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Sample records for large composite structures

  1. Critical joints in large composite aircraft structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, W. D.; Bunin, B. L.; Hart-Smith, L. J.

    1983-01-01

    A program was conducted at Douglas Aircraft Company to develop the technology for critical structural joints of composite wing structure that meets design requirements for a 1990 commercial transport aircraft. The prime objective of the program was to demonstrate the ability to reliably predict the strength of large bolted composite joints. Ancillary testing of 180 specimens generated data on strength and load-deflection characteristics which provided input to the joint analysis. Load-sharing between fasteners in multirow bolted joints was computed by the nonlinear analysis program A4EJ. This program was used to predict strengths of 20 additional large subcomponents representing strips from a wing root chordwise splice. In most cases, the predictions were accurate to within a few percent of the test results. In some cases, the observed mode of failure was different than anticipated. The highlight of the subcomponent testing was the consistent ability to achieve gross-section failure strains close to 0.005. That represents a considerable improvement over the state of the art.

  2. Large Composite Structures Processing Technologies for Reusable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clinton, R. G., Jr.; Vickers, J. H.; McMahon, W. M.; Hulcher, A. B.; Johnston, N. J.; Cano, R. J.; Belvin, H. L.; McIver, K.; Franklin, W.; Sidwell, D.

    2001-01-01

    Significant efforts have been devoted to establishing the technology foundation to enable the progression to large scale composite structures fabrication. We are not capable today of fabricating many of the composite structures envisioned for the second generation reusable launch vehicle (RLV). Conventional 'aerospace' manufacturing and processing methodologies (fiber placement, autoclave, tooling) will require substantial investment and lead time to scale-up. Out-of-autoclave process techniques will require aggressive efforts to mature the selected technologies and to scale up. Focused composite processing technology development and demonstration programs utilizing the building block approach are required to enable envisioned second generation RLV large composite structures applications. Government/industry partnerships have demonstrated success in this area and represent best combination of skills and capabilities to achieve this goal.

  3. Large Area Nondestructive Evaluation of a Fatigue Loaded Composite Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Burke, Eric R.; Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2016-01-01

    Large area nondestructive evaluation (NDE) inspections are required for fatigue testing of composite structures to track damage initiation and growth. Of particular interest is the progression of damage leading to ultimate failure to validate damage progression models. In this work, passive thermography and acoustic emission NDE were used to track damage growth up to failure of a composite three-stringer panel. Fourteen acoustic emission sensors were placed on the composite panel. The signals from the array were acquired simultaneously and allowed for acoustic emission location. In addition, real time thermal data of the composite structure were acquired during loading. Details are presented on the mapping of the acoustic emission locations directly onto the thermal imagery to confirm areas of damage growth leading to ultimate failure. This required synchronizing the acoustic emission and thermal data with the applied loading. In addition, processing of the thermal imagery which included contrast enhancement, removal of optical barrel distortion and correction of angular rotation before mapping the acoustic event locations are discussed.

  4. Manufacturing and NDE of Large Composite Aerospace Structures at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Ann

    2000-01-01

    NASA's vision for transportation to orbit calls for new vehicles built with new materials technology. The goals of this new launch system development are to improve safety, dramatically reduce cost to orbit, and improve vehicle turn around time. Planned Space Shuttle upgrades include new reusable liquid propellant boosters to replace the solid propellant boosters. These boosters are to have wings and return to the launch site for a horizontal landing on an airport runway. New single and two stages to orbit concepts are being investigated. To reduce weight and improve performance composite materials are proposed for fuel and oxidizer tanks, fuel feedlines, valve bodies, aerostructures, turbomachinery components. For large composite structures new methods of fabrication are being proposed and developed. Containment of cryogenic fuel or oxidizer requires emphases on composite material densification and chemical compatibility. Ceramic matrix and fiber composites for hot rotating turbomachinery have been developed with new fabrication processes. The new requirements on the materials for launcher components are requiring development of new manufacturing and inspection methods. This talk will examine new and proposed manufacturing methods to fabricate the revolutionary components. New NDE methods under consideration include alternative X-ray methods, X-ray laminagraphy, advanced CT, Thermography, new ultrasonic methods, and imbedded sensors. The sizes, complexity, use environment, and contamination restrictions will challenge the inspection process. In flight self-diagnosis and rapid depot inspection are also goals of the NDE development.

  5. Manufacturing and NDE of Large Composite Aerospace Structures at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Ann

    2000-01-01

    NASA's vision for transportation to orbit calls for new vehicles built with new materials technology. The goals of this new launch system development are to improve safety, dramatically reduce cost to orbit, and improve vehicle turn around time. Planned Space Shuttle upgrades include new reusable liquid propellant boosters to replace the solid propellant boosters. These boosters are to have wings and return to the launch site for a horizontal landing on an airport runway. New single and two stages to orbit concepts are being investigated. To reduce weight and improve performance composite materials are proposed for fuel and oxidizer tanks, fuel feedlines, valve bodies, aerostructures, turbomachinery components. For large composite structures new methods of fabrication are being proposed and developed. Containment of cryogenic fuel or oxidizer requires emphases on composite material densification and chemical compatibility. Ceramic matrix and fiber composites for hot rotating turbomachinery have been developed with new fabrication processes. The new requirements on the materials for launcher components are requiring development of new manufacturing and inspection methods. This talk will examine new and proposed manufacturing methods to fabricate the revolutionary components. New NDE methods under consideration include alternative X-ray methods, X-ray laminagraphy, advanced CT, Thermography, new ultrasonic methods, and imbedded sensors. The sizes, complexity, use environment, and contamination restrictions will challenge the inspection process. In flight self-diagnosis and rapid depot inspection are also goals of the NDE development.

  6. Composite, large spirochetes from microbial mats: spirochete structure review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margulis, L.; Ashen, J. B.; Sole, M.; Guerrero, R.

    1993-01-01

    Phenomena previously unknown in free-living spirochetes are reported: large-sized cells with variable diameter (length to 100 microns, width between 0.4 and 3.0 microns), composite structure (smaller spirochetes inside larger ones), and positive phototropic behavior. These bacteria, Spirosymplokos, are compared with all other spirochete genera. The large spirochete, grown in mixed culture, was studied live and by transmission EM. The protoplasmic cylinder was replete with spherical granules 20-32 nm in diameter, and three to six periplasmic 26-nm flagella were inserted subterminally. Comparably granulated and flagellated small spirochetes were located inside the protoplasmic cylinder and in the periplasm of the large ones. When exposed to air, movement became erratic, protoplasmic cylinders retracted to lie folded inside the outer membrane, and refractile membranous structures formed. From one to four structures per still-moving spirochete were seen. Spirosymplokos was enriched from laboratory samples exposed to oxygen-rich and desiccating, but not dry, conditions for at least 4 mo after removal of microbial mat from the field.

  7. Composite, large spirochetes from microbial mats: spirochete structure review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margulis, L.; Ashen, J. B.; Sole, M.; Guerrero, R.

    1993-01-01

    Phenomena previously unknown in free-living spirochetes are reported: large-sized cells with variable diameter (length to 100 microns, width between 0.4 and 3.0 microns), composite structure (smaller spirochetes inside larger ones), and positive phototropic behavior. These bacteria, Spirosymplokos, are compared with all other spirochete genera. The large spirochete, grown in mixed culture, was studied live and by transmission EM. The protoplasmic cylinder was replete with spherical granules 20-32 nm in diameter, and three to six periplasmic 26-nm flagella were inserted subterminally. Comparably granulated and flagellated small spirochetes were located inside the protoplasmic cylinder and in the periplasm of the large ones. When exposed to air, movement became erratic, protoplasmic cylinders retracted to lie folded inside the outer membrane, and refractile membranous structures formed. From one to four structures per still-moving spirochete were seen. Spirosymplokos was enriched from laboratory samples exposed to oxygen-rich and desiccating, but not dry, conditions for at least 4 mo after removal of microbial mat from the field.

  8. Ground test experience with large composite structures for commercial transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohon, H. L.; Chapman, A. J., III; Leybold, H. A.

    1983-01-01

    The initial ground test of each component resulted in structural failure at less than ultimate design loads. While such failures represent major program delays, the investigation and analysis of each failure revealed significant lessons for effective utilization of composites in primary structure. Foremost among these are secondary loads that produce through-the-thickness forces which may lead to serious weaknesses in an otherwise sound structural design. The sources, magnitude, and effects of secondary loads need to be thoroughly understood and accounted for by the designers of composite primary aircraft structures.

  9. Automated 3D structure composition for large RNAs.

    PubMed

    Popenda, Mariusz; Szachniuk, Marta; Antczak, Maciej; Purzycka, Katarzyna J; Lukasiak, Piotr; Bartol, Natalia; Blazewicz, Jacek; Adamiak, Ryszard W

    2012-08-01

    Understanding the numerous functions that RNAs play in living cells depends critically on knowledge of their three-dimensional structure. Due to the difficulties in experimentally assessing structures of large RNAs, there is currently great demand for new high-resolution structure prediction methods. We present the novel method for the fully automated prediction of RNA 3D structures from a user-defined secondary structure. The concept is founded on the machine translation system. The translation engine operates on the RNA FRABASE database tailored to the dictionary relating the RNA secondary structure and tertiary structure elements. The translation algorithm is very fast. Initial 3D structure is composed in a range of seconds on a single processor. The method assures the prediction of large RNA 3D structures of high quality. Our approach needs neither structural templates nor RNA sequence alignment, required for comparative methods. This enables the building of unresolved yet native and artificial RNA structures. The method is implemented in a publicly available, user-friendly server RNAComposer. It works in an interactive mode and a batch mode. The batch mode is designed for large-scale modelling and accepts atomic distance restraints. Presently, the server is set to build RNA structures of up to 500 residues.

  10. Automated 3D structure composition for large RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Popenda, Mariusz; Szachniuk, Marta; Antczak, Maciej; Purzycka, Katarzyna J.; Lukasiak, Piotr; Bartol, Natalia; Blazewicz, Jacek; Adamiak, Ryszard W.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the numerous functions that RNAs play in living cells depends critically on knowledge of their three-dimensional structure. Due to the difficulties in experimentally assessing structures of large RNAs, there is currently great demand for new high-resolution structure prediction methods. We present the novel method for the fully automated prediction of RNA 3D structures from a user-defined secondary structure. The concept is founded on the machine translation system. The translation engine operates on the RNA FRABASE database tailored to the dictionary relating the RNA secondary structure and tertiary structure elements. The translation algorithm is very fast. Initial 3D structure is composed in a range of seconds on a single processor. The method assures the prediction of large RNA 3D structures of high quality. Our approach needs neither structural templates nor RNA sequence alignment, required for comparative methods. This enables the building of unresolved yet native and artificial RNA structures. The method is implemented in a publicly available, user-friendly server RNAComposer. It works in an interactive mode and a batch mode. The batch mode is designed for large-scale modelling and accepts atomic distance restraints. Presently, the server is set to build RNA structures of up to 500 residues. PMID:22539264

  11. Composite passive damping struts for large precision structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolgin, Benjamin P. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    In the field of viscoelastic dampers, a new strut design comprises a viscoelastic material sandwiched between multiple layers, some of which layers bear and dampen load force. In one embodiment, the layers are composite plies of opposing orientation. In another embodiment, the strut utilizes a viscoelastic layer sandwiched between V-shaped composite plies. In a third embodiment, a viscoelastic layer is sandwiched between sine-shaped plies. Strut strength is equal to or greater than conventional aluminum struts due to the unique high interlaminar shear ply design.

  12. Development of pressure containment and damage tolerance technology for composite fuselage structures in large transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. J.; Thomson, L. W.; Wilson, R. D.

    1986-01-01

    NASA sponsored composites research and development programs were set in place to develop the critical engineering technologies in large transport aircraft structures. This NASA-Boeing program focused on the critical issues of damage tolerance and pressure containment generic to the fuselage structure of large pressurized aircraft. Skin-stringer and honeycomb sandwich composite fuselage shell designs were evaluated to resolve these issues. Analyses were developed to model the structural response of the fuselage shell designs, and a development test program evaluated the selected design configurations to appropriate load conditions.

  13. Study on utilization of advanced composites in fuselage structures of large transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. W.; Thomson, L. W.; Wilson, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    The potential for utilizing advanced composites in fuselage structures of large transports was assessed. Six fuselage design concepts were selected and evaluated in terms of structural performance, weight, and manufacturing development and costs. Two concepts were selected that merit further consideration for composite fuselage application. These concepts are: (1) a full depth honeycomb design with no stringers, and (2) an I section stringer stiffened laminate skin design. Weight reductions due to applying composites to the fuselages of commercial and military transports were calculated. The benefits of applying composites to a fleet of military transports were determined. Significant technology issues pertinent to composite fuselage structures were identified and evaluated. Program plans for resolving the technology issues were developed.

  14. Critical joints in large composite primary aircraft structures. Volume 2: Technology demonstration test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunin, Bruce L.

    1985-01-01

    A program was conducted to develop the technology for critical structural joints in composite wing structure that meets all the design requirements of a 1990 commercial transport aircraft. The results of four large composite multirow bolted joint tests are presented. The tests were conducted to demonstrate the technology for critical joints in highly loaded composite structure and to verify the analytical methods that were developed throughout the program. The test consisted of a wing skin-stringer transition specimen representing a stringer runout and skin splice on the wing lower surface at the side of the fuselage attachment. All tests were static tension tests. The composite material was Toray T-300 fiber with Ciba-Geigy 914 resin in 10 mil tape form. The splice members were metallic, using combinations of aluminum and titanium. Discussions are given of the test article, instrumentation, test setup, test procedures, and test results for each of the four specimens. Some of the analytical predictions are also included.

  15. Characterization and manufacture of braided composites for large commercial aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedro, Mark J.; Willden, Kurtis

    1992-01-01

    Braided composite materials has been recognized as a potential cost effective material form for fuselage structural elements. Consequently, there is a strong need for more knowledge in the design, manufacture, test, and analysis of textile structural composites. Advance braided composite technology is advanced towards applications to a large commercial transport fuselage. The mechanics are summarized of materials and manufacturing demonstration results which were obtained in order to acquire an understanding of how braided composites can be applied to a commercial fuselage. Textile composites consisting of 2-D, 2-D triaxial, and 3-D braid patterns with thermoplastic and two resin transfer molding resin systems were studied. The structural performance of braided composites was evaluated through an extensive mechanical test program. Analytical methods were also developed and applied to predict the following: internal fiber architecture; stiffness; fiber stresses; failure mechanisms; notch effects; and the history of failure of the braided composite specimens. The applicability of braided composites to a commercial transport fuselage was further assessed through a manufacturing demonstration.

  16. Characterization and manufacture of braided composites for large commercial aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedro, Mark J.; Willden, Kurtis

    1992-01-01

    Braided composite materials, one of the advanced material forms which is under investigation in Boeing's ATCAS program, have been recognized as a potential cost-effective material form for fuselage structural elements. Consequently, there is a strong need for more knowledge in the design, manufacture, test, and analysis of textile structural composites. The overall objective of this work is to advance braided composite technology towards applications to a large commercial transport fuselage. This paper summarizes the mechanics of materials and manufacturing demonstration results which have been obtained in order to acquire an understanding of how braided composites can be applied to a commercial fuselage. Textile composites consisting of 1D, 2D triaxial, and 3D braid patterns with thermoplastic and two RTM resin systems were investigated. The structural performance of braided composites was evaluated through an extensive mechanical test program. Analytical methods were also developed and applied to predict the following: internal fiber architectures, stiffnesses, fiber stresses, failure mechanisms, notch effects, and the entire history of failure of the braided composites specimens. The applicability of braided composites to a commercial transport fuselage was further assessed through a manufacturing demonstration. Three foot fuselage circumferential hoop frames were manufactured to demonstrate the feasibility of consistently producing high quality braided/RTM composite primary structures. The manufacturing issues (tooling requirements, processing requirements, and process/quality control) addressed during the demonstration are summarized. The manufacturing demonstration in conjunction with the mechanical test results and developed analytical methods increased the confidence in the ATCAS approach to the design, manufacture, test, and analysis of braided composites.

  17. Virtual Testing of Large Composite Structures: A Multiple Length/Time-Scale Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gigliotti, Luigi; Pinho, Silvestre T.

    2015-12-01

    This paper illustrates a multiple length/time-scale framework for the virtual testing of large composite structures. Such framework hinges upon a Mesh Superposition Technique (MST) for the coupling between areas of the structure modelled at different length-scales and upon an efficient solid-to-shell numerical homogenization which exploits the internal symmetries of Unit Cells (UCs). Using this framework, it is possible to minimize the areas of the structure modelled at the lowest- (and computationally demanding) scales and the computational cost required to calculate the homogenised to be used in the higher-scales subdomains of multiscale FE models, as well as to simulate the mechanical response of different parts of the structure using different solvers, depending on where they are expected to provide the most computationally efficient solution. The relevance and key-aspects of the multiple length/time-scale framework are demonstrated through the analysis of a real-sized aeronautical composite component.

  18. Fuel containment, lightning protection and damage tolerance in large composite primary aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Charles F.; James, Arthur M.

    1985-01-01

    The damage-tolerance characteristics of high strain-to-failure graphite fibers and toughened resins were evaluated. Test results show that conventional fuel tank sealing techniques are applicable to composite structures. Techniques were developed to prevent fuel leaks due to low-energy impact damage. For wing panels subjected to swept stroke lightning strikes, a surface protection of graphite/aluminum wire fabric and a fastener treatment proved effective in eliminating internal sparking and reducing structural damage. The technology features developed were incorporated and demonstrated in a test panel designed to meet the strength, stiffness, and damage tolerance requirements of a large commercial transport aircraft. The panel test results exceeded design requirements for all test conditions. Wing surfaces constructed with composites offer large weight savings if design allowable strains for compression can be increased from current levels.

  19. Computational Speed-Up of Complex Durability Analysis of Large-Scale Composite Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Storaasli, Olaf O; Abdi, Frank; Dutton, Renly; Cochran, Ernest J

    2008-01-01

    The analysis of modern structures for aerospace, infrastructure, and automotive engineering applications necessitates the use of larger and larger computational models for accurate prediction of structural response. The ever-increasing size of computational structural mechanics simulations imposes a pressing need for commensurate increases in computational speed to keep costs and computation times in check. Innovative methods are needed to expedite the numerical analysis of complex structures while minimizing computational costs. The need for these methodologies is even more critical when performing durability and damage tolerance evaluation as the computation is repeated a number of times for various loading conditions. This paper describes a breakthrough for efficient and accurate predictive methodologies that are amenable to the analysis of progressive failure, reliability, and optimization of large-scale composite structures or structural components.

  20. Critical joints in large composite primary aircraft structures. Volume 1: Technical summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunin, Bruce L.

    1985-01-01

    A program was conducted at Douglas Aircraft Company to develop the technology for critical joints in composite wing structure that meets all the design requirements of a 1990 commercial transport aircraft. In fulfilling this objective, analytical procedures for joint design and analysis were developed during Phase 1 of the program. Tests were conducted at the element level to supply the empirical data required for methods development. Large composite multirow joints were tested to verify the selected design concepts and for correlation with analysis predictions. The Phase 2 program included additional tests to provide joint design and analysis data, and culminated with several technology demonstration tests of a major joint area representative of a commercial transport wing. The technology demonstration program of Phase 2 is discussed. The analysis methodology development, structural test program, and correlation between test results and analytical strength predictions are reviewed.

  1. Structural Characterization of Advanced Composite Tow-Steered Shells with Large Cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, K. Chauncey; Turpin, Jason D.; Gardner, Nathaniel W.; Stanford, Bret K.; Martin, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    The structural performance of two advanced composite tow-steered shells with large cutouts, manufactured using an automated fiber placement system, is assessed using both experimental and analytical methods. The fiber orientation angles of the shells vary continuously around their circumference from +/- 10 degrees on the crown and keel, to +/- 45 degrees on the sides. The raised surface features on one shell result from application of all 24 tows during each fiber placement system pass, while the second shell uses the tow drop/add capability of the system to achieve a more uniform wall thickness. These unstiffened shells, both without and with small cutouts, were previously tested in axial compression and buckled elastically. In this study, a single unreinforced cutout, scaled to represent a cargo door on a commercial aircraft, is machined into one side of each shell. The prebuckling axial stiffnesses and bifurcation buckling loads of these shells with large cutouts are also computed using linear finite element structural analyses for preliminary comparisons with test data. During testing, large displacements are observed around the large cutouts, but the shells maintain an average of 91 percent of the axial stiffness, and also carry 85 percent of the buckling loads, when compared to the pristine shells without cutouts. These relatively small reductions indicate that there is great potential for using tow steering to mitigate the adverse effects of large cutouts on the overall structural performance.

  2. Space exposure of composite materials for large space structures (A0134)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slemp, W. S.

    1984-01-01

    The objective of this experiment is to evaluate the effects of the near-Earth orbital environment on the physical and chemical properties of laminated continuous-filament composites and composites resin films for use in large space structures and advanced spacecraft. The experiment is passive and occupies about one-half of a 6-in.-deep peripheral tray. Specimens of composite materials and polymeric and resin films are arranged above and below the experiment mounting plate to enable both exposure and nonexposure to sunlight. This provides a comparison of the effects of ultraviolet plus vacuum plus thermal cycling and those of vacuum plus thermal cycling on these materials. The experiment tray is thermally isolated from the Long Duration Exposure Facility structure to allow the material specimens to experience a wide range of thermal cycles. Tensile and compression specimens will be used to evaluate the laminated composite materials. A number of the specimens are precut and ready for testing after space exposure, whereas other specimens will be prepared from larger samples.

  3. Manufacturing and NDE of Large Composite Structures for Space Transportation at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGill, Preston; Russell, Sam

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) vision to manufacture, increase safety and reduce the cost of launch vehicles. Nondestructive evaluations of large composite structures are tested for space transportation at MSFC. The topics include: 1) 6 1/2 Generations of Airplanes in a Century; 2) Shuttle Safety Upgrades; 3) Generations of Reusable Launch Vehicles; 4) RLV Technology Demonstration Path; 5) Second Generation; 6) Key NASA Requirements; 7) X-33 Elements; 8) Future-X Pathfinder Projects and Experiments; 9) Focus Area Technical Goals; 10) X-34 Expanded View; 11) X-38 Spacecraft with De-Orbit Propulsion Stage (DPS); 12) Deorbit Module (DM) Critical Design Review (CDR) Design; 13) Forward Structural Adapter (FSA) CDR Design; 14) X-38 DPS CDR Design; 15) RLV Focused Propulsion Technologies; and 16) Challenges in Technology. This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  4. Assessment of the State-of-the-Art in the Design and Manufacturing of Large Composite Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, C. E.

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an assessment of the state-of-the-art in the design and manufacturing of large component structures, including details on the use of continuous fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites (CFRP) in commercial and military aircraft and in space launch vehicles. Project risk mitigation plans must include a building-block test approach to structural design development, manufacturing process scale-up development tests, and pre-flight ground tests to verify structural integrity. The potential benefits of composite structures justifies NASA's investment in developing the technology. Advanced composite structures technology is enabling to virtually every Aero-Space Technology Enterprise Goal.

  5. Validation of New Process Models for Large Injection-Molded Long-Fiber Thermoplastic Composite Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Jin, Xiaoshi; Wang, Jin; Kunc, Vlastimil; Tucker III, Charles L.

    2012-02-23

    This report describes the work conducted under the CRADA Nr. PNNL/304 between Battelle PNNL and Autodesk whose objective is to validate the new process models developed under the previous CRADA for large injection-molded LFT composite structures. To this end, the ARD-RSC and fiber length attrition models implemented in the 2013 research version of Moldflow was used to simulate the injection molding of 600-mm x 600-mm x 3-mm plaques from 40% glass/polypropylene (Dow Chemical DLGF9411.00) and 40% glass/polyamide 6,6 (DuPont Zytel 75LG40HSL BK031) materials. The injection molding was performed by Injection Technologies, Inc. at Windsor, Ontario (under a subcontract by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, ORNL) using the mold offered by the Automotive Composite Consortium (ACC). Two fill speeds under the same back pressure were used to produce plaques under slow-fill and fast-fill conditions. Also, two gating options were used to achieve the following desired flow patterns: flows in edge-gated plaques and in center-gated plaques. After molding, ORNL performed measurements of fiber orientation and length distributions for process model validations. The structure of this report is as follows. After the Introduction (Section 1), Section 2 provides a summary of the ARD-RSC and fiber length attrition models. A summary of model implementations in the latest research version of Moldflow is given in Section 3. Section 4 provides the key processing conditions and parameters for molding of the ACC plaques. The validations of the ARD-RSC and fiber length attrition models are presented and discussed in Section 5. The conclusions will be drawn in Section 6.

  6. Probabilistic Analysis of Large-Scale Composite Structures Using the IPACS Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemonds, Jeffrey; Kumar, Virendra

    1995-01-01

    An investigation was performed to ascertain the feasibility of using IPACS (Integrated Probabilistic Assessment of Composite Structures) for probabilistic analysis of a composite fan blade, the development of which is being pursued by various industries for the next generation of aircraft engines. A model representative of the class of fan blades used in the GE90 engine has been chosen as the structural component to be analyzed with IPACS. In this study, typical uncertainties are assumed in the level, and structural responses for ply stresses and frequencies are evaluated in the form of cumulative probability density functions. Because of the geometric complexity of the blade, the number of plies varies from several hundred at the root to about a hundred at the tip. This represents a extremely complex composites application for the IPACS code. A sensitivity study with respect to various random variables is also performed.

  7. Hierarchical system for autonomous sensing-healing of delamination in large-scale composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakuchi, Shu; Sun, Denghao; Takeda, Nobuo

    2014-10-01

    This study combines our hierarchical fiber-optic-based delamination detection system with a microvascular self-healing material to develop the first autonomous sensing-healing system applicable to large-scale composite structures. In this combined system, embedded vascular modules are connected through check valves to a surface-mounted supply tube of a pressurized healing agent while fiber-optic-based sensors monitor the internal pressure of these vascular modules. When delamination occurs, the healing agent flows into the vascular modules breached by the delamination and infiltrates the damage for healing. At the same time, the pressure sensors identify the damaged modules by detecting internal pressure changes. This paper begins by describing the basic concept of the combined system and by discussing the advantages that arise from its hierarchical nature. The feasibility of the system is then confirmed through delamination infiltration tests. Finally, the hierarchical system is validated in a plate specimen by focusing on the detection and infiltration of the damage. Its self-diagnostic function is also demonstrated.

  8. Critical Joints in Large Composite Primary Aircraft Structures. Volume 3: Ancillary Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunin, Bruce L.; Sagui, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    A program was conducted to develop the technology for critical structural joints for composite wing structure that meets all the design requirements of a 1990 commercial transport aircraft. The results of a comprehensive ancillary test program are summarized, consisting of single-bolt composite joint specimens tested in a variety of configurations. These tests were conducted to characterize the strength and load deflection properties that are required for multirow joint analysis. The composite material was Toray 300 fiber and Ciba-Geigy 914 resin, in the form of 0.005 and 0.01 inch thick unidirectional tape. Tests were conducted in single and double shear for loaded and unloaded hole configurations under both tensile and compressive loading. Two different layup patterns were examined. All tests were conducted at room temperature. In addition, the results of NASA Standard Toughness Test (NASA RP 1092) are reported, which were conducted for several material systems.

  9. Composite sizing and ply orientation for stiffness requirements using a large finite element structural model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radovcich, N. A.; Gentile, D. P.

    1989-01-01

    A NASTRAN bulk dataset preprocessor was developed to facilitate the integration of filamentary composite laminate properties into composite structural resizing for stiffness requirements. The NASCOMP system generates delta stiffness and delta mass matrices for input to the flutter derivative program. The flutter baseline analysis, derivative calculations, and stiffness and mass matrix updates are controlled by engineer defined processes under an operating system called CBUS. A multi-layered design variable grid system permits high fidelity resizing without excessive computer cost. The NASCOMP system uses ply layup drawings for basic input. The aeroelastic resizing for stiffness capability was used during an actual design exercise.

  10. Study of utilization of advanced composites in fuselage structures of large transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, A. C.; Campion, M. C.; Pei, G.

    1984-01-01

    The effort required by the transport aircraft manufacturers to support the introduction of advanced composite materials into the fuselage structure of future commercial and military transport aircraft is investigated. Technology issues, potential benefits to military life cycle costs and commercial operating costs, and development plans are examined. The most urgent technology issues defined are impact dynamics, acoustic transmission, pressure containment and damage tolerance, post-buckling, cutouts, and joints and splices. A technology demonstration program is defined and a rough cost and schedule identified. The fabrication and test of a full-scale fuselage barrel section is presented. Commercial and military benefits are identified. Fuselage structure weight savings from use of advanced composites are 16.4 percent for the commercial and 21.8 percent for the military. For the all-composite airplanes the savings are 26 percent and 29 percent, respectively. Commercial/operating costs are reduced by 5 percent for the all-composite airplane and military life cycle costs by 10 percent.

  11. ACEE composite structures technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klotzsche, M. (Compiler)

    1984-01-01

    The NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) Composite Primary Aircraft Structures Program has made significant progress in the development of technology for advanced composites in commercial aircraft. Commercial airframe manufacturers have demonstrated technology readiness and cost effectiveness of advanced composites for secondary and medium primary components and have initiated a concerted program to develop the data base required for efficient application to safety-of-flight wing and fuselage structures. Oral presentations were compiled into five papers. Topics addressed include: damage tolerance and failsafe testing of composite vertical stabilizer; optimization of composite multi-row bolted joints; large wing joint demonstation components; and joints and cutouts in fuselage structure.

  12. Fuel containment and damage tolerance in large composite primary aircraft structures. Phase 2: Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandifer, J. P.; Denny, A.; Wood, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    Technical issues associated with fuel containment and damage tolerance of composite wing structures for transport aircraft were investigated. Material evaluation tests were conducted on two toughened resin composites: Celion/HX1504 and Celion/5245. These consisted of impact, tension, compression, edge delamination, and double cantilever beam tests. Another test series was conducted on graphite/epoxy box beams simulating a wing cover to spar cap joint configuration of a pressurized fuel tank. These tests evaluated the effectiveness of sealing methods with various fastener types and spacings under fatigue loading and with pressurized fuel. Another test series evaluated the ability of the selected coatings, film, and materials to prevent fuel leakage through 32-ply AS4/2220-1 laminates at various impact energy levels. To verify the structural integrity of the technology demonstration article structural details, tests were conducted on blade stiffened panels and sections. Compression tests were performed on undamaged and impacted stiffened AS4/2220-1 panels and smaller element tests to evaluate stiffener pull-off, side load and failsafe properties. Compression tests were also performed on panels subjected to Zone 2 lightning strikes. All of these data were integrated into a demonstration article representing a moderately loaded area of a transport wing. This test combined lightning strike, pressurized fuel, impact, impact repair, fatigue and residual strength.

  13. Fabrication of low cost composite tooling for filament winding large structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Timothy S.; Fortin, Christopher J.

    A TQM/concurrent engineering approach has been used to create a low cost filament-winding mandrel for large launch-vehicle structure fabrication. The process involves the fabrication of a low cost/low temperature master model, followed by the building of the mandrel and its backup structure within the master. Mandrels fabricated by these means are able to maintain full vacuum integrity and dimensional stability throughout high-temperature cure cycles; the reduced thermal mass of the mandrel results in part-cure cycles that are shorter than those associated with conventional mandrel materials.

  14. An Assessment of the State-of-the-Art in the Design and Manufacturing of Large Composite Structures for Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles E.; Shuart, Mark J.

    2001-01-01

    An assessment of the State-of-the-Art in the design and manufacturing of large composite structures has been conducted. The focus of the assessment is large structural components in commercial and military aircraft. Applications of composites are reviewed for commercial transport aircraft, general aviation aircraft, rotorcraft, and military aircraft.

  15. Durability and damage tolerance of Large Composite Primary Aircraft Structure (LCPAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarty, John E.; Roeseler, William G.

    1984-01-01

    Analysis and testing addressing the key technology areas of durability and damage tolerance were completed for wing surface panels. The wing of a fuel-efficient, 200-passenger commercial transport airplane for 1990 delivery was sized using graphite-epoxy materials. Coupons of various layups used in the wing sizing were tested in tension, compression, and spectrum fatigue with typical fastener penetrations. The compression strength after barely visible impact damage was determined from coupon and structural element tests. One current material system and one toughened system were evaluated by coupon testing. The results of the coupon and element tests were used to design three distinctly different compression panels meeting the strength, stiffness, and damage-tolerance requirements of the upper wing panels. These three concepts were tested with various amounts of damage ranging from barely visible impact to through-penetration. The results of this program provide the key technology data required to assess the durability and damage-tolerance capability or advanced composites for use in commercial aircraft wing panel structure.

  16. Composition and Structure of a Large Online Social Network in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Corten, Rense

    2012-01-01

    Limitations in data collection have long been an obstacle in research on friendship networks. Most earlier studies use either a sample of ego-networks, or complete network data on a relatively small group (e.g., a single organization). The rise of online social networking services such as Friendster and Facebook, however, provides researchers with opportunities to study friendship networks on a much larger scale. This study uses complete network data from Hyves, a popular online social networking service in the Netherlands, comprising over eight million members and over 400 million online friendship relations. In the first study of its kind for the Netherlands, I examine the structure of this network in terms of the degree distribution, characteristic path length, clustering, and degree assortativity. Results indicate that this network shares features of other large complex networks, but also deviates in other respects. In addition, a comparison with other online social networks shows that these networks show remarkable similarities. PMID:22523557

  17. Development of a beam builder for automatic fabrication of large composite space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodle, J. G.

    1979-01-01

    The composite material beam builder which will produce triangular beams from pre-consolidated graphite/glass/thermoplastic composite material through automated mechanical processes is presented, side member storage, feed and positioning, ultrasonic welding, and beam cutoff are formed. Each process lends itself to modular subsystem development. Initial development is concentrated on the key processes for roll forming and ultrasonic welding composite thermoplastic materials. The construction and test of an experimental roll forming machine and ultrasonic welding process control techniques are described.

  18. Fuel containment and damage tolerance for large composite primary aircraft structures. Phase 1: Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandifer, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    Technical problems associated with fuel containment and damage tolerance of composite material wings for transport aircraft were identified. The major tasks are the following: (1) the preliminary design of damage tolerant wing surface using composite materials; (2) the evaluation of fuel sealing and lightning protection methods for a composite material wing; and (3) an experimental investigation of the damage tolerant characteristics of toughened resin graphite/epoxy materials. The test results, the test techniques, and the test data are presented.

  19. Radiation exposure of selected composites and thin films. [for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slemp, W. S.; Santos, B.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of electron radiation on selected candidate composite materials was investigated. Radiation damage mechanisms were identified and the coefficient of thermal expansion were measured for each type composite material. It was concluded that the threshold for major physical and mechanical property changes in the polysulfone films and in the polysulfone and epoxy composites is in excess of 1 x 10 to the 9th power rads of electrons. Based upon these data, the 5208 and 934 epoxies and the P1700 polysulfone composites would be acceptable for 5 to 10 year geosynchronous Earth environment missions receiving 1 x 10 to the 9th power rads of electron radiation.

  20. Making Large Composite Vessels Without Autoclaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sigur, W. A.

    1989-01-01

    Method for making fiber-reinforced composite structure relies on heating and differential thermal expansion to provide temperature and pressure necessary to develop full strength, without having to place structure in large, expensive autoclave. Layers of differentially expanding material squeeze fiber-reinforce composite between them when heated. Method suitable for such cylindrical structures as pressure vessels and tanks. Used for both resin-matrix and metal-matrix composites.

  1. Fuel containment and damage tolerance in large composite primary aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, C. F.

    1983-01-01

    Technical problems related to fuel containment and damage tolerance of composite material wings for transport aircraft was investigated. The major tasks are the following: (1) the preliminary design of damage tolerant wing surface using composite materials; (2) the evaluation of fuel sealing and lightning protection methods for a composite material wing; and (3) an experimental investigation of the damage tolerant characteristics of toughened resin graphite/epoxy materials. The design concepts investigated for the upper and lower surfaces of a composite wing for a transport aircraft are presented and the relationship between weight savings and the design allowable strain used within the analysis is discussed. Experiments which compare the fuel sealing characteristics of bolt-bonded joints and bolted joints sealed with a polysulphide sealant are reviewed. Data from lightning strike tests on stiffened and unstiffened graphite/epoxy panels are presented. A wide variety of coupon tests were conducted to evaluate the relative damage tolerance of toughened resin graphite/epoxies. Data from these tests are presented and their relevance to the wing surface design concepts are discussed.

  2. Electron and proton absorption calculations for a graphite/epoxy composite model. [large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, E. R., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The Bethe-Bloch stopping power relations for inelastic collisions were used to determine the absorption of electron and proton energy in cured neat epoxy resin and the absorption of electron energy in a graphite/epoxy composite. Absorption of electron energy due to bremsstrahlung was determined. Electron energies from 0.2 to 4.0 MeV and proton energies from 0.3 to 1.75 MeV were used. Monoenergetic electron energy absorption profiles for models of pure graphite, cured neat epoxy resin, and graphite/epoxy composites are reported. A relation is determined for depth of uniform energy absorption in a composite as a function of fiber volume fraction and initial electron energy. Monoenergetic proton energy absorption profiles are reported for the neat resin model. A relation for total proton penetration in the epoxy resin as a function of initial proton energy is determined. Electron energy absorption in the composite due to bremsstrahlung is reported. Electron and proton energy absorption profiles in cured neat epoxy resin are reported for environments approximating geosynchronous earth orbit.

  3. Fiber Optic Rosette Strain Gauge Development and Application on a Large-Scale Composite Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Jason P.; Przekop, Adam; Juarez, Peter D.; Roth, Mark C.

    2015-01-01

    A detailed description of the construction, application, and measurement of 196 FO rosette strain gauges that measured multi-axis strain across the outside upper surface of the forward bulkhead component of a multibay composite fuselage test article is presented. A background of the FO strain gauge and the FO measurement system as utilized in this application is given and results for the higher load cases of the testing sequence are shown.

  4. Develop, demonstrate, and verify large area composite structural bonding with polyimide adhesives. [adhesively bonding graphite-polyimide structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhombal, B. D.; Wykes, D. H.; Hong, K. C.; Stenersen, A. A.

    1982-01-01

    The technology required to produce graphite-polyimide structural components with operational capability at 598 K (600 F) is considered. A series of polyimide adhesives was screened for mechanical and physical properties and processibility in fabricating large midplane bonded panels and honeycomb sandwich panels in an effort to fabricate a structural test component of the space shuttle aft body flap. From 41 formulations, LaRC-13, FM34B-18, and a modified LaRC-13 adhesive were selected for further evaluation. The LaRC-13 adhesive was rated as the best of the three adhesives in terms of availability, cost, processibility, properties, and ability to produce void fee large area (12" x 12") midplane bonds. Surface treatments and primers for the adhesives were evaluated and processes were developed for the fabrication of honeycomb sandwich panels of very good quality which was evidenced by rupture in the honeycomb core rather than in the facesheet bands on flatwise tensile strength testing. The fabrication of the adhesively bonded honeycomb sandwich cover panels, ribs, and leading edge covers of Celion graphite/LARC-160 polyimide laminates is described.

  5. A scaleable integrated sensing and control system for NDE, monitoring, and control of medium to very large composite smart structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Jerry; Rhoades, Valerie; Arner, Radford; Clem, Timothy; Cuneo, Adam

    2007-04-01

    technology which may use other hardware processors and various communications means. For example, two demonstrations of SHIELD have been completed, in January and May 2005 respectively. One demonstration used algorithms in C running in multiple threads in the SHIELD core and utilizing two different sensor networks, one CAN bus and one wireless. The second had algorithms operating in C on the SHIELD core and other algorithms running on multiple Texas Instruments DSP processors using a NATNI that communicated via wired TCP/IP. A key feature of SHIELD is the implementation of a wireless ZIGBEE (802.15.4) network for implementing large numbers of small, low cost, low power sensors communication via a meshstar wireless network. While SHIELD was designed to integrate with a wide variety of existing communications protocols, a ZIGBEE network capability was implemented specifically for SHIELD. This will facilitate the monitoring of medium to very large structures including marine applications, utility scale multi-megawatt wind energy systems, and aircraft/spacecraft. The SHIELD wireless network will facilitate large numbers of sensors (up to 32000), accommodate sensors embedded into the composite material, can communicate to both sensors and actuators, and prevents obsolescence by providing for re-programming of the nodes via remote RF communications. The wireless network provides for ultra-low energy use, spatial location, and accurate timestamping, utilizing the beaconing feature of ZIGBEE.

  6. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1982-01-01

    The promise of filamentary composite materials, whose development may be considered as entering its second generation, continues to generate intense interest and applications activity. Fiber reinforced composite materials offer substantially improved performance and potentially lower costs for aerospace hardware. Much progress has been achieved since the initial developments in the mid 1960's. Rather limited applications to primary aircraft structure have been made, however, mainly in a material-substitution mode on military aircraft, except for a few experiments currently underway on large passenger airplanes in commercial operation. To fulfill the promise of composite materials completely requires a strong technology base. NASA and AFOSR recognize the present state of the art to be such that to fully exploit composites in sophisticated aerospace structures, the technology base must be improved. This, in turn, calls for expanding fundamental knowledge and the means by which it can be successfully applied in design and manufacture.

  7. An Assessment of the State-of-the-Art in the Design and Manufacturing of Large Composite Structures for Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles E.; Starnes, James H., Jr.; Shuart, Mark J.

    2001-01-01

    The results of an assessment of the state-of-the-art in the design and manufacturing of large composite structures are described. The focus of the assessment is on the use of polymeric matrix composite materials for large airframe structural components. such as those in commercial and military aircraft and space transportation vehicles. Applications of composite materials for large commercial transport aircraft, general aviation aircraft, rotorcraft, military aircraft. and unmanned rocket launch vehicles are reviewed. The results of the assessment of the state-of-the-art include a summary of lessons learned, examples of current practice, and an assessment of advanced technologies under development. The results of the assessment conclude with an evaluation of the future technology challenges associated with applications of composite materials to the primary structures of commercial transport aircraft and advanced space transportation vehicles.

  8. Large-Deformation Curling Actuators Based on Carbon Nanotube Composite: Advanced-Structure Design and Biomimetic Application.

    PubMed

    Chen, Luzhuo; Weng, Mingcen; Zhou, Zhiwei; Zhou, Yi; Zhang, Lingling; Li, Jiaxin; Huang, Zhigao; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Changhong; Fan, Shoushan

    2015-12-22

    In recent years, electroactive polymers have been developed as actuator materials. As an important branch of electroactive polymers, electrothermal actuators (ETAs) demonstrate potential applications in the fields of artificial muscles, biomimetic devices, robotics, and so on. Large-shape deformation, low-voltage-driven actuation, and ultrafast fabrication are critical to the development of ETA. However, a simultaneous optimization of all of these advantages has not been realized yet. Practical biomimetic applications are also rare. In this work, we introduce an ultrafast approach to fabricate a curling actuator based on a newly designed carbon nanotube and polymer composite, which completely realizes all of the above required advantages. The actuator shows an ultralarge curling actuation with a curvature greater than 1.0 cm(-1) and bending angle larger than 360°, even curling into a tubular structure. The driving voltage is down to a low voltage of 5 V. The remarkable actuation is attributed not only to the mismatch in the coefficients of thermal expansion but also to the mechanical property changes of materials during temperature change. We also construct an S-shape actuator to show the possibility of building advanced-structure actuators. A weightlifting walking robot is further designed that exhibits a fast-moving motion while lifting a sample heavier than itself, demonstrating promising biomimetic applications.

  9. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1985-01-01

    Various topics relating to composite structural materials for use in aircraft structures are discussed. The mechanical properties of high performance carbon fibers, carbon fiber-epoxy interface bonds, composite fractures, residual stress in high modulus and high strength carbon fibers, fatigue in composite materials, and the mechanical properties of polymeric matrix composite laminates are among the topics discussed.

  10. Composite structural materials. [aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1980-01-01

    The use of filamentary composite materials in the design and construction of primary aircraft structures is considered with emphasis on efforts to develop advanced technology in the areas of physical properties, structural concepts and analysis, manufacturing, and reliability and life prediction. The redesign of a main spar/rib region on the Boeing 727 elevator near its actuator attachment point is discussed. A composite fabrication and test facility is described as well as the use of minicomputers for computer aided design. Other topics covered include (1) advanced structural analysis methids for composites; (2) ultrasonic nondestructive testing of composite structures; (3) optimum combination of hardeners in the cure of epoxy; (4) fatigue in composite materials; (5) resin matrix characterization and properties; (6) postbuckling analysis of curved laminate composite panels; and (7) acoustic emission testing of composite tensile specimens.

  11. Deployable Soft Composite Structures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Rodrigue, Hugo; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-02-19

    Deployable structure composed of smart materials based actuators can reconcile its inherently conflicting requirements of low mass, good shape adaptability, and high load-bearing capability. This work describes the fabrication of deployable structures using smart soft composite actuators combining a soft matrix with variable stiffness properties and hinge-like movement through a rigid skeleton. The hinge actuator has the advantage of being simple to fabricate, inexpensive, lightweight and simple to actuate. This basic actuator can then be used to form modules capable of different types of deformations, which can then be assembled into deployable structures. The design of deployable structures is based on three principles: design of basic hinge actuators, assembly of modules and assembly of modules into large-scale deployable structures. Various deployable structures such as a segmented triangular mast, a planar structure comprised of single-loop hexagonal modules and a ring structure comprised of single-loop quadrilateral modules were designed and fabricated to verify this approach. Finally, a prototype for a deployable mirror was developed by attaching a foldable reflective membrane to the designed ring structure and its functionality was tested by using it to reflect sunlight onto to a small-scale solar panel.

  12. Deployable Soft Composite Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Rodrigue, Hugo; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-02-01

    Deployable structure composed of smart materials based actuators can reconcile its inherently conflicting requirements of low mass, good shape adaptability, and high load-bearing capability. This work describes the fabrication of deployable structures using smart soft composite actuators combining a soft matrix with variable stiffness properties and hinge-like movement through a rigid skeleton. The hinge actuator has the advantage of being simple to fabricate, inexpensive, lightweight and simple to actuate. This basic actuator can then be used to form modules capable of different types of deformations, which can then be assembled into deployable structures. The design of deployable structures is based on three principles: design of basic hinge actuators, assembly of modules and assembly of modules into large-scale deployable structures. Various deployable structures such as a segmented triangular mast, a planar structure comprised of single-loop hexagonal modules and a ring structure comprised of single-loop quadrilateral modules were designed and fabricated to verify this approach. Finally, a prototype for a deployable mirror was developed by attaching a foldable reflective membrane to the designed ring structure and its functionality was tested by using it to reflect sunlight onto to a small-scale solar panel.

  13. Deployable Soft Composite Structures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Rodrigue, Hugo; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Deployable structure composed of smart materials based actuators can reconcile its inherently conflicting requirements of low mass, good shape adaptability, and high load-bearing capability. This work describes the fabrication of deployable structures using smart soft composite actuators combining a soft matrix with variable stiffness properties and hinge-like movement through a rigid skeleton. The hinge actuator has the advantage of being simple to fabricate, inexpensive, lightweight and simple to actuate. This basic actuator can then be used to form modules capable of different types of deformations, which can then be assembled into deployable structures. The design of deployable structures is based on three principles: design of basic hinge actuators, assembly of modules and assembly of modules into large-scale deployable structures. Various deployable structures such as a segmented triangular mast, a planar structure comprised of single-loop hexagonal modules and a ring structure comprised of single-loop quadrilateral modules were designed and fabricated to verify this approach. Finally, a prototype for a deployable mirror was developed by attaching a foldable reflective membrane to the designed ring structure and its functionality was tested by using it to reflect sunlight onto to a small-scale solar panel. PMID:26892762

  14. Combining Passive Thermography and Acoustic Emission for Large Area Fatigue Damage Growth Assessment of a Composite Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.; Burke, Eric R.

    2016-01-01

    Passive thermography and acoustic emission data were obtained for improved real time damage detection during fatigue loading. A strong positive correlation was demonstrated between acoustic energy event location and thermal heating, especially if the structure under load was nearing ultimate failure. An image processing routine was developed to map the acoustic emission data onto the thermal imagery. This required removing optical barrel distortion and angular rotation from the thermal data. The acoustic emission data were then mapped onto thermal data, revealing the cluster of acoustic emission event locations around the thermal signatures of interest. By combining both techniques, progression of damage growth is confirmed and areas of failure are identified. This technology provides improved real time inspections of advanced composite structures during fatigue testing.Keywords: Thermal nondestructive evaluation, fatigue damage detection, aerospace composite inspection, acoustic emission, passive thermography

  15. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1979-01-01

    A multifaceted program is described in which aeronautical, mechanical, and materials engineers interact to develop composite aircraft structures. Topics covered include: (1) the design of an advanced composite elevator and a proposed spar and rib assembly; (2) optimizing fiber orientation in the vicinity of heavily loaded joints; (3) failure mechanisms and delamination; (4) the construction of an ultralight sailplane; (5) computer-aided design; finite element analysis programs, preprocessor development, and array preprocessor for SPAR; (6) advanced analysis methods for composite structures; (7) ultrasonic nondestructive testing; (8) physical properties of epoxy resins and composites; (9) fatigue in composite materials, and (10) transverse thermal expansion of carbon/epoxy composites.

  16. Development of large aperture composite adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kmetik, Viliam; Vitovec, Bohumil; Jiran, Lukas; Nemcova, Sarka; Zicha, Josef; Inneman, Adolf; Mikulickova, Lenka; Pavlica, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Large aperture composite adaptive optics for laser applications is investigated in cooperation of Institute of Plasma Physic, Department of Instrumentation and Control Engineering FME CTU and 5M Ltd. We are exploring opportunity of a large-size high-power-laser deformable-mirror production using a lightweight bimorph actuated structure with a composite core. In order to produce a sufficiently large operational free aperture we are developing new technologies for production of flexible core, bimorph actuator and deformable mirror reflector. Full simulation of a deformable-mirrors structure was prepared and validated by complex testing. A deformable mirror actuation and a response of a complicated structure are investigated for an accurate control of the adaptive optics. An original adaptive optics control system and a bimorph deformable mirror driver were developed. Tests of material samples, components and sub-assemblies were completed. A subscale 120 mm bimorph deformable mirror prototype was designed, fabricated and thoroughly tested. A large-size 300 mm composite-core bimorph deformable mirror was simulated and optimized, fabrication of a prototype is carried on. A measurement and testing facility is modified to accommodate large sizes optics.

  17. Large, Easily Deployable Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agan, W. E.

    1983-01-01

    Study of concepts for large space structures will interest those designing scaffolding, radio towers, rescue equipment, and prefabricated shelters. Double-fold, double-cell module was selected for further design and for zero gravity testing. Concept is viable for deployment by humans outside space vehicle as well as by remotely operated manipulator.

  18. Combining passive thermography and acoustic emission for large area fatigue damage growth assessment of a composite structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.; Burke, Eric R.

    2016-05-01

    Passive thermography and acoustic emission data were obtained for improved real time damage detection during fatigue loading. A strong positive correlation was demonstrated between acoustic energy event location and thermal heating, especially if the structure under load was nearing ultimate failure. An image processing routine was developed to map the acoustic emission data onto the thermal imagery. This required removing optical barrel distortion and angular rotation from the thermal data. The acoustic emission data were then mapped onto thermal data, revealing the cluster of acoustic emission event locations around the thermal signatures of interest. By combining both techniques, progression of damage growth is confirmed and areas of failure are identified. This technology provides improved real time inspections of advanced composite structures during fatigue testing.

  19. Optimization of composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroud, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    Structural optimization is introduced and examples which illustrate potential problems associated with optimized structures are presented. Optimized structures may have very low load carrying ability for an off design condition. They tend to have multiple modes of failure occurring simultaneously and can, therefore, be sensitive to imperfections. Because composite materials provide more design variables than do metals, they allow for more refined tailoring and more extensive optimization. As a result, optimized composite structures can be especially susceptible to these problems.

