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Sample records for large case-control study

  1. Traffic noise and hypertension - results from a large case-control study.

    PubMed

    Zeeb, Hajo; Hegewald, Janice; Schubert, Melanie; Wagner, Mandy; Dröge, Patrik; Swart, Enno; Seidler, Andreas

    2017-08-01

    Environmental traffic noise is a potential cause of hypertension. We aimed to study the association between hypertension as recorded in health insurance claims data and the exposure to three sources of traffic noise (aircraft, road and rail). This large case-control study was conducted among persons aged 40 and above in 2010 and living in the region around Frankfurt airport in Germany. Individual residential noise exposure for the index year 2005 was assessed using standard noise algorithms. Cases were all newly diagnosed cases of hypertension recorded in three large health insurances databases in the period 2006-2010. Controls had no hypertension diagnosis. Categorical and continuous analyses were conducted with binary logistic regression models adjusted for sex, age and residential area-based socioeconomic information. The main analysis included 137,577 cases and 355,591 controls. There were no associations with any of the traffic noise sources. Odds ratios (OR) per 10dB noise increase were 0.99 (95% confidence interval: 0.98;1.01) for aircraft noise, and 1.00 (0.99;1.01) both for road and railway noise. Similarly, nighttime noise levels showed no associations with hypertension. Odds ratios were increased for the subgroup of newly diagnosed hypertension cases with a subsequent diagnosis of hypertensive heart disease: per 10dB aircraft noise there was a 13.9% OR increase (6.0% for road traffic, 5.4% for rail traffic). Increases were also noted when we analyzed cases with a longer exposure-outcome time window. Our results are suggestive of an association of noise exposure with clinically more severe hypertension diagnoses, but not with uncomplicated hypertension. The absence of individual confounder data, however, adds to the risk of bias. The results contribute to evidence on traffic noise as a cardiovascular risk factor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Crash involvement of large trucks by configuration: a case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Stein, H S; Jones, I S

    1988-01-01

    For a two-year period, large truck crashes on the interstate system in Washington State were investigated using a case-control method. For each large truck involved in a crash, three trucks were randomly selected for inspection from the traffic stream at the same time and place as the crash but one week later. The effects of truck and driver characteristics on crashes were assessed by comparing their relative frequency among the crash-involved and comparison sample trucks. Double trailer trucks were consistently overinvolved in crashes by a factor of two to three in both single and multiple vehicle crashes. Single unit trucks pulling trailers also were overinvolved. Doubles also had a higher frequency of jackknifing compared to tractor-trailers. The substantial overinvolvement of doubles in crashes was found regardless of driver age, hours of driving, cargo weight, or type of fleet. Younger drivers, long hours of driving, and operating empty trucks were also associated with higher crash involvement. PMID:3354729

  3. Liver enzymes and metabolic syndrome: a large-scale case-control study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Ma, Xiangyu; Jiang, Zhi; Zhang, Kejun; Zhang, Mengxuan; Li, Yafei; Zhao, Xiaolan; Xiong, Hongyan

    2015-09-29

    Previous studies suggested that elevated liver enzymes could be used as potential novel biomarkers of Metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its clinical outcomes, although the results were inconsistent and the conclusions were underpowered. A case-control study with 6,268 MetS subjects and 6,330 frequency-matched healthy controls was conducted to systematically evaluated levels of four liver enzymes (ALT, AST, GGT and ALP), both in overall populations and in subjects with normal liver enzymes, with MetS risk using both quartiles and continuous unit of liver enzymes. We found significant associations were detected for all above analyses. Compared with quartile 1 (Q1), other quartiles have significant higher MetS risk, with ORs ranging from 1.15 to 18.15. The highest effected was detected for GGT, for which the OR value for the highest versus lowest quartile was 18.15 (95% CI: 15.7-20.9). Mutual adjustment proved the independence of the relations for all four liver enzymes. Sensitivity analyses didn't materially changed the trend. To the best of our knowledge, this study should be the largest, which aimed at evaluating the association between liver enzymes measures and MetS risk. The results can better support that liver enzyme levels could be used as clinical predictors of MetS.

  4. Repeat victims of violence: report of a large concurrent case-control study.

    PubMed

    Cooper, C; Eslinger, D; Nash, D; al-Zawahri, J; Stolley, P

    2000-07-01

    Repeat victims of violence (violence victim recidivism) is a phenomenon known throughout the nation by those who work in hospital emergency departments. A level I trauma center in Baltimore, Md, conducted this study to investigate the postulated risk factors for repeat victims of violence, ie, unemployment, limited educational attainment, and involvement with illicit drug use or drug dealing. A case-control study identified 200 cases and 224 controls during a 16-month period. Cases were persons admitted with traumatic injury secondary to violent assault who had been previously hospitalized for a similar reason. Controls were a random selection of eligible age- and sex-matched patients admitted for reasons unrelated to violent injury. Prominent risk factors associated with recidivism were African American male, median age 31 years, unemployed, lacking medical insurance, annual income less than $10000, current drug user, past or present drug dealer, and a positive test for psychoactive substances on admission to the hospital. One hundred seventy-two (86%) of the cases felt that disrespect (called "dissing" in the local vernacular) was involved with their injury. The multiplicity of risk factors and the fact that they are interrelated mandate a comprehensive approach to the difficult problem of violence recidivism. Experiments in hospital-based intervention strategies are needed.

  5. Associated morbidity of pediatric ptosis - a large, community based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Nemet, Arie Y; Segal, Ori; Mimouni, Michael; Vinker, Shlomo

    2014-09-01

    To report the incidence, demographics, and associations of various conditions among patients with pediatric ptosis. A retrospective, observational case-control study of patients (birth-18 years; n = 2,408) diagnosed with pediatric ptosis in 1/2003-12/2012. Age- and gender-matched control patients (n = 9,632) were randomly selected from the district members. Medical and socio-demographic information were extracted from electronic medical records. The average age of diagnosis was 5.6 years, and 1,325 (54%) were male, with an incidence of 19.9/100,000. Systemic conditions significantly associated with pediatric ptosis include myasthenia gravis, congenital anomalies, deafness, mental retardation, muscular dystrophy, neurological diseases, epilepsy, schizophrenia, and malignancy. Ophthalmic conditions associated with pediatric ptosis include exotropia, progressive external ophthalmoplegia, hypotropia, esotropia, hyperopia, vertical heterophoria, intermitent esotropia, astigmatism, retinopathy, internuclear ophthalmoplegia, and myopia. Symptoms of diplopia, blurred vision, and aniseikonia were significantly more common. Pediatric ptosis is associated with various systemic and ophthalmic conditions, and many are diagnosed after the age of 5 years. Clinicians should maintain a high degree of suspicion and thoroughly evaluate all patients with pediatric ptosis to properly assess underlying systemic associations. A better understanding of the patho-physiological association between these factors and pediatric ptosis may help its prevention and treatment.

  6. Lifelong vegetarianism and breast cancer risk: a large multicentre case control study in India.

    PubMed

    Gathani, Toral; Barnes, Isobel; Ali, Raghib; Arumugham, Rajkumar; Chacko, Raju; Digumarti, Raghunadharao; Jivarajani, Parimal; Kannan, Ravi; Loknatha, Dasappa; Malhotra, Hemant; Mathew, Beela S

    2017-01-18

    The lower incidence of breast cancer in Asian populations where the intake of animal products is lower than that of Western populations has led some to suggest that a vegetarian diet might reduce breast cancer risk. Between 2011 and 2014 we conducted a multicentre hospital based case-control study in eight cancer centres in India. Eligible cases were women aged 30-70 years, with newly diagnosed invasive breast cancer (ICD10 C50). Controls were frequency matched to the cases by age and region of residence and chosen from the accompanying attendants of the patients with cancer or those patients in the general hospital without cancer. Information about dietary, lifestyle, reproductive and socio-demographic factors were collected using an interviewer administered structured questionnaire. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to estimate the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals for the risk of breast cancer in relation to lifelong vegetarianism, adjusting for known risk factors for the disease. The study included 2101 cases and 2255 controls. The mean age at recruitment was similar in cases (49.7 years (SE 9.7)) and controls (49.8 years (SE 9.1)). About a quarter of the population were lifelong vegetarians and the rates varied significantly by region. On multivariate analysis, with adjustment for known risk factors for the disease, the risk of breast cancer was not decreased in lifelong vegetarians (OR 1.09 (95% CI 0.93-1.29)). Lifelong exposure to a vegetarian diet appears to have little, if any effect on the risk of breast cancer.

  7. Dietary Inflammatory Index and Risk of Bladder Cancer in a Large Italian Case-control Study.

    PubMed

    Shivappa, Nitin; Hébert, James R; Rosato, Valentina; Rossi, Marta; Libra, Massimo; Montella, Maurizio; Serraino, Diego; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the association between diet in relation to its inflammatory property and bladder cancer (BC) risk. In this study we explored the association between the dietary inflammatory index (DII) and BC risk in an Italian case-control study conducted between 2003 and 2014. Cases were 690 patients with incident and histologically confirmed BC from 4 areas in Italy. Controls were 665 cancer-free subjects admitted to the same network of hospitals as cases for a wide spectrum of acute, non-neoplastic conditions. The DII was computed based on dietary intake assessed using a reproducible and valid 80-item food frequency questionnaire. Odds ratios (OR) were estimated through logistic regression models adjusting for age, sex, total energy intake, and other recognized confounding factors. Subjects in the highest quartile of DII scores (ie, with a more pro-inflammatory diet) had a higher risk of BC compared to subjects in the lowest quartile (ie, with an anti-inflammatory diet) (ORQuartile4vs1 = 1.97; 95% [confidence interval], 1.28, 3.03; P trend = .003). Stratified analyses produced stronger associations between DII and BC risk among females (ORQuartile4vs1 = 5.73; 95% CI = 1.46, 22.44), older ≥65 years (ORQuartile4vs1 = 2.45; 95% CI = 1.38, 4.34), subjects with higher education ≥7 years (ORQuartile4vs1 = 2.22; 95% CI = 1.27, 3.88), and never smokers (ORQuartile4vs1 = 4.04; 95% CI = 1.51, 10.80). A pro-inflammatory diet as indicated by higher DII scores is associated with increased BC risk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and Prostate Cancer Risk in a Large Nested Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Albanes, Demetrius; Mondul, Alison M.; Yu, Kai; Parisi, Dominick; Horst, Ronald L.; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Vitamin D compounds inhibit prostate tumorigenesis experimentally, but epidemiological data are inconsistent with respect to prostate cancer risk, with some studies suggesting non-significant positive associations. Methods The 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D]-prostate cancer relation was examined in a nested case-control study within the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study of 50–69 year old Finnish men. We matched 1,000 controls to 1,000 cases diagnosed during up to 20 years of follow-up based on age (± 1 year) and blood collection date (± 30 days). Conditional multivariate logistic regression models estimated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). All statistical significance testing was two-sided. Results Cases had non-significantly 3% higher serum 25(OH)D(P=0.19). ORs (95% CIs) for increasing season-specific quintiles of 25(OH)D concentrations were 1.00 (reference), 1.29 (0.95–1.74), 1.34 (1.00–1.80), 1.26 (0.93–1.72), and 1.56(1.15–2.12)(Ptrend=0.01). Analyses based on pre-specified clinical categories and season-adjusted values yielded similar results. These findings appeared stronger for aggressive disease (OR [95% CI] for fifth quintile of serum 25(OH)D=1.70 [1.05–2.76]), and among men with greater physical activity (1.85 (1.26–2.72), Ptrend=0.002), higher serum total cholesterol (2.09 (1.36–3.21), Ptrend=0.003) or alpha-tocopherol (2.00 (1.30–3.07), Ptrend=0.01), higher intakes of total calcium (1.82 (1.20–2.76), Ptrend=0.01) or vitamin D (1.69 (1.04–2.75), Ptrend=0.08), or those who had received the trial alpha-tocopherol supplements (1.74 (1.15–2.64), Ptrend=0.006). Conclusion Our findings indicate that men with higher vitamin D blood levels are at increased risk of developing prostate cancer. Impact Greater caution is warranted with respect to recommendations for high-dose vitamin D supplementation and higher population target blood levels. PMID:21784952

  9. Nasopharyngeal Case-Control Study

    Cancer.gov

    A case-control study conducted in Taiwan between 1991-1994 among approximately 1,000 individuals to examine the role of viral, environmental, and genetic factors associated with the development of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

  10. Lifestyle, family history, and risk of idiopathic Parkinson disease: a large Danish case-control study.

    PubMed

    Kenborg, Line; Lassen, Christina F; Ritz, Beate; Andersen, Klaus K; Christensen, Jane; Schernhammer, Eva S; Hansen, Johnni; Wermuth, Lene; Rod, Naja H; Olsen, Jørgen H

    2015-05-15

    The relationship between Parkinson disease (PD) and smoking has been examined in several studies, but little is known about smoking in conjunction with other behaviors and a family history of PD. Using unconditional logistic regression analysis, we studied individual and joint associations of these factors with idiopathic PD among 1,808 Danish patients who were diagnosed in 1996-2009 and matched to 1,876 randomly selected population controls. Although there was a downward trend in duration of smoking, this was not observed for daily tobacco consumption. A moderate intake of caffeine (3.1-5 cups/day) was associated with a lower odds ratio for PD (0.45, 95% confidence interval: 0.34, 0.62), as was a moderate intake of alcohol (3.1-7 units/week) (odds ratio = 0.60, 95% confidence interval: 0.58, 0.84); a higher daily intake did not reduce the odds further. When these behaviors were studied in combination with smoking, the odds ratios were lower than those for each one alone. Compared with never smokers with no family history of PD, never smokers who did have a family history had an odds ratio of 2.81 (95% confidence interval: 1.91, 4.13); for smokers with a family history, the odds ratio was 1.60 (95% confidence interval: 1.15, 2.23). In conclusion, duration of smoking seems to be more important than intensity in the relationship between smoking and idiopathic PD. The finding of lower risk estimates for smoking in combination with caffeine or alcohol requires further confirmation.

  11. Lifestyle, Family History, and Risk of Idiopathic Parkinson Disease: A Large Danish Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Kenborg, Line; Lassen, Christina F.; Ritz, Beate; Andersen, Klaus K.; Christensen, Jane; Schernhammer, Eva S.; Hansen, Johnni; Wermuth, Lene; Rod, Naja H.; Olsen, Jørgen H.

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between Parkinson disease (PD) and smoking has been examined in several studies, but little is known about smoking in conjunction with other behaviors and a family history of PD. Using unconditional logistic regression analysis, we studied individual and joint associations of these factors with idiopathic PD among 1,808 Danish patients who were diagnosed in 1996–2009 and matched to 1,876 randomly selected population controls. Although there was a downward trend in duration of smoking, this was not observed for daily tobacco consumption. A moderate intake of caffeine (3.1–5 cups/day) was associated with a lower odds ratio for PD (0.45, 95% confidence interval: 0.34, 0.62), as was a moderate intake of alcohol (3.1–7 units/week) (odds ratio = 0.60, 95% confidence interval: 0.58, 0.84); a higher daily intake did not reduce the odds further. When these behaviors were studied in combination with smoking, the odds ratios were lower than those for each one alone. Compared with never smokers with no family history of PD, never smokers who did have a family history had an odds ratio of 2.81 (95% confidence interval: 1.91, 4.13); for smokers with a family history, the odds ratio was 1.60 (95% confidence interval: 1.15, 2.23). In conclusion, duration of smoking seems to be more important than intensity in the relationship between smoking and idiopathic PD. The finding of lower risk estimates for smoking in combination with caffeine or alcohol requires further confirmation. PMID:25925389

  12. Management of dental extraction in patients undergoing anticoagulant treatment. Results from a large, multicentre, prospective, case-control study.

    PubMed

    Bacci, Christian; Maglione, Michele; Favero, Lorenzo; Perini, Alessandro; Di Lenarda, Roberto; Berengo, Mario; Zanon, Ezio

    2010-11-01

    Following favourable results from a previous study, a large, multicentre, prospective, case-control study was performed to further assess the incidence of bleeding complications after dental extraction in patients taking oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT). Four hundred fifty-one patients being treated with warfarin who required dental extraction were compared with a control group of 449 non-anticoagulated subjects undergoing the same procedure. In the warfarin-treated group, the oral anticoagulant regimen was maintained unchanged, such that the patients had an International Normalised Ratio ranging between 1.8 and 4, and local haemostatic measures (i.e. fibrin sponges, silk sutures and gauzes saturated with tranexamic acid) were adopted. All the procedures were performed in an outpatient setting. Seven bleeding complications occurred in the OAT group and four in the control group; the difference in the number of bleeding events between the two groups was not statistically significant (OR=1.754; 95% CI 0.510 - 6.034; p=0.3727). No post-operative late bleeds requiring hospitalisation and/or blood transfusions were recorded, and the adjunctive local haemostatic measures were adequate to stop the bleeding. The results of our protocol applied in this large, multicenter study show that dental extractions can be performed easily and safely in anticoagulated outpatients without any modification of the ongoing anticoagulant therapy, thus minimising costs and reducing discomfort for patients.

  13. Parity, hormones and breast cancer subtypes - results from a large nested case-control study in a national screening program.

    PubMed

    Ellingjord-Dale, Merete; Vos, Linda; Tretli, Steinar; Hofvind, Solveig; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Ursin, Giske

    2017-01-23

    Breast cancer comprises several molecular subtypes with different prognoses and possibly different etiology. Reproductive and hormonal factors are associated with breast cancer overall, and with luminal subtypes, but the associations with other subtypes are unclear. We used data from a national screening program to conduct a large nested case-control study. We conducted a nested case-control study on participants in the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program in 2006 - 2014. There was information on estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) for 4748 cases of breast cancer. Breast cancer subtypes were defined as luminal A-like (ER+ PR+ HER2-), luminal B-like (ER+ PR- HER2- or ER+ PR+/PR-HER2+), HER2-positive (ER- PR- HER2+) and triple-negative (ER- PR- HER2-). Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) of breast cancer associated with age at first birth, number of pregnancies, oral contraceptive use, intrauterine devices and menopausal hormone therapy. Analyses were adjusted for age, body mass index, education, age at menarche, number of pregnancies and menopausal status. Number of pregnancies was inversely associated with relative risk of luminal-like breast cancers (p-trend ≤0.02), and although not statistically significant, with HER2-positive (OR = 0.60, 95% CI 0.31-1.19) and triple-negative cancer (OR = 0.70, 95% CI 0.41-1.21). Women who had ≥4 pregnancies were at >40% lower risk of luminal-like and HER2-positive cancers than women who had never been pregnant. However, there was a larger discrepancy between tumor subtypes with menopausal hormone use. Women who used estrogen and progesterone therapy (EPT) had almost threefold increased risk of luminal A-like cancer (OR = 2.92, 95% CI 2.36-3.62) compared to never-users, but were not at elevated risk of HER2-positive (OR = 0.88, 95% CI 0.33-2.30) or triple-negative (OR = 0.92, 95% CI 0.43 - 1

  14. Polymorphic variants in PTGS2 and prostate cancer risk: results from two large nested case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Danforth, Kim N; Hayes, Richard B; Rodriguez, Carmen; Yu, Kai; Sakoda, Lori C; Huang, Wen-Yi; Chen, Bingshu E; Chen, Jinbo; Andriole, Gerald L; Calle, Eugenia E; Jacobs, Eric J; Chu, Lisa W; Figueroa, Jonine D; Yeager, Meredith; Platz, Elizabeth A; Michaud, Dominique S; Chanock, Stephen J; Thun, Michael J; Hsing, Ann W

    2008-03-01

    Chronic inflammation has been hypothesized to increase prostate cancer risk. Prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2) encodes the proinflammatory cyclooxygenase 2 enzyme believed to be the rate-limiting step in the synthesis of prostaglandins, important mediators of inflammation. We investigated associations between PTGS2 polymorphisms and prostate cancer risk among 2321 prostate cancer cases and 2560 controls in two large case-control studies nested within the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial and the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort. Five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs5277, rs20432, rs4648276, rs5275 and rs689470) were examined in SNP and haplotype analyses (five SNPs in PLCO and four SNPs in the Nutrition Cohort). In PLCO, the Ex10 +837 T>C marker (rs5275) was initially associated with prostate cancer risk (P-trend = 0.02) but became non-significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons (P = 0.08); this SNP showed no association with prostate cancer risk in the Nutrition Cohort (P-trend = 0.54) or in an analysis pooling the two cohorts (P-trend = 0.20). No other SNP was associated with prostate cancer risk in PLCO or the Nutrition Cohort individually or combined. Haplotype analyses suggested an association between PTGS2 variants in PLCO alone (global P = 0.007), but not in the Nutrition Cohort (global P = 0.78) or pooled analysis (global P = 0.18). In conclusion, despite the potential importance of inflammation in prostate carcinogenesis, results from our large study of five PTGS2 SNPs does not support a strong association between PTGS2 variants and prostate cancer risk in non-Hispanic white men.

  15. Inflammatory potential of diet and risk of oral and pharyngeal cancer in a large case-control study from Italy.

    PubMed

    Shivappa, Nitin; Hébert, James R; Rosato, Valentina; Garavello, Werner; Serraino, Diego; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2017-08-01

    Diet and inflammation have been suggested to be important risk factors for oral and pharyngeal cancer. We examined the association between dietary inflammatory index (DII™) and oral and pharyngeal cancer in a large case-control study conducted between 1992 and 2009 in Italy. This study included 946 cases with incident, histologically confirmed oral and pharyngeal cancer, and 2,492 controls hospitalized for acute non-neoplastic diseases. The DII was computed based on dietary intake assessed by a valid 78-item food frequency questionnaire and was adjusted for nonalcohol energy intake using the residual approach (E-DII™). Logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), adjusted for age, sex, non-alcohol energy intake, study center, year of interview, education, body mass index, tobacco smoking, and alcohol drinking. Subjects with higher DII scores (i.e., with a more pro-inflammatory diet) had a higher risk of oral and pharyngeal cancer, the OR being 1.80 (95% CI 1.36-2.38) for the highest versus the lowest DII quartile and 1.17 (95% CI 1.10-1.25) for a one-unit increase (8% of the DII range). When stratified by selected covariates, a stronger association was observed among women (ORquartile4 v.1 3.30, 95% CI 1.95-5.57). We also observed a stronger association for oral cancers and a strong combined effect of higher DII score and tobacco smoking or alcohol consumption on oral and pharyngeal cancer. These results indicate that the pro-inflammatory potential of the diet, as shown by higher DII scores, is associated with higher odds of oral and pharyngeal cancer. © 2017 UICC.

  16. Cadmium exposure and endometrial cancer risk: A large midwestern U.S. population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    McElroy, Jane A; Kruse, Robin L; Guthrie, James; Gangnon, Ronald E; Robertson, J David

    2017-01-01

    Estrogen-mimicking chemicals, such as cadmium, may be associated with increased susceptibility to hormone-dependent cancers, though supporting data are sparse, particularly for endometrial cancer. The Health and Environmental Exposure Research (HEER) study worked with the Arkansas Central Cancer Registry, Iowa Cancer Registry and Missouri Cancer Registry to obtain names of women diagnosed with endometrial cancer who were willing to be contacted for participation in our case control study. Voter registration lists from Iowa and Missouri were used to randomly select similarly aged women as represented in the case population. Participants were interviewed by telephone to obtain information on known or suspected endometrial risk factors. Urine kits were sent to participants for home collection and returned for analysis. Our case-control study consisted of 631 incident cases of endometrial cancer diagnosed from January 2010 to October 2012 and 879 age-matched population-based controls, ages 18-81 years (mean age 65 years). We quantified cadmium amounts in urine and standardized these values through creatinine adjustment. Using data from all survey completers, we developed a multivariable model for endometrial cancer. Creatinine-adjusted cadmium concentration was added to this model. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for endometrial cancer were calculated. After multivariable adjustment, higher creatinine-adjusted cadmium exposure was associated with a statistically significant increase of endometrial cancer risk (OR: 1.22; 95% CI: 1.03-1.44). Our results provide evidence that cadmium may increase the risk of endometrial cancer, possibly through estrogenic effects.

  17. Case-control studies: basic concepts.

    PubMed

    Vandenbroucke, Jan P; Pearce, Neil

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to present in elementary mathematical and statistical terms a simple way to quickly and effectively teach and understand case-control studies, as they are commonly done in dynamic populations-without using the rare disease assumption. Our focus is on case-control studies of disease incidence ('incident case-control studies'); we will not consider the situation of case-control studies of prevalent disease, which are published much less frequently.

  18. Cardiac Dimensions Are Largely Determined by Dietary Salt in Patients with Primary Aldosteronism: Results of a Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Richard D.; Ahmed, Ashraf H.; Cowley, Diane; Leano, Rodel; Marwick, Thomas H.; Stowasser, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Context: Animal studies have demonstrated that dietary sodium intake is a major influence in the pathogenesis of aldosterone-induced effects in the heart such as left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and fibrosis. LV hypertrophy is an important predictor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Objective: We aimed to investigate the relationships between aldosterone and dietary salt and LV dimensions in patients with primary aldosteronism (PA). Design and Participants: This case-control study included 21 patients with confirmed PA and 21 control patients with essential hypertension matched for age, gender, duration of hypertension, and 24-h systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Main Outcome Measures: Patients were evaluated by echocardiography and 24-h urinary sodium (UNa) excretion while consuming their usual diets. Results: Patients with PA had significantly greater mean LV end-diastolic diameter, interventricular septum and posterior wall thicknesses, LV mass (LVM) and LV mass index, and end systolic and diastolic volumes than control patients. UNa significantly positively correlated with interventricular septum, posterior wall thicknesses, and LVM in the patients with PA but not in control patients. In a multivariate analysis, UNa was an independent predictor for LV wall thickness and LV mass among the patients with PA but not in patients with essential hypertension. Conclusions: These findings emphasize the importance of dietary sodium in determining the degree of cardiac damage in those patients with PA, and we suggest that aldosterone excess may play a permissive role. In patients with PA, because a high-salt diet is associated with greater LVM, dietary salt restriction might reduce cardiovascular risk. PMID:21632817

  19. Symptoms of adult chronic and acute leukaemia before diagnosis: large primary care case-control studies using electronic records

    PubMed Central

    Shephard, Elizabeth A; Neal, Richard D; Rose, Peter W; Walter, Fiona M; Hamilton, Willie

    2016-01-01

    Background Leukaemia is the eleventh commonest UK cancer. The four main subtypes have different clinical profiles, particularly between chronic and acute types. Aim To identify the symptom profiles of chronic and acute leukaemia in adults in primary care. Design and setting Matched case-control studies using Clinical Practice Research Datalink records. Method Putative symptoms of leukaemia were identified in the year before diagnosis. Conditional logistic regression was used for analysis, and positive predictive values (PPVs) were calculated to estimate risk. Results Of cases diagnosed between 2000 and 2009, 4655 were aged ≥40 years (2877 chronic leukaemia (CL), 937 acute leukaemia (AL), 841 unreported subtype). Ten symptoms were independently associated with CL, the three strongest being: lymphadenopathy (odds ratio [OR] 22, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 13 to 36), weight loss (OR 3.0, 95% CI = 2.1 to 4.2), and bruising (OR 2.3, 95% CI = 1.6 to 3.2). Thirteen symptoms were independently associated with AL, the three strongest being: nosebleeds and/or bleeding gums (OR 5.7, 95% CI = 3.1 to 10), fever (OR 5.3, 95% CI = 2.7 to 10), and fatigue (OR 4.4, 95% CI = 3.3 to 6.0). No individual symptom or combination of symptoms had a PPV >1%. Conclusion The symptom profiles of CL and AL have both overlapping and distinct features. This presents a dichotomy for GPs: diagnosis, by performing a full blood count, is easy; however, the symptoms of leukaemia are non-specific and of relatively low risk. This explains why many leukaemia diagnoses are unexpected findings. PMID:26917658

  20. Symptoms of adult chronic and acute leukaemia before diagnosis: large primary care case-control studies using electronic records.

    PubMed

    Shephard, Elizabeth A; Neal, Richard D; Rose, Peter W; Walter, Fiona M; Hamilton, Willie

    2016-03-01

    Leukaemia is the eleventh commonest UK cancer. The four main subtypes have different clinical profiles, particularly between chronic and acute types. To identify the symptom profiles of chronic and acute leukaemia in adults in primary care. Matched case-control studies using Clinical Practice Research Datalink records. Putative symptoms of leukaemia were identified in the year before diagnosis. Conditional logistic regression was used for analysis, and positive predictive values (PPVs) were calculated to estimate risk. Of cases diagnosed between 2000 and 2009, 4655 were aged ≥40 years (2877 chronic leukaemia (CL), 937 acute leukaemia (AL), 841 unreported subtype). Ten symptoms were independently associated with CL, the three strongest being: lymphadenopathy (odds ratio [OR] 22, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 13 to 36), weight loss (OR 3.0, 95% CI = 2.1 to 4.2), and bruising (OR 2.3, 95% CI = 1.6 to 3.2). Thirteen symptoms were independently associated with AL, the three strongest being: nosebleeds and/or bleeding gums (OR 5.7, 95% CI = 3.1 to 10), fever (OR 5.3, 95% CI = 2.7 to 10), and fatigue (OR 4.4, 95% CI = 3.3 to 6.0). No individual symptom or combination of symptoms had a PPV >1%. The symptom profiles of CL and AL have both overlapping and distinct features. This presents a dichotomy for GPs: diagnosis, by performing a full blood count, is easy; however, the symptoms of leukaemia are non-specific and of relatively low risk. This explains why many leukaemia diagnoses are unexpected findings. © British Journal of General Practice 2016.

  1. Joint and independent effects of alcohol drinking and tobacco smoking on oral cancer: a large case-control study.

    PubMed

    Ferreira Antunes, José Leopoldo; Toporcov, Tatiana Natasha; Biazevic, Maria Gabriela Haye; Boing, Antonio Fernando; Scully, Crispian; Petti, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol drinking and tobacco smoking are assumed to have significant independent and joint effects on oral cancer (OC) development. This assumption is based on consistent reports from observational studies, which, however, overestimated the independent effects of smoking and drinking, because they did not account for the interaction effect in multivariable analyses. This case-control study sought to investigate the independent and the joint effects of smoking and drinking on OC in a homogeneous sample of adults. Case patients (N = 1,144) were affected by invasive oral/oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma confirmed histologically, diagnosed between 1998 and 2008 in four hospitals of São Paulo (Brazil). Control patients (N = 1,661) were not affected by drinking-, smoking-associated diseases, cancers, upper aero-digestive tract diseases. Cumulative tobacco and alcohol consumptions were assessed anamnestically. Patients were categorized into never/ever users and never/level-1/level-2 users, according to the median consumption level in controls. The effects of smoking and drinking on OC adjusted for age, gender, schooling level were assessed using logistic regression analysis; Model-1 did not account for the smoking-drinking interaction; Model-2 accounted for this interaction and included the resultant interaction terms. The models were compared using the likelihood ratio test. According to Model-1, the adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for smoking, drinking, smoking-drinking were 3.50 (95% confidence interval -95CI, 2.76-4.44), 3.60 (95CI, 2.86-4.53), 12.60 (95CI, 7.89-20.13), respectively. According to Model-2 these figures were 1.41 (95CI, 1.02-1.96), 0.78 (95CI, 0.48-1.27), 8.16 (95CI, 2.09-31.78). Analogous results were obtained using three levels of exposure to smoking and drinking. Model-2 showed statistically significant better goodness-of-fit statistics than Model-1. Drinking was not independently associated with OC, while the independent effect of smoking

  2. Serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D and prostate cancer risk in a large nested case-control study.

    PubMed

    Albanes, Demetrius; Mondul, Alison M; Yu, Kai; Parisi, Dominick; Horst, Ronald L; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie J

    2011-09-01

    Vitamin D compounds inhibit prostate tumorigenesis experimentally, but epidemiologic data are inconsistent with respect to prostate cancer risk, with some studies suggesting nonsignificant positive associations. The 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25(OH)D]-prostate cancer relation was examined in a nested case-control study within the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study of 50- to 69-year-old Finnish men. We matched 1,000 controls to 1,000 cases diagnosed during up to 20 years of follow-up on the basis of age (±1 year) and fasting blood collection date (±30 days). Conditional multivariate logistic regression models estimated ORs and 95% CIs. All statistical significance testing was 2-sided. Cases had nonsignificantly 3% higher serum 25(OH)D levels (P = 0.19). ORs (95% CIs) for increasing season-specific quintiles of 25(OH)D concentrations were 1.00 (reference), 1.29 (0.95-1.74), 1.34 (1.00-1.80), 1.26 (0.93-1.72), and 1.56 (1.15-2.12), with P(trend) = 0.01. Analyses based on prespecified clinical categories and season-adjusted values yielded similar results. These findings seemed stronger for aggressive disease [OR (95% CI) for fifth quintile of serum 25(OH)D [1.70 (1.05-2.76), P(trend) = 0.02], among men with greater physical activity [1.85 (1.26-2.72), P(trend) = 0.002], higher concentrations of serum total cholesterol [2.09 (1.36-3.21), P(trend) = 0.003] or α-tocopherol [2.00 (1.30-3.07), P(trend) = 0.01] and higher intakes of total calcium [1.82 (1.20-2.76), P(trend) = 0.01] or vitamin D [1.69 (1.04-2.75), P(trend) = 0.08], or among those who had received the trial α-tocopherol supplements [1.74 (1.15-2.64), P(trend) = 0.006]. Our findings indicate that men with higher vitamin D blood levels are at increased risk of developing prostate cancer. Greater caution is warranted with respect to recommendations for high-dose vitamin D supplementation and higher population target blood levels.

  3. Case-Control Study of Writer's Cramp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roze, E.; Soumare, A.; Pironneau, I.; Sangla, S.; de Cock, V. Cochen; Teixeira, A.; Astorquiza, A.; Bonnet, C.; Bleton, J. P.; Vidailhet, M.; Elbaz, A.

    2009-01-01

    Task-specific focal dystonias are thought to be due to a combination of individual vulnerability and environmental factors. There are no case-control studies of risk factors for writer's cramp. We undertook a case-control study of 104 consecutive patients and matched controls to identify risk factors for the condition. We collected detailed data…

  4. Case-Control Study of Writer's Cramp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roze, E.; Soumare, A.; Pironneau, I.; Sangla, S.; de Cock, V. Cochen; Teixeira, A.; Astorquiza, A.; Bonnet, C.; Bleton, J. P.; Vidailhet, M.; Elbaz, A.

    2009-01-01

    Task-specific focal dystonias are thought to be due to a combination of individual vulnerability and environmental factors. There are no case-control studies of risk factors for writer's cramp. We undertook a case-control study of 104 consecutive patients and matched controls to identify risk factors for the condition. We collected detailed data…

  5. Are nested case-control studies biased?

    PubMed Central

    Langholz, Bryan; Richardson, David

    2014-01-01

    It has been recently asserted that the nested case-control study design, in which case-control sets are sampled from cohort risk sets, can introduce bias (“study design bias”) when there are lagged exposures. The bases for this claim include a theoretic and an “empirical evaluation” argument. Both of these arguments are examined and found to be incorrect. Appropriate methods to explore the performance of nested case-control study designs, analysis methods, and compute power and sample size from an existing cohort are described. This empirical evaluation approach relies on simulating case-control outcomes from risk sets in the cohort from which the case-control study is to be performed. Because it is based on the underlying cohort structure, the empirical evaluation can provide an assessment that is tailored to the specific characteristics of the study under consideration. The methods are illustrated using samples from the Colorado Plateau uranium miners cohort. PMID:19289963

  6. Plasma folate, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), and colorectal cancer risk in three large nested case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Eun; Wei, Esther K; Fuchs, Charles S; Hunter, David J; Lee, I-Min; Selhub, Jacob; Stampfer, Meir J; Willett, Walter C; Ma, Jing; Giovannucci, Edward

    2012-04-01

    Few prospective studies have examined the associations between blood levels of folate, in conjunction with methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) polymorphisms, and colorectal cancer. We evaluated the associations between plasma folate, MTHFR C677T, and A1298C, and colorectal cancer in three large prospective studies: the Nurses' Health Study, the Health Professionals Follow-up Study, and the Physicians' Health Study. A total of 602 incident cases were identified and individually matched to controls who provided blood specimens. We used conditional logistic regression to calculate the relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) and then pooled the estimates using a random effects model. We found a lower risk of colorectal cancer among participants with low plasma folate levels: compared with the lowest quartile, RRs (95% CIs) for each successively higher quartile of plasma folate levels were 1.55 (1.14-2.11), 1.37 (1.00-1.88), and 1.47 (1.07-2.01; P for trend = 0.10). For the MTHFR polymorphisms, RRs (95% CIs) were 0.62 (0.44-0.90) for 677TT versus CC/CT and 0.68 (0.31-1.51) for 1298CC versus AC/AA, and these lower-risk genotypes were associated with lower circulating plasma folate levels. When we partitioned the variation in plasma folate levels, variation due to folate intake was not positively associated with colorectal cancer risk. We found that low plasma folate levels were associated with lower risk of colorectal cancer. The reasons underlying a lower risk of colorectal cancer with low plasma folate levels require elucidation because plasma folate levels can reflect dietary intake, genetic influences, and other factors.

  7. Case-control studies in neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Nesvick, Cody L; Thompson, Clinton J; Boop, Frederick A; Klimo, Paul

    2014-08-01

    Observational studies, such as cohort and case-control studies, are valuable instruments in evidence-based medicine. Case-control studies, in particular, are becoming increasingly popular in the neurosurgical literature due to their low cost and relative ease of execution; however, no one has yet systematically assessed these types of studies for quality in methodology and reporting. The authors performed a literature search using PubMed/MEDLINE to identify all studies that explicitly identified themselves as "case-control" and were published in the JNS Publishing Group journals (Journal of Neurosurgery, Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics, Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine, and Neurosurgical Focus) or Neurosurgery. Each paper was evaluated for 22 descriptive variables and then categorized as having either met or missed the basic definition of a case-control study. All studies that evaluated risk factors for a well-defined outcome were considered true case-control studies. The authors sought to identify key features or phrases that were or were not predictive of a true case-control study. Those papers that satisfied the definition were further evaluated using the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) checklist. The search detected 67 papers that met the inclusion criteria, of which 32 (48%) represented true case-control studies. The frequency of true case-control studies has not changed with time. Use of odds ratios (ORs) and logistic regression (LR) analysis were strong positive predictors of true case-control studies (for odds ratios, OR 15.33 and 95% CI 4.52-51.97; for logistic regression analysis, OR 8.77 and 95% CI 2.69-28.56). Conversely, negative predictors included focus on a procedure/intervention (OR 0.35, 95% CI 0.13-0.998) and use of the word "outcome" in the Results section (OR 0.23, 95% CI 0.082-0.65). After exclusion of nested case-control studies, the negative correlation between focus on a procedure

  8. Data Management and Data Quality in PERCH, a Large International Case-Control Study of Severe Childhood Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Watson, Nora L; Prosperi, Christine; Driscoll, Amanda J; Higdon, Melissa M; Park, Daniel E; Sanza, Megan; DeLuca, Andrea N; Awori, Juliet O; Goswami, Doli; Hammond, Emily; Hossain, Lokman; Johnson, Catherine; Kamau, Alice; Kuwanda, Locadiah; Moore, David P; Neyzari, Omid; Onwuchekwa, Uma; Parker, David; Sapchookul, Patranuch; Seidenberg, Phil; Shamsul, Arifin; Siazeele, Kazungu; Srisaengchai, Prasong; Sylla, Mamadou; Levine, Orin S; Murdoch, David R; O'Brien, Katherine L; Wolff, Mark; Deloria Knoll, Maria

    2017-06-15

    The Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health (PERCH) study is the largest multicountry etiology study of pediatric pneumonia undertaken in the past 3 decades. The study enrolled 4232 hospitalized cases and 5325 controls over 2 years across 9 research sites in 7 countries in Africa and Asia. The volume and complexity of data collection in PERCH presented considerable logistical and technical challenges. The project chose an internet-based data entry system to allow real-time access to the data, enabling the project to monitor and clean incoming data and perform preliminary analyses throughout the study. To ensure high-quality data, the project developed comprehensive quality indicator, data query, and monitoring reports. Among the approximately 9000 cases and controls, analyzable laboratory results were available for ≥96% of core specimens collected. Selected approaches to data management in PERCH may be extended to the planning and organization of international studies of similar scope and complexity. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  9. Plasma folate, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), and colorectal cancer risk in three large nested case-control studies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Few prospective studies have examined the associations between blood levels of folate, in conjunction with methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) polymorphisms, and colorectal cancer. We evaluated the associations between plasma folate, MTHFR C677T, and A1298C, and colorectal cancer in three la...

  10. Different dietary patterns and reduction of lung cancer risk: A large case-control study in the U.S.

    PubMed

    Tu, Huakang; Heymach, John V; Wen, Chi-Pang; Ye, Yuanqing; Pierzynski, Jeanne A; Roth, Jack A; Wu, Xifeng

    2016-05-27

    Reducing lung cancer risk by modifying diet is highly desirable. We investigated whether different U.S. dietary patterns were associated with lung cancer risk. Dietary patterns were derived using exploratory factor analysis for 2139 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cases and 2163 frequency-matched controls. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). Highest adherence (highest vs. lowest quintile) to the "Tex-Mex", "fruits and vegetables", and "American/Western" patterns was associated with a 55% reduced (OR = 0.45; 95% CI = 0.37-0.56; P < 0.001), 32% reduced (OR = 0.68; 95% CI = 0.55-0.85; P = 0.001), and 45% increased (OR = 1.45; 95% CI = 1.18-1.78; P < 0.001) risk of lung cancer, respectively. The effects were stronger for squamous cell carcinoma and ever smokers for the "fruits and vegetables" pattern, and stronger for other non-small cell lung cancer and never smokers for the "American/Western" pattern. Among six genome-wide association (GWA) studies-identified lung cancer susceptibility loci assessed, a variant (rs2808630) of the C-reactive protein gene modified the associations for the "fruits and vegetables" (P for interaction = 0.03) and "American/Western" (P for interaction = 0.02) patterns. Our study first showed that the "Tex-Mex" dietary pattern was associated with a reduced lung cancer risk. Also, the "fruits and vegetables" and "American/Western" patterns affected lung cancer risk, and the effects were further modified by host genetic background.

  11. Different dietary patterns and reduction of lung cancer risk: A large case-control study in the U.S.

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Huakang; Heymach, John V.; Wen, Chi-Pang; Ye, Yuanqing; Pierzynski, Jeanne A.; Roth, Jack A.; Wu, Xifeng

    2016-01-01

    Reducing lung cancer risk by modifying diet is highly desirable. We investigated whether different U.S. dietary patterns were associated with lung cancer risk. Dietary patterns were derived using exploratory factor analysis for 2139 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cases and 2163 frequency-matched controls. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). Highest adherence (highest vs. lowest quintile) to the “Tex-Mex”, “fruits and vegetables”, and “American/Western” patterns was associated with a 55% reduced (OR = 0.45; 95% CI = 0.37–0.56; P < 0.001), 32% reduced (OR = 0.68; 95% CI = 0.55–0.85; P = 0.001), and 45% increased (OR = 1.45; 95% CI = 1.18–1.78; P < 0.001) risk of lung cancer, respectively. The effects were stronger for squamous cell carcinoma and ever smokers for the “fruits and vegetables” pattern, and stronger for other non-small cell lung cancer and never smokers for the “American/Western” pattern. Among six genome-wide association (GWA) studies-identified lung cancer susceptibility loci assessed, a variant (rs2808630) of the C-reactive protein gene modified the associations for the “fruits and vegetables” (P for interaction = 0.03) and “American/Western” (P for interaction = 0.02) patterns. Our study first showed that the “Tex-Mex” dietary pattern was associated with a reduced lung cancer risk. Also, the “fruits and vegetables” and “American/Western” patterns affected lung cancer risk, and the effects were further modified by host genetic background. PMID:27230571

  12. Association between XRCC3 Thr241Met polymorphism and nasopharyngeal carcinoma risk: evidence from a large-scale case-control study and a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Cui, Qian; Zuo, Xiao-Yu; Lian, Yi-Fan; Feng, Qi-Sheng; Xia, Yun-Fei; He, Cai-Yun; Chen, Li-Zhen; Jia, Wei-Hua; Mai, Hai-Qiang; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Bei, Jin-Xin

    2016-11-01

    The X-ray repair cross-complementing group 3 (XRCC3) Thr241Met polymorphism (rs861539, C > T) has drawn wide attentions as its association with cancer risk and its involvement in DNA repair. Several studies have attempted to link rs861539 to nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) risk; however, the sample sizes of these studies are small and the results are controversial. To investigate the relationship of rs861539 and NPC susceptibility, we conducted a large-scale case-control study involving 4001 NPC cases and 2967 controls of southern Chinese. Logistic regression analysis revealed significant association for rs861539 and NPC risk under the recessive model (TT vs. CT + CC) with adjustment of age and gender (odds ratio, OR = 2.72; 95 % CI 1.10-6.72; P = 0.03). Further, meta-analysis involving 4457 NPC cases and 4132 controls from four studies showed consistent association of TT carriers and NPC risk (OR = 3.12; 95 % CI 1.58-6.13; P = 0.001). Taken together, our findings based on large-scale sample size suggested rs861539 at XRCC3 to be associated with NPC risk through recessive model.

  13. The glu298asp polymorphism in the nitric oxide synthase 3 gene is associated with the risk of ischemic stroke in two large independent case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Berger, Klaus; Stögbauer, Florian; Stoll, Monika; Wellmann, Juergen; Huge, Andreas; Cheng, Suzanne; Kessler, Christof; John, Ulrich; Assmann, Gerd; Ringelstein, E Bernd; Funke, Harald

    2007-04-01

    The search for genes involved in the pathogenesis of stroke has been highlighted as a field of needs. We followed the concept, that stroke represents a complex genetic disorder, and analyzed the contribution of 106 informative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 63 candidate genes for cardiovascular diseases for the risk of stroke. We conducted two independent case-control studies in two different German regions and recruited a total of 1,901 hospitalized stroke cases and 1,747 regional population controls. The smaller of both studies was used as the replication study. Multiplex PCR in combination with allele-specific hybridization was used for genotype determination. Descriptive statistics, permutations and multivariable logistic regression were used in the analyses. After permutation testing 5 SNPs, located in the nitric oxide synthase 3, the alpha 2 integrin, the interleukin 13, the selectin P and the chemokine receptor 2 genes, had a significant allele difference between cases and controls in the larger study. For one of these SNPs, the glu298asp polymorphism in the nitric oxide synthase 3 gene, an association with ischemic stroke was replicated in the second study and also in a combined analysis of both studies. This association was independent of age, gender, hypertension, diabetes and hypercholesterolemia in both studies. Using large sample sizes and a replication study approach, we found evidence for a role of a polymorphism in the nitric oxide synthase 3 gene in stroke onset.

  14. Spatial analysis of health effects of large industrial incinerators in England, 1998-2008: a study using matched case-control areas.

    PubMed

    Reeve, Nicola F; Fanshawe, Thomas R; Keegan, Thomas J; Stewart, Alex G; Diggle, Peter J

    2013-01-25

    To assess whether residential proximity to industrial incinerators in England is associated with increased risk of cancer incidence and mortality. Retrospective study using matched case-control areas. Five circular regions of radius 10 km near industrial incinerators in England (case regions) and five matched control regions, 1998-2008. All cases of diseases of interest within the circular areas. Counts of childhood cancer incidence (<15 years); childhood leukaemia incidence (<15 years); leukaemia incidence; liver cancer incidence; lung cancer incidence; non-Hodgkin's lymphoma incidence; all-cause mortality; infant mortality (<1 year) and liver cancer mortality. The estimated relative risks for case circles versus control circles for the nine outcomes considered  range from 0.94 to 1.14, and show neither elevated risk in case circles compared to control areas nor elevated risk with proximity to incinerators within case circles. This study applies statistical methods for analysing spatially referenced health outcome data in regions with a hypothesised exposure relative to matched regions with no such exposure. There is no evidence of elevated risk of cancer incidence or mortality in the vicinity of large industrial incinerators in England.

  15. Association between aircraft, road and railway traffic noise and depression in a large case-control study based on secondary data.

    PubMed

    Seidler, Andreas; Hegewald, Janice; Seidler, Anna Lene; Schubert, Melanie; Wagner, Mandy; Dröge, Patrik; Haufe, Eva; Schmitt, Jochen; Swart, Enno; Zeeb, Hajo

    2017-01-01

    Few studies have examined the relationship between traffic noise and depression providing inconclusive results. This large case-control study is the first to assess and directly compare depression risks by aircraft, road traffic and railway noise. The study population included individuals aged ≥40 years that were insured by three large statutory health insurance funds and were living in the region of Frankfurt international airport. Address-specific exposure to aircraft, road and railway traffic noise in 2005 was estimated. Based on insurance claims and prescription data, 77,295 cases with a new clinical depression diagnosis between 2006 and 2010 were compared with 578,246 control subjects. For road traffic noise, a linear exposure-risk relationship was found with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.17 (95% CI=1.10-1.25) for 24-h continuous sound levels ≥70dB. For aircraft noise, the risk estimates reached a maximum OR of 1.23 (95% CI=1.19-1.28) at 50-55dB and decreased at higher exposure categories. For railway noise, risk estimates peaked at 60-65dB (OR=1.15, 95% CI=1.08-1.22). The highest OR of 1.42 (95% CI=1.33-1.52) was found for a combined exposure to noise above 50dB from all three sources. This study indicates that traffic noise exposure might lead to depression. As a potential explanation for the decreasing risks at high traffic noise levels, vulnerable people might actively cope with noise (e.g. insulate or move away). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A large-scale, hospital-based case-control study of risk factors of breast cancer according to menopausal status.

    PubMed

    Hirose, K; Tajima, K; Hamajima, N; Inoue, M; Takezaki, T; Kuroishi, T; Yoshida, M; Tokudome, S

    1995-02-01

    We conducted a large-scale, hospital-based case-control study to evaluate differences and similarities in the risk factors of female breast cancer according to menopausal status. This study is based on a questionnaire survey on life style routinely obtained from outpatients who first visited the Aichi Cancer Center Hospital between January 1, 1988 and December 31, 1992. Among 36,944 outpatients, 1,186 women with breast cancer detected by histological examination were taken as the case group (607 premenopausal women and 445 postmenopausal women) and 23,163 women confirmed to be free of cancer were selected as the control group. New findings and reconfirmed factors of breast cancer were as follows. 1) The risk of at least one breast cancer history among subjects' first-degree relatives was relatively high among pre- as well as post-menopausal women. 2) A protective effect of physical activity against breast cancer was observed among both pre- and post-menopausal women. 3) Dietary control decreased the risk of premenopausal breast cancer. 4) Current smoking and drinking elevated the risk of breast cancer in premenopausal women. 5) Decreasing trends of breast cancer risk were associated with intake of bean curd, green-yellow vegetables, potato or sweet potato, chicken and ham or sausage in premenopausal women, while in postmenopausal women a risk reduction was associated with a more frequent intake of boiled, broiled and/or raw fish (sashimi). Further study will be needed to clarify the age group- and/or birth cohort-specific risk factors for breast cancer among the young generation in Japan.

  17. Experience with multiple control groups in a large population-based case-control study on genetic and environmental risk factors.

    PubMed

    Pomp, E R; Van Stralen, K J; Le Cessie, S; Vandenbroucke, J P; Rosendaal, F R; Doggen, C J M

    2010-07-01

    We discuss the analytic and practical considerations in a large case-control study that had two control groups; the first control group consisting of partners of patients and the second obtained by random digit dialling (RDD). As an example of the evaluation of a general lifestyle factor, we present body mass index (BMI). Both control groups had lower BMIs than the patients. The distribution in the partner controls was closer to that of the patients, likely due to similar lifestyles. A statistical approach was used to pool the results of both analyses, wherein partners were analyzed with a matched analysis, while RDDs were analyzed without matching. Even with a matched analysis, the odds ratio with partner controls remained closer to unity than with RDD controls, which is probably due to unmeasured confounders in the comparison with the random controls as well as intermediary factors. However, when studying injuries as a risk factor, the odds ratio remained higher with partner control subjects than with RRD control subjects, even after taking the matching into account. Finally we used factor V Leiden as an example of a genetic risk factor. The frequencies of factor V Leiden were identical in both control groups, indicating that for the analyses of this genetic risk factor the two control groups could be combined in a single unmatched analysis. In conclusion, the effect measures with the two control groups were in the same direction, and of the same order of magnitude. Moreover, it was not always the same control group that produced the higher or lower estimates, and a matched analysis did not remedy the differences. Our experience with the intricacies of dealing with two control groups may be useful to others when thinking about an optimal research design or the best statistical approach.

  18. Tea and coffee consumption and risk of oral cavity cancer: results of a large population-based case-control study, the ICARE study.

    PubMed

    Radoï, Loredana; Paget-Bailly, Sophie; Menvielle, Gwenn; Cyr, Diane; Schmaus, Annie; Carton, Matthieu; Guida, Florence; Cénée, Sylvie; Sanchez, Marie; Guizard, Anne-Valérie; Velten, Michel; Stücker, Isabelle; Luce, Danièle

    2013-06-01

    Results on the relationship between coffee and tea drinking and the risk of oral cavity cancer are contrasted. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relation between coffee and tea drinking and the risk of oral cavity cancer in France, a high incidence area. We conducted a population based case-control study with face-to-face interviews and standardized questionnaires (the ICARE study, Investigation of occupational and environmental causes of respiratory cancers). We used data from 689 cases of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma and 3481 controls. Odds-ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) associated with tea and coffee consumption (quantity, duration, cumulative consumption) were estimated by unconditional logistic regression with adjustment for age, gender, area of residence, education, body mass index, tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking. We observed inverse associations between oral cavity cancer and tea or coffee consumption (odds ratio, 0.39; 95% CI 0.21-0.70, for the highest quartile of tea consumption, and 0.60, 95% CI 0.34-1.05, for the highest quartile of coffee consumption). Exclusive tea or coffee consumption was associated with a reduced risk of oral cavity cancer and their joint effect was multiplicative. No differences in risk between men and women or between consumers of tobacco and alcohol and non-consumers were observed. The odds ratios related to the subsites usually included in the oropharynx (soft palate and base of the tongue) did not differ significantly from that observed for the other subsites of the oral cavity. Tea and coffee drinking may decrease the risk of oral cavity cancer through antioxidant components which play a role in the repair of cellular damages. These findings need further investigation in prospective studies and the underlying mechanisms in humans remain to be clarified. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Intake of fatty acids and antioxidants and pancreatic cancer in a large population-based case-control study in the San Francisco Bay Area

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Zhihong; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Wang, Furong; Chan, June M.; Bracci, Paige M.

    2010-01-01

    There are no well-established modifiable risk factors for pancreatic cancer except smoking. Some dietary factors have been associated with pancreatic cancer risk and require further study. We examined the associations among intake of specific fatty acids and antioxidants and risk of pancreatic cancer in a large population-based case-control study in the San Francisco Bay Area. Unconditional logistic regression models were used to compute odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) as estimates of relative risk. Positive associations were observed for high levels of the eight individual saturated fatty acids (4th vs. 1st quartile: ORs ranged from 1.6 to 2.6; all Ptrend<0.001), monounsaturated palmitoleic and oleic fatty acids [OR=1.6 (95%CI: 1.2-2.1) and 1.4 (95%CI: 1.1-1.9); both Ptrend <0.01], and polyunsaturated linolenic acid [OR=1.5 (95%CI: 1.1-2.0); Ptrend=0.02]. Inverse associations were observed for high levels of gadolic acid [4th vs. 1st quartile: OR=0.68 (95%CI: 0.50-0.92); Ptrend=0.007] and omega-3 fatty acids [≥0.85g/day vs. 1st quartile: OR=0.47 (95%CI: 0.25-0.90)]. An inverse association also was observed for high total intake of vitamin C [4th vs. 1st quartile: OR=0.69 (95%CI: 0.51-0.94); Ptrend=0.004] and of vitamin E [OR=0.67 (95%CI: 0.49-0.92); Ptrend=0.01]. Although similar decreased risks also were observed for high supplemental intake of these two vitamins (both Ptrend<0.01), no association was observed for intake from food alone. These results support the hypotheses that a high intake of saturated and certain monounsaturated fatty acids may increase the risk of pancreatic cancer, whereas greater intake of omega-3 fatty acids, vitamins C and E may reduce the risk. PMID:20104522

  20. Green tea drinking and risk of pancreatic cancer: a large-scale, population-based case-control study in urban Shanghai

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Zhang, Wei; Sun, Lu; Yu, Herbert; Ni, Quan-Xing; Risch, Harvey; Gao, Yu-Tang

    2012-01-01

    Background Little is known about the etiology of pancreatic cancer. Epidemiological studies on tea consumption and pancreatic cancer risk have been inconclusive. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the association between green tea drinking and the risk of pancreatic cancer in urban Shanghai, China. Methods In this population-based case-control study conducted in urban Shanghai, 908 cases of pancreatic cancer and 1067 healthy controls were recruited. Information on tea drinking, including type of tea, amount of tea consumption, temperature of tea, and the duration of regular tea drinking, were collected via interview questionnaire. Results We examined the association of multiple tea drinking habits with the risk of pancreatic cancer. In women, regular green tea drinking was associated with 32% reduction of pancreatic cancer risk (OR 0.68, 95% CI 0.48–0.96), compared to those who did not drink tea regularly. Increased consumption and longer duration of tea drinking were both associated with reduced pancreatic cancer risk in women. Among regular tea drinkers, lower temperature of tea was associated with reduced risk of pancreatic cancer in both men and women, independent of amount or duration of tea drinking. Conclusions Habits of green tea drinking, including regular drinking, amount of consumption, persistence of the habit, and tea temperature, may lower pancreatic cancer risk. PMID:22944495

  1. The Joint Effects of Lifestyle Factors and Comorbidities on the Risk of Colorectal Cancer: A Large Chinese Retrospective Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hai; Zhou, Yangyang; Ren, Shujuan; Wu, Jiajin; Zhu, Meiying; Chen, Donghui; Yang, Haiyan; Wang, Liwei

    2015-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of cancer morbidity and mortality. In previous epidemiologic studies, the respective correlation between lifestyle factors and comorbidity and CRC has been extensively studied. However, little is known about their joint effects on CRC. Methods We conducted a retrospective case-control study of 1,144 diagnosed CRC patients and 60,549 community controls. A structured questionnaire was administered to the participants about their socio-demographic factors, anthropometric measures, comorbidity history and lifestyle factors. Logistic regression model was used to calculate the odds ratio (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CIs) for each factor. According to the results from logistic regression model, we further developed healthy lifestyle index (HLI) and comorbidity history index (CHI) to investigate their independent and joint effects on CRC risk. Results Four lifestyle factors (including physical activities, sleep, red meat and vegetable consumption) and four types of comorbidity (including diabetes, hyperlipidemia, history of inflammatory bowel disease and polyps) were found to be independently associated with the risk of CRC in multivariant logistic regression model. Intriguingly, their combined pattern- HLI and CHI demonstrated significant correlation with CRC risk independently (ORHLI: 3.91, 95%CI: 3.13–4.88; ORCHI: 2.49, 95%CI: 2.11–2.93) and jointly (OR: 10.33, 95%CI: 6.59–16.18). Conclusions There are synergistic effects of lifestyle factors and comorbidity on the risk of colorectal cancer in the Chinese population. PMID:26710070

  2. The Joint Effects of Lifestyle Factors and Comorbidities on the Risk of Colorectal Cancer: A Large Chinese Retrospective Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Hang, Junjie; Cai, Binxin; Xue, Peng; Wang, Lei; Hu, Hai; Zhou, Yangyang; Ren, Shujuan; Wu, Jiajin; Zhu, Meiying; Chen, Donghui; Yang, Haiyan; Wang, Liwei

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of cancer morbidity and mortality. In previous epidemiologic studies, the respective correlation between lifestyle factors and comorbidity and CRC has been extensively studied. However, little is known about their joint effects on CRC. We conducted a retrospective case-control study of 1,144 diagnosed CRC patients and 60,549 community controls. A structured questionnaire was administered to the participants about their socio-demographic factors, anthropometric measures, comorbidity history and lifestyle factors. Logistic regression model was used to calculate the odds ratio (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CIs) for each factor. According to the results from logistic regression model, we further developed healthy lifestyle index (HLI) and comorbidity history index (CHI) to investigate their independent and joint effects on CRC risk. Four lifestyle factors (including physical activities, sleep, red meat and vegetable consumption) and four types of comorbidity (including diabetes, hyperlipidemia, history of inflammatory bowel disease and polyps) were found to be independently associated with the risk of CRC in multivariant logistic regression model. Intriguingly, their combined pattern- HLI and CHI demonstrated significant correlation with CRC risk independently (ORHLI: 3.91, 95%CI: 3.13-4.88; ORCHI: 2.49, 95%CI: 2.11-2.93) and jointly (OR: 10.33, 95%CI: 6.59-16.18). There are synergistic effects of lifestyle factors and comorbidity on the risk of colorectal cancer in the Chinese population.

  3. A case-control study of surgical site infection following operative fixation of fractures of the ankle in a large U.K. trauma unit.

    PubMed

    Korim, M T; Payne, R; Bhatia, M

    2014-05-01

    Most of the literature on surgical site infections following the surgical treatment of fractures of the ankle is based on small series of patients, focusing on diabetics or the elderly. None have described post-operative functional scores in those patients who develop an infection. We performed an age- and gender-matched case-control study to identify patient- and surgery-related risk factors for surgical site infection following open reduction and internal fixation of a fracture of the ankle. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify significant risk factors for infection and to calculate odds ratios (OR). Function was assessed using the Olerud and Molander Ankle Score. The incidence of infection was 4% (29/717) and 1.1% (8/717) were deep infections. The median ankle score was significantly lower in the infection group compared with the control group (60 vs 90, Mann-Whitney test p < 0.0001). Multivariate regression analysis showed that diabetes (OR = 15, p = 0.031), nursing home residence (OR = 12, p = 0.018) and Weber C fractures (OR = 4, p = 0.048) were significant risk factors for infection. A low incidence of infection following open reduction and internal fixation of fractures of the ankle was observed. Both superficial and deep infections result in lower functional scores.

  4. Dietary patterns and risk of pancreatic cancer in a large population-based case-control study in the San Francisco Bay Area.

    PubMed

    Chan, June M; Gong, Zhihong; Holly, Elizabeth A; Bracci, Paige M

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is highly lethal, and identifying modifiable risk factors could have substantial public health impact. In this population-based case-control study (532 cases, 1701 controls), we used principal component analysis and multivariable unconditional logistic regression models to examine whether a particular dietary pattern was associated with risk of pancreatic cancer, adjusting for other known risk factors. A prudent dietary pattern, characterized by greater intake of vegetables, fruit, fish, poultry, whole grains, and low-fat dairy, was associated with an approximate 50% reduction in pancreatic cancer risk among men [odds ratio (OR) = 0.51, 95% confidence intervals (CI) = 0.31-0.84, P trend = 0.001] and women (OR = 0.51, 95% CI = 0.29-0.90, P trend = 0.04). A Western dietary pattern, characterized by higher intake of red and processed meats, potato chips, sugary beverages, sweets, high fat dairy, eggs, and refined grains, was associated with a 2.4-fold increased risk of pancreatic cancer among men (95% CI = 1.3-4.2, P trend = 0.008) but was not associated with risk among women. Among men, those in the upper quintiles of the Western diet and lower quintiles of the prudent diet had a threefold increased risk. Consistent with what has been recommended for several other chronic diseases, consuming a diet rich in plant-based foods, whole grains, and white meat, might reduce risk of pancreatic cancer.

  5. Maté drinking and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in South America: pooled results from two large multi-center case-control studies

    PubMed Central

    Lubin, Jay H.; De Stefani, Eduardo; Abnet, Christian C.; Acosta, Gisele; Boffetta, Paolo; Victora, Cesar; Graubard, Barry I.; Muñoz, Nubia; Deneo-Pellegrini, Hugo; Franceschi, Silvia; Castellsagué, Xavier; Ronco, Alvaro L; Dawsey, Sanford M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Maté tea is non-alcoholic infusion widely consumed in southern South America, and may increase risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and other cancers due to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and/or thermal injury. Methods We pooled two case-control studies: a 1988–2005 Uruguay study and a 1986–1992 multinational study in Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay and Uruguay, including 1,400 cases and 3,229 controls. We computed odds ratios (OR) and fitted a linear excess odds ratio (EOR) model for cumulative maté consumption in liters/day-year (LPDY). Results The adjusted OR for ESCC with 95% confidence interval (CI) by ever compared with never use of maté was 1.60 (1.2,2.2). ORs increased linearly with LPDY (test of non-linearity, P=0.69). The estimate of slope (EOR/LPDY) was 0.009 (0.005,0.014) and did not vary with daily intake, indicating maté intensity did not influence the strength of association. EOR/LPDY estimates for consumption at warm, hot and very hot beverage temperatures were 0.004 (−0.002,0.013), 0.007 (0.003,0.013) and 0.016 (0.009,0.027), respectively, and differed significantly (P<0.01). EOR/LPDY estimates were increased in younger (<65) individuals and never alcohol drinkers, but these evaluations were post hoc, and were homogeneous by sex. Conclusions ORs for ESCC increased linearly with cumulative maté consumption and were unrelated to intensity, so greater daily consumption for shorter duration or lesser daily consumption for longer duration resulted in comparable ORs. The strength of association increased with higher mate temperatures. Impact Increased understanding of cancer risks with maté consumption enhances the understanding of the public health consequences given its purported health benefits. PMID:24130226

  6. Early pyloric stenosis: a case control study.

    PubMed

    Demian, Marie; Nguyen, Son; Emil, Sherif

    2009-12-01

    Pyloric stenosis (PS) is rare in the first 2 weeks of life, often leading to delays in diagnosis and treatment. We conducted a case control study to delineate the characteristics of patients with early PS (EPS). In addition, we tested the hypothesis that patients with EPS present with a smaller pylorus than older patients. A database of all patients presenting with PS to a children's hospital over a 5-year period (2002-2006) was obtained. Each patient admitted during the first 2 weeks of life (subject) was matched to a patient admitted after 4 weeks of age (control), with the same gender, electrolyte status, and treating surgeon. A single pediatric radiologist, blinded to patient age, reviewed all available ultrasounds retrospectively. Demographic, clinical, diagnostic, therapeutic, and outcome data were compared. During the study period, 278 pyloromyotomies were performed for PS. Sixteen patients (5.8%) presented with EPS between 2 and 14 days of life. EPS patients had a higher prevalence of positive family history (31 vs. 0%, P = 0.043), and breast milk feeding (75 vs. 31%, P = 0.045). Sonographic measurements showed a pylorus that was of significantly less length (17.1 +/- 0.6 vs. 20.5 +/- 0.9 mm, P = 0.006) and muscle thickness (3.5 +/- 0.2 vs. 4.9 +/- 0.2 mm, P < 0.001) in patients with EPS. Hospital stay was significantly longer for EPS patients (4.3 +/- 0.9 vs. 2.0 +/- 0.1 days, P = 0.19). Babies presenting with EPS are more likely to be breast fed and to have a positive family history. EPS is associated with a longer hospital stay. Use of sonographic diagnostic measurements specific to this age group may prevent delays in diagnosis and treatment, and improve outcomes.

  7. A large case-control study reveals a positive association between bisphosphonate use and delayed dental healing and osteonecrosis of the jaw.

    PubMed

    Borromeo, Gelsomina L; Brand, Caroline; Clement, John G; McCullough, Michael; Crighton, Lisa; Hepworth, Graham; Wark, John D

    2014-06-01

    This study sought to investigate, using a case-control study design, the association between bisphosphonate therapy and delayed dental healing and osteonecrosis of the jaw. Identification of potential cases of delayed dental healing was by consecutive screening of Specialist Oral and Maxillofacial and Special Needs Dentist clinic records for patients aged older than 50 years, during a 6-month window, in Victoria, Australia. Cases were confirmed by a case adjudication panel blinded to bisphosphonate status. Cases associated with malignancy or local radiotherapy were excluded. Controls were matched for age, sex, and source of dental referral (1:4, n = 160 controls). Variables of interest were dental precipitants, dental clinic type, smoking history, and medical comorbidities. A total of 4212 of 22,358 patients met inclusion criteria, of which 69 were potential cases with 40 (0.95%) confirmed cases. The odds ratio (OR) for developing delayed dental healing when taking an oral bisphosphonate was 13.1 (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.4 to 39.3; p < 0.001). There were no cases associated with intravenous bisphosphonate use. There was some evidence of an interaction with age, sex, and clinic type. When adjusted for smoking, the estimated odds ratio was 11.6 (95% CI 1.9 to 69.4; p = 0.01). There was an association between having another illness and delayed dental healing (OR = 2.3; 95% CI 1.0 to 5.2). A dental precipitant was present in 39 of 40 (97.5%) delayed dental healing cases. An important association between bisphosphonate use and delayed dental healing in the setting of benign bone disease, predominately in individuals with a dental precipitant, has been demonstrated. © 2014 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  8. Whole grains and risk of pancreatic cancer in a large population-based case-control study in the San Francisco Bay Area, California.

    PubMed

    Chan, June M; Wang, Furong; Holly, Elizabeth A

    2007-11-15

    Epidemiologic data suggest that consumption of whole-grain products may be inversely associated with risk of pancreatic cancer. Grain intake was examined in a population-based case-control study of pancreatic cancer in the San Francisco Bay Area (1995-1999). A 131-item semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire was administered to 532 cases and 1,701 controls. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were computed as estimates of relative risk. Persons who consumed > or =2 servings of whole grains daily had a lower risk of pancreatic cancer than persons who consumed <1 serving/day (odds ratio (OR) = 0.60, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.31, 1.2; trend-p = 0.04). Similar results were observed for brown rice (OR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.44, 1.2; trend-p = 0.01) and tortillas (OR = 0.56, 95% CI: 0.35, 0.89; trend-p = 0.02). Consumption of doughnuts (> or =2 servings/week vs. <1 serving/month) conferred increased risk (OR = 1.8, 95% CI: 1.2, 2.7; trend-p = 0.003). Consumption of cooked breakfast cereals (> or =2 servings/week vs. <1 serving/month) was positively associated with risk (for oatmeal/oat bran, OR = 1.3, 95% CI: 1.0, 1.7; for other cooked breakfast cereals, OR = 2.1, 95% CI: 1.4, 3.3). Dietary fiber was inversely associated with risk (for highest quartile vs. lowest, OR = 0.65, 95% CI: 0.47, 0.89; trend-p = 0.02). These data provide some support for the hypothesis that consuming more whole-grain or high-fiber foods may reduce the risk of pancreatic cancer. Refined grains were not associated with risk.

  9. Predictors of MERS-CoV infection: A large case control study of patients presenting with ILI at a MERS-CoV referral hospital in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Mohd, Hamzah A; Memish, Ziad A; Alfaraj, Sarah H; McClish, Donna; Altuwaijri, Talal; Alanazi, Marzouqah S; Aloqiel, Saleh A; Alenzi, Ahmed M; Bafaqeeh, Fahad; Mohamed, Amal M; Aldosari, Kamel; Ghazal, Sameeh

    A case control study to better characterize the clinical features, laboratory, and radiological abnormalities associated with MERS-CoV infection in order to help with early identification of this syndrome from other respiratory infections. Eighty patients admitted to a hospital in Riyadh, diagnosed with MERS-CoV infection based on RT-PCR were matched on age, sex, and the presence of a co-morbid condition on a basis of 1:2 to other patients admitted with respiratory symptoms and tested negative for MERS-CoV on RT-PCR. None of the reported MERS-CoV presenting symptoms was significantly associated with being infected with MERS-CoV. On the other hand, WBC count was significantly lower in patients with confirmed MERS-CoV infection (median 5.7 vs 9.3, P: 0.0004). Neutrophil count was as well significantly lower in MERS-CoV patients (median 3.7 vs 6.7, P: 0.0001). Both AST, and ALT values were significantly higher in MERS-CoV infected group (AST median 42 vs 36, P: 0.03, and ALT median 33 vs 28, P: 0.003). Overall our MERS-CoV mortality rate was (10%) below the national figure of (40%). None of the presenting symptoms are specific for MERS-CoV infection. And out of all the investigations WBC, neutrophil counts, AST and ALT values have some predictive utility. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Relationship between sun exposure and melanoma risk for tumours in different body sites in a large case-control study in a temperate climate.

    PubMed

    Newton-Bishop, Julia A; Chang, Yu-Mei; Elliott, Faye; Chan, May; Leake, Susan; Karpavicius, Birute; Haynes, Sue; Fitzgibbon, Elaine; Kukalizch, Kairen; Randerson-Moor, Juliette; Elder, David E; Bishop, D Timothy; Barrett, Jennifer H

    2011-03-01

    A melanoma case-control study was conducted to elucidate the complex relationship between sun exposure and risk. Nine hundred and sixty population-ascertained cases, 513 population and 174 sibling controls recruited in England provided detailed sun exposure and phenotype data; a subset provided serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D(2)+D(3) levels. Phenotypes associated with a tendency to sunburn and reported sunburn at ≥ 20 years of age were associated with increased melanoma risk (odds ratio (OR) 1.56, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 1.23-1.99). Holiday sun exposure was not associated with an increased melanoma risk although this may be in part because reported sun exposure overall was much lower in those with a sun-sensitive phenotype, particularly among controls. Head and neck melanoma was associated with less sun exposure on holidays at low latitudes (OR 0.39, 95% CI (0.23-0.68) for >13 h/year compared to <3.1). Overall the clearest relationship between reported sun exposure and risk was for average weekend sun exposure in warmer months, which was protective (OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.50-0.89 for highest versus lowest tertile of exposure). Serum vitamin D levels were strongly associated with increased weekend and holiday sun exposure. Sun-sensitive phenotypes and reported sunburn were associated with an increased risk of melanoma. Although no evidence was seen of a causal relationship between holiday sun exposure and increased risk, this is consistent with the view that intense sun exposure is causal for melanoma in those prone to sunburn. A protective effect of regular weekend sun exposure was seen, particularly for limb tumours, which could be mediated by photoadaptation or higher vitamin D levels. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Case-control studies in diabetes. Do they really use a case-control design?

