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Sample records for large deformation diffeomorphic

  1. Large Deformation Diffeomorphic Metric Curve Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Glaunès, Joan; Miller, Michael I.; Younes, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    We present a matching criterion for curves and integrate it into the large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping (LDDMM) scheme for computing an optimal transformation between two curves embedded in Euclidean space ℝd. Curves are first represented as vector-valued measures, which incorporate both location and the first order geometric structure of the curves. Then, a Hilbert space structure is imposed on the measures to build the norm for quantifying the closeness between two curves. We describe a discretized version of this, in which discrete sequences of points along the curve are represented by vector-valued functionals. This gives a convenient and practical way to define a matching functional for curves. We derive and implement the curve matching in the large deformation framework and demonstrate mapping results of curves in ℝ2 and ℝ3. Behaviors of the curve mapping are discussed using 2D curves. The applications to shape classification is shown and experiments with 3D curves extracted from brain cortical surfaces are presented. PMID:20419045

  2. Large deformation diffeomorphic registration of diffusion-weighted imaging data

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pei; Niethammer, Marc; Shen, Dinggang; Yap, Pew-Thian

    2014-01-01

    Registration plays an important role in group analysis of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) data. It can be used to build a reference anatomy for investigating structural variation or tracking changes in white matter. Unlike traditional scalar image registration where spatial alignment is the only focus, registration of DWI data requires both spatial alignment of structures and reorientation of local signal profiles. As such, DWI registration is much more complex and challenging than scalar image registration. Although a variety of algorithms has been proposed to tackle the problem, most of them are restricted by the zdiffusion model used for registration, making it difficult to fit to the registered data a different model. In this paper we describe a method that allows any diffusion model to be fitted after registration for subsequent multifaceted analysis. This is achieved by directly aligning DWI data using a large deformation diffeomorphic registration framework. Our algorithm seeks the optimal coordinate mapping by simultaneously considering structural alignment, local signal profile reorientation, and deformation regularization. Our algorithm also incorporates a multi-kernel strategy to concurrently register anatomical structures at different scales. We demonstrate the efficacy of our approach using in vivo data and report detailed qualitative and quantitative results in comparison with several different registration strategies. PMID:25106710

  3. Large Deformation Multiresolution Diffeomorphic Metric Mapping for Multiresolution Cortical Surfaces: A Coarse-to-Fine Approach.

    PubMed

    Tan, Mingzhen; Qiu, Anqi

    2016-09-01

    Brain surface registration is an important tool for characterizing cortical anatomical variations and understanding their roles in normal cortical development and psychiatric diseases. However, surface registration remains challenging due to complicated cortical anatomy and its large differences across individuals. In this paper, we propose a fast coarse-to-fine algorithm for surface registration by adapting the large diffeomorphic deformation metric mapping (LDDMM) framework for surface mapping and show improvements in speed and accuracy via a multiresolution analysis of surface meshes and the construction of multiresolution diffeomorphic transformations. The proposed method constructs a family of multiresolution meshes that are used as natural sparse priors of the cortical morphology. At varying resolutions, these meshes act as anchor points where the parameterization of multiresolution deformation vector fields can be supported, allowing the construction of a bundle of multiresolution deformation fields, each originating from a different resolution. Using a coarse-to-fine approach, we show a potential reduction in computation cost along with improvements in sulcal alignment when compared with LDDMM surface mapping. PMID:27254865

  4. A large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping solution for diffusion spectrum imaging datasets.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yung-Chin; Hsu, Ching-Han; Tseng, Wen-Yih Isaac

