Science.gov

Sample records for large classroom setting

  1. Impact of problem-based learning in a large classroom setting: student perception and problem-solving skills.

    PubMed

    Klegeris, Andis; Hurren, Heather

    2011-12-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) can be described as a learning environment where the problem drives the learning. This technique usually involves learning in small groups, which are supervised by tutors. It is becoming evident that PBL in a small-group setting has a robust positive effect on student learning and skills, including better problem-solving skills and an increase in overall motivation. However, very little research has been done on the educational benefits of PBL in a large classroom setting. Here, we describe a PBL approach (using tutorless groups) that was introduced as a supplement to standard didactic lectures in University of British Columbia Okanagan undergraduate biochemistry classes consisting of 45-85 students. PBL was chosen as an effective method to assist students in learning biochemical and physiological processes. By monitoring student attendance and using informal and formal surveys, we demonstrated that PBL has a significant positive impact on student motivation to attend and participate in the course work. Student responses indicated that PBL is superior to traditional lecture format with regard to the understanding of course content and retention of information. We also demonstrated that student problem-solving skills are significantly improved, but additional controlled studies are needed to determine how much PBL exercises contribute to this improvement. These preliminary data indicated several positive outcomes of using PBL in a large classroom setting, although further studies aimed at assessing student learning are needed to further justify implementation of this technique in courses delivered to large undergraduate classes.

  2. Active Learning in a Large Medical Classroom Setting for Teaching Renal Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietz, John R.; Stevenson, Frazier T.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe an active learning exercise which has been used to replace some lecture hours in the renal portion of an integrated, organ system-based curriculum for first-year medical students. The exercise takes place in a large auditorium with ~150 students. The authors, who are faculty members, lead the discussions,…

  3. A Classroom Tariff-Setting Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winchester, Niven

    2006-01-01

    The author outlines a classroom tariff-setting game that allows students to explore the consequences of import tariffs imposed by large countries (countries able to influence world prices). Groups of students represent countries, which are organized into trading pairs. Each group's objective is to maximize welfare by choosing an appropriate ad…

  4. Impact of Problem-Based Learning in a Large Classroom Setting: Student Perception and Problem-Solving Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klegeris, Andis; Hurren, Heather

    2011-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) can be described as a learning environment where the problem drives the learning. This technique usually involves learning in small groups, which are supervised by tutors. It is becoming evident that PBL in a small-group setting has a robust positive effect on student learning and skills, including better…

  5. Controlling Setting Events in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Paula E.

    2016-01-01

    Teachers face the challenging job of differentiating instruction for the diverse needs of their students. This task is difficult enough with happy students who are eager to learn; unfortunately students often enter the classroom in a bad mood because of events that happened outside the classroom walls. These events--called setting events--can…

  6. Improvement in Generic Problem-Solving Abilities of Students by Use of Tutor-Less Problem-Based Learning in a Large Classroom Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klegeris, Andis; Bahniwal, Manpreet; Hurren, Heather

    2013-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) was originally introduced in medical education programs as a form of small-group learning, but its use has now spread to large undergraduate classrooms in various other disciplines. Introduction of new teaching techniques, including PBL-based methods, needs to be justified by demonstrating the benefits of such…

  7. Improvement in Generic Problem-Solving Abilities of Students by Use of Tutor-less Problem-Based Learning in a Large Classroom Setting

    PubMed Central

    Klegeris, Andis; Bahniwal, Manpreet; Hurren, Heather

    2013-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) was originally introduced in medical education programs as a form of small-group learning, but its use has now spread to large undergraduate classrooms in various other disciplines. Introduction of new teaching techniques, including PBL-based methods, needs to be justified by demonstrating the benefits of such techniques over classical teaching styles. Previously, we demonstrated that introduction of tutor-less PBL in a large third-year biochemistry undergraduate class increased student satisfaction and attendance. The current study assessed the generic problem-solving abilities of students from the same class at the beginning and end of the term, and compared student scores with similar data obtained in three classes not using PBL. Two generic problem-solving tests of equal difficulty were administered such that students took different tests at the beginning and the end of the term. Blinded marking showed a statistically significant 13% increase in the test scores of the biochemistry students exposed to PBL, while no trend toward significant change in scores was observed in any of the control groups not using PBL. Our study is among the first to demonstrate that use of tutor-less PBL in a large classroom leads to statistically significant improvement in generic problem-solving skills of students. PMID:23463230

  8. Improvement in generic problem-solving abilities of students by use of tutor-less problem-based learning in a large classroom setting.

    PubMed

    Klegeris, Andis; Bahniwal, Manpreet; Hurren, Heather

    2013-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) was originally introduced in medical education programs as a form of small-group learning, but its use has now spread to large undergraduate classrooms in various other disciplines. Introduction of new teaching techniques, including PBL-based methods, needs to be justified by demonstrating the benefits of such techniques over classical teaching styles. Previously, we demonstrated that introduction of tutor-less PBL in a large third-year biochemistry undergraduate class increased student satisfaction and attendance. The current study assessed the generic problem-solving abilities of students from the same class at the beginning and end of the term, and compared student scores with similar data obtained in three classes not using PBL. Two generic problem-solving tests of equal difficulty were administered such that students took different tests at the beginning and the end of the term. Blinded marking showed a statistically significant 13% increase in the test scores of the biochemistry students exposed to PBL, while no trend toward significant change in scores was observed in any of the control groups not using PBL. Our study is among the first to demonstrate that use of tutor-less PBL in a large classroom leads to statistically significant improvement in generic problem-solving skills of students.

  9. Implementing iPads in the Inclusive Classroom Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maich, Kimberly; Hall, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    This column provides practical suggestions to help guide teachers in utilizing classroom sets of iPads. Following a brief introduction to tablet technology in inclusive classrooms and the origin of these recommendations from a case study focus group, important elements of setting up classroom iPad use, from finding funding to teaching apps, are…

  10. Classroom Management: Setting Up the Classroom for Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterling, Donna R.

    2009-01-01

    Student learning is directly related to classroom control established the first week of school (Wong and Wong 2001)--what you do the first day counts, and what you do the first 10 minutes counts even more. This article shares the advanced planning aspects of classroom management that should be in place before students enter the classroom for the…

  11. Climate Setting in Second-Language Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans-Harvey, Cher

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the creation of a positive classroom climate, examines four dimensions of classroom climate (physical, academic, organizational, and social-emotional), and reviews techniques that teachers can use to promote a positive classroom climate. Teachers need to get to know their students, discuss the course objectives with their students, and…

  12. Collaboration within Large Groups in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szewkis, Eyal; Nussbaum, Miguel; Rosen, Tal; Abalos, Jose; Denardin, Fernanda; Caballero, Daniela; Tagle, Arturo; Alcoholado, Cristian

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show how a large group of students can work collaboratively in a synchronous way within the classroom using the cheapest possible technological support. Making use of the features of Single Display Groupware and of Multiple Mice we propose a computer-supported collaborative learning approach for big groups within…

  13. Tangential Floor in a Classroom Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marti, Leyla

    2012-01-01

    This article examines floor management in two classroom sessions: a task-oriented computer lesson and a literature lesson. Recordings made in the computer lesson show the organization of floor when a task is given to students. Temporary or "incipient" side floors (Jones and Thornborrow, 2004) emerge beside the main floor. In the literature lesson,…

  14. Classroom Assessment Tools and Students' Affective Stances: KFL Classroom Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byon, Andrew Sangpil

    2005-01-01

    The growth of KFL (Korean-as-a-Foreign-Language) programmes in the US college setting has been truly remarkable in the last three decades. However, despite the gradual and steady growth of the non-heritage student population, the predominant group has been heritage students in most KFL programmes. In addition, teaching these two groups of students…

  15. Radial sets: interactive visual analysis of large overlapping sets.

    PubMed

    Alsallakh, Bilal; Aigner, Wolfgang; Miksch, Silvia; Hauser, Helwig

    2013-12-01

    In many applications, data tables contain multi-valued attributes that often store the memberships of the table entities to multiple sets such as which languages a person masters, which skills an applicant documents, or which features a product comes with. With a growing number of entities, the resulting element-set membership matrix becomes very rich of information about how these sets overlap. Many analysis tasks targeted at set-typed data are concerned with these overlaps as salient features of such data. This paper presents Radial Sets, a novel visual technique to analyze set memberships for a large number of elements. Our technique uses frequency-based representations to enable quickly finding and analyzing different kinds of overlaps between the sets, and relating these overlaps to other attributes of the table entities. Furthermore, it enables various interactions to select elements of interest, find out if they are over-represented in specific sets or overlaps, and if they exhibit a different distribution for a specific attribute compared to the rest of the elements. These interactions allow formulating highly-expressive visual queries on the elements in terms of their set memberships and attribute values. As we demonstrate via two usage scenarios, Radial Sets enable revealing and analyzing a multitude of overlapping patterns between large sets, beyond the limits of state-of-the-art techniques.

  16. Social Studies Instruction in a Non-Classroom Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Margaret M.

    Certain areas in the social studies can be effectively taught in a non-classroom setting. This experiment determined if, in a supermarket situation, consumer preferences (as measured in sales figures and augmented by questionnaire data) could be altered by the addition of nutritional information to the labels of sixteen items which had moderate…

  17. Research into Practice: Listening Strategies in an Instructed Classroom Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Suzanne

    2017-01-01

    This paper considers research and practice relating to listening in instructed classroom settings, limiting itself to what might be called unidirectional listening (Macaro, Graham & Vanderplank 2007)--in other words, where learners listen to a recording, a TV or radio clip or lecture, but where there is no communication back to the speaker(s).…

  18. Observation Instrument of Play Behaviour in a Classroom Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkhout, Louise; Hoekman, Joop; Goorhuis-Brouwer, Sieneke M.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop an instrument to observe the play behaviour of a whole group of children from four to six years of age in a classroom setting on the basis of video recording. The instrument was developed in collaboration with experienced teachers and experts on play. Categories of play were derived from the literature…

  19. Enhancing Feedback via Peer Learning in Large Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zher, Ng Huey; Hussein, Raja Maznah Raja; Saat, Rohaida Mohd

    2016-01-01

    Feedback has been lauded as a key pedagogical tool in higher education. Unfortunately, the value of feedback falls short when being carried out in large classrooms. In this study, strategies for sustaining feedback in large classroom based on peer learning are explored. All the characteristics identified within the concept of peer learning were…

  20. Examining the Effectiveness of Team-Based Learning (TBL) in Different Classroom Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuretich, Richard F.; Kanner, Lisa C.

    2015-01-01

    The problem of effective learning in college classrooms, especially in a large lecture setting, has been a topic of discussion for a considerable span of time. Most efforts to improve learning incorporate various forms of student-active learning, such as in-class investigations or problems, group discussions, collaborative examinations and…

  1. A Tale of Two Settings: The Lab and the Classroom

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-08

    a peer can misspell a word, give one the incorrect formula for the area of a circle, or give bad advice on the organization of an essay. The student ...assistance typically, though not always, occurred between students of the same sex and/or race. Often the giving and receiving of help was embedded in an...courses were conducted in two very 7 different kinds of settings, the classroom and the computer lab, and that students ’ attitudes toward learning in

  2. Observations of Children's Interactions with Teachers, Peers, and Tasks across Preschool Classroom Activity Settings.

    PubMed

    Booren, Leslie M; Downer, Jason T; Vitiello, Virginia E

    2012-07-01

    This descriptive study examined classroom activity settings in relation to children's observed behavior during classroom interactions, child gender, and basic teacher behavior within the preschool classroom. 145 children were observed for an average of 80 minutes during 8 occasions across 2 days using the inCLASS, an observational measure that conceptualizes behavior into teacher, peer, task, and conflict interactions. Findings indicated that on average children's interactions with teachers were higher in teacher-structured settings, such as large group. On average, children's interactions with peers and tasks were more positive in child-directed settings, such as free choice. Children experienced more conflict during recess and routines/transitions. Finally, gender differences were observed within small group and meals. The implications of these findings might encourage teachers to be thoughtful and intentional about what types of support and resources are provided so children can successfully navigate the demands of particular settings. These findings are not meant to discourage certain teacher behaviors or imply value of certain classroom settings; instead, by providing an evidenced-based picture of the conditions under which children display the most positive interactions, teachers can be more aware of choices within these settings and have a powerful way to assist in professional development and interventions.

  3. Using Flipped Classroom Approach to Explore Deep Learning in Large Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danker, Brenda

    2015-01-01

    This project used two Flipped Classroom approaches to stimulate deep learning in large classrooms during the teaching of a film module as part of a Diploma in Performing Arts course at Sunway University, Malaysia. The flipped classes utilized either a blended learning approach where students first watched online lectures as homework, and then…

  4. Patterns of classroom discourse in an integrated, interpreted elementary school setting.

    PubMed

    Shaw, J; Jamieson, J

    1997-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the patterns of classroom discourse experienced by an integrated deaf child with full-time interpreting services in an elementary setting. The child was videotaped for 3 hours during classroom instructional time. The videotapes were analyzed to determine patterns of discourse between the child and the teacher and the child and the interpreter, as well as to gauge the deaf student's accessibility to teacher-class discourse. It was found that the deaf student interacted predominantly with the interpreter; in fact, this student received more direct instruction from the interpreter than from the teacher. The discourse to which the student was exposed was largely academic, rather than cultural or social. Findings are discussed in terms of the extent to which implicit classroom discourse and cultural knowledge were inaccessible to the deaf student.

  5. Teaching the Assessment of Normality Using Large Easily-Generated Real Data Sets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulp, Christopher W.; Sprechini, Gene D.

    2016-01-01

    A classroom activity is presented, which can be used in teaching students statistics with an easily generated, large, real world data set. The activity consists of analyzing a video recording of an object. The colour data of the recorded object can then be used as a data set to explore variation in the data using graphs including histograms,…

  6. Silent Students' Participation in a Large Active Learning Science Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obenland, Carrie A.; Munson, Ashlyn H.; Hutchinson, John S.

    2012-01-01

    Active learning in large science classrooms furthers opportunities for students to engage in the content and in meaningful learning, yet students can still remain anonymously silent. This study aims to understand the impact of active learning on these silent students in a large General Chemistry course taught via Socratic questioning and…

  7. Spatial occupancy models for large data sets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Devin S.; Conn, Paul B.; Hooten, Mevin B.; Ray, Justina C.; Pond, Bruce A.

    2013-01-01

    Since its development, occupancy modeling has become a popular and useful tool for ecologists wishing to learn about the dynamics of species occurrence over time and space. Such models require presence–absence data to be collected at spatially indexed survey units. However, only recently have researchers recognized the need to correct for spatially induced overdisperison by explicitly accounting for spatial autocorrelation in occupancy probability. Previous efforts to incorporate such autocorrelation have largely focused on logit-normal formulations for occupancy, with spatial autocorrelation induced by a random effect within a hierarchical modeling framework. Although useful, computational time generally limits such an approach to relatively small data sets, and there are often problems with algorithm instability, yielding unsatisfactory results. Further, recent research has revealed a hidden form of multicollinearity in such applications, which may lead to parameter bias if not explicitly addressed. Combining several techniques, we present a unifying hierarchical spatial occupancy model specification that is particularly effective over large spatial extents. This approach employs a probit mixture framework for occupancy and can easily accommodate a reduced-dimensional spatial process to resolve issues with multicollinearity and spatial confounding while improving algorithm convergence. Using open-source software, we demonstrate this new model specification using a case study involving occupancy of caribou (Rangifer tarandus) over a set of 1080 survey units spanning a large contiguous region (108 000 km2) in northern Ontario, Canada. Overall, the combination of a more efficient specification and open-source software allows for a facile and stable implementation of spatial occupancy models for large data sets.

  8. Lessons Learned from a Multiculturally, Economically Diverse Classroom Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyman, Lawrence

    For her sabbatical a professor of teacher education at Emporia State University returned to the elementary classroom after a 20-year absence to teach in a third/fourth combination classroom in the Emporia, Kansas Public Schools. The return to elementary classroom teaching provided the professor with the opportunity to utilize some of the social…

  9. Observations of Children's Interactions with Teachers, Peers, and Tasks across Preschool Classroom Activity Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booren, Leslie M.; Downer, Jason T.; Vitiello, Virginia E.

    2012-01-01

    Research Findings: This descriptive study examined classroom activity settings in relation to children's observed behavior during classroom interactions, child gender, and basic teacher behavior within the preschool classroom. A total of 145 children were observed for an average of 80 min during 8 occasions across 2 days using the Individualized…

  10. Using News Articles to Build a Critical Literacy Classroom in an EFL Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Yujong

    2011-01-01

    This article examines an effort to support critical literacy in an English as a foreign language (EFL) setting by analyzing one college EFL reading classroom in which students read and responded to articles from "The New Yorker". Data include transcribed audiotapes of classroom interaction and interviews with students, classroom materials, and…

  11. On Flipping the Classroom in Large First Year Calculus Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jungic, Veselin; Kaur, Harpreet; Mulholland, Jamie; Xin, Cindy

    2015-01-01

    Over the course of two years, 2012-2014, we have implemented a "flipping" the classroom approach in three of our large enrolment first year calculus courses: differential and integral calculus for scientists and engineers. In this article we describe the details of our particular approach and share with the reader some experiences of…

  12. Clickers in the large classroom: current research and best-practice tips.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Jane E

    2007-01-01

    Audience response systems (ARS) or clickers, as they are commonly called, offer a management tool for engaging students in the large classroom. Basic elements of the technology are discussed. These systems have been used in a variety of fields and at all levels of education. Typical goals of ARS questions are discussed, as well as methods of compensating for the reduction in lecture time that typically results from their use. Examples of ARS use occur throughout the literature and often detail positive attitudes from both students and instructors, although exceptions do exist. When used in classes, ARS clickers typically have either a benign or positive effect on student performance on exams, depending on the method and extent of their use, and create a more positive and active atmosphere in the large classroom. These systems are especially valuable as a means of introducing and monitoring peer learning methods in the large lecture classroom. So that the reader may use clickers effectively in his or her own classroom, a set of guidelines for writing good questions and a list of best-practice tips have been culled from the literature and experienced users.

  13. Knowledge Discovery in Large Data Sets

    SciTech Connect

    Simas, Tiago; Silva, Gabriel; Miranda, Bruno; Ribeiro, Rita

    2008-12-05

    In this work we briefly address the problem of unsupervised classification on large datasets, magnitude around 100,000,000 objects. The objects are variable objects, which are around 10% of the 1,000,000,000 astronomical objects that will be collected by GAIA/ESA mission. We tested unsupervised classification algorithms on known datasets such as OGLE and Hipparcos catalogs. Moreover, we are building several templates to represent the main classes of variable objects as well as new classes to build a synthetic dataset of this dimension. In the future we will run the GAIA satellite scanning law on these templates to obtain a testable large dataset.

  14. Classroom Social Capital: Development of a Measure of Instrumental Social Support within Academic Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shecter, Julie

    2009-01-01

    Many universities implement programs and interventions to increase students' perceived instrumental social support within the classroom setting, yet to date, no measures exist to adequately assess such perceptions. In response to this need, the current research developed an operational definition of instrumental classroom social support and also…

  15. An Exploration of the Effectiveness of an Audit Simulation Tool in a Classroom Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zelin, Robert C., II

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of using an audit simulation product in a classroom setting. Many students and professionals feel that a disconnect exists between learning auditing in the classroom and practicing auditing in the workplace. It was hoped that the introduction of an audit simulation tool would help to…

  16. The Emergence of Student Creativity in Classroom Settings: A Case Study of Elementary Schools in Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Younsoon; Chung, Hye Young; Choi, Kyoulee; Seo, Choyoung; Baek, Eunjoo

    2013-01-01

    This research explores the emergence of student creativity in classroom settings, specifically within two content areas: science and social studies. Fourteen classrooms in three elementary schools in Korea were observed, and the teachers and students were interviewed. The three types of student creativity emerging in the teaching and learning…

  17. Introduction to comparing large sequence sets.

    PubMed

    Page, Roderic D M

    2003-02-01

    Comparisons of whole genomes can yield important insights into the evolution of genome structure, such as the role of inversions in bacterial evolution and the identification of large-scale duplications in the human genome. This unit briefly compares two tools for aligning whole genome sequences: MUMmer and PipMaker. These tools differ in both the underlying algorithms used, and in the interface they present to the user.

  18. Thinking Routines: Replicating Classroom Practices within Museum Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolberg, Rochelle Ibanez; Goff, Allison

    2012-01-01

    This article describes thinking routines as tools to guide and support young children's thinking. These learning strategies, developed by Harvard University's Project Zero Classroom, actively engage students in constructing meaning while also understanding their own thinking process. The authors discuss how thinking routines can be used in both…

  19. Helping Children Cope with Stress in the Classroom Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fallin, Karen; Wallinga, Charlotte; Coleman, Mick

    2001-01-01

    Discusses children's experiences with stress, using key concepts of the cognitive-transactional model. Relates stressors to cognitive appraisal, identifies coping strategies, lists resources, and offers suggestions for interventions in the classroom. Recommends identifying and responding to daily stressors with children, facilitating coping…

  20. Twelve Practical Strategies To Prevent Behavioral Escalation in Classroom Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shukla-Mehta, Smita; Albin, Richard W.

    2003-01-01

    Twelve practical strategies that can be used by classroom teachers to prevent behavioral escalation are discussed, including reinforce calm, know the triggers, pay attention to anything unusual, do not escalate, intervene early, know the function of problem behavior, use extinction wisely, teach prosocial behavior, and teach academic survival…

  1. Setting of Classroom Environments for Hearing Impaired Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turan, Zerrin

    2007-01-01

    This paper aims to explain effects of acoustical environments in sound perception of hearing impaired people. Important aspects of sound and hearing impairment are explained. Detrimental factors in acoustic conditions for speech perception are mentioned. Necessary acoustic treatment in classrooms and use of FM systems to eliminate these factors…

  2. Understanding Bystander Perceptions of Cyberbullying in Inclusive Classroom Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guckert, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Cyberbullying is a pervasive problem that puts students at risk of successful academic outcomes and the ability to feel safe in school. As most students with disabilities are served in inclusive classrooms, there is a growing concern that students with special needs are at an increased risk of online bullying harassment. Enhancing responsible…

  3. Researching Pupil Attending Behavior within Naturalistic Classroom Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Douglas M.; Rogers, Constance J.

    1981-01-01

    Examines the relationship between teacher attitudes toward students and visual attending behavior in the classroom. Thirty-two students were identified in four categories, subsequently labeled accepted, indifferent, concerned and rejected. Results indicated significant differences in visual attending behavior and a two-way interaction with pupil…

  4. The moral development of baccalaureate nursing students: understanding unethical behavior in classroom and clinical settings.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Pamela E; Boblin, Sheryl L

    2007-01-01

    Unethical behavior in both classroom and clinical settings is a concern for nurse educators and has the potential to greatly influence the quality of patient care. A review of the literature suggests that students may view unethical clinical behaviors as different from unethical classroom behaviors because they recognize that clinical behaviors may have a direct effect on patient care. An overview of three moral theories, proposed by Kohlberg, Gilligan, and Rest, provides insight into the reasons for unethical behavior. These theories provide the foundation for strategies nurse educators can use to help reduce unethical behavior in both classroom and clinical settings in an attempt to ensure quality patient care.

  5. Large-N in Volcano Settings: Volcanosri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lees, J. M.; Song, W.; Xing, G.; Vick, S.; Phillips, D.

    2014-12-01

    We seek a paradigm shift in the approach we take on volcano monitoring where the compromise from high fidelity to large numbers of sensors is used to increase coverage and resolution. Accessibility, danger and the risk of equipment loss requires that we develop systems that are independent and inexpensive. Furthermore, rather than simply record data on hard disk for later analysis we desire a system that will work autonomously, capitalizing on wireless technology and in field network analysis. To this end we are currently producing a low cost seismic array which will incorporate, at the very basic level, seismological tools for first cut analysis of a volcano in crises mode. At the advanced end we expect to perform tomographic inversions in the network in near real time. Geophone (4 Hz) sensors connected to a low cost recording system will be installed on an active volcano where triggering earthquake location and velocity analysis will take place independent of human interaction. Stations are designed to be inexpensive and possibly disposable. In one of the first implementations the seismic nodes consist of an Arduino Due processor board with an attached Seismic Shield. The Arduino Due processor board contains an Atmel SAM3X8E ARM Cortex-M3 CPU. This 32 bit 84 MHz processor can filter and perform coarse seismic event detection on a 1600 sample signal in fewer than 200 milliseconds. The Seismic Shield contains a GPS module, 900 MHz high power mesh network radio, SD card, seismic amplifier, and 24 bit ADC. External sensors can be attached to either this 24-bit ADC or to the internal multichannel 12 bit ADC contained on the Arduino Due processor board. This allows the node to support attachment of multiple sensors. By utilizing a high-speed 32 bit processor complex signal processing tasks can be performed simultaneously on multiple sensors. Using a 10 W solar panel, second system being developed can run autonomously and collect data on 3 channels at 100Hz for 6 months

  6. Setting a new syllabus: environmental health science in the classroom.

    PubMed

    Brown, Valerie J

    2004-10-01

    Environmental health is a subject that has only relatively recently become prominent in the social consciousness. Even as its significance becomes known, finding ways to integrate the subject into education for primary and secondary students is difficult because of federal testing requirements under the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 and other demands placed on teachers. A number of efforts are under way, however, to provide teachers with resources to help them bring environment health into their classrooms.

  7. Activity Settings and Daily Routines in Preschool Classrooms: Diverse Experiences in Early Learning Settings for Low-Income Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuligni, Allison Sidle; Howes, Carollee; Huang, Yiching; Hong, Sandra Soliday; Lara-Cinisomo, Sandraluz

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines activity settings and daily classroom routines experienced by 3- and 4-year-old low-income children in public center-based preschool programs, private center-based programs, and family child care homes. Two daily routine profiles were identified using a time-sampling coding procedure: a High Free-Choice pattern in which…

  8. Activity Settings and Daily Routines in Preschool Classrooms: Diverse Experiences in Early Learning Settings for Low-Income Children.

    PubMed

    Fuligni, Allison Sidle; Howes, Carollee; Huang, Yiching; Hong, Sandra Soliday; Lara-Cinisomo, Sandraluz

    2012-06-01

    This paper examines activity settings and daily classroom routines experienced by 3- and 4-year-old low-income children in public center-based preschool programs, private center-based programs, and family child care homes. Two daily routine profiles were identified using a time-sampling coding procedure: a High Free-Choice pattern in which children spent a majority of their day engaged in child-directed free-choice activity settings combined with relatively low amounts of teacher-directed activity, and a Structured-Balanced pattern in which children spent relatively equal proportions of their day engaged in child-directed free-choice activity settings and teacher-directed small- and whole-group activities. Daily routine profiles were associated with program type and curriculum use but not with measures of process quality. Children in Structured-Balanced classrooms had more opportunities to engage in language and literacy and math activities, whereas children in High Free-Choice classrooms had more opportunities for gross motor and fantasy play. Being in a Structured-Balanced classroom was associated with children's language scores but profiles were not associated with measures of children's math reasoning or socio-emotional behavior. Consideration of teachers' structuring of daily routines represents a valuable way to understand nuances in the provision of learning experiences for young children in the context of current views about developmentally appropriate practice and school readiness.

  9. Activity Settings and Daily Routines in Preschool Classrooms: Diverse Experiences in Early Learning Settings for Low-Income Children

    PubMed Central

    Fuligni, Allison Sidle; Howes, Carollee; Huang, Yiching; Hong, Sandra Soliday; Lara-Cinisomo, Sandraluz

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines activity settings and daily classroom routines experienced by 3- and 4-year-old low-income children in public center-based preschool programs, private center-based programs, and family child care homes. Two daily routine profiles were identified using a time-sampling coding procedure: a High Free-Choice pattern in which children spent a majority of their day engaged in child-directed free-choice activity settings combined with relatively low amounts of teacher-directed activity, and a Structured-Balanced pattern in which children spent relatively equal proportions of their day engaged in child-directed free-choice activity settings and teacher-directed small- and whole-group activities. Daily routine profiles were associated with program type and curriculum use but not with measures of process quality. Children in Structured-Balanced classrooms had more opportunities to engage in language and literacy and math activities, whereas children in High Free-Choice classrooms had more opportunities for gross motor and fantasy play. Being in a Structured-Balanced classroom was associated with children’s language scores but profiles were not associated with measures of children’s math reasoning or socio-emotional behavior. Consideration of teachers’ structuring of daily routines represents a valuable way to understand nuances in the provision of learning experiences for young children in the context of current views about developmentally appropriate practice and school readiness. PMID:22665945

  10. Content-Based Instruction for English Language Learners: An Exploration across Multiple Classroom Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Seo Jung

    2009-01-01

    This study explored the content-based literacy instruction of English language learners (ELLs) across multiple classroom settings in U.S. elementary schools. The following research questions guided the study: (a) How are ELLs taught English in two types of instructional settings: regular content-area literacy instruction in the all-English…

  11. A Meta-Analysis of Interventions To Decrease Disruptive Classroom Behavior in Public Education Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stage, Scott A.; Quiroz, David R.

    1997-01-01

    Describes meta-analysis of 99 studies that used interventions to decrease disruptive classroom behavior in public education settings. Overall, results indicate interventions yield comparable results to other studies investigating effectiveness of psychotherapy. Findings show that efficacious treatments used in public school settings decrease…

  12. The Print Environment in Kindergartens: A Study of Conventional and Holistic Teachers and Their Classrooms in Three Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beagle, Kimberly Geiger; Dowhower, Sarah L.

    1998-01-01

    Assesses physical print environment of 18 kindergarten classrooms, addressing whether literacy was honored with materials and special places for reading/writing. Finds suburban and holistic classrooms had more writing tools and print than urban, rural, and conventional settings. Concludes print-poor classrooms do not honor literacy, and…

  13. IEngage: Using Technology to Enhance Students' Engagement in a Large Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawang, Sukanlaya; O'Connor, Peter; Ali, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to answer how we can increase students' engagement in a large class. We hypothesised that the use of KeyPad, an interactive student response system, can lead to enhanced student engagement in a large classroom. We tested a model of classroom technology integration enhancing the students' engagement among first year undergraduate…

  14. Technological Challenges: Designing Large Compressed Video and Multimedia Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Russ A.; Parker, Roger

    Designing a distance learning classroom requires integration of educational goals and philosophy with technology and ergonomics. The technological challenge and key to designing effective distance learning and multimedia classrooms is creating an environment in which the participants--students, and teacher--may easily interact with instructional…

  15. Large Data at Small Universities: Astronomical processing using a computer classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Nathaniel James; Clarkson, William I.; Fluharty, Bill; Belanger, Zach; Dage, Kristen

    2016-06-01

    The use of large computing clusters for astronomy research is becoming more commonplace as datasets expand, but access to these required resources is sometimes difficult for research groups working at smaller Universities. As an alternative to purchasing processing time on an off-site computing cluster, or purchasing dedicated hardware, we show how one can easily build a crude on-site cluster by utilizing idle cycles on instructional computers in computer-lab classrooms. Since these computers are maintained as part of the educational mission of the University, the resource impact on the investigator is generally low.By using open source Python routines, it is possible to have a large number of desktop computers working together via a local network to sort through large data sets. By running traditional analysis routines in an “embarrassingly parallel” manner, gains in speed are accomplished without requiring the investigator to learn how to write routines using highly specialized methodology. We demonstrate this concept here applied to 1. photometry of large-format images and 2. Statistical significance-tests for X-ray lightcurve analysis. In these scenarios, we see a speed-up factor which scales almost linearly with the number of cores in the cluster. Additionally, we show that the usage of the cluster does not severely limit performance for a local user, and indeed the processing can be performed while the computers are in use for classroom purposes.

  16. Using Data from the Large Hadron Collider in the Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jeremy

    2017-01-01

    Now is an exciting time for physics students, because they have access to technology and experiments all over the world that were unthinkable a generation ago. Therefore, now is also the ideal time to bring these experiments into the classroom, so students can see what cutting edge science looks like, both in terms of the underlying physics and in terms of the technology used to gather data. With the continued running of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, and the lab's continued dedication to providing open, worldwide access to their data, there is a unique opportunity for students to use these data in a manner very similar to how it's done in the particle physics community. In this session, we will explore ways for students to analyze real data from the CMS experiment at the LHC, plot these data to discover patterns and signals, and use these plots to determine quantities such as the invariant masses of the W, Z and Higgs bosons. Furthermore, we will show how such activities already fit well into standard introductory physics classes, and can in fact enhance already-existing lessons in the topics of momentum, kinematics, energy and electromagnetism.

  17. Training Platoon Leader Adaptive Thinking Skills in a Classroom Setting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    platoon leader address the use of the IA squad at night (they lack night vision goggle - NVG capability). 9 The second scenario, also set in...with night vision goggles or with white light? If you used NVGs, how did you account for the Iraqi squad that probably did not have NVGs...Special Operations Task Force MANOVA – Multivariate Analysis of Variance NGSE – New General Self-Efficacy Scale NVG – Night Vision Goggles OBJ

  18. INTERIOR VIEW, SETTING LARGE CORE WITH ASSISTANCE FROM THE OVERHEAD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW, SETTING LARGE CORE WITH ASSISTANCE FROM THE OVERHEAD RAIL CRANE IN BOX FLOOR MOLD AREA (WORKERS: DAN T. WELLS AND TRUMAN CARLISLE). - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Ductile Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  19. A Collaborative Model for Developing Classroom Management Skills in Urban Professional Development School Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobler, Elizabeth; Kesner, Cathy; Kramer, Rebecca; Resnik, Marilyn; Devin, Libby

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a school-university partnership that focuses on the development of classroom management skills for preservice teachers in an urban setting, through collaboration between mentors, principals, and a university supervisor. To prepare preservice teachers for the unique challenges of urban schools, three key elements were…

  20. Civility in the University Classroom: An Opportunity for Faculty to Set Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Chris; Yates, Dan

    2014-01-01

    This research examines the types of uncivil behaviors frequently encountered in university classrooms. These behaviors range from walking in late to class, texting in class, and/or unprofessional emails. These behaviors can often undermine a professor's teaching. Setting reasonable and consistent expectations is a combination of university policy,…

  1. Teaching Elementary School Teachers Cognitive-Behavioral Techniques To Address ADDH Behaviors in the Classroom Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogelmann-Peper, Marcella

    This practicum was designed to address attention deficit and hyperactive behaviors (ADDH) in the elementary classroom setting. The primary goal was to provide teachers with an effective intervention technique which requires little time and addresses the ADDH syndrome. A second aim was to increase teachers' understanding of the ADDH syndrome and…

  2. The Impact of Physical Settings on Pre-Schoolers Classroom Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tadjic, Mirko; Martinec, Miroslav; Farago, Amalija

    2015-01-01

    The physical setting plays an important role in the lives of pre-schoolers and can be an important component of children's experience and development when it is wisely and meaningfully designed. The classroom organization enhances and supports the pre-schooler capability to perform activities himself, initiate and finish tasks, creates the…

  3. Verbal Interaction in Junior/Community College and University Classrooms: Do Disciplines and Settings Differ?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Glenn Ross

    The objective of this study was to determine whether there were verbal interaction differences between junior/community college and university settings and among disciplines. Theoretically, student achievement and student attitudes are influenced by the types of verbal interactions taking place within classrooms. Forty-eight different classes…

  4. Teacher Perceptions of the Effectiveness of Inclusion in Elementary Classroom Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peacock, Delicia

    2016-01-01

    Inclusion classrooms were introduced in the United States in 1990 when the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act required that special education students be instructed in a general education setting. Ensuing changes in instructional formats have caused role confusion for special and general education teachers, resulted in mixed attitudes…

  5. Generalizability and Decision Studies to Inform Observational and Experimental Research in Classroom Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bottema-Beutel, Kristen; Lloyd, Blair; Carter, Erik W.; Asmus, Jennifer M.

    2014-01-01

    Attaining reliable estimates of observational measures can be challenging in school and classroom settings, as behavior can be influenced by multiple contextual factors. Generalizability (G) studies can enable researchers to estimate the reliability of observational data, and decision (D) studies can inform how many observation sessions are…

  6. Mobile-IT Education (MIT.EDU): M-Learning Applications for Classroom Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sung, M.; Gips, J.; Eagle, N.; Madan, A.; Caneel, R.; DeVaul, R.; Bonsen, J.; Pentland, A.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the Mobile-IT Education (MIT.EDU) system, which demonstrates the potential of using a distributed mobile device architecture for rapid prototyping of wireless mobile multi-user applications for use in classroom settings. MIT.EDU is a stable, accessible system that combines inexpensive, commodity hardware, a flexible…

  7. A Review of Functional Analysis Methods Conducted in Public School Classroom Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, Blair P.; Weaver, Emily S.; Staubitz, Johanna L.

    2016-01-01

    The use of functional behavior assessments (FBAs) to address problem behavior in classroom settings has increased as a result of education legislation and long-standing evidence supporting function-based interventions. Although functional analysis remains the standard for identifying behavior--environment functional relations, this component is…

  8. Turkish Special Education Teachers' Implementation of Functional Analysis in Classroom Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erbas, Dilek; Yucesoy, Serife; Turan, Yasemin; Ostrosky, Michaelene M.

    2006-01-01

    Three Turkish special education teachers conducted a functional analysis to identify variables that might initiate or maintain the problem behaviors of three children with developmental disabilities. The analysis procedures were conducted in natural classroom settings. In Phase 1, following initial training in functional analysis procedures, the…

  9. Analysis of Two Early Childhood Education Settings: Classroom Variables and Peer Verbal Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hojnoski, Robin L.; Margulies, Allison S.; Barry, Amberly; Bose-Deakins, Jillaynne; Sumara, Kimberly M.; Harman, Jennifer L.

    2008-01-01

    Descriptive and ecobehavioral analyses were used to explore the daily activity contexts in classroom settings reflecting two distinct models of early childhood education. Activity context, social configurations, teacher behavior, and child behavior were explored, with specific consideration given to peer verbal behavior as an indicator of social…

  10. Reliability Issues and Solutions for Coding Social Communication Performance in Classroom Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olswang, Lesley B.; Svensson, Liselotte; Coggins, Truman E.; Beilinson, Jill S.; Donaldson, Amy L.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the utility of time-interval analysis for documenting the reliability of coding social communication performance of children in classroom settings. Of particular interest was finding a method for determining whether independent observers could reliably judge both occurrence and duration of ongoing behavioral dimensions for…

  11. Use of Big-Screen Films in Multiple Childbirth Education Classroom Settings

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Tamara

    2010-01-01

    Although two recent films, Orgasmic Birth and Pregnant in America, were intended for the big screen, they can also serve as valuable teaching resources in multiple childbirth education settings. Each film conveys powerful messages about birth and today's birthing culture. Depending on a childbirth educator's classroom setting (hospital, birthing center, or home birth environment), particular portions in each film, along with extra clips featured on the films' DVDs, can enhance an educator's curriculum and spark compelling discussions with class participants. PMID:21358831

  12. Strategies for Engaging FCS Learners in a Large-Format Classroom: Embedded Videos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leslie, Catherine Amoroso

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a method for utilizing technology to increase student engagement in large classroom formats. In their lives outside the classroom, students spend considerable time interfacing with media, and they are receptive to information conveyed in electronic formats. Research has shown that multimedia is an effective learning resource;…

  13. Teaching Methodology in a "Large Power Distance" Classroom: A South Korean Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jambor, Paul Z.

    2005-01-01

    This paper looks at South Korea as an example of a collectivist society having a rather large power distance dimension value. In a traditional Korean classroom the teacher is at the top of the classroom hierarchy, while the students are the passive participants. Gender and age play a role in the hierarchy between students themselves. Teaching…

  14. Adaptive, multiresolution visualization of large data sets using parallel octrees.

    SciTech Connect

    Freitag, L. A.; Loy, R. M.

    1999-06-10

    The interactive visualization and exploration of large scientific data sets is a challenging and difficult task; their size often far exceeds the performance and memory capacity of even the most powerful graphics work-stations. To address this problem, we have created a technique that combines hierarchical data reduction methods with parallel computing to allow interactive exploration of large data sets while retaining full-resolution capability. The hierarchical representation is built in parallel by strategically inserting field data into an octree data structure. We provide functionality that allows the user to interactively adapt the resolution of the reduced data sets so that resolution is increased in regions of interest without sacrificing local graphics performance. We describe the creation of the reduced data sets using a parallel octree, the software architecture of the system, and the performance of this system on the data from a Rayleigh-Taylor instability simulation.

  15. Looking at large data sets using binned data plots

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, D.B.

    1990-04-01

    This report addresses the monumental challenge of developing exploratory analysis methods for large data sets. The goals of the report are to increase awareness of large data sets problems and to contribute simple graphical methods that address some of the problems. The graphical methods focus on two- and three-dimensional data and common task such as finding outliers and tail structure, assessing central structure and comparing central structures. The methods handle large sample size problems through binning, incorporate information from statistical models and adapt image processing algorithms. Examples demonstrate the application of methods to a variety of publicly available large data sets. The most novel application addresses the too many plots to examine'' problem by using cognostics, computer guiding diagnostics, to prioritize plots. The particular application prioritizes views of computational fluid dynamics solution sets on the fly. That is, as each time step of a solution set is generated on a parallel processor the cognostics algorithms assess virtual plots based on the previous time step. Work in such areas is in its infancy and the examples suggest numerous challenges that remain. 35 refs., 15 figs.

  16. [The BASYS observation system for the analysis of aggressive behavior in classroom-settings].

    PubMed

    Wettstein, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Educational or therapeutic measures of aggressive student behavior are often based on the judgments of teachers. However, empirical studies show that the objectivity of these judgments is generally low. In order to assess aggressive behavior in classroom settings, we developed a context-sensitive observational system. The observation system exists in a version for teachers in action as well as a version for the uninvolved observer. The teacher version allows categorizing aggressive behavior while teaching. The aim is to differentiate the perception and the judgments of teachers, so that the judgments can serve as trustable diagnostic information. The version for an independent observer, in addition, contains categories to collect information about the context in which aggressions take place. The behavior observation system was tested in four field-studies in regular and special classes. The empirical results show that, after training, teachers were able to make objective observations, and that aggressive behavior depends to a large extent on situational factors. The system allows identification of problematic people-environment relationships and the derivation of intervention measures.

  17. Generalizability and decision studies to inform observational and experimental research in classroom settings.

    PubMed

    Bottema-Beutel, Kristen; Lloyd, Blair; Carter, Erik W; Asmus, Jennifer M

    2014-11-01

    Attaining reliable estimates of observational measures can be challenging in school and classroom settings, as behavior can be influenced by multiple contextual factors. Generalizability (G) studies can enable researchers to estimate the reliability of observational data, and decision (D) studies can inform how many observation sessions are necessary to achieve a criterion level of reliability. We conducted G and D studies using observational data from a randomized control trial focusing on social and academic participation of students with severe disabilities in inclusive secondary classrooms. Results highlight the importance of anchoring observational decisions to reliability estimates from existing or pilot data sets. We outline steps for conducting G and D studies and address options when reliability estimates are lower than desired.

  18. Reducing Information Overload in Large Seismic Data Sets

    SciTech Connect

    HAMPTON,JEFFERY W.; YOUNG,CHRISTOPHER J.; MERCHANT,BION J.; CARR,DORTHE B.; AGUILAR-CHANG,JULIO

    2000-08-02

    Event catalogs for seismic data can become very large. Furthermore, as researchers collect multiple catalogs and reconcile them into a single catalog that is stored in a relational database, the reconciled set becomes even larger. The sheer number of these events makes searching for relevant events to compare with events of interest problematic. Information overload in this form can lead to the data sets being under-utilized and/or used incorrectly or inconsistently. Thus, efforts have been initiated to research techniques and strategies for helping researchers to make better use of large data sets. In this paper, the authors present their efforts to do so in two ways: (1) the Event Search Engine, which is a waveform correlation tool and (2) some content analysis tools, which area combination of custom-built and commercial off-the-shelf tools for accessing, managing, and querying seismic data stored in a relational database. The current Event Search Engine is based on a hierarchical clustering tool known as the dendrogram tool, which is written as a MatSeis graphical user interface. The dendrogram tool allows the user to build dendrogram diagrams for a set of waveforms by controlling phase windowing, down-sampling, filtering, enveloping, and the clustering method (e.g. single linkage, complete linkage, flexible method). It also allows the clustering to be based on two or more stations simultaneously, which is important to bridge gaps in the sparsely recorded event sets anticipated in such a large reconciled event set. Current efforts are focusing on tools to help the researcher winnow the clusters defined using the dendrogram tool down to the minimum optimal identification set. This will become critical as the number of reference events in the reconciled event set continually grows. The dendrogram tool is part of the MatSeis analysis package, which is available on the Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Research and Engineering Program Web Site. As part of the research

  19. Quantitative prediction of reduction in large pipe setting round process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jun; Zhan, Peipei; Ma, Rui; Zhai, Ruixue

    2013-07-01

    The control manner during the process to ensure the quality of pipe products mainly relies on the operator's experience, so it is very necessary to study the setting round process and obtain its spring-back law. The setting round process is shaping an oval section pipe into circular section, so it is difficult to provide a quantificational analysis for its spring-back process because of the curvature inequality of pipe section neutral layer. However, the spring-back law of the circle-oval process can be easily predicted. The experimental method is firstly used to establish the equivalent effect between the setting round process and the circle-oval process. The setting round process can be converted into the circle-oval process. There are two difficulties in the theoretical analysis for the circle-oval process: elastic-plastic bending problem of curved beam; statically indeterminate problem. A quantitative analytic method for the circle-oval process is presented on the basis of combination of the spring-back law of plane curved beam with the element dividing idea in finite element method. The ovality after unloading versus the relative reduction is plotted with analytical and experimental results respectively, which shows a fair agreement. Finally, the method of quantitative prediction of reduction for large pipe setting round is given based on the equivalent effect and the analytical results. Five pipes, which are needed to be set round, are used to carry out experiment so as to verify this method. The results of verification experiment indicates that, in the experimental range, the residual ovality are all under 0.35% after the once only setting round with the theoretical prediction reductions. It is much less than the 1% requirement of pipe standard. Applying the established theoretical analysis is able to correct the pipe ovality with sufficient accuracy, which provides theoretical direction to plant use.

  20. Interactive Web-Based Map: Applications to Large Data Sets in the Geosciences. Interactive Web-Based Map: Applications to Large Data Sets in the Geosciences.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbow, Z. A.; Olson, N. R.; Yuen, D. A.; Boggs, J. M.

    2001-12-01

    Current advances in computer hardware, information technology and data collection techniques have produced very large data sets, sometimes more than terabytes,in a wide variety of scientific and engineering disciplines. We must harness this opportunity to visualize and extract useful information from geophysical and geological data. We have taken the task of data-mining by using a map-like approach over the web for interrogating the humongous data, using a client-server paradigm. The spatial-data is mapped onto a two-dimensional grid from which the user ( client ) can quiz the data with the map-interface as a user extension . The data is stored on high-end compute server. The computational gateway separating the client and the server can be the front-end of an electronic publication , electronic classroom , a Grid system device or e-business. We have used a combination of JAVA, JAVA-3D and Perl for processing the data and communicating them between the client and the server. The user can interrogate the geospatial data over any particular region with arbitrary length scales and pose relevant statistical questions, such as the histogram plots and local statistics. We have applied this method for the following data sets (1.) distribution of prime numbers (2.) two-dimensional mantle convection (3.) three-dimensional mantle convection (4) high-resolution satellite reflectance data over the Upper Midwest for multiple wavelengths (5) molecular dynamics describing the flow of blood in narrow vessels. Using this map-interface concept, the user can actually interrogate these data over the web. This strategy for dissecting large data-sets can be easily applied to other areas, such as satellite geodesy and earthquake data. This mode of data-query may function in an adequately covered wireless web environment with a transfer rate of around 10 Mbit/sec .

  1. Robust Coordination for Large Sets of Simple Rovers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tumer, Kagan; Agogino, Adrian

    2006-01-01

    The ability to coordinate sets of rovers in an unknown environment is critical to the long-term success of many of NASA;s exploration missions. Such coordination policies must have the ability to adapt in unmodeled or partially modeled domains and must be robust against environmental noise and rover failures. In addition such coordination policies must accommodate a large number of rovers, without excessive and burdensome hand-tuning. In this paper we present a distributed coordination method that addresses these issues in the domain of controlling a set of simple rovers. The application of these methods allows reliable and efficient robotic exploration in dangerous, dynamic, and previously unexplored domains. Most control policies for space missions are directly programmed by engineers or created through the use of planning tools, and are appropriate for single rover missions or missions requiring the coordination of a small number of rovers. Such methods typically require significant amounts of domain knowledge, and are difficult to scale to large numbers of rovers. The method described in this article aims to address cases where a large number of rovers need to coordinate to solve a complex time dependent problem in a noisy environment. In this approach, each rover decomposes a global utility, representing the overall goal of the system, into rover-specific utilities that properly assign credit to the rover s actions. Each rover then has the responsibility to create a control policy that maximizes its own rover-specific utility. We show a method of creating rover-utilities that are "aligned" with the global utility, such that when the rovers maximize their own utility, they also maximize the global utility. In addition we show that our method creates rover-utilities that allow the rovers to create their control policies quickly and reliably. Our distributed learning method allows large sets rovers be used unmodeled domains, while providing robustness against

  2. Optimizing distance-based methods for large data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholl, Tobias; Brenner, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Distance-based methods for measuring spatial concentration of industries have received an increasing popularity in the spatial econometrics community. However, a limiting factor for using these methods is their computational complexity since both their memory requirements and running times are in {{O}}(n^2). In this paper, we present an algorithm with constant memory requirements and shorter running time, enabling distance-based methods to deal with large data sets. We discuss three recent distance-based methods in spatial econometrics: the D&O-Index by Duranton and Overman (Rev Econ Stud 72(4):1077-1106, 2005), the M-function by Marcon and Puech (J Econ Geogr 10(5):745-762, 2010) and the Cluster-Index by Scholl and Brenner (Reg Stud (ahead-of-print):1-15, 2014). Finally, we present an alternative calculation for the latter index that allows the use of data sets with millions of firms.

  3. A large-scale crop protection bioassay data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaulton, Anna; Kale, Namrata; van Westen, Gerard J. P.; Bellis, Louisa J.; Bento, A. Patrícia; Davies, Mark; Hersey, Anne; Papadatos, George; Forster, Mark; Wege, Philip; Overington, John P.

    2015-07-01

    ChEMBL is a large-scale drug discovery database containing bioactivity information primarily extracted from scientific literature. Due to the medicinal chemistry focus of the journals from which data are extracted, the data are currently of most direct value in the field of human health research. However, many of the scientific use-cases for the current data set are equally applicable in other fields, such as crop protection research: for example, identification of chemical scaffolds active against a particular target or endpoint, the de-convolution of the potential targets of a phenotypic assay, or the potential targets/pathways for safety liabilities. In order to broaden the applicability of the ChEMBL database and allow more widespread use in crop protection research, an extensive data set of bioactivity data of insecticidal, fungicidal and herbicidal compounds and assays was collated and added to the database.