    PubMed

    Ramos, Analía; Mendoza, Lilian Cristina; Rabasa, Fernanda; Bolíbar, Ignasi; Puig, Teresa; Corcoy, Rosa

    2017-07-01

    Studies defined as case-control do not always use this design. We aimed to estimate the frequency of mislabelled case-control studies in published articles in the area of diabetes and to identify the predictors of incorrect labelling. We searched Medline and Web of Science for articles with "diabetes" and "case control" in title and filtered for language (English/Romance) and period (January 2010-December 2014). Inclusion criteria were: (1) statement to use a case-control design in title, (2) to be a final full-length publication and (3) to have original data in the area of diabetes. Three independent reviewers went through titles, looked for full texts and reviewed them. Discrepancies were settled with a fourth reviewer. Expert epidemiologist advice was requested in case of doubt. case-control mislabelling; addressed predictors: publication year, journal impact factor and journal subject. proportion of mislabelled CC articles and assessment of predictors by multivariate logistic regression analysis. We retrieved 362 articles, 251 of them fulfilling inclusion criteria. The proportion of mislabelled CC studies was 43.8% (confidence interval 95% 37.7-50.0%). Most mislabelled studies had a cross-sectional design (82.7%). Predictors of mislabelling were publication year, journal impact factor and journal area. A relevant subset of studies defined as case-control in the area of diabetes correspond to mislabelled cross-sectional studies. Incorrect labelling misleads readers regarding the interpretation of results and the cause-effect hypothesis. Researchers, reviewers and editors should be aware of and commit to settle this issue.

  12. Risk of bleeding and antibiotic use in patients receiving continuous phenprocoumon therapy. A case-control study nested in a large insurance- and population-based German cohort.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Sascha; Ihle, Peter; Harder, Sebastian; Schubert, Ingrid

    2014-05-05

    There is major concern about coumarins interacting with various drug classes and increasing the risk of overanticoagulation. The aim of the study was to assess bleeding risk in patients with concurrent use of antibiotics and phenprocoumon, the most widely prescribed coumarin in many European countries. We conducted a nested-case-control study within a cohort of 513,338 incident and continuous phenprocoumon users ≥ 18 years of age using claims data of the statutory health insurance company AOK, covering 30% of the German population. Bleeding risk associated with current use of antibiotics for systemic use (antibacterials/antimycotics) was calculated using conditional logistic regression in 13,785 cases with a bleeding event and 55,140 risk-set sampling-matched controls. Bleeding risk associated with any antibacterial use in phenprocoumon users was significantly increased [odds ratio (OR) 2.37, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.20-2.56]. The association was stronger for gastrointestinal than for cerebral bleeding (OR 2.09, 95% CI 1.84-2.38 and OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.03-1.74, respectively) and highest for other/unspecified bleeding (OR 2.92, 95% CI 2.62-3.26). Specific antibiotic classes were strongly associated with bleeding risk, e.g. cotrimoxazole (OR 3.86, 95% CI 3.08-4.84) and fluorquinolones (OR 3.13, 95% CI 2.74-3.59), among those highest for ofloxacin (OR 5.00, 95% CI 3.01-8.32). Combined use of phenprocoumon and antimycotics was not significantly associated with bleeding risk. Risk was not significantly modified by age (pint=0.25) or sex (pint=0.96). The association was stronger the closer the antibiotic exposure was to the bleeding event. Among continuous phenprocoumon users, antibiotics - particularly quinolones and cotrimoxazole - should be prescribed after careful consideration due to an increased bleeding risk. Close monitoring of international normalised ratio levels after prescription is recommended.

  13. Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia: case control epidemiological study in Yorkshire.

    PubMed Central

    Cartwright, R. A.; Bernard, S. M.; Bird, C. C.; Darwin, C. M.; O'Brien, C.; Richards, I. D.; Roberts, B.; McKinney, P. A.

    1987-01-01

    This is the second report of a large case control study of lymphoma/leukaemia occurring in Yorkshire during 1979-84, and deals with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia presenting either in its haematological (CLL) or more solid lymphomatous (malignant lymphoma-lymphocytic or MLL) forms. In all, 330 cases and 561 controls were interviewed. The results support the concept that CLL/MLL is a condition of multiple aetiologies with evidence for genetic predisposition through an excess of family cases, immune perturbation demonstrated by excessive previous skin diseases and phenylbutazone use, and viral involvement shown by links with infectious diseases and multiple sclerosis. PMID:3304389

  14. Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia: case control epidemiological study in Yorkshire.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, R A; Bernard, S M; Bird, C C; Darwin, C M; O'Brien, C; Richards, I D; Roberts, B; McKinney, P A

    1987-07-01

    This is the second report of a large case control study of lymphoma/leukaemia occurring in Yorkshire during 1979-84, and deals with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia presenting either in its haematological (CLL) or more solid lymphomatous (malignant lymphoma-lymphocytic or MLL) forms. In all, 330 cases and 561 controls were interviewed. The results support the concept that CLL/MLL is a condition of multiple aetiologies with evidence for genetic predisposition through an excess of family cases, immune perturbation demonstrated by excessive previous skin diseases and phenylbutazone use, and viral involvement shown by links with infectious diseases and multiple sclerosis.

  15. Population-based case-control association studies.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Dana B; Scott, William K

    2012-07-01

    This unit provides an overview of the design and analysis of population-based case-control studies of genetic risk factors for complex disease. Considerations specific to genetic studies are emphasized. The unit reviews basic study designs differentiating case-control studies from others, presents different genetic association strategies (candidate gene, genome-wide association, and high-throughput sequencing), introduces basic methods of statistical analysis for case-control data and approaches to combining case-control studies, and discusses measures of association and impact. Admixed populations, controlling for confounding (including population stratification), consideration of multiple loci and environmental risk factors, and complementary analyses of haplotypes, genes, and pathways are briefly discussed. Readers are referred to basic texts on epidemiology for more details on general conduct of case-control studies.

  16. The minimal invasive direct anterior approach in combination with large heads in total hip arthroplasty - is dislocation still a major issue? a case control study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There have been increasing numbers of publications in recent years on minimally invasive surgery (MIS) for total hip arthroplasty (THA), reporting results with the use of different head sizes, tribologic and functional outcomes. This study presents the results and early complication rates after THA using the direct anterior approach (DAA) in combination with head sizes ≥ 36 mm. Methods A total of 113 patients with THA were included in the study. The Harris Hip Score (HHS) was determined, a radiographic evaluation was carried out, and complications were recorded. The minimum follow-up period was 2 years (means 35 ± 7 months). Results The HHS improved from 43.6 (± 12) to 88.2 (± 14; P < 0.01). One early infection occurred, one periprosthetic fracture, and three cases of aseptic stem loosening. No incorrect positioning of the implants was observed, and there were no dislocations. Conclusion THA with the minimally invasive DAA in combination with large heads is associated with good to very good functional results in the majority of cases. The complication rates are not increased. The rate of dislocation mainly as an complication of the first two years can be markedly reduced in particular. PMID:24621189

  17. Clinical characteristics, metabolic features, and phenotype of Chinese women with polycystic ovary syndrome: a large-scale case-control study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong Yuan; Guo, Cheng Xiu; Zhu, Fu Fan; Qu, Peng Peng; Lin, Wan Jun; Xiong, Jing

    2013-03-01

    The Rotterdam criteria extend the phenotypic spectrum of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). The study was to investigate the clinical and biochemical features of a large-scale clinic based on the samples of Chinese women and to evaluate the value of Rotterdam criteria on Chinese PCOS women. One thousand four hundred and four Chinese women were involved in our study, among whom, 719 cases were diagnosed as PCOS based on 2003 Rotterdam criteria, and 685 women without history of hyperandrogenism and with regular menstrual cycles were recruited as control. Clinical features, ultrasonographic (ovarian follicle number and volume), hormonal and metabolic parameters were commenced as outcome measures. Among 719 PCOS women, 6.1 % had hirsutism, 13.3 % had acne, 21.1 % had hyperandrogenism, 94.2 % had polycystic ovaries on ultrasonographic examination, and 88.6 % had menstrual abnormality. About one-third of the total PCOS patients were insulin resistant. The most frequent PCOS phenotype is the non-hyperandrogenic phenotype (O + P). Total testosterone, LH/FSH ratio, body mass index (BMI), and Ferriman and Gallwey scores (F-G) were all significantly higher in PCOS groups compared with non-PCOS group. Women with PCOS and obesity had higher serum testosterone, fasting insulin, longer menstrual cycle and larger ovarian follicle number, and LH/FSH ratio, estradiol or ovarian volume were similar between obese and normal BMI women. The LH level was statistically lower in the obese PCOS group. Rotterdam criteria are generally applicable to Chinese population. Chinese women with PCOS showed lower rates of hyperandrogenemia, hirsutism, obesity, and insulin resistance. Obesity aggravates menstrual irregularity and increases the follicle number and serum total testosterone level.

  18. Positron emission tomography assessment of large vessel inflammation in patients with newly diagnosed, biopsy-proven giant cell arteritis: a prospective, case-control study.

    PubMed

    Prieto-González, Sergio; Depetris, Marina; García-Martínez, Ana; Espígol-Frigolé, Georgina; Tavera-Bahillo, Itziar; Corbera-Bellata, Marc; Planas-Rigol, Ester; Alba, Marco A; Hernández-Rodríguez, José; Grau, Josep M; Lomeña, Franciso; Cid, Maria C

    2014-07-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) scan is emerging as a promising imaging technique to detect large-vessel inflammation in giant cell arteritis (GCA). However, the lack of a standardised definition of arteritis based on (18)fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake is an important limitation to the use of PET scan for diagnostic purposes. To prospectively assess the intensity and distribution of FDG uptake at different vascular territories in patients with newly diagnosed GCA compared with controls. 32 consecutive, biopsy-proven, GCA patients treated with glucocorticoids for ≤3 days were included. The control group consisted of 20 individuals, who underwent PET/CT for cancer staging. Maximal standardised uptake value (SUVm) was calculated at four aortic segments, supraaortic branches and iliac-femoral territory. Sensitivity and specificity was calculated by receiver-operator characteristic curves (ROC) analysis. Mean SUVm was significantly higher in patients than in controls in all vessels explored and correlated with acute-phase reactants and serum IL-6. Mean of the SUVm at all the vascular territories had an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.830, and a cut-off of 1.89 yielded a sensitivity of 80% and a specificity of 79% for GCA diagnosis. There were no significant differences in AUC among the vascular beds examined. FDG uptake by large vessels has a substantial sensitivity and specificity for GCA diagnosis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  19. Melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R), pigmentary characteristics and sun exposure: findings from a case-control study of diffuse large B-cell and follicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Kane, Eleanor V; Painter, Dan; Roman, Eve; Allan, James; Law, Graham; Lightfoot, Tracy

    2010-04-01

    The relationship between skin cancer and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) suggests common genetic, host or environmental causes. Ultraviolet radiation (UVR), pigmentary characteristics have been linked with both malignancies, and for skin cancer, the melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) which influences pigmentation has also been implicated. This paper reports on the relationship between MC1R, skin, hair and eye colour, time spent outdoors, and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and follicular lymphoma (FL). Persons carrying MC1R homozygote variant alleles at R151C, R160W, D294H and D84E were more likely to have fair skin, red hair and to spend less time outdoors than those who did not. The variant allele at V92M was associated with FL (odds ratio (OR)=1.61, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.08-2.39) and the r:wild type genotype with DLBCL (OR=0.58, 95% CI 0.38-0.89). Interactions between MC1R genotypes and skin colour influenced DLBCL risk; the RR genotype increased risk in individuals with medium or dark skin, based on 5 cases and no controls, but decreased risk among those of fair skin. On the whole, DLBCL and FL risk were not related to genetic variation in MC1R, pigmentation or time spent outdoors.

  20. A stable pattern of EEG spectral coherence distinguishes children with autism from neuro-typical controls - a large case control study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The autism rate has recently increased to 1 in 100 children. Genetic studies demonstrate poorly understood complexity. Environmental factors apparently also play a role. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies demonstrate increased brain sizes and altered connectivity. Electroencephalogram (EEG) coherence studies confirm connectivity changes. However, genetic-, MRI- and/or EEG-based diagnostic tests are not yet available. The varied study results likely reflect methodological and population differences, small samples and, for EEG, lack of attention to group-specific artifact. Methods Of the 1,304 subjects who participated in this study, with ages ranging from 1 to 18 years old and assessed with comparable EEG studies, 463 children were diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD); 571 children were neuro-typical controls (C). After artifact management, principal components analysis (PCA) identified EEG spectral coherence factors with corresponding loading patterns. The 2- to 12-year-old subsample consisted of 430 ASD- and 554 C-group subjects (n = 984). Discriminant function analysis (DFA) determined the spectral coherence factors' discrimination success for the two groups. Loading patterns on the DFA-selected coherence factors described ASD-specific coherence differences when compared to controls. Results Total sample PCA of coherence data identified 40 factors which explained 50.8% of the total population variance. For the 2- to 12-year-olds, the 40 factors showed highly significant group differences (P < 0.0001). Ten randomly generated split half replications demonstrated high-average classification success (C, 88.5%; ASD, 86.0%). Still higher success was obtained in the more restricted age sub-samples using the jackknifing technique: 2- to 4-year-olds (C, 90.6%; ASD, 98.1%); 4- to 6-year-olds (C, 90.9%; ASD 99.1%); and 6- to 12-year-olds (C, 98.7%; ASD, 93.9%). Coherence loadings demonstrated reduced short-distance and reduced, as well as increased

  1. [Depression and dementia: case-control study].

    PubMed

    Vilalta-Franch, J; Llinàs-Reglà, J; López-Pousa, S

    To know the prevalence and risk factors for depression in demented patients. From a field epidemiological study, in a double phase, door to door, in which 1,460 subjects older than 69 from a rural area participated, three groups were established: group A made up of 200 dementia diagnosed subjects; group B made up of 119 subjects without dementia but with punctuation on the screening instrument (MEC) under the cut off point; the 283 subjects on the group C were not catalogued as demented, and the MEC punctuation was over the cut off point. Both the diagnoses of dementia and depression were made in basis of CAMDEX criteria. The frequency of depression in groups A, B and C was 26.5%, 11.76% and 4.94%, respectively. The dementia is a risk factor for depression (OR: 4.81; CI: 2.93-7.91). There are no differences in the frequency of depression according to dementia subtypes. Sex, age, marital status and severity of dementia do not have an influence on the prevalence of depression. The presence of psychiatric history is a risk factor for depression on groups A and B, but not for C. Depressions are more common on subjects with cognitive impairment.

  2. Temporomandibular disorders. A case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Bagán, Jose V.; Sanchis, Jose M.; Carbonell, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the risk factors and clinical manifestations of patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) diagnosed according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) (axis I) versus an age and gender matched control group. Study Design: A total of 162 patients explored according to the RDC/TMD (mean age 40.6±18.8 years, range 7-90; 11.1% males and 88.9% females) were compared with 119 controls, measuring differences in TMD risk factors (sleep disturbances, stress, psychoactive medication, parafunctions, loss of posterior support, ligament hyperlaxity) and clinical variables (joint sounds, painful muscle and joint palpation, maximum aperture). Results: Myofascial pain (MFP) (single or multiple diagnoses) was the most frequent diagnosis (42%). The most common diagnostic combination was MFP plus arthralgia (16.0%). Statistically significant differences were observed in clenching (OR 2.3; 95%CI: 1.4-3.8) and in maximum active aperture (MAA) on comparing the two groups both globally (TMD vs. controls) (patients 36.7±8.6 mm, controls 43.1±5.8 mm; F=45.41, p = 0.000) and on comparing according to diagnostic categories. MFP explained most of the observed differences in the risk factors: stress perception (OR=1.98;I.C.:1.01-3.89), psychoactive medication (OR=2.21; I.C.:1.12-4.37), parafunctions (OR=2.14;I.C.:1.12-4.11), and ligament laxity (OR=2.6;I.C.:1.01-6.68). Joint sounds were more frequent in patients with MFP (39.7% vs. 24.0%; χ2=4.66; p=0.03), and painful joint palpation was more common in patients with disc displacement with reduction (DDWR)(15.9% vs. 5.0%; χ2 = 5.2; p = 0.02) and osteoarthrosis (20.8% vs. 5.0%; χ2 = 7.0; p = 0.008). Conclusions: There is a high prevalence of signs and symptoms of TMDs in the general population. Significant differences are observed in clenching and MAA between patients and controls considered both globally and for each diagnostic category individually. The analyzed risk

  3. Long-term outcome of insulin pump therapy in children with type 1 diabetes assessed in a large population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Stephanie R; Cooper, Matthew N; Jones, Timothy W; Davis, Elizabeth A

    2013-11-01

    We determined the impact of insulin pump therapy on long-term glycaemic control, BMI, rate of severe hypoglycaemia and diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in children. Patients on pump therapy at a single paediatric tertiary hospital were matched to patients treated by injections on the basis of age, duration of diabetes and HbA1c at the time of pump start. HbA1c, anthropometric data, episodes of severe hypoglycaemia and rates of hospitalisation for DKA were collected prospectively. A total of 345 patients on pump therapy were matched to controls on injections. The mean age, duration of diabetes at pump start and length of follow-up were 11.4 (± 3.5), 4.1 (± 3.0) and 3.5 (± 2.5) years, respectively. The mean HbA1c reduction in the pump cohort was 0.6% (6.6 mmol/mol). This improved HbA1c remained significant throughout the 7 years of follow-up. Pump therapy reduced severe hypoglycaemia from 14.7 to 7.2 events per 100 patient-years (p < 0.001). In contrast, severe hypoglycaemia increased in the non-pump cohort over the same period from 6.8 to 10.2 events per 100 patient-years. The rate of hospitalisation for DKA was lower in the pump cohort (2.3 vs 4.7 per 100 patient-years, p = 0.003) over the 1,160 patient-years of follow-up. This is the longest and largest study of insulin pump use in children and demonstrates that pump therapy provides a sustained improvement in glycaemic control, and reductions of severe hypoglycaemia and hospitalisation for DKA compared with a matched cohort using injections.

  4. Association between migraine and asthma: matched case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Gail; Sedgwick, Philip; Maier, Will; Visick, George; Strachan, David P; Anderson, H Ross

    2002-01-01

    , the exception being anti-diabetic medication. CONCLUSION: This large case-control study provides evidence for an association between migraine and asthma. Frequent attendance at a general practice surgery may confound this association. However, if the association is real, its elucidation may help the understanding of disease mechanisms shared by migraine and asthma. PMID:12236275

  5. Pooled exposure assessment for matched case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Saha-Chaudhuri, Paramita; Umbach, David M; Weinberg, Clarice R

    2011-09-01

    Exposure assessment using biologic specimens is important for epidemiology but may become impracticable if assays are expensive, specimen volumes are marginally adequate, or analyte levels fall below the limit of detection. Pooled exposure assessment can provide an effective remedy for these problems in unmatched case-control studies. We extend pooled exposure strategies to handle specimens collected in a matched case-control study. We show that if a logistic model applies to individuals, then a logistic model also applies to an analysis using pooled exposures. Consequently, the individual-level odds ratio can be estimated while conserving both cost and specimen. We discuss appropriate pooling strategies for a single exposure, with adjustment for multiple, possibly continuous, covariates (confounders) and assessment of effect modification by a categorical variable. We assess the performance of the approach via simulations and conclude that pooled strategies can markedly improve efficiency for matched as well as unmatched case-control studies.

  6. Improving statistical analysis of matched case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Conway, Aaron; Rolley, John X; Fulbrook, Paul; Page, Karen; Thompson, David R

    2013-06-01

    Matched case-control research designs can be useful because matching can increase power due to reduced variability between subjects. However, inappropriate statistical analysis of matched data could result in a change in the strength of association between the dependent and independent variables or a change in the significance of the findings. We sought to ascertain whether matched case-control studies published in the nursing literature utilized appropriate statistical analyses. Of 41 articles identified that met the inclusion criteria, 31 (76%) used an inappropriate statistical test for comparing data derived from case subjects and their matched controls. In response to this finding, we developed an algorithm to support decision-making regarding statistical tests for matched case-control studies.

  7. Nested case-control studies in cohorts with competing events.

    PubMed

    Wolkewitz, Martin; Cooper, Ben S; Palomar-Martinez, Mercedes; Olaechea-Astigarraga, Pedro; Alvarez-Lerma, Francisco; Schumacher, Martin

    2014-01-01

    In nested case-control studies, incidence density sampling is the time-dependent matching procedure to approximate hazard ratios. The cumulative incidence function can also be estimated if information from the full cohort is used. In the presence of competing events, however, the cumulative incidence function depends on the hazard of the disease of interest and on the competing events hazard. Using hospital-acquired infection as an example (full cohort), we propose a sampling method for nested case-control studies to estimate subdistribution hazard ratios. With further information on the full cohort, the cumulative incidence function for the event of interest can then be estimated as well.

  8. Baldness and testicular cancer: the EPSAM case-control study.

    PubMed

    Moirano, G; Zugna, D; Grasso, C; Lista, P; Ciuffreda, L; Segnan, N; Merletti, F; Richiardi, L

    2016-03-01

    The etiology of testicular cancer is largely unexplained. Research has mainly focused on prenatal exposures, especially to sex hormones, while less attention has been paid to exposures that may act also postnatally. As baldness has been previously associated with testicular cancer risk we focused on baldness and body hairiness, which are both associated with androgen activity. We used data of the Postnatal Exposures and Male Health (EPSAM) study, a case-control study on testicular cancer conducted in the Province of Turin, Italy, involving cases diagnosed between 1997 and 2008. Information was collected using mailed questionnaires. Analyses included 255 cases and 459 controls. We calculated ORs and 95% CIs to estimate testicular cancer risk among those who developed baldness and among those with body hairiness. We found an inverse association between testicular cancer and baldness (OR: 0.67, 95% CI: 0.46-0.98) and body hairiness (OR: 0.78, 95% CI: 0.53-1.16), although the latter had wider CIs. The inverse association between baldness and testicular cancer is consistent with the results from previous studies. These results suggest that androgens activity may influence testicular cancer risk. © 2016 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  9. Association of cytochrome P4502E1 and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 genetic polymorphisms with susceptibility to large artery atherosclerotic ischemic stroke: a case-control study in the Turkish population.

    PubMed

    Türkanoğlu Özçelik, Aysun; Can Demirdöğen, Birsen; Demirkaya, Şeref; Adalı, Orhan

    2017-06-01

    Stroke, a major cause of death and disability, is described as interruption or severe reduction of blood flow in cerebral arteries. Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and carotid atherosclerosis is a risk factor for stroke. Combination of multiple environmental and genetic risk factors is thought to increase stroke. Therefore, investigation of the polymorphisms of enzymes is of crucial importance to determine the molecular etiology of the disease. To test this hypothesis, we performed a case-control study in which we compared the distribution of CYP2E1 and NQO1 genotypes between 245 large artery atherosclerotic ischemic stroke patients and 145 controls, using PCR-RFLP. A significant difference was observed between stroke patients and controls with respect to the CYP2E1*5B genotype (odds ratio; OR 8.069, P = 0.011) and allele (OR 7.876, P = 0.011) distribution. However, this polymorphism was not a significant predictor of disease status in logistic regression analysis. NQO1*2 polymorphism genotype distribution was significantly different between patients and controls (P = 0.027) and heterozygote *1*2 genotype was found to be a protective factor against large artery atherosclerotic ischemic stroke in logistic regression analysis (OR 0.562, P = 0.018). This is the first study conducted regarding the association of CYP2E1 and NQO1 genetic polymorphisms and large artery atherosclerotic ischemic stroke risk in Turkish population.

  10. Melanoma and occupation: results of a case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Fritschi, L; Siemiatycki, J

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Associations between occupational exposures and the occurrence of cutaneous melanoma were examined as part of a large population based case-control study of 19 cancer sites. METHODS: Cases were men aged 35 to 70 years old, resident in Montreal, Canada, with a new histologically confirmed cutaneous melanoma (n = 103). There were two control groups, a randomly selected population control group (n = 533), and a cancer control group (n = 533) randomly selected from among subjects with other types of cancer in the large study. Odds ratios for the occurrence of melanoma were calculated for each exposure circumstance for which there were more than four exposed cases (85 substances, 13 occupations, and 20 industries) adjusting for age, ethnicity, and number of years of schooling. RESULTS: Significantly increased risk of melanoma was found for exposure to four substances (fabric dust, plastic dust, trichloroethylene, and a group containing paints used on surfaces other than metal and varnishes used on surfaces other than wood), three occupations (warehouse clerks, salesmen, and miners and quarrymen), and two industries (clothing and non-metallic mineral products). CONCLUSIONS: Most of the occupational circumstances examined were not associated with melanoma, nor is there any strong evidence from previous research that any of those are risk factors. For the few occupational circumstances which were associated in our data with melanoma, the statistical evidence was weak, and there is little or no supporting evidence in the scientific literature. On the whole, there is no persuasive evidence of occupational risk factors for melanoma, but the studies have been too small or have involved too much misclassification of exposure for this conclusion to be definitive. PMID:8704857

  11. Methodology Series Module 2: Case-control Studies.

    PubMed

    Setia, Maninder Singh

    2016-01-01

    Case-Control study design is a type of observational study. In this design, participants are selected for the study based on their outcome status. Thus, some participants have the outcome of interest (referred to as cases), whereas others do not have the outcome of interest (referred to as controls). The investigator then assesses the exposure in both these groups. The investigator should define the cases as specifically as possible. Sometimes, definition of a disease may be based on multiple criteria; thus, all these points should be explicitly stated in case definition. An important aspect of selecting a control is that they should be from the same 'study base' as that of the cases. We can select controls from a variety of groups. Some of them are: General population; relatives or friends; and hospital patients. Matching is often used in case-control control studies to ensure that the cases and controls are similar in certain characteristics, and it is a useful technique to increase the efficiency of the study. Case-Control studies can usually be conducted relatively faster and are inexpensive - particularly when compared with cohort studies (prospective). It is useful to study rare outcomes and outcomes with long latent periods. This design is not very useful to study rare exposures. Furthermore, they may also be prone to certain biases - selection bias and recall bias.

  12. Survey research methods in evaluation and case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Kalton, Graham; Piesse, Andrea

    2007-04-15

    Survey research methods are widely used in two types of analytic studies: evaluation studies that measure the effects of interventions; and population-based case-control studies that investigate the effects of various risk factors on the presence of disease. This paper provides a broad overview of some design and analysis issues related to such studies, illustrated with examples. The lack of random assignment to treatment and control groups in many evaluation studies makes controlling for confounders critically important. Confounder control can be achieved by matching in the design and by various alternative methods in the analysis. One popular analytic method of controlling for confounders is propensity scoring, which bears a close resemblance to survey weighting. The use of population-based controls has become common in case-control studies. For reasons of cost, population-based controls are often identified by telephone surveys using random digit dialling (RDD) sampling methods. However, RDD surveys are now experiencing serious problems with response rates. A recent alternative approach is to select controls from frames such as driver license lists that contain valuable demographic information for use in matching. Methods of analysis developed in the survey sampling literature are applicable, at least to some degree, in the analyses of evaluation and population-based case-control studies. In particular, the effects of complex sample designs can be taken into account using survey sampling variance estimation methods. Several survey analysis software packages are available for carrying out the computations.

  13. Informed conditioning on clinical covariates increases power in case-control association studies.

    PubMed

    Zaitlen, Noah; Lindström, Sara; Pasaniuc, Bogdan; Cornelis, Marilyn; Genovese, Giulio; Pollack, Samuela; Barton, Anne; Bickeböller, Heike; Bowden, Donald W; Eyre, Steve; Freedman, Barry I; Friedman, David J; Field, John K; Groop, Leif; Haugen, Aage; Heinrich, Joachim; Henderson, Brian E; Hicks, Pamela J; Hocking, Lynne J; Kolonel, Laurence N; Landi, Maria Teresa; Langefeld, Carl D; Le Marchand, Loic; Meister, Michael; Morgan, Ann W; Raji, Olaide Y; Risch, Angela; Rosenberger, Albert; Scherf, David; Steer, Sophia; Walshaw, Martin; Waters, Kevin M; Wilson, Anthony G; Wordsworth, Paul; Zienolddiny, Shanbeh; Tchetgen, Eric Tchetgen; Haiman, Christopher; Hunter, David J; Plenge, Robert M; Worthington, Jane; Christiani, David C; Schaumberg, Debra A; Chasman, Daniel I; Altshuler, David; Voight, Benjamin; Kraft, Peter; Patterson, Nick; Price, Alkes L

    2012-01-01

    Genetic case-control association studies often include data on clinical covariates, such as body mass index (BMI), smoking status, or age, that may modify the underlying genetic risk of case or control samples. For example, in type 2 diabetes, odds ratios for established variants estimated from low-BMI cases are larger than those estimated from high-BMI cases. An unanswered question is how to use this information to maximize statistical power in case-control studies that ascertain individuals on the basis of phenotype (case-control ascertainment) or phenotype and clinical covariates (case-control-covariate ascertainment). While current approaches improve power in studies with random ascertainment, they often lose power under case-control ascertainment and fail to capture available power increases under case-control-covariate ascertainment. We show that an informed conditioning approach, based on the liability threshold model with parameters informed by external epidemiological information, fully accounts for disease prevalence and non-random ascertainment of phenotype as well as covariates and provides a substantial increase in power while maintaining a properly controlled false-positive rate. Our method outperforms standard case-control association tests with or without covariates, tests of gene x covariate interaction, and previously proposed tests for dealing with covariates in ascertained data, with especially large improvements in the case of case-control-covariate ascertainment. We investigate empirical case-control studies of type 2 diabetes, prostate cancer, lung cancer, breast cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, age-related macular degeneration, and end-stage kidney disease over a total of 89,726 samples. In these datasets, informed conditioning outperforms logistic regression for 115 of the 157 known associated variants investigated (P-value = 1 × 10(-9)). The improvement varied across diseases with a 16% median increase in χ(2) test statistics and a

  14. Multiple Sclerosis Associated Risk Factors: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    POOROLAJAL, Jalal; MAZDEH, Mehrdokht; SAATCHI, Mohammad; TALEBI GHANE, Elaheh; BIDERAFSH, Azam; LOTFI, Bahar; FERYADRES, Mohammad; PAJOHI, Khabat

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hamadan Province is one of the high-risk regions in Iran for Multiple sclerosis (MS). A majority of the epidemiological studies conducted in Iran addressing MS are descriptive. This study was conducted to assess MS and its associated risk factors in Hamadan Province, the west of Iran. Methods: This case-control study compared 100 patients with MS (case group) and 100 patients with acute infectious diseases (control group) from September 2013 to March 2014. A checklist was used to assess the demographic, medical, and family history of the patients. The Friedman-Rosenman questionnaire was also used to assess personality type. Statistical analysis was performed using logistic regression model with Stata 11 software program. Results: The adjusted odds ratio (OR) estimate of MS was 4.37 (95% CI: 2.33, 8.20) for females compared to males; 0.15 (95% CI: 0.06, 0.43) for people aged above 50 years compared to aged 14 to 29 years; 0.44 (95% CI: 0.21, 0.91) for overweight or obese people compared to normal weights. Crude OR indicated a significant association between the occurrence of MS and exclusive breast feeding, season of birth, and smoking. However, the association was not statistically significant after adjustment for other covariates. Conclusion: The risk of MS is significantly lower in male gender, obese/overweight, and old people. Furthermore, non-smoking, non-exclusive breast-feeding, and born in autumn may increase the risk of MS but need further investigation. However, long-term large prospective cohort studies are needed to investigate the true effect of the potential risk factors on MS. PMID:26744707

  15. Assessment of global phase uncertainty in case-control studies

    PubMed Central

    Uh, Hae-Won; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J; Putter, Hein; van Houwelingen, Hans C

    2009-01-01

    Background In haplotype-based candidate gene studies a problem is that the genotype data are unphased, which results in haplotype ambiguity. The measure [1] quantifies haplotype predictability from genotype data. It is computed for each individual haplotype, and for a measure of global relative efficiency a minimum value is suggested. Alternatively, we developed methods directly based on the information content of haplotype frequency estimates to obtain global relative efficiency measures: and based on A- and D-optimality, respectively. All three methods are designed for single populations; they can be applied in cases only, controls only or the whole data. Therefore they are not necessarily optimal for haplotype testing in case-control studies. Results A new global relative efficiency measure was derived to maximize power of a simple test statistic that compares haplotype frequencies in cases and controls. Application to real data showed that our proposed method gave a clear and summarizing measure for the case-control study conducted. Additionally this measure might be used for selection of individuals, who have the highest potential for improving power by resolving phase ambiguity. Conclusion Instead of using relative efficiency measure for cases only, controls only or their combined data, we link uncertainty measure to case-control studies directly. Hence, our global efficiency measure might be useful to assess whether data are informative or have enough power for estimation of a specific haplotype risk. PMID:19751505

  16. Assessment of global phase uncertainty in case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Uh, Hae-Won; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J; Putter, Hein; van Houwelingen, Hans C

    2009-09-14

    In haplotype-based candidate gene studies a problem is that the genotype data are unphased, which results in haplotype ambiguity. The R(h)(2) measure 1 quantifies haplotype predictability from genotype data. It is computed for each individual haplotype, and for a measure of global relative efficiency a minimum R(h)(2) value is suggested. Alternatively, we developed methods directly based on the information content of haplotype frequency estimates to obtain global relative efficiency measures: R(A)(2) and R(D)(2) based on A- and D-optimality, respectively. All three methods are designed for single populations; they can be applied in cases only, controls only or the whole data. Therefore they are not necessarily optimal for haplotype testing in case-control studies. A new global relative efficiency measure R(T)(2) was derived to maximize power of a simple test statistic that compares haplotype frequencies in cases and controls. Application to real data showed that our proposed method R(T)(2) gave a clear and summarizing measure for the case-control study conducted. Additionally this measure might be used for selection of individuals, who have the highest potential for improving power by resolving phase ambiguity. Instead of using relative efficiency measure for cases only, controls only or their combined data, we link uncertainty measure to case-control studies directly. Hence, our global efficiency measure might be useful to assess whether data are informative or have enough power for estimation of a specific haplotype risk.

  17. A case-control study of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Savettieri, G; Salemi, G; Arcara, A; Cassata, M; Castiglione, M G; Fierro, B

    1991-01-01

    A retrospective case-control study was conducted using 46 patients affected by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and 92 closely matched healthy controls. Cases were ascertained through typical clinical and instrumental findings. Putative risk factors (bone fractures or major trauma, exposure to domestic animals, surgical operations, disease among first degree relatives and others) were investigated anamnestically using a standard questionnaire. Using Mantel-Haenzsel estimates of the odds ratio, no association was found between amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and the investigated variables.

  18. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: case control epidemiological study in Yorkshire.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, R A; McKinney, P A; O'Brien, C; Richards, I D; Roberts, B; Lauder, I; Darwin, C M; Bernard, S M; Bird, C C

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a case control study of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in the Yorkshire Health Region. In all, 437 cases and 724 controls were interviewed. Risk factors associated with past skin conditions, family history of cancer and infectious mononucleosis, aspects of social life and contact with wood dust and epoxy glues all emerge. A comparison of high and low grade morphological forms of disease reveal contrasting risks and suggest separate aetiologies for these conditions.

  19. Female sexual dysfunction in androgenetic alopecia: Case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Sancak, Eyup Burak; Oguz, Sevilay; Akbulut, Tugba; Uludag, Aysegul; Akbas, Alpaslan; Kurt, Omer; Akbulut, Mehmet Fatih

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: We sought to evaluate the association of female sexual dysfunction (FSD) with androgenetic alopecia (AGA) and metabolic syndrome (MetS) in premenopausal women. Methods: From December 2013 to June 2015, we performed a case-control, prospective study of 115 patients with AGA and 97 age-matched control patients without AGA from among premenopausal women who visited dermatology clinics of the two reference hospitals. Comprehensive history, anthropometric measurements, and questionnaire administration were performed for each of the total of 212 women. The Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) was used to assess the key dimensions of female sexual function. AGA was assessed and graded by an experienced dermatologist according to Ludwig’s classification. The MetS assessment was made according to the NCEP-ATP III criteria. Results: In univariate analysis, age, weight, waist circumference, hip circumference, waist-to-hip ratio, body mass index (BMI), AGA, MetS, cardiovascular event, marital status, hypertension, high fasting plasma glucose, high triglyceride, large waist, total testosterone, and free testosterone were associated with presence of FSD. In logistic regression analysis, age (odds ratio [OR] 1.21, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13–1.30; p<0.001), AGA (OR 3.42, 95% CI 1.31–8.94; p=0.017), MetS (OR 5.39, 95% CI 1.34–21.62; p=0.012), and free testosterone (OR 0.18, 95% CI 0.09–0.37; p<0.001) were independently associated with FSD. Conclusions: Our study suggests that age, AGA, MetS, and free testosterone may have strong impact on sexual function in premenopausal women. Further studies with population-based and longitudinal design should be conducted to confirm this finding. PMID:28255417

  20. [Case-control studies in psychiatry: causality, design and warnings].

    PubMed

    Silva Ayçaguer, L C

    2004-01-01

    This present paper is mainly methodological and has been written with the aim of helping researchers in psychiatry to produce results with higher quality and help readers to have adequate assessment values of others. Brief reflection is made on the most important conditions that must be fulfilled to prove a causality hypothesis, regardless of the investigation design used. However, the main purpose of the text is to examine and illustrate how these conditions work under a case-control study environment. Besides outlining the basic aspects concerning design and analysis, areas extremely illustrated with examples of case and controls in psychiatry found in the literature, a number of suggestions to avoid pitfalls that can invalidate research efforts developed using case-control methodology is offered.

  1. Nested case-control studies: should one break the matching?

    PubMed

    Borgan, Ørnulf; Keogh, Ruth

    2015-10-01

    In a nested case-control study, controls are selected for each case from the individuals who are at risk at the time at which the case occurs. We say that the controls are matched on study time. To adjust for possible confounding, it is common to match on other variables as well. The standard analysis of nested case-control data is based on a partial likelihood which compares the covariates of each case to those of its matched controls. It has been suggested that one may break the matching of nested case-control data and analyse them as case-cohort data using an inverse probability weighted (IPW) pseudo likelihood. Further, when some covariates are available for all individuals in the cohort, multiple imputation (MI) makes it possible to use all available data in the cohort. In the paper we review the standard method and the IPW and MI approaches, and compare their performance using simulations that cover a range of scenarios, including one and two endpoints.

  2. Metabolic syndrome in relation to Barrett’s esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma: results from a large population-based case-control study in the Clinical Practice Research Datalink

    PubMed Central

    Drahos, Jennifer; Li, Lin; Jick, Susan S.; Cook, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) causes local chronic inflammation that increases risks of Barrett’s esophagus (BE) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA), yet symptomatic GERD is absent in approximately half of all such patients. Obesity exacerbates GERD and is also a component of metabolic syndrome (MetS). We evaluated the hypothesis that MetS is a GERD-independent mechanism by which obesity is associated with increased risks of BE and EA using data from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink. BE cases (n=10,215) and EA cases (n=592) were each individually matched to five population controls based on age, sex, and general practice. MetS was defined as occurrence of at least three of the following: obesity, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and high cholesterol. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using conditional logistic regression. MetS was marginally associated with BE (OR=1.12, 95%CI 1.00–1.25). Similar effects were found for the individual component factors of obesity, hypertension, and high cholesterol. History of GERD modified the association (p-effect modification < 1E 5), with the MetS-BE association confined to patients without a history of GERD (OR=1.33, 95%CI 1.12–1.58). No association between MetS and risk of EA was detected in the main or stratified analyses. In this large population-based case-control study, individuals with MetS had a marginally increased risk of BE in the absence of GERD. The systemic inflammatory state (MetS) may represent a reflux-independent inflammatory pathway that increases the risk of BE. MetS did not increase risk of EA in this study population. PMID:26972225

  3. 25-hydroxyvitamin D and breast cancer, colorectal cancer, and colorectal adenomas: case-control versus nested case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Grant, William B

    2015-02-01

    Existing literature includes concerns regarding reliability of case-control studies of breast cancer incidence with respect to 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations. For breast cancer, only case-control studies consistently find inverse correlations between 25(OH)D and breast cancer. However, for colorectal cancer, nested case-control studies find significant inverse correlations with respect to 25(OH)D concentrations at baseline for mean follow-up times of 7 years. This is a review of results currently existing in literature. I provide evidence that 25(OH)D concentration values are only useful for short follow-up times for breast cancer since it develops rapidly. To support the robust nature of breast cancer case-control studies, I show that results from 11 studies from seven countries align in a robust power-law fit to the odds ratio versus mean 25(OH)D concentrations. Case-control studies of breast cancer incidence rates provide reliable results. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  4. Comorbidities in rotator cuff disease: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Titchener, Andrew G; White, Jonathan J E; Hinchliffe, Sally R; Tambe, Amol A; Hubbard, Richard B; Clark, David I

    2014-09-01

    Rotator cuff disease is a common condition in the general population, but relatively little is known about its associated risk factors. We have undertaken a large case-control study using The Health Improvement Network database to assess and to quantify the relative contributions of some constitutional and environmental risk factors for rotator cuff disease in the community. Our data set included 5000 patients with rotator cuff disease who were individually matched with a single control by age, sex, and general practice (primary care practice). The median age at diagnosis was 55 years (interquartile range, 44-65 years). Multivariate analysis showed that the risk factors associated with rotator cuff disease were Achilles tendinitis (odds ratio [OR] = 1.78), trigger finger (OR = 1.99), lateral epicondylitis (OR = 1.71), and carpal tunnel syndrome (OR = 1.55). Oral corticosteroid therapy (OR = 2.03), oral antidiabetic use (OR = 1.66), insulin use (OR = 1.77), and "overweight" body mass index of 25.1 to 30 (OR = 1.15) were also significantly associated. Current or previous smoking history, body mass index of greater than 30, any alcohol intake, medial epicondylitis, de Quervain syndrome, cubital tunnel syndrome, and rheumatoid arthritis were not found to be associated with rotator cuff disease. We have identified a number of comorbidities and risk factors for rotator cuff disease. These include lateral epicondylitis, carpal tunnel syndrome, trigger finger, Achilles tendinitis, oral corticosteroid use, and diabetes mellitus. The findings should alert the clinician to comorbid pathologic processes and guide future research into the etiology of this condition. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Risk factors associated with lipomyelomeningocele: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Esmaeili, Arash; Hanaei, Sara; Fadakar, Kaveh; Dadkhah, Sahar; Arjipour, Mahdi; Habibi, Zohreh; Nejat, Farideh; El Khashab, Mostafa

    2013-01-01

    In general, it seems that both genetic and environmental factors play important roles in the induction of neural tube defects. Lipomyelomeningocele (LipoMMC) is a rather common type of closed neural tube defect, but only limited studies have investigated the potential risk factors of this anomaly. Therefore, the purpose of this case-control study was to investigate the risk factors involved in LipoMMC formation. Various risk factors were evaluated in 35 children between 1 month and 10 years of age with LipoMMC in a hospital-based case-control study. The 2 control arms consisted of 35 children with myelomeningocele (MMC group) and 35 children with congenital anomalies other than central nervous system problems (control group). All groups were matched for age and visited the same hospital. A structured questionnaire was used for the collection of all data, including the mothers' weight and height during pregnancy, education, reproductive history, previous abortions, and socioeconomic status, as well as the parents' consanguinity and family history of the same anomalies. Univariate analysis of the children with LipoMMC compared to the control group showed that the use of periconceptional folic acid supplementation was significantly lower in the MMC and LipoMMC groups compared to the control group. In addition, comparison of the MMC and control groups revealed statistically significant differences regarding the use of folic acid and maternal obesity. In multivariate analysis, use of folic acid in the periconceptional period and during the first trimester was an independent risk factor for LipoMMC and MMC. Furthermore, maternal obesity was a significantly positive risk factor for MMC. The probable risk factors for LipoMMC were investigated in this case-control study. Consumption of folic acid in the periconceptional period and during the first trimester is an independent protective factor against LipoMMC. It seems that larger studies are needed to examine other possible

  6. Risk factors for ovarian cancer: a case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Booth, M.; Beral, V.; Smith, P.

    1989-01-01

    A hospital-based case-control study of ovarian cancer was conducted in London and Oxford between October 1978 and February 1983. Menstrual characteristics, reproductive and contraceptive history and history of exposure to various environmental factors were compared between 235 women with histologically diagnosed epithelial ovarian cancer and 451 controls. High gravidity, hysterectomy, female sterilisation and oral contraceptive use were associated with a reduced risk of ovarian cancer. Infertility and late age at menopause were associated with an increase in risk. While these factors were related, they were each found to be independently associated with ovarian cancer risk after adjusting for the effect of the other factors. PMID:2679848

  7. Associations of aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug and paracetamol use with PSA-detected prostate cancer: findings from a large, population-based, case-control study (the ProtecT study).

    PubMed

    Murad, Ali S; Down, Liz; Davey Smith, George; Donovan, Jenny L; Athene Lane, Janet; Hamdy, Freddie C; Neal, David E; Martin, Richard M

    2011-03-15

    Evidence from laboratory studies suggests that chronic inflammation plays an important role in prostate cancer aetiology. This has resulted in speculation that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may protect against prostate cancer development. We analysed data from a cross-sectional case-control study (n(cases) = 1,016; n(controls) = 5,043), nested within a UK-wide population-based study that used prostate specific antigen (PSA) testing for identification of asymptomatic prostate cancers, to investigate the relationship of aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and paracetamol use with prostate cancer. In conditional logistic regression models accounting for stratum matching on age (5-year age bands) and recruitment centre, use of non-aspirin NSAIDs [odds ratio (OR) = 1.32; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.04-1.67] or all NSAIDs (OR = 1.25; 95% CI = 1.07-1.47) were positively associated with prostate cancer. There were weaker, not conventionally statistically significant, positive associations of aspirin (OR = 1.13; 95% CI = 0.94-1.36) and paracetamol (OR = 1.20; 95% CI = 0.90-1.60) with prostate cancer. Mutual adjustment for aspirin, non-aspirin NSAIDs or paracetamol made little difference to these results. There was no evidence of confounding by age, family history of prostate cancer, body mass index or self-reported diabetes. Aspirin, NSAID and paracetamol use were associated with reduced serum PSA concentrations amongst controls. Our findings do not support the hypothesis that NSAIDs reduce the risk of PSA-detected prostate cancer. Our conclusions are unlikely to be influenced by PSA detection bias because the inverse associations of aspirin, NSAID and paracetamol use with serum PSA would have attenuated (not generated) the observed positive associations.

  8. Metabolic Derangements in Lichen Planus - A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Bikash Ranjan; Panda, Maitreyee

    2016-01-01

    Introduction An association between psoriasis and metabolic syndrome has been established in previous studies. Lichen Planus (LP) is also a chronic inflammatory disease morphologically related to psoriasis and few studies have shown association of metabolic derangements in LP. Aim To study the association of metabolic derangements in LP. Materials and Methods A prospective case control study was undertaken for a period of one year. Age and sex matched patients of LP and other non-inflammatory diseases were taken as cases and controls respectively. Data on height, weight, lipid profile and fasting blood glucose levels were collected for all the patients. Body Mass Index (BMI) was calculated. Results A total of 80 patients were recruited, 40 cases and 40 controls. The mean values for all the lipid and glucose parameters were high in cases as compared to controls with significant p-values. Conclusion In the present study metabolic derangements were seen in patients with LP. PMID:28050485

  9. Case Control Polysomnographic Studies of Sleep Disorders in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Ming-Hui; Fook-Chong, Stephanie; Pavanni, Ratnagopal; Lim, Li-Ling; Tan, Eng-King

    2011-01-01

    Background The relationship between a number of primary sleep disorders and Parkinson's disease (PD) is still debated. There are limited case control polysomnographic studies in PD and most of these study sample sizes are small. Methodology/Findings We conducted one of the largest case-control studies involving overnight polysomnographic evaluation, with prospective recruitment of unselected Parkinson's disease patients and healthy controls from an Asian population. The cases were recruited from the specialized movement disorder outpatient clinics in a tertiary referral center, and controls from the same geographical locations. All subjects underwent an overnight polysomnographic study and a multiple sleep latency test. A total of 124 subjects including 56 patients and 68 controls frequency-matched for age and sex were included. Multivariate analysis revealed that patients had significantly shorter total sleep time than controls (p = 0.01), lower sleep efficiency (p = 0.001) and increased REM latency (p = 0.007). In patients, multivariate analysis showed that reduced total sleep time was significantly associated with increased age (p = 0.001) and increased levodopa dose (p = 0.032). The mean Insomnia Severity Index was higher in PD patients (9.0±7.1) compared to controls (3.3±3.9, p<0.001). The mean Epworth Sleepiness Scale score was higher in PD patients (9.3±5.9 vs. 5.7±4.8, p<0.001). Nocturnal arousals, obstructive sleep apnea, periodic leg movements and objective abnormal sleepiness were not increased in our patients. Conclusions/Significance Our case-control polysomnographic study, the first-ever performed in an Asian population, revealed altered sleep architecture and reduced sleep in PD patients compared to controls. Reduced total sleep time was associated with increased age and levodopa dose. However, nocturnal arousals, primary sleep disorders and abnormal sleepiness were not increased in our PD patients suggesting that ethnic

  10. Childhood cancer and overhead powerlines: a case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Myers, A.; Clayden, A. D.; Cartwright, R. A.; Cartwright, S. C.

    1990-01-01

    A case-control study has been carried out to examine the occurrence of childhood cancer in relation to the proximity of overhead power lines to a child's home address at birth and to the calculated magnetic field at the address. The study included 374 cases diagnosed in the Yorkshire Health Region between 1970 and 1979, together with 588 matched controls. Magnetic-field strengths at the birth addresses due to the load currents of overhead power lines were calculated on the basis of line-network maps and load records. The results indicate no association between the occurrence of childhood malignancies and either the proximity or the magnetic fields of overhead lines, although the statistical power of the study was limited by the small numbers of children living close to overhead power lines. PMID:2257204

  11. Is there any range-of-motion advantage to using bearings larger than 36mm in primary hip arthroplasty: A case-control study comparing 36-mm and large-diameter heads.

    PubMed

    Delay, C; Putman, S; Dereudre, G; Girard, J; Lancelier-Bariatinsky, V; Drumez, E; Migaud, H

    2016-10-01

    the two groups. No episode of dislocation was identified. The current trend of increasing femoral head diameters beyond 36mm to improve the gains in joint range-of-motion and function is not warranted. The potential side effects of increasing the caliber call for even greater caution in the use of large-diameter heads because our hypothesis has not been confirmed. Case-control study, level III. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. A general regression framework for a secondary outcome in case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    Modern case-control studies typically involve the collection of data on a large number of outcomes, often at considerable logistical and monetary expense. These data are of potentially great value to subsequent researchers, who, although not necessarily concerned with the disease that defined the case series in the original study, may want to use the available information for a regression analysis involving a secondary outcome. Because cases and controls are selected with unequal probability, regression analysis involving a secondary outcome generally must acknowledge the sampling design. In this paper, the author presents a new framework for the analysis of secondary outcomes in case-control studies. The approach is based on a careful re-parameterization of the conditional model for the secondary outcome given the case-control outcome and regression covariates, in terms of (a) the population regression of interest of the secondary outcome given covariates and (b) the population regression of the case-control outcome on covariates. The error distribution for the secondary outcome given covariates and case-control status is otherwise unrestricted. For a continuous outcome, the approach sometimes reduces to extending model (a) by including a residual of (b) as a covariate. However, the framework is general in the sense that models (a) and (b) can take any functional form, and the methodology allows for an identity, log or logit link function for model (a).

  13. Risk factors for anal fistula: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Yang, G; Qiu, J; Song, Y; Wang, L; Gao, J; Wang, C

    2014-07-01

    The aim of our study was to identify potential risk factors for anal fistula in order to improve prevention and treatment of anal fistula. A retrospective case-control study for anal fistula was conducted at our unit. Logistic regression analyses were carried out to identify associated risk factors for anal fistula. The final model obtained by the stepwise forward logistic regression analysis method identified the following items as independent risk factors: body mass index of >25.0 kg/m(2), high daily salt intake, history of diabetes, hyperlipidemia, dermatosis, anorectal surgery, history of smoking and alcohol intake, sedentary lifestyle, excessive intake of spicy/greasy food, very infrequent participation in sports and prolonged sitting on the toilet for defecation. Our results indicate that lifestyle factors and certain medical conditions increase an individual's risk of developing anal fistula.

  14. A case-control study of Alzheimer's disease in Australia.

    PubMed

    Broe, G A; Henderson, A S; Creasey, H; McCusker, E; Korten, A E; Jorm, A F; Longley, W; Anthony, J C

    1990-11-01

    We conducted a case-control study of clinically diagnosed Alzheimer's disease (AD) on 170 cases aged 52 to 96 years, and 170 controls matched for age, sex and, where possible, the general practice of origin. Trained lay interviewers naive to the hypotheses and to the clinical status of the elderly person carried out risk-factor interviews with informants. Significant odds ratios were found for 4 variables: a history of either dementia, probable AD, or Down's syndrome in a 1st-degree relative, and underactivity as a behavioral trait in both the recent and more distant past. Previously reported or suggested associations not confirmed by this study include head injury, starvation, thyroid disease, analgesic abuse, antacid use (aluminum exposure), alcohol abuse, smoking, and being left-handed.

  15. Hodgkin's disease: case control epidemiological study in Yorkshire.

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, S. M.; Cartwright, R. A.; Darwin, C. M.; Richards, I. D.; Roberts, B.; O'Brien, C.; Bird, C. C.

    1987-01-01

    This is the first report of a case-control epidemiological study on lymphomas and leukaemias occurring in Yorkshire during 1979-84. This paper deals with the results of the Hodgkin's disease analysis comprising 248 cases and 489 controls. The results indicate support for previous work with respect to small family size and past history of infectious mononucleosis. Positive observations made in a previous pilot study are also confirmed and extended with respect to associations with certain chronic skin lesions, dental anaesthesia and familial factors. Negative associations are described with respect to X-ray exposures and cigarette smoking. It is proposed that these results fit into a general hypothesis that these conditions are the result of interaction between infectious agents and altered immunity in those persons genetically predisposed. PMID:3814482

  16. Hodgkin's disease: case control epidemiological study in Yorkshire.

    PubMed

    Bernard, S M; Cartwright, R A; Darwin, C M; Richards, I D; Roberts, B; O'Brien, C; Bird, C C

    1987-01-01

    This is the first report of a case-control epidemiological study on lymphomas and leukaemias occurring in Yorkshire during 1979-84. This paper deals with the results of the Hodgkin's disease analysis comprising 248 cases and 489 controls. The results indicate support for previous work with respect to small family size and past history of infectious mononucleosis. Positive observations made in a previous pilot study are also confirmed and extended with respect to associations with certain chronic skin lesions, dental anaesthesia and familial factors. Negative associations are described with respect to X-ray exposures and cigarette smoking. It is proposed that these results fit into a general hypothesis that these conditions are the result of interaction between infectious agents and altered immunity in those persons genetically predisposed.

  17. Toxocariasis and childhood asthma: A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Cadore, Priscila Silva; Zhang, Linjie; Lemos, Liliam de Lima; Lorenzi, Carolina; Telmo, Paula de Lima; Dos Santos, Paula Costa; Mattos, Gabriela Torres; Vignol, Flávia Saraçol; Prietsch, Silvio O M; Berne, Maria Elisabeth Aires; Scaini, Carlos James

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the association between anti-Toxocara IgG seropositivity and asthma in children. This was a case-control study conducted in a university hospital in south Brazil between May 2012 and June 2013. Were recruited 208 children up to 12 years old of whom 156 had asthma (cases) and 52 did not have asthma (controls), with a case-control ratio of 3:1 matched by age. Children's parents or guardians were interviewed using a structured questionnaire with closed questions. Serology was performed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with excretory-secretory antigen of Toxocara canis (TES). The seroprevalence of IgG anti-T. canis antibodies was 12.8% in the cases and 7.7% in the controls. There was no significant association between seropositivity to T. canis and risk of asthma (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 1.89, 95% CI: 0.52 to 6.89, p = 0.33). Household income < 2 minimum salaries, paternal school years < 9, allergic rhinitis in children, a positive family history of asthma and rhinitis and contact with cats were significantly associated with asthma, with adjusted ORs (95% CIs) of 3.05 (1.21 to 7.73), 2.83 (1.11 to 7.18), 10.5 (4.32 to 25.6), 2.65 (1.14 to 6.17), 2.49 (1.07 to 5.78) and 2.73 (1.03 to 7.27), respectively. This study did not find a statistically significant association between seropositivity to Toxocara sp. and risk of asthma in children. Low family income, low paternal education level, concomitant allergic rhinitis, family history of asthma and allergic rhinitis and contact with cats were independent factors associated with childhood asthma.

  18. Functional Impairment in Adult Sleepwalkers: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Regis; Jaussent, Isabelle; Scholz, Sabine; Bayard, Sophie; Montplaisir, Jacques; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate the restorative quality of sleep and daytime functioning in sleepwalking adult patients in comparison with controls. Design: Prospective case-control study. Setting: Data were collected at the Sleep Disorders Center, Hôpital-Gui-de Chauliac, Montpellier, France between June 2007 and January 2011. Participants: There were 140 adult sleepwalkers (100 (median age 30 y, 55% male) in whom primary SW was diagnosed) who underwent 1 night of video polysomnography. All patients participated in a standardized clinical interview and completed a battery of questionnaires to assess clinical characteristics of parasomnia, daytime sleepiness, fatigue, insomnia, depressive and anxiety symptoms, and health-related quality of life. Results were compared with those of 100 sex- and age-matched normal controls. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Of the sleepwalkers, 22.3% presented with daily episodes and 43.5% presented with weekly episodes. Median age at sleepwalking onset was 9 y. Familial history of sleepwalking was reported in 56.6% of sleepwalkers and violent sleep related behaviors in 57.9%, including injuries requiring medical care for at least one episode in 17%. Significant associations were found between sleepwalking and daytime sleepiness, fatigue, insomnia, depressive and anxiety symptoms, and altered quality of life. Early-onset sleepwalkers had higher frequency of violent behaviors and injuries. Sleepwalkers with violent behaviors had higher frequency of sleep terrors and triggering factors, with greater alteration in health-related quality of life. Conclusion: Adult sleepwalking is a potentially serious condition that may induce violent behaviors, self-injury or injury to bed partners, sleep disruption, excessive daytime sleepiness, fatigue, and psychological distress, all of which affect health-related quality of life. Citation: Lopez R; Jaussent I; Scholz S; Bayard S; Montplaisir J; Dauvilliers Y. Functional impairment in

  19. Leptospira Exposure and Gardeners: A Case-Control Seroprevalence Study

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Hernandez-Tinoco, Jesus; Sanchez-Anguiano, Luis Francisco; Ramos-Nevarez, Agar; Cerrillo-Soto, Sandra Margarita; Guido-Arreola, Carlos Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Background Leptospira can be found in soil. However, it is unclear whether occupational exposure to soil may represent a risk for Leptospira infection in humans. Therefore, we sought to determine the association of Leptospira IgG seroprevalence with the occupation of gardener, and to determine the epidemiological characteristics of gardeners associated with Leptospira exposure. Methods We performed a case-control study in 168 gardeners and 168 age- and gender-matched control subjects without gardening occupation in Durango City, Mexico. The seroprevalence of anti-Leptospira IgG antibodies in cases and controls was determined using an enzyme immunoassay. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to assess the association of Leptospira exposure and the characteristics of the gardeners. Results Anti-Leptospira IgG antibodies were found in 10 (6%) of 168 gardeners and in 15 (8.9%) of 168 control subjects (odds ratio (OR): 0.64; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.28 - 1.48; P = 0.40). Multivariate analysis showed that Leptospira seropositivity was positively associated with female gender (OR: 5.82; 95% CI: 1.11 - 30.46; P = 0.03), and negatively associated with eating while working (OR: 0.21; 95% CI: 0.05 - 0.87; P = 0.03). In addition, multivariate analysis showed that high anti-Leptospira levels were associated with consumption of boar meat (OR: 28.00; 95% CI: 1.20 - 648.80; P = 0.03). Conclusions This is the first case-control study of Leptospira exposure in gardeners. Results do not support an association of Leptospira exposure with the occupation of gardener. However, further studies to confirm the lack of this association are needed. The potential role of consumption of boar meat in Leptospira infection deserves further investigation. PMID:26668679

  20. Nigerian juvenile offenders: a case-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Ogunlesi, A O

    1991-01-01

    A case-controlled study was carried out on all the 51 juvenile delinquents found in a point prevalence survey of a Nigerian Borstal Remand Centre. Mean age of the delinquents was 17-27 years. They were mostly from the low social class (70.6%) and the commonest reason for admission was for being beyond parental control (68.6%). Identified risk factors found for juvenile delinquency were death of biological mother, parental marital failure, growing up with relatives rather than parents, drug abuse and ordinal position in the family. Possible cultural explanations for some of these observations were proffered. The need to improve on the living conditions of these juveniles and their assessment procedure were highlighted. Finally, it is imperative that the obsolete Nigerian Children and Young Person's Law be updated.

  1. Case-control study of dementia of the Alzheimer type

    SciTech Connect

    French, L.R.; Schuman, L.M.; Mortimer, J.A.; Hutton, J.T.; Boatman, R.A.; Christians, B.

    1985-03-01

    A case-control study to assess factors of possible etiologic significance to dementia of the Alzheimer type was conducted with 78 male cases diagnosed in 1979-1982 at the Veterans Administration Medical Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota and age-race-sex-matched hospital and neighborhood controls (14 of 16 autopsied cases were histopathologically confirmed). Information was obtained on variables relevant to vital, genetic, and immunologic hypotheses, and on possible occupational and environmental exposures, drug use, psychologic stress, smoking, and alcohol consumption. The only major difference between patients with dementia of the Alzheimer type and controls was a significantly greater occurrence of antecedent head trauma in the patients (odds ratio = 4.50). This finding is consistent with the literature on posttraumatic dementia but its importance is presently unclear.

  2. Informed Conditioning on Clinical Covariates Increases Power in Case-Control Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zaitlen, Noah; Lindström, Sara; Pasaniuc, Bogdan; Cornelis, Marilyn; Genovese, Giulio; Pollack, Samuela; Barton, Anne; Bickeböller, Heike; Bowden, Donald W.; Eyre, Steve; Freedman, Barry I.; Friedman, David J.; Field, John K.; Groop, Leif; Haugen, Aage; Heinrich, Joachim; Henderson, Brian E.; Hicks, Pamela J.; Hocking, Lynne J.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Landi, Maria Teresa; Langefeld, Carl D.; Le Marchand, Loic; Meister, Michael; Morgan, Ann W.; Raji, Olaide Y.; Risch, Angela; Rosenberger, Albert; Scherf, David; Steer, Sophia; Walshaw, Martin; Waters, Kevin M.; Wilson, Anthony G.; Wordsworth, Paul; Zienolddiny, Shanbeh; Tchetgen, Eric Tchetgen; Haiman, Christopher; Hunter, David J.; Plenge, Robert M.; Worthington, Jane; Christiani, David C.; Schaumberg, Debra A.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Altshuler, David; Voight, Benjamin; Kraft, Peter; Patterson, Nick; Price, Alkes L.

    2012-01-01

    Genetic case-control association studies often include data on clinical covariates, such as body mass index (BMI), smoking status, or age, that may modify the underlying genetic risk of case or control samples. For example, in type 2 diabetes, odds ratios for established variants estimated from low–BMI cases are larger than those estimated from high–BMI cases. An unanswered question is how to use this information to maximize statistical power in case-control studies that ascertain individuals on the basis of phenotype (case-control ascertainment) or phenotype and clinical covariates (case-control-covariate ascertainment). While current approaches improve power in studies with random ascertainment, they often lose power under case-control ascertainment and fail to capture available power increases under case-control-covariate ascertainment. We show that an informed conditioning approach, based on the liability threshold model with parameters informed by external epidemiological information, fully accounts for disease prevalence and non-random ascertainment of phenotype as well as covariates and provides a substantial increase in power while maintaining a properly controlled false-positive rate. Our method outperforms standard case-control association tests with or without covariates, tests of gene x covariate interaction, and previously proposed tests for dealing with covariates in ascertained data, with especially large improvements in the case of case-control-covariate ascertainment. We investigate empirical case-control studies of type 2 diabetes, prostate cancer, lung cancer, breast cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, age-related macular degeneration, and end-stage kidney disease over a total of 89,726 samples. In these datasets, informed conditioning outperforms logistic regression for 115 of the 157 known associated variants investigated (P-value = 1×10−9). The improvement varied across diseases with a 16% median increase in χ2 test statistics and a

  3. Consanguinity and Neonatal Death: A Nested Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Chaman, Reza; Gholami Taramsari, Mahshid; Khosravi, Ahmad; Amiri, Mohammad; Holakouie Naieni, Kourosh; Yunesian, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Although numerous studies have found higher rates of abortion and still births following consanguinity (familial marriages), the question of whether consanguinity significantly increases the risk of neonatal death has inadequately been addressed.This study aims to evaluate familial marriage effects on neonatal death in rural areas in Iran. Materials and methods: In this nested case-control study, 6900 newbornswho were born in rural areas of Kohgiluyeh and Boyerahmad Province (South-West of Iran)were followed till the end of neonatal period, and neonatal death was the outcome of interest. Subsequently 97 cases and 97 controls were selected in study cohort by using risk set sampling model. Crude and adjusted odds ratios (OR) were estimated by usinga conditional logistic regression model. Results: In the final model, prematurity (OR = 5.57), low birthweight (LBW) (OR = 7.68), consanguinity (first cousins) (OR = 5.23), C-section (OR = 7.27), birth rank more than 3 (OR = 6.95) and birthsinterval less than 24 months (OR = 4.65) showed significant statistical association with neonatal mortality (p < 0.05). Conclusion: According to our findings, after adjusting the effects of other significant risk factors, familial marriageto first cousins is considered asan important risk factor for neonatal death. PMID:25530772

  4. CIGARETTE SMOKING AND MALIGNANT MELANOMA: A CASE-CONTROL STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Kessides, Maria C.; Wheless, Lee; Hoffman-Bolton, Judith; Clipp, Sandra; Alani, Rhoda M.; Alberg, Anthony J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Several previous studies have reported inverse associations between cigarette smoking and melanoma. Often these studies have not adjusted for ultraviolet (UV) exposure history, skin type, or number of blistering sunburns, which could confound the observed associations between cigarette smoking and melanoma. Objective To assess whether this reported inverse association persists after adjusting for UV exposure, skin type, and number of blistering sunburns. Methods We conducted a population-based case-control study (82 melanoma cases, 164 controls). Two controls were matched to each case by age, sex, race, and skin type. Conditional logistic regression models were fit to assess the association between cigarette smoking history and melanoma, with additional adjustments for UV exposure and sunburns. Results Compared to never smokers, both former (OR 0.43, 95% CI 0.18–1.04) and current (OR 0.65, 95% CI 0.19–2.24) smoking were inversely associated with melanoma, but the associations were not statistically significant. Limitations The number of cutaneous nevi was not assessed in this study. Additionally, the relatively small number of cases limits the statistical precision of the observed associations. Conclusions After matching for age, sex, race, and skin type, and further adjusting for UV exposure and number of sunburns, cigarette smoking was not statistically significantly associated with melanoma risk, but the results were consistent with previous observations of an inverse association. PMID:20334951

  5. Neurocysticercotic Calcifications and Hippocampal Sclerosis: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Clarissa Lin; Coan, Ana Carolina; Secolin, Rodrigo; Luiz Cunha da Costa, Alberto; Cendes, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Objective The exact role of calcified neurocysticercotic lesions (CNLs) in epilepsy is yet unknown and controversial. Although the relationship between CNLs, epilepsy and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS) has already been addressed, to our knowledge, no study has actually provided strong statistical evidence, nor reported the ODDS ratio for these associations. Therefore, we designed this case-control study to assess the likelihood of having MTLE-HS versus other forms of epilepsy in the presence of CNLs. Methods In this case-control study we included 119 consecutive patients with epilepsy and 106 disease controls (headache) with previous CT scans. We subdivided cases into MTLE-HS and other epilepsies. We used brain CT scans to define presence or absence of CNLs. After exploratory analyses, we used logistic regression to analyze the association between CNLs, epilepsy subgroups and disease controls. Results CNLs were found in 31.09% of cases and in 11.32% of controls (p<0.001). The initial analysis comparing epilepsy versus controls revealed a significant association between CNLs and epilepsy (OR = 5.32; 95%CI = 2.43-11.54; p<0.001). However, when we compared MTLE-HS versus other epilepsies versus controls we confirmed that CNLs were associated with MTLE-HS (OR = 11.27, 95%CI = 4.73-26.85; p<0.001) but other epilepsies were not. We found no difference in the CNLs load and no difference in the location of the CNLs when we compared patients with MTLE-HS, other epilepsies and disease controls. Significance The inclusion of controls allowed us to estimate the likelihood of having epilepsy in the presence of CNLs. We found that patients with CNLs were 11 times more likely to have MTLE-HS; however, the presence of CNLs did not change the odds of having other types of epilepsy. These findings raise the possibility of neurocysticercosis playing a role in the pathophysiology of MTLE-HS and need further confirmation in other series. PMID

  6. Headaches and pineal cyst: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Christian L; Woeller, Andreas; Valet, Michael; Zimmer, Claus; Berthele, Achim; Tölle, Thomas; Sprenger, Till

    2008-03-01

    Pineal cysts have been suggested to be linked to headache pathogenesis. However, no systematic studies on this topic have been performed so far. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between pineal cysts and headache and to determine the relevance of the cyst size in this context. We conducted a case-control study of patients who consulted the neurological department between 1999 and 2006 to investigate the relationship between pineal cysts and headache and to determine the relevance of the cyst size. A total of 51 patients with pineal cyst were identified, thereby 51% were suffering from headache (half of them had migraine), whereas in the control group, only 25% had headache (thereof 31% suffered from migraine). There was a significant relationship between headache (as well as migraine) and pineal cysts (chi-square test), but no significant difference in pineal cyst diameter between the patient group with headache versus without headache (t-test). Our data provide evidence for a causal relationship between pineal cysts and headache, respectively, migraine in this patient cohort.

  7. Determinants of gestational diabetes mellitus: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Feleke, Berhanu Elfu

    2017-07-09

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is glucose intolerance first recognized during pregnancy. The objective of this study was to identify the determinant factors of GDM. An unmatched case-control study was conducted. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the profile of study participants and binary logistic regression was used to identify the determinants of GDM. GDM was associated with history of abortion (AOR 5.05 [95% CI: 2.65-9.63]), family history of diabetes mellitus (AOR 8.63 [95% CI: 5.19-14.35]), chronic hypertension (AOR 4.63 [95% CI: 1.27-16.86]), dietary diversification score (AOR 2.96 [95% CI: 2-4.46]), regular physical exercise (AOR 0.03 [95% CI: 0.01-0.04]), history of infertility (AOR 6.19 [95%CI: 1.86-20.16]), history of Caesarean section (AOR 3.24 [95% CI: 1.58-6.63]), previous history of GDM (AOR 8.21 [95% CI: 3.18-21.24]), previous history of intrauterine fetal death (AOR 3.96 [95% CI: 1.56-10.04]), literacy (AOR 0.6 [95% CI: 0.43-0.85]), body mass index (AOR 2.96 [95% CI: 2.08-4.2]), parity (AOR 1.78 [95% CI: 1.3-2.49]). Regular physical exercise should be used as the main tool in preventing GDM.

  8. Nonparametric Bayes modeling for case control studies with many predictors.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing; Herring, Amy H; Bhattacharya, Anirban; Olshan, Andrew F; Dunson, David B

    2016-03-01

    It is common in biomedical research to run case-control studies involving high-dimensional predictors, with the main goal being detection of the sparse subset of predictors having a significant association with disease. Usual analyses rely on independent screening, considering each predictor one at a time, or in some cases on logistic regression assuming no interactions. We propose a fundamentally different approach based on a nonparametric Bayesian low rank tensor factorization model for the retrospective likelihood. Our model allows a very flexible structure in characterizing the distribution of multivariate variables as unknown and without any linear assumptions as in logistic regression. Predictors are excluded only if they have no impact on disease risk, either directly or through interactions with other predictors. Hence, we obtain an omnibus approach for screening for important predictors. Computation relies on an efficient Gibbs sampler. The methods are shown to have high power and low false discovery rates in simulation studies, and we consider an application to an epidemiology study of birth defects.

  9. Occupation and breast cancer: a Canadian case-control study.

    PubMed

    Brophy, James T; Keith, Margaret M; Gorey, Kevin M; Luginaah, Isaac; Laukkanen, Ethan; Hellyer, Deborah; Reinhartz, Abraham; Watterson, Andrew; Abu-Zahra, Hakam; Maticka-Tyndale, Eleanor; Schneider, Kenneth; Beck, Matthias; Gilbertson, Michael

    2006-09-01

    A local collaborative process was launched in Windsor, Ontario, Canada to explore the role of occupation as a risk factor for cancer. An initial hypothesis-generating study found an increased risk for breast cancer among women aged 55 years or younger who had ever worked in farming. On the basis of this result, a 2-year case-control study was undertaken to evaluate the lifetime occupational histories of women with breast cancer. The results indicate that women with breast cancer were nearly three times more likely to have worked in agriculture when compared to the controls (OR = 2.80 [95% CI, 1.6-4.8]). The risk for those who worked in agriculture and subsequently worked in automotive-related manufacturing was further elevated (OR = 4.0 [95% CI, 1.7-9.9]). The risk for those employed in agriculture and subsequently employed in health care was also elevated (OR = 2.3 [95% CI, 1.1-4.6]). Farming tended to be among the earlier jobs worked, often during adolescence. While this article has limitations including the small sample size and the lack of information regarding specific exposures, it does provide evidence of a possible association between farming and breast cancer. The findings indicate the need for further study to determine which aspects of farming may be of biological importance and to better understand the significance of timing of exposure in terms of cancer risk.