    2012-11-01

    Spatial transformation for diffusion spectrum imaging (DSI) is an important step for group analyses of DSI datasets. In this study, we developed a transformation method for DSI datasets under the framework of large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping (LDDMM), which is termed LDDMM-DSI. The proposed method made use of the fact that a DSI dataset is 6D, and generalized the original 2D/3D LDDMM algorithm to the 6D case with some modifications made for the DSI datasets. In this manner, the conventional reorientation problem that arises from transforming diffusion-weighted datasets was avoided by making the DSI datasets capable of being freely deformed in the q-space. The algorithm treated the data-matching task as a variational problem under the LDDMM framework and sought optimal velocity fields from which the generated transformations were diffeomorphic and the transformation curve was a geodesic. The mathematical materials and numerical implementation are detailed in the paper, and experiments were performed to analyze the proposed method on real brain DSI datasets. The results showed that the method was capable of registering different DSI datasets in both global structural shapes and local diffusion profiles. In conclusion, the proposed method can facilitate group analyses of DSI datasets and the generation of a DSI template.

  5. Gauss-Newton inspired preconditioned optimization in large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Monica

    2014-10-21

    In this work, we propose a novel preconditioned optimization method in the paradigm of Large Deformation Diffeomorphic Metric Mapping (LDDMM). The preconditioned update scheme is formulated for the non-stationary and the stationary parameterizations of diffeomorphisms, yielding three different LDDMM methods. The preconditioning matrices are inspired in the Hessian approximation used in Gauss-Newton method. The derivatives are computed using Frechet differentials. Thus, optimization is performed in a Sobolev space, in contrast to optimization in L(2) commonly used in non-rigid registration literature. The proposed LDDMM methods have been evaluated and compared with their respective implementations of gradient descent optimization. Evaluation has been performed using real and simulated images from the Non-rigid Image Registration Evaluation Project (NIREP). The experiments conducted in this work reported that our preconditioned LDDMM methods achieved a performance similar or superior to well-established-in-literature gradient descent non-stationary LDDMM in the great majority of cases. Moreover, preconditioned optimization showed a substantial reduction in the execution time with an affordable increase of the memory usage per iteration. Additional experiments reported that optimization using Frechet differentials should be preferable to optimization using L(2) differentials.

  6. Deep Adaptive Log-Demons: Diffeomorphic Image Registration with Very Large Deformations.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liya; Jia, Kebin

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a new framework for capturing large and complex deformation in image registration. Traditionally, this challenging problem relies firstly on a preregistration, usually an affine matrix containing rotation, scale, and translation and afterwards on a nonrigid transformation. According to preregistration, the directly calculated affine matrix, which is obtained by limited pixel information, may misregistrate when large biases exist, thus misleading following registration subversively. To address this problem, for two-dimensional (2D) images, the two-layer deep adaptive registration framework proposed in this paper firstly accurately classifies the rotation parameter through multilayer convolutional neural networks (CNNs) and then identifies scale and translation parameters separately. For three-dimensional (3D) images, affine matrix is located through feature correspondences by a triplanar 2D CNNs. Then deformation removal is done iteratively through preregistration and demons registration. By comparison with the state-of-the-art registration framework, our method gains more accurate registration results on both synthetic and real datasets. Besides, principal component analysis (PCA) is combined with correlation like Pearson and Spearman to form new similarity standards in 2D and 3D registration. Experiment results also show faster convergence speed. PMID:26120356

  7. Deep Adaptive Log-Demons: Diffeomorphic Image Registration with Very Large Deformations

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liya; Jia, Kebin

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a new framework for capturing large and complex deformation in image registration. Traditionally, this challenging problem relies firstly on a preregistration, usually an affine matrix containing rotation, scale, and translation and afterwards on a nonrigid transformation. According to preregistration, the directly calculated affine matrix, which is obtained by limited pixel information, may misregistrate when large biases exist, thus misleading following registration subversively. To address this problem, for two-dimensional (2D) images, the two-layer deep adaptive registration framework proposed in this paper firstly accurately classifies the rotation parameter through multilayer convolutional neural networks (CNNs) and then identifies scale and translation parameters separately. For three-dimensional (3D) images, affine matrix is located through feature correspondences by a triplanar 2D CNNs. Then deformation removal is done iteratively through preregistration and demons registration. By comparison with the state-of-the-art registration framework, our method gains more accurate registration results on both synthetic and real datasets. Besides, principal component analysis (PCA) is combined with correlation like Pearson and Spearman to form new similarity standards in 2D and 3D registration. Experiment results also show faster convergence speed. PMID:26120356

  8. Large chiral diffeomorphisms on Riemann surfaces and W-algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Bandelloni, G.; Lazzarini, S.