  4. A large-scale crop protection bioassay data set

    PubMed Central

    Gaulton, Anna; Kale, Namrata; van Westen, Gerard J. P.; Bellis, Louisa J.; Bento, A. Patrícia; Davies, Mark; Hersey, Anne; Papadatos, George; Forster, Mark; Wege, Philip; Overington, John P.

    2015-01-01

    ChEMBL is a large-scale drug discovery database containing bioactivity information primarily extracted from scientific literature. Due to the medicinal chemistry focus of the journals from which data are extracted, the data are currently of most direct value in the field of human health research. However, many of the scientific use-cases for the current data set are equally applicable in other fields, such as crop protection research: for example, identification of chemical scaffolds active against a particular target or endpoint, the de-convolution of the potential targets of a phenotypic assay, or the potential targets/pathways for safety liabilities. In order to broaden the applicability of the ChEMBL database and allow more widespread use in crop protection research, an extensive data set of bioactivity data of insecticidal, fungicidal and herbicidal compounds and assays was collated and added to the database. PMID:26175909

  5. A large-scale crop protection bioassay data set.

    PubMed

    Gaulton, Anna; Kale, Namrata; van Westen, Gerard J P; Bellis, Louisa J; Bento, A Patrícia; Davies, Mark; Hersey, Anne; Papadatos, George; Forster, Mark; Wege, Philip; Overington, John P

    2015-01-01

    ChEMBL is a large-scale drug discovery database containing bioactivity information primarily extracted from scientific literature. Due to the medicinal chemistry focus of the journals from which data are extracted, the data are currently of most direct value in the field of human health research. However, many of the scientific use-cases for the current data set are equally applicable in other fields, such as crop protection research: for example, identification of chemical scaffolds active against a particular target or endpoint, the de-convolution of the potential targets of a phenotypic assay, or the potential targets/pathways for safety liabilities. In order to broaden the applicability of the ChEMBL database and allow more widespread use in crop protection research, an extensive data set of bioactivity data of insecticidal, fungicidal and herbicidal compounds and assays was collated and added to the database.

  6. Support vector machine classifiers for large data sets.

    SciTech Connect

    Gertz, E. M.; Griffin, J. D.

    2006-01-31

    This report concerns the generation of support vector machine classifiers for solving the pattern recognition problem in machine learning. Several methods are proposed based on interior point methods for convex quadratic programming. Software implementations are developed by adapting the object-oriented packaging OOQP to the problem structure and by using the software package PETSc to perform time-intensive computations in a distributed setting. Linear systems arising from classification problems with moderately large numbers of features are solved by using two techniques--one a parallel direct solver, the other a Krylov-subspace method incorporating novel preconditioning strategies. Numerical results are provided, and computational experience is discussed.

  7. The attributes of an effective teacher differ between the classroom and the clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Haws, Jolene; Rannelli, Luke; Schaefer, Jeffrey P; Zarnke, Kelly; Coderre, Sylvain; Ravani, Pietro; McLaughlin, Kevin

    2016-10-01

    Most training programs use learners' subjective ratings of their teachers as the primary measure of teaching effectiveness. In a recent study we found that preclinical medical students' ratings of classroom teachers were associated with perceived charisma and physical attractiveness of the teacher, but not intellect. Here we explored whether the relationship between these variables and teaching effectiveness ratings holds in the clinical setting. We asked 27 Internal Medicine residents to rate teaching effectiveness of ten teachers with whom they had worked on a clinical rotation, in addition to rating each teacher's clinical skills, physical attractiveness, and charisma. We used linear regression to study the association between these explanatory variables and teaching effectiveness ratings. We found no association between rating of physical attractiveness and teaching effectiveness. Clinical skill and charisma were independently associated with rating of teaching effectiveness (regression coefficients [95 % confidence interval] 0.73 [0.60, 0.85], p < 0.001 and 0.12 [0.01, 0.23], p = 0.03, respectively). The variables associated with effectiveness of classroom and clinical teachers differ, suggesting context specificity in teaching effectiveness ratings. Context specificity may be explained by differences in the exposure that learners have to teachers in the classroom versus clinical setting-so that raters in the clinical setting may base ratings upon observed behaviours rather than stereotype data. Alternatively, since subjective ratings of teaching effectiveness inevitably incorporate learners' context-specific needs, the attributes that make a teacher effective in one context may not meet the needs of learners in a different context.

  8. Techniques for Efficiently Managing Large Geosciences Data Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruger, A.; Krajewski, W. F.; Bradley, A. A.; Smith, J. A.; Baeck, M. L.; Steiner, M.; Lawrence, R. E.; Ramamurthy, M. K.; Weber, J.; Delgreco, S. A.; Domaszczynski, P.; Seo, B.; Gunyon, C. A.

    2007-12-01

    We have developed techniques and software tools for efficiently managing large geosciences data sets. While the techniques were developed as part of an NSF-Funded ITR project that focuses on making NEXRAD weather data and rainfall products available to hydrologists and other scientists, they are relevant to other geosciences disciplines that deal with large data sets. Metadata, relational databases, data compression, and networking are central to our methodology. Data and derived products are stored on file servers in a compressed format. URLs to, and metadata about the data and derived products are managed in a PostgreSQL database. Virtually all access to the data and products is through this database. Geosciences data normally require a number of processing steps to transform the raw data into useful products: data quality assurance, coordinate transformations and georeferencing, applying calibration information, and many more. We have developed the concept of crawlers that manage this scientific workflow. Crawlers are unattended processes that run indefinitely, and at set intervals query the database for their next assignment. A database table functions as a roster for the crawlers. Crawlers perform well-defined tasks that are, except for perhaps sequencing, largely independent from other crawlers. Once a crawler is done with its current assignment, it updates the database roster table, and gets its next assignment by querying the database. We have developed a library that enables one to quickly add crawlers. The library provides hooks to external (i.e., C-language) compiled codes, so that developers can work and contribute independently. Processes called ingesters inject data into the system. The bulk of the data are from a real-time feed using UCAR/Unidata's IDD/LDM software. An exciting recent development is the establishment of a Unidata HYDRO feed that feeds value-added metadata over the IDD/LDM. Ingesters grab the metadata and populate the Postgre

  9. Science Teacher Beliefs and Classroom Practice Related to Constructivism in Different School Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savasci, Funda; Berlin, Donna F.

    2012-01-01

    Science teacher beliefs and classroom practice related to constructivism and factors that may influence classroom practice were examined in this cross-case study. Data from four science teachers in two schools included interviews, demographic questionnaire, Classroom Learning Environment Survey (preferred/perceived), and classroom observations and…

  10. Visualizing large data sets in the earth sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hibbard, William; Santek, David

    1989-01-01

    The authors describe the capabilities of McIDAS, an interactive visualization system that is vastly increasing the ability of earth scientists to manage and analyze data from remote sensing instruments and numerical simulation models. McIDAS provides animated three-dimensionsal images and highly interactive displays. The software can manage, analyze, and visualize large data sets that span many physical variables (such as temperature, pressure, humidity, and wind speed), as well as time and three spatial dimensions. The McIDAS system manages data from at least 100 different sources. The data management tools consist of data structures for storing different data types in files, libraries of routines for accessing these data structures, system commands for performing housekeeping functions on the data files, and reformatting programs for converting external data to the system's data structures. The McIDAS tools for three-dimensional visualization of meteorological data run on an IBM mainframe and can load up to 128-frame animation sequences into the workstations. A highly interactive version of the system can provide an interactive window into data sets containing tens of millions of points produced by numerical models and remote sensing instruments. The visualizations are being used for teaching as well as by scientists.

  11. An Effective Filter for IBD Detection in Large Data Sets

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lin; Bercovici, Sivan; Rodriguez, Jesse M.; Batzoglou, Serafim

    2014-01-01

    Identity by descent (IBD) inference is the task of computationally detecting genomic segments that are shared between individuals by means of common familial descent. Accurate IBD detection plays an important role in various genomic studies, ranging from mapping disease genes to exploring ancient population histories. The majority of recent work in the field has focused on improving the accuracy of inference, targeting shorter genomic segments that originate from a more ancient common ancestor. The accuracy of these methods, however, is achieved at the expense of high computational cost, resulting in a prohibitively long running time when applied to large cohorts. To enable the study of large cohorts, we introduce SpeeDB, a method that facilitates fast IBD detection in large unphased genotype data sets. Given a target individual and a database of individuals that potentially share IBD segments with the target, SpeeDB applies an efficient opposite-homozygous filter, which excludes chromosomal segments from the database that are highly unlikely to be IBD with the corresponding segments from the target individual. The remaining segments can then be evaluated by any IBD detection method of choice. When examining simulated individuals sharing 4 cM IBD regions, SpeeDB filtered out 99.5% of genomic regions from consideration while retaining 99% of the true IBD segments. Applying the SpeeDB filter prior to detecting IBD in simulated fourth cousins resulted in an overall running time that was 10,000x faster than inferring IBD without the filter and retained 99% of the true IBD segments in the output. PMID:24667521

  12. Observations of Teacher-Child Interactions in Classrooms Serving Latinos and Dual Language Learners: Applicability of the Classroom Assessment Scoring System in Diverse Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downer, Jason T.; Lopez, Michael L.; Grimm, Kevin J.; Hamagami, Aki; Pianta, Robert C.; Howes, Carollee

    2012-01-01

    With the rising number of Latino and dual language learner (DLL) children attending pre-k and the importance of assessing the quality of their experiences in those settings, this study examined the extent to which a commonly used assessment of teacher-child interactions, the Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS), demonstrated similar…

  13. Consistency of Learning Styles of Undergraduate Athletic Training Students in the Traditional Classroom versus the Clinical Setting

    PubMed Central

    Coker, Cheryl A.

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To examine the learning styles of undergraduate athletic training students to determine their consistency in traditional classroom versus clinical settings. Design and Setting: Subjects completed the Learning Styles Inventory twice, once focusing on learning new information in the classroom and the other focusing on learning new information in the clinical setting. The order of focus regarding setting (classroom or clinical) was counterbalanced across subjects. Subjects: A total of 26 undergraduate athletic training students from a Committee on the Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs accredited athletic training education program (16 women and 10 men; mean age, 24.42 ± 6.44 years) who were currently assigned to a clinical practicum as part of their academic program served as subjects. Measurements: I performed 4 paired t tests, 1 for each learning mode, to determine if differences existed between the classroom and clinical settings. The percentage of respondents whose learning styles changed across settings was also calculated. Results: The paired t tests revealed a significant difference between the Reflective Observation and Active Experimentation modes across settings. In addition, 58% of respondents' learning styles changed according to setting focus. Conclusions: It appears that learning styles do indeed shift, depending on the domain through which an individual is learning. Consequently, teaching strategies incorporated in 1 setting may not be equally effective in the other setting. Each learning setting should, therefore, be treated separately in order to accommodate individual learning styles and maximize learning achievement. Furthermore, if learning styles are to be considered when designing athletic training education, these findings indicate that in order to ensure the validity of the resulting learning style profile, it may be necessary to provide the respondent with a specific focus, either that of a classroom or clinical

  14. Setting-level influences on implementation of the responsive classroom approach.

    PubMed

    Wanless, Shannon B; Patton, Christine L; Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E; Deutsch, Nancy L

    2013-02-01

    We used mixed methods to examine the association between setting-level factors and observed implementation of a social and emotional learning intervention (Responsive Classroom® approach; RC). In study 1 (N = 33 3rd grade teachers after the first year of RC implementation), we identified relevant setting-level factors and uncovered the mechanisms through which they related to implementation. In study 2 (N = 50 4th grade teachers after the second year of RC implementation), we validated our most salient Study 1 finding across multiple informants. Findings suggested that teachers perceived setting-level factors, particularly principal buy-in to the intervention and individualized coaching, as influential to their degree of implementation. Further, we found that intervention coaches' perspectives of principal buy-in were more related to implementation than principals' or teachers' perspectives. Findings extend the application of setting theory to the field of implementation science and suggest that interventionists may want to consider particular accounts of school setting factors before determining the likelihood of schools achieving high levels of implementation.

  15. Implementing Concept-Based Learning in a Large Undergraduate Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morse, David; Jutras, France

    2008-01-01

    An experiment explicitly introducing learning strategies to a large, first-year undergraduate cell biology course was undertaken to see whether awareness and use of strategies had a measurable impact on student performance. The construction of concept maps was selected as the strategy to be introduced because of an inherent coherence with a course…

  16. Active Learning in a Large General Physics Classroom.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trousil, Rebecca

    2008-04-01

    In 2004, we launched a new calculus-based, introductory physics sequence at Washington University. Designed as an alternative to our traditional lecture-based sequence, the primary objectives for this new course were to actively engage students in the learning process, to significantly strengthen students' conceptual reasoning skills, to help students develop higher level quantitative problem solving skills necessary for analyzing ``real world'' problems, and to integrate modern physics into the curriculum. This talk will describe our approach, using The Six Ideas That Shaped Physics text by Thomas Moore, to creating an active learning environment in large classes as well as share our perspective on key elements for success and challenges that we face in the large class environment.

  17. Comparing Outcomes from Field and Classroom Based Settings for Undergraduate Geoscience Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, M. R.; Harris, R. A.; Flores, J.

    2011-12-01

    Field based learning can be found in nearly every course offered in Geology at Brigham Young University. For example, in our Structural Geology course field studies substitute for labs. Students collect data their own data from several different structural settings of the Wasatch Range. Our curriculum also includes a two-week, sophomore-level field course that introduces students to interpreting field relations themselves and sets the stage for much of what they learn in their upper-division courses. Our senior-level six-week field geology course includes classical field mapping with exercises in petroleum and mineral exploration, environmental geology and geological hazards. Experiments with substituting field-based general education courses for those in traditional classroom settings indicate that student cognition, course enjoyment and recruiting of majors significantly increase in a field-based course. We offer a field-based introductory geology course (Geo 102) that is taught in seven, six-hour field trips during which students travel to localities of geologic interest to investigate a variety of fundamental geological problems. We compare the outcomes of Geo 102 with a traditional classroom-based geology course (Geo 101). For the comparison both courses are taught by the same instructor, use the same text and supplementary materials and take the same exams. The results of 7 years of reporting indicate that test scores and final grades are one-half grade point higher for Geo 102 students versus those in traditional introductory courses. Student evaluations of the course are also 0.8-1.4 points higher on a scale of 1-8, and are consistently the highest in the Department and College. Other observations include increased attendance, attention and curiosity. The later two are measured by the number of students asking questions of other students as well as the instructors, and the total number of questions asked during class time in the field versus the classroom

  18. Web based visualization of large climate data sets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alder, Jay R.; Hostetler, Steven W.

    2015-01-01

    We have implemented the USGS National Climate Change Viewer (NCCV), which is an easy-to-use web application that displays future projections from global climate models over the United States at the state, county and watershed scales. We incorporate the NASA NEX-DCP30 statistically downscaled temperature and precipitation for 30 global climate models being used in the Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), and hydrologic variables we simulated using a simple water-balance model. Our application summarizes very large, complex data sets at scales relevant to resource managers and citizens and makes climate-change projection information accessible to users of varying skill levels. Tens of terabytes of high-resolution climate and water-balance data are distilled to compact binary format summary files that are used in the application. To alleviate slow response times under high loads, we developed a map caching technique that reduces the time it takes to generate maps by several orders of magnitude. The reduced access time scales to >500 concurrent users. We provide code examples that demonstrate key aspects of data processing, data exporting/importing and the caching technique used in the NCCV.

  19. Classroom Audio Distribution in the Postsecondary Setting: A Story of Universal Design for Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flagg-Williams, Joan B.; Bokhorst-Heng, Wendy D.

    2016-01-01

    Classroom Audio Distribution Systems (CADS) consist of amplification technology that enhances the teacher's, or sometimes the student's, vocal signal above the background noise in a classroom. Much research has supported the benefits of CADS for student learning, but most of it has focused on elementary school classrooms. This study investigated…

  20. Challenges Associated With Using Large Data Sets for Quality Assessment and Research in Clinical Settings.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Bevin; Vawdrey, David K; Liu, Jianfang; Caplan, David; Furuya, E Yoko; Mis, Frederick W; Larson, Elaine

    2015-08-01

    The rapidly expanding use of electronic records in health-care settings is generating unprecedented quantities of data available for clinical, epidemiological, and cost-effectiveness research. Several challenges are associated with using these data for clinical research, including issues surrounding access and information security, poor data quality, inconsistency of data within and across institutions, and a paucity of staff with expertise to manage and manipulate large clinical data sets. In this article, we describe our experience with assembling a data-mart and conducting clinical research using electronic data from four facilities within a single hospital network in New York City. We culled data from several electronic sources, including the institution's admission-discharge-transfer system, cost accounting system, electronic health record, clinical data warehouse, and departmental records. The final data-mart contained information for more than 760,000 discharges occurring from 2006 through 2012. Using categories identified by the National Institutes of Health Big Data to Knowledge initiative as a framework, we outlined challenges encountered during the development and use of a domain-specific data-mart and recommend approaches to overcome these challenges.

  1. Trans-dimensional Bayesian inference for large sequential data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandolesi, E.; Dettmer, J.; Dosso, S. E.; Holland, C. W.

    2015-12-01

    This work develops a sequential Monte Carlo method to infer seismic parameters of layered seabeds from large sequential reflection-coefficient data sets. The approach provides parameter estimates and uncertainties along survey tracks with the goal to aid in the detection of unexploded ordnance in shallow water. The sequential data are acquired by a moving platform with source and receiver array towed close to the seabed. This geometry requires consideration of spherical reflection coefficients, computed efficiently by massively parallel implementation of the Sommerfeld integral via Levin integration on a graphics processing unit. The seabed is parametrized with a trans-dimensional model to account for changes in the environment (i.e. changes in layering) along the track. The method combines advanced Markov chain Monte Carlo methods (annealing) with particle filtering (resampling). Since data from closely-spaced source transmissions (pings) often sample similar environments, the solution from one ping can be utilized to efficiently estimate the posterior for data from subsequent pings. Since reflection-coefficient data are highly informative, the likelihood function can be extremely peaked, resulting in little overlap between posteriors of adjacent pings. This is addressed by adding bridging distributions (via annealed importance sampling) between pings for more efficient transitions. The approach assumes the environment to be changing slowly enough to justify the local 1D parametrization. However, bridging allows rapid changes between pings to be addressed and we demonstrate the method to be stable in such situations. Results are in terms of trans-D parameter estimates and uncertainties along the track. The algorithm is examined for realistic simulated data along a track and applied to a dataset collected by an autonomous underwater vehicle on the Malta Plateau, Mediterranean Sea. [Work supported by the SERDP, DoD.

  2. The Incredible Years Teacher Classroom Management Program: Using Coaching to Support Generalization to Real-World Classroom Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinke, Wendy M.; Stormont, Melissa; Webster-Stratton, Carolyn; Newcomer, Lori L.; Herman, Keith C.

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on the Incredible Years Teacher Classroom Management Training (IY TCM) intervention as an example of an evidence-based program that embeds coaching within its design. First, the core features of the IY TCM program are described. Second, the IY TCM coaching model and processes utilized to facilitate high fidelity of…

  3. Science Teacher Beliefs and Classroom Practice Related to Constructivism in Different School Settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savasci, Funda; Berlin, Donna F.

    2012-02-01

    Science teacher beliefs and classroom practice related to constructivism and factors that may influence classroom practice were examined in this cross-case study. Data from four science teachers in two schools included interviews, demographic questionnaire, Classroom Learning Environment Survey (preferred/perceived), and classroom observations and documents. Using an inductive analytic approach, results suggested that the teachers embraced constructivism, but classroom observations did not confirm implementation of these beliefs for three of the four teachers. The most preferred constructivist components were personal relevance and student negotiation; the most perceived component was critical voice. Shared control was the least preferred, least perceived, and least observed constructivist component. School type, grade, student behavior/ability, curriculum/standardized testing, and parental involvement may influence classroom practice.

  4. Student-Centred Anti-Smoking Education: Comparing a Classroom-Based and an Out-of-School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geier, Christine S.; Bogner, Franz X.

    2010-01-01

    The present study monitored a student-centred educational anti-smoking intervention with fifth graders by focusing on their cognitive achievement and intrinsic motivation. In order to assess the potential influence of the setting on self-directed learning, the intervention was conducted in two different learning environments: a classroom-based…

  5. A Case Based Analysis Preparation Strategy for Use in a Classroom Management for Inclusive Settings Course: Preliminary Observations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niles, William J.; Cohen, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Case based instruction (CBI) is a pedagogical option in teacher preparation growing in application but short on practical means to implement the method. This paper presents an analysis strategy and questions developed to help teacher trainees focus on classroom management issues embedded in a set of "real" cases. An analysis of teacher candidate…

  6. The Effects of a Teacher-Child Play Intervention on Classroom Compliance in Young Children in Child Care Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Darren G.; Ducharme, Joseph M.

    2013-01-01

    The current study evaluated the effects of a teacher-conducted play intervention on preschool-aged children's compliance in child care settings. Study participants included 8 children ranging in age from 3 to 5 years and 5 early childhood education teachers within 5 classrooms across 5 child care centers. A combination ABAB and multiple baseline…

  7. Exploration of Pre-Service Teachers' Beliefs in Relation to Mathematics Teaching Activities in Classroom-Based Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kul, Umit; Celik, Sedef

    2017-01-01

    This paper has been conducted to determine future teachers' mathematical beliefs and to explore the relationship between their mathematical beliefs and initial teaching practice in a classroom setting, in terms of how they design the content of teaching activities, they employed the style of teaching in mathematics, and they engaged with pupils. A…

  8. Using Large Data Sets to Study College Education Trajectories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oseguera, Leticia; Hwang, Jihee

    2014-01-01

    This chapter presents various considerations researchers undertook to conduct a quantitative study on low-income students using a national data set. Specifically, it describes how a critical quantitative scholar approaches guiding frameworks, variable operationalization, analytic techniques, and result interpretation. Results inform how…

  9. Computational derivation of structural alerts from large toxicology data sets.

    PubMed

    Ahlberg, Ernst; Carlsson, Lars; Boyer, Scott

    2014-10-27

    Structural alerts have been one of the backbones of computational toxicology and have applications in many areas including cosmetic, environmental, and pharmaceutical toxicology. The development of structural alerts has always involved a manual analysis of existing data related to a relevant end point followed by the determination of substructures that appear to be related to a specific outcome. The substructures are then analyzed for their utility in posterior validation studies, which at times have stretched over years or even decades. With higher throughput methods now being employed in many areas of toxicology, data sets are growing at an unprecedented rate. This growth has made manual analysis of data sets impractical in many cases. This report outlines a fully automatic method that highlights significant substructures for toxicologically important data sets. The method identifies important substructures by computationally breaking chemical structures into fragments and analyzing those fragments for their contribution to the given activity by the calculation of a p-value and a substructure accuracy. The method is intended to aid the expert in locating and analyzing alerts by automatic retrieval of alerts or by enhancing existing alerts. The method has been applied to a data set of AMES mutagenicity results and compared to the substructures generated by manual curation of this same data set as well as another computationally based substructure identification method. The results show that this method can retrieve significant substructures quickly, that the substructures are comparable and in some cases superior to those derived from manual curation, that the substructures found covers all previously known substructures, and that they can be used to make reasonably accurate predictions of AMES activity.

  10. Maximizing Accommodations for Learning Disabled Students in the Regular Classroom Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribich, Frank M.; Debenham, Adaria Ruey

    For a mainstreaming program to be effective, students should be able to experience success in a regular classroom with the enhanced self-image that accompanies a positive experience. Maximizing classroom accommodations for learning disabled students can help improve these students' access to educational opportunities and increase the probability…

  11. The Interests of Full Disclosure: Agenda-Setting and the Practical Initiation of the Feminist Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seymour, Nicole

    2007-01-01

    Several theoretical and pragmatic questions arise when one attempts to employ feminist pedagogy in the classroom (or to study it), such as how to strike a balance between classroom order and instructor de-centering and how to productively address student resistance. In this article, the author describes how she took on her final project for a…

  12. Bridging the Gaps: Multimodal Theme-Sets in the Global Composition Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruefman, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    As international student enrollment increases on college campuses across the US, the landscape of the composition classroom is among the first to observe the shift in the student demographic. Though some international students benefit from developmental English and ESL initiatives, most will eventually experience the mainstream writing classroom.…

  13. Evidence for teaching practice: the impact of clickers in a large classroom environment.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Barbara; Kilpatrick, Judith; Woebkenberg, Eric

    2010-10-01

    As the number of nursing students increases, the ability to actively engage all students in a large classroom is challenging and increasingly difficult. Clickers, or student response systems (SRS), are a relatively new technology in nursing education that use wireless technology and enable students to select individual responses to questions posed to them during class. The study design was a quasi-experimental comparison with one section of an adult medical-surgical course using the SRS and one receiving standard teaching. No significant differences between groups on any measure of performance were found. Focus groups were conducted to describe student perceptions of SRS. Three themes emerged: Being able to respond anonymously, validating an answer while providing immediate feedback, and providing an interactive and engaging environment. Although the clickers did not improve learning outcomes as measured by objective testing, perceptions shared by students indicated an increased degree of classroom engagement. Future research needs to examine other potential outcome variables.

  14. Novel Visualization of Large Health Related Data Sets - NPHRD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    April 2014) Appendix 8 D. Shah, H., Borland, D., McPeek Hinz, E., West, V.L., & Hammond, W. E.. Demonstration of Temporal Visualization of Diabetes ...Borland D, Shah, H, West, V., and Hammond, WE. Temporal visualization of diabetes mellitus via hemoglobin A1c levels. Proceedings of the 2014...change over time. • Set 3 consisted of 2,940 patients with the following data elements: patient ID, death status, ethnic group, gender, diabetes

  15. STEME: efficient EM to find motifs in large data sets.

    PubMed

    Reid, John E; Wernisch, Lorenz

    2011-10-01

    MEME and many other popular motif finders use the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm to optimize their parameters. Unfortunately, the running time of EM is linear in the length of the input sequences. This can prohibit its application to data sets of the size commonly generated by high-throughput biological techniques. A suffix tree is a data structure that can efficiently index a set of sequences. We describe an algorithm, Suffix Tree EM for Motif Elicitation (STEME), that approximates EM using suffix trees. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first application of suffix trees to EM. We provide an analysis of the expected running time of the algorithm and demonstrate that STEME runs an order of magnitude more quickly than the implementation of EM used by MEME. We give theoretical bounds for the quality of the approximation and show that, in practice, the approximation has a negligible effect on the outcome. We provide an open source implementation of the algorithm that we hope will be used to speed up existing and future motif search algorithms.

  16. Preceptor use of classroom assessment techniques to stimulate higher-order thinking in the clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Judy E

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide examples of learning activities to be used as formative (interim) evaluation of an in-hospital orientation or cross-training program. Examples are provided in the form of vignettes that have been derived from strategies described in the literature as classroom assessment techniques. Although these classroom assessment techniques were originally designed for classroom experiences, they are proposed as methods for preceptors to stimulate the development of higher-order thinking such as synthesizing information, solving problems, and learning how to learn.

  17. Processing large remote sensing image data sets on Beowulf clusters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steinwand, Daniel R.; Maddox, Brian; Beckmann, Tim; Schmidt, Gail

    2003-01-01

    High-performance computing is often concerned with the speed at which floating- point calculations can be performed. The architectures of many parallel computers and/or their network topologies are based on these investigations. Often, benchmarks resulting from these investigations are compiled with little regard to how a large dataset would move about in these systems. This part of the Beowulf study addresses that concern by looking at specific applications software and system-level modifications. Applications include an implementation of a smoothing filter for time-series data, a parallel implementation of the decision tree algorithm used in the Landcover Characterization project, a parallel Kriging algorithm used to fit point data collected in the field on invasive species to a regular grid, and modifications to the Beowulf project's resampling algorithm to handle larger, higher resolution datasets at a national scale. Systems-level investigations include a feasibility study on Flat Neighborhood Networks and modifications of that concept with Parallel File Systems.

  18. Evaluation of Data Visualization Software for Large Astronomical Data Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Matthew; Taylor, Roger S.; Kanbur, Shashi; Schofield, Damian; Donalek, Ciro; Djorgovski, Stanislav G.; Davidoff, Scott

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the efficacy of a 3D visualization application used to classify various types of stars using data derived from large synoptic sky surveys. Evaluation methodology included a cognitive walkthrough that prompted participants to identify a specific star type (Supernovae, RR Lyrae or Eclipsing Binary) and retrieve variable information (MAD, magratio, amplitude, frequency) from the star. This study also implemented a heuristic evaluation that applied usability standards such as the Shneiderman Visual Information Seeking Mantra to the initial iteration of the application. Findings from the evaluation indicated that improvements could be made to the application by developing effective spatial organization and implementing data reduction techniques such as linking, brushing, and small multiples.

  19. Value-based customer grouping from large retail data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strehl, Alexander; Ghosh, Joydeep

    2000-04-01

    In this paper, we propose OPOSSUM, a novel similarity-based clustering algorithm using constrained, weighted graph- partitioning. Instead of binary presence or absence of products in a market-basket, we use an extended 'revenue per product' measure to better account for management objectives. Typically the number of clusters desired in a database marketing application is only in the teens or less. OPOSSUM proceeds top-down, which is more efficient and takes a small number of steps to attain the desired number of clusters as compared to bottom-up agglomerative clustering approaches. OPOSSUM delivers clusters that are balanced in terms of either customers (samples) or revenue (value). To facilitate data exploration and validation of results we introduce CLUSION, a visualization toolkit for high-dimensional clustering problems. To enable closed loop deployment of the algorithm, OPOSSUM has no user-specified parameters. Thresholding heuristics are avoided and the optimal number of clusters is automatically determined by a search for maximum performance. Results are presented on a real retail industry data-set of several thousand customers and products, to demonstrate the power of the proposed technique.

  20. The Single and Combined Effects of Multiple Intensities of Behavior Modification and Methylphenidate for Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in a Classroom Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fabiano, Gregory A.; Pelham, William E., Jr.; Gnagy, Elizabeth M.; Burrows-MacLean, Lisa; Coles, Erika K.; Chacko, Anil; Wymbs, Brian T.; Walker, Kathryn S.; Arnold, Fran; Garefino, Allison; Keenan, Jenna K.; Onyango, Adia N.; Hoffman, Martin T.; Massetti, Greta M.; Robb, Jessica A.

    2007-01-01

    Currently behavior modification, stimulant medication, and combined treatments are supported as evidence-based interventions for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in classroom settings. However, there has been little study of the relative effects of these two modalities and their combination in classrooms. Using a within-subject design, the…

  1. Increasing the Writing Performance of Urban Seniors Placed At-Risk through Goal-Setting in a Culturally Responsive and Creativity-Centered Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estrada, Brittany; Warren, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Efforts to support marginalized students require not only identifying systemic inequities, but providing a classroom infrastructure that supports the academic achievement of all students. This action research study examined the effects of implementing goal-setting strategies and emphasizing creativity in a culturally responsive classroom (CRC) on…

  2. Partitioning large data sets: Use of statistical methods applied to a set of Russian igneous-rock chemical analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández Encinas, L.

    1994-12-01

    A method of cluster analysis has been applied on the following ideas: (a) stabilizing the variances of the variables; (b) reducing the number of variables by principal component analysis; and (c) generating a moderate number of groups containing large numbers of samples and applying a method of cluster analysis to them. This method was applied to a large data set to divide it into groups of samples without taking into consideration their origin. The sample set available consists of 1271 rock chemical analyses from 37 Massifs in the Ural Mountains (Russia), which then were divided into 6 differentiated groups. Later, discriminant functions were calculated to assign new samples to the groups determined.

  3. Classroom Management Strategies for Young Children with Challenging Behavior within Early Childhood Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jolivette, Kristine; Steed, Elizabeth A.

    2010-01-01

    Many preschool, Head Start, and kindergarten educators of young children express concern about the number of children who exhibit frequent challenging behaviors and report that managing these behaviors is difficult within these classrooms. This article describes research-based strategies with practical applications that can be used as part of…

  4. A Comparative Study on Second Language Vocabulary Development: Study Abroad vs Classroom Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jimenez-Jimenez, Antonio F.

    2010-01-01

    The present paper aims to achieve a better understanding of the process of vocabulary acquisition by examining the development of lexical knowledge in both classroom and study abroad contexts. Taking Ife, Vives Boix, and Meara's (2000) study as a starting point, this study attempts to determine whether development in both levels of vocabulary…

  5. The Timing of Feedback on Mathematics Problem Solving in a Classroom Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fyfe, Emily R.; Rittle-Johnson, Bethany

    2015-01-01

    Feedback is a ubiquitous learning tool that is theorized to help learners detect and correct their errors. The goal of this study was to examine the effects of feedback in a classroom context for children solving math equivalence problems (problems with operations on both sides of the equal sign). The authors worked with children in 7 second-grade…

  6. The Attributes of an Effective Teacher Differ between the Classroom and the Clinical Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haws, Jolene; Rannelli, Luke; Schaefer, Jeffrey P.; Zarnke, Kelly; Coderre, Sylvain; Ravani, Pietro; McLaughlin, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Most training programs use learners' subjective ratings of their teachers as the primary measure of teaching effectiveness. In a recent study we found that preclinical medical students' ratings of classroom teachers were associated with perceived charisma and physical attractiveness of the teacher, but not intellect. Here we explored whether the…

  7. Observing Students in Classroom Settings: A Review of Seven Coding Schemes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volpe, Robert J.; DiPerna, James C.; Hintze, John M.; Shapiro, Edward S.

    2005-01-01

    A variety of coding schemes are available for direct observational assessment of student classroom behavior. These instruments have been used for a number of assessment tasks including screening children in need of further evaluation for emotional and behavior problems, diagnostic assessment of emotional and behavior problems, assessment of…

  8. Effectiveness of Wellness-Based Classroom Guidance in Elementary School Settings: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villalba, Jose A.; Myers, Jane E.

    2008-01-01

    A three-session, wellness-based classroom guidance unit was developed based on the Indivisible Self wellness model and presented to 55 students in 5th grade. Participants completed the Five Factor Wellness Inventory, Elementary School Version, before and after the unit. Wellness scores were significantly and positively higher at post-testing for…

  9. By What Token Economy? A Classroom Learning Tool for Inclusive Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Carol; Katsiyannis, Antonis

    1997-01-01

    Describes a token economy that used tokens styled as license plates to elicit appropriate behavior in an inclusive fifth-grade class in which four students with behavior disorders were enrolled. Student involvement in establishing the "driving rules" of the classroom is explained, the components of a token economy are outlined, and steps for group…

  10. Response Grids: Practical Ways to Display Large Data Sets with High Visual Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gates, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Spreadsheets are useful for large data sets but they may be too wide or too long to print as conventional tables. Response grids offer solutions to the challenges posed by any large data set. They have wide application throughout science and for every subject and context where visual data displays are designed, within education and elsewhere.…

  11. Service user involvement in pre-registration mental health nurse education classroom settings: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Terry, J

    2012-11-01

    Service user involvement in pre-registration nurse education is now a requirement, yet little is known about how students engage with users in the classroom, how such initiatives are being evaluated, how service users are prepared themselves to teach students, or the potential influence on clinical practice. The aim of this literature review was to bring together published articles on service user involvement in classroom settings in pre-registration mental health nurse education programmes, including their evaluations. A comprehensive review of the literature was carried out via computer search engines and the Internet, as well as a hand search of pertinent journals and references. This produced eight papers that fitted the inclusion criteria, comprising four empirical studies and four review articles, which were then reviewed using a seven-item checklist. The articles revealed a range of teaching and learning strategies had been employed, ranging from exposure to users' personal stories, to students being required to demonstrate awareness of user perspectives in case study presentations, with others involving eLearning and assessment skills initiatives. This review concludes that further longitudinal research is needed to establish the influence of user involvement in the classroom over time.

  12. The Classroom Observation Schedule to Measure Intentional Communication (COSMIC): an observational measure of the intentional communication of children with autism in an unstructured classroom setting.

    PubMed

    Pasco, Greg; Gordon, Rosanna K; Howlin, Patricia; Charman, Tony

    2008-11-01

    The Classroom Observation Schedule to Measure Intentional Communication (COSMIC) was devised to provide ecologically valid outcome measures for a communication-focused intervention trial. Ninety-one children with autism spectrum disorder aged 6 years 10 months (SD 16 months) were videoed during their everyday snack, teaching and free play activities. Inter-rater reliability was high and relevant items showed significant associations with comparable items from concurrent Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule-Generic (Lord et al. 2000, J Autism Dev Disord 30(3):205-223) assessments. In a subsample of 28 children initial differences in rates of initiations, initiated speech/vocalisation and commenting were predictive of language and communication competence 15 months later. Results suggest that the use of observational measures of intentional communication in natural settings is a valuable assessment strategy for research and clinical practice.

  13. Do emotional support and classroom organization earlier in the year set the stage for higher quality instruction?

    PubMed

    Curby, Timothy W; Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E; Abry, Tashia

    2013-10-01

    Many teachers believe that providing greater emotional and organizational supports in the beginning of the year strengthens their ability to teach effectively as the year progresses. Some interventions, such as the Responsive Classroom (RC) approach, explicitly embed this sequence into professional development efforts. We tested the hypothesis that earlier emotional and organizational supports set the stage for improved instruction later in the year in a sample of third- and fourth-grade teachers enrolled in a randomized controlled trial of the RC approach. Further, we examined the extent to which the model generalized for teachers using varying levels of RC practices as well as whether or not teachers were in the intervention or control groups. Teachers' emotional, organizational, and instructional interactions were observed using the Classroom Assessment Scoring System (Pianta, La Paro, & Hamre, 2008) on five occasions throughout the year. Results indicated a reciprocal relation between emotional and instructional supports. Specifically, higher levels of emotional support earlier in the year predicted higher instructional support later in the year. Also, higher levels of instructional support earlier in the year predicted higher emotional support later in the year. Classroom organization was not found to have longitudinal associations with the other domains across a year. This pattern was robust when controlling for the use of RC practices as well as across intervention and control groups. Further, teachers' use of RC practices predicted higher emotional support and classroom organization throughout the year, suggesting the malleability of this teacher characteristic. Discussion highlights the connection between teachers' emotional and instructional supports and how the use of RC practices improves teachers' emotionally supportive interactions with students.

  14. Engaging millennial learners: Effectiveness of personal response system technology with nursing students in small and large classrooms.

    PubMed

    Revell, Susan M Hunter; McCurry, Mary K

    2010-05-01

    Nurse educators must explore innovative technologies that make the most of the characteristics and learning styles of millennial learners. These students are comfortable with technology and prefer interactive classrooms with individual feedback and peer collaboration. This study evaluated the perceived effectiveness of personal response system (PRS) technology in enhancing student learning in small and large classrooms. PRS technology was integrated into two undergraduate courses, nursing research (n = 33) and junior medical-surgical nursing (n = 116). Multiple-choice, true-false, NCLEX-RN alternate format, and reading quiz questions were incorporated within didactic PowerPoint presentations. Data analysis of Likert-type and open-response questions supported the use of PRS technology as an effective strategy for educating millennial learners in both small and large classrooms. PRS technology promotes active learning, increases participation, and provides students and faculty with immediate feedback that reflects comprehension of content and increases faculty-student interaction.

  15. Silent and Vocal Students in a Large Active Learning Chemistry Classroom: Comparison of Performance and Motivational Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obenland, Carrie A.; Munson, Ashlyn H.; Hutchinson, John S.

    2013-01-01

    Active learning is becoming more prevalent in large science classrooms, and this study shows the impact on performance of being vocal during Socratic questioning in a General Chemistry course. 800 college students over a two year period were given a pre and post-test using the Chemistry Concept Reasoning Test. The pre-test results showed that…

  16. Mobile-Phone-Based Classroom Response Systems: Students' Perceptions of Engagement and Learning in a Large Undergraduate Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Peter K.; Richardson, Alice; Oprescu, Florin; McDonald, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Using a Classroom Response System (CRS) has been associated with positive educational outcomes, by fostering student engagement and by allowing immediate feedback to both students and instructors. This study examined a low-cost CRS (VotApedia) in a large first-year class, where students responded to questions using their mobile phones. This study…

  17. Feasibility and Acceptability of Adapting the Eating in the Absence of Hunger Assessment for Preschoolers in the Classroom Setting.

    PubMed

    Soltero, Erica G; Ledoux, Tracey; Lee, Rebecca E

    2015-12-01

    Eating in the Absence of Hunger (EAH) represents a failure to self-regulate intake leading to overconsumption. Existing research on EAH has come from the clinical setting, limiting our understanding of this behavior. The purpose of this study was to describe the adaptation of the clinical EAH paradigm for preschoolers to the classroom setting and evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of measuring EAH in the classroom. The adapted protocol was implemented in childcare centers in Houston, Texas (N=4) and Phoenix, Arizona (N=2). The protocol was feasible, economical, and time efficient, eliminating previously identified barriers to administering the EAH assessment such as limited resources and the time constraint of delivering the assessment to participants individually. Implementation challenges included difficulty in choosing palatable test snacks that were in compliance with childcare center food regulations and the limited control over the meal that was administered prior to the assessment. The adapted protocol will allow for broader use of the EAH assessment and encourage researchers to incorporate the assessment into longitudinal studies in order to further our understanding of the causes and emergence of EAH.

  18. Effective Extensive Reading outside the Classroom: A Large-Scale Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robb, Thomas; Kano, Makimi

    2013-01-01

    We report on a large-scale implementation of extensive reading (ER) in a university setting in Japan where all students were required to read outside class time as part of their course requirement. A pre/posttest comparison between the 2009 cohort of students who read outside of class and the 2008 cohort who did no outside reading shows that the…

  19. Safety and science at sea: connecting science research settings to the classroom through live video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, E.; Peart, L. W.

    2011-12-01

    Many science teachers start the year off with classroom safety topics. Annual repetition helps with mastery of this important and basic knowledge, while helping schools to meet their legal obligations for safe lab science. Although these lessons are necessary, they are often topical, rarely authentic and relatively dull. Interesting connections can, however, be drawn between the importance of safety in science classrooms and the importance of safety in academic laboratories, fieldwork, shipboard research, and commercial research. Teachers can leverage these connections through live video interactions with scientists in the field, thereby creating an authentic learning environment. During the School of Rock 2009, a professional teacher research experience aboard the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program's research vessel JOIDES Resolution, safety and nature-of-science curricula were created to help address this need. By experimenting with various topics and locations on the ship that were accessible and applicable to middle school learning, 43 highly visual "safety signs" and activities were identified and presented "live" by graduate students, teachers, scientists; the ship's mates, doctor and technical staff. Students were exposed to realistic science process skills along with safety content from the world's only riserless, deep-sea drilling research vessel. The once-in-a-lifetime experience caused the students' eyes to brighten behind their safety glasses, especially as they recognized the same eye wash station and safety gear they have to wear and attended a ship's fire and safety drill along side scientists in hard hats and personal floatation devices. This collaborative and replicable live vide approach will connect basic safety content and nature-of-science process skills for a memorable and authentic learning experience for students.

  20. Large Atomic Natural Orbital Basis Sets for the First Transition Row Atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Large atomic natural orbital (ANO) basis sets are tabulated for the Sc to Cu. The primitive sets are taken from the large sets optimized by Partridge, namely (21s 13p 8d) for Sc and Ti and (20s 12p 9d) for V to Cu. These primitive sets are supplemented with three p, one d, six f, and four g functions. The ANO sets are derived from configuration interaction density matrices constructed as the average of the lowest states derived from the 3d(sup n)4s(sup 2) and 3d(sup n+1)4s(sup 1) occupations. For Ni, the 1S(3d(sup 10)) state is included in the averaging. The choice of basis sets for molecular calculations is discussed.

  1. Toddler Subtraction with Large Sets: Further Evidence for an Analog-Magnitude Representation of Number

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slaughter, Virginia; Kamppi, Dorian; Paynter, Jessica

    2006-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to test the hypothesis that toddlers have access to an analog-magnitude number representation that supports numerical reasoning about relatively large numbers. Three-year-olds were presented with subtraction problems in which initial set size and proportions subtracted were systematically varied. Two sets of cookies…

  2. Initial validation of the prekindergarten Classroom Observation Tool and goal setting system for data-based coaching.

    PubMed

    Crawford, April D; Zucker, Tricia A; Williams, Jeffrey M; Bhavsar, Vibhuti; Landry, Susan H

    2013-12-01

    Although coaching is a popular approach for enhancing the quality of Tier 1 instruction, limited research has addressed observational measures specifically designed to focus coaching on evidence-based practices. This study explains the development of the prekindergarten (pre-k) Classroom Observation Tool (COT) designed for use in a data-based coaching model. We examined psychometric characteristics of the COT and explored how coaches and teachers used the COT goal-setting system. The study included 193 coaches working with 3,909 pre-k teachers in a statewide professional development program. Classrooms served 3 and 4 year olds (n = 56,390) enrolled mostly in Title I, Head Start, and other need-based pre-k programs. Coaches used the COT during a 2-hr observation at the beginning of the academic year. Teachers collected progress-monitoring data on children's language, literacy, and math outcomes three times during the year. Results indicated a theoretically supported eight-factor structure of the COT across language, literacy, and math instructional domains. Overall interrater reliability among coaches was good (.75). Although correlations with an established teacher observation measure were small, significant positive relations between COT scores and children's literacy outcomes indicate promising predictive validity. Patterns of goal-setting behaviors indicate teachers and coaches set an average of 43.17 goals during the academic year, and coaches reported that 80.62% of goals were met. Both coaches and teachers reported the COT was a helpful measure for enhancing quality of Tier 1 instruction. Limitations of the current study and implications for research and data-based coaching efforts are discussed.

  3. An interactive environment for the analysis of large Earth observation and model data sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, Kenneth P.; Walsh, John E.; Wilhelmson, Robert B.

    1993-01-01

    We propose to develop an interactive environment for the analysis of large Earth science observation and model data sets. We will use a standard scientific data storage format and a large capacity (greater than 20 GB) optical disk system for data management; develop libraries for coordinate transformation and regridding of data sets; modify the NCSA X Image and X DataSlice software for typical Earth observation data sets by including map transformations and missing data handling; develop analysis tools for common mathematical and statistical operations; integrate the components described above into a system for the analysis and comparison of observations and model results; and distribute software and documentation to the scientific community.

  4. An interactive environment for the analysis of large Earth observation and model data sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, Kenneth P.; Walsh, John E.; Wilhelmson, Robert B.

    1992-01-01

    We propose to develop an interactive environment for the analysis of large Earth science observation and model data sets. We will use a standard scientific data storage format and a large capacity (greater than 20 GB) optical disk system for data management; develop libraries for coordinate transformation and regridding of data sets; modify the NCSA X Image and X Data Slice software for typical Earth observation data sets by including map transformations and missing data handling; develop analysis tools for common mathematical and statistical operations; integrate the components described above into a system for the analysis and comparison of observations and model results; and distribute software and documentation to the scientific community.

  5. Assessing the Effectiveness of Inquiry-based Learning Techniques Implemented in Large Classroom Settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steer, D. N.; McConnell, D. A.; Owens, K.

    2001-12-01

    Geoscience and education faculty at The University of Akron jointly developed a series of inquiry-based learning modules aimed at both non-major and major student populations enrolled in introductory geology courses. These courses typically serve 2500 students per year in four to six classes of 40-160 students each per section. Twelve modules were developed that contained common topics and assessments appropriate to Earth Science, Environmental Geology and Physical Geology classes. All modules were designed to meet four primary learning objectives agreed upon by Department of Geology faculty. These major objectives include: 1) Improvement of student understanding of the scientific method; 2) Incorporation of problem solving strategies involving analysis, synthesis, and interpretation; 3) Development of the ability to distinguish between inferences, data and observations; and 4) Obtaining an understanding of basic processes that operate on Earth. Additional objectives that may be addressed by selected modules include: 1) The societal relevance of science; 2) Use and interpretation of quantitative data to better understand the Earth; 3) Development of the students' ability to communicate scientific results; 4) Distinguishing differences between science, religion and pseudo-science; 5) Evaluation of scientific information found in the mass media; and 6) Building interpersonal relationships through in-class group work. Student pre- and post-instruction progress was evaluated by administering a test of logical thinking, an attitude toward science survey, and formative evaluations. Scores from the logical thinking instrument were used to form balanced four-person working groups based on the students' incoming cognitive level. Groups were required to complete a series of activities and/or exercises that targeted different cognitive domains based upon Bloom's taxonomy (knowledge, comprehension, application, analysis, synthesis and evaluation of information). Daily assessments of knowledge-level learning included evaluations of student responses to pre- and post-instruction conceptual test questions, short group exercises and content-oriented exam questions. Higher level thinking skills were assessed when students completed exercises that required the completion of Venn diagrams, concept maps and/or evaluation rubrics both during class periods and on exams. Initial results indicate that these techniques improved student attendance significantly and improved overall retention in the course by 8-14% over traditional lecture formats. Student scores on multiple choice exam questions were slightly higher (1-3%) for students taught in the active learning environment and short answer questions showed larger gains (7%) over students' scores in a more traditional class structure.

  6. An Examination of the Applications of Constitutional Concepts as an Approach to Classroom Management: Four Studies of Judicious Discipline in Various Classroom Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwan, Barbara; Gathercoal, Paul; Nimmo, Virginia

    This paper presents a composite of four separate research studies conducted to assess the impact of constitutional language on classroom environments. The studies were designed to examine the uses of "Judicious Discipline" in a variety of classrooms and how the use of a common language based on rights and responsibilities affected the…

  7. A Longitudinal Investigation of the Relationship between Motivation and Late Second Language Speech Learning in Classroom Settings.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kazuya; Dewaele, Jean-Marc; Hanzawa, Keiko

    2017-01-01

    The current study set out to examine the role of learner motivation in second language (L2) speech learning in English-as-a-Foreign-Language classrooms. The motivational orientations of 40 first-year university Japanese students were surveyed via a tailored questionnaire and linked to their spontaneous speech development, elicited via a timed picture description task at the onset and end of one academic semester, in terms of perceived comprehensibility (i.e., ease of understanding) and accentedness (i.e., linguistic nativelikeness). Significant improvement in comprehensibility (but not accentedness) was found among certain individuals. These students likely showed a strong motivation to study English for their future career development as a vague and long-term goal, as well as a high degree of concern for improving comprehensibility, grammatical accuracy and complexity.

  8. An Academic Approach to Stress Management for College Students in a Conventional Classroom Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnahan, Robert E.; And Others

    Since the identification of stress and the relationship of individual stress responses to physical and mental health, medical and behavioral professionals have been training individuals in coping strategies. To investigate the possibility of teaching cognitive coping skills to a nonclinical population in an academic setting, 41 college students…

  9. The Effect of Teaching Structural Discourse Markers in an EFL Classroom Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alraddadi, Budoor Muslim

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the effects of explicit teaching on the acquisition of spoken discourse markers (DMs) on EFL learners' presentation production. It also aimed to measure the impact of two different treatments on the acquisition of a set of DMs. This study is an experimental study and focuses on the overall production of spoken…

  10. A Classroom Exercise in Spatial Analysis Using an Imaginary Data Set.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopaska-Merkel, David C.