  10. The limitations of case-control studies in the detection of environmental carcinogens.

    PubMed Central

    Crombie, I K

    1981-01-01

    The ability of the case-control study to detect human carcinogens has been investigated theoretically for varying fractions of the population exposed to hazards carrying different relative risks. The method is shown to be useful for the investigation of factors to which exposure is widespread (for example, common foods or beverages) but it is of limited use for the study of uncommon types of exposure, such as those associated with occupation. The case-control study is unable to detect very small relative risks (less than 1.5) even where exposure is widespread and large numbers of cases of cancer are occurring in the population. The principal limitation of the method is the maximum number of cases which can be recruited and analysed. It will only be through large-scale collaborative multicentre or international studies that important risk factors will be detected. PMID:7338704

  11. Violence against women and gastroschisis: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Ortega-García, Juan Antonio; Soldin, Offie P; Sánchez-Sauco, Miguel Felipe; Cánovas-Conesa, Alicia; Gomaríz-Peñalver, Virtudes; Jaimes-Vega, Diana Carolina; Perales, Joseph E; Cárceles-Alvarez, Alberto; Martínez-Ros, Maria Teresa; Ruiz, Daniel

    2013-10-17

    Gastroschisis, a birth defect characterized by herniated fetal abdominal wall, occurs more commonly in infants born to teenage and young mothers. Ischemia of the vascular vitelline vessels is the likely mechanism of pathogenesis. Given that chronic stress and violence against women are risk factors for cardiovascular disease we explored whether these may represent risk factors for gastroschisis, when they occur during pregnancy. A case-control study was conducted, with 15 incident cases of children born with gastroschisis in the Region of Murcia, Spain, from December 2007 to June 2013. Forty concurrent controls were recruited at gestation weeks 20-24 or post-partum. All mothers of cases and controls completed a comprehensive, in-person, 'green sheet' questionnaire on environmental exposures. Mothers of children with gastroschisis were younger, smoked more cigarettes per week relative to controls, were exposed to higher amounts of illegal drugs, and suffered from domestic violence more frequently than the controls. Multivariable logistic regression analysis highlights periconceptional 'gender-related violence' (OR: 16.6, 95% CI 2.7 to 101.7) and younger maternal age (OR 1.1, 95% CI 1.0-1.3). Violence against pregnant women is associated with birth defects, and should be studied in more depth as a cause-effect teratogenic. Psychosocial risk factors, including gender-based violence, are important for insuring the health and safety of the pregnant mother and the fetus.

  12. Violence against Women and Gastroschisis: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-García, Juan Antonio; Soldin, Offie P.; Sánchez-Sauco, Miguel Felipe; Cánovas-Conesa, Alicia; Gomaríz-Peñalver, Virtudes; Jaimes-Vega, Diana Carolina; Perales, Joseph E.; Cárceles-Alvarez, Alberto; Martínez-Ros, Maria Teresa; Ruiz, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Background: Gastroschisis, a birth defect characterized by herniated fetal abdominal wall, occurs more commonly in infants born to teenage and young mothers. Ischemia of the vascular vitelline vessels is the likely mechanism of pathogenesis. Given that chronic stress and violence against women are risk factors for cardiovascular disease we explored whether these may represent risk factors for gastroschisis, when they occur during pregnancy. A case-control study was conducted, with 15 incident cases of children born with gastroschisis in the Region of Murcia, Spain, from December 2007 to June 2013. Forty concurrent controls were recruited at gestation weeks 20–24 or post-partum. All mothers of cases and controls completed a comprehensive, in-person, ‘green sheet’ questionnaire on environmental exposures. Results: Mothers of children with gastroschisis were younger, smoked more cigarettes per week relative to controls, were exposed to higher amounts of illegal drugs, and suffered from domestic violence more frequently than the controls. Multivariable logistic regression analysis highlights periconceptional ‘gender-related violence’ (OR: 16.6, 95% CI 2.7 to 101.7) and younger maternal age (OR 1.1, 95% CI 1.0–1.3). Conclusions: Violence against pregnant women is associated with birth defects, and should be studied in more depth as a cause-effect teratogenic. Psychosocial risk factors, including gender-based violence, are important for insuring the health and safety of the pregnant mother and the fetus. PMID:24142184

  13. Nutrient patterns and asthenozoospermia: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Eslamian, G; Amirjannati, N; Rashidkhani, B; Sadeghi, M-R; Hekmatdoost, A

    2017-04-01

    The association of dietary nutrient patterns and sperm motility is not yet well elucidated, and previous studies have just focused on the isolated nutrients. This case-control study examined the association of nutrient patterns with asthenozoospermia among Iranian men. In total, 107 incident asthenozoospermic men and 235 age-matched controls were interviewed through the infertility clinics in Tehran, Iran, from January 2012 to November 2013. Semen quality data were analysed according to the fifth edition of WHO guideline. Nutrient patterns were identified using principal component analysis based on semiquantitative 168-item food frequency questionnaires. All nutrient intakes were energy-adjusted by the residual method. In principal component analysis, three dietary patterns emerged. The first pattern, which was high in vitamin E, vitamin D, vitamin C, zinc, folate, total fibre, selenium and polyunsaturated fatty acids, was significantly associated with lower risk of asthenozoospermia. After adjustment for potential confounders, participants in the highest tertile of the first pattern scores had 51% lower risk of asthenozoospermia compared with those in the lowest (p-trend: .004). Our findings suggest that adherence to the pattern comprising mainly of antioxidant nutrients may be inversely associated with asthenozoospermia.

  14. Periodontal disease and spontaneous preterm birth: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Stephen; Frydman, Albert; Cox, Stephen; Brant, Rollin; Needoba, Sheilia; Eley, Barry; Sauve, Reg

    2006-01-01

    Background Several studies have suggested an association between periodontal disease and prematurity but this finding has not been consistently observed. Methods Case control study. Cases (n = 50) were women who had delivered after spontaneous preterm labor at <35 weeks gestation. Two groups of controls (n = 101) were recruited: women who were undelivered but at a preterm gestation and women who delivered at term. A standard, clinical, periodontal examination was performed and gingival crevicular fluid was obtained from standardized locations and tested for neutrophil elastase along with the bacterial enzymes gingipain and dipeptidylpeptidase. Data were analyzed with Fisher's exact tests, ANOVA and multivariate logistic regression. Results There was no difference in the proportion of sites with significant attachment loss (≥3 mm): Cases-3.2%, Controls-2.2% p = 0.21. The gingival crevicular fluid concentrations of elastase and gingipain were elevated in cases vs. controls 238.8 uU/ul vs. 159.6 uU/ul p = .007 and 2.70 uU/ul vs. 1.56 uU/ul p = .001. On multivariate analysis, the mean log concentration of elastase, but not of gingipain, remained a significant predictor of preterm labor p = .0.015. Conclusion We found no evidence that clinical periodontal disease is associated with spontaneous preterm birth. Elevated gingival crevicular fluid levels of elastase were associated with preterm birth but further research is needed before this can be assumed to be a causal relationship. PMID:16848912

  15. Sequential tests for gene-environment interactions in matched case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Tweel, Ingeborg van der; Schipper, Maria

    2004-12-30

    The sample size necessary to detect a significant gene x environment interaction in an observational study can be large. For reasons of cost-effectiveness and efficient use of available biological samples we investigated the properties of sequential designs in matched case-control studies to test for both non-hierarchical and hierarchical interactions. We derived the test statistics Z and V and their characteristics when applied in a two-sided triangular test. Results of simulations show good agreement with theoretical values for V and the type I error. Power values were larger than their theoretical values for very large sample sizes. Median gain in efficiency was about 27 per cent. For a 'rare' phenotype gain in efficiency was larger when the alternative hypothesis was true than under the null hypothesis. Sequential designs lead to substantial efficiency gains in tests for interaction in matched case-control studies.

  16. A case-control study of gastric cancer in Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, N; Plummer, M; Vivas, J; Moreno, V; De Sanjosé, S; Lopez, G; Oliver, W

    2001-08-01

    A case-control study to evaluate risk factors for gastric cancer was carried out among 292 cases of gastric cancer and 485 controls in a high-risk area of Venezuela. Subjects were interviewed using a structured questionnaire, which elicited information on residential history, socio-economic status, family history of gastric diseases, smoking, drinking and dietary habits. Habitual diet was estimated from a meal-structured food frequency questionnaire on 75 food items. There was a strong inverse association with social class, as measured by education and by indicators of poverty. The results of the dietary analysis suggest that a diet high in starch and low in meat, fish and fresh vegetables increases risk of gastric cancer. A protective effect was observed for frequent consumption of allium vegetables. Inverse associations were found with height, which may reflect nutritional status in childhood, and with refrigerator use in the first two decades of life. Alcohol and tobacco consumption was investigated among males only, since the prevalence of alcohol and tobacco use was very low in females. Alcohol drinkers were at higher risk than non-drinkers and there was a small excess risk for current smokers compared with never smokers. There was some evidence of familial aggregation of gastric cancer. These findings will have important implications in planning preventive strategies for gastric cancer in Venezuela.

  17. Association between diabetes and tuberculosis: case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Susan Martins; de Araújo, Gleide Santos; Santos, Carlos Antônio de Souza Teles; de Oliveira, Maeli Gomes; Barreto, Maurício Lima

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To test the association between diabetes and tuberculosis. METHODS It is a case-control study, matched by age and sex. We included 323 new cases of tuberculosis with positive results for bacilloscopy. The controls were 323 respiratory symptomatic patients with negative bacilloscopy, from the same health services, such as: ambulatory cases from three referral hospitals and six basic health units responsible for the notifications of new cases of tuberculosis in Salvador, Bahia. Data collection occurred between 2008 and 2010. The instruments used were structured interview, including clinical data, capillary blood glucose (during fasting or postprandial), and the CAGE questionnaire for screening of abusive consumption of alcohol. Descriptive, exploratory, and multivariate analysis was performed using conditional logistic regression. RESULTS The average age of the cases was 38.5 (SD = 14.2) years and of the controls, 38.5 (SD = 14.3) years. Among cases and controls, most subjects (61%) were male. In univariate analysis we found association between the occurrence of diabetes and tuberculosis (OR = 2.37; 95%CI 1.04–5.42), which remained statistically significant after adjustment for potential confounders (OR = 3.12; 95%CI 1.12–7.94). CONCLUSIONS The association between diabetes and tuberculosis can hinder the control of tuberculosis, contributing to the maintainance of the disease burden. The situation demands increasing early detection of diabetes among people with tuberculosis, in an attempt to improve disease control strategies. PMID:28099656

  18. Case-control study of a gastroschisis cluster in Nevada.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Leslie; Loomis, Dana; Lottritz, Lisa; Slotnick, Robert Nathan; Oki, Earle; Todd, Randall

    2009-11-01

    To identify potential risk factors associated with a sudden increase in gastroschisis cases in northern Nevada. Case-control study. Medical centers and a pregnancy care center in Reno, Nevada. Participants (n = 14) were women who gave birth to infants with gastroschisis at either of the 2 medical centers in Reno, Nevada, from April 5, 2007, through April 4, 2008. Controls (n = 57) were selected from the same pregnancy center providing perinatal care to the cases and were matched 4:1 to the case mothers by maternal date of birth within 1 year. Environmental exposures and illnesses during pregnancy. Association of gastroschisis with illnesses, medications, or environmental exposures. Gastroschisis was associated with the use of methamphetamine (odds ratio [OR], 7.15; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.35-37.99) or any vasoconstrictive recreational drug (methamphetamine, amphetamine, cocaine, ecstasy) (OR, 4.46; 95% CI, 1.21-16.44) before pregnancy. When we limited self-reported illnesses to those occurring during the first trimester of pregnancy, chest colds (OR, 16.77; 95% CI, 1.88-150.27) and sore throats (OR, 12.72; 95% CI, 1.32-122.52) were associated with gastroschisis. These findings add strength to the hypothesis that use of methamphetamine and related drugs is a risk factor for gastroschisis and raise questions about the risks associated with infections.

  19. Smoking, the environment and meningococcal disease: a case control study.

    PubMed Central

    Stanwell-Smith, R. E.; Stuart, J. M.; Hughes, A. O.; Robinson, P.; Griffin, M. B.; Cartwright, K.

    1994-01-01

    This case control study investigated environmental factors in 74 confirmed cases of meningococcal disease (MD). In children aged under 5, passive smoking in the home (30 or more cigarettes daily) was associated with an odds ratio (OR) of 7.5 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.46-38.66). ORs increased both with the numbers of cigarettes smoked and with the number of smokers in the household, suggesting a dose-response relationship. MD in this age group was also significantly associated with household overcrowding (more than 1.5 persons per room) (OR 6.0, 95% CI 1.10-32.8), with kisses on the mouth with 4 or more contacts in the previous 2 weeks (OR 2.46, 95% CI 1.09-5.56), with exposure to dust from plaster, brick or stone in the previous 2 weeks (OR 2.24, 95% CI 1.07-4.65); and with changes in residence (OR 3.0, 95% CI 1.0-8.99), marital arguments (OR 3.0, 95% CI 1.26-7.17) and legal disputes in the previous 6 months (OR 3.10, 95% CI 1.24-7.78). These associations were independent of social class. Public health measures to lower the prevalence of cigarette smoking by parents of young children may reduce the incidence of MD. The influence of building dust and stressful life events merits further investigation. PMID:8150006

  20. Childhood trauma in multiple sclerosis: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Spitzer, Carsten; Bouchain, Miriam; Winkler, Liza Y; Wingenfeld, Katja; Gold, Stefan M; Grabe, Hans Joergen; Barnow, Sven; Otte, Christian; Heesen, Christoph

    2012-04-01

    To investigate the association between childhood trauma and multiple sclerosis (MS) by comparing histories of child abuse and neglect between patients with MS and adults from the general population in a cross-sectional case-control study. Previous research has demonstrated a connection between MS and a variety of emotional stressors, but childhood trauma, which is known to have long-lasting negative consequences for physical health decades into adulthood, has not been studied. The self-reported Childhood Trauma Questionnaire for the assessment of emotional, physical, and sexual abuse and emotional and physical neglect was administered to 234 patients with definite MS and 885 adults from the general population. After adjusting for sociodemographic factors and current depression, patients with MS scored significantly higher in all Childhood Trauma Questionnaire subscales apart from physical abuse and neglect than adults from the general population. Adjusted odds ratios for these types of childhood trauma were higher in the MS group than in controls, ranging from 2.0 for emotional neglect (95% confidence interval = 1.3-3.2) to 3.4 for emotional abuse (95% confidence interval = 2.0-5.7). Although childhood trauma was not associated with the degree of current MS-related disability, patients with MS with histories of physical and/or sexual abuse had significantly higher relapse rates than patients without early-life stress. Our findings suggest an association between childhood trauma and MS in this cross-sectional study. Larger prospective longitudinal studies are needed to clarify the relationship between early-life stress and the risk for MS in genetically susceptible individuals.

  1. [Oxidative stress and longevity; a case-control study].

    PubMed

    Belenguer Varea, Ángel; Mohamed Abdelaziz, Kheira; Avellana Zaragoza, Juan Antonio; Borrás Blasco, Consuelo; Sanchis Aguilar, Paula; Viña Ribes, José

    2015-01-01

    Human longevity is a complex issue influenced by genetic and environmental factors. Oxidative stress (OE) could play an important role in this process. Succesful aging could be related with the organism ability facing OE. In the present study we compared malondialdehyde (MDA) and oxidized proteins (OP) plasma levels, in elderly people older than 97 years and 70-80 years old, to better understand the effects of OE on human longevity. Population-based case control study. We considered as cases patients who were born and live on la Ribera county in Valencia (Spain) older than 97 years old and who accepted to participate in the study. Controls were from the same poblational base, chosen randomly, and 70-80 years old. We made a descriptive analysis of sociodemographic, clinic and functional variables; an odds ratio (OR) estimation of being centenarian by OP and MDA quartiles; and a tendency analysis by Mantel-Haenszel test. Twenty eight cases and 31 controls were included. Functional state and robust percentage were worse in cases. MDA (1,44±0,45 vs 1,84±0,59, p=0,005), and OP (64,29±15,73 vs. 76,52±13,44, p=0,002) levels, were significantly lower in cases. The OR of being centenarian in lower/higher quartile were 3,8 for MDA and 5,7 for OP, with a Mantel-Haenszel signification of 0,029 and 0,044 respectively. In our study OE level were lower in centenarians than in younger elderly, and the lower the OE grade, the higher were the likelihood of being centenarian. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Espana.

  2. Tumor diagnosis preceding Parkinson's disease: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    D'Amelio, Marco; Ragonese, Paolo; Morgante, Letterio; Epifanio, Antonio; Callari, Graziella; Salemi, Giuseppe; Savettieri, Giovanni

    2004-07-01

    Lower cancer risk in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients compared to the general population has been reported. However, most of the studies were based on death certificates. We designed a case-control study to estimate the association of tumor preceding PD onset and PD. PD patients were matched by age and gender to PD-free individuals, randomly selected from the municipalities of residence of cases. Occurrence of tumors preceding PD onset was assessed through a structured questionnaire. Neoplasms were categorized as benign, malignant, or of uncertain classification, and endocrine-related or not. Odds ratios (OR) were calculated using conditional logistic regression and adjusted for tumor categories and risk factors. We included 222 PD patients. Frequency of cancer was 6.8% for cases, 12.6% for controls. PD patients had a decreased risk for neoplasms (adjusted OR, 0.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.2-0.7). Risk was reduced only for women (adjusted OR, 0.3; 95% CI, 0.1-0.7). PD patients had a decreased risk both for malignant (adjusted OR, 0.6; 95% CI, 0.1-2.5) and nonmalignant neoplasms (adjusted OR, 0.3; 95% CI, 0.1-0.7). Still, risk was decreased for endocrine-related tumors (adjusted OR, 0.3; 95% CI, 0.1-0.9) and non-endocrine-related tumors (adjusted OR, 0.4; 95% CI, 0.1-0.9). Our study confirms the inverse association between PD and neoplasms reported in previous epidemiologic studies.

  3. Zinc status in febrile seizure: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Salehiomran, Mohammad Reza; Mahzari, Masoumeh

    2013-01-01

    Febrile seizure is the most common type of seizure in children. Their incidence is 2-5%. There are different hypotheses about relationship between neurotransmitters and trace elements (such as zinc) and febrile seizure. Zinc, as a major element of some enzymes, plays an important role in the central nervous system (CNS) and can affect some inhibitory mechanisms of CNS. The aim of the present study was to determine whether there were any changes in serum zinc level in children with febrile seizure in comparison with febrile children without seizure. This case-control study was performed on 100 patients aged 6 months to 6 years. This study was conducted between January and August 2012, on 50 children with febrile seizures (case) and 50 febrile children without seizures (control), that were referred to Amirkola Children Hospital (a referral hospital in the north of Iran). Two groups were matched for age and sex. The serum zinc levels in the both groups were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry method. The mean serum zinc level was 0.585±0.166 mg/L and 0.704±0.179 mg/L in the case group and the control group, respectively (p=0.001). The mean serum zinc level was significantly lower in the febrile seizure group compared to the control groups. Our findings revealed that serum zinc level was significantly lower in children with simple febrile seizure in comparison with febrile children without seizure. It can emphasize the hypothesis that there is a relation between serum zinc level and febrile seizure in children.

  4. Occupational Risk Factors for COPD: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Drame, Moustapha; Lebargy, Francois; Deschamps, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this research was to examine the occupational risk factors for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases (COPD) in a range of occupations. Methods Eleven occupations involving different types of exposure were observed in this multicenter case-control study. Controls and cases were matched for sex, age and smoking. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs). Results A total of 1,519 participants were initially recruited between September 2004 and September 2012. After matching, 547 pairs were obtained. The mean age was 56.3 +/- 10.4 years. Smelter workers were the only ones with an increased risk of COPD in this study (OR = 7.6, p < 0.0001, 95% CI [4.5, 12.9]). Physical activity was protective (OR = 0.7), while living in the city was a risk (OR = 1.6). The main used metals were cast iron, aluminum and alloys. Molds and cores were mainly made from sand and synthetic resins. Machine maintenance (65.2%), molding (49.6%), finishing (41.1%) and casting (41.0%) were the most common activities. Almost all workers (95.1%) cleaned the floors and machines with a brush or compressed air. Conclusions This study demonstrates the importance of occupational factors in the genesis of COPD, especially among smelter workers. As with the fight against smoking-related disease, the removal or substitution of recognized hazardous agents is the best way of preventing the onset of COPD. This is why it is essential to continue research on its occupational risk factors. PMID:27487078

  5. Snow sports injuries in Scotland: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Langran, M; Selvaraj, S

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the incidence and patterns of snow sports injuries at the three largest commercial ski areas in Scotland and to identify factors associated with injury risk. Methods: A prospective case-control study of all injured people at Cairngorm, Glenshee, and Nevis Range ski areas during the 1999–2000 winter season. Personal details, snow sports related variables, diagnosis, and treatment were recorded. Control data were collected at random from uninjured people at all three areas. Random counts were performed to analyse the composition of the on slope population. Results: A total of 732 injuries were recorded in 674 people. Control data were collected from 336 people. The injury rate for the study was 3.7 injuries per 1000 skier days. Alpine skiers comprised 67% of the on slope population, snowboarders 26%, skiboarders 4%, and telemark skiers 2%. Lower limb injuries and sprains were the commonest injuries in alpine skiers and skiboarders. Snowboarders sustained more injuries to the upper limb and axial areas. Skiboarders and snowboarders had a higher incidence of fractures. After adjustment for other variables, three factors were all independently associated with injury: snowboarding (odds ratio (OR) 4.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.65 to 10.08), alpine skiing (OR 3.82, CI 1.6 to 9.13), and age <16 years (OR 1.9, CI 1.14 to 3.17). More than five days of experience in the current season and at least one week of experience in total had a protective effect against injury. Conclusions: Despite a change in the composition of the alpine population at Scottish ski areas, the overall rate and pattern of injury are similar to those reported previously in comparable studies. Several factors are associated with an increased risk of injury and should be targeted in future injury prevention campaigns. PMID:11916898

  6. [Risk factors associated with trigger finger. Case-control study].

    PubMed

    De la Parra-Márquez, Miguel Leonardo; Tamez-Cavazos, Roberto; Zertuche-Cedillo, Luis; Martínez-Pérez, Juan José; Velasco-Rodríguez, Víctor; Cisneros-Pérez, Vicente

    2008-01-01

    We undertook this study to identify risk factors in our population associated with trigger finger. The study was conducted at the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, UMAE 21, Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico. This was a case-control, retrospective, and observational study. There were 250 patients in each group. For cases, patients who were operated on for trigger finger from March 2006 to August 2006 were included. Controls included patients admitted to the Emergency Department with hand injuries that fulfilled the selection criteria. Risk factors analyzed were diabetes, hypertension, smoking, sex, age, weight, and 19 different occupations. Mean age of the cases was 52 years (SE +/- 14.19 years) with a median and mode of 53 years. The right hand was the most common with the middle, thumb, ring, index and little fingers, respectively. A significant statistical relationship was found: females (OR 7.57, 95% CI 5.07-11.31); diabetes (OR 3.72, 95% CI 2.43-5.70); obesity (OR 1.49, 95% CI 1.02-2.19). With regard to occupation, a statistical relationship was found: homemaker (OR 2.44, 95% CI 1.62-3.69); seamstress (OR 4.8, 95% CI 1.3-21.6); and secretary (OR 2.74, 95% CI 1.38-5.52). Trigger finger is a common pathology in our population and is more frequent in women >53 years old. It may be related to diabetes, body mass index (obesity) and certain occupations such as secretary, seamstress and homemaker.

  7. Surgical site infections in breast surgery: case-control study.

    PubMed

    Vilar-Compte, Diana; Jacquemin, Benedicte; Robles-Vidal, Carlos; Volkow, Patricia

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the frequency of surgical site infections (SSIs) and identify associated risk factors for each type of breast surgery at a cancer hospital. We used a nested case-control design. Between February 1, 2000 and July 31, 2000, all breast surgeries performed were recorded on a daily basis. After hospital discharge, we evaluated patients simultaneously with surgeons three times a week for 30 days or longer. The odds ratio (OR) was estimated using logistic regression analysis. The study followed 280 patients (298 wounds). Altogether, 77 SSIs were detected, for an overall SSI rate of 25.8% (77/298). For excisions, conservative surgery, and radical mastectomies the SSI rates were 1.4%, 18.0%, and 38.3%, respectively. Excisions were excluded ( n = 68) for risk factor analysis. After multivariate analysis, risk factors associated with SSIs were obesity [OR 2.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-4.3], concomitant chemotherapy and radiation (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.2-4.3), radical surgery (OR 3.1, 95% CI 1.1-8.6), insertion of a second drain during the late postoperative period (OR 3.7, 95% CI 1.8-7.8), and drainage duration > or = 19 days (OR 2.9, 95% CI 1.5-5.6). The bacteria most frequently isolated were Pseudomonas aeruginosa ( n = 18 ), Serratia sp. ( n = 18), Staphylococcus aureus ( n = 10), and Staphylococcus epidermidis ( n = 10). Poor compliance with infection control practices and wound management was detected throughout the study period. The overall frequency of SSIs for mastectomies was higher than the reported rates, which was principally related to the more radical surgery required for advanced-stage disease, preoperative irradiation, and inadequate wound and drain care.

  8. Facial dermatosis associated with Demodex: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ya-e; Peng, Yan; Wang, Xiang-lan; Wu, Li-ping; Wang, Mei; Yan, Hu-ling; Xiao, Sheng-xiang

    2011-12-01

    Demodex has been considered to be related with multiple skin disorders, but controversy persists. In this case-control study, a survey was conducted with 860 dermatosis patients aged 12 to 84 years in Xi'an, China to identify the association between facial dermatosis and Demodex. Amongst the patients, 539 suffered from facial dermatosis and 321 suffered from non-facial dermatosis. Demodex mites were sampled and examined using the skin pressurization method. Multivariate regression analysis was applied to analyze the association between facial dermatosis and Demodex infestation, and to identify the risk factors of Demodex infestation. The results showed that total detection rate of Demodex was 43.0%. Patients aged above 30 years had higher odds of Demodex infestation than those under 30 years. Compared to patients with neutral skin, patients with mixed, oily, or dry skin were more likely to be infested with Demodex (odds ratios (ORs) were 2.5, 2.4, and 1.6, respectively). Moreover, Demodex infestation was found to be statistically associated with rosacea (OR=8.1), steroid-induced dermatitis (OR=2.7), seborrheic dermatitis (OR=2.2), and primary irritation dermatitis (OR=2.1). In particular, ORs calculated from the severe infestation (≥5 mites/cm(2)) rate were significantly higher than those of the total rate. Therefore, we concluded that Demodex is associated with rosacea, steroid-induced dermatitis, seborrheic dermatitis, and primary irritation dermatitis. The rate of severe infestation is found to be more correlated with various dermatosis than the total infestation rate. The risk factors of Demodex infestation, age, and skin types were identified. Our study also suggested that good hygiene practice might reduce the chances of demodicosis and Demodex infestation.

  9. Risk factors for psoriasis: A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Jankovic, Slavenka; Raznatovic, Milena; Marinkovic, Jelena; Jankovic, Janko; Maksimovic, Natasa

    2009-06-01

    A case-control study of 110 consecutive psoriatic outpatients and 200 unmatched controls was carried out in order to analyze the association of psoriasis with smoking habits, alcohol consumption, family history of psoriasis and stressful life events. Stressful life events were assessed with Paykel's Interview for Recent Life Events, a semi-structured interview covering 63 life events. According to our results, the risk of psoriasis is higher in urban dwellers (odds ratio [OR] = 3.61; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.99-13.18), patients who were divorced (OR = 5.69; 95% CI = 2.26-14.34) and those exposed to environmental tobacco smoke at home (OR = 2.29; 95% CI = 1.12-4.67). Alcohol consumption (OR = 2.55; 95% CI = 1.26-5.17), family history of psoriasis (OR = 33.96; 95% CI = 14.14-81.57) and change in work conditions (OR = 8.34; 95% CI = 1.86-37.43) are also risk factors for psoriasis. Separate analyses for men and women showed that the risk of developing psoriasis was stronger in men with a family history of psoriasis (OR = 30.39; 95% CI = 6.72-137.42) than in women (OR = 16.99; 95% CI = 7.21-40.07). The effect of environmental tobacco smoke at home was found only in women (OR = 2.44; 95% CI = 1.26-4.73). Future well-designed epidemiological studies need to be performed in order to determine whether lifestyle factors and stress could be risk factors triggering or aggravating psoriasis.

  10. Case-control study on analgesics and nephropathy (SAN): protocol

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, Lothar AJ; Garbe, Edeltraut; Lewis, Michael; van der Woude, Fokko; Graf, Helmut

    2005-01-01

    Background The association between intake of non-phenacetin-containing analgesics and the occurrence of chronic renal failure is still controversially discussed. A new epidemiologic study was planned and conducted in Germany and Austria. Methods/design The objective of the international, multicenter case-control study was to evaluate the association between end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and use of non-phenacetin-containing analgesics with particular emphasis on combined formulations. A targeted sample of 1000 new (incident) dialysis patients, aged less than 50 years, was planned to recruit between January 1, 2001 and December 31, 2004. The age limit was chosen to avoid contamination of the study population with phenacetin-containing analgesics to the extent possible. Four control subjects per ESRD case, matched by age, sex, and region were selected from the population living in the region the case came from. Lifetime exposure to analgesics and potential renal risk factors were recorded in a single face-to-face interview. A set of aids was introduced to reinforce the memory of study participants. A standardized, pre-tested interview questionnaire (participants), a medical documentation sheet (physicians in dialysis centres), a logbook for all activities (dialysis centres) were used to collect the necessary data. Quality management consisted of the standardized procedures, (re-) training and supervision of interviewers, regular checks of all incoming data for completeness and plausibility. The study is scientifically independent and governed by a international Scientific Advisory Committee that bridged the gap between the sponsoring companies and the investigators. Also other advisory groups assisted the managing committee of the study. All relevant German and Austrian nephrological associations supported the study, and the study design was carefully reviewed and approved by the Kidney Foundation of Germany. Discussion The study is expected to answer the main

  11. Laparoscopic surgery for colorectal cancer is safe and has survival outcomes similar to those of open surgery in elderly patients with a poor performance status: subanalysis of a large multicenter case-control study in Japan.

    PubMed

    Niitsu, Hiroaki; Hinoi, Takao; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Ohdan, Hideki; Hasegawa, Hirotoshi; Suzuka, Ichio; Fukunaga, Yosuke; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Endo, Shungo; Tagami, Soichi; Idani, Hitoshi; Ichihara, Takao; Watanabe, Kazuteru; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    It remains controversial whether open or laparoscopic surgery should be indicated for elderly patients with colorectal cancer and a poor performance status. In those patients aged 80 years or older with Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status score of 2 or greater who received elective surgery for stage 0 to stage III colorectal adenocarcinoma and had no concomitant malignancies and who were enrolled in a multicenter case-control study entitled "Retrospective study of laparoscopic colorectal surgery for elderly patients" that was conducted in Japan between 2003 and 2007, background characteristics and short-term and long-term outcomes for open surgery and laparoscopic surgery were compared. Of the 398 patients included, 295 underwent open surgery and 103 underwent laparoscopic surgery. There were no significant differences in the baseline characteristics between open surgery and laparoscopic surgery patients, except for previous abdominal surgery and TNM stage. The median operation duration was shorter with open surgery (open surgery, 153 min; laparoscopic surgery, 202 min; P < 0.001), and less blood loss occurred with laparoscopic surgery (median open surgery, 109 g; median laparoscopic surgery, 30 g; P < 0.001). An operation duration of 180 min or more (odds ratio, 1.97; 95 % confidence interval, 1.17-3.37; P = 0.011) and selection of laparoscopic surgery (odds ratio, 0.41; 95 % confidence interval, 0.22-0.75; P = 0.003) were statistically significant in the multivariate analysis for postoperative morbidity. Moreover, laparoscopic surgery did not result in an inferior overall survival rate compared with open surgery (log-rank test P = 0.289, 0.278, 0.346, 0.199, for all-stage, stage 0-I, stage II, and stage III disease, respectively). Laparoscopic surgery in elderly colorectal cancer patients with a poor performance status is safe and not inferior to open surgery in terms of overall survival.

  12. Risk factors for syphilis in women: case-control study

    PubMed Central

    de Macêdo, Vilma Costa; de Lira, Pedro Israel Cabral; de Frias, Paulo Germano; Romaguera, Luciana Maria Delgado; Caires, Silvana de Fátima Ferreira; Ximenes, Ricardo Arraes de Alencar

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To determine the sociodemographic, behavioral, and health care factors related to the occurrence of syphilis in women treated at public maternity hospitals. METHODS This is a case-control study (239 cases and 322 controls) with women admitted to seven maternity hospitals in the municipality of Recife, Brazil, from July 2013 to July 2014. Eligible women were recruited after the result of the VDRL (Venereal Disease Research Laboratory) under any titration. The selection of cases and controls was based on the result of the serology for syphilis using ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay). The independent variables were grouped into: sociodemographic, behavioral, clinical and obstetric history, and health care in prenatal care and maternity hospital. Information was obtained by interview, during hospitalization, with the application of a questionnaire. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated using logistic regression to identify the predicting factors of the variable to be explained. RESULTS The logistic regression analysis identified as determinant factors for gestational syphilis: education level of incomplete basic education or illiterate (OR = 2.02), lack of access to telephone (OR = 2.4), catholic religion (OR = 1.70 ), four or more pregnancies (OR = 2.2), three or more sexual partners in the last year (OR = 3.1), use of illicit drugs before the age of 18 (OR = 3.0), and use of illicit drugs by the current partner (OR = 1.7). Only one to three prenatal appointments (OR = 3.5) and a previous history of sexually transmitted infection (OR = 9.7) were also identified as determinant factors. CONCLUSIONS Sociodemographic, behavioral, and health care factors are associated with the occurrence of syphilis in women and should be taken into account in the elaboration of universal strategies aimed at the prevention and control of syphilis, but with a focus on situations of greater vulnerability. PMID:28832758

  13. Toxocariasis in Waste Pickers: A Case Control Seroprevalence Study

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme

    2013-01-01

    Background The epidemiology of Toxocara infection in humans in Mexico has been poorly explored. There is a lack of information about Toxocara infection in waste pickers. Aims Determine the seroepidemiology of Toxocara infection in waste pickers. Methods Through a case control study design, the presence of anti-Toxocara IgG antibodies was determined in 90 waste pickers and 90 age- and gender-matched controls using an enzyme-linked immunoassay. Associations of Toxocara exposure with socio-demographic, work, clinical, and behavioral data of the waste pickers were also evaluated. Results The seroprevalence of anti-Toxocara IgG antibodies was significantly higher in waste pickers (12/90: 13%) than in control subjects (1/90: 1%) (OR  = 14; 95% CI: 2–288). The seroprevalence was not influenced by socio-demographic or work characteristics. In contrast, increased seroprevalence was found in waste pickers suffering from gastritis, and reflex and visual impairments. Multivariate analysis showed that Toxocara exposure was associated with a low frequency of eating out of home (OR  = 26; 95% CI: 2–363) and negatively associated with consumption of chicken meat (OR  = 0.03; 95% CI: 0.003–0.59). Other behavioral characteristics such as animal contacts or exposure to soil were not associated with Toxocara seropositivity. Conclusions 1) Waste pickers are a risk group for Toxocara infection. 2) Toxocara is impacting the health of waste pickers. This is the first report of Toxocara exposure in waste pickers and of associations of gastritis and reflex impairment with Toxocara seropositivity. Results warrant for further research. PMID:23349987

  14. Dermatological indicators of coronary risk: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Mirić, D; Fabijanić, D; Giunio, L; Eterović, D; Culić, V; Bozić, I; Hozo, I

    1998-12-31

    We examined the association of dermatological signs such as baldness, thoracic hairiness, hair greying and diagonal earlobe crease with the risk of myocardial infarction in men under the age of 60 years. A hospital-based, case-control study included 842 men admitted for the first non-fatal myocardial infarction, the controls were 712 men admitted with noncardiac diagnoses, without clinical signs of coronary disease. The relative risks were estimated as odds ratios. Logistic regression was used to control for the confounding variables. Baldness, thoracic hairiness and earlobe crease were approximately 40% more prevalent in cases (P<10(-6) in each case). In both cases and controls, baldness and thoracic hairiness were frequently coexistent, as well as hair greying and earlobe crease (P<10(-4) in each case). After allowing for age and other established coronary risk factors, the relative risk of myocardial infarction for fronto-parietal baldness compared with no hair loss was 1.77 (95% CI 1.27-2.45) and it was 1.83 (95 CI 1.4-2.3) for men with thick, extended thoracic hairiness. The presence of a diagonal earlobe crease yielded a relative risk of 1.37 (95% CI 1.25-1.5), while hair greying was associated with myocardial infarction only in men under the age of 50 years. It appears that baldness, thoracic hairiness and diagonal earlobe crease indicate an additional risk of myocardial infarction in men under the age of 60 years, independently of age and other established coronary risk factors.

  15. Hyperhomocysteinemia among Omani autistic children: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Ali, Amanat; Waly, Mostafa I; Al-Farsi, Yahya M; Essa, Musthafa M; Al-Sharbati, Marwan M; Deth, Richard C

    2011-01-01

    High serum homocysteine (Hcy) level is regarded as an indicator for impairment of folate-dependent methionine cycle and is associated with oxidative stress. In a case control study, we evaluated eighty 3-5 years old Omani children (40 diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder and 40 their age and gender matched controls) for their fasting serum homocysteine levels as a biomarker of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Serum folate and vitamin B(12) status were also evaluated. The serum homocysteine was measured using an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) technique whereas folate and vitamin B(12) were measured using an automated random access immune-assay system. The results indicated that mean serum Hcy levels were significantly (P < 0.05) higher in autistic children (20.1 ± 3.3 µmol/L) as compared to controls (9.64 ± 2.1 µmol/L). Significantly (P < 0.05) lower serum folate (1.8 ± 0.4 µg/L) and vitamin B(12) (191.1 ± 0.9 pg/mL) levels were observed in autistic children as compared to controls (6.1 ± 0.6 µg/L and 288.9 ± 1.3 pg/mL, respectively). The levels of homocysteine in autistic children were also much higher as compared to normal reference values (5-15 µmol/L). The results suggest that high fasting serum homocysteine and low folate and vitamin B(12) levels could be used as clinical biomarkers for an early diagnosis and management of ASD.

  16. Determinants of Brushite Stone Formation: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Siener, Roswitha; Netzer, Linda; Hesse, Albrecht

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The occurrence of brushite stones has increased during recent years. However, the pathogenic factors driving the development of brushite stones remain unclear. Methods Twenty-eight brushite stone formers and 28 age-, sex- and BMI-matched healthy individuals were enrolled in this case-control study. Anthropometric, clinical, 24 h urinary parameters and dietary intake from 7-day weighed food records were assessed. Results Pure brushite stones were present in 46% of patients, while calcium oxalate was the major secondary stone component. Urinary pH and oxalate excretion were significantly higher, whereas urinary citrate was lower in patients as compared to healthy controls. Despite lower dietary intake, urinary calcium excretion was significantly higher in brushite stone patients. Binary logistic regression analysis revealed pH>6.50 (OR 7.296; p = 0.035), calcium>6.40 mmol/24 h (OR 25.213; p = 0.001) and citrate excretion <2.600 mmol/24 h (OR 15.352; p = 0.005) as urinary risk factors for brushite stone formation. A total of 56% of patients exhibited distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA). Urinary pH, calcium and citrate excretion did not significantly differ between patients with or without dRTA. Conclusions Hypercalciuria, a diminished citrate excretion and an elevated pH turned out to be the major urinary determinants of brushite stone formation. Interestingly, urinary phosphate was not associated with urolithiasis. The increased urinary oxalate excretion, possibly due to decreased calcium intake, promotes the risk of mixed stone formation with calcium oxalate. Neither dietary factors nor dRTA can account as cause for hypercalciuria, higher urinary pH and diminished citrate excretion. Further research is needed to define the role of dRTA in brushite stone formation and to evaluate the hypothesis of an acquired acidification defect. PMID:24265740

  17. [Risk factors associated with preeclampsia: case-control study].

    PubMed

    Morgan-Ortiz, Fred; Calderón-Lara, Sergio Alberto; Martínez-Félix, Jesús Israel; González-Beltrán, Aurelio; Quevedo-Castro, Everardo

    2010-03-01

    Preeclampsia is one of the most frequent and serious complication of pregnancy characterized by systemic perfusion reduction generated by vasospasm and activation of coagulation systems. To evaluate the association between preeclampsia sociodemographics and obstetrics antecedents. An unmatched case-control study was carried out in which all the clinical registries of patients with preeclampsia (cases: n = 196) assisted in the period 2003-2007 in the Hospital Civil of Culiacan, Sinaloa State of Mexico were analyzed. As controls the clinical registries of patients assisted during the same period were selected at random but that they didn't show up preeclampsia (n = 470). The association of preeclampsia with socioeconomic level, tobacco use, alcohol use, gynecologic and obstetric antecedents (sexual partners, pregnancies, deliveries and abortions number, prenatal control, contraceptive method) and previous pregnancy with preeclampsia were analyzed. There were not association between tobacco use (OR: 3.05; 95% CI: 0.81-11.48), beginning of sexual activity (p = 0.1509), number of sexual partners (OR: 1.23; 95% CI: 0.83-1.83; p = 0.3009) and sexual cohabitation less than 12 months (OR: 0.90; 95% CI: 0.63-1.27). The alcoholism (OR: 5.77; 95% CI: 1.48-22.53), socioeconomic level (p < 0.05), pregnancy previous with preeclampsia (RM:14.81; 95% CI: 1.77-123.85; p = 0.0006) were associated with preeclampsia. There were differences in the use of the contraceptive method between groups (p < 0.005). Preeclampsia was significantly associated with the alcoholism, low socioeconomic level and pregnancy previous with preeclampsia.

  18. The Misconception of Case-Control Studies in the Plastic Surgery Literature: A Literature Audit.

    PubMed

    Hatchell, Alexandra C; Farrokhyar, Forough; Choi, Matthew

    2017-06-01

    Case-control study designs are commonly used. However, many published case-control studies are not true case-controls and are in fact mislabeled. The purpose of this study was to identify all case-control studies published in the top three plastic surgery journals over the past 10 years, assess which were truly case-control studies, clarify the actual design of the articles, and address common misconceptions. MEDLINE, Embase, and Web of Science databases were searched for case-control studies in the three highest-impact factor plastic surgery journals (2005 to 2015). Two independent reviewers screened the resulting titles, abstracts, and methods, if applicable, to identify articles labeled as case-control studies. These articles were appraised and classified as true case-control studies or non-case-control studies. The authors found 28 articles labeled as case-control studies. However, only six of these articles (21 percent) were truly case-control designs. Of the 22 incorrectly labeled studies, one (5 percent) was a randomized controlled trial, three (14 percent) were nonrandomized trials, two (9 percent) were prospective comparative cohort designs, 14 (64 percent) were retrospective comparative cohort designs, and two (9 percent) were cross-sectional designs. The mislabeling was worse in recent years, despite increases in evidence-based medicine awareness. The majority of published case-control studies are not in fact case-control studies. This misunderstanding is worsening with time. Most of these studies are actually comparative cohort designs. However, some studies are truly clinical trials and thus a higher level of evidence than originally proposed.

  19. Acromegalic axial arthropathy: a clinical case-control study.

    PubMed

    Scarpa, Raffaele; De Brasi, Davide; Pivonello, Rosario; Marzullo, Paolo; Manguso, Francesco; Sodano, Antonio; Oriente, Pasquale; Lombardi, Gaetano; Colao, Annamaria

    2004-02-01

    Arthropathy is the major cause of morbidity in acromegaly. To feature the spinal involvement, 54 patients with active acromegaly (27 men, 27 women; age range, 21-69 yr) and 54 sex-, age-, and body mass index-matched healthy controls were enrolled in this observational analytical prospective case-control study. A questionnaire to describe onset, duration, and severity of articular symptoms; rheumatological examination, including vertebral and chest mobility, Schober test, thorax expansion, and axial radiological study; and IGF-I, GH, insulin, and glucose level measurement (baseline and after an oral glucose tolerance test) was used to investigate the prevalence of arthropathy and correlate these findings with hormonal parameters. Axial arthropathy was found in 28 patients (52%) and 12 controls (22%; chi(2) = 8.9; P = 0.003). In detail, spinal mobility was reduced in 30 patients (56%) and 10 controls (18%; chi(2) = 14.3; P < 0.0001), thoracic cage was involved in six patients (11%), alterations of spinal profile were observed in 37 patients (68%) and 15 controls (28%; chi(2) = 16.3; P < 0.0001), and increased L2 vertebra diameters were observed in 34 patients (63%) and none of the controls (chi(2) = 46.7; P < 0.0001). Narrowing and widening of L2-L3 disk space were found in 20 (37%) and seven (13%) patients, respectively. Features of diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) were found in 11 patients (20%) and none of the controls (chi(2) = 10.1; P < 0.001). Disease duration was correlated with vertebral body height (P = 0.001) or intervertebral space height (P = 0.02), and lumbar mobility with thorax expansion (P = 0.004); DISH severity was correlated with basal (P = 0.04) and peak (P = 0.01) glucose levels after glucose load. In conclusion, chronic GH and IGF-I excess typically affects the axial skeleton with development of severe alterations of spine morphology and function until features of DISH occur. An early diagnosis of acromegaly is mandatory to reduce

  20. Spatial Analysis of Childhood Cancer: A Case/Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Ramis, Rebeca; Gómez-Barroso, Diana; Tamayo, Ibon; García-Pérez, Javier; Morales, Antonio; Pardo Romaguera, Elena; López-Abente, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    Background Childhood cancer was the leading cause of death among children aged 1-14 years for 2012 in Spain. Leukemia has the highest incidence, followed by tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) and lymphomas (Hodgkin lymphoma, HL, and Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, NHL). Spatial distribution of childhood cancer cases has been under concern with the aim of identifying potential risk factors. Objective The two objectives are to study overall spatial clustering and cluster detection of cases of the three main childhood cancer causes, looking to increase etiological knowledge. Methods We ran a case-control study. The cases were children aged 0 to 14 diagnosed with leukemia, lymphomas (HL and NHL) or CNS neoplasm in five Spanish regions for the period 1996-2011. As a control group, we used a sample from the Birth Registry matching every case by year of birth, autonomous region of residence and sex with six controls. We geocoded and validated the address of the cases and controls. For our two objectives we used two different methodologies. For the first, for overall spatial clustering detection, we used the differences of K functions from the spatial point patterns perspective proposed by Diggle and Chetwynd and the second, for cluster detection, we used the spatial scan statistic proposed by Kulldorff with a level for statistical significance of 0.05. Results We had 1062 cases of leukemia, 714 cases of CNS, 92 of HL and 246 of NHL. Accordingly we had 6 times the number of controls, 6372 controls for leukemia, 4284 controls for CNS, 552 controls for HL and 1476 controls for NHL. We found variations in the estimated empirical D(s) for the different regions and cancers, including some overall spatial clustering for specific regions and distances. We did not find statistically significant clusters. Conclusions The variations in the estimated empirical D(s) for the different regions and cancers could be partially explained by the differences in the spatial distribution of

  1. Spatial analysis of childhood cancer: a case/control study.

    PubMed

    Ramis, Rebeca; Gómez-Barroso, Diana; Tamayo, Ibon; García-Pérez, Javier; Morales, Antonio; Pardo Romaguera, Elena; López-Abente, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    Childhood cancer was the leading cause of death among children aged 1-14 years for 2012 in Spain. Leukemia has the highest incidence, followed by tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) and lymphomas (Hodgkin lymphoma, HL, and Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, NHL). Spatial distribution of childhood cancer cases has been under concern with the aim of identifying potential risk factors. The two objectives are to study overall spatial clustering and cluster detection of cases of the three main childhood cancer causes, looking to increase etiological knowledge. We ran a case-control study. The cases were children aged 0 to 14 diagnosed with leukemia, lymphomas (HL and NHL) or CNS neoplasm in five Spanish regions for the period 1996-2011. As a control group, we used a sample from the Birth Registry matching every case by year of birth, autonomous region of residence and sex with six controls. We geocoded and validated the address of the cases and controls. For our two objectives we used two different methodologies. For the first, for overall spatial clustering detection, we used the differences of K functions from the spatial point patterns perspective proposed by Diggle and Chetwynd and the second, for cluster detection, we used the spatial scan statistic proposed by Kulldorff with a level for statistical significance of 0.05. We had 1062 cases of leukemia, 714 cases of CNS, 92 of HL and 246 of NHL. Accordingly we had 6 times the number of controls, 6372 controls for leukemia, 4284 controls for CNS, 552 controls for HL and 1476 controls for NHL. We found variations in the estimated empirical D(s) for the different regions and cancers, including some overall spatial clustering for specific regions and distances. We did not find statistically significant clusters. The variations in the estimated empirical D(s) for the different regions and cancers could be partially explained by the differences in the spatial distribution of the population; however, according to the literature

  2. Diet and cataract: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Theodoropoulou, Sofia; Samoli, Evangelia; Theodossiadis, Panagiotis G; Papathanassiou, Miltiadis; Lagiou, Areti; Lagiou, Pagona; Tzonou, Anastasia

    2014-02-01

    We conducted a case-control study to assess the association between diet and risk of cataract in Athens, Greece. Totals of 314 cases and 314 frequency-matched controls of both sexes, aged 45-85 years and attending the ophthalmology department of a major teaching hospital in Athens, Greece, were included in the study. All participants were interviewed using a semi-quantitative food-frequency questionnaire, covering the average frequency of consumption of about 120 food items. Analyses were conducted through multiple logistic regression. The analysis was carried out taking cataract as a general outcome (all types of cataract combined) and repeated by the specific type of cataract. We found significant inverse associations of cataract with dietary consumption of fish (OR = 0.69, p < 0.001), vegetables (OR = 0.47, p < 0.001), fruits (OR = 0.53, p < 0.001), and potatoes (OR = 0.76, p = 0.004), while consumption of meat was positively associated with cataract (OR = 1.46, p = 0.001). High intake of total fat (OR = 2.00, p < 0.001) and cholesterol (OR = 1.65, p < 0.001) increased the risk of cataract. There was a protective association between cataract risk and intake of carbohydrates (OR = 0.39, p < 0.001), carotene (OR = 0.56, p < 0.001), vitamins C and E (OR = 0.50, p < 0.001 and OR = 0.50, p < 0.001 respectively). We identified an association between the risk of cataract and several food groups and nutrients. Diets rich in fruits, vegetables, fish, pulses and starchy foods may protect against cataract. In addition, high intake of vitamins C and E and carotene with reduction of intake in total fat and cholesterol may be beneficial. Dietary advice along these lines may provide adequate public health guidelines for the delay of age-related cataract.

  3. Haematopoietic cancer and medical history: a multicentre case control study

    PubMed Central

    Vineis, P.; Crosignani, P.; Sacerdote, C.; Fontana, A.; Masala, G.; Miligi, L.; Nanni, O.; Ramazzotti, V.; Rodella, S.; Stagnaro, E.; Tumino, R.; Vigano, C.; Vindigni, C.; Costantini, A. S.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Viruses (such as Epstein-Barr virus) and pathological conditions (mainly involving immunosuppression) have been shown to increase the risk of haematolymphopoietic malignancies. Other associations (diabetes, tonsillectomy, autoimmune diseases) have been inconsistently reported.
METHODS—The association between different haematolymphopoietic malignancies (lymphomas, myelomas and leukaemias) and the previous medical history has been studied in a population-based case-control investigation conducted in Italy, based on face to face interviews to 2669 cases and 1718 population controls (refusal rates 10% and 19%, respectively). Controls were a random sample of the general population.
RESULTS—Previous findings were confirmed concerning the association between non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and lupus erythematosus (odds ratio, OR=8.4; 95% CI 1.6, 45), tuberculosis (OR=1.6; 1.05, 2.5) and hepatitis (1.8; 1.4, 2.3). An association was found also between NHL and maternal (OR=2.8; 1.1, 6.9) or paternal tuberculosis (OR=1.7; 0.7, 3.9). Odds ratios of 4.0 (1.4, 11.8) and 4.4 (1.1, 6.6) were detected for the association between NHL and Hodgkin's disease, respectively, and previous infectious mononucleosis, but recall bias cannot be ruled out. No association was found with diabetes, tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy. An association with malaria at young age and "low grade" lymphatic malignancies is suggested. One interesting finding was the observation of four cases of poliomyelitis among NHL patients, one among Hodgkin's disease and one among myeloid leukaemia patients, compared with none among the controls (Fisher's exact test for NHL and Hodgkin's disease, p= 0.03, one tail).
CONCLUSIONS—Some of these findings are confirmatory of previous evidence. Other observations, such as the putative role of the polio virus and of malaria are new. A unifying theory on the mechanisms by which previous medical history may increase the risk of

  4. Combining matched and unmatched control groups in case-control studies.

    PubMed

    le Cessie, Saskia; Nagelkerke, Nico; Rosendaal, Frits R; van Stralen, Karlijn J; Pomp, Elisabeth R; van Houwelingen, Hans C

    2008-11-15

    Multiple control groups in case-control studies are used to control for different sources of confounding. For example, cases can be contrasted with matched controls to adjust for multiple genetic or unknown lifestyle factors and simultaneously contrasted with an unmatched population-based control group. Inclusion of different control groups for a single exposure analysis yields several estimates of the odds ratio, all using only part of the data. Here the authors introduce an easy way to combine odds ratios from several case-control analyses with the same cases. The approach is based upon methods used for meta-analysis but takes into account the fact that the same cases are used and that the estimated odds ratios are therefore correlated. Two ways of estimating this correlation are discussed: sandwich methodology and the bootstrap. Confidence intervals for the pooled estimates and a test for checking whether the odds ratios in the separate case-control studies differ significantly are derived. The performance of the method is studied by simulation and by applying the methods to a large study on risk factors for thrombosis, the MEGA Study (1999-2004), wherein cases with first venous thrombosis were included with a matched control group of partners and an unmatched population-based control group.

  5. Biomass Fuel Smoke and Tuberculosis: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Haque, M A; Barman, N; Islam, M T; Mannan, M; Khan, M H; Karim, M R; Rob, M A; Hossain, M A

    2016-01-01

    This case control study was done to ascertain the association between exposures to biomass cooking fuel smoke and pulmonary tuberculosis. Cases were all newly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis patients, randomly collected from the Hospital (DOTS centers) Registry from January 2012 to June 2012 from two Upazillas of Sirajganj district, Bangladesh. A home visitation program was done subsequently. Healthy controls were recruited from the neighbourhood of each case through a predefined procedure. Total 276 new pulmonary tuberculosis cases and 276 neighbourhood controls were enrolled. A semi-structured questionnaire containing demographic information, smoking habits, cooking place, kitchen condition, use of biomass fuel for cooking was used for interview. Crude (unadjusted) odd ratios and their corresponding 95% confidence limits for independent variables were determined by binary logistic regression. All significant variables were entered into a multivariate conditional logistic regression model and a final fitted model was determined by backward elimination methods. In univariate analysis, member of a nuclear family {Unadjusted odd ratio (Unadj. OR) 1.570, 95% CI 1.008-2.44)}, having non-formal education (Unadj. OR 2.739, 95% CI 1.219, 6.153) or primary (Unadj. OR 3.407, 95% CI 1.492, 7.782) to secondary level (Unadj. OR 2.392, 95% CI 1.032, 5.544) education, using cow dung (Unadj. OR 3.961, 95% CI 1.267, 12.376) and biomass fuel i.e. plant origin (Unadj. OR 3.382, 95% CI 1.087, 10.518) for cooking, past smoker (Unadj. OR 2.504, 95% CI 1.061, 5.910), using open oven (Unadj. OR 3.109, 95% CI 0.995, 9.716), having small kitchen area (Unadj. OR 0.99, 95% CI 0.989, 0.999) all were significantly associated with tuberculosis. When all significant variables were entered into a multivariate conditional logistic regression model nuclear family {Adjusted odd ratio (Adj OR) 1.808, 95% CI 1.127, 2.9)}, primary level education (Adj OR 2.86, 95% CI 1.23, 6.647) and non formal

  6. Association between diabetes and tuberculosis: case-control study.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Susan Martins; Araújo, Gleide Santos de; Santos, Carlos Antônio de Souza Teles; Oliveira, Maeli Gomes de; Barreto, Maurício Lima

    2016-12-22

    To test the association between diabetes and tuberculosis. It is a case-control study, matched by age and sex. We included 323 new cases of tuberculosis with positive results for bacilloscopy. The controls were 323 respiratory symptomatic patients with negative bacilloscopy, from the same health services, such as: ambulatory cases from three referral hospitals and six basic health units responsible for the notifications of new cases of tuberculosis in Salvador, Bahia. Data collection occurred between 2008 and 2010. The instruments used were structured interview, including clinical data, capillary blood glucose (during fasting or postprandial), and the CAGE questionnaire for screening of abusive consumption of alcohol. Descriptive, exploratory, and multivariate analysis was performed using conditional logistic regression. The average age of the cases was 38.5 (SD = 14.2) years and of the controls, 38.5 (SD = 14.3) years. Among cases and controls, most subjects (61%) were male. In univariate analysis we found association between the occurrence of diabetes and tuberculosis (OR = 2.37; 95%CI 1.04-5.42), which remained statistically significant after adjustment for potential confounders (OR = 3.12; 95%CI 1.12-7.94). The association between diabetes and tuberculosis can hinder the control of tuberculosis, contributing to the maintainance of the disease burden. The situation demands increasing early detection of diabetes among people with tuberculosis, in an attempt to improve disease control strategies. Testar a associação entre diabetes e tuberculose. Trata-se de estudo caso-controle, pareado por idade e sexo. Foram incluídos 323 casos novos de tuberculose com resultados positivos à baciloscopia. Os controles foram 323 sintomáticos respiratórios com baciloscopia negativa, oriundos dos mesmos serviços de saúde dos casos: ambulatórios de três hospitais de referência e seis unidades básicas de saúde responsáveis pelas notificações dos casos novos de

  7. Using cumulative sums of martingale residuals for model checking in nested case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Borgan, Ørnulf; Zhang, Ying

    2015-09-01

    Standard use of Cox regression requires collection of covariate information for all individuals in a cohort even when only a small fraction of them experiences the event of interest (fail). This may be very expensive for large cohorts. Further in biomarker studies, it will imply a waste of valuable biological material that one may want to save for future studies. A nested case-control study offers a useful alternative. For this design, covariate information is only needed for the failing individuals (cases) and a sample of controls selected from the cases' at-risk sets. Methods based on martingale residuals are useful for checking the fit of Cox's regression model for cohort data. But similar methods have so far not been developed for nested case-control data. In this article, it is described how one may define martingale residuals for nested case-control data, and it is shown how plots and tests based on cumulative sums of martingale residuals may be used to check model fit. The plots and tests may be obtained using available software.

  8. Case-control study of respiratory cancer and employment

    SciTech Connect

    Glazer, E.R.; Chiang, M.L.

    1984-04-01

    A multiple logistic risk-analysis procedure was used to compare data from 346 case/control pairs to determine occupational/industrial risk factors for respiratory cancer. The duration of employment was considered in blue-collar production occupations. Five industrial categories were included: shipyard, petrochemical, metal-related, construction and a grouping of other occupations under a single heading. The bulk of this grouped category was made up of blue collar employees in the industries of transportation, food production, wholesale and retail trade, professional services, and public administration. Specific attention was given to asbestos exposure, cigarette smoking, educational level attained, and dietary factors such as consumption of vegetables, fruits, and alcohol. A moderately elevated risk for respiratory cancer existed among employees in the metal industry and grouped categories when employment was over 30 years duration. In the metal industry this increase was almost entirely due to a larger than expected number of cases of larynx cancer.

  9. Valid statistical inference methods for a case-control study with missing data.

    PubMed

    Tian, Guo-Liang; Zhang, Chi; Jiang, Xuejun

    2016-05-19

    The main objective of this paper is to derive the valid sampling distribution of the observed counts in a case-control study with missing data under the assumption of missing at random by employing the conditional sampling method and the mechanism augmentation method. The proposed sampling distribution, called the case-control sampling distribution, can be used to calculate the standard errors of the maximum likelihood estimates of parameters via the Fisher information matrix and to generate independent samples for constructing small-sample bootstrap confidence intervals. Theoretical comparisons of the new case-control sampling distribution with two existing sampling distributions exhibit a large difference. Simulations are conducted to investigate the influence of the three different sampling distributions on statistical inferences. One finding is that the conclusion by the Wald test for testing independency under the two existing sampling distributions could be completely different (even contradictory) from the Wald test for testing the equality of the success probabilities in control/case groups under the proposed distribution. A real cervical cancer data set is used to illustrate the proposed statistical methods.

  10. Risk factors for syphilis in women: case-control study.

    PubMed

    Macêdo, Vilma Costa de; Lira, Pedro Israel Cabral de; Frias, Paulo Germano de; Romaguera, Luciana Maria Delgado; Caires, Silvana de Fátima Ferreira; Ximenes, Ricardo Arraes de Alencar

    2017-08-17

    To determine the sociodemographic, behavioral, and health care factors related to the occurrence of syphilis in women treated at public maternity hospitals. This is a case-control study (239 cases and 322 controls) with women admitted to seven maternity hospitals in the municipality of Recife, Brazil, from July 2013 to July 2014. Eligible women were recruited after the result of the VDRL (Venereal Disease Research Laboratory) under any titration. The selection of cases and controls was based on the result of the serology for syphilis using ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay). The independent variables were grouped into: sociodemographic, behavioral, clinical and obstetric history, and health care in prenatal care and maternity hospital. Information was obtained by interview, during hospitalization, with the application of a questionnaire. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated using logistic regression to identify the predicting factors of the variable to be explained. The logistic regression analysis identified as determinant factors for gestational syphilis: education level of incomplete basic education or illiterate (OR = 2.02), lack of access to telephone (OR = 2.4), catholic religion (OR = 1.70 ), four or more pregnancies (OR = 2.2), three or more sexual partners in the last year (OR = 3.1), use of illicit drugs before the age of 18 (OR = 3.0), and use of illicit drugs by the current partner (OR = 1.7). Only one to three prenatal appointments (OR = 3.5) and a previous history of sexually transmitted infection (OR = 9.7) were also identified as determinant factors. Sociodemographic, behavioral, and health care factors are associated with the occurrence of syphilis in women and should be taken into account in the elaboration of universal strategies aimed at the prevention and control of syphilis, but with a focus on situations of greater vulnerability. Determinar os fatores sociodemográficos, comportamentais e de assistência à sa

  11. Preeclampsia and preterm delivery: A population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Davies, Emma L; Bell, Jacqueline S; Bhattacharya, Sohinee

    2016-11-01

    To determine the contribution of preeclampsia toward preterm birth in primiparous women. This large population-based case-control study used the Aberdeen Maternity and Neonatal Databank to analyze data on primiparous women with singleton pregnancies, who delivered between 1997 and 2012. A significant positive association was found between preeclampsia and preterm birth (adjusted odds ratio 4.43; 95% confidence interval 3.80-5.16). Magnitude of association varied according to the onset of delivery and year of delivery. Preeclampsia is an important contributor to preterm delivery in this setting and therefore a potentially useful condition to target in order to reduce preterm rates.

  12. Three ADIPOR1 Polymorphisms and Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis of Case-Control Studies.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jiaxiang; Jiang, Li; Wu, Changliang; Liu, Aiqun; Mao, Sufei; Ge, Lianying

    2015-01-01

    Studies have come to conflicting conclusions about whether polymorphisms in the adiponectin receptor 1 gene (ADIPOR1) are associated with cancer risk. To help resolve this question, we meta-analyzed case-control studies in the literature. PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, the Chinese Biological Medical Database and the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure Database were systematically searched to identify all case-control studies published through February 2015 examining any ADIPOR1 polymorphisms and risk of any type of cancer. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. A total of 13 case-control studies involving 5,750 cases and 6,762 controls were analyzed. Analysis of the entire study population revealed a significant association between rs1342387(G/A) and overall cancer risk using a homozygous model (OR 0.82, 95%CI 0.72 to 0.94), heterozygous model (OR 0.84, 95%CI 0.76 to 0.93), dominant model (OR 0.85, 95%CI 0.75 to 0.97) and allele contrast model (OR 0.88, 95%CI 0.80 to 0.97). However, subgroup analysis showed that this association was significant only for Asians in the case of colorectal cancer. No significant associations were found between rs12733285(C/T) or rs7539542(C/G) and cancer risk, either in analyses of the entire study population or in analyses of subgroups. Our meta-analysis suggests that the ADIPOR1 rs1342387(G/A) polymorphism, but not rs12733285(C/T) or rs7539542(C/G), may be associated with cancer risk, especially risk of colorectal cancer in Asians. Large, well-designed studies are needed to verify our findings.

  13. Lung cancer risk among bricklayers in a pooled analysis of case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Consonni, Dario; De Matteis, Sara; Pesatori, Angela C; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Olsson, Ann C; Kromhout, Hans; Peters, Susan; Vermeulen, Roel C H; Pesch, Beate; Brüning, Thomas; Kendzia, Benjamin; Behrens, Thomas; Stücker, Isabelle; Guida, Florence; Wichmann, Heinz-Erich; Brüske, Irene; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil E; Gustavsson, Per; Plato, Nils; Tse, Lap Ah; Yu, Ignatius Tak-Sun; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Pohlabeln, Hermann; Merletti, Franco; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Simonato, Lorenzo; Forastiere, Francesco; Siemiatycki, Jack; Parent, Marie-Élise; Tardón, Adonina; Boffetta, Paolo; Zaridze, David; Chen, Ying; Field, John K; 't Mannetje, Andrea; Pearce, Neil; McLaughlin, John; Demers, Paul; Lissowska, Jolanta; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Rudnai, Peter; Fabiánová, Eleonóra; Stanescu Dumitru, Rodica; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Schüz, Joachim; Straif, Kurt

    2015-01-15

    Bricklayers may be exposed to several lung carcinogens, including crystalline silica and asbestos. Previous studies that analyzed lung cancer risk among these workers had several study design limitations. We examined lung cancer risk among bricklayers within SYNERGY, a large international pooled analysis of case-control studies on lung cancer and the joint effects of occupational carcinogens. For men ever employed as bricklayers we estimated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) adjusted for study center, age, lifetime smoking history and employment in occupations with exposures to known or suspected lung carcinogens. Among 15,608 cases and 18,531 controls, there were 695 cases and 469 controls who had ever worked as bricklayers (OR: 1.47; 95% CI: 1.28-1.68). In studies using population controls the OR was 1.55 (95% CI: 1.32-1.81, 540/349 cases/controls), while it was 1.24 (95% CI: 0.93-1.64, 155/120 cases/controls) in hospital-based studies. There was a clear positive trend with length of employment (p < 0.001). The relative risk was higher for squamous (OR: 1.68, 95% CI: 1.42-1.98, 309 cases) and small cell carcinomas (OR: 1.78, 95% CI: 1.44-2.20, 140 cases), than for adenocarcinoma (OR: 1.17, 95% CI: 0.95-1.43, 150 cases) (p-homogeneity: 0.0007). ORs were still elevated after additional adjustment for education and in analyses using blue collar workers as referents. This study provided robust evidence of increased lung cancer risk in bricklayers. Although non-causal explanations cannot be completely ruled out, the association is plausible in view of the potential for exposure to several carcinogens, notably crystalline silica and to a lesser extent asbestos. © 2014 UICC.

  14. Multiple myeloma--a case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Cuzick, J.; De Stavola, B.

    1988-01-01

    A total of 399 patients with multiple myeloma and an equal number of match controls were interviewed about factors possibly related to the causes of their disease. Factors studied included occupation, chemical exposure, radiation exposure, prior diseases, immunizations, chronic infections and markers for defects in immune regulation. A strong risk associated with agriculture/food processing was observed (RR = 1.8, P = 0.002). The risk could not be restricted to those exposed to animals or meat products, or those exposed to pesticides. Significant excesses were also noted for reported exposures to chemicals and gases/fumes, but no specific agent or group of agents could be identified. Cases had fewer tonsillectomies above the age of 10 (P = 0.01). A large excess of shingles (herpes zoster) was observed in cases (P less than 0.001), but most of the excess cases occurred within 10 years of diagnosis, suggesting this was a preclinical manifestation of disease rather than a cause of it. PMID:3395559

  15. Prevalence, incidence and concomitant co-morbidities of type 2 diabetes mellitus in South Western Germany--a retrospective cohort and case control study in claims data of a large statutory health insurance.

    PubMed

    Boehme, Michael W J; Buechele, Gisela; Frankenhauser-Mannuss, Julia; Mueller, Jana; Lump, Dietlinde; Boehm, Bernhard O; Rothenbacher, Dietrich

    2015-09-03

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has become a world-wide epidemic. This chronic metabolic disease has a major impact on life expectancy and on quality of life. The burden of this disease includes a number of co-morbidities. However, estimates of prevalence, incidence and associated diseases as well as the current temporal development and regional differences are largely missing for South Western Germany. Lifetime diagnosis-based prevalence, incidence and presence of concomitant co-morbidities were examined between the years 2007 and 2010 in the claims data set of all insured persons of the AOK Baden-Wuerttemberg, a large statutory health insurance. The analysis was based on the respective WHO-ICD-10 codes. Data were standardized for age and sex on the residential population of about 10 million inhabitants of South Western Germany. The total study cohort involved approximately 3.5 million persons each year. The standardized diagnosis-based prevalence (SDP) of T2DM rose from 6.6%, 7.4%, 8.0%, up to 8.6% in the years 2007 to 2010. Yearly SDP was between 14.0% and 18.9% at an age range of 60 to 64 years and between 26.7% and 31.8% at an age of 75 years or older. In the year 2010 the regional distributions of standardized diagnosis-based prevalence were between 7.6% and 11.6 %, respectively. Incidence rates were 8.3 in 2008, 7.8 in 2009, and 8.7 in 2010 (all rates per 1000). The excess disease risk (odds ratio) of T2DM was for adiposity 2.8 to 3.0, hypertension 2.4 to 3.7, coronary heart disease 1.8 to 1.9, stroke 1.7 to 1.8, renal insufficiency 2.8 to 3.4, and retinopathy 2.8 to 2.9 in the years 2007 to 2010. These co-morbidities appeared several years earlier compared to the non-diabetic population. T2DM is common and increasing in South Western Germany. In particular a quarter of the population in higher ages was afflicted by T2DM. Interestingly a region-specific pattern was observed as well as an increase in numbers during earlier years in life. Our data underline

  16. Case-control study of the risk factors for age related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chaine, G.; Hullo, A.; Sahel, J.; Soubrane, G.; Espinasse-Berrod, M.; Schutz, D.; Bourguignon, C.; Harpey, C.; Brault, Y.; Coste, M.; Moccatti, D.; Bourgeois, H.

    1998-01-01

    AIM—A case-control study was initiated to determine the risk factors for the development of age related macular degeneration (AMD).
METHODS—Study participants, who were all white, aged 50-85 years, and were recruited from private ophthalmology practices. Each practitioner enrolled patients with bilateral AMD, who were then matched with controls for sex and age. Environmental factors and systemic and ocular histories were screened. All patients had bilateral red-free fundus photographs and fluorescein angiography. Photographs were classified into pigment epithelium alterations, drusen, geographic atrophy, and exudative AMD. Statistical analysis included the identification of risk factors for AMD. A multivariate analysis was performed at the end of the study. Analysis included the entire study population and was carried out for each stage of AMD.
RESULTS—1844 controls were compared with 1844 patients with AMD. Mean age was 71 years for controls and 72 for cases. Logistic regression identified six major risk factors for AMD (whole population): arterial hypertension (odds ratio (OR) =1.28), coronary disease (OR=1.31), hyperopia (OR=1.33), light coloured irises (OR=1.22), and lens opacities or previous cataract surgery (OR=1.55). The significance of vascular risk factors was increased for late stages of AMD, especially the atrophic forms (coronary disease, OR=3.19).
CONCLUSIONS—This large case-control study confirms some of the risk factors previously identified and may contribute to the determination of methods for prevention of AMD.

 Keywords: age related macular degeneration; risk factors; case-control study PMID:9893587

  17. Parental smoking and childhood asthma: longitudinal and case-control studies

    PubMed Central

    Strachan, D.; Cook, D.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The relation of parental smoking to wheezing and asthma occurring after the first year of life was assessed by a systematic quantitative review of case-control and longitudinal studies, complementing earlier reviews of cross sectional surveys and wheezing in early childhood.
METHODS—Fifty one relevant publications were identified after consideration of 1593 abstracts selected by electronic search of the Embase and Medline databases using keywords relevant to passive smoking in children. The search was completed in April 1997 and identified six studies of asthma incidence, seven of prognosis, 22 case-control studies, and 10 case series addressing disease severity.
RESULTS—Maternal smoking was associated with an increased incidence of wheezing illness up to age 6 (pooled odds ratio 1.31, 95% CI 1.22 to 1.41), but less strongly thereafter (1.13, 95% CI 1.04to 1.22). The long term prognosis of early wheezing illness was better if the mother smoked. The pooled odds ratio for asthma prevalence from 14 case-control studies was 1.37 (95% CI 1.15to 1.64) if either parent smoked. Four studies suggest that parental smoking is more strongly associated with wheezing among non-atopic children. Indicators of disease severity including symptom scores, attack frequency, medication use, hospital attendance, and life threatening bronchospasm were in general positively related to household smoke exposure.
CONCLUSIONS—The excess incidence of wheezing in smoking households appears to be largely non-atopic "wheezy bronchitis" with a relatively benign prognosis, but among children with established asthma, parental smoking is associated with more severe disease. This apparent paradox may be reconciled if environmental tobacco smoke is considered a co-factor provoking wheezing attacks, rather than a cause of the underlying asthmatic tendency.

