDS) is one of the three rare intersex disorders caused by defective anti-mullerian hormone or its receptor, characterized by undescended testes with presence of underdeveloped derivatives of mullerian duct in genetically male infant or adult with normal external genitals and virilization. This population will essentially have normal, 46(XY), phenotype. We hereby present a case of PMDS, presented with incarcerated left inguinal hernia associated with cryptorchidism and seminoma of right testes. Patient underwent laparoscopic hernia repair with bilateral orchidectomy and hysterectomy with uneventful postoperative recovery. Here we highlight the importance of minimal access approach for this scenario in terms of better visualization, less blood loss, combining multiple procedures along with early return to work and excellent cosmetic outcome. PMID:26622120

  5. Acute gastric incarceration from thoracic herniation in pregnancy following laparoscopic antireflux surgery

    PubMed Central

    Brygger, Louise; Fristrup, Claus Wilki; Harbo, Frederik Severin Gråe; Jørgensen, Jan Stener

    2013-01-01

    Diaphragmatic hernia is a rare complication in pregnancy which due to misdiagnosis or management delays may be life-threatening. We report a case of a woman in the third trimester of pregnancy who presented with sudden onset of severe epigastric and thoracic pain radiating to the back. Earlier in the index pregnancy, she had undergone laparoscopic antireflux surgery (ARS) for a hiatus hernia because of severe gastro-oesophageal reflux. Owing to increasing epigastric pain a CT scan was carried out which diagnosed wrap disruption with gastric herniation into the thoracic cavity and threatened incarceration. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of severe adverse outcome after ARS during pregnancy, with acute intrathoracic gastric herniation. We recommend the avoidance of ARS in pregnancy, and the need to advise women undergoing ARS of the postoperative risks if pregnancy occurs within a few years of ARS. PMID:23378556

  6. Large hiatal hernia in infancy with right intrathoracic stomach along with left sided morgagni hernia.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Uzma; Mazhar, Naveed; Zameer, Shahla

    2014-11-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is a very common intrathoracic fetal anomaly with Morgagni hernia typically seen on right side anteriorly and Bochdalek hernia on left side posteriorly, because of the protective effects of liver and heart on either side respectively. Hiatal hernias range from herniation of a small portion of stomach into thoracic cavity to herniation of entire stomach into the left thoracic cavity. Very rarely the herniated stomach has been reported in the right thoracic cavity. Early diagnosis and treatment of all diaphragmatic hernias is essential to reduce the associated morbidity and mortality. We present a very rare and interesting case of an 18 months old baby girl with reverse scenarios. She had a large hiatal hernia with right intrathoracic stomach along with a left sided Morgagni hernia in combination.

  7. Laparoscopic transhiatal approach for resection of an adenocarcinoma in long-segment Barrett’s esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Shiozaki, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Konishi, Hirotaka; Kinoshita, Osamu; Kosuga, Toshiyuki; Morimura, Ryo; Murayama, Yasutoshi; Komatsu, Shuhei; Kuriu, Yoshiaki; Ikoma, Hisashi; Nakanishi, Masayoshi; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Okamoto, Kazuma; Sakakura, Chouhei; Otsuji, Eigo

    2015-01-01

    Barrett’s esophagus (BE) is a precursor of esophageal adenocarcinoma and is associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease, which is often preceded by a hiatal hernia. We describe a case of esophageal adenocarcinoma arising in long-segment BE (LSBE) associated with a hiatal hernia that was successfully treated with a laparoscopic transhiatal approach (LTHA) without thoracotomy. The patient was a 42-year-old male who had previously undergone laryngectomy and tracheal separation to avoid repeated aspiration pneumonitis. An ulcerative lesion was found in a hiatal hernia by endoscopy and superficial esophageal cancer was also detected in the lower thoracic esophagus. The histopathological diagnosis of biopsy samples from both lesions was adenocarcinoma. There were difficulties with the thoracic approach because the patient had severe kyphosis and muscular contractures from cerebral palsy. Therefore, we performed subtotal esophagectomy by LTHA without thoracotomy. Using hand-assisted laparoscopic surgery, the esophageal hiatus was divided and carbon dioxide was introduced into the mediastinum. A hernial sac was identified on the cranial side of the right crus of the diaphragm and carefully separated from the surrounding tissues. Abruption of the thoracic esophagus was performed up to the level of the arch of the azygos vein via LTHA. A cervical incision was made in the left side of the permanent tracheal stoma, the cervical esophagus was divided, and gastric tube reconstruction was performed via a posterior mediastinal route. The operative time was 175 min, and there was 61 mL of intra-operative bleeding. A histopathological examination revealed superficial adenocarcinoma in LSBE. Our surgical procedure provided a good surgical view and can be safely applied to patients with a hiatal hernia and kyphosis. PMID:26269688

  8. Intraoperative pneumothorax during laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Tai, Yu-Pin; Wei, Chang-Kuo; Lai, Yu-Yung

    2006-12-01

    Anesthesiologists currently view laparoscopic cholecystectomy resemblant to other laparoscopic procedures with respect to the necessity of inducing a pneumoperitoneum via abdominal insufflation of carbon dioxide (CO2). The present case report describes a healthy 63-year-old man who while undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy under general anesthesia, developed hypoxemia in the course in consequence of pneumothorax. This complication, although rare, can be catastrophic if prompt diagnosis and rapid intervention and management do not come in the nick of time.

  9. Laparoscopic Management of Large Myomas

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Rakesh; Sundaram, Meenakshi

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this article is to review the different techniques that have been adopted for removal of large myomas laparoscopically. We have also quoted literature about the impact of myomas on Pregnancy and obstetrical outcome and the effect of laparoscopic myomectomy on the same. Technical modifications to remove large myomas have been described along with methods to reduce intraoperative bleeding. This comprehensive review describes all possibilities of laparoscopic myomectomy irrespective of size, site and number. PMID:22442517

  10. De Garengeot hernia: an uncommon presentation of acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Vos, Cornelis G; Mollema, Robbert; Richir, Milan C

    2017-02-01

    We present a case of a 78-year-old female patient with an uncommon presentation of acute appendicitis. She was found to have a perforated appendicitis which developed in a femoral hernia sack. An appendix present in a femoral hernia is called a De Garengeot Hernia, which is a rare form of femoral hernia. Clinical presentation, diagnosis and management are discussed.

  11. [Laparoscopic gastric bypass: computed tomography appearance of common postoperative changes and complications].

    PubMed

    Caracela Zeballos, C R; Diéguez Tapias, S; Cereceda Pérez, C N; Pinto Varela, J M

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y bypass is being increasingly used for weight reduction in patients with morbid obesity. Unfortunately, some complications can occur after this procedure, the most frequent being intestinal obstruction (due to stenosis of the anastomosis at the distal end of the loop, internal hernias, bands, and adhesions), anastomotic leaks, and bleeding. This article provides basic knowledge about the surgical technique and its correlation with the common postoperative changes with the aim of facilitating the interpretation of CT findings and the identification of postoperative complications in these patients.

  12. Laparoscopic radical and partial cystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Challacombe, Ben J.; Rose, Kristen; Dasgupta, Prokar

    2005-01-01

    Radical cystectomy remains the standard treatment for muscle invasive organ confined bladder carcinoma. Laparoscopic radical cystoprostatectomy (LRC) is an advanced laparoscopic procedure that places significant demands on the patient and the surgeon alike. It is a prolonged procedure which includes several technical steps and requires highly developed laparoscopic skills including intra-corporeal suturing. Here we review the development of the technique, the indications, complications and outcomes. We also examine the potential benefits of robotic-assisted LRC and explore the indications and technique of laparoscopic partial cystectomy. PMID:21206662

  13. [Laparoscopic cholecystectomy in acute cholecystitis].

    PubMed

    Neufeld, D; Sivak, G; Jessel, J; Freund, U

    1996-04-01

    We performed 417 laparoscopic cholecystectomies, including 58 for acute cholecystitis, between September 1991 and April 1995,. All operations were successful, with no mortality or complications. In about 10%, the laparoscopic approach failed and we converted to open cholecystectomy. Average post-operative hospitalization was 24 hours. We also performed primary open cholecystectomies in 55 patients with acute cholecystitis, because of limitations of operating room and staff availability for unscheduled laparoscopic surgery. In these patients, hospital stay was longer and rate of complications higher. In our opinion laparoscopic cholecystectomy is safe and the preferred approach in acute cholecystitis.

  14. Virtual reality in laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Uranüs, Selman; Yanik, Mustafa; Bretthauer, Georg

    2004-01-01

    Although the many advantages of laparoscopic surgery have made it an established technique, training in laparoscopic surgery posed problems not encountered in conventional surgical training. Virtual reality simulators open up new perspectives for training in laparoscopic surgery. Under realistic conditions in real time, trainees can tailor their sessions with the VR simulator to suit their needs and goals, and can repeat exercises as often as they wish. VR simulators reduce the number of experimental animals needed for training purposes and are suited to the pursuit of research in laparoscopic surgery.

  15. Diaphragmatic Hernia After Pediatric Liver Transplant.

    PubMed

    Kirnap, Mahir; Akdur, Aydincan; Ozcay, Figen; Soy, Ebru; Coskun, Mehmet; Moray, Gokhan; Haberal, Mehmet

    2015-10-01

    Diaphragmatic hernia is an unusual complication after pediatric liver transplant. Nearly half of bowel obstruction cases, which require surgical intervention in liver transplant patients, are caused by diaphragmatic hernia. The smaller patients are at risk for higher rates of diaphragmatic complication after pediatric liver transplant, but diaphragmatic hernia has not been reported as a unique occurrence. Here, we report 3 cases of diaphragmatic hernia after liver transplant and discuss the possible contributing factors. Diaphragmatic hernia should nevertheless be added to the list of potential complications after liver transplant in the pediatric population. Pediatric transplant physicians and surgeons should be aware of this complication so that it is recognized promptly in both acute and nonacute settings and appropriate action is taken.

  16. Anterior Tension-Free Repair of Recurrent Inguinal Hernia Under Local Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Gianetta, Ezio; Cuneo, Sonia; Vitale, Bruno; Camerini, Giovanni; Marini, Paola; Stella, Mattia

    2000-01-01

    Objective To describe a 7-year experience with recurrent inguinal hernia repair performed mainly with tension-free mesh or plug technique under local anesthesia through the anterior approach, and to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of this method of treatment. Methods One hundred forty-five elective and 1 emergency herniorrhaphies for recurrent groin hernia were performed in 141 subjects (134 men and 7 women) with a mean age of 65 years (range 30–89). Concomitant medical and surgical problems were present in 73% and 8% of subjects, respectively. In 28 instances, the relapsed hernia had already been operated on once or twice for recurrence. A traditional hernioplasty had been previously performed in the vast majority of cases (136). Tension-free mesh or plug techniques through an anterior approach under local anesthesia were performed in 144 reoperations. Preperitoneal mesh repair and general or spinal anesthesia were used in all but one case when herniorrhaphy was performed during simultaneous operations. Results Mean hospital stay after surgery was 1.5 days (range 3 hours–14 days). No perioperative deaths occurred in this series. General complications were one case of acute intestinal bleeding and two cases of urinary retention. Local complications consisted of eight (5.5%) minor complications and one case of orchitis (0.7%) followed by testicular atrophy. In no instance was postoperative neuralgia or chronic pain reported. Two re-recurrences occurred. Conclusions Given the low complication rate in this and other reported series and the absence of surgical or general complications described after preperitoneal open or laparoscopic repair and after general and spinal anesthesia, anterior mesh repair under local anesthesia seems to be a low-cost surgical technique that can be safely and effectively used even in a teaching hospital for the treatment of the majority of patients with recurrent groin hernias. PMID:10636113

  17. [Laparoscopic surgery: planning program].

    PubMed

    Sarli, L; Pietra, N; Carreras, F; Longinotti, E

    1992-01-01

    Performing laparoscopic surgery requires an initial training program. A well-planned organization is essential and the surgeon has to become first familiar with the new procedures; the choice of the necessary equipment is the second step. Upkeep of surgical instruments and a careful consideration of legal aspects are the next important steps. Several areas of a planning program are evaluated on the basis of the authors' experience.

  18. Small Bowel Obstruction Caused by an Incarcerated Hernia after Iliac Crest Bone Harvest

    PubMed Central

    d'Hondt, Steven; Soysal, Savas; Kirchhoff, Philipp; Oertli, Daniel; Heizmann, Oleg

    2011-01-01

    The iliac crest has become an often used site for autogenous bone graft, because of the easy access it affords. One of the less common complications that can occur after removal is a graft-site hernia. It was first reported in 1945 (see the work by Oldfield, 1945). We report a case of iliac crest bone hernia in a 53-year-old male who was admitted for elective resection of a pseudarthrosis and reconstruction of the left femur with iliac crest bone from the right side. One and a half months after initial surgery, the patient presented with increasing abdominal pain and signs of bowel obstruction. A CT scan of the abdominal cavity showed an obstruction of the small bowel caused by the bone defect of the right iliac crest. A laparoscopy showed a herniation of the small bowel. Due to collateral vessels of the peritoneum caused by portal hypertension, an IPOM (intraperitoneal onlay-mesh) occlusion could not be performed. We performed a conventional ventral hernia repair with an onlay mesh. The recovery was uneventful. PMID:22084778

  19. Laparoscopic antireflux surgery with routine mesh-hiatoplasty in the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Granderath, Frank A; Schweiger, Ursula M; Kamolz, Thomas; Pasiut, Martin; Haas, Christoph F; Pointner, Rudolph

    2002-01-01

    One of the most frequent complications after laparoscopic antireflux surgery is intrathoracic migration of the wrap ("slipped" Nissen fundoplication). The most common reasons for this are inadequate closure of the crura or disruption of the crural closure. The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate surgical outcomes in patients who underwent laparoscopic antireflux surgery with simple nonabsorbable polypropylene sutures for hiatal closure in comparison to patients who underwent routine mesh-hiatoplasty. Between 1993 and 1998, a group of 361 patients underwent primary laparoscopic Nissen or Toupet fundoplication with the use of simple nonabsorbable polypropylene sutures for hiatal closure. Since December 1998, in all patients (n = 170) who underwent laparoscopic antireflux surgery, a 1 x 3 cm polypropylene mesh was placed on the crura behind the esophagus to reinforce them. Functional outcome, symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease, and postoperative complications such as recurrent hiatal hernia with or without intrathoracic migration of the wrap have been used for assessment of outcomes. In the initial series of 361 patients, postoperative herniation of the wrap occurred in 22 patients (6.1%). Of these 22 patients, 17 of them (4.7%) had to undergo laparoscopic redo surgery. The remaining five patients were free of symptoms. In comparison to these results, in a second group of 170 patients there was only one (0.6%) who had postoperative herniation of the wrap into the chest. There have been no significant differences in objective data such as DeMeester scores or lower esophageal sphincter pressure between the two groups. Postoperative dysphagia was increased during the early period after surgery in patients undergoing mesh-hiatoplasty but resolved without any further treatment within the first year after laparoscopic antireflux surgery. We concluded that routine hiatoplasty with the use of a polypropylene mesh is effective in preventing postoperative

  20. Single-port access laparoscopic hysterectomy: a new dimension of minimally invasive surgery.

    PubMed

    Liliana, Mereu; Alessandro, Pontis; Giada, Carri; Luca, Mencaglia

    2011-01-01

    The fundamental idea is to have all of the laparoscopic working ports entering the abdominal wall through the same incision. Single-incision laparoscopic surgery is an alternative to conventional multiport laparoscopy. Single-access laparoscopy using a transumbilical port affords maximum cosmetic benefits because the surgical incision is hidden in the umbilicus and reduces morbidity of minimally invasive surgery. The advantages of single-access laparoscopic surgery may include less bleeding, infection, and hernia formation and better cosmetic outcome and less pain. The disadvantages and limitations include longer surgery time, difficulty in learning the technique, and the need for specialized instruments. This review summarizes the history of SPAL hysterectomy (single-port access laparoscopy), and emphasizes nomenclature, surgical technique, instrumentation, and perioperative outcomes. Specific gynecological applications of single-port hysterectomy to date are summarized. Using the PubMed database, the English-language literature was reviewed for the past 40 years. Keyword searches included scarless, scar free, single-port/trocar/incision, single-port access laparoscopic hysterectomy. Within the bibliography of selected references, additional sources were retrieved. The purpose of the present article was to review the development and current status of SPAL hysterectomy and highlight important advances associated with this innovative approach.

  1. Is robotic ventral mesh rectopexy better than laparoscopy in the treatment of rectal prolapse and obstructed defecation? A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ramage, L; Georgiou, P; Tekkis, P; Tan, E

    2015-07-01

    Ventral mesh rectopexy is an approach in the treatment of internal and external rectal prolapse and rectocele. Our aim was to assess whether robotic surgery confers any significant advantages over laparoscopy, and the associated complication rate. Two reviewers performed a literature search using MEDLINE and PubMed databases for studies comparing robotic versus laparoscopic surgery. Five prospective, non-randomised studies were identified and included. A total of 244 patients (101 robotic and 143 laparoscopic) were included in the analysis. Operative time was shorter with laparoscopic surgery, mean weighted difference 27.94 [confidence interval (CI) 19.30-36.57; p < 0.00001]. The conversion rate was not significantly different between groups. There was a trend towards a reduction in length of inpatient stay and early post-operative complications in the robotic group; however, these did not reach statistical significance. Recurrence rates were similar between groups (odds ratio 0.91, CI 0.32-2.63; p = 0.87). Functional results were comparable between groups. Early studies show that robotic ventral rectopexy is a safe option compared to the laparoscopic approach, with overall comparable results. There appeared to be a trend towards a reduction in length of inpatient stay and post-operative complications. These perceived benefits may offset the longer operative times and outlay costs. Larger randomised controlled trials are needed to further evaluate clinical value and cost-effectiveness.

  2. [Laparoscopic hysterectomy -- indications, technic, complications].

    PubMed

    Bechev, Bl; Kornovski, J; Kostov, I; Lazarov, I

    2013-01-01

    In recent decades, interest in laparoscopic gynecological practice increase. This technic applied first as a diagnostic tool in women with infertility. Subsequently starts to be used to perform surgery in small region of the fallopian tubes and ovaries, being increasingly developed and today, it is considered that any gynecological operation can be performed laparoscopically.

  3. Vomeronasal inputs to the rodent ventral striatum.

    PubMed

    Ubeda-Bañon, I; Novejarque, A; Mohedano-Moriano, A; Pro-Sistiaga, P; Insausti, R; Martinez-Garcia, F; Lanuza, E; Martinez-Marcos, A

    2008-03-18

    Vertebrates sense chemical signals through the olfactory and vomeronasal systems. In squamate reptiles, which possess the largest vomeronasal system of all vertebrates, the accessory olfactory bulb projects to the nucleus sphericus, which in turn projects to a portion of the ventral striatum known as olfactostriatum. Characteristically, the olfactostriatum is innervated by neuropeptide Y, tyrosine hydroxylase and serotonin immunoreactive fibers. In this study, the possibility that a structure similar to the reptilian olfactostriatum might be present in the mammalian brain has been investigated. Injections of dextran-amines have been aimed at the posteromedial cortical amygdaloid nucleus (the putative mammalian homologue of the reptilian nucleus sphericus) of rats and mice. The resulting anterograde labeling includes the olfactory tubercle, the islands of Calleja and sparse terminal fields in the shell of the nucleus accumbens and ventral pallidum. This projection has been confirmed by injections of retrograde tracers into the ventral striato-pallidum that render retrograde labeling in the posteromedial cortical amygdaloid nucleus. The analysis of the distribution of neuropeptide Y, tyrosine hydroxylase, serotonin and substance P in the ventral striato-pallidum of rats, and the anterograde tracing of the vomeronasal amygdaloid input in the same material confirm that, similar to reptiles, the ventral striatum of mammals includes a specialized vomeronasal structure (olfactory tubercle and islands of Calleja) displaying dense neuropeptide Y-, tyrosine hydroxylase- and serotonin-immunoreactive innervations. The possibility that parts of the accumbens shell and/or ventral pallidum could be included in the mammalian olfactostriatum cannot be discarded.