  20. Bonded composite repair of composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahler, Mary A.

    Repair and maintenance cost drives a large percentage of the lifetime cost of aircraft structures. Understanding repair issues can lead to a structure that significantly lowers the lifetime cost. Advanced composite materials, while offering the potential to increase aircraft capabilities with minimum weight, are more susceptible to repairable damage than conventional aircraft materials. Improved inspection and repair methods are required to ensure structural integrity and aircraft readiness in the existing operational environment. Many of today's innovative composite designs may result in aircraft structures that are unreasonably difficult to repair. As a first step, technical issues associated with bonded composite repair of composite structures were investigated. An extensive literature review identified many areas where real world composite repairs are being used successfully. An electronic database was developed summarizing the publications found during the literature review. The database includes publication, experimental test results and analytical results of advanced composite bonded repairs. The current analysis of repair does not account for the variations that exist in repair. To facilitate the analysis, a finite element interface was developed to provide analysts with a tool that would create complete finite element models of repaired structures efficiently and in a 3-dimensional view. The finite element models created by the developed interface were successfully correlated to test data for accuracy of the results. Parametric studies were performed using the interface to evaluate effects of repair variables. Thermal impact of repair on the repair panel is one area lacking attention in the repair literature. To understand the impact of heat and thermal gradients of the repair, an analytical investigation was performed to evaluate. the parameters affected by heat. For a solid laminate, the temperature at the adhesive bondline was investigated. The primary

  1. Probabilistic assessment of composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiao, Michael E.; Abumeri, Galib H.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1993-01-01

    A general computational simulation methodology for an integrated probabilistic assessment of composite structures is discussed and demonstrated using aircraft fuselage (stiffened composite cylindrical shell) structures with rectangular cutouts. The computational simulation was performed for the probabilistic assessment of the structural behavior including buckling loads, vibration frequencies, global displacements, and local stresses. The scatter in the structural response is simulated based on the inherent uncertainties in the primitive (independent random) variables at the fiber matrix constituent, ply, laminate, and structural scales that describe the composite structures. The effect of uncertainties due to fabrication process variables such as fiber volume ratio, void volume ratio, ply orientation, and ply thickness is also included. The methodology has been embedded in the computer code IPACS (Integrated Probabilistic Assessment of Composite Structures). In addition to the simulated scatter, the IPACS code also calculates the sensitivity of the composite structural behavior to all the primitive variables that influence the structural behavior. This information is useful for assessing reliability and providing guidance for improvement. The results from the probabilistic assessment for the composite structure with rectangular cutouts indicate that the uncertainty in the longitudinal ply stress is mainly caused by the uncertainty in the laminate thickness, and the large overlap of the scatter in the first four buckling loads implies that the buckling mode shape for a specific buckling load can be either of the four modes.

  2. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1984-01-01

    Progress is reported in studies of constituent materials composite materials, generic structural elements, processing science technology, and maintaining long-term structural integrity. Topics discussed include: mechanical properties of high performance carbon fibers; fatigue in composite materials; experimental and theoretical studies of moisture and temperature effects on the mechanical properties of graphite-epoxy laminates and neat resins; numerical investigations of the micromechanics of composite fracture; delamination failures of composite laminates; effect of notch size on composite laminates; improved beam theory for anisotropic materials; variation of resin properties through the thickness of cured samples; numerical analysis composite processing; heat treatment of metal matrix composites, and the RP-1 and RP2 gliders of the sailplane project.

  3. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewy, Robert G.; Wiberley, Stephen E.

    1987-01-01

    The development and application of composite materials to aerospace vehicle structures which began in the mid 1960's has now progressed to the point where what can be considered entire airframes are being designed and built using composites. Issues related to the fabrication of non-resin matrix composites and the micro, mezzo and macromechanics of thermoplastic and metal matrix composites are emphasized. Several research efforts are presented. They are entitled: (1) The effects of chemical vapor deposition and thermal treatments on the properties of pitch-based carbon fiber; (2) Inelastic deformation of metal matrix laminates; (3) Analysis of fatigue damage in fibrous MMC laminates; (4) Delamination fracture toughness in thermoplastic matrix composites; (5) Numerical investigation of the microhardness of composite fracture; and (6) General beam theory for composite structures.

  4. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1981-01-01

    The composite aircraft program component (CAPCOMP) is a graduate level project conducted in parallel with a composite structures program. The composite aircraft program glider (CAPGLIDE) is an undergraduate demonstration project which has as its objectives the design, fabrication, and testing of a foot launched ultralight glider using composite structures. The objective of the computer aided design (COMPAD) portion of the composites project is to provide computer tools for the analysis and design of composite structures. The major thrust of COMPAD is in the finite element area with effort directed at implementing finite element analysis capabilities and developing interactive graphics preprocessing and postprocessing capabilities. The criteria for selecting research projects to be conducted under the innovative and supporting research (INSURE) program are described.

  5. Load Diffusion in Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horgan, Cornelius O.; Simmonds, J. G.

    2000-01-01

    This research has been concerned with load diffusion in composite structures. Fundamental solid mechanics studies were carried out to provide a basis for assessing the complicated modeling necessary for large scale structures used by NASA. An understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of load diffusion in composite subcomponents is essential in developing primary composite structures. Analytical models of load diffusion behavior are extremely valuable in building an intuitive base for developing refined modeling strategies and assessing results from finite element analyses. The decay behavior of stresses and other field quantities provides a significant aid towards this process. The results are also amendable to parameter study with a large parameter space and should be useful in structural tailoring studies.

  6. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewy, R.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1986-01-01

    Overall emphasis is on basic long-term research in the following categories: constituent materials, composite materials, generic structural elements, processing science technology; and maintaining long-term structural integrity. Research in basic composition, characteristics, and processing science of composite materials and their constituents is balanced against the mechanics, conceptual design, fabrication, and testing of generic structural elements typical of aerospace vehicles so as to encourage the discovery of unusual solutions to present and future problems. Detailed descriptions of the progress achieved in the various component parts of this comprehensive program are presented.

  7. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewy, Robert G.; Wiberley, Stephen E.

    1988-01-01

    A decade long program to develop critical advanced composite technology in the areas of physical properties, structural concept and analysis, manufacturing, reliability, and life predictions is reviewed. Specific goals are discussed. The status of the chemical vapor deposition effects on carbon fiber properties; inelastic deformation of metal matrix laminates; fatigue damage in fibrous MMC laminates; delamination fracture toughness in thermoplastic matrix composites; and numerical analysis of composite micromechanical behavior are presented.

  8. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of the RPI composites program is to develop advanced technology in the areas of physical properties, structural concepts and analysis, manufacturing, reliability and life prediction. Concommitant goals are to educate engineers to design and use composite materials as normal or conventional materials. A multifaceted program was instituted to achieve these objectives.

  9. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1982-01-01

    Research in the basic composition, characteristics, and processng science of composite materials and their constituents is balanced against the mechanics, conceptual design, fabrication, and testing of generic structural elements typical of aerospace vehicles so as to encourage the discovery of unusual solutions to problems. Detailed descriptions of the progress achieved in the various component parts of his program are presented.

  10. Large space structures testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waites, Henry; Worley, H. Eugene

    1987-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the development of testing concepts and facilities that accurately simulate the pathologies believed to exist in future spacecraft. Both the Government and Industry have participated in the development of facilites over the past several years. The progress and problems associated with the development of the Large Space Structure Test Facility at the Marshall Flight Center are presented. This facility was in existence for a number of years and its utilization has run the gamut from total in-house involvement, third party contractor testing, to the mutual participation of other Government Agencies in joint endeavors.

  11. ACEE composite structures technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, A. M.

    1984-01-01

    Topics addressed include: strength and hygrothermal response of L-1011 fin components; wing fuel containment and damage tolerance development; impact dynamics; acoustic transmission; fuselage structure; composite transport wing technology development; spar/assembly concepts.

  12. Rb, Sr and strontium isotopic composition, K/Ar age and large ion lithophile trace element abundances in rocks and glasses from the Wanapitei Lake impact structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winzer, S. R.; Lum, R. K. L.; Schuhmann, S.

    1976-01-01

    Shock metamorphosed rocks and shock-produced melt glasses from the Wanapitei Lake impact structure have been examined petrographically and by electron microprobe. Eleven clasts exhibiting varying degrees of shock metamorphism and eight impact-produced glasses have been analyzed for Rb, Sr and Sr isotopic composition. Five clasts and one glass have also been analyzed for large ion lithophile (LIL) trace element abundances including Li, Rb, Sr, and Ba and the REE's. The impact event forming the Wanapitei Lake structure occurred 37 m.y. ago based on K/Ar dating of glass and glassy whole-rock samples. Rb/Sr isotopic dating failed to provide a meaningful whole-rock or internal isochron. The isotopic composition of the glasses can be explained by impact-produced mixing and melting of metasediments.

  13. Rb, Sr and strontium isotopic composition, K/Ar age and large ion lithophile trace element abundances in rocks and glasses from the Wanapitei Lake impact structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winzer, S. R.; Lum, R. K. L.; Schuhmann, S.

    1976-01-01

    Shock metamorphosed rocks and shock-produced melt glasses from the Wanapitei Lake impact structure have been examined petrographically and by electron microprobe. Eleven clasts exhibiting varying degrees of shock metamorphism and eight impact-produced glasses have been analyzed for Rb, Sr and Sr isotopic composition. Five clasts and one glass have also been analyzed for large ion lithophile (LIL) trace element abundances including Li, Rb, Sr, and Ba and the REE's. The impact event forming the Wanapitei Lake structure occurred 37 m.y. ago based on K/Ar dating of glass and glassy whole-rock samples. Rb/Sr isotopic dating failed to provide a meaningful whole-rock or internal isochron. The isotopic composition of the glasses can be explained by impact-produced mixing and melting of metasediments.

  14. Composite foam structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brian E. (Inventor); Brockmeyer, Jerry (Inventor); Tuffias, Robert H. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A composite rigid foam structure that has a skin or coating on at least one of its surfaces. The skin is formed in situ by thermal spray techniques. The skin is bonded substantially throughout the surface of the porous substrate to the peripheries of the pores. The skin on the average does not penetrate the surface of the substrate by more than the depth of about 2 to 5 pores. Thus, thermal spraying the skin onto the rigid foam produces a composite that is tightly and uniformly bonded together without unduly increasing the weight of the composite structure. Both thermal conductivity and bonding are excellent.

  15. Lightweight Composite Intertank Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehle, Greg V.

    1995-01-01

    Report presents results of study for proposed lightweight composite material alternative to present semimonocoque aluminum intertank structure for advanced launch vehicles. Proposed structure integrated assembly of sandwich panels made of laminated epoxy-matrix/carbon-fiber skins, and aluminum honeycomb core.

  16. Large Folded, Deployable Structure Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, Amy; Kiley, Andrew

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents an overview of Airbus Defence and Space in-house development activity associated with the large foldable deployable structures and analytical process tools initiated in 2007.Industrially the concept of stored energy, self- motorising structures is 'typically' limited to deployable boom concepts with the application to larger secondary or even primary structures having very little heritage. The concept of being able to 'collapse' a structure to fit into the available launcher fairing volume has numerous advantages and applications. One key advantage is the ability to launch very large structures of typical spacecraft cross-sectionand 50m+ deployed length. Another advantage is reduction of body inertia thus promoting dynamic efficiency with possible mass saving.Recent tape spring material characterisation has focused on torque versus angle stiffness characterisation of composite laminates. This work has been extended further to characterise for CFRP Damage Evolution; visco-elastic effect as a function of folded storage duration and impact of stiffness degradation. Further research has been performed around life testing and latched position repeatability.

  17. Metal matrix composite structures

    SciTech Connect

    Krivov, G.A.; Beletsky, V.M.; Gribkov, A.N.

    1993-12-31

    High strength-weight properties, stiffness and fatigue resistance characteristics together with low sensitivity to stress concentration make metal matrix composites (MMC) rather promising for their use in structures. Metal matrix composites consist of a matrix (aluminum, magnesium, titanium and their alloys are the most frequently used) and reinforcers (carbon and boron fibers, high-strength steel wire, silicon carbide whiskers, etc.). This work considers various types of MMC and their applications in structures. The methods of structure production from metal matrix CM of aluminum-boron system with the help of machining, deformation, part joining by welding and riveting are given.

  18. Composite Structural Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberly, S. E.

    1984-01-01

    The development and application of filamentary composite materials, is considered. Such interest is based on the possibility of using relatively brittle materials with high modulus, high strength, but low density in composites with good durability and high tolerance to damage. Fiber reinforced composite materials of this kind offer substantially improved performance and potentially lower costs for aerospace hardware. Much progress has been made since the initial developments in the mid 1960's. There were only limited applied to the primary structure of operational vehicles, mainly as aircrafts.

  19. Testing of a composite thermal structure to insulate the drivers of a large-scale blast/thermal simulator. Final report, Sep 86-Jun 88

    SciTech Connect

    McCue, L.F.

    1991-03-01

    This report describes the developmental testing of the thermal and mechanical properties of two versions of a composite structure which were developed for insulating the walls of high-pressure vessels containing hot nitrogen gas against heat loss and the results of these tests are presented. Included herein are data on thermal diffusivity, specific heat, density, expansion coefficients, thermal conductivity and mechanical properties, as well as energy transfer and temperature profiles for each of the composite systems. A subscale driver tube assembly modeling a driver tube of a Large Blast/Thermal Simulator and consisting of a nitrogen supply system, a gas heater, and the heat-insulated driver tube complete with instrumentation was designed and constructed. A future testing program under actual operating conditions is recommended.

  20. Repairs of composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roh, Hee Seok

    Repair on damaged composite panels was conducted. To better understand adhesively bonded repair, the study investigates the effect of design parameters on the joint strength. The design parameters include bondline length, thickness of adherend and type of adhesive. Adhesives considered in this study were tested to measure their tensile material properties. Three types of adhesively bonded joints, single strap, double strap, and single lap joint were considered under changing bondline lengths, thickness of adherend and type of adhesive. Based on lessons learned from bonded joints, a one-sided patch repair method for composite structures was conducted. The composite patch was bonded to the damaged panel by either film adhesive FM-73M or paste adhesive EA-9394 and the residual strengths of the repaired specimens were compared under varying patch sizes. A new repair method using attachments has been suggested to enhance the residual strength. Results obtained through experiments were analyzed using finite element analysis to provide a better repair design and explain the experimental results. It was observed that the residual strength of the repaired specimen was affected by patch length. Method for rapid repairs of damaged composite structures was investigated. The damage was represented by a circular hole in a composite laminated plate. Pre-cured composite patches were bonded with a quick-curing commercial adhesive near (rather than over) the hole. Tensile tests were conducted on specimens repaired with various patch geometries. The test results showed that, among the methods investigated, the best repair method restored over 90% of the original strength of an undamaged panel. The interfacial stresses in the adhesive zone for different patches were calculated in order to understand the efficiencies of the designs of these patch repairs. It was found that the composite patch that yielded the best strength had the lowest interfacial peel stress between the patch and

  1. Composite mechanics for engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    1987-01-01

    Recent research activities and accomplishments at Lewis Research Center on composite mechanics for engine structures are summarized. The activities focused mainly on developing procedures for the computational simulation of composite intrinsic and structural behavior. The computational simulation encompasses all aspects of composite mechanics, advanced three-dimensional finite-element methods, damage tolerance, composite structural and dynamic response, and structural tailoring and optimization.

  2. Composite mechanics for engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    1989-01-01

    Recent research activities and accomplishments at Lewis Research Center on composite mechanics for engine structures are summarized. The activities focused mainly on developing procedures for the computational simulation of composite intrinsic and structural behavior. The computational simulation encompasses all aspects of composite mechanics, advanced three-dimensional finite-element methods, damage tolerance, composite structural and dynamic response, and structural tailoring and optimization.

  3. Composite mechanics for engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    1989-01-01

    Recent research activities and accomplishments at Lewis Research Center on composite mechanics for engine structures are summarized. The activities focused mainly on developing procedures for the computational simulation of composite intrinsic and structural behavior. The computational simulation encompasses all aspects of composite mechanics, advanced three-dimensional finite-element methods, damage tolerance, composite structural and dynamic response, and structural tailoring and optimization.

  4. A technique for real-time detection, location and quantification of damage in large polymer composite structures made of electrically non-conductive fibers and carbon nanotube networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naghashpour, Ali; Van Hoa, Suong

    2013-11-01

    In this work, we have developed a novel, practical and real-time structural health monitoring (SHM) technique to detect, locate and quantify damage that occurs at one or more locations in large polymer composite structures (LPCSs) made of electrically non-conductive fibers and carbon nanotube networks. Our technique exploits the piezoresistive effect of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in epoxy resin. The electrically conductive epoxy resin was used to prepare glass fiber reinforced composite plates. The plates were marked with grid points where electrically conductive silver-epoxy pastes were deposited. The electrical resistances between the grid points were measured and used as a reference set. Two new concepts are introduced. One is uniformity of MWCNT distribution which gives rise to uniformity in electrical conductivity. The second is maximum sensitivity to change in electrical resistance due to the occurrence of damage. These issues are demonstrated as criteria to determine the optimal quantity of MWCNTs. This optimal quantity is used to assure damage detectability at any region in the large plates. Drilled holes and impact testing were conducted to simulate damage. The damage causes the electrical resistance between the contact points surrounding the damage to increase. This increase is used to detect, locate and quantify damage.

  5. Hybrid composite laminate structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Lark, R. F. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An invention which relates to laminate structures and specifically to essentially anisotropic fiber composite laminates is described. Metal foils are selectively disposed within the laminate to produce increased resistance to high velocity impact, fracture, surface erosion, and other stresses within the laminate.

  6. Unibody Composite Pressurized Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rufer, Markus; Conger, Robert; Bauer, Thomas; Newman, John

    2013-01-01

    An integrated, generic unibody composite pressurized structure (UCPS) combined with a positive expulsion device (PED), consisting of an elastomeric bladder for monopropellant hydrazine, has been quasi-standardized for spacecraft use. The combination functions as an all-composite, non-metallic, propellant tank with bladder. The integrated UCPS combines several previous innovations - specifically, the linerless, all-composite cryogenic tank technology; all-composite boss; resin formulation; and integrated stringer system. The innovation combines the UCPS with an integrated propellant management device (PMD), the PED or bladder, to create an entirely unique system for in-space use. The UCPS is a pressure vessel that incorporates skirts, stringers, and other structures so that it is both an in-space hydrazine tank, and also a structural support system for a spacecraft in a single, all-composite unit. This innovation builds on the progress in the development of a previous SBIR (Small Business Innovation Research) Phase I with Glenn Research Center and an SBIR III with Johnson Space Center that included the fabrication of two 42-in. (˜107-cm) diameter all-composite cryogenic (LOX and liquid methane) UCPS test tanks for a lunar lander. This Phase II provides hydra zine compatibility testing of the elastomeric bladder, a see-through PED to validate the expulsion process and model, and a complete UCPS-based PED with stringers and skirts that will be used to conduct initial qualification and expulsion tests. This extends the UCPS technology to include hydrazine-based, in-space pro - pulsion applications and can also be used for electric propulsion. This innovation creates a system that, in comparison to the traditional approach, is lower in weight, cost, volume, and production time; is stronger; and is capable of much higher pressures. It also has fewer failure modes, and is applicable to both chemical and electric propulsion systems.

  7. Species composition and stand structure of a large red spruce planting 67 years after its establishment in western North Carolina

    Treesearch

    W. Henry McNab; James H. Holbrook; Ted M. Oprean

    2010-01-01

    Red spruce (Picea rubens Michx.) is a large and long-lived species that dominated high-elevation forests of the southern Appalachians before most stands were heavily logged in the early 1900s. Restoration of spruce forests by artificial methods has been studied since the 1920s, but little information is available on characteristics of older planted...

  8. Investigation of the effect of the structure of large-area carbon nanotube/fuel composites on energy generation from thermopower waves

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Thermopower waves are a recently developed energy conversion concept utilizing dynamic temperature and chemical potential gradients to harvest electrical energy while the combustion wave propagates along the hybrid layers of nanomaterials and chemical fuels. The intrinsic properties of the core nanomaterials and chemical fuels in the hybrid composites can broadly affect the energy generation, as well as the combustion process, of thermopower waves. So far, most research has focused on the application of new core nanomaterials to enhance energy generation. In this study, we demonstrate that the alignment of core nanomaterials can significantly influence a number of aspects of the thermopower waves, while the nanomaterials involved are identical carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Diversely structured, large-area CNT/fuel composites of one-dimensional aligned CNT arrays (1D CNT arrays), randomly oriented CNT films (2D CNT films), and randomly aggregated bulk CNT clusters (3D CNT clusters) were fabricated to evaluate the energy generation, as well as the propagation of the thermal wave, from thermopower waves. The more the core nanostructures were aligned, the less inversion of temperature gradients and the less cross-propagation of multiple thermopower waves occurred. These characteristics of the aligned structures prevented the cancellation of charge carrier movements among the core nanomaterials and produced the relative enhancement of the energy generation and the specific power with a single-polarity voltage signal. Understanding this effect of structure on energy generation from thermopower waves can help in the design of optimized hybrid composites of nanomaterials and fuels, especially designs based on the internal alignment of the materials. More generally, we believe that this work provides clues to the process of chemical to thermal to electrical energy conversion inside/outside hybrid nanostructured materials. PMID:25285059

  9. Investigation of the effect of the structure of large-area carbon nanotube/fuel composites on energy generation from thermopower waves.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hayoung; Yeo, Taehan; Um, Jo-Eun; Lee, Kang Yeol; Kim, Hong-Seok; Han, Jae-Hee; Kim, Woo-Jae; Choi, Wonjoon

    2014-01-01

    Thermopower waves are a recently developed energy conversion concept utilizing dynamic temperature and chemical potential gradients to harvest electrical energy while the combustion wave propagates along the hybrid layers of nanomaterials and chemical fuels. The intrinsic properties of the core nanomaterials and chemical fuels in the hybrid composites can broadly affect the energy generation, as well as the combustion process, of thermopower waves. So far, most research has focused on the application of new core nanomaterials to enhance energy generation. In this study, we demonstrate that the alignment of core nanomaterials can significantly influence a number of aspects of the thermopower waves, while the nanomaterials involved are identical carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Diversely structured, large-area CNT/fuel composites of one-dimensional aligned CNT arrays (1D CNT arrays), randomly oriented CNT films (2D CNT films), and randomly aggregated bulk CNT clusters (3D CNT clusters) were fabricated to evaluate the energy generation, as well as the propagation of the thermal wave, from thermopower waves. The more the core nanostructures were aligned, the less inversion of temperature gradients and the less cross-propagation of multiple thermopower waves occurred. These characteristics of the aligned structures prevented the cancellation of charge carrier movements among the core nanomaterials and produced the relative enhancement of the energy generation and the specific power with a single-polarity voltage signal. Understanding this effect of structure on energy generation from thermopower waves can help in the design of optimized hybrid composites of nanomaterials and fuels, especially designs based on the internal alignment of the materials. More generally, we believe that this work provides clues to the process of chemical to thermal to electrical energy conversion inside/outside hybrid nanostructured materials.

  10. Early invasion population structure of quagga mussel and associated benthic invertebrate community composition on soft sediment in a large reservoir

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wittmann, Marion E.; Chandra, Sudeep; Caires, Andrea; Denton, Marianne; Rosen, Michael R.; Wong, Wai Hing; Teitjen, Todd; Turner, Kent; Roefer, Peggy; Holdren, G. Chris

    2010-01-01

    In 2007 an invasive dreissenid mussel species, Dreissena bugensis (quagga mussel), was discovered in Lake Mead reservoir (AZ–NV). Within 2 years, adult populations have spread throughout the lake and are not only colonizing hard substrates, but also establishing in soft sediments at depths ranging from 1 to >100 m. Dreissena bugensis size class and population density distribution differs between basins; cluster analysis revealed 5 adult cohorts within Boulder Basin and Overton Arm but low densities and low cohort survival in the Las Vegas Basin. Regression analysis suggests depth and temperature are not primary controllers of D. bugensis density in Lake Mead, indicating other factors such as sediment type, food availability or other resource competition may be important. Monthly veliger tows showed at least 2 major spawning events per year, with continuous presence of veligers in the water column. Adult mussels have been found in spawn or post-spawn condition in soft sediments in shallow to deep waters (>80 m) indicating the potential for reproduction at multiple depths. Comparisons to a 1986 benthic survey suggest there have been shifts in nondreissenid macroinvertebrate composition; however, it is unclear if this is due to D. bugensis presence. Current distribution of nondreissenid macroinvertebrates is heterogeneous in all 3 basins, and their biodiversity decreased when D. bugensis density was 2500/m2 or greater.

  11. Honeycomb-laminate composite structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilwee, W. J., Jr.; Parker, J. A. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A honeycomb-laminate composite structure was comprised of: (1) a cellular core of a polyquinoxaline foam in a honeycomb structure, and (2) a layer of a noncombustible fibrous material impregnated with a polyimide resin laminated on the cellular core. A process for producing the honeycomb-laminate composite structure and articles containing the honeycomb-laminate composite structure is described.

  12. Large-scale biochemical profiling of the Candida albicans biofilm matrix: new compositional, structural, and functional insights.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Ribot, Jose L

    2014-09-09

    Among pathogenic fungi, Candida albicans is most frequently associated with biofilm formation, a lifestyle that is entirely different from the planktonic state. One of the distinguishing features of these biofilms is the presence of extracellular material, commonly referred to as the "biofilm matrix." The fungal biofilm matrix embeds sessile cells within these communities and plays important structural and physiological functions, including antifungal drug resistance with important clinical repercussions. This matrix is mostly self-produced by the fungal cells themselves and is composed of different types of biopolymers. In C. albicans, the main components of the biofilm matrix are carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, and DNA, but many of them remain unidentified and/or poorly characterized. In their recent article, Zarnowski et al. [mBio 5(4):e01333-14, 2014, doi:10.1128/mBio.01333-14] used a variety of biochemical and state-of-the-art "omic" approaches (glycomics, proteomics, and lipidomics) to identify and characterize unique biopolymers present in the C. albicans biofilm matrix. Besides generating a true "encyclopedic" catalog of individual moieties from each of the different macromolecular categories, results also provide important insights into structural and functional aspects of the fungal biofilm matrix, particularly the interaction between different components and the contribution of multiple matrix constituents to biofilm antifungal drug resistance. Copyright © 2014 Lopez-Ribot.

  13. Large contrast observed in crustal composition and structure between the Ordos plateau and the northeastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, S.; Niu, F.

    2010-12-01

    The Ordos plateau located in the western side of the North China craton is a distinct aseismic block. The plateau is bounded on the south and east, respectively, by the Paleozoic-Mesozoic Qinling orogenic belt and the Taihangshan mountain range. A series of graben systems were developed late in Cenozoic around the southern and eastern margins of the plateau. The Ordos is also bordered on the southwest by the northeastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau formed by the Cenozoic India-Eurasia collision. The gentle topographic slope together with the moderately thickened crust along the northeastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau was modeled by an injection of lower crustal material into a relatively weak foreland. We have analyzed thousands of receiver-function data recorded by 182 national and regional stations of the broadband seismic network operated by the China Earthquake Administration to study the crustal structure beneath the Ordos plateau and the northeastern margin of the Tibetan plateau. Crustal thickness and average crustal Vp/Vs ratio were measured at each station. The Ordos plateau is underlain by a moderate thick crust with an average Moho depth ~40 km. The Trans-North China Orogen east to the Ordos is featured by a thin crust varying from 25-35 km. The Weihe Graben at the southern border of the Ordos plateau is lying above a ~30-km thin crust, while its southern neighbor, the Qinling organic belt has a thick root extending to as much as 45 km deep. Crust beneath the northeastern margin of the Tibetan plateau varies from 55 to 65 km. We found a remarkable contrast between the Tibetan and Ordos plateaus in the measured Poisson’s ratio: the Ordos plateau is featured by a high Poisson’s ratio while the Tibetan margin has a very low Poisson’s ratio. In general, lower crustal rocks are more mafic with a higher Poisson’s ratio than those found in the upper crust and mafic rocks are mechanically stronger than the felsic ones. The measured lower ratio thus

  14. Probabilistic Design of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2006-01-01

    A formal procedure for the probabilistic design evaluation of a composite structure is described. The uncertainties in all aspects of a composite structure (constituent material properties, fabrication variables, structural geometry, and service environments, etc.), which result in the uncertain behavior in the composite structural responses, are included in the evaluation. The probabilistic evaluation consists of: (1) design criteria, (2) modeling of composite structures and uncertainties, (3) simulation methods, and (4) the decision-making process. A sample case is presented to illustrate the formal procedure and to demonstrate that composite structural designs can be probabilistically evaluated with accuracy and efficiency.

  15. Bonded and Stitched Composite Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalewski, Bart F. (Inventor); Dial, William B. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method of forming a composite structure can include providing a plurality of composite panels of material, each composite panel having a plurality of holes extending through the panel. An adhesive layer is applied to each composite panel and a adjoining layer is applied over the adhesive layer. The method also includes stitching the composite panels, adhesive layer, and adjoining layer together by passing a length of a flexible connecting element into the plurality of holes in the composite panels of material. At least the adhesive layer is cured to bond the composite panels together and thereby form the composite structure.

  16. Causality and Composite Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Joglekar, Satish D.

    2007-10-03

    In this talk, we discuss the question of whether a composite structure of elementary particles, with a length scale 1/{lambda}, can leave observable effects of non-locality and causality violation at higher energies (but {<=}{lambda}); employing a model-independent approach based on Bogoliubov-Shirkov formulation of causality. We formulate a condition which must be fulfilled for the derived theory to be causal, if the fundamental theory is so; and analyze it to exhibit possibilities which fulfil and which violate the condition. We comment on how causality violating amplitudes can arise.

  17. Progressive Fracture of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Minnetyan, Levon

    2008-01-01

    A new approach is described for evaluating fracture in composite structures. This approach is independent of classical fracture mechanics parameters like fracture toughness. It relies on computational simulation and is programmed in a stand-alone integrated computer code. It is multiscale, multifunctional because it includes composite mechanics for the composite behavior and finite element analysis for predicting the structural response. It contains seven modules; layered composite mechanics (micro, macro, laminate), finite element, updating scheme, local fracture, global fracture, stress based failure modes, and fracture progression. The computer code is called CODSTRAN (Composite Durability Structural ANalysis). It is used in the present paper to evaluate the global fracture of four composite shell problems and one composite built-up structure. Results show that the composite shells and the built-up composite structure global fracture are enhanced when internal pressure is combined with shear loads.

  18. Impact Damage to Composite Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-02-01

    Security Classification of Document UNCLASSIFIED 6. Title IMPACT DAMAGE TO COMPOSITE STRUCTURES 7. Presented at 8. Authar(s)/Editor(s) Various 10...materials Composite structures Structural analysis Mechanical properties Impact strength Damage 14. Abstract The Structures and Materials Panel...POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MOMTEREY, CAL1F.QRN.IA 9,19ili AGARD-R-729 AGARD REPORT No.729 Impact Damage to Composite Structures * DISTRIBUTION AND AVAILABILITY

  19. Modeling large heterogeneous RF structures

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zenghai; Ko, Kwok; Srinivas, V.; Higo, Toshiyasu

    1996-11-01

    Large heterogeneous structures are difficult to model on a numerical grid because of the limitations on computing resources, so that alternate approaches such as equivalent circuits and mode-matching have been developed to treat this problem. This paper will describe the three methods and will analyze a structure representative of the SLAC and JLC detuned structures to compare the efficacy of each approach.

  20. Composite materials for space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenney, D. R.; Sykes, G. F.; Bowles, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    The use of advanced composites for space structures is reviewed. Barriers likely to limit further applications of composites are discussed and highlights of research to improve composites are presented. Developments in composites technology which could impact spacecraft systems are reviewed to identify technology needs and opportunities.

  1. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1983-01-01

    Transverse properties of fiber constituents in composites, fatigue in composite materials, matrix dominated properties of high performance composites, numerical investigation of moisture effects, numerical investigation of the micromechanics of composite fracture, advanced analysis methods, compact lug design, and the RP-1 and RP-2 sailplanes projects are discussed.

  2. Multifunctional Composite Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    37  Fig. 25  Structure mesh for multi-material systems .................................................... 38  Fig. 26...Actuators Magnetic  fields  can  be  created  by  currents  flowing  through  fiber  networks   or  embedded conductors within composites. These magnetic...models  for  such  systems   is  difficult  in  conventional  finite  element  analysis  software.  A  method  that  does  not  require  conforming mesh

  3. Large fracture toughness boron-epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkins, A. G.

    1975-01-01

    The high tensile strengths of strong interfacial bonding may be combined with the large fracture toughness of weak interfacial bonding in brittle fiber/brittle matrix composites by intermittently coating the filaments before layup so as to have random alternate weak and strong regions. Appropriate coating materials enable Cook-Gordon Mode I interfacial debonding to take place, which produces very long pull-out lengths with an associated large contribution to toughness. Unidirectional boron-epoxy composites have been so made which have toughnesses greater than 200 kJ/sq m while retaining rule of mixtures tensile strengths. Similar trends have been observed for crossply layups.

  4. Large Scale Composite Manufacturing for Heavy Lift Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stavana, Jacob; Cohen, Leslie J.; Houseal, Keth; Pelham, Larry; Lort, Richard; Zimmerman, Thomas; Sutter, James; Western, Mike; Harper, Robert; Stuart, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Risk reduction for the large scale composite manufacturing is an important goal to produce light weight components for heavy lift launch vehicles. NASA and an industry team successfully employed a building block approach using low-cost Automated Tape Layup (ATL) of autoclave and Out-of-Autoclave (OoA) prepregs. Several large, curved sandwich panels were fabricated at HITCO Carbon Composites. The aluminum honeycomb core sandwich panels are segments of a 1/16th arc from a 10 meter cylindrical barrel. Lessons learned highlight the manufacturing challenges required to produce light weight composite structures such as fairings for heavy lift launch vehicles.

  5. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1979-01-01

    Technology utilization of fiber reinforced composite materials is discussed in the areas of physical properties, and life prediction. Programs related to the Composite Aircraft Program are described in detail.

  6. ACEE composite structures technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinlivan, John T.; Wilson, Robert D.; Smith, Peter J.; Johnson, Ronald W.

    1984-01-01

    Toppics addressed include: advanced composites on Boeing commercial aircraft; composite wing durability; damage tolerance technology development; heavily loaded wing panel design; and pressure containment and damage tolerance in fuselages.

  7. Coupled structural/thermal/electromagnetic analysis/tailoring of graded composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.; Huang, H.; Hartle, M.

    1992-01-01

    Accomplishments are described for the third years effort of a 5-year program to develop a methodology for coupled structural/thermal/electromagnetic analysis/tailoring of graded composite structures. These accomplishments include: (1) structural analysis capability specialized for graded composite structures including large deformation and deformation position eigenanalysis technologies; (2) a thermal analyzer specialized for graded composite structures; (3) absorption of electromagnetic waves by graded composite structures; and (4) coupled structural thermal/electromagnetic analysis of graded composite structures.

  8. Large, low cost composite wind turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gewehr, H. W.

    1979-01-01

    A woven roving E-glass tape, having all of its structural fibers oriented across the tape width was used in the manufacture of the spar for a wind turbine blade. Tests of a 150 ft composite blade show that the transverse filament tape is capable of meeting structural design requirements for wind turbine blades. Composite blades can be designed for interchangeability with steel blades in the MOD-1 wind generator system. The design, analysis, fabrication, and testing of the 150 ft blade are discussed.

  9. Liquid crystallinity driven highly aligned large graphene oxide composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyung Eun; Oh, Jung Jae; Yun, Taeyeong; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2015-04-01

    Graphene is an emerging graphitic carbon materials, consisting of sp2 hybridized two dimensinal honeycomb structure. It has been widely studied to incorporate graphene with polymer to utilize unique property of graphene and reinforce electrical, mechanical and thermal property of polymer. In composite materials, orientation control of graphene significantly influences the property of composite. Until now, a few method has been developed for orientation control of graphene within polymer matrix. Here, we demonstrate facile fabrication of high aligned large graphene oxide (LGO) composites in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix exploiting liquid crystallinity. Liquid crystalline aqueous dispersion of LGO is parallel oriented within flat confinement geometry. Freeze-drying of the aligned LGO dispersion and subsequent infiltration with PDMS produce highly aligned LGO/PDMS composites. Owing to the large shape anisotropy of LGO, liquid crystalline alignment occurred at low concentration of 2 mg/ml in aqueous dispersion, which leads to the 0.2 wt% LGO loaded composites.

  10. Structural qualification of large spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, Ben K.

    1986-01-01

    Over the past twenty-five (25) years of the space program, the major challenge in the structural qualification of the primary structure has shifted from conducting a test that simulated the environment to accurately predicting the structural member loads in flight. Once the flight loads are avaliable, a number of different test methods are used to qualify the structure by subjecting it to the proper loads. The qualification challenge for future large spacecraft will be to adequately predict its dynamic characteristic in space to assure that it can be controlled to meet the mission objectives. A new test concept that may allow acquisition of modal data by ground tests for verification of mathematical models of large flexible space structures which can't be ground tested by conventional methods is discussed.

  11. Investigation of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, Michael W.

    2000-01-01

    This final report consists of a compilation of four separate written documents, three dealing with the response and failure of elliptical composite cylinders to an internal pressure load, and the fourth dealing with the influence of manufacturing imperfections in curved composite panels. The three focused on elliptical cylinders consist of the following: 1 - A paper entitled "Progressive Failure Analysis of Internally Pressurized Elliptical Composite Cylinders," 2 - A paper entitled "Influence of Geometric Nonlinearities on the Response and Failure of Internally Pressurized Elliptical Composite Cylinders," and 3 - A report entitled "Response and Failure of Internally Pressurized Elliptical Composite Cyclinders." The document which deals with the influence of manufacturing imperfections is a paper entitled "Manufacturing Distortions of Curved Composite Panels."

  12. Chemical compositions of large cluster IDPs

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, G.J.; Lanzirotti, A.; Sutton, S.R.

    2006-12-06

    We performed X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy on two large cluster IDPs, which sample the IDP parent body at a mass scale two orders-of-magnitude larger than {approx}10 {micro}m IDPs, allowing proper incorporation of larger mineral grains into the bulk composition of the parent body. We previously determined that {approx}10 {micro}m interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected from the Earth's stratosphere are enriched in many moderately volatile elements by a factor of {approx}3 over the CI meteorites. However, these IDP measurements provide no direct constraint on the bulk chemical composition of the parent body (or parent bodies) of the IDPs. Collisions are believed to be the major mechanism for dust production by the asteroids, producing dust by surface erosion, cratering and catastrophic disruption. Hypervelocity impact experiments at {approx}5 km/sec, which is the mean collision velocity in the main belt, performed by Flynn and Durda on ordinary chondrite meteorites and the carbonaceous chondrite meteorite Allende show that the 10 {micro}m debris is dominated by matrix material while the debris larger than {approx}25 {micro}m is dominated by chondrule fragments. Thus, if the IDP parent body is similar in structure to the chondritic meteorites, it is likely that the {approx}10 {micro}m IDPs oversample the fine-grained component of the parent body. We have examined the matrix material from the few meteorites that are sufficiently fine-grained to be samples of potential IDP parent bodies. This search has, thus far, not produced a compositional and mineralogical match to either the hydrous or anhydrous IDPs. This result, coupled with our recent mapping of the element distributions, which indicates the enrichment of moderately volatile elements is not due to contamination on their surfaces, suggests the IDPs represent a new type of extraterrestrial material. Nonetheless, the meteorite fragmentation results suggest that compositional measurements on 10 {micro

  13. Probabilistic assessment of composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Shiao, Michael C.

    1993-01-01

    A methodology and attendant computer code were developed and are used to computationally simulate the uncertain behavior of composite structures. The uncertain behavior includes buckling loads, stress concentration factors, displacements, stress/strain, etc., which are the consequences of the inherent uncertainties (scatter) in the primitive (independent random) variables (constituent, ply, laminate, and structural) that describe the composite structures. The computer code is IPACS (Integrated Probabilistic Assessment of Composite Structures). IPACS can simulate both composite mechanics and composite structural behavior. Application to probabilistic composite mechanics is illustrated by its use to evaluate the uncertainties in the major Poisson's ratio and in laminate stiffness and strength. IPACS' application to probabilistic structural analysis is illustrated by its used to evaluate the uncertainties in the buckling of a composite plate, the stress concentration factor in a composite panel, and the vertical displacement and ply stress in a composite aircraft wing segment. IPACS' application to probabilistic design is illustrated by its use to assess the thin composite shell (pipe).

  14. Composite structural materials. [fiber reinforced composites for aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberly, S. E.

    1981-01-01

    Physical properties of fiber reinforced composites; structural concepts and analysis; manufacturing; reliability; and life prediction are subjects of research conducted to determine the long term integrity of composite aircraft structures under conditions pertinent to service use. Progress is reported in (1) characterizing homogeneity in composite materials; (2) developing methods for analyzing composite materials; (3) studying fatigue in composite materials; (4) determining the temperature and moisture effects on the mechanical properties of laminates; (5) numerically analyzing moisture effects; (6) numerically analyzing the micromechanics of composite fracture; (7) constructing the 727 elevator attachment rib; (8) developing the L-1011 engine drag strut (CAPCOMP 2 program); (9) analyzing mechanical joints in composites; (10) developing computer software; and (11) processing science and technology, with emphasis on the sailplane project.

  15. Low Cost Large Core Vehicle Structures Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Steven E.

    1998-01-01

    Boeing Information, Space, and Defense Systems executed a Low Cost Large Core Vehicle Structures Assessment (LCLCVSA) under contract to NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) between November 1997 and March 1998. NASA is interested in a low-cost launch vehicle, code named Magnum, to place heavy payloads into low earth orbit for missions such as a manned mission to Mars, a Next Generation Space Telescope, a lunar-based telescope, the Air Force's proposed space based laser, and large commercial satellites. In this study, structural concepts with the potential to reduce fabrication costs were evaluated in application to the Magnum Launch Vehicle (MLV) and the Liquid Fly Back Booster (LFBB) shuttle upgrade program. Seventeen concepts were qualitatively evaluated to select four concepts for more in-depth study. The four structural concepts selected were: an aluminum-lithium monocoque structure, an aluminum-lithium machined isogrid structure, a unitized composite sandwich structure, and a unitized composite grid structure. These were compared against a baseline concept based on the Space Shuttle External Tank (ET) construction. It was found that unitized composite structures offer significant cost and weight benefits to MLV structures. The limited study of application to LFBB structures indicated lower, but still significant benefits. Technology and facilities development roadmaps to prepare the approaches studied for application to MLV and LFBB were constructed. It was found that the cost and schedule to develop these approaches were in line with both MLV and LFBB development schedules. Current Government and Boeing programs which address elements of the development of the technologies identified are underway. It is recommended that NASA devote resources in a timely fashion to address the specific elements related to MLV and LFBB structures.

  16. Structural Health Monitoring of Large Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hyoung M.; Bartkowicz, Theodore J.; Smith, Suzanne Weaver; Zimmerman, David C.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a damage detection and health monitoring method that was developed for large space structures using on-orbit modal identification. After evaluating several existing model refinement and model reduction/expansion techniques, a new approach was developed to identify the location and extent of structural damage with a limited number of measurements. A general area of structural damage is first identified and, subsequently, a specific damaged structural component is located. This approach takes advantage of two different model refinement methods (optimal-update and design sensitivity) and two different model size matching methods (model reduction and eigenvector expansion). Performance of the proposed damage detection approach was demonstrated with test data from two different laboratory truss structures. This space technology can also be applied to structural inspection of aircraft, offshore platforms, oil tankers, ridges, and buildings. In addition, its applications to model refinement will improve the design of structural systems such as automobiles and electronic packaging.

  17. Gyrodampers for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aubrun, J. N.; Margulies, G.

    1979-01-01

    The problem of controlling the vibrations of a large space structures by the use of actively augmented damping devices distributed throughout the structure is addressed. The gyrodamper which consists of a set of single gimbal control moment gyros which are actively controlled to extract the structural vibratory energy through the local rotational deformations of the structure, is described and analyzed. Various linear and nonlinear dynamic simulations of gyrodamped beams are shown, including results on self-induced vibrations due to sensor noise and rotor imbalance. The complete nonlinear dynamic equations are included. The problem of designing and sizing a system of gyrodampers for a given structure, or extrapolating results for one gyrodamped structure to another is solved in terms of scaling laws. Novel scaling laws for gyro systems are derived, based upon fundamental physical principles, and various examples are given.

  18. Lessons learned for composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, R. S.

    1991-01-01

    Lessons learned for composite structures are presented in three technology areas: materials, manufacturing, and design. In addition, future challenges for composite structures are presented. Composite materials have long gestation periods from the developmental stage to fully matured production status. Many examples exist of unsuccessful attempts to accelerate this gestation period. Experience has shown that technology transition of a new material system to fully matured production status is time consuming, involves risk, is expensive and should not be undertaken lightly. The future challenges for composite materials require an intensification of the science based approach to material development, extension of the vendor/customer interaction process to include all engineering disciplines of the end user, reduced material costs because they are a significant factor in overall part cost, and improved batch-to-batch pre-preg physical property control. Historical manufacturing lessons learned are presented using current in-service production structure as examples. Most producibility problems for these structures can be traced to their sequential engineering design. This caused an excessive emphasis on design-to-weight and schedule at the expense of design-to-cost. This resulted in expensive performance originated designs, which required costly tooling and led to non-producible parts. Historically these problems have been allowed to persist throughout the production run. The current/future approach for the production of affordable composite structures mandates concurrent engineering design where equal emphasis is placed on product and process design. Design for simplified assembly is also emphasized, since assembly costs account for a major portion of total airframe costs. The future challenge for composite manufacturing is, therefore, to utilize concurrent engineering in conjunction with automated manufacturing techniques to build affordable composite structures

  19. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1983-01-01

    Progress and plans are reported for investigations of: (1) the mechanical properties of high performance carbon fibers; (2) fatigue in composite materials; (3) moisture and temperature effects on the mechanical properties of graphite-epoxy laminates; (4) the theory of inhomogeneous swelling in epoxy resin; (5) numerical studies of the micromechanics of composite fracture; (6) free edge failures of composite laminates; (7) analysis of unbalanced laminates; (8) compact lug design; (9) quantification of Saint-Venant's principles for a general prismatic member; (10) variation of resin properties through the thickness of cured samples; and (11) the wing fuselage ensemble of the RP-1 and RP-2 sailplanes.

  20. Combustible structural composites and methods of forming combustible structural composites

    DOEpatents

    Daniels, Michael A.; Heaps, Ronald J.; Steffler, Eric D; Swank, William D.

    2011-08-30

    Combustible structural composites and methods of forming same are disclosed. In an embodiment, a combustible structural composite includes combustible material comprising a fuel metal and a metal oxide. The fuel metal is present in the combustible material at a weight ratio from 1:9 to 1:1 of the fuel metal to the metal oxide. The fuel metal and the metal oxide are capable of exothermically reacting upon application of energy at or above a threshold value to support self-sustaining combustion of the combustible material within the combustible structural composite. Structural-reinforcing fibers are present in the composite at a weight ratio from 1:20 to 10:1 of the structural-reinforcing fibers to the combustible material. Other embodiments and aspects are disclosed.

  1. Combustible structural composites and methods of forming combustible structural composites

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, Michael A.; Heaps, Ronald J.; Steffler, Eric D.; Swank, W. David

    2013-04-02

    Combustible structural composites and methods of forming same are disclosed. In an embodiment, a combustible structural composite includes combustible material comprising a fuel metal and a metal oxide. The fuel metal is present in the combustible material at a weight ratio from 1:9 to 1:1 of the fuel metal to the metal oxide. The fuel metal and the metal oxide are capable of exothermically reacting upon application of energy at or above a threshold value to support self-sustaining combustion of the combustible material within the combustible structural composite. Structural-reinforcing fibers are present in the composite at a weight ratio from 1:20 to 10:1 of the structural-reinforcing fibers to the combustible material. Other embodiments and aspects are disclosed.

  2. Advances in Structures for Large Space Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, W. Keith

    2004-01-01

    The development of structural systems for scientific remote sensing and space exploration has been underway for four decades. The seminal work from 1960 to 1980 provided the basis for many of the design principles of modern space systems. From 1980- 2000 advances in active materials and structures and the maturing of composites technology led to high precision active systems such those used in the Space Interferometry Mission. Recently, thin-film membrane or gossamer structures are being investigated for use in large area space systems because of their low mass and high packaging efficiency. Various classes of Large Space Systems (LSS) are defined in order to describe the goals and system challenges in structures and materials technologies. With an appreciation of both past and current technology developments, future technology challenges are used to develop a list of technology investments that can have significant impacts on LSS development.

  3. Composite desiccant structure

    DOEpatents

    Fraioli, Anthony V.; Schertz, William W.

    1987-01-01

    A composite formed of small desiccant particles retained in a dark matrix composed of a porous binder containing a transition metal oxide with pores to provide moisture transport with respect to the particles, and metallic fibers to remove the heat of condensation during dehumidification and provide heat for the removal of moisture during regeneration. The moisture absorbing properties of the composite may be regenerated by exposure of the dark matrix to solar radiation with dehumidification occurring at night.

  4. Composite desiccant structure

    DOEpatents

    Fraioli, A.V.; Schertz, W.W.

    1984-06-06

    This patent discloses a composite formed of small desiccant particles retained in a dark matrix composed of a porous binder containing a transition metal oxide with pores to provide moisture transport with respect to the particles, and metallic fibers to remove the heat of condensation during dehumidification and provide heat for the removal of moisture during regeneration. The moisture absorbing properties of the composite may be regenerated by exposure of the dark matrix to solar radiation with dehumidification occurring at night.

  5. Method of fabricating composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sigur, W. A. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A method of fabricating structures formed from composite materials by positioning the structure about a high coefficient of thermal expansion material, wrapping a graphite fiber overwrap about the structure, and thereafter heating the assembly to expand the high coefficient of thermal expansion material to forcibly compress the composite structure against the restraint provided by the graphite overwrap. The high coefficient of thermal expansion material is disposed about a mandrel with a release system therebetween, and with a release system between the material having the high coefficient of thermal expansion and the composite material, and between the graphite fibers and the composite structure. The heating may occur by inducing heat into the assembly by a magnetic field created by coils disposed about the assembly through which alternating current flows. The method permits structures to be formed without the use of an autoclave.

  6. Liquid crystallinity driven highly aligned large graphene oxide composites

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kyung Eun; Oh, Jung Jae; Yun, Taeyeong; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2015-04-15

    Graphene is an emerging graphitic carbon materials, consisting of sp{sup 2} hybridized two dimensinal honeycomb structure. It has been widely studied to incorporate graphene with polymer to utilize unique property of graphene and reinforce electrical, mechanical and thermal property of polymer. In composite materials, orientation control of graphene significantly influences the property of composite. Until now, a few method has been developed for orientation control of graphene within polymer matrix. Here, we demonstrate facile fabrication of high aligned large graphene oxide (LGO) composites in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix exploiting liquid crystallinity. Liquid crystalline aqueous dispersion of LGO is parallel oriented within flat confinement geometry. Freeze-drying of the aligned LGO dispersion and subsequent infiltration with PDMS produce highly aligned LGO/PDMS composites. Owing to the large shape anisotropy of LGO, liquid crystalline alignment occurred at low concentration of 2 mg/ml in aqueous dispersion, which leads to the 0.2 wt% LGO loaded composites. - Graphical abstract: Liquid crystalline LGO aqueous dispersions are spontaneous parallel aligned between geometric confinement for highly aligned LGO/polymer composite fabrication. - Highlights: • A simple fabrication method for highly aligned LGO/PDMS composites is proposed. • LGO aqueous dispersion shows nematic liquid crystalline phase at 0.8 mg/ml. • In nematic phase, LGO flakes are highly aligned by geometric confinement. • Infiltration of PDMS into freeze-dried LGO allows highly aligned LGO/PDMS composites.

  7. Field-structured composite studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, James Ellis; Williamson, Rodney L.

    2004-04-01

    Field-structured composites (FSCs) were produced by hosting micron-sized gold-coated nickel particles in a pre-polymer and allowing the mixture to cure in a magnetic field environment. The feasibility of controlling a composite's electrical conductivity using feedback control applied to the field coils was investigated. It was discovered that conductivity in FSCs is primarily determined by stresses in the polymer host matrix due to cure shrinkage. Thus, in cases where the structuring field was uniform and unidirectional so as to produce chainlike structures in the composite, no electrical conductivity was measured until well after the structuring field was turned off at the gel point. In situations where complex, rotating fields were used to generate complex, three-dimensional structures in a composite, very small, but measurable, conductivity was observed prior to the gel point. Responsive, sensitive prototype chemical sensors were developed based on this technology with initial tests showing very promising results.

  8. Structural design methodology for large space structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dornsife, Ralph J.

    The Department of Defense requires research and development in designing, fabricating, deploying, and maintaining large space structures (LSS) in support of Army and Strategic Defense Initiative military objectives. Because of their large size, extreme flexibility, and the unique loading conditions in the space environment, LSS will present engineers with problems unlike those encountered in designing conventional civil engineering or aerospace structures. LSS will require sophisticated passive damping and active control systems in order to meet stringent mission requirements. These structures must also be optimally designed to minimize high launch costs. This report outlines a methodology for the structural design of LSS. It includes a definition of mission requirements, structural modeling and analysis, passive damping and active control system design, ground-based testing, payload integration, on-orbit system verification, and on-orbit assessment of structural damage. In support of this methodology, analyses of candidate LSS truss configurations are presented, and an algorithm correlating ground-based test behavior to expected microgravity behavior is developed.

  9. Structural design methodology for large space structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dornsife, Ralph J.