    One skill that elementary students need to acquire is the ability to analyze spatially distributed data. In this activity students are asked to complete the following tasks: (1) plot a set of data (related to "mud-sharks"--an imaginary fish) on a map of the state of Alabama, (2) identify trends in the data, (3) make graphs using the data…

  11. BEST in CLASS: A Classroom-Based Model for Ameliorating Problem Behavior in Early Childhood Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vo, Abigail; Sutherland, Kevin S.; Conroy, Maureen A.

    2012-01-01

    As more young children enter school settings to attend early childhood programs, early childhood teachers and school psychologists have been charged with supporting a growing number of young children with chronic problem behaviors that put them at risk for the development of emotional/behavioral disorders (EBDs). There is a need for effective,…

  12. Best in Class: A Classroom-Based Model for Ameliorating Problem Behavior in Early Childhood Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vo, Abigail K.; Sutherland, Kevin S.; Conroy, Maureen A.

    2012-01-01

    As more young children enter school settings to attend early childhood programs, early childhood teachers and school psychologists have been charged with supporting a growing number of young children with chronic problem behaviors that put them at risk for the development of emotional/behavioral disorders (EBDs). There is a need for effective,…

  13. Ready, Set, SCIENCE!: Putting Research to Work in K-8 Science Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michaels, Sarah; Shouse, Andrew W.; Schweingruber, Heidi A.

    2007-01-01

    What types of instructional experiences help K-8 students learn science with understanding? What do science educators, teachers, teacher leaders, science specialists, professional development staff, curriculum designers, and school administrators need to know to create and support such experiences? "Ready, Set, Science!" guides the way with an…

  14. Predictors of Preschool Children's Compliance Behavior in Early Childhood Classroom Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wachs, Theodore D.; Gurkas, Pinar; Kontos, Susan

    2004-01-01

    Working within a person-process-context framework, we investigated the relation of the level of preschool children's compliance to child temperament, caregiver-child interaction in the child care setting, child care quality, and contextual chaos. Participants were 86 preschoolers and their teachers. Our database included both questionnaires and…

  15. MiniWall Tool for Analyzing CFD and Wind Tunnel Large Data Sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuh, Michael J.; Melton, John E.; Stremel, Paul M.

    2017-01-01

    It is challenging to review and assimilate large data sets created by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations and wind tunnel tests. Over the past 10 years, NASA Ames Research Center has developed and refined a software tool dubbed the "MiniWall" to increase productivity in reviewing and understanding large CFD-generated data sets. Under the recent NASA ERA project, the application of the tool expanded to enable rapid comparison of experimental and computational data. The MiniWall software is browser based so that it runs on any computer or device that can display a web page. It can also be used remotely and securely by using web server software such as the Apache HTTP Server. The MiniWall software has recently been rewritten and enhanced to make it even easier for analysts to review large data sets and extract knowledge and understanding from these data sets. This paper describes the MiniWall software and demonstrates how the different features are used to review and assimilate large data sets.

  16. MiniWall Tool for Analyzing CFD and Wind Tunnel Large Data Sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuh, Michael J.; Melton, John E.; Stremel, Paul M.

    2017-01-01

    It is challenging to review and assimilate large data sets created by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations and wind tunnel tests. Over the past 10 years, NASA Ames Research Center has developed and refined a software tool dubbed the MiniWall to increase productivity in reviewing and understanding large CFD-generated data sets. Under the recent NASA ERA project, the application of the tool expanded to enable rapid comparison of experimental and computational data. The MiniWall software is browser based so that it runs on any computer or device that can display a web page. It can also be used remotely and securely by using web server software such as the Apache HTTP server. The MiniWall software has recently been rewritten and enhanced to make it even easier for analysts to review large data sets and extract knowledge and understanding from these data sets. This paper describes the MiniWall software and demonstrates how the different features are used to review and assimilate large data sets.

  17. Teleconsultation in school settings: linking classroom teachers and behavior analysts through web-based technology.

    PubMed

    Frieder, Jessica E; Peterson, Stephanie M; Woodward, Judy; Crane, Jaelee; Garner, Marlane

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a technically driven, collaborative approach to assessing the function of problem behavior using web-based technology. A case example is provided to illustrate the process used in this pilot project. A school team conducted a functional analysis with a child who demonstrated challenging behaviors in a preschool setting. Behavior analysts at a university setting provided the school team with initial workshop trainings, on-site visits, e-mail and phone communication, as well as live web-based feedback on functional analysis sessions. The school personnel implemented the functional analysis with high fidelity and scored the data reliably. Outcomes of the project suggest that there is great potential for collaboration via the use of web-based technologies for ongoing assessment and development of effective interventions. However, an empirical evaluation of this model should be conducted before wide-scale adoption is recommended.

  18. Computing Steerable Principal Components of a Large Set of Images and Their Rotations

    PubMed Central

    Ponce, Colin; Singer, Amit

    2013-01-01

    We present here an efficient algorithm to compute the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of a large image set consisting of images and, for each image, the set of its uniform rotations in the plane. We do this by pointing out the block circulant structure of the covariance matrix and utilizing that structure to compute its eigenvectors. We also demonstrate the advantages of this algorithm over similar ones with numerical experiments. Although it is useful in many settings, we illustrate the specific application of the algorithm to the problem of cryo-electron microscopy. PMID:21536533

  19. Computing steerable principal components of a large set of images and their rotations.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Colin; Singer, Amit

    2011-11-01

    We present here an efficient algorithm to compute the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of a large image set consisting of images and, for each image, the set of its uniform rotations in the plane. We do this by pointing out the block circulant structure of the covariance matrix and utilizing that structure to compute its eigenvectors. We also demonstrate the advantages of this algorithm over similar ones with numerical experiments. Although it is useful in many settings, we illustrate the specific application of the algorithm to the problem of cryo-electron microscopy.

  20. Impact of Abbreviated Lecture with Interactive Mini-cases vs Traditional Lecture on Student Performance in the Large Classroom

    PubMed Central

    Nykamp, Diane L.; Momary, Kathryn M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To compare the impact of 2 different teaching and learning methods on student mastery of learning objectives in a pharmacotherapy module in the large classroom setting. Design. Two teaching and learning methods were implemented and compared in a required pharmacotherapy module for 2 years. The first year, multiple interactive mini-cases with inclass individual assessment and an abbreviated lecture were used to teach osteoarthritis; a traditional lecture with 1 inclass case discussion was used to teach gout. In the second year, the same topics were used but the methods were flipped. Student performance on pre/post individual readiness assessment tests (iRATs), case questions, and subsequent examinations were compared each year by the teaching and learning method and then between years by topic for each method. Students also voluntarily completed a 20-item evaluation of the teaching and learning methods. Assessment. Postpresentation iRATs were significantly higher than prepresentation iRATs for each topic each year with the interactive mini-cases; there was no significant difference in iRATs before and after traditional lecture. For osteoarthritis, postpresentation iRATs after interactive mini-cases in year 1 were significantly higher than postpresentation iRATs after traditional lecture in year 2; the difference in iRATs for gout per learning method was not significant. The difference between examination performance for osteoarthritis and gout was not significant when the teaching and learning methods were compared. On the student evaluations, 2 items were significant both years when answers were compared by teaching and learning method. Each year, students ranked their class participation higher with interactive cases than with traditional lecture, but both years they reported enjoying the traditional lecture format more. Conclusion. Multiple interactive mini-cases with an abbreviated lecture improved immediate mastery of learning objectives compared to

  1. DocCube: Multi-Dimensional Visualization and Exploration of Large Document Sets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mothe, Josiane; Chrisment, Claude; Dousset, Bernard; Alaux, Joel

    2003-01-01

    Describes a user interface that provides global visualizations of large document sets to help users formulate the query that corresponds to their information needs. Highlights include concept hierarchies that users can browse to specify and refine information needs; knowledge discovery in databases and texts; and multidimensional modeling.…

  2. Teaching Children to Organise and Represent Large Data Sets in a Histogram

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nisbet, Steven; Putt, Ian

    2004-01-01

    Although some bright students in primary school are able to organise numerical data into classes, most attend to the characteristics of individuals rather than the group, and "see the trees rather than the forest". How can teachers in upper primary and early high school teach students to organise large sets of data with widely varying…

  3. Setting Cut Scores on Large-Scale Assessments. The State Board Connection Issues in Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of State Boards of Education, Alexandria, VA.

    This Brief builds on the work of the National Association of State Boards of Education 1997 Study Group on State Assessment Systems by examining one of the state board actions that is most likely to capture the publics attention: setting cut scores on state assessments. This process involves a large measure of human judgment and politics and a…

  4. Preschoolers' Nonsymbolic Arithmetic with Large Sets: Is Addition More Accurate than Subtraction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shinskey, Jeanne L.; Chan, Cindy Ho-man; Coleman, Rhea; Moxom, Lauren; Yamamoto, Eri

    2009-01-01

    Adult and developing humans share with other animals analog magnitude representations of number that support nonsymbolic arithmetic with large sets. This experiment tested the hypothesis that such representations may be more accurate for addition than for subtraction in children as young as 3 1/2 years of age. In these tasks, the experimenter hid…

  5. Influences of large sets of environmental exposures on immune responses in healthy adult men

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Buqing; Rykova, Marina; Jäger, Gundula; Feuerecker, Matthias; Hörl, Marion; Matzel, Sandra; Ponomarev, Sergey; Vassilieva, Galina; Nichiporuk, Igor; Choukèr, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Environmental factors have long been known to influence immune responses. In particular, clinical studies about the association between migration and increased risk of atopy/asthma have provided important information on the role of migration associated large sets of environmental exposures in the development of allergic diseases. However, investigations about environmental effects on immune responses are mostly limited in candidate environmental exposures, such as air pollution. The influences of large sets of environmental exposures on immune responses are still largely unknown. A simulated 520-d Mars mission provided an opportunity to investigate this topic. Six healthy males lived in a closed habitat simulating a spacecraft for 520 days. When they exited their “spacecraft” after the mission, the scenario was similar to that of migration, involving exposure to a new set of environmental pollutants and allergens. We measured multiple immune parameters with blood samples at chosen time points after the mission. At the early adaptation stage, highly enhanced cytokine responses were observed upon ex vivo antigen stimulations. For cell population frequencies, we found the subjects displayed increased neutrophils. These results may presumably represent the immune changes occurred in healthy humans when migrating, indicating that large sets of environmental exposures may trigger aberrant immune activity. PMID:26306804

  6. Interdependent Learning in an Open Classroom Setting: Dean Rusk Elementary School, 1972-73. Research and Development Report, Volume 7, Number 7, August 1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goettee, Margaret

    All special programs at Dean Rusk Elementary School, funded in part under Title I of the 1965 Elementary Secondary Education Act, combined to facilitate individualized instruction in the nongraded, open classroom setting of the school. To better meet the needs of the pupils during the 1972-73 school year, the Follow Through Program included, for…

  7. The Effects of Fixed-Time Reinforcement Schedules on Problem Behavior of Children with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders in a Day-Treatment Classroom Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasmussen, Karina; O'Neill, Robert E.

    2006-01-01

    The current study assessed the effects of fixed-time reinforcement schedules on problem behavior of students with emotional-behavioral disorders in a clinical day-treatment classroom setting. Three elementary-aged students with a variety of emotional and behavioral problems participated in the study. Initial functional assessments indicated that…

  8. Out in the Classroom: Transgender Student Experiences at a Large Public University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pryor, Jonathan T.

    2015-01-01

    Faculty and peer interactions are 2 of the most important relationships for college students to foster (Astin, 1993). Transgender college students have an increasing visible presence on college campuses (Pusch, 2005), yet limited research exists on their experiences and struggles in the classroom environment (Garvey & Rankin, 2015; Renn,…

  9. Prekindergarten Teachers' Verbal References to Print during Classroom-Based, Large-Group Shared Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zucker, Tricia A.; Justice, Laura M.; Piasta, Shayne B.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The frequency with which adults reference print when reading with preschool-age children is associated with growth in children's print knowledge (e.g., L.M. Justice & H.K. Ezell, 2000, 2002). This study examined whether prekindergarten (pre-K) teachers naturally reference print during classroom shared reading and if verbal print…

  10. Classroom Response Systems for Implementing "Interactive Inquiry" in Large Organic Chemistry Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Richard W.; Caughran, Joel A.; Sauers, Angela L.

    2014-01-01

    The authors have developed "sequence response applications" for classroom response systems (CRSs) that allow instructors to engage and actively involve students in the learning process, probe for common misconceptions regarding lecture material, and increase interaction between instructors and students. "Guided inquiry" and…

  11. Experiments and other methods for developing expertise with design of experiments in a classroom setting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, John W.

    1990-01-01

    The only way to gain genuine expertise in Statistical Process Control (SPC) and the design of experiments (DOX) is with repeated practice, but not on canned problems with dead data sets. Rather, one must negotiate a wide variety of problems each with its own peculiarities and its own constantly changing data. The problems should not be of the type for which there is a single, well-defined answer that can be looked up in a fraternity file or in some text. The problems should match as closely as possible the open-ended types for which there is always an abundance of uncertainty. These are the only kinds that arise in real research, whether that be basic research in academe or engineering research in industry. To gain this kind of experience, either as a professional consultant or as an industrial employee, takes years. Vast amounts of money, not to mention careers, must be put at risk. The purpose here is to outline some realistic simulation-type lab exercises that are so simple and inexpensive to run that the students can repeat them as often as desired at virtually no cost. Simulations also allow the instructor to design problems whose outcomes are as noisy as desired but still predictable within limits. Also the instructor and the students can learn a great deal more from the postmortum conducted after the exercise is completed. One never knows for sure what the true data should have been when dealing only with real life experiments. To add a bit more realism to the exercises, it is sometimes desirable to make the students pay for each experimental result from a make-believe budget allocation for the problem.

  12. An Analysis Framework Addressing the Scale and Legibility of Large Scientific Data Sets

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, Hank R.

    2006-01-01

    Much of the previous work in the large data visualization area has solely focused on handling the scale of the data. This task is clearly a great challenge and necessary, but it is not sufficient. Applying standard visualization techniques to large scale data sets often creates complicated pictures where meaningful trends are lost. A second challenge, then, is to also provide algorithms that simplify what an analyst must understand, using either visual or quantitative means. This challenge can be summarized as improving the legibility or reducing the complexity of massive data sets. Fully meeting both of these challenges is the work of many, many PhD dissertations. In this dissertation, we describe some new techniques to address both the scale and legibility challenges, in hope of contributing to the larger solution. In addition to our assumption of simultaneously addressing both scale and legibility, we add an additional requirement that the solutions considered fit well within an interoperable framework for diverse algorithms, because a large suite of algorithms is often necessary to fully understand complex data sets. For scale, we present a general architecture for handling large data, as well as details of a contract-based system for integrating advanced optimizations into a data flow network design. We also describe techniques for volume rendering and performing comparisons at the extreme scale. For legibility, we present several techniques. Most noteworthy are equivalence class functions, a technique to drive visualizations using statistical methods, and line-scan based techniques for characterizing shape.

  13. Extensions of parallel coordinates for interactive exploration of large multi-timepoint data sets.

    PubMed

    Blaas, Jorik; Botha, Charl P; Post, Frits H

    2008-01-01

    Parallel coordinate plots (PCPs) are commonly used in information visualization to provide insight into multi-variate data. These plots help to spot correlations between variables. PCPs have been successfully applied to unstructured datasets up to a few millions of points. In this paper, we present techniques to enhance the usability of PCPs for the exploration of large, multi-timepoint volumetric data sets, containing tens of millions of points per timestep. The main difficulties that arise when applying PCPs to large numbers of data points are visual clutter and slow performance, making interactive exploration infeasible. Moreover, the spatial context of the volumetric data is usually lost. We describe techniques for preprocessing using data quantization and compression, and for fast GPU-based rendering of PCPs using joint density distributions for each pair of consecutive variables, resulting in a smooth, continuous visualization. Also, fast brushing techniques are proposed for interactive data selection in multiple linked views, including a 3D spatial volume view. These techniques have been successfully applied to three large data sets: Hurricane Isabel (Vis'04 contest), the ionization front instability data set (Vis'08 design contest), and data from a large-eddy simulation of cumulus clouds. With these data, we show how PCPs can be extended to successfully visualize and interactively explore multi-timepoint volumetric datasets with an order of magnitude more data points.

  14. Cloud-based MOTIFSIM: Detecting Similarity in Large DNA Motif Data Sets.

    PubMed

    Tran, Ngoc Tam L; Huang, Chun-Hsi

    2016-09-08

    We developed the cloud-based MOTIFSIM on Amazon Web Services (AWS) cloud. The tool is an extended version from our web-based tool version 2.0, which was developed based on a novel algorithm for detecting similarity in multiple DNA motif data sets. This cloud-based version further allows researchers to exploit the computing resources available from AWS to detect similarity in multiple large-scale DNA motif data sets resulting from the next-generation sequencing technology. The tool is highly scalable with expandable AWS.

  15. Classroom Behaviors of Students in Rural Mainstreamed Settings: A Comparison of Students with Disabilities and Their Normative Peers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butera, Gretchen; And Others

    This study compared the behaviors of mainstreamed disabled students to those of their normative peers in the same classroom. Observational sessions were conducted in 48 classrooms in 3 rural West Virginia school districts. Data were collected on 71 disabled students in grades 3-7 over a 4-week period, including students with mild mental…

  16. Examining Quality in Two Preschool Settings: Publicly Funded Early Childhood Education and Inclusive Early Childhood Education Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelatti, Christina Yeager; Dynia, Jaclyn M.; Logan, Jessica A.; Justice, Laura M.; Kaderavek, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although classroom quality is an important consideration, few recent research studies have examined the process and structural quality in publicly funded early childhood education (ECE) and inclusive ECE classrooms. This study provides an important contribution to the literature by comparing two conceptualizations of quality in…

  17. Coaching as a Key Component in Teachers' Professional Development: Improving Classroom Practices in Head Start Settings. OPRE Report 2012-4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, Chrrishana M.; Modlin, Emmily L.

    2012-01-01

    Head Start CARES (Classroom-based Approaches and Resources for Emotion and Social Skill Promotion) is a large-scale, national research demonstration that was designed to test the effects of a one-year program aimed at improving pre-kindergarteners' social and emotional readiness for school. To facilitate the delivery of the program, teachers…

  18. A fractal model of HIV transmission on complex sociogeographic networks: towards analysis of large data sets.

    PubMed

    Wallace, R

    1993-01-01

    "A paradigm of HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) transmission along very large 'sociogeographic' networks--spatially focused nets of social interaction--is extended to include fractal (dilationally self-similar) structures upon which a metric of 'sociogeographic' distance can be defined.... Techniques are sketched for determining the sociogeographic structure of a large, geographically centered social network, providing a possible empirical basis for predicting forms and rates of spread of the initial, rapid stages of an HIV outbreak for networks not yet infected, and perhaps greatly expanding the utility of routinely collected small-area administrative data sets in the design of mutually reinforcing, multifactorial disease-control strategies."

  19. PrestoPronto: a code devoted to handling large data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa, S. J. A.; Prestipino, C.

    2016-05-01

    The software PrestoPronto consist to a full graphical user interface (GUI) program aimed to execute the analysis of large X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy data sets. Written in Python is free and open source. The code is able to read large datasets, apply calibration, alignment corrections and perform classical data analysis, from the extraction of the signal to EXAFS fit. The package includes also programs with GUIs] to perform, Principal Component Analysis and Linear Combination Fits. The main benefit of this program is allow to follow quickly the evolution of time resolved experiments coming from Quick-EXAFS (QEXAFS) and dispersive EXAFS beamlines.

  20. Classroom Discourse and Reading Comprehension in Bilingual Settings: A Case Study of Collaborative Reasoning in a Chinese Heritage Language Learners' Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Hsiao-Feng

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines the participation of one Chinese teacher and five 13 to 15 year-old Chinese heritage students in a classroom in a Chinese community school during group discussions about narrative texts. In this study, the teacher used Collaborative Reasoning (CR) (Anderson, et al., 2001) to help the Chinese heritage students extend…

  1. Decision forests for machine learning classification of large, noisy seafloor feature sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Ed; Smith, Denson; Sofge, Donald; Elmore, Paul; Petry, Frederick

    2017-02-01

    Extremely randomized trees (ET) classifiers, an extension of random forests (RF) are applied to classification of features such as seamounts derived from bathymetry data. This data is characterized by sparse training data from by large noisy features sets such as often found in other geospatial data. A variety of feature metrics may be useful for this task and we use a large number of metrics relevant to the task of finding seamounts. The major significant results to be described include: an outstanding seamount classification accuracy of 97%; an automated process to produce the most useful classification features that are relevant to geophysical scientists (as represented by the feature metrics); demonstration that topography provides the most important data representation for classification. As well as achieving good accuracy in classification, the human-understandable set of metrics generated by the classifier that are most relevant for the results are discussed.

  2. Validating a large geophysical data set: Experiences with satellite-derived cloud parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph; Haskins, Robert D.; Knighton, James E.; Pursch, Andrew; Granger-Gallegos, Stephanie

    1992-01-01

    We are validating the global cloud parameters derived from the satellite-borne HIRS2 and MSU atmospheric sounding instrument measurements, and are using the analysis of these data as one prototype for studying large geophysical data sets in general. The HIRS2/MSU data set contains a total of 40 physical parameters, filling 25 MB/day; raw HIRS2/MSU data are available for a period exceeding 10 years. Validation involves developing a quantitative sense for the physical meaning of the derived parameters over the range of environmental conditions sampled. This is accomplished by comparing the spatial and temporal distributions of the derived quantities with similar measurements made using other techniques, and with model results. The data handling needed for this work is possible only with the help of a suite of interactive graphical and numerical analysis tools. Level 3 (gridded) data is the common form in which large data sets of this type are distributed for scientific analysis. We find that Level 3 data is inadequate for the data comparisons required for validation. Level 2 data (individual measurements in geophysical units) is needed. A sampling problem arises when individual measurements, which are not uniformly distributed in space or time, are used for the comparisons. Standard 'interpolation' methods involve fitting the measurements for each data set to surfaces, which are then compared. We are experimenting with formal criteria for selecting geographical regions, based upon the spatial frequency and variability of measurements, that allow us to quantify the uncertainty due to sampling. As part of this project, we are also dealing with ways to keep track of constraints placed on the output by assumptions made in the computer code. The need to work with Level 2 data introduces a number of other data handling issues, such as accessing data files across machine types, meeting large data storage requirements, accessing other validated data sets, processing speed

  3. Analyzing large data sets from XGC1 magnetic fusion simulations using apache spark

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, R. Michael

    2016-11-21

    Apache Spark is explored as a tool for analyzing large data sets from the magnetic fusion simulation code XGCI. Implementation details of Apache Spark on the NERSC Edison supercomputer are discussed, including binary file reading, and parameter setup. Here, an unsupervised machine learning algorithm, k-means clustering, is applied to XGCI particle distribution function data, showing that highly turbulent spatial regions do not have common coherent structures, but rather broad, ring-like structures in velocity space.

  4. Moving Large Data Sets Over High-Performance Long Distance Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Hodson, Stephen W; Poole, Stephen W; Ruwart, Thomas; Settlemyer, Bradley W

    2011-04-01

    In this project we look at the performance characteristics of three tools used to move large data sets over dedicated long distance networking infrastructure. Although performance studies of wide area networks have been a frequent topic of interest, performance analyses have tended to focus on network latency characteristics and peak throughput using network traffic generators. In this study we instead perform an end-to-end long distance networking analysis that includes reading large data sets from a source file system and committing large data sets to a destination file system. An evaluation of end-to-end data movement is also an evaluation of the system configurations employed and the tools used to move the data. For this paper, we have built several storage platforms and connected them with a high performance long distance network configuration. We use these systems to analyze the capabilities of three data movement tools: BBcp, GridFTP, and XDD. Our studies demonstrate that existing data movement tools do not provide efficient performance levels or exercise the storage devices in their highest performance modes. We describe the device information required to achieve high levels of I/O performance and discuss how this data is applicable in use cases beyond data movement performance.

  5. Parallel analysis tools and new visualization techniques for ultra-large climate data set

    SciTech Connect

    Middleton, Don; Haley, Mary

    2014-12-10

    ParVis was a project funded under LAB 10-05: “Earth System Modeling: Advanced Scientific Visualization of Ultra-Large Climate Data Sets”. Argonne was the lead lab with partners at PNNL, SNL, NCAR and UC-Davis. This report covers progress from January 1st, 2013 through Dec 1st, 2014. Two previous reports covered the period from Summer, 2010, through September 2011 and October 2011 through December 2012, respectively. While the project was originally planned to end on April 30, 2013, personnel and priority changes allowed many of the institutions to continue work through FY14 using existing funds. A primary focus of ParVis was introducing parallelism to climate model analysis to greatly reduce the time-to-visualization for ultra-large climate data sets. Work in the first two years was conducted on two tracks with different time horizons: one track to provide immediate help to climate scientists already struggling to apply their analysis to existing large data sets and another focused on building a new data-parallel library and tool for climate analysis and visualization that will give the field a platform for performing analysis and visualization on ultra-large datasets for the foreseeable future. In the final 2 years of the project, we focused mostly on the new data-parallel library and associated tools for climate analysis and visualization.

  6. Classification of large-scale fundus image data sets: a cloud-computing framework.

    PubMed

    Roychowdhury, Sohini; Roychowdhury, Sohini; Roychowdhury, Sohini

    2016-08-01

    Large medical image data sets with high dimensionality require substantial amount of computation time for data creation and data processing. This paper presents a novel generalized method that finds optimal image-based feature sets that reduce computational time complexity while maximizing overall classification accuracy for detection of diabetic retinopathy (DR). First, region-based and pixel-based features are extracted from fundus images for classification of DR lesions and vessel-like structures. Next, feature ranking strategies are used to distinguish the optimal classification feature sets. DR lesion and vessel classification accuracies are computed using the boosted decision tree and decision forest classifiers in the Microsoft Azure Machine Learning Studio platform, respectively. For images from the DIARETDB1 data set, 40 of its highest-ranked features are used to classify four DR lesion types with an average classification accuracy of 90.1% in 792 seconds. Also, for classification of red lesion regions and hemorrhages from microaneurysms, accuracies of 85% and 72% are observed, respectively. For images from STARE data set, 40 high-ranked features can classify minor blood vessels with an accuracy of 83.5% in 326 seconds. Such cloud-based fundus image analysis systems can significantly enhance the borderline classification performances in automated screening systems.

  7. Kernel Density Estimation, Kernel Methods, and Fast Learning in Large Data Sets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shitong; Wang, Jun; Chung, Fu-lai

    2014-01-01

    Kernel methods such as the standard support vector machine and support vector regression trainings take O(N(3)) time and O(N(2)) space complexities in their naïve implementations, where N is the training set size. It is thus computationally infeasible in applying them to large data sets, and a replacement of the naive method for finding the quadratic programming (QP) solutions is highly desirable. By observing that many kernel methods can be linked up with kernel density estimate (KDE) which can be efficiently implemented by some approximation techniques, a new learning method called fast KDE (FastKDE) is proposed to scale up kernel methods. It is based on establishing a connection between KDE and the QP problems formulated for kernel methods using an entropy-based integrated-squared-error criterion. As a result, FastKDE approximation methods can be applied to solve these QP problems. In this paper, the latest advance in fast data reduction via KDE is exploited. With just a simple sampling strategy, the resulted FastKDE method can be used to scale up various kernel methods with a theoretical guarantee that their performance does not degrade a lot. It has a time complexity of O(m(3)) where m is the number of the data points sampled from the training set. Experiments on different benchmarking data sets demonstrate that the proposed method has comparable performance with the state-of-art method and it is effective for a wide range of kernel methods to achieve fast learning in large data sets.

  8. Breeding and Genetics Symposium: really big data: processing and analysis of very large data sets.

    PubMed

    Cole, J B; Newman, S; Foertter, F; Aguilar, I; Coffey, M

    2012-03-01

    Modern animal breeding data sets are large and getting larger, due in part to recent availability of high-density SNP arrays and cheap sequencing technology. High-performance computing methods for efficient data warehousing and analysis are under development. Financial and security considerations are important when using shared clusters. Sound software engineering practices are needed, and it is better to use existing solutions when possible. Storage requirements for genotypes are modest, although full-sequence data will require greater storage capacity. Storage requirements for intermediate and results files for genetic evaluations are much greater, particularly when multiple runs must be stored for research and validation studies. The greatest gains in accuracy from genomic selection have been realized for traits of low heritability, and there is increasing interest in new health and management traits. The collection of sufficient phenotypes to produce accurate evaluations may take many years, and high-reliability proofs for older bulls are needed to estimate marker effects. Data mining algorithms applied to large data sets may help identify unexpected relationships in the data, and improved visualization tools will provide insights. Genomic selection using large data requires a lot of computing power, particularly when large fractions of the population are genotyped. Theoretical improvements have made possible the inversion of large numerator relationship matrices, permitted the solving of large systems of equations, and produced fast algorithms for variance component estimation. Recent work shows that single-step approaches combining BLUP with a genomic relationship (G) matrix have similar computational requirements to traditional BLUP, and the limiting factor is the construction and inversion of G for many genotypes. A naïve algorithm for creating G for 14,000 individuals required almost 24 h to run, but custom libraries and parallel computing reduced that to

  9. Coffee Shops, Classrooms and Conversations: public engagement and outreach in a large interdisciplinary research Hub

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, Jennifer A.

    2014-05-01

    Public engagement and outreach activities are increasingly using specialist staff for co-ordination, training and support for researchers, they are also becoming expected for large investments. Here, the experience of public engagement and outreach a large, interdisciplinary Research Hub is described. dot.rural, based at the University of Aberdeen UK, is a £11.8 million Research Councils UK Rural Digital Economy Hub, funded as part of the RCUK Digital Economy Theme (2009-2015). Digital Economy research aims to realise the transformational impact of digital technologies on aspects of the environment, community life, cultural experiences, future society, and the economy. The dot.rural Hub involves 92 researchers from 12 different disciplines, including Geography, Hydrology and Ecology. Public Engagement and Outreach is embedded in the dot.rural Digital Economy Hub via an Outreach Officer. Alongside this position, public engagement and outreach activities are compulsory part of PhD student contracts. Public Engagement and Outreach activities at the dot.rural Hub involve individuals and groups in both formal and informal settings organised by dot.rural and other organisations. Activities in the realms of Education, Public Engagement, Traditional and Social Media are determined by a set of Underlying Principles designed for the Hub by the Outreach Officer. The underlying Engagement and Outreach principles match funding agency requirements and expectations alongside researcher demands and the user-led nature of Digital Economy Research. All activities include researchers alongside the Outreach Officer are research informed and embedded into specific projects that form the Hub. Successful public engagement activities have included participation in Café Scientifique series, workshops in primary and secondary schools, and online activities such as I'm a Scientist Get Me Out of Here. From how to engage 8 year olds with making hydrographs more understandable to members of

  10. Density-Dependent Quantized Least Squares Support Vector Machine for Large Data Sets.

    PubMed

    Nan, Shengyu; Sun, Lei; Chen, Badong; Lin, Zhiping; Toh, Kar-Ann

    2017-01-01

    Based on the knowledge that input data distribution is important for learning, a data density-dependent quantization scheme (DQS) is proposed for sparse input data representation. The usefulness of the representation scheme is demonstrated by using it as a data preprocessing unit attached to the well-known least squares support vector machine (LS-SVM) for application on big data sets. Essentially, the proposed DQS adopts a single shrinkage threshold to obtain a simple quantization scheme, which adapts its outputs to input data density. With this quantization scheme, a large data set is quantized to a small subset where considerable sample size reduction is generally obtained. In particular, the sample size reduction can save significant computational cost when using the quantized subset for feature approximation via the Nyström method. Based on the quantized subset, the approximated features are incorporated into LS-SVM to develop a data density-dependent quantized LS-SVM (DQLS-SVM), where an analytic solution is obtained in the primal solution space. The developed DQLS-SVM is evaluated on synthetic and benchmark data with particular emphasis on large data sets. Extensive experimental results show that the learning machine incorporating DQS attains not only high computational efficiency but also good generalization performance.

  11. Tiny videos: a large data set for nonparametric video retrieval and frame classification.

    PubMed

    Karpenko, Alexandre; Aarabi, Parham

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we present a large database of over 50,000 user-labeled videos collected from YouTube. We develop a compact representation called "tiny videos" that achieves high video compression rates while retaining the overall visual appearance of the video as it varies over time. We show that frame sampling using affinity propagation-an exemplar-based clustering algorithm-achieves the best trade-off between compression and video recall. We use this large collection of user-labeled videos in conjunction with simple data mining techniques to perform related video retrieval, as well as classification of images and video frames. The classification results achieved by tiny videos are compared with the tiny images framework [24] for a variety of recognition tasks. The tiny images data set consists of 80 million images collected from the Internet. These are the largest labeled research data sets of videos and images available to date. We show that tiny videos are better suited for classifying scenery and sports activities, while tiny images perform better at recognizing objects. Furthermore, we demonstrate that combining the tiny images and tiny videos data sets improves classification precision in a wider range of categories.

  12. Implementing Child-focused Activity Meter Utilization into the Elementary School Classroom Setting Using a Collaborative Community-based Approach

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, BA; Jones, A; Biggs, BK; Kaufman, T; Cristiani, V; Kumar, S; Quigg, S; Maxson, J; Swenson, L; Jacobson, N

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of pediatric obesity has increased over the past 3 decades and is a pressing public health program. New technology advancements that can encourage more physical in children are needed. The Zamzee program is an activity meter linked to a motivational website designed for children 8–14 years of age. The objective of the study was to use a collaborative approach between a medical center, the private sector and local school staff to assess the feasibility of using the Zamzee Program in the school-based setting to improve physical activity levels in children. Methods This was a pilot 8-week observational study offered to all children in one fifth grade classroom. Body mass index (BMI), the amount of physical activity by 3-day recall survey, and satisfaction with usability of the Zamzee Program were measured pre- and post-study. Results Out of 11 children who enrolled in the study, 7 completed all study activities. In those who completed the study, the median (interquartile range) total activity time by survey increased by 17 (1042) minutes and the BMI percentile change was 0 (8). Both children and their caregivers found the Zamzee Activity Meter (6/7) and website (6/7) “very easy” or “easy” to use. Conclusion The Zamzee Program was found to be usable but did not significantly improve physical activity levels or BMI. Collaborative obesity intervention projects involving medical centers, the private sector and local schools are feasible but the effectiveness needs to be evaluated in larger-scale studies. PMID:27042382

  13. Basis set convergence of CCSD(T) equilibrium geometries using a large and diverse set of molecular structures.

    PubMed

    Spackman, Peter R; Jayatilaka, Dylan; Karton, Amir

    2016-09-14

    We examine the basis set convergence of the CCSD(T) method for obtaining the structures of the 108 neutral first- and second-row species in the W4-11 database (with up to five non-hydrogen atoms). This set includes a total of 181 unique bonds: 75 H-X, 49 X-Y, 43 X=Y, and 14 X≡Y bonds (where X and Y are first- and second-row atoms). As reference values, geometries optimized at the CCSD(T)/aug'-cc-pV(6+d)Z level of theory are used. We consider the basis set convergence of the CCSD(T) method with the correlation consistent basis sets cc-pV(n+d)Z and aug'-cc-pV(n+d)Z (n = D, T, Q, 5) and the Weigend-Ahlrichs def2-n ZVPP basis sets (n = T, Q). For each increase in the highest angular momentum present in the basis set, the root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) over the bond distances is decreased by a factor of ∼4. For example, the following RMSDs are obtained for the cc-pV(n+d)Z basis sets 0.0196 (D), 0.0050 (T), 0.0015 (Q), and 0.0004 (5) Å. Similar results are obtained for the aug'-cc-pV(n+d)Z and def2-n ZVPP basis sets. The double-zeta and triple-zeta quality basis sets systematically and significantly overestimate the bond distances. A simple and cost-effective way to improve the performance of these basis sets is to scale the bond distances by an empirical scaling factor of 0.9865 (cc-pV(D+d)Z) and 0.9969 (cc-pV(T+d)Z). This results in RMSDs of 0.0080 (scaled cc-pV(D+d)Z) and 0.0029 (scaled cc-pV(T+d)Z) Å. The basis set convergence of larger basis sets can be accelerated via standard basis-set extrapolations. In addition, the basis set convergence of explicitly correlated CCSD(T)-F12 calculations is investigated in conjunction with the cc-pVnZ-F12 basis sets (n = D, T). Typically, one "gains" two angular momenta in the explicitly correlated calculations. That is, the CCSD(T)-F12/cc-pVnZ-F12 level of theory shows similar performance to the CCSD(T)/cc-pV(n+2)Z level of theory. In particular, the following RMSDs are obtained for the cc-pVnZ-F12 basis sets 0.0019 (D

  14. Coresets vs clustering: comparison of methods for redundancy reduction in very large white matter fiber sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandroni, Guy; Zimmerman Moreno, Gali; Sochen, Nir; Greenspan, Hayit

    2016-03-01

    Recent advances in Diffusion Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DW-MRI) of white matter in conjunction with improved tractography produce impressive reconstructions of White Matter (WM) pathways. These pathways (fiber sets) often contain hundreds of thousands of fibers, or more. In order to make fiber based analysis more practical, the fiber set needs to be preprocessed to eliminate redundancies and to keep only essential representative fibers. In this paper we demonstrate and compare two distinctive frameworks for selecting this reduced set of fibers. The first framework entails pre-clustering the fibers using k-means, followed by Hierarchical Clustering and replacing each cluster with one representative. For the second clustering stage seven distance metrics were evaluated. The second framework is based on an efficient geometric approximation paradigm named coresets. Coresets present a new approach to optimization and have huge success especially in tasks requiring large computation time and/or memory. We propose a modified version of the coresets algorithm, Density Coreset. It is used for extracting the main fibers from dense datasets, leaving a small set that represents the main structures and connectivity of the brain. A novel approach, based on a 3D indicator structure, is used for comparing the frameworks. This comparison was applied to High Angular Resolution Diffusion Imaging (HARDI) scans of 4 healthy individuals. We show that among the clustering based methods, that cosine distance gives the best performance. In comparing the clustering schemes with coresets, Density Coreset method achieves the best performance.

  15. The effects of fixed-time reinforcement schedules on problem behavior of children with emotional and behavioral disorders in a day-treatment classroom setting.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Karina; O'Neill, Robert E

    2006-01-01

    The current study assessed the effects of fixed-time reinforcement schedules on problem behavior of students with emotional-behavioral disorders in a clinical day-treatment classroom setting. Three elementary-aged students with a variety of emotional and behavioral problems participated in the study. Initial functional assessments indicated that social attention was the maintaining reinforcer for their verbally disruptive behavior. Baseline phases were alternated with phases in which attention was provided on fixed-time schedules in the context of an ABAB design. The results indicated that the provision of attention on fixed-time schedules substantially reduced the participants' rate of verbal disruptions. These decreases were maintained during initial thinning of the schedules. The results provide one of the first examples that such an intervention can be successfully implemented in a classroom setting.

  16. Distributed Computation of the knn Graph for Large High-Dimensional Point Sets

    PubMed Central

    Plaku, Erion; Kavraki, Lydia E.

    2009-01-01

    High-dimensional problems arising from robot motion planning, biology, data mining, and geographic information systems often require the computation of k nearest neighbor (knn) graphs. The knn graph of a data set is obtained by connecting each point to its k closest points. As the research in the above-mentioned fields progressively addresses problems of unprecedented complexity, the demand for computing knn graphs based on arbitrary distance metrics and large high-dimensional data sets increases, exceeding resources available to a single machine. In this work we efficiently distribute the computation of knn graphs for clusters of processors with message passing. Extensions to our distributed framework include the computation of graphs based on other proximity queries, such as approximate knn or range queries. Our experiments show nearly linear speedup with over one hundred processors and indicate that similar speedup can be obtained with several hundred processors. PMID:19847318

  17. Experimental set-up for three PHOEBUS type large-area heliostats at the PSA

    SciTech Connect

    Haeger, M.; Schiel, W.; Romero, M.; Schmitz-Goeb, M.

    1995-11-01

    Three large-area heliostat prototypes are being erected at the Plataforma Solar de Almeria by Spanish and German industry. The objective is to demonstrate their technical and economical suitability for a PHOEBUS power tower plant. The two different heliostat designs including two 100 ml glass/metal faceted heliostats and one 150 m{sup 2} stressed membrane heliostat are tested at a representative distance of 485 m to the PSA`s CESA tower. The paper introduces the heliostat designs and test set-up, such as location, targets, flux measurement, data acquisition and control.

  18. Envision: An interactive system for the management and visualization of large geophysical data sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Searight, K. R.; Wojtowicz, D. P.; Walsh, J. E.; Pathi, S.; Bowman, K. P.; Wilhelmson, R. B.

    1995-01-01

    Envision is a software project at the University of Illinois and Texas A&M, funded by NASA's Applied Information Systems Research Project. It provides researchers in the geophysical sciences convenient ways to manage, browse, and visualize large observed or model data sets. Envision integrates data management, analysis, and visualization of geophysical data in an interactive environment. It employs commonly used standards in data formats, operating systems, networking, and graphics. It also attempts, wherever possible, to integrate with existing scientific visualization and analysis software. Envision has an easy-to-use graphical interface, distributed process components, and an extensible design. It is a public domain package, freely available to the scientific community.

  19. A practical, bioinformatic workflow system for large data sets generated by next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Cantacessi, Cinzia; Jex, Aaron R; Hall, Ross S; Young, Neil D; Campbell, Bronwyn E; Joachim, Anja; Nolan, Matthew J; Abubucker, Sahar; Sternberg, Paul W; Ranganathan, Shoba; Mitreva, Makedonka; Gasser, Robin B

    2010-09-01

    Transcriptomics (at the level of single cells, tissues and/or whole organisms) underpins many fields of biomedical science, from understanding the basic cellular function in model organisms, to the elucidation of the biological events that govern the development and progression of human diseases, and the exploration of the mechanisms of survival, drug-resistance and virulence of pathogens. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies are contributing to a massive expansion of transcriptomics in all fields and are reducing the cost, time and performance barriers presented by conventional approaches. However, bioinformatic tools for the analysis of the sequence data sets produced by these technologies can be daunting to researchers with limited or no expertise in bioinformatics. Here, we constructed a semi-automated, bioinformatic workflow system, and critically evaluated it for the analysis and annotation of large-scale sequence data sets generated by NGS. We demonstrated its utility for the exploration of differences in the transcriptomes among various stages and both sexes of an economically important parasitic worm (Oesophagostomum dentatum) as well as the prediction and prioritization of essential molecules (including GTPases, protein kinases and phosphatases) as novel drug target candidates. This workflow system provides a practical tool for the assembly, annotation and analysis of NGS data sets, also to researchers with a limited bioinformatic expertise. The custom-written Perl, Python and Unix shell computer scripts used can be readily modified or adapted to suit many different applications. This system is now utilized routinely for the analysis of data sets from pathogens of major socio-economic importance and can, in principle, be applied to transcriptomics data sets from any organism.

  20. Approaching the exa-scale: a real-world evaluation of rendering extremely large data sets

    SciTech Connect

    Patchett, John M; Ahrens, James P; Lo, Li - Ta; Browniee, Carson S; Mitchell, Christopher J; Hansen, Chuck

    2010-10-15

    Extremely large scale analysis is becoming increasingly important as supercomputers and their simulations move from petascale to exascale. The lack of dedicated hardware acceleration for rendering on today's supercomputing platforms motivates our detailed evaluation of the possibility of interactive rendering on the supercomputer. In order to facilitate our understanding of rendering on the supercomputing platform, we focus on scalability of rendering algorithms and architecture envisioned for exascale datasets. To understand tradeoffs for dealing with extremely large datasets, we compare three different rendering algorithms for large polygonal data: software based ray tracing, software based rasterization and hardware accelerated rasterization. We present a case study of strong and weak scaling of rendering extremely large data on both GPU and CPU based parallel supercomputers using Para View, a parallel visualization tool. Wc use three different data sets: two synthetic and one from a scientific application. At an extreme scale, algorithmic rendering choices make a difference and should be considered while approaching exascale computing, visualization, and analysis. We find software based ray-tracing offers a viable approach for scalable rendering of the projected future massive data sizes.

  1. Treatment of severe pulmonary hypertension in the setting of the large patent ductus arteriosus.

    PubMed

    Niu, Mary C; Mallory, George B; Justino, Henri; Ruiz, Fadel E; Petit, Christopher J

    2013-05-01

    Treatment of the large patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in the setting of pulmonary hypertension (PH) is challenging. Left patent, the large PDA can result in irreversible pulmonary vascular disease. Occlusion, however, may lead to right ventricular failure for certain patients with severe PH. Our center has adopted a staged management strategy using medical management, noninvasive imaging, and invasive cardiac catheterization to treat PH in the presence of a large PDA. This approach determines the safety of ductal closure but also leverages medical therapy to create an opportunity for safe PDA occlusion. We reviewed our experience with this approach. Patients with both severe PH and PDAs were studied. PH treatment history and hemodynamic data obtained during catheterizations were reviewed. Repeat catheterizations, echocardiograms, and clinical status at latest follow-up were also reviewed. Seven patients had both PH and large, unrestrictive PDAs. At baseline, all patients had near-systemic right ventricular pressures. Nine catheterizations were performed. Two patients underwent 2 catheterizations each due to poor initial response to balloon test occlusion. Six of 7 patients exhibited subsystemic pulmonary pressures during test occlusion and underwent successful PDA occlusion. One patient did not undergo PDA occlusion. In follow-up, 2 additional catheterizations were performed after successful PDA occlusion for subsequent hemodynamic assessment. At the latest follow-up, the 6 patients who underwent PDA occlusion are well, with continued improvement in PH. Five patients remain on PH treatment. A staged approach to PDA closure for patients with severe PH is an effective treatment paradigm. Aggressive treatment of PH creates a window of opportunity for PDA occlusion, echocardiography assists in identifying the timing for closure, and balloon test occlusion during cardiac catheterization is critical in determining safety of closure. By safely eliminating the large PDA

  2. Large-scale similarity search profiling of ChEMBL compound data sets.

    PubMed

    Heikamp, Kathrin; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2011-08-22

    A large-scale similarity search investigation has been carried out on 266 well-defined compound activity classes extracted from the ChEMBL database. The analysis was performed using two widely applied two-dimensional (2D) fingerprints that mark opposite ends of the current performance spectrum of these types of fingerprints, i.e., MACCS structural keys and the extended connectivity fingerprint with bond diameter four (ECFP4). For each fingerprint, three nearest neighbor search strategies were applied. On the basis of these search calculations, a similarity search profile of the ChEMBL database was generated. Overall, the fingerprint search campaign was surprisingly successful. In 203 of 266 test cases (∼76%), a compound recovery rate of at least 50% was observed with at least the better performing fingerprint and one search strategy. The similarity search profile also revealed several general trends. For example, fingerprint searching was often characterized by an early enrichment of active compounds in database selection sets. In addition, compound activity classes have been categorized according to different similarity search performance levels, which helps to put the results of benchmark calculations into perspective. Therefore, a compendium of activity classes falling into different search performance categories is provided. On the basis of our large-scale investigation, the performance range of state-of-the-art 2D fingerprinting has been delineated for compound data sets directed against a wide spectrum of pharmaceutical targets.

  3. A flexible method for estimating the fraction of fitness influencing mutations from large sequencing data sets

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Sunjin; Akey, Joshua M.

    2016-01-01

    A continuing challenge in the analysis of massively large sequencing data sets is quantifying and interpreting non-neutrally evolving mutations. Here, we describe a flexible and robust approach based on the site frequency spectrum to estimate the fraction of deleterious and adaptive variants from large-scale sequencing data sets. We applied our method to approximately 1 million single nucleotide variants (SNVs) identified in high-coverage exome sequences of 6515 individuals. We estimate that the fraction of deleterious nonsynonymous SNVs is higher than previously reported; quantify the effects of genomic context, codon bias, chromatin accessibility, and number of protein–protein interactions on deleterious protein-coding SNVs; and identify pathways and networks that have likely been influenced by positive selection. Furthermore, we show that the fraction of deleterious nonsynonymous SNVs is significantly higher for Mendelian versus complex disease loci and in exons harboring dominant versus recessive Mendelian mutations. In summary, as genome-scale sequencing data accumulate in progressively larger sample sizes, our method will enable increasingly high-resolution inferences into the characteristics and determinants of non-neutral variation. PMID:27197222

  4. Litho-kinematic facies model for large landslide deposits in arid settings

    SciTech Connect

    Yarnold, J.C.; Lombard, J.P.

    1989-04-01

    Reconnaissance field studies of six large landslide deposits in the S. Basin and Range suggest that a set of characteristic features is common to the deposits of large landslides in an arid setting. These include a coarse boulder cap, an upper massive zone, a lower disrupted zone, and a mixed zone overlying disturbed substrate. The upper massive zone is dominated by crackel breccia. This grades downward into a lower disrupted zone composed of a more matrix-rich breccia that is internally sheared, intruded by clastic dikes, and often contains a cataclasite layer at its base. An underlying discontinuous mixed zone is composed of material from the overlying breccia mixed with material entrained from the underlying substrate. Bedding in the substrate sometimes displays folding and contortion that die out downward. The authors work suggests a spatial zonation of these characteristic features within many landslide deposits. In general, clastic dikes, the basal cataclasite, and folding in the substrate are observed mainly in distal parts of landslides. In most cases, total thickness, thickness of the basal disturbed and mixed zones, and the degree of internal shearing increase distally, whereas maximum clast size commonly decreases distally. Zonation of these features is interpreted to result from kinematics of emplacement that cause generally increased deformation in the distal regions of the landslide.

  5. Contextual settings, science stories, and large context problems: Toward a more humanistic science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stinner, Arthur

    This article addresses the need for and the problem of organizing a science curriculum around contextual settings and science stories that serve to involve and motivate students to develop an understanding of the world that is rooted in the scientific and the humanistic traditions. A program of activities placed around contextual settings, science stories, and contemporary issues of interest is recommended in an attempt to move toward a slow and secure abolition of the gulf between scientific knowledge and common sense beliefs. A conceptual development model is described to guide the connection between theory and evidence on a level appropriate for children, from early years to senior years. For the senior years it is also important to connect the activity of teaching to a sound theoretical structure. The theoretical structure must illuminate the status of theory in science, establish what counts as evidence, clarify the relationship between experiment and explanation, and make connections to the history of science. The article concludes with a proposed program of activities in terms of a sequence of theoretical and empirical experiences that involve contextual settings, science stories, large context problems, thematic teaching, and popular science literature teaching.

  6. Robust Periodic Hartree-Fock Exchange for Large-Scale Simulations Using Gaussian Basis Sets.

    PubMed

    Guidon, Manuel; Hutter, Jürg; VandeVondele, Joost

    2009-11-10

    Hartree-Fock exchange with a truncated Coulomb operator has recently been discussed in the context of periodic plane-waves calculations [Spencer, J.; Alavi, A. Phys. Rev. B: Solid State, 2008, 77, 193110]. In this work, this approach is extended to Gaussian basis sets, leading to a stable and accurate procedure for evaluating Hartree-Fock exchange at the Γ-point. Furthermore, it has been found that standard hybrid functionals can be transformed into short-range functionals without loss of accuracy. The well-defined short-range nature of the truncated exchange operator can naturally be exploited in integral screening procedures and makes this approach interesting for both condensed phase and gas phase systems. The presented Hartree-Fock implementation is massively parallel and scales up to ten thousands of cores. This makes it feasible to perform highly accurate calculations on systems containing thousands of atoms or ten thousands of basis functions. The applicability of this scheme is demonstrated by calculating the cohesive energy of a LiH crystal close to the Hartree-Fock basis set limit and by performing an electronic structure calculation of a complete protein (rubredoxin) in solution with a large and flexible basis set.