    2006-10-15

    The diffeomorphism action lifted on truncated (chiral) Taylor expansion of a complex scalar field over a Riemann surface is presented in the paper under the name of large diffeomorphisms. After an heuristic approach, we show how a linear truncation in the Taylor expansion can generate an algebra of symmetry characterized by some structure functions. Such a linear truncation is explicitly realized by introducing the notion of Forsyth frame over the Riemann surface with the help of a conformally covariant algebraic differential equation. The large chiral diffeomorphism action is then implemented through a Becchi-Rouet-Stora (BRS) formulation (for a given order of truncation) leading to a more algebraic setup. In this context the ghost fields behave as holomorphically covariant jets. Subsequently, the link with the so-called W-algebras is made explicit once the ghost parameters are turned from jets into tensorial ghost ones. We give a general solution with the help of the structure functions pertaining to all the possible truncations lower or equal to the given order. This provides another contribution to the relationship between Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) flows and W-diffeomorphims.

  9. Anyonic statistics and large horizon diffeomorphisms for loop quantum gravity black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pithis, Andreas G. A.; Ruiz Euler, Hans-Christian

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the role played by large diffeomorphisms of quantum isolated horizons for the statistics of loop quantum gravity (LQG) black holes by means of their relation to the braid group. To this aim the symmetries of Chern-Simons theory are recapitulated with particular regard to the aforementioned type of diffeomorphisms. For the punctured spherical horizon, these are elements of the mapping class group of S2, which is almost isomorphic to a corresponding braid group on this particular manifold. The mutual exchange of quantum entities in two dimensions is achieved by the braid group, rendering the statistics anyonic. With this we argue that the quantum isolated horizon model of LQG based on S U (2 )k-Chern-Simons theory exhibits non-Abelian anyonic statistics. In this way a connection to the theory behind the fractional quantum Hall effect and that of topological quantum computation is established, where non-Abelian anyons play a significant role.

  10. Longitudinal Analysis of Image Time Series with Diffeomorphic Deformations: A Computational Framework Based on Stationary Velocity Fields

    PubMed Central

    Hadj-Hamou, Mehdi; Lorenzi, Marco; Ayache, Nicholas; Pennec, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    We propose and detail a deformation-based morphometry computational framework, called Longitudinal Log-Demons Framework (LLDF), to estimate the longitudinal brain deformations from image data series, transport them in a common space and perform statistical group-wise analyses. It is based on freely available software and tools, and consists of three main steps: (i) Pre-processing, (ii) Position correction, and (iii) Non-linear deformation analysis. It is based on the LCC log-Demons non-linear symmetric diffeomorphic registration algorithm with an additional modulation of the similarity term using a confidence mask to increase the robustness with respect to brain boundary intensity artifacts. The pipeline is exemplified on the longitudinal Open Access Series of Imaging Studies (OASIS) database and all the parameters values are given so that the study can be reproduced. We investigate the group-wise differences between the patients with Alzheimer's disease and the healthy control group, and show that the proposed pipeline increases the sensitivity with no decrease in the specificity of the statistical study done on the longitudinal deformations. PMID:27375408

  11. Longitudinal Analysis of Image Time Series with Diffeomorphic Deformations: A Computational Framework Based on Stationary Velocity Fields.