  4. Immunological response in laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Smit, M J; Beelen, R H; Eijsbouts, Q A; Meijer, S; Cuesta, M A

    1996-01-01

    Immunological response to surgical trauma may be protected during laparoscopic surgery. A less surgical trauma, in comparison with conventional surgery, may explained these important advantages. Plasma and macrophages studies have demonstrated that laparoscopic cholecystectomy causes less depression of cell mediated immunity than open cholecystectomy. What will be the impact of this immunological protection in laparoscopic advanced and oncological surgery? Experimental studies have showed that laparoscopic techniques in advanced and oncological surgery may have important advantages concerning the "preservation of the immune status" of the patient. That will imply in the future a lower percentage of infections, local recurrence and even a lower percentage of distant metastases. On the other hand, the appearance of tumor implants in the port sites after laparoscopic resection for cancer is a significant drawback of this procedure. Proper investigations have to be carried out in order to find the cause and the solution of this dilemma.

  5. Laparoscopically guided bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershman, Alex; Danoff, Dudley; Chandra, Mudjianto; Grundfest, Warren S.

    1991-07-01

    Pelvic node dissection has gained widespread acceptance as the final staging procedure in patients with normal acid phospatase and bone scan free of metastatic disease prior to definitive therapy for cure. However, the procedure has had a high morbidity (20-34%) and a major economic impact on the patient due to lengthy hospitalization and recuperative time. The development of laparoscopic biopsy techniques suggests that the need for open surgical lymphadenectomy may be reduced by a laparoscopically performed lymphadenectomy. The goal of this report is to investigate the possibility of laparoscopic pelvic lymphadenectomy in an animal model. Our interest in laparoscopy is based on the ability of this technique to permit tissue removal without the need for major incisions. In laparoscopic cholecystectomy and laparoscopic appendectomy, the surgical procedure is essentially unaltered. The diseased organ is removed and there is no need for a large abdominal incision.

  6. Portomesenteric venous thrombosis: A rare but probably under-reported complication of laparoscopic surgery: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Yan Mei; Tokala, Ajay; Hany, Tarek; Pursnani, Kishore G.; Date, Ravindra S.

    2017-01-01

    Portomesenteric venous thrombosis (PMVT) is a rare but well-reported complication following laparoscopic surgery. We present three cases of PMVT following laparoscopic surgery. Our first case is a 71-year-old morbidly obese woman admitted for elective laparoscopic giant hiatus hernia (LGHH) repair. Post-operatively, she developed multi-organ dysfunction and computed tomography scan revealed portal venous gas and extensive small bowel infarct. The second patient is a 51-year-old man with known previous deep venous thrombosis who also had elective LGHH repair. He presented 8 weeks post-operatively with severe abdominal pain and required major bowel resection. Our third case is an 86-year-old woman who developed worsening abdominal tenderness 3 days after laparoscopic right hemicolectomy for adenocarcinoma and was diagnosed with an incidental finding of thrombus in the portal vein. She did not require further surgical intervention. The current guidelines for thromboprophylaxis follow-up in this patient group may not be adequate for the patients at risk. Hence, we propose prolonged period of thromboprophylaxis in the patients undergoing major laparoscopic surgery. PMID:28281480

  7. Inguinal hernia recurrence: Classification and approach

    PubMed Central

    Campanelli, Giampiero; Pettinari, Diego; Cavalli, Marta; Avesani, Ettore Contessini

    2006-01-01

    The authors reviewed the records of 2,468 operations of groin hernia in 2,350 patients, including 277 recurrent hernias updated to January 2005. The data obtained - evaluating technique, results and complications - were used to propose a simple anatomo-clinical classification into three types which could be used to plan the surgical strategy: Type R1: first recurrence ‘high,’ oblique external, reducible hernia with small (<2 cm) defect in non-obese patients, after pure tissue or mesh repairType R2: first recurrence ‘low,’ direct, reducible hernia with small (<2 cm) defect in non-obese patients, after pure tissue or mesh repairType R3: all the other recurrences - including femoral recurrences; recurrent groin hernia with big defect (inguinal eventration); multirecurrent hernias; nonreducible, linked with a controlateral primitive or recurrent hernia; and situations compromised from aggravating factors (for example obesity) or anyway not easily included in R1 or R2, after pure tissue or mesh repair. PMID:21187986

  8. Sportsman's hernia? An ambiguous term.

    PubMed

    Dimitrakopoulou, Alexandra; Schilders, Ernest

    2016-04-01

    Groin pain is common in athletes. Yet, there is disagreement on aetiology, pathomechanics and terminology. A plethora of terms have been employed to explain inguinal-related groin pain in athletes. Recently, at the British Hernia Society in Manchester 2012, a consensus was reached to use the term inguinal disruption based on the pathophysiology while lately the Doha agreement in 2014 defined it as inguinal-related groin pain, a clinically based taxonomy. This review article emphasizes the anatomy, pathogenesis, standard clinical assessment and imaging, and highlights the treatment options for inguinal disruption.

  9. Role of sonography in assessing complications after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Smereczyński, Andrzej; Starzyńska, Teresa; Kołaczyk, Katarzyna; Kładny, Józef

    2014-06-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy, which was introduced to the arsenal of surgical procedures in the middle of the 1980s, is a common alternative for conventional cholecystectomy. Its primary advantage is less invasive character which entails shorter hospitalization and faster recovery. Nevertheless, the complications of both procedures are comparable and encompass multiple organs and tissues. The paper presents ultrasound presentation of the surgical bed after laparoscopic cholecystectomy and of complications associated with this procedure. In the first week following the surgery, the presence of up to 60 ml of fluid in the removed gallbladder bed should be considered normal in certain patients. The fluid will gradually absorb. In single cases, slight amounts of fluid are detected in the peritoneal cavity, which also should not be alarming. Carbon dioxide absorbs from the peritoneal cavity within two days. Ultrasound assessment of the surgical bed after cholecystectomy is inhibited by hemostatic material left during the surgery. Its presentation may mimic an abscess. In such cases, the decisive examination is magnetic resonance imaging but not computed tomography. On the other hand, rapidly accumulating fluid around the liver is an alarming symptom, particularly when there is inadequate blood supply or when peritoneum irritation symptoms develop. Depending on the suspected cause of the patient's deteriorating condition, it is essential to perform urgent computed tomography angiography, celiac angiography or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography or magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography. The character of the fluid collection may be determined by its ultrasound-guided puncture. This procedure allows for aspiration of fluid and placement of a drain. Moreover, transabdominal ultrasound examination after laparoscopic cholecystectomy may contribute to the identification of: dropped stones in the right hypochondriac region, residual fragment of the gallbladder

  10. Comparison between single and three portal laparoscopic splenectomy in dogs

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Single incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) is a newly growing technique to replace a more invasive conventional multiple portal laparoscopic surgery. The objective of this study was to compare single (SILS) with three portal (Conventional) laparoscopic splenectomy in dogs. Mongrel dogs (n = 18), weighting 15 ± 3 kg, were selected for this study (n = 12 SILS; n = 6 conventional). The area from xiphoid to pubis was prepared under aseptic conditions in dorsal recumbency with the head down and tilted 30 degree in the right lateral position. Pneumoperitoneum was established by CO2 using an automatic high flow pressure until achieving 12 mm Hg. Instrumentation used consisted of curved flexible-tip 5 mm Maryland forceps and ultracision harmonic scalpel for sealing and cutting of the vessels and splenic attachments. Results All dogs recovered uneventfully. The splenectomy procedure using SILS and conventional methods were significantly different in the respective operative time (29.1 ± 1.65 vs. 42.0 + 2.69 min) and the length of the surgical scar (51.6 ± 1.34 mm vs. 72.0 ± 1.63 mm; P < 0.001). There were no post-operative wound complication including inflammation, infection, hernia formation and dehiscence up to one month after surgery. Meanwhile, the conversion to open surgery or application of additional portals was not required in both approaches. Conclusion This study demonstrated that SILS is a safe and feasible operation and could be used as an alternative approach to three portal (Conventional) for splenectomy in dog. PMID:22963734

  11. The role of hiatus hernia in GERD.

    PubMed Central

    Kahrilas, P. J.

    1999-01-01

    Increased esophageal acid exposure in gastroesophageal reflux disease has several potential causes, some related primarily to physiological dysfunction of the LES and others related to anatomic distortion of the gastroesophageal junction as occurs with hiatus hernia. One attractive feature of implicating hiatal hernias in the pathogenesis of reflux disease is that, like reflux disease, axial hernias become more common with age and obesity. However, the importance of hiatus hernia is obscured by imprecise definition and an all-or-none conceptualization that has led to wide variation in estimates of prevalence among normal or diseased populations. There are at least three potentially significant radiographic features of a hiatus hernia: axial length during distention, axial length at rest, and competence of the diaphragmatic hiatus. Although any or all of these features may be abnormal in a particular instance of hiatus hernia, each is of different functional significance. Grouping all abnormalities of the gastroesophageal junction as "hiatus hernia" without detailing the specifics of each case defies logic. Mechanistically, the gastroesophageal junction must protect against reflux both in static and dynamic conditions. During abrupt increases in intra-abdominal pressure, the crural diaphragm normally serves as a "second sphincter," and this mechanism is substantially impaired in individuals with a gaping hiatus. Large, non-reducing hernias also impair the process of esophageal emptying, thereby prolonging acid clearance time following a reflux event (especially while in the supine posture). These anatomically-determined functional impairments of the gastroesophageal junction lead to increased esophageal acid exposure. Thus, although hiatus hernia may or may not be an initiating factor at the inception of reflux disease, it clearly can act as a sustaining factor accounting for the frequently observed chronicity of the disease. PMID:10780571

  12. Risk factors for early recurrence after inguinal hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Family history, male gender and age are significant risk factors for inguinal hernia disease. Family history provides evidence for a genetic trait and could explain early recurrence after inguinal hernia repair despite technical advance at least in a subgroup of patients. This study evaluates if age and family history can be identified as risk factors for early recurrence after primary hernia repair. Methods We performed an observational cohort study for 75 patients having at least two recurrent hernias. The impact of age, gender and family history on the onset of primary hernias, age at first recurrence and recurrence rates was investigated. Results 44% (33/75) of recurrent hernia patients had a family history and primary as well as recurrent hernias occurred significantly earlier in this group (p = 0.04). The older the patients were at onset the earlier they got a recurrent hernia. Smoking could be identified as on additional risk factor for early onset of hernia disease but not for hernia recurrence. Conclusion Our data reveal an increased incidence of family history for recurrent hernia patients when compared with primary hernia patients. Patients with a family history have their primary hernias as well as their recurrence at younger age then patients without a family history. Though recurrent hernia has to be regarded as a disease caused by multiple factors, a family history may be considered as a criterion to identify the risk for recurrence before the primary operation. PMID:20003183

  13. New approaches to managing congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Ivascu, Felicia A; Hirschl, Ronald B

    2004-06-01

    A number of new techniques have been studied for managing newborns with congenital diaphragmatic hernia and respiratory insufficiency. Among these have been the techniques of delayed approach to the repair of the diaphragmatic hernia; permissive hypercapnia; nitric oxide and surfactant administration; intratracheal pulmonary ventilation; liquid ventilation; perfluorocarbon-induced lung growth; and lung transplantation. These interventions are at various stages of development and evaluation of effectiveness. All, however, are being explored in the hopes of improving outcome in patients with congenital diaphragmatic hernia who continue to have significant morbidity and mortality in the newborn period.

  14. Colocutaneous Fistula after Open Inguinal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kallis, Panayiotis; Koronakis, Nikolaos; Hadjicostas, Panayiotis

    2016-01-01

    The plug-and-patch technique is frequently used for the open repair of inguinal hernias; however, serious complications may arise on rare occasions. We present the case of a 69-year-old patient who presented with a colocutaneous fistula with the sigmoid colon 9 years after the repair of a left sliding inguinal hernia with the plug-and-patch technique. The patient underwent sigmoidectomy and excision of the fistulous track. He was discharged on postoperative day 5 and had an uneventful recovery. Although such complications are reported rarely, the surgeon must be aware of them when deciding upon the method of hernia repair. PMID:27738544

  15. [Spontaneous pulmonary hernia: report of a case].

    PubMed

    Petour Gazitúa, Felipe; Pérez Velásquez, Javiera; Quintanilla Guidobono, Felipe; Chehade, Jeanne Marie

    2015-10-13

    Pulmonary hernia is a protrusion of lung tissue through a defect in the chest wall. Its origin can be congenital or acquired; spontaneous presentation is the least frequent. We report a case of spontaneous intercostal pulmonary hernia with a brief description of the disease. In this case, the patient developed a hematoma in the left hemithorax associated to pain at the base of the left hemithorax after a Valsalva's maneuver. The images obtained by thoracic CT scan revealed the existence of a left intercostal hernia. After radiological diagnosis, surgical treatment of the defect was performed with good results.

  16. Diaphragmatic hernia in Denys-Drash syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Devriendt, K.; Deloof, E.; Moerman, P.

    1995-05-22

    We report on a newborn infant with male pseudohermaphroditism and glomerular lesions (Denys-Drash syndrome) but without Wilms tumor. A constitutional heterozygous mutation in the WT1 gene ({sup 366} Arg to His) was identified. In addition the child had a large diaphragmatic hernia, so far not described in Denys-Drash syndrome. The expression of the WT1 gene in pleural and abdominal mesothelium and the occurrence of diaphragmatic hernia in transgenic mice with a homozygous WT1 deletion strongly suggests that the diphragmatic hernia in this patient is part of the malformation pattern caused by WT1 mutations. 21 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Sports Hernia/Athletic Pubalgia

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Sports hernia/athletic pubalgia has received increasing attention as a source of disability and time lost from athletics. Studies are limited, however, lacking consistent objective criteria for making the diagnosis and assessing outcomes. Evidence Acquisition: PubMed database through January 2013 and hand searches of the reference lists of pertinent articles. Study Design: Review article. Level of Evidence: Level 5. Results: Nonsurgical outcomes have not been well reported. Various surgical approaches have return-to–athletic activity rates of >80% regardless of the approach. The variety of procedures and lack of outcomes measures in these studies make it difficult to compare one surgical approach to another. There is increasing evidence that there is an association between range of motion–limiting hip disorders (femoroacetabular impingement) and sports hernia/athletic pubalgia in a subset of athletes. This has added increased complexity to the decision-making process regarding treatment. Conclusion: An association between femoroacetabular impingement and athletic pubalgia has been recognized, with better outcomes reported when both are managed concurrently or in a staged manner. PMID:24587864

  18. Obstructive Uropathy Secondary to Uretero-inguinal Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Lih En; Tan, Chrismin; Li, Jordan

    2015-01-01

    Uretero-inguinal hernia in patients with native kidneys is rare. We report a case of an 84-year-old man who was diagnosed with obstructive uropathy secondary to uretero-inguinal hernia, with no past history of herniorrhaphy or congenital genitourinary malformation. Uretero-inguinal hernias are predominantly indirect inguinal hernias and may be paraperitoneal or extraperitoneal. Computed tomography (CT) is a non-invasive diagnostic tool for uretero-inguinal hernia. Herniorrhaphy is indicated in all cases of uretero-inguinal hernia to prevent obstructive uropathy. PMID:26180656

  19. [Incarcerated and strangulated hernias--surgical approach and management].

    PubMed

    Mauch, J; Helbling, C; Schlumpf, R

    2000-01-01

    Acute symptomatic groin hernias with potential or definite ischemia represent a special group of all the groin hernias. The method of choice to treat these hernias has to fulfill the following criteria: 1. Easy reduction of the hernia sac and its contents without causing damage. 2. Good exposure and easy access for possible resection. 3. Safe hernia repair through the same access. According to our experience with 44 incarcerated and strangulated groin hernias operated between 1993 and 1997 and after a literature review, we took the following procedure as our routine: Posterior approach and mesh repair. We do not use a meshgraft only in the presence of colonic necrosis or peritonitis.

  20. Laparoscopic anatomic liver resection

    PubMed Central

    Vibert, Eric; Kouider, Ali

    2004-01-01

    Background Liver resection is reputed to be one of the most difficult procedures embraced in laparoscopy. This report shows that with adequate training, anatomical liver resection including major hepatectomies can be performed. Methods This is a retrospective study. Results From 1995 to 2004, among 84 laparoscopic liver resections, 46 (54%) anatomical laparoscopic hepatectomies were performed in our institution by laparoscopy. Nine (20%) patients had benign disease while 37 (80%) had malignant lesions. Among those with malignant lesions, 14 patients had hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), 18 had colorectal metastasis (CRM), while 5 had miscellaneous tumours. For benign disease, minor (two Couinaud's segments or less) and major anatomic hepatectomies were performed in five and four patients, respectively. For malignant lesions, minor and major anatomic hepatectomies were performed in 15 and 22 patients, respectively. Overall, conversion to laparotomy was necessary in 7 (15%) patients. Blood transfusion was required in five (10%) patients. One patient died of cerebral infarction 8 days after a massive peroperative haemorrhage. The overall morbidity rate was 34% whatever the type of resection. Three patients required reoperation, either for haemorrhage (n=1) and/or biliary leak (n=2). For CRM (n=18), overall and disease-free survival at 24 months (mean follow-up of 17 months) were 100% and 56%, respectively. For HCC (n=14), overall and disease-free survival at 36 months (mean follow-up of 29 months) were 91% and 65%, respectively. No port site metastasis occurred in patients with malignancy. Conclusions After a long training with limited liver resection in superficial segments, laparoscopic anatomical minor and major resections are feasible. Short-term carcinological results seem to be similar to those obtained with laparotomy. PMID:18333079

  1. The 10 years’ experience in the laparoscopic treatment of benign pathology of the eso gastric junction

    PubMed Central

    Lucenco, L; Marincas, M; Cirimbei, C; Bratucu, E; Ionescu, S

    2012-01-01

    In the era of mini invasive surgery, the surgical approach of the esogastric junction occupies an important role, which regards both the results and the complete, long-term patient satisfaction. The main benign pathology of the esogastric pole includes hiatal hernia, gastroesophageal reflux disease, cardiospasm, oesophageal diverticula. The present study is based on the experience of our clinic in the laparoscopic treatment of esogastric pathology that contains 85 patients in 10 years. Out of these, 15 were operated on for cardiospasm, 29 for hiatal hernia and 41 for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The investigation protocol consisted in barium swallows and endoscopy, both pre and postoperatively. The results obtained allowed us to underline the superiority of the surgical treatment over the medical one. Likewise, medical literature reports rates of success of 90% in antireflux surgery. The latter is conditioned by correct determination of the reflux causes and by the choice of the adequate time to perform the surgery, in concordance with the local anatomical conditions. As far as the two techniques used (complete or partial fundoplication) are concerned, there were no significant differences in the postoperative evolution of the patients, but we have to mention, nevertheless, the increased incidence of dysphagia after Nissen. The data presented confirm the superiority of laparoscopic surgery over the classic one, due to the superior aesthetic result, the shortened admission time –with reduced costs and rapid social reinsertion. AbbreviationsGERD – gastroesophageal reflux disease, LES – lower esophagian sphincter PMID:22802887

  2. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy: new indications.

    PubMed

    Nowzaradan, Y; Westmoreland, J C

    1991-06-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed on 65 unselected and consecutive patients, regardless of age, weight, history of abdominal surgery or presence of acute cholecystitis. All procedures were completed successfully, with only two patients converted to an open cholecystectomy. There were no intra-abdominal intraoperative complications; n o intraoperative transfusions were required. There were no intra-abdominal injuries, and no patient required repeat surgery for postoperative complications. Hospital stays averaged 30 hours, and the average time until patients resumed normal activities was 6 days.