  7. Developing consistent Landsat data sets for large area applications: the MRLC 2001 protocol

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chander, G.; Huang, C.; Yang, L.; Homer, C.; Larson, C.

    2009-01-01

    One of the major efforts in large area land cover mapping over the last two decades was the completion of two U.S. National Land Cover Data sets (NLCD), developed with nominal 1992 and 2001 Landsat imagery under the auspices of the MultiResolution Land Characteristics (MRLC) Consortium. Following the successful generation of NLCD 1992, a second generation MRLC initiative was launched with two primary goals: (1) to develop a consistent Landsat imagery data set for the U.S. and (2) to develop a second generation National Land Cover Database (NLCD 2001). One of the key enhancements was the formulation of an image preprocessing protocol and implementation of a consistent image processing method. The core data set of the NLCD 2001 database consists of Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) images. This letter details the procedures for processing the original ETM+ images and more recent scenes added to the database. NLCD 2001 products include Anderson Level II land cover classes, percent tree canopy, and percent urban imperviousness at 30-m resolution derived from Landsat imagery. The products are freely available for download to the general public from the MRLC Consortium Web site at http://www.mrlc.gov.

  8. Hierarchical unbiased graph shrinkage (HUGS): a novel groupwise registration for large data set.

    PubMed

    Ying, Shihui; Wu, Guorong; Wang, Qian; Shen, Dinggang

    2014-01-01

    Normalizing all images in a large data set into a common space is a key step in many clinical and research studies, e.g., for brain development, maturation, and aging. Recently, groupwise registration has been developed for simultaneous alignment of all images without selecting a particular image as template, thus potentially avoiding bias in the registration. However, most conventional groupwise registration methods do not explore the data distribution during the image registration. Thus, their performance could be affected by large inter-subject variations in the data set under registration. To solve this potential issue, we propose to use a graph to model the distribution of all image data sitting on the image manifold, with each node representing an image and each edge representing the geodesic pathway between two nodes (or images). Then, the procedure of warping all images to their population center turns to the dynamic shrinking of the graph nodes along their graph edges until all graph nodes become close to each other. Thus, the topology of image distribution on the image manifold is always preserved during the groupwise registration. More importantly, by modeling the distribution of all images via a graph, we can potentially reduce registration error since every time each image is warped only according to its nearby images with similar structures in the graph. We have evaluated our proposed groupwise registration method on both infant and adult data sets, by also comparing with the conventional group-mean based registration and the ABSORB methods. All experimental results show that our proposed method can achieve better performance in terms of registration accuracy and robustness.

  9. The compression–error trade-off for large gridded data sets

    DOE PAGES

    Silver, Jeremy D.; Zender, Charles S.

    2017-01-27

    The netCDF-4 format is widely used for large gridded scientific data sets and includes several compression methods: lossy linear scaling and the non-lossy deflate and shuffle algorithms. Many multidimensional geoscientific data sets exhibit considerable variation over one or several spatial dimensions (e.g., vertically) with less variation in the remaining dimensions (e.g., horizontally). On such data sets, linear scaling with a single pair of scale and offset parameters often entails considerable loss of precision. We introduce an alternative compression method called "layer-packing" that simultaneously exploits lossy linear scaling and lossless compression. Layer-packing stores arrays (instead of a scalar pair) of scalemore » and offset parameters. An implementation of this method is compared with lossless compression, storing data at fixed relative precision (bit-grooming) and scalar linear packing in terms of compression ratio, accuracy and speed. When viewed as a trade-off between compression and error, layer-packing yields similar results to bit-grooming (storing between 3 and 4 significant figures). Bit-grooming and layer-packing offer significantly better control of precision than scalar linear packing. Relative performance, in terms of compression and errors, of bit-groomed and layer-packed data were strongly predicted by the entropy of the exponent array, and lossless compression was well predicted by entropy of the original data array. Layer-packed data files must be "unpacked" to be readily usable. The compression and precision characteristics make layer-packing a competitive archive format for many scientific data sets.« less

  10. Identifying at risk individuals for drug and alcohol dependence: teaching the competency to students in classroom and clinical settings.

    PubMed

    Kane, Irene; Mitchell, Ann M; Puskar, Kathryn R; Hagle, Holly; Talcott, Kimberly; Fioravanti, Marie; Droppa, Mandy; Luongo, Peter F; Lindsay, Dawn

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol use and other drug use affect patient healthcare outcomes. This article describes a classroom-to-clinical approach teaching nursing students to utilize motivational interviewing techniques to support patient behavior change. Through the lens of a universal prevention method, nursing students learned about reward circuit activation leading to risky substance use and the difference between addiction and at-risk use. Specific assessment tools and motivational interviewing techniques were presented in the classroom. Students then applied their knowledge in simulation laboratories and clinical rotations.

  11. The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope and Foundations for Data Exploitation of Petabyte Data Sets

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, K H; Nikolaev, S; Huber, M E

    2007-02-26

    The next generation of imaging surveys in astronomy, such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), will require multigigapixel cameras that can process enormous amounts of data read out every few seconds. This huge increase in data throughput (compared to megapixel cameras and minute- to hour-long integrations of today's instruments) calls for a new paradigm for extracting the knowledge content. We have developed foundations for this new approach. In this project, we have studied the necessary processes for extracting information from large time-domain databases systematics. In the process, we have produced significant scientific breakthroughs by developing new methods to probe both the elusive time and spatial variations in astrophysics data sets from the SuperMACHO (Massive Compact Halo Objects) survey, the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search (LONEOS), and the Taiwanese American Occultation Survey (TAOS). This project continues to contribute to the development of the scientific foundations for future wide-field, time-domain surveys. Our algorithm and pipeline development has provided the building blocks for the development of the LSST science software system. Our database design and performance measures have helped to size and constrain LSST database design. LLNL made significant contributions to the foundations of the LSST, which has applications for large-scale imaging and data-mining activities at LLNL. These developments are being actively applied to the previously mentioned surveys producing important scientific results that have been released to the scientific community and more continue to be published and referenced, enhancing LLNL's scientific stature.

  12. Twelve- to 14-Month-Old Infants Can Predict Single-Event Probability with Large Set Sizes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denison, Stephanie; Xu, Fei

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has revealed that infants can reason correctly about single-event probabilities with small but not large set sizes (Bonatti, 2008; Teglas "et al.", 2007). The current study asks whether infants can make predictions regarding single-event probability with large set sizes using a novel procedure. Infants completed two trials: A…

  13. Radiometric Normalization of Large Airborne Image Data Sets Acquired by Different Sensor Types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrke, S.; Beshah, B. T.

    2016-06-01

    successfully applied to large sets of heterogeneous imagery, including the adjustment of original sensor images prior to quality control and further processing as well as radiometric adjustment for ortho-image mosaic generation.

  14. A Preliminary Investigation of a Specialized Music Therapy Model for Children with Disabilities Delivered in a Classroom Setting

    PubMed Central

    White, Yasmine; Hans, Laura; Adebari, Richard; Goldsmith, Ali; Ozler, Burcu; Buehne, Kristen; Jones, Sarah; Shapleton, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Music therapy is gaining popularity as an intervention strategy for children with developmental disabilities, including autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This study was a pilot investigation of a classroom-based music-based intervention, Voices Together®, for improving communication skills in children with ASD and children with intellectual disabilities. Four local public elementary school special education classrooms, serving 5 children with a classification of autistic disorder and 32 children with intellectual disability without autism, were randomly selected to receive one of two levels of exposure to Voices Together music therapy: “long-term” (15 weeks beginning in January 2015 (Time 1), n = 14) or “short-term” (7 weeks beginning 7 weeks later in February (Time 2), n = 17). Using observational ratings, investigators reliably scored participants live in terms of their level of verbal responsiveness to prompts during three songs featured each week of the program. Both groups demonstrated increases in verbal responses over time; however, only the long-term group demonstrated significant within-group increases. Preliminary findings suggest that music therapy delivered in a classroom in 45-minute weekly sessions for 15 weeks can promote improvements in verbal responsiveness among individuals with autism and other developmental disabilities. Findings warrant further investigation into the efficacy of classroom-based music therapy programs. PMID:27999683

  15. A Preliminary Investigation of a Specialized Music Therapy Model for Children with Disabilities Delivered in a Classroom Setting.

    PubMed

    Mendelson, Jenna; White, Yasmine; Hans, Laura; Adebari, Richard; Schmid, Lorrie; Riggsbee, Jan; Goldsmith, Ali; Ozler, Burcu; Buehne, Kristen; Jones, Sarah; Shapleton, Jennifer; Dawson, Geraldine

    2016-01-01

    Music therapy is gaining popularity as an intervention strategy for children with developmental disabilities, including autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This study was a pilot investigation of a classroom-based music-based intervention, Voices Together®, for improving communication skills in children with ASD and children with intellectual disabilities. Four local public elementary school special education classrooms, serving 5 children with a classification of autistic disorder and 32 children with intellectual disability without autism, were randomly selected to receive one of two levels of exposure to Voices Together music therapy: "long-term" (15 weeks beginning in January 2015 (Time 1), n = 14) or "short-term" (7 weeks beginning 7 weeks later in February (Time 2), n = 17). Using observational ratings, investigators reliably scored participants live in terms of their level of verbal responsiveness to prompts during three songs featured each week of the program. Both groups demonstrated increases in verbal responses over time; however, only the long-term group demonstrated significant within-group increases. Preliminary findings suggest that music therapy delivered in a classroom in 45-minute weekly sessions for 15 weeks can promote improvements in verbal responsiveness among individuals with autism and other developmental disabilities. Findings warrant further investigation into the efficacy of classroom-based music therapy programs.

  16. Classroom-Based Interventions and Teachers' Perceived Job Stressors and Confidence: Evidence from a Randomized Trial in Head Start Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhai, Fuhua; Raver, C. Cybele; Li-Grining, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Preschool teachers' job stressors have received increasing attention but have been understudied in the literature. We investigated the impacts of a classroom-based intervention, the Chicago School Readiness Project (CSRP), on teachers' perceived job stressors and confidence, as indexed by their perceptions of job control, job resources, job…

  17. Child and Setting Characteristics Affecting the Adult Talk Directed at Preschoolers with Autism Spectrum Disorder in the Inclusive Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irvin, Dwight W.; Boyd, Brian A.; Odom, Samuel L.

    2015-01-01

    Difficulty with social competence is a core deficit of autism spectrum disorder. Research on typically developing children and children with disabilities, in general, suggests the adult talk received in the classroom is related to their social development. The aims of this study were to examine (1) the types and amounts of adult talk children with…

  18. Initial Validation of the Prekindergarten Classroom Observation Tool and Goal Setting System for Data-Based Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, April D.; Zucker, Tricia A.; Williams, Jeffrey M.; Bhavsar, Vibhuti; Landry, Susan H.

    2013-01-01

    Although coaching is a popular approach for enhancing the quality of Tier 1 instruction, limited research has addressed observational measures specifically designed to focus coaching on evidence-based practices. This study explains the development of the prekindergarten (pre-k) Classroom Observation Tool (COT) designed for use in a data-based…

  19. Science in the Classroom: Finding a Balance between Autonomous Exploration and Teacher-Led Instruction in Preschool Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nayfeld, Irena; Brenneman, Kimberly; Gelman, Rochel

    2011-01-01

    Research Findings: This paper reports on children's use of science materials in preschool classrooms during their free choice time. Baseline observations showed that children and teachers rarely spend time in the designated science area. An intervention was designed to "market" the science center by introducing children to 1 science…

  20. An Analogous Study of Children's Attitudes Toward School in an Open Classroom Environment as Opposed to a Conventional Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeli, Doris Conti

    A study sought to determine whether intermediate age children exposed to open classroom teaching strategy have a more positive attitude toward school than intermediate age children exposed to conventional teaching strategy. The hypothesis was that there would be no significant difference in attitude between the two groups. The study was limited to…

  1. Analogies as Tools for Meaning Making in Elementary Science Education: How Do They Work in Classroom Settings?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerra-Ramos, Maria Teresa

    2011-01-01

    In this paper there is a critical overview of the role of analogies as tools for meaning making in science education, their advantages and disadvantages. Two empirical studies on the use of analogies in primary classrooms are discussed and analysed. In the first study, the "string circuit" analogy was used in the teaching of electric circuits with…

  2. Innovation from within the Box: Evaluation of Online Problem Sets in a Series of Large Lecture Undergraduate Science Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaeffer, Evonne; Bhargava, Tina; Nash, John; Kerns, Charles; Stocker, Scott

    A technology-mediated solution to enhance the learning experience for students in a large lecture setting was evaluated. Online problem sets were developed to engage students in the content of a human biology course and implemented in the classes of eight faculty coordinators. The weekly problem sets contained several multiple choice problems,…

  3. Accurate Hartree-Fock energy of extended systems using large Gaussian basis sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paier, Joachim; Diaconu, Cristian V.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.; Guidon, Manuel; Vandevondele, Joost; Hutter, Jürg

    2009-11-01

    Calculating highly accurate thermochemical properties of condensed matter via wave-function-based approaches (such as, e.g., Hartree-Fock or hybrid functionals) has recently attracted much interest. We here present two strategies providing accurate Hartree-Fock energies for solid LiH in a large Gaussian basis set and applying periodic boundary conditions. The total energies were obtained using two different approaches, namely, a supercell evaluation of Hartree-Fock exchange using a truncated Coulomb operator and an extrapolation toward the full-range Hartree-Fock limit of a Padé fit to a series of short-range screened Hartree-Fock calculations. These two techniques agreed to significant precision. We also present the Hartree-Fock cohesive energy of LiH (converged to within sub-millielectron volt) at the experimental equilibrium volume as well as the Hartree-Fock equilibrium lattice constant and bulk modulus.

  4. Generating extreme weather event sets from very large ensembles of regional climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Neil; Guillod, Benoit; Otto, Friederike; Allen, Myles; Jones, Richard; Hall, Jim

    2015-04-01

    Generating extreme weather event sets from very large ensembles of regional climate models Neil Massey, Benoit P. Guillod, Friederike E. L. Otto, Myles R. Allen, Richard Jones, Jim W. Hall Environmental Change Institute, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK Extreme events can have large impacts on societies and are therefore being increasingly studied. In particular, climate change is expected to impact the frequency and intensity of these events. However, a major limitation when investigating extreme weather events is that, by definition, only few events are present in observations. A way to overcome this issue it to use large ensembles of model simulations. Using the volunteer distributed computing (VDC) infrastructure of weather@home [1], we run a very large number (10'000s) of RCM simulations over the European domain at a resolution of 25km, with an improved land-surface scheme, nested within a free-running GCM. Using VDC allows many thousands of climate model runs to be computed. Using observations for the GCM boundary forcings we can run historical "hindcast" simulations over the past 100 to 150 years. This allows us, due to the chaotic variability of the atmosphere, to ascertain how likely an extreme event was, given the boundary forcings, and to derive synthetic event sets. The events in these sets did not actually occur in the observed record but could have occurred given the boundary forcings, with an associated probability. The event sets contain time-series of fields of meteorological variables that allow impact modellers to assess the loss the event would incur. Projections of events into the future are achieved by modelling projections of the sea-surface temperature (SST) and sea-ice boundary forcings, by combining the variability of the SST in the observed record with a range of warming signals derived from the varying responses of SSTs in the CMIP5 ensemble to elevated greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in three RCP scenarios. Simulating the future with a

  5. Ghost transmission: How large basis sets can make electron transport calculations worse

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, Carmen; Solomon, Gemma C.; Subotnik, Joseph E.; Mujica, Vladimiro; Ratner, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    The Landauer approach has proven to be an invaluable tool for calculating the electron transport properties of single molecules, especially when combined with a nonequilibrium Green’s function approach and Kohn–Sham density functional theory. However, when using large nonorthogonal atom-centered basis sets, such as those common in quantum chemistry, one can find erroneous results if the Landauer approach is applied blindly. In fact, basis sets of triple-zeta quality or higher sometimes result in an artificially high transmission and possibly even qualitatively wrong conclusions regarding chemical trends. In these cases, transport persists when molecular atoms are replaced by basis functions alone (“ghost atoms”). The occurrence of such ghost transmission is correlated with low-energy virtual molecular orbitals of the central subsystem and may be interpreted as a biased and thus inaccurate description of vacuum transmission. An approximate practical correction scheme is to calculate the ghost transmission and subtract it from the full transmission. As a further consequence of this study, it is recommended that sensitive molecules be used for parameter studies, in particular those whose transmission functions show antiresonance features such as benzene-based systems connected to the electrodes in meta positions and other low-conducting systems such as alkanes and silanes.

  6. fastSTRUCTURE: variational inference of population structure in large SNP data sets.

    PubMed

    Raj, Anil; Stephens, Matthew; Pritchard, Jonathan K

    2014-06-01

    Tools for estimating population structure from genetic data are now used in a wide variety of applications in population genetics. However, inferring population structure in large modern data sets imposes severe computational challenges. Here, we develop efficient algorithms for approximate inference of the model underlying the STRUCTURE program using a variational Bayesian framework. Variational methods pose the problem of computing relevant posterior distributions as an optimization problem, allowing us to build on recent advances in optimization theory to develop fast inference tools. In addition, we propose useful heuristic scores to identify the number of populations represented in a data set and a new hierarchical prior to detect weak population structure in the data. We test the variational algorithms on simulated data and illustrate using genotype data from the CEPH-Human Genome Diversity Panel. The variational algorithms are almost two orders of magnitude faster than STRUCTURE and achieve accuracies comparable to those of ADMIXTURE. Furthermore, our results show that the heuristic scores for choosing model complexity provide a reasonable range of values for the number of populations represented in the data, with minimal bias toward detecting structure when it is very weak. Our algorithm, fastSTRUCTURE, is freely available online at http://pritchardlab.stanford.edu/structure.html.

  7. Galaxy Evolution Insights from Spectral Modeling of Large Data Sets from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Hoversten, Erik A.

    2007-10-01

    This thesis centers on the use of spectral modeling techniques on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to gain new insights into current questions in galaxy evolution. The SDSS provides a large, uniform, high quality data set which can be exploited in a number of ways. One avenue pursued here is to use the large sample size to measure precisely the mean properties of galaxies of increasingly narrow parameter ranges. The other route taken is to look for rare objects which open up for exploration new areas in galaxy parameter space. The crux of this thesis is revisiting the classical Kennicutt method for inferring the stellar initial mass function (IMF) from the integrated light properties of galaxies. A large data set (~ 105 galaxies) from the SDSS DR4 is combined with more in-depth modeling and quantitative statistical analysis to search for systematic IMF variations as a function of galaxy luminosity. Galaxy Hα equivalent widths are compared to a broadband color index to constrain the IMF. It is found that for the sample as a whole the best fitting IMF power law slope above 0.5 M is Γ = 1.5 ± 0.1 with the error dominated by systematics. Galaxies brighter than around Mr,0.1 = -20 (including galaxies like the Milky Way which has Mr,0.1 ~ -21) are well fit by a universal Γ ~ 1.4 IMF, similar to the classical Salpeter slope, and smooth, exponential star formation histories (SFH). Fainter galaxies prefer steeper IMFs and the quality of the fits reveal that for these galaxies a universal IMF with smooth SFHs is actually a poor assumption. Related projects are also pursued. A targeted photometric search is conducted for strongly lensed Lyman break galaxies (LBG) similar to MS1512-cB58. The evolution of the photometric selection technique is described as are the results of spectroscopic follow-up of the best targets. The serendipitous discovery of two interesting blue compact dwarf galaxies is reported. These

  8. Efficient Implementation of an Optimal Interpolator for Large Spatial Data Sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Memarsadeghi, Nargess; Mount, David M.

    2007-01-01

    Scattered data interpolation is a problem of interest in numerous areas such as electronic imaging, smooth surface modeling, and computational geometry. Our motivation arises from applications in geology and mining, which often involve large scattered data sets and a demand for high accuracy. The method of choice is ordinary kriging. This is because it is a best unbiased estimator. Unfortunately, this interpolant is computationally very expensive to compute exactly. For n scattered data points, computing the value of a single interpolant involves solving a dense linear system of size roughly n x n. This is infeasible for large n. In practice, kriging is solved approximately by local approaches that are based on considering only a relatively small'number of points that lie close to the query point. There are many problems with this local approach, however. The first is that determining the proper neighborhood size is tricky, and is usually solved by ad hoc methods such as selecting a fixed number of nearest neighbors or all the points lying within a fixed radius. Such fixed neighborhood sizes may not work well for all query points, depending on local density of the point distribution. Local methods also suffer from the problem that the resulting interpolant is not continuous. Meyer showed that while kriging produces smooth continues surfaces, it has zero order continuity along its borders. Thus, at interface boundaries where the neighborhood changes, the interpolant behaves discontinuously. Therefore, it is important to consider and solve the global system for each interpolant. However, solving such large dense systems for each query point is impractical. Recently a more principled approach to approximating kriging has been proposed based on a technique called covariance tapering. The problems arise from the fact that the covariance functions that are used in kriging have global support. Our implementations combine, utilize, and enhance a number of different

  9. Classroom-based Interventions and Teachers' Perceived Job Stressors and Confidence: Evidence from a Randomized Trial in Head Start Settings.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Fuhua; Raver, C Cybele; Li-Grining, Christine

    2011-09-01

    Preschool teachers' job stressors have received increasing attention but have been understudied in the literature. We investigated the impacts of a classroom-based intervention, the Chicago School Readiness Project (CSRP), on teachers' perceived job stressors and confidence, as indexed by their perceptions of job control, job resources, job demands, and confidence in behavior management. Using a clustered randomized controlled trial (RCT) design, the CSRP provided multifaceted services to the treatment group, including teacher training and mental health consultation, which were accompanied by stress-reduction services and workshops. Overall, 90 teachers in 35 classrooms at 18 Head Start sites participated in the study. After adjusting for teacher and classroom factors and site fixed effects, we found that the CSRP had significant effects on the improvement of teachers' perceived job control and work-related resources. We also found that the CSRP decreased teachers' confidence in behavior management and had no statistically significant effects on job demands. Overall, we did not find significant moderation effects of teacher race/ethnicity, education, teaching experience, or teacher type. The implications for research and policy are discussed.

  10. Child and setting characteristics affecting the adult talk directed at preschoolers with autism spectrum disorder in the inclusive classroom.

    PubMed

    Irvin, Dwight W; Boyd, Brian A; Odom, Samuel L

    2015-02-01

    Difficulty with social competence is a core deficit of autism spectrum disorder. Research on typically developing children and children with disabilities, in general, suggests the adult talk received in the classroom is related to their social development. The aims of this study were to examine (1) the types and amounts of adult talk children with autism spectrum disorder are exposed to in the preschool classroom and (2) the associations between child characteristics (e.g. language), activity area, and adult talk. Kontos' Teacher Talk classification was used to code videos approximately 30 min in length of 73 children with autism spectrum disorder (ages 3-5) in inclusive classrooms (n = 33) during center time. The results indicated practical/personal assistance was the most common type of adult talk coded, and behavior management talk least often coded. Child characteristics (i.e. age and autism severity) and activity area were found to be related to specific types of adult talk. Given the findings, implications for future research are discussed.

  11. Registering coherent change detection products associated with large image sets and long capture intervals

    DOEpatents

    Perkins, David Nikolaus; Gonzales, Antonio I

    2014-04-08

    A set of co-registered coherent change detection (CCD) products is produced from a set of temporally separated synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of a target scene. A plurality of transformations are determined, which transformations are respectively for transforming a plurality of the SAR images to a predetermined image coordinate system. The transformations are used to create, from a set of CCD products produced from the set of SAR images, a corresponding set of co-registered CCD products.

  12. Considerations for observational research using large data sets in radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Jagsi, Reshma; Bekelman, Justin E; Chen, Aileen; Chen, Ronald C; Hoffman, Karen; Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Smith, Benjamin D; Yu, James B

    2014-09-01

    The radiation oncology community has witnessed growing interest in observational research conducted using large-scale data sources such as registries and claims-based data sets. With the growing emphasis on observational analyses in health care, the radiation oncology community must possess a sophisticated understanding of the methodological considerations of such studies in order to evaluate evidence appropriately to guide practice and policy. Because observational research has unique features that distinguish it from clinical trials and other forms of traditional radiation oncology research, the International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics assembled a panel of experts in health services research to provide a concise and well-referenced review, intended to be informative for the lay reader, as well as for scholars who wish to embark on such research without prior experience. This review begins by discussing the types of research questions relevant to radiation oncology that large-scale databases may help illuminate. It then describes major potential data sources for such endeavors, including information regarding access and insights regarding the strengths and limitations of each. Finally, it provides guidance regarding the analytical challenges that observational studies must confront, along with discussion of the techniques that have been developed to help minimize the impact of certain common analytical issues in observational analysis. Features characterizing a well-designed observational study include clearly defined research questions, careful selection of an appropriate data source, consultation with investigators with relevant methodological expertise, inclusion of sensitivity analyses, caution not to overinterpret small but significant differences, and recognition of limitations when trying to evaluate causality. This review concludes that carefully designed and executed studies using observational data that possess these qualities hold

  13. Considerations for Observational Research Using Large Data Sets in Radiation Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Jagsi, Reshma; Bekelman, Justin E.; Chen, Aileen; Chen, Ronald C.; Hoffman, Karen; Tina Shih, Ya-Chen; Smith, Benjamin D.; Yu, James B.

    2014-09-01

    The radiation oncology community has witnessed growing interest in observational research conducted using large-scale data sources such as registries and claims-based data sets. With the growing emphasis on observational analyses in health care, the radiation oncology community must possess a sophisticated understanding of the methodological considerations of such studies in order to evaluate evidence appropriately to guide practice and policy. Because observational research has unique features that distinguish it from clinical trials and other forms of traditional radiation oncology research, the International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics assembled a panel of experts in health services research to provide a concise and well-referenced review, intended to be informative for the lay reader, as well as for scholars who wish to embark on such research without prior experience. This review begins by discussing the types of research questions relevant to radiation oncology that large-scale databases may help illuminate. It then describes major potential data sources for such endeavors, including information regarding access and insights regarding the strengths and limitations of each. Finally, it provides guidance regarding the analytical challenges that observational studies must confront, along with discussion of the techniques that have been developed to help minimize the impact of certain common analytical issues in observational analysis. Features characterizing a well-designed observational study include clearly defined research questions, careful selection of an appropriate data source, consultation with investigators with relevant methodological expertise, inclusion of sensitivity analyses, caution not to overinterpret small but significant differences, and recognition of limitations when trying to evaluate causality. This review concludes that carefully designed and executed studies using observational data that possess these qualities hold

  14. The Academic Achievement of Elementary Level General Education Students in Inclusion Classrooms versus Non-Inclusion Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Surgener, Gena F.

    2016-01-01

    This research study was conducted to examine the effects of the academic achievement of elementary level general education students in the inclusion classroom setting versus the general education students in the non-inclusion classroom in a large suburban school district in Tennessee as measured by third, fourth, and fifth grade mathematics and…

  15. Taking Energy to the Physics Classroom from the Large Hadron Collider at CERN

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cid, Xabier; Cid, Ramon

    2009-01-01

    In 2008, the greatest experiment in history began. When in full operation, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will generate the greatest amount of information that has ever been produced in an experiment before. It will also reveal some of the most fundamental secrets of nature. Despite the enormous amount of information available on this…

  16. An Evaluation of the Developmental Designs Approach and Professional Development Model on Classroom Management in 22 Middle Schools in a Large, Midwestern School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hough, David L.

    2011-01-01

    This study presents findings from an evaluation of the Developmental Designs classroom management approach and professional development model during its first year of implementation across 22 middle schools in a large, Midwestern school district. The impact of this professional development model on teaching and learning as related to participants'…

  17. Listserv Lemmings and Fly-brarians on the Wall: A Librarian-Instructor Team Taming the Cyberbeast in the Large Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickstein, Ruth; McBride, Kari Boyd

    1998-01-01

    Computer technology can empower students if they have the tools to find their way through print and online sources. This article describes how a reference librarian and a faculty instructor collaborated to teach research strategies and critical thinking skills (including analysis and evaluation of resources) in a large university classroom using a…

  18. Issues in Estimating Program Effects and Studying Implementation in Large-Scale Educational Experiments: The Case of a Connected Classroom Technology Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shin, Hye Sook

    2009-01-01

    Using data from a nationwide, large-scale experimental study of the effects of a connected classroom technology on student learning in algebra (Owens et al., 2004), this dissertation focuses on challenges that can arise in estimating treatment effects in educational field experiments when samples are highly heterogeneous in terms of various…

  19. Any Questions? An Application of Weick's Model of Organizing to Increase Student Involvement in the Large-Lecture Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ledford, Christy J. W.; Saperstein, Adam K.; Cafferty, Lauren A.; McClintick, Stacey H.; Bernstein, Ethan M.

    2015-01-01

    Microblogs, with their interactive nature, can engage students in community building and sensemaking. Using Weick's model of organizing as a framework, we integrated the use of micromessaging to increase student engagement in the large-lecture classroom. Students asked significantly more questions and asked a greater diversity of questions…

  20. Anomaly Detection in Large Sets of High-Dimensional Symbol Sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budalakoti, Suratna; Srivastava, Ashok N.; Akella, Ram; Turkov, Eugene

    2006-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of detecting and describing anomalies in large sets of high-dimensional symbol sequences. The approach taken uses unsupervised clustering of sequences using the normalized longest common subsequence (LCS) as a similarity measure, followed by detailed analysis of outliers to detect anomalies. As the LCS measure is expensive to compute, the first part of the paper discusses existing algorithms, such as the Hunt-Szymanski algorithm, that have low time-complexity. We then discuss why these algorithms often do not work well in practice and present a new hybrid algorithm for computing the LCS that, in our tests, outperforms the Hunt-Szymanski algorithm by a factor of five. The second part of the paper presents new algorithms for outlier analysis that provide comprehensible indicators as to why a particular sequence was deemed to be an outlier. The algorithms provide a coherent description to an analyst of the anomalies in the sequence, compared to more normal sequences. The algorithms we present are general and domain-independent, so we discuss applications in related areas such as anomaly detection.

  1. Response to a Large Polio Outbreak in a Setting of Conflict - Middle East, 2013-2015.

    PubMed

    Mbaeyi, Chukwuma; Ryan, Michael J; Smith, Philip; Mahamud, Abdirahman; Farag, Noha; Haithami, Salah; Sharaf, Magdi; Jorba, Jaume C; Ehrhardt, Derek

    2017-03-03

    As the world advances toward the eradication of polio, outbreaks of wild poliovirus (WPV) in polio-free regions pose a substantial risk to the timeline for global eradication. Countries and regions experiencing active conflict, chronic insecurity, and large-scale displacement of persons are particularly vulnerable to outbreaks because of the disruption of health care and immunization services (1). A polio outbreak occurred in the Middle East, beginning in Syria in 2013 with subsequent spread to Iraq (2). The outbreak occurred 2 years after the onset of the Syrian civil war, resulted in 38 cases, and was the first time WPV was detected in Syria in approximately a decade (3,4). The national governments of eight countries designated the outbreak a public health emergency and collaborated with partners in the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) to develop a multiphase outbreak response plan focused on improving the quality of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) surveillance* and administering polio vaccines to >27 million children during multiple rounds of supplementary immunization activities (SIAs).(†) Successful implementation of the response plan led to containment and interruption of the outbreak within 6 months of its identification. The concerted approach adopted in response to this outbreak could serve as a model for responding to polio outbreaks in settings of conflict and political instability.

  2. Information Theoretic Approaches to Rapid Discovery of Relationships in Large Climate Data Sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knuth, Kevin H.; Rossow, William B.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Mutual information as the asymptotic Bayesian measure of independence is an excellent starting point for investigating the existence of possible relationships among climate-relevant variables in large data sets, As mutual information is a nonlinear function of of its arguments, it is not beholden to the assumption of a linear relationship between the variables in question and can reveal features missed in linear correlation analyses. However, as mutual information is symmetric in its arguments, it only has the ability to reveal the probability that two variables are related. it provides no information as to how they are related; specifically, causal interactions or a relation based on a common cause cannot be detected. For this reason we also investigate the utility of a related quantity called the transfer entropy. The transfer entropy can be written as a difference between mutual informations and has the capability to reveal whether and how the variables are causally related. The application of these information theoretic measures is rested on some familiar examples using data from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) to identify relation between global cloud cover and other variables, including equatorial pacific sea surface temperature (SST), over seasonal and El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) cycles.

  3. Public-private partnerships with large corporations: setting the ground rules for better health.

    PubMed

    Galea, Gauden; McKee, Martin

    2014-04-01

    Public-private partnerships with large corporations offer potential benefits to the health sector but many concerns have been raised, highlighting the need for appropriate safeguards. In this paper we propose five tests that public policy makers may wish to apply when considering engaging in such a public-private partnership. First, are the core products and services provided by the corporation health enhancing or health damaging? In some cases, such as tobacco, the answer is obvious but others, such as food and alcohol, are contested. In such cases, the burden of proof is on the potential partners to show that their activities are health enhancing. Second, do potential partners put their policies into practice in the settings where they can do so, their own workplaces? Third, are the corporate social responsibility activities of potential partners independently audited? Fourth, do potential partners make contributions to the commons rather than to narrow programmes of their choosing? Fifth, is the role of the partner confined to policy implementation rather than policy development, which is ultimately the responsibility of government alone?

  4. Assembly of large metagenome data sets using a Convey HC-1 hybrid core computer (7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema

    Copeland, Alex [DOE JGI

    2016-07-12

    Alex Copeland on "Assembly of large metagenome data sets using a Convey HC-1 hybrid core computer" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  5. PORTAAL: A Classroom Observation Tool Assessing Evidence-Based Teaching Practices for Active Learning in Large Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Classes.

    PubMed

    Eddy, Sarah L; Converse, Mercedes; Wenderoth, Mary Pat

    2015-01-01

    There is extensive evidence that active learning works better than a completely passive lecture. Despite this evidence, adoption of these evidence-based teaching practices remains low. In this paper, we offer one tool to help faculty members implement active learning. This tool identifies 21 readily implemented elements that have been shown to increase student outcomes related to achievement, logic development, or other relevant learning goals with college-age students. Thus, this tool both clarifies the research-supported elements of best practices for instructor implementation of active learning in the classroom setting and measures instructors' alignment with these practices. We describe how we reviewed the discipline-based education research literature to identify best practices in active learning for adult learners in the classroom and used these results to develop an observation tool (Practical Observation Rubric To Assess Active Learning, or PORTAAL) that documents the extent to which instructors incorporate these practices into their classrooms. We then use PORTAAL to explore the classroom practices of 25 introductory biology instructors who employ some form of active learning. Overall, PORTAAL documents how well aligned classrooms are with research-supported best practices for active learning and provides specific feedback and guidance to instructors to allow them to identify what they do well and what could be improved.

  6. PORTAAL: A Classroom Observation Tool Assessing Evidence-Based Teaching Practices for Active Learning in Large Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Classes

    PubMed Central

    Eddy, Sarah L.; Converse, Mercedes; Wenderoth, Mary Pat

    2015-01-01

    There is extensive evidence that active learning works better than a completely passive lecture. Despite this evidence, adoption of these evidence-based teaching practices remains low. In this paper, we offer one tool to help faculty members implement active learning. This tool identifies 21 readily implemented elements that have been shown to increase student outcomes related to achievement, logic development, or other relevant learning goals with college-age students. Thus, this tool both clarifies the research-supported elements of best practices for instructor implementation of active learning in the classroom setting and measures instructors’ alignment with these practices. We describe how we reviewed the discipline-based education research literature to identify best practices in active learning for adult learners in the classroom and used these results to develop an observation tool (Practical Observation Rubric To Assess Active Learning, or PORTAAL) that documents the extent to which instructors incorporate these practices into their classrooms. We then use PORTAAL to explore the classroom practices of 25 introductory biology instructors who employ some form of active learning. Overall, PORTAAL documents how well aligned classrooms are with research-supported best practices for active learning and provides specific feedback and guidance to instructors to allow them to identify what they do well and what could be improved. PMID:26033871

  7. Classroom management programs for deaf children in state residential and large public schools.

    PubMed

    Wenkus, M; Rittenhouse, B; Dancer, J

    1999-12-01

    Personnel in 4 randomly selected state residential schools for the deaf and 3 randomly selected large public schools with programs for the deaf were surveyed to assess the types of management or disciplinary programs and strategies currently in use with deaf students and the rated effectiveness of such programs. Several behavioral management programs were identified by respondents, with Assertive Discipline most often listed. Ratings of program effectiveness were generally above average on a number of qualitative criteria.

  8. Science Teachers' Decision-Making in Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage (AOUM) Classrooms: Taboo Subjects and Discourses of Sex and Sexuality in Classroom Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, Puneet Singh

    2015-01-01

    Sex education, especially in the southeastern USA, remains steeped in an Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage (AOUM) approach, which sets up barriers to the education of sexually active students. Research confirms that science education has the potential to facilitate discussion of controversial topics, including sex education. Science teachers in the…

  9. Linked Scatter Plots, A Powerful Exploration Tool For Very Large Sets of Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbon, Duane Francis; Henze, Christopher

    2015-08-01

    We present a new tool, based on linked scatter plots, that is designed to efficiently explore very large spectrum data sets such as the SDSS, APOGEE, LAMOST, GAIA, and RAVE data sets.The tool works in two stages: the first uses batch processing and the second runs interactively. In the batch stage, spectra are processed through our data pipeline which computes the depths relative to the local continuum at preselected feature wavelengths. These depths, and any additional available variables such as local S/N level, magnitudes, colors, positions, and radial velocities, are the basic measured quantities used in the interactive stage.The interactive stage employs the NASA hyperwall, a configuration of 128 workstation displays (8x16 array) controlled by a parallelized software suite running on NASA's Pleiades supercomputer. Each hyperwall panel is used to display a fully linked 2-D scatter plot showing the depth of feature A vs the depth of feature B for all of the spectra. A and B change from panel to panel. The relationships between the various (A,B) strengths and any distinctive clustering, as well as unique outlier groupings, are visually apparent when examining and inter-comparing the different panels on the hyperwall. In addition, the data links between the scatter plots allow the user to apply a logical algebra to the measurements. By graphically selecting the objects in any interesting region of any 2-D plot on the hyperwall, the tool immediately and clearly shows how the selected objects are distributed in all the other 2-D plots. The selection process may be repeated multiple times and, at each step, the selections can represent a sequence of logical constraints on the measurements, revealing those objects which satisfy all the constraints thus far. The spectra of the selected objects may be examined at any time on a connected workstation display.Using over 945,000,000 depth measurements from 569,738 SDSS DR10 stellar spectra, we illustrate how to quickly

  10. Getting specific: making taxonomic and ecological sense of large sequencing data sets.

    PubMed

    Massana, Ramon

    2015-06-01

    in microbial assemblages, only accessible by molecular tools. Moreover, the number of species detected was limited, agreeing with a putative scenario of constrained evolutionary diversification in free-living small eukaryotes. This study illustrates the potential of HTS to address ecological relevant questions in an accessible way by processing large data sets that, nonetheless, need to be treated with a fair understanding of their limitations.

  11. BACHSCORE. A tool for evaluating efficiently and reliably the quality of large sets of protein structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarti, E.; Zamuner, S.; Cossio, P.; Laio, A.; Seno, F.; Trovato, A.

    2013-12-01

    In protein structure prediction it is of crucial importance, especially at the refinement stage, to score efficiently large sets of models by selecting the ones that are closest to the native state. We here present a new computational tool, BACHSCORE, that allows its users to rank different structural models of the same protein according to their quality, evaluated by using the BACH++ (Bayesian Analysis Conformation Hunt) scoring function. The original BACH statistical potential was already shown to discriminate with very good reliability the protein native state in large sets of misfolded models of the same protein. BACH++ features a novel upgrade in the solvation potential of the scoring function, now computed by adapting the LCPO (Linear Combination of Pairwise Orbitals) algorithm. This change further enhances the already good performance of the scoring function. BACHSCORE can be accessed directly through the web server: bachserver.pd.infn.it. Catalogue identifier: AEQD_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEQD_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 130159 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 24 687 455 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++. Computer: Any computer capable of running an executable produced by a g++ compiler (4.6.3 version). Operating system: Linux, Unix OS-es. RAM: 1 073 741 824 bytes Classification: 3. Nature of problem: Evaluate the quality of a protein structural model, taking into account the possible “a priori” knowledge of a reference primary sequence that may be different from the amino-acid sequence of the model; the native protein structure should be recognized as the best model. Solution method: The contact potential scores the occurrence of any given type of residue pair in 5 possible

  12. Flow cytometry data analysis: comparing large multivariate data sets using classification trees

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, J.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes a method to compare flow cytometry data sets, which typically contain 50,000 six-parameter measurements each. By this method, the data points in two such data sets are divided into subpopulations using a binary classification tree generated from the data. The {chi}{sup 2} test is then used to establish the homogeneity of the two data sets based on how their data are distributed across these subpopulations. Preliminary results indicate that this comparison method is sufficiently sensitive to detect differences between flow cytometry data sets that are too subtle for human investigators to notice.

  13. Tools for Analysis and Visualization of Large Time-Varying CFD Data Sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelms, Jane; VanGelder, Allen

    1997-01-01

    In the second year, we continued to built upon and improve our scanline-based direct volume renderer that we developed in the first year of this grant. This extremely general rendering approach can handle regular or irregular grids, including overlapping multiple grids, and polygon mesh surfaces. It runs in parallel on multi-processors. It can also be used in conjunction with a k-d tree hierarchy, where approximate models and error terms are stored in the nodes of the tree, and approximate fast renderings can be created. We have extended our software to handle time-varying data where the data changes but the grid does not. We are now working on extending it to handle more general time-varying data. We have also developed a new extension of our direct volume renderer that uses automatic decimation of the 3D grid, as opposed to an explicit hierarchy. We explored this alternative approach as being more appropriate for very large data sets, where the extra expense of a tree may be unacceptable. We also describe a new approach to direct volume rendering using hardware 3D textures and incorporates lighting effects. Volume rendering using hardware 3D textures is extremely fast, and machines capable of using this technique are becoming more moderately priced. While this technique, at present, is limited to use with regular grids, we are pursuing possible algorithms extending the approach to more general grid types. We have also begun to explore a new method for determining the accuracy of approximate models based on the light field method described at ACM SIGGRAPH '96. In our initial implementation, we automatically image the volume from 32 equi-distant positions on the surface of an enclosing tessellated sphere. We then calculate differences between these images under different conditions of volume approximation or decimation. We are studying whether this will give a quantitative measure of the effects of approximation. We have created new tools for exploring the

  14. Gaining A Geological Perspective Through Active Learning in the Large Lecture Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapp, J. L.; Richardson, R. M.; Slater, S. J.

    2008-12-01

    NATS 101 A Geological Perspective is a general education course taken by non science majors. We offer 600 seats per semester, with four large lecture sections taught by different faculty members. In the past we have offered optional once a week study groups taught by graduate teaching assistants. Students often feel overwhelmed by the science and associated jargon, and many are prone to skipping lectures altogether. Optional study groups are only attended by ~50% of the students. Faculty members find the class to be a lot of work, mainly due to the grading it generates. Activities given in lecture are often short multiple choice or true false assignments, limiting the depth of understanding we can evaluate. Our students often lack math and critical thinking skills, and we spend a lot of time in lecture reintroducing ideas students should have already gotten from the text. In summer 2007 we were funded to redesign the course. Our goals were to 1) cut the cost of running the course, and 2) improve student learning. Under our redesign optional study groups were replaced by once a week mandatory break out sessions where students complete activities that have been introduced in lecture. Break out sessions substitute for one hour of lecture, and are run by undergraduate preceptors and graduate teaching assistants (GTAs). During the lecture period, lectures themselves are brief with a large portion of the class devoted to active learning in small groups. Weekly reading quizzes are submitted via the online course management system. Break out sessions allow students to spend more time interacting with their fellow students, undergraduate preceptors, and GTAs. They get one on one help in break out sessions on assignments designed to enhance the lecture material. The active lecture format means less of their time is devoted to listening passively to a lecture, and more time is spent peer learning an interacting with the instructor. Completing quizzes online allows students

  15. Classroom Management and the Librarian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackburn, Heidi; Hays, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    As librarians take on more instructional responsibilities, the need for classroom management skills becomes vital. Unfortunately, classroom management skills are not taught in library school and therefore, many librarians are forced to learn how to manage a classroom on the job. Different classroom settings such as one-shot instruction sessions…

  16. Tools and strategies for visualization of large image data sets in high-resolution imaging mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinkert, Ivo; McDonnell, Liam A.; Luxembourg, Stefan L.; Maarten Altelaar, A. F.; Amstalden, Erika R.; Piersma, Sander R.; Heeren, Ron M. A.

    2007-05-01

    Mass spectrometry based proteomics is one of the scientific domains in which experiments produce a large amount of data that need special environments to interpret the results. Without the use of suitable tools and strategies, the transformation of the large data sets into information is not easily achievable. Therefore, in the context of the virtual laboratory of enhanced science, software tools are developed to handle mass spectrometry data sets. Using different data processing strategies for visualization, it enables fast mass spectrometric imaging of large surfaces at high-spatial resolution and thus aids in the understanding of various diseases and disorders. This article describes how to optimize the handling and processing of the data sets, including the selection of the most optimal data formats and the use of parallel processing. It also describes the tools and solutions and their application in mass spectrometric imaging strategies, including new measurement principles, image enhancement, and image artifact suppression.

  17. Setting up a large set of protein-ligand PDB complexes for the development and validation of knowledge-based docking algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Diago, Luis A; Morell, Persy; Aguilera, Longendri; Moreno, Ernesto

    2007-01-01

    Background The number of algorithms available to predict ligand-protein interactions is large and ever-increasing. The number of test cases used to validate these methods is usually small and problem dependent. Recently, several databases have been released for further understanding of protein-ligand interactions, having the Protein Data Bank as backend support. Nevertheless, it appears to be difficult to test docking methods on a large variety of complexes. In this paper we report the development of a new database of protein-ligand complexes tailored for testing of docking algorithms. Methods Using a new definition of molecular contact, small ligands contained in the 2005 PDB edition were identified and processed. The database was enriched in molecular properties. In particular, an automated typing of ligand atoms was performed. A filtering procedure was applied to select a non-redundant dataset of complexes. Data mining was performed to obtain information on the frequencies of different types of atomic contacts. Docking simulations were run with the program DOCK. Results We compiled a large database of small ligand-protein complexes, enriched with different calculated properties, that currently contains more than 6000 non-redundant structures. As an example to demonstrate the value of the new database, we derived a new set of chemical matching rules to be used in the context of the program DOCK, based on contact frequencies between ligand atoms and points representing the protein surface, and proved their enhanced efficiency with respect to the default set of rules included in that program. Conclusion The new database constitutes a valuable resource for the development of knowledge-based docking algorithms and for testing docking programs on large sets of protein-ligand complexes. The new chemical matching rules proposed in this work significantly increase the success rate in DOCKing simulations. The database developed in this work is available at . PMID:17718923

  18. Engaged: Making Large Classes Feel Small through Blended Learning Instructional Strategies that Promote Increased Student Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Raymond W.

    2012-01-01

    It is not enough to be great at sharing information in a large classroom setting. To be an effective teacher you must be able to meaningfully engage your students with their peers and with the content. And you must do this regardless of class size or content. The issues of teaching effectively in large classroom settings have presented ongoing…

  19. A posteriori correction of camera characteristics from large image data sets.

    PubMed

    Afanasyev, Pavel; Ravelli, Raimond B G; Matadeen, Rishi; De Carlo, Sacha; van Duinen, Gijs; Alewijnse, Bart; Peters, Peter J; Abrahams, Jan-Pieter; Portugal, Rodrigo V; Schatz, Michael; van Heel, Marin

    2015-06-11

    Large datasets are emerging in many fields of image processing including: electron microscopy, light microscopy, medical X-ray imaging, astronomy, etc. Novel computer-controlled instrumentation facilitates the collection of very large datasets containing thousands of individual digital images. In single-particle cryogenic electron microscopy ("cryo-EM"), for example, large datasets are required for achieving quasi-atomic resolution structures of biological complexes. Based on the collected data alone, large datasets allow us to precisely determine the statistical properties of the imaging sensor on a pixel-by-pixel basis, independent of any "a priori" normalization routinely applied to the raw image data during collection ("flat field correction"). Our straightforward "a posteriori" correction yields clean linear images as can be verified by Fourier Ring Correlation (FRC), illustrating the statistical independence of the corrected images over all spatial frequencies. The image sensor characteristics can also be measured continuously and used for correcting upcoming images.

  20. Improved student engagement, satisfaction, and learning outcomes in a "flipped" large-lecture setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, A. S.; Bettis, E. A., III; Russell, J. E.; Van Horne, S.; Rocheford, M. K.; Sipola, M.; Colombo, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    Large lecture courses are traditional teaching practices of most large institutions of public higher education. They have historically provided an efficient way to deliver content information to the large number of students with the least amount of faculty resources. However, research of student learning indicates that the traditional lecture format does not provide the best learning experience for students, and students learn better in the active learning environments in which students engage in meaningful learning activities rather than just listening. In this study, we compare two offerings of Introduction to Environmental Science, a large-lecture general education course, offered in two formats by the same instructors in subsequent years. In the first offering (Spring 2013) the course was offered as a traditional large-lecture course, with lecture to large audiences and a limited number of exams for assessment. In the second offering (Spring 2014), the course included small-group discussion periods, peer-review of writing assignments, guest lectures, and online learning with limited traditional lecture. Our primary objective was to quantify differences in student engagement and learning outcomes between the two course offerings. Results of our study show that the students in the transformed course indicated higher interest, engagement level, and satisfaction than the students in the traditional lecture course. Furthermore, students in the transformed course reported increased behavior, emotional, and cognitive engagement over those in the traditional course, and also increased satisfaction with the course.

  1. T1DBase: update 2011, organization and presentation of large-scale data sets for type 1 diabetes research.

    PubMed

    Burren, Oliver S; Adlem, Ellen C; Achuthan, Premanand; Christensen, Mikkel; Coulson, Richard M R; Todd, John A

    2011-01-01

    T1DBase (http://www.t1dbase.org) is web platform, which supports the type 1 diabetes (T1D) community. It integrates genetic, genomic and expression data relevant to T1D research across mouse, rat and human and presents this to the user as a set of web pages and tools. This update describes the incorporation of new data sets, tools and curation efforts as well as a new website design to simplify site use. New data sets include curated summary data from four genome-wide association studies relevant to T1D, HaemAtlas-a data set and tool to query gene expression levels in haematopoietic cells and a manually curated table of human T1D susceptibility loci, incorporating genetic overlap with other related diseases. These developments will continue to support T1D research and allow easy access to large and complex T1D relevant data sets.