    1992-02-01

    The Department of Defense requires research and development in designing, fabricating, deploying, and maintaining large space structures (LSS) in support of Army and Strategic Defense Initiative military objectives. Because of their large size, extreme flexibility, and the unique loading conditions in the space environment, LSS will present engineers with problems unlike those encountered in designing conventional civil engineering or aerospace structures. LSS will require sophisticated passive damping and active control systems in order to meet stringent mission requirements. These structures must also be optimally designed to minimize high launch costs. This report outlines a methodology for the structural design of LSS. It includes a definition of mission requirements, structural modeling and analysis, passive damping and active control system design, ground-based testing, payload integration, on-orbit system verification, and on-orbit assessment of structural damage. In support of this methodology, analyses of candidate LSS truss configurations are presented, and an algorithm correlating ground-based test behavior to expected microgravity behavior is developed.

  10. Mobile Platform for Large Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesselski, C. J.; Schneider, W. C.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed platform moves forward and in reverse, turns left and right, and changes planes. Mobile-platform concept proposed to move remote manipulators, workers, or other loads over truss panels on large structures. Platform moves at constant speed so does not cause swinging motion in hanging loads and overstress remote-manipulator arms. Transferred around corners to adjacent panels. Platform rides on sprocketed guide pins extending from structure at truss joints. Set of orthogonal tracks under platform slides on pins, which have enlarged heads to interlock with tracks. At least three tracks engage at least three pins at any position on panel so platform adequately and stably supported.

  11. Large space structure damping design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilkey, W. D.; Haviland, J. K.

    1983-01-01

    Several FORTRAN subroutines and programs were developed which compute complex eigenvalues of a damped system using different approaches, and which rescale mode shapes to unit generalized mass and make rigid bodies orthogonal to each other. An analytical proof of a Minimum Constrained Frequency Criterion (MCFC) for a single damper is presented. A method to minimize the effect of control spill-over for large space structures is proposed. The characteristic equation of an undamped system with a generalized control law is derived using reanalysis theory. This equation can be implemented in computer programs for efficient eigenvalue analysis or control quasi synthesis. Methods to control vibrations in large space structure are reviewed and analyzed. The resulting prototype, using electromagnetic actuator, is described.

  12. Composite structural materials. [aircraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1981-01-01

    The development of composite materials for aircraft applications is addressed with specific consideration of physical properties, structural concepts and analysis, manufacturing, reliability, and life prediction. The design and flight testing of composite ultralight gliders is documented. Advances in computer aided design and methods for nondestructive testing are also discussed.

  13. Precision Composite Space Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-15

    243-246. [D.128]. Kaddour AS, Soden PD, Hinton MJ. Failure of ± 55 degree filament wound glass/epoxy composite tubes under biaxial compression. J...Corporation. The T-joint was modified to include an adhesively bonded sheet of titanium foil that would induce measurable distortions of the...properties. Most all of these were found to be directed at progressive failure analysis and lacked the fidelity needed to be useful for dimensional

  14. Control of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gran, R.; Rossi, M.; Moyer, H. G.; Austin, F.

    1979-01-01

    The control of large space structures was studied to determine what, if any, limitations are imposed on the size of spacecraft which may be controlled using current control system design technology. Using a typical structure in the 35 to 70 meter size category, a control system design that used actuators that are currently available was designed. The amount of control power required to maintain the vehicle in a stabilized gravity gradient pointing orientation that also damped various structural motions was determined. The moment of inertia and mass properties of this structure were varied to verify that stability and performance were maintained. The study concludes that the structure's size is required to change by at least a factor of two before any stability problems arise. The stability margin that is lost is due to the scaling of the gravity gradient torques (the rigid body control) and as such can easily be corrected by changing the control gains associated with the rigid body control. A secondary conclusion from the study is that the control design that accommodates the structural motions (to damp them) is a little more sensitive than the design that works on attitude control of the rigid body only.

  15. Advanced technology composite aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilcewicz, Larry B.; Walker, Thomas H.

    1991-01-01

    Work performed during the 25th month on NAS1-18889, Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures, is summarized. The main objective of this program is to develop an integrated technology and demonstrate a confidence level that permits the cost- and weight-effective use of advanced composite materials in primary structures of future aircraft with the emphasis on pressurized fuselages. The period from 1-31 May 1991 is covered.

  16. Quantitative NDE of Composite Structures at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, K. Elliott; Leckey, Cara A. C.; Howell, Patricia A.; Johnston, Patrick H.; Burke, Eric R.; Zalameda, Joseph N.; Winfree, William P.; Seebo, Jeffery P.

    2015-01-01

    The use of composite materials continues to increase in the aerospace community due to the potential benefits of reduced weight, increased strength, and manufacturability. Ongoing work at NASA involves the use of the large-scale composite structures for spacecraft (payload shrouds, cryotanks, crew modules, etc). NASA is also working to enable the use and certification of composites in aircraft structures through the Advanced Composites Project (ACP). The rapid, in situ characterization of a wide range of the composite materials and structures has become a critical concern for the industry. In many applications it is necessary to monitor changes in these materials over a long time. The quantitative characterization of composite defects such as fiber waviness, reduced bond strength, delamination damage, and microcracking are of particular interest. The research approaches of NASA's Nondestructive Evaluation Sciences Branch include investigation of conventional, guided wave, and phase sensitive ultrasonic methods, infrared thermography and x-ray computed tomography techniques. The use of simulation tools for optimizing and developing these methods is also an active area of research. This paper will focus on current research activities related to large area NDE for rapidly characterizing aerospace composites.

  17. Stable isotope composition of Earth's large lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasechko, S.; Gibson, J. J.; YI, Y.; Birks, S. J.; Sharp, Z. D.

    2011-12-01

    Lakes cover about three percent of Earth's continental area. Large lakes can significantly influence lake shore and regional climates by increasing specific humidity during evaporation and by moderating air temperatures. Stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen can be used to quantify lake evaporation, providing a supplementary and often cost-advantageous alternative to conventional hydrologic approaches that require over lake monitoring. Further, stable isotopes in lake sediments are an established tool in paleolimnology; however, interpreting changes to a lake's past isotope composition requires a comprehensive understanding of contemporary controls. Here, δ18O and δ2H values of water in modern lakes exceeding roughly five hundred square kilometres are compiled (n > 35). Voluminous and seasonally mixed lakes - such as the North American Great Lakes - have the most homogenous stable isotope compositions, while perennially-stratified and shallow lakes show greater variability. A rudimentary stable isotope mass balance is used to assess evaporation fluxes from large lakes on Earth. The approach taken simultaneously constrains evaporation outputs for both oxygen and hydrogen stable isotopes by accounting for lake effects on the overlying atmosphere. Model development highlights important considerations such as isotopic stratification (Tanganyika), disequilibrium isotopic mass balances (Baikal), and non-steady hydrologic balances. Further, the isotope composition of Earth's continental surface water reservoir is calculated. This value - weighted to volume - is δ18O = -7.5±1.7 per mille relative to standard mean ocean water. The compiled data may be a useful tracer of continental evaporate in global atmospheric water cycle studies and could be coupled to climate models capable of incorporating oxygen-18 and deuterium tracers to improve or validate calculations of lake effects on regional water cycling.

  18. Cosmology with Large Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Shirley; Cuesta, A.; Ross, A.; Seo, H.; DePutter, R.; Padmanabhan, N.; White, M.; Myers, A.; Bovy, J.; Blanton, M.; Hernandez, C.; Mena, O.; Percival, W.; Prada, F.; Ross, N. P.; Saito, S.; Schneider, D.; Skibba, R.; Smith, K.; Slosar, A.; Strauss, M.; Verde, L.; Weinberg, D.; Bachall, N.; Brinkmann, J.; da Costa, L. A.

    2012-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey I-III surveyed 14,000 square degrees, and delivered over a trillion pixels of imaging data. I present cosmological results from this unprecedented data set which contains over a million galaxies distributed between redshift of 0.45 to 0.70. With such a large volume of data set, high precision cosmological constraints can be obtained given a careful control and understanding of observational systematics. I present a novel treatment of observational systematics and its application to the clustering signals from the data set. I will present cosmological constraints on dark components of the Universe and tightest constraints of the non-gaussianity of early Universe to date utilizing Large Scale Structure.

  19. Structural biological composites: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Marc A.; Lin, Albert Y. M.; Seki, Yasuaki; Chen, Po-Yu; Kad, Bimal K.; Bodde, Sara

    2006-07-01

    Biological materials are complex composites that are hierarchically structured and multifunctional. Their mechanical properties are often outstanding, considering the weak constituents from which they are assembled. They are for the most part composed of brittle (often, mineral) and ductile (organic) components. These complex structures, which have risen from millions of years of evolution, are inspiring materials scientists in the design of novel materials. This paper discusses the overall design principles in biological structural composites and illustrates them for five examples; sea spicules, the abalone shell, the conch shell, the toucan and hornbill beaks, and the sheep crab exoskeleton.

  20. Multifunctional Structural Composite Batteries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    c . THIS PAGE U 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 18 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include area code...cells vs. lithium foil 3.2 C abric annot be used as cathodes since it can act as an anode and short the battery. Instead, a metal bstrate is...theoretical values. Increasing the volume athode The cathodes must be electrically conductive and structurally robust. Carbon f c su permeable thin film of

  1. Structural attachments for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruett, E. C.; Loughead, T. E.; Robertson, K. B., III

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility of fabricating beams in space and using them as components of a large, crew assembled structure, was investigated. Two projects were undertaken: (1) design and development of a ground version of an automated beam builder capable of producing triangular cross section aluminum beams; and (2) design and fabrication of lap joints to connect the beams orthogonally and centroidal end caps to connect beams end to end at any desired angle. The first project produced a beam building machine which fabricates aluminum beams suitable for neutral buoyancy evaluation. The second project produced concepts for the lap joint and end cap. However, neither of these joint concepts was suitable for use by a pressure suited crew member in a zero gravity environment. It is concluded that before the beams can be evaluated the joint designs need to be completed and sufficient joints produced to allow assembly of a complex structure.

  2. Progressive failure of large deformation composites under dynamic tensile loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Liqun

    The applications of polymer based composite materials in structural components under dynamic loading have increased dramatically. The accurate understanding and modeling of the material mechanical behavior is the basis for the composite structure design and analysis. This research was designed to investigate the progressive failure nature of woven polymer-based composites under dynamic tensile loading conditions. A plain-woven E-glass/vinyl ester composite was selected and a generalized anisotropic material characterization procedure was developed. Off-axial tensile dynamic loading experiments with different strain rates and temperature was conducted. A nonlinear and rate dependent constitutive model used for the polymer-based composites under tensile dynamic tensile loading was constructed. The comparison shows a good match with testing data and a good prediction of stress to failure values. A hybrid method that combined the classical laminate theory with material microstructure analysis was presented to model the large strain to failure phenomenon. A single material parameter failure criteria based on Monkman-Grant concept was built to represent the materials anisotropic and rate dependency natural for tensile loading. And the strength concept based on the material constitution relationship and failure criteria was established to for structure analyses.

  3. Structural Qualification of Composite Airframes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kedward, Keith T.; McCarty, John E.

    1997-01-01

    The development of fundamental approaches for predicting failure and elongation characteristics of fibrous composites are summarized in this document. The research described includes a statistical formulation for individual fiber breakage and fragmentation and clustered fiber breakage, termed macrodefects wherein the aligned composite may represent a structural component such as a reinforcing bar element, a rebar. Experimental work conducted in support of the future exploitation of aligned composite rebar elements is also described. This work discusses the experimental challenges associated with rebar tensile test evaluation and describes initial numerical analyses performed in support of the experimental program.

  4. COBSTRAN - COMPOSITE BLADE STRUCTURAL ANALYZER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aiello, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    The COBSTRAN (COmposite Blade STRuctural ANalyzer) program is a pre- and post-processor that facilitates the design and analysis of composite turbofan and turboprop blades, as well as composite wind turbine blades. COBSTRAN combines composite mechanics and laminate theory with a data base of fiber and matrix properties. As a preprocessor for NASTRAN or another Finite Element Method (FEM) program, COBSTRAN generates an FEM model with anisotropic homogeneous material properties. Stress output from the FEM program is provided as input to the COBSTRAN postprocessor. The postprocessor then uses the composite mechanics and laminate theory routines to calculate individual ply stresses, strains, interply stresses, thru-the-thickness stresses and failure margins. COBSTRAN is designed to carry out the many linear analyses required to efficiently model and analyze blade-like structural components made of multilayered angle-plied fiber composites. Components made from isotropic or anisotropic homogeneous materials can also be modeled as a special case of COBSTRAN. NASTRAN MAT1 or MAT2 material cards are generated according to user supplied properties. COBSTRAN is written in FORTRAN 77 and was implemented on a CRAY X-MP with a UNICOS 5.0.12 operating system. The program requires either COSMIC NASTRAN or MSC NASTRAN as a structural analysis package. COBSTRAN was developed in 1989, and has a memory requirement of 262,066 64 bit words.

  5. Advanced strategic interceptor composite structures

    SciTech Connect

    Ennis, D.H.; Patty, C.E. Jr.

    1993-12-31

    Launch mass reduction, stiffness increase, and primary bending mode frequency increase remain the prime focus of the US Army Strategic Defense Command (USASDC) advanced composite material development and testing program. The initial activity was directed toward fabrication of a demonstration structure consistent with the Ground-Based Interceptor (GBI) ERIS flight design. The objectives of this phase of the work were three-fold: selection of the optimum composite materials; concurrent bonding and joining technology development; evaluation of the performance of each test structure relative to its metal counterpart and relative to alternative composites. The effort exceeded model predictions. The resin matrix composite structure mass was 52% lower than the metal design. Modal testing demonstrated a 200% increase in stiffness and a 41% gain in first mode bending frequency. Given the demonstrated level of success, an additional element was added to the task focus: cost-effective, mass quantity fabrication techniques. Single step technology has been successfully applied to a relatively simple thermoset based bridge structure. Two step molding and assembly have been demonstrated for a GBI-X class thermoplastic structure. Preliminary testing has been completed to isolate and resolve problems associated with single step fabrication of the more complex GBI-X class structure. Fabrication of an appropriate test article as preparation for modal survey evaluation of the latter is in progress. Results are presented. Future program directions are summarized.

  6. Deterministic composite nanophotonic lattices in large area for broadband applications

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Jolly; Probst, Jürgen; Becker, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    Exotic manipulation of the flow of photons in nanoengineered materials with an aperiodic distribution of nanostructures plays a key role in efficiency-enhanced broadband photonic and plasmonic technologies for spectrally tailorable integrated biosensing, nanostructured thin film solarcells, white light emitting diodes, novel plasmonic ensembles etc. Through a generic deterministic nanotechnological route here we show subwavelength-scale silicon (Si) nanostructures on nanoimprinted glass substrate in large area (4 cm2) with advanced functional features of aperiodic composite nanophotonic lattices. These nanophotonic aperiodic lattices have easily tailorable supercell tiles with well-defined and discrete lattice basis elements and they show rich Fourier spectra. The presented nanophotonic lattices are designed functionally akin to two-dimensional aperiodic composite lattices with unconventional flexibility- comprising periodic photonic crystals and/or in-plane photonic quasicrystals as pattern design subsystems. The fabricated composite lattice-structured Si nanostructures are comparatively analyzed with a range of nanophotonic structures with conventional lattice geometries of periodic, disordered random as well as in-plane quasicrystalline photonic lattices with comparable lattice parameters. As a proof of concept of compatibility with advanced bottom-up liquid phase crystallized (LPC) Si thin film fabrication, the experimental structural analysis is further extended to double-side-textured deterministic aperiodic lattice-structured 10 μm thick large area LPC Si film on nanoimprinted substrates. PMID:27941869

  7. Deterministic composite nanophotonic lattices in large area for broadband applications.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Jolly; Probst, Jürgen; Becker, Christiane

    2016-12-12

    Exotic manipulation of the flow of photons in nanoengineered materials with an aperiodic distribution of nanostructures plays a key role in efficiency-enhanced broadband photonic and plasmonic technologies for spectrally tailorable integrated biosensing, nanostructured thin film solarcells, white light emitting diodes, novel plasmonic ensembles etc. Through a generic deterministic nanotechnological route here we show subwavelength-scale silicon (Si) nanostructures on nanoimprinted glass substrate in large area (4 cm(2)) with advanced functional features of aperiodic composite nanophotonic lattices. These nanophotonic aperiodic lattices have easily tailorable supercell tiles with well-defined and discrete lattice basis elements and they show rich Fourier spectra. The presented nanophotonic lattices are designed functionally akin to two-dimensional aperiodic composite lattices with unconventional flexibility- comprising periodic photonic crystals and/or in-plane photonic quasicrystals as pattern design subsystems. The fabricated composite lattice-structured Si nanostructures are comparatively analyzed with a range of nanophotonic structures with conventional lattice geometries of periodic, disordered random as well as in-plane quasicrystalline photonic lattices with comparable lattice parameters. As a proof of concept of compatibility with advanced bottom-up liquid phase crystallized (LPC) Si thin film fabrication, the experimental structural analysis is further extended to double-side-textured deterministic aperiodic lattice-structured 10 μm thick large area LPC Si film on nanoimprinted substrates.

  8. Deterministic composite nanophotonic lattices in large area for broadband applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xavier, Jolly; Probst, Jürgen; Becker, Christiane

    2016-12-01

    Exotic manipulation of the flow of photons in nanoengineered materials with an aperiodic distribution of nanostructures plays a key role in efficiency-enhanced broadband photonic and plasmonic technologies for spectrally tailorable integrated biosensing, nanostructured thin film solarcells, white light emitting diodes, novel plasmonic ensembles etc. Through a generic deterministic nanotechnological route here we show subwavelength-scale silicon (Si) nanostructures on nanoimprinted glass substrate in large area (4 cm2) with advanced functional features of aperiodic composite nanophotonic lattices. These nanophotonic aperiodic lattices have easily tailorable supercell tiles with well-defined and discrete lattice basis elements and they show rich Fourier spectra. The presented nanophotonic lattices are designed functionally akin to two-dimensional aperiodic composite lattices with unconventional flexibility- comprising periodic photonic crystals and/or in-plane photonic quasicrystals as pattern design subsystems. The fabricated composite lattice-structured Si nanostructures are comparatively analyzed with a range of nanophotonic structures with conventional lattice geometries of periodic, disordered random as well as in-plane quasicrystalline photonic lattices with comparable lattice parameters. As a proof of concept of compatibility with advanced bottom-up liquid phase crystallized (LPC) Si thin film fabrication, the experimental structural analysis is further extended to double-side-textured deterministic aperiodic lattice-structured 10 μm thick large area LPC Si film on nanoimprinted substrates.

  9. SMART solutions for composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, David C.; Liu, Paul; Beard, Shawn; Qing, Peter; Kumar, Amrita; Ouyang, Lien

    2008-03-01

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) that uses integrated sensor network to provide real-time monitoring of in-service structures can improve the safety and reliability of the structures significantly. Acellent Technologies' SHM systems based on SMART technology consists of the integrated sensor network, diagnosis hardware platform and the diagnosis software. This paper introduces the latest SMART damage detection hardware platform - ScanGenie and the new analysis software for damage detection in composite and metal structures. The ScanGenie is a portable high-performance hardware that provides many features such as through-transmission, pulse-echo, temperature measurement, self-diagnosis, sensor diagnosis, etc. The new analysis software is based on the ScanGenie hardware to provide functions such as temperature compensation, auto-gain adjustment, impedance-based diagnosis and probability of detection. The system can be used for damage detection in most composite and metal structures such as aircraft, spacecraft and civil infrastructures.

  10. Damping characterization in large structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eke, Fidelis O.; Eke, Estelle M.

    1991-01-01

    This research project has as its main goal the development of methods for selecting the damping characteristics of components of a large structure or multibody system, in such a way as to produce some desired system damping characteristics. The main need for such an analytical device is in the simulation of the dynamics of multibody systems consisting, at least partially, of flexible components. The reason for this need is that all existing simulation codes for multibody systems require component-by-component characterization of complex systems, whereas requirements (including damping) often appear at the overall system level. The main goal was met in large part by the development of a method that will in fact synthesize component damping matrices from a given system damping matrix. The restrictions to the method are that the desired system damping matrix must be diagonal (which is almost always the case) and that interbody connections must be by simple hinges. In addition to the technical outcome, this project contributed positively to the educational and research infrastructure of Tuskegee University - a Historically Black Institution.

  11. Progressive Fracture of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon

    2001-01-01

    This report includes the results of a research in which the COmposite Durability STRuctural ANalysis (CODSTRAN) computational simulation capabilities were augmented and applied to various structures for demonstration of the new features and verification. The first chapter of this report provides an introduction to the computational simulation or virtual laboratory approach for the assessment of damage and fracture progression characteristics in composite structures. The second chapter outlines the details of the overall methodology used, including the failure criteria and the incremental/iterative loading procedure with the definitions of damage, fracture, and equilibrium states. The subsequent chapters each contain an augmented feature of the code and/or demonstration examples. All but one of the presented examples contains laminated composite structures with various fiber/matrix constituents. For each structure simulated, damage initiation and progression mechanisms are identified and the structural damage tolerance is quantified at various degradation stages. Many chapters contain the simulation of defective and defect free structures to evaluate the effects of existing defects on structural durability.

  12. Biomimetically Ornamented Rapid Prototyping Fabrication of an Apatite-Collagen-Polycaprolactone Composite Construct with Nano-Micro-Macro Hierarchical Structure for Large Bone Defect Treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinbing; Wu, Dingyu; Zhang, Zhanzhao; Li, Jun; Shen, Yi; Wang, Zhenxing; Li, Yu; Zhang, Zhi-Yong; Sun, Jian

    2015-12-02

    Biomaterial-based bone graft substitute with favorable mechanical and biological properties could be used as an alternative to autograft for large defect treatment. Here, an apatite-collagen-polycaprolactone (Ap-Col-PCL) composite construct was developed with unique nano-micro-macro hierarchical architectures by combining rapid prototyping (RP) fabrication technology and a 3D functionalization strategy. Macroporous PCL framework was fabricated using RP technology, then functionalized by collagen incorporation and biomimetic deposition. Ap-Col-PCL composite construct was characterized with hierarchical architectures of a nanoscale (∼100 nm thickness and ∼1 μm length) platelike apatite coating on the microporous (126 ± 18 μm) collagen networks, which homogeneously filled the macroporous (∼1000 μm) PCL frameworks and possessed a favorable hydrophilic property and compressive modulus (68.75 ± 3.39 MPa) similar to that of cancellous bone. Moreover, in vitro cell culture assay and in vivo critical-sized bone defect implantation demonstrated that the Ap-Col-PCL construct could not only significantly increase the cell adhesion capability (2.0-fold) and promote faster cell proliferation but also successfully bridge the segmental long bone defect within 12 weeks with much more bone regeneration (5.2-fold), better osteointegration (7.2-fold), and a faster new bone deposition rate (2.9-fold). Our study demonstrated that biomimetically ornamented Ap-Col-PCL constructs exhibit a favorable mechanical property, more bone tissue ingrowth, and better osteointegration capability as an effective bone graft substitute for critical-sized bone defect treatment; meanwhile, it can also harness the advantages of RP technology, in particular, facilitating the customization of the shape and size of implants according to medical images during clinical application.

  13. Thermal Modeling of Large Composite Plutons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartley, J. M.; Wohletz, K.; Coleman, D. S.; Glazner, A. F.

    2004-12-01

    Field and geochronologic evidence indicate that large plutons commonly amalgamate from many small intrusive increments [e.g., Glazner et al., 2004, GSA Today; Coleman et al., 2004, Geology]. To investigate the thermal consequences of this process, we model the growth of composite intrusions using the program HEAT. HEAT uses a finite-difference scheme to track transport and storage of heat, and resulting temperature variations, in a 2-D or 3-D intrusion and its wall rocks. Heat advected by wall-rock displacement is conserved kinematically by distributing the heat of intruded rock into adjacent mesh locations following a system determined by the aspect ratio of each intrusive increment. Modeling to date focuses on laccolithic plutons formed by stacking of sills. In a typical model, an 1100°C sill of intermediate-composition magma with a solidus of 750°C, 100-m-thick and 10-km-wide, is emplaced every 10 ka (10 mm/yr vertical inflation rate) for 600 ka to form a tabular pluton 6 km thick. Model runs to date have yielded at least three intriguing results. 1) Stacking of sills from bottom to top produces higher sustained temperatures than stacking from top to bottom. Over the first half of a 600 ka emplacement time, a bottom-up intrusion completely solidifies between increments but, during the latter half, a partial-melt zone becomes a steady-state feature. Dimensions of the partial melt zone vary through a 10 ka intrusive cycle, but the thickness reaches nearly 2 km by the time the last sill is emplaced. An otherwise identical top-down intrusion solidifies completely after each intrusive increment until the last 35 ka, when a small zone of partial melt persists between increments. The large composite complexes of the Sierra Nevada such as the Tuolumne and Whitney intrusive suites appear to have grown from their tops down, but bottom-up plutons also have been widely reported. 2) The partial-melt zone in a bottom-up intrusion mainly forms below each new intrusive

  14. Textile composite fuselage structures development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Anthony C.; Barrie, Ronald E.; Chu, Robert L.

    1993-01-01

    Phase 2 of the NASA ACT Contract (NAS1-18888), Advanced Composite Structural Concepts and Materials Technology for Transport Aircraft Structures, focuses on textile technology, with resin transfer molding or powder coated tows. The use of textiles has the potential for improving damage tolerance, reducing cost and saving weight. This program investigates resin transfer molding (RTM), as a maturing technology for high fiber volume primary structures and powder coated tows as an emerging technology with a high potential for significant cost savings and superior structural properties. Powder coated tow technology has promise for significantly improving the processibility of high temperature resins such as polyimides.

  15. Composite Crew Module: Primary Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirsch, Michael T.

    2011-01-01

    In January 2007, the NASA Administrator and Associate Administrator for the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate chartered the NASA Engineering and Safety Center to design, build, and test a full-scale crew module primary structure, using carbon fiber reinforced epoxy based composite materials. The overall goal of the Composite Crew Module project was to develop a team from the NASA family with hands-on experience in composite design, manufacturing, and testing in anticipation of future space exploration systems being made of composite materials. The CCM project was planned to run concurrently with the Orion project's baseline metallic design within the Constellation Program so that features could be compared and discussed without inducing risk to the overall Program. This report discusses the project management aspects of the project including team organization, decision making, independent technical reviews, and cost and schedule management approach.

  16. Commercial transport aircraft composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarty, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    The role that analysis plays in the development, production, and substantiation of aircraft structures is discussed. The types, elements, and applications of failure that are used and needed; the current application of analysis methods to commercial aircraft advanced composite structures, along with a projection of future needs; and some personal thoughts on analysis development goals and the elements of an approach to analysis development are discussed.

  17. Large Deformation Dynamic Bending of Composite Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Derian, E. J.; Hyer, M. W.

    1986-01-01

    Studies were conducted on the large deformation response of composite beams subjected to a dynamic axial load. The beams were loaded with a moderate eccentricity to promote bending. The study was primarily experimental but some finite element results were obtained. Both the deformation and the failure of the beams were of interest. The static response of the beams was also studied to determine potential differences between the static and dynamic failure. Twelve different laminate types were tested. The beams tested were 23 in. by 2 in. and generally 30 plies thick. The beams were loaded dynamically with a gravity-driven impactor traveling at 19.6 ft/sec and quasi-static tests were conducted on identical beams in a displacement controlled manner. For laminates of practical interest, the failure modes under static and dynamic loadings were identical. Failure in most of the laminate types occurred in a single event involving 40% to 50% of the plies. However, failure in laminates with 300 or 150 off-axis plies occurred in several events. All laminates exhibited bimodular elastic properties. The compressive flexural moduli in some laminates was measured to be 1/2 the tensile flexural modulus. No simple relationship could be found among the measured ultimate failure strains of the different laminate types. Using empirically determined flexural properties, a finite element analysis was reasonably accurate in predicting the static and dynamic deformation response.

  18. Large Deformation Dynamic Bending of Composite Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Derian, E. J.; Hyer, M. W.

    1986-01-01

    Studies were conducted on the large deformation response of composite beams subjected to a dynamic axial load. The beams were loaded with a moderate eccentricity to promote bending. The study was primarily experimental but some finite element results were obtained. Both the deformation and the failure of the beams were of interest. The static response of the beams was also studied to determine potential differences between the static and dynamic failure. Twelve different laminate types were tested. The beams were loaded dynamically with a gravity driven impactor traveling at 19.6 ft/sec and quasi-static tests were conducted on identical beams in a displacement controlled manner. For laminates of practical interest, the failure modes under static and dynamic loadings were identical. Failure in most of the laminate types occurred in a single event involving 40% to 50% of the plies. However, failure in laminates with 30 deg or 15 deg off-axis plies occured in several events. All laminates exhibited bimodular elastic properties. Using empirically determined flexural properties, a finite element analysis was reasonably accurate in predicting the static and dynamic deformation response.

  19. Composite structures for optical mirror applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Richard A.; Marks, John E.

    1990-10-01

    The employment of composites in RF structures such as antennas, feedhorns, and waveguides is outlined, and focus is placed on the parameters of a composite mirror operating in the 3-5- and 8-12-micron areas. A large beam-steering composite mirror fabricated from ultrahigh-modulus graphite/epoxy is described, including its three subassemblies: the core subassembly and two facesheet subassemblies. Attention is given to an alternative approach in which a gel coat resin is applied to the glass surface and the mirror substrate is pressed to the tool to cover the mirror with the resin. Another method is to seal the composite from the effects of moisture expansion by applying a eutectic coating; voids and crystal-grain growth are the main sources of surface perturbation on such mirror surfaces.

  20. Removable fastener for large structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thulson, M. D.

    1979-01-01

    Frame clamps lateral braces for assembling trusses, scaffolds, and other structures. Although approach originally proposed for assembling antennas and solar arrays in space, method is useful in temporary structures which require fastening before they are permanently welded or bonded.

  1. Solvent sensitive polymer composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiappini, A.; Armellini, C.; Carpentiero, A.; Minati, L.; Righini, G. C.; Ferrari, M.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper we describe a composite system based on polystyrene colloidal nanoparticles assembled and embedded in an elastomeric matrix (polymer colloidal crystal, PCC), in the specific we have designed a PCC structure which displays an iridescent green color that can be attributed to the photonic crystal effect. This effect has been exploited to create a chemical sensor, in fact optical measurements have evidenced that the composite structure presents a different optical response as a function of the solvent applied on the surface. In particular we have demonstrated that the PCC possess, for specific solvents: (i) high sensitivity, (ii) fast response (less than 1s), and (iii) reversibility of the signal change. Finally preliminary results on the PCC have shown that this system can be also used as optical writing substrate using a specific solvent as ink, moreover an erasing procedure is also reported and discussed.

  2. Composite Structure with Origami Core

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-19

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2016-0063 Composite Structure with Origami Core Zhong You THE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD Final Report 07/19/2016 DISTRIBUTION A...ADDRESS(ES) THE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD UNIVERSITY OFFICES OXFORD , OX1 2JD GB 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY...Institution: University of Oxford Department: Engineering Science Mailing Address: Department of Engineering Science Parks Road, Oxford , OX1 3PJ, U. K

  3. Industry workshop on large space structures: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, E.

    1976-01-01

    A NASA-sponsored Industry Workshop on Large Space Structures was convened at Langley Research Center on 24-26 February 1976. A number of structures specialists from seven major aerospace companies participated. Predictions about the future structures to be fabricated/assembled/erected in space are presented along with a composite appraisal of what the Aerospace Industry views as the critical structural technology developments needed to support NASA space missions in the 1985-2000 time frame.

  4. Large-scale structural optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, J.

    1983-01-01

    Problems encountered by aerospace designers in attempting to optimize whole aircraft are discussed, along with possible solutions. Large scale optimization, as opposed to component-by-component optimization, is hindered by computational costs, software inflexibility, concentration on a single, rather than trade-off, design methodology and the incompatibility of large-scale optimization with single program, single computer methods. The software problem can be approached by placing the full analysis outside of the optimization loop. Full analysis is then performed only periodically. Problem-dependent software can be removed from the generic code using a systems programming technique, and then embody the definitions of design variables, objective function and design constraints. Trade-off algorithms can be used at the design points to obtain quantitative answers. Finally, decomposing the large-scale problem into independent subproblems allows systematic optimization of the problems by an organization of people and machines.

  5. Functionally Graded Metal-Metal Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brice, Craig A. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Methods and devices are disclosed for creating a multiple alloy composite structure by forming a three-dimensional arrangement of a first alloy composition in which the three-dimensional arrangement has a substantially open and continuous porosity. The three-dimensional arrangement of the first alloy composition is infused with at least a second alloy composition, where the second alloy composition comprises a shape memory alloy. The three-dimensional arrangement is consolidated into a fully dense solid structure, and the original shape of the second alloy composition is set for reversible transformation. Strain is applied to the fully dense solid structure, which is treated with heat so that the shape memory alloy composition becomes memory activated to recover the original shape. An interwoven composite of the first alloy composition and the memory-activated second alloy composition is thereby formed in the multiple alloy composite structure.

  6. Application of Composite Mechanics to Composites Enhanced Concrete Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Gotsis, Pascal K.

    2006-01-01

    A new and effective method is described to design composites to repair damage or enhance the overload strength of concrete infrastructures. The method is based on composite mechanics which is available in computer codes. It is used to simulate structural sections made from reinforced concrete which are typical in infrastructure as well as select reinforced concrete structures. The structural sections are represented by a number of layers through the thickness where different layers are used in concrete, and for the composite. The reinforced concrete structures are represented with finite elements where the element stiffness parameters are from the structural sections which are represented by composite mechanics. The load carrying capability of the structure is determined by progressive structural fracture. Results show up to 40 percent improvements for damage and for overload enhancement with relatively small laminate thickness for the structural sections and up to three times for the composite enhanced select structures (arches and domes).

  7. Sensor devices comprising field-structured composites

    DOEpatents

    Martin, James E.; Hughes, Robert C.; Anderson, Robert A.

    2001-02-27

    A new class of sensor devices comprising field-structured conducting composites comprising a textured distribution of conducting magnetic particles is disclosed. The conducting properties of such field-structured materials can be precisely controlled during fabrication so as to exhibit a large change in electrical conductivity when subject to any environmental influence which changes the relative volume fraction. Influences which can be so detected include stress, strain, shear, temperature change, humidity, magnetic field, electromagnetic radiation, and the presence or absence of certain chemicals. This behavior can be made the basis for a wide variety of sensor devices.

  8. Thermal inspection of composite honeycomb structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Parker, F. Raymond

    2014-05-01

    Composite honeycomb structures continue to be widely used in aerospace applications due to their low weight and high strength advantages. Developing nondestructive evaluation (NDE) inspection methods are essential for their safe performance. Pulsed thermography is a commonly used technique for composite honeycomb structure inspections due to its large area and rapid inspection capability. Pulsed thermography is shown to be sensitive for detection of face sheet impact damage and face sheet to core disbond. Data processing techniques, using principal component analysis to improve the defect contrast, are presented. In addition, limitations to the thermal detection of the core are investigated. Other NDE techniques, such as computed tomography X-ray and ultrasound, are used for comparison to the thermography results.

  9. Thermal Inspection of Composite Honeycomb Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Parker, F. Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Composite honeycomb structures continue to be widely used in aerospace applications due to their low weight and high strength advantages. Developing nondestructive evaluation (NDE) inspection methods are essential for their safe performance. Pulsed thermography is a commonly used technique for composite honeycomb structure inspections due to its large area and rapid inspection capability. Pulsed thermography is shown to be sensitive for detection of face sheet impact damage and face sheet to core disbond. Data processing techniques, using principal component analysis to improve the defect contrast, are presented. In addition, limitations to the thermal detection of the core are investigated. Other NDE techniques, such as computed tomography X-ray and ultrasound, are used for comparison to the thermography results.

  10. ACEE Composite Structures Technology: Review of selected NASA research on composite materials and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) Composite Primary Aircraft Structures Program was designed to develop technology for advanced composites in commercial aircraft. Research on composite materials, aircraft structures, and aircraft design is presented herein. The following parameters of composite materials were addressed: residual strength, damage tolerance, toughness, tensile strength, impact resistance, buckling, and noise transmission within composite materials structures.

  11. Study of composites as substrate materials in large space telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, A. V.

    1979-01-01

    Nonmetallic composites such as the graphite/epoxy system were investigated as possible substrates for the primary mirror of the large space telescope. The possible use of fiber reinforced metal matrix composites was reviewed in the literature. Problems arising out of the use of composites as substrate materials such as grinding, polishing, adherence of reflective coatings, rigidity of substrate, hygrospcopici tendency of the composites, thermal and temporal stability and other related problems were examined.

  12. Desmosome structure, composition and function.

    PubMed

    Garrod, David; Chidgey, Martyn

    2008-03-01

    Desmosomes are intercellular junctions of epithelia and cardiac muscle. They resist mechanical stress because they adopt a strongly adhesive state in which they are said to be hyper-adhesive and which distinguishes them from other intercellular junctions; desmosomes are specialised for strong adhesion and their failure can result in diseases of the skin and heart. They are also dynamic structures whose adhesiveness can switch between high and low affinity adhesive states during processes such as embryonic development and wound healing, the switching being signalled by protein kinase C. Desmosomes may also act as signalling centres, regulating the availability of signalling molecules and thereby participating in fundamental processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation and morphogenesis. Here we consider the structure, composition and function of desmosomes, and their role in embryonic development and disease.

  13. Load Diffusion in Composite and Smart Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horgan, Cornelius O.; Ambur, D. (Technical Monitor); Nemeth, M. P. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The research carried out here builds on our previous NASA supported research on the general topic of edge effects and load diffusion in composite structures. Further fundamental solid mechanics studies were carried out to provide a basis for assessing the complicated modeling necessary for the multi-functional large scale structures used by NASA. An understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of load diffusion in composite subcomponents is essential in developing primary composite structures. Some specific problems recently considered were those of end effects in smart materials and structures, study of the stress response of pressurized linear piezoelectric cylinders for both static and steady rotating configurations, an analysis of the effect of pre-stressing and pre-polarization on the decay of end effects in piezoelectric solids and investigation of constitutive models for hardening rubber-like materials. Our goal in the study of load diffusion is the development of readily applicable results for the decay lengths in terms of non-dimensional material and geometric parameters. Analytical models of load diffusion behavior are extremely valuable in building an intuitive base for developing refined modeling strategies and assessing results from finite element analyses.

  14. Hybrid Composite Cryogenic Tank Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid lightweight composite tank has been created using specially designed materials and manufacturing processes. The tank is produced by using a hybrid structure consisting of at least two reinforced composite material systems. The inner composite layer comprises a distinct fiber and resin matrix suitable for cryogenic use that is a braided-sleeve (and/or a filamentwound layer) aramid fiber preform that is placed on a removable mandrel (outfitted with metallic end fittings) and is infused (vacuum-assisted resin transfer molded) with a polyurethane resin matrix with a high ductility at low temperatures. This inner layer is allowed to cure and is encapsulated with a filamentwound outer composite layer of a distinct fiber resin system. Both inner and outer layer are in intimate contact, and can also be cured at the same time. The outer layer is a material that performs well for low temperature pressure vessels, and it can rely on the inner layer to act as a liner to contain the fluids. The outer layer can be a variety of materials, but the best embodiment may be the use of a continuous tow of carbon fiber (T-1000 carbon, or others), or other high-strength fibers combined with a high ductility epoxy resin matrix, or a polyurethane matrix, which performs well at low temperatures. After curing, the mandrel can be removed from the outer layer. While the hybrid structure is not limited to two particular materials, a preferred version of the tank has been demonstrated on an actual test tank article cycled at high pressures with liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen, and the best version is an inner layer of PBO (poly-pphenylenebenzobisoxazole) fibers with a polyurethane matrix and an outer layer of T-1000 carbon with a high elongation epoxy matrix suitable for cryogenic temperatures. A polyurethane matrix has also been used for the outer layer. The construction method is ideal because the fiber and resin of the inner layer has a high strain to failure at cryogenic

  15. Random vibration and reliability of composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cederbaum, Gabriel; Elishakoff, Isaac; Aboudi, Jacob; Librescu, Liviu

    A presentation is given of a wide spectrum of problems related to the random response and the reliability of composite structures. The general topics addressed include: random vibration of laminated composite plates, dynamic response of moderately thick laminated composite shells to random excitation, response of laminated plates to nonstationary random excitation, reliability of composite laminated plates, micromechanics of fiber-reinforced composites, random vibration of viscoelastic laminated plates, reliability of composites based on micromechanically predicted strength and fatigue criteria.

  16. High-strain composites and dual-matrix composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maqueda Jimenez, Ignacio

    Most space applications require deployable structures due to the limiting size of current launch vehicles. Specifically, payloads in nanosatellites such as CubeSats require very high compaction ratios due to the very limited space available in this typo of platform. Strain-energy-storing deployable structures can be suitable for these applications, but the curvature to which these structures can be folded is limited to the elastic range. Thanks to fiber microbuckling, high-strain composite materials can be folded into much higher curvatures without showing significant damage, which makes them suitable for very high compaction deployable structure applications. However, in applications that require carrying loads in compression, fiber microbuckling also dominates the strength of the material. A good understanding of the strength in compression of high-strain composites is then needed to determine how suitable they are for this type of application. The goal of this thesis is to investigate, experimentally and numerically, the microbuckling in compression of high-strain composites. Particularly, the behavior in compression of unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced silicone rods (CFRS) is studied. Experimental testing of the compression failure of CFRS rods showed a higher strength in compression than the strength estimated by analytical models, which is unusual in standard polymer composites. This effect, first discovered in the present research, was attributed to the variation in random carbon fiber angles respect to the nominal direction. This is an important effect, as it implies that microbuckling strength might be increased by controlling the fiber angles. With a higher microbuckling strength, high-strain materials could carry loads in compression without reaching microbuckling and therefore be suitable for several space applications. A finite element model was developed to predict the homogenized stiffness of the CFRS, and the homogenization results were used in

  17. Laminar composite structures for high power actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobosyan, M. A.; Martinez, P. M.; Zakhidov, A. A.; Haines, C. S.; Baughman, R. H.; Martirosyan, K. S.

    2017-05-01

    Twisted laminar composite structures for high power and large-stroke actuators based on coiled Multi Wall Carbon Nanotube (MWNT) composite yarns were crafted by integrating high-density Nanoenergetic Gas Generators (NGGs) into carbon nanotube sheets. The linear actuation force, resulting from the pneumatic force caused by expanding gases confined within the pores of laminar structures and twisted carbon nanotube yarns, can be further amplified by increasing NGG loading and yarns twist density, as well as selecting NGG compositions with high energy density and large-volume gas generation. Moreover, the actuation force and power can be tuned by the surrounding environment, such as to increase the actuation by combustion in ambient air. A single 300-μm-diameter integrated MWNT/NGG coiled yarn produced 0.7 MPa stress and a contractile specific work power of up to 4.7 kW/kg, while combustion front propagated along the yarn at a velocity up to 10 m/s. Such powerful yarn actuators can also be operated in a vacuum, enabling their potential use for deploying heavy loads in outer space, such as to unfold solar panels and solar sails.

  18. Testing Large Structures in the Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, George; Carne, Thomas G.

    2009-01-01

    Field testing large structures creates unique challenges such as limited choices for boundary conditions and the fact that natural excitation sources cannot be removed. Several critical developments in field testing of large structures are reviewed, including: step relaxation testing which has been developed into a useful technique to apply large forces to operational systems by careful windowing; the capability of large structures testing with free support conditions which has been expanded by implementing modeling of the support structure; natural excitation which has been developed as a viable approach to field testing; and the hybrid approach which has been developed to allow forces to be estimated in operating structures. These developments have increased the ability to extract information from large structures and are highlighted in this presentation.

  19. Textural and compositional variability across littoral segments of Lake Tanganyika: The effect of asymmetric basin structure on sedimentation in large rift lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Soreghan, M.J.; Cohen, A.S.

    1996-03-01

    Lake Tanganyika, part of the East African rift system, represents one of the most widely cited modern analogs for interpreting ancient rift lakes. To date, few published detailed sedimentologic studies of the modern sediments allow for comparisons to outcrop- and well-bore-scale observations within ancient strata. Four recurrent structural margin types exist along the alternating half-graben structure of the lake: hinged margins, axial margins, accommodation zone margins, and escarpment margins. The hinged margin consists of a series of structurally controlled benches over which long, continuous tracts of bioclastic lag deposits predominate; clastic sands are limited to moderate-size silty deltas and long, narrow shoreface sands. The axial margin is dominated by a wave-dominated, silt-rich delta system. Accommodation zone margins consist of bioclastic lag deposits atop structural highs, whereas carbonate and clastic mud accumulates farther offshore. Escarpment margins contain small fan-delta deposits alternating along shore with talus deposits; offshore carbonate and clastic mud is present away from active gravity-flow deposition. Total organic carbon (TOC) and pyrolysis data from fine-grained samples subtly reflect the contrasts in margin types, but these values are controlled more directly by water depth. Although facies are similar among all margin types, their spatial distribution, in particular the degree to which facies tracts trend parallel to shore, best discriminates among the different margin types. These data suggest that unique but predictable associations of reservoir, seal, and source facies exist along each of the different margin types.

  20. Large space structures - Fantasies and facts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Card, M. F.; Boyer, W. J.

    1980-01-01

    A review of large space structures activities from 1973 to 1979 is presented. Long-range studies of space colonies, gigantic solar power stations and projected earth applications revived interest in space activities. Studies suggest opportunities for advanced antenna and platform applications. Matching low-thrust propulsion to large flexible vehicles will be a key technology. Current structures technology investigations include deployable and erectable structures and assembly techniques. Based on orbited structures experience, deployment reliability is a critical issue for deployable structures. For erectable structures, concepts for earth-fabricated and space-fabricated memb

  1. Adaptive Control Of Large Vibrating, Rotating Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, David S.

    1991-01-01

    Globally convergent theoretical method provides for adaptive set-point control of orientation of, along with suppression of the vibrations of, large structure. Method utilizes inherent passivity properties of structure to attain mathematical condition essential to adaptive convergence on commanded set point. Maintains stability and convergence in presence of errors in mathematical model of dynamics of structure and actuators. Developed for controlling attitudes of large, somewhat flexible spacecraft, also useful in such terrestrial applications as controlling movable bridges or suppressing earthquake vibrations in bridges, buildings, and other large structures.

  2. Recent advancement in optical fiber sensing for aerospace composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakuchi, Shu; Takeda, Nobuo

    2013-12-01

    Optical fiber sensors have attracted considerable attention in health monitoring of aerospace composite structures. This paper briefly reviews our recent advancement mainly in Brillouin-based distributed sensing. Damage detection, life cycle monitoring and shape reconstruction systems applicable to large-scale composite structures are presented, and new technical concepts, "smart crack arrester" and "hierarchical sensing system", are described as well, highlighting the great potential of optical fiber sensors for the structural health monitoring (SHM) field.

  3. A BR 1 gene in Chironomus tentans has a composite structure: a large repetitive core block is separated from a short unrelated 3'-terminal domain by a small intron.

    PubMed Central

    Höög, C; Engberg, C; Wieslander, L

    1986-01-01

    The large Balbiani ring (BR) genes in the dipteran genus Chironomus have been considered to be homogeneous repetitive structures. Analysis of a genomic DNA segment now reveals that a BR 1 gene in C. tentans is a composite gene, consisting of two different types of sequences. A 15-20 kb core block of tandemly arranged repeat units extends close to the 3' end of the BR 1 gene and ends in repetitive structures partly different from the repeat units in the core block. A 55 bp long intron separates the core block, which probably constitutes a single exon, from a non-related 3'-exon, comprising the final 332 bp of the translated part of the gene. According to hydrophobicity and secondary structure predictions, the 3'-exon encoded peptide is distinctly different from the repetitive core block domain and attains a globular structure. The carboxyl-terminal peptide domain is likely to be a general feature of BR encoded proteins and may have important functions in the excretion and polymerisation of the secretory proteins. Images PMID:3003693

  4. Multiscale Multifunctional Progressive Fracture of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Minnetyan, L.

    2012-01-01

    A new approach is described for evaluating fracture in composite structures. This approach is independent of classical fracture mechanics parameters like fracture toughness. It relies on computational simulation and is programmed in a stand-alone integrated computer code. It is multiscale, multifunctional because it includes composite mechanics for the composite behavior and finite element analysis for predicting the structural response. It contains seven modules; layered composite mechanics (micro, macro, laminate), finite element, updating scheme, local fracture, global fracture, stress based failure modes, and fracture progression. The computer code is called CODSTRAN (Composite Durability Structural ANalysis). It is used in the present paper to evaluate the global fracture of four composite shell problems and one composite built-up structure. Results show that the composite shells. Global fracture is enhanced when internal pressure is combined with shear loads. The old reference denotes that nothing has been added to this comprehensive report since then.

  5. Dynamics and control of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nurre, G. S.; Ryan, R. S.; Scofield, H. N.; Sims, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    An attempt is made to gather data useful to investigators in the fields of large space structure dynamics and control modeling, design and testing. Attention is given to structural dynamics and its relationship to such allied engineering fields as flutter analysis, as well as to problems in the prediction of atmospheric density at orbital altitude. The first challenge posed by large space structure control is the design of control systems with natural frequencies above several major structural frequencies. The establishment of a sufficiently accurate structural model, plant excitation, and shape maintenance, are noted to be additional problems.

  6. Composite structures for commercial transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vosteen, L. F.

    1978-01-01

    The development of graphite-epoxy composite structures for use on commercial transport aircraft is considered. Six components, three secondary structures, and three primary structures, are presently under development. The six components are described along with some of the key features of the composite designs and their projected weight savings.

  7. Fire resistance of structural composite lumber products

    Treesearch

    Robert H. White

    2006-01-01

    Use of structural composite lumber products is increasing. In applications requiring a fire resistance rating, calculation procedures are used to obtain the fire resistance rating of exposed structural wood products. A critical factor in the calculation procedures is char rate for ASTM E 119 fire exposure. In this study, we tested 14 structural composite lumber...

  8. Learning to build large structures in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagler, T.; Patterson, H. G.; Nathan, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    The paper examines some of the key technologies and forms of construction know-how that will have to be developed and tested for eventual application to building large structures in space. Construction of a shuttle-tended space construction/demonstration platform would comprehensively demonstrate large structure technology, develop construction capability, and furnish a construction platform for a variety of operational large structures. Completion of this platform would lead to demonstrations of the Satellite Power System (SPS) concept, including microwave transmission, fabrication of 20-m-deep beams, conductor installation, rotary joint installation, and solar blanket installation.

  9. Learning to build large structures in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagler, T.; Patterson, H. G.; Nathan, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    The paper examines some of the key technologies and forms of construction know-how that will have to be developed and tested for eventual application to building large structures in space. Construction of a shuttle-tended space construction/demonstration platform would comprehensively demonstrate large structure technology, develop construction capability, and furnish a construction platform for a variety of operational large structures. Completion of this platform would lead to demonstrations of the Satellite Power System (SPS) concept, including microwave transmission, fabrication of 20-m-deep beams, conductor installation, rotary joint installation, and solar blanket installation.

  10. Rapid Prototyping of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colton, Jonathan S.

    1998-01-01

    This final report for the project Rapid Production of Composite Structures covers the period from July 14, 1997 to September 30, 1998. It will present a short overview of the project, followed by the results to date and plans for the future. The goal of this research is to provide a minimum 100x reduction in the time required to produce arbitrary, laminated products without the need for a separate mold or an autoclave. It will accomplish this by developing the science underlying the rapid production of composite structures, specifically those of carbon fiber-epoxy materials. This scientific understanding will be reduced to practice in a demonstration device that will produce a part on the order of 12in. by 12in. by 6in. Work in the past year has focussed on developing an understanding of the materials issues and of the machine design issues. Our initial goal was to use UV cureable resins to accomplish full cure on the machine. Therefore, we have centered our materials work around whether or not UV cureable resins will work. Currently, the answer seems to be that they will not work, because UV light cannot penetrate the carbon fibers, and because no "shadow" curing seems to occur. As a result, non-UV cureable resins are being investigated. This has resulted in a change in the machine design focus. We are now looking into a "dip and place" machine design, whereby a prepreg layer would have one side coated with a curing agent, and then would be placed onto the previous layer. This would lead to cure at the interface, but not to the top of the layer. The formulation of the resins to accomplish this task at room or slightly elevated temperatures is being investigated, as is the machine design needed to apply the curing agent and then cure or partially cure the part. A final, out-of-autoclave, post-cure may be needed with this strategy, as final cure on the machine may not be possible, as it was for the initial UV cure strategy. The remainder of this report details the

  11. Rapid Prototyping of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colton, Jonathan S.

    1998-01-01

    This final report for the project Rapid Production of Composite Structures covers the period from July 14, 1997 to September 30, 1998. It will present a short overview of the project, followed by the results to date and plans for the future. The goal of this research is to provide a minimum 100x reduction in the time required to produce arbitrary, laminated products without the need for a separate mold or an autoclave. It will accomplish this by developing the science underlying the rapid production of composite structures, specifically those of carbon fiber-epoxy materials. This scientific understanding will be reduced to practice in a demonstration device that will produce a part on the order of 12in. by 12in. by 6in. Work in the past year has focussed on developing an understanding of the materials issues and of the machine design issues. Our initial goal was to use UV cureable resins to accomplish full cure on the machine. Therefore, we have centered our materials work around whether or not UV cureable resins will work. Currently, the answer seems to be that they will not work, because UV light cannot penetrate the carbon fibers, and because no "shadow" curing seems to occur. As a result, non-UV cureable resins are being investigated. This has resulted in a change in the machine design focus. We are now looking into a "dip and place" machine design, whereby a prepreg layer would have one side coated with a curing agent, and then would be placed onto the previous layer. This would lead to cure at the interface, but not to the top of the layer. The formulation of the resins to accomplish this task at room or slightly elevated temperatures is being investigated, as is the machine design needed to apply the curing agent and then cure or partially cure the part. A final, out-of-autoclave, post-cure may be needed with this strategy, as final cure on the machine may not be possible, as it was for the initial UV cure strategy. The remainder of this report details the

  12. Effect of stress concentrations in composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babcock, C. D.; Waas, A. M.