  3. Laparoscopic CBD Exploration.

    PubMed

    Savita, K S; Bhartia, Vishnu K

    2010-10-01

    Laparoscopic CBD exploration (LCBDE) is a cost effective, efficient and minimally invasive method of treating choledocholithiasis. Laparoscopic Surgery for common bile duct stones (CBDS) was first described in 1991, Petelin (Surg Endosc 17:1705-1715, 2003). The surgical technique has evolved since then and several studies have concluded that Laparoscopic common bile duct exploration(LCBDE) procedures are superior to sequential endolaparoscopic treatment in terms of both clinical and economical outcomes, Cuschieri et al. (Surg Endosc 13:952-957, 1999), Rhodes et al. (Lancet 351:159-161, 1998). We started doing LCBDE in 1998.Our experience with LCBDE from 1998 to 2004 has been published, Gupta and Bhartia (Indian J Surg 67:94-99, 2005). Here we present our series from January 2005 to March 2009. In a retrospective study from January 2005 to March 2009, we performed 3060 laparoscopic cholecystectomies, out of which 342 patients underwent intraoperative cholangiogram and 158 patients eventually had CBD exploration. 6 patients were converted to open due to presence of multiple stones and 2 patients were converted because of difficulty in defining Calots triangle; 42 patients underwent transcystic clearance, 106 patients had choledochotomy, 20 patients had primary closure of CBD whereas in 86 patients CBD was closed over T-tube; 2 patients had incomplete stone clearance and underwent postoperative ERCP. Choledochoduodenosotomy was done in 2 patients. Patients were followed regularly at six monthly intervals with a range of six months to three years of follow-up. There were no major complications like bile leak or pancreatitis. 8 patients had port-site minor infection which settled with conservative treatment. There were no cases of retained stones or intraabdominal infection. The mean length of hospital stay was 3 days (range 2-8 days). LCBDE remains an efficient, safe, cost-effective method of treating CBDS. Primary closure of choledochotomy in select patients is a

  4. Ventral nerve cord in Phoronopsis harmeri larvae.

    PubMed

    Temereva, Elena N

    2012-01-15

    The nervous system organization is considered a phylogenetically important character among metazoans. The phylum Phoronida is included in a supraphyletic taxon known as Lophotrochozoa. Many lophotrochozoans possess a metameric ventral nerve cord as adults or larvae. Phoronids do not exhibit external metamery either as larvae or as adults. The current study describes the ventral nerve cord in the young larva of Phoronopsis harmeri. This structure is apparent both in the serotonergic and FMRF-amidergic nervous system in young larvae. The ventral nerve cord extends from the mouth to the tentacular ridge. Both serotonergic and FMRF-amidergic components consist of two ventrolateral nerves, each with several unipolar neurons. The ventrolateral nerves connect to each other by means of thin repetitive transversal nerves ("commissures"). The abundance of neurons and nerves in the epidermis of the oral field of actinotrocha larva likely reflects the importance of this area in collection of food particles. The ventral nerve cords of the actinotrocha and the metatrochophore differ in their positions with respect to ciliated bands: the cord is located between the preoral and postoral ciliated bands in the actinotrocha but between the postoral ciliated band and telotroch in the metatrochophore. The presence of the ventral nerve cord, which contains repetitive elements (neurons and "commissures"), in the early development of P. harmeri may recapitulate some stages of nervous system development during phoronid phylogeny. The larval nervous system does not contain nervous centers under the tentacular ridge that can correlate with the catastrophic metamorphosis and unique body plan of phoronids.

  5. Hiatal hernia squeezing the heart to flutter.

    PubMed

    Patel, Arpan; Shah, Rushikesh; Nadavaram, Sravanthi; Aggarwal, Aakash

    2014-04-01

    An 80-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with failure to thrive and weakness for 14 days. Medical history was significant for polio. On admission her electrocardiogram showed atrial flutter, and cardiac enzymes were elevated. Echocardiogram revealed a high pulmonary artery pressure, but no other wall motion abnormalities or valvulopathies. Chest x-ray showed a large lucency likely representing a diaphragmatic hernia. Computed tomographic scan confirmed the hernia. Our patient remained in atrial flutter despite rate control, and thereafter surgery was consulted to evaluate the patient. She underwent hernia repair. After surgery, the patient was taken off rate control and monitored for 72 hours; she did not have any episode of atrial flutter and was discharged with follow up in a week showing no arrhythmia. Her flutter was caused directly by the mechanical effect of the large hiatal hernia pressing against her heart, as the flutter resolved after the operation.

  6. Gallstone ileus in an 'asymptomatic' parastomal hernia.

    PubMed

    Jayamanne, H; Brown, J; Stephenson, B M

    2016-09-01

    Parastomal hernias are common and often asymptomatic. We report the first known case in which later, acute symptoms developed owing to gallstone ileus in a sac containing both omentum and small bowel. Urgent computed tomography established the diagnosis.

  7. From the lumen to the laparoscope.

    PubMed

    Modlin, Irvin M; Kidd, Mark; Lye, Kevin D

    2004-10-01

    Throughout the ages, the issues that have defined the management of disease processes have been particularly exemplified in the gastrointestinal tract. The use of gas lamps and candles with reflectors by Bozzini, Segalas, Cruise, and Fisher (19th century) allowed for some ingress into both the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract. Von Mikulicz, Leiter, Nitze, Kelling, and Jacobaeus contributed to the development of rigid instruments that could be used endoscopically or laparoscopically. Endoscopic efforts were amplified and extended by Rosenheim, Sternberg, Wolf, and, finally, Schindler, who not only introduced novel lens systems but also for the most part overcame the problems of flexibility and illumination. Bernheim, Ruddock, Veress, and Palmer made significant technical and clinical contributions to abdominal cavity exploration. The subsequent application of Hopkins and Kapany's work on optics, and the development by Hirschowitz and Curtiss of the flexible fiber optic endoscope, enabled the design of instruments that would allow the appropriate illumination and vision of both the farthest reaches of the bowel as well as the interior of the abdomen. Thus, the same endoscopic instruments coupled with a surgical interest in diagnostic laparotomy allowed for the evolution of minimally invasive surgery along a similar timescale. The cycle whereby diagnostic laparotomy in the early part of the century was supplanted by endoscopy and laparoscopy has now attained full circle whereby laparoscopy has evolved from a diagnostic procedure into one with major therapeutic applications and is perceived as the state-of-the-art technique for a wide variety of operations, including appendectomy, cholecystectomy, hernia repair, fundoplication, splenectomy, colectomy, and gastrointestinal anastomoses.

  8. Surgical Treatment of Paraesophageal Hernias: A Review.

    PubMed

    Andolfi, Ciro; Jalilvand, Anahita; Plana, Alejandro; Fisichella, P Marco

    2016-10-01

    The management of paraesophageal hernia (PEH) can be challenging due to the lack of consensus regarding indications and principles of operative treatment. In addition, data about the pathophysiology of the hernias are scant. Therefore, the goal of this review is to shed light and describe the classification, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and indications for treatment of PEHs, and provide an overview of the surgical management and a description of the technical principles of the repair.

  9. Laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication.

    PubMed

    Nowzaradan, Y; Barnes, P

    1993-10-01

    A technique for laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication is described and a series of 11 cases is presented. The technique secures the patient to the operating table with three safety straps and the patient is then placed in a reverse Trendelenburg position with the hips flexed. The surgeon operates from the patient's right side using two midline trocar sites as the main operating ports. Other ports provide retraction and laparoscope access. The liver retractor is held by a mechanical arm. Once the esophageal peritoneum has been opened, the esophagus and diaphragmatic crura are dissected out and elevated by a Penrose drain sling. The short gastrics are divided and the fundus is brought posterior to the esophagus passing from left to right. A large Maloney dilator is placed in the esophagus and the fundal wrap is sutured to the anterior aspect of the stomach by three sutures; the inferior--most of which incorporates the anterior wall of the esophagus. Once the fundoplication is completed, the dilator is replaced by a nasogastric tube. Postoperatively, patients are given clear liquids and when these are tolerated the nasogastric tube is removed. Most patients are discharged on the second or third postoperative day. Operating time averaged 147 min, and all patients returned to unrestricted activity within 2 to 3 weeks. All patients reported complete relief of gastroesophageal reflux. Average follow up was 120 days with a median of 148 days. Long-term follow up is in progress.

  10. Laparoscopic donor nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Deger, S; Giessing, M; Roigas, J; Wille, A H; Lein, M; Schönberger, B; Loening, S A

    2005-01-01

    Laparoscopic live donor nephrectomy (LDN) has removed disincentives of potential donors and may bear the potential to increase kidney donation. Multiple modifications have been made to abbreviate the learning curve while at the same time guarantee the highest possible level of medical quality for donor and recipient. We reviewed the literature for the evolution of the different LDN techniques and their impact on donor, graft and operating surgeon, including the subtleties of different surgical accesses, vessel handling and organ extraction. We performed a literature search (PubMed, DIMDI, medline) to evaluate the development of the LDN techniques from 1995 to 2003. Today more than 200 centres worldwide perform LDN. Hand-assistance has led to a spread of LDN. Studies comparing open and hand-assisted LDN show a reduction of operating and warm ischaemia times for the hand-assisted LDN. Different surgical access sites (trans- or retroperitoneal), different vessel dissection approaches, donor organ delivery techniques, delivery sites and variations of hand-assistance techniques reflect the evolution of LDN. Proper techniques and their combination for the consecutive surgical steps minimize both warm ischaemia time and operating time while offering the donor a safe minimally invasive laparoscopic procedure. LDN has breathed new life into the moribund field of living kidney donation. Within a few years LDN could become the standard approach in living kidney donation. Surgeons working in this field must be trained thoroughly and well acquainted with the subtleties of the different LDN techniques and their respective advantages and disadvantages.

  11. Pitfalls in laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Yvergneaux, J P; Kint, M; Kuppens, E

    1994-01-01

    On the basis of literature and of 475 laparoscopic cholecystectomies of the authors, some pitfalls are reviewed. The circumstances, the mechanism and the prevention of injuries were detailed together with the connected problem of postoperative bile leakage. Among the cholangiographic pitfalls the importance of detection of congenital and acquired anomalies of the biliary tree by means of preoperative ERCP or intraoperative trans-cystic cholangiograms was emphasized. A particular study was made of 3 pictures: Mirizzi syndrome; stone impaction in Vater's papilla; no retrograde flow of the common hepatic duct on intraoperative cholangiograms. Biliodigestive fistulas were briefly commented. The problems with cystic duct stones, particularly the treatment of stones in a long, low inserted cystic duct with retroduodenal course and the closing of thick-walled or wide cystic stumps, were explained. In patients with intraoperative residual common bile duct stones and with failed preoperative catheterization of the papilla, the authors advocate their double approach technique. This combined intraoperative laparoscopic and postoperative endoscopic procedure is carried out via the same transcystic polythene catheters as used for cholangiography and external biliary drainage of the common bile duct.

  12. Laparoscopic partial adrenalectomy.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Y; Takami, H; Tajima, G; Sasaki, Y; Takayama, J; Kurihara, H; Niimi, M

    2002-01-01

    Since corticosteroids are indispensable hormones, partial or cortical-sparing adrenalectomies may be adopted for the surgical treatment of adrenal diseases. In this article, we describe the technique and results of these procedures. Laparoscopic partial or cortical-sparing adrenalectomy has been performed in 10 patients. Seven cases had an aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA) and three had a pheochromocytoma. Three cases with an APA and a case with a pheochromocytoma had tumors located far from the adrenal central vein, and the vein could be preserved. Four cases with an APA and two with a pheochromocytoma had tumors located close to the adrenal central vein, and it was necessary to section the central vein to resect them. All endoscopic procedures were performed successfully. There were no postoperative complications. At follow-up, adrenal 131I-adosterol scintigrams showed the preservation of remnant adrenal function in all patients. Laparoscopic partial or cortical-sparing adrenal surgery was safely performed, and adrenal function was preserved irrespective of whether the adrenal central vein could be preserved or not. We consider this to be a useful operative technique for selected cases.

  13. Umbilical Hernia Repair: Analysis After 934 Procedures.

    PubMed

    Porrero, José L; Cano-Valderrama, Oscar; Marcos, Alberto; Bonachia, Oscar; Ramos, Beatriz; Alcaide, Benito; Villar, Sol; Sánchez-Cabezudo, Carlos; Quirós, Esther; Alonso, María T; Castillo, María J

    2015-09-01

    There is a lack of consensus about the surgical management of umbilical hernias. The aim of this study is to analyze the medium-term results of 934 umbilical hernia repairs. In this study, 934 patients with an umbilical hernia underwent surgery between 2004 and 2010, 599 (64.1%) of which were evaluated at least one year after the surgery. Complications, recurrence, and the reoperation rate were analyzed. Complications were observed in 5.7 per cent of the patients. With a mean follow-up time of 35.5 months, recurrence and reoperation rates were 3.8 per cent and 4.7 per cent, respectively. A higher percentage of female patients (60.9 % vs 29 %, P = 0.001) and a longer follow-up time (47.4 vs 35 months, P = 0.037) were observed in patients who developed a recurrence. No significant differences were observed between complications and the reoperation rate in patients who underwent Ventralex(®) preperitoneal mesh reinforcement and suture repair; however, a trend toward a higher recurrence rate was observed in patients with suture repair (6.5 % vs 3.2 %, P = 0.082). Suture repair had lower recurrence and reoperation rates in patients with umbilical hernias less than 1 cm. Suture repair is an appropriate procedure for small umbilical hernias; however, for larger umbilical hernias, mesh reinforcement should be considered.

  14. Late mesh migration through the stomach wall after laparoscopic refundoplication using a dual-sided PTFE/ePTFE mesh.

    PubMed

    Carpelan-Holmström, M; Kruuna, O; Salo, J; Kylänpää, L; Scheinin, T

    2011-04-01

    We report a rare complication after laparoscopic fundoplication using a dual-sided PTFE/ePTFE (Bard® Crurasoft™) mesh fixation. A 53-year-old man was re-operated for a recurrent hiatal hernia. The hiatal hernia was reinforced using a mesh. Two years later, the patient presented with serious dysphagia and weight loss. An endoscopy revealed a migrated mesh in the stomach. The mesh was excreted within the stool without notice. The PTFE/ePTFE mesh, which is designed for treating hiatal defects, is considered to have superior tissue incorporation, together with less adhesion formation and fistulation. As mesh migration into the upper gastrointestinal tract is possible, it should be used with great care in the peri-oesophageal region.

  15. Resorbable Synthetic Mesh Supported With Omentum Flap in the Treatment of Giant Hiatal Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Pérez Lara, F. J.; Marín, R.; del Rey, A.; Oliva, H.

    2014-01-01

    Covering a large hiatal hernia with a mesh has become a basic procedure in the last few years. However, mesh implants are associated with high complication rates (esophageal erosion, perforation, fistula, etc.). We propose using a synthetic resorbable mesh supported with an omental flap as a possible solution to this problem. A 54-year-old female patient with a large hiatal defect (9 cm) was laparoscopically implanted with a synthetic resorbable mesh supported with an omental flap. The surgical procedure was successful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 2. On a follow-up examination 6 months after surgery, she remained free of relapse or complication signs. Supporting an implanted resorbable mesh with an omental flap may be a solution to the problems posed by large esophageal hiatus defects. However, more studies based on larger patient samples and longer follow-up periods are necessary. PMID:25216419

  16. Multidetector CT of expected findings and complications after contemporary inguinal hernia repair surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tonolini, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Inguinal hernia repair (IHR) with prosthetic mesh implantation is the most common procedure in general surgery, and may be performed using either an open or laparoscopic approach. This paper provides an overview of contemporary tension-free IHR techniques and materials, and illustrates the expected postoperative imaging findings and iatrogenic injuries. Emphasis is placed on multidetector CT, which represents the ideal modality to comprehensively visualize the operated groin region and deeper intra-abdominal structures. CT consistently depicts seroma, mesh infections, hemorrhages, bowel complications and urinary bladder injuries, and thus generally provides a consistent basis for therapeutic choice. Since radiologists are increasingly requested to investigate suspected iatrogenic complications, this paper aims to provide an increased familiarity with early CT studies after IHR, including complications and normal postoperative appearances such as focal pseudolesions, in order to avoid misinterpretation and inappropriate management. PMID:27460285

  17. Hiatal hernia repair with biologic mesh reinforcement reduces recurrence rate in small hiatal hernias.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, E; Shaligram, A; Reynoso, J F; Kothari, V; Oleynikov, D

    2014-01-01

    The utility of mesh reinforcement for small hiatal hernia found especially during antireflux surgery is unknown. Initial reports for the use of biological mesh for crural reinforcement during repair for defects greater than 5 cm have been shown to decrease recurrence rates. This study compares patients with small hiatal hernias who underwent onlay biologic mesh buttress repair versus those with suture cruroplasty alone. This is a single-institution retrospective review of all patients undergoing repair of hiatal hernia measuring 1-5 cm between 2002 and 2009. The patients were evaluated based on surgical repair: one group undergoing crural reinforcement with onlay biologic mesh and other group with suture cruroplasty only. Seventy patients with hiatal hernia measuring 1-5 cm were identified. Thirty-eight patients had hernia repair with biologic mesh, and 32 patients had repair with suture cruroplasty only. Recurrence rate at 1 year was 16% (5/32) in patients who had suture cruroplasty only and 0% (0/38) in the group with crural reinforcement with absorbable mesh (statistically significant, P = 0.017). Suture cruroplasty alone appears to be inadequate for hiatal hernias measuring 1-5 cm with significant recurrence rate and failure of antireflux surgery. Crural reinforcement with absorbable mesh may reduce hiatal hernia recurrence rate in small hiatal hernias.

  18. Internal abdominal hernia: Intestinal obstruction due to trans-mesenteric hernia containing transverse colon

    PubMed Central

    Crispín-Trebejo, Brenda; Robles-Cuadros, María Cristina; Orendo-Velásquez, Edwin; Andrade, Felipe P.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Internal abdominal hernias are infrequent but an increasing cause of bowel obstruction still often underdiagnosed. Among adults its usual causes are congenital anomalies of intestinal rotation, postsurgical iatrogenic, trauma or infection diseases. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report the case of a 63-year-old woman with history of chronic constipation. The patient was hospitalized for two days with acute abdominal pain, abdominal distension and inability to eliminate flatus. The X-ray and abdominal computerized tomography scan (CT scan) showed signs of intestinal obstruction. Exploratory laparotomy performed revealed a trans-mesenteric hernia containing part of the transverse colon. The intestine was viable and resection was not necessary. Only the hernia was repaired. DISCUSSION Internal trans-mesenteric hernia constitutes a rare type of internal abdominal hernia, corresponding from 0.2 to 0.9% of bowel obstructions. This type carries a high risk of strangulation and even small hernias can be fatal. This complication is specially related to trans-mesenteric hernias as it tends to volvulize. Unfortunately, the clinical diagnosis is rather difficult. CONCLUSION Trans-mesenteric internal abdominal hernia may be asymptomatic for many years because of its nonspecific symptoms. The role of imaging test is relevant but still does not avoid the necessity of exploratory surgery when clinical features are uncertain. PMID:24880799

  19. Results of a prospective multicenter trial evaluating the ePTFE peritoneal onlay laparoscopic inguinal hernioplasty.

    PubMed

    Toy, F K; Moskowitz, M; Smoot, R T; Pleatman, M; Bagdasarian, A; Polito, W; Carey, S D; Schatz, R; Janes, K; Zipser, M E

    1996-12-01

    A 2.8-year prospective multicenter trial was conducted to evaluate the ePTFE peritoneal onlay laparoscopic inguinal hernioplasty. A total of 441 inguinal hernias were repaired in 351 patients (326 male; 25 female). Two hundred twenty-six of the hernias were direct, 185 indirect, 4 femoral, 26 pantaloon, 90 bilateral, and 92 recurrent. Standardized data collection forms were used and submitted for centralized data analysis. For the hernioplasty, Cooper's ligament was exposed and an 8 cm x 12 cm x 1 mm GORE-TEX Soft Tissue Patch was stapled circumferentially to Cooper's ligament and the endoabdominal fascia. Patients were followed at 1 week, 6 months, 1 year, and then annually. Three-month intervals were used as needed. There was a mean follow-up of 447 days, with 21% of the total repairs followed for more than 2 years and 56% for more than a year. The overall follow-up rate was 95.5%. The operative and postoperative complication rates were 0.45% and 8%, respectively. There were 17 recurrent hernias (3.8%). The range of experience among the investigators was 13 to 168 hernioplasties. With the completion of 25 cases per investigator, the recurrence rate fell to 0.39%. Postoperative analgesia averaged a 24-hr supply of medication; 12.2% of patients required no analgesia. Convalescence averaged 5.4 days, and return to work averaged 7.7 days. This multicenter trial demonstrates that the ePTFE laparoscopic peritoneal onlay inguinal hernioplasty is a safe and dependable repair, especially after the initial learning curve is surmounted.

  20. Laparoscopic Management of Sigmoidorectal Intussusception

    PubMed Central

    Greenley, C. Travis; Ahmed, Bestoun; Friedman, Lee; Deitte, Lori

    2010-01-01

    Adult intussusception is an uncommon entity. Surgical resection is required because of the high incidence of pathological lead point. We report a case of sigmoidorectal intussusception caused by a large tubulovillous adenoma. The patient underwent laparoscopic sigmoidectomy. PMID:20529540

  1. Laparoscopic management of sigmoidorectal intussusception.

    PubMed

    Greenley, C Travis; Ahmed, Bestoun; Friedman, Lee; Deitte, Lori; Awad, Ziad T

    2010-01-01

    Adult intussusception is an uncommon entity. Surgical resection is required because of the high incidence of pathological lead point. We report a case of sigmoidorectal intussusception caused by a large tubulovillous adenoma. The patient underwent laparoscopic sigmoidectomy.