    PubMed

    Hadj-Hamou, Mehdi; Lorenzi, Marco; Ayache, Nicholas; Pennec, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    We propose and detail a deformation-based morphometry computational framework, called Longitudinal Log-Demons Framework (LLDF), to estimate the longitudinal brain deformations from image data series, transport them in a common space and perform statistical group-wise analyses. It is based on freely available software and tools, and consists of three main steps: (i) Pre-processing, (ii) Position correction, and (iii) Non-linear deformation analysis. It is based on the LCC log-Demons non-linear symmetric diffeomorphic registration algorithm with an additional modulation of the similarity term using a confidence mask to increase the robustness with respect to brain boundary intensity artifacts. The pipeline is exemplified on the longitudinal Open Access Series of Imaging Studies (OASIS) database and all the parameters values are given so that the study can be reproduced. We investigate the group-wise differences between the patients with Alzheimer's disease and the healthy control group, and show that the proposed pipeline increases the sensitivity with no decrease in the specificity of the statistical study done on the longitudinal deformations. PMID:27375408

  12. Diffeomorphic Metric Surface Mapping in Superior Temporal Gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Vaillant, Marc; Qiu, Anqi; Glaunès, Joan; Miller, Michael I.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the application of large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping to cortical surfaces based on the shape and geometric properties of subregions of the superior temporal gyrus in the human brain. The anatomical surfaces of the cortex are represented as triangulated meshes. The diffeomorphic matching algorithm is implemented by defining a norm between the triangulated meshes, based on the algorithms of Vaillant and Glaunès. The diffeomorphic correspondence is defined as a flow of the extrinsic three dimensional coordinates containing the cortical surface that registers the initial and target geometry by minimizing the norm. The methods are demonstrated in 40 high resolution MRI cortical surfaces of planum temporale (PT) constructed from subsets of the superior temporal gyrus (STG). The effectiveness of the algorithm is demonstrated via the Euclidean positional distance, distance of normal vectors, and curvature before and after the surface matching as well as the comparison with a landmark matching algorithm. The results demonstrate that both the positional and shape variability of the anatomical configurations are being represented by the diffeomorphic maps. PMID:17185000

  13. Large Scale Nanolaminate Deformable Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Papavasiliou, A; Olivier, S; Barbee, T; Miles, R; Chang, K

    2005-11-30

    This work concerns the development of a technology that uses Nanolaminate foils to form light-weight, deformable mirrors that are scalable over a wide range of mirror sizes. While MEMS-based deformable mirrors and spatial light modulators have considerably reduced the cost and increased the capabilities of adaptive optic systems, there has not been a way to utilize the advantages of lithography and batch-fabrication to produce large-scale deformable mirrors. This technology is made scalable by using fabrication techniques and lithography that are not limited to the sizes of conventional MEMS devices. Like many MEMS devices, these mirrors use parallel plate electrostatic actuators. This technology replicates that functionality by suspending a horizontal piece of nanolaminate foil over an electrode by electroplated nickel posts. This actuator is attached, with another post, to another nanolaminate foil that acts as the mirror surface. Most MEMS devices are produced with integrated circuit lithography techniques that are capable of very small line widths, but are not scalable to large sizes. This technology is very tolerant of lithography errors and can use coarser, printed circuit board lithography techniques that can be scaled to very large sizes. These mirrors use small, lithographically defined actuators and thin nanolaminate foils allowing them to produce deformations over a large area while minimizing weight. This paper will describe a staged program to develop this technology. First-principles models were developed to determine design parameters. Three stages of fabrication will be described starting with a 3 x 3 device using conventional metal foils and epoxy to a 10-across all-metal device with nanolaminate mirror surfaces.

  14. Explicit B-spline regularization in diffeomorphic image registration

    PubMed Central

    Tustison, Nicholas J.; Avants, Brian B.