    1985-01-01

    Composite structures have found wide use in many engineering fields and a sound understanding of their response under load is important to their utilization. An experimental program is being carried out to gain a fundamental understanding of the failure mechanics of multilayered composite structures at GALCIT. As a part of this continuing study, the performance of laminated composite plates in the presence of a stress gradient and the failure of composite structures at points of thickness discontinuity is assessed. In particular, the questions of initiation of failure and its subsequent growth to complete failure of the structure are addressed.

  13. Rapid Prototyping of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colton, Jonathan S.

    1998-01-01

    This progress report for the project Rapid Production of Composite Structures covers the period from July 14, 1997 to June 30, 1998. It will present a short overview of the project, followed by the results to date and plans for the future. The goal of this research is to provide a minimum 100x reduction in the time required to produce arbitrary, laminated products without the need for a separate mold or an autoclave. It will accomplish this by developing the science underlying the rapid production of composite structures, specifically those of carbon fiber-epoxy materials. This scientific understanding will be reduced to practice in a demonstration device that will produce a part on the order of 12" by 12" by 6". Work in the past year has focussed on developing an understanding of the materials issues and of the machine design issues. Our initial goal was to use UV cureable resins to accomplish full cure on the machine. Therefore, we have centered our materials work around whether or not UV cureable resins will work. Currently, the answer seems to be that they will not work, because UV light cannot penetrate the carbon fibers, and because no "shadow" curing seems to occur. As a result, non-UV cureable resins are being investigated. This has resulted in a change in the machine design focus. We are now looking into a "dip and place" machine design, whereby a prepreg layer would have one side coated with a curing agent, and then would be placed onto the previous layer. This would lead to cure at the interface, but not to the top of the layer. The formulation of the resins to accomplish this task at room or slightly elevated temperatures is being investigated, as is the machine design needed to apply the curing agent and then cure or partially cure the part. A final, out-of-autoclave, post-cure may be needed with this strategy, as final cure on the machine may not be possible, as it was for the initial UV cure strategy. The remainder of this report details the progress

  14. Impact analysis of composite aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pifko, Allan B.; Kushner, Alan S.

    1993-01-01

    The impact analysis of composite aircraft structures is discussed. Topics discussed include: background remarks on aircraft crashworthiness; comments on modeling strategies for crashworthiness simulation; initial study of simulation of progressive failure of an aircraft component constructed of composite material; and research direction in composite characterization for impact analysis.

  15. Load Diffusion in Composite and Smart Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horgan, C. O.

    2003-01-01

    The research carried out here builds on our previous NASA supported research on the general topic of edge effects and load diffusion in composite structures. Further fundamental solid mechanics studies were carried out to provide a basis for assessing the complicated modeling necessary for the multi-functional large scale structures used by NASA. An understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of load diffusion in composite subcomponents is essential in developing primary composite structures. Some specific problems recently considered were those of end effects in smart materials and structures, study of the stress response of pressurized linear piezoelectric cylinders for both static and steady rotating configurations, an analysis of the effect of pre-stressing and pre-polarization on the decay of end effects in piezoelectric solids and investigation of constitutive models for hardening rubber-like materials. Our goal in the study of load diffusion is the development of readily applicable results for the decay lengths in terms of non-dimensional material and geometric parameters. Analytical models of load diffusion behavior are extremely valuable in building an intuitive base for developing refined modeling strategies and assessing results from finite element analyses. The decay behavior of stresses and other field quantities provides a significant aid towards this process. The analysis is also amenable to parameter study with a large parameter space and should be useful in structural tailoring studies. Special purpose analytical models of load diffusion behavior are extremely valuable in building an intuitive base for developing refined modeling strategies and in assessing results from general purpose finite element analyses. For example, a rational basis is needed in choosing where to use three-dimensional to two-dimensional transition finite elements in analyzing stiffened plates and shells. The decay behavior of stresses and other field quantities furnished by

  16. Composite Materials for Structural Design.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    Conditioning of Cross-Ply Graphite/Epoxy Laminates." In Advances in Composite Materials (Proceedings of 3rd International Con- ference on Composite Materials...Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. W. L. Bradley An epoxy resin commonly used in advanced composite materials for aerospace application was tested...34, Vought Corp. Advanced Technology Center Final Report, Aug. 1978. Contract No. N00019-77-C-0369 with the Department of the Navy. 2. Williams, M.L., et al

  17. Composite structures for magnetosphere imager spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Tsuchin

    1994-01-01

    Results of a trade study addressing the issues and benefits in using carbon fiber reinforced composites for the Magnetosphere Imager (MI) spacecraft are presented. The MI mission is now part of the Sun/Earth Connection Program. To qualify for this category, new technology and innovative methods to reduce the cost and size have to be considered. Topics addressed cover: (1) what is a composite, including advantages and disadvantages of composites and carbon/graphite fibers; and (2) structural design for MI, including composite design configuration, material selection, and analysis of composite structures.

  18. Crash-Energy-Absorbing Composite Subfloor Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.

    1988-01-01

    Simple method of predicting energy-absorption capability of composite subfloor beam structure developed. Based upon weighted sum of energy-absorption capabilities of constituent elements of subfloor beam. Procedure general and applicable to wide range of subfloor beam structures.

  19. Vibration suppression in a large space structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narendra, Kumpati S.

    1988-01-01

    The Yale University Center for Systems Science and the NASA Johnson Space Center collaborated in a study of vibration suppression in a large space structure during the period January 1985 to August 1987. The research proposal submitted by the Center to NASA concerned disturbance isolation in flexible space structures. The general objective of the proposal was to create within the Center a critical mass of expertise on problems related to the dynamics and control of large flexible space structures. A specific objective was to formulate both passive and active control strategies for the disturbance isolation problem. Both objectives were achieved during the period of the contract. While an extensive literature exists on the control of flexible space structures, it is generally acknowledged that many important questions remain open at even a fundamental level. Hence, instead of studying grossly simplified models of complex structural systems, it was decided as a first step to confine attention to detailed and thorough analyses of simple structures.

  20. Impact dynamics research on composite transport structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, H. D.

    1984-01-01

    The experimental and analytical efforts being undertaken to investigate the response of composite and aluminum structures under crash loading conditions were reviewed. A Boeing 720 airplane was used in the controlled-impact demonstration test. Energy absorption of composite materials, the tearing of fuselage skin panels, the friction and abrasion behavior of composite skins, and the crushing behavior and dynamic response of composite beams were among the topics addressed.

  1. Impact dynamics research on composite transport structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, H. D.

    1985-01-01

    The experimental and analytical efforts being undertaken to investigate the response of composite and aluminum structures under crash loading conditions were reviewed. A Boeing 720 airplane was used in the controlled-impact demonstration test. Energy absorption of composite materials, the tearing of fuselage skin panels, the friction and abrasion behavior of composite skins, and the crushing behavior and dynamic response of composite beams were among the topics addressed.

  2. Computational composite mechanics for aerospace propulsion structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    1987-01-01

    Specialty methods are presented for the computational simulation of specific composite behavior. These methods encompass all aspects of composite mechanics, impact, progressive fracture and component specific simulation. Some of these methods are structured to computationally simulate, in parallel, the composite behavior and history from the initial frabrication through several missions and even to fracture. Select methods and typical results obtained from such simulations are described in detail in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of computationally simulating: (1) complex composite structural behavior in general, and (2) specific aerospace propulsion structural components in particular.

  3. Dynamics of rotationally periodic large space structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdaniel, T. J.; Chang, K. J.

    1980-01-01

    The analysis of large area rotationally periodic space structures presented in the paper combines the finite element method, transfer matrix procedures, approximation methods, and periodic structure analysis to obtain computational efficiency. The computations used in the analysis indicate that additive damping mechanisms can be evaluated from the frequency response of the structure. The transient response can also be obtained from the frequency response to complete the dynamic analysis.

  4. Large structures and tethers working group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, G.; Garrett, H.; Samir, U.; Barnett, A.; Raitt, J.; Sullivan, J.; Katz, I.

    1986-01-01

    The Large Structures and Tethers Working Group sought to clarify the meaning of large structures and tethers as they related to space systems. Large was assumed to mean that the characteristic length of the structure was greater than one of such relevant plasma characteristics as ion gyroradius or debey length. Typically, anything greater than or equal to the Shuttle dimensions was considered large. It was agreed that most large space systems that the tether could be better categorized as extended length, area, or volume structures. The key environmental interactions were then identified in terms of these three categories. In the following Working Group summary, these categories and the related interactions are defined in detail. The emphasis is on how increases in each of the three spatial dimensions uniquely determine the interactions with the near-Earth space environment. Interactions with the environments around the other planets and the solar wind were assumed to be similar or capable of being extrapolated from the near-Earth results. It should be remembered in the following that the effects on large systems do not just affect specific technologies but will quite likely impact whole missions. Finally, the possible effects of large systems on the plasma environment, although only briefly discussed, were felt to be of potentially great concern.

  5. Identification of large space structures - Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denman, Eugene; Juang, Jer-Nan; Junkins, John; Kamat, Manohar; Hasselman, T. K.

    1988-01-01

    The system identification process presently discussed for the case of large space structures uses the observed input to a system and its observed response, or output, to derive an analytical model of the system which can then be used to predict its response to future inputs. Due to their size and complexity, as well as the intrinsic difficulty of identifying the environment in which they function, large space structures will require vast amounts of information, encompassing both experimental and analytical data for identification. A status evaluation is made of the structural system identification literature to date.

  6. Durability of Composite Materials and Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-02

    Michigan State University Composite Materials and Structures Center 2100 Engineering Building , East Lansing, MI 48824-1226 6.1 Objectives The...DATES COVERED (From - To) February 7, 2005 - January 31. 2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE DURABILITY OF COMPOSITE MATERIALS AND STRUCTURES 5a...Manager: Dr. Yapa D.S. Rajapakse Office of Naval Research 875 N. Randolph Street Arlington, VA 22203-1995 DURABILITY OF COMPOSITE MATERIALS AND

  7. Photospheric composition and structure in white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barstow, M. A.

    1993-12-01

    One of the central mysteries of white dwarf studies has been the nature and abundance of trace elements in the atmospheres of these stars. It had been thought that the dominant trace element in otherwise pure hydrogen DA white dwarf atmospheres was helium. However, some spectroscopic and theoretical evidence suggested that, at least in some stars, heavier elements may be important. Prior to the launch of ROSAT the questions regarding the atmospheric composition of DA white dwarfs in general remained unresolved. The ROSAT mission has provided EUV and X-ray data for a large sample of DA white dwarfs with which we can study their photospheric composition and structure through the effect of trace opacity sources on the emergent fluxes. Contrary to expectations little (if any) helium is found and the main sources of opacity appear to be trace heavy elements. Support for these conclusions is found in recent EUV and far-UV spectra of several stars. However, photometric data do not allow us to determine the abundance of the individual elements and observations with the extreme ultraviolet explorer satellite (EUVE) spectrometers will be essential for detailed composition measurements.

  8. The design of repairable advanced composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart-Smith, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    This paper addresses the repair of advanced composite structures by mechanical fasteners or by adhesive bonding. It is shown that many of today's composite designs are unreasonably difficult to repair. Conversely, the knowledge to design repairable structures is already available, if only it is applied during the initial design stage. Bolted or riveted repairs require only the avoidance of extremely orthotropic composite fiber patterns; those near the quasi-isotropic layup are the most suitable. Mildly orthotropic fiber patterns are appropriate for structures in which there is a dominant load direction. Thick composite structures are shown to require bolted or riveted repairs while thin structures favor adhesively bonded permanent repairs, although provisions can be easily made for temporary mechanical repairs. The reasons why integrally stiffened cocured composite designs are usually impractical to repair are explained and alternative repairable design concepts are presented.

  9. Creep of Structural Nuclear Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Will Windes; R.W. Lloyd

    2005-09-01

    A research program has been established to investigate fiber reinforced ceramic composites to be used as control rod components within a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design. Two candidate systems have been identified, carbon fiber reinforced carbon (Cf/C) and silicon carbide fiber reinforced silicon carbide (SiCf/SiC) composites. One of the primary degradation mechanisms anticipated for these core components is high temperature thermal and irradiation enhanced creep. As a consequence, high temperature test equipment, testing methodologies, and test samples for very high temperature (up to 1600º C) tensile strength and long duration creep studies have been established. Actual testing of both tubular and flat, "dog-bone"-shaped tensile composite specimens will begin next year. Since there is no precedence for using ceramic composites within a nuclear reactor, ASTM standard test procedures are currently being established from these high temperature mechanical tests.

  10. Quantification of Energy Release in Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon; Chamis, Christos C. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Energy release rate is usually suggested as a quantifier for assessing structural damage tolerance. Computational prediction of energy release rate is based on composite mechanics with micro-stress level damage assessment, finite element structural analysis and damage progression tracking modules. This report examines several issues associated with energy release rates in composite structures as follows: Chapter I demonstrates computational simulation of an adhesively bonded composite joint and validates the computed energy release rates by comparison with acoustic emission signals in the overall sense. Chapter II investigates the effect of crack plane orientation with respect to fiber direction on the energy release rates. Chapter III quantifies the effects of contiguous constraint plies on the residual stiffness of a 90 deg ply subjected to transverse tensile fractures. Chapter IV compares ICAN and ICAN/JAVA solutions of composites. Chapter V examines the effects of composite structural geometry and boundary conditions on damage progression characteristics.

  11. Quantification of Energy Release in Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon

    2003-01-01

    Energy release rate is usually suggested as a quantifier for assessing structural damage tolerance. Computational prediction of energy release rate is based on composite mechanics with micro-stress level damage assessment, finite element structural analysis and damage progression tracking modules. This report examines several issues associated with energy release rates in composite structures as follows: Chapter I demonstrates computational simulation of an adhesively bonded composite joint and validates the computed energy release rates by comparison with acoustic emission signals in the overall sense. Chapter II investigates the effect of crack plane orientation with respect to fiber direction on the energy release rates. Chapter III quantifies the effects of contiguous constraint plies on the residual stiffness of a 90 ply subjected to transverse tensile fractures. Chapter IV compares ICAN and ICAN/JAVA solutions of composites. Chapter V examines the effects of composite structural geometry and boundary conditions on damage progression characteristics.

  12. A consistent large deflection theory of composite sandwich shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jinfu

    1993-05-01

    Composite sandwich shells are important structures in aeronautical and astronautical industry. The theory, especially nonlinear theory, of them is still required to be advanced so as to meet the demand of engineering application. With Lagrangian description, the consistent Green strain tensor, the compatibility equations and the second Piola-Kirchhoff stress tensor of the composite sandwich shells are obtained. Based on these results and several assumptions, the constitutive equations relating the stress resultants to the strains, the strain energy density and the potential energy functional are further developed. In terms of minimum potential energy principle, the equilibrium equations and associated boundary conditions are obtained, which are consistent with the first order approximation under the conditions of small strain accompanied with moderate/small rotation. In terms of the structural features of the shallow composite sandwich shells, the equations obtained are further processed approximately and Donnel-type equations for the shallow composite sandwich shells are obtained.

  13. Fluid Structure Interaction Effect on Sandwich Composite Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    14. SUBJECT TERMS Fluid Structure Interaction, FSI, composite, balsa, low velocity impact, sandwich composites, VARTM , Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer...11 1. Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding ( VARTM ) ...................11 2. Procedure...required equipment for VARTM composite production. ..............10 Figure 4. VARTM Lay-up (From [8

  14. Multi-functional composite structures

    DOEpatents

    Mulligan, Anthony C.; Halloran, John; Popovich, Dragan; Rigali, Mark J.; Sutaria, Manish P.; Vaidyanathan, K. Ranji; Fulcher, Michael L.; Knittel, Kenneth L.

    2010-04-27

    Fibrous monolith processing techniques to fabricate multifunctional structures capable of performing more than one discrete function such as structures capable of bearing structural loads and mechanical stresses in service and also capable of performing at least one additional non-structural function.

  15. Multi-functional composite structures

    DOEpatents

    Mulligan, Anthony C.; Halloran, John; Popovich, Dragan; Rigali, Mark J.; Sutaria, Manish P.; Vaidyanathan, K. Ranji; Fulcher, Michael L.; Knittel, Kenneth L.

    2004-10-19

    Fibrous monolith processing techniques to fabricate multifunctional structures capable of performing more than one discrete function such as structures capable of bearing structural loads and mechanical stresses in service and also capable of performing at least one additional non-structural function.

  16. Ground test experiment for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tollison, D. K.; Waites, H. B.

    1985-01-01

    In recent years a new body of control theory has been developed for the design of control systems for Large Space Structures (LSS). The problems of testing this theory on LSS hardware are aggravated by the expense and risk of actual in orbit tests. Ground tests on large space structures can provide a proving ground for candidate control systems, but such tests require a unique facility for their execution. The current development of such a facility at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is the subject of this report.

  17. Damage Tolerance of Large Shell Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, L.; Chamis, C. C.

    1999-01-01

    Progressive damage and fracture of large shell structures is investigated. A computer model is used for the assessment of structural response, progressive fracture resistance, and defect/damage tolerance characteristics. Critical locations of a stiffened conical shell segment are identified. Defective and defect-free computer models are simulated to evaluate structural damage/defect tolerance. Safe pressurization levels are assessed for the retention of structural integrity at the presence of damage/ defects. Damage initiation, growth, accumulation, and propagation to fracture are included in the simulations. Damage propagation and burst pressures for defective and defect-free shells are compared to evaluate damage tolerance. Design implications with regard to defect and damage tolerance of a large steel pressure vessel are examined.

  18. Fire Response of Geopolymer Structural Composites.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-01-01

    The fire response of a potassium aluminosilicate matrix ( geopolymer ) carbon fiber composite was measured and the results compared to organic matrix...laminates ignited readily and released appreciable heat and smoke, while carbon-fiber reinforced geopolymer composites did not ignite, burn, or release...any smoke even after extended heat flux exposure. The geopolymer matrix carbon fiber composite retains sixty-three percent of its original 245 MPa flexural strength after a simulated large fire exposure. (MM)

  19. Recent advances in structural dynamics of large space structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinson, Larry D.

    Recent progress in the area of structural dynamics of large space structures is reviewed. Topics include system identification, large angle slewing of flexible structures, definition of scaling limitations in structural models, and recent results on a tension-stabilized antenna concept known as the hoop-column. Increasingly complex laboratory experiments guide most of the activities leading to realistic technological developments. Theoretical progress in system identification based on system realization theory resulting in unification of several methods is reviewed. Experimental results from implementation of a theoretical large-angle slewing control approach are shown. Status and results of the development of a research computer program for analysis of the transient dynamics of large angle motion of flexible structures are presented. Correlation of results from analysis and vibration tests of the hoop-column antenna concept is summarized.

  20. Large-scale wind turbine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, David A.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to show how structural technology was applied in the design of modern wind turbines, which were recently brought to an advanced stage of development as sources of renewable power. Wind turbine structures present many difficult problems because they are relatively slender and flexible; subject to vibration and aeroelastic instabilities; acted upon by loads which are often nondeterministic; operated continuously with little maintenance in all weather; and dominated by life-cycle cost considerations. Progress in horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWT) development was paced by progress in the understanding of structural loads, modeling of structural dynamic response, and designing of innovative structural response. During the past 15 years a series of large HAWTs was developed. This has culminated in the recent completion of the world's largest operating wind turbine, the 3.2 MW Mod-5B power plane installed on the island of Oahu, Hawaii. Some of the applications of structures technology to wind turbine will be illustrated by referring to the Mod-5B design. First, a video overview will be presented to provide familiarization with the Mod-5B project and the important components of the wind turbine system. Next, the structural requirements for large-scale wind turbines will be discussed, emphasizing the difficult fatigue-life requirements. Finally, the procedures used to design the structure will be presented, including the use of the fracture mechanics approach for determining allowable fatigue stresses.

  1. Structure and Composition of the Lunar Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spudis, P. D.; Bussey, D. B. J.; Hawke, B. R.

    1999-01-01

    . Although some areas on the northern farside appear very anorthositic, most areas of the upper highlands different from this composition are more mafic, not more feldspathic, showing affinities to highland basalt, with or without KREEP. The next zone of the crust is found at depths between 15 and about 35 km. It appears to consist largely of nearly pure, ferroan anorthosite (FeO < 2 wt%; Al2O3 > 33 wt%). Outcrops of pure anorthosite principally occur on the Moon in the inner rings of multiring basins, which are structurally uplifted blocks from midcrustal levels, or rarely, as central peaks in some selected craters (Alphonsus, Aristarchus). The anorthosite is apparently confined to middle levels in the crust; moreover, it appears to be at least partly of global extent, as basin rings of anorthosite are found in basins spanning the globe, from Orientale to Humboldtianum. Because anorthosite is most likely to represent the primordial crust , we interpret this global "layer" of anorthosite as the remnant of the original crust of the Moon. The petrological nature of the roughly half of the crust below the anorthosite zone (depths of 35-65 km) remains obscure, but several observations may be made about the likely nature of rocks tobe found there. First, where most of the upper crust has been removed by large, basin-forming impact (such as the floors of the SPA and Imbrium Basins), the crustal composition appears to be that of highland basalt (FeO 9-12 wt%; Al2O3 18-20 wt%). Second, a plot of the total Fe content of basin ejecta (determined from orbital measurements;) against basin size shows that larger basins excavate more mafic (Fe-rich) material. This relation suggests that the lower levels of the crust are more "basaltic" than middle or upper levels. Additional information contained in original.

  2. Structural Composites With Tuned EM Chirality

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-23

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0018 STRUCTURAL COMPOSITES WITH TUNED EM CHIRALITY Siavouche Nemat Nasser UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SAN DIEGO Final Report 12/23...REPORT Grant/Contract  Title:        STRUCTURAL  COMPOSITES  WITH  TUNED  EM   CHIRALITY     Grant  No.:  FA9550-­‐09-­‐1...structural   composites  with   tunable   chiral   elements   has   produced   some   impressive   results   in   the

  3. Certification of damage tolerant composite structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapoff, Andrew J.; Dill, Harold D.; Sanger, Kenneth B.; Kautz, Edward F.

    1990-01-01

    A reliability based certification testing methodology for impact damage tolerant composite structure was developed. Cocured, adhesively bonded, and impact damaged composite static strength and fatigue life data were statistically analyzed to determine the influence of test parameters on the data scatter. The impact damage resistance and damage tolerance of various structural configurations were characterized through the analysis of an industry wide database of impact test results. Realistic impact damage certification requirements were proposed based on actual fleet aircraft data. The capabilities of available impact damage analysis methods were determined through correlation with experimental data. Probabilistic methods were developed to estimate the reliability of impact damaged composite structures.

  4. Construction and control of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Card, M. F.; Heard, W. L., Jr.; Akin, D. L.

    1986-01-01

    Recent NASA research efforts on space construction are reviewed. Preliminary results of the EASE/ACCESS Shuttle experiments are discussed. A 45-foot beam was constructed on orbit in 30 minutes using a manual assembly technique at a work station. A large tetrahedron was constructed several times using a free floating technique. The capability of repair, utilities installation, and handling the structures using a mobile foot restraint on the RMS was also demonstrated. Implications of the experiments for space station are presented. Models of 5-meter space station structure together with neutral buoyancy simulations suggest manual assembly techniques are feasible. Selected research on control of flexible structures is discussed.

  5. Hydrodynamic Forces on Composite Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    13  2.  Method of Fabrication .......................................................................16  3.  Application of Strain Gauges...17  Figure 12  Measuring of woven glass fabric ...environment. Furthermore, composite materials can greatly alter the fabrication process available to shipbuilder, providing flexibility and further

  6. Camera Systems Rapidly Scan Large Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    Needing a method to quickly scan large structures like an aircraft wing, Langley Research Center developed the line scanning thermography (LST) system. LST works in tandem with a moving infrared camera to capture how a material responds to changes in temperature. Princeton Junction, New Jersey-based MISTRAS Group Inc. now licenses the technology and uses it in power stations and industrial plants.

  7. Composite fuselage shell structures research at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Shuart, Mark J.

    1992-01-01

    Fuselage structures for transport aircraft represent a large portion of both the weight and cost of these aircraft primary structures. Composite materials offer the potential for reducing both the weight and cost of these structures, but only limited studies of the response and failure of composite fuselage structures have been conducted. The research is described which is being conducted and planned at NASA Langley to understand the critical behavior of composite fuselage structures and to validate the structural mechanics methodology being developed for stiffened composite fuselage shell structure subjected to combined internal pressure and mechanical loads. Stiffened shell and curved stiffened panel designs are currently being developed and analyzed, and these designs will be fabricated and then tested to study critical fuselage behavior and to validate structural analysis and design methodology. The research includes studies of the effects of combined internal pressure and mechanical loads on nonlinear stiffened panel and shell behavior, the effects of cutouts and other gradient producing discontinuities on composite shell response, and the effects of local damage on pressure containment and residual strength. Scaling laws are being developed that relate full scale and subscale behavior of composite fuselage shells.

  8. Structural Health Monitoring for Impact Damage in Composite Structures.

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, Dennis P.; Raymond Bond; Doug Adams

    2014-08-01

    Composite structures are increasing in prevalence throughout the aerospace, wind, defense, and transportation industries, but the many advantages of these materials come with unique challenges, particularly in inspecting and repairing these structures. Because composites of- ten undergo sub-surface damage mechanisms which compromise the structure without a clear visual indication, inspection of these components is critical to safely deploying composite re- placements to traditionally metallic structures. Impact damage to composites presents one of the most signi fi cant challenges because the area which is vulnerable to impact damage is generally large and sometimes very dif fi cult to access. This work seeks to further evolve iden- ti fi cation technology by developing a system which can detect the impact load location and magnitude in real time, while giving an assessment of the con fi dence in that estimate. Fur- thermore, we identify ways by which impact damage could be more effectively identi fi ed by leveraging impact load identi fi cation information to better characterize damage. The impact load identi fi cation algorithm was applied to a commercial scale wind turbine blade, and results show the capability to detect impact magnitude and location using a single accelerometer, re- gardless of sensor location. A technique for better evaluating the uncertainty of the impact estimates was developed by quantifying how well the impact force estimate meets the assump- tions underlying the force estimation technique. This uncertainty quanti fi cation technique was found to reduce the 95% con fi dence interval by more than a factor of two for impact force estimates showing the least uncertainty, and widening the 95% con fi dence interval by a fac- tor of two for the most uncertain force estimates, avoiding the possibility of understating the uncertainty associated with these estimates. Linear vibration based damage detection tech- niques were investigated in the

  9. Composite rotor blades for large wind energy installations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kussmann, A.; Molly, J.; Muser, D.

    1980-01-01

    The design of large wind power systems in Germany is reviewed with attention given to elaboration of the total wind energy system, aerodynamic design of the rotor blade, and wind loading effects. Particular consideration is given to the development of composite glass fiber/plastic or carbon fiber/plastic rotor blades for such installations.

  10. Curing A Large Composite Cylinder Without An Autoclave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazer, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    Proposed technique provides application of heat and pressure to cure fiber-wound composite cylinder too large to fit in autoclave. Tube wound around cylinder applies pressure. Blanket distributes pressure. Pressure expels gas bubbles from material. Heat applied by conventional methods.

  11. Travelling wave effects in large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonflotow, A.

    1983-01-01

    Several aspects of travelling waves in Large Space Structures(LSS) are discussed. The dynamic similarity among LSS's, electric power systems, microwave circuits and communications network is noted. The existence of time lag between actuation and response is illuminated with the aid of simple examples, and their prediction is demonstrated. To prevent echoes, communications lines have matched terminations; this idea is applied to the design of dampers of one dimensional structures. Periodic structures act as mechanical band pass filters. Implications of this behavior are examined on a simple example. It is noted that the implication is twofold; continuum models of periodic lattice structures may err considerably; on the other hand, it is possible to design favorable transmission (and resonance) characteristics into the structure.

  12. Mechanical Model Development for Composite Structural Supercapacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricks, Trenton M.; Lacy, Thomas E., Jr.; Santiago, Diana; Bednarcyk, Brett A.

    2016-01-01

    Novel composite structural supercapacitor concepts have recently been developed as a means both to store electrical charge and to provide modest mechanical load carrying capability. Double-layer composite supercapacitors are often fabricated by impregnating a woven carbon fiber fabric, which serves as the electrodes, with a structural polymer electrolyte. Polypropylene or a glass fabric is often used as the separator material. Recent research has been primarily limited to evaluating these composites experimentally. In this study, mechanical models based on the Multiscale Generalized Method of Cells (MSGMC) were developed and used to calculate the shear and tensile properties and response of two composite structural supercapacitors from the literature. The modeling approach was first validated against traditional composite laminate data. MSGMC models for composite supercapacitors were developed, and accurate elastic shear/tensile properties were obtained. It is envisioned that further development of the models presented in this work will facilitate the design of composite components for aerospace and automotive applications and can be used to screen candidate constituent materials for inclusion in future composite structural supercapacitor concepts.

  13. Boundary dislocation structure of crystalline composites

    SciTech Connect

    Regel', V.A.; Stepantsov, E.A.; Tovmasyan, A.B.

    1986-01-01

    The authors perform the first studies of the dislocation structure of intergrowth boundaries and the adjoining regions in the example of crystalline composites of lithium flouride single crystals. It has been established that the intergrowth boundary of a crystalline composite consists of two dislocation networks: a network of immobile dislocations and the usual subboundary that may shift from its original position.

  14. Structural Dynamics and Control of Large Space Structures, 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brumfield, M. L. (Compiler)

    1983-01-01

    Basic research in the control of large space structures is discussed. Active damping and control of flexible beams, active stabilization of flexible antenna feed towers, spacecraft docking, and robust pointing control of large space platform payloads are among the topics discussed.

  15. Effects of defects in composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sendeckyj, G. P.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of defects in composite structures is addressed. Defects in laminates such as wrinkles, foreign particles, scratches and breaks are discussed. Effects of plygap plywaviness and machining defects are also studied.

  16. Probabilistic assessment of smart composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Shiao, Michael C.

    1994-01-01

    A composite wing with spars and bulkheads is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of probabilistic assessment of smart composite structures to control uncertainties in distortions and stresses. Results show that a smart composite wing can be controlled to minimize distortions and to have specified stress levels in the presence of defects. Structural responses such as changes in angle of attack, vertical displacements, and stress in the control and controlled plies are probabilistically assessed to quantify their respective uncertainties. Sensitivity factors are evaluated to identify those parameters that have the greatest influence on a specific structural response. Results show that smart composite structures can be configured to control both distortions and ply stresses to satisfy specified design requirements.

  17. Advanced textile structural composites -- status and outlook

    SciTech Connect

    Arendts, F.J.; Drechsler, K.; Brandt, J.

    1993-12-31

    Composites with 3D woven, braided or knitted fiber reinforcement offer a high potential for the cost-effective manufacturing of structures featuring an interesting mechanical performance, for example with regard to damage tolerance or energy absorption capability. In this paper, the properties of various textile structural composites with regard to stiffness, strength, damage tolerance, energy absorption capability as well as the respective manufacturing processes (RTM or thermoplastic hybrid-yarn technique) are presented in comparison to conventional ud tape based composites. The influence of the fiber architecture on the mechanical performance (tensile stiffness and strength, compression strength, interlaminar shear strength, compression strength after impact, fracture mechanical properties, through-penetration resistance) of monolithic and composite sandwich structures has been evaluated in an experimental study. It has been shown that composites involving new 3D weavings with minimum fiber crimp can compete with tape-based laminates as far as stiffness and strength are concerned. Using knittings makes it possible to manufacture composites having superior through-penetration resistance. The specific feature of the 3D braiding process is the ability to produce complex shaped structures having a high degree of freedom with regard to fiber geometry. Finally, the application of various textile structural composites will be presented on the basis of three demonstrator components (automotive engine mount, aircraft leading edge and motor cycle helmet), and the potential for further developments will be discussed.

  18. Functionalized Nano and Micro Structured Composite Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    AFRL-RX-TY-TR-2011-0069 FUNCTIONALIZED NANO AND MICRO STRUCTURED COMPOSITE COATINGS (FINAL REPORT) Igor Luzinov and Konstantin Kornev...Technical Report 21-MAY-2009 -- 31-MAY-2011 Functional Polymeric Materials - from Research Labs to Field Applications: Functionalized Nano and Micro ...work was to conduct research on development of effective nano and micro structured composite coatings capable to collect and decontaminate the

  19. Installation of adhesively bonded composites to repair carbon steel structure.

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, Dennis Patrick; Dunn, Dennis P.; Rackow, Kirk A.

    2003-02-01

    In the past decade, an advanced composite repair technology has made great strides in commercial aviation use. Extensive testing and analysis, through joint programs between the Sandia Labs FAA Airworthiness Assurance Center and the aviation industry, have proven that composite materials can be used to repair damaged aluminum structure. Successful pilot programs have produced flight performance history to establish the viability and durability of bonded composite patches as a permanent repair on commercial aircraft structures. With this foundation in place, efforts are underway to adapt bonded composite repair technology to civil structures. This paper presents a study in the application of composite patches on large trucks and hydraulic shovels typically used in mining operations. Extreme fatigue, temperature, erosive, and corrosive environments induce an array of equipment damage. The current weld repair techniques for these structures provide a fatigue life that is inferior to that of the original plate. Subsequent cracking must be revisited on a regular basis. It is believed that the use of composite doublers, which do not have brittle fracture problems such as those inherent in welds, will help extend the structure's fatigue life and reduce the equipment downtime. Two of the main issues for adapting aircraft composite repairs to civil applications are developing an installation technique for carbon steel structure and accommodating large repairs on extremely thick structures. This paper will focus on the first phase of this study which evaluated the performance of different mechanical and chemical surface preparation techniques. The factors influencing the durability of composite patches in severe field environments will be discussed along with related laminate design and installation issues.

  20. Intelligent composites and structures -- a review

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, B.Z.

    1993-12-31

    Functionally responsive composites, as precursors to intelligent or smart material systems, are reviewed. These include composites containing a complex network of sensors that can monitor several parameters simultaneously over the entire lifetime of the structure. For instance, fiber optic sensors can be used for (1) monitoring the manufacturing process, (2) augmenting nondestructive evaluation technique, (3) enabling structure health monitoring and damage assessment systems, and (4) supporting control system. Significant progress has been made towards controlling structural radiated noise by active/adaptive means applied directly to the structure. By incorporating electrorheological (ER) fluids in composites, one can produce a new class of materials of which the mechanical properties can be changed in situ. By adjusting the rheological properties of the ER fluid through an electric field, both stiffness and damping capabilities can be altered. Active vibration control can also be achieved by incorporating a shape memory alloy (SMA, e.g. Nitinol) in a fiber reinforced composite as the embedded distributed actuators. The SMA embedded laminates have the capabilities to change their material properties, modify the stress and strain state of the structure, and possibly alter its configuration possibly in a controlled manner. The advantages and limitations of ER fluids, piezoelectric ceramics, and SMAs as the actuators for smart structures will be discussed. Also to be discussed are the theoretical basis, some fabrication techniques, and potential applications of piezoelectric composites and optical composites.

  1. Aspects of control in large space structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santini, P.

    Noting that future large space structures (LSS) such as the SPS, communications satellites, and antennas will require a beam amplitude of less than 0.1, vibration amplitudes of less than 0.005, and surface distortion less than 1 mm, a model for the control-structure interaction is formulated qualititively. Considering it an impossibility to effectively control all the parameters of structural frequencies, eigenmodes, and local characteristics, use of modal synthesis is suggested as an alternative to attempting active control of every factor. A feedback control of the first N modes is applied to a discretized system, obtained by truncation f the eigenmodes of the structural operator, and incorporating a priori conditions to avoid uncontrolled modes. Repeated implementation of hierarchicontrol techniques are proposed as an effective means to reduce propellant mass consumption.

  2. Control theoretics for large structural systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    The areas of research addressed include modeling identification for both the purposes of analysis and controls, design of structural control systems actuator sensor placement, and distributed sensing and actuation as opposed to co-located sensor and actuators. Also investigated are adaptive/learning processes that could more specifically be referred to as inflight testing procedures where a structure is tested during its deployment or assembly and during its orbital life at specific points where the characteristics of the structure for the purpose of tuning the control system are identified. Another area is redundancy management techniques for structural systems. This is important because of the reliability issue for managing multiple very large numbers of sensors and actuators.

  3. Ground test of large flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, Ben K.

    1987-01-01

    Many future mission models require large space (LSS) which have accurate surfaces and/or the capability of being accurately aligned. If ground test approaches which will provide adequate confidence of the structrual performance to the program managers are not developed, many viable structural concepts may never be utilized. The size and flexibility of many of the structural concepts will preclude the use of the current ground test methods because of the adverse effects of the terrestrial environment. The challenge is to develop new test approaches which will provide confidence in the capability of LSS to meet performance requirements prior to flight. The activities on ground testing of LSS are described. Since some of the proposed structural systems cannot be tested in entirety, a coordinated ground test analytical model program is required to predict structural performance in space. Several concepts of ground testing under development are addressed.

  4. On passive damping mechanisms in large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashley, H.

    1982-01-01

    The significance is explained of even tiny amounts of passive energy dissipation to ensure successful stabilization of large, flexible space structures. Study of scale effects on various mechanisms indicates that modal damping ratios are likely to decrease as size increases in a family of similar structures. Paper focuses on thermal dissipation induced by strain gradients during vibration of monolithic configurations. Past work and the expected magnitudes of this damping are reviewed, along with reasons why it is, to some degree, under the designer's control. In the search for the highest practical values, unidirectional metallic composites and other arrangements are examined

  5. On passive damping mechanisms in large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashley, H.

    1982-01-01

    The significance is explained of even tiny amounts of passive energy dissipation to ensure successful stabilization of large, flexible space structures. Study of scale effects on various mechanisms indicates that modal damping ratios are likely to decrease as size increases in a family of similar structures. Paper focuses on thermal dissipation induced by strain gradients during vibration of monolithic configurations. Past work and the expected magnitudes of this damping are reviewed, along with reasons why it is, to some degree, under the designer's control. In the search for the highest practical values, unidirectional metallic composites and other arrangements are examined

  6. Large energy absorption in Ni-Mn-Ga/polymer composites

    SciTech Connect

    Feuchtwanger, Jorge; Richard, Marc L.; Tang, Yun J.; Berkowitz, Ami E.; O'Handley, Robert C.; Allen, Samuel M.

    2005-05-15

    Ferromagnetic shape memory alloys can respond to a magnetic field or applied stress by the motion of twin boundaries and hence they show large hysteresis or energy loss. Ni-Mn-Ga particles made by spark erosion have been dispersed and oriented in a polymer matrix to form pseudo 3:1 composites which are studied under applied stress. Loss ratios have been determined from the stress-strain data. The loss ratios of the composites range from 63% to 67% compared to only about 17% for the pure, unfilled polymer samples.

  7. On the structural analysis of textile composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanovich, Alexander E.; Pastore, Christopher M.

    The local structural inhomogeneities which distinguish textile composites from laminated materials are discussed. Techniques for quantifying these inhomogeneities through three dimensional geometric modelling are introduced and methods of translating them into elastic properties are presented. Some basic ideas on application of spline functions to the stress field analysis in textile composites are proposed. The significance of internal continuity conditions for these materials is emphasized. Several analytical techniques based on the concept of a meso-volume are discussed. An example is presented to demonstrate the application of the method to structural analysis of textile composites.

  8. Application of NASTRAN to large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balderes, T.; Zalesak, J.; Dyreyes, V.; Lee, E.

    1976-01-01

    The application of NASTRAN to design studies of two very large-area lightweight structures is described. The first is the Satellite Solar Power Station, while the second is a deployable three hundred meter diameter antenna. A brief discussion of the operation of the SSPS is given, followed by a description of the structure. The use of the NASTRAN program for static, vibration and thermal analysis is illustrated and some results are given. Next, the deployable antenna is discussed and the use of NASTRAN for static analysis, buckling analysis and vibration analysis is detailed.

  9. Composite blade structural analyzer (COBSTRAN) user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aiello, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    The installation and use of a computer code, COBSTRAN (COmposite Blade STRuctrual ANalyzer), developed for the design and analysis of composite turbofan and turboprop blades and also for composite wind turbine blades was described. This code combines composite mechanics and laminate theory with an internal data base of fiber and matrix properties. Inputs to the code are constituent fiber and matrix material properties, factors reflecting the fabrication process, composite geometry and blade geometry. COBSTRAN performs the micromechanics, macromechanics and laminate analyses of these fiber composites. COBSTRAN generates a NASTRAN model with equivalent anisotropic homogeneous material properties. Stress output from NASTRAN is used to calculate individual ply stresses, strains, interply stresses, thru-the-thickness stresses and failure margins. Curved panel structures may be modeled providing the curvature of a cross-section is defined by a single value function. COBSTRAN is written in FORTRAN 77.

  10. Compression Strength of Composite Primary Structural Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Eric R.; Starnes, James H., Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The focus of research activities under NASA Grant NAG-1-2035 was the response and failure of thin-walled structural components. The research is applicable to the primary load carrying structure of flight vehicles, with particular emphasis on fuselage and wing'structure. Analyses and tests were performed that are applicable to the following structural components an aft pressure bulkhead, or a composite pressure dome, pressure cabin damage containment, and fuselage frames subject to crash-type loads.

  11. Integrating electrostatic adhesion to composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Callum J. C.; Bond, Ian P.; Potter, Kevin D.

    2015-04-01

    Additional functionality within load bearing components holds potential for adding value to a structure, design or product. We consider the adaptation of an established technology, electrostatic adhesion or electroadhesion, for application in glass fibre reinforced polymer (GFRP) composite materials. Electroadhesion uses high potential difference (~2-3 kV) between co-planar electrodes to generate temporary holding forces to both electrically conductive and nonconductive contact surfaces. Using a combination of established fabrication techniques, electroadhesive elements are co-cured within a composite host structure during manufacture. This provides an almost symbiotic relationship between the electroadhesive and the composite structure, with the electroadhesive providing an additional functionality, whilst the epoxy matrix material of the composite acts as a dielectric for the high voltage electrodes of the device. Silicone rubber coated devices have been shown to offer high shear load (85kPa) capability for GFRP components held together using this technique. Through careful control of the connection interface, we consider the incorporation of these devices within complete composite structures for additional functionality. The ability to vary the internal connectivity of structural elements could allow for incremental changes in connectivity between discrete sub-structures, potentially introducing variable stiffness to the global structure.

  12. Design concepts for large reflector antenna structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.; Adams, L. R.

    1983-01-01

    Practical approaches for establishing large, precise antenna reflectors in space are described. Reflector surfaces consisting of either solid panels or knitted mesh are considered. The approach using a deep articulated truss structure to support a mesh reflector is selected for detailed investigations. A new sequential deployment concept for the tetrahedral truss is explained. Good joint design is discussed, and examples are described both analytically and by means of demonstration models. The influence of curvature on the design and its vibration characteristics are investigated.

  13. Structure-battery multifunctional composite design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qidwai, Muhammad A.; Thomas, James; Matic, Peter

    2002-07-01

    In multifunctional material design, two or more functions performed by distinct system components or materials are incorporated into a single component or material system to improve system performance. The aim of this paper is to present a framework for the design of structure-battery (power) multifunctional composite materials for unmanned air vehicle (UAV) applications. The design methodology is based on optimization of composite material performance indices and the use of material design selection charts introduced by Ashby and coworkers in a series of papers for homogeneous and two-phase composite materials. Performance indices are derived for prismatic structure-battery composites under various loading conditions. The development of simple design tools in the form of spreadsheet templates is also discussed. Finally, results based on the above-mentioned framework and actual material properties will be presented for structure-battery circular and square struts.

  14. Laminate analogy for composites enhanced concrete structures

    SciTech Connect

    Chamis, C.C.; Gotsis, P.K.

    1997-10-01

    A new and effective method is described to design composites to repair damage or enhance the overload strength of concrete infrastructures. The method is based on laminate analogy which is derivable from composite mechanics and available in computer codes. It is used to simulate structural sections made from reinforced concrete which are typical in infrastructures as well as select reinforced concrete structures. The structural sections are represented by a number of layers through the thickness where different layers are used for the concrete, for the reinforcing steel in concrete, and for the composite. The reinforced concrete structures are represented with finite elements where the element stiffness parameters are from the structural sections which are represented by the laminate analogy. The load carrying capability of the structure is determined by progressive structural fracture. Results show up to 40 percent improvements for damage and for overload enhancement with relatively small laminate thickness for the structural sections and up to three times for the composite enhanced select structures (arch and dome).

  15. Integrated controls-structures optimization of a large space structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Sharon L.; Walsh, Joanne L.; Sandridge, Chris A.; Haftka, Raphael T.

    1990-01-01

    A technique for the simultaneous optimization of structural and control elements of a large space structure is developed and demonstrated for a test problem, the NASA COFS-I Mast Flight System. General-purpose control and structural-analysis codes are applied directly to a large detailed model, with realistic objective and constraint functions. The steps in the process (structural optimization, control optimization, and system coordination) are described and illustrated with diagrams; the numerical implementation (using different computers for different steps) is discussed; and results showing significant design improvements in three COFS-I configurations are presented in graphs. When the weights of both structure and power-generating equipment are taken into account, a 40-bay truss design is found to be better than designs with 42 or 44 bays.

  16. Modeling, Analysis, and Optimization Issues for Large Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinson, L. D. (Compiler); Amos, A. K. (Compiler); Venkayya, V. B. (Compiler)

    1983-01-01

    Topics concerning the modeling, analysis, and optimization of large space structures are discussed including structure-control interaction, structural and structural dynamics modeling, thermal analysis, testing, and design.

  17. Flexible ultrasonic array system for inspecting thick composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankle, Robert S.; Rose, Douglas N.

    1995-06-01

    Composite materials, which have commonly been used in recreational boats, are now being applied to more challenging marine applications. The high specific stiffness and strength of composites translates into increased range and payload. Composites offer the added benefits of corrosion and erosion resistance, fatigue and wear resistance, reduced signature, and reduced maintenance and life cycle costs as compared to traditional metallic structures. Although ultrasonic techniques are typically used to inspect composite structures, thick composites, such as those used in marine applications, are difficult to inspect with ordinary ultrasonic methods. An ultrasonic inspection system is being developed for the US Army to inspect thick composite materials for future armored vehicles. This system is an extension of the existing PARIS flexible array ultrasonic inspection system, which was originally developed for inspecting thin composite aircraft structures. The extension is designed to increase ultrasonic penetration by 1) fabricating an array that operates at lower frequency and higher voltage, and 2) employing a synthetic pulse technique. The flexible array can rapidly inspect large areas and produce images of the inspection results that are easy to interpret. This paper describes the ultrasonic inspection system and presents examples of inspection results from both thick and thin composite materials.

  18. Compliant composite electrodes and large strain bistable actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Sungryul; Yu, Zhibin; Niu, Xiaofan; Hu, Weili; Li, Lu; Brochu, Paul; Pei, Qibing

    2012-04-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuators (DEA) and bistable electroactive polymers (BSEP) both require compliant electrodes with rubbery elasticity and high conductivity at large strains. Stretchable opto-electronic devices additionally require the compliant electrodes to be optically transparent. Many candidate materials have been investigated. We report a new approach to mechanically robust, stretchable compliant electrodes. A facile in-situ composite synthesis and transfer technique is employed, and the resulting composite electrodes retain the high surface conductivity of the original conductive network formed by nanowires or nanotubes, while exhibiting the mechanical flexibility of the matrix polymer. The composite electrodes have high transparency and low surface roughness useful for the fabrication of polymer thinfilm electronic devices. The new electrodes are suitable for high-strain actuation, as a complaint resistive heating element to administer the temperature of shape memory polymers, and as the charge injection electrodes for flexible/stretchable polymer light emitting diodes. Bistable electroactive polymers employing the composite electrodes can be actuated to large strains via heating-actuation-cooling cycles.

  19. Large space erectable structures - building block structures study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, W. H.; Skoumal, D. E.; Straayer, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    A modular planar truss structure and a long slender boom concept identified as building block approaches to construction of large spacecraft configurations are described. The concepts are compatible in weight and volume goals with the Space Transportation System, use standard structural units, and represent high on-orbit productivity in terms of structural area or beam length. Results of structural trade studies involving static and dynamic analyses of a single module and rigid body deployment analyses to assess kinetics and kinematics of automatic deployment of the building block modules are presented.

  20. Lithographically defined microporous carbon-composite structures

    DOEpatents

    Burckel, David Bruce; Washburn, Cody M.; Lambert, Timothy N.; Finnegan, Patrick Sean; Wheeler, David R.

    2016-12-06

    A microporous carbon scaffold is produced by lithographically patterning a carbon-containing photoresist, followed by pyrolysis of the developed resist structure. Prior to exposure, the photoresist is loaded with a nanoparticulate material. After pyrolysis, the nanonparticulate material is dispersed in, and intimately mixed with, the carbonaceous material of the scaffold, thereby yielding a carbon composite structure.

  1. Computational simulation of hot composites structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Singhal, S. N.

    1991-01-01

    Three different computer codes developed in-house are described for application to hot composite structures. These codes include capabilities for: (1) laminate behavior (METCAN); (2) thermal/structural analysis of hot structures made from high temperature metal matrix composites (HITCAN); and (3) laminate tailoring (MMLT). Results for select sample cases are described to demonstrate the versatility as well as the application of these codes to specific situations. The sample case results show that METCAN can be used to simulate cyclic life in high temperature metal matrix composites; HITCAN can be used to evaluate the structural performance of curved panels as well as respective sensitivities of various nonlinearities, and MMLT can be used to tailor the fabrication process in order to reduce residual stresses in the matrix upon cool-down.

  2. Structural dynamics and control of large space structures. [conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lightner, E. B. (Compiler)

    1981-01-01

    The focus of the workshop was the basic research program assembled by LaRC to address the fundamental technology deficiencies that were identified in several studies on large space systems (LSS) conducted by NASA in the last several years. The staffs of the respective participants were assembled at the workshop to review the current state of research in the control technology for large structural systems and to plan the efforts that would be pursued by their respective organizations.

  3. Space Spider - A concept for fabrication of large structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britton, W. R.; Johnston, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    The Space Spider concept for the automated fabrication of large space structures involves a specialized machine which roll-forms thin gauge material such as aluminum and develops continuous spiral structures with radial struts to sizes of 600-1,000 feet in diameter by 15 feet deep. This concept allows the machine and raw material to be integrated using the Orbiter capabilities, then boosting the rigid system to geosynchronous equatorial orbit (GEO) without high sensitivity to acceleration forces. As a teleoperator controlled device having repetitive operations, the fabrication process can be monitored and verified from a ground-based station without astronaut involvement in GEO. The resultant structure will be useful as an intermediate size platform or as a structural element to be used with other elements such as the space-fabricated beams or composite nested tubes.

  4. Space Spider - A concept for fabrication of large structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britton, W. R.; Johnston, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    The Space Spider concept for the automated fabrication of large space structures involves a specialized machine which roll-forms thin gauge material such as aluminum and develops continuous spiral structures with radial struts to sizes of 600-1,000 feet in diameter by 15 feet deep. This concept allows the machine and raw material to be integrated using the Orbiter capabilities, then boosting the rigid system to geosynchronous equatorial orbit (GEO) without high sensitivity to acceleration forces. As a teleoperator controlled device having repetitive operations, the fabrication process can be monitored and verified from a ground-based station without astronaut involvement in GEO. The resultant structure will be useful as an intermediate size platform or as a structural element to be used with other elements such as the space-fabricated beams or composite nested tubes.