  2. A peculiar variety of indirect inguinal hernia (juxtacordal indirect inguinal hernia)

    PubMed Central

    Alkhateeb, Harith M.; Aljanabi, Thaer J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Indirect inguinal hernias are usually congenital, forming a sac in the core of the spermatic cord covered by the internal spermatic, cremasteric, and external spermatic fasciae1−3. Direct inguinal hernias are acquired; the sac lies beside/behind the cord1−3. A rare third type is a combination of indirect and direct sacs on both sides of inferior epigastric vessels1−3. We describe a rare fourth type, juxtacordal indirect oblique inguinal hernia (Fig. 1), in which the sac emerges through a weakness in the deep inguinal ring, lateral to inferior epigastric vessels, and passes into the inguinal canal beside and in contact with the cord but outside of its covering fasciae. Objective Describes a very rare variety of inguinal hernia. Design Case reports. Setting Tikrit Teaching Hospital/Salahuddin/Iraq. Participants: and presentation The first case; a 5-year-old male with right inguinal hernia, the second case; a 25-year-old man with right inguinal hernia, the third case; a 60-year-old man with right inguinal hernia. Interventions Surgery has been done electively for all. Results and discussion Because the sac emerges through the deep inguinal ring and passes through the inguinal canal, it is an indirect type and because it passes beside the spermatic cord we call it juxtacordal hernia. Because of the thick extraperitoneal fat layer over the sac, we think this hernia is acquired. Conclusions Knowing this type of hernia might reduce the risk of inferior epigastric vessels injury and lower the rate of recurrence. PMID:26052435

  3. Which mesh for hernia repair?

    PubMed Central

    Brown, CN; Finch, JG

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The concept of using a mesh to repair hernias was introduced over 50 years ago. Mesh repair is now standard in most countries and widely accepted as superior to primary suture repair. As a result, there has been a rapid growth in the variety of meshes available and choosing the appropriate one can be difficult. This article outlines the general properties of meshes and factors to be considered when selecting one. MATERIALS AND METHODS We performed a search of the medical literature from 1950 to 1 May 2009, as indexed by Medline, using the PubMed search engine (). To capture all potentially relevant articles with the highest degree of sensitivity, the search terms were intentionally broad. We used the following terms: ‘mesh, pore size, strength, recurrence, complications, lightweight, properties’. We also hand-searched the bibliographies of relevant articles and product literature to identify additional pertinent reports. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS The most important properties of meshes were found to be the type of filament, tensile strength and porosity. These determine the weight of the mesh and its biocompatibility. The tensile strength required is much less than originally presumed and light-weight meshes are thought to be superior due to their increased flexibility and reduction in discomfort. Large pores are also associated with a reduced risk of infection and shrinkage. For meshes placed in the peritoneal cavity, consideration should also be given to the risk of adhesion formation. A variety of composite meshes have been promoted to address this, but none appears superior to the others. Finally, biomaterials such as acellular dermis have a place for use in infected fields but have yet to prove their worth in routine hernia repair. PMID:20501011

  4. Laparoscopic treatment of abdominal complications following ventriculoperitoneal shunt

    PubMed Central

    Grigorean, VT; Onose, G; Popescu, M; Strambu, V; Sandu, AM

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is the evaluation of laparoscopic treatment in abdominal complications following ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt. Methods: We report a retrospective study including 17 patients with abdominal complications secondary to VP shunt for hydrocephalus, laparoscopically treated in our department, between 2000 and 2007. Results: Patients' age ranged from 1 to 72 years old (mean age 25.8 years old). Male: female ratio was 1.4. Abdominal complications encountered were: shunt disconnection with intraperitoneal distal catheter migration 47.05% (8/17), infections 23.52% (4/17) such as abscesses and peritonitis, pseudocysts 11.76% (2/17), CSF ascites 5.88% (1/17), inguinal hernia 5.88% (1/17), and shunt malfunction due to excessive length of intraperitoneal tube 5.88% (1/17). Free–disease interval varies from 1 day to 21 years, depending on the type of complication, short in peritoneal irritation syndrome and abscesses (days) and long in ascites, pseudocysts(months– years). Laparoscopic treatment was: extraction of the foreign body in shunt disconnection with intraperitoneal distal catheter migration, evacuation, debridement, lavage and drainage for pseudocysts, abscess and peritonitis, shortening of the tube in shunt malfunction due to excessive length of intraperitoneal tube a nd hernioraphy. One diagnostic laparoscopy was performed in a peritoneal irritation syndrome, which found only CSF ascites. There were no conversions to open surgery. The overall mortality was of 5.88% and postoperative morbidity was of 11.76%. In 7 patients operated for abscesses, peritonitis, pseudocysts, and CSF ascites the shunting system was converted in to a ventriculocardiac shunt. Conclusions: Abdominal complication following VP shunt can be successfully performed laparoscopically. Abdominal surgery required, in selected cases, the repositioning of the distal catheter, frequently as a ventriculocardiac shunt. There are abdominal complications with no indication of

  5. [Right laparoscopic adrenalectomy].

    PubMed

    Cougard, P; Osmak, L; Goudet, P

    2003-06-01

    The transperitoneal laparoscopic approach for right adrenalectomy is performed in patients placed in a lateral decubitus position. Four ports are usually needed (2 or 3, 10 mm ports, 1 or 2, 5 mm ports), inserted in the right subcostal area. After liver retraction, the retroperitonéal space is opened close to the liver, exposing the right adrenal gland and the inferior vena cava. The periphrenic fat and the internal side of the gland are dissected close to the right side of the vena cava in order to expose the main adrenal vein. This vein is double clipped. At the inferior pole of the gland, the inferior adrenal artery is ligated with clips. Before removing and extracting the gland, the right side and the upper pole of the gland are dissected last.

  6. Laparoscopic partial splenic resection.

    PubMed

    Uranüs, S; Pfeifer, J; Schauer, C; Kronberger, L; Rabl, H; Ranftl, G; Hauser, H; Bahadori, K

    1995-04-01

    Twenty domestic pigs with an average weight of 30 kg were subjected to laparoscopic partial splenic resection with the aim of determining the feasibility, reliability, and safety of this procedure. Unlike the human spleen, the pig spleen is perpendicular to the body's long axis, and it is long and slender. The parenchyma was severed through the middle third, where the organ is thickest. An 18-mm trocar with a 60-mm Endopath linear cutter was used for the resection. The tissue was removed with a 33-mm trocar. The operation was successfully concluded in all animals. No capsule tears occurred as a result of applying the stapler. Optimal hemostasis was achieved on the resected edges in all animals. Although these findings cannot be extended to human surgery without reservations, we suggest that diagnostic partial resection and minor cyst resections are ideal initial indications for this minimally invasive approach.

  7. Robotic Laparoscopic Pyeloplasty

    PubMed Central

    Mitre, Anuar I.; Hubert, Nicolas; Egrot, Christophe; Hubert, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: We aimed to assess the feasibility and outcomes of complex ureteropelvic junction obstruction cases submitted to robotic-assisted laparoscopic pyeloplasty. Methods: The records of 131 consecutive patients who underwent robotic-assisted laparoscopic pyeloplasty were reviewed. Of this initial population of cases, 17 were considered complex, consisting of either atypical anatomy (horseshoe kidneys in 3 patients) or previous ureteropelvic junction obstruction management (14 patients). The patients were divided into 2 groups: primary pyeloplasty (group 1) and complex cases (group 2). Results: The mean operative time was 117.3 ± 33.5 minutes in group 1 and 153.5 ± 31.1 minutes in group 2 (P = .002). The median hospital stay was 5.19 ± 1.66 days in group 1 and 5.90 ± 2.33 days in group 2 (P = .326). The surgical findings included 53 crossing vessels in group 1 and 5 in group 2. One patient in group 1 required conversion to open surgery because of technical difficulties. One patient in group 2, with a history of hemorrhagic rectocolitis, presented with peritonitis postoperatively due to a small colonic injury. A secondary procedure was performed after the patient had an uneventful recovery. At 3 months, significant improvement (clinical and radiologic) was present in 93% of cases in group 1 and 88.2% in group 2. At 1 year, all patients in group 2 showed satisfactory results. At a late follow-up visit, 1 patient in group 1 presented with a recurrent obstruction. Conclusions: Robotic pyeloplasty appear to be feasible and effective, showing a consistent success rate even in complex situations. Particular care should be observed during the colon dissection in patients with previous colonic pathology. PMID:24680152

  8. Mesh Inguinal Hernia Repair and Appendectomy in the Treatment of Amyand's Hernia with Non-Inflamed Appendices

    PubMed Central

    Kose, Emin; Sisik, Abdullah

    2017-01-01

    Amyand's hernia is defined as protrusion of the vermiform appendix in an inguinal hernia sac. It is a rare entity with variable clinical presentation from normal vermiform appendix to abscess formation due to perforation of acute appendicitis. Although surgical treatment includes appendectomy and hernia repair, appendectomy in the absence of an inflamed appendix and use of a mesh in cases of appendectomy remain to be controversial. The aim of this study was to review the experience of mesh inguinal hernia repair plus appendectomy performed for Amyand's hernia with noninflamed appendices. There were five male patients with a mean age of 42.4 ± 16.1 years in this retrospective study in which Amyand's hernia was treated with mesh inguinal hernia repair plus appendectomy for noninflamed appendices. Patients with acute appendicitis and perforated vermiform appendix were excluded. There were four right sided and one bilateral inguinal hernia. Postoperative courses were uneventful. During the follow-up period (14.0 ± 7.7 months), there was no inguinal hernia recurrence. Mesh inguinal hernia repair with appendectomy can be performed for Amyand's hernia in the absence of acute appendicitis. However, presence of fibrous connections between the vermiform appendix and the surrounding hernia sac may be regarded as a parameter to perform appendectomy. PMID:28194430

  9. Hernia

    MedlinePlus

    ... lifting heavy objects. In time, the most common complaint is a bump that is sore and growing. ... ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow ...

  10. Hernias

    MedlinePlus

    ... and exercise program if you think you are overweight or obese. Make fruits, veggies, and whole grains ... to lift something that's heavy, bend from your knees, not at your waist, or don't lift ...

  11. Hernias

    MedlinePlus

    ... heavy objects diarrhea or constipation persistent coughing or sneezing pregnancy These types of strain on their own ... a persistent cough from a cold or you sneeze a lot because of allergies , see your doctor ...

  12. Laparoscopic Cytoreductive Surgery and HIPEC in Patients with Limited Pseudomyxoma Peritonei of Appendiceal Origin.

    PubMed

    Esquivel, Jesus; Averbach, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Increasing numbers of patients with pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP) of appendiceal origin are being evaluated with a low tumor burden. We explored a minimally invasive approach for this group of patients. Materials and Methods. We designed a protocol in which patients with a PMP diagnosis would have a diagnostic laparoscopy. If limited carcinomatosis (PCI ≤ 10) is identified, the procedure will continue laparoscopically. If extensive carcinomatosis (PCI > 10) is found, then the procedure will be converted to an open approach. Results. From December 2008 to December 2011, 19 patients had a complete cytoreduction and HIPEC: 18 of them (95%) were done laparoscopically and 1 of them (5%) was converted to an open procedure. Mean PCI was 4.2. Grade 3 morbidity was 0, and one patient (5%) experienced a grade 4 complication, needing a reoperation for an internal hernia. There were no mortalities. Mean length of hospital stay was 5.3 days. At a mean follow-up of 17 months (1-37) all 19 patients are alive and free of disease. Conclusion. This study demonstrates that cytoreductive surgery and HIPEC via the laparoscopic route is feasible and safe and should be offered to patients with limited pseudomyxoma peritonei of appendiceal origin.

  13. New Approach in Surgical Treatment of Morbid Obesity: Laparoscopic Gastric Banding.

    PubMed

    Fried; Peskova

    1995-02-01

    BACKGROUND: gastric banding has been performed for morbid obesity, with the last nine patients having a laparoscopic approach. MATERIALS: forty-five patients who had undergone primary operations for morbid obesity between 1986 and 1993 were selected for retrospective analysis. All patients had undergone gastric banding. Average pre-operative BMI was 50.9 (kg m(2)) and average pre-operative weight was 135.1 kg. RESULTS: the 3 year mean post-operative BMI reached 28.7 and the 3 year mean post-operative weight loss was 55.7 kg. Blood pressure significantly decreased from the mean 151/ 96 mmHg to l32/90 mmHg at 1-year follow-up. There were no significant changes noted in the levels of RBC, electrolytes and transaminase. There were post-operative wound-healing complications in 18.1% of the patients, wound discharge in 8.8% and incisional hernia in 8.8% of the patients. In 1993 we commenced laparoscopic gastric banding which enabled us to shorten the hospital stay and decrease post-operative complications. CONCLUSION: we are achieving the same good weight-loss results with the laparoscopic technique as after 'open' laparotomy gastric banding.

  14. Laparoscopic Treatment of Bowel Obstruction Due to a Bezoar in a Meckel's Diverticulum

    PubMed Central

    de Moya, Marc A.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Meckel's diverticulum is a common anomaly of the gastrointestinal tract that may result in gastrointestinal bleeding, diverticulitis, and small bowel obstruction. This report describes the use of laparoscopy to treat a rare complication of Meckel's diverticulum–small bowel obstruction due to phytobezoar impaction. More generally, it provides an example of the feasibility and utility of a laparoscopic approach to small bowel obstructions of unknown causes. Methods: A 34-year-old male presented to the emergency department complaining of episodic abdominal pain and vomiting. He had no history of abdominal surgery. His vital signs were stable, and his abdomen was distended, but only mildly tender. He had no abdominal wall hernias on examination. Imaging was consistent with small bowel obstruction. He was brought to the operating room where laparoscopy revealed a Meckel's diverticulum with an impacted phytobezoar as the source of obstruction. The diverticulum was resected and the phytobezoar removed laparoscopically. Results: The patient recovered well and was discharged home on the third postoperative day, tolerating a regular diet. Conclusions: Phytobezoar impaction in a Meckel's diverticulum causing small bowel obstruction is a rare event. It can be effectively treated laparoscopically. This case provides an example of the potential utility of laparoscopy in treating small bowel obstructions of unclear etiology. PMID:22643518

  15. Single port laparoscopic mesh rectopexy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Traditionally, laparoscopic mesh rectopexy is performed with four ports, in an attempt to improve cosmetic results. Following laparoscopic mesh rectopexy there is a new operative technique called single-port laparoscopic mesh rectopexy. Aim To evaluate the single-port laparoscopic mesh rectopexy technique in control of rectal prolapse and the cosmesis and body image issues of this technique. Material and methods The study was conducted in El Fayoum University Hospital between July 2013 and November 2014 in elective surgery for symptomatic rectal prolapse with single-port laparoscopic mesh rectopexy on 10 patients. Results The study included 10 patients: 3 (30%) males and 7 (70%) females. Their ages ranged between 19 years and 60 years (mean: 40.3 ±6 years), and they all underwent laparoscopic mesh rectopexy. There were no conversions to open technique, nor injuries to the rectum or bowel, and there were no mortalities. Mean operative time was 120 min (range: 90–150 min), and mean hospital stay was 2 days (range: 1–3 days). Preoperatively, incontinence was seen in 5 (50%) patients and constipation in 4 (40%). Postoperatively, improvement in these symptoms was seen in 3 (60%) patients for incontinence and in 3 (75%) for constipation. Follow-up was done for 6 months and no recurrence was found with better cosmetic appearance for all patients. Conclusions Single-port laparoscopic mesh rectopexy is a safe procedure with good results as regards operative time, improvement in bowel function, morbidity, cost, and recurrence, and with better cosmetic appearance. PMID:27350840

  16. Single-site multiport combined splenectomy and cholecystectomy with conventional laparoscopic instruments: Case series and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Ozemir, Ibrahim Ali; Bayraktar, Baris; Bayraktar, Onur; Tosun, Salih; Bilgic, Cagri; Demiral, Gokhan; Ozturk, Erman; Yigitbasi, Rafet; Alimoglu, Orhan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Conventional laparoscopic procedures have been used for splenic diseases and concomitant gallbladder stones, frequently in patients with hereditary spherocytosis since 1990’s. The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of single-site surgery with conventional instruments in combined procedures. Presentation of case series Six consecutive patients who scheduled for combined cholecystectomy and splenectomy because of hereditary spherocytosis or autoimmune hemolytic anemia were included this study. Both procedures were performed via trans-umbilical single-site multiport approach using conventional instruments. All procedures completed successfully without conversion to open surgery or conventional laparoscopic surgery. An additional trocar was required for only one patient. The mean operation time was 190 min (150–275 min). The mean blood loss was 185 ml (70–300 ml). Median postoperative hospital stay was two days. No perioperative mortality or major complications occurred in our series. Recurrent anemia, hernia formation or wound infection was not observed during the follow-up period. Discussion Nowadays, publications are arising about laparoscopic or single site surgery for combined diseases. Surgery for combined diseases has some difficulties owing to the placement of organs and position of the patient during laparoscopic surgery. Single site laparoscopic surgery has been proposed to have better cosmetic outcome, less postoperative pain, greater patient satisfaction and faster recovery compared to standard laparoscopy. Conclusion We consider that single-site multiport laparoscopic approach for combined splenectomy and cholecystectomy is a safe and feasible technique, after gaining enough experience on single site surgery. PMID:26708949

  17. Traumatic abdominal hernia complicated by necrotizing fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pérez, Aleix; Garrigós-Ortega, Gonzalo; Gómez-Abril, Segundo Ángel; Martí-Martínez, Eva; Torres-Sánchez, Teresa

    2014-11-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a critical illness involving skin and soft tissues, which may develop after blunt abdominal trauma causing abdominal wall hernia and representing a great challenge for physicians. A 52-year-old man was brought to the emergency department after a road accident, presenting blunt abdominal trauma with a large non-reducible mass in the lower-right abdomen. A first, CT showed abdominal hernia without signs of complication. Three hours after ICU admission, he developed hemodynamic instability. Therefore, a new CT scan was requested, showing signs of hernia complication. He was moved to the operating room where a complete transversal section of an ileal loop was identified. Five hours after surgery, he presented a new episode of hemodynamic instability with signs of skin and soft tissue infection. Due to the high clinical suspicion of necrotizing fasciitis development, wide debridement was performed. Following traumatic abdominal wall hernia (TAWH), patients can present unsuspected injuries in abdominal organs. Helical CT can be falsely negative in the early moments, leading to misdiagnosis. Necrotizing fasciitis is a potentially fatal infection and, consequently, resuscitation measures, wide-spectrum antibiotics, and early surgical debridement are required. This type of fasciitis can develop after blunt abdominal trauma following wall hernia without skin disruption.

  18. Adult Bochdalek hernia with bowel incarceration.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yeh-Huang; Chien, Yu-Hon; Yan, Sheng-Lei; Chen, Ming-Feng

    2008-10-01

    Bochdalek hernias are rare in adults. We report 2 cases of Bochdalek hernia with bowel obstruction. The first case was a 74-year-old male patient who suffered from abdominal pain and chest tightness for 1 day. Chest radiography indicated a mass-like lesion above the left diaphragm. The pain could not be relieved by nasogastric tube decompression for 12 hours. We arranged computed tomography, which revealed a dilated bowel above the diaphragm and intestinal obstruction with gangrenous change. The patient received emergency laparotomy, and a Bochdalek hernia was detected during the operation. The second case was a 75-year-old female patient who suffered from chest tightness and dyspnea for about 1 week. Chest X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging revealed herniation of small and large bowels at the right posterior aspect of the thoracic cavity. She received transthoracic repair of diaphragmatic hernia, recovered, and was discharged 15 days later. We recommend that adult Bochdalek hernia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of bowel obstruction.