    2013-01-01

    Diffeomorphic mappings are central to image registration due largely to their topological properties and success in providing biologically plausible solutions to deformation and morphological estimation problems. Popular diffeomorphic image registration algorithms include those characterized by time-varying and constant velocity fields, and symmetrical considerations. Prior information in the form of regularization is used to enforce transform plausibility taking the form of physics-based constraints or through some approximation thereof, e.g., Gaussian smoothing of the vector fields [a la Thirion's Demons (Thirion, 1998)]. In the context of the original Demons' framework, the so-called directly manipulated free-form deformation (DMFFD) (Tustison et al., 2009) can be viewed as a smoothing alternative in which explicit regularization is achieved through fast B-spline approximation. This characterization can be used to provide B-spline “flavored” diffeomorphic image registration solutions with several advantages. Implementation is open source and available through the Insight Toolkit and our Advanced Normalization Tools (ANTs) repository. A thorough comparative evaluation with the well-known SyN algorithm (Avants et al., 2008), implemented within the same framework, and its B-spline analog is performed using open labeled brain data and open source evaluation tools. PMID:24409140

  15. Explicit B-spline regularization in diffeomorphic image registration.

    PubMed

    Tustison, Nicholas J; Avants, Brian B

    2013-01-01

    Diffeomorphic mappings are central to image registration due largely to their topological properties and success in providing biologically plausible solutions to deformation and morphological estimation problems. Popular diffeomorphic image registration algorithms include those characterized by time-varying and constant velocity fields, and symmetrical considerations. Prior information in the form of regularization is used to enforce transform plausibility taking the form of physics-based constraints or through some approximation thereof, e.g., Gaussian smoothing of the vector fields [a la Thirion's Demons (Thirion, 1998)]. In the context of the original Demons' framework, the so-called directly manipulated free-form deformation (DMFFD) (Tustison et al., 2009) can be viewed as a smoothing alternative in which explicit regularization is achieved through fast B-spline approximation. This characterization can be used to provide B-spline "flavored" diffeomorphic image registration solutions with several advantages. Implementation is open source and available through the Insight Toolkit and our Advanced Normalization Tools (ANTs) repository. A thorough comparative evaluation with the well-known SyN algorithm (Avants et al., 2008), implemented within the same framework, and its B-spline analog is performed using open labeled brain data and open source evaluation tools.

  16. Freesurfer-initialized large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping with application to Parkinson's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jingyun; Palmer, Samantha J.; Khan, Ali R.; Mckeown, Martin J.; Beg, Mirza Faial

    2009-02-01

    We apply a recently developed automated brain segmentation method, FS+LDDMM, to brain MRI scans from Parkinson's Disease (PD) subjects, and normal age-matched controls and compare the results to manual segmentation done by trained neuroscientists. The data set consisted of 14 PD subjects and 12 age-matched control subjects without neurologic disease and comparison was done on six subcortical brain structures (left and right caudate, putamen and thalamus). Comparison between automatic and manual segmentation was based on Dice Similarity Coefficient (Overlap Percentage), L1 Error, Symmetrized Hausdorff Distance and Symmetrized Mean Surface Distance. Results suggest that FS+LDDMM is well-suited for subcortical structure segmentation and further shape analysis in Parkinson's Disease. The asymmetry of the Dice Similarity Coefficient over shape change is also discussed based on the observation and measurement of FS+LDDMM segmentation results.

  17. Finite-Dimensional Lie Algebras for Fast Diffeomorphic Image Registration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Miaomiao; Fletcher, P Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a fast geodesic shooting algorithm for diffeomorphic image registration. We first introduce a novel finite-dimensional Lie algebra structure on the space of bandlimited velocity fields. We then show that this space can effectively represent initial velocities for diffeomorphic image registration at much lower dimensions than typically used, with little to no loss in registration accuracy. We then leverage the fact that the geodesic evolution equations, as well as the adjoint Jacobi field equations needed for gradient descent methods, can be computed entirely in this finite-dimensional Lie algebra. The result is a geodesic shooting method for large deformation metric mapping (LDDMM) that is dramatically faster and less memory intensive than state-of-the-art methods. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our model to register 3D brain images and compare its registration accuracy, run-time, and memory consumption with leading LDDMM methods. We also show how our algorithm breaks through the prohibitive time and memory requirements of diffeomorphic atlas building.