  2. Fortran IV computer program for rapid hierarchical classification of large data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jambu, Michel

    1981-01-01

    A rapid hierarchical classification program enables the clustering of 5000 elements in only a few minutes of central processor time using an IBM 370/168 computer. The program algorithm, based on the reductibility axiom in graph theory, is related to the criterion of correspondence analysis. Its application to a set of hydrogeological data is described briefly.

  3. Setting Learning Analytics in Context: Overcoming the Barriers to Large-Scale Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Rebecca; Macfadyen, Leah P.; Clow, Doug; Tynan, Belinda; Alexander, Shirley; Dawson, Shane

    2014-01-01

    A core goal for most learning analytic projects is to move from small-scale research towards broader institutional implementation, but this introduces a new set of challenges because institutions are stable systems, resistant to change. To avoid failure and maximize success, implementation of learning analytics at scale requires explicit and…

  4. Laboratory and Field Evaluation of Rapid Setting Cementitious Materials for Large Crater Repair

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    pavement fill material used during preparation of the test craters...60 Figure 43. Filling the proportional mixer with Rapid Set DOT cement...87 Figure 84. Section 2 of Crater 4 was filled with a portion of the material from Batch 6

  5. Promoting a Culture of Reflection in Teacher Education: The Challenge of Large Lecture Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Marie

    2011-01-01

    The promotion of reflective practice, while widely advocated in higher education settings, nonetheless presents numerous challenges. This is an under-researched aspect of the discourse on reflective practice. A key challenge for those working in the field of teacher education within higher education is to promote a culture of refection in large…

  6. Use of Large-Scale Data Sets to Study Educational Pathways of American Indian and Alaska Native Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faircloth, Susan C.; Alcantar, Cynthia M.; Stage, Frances K.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter discusses issues and challenges encountered in using large-scale data sets to study educational experiences and subsequent outcomes for American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) students. In this chapter, we argue that the linguistic and cultural diversity of Native peoples, coupled with the legal and political ways in which education…

  7. Caught you: threats to confidentiality due to the public release of large-scale genetic data sets

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Large-scale genetic data sets are frequently shared with other research groups and even released on the Internet to allow for secondary analysis. Study participants are usually not informed about such data sharing because data sets are assumed to be anonymous after stripping off personal identifiers. Discussion The assumption of anonymity of genetic data sets, however, is tenuous because genetic data are intrinsically self-identifying. Two types of re-identification are possible: the "Netflix" type and the "profiling" type. The "Netflix" type needs another small genetic data set, usually with less than 100 SNPs but including a personal identifier. This second data set might originate from another clinical examination, a study of leftover samples or forensic testing. When merged to the primary, unidentified set it will re-identify all samples of that individual. Even with no second data set at hand, a "profiling" strategy can be developed to extract as much information as possible from a sample collection. Starting with the identification of ethnic subgroups along with predictions of body characteristics and diseases, the asthma kids case as a real-life example is used to illustrate that approach. Summary Depending on the degree of supplemental information, there is a good chance that at least a few individuals can be identified from an anonymized data set. Any re-identification, however, may potentially harm study participants because it will release individual genetic disease risks to the public. PMID:21190545

  8. Psychology in an Interdisciplinary Setting: A Large-Scale Project to Improve University Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, Franziska D.; Vogt, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    At a German university of technology, a large-scale project was funded as a part of the "Quality Pact for Teaching", a programme launched by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research to improve the quality of university teaching and study conditions. The project aims at intensifying interdisciplinary networking in teaching,…

  9. Learning through Discussions: Comparing the Benefits of Small-Group and Large-Class Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollock, Philip H.; Hamann, Kerstin; Wilson, Bruce M.

    2011-01-01

    The literature on teaching and learning heralds the benefits of discussion for student learner outcomes, especially its ability to improve students' critical thinking skills. Yet, few studies compare the effects of different types of face-to-face discussions on learners. Using student surveys, we analyze the benefits of small-group and large-class…

  10. Design of Availability-Dependent Distributed Services in Large-Scale Uncooperative Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morales, Ramses Victor

    2009-01-01

    Thesis Statement: "Availability-dependent global predicates can be efficiently and scalably realized for a class of distributed services, in spite of specific selfish and colluding behaviors, using local and decentralized protocols". Several types of large-scale distributed systems spanning the Internet have to deal with availability variations…

  11. A posteriori correction of camera characteristics from large image data sets

    PubMed Central

    Afanasyev, Pavel; Ravelli, Raimond B. G.; Matadeen, Rishi; De Carlo, Sacha; van Duinen, Gijs; Alewijnse, Bart; Peters, Peter J.; Abrahams, Jan-Pieter; Portugal, Rodrigo V.; Schatz, Michael; van Heel, Marin

    2015-01-01

    Large datasets are emerging in many fields of image processing including: electron microscopy, light microscopy, medical X-ray imaging, astronomy, etc. Novel computer-controlled instrumentation facilitates the collection of very large datasets containing thousands of individual digital images. In single-particle cryogenic electron microscopy (“cryo-EM”), for example, large datasets are required for achieving quasi-atomic resolution structures of biological complexes. Based on the collected data alone, large datasets allow us to precisely determine the statistical properties of the imaging sensor on a pixel-by-pixel basis, independent of any “a priori” normalization routinely applied to the raw image data during collection (“flat field correction”). Our straightforward “a posteriori” correction yields clean linear images as can be verified by Fourier Ring Correlation (FRC), illustrating the statistical independence of the corrected images over all spatial frequencies. The image sensor characteristics can also be measured continuously and used for correcting upcoming images. PMID:26068909

  12. Training Health Service Technicians as Teacher Assistants in an Inpatient Residential Emotional/Behavior Disorder Classroom Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Walter E.

    2012-01-01

    Schools have identified that the use of Teacher Assistants often provides needed additional support in the school setting. In a Health Care Facility that provides inpatient psychiatric services, children ages 5-14 are required to engage in school activities. Currently there are no Teacher Assistants trained in the facility. This study focuses on…

  13. Longitudinal surveillance for meningitis by Acinetobacter in a large urban setting in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Coelho-Souza, Talita; Reis, Joice N.; Martins, Natacha; Martins, Ianick Souto; Menezes, Ana Paula O.; Reis, Mitermayer G.; Silva, Neide O.; Dias, Rubens C. S.; Riley, Lee W.; Moreira, Beatriz Meurer

    2013-01-01

    The study aim was to describe the emergency of carbapenem resistance and clonal complexes (CC), defined by multilocus sequence typing (MLST), in Acinetobacter baumannii in a surveillance system for meningitis. Starting in 1996 at an urban setting of Brazil, surveillance detected meningitis by Acinetobacter sp for the first time in 2002. Until 2008, 35 isolates were saved. Carbapenem resistance emerged in 2006, reaching 70% of A. baumannii isolates in 2008, including one colistin-resistant. A. baumannii belonged to CC113/79 (University of Oxford/ Institute Pasteur schemes), CC235/162 and CC103/15. Dissemination of infections resistant to all antimicrobial agents may occur in the future. PMID:23398654

  14. High-throughput film-densitometry: An efficient approach to generate large data sets

    SciTech Connect

    Typke, Dieter; Nordmeyer, Robert A.; Jones, Arthur; Lee, Juyoung; Avila-Sakar, Agustin; Downing, Kenneth H.; Glaeser, Robert M.

    2004-07-14

    A film-handling machine (robot) has been built which can, in conjunction with a commercially available film densitometer, exchange and digitize over 300 electron micrographs per day. Implementation of robotic film handling effectively eliminates the delay and tedium associated with digitizing images when data are initially recorded on photographic film. The modulation transfer function (MTF) of the commercially available densitometer is significantly worse than that of a high-end, scientific microdensitometer. Nevertheless, its signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) is quite excellent, allowing substantial restoration of the output to ''near-to-perfect'' performance. Due to the large area of the standard electron microscope film that can be digitized by the commercial densitometer (up to 10,000 x 13,680 pixels with an appropriately coded holder), automated film digitization offers a fast and inexpensive alternative to high-end CCD cameras as a means of acquiring large amounts of image data in electron microscopy.

  15. Parallel k-Means Clustering for Quantitative Ecoregion Delineation Using Large Data Sets

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Jitendra; Mills, Richard T; Hoffman, Forrest M; HargroveJr., William Walter

    2011-01-01

    Identification of geographic ecoregions has long been of interest to environmental scientists and ecologists for identifying regions of similar ecological and environmental conditions. Such classifications are important for predicting suitable species ranges, for stratification of ecological samples, and to help prioritize habitat preservation and remediation efforts. Hargrove and Hoffman (1999, 2009) have developed geographical spatio-temporal clustering algorithms and codes and have successfully applied them to a variety of environmental science domains, including ecological regionalization; environmental monitoring network design; analysis of satellite-, airborne-, and ground-based remote sensing, and climate model-model and model-measurement intercomparison. With the advances in state-of-the-art satellite remote sensing and climate models, observations and model outputs are available at increasingly high spatial and temporal resolutions. Long time series of these high resolution datasets are extremely large in size and growing. Analysis and knowledge extraction from these large datasets are not just algorithmic and ecological problems, but also pose a complex computational problem. This paper focuses on the development of a massively parallel multivariate geographical spatio-temporal clustering code for analysis of very large datasets using tens of thousands processors on one of the fastest supercomputers in the world.

  16. Latest developments in the display of large-scale ionospheric and thermospheric data sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sojka, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    Over the past decade, data base sizes have continually increased and will continue to do so in the future. This problem of size is further compounded because the trend in present-day studies is to use data from many different locations and different instruments and then compare it with data from global scale physical models. The latter produce data bases of comparable if not even larger size. Much of the data can be viewed as 'image' time sequences and is most readily viewed on color display terminals. These data sets reside in national or owner-generated data bases linked together by computer networks. As the size increases, just moving this data around, taking 'quick-looks' at the data, or even storing it locally become severe problems compromising the scientific return from the data. Is the present-day technology with these analysis techniques being used in the best way? What are the prospects for reducing the storage and transmission size of the data sets? Examples of such problems and potential solutions are described in this paper.

  17. Large-Eddy Simulation of Premixed and Partially Premixed Turbulent Combustion Using a Level Set Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchamp de Lageneste, Laurent; Pitsch, Heinz

    2001-11-01

    Level-set methods (G-equation) have been recently used in the context of RANS to model turbulent premixed (Hermann 2000) or partially premixed (Chen 1999) combustion. By directly taking into account unsteady effects, LES can be expected to improve predictions over RANS. Since the reaction zone thickness of premixed flames in technical devices is usually much smaller than the LES grid spacing, chemical reactions completely occur on the sub-grid scales and hence have to be modeled entirely. In the level-set methodology, the flame front is represented by an arbitrary iso-surface G0 of a scalar field G whose evolution is described by the so-called G-equation. This equation is only valid at G=G_0, and hence decoupled from other G levels. Heat release is then modeled using a flamelet approach in which temperature is determined as a function of G and the mixture-fraction Z. In the present study, the proposed approach has been formulated for LES and validated using data from a turbulent Bunsen burner experiment (Chen, Peters 1996). Simulation of an experimental Lean Premixed Prevapourised (LPP) dump combustor (Besson, Bruel 1999, 2000) under different premixed or partially premixed conditions will also be presented.

  18. Validating hierarchical verbal autopsy expert algorithms in a large data set with known causes of death

    PubMed Central

    Kalter, Henry D; Perin, Jamie; Black, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    Background Physician assessment historically has been the most common method of analyzing verbal autopsy (VA) data. Recently, the World Health Organization endorsed two automated methods, Tariff 2.0 and InterVA–4, which promise greater objectivity and lower cost. A disadvantage of the Tariff method is that it requires a training data set from a prior validation study, while InterVA relies on clinically specified conditional probabilities. We undertook to validate the hierarchical expert algorithm analysis of VA data, an automated, intuitive, deterministic method that does not require a training data set. Methods Using Population Health Metrics Research Consortium study hospital source data, we compared the primary causes of 1629 neonatal and 1456 1–59 month–old child deaths from VA expert algorithms arranged in a hierarchy to their reference standard causes. The expert algorithms were held constant, while five prior and one new “compromise” neonatal hierarchy, and three former child hierarchies were tested. For each comparison, the reference standard data were resampled 1000 times within the range of cause–specific mortality fractions (CSMF) for one of three approximated community scenarios in the 2013 WHO global causes of death, plus one random mortality cause proportions scenario. We utilized CSMF accuracy to assess overall population–level validity, and the absolute difference between VA and reference standard CSMFs to examine particular causes. Chance–corrected concordance (CCC) and Cohen’s kappa were used to evaluate individual–level cause assignment. Results Overall CSMF accuracy for the best–performing expert algorithm hierarchy was 0.80 (range 0.57–0.96) for neonatal deaths and 0.76 (0.50–0.97) for child deaths. Performance for particular causes of death varied, with fairly flat estimated CSMF over a range of reference values for several causes. Performance at the individual diagnosis level was also less favorable than that for

  19. Using large clinical data sets to infer pathogenicity for rare copy number variants in autism cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-De-Luca, D; Sanders, S J; Willsey, A J; Mulle, J G; Lowe, J K; Geschwind, D H; State, M W; Martin, C L; Ledbetter, D H

    2013-01-01

    Copy number variants (CNVs) have a major role in the etiology of autism spectrum disorders (ASD), and several of these have reached statistical significance in case–control analyses. Nevertheless, current ASD cohorts are not large enough to detect very rare CNVs that may be causative or contributory (that is, risk alleles). Here, we use a tiered approach, in which clinically significant CNVs are first identified in large clinical cohorts of neurodevelopmental disorders (including but not specific to ASD), after which these CNVs are then systematically identified within well-characterized ASD cohorts. We focused our initial analysis on 48 recurrent CNVs (segmental duplication-mediated ‘hotspots') from 24 loci in 31 516 published clinical cases with neurodevelopmental disorders and 13 696 published controls, which yielded a total of 19 deletion CNVs and 11 duplication CNVs that reached statistical significance. We then investigated the overlap of these 30 CNVs in a combined sample of 3955 well-characterized ASD cases from three published studies. We identified 73 deleterious recurrent CNVs, including 36 deletions from 11 loci and 37 duplications from seven loci, for a frequency of 1 in 54; had we considered the ASD cohorts alone, only 58 CNVs from eight loci (24 deletions from three loci and 34 duplications from five loci) would have reached statistical significance. In conclusion, until there are sufficiently large ASD research cohorts with enough power to detect very rare causative or contributory CNVs, data from larger clinical cohorts can be used to infer the likely clinical significance of CNVs in ASD. PMID:23044707

  20. Plastic set of smooth large radii of curvature thermal conductance specimens at light loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckinzie, D. J., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Thermal contact conductance test data at high vacuum were obtained from two Armco iron specimens having smooth, large radii of curvature, convex, one-half wave length surfaces. The data are compared with calculations based on two macroscopic elastic deformation theories and an empirical expression. Major disagreement with the theories and fair agreement with the empirical expression resulted. Plastic deformation of all the contacting surfaces was verified from surface analyzer statistics. These results indicate that the theoretical assumption of macroscopic elastic deformation is inadequate for accurate prediction of heat transfer with light loads for Armco iron specimens similar to those used in this investigation.

  1. Brucellosis in household members of Brucella patients residing in a large urban setting in Peru.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Núñez, Marjorie; Mulder, Maximilian; Franco, María Pía; Maas, Kathlène S J S M; Castañeda, Maria L; Bonifacio, Nilo; Chacaltana, Jesús; Yagui, Elena; Gilman, Robert H; Espinosa, Benjamin; Blazes, David; Hall, Eric; Abdoel, Theresia H; Smits, Henk L

    2008-04-01

    During home visits and using a point-of-care test for brucellosis, we screened the household members of adult patients found to have brucellosis by investigation at the Hospital Nacional Daniel Alcides Carrión in Callao, Peru. A total of 206 household members of 43 patients were screened, and 15 (7.3%) household members in 10 (23.3%) households tested seropositive. Brucellosis was diagnosed in 14 of them, all but 4 presenting with acute or subacute uncomplicated disease. Regardless of attempts to control brucellosis in Peru, the disease continues to be reasonably common among household members of brucellosis patients. Household members presumably remain the single most important identifiable risk group in an urban setting, and screening them provides an effective means for their early diagnosis. Although contact with livestock was rare, the consumption of unpasteurized dairy products was reported by almost all patients with brucellosis, their household members, and hospitalized non-brucellosis patients.

  2. Large deformation solid-fluid interaction via a level set approach.

    SciTech Connect

    Schunk, Peter Randall; Noble, David R.; Baer, Thomas A.; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Notz, Patrick K.; Wilkes, Edward Dean

    2003-12-01

    Solidification and blood flow seemingly have little in common, but each involves a fluid in contact with a deformable solid. In these systems, the solid-fluid interface moves as the solid advects and deforms, often traversing the entire domain of interest. Currently, these problems cannot be simulated without innumerable expensive remeshing steps, mesh manipulations or decoupling the solid and fluid motion. Despite the wealth of progress recently made in mechanics modeling, this glaring inadequacy persists. We propose a new technique that tracks the interface implicitly and circumvents the need for remeshing and remapping the solution onto the new mesh. The solid-fluid boundary is tracked with a level set algorithm that changes the equation type dynamically depending on the phases present. This novel approach to coupled mechanics problems promises to give accurate stresses, displacements and velocities in both phases, simultaneously.

  3. Using a Classroom Response System for Promoting Interaction to Teaching Mathematics to Large Groups of Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morais, Adolfo; Barragués, José Ignacio; Guisasola, Jenaro

    2015-01-01

    This work describes the design and evaluation of a proposal to use Classroom Response Systems (CRS), intended to promote participative classes of Mathematics at University. The proposal is based on Problem Based Learnig (PBL) and uses Robert's six hypotheses for mathematical teaching-learning. The results show that PBL is a relevant strategy to…

  4. The Impact of Mobile Learning on Students' Learning Behaviours and Performance: Report from a Large Blended Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Minjuan; Shen, Ruimin; Novak, Daniel; Pan, Xiaoyan

    2009-01-01

    Chinese classrooms, whether on school grounds or online, have long suffered from a lack of interactivity. Many online classes simply provide recorded instructor lectures, which only reinforces the negative effects of passive nonparticipatory learning. At Shanghai Jiaotong University, researchers and developers actively seek technologic…

  5. A study of large volcanoes and their geological settings on Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brian, Antony William

    Magellan SAR, radiometric and gravity data has been used to investigate several areas of venusian geology. The V39 Taussig Quadrangle has been mapped as part of the NASA/USGS VMAP project. The area contains a diverse cross-section of geological features including volcanic plains, coronae, large volcanoes and rifts, and 54 individual units have been identified. The stratigraphic history of the region shows geological processes overlapping and repeating over time, favouring a non-directional stratigraphic model. This style of 'patch' resurfacing is more consistent with an equilibrium resurfacing model. Gravity studies across the region show a top-loading signature located over Maram Corona and the Parga Chasma rift. This suggests that delamination by an active mantle plume may be acting beneath the rift. Studies of Laufey Regio (2°S-16°N, 305-325°E) show that it is a newly discovered topographic rise on Venus. It is dominated by Var and Atanua Montes and surrounded by a concentric ring of wrinkle ridges interpreted to have formed after the onset of centralised volcanism. Detailed geologic mapping has recorded the local stratigraphic history and revealed that many volcanoes and coronae in the area have protracted histories. This also suggests a non-directional stratigraphy. Gravity studies were used to investigate the subsurface structure below Laufey. They indicate the presence of a mantle plume at depth (~190 km) together with a thick crust (~25-30 km) and a large elastic thickness (~55-60 km). The results suggest that Laufey is in a late stage of evolution. A new global survey has identified 134 large venusian volcanoes. The database describes the summit, flank and tectonic characteristics of each feature and together with detailed case studies of individual volcanoes is used to test models of volcano distribution, formation and evolution. There are 0.30 volcanic centres per 106km2 globally, but they do not show a uniform distribution. Volcanoes are clustered

  6. Setting up a Rayleigh Scattering Based Flow Measuring System in a Large Nozzle Testing Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, Jayanta; Gomez, Carlos R.

    2002-01-01

    A molecular Rayleigh scattering based air density measurement system has been built in a large nozzle testing facility at NASA Glenn Research Center. The technique depends on the light scattering by gas molecules present in air; no artificial seeding is required. Light from a single mode, continuous wave laser was transmitted to the nozzle facility by optical fiber, and light scattered by gas molecules, at various points along the laser beam, is collected and measured by photon-counting electronics. By placing the laser beam and collection optics on synchronized traversing units, the point measurement technique is made effective for surveying density variation over a cross-section of the nozzle plume. Various difficulties associated with dust particles, stray light, high noise level and vibration are discussed. Finally, a limited amount of data from an underexpanded jet are presented and compared with expected variations to validate the technique.

  7. Estimation of melting points of large set of persistent organic pollutants utilizing QSPR approach.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Marquita; Sizochenko, Natalia; Rasulev, Bakhtiyor; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2016-03-01

    The presence of polyhalogenated persistent organic pollutants (POPs), such as Cl/Br-substituted benzenes, biphenyls, diphenyl ethers, and naphthalenes has been identified in all environmental compartments. The exposure to these compounds can pose potential risk not only for ecological systems, but also for human health. Therefore, efficient tools for comprehensive environmental risk assessment for POPs are required. Among the factors vital for environmental transport and fate processes is melting point of a compound. In this study, we estimated the melting points of a large group (1419 compounds) of chloro- and bromo- derivatives of dibenzo-p-dioxins, dibenzofurans, biphenyls, naphthalenes, diphenylethers, and benzenes by utilizing quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) techniques. The compounds were classified by applying structure-based clustering methods followed by GA-PLS modeling. In addition, random forest method has been applied to develop more general models. Factors responsible for melting point behavior and predictive ability of each method were discussed.

  8. SeqPig: simple and scalable scripting for large sequencing data sets in Hadoop

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, André; Pireddu, Luca; Niemenmaa, Matti; Kallio, Aleksi; Korpelainen, Eija; Zanetti, Gianluigi; Heljanko, Keijo

    2014-01-01

    Summary: Hadoop MapReduce-based approaches have become increasingly popular due to their scalability in processing large sequencing datasets. However, as these methods typically require in-depth expertise in Hadoop and Java, they are still out of reach of many bioinformaticians. To solve this problem, we have created SeqPig, a library and a collection of tools to manipulate, analyze and query sequencing datasets in a scalable and simple manner. SeqPigscripts use the Hadoop-based distributed scripting engine Apache Pig, which automatically parallelizes and distributes data processing tasks. We demonstrate SeqPig’s scalability over many computing nodes and illustrate its use with example scripts. Availability and Implementation: Available under the open source MIT license at http://sourceforge.net/projects/seqpig/ Contact: andre.schumacher@yahoo.com Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24149054

  9. Three-dimensional nanostructure determination from a large diffraction data set recorded using scanning electron nanodiffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Meng, Yifei; Zuo, Jian-Min

    2016-07-04

    A diffraction-based technique is developed for the determination of three-dimensional nanostructures. The technique employs high-resolution and low-dose scanning electron nanodiffraction (SEND) to acquire three-dimensional diffraction patterns, with the help of a special sample holder for large-angle rotation. Grains are identified in three-dimensional space based on crystal orientation and on reconstructed dark-field images from the recorded diffraction patterns. Application to a nanocrystalline TiN thin film shows that the three-dimensional morphology of columnar TiN grains of tens of nanometres in diameter can be reconstructed using an algebraic iterative algorithm under specified prior conditions, together with their crystallographic orientations. The principles can bemore » extended to multiphase nanocrystalline materials as well. Thus, the tomographic SEND technique provides an effective and adaptive way of determining three-dimensional nanostructures.« less

  10. Processing large sensor data sets for safeguards : the knowledge generation system.

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Maikel A.; Smartt, Heidi Anne; Matthews, Robert F.

    2012-04-01

    Modern nuclear facilities, such as reprocessing plants, present inspectors with significant challenges due in part to the sheer amount of equipment that must be safeguarded. The Sandia-developed and patented Knowledge Generation system was designed to automatically analyze large amounts of safeguards data to identify anomalous events of interest by comparing sensor readings with those expected from a process of interest and operator declarations. This paper describes a demonstration of the Knowledge Generation system using simulated accountability tank sensor data to represent part of a reprocessing plant. The demonstration indicated that Knowledge Generation has the potential to address several problems critical to the future of safeguards. It could be extended to facilitate remote inspections and trigger random inspections. Knowledge Generation could analyze data to establish trust hierarchies, to facilitate safeguards use of operator-owned sensors.

  11. Improved Species-Specific Lysine Acetylation Site Prediction Based on a Large Variety of Features Set

    PubMed Central

    Wuyun, Qiqige; Zheng, Wei; Zhang, Yanping; Ruan, Jishou; Hu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a major post-translational modification. It plays a vital role in numerous essential biological processes, such as gene expression and metabolism, and is related to some human diseases. To fully understand the regulatory mechanism of acetylation, identification of acetylation sites is first and most important. However, experimental identification of protein acetylation sites is often time consuming and expensive. Therefore, the alternative computational methods are necessary. Here, we developed a novel tool, KA-predictor, to predict species-specific lysine acetylation sites based on support vector machine (SVM) classifier. We incorporated different types of features and employed an efficient feature selection on each type to form the final optimal feature set for model learning. And our predictor was highly competitive for the majority of species when compared with other methods. Feature contribution analysis indicated that HSE features, which were firstly introduced for lysine acetylation prediction, significantly improved the predictive performance. Particularly, we constructed a high-accurate structure dataset of H.sapiens from PDB to analyze the structural properties around lysine acetylation sites. Our datasets and a user-friendly local tool of KA-predictor can be freely available at http://sourceforge.net/p/ka-predictor. PMID:27183223

  12. Data Mining on Large Data Set for Predicting Salmon Spawning Habitat

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, YuLong; Murray, Christopher J.; Hanrahan, Timothy P.; Geist, David R.

    2008-07-01

    Hydraulic properties related to river flow affect salmon spawning habitat. Accurate prediction of salmon spawning habitat and understanding the influential properties on the spawning behavior are of great interest for hydroelectric dam management. Previous research predicted salmon spawning habitat through deriving river specific spawning suitability indices and employing a function estimate method like logistic regression on several static river flow related properties and had some success. The objective of this study was two-fold. First dynamic river flow properties associated with upstream dam operation were successfully derived from a huge set of time series of both water velocity and water depth for about one fifth of a million habitat cells through principal component analysis (PCA) using nonlinear iterative partial least squares (NIPLAS). The inclusion of dynamic variables in the models greatly improved the model prediction. Secondly, nine machine learning methods were applied to the data and it was found that decision tree and rule induction methods were generally outperformed usually used logistic regression. Specifically random forest, an advanced decision tree algorithm, provided unanimous better results. Over-prediction problem in previous studies were greatly alleviated.

  13. Mining pinyin-to-character conversion rules from large-scale corpus: a rough set approach.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolong; Chen, Qingcai; Yeung, Daniel S

    2004-04-01

    This paper introduces a rough set technique for solving the problem of mining Pinyin-to-character (PTC) conversion rules. It first presents a text-structuring method by constructing a language information table from a corpus for each pinyin, which it will then apply to a free-form textual corpus. Data generalization and rule extraction algorithms can then be used to eliminate redundant information and extract consistent PTC conversion rules. The design of our model also addresses a number of important issues such as the long-distance dependency problem, the storage requirements of the rule base, and the consistency of the extracted rules, while the performance of the extracted rules as well as the effects of different model parameters are evaluated experimentally. These results show that by the smoothing method, high precision conversion (0.947) and recall rates (0.84) can be achieved even for rules represented directly by pinyin rather than words. A comparison with the baseline tri-gram model also shows good complement between our method and the tri-gram language model.

  14. Self Organizing Maps for the Clustering of Large Sets of Labeled Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shujia; Hagenbuchner, Markus; Tsoi, Ah Chung; Sperduti, Alessandro

    Data mining on Web documents is one of the most challenging tasks in machine learning due to the large number of documents on the Web, the underlying structures (as one document may refer to another document), and the data is commonly not labeled (the class in which the document belongs is not known a-priori). This paper considers latest developments in Self-Organizing Maps (SOM), a machine learning approach, as one way to classifying documents on the Web. The most recent development is called a Probability Mapping Graph Self-Organizing Map (PMGraphSOM), and is an extension of an earlier Graph-SOM approach; this encodes undirected and cyclic graphs in a scalable fashion. This paper illustrates empirically the advantages of the PMGraphSOM versus the original GraphSOM model in a data mining application involving graph structured information. It will be shown that the performances achieved can exceed the current state-of-the art techniques on a given benchmark problem.

  15. Inference of higher-order relationships in the cycads from a large chloroplast data set.

    PubMed

    Rai, Hardeep S; O'Brien, Heath E; Reeves, Patrick A; Olmstead, Richard G; Graham, Sean W

    2003-11-01

    We investigated higher-order relationships in the cycads, an ancient group of seed-bearing plants, by examining a large portion of the chloroplast genome from seven species chosen to exemplify our current understanding of taxonomic diversity in the order. The regions considered span approximately 13.5 kb of unaligned data per taxon, and comprise a diverse range of coding sequences, introns and intergenic spacers dispersed throughout the plastid genome. Our results provide substantial support for most of the inferred backbone of cycad phylogeny, and weak evidence that the sister-group of the cycads among living seed plants is Ginkgo biloba. Cycas (representing Cycadaceae) is the sister-group of the remaining cycads; Dioon is part of the next most basal split. Two of the three commonly recognized families of cycads (Zamiaceae and Stangeriaceae) are not monophyletic; Stangeria is embedded within Zamiaceae, close to Zamia and Ceratozamia, and not closely allied to the other genus of Stangeriaceae, Bowenia. In contrast to the other seed plants, cycad chloroplast genomes share two features with Ginkgo: a reduced rate of evolution and an elevated transition:transversion ratio. We demonstrate that the latter aspect of their molecular evolution is unlikely to have affected inference of cycad relationships in the context of seed-plant wide analyses.

  16. Value-cell bar charts for visualizing large transaction data sets.

    PubMed

    Keim, Daniel A; Hao, Ming C; Dayal, Umeshwar; Lyons, Martha

    2007-01-01

    One of the common problems businesses need to solve is how to use large volumes of sales histories, Web transactions, and other data to understand the behavior of their customers and increase their revenues. Bar charts are widely used for daily analysis, but only show highly aggregated data. Users often need to visualize detailed multidimensional information reflecting the health of their businesses. In this paper, we propose an innovative visualization solution based on the use of value cells within bar charts to represent business metrics. The value of a transaction can be discretized into one or multiple cells: high-value transactions are mapped to multiple value cells, whereas many small-value transactions are combined into one cell. With value-cell bar charts, users can 1) visualize transaction value distributions and correlations, 2) identify high-value transactions and outliers at a glance, and 3) instantly display values at the transaction record level. Value-Cell Bar Charts have been applied with success to different sales and IT service usage applications, demonstrating the benefits of the technique over traditional charting techniques. A comparison with two variants of the well-known Treemap technique and our earlier work on Pixel Bar Charts is also included.

  17. A Large Set of Newly Created Interspecific Saccharomyces Hybrids Increases Aromatic Diversity in Lager Beers

    PubMed Central

    Mertens, Stijn; Steensels, Jan; Saels, Veerle; De Rouck, Gert; Aerts, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Lager beer is the most consumed alcoholic beverage in the world. Its production process is marked by a fermentation conducted at low (8 to 15°C) temperatures and by the use of Saccharomyces pastorianus, an interspecific hybrid between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the cold-tolerant Saccharomyces eubayanus. Recent whole-genome-sequencing efforts revealed that the currently available lager yeasts belong to one of only two archetypes, “Saaz” and “Frohberg.” This limited genetic variation likely reflects that all lager yeasts descend from only two separate interspecific hybridization events, which may also explain the relatively limited aromatic diversity between the available lager beer yeasts compared to, for example, wine and ale beer yeasts. In this study, 31 novel interspecific yeast hybrids were developed, resulting from large-scale robot-assisted selection and breeding between carefully selected strains of S. cerevisiae (six strains) and S. eubayanus (two strains). Interestingly, many of the resulting hybrids showed a broader temperature tolerance than their parental strains and reference S. pastorianus yeasts. Moreover, they combined a high fermentation capacity with a desirable aroma profile in laboratory-scale lager beer fermentations, thereby successfully enriching the currently available lager yeast biodiversity. Pilot-scale trials further confirmed the industrial potential of these hybrids and identified one strain, hybrid H29, which combines a fast fermentation, high attenuation, and the production of a complex, desirable fruity aroma. PMID:26407881

  18. "Tools For Analysis and Visualization of Large Time- Varying CFD Data Sets"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelms, Jane; vanGelder, Allen

    1999-01-01

    During the four years of this grant (including the one year extension), we have explored many aspects of the visualization of large CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) datasets. These have included new direct volume rendering approaches, hierarchical methods, volume decimation, error metrics, parallelization, hardware texture mapping, and methods for analyzing and comparing images. First, we implemented an extremely general direct volume rendering approach that can be used to render rectilinear, curvilinear, or tetrahedral grids, including overlapping multiple zone grids, and time-varying grids. Next, we developed techniques for associating the sample data with a k-d tree, a simple hierarchial data model to approximate samples in the regions covered by each node of the tree, and an error metric for the accuracy of the model. We also explored a new method for determining the accuracy of approximate models based on the light field method described at ACM SIGGRAPH (Association for Computing Machinery Special Interest Group on Computer Graphics) '96. In our initial implementation, we automatically image the volume from 32 approximately evenly distributed positions on the surface of an enclosing tessellated sphere. We then calculate differences between these images under different conditions of volume approximation or decimation.

  19. Can Wide Consultation Help with Setting Priorities for Large-Scale Biodiversity Monitoring Programs?

    PubMed Central

    Boivin, Frédéric; Simard, Anouk; Peres-Neto, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Climate and other global change phenomena affecting biodiversity require monitoring to track ecosystem changes and guide policy and management actions. Designing a biodiversity monitoring program is a difficult task that requires making decisions that often lack consensus due to budgetary constrains. As monitoring programs require long-term investment, they also require strong and continuing support from all interested parties. As such, stakeholder consultation is key to identify priorities and make sound design decisions that have as much support as possible. Here, we present the results of a consultation conducted to serve as an aid for designing a large-scale biodiversity monitoring program for the province of Québec (Canada). The consultation took the form of a survey with 13 discrete choices involving tradeoffs in respect to design priorities and 10 demographic questions (e.g., age, profession). The survey was sent to thousands of individuals having expected interests and knowledge about biodiversity and was completed by 621 participants. Overall, consensuses were few and it appeared difficult to create a design fulfilling the priorities of the majority. Most participants wanted 1) a monitoring design covering the entire territory and focusing on natural habitats; 2) a focus on species related to ecosystem services, on threatened and on invasive species. The only demographic characteristic that was related to the type of prioritization was the declared level of knowledge in biodiversity (null to high), but even then the influence was quite small. PMID:25525798

  20. Can wide consultation help with setting priorities for large-scale biodiversity monitoring programs?

    PubMed

    Boivin, Frédéric; Simard, Anouk; Peres-Neto, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Climate and other global change phenomena affecting biodiversity require monitoring to track ecosystem changes and guide policy and management actions. Designing a biodiversity monitoring program is a difficult task that requires making decisions that often lack consensus due to budgetary constrains. As monitoring programs require long-term investment, they also require strong and continuing support from all interested parties. As such, stakeholder consultation is key to identify priorities and make sound design decisions that have as much support as possible. Here, we present the results of a consultation conducted to serve as an aid for designing a large-scale biodiversity monitoring program for the province of Québec (Canada). The consultation took the form of a survey with 13 discrete choices involving tradeoffs in respect to design priorities and 10 demographic questions (e.g., age, profession). The survey was sent to thousands of individuals having expected interests and knowledge about biodiversity and was completed by 621 participants. Overall, consensuses were few and it appeared difficult to create a design fulfilling the priorities of the majority. Most participants wanted 1) a monitoring design covering the entire territory and focusing on natural habitats; 2) a focus on species related to ecosystem services, on threatened and on invasive species. The only demographic characteristic that was related to the type of prioritization was the declared level of knowledge in biodiversity (null to high), but even then the influence was quite small.

  1. The ASTRO-H SXT performance to the large off-set angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Toshiki; Iizuka, Ryo; Mori, Hideyuki; Hayashi, Takayuki; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Ishida, Manabu; Kikuchi, Naomichi; Kurashima, Sho; Nakaniwa, Nozomi; Okajima, Takashi; Soong, Yang; Serlemitsos, Peter J.

    2016-07-01

    The X-ray astronomy satellite ASTRO-H, which is the 6th Japanese X-ray astronomy satellite and is renamed Hitomi after launch, is designed to observe celestial X-ray objects in a wide energy band from a few hundred eV to 600 keV. The Soft X-ray Telescopes (SXTs) onboard ASTRO-H play a role of collecting and imaging X-rays up to 12 keV. Although the field of view of the SXT is 150' (FWHM), due to the thin-foil-nested Wolter-I type optics adopted in the SXTs, X-rays out of the field of view can reach the focal plane without experiencing a normal double reflection. This component is referred to as "stray light". Owing to investigation of the stray light so far, "secondary reflection" is now identified as the main component of the stray light, which is composed of X-rays reflected only by secondary reflectors. In order to cut the secondary reflections, a "pre-collimator" is equipped on top of the SXTs. However, we cannot cut all the stray lights with the pre-collimator in some off-axis angle domain. In this study, we measure the brightness of the stray light of the SXTs at some representative off-axis angles by using the ISAS X-ray beam line. ASTRO-H is equipped with two modules of the SXT; one is for the Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS), an X-ray calorimeter, and the other is for the Soft X-ray Imager (SXI), an X-ray CCD camera. These SXT modules are called SXT-S and SXT-I, respectively. Of the two detector systems, the SXI has a large field of view, a square with 38' on a side. To cope with this, we have made a mosaic mapping of the stray light at a representative off-axis angle of 30' in the X-ray beam line at the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science. The effective area of the brightest secondary reflection is found of order 0.1% of the on-axis effective area at the energy of 1.49 keV. The other components are not so bright (<5 X 10-4 times smaller than the on-axis effective area). On the other hand, we have found that the effective area of the stray light in

  2. A heuristic algorithm for pattern identification in large multivariate analysis of geophysical data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva Pereira, João Eduardo; Strieder, Adelir José; Amador, Janete Pereira; da Silva, José Luiz Silvério; Volcato Descovi Filho, Leônidas Luiz

    2010-01-01

    This paper aims to present a heuristic algorithm with factor analysis and a local search optimization system for pattern identification problems as applied to large and multivariate aero-geophysical data. The algorithm was developed in MATLAB code using both multivariate and univariate methodologies. Two main analysis steps are detailed in the MATLAB code: the first deals with multivariate factor analysis to reduce the problem of dimension, and to orient the variables in an independent and orthogonal structure; and the second with the application of a novel local research optimization system based on univariate structure. The process of local search is simple and consistent because it solves a multivariate problem by summing up univariate and independent problems. Thus, it can reduce computational time and render the efficiency of estimates independent of the data bank. The aero-geophysical data include the results of the magnetometric and gammaspectrometric (TC, K, Th, and U channels) surveys for the Santa Maria region (RS, Brazil). After the classification, when the observations are superimposed on the regional map, one can see that data belonging to the same subspace appear closer to each other revealing some physical law governing area pattern distribution. The analysis of variance for the original variables as functions of the subspaces obtained results in different mean behaviors for all the variables. This result shows that the use of factor transformation captures the discriminative capacity of the original variables. The proposed algorithm for multivariate factor analysis and the local search system open up new challenges in aero-geophysical data handling and processing techniques.

  3. Twelve- to 14-month-old infants can predict single-event probability with large set sizes.

    PubMed

    Denison, Stephanie; Xu, Fei

    2010-09-01

    Previous research has revealed that infants can reason correctly about single-event probabilities with small but not large set sizes (Bonatti, 2008; Teglas et al., 2007). The current study asks whether infants can make predictions regarding single-event probability with large set sizes using a novel procedure. Infants completed two trials: A preference trial to determine whether they preferred pink or black lollipops and a test trial where infants saw two jars, one containing mostly pink lollipops and another containing mostly black lollipops. The experimenter removed one occluded lollipop from each jar and placed them in two separate opaque cups. Seventy-eight percent of infants searched in the cup that contained a lollipop from the jar with a higher proportion of their preferred color object, significantly better than chance. Thus infants can reason about single-event probabilities with large set sizes in a choice paradigm, and contrary to most findings in the infant literature, the prediction task used here appears a more sensitive measure than the standard looking-time task.

  4. Actual Versus Estimated Utility Factor of a Large Set of Privately Owned Chevrolet Volts

    SciTech Connect

    John Smart; Thomas Bradley; Stephen Schey

    2014-04-01

    In order to determine the overall fuel economy of a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV), the amount of operation in charge depleting (CD) versus charge sustaining modes must be determined. Mode of operation is predominantly dependent on customer usage of the vehicle and is therefore highly variable. The utility factor (UF) concept was developed to quantify the distance a group of vehicles has traveled or may travel in CD mode. SAE J2841 presents a UF calculation method based on data collected from travel surveys of conventional vehicles. UF estimates have been used in a variety of areas, including the calculation of window sticker fuel economy, policy decisions, and vehicle design determination. The EV Project, a plug-in electric vehicle charging infrastructure demonstration being conducted across the United States, provides the opportunity to determine the real-world UF of a large group of privately owned Chevrolet Volt extended range electric vehicles. Using data collected from Volts enrolled in The EV Project, this paper compares the real-world UF of two groups of Chevrolet Volts to estimated UF's based on J2841. The actual observed fleet utility factors (FUF) for the MY2011/2012 and MY2013 Volt groups studied were observed to be 72% and 74%, respectively. Using the EPA CD ranges, the method prescribed by J2841 estimates a FUF of 65% and 68% for the MY2011/2012 and MY2013 Volt groups, respectively. Volt drivers achieved higher percentages of distance traveled in EV mode for two reasons. First, they had fewer long-distance travel days than drivers in the national travel survey referenced by J2841. Second, they charged more frequently than the J2841 assumption of once per day - drivers of Volts in this study averaged over 1.4 charging events per day. Although actual CD range varied widely as driving conditions varied, the average CD ranges for the two Volt groups studied matched the EPA CD range estimates, so CD range variation did not affect FUF results.

  5. Designing Websites for Displaying Large Data Sets and Images on Multiple Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, A.; Wolf, V. G.; Garron, J.; Kirschner, M.

    2012-12-01

    The desire to build websites to analyze and display ever increasing amounts of scientific data and images pushes for web site designs which utilize large displays, and to use the display area as efficiently as possible. Yet, scientists and users of their data are increasingly wishing to access these websites in the field and on mobile devices. This results in the need to develop websites that can support a wide range of devices and screen sizes, and to optimally use whatever display area is available. Historically, designers have addressed this issue by building two websites; one for mobile devices, and one for desktop environments, resulting in increased cost, duplicity of work, and longer development times. Recent advancements in web design technology and techniques have evolved which allow for the development of a single website that dynamically adjusts to the type of device being used to browse the website (smartphone, tablet, desktop). In addition they provide the opportunity to truly optimize whatever display area is available. HTML5 and CSS3 give web designers media query statements which allow design style sheets to be aware of the size of the display being used, and to format web content differently based upon the queried response. Web elements can be rendered in a different size, position, or even removed from the display entirely, based upon the size of the display area. Using HTML5/CSS3 media queries in this manner is referred to as "Responsive Web Design" (RWD). RWD in combination with technologies such as LESS and Twitter Bootstrap allow the web designer to build web sites which not only dynamically respond to the browser display size being used, but to do so in very controlled and intelligent ways, ensuring that good layout and graphic design principles are followed while doing so. At the University of Alaska Fairbanks, the Alaska Satellite Facility SAR Data Center (ASF) recently redesigned their popular Vertex application and converted it from a

  6. Large population sizes mitigate negative effects of variable weather conditions on fruit set in two spring woodland orchids

    PubMed Central

    Jacquemyn, Hans; Brys, Rein; Honnay, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    Global circulation models predict increased climatic variability, which could increase variability in demographic rates and affect long-term population viability. In animal-pollinated species, pollination services, and thus fruit and seed set, may be highly variable among years and sites, and depend on both local environmental conditions and climatic variables. Orchid species may be particularly vulnerable to disruption of their pollination services, as most species depend on pollinators for successful fruit set and because seed germination and seedling recruitment are to some extent dependent on the amount of fruits and seeds produced. Better insights into the factors determining fruit and seed set are therefore indispensable for a better understanding of population dynamics and viability of orchid populations under changing climatic conditions. However, very few studies have investigated spatio-temporal variation in fruit set in orchids. Here, we quantified fruit production in eight populations of the orchid Orchis purpurea that does not reward pollinators and 13 populations of the rewarding Neottia (Listera) ovata during five consecutive years (2002–2006). Fruit production in large populations showed much higher stability than that in small populations and was less affected by extreme weather conditions. Our results highlight the potential vulnerability of small orchid populations to an increasingly variable climate through highly unpredictable fruit-set patterns. PMID:19457885

  7. Mining unusual and rare stellar spectra from large spectroscopic survey data sets using the outlier-detection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Peng; Luo, Ali; Li, Yinbi; Pan, Jingchang; Tu, Liangping; Jiang, Bin; Kong, Xiao; Shi, Zhixin; Yi, Zhenping; Wang, Fengfei; Liu, Jie; Zhao, Yongheng

    2013-05-01

    The large number of spectra obtained from sky surveys such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the survey executed by the Large sky Area Multi-Object fibre Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST, also called GuoShouJing Telescope) provide us with opportunities to search for peculiar or even unknown types of spectra. In response to the limitations of existing methods, a novel outlier-mining method, the Monte Carlo Local Outlier Factor (MCLOF), is proposed in this paper, which can be used to highlight unusual and rare spectra from large spectroscopic survey data sets. The MCLOF method exposes outliers automatically and efficiently by marking each spectrum with a number, i.e. using outlier index as a flag for an unusual and rare spectrum. The Local Outlier Factor (LOF) represents how unusual and rare a spectrum is compared with other spectra and the Monte Carlo method is used to compute the global LOF for each spectrum by randomly selecting samples in each independent iteration. Our MCLOF method is applied to over half a million stellar spectra (classified as STAR by the SDSS Pipeline) from the SDSS data release 8 (DR8) and a total of 37 033 spectra are selected as outliers with signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) ≥ 3 and outlier index ≥0.85. Some of these outliers are shown to be binary stars, emission-line stars, carbon stars and stars with unusual continuum. The results show that our proposed method can efficiently highlight these unusual spectra from the survey data sets. In addition, some relatively rare and interesting spectra are selected, indicating that the proposed method can also be used to mine rare, even unknown, spectra. The proposed method can be applicable not only to spectral survey data sets but also to other types of survey data sets. The spectra of all peculiar objects selected by our MCLOF method are available from a user-friendly website: http://sciwiki.lamost.org/Miningdr8/.

  8. The Same or Separate? An Exploration of Teachers' Perceptions of the Classroom Assignment of Twins in Prior to School and Kindergarten to Year Two School Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Laura; De Gioia, Katey

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates the perceptions of 12 teachers from New South Wales, Australia, regarding the classroom assignment of twins. Analysis of semi-structured interviews with each of the teachers revealed four key findings: 1) teachers' perceptions about the classroom assignment of twins vary according to their previous experience and…

  9. Knowledge and Theme Discovery across Very Large Biological Data Sets Using Distributed Queries: A Prototype Combining Unstructured and Structured Data

    PubMed Central

    Repetski, Stephen; Venkataraman, Girish; Che, Anney; Luke, Brian T.; Girard, F. Pascal; Stephens, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    As the discipline of biomedical science continues to apply new technologies capable of producing unprecedented volumes of noisy and complex biological data, it has become evident that available methods for deriving meaningful information from such data are simply not keeping pace. In order to achieve useful results, researchers require methods that consolidate, store and query combinations of structured and unstructured data sets efficiently and effectively. As we move towards personalized medicine, the need to combine unstructured data, such as medical literature, with large amounts of highly structured and high-throughput data such as human variation or expression data from very large cohorts, is especially urgent. For our study, we investigated a likely biomedical query using the Hadoop framework. We ran queries using native MapReduce tools we developed as well as other open source and proprietary tools. Our results suggest that the available technologies within the Big Data domain can reduce the time and effort needed to utilize and apply distributed queries over large datasets in practical clinical applications in the life sciences domain. The methodologies and technologies discussed in this paper set the stage for a more detailed evaluation that investigates how various data structures and data models are best mapped to the proper computational framework. PMID:24312478

  10. Knowledge and theme discovery across very large biological data sets using distributed queries: a prototype combining unstructured and structured data.

    PubMed

    Mudunuri, Uma S; Khouja, Mohamad; Repetski, Stephen; Venkataraman, Girish; Che, Anney; Luke, Brian T; Girard, F Pascal; Stephens, Robert M

    2013-01-01

    As the discipline of biomedical science continues to apply new technologies capable of producing unprecedented volumes of noisy and complex biological data, it has become evident that available methods for deriving meaningful information from such data are simply not keeping pace. In order to achieve useful results, researchers require methods that consolidate, store and query combinations of structured and unstructured data sets efficiently and effectively. As we move towards personalized medicine, the need to combine unstructured data, such as medical literature, with large amounts of highly structured and high-throughput data such as human variation or expression data from very large cohorts, is especially urgent. For our study, we investigated a likely biomedical query using the Hadoop framework. We ran queries using native MapReduce tools we developed as well as other open source and proprietary tools. Our results suggest that the available technologies within the Big Data domain can reduce the time and effort needed to utilize and apply distributed queries over large datasets in practical clinical applications in the life sciences domain. The methodologies and technologies discussed in this paper set the stage for a more detailed evaluation that investigates how various data structures and data models are best mapped to the proper computational framework.

  11. Performance-friendly rule extraction in large water data-sets with AOC posets and relational concept analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolques, Xavier; Le Ber, Florence; Huchard, Marianne; Grac, Corinne

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we consider data analysis methods for knowledge extraction from large water data-sets. More specifically, we try to connect physico-chemical parameters and the characteristics of taxons living in sample sites. Among these data analysis methods, we consider formal concept analysis (FCA), which is a recognized tool for classification and rule discovery on object-attribute data. Relational concept analysis (RCA) relies on FCA and deals with sets of object-attribute data provided with relations. RCA produces more informative results but at the expense of an increase in complexity. Besides, in numerous applications of FCA, the partially ordered set of concepts introducing attributes or objects (AOC poset, for Attribute-Object-Concept poset) is used rather than the concept lattice in order to reduce combinatorial problems. AOC posets are much smaller and easier to compute than concept lattices and still contain the information needed to rebuild the initial data. This paper introduces a variant of the RCA process based on AOC posets rather than concept lattices. This approach is compared with RCA based on iceberg lattices. Experiments are performed with various scaling operators, and a specific operator is introduced to deal with noisy data. We show that using AOC poset on water data-sets provides a reasonable concept number and allows us to extract meaningful implication rules (association rules whose confidence is 1), whose semantics depends on the chosen scaling operator.