  19. Review article: appendicitis in groin hernias.

    PubMed

    Meinke, Alan K

    2007-10-01

    To review the clinical presentation, outcome and causes of acute appendicitis presenting within a groin hernia. A comprehensive review of the past 70 years of English language surgical literature was conducted pertaining to acute appendicitis presenting within an inguinal or femoral hernia. Thirty-four reports describing 45 patients were reviewed to determine age, position, gender, pathologic stage at presentation, causal suppositions, and clinical outcomes. Hernial appendicitis presented as an inguinal abscess or a tender inguinal mass, often in the femoral position, and most commonly at the extremes of age. It was almost never recognized preoperatively, and, because of the sequestered nature of the inflammatory process, presented with few classic systemic signs or symptoms suggestive of acute appendicitis. Advanced pathologic stage and death correlated with the patient's age, delay in presentation, and delay in recognition. Evaluation of an inguinal abscess or a nonreducible tender groin hernia presenting in a patient at the extremes of age, should include computed tomography to rule out an occult acute appendicitis within the hernia, as systemic signs and symptoms of appendicitis are rarely evident. The condition appears to be caused by inflammatory adhesions caused by appendicitis occurring within an enlarged hernial orifice rather than appendicitis caused by external compression of the appendix base. Early recognition of this unique presentation of appendicitis allows trans-hernial appendectomy and immediate herniorraphy. Delayed diagnosis requires drainage of abscess with appendectomy and interval hernia repair.

  20. Giant Inguinal Herniae Managed by Primary Repair: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Madhur; Naku, Narang; Hajong, Debobratta; Singh, K Lenish

    2017-01-01

    Giant inguinal hernia are usually found in developing countries due to delay in seeking medical attention. The management of such hernias may sometimes require procedures to increase the intra-peritoneal capacity prior to the repair of the giant hernia. Otherwise patients may develop abdominal compartment syndrome leading to various unwanted complications. Primary repair of giant hernias are possible in some cases without having significant post-operative complications. In this present case series, we have managed a total of four patients of giant inguinal hernia by primary repair without much post-operative complications. PMID:28384934

  1. An 81-year-old gentleman with symptomatic Bochdalek hernia

    PubMed Central

    Rajput, Mohammed Zak; Fisichella, Piero Marco

    2013-01-01

    An 81-year-old gentleman with congenital polycystic kidney disease presented to his primary care physician with dysphagia, gastroesophageal reflux refractory to medical management, and 11.25 kg weight loss in a 6 mo-period. A barium swallow misdiagnosed a paraesophageal hernia for a Bochdalek hernia. Herein, we highlight how a Bochdalek hernia may be disregarded in the differential diagnosis and how providers can resort to a more common diagnosis, a paraesophageal hernia, which is more frequently encountered in old age and whose radiologic appearance might mimic a Bochdalek hernia. PMID:23894690

  2. An 81-year-old gentleman with symptomatic Bochdalek hernia.

    PubMed

    Rajput, Mohammed Zak; Fisichella, Piero Marco

    2013-07-27

    An 81-year-old gentleman with congenital polycystic kidney disease presented to his primary care physician with dysphagia, gastroesophageal reflux refractory to medical management, and 11.25 kg weight loss in a 6 mo-period. A barium swallow misdiagnosed a paraesophageal hernia for a Bochdalek hernia. Herein, we highlight how a Bochdalek hernia may be disregarded in the differential diagnosis and how providers can resort to a more common diagnosis, a paraesophageal hernia, which is more frequently encountered in old age and whose radiologic appearance might mimic a Bochdalek hernia.

  3. Laparoscopic Single Site Adrenalectomy Using a Conventional Laparoscope and Instrumentation

    PubMed Central

    Colon, Modesto J; LeMasters, Patrick; Newell, Phillipa; Divino, Celia; Weber, Kaare J.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives: We present a case of Laparoendoscopic Single Site Surgery (LESS) left adrenalectomy performed with a conventional laparoscope and instruments. Methods: A 45-year-old male was diagnosed with hyperaldosteronism. Computed tomography detected a left adrenal nodule. Bilateral adrenal vein sampling was consistent with a left-sided source for hyperaldosteronism. Results: Total operative time for LESS left adrenalectomy was 120 minutes. The surgery was performed with conventional instruments, a standard 5-mm laparoscope, and a SILS port, with no additional incisions or trocars needed. No complications occurred, and the patient reported an uneventful recovery. Conclusions: LESS adrenalectomy is a feasible procedure. Although articulating instruments and laparoscopes may offer advantages, LESS adrenalectomy can be done without these. PMID:21902983

  4. Application of subcutaneous talc in hernia repair and wide subcutaneous dissection dramatically reduces seroma formation and postoperative wound complications.

    PubMed

    Klima, David A; Brintzenhoff, Rita A; Tsirline, Victor B; Belyansky, Igor; Lincourt, Amy E; Getz, Stanley; Heniford, B Todd

    2011-07-01

    Wound complications after large ventral hernia repairs when combined with wide subcutaneous dissection (OVHR/WSD) are common (33 to 66%). We evaluate a novel technique of applying talc to wound subcutaneous tissues to decrease wound complications. We accessed our prospectively collected surgical outcomes database for OVHR/WSD procedures performed. Patients were divided into those that did and did not receive subcutaneous talc (TALC vs NOTALC). Demographics intraoperative and outcomes data were collected and analyzed. The study included 180 patients (n = 74 TALC, n = 106 NOTALC). Demographics were all similar, but hernias were larger in the TALC group. TALC patients had their drains removed earlier (14.6 vs 25.6 days; P < 0.001) with dramatic reduction in postoperative seromas requiring intervention (20.8 to 2.7%; P < 0.001) and cellulitis (39.0 to 20.6%; P = 0.007). Short-term follow-up demonstrates significantly higher recurrence rates in the NOTALC group with each recurrence related to infection. The use of talc in the subcutaneous space of OVHR/WSD results in significantly earlier removal of subcutaneous drains, fewer wound complications, and a decrease in early hernia recurrence. Use of talc in the subcutaneous space at the time of wound closure is an excellent technique to decrease wound complications in large subcutaneous dissections.

  5. Ureteral inguinal hernia: an uncommon trap for general surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Yahya, Zarif; Al-habbal, Yahya; Hassen, Sayed

    2017-01-01

    Inguinal hernias involving the ureter, a retroperitoneal structure, is an uncommon phenomenon. It can occur with or without obstructive uropathy, the latter posing a trap for the unassuming general surgeon performing a routine inguinal hernia repair. Ureteral inguinal hernia should be included as a differential when a clinical inguinal hernia is diagnosed concurrently with unexplained hydronephrosis, renal failure or urinary tract infection particularly in a male. The present case describes a patient with a known ureteroinguinal hernia who proceeded to having a planned hernia repair and ureteric protection. The case is a reminder that when faced with an unexpected finding such an indirect sliding inguinal hernia, extreme care should be taken to ensure that no structures are inadvertently damaged and that a rare possibility is the entrapment of the ureter in the inguinal canal. PMID:28275027

  6. Strangulated Morgagni's Hernia: A Rare Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Mate, Ajay; Rege, Samir

    2016-01-01

    Morgagni hernia is a rare type of congenital diaphragmatic hernia. It accounts for only 3% of all diaphragmatic hernias. The defect is small and hernia being asymptomatic in the majority presents late in adulthood. Obstruction or incarceration in Morgagni hernia is uncommon. We report a rare occurrence of strangulated Morgagni hernia. A 40-year-old gentleman presented to our emergency department with features of intestinal obstruction. Computed tomography of the chest and abdomen showed a strangulated right Morgagni hernia. An exploratory laparotomy was performed with resection of the ischemic bowel segment with anastomosis and a primary repair of the diaphragmatic defect. Postoperative recovery was uneventful and asymptomatic at follow-up. PMID:27891284

  7. Bilateral inguinal hernias: simultaneous or sequential repair?

    PubMed Central

    Stott, M. A.; Sutton, R.; Royle, G. T.

    1988-01-01

    Two hundred and forty four patients underwent either simultaneous bilateral inguinal hernia repair (n = 122) or unilateral inguinal hernia (n = 122) repair at a general hospital between January 1971 and December 1981. The two groups of patients were matched for age and sex. Both groups had a similar overall incidence of post-operative complications and in both groups the duration of post-operative stay and duration of operating time were similar. Chest infections developed in 12 patients after bilateral repair and in 3 patients after unilateral repair (P less than 0.02). All patients were assessed prospectively from 4 to 15 years after operation, when no significant difference in the number of recurrent hernias was found. Our results suggest that simultaneous bilateral inguinal herniorrhaphy is economical in terms of both operating time and duration of hospital stay, and that this economy is not bought at a cost of increased short term morbidity or long-term recurrence rate. PMID:3200778

  8. [Diagnosis and surgical therapy of hiatal hernia].

    PubMed

    Koch, O O; Köhler, G; Antoniou, S A; Pointner, R

    2014-08-01

    Using the usual diagnostic tools like barium swallow examination, endoscopy, and manometry, we are able to diagnose a hiatal hernia, but it is not possible to predict the size of the hernia opening or, respectively, the size of the hiatal defect. At least a correlation can be expected if the gastroesophageal junction is endoscopically assessed in a retroflexed position, and graded according to Hill. So far, it is not possible to come to a clear conclusion how the hiatal closure during hiatal hernia repair should be performed. There is no consensus on using a mesh, and when using a mesh which type or shape should be used. Further studies including long-term results on this issue are necessary. However, it seems obvious to make the decision depending on certain conditions found during operation, and not on preoperative findings.

  9. Strangulation of chronic transdiaphragmatic intercostal hernia.

    PubMed

    Kao, Peiyu; Fang, Hsin-Yuan; Lu, Ting-Yu; Hsu, Shih-Chao; Chen, Chien-Kuang; Chen, Pin-Ru

    2014-06-01

    Transdiaphragmatic intercostal hernia (TIH) caused by violent coughing is a rare clinical diagnosis. Most patients diagnosed with TIH have a chronic condition consisting of a hernia that can be reduced completely by surgical intervention. Our patient presented with acute abdomen resulting from mechanical bowel obstruction secondary to an incarcerated hernia. Acute TIH presents a diagnostic challenge because of its rarity and lack of specific signs or symptoms in the differential diagnosis of acute abdomen. We recommend performing diagnostic computed tomography (CT) early if there is suspicion of TIH. Surgical intervention is always needed. Surgical intervention was complicated in this case, necessitating both transthoracic and abdominal exposure to resect the ischemic bowel segment. Nonetheless, the patient recovered uneventfully.

  10. Ventral striatal plasticity and spatial memory.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, Valentina; Roullet, Pascal; Sargolini, Francesca; Rinaldi, Arianna; Perri, Valentina; Del Fabbro, Martina; Costantini, Vivian J A; Annese, Valentina; Scesa, Gianluigi; De Stefano, Maria Egle; Oliverio, Alberto; Mele, Andrea

    2010-04-27

    Spatial memory formation is a dynamic process requiring a series of cellular and molecular steps, such as gene expression and protein translation, leading to morphological changes that have been envisaged as the structural bases for the engram. Despite the role suggested for medial temporal lobe plasticity in spatial memory, recent behavioral observations implicate specific components of the striatal complex in spatial information processing. However, the potential occurrence of neural plasticity within this structure after spatial learning has never been investigated. In this study we demonstrate that blockade of cAMP response element binding protein-induced transcription or inhibition of protein synthesis or extracellular proteolytic activity in the ventral striatum impairs long-term spatial memory. These findings demonstrate that, in the ventral striatum, similarly to what happens in the hippocampus, several key molecular events crucial for the expression of neural plasticity are required in the early stages of spatial memory formation.

  11. Ventral striatal plasticity and spatial memory

    PubMed Central

    Ferretti, Valentina; Roullet, Pascal; Sargolini, Francesca; Rinaldi, Arianna; Perri, Valentina; Del Fabbro, Martina; Costantini, Vivian J. A.; Annese, Valentina; Scesa, Gianluigi; De Stefano, Maria Egle; Oliverio, Alberto; Mele, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Spatial memory formation is a dynamic process requiring a series of cellular and molecular steps, such as gene expression and protein translation, leading to morphological changes that have been envisaged as the structural bases for the engram. Despite the role suggested for medial temporal lobe plasticity in spatial memory, recent behavioral observations implicate specific components of the striatal complex in spatial information processing. However, the potential occurrence of neural plasticity within this structure after spatial learning has never been investigated. In this study we demonstrate that blockade of cAMP response element binding protein–induced transcription or inhibition of protein synthesis or extracellular proteolytic activity in the ventral striatum impairs long-term spatial memory. These findings demonstrate that, in the ventral striatum, similarly to what happens in the hippocampus, several key molecular events crucial for the expression of neural plasticity are required in the early stages of spatial memory formation. PMID:20351272

  12. Chronic pain after open inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Nikkolo, Ceith; Lepner, Urmas

    2016-01-01

    Following the widespread use of mesh repairs, recurrence rates after inguinal hernia surgery have become acceptable and focus has shifted from recurrence to chronic pain. Although pain can be controlled with analgesics, chronic postsurgical pain is a major clinical problem, which can significantly influence the patient's quality of life. The rate of chronic pain after inguinal hernia mesh repair can reach 51.6%. The reasons for posthernioplasty chronic pain are often unclear. It has been linked to nerve injury and nerve entrapment, but there is also association between the rate of chronic pain and the type of mesh used for hernia repair. As there are >160 meshes available in the market, it is difficult to choose a mesh whose usage would result in the best outcome. Different mesh characteristics have been studied, among them weight of mesh has probably gained the most attention. The choice of adequate therapy for chronic groin pain after inguinal hernia repair is controversial. The European Hernia Society recommends that a multidisciplinary approach at a pain clinic should be considered for the treatment of chronic postoperative pain. Although surgical treatment of chronic posthernioplasty pain is limited because of the lack of relevant research data, resection of entrapped nerves, mesh removal in the case of mesh related pain or removal of fixation sutures can be beneficial for the patient with severe pain after inguinal hernia surgery. One drawback of published studies is the lack of consensus over definition of chronic pain, which makes it complicated to compare the results of different studies and to conduct meta-analyses and systematic reviews. Therefore, a uniform definition of chronic pain and its best assessment methods should be developed in order to conduct top quality multicenter randomized trials. Further research to develop meshes with optimal parameters is of vital importance and should be encouraged.

  13. [Prosthetic material in incisional hernia surgery].

    PubMed

    López-Cano, Manuel; Barreiro Morandeira, Francisco

    2010-09-01

    There are different designs of prosthesis for use in the repair of incisional hernia, and it is often difficult to choose the most appropriate. The biological behaviour of the material must be a key part in the selection, although this behaviour will vary depending on what materials are available. A proper understanding of the relationship of the material with the abdominal wall dynamics is another important factor in this selection. Finally we need a stable repair without long term side effects. This paper analyses the prostheses more commonly available for incisional hernia surgery in the non-emergency situation.

  14. Ventral and dorsal pathways for language

    PubMed Central

    Saur, Dorothee; Kreher, Björn W.; Schnell, Susanne; Kümmerer, Dorothee; Kellmeyer, Philipp; Vry, Magnus-Sebastian; Umarova, Roza; Musso, Mariacristina; Glauche, Volkmar; Abel, Stefanie; Huber, Walter; Rijntjes, Michel; Hennig, Jürgen; Weiller, Cornelius

    2008-01-01

    Built on an analogy between the visual and auditory systems, the following dual stream model for language processing was suggested recently: a dorsal stream is involved in mapping sound to articulation, and a ventral stream in mapping sound to meaning. The goal of the study presented here was to test the neuroanatomical basis of this model. Combining functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with a novel diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)-based tractography method we were able to identify the most probable anatomical pathways connecting brain regions activated during two prototypical language tasks. Sublexical repetition of speech is subserved by a dorsal pathway, connecting the superior temporal lobe and premotor cortices in the frontal lobe via the arcuate and superior longitudinal fascicle. In contrast, higher-level language comprehension is mediated by a ventral pathway connecting the middle temporal lobe and the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex via the extreme capsule. Thus, according to our findings, the function of the dorsal route, traditionally considered to be the major language pathway, is mainly restricted to sensory-motor mapping of sound to articulation, whereas linguistic processing of sound to meaning requires temporofrontal interaction transmitted via the ventral route. PMID:19004769

  15. Spilled gallstones after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Papasavas, Pavlos K; Caushaj, Philip F; Gagné, Daniel J

    2002-10-01

    Spilled gallstones have emerged as a new issue in the era of laparoscopic cholecystectomy. We treated a 77-year-old woman who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Subsequently, a right flank abscess developed. During the cholecystectomy, the gallbladder was perforated and stones were spilled. After a failed attempt to drain the abscess percutaneously, the patient required open drainage, which revealed retained gallstones in the right flank. The abscess resolved, although the patient continued to have intermittent drainage without evidence of sepsis. Review of the literature revealed 127 cases of spilled gallstones, of which 44.1% presented with intraperitoneal abscess, 18.1% with abdominal wall abscess, 11.8% with thoracic abscess, 10.2% with retroperitoneal abscess, and the rest with various clinical pictures. In case of gallstone spillage during laparoscopic cholecystectomy, every effort should be made to locate and retrieve the stones.

  16. Transduodenal sphincterotomy in laparoscopic era.

    PubMed

    Carboni, M; Negro, P; D'Amore, L; Proposito, D

    2001-10-01

    Indications for transduodenal sphincterotomy have been reduced in recent years, mainly because of the development of endoscopic sphincterotomy and laparoscopic procedures. Endoscopic treatment is effective, but it is necessary to carefully evaluate its indications because the incidence of early and late complications is not negligible. Laparoscopic procedures require advanced and expensive technologies and considerable laparoscopic experience. Transduodenal sphincterotomy is safe and effective, if correctly performed. Some risk factors appear to be related to the incidence of complications that do not significantly differ from those following endoscopic sphincterotomy. Transduodenal sphincterotomy may be still indicated in selected cases, and for this reason it should be considered an essential part of the knowledge of a general surgeon.

  17. [Principles of the management of adult inguinal hernia--recommendations by the European Hernia Society].

    PubMed

    Wéber, György

    2010-10-01

    The European Hernia Society (EHS) presented the EHS Guidelines for the Treatment of Inguinal Hernia in Adult Patients. The Guidelines contain recommendations for the management of inguinal hernia from diagnosis to aftercare. These have been developed by a Working Group consisting of expert surgeons with representatives of 14 member countries of the EHS. The Guidelines are evidence-based and, when necessary, a consensus of all members was reached. The Guidelines have been reviewed by a Steering Committee as well. Before finalisation, feedback from the relevant national hernia societies was obtained. The Guidelines can be used to adjust local protocols, training purposes as well as quality control. In order to keep them updated the next revision will be published in 2012. A short update of new high-level evidence will be provided by the Working Group during the EHS annual congress until the next revision.

  18. Laparoscopic Renal Cryoablation

    PubMed Central

    Schiffman, Marc; Moshfegh, Amiel; Talenfeld, Adam; Del Pizzo, Joseph J.

    2014-01-01

    In light of evidence linking radical nephrectomy and consequent suboptimal renal function to adverse cardiovascular events and increased mortality, research into nephron-sparing techniques for renal masses widely expanded in the past two decades. The American Urological Association (AUA) guidelines now explicitly list partial nephrectomy as the standard of care for the management of T1a renal tumors. Because of the increasing utilization of cross-sectional imaging, up to 70% of newly detected renal masses are stage T1a, making them more amenable to minimally invasive nephron-sparing therapies including laparoscopic and robotic partial nephrectomy and ablative therapies. Cryosurgery has emerged as a leading option for renal ablation, and compared with surgical techniques it offers benefits in preserving renal function with fewer complications, shorter hospitalization times, and allows for quicker convalescence. A mature dataset exists at this time, with intermediate and long-term follow-up data available. Cryosurgical recommendations as a first-line therapy are made at this time in limited populations, including elderly patients, patients with multiple comorbidities, and those with a solitary kidney. As more data emerge on oncologic efficacy, and technical experience and the technology continue to improve, the application of this modality will likely be extended in future treatment guidelines. PMID:24596441

  19. [Peritoneum and laparoscopic environment].

    PubMed

    Canis, Michel; Matsuzaki, Sachiko; Bourdel, Nicolas; Jardon, Kris; Cotte, Benjamin; Botchorishvili, Revaz; Rabischong, Benoit; Mage, Gérard

    2007-12-01

    Laparoscopic surgery takes place in a closed environment, the peritoneal cavity distended by the pneumoperitoneum whose parameters, such as pressure, composition, humidity and temperature of the gas, may be changed and adapted to influence the intra and postoperative surgical processes. Such changes were impossible in the "open" environment. This review includes recent data on peritoneal physiology, which are relevant for surgeons, and on the effects of the pneumoperitoneum on the peritoneal membrane. The ability to work in a new surgical environment, which may be adapted to each situation, opens a new era in endoscopic surgery. Using nebulizers, the pneumoperitoneum may become a new way to administer intraoperative treatments. Most of the current data on the consequences of the pneumoperitoneum were obtained using poor animal models so that it remains difficult to estimate the progresses, which will be brought to the operative theater by this new concept. However this revolution will likely be used by thoracic or cardiac surgeon who are also working in a serosa. This approach may even appear essential to all the surgeons who are using endoscopy in a retroperitoneal space such as urologists or endocrine surgeons.