 PMID:9659358

  18. Pregnancy-associated osteoporosis: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Hadji, P; Boekhoff, J; Hahn, M; Hellmeyer, L; Hars, O; Kyvernitakis, I

    2017-04-01

    The etiology and underlying mechanisms of pregnancy-associated osteoporosis (PAO) are still unknown, since no systematic analyses exist. Our results indicate that PAO is a heterogeneous, rare but severe disease including a substantial number of fractures with a significant delay from first symptom to diagnose. Pregnancy-associated osteoporosis (PAO) is a rare but severe type of premenopausal osteoporosis. Most common symptom includes acute lower back pain due to vertebral fracture predominantly occurring in the last trimester of pregnancy or immediately postpartum. The exact underlining mechanisms and risk factors of PAO are still unknown, and up to date, there are no published systematic analyses. We identified 102 PAO patients and matched them with 102 healthy controls according to age, region, and gravidity to evaluate risk factors in a large and homogenous population of women. The baseline characteristics and anthropometric data of the two study groups were similar. Eighty-eight percent of the patients with PAO suffered from one or more fractures with a mean of 3.3 fractures per patient. The most common fracture site was the thoracolumbar spine, whereas 29, 37, 48, and 35% of the patients reported fractures at TH11, TH12, L1, and L2, respectively. PAO patients suffered more frequently from excessive dental problems in childhood (p < 0.001). The control group performed significantly more frequently sports both before (p < 0.002) and after puberty (p < 0.01). Compared to the controls, the patients with PAO reported twice as often severe diseases during pregnancy (p < 0.029). Hereby, the frequency of immobilization was twice as often in the PAO group compared to that in the control group (p < 0.005). Our results indicate that PAO is a heterogeneous, rare but severe disease including a substantial number of fractures with a significant delay from first symptom to diagnose. Increased awareness is warranted to immediately start effective treatment.

  19. Risk Factors for Contact Lens-Related Microbial Keratitis: A Case-Control Multicenter Study.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Arnaud; Meyer, Nicolas; Bourcier, Tristan

    2016-05-01

    The most feared complication of contact lens (CL) wear is microbial keratitis (MK), even though its incidence remains low. This study aimed to identify the risk factors of CL-related MK in a large, prospective, multicenter case-control study. A multicenter case-control study was designed. The CL-related MK subpopulation (Case) was compared with healthy CL wearers (Control) using a 52-item anonymous questionnaire designed to determine subject demographics and lens wear history. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to compare both groups. The study enrolled 499 cases and 508 controls. The risk factors associated with the greatest increased odds of CL-related MK were as follows: using disinfecting solution more than 3 months (odds ratio [OR]=1.94), cosmetic CL wear and use of multipurpose disinfection solution (1.37 each), overnight wear, and soft lens use (OR=1.24 each). The protective factors associated with the greatest reduction in OR were fitting by an ophthalmologist (OR=0.73) and hyperopia versus myopia (OR=0.75). The infectious determinants were linked to the type of lenses, hygiene routine, CL handling, disinfecting solution, and storage case. This study aimed to highlight the increasingly CL-related MK, which likely occurs because of lack of patient information regarding basic rules of hygiene and CL care and handling.

  20. Bayesian sample size determination for case-control studies when exposure may be misclassified.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Lawrence; Bélisle, Patrick

    2013-12-01

    Odds ratios are frequently used for estimating the effect of an exposure on the probability of disease in case-control studies. In planning such studies, methods for sample size determination are required to ensure sufficient accuracy in estimating odds ratios once the data are collected. Often, the exposure used in epidemiologic studies is not perfectly ascertained. This can arise from recall bias, the use of a proxy exposure measurement, uncertain work exposure history, and laboratory or other errors. The resulting misclassification can have large impacts on the accuracy and precision of estimators, and specialized estimation techniques have been developed to adjust for these biases. However, much less work has been done to account for the anticipated decrease in the precision of estimators at the design stage. Here, we develop methods for sample size determination for odds ratios in the presence of exposure misclassification by using several interval-based Bayesian criteria. By using a series of prototypical examples, we compare sample size requirements after adjustment for misclassification with those required when this problem is ignored. We illustrate the methods by planning a case-control study of the effect of late introduction of peanut to the diet of children to the subsequent development of peanut allergy.

  1. Epidemiological study of prostate cancer (EPICAP): a population-based case-control study in France.

    PubMed

    Menegaux, Florence; Anger, Antoinette; Randrianasolo, Hasina; Mulot, Claire; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Iborra, François; Bringer, Jean-Pierre; Leizour, Benoit; Thuret, Rodolphe; Lamy, Pierre-Jean; Rébillard, Xavier; Trétarre, Brigitte

    2014-02-19

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in male in most Western countries, including France. Despite a significant morbidity and mortality to a lesser extent, the etiology of prostate cancer remains largely unknown. Indeed, the only well-established risk factors to date are age, ethnicity and a family history of prostate cancer. We present, here, the rationale and design of the EPIdemiological study of Prostate CAncer (EPICAP), a population-based case-control study specifically designed to investigate the role of environmental and genetic factors in prostate cancer. The EPICAP study will particularly focused on the role of circadian disruption, chronic inflammation, hormonal and metabolic factors in the occurrence of prostate cancer. EPICAP is a population-based case-control study conducted in the département of Hérault in France. Eligible cases are all cases of prostate cancers newly diagnosed in 2012-2013 in men less than 75 years old and residing in the département of Hérault at the time of diagnosis. Controls are men of the same age as the cases and living in the département of Hérault, recruited in the general population.The sample will include a total of 1000 incident cases of prostate cancer and 1000 population-based controls over a 3-year period (2012-2014).The cases and controls are face-to-face interviewed using a standardized computed assisted questionnaire. The questions focus primarily on usual socio-demographic characteristics, personal and family medical history, lifestyle, leisure activities, residential and occupational history. Anthropometric measures and biological samples are also collected for cases and controls. The EPICAP study aims to answer key questions in prostate cancer etiology: (1) role of circadian disruption through the study of working hours, chronotype and duration/quality of sleep, (2) role of chronic inflammation and anti-inflammatory drugs, (3) role of hormonal and metabolic factors through a detailed questionnaire, (4

  2. A low-level asbestos exposure case-control epidemiology study

    SciTech Connect

    Ocasio-Alvarex, A.

    1988-01-01

    The potential for low levels of airborne asbestos exposure in public schools and in public and commercial buildings in the United States has generated concern due to the large population at risk and the definite human carcinogenicity of asbestos at high levels. To assist in the clarification of the risk associated with low level asbestos exposure and in the decision-making in asbestos management in schools and in other buildings, a case-control study was conducted to estimate the risk relationship between low levels of asbestos exposure and pulmonary cancer among Indiana public school teachers. A total of 236 lung cancer cases and 154 controls to be used in this case-control study were identified from a previous proportionate mortality rate study which had examined over 8,000 teachers' death certificates. The controls were selected from teachers who died of chronic bronchitis, emphysema or a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The teachers' work history and their potential for asbestos exposure, as well as the reliability of the information obtained on the presence or absence of asbestos, was determined to calculate the odds ratio.

  3. Association between bullous pemphigoid and neurologic diseases: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Casas-de-la-Asunción, E; Ruano-Ruiz, J; Rodríguez-Martín, A M; Vélez García-Nieto, A; Moreno-Giménez, J C

    2014-11-01

    In the past 10 years, bullous pemphigoid has been associated with other comorbidities and neurologic and psychiatric conditions in particular. Case series, small case-control studies, and large population-based studies in different Asian populations, mainland Europe, and the United Kingdom have confirmed this association. However, no data are available for the Spanish population. This was an observational, retrospective, case-control study with 1:2 matching. Fifty-four patients with bullous pemphigoid were selected. We compared the percentage of patients in each group with concurrent neurologic conditions, ischemic heart disease, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and solid tumors using univariate logistic regression. An association model was constructed with conditional multiple logistic regression. The case group had a significantly higher percentage of patients with cerebrovascular accident and/or transient ischemic attack (odds ratio [OR], 3.06; 95% CI, 1.19-7.87], dementia (OR, 5.52; 95% CI, 2.19-13.93), and Parkinson disease (OR, 5; 95% CI, 1.57-15.94). A significantly higher percentage of cases had neurologic conditions (OR, 6.34; 95% CI, 2.89-13.91). Dementia and Parkinson disease were independently associated with bullous pemphigoid in the multivariate analysis. Patients with bullous pemphigoid have a higher frequency of neurologic conditions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  4. Human papillomaviruses in colorectal cancers: A case-control study in western patients.

    PubMed

    Vuitton, Lucine; Jaillet, Carine; Jacquin, Elise; Monnien, Franck; Heberle, Marine; Mihai, Maria I; Lassabe, Catherine; Raffoul, Johnny; Puyraveau, Marc; Lakkis, Zaher; Lamfichekh, Najib; Picard, Alain; Prétet, Jean-Luc; Mougin, Christiane; Valmary-Degano, Séverine

    2017-04-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers. As in other cancer locations, the involvement of human papillomaviruses (HPV) has been suggested but remains highly debated with wide differences among reported prevalence of HPV infection in CRCs. To determine the actual prevalence of high risk HPV16 and 18 in a large case-control study. CRC specimens were used for analysis of both tumor and distant healthy tissue. As a non-malignant control group, samples from sigmoid diverticulosis resections were studied. Detection of HPV16 and HPV18 DNA was performed using a real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Ten percent of tumor samples were also randomly subjected to a complete HPV genotyping using the INNO-LiPA technique. 467 samples were analyzed: 217 tumor samples from 210 CRCs, 210 distant healthy tissue samples, and 40 sigmoid samples. HPV18 DNA was never amplified and HPV16 was amplified only three times in tumor tissues with viral loads under or at the limit of quantification. New extraction from the same tumor blocks for these samples revealed no HPV with qPCR and INNO-Lipa assays. With adequate procedures and reliable techniques, no HPV was detected in the largest case-control study so far, bringing more evidence on the absence of involvement of HPV in CRCs. Copyright © 2016 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Tularemia Outbreak Investigation in Kosovo: Case Control and Environmental Studies

    PubMed Central

    Dedushaj, Isuf; Gjini, Ardiana; Jorgensen, Tine Rikke; Cotter, Benvon; Lieftucht, Alfons; D’Ancona, Fortunato; Dennis, David T.; Kosoy, Michael A.; Mulliqi-Osmani, Gjyle; Grunow, Roland; Kalaveshi, Ariana; Gashi, Luljeta; Humolli, Isme

    2002-01-01

    A large outbreak of tularemia occurred in Kosovo in the early postwar period, 1999-2000. Epidemiologic and environmental investigations were conducted to identify sources of infection, modes of transmission, and household risk factors. Case and control status was verified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blot, and microagglutination assay. A total of 327 serologically confirmed cases of tularemia pharyngitis and cervical lymphadenitis were identified in 21 of 29 Kosovo municipalities. Matched analysis of 46 case households and 76 control households suggested that infection was transmitted through contaminated food or water and that the source of infection was rodents. Environmental circumstances in war-torn Kosovo led to epizootic rodent tularemia and its spread to resettled rural populations living under circumstances of substandard housing, hygiene, and sanitation. PMID:11749751

  6. A case-control study of Nocardia mastitis in Nova Scotia dairy herds

    PubMed Central

    Ferns, Lyn; Dohoo, Ian; Donald, Alan

    1991-01-01

    A case-control study was conducted to identify herd production, housing, and hygienic and therapeutic factors associated with a diagnosis of Nocardia mastitis in dairy herds in Nova Scotia. The data were collected by on-farm interviews with owners of 54 case and 54 control herds. Logistic regression was used to study risk factors. The use of dry cow products containing neomycin, including two specific dry cow products, was strongly associated with a diagnosis of Nocardia mastitis in a herd. Other factors which increased the risk of Nocardia mastitis were higher levels of production, larger herd size, and a large percentage of cows treated with dry cow products. These results are compared to results from a similar study carried out in Ontario. PMID:17423896

  7. [Child abuse in Tlaxcala: a case-control study].

    PubMed

    Herrada-Huidobro, A; Nazar-Beutelspacher, A; Cassaball-Núñez, M; Vega-Ramos, R; Nava-Cruz, C B

    1992-01-01

    A longitudinal, retrospective and descriptive study about child abuse was carried out in the Hospitals of the Tlaxcala Secretariat of Health, Mexico. The information was obtained from hospitalized children's charts between January first and November 30, 1991. The charts included were those belonging to zero to 14 year old children with injuries, poisoning, and II-III degrees of malnutrition. Four child-abuse criteria were established: physical, sexual, non organic malnutrition and mixed (physical and non organic malnutrition). Two control groups were defined. Different patterns were observed between accidental and non accidental injuries, malnutrition and poisoning among the case and the control groups. The study provides useful information for the integral diagnosis of child abuse in hospitalized children.

  8. Nonoliguric hyperkalemia in neonates: a case-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Yaseen, Hakam

    2009-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the incidence, risk factors, and morbidities associated with nonoliguric hyperkalemia (NOHK) in neonates. Infants were eligible for the study if they were born at Al Qassimi Hospital and fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of NOHK (serum potassium [SK] > or = 7 mmol/L during the first 72 hours of life with urinary output > or = 1 mL/kg/h). The next admitted infant with gestational age +/- 1 week and normal SK acted as control. Exclusion criteria were severe congenital malformation, renal failure, failure of adequate urinary collection, and early blood transfusion within the first 72 hours of life. Fluid intake and urinary output were monitored. Infants who developed hyperkalemia (SK > or = 6.5 mmol/L in two nonhemolysed venous or arterial blood samples) had serum potassium measured every 4 hours until it reached below 6 mmol/L. Hyperkalemia was identified between 6 and 36 hours of age in 45 infants (peak SK 7 to 9.3 mmol/L). During the time of the study, the prevalence of NOHK was 24% among extremely-low-birth-weight infants (with birth weight < 1000 g) who comprised 83% of those identified. Of infants with NOHK, 13% developed tachycardiac arrhythmia and 17% died. NOHK was significantly associated with fetal distress, early metabolic acidosis, early hyperglycemia, and absence of antenatal steroid administration. Hyperkalemic infants had significantly lower serum calcium and higher serum phosphorous, urea, and creatinine. Early polyuric episodes and high urinary output were also more common in hyperkalemic infants. NOHK affects mainly preterm infants. Electrolyte disturbance and increased serum urea and creatinine were associated with hyperkalemia. Infants with NOHK also had high incidence of cardiac arrhythmias and mortality.

  9. Suicides following inpatient psychiatric hospitalization: A nationwide case control study.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Petr; Mladá, Karolína; Csémy, Ladislav; Nechanská, Blanka; Höschl, Cyril

    2015-09-15

    Research shows the elevated risk of suicide associated with current or recent inpatient psychiatric hospitalization. However, it is unclear whether this applies in the area of post-communist Central and Eastern Europe where mental health care has not been deinstitutionalized yet. The present study aims to examine the rates of suicides among psychiatric patients during and shortly after discharge from inpatient hospitalization in the Czech Republic. All inpatient psychiatric hospitalizations and all suicides committed between 2008 and 2012 have been merged on an individual data basis. The time horizon between the admission and two months after the discharge from inpatient psychiatric facility was utilized and multiple logistic regression was performed to calculate the odds of committing suicide. A total of 137,290 inpatients were hospitalized in Czech psychiatric facilities between 2008 and 2012, and 402 of the inpatients committed suicide during the hospitalization or within the 2 months after the discharge. Highly elevated risks of suicides were found to be associated with being a male, having a history of multiple hospitalizations, and having a diagnosis of affective, anxiety, or personality disorder. Limitations are related to the design of the study, and its reliance on routinely collected data. Also, it was not possible to assess the odds of suicide associated with inpatient psychiatric hospitalization against the odds of suicide in general population. During psychiatric treatment and recovery, suicial behavior and idealiation is increased. In psychiatry, hospitalization may be a risky period for suicide behavior. Suicide rates during and soon after the psychiatric hospitalization identified in this study from Central and Eastern Europe are similar to the findings from Western Europe. Preventive strategies should be tailored accordingly. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. [Effects of COPD on cognitive functions: a case control study].

    PubMed

    Sarınç Ulaşlı, Sevinç; Oruç, Serdar; Günay, Ersin; Aktaş, Orçun; Akar, Olcay; Koyuncu, Tülay; Ünlü, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    Assessment of disease severity, effects of disease on health status and future events should be considered to direct treatment strategies in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) management. Although extrapulmonary effects of COPD are well known, effects of COPD on cognitive functions have not been evaluated sufficiently. therefore we aimed to determine cognitive functions of copd patients in the present study. 112 COPD patients with moderate, severe and very severe irreversible airway obstruction and 44 age matched healthy subjects without COPD and systemic diseases as control group were enrolled to the study. Mini mental state examination (MMSE) was performed to evaluate cognitive functions. MMSE results were compared between patient and control groups. Moreover relationship between exacerbation frequency and cognitive functions was evaluated. Total 156 subjects as 112 COPD patients and 44 healthy subjects were included to the study. Mean age of COPD patients was 65.03 ± 7.63 years, and mean age of control group was 63.63 ± 8.96 years (p= 0.364). Mean score of MMSE in COPD patients was 23.8 ± 4.39, and mean score of MMSE in control group was 26.7 ± 2.88. We determined a significant difference in terms of MMSE scores betweeen patient and control group (p< 0.0001). MMSE scores and FEV1 values were significantly different among patients with moderate, sevre and very severe airflow obstruction (p= 0.001; p< 0.0001 respectively). We found a significant negative correlation between MMSE results and exacerbation frequency during last year (p= 0.003; r= -0.239). Lower MMSE scores of COPD patients than subjects in control group indicates the impairment of cognitive functions in COPD patients. Moreover a negative relationship between MMSE scores with exacerbation frequency during last year suggests that prevention from exacerbation can decrease cognitive impairment in COPD patients. We believe that assessment of cognitive functions and preventive strategies

  11. Vertebral hyperostosis and diabetes mellitus: a case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Daragon, A; Mejjad, O; Czernichow, P; Louvel, J P; Vittecoq, O; Durr, A; Le Loët, X

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare glucose metabolism in patients with vertebral hyperostosis (VH), with that in control patients. METHODS--We studied 50 patients aged 60 years or more who had VH according to Resnick's criteria, and 50 control patients without VH, matched for sex, age, weight and height. Plasma glucose was evaluated before and 120 minutes after ingestion of 75 g glucose. World Health Organisation criteria for diabetes mellitus (DM) were used. Radiographs of the pelvis and thoracic and lumbar spine were performed and read blind by two physicians. RESULTS--Statistical analysis showed no difference between cases and control patients for prevalence of DM, and plasma glucose at 0 and 120 minutes. CONCLUSION--These data suggest that glucoregulation in patients with VH does not differ from that in matched controls. PMID:7794043

  12. Alexithymia and Acne Vulgaris: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Baykir, Murat; Ateş, Gülfem; Ekşioğlu, Meral

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess relationship between alexithymia and acne vulgaris in young people. Methods A hundred and eleven subjects between 15 and 25 years of age referred to out-patient clinic of dermatology with acne and 78 subjects applied to family physician for complaints other than acne were included in patient and control groups of the study, respectively. A questionnaire to determine demographic characteristics, an acne classification to determine severity of acne and Toronto Alexithymic Scale (TAS) to assess alexithymia were used. Results The mean scores of TAS were 52.7±10.8 and 51.7±10.7 in patient and control groups, respectively. Alexitymia was determined in 23.4% of the subjects in acne group and in 24.4% of control group. No significant differences were found between groups in terms of alexithymia, intermediate alexitymia and three-factors of TAS. Conclusion Alexithymia does not appear to be related to acne vulgaris. PMID:22216042

  13. Cognitive impairments in Hashimoto's encephalopathy: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianhong; Zhang, Jun; Xu, Lan; Shi, Yunbo; Wu, Xunyi; Guo, Qihao

    2013-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is considered as a treatable dementia, but it is often misdiagnosed. We investigated cognitive impairment and the MRI pathology of Hashimoto's encephalopathy patients. The study comprised eight patients with Hashimoto's encephalopathy, 16 patients with mild Alzheimer's disease and 24 healthy subjects. A neuropsychological battery included assessments of memory, language, attention, executive function and visuospatial ability. Cranial MRI was obtained from all Hashimoto's encephalopathy patients. Hashimoto's encephalopathy and mild Alzheimer's disease showed cognitive impairments in episodic memory, attention, executive function and visuospatial ability, but naming ability was unaffected in Hashimoto's encephalopathy. The MRI of Hashimoto's encephalopathy showed leukoencephalopathy-like type or limbic encephalitis-like type; the lesions did not affect the temporal cortex which plays a role in naming ability. Except that the naming ability was retained, the impairments in cognitive functions for the Hashimoto's encephalopathy patients were similar to those of Alzheimer's disease patients. These results were consistent with the MRI findings.

  14. Trachoma and Relative Poverty: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Habtamu, Esmael; Wondie, Tariku; Aweke, Sintayehu; Tadesse, Zerihun; Zerihun, Mulat; Zewdie, Zebideru; Callahan, Kelly; Emerson, Paul M; Kuper, Hannah; Bailey, Robin L; Mabey, David C W; Rajak, Saul N; Polack, Sarah; Weiss, Helen A; Burton, Matthew J

    2015-11-01

    Trachoma is widely considered a disease of poverty. Although there are many epidemiological studies linking trachoma to factors normally associated with poverty, formal quantitative data linking trachoma to household economic poverty within endemic communities is very limited. Two hundred people with trachomatous trichiasis were recruited through community-based screening in Amhara Region, Ethiopia. These were individually matched by age and gender to 200 controls without trichiasis, selected randomly from the same sub-village as the case. Household economic poverty was measured through (a) A broad set of asset-based wealth indicators and relative household economic poverty determined by principal component analysis (PCA, (b) Self-rated wealth, and (c) Peer-rated wealth. Activity participation data were collected using a modified 'Stylised Activity List' developed for the World Bank's Living Standards Measurement Survey. Trichiasis cases were more likely to belong to poorer households by all measures: asset-based analysis (OR = 2.79; 95%CI: 2.06-3.78; p<0.0001), self-rated wealth (OR, 4.41, 95%CI, 2.75-7.07; p<0.0001) and peer-rated wealth (OR, 8.22, 95% CI, 4.59-14.72; p<0.0001). Cases had less access to latrines (57% v 76.5%, p = <0.0001) and higher person-to-room density (4.0 v 3.31; P = 0.0204) than the controls. Compared to controls, cases were significantly less likely to participate in economically productive activities regardless of visual impairment and other health problems, more likely to report difficulty in performing activities and more likely to receive assistance in performing productive activities. This study demonstrated a strong association between trachomatous trichiasis and relative poverty, suggesting a bidirectional causative relationship possibly may exist between poverty and trachoma. Implementation of the full SAFE strategy in the context of general improvements might lead to a virtuous cycle of improving health and wealth. Trachoma is a

  15. Trachoma and Relative Poverty: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Habtamu, Esmael; Wondie, Tariku; Aweke, Sintayehu; Tadesse, Zerihun; Zerihun, Mulat; Zewdie, Zebideru; Callahan, Kelly; Emerson, Paul M.; Kuper, Hannah; Bailey, Robin L.; Mabey, David C. W.; Rajak, Saul N.; Polack, Sarah; Weiss, Helen A.; Burton, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Trachoma is widely considered a disease of poverty. Although there are many epidemiological studies linking trachoma to factors normally associated with poverty, formal quantitative data linking trachoma to household economic poverty within endemic communities is very limited. Methodology/Principal Findings Two hundred people with trachomatous trichiasis were recruited through community-based screening in Amhara Region, Ethiopia. These were individually matched by age and gender to 200 controls without trichiasis, selected randomly from the same sub-village as the case. Household economic poverty was measured through (a) A broad set of asset-based wealth indicators and relative household economic poverty determined by principal component analysis (PCA, (b) Self-rated wealth, and (c) Peer-rated wealth. Activity participation data were collected using a modified ‘Stylised Activity List’ developed for the World Bank’s Living Standards Measurement Survey. Trichiasis cases were more likely to belong to poorer households by all measures: asset-based analysis (OR = 2.79; 95%CI: 2.06–3.78; p<0.0001), self-rated wealth (OR, 4.41, 95%CI, 2.75–7.07; p<0.0001) and peer-rated wealth (OR, 8.22, 95% CI, 4.59–14.72; p<0.0001). Cases had less access to latrines (57% v 76.5%, p = <0.0001) and higher person-to-room density (4.0 v 3.31; P = 0.0204) than the controls. Compared to controls, cases were significantly less likely to participate in economically productive activities regardless of visual impairment and other health problems, more likely to report difficulty in performing activities and more likely to receive assistance in performing productive activities. Conclusions/Significance This study demonstrated a strong association between trachomatous trichiasis and relative poverty, suggesting a bidirectional causative relationship possibly may exist between poverty and trachoma. Implementation of the full SAFE strategy in the context of general improvements

  16. Case-control study of pathogens involved in piglet diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Vera L A; Bersano, Josete G; Carvalho, Aline F; Catroxo, Márcia H B; Chiebao, Daniela P; Gregori, Fábio; Miyashiro, Simone; Nassar, Alessandra F C; Oliveira, Trícia M F S; Ogata, Renato A; Scarcelli, Eliana P; Tonietti, Paloma O

    2016-01-11

    Diarrhea in piglets directly affects commercial swine production. The disease results from the interaction of pathogens with the host immune system and is also affected by management procedures. Several pathogenic agents such as Campylobacter spp., Clostridium perfringens, Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., group A rotavirus (RV-A), coronaviruses (transmissible gastroenteritis virus; porcine epidemic diarrhea virus), as well as nematode and protozoan parasites, can be associated with disease cases. All bacterial, viral, protozoan, and parasitic agents here investigated, with the exception of Salmonella spp. as well as both coronaviruses, were detected in varying proportions in piglet fecal samples, and positive animals were equally distributed between case and control groups. A statistically significant difference between case and control groups was found only for Cystoisospora suis (p = 0.034) and Eimeria spp. (p = 0.047). When co-infections were evaluated, a statistically significant difference was found only for C. perfringens β2 and C. suis (p = 0.014). The presence of pathogens in piglets alone does not determine the occurrence of diarrhea episodes. Thus, the indiscriminate use of antibiotic and anthelminthic medication should be re-evaluated. This study also reinforces the importance of laboratory diagnosis and correct interpretation of results as well as the relevance of control and prophylactic measures.

  17. Ovarian cancer and talc: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Cramer, D W; Welch, W R; Scully, R E; Wojciechowski, C A

    1982-07-15

    Opportunities for genital exposure to talc were assessed in 215 white females with epithelial ovarian cancers and in 215 control women from the general population matched by age, race, and residence. Ninety-two (42.8%) cases regularly used talc either as a dusting powder on the perineum or on sanitary napkins compared with 61 (28.4%) controls. Adjusted for parity and menopausal status, this difference yielded a relative risk of 1.92 (P less than 0.003) for ovarian cancer associated with these practices. Women who had regularly engaged in both practices had an adjusted relative risk of 3.28 (P less than 0.001) compared to women with neither exposure. This provides some support for an association between talc and ovarian cancer hypothesized because of the similarity of ovarian cancer to mesotheliomas and the chemical relation of talc to asbestos, a known cause of mesotheliomas. The authors also investigated opportunities for potential talc exposure from rubber products such as condoms or diaphragms or from pelvic surgery. No significant differences were noted between cases and controls in these exposures, although the intensity of talc exposure from these sources was likely affected by variables not assessed in this study.

  18. Panic disorder in menopause: a case control study.

    PubMed

    Claudia, Pacchierotti; Andrea, Castrogiovanni; Chiara, Cavicchioli; Stefano, Luisi; Giuseppe, Morgante; Vincenzo, De Leo; Felice, Petraglia; Paolo, Castrogiovanni

    2004-06-15

    The course of panic disorder (PD) is often influenced by the different phases of the female reproductive cycle. The aim of this study is to assess PD in the climacteric stage and single out possible correlations between symptoms of PD and clinical and demographic variables in order to identify possible risk factors. Forty-five women between 40 and 60 years of age was assessed through the SCL-90, the SCID, a "Climacteric Symptoms Questionnaire" (CSQ) devised to evaluate psychological symptoms typically associated with menopause, the Kupperman Index for the analysis of climacteric symptoms, and plasma level of allopregnanolone (ALLO). PD results in eight patients (18%). This group does not differ from the controls as far as socio-demographic data is concerned, but exhibits significantly higher values in the Kupperman Index, the SCL-90 total, and the CSQ. The plasma levels of ALLO correlate significantly inversely with the total of CSQ and, in any case, negatively with the other variables analysed. PD may arise and worsen with menopause, in correlation with greater severity of the climacteric syndrome in its physical and psychological symptoms.

  19. Case-control study of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Deapen, D.M.; Henderson, B.E.

    1986-05-01

    The authors conducted a study of 518 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients identified between 1977 and 1979 and 518 controls to investigate putative risk factors for this disease. Occupations at risk of electrical exposure were reported more often by patients (odds ratio (OR) = 3.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.4-13.0) as were electrical shocks producing unconsciousness (OR = 2.8, 95% CI = 1.0-9.9). Although an overall excess of physical trauma associated with unconsciousness was observed in the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients (OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.0-2.4), the effect was inversely associated with duration of the unconscious episodes, suggesting an effect of recall bias. Only slight differences were found for surgical traumata to the nervous system. Parkinsonism was reported more often among first degree relatives of cases (OR = 2.7, 95% CI = 1.1-7.6). The frequencies of prior poliomyelitis or other central nervous system diseases were similar for patients and controls. Occupational exposure to selected toxic substances was similar for patients and controls except for the manufacture of plastics (OR = 3.7, 95% CI = 1.0-20.5), although few details of these exposures were provided. No differences in occupations with exposure to animal skins or hides were observed.

  20. Risk factors in highway traffic accidents: a case control study.

    PubMed

    Hijar, M; Carrillo, C; Flores, M; Anaya, R; Lopez, V

    2000-09-01

    The objective of this study was to identify risk factors related to the driver, the vehicle and the environment, that are associated with motor vehicles accidents on highways. A case and control design was used where the case was: the driver of a motor vehicle who was involved in an accident while traveling on the Mexico-Cuernavaca highway; and the control was: the driver or a motor vehicle who, traveling on the highway, completed the trip without being involved in a traffic accident. Risk factors associated with the occurrence of a traffic accident (P > 0.05) were: age under 25 years, frequent travel, traveling to work, alcohol consumption, driving during the daylight, on a week-day, under adverse weather conditions and in the Mexico Cuernavaca direction of road. Risks adjusted by logistic regression were: age under 25 years odds ratio (OR) 3.01, confidence interval (CI) (95%) 1.46-6.18; work as a travel reason OR 1.74, CI 1.06 2.86; alcohol intake OR 4.70, Cl 1.62 13.6; driving under adverse weather conditions OR 5.70, CI 3.66-8.85; traveling on a week-day OR 1.84, CI 1.14-2.94; during daylight hours OR 4.23, CI 2.36-7.58 and in the Mexico Cuernavaca direction of road OR 2.69, CI 1.67 4.32. The identification of factors associated with the risk of being involved in a highway traffic accident allows us to propose primary prevention measures for this important public health problem.

  1. Dropped head syndrome after cervical laminoplasty: A case control study.

    PubMed

    Koda, Masao; Furuya, Takeo; Kinoshita, Tomoaki; Miyashita, Tomohiro; Ota, Mitsutoshi; Maki, Satoshi; Ijima, Yasushi; Saito, Junya; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Yamazaki, Masashi; Aramomi, Masaaki; Mannoji, Chikato

    2016-10-01

    Dropped head syndrome (DHS) is characterized by apparent neck extensor muscle weakness and difficulty extending the neck to raise the head against gravity. The aim of the present study was to elucidate possible risk factors for DHS after cervical laminoplasty. Five patients who developed DHS after cervical laminoplasty (DHS group) and twenty age-matched patients who underwent laminoplasty without DHS after surgery (control group) were compared. The surgical procedure was single-door laminoplasty with strut grafting using resected spinous processes or hydroxyapatite spacers from C3 to C6 or C7. Analyses of preoperative images including the C2-C7 angle, C7-T1 kyphosis, T1 tilt, center of gravity line from the head-C7 sagittal vertical axis (CGH-C7 SVA) were performed on lateral plain cervical spine radiographs. Preoperative T2-weighted MRI at the C5 vertebral level was used to measure the cross-sectional area of the deep extensor muscles. Widths of the lateral gutters were assessed postoperatively using CT scans of the C5 vertebral body. The average preoperative C2-C7 angle was significantly smaller in the DHS group compared with the control group. The average preoperative C7-T1 angle was significantly larger in the DHS group compared with the control group. The average preoperative CGH-C7 SVA was significantly larger in the DHS group compared with the control group. In conclusion, patients with more pronounced preoperative C2-C7 kyphosis, C7-T1 kyphosis, and CGH-C7 SVA are more likely to develop DHS following laminoplasty.

  2. Two-stage replication of previous genome-wide association studies of AS3MT-CNNM2-NT5C2 gene cluster region in a large schizophrenia case-control sample from Han Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Guan, Fanglin; Zhang, Tianxiao; Li, Lu; Fu, Dongke; Lin, Huali; Chen, Gang; Chen, Teng

    2016-10-01

    Schizophrenia is a devastating psychiatric condition with high heritability. Replicating the specific genetic variants that increase susceptibility to schizophrenia in different populations is critical to better understand schizophrenia. CNNM2 and NT5C2 are genes recently identified as susceptibility genes for schizophrenia in Europeans, but the exact mechanism by which these genes confer risk for schizophrenia remains unknown. In this study, we examined the potential for genetic susceptibility to schizophrenia of a three-gene cluster region, AS3MT-CNNM2-NT5C2. We implemented a two-stage strategy to conduct association analyses of the targeted regions with schizophrenia. A total of 8218 individuals were recruited, and 45 pre-selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped. Both single-marker and haplotype-based analyses were conducted in addition to imputation analysis to increase the coverage of our genetic markers. Two SNPs, rs11191419 (OR=1.24, P=7.28×10(-5)) and rs11191514 (OR=1.24, P=0.0003), with significant independent effects were identified. These results were supported by the data from both the discovery and validation stages. Further haplotype and imputation analyses also validated these results, and bioinformatics analyses indicated that CALHM1, which is located approximately 630kb away from CNNM2, might be a susceptible gene for schizophrenia. Our results provide further support that AS3MT, CNNM2 and CALHM1 are involved with the etiology and pathogenesis of schizophrenia, suggesting these genes are potential targets of interest for the improvement of disease management and the development of novel pharmacological strategies.

  3. Congenital anosmia and emotion recognition: A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Lemogne, Cédric; Smadja, Julien; Zerdazi, El-Hadi; Soudry, Yaël; Robin, Marion; Berthoz, Sylvie; Limosin, Frédéric; Consoli, Silla M; Bonfils, Pierre

    2015-06-01

    Patients with anosmia are not able to detect volatile chemicals signaling the presence of infectious and non-infectious environmental hazards, which typically elicit disgust and fear, respectively. Social animals may compensate a loss of olfaction by taking advantage of signals of threat that are produced by their conspecifics. Among humans and other primates, body postures and facial expressions are powerful cues conveying emotional information, including fear and disgust. The aim of the present study was to examine whether humans with agenesis of the olfactory bulb, a rare disorder characterized by congenital anosmia, would be more accurate in recognizing facial expressions of fear and disgust. A total of 90 participants with no history of mental disorder or traumatic brain injury were recruited, including 17 patients with congenital anosmia (10 men, mean age ± standard deviation: 36.5 ± 14.8 years), 34 patients with acquired anosmia (18 men, mean age ± standard deviation: 57.2 ± 11.8 years) and 39 healthy subjects (22 men, mean age ± standard deviation: 36.7 ± 13.2 years). For each patient with congenital anosmia, the agenesis of the olfactory bulb was ascertained through magnetic resonance imaging. Emotion recognition abilities were examined with a dynamic paradigm in which a morphing technique allowed displaying emotional facial expressions increasing in intensity over time. Adjusting for age, education, depression and anxiety, patients with congenital anosmia required similar levels of intensity to correctly recognize fear and disgust than healthy subjects while they displayed decreased error rates for both fear (mean difference [95% confidence interval] = -28.3% [-46.3%, -10.2%], P = 0.003) and disgust (mean difference [95% confidence interval] = -15.8% [-31.5%, -0.2%], P = 0.048). Furthermore, among patients with acquired anosmia, there was a negative correlation between duration of anosmia and the rate of errors for fearful (Spearman's ρ = -0.531, P

  4. Primary biliary cirrhosis and osteoporosis: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Mounach, Aziza; Ouzzif, Zhor; Wariaghli, Ghizlane; Achemlal, Lahsen; Benbaghdadi, Imane; Aouragh, Aziz; Bezza, Ahmed; El Maghraoui, Abdellah

    2008-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a common complication of chronic liver disease, from cholestatic disorders to autoimmune, alcoholic, and posthepatitic cirrhosis. Osteoporosis appears more striking in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) because the disease usually affects elderly women, who are naturally prone to osteoporosis. Our aims were (1) to compare the prevalence of osteoporosis (T-score <-2.5 SD) between PBC patients and a group of age-and sex-matched controls consisting of healthy subjects from the general population; and (2) to identify the main risk factors for the development of bone loss. Thirty-three women with PBC (mean age, 47.3 +/- 10.4 years) and 66 healthy subjects were enrolled in the study. Bone mineral density (BMD) was assessed at the lumbar spine by dual-photon X-ray absorptiometry. Bone metabolism was evaluated by measuring serum calcium corrected for serum albumin, 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OH vit D), parathyroid hormone, and osteocalcin. Vertebral fractures were analyzed using vertebral fracture assessment (VFA). The mean T-score was lower in the PBC group compared to healthy controls, with a significant statistical difference (-2.39 +/- 0.93 and -1.47 +/- 0.99 in lumbar spine and total hip, respectively, in the PBC group versus -0.99 +/- 0.51 and -0.56 +/- 1.14 in healthy controls (P < 0.001). The prevalence of osteoporosis was 51.5% in the PBC group versus 22.7% in healthy controls with a statistically significant difference (P = 0.004). BMD of the PBC group was significantly correlated positively with body mass index (BMI) and 25-OH vit D, and negatively with menopausal status, duration of disease, and parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels. Vertebral fractures were present in 9% of the patients. We found that osteoporosis is more prevalent in women with PBC than in the general population. BMI, menopausal status, duration of the disease, and vitamin D deficiency are the main risk factors for osteoporosis in this liver disease.

  5. Study design in evidence-based surgery: What is the role of case-control studies?

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Amy M; Cox, Michael R; Eslick, Guy D

    2016-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are the gold standard in terms of study design, however, in the surgical setting conducting RCTs can often be unethical or logistically impossible. Case-control studies should become the major study design used in surgical research when RCTs are unable to be conducted and definitely replacing case series which offer little insight into surgical outcomes and disease processes. PMID:27019801

  6. Risk factors in lateral epicondylitis (tennis elbow): a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Titchener, A G; Fakis, A; Tambe, A A; Smith, C; Hubbard, R B; Clark, D I

    2013-02-01

    Lateral epicondylitis is a common condition, but relatively little is known about its aetiology and associated risk factors. We have undertaken a large case-control study using The Health Improvement Network database to assess and quantify the relative contributions of some constitutional and environmental risk factors for lateral epicondylitis in the community. Our dataset included 4998 patients with lateral epicondylitis who were individually matched with a single control by age, sex, and general practice. The median age at diagnosis was 49 (interquartile range 42-56) years . Multivariate analysis showed that the risk factors associated with lateral epicondylitis were rotator cuff pathology (OR 4.95), De Quervain's disease (OR 2.48), carpal tunnel syndrome (OR 1.50), oral corticosteroid therapy (OR 1.68), and previous smoking history (OR 1.20). Diabetes mellitus, current smoking, trigger finger, rheumatoid arthritis, alcohol intake, and obesity were not found to be associated with lateral epicondylitis.

  7. 77 FR 12598 - Notice Correction; A Multi-Center International Hospital-Based Case-Control Study of Lymphoma in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-01

    ...-Based Case-Control Study of Lymphoma in Asia (AsiaLymph) (NCI) The Federal Register notice published on... international hospital-based case-control study of lymphoma in Asia (AsiaLymph) (NCI)'' was submitted with...

  8. Risk Factors for Surgical Site Infections Following Neurosurgical Spinal Fusion Operations: A Case Control Study.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Thomas L; Querry, Ashley M; McCool, Sheila; Galdys, Alison L; Shutt, Kathleen A; Saul, Melissa I; Muto, Carlene A

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine risk factors for the development of surgical site infections (SSIs) in neurosurgery patients undergoing spinal fusion. DESIGN Retrospective case-control study. SETTING Large, academic, quaternary care center. PATIENTS The study population included all neurosurgery patients who underwent spinal fusion between August 1, 2009, and August 31, 2013. Cases were defined as patients in the study cohort who developed an SSI. Controls were patients in the study cohort who did not develop an SSI. METHODS To achieve 80% power with an ability to detect an odds ratio (OR) of 2, we performed an unmatched case-control study with equal numbers of cases and controls. RESULTS During the study period, 5,473 spinal fusion procedures were performed by neurosurgeons in our hospital. With 161 SSIs recorded during the study period, the incidence of SSIs associated with these procedures was 2.94%. While anterior surgical approach was found to be a protective factor (OR, 0.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.08-0.52), duration of procedure (OR, 1.58; 95% CI, 1.29-1.93), American Society of Anesthesiologists score of 3 or 4 (OR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.00-3.18), and hospitalization within the prior 30 days (OR, 5.8; 95% CI, 1.37-24.57) were found in multivariate analysis to be independent predictors of SSI following spinal fusion. Prior methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) nares colonization was highly associated with odds 20 times higher of SSI following spinal fusion (OR, 20.30; 95% CI, 4.64-8.78). CONCLUSIONS In additional to nonmodifiable risk factors, prior colonization with MRSA is a modifiable risk factor very strongly associated with development of SSI following spinal fusion. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:348-352.

  9. Case-control vaccine effectiveness studies: Data collection, analysis and reporting results.

    PubMed

    Verani, Jennifer R; Baqui, Abdullah H; Broome, Claire V; Cherian, Thomas; Cohen, Cheryl; Farrar, Jennifer L; Feikin, Daniel R; Groome, Michelle J; Hajjeh, Rana A; Johnson, Hope L; Madhi, Shabir A; Mulholland, Kim; O'Brien, Katherine L; Parashar, Umesh D; Patel, Manish M; Rodrigues, Laura C; Santosham, Mathuram; Scott, J Anthony; Smith, Peter G; Sommerfelt, Halvor; Tate, Jacqueline E; Victor, J Chris; Whitney, Cynthia G; Zaidi, Anita K; Zell, Elizabeth R

    2017-06-05

    The case-control methodology is frequently used to evaluate vaccine effectiveness post-licensure. The results of such studies provide important insight into the level of protection afforded by vaccines in a 'real world' context, and are commonly used to guide vaccine policy decisions. However, the potential for bias and confounding are important limitations to this method, and the results of a poorly conducted or incorrectly interpreted case-control study can mislead policies. In 2012, a group of experts met to review recent experience with case-control studies evaluating vaccine effectiveness; we summarize the recommendations of that group regarding best practices for data collection, analysis, and presentation of the results of case-control vaccine effectiveness studies. Vaccination status is the primary exposure of interest, but can be challenging to assess accurately and with minimal bias. Investigators should understand factors associated with vaccination as well as the availability of documented vaccination status in the study context; case-control studies may not be a valid method for evaluating vaccine effectiveness in settings where many children lack a documented immunization history. To avoid bias, it is essential to use the same methods and effort gathering vaccination data from cases and controls. Variables that may confound the association between illness and vaccination are also important to capture as completely as possible, and where relevant, adjust for in the analysis according to the analytic plan. In presenting results from case-control vaccine effectiveness studies, investigators should describe enrollment among eligible cases and controls as well as the proportion with no documented vaccine history. Emphasis should be placed on confidence intervals, rather than point estimates, of vaccine effectiveness. Case-control studies are a useful approach for evaluating vaccine effectiveness; however careful attention must be paid to the collection

  10. Lack of association between risk of biliary tract cancer and circulating IGF (Insulin-like Growth Factor) -I, IGF-II or IGFBP-3 (IGF-binding Protein-3): A nested case-control study in a large scale cohort study in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yagyu, Kiyoko; Kikuchi, Shogo; Lin, Yingsong; Ishibashi, Teruo; Obata, Yuki; Kurosawa, Michiko; Ito, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Inaba, Yutaka; Tajima, Kazuo; Nakachi, Kei; Tamakoshi, Akiko

    2009-12-01

    Biliary tract cancer, encompassing gallbladder and bile duct cancers, has a poor prognosis, but little is known of the etiology. A nested case-control study was here conducted to evaluate the association between serum levels of IGF-I, IGF-II and IGFBP-3 and death from biliary tract cancer. In a large scale cohort study, 35 gallbladder and 42 bile duct cancers were observed during the follow-up. For each subject in the case group, 1-3 control subjects (228 in total) were selected randomly, matched for sex, age (as near as possible) and residential area. The subjects were divided into tertiles by circulating levels of IGF-I, IGF-II or IGFBP-3. Using conditional logistic regression, risks among the tertiles were compared adjusted for defecation, smoking and drinking habits. No remarkable differences in risks of gallbladder or bile duct cancer were observed among tertiles of IGF-I or IGF-II, and no remarkable trend was observed. Circulating IGFBP-3 showed an inverse U-shape association with gallbladder cancer and a U-shaped one with bile duct cancer. Associations between IGF-I or IGF-II and gallbladder or bile duct cancer thus were lacking or very weak. The observed U- and inverse U-shaped association of IGFBP-3 with the cancers is not suggestive of any meaningful relationships.

  11. Assessing different measures of population-level vaccine protection using a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mohammad; You, Young Ae; Kanungo, Suman; Manna, Byomkesh; Deen, Jacqueline L; Lopez, Anna Lena; Wierzba, Thomas F; Bhattacharya, Sujit K; Sur, Dipika; Clemens, John D

    2015-11-27

    Case-control studies have not been examined for their utility in assessing population-level vaccine protection in individually randomized trials. We used the data of a randomized, placebo-controlled trial of a cholera vaccine to compare the results of case-control analyses with those of cohort analyses. Cases of cholera were selected from the trial population followed for three years following dosing. For each case, we selected 4 age-matched controls who had not developed cholera. For each case and control, GIS was used to calculate vaccine coverage of individuals in a surrounding "virtual" cluster. Specific selection strategies were used to evaluate the vaccine protective effects. 66,900 out of 108,389 individuals received two doses of the assigned regimen. For direct protection among subjects in low vaccine coverage clusters, we observed 78% (95% CI: 47-91%) protection in a cohort analysis and 84% (95% CI: 60-94%) in case-control analysis after adjusting for confounding factors. Using our GIS-based approach, estimated indirect protection was 52% (95% CI: 10-74%) in cohort and 76% (95% CI: 47-89%) in case control analysis. Estimates of total and overall effectiveness were similar for cohort and case-control analyses. The findings show that case-control analyses of individually randomized vaccine trials may be used to evaluate direct as well as population-level vaccine protection. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Coffee consumption and risk of colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis of case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Galeone, Carlotta; Turati, Federica; La Vecchia, Carlo; Tavani, Alessandra

    2010-11-01

    A meta-analysis of case-control studies on coffee consumption and colorectal cancer risk was conducted. Twenty-four eligible studies published before May 2010 were identified, including a total of 14,846 cases of colorectal, colon or rectal cancer. Compared to non/occasional drinkers, the odds ratios (OR) for drinkers were 0.83 (95% CI 0.73-0.95) for colorectal, 0.93 (95% CI 0.81-1.07) for colon and 0.98 (95% CI 0.85-1.13) for rectal cancer, with significant heterogeneity among studies; the corresponding ORs for the increment of 1 cup/day were 0.94 (95% CI 0.91-0.98), 0.95 (95% CI 0.92-0.98), and 0.97 (95% CI 0.95-0.99). For the highest coffee drinkers, the ORs were 0.70 (95% CI 0.60-0.81) for colorectal cancer, 0.75 (95% CI 0.64-0.88) for colon cancer and 0.87 (95% CI 0.75-1.00) for rectal cancer, when compared to non/low drinkers. The results of this meta-analysis of case-control studies suggest a moderate favorable effect of coffee consumption on colorectal cancer risk. The reduced risk was consistent across study design (hospital vs. population based), geographic area, and various confounding factors considered. It may reflect a real protection but also partly or largely be due to reverse causation, i.e. decreased coffee consumption among cases following the onset of bowel symptoms.

  13. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and Gastrointestinal Bleeding: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal, Alfonso; Ortega, Sara; Del Olmo, Lourdes; Vidal, Xavier; Aguirre, Carmelo; Ruiz, Borja; Conforti, Anita; Leone, Roberto; López-Vázquez, Paula; Figueiras, Adolfo; Ibáñez, Luisa

    2011-01-01

    Background Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have been associated with upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Given their worldwide use, even small risks account for a large number of cases. This study has been conducted with carefully collected information to further investigate the relationship between SSRIs and upper GI bleeding. Methods We conducted a case-control study in hospitals in Spain and in Italy. Cases were patients aged ≥18 years with a primary diagnosis of acute upper GI bleeding diagnosed by endoscopy; three controls were matched by sex, age, date of admission (within 3 months) and hospital among patients who were admitted for elective surgery for non-painful disorders. Exposures to SSRIs, other antidepressants and other drugs were defined as any use of these drugs in the 7 days before the day on which upper gastrointestinal bleeding started (index day). Results 581 cases of upper GI bleeding and 1358 controls were considered eligible for the study; no differences in age or sex distribution were observed between cases and controls after matching. Overall, 4.0% of the cases and 3.3% of controls used an SSRI antidepressant in the week before the index day. No significant risk of upper GI bleeding was encountered for SSRI antidepressants (adjusted odds ratio, 1.06, 95% CI, 0.57–1.96) or for whichever other grouping of antidepressants. Conclusions The results of this case-control study showed no significant increase in upper GI bleeding with SSRIs and provide good evidence that the magnitude of any increase in risk is not greater than 2. PMID:21625637

  14. Neurocognitive performance in family-based and case-control studies of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Gur, Ruben C.; Braff, David L.; Calkins, Monica E.; Dobie, Dorcas J.; Freedman, Robert; Green, Michael F.; Greenwood, Tiffany A.; Lazzeroni, Laura C.; Light, Gregory A.; Nuechterlein, Keith H.; Olincy, Ann; Radant, Allen D.; Seidman, Larry J.; Siever, Larry J.; Silverman, Jeremy M.; Sprock, Joyce; Stone, William S.; Sugar, Catherine A.; Swerdlow, Neal R.; Tsuang, Debby W.; Tsuang, Ming T.; Turetsky, Bruce I.; Gur, Raquel E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Neurocognitive deficits in schizophrenia (SZ) are established and the Consortium on the Genetics of Schizophrenia (COGS) investigated such measures as endophenotypes in family-based (COGS-1) and case-control (COGS-2) studies. By requiring family participation, family-based sampling may result in samples that vary demographically and perform better on neurocognitive measures. Methods The Penn computerized neurocognitive battery (CNB) evaluates accuracy and speed of performance for several domains and was administered across sites in COGS-1 and COGS-2. Most tests were included in both studies. COGS-1 included 328 patients with SZ and 497 healthy comparison subjects (HCS) and COGS-2 included 1195 patients and 1009 HCS. Results Demographically, COGS-1 participants were younger, more educated, with more educated parents and higher estimated IQ compared to COGS-2 participants. After controlling for demographics, the two samples produced very similar performance profiles compared to their respective controls. As expected, performance was better and with smaller effect sizes compared to controls in COGS-1 relative to COGS-2. Better performance was most pronounced for spatial processing while emotion identification had large effect sizes for both accuracy and speed in both samples. Performance was positively correlated with functioning and negatively with negative and positive symptoms in both samples, but correlations were attenuated in COGS-2, especially with positive symptoms. Conclusions Patients ascertained through family-based design have more favorable demographics and better performance on some neurocognitive domains. Thus, studies that use case-control ascertainment may tap into populations with more severe forms of illness that are exposed to less favorable factors compared to those ascertained with family-based designs. PMID:25432636

  15. Unprovoked seizures after traumatic brain injury: A population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Mahler, Benno; Carlsson, Sofia; Andersson, Tomas; Adelöw, Cecilia; Ahlbom, Anders; Tomson, Torbjörn

    2015-09-01

    To quantify the risk of unprovoked seizures after traumatic brain injury (TBI) METHODS: We used the Stockholm Incidence Registry on Epilepsy to carry out a population-based case-control study, including 1,885 cases with incident unprovoked seizures from September 1, 2000 through August 31, 2008, together with 15,080 matched controls. Information of prior hospitalizations for TBI was obtained through record linkage with the Swedish National Inpatient Registry for the period 1980-2008. Relative risks (RRs) for unprovoked seizures were estimated after various TBI diagnoses, and influences of TBI severity and time since trauma were studied in detail. After hospitalization for mild TBI, the RR was 2.0 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.5-2.7). The RR was higher after brain contusion (5.9, 95% CI 2.4-15.0) or intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) (4.5, 95% CI 2.2-9.0), whereas a combination of both diagnoses led to a further sevenfold increase in RR (42.6, 95% CI 12.2-148.5). The risk was greatest during the first 6 months after severe TBI (RR 48.9, 95% CI 10.9-218.9) or mild TBI (RR 8.1, 95% CI 3.1-21.7), but was still elevated >10 years after any TBI. Herein we present a large population-based case-control study on TBI as a risk factor for unprovoked epileptic seizures, including cases of all ages with individually validated seizure diagnoses. The risk for epileptic seizures was substantially increased after TBI, especially during the first 6 months after the injury and in patients with a combination of ICH and brain contusion. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 International League Against Epilepsy.

  16. General practitioner notes as a source of information for case-control studies in young women. UK National Case-Control Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    Chilvers, C E; Pike, M C; Taylor, C N; Hermon, C; Crossley, B; Smith, S J

    1994-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--The UK National Case-Control Study was carried out to investigate the relationship between oral contraceptive use and breast cancer risk. This study investigates whether general practitioner notes could be used as the sole data source for epidemiological studies of young women and what the effect would be on non-response and recall bias. DESIGN--Case-control study with data on gynaecological, obstetric, and contraceptive history collected at interview and from general practitioners' notes. Information from these two sources was compared. SETTING--This was a population-based study. PARTICIPANTS--Altogether 755 women with breast cancer aged under 36 years at diagnosis, each with an age-matched control, participated in the study. Response rates at interview were 72% and 89% for cases and controls but GP data were available for 90% of the 1049 case and first-selected control pairs. MAIN RESULTS--There was generally good agreement between the two data sources with respect to obstetric history and gynaecological procedures (hysterectomy, oophorectomy, and tubal ligation). The use of intra-uterine devices, or diaphragm, and partner's vasectomy were not reliably recorded in the GP's notes. The overall results of the UK study would have been qualitatively the same with respect to the relationship between oral contraceptive use and breast cancer risk if GP notes only had been used, in spite of the fact that only about half of all oral contraceptive usage was recorded in the notes. Response rates would have been higher, recall bias eliminated, and the cost of the study halved. CONCLUSIONS--When planning case-control studies in young women, the possibility of using GP notes as the primary data source should be considered. Lack of data on potential confounding factors is a possible drawback to such use. The practice of destroying GP's notes shortly after the death of patients seriously restricts the possibility of using these notes when studying rapidly fatal

  17. Environmental and occupational risk factors for progressive supranuclear palsy: Case-control study.

    PubMed

    Litvan, Irene; Lees, Peter S J; Cunningham, Christopher R; Rai, Shesh N; Cambon, Alexander C; Standaert, David G; Marras, Connie; Juncos, Jorge; Riley, David; Reich, Stephen; Hall, Deborah; Kluger, Benzi; Bordelon, Yvette; Shprecher, David R

    2016-05-01

    The cause of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is largely unknown. Based on evidence for impaired mitochondrial activity in PSP, we hypothesized that the disease may be related to exposure to environmental toxins, some of which are mitochondrial inhibitors. This multicenter case-control study included 284 incident PSP cases of 350 cases and 284 age-, sex-, and race-matched controls primarily from the same geographical areas. All subjects were administered standardized interviews to obtain data on demographics, residential history, and lifetime occupational history. An industrial hygienist and a toxicologist unaware of case status assessed occupational histories to estimate past exposure to metals, pesticides, organic solvents, and other chemicals. Cases and controls were similar on demographic factors. In unadjusted analyses, PSP was associated with lower education, lower income, more smoking pack-years, more years of drinking well water, more years living on a farm, more years living 1 mile from an agricultural region, more transportation jobs, and more jobs with exposure to metals in general. However, in adjusted models, only more years of drinking well water was significantly associated with PSP. There was an inverse association with having a college degree. We did not find evidence for a specific causative chemical exposure; higher number of years of drinking well water is a risk factor for PSP. This result remained significant after adjusting for income, smoking, education and occupational exposures. This is the first case-control study to demonstrate PSP is associated with environmental factors. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  18. A concordance index for matched case-control studies with applications in cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Brentnall, Adam R; Cuzick, Jack; Field, John; Duffy, Stephen W

    2015-02-10

    In unmatched case-control studies, the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) may be used to measure how well a variable discriminates between cases and controls. The AUC is sometimes used in matched case-control studies by ignoring matching, but it lacks interpretation because it is not based on an estimate of the ROC for the population of interest. We introduce an alternative measure of discrimination that is the concordance of risk factors conditional on the matching factors. Parametric and non-parametric estimators are given for different matching scenarios, and applied to real data from breast and lung cancer case-control studies. Diagnostic plots to verify the constancy of discrimination over matching factors are demonstrated. The proposed simple measure is easy to use, interpret, more efficient than unmatched AUC statistics and may be applied to compare the conditional discrimination performance of risk factors.

  19. Helicobacter pylori infection and early onset myocardial infarction: case-control and sibling pairs study

    PubMed Central

    Danesh, John; Youngman, Linda; Clark, Sarah; Parish, Sarah; Peto, Richard; Collins, Rory

    1999-01-01

    Objectives To examine the association between coronary heart disease and chronic Helicobacter pylori infection. Design Case-control study of myocardial infarction at young ages and study of sibling pairs with one member affected and the other not. Setting United Kingdom. Participants 1122 survivors of suspected acute myocardial infarction at ages 30-49 (mean age 44 years) and 1122 age and sex matched controls with no history of coronary heart disease; 510 age and sex matched pairs of siblings (mean age 59 years) in which one sibling had survived myocardial infarction and one had no history of coronary heart disease. Main outcome measures Serological evidence of chronic infection with H pylori. Results 472 (42%) of the 1122 cases with early onset myocardial infarction were seropositive for H pylori antibodies compared with 272 (24%) of the 1122 age and sex matched controls, giving an odds ratio of 2.28 (99% confidence interval 1.80 to 2.90). This odds ratio fell to 1.87 (1.42 to 2.47; P<0.0001) after smoking and indicators of socioeconomic status were adjusted for and to 1.75 (1.29 to 2.36) after additional adjustment for blood lipid concentrations and obesity. Only 158 of the 510 pairs of siblings were discordant for H pylori status; among these, 91 cases and 67 controls were seropositive (odds ratio 1.33 (0.86 to 2.05)). No strong correlations were observed between H pylori seropositivity and measurements of other risk factors for coronary heart disease (plasma lipids, fibrinogen, C reactive protein, albumin, etc). Conclusion In the context of results from other relevant studies, these two studies suggest a moderate association between coronary heart disease and H pylori seropositivity that cannot be fully accounted for by other risk factors. But even if this association is causal and largely reversible by eradication of chronic infection, very large randomised trials would be needed to show this. Key messagesMost previous studies of associations between chronic H

  20. Psychosocial and Psychiatric Factors Associated with Adolescent Suicide: A Case-Control Psychological Autopsy Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portzky, Gwendolyn; Audenaert, Kurt; van Heeringen, Kees

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed at the investigation of psychosocial and psychiatric risk factors of adolescent suicide by means of a case-control psychological autopsy study. Relatives and other informants of 19 suicide victims and 19 matched psychiatric controls were interviewed by means of a semi-structured interview schedule. Psychiatric controls included…

  1. National Case-Control Study of Homicide Offending and Methamphetamine Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stretesky, Paul B.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between methamphetamine use and homicide. To carry out this study, data from the National Household Survey on Drug Abuse and Survey of Inmates in State and Federal Correctional Facilities were combined to create a case-control design. The main exposure measure is methamphetamine use and the…

  2. Behavioural Comorbidity in Tanzanian Children with Epilepsy: A Community-Based Case-Control Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Kathryn; Rogathe, Jane; Hunter, Ewan; Burton, Matthew; Swai, Mark; Todd, Jim; Neville, Brian; Walker, Richard; Newton, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to define the prevalence of and risk factors for behavioural disorders in children with epilepsy from a rural district of Tanzania by conducting a community-based case-control study. Method: One hundred and twelve children aged 6 to 14 years (55 males, 57 females; median age 12y) with active epilepsy (at least two…

  3. Psychosocial and Psychiatric Factors Associated with Adolescent Suicide: A Case-Control Psychological Autopsy Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portzky, Gwendolyn; Audenaert, Kurt; van Heeringen, Kees

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed at the investigation of psychosocial and psychiatric risk factors of adolescent suicide by means of a case-control psychological autopsy study. Relatives and other informants of 19 suicide victims and 19 matched psychiatric controls were interviewed by means of a semi-structured interview schedule. Psychiatric controls included…

  4. National Case-Control Study of Homicide Offending and Methamphetamine Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stretesky, Paul B.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between methamphetamine use and homicide. To carry out this study, data from the National Household Survey on Drug Abuse and Survey of Inmates in State and Federal Correctional Facilities were combined to create a case-control design. The main exposure measure is methamphetamine use and the…

  5. Case-Control Genome-Wide Association Study of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neale, Benjamin M.; Medland, Sarah; Ripke, Stephan; Anney, Richard J. L.; Asherson, Philip; Buitelaar, Jan; Franke, Barbara; Gill, Michael; Kent, Lindsey; Holmans, Peter; Middleton, Frank; Thapar, Anita; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Faraone, Stephen V.; Daly, Mark; Nguyen, Thuy Trang; Schafer, Helmut; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Reif, Andreas; Renner, Tobias J.; Romanos, Marcel; Romanos, Jasmin; Warnke, Andreas; Walitza, Susanne; Freitag, Christine; Meyer, Jobst; Palmason, Haukur; Rothenberger, Aribert; Hawi, Ziarih; Sergeant, Joseph; Roeyers, Herbert; Mick, Eric; Biederman, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Although twin and family studies have shown attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to be highly heritable, genetic variants influencing the trait at a genome-wide significant level have yet to be identified. Thus additional genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are needed. Method: We used case-control analyses of 896 cases…

  6. Behavioural Comorbidity in Tanzanian Children with Epilepsy: A Community-Based Case-Control Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Kathryn; Rogathe, Jane; Hunter, Ewan; Burton, Matthew; Swai, Mark; Todd, Jim; Neville, Brian; Walker, Richard; Newton, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to define the prevalence of and risk factors for behavioural disorders in children with epilepsy from a rural district of Tanzania by conducting a community-based case-control study. Method: One hundred and twelve children aged 6 to 14 years (55 males, 57 females; median age 12y) with active epilepsy (at least two…

  7. Case-Control Genome-Wide Association Study of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neale, Benjamin M.; Medland, Sarah; Ripke, Stephan; Anney, Richard J. L.; Asherson, Philip; Buitelaar, Jan; Franke, Barbara; Gill, Michael; Kent, Lindsey; Holmans, Peter; Middleton, Frank; Thapar, Anita; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Faraone, Stephen V.; Daly, Mark; Nguyen, Thuy Trang; Schafer, Helmut; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Reif, Andreas; Renner, Tobias J.; Romanos, Marcel; Romanos, Jasmin; Warnke, Andreas; Walitza, Susanne; Freitag, Christine; Meyer, Jobst; Palmason, Haukur; Rothenberger, Aribert; Hawi, Ziarih; Sergeant, Joseph; Roeyers, Herbert; Mick, Eric; Biederman, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Although twin and family studies have shown attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to be highly heritable, genetic variants influencing the trait at a genome-wide significant level have yet to be identified. Thus additional genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are needed. Method: We used case-control analyses of 896 cases…

  8. Alcohol consumption and psoriatic risk: a meta-analysis of case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Kun-Ju; Zhu, Cheng-Yao; Fan, Yi-Ming

    2012-09-01

    Psoriasis is one of the most common dermatological disorders. The association between alcohol consumption and psoriasis has been inconsistent among studies. To examine the magnitude of the risk of developing psoriasis for drinking populations compared to those with non-drinking, and to determine causes of the variation in odds ratios (OR) between various case-control studies, we performed a comprehensive published work search and a meta-analysis of case-control studies considering prevalence. We did electronic searches on Medline, and searched reports to identify case-control studies of prevalent of psoriasis. We did meta-analyses of study-specific incremental estimates to determine the risk of psoriasis associated with drinking. The magnitude of the OR was analyzed by combining 15 case-control studies that matched defined criteria. The variance in OR between studies was explored. The overall OR of psoriasis for drinking persons compared to those with non-drinking was 1.531 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.164-2.014, P = 0.002) and the association remains statistically significant across a number of stratified analyses in European descent subgroup (OR = 1.432, 95% CI = 1.085-1.889, P = 0.011) and also persists in sensitivity analyses performed to assess the potential effect of varying psoriasis outcome definitions. Alcohol consumption is associated with increased risk of psoriasis. These epidemiological observations should inform the exploration of biological mechanisms that link alcohol consumption with psoriasis.

  9. Performance of Disease Risk Score Matching in Nested Case-Control Studies: A Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Desai, Rishi J; Glynn, Robert J; Wang, Shirley; Gagne, Joshua J

    2016-05-15

    In a case-control study, matching on a disease risk score (DRS), which includes many confounders, should theoretically result in greater precision than matching on only a few confounders; however, this has not been investigated. We simulated 1,000 hypothetical cohorts with a binary exposure, a time-to-event outcome, and 13 covariates. Each cohort comprised 2 subcohorts of 10,000 patients each: a historical subcohort and a concurrent subcohort. DRS were estimated in the historical subcohorts and applied to the concurrent subcohorts. Nested case-control studies were conducted in the concurrent subcohorts using incidence density sampling with 2 strategies-matching on age and sex, with adjustment for additional confounders, and matching on DRS-followed by conditional logistic regression for 9 outcome-exposure incidence scenarios. In all scenarios, DRS matching yielded lower average standard errors and mean squared errors than did matching on age and sex. In 6 scenarios, DRS matching also resulted in greater empirical power. DRS matching resulted in less relative bias than did matching on age and sex at lower outcome incidences but more relative bias at higher incidences. Post-hoc analysis revealed that the effect of DRS model misspecification might be more pronounced at higher outcome incidences, resulting in higher relative bias. These results suggest that DRS matching might increase the statistical efficiency of case-control studies, particularly when the outcome is rare. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Using full-cohort data in nested case-control and case-cohort studies by multiple imputation.

    PubMed

    Keogh, Ruth H; White, Ian R

    2013-10-15

    In many large prospective cohorts, expensive exposure measurements cannot be obtained for all individuals. Exposure-disease association studies are therefore often based on nested case-control or case-cohort studies in which complete information is obtained only for sampled individuals. However, in the full cohort, there may be a large amount of information on cheaply available covariates and possibly a surrogate of the main exposure(s), which typically goes unused. We view the nested case-control or case-cohort study plus the remainder of the cohort as a full-cohort study with missing data. Hence, we propose using multiple imputation (MI) to utilise information in the full cohort when data from the sub-studies are analysed. We use the fully observed data to fit the imputation models. We consider using approximate imputation models and also using rejection sampling to draw imputed values from the true distribution of the missing values given the observed data. Simulation studies show that using MI to utilise full-cohort information in the analysis of nested case-control and case-cohort studies can result in important gains in efficiency, particularly when a surrogate of the main exposure is available in the full cohort. In simulations, this method outperforms counter-matching in nested case-control studies and a weighted analysis for case-cohort studies, both of which use some full-cohort information. Approximate imputation models perform well except when there are interactions or non-linear terms in the outcome model, where imputation using rejection sampling works well.

  11. Network-based regularization for high dimensional SNP data in the case-control study of Type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jie; He, Tao; Li, Ye; Liu, Sai; Du, Yinhao; Jiang, Yu; Wu, Cen

    2017-05-16

    Over the past decades, the prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) has been steadily increasing around the world. Despite large efforts devoted to better understand the genetic basis of the disease, the identified susceptibility loci can only account for a small portion of the T2D heritability. Some of the existing approaches proposed for the high dimensional genetic data from the T2D case-control study are limited by analyzing a few number of SNPs at a time from a large pool of SNPs, by ignoring the correlations among SNPs and by adopting inefficient selection techniques. We propose a network constrained regularization method to select important SNPs by taking the linkage disequilibrium into account. To accomodate the case control study, an iteratively reweighted least square algorithm has been developed within the coordinate descent framework where optimization of the regularized logistic loss function is performed with respect to one parameter at a time and iteratively cycle through all the parameters until convergence. In this article, a novel approach is developed to identify important SNPs more effectively through incorporating the interconnections among them in the regularized selection. A coordinate descent based iteratively reweighed least squares (IRLS) algorithm has been proposed. Both the simulation study and the analysis of the Nurses's Health Study, a case-control study of type 2 diabetes data with high dimensional SNP measurements, demonstrate the advantage of the network based approach over the competing alternatives.

  12. Analysis of secondary outcomes in nested case-control study designs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ryung S; Kaplan, Robert C

    2014-10-30

    One of the main perceived advantages of using a case-cohort design compared with a nested case-control design in an epidemiologic study is the ability to evaluate with the same subcohort outcomes other than the primary outcome of interest. In this paper, we show that valid inferences about secondary outcomes can also be achieved in nested case-control studies by using the inclusion probability weighting method in combination with an approximate jackknife standard error that can be computed using existing software. Simulation studies demonstrate that when the sample size is sufficient, this approach yields valid type 1 error and coverage rates for the analysis of secondary outcomes in nested case-control designs. Interestingly, the statistical power of the nested case-control design was comparable with that of the case-cohort design when the primary and secondary outcomes were positively correlated. The proposed method is illustrated with the data from a cohort in Cardiovascular Health Study to study the association of C-reactive protein levels and the incidence of congestive heart failure.

  13. Head trauma and Parkinson's disease: results from an Italian case-control study.

    PubMed

    Nicoletti, Alessandra; Vasta, Rosario; Mostile, Giovanni; Nicoletti, Giuseppe; Arabia, Gennarina; Iliceto, Giovanni; Lamberti, Paolo; Marconi, Roberto; Morgante, Letterio; Barone, Paolo; Quattrone, Aldo; Zappia, Mario

    2017-07-26

    We evaluated the possible association between head trauma and Parkinson's disease (PD). The FRAGAMP (Fattori di Rischio Ambientali e Genetici Associati alla Malattia di Parkinson) study is a large Italian multicenter case-control study carried out to evaluate the possible role of environmental and genetic factors in PD. Cases and controls were enrolled from six movement disorders centers located in the Central-Southern Italy. A standardized questionnaire was administered to record demographic, epidemiological, and clinical data. Positive history of head trauma was considered only if the head trauma preceded the onset of PD. All cases and controls underwent a standard neurological examination. Adjusted ORs and 95% CI were estimated using multivariate analysis (logistic regression). Four hundred ninety-two PD patients (292 men and 200 women) and 459 controls (160 men and 299 women) were enrolled in the study. A positive history for head trauma was reported by 106 (21.5%) PD patients and by 62 (13.5%) healthy controls. Multivariate analysis (OR adjusted by age, sex, family history, coffee smoking, and alcohol consumption) showed a significant positive association between PD and head trauma with an adjusted OR of 1.50 (95%CI 1.04-2.17; p value 0.03). In agreement with literature data, our study supports the positive association between head trauma and PD.

  14. The role of the CHRNA4 gene in Internet addiction: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Montag, Christian; Kirsch, Peter; Sauer, Carina; Markett, Sebastian; Reuter, Martin

    2012-09-01

    Recent studies from Asia provided first evidence for a molecular genetic link between serotonergic and dopaminergic neurotransmission and Internet addiction. The present report offers data on a new candidate gene in the investigation of Internet addiction-the gene coding for the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit alpha 4 (CHRNA4). A case-control study was carried out. The participants were recruited from a large gene data bank, including people from the general population and from a university setting. A total of 132 participants with problematic Internet use and 132 age- and sex-matched controls participated in the study. Participants provided DNA samples and filled in the Internet Addiction Test Questionnaire. The T- variant (CC genotype) of the rs1044396 polymorphism on the CHRNA4 gene occurred significantly more frequently in the case group. Further analyses revealed that this effect was driven by females. Combined with the findings from other studies, the present data point in the direction that rs1044396 exerts pleiotropic effects on a vast range of behaviors, including cognition, emotion, and addiction.