  12. Development and Validation of Decision Forest Model for Estrogen Receptor Binding Prediction of Chemicals Using Large Data Sets.

    PubMed

    Ng, Hui Wen; Doughty, Stephen W; Luo, Heng; Ye, Hao; Ge, Weigong; Tong, Weida; Hong, Huixiao

    2015-12-21

    Some chemicals in the environment possess the potential to interact with the endocrine system in the human body. Multiple receptors are involved in the endocrine system; estrogen receptor α (ERα) plays very important roles in endocrine activity and is the most studied receptor. Understanding and predicting estrogenic activity of chemicals facilitates the evaluation of their endocrine activity. Hence, we have developed a decision forest classification model to predict chemical binding to ERα using a large training data set of 3308 chemicals obtained from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Estrogenic Activity Database. We tested the model using cross validations and external data sets of 1641 chemicals obtained from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's ToxCast project. The model showed good performance in both internal (92% accuracy) and external validations (∼ 70-89% relative balanced accuracies), where the latter involved the validations of the model across different ER pathway-related assays in ToxCast. The important features that contribute to the prediction ability of the model were identified through informative descriptor analysis and were related to current knowledge of ER binding. Prediction confidence analysis revealed that the model had both high prediction confidence and accuracy for most predicted chemicals. The results demonstrated that the model constructed based on the large training data set is more accurate and robust for predicting ER binding of chemicals than the published models that have been developed using much smaller data sets. The model could be useful for the evaluation of ERα-mediated endocrine activity potential of environmental chemicals.

  13. Software tools that facilitate kinetic modelling with large data sets: an example using growth modelling in sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Uys, L; Hofmeyr, J H S; Snoep, J L; Rohwer, J M

    2006-09-01

    A solution to manage cumbersome data sets associated with large modelling projects is described. A kinetic model of sucrose accumulation in sugarcane is used to predict changes in sucrose metabolism with sugarcane internode maturity. This results in large amounts of output data to be analysed. Growth is simulated by reassigning maximal activity values, specific to each internode of the sugarcane plant, to parameter attributes of a model object. From a programming perspective, only one model definition file is required for the simulation software used; however, the amount of input data increases with each extra interrnode that is modelled, and likewise the amount of output data that is generated also increases. To store, manipulate and analyse these data, the modelling was performed from within a spreadsheet. This was made possible by the scripting language Python and the modelling software PySCeS through an embedded Python interpreter available in the Gnumeric spreadsheet program.

  14. Evaluation in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becnel, Shirley

    Six classroom research-based instructional projects funded under Chapter 2 are described, and their outcomes are summarized. The projects each used computer hardware and software in the classroom setting. The projects and their salient points include: (1) the Science Technology Project, in which 48 teachers and 2,847 students in 18 schools used…

  15. Tips from the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benedetti, Teresa; De Gaetano, Yvonne; Weinstein-McShane, Ruth; Paez, Doris; McCarty, Laurie; Ehlers-Zavala, Fabiola; Bakken, Jeffrey P.

    1997-01-01

    This group of classroom tips discusses the benefits of peer coaching, peer group conversation about teachers' classroom experiences, using visual displays for collegial sharing, using cultural brokers in educational settings, and the role of picture books in developing literacy skills in diverse students with disabilities. (Author/CK)

  16. Classroom Assessment in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shermis, Mark D.; DiVesta, Francis J.

    2011-01-01

    "Classroom Assessment in Action" clarifies the multi-faceted roles of measurement and assessment and their applications in a classroom setting. Comprehensive in scope, Shermis and Di Vesta explain basic measurement concepts and show students how to interpret the results of standardized tests. From these basic concepts, the authors then…

  17. The Differentiated Classroom Observation Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassady, Jerrell C.; Neumeister, Kristie L. Speirs; Adams, Cheryll M.; Cross, Tracy L.; Dixon, Felicia A.; Pierce, Rebecca L.

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a new classroom observation scale that was developed to examine the differential learning activities and experiences of gifted children educated in regular classroom settings. The Differentiated Classroom Observation Scale (DCOS) is presented in total, with clarification of the coding practices and strategies. Although the…

  18. Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) show robust primacy and recency in memory for lists from small, but not large, image sets

    PubMed Central

    Basile, Benjamin M.; Hampton, Robert R.

    2010-01-01

    The combination of primacy and recency produces a U-shaped serial position curve typical of memory for lists. In humans, primacy is often thought to result from rehearsal, but there is little evidence for rehearsal in nonhumans. To further evaluate the possibility that rehearsal contributes to primacy in monkeys, we compared memory for lists of familiar stimuli (which may be easier to rehearse) to memory for unfamiliar stimuli (which are likely difficult to rehearse). Six rhesus monkeys saw lists of five images drawn from either large, medium, or small image sets. After presentation of each list, memory for one item was assessed using a serial probe recognition test. Across four experiments, we found robust primacy and recency with lists drawn from small and medium, but not large, image sets. This finding is consistent with the idea that familiar items are easier to rehearse and that rehearsal contributes to primacy, warranting further study of the possibility of rehearsal in monkeys. However, alternative interpretations are also viable and are discussed. PMID:20035843

  19. A large set of 26 new reference transcriptomes dedicated to comparative population genomics in crops and wild relatives.

    PubMed

    Sarah, Gautier; Homa, Felix; Pointet, Stéphanie; Contreras, Sandy; Sabot, François; Nabholz, Benoit; Santoni, Sylvain; Sauné, Laure; Ardisson, Morgane; Chantret, Nathalie; Sauvage, Christopher; Tregear, James; Jourda, Cyril; Pot, David; Vigouroux, Yves; Chair, Hana; Scarcelli, Nora; Billot, Claire; Yahiaoui, Nabila; Bacilieri, Roberto; Khadari, Bouchaib; Boccara, Michel; Barnaud, Adéline; Péros, Jean-Pierre; Labouisse, Jean-Pierre; Pham, Jean-Louis; David, Jacques; Glémin, Sylvain; Ruiz, Manuel

    2016-08-04

    We produced a unique large data set of reference transcriptomes to obtain new knowledge about the evolution of plant genomes and crop domestication. For this purpose, we validated a RNA-Seq data assembly protocol to perform comparative population genomics. For the validation, we assessed and compared the quality of de novo Illumina short-read assemblies using data from two crops for which an annotated reference genome was available, namely grapevine and sorghum. We used the same protocol for the release of 26 new transcriptomes of crop plants and wild relatives, including still understudied crops such as yam, pearl millet and fonio. The species list has a wide taxonomic representation with the inclusion of 15 monocots and 11 eudicots. All contigs were annotated using BLAST, prot4EST and Blast2GO. A strong originality of the data set is that each crop is associated with close relative species, which will permit whole-genome comparative evolutionary studies between crops and their wild-related species. This large resource will thus serve research communities working on both crops and model organisms. All the data are available at http://arcad-bioinformatics.southgreen.fr/.

  20. Functional network construction in Arabidopsis using rule-based machine learning on large-scale data sets.

    PubMed

    Bassel, George W; Glaab, Enrico; Marquez, Julietta; Holdsworth, Michael J; Bacardit, Jaume

    2011-09-01

    The meta-analysis of large-scale postgenomics data sets within public databases promises to provide important novel biological knowledge. Statistical approaches including correlation analyses in coexpression studies of gene expression have emerged as tools to elucidate gene function using these data sets. Here, we present a powerful and novel alternative methodology to computationally identify functional relationships between genes from microarray data sets using rule-based machine learning. This approach, termed "coprediction," is based on the collective ability of groups of genes co-occurring within rules to accurately predict the developmental outcome of a biological system. We demonstrate the utility of coprediction as a powerful analytical tool using publicly available microarray data generated exclusively from Arabidopsis thaliana seeds to compute a functional gene interaction network, termed Seed Co-Prediction Network (SCoPNet). SCoPNet predicts functional associations between genes acting in the same developmental and signal transduction pathways irrespective of the similarity in their respective gene expression patterns. Using SCoPNet, we identified four novel regulators of seed germination (ALTERED SEED GERMINATION5, 6, 7, and 8), and predicted interactions at the level of transcript abundance between these novel and previously described factors influencing Arabidopsis seed germination. An online Web tool to query SCoPNet has been developed as a community resource to dissect seed biology and is available at http://www.vseed.nottingham.ac.uk/.

  1. Achieving the Complete-Basis Limit in Large Molecular Clusters: Computationally Efficient Procedures to Eliminate Basis-Set Superposition Error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Ryan M.; Herbert, John M.

    2013-06-01

    Previous electronic structure studies that have relied on fragmentation have been primarily interested in those methods' abilities to replicate the supersystem energy (or a related energy difference) without recourse to the ability of those supersystem results to replicate experiment or high accuracy benchmarks. Here we focus on replicating accurate ab initio benchmarks, that are suitable for comparison to experimental data. In doing this it becomes imperative that we correct our methods for basis-set superposition errors (BSSE) in a computationally feasible way. This criterion leads us to develop a new method for BSSE correction, which we term the many-body counterpoise correction, or MBn for short. MBn is truncated at order n, in much the same manner as a normal many-body expansion leading to a decrease in computational time. Furthermore, its formulation in terms of fragments makes it especially suitable for use with pre-existing fragment codes. A secondary focus of this study is directed at assessing fragment methods' abilities to extrapolate to the complete basis set (CBS) limit as well as compute approximate triples corrections. Ultimately, by analysis of (H_2O)_6 and (H_2O)_{10}F^- systems, it is concluded that with large enough basis-sets (triple or quad zeta) fragment based methods can replicate high level benchmarks in a fraction of the time.

  2. How to narrow down chromosomal breakpoints in small and large derivative chromosomes--a new probe set.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Ahmed B; Kreskowski, Katharina; Weise, Anja; Kosayakova, Nadezda; Mrasek, Kristin; Voigt, Martin; Guilherme, Roberta Santos; Wagner, Rebecca; Hardekopf, David; Pekova, Sona; Karamysheva, Tatyana; Liehr, Thomas; Klein, Elisabeth

    2012-08-01

    Here a new fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH-) based probe set is presented and its possible applications are highlighted in 34 exemplary clinical cases. The so-called pericentric-ladder-FISH (PCL-FISH) probe set enables a characterization of chromosomal breakpoints especially in small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC), but can also be applied successfully in large inborn or acquired derivative chromosomes. PCL-FISH was established as 24 different chromosome-specific probe sets and can be used in two- up multicolor-FISH approaches. PCL-FISH enables the determination of a chromosomal breakpoint with a resolution between 1 and ∼10 megabasepairs and is based on locus-specific bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) probes. Results obtained on 29 sSMC cases and five larger derivative chromosomes are presented and discussed. To confirm the reliability of PCL-FISH, eight of the 29 sSMC cases were studied by array-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH); the used sSMC-specific DNA was obtained by glass-needle based microdissection and DOP-PCR-amplification. Overall, PCL-FISH leads to a better resolution than most FISH-banding approaches and is a good tool to narrow down chromosomal breakpoints.

  3. Supporting Classroom Activities with the BSUL System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogata, Hiroaki; Saito, Nobuji A.; Paredes J., Rosa G.; San Martin, Gerardo Ayala; Yano, Yoneo

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the integration of ubiquitous computing systems into classroom settings, in order to provide basic support for classrooms and field activities. We have developed web application components using Java technology and configured a classroom with wireless network access and a web camera for our purposes. In this classroom, the…

  4. Student Engagement in a Large Classroom: Using Technology to Generate a Hybridized Problem- Based Learning Experience in a Large First Year Undergraduate Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fukuzawa, Sherry; Boyd, Cleo

    2016-01-01

    Large first year undergraduate courses have unique challenges in the promotion of student engagement and self-directed learning due to resource constraints that prohibit small group discussions with instructors. The Monthly Virtual Mystery was developed to increase student engagement in a large (N = 725) first year undergraduate class in…

  5. Possible calcium centers for hydrogen storage applications: An accurate many-body study by AFQMC calculations with large basis sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purwanto, Wirawan; Krakauer, Henry; Zhang, Shiwei; Virgus, Yudistira

    2011-03-01

    Weak H2 physisorption energies present a significant challenge to first-principle theoretical modeling and prediction of materials for H storage. There has been controversy regarding the accuracy of DFT on systems involving Ca cations. We use the auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo (AFQMC) method to accurately predict the binding energy of Ca + , - 4{H}2 . AFQMC scales as Nbasis3and has demonstrated accuracy similar to or better than the gold-standard coupled cluster CCSD(T) method. We apply a modified Cholesky decomposition to achieve efficient Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation in AFQMC at large basis sizes. We employ the largest correlation consistent basis sets available, up to Ca/cc-pCV5Z, to extrapolate to the complete basis limit. The calculated potential energy curve exhibits binding with a double-well structure. Supported by DOE and NSF. Calculations were performed at OLCF Jaguar and CPD.

  6. Goal Setting and Student Achievement: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moeller, Aleidine J.; Theiler, Janine M.; Wu, Chaorong

    2012-01-01

    The connection between goals and student motivation has been widely investigated in the research literature, but the relationship of goal setting and student achievement at the classroom level has remained largely unexplored. This article reports the findings of a 5-year quasi-experimental study examining goal setting and student achievement in…

  7. Digital footprints: facilitating large-scale environmental psychiatric research in naturalistic settings through data from everyday technologies.

    PubMed

    Bidargaddi, N; Musiat, P; Makinen, V-P; Ermes, M; Schrader, G; Licinio, J

    2017-02-01

    Digital footprints, the automatically accumulated by-products of our technology-saturated lives, offer an exciting opportunity for psychiatric research. The commercial sector has already embraced the electronic trails of customers as an enabling tool for guiding consumer behaviour, and analogous efforts are ongoing to monitor and improve the mental health of psychiatric patients. The untargeted collection of digital footprints that may or may not be health orientated comprises a large untapped information resource for epidemiological scale research into psychiatric disorders. Real-time monitoring of mood, sleep and physical and social activity in a substantial portion of the affected population in a naturalistic setting is unprecedented in psychiatry. We propose that digital footprints can provide these measurements from real world setting unobtrusively and in a longitudinal fashion. In this perspective article, we outline the concept of digital footprints and the services and devices that create them, and present examples where digital footprints have been successfully used in research. We then critically discuss the opportunities and fundamental challenges associated digital footprints in psychiatric research, such as collecting data from different sources, analysis, ethical and research design challenges.

  8. Digital footprints: facilitating large-scale environmental psychiatric research in naturalistic settings through data from everyday technologies

    PubMed Central

    Bidargaddi, N; Musiat, P; Makinen, V-P; Ermes, M; Schrader, G; Licinio, J

    2017-01-01

    Digital footprints, the automatically accumulated by-products of our technology-saturated lives, offer an exciting opportunity for psychiatric research. The commercial sector has already embraced the electronic trails of customers as an enabling tool for guiding consumer behaviour, and analogous efforts are ongoing to monitor and improve the mental health of psychiatric patients. The untargeted collection of digital footprints that may or may not be health orientated comprises a large untapped information resource for epidemiological scale research into psychiatric disorders. Real-time monitoring of mood, sleep and physical and social activity in a substantial portion of the affected population in a naturalistic setting is unprecedented in psychiatry. We propose that digital footprints can provide these measurements from real world setting unobtrusively and in a longitudinal fashion. In this perspective article, we outline the concept of digital footprints and the services and devices that create them, and present examples where digital footprints have been successfully used in research. We then critically discuss the opportunities and fundamental challenges associated digital footprints in psychiatric research, such as collecting data from different sources, analysis, ethical and research design challenges. PMID:27922603

  9. New BAC probe set to narrow down chromosomal breakpoints in small and large derivative chromosomes, especially suited for mosaic conditions.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Ahmed B; Fan, Xiaobo; Kosyakova, Nadezda; Radhakrishnan, Gopakumar; Liehr, Thomas; Karamysheva, Tatyana

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and/or array-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) performed after initial banding cytogenetics is still the gold standard for detection of chromosomal rearrangements. Although aCGH provides a higher resolution, FISH has two main advantages over the array-based approaches: (1) it can be applied to characterize balanced as well as unbalanced rearrangements, whereas aCGH is restricted to unbalanced ones, and (2) chromosomal aberrations present in low level or complex mosaics can be characterized by FISH without any problems, while aCGH requires presence of over 50 % of aberrant cells in the sample for detection. Recently, a new FISH-based probe set was presented: the so-called pericentric-ladder-FISH (PCL-FISH) that enables characterization of chromosomal breakpoints especially in mosaic small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC). It can also be applied on large inborn or acquired derivative chromosomes. The main feature of this set is that the probes are applied in a chromosome-specific manner and they align along the chromosome in average intervals of ten megabasepairs. Hence PCL-FISH provides denser coverage and a more precise anchorage on the human DNA-sequence than most other FISH-banding approaches.

  10. QSAR prediction of estrogen activity for a large set of diverse chemicals under the guidance of OECD principles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huanxiang; Papa, Ester; Gramatica, Paola

    2006-11-01

    A large number of environmental chemicals, known as endocrine-disrupting chemicals, are suspected of disrupting endocrine functions by mimicking or antagonizing natural hormones, and such chemicals may pose a serious threat to the health of humans and wildlife. They are thought to act through a variety of mechanisms, mainly estrogen-receptor-mediated mechanisms of toxicity. However, it is practically impossible to perform thorough toxicological tests on all potential xenoestrogens, and thus, the quantitative structure--activity relationship (QSAR) provides a promising method for the estimation of a compound's estrogenic activity. Here, QSAR models of the estrogen receptor binding affinity of a large data set of heterogeneous chemicals have been built using theoretical molecular descriptors, giving full consideration to the new OECD principles in regulation for QSAR acceptability, during model construction and assessment. An unambiguous multiple linear regression (MLR) algorithm was used to build the models, and model predictive ability was validated by both internal and external validation. The applicability domain was checked by the leverage approach to verify prediction reliability. The results obtained using several validation paths indicate that the proposed QSAR model is robust and satisfactory, and can provide a feasible and practical tool for the rapid screening of the estrogen activity of organic compounds.

  11. Do networking activities outside of the classroom protect students against being bullied? A field study with students in secondary school settings in Germany.

    PubMed

    Blickle, Gerhard; Meurs, James A; Schoepe, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Research has shown that having close relationships with fellow classmates can provide a buffer for students against bullying and the negative outcomes associated with it. But, research has not explicitly examined the potential benefits of social networking behaviors outside of the classroom for those who could be bullied. This study addresses this gap and finds that, although a bullying climate in the classroom increases overall bullying, students high on external networking activities did not experience an increase in the bullying they received when in a classroom with a high bullying climate. However, the same group of students reported the largest degree of received bulling under conditions of a low bullying climate. We discuss the implications of our results and provide directions for future research.

  12. WebViz:A Web-based Collaborative Interactive Visualization System for large-Scale Data Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, D. A.; McArthur, E.; Weiss, R. M.; Zhou, J.; Yao, B.

    2010-12-01

    WebViz is a web-based application designed to conduct collaborative, interactive visualizations of large data sets for multiple users, allowing researchers situated all over the world to utilize the visualization services offered by the University of Minnesota’s Laboratory for Computational Sciences and Engineering (LCSE). This ongoing project has been built upon over the last 3 1/2 years .The motivation behind WebViz lies primarily with the need to parse through an increasing amount of data produced by the scientific community as a result of larger and faster multicore and massively parallel computers coming to the market, including the use of general purpose GPU computing. WebViz allows these large data sets to be visualized online by anyone with an account. The application allows users to save time and resources by visualizing data ‘on the fly’, wherever he or she may be located. By leveraging AJAX via the Google Web Toolkit (http://code.google.com/webtoolkit/), we are able to provide users with a remote, web portal to LCSE's (http://www.lcse.umn.edu) large-scale interactive visualization system already in place at the University of Minnesota. LCSE’s custom hierarchical volume rendering software provides high resolution visualizations on the order of 15 million pixels and has been employed for visualizing data primarily from simulations in astrophysics to geophysical fluid dynamics . In the current version of WebViz, we have implemented a highly extensible back-end framework built around HTTP "server push" technology. The web application is accessible via a variety of devices including netbooks, iPhones, and other web and javascript-enabled cell phones. Features in the current version include the ability for users to (1) securely login (2) launch multiple visualizations (3) conduct collaborative visualization sessions (4) delegate control aspects of a visualization to others and (5) engage in collaborative chats with other users within the user interface

  13. Hydraulic behavior of two areas of the Floridan aquifer system characterized by complex hydrogeologic settings and large groundwater withdrawals

    SciTech Connect

    Maslia, M.L. )

    1993-03-01

    Two areas of the Florida aquifer system (FAS) that are characterized by complex hydrogeologic settings and exceedingly large ground-water withdrawals are the Dougherty Plain area of southwest GA and the Glynn County area of southeast GA. In southwest GA, large scale withdrawals of ground water for agricultural and livestock irrigation amounted to about 148 million gallons per day (mg/d) during 1990. Large scale pumping in Glynn County, primarily used for industrial purposes and centered in the City of Brunswick, amounted to about 88 mg/d during 1990. In southwest GA, the FAS consists primarily of the Ocala Limestone (OL) of late Eocene age. Confining the aquifer from above is a residual layer (50 ft thick) of sand and clay containing silicified boulders which is derived from the chemical weathering of the OL. This area is characterized by karst topography marked by numerous depressions and sinkholes, high transmissivity (generally greater than 50,000 feet squared per day), and significant hydraulic connections to overlying streams and lakes. These characteristics, along with the seasonal nature of pumping and mean annual recharge of about 10 inches per year have prevented permanent, long-term water-level declines. In the Glynn County area, the FAS can be more than 2,600 ft thick, consisting of a sequence of calcareous and dolomitic rocks that are of Late Cretaceous to early Miocene in age. The aquifer system is confined above by clastic rocks of Middle Miocene age, having an average thickness of 400 ft. This area is characterized by post-depositional tectonic modification of the subsurface as opposed to simple karst development, thick confinement of the aquifer system, and significant amounts of vertical leakage of water from below. These characteristics and heavy-long term pumping from the Upper Floridan aquifer (UFA) have caused a broad, shallow cone of depression to develop and the upward migration of saltwater to contaminate the freshwater zones of the UFA.

  14. Simulation studies as designed experiments: the comparison of penalized regression models in the "large p, small n" setting.

    PubMed

    Chaibub Neto, Elias; Bare, J Christopher; Margolin, Adam A

    2014-01-01

    New algorithms are continuously proposed in computational biology. Performance evaluation of novel methods is important in practice. Nonetheless, the field experiences a lack of rigorous methodology aimed to systematically and objectively evaluate competing approaches. Simulation studies are frequently used to show that a particular method outperforms another. Often times, however, simulation studies are not well designed, and it is hard to characterize the particular conditions under which different methods perform better. In this paper we propose the adoption of well established techniques in the design of computer and physical experiments for developing effective simulation studies. By following best practices in planning of experiments we are better able to understand the strengths and weaknesses of competing algorithms leading to more informed decisions about which method to use for a particular task. We illustrate the application of our proposed simulation framework with a detailed comparison of the ridge-regression, lasso and elastic-net algorithms in a large scale study investigating the effects on predictive performance of sample size, number of features, true model sparsity, signal-to-noise ratio, and feature correlation, in situations where the number of covariates is usually much larger than sample size. Analysis of data sets containing tens of thousands of features but only a few hundred samples is nowadays routine in computational biology, where "omics" features such as gene expression, copy number variation and sequence data are frequently used in the predictive modeling of complex phenotypes such as anticancer drug response. The penalized regression approaches investigated in this study are popular choices in this setting and our simulations corroborate well established results concerning the conditions under which each one of these methods is expected to perform best while providing several novel insights.

  15. Navigating the Problem Space of Academia: Exploring Processes of Course Design and Classroom Teaching in Postsecondary Settings. WCER Working Paper No. 2014-1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hora, Matthew T.

    2014-01-01

    Policymakers and educators alike increasing focus on faculty adoption of interactive teaching techniques as a way to improve undergraduate education. Yet, little empirical research exists that examines the processes whereby faculty make decisions about curriculum design and classroom teaching in real-world situations. In this study, I use the idea…

  16. The Impact of Brief Teacher Training on Classroom Management and Child Behavior in At-Risk Preschool Settings: Mediators and Treatment Utility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, James; Low, Sabina; Schultz, Tara; Barner, Stacy; Moreno, Desirae; Garst, Meladee; Leiker, Ryan; Swink, Nathan; Schrepferman, Lynn

    2011-01-01

    Teachers from fourteen classrooms were randomly assigned to an adaptation of Incredible Years (IY) teacher training or to teacher training-as-usual. Observations were made of the behavior of 136 target preschool boys and girls nominated by teachers as having many or few conduct problems. Peer and teacher behavior were observed at baseline and post…

  17. "Designing Instrument for Science Classroom Learning Environment in Francophone Minority Settings: Accounting for Voiced Concerns among Teachers and Immigrant/Refugee Students"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolivar, Bathélemy

    2015-01-01

    The three-phase process "-Instrument for Minority Immigrant Science Learning Environment," an 8-scale, 32-item see Appendix I- (I_MISLE) instrument when completed by teachers provides an accurate description of existing conditions in classrooms in which immigrant and refugee students are situated. Through the completion of the instrument…

  18. Culture in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medin, Douglas L.; Bang, Megan

    2014-01-01

    Culture plays a large but often unnoticeable role in what we teach and how we teach children. We are a country of immense diversity, but in classrooms the dominant European-American culture has become the language of learning.

  19. Classroom Behaviors of Asian American Students in Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Shwu-yong L.; Waxman, Hersholt C.

    This study examines Asian American middle school students' classroom behaviors in mathematics using systematic classroom observation techniques. The study explores questions related to classroom behaviors in terms of interactions with teachers, classroom settings, activities, and manners; differences in classroom behaviors between boys and girls…

  20. Design and implementation of an open source indexing solution for a large set of radiological reports and images.

    PubMed

    Voet, T; Devolder, P; Pynoo, B; Vercruysse, J; Duyck, P

    2007-11-01

    This paper hopes to share the insights we experienced during designing, building, and running an indexing solution for a large set of radiological reports and images in a production environment for more than 3 years. Several technical challenges were encountered and solved in the course of this project. One hundred four million words in 1.8 million radiological reports from 1989 to the present were indexed and became instantaneously searchable in a user-friendly fashion; the median query duration is only 31 ms. Currently, our highly tuned index holds 332,088 unique words in four languages. The indexing system is feature-rich and language-independent and allows for making complex queries. For research and training purposes it certainly is a valuable and convenient addition to our radiology informatics toolbox. Extended use of open-source technology dramatically reduced both implementation time and cost. All software we developed related to the indexing project has been made available to the open-source community covered by an unrestricted Berkeley Software Distribution-style license.

  1. Oklahoma Lightning Mapping Array: Detection Efficiency, Mapping Large Sets of Data, and the Beginning of a Total Lightning Climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Oklahoma Lightning Mapping Array (OKLMA) has collected the time and location of very
high frequency (VHF) radiation sources produced by all types of lightning in central Oklahoma since the spring of 2003. The detection efficiency of the OKLMA decreases with distance from the center of the LMA, which causes a false maximum in sources over the network when working with very large data sets. Using five months worth of data and assuming a VHF source detection efficiency of 100% over the network, a map of detection efficiency at different ranges is presented. Two methods of eliminating the bias of source detection over the network are explored: a normalization method based on the decreasing VHF power of detected sources with range and a flash-sorting method. Although both methods yield similar results, the flash sorting method is chosen for future climatology studies because it is more readily understood and is already in use throughout the community in case studies and lightning jump algorithms. The first maps and time series of total lightning over central Oklahoma for a 10-year period are presented.

  2. Spatial Fingerprints of Community Structure in Human Interaction Network for an Extensive Set of Large-Scale Regions

    PubMed Central

    Kallus, Zsófia; Barankai, Norbert; Szüle, János; Vattay, Gábor

    2015-01-01

    Human interaction networks inferred from country-wide telephone activity recordings were recently used to redraw political maps by projecting their topological partitions into geographical space. The results showed remarkable spatial cohesiveness of the network communities and a significant overlap between the redrawn and the administrative borders. Here we present a similar analysis based on one of the most popular online social networks represented by the ties between more than 5.8 million of its geo-located users. The worldwide coverage of their measured activity allowed us to analyze the large-scale regional subgraphs of entire continents and an extensive set of examples for single countries. We present results for North and South America, Europe and Asia. In our analysis we used the well-established method of modularity clustering after an aggregation of the individual links into a weighted graph connecting equal-area geographical pixels. Our results show fingerprints of both of the opposing forces of dividing local conflicts and of uniting cross-cultural trends of globalization. PMID:25993329

  3. Determination of counterfeit medicines by Raman spectroscopy: Systematic study based on a large set of model tablets.

    PubMed

    Neuberger, Sabine; Neusüß, Christian

    2015-08-10

    In the last decade, counterfeit pharmaceutical products have become a widespread issue for public health. Raman spectroscopy which is easy, non-destructive and information-rich is particularly suitable as screening method for fast characterization of chemicals and pharmaceuticals. Combined with chemometric techniques, it provides a powerful tool for the analysis and determination of counterfeit medicines. Here, for the first time, a systematic study of the benefits and limitations of Raman spectroscopy for the analysis of pharmaceutical samples on a large set of model tablets, varying with respect to chemical and physical properties, was performed. To discriminate between the different mixtures, a combination of dispersive Raman spectroscopy performing in backscattering mode and principal component analysis was used. The discrimination between samples with different coatings, a varying amount of active pharmaceutical ingredients and a diversity of excipients were possible. However, it was not possible to distinguish between variations of the press power, mixing quality and granulation. As a showcase, the change in Raman signals of commercial acetylsalicylic acid effervescent tablets due to five different storage conditions was monitored. It was possible to detect early small chemical changes caused by inappropriate storage conditions. These results demonstrate that Raman spectroscopy combined with multivariate data analysis provides a powerful methodology for the fast and easy characterization of genuine and counterfeit medicines.

  4. RelMon: A General Approach to QA, Validation and Physics Analysis through Comparison of large Sets of Histograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piparo, Danilo

    2012-12-01

    The estimation of the compatibility of large amounts of histogram pairs is a recurrent problem in high energy physics. The issue is common to several different areas, from software quality monitoring to data certification, preservation and analysis. Given two sets of histograms, it is very important to be able to scrutinize the outcome of several goodness of fit tests, obtain a clear answer about the overall compatibility, easily spot the single anomalies and directly access the concerned histogram pairs. This procedure must be automated in order to reduce the human workload, therefore improving the process of identification of differences which is usually carried out by a trained human mind. Some solutions to this problem have been proposed, but they are experiment specific. RelMon depends only on ROOT and offers several goodness of fit tests (e.g. chi-squared or Kolmogorov-Smirnov). It produces highly readable web reports, in which aggregations of the comparisons rankings are available as well as all the plots of the single histogram overlays. The comparison procedure is fully automatic and scales smoothly towards ensembles of millions of histograms. Examples of RelMon utilisation within the regular workflows of the CMS collaboration and the advantages therewith obtained are described. Its interplay with the data quality monitoring infrastructure is illustrated as well as its role in the QA of the event reconstruction code, its integration in the CMS software release cycle process, CMS user data analysis and dataset validation.

  5. Wide-range photoabsorption cross-sections of simple metals: large basis-set OPW calculations for sodium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, Hikaru

    2013-02-01

    Photoabsorption cross-sections of simple metals are formulated through a solid-state band theory based on the orthogonalized-plane-wave (OPW) method in Slater’s local-exchange approximation, where interband transitions of core and conduction electrons are evaluated up to the soft x-ray regime by using large basis sets. The photoabsorption cross-sections of a sodium crystal are computed for a wide photon energy range from 3 to 1800 eV. It is found that the numerical results reproduce the existing x-ray databases fairly well for energies above the L2,3-edge (31 eV), verifying a consistency between solid-state and atomic models for inner-shell photoabsorption; additional oscillatory structures in the present spectra manifest solid-state effects. Our computed results in the vacuum ultraviolet regime (6-30 eV) are also in better agreement with experimental data compared to earlier theories, although some discrepancies remain in the range of 20-30 eV. The influence of the core eigenvalues on the absorption spectra is examined.

  6. My Classroom Physical Activity Pyramid: A Tool for Integrating Movement into the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orlowski, Marietta; Lorson, Kevin; Lyon, Anna; Minoughan, Susan

    2013-01-01

    The classroom teacher is a critical team member of a comprehensive school physical activity program and an activity-friendly school environment. Students spend more time in the classroom than in any other school setting or environment. Classrooms are busy places, and classroom teachers must make decisions about how to make the best use of their…

  7. Development of a large-sample watershed-scale hydrometeorological data set for the contiguous USA: data set characteristics and assessment of regional variability in hydrologic model performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, A. J.; Clark, M. P.; Sampson, K.; Wood, A.; Hay, L. E.; Bock, A.; Viger, R. J.; Blodgett, D.; Brekke, L.; Arnold, J. R.; Hopson, T.; Duan, Q.

    2015-01-01

    We present a community data set of daily forcing and hydrologic response data for 671 small- to medium-sized basins across the contiguous United States (median basin size of 336 km2) that spans a very wide range of hydroclimatic conditions. Area-averaged forcing data for the period 1980-2010 was generated for three basin spatial configurations - basin mean, hydrologic response units (HRUs) and elevation bands - by mapping daily, gridded meteorological data sets to the subbasin (Daymet) and basin polygons (Daymet, Maurer and NLDAS). Daily streamflow data was compiled from the United States Geological Survey National Water Information System. The focus of this paper is to (1) present the data set for community use and (2) provide a model performance benchmark using the coupled Snow-17 snow model and the Sacramento Soil Moisture Accounting Model, calibrated using the shuffled complex evolution global optimization routine. After optimization minimizing daily root mean squared error, 90% of the basins have Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency scores ≥0.55 for the calibration period and 34% ≥ 0.8. This benchmark provides a reference level of hydrologic model performance for a commonly used model and calibration system, and highlights some regional variations in model performance. For example, basins with a more pronounced seasonal cycle generally have a negative low flow bias, while basins with a smaller seasonal cycle have a positive low flow bias. Finally, we find that data points with extreme error (defined as individual days with a high fraction of total error) are more common in arid basins with limited snow and, for a given aridity, fewer extreme error days are present as the basin snow water equivalent increases.

  8. Changing the English Classroom: When Large-Scale "Common" Testing Meets Secondary Curriculum and Instruction in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cimbricz, Sandra K.; McConn, Matthew L.

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the intersection of new, large-scale standards-based testing, teacher accountability policy, and secondary curriculum and instruction in the United States. Two federally funded consortia--the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium and the Partnership for Readiness of College and Careers--prove focal to this paper, as these…

  9. Sandbar Variability in the U.S. Pacific Northwest: Observations of Nearshore Morphology from a Large-scale Data Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Leonardo, D. R.; Ruggiero, P.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding sandbar dynamics and variability is integral to developing a predictive capacity for nearshore flows, sediment transport, morphological change, and ultimately for determining coastline exposure to damaging storm waves. Along the high-energy U.S. Pacific Northwest (PNW) coast, sandbars typically dominate the bathymetry of the active zone. Here we report on a nearshore bathymetric data set that covers an exceptionally long stretch of coast and crosses several littoral cell boundaries. Our study area extends from Point Grenville, Washington to Cascade Head, Oregon, covering 6 littoral cells and over 230 km in the alongshore. We are analyzing the data to describe and quantify the morphological variability of sandbars in the PNW over large spatial scales as well as to attempt an explanation of the large scale variability between littoral cells. From over 600 bathymetric profiles (~1000 km of measurements) we have extracted over 800 individual subtidal sandbars. The bar zone extends to over 1km from the shoreline in the northern part of the study area, but only to about 700m in the southern part. Maximum bar crest depths are approximately 7m below MLLW. Bar heights range from a step in the cross-shore profile to over 3m from crest to trough. The southernmost littoral cells typically have only one bar per cross-shore profile whereas the littoral cells in the northern part of our study area have two or more subtidal bars. The mean depths of the bars, however, are much more consistent across littoral cells. The mean depths remain consistent even while the upper shoreface slope significantly increases from north to south, requiring that the maximum bar distance from the shoreline decreases from north to south. This regional gradient in upper shoreface slope is likely a response to a general coarsening trend in the sediment from north to south and hence linked to variations in regional geology. The narrower bar zone is perhaps responsible for creating a single

  10. Empirical Mining of Large Data Sets Already Helps to Solve Practical Ecological Problems; A Panoply of Working Examples (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargrove, W. W.; Hoffman, F. M.; Kumar, J.; Spruce, J.; Norman, S. P.

    2013-12-01

    Here we present diverse examples where empirical mining and statistical analysis of large data sets have already been shown to be useful for a wide variety of practical decision-making problems within the realm of large-scale ecology. Because a full understanding and appreciation of particular ecological phenomena are possible only after hypothesis-directed research regarding the existence and nature of that process, some ecologists may feel that purely empirical data harvesting may represent a less-than-satisfactory approach. Restricting ourselves exclusively to process-driven approaches, however, may actually slow progress, particularly for more complex or subtle ecological processes. We may not be able to afford the delays caused by such directed approaches. Rather than attempting to formulate and ask every relevant question correctly, empirical methods allow trends, relationships and associations to emerge freely from the data themselves, unencumbered by a priori theories, ideas and prejudices that have been imposed upon them. Although they cannot directly demonstrate causality, empirical methods can be extremely efficient at uncovering strong correlations with intermediate "linking" variables. In practice, these correlative structures and linking variables, once identified, may provide sufficient predictive power to be useful themselves. Such correlation "shadows" of causation can be harnessed by, e.g., Bayesian Belief Nets, which bias ecological management decisions, made with incomplete information, toward favorable outcomes. Empirical data-harvesting also generates a myriad of testable hypotheses regarding processes, some of which may even be correct. Quantitative statistical regionalizations based on quantitative multivariate similarity have lended insights into carbon eddy-flux direction and magnitude, wildfire biophysical conditions, phenological ecoregions useful for vegetation type mapping and monitoring, forest disease risk maps (e.g., sudden oak

  11. Hyperview-fast, economical access to large data sets: a system for the archiving and distribution of hyperspectral data sets and derived products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lurie, Joan B.

    1996-12-01

    TRW, under a Small Satellite Technology Initiative (SSTI) contract, is building the Lewis satellite. The principal sensor on Lewis is a hyperspectral imaging spectrometer. Part of the SSTI mission is to establish the commercial and educational utility of this data and the hyperspectral data already being acquired on airborne platforms. Essential requirements are rapid availability (after data acquisition) and easy accessibility to a catalog of images and imagery products. Each image is approximately 256 by 512 pixels with 384 bands of data acquired at each pixel. For some applications, some users will want the entire data sets; in other cases partial data sets (e.g. three band images) will be all that a user can handle or need for a given application. In order to make the most effective use of this new imagery and justify the cost of collecting it, we must find ways to make the information it contains more readily accessible to an ever broadening community of potential users. Tools are needed to store, access, and communicate the data more efficiently, to place it in context, and to derive both qualitative and quantitative information from it. A variety of information products which address the specific needs of particular user communities will be derived from the imagery. The data is unique in its ability to provide high spatial and spectral resolution simultaneously, and shows great promise in both military and civilian applications. A data management and analysis system has been built at TRW. This development has been prompted by the business opportunities, by the series of instruments built here and by the availability of data from other instruments. The products of the processing system have been shown to prospective customers in the U.S. and abroad. The system has been used to process data produced by TRW sensors and other instruments. This paper provides an overview of the TRW hyperspectral collection, data handling and exploitation capability.

  12. Rates and Mechanisms of Solidification in Large Magma Bodies: Implications for Melt Extraction in all Tectonic Settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanTongeren, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    As is observed in both experiment and theory, in the absence of hydrothermal convection, the majority of magma chamber heat loss occurs via conduction through the roof of the intrusion and into the cold country rock above. The formation of an upper solidification front (or Upper Border Series, UBS), recorded in the rocks both geochemically and texturally, is a natural outcome of the progression of the solidification front from the cold roof to the hot center of the magma chamber. There are, however, a few unique layered mafic intrusions for which little or no UBS exists. In this study, I examine the thermal evolution and crystallization rates of several classic layered intrusions as it is recorded in the extent of the preserved UBS. For those intrusions that have experienced crystallization at the roof, such as the Skaergaard Intrusion, the development of a UBS reduces the temperature gradient at the roof and effectively slows the rate of heat loss from the main magma body. However, for those intrusions that do not have an UBS, such as the Bushveld Complex, the cooling rate is controlled only by the maximum rate of conductive heat loss through the overlying roof rocks, which decreases with time. The implications are two-fold: (1) The relative thickness of the UBS in large intrusions may be the key to quantifying their cooling and solidification rates; and (2) The nature of the magma mush zone near the roof of an intrusion may depend principally on the long-term thermal evolution of the magma body. Particularly at the end stages of crystallization, when the liquids are likely to be highly evolved and high viscosities may inhibit convection, intrusions lacking a well-defined UBS may provide important insights into the mechanics of crystal-liquid separation, melt extraction, and compaction in felsic plutons as well as mafic intrusions. These results are important for long-lived (>500 kyr) or repeatedly replenished magma chambers in all tectonic settings.

  13. Efficacy, Safety, and Tolerability of an Extended-Release Orally Disintegrating Methylphenidate Tablet in Children 6–12 Years of Age with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in the Laboratory Classroom Setting

    PubMed Central

    Childress, Ann C.; Kollins, Scott H.; Cutler, Andrew J.; Marraffino, Andrea; Sikes, Carolyn R.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Methylphenidate extended-release orally disintegrating tablets (MPH XR-ODTs) represent a new technology for MPH delivery. ODTs disintegrate in the mouth without water and provide a pharmacokinetic profile that is consistent with once-daily dosing. This study sought to determine the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of this novel MPH XR-ODT formulation in school-age children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in a laboratory classroom setting. Methods: Children aged 6–12 years with ADHD (n = 87) were enrolled in this randomized, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel, laboratory classroom study. The MPH XR-ODT dose was titrated to an optimized dose during a 4-week open-label period and maintained on that dose for 1 week. Participants (n = 85) were then randomized to receive their optimized dose of MPH XR-ODT or placebo once daily for 1 week (double blind), culminating in a laboratory classroom testing day. Efficacy was evaluated using the Swanson, Kotkin, Agler, M-Flynn, and Pelham (SKAMP) Attention, Deportment, and Combined scores along with Permanent Product Measure of Performance (PERMP; Attempted and Correct) assessments. Onset and duration of drug action were also evaluated as key secondary endpoints. Safety assessments included adverse events (AEs), physical examinations, electrocardiograms (ECGs), and the Columbia Suicide Severity Rating Scale (C-SSRS). Results: The average SKAMP-Combined score on the classroom study day was significantly better for the MPH XR-ODT group (n = 43) than for the placebo group (n = 39; p < 0.0001). The effect was evident at 1 hour and lasted through 12 hours postdose. The average SKAMP-Attention, SKAMP-Deportment, PERMP-A, and PERMP-C scores were indicative of significantly greater ADHD symptom control for the MPH XR-ODT group. The most common AEs reported were decreased appetite, upper abdominal pain, headache, insomnia, upper respiratory tract

  14. Teaching cell biology in the large-enrollment classroom: methods to promote analytical thinking and assessment of their effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, Elizabeth; Bell, John D; Reeve, Suzanne; Sudweeks, Richard R; Bradshaw, William S

    2003-01-01

    A large-enrollment, undergraduate cellular biology lecture course is described whose primary goal is to help students acquire skill in the interpretation of experimental data. The premise is that this kind of analytical reasoning is not intuitive for most people and, in the absence of hands-on laboratory experience, will not readily develop unless instructional methods and examinations specifically designed to foster it are employed. Promoting scientific thinking forces changes in the roles of both teacher and student. We describe didactic strategies that include directed practice of data analysis in a workshop format, active learning through verbal and written communication, visualization of abstractions diagrammatically, and the use of ancillary small-group mentoring sessions with faculty. The implications for a teacher in reducing the breadth and depth of coverage, becoming coach instead of lecturer, and helping students to diagnose cognitive weaknesses are discussed. In order to determine the efficacy of these strategies, we have carefully monitored student performance and have demonstrated a large gain in a pre- and posttest comparison of scores on identical problems, improved test scores on several successive midterm examinations when the statistical analysis accounts for the relative difficulty of the problems, and higher scores in comparison to students in a control course whose objective was information transfer, not acquisition of reasoning skills. A novel analytical index (student mobility profile) is described that demonstrates that this improvement was not random, but a systematic outcome of the teaching/learning strategies employed. An assessment of attitudes showed that, in spite of finding it difficult, students endorse this approach to learning, but also favor curricular changes that would introduce an analytical emphasis earlier in their training.

  15. Teaching Cell Biology in the Large-Enrollment Classroom: Methods to Promote Analytical Thinking and Assessment of Their Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Kitchen, Elizabeth; Bell, John D.; Reeve, Suzanne; Sudweeks, Richard R.; Bradshaw, William S.

    2003-01-01

    A large-enrollment, undergraduate cellular biology lecture course is described whose primary goal is to help students acquire skill in the interpretation of experimental data. The premise is that this kind of analytical reasoning is not intuitive for most people and, in the absence of hands-on laboratory experience, will not readily develop unless instructional methods and examinations specifically designed to foster it are employed. Promoting scientific thinking forces changes in the roles of both teacher and student. We describe didactic strategies that include directed practice of data analysis in a workshop format, active learning through verbal and written communication, visualization of abstractions diagrammatically, and the use of ancillary small-group mentoring sessions with faculty. The implications for a teacher in reducing the breadth and depth of coverage, becoming coach instead of lecturer, and helping students to diagnose cognitive weaknesses are discussed. In order to determine the efficacy of these strategies, we have carefully monitored student performance and have demonstrated a large gain in a pre- and posttest comparison of scores on identical problems, improved test scores on several successive midterm examinations when the statistical analysis accounts for the relative difficulty of the problems, and higher scores in comparison to students in a control course whose objective was information transfer, not acquisition of reasoning skills. A novel analytical index (student mobility profile) is described that demonstrates that this improvement was not random, but a systematic outcome of the teaching/learning strategies employed. An assessment of attitudes showed that, in spite of finding it difficult, students endorse this approach to learning, but also favor curricular changes that would introduce an analytical emphasis earlier in their training. PMID:14506506

  16. How do you assign persistent identifiers to extracts from large, complex, dynamic data sets that underpin scholarly publications?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyborn, Lesley; Car, Nicholas; Evans, Benjamin; Klump, Jens

    2016-04-01

    Persistent identifiers in the form of a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) are becoming more mainstream, assigned at both the collection and dataset level. For static datasets, this is a relatively straight-forward matter. However, many new data collections are dynamic, with new data being appended, models and derivative products being revised with new data, or the data itself revised as processing methods are improved. Further, because data collections are becoming accessible as services, researchers can log in and dynamically create user-defined subsets for specific research projects: they also can easily mix and match data from multiple collections, each of which can have a complex history. Inevitably extracts from such dynamic data sets underpin scholarly publications, and this presents new challenges. The National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) has been experiencing and making progress towards addressing these issues. The NCI is large node of the Research Data Services initiative (RDS) of the Australian Government's research infrastructure, which currently makes available over 10 PBytes of priority research collections, ranging from geosciences, geophysics, environment, and climate, through to astronomy, bioinformatics, and social sciences. Data are replicated to, or are produced at, NCI and then processed there to higher-level data products or directly analysed. Individual datasets range from multi-petabyte computational models and large volume raster arrays, down to gigabyte size, ultra-high resolution datasets. To facilitate access, maximise reuse and enable integration across the disciplines, datasets have been organized on a platform called the National Environmental Research Data Interoperability Platform (NERDIP). Combined, the NERDIP data collections form a rich and diverse asset for researchers: their co-location and standardization optimises the value of existing data, and forms a new resource to underpin data-intensive Science. New publication

  17. Classroom Planetarium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ankney, Paul

    1981-01-01

    Provides instructions for the construction of a paper mache classroom planetarium and suggests several student activities using this planetarium model. Lists reasons why students have difficulties in transferring classroom instruction in astronomy to the night sky. (DS)

  18. A Large-Scale Inquiry-Based Astronomy Intervention Project: Impact on Students' Content Knowledge Performance and Views of their High School Science Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, Michael; McKinnon, David H.; Danaia, Lena; Deehan, James

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we present the results from a study of the impact on students involved in a large-scale inquiry-based astronomical high school education intervention in Australia. Students in this intervention were led through an educational design allowing them to undertake an investigative approach to understanding the lifecycle of stars more aligned with the `ideal' picture of school science. Through the use of two instruments, one focused on content knowledge gains and the other on student views of school science, we explore the impact of this design. Overall, students made moderate content knowledge gains although these gains were heavily dependent on the individual teacher, the number of times a teacher implemented and the depth to which an individual teacher went with the provided materials. In terms of students' views, there were significant global changes in their views of their experience of the science classroom. However, there were some areas where no change or slightly negative changes of which some were expected and some were not. From these results, we comment on the necessity of sustained long-period implementations rather than single interventions, the requirement for similarly sustained professional development and the importance of monitoring the impact of inquiry-based implementations. This is especially important as inquiry-based approaches to science are required by many new curriculum reforms, most notably in this context, the new Australian curriculum currently being rolled out.

  19. Inter-species inference of gene set enrichment in lung epithelial cells from proteomic and large transcriptomic datasets

    PubMed Central

    Hormoz, Sahand; Bhanot, Gyan; Biehl, Michael; Bilal, Erhan; Meyer, Pablo; Norel, Raquel; Rhrissorrakrai, Kahn; Dayarian, Adel

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Translating findings in rodent models to human models has been a cornerstone of modern biology and drug development. However, in many cases, a naive ‘extrapolation’ between the two species has not succeeded. As a result, clinical trials of new drugs sometimes fail even after considerable success in the mouse or rat stage of development. In addition to in vitro studies, inter-species translation requires analytical tools that can predict the enriched gene sets in human cells under various stimuli from corresponding measurements in animals. Such tools can improve our understanding of the underlying biology and optimize the allocation of resources for drug development. Results: We developed an algorithm to predict differential gene set enrichment as part of the sbv IMPROVER (systems biology verification in Industrial Methodology for Process Verification in Research) Species Translation Challenge, which focused on phosphoproteomic and transcriptomic measurements of normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) primary cells under various stimuli and corresponding measurements in rat (NRBE) primary cells. We find that gene sets exhibit a higher inter-species correlation compared with individual genes, and are potentially more suited for direct prediction. Furthermore, in contrast to a similar cross-species response in protein phosphorylation states 5 and 25 min after exposure to stimuli, gene set enrichment 6 h after exposure is significantly different in NHBE cells compared with NRBE cells. In spite of this difference, we were able to develop a robust algorithm to predict gene set activation in NHBE with high accuracy using simple analytical methods. Availability and implementation: Implementation of all algorithms is available as source code (in Matlab) at http://bhanot.biomaps.rutgers.edu/wiki/codes_SC3_Predicting_GeneSets.zip, along with the relevant data used in the analysis. Gene sets, gene expression and protein phosphorylation data are available on

  20. Novel method to construct large-scale design space in lubrication process utilizing Bayesian estimation based on a small-scale design-of-experiment and small sets of large-scale manufacturing data.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Jin; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Takayama, Kozo

    2012-12-01

    A large-scale design space was constructed using a Bayesian estimation method with a small-scale design of experiments (DoE) and small sets of large-scale manufacturing data without enforcing a large-scale DoE. The small-scale DoE was conducted using various Froude numbers (X(1)) and blending times (X(2)) in the lubricant blending process for theophylline tablets. The response surfaces, design space, and their reliability of the compression rate of the powder mixture (Y(1)), tablet hardness (Y(2)), and dissolution rate (Y(3)) on a small scale were calculated using multivariate spline interpolation, a bootstrap resampling technique, and self-organizing map clustering. The constant Froude number was applied as a scale-up rule. Three experiments under an optimal condition and two experiments under other conditions were performed on a large scale. The response surfaces on the small scale were corrected to those on a large scale by Bayesian estimation using the large-scale results. Large-scale experiments under three additional sets of conditions showed that the corrected design space was more reliable than that on the small scale, even if there was some discrepancy in the pharmaceutical quality between the manufacturing scales. This approach is useful for setting up a design space in pharmaceutical development when a DoE cannot be performed at a commercial large manufacturing scale.