  18. Large Deformations of a Soft Porous Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMinn, Christopher W.; Dufresne, Eric R.; Wettlaufer, John S.

    2016-04-01

    Compressing a porous material will decrease the volume of the pore space, driving fluid out. Similarly, injecting fluid into a porous material can expand the pore space, distorting the solid skeleton. This poromechanical coupling has applications ranging from cell and tissue mechanics to geomechanics and hydrogeology. The classical theory of linear poroelasticity captures this coupling by combining Darcy's law with Terzaghi's effective stress and linear elasticity in a linearized kinematic framework. Linear poroelasticity is a good model for very small deformations, but it becomes increasingly inappropriate for moderate to large deformations, which are common in the context of phenomena such as swelling and damage, and for soft materials such as gels and tissues. The well-known theory of large-deformation poroelasticity combines Darcy's law with Terzaghi's effective stress and nonlinear elasticity in a rigorous kinematic framework. This theory has been used extensively in biomechanics to model large elastic deformations in soft tissues and in geomechanics to model large elastoplastic deformations in soils. Here, we first provide an overview and discussion of this theory with an emphasis on the physics of poromechanical coupling. We present the large-deformation theory in an Eulerian framework to minimize the mathematical complexity, and we show how this nonlinear theory simplifies to linear poroelasticity under the assumption of small strain. We then compare the predictions of linear poroelasticity with those of large-deformation poroelasticity in the context of two uniaxial model problems: fluid outflow driven by an applied mechanical load (the consolidation problem) and compression driven by a steady fluid throughflow. We explore the steady and dynamical errors associated with the linear model in both situations, as well as the impact of introducing a deformation-dependent permeability. We show that the error in linear poroelasticity is due primarily to kinematic

  19. The algebra of diffeomorphisms from the world sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulgin, Waldemar; Troost, Jan

    2014-09-01

    The quantum theory of a massless spin two particle is strongly constrained by diffeomorphism invariance, which is in turn implied by unitarity. We explicitly exhibit the space-time diffeomorphism algebra of string theory, realizing it in terms of world sheet vertex operators. Viewing diffeomorphisms as field redefinitions in the two-dimensional conformal field theory renders the calculation of their algebra straightforward. Next, we generalize the analysis to combinations of space-time anti-symmetric tensor gauge transformations and diffeomorphisms. We also point out a left-right split of the algebra combined with a twist that reproduces the C-bracket of double field theory. We further compare our derivation to an analysis in terms of marginal deformations as well as vertex operator algebras.

  20. Materials response to large plastic deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, M.G.; Hecker, S.S.

    1982-01-01

    Strain hardening at large plastic strains cannot be inferred from small-strain tensile tests. Most metals and alloys at room temperature do not reach steady state saturation at strain levels of 3 to 5. Typically, some disturbing influence offsets the balance between dislocation generation and annihilation. The most prominent of these appears to be texture formation. However, grain size, second-phase particles, and deformation on shear bands are also important. The effect on hardening of most of these features depends on geometry (or deformation mode) and, hence, no single intrinsic hardening curve can be expected at large strains. It should be noted that high material purity and a torsional deformation mode favor saturation. 42 references, 15 figures.

  1. Generating charge from diffeomorphisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, James; Kraus, Per

    2006-12-01

    We unravel some subtleties involving the definition of sphere angular momentum charges in AdSq × Sp spacetimes, or equivalently, R-symmetry charges in the dual boundary CFT. In the AdS3 context, it is known that charges can be generated by coordinate transformations, even though the underlying theory is diffeomorphism invariant. This is the bulk version of spectral flow in the boundary CFT. We trace this behavior back to special properties of the p-form field strength supporting the solution, and derive the explicit formulas for angular momentum charges. This analysis also reveals the higher dimensional origin of three dimensional Chern-Simons terms and of chiral anomalies in the boundary theory.