  5. Large-Scale Structures of Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray-Clay, Ruth; Rogers, Leslie A.

    2015-12-01

    A class of solar system analogs has yet to be identified among the large crop of planetary systems now observed. However, since most observed worlds are more easily detectable than direct analogs of the Sun's planets, the frequency of systems with structures similar to our own remains unknown. Identifying the range of possible planetary system architectures is complicated by the large number of physical processes that affect the formation and dynamical evolution of planets. I will present two ways of organizing planetary system structures. First, I will suggest that relatively few physical parameters are likely to differentiate the qualitative architectures of different systems. Solid mass in a protoplanetary disk is perhaps the most obvious possible controlling parameter, and I will give predictions for correlations between planetary system properties that we would expect to be present if this is the case. In particular, I will suggest that the solar system's structure is representative of low-metallicity systems that nevertheless host giant planets. Second, the disk structures produced as young stars are fed by their host clouds may play a crucial role. Using the observed distribution of RV giant planets as a function of stellar mass, I will demonstrate that invoking ice lines to determine where gas giants can form requires fine tuning. I will suggest that instead, disk structures built during early accretion have lasting impacts on giant planet distributions, and disk clean-up differentially affects the orbital distributions of giant and lower-mass planets. These two organizational hypotheses have different implications for the solar system's context, and I will suggest observational tests that may allow them to be validated or falsified.

  6. Thermostructural tailoring of fiber composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acquaviva, Thomas H.

    1992-01-01

    A significant area of interest in design of complex structures involves the study of multidisciplined problems. The coordination of several different intricate areas of study to obtain a particular design of a structure is a new and pressing area of research. In the past, each discipline would perform its task consecutively using the appropriate inputs from the other disciplines. This process usually required several time-consuming iterations to obtain a satisfactory design. The alternative pursued here is combining various participating disciplines and specified design requirements into a formal structural computer code. The main focus of this research is to develop a multidiscipline structural tailoring method for select composite structures and to demonstrate its application to specific areas. The development of an integrated computer program involves the coupling of three independent computer programs using an excutive module. This module will be the foundation for integrating a structural optimizer, a composites analyzer and a thermal analyzer. With the completion of the executive module, the first step was taken toward the evolution of multidiscipline software in the field of composite mechanics. Through the use of an array of cases involving a variety of objective functions/constraints and thermal-mechanical load conditions, it became evident that simple composite structures can be designed to a combined loads environment.

  7. Secondary flow structures in large rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvet, H.; Devauchelle, O.; Metivier, F.; Limare, A.; Lajeunesse, E.

    2012-04-01

    Measuring the velocity field in large rivers remains a challenge, even with recent measurement techniques such as Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP). Indeed, due to the diverging angle between its ultrasonic beams, an ADCP cannot detect small-scale flow structures. However, when the measurements are limited to a single location for a sufficient period of time, averaging can reveal large, stationary flow structures. Here we present velocity measurements in a straight reach of the Seine river in Paris, France, where the cross-section is close to rectangular. The transverse modulation of the streamwise velocity indicates secondary flow cells, which seem to occupy the entire width of the river. This observation is reminiscent of the longitudinal vortices observed in laboratory experiments (e.g. Blanckaert et al., Advances in Water Resources, 2010, 33, 1062-1074). Although the physical origin of these secondary structures remains unclear, their measured velocity is sufficient to significantly impact the distribution of streamwise momentum. We propose a model for the transverse profile of the depth-averaged velocity based on a crude representation of the longitudinal vortices, with a single free parameter. Preliminary results are in good agreement with field measurements. This model also provides an estimate for the bank shear stress, which controls bank erosion.

  8. Hierarchical Simulation of Hot Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Singhal, S. N.

    1993-01-01

    Computational procedures are described to simulate the thermal and mechanical behavior of high temperature metal matrix composites (HT-MMC) in the following three broad areas: (1) Behavior of HT-MMC's from micromechanics to laminate via Metal Matrix Composite Analyzer (METCAN), (2) tailoring of HT-MMC behavior for optimum specific performance via Metal Matrix Laminate Tailoring (MMLT), and (3) HT-MMC structural response for hot structural components via High Temperature Composite Analyzer (HITCAN). Representative results from each area are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of computational simulation procedures. The sample case results show that METCAN can be used to simulate material behavior such as strength, stress-strain response, and cyclic life in HTMMC's; MMLT can be used to tailor the fabrication process for optimum performance such as that for in-service load carrying capacity of HT-MMC's; and HITCAN can be used to evaluate static fracture and fatigue life of hot pressurized metal matrix composite rings.

  9. Shock Wave Structure in Particulate Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauls, Michael; Ravichandran, Guruswami

    2015-06-01

    Shock wave experiments are conducted on a particulate composite consisting of a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) matrix reinforced by glass beads. Such a composite with an impedance mismatch of 4.3 closely mimics heterogeneous solids of interest such as concrete and energetic materials. The composite samples are prepared using a compression molding process. The structure and particle velocity rise times of the shocks are examined using forward ballistic experiments. Reverse ballistic experiments are used to track how the interface density influences velocity overshoot above the steady state particle velocity. The effects of particle size (0.1 to 1 mm) and volume fraction of glass beads (30-40%) on the structure of the leading shock wave are investigated. It is observed that the rise time increases with increasing particle size and scales linearly for the range of particle sizes considered here. Results from numerical simulations using CTH are compared with experimental results to gain insights into wave propagation in heterogeneous particulate composites.

  10. Effects of material degradation on large space structures dynamic response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdigao, Alan J.

    1992-08-01

    Composite Large Space Structures (LSS) including booms, planar surfaces, antennas, platforms, and space stations are proposed for use in NASA's Space Station 'Freedom' and the DOD's Global Protection Against Limited Strikes programs. Because of their low mass and high strength and stiffness, composite repetitive lattice structures are ideal for these space applications. LSS will be required to sustain severe environmental effects - radiation, thermal cycling, atomic oxygen bombardment, collision with micrometeoroids and space debris, and hostile actions - and transient operational loads - docking, slewing, manned activities, control system, and the mobile service center - while maintaining strict mission parameters. Platform pointing is one example of these requirements and necessitates tolerances of less than one thousandth of a degree. Over time, material and structural degradation will occur due to environmental effects causing a change in the structure's stiffness and dynamic response. Likely, this structural damage will require immediate repair to restore the LSS to full mission capability. This thesis investigates the dynamic response of one LSS - the NASA Dual-Keel Space Station with 5 meter graphite epoxy erectable truss under one operational load - shuttle docking - and Low Earth Orbit (LEO) environmental conditions, and predicts how the material, structural properties, and dynamic response change over the 20-30 year design life. Results show the effects of material degradation on the station's dynamic response and mission requirements and has applications for NASA and DOD logistics planning for future LSS.

  11. Damage Tolerance Characterisitics of Composite Sandwich Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-02-01

    and very simplified modelling Unit of the EH-101 helicopter is made of a composite skeleton of the damage introduced by impact; second, the evaluation...the delamination boundary. The Multi Point Constraint If the delamination growth data from the teflon strip element of NASTRAN is used for modelling ...component level. These kinds of tests are composite sandwich structures used by the helicopter industry, carried out not only to verify load paths and

  12. Neutrinos and large-scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenstein, Daniel J.

    2015-07-15

    I review the use of cosmological large-scale structure to measure properties of neutrinos and other relic populations of light relativistic particles. With experiments to measure the anisotropies of the cosmic microwave anisotropies and the clustering of matter at low redshift, we now have securely measured a relativistic background with density appropriate to the cosmic neutrino background. Our limits on the mass of the neutrino continue to shrink. Experiments coming in the next decade will greatly improve the available precision on searches for the energy density of novel relativistic backgrounds and the mass of neutrinos.

  13. Rapid detection and quantification of impact damage in composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Barry T.

    1992-01-01

    It is shown that a multidisciplinary nondestructive evaluation approach for impact damage detection in composite structures can be used to produce a more efficient inspection. The multidisciplinary NDE approach relies on fast large area thermographic inspections along with detailed ultrasonic volumetric imaging. The thermal inspection technique rapidly identifies the impact damage. The ultrasonic volumetric imaging quantifies the impact generated delaminations through the volume of the structure.

  14. EVA assembly of large space structure element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, L. J.; Bush, H. G.; Heard, W. L., Jr.; Stokes, J. W., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a test program to assess the potential of manned extravehicular activity (EVA) assembly of erectable space trusses are described. Seventeen tests were conducted in which six "space-weight" columns were assembled into a regular tetrahedral cell by a team of two "space"-suited test subjects. This cell represents the fundamental "element" of a tetrahedral truss structure. The tests were conducted under simulated zero-gravity conditions. Both manual and simulated remote manipulator system modes were evaluated. Articulation limits of the pressure suit and zero gravity could be accommodated by work stations with foot restraints. The results of this study have confirmed that astronaut EVA assembly of large, erectable space structures is well within man's capabilities.

  15. Adaptive momentum management for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, E.

    1987-01-01

    Momentum management is discussed for a Large Space Structure (LSS) with the structure selected configuration being the Initial Orbital Configuration (IOC) of the dual keel space station. The external forces considered were gravity gradient and aerodynamic torques. The goal of the momentum management scheme developed is to remove the bias components of the external torques and center the cyclic components of the stored angular momentum. The scheme investigated is adaptive to uncertainties of the inertia tensor and requires only approximate knowledge of principle moments of inertia. Computational requirements are minimal and should present no implementation problem in a flight type computer and the method proposed is shown to be effective in the presence of attitude control bandwidths as low as .01 radian/sec.

  16. System for inspecting large size structural components

    DOEpatents

    Birks, Albert S.; Skorpik, James R.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention relates to a system for inspecting large scale structural components such as concrete walls or the like. The system includes a mobile gamma radiation source and a mobile gamma radiation detector. The source and detector are constructed and arranged for simultaneous movement along parallel paths in alignment with one another on opposite sides of a structural component being inspected. A control system provides signals which coordinate the movements of the source and detector and receives and records the radiation level data developed by the detector as a function of source and detector positions. The radiation level data is then analyzed to identify areas containing defects corresponding to unexpected variations in the radiation levels detected.

  17. Composite electrode/electrolyte structure

    DOEpatents

    Visco, Steven J.; Jacobson, Craig P.; DeJonghe, Lutgard C.

    2004-01-27

    Provided is an electrode fabricated from highly electronically conductive materials such as metals, metal alloys, or electronically conductive ceramics. The electronic conductivity of the electrode substrate is maximized. Onto this electrode in the green state, a green ionic (e.g., electrolyte) film is deposited and the assembly is co-fired at a temperature suitable to fully densify the film while the substrate retains porosity. Subsequently, a catalytic material is added to the electrode structure by infiltration of a metal salt and subsequent low temperature firing. The invention allows for an electrode with high electronic conductivity and sufficient catalytic activity to achieve high power density in ionic (electrochemical) devices such as fuel cells and electrolytic gas separation systems.

  18. Lightweight optical barrel assembly structures for large deployable space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Peter A.; Silver, Mark J.; Dobson, Benjamin J.

    2009-08-01

    Future space based telescopes will need apertures and focal lengths that exceed the dimensions of the launch vehicle shroud. In addition to deploying the primary mirror and secondary mirror support structure, these large telescopes must also deploy the stray light and thermal barriers needed to ensure proper telescope performance. The authors present a deployable light and thermal optical barrel assembly approach for a very large telescope with a variable sun angle and fast slew rate. The Strain Energy Deployable Optical Barrel Assembly (SEDOBA) uses elastic composite hinges to power the deployment of a hierarchical truss structure that supports the thermal and stray light shroud material that form the overall system. The paper describes the overall design approach, the key component technologies, and the design and preliminary testing of a self deploying scale model prototype.

  19. Interactive design of large end rings on stiffened conical shells using composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. C.; Cooper, P. A.

    1974-01-01

    Design study methods and results for a composite reinforced base ring for the conical aeroshell structure of the planetary lander vehicle for Project Viking, an unmanned mission to Mars, are presented. The aeroshell is a ring and stringer-stiffened conical shell structure having a half angle of 70 degrees with a large base ring mounted at the outer edge of the cone and a large pay-load ring in the interior with many smaller rings spaced along the inside shell surface. The purpose of the structure is to develop the aerodynamic drag required to decelerate the lander in the Mars atmosphere to facilitiate a soft landing. The design of a shell structure of this complexity requires the use of the latest technology available in a large general-purpose shell buckling program. The large general-purpose non-linear shell buckling program (BOSOR 2) which was used for this purpose is described.

  20. Structural identification and damage assessment of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Richard B.; Fourney, Michael E.

    1988-01-01

    Two different methods are proposed for identifying the structural properties of large orbiting space structures under ordinary service loads, and for assessing potential damage due to impact or other extreme loadings. It is shown that the behavior of a structure in a weightless environment is nonlinear due to unloaded or lightly loaded connections, an effect which not only complicates structural control, but makes the problem of system identification more difficult than for ground based systems. Both proposed methods assume that the structure is subjected to loads imposed by prescribed self stressing systems sufficient to produce repeatable internal force systems in the structure. The first method is based on statical response and requires a survey of structural displacements produced by the self stressing systems. The displacements do not have to be determined completely (i.e., in three directions at each connection), but more displacement information produces more accurate structural stiffness information. It is anticipated that displacement measurements will be taken using on-board laser measurement devices. The second technique employs dynamic stress wave measurement techniques using on-board loading devices and strain gages to track stress wave propagation through the space structure. This approach, which is in its early stages of development, relies on an analysis of transit times of impulsive stress waves and changes in transit times and wave forms due to changes in structural parameters.

  1. Structural identification and damage assessment of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Richard B.; Fourney, Michael E.

    1988-01-01

    Two different methods are proposed for identifying the structural properties of large orbiting space structures under ordinary service loads, and for assessing potential damage due to impact or other extreme loadings. It is shown that the behavior of a structure in a weightless environment is nonlinear due to unloaded or lightly loaded connections, an effect which not only complicates structural control, but makes the problem of system identification more difficult than for ground based systems. Both proposed methods assume that the structure is subjected to loads imposed by prescribed self stressing systems sufficient to produce repeatable internal force systems in the structure. The first method is based on statical response and requires a survey of structural displacements produced by the self stressing systems. The displacements do not have to be determined completely (i.e., in three directions at each connection), but more displacement information produces more accurate structural stiffness information. It is anticipated that displacement measurements will be taken using on-board laser measurement devices. The second technique employs dynamic stress wave measurement techniques using on-board loading devices and strain gages to track stress wave propagation through the space structure. This approach, which is in its early stages of development, relies on an analysis of transit times of impulsive stress waves and changes in transit times and wave forms due to changes in structural parameters.

  2. Compression failure mechanisms of composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, H. T.; Sohi, M.; Moon, S.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental and analytical study was conducted to delineate the compression failure mechanisms of composite structures. The present report summarizes further results on kink band formation in unidirectional composites. In order to assess the compressive strengths and failure modes of fibers them selves, a fiber bundle was embedded in epoxy casting and tested in compression. A total of six different fibers were used together with two resins of different stiffnesses. The failure of highly anisotropic fibers such as Kevlar 49 and P-75 graphite was due to kinking of fibrils. However, the remaining fibers--T300 and T700 graphite, E-glass, and alumina--failed by localized microbuckling. Compressive strengths of the latter group of fibers were not fully utilized in their respective composite. In addition, acoustic emission monitoring revealed that fiber-matrix debonding did not occur gradually but suddenly at final failure. The kink band formation in unidirectional composites under compression was studied analytically and through microscopy. The material combinations selected include seven graphite/epoxy composites, two graphite/thermoplastic resin composites, one Kevlar 49/epoxy composite and one S-glass/epoxy composite.

  3. Large-scale structural monitoring systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, Ian; Cunnane, James; Stevenson, Paul

    2000-06-01

    Extensive structural health instrumentation systems have been installed on three long-span cable-supported bridges in Hong Kong. The quantities measured include environment and applied loads (such as wind, temperature, seismic and traffic loads) and the bridge response to these loadings (accelerations, displacements, and strains). Measurements from over 1000 individual sensors are transmitted to central computing facilities via local data acquisition stations and a fault- tolerant fiber-optic network, and are acquired and processed continuously. The data from the systems is used to provide information on structural load and response characteristics, comparison with design, optimization of inspection, and assurance of continued bridge health. Automated data processing and analysis provides information on important structural and operational parameters. Abnormal events are noted and logged automatically. Information of interest is automatically archived for post-processing. Novel aspects of the instrumentation system include a fluid-based high-accuracy long-span Level Sensing System to measure bridge deck profile and tower settlement. This paper provides an outline of the design and implementation of the instrumentation system. A description of the design and implementation of the data acquisition and processing procedures is also given. Examples of the use of similar systems in monitoring other large structures are discussed.

  4. Design of a robust SHM system for composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beard, Shawn; Liu, Ching-Chao; Chang, Fu-Kuo

    2007-04-01

    Composites are becoming increasingly popular materials used in a wide range of applications on large-scale structures such as windmill blades, rocket motor cases, and aircraft fuselage and wings. For these large structures, using composites greatly enhances the operation and performance of the application, but also introduces extraordinary inspection challenges that push the limits of traditional NDE in terms of time and cost. Recent advances in Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) technologies offer a promising solution to these inspection challenges. But efficient design methodologies and implementation procedures are needed to ensure the reliability and robustness of SHM technologies for use in real-world applications. This paper introduces the essential elements of the design and implementation process by way of example. State-of-the-art techniques to optimize sensor placement, perform self-diagnostics, compensate for environmental conditions, and generate probability of detection (POD) curves for any application are discussed. The techniques are presented in relation to Acellent's recently developed SmartComposite System that is used to monitor the integrity of large composite structures. The system builds on the active sensor network technology of Acellent that is analogous to a built-in acousto-ultrasonic NDE system. Key features of the system include new miniaturized lightweight hardware, self-diagnostics and adaptive algorithm to automatically compensate for damaged sensors, reliable damage detection under different environmental conditions, and generation of POD curves. This paper will provide an overview of the system and demonstrate its key features.

  5. Structural behavior of composites with progressive fracture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon; Chamis, Christos C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    1990-01-01

    Structural characteristics such as natural frequencies and buckling loads with corresponding mode shapes were investigated during progressive fracture of multilayer, angle-plied polymer matrix composites. A computer program was used to generate the numerical results for overall mechanical response of damaged composites. Variations in structural characteristics as a function of the previously applied loading were studied. Results indicate that most of the overall structural properties were preserved throughout a significant proportion of the ultimate fracture load. For the cases studied, changes in structural behavior began to occur after 70 percent of the ultimate fracture load was applied. However, the individual nature of the structural change was rather varied depending on the laminate configuration, fiber orientation, and the boundary conditions.

  6. Removable Large-Area Ultrasmooth Silver Nanowire Transparent Composite Electrode.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yunxia; Wang, Kaiqing; Cheng, Yuanrong; Pei, Qibing; Xu, Yuxi; Xiao, Fei

    2017-02-08

    In this work, a composite silver nanowire (AgNW) transparent electrode that is large-area ultrasmooth without conductivity or transmittance scarifice, removable but with good resistance to both water and organic solvent, is reported. Via a simple low-temperature solution process without complicated transfer steps or additional pressure pressing, a new kind of AgNWs composite with biocompatible and patternable chitosan polymer complex demonstrates a quite low root-mean-square roughness ∼7 nm at a largest reported scan size of 50 μm × 50 μm, which is among the best flat surface. After long-term exposure to both water and organic solvent, it still shows strong adhesion, unchanged transparency, and no obvious conductivity reduction, suggesting a good stability staying on the substrate. Meanwhile, the polymer and silver nanowire in the composite electrode can be damaged via the same process through concentrated acid or base etching to leave off the substrate, allowing a simple patterning technology. Besides, the imported insulating polymer does not lower down the opto-electrical performance, and a high figure of merit close to 300 is obtained for the composite electrode, significantly outperforming the optoelectronic performance of indium-tin oxide (ITO) coated plastics (∼100) and comparable to ITO-coated glass. It shows great advantage to replace ITO as a promising transparent electrode.

  7. Large strain variable stiffness composites for shear deformations with applications to morphing aircraft skins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKnight, G. P.; Henry, C. P.

    2008-03-01

    Morphing or reconfigurable structures potentially allow for previously unattainable vehicle performance by permitting several optimized structures to be achieved using a single platform. The key to enabling this technology in applications such as aircraft wings, nozzles, and control surfaces, are new engineered materials which can achieve the necessary deformations but limit losses in parasitic actuation mass and structural efficiency (stiffness/weight). These materials should exhibit precise control of deformation properties and provide high stiffness when exercised through large deformations. In this work, we build upon previous efforts in segmented reinforcement variable stiffness composites employing shape memory polymers to create prototype hybrid composite materials that combine the benefits of cellular materials with those of discontinuous reinforcement composites. These composites help overcome two key challenges for shearing wing skins: the resistance to out of plane buckling from actuation induced shear deformation, and resistance to membrane deflections resulting from distributed aerodynamic pressure loading. We designed, fabricated, and tested composite materials intended for shear deformation and address out of plane deflections in variable area wing skins. Our designs are based on the kinematic engineering of reinforcement platelets such that desired microstructural kinematics is achieved through prescribed boundary conditions. We achieve this kinematic control by etching sheets of metallic reinforcement into regular patterns of platelets and connecting ligaments. This kinematic engineering allows optimization of materials properties for a known deformation pathway. We use mechanical analysis and full field photogrammetry to relate local scale kinematics and strains to global deformations for both axial tension loading and shear loading with a pinned-diamond type fixture. The Poisson ratio of the kinematically engineered composite is ~3x higher than

  8. Numerical and experimental analyses of large composite skeletal satellite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparry, D. A. C.

    1992-01-01

    The world's ever increasing demand for communication capacity has been the catalyst for the development of a range of next generation satellite reflectors. This new generation of satellites is significantly larger than those currently in orbit. Their dimensions prohibit transportation into space in their operational configuration. The use of deployable tetrahedral trusses for the reflecting surface support structures of a 50 m diameter Land Mobile Communication System is investigated. A deployable structural system was selected ahead of other possible forms, as it satisfied the majority of the criteria of low part count, quick assembly times, and an economical packaging volume thereby minimizing transportation and on-orbit fabrication costs. The composite material examined is formed from a polyethersulphone thermoplastic matrix reinforced with high strength, low modulus carbon fibers, C-PES. The modal characteristics of a series of scaled sub-units of the proposed structure were examined. These units, manufactured from the two types of material considered, C-PES and Perspex, were subjected to a range of excitation functions. The C-PES units were thermally cycled under high vacuum to simulate the space environment. The accelerated thermal cycling of the composite structural units revealed that a shift in resonant frequency occurred, together with some surface cracking which could affect the long term stability of the material. The effects of surface pigmentation on the thermal response were also considered. An algorithm was developed which allows low cost materials to be used to predict the behavior of geometrically similar units manufactured from the composite material. The interaction between the predicted dynamic structural behavior and the electrical performance of the satellite is also addressed and suggests that some form of active control system will be required if the maximum defocus parameter is not to be violated.

  9. Ballistic Impacts on Composite and Sandwich Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrate, Serge

    Composite and sandwich structures are sometimes subjected to impacts that result in complete perforation. Tests are conducted to determine the velocity required to achieve complete penetration for a given projectile and a model is required for data reduction purposes, to understand the effect of various parameters and to extrapolate for other test conditions. In addition, models capable of predicting the ballistic limit and the extent of damage in composite and sandwich structures are also needed. This chapter presents a comprehensive and critical assessment of the existing literature on this topic.

  10. Advanced fiber placement of composite fuselage structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Robert L.; Grant, Carroll G.

    1991-01-01

    The Hercules/NASA Advanced Composite Technology (ACT) program will demonstrate the low cost potential of the automated fiber placement process. The Hercules fiber placement machine was developed for cost effective production of composite aircraft structures. The process uses a low cost prepreg tow material form and achieves equivalent laminate properties to structures fabricated with prepreg tape layup. Fiber placement demonstrations planned for the Hercules/NASA program include fabrication of stiffened test panels which represent crown, keel, and window belt segments of a typical transport aircraft fuselage.

  11. Annealing and structural properties of composite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotov, L. N.; Ustyugov, V. A.; Vlasov, V. S.; Turkov, V. K.; Dianov, M. Yu; Antonets, I. V.; Kalinin, Yu E.; Sitnikov, A. V.; Golubev, E. A.

    2017-02-01

    The composite films were investigated by AFM methods before and after annealing. Topographic and phase-contrast AFM images of the composite films at different annealing temperature were obtained. The separate metal granules and larger-scale labyrinth-like formations were described. These formations appear by the process of the film growth, also by film annealing. Strong changes of the structural properties of the films are observed after the percolation transition. The significant changes of the structural properties are connected with nanostructural transformations in the metal granules topology and presence of metal crystal phase.

  12. Structural concepts for large solar concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, John M.; Miller, Richard K.

    1987-01-01

    The Sunflower large solar concentrator, developed in the early 1970's, is a salient example of a high-efficiency concentrator. The newly emphasized needs for solar dynamic power on the Space Station and for large, lightweight thermal sources are outlined. Existing concepts for high efficiency reflector surfaces are examined with attention to accuracy needs for concentration rates of 1000 to 3000. Concepts using stiff reflector panels are deemed most likely to exhibit the long-term consistent accuracy necessary for low-orbit operation, particularly for the higher concentration ratios. Quantitative results are shown of the effects of surface errors for various concentration and focal-length diameter ratios. Cost effectiveness is discussed. Principal sources of high cost include the need for various dished panels for paraboloidal reflectors and the expense of ground testing and adjustment. A new configuration is presented addressing both problems, i.e., a deployable Pactruss backup structure with identical panels installed on the structure after deployment in space. Analytical results show that with reasonable pointing errors, this new concept is capable of concentration ratios greater than 2000.

  13. Offloading techniques for large deployable space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caravaggio, Levino; Golob, Alex

    1992-01-01

    The validation and verification of large deployable space structures are continual challenges which face the integration and test engineer today. Spar Aerospace Limited has worked on various programs in which such structure validation was required and faces similar tasks in the future. This testing is reported and the different offloading and deployment methods which were used, as well as the proposed methods which will be used on future programs, are described. Past programs discussed include the Olympus solar array ambient and thermal vacuum deployments, and the Anik-E array and reflector deployments. The proposed MSAT reflector and boom ambient deployment tests, as well as the proposed RADARSAT Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) ambient and thermal vacuum deployment tests will also be presented. A series of tests relating to various component parts of the offloading equipment systems was required. These tests included the characterization and understanding of linear bearings and large (180 in-lbf) constant force spring motors in a thermal vacuum environment, and the results from these tests are presented.

  14. Noise transmission characteristics of a large scale composite fuselage model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyer, Todd B.; Silcox, Richard J.

    1990-01-01

    Results from an experimental test undertaken to study the basic noise transmission characteristics of a realistic, built-up composite fuselage model are presented. The floor-equipped stiffened composite cylinder was exposed to a number of different exterior noise source configurations in a large anechoic chamber. These exterior source configurations included two point sources located in the same plane on opposite sides of the cylinder, a single point source and a propeller simulator. The results indicate that the interior source field is affected strongly by exterior noise source phasing. Sidewall treatment is seen to reduce the overall interior sound pressure levels and dampen dominant acoustic resonances so that other acoustic modes can affect interior noise distribution.

  15. Large-scale shielding structures in low earth orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, D. V.; Silnikov, M. V.; Mikhaylin, A. I.; Rubzov, I. S.; Nosikov, V. B.; Minenko, E. Yu.; Murtazin, D. A.

    2015-04-01

    The problems involved in the design-engineering digital simulation of large-size transformable-screen constructions for protecting spacecraft and equipment from space debris and meteoroids were considered. The engineering principles used to improve the design and efficiency of protective screens are presented. The use of embedded matrix transducers located all over the composite material used for armor tiles is proposed for the construction of protective clad screens; this approach enables efficient detection of damaged areas of the protective screen, the assessment of the level of damage, and the prediction of damage to spacecraft and equipment structures.

  16. Enhanced Composites Integrity Through Structural Health Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giurgiutiu, Victor; Soutis, Constantinos

    2012-10-01

    This paper discusses the topic of how the integrity of safety-critical structural composites can be enhanced by the use of structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques. The paper starts with a presentation of how the certification of flight-critical composite structures can be achieved within the framework of civil aviation safety authority requirements. Typical composites damage mechanisms, which make this process substantially different from that for metallic materials are discussed. The opportunities presented by the use of SHM techniques in future civil aircraft developments are explained. The paper then focuses on active SHM with piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS). After reviewing the PWAS-based SHM options, the paper follows with a discussion of the specifics of guided wave propagation in composites and PWAS-tuning effects. The paper presents a number of experimental results for damage detection in simple flat unidirectional and quasi-isotropic composite specimens. Calibrated through holes of increasing diameter and impact damage of various energies and velocities are considered. The paper ends with conclusions and suggestions for further work.

  17. Composites technology for transport primary structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Victor; Hawley, Arthur; Klotzsche, Max; Markus, Alan; Palmer, Ray

    1991-01-01

    The ACT contract activity being performed by the McDonnell Douglas Corporation is divided into two separate activities: one effort by Douglas Aircraft in Long Beach, California with a focus on Transport Primary Wing and Fuselage Structure, and the other effort by McDonnell Aircraft in St. Louis, Missouri with a focus on Advanced Combat Aircraft Center Wing-Fuselage Structure. This presentation is on the Douglas Aircraft Transport Structure portion of the ACT program called ICAPS - Innovative Composite Aircraft Primary Structure.

  18. Composite structural armor for combat vehicle applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskell, William E., III; Alesi, A. L.; Parsons, G. R.

    1990-01-01

    Several projects that have demonstrated the advantages of using thick composite armor technology for structural applications in armored combat vehicles are discussed. The first involved composite cargo doors for the Marine Corps LVTP-7 amphibious landing vehicle. Another was a demonstration composite turret that offered a weight reduction of 15.5 percent. The advantages of this composite armor compared to metallic armors used for combat vehicle hull and turret applications are reduced weight at equal ballistic protection; reduced back armor spall; excellent corrosion resistance; reduced production costs by parts consolidation; and inherent thermal and acoustic insulative properties. Based on the encouraging results of these past programs, the Demonstration Composite Hull Program was started in September 1986. To demonstrate this composite armor technology, the Army's newest infantry fighting vehicle, the Bradley Fighting Vehicle (BFV), was selected as a model. A composite infantry fighting vehicle, designated the CIFV for this program, has been designed and fabricated and is currently undergoing a 6000 mile field endurance test. The CIFV demonstration vehicle uses the BFV engine, transmission, suspension, track and other equipment.

  19. Warpage of Large Curved Composite Panels due to Manufacturing Anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, James H., Jr. (Technical Monitor); Ambur, Damadar (Technical Monitor); Ochinero, T. T.; Hyer, M. W.

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses the influences of a misaligned layer, a resin-rich slightly thicker layer, and a small thermal gradient on the thermally-induced deformations of large curved composite panels during cooldown from their cure temperature. The deformations represent warpage of the panels due to anomalies that occur during layup, consolidation, and cure. Two-dimensional finite element analyses are used The deformations are categorized as to their impact on circumferential and twist warpage metrics. The results are intended to highlight the sensitivity of manufactured panel shape to the various unwanted effects that can occur during manufacturing.

  20. Advanced composite structures. [metal matrix composites - structural design criteria for spacecraft construction materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A monograph is presented which establishes structural design criteria and recommends practices to ensure the design of sound composite structures, including composite-reinforced metal structures. (It does not discuss design criteria for fiber-glass composites and such advanced composite materials as beryllium wire or sapphire whiskers in a matrix material.) Although the criteria were developed for aircraft applications, they are general enough to be applicable to space vehicles and missiles as well. The monograph covers four broad areas: (1) materials, (2) design, (3) fracture control, and (4) design verification. The materials portion deals with such subjects as material system design, material design levels, and material characterization. The design portion includes panel, shell, and joint design, applied loads, internal loads, design factors, reliability, and maintainability. Fracture control includes such items as stress concentrations, service-life philosophy, and the management plan for control of fracture-related aspects of structural design using composite materials. Design verification discusses ways to prove flightworthiness.

  1. Resin selection criteria for tough composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Smith, G. T.

    1983-01-01

    Resin selection criteria are derived using a structured methodology consisting of an upward integrated mechanistic theory and its inverse (top-down structured theory). These criteria are expressed in a "criteria selection space" which are used to identify resin bulk properties for improved composite "toughness". The resin selection criteria correlate with a variety of experimental data including laminate strength, elevated temperature effects and impact resistance.

  2. Statistical Measures of Large-Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogeley, Michael; Geller, Margaret; Huchra, John; Park, Changbom; Gott, J. Richard

    1993-12-01

    \\inv Mpc} To quantify clustering in the large-scale distribution of galaxies and to test theories for the formation of structure in the universe, we apply statistical measures to the CfA Redshift Survey. This survey is complete to m_{B(0)}=15.5 over two contiguous regions which cover one-quarter of the sky and include ~ 11,000 galaxies. The salient features of these data are voids with diameter 30-50\\hmpc and coherent dense structures with a scale ~ 100\\hmpc. Comparison with N-body simulations rules out the ``standard" CDM model (Omega =1, b=1.5, sigma_8 =1) at the 99% confidence level because this model has insufficient power on scales lambda >30\\hmpc. An unbiased open universe CDM model (Omega h =0.2) and a biased CDM model with non-zero cosmological constant (Omega h =0.24, lambda_0 =0.6) match the observed power spectrum. The amplitude of the power spectrum depends on the luminosity of galaxies in the sample; bright (L>L(*) ) galaxies are more strongly clustered than faint galaxies. The paucity of bright galaxies in low-density regions may explain this dependence. To measure the topology of large-scale structure, we compute the genus of isodensity surfaces of the smoothed density field. On scales in the ``non-linear" regime, <= 10\\hmpc, the high- and low-density regions are multiply-connected over a broad range of density threshold, as in a filamentary net. On smoothing scales >10\\hmpc, the topology is consistent with statistics of a Gaussian random field. Simulations of CDM models fail to produce the observed coherence of structure on non-linear scales (>95% confidence level). The underdensity probability (the frequency of regions with density contrast delta rho //lineρ=-0.8) depends strongly on the luminosity of galaxies; underdense regions are significantly more common (>2sigma ) in bright (L>L(*) ) galaxy samples than in samples which include fainter galaxies.

  3. Timber rivets in structural composite lumber

    Treesearch

    Ronald W. Wolfe; Marshall Begel; Bruce Craig

    2004-01-01

    Timber rivet connections, originally developed for use with glulam construction, may be a viable option for use with structural composite lumber (SCL) products. Tests were conducted on small samples to assess the performance and predictability of timber rivet connections in parallel strand lumber (PSL) and laminated strand lumber (LSL). The test joint configurations...

  4. Structure, composition, and condition of overstory trees

    Treesearch

    Daniel A. Yaussy; Todd F. Hutchinson; Elaine Kennedy Sutherland

    2003-01-01

    The structure, composition, and condition of overstory trees in the four study areas prior to prescribed fire treatments are summarized. Stand initiation dates were similar among the study areas (ca. 1885), and coincided with the decline of the charcoal iron industry in southern Ohio. Tree basal area averaged 26.8m²/ha and was not significantly different among...

  5. Failure Analysis of Composite Structure Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    8MATERIAL STRUCTURES DISCONTINUITY T•R PLY DROPOFF i 7ARC LAP/GAP . PRPAATION A, ,OM LY , 1e, ’ •INS ERVICE MAINTENANCE DAMAGE SVv , S IMPACT \\\\ CHESIE ...composite joints such as box beam members, for example, are difficult to inspect by ultrasonic techniques, and the X-ray attenuation coefficients of

  6. Automated Tape Laying Machine for Composite Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The invention comprises an automated tape laying machine, for laying tape on a composite structure. The tape laying machine has a tape laying head...neatly cut. The automated tape laying device utilizes narrow width tape to increase machine flexibility and reduce wastage.

  7. Structure and Composition of the Grain

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    As a crop with a wide range of genetic diversity, sorghum grain composition and structure can vary widely. Such variability can be of great benefit in supplying a diversity of uses but can also be a negative when viewed from the standpoint of uniformity. Despite sharing similarities to other cereals...

  8. Lightning Protection for Composite Aircraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, G. O.

    1985-01-01

    Lightning protection system consisting of two layers of aluminum foil separated by layer of dielectric material protects graphite/epoxy composite structures on aircraft. Protective layer is secondarily applied lightning protection system, prime advantage of which is nullification of thermal and right angle effect of lightning arc attachment to graphite/epoxy laminate.

  9. Variable Complexity Optimization of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, Raphael T.

    2002-01-01

    The use of several levels of modeling in design has been dubbed variable complexity modeling. The work under the grant focused on developing variable complexity modeling strategies with emphasis on response surface techniques. Applications included design of stiffened composite plates for improved damage tolerance, the use of response surfaces for fitting weights obtained by structural optimization, and design against uncertainty using response surface techniques.

  10. Grid sensitivity capability for large scale structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagendra, Gopal K.; Wallerstein, David V.

    1989-01-01

    The considerations and the resultant approach used to implement design sensitivity capability for grids into a large scale, general purpose finite element system (MSC/NASTRAN) are presented. The design variables are grid perturbations with a rather general linking capability. Moreover, shape and sizing variables may be linked together. The design is general enough to facilitate geometric modeling techniques for generating design variable linking schemes in an easy and straightforward manner. Test cases have been run and validated by comparison with the overall finite difference method. The linking of a design sensitivity capability for shape variables in MSC/NASTRAN with an optimizer would give designers a powerful, automated tool to carry out practical optimization design of real life, complicated structures.

  11. Direct Measurement of Large, Diffuse, Optical Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saif, Babak N.; Keski-Kuha, Ritva; Feinberg, Lee; Wyant, J. C.; Atkinson, C.

    2004-01-01

    Digital Speckle Pattern Interferometry (DSPI) is a well-established method for the measurement of diffuse objects in experimental mechanics. DSPIs are phase shifting interferometers. Three or four bucket temporal phase shifting algorithms are commonly used to provide phase shifting. These algorithms are sensitive to vibrations and can not be used to measure large optical structures far away from the interferometer. In this research a simultaneous phase shifted interferometer, PhaseCam product of 4D Technology Corporation in Tucson Arizona, is modified to be a Simultaneous phase shifted Digital Speckle Pattern Interferometer (SDSPI). Repeatability, dynamic range, and accuracy of the SDSPI are characterized by measuring a 5 cm x 5 cm carbon fiber coupon.

  12. The challenge of large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, S. A.

    1996-03-01

    The tasks that I have assumed for myself in this presentation include three separate parts. The first, appropriate to the particular setting of this meeting, is to review the basic work of the founding of this field; the appropriateness comes from the fact that W. G. Tifft made immense contributions that are not often realized by the astronomical community. The second task is to outline the general tone of the observational evidence for large scale structures. (Here, in particular, I cannot claim to be complete. I beg forgiveness from any workers who are left out by my oversight for lack of space and time.) The third task is to point out some of the major aspects of the field that may represent the clues by which some brilliant sleuth will ultimately figure out how galaxies formed.

  13. Improved Joining of Metal Components to Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semmes, Edmund

    2009-01-01

    Systems requirements for complex spacecraft drive design requirements that lead to structures, components, and/or enclosures of a multi-material and multifunctional design. The varying physical properties of aluminum, tungsten, Invar, or other high-grade aerospace metals when utilized in conjunction with lightweight composites multiply system level solutions. These multi-material designs are largely dependent upon effective joining techAn improved method of joining metal components to matrix/fiber composite material structures has been invented. The method is particularly applicable to equipping such thin-wall polymer-matrix composite (PMC) structures as tanks with flanges, ceramic matrix composite (CMC) liners for high heat engine nozzles, and other metallic-to-composite attachments. The method is oriented toward new architectures and distributing mechanical loads as widely as possible in the vicinities of attachment locations to prevent excessive concentrations of stresses that could give rise to delaminations, debonds, leaks, and other failures. The method in its most basic form can be summarized as follows: A metal component is to be joined to a designated attachment area on a composite-material structure. In preparation for joining, the metal component is fabricated to include multiple studs projecting from the aforementioned face. Also in preparation for joining, holes just wide enough to accept the studs are molded into, drilled, or otherwise formed in the corresponding locations in the designated attachment area of the uncured ("wet') composite structure. The metal component is brought together with the uncured composite structure so that the studs become firmly seated in the holes, thereby causing the composite material to become intertwined with the metal component in the joining area. Alternately, it is proposed to utilize other mechanical attachment schemes whereby the uncured composite and metallic parts are joined with "z-direction" fasteners. The

  14. Structural Design of Ares V Interstage Composite Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sleigh, David W.; Sreekantamurthy, Thammaiah; Kosareo, Daniel N.; Martin, Robert A.; Johnson, Theodore F.

    2011-01-01

    Preliminary and detailed design studies were performed to mature composite structural design concepts for the Ares V Interstage structure as a part of NASA s Advanced Composite Technologies Project. Aluminum honeycomb sandwich and hat-stiffened composite panel structural concepts were considered. The structural design and analysis studies were performed using HyperSizer design sizing software and MSC Nastran finite element analysis software. System-level design trade studies were carried out to predict weight and margins of safety for composite honeycomb-core sandwich and composite hat-stiffened skin design concepts. Details of both preliminary and detailed design studies are presented in the paper. For the range of loads and geometry considered in this work, the hat-stiffened designs were found to be approximately 11-16 percent lighter than the sandwich designs. A down-select process was used to choose the most favorable structural concept based on a set of figures of merit, and the honeycomb sandwich design was selected as the best concept based on advantages in manufacturing cost.

  15. Voids in the Large-Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Ad, Hagai; Piran, Tsvi

    1997-12-01

    Voids are the most prominent feature of the large-scale structure of the universe. Still, their incorporation into quantitative analysis of it has been relatively recent, owing essentially to the lack of an objective tool to identify the voids and to quantify them. To overcome this, we present here the VOID FINDER algorithm, a novel tool for objectively quantifying voids in the galaxy distribution. The algorithm first classifies galaxies as either wall galaxies or field galaxies. Then, it identifies voids in the wall-galaxy distribution. Voids are defined as continuous volumes that do not contain any wall galaxies. The voids must be thicker than an adjustable limit, which is refined in successive iterations. In this way, we identify the same regions that would be recognized as voids by the eye. Small breaches in the walls are ignored, avoiding artificial connections between neighboring voids. We test the algorithm using Voronoi tesselations. By appropriate scaling of the parameters with the selection function, we apply it to two redshift surveys, the dense SSRS2 and the full-sky IRAS 1.2 Jy. Both surveys show similar properties: ~50% of the volume is filled by voids. The voids have a scale of at least 40 h-1 Mpc and an average -0.9 underdensity. Faint galaxies do not fill the voids, but they do populate them more than bright ones. These results suggest that both optically and IRAS-selected galaxies delineate the same large-scale structure. Comparison with the recovered mass distribution further suggests that the observed voids in the galaxy distribution correspond well to underdense regions in the mass distribution. This confirms the gravitational origin of the voids.

  16. Tooling Foam for Structural Composite Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Tom; Smith, Brett H.; Ely, Kevin; MacArthur, Doug

    1998-01-01

    Tooling technology applications for composite structures fabrication have been expanded at MSFC's Productivity Enhancement Complex (PEC). Engineers from NASA/MSFC and Lockheed Martin Corporation have developed a tooling foam for use in composite materials processing and manufacturing that exhibits superior thermal and mechanical properties in comparison with other tooling foam materials. This tooling foam is also compatible with most preimpregnated composite resins such as epoxy, bismaleimide, phenolic and their associated cure cycles. MARCORE tooling foam has excellent processability for applications requiring either integral or removable tooling. It can also be tailored to meet the requirements for composite processing of parts with unlimited cross sectional area. A shelf life of at least six months is easily maintained when components are stored between 50F - 70F. The MARCORE tooling foam system is a two component urethane-modified polyisocyanurate, high density rigid foam with zero ozone depletion potential. This readily machineable, lightweight tooling foam is ideal for composite structures fabrication and is dimensionally stable at temperatures up to 350F and pressures of 100 psi.

  17. Process monitoring during manufacturing of large-scale composite parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heider, Dirk; Eckel, Douglas A., II; Don, Roderic C.; Fink, Bruce K.; Gillespie, John W., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    One of the inherent problems with the processing of composites is the development of internal stresses and the resulting warpage, which results in out-of-tolerance components. This investigation examines possible fiber-optic sensor methods, which can be applied to measure internal strain and thus residual stress during production. Extrinsic Fabry-Perot Interferometers (EFPI) and Bragg gratings are utilizes to monitor the strain behavior during manufacturing of large-scale composite parts. Initially, a 24 in X 18 in X 1 in thick part was manufactured using the vacuum- assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) technique. In this part, one Bragg grating, multiple thermocouples and a resin flow sensor (SMARTweave) were integrate to measure the flow and cure behavior during production. An AGEMA thermal image camera verified the temperature history on the part surface. In addition, several EFPI's and Bragg gratings were implemented into three temperature history on the part surface. In addition, several EFPI's and Bragg gratings were implemented into three 13 ft X 32 ft X 20.3 in civilian bridge deck test specimens manufactured with the VARTM process. The Bragg gratings showed great promise to capture the changes in strain due to the residual stress during cure. The actual implementation of fiber optics into large composite parts is a challenge and the problems of sensor survivability in these parts are addressed in this study. The fiber optic measurements in combination with SMARTweave's ability to monitor flow could lead to a sensor system, which allows feedback for process control of the VARTM technique. In addition, the optical fibers will be used for health monitoring during the lifetime of the part.

  18. Instability and Wave Propagation in Structured 3D Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaynia, Narges; Fang, Nicholas X.; Boyce, Mary C.

    2014-03-01

    Many structured composites found in nature possess undulating and wrinkled interfacial layers that regulate mechanical, chemical, acoustic, adhesive, thermal, electrical and optical functions of the material. This research focused on the complex instability and wrinkling pattern arising in 3D structured composites and the effect of the buckling pattern on the overall structural response. The 3D structured composites consisted of stiffer plates supported by soft matrix on both sides. Compression beyond the critical strain led to complex buckling patterns in the initially straight plates. The motivation of our work is to elaborate the formation of a system of prescribed periodic scatterers (metamaterials) due to buckling, and their effect to interfere wave propagation through the metamaterial structures. Such metamaterials made from elastomers enable large reversible deformation and, as a result, significant changes of the wave propagation properties. We developed analytical and finite element models to capture various aspects of the instability mechanism. Mechanical experiments were designed to further explore the modeling results. The ability to actively alter the 3D composite structure can enable on-demand tunability of many different functions, such as active control of wave propagation to create band-gaps and waveguides.

  19. Use of lightweight composites for GAS payload structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, Mark B.

    1987-01-01

    A key element in the design of a small self-contained payload is the supporting structure. This structure must support the experiments and other components while using as little space and weight as possible. Hence, the structure material must have characteristics of being both strong and light. Aluminum was used for the structure on the first Purdue University payload, but consumed a relatively large percentage of the total payload weight. The current payload has a larger power supply requirement than did the previous payload. To allow additional weight for the batteries, a composite material has been chosen for the structure which has the required strength while being considerably lighter than aluminum. A radial fin design has been chosen for ease of composite material lay-up and its overall strength of design. A composite plate will connect the free ends of the fins and add strength and reduce vibration. The physical characteristics of the composite material and the method of open lay-up construction is described. Also discussed are the testing, modifications, and problems encountered during assembly of the experiments to the structure.

  20. Finite element structural model of a large, thin, completely free, flat plate. [for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, S. M.; Groom, N. J.

    1980-01-01

    A finite element structural model of a 30.48 m x 30.48 m x 2.54 mm completely free aluminum plate is described and modal frequencies and mode shape data for the first 44 modes are presented. An explanation of the procedure for using the data is also presented. The model should prove useful for the investigation of controller design approaches for large flexible space structures.

  1. Multidisciplinary tailoring of hot composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, Surendra N.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1993-01-01

    A computational simulation procedure is described for multidisciplinary analysis and tailoring of layered multi-material hot composite engine structural components subjected to simultaneous multiple discipline-specific thermal, structural, vibration, and acoustic loads. The effect of aggressive environments is also simulated. The simulation is based on a three-dimensional finite element analysis technique in conjunction with structural mechanics codes, thermal/acoustic analysis methods, and tailoring procedures. The integrated multidisciplinary simulation procedure is general-purpose including the coupled effects of nonlinearities in structure geometry, material, loading, and environmental complexities. The composite material behavior is assessed at all composite scales, i.e., laminate/ply/constituents (fiber/matrix), via a nonlinear material characterization hygro-thermo-mechanical model. Sample tailoring cases exhibiting nonlinear material/loading/environmental behavior of aircraft engine fan blades, are presented. The various multidisciplinary loads lead to different tailored designs, even those competing with each other, as in the case of minimum material cost versus minimum structure weight and in the case of minimum vibration frequency versus minimum acoustic noise.

  2. Multidisciplinary tailoring of hot composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, Surendra N.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1992-01-01

    A computational simulation procedure is described for multidisciplinary analysis and tailoring of multilayered multimaterial hot composite engine structural components subjected to simultaneous multiple discipline-specific thermal, structural, vibration, and acoustic loadings including the effect of aggressive environments. The simulation is based on a 3D finite element analysis technique in conjunction with structural mechanics codes, thermal/acoustic analysis methods, and tailoring procedures. The integrated multidisciplinary simulation procedure is general-purpose including the coupled effects of nonlinearities in structure geometry, material, loading, and environmental complexities. The composite material behavior is assessed at all composite scales, i.e., the laminate/ply/constituents (fiber/matrix), via a nonlinear material characterization hygro-thermomechanical model. Sample tailoring cases exhibiting nonlinear material/loading/environmental behavior of aircraft engine fan blades, are presented. The various multidisciplinary loadings lead to different tailored designs, even those opposite of each other, as in the case of minimum material cost versus minimum structure weight and in the case of minimum vibration frequency versus minimum acoustic noise.

  3. Analysis of Smart Composite Structures Including Debonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Seeley, Charles E.

    1997-01-01

    Smart composite structures with distributed sensors and actuators have the capability to actively respond to a changing environment while offering significant weight savings and additional passive controllability through ply tailoring. Piezoelectric sensing and actuation of composite laminates is the most promising concept due to the static and dynamic control capabilities. Essential to the implementation of these smart composites are the development of accurate and efficient modeling techniques and experimental validation. This research addresses each of these important topics. A refined higher order theory is developed to model composite structures with surface bonded or embedded piezoelectric transducers. These transducers are used as both sensors and actuators for closed loop control. The theory accurately captures the transverse shear deformation through the thickness of the smart composite laminate while satisfying stress free boundary conditions on the free surfaces. The theory is extended to include the effect of debonding at the actuator-laminate interface. The developed analytical model is implemented using the finite element method utilizing an induced strain approach for computational efficiency. This allows general laminate geometries and boundary conditions to be analyzed. The state space control equations are developed to allow flexibility in the design of the control system. Circuit concepts are also discussed. Static and dynamic results of smart composite structures, obtained using the higher order theory, are correlated with available analytical data. Comparisons, including debonded laminates, are also made with a general purpose finite element code and available experimental data. Overall, very good agreement is observed. Convergence of the finite element implementation of the higher order theory is shown with exact solutions. Additional results demonstrate the utility of the developed theory to study piezoelectric actuation of composite

  4. Health monitoring of a composite wingbox structure.

    PubMed

    Grondel, S; Assaad, J; Delebarre, C; Moulin, E

    2004-04-01

    This work was devoted to the development of a health monitoring system assigned to aerospace applications. Those applications concerned the detection of damaging impacts and debonding between stiffeners and composite skins, since they are the major causes of in-service damage of aircraft structures. The chosen health monitoring system was first based on the excitation and reception of Lamb waves along the structure by using thin piezoelectric transducers (active mode) and secondly on a continuous monitoring taking the same transducers used as acoustic emission sensors (passive mode). The composite specimen used was consistent with aircraft wingbox in terms of structure and loading. Several impacts with increasing energy increments were applied on the composite specimen. In passive mode, the study showed the ability of using the acoustic signature of an impact to detect possible damage. Moreover, the damage emergence in the case of damaging impact was confirmed in active mode. Further measurements during fatigue testing were performed. The aim was to demonstrate the ability of the system to monitor disbond growth between the stiffener and the composite skin. The sensitivity of the health monitoring system to the disbond growth was further demonstrated.

  5. Cost-efficient manufacturing of composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, W. Tom; Davis, John G.; Johnston, Norman J.

    1991-01-01

    The Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) program is seeking research breakthroughs that will allow structures made of graphite epoxy materials to replace metals in the wings and fuselages of future aircrafts. NASA's goals are to reduce acquisition cost by 20 to 25 percent, structural weight for a resized aircraft by 40 to 50 percent, and the number of parts by half compared to current production aluminum aircraft. The innovative structural concepts, materials, and fabrication techniques emerging from the ACT program are described, and the relationship between aerospace developments and industrial, commercial, and sporting goods applications are discussed.