  20. Laparoscopic ultrasound and gastric cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, T. Michael; Vu, Huan

    2001-05-01

    The management of gastrointestinal malignancies continues to evolve with the latest available therapeutic and diagnostic modalities. There are currently two driving forces in the management of these cancers: the benefits of minimally invasive surgery so thoroughly demonstrated by laparoscopic surgery, and the shift toward neoadjuvant chemotherapy for upper gastrointestinal cancers. In order to match the appropriate treatment to the disease, accurate staging is imperative. No technological advances have combined these two needs as much as laparascopic ultrasound to evaluate the liver and peritoneal cavity. We present a concise review of the latest application of laparoscopic ultrasound in management of gastrointestinal malignancy.

  1. [Inguinal hernia repair by the tension free technique of Lichtenstein].

    PubMed

    Prywiński, S; Zomrowski, L; Kapała, A; Mackiewicz, Z

    1997-01-01

    Failure rate in standard groin hernia repair varies from 3 to 10%. Polypropylene mesh implantation based on Lichtenstein "tension free" method in 1986 year reduced the failure rate to less than 1%. From Feb. '95 to Dec.'96, 115 patients were operated on with 127 groin hernias repair. The average age of patients was 58 years 52 direct hernias, 74 indirect hernias and 1 pantaloon hernia have been diagnosed in examined material, 101 primary repairs and 26 repairs of recurrent hernia have been performed. The operations were performed in subarachnoid anaesthesia--66 patients, in general anaesthesia--11 patients in local anaesthesia--38 patients. After having opened the inguinal canal estimated the type of its wall defect. In case of direct hernia the sac usually was invaginated by absorbing suture. In case of indirect hernia sac was cut and peritoneal cavity left opened. The patch made of polypropylene monofilament mesh (size 6 x 8 cm) was sewn with "tension free" method under spermatic funiculus. As a complication 6 patients had haematomas in operating wounds. Four of the patients had wound infections. One of these patients was operated again and the patch was removed. The patients had no recurrence of hernia during the previous 10.6 months of observation. We haven't confirmed recurrence in examined material, yet it was too short time to estimate the efficiency of repair. The proposed way of groin hernia repair is easy and simple in every-day surgery practice.

  2. Hiatal hernia on thoracic computed tomography in pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Tossier, Céline; Dupin, Clairelyne; Plantier, Laurent; Leger, Julie; Flament, Thomas; Favelle, Olivier; Lecomte, Thierry; Diot, Patrice; Marchand-Adam, Sylvain

    2016-09-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux has long been suspected of implication in the genesis and progression of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). We hypothesised that hiatal hernia may be more frequent in IPF than in other interstitial lung disease (ILD), and that hiatal hernia may be associated with more severe clinical characteristics in IPF.We retrospectively compared the prevalence of hiatal hernia on computed tomographic (CT) scans in 79 patients with IPF and 103 patients with other ILD (17 scleroderma, 54 other connective tissue diseases and 32 chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis). In the IPF group, we compared the clinical, biological, functional, CT scan characteristics and mortality of patients with hiatal hernia (n=42) and without hiatal hernia (n=37).The prevalence of hiatal hernia on CT scan at IPF diagnosis was 53%, similar to ILD associated with scleroderma, but significantly higher than in the two other ILD groups. The size of the hiatal hernia was not linked to either fibrosis CT scan scores, or reduction in lung function in any group. Mortality from respiratory causes was significantly higher among IPF patients with hiatal hernia than among those without hiatal hernia (p=0.009).Hiatal hernia might have a specific role in IPF genesis, possibly due to pathological gastro-oesophageal reflux.

  3. A retrospective study of inguinal hernia in 35 dogs.

    PubMed

    Waters, D J; Roy, R G; Stone, E A

    1993-01-01

    Inguinal hernia was associated with trauma in five dogs and was considered nontraumatic in 30 dogs. There were 11 males, 13 intact females, and six spayed females with nontraumatic inguinal hernia. Six dogs had bilateral hernias. Five dogs were younger than 4 months at the time of diagnosis. In 11 older dogs with nontraumatic inguinal hernia, the hernias were identified less than 7 days before surgical repair; in 14 older dogs, the hernias had been recognized for 1 to 60 months. Clinical signs in dogs without small intestinal incarceration were usually limited to a visible or palpable mass without pain or systemic illness. Herniorrhaphy approaches included inguinal, midline with contralateral ring evaluation, and celiotomy with or without inguinal exposure. Fat and omentum were the most common hernial contents. Small intestine was within the hernias of 12 dogs. Six dogs had nonviable small intestine. Postoperative complications included two incisional infections, one incisional dehiscence, two cases of peritonitis and sepsis associated with bowel leakage after intestinal resection and anastomosis, and one hernia recurrence. The overall prevalence of postoperative complications was 17%, and the mortality rate was 3%. Vomiting for 2 to 6 days was predictive of nonviable small intestine. Dogs younger than 2 years were at 11 times greater risk for nonviable small intestine than dogs older than 2 years. Four of five dogs with nontraumatic inguinal hernia and nonviable small intestine were intact males, whereas none of 13 intact females were affected. Only one of 14 dogs with longstanding hernias had nonviable small intestine.

  4. Stress response to laparoscopic liver resection

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Kazuki; Turner, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    Background: The magnitude of the systemic response is proportional to the degree of surgical trauma. Much has been reported in the literature comparing metabolic and immune responses, analgesia use, or length of hospital stay between laparoscopic and open procedures. In particular, metabolic and immune responses are represented by measuring various chemical mediators as stress responses. Laparoscopic procedures are associated with reduced operative trauma compared with open procedures, resulting in lower systemic response. As a result, laparoscopic procedures are now well accepted for both benign and malignant processes. Laparoscopic liver resection, specifically, is employed for symptomatic and some malignant tumors, following improvements in diagnostic accuracy, laparoscopic devices, and techniques. However, laparoscopic liver resection is still controversial in malignant disease because of complex anatomy, the technical difficulty of the procedure, and questionable indications. There are few reports describing the stress responses associated with laparoscopic liver resection, even though many studies reviewing stress responses have been performed recently in both humans and animal models comparing laparoscopic to conventional open surgery. Although this review examines stress response after laparoscopic liver resection in both an animal and human clinical model, further controlled randomized studies with additional investigations of immunologic parameters are needed to demonstrate the consequences of either minimally invasive surgery or open procedures on perioperative or postoperative stress responses for laparoscopic liver resection. PMID:18333082

  5. Planned hernia repair and late abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Leppäniemi, Ari; Tukiainen, Erkki

    2012-03-01

    Planned ventral hernia is a management strategy in which the abdominal fascial layer has been left unclosed and the viscera are covered only with original or grafted skin. Leaving the fascia open can be deliberate or unavoidable and most commonly results from staged repair of the abdominal wall due to trauma, peritonitis, pancreatitis, abdominal vascular emergencies, or abdominal compartment syndrome. The abdominal wall defects can be categorized as type I or II defects depending on whether there is intact, stable skin coverage. In defects with intact skin coverage, the most commonly used methods are the components separation technique and a prosthetic repair, sometimes used in combination. The advantages of the components separation technique is the ability to close the linea alba at the midline, creating a better functional result than a repair with inert mesh. Although the reherniation risk seems higher after components separation, the risk of infection is considerably lower. With a type II defect, with absent or unstable skin coverage, fascial repair alone is inadequate. Of the more complex reconstruction techniques, the use of a free tensor fasciae latae (TFL) flap utilizing a saphenous vein arteriovenous loop is the most promising. The advantages of the TFL flap include constant anatomy of the pedicle, a strong fascial layer, large-caliber vessels matching the size of the AV loop, and the ability to use large flaps (up to 20 × 35 cm). Whatever technique is used, the repair of complex abdominal wall defects requires close collaboration with plastic and abdominal surgeons, which is best managed in specialized centers.

  6. Single incision glove port laparoscopic colorectal cancer resection

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, HMN; Gosselink, MP; Adusumilli, S; Hompes, R; Cunningham, C; Lindsey, I

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The advantages of single port surgery remain controversial. This study was designed to evaluate the safety and feasibility of single incision glove port colon resections using a diathermy hook, reusable ports and standard laparoscopic straight instrumentation. Methods Between June 2012 and February 2014, 70 consecutive patients (30 women) underwent a colonic resection using a wound retractor and glove port. Forty patients underwent a right hemicolectomy through the umbilicus and thirty underwent attempted single port resection via an incision in the right rectus sheath (14 high anterior resection, 13 low anterior resection, 3 abdominoperineal resection). Results Sixty-two procedures (89%) were completed without conversion to open or multiport techniques. Four procedures had to be converted and additional ports were needed in four other patients. The postoperative mortality rate was 0%. Complications occurred in six patients (9%). Two cases were R1 while the remainder were R0 with a median nodal harvest of 20 (range: 9–48). The median length of hospital stay was 5 days (range: 3–25 days) (right hemicolectomy: 5 days (range: 3–12 days), left sided resection: 6 days (range: 4–25 days). At a median follow-up of 14 months, no port site hernias were observed. Conclusions Single incision glove port surgery is an appropriate technique for different colorectal cancer resections and has the advantage of being less expensive than surgery with commercial single incision ports. PMID:26263805

  7. Botulism toxemia following laparoscopic appendectomy.

    PubMed

    Nystrom, Susan C; Wells, Eden V; Pokharna, Hiren S; Johnson, Laura E; Najjar, Mazen A; Mamou, Fatema M; Rudrik, James T; Miller, Corinne E; Boulton, Matthew L

    2012-02-15

    We describe a case of botulism infection in a patient who had undergone laparoscopic appendectomy, an occurrence not previously described in the literature. This case exemplifies the need for coordination between clinical and public health personnel to ensure the immediate recognition and treatment of suspected botulism cases.

  8. What is a Certified Hernia Center? The Example of the German Hernia Society and German Society of General and Visceral Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Köckerling, Ferdinand; Berger, Dieter; Jost, Johannes O.

    2014-01-01

    To date, the scientific definition “hernia center” does not exist and this term is being used by hospitals and private institutions as a marketing instrument. Hernia surgery has become increasingly more complex over the past 25 years. Differentiated use of the various techniques in hernia surgery has been adopted as a “tailored approach” program and requires intensive engagement with, and extensive experience of, the entire field of hernia surgery. Therefore, there is a need for hernia centers. A basic requirement for a credible certification process for hernia centers involves definition of requirements and its verification by hernia societies and/or non-profit organizations that are interested in assuring the best possible quality of hernia surgery. At present, there are two processes for certification of hernia centers by hernia societies or non-profit organizations. PMID:25593950

  9. Laparoscopic management of urachal cysts

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background The urachus and the urachal remnants represent a failure in the obliteration of the allantois at birth that connects the bladder to the umbilicus. After birth it obliterates and presents as the midline umbilical ligament. Urachal cyst are the most common urachal anomaly in the pediatric population. The traditional surgical approach is a semicircular infraumbilical incision or a lower midline laparotomy. Methods In a 10 years period at Pediatric Surgery Department of Vicenza 16 children were diagnosed with urachal anomalies presenting as abdominal or urinary symptoms. Eight underwent open excision; eight were treated by laparoscopic surgery. The average age was 5.5 years (range, 4 months–13 years) in open group and 10 years (range, 1 month–18 years) in laparoscopic group. Results Mean operative time was 63 minutes (range, 35–105 minutes) in open group, 50 minutes (range, 35–90 minutes) in laparoscopic group. There were no postoperative complications. The patients of laparoscopic group were all discharged after few days (range, 2–4 days). Pathological examination confirmed a benign urachal remnant in all cases. Reporting our experience since comparing the two surgical approaches we want to describe the technique step by step of laparoscopic urachal cyst excision as minimally invasive diagnostic and surgical techniques. Conclusions Laparoscopy represents a useful alternative for the management of persistent or infected urachus, in particular when there’s the suspect despite the lack of radiological evidence. The morbidity associated with this approach is very low as the risk or recurrence. Laparoscopy in the management of urachal cyst is safe effective and ensures good cosmesis with all the advantages of minimally invasive approach. PMID:27867852

  10. An unusual presentation of an incarcerated Spigelian hernia.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Karen; Huysentruyt, Frederik; Delvaux, Peter

    2016-11-29

    Spigelian hernias are rare hernias, occurring through a defect in the Spigelian aponeurosis. Like other hernias, they may contain abdominal contents but are more likely to be incarcerated due to the small size of the fascial defect. Multiple intra-abdominal organs have reportedly been found in Spigelian hernias. A search of the literature showed only nine reported cases in which an appendix has been found within a Spigelian hernia. We present a patient with a history of lower abdominal pain since 10 weeks with a large intra-abdominal mass in the right iliac fossa. Due to abscess formation with spontaneous evacuation through the abdominal wall, drainage and incision were performed and the patient was treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics. An explorative laparoscopy after six weeks showed an incarcerated appendix in a Spigelian hernia.

  11. Amyand's hernia in elderly patients: diagnostic, anesthetic, and perioperative considerations.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weiping; Tao, Zongyuan; Chen, Hao; Li, Qinyu; Chu, Peiguo G; Yen, Yun; Qiu, Weihua

    2009-01-01

    The presence of a vermiform appendix in an inguinal hernia sac is termed as Amyand's hernia. Although rare, mistakes in diagnosis and treatment can cause catastrophic results. Charts of patients with inguinal hernia were reviewed, and four cases of Amyand's hernia were confirmed. The clinical presentation, anesthetic, and perioperative management of Amyand's hernia were further analyzed. The mean age of patients was over 70 years, and all were males. None of the patients were diagnosed preoperatively. All the patients had little abdominal complaint only with a right inguinal mass and dragging sensation for several hours. Due to the short time after incarceration and significant cardiovascular and pulmonary comorbidities, manual reduction was attempted first in three patients. With complete preoperative evaluation and careful perioperative support, all patients underwent appendectomy and Bassini's hernia repair through a groin incision. Based on age-related organ failure and associated chronic medical illnesses of geriatric patients, the difficulties in the diagnosis and treatment are also summarized and analyzed.

  12. Laparoscopic repair of diaphragm perforation with heart patch after microwave ablation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Qing-Chen; Tian, Yan-Jie; Jiang, Xiao-Ting

    2016-03-01

    Microwave ablation (MWA) is a new technology developed in recent years, which is widely used in various disciplines. Microwave ablation is an alternative to surgery in the management of various tumors, and it has been demonstrated to be effective in the management of primary tumors and metastatic tumors. Microwave ablation is widely used in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma with an obvious effect and less side effects, and only 2.7% had serious complications. Many studies have confirmed the complications are thermal damage, hemorrhage, pleural effusion, bile leak, tumor seeding, hepatic abscess, cholangitis, and so forth. But diaphragm perforation is rare, and it is probably the first case reported. This article describes diaphragmatic perforation secondary to MWA of the liver with subsequent pleural effusion and diaphragmatic hernia. We also describe its management via the laparoscopic approach.

  13. Laparoscopic repair of diaphragm perforation with heart patch after microwave ablation

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Qing-Chen; Tian, Yan-Jie; Xiao-Jiang, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Microwave ablation (MWA) is a new technology developed in recent years, which is widely used in various disciplines. Microwave ablation is an alternative to surgery in the management of various tumors, and it has been demonstrated to be effective in the management of primary tumors and metastatic tumors. Microwave ablation is widely used in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma with an obvious effect and less side effects, and only 2.7% had serious complications. Many studies have confirmed the complications are thermal damage, hemorrhage, pleural effusion, bile leak, tumor seeding, hepatic abscess, cholangitis, and so forth. But diaphragm perforation is rare, and it is probably the first case reported. This article describes diaphragmatic perforation secondary to MWA of the liver with subsequent pleural effusion and diaphragmatic hernia. We also describe its management via the laparoscopic approach. PMID:26905357

  14. Laparoscopic Operative Technique for Adrenal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Szostek, Grzegorz; Nazarewski, Slawomir; Borkowski, Tomasz; Chudzinski, Witold; Tolloczko, Tadeusz

    2000-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Laparoscopy has acquired an unquestionable position in surgical practice as a diagnostic and operative tool. Recently, the laparoscopic approach has become a valuable option for adrenalectomy. This paper reports, in detail, our experience of laparoscopic adrenalectomy performed for adrenal tumors. Methods: We performed 12 laparoscopic adrenalectomies from October 29, 1997 to October 31, 1998. The technique of laparoscopic adrenalectomy is described thoroughly in all relevant details for either left or right-sided adrenal lesions. Results: The presented technique of laparoscopic adrenalectomy in all 12 cases provided good and relatively simple exposure of the immediate operative area. All relevant vascular elements were safely controlled, adrenal tumors could be successfully removed, and adequate hemostasis was achieved. No intraoperative or postoperative complications were observed. Conclusions: Laparoscopic adrenalectomy is a safe alternative to open surgery and is preferred for most patients because of shorter postoperative hospital stay and less postoperative discomfort. PMID:10917119

  15. Laparoscopic adrenalectomy: alternative or new standard?

    PubMed

    Higashihara, Eiji; Nutahara, Kikuo; Kato, Moriaki

    2002-04-01

    Laparoscopy has become a standard approach for adrenalectomy because of its safety, low invasiveness, and less demanding technical nature and the readily removable size of tumor through trocar incision. Comparative studies between open and laparoscopic adrenalectomy document less blood loss, shorter hospital stay, and lower incidence of complication. These reports also show that the patients have less pain, use fewer narcotics postoperatively, and have quicker resumption of oral intake after surgery with the laparoscopic approach. The techniques for laparoscopic adrenalectomy started with the transperitoneal approach and developed into the retroperitoneal approach. Further technical development and recognition yielded three transperitoneal and two retroperitoneal approaches. Characteristics of each approach are discussed. Due to technical developments and experiences in laparoscopic surgery, application of the laparoscopic approach has been expanded to include excision for adrenal cancer and laparoscopic partial adrenalectomy for bilateral pheochromocytoma in certain cases and in selected institutes.

  16. Single incision laparoscopic splenectomy with double port.

    PubMed

    Vatansev, Celalettin; Ece, Ilhan

    2009-12-01

    In response to the increasing interest in minimally invasive surgery by both patients and surgeons, most abdominal surgery today is carried out laparoscopically. Laparoscopic splenectomy has become a gold standard in the treatment of spleen disorders related to hematologic diseases. Increasing laparoscopic surgery experience and improved new vessel sealing equipment have led to a decreasing number of ports in laparoscopic surgery and to operations from 1 incision. We carried out single-incision double-port laparoscopic splenectomy in a patient with immune thrombocytopenic purpura using only 2 trocars with a simple manipulation. Our review of the related literature revealed no earlier description of a single-incision double-port laparoscopic splenectomy. We therefore present herein this earlier unreported technique.

  17. Obstructed Groin Hernia in a Tropical African Population

    PubMed Central

    Ajao, Oluwole G.