  15. Adaptation of Chain Event Graphs for use with Case-Control Studies in Epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Keeble, Claire; Thwaites, Peter Adam; Barber, Stuart; Law, Graham Richard; Baxter, Paul David

    2017-09-26

    Case-control studies are used in epidemiology to try to uncover the causes of diseases, but are a retrospective study design known to suffer from non-participation and recall bias, which may explain their decreased popularity in recent years. Traditional analyses report usually only the odds ratio for given exposures and the binary disease status. Chain event graphs are a graphical representation of a statistical model derived from event trees which have been developed in artificial intelligence and statistics, and only recently introduced to the epidemiology literature. They are a modern Bayesian technique which enable prior knowledge to be incorporated into the data analysis using the agglomerative hierarchical clustering algorithm, used to form a suitable chain event graph. Additionally, they can account for missing data and be used to explore missingness mechanisms. Here we adapt the chain event graph framework to suit scenarios often encountered in case-control studies, to strengthen this study design which is time and financially efficient. We demonstrate eight adaptations to the graphs, which consist of two suitable for full case-control study analysis, four which can be used in interim analyses to explore biases, and two which aim to improve the ease and accuracy of analyses. The adaptations are illustrated with complete, reproducible, fully-interpreted examples, including the event tree and chain event graph. Chain event graphs are used here for the first time to summarise non-participation, data collection techniques, data reliability, and disease severity in case-control studies. We demonstrate how these features of a case-control study can be incorporated into the analysis to provide further insight, which can help to identify potential biases and lead to more accurate study results.

  16. Telomere length in prospective and retrospective cancer case-control studies

    PubMed Central

    Pooley, Karen A.; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Tyrer, Jonathan; Shah, Mitul; Driver, Kristy E.; Luben, Robert N.; Bingham, Sheila A.; Ponder, Bruce A.J.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Easton, Douglas F.; Dunning, Alison M.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that shorter mean telomere length in lymphocytes is associated with increased susceptibility to common diseases of aging, and may be predictive of cancer risk. However, most analyses have examined retrospectively-collected case-control studies. Mean telomere length was measured using high-throughput quantitative Real Time PCR. Blood for DNA extraction was collected after cancer diagnosis in the East Anglian SEARCH Breast (2243 cases, 2181 controls) and SEARCH Colorectal (2249 cases, 2161 controls) studies. Prospective case-control studies were conducted for breast cancer (199 cases) and colorectal cancer (185 cases), nested within the EPIC-Norfolk cohort. Blood has been collected at least 6 months prior to diagnosis, and was matched to DNA from two cancer-free controls per case. In the retrospective, SEARCH studies, the age-adjusted Odds Ratios for shortest (Q4) vs. longest (Q1) quartile of mean telomere length was 15.5 (95%CI 11.6–20.8), p-het=5.7×10−75; with a ‘per quartile’ p-trend=2.1×10−80 for breast cancer, and 2.14 (95%CI 1.77–2.59), p-het=7.3×10−15; with a ‘per quartile’ p-trend=1.8×10−13 for colorectal cancer. In the prospective, EPIC study, the comparable Odds Ratios [Q4 vs. Q1] were 1.58 (95%CI 0.75–3.31), p-het=0.23 for breast cancer, and 1.13 (95%CI 0.54–2.36), p-het=0.75 for colorectal cancer risk. Mean telomere length was shorter in retrospectively-collected cases than in controls but the equivalent association was markedly weaker in the prospective studies. This suggests that telomere shortening largely occurs after diagnosis, and may not, therefore, be of value in cancer prediction. PMID:20395204

  17. Nutritional Status of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs): A Case-Control Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marí-Bauset, Salvador; Llopis-González, Agustín; Zazpe-García, Itziar; Marí-Sanchis, Amelia; Morales-Suárez-Varela, María

    2015-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have problems of food selectivity, implying risks of nutritional deficiencies. The aim was to compare intakes of macro and micronutrients and body mass index in ASD and typically developing (TD) children. In a case--control study, 3-day food diaries and anthropometric measurements were completed for ASD…

  18. COMPARISON OF GEOCODING METHODS USED IN CASE-CONTROL STUDY OF AIR QUALITY AND BIRTH DEFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction: Accurate geocoding of maternal residence is critical to the success of an ongoing case-control study of exposure to five criteria air pollutants and the risk of selected birth defects in seven Texas counties between 1997 and 2000. The geocoded maternal residence a...

  19. Toxoplasmosis gondii and schizophrenia: a case control study in a low Toxoplasma gondii seroprevalence Mexican population

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There are conflicting reports concerning the association of T. gondii infection and schizophrenia. Therefore, we determined such association in a Mexican population of Mestizo ethnicity. Through a case-control study design, 50 schizophrenic patients and 150 control subjects matched by gender, age, r...

  20. A Case Control Study of Suicide and Attempted Suicide in Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beautrais, Annette L.

    2002-01-01

    Risk factors for serious suicidal behavior among older adults were examined in a case control study of adults aged 55 and older who died by suicide or made suicide attempts and who were compared with randomly selected comparison subjects. Multivariate analyses suggested that mood disorders were the most significant risk factor for suicidal…

  1. Nutritional Status of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs): A Case-Control Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marí-Bauset, Salvador; Llopis-González, Agustín; Zazpe-García, Itziar; Marí-Sanchis, Amelia; Morales-Suárez-Varela, María

    2015-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have problems of food selectivity, implying risks of nutritional deficiencies. The aim was to compare intakes of macro and micronutrients and body mass index in ASD and typically developing (TD) children. In a case--control study, 3-day food diaries and anthropometric measurements were completed for ASD…

  2. How to quantify information loss due to phase ambiguity in haplotype case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Uh, Hae-Won; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J; Putter, Hein; van Houwelingen, Hans C

    2005-12-30

    Assigning haplotypes in a case-control study is a challenging problem. We proposed a method to quantify the information loss due to missing phase information. We determined which individuals were responsible for the information loss, and calculated how much information could be gained when the ambiguous individuals could be resolved by adding additional parental information.

  3. COMPARISON OF GEOCODING METHODS USED IN CASE-CONTROL STUDY OF AIR QUALITY AND BIRTH DEFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction: Accurate geocoding of maternal residence is critical to the success of an ongoing case-control study of exposure to five criteria air pollutants and the risk of selected birth defects in seven Texas counties between 1997 and 2000. The geocoded maternal residence a...

  4. A Case Control Study of Suicide and Attempted Suicide in Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beautrais, Annette L.

    2002-01-01

    Risk factors for serious suicidal behavior among older adults were examined in a case control study of adults aged 55 and older who died by suicide or made suicide attempts and who were compared with randomly selected comparison subjects. Multivariate analyses suggested that mood disorders were the most significant risk factor for suicidal…

  5. Uncovering selection bias in case-control studies using Bayesian post-stratification.

    PubMed

    Geneletti, S; Best, N; Toledano, M B; Elliott, P; Richardson, S

    2013-07-10

    Case-control studies are particularly prone to selection bias, which can affect odds ratio estimation. Approaches to discovering and adjusting for selection bias have been proposed in the literature using graphical and heuristic tools as well as more complex statistical methods. The approach we propose is based on a survey-weighting method termed Bayesian post-stratification and follows from the conditional independences that characterise selection bias. We use our approach to perform a selection bias sensitivity analysis by using ancillary data sources that describe the target case-control population to re-weight the odds ratio estimates obtained from the study. The method is applied to two case-control studies, the first investigating the association between exposure to electromagnetic fields and acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in children and the second investigating the association between maternal occupational exposure to hairspray and a congenital anomaly in male babies called hypospadias. In both case-control studies, our method showed that the odds ratios were only moderately sensitive to selection bias.

  6. Case-control vaccine effectiveness studies: Preparation, design, and enrollment of cases and controls.

    PubMed

    Verani, Jennifer R; Baqui, Abdullah H; Broome, Claire V; Cherian, Thomas; Cohen, Cheryl; Farrar, Jennifer L; Feikin, Daniel R; Groome, Michelle J; Hajjeh, Rana A; Johnson, Hope L; Madhi, Shabir A; Mulholland, Kim; O'Brien, Katherine L; Parashar, Umesh D; Patel, Manish M; Rodrigues, Laura C; Santosham, Mathuram; Scott, J Anthony; Smith, Peter G; Sommerfelt, Halvor; Tate, Jacqueline E; Victor, J Chris; Whitney, Cynthia G; Zaidi, Anita K; Zell, Elizabeth R

    2017-06-05

    Case-control studies are commonly used to evaluate effectiveness of licensed vaccines after deployment in public health programs. Such studies can provide policy-relevant data on vaccine performance under 'real world' conditions, contributing to the evidence base to support and sustain introduction of new vaccines. However, case-control studies do not measure the impact of vaccine introduction on disease at a population level, and are subject to bias and confounding, which may lead to inaccurate results that can misinform policy decisions. In 2012, a group of experts met to review recent experience with case-control studies evaluating the effectiveness of several vaccines; here we summarize the recommendations of that group regarding best practices for planning, design and enrollment of cases and controls. Rigorous planning and preparation should focus on understanding the study context including healthcare-seeking and vaccination practices. Case-control vaccine effectiveness studies are best carried out soon after vaccine introduction because high coverage creates strong potential for confounding. Endpoints specific to the vaccine target are preferable to non-specific clinical syndromes since the proportion of non-specific outcomes preventable through vaccination may vary over time and place, leading to potentially confusing results. Controls should be representative of the source population from which cases arise, and are generally recruited from the community or health facilities where cases are enrolled. Matching of controls to cases for potential confounding factors is commonly used, although should be reserved for a limited number of key variables believed to be linked to both vaccination and disease. Case-control vaccine effectiveness studies can provide information useful to guide policy decisions and vaccine development, however rigorous preparation and design is essential. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Assessment of biomarkers for risk prediction with nested case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qian M; Zheng, Yingye; Cai, Tianxi

    2013-10-01

    Accurate risk prediction plays a key role in disease prevention and disease management; emergence of new biomarkers may lead to an important question about how much improvement in prediction accuracy it would achieve by adding the new markers into the existing risk prediction tools. In large prospective cohort studies, the standard full-cohort design, requiring marker measurement on the entire cohort, may be infeasible due to cost and low rate of the clinical condition of interest. To overcome such difficulties, nested case-control (NCC) studies provide cost-effective alternatives but bring about challenges in statistical analyses due to complex data sets generated. To evaluate prognostic accuracy of a risk model, Cai and Zheng proposed a class of nonparametric inverse probability weighting (IPW) estimators for accuracy measures in the time-dependent receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. To accommodate a three-phase NCC design in Nurses' Health Study, we extend the double IPW estimators of Cai and Zheng to develop risk prediction models under time-dependent generalized linear models and evaluate the incremental values of new biomarkers and genetic markers. Our results suggest that aggregating the information from both the genetic markers and biomarkers substantially improves the accuracy for predicting 5-year and 10-year risks of rheumatoid arthritis. Our method provided robust procedures to evaluate the incremental value of new biomarkers allowing for complex sampling designs.

  8. Dietary factors and gastric cancer in Korea: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Ja; Chang, Woong Ki; Kim, Mi Kyung; Lee, Sang Sun; Choi, Bo Youl

    2002-02-01

    To assess gastric cancer (GC) risk in relation to dietary intake in Korea, a case-control study was performed. Trained dietitians interviewed 136 patients diagnosed with GC, and the same number of controls were selected by matching sex, age and hospital. A significant decrease in GC risk was observed with increased intake of Baiechu kimchi (prepared with salted Chinese cabbage and red pepper, etc.), Baiechu kimchi-stew, garlic, mushroom and soybean milk. On the contrary, a significant increase in the risk of GC was observed with increased intake of cooked rice with bean, charcoal grilled beef, pollack soup, Kkakduki (a kind of kimchi prepared with salted radish and red pepper, etc.), Dongchimi (a kind of kimchi prepared with radish and a large quantity of salt water) and cooked spinach. In food groups, increased intake of soybean products was associated with decreased risk of GC. Intake of citrus fruits rather than total fruits was shown to have a protective effect on the risk of GC, but was not significant. In this study, intake of total vegetables was shown to have a protective effect, whereas high nitrate-containing vegetables increased the risk of GC. In conclusion, our study suggests that the risk of GC decreased with high consumption of fresh vegetables and fruits, whereas high consumption of foods rich in nitrate and carcinogenic substances produced during the cooking process increased the risk of GC. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Prevalence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo among motocross racers: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Hancı, Deniz; Altun, Hüseyin

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the prevalence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) among motocross racers after cross-country up and downhill activities. This case-control study included 40 motocross racers (39 males, 1 female; mean age 26 years; range 21 to 43 years) and 40 healthy controls (30 males, 10 females; mean age 28 years; range 22 to 43 years) who had no hearing or balance problems. The Dix-Hallpike maneuver was applied to confirm the diagnosis of BPPV. Patients with BPPV were administered the Epley maneuver every week for one month and followed-up for treatment response assessment. Motocross and control groups were similar in terms of demographic and laboratory parameters. While BPPV was detected in four motocross racers (10%) according to Dix-Hallpike maneuver outcome and clinical findings, there was no BPPV in the control group. Of the motocross racers with BPPV, three had unilateral, one had bilateral disease. Of these patients, Epley maneuver was applied two times in two patients and three times in the other two patients. There was no vertigo or nystagmus in any of the patients with BPPV in one month. Intensive motocross activity is a cause of post-traumatic BPPV developing without head trauma. Large-scale, randomized controlled studies are needed to establish the post-traumatic etiology of BPPV in motocross racers.

  10. Hyperthyroidism and erectile dysfunction: a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Keller, J; Chen, Y-K; Lin, H-C

    2012-01-01

    Dysthyroidism has been highlighted as a common endocrine disorder associated with erectile dysfunction (ED); however, to date, no large-scale population-based study has investigated the association between hyperthyroidism and ED. This case-control study aimed to explore the association between ED and hyperthyroidism using a population-based data set. In total, 6310 adult patients who received new diagnoses of ED were recruited as cases together with 18 930 matched enrollees with no history of ED who served as controls. Conditional logistic regressions were conducted to explore the association between ED and having been previously diagnosed with hyperthyroidism. In total, 569 (2.3%) of the 25 240 sampled subjects had been diagnosed with hyperthyroidism before the index date; hyperthyroidism was found in 207 (3.3%) cases and 362 (1.90%) controls. After adjusting for potential confounding factors, the odds ratio (OR) of prior hyperthyroidism among cases was 1.64 (95% confidence interval=1.37-1.96, P<0.001) than that of controls. No association was detected between prior hyperthyroidism and ED for the 18-30, 30-39 and >70 age groups. Subjects aged between 60 and 69 years had the highest ORs for prior hyperthyroidism among cases when compared to controls (OR=1.84; 95% confidence interval=1.20-2.84; P<0.001). Our study further confirms the existence of an association between ED and prior hyperthyroidism.

  11. Protective and risk factors for inpatient suicides: a nested case-control study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shi-Kwang; Hung, Tsui-Mei; Liao, Ya-Tang; Lee, Wen-Chung; Tsai, Shang-Ying; Chen, Chiao-Chicy; Kuo, Chian-Jue

    2014-06-30

    This study aimed at estimating the protective effect of suicide precautions and clinical risk factors for inpatient suicides. A standardized precaution system was implemented in a large psychiatric center on January 1, 1996. A consecutive series of 33,121 admissions from 1998 to 2008 constituted the post-implementation cohort and 13,515 admissions from 1985 to 1995 constituted the pre-implementation cohort as comparison group. Inpatient suicides were identified via record linkage with national mortality database. For each of 41 inpatient suicides, four controls were randomly selected based on a nested case-control study. A standardized chart review process was employed to collate clinical information for each study subject. Risk and protective factors for inpatient suicides was estimated by conditional logistic regression. The findings showed that, among subjects with shorter lengths of stay, those admitted in post-implementation era had a significantly lower adjusted risk ratio (0.157, p=0.048) for inpatient suicides. Three depression-related symptoms elevated the risk for inpatient suicides: depressed mood (adjusted risk ratio=2.11, P=0.002), loss of energy (adjusted risk ratio=1.99, P=0.018), and psychomotor retardation (adjusted risk ratio=1.67, P=0.066; with marginal statistical significance). Suicide precautions have protective effect against inpatient suicides. A better assessment and prevention efforts is needed, particularly for those with depression-related symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Occupational risks for uveal melanoma results from a case-control study in nine European countries.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Jean-Michel; Cree, Ian; Sabroe, Svend; Kvist, Tine Kajsa; Clausen, Lene Bjørk; Afonso, Noemia; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Ballard, Terri J; Bell, Janine; Cyr, Diane; Eriksson, Mikael; Févotte, Joëlle; Guénel, Pascal; Hardell, Lennart; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Miranda, Ana; Merletti, Franco; Morales-Suarez-Varela, Maria M; Stengrevics, Aivars; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2005-05-01

    Uveal melanoma is a rare disease with poor prognosis and largely unknown etiology. We studied potential occupational risk factors. A population based case-control study was undertaken during 1995-1997 in nine European countries using population and colon cancer controls with personal interviews. Occupational exposure to sunlight and artificial UV radiation was assessed with a job exposure matrix. In total, 320 uveal melanoma cases were eligible at pathology review, and 292 cases were interviewed, participation 91%. Out of 3357 population controls, 2062 were interviewed, 61%, and out of 1272 cancer controls 1094 were interviewed, 86%. Using population controls, occupational exposure to sunlight was not associated with an increased risk (RR=1.24, 95% CI=0.88-1.74), while an excess risk found with use of colon cancer controls was attributed to confounding factors. An excess risk in welders was restricted to the French part of the data. Cooks, RR=2.40; cleaners, RR 2.15; and laundry workers, RR=3.14, were at increased risk of uveal melanoma. Our study does overall not support an association between occupational sunlight exposure and risk of uveal melanoma. The finding of an excess risk of eye melanoma in cooks in several European countries is intriguing.

  13. Excess relative risk as an effect measure in case-control studies of rare diseases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wen-Chung

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiologists often use ratio-type indices (rate ratio, risk ratio and odds ratio) to quantify the association between exposure and disease. By comparison, less attention has been paid to effect measures on a difference scale (excess rate or excess risk). The excess relative risk (ERR) used primarily by radiation epidemiologists is of peculiar interest here, in that it involves both difference and ratio operations. The ERR index (but not the difference-type indices) is estimable in case-control studies. Using the theory of sufficient component cause model, the author shows that when there is no mechanistic interaction (no synergism in the sufficient cause sense) between the exposure under study and the stratifying variable, the ERR index (but not the ratio-type indices) in a rare-disease case-control setting should remain constant across strata and can therefore be regarded as a common effect parameter. By exploiting this homogeneity property, the related attributable fraction indices can also be estimated with greater precision. The author demonstrates the methodology (SAS codes provided) using a case-control dataset, and shows that ERR preserves the logical properties of the ratio-type indices. In light of the many desirable properties of the ERR index, the author advocates its use as an effect measure in case-control studies of rare diseases.

  14. Study designs may influence results: the problems with questionnaire-based case-control studies on the epidemiology of glioma.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Christoffer; Schüz, Joachim; Andreasen, Anne-Marie Serena; Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg

    2017-03-28

    Glioma is a rare brain tumour with a very poor prognosis and the search for modifiable factors is intense. We reviewed the literature concerning risk factors for glioma obtained in case-control designed epidemiological studies in order to discuss the influence of this methodology on the observed results. When reviewing the association between three exposures, medical radiation, exogenous hormone use and allergy, we critically appraised the evidence from both case-control and cohort studies. For medical radiation and hormone replacement therapy (HRT), questionnaire-based case-control studies appeared to show an inverse association, whereas nested case-control and cohort studies showed no association. For allergies, the inverse association was observed irrespective of study design. We recommend that the questionnaire-based case-control design be placed lower in the hierarchy of studies for establishing cause-and-effect for diseases such as glioma. We suggest that a state-of-the-art case-control study should, as a minimum, be accompanied by extensive validation of the exposure assessment methods and the representativeness of the study sample with regard to the exposures of interest. Otherwise, such studies cannot be regarded as 'hypothesis testing' but only 'hypothesis generating'. We consider that this holds true for all questionnaire-based case-control studies on cancer and other chronic diseases, although perhaps not to the same extent for each exposure-outcome combination.

  15. Parkinson's disease and colorectal cancer risk-A nested case control study.

    PubMed

    Boursi, Ben; Mamtani, Ronac; Haynes, Kevin; Yang, Yu-Xiao

    2016-08-01

    A pro-inflammatory gut microbiota was described in both Parkinson's disease and colorectal cancer (CRC) and recently α-synuclein was demonstrated in the enteric nervous system. We sought to evaluate the association between Parkinson's disease and CRC. We conducted a nested case-control study using a large primary-care database. Cases were defined as all individuals with CRC. Up to 4 controls were matched with each case based on age, sex, practice-site and duration of follow-up. The primary exposure of interest was diagnosis of Parkinson's disease prior to CRC as well as disease duration, and Parkinson's specific therapies. The primary analysis was a conditional logistic-regression to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence interval (95%CI). The study included 22,093 CRC cases and 85,833 matched controls. Past medical history of Parkinson's disease >1 year before index-date was associated with lower CRC risk (OR 0.74, 95%CI 0.59-0.94). The inverse association was more prominent among females compared to males (0.64, 95%CI 0.42-0.96 and 0.8, 95%CI 0.60-1.07, respectively). While patients who received no therapy or therapy with dopamine agonists had a non-significant decrease in cancer risk, patients who were treated with dopamine had a non-significant elevated cancer risk. Parkinson's disease is inversely associated with CRC risk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Genetic Structure, Self-Identified Race/Ethnicity, and Confounding in Case-Control Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hua; Quertermous, Tom; Rodriguez, Beatriz; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Brown, Andrew; Pankow, James S.; Province, Michael A.; Hunt, Steven C.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Schork, Nicholas J.; Risch, Neil J.

    2005-01-01

    We have analyzed genetic data for 326 microsatellite markers that were typed uniformly in a large multiethnic population-based sample of individuals as part of a study of the genetics of hypertension (Family Blood Pressure Program). Subjects identified themselves as belonging to one of four major racial/ethnic groups (white, African American, East Asian, and Hispanic) and were recruited from 15 different geographic locales within the United States and Taiwan. Genetic cluster analysis of the microsatellite markers produced four major clusters, which showed near-perfect correspondence with the four self-reported race/ethnicity categories. Of 3,636 subjects of varying race/ethnicity, only 5 (0.14%) showed genetic cluster membership different from their self-identified race/ethnicity. On the other hand, we detected only modest genetic differentiation between different current geographic locales within each race/ethnicity group. Thus, ancient geographic ancestry, which is highly correlated with self-identified race/ethnicity—as opposed to current residence—is the major determinant of genetic structure in the U.S. population. Implications of this genetic structure for case-control association studies are discussed. PMID:15625622

  17. Blessed be the Children: A Case-Control Study of Sexual Abusers in the Catholic Church.

    PubMed

    Calkins, Cynthia; Fargo, Jamison; Jeglic, Elizabeth; Terry, Karen

    2015-08-01

    Individuals working in churches and other youth-serving institutions have a unique level of access to children, yet the problem of sexual abuse in institutional settings has received scant research attention. To address this gap, we analyzed data from a large sample of clergy (N = 1,121) and applied a social-ecological model of offending to identify risk factors for sexual abuse perpetration. Using a case-control study design that compared clergy sexual abusers with three control groups of clergy, this study focuses specifically on individual-, relationship-, and community-level factors associated with a higher risk of abuse in professional populations. Findings revealed that clergy sexual abusers tended to have more truncated pre-seminary dating histories, and that their dating and sexual partners were more likely to have been male than female. Self-reported sexual abuse history was associated with a greater likelihood of sexual abuse perpetration among clergy. Clergy abusers tended to be more involved with youth and adolescents in their ministries; however, they were observed to relate less well to youth and adolescents than their clergy counterparts. Given widespread changes in our cultural understanding of abuse as well as more specific changes in the organizational approach to seminary education, these differences underscore the role that youth-serving institutions and society can have in the primary prevention of child sexual abuse.

  18. Dietary glycemic index and glycemic load, and breast cancer risk: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Augustin, L S; Dal Maso, L; La Vecchia, C; Parpinel, M; Negri, E; Vaccarella, S; Kendall, C W; Jenkins, D J; Francesch, S

    2001-11-01

    Certain types of carbohydrates increase glucose and insulin levels to a greater extent than others. In turn, insulin may raise levels of insulin-like growth factors, which may influence breast cancer risk. We analyzed the effect of type and amount of carbohydrates on breast cancer risk, using the glycemic index and the glycemic load measures in a large case-control study conducted in Italy. Cases were 2,569 women with incident, histologically-confirmed breast cancer interviewed between 1991 and 1994. Controls were 2588 women admitted to the same hospital network for a variety of acute, non-neoplastic conditions. Average daily glycemic index and glycemic load were calculated from a validated 78-item food frequency questionnaire. Direct associations with breast cancer risk emerged for glycemic index (odds ratio, OR for highest vs. lowest quintile = 1.4; P for trend <0.01) and glycemic load (OR = 1.3; P < 0.01). High glycemic index foods, such as white bread, increased the risk of breast cancer (OR = 1.3) while the intake of pasta, a medium glycemic index food, seemed to have no influence (OR = 1.0). Findings were consistent across different strata of menopausal status, alcohol intake, and physical activity level. This study supports the hypothesis of moderate, direct associations between glycemic index or glycemic load and breast cancer risk and, consequently, a possible role of hyperinsulinemia/insulin resistance in breast cancer development.

  19. Lifestyle factors and risk of leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Parodi, Stefano; Santi, Irene; Marani, Enza; Casella, Claudia; Puppo, Antonella; Garrone, Elsa; Fontana, Vincenzo; Stagnaro, Emanuele

    2016-03-01

    Risk factors for leukemia and lymphomas in adults are largely unknown. This study was aimed at evaluating the association between lifestyle factors and the risk of hematological malignancies in an adult population. Data were drawn from a population-based case-control study carried out in Italy and included 294 cases (199 lymphoid and 95 myeloid) and 279 controls. Analyses were performed using standard multivariable logistic regression. Hair dye use for at least 15 years was associated with a higher risk of lymphoid malignancies among females (OR 2.3, 95 % CI 1.0-4.9, p = 0.036, test for trend). Furthermore, a protective effect of a moderate to heavy tea consumption on the risk of myeloid malignancies was observed (OR 0.4, 95 % CI 0.2-0.9, p = 0.017). No association was found for the use of alcoholic beverages and tobacco smoking. Our results confirm the potential carcinogenic effect of prolonged hair dye use observed in previous investigations. The excess risk could be explained by exposure to a higher concentration of toxic compounds in hair products used in the past. The protective effect of regular tea consumption observed in an area with a very high prevalence of black tea consumers deserves further investigation.

  20. Occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields and acute leukaemia: analysis of a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Willett, E; McKinney, P; Fear, N; Cartwright, R; Roman, E

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To investigate whether the risk of acute leukaemia among adults is associated with occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields. Methods: Probable occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields at higher than typical residential levels was investigated among 764 patients diagnosed with acute leukaemia during 1991–96 and 1510 sex and age matched controls. A job exposure matrix was applied to the self reported employment histories to determine whether or not a subject was exposed to electromagnetic fields. Risks were assessed using conditional logistic regression for a matched analysis. Results: Study subjects considered probably ever exposed to electromagnetic fields at work were not at increased risk of acute leukaemia compared to those considered never exposed. Generally, no associations were observed on stratification by sex, leukaemia subtype, number of years since exposure stopped, or occupation; there was no evidence of a dose-response effect using increasing number of years exposed. However, relative to women considered never exposed, a significant excess of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia was observed among women probably exposed to electromagnetic fields at work that remained increased irrespective of time prior to diagnosis or job ever held. Conclusion: This large population based case-control study found little evidence to support an association between occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields and acute leukaemia. While an excess of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia among women was observed, it is unlikely that occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields was responsible, given that increased risks remained during periods when exposure above background levels was improbable. PMID:12883018

  1. [Risk factors for contact lens-related microbial keratitis: A multicenter case-control study].

    PubMed

    Becmeur, P H; Abry, F; Bourcier, T; Meyer, N; Sauer, A

    2017-03-01

    Currently, the most feared complication by ophthalmologists of contact lens (CL) wear is microbial keratitis (MK), even though its incidence remains low. It is also a significant financial burden for society. This study aimed to identify the risk factors for CL-related MK especially with regard to hygiene and pattern of use, in a large, prospective, multicenter, case-control study. A multicenter retrospective case-control study was designed. The CL-related MK subpopulation (case) was compared with healthy CL wearers (control) using a 52-item anonymous questionnaire designed to determine subject demographics, lens wear history, lens type and disinfection solution, fitting, patient education, hygiene and maintenance of contact lenses, and patient history. Univariate logistic regression analysis was performed to compare both groups. The study included 497 cases and 364 controls. The risk factors associated with the greatest increased odds of CL-related MK were as follows: extended wear (OR=2.96 [1.65-5.33], P<0.001), occasional overnight lens use (OR=6.37 [4,55-8.90], P<0.001), fitting by an optician (OR=1.97 [1.38-2.83], P<0.001), absence of ophthalmologic exam (OR=6.56 [2-22], P<0.01) or no training in handling the contact lens (OR=4.47 [2.27-8.77], P<0.01), use of optician's disinfection solution (OR=5.55 [3.12-9.85], P<0.001), mixing solutions ("topping off") (OR=4.68 [2.73-8.04], P<0.001), no case replacement (OR=3.95 [2.28-6.82] P<0.01), no compliance with hygiene rules and smoking (OR=2.29 [1.67-3.14], P<0.01). The protective factors associated with the greatest reduction in OR were female gender (OR=0.49 [0.36-0.66], P<0.01), hypermetropia (OR=0.28 [0.16-0.48], P=0.01), rigid contact lens wear, fitting by an ophthalmologist, written and verbal instruction, and daily case maintenance. The knowledge of these risks factors incentivizes action at all levels to reduce the incidence of MK, from the prescriber to the patient, including the type of CL, case and

  2. Analgesics use and ESRD in younger age: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    van der Woude, Fokke J; Heinemann, Lothar AJ; Graf, Helmut; Lewis, Michael; Moehner, Sabine; Assmann, Anita; Kühl-Habich, Doerthe

    2007-01-01

    Background An ad hoc peer-review committee was jointly appointed by Drug Authorities and Industry in Germany, Austria and Switzerland in 1999/2000 to review the evidence for a causal relation between phenacetin-free analgesics and nephropathy. The committee found the evidence as inconclusive and requested a new case-control study of adequate design. Methods We performed a population-based case-control study with incident cases of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) under the age of 50 years and four age and sex-matched neighborhood controls in 170 dialysis centers (153 in Germany, and 17 in Austria) from January 1, 2001 to December 31, 2004. Data on lifetime medical history, risk factors, treatment, job exposure and intake of analgesics were obtained in a standardized face-to-face interview using memory aids to enhance accuracy. Study design, study performance, analysis plan, and study report were approved by an independent international advisory committee and by the Drug Authorities involved. Unconditional logistic regression analyses were performed. Results The analysis included 907 cases and 3,622 controls who had never used phenacetin-containing analgesics in their lifetime. The use of high cumulative lifetime dose (3rd tertile) of analgesics in the period up to five years before dialysis was not associated with later ESRD. Adjusted odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were 0.8 (0.7 – 1.0) and 1.0 (0.8 – 1.3) for ever- compared with no or low use and high use compared with low use, respectively. The same results were found for all analgesics and for mono-, and combination preparations with and without caffeine. No increased risk was shown in analyses stratifying for dose and duration. Dose-response analyses showed that analgesic use was not associated with an increased risk for ESRD up to 3.5 kg cumulative lifetime dose (98 % of the cases with ESRD). While the large subgroup of users with a lifetime dose up to 0.5 kg (278 cases and 1365 controls) showed a

  3. A review of case-control studies on the risk factors for the development of autoimmune blistering diseases.

    PubMed

    Oh, D D; Zhao, C Y; Murrell, D F

    2016-04-01

    Autoimmune blistering diseases (AIBD) are a group of rare but potentially fatal diseases characterized by the production of autoantibodies directed against the structural proteins of the skin. Much has been published on the clinical manifestation and interventional options for AIBD, especially on the more common subtypes such as bullous pemphigoid, pemphigus vulgaris (PV) and pemphigus foliaceus (PF). However, the aetiology of AIBD remains unknown. We aim to provide an overview of published case-control studies focussing on the non-genetic aetiological factors of bullous pemphigoid, PV and/or PF. The relevant studies were appraised for their validity and results. Our results showed that a large proportion of the studies had inconclusive results due to compromised study methodologies. Moreover, there were no identified case-control studies that investigated the possible associations between bullous pemphigoid and patient environment, or the potential links between pemphigus and drugs. Hence, a case-control study with a higher quality design addressing these shortcomings would contribute greatly to our knowledge of AIBD.

  4. Ecological versus case-control studies for testing a linear-no threshold dose-response relationship.

    PubMed

    Cohen, B L

    1990-09-01

    The two basic problems with ecological studies are (A) individuals studied are not necessarily the individuals who are at risk, and (B) they are very vulnerable to confounding factors. It is shown that where the study is designed to test a linear-no threshold dose-response theory, (A) does not apply. Where the ecological study deals with the average dose and response in a large number of US counties, the available data and computer capability for reducing effects of confounders are so powerful that (B) may be no more important for the ecological than for a case-control study. The migration problem is treated and found to be relatively unimportant.

  5. A Data Management System for Multi-Phase Case-Control Studies

    PubMed Central

    Gibeau, Joanne M.; Steinfeldt, Lois C.; Stine, Mark J.; Tullis, Katherine V.; Lynch, H. Keith

    1983-01-01

    The design of a computerized system for the management of data in multi-phase epidemiologic case-control studies is described. Typical study phases include case-control selection, abstracting of data from medical records, and interview of study subjects or next of kin. In consultation with project personnel, requirements for the system were established: integration of data from all study phases into one data base, accurate follow-up of subjects through the study, sophisticated data editing capabilities, ready accessibility of specified programs to project personnel, and generation of current status and exception reports for project managment. SIR (Scientific Information Retrieval), a commercially available data base management system, was selected as the foundation of this system. The system forms a comprehensive data management system applicable to many types of public health research studies.

  6. Poor social integration and suicide: fact or artifact? A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Duberstein, P R; Conwell, Y; Conner, K R; Eberly, S; Evinger, J S; Caine, E D

    2004-10-01

    Sociological studies have shown that poor social integration confers suicide risk. It is not known whether poor integration amplifies risk after adjusting statistically for the effects of mental disorders and employment status. A case-control design was used to compare 86 suicides and 86 living controls 50 years of age and older, matched on age, gender, race, and county of residence. Structured interviews were conducted with proxy respondents for suicides and controls. Social integration was defined in reference to two broad levels of analysis: family (e.g. sibship status, childrearing status) and social/ community (e.g. social interaction, religious participation, community involvement). Bivariate analyses showed that suicides were less likely to be married, have children, or live with family. They were less likely to engage in religious practice or community activities and they had lower levels of social interaction. A trimmed logistic regression model showed that marital status, social interaction and religious involvement were all associated with suicide even after statistical adjusting for the effects of affective disorder and employment status. Adding substance abuse to the model eliminated the effects of religious involvement. The association between family and social/community indicators of poor social integration and suicide is robust and largely independent of the presence of mental disorders. Findings could be used to enhance screening instruments and identify problem behaviors, such as low levels of social interaction, which could be targeted for intervention.

  7. Outlining a Population "at Risk" of Parkinson's Disease: Evidence from a Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Schirinzi, Tommaso; Martella, Giuseppina; D'Elia, Alessio; Di Lazzaro, Giulia; Imbriani, Paola; Madeo, Graziella; Monaco, Leonardo; Maltese, Marta; Pisani, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The multifactorial pathogenesis of Parkinson's Disease (PD) requires a careful identification of populations "at risk" of developing the disease. In this case-control study we analyzed a large Italian population, in an attempt to outline general criteria to define a population "at risk" of PD. We enrolled 300 PD patients and 300 controls, gender and age matched, from the same urban geographical area. All subjects were interviewed on demographics, family history of PD, occupational and environmental toxicants exposure, smoking status, and alcohol consumption. A sample of 65 patients and 65 controls also underwent serum dosing of iron, copper, mercury, and manganese by means of Inductively Coupled-Plasma-Mass-Spectrometry (ICP-MS). Positive family history, toxicants exposure, non-current-smoker, and alcohol nonconsumer status occurred as significant risk factors in our population. The number of concurring risk factors overlapping in the same subject impressively increased the overall risk. No significant differences were measured in the metal serum levels. Our findings indicate that combination of three to four concurrent PD-risk factors defines a condition "at risk" of PD. A simple stratification, based on these questionnaires, might be of help in identifying subjects suitable for neuroprotective strategies.

  8. Population-based case-control teratogenic study of hydroxyprogesterone treatment during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Dudás, István; Gidai, János; Czeizel, Andrew E

    2006-12-01

    Hydroxyprogesterone, a synthetic progestin, was used for the treatment of pregnant women with threatened abortion and preterm delivery. Previous studies showed some association between hydroxyprogesterone use during early pregnancy and some specific congenital abnormalities. The population-based large Hungarian data set seemed to be appropriate to check this possible association. The Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital Abnormalities between 1980 and 1996 includes 22 843 cases with congenital abnormalities and 38 151 controls without any defect. 318 (1.4%) cases, while 433 (1.1%) controls had mothers with hydroxyprogesterone treatment during pregnancy (adjusted POR with 95% CI: 1.3, 1.1-1.5). However, there was no association between risk for any congenital abnormality group and a higher use of maternal hydroxyprogesterone treatment during the second and third month of gestation. On the other hand hydroxyprogesterone is not effective in the prevention of preterm delivery. In conclusion, there was no detectable risk for congenital abnormalities in the offspring of mothers with hydroxyprogesterone treatment during early pregnancy, however, there is no reasonable indication of this treatment during pregnancy.

  9. Lung Cancer and Occupation in a Population-based Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Consonni, Dario; De Matteis, Sara; Lubin, Jay H.; Wacholder, Sholom; Tucker, Margaret; Pesatori, Angela Cecilia; Caporaso, Neil E.; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Landi, Maria Teresa

    2010-01-01

    The authors examined the relation between occupation and lung cancer in the large, population-based Environment And Genetics in Lung cancer Etiology (EAGLE) case-control study. In 2002–2005 in the Lombardy region of northern Italy, 2,100 incident lung cancer cases and 2,120 randomly selected population controls were enrolled. Lifetime occupational histories (industry and job title) were coded by using standard international classifications and were translated into occupations known (list A) or suspected (list B) to be associated with lung cancer. Smoking-adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated with logistic regression. For men, an increased risk was found for list A (177 exposed cases and 100 controls; odds ratio = 1.74, 95% confidence interval: 1.27, 2.38) and most occupations therein. No overall excess was found for list B with the exception of filling station attendants and bus and truck drivers (men) and launderers and dry cleaners (women). The authors estimated that 4.9% (95% confidence interval: 2.0, 7.8) of lung cancers in men were attributable to occupation. Among those in other occupations, risk excesses were found for metal workers, barbers and hairdressers, and other motor vehicle drivers. These results indicate that past exposure to occupational carcinogens remains an important determinant of lung cancer occurrence. PMID:20047975

  10. Occupations and lung cancer: a population-based case-control study in British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Yenugadhati, Nagarajkumar; Birkett, Nicholas J; Momoli, Franco; Krewski, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    An investigation based on a large population-based case-control study in British Columbia, Canada, was conducted to identify high-risk occupations for lung cancer by histological subtypes. Subjects were 14,755 male incident cancer cases for whom lifetime occupational histories and information on smoking and relevant covariates were collected. Occupational associations for 2998 lung cancer cases, including histological subtypes, were assessed by logistic regression using other cancer cases, excluding smoking-related cancers, as controls. An excess risk of lung cancer was found among workers in metal processing, bakers, and ship deck crew for all histological subtypes, and construction workers, chefs and cooks, and medical workers for specific histological subtypes. Occupational associations that are unique to histological subtypes of lung cancer were identified. Owing to a scarcity of literature in this area, future research needs to focus on confirming these histological associations, and identifying the risk from key exposures found within these occupations (e.g., medical radiation, electromagnetic fields, and cooking fumes).

  11. Lung cancer and occupation in a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Consonni, Dario; De Matteis, Sara; Lubin, Jay H; Wacholder, Sholom; Tucker, Margaret; Pesatori, Angela Cecilia; Caporaso, Neil E; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Landi, Maria Teresa

    2010-02-01

    The authors examined the relation between occupation and lung cancer in the large, population-based Environment And Genetics in Lung cancer Etiology (EAGLE) case-control study. In 2002-2005 in the Lombardy region of northern Italy, 2,100 incident lung cancer cases and 2,120 randomly selected population controls were enrolled. Lifetime occupational histories (industry and job title) were coded by using standard international classifications and were translated into occupations known (list A) or suspected (list B) to be associated with lung cancer. Smoking-adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated with logistic regression. For men, an increased risk was found for list A (177 exposed cases and 100 controls; odds ratio = 1.74, 95% confidence interval: 1.27, 2.38) and most occupations therein. No overall excess was found for list B with the exception of filling station attendants and bus and truck drivers (men) and launderers and dry cleaners (women). The authors estimated that 4.9% (95% confidence interval: 2.0, 7.8) of lung cancers in men were attributable to occupation. Among those in other occupations, risk excesses were found for metal workers, barbers and hairdressers, and other motor vehicle drivers. These results indicate that past exposure to occupational carcinogens remains an important determinant of lung cancer occurrence.

  12. Risk factors of peripheral arterial disease: a case control study in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Weragoda, Janaka; Seneviratne, Rohini; Weerasinghe, Manuj C; Wijeyaratne, S M

    2016-12-09

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is an important global health problem and contributes to notable proportion of morbidity and mortality. This particular manifestation of systemic atherosclerosis is largely under diagnosed and undertreated. For sustainable preventive strategies in a country, it is mandatory to identify country-specific risk factors. We intended to assess the risk factors of PAD among adults aged 40-74 years. This case control study was conducted in 2012-2013 in Sri Lanka. Seventy-nine cases and 158 controls in the age group of 40-74 years were selected for the study in order to have case to control ratio 1:2. The criterion for selecting cases and control was based on Ankle brachial pressure index (ABPI). Cases were selected from those who had ABPI 0.85 or less (ABPI ≤0.85) in either lower limb. Controls were selected from those ABPI score between 1.18 and 1.28 in both lower limbs. Only newly identified individuals with PAD were selected as cases. Controls were selected from the same geographical location and within the 5 year age group as cases. The history of diabetes mellitus more than 10 years (OR 5.8, 95% CI 2.2-14.2), history of dyslipidemia for more than 10 years (OR 4.9, 95% CI 2.1-16.2), history of hypertension for more than 10 years (OR 3.8, 95% CI 1.8-12.7) and smoking (OR 2.9, 95% CI 1.2-6.9), elevated HsCRP (OR 3.7, 95% CI 1.2-12.0) and hyperhomocysteinemia (OR 3.0, 95% CI 1.1-8.1) were revealed as country specific significant risk factor of PAD. Diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia, smoking as well as elevated homocysteine and HsCRP found as risk factors of PAD. Longer the duration or higher level exposure to these risk factors has increased the risk of PAD. These findings emphasis the need for routine screening of PAD among patients with the identified risk factors.

  13. [Application of nested case-control study on safe evaluation of post-marketing traditional Chinese medicine injection].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ying; Zhao, Yubin; Xie, Yanming

    2011-10-01

    The nested case-control study design (or the case-control in a cohort study) is described here as a new study design used in safe evaluation of post-marketing traditional Chinese medicine injection. In the nested case-control study, cases of a disease that occur in a defined cohort are identified and, for each, a specified number of matched controls is selected from among those in the cohort who have not developed the disease by the time of disease occurrence in the case. For many research questions, the nested case-control design potentially offers impressive reductions in costs and efforts of data collection and analysis compared with the full cohort approach, with relatively minor loss in statistical efficiency. The nested case-control design is particularly advantageous for studies in safe evaluation of post-marketing traditional Chinese medicine injection. Some examples of the application of nested case-control study were given.

  14. Case-control study of cumulative cigarette tar exposure and lung and upper aerodigestive tract cancers.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Travis J; Chang, Shen-Chih; Chang, Po-Yin; Morgenstern, Hal; Tashkin, Donald P; Rao, Jian-Yu; Cozen, Wendy; Mack, Thomas M; Zhang, Zuo-Feng

    2017-05-01

    The development of comprehensive measures for tobacco exposure is crucial to specify effects on disease and inform public health policy. In this population-based case-control study, we evaluated the associations between cumulative lifetime cigarette tar exposure and cancers of the lung and upper aerodigestive tract (UADT). The study included 611 incident cases of lung cancer; 601 cases of UADT cancers (oropharyngeal, laryngeal and esophageal cancers); and 1,040 cancer-free controls. We estimated lifetime exposure to cigarette tar based on tar concentrations abstracted from government cigarette records and self-reported smoking histories derived from a standardized questionnaire. We analyzed the associations for cumulative tar exposure with lung and UADT cancer, overall and according to histological subtype. Cumulative tar exposure was highly correlated with pack-years among ever smoking controls (Pearson coefficient = 0.90). The adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence limits) for the estimated effect of about 1 kg increase in tar exposure (approximately the interquartile range in all controls) was 1.61 (1.50, 1.73) for lung cancer and 1.21 (1.13, 1.29) for UADT cancers. In general, tar exposure was more highly associated with small, squamous and large cell lung cancer than adenocarcinoma. With additional adjustment for pack-years, positive associations between tar and lung cancer were evident, particularly for small cell and large cell subtypes. Therefore, incorporating the composition of tobacco carcinogens in lifetime smoking exposure may improve lung cancer risk estimation. This study does not support the claim of a null or inverse association between "low exposure" to tobacco smoke and risk of these cancer types.

  15. Matched case-control studies: a review of reported statistical methodology.

    PubMed

    Niven, Daniel J; Berthiaume, Luc R; Fick, Gordon H; Laupland, Kevin B

    2012-01-01

    Case-control studies are a common and efficient means of studying rare diseases or illnesses with long latency periods. Matching of cases and controls is frequently employed to control the effects of known potential confounding variables. The analysis of matched data requires specific statistical methods. The objective of this study was to determine the proportion of published, peer-reviewed matched case-control studies that used statistical methods appropriate for matched data. Using a comprehensive set of search criteria we identified 37 matched case-control studies for detailed analysis. Among these 37 articles, only 16 studies were analyzed with proper statistical techniques (43%). Studies that were properly analyzed were more likely to have included case patients with cancer and cardiovascular disease compared to those that did not use proper statistics (10/16 or 63%, versus 5/21 or 24%, P = 0.02). They were also more likely to have matched multiple controls for each case (14/16 or 88%, versus 13/21 or 62%, P = 0.08). In addition, studies with properly analyzed data were more likely to have been published in a journal with an impact factor listed in the top 100 according to the Journal Citation Reports index (12/16 or 69%, versus 1/21 or 5%, P ≤ 0.0001). The findings of this study raise concern that the majority of matched case-control studies report results that are derived from improper statistical analyses. This may lead to errors in estimating the relationship between a disease and exposure, as well as the incorrect adaptation of emerging medical literature.

  16. Matched case-control studies: a review of reported statistical methodology

    PubMed Central

    Niven, Daniel J; Berthiaume, Luc R; Fick, Gordon H; Laupland, Kevin B

    2012-01-01

    Background Case-control studies are a common and efficient means of studying rare diseases or illnesses with long latency periods. Matching of cases and controls is frequently employed to control the effects of known potential confounding variables. The analysis of matched data requires specific statistical methods. Methods The objective of this study was to determine the proportion of published, peer-reviewed matched case-control studies that used statistical methods appropriate for matched data. Using a comprehensive set of search criteria we identified 37 matched case-control studies for detailed analysis. Results Among these 37 articles, only 16 studies were analyzed with proper statistical techniques (43%). Studies that were properly analyzed were more likely to have included case patients with cancer and cardiovascular disease compared to those that did not use proper statistics (10/16 or 63%, versus 5/21 or 24%, P = 0.02). They were also more likely to have matched multiple controls for each case (14/16 or 88%, versus 13/21 or 62%, P = 0.08). In addition, studies with properly analyzed data were more likely to have been published in a journal with an impact factor listed in the top 100 according to the Journal Citation Reports index (12/16 or 69%, versus 1/21 or 5%, P ≤ 0.0001). Conclusion The findings of this study raise concern that the majority of matched case-control studies report results that are derived from improper statistical analyses. This may lead to errors in estimating the relationship between a disease and exposure, as well as the incorrect adaptation of emerging medical literature. PMID:22570570

  17. Habitual physical activity and menopausal symptoms: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Sternfeld, B; Quesenberry, C P; Husson, G

    1999-01-01

    A case-control study design was used to examine whether habitual physical activity prior to the final menstrual period (FMP) was associated with reduced risk of vasomotor and other symptoms during the perimenopausal period. Both cases and controls were identified through a screening interview with randomly selected women members, ages 48-52, of a large health maintenance organization. Cases (n = 82) were defined as women 3-12 months past their FMP who reported regularly having hot flashes or night sweats at least once a day or night during the 3 months following their FMP. Controls (n = 89) were of the same biologic age with respect to the FMP but reported vasomotor symptoms less than once a week during the reference time period. Neither cases nor controls had a history of hormone replacement therapy (HRT), hysterectomy, or bilateral oophorectomy. Case-control status, habitual physical activity (including recreational, housework, child care, and occupational activity), and psychological and somatic symptoms were assessed by self-report. Participation in vigorous recreational activity during the year prior to the FMP was not associated with reduced risk of frequent vasomotor symptoms after the FMP (odds ratio [OR] = 1.03 for a 50-unit increase in activity score, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.97-1.1). This lack of relationship was observed in all domains of activity. Factors that were associated with decreased risk included higher body mass index (BMI) (weight in kg/(height in meters)2) (OR = 0.95 per 1 unit increase in BMI, 95% CI = 0.90-1.00) and higher education (having a college degree relative to less education) (OR = 0.56, 95% CI = 0.40-0.80). Physical activity was also unassociated with reduced risk of psychologic distress, depressive feelings, or somatic symptoms, but, relative to controls, having vasomotor symptoms (being a case) was strongly associated with increased risk of experiencing those symptoms (OR ranging from 1.83 for psychologic distress to 2

  18. Female breast cancer and electrical manufacturing: results of a nested case-control study.

    PubMed

    Oddone, Enrico; Edefonti, Valeria; Scaburri, Alessandra; Vai, Tiziana; Bai, Edoardo; Modonesi, Carlo; Crosignani, Paolo; Imbriani, Marcello

    2014-01-01

    A previous explorative record-linkage study suggested a putative role of employment in electrical manufacturing in increasing female breast cancer risk in the Province of Milan (Italy). We deepened the understanding of this possible association in a single large electrical manufacturing plant located in Lombardy in the Province of Milan. We carried out a nested case-control study within a cohort of women employed in a large electrical manufacturing plant. All incident cases during 2002 to 2009 of female breast cancer in individuals who worked at least a 1 year in the factory and resided in Lombardy, Italy, were selected. Controls were randomly sampled from all women who worked in the same plant and resided in Lombardy as of December 31, 2005. Odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using multiple logistic regression models, taking into consideration only female workers as ever/never exposed to physical/chemical agents and their longest occupational period. ORs were adjusted for several potential confounders, namely, other known risk factors. The ORs for female breast cancer were significantly increased for exposure to chlorinated solvents (OR 1.65, 95% CI 1.04-2.62), and there was a twofold increase (OR 2.10, 95% CI 1.21-3.66) among women exposed for at least 10 years. We found no other significantly increased OR by exposure or job title. Our results suggest an increased risk of breast cancer after exposure to chlorinated solvents among women employed in the electrical manufacturing industry.

  19. Evaluating the use of friend or family controls in epidemiologic case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Charlie; Cockburn, Myles; Cozen, Wendy; Voutsinas, Jenna; Lacey, James V; Luo, Jianning; Sullivan-Halley, Jane; Bernstein, Leslie; Wang, Sophia S

    2017-02-01

    Traditional methodologies for identifying and recruiting controls in epidemiologic case-control studies, such as random digit dialing or neighborhood walk, suffer from declining response rates. Here, we revisit the feasibility and comparability of using alternative sources of controls, specifically friend and family controls. We recruited from a recently completed case-control study of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) among women in Los Angeles County where controls from the parent study were ascertained by neighborhood walk. We calculated participation rates and compared questionnaire responses between the friend/family controls and the original matched controls from the parent study. Of the 182 NHL case patients contacted, 111 (61%) agreed to participate in our feasibility study. 70 (63%) provided contact information for potential friend and/or family member controls. We were able to successfully contact and recruit a friend/family member for 92% of the case patients. This represented 46 friend controls and 54 family controls. Family controls significantly differed from original matched controls by sex and household income. Other characteristics were similar between friend controls and the original study's neighborhood controls. The apparent comparability of neighborhood controls to friend and family controls among respondents in this study suggests that these alternative methods of control identification can serve as a complementary source of eligible controls in epidemiologic case-control studies. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Polychlorinated Biphenyls, Organochlorines & PD Risk: A Case Control Study in Alaskan Natives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    1-0490 TITLE: Polychlorinated Biphenyls, Organochlorines & PD Risk: A Case Control Study in Alaskan Natives PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Polychlorinated Biphenyls, Organochlorines & PD Risk: A Case 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-04-1-0490 Control Study in Alaskan Natives 5b. GRANT NUMBER...to pol ychlorinated biphenyl (PCBs) residues, organochlorine pesticides and methylmercury with PD. The hy pothesis is that increased exposure to t

  1. Polychlorinated Biphenyls, Organochlorines & PD Risk: A Case Control Study in Alaska

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    TITLE: Polychlorinated Biphenyls, Organochlorines & PD Risk: A Case Control Study in Alaska PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Caroline M. Tanner, M.D...2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Polychlorinated Biphenyls, Organochlorines & PD Risk: A Case 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-04-1-0490 Control Study in...now in progress in Anchorage. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Parkinson’s disease, Polychlorinated biphenyl, Organochlorine pesticides, Methylmercury, Alaska

  2. Accurate liability estimation improves power in ascertained case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Weissbrod, Omer; Lippert, Christoph; Geiger, Dan; Heckerman, David

    2015-04-01

    Linear mixed models (LMMs) have emerged as the method of choice for confounded genome-wide association studies. However, the performance of LMMs in nonrandomly ascertained case-control studies deteriorates with increasing sample size. We propose a framework called LEAP (liability estimator as a phenotype; https://github.com/omerwe/LEAP) that tests for association with estimated latent values corresponding to severity of phenotype, and we demonstrate that this can lead to a substantial power increase.

  3. On estimation of time-dependent attributable fraction from population-based case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Chen, Ying Qing; Hsu, Li

    2017-01-18

    Population attributable fraction (PAF) is widely used to quantify the disease burden associated with a modifiable exposure in a population. It has been extended to a time-varying measure that provides additional information on when and how the exposure's impact varies over time for cohort studies. However, there is no estimation procedure for PAF using data that are collected from population-based case-control studies, which, because of time and cost efficiency, are commonly used for studying genetic and environmental risk factors of disease incidences. In this article, we show that time-varying PAF is identifiable from a case-control study and develop a novel estimator of PAF. Our estimator combines odds ratio estimates from logistic regression models and density estimates of the risk factor distribution conditional on failure times in cases from a kernel smoother. The proposed estimator is shown to be consistent and asymptotically normal with asymptotic variance that can be estimated empirically from the data. Simulation studies demonstrate that the proposed estimator performs well in finite sample sizes. Finally, the method is illustrated by a population-based case-control study of colorectal cancer.

  4. Determining exposure underreporting in pharmacoepidemiologic case-control studies: methods and example.

    PubMed

    Lane, D A; Kramer, M S

    1999-12-01

    Many pharmacoepidemiologic case-control studies have to rely on what their subjects relate about the drugs to which they have been exposed and the durations of exposure. There is often good reason to suppose that not all exposures are actually reported and to suspect reporting rates may differ between cases and controls. We introduce two procedures designed to determine the extent of underreporting of exposures. These procedures make use of data from the case-control study itself, as well as sales, demographic and market research data for a reference population to which study subjects belong. We apply these procedures to data from the International Primary Pulmonary Hypertension Study (IPPHS) linking anorexigens with PPH. We show that exposures to the anorectic agent dexfenfluramine beginning in or before 1989 were highly significantly underrepresented in the data for IPPHS controls, relative to exposures beginning after 1989 (P<0.01); there is no corresponding evidence for relative underrepresentation of early exposure for IPPHS cases. However, data on control exposures from 1990 to 1992 are consistent with the hypothesis that these exposures were not underreported to the IPPHS. Subject to certain key modeling assumptions and the availability of some supplemental data, it is possible to investigate the extent of underreporting of exposure in a pharmacoepidemiologic case-control study and in particular to determine if study results are likely to have been affected by recall bias.

  5. Rheumatoid Arthritis Was Negatively Associated with Alzheimer's Disease: A Population-Based Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Kao, Li-Ting; Kang, Jiunn-Horng; Lin, Herng-Ching; Huang, Chung-Chien; Lee, Hsin-Chien; Chung, Shiu-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Some of the prior literature investigated the potential association between rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) because these two diseases may share similar inflammatory mechanisms. Nevertheless, to date, findings of the previous literature are still controversial, and some methodological limitations were observed in those studies. The aim of this case-control study was to investigate the relationship between prior RA and AD using a large population-based dataset. This study used the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2005. We included 2271 patients with AD who had received prescriptions for acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs) as cases and 6813 patients without AD as controls in this study. In addition, we performed a conditional logistic regression to examine the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for prior RA between cases and controls. The study found that 330 (3.63%) of the total sampled patients had an RA diagnosis before the index date. Additionally, prior RA was found in 60 (2.64%) cases and in 270 (3.96%) controls. The conditional logistic regression analysis showed that the crude OR of prior RA for cases was 0.66 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.49~0.87) compared to controls. After adjusting for patients' geographic location, urbanization level, and comorbidities, the adjusted OR of prior RA for patients with AD was 0.73 (95% CI: 0.55~0.98) compared to those without AD. We concluded that there was an inverse association between prior RA and AD even after adjusting for potential confounders.

  6. Association between family history and herpes zoster: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Ansar, Akram; Farshchian, Mahmood; Ghasemzadeh, Mostafa; Sobhan, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    There are many risk factors besides age and immune suppression for herpes zoster. Family history as a risk factor is suggested in some recent studies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between herpes zoster and family history. This case-control study was undertaken in Farshchian Hospital, Hamadan, Iran. "Case group" included patients with confirmed diagnosis of herpes zoster. "Control group" was chosen among other dermatologic patients or their companions without any history of herpes zoster. Immune deficiency was the main excluding criteria. Information about age, gender, dermatome involved (only in patient group), history of chronic dermatologic or systemic diseases and family history of herpes zoster was asked using special questionnaires. Case and control groups included 217 and 200 participants respectively. Mean age of cases and controls was 49.08±15.59 and 49.96±15.54 years old respectively (P=0.936). 53.5% of cases and 54.5% of controls were women (P=0.845). Most frequent dermatomes involved in patients were thoracic (85/217; 39.25%) and cervical dermatomes (55/217; 25.3%). Frequency of herpes zoster in first-degree blood relatives in cases and controls was 65/217 (30%) and 16/200 (8%) respectively (OR=4.91; 95% CI: 2.73, 8.85; P=0.001). Our findings indicated a significantly higher proportion of patients with family history of herpes zoster comparing to controls. This study confirms family history as a risk factor for herpes zoster. Therefore, the old patients with positive family history of herpes zoster may be appropriate candidates for vaccination with Zostavax. However, more evidence based on large cohort studies in needed to confirm our findings.

  7. Using genetic epidemiology to study Rett syndrome: the design of a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Leonard, H; Fyfe, S; Dye, D; Leonard, S

    2000-01-01

    Rett syndrome is a neurological disorder that is seen almost exclusively in females. Although generally considered to have a genetic basis, the underlying mechanism remains obscure. One favoured hypothesis is that the syndrome is an X-linked dominant disorder, lethal or non-expressed in males. Genealogical research has also suggested that the mode of transmission in Rett syndrome may involve a premutation which over several generations is converted to a full mutation. Geographical clustering has been reported, and it has also been proposed that Rett syndrome is a clinically variable condition and that other neurological disorders may be occurring more commonly in families with Rett syndrome. Other studies have found an apparent increase in intellectual disability and seizures in the extended families of girls with Rett syndrome. The science of genetic epidemiology can be used to identify familial aggregation, which is the clustering of a disorder within a family. We have used a case-control study design to investigate both fetal wastage and familial aggregation of other disorders in families of girls with Rett syndrome. The Australian Rett Syndrome Database provided the source of cases, and control probands were girls of a similar age with normal development. This paper describes the methodology for a case-control study of this rare condition using pedigree data and discusses issues in the collection and evaluation of such data. The use of a control population is an important feature. Both the strengths and the shortcomings of our design are identified, and recommendations are made for future research.

  8. Sleep and Parkinson's disease: a review of case-control polysomnography studies.

    PubMed

    Peeraully, Tasneem; Yong, Ming-Hui; Chokroverty, Sudhansu; Tan, Eng-King

    2012-12-01

    The link between Parkinson's disease (PD) and certain primary sleep disorders has yet to be clarified. We performed a systematic review of case-control polysomnography studies to evaluate the relationship between PD and sleep disorders. A PubMed literature search and bibliography review yielded 15 case-control polysomnography studies in patients with PD. Studies differed by recruitment methods, duration of polysomnography monitoring, and sleep parameters measured. Subjective sleepiness was greater in patients than controls (50%-66% vs 2.9%-12%) despite lack of objective increase in daytime sleepiness by mean sleep latency testing. The 4 case-control polysomnography studies investigating rapid eye movement behavior disorder support a higher prevalence in PD (0%-47% vs 0%-1.8% in controls), although differences in diagnostic criteria hamper interpretation. The preponderance of evidence did not support an increased incidence of obstructive sleep apnea (27%-60% vs 13%-65%) or periodic leg movements of sleep in patients compared to controls. Adequately powered, prospective studies with uniform methodology and healthy controls are needed to further address the association and pathophysiological significance between PD and sleep problems.

  9. CONTROL FUNCTION ASSISTED IPW ESTIMATION WITH A SECONDARY OUTCOME IN CASE-CONTROL STUDIES.

    PubMed

    Sofer, Tamar; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Kraft, Peter; Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric J

    2017-04-01

    Case-control studies are designed towards studying associations between risk factors and a single, primary outcome. Information about additional, secondary outcomes is also collected, but association studies targeting such secondary outcomes should account for the case-control sampling scheme, or otherwise results may be biased. Often, one uses inverse probability weighted (IPW) estimators to estimate population effects in such studies. IPW estimators are robust, as they only require correct specification of the mean regression model of the secondary outcome on covariates, and knowledge of the disease prevalence. However, IPW estimators are inefficient relative to estimators that make additional assumptions about the data generating mechanism. We propose a class of estimators for the effect of risk factors on a secondary outcome in case-control studies that combine IPW with an additional modeling assumption: specification of the disease outcome probability model. We incorporate this model via a mean zero control function. We derive the class of all regular and asymptotically linear estimators corresponding to our modeling assumption, when the secondary outcome mean is modeled using either the identity or the log link. We find the efficient estimator in our class of estimators and show that it reduces to standard IPW when the model for the primary disease outcome is unrestricted, and is more efficient than standard IPW when the model is either parametric or semiparametric.

  10. Case-Control Studies of Sporadic Enteric Infections: A Review and Discussion of Studies Conducted Internationally from 1990 to 2009

    PubMed Central

    Fullerton, Kathleen E.; Scallan, Elaine; Kirk, Martyn D.; Mahon, Barbara E.; Angulo, Frederick J.; de Valk, Henriette; van Pelt, Wilfrid; Gauci, Charmaine; Hauri, Anja M.; Majowicz, Shannon; O’Brien, Sarah J.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiologists have used case-control studies to investigate enteric disease outbreaks for many decades. Increasingly, case-control studies are also used to investigate risk factors for sporadic (not outbreak-associated) disease. While the same basic approach is used, there are important differences between outbreak and sporadic disease settings that need to be considered in the design and implementation of the case-control study for sporadic disease. Through the International Collaboration on Enteric Disease “Burden of Illness” Studies (the International Collaboration), we reviewed 79 case-control studies of sporadic enteric infections caused by nine pathogens that were conducted in 22 countries and published from 1990 through to 2009. We highlight important methodological and study design issues (including case definition, control selection, and exposure assessment) and discuss how approaches to the study of sporadic enteric disease have changed over the last 20 years (e.g., making use of more sensitive case definitions, databases of controls, and computer-assisted interviewing). As our understanding of sporadic enteric infections grows, methods and topics for case-control studies are expected to continue to evolve; for example, advances in understanding of the role of immunity can be used to improve control selection, the apparent protective effects of certain foods can be further explored, and case-control studies can be used to provide population-based measures of the burden of disease. PMID:22443481

  11. Case-control studies of sporadic enteric infections: a review and discussion of studies conducted internationally from 1990 to 2009.

    PubMed

    Fullerton, Kathleen E; Scallan, Elaine; Kirk, Martyn D; Mahon, Barbara E; Angulo, Frederick J; de Valk, Henriette; van Pelt, Wilfrid; Gauci, Charmaine; Hauri, Anja M; Majowicz, Shannon; O'Brien, Sarah J

    2012-04-01

    Epidemiologists have used case-control studies to investigate enteric disease outbreaks for many decades. Increasingly, case-control studies are also used to investigate risk factors for sporadic (not outbreak-associated) disease. While the same basic approach is used, there are important differences between outbreak and sporadic disease settings that need to be considered in the design and implementation of the case-control study for sporadic disease. Through the International Collaboration on Enteric Disease "Burden of Illness" Studies (the International Collaboration), we reviewed 79 case-control studies of sporadic enteric infections caused by nine pathogens that were conducted in 22 countries and published from 1990 through to 2009. We highlight important methodological and study design issues (including case definition, control selection, and exposure assessment) and discuss how approaches to the study of sporadic enteric disease have changed over the last 20 years (e.g., making use of more sensitive case definitions, databases of controls, and computer-assisted interviewing). As our understanding of sporadic enteric infections grows, methods and topics for case-control studies are expected to continue to evolve; for example, advances in understanding of the role of immunity can be used to improve control selection, the apparent protective effects of certain foods can be further explored, and case-control studies can be used to provide population-based measures of the burden of disease.

  12. Population versus hospital controls for case-control studies on cancers in Chinese hospitals.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Zhang, Min; Holman, D'Arcy

    2011-12-15

    Correct control selection is crucial to the internal validity of case-control studies. Little information exists on differences between population and hospital controls in case-control studies on cancers in Chinese hospital setting. We conducted three parallel case-control studies on leukemia, breast and colorectal cancers in China between 2009 and 2010, using population and hospital controls to separately match 540 incident cases by age, gender and residency at a 1:1 ratio. Demographic and lifestyle factors were measured using a validated questionnaire in face-to-face interview. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were obtained using conditional logistic regression analyses. The two control groups had closely similar exposure distributions of 15 out of 16 factors, with the only exception being that hospital controls were less likely to have a BMI ≥ 25 (OR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.54, 0.93). For exposure of green tea drinking, the adjusted ORs (95% CIs) comparing green tealeaves intake ≥ 1000 grams annually with non-drinkers were 0.51 (0.31, 0.83) and 0.21 (0.27, 0.74) for three cancers combined, 0.06 (0.01, 0.61) and 0.07 (0.01, 0.47) for breast cancer, 0.52 (0.29, 0.94) and 0.45 (0.25, 0.82) for colorectal cancer, 0.65 (0.08, 5.63) and 0.57 (0.07, 4.79) for leukemia using hospital and population controls respectively. The study found that hospital controls were comparable with population controls for most demographic characteristics and lifestyle factors measured, but there was a slight difference between the two control groups. Hospital outpatients provide a satisfactory control group in hospital-based case-control study in the Chinese hospital setting.

  13. Trypanosoma cruzi-associated cerebrovascular disease: a case-control study in Eastern Colombia.

    PubMed

    Leon-Sarmiento, Fidias E; Mendoza, Eder; Torres-Hillera, Martin; Pinto, Neyla; Prada, Janette; Silva, Clara A; Vera, Silvia J; Castillo, Erwin; Valderrama, Vladimir; Prada, Didier G; Bayona-Prieto, Jaime; Garcia, Ingrid

    2004-01-15

    Trypanosoma cruzi infection is a common cause of cardiopathy in South America leading it eventually to an established stroke; however, the association between T. cruzi infection itself and cerebrovascular disease is still unknown. We did a case-control study at Eastern Colombia and found that T. cruzi infection was more frequent and statistically significant in stroke cases (24.4%) than controls (1.9%), (Chi square: 21.72; OR: 16.13; 95% confidence interval (CI): 3.64-71.4; p<0.00001). After removing the seropositive patients with cardiological abnormalities, the significance still remained by multivariate analysis (p<0.05). This is the first case-control study that demonstrated a significant link between this infection and symptomatic cerebrovascular disease, mainly ischemic, regardless of cardiac abnormalities. Therefore, we recommend that patients with stroke must be screened for T. cruzi infection if they currently live or have lived in places where this parasite is considered endemic.

  14. Polychlorinated Biphenyls, Organochlorines & PD Risk: A Case Control Study in Alaska

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    Organochlorines & PD Risk: A Case Control Study in Alaska 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-04-1-0490 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...biphenyl (PCBs) residues, organochlorine pesticides and methylmercury with PD. The hypothesis is that increased exposure to these compounds will be...Parkinson’s disease, polychlorinated biphenyl, organochlorine pesticides, methylmercury, Alaska natives, neurodegeneration 16. SECURITY

  15. Acute myeloid leukemia in adults: a case-control study in Yorkshire.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, R A; Darwin, C; McKinney, P A; Roberts, B; Richards, I D; Bird, C C

    1988-10-01

    This paper reports the results of a case-control analysis of 161 cases of acute myeloid leukemia and 310 matched hospital controls. The patients were interviewed between 1982 and 1986. The study shows a weak association for cases with previous malignant disease. Furnace workers show excess risks. Urticaria and vertigo are in excess, as well as some aspects of family medical histories, including multiple sclerosis and cases of leukemia/lymphoma in blood relations.

  16. Antioxidants and breast cancer risk- a population-based case-control study in Canada

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The effect of antioxidants on breast cancer is still controversial. Our objective was to assess the association between antioxidants and breast cancer risk in a large population-based case-control study. Methods The study population included 2,362 cases with pathologically confirmed incident breast cancer (866 premenopausal and 1,496 postmenopausal) and 2,462 controls in Canada. Intakes of antioxidants from diet and from supplementation as well as other potential risk factors for breast cancer were collected by a self-reported questionnaire. Results Compared with subjects with no supplementation, 10 years or longer supplementation of zinc had multivariable-adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of 0.46 (0.25-0.85) for premenopausal women, while supplementation of 10 years or longer of multiple vitamin, beta-carotene, vitamin C, vitamin E and zinc had multivariable-adjusted ORs (95% CIs) of 0.74 (0.59, 0.92), 0.58 (0.36, 0.95), 0.79 (0.63-0.99), 0.75 (0.58, 0.97), and 0.47 (0.28-0.78), respectively, for postmenopausal women. No significant effect of antioxidants from dietary sources (including beta-carotene, alpha-carotene, lycopene, lutein and zeaxanthin, vitamin C, vitamin E, selenium and zinc) or from supplementation less than 10 years was observed. Conclusions This study suggests that supplementation of zinc in premenopausal women, and supplementation of multiple vitamin, beta-carotene, vitamin C, vitamin E and zinc in postmenopausal women for 10 or more years may protect women from developing breast cancer. However, we were unable to determine the overall effect of total dose or intake from both diet and supplement. PMID:21864361

  17. Association between obesity and the risk of malignant lymphoma in Japanese: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Junya; Matsuo, Keitaro; Suzuki, Takeshi; Hosono, Satoyo; Ito, Hidemi; Ichinohe, Tatsuo; Seto, Masao; Morishima, Yasuo; Tajima, Kazuo; Tanaka, Hideo

    2010-05-15

    Although marked differences in anthropometric characteristics and malignant lymphoma (ML) incidence suggest that the association between obesity and ML risk in Asian and non-Asian populations may differ, few studies have investigated this association in Asian populations. Here, we conducted a sex- and age-matched case-control study in a Japanese population using 782 cases and 3,910 noncancer controls in the hospital-based Epidemiological Research Program at Aichi Cancer Center Hospital. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for anthropometric characteristics were estimated using a conditional logistic regression model that incorporated smoking and alcohol intake. Recent body weight and body mass index (BMI) showed marginally significant association with ML risk (ORs [95% CIs] per 5-unit increase in recent weight and BMI; 1.04 [0.99-1.09] and 1.11 [0.98-1.27], respectively). On the other hand, weight and BMI in early adulthood exhibited a strong association with ML risk (ORs [95% CIs] per 5-unit increase in early adulthood weight and BMI; 1.11 [1.05-1.18] and 1.33 [1.13-1.55], respectively). Further, in women, a BMI of 25.0-29.9 kg/m(2), defined as obesity in Asian populations, during early adulthood was significantly associated with ML risk compared to the normal range of 18.5-22.9 kg/m(2). By histological ML subtype, the point estimates of ORs for obesity relative to normal weight in early adulthood were over unity for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) as a whole and significant for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). In conclusion, our study in Japanese subjects suggested that early adulthood obesity is associated with the risk of NHL, particularly DLBCL.