  6. Time Domain Diffraction by Composite Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccio, Giovanni; Frongillo, Marcello

    2017-04-01

    Time domain (TD) diffraction problems are receiving great attention because of the widespread use of ultra wide band (UWB) communication and radar systems. It is commonly accepted that, due to the large bandwidth of the UWB signals, the analysis of the wave propagation mechanisms in the TD framework is preferable to the frequency domain (FD) data processing. Furthermore, the analysis of transient scattering phenomena is also of importance for predicting the effects of electromagnetic pulses on civil structures. Diffraction in the TD framework represents a challenging problem and numerical discretization techniques can be used to support research and industry activities. Unfortunately, these methods become rapidly intractable when considering excitation pulses with high frequency content. This contribution deals with the TD diffraction phenomenon related to composite structures containing a dielectric wedge with arbitrary apex angle when illuminated by a plane wave. The approach is the same used in [1]-[3]. The transient diffracted field originated by an arbitrary function plane wave is evaluated via a convolution integral involving the TD diffraction coefficients, which are determined in closed form starting from the knowledge of the corresponding FD counterparts. In particular, the inverse Laplace transform is applied to the FD Uniform Asymptotic Physical Optics (FD-UAPO) diffraction coefficients available for the internal region of the structure and the surrounding space. For each observation domain, the FD-UAPO expressions are obtained by considering electric and magnetic equivalent PO surface currents located on the interfaces. The surface radiation integrals using these sources is assumed as starting point and manipulated for obtaining integrals able to be solved by means of the Steepest Descent Method and the Multiplicative Method. [1] G. Gennarelli and G. Riccio, "Time domain diffraction by a right-angled penetrable wedge," IEEE Trans. Antennas Propag., Vol

  7. A Nonlinear Theory for Smart Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Aditi

    2002-01-01

    The paper discusses the following: (1) Development of a completely coupled thermo-piezoelectric-mechanical theory for the analysis of composite shells with segmented and distributed piezoelectric sensor/actuators and shape memory alloys. The higher order displacement theory will be used to capture the transverse shear effects in anisotropic composites. The original theory will be modified to satisfy the stress continuity at ply interfaces. (2) Development of a finite element technique to implement the mathematical model. (3) Investigation of the coupled structures/controls interaction problem to study the complex trade-offs associated with the coupled problem.

  8. Fabrication of graphite/polyimide composite structures.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varlas, M.

    1972-01-01

    Selection of graphite/polyimide composite as a prime candidate for high-temperature structural applications involving long-duration temperature environments of 400 to 600 F. A variety of complex graphite/polyimide components has been fabricated, using a match-metal die approach developed for making fiber-reinforced resin composites. Parts produced include sections of a missile adapter skin flange, skin frame section, and I-beam and hat-section stringers, as well as unidirectional (0 deg) and plus or minus 45 deg oriented graphite/polyimide tubes in one-, two-, and six-inch diameters.

  9. Coupled structural/thermal/electromagnetic analysis/tailoring of graded composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.; Chen, P. C.; Dame, L. T.; Huang, H.

    1992-01-01

    Accomplishments are described for the first year effort of a 5-year program to develop a methodology for coupled structural/thermal/electromagnetic analysis/tailoring of graded composite structures. These accomplishments include: (1) the results of the selective literature survey; (2) 8-, 16-, and 20-noded isoparametric plate and shell elements; (3) large deformation structural analysis; (4) eigenanalysis; (5) anisotropic heat transfer analysis; and (6) anisotropic electromagnetic analysis.

  10. Elastic waves in structurally chiral composites

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shiuhkuang.

    1990-01-01

    Elastic wave propagation through structurally chiral (handed) media was studied. The primary objectives are to construct structurally chiral composites and to characterize their properties. Structurally chiral composites are constructed by stacking identical uniaxial plates, whose consecutive symmetric axes describe either a right- or a left-handed spiral. A matrix representation method is used to solve the elastic wave propagation in such layered composites. Numerical computation of the plane wave reflection and transmission characteristics for chiral arrangements are compared with those for the non-chiral one. It is concluded that the co-polarized characteristics are unaffected by the structural chirality, while the cross-polarized reflected and transmitted fields are greatly influenced by it. Numerical modeling is also applied for the real samples. The polarization ellipse of the transmitted field of each sample is calculated. To verify the form chirality, four glass-reinforced chiral and non-chiral composite samples are made from helix tape, molded, debulked, and cured individually under identical temperature and pressure histories. The spiral composites are characterized using shear and longitudinal wave transducers in ultrasonic experiments. Both the material properties and the polarization ellipse of the transmitted field of each sample are measured. It is proved conclusively that left and right handedness in the microstructures of a material rotates the plane of polarization of a propagating shear wave in the opposite directions. Thus it is now possible to say that by reducing the length scale of the handed microstructures tone more appropriate to its propagating wavelength, a medium is obtained that gives rise to effects similar to optical radar and optical dichroism.

  11. Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) for Inspection of Composite Sandwich Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Parker, F. Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Composite honeycomb structures are widely used in aerospace applications due to their low weight and high strength advantages. Developing nondestructive evaluation (NDE) inspection methods are essential for their safe performance. Flash thermography is a commonly used technique for composite honeycomb structure inspections due to its large area and rapid inspection capability. Flash thermography is shown to be sensitive for detection of face sheet impact damage and face sheet to core disbond. Data processing techniques, using principal component analysis to improve the defect contrast, are discussed. Limitations to the thermal detection of the core are investigated. In addition to flash thermography, X-ray computed tomography is used. The aluminum honeycomb core provides excellent X-ray contrast compared to the composite face sheet. The X-ray CT technique was used to detect impact damage, core crushing, and skin to core disbonds. Additionally, the X-ray CT technique is used to validate the thermography results.

  12. Structural complexity of a composite amyloid fibril.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, Józef R; van der Wel, Patrick C A; Rigney, Mike; Grigorieff, Nikolaus; Griffin, Robert G

    2011-09-21

    The molecular structure of amyloid fibrils and the mechanism of their formation are of substantial medical and biological importance, but present an ongoing experimental and computational challenge. An early high-resolution view of amyloid-like structure was obtained on amyloid-like crystals of a small fragment of the yeast prion protein Sup35p: the peptide GNNQQNY. As GNNQQNY also forms amyloid-like fibrils under similar conditions, it has been theorized that the crystal's structural features are shared by the fibrils. Here we apply magic-angle-spinning (MAS) NMR to examine the structure and dynamics of these fibrils. Previously multiple NMR signals were observed for such samples, seemingly consistent with the presence of polymorphic fibrils. Here we demonstrate that peptides with these three distinct conformations instead assemble together into composite protofilaments. Electron microscopy (EM) of the ribbon-like fibrils indicates that these protofilaments combine in differing ways to form striations of variable widths, presenting another level of structural complexity. Structural and dynamic NMR data reveal the presence of highly restricted side-chain conformations involved in interfaces between differently structured peptides, likely comprising interdigitated steric zippers. We outline molecular interfaces that are consistent with the observed EM and NMR data. The rigid and uniform structure of the GNNQQNY crystals is found to contrast distinctly with the more complex structural and dynamic nature of these "composite" amyloid fibrils. These results provide insight into the fibril-crystal distinction and also indicate a necessary caution with respect to the extrapolation of crystal structures to the study of fibril structure and formation.

  13. Plate Waves Structural Health Monitoring of Composite Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaganathan, R.; Somasekhar, B. V.; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan; Krishnamurthy, C. V.

    2005-04-01

    Layered composite plate-like structures are finding an increasing range of applications in the aerospace industry. Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) of such structures is seen as a paradigm that will embrace efficient non-destructive testing/evaluation techniques. The present study demonstrates two techniques that have the potential for the SHM of multi-layered composite structures. The first technique is based on multi-transmitter-multi-receiver (MTMR) technique with tomographic methods used for data reconstruction. In the MTMR, the possibility of SHM using algebraic reconstruction techniques (ART) for tomographic imaging with Lamb wave data measured in realistic materials is examined. Commercially available narrow bandwidth PZT crystals were used as sensors on multi-layered quasi-isotropic and cross-ply composite plates with and without defects. Defects (through holes and low velocity impact delaminations) were synthetic and have been chosen to simulate impact damage in composite plates. To achieve reasonable image quality, conventional cross-hole configuration is replaced by a new modified cross-hole configuration that also optimizes the number of sensors. The second technique is a single-transmitter-multi-receiver (STMR) technique that is more compact and uses reconstruction techniques that are analogus to synthetic aperture techniques. Here, the phase shifting is performed on the individual signals based on the guided wave dispersion relationships. The reconstruction algorithm uses summation of the phase shifted signals to image the location of defects, portions of the plate edges, and any reflectors from inherent structural features of the component.

  14. Thermal-structural composites radiator trends

    SciTech Connect

    Kriegbaum, R.; Rawal, S.P.

    1996-03-01

    Driven by stringent weight and performance requirements, current commercial satellites will use high conductivity polymer matrix composite radiators with embedded heat pipes. Current trends toward high power density electronics will require larger areas to reject higher heat fluxes than the area available in future small satellites. These thermal-structural requirements dictate the necessity of designing and developing lightweight, highly conductive deployable radiators. In an Air Force/Materials Lab sponsored program, Lockheed Martin, Denver is evaluating present and future spacecraft requirements. These thermal requirements will lead to the development of an optimum radiator design, such as a lightweight composite deployable radiator. This paper presents the theoretical basis and payoffs of developing a high conductivity composite radiator. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Composite Blade Structural Analyzer (COBSTRAN) demonstration manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aiello, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    The input deck setup is described for a computer code, composite blade structural analyzer (COBSTRAN) which was developed for the design and analysis of composite turbofan and turboprop blades and also for composite wind turbine blades. This manual is intended for use in conjunction with the COBSTRAN user's manual. Seven demonstration problems are described with pre- and postprocessing input decks. Modeling of blades which are solid thru-the-thickness and also aircraft wing airfoils with internal spars is shown. Corresponding NASTRAN and databank input decks are also shown. Detail descriptions of each line of the pre- and post-processing decks is provided with reference to the Card Groups defined in the user's manual. A dictionary of all program variables and terms used in this manual may be found in Section 6 of the user's manual.

  16. Self Healing Composite for Aircraft's Structural Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teoh, S. H.; Chia, H. Y.; Lee, M. S.; Nasyitah, A. J. N.; Luqman, H. B. S. M.; Nurhidayah, S.; Tan, Willy. C. K.

    When one cuts himself, it is amazing to watch how quickly the body acts to mend the wound. Immediately, the body works to pull the skin around the cut back together. The concept of repair by bleeding of enclosed functional agents serves as the biomimetic inspiration of synthetic self repair systems. Such synthetic self repair systems are based on advancement in polymeric materials; the process of human thrombosis is the inspiration for the application of self healing fibres within the composite materials. Results based on flexural 3 point bend test on the prepared samples have shown that the doubled layer healed hollow fibre laminate subjected to a healing regime of 3 weeks has a healed strength increase of 27% compared to the damaged baseline laminate. These results gave us confidence that there is a great potential to adopt such self healing mechanism on actual composite parts like in aircraft's composite structures.

  17. Hierarchical nonlinear behavior of hot composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, C. C.; Singhal, S. N.

    1993-01-01

    Hierarchical computational procedures are described to simulate the multiple scale thermal/mechanical behavior of high temperature metal matrix composites (HT-MMC) in the following three broad areas: (1) behavior of HT-MMC's from micromechanics to laminate via METCAN (Metal Matrix Composite Analyzer), (2) tailoring of HT-MMC behavior for optimum specific performance via MMLT (Metal Matrix Laminate Tailoring), and (3) HT-MMC structural response for hot structural components via HITCAN (High Temperature Composite Analyzer). Representative results from each area are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of computational simulation procedures and accompanying computer codes. The sample case results show that METCAN can be used to simulate material behavior such as the entire creep span; MMLT can be used to concurrently tailor the fabrication process and the interphase layer for optimum performance such as minimum residual stresses; and HITCAN can be used to predict the structural behavior such as the deformed shape due to component fabrication. These codes constitute virtual portable desk-top test laboratories for characterizing HT-MMC laminates, tailoring the fabrication process, and qualifying structural components made from them.

  18. End Effects and Load Diffusion in Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horgan, Cornelius O.; Ambur, D. (Technical Monitor); Nemeth, M. P. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The research carried out here builds on our previous NASA supported research on the general topic of edge effects and load diffusion in composite structures. Further fundamental solid mechanics studies were carried out to provide a basis for assessing the complicated modeling necessary for large scale structures used by NASA. An understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of load diffusion in composite subcomponents is essential in developing primary composite structures. Specific problems recently considered were focussed on end effects in sandwich structures and for functionally graded materials. Both linear and nonlinear (geometric and material) problems have been addressed. Our goal is the development of readily applicable design formulas for the decay lengths in terms of non-dimensional material and geometric parameters. Analytical models of load diffusion behavior are extremely valuable in building an intuitive base for developing refined modeling strategies and assessing results from finite element analyses. The decay behavior of stresses and other field quantities provides a significant aid towards this process. The analysis is also amenable to parameter study with a large parameter space and should be useful in structural tailoring studies.

  19. Global Failure Modes in Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knauss, W. G.; Gonzalez, Luis

    2001-01-01

    Composite materials provide well-known advantages for space and aeronautical applications in terms of strength and rigidity to weight ratios and other mechanical properties. As a consequence, their use has experienced a constant increase in the past decades and it is anticipated that this trend will be maintained in the near future. At the same time, being these materials relatively new compared to metals, and having failure characteristics completely different from them, their damage growth and their failure mechanisms are not as well understood in a predictive sense. For example, while in metals fracture produces "clean" cracks with their well defined analytically stress fields at the crack tip, composite fracture is a more complex phenomenon. Instead of a crack, we confront a "damage zone" that may include fiber breakage, fiber microbuckling, fiber pullout, matrix cracking, delamination, debonding or any combination of all these different mechanisms. These phenomena are prevalent in any failure process through an aircraft structure, whether one addresses a global failure such as the ripping of a fuselage or wing section, or whether one is concerned with the failure initiation near a thickness change at stringers or other reinforcement. Thus the topic that has been under consideration has wide application in any real structure and is considered an essential contribution to the predictive failure analysis capability for aircraft containing composite components. The heterogeneity and the anisotropy of composites are not only advantageous but essential characteristics, yet these same features provide complex stress fields, especially in the presence of geometrical discontinuities such as notches, holes or cutouts or structural elements such as stiffeners, stringers, etc. To properly address the interaction between a damage/crack front and a hole with a stringer it is imperative that the stress and deformation fields of the former be (sufficiently well) characterized

  20. Product design and material optimization make large pultrusions perform for Stoughton Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.; Sjostedt, R.

    1996-11-01

    A box, is a box, is a box--until you look at the family of pultruded composite boxes designed and built by Stoughton Composites, Inc., (SCI), of Brodhead, Wisconsin and used for intermodal shipping purposes. The movers and shakers of the pultrusion industry have always believed that their process had the potential to move composite materials into large structural applications. At Stoughton Composites, FEA designed composite profile and industrial adhesives are defining the role of pultrusions in domestic and international shipping containers and trailers up to 53 feet long. With significant opportunity looming in large infrastructure applications, the pultrusion industry can gain significantly from SCI`s learning curve in design, materials application, pultrusion processing and assembly technologies. Stoughton proved that not only can pultrusions be designed to successfully meet market needs in this industry, but it can also do so economically and competitively. Having pultruded 6,000,000 pounds of composites in its first year as a start-up company, Stoughton has put the container and pultrusion markets on notice.

  1. Large scale structure of the sun's corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Mukul R.

    Results concerning the large-scale structure of the solar corona obtained by observations at meter-decameter wavelengths are reviewed. Coronal holes observed on the disk at multiple frequencies show the radial and azimuthal geometry of the hole. At the base of the hole there is good correspondence to the chromospheric signature in He I 10,830 A, but at greater heights the hole may show departures from symmetry. Two-dimensional imaging of weak-type III bursts simultaneously with the HAO SMM coronagraph/polarimeter measurements indicate that these bursts occur along elongated features emanating from the quiet sun, corresponding in position angle to the bright coronal streamers. It is shown that the densest regions of streamers and the regions of maximum intensity of type II bursts coincide closely. Non-flare-associated type II/type IV bursts associated with coronal streamer disruption events are studied along with correlated type II burst emissions originating from distant centers on the sun.

  2. Advanced Technology Composite Fuselage-Structural Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, T. H.; Minguet, P. J.; Flynn, B. W.; Carbery, D. J.; Swanson, G. D.; Ilcewicz, L. B.

    1997-01-01

    Boeing is studying the technologies associated with the application of composite materials to commercial transport fuselage structure under the NASA-sponsored contracts for Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures (ATCAS) and Materials Development Omnibus Contract (MDOC). This report addresses the program activities related to structural performance of the selected concepts, including both the design development and subsequent detailed evaluation. Design criteria were developed to ensure compliance with regulatory requirements and typical company objectives. Accurate analysis methods were selected and/or developed where practical, and conservative approaches were used where significant approximations were necessary. Design sizing activities supported subsequent development by providing representative design configurations for structural evaluation and by identifying the critical performance issues. Significant program efforts were directed towards assessing structural performance predictive capability. The structural database collected to perform this assessment was intimately linked to the manufacturing scale-up activities to ensure inclusion of manufacturing-induced performance traits. Mechanical tests were conducted to support the development and critical evaluation of analysis methods addressing internal loads, stability, ultimate strength, attachment and splice strength, and damage tolerance. Unresolved aspects of these performance issues were identified as part of the assessments, providing direction for future development.

  3. Crashworthiness simulation of composite automotive structures

    SciTech Connect

    Botkin, M E; Johnson, N L; Simunovic, S; Zywicz, E

    1998-06-01

    In 1990 the Automotive Composites Consortium (ACC) began the investigation of crash worthiness simulation methods for composite materials. A contract was given to Livermore Software Technology Corporation (LSTC) to implement a new damage model in LS-DYNA3DTM specifically for composite structures. This model is in LS-DYNA3DTM and is in use by the ACC partners. In 1994 USCAR, a partnership of American auto companies, entered into a partnership called SCAAP (Super Computing Automotive Applications Partnership) for the express purpose of working with the National Labs on computational oriented research. A CRADA (Cooperative Research and Development Agreement) was signed with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory to work in three distinctly different technical areas, one of which was composites material modeling for crash worthiness. Each Laboratory was assigned a specific modeling task. The ACC was responsible for the technical direction of the composites project and provided all test data for code verification. All new models were to be implemented in DYNA3D and periodically distributed to all partners for testing. Several new models have been developed and implemented. Excellent agreement has been shown between tube crush simulation and experiments.

  4. Acoustic emissions (AE) monitoring of large-scale composite bridge components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazquez, E.; Klein, D. J.; Robinson, M. J.; Kosmatka, J. B.

    2008-03-01

    Acoustic Emissions (AE) has been successfully used with composite structures to both locate and give a measure of damage accumulation. The current experimental study uses AE to monitor large-scale composite modular bridge components. The components consist of a carbon/epoxy beam structure as well as a composite to metallic bonded/bolted joint. The bonded joints consist of double lap aluminum splice plates bonded and bolted to carbon/epoxy laminates representing the tension rail of a beam. The AE system is used to monitor the bridge component during failure loading to assess the failure progression and using time of arrival to give insight into the origins of the failures. Also, a feature in the AE data called Cumulative Acoustic Emission counts (CAE) is used to give an estimate of the severity and rate of damage accumulation. For the bolted/bonded joints, the AE data is used to interpret the source and location of damage that induced failure in the joint. These results are used to investigate the use of bolts in conjunction with the bonded joint. A description of each of the components (beam and joint) is given with AE results. A summary of lessons learned for AE testing of large composite structures as well as insight into failure progression and location is presented.

  5. Clay Mineral Crystal Structure Tied to Composition

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-13

    This diagram illustrates how the dimensions of clay minerals' crystal structure are affected by which ions are present in the composition of the mineral. Different clay minerals were identified this way at two sites in Mars' Gale Crater: "Murray Buttes" and "Yellowknife Bay." In otherwise identical clay minerals, a composition that includes aluminum and ferric iron ions (red dots) results in slightly smaller crystalline unit cells than one that instead includes magnesium and ferrous iron ions (green dots). Ferric iron is more highly oxidized than ferrous iron. Crystalline cell units are the basic repeating building blocks that define minerals. X-ray diffraction analysis, a capability of the Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instrument on NASA's Curiosity Mars rover, identifies minerals from their crystalline structure. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21148

  6. Computational Simulation of Composite Structural Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon

    2004-01-01

    Progressive damage and fracture of composite structures subjected to monotonically increasing static, tension-tension cyclic, pressurization, and flexural cyclic loading are evaluated via computational simulation. Constituent material properties, stress and strain limits are scaled up to the structure level to evaluate the overall damage and fracture propagation for composites. Damage initiation, growth, accumulation, and propagation to fracture due to monotonically increasing static and cyclic loads are included in the simulations. Results show the number of cycles to failure at different temperatures and the damage progression sequence during different degradation stages. A procedure is outlined for use of computational simulation data in the assessment of damage tolerance, determination of sensitive parameters affecting fracture, and interpretation of results with insight for design decisions.

  7. Out of plane analysis for composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, P. C.; Saff, C. R.; Sanger, Kenneth B.; Mahler, M. A.; Kan, Han Pin; Kautz, Edward F.

    1990-01-01

    Simple two dimensional analysis techniques were developed to aid in the design of strong joints for integrally stiffened/bonded composite structures subjected to out of plane loads. It was found that most out of plane failures were due to induced stresses arising from rapid changes in load path direction or geometry, induced stresses due to changes in geometry caused by buckling, or direct stresses produced by fuel pressure or bearing loads. While the analysis techniques were developed to address a great variety of out of plane loading conditions, they were primarily derived to address the conditions described above. The methods were developed and verified using existing element test data. The methods were demonstrated using the data from a test failure of a high strain wingbox that was designed, built, and tested under a previous program. Subsequently, a set of design guidelines were assembled to assist in the design of safe, strong integral composite structures using the analysis techniques developed.

  8. Computational Simulation of Composite Structural Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon; Chamis, Christos C. (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    Progressive damage and fracture of composite structures subjected to monotonically increasing static, tension-tension cyclic, pressurization, and flexural cyclic loading are evaluated via computational simulation. Constituent material properties, stress and strain limits are scaled up to the structure level to evaluate the overall damage and fracture propagation for composites. Damage initiation, growth, accumulation, and propagation to fracture due to monotonically increasing static and cyclic loads are included in the simulations. Results show the number of cycles to failure at different temperatures and the damage progression sequence during different degradation stages. A procedure is outlined for use of computational simulation data in the assessment of damage tolerance, determination of sensitive parameters affecting fracture, and interpretation of results with insight for design decisions.

  9. Low-Cost Composite Materials and Structures for Aircraft Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deo, Ravi B.; Starnes, James H., Jr.; Holzwarth, Richard C.

    2003-01-01

    A survey of current applications of composite materials and structures in military, transport and General Aviation aircraft is presented to assess the maturity of composites technology, and the payoffs realized. The results of the survey show that performance requirements and the potential to reduce life cycle costs for military aircraft and direct operating costs for transport aircraft are the main reasons for the selection of composite materials for current aircraft applications. Initial acquisition costs of composite airframe components are affected by high material costs and complex certification tests which appear to discourage the widespread use of composite materials for aircraft applications. Material suppliers have performed very well to date in developing resin matrix and fiber systems for improved mechanical, durability and damage tolerance performance. The next challenge for material suppliers is to reduce material costs and to develop materials that are suitable for simplified and inexpensive manufacturing processes. The focus of airframe manufacturers should be on the development of structural designs that reduce assembly costs by the use of large-scale integration of airframe components with unitized structures and manufacturing processes that minimize excessive manual labor.

  10. Low-Cost Composite Materials and Structures for Aircraft Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deo, Ravi B.; Starnes, James H., Jr.; Holzwarth, Richard C.

    2003-01-01

    A survey of current applications of composite materials and structures in military, transport and General Aviation aircraft is presented to assess the maturity of composites technology, and the payoffs realized. The results of the survey show that performance requirements and the potential to reduce life cycle costs for military aircraft and direct operating costs for transport aircraft are the main reasons for the selection of composite materials for current aircraft applications. Initial acquisition costs of composite airframe components are affected by high material costs and complex certification tests which appear to discourage the widespread use of composite materials for aircraft applications. Material suppliers have performed very well to date in developing resin matrix and fiber systems for improved mechanical, durability and damage tolerance performance. The next challenge for material suppliers is to reduce material costs and to develop materials that are suitable for simplified and inexpensive manufacturing processes. The focus of airframe manufacturers should be on the development of structural designs that reduce assembly costs by the use of large-scale integration of airframe components with unitized structures and manufacturing processes that minimize excessive manual labor.

  11. Application of the self-diagnosis composite into concrete structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubara, Hideaki; Shin, Soon-Gi; Okuhara, Yoshiki; Nomura, Hiroshi; Yanagida, Hiroaki

    2001-04-01

    The function and performance of the self-diagnosis composites embedded in mortar/concrete blocks and concrete piles were investigated by bending tests and electrical resistance measurements. Carbon powder (CP) and carbon fiber (CF) were introduced in glass fiber reinforced plastics composites to obtain electrical conductivity. The CP composite has commonly good performances in various bending tests of block and pile specimens, comparing to the CF composite. The electrical resistance of the CP composite increases in a small strain to response remarkably micro-crack formation at about 200 (mu) strain and to detect well to smaller deformations before the crack formation. The CP composite possesses a continuous resistance change up to a large strain level near the final fracture of concrete structures reinforced by steel bars. The cyclic bending tests showed that the micro crack closed at unloading state was able to be evaluated from the measurement of residual resistance. It has been concluded that the self- diagnosis composite is fairly useful for the measurement of damage and fracture in concrete blocks and piles.

  12. Variable Complexity Optimization of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, Raphael T.

    1999-01-01

    The use of several levels of modeling in design has been dubbed variable complexity modeling. The work under the grant focused on developing variable complexity modeling strategies with emphasis on response surface techniques. Applications included design of plates with discontinuities subject to uncertainty in material properties and geometry, design of stiffened composite plates for improved damage tolerance, and the use of response surfaces for fitting weights obtained by structural optimization.

  13. Bioinspired twisted composites based on Bouligand structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, F.; Iervolino, O.; Scarselli, G.; Ginzburg, D.; Meo, M.

    2016-04-01

    The coupling between structural support and protection makes biological systems an important source of inspiration for the development of advanced smart composite structures. In particular, some particular material configurations can be implemented into traditional composites in order to improve their impact resistance and the out-of-plane properties, which represents one of the major weakness of commercial carbon fibres reinforced polymers (CFRP) structures. Based on this premise, a three-dimensional twisted arrangement shown in a vast multitude of biological systems (such as the armoured cuticles of Scarabei, the scales of Arapaima Gigas and the smashing club of Odontodactylus Scyllarus) has been replicated to develop an improved structural material characterised by a high level of in-plane isotropy and a higher interfacial strength generated by the smooth stiffness transition between each layer of fibrils. Indeed, due to their intrinsic layered nature, interlaminar stresses are one of the major causes of failure of traditional CFRP and are generated by the mismatch of the elastic properties between plies in a traditional laminate. Since the energy required to open a crack or a delamination between two adjacent plies is due to the difference between their orientations, the gradual angle variation obtained by mimicking the Bouligand Structures could improve energy absorption and the residual properties of carbon laminates when they are subjected to low velocity impact event. Two different bioinspired laminates were manufactured following a double helicoidal approach and a rotational one and were subjected to a complete test campaign including low velocity impact loading and compared to a traditional quasi-isotropic panel. Fractography analysis via X-Ray tomography was used to understand the mechanical behaviour of the different laminates and the residual properties were evaluated via Compression After Impact (CAI) tests. Results confirmed that the biological

  14. Structures-propulsion interactions and requirements. [large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyner, J. V.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of low-thrust primary propulsion system characteristics on the mass, area, and orbit transfer characteristics of large space systems (LSS) were determined. Three general structural classes of LSS were considered, each with a broad range of diameters and nonstructural surface densities. While transferring the deployed structure from LEO and to GEO, an acceleration range of 0.02 to 0.1 g's was found to maximize deliverable payload based on structural mass impact. After propulsion system parametric analyses considering four propellant combinations produced values for available payload mass, length and volume, a thrust level range which maximizes deliverable LSS diameter was determined corresponding to a structure and propulsion vehicle. The engine start and/or shutdown thrust transients on the last orbit transfer (apogee) burn can impose transient loads which would be greater than the steady-state loads at the burnout acceleration. The effect of the engine thrust transients on the LSS was determined from the dynamic models upon which various engine ramps were imposed.

  15. Structures-propulsion interactions and requirements. [large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyner, J. V.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of low-thrust primary propulsion system characteristics on the mass, area, and orbit transfer characteristics of large space systems (LSS) were determined. Three general structural classes of LSS were considered, each with a broad range of diameters and nonstructural surface densities. While transferring the deployed structure from LEO and to GEO, an acceleration range of 0.02 to 0.1 g's was found to maximize deliverable payload based on structural mass impact. After propulsion system parametric analyses considering four propellant combinations produced values for available payload mass, length and volume, a thrust level range which maximizes deliverable LSS diameter was determined corresponding to a structure and propulsion vehicle. The engine start and/or shutdown thrust transients on the last orbit transfer (apogee) burn can impose transient loads which would be greater than the steady-state loads at the burnout acceleration. The effect of the engine thrust transients on the LSS was determined from the dynamic models upon which various engine ramps were imposed.

  16. Structural dynamic analysis of composite beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, J. K.; Venkatesan, C.; Ramamurti, V.

    1990-12-01

    In the treatment of the structural dynamic problem of composite materials, two alternate types of formulations, based on the elastic modulus and compliance quantities, exist in the literature. The definitions of the various rigidities are observed to differ in these two approaches. Following these two types of formulation, the structural dynamic characteristics of a composite beam are analyzed. The results of the analysis are compared with those available in the literature. Based on the comparison, the influence of the warping function in defining the coupling terms in the modulus approach and also on the natural frequencies of the beam has been identified. It is found from the analysis that, in certain cases, the difference between the results of the two approaches is appreciable. These differences may be attributed to the constraints imposed on the deformation and flexibility of the beam by the choice of the description of the warping behaviour. Finally, the influence of material properties on the structural dynamic characteristics of the beam is studied for different composites for various angles of orthotropy.

  17. Development of thermoplastic composite aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renieri, Michael P.; Burpo, Steven J.; Roundy, Lance M.; Todd, Stephanie A.; Kim, H. J.

    1992-01-01

    Efforts focused on the use of thermoplastic composite materials in the development of structural details associated with an advanced fighter fuselage section with applicability to transport design. In support of these designs, mechanics developments were conducted in two areas. First, a dissipative strain energy approach to material characterization and failure prediction, developed at the Naval Research Laboratory, was evaluated as a design/analysis tool. Second, a finite element formulation for thick composites was developed and incorporated into a lug analysis method which incorporates pin bending effects. Manufacturing concepts were developed for an upper fuel cell cover. A detailed trade study produced two promising concepts: fiber placement and single-step diaphragm forming. Based on the innovative design/manufacturing concepts for the fuselage section primary structure, elements were designed, fabricated, and structurally tested. These elements focused on key issues such as thick composite lugs and low cost forming of fastenerless, stiffener/moldine concepts. Manufacturing techniques included autoclave consolidation, single diaphragm consolidation (SDCC) and roll-forming.

  18. Self-healing composite sandwich structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, H. R.; Trask, R. S.; Bond, I. P.

    2007-08-01

    Impact damage can degrade the flexural strength of composite sandwich structures by over 50% due to a loss of skin support inducing localized skin buckling. Various self-healing methodologies have been applied to laminated composites but the concept of delivering a healing agent from a remote reservoir to a region of damage via a vascular network offers the potential for a robust and replenishable system housed in the core of a sandwich structure. In this pilot study a vascular sandwich structure that appears as a conventional sandwich composite has been developed and tested. The network has been shown to have negligible influence on the innate static mechanical properties of the host panel. Infiltration of the vascular network with a pre-mixed epoxy resin system after impact damage demonstrated a complete recovery of flexural failure mode and load. Infiltration with the same resin system from separate unmixed networks, where self-healing is initiated autonomously via mixing within the damage, has also been shown to fully recover undamaged failure load when both networks are successfully breached.

  19. Health Monitoring of Composite Material Structures using a Vibrometry Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulz, Mark J.

    1997-01-01

    Large composite material structures such as aircraft and Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLVS) operate in severe environments comprised of vehicle dynamic loads, aerodynamic loads, engine vibration, foreign object impact, lightning strikes, corrosion, and moisture absorption. These structures are susceptible to damage such as delamination, fiber breaking/pullout, matrix cracking, and hygrothermal strain. To ensure human safety and load-bearing integrity, these structures must be inspected to detect and locate often invisible damage and faults before becoming catastrophic. Moreover, nearly all future structures will need some type of in-service inspection technique to increase their useful life and reduce maintenance and overall costs. Possible techniques for monitoring the health and indicating damage on composite structures include: c-scan, thermography, acoustic emissions using piezoceramic actuators or fiber-optic wires with gratings, laser ultrasound, shearography, holography, x-ray, and others. These techniques have limitations in detecting damage that is beneath the surface of the structure, far away from a sensor location, or during operation of the vehicle. The objective of this project is to develop a more global method for damage detection that is based on structural dynamics principles, and can inspect for damage when the structure is subjected to vibratory loads to expose faults that may not be evident by static inspection. A Transmittance Function Monitoring (TFM) method is being developed in this project for ground-based inspection and operational health monitoring of large composite structures as a RLV. A comparison of the features of existing health monitoring approaches and the proposed TFM method is given.

  20. Global Failure Modes in High Temperature Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knauss, W. G.

    1998-01-01

    Composite materials have been considered for many years as the major advance in the construction of energy efficient aerospace structures. Notable advances have been made in understanding the special design considerations that set composites apart from the usual "isotropic" engineering materials such as the metals. As a result, a number of significant engineering designs have been accomplished. However, one shortcoming of the currently favored composites is their relatively unforgiving behavior with respect to failure (brittleness) under seemingly mild impact conditions and large efforts are underway to rectify that situation, much along the lines of introducing thermoplastic matrix materials. Because of their relatively more pronounced (thermo) viscoelastic behavior these materials respond with "toughness" in fracture situations. From the point of view of applications requiring material strength, this property is highly desirable. This feature impacts several important and distinct engineering problems which have been' considered under this grant and cover the 1) effect of impact damage on structural (buckling) stability of composite panels, the 2) effect of time dependence on the progression of buckling instabilities, and the 3) evolution of damage and fracture at generic thickness discontinuities in structures. The latter topic has serious implications for structural stability problems (buckling failure in reinforced shell structures) as well as failure progression in stringer-reinforced shell structures. This grant has dealt with these issues. Polymer "toughness" is usually associated with uncrosslinked or thermo-plastic polymers. But, by comparison with their thermoset counterparts they tend to exhibit more pronounced time dependent material behavior; also, that time dependence can occur at lower temperatures which places restriction in the high temperature use of these "newer and tougher" materials that are not quite so serious with the thermoset matrix

  1. Increasing thermomagnetic stability of composite superconductors with additives of extremely-large-heat-capacity substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keilin, V. E.; Kovalev, I. A.; Kruglov, S. L.; Lupanov, D. É.; Shcherbakov, V. I.

    2008-05-01

    We have studied the thermomagnetic stability (with respect to magnetic flux disturbances) of composite superconductors screened by additives of rare earth compounds possessing extremely high heat capacity at low temperatures. Three tubular composite structures have been manufactured and studied with respect to screening of the central region from variations of an external magnetic field. The effect of large-heat-capacity substances (LHCSs) was evaluated by measuring a jump in the magnetic flux in response to the rate of variation (ramp) of the external magnetic field. It is established that the adiabatic criterion of stability (magnetic-flux jump field) in the sample structures containing LHCSs significantly increases—by 20% for HoCu2 intermetallic compound and 31% for Gd2O2S ceramics—as compared to the control structure free of such additives.

  2. Advanced composite combustor structural concepts program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sattar, M. A.; Lohmann, R. P.

    1984-01-01

    An analytical study was conducted to assess the feasibility of and benefits derived from the use of high temperature composite materials in aircraft turbine engine combustor liners. The study included a survey and screening of the properties of three candidate composite materials including tungsten reinforced superalloys, carbon-carbon and silicon carbide (SiC) fibers reinforcing a ceramic matrix of lithium aluminosilicate (LAS). The SiC-LAS material was selected as offering the greatest near term potential primarily on the basis of high temperature capability. A limited experimental investigation was conducted to quantify some of the more critical mechanical properties of the SiC-LAS composite having a multidirection 0/45/-45/90 deg fiber orientation favored for the combustor linear application. Rigorous cyclic thermal tests demonstrated that SiC-LAS was extremely resistant to the thermal fatigue mechanisms that usually limit the life of metallic combustor liners. A thermal design study led to the definition of a composite liner concept that incorporated film cooled SiC-LAS shingles mounted on a Hastelloy X shell. With coolant fluxes consistent with the most advanced metallic liner technology, the calculated hot surface temperatures of the shingles were within the apparent near term capability of the material. Structural analyses indicated that the stresses in the composite panels were low, primarily because of the low coefficient of expansion of the material and it was concluded that the dominant failure mode of the liner would be an as yet unidentified deterioration of the composite from prolonged exposure to high temperature. An economic study, based on a medium thrust size commercial aircraft engine, indicated that the SiC-LAS combustor liner would weigh 22.8N (11.27 lb) less and cost less to manufacture than advanced metallic liner concepts intended for use in the late 1980's.

  3. Material and Geometric Analysis of Structures Subjected to Large Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferranto, Justin

    The two major focuses of this dissertation are: (1) Studying the structural behaviors of hyper-elastic membranes subjected to extremely large deformation. These membranes are used in a reconfigurable tooling system (RTS) which was under development during the course of this study. (2) Establishing a continuum constitutive model for fabric materials under in-plane large deformation through theoretical and numerical analyses. This model may also be applied to study a class of materials which involve significant internal structure reconfiguration during deformation. The RTS allows quick onsite fabrication of high temperature composite parts. RTS applications include rapid onsite repair of aircraft components. The RTS uses a hyperelastic membrane as an interface between the state-change material and model. This membrane may be subjected to 800% engineering strain during operation. In this part of the study, material properties of the membranes have been characterized through three tests: simple tension, equal biaxial tension and planar tension. Nine-term Money-Rivlin constants are obtained through data regression. Finite element simulations have been conducted to simulate the deformed shapes of a membrane around several representative geometries under various vacuum pressure and constraint conditions. Experimental results have been compared with predictions from finite element simulations. This study contributes to understanding the behavior of membrane structures under large deformations in general; the results are used to generate design guidelines for RTS applicability. Fabric materials are widely used in industry for numerous applications. They exhibit a meso-scale complexity and involve significant internal structure reconfiguration during large deformation, which prohibits the direct application of the theory of continuum mechanics when studying these materials. In the second part of this work, a unique meso-scale FEA model, utilizing new modeling techniques and

  4. Thick-walled carbon composite multifunctional structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haake, John M.; Jacobs, Jack H.; McIlroy, Bruce E.

    1997-06-01

    Satellite programs are moving in the direction of smaller and lighter structures. Technological advances have permitted more sophisticated equipment to be consolidated into compact spaces. Micro-satellites, between 10 and 100 kg, will incorporate micro-electric devices into the lay-up of the satellite structure. These structures will be designed to carry load, provide thermal control, enhance damping, and include integrated passive electronics. These multifunctional structures offer lighter weight, reduced volume, and a 'smarter' overall package for incorporation of sensors, electronics, fiber optics, powered appendages or active components. McDonnell Douglas Corporation (MDC) has applied technology from the synthesis and processing of intelligent cost effective structures (SPICES) and independent research and development (IRAD) programs to the modular instrument support system (MISS) for multifunctional space structures and micro-satellites. The SPICES program was funded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to develop affordable manufacturing processes for smart materials to be used in vibration control, and the MISS program was funded by NASA-Langley. The MISS program was conceived to develop concepts and techniques to make connections between different multifunctional structures. MDA fabricated a trapezoidal carbon composite structure out of IM7/977-3 tape prepreg. Flex circuits, thermal and optical conduits were embedded to realize a utility modular connector. These provide electrical, thermal, optical and mechanical connections between micro- satellite components. A quick disconnect mount was also developed to accommodate a variety of devices such as solar arrays, power sources, thermal transfer and vibration control modules.

  5. Open-Lattice Composite Design Strengthens Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Advanced composite materials and designs could eventually be applied as the framework for spacecraft or extraterrestrial constructions for long-term space habitation. One such structure in which NASA has made an investment is the IsoTruss grid structure, an extension of a two-dimensional "isogrid" concept originally developed at McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company, under contract to NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in the early 1970s. IsoTruss is a lightweight and efficient alternative to monocoque composite structures, and can be produced in a manner that involves fairly simple techniques. The technology was developed with support from NASA to explore space applications, and is garnering global attention because it is extremely lightweight; as much as 12 times stronger than steel; inexpensive to manufacture, transport, and install; low-maintenance; and is fully recyclable. IsoTruss is expected to see application as utility poles and meteorological towers, for the aforementioned reasons and because its design offers superior wind resistance and is less susceptible to breaking and woodpeckers. Other applications, such as reinforcement for concrete structures, stand-alone towers, sign supports, prostheses, irrigation equipment, and sporting goods are being explored

  6. Excitation of a composite structure by collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, N.D. Jr.

    1984-08-01

    A simple model is employed to study the excitation of a composite structure by collisions. The composite structure is a diatomic ''molecule'' composed of two equal point masses joined by a Hooke's law spring of constant, k/sub 1/. This structure, in an unexcited state, makes a one-dimensional head-on collision with a fixed wall. The interaction with the wall is mediated by a second Hooke's law spring of constant, k/sub 2/. After rebounding from the wall the diatom may be in an excited state. The excitation energy is calculated as a function of the hardness of the wall. An eigenvalue problem is solved which yields an infinite number of ..beta..'s (..beta.. = k/sub 1//k/sub 2/) which leave the diatom unexcited. The phenomenon of ''double hitting'' : when a soft structure strikes a hard wall: is discussed. The maximum energy transfer into the internal mode is 23%. An air-track experiment is suggested to check the theoretical predictions.

  7. Cooled Ceramic Matrix Composite Propulsion Structures Demonstrated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaskowiak, Martha H.; Dickens, Kevin W.

    2005-01-01

    NASA's Next Generation Launch Technology (NGLT) Program has successfully demonstrated cooled ceramic matrix composite (CMC) technology in a scramjet engine test. This demonstration represented the world s largest cooled nonmetallic matrix composite panel fabricated for a scramjet engine and the first cooled nonmetallic composite to be tested in a scramjet facility. Lightweight, high-temperature, actively cooled structures have been identified as a key technology for enabling reliable and low-cost space access. Tradeoff studies have shown this to be the case for a variety of launch platforms, including rockets and hypersonic cruise vehicles. Actively cooled carbon and CMC structures may meet high-performance goals at significantly lower weight, while improving safety by operating with a higher margin between the design temperature and material upper-use temperature. Studies have shown that using actively cooled CMCs can reduce the weight of the cooled flow-path component from 4.5 to 1.6 lb/sq ft and the weight of the propulsion system s cooled surface area by more than 50 percent. This weight savings enables advanced concepts, increased payload, and increased range. The ability of the cooled CMC flow-path components to operate over 1000 F hotter than the state-of-the-art metallic concept adds system design flexibility to space-access vehicle concepts. Other potential system-level benefits include smaller fuel pumps, lower part count, lower cost, and increased operating margin.

  8. Foil support structure for large electron guns

    SciTech Connect

    Brucker, J.P.; Rose, E.A.

    1993-08-01

    This paper describes a novel support structure for a vacuum diode used to pump a gaseous laser with an electron beam. Conventional support structures are designed to hold a foil flat and rigid. This new structure takes advantage of the significantly greater strength of metals in pure tension, utilizing curved shapes for both foil and support structure. The shape of the foil is comparable to the skin of a balloon, and the shape of the support structures is comparable to the cables of a suspension bridge. This design allows a significant reduction in foil thickness and support structure mass, resulting in a lower electron-beam loss between diode and laser gas. In addition, the foil is pre-formed in the support structure at pressures higher than operating pressure. Therefore, the foil is operated far from the yield point. Increased reliability is anticipated.

  9. High temperature seal for large structural movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor); Dunlap, Jr., Patrick H. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A high temperature sealing system is operative to seal an interface between adjacent hot structures and to minimize parasitic flow between such structures that move relative to one another in-plane or out-of-plane. The sealing system may be used to seal thrust-directing ramp structures of a reusable launch vehicle and includes a channel and a plurality of movable segmented sealing elements. Adjacent ramp structures include edge walls which extend within the channel. The sealing elements are positioned along the sides of the channel and are biased to engage with the inner surfaces of the ramp structures. The segmented sealing elements are movable to correspond to the contour of the thrust-directing ramp structures. The sealing system is operative to prevent high temperature thrust gases that flow along the ramp structures from infiltrating into the interior of the vehicle.

  10. Interfacial chemistry and structure in ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.H.; Saenz, N.T.; Schilling, C.H.

    1990-09-01

    The interfacial chemistry and structure of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) play a major role in the properties of these materials. Fiber-matrix interfaces chemistries are vitally important in the fracture strength, fracture toughness, and fracture resistance of ceramic composites because they influence fiber loading and fiber pullout. Elevated-temperature properties are also linked to the interfacial characteristics through the chemical stability of the interface in corrosive environments and the creep/pullout behavior of the interface. Physical properties such as electrical and thermal conductivity are also dependent on the interface. Fiber-matrix interfaces containing a 1-{mu}m-thick multilayered interface with amorphous and graphitic C to a 1-nm-thick SiO{sub 2} layer can result from sintering operations for some composite systems. Fibers coated with C, BN, C/BC/BN, and Si are also used to produce controlled interface chemistries and structures. Growth interfaces within the matrix resulting from processing of CMCs can also be crucial to the behavior of these materials. Evaluation of the interfacial chemistry and structure of CMCs requires the use of a variety of analytical tools, including optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive x-ray analysis. A review of the interfacial chemistry and structure of SiC whisker- and fiber-reinforced Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and SiC/SiC materials is presented. Where possible, correlations with fracture properties and high-temperature stability are made. 94 refs., 10 figs.

  11. Wood-based composite materials : panel products, glued-laminated timber, structural composite lumber, and wood-nonwood composite materials

    Treesearch

    Nicole M. Stark; Zhiyong Cai; Charles Carll

    2010-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview of the general types and composition of wood-based composite products and the materials and processes used to manufacture them. It describes conventional wood-based composite panels and structural composite materials intended for general construction, interior use, or both. This chapter also describes wood–nonwood composites. Mechanical...

  12. Activation and micropore structure of carbon-fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kimber, G.

    1997-12-01

    Rigid, high surface area activated carbon fiber composites have been produced with high permeabilities for environmental applications in gas and water purification. The project involves a collaboration between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), University of Kentucky. The main focus of recent work has been to find a satisfactory means to uniformly activate large samples of carbon fiber composites to produce controlled pore structures. Processes have been developed using activation in steam and CO{sub 2}, and a less conventional method involving oxygen chemisorption and subsequent heat treatment. Another objective has been to explore applications for the activated composites in environmental applications related to fossil energy production.

  13. Assembly induced delaminations in composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goering, J.; Bohlmann, R.; Wanthal, S.; Kautz, E.; Neri, Lawrence M.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental and analytical studies of the development of delaminations around fastener holes in composite structures are presented. This type of delamination is known to occur in composite skins that are mechanically fastened to a poorly mating substructure. Results of an experimental study to determine the resistance of laminates to the initiation of assembly induced delaminations and the residual strength of assembly damaged coupons are presented for AS4/3501-6, IM7/8551-7A, and AS4/PEEK material systems. A survey of existing analytical models for predicting the residual strength and stability of delaminations is presented, and the development of a new model for predicting the initiation of delaminations around a fastener hole is outlined. The fastener hole damage initiation model utilizes a finite element based Fourier series solution, and is validated through comparisons of analytical and experimental results.

  14. Noise transmission properties and control strategies for composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silcox, Richard J.; Beyer, Todd B.; Lester, Harold C.

    1991-01-01

    A study of several component technologies required to apply active control techniques to reduce interior noise in composite aircraft structures is described. The mechanisms of noise transmission in an all composite, large-scale, fuselage model are studied in an experimental program and found similar to mechanisms found in conventional aircraft construction. Two primary conditions of structural acoustic response are found to account for the dominant interior acoustic response. A preliminary study of active noise control in cylinders used piezoceramic actuators as force inputs for a simple aluminum fuselage model. These actuators provided effective control for the same two conditions of noise transmission found in the composite fuselage structure. The use of piezoceramic actuators to apply force inputs overcomes the weight and structural requirements of conventional shaker actuators. Finally, in order to accurately simulate these types of actuators in a cylindrical shell, two analytical models are investigated that apply either in-plane forces or bending moments along the boundaries of a finite patch. It is shown that the bending model may not be as effective as the force model for exciting the low order azimuthal modes that typically dominate the structural acoustic response in these systems. This result will affect the arrangement and distribution of actuators required for effective active control systems.

  15. Composition and structure of calcium aluminosilicate microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharonova, O. M.; Oreshkina, N. A.; Zhizhaev, A. M.

    2017-06-01

    The composition was studied of calcium aluminosilicate microspheres of three morphological types in high-calcium fly ash from combustion of brown coal from the Kansk-Achinsk basin in slag-tap boilers at temperatures from 1400 to 1500°C and sampled in the first field of electrostatic precipitators at the Krasnoyarsk Cogeneration Power Station no. 2 (TETs-2). Gross compositions and the composition of local areas were determined using a scanning electron microscopy technique and an energy-dispersive analysis with full mapping of globules. With a high content of basic oxides O ox (68 to 79 wt %) and a low content of acid oxides K ox (21 to 31 wt %), type 1 microspheres are formed. They consist of heterogeneous areas having a porous structure and crystalline components in which the content of CaO, SiO2, or Al2O3 differs by two to three times and the content of MgO differs by seven times. With a lower content of O ox (55 to 63 wt %) and an elevated content of K ox (37 to 45 wt %), type 2 microspheres are formed. They are more homogeneous in the composition and structure and consist of similar crystalline components. Having a close content of O ox (46 to 53 wt %) and K ox (47 to 54 wt %), type 3 microspheres, which are a dense matter consisting of amorphous substance with submicron- and nanostructure of crystalline components, are formed. The basic precursor in formation of high-calcium aluminosilicate microspheres is calcium from the organomineral matter of coals with various contribution of Mg, Fe, S, or Na from the coal organic matter and Al, Fe, S, or Si in the form of single mineral inclusions in a coal particle. On the basis of the available data, the effect was analyzed of the composition of a CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-FeO system on the melting and viscous properties of the matter in microspheres and formation of globules of different morphology. The results of this analysis will help to find a correlation with properties of microspheres in their use as functional

  16. A method for the probabilistic design assessment of composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiao, Michael C.; Singhal, Surendra N.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1994-01-01

    A formal procedure for the probabilistic design assessment of a composite structure is described. The uncertainties in all aspects of a composite structure (constituent material properties, fabrication variables, structural geometry, service environments, etc.), which result in the uncertain behavior in the composite structural responses, are included in the assessment. The probabilistic assessment consists of design criteria, modeling of composite structures and uncertainties, simulation methods, and the decision making process. A sample case is presented to illustrate the formal procedure and to demonstrate that composite structural designs can be probabilistically assessed with accuracy and efficiency.

  17. Self-healing sandwich composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fugon, D.; Chen, C.; Peters, K.

    2012-04-01

    Previous research demonstrated that a thin self-healing layer is effective in recovering partial sandwich composite performance after an impact event. Many studies have been conducted that show the possibility of using Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors to monitor the cure of a resin through strain and temperature monitoring. For this experiment, FBG sensors were used to monitor the curing process of a self-healing layer within a twelve-layer fiberglass laminate after impact. First, five self-healing sandwich composite specimens were manufactured. FBG sensors were embedded between the fiberglass and foam core. Then the fiberglass laminate was impacted with the use of a drop tower and the curing process was monitored. The collected data was used to compare the cure of the resin and fiberglass alone to the cure of the resin from a self-healing specimen. For the low viscosity resin system tested, these changes were not sufficiently large to identify different polymerization states in the resin as it cured. These results indicate that applying different resin systems might increase the efficiency of the self-healing in the sandwich composites.

  18. Structural integrity of engineering composite materials: a cracking good yarn.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Peter W R; Soutis, Costas

    2016-07-13

    Predicting precisely where a crack will develop in a material under stress and exactly when in time catastrophic fracture of the component will occur is one the oldest unsolved mysteries in the design and building of large-scale engineering structures. Where human life depends upon engineering ingenuity, the burden of testing to prove a 'fracture safe design' is immense. Fitness considerations for long-life implementation of large composite structures include understanding phenomena such as impact, fatigue, creep and stress corrosion cracking that affect reliability, life expectancy and durability of structure. Structural integrity analysis treats the design, the materials used, and figures out how best components and parts can be joined, and takes service duty into account. However, there are conflicting aims in the complete design process of designing simultaneously for high efficiency and safety assurance throughout an economically viable lifetime with an acceptable level of risk. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  19. Structural integrity of engineering composite materials: a cracking good yarn

    PubMed Central

    Beaumont, Peter W. R.