  2. Diffeomorphic Registration of Images with Variable Contrast Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Janssens, Guillaume; Jacques, Laurent; Orban de Xivry, Jonathan; Geets, Xavier; Macq, Benoit

    2011-01-01

    Nonrigid image registration is widely used to estimate tissue deformations in highly deformable anatomies. Among the existing methods, nonparametric registration algorithms such as optical flow, or Demons, usually have the advantage of being fast and easy to use. Recently, a diffeomorphic version of the Demons algorithm was proposed. This provides the advantage of producing invertible displacement fields, which is a necessary condition for these to be physical. However, such methods are based on the matching of intensities and are not suitable for registering images with different contrast enhancement. In such cases, a registration method based on the local phase like the Morphons has to be used. In this paper, a diffeomorphic version of the Morphons registration method is proposed and compared to conventional Morphons, Demons, and diffeomorphic Demons. The method is validated in the context of radiotherapy for lung cancer patients on several 4D respiratory-correlated CT scans of the thorax with and without variable contrast enhancement. PMID:21197460

  3. Large Deformation Dynamic Bending of Composite Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Derian, E. J.; Hyer, M. W.

    1986-01-01

    Studies were conducted on the large deformation response of composite beams subjected to a dynamic axial load. The beams were loaded with a moderate eccentricity to promote bending. The study was primarily experimental but some finite element results were obtained. Both the deformation and the failure of the beams were of interest. The static response of the beams was also studied to determine potential differences between the static and dynamic failure. Twelve different laminate types were tested. The beams tested were 23 in. by 2 in. and generally 30 plies thick. The beams were loaded dynamically with a gravity-driven impactor traveling at 19.6 ft/sec and quasi-static tests were conducted on identical beams in a displacement controlled manner. For laminates of practical interest, the failure modes under static and dynamic loadings were identical. Failure in most of the laminate types occurred in a single event involving 40% to 50% of the plies. However, failure in laminates with 300 or 150 off-axis plies occurred in several events. All laminates exhibited bimodular elastic properties. The compressive flexural moduli in some laminates was measured to be 1/2 the tensile flexural modulus. No simple relationship could be found among the measured ultimate failure strains of the different laminate types. Using empirically determined flexural properties, a finite element analysis was reasonably accurate in predicting the static and dynamic deformation response.

  4. Large Deformation Dynamic Bending of Composite Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Derian, E. J.; Hyer, M. W.

    1986-01-01

    Studies were conducted on the large deformation response of composite beams subjected to a dynamic axial load. The beams were loaded with a moderate eccentricity to promote bending. The study was primarily experimental but some finite element results were obtained. Both the deformation and the failure of the beams were of interest. The static response of the beams was also studied to determine potential differences between the static and dynamic failure. Twelve different laminate types were tested. The beams were loaded dynamically with a gravity driven impactor traveling at 19.6 ft/sec and quasi-static tests were conducted on identical beams in a displacement controlled manner. For laminates of practical interest, the failure modes under static and dynamic loadings were identical. Failure in most of the laminate types occurred in a single event involving 40% to 50% of the plies. However, failure in laminates with 30 deg or 15 deg off-axis plies occured in several events. All laminates exhibited bimodular elastic properties. Using empirically determined flexural properties, a finite element analysis was reasonably accurate in predicting the static and dynamic deformation response.

  5. Diffeomorphisms in group field theories

    SciTech Connect

    Baratin, Aristide; Girelli, Florian; Oriti, Daniele

    2011-05-15

    We study the issue of diffeomorphism symmetry in group field theories (GFT), using the noncommutative metric representation introduced by A. Baratin and D. Oriti [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 221302 (2010).]. In the colored Boulatov model for 3d gravity, we identify a field (quantum) symmetry which ties together the vertex translation invariance of discrete gravity, the flatness constraint of canonical quantum gravity, and the topological (coarse-graining) identities for the 6j symbols. We also show how, for the GFT graphs dual to manifolds, the invariance of the Feynman amplitudes encodes the discrete residual action of diffeomorphisms in simplicial gravity path integrals. We extend the results to GFT models for higher-dimensional BF theories and discuss various insights that they provide on the GFT formalism itself.