    1979-01-01

    In a 15-month period, at the University College Hospital, Ibadan, 44 cases of obstructed hernia were treated by emergency operation. More than 94 percent were inguinal, but femoral hernia was not common. The ratio of females to males was 1:6.4, and more than 68 percent of hernias occurred on the right side. The youngest patient was two weeks old. One incarcerated hernial sac contained an ileoileal intussusception and a segment of sigmoid colon. PMID:529309

  18. Congenital mesenteric hernia in neonates: Still a dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Mandhan, Parkash; Alshahwani, Noora; Al-Balushi, Zainab; Arain, Anwar

    2015-01-01

    Congenital transmesenteric hernia in neonates is a rare cause of intestinal obstruction with devastating outcomes and still remains a challenge to diagnose pre-operatively. Patients are often managed with emergency surgical exploration and may need bowel resection. We present 2 neonates with small bowel obstruction secondary to strangulated transmesenteric hernia through a congenital defect in the small bowel mesentery, which were managed successfully. We have also reviewed the literature about congenital transmesenteric hernia in neonates. PMID:26612129

  19. Thoracotomy for Traumatic Diaphragmatic Hernia.

    PubMed

    Fangbiao, Zhang; Chunhui, Zheng; Chun, Zhao; Hongcan, Shi; Xiangyan, Zhang; Shaosong, Tu

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this retrospective study is to review our experience in the diagnosis and role of thoracotomy for traumatic diaphragmatic hernia (TDH). Between January 2008 and June 2014, 23 patients from Yangzhou Medical College (Yangzhou China) and Lishui Center Hospital (Lishui China), who underwent thoracotomy for TDH, were analyzed. The clinical features, imaging findings, operative findings, and outcome of treatment in these patients are presented. There were 23 patients (18 males and 5 females) who underwent surgical procedures due to TDH. The median age of the patients was 43.2 years (range, 15-68 years). The cause of rupture was penetrating trauma in 1 (4.3 %) patient and blunt trauma in 22 (95.7 %) patients. The TDH was left sided in 21 patients and right sided in two patients. The diagnosis was made by chest X-ray (n = 2) and chest or abdominal CT (n = 13) and at thoracotomy based on a high index of suspicion (n = 8). Associated injuries were seen in 21 patients (91.3 %). Twenty-two patients underwent thoracotomy, and one underwent thoracotomy with laparotomy. The mean operating time was 112 min (range, 60-185 min) and the mean blood loss was 116 mL (range, 20-400 mL). The most common herniated organs were the omentum (n = 15), stomach (n = 14), spleen (n = 11), colon (n = 10), small bowel (n = 2), and liver (n = 1). All diaphragmatic defects were repaired using interrupted prolene sutures. The overall mortality rate was 4.3 % (n = 1). The diagnosis of TDH is easily missed or delayed. Chest X-ray and computer tomography (CT), especially chest and abdominal CT, are useful in the diagnosis of diaphragmatic ruptures, and thoracotomy is an effective and successful treatment for TDH.

  20. [Laparoscopic distal resection of the pancreas].

    PubMed

    Gürlich, R; Sixta, B; Oliverius, M; Kment, M; Rusina, R; Spicák, J; Sváb, J

    2005-09-01

    During the last two years, reports on laparoscopic procedures of the pancreas have been on increase. Laparoscopic resection of the pancreatic cauda is indicated, primarily, for benign cystic lesions of the cauda of the pancreas and for neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas (mainly insulinomas). We have not recorded any report on the above procedure in the Czech literature. Therefore, in our case review, we have described laparoscopic distal resection of the pancreas with splenectomy for a pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreas.

  1. Functional Organization of the Ventral Auditory Pathway.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Yale E; Bennur, Sharath; Christison-Lagay, Kate; Gifford, Adam M; Tsunada, Joji

    2016-01-01

    The fundamental problem in audition is determining the mechanisms required by the brain to transform an unlabelled mixture of auditory stimuli into coherent perceptual representations. This process is called auditory-scene analysis. The perceptual representations that result from auditory-scene analysis are formed through a complex interaction of perceptual grouping, attention, categorization and decision-making. Despite a great deal of scientific energy devoted to understanding these aspects of hearing, we still do not understand (1) how sound perception arises from neural activity and (2) the causal relationship between neural activity and sound perception. Here, we review the role of the "ventral" auditory pathway in sound perception. We hypothesize that, in the early parts of the auditory cortex, neural activity reflects the auditory properties of a stimulus. However, in latter parts of the auditory cortex, neurons encode the sensory evidence that forms an auditory decision and are causally involved in the decision process. Finally, in the prefrontal cortex, which receives input from the auditory cortex, neural activity reflects the actual perceptual decision. Together, these studies indicate that the ventral pathway contains hierarchical circuits that are specialized for auditory perception and scene analysis.

  2. Ruptured abdominal aneurysm disguised as an incarcerated inguinal hernia.

    PubMed

    Colpaert, J; Willaert, B; Van Molhem, Y

    2017-01-31

    An incarcerated inguinal hernia is a textbook example of a basic and straightforward diagnosis. In rare cases, an incarcerated hernia may be a symptom of more complex underlying pathology. In this case report a patient with a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm presented with an incarcerated left inguinal hernia. Only two other cases have been reported with a stable patient at initial presentation. The diagnosis was suspected when blood seeping next to the internal inguinal ring was detected, and an urgent ultrasound in the operating room confirmed the diagnosis. Whether or not patients with an inguinal hernia are more at risk for an AAA remains unclear.

  3. Bochdalek Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia in an Adult Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Williams, R. D.; Katz, M. G.; Fargnoli, A. S.; Kendle, A. P.; Mihalko, K. L.; Bridges, C. R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a rare condition. The aetiology of CDH is often unclear. In our case, a hollow mass was noted on MRI. Cardiac ejection fraction was diminished (47.0%) compared to 60.5% (average of 10 other normal animals, P < 0.05). The final diagnosis of congenital diaphragmatic hernia (Bochdalek type) was made when the sheep underwent surgery. The hernia was right-sided and contained the abomasum. Lung biopsy demonstrated incomplete development with a low number of bronchopulmonary segments and vessels. The likely cause of this hernia was genetic malformation. PMID:26293994

  4. Bochdalek Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia in an Adult Sheep.

    PubMed

    Williams, R D; Katz, M G; Fargnoli, A S; Kendle, A P; Mihalko, K L; Bridges, C R

    2016-06-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a rare condition. The aetiology of CDH is often unclear. In our case, a hollow mass was noted on MRI. Cardiac ejection fraction was diminished (47.0%) compared to 60.5% (average of 10 other normal animals, P < 0.05). The final diagnosis of congenital diaphragmatic hernia (Bochdalek type) was made when the sheep underwent surgery. The hernia was right-sided and contained the abomasum. Lung biopsy demonstrated incomplete development with a low number of bronchopulmonary segments and vessels. The likely cause of this hernia was genetic malformation.

  5. Incisional hernia involving the neobladder: technical considerations to avoid complications.

    PubMed

    Katkoori, Devendar; Jayathillake, Anuradha; Eldefrawy, Ahmed; Manoharan, Murugesan

    2009-06-30

    The management of incisional hernia following radical cystectomy (RC) and neobladder diversion poses a special challenge. Mesh erosion into the neobladder is a potential complication of hernia repair in this setting. We describe our experience and steps to avoid this complication. Three patients developed incisional hernias following RC involving the neobladder. The incisional hernias were repaired by the same surgeon. A systematic dissection and repair of the hernias with an onlay dual-layer mesh (made of polyglactin and polypropylene) was carried out. The critical steps were placing the polyglactin side of the mesh deeper and positioning of an omental flap anterior to the neobladder. The omental flap adds a protective layer that prevents adhesions between the neobladder and abdominal wall, and prevents erosion of the mesh into the fragile neobladder wall. All of these patients had received two cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy prior to RC. The time duration from RC to the repair of hernia was 7, 42, and 54 months. No intraoperative injury to the neobladder or other complication was noted during hernia repair. The patients were followed after hernia repair for 20, 22, and 42 months with no recurrence, mesh erosion, or other complications. Careful understanding and attention to details of the technique can minimize the risk of complications, especially incisional hernia recurrence, injury to the neobladder, and erosion of mesh into the neobladder wall.

  6. Type 4 appendiceal diverticulum within a de Garengeot hernia

    PubMed Central

    Coveney, E

    2016-01-01

    A de Garengeot hernia is defined as an incarcerated femoral hernia containing the vermiform appendix. We describe the case of a patient with a type 4 appendiceal diverticulum within a de Garengeot hernia and delineate valuable learning points. A 76-year-old woman presented with a 2-week history of a non-reducible painless femoral mass. Outpatient ultrasonography demonstrated a 36mm × 20mm smooth walled, multiloculated, partially cystic lesion anterior to the right inguinal ligament in keeping with an incarcerated femoral hernia. Intraoperatively, the appendix was found to be incarcerated in the sac of the femoral hernia and appendicectomy was performed. Histopathology demonstrated no evidence of inflammation in the appendix. However, an incidental appendiceal diverticulum was identified. It is widely recognised that a de Garengeot hernia may present with concomitant appendicitis, secondary to raised intraluminal pressure in the incarcerated appendix. Appendiceal diverticulosis is also believed to develop in response to raised pressure in the appendix and may therefore develop secondary to incarceration in a de Garengeot hernia. To our knowledge, only one such case has been described in the literature. A de Garengeot hernia is a rare entity, which poses significant diagnostic challenges. A high index of clinical suspicion is necessary as these hernias are at particularly high risk of perforation and so prompt surgical management is paramount. PMID:27269437

  7. Increasing Body Mass Index Is Inversely Related to Groin Hernias.

    PubMed

    Ravanbakhsh, Samine; Batech, Michael; Tejirian, Talar

    2015-10-01

    Few studies describe the relationship between obesity and groin hernias. Our objective was to investigate the correlation between body mass index (BMI) and groin hernias in a large population. Patients with the diagnosis of inguinal or femoral hernia with and without incarceration or strangulation were identified using the Kaiser Permanente Southern California regional database including 14 hospitals over a 7-year period. Patients were stratified by BMI. There were 47,950 patients with a diagnosis of a groin hernia--a prevalence of 2.28 per cent. Relative to normal BMI (20-24.9 kg/m(2)), lower BMI was associated with an increased risk for hernia diagnosis. With increasing BMI, the risk of incarceration or strangulation increased. Additionally, increasing age, male gender, white race, history of hernia, tobacco use history, alcohol use, and higher comorbidity index increased the chance of a groin hernia diagnosis. Complications were higher for women, patients with comorbidities, black race, and alcohol users. Our study is the largest to date correlating obesity and groin hernias in a diverse United States population. Obesity (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)) is associated with a lower risk of groin hernia diagnosis, but an increased risk of complications. This inverse relationship may be due to limitations of physical exam in obese patients.

  8. De Garengeot's hernia: an unusual right groin mass due to acute appendicitis in an incarcerated femoral hernia.

    PubMed

    Salkade, Parag R; Chung, Alexander Y F; Law, Y M

    2012-10-01

    The presence of an acutely inflamed vermiform appendix in a femoral hernia sac is extremely rare; the condition is termed De Garengeot's hernia. Here we describe an elderly patient for whom preoperative computed tomography aided the diagnosis of this rare entity. This Chinese woman had presented with a painful right groin mass. The patient successfully underwent an emergency appendicectomy and primary femoral hernia repair. Once diagnosed, it is imperative to follow key surgical principles to limit the spread of infection.

  9. Prosthetic Mesh Repair for Incarcerated Inguinal Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Tatar, Cihad; Tüzün, İshak Sefa; Karşıdağ, Tamer; Kızılkaya, Mehmet Celal; Yılmaz, Erdem

    2016-01-01

    Background: Incarcerated inguinal hernia is a commonly encountered urgent surgical condition, and tension-free repair is a well-established method for the treatment of non-complicated cases. However, due to the risk of prosthetic material-related infections, the use of mesh in the repair of strangulated or incarcerated hernia has often been subject to debate. Recent studies have demonstrated that biomaterials represent suitable materials for performing urgent hernia repair. Certain studies recommend mesh repair only for cases where no bowel resection is required; other studies, however, recommend mesh repair for patients requiring bowel resection as well. Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of different surgical techniques performed for strangulated hernia, and to evaluate the effect of mesh use on postoperative complications. Study Design: Retrospective cross-sectional study. Methods: This retrospective study was performed with 151 patients who had been admitted to our hospital’s emergency department to undergo surgery for a diagnosis of incarcerated inguinal hernia. The patients were divided into two groups based on the applied surgical technique. Group 1 consisted of 112 patients treated with mesh-based repair techniques, while Group 2 consisted of 39 patients treated with tissue repair techniques. Patients in Group 1 were further divided into two sub-groups: one consisting of patients undergoing bowel resection (Group 3), and the other consisting of patients not undergoing bowel resection (Group 4). Results: In Group 1, it was observed that eight (7.14%) of the patients had wound infections, while two (1.78%) had hematomas, four (3.57%) had seromas, and one (0.89%) had relapse. In Group 2, one (2.56%) of the patients had a wound infection, while three (7.69%) had hematomas, one (2.56%) had seroma, and none had relapses. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups with respect to wound infection, seroma

  10. Laparoscopic surgery for colon cancer: a review of the fascial composition of the abdominal cavity.

    PubMed

    Mike, Makio; Kano, Nobuyasu

    2015-02-01

    Laparoscopic surgery has generally been performed for digestive diseases. Many patients with colon cancer undergo laparoscopic procedures. The outcomes of laparoscopic colectomy and open colectomy are the same in terms of the long-time survival. It is important to dissect the embryological plane to harvest the lymph nodes and to avoid bleeding during colon cancer surgery. To date, descriptions of the anatomy of the fascial composition have mainly involved observations unrelated to fundamental embryological concepts, causing confusion regarding the explanations of the surgical procedures, with various vocabularies used without definitions. We therefore examined the fascia of the abdominal space using a fascia concept based on clinical anatomy and embryology. Mobilization of the bilateral sides of the colon involves dissection between the fusion fascia of Toldt and the deep subperitoneal fascia. It is important to understand that the right fusion fascia of Toldt is divided into the posterior pancreatic fascia of Treitz dorsally and the anterior pancreatic fascia ventrally at the second portion of the duodenum. A comprehensive understanding of fascia composition between the stomach and transverse colon is necessary for dissecting the splenic flexure of the colon. As a result of these considerations of the fascia, more accurate surgical procedures can be performed for the excision of colon cancer.

  11. Pure laparoscopic hepatectomy combined with a pure laparoscopic pringle maneuver in patients with severe cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Miyagi, Shigehito; Nakanishi, Chikashi; Kawagishi, Naoki; Kamei, Takashi; Satomi, Susumu; Ohuchi, Noriaki

    2015-01-01

    Laparoscopic hepatectomy is a standard surgical procedure. However, it is difficult to perform in patients with severe cirrhosis because of fibrosis and a high risk of hemorrhage. We report our recent experience in five cases of pure laparoscopic hepatectomy combined with a pure laparoscopic Pringle maneuver in patients with severe cirrhosis. From 2012 to 2014, we performed pure laparoscopic partial hepatectomy in five patients with severe liver cirrhosis (indocyanine green retention rate at 15 min [ICG R15] >30% and fibrosis stage f4). A pure laparoscopic Pringle maneuver was employed in all patients. We investigated operative time, blood loss, duration of hospitalization and the days when discharge was possible, and compared these findings with those of patients with a normal liver (ICG R15 <10%, f0) who underwent pure laparoscopic partial hepatectomy during the same period (n = 7). As a result, operative time, blood loss, duration of hospitalization and the days when discharge was possible were similar in patients with cirrhosis undergoing pure laparoscopic hepatectomy combined with a pure laparoscopic Pringle maneuver to those in patients with a normal liver undergoing pure laparoscopic partial hepatectomy. In conclusion, pure laparoscopic hepatectomy combined with a pure laparoscopic Pringle maneuver appears to be safe in patients with severe cirrhosis.

  12. Preperitoneal Suction Technique to Secure the Proper Mesh Position During Laparoscopic Herniorrhaphy

    PubMed Central

    Soeta, Nobutoshi; Ito, Fujio; Gotoh, Mitsukazu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Dislocation of the mesh is 1 cause of recurrence after laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair (LIHR). Here, we propose a new procedure, the “preperitoneal cavity suction technique,” to confirm mesh position during LIHR under a transabdominal preperitoneal approach (TAPP). Patients and Methods: We developed the “preperitoneal cavity suction technique” during LIHR by TAPP, visualizing the mesh through the closed peritoneum by vacuuming up the carbon dioxide and effusion at the preperitoneal cavity using a suction tube inserted through the tunnel from a laterally placed trocar into the preperitoneal space. We applied this technique in adults with inguinal hernias who were scheduled to undergo elective surgery in our hospital between April 2013 and March 2015. Results: In total, 84 lesions were treated in 74 consecutive LIHRs by TAPP. The “preperitoneal cavity suction technique” was applied to 83 lesions. We confirmed appropriate positioning of the mesh for 82 of the 83 lesions (98.8%), with dislocation of the mesh detected in 1 case. In that case, we reopened the peritoneal flap and repositioned the mesh correctly during the operation. No patients complained of pain or a sense of discomfort, and no hematoma was identified around the dissected area or anterior superior iliac spine on the affected side. Mean duration of hospitalization was 2.5 days. No cases of hernia recurrence were observed during follow-up (range, 7 to 31 mo; median, 15 mo). Conclusions: The “preperitoneal suction technique” seems useful to detect mesh dislocation and has potential to reduce TAPP-related complications. PMID:27870783

  13. Multicentric evaluation by Verbal Rate Scale and EuroQoL-5D of early and late post-operative pain after TAPP and TEP procedures with mechanical fixation for bilateral inguinal hernias.

    PubMed

    Zanghì, Antonio; Di Vita, Maria; Lo Menzo, Emanuele; Castorina, Sergio; Cavallaro, Andrea Sebastiano; Piccolo, Gaetano; Grosso, Giuseppe; Cappellani, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    Aimed to evaluate the postoperative pain and other complications among two cohorts of patients undergone transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) and totally extraperitoneal (TEP) laparoscopic hernia repairs with mechanical fixation, the chart of 305 TAPP and 134 TEP for bilateral not recurrent inguinal hernias were reviewed. The postoperative pain was assessed by using the Verbal Rating Scale (VRS) at one week, one month, 3 months ad six months postoperatively. A subgroup of 60 patients was also administered the QoL EQ-5D questionnaire and follow up for at least 6 months. We found a statistically significant difference in the first day (p = 0.001), in the 7th day (p = 0.002), 30th, and 90th day (p = 0.008) between patients perception of pain in TAPP group and TEP group, but after the 180th day there was not any considerable distinction. On the short term the postoperative pain seems slightly lesser in TEP group.

  14. Linea arcuate hernia disguised as Pfannenstiel incision's hernia: a case report and a systemic literature review

    PubMed Central

    Vincelli, Veronica; Marazzi, Cesare; Posabella, Alberto; Steiger, Aurore

    2017-01-01

    We report a rare case of a 46-year-old woman 2 weeks after a cesarean section with Pfannenstiel incision, who presented at the Emergency Department with a significant abdominal pain accompanied by two episodes of vomiting. After that a clinical examination and an abdominal computed tomography scan were completed, a visceral herniation through Pfannenstiel incision was suspected. The indication of surgical exploration was clear. Finally, the laparotomy revealed a linea arcuata hernia with a hernia of the small intestine. After a reduction of the hernia sac, the defect was repaired and no mesh was placed. An antibiotic treatment with co-amoxicillin for 1 week during the recovery was prescribed. The patient recovered uneventfully and could be discharged by postoperative day 7. PMID:28069882

  15. Linea arcuate hernia disguised as Pfannenstiel incision's hernia: a case report and a systemic literature review.

    PubMed

    Vincelli, Veronica; Marazzi, Cesare; Posabella, Alberto; Steiger, Aurore

    2017-01-08

    We report a rare case of a 46-year-old woman 2 weeks after a cesarean section with Pfannenstiel incision, who presented at the Emergency Department with a significant abdominal pain accompanied by two episodes of vomiting. After that a clinical examination and an abdominal computed tomography scan were completed, a visceral herniation through Pfannenstiel incision was suspected. The indication of surgical exploration was clear. Finally, the laparotomy revealed a linea arcuata hernia with a hernia of the small intestine. After a reduction of the hernia sac, the defect was repaired and no mesh was placed. An antibiotic treatment with co-amoxicillin for 1 week during the recovery was prescribed. The patient recovered uneventfully and could be discharged by postoperative day 7.

  16. What is inside the hernia sac?

    PubMed Central

    Virgínia, Ana Araújo; Santos, Cláudia; Contente, Helena; Branco, Cláudia

    2016-01-01

    Most ovarian inguinal hernias occur in children and are frequently associated with congenital genitalia defects. The authors present the case of a multiparous 89-year-old woman, without any genitalia defect, who was brought to the emergency department with an irreducible inguinal hernia. The patient was proposed for emergency surgery during which we encountered an ovary and a fallopian tube inside the hernial sac. An oophorosalpingectomy and a Lichtenstein procedure were carried out and the postoperative period was uneventful. This case shows that, even though it is rare, a hernial sac may contain almost any intra-abdominal organ, including those least frequent such as the appendix, an ovary or the fallopian tubes. PMID:27511751

  17. Incisional Hernia Following Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt Positioning.

    PubMed

    Bonatti, Matteo; Vezzali, Norberto; Frena, Antonio; Bonatti, Giampietro

    2016-06-01

    Incisional hernia represents a rare complication after ventriculoperitoneal shunt positioning due to failure of the fascial suture in the site of abdominal entrance of ventriculoperitoneal catheter. Clinical presentation can be extremely variable, according to patient's performance status, herniated material constitution (i.e. mesenteric fat, bowel loops or both) and complication occurrence (e.g. strangulation or intestinal obstruction). Early diagnosis is fundamental in order to surgically repair the defect and prevent further complications. We present the case of a paucisymptomatic incisional hernia following ventriculoperitoneal shunt positioning. Diagnosis was made by means of ultrasound and confirmed by means of computed tomography. The patient was successfully managed by means of surgical repositioning of herniated loop and re-suture.