    2016-01-01

    Predicting precisely where a crack will develop in a material under stress and exactly when in time catastrophic fracture of the component will occur is one the oldest unsolved mysteries in the design and building of large-scale engineering structures. Where human life depends upon engineering ingenuity, the burden of testing to prove a ‘fracture safe design’ is immense. Fitness considerations for long-life implementation of large composite structures include understanding phenomena such as impact, fatigue, creep and stress corrosion cracking that affect reliability, life expectancy and durability of structure. Structural integrity analysis treats the design, the materials used, and figures out how best components and parts can be joined, and takes service duty into account. However, there are conflicting aims in the complete design process of designing simultaneously for high efficiency and safety assurance throughout an economically viable lifetime with an acceptable level of risk. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials’. PMID:27242293

  20. Line scanning thermography for rapid nondestructive inspection of large scale composites

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, S.; Ley, O.; Godinez, V.; Bandos, B.

    2011-06-23

    As next generation structures are utilizing larger amounts of composite materials, a rigorous and reliable method is needed to inspect these structures in order to prevent catastrophic failure and extend service life. Current inspection methods, such as ultrasonic, generally require extended down time and man hours as they are typically carried out via point-by-point measurements. A novel Line Scanning Thermography (LST) System has been developed for the non-contact, large-scale field inspection of composite structures with faster scanning times than conventional thermography systems. LST is a patented dynamic thermography technique where the heat source and thermal camera move in tandem, which allows the continuous scan of long surfaces without the loss of resolution. The current system can inspect an area of 10 in{sup 2} per 1 second, and has a resolution of 0.05x0.03 in{sup 2}. Advanced data gathering protocols have been implemented for near-real time damage visualization and post-analysis algorithms for damage interpretation. The system has been used to successfully detect defects (delamination, dry areas) in fiber-reinforced composite sandwich panels for Navy applications, as well as impact damage in composite missile cases and armor ceramic panels.

  1. Line Scanning Thermography for Rapid Nondestructive Inspection of Large Scale Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, S.; Ley, O.; Godinez, V.; Bandos, B.

    2011-06-01

    As next generation structures are utilizing larger amounts of composite materials, a rigorous and reliable method is needed to inspect these structures in order to prevent catastrophic failure and extend service life. Current inspection methods, such as ultrasonic, generally require extended down time and man hours as they are typically carried out via point-by-point measurements. A novel Line Scanning Thermography (LST) System has been developed for the non-contact, large-scale field inspection of composite structures with faster scanning times than conventional thermography systems. LST is a patented dynamic thermography technique where the heat source and thermal camera move in tandem, which allows the continuous scan of long surfaces without the loss of resolution. The current system can inspect an area of 10 in2 per 1 second, and has a resolution of 0.05×0.03 in2. Advanced data gathering protocols have been implemented for near-real time damage visualization and post-analysis algorithms for damage interpretation. The system has been used to successfully detect defects (delamination, dry areas) in fiber-reinforced composite sandwich panels for Navy applications, as well as impact damage in composite missile cases and armor ceramic panels.

  2. Health Monitoring of Composite Material Structures Using a Vibrometry Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulz, Mark J.

    1998-01-01

    Non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methods for quantifying and locating damage are essential for inspecting structures to ensure safety and reliability. Transmittance function monitoring is a potentially new NDE technique being tested as a tool to detect, quantify, and locate damage on flexible structures. The technique has a large spatial range that is practical for detecting damage on large composite material structures such as a reusable launch vehicle. The Transmittance Function (TF) theory is based on structural dynamics principles that define how vibration at one point in a structure is related to a force at another point. This relationship is called the Frequency Response Function (FRF). A Transmittance Function (TF) is derived as the ratio of FRFs, and can detect damage because the FRFs change due to damage. If one excitation is used for the testing, the force does not need to be measured to compute the TF. In the damage detection procedure, the structure is subjected to wide-band vibration and TFs are computed between different accelerometers to detect changes in the structure, presumably due to damage. In the first year of the project the TF method was tested on a bolted panel, a curved panel, and beams, all made of fiberglass. It was shown that damage could be detected using low frequency vibration, 250 to 1,250 Hz. The technique is sensitive to damage, but it requires storage of historical or pre-damage TFs for the healthy structure. This would become a large data storage requirement for large structures. Thus one objective for the second year of the project was to eliminate the need to store historical data. The second year report gives details of how storage of historical data was eliminated. Further results of testing panel structures are also given.

  3. Optimal design of a composite structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graesser, D. L.; Zabinsky, Z. B.; Tuttle, M. E.; Kim, G. I.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a design methodology for a laminated composite stiffened panel, subjected to multiple in-plane loads and bending moments. Design variables include the skin and stiffener ply orientation angles and stiffener geometry variables. Optimum designs are sought which minimize structural weight and satisfy mechanical performance requirements. Two types of mechanical performance requirements are placed on the panel, maximum strain and minimum strength. Minimum weight designs are presented which document that the choice of mechanical performance requirements cause changes in the optimum design. The effects of lay-up constraints which limit the ply angles to user specified values, such as symmetric or quasi-isotropic laminates, are also investigated.

  4. Composition, structure, and chemistry of interstellar dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Allamandola, L. J.

    1987-01-01

    Different dust components present in the interstellar medium (IM) such as amorphous carbon, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and those IM components which are organic refractory grains and icy grain mantles are discussed as well as their relative importance. The physical properties of grain surface chemistry are discussed with attention given to the surface structure of materials, the adsorption energy and residence time of species on a grain surface, and the sticking probability. Consideration is also given to the contribution of grains to the gas-phase composition of molecular clouds.

  5. Anisotropic fiber alignment in composite structures

    DOEpatents

    Graham, Alan L.; Mondy, Lisa A.; Guell, David C.

    1993-01-01

    High strength material composite structures are formed with oriented fibers to provide controlled anisotropic fibers. Fibers suspended in non-dilute concentrations (e.g., up to 20 volume percent for fibers having an aspect ratio of 20) in a selected medium are oriented by moving an axially spaced array of elements in the direction of desired fiber alignment. The array elements are generally perpendicular to the desired orientation. The suspension medium may also include sphere-like particles where the resulting material is a ceramic.

  6. Support structures for large infrared telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    An infrared telescope requires an accuracy of its reflecting surfaces of less than a micrometer. Future missions may require such accuracy from telescopes that are 20 meters or larger in diameter. The structure for supporting such a telescope will most probably take the form of a deep truss. Various approaches for constructing the primary mirror in space are illustrated. One that employs automated deployment of interconnected reflector-structure modules was described in detail. Estimates were made of the precision obtainable with properly configured truss structures and the required ability of active control systems for achieving the desired accuracy.

  7. Fabricating Composite-Material Structures Containing SMA Ribbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.; Cano, Roberto J.; Lach, Cynthia L.

    2003-01-01

    An improved method of designing and fabricating laminated composite-material (matrix/fiber) structures containing embedded shape-memory-alloy (SMA) actuators has been devised. Structures made by this method have repeatable, predictable properties, and fabrication processes can readily be automated. Such structures, denoted as shape-memory-alloy hybrid composite (SMAHC) structures, have been investigated for their potential to satisfy requirements to control the shapes or thermoelastic responses of themselves or of other structures into which they might be incorporated, or to control noise and vibrations. Much of the prior work on SMAHC structures has involved the use SMA wires embedded within matrices or within sleeves through parent structures. The disadvantages of using SMA wires as the embedded actuators include (1) complexity of fabrication procedures because of the relatively large numbers of actuators usually needed; (2) sensitivity to actuator/ matrix interface flaws because voids can be of significant size, relative to wires; (3) relatively high rates of breakage of actuators during curing of matrix materials because of sensitivity to stress concentrations at mechanical restraints; and (4) difficulty of achieving desirable overall volume fractions of SMA wires when trying to optimize the integration of the wires by placing them in selected layers only.

  8. Large-diameter carbon-composite monofilaments. [production method and characteristics of carbon composite monofilaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradshaw, W. G.; Pinoli, P. C.; Karlak, R. F.

    1974-01-01

    Large-diameter carbon composite monofilaments with high strength and high modulus were produced by pregging multifiber carbon bundles with suitable organic resins and pyrolysing them together. Two approaches were developed to increase the utilization of fiber tensile strength by minimizing stress concentration defects induced by dissimilar shrinkage during pyrolysis. These were matrix modification to improve char yield and strain-to-failure and fiber-matrix copyrolysis to alleviate matrix cracking. Highest tensile strength and modulus were obtained by heat treatments to 2873 K to match fiber and matrix strain-to-failure and develop maximum monofilament tensile-strength and elastic modulus.

  9. Dynamic Probabilistic Instability of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2009-01-01

    A computationally effective method is described to evaluate the non-deterministic dynamic instability (probabilistic dynamic buckling) of thin composite shells. The method is a judicious combination of available computer codes for finite element, composite mechanics and probabilistic structural analysis. The solution method is incrementally updated Lagrangian. It is illustrated by applying it to thin composite cylindrical shell subjected to dynamic loads. Both deterministic and probabilistic buckling loads are evaluated to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method. A universal plot is obtained for the specific shell that can be used to approximate buckling loads for different load rates and different probability levels. Results from this plot show that the faster the rate, the higher the buckling load and the shorter the time. The lower the probability, the lower is the buckling load for a specific time. Probabilistic sensitivity results show that the ply thickness, the fiber volume ratio and the fiber longitudinal modulus, dynamic load and loading rate are the dominant uncertainties in that order.

  10. Microstructure and Crystal Structure in TAGS Compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, A. J.; Sharp, J; Rawn, Claudia J

    2009-01-01

    GeTe, a small bandgap semiconductor that has native p-type defects due to Ge vacancies, is an important constituent in the thermoelectric material known as TAGS. TAGS is an acronym for alloys of GeTe with AgSbTe{sub 2}, and compositions are normally designated as TAGS-x, where x is the fraction of GeTe. TAGS-85 is the most important with regard to applications, and there is also commercial interest in TAGS-80. The crystal structure of GeTe{sub 1+{delta}} has a composition-dependent phase transformation at a temperature ranging from 430 C ({delta} = 0) to {approx}400 C ({delta} = 0.02). The high-temperature form is cubic. The low-temperature form is rhombohedral for {delta} < 0.01, as is the case for good thermoelectric performance. Addition of AgSbTe{sub 2} shifts the phase transformation to lower temperatures, and one of the goals of this work is a systematic study of the dependence of transformation temperature on the parameter x. We present results on phase transformations and associated instabilities in TAGS compositions in the range of 70 at.% to 85 at.% GeTe.

  11. Vibration testing of large structures (CLAES Instrument)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newkirk, Roger

    The vibration testing performed on the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) Instrument, installed on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite, is discussed. The tests discussed include random vibration, model verification using random vibration, and structural verification using a low frequency sine burst. Particular attention is given to the use of the sine burst test method to verify the structural integrity. Lessons learned from the program are summarized.

  12. Fluxless Brazing of Large Structural Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuyukian, C. S.

    1982-01-01

    Fluxless brazing is used in fabricating aluminum structural panels that withstand high internal pressure. Aluminum sheet of structural thickness with 4045 aluminum/silicon-braze-alloy cladding is brazed to corrugated "fin stock" having channels 0.001 inch (0.03mm) high by same width. Process is carried out in an inert (argon) atmosphere in a retort furnace. Filler bars are used in some channels to prevent fin stock from collapsing as pressure is applied.

  13. Fluxless Brazing of Large Structural Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuyukian, C. S.

    1982-01-01

    Fluxless brazing is used in fabricating aluminum structural panels that withstand high internal pressure. Aluminum sheet of structural thickness with 4045 aluminum/silicon-braze-alloy cladding is brazed to corrugated "fin stock" having channels 0.001 inch (0.03mm) high by same width. Process is carried out in an inert (argon) atmosphere in a retort furnace. Filler bars are used in some channels to prevent fin stock from collapsing as pressure is applied.

  14. Structure of large dsDNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    Klose, Thomas; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic large dsDNA viruses (NCLDVs) encompass an ever-increasing group of large eukaryotic viruses, infecting a wide variety of organisms. The set of core genes shared by all these viruses includes a major capsid protein with a double jelly-roll fold forming an icosahedral capsid, which surrounds a double layer membrane that contains the viral genome. Furthermore, some of these viruses, such as the members of the Mimiviridae and Phycodnaviridae have a unique vertex that is used during infection to transport DNA into the host. PMID:25003382

  15. NASA/Howard University Large Space Structures Institute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broome, T. H., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Basic research on the engineering behavior of large space structures is presented. Methods of structural analysis, control, and optimization of large flexible systems are examined. Topics of investigation include the Load Correction Method (LCM) modeling technique, stabilization of flexible bodies by feedback control, mathematical refinement of analysis equations, optimization of the design of structural components, deployment dynamics, and the use of microprocessors in attitude and shape control of large space structures. Information on key personnel, budgeting, support plans and conferences is included.

  16. Composite foods: from structure to sensory perception.

    PubMed

    Scholten, Elke

    2017-02-22

    An understanding of the effect of structural features of foods in terms of specific sensory attributes is necessary to design foods with specific functionalities, such as reduced fat or increased protein content, and increased feeling of satiety or liking. Although the bulk rheological properties of both liquid and solid foods can be related to textural attributes such as thickness and firmness, they do not always correlate to more complex sensory attributes, such as creamy and smooth. These attributes are often a result of different contributions, including lubrication aspects and interactions between food and components present in the oral cavity. In this review, the different contributions for a variety of composite foods, such as dispersions, emulsions and emulsion-filled gels, are discussed. The rheological properties are discussed in relation to specific structural characteristics of the foods, which are then linked to lubrication aspects and sensory perception.

  17. Supervoltage NDE Techniques for Large Aerospace Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-01

    long hours and with much creativity at the RPI Linac to assemble and commission the scanner and to obtain the results reported herein; all in a period...conventional radiography. Thus, for these large and highly attenuating objects, inovative technical approaches are urgently needed to provide NDE data to

  18. Midfrequency band dynamics of large space structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppolino, Robert N.; Adams, Douglas S.; Levine, Marie B.

    2004-09-01

    High and low intensity dynamic environments experienced by a spacecraft during launch and on-orbit operations, respectively, induce structural loads and motions, which are difficult to reliably predict. Structural dynamics in low- and mid-frequency bands are sensitive to component interface uncertainty and non-linearity as evidenced in laboratory testing and flight operations. Analytical tools for prediction of linear system response are not necessarily adequate for reliable prediction of mid-frequency band dynamics and analysis of measured laboratory and flight data. A new MATLAB toolbox, designed to address the key challenges of mid-frequency band dynamics, is introduced in this paper. Finite-element models of major subassemblies are defined following rational frequency-wavelength guidelines. For computational efficiency, these subassemblies are described as linear, component mode models. The complete structural system model is composed of component mode subassemblies and linear or non-linear joint descriptions. Computation and display of structural dynamic responses are accomplished employing well-established, stable numerical methods, modern signal processing procedures and descriptive graphical tools. Parametric sensitivity and Monte-Carlo based system identification tools are used to reconcile models with experimental data and investigate the effects of uncertainties. Models and dynamic responses are exported for employment in applications, such as detailed structural integrity and mechanical-optical-control performance analyses.

  19. Chemical compositions, methods of making the chemical compositions, and structures made from the chemical compositions

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Lei; Cheng, Zhe; Liu, Ze; Liu, Meilin

    2015-01-13

    Embodiments of the present disclosure include chemical compositions, structures, anodes, cathodes, electrolytes for solid oxide fuel cells, solid oxide fuel cells, fuel cells, fuel cell membranes, separation membranes, catalytic membranes, sensors, coatings for electrolytes, electrodes, membranes, and catalysts, and the like, are disclosed.

  20. Structural studies of large nucleoprotein particles, vaults

    PubMed Central

    TANAKA, Hideaki; TSUKIHARA, Tomitake

    2012-01-01

    Vault is the largest nonicosahedral cytosolic nucleoprotein particle ever described. The widespread presence and evolutionary conservation of vaults suggest important biologic roles, although their functions have not been fully elucidated. X-ray structure of vault from rat liver was determined at 3.5 Å resolution. It exhibits an ovoid shape with a size of 40 × 40 × 67 nm3. The cage structure of vault consists of a dimer of half-vaults, with each half-vault comprising 39 identical major vault protein (MVP) chains. Each MVP monomer folds into 12 domains: nine structural repeat domains, a shoulder domain, a cap-helix domain and a cap-ring domain. Interactions between the 42-turn-long cap-helix domains are key to stabilizing the particle. The other components of vaults, telomerase-associated proteins, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases and small RNAs, are in location in the vault particle by electron microscopy. PMID:23060231

  1. Large-Scale Structure of Magnetospheric Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. E.; Delcourt, D. C.

    1995-01-01

    Recent investigations of magnetospheric plasma structure are summarized under the broad categories of empirical models, transport across boundaries, formation, and dynamics of the plasma sheet. This report reviews work in these areas during the period 1991 to 1993. Fully three-dimensional empirical models and simulations have become important contributors to our understanding of the magnetospheric system. Some new structural concepts have appeared in the literature: the 'entry boundary' and 'geo-pause', the plasma sheet 'region 1 vortices', the 'low-energy layer', the 'adia-baticity boundary' or 'wall region', and a region in the tail to which we refer as the 'injection port'. Traditional structural concepts have also been the subject of recent study, notably the plasmapause, the magnetopause, and the plasma sheet. Significant progress has been made in understanding the nature of plasma sheet formation and dynamics, but the acceleration of electrons to high energy remains somewhat mysterious.

  2. Hierarchically structured carbon-based composites: Design, synthesis and their application in electrochemical capacitors.

    PubMed

    Yuan, C Z; Gao, B; Shen, L F; Yang, S D; Hao, L; Lu, X J; Zhang, F; Zhang, L J; Zhang, X G

    2011-02-01

    This feature article provides an overview of the recent research progress on the hierarchically structured carbon-based composites for electrochemical capacitors. The basic principles of electrochemical capacitors, and the design, construction and performance of hierarchically structured carbon-based composites electrode materials with good ions and electron transportation and large specific surface area are discussed. The trend of future development of high-power and large-energy electrochemical capacitors is proposed.

  3. "Cosmological Parameters from Large Scale Structure"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, A. J. S.

    2005-01-01

    This grant has provided primary support for graduate student Mark Neyrinck, and some support for the PI and for colleague Nick Gnedin, who helped co-supervise Neyrinck. This award had two major goals. First, to continue to develop and apply methods for measuring galaxy power spectra on large, linear scales, with a view to constraining cosmological parameters. And second, to begin try to understand galaxy clustering at smaller. nonlinear scales well enough to constrain cosmology from those scales also. Under this grant, the PI and collaborators, notably Max Tegmark. continued to improve their technology for measuring power spectra from galaxy surveys at large, linear scales. and to apply the technology to surveys as the data become available. We believe that our methods are best in the world. These measurements become the foundation from which we and other groups measure cosmological parameters.

  4. Management Structures and Large-Scale Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welty, Gordon; Lundin, Edward

    The structure of an organization plays a vital role in the evaluation of the organization. Social science researchers often assume that controls inherent in the physical sciences are as applicable to human subjects. Evaluation of Head Start is an example of the social relation of investigator to subject matter and of the variables introduced by…

  5. Real or virtual large-scale structure?

    PubMed Central

    Evrard, August E.

    1999-01-01

    Modeling the development of structure in the universe on galactic and larger scales is the challenge that drives the field of computational cosmology. Here, photorealism is used as a simple, yet expert, means of assessing the degree to which virtual worlds succeed in replicating our own. PMID:10200243

  6. Delamination Assessment Tool for Spacecraft Composite Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portela, Pedro; Preller, Fabian; Wittke, Henrik; Sinnema, Gerben; Camanho, Pedro; Turon, Albert

    2012-07-01

    Fortunately only few cases are known where failure of spacecraft structures due to undetected damage has resulted in a loss of spacecraft and launcher mission. However, several problems related to damage tolerance and in particular delamination of composite materials have been encountered during structure development of various ESA projects and qualification testing. To avoid such costly failures during development, launch or service of spacecraft, launcher and reusable launch vehicles structures a comprehensive damage tolerance verification approach is needed. In 2009, the European Space Agency (ESA) initiated an activity called “Delamination Assessment Tool” which is led by the Portuguese company HPS Lda and includes academic and industrial partners. The goal of this study is the development of a comprehensive damage tolerance verification approach for launcher and reusable launch vehicles (RLV) structures, addressing analytical and numerical methodologies, material-, subcomponent- and component testing, as well as non-destructive inspection. The study includes a comprehensive review of current industrial damage tolerance practice resulting from ECSS and NASA standards, the development of new Best Practice Guidelines for analysis, test and inspection methods and the validation of these with a real industrial case study. The paper describes the main findings of this activity so far and presents a first iteration of a Damage Tolerance Verification Approach, which includes the introduction of novel analytical and numerical tools at an industrial level. This new approach is being put to the test using real industrial case studies provided by the industrial partners, MT Aerospace, RUAG Space and INVENT GmbH

  7. Compression Strength of Composite Primary Structural Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Eric R.

    1998-01-01

    Research conducted under NASA Grant NAG-1-537 focussed on the response and failure of advanced composite material structures for application to aircraft. Both experimental and analytical methods were utilized to study the fundamental mechanics of the response and failure of selected structural components subjected to quasi-static loads. Most of the structural components studied were thin-walled elements subject to compression, such that they exhibited buckling and postbuckling responses prior to catastrophic failure. Consequently, the analyses were geometrically nonlinear. Structural components studied were dropped-ply laminated plates, stiffener crippling, pressure pillowing of orthogonally stiffened cylindrical shells, axisymmetric response of pressure domes, and the static crush of semi-circular frames. Failure of these components motivated analytical studies on an interlaminar stress postprocessor for plate and shell finite element computer codes, and global/local modeling strategies in finite element modeling. These activities are summarized in the following section. References to literature published under the grant are listed on pages 5 to 10 by a letter followed by a number under the categories of journal publications, conference publications, presentations, and reports. These references are indicated in the text by their letter and number as a superscript.

  8. Status of geometry effects on structural nuclear composite properties

    SciTech Connect

    Will Windes; Y. Katoh; L.L. Snead; E. Lara-Curzio; C. Henagar, Jr.

    2005-09-01

    structural ceramic composites being considered for control rod applications within the VHTR design. While standard sized (i.e. 150-mm long or longer) test specimens can be used for baseline non-irradiated thermal creep studies, very small, compact, tensile specimens will be required for the irradiated creep studies. Traditionally, it is standard practice to use small, representative test samples in place of full-size components for an irradiated study. However, a real problem exists for scale-up of composite materials. Unlike monolithic materials, these composites are engineered from two distinct materials using complicated infiltration techniques to provide full density and maximum mechanical properties. The material properties may be significantly affected when the component geometry or size is changed. It must be demonstrated that the smaller test samples used in an irradiated study will adequately represent larger composite tubes used for control rod applications. To accomplish this, two different test programs are being implemented to establish that small, flat test specimens are representative of the mechanical response for large, cylindrical composite tubes: a size effect study and a geometry effect study.

  9. The Overall Response of Composite Materials Undergoing Large Deformations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-10-15

    University, December 11, 1991. "Propiedades effectivas de materiales compuestos." & "Propiedades effectivas de materiales compuestos no- lineales ...unlike the corresponding problem for a general composite. simplifies to an algebraic one. Although. in principle. the resulting problem can always...take the form of complicated sets of nonlinear algebraic equations. However, if the composite is made up of linear phases (with quadratic energy

  10. Natural Kenaf Fiber Reinforced Composites as Engineered Structural Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittenber, David B.

    The objective of this work was to provide a comprehensive evaluation of natural fiber reinforced polymer (NFRP)'s ability to act as a structural material. As a chemical treatment, aligned kenaf fibers were treated with sodium hydroxide (alkalization) in different concentrations and durations and then manufactured into kenaf fiber / vinyl ester composite plates. Single fiber tensile properties and composite flexural properties, both in dry and saturated environments, were assessed. Based on ASTM standard testing, a comparison of flexural, tensile, compressive, and shear mechanical properties was also made between an untreated kenaf fiber reinforced composite, a chemically treated kenaf fiber reinforced composite, a glass fiber reinforced composite, and oriented strand board (OSB). The mechanical properties were evaluated for dry samples, samples immersed in water for 50 hours, and samples immersed in water until saturation (~2700 hours). Since NFRPs are more vulnerable to environmental effects than synthetic fiber composites, a series of weathering and environmental tests were conducted on the kenaf fiber composites. The environmental conditions studied include real-time outdoor weathering, elevated temperatures, immersion in different pH solutions, and UV exposure. In all of these tests, degradation was found to be more pronounced in the NFRPs than in the glass FRPs; however, in nearly every case the degradation was less than 50% of the flexural strength or stiffness. Using a method of overlapping and meshing discontinuous fiber ends, large mats of fiber bundles were manufactured into composite facesheets for structural insulated panels (SIPs). The polyisocyanurate foam cores proved to be poorly matched to the strength and stiffness of the NFRP facesheets, leading to premature core shear or delamination failures in both flexure and compressive testing. The NFRPs were found to match well with the theoretical stiffness prediction methods of classical lamination

  11. Development of a composite satellite structure for FORTE

    SciTech Connect

    Grastataro, C.I.; Butler, T.A.; Smith, B.G.; Thompson, T.C.

    1995-04-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in partnership with Composite Optics Incorporated (COI) has advanced the development of low-cost, lightweight, composite technology for use in small satellite structures, in this case, for the Fast On-Orbit Recording of Transient Events (FORTE) satellite mission. The use of advanced composites in space applications is well developed, but the application of an all-composite satellite structure has not been achieved until now. This paper investigates the application of composite technology in the design of an all-composite spacecraft structure for small satellites. Engineering analysis and test results obtained from the development of the spacecraft engineering model are also presented.

  12. Control methodologies for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcree, G. J.; Altonji, E.

    1984-01-01

    The objectives of this research were to develop techniques of controlling a dc-motor driven flywheel which would apply torque to the structure to which it was mounted. The motor control system was to be implemented using a microprocessor based controller. The purpose of the torque applied by this system was to dampen oscillations of the structure to which it was mounted. Before the work was terminated due to the unavailability of equipment, a system was developed and partially tested which would provide tight control of the flywheel velocity when it received a velocity command in the form of a voltage. The procedure followed in this development was to first model the motor and flywheel system on an analog computer. Prior to the time the microprocessor development system was available, an analog control loop was replaced by the microprocessor and the system was partially tested.

  13. Identification of Large Space Structures on Orbit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    Anderson, M.S. and Greene , W.H.,"Continuurn Models for Beam and Plate-like Lattice Structures," ALAA J., vol. 16, No. 12, 1978, pp. 1219-1228. 43. Noor...Identification, Advances and Caes Studies, Edited by R. K. Mehra and D. G. Lain- iotis, Academic PRess, 1976. Ljung, L., T. Soderatrom and Gustavsson ...Ljung, L., I. Gustavsson and T. Soderstrom, "Identification of Linear, Multivariable Sys- tem Operating Under Linear Feedback Control", IEEE Trans

  14. Large Scale Coordination of Small Scale Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobelski, Adam; Tarr, Lucas A.; Jaeggli, Sarah A.; Savage, Sabrina

    2017-08-01

    Transient brightenings are ubiquitous features of the solar atmosphere across many length and energy scales, the most energetic of which manifest as large-class solar flares. Often, transient brightenings originate in regions of strong magnetic activity and create strong observable enhancements across wavelengths from X-ray to radio, with notable dynamics on timescales of seconds to hours.The coronal aspects of these brightenings have often been studied by way of EUV and X-ray imaging and spectra. These events are likely driven by photospheric activity (such as flux emergence) with the coronal brightenings originating largely from chromospheric ablation (evaporation). Until recently, chromospheric and transition region observations of these events have been limited. However, new observational capabilities have become available which significantly enhance our ability to understand the bi-directional flow of energy through the chromosphere between the photosphere and the corona.We have recently obtained a unique data set with which to study this flow of energy through the chromosphere via the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS), Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS), Hinode X-Ray Telescope (XRT), Hinode Solar Optical Telescope (SOT), Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), SDO Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI), Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuStar), Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA), and Interferometric BIdimensional Spectropolarimeter (IBIS) at the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST). This data set targets a small active area near disk center which was tracked simultaneously for approximately four hours. Within this region, many transient brightenings detected through multiple layers of the solar atmosphere. In this study, we combine the imaging data and use the spectra from EIS and IRIS to track flows from the photosphere (HMI, SOT) through the chromosphere and transition region (AIA, IBIS, IRIS, ALMA) into the corona

  15. Automatic Fastening Large Structures: a New Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumley, D. F.

    1985-01-01

    The external tank (ET) intertank structure for the space shuttle, a 27.5 ft diameter 22.5 ft long externally stiffened mechanically fastened skin-stringer-frame structure, was a labor intensitive manual structure built on a modified Saturn tooling position. A new approach was developed based on half-section subassemblies. The heart of this manufacturing approach will be 33 ft high vertical automatic riveting system with a 28 ft rotary positioner coming on-line in mid 1985. The Automatic Riveting System incorporates many of the latest automatic riveting technologies. Key features include: vertical columns with two sets of independently operating CNC drill-riveting heads; capability of drill, insert and upset any one piece fastener up to 3/8 inch diameter including slugs without displacing the workpiece offset bucking ram with programmable rotation and deep retraction; vision system for automatic parts program re-synchronization and part edge margin control; and an automatic rivet selection/handling system.

  16. Local gravity and large-scale structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juszkiewicz, Roman; Vittorio, Nicola; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    1990-01-01

    The magnitude and direction of the observed dipole anisotropy of the galaxy distribution can in principle constrain the amount of large-scale power present in the spectrum of primordial density fluctuations. This paper confronts the data, provided by a recent redshift survey of galaxies detected by the IRAS satellite, with the predictions of two cosmological models with very different levels of large-scale power: the biased Cold Dark Matter dominated model (CDM) and a baryon-dominated model (BDM) with isocurvature initial conditions. Model predictions are investigated for the Local Group peculiar velocity, v(R), induced by mass inhomogeneities distributed out to a given radius, R, for R less than about 10,000 km/s. Several convergence measures for v(R) are developed, which can become powerful cosmological tests when deep enough samples become available. For the present data sets, the CDM and BDM predictions are indistinguishable at the 2 sigma level and both are consistent with observations. A promising discriminant between cosmological models is the misalignment angle between v(R) and the apex of the dipole anisotropy of the microwave background.

  17. Local gravity and large-scale structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juszkiewicz, Roman; Vittorio, Nicola; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    1990-01-01

    The magnitude and direction of the observed dipole anisotropy of the galaxy distribution can in principle constrain the amount of large-scale power present in the spectrum of primordial density fluctuations. This paper confronts the data, provided by a recent redshift survey of galaxies detected by the IRAS satellite, with the predictions of two cosmological models with very different levels of large-scale power: the biased Cold Dark Matter dominated model (CDM) and a baryon-dominated model (BDM) with isocurvature initial conditions. Model predictions are investigated for the Local Group peculiar velocity, v(R), induced by mass inhomogeneities distributed out to a given radius, R, for R less than about 10,000 km/s. Several convergence measures for v(R) are developed, which can become powerful cosmological tests when deep enough samples become available. For the present data sets, the CDM and BDM predictions are indistinguishable at the 2 sigma level and both are consistent with observations. A promising discriminant between cosmological models is the misalignment angle between v(R) and the apex of the dipole anisotropy of the microwave background.

  18. Advances in Computational Stability Analysis of Composite Aerospace Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Degenhardt, R.; Araujo, F. C. de

    2010-09-30

    European aircraft industry demands for reduced development and operating costs. Structural weight reduction by exploitation of structural reserves in composite aerospace structures contributes to this aim, however, it requires accurate and experimentally validated stability analysis of real structures under realistic loading conditions. This paper presents different advances from the area of computational stability analysis of composite aerospace structures which contribute to that field. For stringer stiffened panels main results of the finished EU project COCOMAT are given. It investigated the exploitation of reserves in primary fibre composite fuselage structures through an accurate and reliable simulation of postbuckling and collapse. For unstiffened cylindrical composite shells a proposal for a new design method is presented.

  19. Synthesis and Characterization of Bionanoparticle-Silica Composites and Mesoporous Silica with Large Pores

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, Z.; Yang, L.; Kabisatpathy, S.; He, J.; Lee, A.; Ron, J.; Sikha, G.; Popov, B.N.; Emrick, T.; Russell, T. P.; Wang. Q.

    2009-03-24

    A sol-gel process has been developed to incorporate bionanoparticles, such as turnip yellow mosaic virus, cowpea mosaic virus, tobacco mosaic virus, and ferritin into silica, while maintaining the integrity and morphology of the particles. The structures of the resulting materials were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, small angle X-ray scattering, and N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption analysis. The results show that the shape and surface morphology of the bionanoparticles are largely preserved after being embedded into silica. After removal of the bionanoparticles by calcination, mesoporous silica with monodisperse pores, having the shape and surface morphology of the bionanoparticles replicated inside the silica, was produced,. This study is expected to lead to both functional composite materials and mesoporous silica with structurally well-defined large pores.

  20. Probabilistic Assessment of Fracture Progression in Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Minnetyan, Levon; Mauget, Bertrand; Huang, Dade; Addi, Frank

    1999-01-01

    This report describes methods and corresponding computer codes that are used to evaluate progressive damage and fracture and to perform probabilistic assessment in built-up composite structures. Structural response is assessed probabilistically, during progressive fracture. The effects of design variable uncertainties on structural fracture progression are quantified. The fast probability integrator (FPI) is used to assess the response scatter in the composite structure at damage initiation. The sensitivity of the damage response to design variables is computed. The methods are general purpose and are applicable to stitched and unstitched composites in all types of structures and fracture processes starting from damage initiation to unstable propagation and to global structure collapse. The methods are demonstrated for a polymer matrix composite stiffened panel subjected to pressure. The results indicated that composite constituent properties, fabrication parameters, and respective uncertainties have a significant effect on structural durability and reliability. Design implications with regard to damage progression, damage tolerance, and reliability of composite structures are examined.

  1. Fuselage structure using advanced technology fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R. K.; Tomlinson, H. M. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A fuselage structure is described in which the skin is comprised of layers of a matrix fiber reinforced composite, with the stringers reinforced with the same composite material. The high strength to weight ratio of the composite, particularly at elevated temperatures, and its high modulus of elasticity, makes it desirable for use in airplane structures.

  2. Oceans and Internal Structures of the Large Icy Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, S.; Brown, J.; Choukroun, M.; Sotin, C.

    2013-12-01

    We predict water ice freezing and constrain geothermal gradients in the interiors of the large icy satellites Ganymede, Callisto, and Titan using thermodynamic and phase-boundary data for MgSO4 and ammonia solutions, including new results for ammonia. Accounting for available measurements of gravitational moments of inertia leads to estimates of the depths to silicate boundaries. In the case of Ganymede we also compute the size of an iron-bearing core. The new equations of state allow us to assess the influence of ocean salinity on the thickness of layers of ice I-III-V-VI in the interiors of these objects, and on associated ocean dynamics. Ocean compositions with salt and ammonia have less high-pressure ice, and can exist in the presence of ice III. In some model oceans high-pressure ice phases become buoyant relative to surrounding fluids, implying frazil-like upward snows, interlayered liquids and ices, and fluids in direct contact with rock. We discuss the relative roles of dissolved constituents in the large icy satellites, the consequences for their habitability, and prospects of future missions for testing these predictions. Schematic of interior structure for Ganymede showing dense fluids under high pressure ices and directly in contact with rock. We use available thermodynamic properties for relevant fluids and solids materials us to calculate self-consistent depths for the various layers (approximate values shown here).

  3. Structural concepts for large solar concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.; Miller, R. K.

    1986-01-01

    Solar collectors for space use are examined, including both early designs and current concepts. In particular, attention is given to stiff sandwich panels and aluminum dishes as well as inflated and umbrella-type membrane configurations. The Sunflower concentrator is described as an example of a high-efficiency collector. It is concluded that stiff reflector panels are most likely to provide the long-term consistent accuracy necessary for low-orbit operation. A new configuration consisting of a Pactruss backup structure, with identical panels installed after deployment in space, is presented. It is estimated that concentration ratios in excess of 2000 can be achieved with this concept.

  4. Large Space Structure Charging during Eclipse Passage.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-15

    ADDRESS(It different fron Controllng Olfc1 ) IS. SECURITY ::LASS (of In$. report) Unclassified IS.. DE’.LASSIFICATION ’DOWNGRADING SCHEDULE 16 ...as a Function of Vmax, the Eclipse Potential 15 10. Ohmic Power Loss in Solar Power Satellite as a Function of Resistivity 16 Tables 1. Space Plasma...total drop between the ends of the structure 6V. The high-resistance curve is nearly linear, owing to the fact 12 - pHo 4 X10- 6 A/M 2 DA1.0 16 800

  5. Modeling and Control of Large Flexible Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-31

    frequencies induced by the 4th spatial mode.) The meaning of the plot titles is as follows: "Beam at x, yth mode," t means that the beam is initially...structures, represented here by an Euler beam model. The results of . this algorithm provide a means for assessing effects of controller/observer...define T - - r-i E), T- - (60) +- 1 then .L. 0 t>O 0 > 7 𔄀) -1 (61 C: t𔃾) 0 0J -. This means that T +(respectively T ) is the projection of T onto the

  6. Structural concepts for large solar concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.; Miller, R. K.

    1986-01-01

    Solar collectors for space use are examined, including both early designs and current concepts. In particular, attention is given to stiff sandwich panels and aluminum dishes as well as inflated and umbrella-type membrane configurations. The Sunflower concentrator is described as an example of a high-efficiency collector. It is concluded that stiff reflector panels are most likely to provide the long-term consistent accuracy necessary for low-orbit operation. A new configuration consisting of a Pactruss backup structure, with identical panels installed after deployment in space, is presented. It is estimated that concentration ratios in excess of 2000 can be achieved with this concept.

  7. The Structure and Composition of Io's Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyth, W. H.; Marconi, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    Io's atmosphere is thought to be generated principally by sublimation on the dayside and by multiple volcanoes scattered throughout its surface and more concentrated near the equator. While SO2 seems to be the principle product of these sources, many other chemical species are placed into the atmosphere by these sources, including substantial amounts of SO and S2 as well as smaller but observationally significant amounts of Na bearing molecules. These species in turn interact strongly with the torus plasma generating additional species such as O2, S, O, and Na. The strong interaction of the torus plasma with the neutral atmosphere not only exerts a profound effect on the composition of Io's atmosphere but also strongly affects the dynamics and thermodynamics of Io's atmosphere, particularly at higher altitudes. In addition, as Io orbits Jupiter, the change in location of the sublimation region and the eclipse of Io as it passes through Jupiter's shadow result in substantial variation in the atmosphere. A complex time-dependent three-dimensional atmosphere with strong spatial compositional variation is created. Here we extend the two-dimensional multispecies Navier-Stokes model of Smyth and Wong (2004) to three-dimensions, include two volcanic sources similar to Pele and Loki, and include the effect of Io's movement around Jupiter on sublimation. The effects of the torus plasma are also included as in Smyth and Wong. We will present the overall composition and structure of the atmosphere, O to S ratios in the upper atmosphere, and discuss a potential issue with the O2 abundance. Smyth, W.H. and M.C. Wong, Icarus 171, 171-182, 2004.

  8. The large data base file structure dilemma.

    PubMed

    Lefkovitz, D

    1975-02-01

    This paper first presents a brief tutorial on the principal random file organization methods for handling two major applications--Transaction oriented systems and information storage and retrieval systems. It then addresses a particular large data base dilemma, not satisfactorily resolved by any of these methods, and which is currently under active investigation. Two approaches to a solution are described. One is called the hybrid inverted list; the other is based upon an old technique called super-imposed coding. The former has been implemented and has recently been installed in an operational system. Some statistics related to file characteristics in this application are provided, but operational cost and performance statistics are not yet available.

  9. Some Lower Valence Vanadium Fluorides: Their Crystal Distortions, Domain Structures, Modulated Structures, Ferrimagnetism, and Composition Dependence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Y. S.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes some contemporary concepts unique to the structure of advanced solids, i.e., their crystal distortions, domain structures, modulated structures, ferrimagnetism, and composition dependence. (Author/CS)

  10. Some Lower Valence Vanadium Fluorides: Their Crystal Distortions, Domain Structures, Modulated Structures, Ferrimagnetism, and Composition Dependence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Y. S.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes some contemporary concepts unique to the structure of advanced solids, i.e., their crystal distortions, domain structures, modulated structures, ferrimagnetism, and composition dependence. (Author/CS)

  11. Technical issues in dynamics and control of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Card, M. F.; Anderson, W. W.

    1983-01-01

    Examples of large space systems currently being considered by NASA include a large communications antenna system (the Land Mobile Satellite System), a precision antenna system (the Large Deployable Reflector System), and a preliminary concept for NASA's space station. Each system has low natural vibration frequencies, stringent pointing requirements, and, for the antennas, demanding surface accuracy requirements. A review is provided of the progress being made in structural ground tests with respect to surface accuracy, deployment, and erection of large structures. Attention is given to the dynamic loads on large space structures, on-orbit testing, space vibration control devices, and the characteristics of distributed control.

  12. Composite layup monitoring using structured light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tait, Robert; Harding, Kevin; Nafis, Chris

    2015-05-01

    The making of composite parts involves laying down multiple layers of tape in an organized manner. Misplaced ends, wrinkles or other factors can cause the part being built to have weaknesses or other imperfections. However, the actual edges of the tape do not stand out well with each layer reacting differently to lighting. The fiber nature of the tape will make the surface appear bright in some orientations and very dark in other. To complicate the problem, each layer of tape needs to be laid down at different angles, so can be dark, light or in-between, and at positions to fairly tight tolerances. This paper presents a study of several methods for determining the tape position and flaws, as well as details of a structured light method for determining the tape position. Considerations of tolerances, experimental results and how such a system might be implemented will be presented.

  13. Ceres' internal structure as inferred from its large craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchi, Simone; Raymond, Carol; Fu, Roger; Ermakov, Anton I.; O'Brien, David P.; De Sanctis, Cristina; Ammannito, Eleonora; Russell, Christopher T.

    2016-10-01

    The Dawn spacecraft has gathered important data about the surface composition, internal structure, and geomorphology of Ceres, revealing a cratered landscape. Digital terrain models and global mosaics have been used to derive a global catalog of impact craters larger than 10 km in diameter. A surface dichotomy appears evident: a large fraction of the northern hemisphere is heavily cratered as the result of several billion of years of collisions, while portions of the equatorial region and southern hemisphere are much less cratered. The latter are associated with the presence of the two largest (~270-280 km) impact craters, Kerwan and Yalode. The global crater count shows a severe depletion for diameters larger than 100-150 km with respect to collisional models and other large asteroids, like Vesta. This is a strong indication that a significant population of large cerean craters has been obliterated over geological time-scales. This observation is supported by the overall topographic power spectrum of Ceres, which shows that long wavelengths in topography are suppressed (that is, flatter surface) compared to short wavelengths.Viscous relaxation of topography may be a natural culprit for the observed paucity of large craters. Relaxation accommodated by the creep of water ice is expected to result in much more rapid and complete decay of topography than inferred. In contrast, we favor a strong crust composed of a mixture of silicates and salt species (<30% vol water ice) with viscosity decreasing by two-three orders of magnitude in the top 45-70 km of Ceres' crust. This model can account for the observed topography power spectrum and explain the lack of craters in the size range ~100-600 km.Interestingly, Ceres' surface exhibits an 800-km-wide, 4-km-deep depression, known as Vendimia Planitia. The overall topography of Vendimia Planitia is compatible with a partially relaxed mega impact structure. The presence of such a large scale depression bears implications for

  14. Large Scale Turbulent Structures in Supersonic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Ram Mohan; Lundgren, Thomas S.

    1997-01-01

    Jet noise is a major concern in the design of commercial aircraft. Studies by various researchers suggest that aerodynamic noise is a major contributor to jet noise. Some of these studies indicate that most of the aerodynamic jet noise due to turbulent mixing occurs when there is a rapid variation in turbulent structure, i.e. rapidly growing or decaying vortices. The objective of this research was to simulate a compressible round jet to study the non-linear evolution of vortices and the resulting acoustic radiations. In particular, to understand the effect of turbulence structure on the noise. An ideal technique to study this problem is Direct Numerical Simulations(DNS), because it provides precise control on the initial and boundary conditions that lead to the turbulent structures studied. It also provides complete 3-dimensional time dependent data. Since the dynamics of a temporally evolving jet are not greatly different from those, of a spatially evolving jet, a temporal jet problem was solved, using periodicity ill the direction of the jet axis. This enables the application of Fourier spectral methods in the streamwise direction. Physically this means that turbulent structures in the jet are repeated in successive downstream cells instead of being gradually modified downstream into a jet plume. The DNS jet simulation helps us understand the various turbulent scales and mechanisms of turbulence generation in the evolution of a compressible round jet. These accurate flow solutions will be used in future research to estimate near-field acoustic radiation by computing the total outward flux across a surface and determine how it is related to the evolution of the turbulent solutions. Furthermore, these simulations allow us to investigate the sensitivity of acoustic radiations to inlet/boundary conditions, with possible application to active noise suppression. In addition, the data generated can be used to compute various turbulence quantities such as mean velocities

  15. Large Scale Turbulent Structures in Supersonic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Ram Mohan; Lundgren, Thomas S.

    1997-01-01

    Jet noise is a major concern in the design of commercial aircraft. Studies by various researchers suggest that aerodynamic noise is a major contributor to jet noise. Some of these studies indicate that most of the aerodynamic jet noise due to turbulent mixing occurs when there is a rapid variation in turbulent structure, i.e. rapidly growing or decaying vortices. The objective of this research was to simulate a compressible round jet to study the non-linear evolution of vortices and the resulting acoustic radiations. In particular, to understand the effect of turbulence structure on the noise. An ideal technique to study this problem is Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS), because it provides precise control on the initial and boundary conditions that lead to the turbulent structures studied. It also provides complete 3-dimensional time dependent data. Since the dynamics of a temporally evolving jet are not greatly different from those of a spatially evolving jet, a temporal jet problem was solved, using periodicity in the direction of the jet axis. This enables the application of Fourier spectral methods in the streamwise direction. Physically this means that turbulent structures in the jet are repeated in successive downstream cells instead of being gradually modified downstream into a jet plume. The DNS jet simulation helps us understand the various turbulent scales and mechanisms of turbulence generation in the evolution of a compressible round jet. These accurate flow solutions will be used in future research to estimate near-field acoustic radiation by computing the total outward flux across a surface and determine how it is related to the evolution of the turbulent solutions. Furthermore, these simulations allow us to investigate the sensitivity of acoustic radiations to inlet/boundary conditions, with possible appli(,a- tion to active noise suppression. In addition, the data generated can be used to compute, various turbulence quantities such as mean

  16. Responses in large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreira, Alexandre; Schmidt, Fabian

    2017-06-01

    We introduce a rigorous definition of general power-spectrum responses as resummed vertices with two hard and n soft momenta in cosmological perturbation theory. These responses measure the impact of long-wavelength perturbations on the local small-scale power spectrum. The kinematic structure of the responses (i.e., their angular dependence) can be decomposed unambiguously through a ``bias'' expansion of the local power spectrum, with a fixed number of physical response coefficients, which are only a function of the hard wavenumber k. Further, the responses up to n-th order completely describe the (n+2)-point function in the squeezed limit, i.e. with two hard and n soft modes, which one can use to derive the response coefficients. This generalizes previous results, which relate the angle-averaged squeezed limit to isotropic response coefficients. We derive the complete expression of first- and second-order responses at leading order in perturbation theory, and present extrapolations to nonlinear scales based on simulation measurements of the isotropic response coefficients. As an application, we use these results to predict the non-Gaussian part of the angle-averaged matter power spectrum covariance CovNGl=0(k1,k2), in the limit where one of the modes, say k2, is much smaller than the other. Without any free parameters, our model results are in very good agreement with simulations for k2 lesssim 0.06 h Mpc-1, and for any k1 gtrsim 2k2. The well-defined kinematic structure of the power spectrum response also permits a quick evaluation of the angular dependence of the covariance matrix. While we focus on the matter density field, the formalism presented here can be generalized to generic tracers such as galaxies.

  17. Validation of Design and Analysis Techniques of Tailored Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, Dawn C. (Technical Monitor); Wijayratne, Dulnath D.

    2004-01-01

    Aeroelasticity is the relationship between the elasticity of an aircraft structure and its aerodynamics. This relationship can cause instabilities such as flutter in a wing. Engineers have long studied aeroelasticity to ensure such instabilities do not become a problem within normal operating conditions. In recent decades structural tailoring has been used to take advantage of aeroelasticity. It is possible to tailor an aircraft structure to respond favorably to multiple different flight regimes such as takeoff, landing, cruise, 2-g pull up, etc. Structures can be designed so that these responses provide an aerodynamic advantage. This research investigates the ability to design and analyze tailored structures made from filamentary composites. Specifically the accuracy of tailored composite analysis must be verified if this design technique is to become feasible. To pursue this idea, a validation experiment has been performed on a small-scale filamentary composite wing box. The box is tailored such that its cover panels induce a global bend-twist coupling under an applied load. Two types of analysis were chosen for the experiment. The first is a closed form analysis based on a theoretical model of a single cell tailored box beam and the second is a finite element analysis. The predicted results are compared with the measured data to validate the analyses. The comparison of results show that the finite element analysis is capable of predicting displacements and strains to within 10% on the small-scale structure. The closed form code is consistently able to predict the wing box bending to 25% of the measured value. This error is expected due to simplifying assumptions in the closed form analysis. Differences between the closed form code representation and the wing box specimen caused large errors in the twist prediction. The closed form analysis prediction of twist has not been validated from this test.

  18. Tailoring of composite wing structures for elastically produced camber deformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rehfield, Lawrence W.; Chang, Stephen; Zischka, Peter J.; Pickings, Richard D.; Holl, Michael W.

    1991-01-01

    Structural concepts have been created which produce chordwise camber deformation that results in enhanced lift. A wing box can be tailored to utilize these concepts with composites. In attempting to optimize the aerodynamic benefits, it is found that there are two optimum designs that are of interest. There is a 'weight' optimum which corresponds to the maximum lift per unit structural weight. There is also a 'lift' optimum that corresponds to maximum absolute lift. Experience indicates that a large weight penalty accompanies the transition from weight to lift optimum designs. New structural models, the basic deformation mechanisms that are utilized and typical analytical results are presented. It appears that lift enhancements of sufficient magnitude can be produced to render this type of wing tailoring of practical interest.

  19. Tailoring of composite wing structures for elastically produced camber deformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rehfield, Lawrence W.; Chang, Stephen; Zischka, Peter J.; Pickings, Richard D.; Holl, Michael W.

    1991-01-01

    Structural concepts have been created which produce chordwise camber deformation that results in enhanced lift. A wing box can be tailored to utilize these concepts with composites. In attempting to optimize the aerodynamic benefits, it is found that there are two optimum designs that are of interest. There is a 'weight' optimum which corresponds to the maximum lift per unit structural weight. There is also a 'lift' optimum that corresponds to maximum absolute lift. Experience indicates that a large weight penalty accompanies the transition from weight to lift optimum designs. New structural models, the basic deformation mechanisms that are utilized and typical analytical results are presented. It appears that lift enhancements of sufficient magnitude can be produced to render this type of wing tailoring of practical interest.

  20. Neutrino footprint in large scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garay, Carlos Peña; Verde, Licia; Jimenez, Raul

    2017-03-01

    Recent constrains on the sum of neutrino masses inferred by analyzing cosmological data, show that detecting a non-zero neutrino mass is within reach of forthcoming cosmological surveys. Such a measurement will imply a direct determination of the absolute neutrino mass scale. Physically, the measurement relies on constraining the shape of the matter power spectrum below the neutrino free streaming scale: massive neutrinos erase power at these scales. However, detection of a lack of small-scale power from cosmological data could also be due to a host of other effects. It is therefore of paramount importance to validate neutrinos as the source of power suppression at small scales. We show that, independent on hierarchy, neutrinos always show a footprint on large, linear scales; the exact location and properties are fully specified by the measured power suppression (an astrophysical measurement) and atmospheric neutrinos mass splitting (a neutrino oscillation experiment measurement). This feature cannot be easily mimicked by systematic uncertainties in the cosmological data analysis or modifications in the cosmological model. Therefore the measurement of such a feature, up to 1% relative change in the power spectrum for extreme differences in the mass eigenstates mass ratios, is a smoking gun for confirming the determination of the absolute neutrino mass scale from cosmological observations. It also demonstrates the synergy between astrophysics and particle physics experiments.