  18. Cigarette smoking and risk of ovarian cancer: a pooled analysis of 21 case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Faber, Mette T; Kjær, Susanne K; Dehlendorff, Christian; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Andersen, Klaus K; Høgdall, Estrid; Webb, Penelope M; Jordan, Susan J; Rossing, Mary Anne; Doherty, Jennifer A; Lurie, Galina; Thompson, Pamela J; Carney, Michael E; Goodman, Marc T; Ness, Roberta B; Modugno, Francesmary; Edwards, Robert P; Bunker, Clareann H; Goode, Ellen L; Fridley, Brooke L; Vierkant, Robert A; Larson, Melissa C; Schildkraut, Joellen; Cramer, Daniel W; Terry, Kathryn L; Vitonis, Allison F; Bandera, Elisa V; Olson, Sara H; King, Melony; Chandran, Urmila; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Massuger, Leon F A G; van Altena, Anne M; Vermeulen, Sita H; Brinton, Louise; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Lissowska, Jolanta; Yang, Hannah P; Moysich, Kirsten B; Odunsi, Kunle; Kasza, Karin; Odunsi-Akanji, Oluwatosin; Song, Honglin; Pharaoh, Paul; Shah, Mitul; Whittemore, Alice S; McGuire, Valerie; Sieh, Weiva; Sutphen, Rebecca; Menon, Usha; Gayther, Simon A; Ramus, Susan J; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Wu, Anna H; Pike, Malcolm C; Risch, Harvey A; Jensen, Allan

    2013-05-01

    The majority of previous studies have observed an increased risk of mucinous ovarian tumors associated with cigarette smoking, but the association with other histological types is unclear. In a large pooled analysis, we examined the risk of epithelial ovarian cancer associated with multiple measures of cigarette smoking with a focus on characterizing risks according to tumor behavior and histology. We used data from 21 case-control studies of ovarian cancer (19,066 controls, 11,972 invasive and 2,752 borderline cases). Study-specific odds ratios (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) were obtained from logistic regression models and combined into a pooled odds ratio using a random effects model. Current cigarette smoking increased the risk of invasive mucinous (OR = 1.31; 95 % CI: 1.03-1.65) and borderline mucinous ovarian tumors (OR = 1.83; 95 % CI: 1.39-2.41), while former smoking increased the risk of borderline serous ovarian tumors (OR = 1.30; 95 % CI: 1.12-1.50). For these histological types, consistent dose-response associations were observed. No convincing associations between smoking and risk of invasive serous and endometrioid ovarian cancer were observed, while our results provided some evidence of a decreased risk of invasive clear cell ovarian cancer. Our results revealed marked differences in the risk profiles of histological types of ovarian cancer with regard to cigarette smoking, although the magnitude of the observed associations was modest. Our findings, which may reflect different etiologies of the histological types, add to the fact that ovarian cancer is a heterogeneous disease.

  19. Leptospira Exposure and Waste Pickers: A Case-Control Seroprevalence Study in Durango, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Hernandez-Tinoco, Jesus; Sanchez-Anguiano, Luis Francisco; Ramos-Nevarez, Agar; Cerrillo-Soto, Sandra Margarita; Guido-Arreola, Carlos Alberto

    2015-08-01

    Infection with Leptospira may occur by contact with Leptospira-infected animals. Waste pickers are in contact with rodents and dogs while picking in the garbage. Whether waste pickers are at risk for Leptospira infection is largely unknown. This study was aimed to determine the association of Leptospira IgG seroprevalence with the occupation of waste picking, and to determine the epidemiological characteristics of the waste pickers with Leptospira exposure. Through a case-control study, we determined the seroprevalence of anti-Leptospira IgG antibodies in 90 waste pickers and 90 age- and gender-matched control subjects in Durango City, Mexico using an enzyme immunoassay. Data were analyzed by bivariate and multivariate analyses. The prevalence of anti-Leptospira IgG antibodies was similar in waste pickers (4/90: 4.4%) to that in control subjects (5/90: 5.6%) (P = 1.00). Bivariate analysis showed that Leptospira exposure in waste pickers was associated with increasing age (P = 0.009), no education (P = 0.008), and consumption of rat meat (P = 0.04). However, these associations were no longer found by multivariate analysis. Leptospira exposure in waste pickers was not associated with health status, duration in the activity, wearing hand gloves and facemasks, history of injuries with sharp material of the garbage, or contact with animals or soil. This is the first study about Leptospira exposure in waste pickers. Results suggest that waste pickers are not at increasing risk for Leptospira exposure in Durango City, Mexico. Further research with a larger sample size to elucidate the association of Leptospira exposure with waste picking activity is needed.

  20. Leptospira Exposure and Waste Pickers: A Case-Control Seroprevalence Study in Durango, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Hernandez-Tinoco, Jesus; Sanchez-Anguiano, Luis Francisco; Ramos-Nevarez, Agar; Cerrillo-Soto, Sandra Margarita; Guido-Arreola, Carlos Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Background Infection with Leptospira may occur by contact with Leptospira-infected animals. Waste pickers are in contact with rodents and dogs while picking in the garbage. Whether waste pickers are at risk for Leptospira infection is largely unknown. This study was aimed to determine the association of Leptospira IgG seroprevalence with the occupation of waste picking, and to determine the epidemiological characteristics of the waste pickers with Leptospira exposure. Methods Through a case-control study, we determined the seroprevalence of anti-Leptospira IgG antibodies in 90 waste pickers and 90 age- and gender-matched control subjects in Durango City, Mexico using an enzyme immunoassay. Data were analyzed by bivariate and multivariate analyses. Results The prevalence of anti-Leptospira IgG antibodies was similar in waste pickers (4/90: 4.4%) to that in control subjects (5/90: 5.6%) (P = 1.00). Bivariate analysis showed that Leptospira exposure in waste pickers was associated with increasing age (P = 0.009), no education (P = 0.008), and consumption of rat meat (P = 0.04). However, these associations were no longer found by multivariate analysis. Leptospira exposure in waste pickers was not associated with health status, duration in the activity, wearing hand gloves and facemasks, history of injuries with sharp material of the garbage, or contact with animals or soil. Conclusions This is the first study about Leptospira exposure in waste pickers. Results suggest that waste pickers are not at increasing risk for Leptospira exposure in Durango City, Mexico. Further research with a larger sample size to elucidate the association of Leptospira exposure with waste picking activity is needed. PMID:26124911

  1. Questionnaires for collecting detailed occupational information for community-based case control studies.

    PubMed

    Stewart, P A; Stewart, W F; Siemiatycki, J; Heineman, E F; Dosemeci, M

    1998-01-01

    In case control studies, collection of information on the workplace environment has generally been limited to self-reports of exposures or to job title, type of employer, and the dates the jobs were held, supplemented sometimes by work activities. This information, however, may be insufficient to assess the potential and level of exposure accurately due to recall difficulties and the variability of exposures within a job. A solution to this problem is to use job-specific questionnaires. The organization of a series of such questionnaires developed for a case control study of brain tumors is described. Three types of questionnaires, or modules, were developed, task-based, industry-based, and modules based on jobs with nonspecific types of tasks (e.g., laborer). The format of these modules starts with questions on the general work environment (type of employer) and proceeds to questions on tasks. More detailed information is then gathered on materials and equipment used, sensory descriptions, dermal exposure, work practices, engineering controls, and personal protective equipment use. The questionnaires cover a wide variety of exposures including solvents, heavy metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, machining fluids, electromagnetic frequency fields, and many other exposures and, therefore, can be used in other case control studies.

  2. Impact of waning acquired immunity and asymptomatic infections on case-control studies for enteric pathogens.

    PubMed

    Havelaar, Arie H; Swart, Arno

    2016-12-01

    Case-control studies of outbreaks and of sporadic cases of infectious diseases may provide a biased estimate of the infection rate ratio, due to selecting controls that are not at risk of disease. We use a dynamic mathematical model to explore biases introduced in results drawn from case-control studies of enteric pathogens by waning and boosting of immunity, and by asymptomatic infections, using Campylobacter jejuni as an example. Individuals in the population are either susceptible (at risk of infection and disease), fully protected (not at risk of either) or partially protected (at risk of infection but not of disease). The force of infection is a function of the exposure frequency and the exposure dose. We show that the observed disease odds ratios are indeed strongly biased towards the null, i.e. much lower than the infection rate ratio, and furthermore even not proportional to it. The bias could theoretically be controlled by sampling controls only from the reservoir of susceptible individuals. The population at risk is in a dynamic equilibrium, and cannot be identified as those who are not and have never experienced disease. Individual-level samples to measure protective immunity would be required, complicating the design, cost and execution of case-control studies.

  3. Multivariate multidistance tests for high-dimensional low sample size case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Marozzi, Marco

    2015-04-30

    A class of multivariate tests for case-control studies with high-dimensional low sample size data and with complex dependence structure, which are common in medical imaging and molecular biology, is proposed. The tests can be applied when the number of variables is much larger than the number of subjects and when the underlying population distributions are heavy-tailed or skewed. As a motivating application, we consider a case-control study where phase-contrast cinematic cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging has been used to compare many cardiovascular characteristics of young healthy smokers and young healthy non-smokers. The tests are based on the combination of tests on interpoint distances. It is theoretically proved that the tests are exact, unbiased and consistent. It is shown that the tests are very powerful under normal, heavy-tailed and skewed distributions. The tests can also be applied to case-control studies with high-dimensional low sample size data from other medical imaging techniques (like computed tomography or X-ray radiography), chemometrics and microarray data (proteomics and transcriptomics).

  4. An alternative hypothesis testing strategy for secondary phenotype data in case-control genetic association studies.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Sharon M; Hokanson, John E; Lange, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by the challenges associated with accounting for the ascertainment when analyzing secondary phenotypes that are correlated with case-control status, Lin and Zeng have proposed a method that properly reflects the case-control sampling (Lin and Zeng, 2009). The Lin and Zeng method has the advantage of accurately estimating effect sizes for secondary phenotypes that are normally distributed or dichotomous. This method can be computationally intensive in practice under the null hypothesis when the likelihood surface that needs to be maximized can be relatively flat. We propose an extension of the Lin and Zeng method for hypothesis testing that uses proportional odds logistic regression to circumvent these computational issues. Through simulation studies, we compare the power and type-1 error rate of our method to standard approaches and Lin and Zeng's approach.

  5. A double robust approach to causal effects in case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Rose, Sherri; van der Laan, Mark

    2014-03-15

    In a recent issue of the Journal, VanderWeele and Vansteelandt (Am J Epidemiol. 2011;174(10):1197-1203) discussed an inverse probability weighting method for case-control studies that could be used to estimate an additive interaction effect, referred to as the "relative excess risk due to interaction." In this article, we reinforce the well-known disadvantages of inverse probability weighting and comment on the desirability of the described parameter. Further, we review an existing double robust estimator not considered by VanderWeele and Vansteelandt, the case-control-weighted targeted maximum likelihood estimator, which has improved properties in comparison with a previously described inverse-probability-weighted estimator. This targeted maximum likelihood estimator can be used to target various parameters of interest, and its implementation has been described previously for the risk difference, relative risk, and odds ratio.

  6. Associations between central obesity and asthma in children and adolescents: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Papoutsakis, Constantina; Chondronikola, Maria; Antonogeorgos, Georgios; Papadakou, Eleni; Matziou, Vasiliki; Drakouli, Maria; Konstantaki, Evanthia; Papadimitriou, Anastasios; Priftis, Kostas N

    2015-03-01

    Evidence supports a significant yet weak association between high-body weight and asthma in children. However, most studies investigating the obesity-asthma link use Body Mass Index (BMI) to evaluate body fatness. The relationship between body fat distribution and asthma remains largely unknown, especially in children. This pediatric case-control investigation examined associations between central obesity/high-body weight and asthma diagnosis. Five-hundred and fourteen children (217 physician diagnosed asthma cases and 297 healthy controls) of 5-11 years were recruited. Height, weight and waist circumference were measured. Asthma symptoms, past medical history, personal lifestyle, socioeconomic status, diet and physical activity history were also collected. A higher proportion of children with asthma were centrally obese [(≥90th waist percentile) 15.2 vs. 9.4%, p<0.0001; (≥90th waist-to-height ratio percentile) 39.6 vs. 24.2%, p<0.0001)]. Regression analyses revealed that centrally obese children were more likely to have asthma (high-waist circumference (OR = 1.99, 95% CI: 1.07-3.68) and high-waist circumference to height ratio (OR = 2.24, 95% CI: 1.47-3.40), following adjustment for various confounders. Overweight/obese participants (BMI defined) were more likely to be asthmatic [odds ratio (OR) = 1.52, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03-2.70)] when compared to controls. Presence of central obesity and high-body weight (at least overweight) as assessed by waist circumference, waist-to-height ratio, and BMI are associated with asthma diagnosis. More studies are needed, especially in children and adolescents, to confirm these findings and better understand how body fat distribution impacts the obesity-asthma relationship.

  7. Linezolid-resistant staphylococcal bacteraemia: A multicentre case-case-control study in Italy.

    PubMed

    Russo, Alessandro; Campanile, Floriana; Falcone, Marco; Tascini, Carlo; Bassetti, Matteo; Goldoni, Paola; Trancassini, Maria; Della Siega, Paola; Menichetti, Francesco; Stefani, Stefania; Venditti, Mario

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this multicentre study was to analyse the characteristics of patients with bloodstream infections due to staphylococcal strains resistant to linezolid. This was a retrospective case-case-control study of patients hospitalised in three large teaching hospitals in Italy. A linezolid-resistant (LIN-R) Staphylococcus spp. group and a linezolid-susceptible (LIN-S) Staphylococcus spp. group were compared with control patients to determine the clinical features and factors associated with isolation of LIN-R strains. All LIN-R Staphylococcus spp. strains underwent molecular typing. Compared with the LIN-S group, central venous catheters were the main source of infection in the LIN-R group. The LIN-R and LIN-S groups showed a similar incidence of severe sepsis or septic shock, and both showed a higher incidence of these compared with the control group. Overall, patients in the LIN-R group had a higher 30-day mortality rate. Multivariate analysis found previous linezolid therapy, linezolid therapy >14 days, antibiotic therapy in the previous 30 days, antibiotic therapy >14 days, previous use of at least two antibiotics and hospitalisation in the previous 90 days as independent risk factors associated with isolation of a LIN-R strain. The G2576T mutation in domain V of 23S rRNA was the principal mechanism of resistance; only one strain of Staphylococcus epidermidis carried the cfr methylase gene (A2503), together with L4 insertion (71GGR72) and L3 substitution (H146Q). LIN-R strains are associated with severe impairment of clinical conditions and unfavourable patient outcomes. Reinforcement of infection control measures may have an important role in preventing these infections.

  8. Undiagnosed metabolic dysfunction and sudden infant death syndrome--a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Ning An; Currier, Robert J; Baer, Rebecca J; Feuchtbaum, Lisa; Jelliffe-Pawlowski, Laura L

    2015-03-01

    Decades of research has yielded few clues about causes of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). While some studies have shown a link to inborn errors of metabolism (IEMs), few have examined the link in a large population-based sample. This population-based case-control study assessed the association between undiagnosed IEMs and SIDS. Children born in California during 2005-08 who died from SIDS were obtained from death records and linked to the newborn screening, birth certificate, and hospital discharge databases. Individuals with known chromosomal and neural tube defects, genetic disorders, and non-singleton births were excluded. Five controls were matched to each case on tandem mass spectrometry testing date and lab code. Rates of undiagnosed IEMs were compared between cases and controls using conditional logistic regression adjusting for known confounding factors. After adjusting for known confounding factors, SIDS cases had similar risk of having IEMs as controls (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.3, 5.5). Infants who were male, Black, and born preterm had higher risk of SIDS with the highest risk observed for those born preterm [adjusted HR = 1.7, 95% CI 1.3, 2.2]. Younger maternal age at delivery, mother being born in the US, parity after current birth >3, and delayed prenatal care were also significantly associated with higher risk of SIDS. While many maternal and infant factors are associated with an increased risk of SIDS, there is no evidence that undiagnosed IEMs are associated with increased risk. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Aetiological factors in persistent sputum production: a case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Cullinan, P

    1993-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--The aim was to explore the aetiological roles of smoking, occupational exposure, childhood respiratory illness, and atopy in persistent sputum production. DESIGN--This was a case-control study. Data were obtained using a questionnaire administered by two observers blind to the subjects' status. Information was sought on lifetime smoking, occupation, hospital admissions due to respiratory disease, and respiratory disease history. SETTING--Four general practices in south east England in 1990, with a total population of about 30,000. SUBJECTS--Cases were subjects aged 5 to 54 years with sputum production; one control was selected per case, matched by general practice, age, and sex, forming 210 matched pairs (88% response rate). MAIN RESULTS--Cigarette smoking remains an important cause of persistent sputum production: the odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for current smoking was 7.9 (3.6-20.4). A dose-response relationship was confirmed, with falling risk estimates after stopping smoking. The association of sputum production with occupational exposure to respiratory irritants, which was independent of smoking, was confined to men (odds ratio 2.4, 1.0-6.0) and largely attributable to very heavy exposure. Examination of the relationship with early respiratory disease suggested that much, though not all, was attributable to wheezing illnesses first manifest in childhood. CONCLUSIONS--Aetiological fractions derived from the results suggest that in the general population of south east England approximately 68% of all cases of persistent sputum production can be independently attributed to current cigarette smoking, 17% to heavy occupational exposure to respiratory irritants, and 13% to wheezing illnesses first manifest in early childhood. PMID:8436888

  10. Statins and hip fracture risk in men: a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Adams, Annette L; Shi, Jiaxiao M; Reynolds, Kristi; Haque, Reina; Cheetham, T Craig; Kawatkar, Aniket A; Fithian, Donald C; Jacobsen, Steven J

    2015-11-01

    To estimate the association between hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA inhibitor (statin) use and hip fracture. We conducted a population-based case-control study. Cases were 6774 male enrollees in a large managed care organization, aged 45 or more years, with an incident hip fracture from 1997 to 2006. Controls without fracture (n = 6774) were matched to cases on age, race, and medical center. Electronic information on pharmaceutical use was used to identify the dispensing of statins from 1991 forward. Overall, 1884 (27.8%) cases and 2150 controls (31.7%) used a statin before index date (matched odds ratio [mOR] = 0.81, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.74-0.87). Adjustment for comorbidity burden strengthened the magnitude of the overall association (mOR = 0.68, CI = 0.62-0.74). The adjusted association was similar across age groups but was strongest among men aged 80 years or more (mOR = 0.62, CI = 0.54-0.71) and was most pronounced in African Americans (mOR = 0.43, CI = 0.28-0.64). Greater duration of statin use did not alter the odds ratios. These data add to the growing evidence of a potential protective effect of statin use on bone health. However, these results need to be replicated in a prospective study that can account for confounding by indication which may explain these findings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Do selected drugs increase the risk of lupus? A matched case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Schoonen, W Marieke; Thomas, Sara L; Somers, Emily C; Smeeth, Liam; Kim, Joseph; Evans, Stephen; Hall, Andrew J

    2010-01-01

    AIM To investigate the association between risk of lupus and exposure to selected drugs implicated in risk of lupus in a number of case reports. METHODS In this matched nested case-control study we utilized primary care data from the UK General Practice Research Database recorded between 1987 and 2001. Cases with at least one medical code for systemic lupus erythematosus or drug-induced lupus in their computerized records were matched to controls without a medical code for lupus or any other autoimmune disorder. Using conditional logistic regression we computed odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for risk of lupus associated with exposure to selected drugs. RESULTS There were 875 incident cases, of which 12% (n = 107) had evidence of a prescription for one or more of the suspected drugs, and 3632 matched controls. For some drugs, prescriptions were too uncommon to be able to estimate associated risk of lupus. Despite small numbers of exposed patients and low statistical precision we observed an increased risk of lupus for hydralazine (OR = 6.62, 95% CI 1.03, 42.74), minocycline (OR = 4.23, 95% CI 2.65, 6.75) and carbamazepine (OR = 1.88, 95% CI 1.09, 3.22). There was some indication that the effect of carbamazepine was restricted to women (P for interaction by gender = 0.047). CONCLUSION This study shows that even those drugs suggested by case reports as causing lupus cannot all be clearly shown to be associated, even in a very large population-based database. Our findings support causal relationships for carbamazepine, minocycline and possibly hydralazine. Overall, drugs do not seem to be a major cause of lupus. PMID:20840450

  12. Occupation and malignant lymphoma: a population based case control study in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Mester, B; Nieters, A; Deeg, E; Elsner, G; Becker, N; Seidler, A

    2006-01-01

    Aims To identify occupations suspected to be associated with malignant lymphoma and to generate new hypotheses about occupational risks in a multicentre, population based case control study. Methods Male and female patients with malignant lymphoma (n = 710) aged 18–80 years of age were prospectively recruited in six study regions in Germany. For each newly recruited lymphoma case, a sex, region, and age matched control was drawn from the population registers. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for major occupations and industries were calculated using conditional logistic regression analysis, adjusted for smoking (in pack‐years) and alcohol consumption. Patients with specific lymphoma subentities were additionally compared with the entire control group using unconditional logistic regression analysis. Results The following economic/industrial sectors were positively associated with lymphoma: food products, beverages, tobacco; paper products, publishing and printing; and metals. Chemicals; real estate, renting, and business activities were negatively associated with lymphoma diagnosis. The authors observed an increased overall lymphoma risk among architects; maids; farmers; glass formers; and construction workers. Shoemaking and leather goods making was negatively associated with the lymphoma diagnosis (although based on small numbers). In the occupational group analysis of lymphoma subentities, Hodgkin's lymphoma was significantly associated only with rubber and plastic products making; diffuse large B cell lymphoma risk was considerably increased among metal processors; follicular lymphoma showed highly significant risk increases for several occupational groups (medical, dental, and veterinary workers; sales workers; machinery fitters; and electrical fitters); and multiple myeloma showed a particularly pronounced risk increase for farmers as well as for agriculture and animal husbandry workers. Conclusions The results partly confirm previously

  13. Background radiation and childhood leukemia: A nationwide register-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Nikkilä, Atte; Erme, Sini; Arvela, Hannu; Holmgren, Olli; Raitanen, Jani; Lohi, Olli; Auvinen, Anssi

    2016-11-01

    High doses of ionizing radiation are an established cause of childhood leukemia. However, substantial uncertainty remains about the effect of low doses of radiation, including background radiation and potential differences between genetic subgroups of leukemia have rarely been explored. We investigated the effect of the background gamma radiation on childhood leukemia using a nationwide register-based case-control study. For each of the 1,093 cases, three age- and gender matched controls were selected (N = 3,279). Conditional logistic regression analyses were adjusted for confounding by Down syndrome, birth weight (large for gestational age), and maternal smoking. Complete residential histories and previously collected survey data of the background gamma radiation in Finland were used to assess the exposure of the study subjects to indoor and outdoor gamma radiation. Overall, background gamma radiation showed a non-significant association with the OR of childhood leukemia (OR 1.01, 95% CI 0.97, 1.05 for 10 nSv/h increase in average equivalent dose rate to red bone marrow). In subgroup analyses, age group 2-<7 years displayed a larger effect (OR 1.27, 95% CI 1.01, 1.60 for 1 mSv increase in equivalent cumulative dose to red bone marrow). Suggestive difference in OR by genetic subtype was found. Our results provide further support to the notion that low doses of ionizing radiation increase the risk for childhood leukemia, particularly at age 2-<7 years. Our findings suggest a larger effect of radiation on leukemia with high hyperpdiploidy than other subgroups, but this result requires further confirmation.

  14. Tests for gene-environment interaction from case-control data: a novel study of type I error, power and designs.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Bhramar; Ahn, Jaeil; Gruber, Stephen B; Rennert, Gad; Moreno, Victor; Chatterjee, Nilanjan

    2008-11-01

    To evaluate the risk of a disease associated with the joint effects of genetic susceptibility and environmental exposures, epidemiologic researchers often test for non-multiplicative gene-environment effects from case-control studies. In this article, we present a comparative study of four alternative tests for interactions: (i) the standard case-control method; (ii) the case-only method, which requires an assumption of gene-environment independence for the underlying population; (iii) a two-step method that decides between the case-only and case-control estimators depending on a statistical test for the gene-environment independence assumption and (iv) a novel empirical-Bayes (EB) method that combines the case-control and case-only estimators depending on the sample size and strength of the gene-environment association in the data. We evaluate the methods in terms of integrated Type I error and power, averaged with respect to varying scenarios for gene-environment association that are likely to appear in practice. These unique studies suggest that the novel EB procedure overall is a promising approach for detection of gene-environment interactions from case-control studies. In particular, the EB procedure, unlike the case-only or two-step methods, can closely maintain a desired Type I error under realistic scenarios of gene-environment dependence and yet can be substantially more powerful than the traditional case-control analysis when the gene-environment independence assumption is satisfied, exactly or approximately. Our studies also reveal potential utility of some non-traditional case-control designs that samples controls at a smaller rate than the cases. Apart from the simulation studies, we also illustrate the different methods by analyzing interactions of two commonly studied genes, N-acetyl transferase type 2 and glutathione s-transferase M1, with smoking and dietary exposures, in a large case-control study of colorectal cancer.

  15. Alcohol consumption and colorectal cancer in a Mediterranean population: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Kontou, Niki; Psaltopoulou, Theodora; Soupos, Nick; Polychronopoulos, Evangelos; Xinopoulos, Dimitrios; Linos, Athena; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes

    2012-06-01

    of colorectal cancer overall (p < 0.001), in men (OR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.83-0.97), and in women (OR, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.80-0.94). The major limitations of this study included the inability of a case-control design to determine causation and the potential for recall bias. The association between quantity of alcohol consumed and the presence of colorectal cancer followed a J-shaped curve. While demonstrating the detrimental effect of consuming large amounts of alcohol, the results of this study suggest that moderate alcohol consumption exerts a protective effect on colorectal cancer in both men and women, possibly related to the effects of red wine.

  16. Epistatic Module Detection for Case-Control Studies: A Bayesian Model with a Gibbs Sampling Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wanwan; Wu, Xuebing; Jiang, Rui; Li, Yanda

    2009-01-01

    The detection of epistatic interactive effects of multiple genetic variants on the susceptibility of human complex diseases is a great challenge in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Although methods have been proposed to identify such interactions, the lack of an explicit definition of epistatic effects, together with computational difficulties, makes the development of new methods indispensable. In this paper, we introduce epistatic modules to describe epistatic interactive effects of multiple loci on diseases. On the basis of this notion, we put forward a Bayesian marker partition model to explain observed case-control data, and we develop a Gibbs sampling strategy to facilitate the detection of epistatic modules. Comparisons of the proposed approach with three existing methods on seven simulated disease models demonstrate the superior performance of our approach. When applied to a genome-wide case-control data set for Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD), the proposed approach successfully identifies two known susceptible loci and suggests that a combination of two other loci—one in the gene SGCD and the other in SCAPER—is associated with the disease. Further functional analysis supports the speculation that the interaction of these two genetic variants may be responsible for the susceptibility of AMD. When applied to a genome-wide case-control data set for Parkinson's disease, the proposed method identifies seven suspicious loci that may contribute independently to the disease. PMID:19412524

  17. Case control study to identify risk factors for simple colonic obstruction and distension colic in horses.

    PubMed

    Hillyer, M H; Taylor, F G R; Proudman, C J; Edwards, G B; Smith, J E; French, N P

    2002-07-01

    A case control study was performed to identify risk factors for colic caused by simple colonic obstruction and distension (SCOD) in the horse. Case horses were recruited from 2 veterinary school clinics. Control horses were population based and matched by time of year. A number of risk factors were considered in the following areas: general carer and premises information; exercise information; husbandry information (housing- and pasture-related); feeding information; breeding information; behavioural information; travel information; preventive medicine information and previous medical information. All variables with a P value of <0.2 in the univariable analysis were considered for possible inclusion in a multivariable model. A final model, produced by a forward stepwise method, identified crib-biting or windsucking, an increasing number of hours spent in a stable, a recent change in a regular exercise programme, the absence of administration of an ivermectin or moxidectin anthelmintic in the previous 12 months and a history of travel in the previous 24 h as associated with a significantly increased risk of SCOD. An alternative final model, produced by a backwards elimination method, identified the same variables as the forward model with, in addition, a history of residing on the current establishment for less than 6 months, a history of a previous colic episode and the fewer times per year the teeth were checked/treated as associated with a significantly increased risk of SCOD. Three of the risk factors in this model were associated with a large increase in risk: stabling for 24 h/day, crib-biting/windsucking and travel in the previous 24 h.

  18. Risk factors for acanthamoeba keratitis in contact lens users: a case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Radford, C. F.; Bacon, A. S.; Dart, J. K.; Minassian, D. C.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate reasons for an increase in cases of Acanthamoeba keratitis related to contact lenses. DESIGN--Case-control study. Cases were contact lens related acanthamoeba keratitis patients treated between 1 September 1989 and 31 August 1992. Controls were lens users without lens related disease who presented as new patients to the casualty department from 1 March 1992 to 31 August 1992. All subjects completed a questionnaire detailing lens use and hygiene practices. SETTING--Eye hospital. SUBJECTS--35 cases with acanthamoeba keratitis and 378 controls. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Relative risks comparing different contact lens types, socioeconomic classification, age, sex, lens use, lens wearing experience, hygiene compliance, and hygiene systems. RESULTS--The crude relative risk for developing acanthamoeba keratitis with the use of daily wear disposable lenses was 49.45 (95% confidence interval 6.53 to 2227; P < 0.001) compared with conventional soft lenses (the referent). Multivariable analysis showed that this increased risk could be largely attributed to lack of disinfection (relative risk 55.86 (10 to 302); P < 0.001) and use of chlorine based disinfection (14.63 (2.8 to 76); P = 0.001) compared with other chemical systems (the referent). None of the other outcome measures showed a significant association. CONCLUSIONS--Both failure to disinfect daily wear soft contact lenses and the use of chlorine release lens disinfection systems, which have little protective effect against the organism, are major risk factors for acanthamoeba keratitis. These risks have been particularly common in disposable lens use. Over 80% of acanthamoeba keratitis could be avoided by the use of lens disinfection systems that are effective against the organism. PMID:7787645

  19. Understanding Heterogeneity in Clinical Cohorts Using Normative Models: Beyond Case-Control Studies.

    PubMed

    Marquand, Andre F; Rezek, Iead; Buitelaar, Jan; Beckmann, Christian F

    2016-10-01

    Despite many successes, the case-control approach is problematic in biomedical science. It introduces an artificial symmetry whereby all clinical groups (e.g., patients and control subjects) are assumed to be well defined, when biologically they are often highly heterogeneous. By definition, it also precludes inference over the validity of the diagnostic labels. In response, the National Institute of Mental Health Research Domain Criteria proposes to map relationships between symptom dimensions and broad behavioral and biological domains, cutting across diagnostic categories. However, to date, Research Domain Criteria have prompted few methods to meaningfully stratify clinical cohorts. We introduce normative modeling for parsing heterogeneity in clinical cohorts, while allowing predictions at an individual subject level. This approach aims to map variation within the cohort and is distinct from, and complementary to, existing approaches that address heterogeneity by employing clustering techniques to fractionate cohorts. To demonstrate this approach, we mapped the relationship between trait impulsivity and reward-related brain activity in a large healthy cohort (N = 491). We identify participants who are outliers within this distribution and show that the degree of deviation (outlier magnitude) relates to specific attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms (hyperactivity, but not inattention) on the basis of individualized patterns of abnormality. Normative modeling provides a natural framework to study disorders at the individual participant level without dichotomizing the cohort. Instead, disease can be considered as an extreme of the normal range or as-possibly idiosyncratic-deviation from normal functioning. It also enables inferences over the degree to which behavioral variables, including diagnostic labels, map onto biology. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Uncovering clinical and radiological associations of triphasic waves in acute encephalopathy: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Sutter, R; Kaplan, P W

    2014-04-01

    Triphasic waves (TWs) are archetypal waveforms seen on electroencephalography (EEG) in some forms of encephalopathy. Their particular underlying pathological substrates are largely unexplored. This case-control study was designed to identify and quantify specific clinical and neuroradiological associations underlying TWs and to determine if TWs predicate outcome. From 2004 to 2012, adult encephalopathic patients with TWs (cases) were matched 1:1 with encephalopathic patients without TWs (controls) by Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) and the frequency range of EEG background activity. Clinical characteristics, neuroimaging and outcomes were assessed. The mean age of 190 patients (95 with and 95 without TWs) was 66.6 years (±15.6). In multivariable analyses, patients with TWs had significantly higher odds for liver insufficiency [odds ratio (OR) = 8.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.98-33.08], alcohol abuse (OR = 3.65, 95% CI 1.25-10.63), subcortical brain atrophy (OR = 2.82, 95% CI 1.39-5.71) and respiratory tract infections (OR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.01-4.71). With each additional independent predictor, the odds increased for the occurrence of TWs (1 predictor, OR = 2.40, 95% CI 1.16-5.13; ≥2 predictors, OR = 9.20, 95% CI 3.27-25.62). Mortality was 15% and tended to be higher in patients with TWs (19% with vs. 11% without TWs). Alcohol abuse, liver insufficiency, infections and subcortical brain atrophy were independently associated with TWs in patients matched for clinical and EEG features of encephalopathy. These associations strengthen the hypothesis that TWs evolve from an interplay of pathological neurostructural, metabolic and toxic conditions. When matched for EEG background activity and GCS, TWs were not associated with death. © 2014 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2014 EFNS.

  1. Occupation and lung cancer in Shanghai: a case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Levin, L I; Zheng, W; Blot, W J; Gao, Y T; Fraumeni, J F

    1988-01-01

    Occupation was evaluated as a potential risk factor for lung cancer as part of a large population based case-control study conducted in the ten urban districts of Shanghai. A total of 733 newly diagnosed cases of male lung cancer and 760 controls selected from the general population was interviewed to obtain lifetime occupational histories and information on smoking and other factors. Of the approximately 25 major industrial titles examined, significantly raised risks, adjusted for smoking, were found for employment in agricultural production (odds ratio (OR) = 1.6, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.0-2.6). A concomitant increase was detected for farmers (OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.0-2.5) when 35 major occupational titles were examined. There was a 70% excess among workers in the chemical industry (OR = 1.7, 95% CI = 0.9-3.1) and a significant decrease among textile industry workers (OR = 0.7, 95% CI = 0.5-1.0). Raised risks of 30% to 80% were associated with reported job exposures to wood and coal dusts, smoke from burning fuels, and chemical fumes. Employment categories were also examined for 672 cases and 735 controls among women, but small numbers in many of the industrial and occupational categories precluded detailed analyses. The largest excess risk among women (OR = 5.1, 95% CI 1.3-23.5) was among glass products workers. Although cigarette smoking was the dominant cause of lung cancer among men and a significant risk factor among women in Shanghai, these findings suggest the importance of certain workplace exposures and offer leads to occupational carcinogens. PMID:3395581

  2. Psychiatric illness and subsequent traumatic brain injury: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    Fann, J; Leonetti, A; Jaffe, K; Katon, W; Cummings, P; Thompson, R

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether psychiatric illness is a risk factor for subsequent traumatic brain injury (TBI). Methods: Case control study in a large staff model health maintenance organisation in western Washington State. Patients with TBI, determined by International classification of diseases, 9th revision, clinical modification (ICD-9-CM) diagnoses, were 1440 health plan members who had TBI diagnosed in 1993 and who had been enrolled in the previous year, during which no TBI was ascertained. Three health plan members were randomly selected as control subjects, matched by age, sex, and reference date. Psychiatric illness in the year before the TBI reference date was determined by using computerised records of ICD-9-CM diagnoses, psychiatric medication prescriptions, and utilisation of a psychiatric service. Results: For those with a psychiatric diagnosis in the year before the reference date, the adjusted relative risk for TBI was 1.7 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.4 to 2.0) compared with those without a psychiatric diagnosis. Patients who had filled a psychiatric medication prescription had an adjusted relative risk for TBI of 1.6 (95% CI 1.2 to 2.1) compared with those who had not filled a psychiatric medication prescription. Patients who had utilised psychiatric services had an adjusted relative risk for TBI of 1.3 (95% CI 1.0 to 1.6) compared with those who had not utilised psychiatric services. The adjusted relative risk for TBI for patients with psychiatric illness determined by any of the three psychiatric indicators was 1.6 (95% CI 1.4 to 1.9) compared with those without any psychiatric indicator. Conclusion: Psychiatric illness appears to be associated with an increased risk for TBI. PMID:11971048

  3. A population-based case-control teratologic study of oral dipyrone treatment during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bánhidy, Ferenc; Acs, Nándor; Puhó, Erzsébet; Czeizel, Andrew E

    2007-01-01

    To study the possible human teratogenic effect of oral dipyrone, an antipyretic and analgesic drug treatment during pregnancy. The analysis of cases with different congenital abnormalities and their matched population controls without congenital abnormalities, in addition to a comparison between cases and malformation controls (Down's syndrome) in the population-based, large data set of the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital Abnormalities, 1980-1996. 22 843 neonates or fetuses with congenital abnormalities (cases), 38 151 matched newborns without congenital abnormalities (population controls) and 834 neonates or fetuses with Down's syndrome (malformation controls). 25 congenital abnormality groups. 1382 (6%) cases, 1911 (5%) population controls and 74 (8.9%) malformation controls were born to mothers treated with dipyrone during pregnancy. The case-matched population control analysis showed a higher rate of diaphragmatic defect (adjusted prevalence odds ratio [POR] 2.7; 95% CI 1.0, 6.8), cardiovascular malformations (POR 1.3; 95% CI 1.0, 1.7) and other isolated congenital abnormalities (POR 1.8; 95% CI 1.1, 2.9) after oral dipyrone treatment during the second and third months of gestation, i.e. in the critical period for most major congenital abnormalities. However, the evaluation of only medically recorded dipyrone use did not confirm these possible associations. The comparison of dipyrone treatment between 25 congenital abnormalities groups and malformation controls as the referent group also did not show any difference in the dipyrone use during the second and third months of gestation. The higher occurrence of dipyrone treatment in the case mothers compared with population control mothers can be explained by recall bias and/or chance. However, the higher rate of diaphragmatic congenital abnormalities can be considered as a signal and merits further investigation.

  4. Dietary inflammatory index and non-Hodgkin lymphoma risk in an Italian case-control study.

    PubMed

    Shivappa, Nitin; Hébert, James R; Taborelli, Martina; Montella, Maurizio; Libra, Massimo; Zucchetto, Antonella; Crispo, Anna; Grimaldi, Maria; La Vecchia, Carlo; Serraino, Diego; Polesel, Jerry

    2017-07-01

    While dietary factors have been shown to play an important etiologic role in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), little is known about the association between inflammatory properties of diet and NHL risk. We explored the association between the dietary inflammatory index (DII) and NHL risk in a multicenter Italian case-control study conducted between 1999 and 2014. Cases were 536 subjects with incident, histologically confirmed NHL from three areas in Italy. Controls were 984 subjects admitted to the same network of hospitals as the cases for acute, nonmalignant conditions, unrelated to diet. DII scores were computed based on 30 nutrients and food items assessed using a reproducible and validated 78-item food-frequency questionnaire. Odds ratios (ORs) were estimated through logistic regression models adjusting for age, total energy intake, and other recognized confounding factors. Subjects in the highest quartile of DII scores (i.e., with the most pro-inflammatory diets) had a higher risk of NHL compared with subjects in the lowest quartile (i.e., with the most anti-inflammatory diets) (ORQuartile4vs1 1.61, 95% confidence interval CI 1.07-2.43; p-trend = 0.01). Stratified analyses produced stronger associations between DII and NHL among males (ORQuartile4vs1 2.14; 95% CI 1.25-3.67) with significant heterogeneity (p value = 0.02); when analyzed by histologic subtype, a significant association was observed with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (ORQuartile4vs1 1.84; 95% CI 1.09-3.10). A pro-inflammatory diet, as indicated by higher DII scores, is associated with elevated odds of NHL, especially among males.

  5. Incorporating Single-Locus Tests into Haplotype Cladistic Analysis in Case-Control Studies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianfeng; Papasian, Chris; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2007-01-01

    In case-control studies, genetic associations for complex diseases may be probed either with single-locus tests or with haplotype-based tests. Although there are different views on the relative merits and preferences of the two test strategies, haplotype-based analyses are generally believed to be more powerful to detect genes with modest effects. However, a main drawback of haplotype-based association tests is the large number of distinct haplotypes, which increases the degrees of freedom for corresponding test statistics and thus reduces the statistical power. To decrease the degrees of freedom and enhance the efficiency and power of haplotype analysis, we propose an improved haplotype clustering method that is based on the haplotype cladistic analysis developed by Durrant et al. In our method, we attempt to combine the strengths of single-locus analysis and haplotype-based analysis into one single test framework. Novel in our method is that we develop a more informative haplotype similarity measurement by using p-values obtained from single-locus association tests to construct a measure of weight, which to some extent incorporates the information of disease outcomes. The weights are then used in computation of similarity measures to construct distance metrics between haplotype pairs in haplotype cladistic analysis. To assess our proposed new method, we performed simulation analyses to compare the relative performances of (1) conventional haplotype-based analysis using original haplotype, (2) single-locus allele-based analysis, (3) original haplotype cladistic analysis (CLADHC) by Durrant et al., and (4) our weighted haplotype cladistic analysis method, under different scenarios. Our weighted cladistic analysis method shows an increased statistical power and robustness, compared with the methods of haplotype cladistic analysis, single-locus test, and the traditional haplotype-based analyses. The real data analyses also show that our proposed method has practical

  6. Predictors of delayed recovery following pediatric sports-related concussion: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Miller, Joseph H; Gill, Clarence; Kuhn, Elizabeth N; Rocque, Brandon G; Menendez, Joshua Y; O'Neill, Jilian A; Agee, Bonita S; Brown, Steven T; Crowther, Marshall; Davis, R Drew; Ferguson, Drew; Johnston, James M

    2016-04-01

    postconcussive symptoms lasting more than 28 days. For patients without SCAT2 scores, female sex and reporting a history of ADHD significantly increased the odds of prolonged recovery (aOR 4.41, 95% CI 1.93-10.07 and aOR 3.87, 95% CI 1.13-13.24, respectively). Concussions resulting from playing a nonhelmet sport were also associated with a higher risk for prolonged symptoms in patients with and without SCAT2 scores (OR 2.59, 95% CI 1.28-5.26 and OR 2.17, 95% CI 0.99-7.73, respectively). Amnesia, balance abnormalities, and a history of migraines were not associated with symptoms lasting longer than 28 days. CONCLUSIONS This case-control study suggests candidate risk factors for predicting prolonged recovery following sports-related concussion. Large prospective cohort studies of youth athletes examined and treated with standardized protocols will be needed to definitively establish these associations and confirm which children are at highest risk for delayed recovery.

  7. Evaluating psychiatric case-control studies using the STROBE (STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational Studies in Epidemiology) statement.

    PubMed

    Goi, Pedro Domingues; Goi, Julia Domingues; Cordini, Kariny Larissa; Ceresér, Keila Mendes; Rocha, Neusa Sica da

    2014-01-01

    Case-control studies are important in developing clinical and public health knowledge. The STROBE statement (STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational Studies in Epidemiology) was developed to establish a checklist of items that should be included in articles reporting observational studies. Our aim was to analyze whether the psychiatric case-control articles published in Brazilian journals with CAPES Qualis rating B1/B2 in 2009 conformed with the STROBE statement. Descriptive study on psychiatric papers published in Brazilian journals, within the Postgraduate Medical Program on Psychiatry, at Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul. All psychiatric case-control studies from Brazilian Qualis B1/B2 journals of psychiatry, neurology and public health in 2009 were analyzed. The four most specific items of the STROBE statement were used to evaluate whether these studies fitted within the case-control parameters: 1) selection of cases and controls; 2) controlling for bias; 3) statistical analysis; and 4) presentation of results. Sixteen case-control studies were identified, of which eleven (68.75%) were in psychiatry-focused journals. From analysis using the STROBE statement, all of the articles conformed with item 1; two (12.5%) completely conformed with item 2; none completely conformed with item 3; and only three (18.8%) conformed with item 4. The case-control studies analyzed here did not completely conform with the four STROBE statement items for case-control design. In view of the inadequate methodology of the published studies, these findings justify focusing on research and methodology and expanding the investigations on adherence of studies to their designs.

  8. Multicenter Case-Control Study on Restless Legs Syndrome in Multiple Sclerosis: the REMS Study

    PubMed Central

    Manconi, Mauro; Ferini-Strambi, Luigi; Filippi, Massimo; Bonanni, Enrica; Iudice, Alfonso; Murri, Luigi; Gigli, Gian Luigi; Fratticci, Lara; Merlino, Giovanni; Terzano, Giovanni; Granella, Franco; Parrino, Liborio; Silvestri, Rosalia; Aricò, Irene; Dattola, Vincenzo; Russo, Giovanna; Luongo, Carmela; Cicolin, Alessandro; Tribolo, Antonella; Cavalla, Paola; Savarese, Mariantonietta; Trojano, Maria; Ottaviano, Salvatore; Cirignotta, Fabio; Simioni, Valentina; Salvi, Fabrizio; Mondino, Fiorella; Perla, Franco; Chinaglia, Giorgia; Zuliani, Cristina; Cesnik, Edward; Granieri, Enrico; Placidi, Fabio; Palmieri, Maria Giuseppina; Manni, Raffaele; Terzaghi, Michele; Bergamaschi, Roberto; Rocchi, Raffaele; Ulivelli, Monica; Bartalini, Sabina; Ferri, Raffaele; Fermo, Salvatore Lo; Ubiali, Emilio; Viscardi, Massimo; Rottoli, Mariarosa; Nobili, Lino; Protti, Alessandra; Ferrillo, Franco; Allena, Marta; Mancardi, Gianluigi; Guarnieri, Biancamaria; Londrillo, Francesco

    2008-01-01

    Study objectives: To verify the existence of a symptomatic form of restless legs syndrome (RLS) secondary to multiple sclerosis (MS) and to identify possible associated risk factors. Design: Prospective, multicenter, case-control epidemiologic survey. Settings: Twenty sleep centers certified by the Italian Association of Sleep Medicine. Patients: Eight hundred and sixty-one patients affected by MS and 649 control subjects. Interventions: N/A. Measures and results: Data regarding demographic and clinical factors, presence and severity of RLS, the results of hematologic tests, and visual analysis of cerebrospinal magnetic resonance imaging studies were collected. The prevalence of RLS was 19% in MS and 4.2% in control subjects, with a risk to be affected by RLS of 5.4 (95%confidence interval: 3.56–8.26) times greater for patients with MS than for control subjects. In patients with MS, the following risk factors for RLS were significant: older age; longer MS duration; the primary progressive MS form; higher global, pyramidal, and sensory disability; and the presence of leg jerks before sleep onset. Patients with MS and RLS more often had sleep complaints and a higher intake of hypnotic medications than patients with MS without RLS. RLS associated with MS was more severe than that of control subjects. Conclusions: RLS is significantly associated with MS, especially in patients with severe pyramidal and sensory disability. These results strengthen the idea that the inflammatory damage correlated with MS may induce a secondary form of RLS. As it does in idiopathic cases, RLS has a significant impact on sleep quality in patients with MS; therefore, it should be always searched for, particularly in the presence of insomnia unresponsive to treatment with common hypnotic drugs. Citation: Manconi M; Ferini-Strambi L; Filippi M; Bonanni E; Iudice A; Murri L; Gigli GL; Fratticci L; Merlino G; Terzano G; Granella F; Parrino L; Silvestri R; Aricò I; Dattola V; Russo G; Luongo

  9. Cutaneous Human Papillomaviruses and Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Skin: Nested Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Faust, Helena; Andersson, Kristin; Luostarinen, Tapio; Gislefoss, Randi E; Dillner, Joakim

    2016-04-01

    Cutaneous human papillomavirus (HPV) types have been associated with non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), including a previous nested case-control study using HPV serology with bacterially derived fusion proteins with the major HPV capsid protein L1 (GST-L1). However, HPV serology using conformationally intact pseudovirions has been shown to correlate better with natural infection. Prospective studies using a more valid marker of infection are therefore warranted. Cancer registry follow-up of large Nordic biobanks identified prediagnostic serum samples from 633 subjects who later developed SCC, 1,990 subjects who developed basal cell carcinoma (BCC). The samples from cases and matched controls were tested for IgG to pseudovirions to 16 different HPV types (3, 5, 6, 11, 15: , 16, 18, 31, 32, 33, 38: , 45, 52, 58, 68, and 76: ) and two polyomaviruses (MCPyV and JCPyV). Baseline seropositivity was not associated with SCC risk, and there were only weak associations with BCC risk [HPV-5 (OR, 1.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0-1.3), HPV-15 (OR, 1.2; 95% CI, 1.0-1.4), HPV-38 (OR, 1.2; 95% CI, 1.0-1.3), and MCPyV (OR, 1.1; 95% CI, 1.0-1.3)]. Acquisition of HPV-5 seropositivity during follow-up was associated with SCC risk (OR, 3.2; 95% CI, 1.3-7.6). Persistent seropositivity for HPV-15 was weakly associated with BCC (OR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.0-1.9) and HPV-6 antibody persistence was weakly associated with SCC (OR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.0-4.8). Considering the large number of viruses tested, the weak associations found do not support any strong links between studied HPV and NMSC, with the possible exception of HPV-5 seroconversion and SCC. Known alpha and beta papillomaviruses do not appear to be risk factors for NMSC. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(4); 721-4. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. Challenges in Recruiting Aging Women Holocaust Survivors to a Case Control Study of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Vin-Raviv, Neomi; Dekel, Rachel; Barchana, Micha; Linn, Shai; Keinan-Boker, Lital

    2015-01-01

    Older adults are underrepresented in medical research for many reasons, including recruitment difficulties. Recruitment of older adults for research studies is often a time-consuming process and can be more challenging when the study involves older adults with unique exposures to traumatic events and from minority groups. The current article provides a brief overview of (a) challenges encountered while recruiting aging women Holocaust survivors for a case control study and (b) strategies used for meeting those challenges. The case group comprised women Holocaust survivors who were recently diagnosed with breast cancer and the control group comprised healthy women from a Holocaust-survivor community in Israel.

  11. Design and methods in a multi-center case-control interview study.

    PubMed Central

    Hartge, P; Cahill, J I; West, D; Hauck, M; Austin, D; Silverman, D; Hoover, R

    1984-01-01

    We conducted a case-control study in ten areas of the United States in which a total of 2,982 bladder cancer patients and 5,782 population controls were interviewed. We employed a variety of existing and new techniques to reduce bias and to monitor the quality of data collected. We review here many of the design elements and field methods that can be generally applied in epidemiologic studies, particularly multi-center interview studies, and explain the reasons for our selection of the methods, instruments, and procedures used. PMID:6689843

  12. Serum vitamin D concentration and prostate cancer risk: a nested case-control study.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jiyoung; Peters, Ulrike; Albanes, Demetrius; Purdue, Mark P; Abnet, Christian C; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Horst, Ronald L; Hollis, Bruce W; Huang, Wen-Yi; Shikany, James M; Hayes, Richard B

    2008-06-04

    Epidemiological studies have yielded inconsistent associations between vitamin D status and prostate cancer risk, and few studies have evaluated whether the associations vary by disease aggressiveness. We investigated the association between vitamin D status, as determined by serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] level, and risk of prostate cancer in a case-control study nested within the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial. The study included 749 case patients with incident prostate cancer who were diagnosed 1-8 years after blood draw and 781 control subjects who were frequency matched by age at cohort entry, time since initial screening, and calendar year of cohort entry. All study participants were selected from the trial screening arm (which includes annual standardized prostate cancer screening). Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) by quintile of season-standardized serum 25(OH)D concentration. Statistical tests were two-sided. No statistically significant trend in overall prostate cancer risk was observed with increasing season-standardized serum 25(OH)D level. However, serum 25(OH)D concentrations greater than the lowest quintile (Q1) were associated with increased risk of aggressive (Gleason sum > or = 7 or clinical stage III or IV) disease (in a model adjusting for matching factors, study center, and history of diabetes, ORs for Q2 vs Q1 = 1.20, 95% CI = 0.80 to 1.81, for Q3 vs Q1 =1.96, 95% CI = 1.34 to 2.87, for Q4 vs Q1 = 1.61, 95% CI = 1.09 to 2.38, and for Q5 vs Q1 = 1.37, 95% CI = 0.92 to 2.05; P(trend) = .05). The rates of aggressive prostate cancer for increasing quintiles of serum 25(OH)D were 406, 479, 780, 633, and 544 per 100 000 person-years. In exploratory analyses, these associations with aggressive disease were consistent across subgroups defined by age, family history of prostate cancer, diabetes, body mass index, vigorous

  13. Effectiveness of reactive oral cholera vaccination in rural Haiti: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Ivers, Louise C; Hilaire, Isabelle J; Teng, Jessica E; Almazor, Charles P; Jerome, J Gregory; Ternier, Ralph; Boncy, Jacques; Buteau, Josiane; Murray, Megan B; Harris, Jason B; Franke, Molly F

    2015-01-01

    Background Between April and June 2012, a reactive cholera vaccination campaign was conducted in Haiti using an oral inactivated bivalent whole-cell vaccine (BivWC). Methods We conducted a case-control study to estimate field effectiveness of the vaccine. Cases had acute watery diarrhea, sought treatment at one of three participating cholera treatment units from October 24, 2012 through March 9, 2014, and had a stool sample positive for cholera by culture. For each case, four controls (individuals who did not seek treatment for acute watery diarrhea) were matched by location of residence, calendar time, and age. We also conducted a bias-indicator case-control study to assess the likelihood of bias in the vaccine effectiveness (VE) study. Findings During the study period, 114 eligible individuals presented with acute watery diarrhea and were enrolled. 47 were analyzed as cases in the VE case-control study and 42 as cases in the bias-indicator study. In multivariable analyses, VE was 63% [95% confidence interval (CI): 8%–85%] by self-reported vaccination and 58% [95% CI: 13%–80%] for verified vaccination. Neither self-reported nor verified vaccination was significantly associated with non-cholera diarrhea (VE: 18% [95% CI: −208%–−78%] by self-report and −21% [95%CI: −238%–57%] for verified vaccination). Interpretation BivWC oral cholera vaccine was effective in protecting against cholera in Haiti during the study period –from 4 through 24 months after vaccination. Vaccination is an important component of epidemic cholera control efforts. Funding National Institutes of Health, Delivering Oral Vaccines Effectively project, Department of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School. PMID:25701994

  14. Study of environmental and genetic factors in children with craniosynostosis: A case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Barik, Mayadhar; Bajpai, Minu; Das, Rashmi Ranjan; Panda, Shasanka Shekhar

    2013-01-01

    Background: Craniosynostosis is a congenital defect that causes one or more sutures on an infant's skull to close earlier than normal. Though both genetic and environmental factors play a role in its pathogenesis, there is no published Indian data to verify this. Materials and Methods: In this case-control study, we investigated the association of craniosynostosis with parental age in 50 children with craniosynostosis attending the surgical outpatient department of a tertiary care institution in North India. Results: There was a significant association of craniosynostosis with advanced parental [OR 2.17 (95% CI 1.08 to 4.36)] but not maternal age. Education status of parents also revealed that those having a higher education had an increased risk of having a child with craniosynostosis [maternal education, OR 2.32 (95% CI 1.2 to 4.76); paternal education, OR 2.51 (95% CI 1.21 to 5.0)]. Molecular analysis by sequencing confirmed following amino-acid substitution in different Exons of the FGFR2 gene. Besides these, we found other novel identical mutations in FGFR2 gene in both syndromic and non-syndromic craniosynostoses. Conclusion: This is the first epidemiological study in India that provides evidence that, advanced paternal age and higher parental education level might be associated with an increased risk of craniosynostosis. New mutations were identified in cases of both syndromic and non-syndromic craniosynostosis. PMID:24082921

  15. Residential magnetic fields exposure and childhood leukemia: a population-based case-control study in California.

    PubMed

    Kheifets, Leeka; Crespi, Catherine M; Hooper, Chris; Cockburn, Myles; Amoon, Aryana T; Vergara, Ximena P

    2017-09-12

    Studies have reported an increased risk of childhood leukemia associated with exposure to magnetic fields. We conducted a large records-based case-control study of childhood leukemia risk and exposure to magnetic fields from power lines in California. The study included 5,788 childhood leukemia cases (born in and diagnosed in California 1986-2008) matched to population-based controls on age and sex. We calculated magnetic fields at birth addresses using geographic information systems, aerial imagery, historical information on load and phasing, and site visits. Based on unconditional logistic regression controlling for age, sex, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status using subjects geocoded to a basic standard of accuracy, we report a slight risk deficit in two intermediate exposure groups and a small excess risk in the highest exposure group (odds ratio of 1.50 (95% confidence interval [0.70, 3.23])). Subgroup and sensitivity analyses as well as matched analyses gave similar results. All estimates had wide confidence intervals. Our large, statewide, record-based case-control study of childhood leukemia in California does not in itself provide clear evidence of risk associated with greater exposure to magnetic fields from power lines, but could be viewed as consistent with previous findings of increased risk.

  16. Risk factors for femicide-suicide in abusive relationships: results from a multisite case control study.

    PubMed

    Koziol-McLain, Jane; Webster, Daniel; McFarlane, Judith; Block, Carolyn Rebecca; Ulrich, Yvonne; Glass, Nancy; Campbell, Jacquelyn C

    2006-02-01

    The killing of women by men who then take their own lives (femicide-suicide) is the most common form of homicide-suicide. This study identified femicide-suicide risk factors in an 11-city case-control study of femicide in the United States. Perpetrator, victim, relationship, and incident characteristics were analyzed for femicide-suicide cases (n = 67) and controls (n = 356, women living in the community with nonfatal physical abuse) using logistic regression modeling. Two risk factors emerged that were unique to femicide-suicides cases compared to overall femicide risk analyses: prior perpetrator suicide threats and victims having ever been married to the perpetrator.

  17. An alternative experimental case-control design for genetic association studies on bovine mastitis.

    PubMed

    Biffani, S; Del Corvo, M; Capoferri, R; Pedretti, A; Luini, M; Williams, J L; Pagnacco, G; Minvielle, F; Minozzi, G

    2017-04-01

    The possibility of using genetic control strategies to increase disease resistance to infectious diseases relies on the identification of markers to include in the breeding plans. Possible incomplete exposure of mastitis-free (control) animals, however, is a major issue to find relevant markers in genetic association studies for infectious diseases. Usually, designs based on elite dairy sires are used in association studies, but an epidemiological case-control strategy, based on cows repeatedly field-tested could be an alternative for disease traits. To test this hypothesis, genetic association results obtained in the present work from a cohort of Italian Holstein cows tested for mastitis over time were compared with those from a previous genome-wide scan on Italian Holstein sires genotyped with 50k single nucleotide polymorphisms for de-regressed estimated breeding values for somatic cell counts (SCCs) on Bos taurus autosome (BTA6) and BTA14. A total of 1121 cows were selected for the case-control approach (cases=550, controls=571), on a combination of herd level of SCC incidence and of within herd individual level of SCC. The association study was conducted on nine previously identified markers, six on BTA6 and four on BTA14, using the R statistical environment with the 'qtscore' function of the GenABEL package, on high/low adjusted linear score as a binomial trait. The results obtained in the cow cohort selected on epidemiological information were in agreement with those obtained from the previous sire genome-wide association study (GWAS). Six out of the nine markers showed significant association, four on BTA14 (rs109146371, rs109234250, rs109421300, rs109162116) and two on BTA6 (rs110527224 and rs42766480). Most importantly, using mastitis as a case study, the current work further validated the alternative use of historical field disease data in case-control designs for genetic analysis of infectious diseases in livestock.

  18. Case-control study of high risk occupations for bladder cancer in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Dryson, Evan; 't Mannetje, Andrea; Walls, Chris; McLean, Dave; McKenzie, Fiona; Maule, Milena; Cheng, Soo; Cunningham, Chris; Kromhout, Hans; Boffetta, Paolo; Blair, Aaron; Pearce, Neil

    2008-03-15

    We conducted a nationwide case-control study of bladder cancer in adult New Zealanders to identify occupations that may contribute to the risk of bladder cancer in the New Zealand population. A total of 213 incident cases of bladder cancer (age 25-70 years) notified to the New Zealand Cancer Registry during 2003 and 2004, and 471 population controls, were interviewed face-to-face. The questionnaire collected demographic information and a full occupational history. The relative risks for bladder cancer associated with ever being employed in particular occupations and industries were calculated by unconditional logistic regression adjusting for age, sex, smoking and socio-economic status. Estimates were subsequently semi-Bayes adjusted to account for the large number of occupations and industries being considered. An elevated bladder cancer risk was observed for hairdressers (odds ratio (OR) 9.15 95% Confidence Interval (95%CI) 1.60-62.22), and sewing machinists (OR 3.07 95%CI 1.35-6.96). Significantly increased risks were not observed for several other occupations that have been reported in previous studies, including sales assistants (OR 1.03 95%CI 0.64-1.67), painters and paperhangers (OR 1.42 95%CI 0.56-3.60), sheet metal workers (OR 0.39, 95%CI 0.15-1.00), printing trades workers (OR 1.11 95%CI 0.41-3.05) and truck drivers (OR 1.36 95%CI 0.60-3.09), although the elevated odds ratios for painters, printers and truck drivers are consistent with excesses observed in other studies. Nonsignificantly increased risks were observed for tailors and dressmakers (OR 2.84 95%CI 0.62-13.05), rubber and plastics products machine operators (OR 2.82 95%CI 0.75-10.67), building workers (OR 2.15, 95%CI 0.68-6.73), and female market farmers and crop growers (OR 2.05 95%CI 0.72-5.83). In conclusion, this study has confirmed that hairdressers and sewing machinists are high risk occupations for bladder cancer in New Zealand, and has identified several other occupations and industries

  19. Leukaemia incidence among workers in the shoe and boot manufacturing industry: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Forand, Steven P

    2004-08-30

    Previous reports have indicated an excess of leukaemia in Broome County, New York, particularly in the Town of Union. Surveillance of cancer incidence data indicates that a large proportion of these cases occurred among males ages 65 and older. Shoe and boot manufacturing has been the largest single industry in this area throughout much of the past century. Occupational studies from Europe suggest a link between leukaemia and employment in the shoe and boot manufacturing industry. However, researchers have not found a positive association between leukaemia and employment in the shoe industry among workers in the United States. A matched case-control study was conducted to investigate the association between leukaemia incidence among males 65 and older and employment in the shoe and boot manufacturing industry. Thirty-six cases of leukaemia occurring between 1981-1990; among males age 65 and older; residing in the town of Union met the study case criteria. Death certificates were obtained for each of the cases. These were matched to death certificates of 144 controls on date of death and date of birth +/- 1 year. Death certificates were then examined to determine the employer and occupation of each study subject. Conditional logistic regression was used to determine the risk of leukaemia among those working in the industry. The risk of both leukaemia (OR = 1.47; 95% CI 0.70, 3.09) and acute myeloid leukaemia (OR = 1.19; 95% CI 0.33, 4.28) were elevated among those employed in the shoe and boot manufacturing industry, however neither was statistically significant. The results, though suggestive of an association between leukaemia and employment in the shoe and boot manufacturing industry, were not statistically conclusive due mainly to limited study power. Several additional limitations may also have prevented the observance of more conclusive findings. Better exposure assessment, information on length of exposure and types of job held, control of confounding factors

  20. Bayesian analysis of genetic interactions in case-control studies, with application to adiponectin genes and colorectal cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Yi, Nengjun; Kaklamani, Virginia G; Pasche, Boris

    2011-01-01

    Complex diseases such as cancers are influenced by interacting networks of genetic and environmental factors. However, a joint analysis of multiple genes and environmental factors is challenging, owing to potentially large numbers of correlated and complex variables. We describe Bayesian generalized linear models for simultaneously analyzing covariates, main effects of numerous loci, gene-gene and gene-environment interactions in population case-control studies. Our Bayesian models use Student-t prior distributions with different shrinkage parameters for different types of effects, allowing reliable estimates of main effects and interactions and hence increasing the power for detection of real signals. We implement a fast and stable algorithm for fitting models by extending available tools for classical generalized linear models to the Bayesian case. We propose a novel method to interpret and visualize models with multiple interactions by computing the average predictive probability. Simulations show that the method has the potential to dissect interacting networks of complex diseases. Application of the method to a large case-control study of adiponectin genes and colorectal cancer risk highlights the previous results and detects new epistatic interactions and sex-specific effects that warrant follow-up in independent studies.

  1. A population-based case-control study of radiofrequency exposure in relation to childhood neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Li, Chung-Yi; Liu, Chih-Ching; Chang, Ya-Hui; Chou, Li-Ping; Ko, Ming-Chung

    2012-10-01

    This population-based case-control study in Taiwan considered incident cases aged 15 years or less and admitted in 2003 to 2007 for all neoplasm (ICD-9-CM: 140-239) (n=2606), including 939 leukemia and 394 brain neoplasm cases. Controls were randomly selected, with a case/control ratio of 1:30 and matched on year of birth, from all non-neoplasm children insured in the same year when the index case was admitted. Annual summarized power (ASP, watt-year) was calculated for each of the 71,185 mobile phone base stations (MPBS) in service between 1998 and 2007. Then, the annual power density (APD, watt-year/km(2)) of each township (n=367) was computed as a ratio of the total ASP of all MPBS in a township to the area of that particular township. Exposure of each study subject to radio frequency (RF) was indicated by the averaged APD within 5 years prior to the neoplasm diagnosis (cases) or July 1st of the year when the index case was admitted (controls) in the township where the subject lived. Unconditional logistic regression model with generalized estimation equation was employed to calculate the covariate-adjusted odds ratio [AOR] of childhood neoplasm in relation to RF exposure. A higher than median averaged APD (approximately 168 WYs/km(2)) was significantly associated with an increased AOR for all neoplasms (1.13; 1.01 to 1.28), but not for leukemia (1.23; 0.99 to 1.52) or brain neoplasm (1.14, 0.83 to 1.55). This study noted a significantly increased risk of all neoplasms in children with higher-than-median RF exposure to MPBS. The slightly elevated risk was seen for leukemia and brain neoplasm, but was not statistically significant. These results may occur due to several methodological limitations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Random and systematic errors in case-control studies calculating the injury risk of driving under the influence of psychoactive substances.

    PubMed

    Houwing, Sjoerd; Hagenzieker, Marjan; Mathijssen, René P M; Legrand, Sara-Ann; Verstraete, Alain G; Hels, Tove; Bernhoft, Inger Marie; Simonsen, Kirsten Wiese; Lillsunde, Pirjo; Favretto, Donata; Ferrara, Santo D; Caplinskiene, Marija; Movig, Kris L L; Brookhuis, Karel A

    2013-03-01

    Between 2006 and 2010, six population based case-control studies were conducted as part of the European research-project DRUID (DRiving Under the Influence of Drugs, alcohol and medicines). The aim of these case-control studies was to calculate odds ratios indicating the relative risk of serious injury in car crashes. The calculated odds ratios in these studies showed large variations, despite the use of uniform guidelines for the study designs. The main objective of the present article is to provide insight into the presence of random and systematic errors in the six DRUID case-control studies. Relevant information was gathered from the DRUID-reports for eleven indicators for errors. The results showed that differences between the odds ratios in the DRUID case-control studies may indeed be (partially) explained by random and systematic errors. Selection bias and errors due to small sample sizes and cell counts were the most frequently observed errors in the six DRUID case-control studies. Therefore, it is recommended that epidemiological studies that assess the risk of psychoactive substances in traffic pay specific attention to avoid these potential sources of random and systematic errors. The list of indicators that was identified in this study is useful both as guidance for systematic reviews and meta-analyses and for future epidemiological studies in the field of driving under the influence to minimize sources of errors already at the start of the study.

  3. Intrauterine exposure to carbamazepine and specific congenital malformations: systematic review and case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Jentink, Janneke; Dolk, Helen; Loane, Maria A; Morris, Joan K; Wellesley, Diana; Garne, Ester

    2010-01-01

    Objective To identify specific major congenital malformations associated with use of carbamazepine in the first trimester of pregnancy. Design A review of all published cohort studies to identify key indications and a population based case-control study to test these indications. Setting Review of PubMed, Web of Science, and Embase for papers about carbamazepine exposure in the first trimester of pregnancy and specific malformations, and the EUROCAT Antiepileptic Study Database, including data from 19 European population based congenital anomaly registries, 1995-2005. Participants The literature review covered eight cohort studies of 2680 pregnancies with carbamazepine monotherapy exposure, and the EUROCAT dataset included 98 075 registrations of malformations covering over 3.8 million births. Main outcome measures Overall prevalence for a major congenital malformation after exposure to carbamazepine monotherapy in the first trimester. Odds ratios for malformations with exposure to carbamazepine among cases (five types of malformation identified in the literature review) compared with two groups of controls: other non-chromosomal registrations of malformations and chromosomal syndromes. Results The literature review yielded an overall prevalence for a major congenital malformation of 3.3% (95% confidence interval 2.7 to 4.2) after exposure to carbamazepine monotherapy in the first trimester. In 131 registrations of malformations, the fetus had been exposed to carbamazepine monotherapy. Spina bifida was the only specific major congenital malformation significantly associated with exposure to carbamazepine monotherapy (odds ratio 2.6 (95% confidence interval 1.2 to 5.3) compared with no antiepileptic drug), but the risk was smaller for carbamazepine than for valproic acid (0.2, 0.1 to 0.6). There was no evidence for an association with total anomalous pulmonary venous return (no cases with carbamazepine exposure), cleft lip (with or without palate) (0.2, 0.0 to 1

  4. Efficacy and safety of Innoseal for air leak after pulmonary resection: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Petrella, Francesco; Borri, Alessandro; Brambilla, Daniela; Calanca, Giorgio; Vezzani, Nicola; Colantoni, Antonio; Gasparetto, Adolfo; Spaggiari, Lorenzo

    2016-11-01

    Prolonged air leak is one of the most common complications after lung surgery and the cause of prolonged hospital stay frequently associated with major postoperative morbidity and thus responsible for even higher hospital costs. This case-control study was designed to test the sealing efficacy and safety of Enable-Innoseal TP4 in patients undergoing pulmonary resection for lung cancer. This was a case-control trial enrolling patients with primary or single site metastatic lung cancer scheduled for elective anatomic or nonanatomic pulmonary resection presenting intraoperative grade 1 or 2 air leak at water submersion test; the study group population was then matched 1:1 according to surgical procedure, male/female ratio, preoperative FEV1, and age. In the study population, 21 patients (70.0%) presented intraoperative grade 1 air leak and 9 patients grade 2 (30.0%) air leak; after comparison with the control group, we observed a significant shorter time for chest drain removal in the study population (P = 0.0050), whereas no difference was registered in terms of number of days needing for discharge (P = 0.0762). Enable-Innoseal TP4 was effective in treating limited intraoperative air leaks after pulmonary resection and preventing prolonged postoperative air leaks in patients receiving either anatomic or nonanatomic lung resections. Further randomized double-arm studies are required to confirm the efficacy of Enable-Innoseal TP4 demonstrated by this pilot study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Gastric cancer and coal mine dust exposure. A case-control study

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, R.G.

    1983-10-01

    Based on evidence that coal miners have elevated gastric cancer mortality rates, a case-control study was developed to assess the gastric cancer risk of coal mine dust exposure. Forty-six cases of US white male gastric cancer deaths from NIOSH coal miner cohorts were individually matched by age to controls. From these data we show that a statistically elevated gastric cancer risk exists for miners who have prolonged exposure to coal mine dust and prolonged exposure to cigarette smoke. Coal workers' pneumoconiosis, a disease defined in terms of coal dust deposition in the lungs, was not found to be a gastric cancer risk.

  6. Consumption of dairy produce and alcohol in a case-control study of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lê, M G; Moulton, L H; Hill, C; Kramar, A

    1986-09-01

    In a French case-control study of 1,010 breast cancer cases and 1,950 controls with nonmalignant diseases, the risk of breast cancer was found to be positively associated with frequency of cheese consumption and the level of fat in the milk consumed. A negative association was found between frequency of yogurt consumption and the risk of breast cancer. No association was found between the consumption of butter and the risk of breast cancer. The positive association between a daily consumption of alcohol and the risk of breast cancer previously reported was not altered when dairy produce consumption was taken into account.

  7. [Recurrent myocardial infarctions: specific changes in biomarkers and in myocardial remodeling (case-control study)].

    PubMed

    Volkova, E G; Malykhina, O P; Levashov, S Iu

    2007-01-01

    Basing on a case-control study (n=81) with the use of standard methods of myocardial infarction verification, examination of hemogram, troponin T, C-reactive protein, echocardiography data it was established that markers of myocardial infarction (troponin T level) and inflammation (C reactive protein level, lymphopenia) during recurrent infarctions are less pronounced than during first infarctions. Remodeling in recurrent infarctions had the following specific characteristics: increase of left ventricular end diastolic dimension, myocardial mass index, diastolic dysfunction and stroke volume with unchanged ejection fraction.

  8. Comparison of racial differences in childhood cancer risk in case-control studies and population-based cancer registries.