  1. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of a Measure of Staff/Child Interaction Quality (the Classroom Assessment Scoring System) in Early Childhood Education and Care Settings and Child Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Perlman, Michal; Falenchuk, Olesya; Fletcher, Brooke; McMullen, Evelyn; Beyene, Joseph; Shah, Prakesh S

    2016-01-01

    The quality of staff/child interactions as measured by the Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS) in Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) programs is thought to be important for children's outcomes. The CLASS is made of three domains that assess Emotional Support, Classroom Organization and Instructional Support. It is a relatively new measure that is being used increasingly for research, quality monitoring/accountability and other applied purposes. Our objective was to evaluate the association between the CLASS and child outcomes. Searches of Medline, PsycINFO, ERIC, websites of large datasets and reference sections of all retrieved articles were conducted up to July 3, 2015. Studies that measured association between the CLASS and child outcomes for preschool-aged children who attended ECEC programs were included after screening by two independent reviewers. Searches and data extraction were conducted by two independent reviewers. Thirty-five studies were systematically reviewed of which 19 provided data for meta-analyses. Most studies had moderate to high risk of bias. Of the 14 meta-analyses we conducted, associations between Classroom Organization and Pencil Tapping and between Instructional Support and SSRS Social Skills were significant with pooled correlations of .06 and .09 respectively. All associations were in the expected direction. In the systematic review, significant correlations were reported mainly from one large dataset. Substantial heterogeneity in use of the CLASS, its dimensions, child outcomes and statistical measures was identified. Greater consistency in study methodology is urgently needed. Given the multitude of factors that impact child development it is encouraging that our analyses revealed some, although small, associations between the CLASS and children's outcomes.

  2. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of a Measure of Staff/Child Interaction Quality (the Classroom Assessment Scoring System) in Early Childhood Education and Care Settings and Child Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Perlman, Michal; Falenchuk, Olesya; Fletcher, Brooke; McMullen, Evelyn; Beyene, Joseph; Shah, Prakesh S.

    2016-01-01

    The quality of staff/child interactions as measured by the Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS) in Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) programs is thought to be important for children’s outcomes. The CLASS is made of three domains that assess Emotional Support, Classroom Organization and Instructional Support. It is a relatively new measure that is being used increasingly for research, quality monitoring/accountability and other applied purposes. Our objective was to evaluate the association between the CLASS and child outcomes. Searches of Medline, PsycINFO, ERIC, websites of large datasets and reference sections of all retrieved articles were conducted up to July 3, 2015. Studies that measured association between the CLASS and child outcomes for preschool-aged children who attended ECEC programs were included after screening by two independent reviewers. Searches and data extraction were conducted by two independent reviewers. Thirty-five studies were systematically reviewed of which 19 provided data for meta-analyses. Most studies had moderate to high risk of bias. Of the 14 meta-analyses we conducted, associations between Classroom Organization and Pencil Tapping and between Instructional Support and SSRS Social Skills were significant with pooled correlations of .06 and .09 respectively. All associations were in the expected direction. In the systematic review, significant correlations were reported mainly from one large dataset. Substantial heterogeneity in use of the CLASS, its dimensions, child outcomes and statistical measures was identified. Greater consistency in study methodology is urgently needed. Given the multitude of factors that impact child development it is encouraging that our analyses revealed some, although small, associations between the CLASS and children’s outcomes. PMID:28036333

  3. Classroom Characters (in the Classroom).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Tom

    1991-01-01

    Describes a classroom technique used to creatively involve first grade students in reading and writing through the use of classroom characters who talk to the class via a paper cartoon-type balloon attached to the characters picture. Provides examples of classroom characters and how they help children develop their writing skills. (MG)

  4. Effects of hippocampal lesions on the monkey's ability to learn large sets of object-place associations.

    PubMed

    Belcher, Annabelle M; Harrington, Rebecca A; Malkova, Ludise; Mishkin, Mortimer

    2006-01-01

    Earlier studies found that recognition memory for object-place associations was impaired in patients with relatively selective hippocampal damage (Vargha-Khadem et al., Science 1997; 277:376-380), but was unaffected after selective hippocampal lesions in monkeys (Malkova and Mishkin, J Neurosci 2003; 23:1956-1965). A potentially important methodological difference between the two studies is that the patients were required to remember a set of 20 object-place associations for several minutes, whereas the monkeys had to remember only two such associations at a time, and only for a few seconds. To approximate more closely the task given to the patients, we trained monkeys on several successive sets of 10 object-place pairs each, with each set requiring learning across days. Despite the increased associative memory demands, monkeys given hippocampal lesions were unimpaired relative to their unoperated controls, suggesting that differences other than set size and memory duration underlie the different outcomes in the human and animal studies.

  5. Is Our Classroom an Ecological Place?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xia, Wang

    2006-01-01

    The essence of ecology is life and its diversity, integrity, openness and coexistence. When one contemplates and analyzes classroom from the perspective of ecology, classroom should contain open-ended and multiple goals instead of a single and pre-set goal; classroom is more flexible, allowing great diversity instead of being narrow-minded,…

  6. Free vascularised fibular grafting with OsteoSet®2 demineralised bone matrix versus autograft for large osteonecrotic lesions of the femoral head.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yong; Wang, Shanzhi; Jin, Dongxu; Sheng, Jiagen; Chen, Shengbao; Cheng, Xiangguo; Zhang, Changqing

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the safety and efficacy of OsteoSet®2 DBM with autologous cancellous bone in free vascularised fibular grafting for the treatment of large osteonecrotic lesions of the femoral head. Twenty-four patients (30 hips) with large osteonecrotic lesions of the femoral head (stage IIC in six hips, stage IIIC in 14, and stage IVC in ten, according to the classification system of Steinberg et al.) underwent free vascularised fibular grafting with OsteoSet®2 DBM. This group was retrospectively matched to a group of 24 patients (30 hips) who underwent free vascularised fibular grafting with autologous cancellous bone during the same time period according to the aetiology, stage, and size of the lesion and the mean preoperative Harris hip score. A prospective case-controlled study was then performed with a mean follow-up duration of 26 months. The results show no statistically significant differences between the two groups in overall clinical outcome or the radiographic assessment. Furthermore, no adverse events related to the use of the OsteoSet®2 DBM were observed. The results demonstrate that OsteoSet®2 DBM combined with autograft bone performs equally as well as that of autologous bone alone. Therefore, OsteoSet®2 DBM can be used as a safe and effective graft extender in free vascularised fibular grafting for large osteonecrotic lesions of the femoral head.

  7. Key Issues and Strategies for Recruitment and Implementation in Large-Scale Randomized Controlled Trial Studies in Afterschool Settings. Afterschool Research Brief. Issue No. 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Debra Hughes; Vaden-Kiernan, Michael; Rudo, Zena; Fitzgerald, Robert; Hartry, Ardice; Chambers, Bette; Smith, Dewi; Muller, Patricia; Moss, Marcey A.

    2008-01-01

    Under the larger scope of the National Partnership for Quality Afterschool Learning, SEDL funded three awardees to carry out large-scale randomized controlled trials (RCT) assessing the efficacy of promising literacy curricula in afterschool settings on student academic achievement. SEDL provided analytic and technical support to the RCT studies…

  8. Developing a "Semi-Systematic" Approach to Using Large-Scale Data-Sets for Small-Scale Interventions: The "Baby Matterz" Initiative as a Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The appropriateness of using statistical data to inform the design of any given service development or initiative often depends upon judgements regarding scale. Large-scale data sets, perhaps national in scope, whilst potentially important in informing the design, implementation and roll-out of experimental initiatives, will often remain unused…

  9. Statistical Analysis of a Large Sample Size Pyroshock Test Data Set Including Post Flight Data Assessment. Revision 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Anne M.

    2010-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra spacecraft was launched on an Atlas IIAS launch vehicle on its mission to observe planet Earth in late 1999. Prior to launch, the new design of the spacecraft's pyroshock separation system was characterized by a series of 13 separation ground tests. The analysis methods used to evaluate this unusually large amount of shock data will be discussed in this paper, with particular emphasis on population distributions and finding statistically significant families of data, leading to an overall shock separation interface level. The wealth of ground test data also allowed a derivation of a Mission Assurance level for the flight. All of the flight shock measurements were below the EOS Terra Mission Assurance level thus contributing to the overall success of the EOS Terra mission. The effectiveness of the statistical methodology for characterizing the shock interface level and for developing a flight Mission Assurance level from a large sample size of shock data is demonstrated in this paper.

  10. The large karstic holes at the top of the Syrian coastal Mountain Range. Importance of structural setting for the karstogenesis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mocochain, Ludovic; Blanpied, Christian; Bigot, Jean-Yves; Peyronel, Olivier; Gorini, Christian; Abdalla, Abdelkarim Al; Azki, Fawaz

    2015-04-01

    Along the Eastern Mediterranean Sea, the Syria Coastal Mountain Range spreads from north to south over 150 km of long. This range is a monocline structure stopped by a major escarpment that domines Al-Gahb Graben to the East. The Coastal Mountain Range is mainly formed by Mesozoic limestone that show a major unconformity between the Upper Jurassic and Aptien deposits, and important erosions in the Upper Cretaceous deposits. Locally, the Juro-Cretaceous unconformity is characterized by a layer of continental basalts with fossil woods that reveal a long emersion of the platform. The most recent carbonate deposits at the top of the Coastal Mountain Range are Turonian age. In the center part of the Coastal Mountain Range, in a small area, the Cretaceous carbonates are affected by large karstic dolines. These dolines are curiously located at the top of the mountain range. This position is not beneficial for the development of large karstic holes.

  11. Visual Data Mining of Astronomic Data With Virtual Reality Spaces: Understanding the Underlying Structure of Large Data Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdés, J. J.

    2005-12-01

    The information explosion in astronomy requires the development of data mining procedures that speed up the process of scientific discovery, and the in-depth understanding of the internal structure of the data. This is crucial for the identification of valid, novel, potentially useful, and understandable patterns (regularities, oddities, etc.). A Virtual Reality (VR) approach for large heterogeneous, incomplete and imprecise information is introduced for the problem of visualizing and analyzing astronomic data. The method is based on mappings between one heterogeneous space representing the data, and a homogeneous virtual reality space. This VR-based visual data mining technique allows the incorporation of the unmatched geometric capabilities of the human brain into the knowledge discovery process, and helps in understanding data structure and patterns. This approach has been applied successfully to a wide variety of real-world domains, and it has a large potential in astronomy. Examples are presented from the domain of galaxy research.

  12. Fast and Accurate Protein False Discovery Rates on Large-Scale Proteomics Data Sets with Percolator 3.0.

    PubMed

    The, Matthew; MacCoss, Michael J; Noble, William S; Käll, Lukas

    2016-11-01

    Percolator is a widely used software tool that increases yield in shotgun proteomics experiments and assigns reliable statistical confidence measures, such as q values and posterior error probabilities, to peptides and peptide-spectrum matches (PSMs) from such experiments. Percolator's processing speed has been sufficient for typical data sets consisting of hundreds of thousands of PSMs. With our new scalable approach, we can now also analyze millions of PSMs in a matter of minutes on a commodity computer. Furthermore, with the increasing awareness for the need for reliable statistics on the protein level, we compared several easy-to-understand protein inference methods and implemented the best-performing method-grouping proteins by their corresponding sets of theoretical peptides and then considering only the best-scoring peptide for each protein-in the Percolator package. We used Percolator 3.0 to analyze the data from a recent study of the draft human proteome containing 25 million spectra (PM:24870542). The source code and Ubuntu, Windows, MacOS, and Fedora binary packages are available from http://percolator.ms/ under an Apache 2.0 license. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  13. Fast and Accurate Protein False Discovery Rates on Large-Scale Proteomics Data Sets with Percolator 3.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The, Matthew; MacCoss, Michael J.; Noble, William S.; Käll, Lukas

    2016-11-01

    Percolator is a widely used software tool that increases yield in shotgun proteomics experiments and assigns reliable statistical confidence measures, such as q values and posterior error probabilities, to peptides and peptide-spectrum matches (PSMs) from such experiments. Percolator's processing speed has been sufficient for typical data sets consisting of hundreds of thousands of PSMs. With our new scalable approach, we can now also analyze millions of PSMs in a matter of minutes on a commodity computer. Furthermore, with the increasing awareness for the need for reliable statistics on the protein level, we compared several easy-to-understand protein inference methods and implemented the best-performing method—grouping proteins by their corresponding sets of theoretical peptides and then considering only the best-scoring peptide for each protein—in the Percolator package. We used Percolator 3.0 to analyze the data from a recent study of the draft human proteome containing 25 million spectra (PM:24870542). The source code and Ubuntu, Windows, MacOS, and Fedora binary packages are available from http://percolator.ms/ under an Apache 2.0 license.

  14. The Classroom as Public Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Robert O.

    The necessity for maintaining and extending the public space within which argumentation may appear, whether or not represented in the classroom, stems largely from pressures which have increasingly restricted that space. To function as public spaces, classrooms must enable students as citizens to confer in an unrestricted fashion about matters of…

  15. A Zebra in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leake, Devin; Morvillo, Nancy

    1998-01-01

    Describes the care and breeding of zebra fish, suggests various experiments and observations easily performed in a classroom setting, and provides some ideas to further student interest and exploration of these organisms. (DDR)

  16. Impacts of Flipped Classroom in High School Health Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Li-Ling

    2016-01-01

    As advanced technology increasingly infiltrated into classroom, the flipped classroom has come to light in secondary educational settings. The flipped classroom is a new instructional approach that intends to flip the traditional teacher-centered classroom into student centered. The purpose of this research is to investigate the impact of the…

  17. Pre-Service Teachers and Classroom Authority

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pellegrino, Anthony M.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the classroom practices of five pre-service teachers from three secondary schools in a large southeastern state. Through classroom observations, survey responses, reviews of refection logs, and focus-group interview responses, we centered on the issue of developing classroom authority as a means to effective classroom…

  18. Estimation of comprehensive forest variable sets from multiparameter SAR data over a large area with diverse species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moghaddam, M.

    2001-01-01

    Polarimetric and multifrequency data from the NASA/JPL airborne synthetic aperture radar (AIRSAR) have been used in a multi-tier estimation algorithm to calculate a comprehensive set of forest canopy properties including branch layer moisture and thickness, trunk density, trunk water content and diameter, trunk height, and subcanapy soil moisture. The estimation algorithm takes advantage of species-specific allometric relations, and is applied to a 100Km x 100Km area in the Canadian boreal region containing many different vegetation species types. The results show very good agreement with ground measurements taken at several focused and auxiliary study sites. This paper expands on the results reported in [1] and applies the algorithm on the regional scale.

  19. Classroom Management That Works

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleve, Lauren

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find the best classroom management strategies to use when teaching in an elementary school setting. I wanted to conduct the best possible management tools for a variety of age groups as well as meet educational standards. Through my research I found different approaches in different grade levels is an important…

  20. My Classroom: Kazakhstan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    Yulia Bulatkulova discovered her passion for English language teaching at a young age as a result of the example set by an esteemed childhood English teacher, Elvira Kuyanova. This article discusses how Ms. Bulatkulova's interactions with her students, both inside and outside the classroom, demonstrate that she has followed in the footsteps of her…

  1. Learning in Tomorrow's Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Richard F.

    2015-01-01

    Teaching today remains the most individualistic of all the professions, with educators characteristically operating in a highly fragmented world of "their" courses, "their" skills, and "their" students. Learning will occur in the classrooms of the future through a sustainable set of complementary capabilities:…

  2. The Moral Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Kathleen M.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses character and moral education in the classroom, suggesting that schools should reinforce the lessons of the home rather than acting as value-free zones. Modern education has the tendency to present students with a huge set of options with no distinctions made as to each option's pros and cons. Students need guidance in discerning correct…

  3. The Paperless Music Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giebelhausen, Robin

    2016-01-01

    In an age where the world is becoming ever more aware of paper consumption, educators are turning toward technology to cut back on paper waste. Besides the environmental reasons, a paperless music classroom helps students develop their musicianship in new and exciting ways. This article will look at the considerations for setting up a paperless…

  4. Wind speed reductions by large-scale wind turbine deployments lower turbine efficiencies and set low generation limits

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Lee M.; Kleidon, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Wind turbines generate electricity by removing kinetic energy from the atmosphere. Large numbers of wind turbines are likely to reduce wind speeds, which lowers estimates of electricity generation from what would be presumed from unaffected conditions. Here, we test how well wind power limits that account for this effect can be estimated without explicitly simulating atmospheric dynamics. We first use simulations with an atmospheric general circulation model (GCM) that explicitly simulates the effects of wind turbines to derive wind power limits (GCM estimate), and compare them to a simple approach derived from the climatological conditions without turbines [vertical kinetic energy (VKE) estimate]. On land, we find strong agreement between the VKE and GCM estimates with respect to electricity generation rates (0.32 and 0.37 We m−2) and wind speed reductions by 42 and 44%. Over ocean, the GCM estimate is about twice the VKE estimate (0.59 and 0.29 We m−2) and yet with comparable wind speed reductions (50 and 42%). We then show that this bias can be corrected by modifying the downward momentum flux to the surface. Thus, large-scale limits to wind power use can be derived from climatological conditions without explicitly simulating atmospheric dynamics. Consistent with the GCM simulations, the approach estimates that only comparatively few land areas are suitable to generate more than 1 We m−2 of electricity and that larger deployment scales are likely to reduce the expected electricity generation rate of each turbine. We conclude that these atmospheric effects are relevant for planning the future expansion of wind power. PMID:27849587

  5. Wind speed reductions by large-scale wind turbine deployments lower turbine efficiencies and set low generation limits.

    PubMed

    Miller, Lee M; Kleidon, Axel

    2016-11-29

    Wind turbines generate electricity by removing kinetic energy from the atmosphere. Large numbers of wind turbines are likely to reduce wind speeds, which lowers estimates of electricity generation from what would be presumed from unaffected conditions. Here, we test how well wind power limits that account for this effect can be estimated without explicitly simulating atmospheric dynamics. We first use simulations with an atmospheric general circulation model (GCM) that explicitly simulates the effects of wind turbines to derive wind power limits (GCM estimate), and compare them to a simple approach derived from the climatological conditions without turbines [vertical kinetic energy (VKE) estimate]. On land, we find strong agreement between the VKE and GCM estimates with respect to electricity generation rates (0.32 and 0.37 We m(-2)) and wind speed reductions by 42 and 44%. Over ocean, the GCM estimate is about twice the VKE estimate (0.59 and 0.29 We m(-2)) and yet with comparable wind speed reductions (50 and 42%). We then show that this bias can be corrected by modifying the downward momentum flux to the surface. Thus, large-scale limits to wind power use can be derived from climatological conditions without explicitly simulating atmospheric dynamics. Consistent with the GCM simulations, the approach estimates that only comparatively few land areas are suitable to generate more than 1 We m(-2) of electricity and that larger deployment scales are likely to reduce the expected electricity generation rate of each turbine. We conclude that these atmospheric effects are relevant for planning the future expansion of wind power.

  6. Large reptiles and cold temperatures: Do extreme cold spells set distributional limits for tropical reptiles in Florida?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mazzotti, Frank J.; Cherkiss, Michael S.; Parry, Mark; Beauchamp, Jeff; Rochford, Mike; Smith, Brian J.; Hart, Kristen M.; Brandt, Laura A.

    2016-01-01

    Distributional limits of many tropical species in Florida are ultimately determined by tolerance to low temperature. An unprecedented cold spell during 2–11 January 2010, in South Florida provided an opportunity to compare the responses of tropical American crocodiles with warm-temperate American alligators and to compare the responses of nonnative Burmese pythons with native warm-temperate snakes exposed to prolonged cold temperatures. After the January 2010 cold spell, a record number of American crocodiles (n = 151) and Burmese pythons (n = 36) were found dead. In contrast, no American alligators and no native snakes were found dead. American alligators and American crocodiles behaved differently during the cold spell. American alligators stopped basking and retreated to warmer water. American crocodiles apparently continued to bask during extreme cold temperatures resulting in lethal body temperatures. The mortality of Burmese pythons compared to the absence of mortality for native snakes suggests that the current population of Burmese pythons in the Everglades is less tolerant of cold temperatures than native snakes. Burmese pythons introduced from other parts of their native range may be more tolerant of cold temperatures. We documented the direct effects of cold temperatures on crocodiles and pythons; however, evidence of long-term effects of cold temperature on their populations within their established ranges remains lacking. Mortality of crocodiles and pythons outside of their current established range may be more important in setting distributional limits.

  7. Organizational development trajectory of a large academic radiotherapy department set up similarly to a prospective clinical trial: the MAASTRO experience

    PubMed Central

    Boersma, L; Dekker, A; Hermanns, E; Houben, R; Govers, M; van Merode, F; Lambin, P

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To simultaneously improve patient care processes and clinical research activities by starting a hypothesis-driven reorganization trajectory mimicking the rigorous methodology of a prospective clinical trial. Methods: The design of this reorganization trajectory was based on the model of a prospective trial. It consisted of (1) listing problems and analysing their potential causes, (2) defining interventions, (3) defining end points and (4) measuring the effect of the interventions (i.e. at baseline and after 1 and 2 years). The primary end point for patient care was the number of organizational root causes of incidents/near incidents; for clinical research, it was the number of patients in trials. There were several secondary end points. We analysed the data using two sample z-tests, χ2 test, a Mann–Whitney U test and the one-way analysis of variance with Bonferroni correction. Results: The number of organizational root causes was reduced by 27% (p < 0.001). There was no effect on the percentage of patients included in trials. Conclusion: The reorganizational trajectory was successful for the primary end point of patient care and had no effect on clinical research. Some confounding events hampered our ability to draw strong conclusions. Nevertheless, the transparency of this approach can give medical professionals more confidence in moving forward with other organizational changes in the same way. Advances in knowledge: This article is novel because managerial interventions were set up similarly to a prospective clinical trial. This study is the first of its kind in radiotherapy, and this approach can contribute to discussions about the effectiveness of managerial interventions. PMID:25679320

  8. Large Density-Functional and Basis-Set Effects for the DMSO Reductase Catalyzed Oxo-Transfer Reaction.

    PubMed

    Li, Ji-Lai; Mata, Ricardo A; Ryde, Ulf

    2013-03-12

    The oxygen-atom transfer reaction catalyzed by the mononuclear molybdenum enzyme dimethyl sulfoxide reductase (DMSOR) has attracted considerable attention through both experimental and theoretical studies. We show here that this reaction is more sensitive to details of quantum mechanical calculations than what has previously been appreciated. Basis sets of at least triple-ζ quality are needed to obtain qualitatively correct results. Dispersion has an appreciable effect on the reaction, in particular the binding of the substrate or the dissociation of the product (up to 34 kJ/mol). Polar and nonpolar solvation effects are also significant, especially if the enzyme can avoid cavitation effects by using a preformed active-site cavity. Relativistic effects are considerable (up to 22 kJ/mol), but they are reasonably well treated by a relativistic effective core potential. Various density-functional methods give widely different results for the activation and reaction energy (differences of over 100 kJ/mol), mainly reflecting the amount of exact exchange in the functional, owing to the oxidation of Mo from +IV to +VI. By calibration toward local CCSD(T0) calculations, we show that none of eight tested functionals (TPSS, BP86, BLYP, B97-D, TPSSH, B3LYP, PBE0, and BHLYP) give accurate energies for all states in the reaction. Instead, B3LYP gives the best activation barrier, whereas pure functionals give more accurate energies for the other states. Our best results indicate that the enzyme follows a two-step associative reaction mechanism with an overall activation enthalpy of 63 kJ/mol, which is in excellent agreement with the experimental results.

  9. Application of a statistical software package for analysis of large patient dose data sets obtained from RIS.

    PubMed

    Fazakerley, J; Charnock, P; Wilde, R; Jones, R; Ward, M

    2010-01-01

    For the purpose of patient dose audit, clinical audit and radiology workload analysis, data from Radiology Information Systems (RIS) at many hospitals are collected using a database and the analysis was automated using a statistical package and Visual Basic coding. The database is a Structured Query Language database, which can be queried using an off-the-shelf statistical package, Statistica. Macros were created to automatically format the data to a consistent format between different hospitals ready for analysis. These macros can also be used to automate further analysis such as detailing mean kV, mAs and entrance surface dose per room and per gender. Standard deviation and standard error of the mean are also generated. Graphs can also be generated to illustrate the trends in doses between different variables such as room and gender. Collectively, this information can be used to generate a report. A process that once could take up to 1 d to complete now takes around 1 h. A major benefit in providing the service to hospital trusts is that less resource is now required to report on RIS data, making the possibility of continuous dose audit more likely. Time that was spent on sorting through data can now be spent on improving the analysis to provide benefit to the customer. Using data sets from RIS is a good way to perform dose audits as the huge numbers of data available provide the bases for very accurate analysis. Using macros written in Statistica Visual Basic has helped sort and consistently analyse these data. Being able to analyse by exposure factors has provided a more detailed report to the customer.

  10. Classroom Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology & Learning, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Good organization skills are key to running an efficient classroom, and having the right tools makes it easier to manage all of the tasks, save time, and be more productive. Having the power of information when and where anyone need it makes a difference in how well any teacher runs the classroom and knows his or her students. A Palm handheld…

  11. Outdoor Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayes, Valynda

    2010-01-01

    An outdoor classroom is the ideal vehicle for community involvement: Parents, native plant societies, 4-H, garden clubs, and master naturalists are all resources waiting to be tapped, as are local businesses offering support. If you enlist your community in the development and maintenance of your outdoor classroom, the entire community will…

  12. Moving toward an Empowering Setting in a First Grade Classroom Serving Primarily Working Class and Working Poor Latina/o Children: An Exploratory Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Janelle M.; Langhout, Regina Day

    2016-01-01

    Empowering settings are important places for people to develop leadership skills in order to enact social change. Yet, due to socio-cultural constructions of childhood in the US, especially constructions around working class and working poor children of Color, they are often not seen as capable or competent change agents, or in need of being in…

  13. The Effects of Positive Verbal Reinforcement on the Time Spent outside the Classroom for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders in a Residential Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Christina; Jolivette, Kristine

    2008-01-01

    To more effectively instruct the entire class, teachers of students with emotional behavioral disorders (EBD) often choose to send students who display inappropriate behavior out of the room. A multiple baseline across settings was used to evaluate the effects of increasing teacher positive verbal reinforcement on the amount of time 2 students…

  14. "Did Ronald McDonald also Tend to Scare You as a Child?": Working to Emplace Consumption, Commodities and Citizen-Students in a Large Classroom Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Michael K.

    2008-01-01

    So-called "radical" and "critical"pedagogy seems to be everywhere these days on the landscapes of geographical teaching praxis and theory. Part of the remit of radical/critical pedagogy involves a de-centring of the traditional "banking" method of pedagogical praxis. Yet, how do we challenge this "banking" model of knowledge transmission in both a…

  15. The effect of between-set rest intervals on the oxygen uptake during and after resistance exercise sessions performed with large- and small-muscle mass.

    PubMed

    Farinatti, Paulo T V; Castinheiras Neto, Antonio G

    2011-11-01

    Between-set rest intervals (RIs) may influence accumulated fatigue, work volume, and therefore oxygen uptake (VO2) and energy expenditure (EE) during resistance training. The study investigated the effects of different RIs on VO2 and EE in resistance exercises performed with multiple sets and recruiting large and small-muscle mass. Ten healthy men performed 4 randomized protocols (5 sets of 10 repetitions with 15 repetition maximum workloads in either horizontal leg press [LP] or chest fly [CF] with an RI of 1 and 3 minutes). The VO2 was measured at rest, within sets, and during 90-minute postexercise recovery (excess postexercise oxygen consumption [EPOC]). The EE was estimated from VO2net (total VO2 - rest VO2). The VO2 increased in all protocols, being higher within the exercises and during EPOC in the LP than in the CF regardless of the RI. The 1-minute RI induced higher accumulated VO2 during LP (p < 0.05) but not during CF. The EPOC lasted approximately 40 minutes after LP1, LP3, and CF1, being longer than after CF3 (20 minutes, p < 0.05). Total EE was mainly influenced by muscle mass (p < 0.001) (LP3 = 91.1 ± 13.5 kcal ∼ LP1 = 88.7 ± 18.4 kcal > CF1 = 50.3 ± 14.4 kcal ∼ CF3 = 54.1 ± 12.0 kcal). In conclusion, total VO2 was always higher in LP than in CF. Shortening RI enhanced the accumulated fatigue throughout sets only in LP and increased VO2 in the initial few minutes of EPOC, whereas it did not influence total VO2 and EE in both exercises. Therefore, (a) the role of RI in preventing early fatigue seems to be more important when large-muscle groups are recruited; (b) resistance exercises recruiting large-muscle mass induce higher EE because of a greater EPOC magnitude.

  16. Reaching record-low β* at the CERN Large Hadron Collider using a novel scheme of collimator settings and optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, R.; Bracco, C.; De Maria, R.; Giovannozzi, M.; Mereghetti, A.; Mirarchi, D.; Redaelli, S.; Quaranta, E.; Salvachua, B.

    2017-03-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is built to collide intense proton beams with an unprecedented energy of 7 TeV. The design stored energy per beam of 362 MJ makes the LHC beams highly destructive, so that any beam losses risk to cause quenches of superconducting magnets or damage to accelerator components. Collimators are installed to protect the machine and they define a minimum normalized aperture, below which no other element is allowed. This imposes a limit on the achievable luminosity, since when squeezing β* (the β-function at the collision point) to smaller values for increased luminosity, the β-function in the final focusing system increases. This leads to a smaller normalized aperture that risks to go below the allowed collimation aperture. In the first run of the LHC, this was the main limitation on β*, which was constrained to values above the design specification. In this article, we show through theoretical and experimental studies how tighter collimator openings and a new optics with specific phase-advance constraints allows a β* as small as 40 cm, a factor 2 smaller than β*=80 cm used in 2015 and significantly below the design value β*=55 cm, in spite of a lower beam energy. The proposed configuration with β*=40 cm has been successfully put into operation and has been used throughout 2016 as the LHC baseline. The decrease in β* compared to 2015 has been an essential contribution to reaching and surpassing, in 2016, the LHC design luminosity for the first time, and to accumulating a record-high integrated luminosity of around 40 fb-1 in one year, in spite of using less bunches than in the design.

  17. SU-E-I-58: Experiences in Setting Up An Online Fluoroscopy Tracking System in a Large Healthcare System

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, R; Wunderle, K; Lingenfelter, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Transitioning from a paper based to an online system for tracking fluoroscopic case information required by state regulation and to conform to NCRP patient dose tracking suggestions. Methods: State regulations require documentation of operator, equipment, and some metric of tube output for fluoroscopy exams. This information was previously collected in paper logs, which was cumbersome and inefficient for the large number of fluoroscopic units across multiple locations within the system. The “tech notes” feature within Siemens’ Syngo workflow RIS was utilized to create an entry form for technologists to input case information, which was sent to a third party vendor for archiving and display though an online web based portal. Results: Over 55k cases were logged in the first year of implementation, with approximately 6,500 cases per month once fully online. A system was built for area managers to oversee and correct data, which has increased the accuracy of inputted values. A high-dose report was built to automatically send notifications when patients exceed trigger levels. In addition to meeting regulatory requirements, the new system allows for larger scale QC in fluoroscopic cases by allowing comparison of data from specific procedures, locations, equipment, and operators so that instances that fall outside of reference levels can be identified for further evaluation. The system has also drastically improved identification of operators without documented equipment specific training. Conclusion: The transition to online fluoroscopy logs has improved efficiency in meeting state regulatory requirements as well as allowed for identification of particular procedures, equipment, and operators in need of additional attention in order to optimize patient and personnel doses, while high dose alerts improve patient care and follow up. Future efforts are focused on incorporating case information from outside of radiology, as well as on automating processes for

  18. The trajectory of the blood DNA methylome ageing rate is largely set before adulthood: evidence from two longitudinal studies.

    PubMed

    Kananen, L; Marttila, S; Nevalainen, T; Kummola, L; Junttila, I; Mononen, N; Kähönen, M; Raitakari, O T; Hervonen, A; Jylhä, M; Lehtimäki, T; Hurme, M; Jylhävä, J

    2016-06-01

    The epigenetic clock, defined as the DNA methylome age (DNAmAge), is a candidate biomarker of ageing. In this study, we aimed to characterize the behaviour of this marker during the human lifespan in more detail using two follow-up cohorts (the Young Finns study, calendar age i.e. cAge range at baseline 15-24 years, 25-year-follow-up, N = 183; The Vitality 90+ study, cAge range at baseline 19-90 years, 4-year-follow-up, N = 48). We also aimed to assess the relationship between DNAmAge estimate and the blood cell distributions, as both of these measures are known to change as a function of age. The subjects' DNAmAges were determined using Horvath's calculator of epigenetic cAge. The estimate of the DNA methylome age acceleration (Δ-cAge-DNAmAge) demonstrated remarkable stability in both cohorts: the individual rank orders of the DNAmAges remained largely unchanged during the follow-ups. The blood cell distributions also demonstrated significant intra-individual correlation between the baseline and follow-up time points. Interestingly, the immunosenescence-associated features (CD8+CD28- and CD4+CD28- cell proportions and the CD4/CD8 cell ratio) were tightly associated with the estimate of the DNA methylome age. In summary, our data demonstrate that the general level of Δ-cAge-DNAmAge is fixed before adulthood and appears to be quite stationary thereafter, even in the oldest-old ages. Moreover, the blood DNAmAge estimate seems to be tightly associated with ageing-associated shifts in blood cell composition, especially with those that are the hallmarks of immunosenescence. Overall, these observations contribute to the understanding of the longitudinal aspects of the DNAmAge estimate.

  19. HLA-B37 and HLA-A2.1 molecules bind largely nonoverlapping sets of peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Carreno, B M; Anderson, R W; Coligan, J E; Biddison, W E

    1990-01-01

    T-cell recognition of peptides that are bound and presented by class I major histocompatibility complex molecules is highly specific. At present it is unclear what role class I peptide binding plays relative to T-cell receptor specificity in determination of immune recognition. A previous study from our group demonstrated that the HLA-A2.1 molecule could bind to 25% of the members of a panel of unrelated synthetic peptides as assessed by a functional peptide competition assay. To determine the peptide-binding specificity of another HLA class I molecule, we have examined the capacity of this panel of peptides to compete for the presentation of influenza virus nucleoprotein peptide NP-(335-350) by HLA-B37 to NP-peptide-specific HLA-B37-restricted cytotoxic T-lymphocyte lines. Forty-two percent of peptides tested were capable of inhibiting NP-(335-350) presentation by HLA-B37. Remarkably, none of these HLA-B37-binding peptides belong to the subset that was previously shown to bind to the HLA-A2.1 molecule. Only the NP-(335-350) peptide was capable of binding to both HLA-A2.1 and HLA-B37. These findings demonstrate that the peptide-binding specificities of HLA-B37 and HLA-A2.1 are largely nonoverlapping and suggest that, from the universe of peptides, individual HLA class I molecules can bind to clearly distinct subsets of these peptides. PMID:2333291

  20. SymDex: increasing the efficiency of chemical fingerprint similarity searches for comparing large chemical libraries by using query set indexing.

    PubMed

    Tai, David; Fang, Jianwen

    2012-08-27

    The large sizes of today's chemical databases require efficient algorithms to perform similarity searches. It can be very time consuming to compare two large chemical databases. This paper seeks to build upon existing research efforts by describing a novel strategy for accelerating existing search algorithms for comparing large chemical collections. The quest for efficiency has focused on developing better indexing algorithms by creating heuristics for searching individual chemical against a chemical library by detecting and eliminating needless similarity calculations. For comparing two chemical collections, these algorithms simply execute searches for each chemical in the query set sequentially. The strategy presented in this paper achieves a speedup upon these algorithms by indexing the set of all query chemicals so redundant calculations that arise in the case of sequential searches are eliminated. We implement this novel algorithm by developing a similarity search program called Symmetric inDexing or SymDex. SymDex shows over a 232% maximum speedup compared to the state-of-the-art single query search algorithm over real data for various fingerprint lengths. Considerable speedup is even seen for batch searches where query set sizes are relatively small compared to typical database sizes. To the best of our knowledge, SymDex is the first search algorithm designed specifically for comparing chemical libraries. It can be adapted to most, if not all, existing indexing algorithms and shows potential for accelerating future similarity search algorithms for comparing chemical databases.

  1. More to Astronomical Images than Meets the Eye: Data Dimension Reduction for Efficient Data Organization, Retrieval and Advanced Visualization and Analysis of Large Multitemporal/Multispectral Data Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesenson, Meyer; Pesenson, I.; Carey, S.; Roby, W.; McCollum, B.; Ingalls, J.; Ardila, D.; Teplitz, H.

    2009-01-01

    Effective analysis of large multispectral and multitemporal data sets demands new ways of data representation. We present applications of standard and original methods of data dimension reduction to astrophysical images (finding significant low-dimensional structures concealed in high-dimensional data). Such methods are widely used already outside of astronomy to effectively analyze large data sets. Data dimension reduction facilitates data organization, retrieval, and analysis (by improving statistical inference), which are crucial to multiwavelength astronomy, archival research, large-scale digital sky surveys and temporal astronomy. These methods allow a user to reduce a large number of FITS images, e.g. each representing a different wavelength, into a few images retaining more than 95% of the original visual information. An immediate simple application of this would be creating a multiwavelength "quick-look" image that includes all essential information in a statistically justified way, and thus is much more accurate than a "quick-look" made by simple coadding with an ad hoc, heuristic weighting. The dimensionally-reduced image is also naturally much smaller in file size in bytes than the total summed size of the non-dimensionally-reduced images. Thus dimensionally-reduced images offer an enormous savings in storage space and database-transmission bandwidth for the user. An analogous process of dimension reduction is possible for a large set of images obtained at the same wavelength but at different times (e.g. LSST images). Other applications of data dimension reduction include, but are not limited to, decorrelating data elements, removing noise, artifact separation, feature extraction, clustering and pattern classification in astronomical images. We demonstrate applications of the algorithms to test cases of current space-based IR data from the Spitzer Space Telescope.

  2. Eruptive history and tectonic setting of Medicine Lake Volcano, a large rear-arc volcano in the southern Cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Grove, Timothy L.; Lanphere, Marvin A.; Champion, Duane E.; Ramsey, David W.

    2008-10-01

    Medicine Lake Volcano (MLV), located in the southern Cascades ˜ 55 km east-northeast of contemporaneous Mount Shasta, has been found by exploratory geothermal drilling to have a surprisingly silicic core mantled by mafic lavas. This unexpected result is very different from the long-held view derived from previous mapping of exposed geology that MLV is a dominantly basaltic shield volcano. Detailed mapping shows that < 6% of the ˜ 2000 km 2 of mapped MLV lavas on this southern Cascade Range shield-shaped edifice are rhyolitic and dacitic, but drill holes on the edifice penetrated more than 30% silicic lava. Argon dating yields ages in the range ˜ 475 to 300 ka for early rhyolites. Dates on the stratigraphically lowest mafic lavas at MLV fall into this time frame as well, indicating that volcanism at MLV began about half a million years ago. Mafic compositions apparently did not dominate until ˜ 300 ka. Rhyolite eruptions were scarce post-300 ka until late Holocene time. However, a dacite episode at ˜ 200 to ˜ 180 ka included the volcano's only ash-flow tuff, which was erupted from within the summit caldera. At ˜ 100 ka, compositionally distinctive high-Na andesite and minor dacite built most of the present caldera rim. Eruption of these lavas was followed soon after by several large basalt flows, such that the combined area covered by eruptions between 100 ka and postglacial time amounts to nearly two-thirds of the volcano's area. Postglacial eruptive activity was strongly episodic and also covered a disproportionate amount of area. The volcano has erupted 9 times in the past 5200 years, one of the highest rates of late Holocene eruptive activity in the Cascades. Estimated volume of MLV is ˜ 600 km 3, giving an overall effusion rate of ˜ 1.2 km 3 per thousand years, although the rate for the past 100 kyr may be only half that. During much of the volcano's history, both dry HAOT (high-alumina olivine tholeiite) and hydrous calcalkaline basalts erupted

  3. Eruptive history and tectonic setting of Medicine Lake Volcano, a large rear-arc volcano in the southern Cascades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Grove, T.L.; Lanphere, M.A.; Champion, D.E.; Ramsey, D.W.

    2008-01-01

    Medicine Lake Volcano (MLV), located in the southern Cascades ??? 55??km east-northeast of contemporaneous Mount Shasta, has been found by exploratory geothermal drilling to have a surprisingly silicic core mantled by mafic lavas. This unexpected result is very different from the long-held view derived from previous mapping of exposed geology that MLV is a dominantly basaltic shield volcano. Detailed mapping shows that < 6% of the ??? 2000??km2 of mapped MLV lavas on this southern Cascade Range shield-shaped edifice are rhyolitic and dacitic, but drill holes on the edifice penetrated more than 30% silicic lava. Argon dating yields ages in the range ??? 475 to 300??ka for early rhyolites. Dates on the stratigraphically lowest mafic lavas at MLV fall into this time frame as well, indicating that volcanism at MLV began about half a million years ago. Mafic compositions apparently did not dominate until ??? 300??ka. Rhyolite eruptions were scarce post-300??ka until late Holocene time. However, a dacite episode at ??? 200 to ??? 180??ka included the volcano's only ash-flow tuff, which was erupted from within the summit caldera. At ??? 100??ka, compositionally distinctive high-Na andesite and minor dacite built most of the present caldera rim. Eruption of these lavas was followed soon after by several large basalt flows, such that the combined area covered by eruptions between 100??ka and postglacial time amounts to nearly two-thirds of the volcano's area. Postglacial eruptive activity was strongly episodic and also covered a disproportionate amount of area. The volcano has erupted 9 times in the past 5200??years, one of the highest rates of late Holocene eruptive activity in the Cascades. Estimated volume of MLV is ??? 600??km3, giving an overall effusion rate of ??? 1.2??km3 per thousand years, although the rate for the past 100??kyr may be only half that. During much of the volcano's history, both dry HAOT (high-alumina olivine tholeiite) and hydrous calcalkaline

  4. Computers in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merton, Andrew

    1983-01-01

    Major computer manufacturers are donating microcomputers to school systems. Discusses whether or not these computers in the classroom will help spur a "back to basics" movement or prove to be an expensive and largely tangential sideshow. Considers software, software evaluation, skill transfer, and other topics. (JN)

  5. Flexible Classroom Furniture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim Hassell,

    2011-01-01

    Classroom design for the 21st-century learning environment should accommodate a variety of learning skills and needs. The space should be large enough so it can be configured to accommodate a number of learning activities. This also includes furniture that provides flexibility and accommodates collaboration and interactive work among students and…

  6. Tips from the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TESOL Journal, 1993

    1993-01-01

    Four short articles are combined: "Adding Discourse-Level Practice to Sentence-Level Exercises" (Eric S. Nelson); "Presenting Picture Books in the ESL Classroom" (Lijun Shen); "Role Playing in a Large Class" (Ellen Rosen); and "Calvin and Hobbes and Other Icons of Americana" (Daniel J. Conrad). (Contains seven references.) (LB)

  7. Best Friend Networks of Children across Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Glen E.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Investigated children's classroom sociometry and size of their best-friend networks. For both classroom and playground settings, popular children had the most reciprocal best friends, while rejected children had the fewest, but had more on the playground than in the classroom. Results suggest that constraints and opportunities of different…

  8. Learning to Stand: The Acceptability and Feasibility of Introducing Standing Desks into College Classrooms

    PubMed Central

    Benzo, Roberto M.; Gremaud, Allene L.; Jerome, Matthew; Carr, Lucas J.

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged sedentary behavior is an independent risk factor for multiple negative health outcomes. Evidence supports introducing standing desks into K-12 classrooms and work settings to reduce sitting time, but no studies have been conducted in the college classroom environment. The present study explored the acceptability and feasibility of introducing standing desks in college classrooms. A total of 993 students and 149 instructors completed a single online needs assessment survey. This cross-sectional study was conducted during the fall semester of 2015 at a large Midwestern University. The large majority of students (95%) reported they would prefer the option to stand in class. Most students (82.7%) reported they currently sit during their entire class time. Most students (76.6%) and instructors (86.6%) reported being in favor of introducing standing desks into college classrooms. More than half of students and instructors predicted having access to standing desks in class would improve student’s “physical health”, “attention”, and “restlessness”. Collectively, these findings support the acceptability of introducing standing desks in college classrooms. Future research is needed to test the feasibility, cost-effectiveness and efficacy of introducing standing desks in college classrooms. Such studies would be useful for informing institutional policies regarding classroom designs. PMID:27537901

  9. Strategy Training in a Task-Based Language Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Chun; Lin, Xiaolin

    2015-01-01

    Recent literature that examines the implementation of task-based language teaching (TBLT) in classroom settings has reported various challenges related to educational cultures, classroom management, teacher cognition and learner perceptions. To facilitate the smooth transition of TBLT from laboratory settings to classroom contexts, measures need…

  10. News Teaching: The epiSTEMe project: KS3 maths and science improvement Field trip: Pupils learn physics in a stately home Conference: ShowPhysics welcomes fun in Europe Student numbers: Physics numbers increase in UK Tournament: Physics tournament travels to Singapore Particle physics: Hadron Collider sets new record Astronomy: Take your classroom into space Forthcoming Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-05-01

    Teaching: The epiSTEMe project: KS3 maths and science improvement Field trip: Pupils learn physics in a stately home Conference: ShowPhysics welcomes fun in Europe Student numbers: Physics numbers increase in UK Tournament: Physics tournament travels to Singapore Particle physics: Hadron Collider sets new record Astronomy: Take your classroom into space Forthcoming Events

  11. Classroom Wildlife.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleer, Daryl

    1984-01-01

    A game is used to study population control factors on a wolf pack and to explore human competition with these animals. A game board and chance cards to be photocopied for use in the classroom are provided. (DH)

  12. Towards Perceptual Interface for Visualization Navigation of Large Data Sets Using Gesture Recognition with Bezier Curves and Registered 3-D Data

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, M C; Tsap, L V; Goldgof, D B

    2003-03-20

    This paper presents a gesture recognition system for visualization navigation. Scientists are interested in developing interactive settings for exploring large data sets in an intuitive environment. The input consists of registered 3-D data. A geometric method using Bezier curves is used for the trajectory analysis and classification of gestures. The hand gesture speed is incorporated into the algorithm to enable correct recognition from trajectories with variations in hand speed. The method is robust and reliable: correct hand identification rate is 99.9% (from 1641 frames), modes of hand movements are correct 95.6% of the time, recognition rate (given the right mode) is 97.9%. An application to gesture-controlled visualization of 3D bioinformatics data is also presented.

  13. Small Atomic Orbital Basis Set First‐Principles Quantum Chemical Methods for Large Molecular and Periodic Systems: A Critical Analysis of Error Sources

    PubMed Central

    Sure, Rebecca; Brandenburg, Jan Gerit

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In quantum chemical computations the combination of Hartree–Fock or a density functional theory (DFT) approximation with relatively small atomic orbital basis sets of double‐zeta quality is still widely used, for example, in the popular B3LYP/6‐31G* approach. In this Review, we critically analyze the two main sources of error in such computations, that is, the basis set superposition error on the one hand and the missing London dispersion interactions on the other. We review various strategies to correct those errors and present exemplary calculations on mainly noncovalently bound systems of widely varying size. Energies and geometries of small dimers, large supramolecular complexes, and molecular crystals are covered. We conclude that it is not justified to rely on fortunate error compensation, as the main inconsistencies can be cured by modern correction schemes which clearly outperform the plain mean‐field methods. PMID:27308221

  14. Small Atomic Orbital Basis Set First-Principles Quantum Chemical Methods for Large Molecular and Periodic Systems: A Critical Analysis of Error Sources.

    PubMed

    Sure, Rebecca; Brandenburg, Jan Gerit; Grimme, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    In quantum chemical computations the combination of Hartree-Fock or a density functional theory (DFT) approximation with relatively small atomic orbital basis sets of double-zeta quality is still widely used, for example, in the popular B3LYP/6-31G* approach. In this Review, we critically analyze the two main sources of error in such computations, that is, the basis set superposition error on the one hand and the missing London dispersion interactions on the other. We review various strategies to correct those errors and present exemplary calculations on mainly noncovalently bound systems of widely varying size. Energies and geometries of small dimers, large supramolecular complexes, and molecular crystals are covered. We conclude that it is not justified to rely on fortunate error compensation, as the main inconsistencies can be cured by modern correction schemes which clearly outperform the plain mean-field methods.

  15. A Model for the Social Aspects of Classroom Organization. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talavage, Joseph

    An initial effort is made to investigate social aspects of the classroom within a mathematical framework called general system theory. The objective of the study is to set the stage for a theory of social behavior in the large which, when verified, may be employed to guide computer simulations of detailed social situations. A model of a…

  16. Rethinking the Christian Studies Classroom: Reflections on the Dynamics of Teaching Religion in Southern Public Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gravett, Sandie; Hulsether, Mark; Medine, Carolyn

    2011-01-01

    An extended set of conversations conducted by three religious studies faculty teaching at large public universities in the Southern United States spurred these reflections on how their institutional locations inflected issues such as the cultural expectations students bring to the classroom, how these expectations interact with the evolving…

  17. DCMB that combines divide-and-conquer and mixed-basis set methods for accurate geometry optimizations, total energies, and vibrational frequencies of large molecules.

    PubMed

    Wu, Anan; Xu, Xin

    2012-06-15

    We present a method, named DCMB, for the calculations of large molecules. It is a combination of a parallel divide-and-conquer (DC) method and a mixed-basis (MB) set scheme. In this approach, atomic forces, total energy and vibrational frequencies are obtained from a series of MB calculations, which are derived from the target system utilizing the DC concept. Unlike the fragmentation based methods, all DCMB calculations are performed over the whole target system and no artificial caps are introduced so that it is particularly useful for charged and/or delocalized systems. By comparing the DCMB results with those from the conventional method, we demonstrate that DCMB is capable of providing accurate prediction of molecular geometries, total energies, and vibrational frequencies of molecules of general interest. We also demonstrate that the high efficiency of the parallel DCMB code holds the promise for a routine geometry optimization of large complex systems.