  18. [Spigelian hernia: clinical, diagnostic and therapeutical aspects].

    PubMed

    Versaci, A; Rossitto, M; Centorrino, T; Barbera, A; Fonti, M T; Broccio, M; Ciccolo, A

    1998-01-01

    The Authors describing a case of Spigelian hernia observed point out clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic considerations about this rare pathology of abdominal wall. They specify the anatomic characteristics of the region and underline as any diagnostic difficulties are by passed by use of USG and TC imaging for formulation of correct preoperative diagnosis. They confirm as surgical treatment by a correct access isn't different by a normal hernioplasty and guarantee the long term surgical outcome.

  19. Thoracic kidney associated with congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Rattan, Kamal N; Rohilla, Seema; Narang, Rajat; Rattan, Simmi K; Maggu, Sarita; Dhaulakhandi, Dhara B

    2009-09-01

    We report three cases of ectopic thoracic (or superior ectopic) kidney; one in a neonate and two in 6-month-old children, associated with congenital diaphragmatic hernia. In all cases the diagnosis was made during surgery and confirmed by intravenous pyelography, sonography and magnetic resonance imaging in the postoperative period. Because of the rarity of this condition we report these cases together with a wide review of the published reports.

  20. Rare presentation of spontaneous acquired diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shweta; Bali, Roseleen Kaur; Das, Kamanasish; Sisodia, Anula; Dewan, R K; Singla, Rupak

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous acquired diaphragmatic hernia without any apparent history of trauma is a very rare condition and is very difficult to diagnose. We present a case of a 21-year-old male who presented with abdominal pain for one month and four episodes of vomiting for one day. Clinical suspicion, chest radiography with nasogastric tube in situ and computed tomography (CT) confirmed the diagnosis. The diaphragmatic defect was repaired surgically. The patient had an uneventful post-operative recovery.

  1. Laparoscopic Management of Mobile Cecum

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Cleber; Catena, Fausto; Di Saverio, Salomone; Sartelli, Massimo; Gomes, Camila Couto; Gomes, Felipe Couto

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The mobile cecum is an embryologic abnormality and has been associated with functional colon disease (chronic constipation and irritable bowel syndrome). However, unlike functional disease, the primary treatment is operative, using laparoscopic cecopexy. We compare the epidemiology and pathophysiology of mobile cecum syndrome and functional colon disease and propose diagnostic and treatment guidelines. Method: This study was a case–control series of 15 patients who underwent laparoscopic cecopexy. Age, gender, recurrent abdominal pain, and constipation based on Rome III criteria were assessed. Ileocecal–appendiceal unit displacement was graded as follows: I (cecum retroperitoneal or with little mobility); II (wide mobility, crossing the midline); and III (maximum mobility, reaching the left abdomen). Patients with Grades II and III underwent laparoscopic cecopexy. The clinical outcomes were evaluated according to modified Visick's criteria, and postoperative complications were assessed according to the Clavien-Dindo classification. Results: The mean age was 31.86 ± 12.02 years, and 13 patients (86.7%) were women. Symptoms of constipation and abdominal pain were present in 14 (93.3%) and 11 (73.3%), respectively. Computed tomography was performed in 8 (53.3%) patients. The mean operative time was 41 ± 6.66 min. There were no postoperative infections. One (7.8%) patient was classified as Clavien Dindo IIIb and all patients were classified as Visick 1 or 2. Conclusion: Many patients with clinical and epidemiological features of functional colon disease in common in fact have an anatomic anomaly, for which the treatment of choice is laparoscopic cecopexy. New protocols should be developed to support this recommendation. PMID:27807396

  2. [New aspects of laparoscopic cholangiography].

    PubMed

    Klima, S; Schyra, B

    1998-01-01

    Cholangiography does not prevent bile duct injury, but if performed properly, it can identify impending injury before hand. We present a modified form of laparoscopic cholecystcholangiography; only 5 min are required to perform this technique. Some 408 consecutive peroperative cholangiographies are analyzed. We recommend this method, which decreases the risk of bile duct injuries, reveals occult bile duct stones in 4.2%, and gives the opportunity to approximate the gold standard of cholecystectomies.

  3. Retinotopic Organization of Human Ventral Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Arcaro, Michael J.; McMains, Stephanie A.; Singer, Benjamin D.; Kastner, Sabine

    2009-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have shown that human ventral visual cortex anterior to area hV4 contains two visual field maps, VO-1 and VO-2, that together form the VO-cluster (Brewer et al., 2005). This cluster is characterized by common functional response properties and responds preferentially to color and object stimuli. Here, we confirm the topographic and functional characteristics of the VO-cluster and describe two new visual field maps that are located anterior to VO-2 extending across the collateral sulcus into the posterior parahippocampal cortex (PHC). We refer to these visual field maps as parahippocampal areas PHC-1 and PHC-2. Each PHC map contains a topographic representation of contralateral visual space. The polar angle representation in PHC-1 extends from regions near the lower vertical meridian (that is the shared border with VO-2) to those close to the upper vertical meridian (that is the shared border with PHC-2). The polar angle representation in PHC-2 is a mirror-reversal of the PHC-1 representation. PHC-1 and PHC-2 share a foveal representation and show a strong bias towards representations of peripheral eccentricities. Both the foveal and peripheral representations of PHC-1 and PHC-2 respond more strongly to scenes than to objects or faces, with greater scene preference in PHC-2 than PHC-1. Importantly, both areas heavily overlap with the functionally defined parahippocampal place area (PPA). Our results suggest that ventral visual cortex can be subdivided on the basis of topographic criteria into a greater number of discrete maps than previously thought. PMID:19710316

  4. Review. Laparoscopic appendicectomy: current status.

    PubMed Central

    Memon, M. A.

    1997-01-01

    Laparoscopic appendicectomy (LA), has failed to gain unequivocal acceptance by the general surgical community as an alternative to open appendicectomy (OA). This is because the early postoperative recovery leading to quicker hospital discharge, which led to the worldwide acceptance of laparoscopic cholecystectomy, has not been universally seen with LA. Moreover, in the majority of the published series of LAs, there seems to be a trend towards an increased incidence of intra-abdominal abscesses. However, laparoscopy is superior to the 'watch and wait' policy where the diagnosis of appendicitis is questionable. Furthermore, since a large incision can be avoided by using the LA technique in obese patients, the incidence of postoperative morbidity can be reduced considerably. Nevertheless, before endorsing routine and widespread use of LA, it is essential that this technique is critically evaluated in well-designed, controlled, randomised trials, showing clearly the major benefits to the patient in terms of quicker hospital discharge, reduced postoperative pain, decreased wound infection and early return to full activities. Laparoscopic appendicectomy will never replace all open appendicectomies, but should become an alternative in certain groups of patients. PMID:9422862

  5. Laparoscopic Pectopexy: A Biomechanical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Puppe, J.; Prescher, A.; Scaal, M.; Noé, G. K.; Schiermeier, S.; Warm, M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pectopexy, a laparoscopic method for prolapse surgery, showed promising results in recent literature. Further improving this approach by reducing surgical time may decrease complication rates and patient morbidity. Since laparoscopic suturing is a time consuming task, we propose a single suture /mesh ileo-pectineal ligament fixation as opposed to the commonly used continues approach. Methods Evaluation was performed on human non-embalmed, fresh cadaver pelves. A total of 33 trials was performed. Eight female pelves with an average age of 75, were used. This resulted in 16 available ligaments. Recorded parameters were ultimate load, displacement at failure and stiffness. Results The ultimate load for the mesh + simplified single “interrupted” suture (MIS) group was 35 (± 12) N and 48 (± 7) N for the mesh + continuous suture (MCS) group. There was no significant difference in the ultimate load between both groups (p> 0.05). This was also true for displacement at failure measured at 37 (± 12) mm and 36 (±5) mm respectively. There was also no significant difference in stiffness and failure modes. Conclusion Given the data above we must conclude that a continuous suture is not necessary in laparoscopic mesh / ileo-pectineal ligament fixation during pectopexy. Ultimate load and displacement at failure results clearly indicate that a single suture is not inferior to a continuous approach. The use of two single sutures may improve ligamental fixation. However, overall stability should not benefit since the surgical mesh remains the limiting factor. PMID:26844890

  6. Delayed presentation of traumatic diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed Central

    Hegarty, M M; Bryer, J V; Angorn, I B; Baker, L W

    1978-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with traumatic diaphragmatic hernia discovered at least five months after injury are described, of whom 18 were male and seven female. All but one hernia occurred on the left side. Stab wounds were the etiological factor in 22 patients and blunt trauma in three. The diagnosis was most often made by a chest or abdominal radiograph, but barium ingestion confirmed the diagnosis in ten patients. Intercostal drainage of gastric contents provided the diagnosis in two patients. In all nine patients initially approached by a thoracotomy or a thoracoabdominal incision, the hernia was easily reduced and the defect repaired. Although reduction and repair were easily accomplished by the abdominal route in seven patients, this approach was unsatisfactory or inadequate in six others. The colon and stomach were usually in the chest, and strangulation occurred in five patients. The mortality was 20% but rose to 80% when gangrene was present. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:686890

  7. "Limulus" Psychophysics: Spectral Sensitivity of the Ventral Eye

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasserman, Gerald S.

    1976-01-01

    The ventral eye of "Limulus" (horseshoe crab) contains only one type of photoreceptor. Behaviors mediated by the ventral eye provide an unambiguous representation of the function of that single-receptor type. Compares such behaviors with results of acute, single-cell investigations to assay for the contributions of candidate neural codes in the…

  8. Place preference conditioning with ventral tegmental injections of cytisine.

    PubMed

    Museo, E; Wise, R A

    1994-01-01

    The present experiment was designed to determine whether ventral tegmental injections of the nicotinic agonist cytisine can establish place preferences. Two groups of rats were tested: one group received injections into the ventral tegmentum and a second group received injections into sites dorsal to the ventral tegmentum; this latter group was used to assess whether the diffusion of drug into sites dorsal to the ventral tegmentum might in itself be sufficient to account for the effects associated with injections into the ventral tegmentum. A total of eight sets of injections were made. On days 1, 3, 5, and 7, animals were injected with cytisine (10 nmol per 0.5 microliter per side) and placed in one of the two main compartments of a place-preference apparatus. On days 2, 4, 6, and 8, injections of physiological saline, the drug vehicle, were paired with the other main compartment. Animals that received ventral tegmental injections of cytisine spent significantly more time in the cytisine-paired compartment than in the saline-paired compartment. Animals given cytisine injections into sites dorsal to the ventral tegmentum did not show a preference for the cytisine-paired compartment. These findings provide additional evidence in support of the hypothesis that nicotinic actions at the level of the ventral tegmentum contribute to the reinforcing actions of systemic injections of nicotine.

  9. Single port laparoscopic orchidopexy in children using surgical glove port and conventional rigid instruments

    PubMed Central

    Mahdi, Ben Dhaou; Mohamed, Jallouli; Hayet, Zitouni; Riadh, Mhiri

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We review the literature and describe our technique for laparoendoscopic single-site orchidopexy using a glove port and rigid instruments. We assessed the feasibility and outcomes of this procedure. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the case records of all children who had undergone laparoendoscopic single-site orchidopexy by use of a surgical glove port and conventional rigid instruments for a nonpalpable intraabdominal testis between January 2013 and September 2014. Results Data from a total of 20 patients were collected. The patients' mean age was 18 months. All cases had a nonpalpable unilateral undescended testis. Fourteen patients (70%) had an undescended testis on the right side and six patients (30%) had an undescended testis on the left side. Seventeen patients underwent primary orchidopexy. Three patients underwent single-port laparoscopic Fowler-Stephens orchidopexy for the first and the second stage. Average operating time was 57 minutes (range, 40 to 80 minutes). No patient was lost to follow-up. At follow-up, 2 testes were found to have retracted out of the scrotum and these were successfully dealt with in a second operation. One testis was hypoplastic in the scrotal pouch. There were no signs of umbilical hernia. Conclusions Single-port laparoscopic orchidopexy using a glove port and rigid instruments is technically feasible and safe for various nonpalpable intraabdominal testes. However, surgical experience and long-term follow-up are needed to confirm the superiority of this technique. PMID:26568797

  10. Laparoscopic correction of right transverse colostomy prolapse.

    PubMed

    Gundogdu, Gokhan; Topuz, Ufuk; Umutoglu, Tarik

    2013-08-01

    Colostomy prolapse is a frequently seen complication of transverse colostomy. In one child with recurrent stoma prolapse, we performed a loop-to-loop fixation and peritoneal tethering laparoscopically. No prolapse had recurred at follow-up. Laparoscopic repair of transverse colostomy prolapse seems to be a less invasive method than other techniques.

  11. [Laparoscopic partial nephrectomy: technique and outcomes].

    PubMed

    Colombo, J R; Gill, I S

    2006-05-01

    The indication of laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN) has evolved considerably, and the technique is approaching established status at our institution. Over the past 5 years, the senior author has performed more than 450 laparoscopic partial nephrectomies at the Cleveland Clinic. Herein we present our current technique, review contemporary data and oncological outcomes of LPN.

  12. [Unusual ischemic cord compression by discal hernia (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Vergeret, J; Noble, Y; Barat, M; Guérin, J; Arné, L

    The discal hernia are unfrequent in dorsal localization and neurological appearances are deceptive. We report a case with amyotrophic and fasciculations developing a progressive spinal cord amyotrophy aspect. The complementary investigations (gaz myelography and spinal angiography) show the discal hernia in T11-T12 which was operated successfully. The vascular factor role is discussed about semiologic and pathogenic view.

  13. Acquired umbilical hernias in four captive polar bears (Ursus maritimus).

    PubMed

    Velguth, Karen E; Rochat, Mark C; Langan, Jennifer N; Backues, Kay

    2009-12-01

    Umbilical hernias are a common occurrence in domestic animals and humans but have not been well documented in polar bears. Surgical reduction and herniorrhaphies were performed to correct acquired hernias in the region of the umbilicus in four adult captive polar bears (Ursus maritimus) housed in North American zoos. Two of the four bears were clinically unaffected by their hernias prior to surgery. One bear showed signs of severe discomfort following acute enlargement of the hernia. In another bear, re-herniation led to acute abdominal pain due to gastric entrapment and strangulation. The hernias in three bears were surgically repaired by debridement of the hernia ring and direct apposition of the abdominal wall, while the large defect in the most severely affected bear was closed using polypropylene mesh to prevent excessive tension. The cases in this series demonstrate that while small hernias may remain clinically inconsequential for long periods of time, enlargement or recurrence of the defect can lead to incarceration and acute abdominal crisis. Umbilical herniation has not been reported in free-ranging polar bears, and it is suspected that factors such as body condition, limited exercise, or enclosure design potentially contribute to the development of umbilical hernias in captive polar bears.

  14. Diaphragmatic Hernia after Transhiatal Esophagectomy for Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dohun; Kim, Si-Wook; Hong, Jong-Myeon

    2016-01-01

    Diaphragmatic hernia was found in a patient who had undergone transhiatal esophagectomy for early esophageal cancer. Chest X-ray was not helpful, but abdominal or chest computed tomography was useful for accurate diagnosis. Primary repair through thoracotomy was performed and was found to be feasible and effective. However, long-term follow-up is required because hernia recurrence is common. PMID:27525243

  15. Fecally loaded inguinoscrotal hernia masquerading as testicular mass.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Robert David; Wallace, Sophie; Zein, Abdulhalim Al; D'Costa, Horace

    2011-10-01

    An 88-year-old man presented with clinical signs suggestive of a testicular mass. The initial ultrasound examination was inconclusive however regional computed tomography eloquently distinguished a large indirect inguinoscrotal hernia with a hernia sac containing a loop of fecally loaded sigmoid colon.

  16. [Results of surgical treatment of postoperative abdominal hernia].

    PubMed

    Belokonev, V I; Pushkin, S Iu

    2000-09-01

    There were examined 525 patients with postoperative abdominal hernia, in 47.3% of them big, vast and giant hernia was revealed. There were operated 436 patients using local tissues with duplicature formation--according to Mayo, Sapezhko, Napalkov and Yanov method.

  17. Impact of Bariatric Surgery on Hiatal Hernia Repair Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Victoria; Kuwada, Timothy; Gersin, Keith; Simms, Connie; Stefanidis, Dimitrios

    2016-08-01

    Large hiatal hernias are notorious for their high recurrence rates after conventional repair. Recurrence rates have been described to be higher in obese patients due to increased intra-abdominal pressure. We hypothesized that patients who undergo hiatal hernia repair (HHR) with bariatric surgery (BAR) will have a lower hernia recurrence rate when compared to patients who undergo HHR with fundoplication (FP) due to the decrease in intra-abdominal pressure observed with weight loss. This was an Institutional Review Board approved retrospective review. The outcomes of patients who underwent HHR+BAR as well as patients who had HHR+FP only from 2007 to 2014 were reviewed. Patients who had small hiatal hernias (<2 cm), underwent an anterior repair, or had gastropexy only were excluded. The primary outcome was hernia recurrence and reflux resolution. The outcomes of 58 patients who had HHR+BAR were compared with 30 patients with HHR+FP. Hernia recurrence rate for HHR+BAR was 12 per cent, whereas hernia recurrence rate for HHR+FP was 38 per cent (P < 0.01). Reflux resolution for HHR+FP was 78 per cent, whereas reflux improvement rate for HHR+BAR was 84 per cent (P = n.s.). Combining HHR with BAR leads to a lower hernia recurrence rate when compared to patients who undergo HHR with FP.

  18. Transdiaphragmatic intercostal hernia: imaging aspects in three cases*

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Ana Carolina Sandoval; Kay, Fernando Uliana; Terra, Ricardo Mingarini; de Campos, José Ribas Milanez; Aranha, André Galante Alencar; Funari, Marcelo Buarque de Gusmão

    2013-01-01

    Transdiaphragmatic intercostal hernia is uncommon and mostly related to blunt or penetrating trauma. We report three similar cases of cough-induced transdiaphragmatic intercostal hernia, highlighting the anatomic findings obtained with different imaging modalities (radiography, ultrasonography, CT, and magnetic resonance) in each of the cases. PMID:24068274

  19. Transdiaphragmatic intercostal hernia: imaging aspects in three cases.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Ana Carolina Sandoval; Kay, Fernando Uliana; Terra, Ricardo Mingarini; Campos, José Ribas Milanez de; Aranha, André Galante Alencar; Funari, Marcelo Buarque de Gusmão

    2013-01-01

    Transdiaphragmatic intercostal hernia is uncommon and mostly related to blunt or penetrating trauma. We report three similar cases of cough-induced transdiaphragmatic intercostal hernia, highlighting the anatomic findings obtained with different imaging modalities (radiography, ultrasonography, CT, and magnetic resonance) in each of the cases.

  20. Incidence of Ostomy Site Incisional Hernias after Stoma Closure.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Stephen P; Francis, Jacquelyn K; Valerian, Brian T; Canete, Jonathan J; Chismark, A David; Lee, Edward C

    2015-12-01

    This study sought to evaluate the incidence of ostomy site incisional hernias after stoma reversal at a single institution. This is a retrospective analysis from 2001 to 2011 evaluating the following demographics: age, gender, indication for stoma, urgent versus elective operation, time to closure, total follow-up time, the incidence of and reoperation for stoma incisional hernia, diabetes, postoperative wound infection, smoking status within six months of surgery, body mass index, and any immunosuppressive medications. A total of 365 patients were evaluated. The median follow-up time was 30 months. The clinical hernia rate was 19 percent. Significant risk factors for hernia development were age, diabetes, end colostomies, loop colostomies, body mass index >30, and undergoing an urgent operation. The median time to clinical hernia detection was 32 months. Sixty-four percent of patients required surgical repair of their stoma incisional hernia. A significant number of patients undergoing stoma closure developed an incisional hernia at the prior stoma site with the majority requiring definitive repair. These hernias are a late complication after stoma closure and likely why they are under-reported in the literature.