    PubMed

    Slusky, Danna A; Mezei, Gabor; Metayer, Catherine; Selvin, Steve; Von Behren, Julie; Buffler, Patricia A

    2012-02-01

    Although selection bias in case-control studies has been studied extensively, little is known about selection of cases and controls among various ethnic groups. This study compares racial differences in childhood cancer rates as estimated by case-control studies with various design features. It also compares estimates of racial distribution among cases as reported by case-control studies to those observed for an ideal case series with complete ascertainment of cases for these studies or in population-based cancer registries in corresponding geographic regions and calendar periods. Peer-reviewed publications on childhood leukemia and brain tumors from North America, published between 1980 and 2007, were reviewed. Incidence data by race/ethnicity were compiled from research publications, federal cancer statistics, and cancer registries. Meta-analysis was conducted to assess racial/ethnic differences by study characteristics. Racial distributions of cases from published case-control studies were compared to those of a presumably noncensored case distribution (i.e. include both participating and non-participating cases in a case-control study) or cases recorded by cancer registries. In interview-based case-control studies of childhood cancer, the proportion of Whites compared to non-Whites tended to be higher among controls than among cases; however, the opposite was true for record-based case-control studies. Additionally, the proportion of Whites tended to be higher among the participating cases in the published case-control studies compared to the proportion of Whites among the non-participating cases or in cancer registries. Investigators need to consider differential participation by racial group as a potential source of bias in the interpretation of case-control study results. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Fetal growth and risk of stillbirth: a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Radek; Hansen, Nellie I; Willinger, Marian; Reddy, Uma M; Parker, Corette B; Pinar, Halit; Silver, Robert M; Dudley, Donald J; Stoll, Barbara J; Saade, George R; Koch, Matthew A; Rowland Hogue, Carol J; Varner, Michael W; Conway, Deborah L; Coustan, Donald; Goldenberg, Robert L

    2014-04-01

    Stillbirth is strongly related to impaired fetal growth. However, the relationship between fetal growth and stillbirth is difficult to determine because of uncertainty in the timing of death and confounding characteristics affecting normal fetal growth. We conducted a population-based case-control study of all stillbirths and a representative sample of live births in 59 hospitals in five geographic areas in the US. Fetal growth abnormalities were categorized as small for gestational age (SGA) (<10th percentile) or large for gestational age (LGA) (>90th percentile) at death (stillbirth) or delivery (live birth) using population, ultrasound, and individualized norms. Gestational age at death was determined using an algorithm that considered the time-of-death interval, postmortem examination, and reliability of the gestational age estimate. Data were weighted to account for the sampling design and differential participation rates in various subgroups. Among 527 singleton stillbirths and 1,821 singleton live births studied, stillbirth was associated with SGA based on population, ultrasound, and individualized norms (odds ratio [OR] [95% CI]: 3.0 [2.2 to 4.0]; 4.7 [3.7 to 5.9]; 4.6 [3.6 to 5.9], respectively). LGA was also associated with increased risk of stillbirth using ultrasound and individualized norms (OR [95% CI]: 3.5 [2.4 to 5.0]; 2.3 [1.7 to 3.1], respectively), but not population norms (OR [95% CI]: 0.6 [0.4 to 1.0]). The associations were stronger with more severe SGA and LGA (<5th and >95th percentile). Analyses adjusted for stillbirth risk factors, subset analyses excluding potential confounders, and analyses in preterm and term pregnancies showed similar patterns of association. In this study 70% of cases and 63% of controls agreed to participate. Analysis weights accounted for differences between consenting and non-consenting women. Some of the characteristics used for individualized fetal growth estimates were missing and were replaced with reference

  10. Spatial variation in mortality risk for hematological malignancies near a petrochemical refinery: A population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Di Salvo, Francesca; Meneghini, Elisabetta; Vieira, Veronica; Baili, Paolo; Mariottini, Mauro; Baldini, Marco; Micheli, Andrea; Sant, Milena

    2015-07-01

    The study investigated the geographic variation of mortality risk for hematological malignancies (HMs) in order to identify potential high-risk areas near an Italian petrochemical refinery. A population-based case-control study was conducted and residential histories for 171 cases and 338 sex- and age-matched controls were collected. Confounding factors were obtained from interviews with consenting relatives for 109 HM deaths and 267 controls. To produce risk mortality maps, two different approaches were applied and compared. We mapped (1) adaptive kernel density relative risk estimation for case-control studies which estimates a spatial relative risk function using the ratio between cases and controls' densities, and (2) estimated odds ratios for case-control study data using Generalized Additive Models (GAMs) to smooth the effect of location, a proxy for exposure, while adjusting for confounding variables. No high-risk areas for HM mortality were identified among all subjects (men and women combined), by applying both approaches. Using the adaptive KDE approach, we found a significant increase in death risk only among women in a large area 2-6 km southeast of the refinery and the application of GAMs also identified a similarly-located significant high-risk area among women only (global p-value<0.025). Potential confounding risk factors we considered in the GAM did not alter the results. Both approaches identified a high-risk area close to the refinery among women only. Those spatial methods are useful tools for public policy management to determine priority areas for intervention. Our findings suggest several directions for further research in order to identify other potential environmental exposures that may be assessed in forthcoming studies based on detailed exposure modeling. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Spatial variation in mortality risk for haematological malignancies near a petrochemical refinery: a population-based case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Di Salvo, Francesca; Meneghini, Elisabetta; Vieira, Veronica; Baili, Paolo; Mariottini, Mauro; Baldini, Marco; Micheli, Andrea; Sant, Milena

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The study investigated the geographic variation of mortality risk for hematological malignancies (HMs) in order to identify potential high-risk areas near an Italian petrochemical refinery. Material and methods A population-based case-control study was conducted and residential histories for 171 cases and 338 sex- and age-matched controls were collected. Confounding factors were obtained from interviews with consenting relatives for 109 HM deaths and 267 controls. To produce risk mortality maps, two different approaches were applied. We mapped (1) adptive kernel density relative risk estimation (KDE) for case-control studies which estimates a spatial relative risk function using the ratio between cases and controls’ densities, and (2) estimated odds ratios for case-control study data using generalized additive models (GAMs) to smooth the effect of location, a proxy for exposure, while adjusting for confounding variables. Results No high-risk areas for HM mortality were identified among all subjects (men and women combined), by applying both approaches. Using the adaptive KDE approach, we found a significant increase in death risk only among women in a large area 2–6 km southeast of the refinery and the application of GAMs also identified a similarly-located significant high-risk area among women only (global p-value<0.025). Potential confounding risk factors we considered in the GAM did not alter the results. Conclusion Both approaches identified a high-risk area close to the refinery among women only. Those spatial methods are useful tools for public policy management to determine priority areas for intervention. Our findings suggest several directions for further research in order to identify other potential environmental exposures that may be assessed in forthcoming studies based on detailed exposure modeling. PMID:26073202

  12. Results of case-control studies support the association between contact lens use and Acanthamoeba keratitis.

    PubMed

    Pacella, Elena; La Torre, Giuseppe; De Giusti, Maria; Brillante, Chiara; Lombardi, Anna Maria; Smaldone, Gianpaolo; Lenzi, Tommaso; Pacella, Fernanda

    2013-01-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) is ever more frequently reported in industrialized countries. The loss of the corneal surface integrity consequent to secondary microtrauma produced by the use of contact lens (CL) favors the penetration of the parasite into the corneal tissue. A scientific review was performed to investigate the association of CL wear as an Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) risk factor. A computerized screening of 7834 Medline articles (4623 from PubMed; 3211 from Scopus) used a strict selection criteria of case-control studies involving CL wear and/or trauma. The search yielded five case-control studies published from 1995 to 2012. All studies included showed a statistically significant positive association between AK and CL use, with a combined odds ratio (OR) of 10.21 (95%, confidence intervals [CI]; 3.57-27.64). All studies included showed a statistically significant positive association between AK and CL use, though with differing OR values. Though rare, AK should be held in higher consideration when ophthalmologists are faced with CL users exhibiting simplex-like lesions associated with circular stromal infiltrates and disproportionate ocular pain in respect to the objective clinical picture.

  13. A Case-Control Study of Risk Factors for Salivary Gland Cancer in Canada

    PubMed Central

    de Groh, Margaret; Morrison, Howard

    2017-01-01

    Aim. To assess the effect of various lifestyle risk factors on the risk of salivary gland cancer in Canada using data from a population-based case-control study. Methods. Data from a population-based case-control study of 132 incident cases of salivary gland cancer and 3076 population controls were collected through self-administered questionnaire and analysed using unconditional logistic regression. Results. Four or more servings/week of processed meat product was associated with an adjusted odds ratio (OR) and corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) of 1.62 (1.02–2.58). Nonsignificantly increased ORs were also related to obesity, >7 drinks/week of alcohol consumption, and occupational exposure to radiation. Furthermore, nonsignificantly decreased ORs were found to be associated with high education level (>12 years) (OR = 0.65), high consumption of spinach/squash (OR = 0.62) and all vegetables/vegetable juices (OR = 0.75), and >30 sessions/month of recreational physical activity (OR = 0.78). Conclusions. This study suggests positive associations with consumption of processed meat, smoking, obesity, alcohol drinking, and occupational exposure to radiation as well as negative associations with higher education, consumption of spinach/squash, and physical activity, which suggest a role of lifestyle factors in the etiology of salivary gland cancer. However, these findings were based on small number of cases and were nonsignificant. Further larger studies are warranted to confirm our findings. PMID:28133481

  14. [Relations between extraction of wisdom teeth and temporomandibular disorders: a case/control study].

    PubMed

    Duval, Florian; Leroux, Agathe; Bertaud, Valérie; Meary, Fleur; Le Padellec, Clément; Refuveille, Laura; Lemaire, Arnaud; Sorel, Olivier; Chauvel-Lebret, Dominique

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of extraction of third molars on the occurrence of temporo-mandibular disorders (TMD). A review of the literature and a case-control study have been conducted. The case-control study compares the frequency of extraction of third molars between the sample with TMD (case) and the sample without TMD (control). The proportion of patients who had undergone extractions of wisdom teeth was higher in the case group than in the control group. The difference was statistically significant when patients had undergone extraction of all four wisdom teeth or when the extraction of four wisdom teeth underwent in one sitting or under general anesthesia. The study of patients in case sample shows that all signs of TMD were more common in patients who had undergone extractions in several sessions and under local anesthesia. The temporomandibular joint sounds are significantly more frequent with local anesthesia. In the case group, 85 to 92% of patients have parafunctions and 5 to 11% have malocclusion. This demonstrates the multifactorial etiology of temporomandibular disorders.

  15. Diagnostic Microbiologic Methods in the GEMS-1 Case/Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Panchalingam, Sandra; Antonio, Martin; Hossain, Anowar; Mandomando, Inacio; Ochieng, Ben; Oundo, Joseph; Ramamurthy, T.; Tamboura, Boubou; Zaidi, Anita K. M.; Petri, William; Houpt, Eric; Murray, Patrick; Prado, Valeria; Vidal, Roberto; Steele, Duncan; Strockbine, Nancy; Sansonetti, Philippe; Glass, Roger I.; Robins-Browne, Roy M.; Tauschek, Marija; Svennerholm, Ann-Marie; Kotloff, Karen; Levine, Myron M.; Nataro, James P.

    2012-01-01

    To understand the etiology of moderate-to-severe diarrhea among children in high mortality areas of sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia, we performed a comprehensive case/control study of children aged <5 years at 7 sites. Each site employed an identical case/control study design and each utilized a uniform comprehensive set of microbiological assays to identify the likely bacterial, viral and protozoal etiologies. The selected assays effected a balanced consideration of cost, robustness and performance, and all assays were performed at the study sites. Identification of bacterial pathogens employed streamlined conventional bacteriologic biochemical and serological algorithms. Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli were identified by application of a multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay for enterotoxigenic, enteroaggregative, and enteropathogenic E. coli. Rotavirus, adenovirus, Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia enterica, and Cryptosporidium species were detected by commercially available enzyme immunoassays on stool samples. Samples positive for adenovirus were further evaluated for adenovirus serotypes 40 and 41. We developed a novel multiplex assay to detect norovirus (types 1 and 2), astrovirus, and sapovirus. The portfolio of diagnostic assays used in the GEMS study can be broadly applied in developing countries seeking robust cost-effective methods for enteric pathogen detection. PMID:23169941

  16. Rethinking sources of representative controls for the conduct of case-control studies in minority populations.

    PubMed

    Bandera, Elisa V; Chandran, Urmila; Zirpoli, Gary; McCann, Susan E; Ciupak, Gregory; Ambrosone, Christine B

    2013-05-31

    Recruitment of controls remains a challenge in case-control studies and particularly in studies involving minority populations. We compared characteristics of controls recruited through random digit dialing (RDD) to those of community controls enrolled through churches, health events and other outreach sources among women of African ancestry (AA) participating in the Women's Circle of Health Study, a case-control study of breast cancer. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were also computed using unconditional logistic regression to evaluate the impact of including the community controls for selected variables relevant to breast cancer and for which there were significant differences in distribution between the two control groups. Compared to community controls (n=347), RDD controls (n=207) had more years of education and higher income, lower body mass index, were more likely to have private insurance, and less likely to be single. While the percentage of nulliparous women in the two groups was similar, community controls tended to have more children, have their first child at a younger age, and were less likely to breastfeed their children. Dietary intake was similar in the two groups. Compared to census data, the combination of RDD and community controls seems to be more representative of the general population than RDD controls alone. Furthermore, the inclusion of the community group had little impact on the magnitude of risk estimates for most variables, while enhancing statistical power. Community-based recruitment was found to be an efficient and feasible method to recruit AA controls.

  17. Diagnostic microbiologic methods in the GEMS-1 case/control study.

    PubMed

    Panchalingam, Sandra; Antonio, Martin; Hossain, Anowar; Mandomando, Inacio; Ochieng, Ben; Oundo, Joseph; Ramamurthy, T; Tamboura, Boubou; Zaidi, Anita K M; Petri, William; Houpt, Eric; Murray, Patrick; Prado, Valeria; Vidal, Roberto; Steele, Duncan; Strockbine, Nancy; Sansonetti, Philippe; Glass, Roger I; Robins-Browne, Roy M; Tauschek, Marija; Svennerholm, Ann-Marie; Berkeley, Lynette Y; Kotloff, Karen; Levine, Myron M; Nataro, James P

    2012-12-01

    To understand the etiology of moderate-to-severe diarrhea among children in high mortality areas of sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia, we performed a comprehensive case/control study of children aged <5 years at 7 sites. Each site employed an identical case/control study design and each utilized a uniform comprehensive set of microbiological assays to identify the likely bacterial, viral and protozoal etiologies. The selected assays effected a balanced consideration of cost, robustness and performance, and all assays were performed at the study sites. Identification of bacterial pathogens employed streamlined conventional bacteriologic biochemical and serological algorithms. Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli were identified by application of a multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay for enterotoxigenic, enteroaggregative, and enteropathogenic E. coli. Rotavirus, adenovirus, Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia enterica, and Cryptosporidium species were detected by commercially available enzyme immunoassays on stool samples. Samples positive for adenovirus were further evaluated for adenovirus serotypes 40 and 41. We developed a novel multiplex assay to detect norovirus (types 1 and 2), astrovirus, and sapovirus. The portfolio of diagnostic assays used in the GEMS study can be broadly applied in developing countries seeking robust cost-effective methods for enteric pathogen detection.

  18. Leptospira Exposure and Patients with Liver Diseases: A Case-Control Seroprevalence Study

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Sánchez-Anguiano, Luis Francisco; Hernández-Tinoco, Jesús; Ramos-Nevárez, Agar; Margarita Cerrillo-Soto, Sandra; Alberto Guido-Arreola, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The seroepidemiology of Leptospira infection in patients suffering from liver disease has been poorly studied. Information about risk factors associated with infection in liver disease patients may help in the optimal planning of preventive measures. We sought to determine the association of Leptospira IgG seroprevalence and patients with liver diseases, and to determine the characteristics of the patients with Leptospira exposure. We performed a case-control study of 75 patients suffering from liver diseases and 150 age- and gender-matched control subjects. Diagnoses of liver disease included liver cirrhosis, steatosis, chronic hepatitis, acute hepatitis, and amoebic liver abscess. Sera of participants were analyzed for the presence of anti- Leptospira IgG antibodies using a commercially available enzyme immunoassay. Anti-Leptospira IgG antibodies were found in 17 (22.7%) of 75 patients and in 15 (10.0%) of 150 control subjects (OR = 2.32; 95% CI: 1.09-4.94; P=0.03). This is the first age- and gender-matched case control study about Leptospira seroprevalence in patients with liver diseases. Results indicate that Leptospira infection is associated with chronic and acute liver diseases. Results warrants for additional studies on the role of Leptospira exposure in chronic liver disease. PMID:27493589

  19. A multicenter, matched case-control study of risk factors for equine laminitis.

    PubMed

    Alford, P; Geller, S; Richrdson, B; Slater, M; Honnas, C; Foreman, J; Robinson, J; Messer, M; Roberts, M; Goble, D; Hood, D; Chaffin, M

    2001-05-01

    Risk factors for equine laminitis were examined in a prospective case-control study of the 258 cases seen at six collaborating veterinary teaching hospitals over a 32-month period. Case-control pairs were matched on institution, clinician, and season of diagnosis. The 90% of case-control pairs (78 acute, 155 chronic) that had complete data for age, gender, and breed were used in separate conditional logistic-regression models for acute and chronic laminitis. There was an increase in risk for horses with acute laminitis from 5 to 7 years of age (OR 4.7, 95% CI 1.3-16) and from 13 to 31 years of age (OR 3.9, 95% CI 1.3-12) (both compared to <5 years); risk was increased for chronic laminitis from 10 to 14 years (OR 3, 95% CI 1.4-6.8) and from 15 to 38 years (OR 2.9, 95% CI 1.4-6.1) (both compared to <6 years). Mares - but not stallions - were more likely than geldings to develop acute laminitis (OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.1-6.2) and chronic laminitis (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.1-3.6). In the small acute-laminitis data set, the breed variable was collapsed into three categories: Thoroughbred (THB, reference), the Quarter Horse (QH), and other (non-QH-THB). The non-QH-THB group was at increased risk of acute laminitis (OR 3.8, 95% CI 1.2-11.8). For the seven breed-group categories used in the chronic-laminitis model, however, all non-THB breed groups appeared significantly at risk as compared to the THB, with odds ratios ranging from 3.3 (95% CI 1.3-8.30) for the QH to 9.1 (95% CI 2.1-39.3) for ponies.

  20. A case-control study of gastric cancer and diet in Italy.

    PubMed

    Buiatti, E; Palli, D; Decarli, A; Amadori, D; Avellini, C; Bianchi, S; Biserni, R; Cipriani, F; Cocco, P; Giacosa, A

    1989-10-15

    A case-control study was conducted in high- and low-risk areas of Italy to evaluate reasons for the striking geographic variation in gastric cancer (GC) mortality within the country. Personal interviews with 1,016 histologically confirmed GC cases and 1,159 population controls of similar age and sex revealed that the patients were more often of lower social class and resident in rural areas and more frequently reported a familial history of gastric (but not other) cancer. After adjusting for these effects, case-control differences were found for several dietary variables, assessed by asking about the usual frequency of consumption of 146 food items and beverages. A significant trend of increasing GC risk was found with increasing consumption of traditional soups, meat, salted/dried fish and a combination of cold cuts and seasoned cheeses. The habit of adding salt and the preference for salty foods were associated with elevated GC risk, while more frequently storing foods in the refrigerator, the availability of a freezer and use of frozen foods lowered risk. Reduced GC risk were associated with increasing intake of raw vegetables, fresh fruit and citrus fruits. Lowered risk was also related to consumption of spices, olive oil and garlic. Neither cigarette smoking nor alcoholic beverage drinking were significantly related to GC risk. The case-control differences tended to be consistent across geographic areas, despite marked regional variations in intake levels of certain foods. The high-risk areas tended to show higher consumption of food associated with elevated risk (traditional soups, cold cuts) and lower consumption of foods associated with reduced risks (raw vegetables, citrus fruits, garlic). Our findings indicate that dietary factors contribute to the regional variation of stomach cancer occurrence in Italy, and offer clues for further etiologic and prevention research.

  1. Exposure to electromagnetic fields and suicide among electric utility workers: a nested case-control study

    PubMed Central

    van Wijngaarden, E.; Savitz, D.; Kleckner, R.; Cai, J.; Loomis, D.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—This nested case-control study examines mortality from suicide in relation to estimated exposure to extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs) in a cohort of 138 905 male electric utility workers.
METHODS—Case-control sampling included 536 deaths from suicide and 5348 eligible controls. Exposure was classified based on work in the most common jobs with increased exposure to magnetic fields and indices of cumulative exposure to magnetic fields based on a measurement survey.
RESULTS—Suicide mortality was increased relative to work in exposed jobs and with indices of exposure to magnetic fields. Increased odds ratios (ORs) were found for years of employment as an electrician (OR 2.18; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.25 to 3.80) or lineman (OR 1.59; 95% CI 1.18 to 2.14), whereas a decreased OR was found for power plant operators (OR 0.67; 95% CI 0.33 to 1.40). A dose response gradient with exposure to magnetic fields was found for exposure in the previous year, with a mortality OR of 1.70 (95% CI 1.00 to 2.90) in the highest exposure category. Stronger associations, with ORs in the range of 2.12-3.62, were found for men <50 years of age.
CONCLUSION—These data provide evidence for an association between occupational electromagnetic fields and suicide that warrants further evaluation. A plausible mechanism related to melatonin and depression provides a direction for additional laboratory research as well as epidemiological evaluation.


Keywords: electromagnetic fields; suicide; nested case-control PMID:10810112

  2. ATRIUM: testing untyped SNPs in case-control association studies with related individuals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zuoheng; McPeek, Mary Sara

    2009-11-01

    In genome-wide association studies, only a subset of all genomic variants are typed by current, high-throughput, SNP-genotyping platforms. However, many of the untyped variants can be well predicted from typed variants, with linkage disequilibrium (LD) information among typed and untyped variants available from an external reference panel such as HapMap. Incorporation of such external information can allow one to perform tests of association between untyped variants and phenotype, thereby making more efficient use of the available genotype data. When related individuals are included in case-control samples, the dependence among their genotypes must be properly addressed for valid association testing. In the context of testing untyped variants, an additional analytical challenge is that the dependence, across related individuals, of the partial information on untyped-SNP genotypes must also be assessed and incorporated into the analysis for valid inference. We address this challenge with ATRIUM, a method for case-control association testing with untyped SNPs, based on genome screen data in samples in which some individuals are related. ATRIUM uses LD information from an external reference panel to specify a one-degree-of-freedom test of association with an untyped SNP. It properly accounts for dependence in the partial information on untyped-SNP genotypes across related individuals. We demonstrate that ATRIUM is robust in that it maintains the nominal type I error rate even when the external reference panel is not well matched to the case-control sample. We apply the method to detect association between type 2 diabetes and variants on chromosome 10 in the Framingham SHARe data.

  3. Severity of Scorpion Stings in the Western Brazilian Amazon: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Queiroz, Amanda M.; Sampaio, Vanderson S.; Mendonça, Iran; Fé, Nelson F.; Sachett, Jacqueline; Ferreira, Luiz Carlos L.; Feitosa, Esaú; Wen, Fan Hui; Lacerda, Marcus; Monteiro, Wuelton

    2015-01-01

    Background Scorpion stings are a major public health problem in Brazil, with an increasing number of registered cases every year. Affecting mostly vulnerable populations, the phenomenon is not well described and is considered a neglected disease. In Brazil, the use of anti-venom formulations is provided free of charge. The associate scorpion sting case is subject to compulsory reporting. This paper describes the epidemiology and identifies factors associated with severity of scorpions stings in the state of Amazonas, in the Western Brazilian Amazon. Methodology/Principal Findings This study included all cases of scorpion stings in the state of Amazonas reported to the Brazilian Diseases Surveillance System from January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2014. A case-control study was conducted to identify factors associated with scorpions sting severity. A total of 2,120 cases were reported during this period. The mean incidence rate in the Amazonas was 7.6 per 100,000 inhabitants/year. Scorpion stings showed a large spatial distribution in the state and represent a potential occupational health problem for rural populations. There was a positive correlation between the absolute number of cases and the altimetric river levels in the Central (p<0.001; Rs = 0.479 linear) and Southwest (p = 0.032; linear Rs = 0.261) regions of the state. Cases were mostly classified as mild (68.6%), followed by moderate (26.8%), and severe (4.6%). The overall lethality rate was 0.3%. Lethality rate among children ≤10 years was 1.3%. Age <10 years [OR = 2.58 (95%CI = 1.47–4.55; p = 0.001)], stings occurring in the rural area [OR = 1.97 (95%CI = 1.18–3.29; p = 0.033) and in the South region of the state [OR = 1.85 (95%CI = 1.17–2.93; p = 0.008)] were independently associated with the risk of developing severity. Conclusions/Significance Scorpion stings show an extensive distribution in the Western Brazilian Amazon threatening especially rural populations, children ≤10 in particular. Thus

  4. Antibiotic exposure and the risk for depression, anxiety, or psychosis: a nested case-control study.

    PubMed

    Lurie, Ido; Yang, Yu-Xiao; Haynes, Kevin; Mamtani, Ronac; Boursi, Ben

    2015-11-01

    Changes in the microbiota (dysbiosis) were suggested to increase the risk of several psychiatric conditions through neurologic, metabolic, and immunologic pathways. Our aim was to assess whether exposure to specific antibiotic groups increases the risk for depression, anxiety, or psychosis. We conducted 3 nested case-control studies during the years 1995-2013 using a large population-based medical record database from the United Kingdom. The study included 202,974 patients with depression, 14,570 with anxiety, and 2,690 with psychosis and 803,961, 57,862, and 10,644 matched controls, respectively. Cases were defined as individuals aged 15-65 years with any medical Read code for depression, anxiety, or psychosis. Subjects with diagnosis-specific psychotropic prescriptions > 90 days before index date were excluded. For every case, 4 controls were selected using incidence density sampling, matching on age, sex, practice site, calendar time, and duration of follow-up before index date. The primary exposure of interest was therapy with 1 of 7 antibiotic classes > 1 year before index date. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CIs were calculated for the association between each psychiatric disorder and exposure to individual classes of antibiotics using conditional logistic regression analysis. The risk was adjusted for obesity, smoking history, alcohol consumption, socioeconomic status, and number of infectious events before diagnosis. Treatment with a single antibiotic course was associated with higher risk for depression with all antibiotic groups, with an adjusted OR (AOR) of 1.23 for penicillins (95% CI, 1.18-1.29) and 1.25 (95% CI, 1.15-1.35) for quinolones. The risk increased with recurrent antibiotic exposures to 1.40 (95% CI, 1.35-1.46) and 1.56 (95% CI, 1.46-1.65) for 2-5 and > 5 courses of penicillin, respectively. Similar association was observed for anxiety and was most prominent with exposures to penicillins and sulfonamides, with an AOR of 1.17 (95% CI, 1

  5. Embolization of hypervascular bone metastases reduces intraoperative blood loss: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Pazionis, Theresa J C; Papanastassiou, Ioannis D; Maybody, Majid; Healey, John H

    2014-10-01

    Small case series suggest that preoperative transcatheter arterial embolization minimizes bleeding and facilitates surgery for hypervascular metastatic bone tumors. However, control groups would make our confidence in clinical recommendations stronger, but small patient numbers make prospective trials difficult to conduct on this topic. In this case-control study, we asked whether (1) patients who undergo embolization have less estimated blood loss and/or shorter operative time than patients who do not have embolization; (2) larger tumor size, greater initial tumor vascularity, and longer interval from embolization to surgery are associated with greater estimated blood loss and packed red blood cell transfusion volume; and (3) embolization does not affect renal function in patients with normal preoperative renal function. We retrospectively reviewed records of patients with hypervascular bone metastases treated at our institution between 1998 and 2008. Twenty-seven patients with renal cell carcinoma and 12 with thyroid carcinoma who underwent embolization before 41 surgical procedures were matched to 41 patients who did not have embolization with respect to age, diagnosis, tumor size and potential vascularity, and procedure type; matching was performed without knowledge of outcomes. In univariate and multivariate analyses, age, tumor size, use of embolization, surgery type and risk, embolization-to-surgery interval, and degree of devascularization were evaluated for correlations with estimated blood loss, packed red blood cell transfusion volume, operative time, and postembolization renal function. Overall, patients who had embolization had less mean estimated blood loss (0.90 versus 1.77 L; p = 0.002), packed red blood cell transfusion volume (2.15 versus 3.56 U; p = 0.020), and operative time (3.13 versus 3.91 hours; p < 0.001). Larger tumor size correlated with greater estimated blood loss (r = 0.451; p = 0.003), packed red blood cell transfusion volume (r = 0

  6. Assessing risk factors of sporadic Campylobacter infection: a case-control study in Arizona.

    PubMed

    Pogreba-Brown, K; Baker, A; Ernst, K; Stewart, J; Harris, R B; Weiss, J

    2016-03-01

    Case-control studies of sporadic Campylobacter infections have predominately been conducted in non-Hispanic populations. In Arizona, rates of campylobacteriosis have been historically higher than the national average, with particularly high rates in Hispanics. In 2010, health departments and a state university collaborated to conduct a statewide case-control study to determine whether risk factors differ in an ethnically diverse region of the United States. Statistically significant risk factors in the final multivariate model were: eating cantaloupe [odds ratio (OR) 7·64], handling raw poultry (OR 4·88) and eating queso fresco (OR 7·11). In addition, compared to non-Hispanic/non-travellers, the highest risk group were Hispanic/non-travellers (OR 7·27), and Hispanic/travellers (OR 5·87, not significant). Results of this study suggest Hispanics have higher odds of disease, probably due to differential exposures. In addition to common risk factors, consumption of cantaloupe was identified as a significant risk factor. These results will inform public health officials of the varying risk factors for Campylobacter in this region.

  7. Anorexia nervosa versus bulimia nervosa: differences based on retrospective correlates in a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Machado, Bárbara C; Gonçalves, Sónia F; Martins, Carla; Brandão, Isabel; Roma-Torres, António; Hoek, Hans W; Machado, Paulo P

    2016-06-01

    This study is the result of two Portuguese case-control studies that examined the replication of retrospective correlates and preceding life events in anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) development. This study aims to identify retrospective correlates that distinguish AN and BN METHOD: A case-control design was used to compare a group of women who met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria for AN (N = 98) and BN (N = 79) with healthy controls (N = 86) and with other psychiatric disorders (N = 68). Each control group was matched with AN patients regarding age and parental social categories. Risk factors were assessed by interviewing each person with the Oxford Risk Factor Interview. Compared to AN, women with BN reported significantly higher rates of paternal high expectations, excessive family importance placed on fitness/keeping in shape, and negative consequences due to adolescent overweight and adolescent objective overweight. Overweight during adolescence emerged as the most relevant retrospective correlate in the distinction between BN and AN participants. Family expectations and the importance placed on keeping in shape were also significant retrospective correlates in the BN group.

  8. Snippets from the past: is Flint, Michigan, the birthplace of the case-control study?

    PubMed

    Morabia, Alfredo

    2013-12-15

    In the summer of 1924, an outbreak of scarlet fever occurred in Flint, Michigan. Unable to trace it to the usual causes, particularly fresh milk, the Michigan Department of Health used a novel approach to disentangle the enigma: The 116 cases of scarlet fever were compared with 117 "controls" selected from neighbors of the quarantined cases and from patients at the City Health Center who had been treated for ailments unrelated to scarlet fever. The extraordinary culprit was ice cream, which had a frequent/occasional/none consumption prevalence of 60%, 34%, and 6% among the cases and 24%, 51%, and 25% among the controls, respectively. The 1925 report reads, "Detailed epidemiological investigation, by means of case histories and control histories on well persons, confirmed early suspicions and established the fact that the epidemic was spread by ice cream" (Am J Hyg. 1925;5(5):669-681). This forgotten epidemiologic study is the oldest study using the case-control design to have been resurrected thus far. The case-control study design may have been conceived simultaneously, but independently and for different purposes, in England (Janet Lane-Claypon's 1926 report on the determinants of breast cancer) and the United States.

  9. Snippets From the Past: Is Flint, Michigan, the Birthplace of the Case-Control Study?

    PubMed Central

    Morabia, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    In the summer of 1924, an outbreak of scarlet fever occurred in Flint, Michigan. Unable to trace it to the usual causes, particularly fresh milk, the Michigan Department of Health used a novel approach to disentangle the enigma: The 116 cases of scarlet fever were compared with 117 “controls” selected from neighbors of the quarantined cases and from patients at the City Health Center who had been treated for ailments unrelated to scarlet fever. The extraordinary culprit was ice cream, which had a frequent/occasional/none consumption prevalence of 60%, 34%, and 6% among the cases and 24%, 51%, and 25% among the controls, respectively. The 1925 report reads, “Detailed epidemiological investigation, by means of case histories and control histories on well persons, confirmed early suspicions and established the fact that the epidemic was spread by ice cream” (Am J Hyg. 1925;5(5):669–681). This forgotten epidemiologic study is the oldest study using the case-control design to have been resurrected thus far. The case-control study design may have been conceived simultaneously, but independently and for different purposes, in England (Janet Lane-Claypon's 1926 report on the determinants of breast cancer) and the United States. PMID:24064743

  10. Postmenopausal hormone therapy and ductal carcinoma in situ: A population-based case control study

    PubMed Central

    Calvocoressi, Lisa; Stowe, Meredith H.; Carter, Darryl; Claus, Elizabeth B.

    2013-01-01

    Background and aim The relationship between hormone therapy (HT) and invasive breast cancer has been extensively investigated, but the relationship between HT and in situ breast cancer has received relatively little attention. We examined the relationship between HT and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) among postmenopausal women who participated in a population-based case control study in Connecticut, USA. Methods This analysis included 1,179 post-menopausal women (603 controls and 576 cases), who comprised a subset of a population-based case-control study that included all incident cases of breast carcinoma in situ (BCIS) in Connecticut and frequency-matched controls by 5-year age intervals. Results We found no association between DCIS and ever use of any HT (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 0.85, 95 % confidence interval (CI): 0.65-1.11); of estrogen alone (adjusted OR = 0.93; 95 % CI: 0.68-1.29) or of estrogen and progesterone (adjusted OR = 0.75; 95 % CI: 0.52-1.08). There was also no association between DCIS and current use of these hormones. In addition, estimated risk of DCIS did not increase with duration of use of these preparations. Conclusions These results add to a small literature that remains inconclusive. To determine whether HT poses risk of in situ breast cancer, larger studies with greater power and precise control of important covariates (e.g., mammography screening) are needed, as are meta-analyses of available data. PMID:22317899

  11. Control selection methods in recent case-control studies conducted as part of infectious disease outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Waldram, Alison; McKerr, Caoimhe; Gobin, Maya; Adak, Goutam; Stuart, James M; Cleary, Paul

    2015-06-01

    Successful investigation of national outbreaks of communicable disease relies on rapid identification of the source. Case-control methodologies are commonly used to achieve this. We assessed control selection methods used in recently published case-control studies for methodological and resource issues to determine if a standard approach could be identified. Neighbourhood controls were the most frequently used method in 53 studies of a range of different sizes, infections and settings. The most commonly used method of data collection was face to face interview. Control selection issues were identified in four areas: method of identification of controls, appropriateness of controls, ease of recruitment of controls, and resource requirements. Potential biases arising from the method of control selection were identified in half of the studies assessed. There is a need to develop new ways of selecting controls in a rapid, random and representative manner to improve the accuracy and timeliness of epidemiological investigations and maximise the effectiveness of public health interventions. Innovative methods such as prior recruitment of controls could improve timeliness and representativeness of control selection.

  12. Association between alcohol consumption and colorectal cancer risk: a case-control study in the Han Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Yang, Helen; Shen, Chun-Jian; Ge, Jin-Nian; Lin, Jie

    2017-07-07

    Many epidemiologic studies have reported that alcohol is a risk factor for colorectal cancer. To further evaluate the association, we carried out a case-control study in the Han Chinese population. From February 2008 to February 2013, we carried out a hospital-based case-control study on colorectal cancer. Information was collected using a questionnaire. Cases were 310 patients with colorectal cancer; 620 healthy matched controls were also recruited. Multiple logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratios (OR) and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals. Alcohol consumption was associated with increased colorectal cancer risk, but OR was significant only among heavy drinkers (OR=2.18, for ≥21 drinks/week). Colorectal cancer risk was 4.01-fold higher in heavy smokers (≥20 cigarettes/day) and heavy drinkers (≥21 drinks/week) in comparison with never smokers who consumed less than 7 drinks/week. The relationship was strengthened by stratified studies of sex. Among former drinkers, the excess of risk disappeared in those who had quit for at least 10 years (OR=0.86). Our study confirmed that heavy alcohol consumption was associated with an increasing risk of colorectal cancer; smoking modified this relationship, especially heavy smokers. Further data from large cohorts are desirable for conclusive confirmation.

  13. A case-control study on risk factors for unintentional childhood poisoning in Tehran

    PubMed Central

    Mansori, Kamyar; Soori, Hamid; Farnaghi, Fariba; Khodakarim, Sohila; Mansouri hanis, Shiva; Khodadost, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Background: Poisoning is a major public health problem and is one of the most frequent causes of emergency hospital admissions. The aim of this study was to identify the main risk factors for unintentional childhood poisoning in Tehran, Iran and to suggest possible causes and preventative measures. Methods: In this case-control study (case, n=140; control, n=280), two controls were selected for every case. Controls were matched by age, sex, and date of hospital attendance. All children and their guardians were then interviewed by the same person using a standard questionnaire that covered the demographic, behavioral, and risk factors associated with accidental poisonings. Results: The most common type of poisoning was related to narcotics (58.6%); and among the narcotics, methadone was the most prevalent poisoning agent (74.7%). Multivariate conditional logistic regression model revealed that addiction in the family (OR=14.6; 95% CI:6.2-34.6), previous poisoning (OR=7; 95% CI:2.4- 20.2), maternal occupation (OR=4; 95% CI:1.3- 12.3), and inaccessibility of poisoning products (OR=0.03; 95% CI:0.01- 0.12) were the main risk factors in unintentional childhood poisoning. Conclusion: Addiction in the family as a risk factor and inaccessibility of poisoning products as a protecting factor were recognized to have the highest correlation with the unintentional child poisoning. These two factors were considered as priorities in health education programs. PMID:27453885

  14. Bronchodilator treatment and asthma death: a new analysis of a British case-control study.

    PubMed

    Butland, Barbara K; Anderson, H Ross; Cates, Christopher J

    2011-04-01

    We investigated the relationship between asthma mortality and long-acting beta(2)-agonists (LABA), including interactions with age, inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) and social deprivation. We used a new, expanded dataset of recorded medication extracted blind from the anonymised primary care records of an earlier British case-control study. The cases were 532 asthma deaths aged < 65 occurring between 1994 and 1998 and the controls were 532 asthma admissions, matched for age, hospital, and index date (date of death/asthma admission). The exposure periods prior to the index date were current (≤ 2 months) or recent ( > 2-6 months). We found no evidence of an overall association with current (OR = 0.89 [95% confidence interval 0.61-1.30]) or recent (1.08 [0.76-1.53]) mention of LABA, but there was some evidence of a positive interaction with age. Among controls with mention of LABA, a concurrent mention of ICS (within 1 month) was common (85% and 93% for the two respective periods) which limited our power to investigate any interaction between LABA and ICS. There was no coherent evidence of effect modification by social deprivation. In a population based case-control study where prescription of LABA without concomitant ICS was uncommon there was no evidence of an overall association between LABA and asthma death.

  15. Case-control study of vulvar vestibulitis risk associated with genital infections.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Elaine M; Ritchie, Justine M; Galask, Rudolph; Pugh, Erica E; Jia, Jian; Ricks-McGillan, Joan

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the risk of vulvar vestibulitis syndrome (VVS) associated with genital infections in a case-control study. METHODS: Diagnosed cases with VVS (n = 69) and age-frequency-matched healthy controls (n = 65) were enrolled from gynecology clinics in a university medical hospital during 1999. They were compared for potential risk factors and symptoms of disease. RESULTS: VVS cases had a significantly higher risk of physician-reported bacterial vaginosis (BV) (odds ratio, OR = 9.4), Candida albicans (OR = 5.7), pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) (OR = 11.2), trichomoniasis (OR = 20.6), and vulvar dysplasia (OR = l5.7) but no risk associated with human papillomavirus (HPV), ASCUS, cervical dysplasia, genital warts, chlamydia, genital herpes or gonorrhea. Genital symptoms reported significantly more often with VVS included vulvar burning (91 vs. 12%), dyspareunia (81 vs. 15%), vulvar itching (68 vs. 23%) and dysuria (54 vs. 19%) (p < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: A history of genital infections is associated with an increased risk of VVS. Long-term follow-up case-control studies are needed to elucidate etiologic mechanisms, methods for prevention and effective treatment. PMID:12648313

  16. A case-control study on risk factors for unintentional childhood poisoning in Tehran.

    PubMed

    Mansori, Kamyar; Soori, Hamid; Farnaghi, Fariba; Khodakarim, Sohila; Mansouri Hanis, Shiva; Khodadost, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Poisoning is a major public health problem and is one of the most frequent causes of emergency hospital admissions. The aim of this study was to identify the main risk factors for unintentional childhood poisoning in Tehran, Iran and to suggest possible causes and preventative measures. In this case-control study (case, n=140; control, n=280), two controls were selected for every case. Controls were matched by age, sex, and date of hospital attendance. All children and their guardians were then interviewed by the same person using a standard questionnaire that covered the demographic, behavioral, and risk factors associated with accidental poisonings. The most common type of poisoning was related to narcotics (58.6%); and among the narcotics, methadone was the most prevalent poisoning agent (74.7%). Multivariate conditional logistic regression model revealed that addiction in the family (OR=14.6; 95% CI:6.2-34.6), previous poisoning (OR=7; 95% CI:2.4- 20.2), maternal occupation (OR=4; 95% CI:1.3- 12.3), and inaccessibility of poisoning products (OR=0.03; 95% CI:0.01- 0.12) were the main risk factors in unintentional childhood poisoning. Addiction in the family as a risk factor and inaccessibility of poisoning products as a protecting factor were recognized to have the highest correlation with the unintentional child poisoning. These two factors were considered as priorities in health education programs.

  17. Stillbirths at Term: Case Control Study of Risk Factors, Growth Status and Placental Histology

    PubMed Central

    Mecacci, Federico; Serena, Caterina; Avagliano, Laura; Cozzolino, Mauro; Baroni, Eleonora; Rambaldi, Marianna Pina; Simeone, Serena; Castiglione, Francesca; Taddei, Gian Luigi; Bulfamante, Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the proportion of stillbirths at term associated with abnormal growth using customized birth weight percentiles and to compare histological placental findings both in underweight stillborn fetuses and in live births. Methods A retrospective case-control study of 150 singleton term stillbirths. The livebirth control groups included 586 cases of low-risk pregnancies and 153 late fetal growth restriction fetuses. Stillbirths and livebirths from low-risk pregnancies were classified using customized standards for fetal weight at birth, as adequate for gestational age (AGA; 10-90th percentile), small (SGA; <10th percentile) or large for gestational age (LGA; >90th percentile). Placental characteristics in stillbirth were compared with those from livebirths using four categories: inflammation, disruptive, obstructive and adaptive lesions. Results There was a higher rate of SGA (26% vs 6%, p<0.001) and LGA fetuses (10.6% vs 5.6%, p<0.05) in the stillbirth group. Among stillbirth fetuses, almost half of the SGA were very low birthweight (≤3°percentile) (12% vs 0.3%, p<0.001). The disruptive (7.3% vs 0.17%;p<0.001), obstructive (54.6% vs 7.5%;p<0.001) and adaptive (46.6% vs 35.8%;p<0.001) findings were significantly more common in than in livebirth-low risk. Placental characteristics of AGA and SGA stillbirth were compared with those of AGA and FGR livebirth. In stillbirths-SGA we found a higher number of disruptive (12.8% vs 0%; p<0.001), obstructive (58.9% vs 23.5%;p<0.001) and adaptive lesions (56.4% vs 49%; p 0.47) than in livebirth-FGR. Conclusion The assessment of fetal weight with customized curves can identify fetuses which have not reached their genetically determined growth potential and are therefore at risk for adverse outcomes. Placental evaluation in stillbirths can reveal chronic histological signs that might be useful to clinical assessment, especially in underweight fetuses. PMID:27936018

  18. Case-control study of mammographic density and breast cancer risk using processed digital mammograms.

    PubMed

    Habel, Laurel A; Lipson, Jafi A; Achacoso, Ninah; Rothstein, Joseph H; Yaffe, Martin J; Liang, Rhea Y; Acton, Luana; McGuire, Valerie; Whittemore, Alice S; Rubin, Daniel L; Sieh, Weiva

    2016-05-21

    Full-field digital mammography (FFDM) has largely replaced film-screen mammography in the US. Breast density assessed from film mammograms is strongly associated with breast cancer risk, but data are limited for processed FFDM images used for clinical care. We conducted a case-control study nested among non-Hispanic white female participants of the Research Program in Genes, Environment and Health of Kaiser Permanente Northern California who were aged 40 to 74 years and had screening mammograms acquired on Hologic FFDM machines. Cases (n = 297) were women with a first invasive breast cancer diagnosed after a screening FFDM. For each case, up to five controls (n = 1149) were selected, matched on age and year of FFDM and image batch number, and who were still under follow-up and without a history of breast cancer at the age of diagnosis of the matched case. Percent density (PD) and dense area (DA) were assessed by a radiological technologist using Cumulus. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) for breast cancer associated with PD and DA, modeled continuously in standard deviation (SD) increments and categorically in quintiles, after adjusting for body mass index, parity, first-degree family history of breast cancer, breast area, and menopausal hormone use. Median intra-reader reproducibility was high with a Pearson's r of 0.956 (range 0.902 to 0.983) for replicate PD measurements across 23 image batches. The overall mean was 20.02 (SD, 14.61) for PD and 27.63 cm(2) (18.22 cm(2)) for DA. The adjusted ORs for breast cancer associated with each SD increment were 1.70 (95 % confidence interval, 1.41-2.04) for PD, and 1.54 (1.34-1.77) for DA. The adjusted ORs for each quintile were: 1.00 (ref.), 1.49 (0.91-2.45), 2.57 (1.54-4.30), 3.22 (1.91-5.43), 4.88 (2.78-8.55) for PD, and 1.00 (ref.), 1.43 (0.85-2.40), 2.53 (1.53-4.19), 2.85 (1.73-4.69), 3.48 (2.14-5.65) for DA. PD and DA measured using Cumulus on processed FFDM images are

  19. Multicenter case-control study on restless legs syndrome in multiple sclerosis: the REMS study.

    PubMed

    Manconi, Mauro; Ferini-Strambi, Luigi; Filippi, Massimo; Bonanni, Enrica; Iudice, Alfonso; Murri, Luigi; Gigli, Gian Luigi; Fratticci, Lara; Merlino, Giovanni; Terzano, Giovanni; Granella, Franco; Parrino, Liborio; Silvestri, Rosalia; Aricò, Irene; Dattola, Vincenzo; Russo, Giovanna; Luongo, Carmela; Cicolin, Alessandro; Tribolo, Antonella; Cavalla, Paola; Savarese, Mariantonietta; Trojano, Maria; Ottaviano, Salvatore; Cirignotta, Fabio; Simioni, Valentina; Salvi, Fabrizio; Mondino, Fiorella; Perla, Franco; Chinaglia, Giorgia; Zuliani, Cristina; Cesnik, Edward; Granieri, Enrico; Placidi, Fabio; Palmieri, Maria Giuseppina; Manni, Raffaele; Terzaghi, Michele; Bergamaschi, Roberto; Rocchi, Raffaele; Ulivelli, Monica; Bartalini, Sabina; Ferri, Raffaele; Lo Fermo, Salvatore; Ubiali, Emilio; Viscardi, Massimo; Rottoli, Mariarosa; Nobili, Lino; Protti, Alessandra; Ferrillo, Franco; Allena, Marta; Mancardi, Gianluigi; Guarnieri, Biancamaria; Londrillo, Francesco

    2008-07-01

    To verify the existence of a symptomatic form of restless legs syndrome (RLS) secondary to multiple sclerosis (MS) and to identify possible associated risk factors. Prospective, multicenter, case-control epidemiologic survey. Twenty sleep centers certified by the Italian Association of Sleep Medicine. Eight hundred and sixty-one patients affected by MS and 649 control subjects. N/A. Data regarding demographic and clinical factors, presence and severity of RLS, the results of hematologic tests, and visual analysis of cerebrospinal magnetic resonance imaging studies were collected. The prevalence of RLS was 19% in MS and 4.2% in control subjects, with a risk to be affected by RLS of 5.4 (95%confidence interval: 3.56-8.26) times greater for patients with MS than for control subjects. In patients with MS, the following risk factors for RLS were significant: older age; longer MS duration; the primary progressive MS form; higher global, pyramidal, and sensory disability; and the presence of leg jerks before sleep onset. Patients with MS and RLS more often had sleep complaints and a higher intake of hypnotic medications than patients with MS without RLS. RLS associated with MS was more severe than that of control subjects. RLS is significantly associated with MS, especially in patients with severe pyramidal and sensory disability. These results strengthen the idea that the inflammatory damage correlated with MS may induce a secondary form of RLS. As it does in idiopathic cases, RLS has a significant impact on sleep quality in patients with MS; therefore, it should be always searched for, particularly in the presence of insomnia unresponsive to treatment with common hypnotic drugs.

  20. Antioxidant intake and adult-onset wheeze: a case-control study. Aberdeen WHEASE Study Group.

    PubMed

    Bodner, C; Godden, D; Brown, K; Little, J; Ross, S; Seaton, A

    1999-01-01

    An increase in prevalence of wheezing illness in the UK has coincided with a reduction in the consumption of natural antioxidants, which may modulate the lung's response to oxidant stress, limiting the expression of airway inflammation and respiratory symptoms. The hypothesis that intakes and plasma levels of natural antioxidants would be determinants of adult-onset wheezing illness was tested. A nested case-control study was conducted in 94 cases with adult-onset wheeze and 203 controls aged 39-45 yrs identified in a 30-yr follow-up survey. Antioxidant intake was measured by a food frequency questionnaire, and plasma and red cell measurements of antioxidant status were obtained. Outcome measures were onset of wheeze since age 15 yrs (ever wheeze) and wheeze occurring in the past 12 months (current wheeze). After adjusting for the effects of smoking, socioeconomic status, atopy, family history of atopic disease and total energy intake, intakes of vitamin E (odds ratio (OR) = 4.02 for low compared to high tertile of intake) and plasma levels of ascorbate (OR = 0.98 per unit) and alpha-tocopherol:triglyceride ratio (OR = 0.34 per log(e) unit) were inversely related to adult-onset wheeze. In analyses stratified by social class and smoking, intakes of vitamin C and E and plasma levels of ascorbate and alpha-tocopherol:triglyceride ratio were inversely related to current wheeze in the manual social class and among current smokers. No independent associations of vitamin A, beta-carotene or total plasma antioxidant capacity were found. The results support the hypothesis that deficiencies of vitamins C and E are associated with wheezing symptoms. Smokers in the manual social class are particularly susceptible to these effects.

  1. Alternative population sampling frames produced important differences in estimates of association: a case-control study of vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Macfarlane, Gary J; Jones, Gareth T; Swafe, Leyla; Reid, David M; Basu, Neil

    2013-06-01

    A common population sampling frame in countries with universal health care is health service registers. We have evaluated the use of such a register, in the United Kingdom, against a commercially available database claiming large population coverage, an alternative that offers ease of access and flexibility of use. A case-control study of vasculitis, which recruited cases from secondary care clinics in Scotland, compared two alternative sampling frames for population controls, namely the registers of National Health Service (NHS) primary care practices and a commercially available database. The characteristics of controls recruited from both sources were compared in addition to separate case-control comparison using logistic regression. A total of 166 of 189 cases participated (88% participation rate), while both the commercial database and NHS Central Register (NHSCR) controls achieved a participation rate of 24% among persons assumed to have received the invitation. On several measures, the NHSCR patients reported poorer health than the commercial database controls: low scores on the physical component score of the Short Form 36 (odds ratio [OR]: 2.3; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.3-4.1), chronic widespread pain (OR: 2.3; CI: 1.1-4.7), and high levels of fatigue (OR: 2.0; CI: 1.3-3.1). These had an important influence on the estimates of association with case status with one association (pain) showing a strong and significant association using commercial database controls, which was absent with NHSCR controls. There are important differences in self-reported measures of health and quality of life using controls from two alternative population sampling frames. It emphasizes the importance of methodological rigor and prior assessment in choosing sampling frames for case-control studies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Pilot age and geographic region of commuter and air taxi crashes: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Rebok, George W; Qiang, Yandong; Baker, Susan P; Li, Guohua

    2011-02-01

    Previous studies of major airline and general aviation crashes have identified a host of risk factors. We examined risk factors related to crashes involving commuter air carrier and air taxi flights. A matched case-control design was applied to assess the association of pilot age, total flight time, and geographic region with commuter air carrier and air taxi crashes (14 CFR Part 135) from 1983-2002 in the United States. A total of 2033 commuter air carrier or air taxi crashes from the National Transportation Safety Board aviation crash database were identified as eligible cases. Controls were randomly selected incidents from the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) aviation incident database coded under Part 135 operation. Relative to controls, commuter air carrier and air taxi crashes were less likely to occur in pilots under 30 yr of age (adjusted odds ratio 0.68, 95% confidence interval 0.54-0.88) after adjusting for geographic region and total flight time. With adjustment for pilot age and total flight time, the commuter air carrier and air taxi crashes with pilot error were nearly 13 times as likely to be in Alaska as their matched controls (adjusted odds ratio 12.84, 95% confidence interval 5.24-31.45). These results suggest that pilot age may be associated with risk of crash involvement in Part 135 operations. The excess crash risk in Alaska with or without pilot error underscores the importance of environmental hazards in flight safety.

  3. A case--control study of selenium in nails and prostate cancer risk in British men.

    PubMed

    Allen, N E; Morris, J S; Ngwenyama, R A; Key, T J

    2004-04-05

    In view of the experimental evidence suggesting that the micronutrient selenium reduces prostate cancer risk, we investigated the association between the selenium level in fingernails, a measure of long-term selenium intake, and prostate cancer risk in a case-control study among 656 British men, conducted in 1989-1992. Nail clippings were taken at the time of recruitment and selenium concentration, measured using neutron activation techniques, was successfully assayed for 300 case-control pairs and varied six-fold among the controls (0.59 p.p.m.; interquartile range, 0.50-0.71 p.p.m.). Nail selenium concentration was not significantly associated with prostate cancer risk: men in the highest quartile of nail selenium had a slightly increased risk compared with men in the lowest quartile (OR 1.24, 95 CI, 0.73-2.10); for advanced prostate cancer, men in the highest quartile had a slightly reduced risk compared with men in the lowest quartile (OR 0.78, 95% CI, 0.27-2.25). These results suggest that selenium is not strongly associated with prostate cancer risk in British men.

  4. Chernobyl-related thyroid cancer in children of Belarus: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Astakhova, L N; Anspaugh, L R; Beebe, G W; Bouville, A; Drozdovitch, V V; Garber, V; Gavrilin, Y I; Khrouch, V T; Kuvshinnikov, A V; Kuzmenkov, Y N; Minenko, V P; Moschik, K V; Nalivko, A S; Robbins, J; Shemiakina, E V; Shinkarev, S; Tochitskaya, S I; Waclawiw, M A

    1998-09-01

    The accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant on April 26, 1986, released approximately 2 EBq of 131I and other radioiodine isotopes that heavily contaminated southern Belarus. An increase in thyroid cancer reported in 1992 and attributed to the Chernobyl accident was challenged as possibly the result of intensive screening. We began a case-control study to test the hypothesis that the Chernobyl accident caused the increase in thyroid cancer. Records of childhood thyroid cancer in the national therapy centers in Minsk in 1992 yielded 107 individuals with confirmed pathology diagnoses and available for interview. Pathways to diagnosis were (1) routine endocrinological screening in 63, (2) presentation with enlarged or nodular thyroid in 25 and (3) an incidental finding in 19. Two sets of controls were chosen, one matched on pathway to diagnosis, the other representing the area of heavy fallout, both matched on age, sex and rural/urban residence in 1986. The 131I dose to the thyroid was estimated from ground deposition of 137Cs, ground deposition of 131I, a data bank of 1986 thyroid radiation measurements, questionnaires and interviews. Highly significant differences were observed between cases and controls (both sets) with respect to dose. The differences persisted within pathway to diagnosis, gender, age and year of diagnosis, and level of iodine in the soil, and were most marked in the southern portion of the Gomel region. The case-control comparisons indicate a strong relationship between thyroid cancer and estimated radiation dose from the Chernobyl accident.

  5. Using sign score regression models to select variables in case-control studies.

    PubMed

    O'Gorman, T W

    1995-02-28

    This paper evaluates the performance of four variable selection methods suitable for case-control studies. Two of the methods are logistic regression and the rank transformed version of it which uses the ranks of the explanatory variables in place of the original observations. The third method is based on Kendall's tau b correlations. I propose a fourth method, a sign score regression model to select variables. To evaluate these four methods, I generate many data sets for a case group and a control group with the use of several different distributions and covariance matrices. I evaluate the methods on their ability to select correctly the variables related to case-control status while not selecting the unrelated variables. Using this criterion, the sign score regression method and the tau b method are more effective than the other two methods with uncorrelated or weakly correlated variables. The sign score regression method is more effective than the tau b method for all simulations that use normal variables and for some that use log-normal variables. Overall, the sign score regression method is the most effective variable selection method for data sets that have low or moderate correlations between variables.

  6. Probability of detecting disease-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms in case-control genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Gail, Mitchell H; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Wheeler, William; Pee, David

    2008-04-01

    Some case-control genome-wide association studies (CCGWASs) select promising single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) by ranking corresponding p-values, rather than by applying the same p-value threshold to each SNP. For such a study, we define the detection probability (DP) for a specific disease-associated SNP as the probability that the SNP will be "T-selected," namely have one of the top T largest chi-square values (or smallest p-values) for trend tests of association. The corresponding proportion positive (PP) is the fraction of selected SNPs that are true disease-associated SNPs. We study DP and PP analytically and via simulations, both for fixed and for random effects models of genetic risk, that allow for heterogeneity in genetic risk. DP increases with genetic effect size and case-control sample size and decreases with the number of nondisease-associated SNPs, mainly through the ratio of T to N, the total number of SNPs. We show that DP increases very slowly with T, and the increment in DP per unit increase in T declines rapidly with T. DP is also diminished if the number of true disease SNPs exceeds T. For a genetic odds ratio per minor disease allele of 1.2 or less, even a CCGWAS with 1000 cases and 1000 controls requires T to be impractically large to achieve an acceptable DP, leading to PP values so low as to make the study futile and misleading. We further calculate the sample size of the initial CCGWAS that is required to minimize the total cost of a research program that also includes follow-up studies to examine the T-selected SNPs. A large initial CCGWAS is desirable if genetic effects are small or if the cost of a follow-up study is large.

  7. Lack of association of CASC8 rs1447295 with colorectal cancer in Iranian population: A multicenter case-control study.

    PubMed

    Haerian, Monir Sadat; Haerian, Batoul Sadat; Molanaei, Saadat; Kosari, Farid; Sabeti, Shahram; Bidari-Zerehpoosh, Farahnaz; Abdolali, Ebrahim

    2017-11-15

    Several studies reported the potential role of the rs1447295 polymorphism in susceptibility to cancer. This variant located in the cancer susceptibility candidate 8 (CASC8) is a long noncoding RNA (lnRNA) gene and does not code protein. LnRNA transcripts play a potential regulatory role in the expression of key genes involved in multiple cellular pathways, including cell cycle, pluripotency, and immune response. The aim of this study is to evaluate this association with colorectal cancer (CRC) in a large case-control study of the Iranian population. After extraction of genomic DNA by the standard protocols, the rs1447295 was genotyped in 2416 subjects (46% patients). Results of this case-control demonstrated no significant association between the rs1447295 polymorphism and risk of CRC or its characteristics under allele or alternative genotype models. In conclusion, it is unlikely that the rs1447295 polymorphism is a risk variant for the development of CRC in Iranian population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Length of Menstrual Cycle and Risk of Endometriosis: A Meta-Analysis of 11 Case-Control Studies.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ming; Cheng, Yanfei; Bu, Huaien; Zhao, Ye; Zhao, Wenli

    2016-03-01

    Endometriosis is a complex disease that affects a large number of women worldwide and may cause pain and infertility. To systematically review published studies evaluating the relationship between menstrual cycle length and risk of endometriosis. We searched the Cochrane Library, PubMed, Web of Science, and EMBASE in databases in July 2014 using the keywords "case-control studies," "epidemiologic determinants," "risk factors," "menstrual cycle," "menstrual length," "menstrual character," and "endometriosis." We included case-control studies published in English that investigated cases of surgically confirmed endometriosis and examined the relationship between endometriosis risk and menstrual cycle. Eleven articles that met the inclusion criteria included data of 3392 women with endometriosis and 5006 controls. Fixed-effects and random-effects models were used for the evaluation. For the association of risk of endometriosis and menstrual cycle length shorter than or equal to 27 days (SEQ27) or length longer than or equal to 29 days (LEQ29), the odds ratio was 1.22 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05-1.43) and 0.68 (95% CI: 0.48-0.96), respectively. In conclusion, this meta-analysis suggests that menstrual cycle length SEQ27 increase the risk of endometriosis and cycle length LEQ29 decrease the risk.

  9. Zinc Intake and Risk of Prostate Cancer: Case-Control Study and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dabbous, Firas; Ali, Mohamed M.; Batai, Ken; Shah, Ebony; Kittles, Rick A.

    2016-01-01

    Zinc is an essential dietary element that has been implicated in the pathogenesis of prostate cancer, a cancer that disproportionately affects men of African descent. Studies assessing the association of zinc intake and prostate cancer have yielded inconsistent results. Furthermore, very little is known about the relationship between zinc intake and prostate cancer among African Americans. We examined the association between self-reported zinc intake and prostate cancer in a hospital-based case-control study of African Americans. We then compared our results with previous studies by performing a meta-analysis to summarize the evidence regarding the association between zinc and prostate cancer. Newly diagnosed African American men with histologically confirmed prostate cancer (n = 127) and controls (n = 81) were recruited from an urban academic urology clinic in Washington, DC. Controls had higher zinc intake, with a mean of 14 mg/day versus 11 mg/day for cases. We observed a non-significant, non-linear increase in prostate cancer when comparing tertiles of zinc intake (OR <6.5 vs 6.5–12.5mg/day 1.8, 95% CI: 0.6,5.6; OR <6.5 vs >12.5mg/day 1.3, 95% CI: 0.2,6.5). The pooled estimate from 17 studies (including 3 cohorts, 2 nested case-control, 11 case-control studies, and 1 randomized clinical trial, with a total of 111,199 participants and 11,689 cases of prostate cancer) was 1.07hi vs lo 95% CI: 0.98–1.16. Using a dose-response meta-analysis, we observed a non-linear trend in the relationship between zinc intake and prostate cancer (p for nonlinearity = 0.0022). This is the first study to examine the relationship between zinc intake in black men and risk of prostate cancer and systematically evaluate available epidemiologic evidence about the magnitude of the relationship between zinc intake and prostate cancer. Despite of the lower intake of zinc by prostate cancer patients, our meta-analysis indicated that there is no evidence for an association between zinc

  10. Evaluation of Feasibility for a Case-Control Study of Pituitary-Ovarian Function in Premenopausal Women with Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    feasibility of a case-control study that uses gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) stimulation tests to evaluate sensitivity of the hypothalamic...determine the safety and feasibility of conducting a case-control study that uses gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnHR) stimulation tests to evaluate...women. The full-scale study will determine if: 1) the anterior pituitary of pre-menopausal women with breast cancer secretes more luteinizing hormone (LH

  11. Healthy control subjects are poorly defined in case-control studies of irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ghorbani, Shireen; Nejad, Amir; Law, David; Chua, Kathleen S.; Amichai, Meridythe M.; Pimentel, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Background Case-control studies are vital for understanding the pathophysiology of gastrointestinal disease. While the definition of disease is clear, the definition of healthy control is not. This is particularly relevant for functional bowel diseases such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In this study, a systematic review formed the basis for a prospective study evaluating the effectiveness of commonly used techniques for defining healthy controls in IBS. Methods A systematic review of the literature was conducted to identify case-control studies involving functional gastrointestinal disorders. “Lack of Rome criteria”, self-description as “healthy” and the bowel disease questionnaire (BDQ) were common methods for identifying healthy controls. These 3 methods were then applied to a cohort of 53 non-patient subjects to determine their validity compared to objective outcome measures (7-day stool diary). Results “Lack of Rome criteria” and “healthy” self-description were the most common methods for identifying healthy control subjects, but many studies failed to describe the methods used. In the prospective study, more subjects were identified as non-healthy using the BDQ than using either lack of Rome criteria (P=0.01) or “healthy” self-description (P=0.026). Furthermore, stool diaries identified several subjects with abnormal stool form and/or frequency which were not identified using lack of Rome criteria or the “healthy” question. Comparisons revealed no agreement (κ) between the different methods for defining healthy controls. Conclusions The definitions of healthy controls in studies of functional bowel diseases such as IBS are inconsistent. Since functional symptoms are common, a strict definition of “normal” is needed in this area of research. PMID:25609236

  12. Association between Myocardial Infarction and Periodontitis: A Meta-Analysis of Case-Control Studies.

    PubMed

    Shi, Quan; Zhang, Bin; Huo, Na; Cai, Chuan; Liu, Hongchen; Xu, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Many clinical researches have been carried out to investigate the relationship between myocardial infarction (MI) and periodontitis. Despite most of them indicated that the periodontitis may be associated with an increased risk of MI, the findings and study types of these studies have been inconsistent. The goal of this meta-analysis was to critically assess the strength of the association between MI and periodontitis in case-control studies. Methods: PubMed and the Cochrane Library were searched for eligible case-control studies reporting relevant parameters that compared periodontal status between MI and control subjects. The odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) from each study were pooled to estimate the strength of the association between MI and periodontitis. The mean differences and 95% CIs for periodontal-related parameters were calculated to determine their overall effects. Results: Seventeen studies including a total of 3456 MI patients and 3875 non-MI control subjects were included. The pooled OR for the association between MI and periodontitis was 2.531 (95% CI: 1.927-3.324). The mean differences (95% CIs) for clinical attachment loss, probing depth, bleeding on probing, plaque index, and the number of missing teeth were 1.000 (0.726-1.247), 1.209 (0.538-1.880), 0.342 (0.129-0.555), 0.383 (0.205-0.560), and 4.122 (2.012-6.232), respectively. Conclusion: With the current evidence, the results support the presence of a significant association between MI and periodontitis. Moreover, MI patients had worse periodontal and oral hygiene status and fewer teeth than did control subjects. More high-quality and well-designed studies focusing on the casual relationship between MI and periodontitis should be conducted in the future.

  13. Culture, risk factors and suicide in rural China: a psychological autopsy case control study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, J.; Conwell, Y.; Zhou, L.; Jiang, C.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Previous research on sociocultural factors for Chinese suicide have been basically limited to single case studies or qualitative research with ethnographic methodology. The current study examines the major risk factors and some cultural uniqueness related to Chinese rural suicide using a quantitative design. Method This is a case control study with 66 completed suicides and 66 living controls obtained from psychological autopsy interviews in rural China. Results Both bivariate analyses and the multiple regression model have found that the Chinese rural suicide patterns are basically similar to those in most other cultures in the world: strong predictors of rural Chinese suicide are the psychopathological, psychological, and physical health variables, followed by social support and negative and stressful life events. Other significant correlates include lower education, poverty, religion, and family disputes. Conclusion Culture has an important impact on suicide patterns in a society. PMID:15521827

  14. Opioid system genes in alcoholism: a case-control study in Croatian population.

    PubMed

    Cupic, B; Stefulj, J; Zapletal, E; Matosic, A; Bordukalo-Niksic, T; Cicin-Sain, L; Gabrilovac, J

    2013-10-01

    Due to their involvement in dependence pathways, opioid system genes represent strong candidates for association studies investigating alcoholism. In this study, single nucleotide polymorphisms within the genes for mu (OPRM1) and kappa (OPRK1) opioid receptors and precursors of their ligands - proopiomelanocortin (POMC), coding for beta-endorphin and prodynorphin (PDYN) coding for dynorphins, were analyzed in a case-control study that included 354 male alcohol-dependent and 357 male control subjects from Croatian population. Analysis of allele and genotype frequencies of the selected polymorphisms of the genes OPRM1/POMC and OPRK1/PDYN revealed no differences between the tested groups. The same was true when alcohol-dependent persons were subdivided according to the Cloninger's criteria into type-1 and type-2 groups, known to differ in the extent of genetic control. Thus, the data obtained suggest no association of the selected polymorphisms of the genes OPRM1/POMC and OPRK1/PDYN with alcoholism in Croatian population.

  15. Adherence to Buprenorphine Maintenance Treatment in Opioid Dependence Syndrome: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Bandawar, Mrunal; Kandasamy, Arun; Chand, Prabhat; Murthy, Pratima; Benegal, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Background: Opioid Use disorders are emerging as a serious public health concern in India. Opioid substitution treatment is one of the emerging forms of treatment in this population which needs more evidence to increase its availability and address prejudices towards the same. Materials and Methods: This is a case control study with retrospective design reviewing the charts of patients with opioid dependence syndrome registered between January 2005 to December 2012. Adherence to treatment was the outcome variable assessed in this study. Results: The odds of the Buprenorphine Maintenance Treatment (BMT) group remaining in treatment is 4.5 (P < 0.005) times more than Naltrexone Maintenance Treatment (NMT) group and 7 times (P < 0.001) more than Psychosocial intervention (PST) alone group. Discussion: We believe that these study findings will help in reducing the prejudice towards BMT and encourage further research in this field. Conclusion: BMT has a better adherence rate than other treatments in opioid use disorders. PMID:26664083

  16. High reprint orders in medical journals and pharmaceutical industry funding: case-control study.

    PubMed

    Handel, Adam E; Patel, Sunil V; Pakpoor, Julia; Ebers, George C; Goldacre, Ben; Ramagopalan, Sreeram V

    2012-06-28

    To assess the extent to which funding and study design are associated with high reprint orders. Case-control study. Top articles by size of reprint orders in seven journals, 2002-09. Lancet, Lancet Neurology, Lancet Oncology (Lancet Group), BMJ, Gut, Heart, and Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry (BMJ Group) matched to contemporaneous articles not in the list of high reprint orders. Funding and design of randomised controlled trials or other study designs. Median reprint orders for the seven journals ranged from 3000 to 126,350. Papers with high reprint orders were more likely to be funded by the pharmaceutical industry than were control papers (industry funding versus other or none: odds ratio 8.64, 95% confidence interval 5.09 to 14.68, and mixed funding versus other or none: 3.72, 2.43 to 5.70). Funding by the pharmaceutical industry is associated with high numbers of reprint orders.

  17. Occupation and risk of pancreatic cancer: a population-based case-control study in iowa.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yawei; Cantor, Kenneth P; Lynch, Charles F; Zhu, Yong; Zheng, Tongzhang

    2005-04-01

    Previous epidemiological studies have inconsistently linked various occupations and industries to pancreatic cancer risk. We analyzed data from a population-based case-control study conducted in Iowa involving 376 histologically confirmed incident pancreatic cancer cases and 2434 control subjects. A significantly increased risk was observed among men who worked in the following industries: chemical and allied products, transportation, and elementary and secondary schools. Increased risks also were observed in men who were employed as truck drivers; railroad brake, signal, and switch operators; purchasing agents and buyers; teachers; insurance agents; and retail supervisors. Among women, a significantly increased risk of pancreatic cancer was found for employment in furniture and home furnishing stores, and a borderline significantly increased risk among textile sewing machine operators and tenders. Working in several occupations and industries was associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer in this study, and these associations warrant further investigation.

  18. Case-control studies of sporadic cryptosporidiosis in Melbourne and Adelaide, Australia.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, B.; Sinclair, M. I.; Forbes, A. B.; Veitch, M.; Kirk, M.; Cunliffe, D.; Willis, J.; Fairley, C. K.

    2002-01-01

    Few studies have assessed risk factors for sporadic cryptosporidiosis in industrialized countries, even though it may be numerically more common than outbreaks of disease. We carried out case-control studies assessing risk factors for sporadic disease in Melbourne and Adelaide, which have water supplies from different ends of the raw water spectrum. In addition to examining drinking water, we assessed several other exposures. 201 cases and 795 controls were recruited for Melbourne and 134 cases and 536 controls were recruited for Adelaide. Risk factors were similar for the two cities, with swimming in public pools and contact with a person with diarrhoea being most important. The consumption of plain tap water was not found to be associated with disease. This study emphasizes the need for regular public health messages to the public and swimming pool managers in an attempt to prevent sporadic cryptosporidiosis, as well as outbreaks of disease. PMID:12113486

  19. National case-control study of homicide offending and methamphetamine use.

    PubMed

    Stretesky, Paul B

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between methamphetamine use and homicide. To carry out this study, data from the National Household Survey on Drug Abuse and Survey of Inmates in State and Federal Correctional Facilities were combined to create a case-control design. The main exposure measure is methamphetamine use and the main outcome measure is homicide. Results suggest that the odds of committing a homicide are nearly 9 times greater for an individual who uses methamphetamine. More importantly, the association between methamphetamine use and homicide persists even after adjusting for alternative drug use (i.e., alcohol, heroin, crack, cocaine, PCP, LSD), sex, race, income, age, marital status, previous arrests, military experience, and education level. Methamphetamine was the only drug use variable that was strongly correlated with homicide. These results support recent clinical studies that suggest methamphetamine use is different than other drug use in its effects on violence.

  20. On Combining Family–based and Population-based Case-control Data in Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yingye; Heagerty, Patrick J.; Hsu, Li; Newcomb, Polly A

    2011-01-01

    Summary Combining data collected from different sources can potentially enhance statistical efficiency in estimating effects of environmental or genetic factors or gene-environment interactions. However, combining data across studies becomes complicated when data are collected under different study designs, such as family-based and unrelated individual-based case-control design. In this paper, we describe likelihood based approaches that permit the joint estimation of covariate effects on disease risk under study designs that include cases, relatives of cases, and unrelated individuals. Our methods accommodate familial residual correlation and a variety of ascertainment schemes. Extensive simulation experiments demonstrate that the proposed methods for estimation and inference perform well in realistic settings. Efficiencies of different designs are contrasted in the simulation. We applied the methods to data from the Colorectal Cancer Family Registry. PMID:20163402

  1. [Case-control study of risk factors associated with constipation. The FREI Study].