  18. Tectonic stress inversion of large multi-phase fracture data sets: application of Win-Tensor to reveal the brittle tectonic history of the Lufilan Arc, DRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delvaux, Damien; Kipata, Louis; Sintubin, Manuel

    2013-04-01

    Large fault-slip data sets from multiphase orogenic regions present a particular challenge in paleostress reconstructions. The Lufilian Arc is an arcuate fold-and-thrust belt that formed during the late Pan-African times as the result of combined N-S and E-W amalgamation of Gondwana in SE-DRCongo and N-Zambia. We studied more than 22 sites in the Lufilian Arc, and its foreland and correlated the results obtained with existing result in the Ubende belt of W-Tanzania. Most studied sites are characterized by multiphase brittle deformation in which the observed brittle structures are the result of progressive saturation of the host rock by neoformed fractures and the reactivation of early formed fractures. They correspond to large mining exploitations with multiple large and continuous outcrops that allow obtaining datasets sufficiently large to be of statistical significance and often corresponding to several successive brittle events. In this context, the reconstruction of tectonic stress necessitates an initial field-base separation of data, completed by a dynamic separation of the original data set into subsets. In the largest sites, several parts of the deposits have been measured independently and are considered as sub-sites that are be processed separately in an initial stage. The procedure used for interactive fault-slip data separation and stress inversion will be illustrated by field examples (Luiswishi and Manono mining sites). This principle has been applied to all result in the reconstruction of the brittle tectonic history of the region, starting with two major phases of orogenic compression, followed by late orogenic extension and extensional collapse. A regional tectonic inversion during the early Mesozoic, as a result of far- field stresses mark the transition towards rift-related extension. More details in Kipata, Delvaux et al.(2013), Geologica Belgica 16/1-2: 001-017 Win-Tensor can be downloaded at: http://users.skynet.be/damien.delvaux/Tensor/tensor-index.html

  19. Classroom Size & Number of Students Per Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner, C. Kenneth

    2001-01-01

    Discusses what size classrooms should be and what research is revealing on the concept of social distance and its influence on classroom size considerations. A standard classroom size chart is provided. (GR)

  20. Grafting computer projected simulations and interactive engagement methods within a traditional classroom setting: The influence on secondary level students' understanding of Newtonian mechanics and on attitudes towards physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoubeir, Wassim Fouad

    This research explored the effects of a constructivist approach using computer projected simulations (CPS) and interactive engagement (IE) methods on 12th grade school students. The treatment lasted 18 weeks during the 1999-2000 fall semester and seeked to evaluate three variations in students': (1)conceptual understanding of Newtonian mechanics as measured by the Force Concept Inventory (FCI), (2)modification of their views about science as measured by the Views About Science Survey (VASS), and (3)achievement on traditional examinations, as measured by their end of semester grades. Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA) was applied to determine the differences between the mean scores of the experimental group students, and students of the control group, who were exposed to traditional teaching methods only. The FCI data analysis showed that, after 18 weeks, conceptual understanding of Newtonian mechanics had markedly improved only in the experimental group (F(1,99) = 44.739, p < .001). By contrast, there was no statistically significant difference in students' performance on the VASS instrument for both groups (F(1,99) = .033, p = .856), confirming previous and comparable findings for studies of short implementation period. The lack of statistically significant difference between the control and experimental groups in graded achievement, while controlling for students' previous achievement, was unexpected (F(1,99) = 1.178, p = .280). It is suggested that in this particular setting, the influence of a technical factor may have been overlooked: the monitored and systematic drill exercises using elaborate math formulae to prepare students for traditional math-loaded exams. Still, despite being intentionally deprived of such preparation throughout the study, students of the experimental group did not achieve less than their counterpart, and in addition, they had gained a satisfactory understanding of Newtonian mechanics. This result points unmistakably at a plausible

  1. A geometrical correction for the inter- and intra-molecular basis set superposition error in Hartree-Fock and density functional theory calculations for large systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, Holger; Grimme, Stefan

    2012-04-01

    chemistry yields MAD=0.68 kcal/mol, which represents a huge improvement over plain B3LYP/6-31G* (MAD=2.3 kcal/mol). Application of gCP-corrected B97-D3 and HF-D3 on a set of large protein-ligand complexes prove the robustness of the method. Analytical gCP gradients make optimizations of large systems feasible with small basis sets, as demonstrated for the inter-ring distances of 9-helicene and most of the complexes in Hobza's S22 test set. The method is implemented in a freely available FORTRAN program obtainable from the author's website.

  2. Methodologic implications of social inequalities for analyzing health disparities in large spatiotemporal data sets: an example using breast cancer incidence data (Northern and Southern California, 1988--2002).

    PubMed

    Chen, Jarvis T; Coull, Brent A; Waterman, Pamela D; Schwartz, Joel; Krieger, Nancy

    2008-09-10

    Efforts to monitor, investigate, and ultimately eliminate health disparities across racial/ethnic and socioeconomic groups can benefit greatly from spatiotemporal models that enable exploration of spatial and temporal variation in health. Hierarchical Bayes methods are well-established tools in the statistical literature for fitting such models, as they permit smoothing of unstable small-area rates. However, issues presented by 'real-life' surveillance data can be a barrier to routine use of these models by epidemiologists. These include (1) shifting of regional boundaries over time, (2) social inequalities in racial/ethnic residential segregation, which imply differential spatial structuring across different racial/ethnic groups, and (3) heavy computational burdens for large spatiotemporal data sets. Using data from a study of changing socioeconomic gradients in female breast cancer incidence in two population-based cancer registries covering the San Francisco Bay Area and Los Angeles County, CA (1988--2002), we illustrate a two-stage approach to modeling health disparities and census tract (CT) variation in incidence over time. In the first stage, we fit race- and year-specific spatial models using CT boundaries normalized to the U.S. Census 2000. In stage 2, temporal patterns in the race- and year-specific estimates of racial/ethnic and socioeconomic effects are explored using a variety of methods. Our approach provides a straightforward means of fitting spatiotemporal models in large data sets, while highlighting differences in spatial patterning across racial/ethnic population and across time.

  3. River Modeling in Large and Ungauged Basins: Experience of Setting up the HEC RAS Model over the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, F.; Maswood, M.

    2014-12-01

    River modeling is the processing of setting up a physically-based hydrodynamic model that can simulate the water flow dynamics of a stream network against time varying boundary conditions. Such river models are an important component of any flood forecasting system that forecasts river levels in flood prone regions. However, many large river basins in the developing world such as the Ganges, Brahmaputra, Meghna (GBM), Indus, Irrawaddy, Salween, Mekong and Niger are mostly ungauged. Such large basins lack the necessary in-situ measurements of river bed depth/slope, bathymetry (river cross section), floodplain mapping and boundary condition flows for forcing a river model. For such basins, proxy approaches relying mostly on remote sensing data from space platforms are the only alternative. In this study, we share our experience of setting up the widely-used 1-D river model over the entire GBM basin and its stream network. Good quality in-situ measurements of river hydraulics (cross section, slope, flow) was available only for the downstream and flood prone region of the basin, which comprises only 7% of the basin area. For the remaining 93% of the basin area, we resorted to the use of data from the following satellite sensors to build a workable river model: a) Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) for deriving bed slope; b) LANDSAT/MODIS for updating river network and flow direction generated by elevation data; c) radar altimetry data to build depth versus width relationship at river locations; d) satellite precipitation based hydrologic modeling of lateral flows into main stem rivers. In addition, we referred to an extensive body of literature to estimate the prevailing baseline hydraulics of rivers in the ungauged region. We measured success of our approach by systematically testing how well the basin-wide river model could simulate river level dynamics at two measured locations inside Bangladesh. Our experience of river modeling was replete with numerous

  4. Design Office within the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Kumari

    1980-01-01

    To help architectural students adapt to the realities of the work environment, Gerard Campbell of Holland College has set up his classroom as a design office. Working as a team, the students prepare a complete set of working drawings and construction documents, simulating an actual design process. (JOW)

  5. Functional Network Construction in Arabidopsis Using Rule-Based Machine Learning on Large-Scale Data Sets[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Bassel, George W.; Glaab, Enrico; Marquez, Julietta; Holdsworth, Michael J.; Bacardit, Jaume

    2011-01-01

    The meta-analysis of large-scale postgenomics data sets within public databases promises to provide important novel biological knowledge. Statistical approaches including correlation analyses in coexpression studies of gene expression have emerged as tools to elucidate gene function using these data sets. Here, we present a powerful and novel alternative methodology to computationally identify functional relationships between genes from microarray data sets using rule-based machine learning. This approach, termed “coprediction,” is based on the collective ability of groups of genes co-occurring within rules to accurately predict the developmental outcome of a biological system. We demonstrate the utility of coprediction as a powerful analytical tool using publicly available microarray data generated exclusively from Arabidopsis thaliana seeds to compute a functional gene interaction network, termed Seed Co-Prediction Network (SCoPNet). SCoPNet predicts functional associations between genes acting in the same developmental and signal transduction pathways irrespective of the similarity in their respective gene expression patterns. Using SCoPNet, we identified four novel regulators of seed germination (ALTERED SEED GERMINATION5, 6, 7, and 8), and predicted interactions at the level of transcript abundance between these novel and previously described factors influencing Arabidopsis seed germination. An online Web tool to query SCoPNet has been developed as a community resource to dissect seed biology and is available at http://www.vseed.nottingham.ac.uk/. PMID:21896882

  6. Using a Conference Workshop Setting to Engage Mathematics Teachers in Culturally Relevant Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmons-Brown, Stephanie; Warner, Catharine

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the authors explore using a conference workshop setting to engage mathematics teachers, who serve largely underserved student populations, in culturally relevant pedagogy (CRP). The conference workshop encouraged the exchange of information among teachers of similar grade levels and classroom contexts. The authors' analysis of the…

  7. PairMotifChIP: A Fast Algorithm for Discovery of Patterns Conserved in Large ChIP-seq Data Sets

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Hongwei; Feng, Dazheng

    2016-01-01

    Identifying conserved patterns in DNA sequences, namely, motif discovery, is an important and challenging computational task. With hundreds or more sequences contained, the high-throughput sequencing data set is helpful to improve the identification accuracy of motif discovery but requires an even higher computing performance. To efficiently identify motifs in large DNA data sets, a new algorithm called PairMotifChIP is proposed by extracting and combining pairs of l-mers in the input with relatively small Hamming distance. In particular, a method for rapidly extracting pairs of l-mers is designed, which can be used not only for PairMotifChIP, but also for other DNA data mining tasks with the same demand. Experimental results on the simulated data show that the proposed algorithm can find motifs successfully and runs faster than the state-of-the-art motif discovery algorithms. Furthermore, the validity of the proposed algorithm has been verified on real data. PMID:27843946

  8. Pivotal Response Teaching in the Classroom Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stahmer, Aubyn C.; Suhrheinrich, Jessica; Reed, Sarah; Bolduc, Cynthia; Schreibman, Laura

    2010-01-01

    Pivotal response teaching (PRT) is an empirically supported naturalistic behavioral intervention proven to be efficacious in the education of children with autism. This intervention involves loosely structured learning environments, teaching during ongoing interactions between student and teacher, child initiation of teaching episodes, child…

  9. Resistance to disruption in a classroom setting.

    PubMed

    Parry-Cruwys, Diana E; Neal, Carrie M; Ahearn, William H; Wheeler, Emily E; Premchander, Raseeka; Loeb, Melissa B; Dube, William V

    2011-01-01

    Substantial experimental evidence indicates that behavior reinforced on a denser schedule is more resistant to disruption than is behavior reinforced on a thinner schedule. The present experiment studied resistance to disruption in a natural educational environment. Responding during familiar activities was reinforced on a multiple variable-interval (VI) 7-s VI 30-s schedule for 6 participants with developmental disabilities. Resistance to disruption was measured by presenting a distracting item. Response rates in the disruption components were compared to within-session response rates in prior baseline components. Results were consistent with the predictions of behavioral momentum theory for 5 of 6 participants.

  10. Resistance to Disruption in a Classroom Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parry-Cruwys, Diana E.; Neal, Carrie M.; Ahearn, William H.; Wheeler, Emily E.; Premchander, Raseeka; Loeb, Melissa B.; Dube, William V.

    2011-01-01

    Substantial experimental evidence indicates that behavior reinforced on a denser schedule is more resistant to disruption than is behavior reinforced on a thinner schedule. The present experiment studied resistance to disruption in a natural educational environment. Responding during familiar activities was reinforced on a multiple…

  11. Classroom Tech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructor, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This article features the latest classroom technologies namely the FLY Pentop, WriteToLearn, and a new iris scan identification system. The FLY Pentop is a computerized pen from Leapster that "magically" understands what kids write and draw on special FLY paper. WriteToLearn is an automatic grading software from Pearson Knowledge Technologies and…

  12. Classroom Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Journal of Mathematical Education in Science and Technology, 2007

    2007-01-01

    In this issue's "Classroom Notes" section, the following papers are described: (1) "Sequences of Definite Integrals" by T. Dana-Picard; (2) "Structural Analysis of Pythagorean Monoids" by M.-Q Zhan and J. Tong; (3) "A Random Walk Phenomenon under an Interesting Stopping Rule" by S. Chakraborty; (4) "On Some Confidence Intervals for Estimating the…

  13. Smart Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Rhea, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    What makes a classroom "smart"? Presentation technologies such as projectors, document cameras, and LCD panels clearly fit the bill, but when considering other technologies for teaching, learning, and developing content, the possibilities become limited only by the boundaries of an institution's innovation. This article presents 32 best practices…

  14. Classroom Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Journal of Mathematical Education in Science and Technology, 2007

    2007-01-01

    In this issue's "Classroom Notes" section, the following papers are discussed: (1) "Constructing a line segment whose length is equal to the measure of a given angle" (W. Jacob and T. J. Osler); (2) "Generating functions for the powers of Fibonacci sequences" (D. Terrana and H. Chen); (3) "Evaluation of mean and variance integrals without…

  15. Should Supervisors Intervene during Classroom Visits?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Real-time coaching has become the go-to supervisory model in some schools (especially charters), with supervisors routinely jumping in during teacher observations and sometimes taking over the class to model a more effective approach. The author sets out goals and guidelines for impromptu classroom visits that include visiting each classroom at…

  16. Application of Transcultural Themes in International Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Hook, Steven R.

    2007-01-01

    The effective use of transcultural themes and images may help promote positive resonance in international settings, such as found in the traditional and online classrooms of globalizing higher education. Findings of transculturally resonant themes and images may be applied to international classroom pedagogy through such means as multimedia…

  17. Classroom Assessment Techniques: A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiCarlo, Kristen; Cooper, Lori

    2014-01-01

    Effective classroom assessment techniques are directly linked to course objectives and proposed outcomes. Results within formative and summative assessments have been studied in the online learning environment as educators seek to meet objectives with respect to student success in the non-traditional setting. Online classroom assessment techniques…

  18. Practical Classroom Applications of Language Experience: Looking Back, Looking Forward.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Olga G., Ed.; Linek, Wayne M., Ed.

    The 38 essays in this book look back at language experience as an educational approach, provide practical classroom applications, and reconceptualize language experience as an overarching education process. Classroom teachers and reading specialists describe strategies in use in a variety of classroom settings and describe ways to integrate…

  19. Systemize Classroom Management to Enhance Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delman, Douglas J.

    2011-01-01

    Good classroom management is one of the most important goals teachers strive to establish from the first day of class. The rules, procedures, activities, and behaviors set the classroom tone throughout the school year. By revising, updating, and systemizing classroom management activities, teachers can eliminate many problems created by students…

  20. A Case Study of Epistemic Order in Mathematics Classroom Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruthven, Kenneth; Hofmann, Riikka

    2016-01-01

    We define epistemic order as the way in which the exchange and development of knowledge takes place in the classroom, breaking this down into a system of three components: epistemic initiative relating to who sets the agenda in classroom dialogue, and how; epistemic appraisal relating to who judges contributions to classroom dialogue, and how; and…

  1. Multilingual Label Quests: A Practice for the "Asymmetrical" Multilingual Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonacina-Pugh, Florence

    2013-01-01

    Research on multilingual classrooms usually focuses on contexts where both teachers and pupils share the same linguistic repertoire; what can be called "symmetrical" multilingual classrooms. This paper sets out to investigate whether (and how) pupils' multilingual resources can be used in classrooms where the teacher does not share…

  2. Improving the Teacher's Awareness of Nonverbal Communication in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kachur, Donald; And Others

    The emphasis in this paper is on developing teacher awareness of how nonverbal communication fits into the classroom setting. Various positive and negative aspects of this phase of communication in the classroom are explored. A classroom teacher is observed closely by students every day, and her/his attitude, feelings, mood or state of mind,…

  3. The Social Context of Urban Classrooms: Measuring Student Psychological Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Stacy L.; Mehta, Tara G.; Atkins, Marc S.; Glisson, Charles; Green, Philip D.; Gibbons, Robert D.; Kim, Jong Bae; Chapman, Jason E.; Schoenwald, Sonja K.; Cua, Grace; Ogle, Robert R.

    2015-01-01

    Classrooms are unique and complex work settings in which teachers and students both participate in and contribute to classroom processes. This article describes the measurement phase of a study that examined the social ecology of urban classrooms. Informed by the dimensions and items of an established measure of organizational climate, we designed…

  4. Promoting Active Involvement in Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conderman, Greg; Bresnahan, Val; Hedin, Laura

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a rationale for using active involvement techniques, describes large- and small-group methods based on their documented effectiveness and applicability to K-12 classrooms, and illustrates their use. These approaches include ways of engaging students in large groups (e.g., unison responses, response cards, dry-erase boards,…

  5. Multilevel and Diverse Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baurain, Bradley, Ed.; Ha, Phan Le, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    The benefits and advantages of classroom practices incorporating unity-in-diversity and diversity-in-unity are what "Multilevel and Diverse Classrooms" is all about. Multilevel classrooms--also known as mixed-ability or heterogeneous classrooms--are a fact of life in ESOL programs around the world. These classrooms are often not only…

  6. Early Childhood/CDA Learning Modules: A Competency-Based Training Program for Classroom Personnel in Preschool Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaty, Janice J.

    This training manual for early childhood CDA candidates provides 21 learning modules on the following subjects: field trips, books, parent involvement, setting up the classroom, the role of play, creative expression (art), preschool science, cooking, self-image, large motor development, speaking and listening skills, daily program planning, small…

  7. Behavior Problems in Learning Activities and Social Interactions in Head Start Classrooms and Early Reading, Mathematics, and Approaches to Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulotsky-Shearer, Rebecca J.; Fernandez, Veronica; Dominguez, Ximena; Rouse, Heather L.

    2011-01-01

    Relations between early problem behavior in preschool classrooms and a comprehensive set of school readiness outcomes were examined for a stratified random sample (N = 256) of 4-year-old children enrolled in a large, urban school district Head Start program. A series of multilevel models examined the unique contribution of early problem behavior…

  8. Young Children's Views Concerning Distribution of Clean-Up Duties in the Classroom: Responsibility and Self-Interest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penderi, Efthymia; Rekalidou, Galini

    2016-01-01

    The preschool setting offers many opportunities to promote development of responsibility in young children. Clean-up routines may support children's distributional judgments, and reveal their sense of responsibility about classroom duties. Although there is a large number of studies regarding children's views about resource distribution,…

  9. Film Excerpts Shown to Specifically Elicit Various Affects Lead to Overlapping Activation Foci in a Large Set of Symmetrical Brain Regions in Males

    PubMed Central

    Karama, Sherif; Armony, Jorge; Beauregard, Mario

    2011-01-01

    While the limbic system theory continues to be part of common scientific parlance, its validity has been questioned on multiple grounds. Nonetheless, the issue of whether or not there exists a set of brain areas preferentially dedicated to emotional processing remains central within affective neuroscience. Recently, a widespread neural reference space for emotion which includes limbic as well as other regions was characterized in a large meta-analysis. As methodologically heterogeneous studies go into such meta-analyses, showing in an individual study in which all parameters are kept constant, the involvement of overlapping areas for various emotion conditions in keeping with the neural reference space for emotion, would serve as valuable confirmatory evidence. Here, using fMRI, 20 young adult men were scanned while viewing validated neutral and effective emotion-eliciting short film excerpts shown to quickly and specifically elicit disgust, amusement, or sexual arousal. Each emotion-specific run included, in random order, multiple neutral and emotion condition blocks. A stringent conjunction analysis revealed a large overlap across emotion conditions that fit remarkably well with the neural reference space for emotion. This overlap included symmetrical bilateral activation of the medial prefrontal cortex, the anterior cingulate, the temporo-occipital junction, the basal ganglia, the brainstem, the amygdala, the hippocampus, the thalamus, the subthalamic nucleus, the posterior hypothalamus, the cerebellum, as well as the frontal operculum extending towards the anterior insula. This study clearly confirms for the visual modality, that processing emotional stimuli leads to widespread increases in activation that cluster within relatively confined areas, regardless of valence. PMID:21818311

  10. Classroom Connectivity: Increasing Participation and Understanding Inside the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hegedus, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    This article shows how highly mobile computing, when used with new forms of network connectivity, can allow new forms of activities in the mathematics classroom. Examples are provided, such as the ability to share, harvest, and aggregate mathematical objects, and the ability for teachers and students to analyze the entire set of classroom…

  11. Exclusively Visual Analysis of Classroom Group Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Laura; Scherr, Rachel E.; Zickler, Todd; Mazur, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale audiovisual data that measure group learning are time consuming to collect and analyze. As an initial step towards scaling qualitative classroom observation, we qualitatively coded classroom video using an established coding scheme with and without its audio cues. We find that interrater reliability is as high when using visual data…

  12. Creating Learning Communities in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saville, Bryan K.; Lawrence, Natalie Kerr; Jakobsen, Krisztina V.

    2012-01-01

    There are many ways to construct classroom-based learning communities. Nevertheless, the emphasis is always on cooperative learning. In this article, the authors focus on three teaching methods--interteaching, team-based learning, and cooperative learning in large, lecture-based courses--that they have used successfully to create classroom-based…

  13. How Tablets Are Utilized in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ditzler, Christine; Hong, Eunsook; Strudler, Neal

    2016-01-01

    New technologies are a large part of the educational landscape in the 21st century. Emergent technologies are implemented in the classroom at an exponential rate. The newest technology to be added to the daily classroom is the tablet computer. Understanding students' and teachers' perceptions about the role of tablet computers is important as this…

  14. New Ways of Classroom Assessment. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, J. D., Ed.

    2013-01-01

    In this revised edition in the popular New Ways Series, teachers have once again been given an opportunity to show how they do assessment in their classrooms on an everyday basis. Often feeling helpless when confronted with large-scale standardized testing practices, teachers here offer classroom testing created with the direct aim of helping…

  15. Bag-Tanks for Your Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wulfson, Stephen E.

    1981-01-01

    Suggests using plastic bags as aquaria and terraria. Describes techniques for converting plastic sheets into aquaria, how to set them up for classroom use, and other uses for plastic bag aquaria. (DS)

  16. A co-localization model of paired ChIP-seq data using a large ENCODE data set enables comparison of multiple samples

    PubMed Central

    Maehara, Kazumitsu; Odawara, Jun; Harada, Akihito; Yoshimi, Tomohiko; Nagao, Koji; Obuse, Chikashi; Akashi, Koichi; Tachibana, Taro; Sakata, Toshio; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Deep sequencing approaches, such as chromatin immunoprecipitation by sequencing (ChIP-seq), have been successful in detecting transcription factor-binding sites and histone modification in the whole genome. An approach for comparing two different ChIP-seq data would be beneficial for predicting unknown functions of a factor. We propose a model to represent co-localization of two different ChIP-seq data. We showed that a meaningful overlapping signal and a meaningless background signal can be separated by this model. We applied this model to compare ChIP-seq data of RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain (CTD) serine 2 phosphorylation with a large amount of peak-called data, including ChIP-seq and other deep sequencing data in the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project, and then extracted factors that were related to RNA polymerase II CTD serine 2 in HeLa cells. We further analyzed RNA polymerase II CTD serine 7 phosphorylation, of which their function is still unclear in HeLa cells. Our results were characterized by the similarity of localization for transcription factor/histone modification in the ENCODE data set, and this suggests that our model is appropriate for understanding ChIP-seq data for factors where their function is unknown. PMID:23125363

  17. Comparison of Two Methods for Estimating the Sampling-Related Uncertainty of Satellite Rainfall Averages Based on a Large Radar Data Set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor); Bell, Thomas L.; Steiner, Matthias; Zhang, Yu; Wood, Eric F.

    2002-01-01

    The uncertainty of rainfall estimated from averages of discrete samples collected by a satellite is assessed using a multi-year radar data set covering a large portion of the United States. The sampling-related uncertainty of rainfall estimates is evaluated for all combinations of 100 km, 200 km, and 500 km space domains, 1 day, 5 day, and 30 day rainfall accumulations, and regular sampling time intervals of 1 h, 3 h, 6 h, 8 h, and 12 h. These extensive analyses are combined to characterize the sampling uncertainty as a function of space and time domain, sampling frequency, and rainfall characteristics by means of a simple scaling law. Moreover, it is shown that both parametric and non-parametric statistical techniques of estimating the sampling uncertainty produce comparable results. Sampling uncertainty estimates, however, do depend on the choice of technique for obtaining them. They can also vary considerably from case to case, reflecting the great variability of natural rainfall, and should therefore be expressed in probabilistic terms. Rainfall calibration errors are shown to affect comparison of results obtained by studies based on data from different climate regions and/or observation platforms.

  18. Development and Evaluation of a Classroom Interaction System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cao, Bingyi; Esponda-Argüero, Margarita; Rojas, Raúl

    2016-01-01

    In order to reduce the passivity of students and enhance their learning experience in large lectures, we developed a browser-based tool called Classroom Interacter to promote classroom interaction. It allows students to use their own mobile devices to participate in the learning process. The main features of Classroom Interacter include live…

  19. Classroom Culture Promotes Academic Resiliency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiTullio, Gina

    2014-01-01

    Resiliency is what propels many students to continue moving forward under difficult learning and life conditions. We intuitively think that such resilience is a character quality that cannot be taught. On the contrary, when a teacher sets the right conditions and culture for it in the classroom by teaching collaboration and communication skills,…

  20. Price Discrimination: A Classroom Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguiló, Paula; Sard, Maria; Tugores, Maria

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe a classroom experiment aimed at familiarizing students with different types of price discrimination (first-, second-, and third-degree price discrimination). During the experiment, the students were asked to decide what tariffs to set as monopolists for each of the price discrimination scenarios under…

  1. The Classroom Animal: Crickets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, David C.

    1985-01-01

    Suggests using crickets for classroom activities, providing background information on their anatomy and reproduction and tips on keeping individual organisms or a breeding colony in the classroom. (JN)

  2. The role of large strike-slip faults in a convergent continental setting - first results from the Dzhungarian Fault in Eastern Kazakhstan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grützner, Christoph; Campbell, Grace; Elliott, Austin; Walker, Richard; Abdrakhmatov, Kanatbek

    2016-04-01

    The Tien Shan and the Dzhungarian Ala-tau mountain ranges in Eastern Kazakhstan and China take up a significant portion of the total convergence between India and Eurasia, despite the fact that they are more than 1000 km away from the actual plate boundary. Shortening is accommodated by large thrust faults that strike more or less perpendicular to the convergence vector, and by a set of conjugate strike-slip faults. Some of these strike-slip faults are major features of several hundred kilometres length and have produced great historical earthquakes. In most cases, little is known about their slip-rates and earthquake history, and thus, about their role in the regional tectonic setting. This study deals with the NW-SE trending Dzhungarian Fault, a more than 350 km-long, right-lateral strike slip feature. It borders the Dzhungarian Ala-tau range and forms one edge of the so-called Dzhungarian Gate. The fault curves from a ~305° strike at its NW tip in Kazakhstan to a ~328° strike in China. No historical ruptures are known from the Kazakh part of the fault. A possible rupture in 1944 in the Chinese part remains discussed. We used remote sensing, Structure-from-Motion (SfM), differential GPS, field mapping, and Quaternary dating of offset geological markers in order to map the fault-related morphology and to measure the slip rate of the fault at several locations along strike. We also aimed to find out the age of the last surface rupturing earthquake and to determine earthquake recurrence intervals and magnitudes. We were further interested in the relation between horizontal and vertical motion along the fault and possible fault segmentation. Here we present first results from our 2015 survey. High-resolution digital elevation models of offset river terraces allowed us to determine the slip vector of the most recent earthquake. Preliminary dating results from abandoned fluvial terraces allow us to speculate on a late Holocene surface rupturing event. Morphological

  3. Global Internet Video Classroom: A Technology Supported Learner-Centered Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    The Global Internet Video Classroom (GIVC) Project connected Chicago Civil Rights activists of the 1960s with Cape Town Anti-Apartheid activists of the 1960s in a classroom setting where learners from Cape Town and Chicago engaged activists in conversations about their motivation, principles, and strategies. The project was launched in order to…

  4. Classroom Management and Teachers' Coping Strategies: Inside Classrooms in Australia, China and Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romi, Shlomo; Lewis, Ramon; Roache, Joel

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the degree to which recently reported relationships between the classroom management techniques and coping styles of Australian teachers apply in two other national settings: China and Israel. Little is known about which teacher characteristics relate to their approach to classroom management, although researchers in Australia…

  5. Measuring Quality in Inclusive Preschool Classrooms: Development and Validation of the Inclusive Classroom Profile (ICP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soukakou, Elena P.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate an observation measure designed to assess classroom quality in inclusive preschool programs, the Inclusive Classroom Profile (ICP). Developing the rating scale entailed systematic fieldwork in inclusive settings and review of the literature on preschool inclusion. Results from the validation…

  6. A Large-Scale Inquiry-Based Astronomy Intervention Project: Impact on Students' Content Knowledge Performance and Views of Their High School Science Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Michael; McKinnon, David H.; Danaia, Lena; Deehan, James

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present the results from a study of the impact on students involved in a large-scale inquiry-based astronomical high school education intervention in Australia. Students in this intervention were led through an educational design allowing them to undertake an investigative approach to understanding the lifecycle of stars more…

  7. Classroom risks and resources: Teacher burnout, classroom quality and children's adjustment in high needs elementary schools.

    PubMed

    Hoglund, Wendy L G; Klingle, Kirsten E; Hosan, Naheed E

    2015-10-01

    The current paper presents two related sets of findings on the classroom context in high needs elementary schools. First, we investigated change over one school term in teacher burnout (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, personal accomplishment) and classroom quality (emotional and instructional support, organization) and assessed the degree to which burnout and classroom quality co-varied over the term with each other and with aggregate externalizing behaviors (average child externalizing behaviors in the classroom). These analyses describe the classroom context in which the children are nested. Second, we examined change over one school term in children's social adjustment (relationship quality with teachers and friends) and academic adjustment (school engagement, literacy skills) and assessed how adjustment co-varied over time with child externalizing behaviors and was predicted by teacher burnout, classroom quality and aggregate externalizing behaviors. These models were tested with a sample of low-income, ethnically diverse children in kindergarten to grade 3 and their teachers. The children and teachers were assessed three times over one school term. Personal accomplishment co-varied positively with overall classroom quality. Reciprocally, classroom organization co-varied positively with overall teacher burnout. Aggregate externalizing behaviors co-varied positively with depersonalization and negatively with personal accomplishment and overall classroom quality, including emotional support and organization. In turn, teacher burnout interacted with aggregate externalizing behaviors to predict change in child social and academic adjustment. Alternatively, classroom quality interacted with aggregate and child externalizing behaviors to predict change in child social and academic adjustment.

  8. Consistency of Toddler Engagement across Two Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguiar, Cecilia; McWilliam, R. A.

    2013-01-01

    This study documented the consistency of child engagement across two settings, toddler child care classrooms and mother-child dyadic play. One hundred twelve children, aged 14-36 months (M = 25.17, SD = 6.06), randomly selected from 30 toddler child care classrooms from the district of Porto, Portugal, participated. Levels of engagement were…

  9. Classroom Games: A Prisoner's Dilemma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Charles A.; Capra, Monica

    2000-01-01

    Describes a classroom game called the prisoner's dilemma that illustrates the conflict between social incentives to cooperate and private incentives to defect. Explains that it is a simple card game involving a large number of students. States that the students should be introduced to the real-world applications of the game. (CMK)

  10. Revoicing Classrooms: A Spatial Manifesto

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Kenn

    2004-01-01

    Why is the physical learning environment in schools largely ignored by teachers within pedagogical practice? The cellular classroom has remained seemingly immutable since the Industrial Revolution, with spatiality playing a silent and subconscious role in schooling other than related to concerns around surveillance. Previous studies have shown…

  11. Photonics Explorer: revolutionizing photonics in the classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Amrita; Debaes, Nathalie; Cords, Nina; Fischer, Robert; Vlekken, Johan; Euler, Manfred; Thienpont, Hugo

    2012-10-01

    The `Photonics Explorer' is a unique intra-curricular optics kit designed to engage, excite and educate secondary school students about the fascination of working with light - hands-on, in their own classrooms. Developed with a pan European collaboration of experts, the kit equips teachers with class sets of experimental material provided within a supporting didactic framework, distributed in conjunction with teacher training courses. The material has been specifically designed to integrate into European science curricula. Each kit contains robust and versatile components sufficient for a class of 25-30 students to work in groups of 2-3. The didactic content is based on guided inquiry-based learning (IBL) techniques with a strong emphasis on hands-on experiments, team work and relating abstract concepts to real world applications. The content has been developed in conjunction with over 30 teachers and experts in pedagogy to ensure high quality and ease of integration. It is currently available in 7 European languages. The Photonics Explorer allows students not only to hone their essential scientific skills but also to really work as scientists and engineers in the classroom. Thus, it aims to encourage more young people to pursue scientific careers and avert the imminent lack of scientific workforce in Europe. 50 Photonics Explorer kits have been successfully tested in 7 European countries with over 1500 secondary school students. The positive impact of the kit in the classroom has been qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated. A non-profit organisation, EYESTvzw [Excite Youth for Engineering Science and Technology], is responsible for the large scale distribution of the Photonics Explorer.

  12. Mendel in the Modern Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Mike U.; Gericke, Niklas M.

    2015-01-01

    Mendel is an icon in the history of genetics and part of our common culture and modern biology instruction. The aim of this paper is to summarize the place of Mendel in the modern biology classroom. In the present article we will identify key issues that make Mendel relevant in the classroom today. First, we recount some of the historical controversies that have relevance to modern curricular design, such as Fisher's (Ann Sci 1:115-137, 1936/2008) claim that Mendel's data were too good to be true. We also address questions about Mendel's status as the father of genetics as well as questions about the sequencing of Mendel's work in genetics instruction in relation to modern molecular genetics and evolution. Next, we present a systematic set of examples of research based approaches to the use of Mendel in the modern classroom along with criticisms of these designs and questions about the historical accuracy of the story of Mendel as presented in the typical classroom. Finally, we identify gaps in our understanding in need of further study and present a selected set of resources that, along with the references cited, should be valuable to science educators interested in further study of the story of Mendel.

  13. Connecting classrooms to the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomé, P.; Radiguet, A.; Albert, B.; Batrung, M.; Caillat, M.; Gheudin, M.; Libert, Y.; Ferlet, R.; Maestrini, A.; Melchior, A.-L.; Munier, J.-M.; Rudolph, A.

    2012-12-01

    'Connecting Classrooms to the Milky Way' is a project of the EU-HOU Consortium (Hands-On-Universe, Europe), involving 11 European countries. It is supported by the lifelong Learning Programme of the European Community. The main goal of this project was to set up the first network of small radio-telescopes dedicated to education all around Europe and directly accessible from a simple Web interface. Any classroom connected to Internet via any Web-browser can now remotely control one of the radio-telescopes and observe the HI emission coming from our Galaxy. The interface also provides the users with simple tools to analyse the data: (i) derive the Milky-Way rotation curve and (ii) map the spiral arms HI distribution. A special emphasis has been made to enable the young generation to understand the challenges of these wavelengths, which are currently at the frontline of the new instruments with the development of the ALMA (Atacama Large Millimeter Array) and SKA (Square Kilometer Array) projects.

  14. Twelve tips for "flipping" the classroom.

    PubMed

    Moffett, Jennifer

    2015-04-01

    The flipped classroom is a pedagogical model in which the typical lecture and homework elements of a course are reversed. The following tips outline the steps involved in making a successful transition to a flipped classroom approach. The tips are based on the available literature alongside the author's experience of using the approach in a medical education setting. Flipping a classroom has a number of potential benefits, for example increased educator-student interaction, but must be planned and implemented carefully to support effective learning.

  15. The contribution of children's self-regulation and classroom quality to children's adaptive behaviors in the kindergarten classroom.

    PubMed

    Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E; Curby, Tim W; Grimm, Kevin J; Nathanson, Lori; Brock, Laura L

    2009-07-01

    In this study, the authors examined the extent to which children's self-regulation upon kindergarten entrance and classroom quality in kindergarten contributed to children's adaptive classroom behavior. Children's self-regulation was assessed using a direct assessment upon entrance into kindergarten. Classroom quality was measured on the basis of multiple classroom observations during the kindergarten year. Children's adaptive classroom behavior in kindergarten was assessed through teacher report and classroom observations: Teachers rated children's cognitive and behavioral self-control and work habits during the spring of the kindergarten year; observers rated children's engagement and measured off-task behavior at 2-month intervals from November to May. Hierarchical linear models revealed that children's self-regulation upon school entry in a direct assessment related to teachers' report of behavioral self-control, cognitive self-control, and work habits in the spring of the kindergarten year. Classroom quality, particularly teachers' effective classroom management, was linked to children's greater behavioral and cognitive self-control, children's higher behavioral engagement, and less time spent off-task in the classroom. Classroom quality did not moderate the relation between children's self-regulation upon school entry and children's adaptive classroom behaviors in kindergarten. The discussion considers the implications of classroom management for supporting children's early development of behavioral skills that are important in school settings.

  16. Molecular Phenotyping Small (Asian) versus Large (Western) Plaque Psoriasis Shows Common Activation of IL-17 Pathway Genes but Different Regulatory Gene Sets.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaehwan; Oh, Chil-Hwan; Jeon, Jiehyun; Baek, Yoosang; Ahn, Jaewoo; Kim, Dong Joo; Lee, Hyun-Soo; Correa da Rosa, Joel; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Lowes, Michelle A; Krueger, James G

    2016-01-01

    Psoriasis is present in all racial groups, but in varying frequencies and severity. Considering that small plaque psoriasis is specific to the Asian population and severe psoriasis is more predominant in the Western population, we defined Asian small and intermediate plaque psoriasis as psoriasis subtypes and compared their molecular signatures with the classic subtype of Western large plaque psoriasis. Two different characteristics of psoriatic spreading-vertical growth and radial expansion-were contrasted between subtypes, and genomic data were correlated to histologic and clinical measurements. Compared with Western large plaque psoriasis, Asian small plaque psoriasis revealed limited psoriasis spreading, but IL-17A and IL-17-regulated proinflammatory cytokines were highly expressed. Paradoxically, IL-17A and IL-17-regulated proinflammatory cytokines were lower in Western large plaque psoriasis, whereas T cells and dendritic cells in total psoriatic skin area were exponentially increased. Negative immune regulators, such as CD69 and FAS, were decreased in both Western large plaque psoriasis and psoriasis with accompanying arthritis or obesity, and their expression was correlated with psoriasis severity index. Based on the disease subtype comparisons, we propose that dysregulation of T-cell expansion enabled by downregulation of immune negative regulators is the main mechanism for development of large plaque psoriasis subtypes.

  17. Edifying Teachers in the Networked Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisser, Christian

    Most instructors today feel that using computers in classrooms to create electronic forums automatically results in a more egalitarian setting, but technology can become an effective cloak for otherwise oppressive practices. These settings can potentially reinscribe dominant ideologies, stifling students rather than empowering them. These…

  18. Self-Contained Classrooms. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Determining the ideal academic setting in which students can be successful continues to be one of the primary goals of educators. Is there a best classroom structure in which students can be successful? Although there is research on the academic gains in the block schedule and in traditional departmentalized settings, both of which are common in…

  19. Allowing "Artistic Agency" in the Elementary Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rufo, David

    2011-01-01

    The author was interested in seeing what would happen if children were given more latitude when making art in school. In January 2009, he began by setting up environments in his classroom wherein he hoped his students would feel free to create self-initiated forms of artmaking. Two times each week an hour was set aside for an activity called Open…

  20. Designing Cooperative Learning in the Science Classroom: Integrating the Peer Tutoring Small Investigation Group (PTSIG) within the Model of the Six Mirrors of the Classroom Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarowitz, Reuven; Hertz-Lazarowitz, Rachel; Khalil, Mahmood; Ron, Salit

    2013-01-01

    The model of the six mirrors of the classroom and its use in teaching biology in a cooperative learning mode were implemented in high school classrooms. In this study we present: a) The model of the six mirrors of the classroom (MSMC). b) Cooperative learning settings: 1. The Group Investigation; 2. The Jigsaw Method; and 3. Peer Tutoring in Small…

  1. Teaching Quality across School Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Julie; Brown, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Districts are increasingly making personnel decisions based on teachers' impact on student-achievement gains and classroom observations. In some schools, however, a teacher's practices and their students' achievement may reflect not just individual but collaborative efforts. In other settings, teachers' instruction benefits less from the insights…

  2. Bridging the Gap Between Large-scale Data Sets and Analyses: Semi-automated Methods to Facilitate Length Polymorphism Scoring and Data Analyses.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers can be developed more quickly and at a lower cost than microsatellite and single nucleotide polymorphism markers, which makes them ideal markers for large-scale studies of understudied taxa — such as species at risk. However,...

  3. Tips from the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Jim; Ashcraft, Nikki; Clarke, Paul M.; Wolf, Grant S.

    1999-01-01

    Four tips for use in the English-as-a-Second-Language classroom are highlighted: Mr. Bean in the Classroom; Defining Your Future; Coin Questions; Our Futures: Simple, Progressive, and Perfect. (Author/VWL)

  4. ABCs of Smart Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Cathy

    2002-01-01

    Describes issues involved when converting traditional classrooms into smart classrooms that include appropriate educational technology. Highlights include faculty training in advance; flexibility; design considerations; technical support; and an example based on experiences at Virginia Commonwealth University. (LRW)

  5. Inside the Primary Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Brian

    1980-01-01

    Presents some of the findings of the ORACLE research program (Observational Research and Classroom Learning Evaluation), a detailed observational study of teacher-student interaction, teaching styles, and management methods within a sample of primary classrooms. (Editor/SJL)

  6. In the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Michael P.; Danielson, Kathy Everts

    1991-01-01

    Presents seven reading activities involving the preschool classroom writing environment, using big books and predictable books, using cereal boxes to foster emergent literacy, using editorials, visual-auditory links, reading outside the classroom, and ownership of writing. (MG)

  7. Adapting Classroom Schemata.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littlewood, William

    1999-01-01

    Discusses schema theory in relation to the language classroom. Argues that as teachers themselves are former learners, the schemata they have developed both inside and outside the classroom will provide them assumptions about how people learn. (Author/VWL)

  8. Classroom Management. TESOL Classroom Practice Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, Thomas S. C., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    This series captures the dynamics of the contemporary ESOL classroom. It showcases state-of-the-art curricula, materials, tasks, and activities reflecting emerging trends in language education and seeks to build localized language teaching and learning theories based on teachers' and students' unique experiences in and beyond the classroom. Each…

  9. Classroom Strategies: Classroom Management Systems. Volume 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speiss, Madeleine F.; And Others

    Classroom management is defined as procedures for arranging the classroom environment so that children learn what the teacher wants to teach them in the healthiest and most effective way possible. The Southwestern Cooperative Educational Laboratory presents a discussion of these procedures as they relate to social controls and components of…

  10. Classroom Observation Scales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emmer, Edmund T.

    Nine scales were developed to measure a series of classroom behavior variables derived from a factor analytic study of five observation systems. The scales are multipoint check lists which are behaviorally referenced by different amounts and types of classroom behaviors. The scales measure such aspects of classroom behavior as teacher-initiated…

  11. Classroom Use and Utilization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, Ira

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how classrooms are distributed by size on a campus, how well they are used, and how their use changes with faculty and student needs and desires. Details how to analyze classroom space, use, and utilization, taking into account such factors as scheduling and classroom stations. (EV)

  12. Competition in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jameson, Daphne

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author shares the strategy she adopted to even out the participation among her multicultural students during their classroom discussions. The author realized that her students had different concepts about the classroom and different philosophies about competition. For the Americans and Indians, the classroom was a site of…

  13. Quick Guide: Democratic Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Service Learning Clearinghouse, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Democratic classrooms are those in which the curriculum actively engages students in collaborative inquiry, decision making is shared between students and staff, and students choose their daily activities. Compared with traditional classrooms, students in democratic classrooms take more ownership of and responsibility for their own learning.…

  14. Discipline in Your Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petty, Ray

    1988-01-01

    Discusses some of the principles of classroom management and discipline that can be used in the classroom. Includes avoiding distracting verbal exchanges, a management system, the use of verbal reprimand, room arrangements and isolation. Concludes that planning and attention to classroom management are worth the effort. (CW)

  15. Observing Classroom Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danielson, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    Classroom observation is a crucial aspect of any system of teacher evaluation. No matter how skilled a teacher is in other aspects of teaching--such as careful planning, working well with colleagues, and communicating with parents--if classroom practice is deficient, that individual cannot be considered a good teacher. Classroom observations can…

  16. Unprecedently Large-Scale Kinase Inhibitor Set Enabling the Accurate Prediction of Compound–Kinase Activities: A Way toward Selective Promiscuity by Design?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Drug discovery programs frequently target members of the human kinome and try to identify small molecule protein kinase inhibitors, primarily for cancer treatment, additional indications being increasingly investigated. One of the challenges is controlling the inhibitors degree of selectivity, assessed by in vitro profiling against panels of protein kinases. We manually extracted, compiled, and standardized such profiles published in the literature: we collected 356 908 data points corresponding to 482 protein kinases, 2106 inhibitors, and 661 patents. We then analyzed this data set in terms of kinome coverage, results reproducibility, popularity, and degree of selectivity of both kinases and inhibitors. We used the data set to create robust proteochemometric models capable of predicting kinase activity (the ligand–target space was modeled with an externally validated RMSE of 0.41 ± 0.02 log units and R02 0.74 ± 0.03), in order to account for missing or unreliable measurements. The influence on the prediction quality of parameters such as number of measurements, Murcko scaffold frequency or inhibitor type was assessed. Interpretation of the models enabled to highlight inhibitors and kinases properties correlated with higher affinities, and an analysis in the context of kinases crystal structures was performed. Overall, the models quality allows the accurate prediction of kinase-inhibitor activities and their structural interpretation, thus paving the way for the rational design of compounds with a targeted selectivity profile. PMID:27482722

  17. Explicitly correlated PNO-MP2 and PNO-CCSD and their application to the S66 set and large molecular systems.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Gunnar; Hättig, Christof; Tew, David P

    2014-10-28

    We present our current progress on the combination of explicit electron correlation with the pair natural orbital (PNO) representation. In particular we show cubic scaling PNO-MP2-F12, and PNO-CCSD[F12] implementations. The PNOs are constructed using a hybrid scheme, where the PNOs are generated in a truncated doubles space, spanned by orbital specific virtuals obtained using an iterative eigenvector algorithm. We demonstrate the performance of our implementation through calculations on a series of glycine chains. The accuracy of the local approximations is assessed using the S66 benchmark set, and we report for the first time explicitly correlated CCSD results for the whole set and improved estimates for the CCSD/CBS limits. For several dimers the PNO-CCSD[F12] calculations are more accurate than the current reference values. Additionally, we present pilot applications of our PNO-CCSD[F12] code to host-guest interactions in a cluster model for zeolite H-ZSM-5 and in a calix[4]arene-water complex.

  18. Optimization Method to Branch and Bound Large SBO State Spaces Under Dynamic Probabilistic Risk Assessment via use of LENDIT Scales and S2R2 Sets

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph W. Nielsen; Akira Tokurio; Robert Hiromoto; Jivan Khatry

    2014-06-01

    Traditional Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) methods have been developed and are quite effective in evaluating risk associated with complex systems, but lack the capability to evaluate complex dynamic systems. These time and energy scales associated with the transient may vary as a function of transition time to a different physical state. Dynamic PRA (DPRA) methods provide a more rigorous analysis of complex dynamic systems, while complete, results in issues associated with combinatorial explosion. In order to address the combinatorial complexity arising from the number of possible state configurations and discretization of transition times, a characteristic scaling metric (LENDIT – length, energy, number, distribution, information and time) is proposed as a means to describe systems uniformly and thus provide means to describe relational constraints expected in the dynamics of a complex (coupled) systems. Thus when LENDIT is used to characterize four sets – ‘state, system, resource and response’ (S2R2) – describing reactor operations (normal and off-normal), LENDIT and S2R2 in combination have the potential to ‘branch and bound’ the state space investigated by DPRA. In this paper we introduce the concept of LENDIT scales and S2R2 sets applied to a branch-and-bound algorithm and apply the methods to a station black out transient (SBO).

  19. Using Growth Norms to Set Instructional Goals for Struggling Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haas, Lindsay B.; Stickney, Eric M.; Ysseldyke, James E.

    2016-01-01

    The authors examined the extent to which classroom teachers in naturalistic settings used a Goal-Setting Tool to set instructional goals for struggling students, the kinds of goals they set, their progress monitoring practices with and without goals, and the extent to which students gain more when a goal-setting tool is used. The goal-setting tool…

  20. Integrating Community Outreach into the Undergraduate Neuroscience Classroom

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Courtney

    2011-01-01

    While both federal agencies and professional associations emphasize the importance of neuroscience outreach, this goal seldom reaches the undergraduate neuroscience classroom. However, incorporating outreach into undergraduate neuroscience classes is an efficient means to reach not only future scientists, but also the future practitioners (K-12 teachers, social service workers, etc.) with whom neuroscientists hope to communicate. It also provides a vehicle for faculty members to engage in outreach activities that are typically un- or under-rewarded in faculty reviews. In this article, a Neuroscience Community Outreach Project (NCOP) is described. The project has been used in three offerings of a Cognitive Neuroscience course at a small liberal arts college, shared and applied at a large state university, and presented at a regional Society for Neuroscience meeting as an example of outreach opportunities for faculty. The NCOP assignment is a student-driven, modular activity that can be easily incorporated into existing neuroscience course frameworks. The assignment builds on student interests and connections in the community, providing a way for faculty at institutions without formal outreach programs to incorporate neuroscience outreach into the classroom and connect students to online resources. Several sample student projects are described across three broad domains (K-12 outreach, presentations to social service organizations, and media / popular press presentations). The article ends with a set of suggestions addressing common faculty concerns about incorporating community outreach into the undergraduate neuroscience classroom. PMID:23626492