  1. Advanced fiber-composite hybrids--A new structural material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Lark, R. F.; Sullivan, T. L.

    1974-01-01

    Introduction of metal foil as part of matrix and fiber composite, or ""sandwich'', improves strength and stiffness for multidirectional loading, improves resistance to cyclic loading, and improves impact and erosion resistance of resultant fiber-composite hybrid structure.

  2. Out-of-Furnace Brazing Technology for Assembly of Large Carbon-Carbon Space Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-01

    composites required use of high temperature vacuum furnaces which, in addition to needing costly mechanical and diffusion vacuum pumps, also require...structures such as Space Based Radar ( SBR ), Survivable Power Subsystem (SUPER), and Zenith STAR may involve C/C structures in excess of 350 ft. Figure 3...depicts the size and complexity of some of these structures. Consequently, mechanical fastening becomes the joining method of choice for large C/C

  3. Progress in patch repair of aerospace composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Weiguo; Zhang, Weifang; Tang, Qingyun

    2011-11-01

    With the rapid application of the composite structure in the aerospace industry, more load-bearing structures and components are used with composites instead of conventional engineering materials. However, the composite structures are inevitably suffered damages in the complex environment, the composites structures repair become more important in the airplane maintenance. This paper describes the composites patch repair progress. Firstly, the flaws and damages concerned to composite structures are concluded, and also the repair principles are presented. Secondly, the advantages and disadvantages for different repair methods are analyzed, as well as the different bonded repair and their applicability to different structures is discussed. According the recent research in theory and experiment, the scarf repair effects under different parameters are analyzed. Finally, the failure mechanisms of repair structure are discussed, and some prospects are put forward.

  4. Progress in patch repair of aerospace composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Weiguo; Zhang, Weifang; Tang, Qingyun

    2012-04-01

    With the rapid application of the composite structure in the aerospace industry, more load-bearing structures and components are used with composites instead of conventional engineering materials. However, the composite structures are inevitably suffered damages in the complex environment, the composites structures repair become more important in the airplane maintenance. This paper describes the composites patch repair progress. Firstly, the flaws and damages concerned to composite structures are concluded, and also the repair principles are presented. Secondly, the advantages and disadvantages for different repair methods are analyzed, as well as the different bonded repair and their applicability to different structures is discussed. According the recent research in theory and experiment, the scarf repair effects under different parameters are analyzed. Finally, the failure mechanisms of repair structure are discussed, and some prospects are put forward.

  5. Titanium-silicon carbide composite lattice structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moongkhamklang, Pimsiree

    Sandwich panel structures with stiff, strong face sheets and lightweight cellular cores are widely used for weight sensitive, bending dominated loading applications. The flexural stiffness and strength of a sandwich panel is determined by the stiffness, strength, thickness, and separation of the face sheets, and by the compressive and shear stiffness and strength of the cellular core. Panel performance can be therefore optimized using cores with high specific stiffness and strength. The specific stiffness and strength of all cellular materials depends upon the specific elastic modulus and strength of the material used to make the structure. The stiffest and strongest cores for ambient temperature applications utilize carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) honeycombs and lattice structures. Few options exist for lightweight sandwich panels intended for high temperature uses. High temperature alloys such as Ti-6A1-4V can be applied to SiC monofilaments to create very high specific modulus and strength fibers. These are interesting candidates for the cores of elevated temperature sandwich structures such as the skins of hypersonic vehicles. This dissertation explores the potential of sandwich panel concepts that utilize millimeter scale titanium matrix composite (TMC) lattice structures. A method has been developed for fabricating millimeter cell size cellular lattice structures with the square or diamond collinear truss topologies from 240 mum diameter Ti-6A1-4V coated SiC monofilaments (TMC monofilaments). Lattices with relative densities in the range 10% to 20% were manufactured and tested in compression and shear. Given the very high compressive strength of the TMC monofilaments, the compressive strengths of both the square and diamond lattices were dominated by elastic buckling of the constituent struts. However, under shear loading, some of the constituent struts of the lattices are subjected to tensile stresses and failure is then set by tensile failure of the

  6. Design for progressive fracture in composite shell structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    1992-01-01

    The load carrying capability and structural behavior of composite shell structures and stiffened curved panels are investigated to provide accurate early design loads. An integrated computer code is utilized for the computational simulation of composite structural degradation under practical loading for realistic design. Damage initiation, growth, accumulation, and propagation to structural fracture are included in the simulation. Progressive fracture investigations providing design insight for several classes of composite shells are presented. Results demonstrate the significance of local defects, interfacial regions, and stress concentrations on the structural durability of composite shells.

  7. Composite fiber structures for catalysts and electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marrion, Christopher J.; Cahela, Donald R.; Ahn, Soonho; Tatarchuk, Bruce J.

    1993-01-01

    We have recently envisioned a process wherein fibers of various metals in the 0.5 to 15 micron diameter range are slurried in concert with cellulose fibers and various other materials in the form of particulates and/or fibers. The resulting slurry is cast via a wet-lay process into a sheet and dried to produce a free-standing sheet of 'composite paper.' When the 'preform' sheet is sintered in hydrogen, the bulk of the cellulose is removed with the secondary fibers and/or particulates being entrapped by the sinter-locked network provided by the metal fibers. The resulting material is unique, in that it allows the intimate contacting and combination of heretofore mutually exclusive materials and properties. Moreover, due to the ease of paper manufacture and processing, the resulting materials are relatively inexpensive and can be fabricated into a wide range of three-dimensional structures. Also, because cellulose is both a binder and a pore-former, structures combining high levels of active surface area and high void volume (i.e., low pressure drop) can be prepared as freestanding flow through monoliths.

  8. Damage Assessment of Composite Structures Using Digital Image Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caminero, M. A.; Lopez-Pedrosa, M.; Pinna, C.; Soutis, C.

    2014-02-01

    The steady increase of Carbon-Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) Structures in modern aircraft will reach a new dimension with the entry into service of the Boeing 787 and Airbus 350. Replacement of damaged parts will not be a preferable solution due to the high level of integration and the large size of the components involved. Consequently the need to develop repair techniques and processes for composite components is readily apparent. Bonded patch repair technologies provide an alternative to mechanically fastened repairs with significantly higher performance, especially for relatively thin skins. Carefully designed adhesively bonded patches can lead to cost effective and highly efficient repairs in comparison with conventional riveted patch repairs that cut fibers and introduce highly strained regions. In this work, the assessment of the damage process taking place in notched (open-hole) specimens under uniaxial tensile loading was studied. Two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) Digital Image Correlation (DIC) techniques were employed to obtain full-field surface strain measurements in carbon-fiber/epoxy T700/M21 composite plates with different stacking sequences in the presence of an open circular hole. Penetrant enhanced X-ray radiographs were taken to identify damage location and extent after loading around the hole. DIC strain fields were compared to finite element predictions. In addition, DIC techniques were used to characterise damage and performance of adhesively bonded patch repairs in composite panels under tensile loading. This part of work relates to strength/stiffness restoration of damaged composite aircraft that becomes more important as composites are used more extensively in the construction of modern jet airliners. The behaviour of bonded patches under loading was monitored using DIC full-field strain measurements. Location and extent of damage identified by X-ray radiography correlates well with DIC strain results giving confidence to

  9. Dual structural-control optimization of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messac, A.; Turner, J.

    1984-01-01

    A new approach is proposed for solving dual structural-control optimization problems for high-order flexible space structures where reduced-order structural models are employed. For a given initial structural dessign, a quadratic control cost is minimized subject to a constant-mass constraint. The sensitivity of the optimal control cost with respect to the stuctural design variables is then determined and used to obtain successive structural redesigns using a contrained gradient optimization algorithm. This process is repeated until the constrained control cost sensitivity becomes negligible. A numerical example is presented which demonstrates that this new approach effectively addresses the problem of dual optimization for potentially very high-order structures.

  10. THE DURABILITY OF LARGE-SCALE ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING COMPOSITE MOLDS

    SciTech Connect

    Post, Brian K; Love, Lonnie J; Duty, Chad; Vaidya, Uday; Pipes, R. Byron; Kunc, Vlastimil

    2016-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory s Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) technology permits the rapid production of thermoplastic composite molds using a carbon fiber filled Acrylonitrile-Butadiene-Styrene (ABS) thermoplastic. Demonstration tools (i.e. 0.965 m X 0.559 m X 0.152 m) for composite part fabrication have been printed, coated, and finished with a traditional tooling gel. We present validation results demonstrating the stability of thermoplastic printed molds for room temperature Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM) processes. Arkema s Elium thermoplastic resin was investigated with a variety of reinforcement materials. Experimental results include dimensional characterization of the tool surface using laser scanning technique following demolding of 10 parts. Thermoplastic composite molds offer rapid production compared to traditionally built thermoset molds in that near-net deposition allows direct digital production of the net geometry at production rate of 45 kg/hr.

  11. Mass resolution optimization in a large isotopic composition experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esposito, J. A.; Acharya, B. S.; Balasubrahmanyan, V. K.; Mauger, B. G.; Ormes, J. F.; Streitmatter, R. E.; Heinrich, W.; Henkel, M.; Simon, M.; Tittel, H. O.

    1985-01-01

    A range-energy experiment was built to measure the isotopic composition of galactic cosmic rays. An enrichment of neutron rich isotopes, 22Ne and (25Mg + 26Mg) in particular, when compared to the solar composition is shown. A rich statistics measurement of these and other neutron-rich isotopes in the galactic flux yields information to the source of these particles. A computer simulation of the experiment was used to estimate the instrument resolution. The Cherenkov detector light collection efficiency, was calculated. Absorption of light in the radiator was considered to determine the optimum Cherenkov medium thickness. The experiment will determine the isotopic composition for the elements neon through argon in the energy range 300 to 800 MeV per nucleon.

  12. Nepheline structural and chemical dependence on melt composition

    SciTech Connect

    Marcial, José; Crum, Jarrod; Neill, Owen; McCloy, John

    2016-02-01

    Nepheline crystallizes upon slow-cooling in some melts concentrated in Na2O and Al2O3, which can result in a residual glass phase of low chemical durability. Nepheline can incorporate many components often found in high-level waste radioactive borosilicate glass, including glass network ions (e.g., Si, Al, Fe), alkali metals (e.g., Cs, K, Na, and possibly Li), alkaline-earth metals (e.g., Ba, Sr, Ca, Mg), and transition metals (e.g., Mn, and possibly Cr, Zn, Ni). When crystallized from melts of different compositions, nepheline chemistry varies as a function of starting glass composition. Five simulated high level nuclear waste borosilicate glasses shown to crystallize large fractions of nepheline on slow cooling, were selected for study. These melts constituted a range of Al2O3, B2O3, CaO, Na2O, K2O, Fe2O3, and SiO2 compositions. Compositional analyses of nepheline crystals in glass by electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA) indicate that boron is unlikely to be present in any significant concentration, if at all, in nepheline. Also, several models are presented for calculating the fraction of vacancies in the nepheline structure.

  13. Asymptotic Analysis of Fiber-Reinforced Composites of Hexagonal Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalamkarov, Alexander L.; Andrianov, Igor V.; Pacheco, Pedro M. C. L.; Savi, Marcelo A.; Starushenko, Galina A.

    2016-08-01

    The fiber-reinforced composite materials with periodic cylindrical inclusions of a circular cross-section arranged in a hexagonal array are analyzed. The governing analytical relations of the thermal conductivity problem for such composites are obtained using the asymptotic homogenization method. The lubrication theory is applied for the asymptotic solution of the unit cell problems in the cases of inclusions of large and close to limit diameters, and for inclusions with high conductivity. The lubrication method is further generalized to the cases of finite values of the physical properties of inclusions, as well as for the cases of medium-sized inclusions. The analytical formulas for the effective coefficient of thermal conductivity of the fiber-reinforced composite materials of a hexagonal structure are derived in the cases of small conductivity of inclusions, as well as in the cases of extremely low conductivity of inclusions. The three-phase composite model (TPhM) is applied for solving the unit cell problems in the cases of the inclusions with small diameters, and the asymptotic analysis of the obtained solutions is performed for inclusions of small sizes. The obtained results are analyzed and illustrated graphically, and the limits of their applicability are evaluated. They are compared with the known numerical and asymptotic data in some particular cases, and very good agreement is demonstrated.

  14. Electrostatic adhesion for added functionality of composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Callum J. C.; Bond, Ian P.; Potter, Kevin D.

    2016-02-01

    Electrostatic adhesion can be used as a means of reversible attachment. The incorporation of electrostatic adhesion into fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) composite structures could provide significant value added functionality. Imparting large potential differences (∼2 kV) across electrodes generates an attractive force, thus providing a means of attachment. This could be used as a reversible latching mechanism or as a means of controllable internal connectivity. Varying the connectivity for discrete elements of a substructure of a given design allows for control of internal load paths and moment of area of the cross section. This could facilitate variable stiffness (both in bending and torsion). Using a combination of existing fabrication techniques, functional electrodes have been integrated within a FRP. Copper polyimide thin film laminate material has been both co-cured with carbon fibre reinforced epoxy and bonded to PVC closed cell foam core material to provide a range of structural configurations with integrated electrodes. The ability of such integrated devices to confer variations in global bending stiffness of basic beam structures is investigated. Through the application of 4 kV across integrated electrostatic adhesive devices, a 112% increase in flexural stiffness has been demonstrated for a composite sandwich structure.

  15. Dynamic Response of Composite Structures Underwater

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    6 B. COMPOSITE FABRICATION ...15 Figure 9. Strain Gages Fully Attached and Waterproofed ...Vacuum hose 7 • Spiral wrap • Resin trap • Vacuum Gage • Glass Foundation B. COMPOSITE FABRICATION 1. Plate Sample Procedure a. Step 1

  16. Optimization of composite wood structural components : processing and design choices

    Treesearch

    Theodore L. Laufenberg

    1985-01-01

    Decreasing size and quality of the world's forest resources are responsible for interest in producing composite wood structural components. Process and design optimization methods are offered in this paper. Processing concepts for wood composite structural products are reviewed to illustrate manufacturing boundaries and areas of high potential. Structural...

  17. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Damage in Woven GFRP Composites Under Large-deflection Bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, Himayat; Harland, Andy R.; Silberschmidt, Vadim V.

    2012-10-01

    Textile-reinforced composites such as glass fibre-reinforced polymer (GFRP) used in sports products can be exposed to different in-service conditions such as large bending deformation and multiple impacts. Such loading conditions cause high local stresses and strains, which result in multiple modes of damage and fracture in composite laminates due to their inherent heterogeneity and non-trivial microstructure. In this paper, various damage modes in GFRP laminates are studied using experimental material characterisation, non-destructive micro-structural damage evaluation and numerical simulations. Experimental tests are carried out to characterise the behaviour of these materials under large-deflection bending. To obtain in-plane shear properties of laminates, tensile tests are performed using a full-field strain-measurement digital image correlation technique. X-ray micro computed tomography (Micro CT) is used to investigate internal material damage modes - delamination and cracking. Two-dimensional finite element (FE) models are implemented in the commercial code Abaqus to study the deformation behaviour and damage in GFRP. In these models, multiple layers of bilinear cohesive-zone elements are employed to study the onset and progression of inter-ply delamination and intra-ply fabric fracture of composite laminate, based on the X-ray Micro CT study. The developed numerical models are capable to simulate these features with their mechanisms as well as subsequent mode coupling observed in tests and Micro CT scanning. The obtained results of simulations are in agreement with experimental data.

  18. A Design Tool for Robust Composite Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    related goal is to compare the blast response of Dyneema® laminates with that of a carbon fiber reinforced polymer ( CFRP ) composite. (iii) To identify...embedded Dyneema® composite layers, both below and above the ballistic limit. 16 6. Hybrid Dyneema®/Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites...of Dyneema® fibers to carbon fiber reinforced polymer ( CFRP ) composites. The study focuses specifically on 3D orthogonal weaves with carbon employed

  19. Braided Composite Technologies for Rotorcraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jessie, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    A&P Technology has developed a braided material approach for fabricating lightweight, high-strength hybrid gears for aerospace drive systems. The conventional metallic web was replaced with a composite element made from A&P's quasi-isotropic braid. The 0deg, +/-60deg braid architecture was chosen so that inplane stiffness properties and strength would be nearly equal in all directions. The test results from the Phase I Small Spur Gear program demonstrated satisfactory endurance and strength while providing a 20 percent weight savings. (Greater weight savings is anticipated with structural optimization.) The hybrid gears were subjected to a proof-of-concept test of 1 billion cycles in a gearbox at 10,000 revolutions per minute and 490 in-lb torque with no detectable damage to the gears. After this test the maximum torque capability was also tested, and the static strength capability of the gears was 7x the maximum operating condition. Additional proof-of-concept tests are in progress using a higher oil temperature, and a loss-of-oil test is planned. The success of Phase I led to a Phase II program to develop, fabricate, and optimize full-scale gears, specifically Bull Gears. The design of these Bull Gears will be refined using topology optimization, and the full-scale Bull Gears will be tested in a full-scale gear rig. The testing will quantify benefits of weight savings, as well as noise and vibration reduction. The expectation is that vibration and noise will be reduced through the introduction of composite material in the vibration transmission path between the contacting gear teeth and the shaft-and-bearing system.

  20. Braided Composite Technologies for Rotorcraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jessie, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    A&P Technology has developed a braided material approach for fabricating lightweight, high-strength hybrid gears for aerospace drive systems. The conventional metallic web was replaced with a composite element made from A&P's quasi-isotropic braid. The 0deg, plus or minus 60 deg braid architecture was chosen so that inplane stiffness properties and strength would be nearly equal in all directions. The test results from the Phase I Small Spur Gear program demonstrated satisfactory endurance and strength while providing a 20 percent weight savings. (Greater weight savings is anticipated with structural optimization.) The hybrid gears were subjected to a proof-of-concept test of 1 billion cycles in a gearbox at 10,000 revolutions per minute and 490 in-lb torque with no detectable damage to the gears. After this test the maximum torque capability was also tested, and the static strength capability of the gears was 7x the maximum operating condition. Additional proof-of-concept tests are in progress using a higher oil temperature, and a loss-of-oil test is planned. The success of Phase I led to a Phase II program to develop, fabricate, and optimize full-scale gears, specifically Bull Gears. The design of these Bull Gears will be refined using topology optimization, and the full-scale Bull Gears will be tested in a full-scale gear rig. The testing will quantify benefits of weight savings, as well as noise and vibration reduction. The expectation is that vibration and noise will be reduced through the introduction of composite material in the vibration transmission path between the contacting gear teeth and the shaft-and-bearing system.

  1. Atomic structures and compositions of internal interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Seidman, D.N. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Merkle, K.L. )

    1992-03-01

    This research program addresses fundamental questions concerning the relationships between atomic structures and chemical compositions of metal/ceramic heterophase interfaces. The chemical composition profile across a Cu/MgO {l brace}111{r brace}-type heterophase interface, produced by the internal oxidation of a Cu(Mg) single phase alloy, is measured via atom-probe field-ion microscopy with a spatial resolution of 0.121 nm; this resolution is equal to the interplanar space of the {l brace}222{r brace} MgO planes. In particular, we demonstrate for the first time that the bonding across a Cu/MgO {l brace}111{r brace}-type heterophase interface, along a <111> direction common to both the Cu matrix and an MgO precipitate, has the sequence Cu{vert bar}O{vert bar}Mg{hor ellipsis} and not Cu{vert bar}Mg{vert bar}O{hor ellipsis}; this result is achieved without any deconvolution of the experimental data. Before determining this chemical sequence it was established, via high resolution electron microscopy, that the morphology of an MgO precipitate in a Cu matrix is an octahedron faceted on {l brace}111{r brace} planes with a cube-on-cube relationship between a precipitate and the matrix. First results are also presented for the Ni/Cr{sub 2}O{sub 4} interface; for this system selected area atom probe microscopy was used to analyze this interface; Cr{sub 2}O{sub 4} precipitates are located in a field-ion microscope tip and a precipitate is brought into the tip region via a highly controlled electropolishing technique.

  2. Structural optimization of large ocean-going structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, O. F.

    1984-01-01

    Ocean-going vehicles and platforms are among the largest structures in the world and are subjected to relatively harsh conditions of motions and loads. Some of them, such as semi-submersible platforms, are a relatively new type of structure and hence there is no formal, well evolved and established structural design code as there is for more traditional structures. More recently, efforts have also been made to develop a design method of this type for ships and other ocean structures. One of the many advantages of a rationally based design method is versatility; it can be used for structures that have widely differing purposes, measures of merit, shapes and sizes. The purpose is to describe a rationally based design method that has been developed within the field of ocean structures, in order that persons dealing with other types of structure can judge whether and to what extent its various features may be useful for those other types. Also, even though some features may not be applicable they might stimulate some useful ideas.

  3. The Overall Response of Composite Materials Undergoing Large Elastic Deformations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-30

    procedure in general to es.et the energy of the composite W (i). For the linear case, it has been shown (MILTON, 1985; AVELLANEDA , 1987) that the DSC...No. 89-0288. 26 P. . CASTAFEDA REFRENcEs AVELLANEDA . M. 1987 Commun. Pure appi. Math. 40, 527. BOUCHER. S. 1974 J. Compos. Mater. 8, 82. BUDIANSKY, B

  4. The Overall Response of Composite Materials Undergoing Large Deformations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-11-15

    anisotropic composites with prescribed volume fractions, the Voigt/Reuss bounds on the effective energy function U are known to be non-optimal. AVELLANEDA ...discussions. References M. AVELLANEDA (1987) SIAM J. appl. Math. 47, 1216. M. BERAN AND J. MOLYNEUX (1984) Q. appl. Math. 24, 107. G. DE BOTTON and P

  5. Development of Damped Metal Matrix Composites for Advanced Structural Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-01

    DTIP FiLE COPY Applied Research Laboratory (Dto 00 CD Technical Report NO DEVELOPMENT OF DAMPED METAL MATRIX COMPOSITES FOR ADVANCED STRUCTURAL...DEVELOPMENT OF DAMPED METAL MATRIX COMPOSITES FOR ADVANCED STRUCTURAL APPLICATIONS by Clark A. Updike Ram B. Bhagat Technical Report No. TR 90-004 April 1990... Metal Matrix Composites for Advanced Structural Applications 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) C.A. Updike, R. Bhagat 1 3a TYPE OF REPORT 13b TIME COVERED 14. DATE

  6. Innovative Energy Absorbing Composite Material for Crashworthy Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-12

    Innovative Energy Absorbing Composite Material for Crashworthy Structures Charles E. Bakis, Edward C. Smith, Chandrashekhar Tiwari, Todd C. Henry...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Innovative Energy Absorbing Composite Material for Crashworthy Structures 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER N00014-09-1...vehicles by providing outstanding energy absorption with minimal weight. The structural element is an array of concentric fiber reinforced composite tubes

  7. Research on the control of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denman, E. D.

    1983-01-01

    The research effort on the control of large space structures at the University of Houston has concentrated on the mathematical theory of finite-element models; identification of the mass, damping, and stiffness matrix; assignment of damping to structures; and decoupling of structure dynamics. The objective of the work has been and will continue to be the development of efficient numerical algorithms for analysis, control, and identification of large space structures. The major consideration in the development of the algorithms has been the large number of equations that must be handled by the algorithm as well as sensitivity of the algorithms to numerical errors.

  8. Size effect in composite materials and structures: Basic concepts and design considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweben, Carl

    1994-01-01

    Composite materials display strength characteristics that are similar to those of brittle ceramics, whose strengths are known to decrease with increasing volume for a uniform state of stress (size effect) and also are dependent on stress distribution. These similarities raise the question of whether there is also a size effect in composite materials and structures. There is significant, but inconclusive experimental evidence for the existence of a size effect in composites. Macroscopic and micromechanical statistical models have been developed which predict a size effect and are in general agreement with experimental data. The existence of a significant size effect in composites would be of great importance. For example, it would mean that use of standard test coupons to establish design allowables for large structures could be very nonconservative. Further, it would be necessary to analyze the strength of large composite structures using statistical methods, as is done for ceramics.

  9. Size effect in composite materials and structures: Basic concepts and design considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweben, Carl

    1994-01-01

    Composite materials display strength characteristics that are similar to those of brittle ceramics, whose strengths are known to decrease with increasing volume for a uniform state of stress (size effect) and also are dependent on stress distribution. These similarities raise the question of whether there is also a size effect in composite materials and structures. There is significant, but inconclusive experimental evidence for the existence of a size effect in composites. Macroscopic and micromechanical statistical models have been developed which predict a size effect and are in general agreement with experimental data. The existence of a significant size effect in composites would be of great importance. For example, it would mean that use of standard test coupons to establish design allowables for large structures could be very nonconservative. Further, it would be necessary to analyze the strength of large composite structures using statistical methods, as is done for ceramics.

  10. Study on voids of epoxy matrix composites sandwich structure parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Simin; Wen, Youyi; Yu, Wenjun; Liu, Hong; Yue, Cheng; Bao, Jing

    2017-03-01

    Void is the most common tiny defect of composite materials. Porosity is closely related to composite structure property. The voids forming behaviour in the composites sandwich structural parts with the carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin skins was researched by adjusting the manufacturing process parameters. The composites laminate with different porosities were prepared with the different process parameter. The ultrasonic non-destructive measurement method for the porosity was developed and verified through microscopic examination. The analysis results show that compaction pressure during the manufacturing process had influence on the porosity in the laminate area. Increasing the compaction pressure and compaction time will reduce the porosity of the laminates. The bond-line between honeycomb core and carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin skins were also analyzed through microscopic examination. The mechanical properties of sandwich structure composites were studied. The optimization process parameters and porosity ultrasonic measurement method for composites sandwich structure have been applied to the production of the composite parts.

  11. Multi-material Preforming of Structural Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, Robert E.; Eberle, Cliff C.; Pastore, Christopher M.; Sudbury, Thomas Z.; Xiong, Fue; Hartman, David

    2015-05-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites offer significant weight reduction potential, with glass fiber composites already widely adopted. Carbon fiber composites deliver the greatest performance benefits, but their high cost has inhibited widespread adoption. This project demonstrates that hybrid carbon-glass solutions can realize most of the benefits of carbon fiber composites at much lower cost. ORNL and Owens Corning Reinforcements along with program participants at the ORISE collaborated to demonstrate methods for produce hybrid composites along with techniques to predict performance and economic tradeoffs. These predictions were then verified in testing coupons and more complex demonstration articles.

  12. Creating and testing large space structures of high precision surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medzmariashvili, Elgudja; Iacobashvili, Alexander; Beducadze, Guram

    The authors describe work on the development of large structures for use in space. This work involves development of structural classes (types), theoretical studis, systems manufacturing and full scale structure testing. Collecting solar energy in space and sending it down to Earth is of great interest to humanity because of the large need for energy on Earth. Building any large solar power station requires industry and construction engineering in space. The problem, as a whole, as well as specific parts thereof virtually always requires certain engineering support, i.e. erection of supporting, reflecting and other large-sized structures in orbit. The Institute of Transformed Structures carries out research, design manufacturing, ground testing and supply of launchable prototypes. The work is performed in an unified manner and contains several trends (categories) which define structures that can be assembled in space.

  13. Structural Durability of Damaged Metallic Panel Repaired with Composite Patches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon; Chamis, Christos C.

    1997-01-01

    Structural durability/damage tolerance characteristics of an aluminum tension specimen possessing a short crack and repaired by applying a fiber composite surface patch is investigated via computational simulation. The composite patch is made of graphite/epoxy plies with various layups. An integrated computer code that accounts for all possible failure modes is utilized for the simulation of combined fiber-composite/aluminum structural degradation under loading. Damage initiation, growth, accumulation, and propagation to structural fracture are included in the simulation. Results show the structural degradation stages due to tensile loading and illustrate the use of computational simulation for the investigation of a composite patch repaired cracked metallic panel.

  14. High Performance Piezoelectric Thin Films for Shape Control in Large Inflatable Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neurgaonkar, R. R.; Nelson, J. G.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this research and development program was to develop PbZr(1-x)Ti(x)O3 (PZT) and Pb(1-x)Ba(x)Nb2O6 (PBN) materials with large piezoelectric response which are suitable for shape control in large inflatable structures. Two approaches were to be considered: (1) direct deposition of PZT and PBN films on flexible plastic or thin metal foil substrates, and (2) deposition on Si followed by fabrication of hybrid structures on mylar or kapton. Testing in shape control concepts was carried out at JPL and based on their results, the required modifications were made in the final film compositions and deposition techniques. The program objective was to identify and then optimize piezoelectric materials for NASA shape control applications. This involved the bulk piezoelectric and photovoltaic responses and the compatibility of the thin films with appropriate substrate structures. Within the PZT system, Rockwell has achieved the highest reported piezoelectric coefficient (d(sub 33) greater than 100 pC/N) of any ceramic composition. We used this experience in piezoelectric technology to establish compositions that can effectively address the issues of this program. The performance of piezoelectric thin films depends directly on d(sub ij) and epsilin. The challenge was to find PZT compositions that maintained high d(sub ij) and epsilon, while also exhibiting a large photovoltaic effect and integrate thin films of this composition into the system structure necessary to meet shape control applications. During the course of this program, several PZT and PLZT compositions were identified that meet these requirements. Two such compositions were successfully used in electrical and optical actuation studies of thin film structures.

  15. High Performance Piezoelectric Thin Films for Shape Control in Large Inflatable Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neurgaonkar, R. R.; Nelson, J. G.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this research and development program was to develop PbZr(1-x)Ti(x)O3 (PZT) and Pb(1-x)Ba(x)Nb2O6 (PBN) materials with large piezoelectric response which are suitable for shape control in large inflatable structures. Two approaches were to be considered: (1) direct deposition of PZT and PBN films on flexible plastic or thin metal foil substrates, and (2) deposition on Si followed by fabrication of hybrid structures on mylar or kapton. Testing in shape control concepts was carried out at JPL and based on their results, the required modifications were made in the final film compositions and deposition techniques. The program objective was to identify and then optimize piezoelectric materials for NASA shape control applications. This involved the bulk piezoelectric and photovoltaic responses and the compatibility of the thin films with appropriate substrate structures. Within the PZT system, Rockwell has achieved the highest reported piezoelectric coefficient (d(sub 33) greater than 100 pC/N) of any ceramic composition. We used this experience in piezoelectric technology to establish compositions that can effectively address the issues of this program. The performance of piezoelectric thin films depends directly on d(sub ij) and Epsilon. The challenge was to find PZT compositions that maintained high d(sub ij) and Epsilon, while also exhibiting a large photovoltaic effect and integrate thin films of this composition into the system structure necessary to meet shape control applications. During the course of this program, several PZT and PLZT compositions were identified that meet these requirements. Two such compositions were successfully used in electrical and optical actuation studies of thin film structures.

  16. Electrical rotary joint apparatus for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belew, R. R.; Boehme, R. J. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A structural array and electrical rotary joint for transmitting an electrical power between large space structures having relative rotational movement is disclosed which includes large support framework structures which rotate relative to one another about a common axis of rotation. A rotary interface joint is defined between the structures. A cylindrical hub member is carried by one structure and a cylindrical hub member is carried by a support structure with a third hub member being concentrically within a fourth hub member for relative rotation. Tension connecting cables connect hub members with their associated outer structures whereby relative rotational movement between the structures is transmitted to the cylindrical hub members for unitary motion therewith. Electrical conductor brush members are carried by one hub and electrical contact rings are carried by another hub member in sliding electrical contact with the brushes for transmission of electrical power during relative rotational movement between the two support structures.

  17. Compositional Variegation of Large-Diameter Low-Albedo Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilas, F.; Jarvis, K. S.; Anz-Meador, T. D.; Thibault, C. A.; Sawyer, S. R.; Fitzsimmons, A.

    1997-07-01

    Asteroids showing signs of aqueous alteration and thermal metamorphism in visible/near IR spectroscopy and photometry (C, G, F, B, and P classes) ranging from 0.37 - 0.90mu m dominate the asteroid population at heliocentric distances of 2.6 - 3.5 AU. Age dating of meteorites indicates that the Solar System was subjected to a major heating event 4.5 Gyr ago. Recent meteoritic research has produced evidence of a carbonaceous chondrite subjected to two separate aqueous alteration events with a metamorphic heating inbetween (Krot et al., 1997, submitted). Models of the effects of heating by electromagnetic induction or decay of short-lived radionuclides combined with models of the early collisional history of the Solar System after Jupiter's formation indicate that asteroids observed today can be divided into two groups by diameter. Those asteroids having diameters greater than 100 km were mixed by multiple collisions but remain as gravitationally bound rubble piles. Asteroids with diameters less than 100 km should show more compositional diversity. Vilas and Sykes (1996, Icarus, v. 124, 483) have shown using ECAS photometry that this compositional difference exists. Those asteroids having diameters greater than 100 km should be individually homogeneous, with spectral differences showing the combined effects of a primordial compositional gradient in the asteroid belt with thermal metamorphism. We address the significance of spatially-resolved spectra of 42 asteroids to the collective origin of these asteroids.

  18. Compositional Variation in Large-Diameter Low-Albedo asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilas, F.; Jarvis, K. S.; Thibault, C. A.; Sawyer, S. R.

    2000-12-01

    Age dating of meteorites indicates that the Solar System was subjected to a major heating event 4.5 Gyr ago. Models of the effects of heating by electromagnetic induction or decay of short-lived radionuclides combined with models of the early collisional history of the Solar System after Jupiter's formation indicate that asteroids observed today can be divided into two groups by diameter. Those asteroids having diameters greater than 100 km were mixed by multiple collisions but remain as gravitationally bound rubble piles. Asteroids with diameters less than 100 km should show more compositional diversity. Vilas and Sykes (1996, Icarus, 124) have shown using ECAS photometry that this compositional difference exists. The larger diameter group should be individually homogenous, with spectral differences showing the combined effects of a primordial compositional gradient in the asteroid belt with thermal metamorphism. We address the significance of 36 rotationally-resolved spectra of larger-diameter low-albedo asteroids of the C class (and subclasses B, F, G) and P class in the visible and Near-IR spectral regions. This work was supported by the NASA Planetary Astronomy program.

  19. Composition, structure and chemistry of interstellar dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Allamandola, Louis J.

    1986-01-01

    The observational constraints on the composition of the interstellar dust are analyzed. The dust in the diffuse interstellar medium consists of a mixture of stardust (amorphous silicates, amorphous carbon, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and graphite) and interstellar medium dust (organic refractory material). Stardust seems to dominate in the local diffuse interstellar medium. Inside molecular clouds, however, icy grain mantles are also important. The structural differences between crystalline and amorphous materials, which lead to differences in the optical properties, are discussed. The astrophysical consequences are briefly examined. The physical principles of grain surface chemistry are discussed and applied to the formation of molecular hydrogen and icy grain mantles inside dense molecular clouds. Transformation of these icy grain mantles into the organic refractory dust component observed in the diffuse interstellar medium requires ultraviolet sources inside molecular clouds as well as radical diffusion promoted by transient heating of the mantle. The latter process also returns a considerable fraction of the molecules in the grain mantle to the gas phase.

  20. Environmentally Friendly Bio-Based Vinyl Ester Resins for Military Composite Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    DoD because of their low weight and excellent properties, enabling the production of lighter weight and stronger vehicles, ships, and structures...HAP emissions during resin processing, composite production , and painting applications. These trapping devices need to absorb most of the VOC/HAP...First, their use is not feasible in the production of large-scale structures or in field repair. Large-scale structures are typically fabricated

  1. Integrated structural control design of large space structures

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.J.; Lauffer, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    Active control of structures has been under intensive development for the last ten years. Reference 2 reviews much of the identification and control technology for structural control developed during this time. The technology was initially focused on space structure and weapon applications; however, recently the technology is also being directed toward applications in manufacturing and transportation. Much of this technology focused on multiple-input/multiple-output (MIMO) identification and control methodology because many of the applications require a coordinated control involving multiple disturbances and control objectives where multiple actuators and sensors are necessary for high performance. There have been many optimal robust control methods developed for the design of MIMO robust control laws; however, there appears to be a significant gap between the theoretical development and experimental evaluation of control and identification methods to address structural control applications. Many methods have been developed for MIMO identification and control of structures, such as the Eigensystem Realization Algorithm (ERA), Q-Markov Covariance Equivalent Realization (Q-Markov COVER) for identification; and, Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG), Frequency Weighted LQG and H-/ii-synthesis methods for control. Upon implementation, many of the identification and control methods have shown limitations such as the excitation of unmodelled dynamics and sensitivity to system parameter variations. As a result, research on methods which address these problems have been conducted.

  2. Advanced Composite Structures At NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldred, Lloyd B.

    2015-01-01

    Dr. Eldred's presentation will discuss several NASA efforts to improve and expand the use of composite structures within aerospace vehicles. Topics will include an overview of NASA's Advanced Composites Project (ACP), Space Launch System (SLS) applications, and Langley's ISAAC robotic composites research tool.

  3. Hydroelastic responses of pontoon type very large floating offshore structure

    SciTech Connect

    Haeda, Hisaaki; Miyajima, Shyogo; Masuda, Koich; Ikoma, Tomoki

    1996-12-31

    The authors developed the estimating method of the hydroelastic response of a very large pontoon type floating structure. In this method, the pressure distribution method with shallow draft assumption was used to obtain the hydrodynamic forces considering the elastic motion of a floating body. The elastic responses of very large floating structure were estimated by using 1-D beam modeling. On the other hand, to observe the elastic response of a large pontoon type structure they carried out experiments in head sea and head-beam sea conditions. The experimental model was an elastic model of pontoon type large floating body. To validate numerical estimation method the authors compared the numerical results with experimental results. From these results, they found good agreement and confirmed the accuracy of this numerical estimation method of the hydroelasticity of a very large pontoon type floating structure.

  4. Damage Detection in Composite Structures with Wavenumber Array Data Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Leckey, Cara; Yu, Lingyu

    2013-01-01

    Guided ultrasonic waves (GUW) have the potential to be an efficient and cost-effective method for rapid damage detection and quantification of large structures. Attractive features include sensitivity to a variety of damage types and the capability of traveling relatively long distances. They have proven to be an efficient approach for crack detection and localization in isotropic materials. However, techniques must be pushed beyond isotropic materials in order to be valid for composite aircraft components. This paper presents our study on GUW propagation and interaction with delamination damage in composite structures using wavenumber array data processing, together with advanced wave propagation simulations. Parallel elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) is used for the example simulations. Multi-dimensional Fourier transform is used to convert time-space wavefield data into frequency-wavenumber domain. Wave propagation in the wavenumber-frequency domain shows clear distinction among the guided wave modes that are present. This allows for extracting a guided wave mode through filtering and reconstruction techniques. Presence of delamination causes spectral change accordingly. Results from 3D CFRP guided wave simulations with delamination damage in flat-plate specimens are used for wave interaction with structural defect study.

  5. Modeling the initiation and growth of delaminations in composite structures

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, E.D. Jr.; Mello, F.J.; Guess, T.R.

    1996-01-01

    A method for modeling the initiation and growth of discrete delaminations in shell-like composite structures is presented. The laminate is divided into two or more sublaminates, with each sublaminate modeled with 4-noded quadrilateral shell elements. A special, 8-noded hex constraint element connects the sublaminates and makes them act as a single laminate until a prescribed failure criterion is attained. When the failure criterion is reached, the connection is broken, and a discrete delamination is initiated or grows. This approach has been implemented in a three-dimensional, finite element code. This code uses explicit time integration, and can analyze shell-like structures subjected to large deformations and complex contact conditions. Tensile, compressive, and shear laminate failures are also modeled. This paper describes the 8-noded hex constraint element used to model the initiation and growth of a delamination, and discusses associated implementation issues. In addition, calculated results for double cantilever beam and end notched flexure specimens are presented and compared to measured data to assess the ability of the present approach to reproduce observed behavior. Results are also presented for a diametrally compressed ring to demonstrate the capacity to analyze progressive failure in a highly deformed composite structure.

  6. Damage Detection in Composite Structures with Wavenumber Array Data Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Leckey, Cara; Yu, Lingyu

    2013-01-01

    Guided ultrasonic waves (GUW) have the potential to be an efficient and cost-effective method for rapid damage detection and quantification of large structures. Attractive features include sensitivity to a variety of damage types and the capability of traveling relatively long distances. They have proven to be an efficient approach for crack detection and localization in isotropic materials. However, techniques must be pushed beyond isotropic materials in order to be valid for composite aircraft components. This paper presents our study on GUW propagation and interaction with delamination damage in composite structures using wavenumber array data processing, together with advanced wave propagation simulations. Parallel elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) is used for the example simulations. Multi-dimensional Fourier transform is used to convert time-space wavefield data into frequency-wavenumber domain. Wave propagation in the wavenumber-frequency domain shows clear distinction among the guided wave modes that are present. This allows for extracting a guided wave mode through filtering and reconstruction techniques. Presence of delamination causes spectral change accordingly. Results from 3D CFRP guided wave simulations with delamination damage in flat-plate specimens are used for wave interaction with structural defect study.

  7. Simulation of Mechanical Behavior and Damage of a Large Composite Wind Turbine Blade under Critical Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarfaoui, M.; Nachtane, M.; Khadimallah, H.; Saifaoui, D.

    2017-07-01

    Issues such as energy generation/transmission and greenhouse gas emissions are the two energy problems we face today. In this context, renewable energy sources are a necessary part of the solution essentially winds power, which is one of the most profitable sources of competition with new fossil energy facilities. This paper present the simulation of mechanical behavior and damage of a 48 m composite wind turbine blade under critical wind loads. The finite element analysis was performed by using ABAQUS code to predict the most critical damage behavior and to apprehend and obtain knowledge of the complex structural behavior of wind turbine blades. The approach developed based on the nonlinear FE analysis using mean values for the material properties and the failure criteria of Tsai-Hill to predict failure modes in large structures and to identify the sensitive zones.

  8. Analysis of truss, beam, frame, and membrane components. [composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoell, A. C.; Robinson, E. Y.

    1975-01-01

    Truss components are considered, taking into account composite truss structures, truss analysis, column members, and truss joints. Beam components are discussed, giving attention to composite beams, laminated beams, and sandwich beams. Composite frame components and composite membrane components are examined. A description is given of examples of flat membrane components and examples of curved membrane elements. It is pointed out that composite structural design and analysis is a highly interactive, iterative procedure which does not lend itself readily to characterization by design or analysis function only.-

  9. Composites structures for bone tissue reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Neto, W.; Santos, João; Avérous, L.; Schlatter, G.; Bretas, Rosario

    2015-05-22

    The search for new biomaterials in the bone reconstitution field is growing continuously as humane life expectation and bone fractures increase. For this purpose, composite materials with biodegradable polymers and hydroxyapatite (HA) have been used. A composite material formed by a film, nanofibers and HA has been made. Both, the films and the non-woven mats of nanofibers were formed by nanocomposites made of butylene adipate-co-terephthalate (PBAT) and HA. The techniques used to produce the films and nanofibers were spin coating and electrospinning, respectively. The composite production and morphology were evaluated. The composite showed an adequate morphology and fibers size to be used as scaffold for cell growth.

  10. Composites structures for bone tissue reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neto, W.; Santos, João.; Avérous, L.; Schlatter, G.; Bretas, Rosario.

    2015-05-01

    The search for new biomaterials in the bone reconstitution field is growing continuously as humane life expectation and bone fractures increase. For this purpose, composite materials with biodegradable polymers and hydroxyapatite (HA) have been used. A composite material formed by a film, nanofibers and HA has been made. Both, the films and the non-woven mats of nanofibers were formed by nanocomposites made of butylene adipate-co-terephthalate (PBAT) and HA. The techniques used to produce the films and nanofibers were spin coating and electrospinning, respectively. The composite production and morphology were evaluated. The composite showed an adequate morphology and fibers size to be used as scaffold for cell growth.

  11. Composite Bus Structure for the SMEX/WIRE Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosanova, Giulio G.

    1998-01-01

    In an effort to reduce the weight and optimize the structural design of the Small Explorer (SMEX) Wide-Field Infrared Explorer (WIRE) spacecraft, it has become desirable to change the material and construction from mechanically fastened aluminum structure to a fully bonded fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) structure. GSFC has developed the WIRE spacecraft structural bus design concept, including the instrument and launch vehicle requirements. The WIRE Satellite is the fifth of a series of SMEX satellites to be launched once per year. GSFC has chosen Composite Optics Inc. (COI) as the prime contractor for the development and procurement of the WIRE composite structure. The detailed design of the fully bonded FRC structure is based on COI's Short Notice Accelerated Production SATellite ("SNAPSAT") approach. SNAPSAT is a state of the art design and manufacturing technology for advanced composite materials which utilizes flat-stock detail parts bonded together to produce a final structural assembly. The structural design approach adopted for the WIRE structure provides a very viable alternative to both traditional aluminum construction as well as high tech. molded type composite structures. This approach to composite structure design is much less costly than molded or honeycomb sandwich type composite construction, but may cost slightly more than conventional aluminum construction on the subsystem level. However on the overall program level the weight saving achieved is very cost effective, since the primary objective is to allocate more mass for science payloads.

  12. Acoustic Emission of Large PRSEUS Structures (Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, Michael R.; Juarez, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    In the role of structural health monitoring (SHM), Acoustic Emission (AE) analysis is being investigated as an effective method for tracking damage development in large composite structures under load. Structures made using Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) for damage tolerant, light, and economical airframe construction are being pursued by The Boeing Company and NASA under the Environmentally Responsible Aircraft initiative (ERA). The failure tests of two PRSEUS substructures based on the Boeing Hybrid Wing Body fuselage concept were conducted during third quarter 2011 and second quarter 2015. One fundamental concern of these tests was determining the effectiveness of the stitched integral stiffeners to inhibit damage progression. By design, severe degradation of load carrying capability should not occur prior to Design Ultimate Load (DUL). While minor damage prior to DUL was anticipated, the integral stitching should not fail since this would allow a stiffener-skin delamination to progress rapidly and alter the transfer of load into the stiffeners. In addition, the stiffeners should not fracture because they are fundamental to structural integrity. Getting the best information from each AE sensor is a primary consideration because a sparse network of sensors is implemented. Sensitivity to stiffener-contiguous degradation is supported by sensors near the stiffeners, which increases the coverage per sensor via AE waveguide actions. Some sensors are located near potentially critical areas or "critical zones" as identified by numerical analyses. The approach is compared with the damage progression monitored by other techniques (e.g. ultrasonic C-scan).

  13. Identification of large structures on orbit - A survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denman, Eugene E.; Juang, Jer-Nan; Junkins, John L.; Kamat, Manohar; Hasselman, T. K.

    1988-01-01

    This paper seeks to provide a brief overview of the somewhat unfamiliar concept underlying system identification especially as it applies to large flexible space structures. Having elaborated on the concept, the authors provide a detailed description of the identification process including model development, its experimental validation and final certification. This discussion is followed by a classification of the different identification methods and a brief evaluation of the potential of existing methodology to address special circumstances of large flexible space structures. The paper concludes by making a few recommendations that are deemed necessary to meet the enormous challenges posed by the deployment or erection of large space structures.

  14. Probabilistic evaluation of fuselage-type composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiao, Michael C.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1992-01-01

    A methodology is developed to computationally simulate the uncertain behavior of composite structures. The uncertain behavior includes buckling loads, natural frequencies, displacements, stress/strain etc., which are the consequences of the random variation (scatter) of the primitive (independent random) variables in the constituent, ply, laminate and structural levels. This methodology is implemented in the IPACS (Integrated Probabilistic Assessment of Composite Structures) computer code. A fuselage-type composite structure is analyzed to demonstrate the code's capability. The probability distribution functions of the buckling loads, natural frequency, displacement, strain and stress are computed. The sensitivity of each primitive (independent random) variable to a given structural response is also identified from the analyses.

  15. Electrostriction in Field-Structured Composites: Basis for a Fast Artificial Muscle?

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.A.; Martin, J.E.

    1999-01-27

    The electrostriction of composites consisting of dielectric particles embedded in a gel or elastomer is discussed. It is shown that when these particles are organized by a uniaxial field before gelation, the resulting field-structured composites are expected to exhibit enhanced electrostriction in a uniform field applied along the same axis as the structuring field. The associated stresses might be large enough to form the basis of a polymer-based fast artificial muscle.

  16. Electrostriction in field-structured composites: Basis for a fast artificial muscle?

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.E.; Anderson, R.A.

    1999-09-01

    The electrostriction of composites consisting of dielectric particles embedded in a gel or elastomer is discussed. It is shown that when these particles are organized by a uniaxial field before gelation, the resulting {ital field-structured} composites are expected to exhibit enhanced electrostriction in a uniform field applied along the same axis as the structuring field. The associated stresses might be large enough to form the basis of a polymer-based fast artificial muscle. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Compression strength of composite primary structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Eric R.

    1994-01-01

    The linear elastic response is determined for an internally pressurized, long circular cylindrical shell stiffened on the inside by a regular arrangement of identical stringers and identical rings. Periodicity of this configuration permits the analysis of a portion of the shell wall centered over a generic stringer-ring joint; i.e., a unit cell model. The stiffeners are modeled as discrete beams, and the stringer is assumed to have a symmetrical cross section and the ring an asymmetrical section. Asymmetery causes out-of-plane bending and torsion of the ring. Displacements are assumed as truncated double Fourier series plus simple terms in the axial coordinate to account for the closed and pressure vessel effect (a non-periodic effect). The interacting line loads between the stiffeners and the inside shell wall are Lagrange multipliers in the formulation, and they are also assumed as truncated Fourier series. Displacement continuity constraints between the stiffeners and shell along the contact lines are satisfied point-wise. Equilibrium is imposed by the principle of virtual work. A composite material crown panel from the fuselage of a large transport aircraft is the numerical example. The distributions of the interacting line loads, and the out-of-plane bending moment and torque in the ring, are strongly dependent on modeling the deformations due to transverse shear and cross-sectional warping of the ring in torsion. This paper contains the results from the semiannual report on research on 'Pressure Pillowing of an Orthogonally Stiffened Cylindrical Shell'. The results of the new work are illustrated in the included appendix.

  18. Compression strength of composite primary structural components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Eric R.

    1994-12-01

    The linear elastic response is determined for an internally pressurized, long circular cylindrical shell stiffened on the inside by a regular arrangement of identical stringers and identical rings. Periodicity of this configuration permits the analysis of a portion of the shell wall centered over a generic stringer-ring joint; i.e., a unit cell model. The stiffeners are modeled as discrete beams, and the stringer is assumed to have a symmetrical cross section and the ring an asymmetrical section. Asymmetery causes out-of-plane bending and torsion of the ring. Displacements are assumed as truncated double Fourier series plus simple terms in the axial coordinate to account for the closed and pressure vessel effect (a non-periodic effect). The interacting line loads between the stiffeners and the inside shell wall are Lagrange multipliers in the formulation, and they are also assumed as truncated Fourier series. Displacement continuity constraints between the stiffeners and shell along the contact lines are satisfied point-wise. Equilibrium is imposed by the principle of virtual work. A composite material crown panel from the fuselage of a large transport aircraft is the numerical example. The distributions of the interacting line loads, and the out-of-plane bending moment and torque in the ring, are strongly dependent on modeling the deformations due to transverse shear and cross-sectional warping of the ring in torsion. This paper contains the results from the semiannual report on research on 'Pressure Pillowing of an Orthogonally Stiffened Cylindrical Shell'. The results of the new work are illustrated in the included appendix.

  19. CRADA/NFE-15-05779 Report: Fabrication of Large Area Printable Composite Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Paranthaman, M. Parans

    2016-09-29

    The technical objective of this technical collaboration phase I proposal was to fabricate large area NdFeB composite magnets at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (ORNL MDF). The goal was to distribute domestically produced isotropic and highly anisotropic high energy density magnetic particles throughout the composite structure in order to enable site specific placement of magnetic phases and minimize the generated waste associated with permanent magnet manufacturing. Big area additive manufacturing (BAAM) and magnet composite fabrication methods were used in this study. BAAM was used to fabricate 65 vol % isotropic MQP NdFeB magnets in nylon polymer matrix. BAAM magnet cylinder was sliced to two magnetic arc-shaped braces. The density of the small BAAM magnet pieces reached 4.1 g/cm3, and the room temperature magnetic properties are: Intrinsic coercivity Hci = 8.8 kOe, Remanence Br = 4.2 kG, and energy product (BH)max = 3.7 MGOe. Also, 1.5” x 1.5” composite magnets with anisotropic MQA NdFeB magnet in a resin were also fabricated under magnetic field. The unaligned sample had a density of 3.75 g/cm3. However, aligned sample possessed a density of 4.27 g/cm3. The magnetic properties didn’t degrade during this process. This study provides a pathway for preparing composite magnets for various magnetic applications.

  20. Composite isogrid structures for parabolic surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverman, Edward M. (Inventor); Boyd, Jr., William E. (Inventor); Rhodes, Marvin D. (Inventor); Dyer, Jack E. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The invention relates to high stiffness parabolic structures utilizing integral reinforced grids. The parabolic structures implement the use of isogrid structures which incorporate unique and efficient orthotropic patterns for efficient stiffness and structural stability.