    PubMed

    Comas Vives, A; Polanco Allué, I

    2005-04-01

    Children represent one of the patient groups most affected by constipation. Our objective was to identify and describe the risk factors associated with childhood constipation. The study had a case-control, retrospective, open and multicenter design. Clinical data on possible risk factors were collected through an ad-hoc questionnaire. Two groups were studied: children with and without constipation. Nine hundred twenty-one children were recruited; of these, 898 (97.6%) were included in the statistical analysis. There were 408 (45.4%) children in the constipated group and 490 (54.5%) in the non-constipated group. Most of the children with constipation (53.6%) had a maternal history of constipation compared with 21.4% of children without constipation (p < 0.05). More than half (53.2%) of the constipated children reported a lack of regularity in their toilet habits while 64.9 % of the children without constipation went to the toilet regularly. Toilet training started slightly earlier (at 3 years) in children without constipation (93.2%) than in those with the disorder (83.8%) (p < 0.05). At school, 57.4% of the children with constipation never used the toilet compared with 26.8% of those without constipation (p < 0.05). A total of 73.4% of children with constipation drank less than four glasses of water per day compared with 47.1% of those without constipation (p < 0.05). Consumption of vegetables and legumes in the diet was significantly lower in children with constipation than in those without (p < 0.05). The risk factors linked to childhood constipation found in this study were a familial history of constipation, irregular toilet habits, low dietary fiber contents and no fruit intake. The main preventive factors against constipation were water and vegetable consumption and training on the use of the toilet at school. Daily toilet training and dietary changes are needed to prevent constipation among children and to achieve regular defecation. This preventive

  2. The mid-term efficacy of intra-articular hyaluronic acid injections on joint structure: a nested case control study.

    PubMed

    Oka, Hiroyuki; Akune, Toru; Muraki, Shigeyuki; Tanaka, Sakae; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kozo; Yoshimura, Noriko

    2013-07-01

    Intra-articular (IA) injection of hyaluronic acid (HA) has been shown to relieve osteoarthritis (OA)-related pain and improve joint structure within a 1-year period. We examined the mid-term (2-year) efficacy of IA-HA in Japanese subjects by using a large-scale population-based cohort of the Research on Osteoarthritis/Osteoporosis Against Disability study. We performed a nested case control study of 60 case control pairs matched for age (within 1 year), sex, Kellgren and Lawrence grade, and history of knee pain. The mean follow-up period after IA-HA series was 2.9 years in case patients. We examined the association of IA-HA with knee radiographic severity and knee pain. To estimate radiographic severity of OA, six distinct features--joint space area and the minimum joint space width at medial and lateral sides, osteophyte area, and tibiofemoral angle--were measured using a fully automatic computer-assisted program. Comparison of the radiographic parameters between case patients and controls showed that the medial and lateral joint space areas were significantly bigger in case patients than in controls. After constructing a multivariate logistic regression model to examine the correlation of knee pain, IA-HA, and radiographic features, we found that unlike radiographic features, IA-HA was protectively associated with the presence of pain. IA-HA might effectively improve joint structure and relieve pain in patients with knee OA.

  3. Dietary factors and the risk of glioma in adults: results of a case-control study in Melbourne, Australia.

    PubMed

    Giles, G G; McNeil, J J; Donnan, G; Webley, C; Staples, M P; Ireland, P D; Hurley, S F; Salzberg, M

    1994-11-01

    In a population-based case-control study of 416 incident gliomas in adults carried out in Melbourne, Australia, between 1987 and 1991, 409 age-sex-matched case-control pairs (243 male and 166 female) had adequate data available to examine associations between the dietary intake of N-nitroso compounds, N-nitroso precursors, other nutrients including N-nitroso inhibitors, and the risk of glioma. Dietary intakes were based on the reported frequency of consumption of 59 food items. Increased odds ratio (OR) were observed in males who consumed high levels of bacon, corned meats, apples, melons and oil. OR less than unity were observed in men consuming cabbage and cola drinks, and in women who consumed wholegrain bread, pasta, corned meat, bananas, cauliflower, brocoli, cola drinks and nuts. Generally, N-nitroso associations were greater in men and micronutrient associations were greater in women. Elevated OR in men, but not women, were associated with the intake of N-nitroso dimethylamine (NDMA), retinol and vitamin E. The intake of nitrate (largely of vegetable origin) was protective in women but not in men. When analyzed using multiple logistic regression, the association with NDMA intake in males was not modified by dietary micronutrient intakes. In females, beta carotene alone, though not directly associated with risk, modified the effect of NDMA. On balance, this study added only limited support to the N-nitroso hypothesis of glial carcinogenesis.

  4. Serum Taurine and Stroke Risk in Women: A Prospective, Nested Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fen; Koenig, Karen L.; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Jonas, Saran; Afanasyeva, Yelena; Wójcik, Oktawia P.; Costa, Max; Chen, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Background Taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid), a conditionally essential sulfur-containing amino acid, is mainly obtained from diet in humans. Experimental studies have shown that taurine’s main biological actions include bile salt conjugation, blood pressure regulation, anti-oxidation, and anti-inflammation. Methods We conducted a prospective case-control study nested in the New York University Women’s Health Study, a cohort study involving 14,274 women enrolled since 1985. Taurine was measured in pre-diagnostic serum samples of 241 stroke cases and 479 matched controls. Results There was no statistically significant association between serum taurine and stroke risk in the overall study population. The adjusted ORs for stroke were 1.0 (reference), 0.87 (95% CI, 0.59–1.28), and 1.03 (95% CI, 0.69–1.54) in increasing tertiles of taurine (64.3–126.6, 126.7–152.9, and 153.0–308.5 nmol/mL, respectively). A significant inverse association between serum taurine and stroke risk was observed among never smokers, with an adjusted OR of 0.66 (95% CI, 0.37–1.18) and 0.50 (95% CI, 0.26–0.94) for the second and third tertile, respectively (p for trend = 0.01), but not among past or current smokers (p for interaction < 0.01). Conclusions We observed no overall association between serum taurine and stroke risk, although a protective effect was observed in never smokers, which requires further investigation. Taurine, Stroke, Epidemiology, Prospective, Case-control study, NYUWHS. PMID:26866594

  5. Serum Taurine and Stroke Risk in Women: A Prospective, Nested Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fen; Koenig, Karen L; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Jonas, Saran; Afanasyeva, Yelena; Wójcik, Oktawia P; Costa, Max; Chen, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid), a conditionally essential sulfur-containing amino acid, is mainly obtained from diet in humans. Experimental studies have shown that taurine's main biological actions include bile salt conjugation, blood pressure regulation, anti-oxidation, and anti-inflammation. We conducted a prospective case-control study nested in the New York University Women's Health Study, a cohort study involving 14,274 women enrolled since 1985. Taurine was measured in pre-diagnostic serum samples of 241 stroke cases and 479 matched controls. There was no statistically significant association between serum taurine and stroke risk in the overall study population. The adjusted ORs for stroke were 1.0 (reference), 0.87 (95% CI, 0.59-1.28), and 1.03 (95% CI, 0.69-1.54) in increasing tertiles of taurine (64.3-126.6, 126.7-152.9, and 153.0-308.5 nmol/mL, respectively). A significant inverse association between serum taurine and stroke risk was observed among never smokers, with an adjusted OR of 0.66 (95% CI, 0.37-1.18) and 0.50 (95% CI, 0.26-0.94) for the second and third tertile, respectively (p for trend = 0.01), but not among past or current smokers (p for interaction < 0.01). We observed no overall association between serum taurine and stroke risk, although a protective effect was observed in never smokers, which requires further investigation. Taurine, Stroke, Epidemiology, Prospective, Case-control study, NYUWHS.

  6. Salivirus in Children and Its Association with Childhood Acute Gastroenteritis: A Paired Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jie-Mei; Ao, Yuan-Yun; Liu, Na; Li, Li-Li; Duan, Zhao-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Salivirus was recently discovered in children with gastroenteritis and in sewage. Though a causative role for salivirus in childhood gastroenteritis was suggested in the previous study, the relationship between salivirus and acute gastroenteritis has not yet been clearly clarified. The sewage strain reported by Ng, although represented by incomplete genome sequencing data, was distinct from previously reported saliviruses, and had not previously been detected in humans. A case-control study examining 461 paired stool samples from children with diarrhea and healthy controls (1:1) was conducted in this study. Also, common diarrheal viruses were detected and complete genome of a salivirus was determined. Results showed that salivirus was detected in 16 (3.5%) and 13 (2.8%) of the case and control samples, respectively; no differences in detection rates (p=0.571) or mean values of viral loads (p=0.400) were observed between the groups. Multivariate Cox regression revealed no association between salivirus and gastroenteritis (p=0.774). The data also demonstrated that salivirus infection did not exacerbate clinical symptoms of gastroenteritis in children. Furthermore, complete genome sequence of a salivirus recovered from the feces of a child with diarrhea (i.e., SaliV-FHB) shared a 99% nucleotide identity with the sewage strain. In conclusion, a paired case-control study did not support a causative role for salivirus strains detected in this study with pediatric gastroenteritis. This study also demonstrated that all known saliviruses can be detected in the feces of children with or without gastroenteritis.

  7. Salivirus in Children and Its Association with Childhood Acute Gastroenteritis: A Paired Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jie-mei; Ao, Yuan-yun; Liu, Na; Li, Li-li; Duan, Zhao-jun

    2015-01-01

    Salivirus was recently discovered in children with gastroenteritis and in sewage. Though a causative role for salivirus in childhood gastroenteritis was suggested in the previous study, the relationship between salivirus and acute gastroenteritis has not yet been clearly clarified. The sewage strain reported by Ng, although represented by incomplete genome sequencing data, was distinct from previously reported saliviruses, and had not previously been detected in humans. A case-control study examining 461 paired stool samples from children with diarrhea and healthy controls (1:1) was conducted in this study. Also, common diarrheal viruses were detected and complete genome of a salivirus was determined. Results showed that salivirus was detected in 16 (3.5%) and 13 (2.8%) of the case and control samples, respectively; no differences in detection rates (p=0.571) or mean values of viral loads (p=0.400) were observed between the groups. Multivariate Cox regression revealed no association between salivirus and gastroenteritis (p=0.774). The data also demonstrated that salivirus infection did not exacerbate clinical symptoms of gastroenteritis in children. Furthermore, complete genome sequence of a salivirus recovered from the feces of a child with diarrhea (i.e., SaliV-FHB) shared a 99% nucleotide identity with the sewage strain. In conclusion, a paired case-control study did not support a causative role for salivirus strains detected in this study with pediatric gastroenteritis. This study also demonstrated that all known saliviruses can be detected in the feces of children with or without gastroenteritis. PMID:26193371

  8. Influence of social factors on avoidable mortality: a hospital-based case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Bautista, Daniel; Alfonso, José Luis; Corella, Dolores; Saiz, Carmen

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The effect of socioeconomic factors on avoidable mortality at an individual level is not well known, since most studies showing this association are based on aggregate data. The purpose of this study was to determine socioeconomic differences between those patients who die of avoidable causes and those who do not die. METHODS: A matched case-control study was carried out regarding in-hospital avoidable mortality (Holland's medical care indicators) that occurred in a university hospital serving a Spanish-Mediterranean population during a 30-month period. RESULTS: We studied 82 cases of death from avoidable causes and 300 controls matched on medical care indicators and age. The variables that showed a statistically significant association with in-hospital avoidable mortality were number of diagnoses (the greater the number, the higher the risk), length of stay (patients staying seven or more days presented a lower risk), and education. Those patients with low and middle educational levels showed a greater risk of avoidable mortality (adjusted odds ratio=3.57 and 2.82, respectively) than those patients with higher levels of education. CONCLUSIONS: Consistent with the findings of studies based on aggregate data, our case-control analyses indicated that among several socioeconomic variables studied, educational level was significantly associated with the risk of in-hospital avoidable mortality, regardless of age and medical care indicators. Patients with low levels of education (<6 years of schooling) were at highest risk for in-hospital avoidable mortality, followed by those with middle levels of education (7-10 years of schooling). PMID:15736332

  9. A cohort mortality and nested case-control study of French and Austrian talc workers

    PubMed Central

    Wild, P; Leodolter, K; Refregier, M; Schmidt, H; Zidek, T; Haidinger, G

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To study whether the mortality from non-malignant and malignant respiratory diseases of workers employed in French and Austrian talc mines and mills is related to their long term occupational exposure. Methods: Two historical cohorts were set up comprising all male subjects who had been working continuously for at least 1 year in a series of talc producing companies in France and Austria. The French cohort consisted of those employed at a site in the French Pyrenees and working between 1 January 1945 and 31 December 1994. The Austrian cohort consisted of the workers employed between 1 January 1972 and 31 December 1995 in one of four industrial sites in the Austrian Alps. The mortality within the cohorts was compared with local death rates. Two nested case-control studies focusing on non-malignant and malignant respiratory diseases were set up to estimate possible dose-response relations with cumulative exposure to talc dust based on an industry specific job exposure matrix. Results: Mortality from lung cancer was in small excess in both cohorts (France, standardised mortality ratio (SMR) 1.23, 21 cases observed, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.76 to 1.89; Austria, SMR 1.06, seven observed, 95% CI 0.43 to 2.19). A non-significant excess mortality was found for all non-malignant respiratory diseases in the French cohort due to a significant excess for pneumoconiosis (SMR 5.56, three observed, 95% CI 1.12 to 16.2). The case-control study of non-malignant respiratory disease showed an increased mortality in the highest exposure groups (odds ratio (OR) 2.5 for a cumulative exposure ≥800 y.mg/m3) with a significant trend (OR/100 y.mg/m3 1.08) with cumulative exposure to talc. On the contrary, no increasing trend could be found in the case-control study of lung cancer. This result must be interpreted considering the small cohort size. Adjustment on smoking and exposure to quartz did not influence these results to any extent. Conclusions: The mortality

  10. Poison prevention practices and medically attended poisoning in young children: multicentre case-control study.

    PubMed

    Kendrick, Denise; Majsak-Newman, Gosia; Benford, Penny; Coupland, Carol; Timblin, Clare; Hayes, Mike; Goodenough, Trudy; Hawkins, Adrian; Reading, Richard

    2017-04-01

    Childhood poisonings are common, placing a substantial burden on health services. Case-control studies have found inconsistent evidence about modifiable risk factors for poisonings among children aged 0-4 years. This study quantifies associations between poison prevention practices and medically attended poisonings in children aged 0-4 years. Multicentre case-control study conducted at hospitals, minor injury units and family practices from four study centres in England between 2010 and 2013. Participants comprised 567 children presenting with unintentional poisoning occurring at home and 2320 community control participants matched on age, sex, date of event and study centre. Parents/caregivers provided data on safety practices, safety equipment use, home hazards and potential confounders by means of self-completion questionnaires. Data were analysed using conditional logistic regression. Compared with community controls, parents of poisoned children were significantly more likely not to store medicines out of reach (adjusted OR (AOR) 1.59; 95% CI 1.21 to 2.09; population attributable fraction (PAF) 15%), not to store medicines safely (locked or out of reach (AOR 1.83; 95% CI 1.38 to 2.42; PAF 16%) and not to have put all medicines (AOR 2.11; 95% CI 1.54 to 2.90; PAF 20%) or household products (AOR 1.79, 95% CI 1.29 to 2.48; PAF 11%) away immediately after use. Not storing medicines out of reach or locked away and not putting medicines and household products away immediately after use increased the odds of secondary care attended poisonings in children aged 0-4 years. If associations are causal, implementing these poison prevention practices could each prevent between 11% and 20% of poisonings. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  11. Multilocus genetic risk score associates with ischemic stroke in case-control and prospective cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Malik, Rainer; Bevan, Steve; Nalls, Michael A; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Devan, William J; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Ibrahim-Verbaas, Carla A; Verhaaren, Benjamin F J; Bis, Joshua C; Joon, Aron Y; de Stefano, Anita L; Fornage, Myriam; Psaty, Bruce M; Ikram, M Arfan; Launer, Lenore J; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Sharma, Pankaj; Mitchell, Braxton D; Rosand, Jonathan; Meschia, James F; Levi, Christopher; Rothwell, Peter M; Sudlow, Cathie; Markus, Hugh S; Seshadri, Sudha; Dichgans, Martin

    2014-02-01

    Genome-wide association studies have revealed multiple common variants associated with known risk factors for ischemic stroke (IS). However, their aggregate effect on risk is uncertain. We aimed to generate a multilocus genetic risk score (GRS) for IS based on genome-wide association studies data from clinical-based samples and to establish its external validity in prospective population-based cohorts. Three thousand five hundred forty-eight clinic-based IS cases and 6399 controls from the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 2 were used for derivation of the GRS. Subjects from the METASTROKE consortium served as a replication sample. The validation sample consisted of 22 751 participants from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology consortium. We selected variants that had reached genome-wide significance in previous association studies on established risk factors for IS. A combined GRS for atrial fibrillation, coronary artery disease, hypertension, and systolic blood pressure significantly associated with IS both in the case-control samples and in the prospective population-based studies. Subjects in the top quintile of the combined GRS had >2-fold increased risk of IS compared with subjects in the lowest quintile. Addition of the combined GRS to a simple model based on sex significantly improved the prediction of IS in the combined clinic-based samples but not in the population-based studies, and there was no significant improvement in net reclassification. A multilocus GRS based on common variants for established cardiovascular risk factors was significantly associated with IS both in clinic-based samples and in the general population. However, the improvement in clinical risk prediction was found to be small.

  12. Sympathetic skin response in multiple sclerosis: a meta-analysis of case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Margaritella, Nicolò; Mendozzi, Laura; Garegnani, Massimo; Gilardi, Elisabetta; Nemni, Raffaello; Pugnetti, Luigi

    2017-09-29

    The usefulness of sympathetic skin responses (SSR) in multiple sclerosis (MS) has been advocated by several studies in the last 20 years; however, due to a great heterogeneity of findings, a comprehensive meta-analysis of case-control studies is in order to pinpoint consistencies and investigate the causes of discrepancies. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane databases for case-control studies comparing SSR absence frequency and latency between patients with MS and healthy controls. Thirteen eligible studies including 415 MS patients and 331 healthy controls were identified. The pooled analysis showed that SSR can be always obtained in healthy controls while 34% of patients had absent SSRs in at least one limb (95% CI 22-47%; p < 0.0001) but with considerable heterogeneity across studies (I (2) = 90.3%). Patients' age explained 22% of the overall variability and positive correlations were found with Expanded Disability Status Scale and disease duration. The pooled mean difference of SSR latency showed a significant increase in patients on both upper (193 ms; 95% CI 120-270 ms) and lower (350 ms; 95% CI 190-510 ms) extremities. We tested the discriminatory value of SSR latency thresholds defined as the 95% confidence interval (CI) upper bound of the healthy controls, and validated the results on a new dataset. The lower limb threshold of 1.964 s produces the best results in terms of sensitivity 0.86, specificity 0.67, positive predicted value 0.75 and negative predicted value 0.80. Despite a considerable heterogeneity of findings, there is evidence that SSR is a useful tool in MS.

  13. Reduced Risk of Barrett's Esophagus in Statin Users: Case-Control Study and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Beales, Ian L P; Dearman, Leanne; Vardi, Inna; Loke, Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Use of statins has been associated with a reduced incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma in population-based studies. However there are few studies examining statin use and the development of Barrett's esophagus. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between statin use and the presence of Barrett's esophagus in patients having their first gastroscopy. We have performed a case-control study comparing statin use between patients with, and without, an incident diagnosis of non-dysplastic Barrett's esophagus. Male Barrett's cases (134) were compared to 268 male age-matched controls in each of two control groups (erosive gastro-esophageal reflux and dyspepsia without significant upper gastrointestinal disease). Risk factor and drug exposure were established using standardised interviews. Logistic regression was used to compare statin exposure and correct for confounding factors. We performed a meta-analysis pooling our results with three other case-control studies. Regular statin use was associated with a significantly lower incidence of Barrett's esophagus compared to the combined control groups [adjusted OR 0.62 (95 % confidence intervals 0.37-0.93)]. This effect was more marked in combined statin plus aspirin users [adjusted OR 0.43 (95 % CI 0.21-0.89)]. The inverse association between statin or statin plus aspirin use and risk of Barrett's was significantly greater with longer duration of use. Meta-analysis of pooled data (1098 Barrett's, 2085 controls) showed that statin use was significantly associated with a reduced risk of Barrett's esophagus [pooled adjusted OR 0.63 (95 % CI 0.51-0.77)]. Statin use is associated with a reduced incidence of a new diagnosis of Barrett's esophagus.

  14. Diagonal Earlobe Crease as a Significant Marker for Coronary Artery Disease: A Case-control Study.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Rida; Kausar, Komal; Qavi, Ahmed H; Minto, Moeed H; Ilyas, Fariha; Assad, Salman; Shah, Saeed U

    2017-02-05

    To investigate the association between diagonal earlobe crease (DELC) and coronary artery disease (CAD). Limited data exists in South Asia and no prior studies have been performed in Pakistan to assess this relationship. In this case-control study, 200 participants from December 2015 to March 2016 at Shifa International Hospital, Islamabad, Pakistan were enrolled. Consecutive non-probability sampling was used to recruit patients. Cases were enrolled from cardiac care unit (CCU) of the hospital with angiography-proven CAD. Controls were selected from surgical, medical and neurology units of the hospital if they had no previously established evidence or symptoms of CAD. Patients were evaluated in terms of age and any history of hypertension, diabetes and/or smoking. Cases and controls were examined separately by two investigators for the unilateral or bilateral presence of DELC of the lobular portion of either auricle. Patients with ear piercings were excluded from the study. The data was analyzed in statistical product and service solutions (SPSS) (IBM, Delaware, Chicago), and an online statistical software. Out of the 200 patients, 126 (63%) were males and 74 (37%) were females. In the 100 cases, 76 had DELC and 24 had no crease whereas, among the 100 controls, 36 had DELC and 64 had no DELC (p <0.001, OR = 5.63, CI = 2.91-10.93). The prevalence of diseases such as hypertension, diabetes, smoking among the cases and controls were 66%, 53%, 27% and 27%, 18%, 25% respectively. The effect of hypertension and diabetes on the presence of DELC was statistically significant (p <0.05) but the impact of smoking on DELC presence was insignificant (p >0.05). There is a significant association between DELC and CAD. This is the first case-control study from South Asia disclosing this important correlation. Our study also reports a high frequency of DELC in patients suffering from hypertension and diabetes mellitus. No association between smoking and DELC was found.

  15. High Seroprevalence of Leptospira Exposure in Meat Workers in Northern Mexico: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Hernandez-Tinoco, Jesus; Sanchez-Anguiano, Luis Francisco; Ramos-Nevarez, Agar; Cerrillo-Soto, Sandra Margarita; Saenz-Soto, Leandro; Martinez-Ramirez, Lucio

    2016-03-01

    The seroepidemiology of Leptospira infection in workers occupationally exposed to raw meat has been poorly studied. This work aimed to determine the association between Leptospira exposure and the occupation of meat worker, and to determine the seroprevalence association with socio-demographic, work, clinical and behavioral characteristics of the meat workers studied. We performed a case-control study in 124 meat workers and 124 age- and gender-matched control subjects in Durango City, Mexico. Sera of cases and controls were analyzed for anti-Leptospira IgG antibodies using a commercially available enzyme immunoassay. Data of meat workers were obtained with the aid of a questionnaire. The association of Leptospira exposure with the characteristics of meat workers was analyzed by bivariate and multivariate analyses. Anti-Leptospira IgG antibodies were found in 22 (17.7%) of 124 meat workers and in eight (6.5%) of 124 controls (OR = 3.12; 95% CI: 1.33 - 7.33; P = 0.006). Seroprevalence of Leptospira infection was similar between male butchers (17.6%) and female butchers (18.2%) (P = 1.00). Multivariate analysis of socio-demographic, work and behavioral variables showed that Leptospira exposure was associated with duration in the activity, rural residence, and consumption of snake meat and unwashed raw fruits. This is the first case-control study of the association of Leptospira exposure with the occupation of meat worker. Results indicate that meat workers represent a risk group for Leptospira exposure. Risk factors for Leptospira exposure found in this study may help in the design of optimal preventive measures against Leptospira infection.

  16. Multilocus genetic risk score associates with ischemic stroke in case-control and prospective cohort studies

    PubMed Central

    Malik, R; Bevan, S; Nalls, MA; Holliday, EG; Devan, WJ; Cheng, YC; Ibrahim-Verbaas, CA; Verhaaren, BF; Bis, JC; Joon, AY; de Stefano, AL; Fornage, M; Psaty, BM; Ikram, MA; Launer, LJ; van Duijn, CM; Sharma, P; Mitchell, BD; Rosand, J; Meschia, JF; Levi, C; Rothwell, PM; Sudlow, C; Markus, HS; Seshadri, S; Dichgans, M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Genome-wide association studies have revealed multiple common variants associated with known risk factors for ischemic stroke (IS). However, their aggregate effect on risk is uncertain. We aimed to generate a multilocus genetic risk score (GRS) for IS based on genome-wide association studies data from clinical-based samples and to establish its external validity in prospective population-based cohorts. METHODS Three thousand five hundred forty-eight clinic-based IS cases and 6399 controls from the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 2 were used for derivation of the GRS. Subjects from the METASTROKE consortium served as a replication sample. The validation sample consisted of 22 751 participants from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology consortium. We selected variants that had reached genome-wide significance in previous association studies on established risk factors for IS. RESULTS A combined GRS for atrial fibrillation, coronary artery disease, hypertension, and systolic blood pressure significantly associated with IS both in the case-control samples and in the prospective population-based studies. Subjects in the top quintile of the combined GRS had >2-fold increased risk of IS compared with subjects in the lowest quintile. Addition of the combined GRS to a simple model based on sex significantly improved the prediction of IS in the combined clinic-based samples but not in the population-based studies, and there was no significant improvement in net reclassification. CONCLUSIONS A multilocus GRS based on common variants for established cardiovascular risk factors was significantly associated with IS both in clinic-based samples and in the general population. However, the improvement in clinical risk prediction was found to be small. PMID:24436234

  17. High Seroprevalence of Leptospira Exposure in Meat Workers in Northern Mexico: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Hernandez-Tinoco, Jesus; Sanchez-Anguiano, Luis Francisco; Ramos-Nevarez, Agar; Cerrillo-Soto, Sandra Margarita; Saenz-Soto, Leandro; Martinez-Ramirez, Lucio

    2016-01-01

    Background The seroepidemiology of Leptospira infection in workers occupationally exposed to raw meat has been poorly studied. This work aimed to determine the association between Leptospira exposure and the occupation of meat worker, and to determine the seroprevalence association with socio-demographic, work, clinical and behavioral characteristics of the meat workers studied. Methods We performed a case-control study in 124 meat workers and 124 age- and gender-matched control subjects in Durango City, Mexico. Sera of cases and controls were analyzed for anti-Leptospira IgG antibodies using a commercially available enzyme immunoassay. Data of meat workers were obtained with the aid of a questionnaire. The association of Leptospira exposure with the characteristics of meat workers was analyzed by bivariate and multivariate analyses. Results Anti-Leptospira IgG antibodies were found in 22 (17.7%) of 124 meat workers and in eight (6.5%) of 124 controls (OR = 3.12; 95% CI: 1.33 - 7.33; P = 0.006). Seroprevalence of Leptospira infection was similar between male butchers (17.6%) and female butchers (18.2%) (P = 1.00). Multivariate analysis of socio-demographic, work and behavioral variables showed that Leptospira exposure was associated with duration in the activity, rural residence, and consumption of snake meat and unwashed raw fruits. Conclusions This is the first case-control study of the association of Leptospira exposure with the occupation of meat worker. Results indicate that meat workers represent a risk group for Leptospira exposure. Risk factors for Leptospira exposure found in this study may help in the design of optimal preventive measures against Leptospira infection. PMID:26858797

  18. Case-Control Study of Risk Factors for Meningococcal Disease in Chile.

    PubMed

    Olea, Andrea; Matute, Isabel; González, Claudia; Delgado, Iris; Poffald, Lucy; Pedroni, Elena; Alfaro, Tania; Hirmas, Macarena; Nájera, Manuel; Gormaz, Ana; López, Darío; Loayza, Sergio; Ferreccio, Catterina; Gallegos, Doris; Fuentes, Rodrigo; Vial, Pablo; Aguilera, Ximena

    2017-07-01

    An outbreak of meningococcal disease with a case-fatality rate of 30% and caused by predominantly serogroup W of Neisseria meningitidis began in Chile in 2012. This outbreak required a case-control study to assess determinants and risk factors for infection. We identified confirmed cases during January 2012-March 2013 and selected controls by random sampling of the population, matched for age and sex, resulting in 135 case-patients and 618 controls. Sociodemographic variables, habits, and previous illnesses were studied. Analyses yielded adjusted odds ratios as estimators of the probability of disease development. Results indicated that conditions of social vulnerability, such as low income and overcrowding, as well as familial history of this disease and clinical histories, especially chronic diseases and hospitalization for respiratory conditions, increased the probability of illness. Findings should contribute to direction of intersectoral public policies toward a highly vulnerable social group to enable them to improve their living conditions and health.

  19. Tobacco chewing and risk of gastric cancer: a case-control study in Yemen.

    PubMed

    Al-Qadasi, F A; Shah, S A; Ghazi, H F

    2017-01-23

    This study aimed to assess the risk factors for gastric cancer in Yemen. A hospital-based case-control study of 70 cases and 140 controls was carried out in Sana'a city between May and October 2014. A structured questionnaire was used to collect information through direct interview. Living in rural areas, tobacco chewing and drinking untreated water were significant risk factors for gastric cancer. Frequent consumption of chicken, cheese, milk, starchy vegetables, cucumber, carrots, leeks, sweet pepper, fruit drinks, legumes and olive oil were associated significantly with decreased risk of gastric cancer. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that chewing tobacco and frequent consumption of white bread were associated with increased risk of gastric cancer, whereas frequent consumption of chicken, cooked potatoes and fruit drinks had an inverse association. Risk of gastric cancer can be prevented by health education and increasing community awareness.

  20. Dietary total antioxidant capacity and the risk of breast cancer: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Z; Bahadoran, Z; Abedini, S; Houshyar-Rad, A; Rashidkhani, B

    2015-09-28

    There is growing evidence that dietary antioxidants may have favourable effects in reducing cancer risk. In a case-control study we investigated the association of dietary total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and risk of breast cancer. Sociodemographic data, medical history and anthropometric measurements were collected from 275 women (100 breast cancer cases & 175 controls). Participants' usual dietary intake was measured using a validated semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire and their dietary TAC was estimated. An inverse, but non-significant, association was observed between dietary TAC and breast cancer risk. Multiple logistic regression models based on TAC of individual food groups showed that consumption of fruits and vegetables with higher TAC (μmolTE/100 g) was associated with a significantly decreased risk of breast cancer. Our study supports a protective effect of dietary antioxidants in relation to breast cancer risk. Food selection based on TAC of foods may be an effective strategy to modify the risk of cancer.

  1. [Voice disorders related to job stress in teaching: a case-control study].

    PubMed

    Giannini, Susana Pimentel Pinto; Latorre, Maria do Rosário Dias de Oliveira; Ferreira, Leslie Piccolotto

    2012-11-01

    This case-control study aimed to test the association between voice disorders and job stress among public schoolteachers in São Paulo, Brazil. The groups consisted of teachers with (n = 165) and without (n = 105) voice-related complaints. Both groups answered the questionnaires Conditions of Vocal Production and Job Stress Scale. Analysis of cases and controls showed comparable samples, differing only by vocal symptoms. There was a statistically significant difference between cases and controls in relation to job stress involving high strain (OR = 2.1; 95%CI: 1.1-3.9), which places high demands combined with low job control. High strain in cases in this study represents the highest risk of physical and mental disorders for teachers. Loss of voice prevents teachers from continuing in their professional role, eliminates their professional identity, and jeopardizes their career.

  2. Effect of suboptimal breast-feeding on occurrence of autism: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Al-Farsi, Yahya M; Al-Sharbati, Marwan M; Waly, Mostafa I; Al-Farsi, Omar A; Al-Shafaee, Mohammed A; Al-Khaduri, Maha M; Trivedi, Malav S; Deth, Richard C

    2012-07-01

    To evaluate the association between suboptimal breast-feeding practices and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). A case-control study was conducted in 102 ASD cases and 102 matched healthy controls. Based on adjusted odds ratios from logistic regression models, ASD was found to be associated with the late initiation of breast-feeding (odds ratio 1.48, 95% confidence interval 1.01-3.1), a non-intake of colostrum (odds ratio 1.7, 95% confidence interval 1.03-4.3), prelacteal feeding, and bottle-feeding. The risk of ASD was found to decrease in a dose-response fashion over increasing periods of exclusive breast-feeding (P for trend = 0.04) and continued breast-feeding (P for trend = 0.001). The study indicates that increased ASD risk is generally associated with suboptimal breast-feeding practices. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Relationship between air pollution and pre-eclampsia in pregnant women: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Nahidi, F; Gholami, R; Rashidi, Y; Majd, H Alavi

    2014-01-09

    Pre-eclampsia is the main cause of maternal and fetal death and disability worldwide. Its incidence in the Islamic Republic of Iran is 5%-12%. Air pollution has been reported to be one of the causative factors, and this case-control study determined its effect on pre-eclampsia in 195 pregnant women (65 with pre-eclampsia and 130 without) admitted to hospitals in Tehran. Women were divided into high and low exposure groups according to the mean density of exposure to pollutants during pregnancy. There was no statistically significant relationship between exposure to air pollutants including CO, particulate matter, SO2, NO2 and O3 and pre-eclampsia. The combined effect was also not significant. Air pollution is one of the problems of modern society and its avoidance is almost impossible for pregnant women. This study should reduce concern about pregnant women living in polluted cities.

  4. Association between psoas abscess and prosthetic hip infection: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Dauchy, Frédéric-Antoine; Dupon, Michel; Dutronc, Hervé; de Barbeyrac, Bertille; Lawson-Ayayi, Sylvie; Dubuisson, Vincent; Souillac, Vincent

    2009-04-01

    The relationship between prosthetic hip infection and a psoas abscess is poorly documented. We determined the frequency of prosthetic hip infections associated with psoas abscesses and identified their determinants. We conducted a 2-year observational study. Data from patients with psoas abscesses that were associated with prosthetic hip infections were examined in a case-control study. Of 106 patients admitted to the Infectious Diseases Department with prosthetic hip infection, 13 also had a psoas abscess (12%; 95% CI: 6-19). By conditional logistic regression analysis, psoas abscesses were observed more frequently in cases of hematogenous prosthetic infections (OR = 93, p = 0.06) and in patients with a history of neoplasm (OR = 20, p = 0.03). Our results suggest that the presence of psoas abscesses is a frequent but under-diagnosed complication of prosthetic hip infection. We recommend that an abdominal CT scan be performed on patients with hematogenous prosthetic hip infection or with a history of neoplasm.

  5. Risk factors for campylobacter infection in infants and young children: a matched case-control study.

    PubMed

    Tenkate, T D; Stafford, R J

    2001-12-01

    Campylobacter infection has one of the highest rates of all the notifiable diseases in Australia, with a peak in children aged 0-35 months. A matched case-control study was conducted to investigate risk factors for campylobacter infection for children in this age group. Eighty-one cases and 144 controls were enrolled in the study that was conducted between 24 January 1996 and 21 January 1997. The following risk factors were found to be independently associated with illness: ownership of pet puppies (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 16.58, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.73-73.65) and pet chickens (OR 11.80, CI 1.37-101.75), and consumption of mayonnaise (OR 4.13, CI 1.61-10.59). We propose that children aged less than 3 years are at risk of campylobacter infection if residing in a household which has puppies or chickens as pets.

  6. Putative risk factors in developmental dyslexia: a case-control study of Italian children.

    PubMed

    Mascheretti, Sara; Marino, Cecilia; Simone, Daniela; Quadrelli, Ermanno; Riva, Valentina; Cellino, Maria Rosaria; Maziade, Michel; Brombin, Chiara; Battaglia, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Although dyslexia runs in families, several putative risk factors that cannot be immediately identified as genetic predict reading disability. Published studies analyzed one or a few risk factors at a time, with relatively inconsistent results. To assess the contribution of several putative risk factors to the development of dyslexia, we conducted a case-control study of 403 Italian children, 155 with dyslexia, by implementing a stepwise logistic regression applied to the entire sample, and then to boys and girls separately. Younger parental age at child's birth, lower parental education, and risk of miscarriage significantly increased the odds of belonging to the dyslexia group (19.5% of the variation). These associations were confirmed in the analyses conducted separately by sex, except for parental education, which significantly affected only males. These findings support reading disabilities as a multifactorial disorder and may bear some importance for the prevention and/or early detection of children at heightened risk for dyslexia.

  7. Occupation and thyroid cancer: a population-based case-control study in Connecticut

    PubMed Central

    Ba, Yue; Huang, Huang; Lerro, Catherine C.; Li, Shuzhen; Zhao, Nan; Li, Anqi; Ma, Shuangge; Udelsman, Robert; Zhang, Yawei

    2016-01-01

    Objective The study aims to explore the associations between various occupations and thyroid cancer risk. Methods A population-based case-control study involving 462 histologically confirmed incident cases and 498 controls was conducted in Connecticut in 2010–2011. Results A significantly increased risk of thyroid cancer, particularly papillary microcarcinoma, was observed for those working as the healthcare practitioners and technical workers, health diagnosing and treating practitioners and registered nurses. Those working in building and grounds cleaning, maintenance occupations, pest control, retail sales, and customer service also had increased risk for papillary thyroid cancer. Subjects who worked as cooks, janitors, cleaners, and customer service representatives were at an increased risk of papillary thyroid cancer with tumor size >1 cm. Conclusions Certain occupations were associated with an increased risk of thyroid cancer, with some tumor size and subtype specificity. PMID:26949881

  8. Causative or precipitating aspects of burning mouth syndrome: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Sardella, Andrea; Lodi, Giovanni; Demarosi, Federica; Uglietti, Daniela; Carrassi, Antonio

    2006-09-01

    On causative or precipitating causes of burning mouth syndrome (BMS), there is a lack of consensus. In this prospective case-control study, we compared clinical features and laboratory aspects to evaluate the association of the proposed causative/precipitating factors of BMS. A total of 61 BMS patients and 54 control subjects underwent several evaluations: rest and stimulated salivary flow rates measurements, laboratory tests, isolation of Candida species, assessment of parafunctional activities, detection of anxiety and depression by means of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Odds ratio and 95% confidence interval were calculated to compare the variables. No statistically significant differences were found with regard to the tested variables except for anxiety and depression. The results of this study seem not to support a role for the usually reported causative or precipitating factors of BMS and efforts should be addressed towards different aetiologies including possible neuropathic mechanisms of BMS.

  9. A case-control study of pediatric falls using electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Messmer, Patricia Ruth; Williams, Phoebe D; Williams, Arthur R

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively review Humpty Dumpty Falls Scale (HDFS) scores using electronic medical records (EMR) reports at a pediatric hospital to determine characteristics related to falls, injuries, and performance of the HDFS tool. The specific research question was: Is there a significant difference in HDFS total scores between cases (children who fell) and controls (those who did not fall)? Results from 74 cases and 242 controls revealed the number of falls did not differ significantly between those who obtained high HDFS scores and those who obtained low scores. HDFS sensitivity was 57%, specificity was 39%. The pediatric patients who fell were mostly oriented and ambulating; falls with injury did not exceed 19%. Future case-control studies should use larger sample sizes across multiple institutions with EMR capability. © 2013 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  10. Food groups and endometrial cancer risk: a case-control study from Italy.

    PubMed

    Bravi, Francesca; Scotti, Lorenza; Bosetti, Cristina; Zucchetto, Antonella; Talamini, Renato; Montella, Maurizio; Greggi, Stefano; Pelucchi, Claudio; Negri, Eva; Franceschi, Silvia; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2009-03-01

    Although several studies have been conducted on the relation between dietary habits and endometrial cancer risk, the evidence for specific food groups is still controversial. We analyzed data from an Italian case-control study including 454 women with histologically confirmed endometrial cancer and 908 controls admitted to the same hospitals for acute, nonneoplastic conditions. Multivariate odds ratios (ORs) were obtained after allowance for major potential confounding factors. A significant increase in risk was observed for red meat, with an OR of 2.07 for an increment of 1 serving per day. Inverse associations were observed for coffee (OR, 0.83), cereals (OR, 0.92), and vegetables (OR, 0.83). Our results support the existence of a relation between dietary habits and endometrial cancer risk and in particular suggest that a diet rich in red meat and poor in vegetables may have an unfavorable effect.

  11. Blinded case-control study of the relationship between human coronavirus NL63 and Kawasaki syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, Samuel R; Anderson, Marsha S; Glodé, Mary P; Robinson, Christine C; Holmes, Kathryn V

    2006-12-15

    We conducted a blinded, case-control, retrospective study in pediatric patients hospitalized at The Children's Hospital, Denver, Colorado, to determine whether human coronavirus (HCoV)-NL63 infection is associated with Kawasaki syndrome (KS). Over the course of a 7-month period, nasopharyngeal-wash samples from 2 (7.7%) of 26 consecutive children with KS and 4 (7.7%) of 52 matched control subjects tested positive for HCoV-NL63 by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. These data suggest that, although HCoV-NL63 was circulating in children in our community during the time of the study, the prevalence of infection with HCoV-NL63 was not greater in patients with KS than in control subjects.

  12. Causal diagrams and the logic of matched case-control studies

    PubMed Central

    Shahar, Eyal; Shahar, Doron J

    2012-01-01

    It is tempting to assume that confounding bias is eliminated by choosing controls that are identical to the cases on the matched confounder(s). We used causal diagrams to explain why such matching not only fails to remove confounding bias, but also adds colliding bias, and why both types of bias are removed by conditioning on the matched confounder(s). As in some publications, we trace the logic of matching to a possible tradeoff between effort and variance, not between effort and bias. Lastly, we explain why the analysis of a matched case-control study – regardless of the method of matching – is not conceptually different from that of an unmatched study. PMID:22701093

  13. Risk factors for campylobacter infection in infants and young children: a matched case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Tenkate, T. D.; Stafford, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    Campylobacter infection has one of the highest rates of all the notifiable diseases in Australia, with a peak in children aged 0-35 months. A matched case-control study was conducted to investigate risk factors for campylobacter infection for children in this age group. Eighty-one cases and 144 controls were enrolled in the study that was conducted between 24 January 1996 and 21 January 1997. The following risk factors were found to be independently associated with illness: ownership of pet puppies (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 16.58, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.73-73.65) and pet chickens (OR 11.80, CI 1.37-101.75), and consumption of mayonnaise (OR 4.13, CI 1.61-10.59). We propose that children aged less than 3 years are at risk of campylobacter infection if residing in a household which has puppies or chickens as pets. PMID:11811871

  14. Evaluation of Feasibility for a Case-Control Study of Pituitary-Ovarian Function in Premenopausal Women With Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    case-control study that uses gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist stimulation tests to compare pituitary -ovarian function in premenopausal women...in responsiveness of ovarian hormones to gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) stimulation in healthy premenopausal women. GnRH stimulation was...determine the safety and feasibility of conducting a case-control study that uses gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) stimulation tests to evaluate

  15. Risk factors for mortality in ventilator-associated tracheobronchitis: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Pontes, Leonilda Giani; de Menezes, Fernando Gatti; Gonçalves, Priscila; Toniolo, Alexandra do Rosário; Silva, Claudia Vallone; Kawagoe, Julia Yaeko; dos Santos, Camila Marques; Castagna, Helena Maria Fernandes; Martino, Marinês Dalla Valle; Corrêa, Luci

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To describe the microbiological characteristics and to assess the risk factors for mortality of ventilator-associated tracheobronchitis in a case-control study of intensive care patients. Methods This case-control study was conducted over a 6-year period in a 40-bed medical-surgical intensive care unit in a tertiary care, private hospital in São Paulo, Brazil. Case patients were identified using the Nosocomial Infection Control Committee database. For the analysis of risk factors, matched control subjects were selected from the same institution at a 1:8.8 ratio, between January 2006 and December 2011. Results A total of 40 episodes of ventilator-associated tracheobronchitis were evaluated in 40 patients in the intensive care unit, and 354 intensive care patients who did not experience tracheobronchitis were included as the Control Group. During the 6-year study period, a total of 42 organisms were identified (polymicrobial infections were 5%) and 88.2% of all the microorganisms identified were Gram-negative. Using a logistic regression model, we found the following independent risk factors for mortality in ventilator-associated tracheobronchitis patients: Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation I score (odds ratio 1.18 per unit of score; 95%CI: 1.05-1.38; p=0.01), and duration of mechanical ventilation (odds ratio 1.09 per day of mechanical ventilation; 95%CI: 1.03-1.17; p=0.004). Conclusion Our study provided insight into the risk factors for mortality and microbiological characteristics of ventilator-associated tracheobronchitis. PMID:28444091

  16. Dietary food groups intake and cooking methods associations with pancreatic cancer: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Ghorbani, Zeinab; Hekmatdoost, Azita; Zinab, Hassan Eini; Farrokhzad, Solmaz; Rahimi, Roya; Malekzadeh, Reza; Pourshams, Akram

    2015-05-01

    The role of dietary habits in the etiology of pancreatic cancer (PC) has not yet been well elucidated. The aim of the present study was to examine the association of the frequency of different food groups' intake and their cooking methods with PC risk based on a well-designed case-control study. A case-control study including 307 PC patients and 322 controls referred to four tertiary endosonography centers was conducted from January 2011 to January 2014 to compare the frequency intake of different food items and their cooking methods between cases and controls. After adjustment for gender, age, body mass index, years of education, diabetes and alcohol history, smoking status, and opium use, a significant direct relationship was observed between PC risk and intake frequency (time/week) of bread (OR = 1.50; 95 % CI 1.05-2.13; p-value 0.024), rice (OR = 2.10; 95 % CI 1.15-3.82; p for trend 0.034), and red meat (OR = 2.25; 95 % CI 1.22-4.14; p for trend 0.033) (time/day), when comparing the highest category of intake frequency with the lowest, while increasing frequency of fish consumption was associated with a lower risk of PC (OR = 0.93; 95 % CI0.59-1.47; p for trend 0.009). Increasing consumption of barbecuing red meat and deep fried vegetables was associated with 67 % and 70 % increased risk of PC (p-value 0.025 and 0.006, respectively). Our results indicate that increased frequency of intake of bread, rice, and red meat (especially barbecued) and deep fried vegetables can aggregate PC risk, while increased frequency of fish consumption can protect against PC. However, more studies are still needed.

  17. Sequential analysis of longitudinal data in a prospective nested case-control study.

    PubMed

    Park, Eunsik; Chang, Yuan-chin I

    2010-12-01

    The nested case-control design is a relatively new type of observational study whereby a case-control approach is employed within an established cohort. In this design, we observe cases and controls longitudinally by sampling all cases whenever they occur but controls at certain time points. Controls can be obtained at time points randomly scheduled or prefixed for operational convenience. This design with longitudinal observations is efficient in terms of cost and duration, especially when the disease is rare and the assessment of exposure levels is difficult. In our design, we propose sequential sampling methods and study both (group) sequential testing and estimation methods so that the study can be stopped as soon as the stopping rule is satisfied. To make such a longitudinal sampling more efficient in terms of both numbers of subjects and replications, we propose applying sequential sampling methods to subjects and replications, simultaneously, until the information criterion is fulfilled. This simultaneous sequential sampling on subjects and replicates is more flexible for practitioners designing their sampling schemes, and is different from the classical approaches used in longitudinal studies. We newly define the σ-field to accommodate our proposed sampling scheme, which contains mixtures of independent and correlated observations, and prove the asymptotic optimality of sequential estimation based on the martingale theories. We also prove that the independent increment structure is retained so that the group sequential method is applicable. Finally, we present results by employing sequential estimation and group sequential testing on both simulated data and real data on children's diarrhea. © 2009, The International Biometric Society.

  18. Maternal and neonatal risk factors for childhood type 1 diabetes: a matched case-control study.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Lynn; Harrild, Kirsten

    2010-05-27

    An interaction between genetic susceptibility and environmental factors is thought to be involved in the aetiology of type 1 diabetes. The aim of this study was to investigate maternal and neonatal risk factors for type 1 diabetes in children under 15 years old in Grampian, Scotland. A matched case-control study was conducted by record linkage. Cases (n = 361) were children born in Aberdeen Maternity Hospital from 1972 to 2002, inclusive, who developed type 1 diabetes, identified from the Scottish Study Group for the Care of Diabetes in the Young Register. Controls (n = 1083) were randomly selected from the Aberdeen Maternity Neonatal Databank, matched by year of birth. Exposure data were obtained from the Aberdeen Maternity Neonatal Databank. Conditional logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between various maternal and neonatal factors and the risk of type 1 diabetes. There was no evidence of statistically significant associations between type 1 diabetes and maternal age, maternal body mass index, previous abortions, pre-eclampsia, amniocentesis, maternal deprivation, use of syntocinon, mode of delivery, antepartum haemorrhage, baby's sex, gestational age at birth, birth order, birth weight, jaundice, phototherapy, breast feeding, admission to neonatal unit and Apgar score (P > 0.05). A significantly decreased risk of type 1 diabetes was observed in children whose mothers smoked at the booking appointment compared to those whose mothers did not, with an adjusted OR of 0.67, 95% CI (0.46, 0.99). This case-control study found limited evidence of a reduced risk of the development of type 1 diabetes in children whose mothers smoked, compared to children whose mothers did not. No evidence was found of a significant association between other maternal and neonatal factors and childhood type 1 diabetes.

  19. Case-control association study of TGOLN2 in attempted suicide.

    PubMed

    Mahon, Pamela B; Stütz, Adrian M; Seifuddin, Fayaz; Huo, Yuqing; Goes, Fernando S; Jancic, Dubravka; Judy, Jennifer T; Depaulo, J Raymond; Gershon, Elliot S; McMahon, Francis J; Zandi, Peter P; Potash, James B; Willour, Virginia L

    2010-07-01

    Family, twin, and adoption studies provide convincing evidence for a genetic contribution to suicidal behavior. The heritability for suicidal behavior depends in part on the transmission of psychiatric disorders, such as mood disorders and substance use disorders, but is also partly independent of them. Three linkage studies using the attempted suicide phenotype in pedigrees with bipolar disorder, major depression, or alcoholism have provided consistent evidence that 2p11-12 harbors a susceptibility gene for attempted suicide. A microarray expression study using postmortem brain samples has implicated a gene from the 2p11-12 candidate region, the trans-Golgi network protein 2 (TGOLN2) gene, as being consistently up-regulated in suicide cases as compared to controls. Here, we present a TGOLN2 case-control association study using nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). These nine SNPs, which include seven tag SNPs and two coding SNPs, have been genotyped in 517 mood disorder subjects with a history of attempted suicide and 515 normal controls. Allelic and genotypic analyses of the case-control sample did not provide evidence for association with the attempted suicide phenotype. Eight of the nine SNPs provided supportive evidence for association (P-values ranging from 0.008 to 0.03) when we compared the attempted suicide cases with a history of alcoholism to the attempted suicide cases without a history of alcoholism. However, this association finding was not replicated in an independent sample. Taken together, these analyses do not provide support for the hypothesis that common genetic variation in TGOLN2 contributes significantly to the risk for attempted suicide in subjects with major mood disorders.

  20. Risk factors for cellulitis in patients with lymphedema: a case-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Teerachaisakul, M; Ekataksin, W; Durongwatana, S; Taneepanichskul, S

    2013-09-01

    Risk factors for cellulitis in lymphedema (LE) have never been evaluated in controlled studies. The objective of this study was to assess the risk factors for cellulitis in patients with LE using a case-controlled study method. Medical records of patients from November 2009 to September 2011 who met the following criteria were retrieved and analyzed: (a) clinical diagnosis of LE of the limb, (b) aged 18 or above, (c) no food allergy history and (d) no medical diagnosis of cancer metastasis. Overall, there were 179 cases of LE with cellulitis. Each case was matched by age (+/- 5 years) and gender with a patient with LE and without cellulitis for controls. Logistic regression with backward selection procedure was used to identify independent risk factors. The area under the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve of the final model was calculated. Independent risk factors for cellulitis in patients with LE were percentage difference in circumference of the limb (adjusted odds ratio (AOR)=1.07, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.04-1.10), primary LE diagnosis (AOR=3.36, 95% CI=1.37-8.22), food-induced complication experiences (FIE: AOR=6.82, 95% CI=2.82-16.51) and systolic blood pressure (AOR=1.02, 95% CI=1.01-1.04). The area under the curve for the model was 0.80 (95% CI=0.75-0.85, p<0.001). No association was observed with hypertension, diabetes mellitus, body mass index and the duration of LE. This first case-controlled study highlights the important roles of dietary factors, percentage difference in circumference of the limb, and systolic blood pressure for developing cellulitis. The results suggest that controlling the percentage difference in circumference of the limb and systolic blood pressure together with restriction of fatty food and meat consumption may result in a decreased incidence of cellulitis among patients with LE.

  1. Risk factors of Streptococcus suis infection in Vietnam. A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Nghia, Ho Dang Trung; Ho, Dang Trung Nghia; Tu, Le Thi Phuong; Le, Thi Phuong Tu; Wolbers, Marcel; Thai, Cao Quang; Cao, Quang Thai; Hoang, Nguyen Van Minh; Nguyen, Van Minh Hoang; Nga, Tran Vu Thieu; Tran, Vu Thieu Nga; Thao, Le Thi Phuong; Le, Thi Phuong Thao; Phu, Nguyen Hoan; Nguyen, Hoan Phu; Chau, Tran Thi Hong; Tran, Thi Hong Chau; Sinh, Dinh Xuan; Dinh, Xuan Sinh; Diep, To Song; To, Song Diep; Hang, Hoang Thi Thanh; Hoang, Thi Thanh Hang; Truong, Hoang; Campbell, James; Chau, Nguyen Van Vinh; Nguyen, Van Vinh Chau; Chinh, Nguyen Tran; Nguyen, Tran Chinh; Dung, Nguyen Van; Nguyen, Van Dung; Hoa, Ngo Thi; Ngo, Thi Hoa; Spratt, Brian G; Hien, Tran Tinh; Tran, Tinh Hien; Farrar, Jeremy; Schultsz, Constance

    2011-03-08

    Streptococcus suis infection, an emerging zoonosis, is an increasing public health problem across South East Asia and the most common cause of acute bacterial meningitis in adults in Vietnam. Little is known of the risk factors underlying the disease. A case-control study with appropriate hospital and matched community controls for each patient was conducted between May 2006 and June 2009. Potential risk factors were assessed using a standardized questionnaire and investigation of throat and rectal S. suis carriage in cases, controls and their pigs, using real-time PCR and culture of swab samples. We recruited 101 cases of S. suis meningitis, 303 hospital controls and 300 community controls. By multivariate analysis, risk factors identified for S. suis infection as compared to either control group included eating "high risk" dishes, including such dishes as undercooked pig blood and pig intestine (OR(1) = 2.22; 95%CI = [1.15-4.28] and OR(2) = 4.44; 95%CI = [2.15-9.15]), occupations related to pigs (OR(1) = 3.84; 95%CI = [1.32-11.11] and OR(2) = 5.52; 95%CI = [1.49-20.39]), and exposures to pigs or pork in the presence of skin injuries (OR(1) = 7.48; 95%CI = [1.97-28.44] and OR(2) = 15.96; 95%CI = [2.97-85.72]). S. suis specific DNA was detected in rectal and throat swabs of 6 patients and was cultured from 2 rectal samples, but was not detected in such samples of 1522 healthy individuals or patients without S. suis infection. This case control study, the largest prospective epidemiological assessment of this disease, has identified the most important risk factors associated with S. suis bacterial meningitis to be eating 'high risk' dishes popular in parts of Asia, occupational exposure to pigs and pig products, and preparation of pork in the presence of skin lesions. These risk factors can be addressed in public health campaigns aimed at preventing S. suis infection.

  2. Benzodiazepines and hip fractures in elderly people: case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Pierfitte, Corinne; Macouillard, Gerard; Thicoïpe, Michel; Chaslerie, Anicet; Pehourcq, Fabienne; Aïssou, Myriam; Martinez, Béatrice; Lagnaoui, Rajaa; Fourrier, Annie; Bégaud, Bernard; Dangoumau, Jacques; Moore, Nicholas

    2001-01-01

    Objective To determine whether benzodiazepines are associated with an increased risk of hip fracture. Design Case-control study. Participants All incident cases of hip fracture not related to traffic accidents or cancer in patients over 65 years of age. 245 cases were matched to 817 controls. Setting Emergency department of a university hospital. Main outcome measures Exposure to benzodiazepines and other potential risk or protective factors or lifestyle items. Results The use of benzodiazepines as determined from questionnaires, medical records, or plasma samples at admission to hospital was not associated with an increased risk of hip fracture (odds ratio 0.9, 95% confidence interval 0.5 to 1.5). Hip fracture was, however, associated with the use of two or more benzodiazepines, as determined from questionnaires or medical records but not from plasma samples. Of the individual drugs, only lorazepam was significantly associated with an increased risk of hip fracture (1.8, 1.1 to 3.1). Conclusion Except for lorazepam, the presence of benzodiazepines in plasma was not associated with an increased risk of hip fracture. The method used to ascertain exposure could influence the results of case-control studies. What is already known on this topicBenzodiazepines increase the risk of elderly people falling in a dose dependent wayTheir role in hip fracture remains disputed, with increased risk sometimes attributed to drugs with a longer half life or those used to induce sleepWhat this study addsBenzodiazepines were not associated with hip fracture either as a group or according to half life or to characterisation as hypnotic or anxiolyticPatients using two or more benzodiazepines may be at higher riskPatients using lorazepam or certain other benzodiazepines may also be at a higher risk of fracture PMID:11264208

  3. Bone fractures and hypoglycemic treatment in type 2 diabetic patients: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Monami, Matteo; Cresci, Barbara; Colombini, Angela; Pala, Laura; Balzi, Daniela; Gori, Francesca; Chiasserini, Veronica; Marchionni, Niccolò; Rotella, Carlo Maria; Mannucci, Edoardo

    2008-02-01

    Hypoglycemic treatments could modulate the risk for fractures in many ways. Most studies have not explored the effect on the incidence of bone fractures of individual oral hypoglycemic agents, rather all oral treatments as a whole. The aim of this case-control study, nested within a retrospective cohort, is the assessment of the risk for bone fractures associated with exposure to insulin or different oral hypoglycemic agents. A case-control study nested within a cohort of 1,945 diabetic outpatients with a follow-up of 4.1 +/- 2.3 years was performed, comparing 83 case subjects of bone fractures and 249 control subjects matched for age, sex, duration of diabetes, BMI, A1C, comorbidity, smoking, and alcohol abuse. Exposure to hypoglycemic drugs during the 10 years preceding the event (or matching index date) was assessed. In a model including treatment with insulin secretagogues metformin and insulin for at least 36 months during the previous 10 years, no significant association was observed between bone fractures and medications. In an alternative model considering treatments at the time of fracture, insulin treatment was significantly associated with bone fractures in men (OR 3.20 [95% CI 1.32-7.74]) but not in women (1.41 [0.73-2.73]). Insulin-sensitizing treatment with metformin is not associated with a higher incidence of bone fractures, suggesting that the negative effect of thiazolidinediones is due to a specific action on bone metabolism rather a reduction of insulinemia. Conversely, current treatment with insulin increases the risk of fractures; at the same time, exposure to this agent in the longer term does not appear to affect bone frailty.

  4. Endometriosis after Laparoscopic Supracervical Hysterectomy with Uterine Morcellation: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Mitchell W.; Wheeler, Thomas L.; Richter, Holly E.

    2011-01-01

    Study Objective To compare the incidence of new onset endometriosis after laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy (LSH) with uterine morcellation to traditional routes. Design Single center case-control study Design Classification Canadian Task Force Classification II-2 Setting Single Center case-control study of hysterectomies from January, 2006 through December, 2008. Patients 277 laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomies with morcellation (cases) and 187 transvaginal or abdominal hysterectomies without morcellation (controls) performed from January, 2006 to December 2008. Interventions 464 women underwent hysterectomy, 277 cases via laparoscopic supracervical approach (LSH) with morcellation and 187 performed either transvaginally or abdominally without morcellation. Repeat operative procedures were performed for other benign indications on 16 of 464 (3.5%) prior hysterectomy patients. Measurements and Main Results 102 patients had endometriosis at the time of hysterectomy diagnosed by pathologic evaluation or gross visualization. In those without endometriosis, repeat operative procedures were performed for pain and bleeding in 3.3% (12/362). 60% (3/5) of LSH patients and 28.6% (2/7) of the control group were found to have newly diagnosed endometriosis conferring a rate of 1.4% (3/217) for the LSH group and 1.4% (2/145) in the controls. In patients with endometriosis, repeat operative procedures for pain and/or bleeding occurred in 2.9% (3/102); 3/60 of LSH patients and none in the control group (0/42). Two of these 3 patients undergoing a second surgery had recurrent/continued endometriosis. Conclusion Newly diagnosed endometriosis was noted in 1.4% of patients after hysterectomy with a similar incidence between the LSH and control groups. Reoperation for those with endometriosis at the time of LSH with morcellation was infrequent, but endometriosis was usually found. Further research is needed to delineate risk factors for development of de novo endometriosis

  5. Statin use and risk of endometrial cancer: a nationwide registry-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Sperling, Cecilie D; Verdoodt, Freija; Friis, Søren; Dehlendorff, Christian; Kjaer, Susanne K

    2017-02-01

    Laboratory and epidemiological evidence have suggested that statin use may protect against the development of certain cancers, including endometrial cancer. In a nationwide registry-based case-control study, we examined the association between statin use and risk of endometrial cancer. Cases were female residents of Denmark with a primary diagnosis of endometrial cancer during 2000-2009. For each case, we selected 15 female population controls matched on date of birth (±one month) using risk-set sampling. Ever use of statin was defined as two or more prescriptions on separate dates. Conditional logistic regressions were used to estimate age-matched (by design) and multivariable-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for endometrial cancer associated with statin use. The multivariable-adjusted models included parity, hormone replacement therapy (HRT), obesity, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and education. We evaluated whether the association between statin use and endometrial cancer varied with duration and intensity of statin use, type of endometrial cancer or patient characteristics. The study population comprised 5382 endometrial cancer cases and 72 127 population controls. We observed no association between ever use of statins and endometrial cancer risk (OR 1.03, 95% CI 0.94-1.14). In addition, endometrial cancer risk did not vary substantially with duration or intensity of statin use. Stratification by type of endometrial cancer also yielded neutral ORs. In our nationwide case-control study, we found no association between statin use and risk of endometrial cancer. © 2016 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  6. Validity of using ad hoc methods to analyze secondary traits in case-control association studies.

    PubMed

    Yung, Godwin; Lin, Xihong

    2016-12-01

    Case-control association studies often collect from their subjects information on secondary phenotypes. Reusing the data and studying the association between genes and secondary phenotypes provide an attractive and cost-effective approach that can lead to discovery of new genetic associations. A number of approaches have been proposed, including simple and computationally efficient ad hoc methods that ignore ascertainment or stratify on case-control status. Justification for these approaches relies on the assumption of no covariates and the correct specification of the primary disease model as a logistic model. Both might not be true in practice, for example, in the presence of population stratification or the primary disease model following a probit model. In this paper, we investigate the validity of ad hoc methods in the presence of covariates and possible disease model misspecification. We show that in taking an ad hoc approach, it may be desirable to include covariates that affect the primary disease in the secondary phenotype model, even though these covariates are not necessarily associated with the secondary phenotype. We also show that when the disease is rare, ad hoc methods can lead to severely biased estimation and inference if the true disease model follows a probit model instead of a logistic model. Our results are justified theoretically and via simulations. Applied to real data analysis of genetic associations with cigarette smoking, ad hoc methods collectively identified as highly significant (P<10-5) single nucleotide polymorphisms from over 10 genes, genes that were identified in previous studies of smoking cessation. © 2016 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  7. A case-control study on the effect of hormone replacement therapy on ischaemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Hippisley-Cox, Julia; Pringle, Mike; Crown, Nicola; Coupland, Carol

    2003-03-01

    Many clinicians believe that hormone replacement therapy (HRT) protects against coronary heart disease (CHD) in women. However, recent reports have cast some doubt on this because of lack of dose-response or duration-response effects. Since CHD is common in women--about half of all postmenopausal women will get it and about a third of these will die from it--the effect of HRT on CHD is of great public health importance. To determine the degree of cardioprotection conferred by HRT, including the effect of duration, time since last issue, the addition of progestogens, route of administration, and dose. Population-based case-control study. Nine general practices recruited from the Trent Focus Collaborative Research Network. A total of 417 female cases with CHD matched by age and practice to 2435 controls with a case-control ratio of 1:5.8 were studied. The main outcome measure was the odds ratio for CHD calculated by conditional logistic regression adjusted for diabetes, hypertension, body mass index, and smoking. No evidence was found, either from univariate analysis or multivariate analysis, that use of HRT was associated with reduced risk of CHD (odds ratio = 1.32; 95% confidence interval = 0.93 to 1.87). Indeed, the trend was in the opposite direction. There was no association for different types of HRT (opposed or unopposed) or routes of administration. Similarly, there was no association for current or past use and no effect for dose or duration. This study adds to growing evidence that HRT does not confer cardioprotection. Until there is robust evidence to the contrary, general physicians need to assess risks and benefits of HRT independently of any possible reduction in risk of CHD.

  8. Factors Associated With Unplanned Extubation in Children: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Paulo Sérgio Lucas; Fonseca, Marcelo Cunio Machado

    2017-01-01

    Although several studies assess unplanned extubation (UE) in children, few have addressed determinants of UE and factors associated with reintubation in a case-controlled manner. We aimed to identify the risk factors and outcomes associated with UE in a pediatric intensive care unit. Cases of UE were randomly matched with control patients at a ratio of 1:4 for age, severity of illness, and admission diagnosis. For cases and controls, we also collected data associated with UE events, reintubation, and outcomes. We analyzed 94 UE patients (0.75 UE per 100 intubation days) and found no differences in demographics between the 2 groups. Logistic regression revealed that patient agitation (odds ratio [OR]: 2.44; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.28-4.65), continuous sedation infusion (OR: 3.27; 95% CI: 1.70-6.29), night shifts (OR: 9.16; 95% CI: 4.25-19.72), in-charge nurse experience <2 years (OR: 2.38; 95% CI: 1.13-4.99), and oxygenation index (OI) >5 (OR: 76.9; 95% CI: 16.79-352.47) were associated with UE. Risk factors for reintubation after UE included prior level of sedation (COMFORT score < 27; OR: 7.93; 95% CI: 2.30-27.29), copious secretion (OR: 11.88; 95% CI: 2.20-64.05), and OI > 5 (OR: 9.32; 95% CI: 2.45-35.48). This case-control study showed that both patient- and nurse-associated risk factors were related to UE. Risk factors associated with reintubation included lower levels of consciousness, copious secretions, and higher OI. Further evidence-based studies, including a larger sample size, are warranted to identify predisposing factors in UEs.

  9. Heel ulcers - Pressure ulcers or symptoms of peripheral arterial disease? An exploratory matched case control study.

    PubMed

    Twilley, Heidi; Jones, Sarahjane

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the relationship between pressure ulcers of the heel and peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and determine the feasibility of conducting a statistically powered matched case control study. Evidence indicates a relationship between chronic leg ulcers and vascular disease. The relationship between pressure ulcers of the heel and vascular disease is less well established. A matched case control study. Data were collected between March 2014 and January 2015. 15 patients identified as having a grade 2, 3 or 4 pressure ulcer of the heel were compared with 15 matched controls without pressure ulcers of the heel. The primary clinical outcome measure was the ankle brachial pressure index (ABPI), where an ABPI <0.9 or >1.3 was considered clinically indicative of PAD. The primary feasibility outcome measure was the rate of recruitment. Eighty seven patients were reported as having foot and heel ulcers; 36 of whom were identified as having pressure ulcers of the heel, 15 (42%) of whom were recruited to the study. Patients presenting with pressure ulcers of the heel were significantly more likely to simultaneously have previously undiagnosed PAD compared with age, gender and ethnicity matched controls without pressure ulcers of the heel (odds ratio: 11, 95% confidence interval 1.99-60.57). The formation of pressure ulcers of the heel could, in some patients, be related to the presence of PAD rather than a consequence of poor quality care. Healthcare professionals should assess the patient to exclude or confirm PAD. Copyright © 2016 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Association between protozoa in sputum and asthma: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    van Woerden, Hugo C; Ratier-Cruz, Adriana; Aleshinloye, Olabode B; Martinez-Giron, Rafael; Gregory, Clive; Matthews, Ian P

    2011-06-01

    Atypical infectious agents have been proposed as potential contributors to asthma. A novel set of morphological and staining criteria permit the identification of flagellated protozoa in sputum. This case-control study was designed to use this novel method and to assess: (1) are protozoa more common in asthmatics than in non-asthmatics; (2) is the presence of protozoa associated with the use of steroid inhalers; and (3) is the presence of protozoa associated with living in damp housing? Induced sputum samples were collected from asthma patients and local non-atopic, non-smoking controls. Questionnaires assessed asthma severity and housing conditions. Sputum was examined for flagellated protozoa using a previously described staining technique. 96 participants were recruited for this study; 54 asthma patients and 42 controls, age range 21-62 years, 70% female participants. Limiting results to those who were clearly positive or negative for flagellated protozoa, 66.7% (20/30) of asthmatics and 30.8% (4/13) of controls had protozoa (p = 0.046). Among the asthma patients, prevalence of protozoa was not significantly different between those who had (10/18), and those who had not (10/12), used steroid inhaler in the preceding two weeks (p = 0.11). Similarly, the prevalence of protozoa was not significantly different between those who did (6/11) and those who did not (18/32), live in damp homes (p = 0.92). This case-control study demonstrates an association between flagellated protozoa in sputum and asthma. It is now necessary to confirm and characterise the protozoa using genetic techniques based on 18S ribosomal RNA. Once tis is established it would be worthwhile to determine if asthma symptoms improve when treated by anti-protozoal agents. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Metformin intake is associated with better survival in ovarian cancer: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Meuter, Alexandra; Thapa, Prabin; Langstraat, Carrie; Giri, Shailendra; Chien, Jeremy; Rattan, Ramandeep; Cliby, William; Shridhar, Viji

    2013-02-01

    The objective of this case-control study was to identify any association of metformin intake with the survival of patients with ovarian cancer. In this retrospective case-control study, women with ovarian cancer who received metformin (cases) were compared with women with ovarian cancer who did not receive metformin (controls). A 2-layered analysis was conducted. In preliminary analysis, all cases (the OC cohort) were compared with controls at a 1:2 ratio. Subsequently, in definitive analysis, only patients who had epithelial ovarian cancer (the EOC cohort) were compared with controls at a 1:3 ratio. In the EOC cohort, cases were matched with controls for age (±5 years), International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage, and residual disease. Prognostic variables and disease specific survival were compared using chi-square tests, the Kaplan-Meier (log-rank) method, and Cox proportional hazards analysis. In a preliminary analysis of the OC cohort (72 cases and 143 controls), cases had better survival (5-year disease-specific survival for cases vs controls, 73% vs 44%; P = .0002). In the definitive analysis of the EOC cohort (61 cases and 178 controls), the distribution of age, disease stage, optimal cytoreduction, serous histology, and platinum chemotherapy remained similar between cases and controls (P > .05). Despite these similarities, cases had significantly better survival (5-year disease-specific survival for cases vs controls, 67% vs 47%; P = .007). On multivariate analysis, metformin remained an independent predictor of survival (hazard ratio, 2.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-3.8; P = .007) after controlling for disease stage, grade, histology, chemotherapy, body mass index, and surgical cytoreduction. The results of this study indicated an association of metformin intake with survival in patients with ovarian cancer. The receipt of metformin was associated with better survival, and the authors concluded that metformin is worthy of clinical

  12. [A population-based case control study of primary liver cancer in Fusui].

    PubMed

    Zhang, M D

    1993-02-01

    A population-based case control study of primary liver cancer (PLC) was undertaken in Fusui County, Guangxi Autonomous Region. Ninety-nine PLC cases and 99 age-sex-matched controls were surveyed for their general conditions, life style features, dietary habits, types of drinking water and family history. Cases and controls were well distributed in nationality, education, marital status and annual income per person. Conditional logistic regression results showed that HBV infection, drinking pond-ditch water, family history and total alcohol intake were the risk factors of PLC with the relative risks 5.330 (2.502-11.35), 3.703 (1.251-10.96), 2.881 (1.289-6.441), 1.002 (1.000-1.004), respectively. And antibody of HBV surface antigen is protective factor with the relative risk of 0.418 (0.210-0.834).

  13. Case-control study of diesel exhaust exposure and bladder cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wynder, E.L.; Dieck, G.S.; Hall, N.E.L.; Lahti, H.

    1985-08-01

    The relationship between bladder cancer and employment in occupations involving exposure to diesel exhaust was examined using data from a hospital-based case-control study of men aged 20 to 80 years in 18 hospitals in six US cities, from January 1981 to May 1983. In this analysis, 194 cases and 582 controls were compared according to occupation, smoking history, alcohol and coffee consumption, and various demographic variables. No difference was found in the proportion of bladder cancer cases employed in occupations with exposure to diesel exhaust compared to controls. This relationship did not change after taking smoking habits into account. Bladder cancer cases were significantly more likely to be current smokers of cigarettes than were controls.

  14. Postadmission sepsis as a screen f