  6. Local remeshing for large amplitude grid deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyle, Keri R.; Ventikos, Yiannis

    2008-02-01

    Fluid-structure interaction (FSI) modelling can involve large deformations in the fluid domain, which could lead to degenerating mesh quality and numerical inaccuracies or instabilities, if allowed to amplify unchecked. Complete remeshing of the entire domain during the solution process is computationally expensive, and can require interpolation of solution variables between meshes. As an alternative, we investigate a local remeshing algorithm, with two emphases: (a) the identification and remedy of flat, degenerate tetrahedra, and (b) the avoidance of node motion, and hence associated interpolation errors. Initially, possible topological changes are examined using a dynamic programming algorithm to maximise the minimum local element quality through edge reconnection. In the 3D situation it was found that reconnection improvements tend to be limited to long edges, and those with few (three or four) element neighbours. The remaining degenerate elements are classified into one of four types using three proposed metrics - the minimum edge-to-edge distance (EE), the minimum node-to-edge distance (NE), and the shortest edge length (SE) - and removed according to the best manner for their type. Optimised thresholds for identifying and classifying elements for removal were found to be EE < 0.18, NE < 0.21, SE < 0.2.

  7. Large aperture nanocomposite deformable mirror technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peter C.; Hale, Richard D.

    2007-12-01

    We report progress in the development of deformable mirrors (DM) using nanocomposite materials. For the extremely large telescopes (ELTs) currently being planned, a new generation of DMs with unprecedented performance is a critical path item. The DMs need to have large apertures (meters), continuous surfaces, and low microroughness. Most importantly, they must have excellent static optical figures and yet be sufficiently thin (1-2 mm) and flexible to function with small, low powered actuators. Carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) have the potential to fulfill these requirements. However, CFRP mirrors made using direct optical replication have encountered a number of problems. Firstly, it is difficult if not impossible for a CFRP mirror to maintain a good static optical figure if a small number of plies are used, but adding more plies to the laminate tends to make the substrate too thick and stiff. Secondly, direct optical replication requires precision mandrels, the costs of which become prohibitive at multi-meter apertures. We report development of a new approach. By using a combination of a novel support structure, selected fibers, and binding resins infused with nanoparticles, it is possible to make millimeter thick optical mirrors that can both maintain good static optical figures and yet still have the required flexibility for actuation. Development and refinement of a non-contact, deterministic process of fine figuring permits generation of accurate optical surfaces without the need for precision optical mandrels. We present data from tests that have been carried out to demonstrate these new processes. A number of flat DMs have been fabricated, as well as concave and convex DMs in spherical, parabolic, and other forms.

  8. Induced gravity from curvature density preserving diffeomorphisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Ichiro

    2016-08-01

    We construct not only an induced gravity model with restricted diffeomorphisms, that is, transverse diffeomorphisms that preserve the curvature density, but also with full diffeomorphisms. By solving the equations of motion, it turns out that these models produce Einstein's equations with a certain Newton constant in addition to the constraint for the curvature density. In the limit of the infinite Newton constant, the models give rise to induced gravity. Moreover, we discuss cosmological solutions on the basis of the gravitational models at hand.

  9. Displacement and deformation measurement for large structures by camera network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Yang; Yu, Qifeng; Yang, Zhen; Xu, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Xiaohu

    2014-03-01

    A displacement and deformation measurement method for large structures by a series-parallel connection camera network is presented. By taking the dynamic monitoring of a large-scale crane in lifting operation as an example, a series-parallel connection camera network is designed, and the displacement and deformation measurement method by using this series-parallel connection camera network is studied. The movement range of the crane body is small, and that of the crane arm is large. The displacement of the crane body, the displacement of the crane arm relative to the body and the deformation of the arm are measured. Compared with a pure series or parallel connection camera network, the designed series-parallel connection camera network can be used to measure not only the movement and displacement of a large structure but also the relative movement and deformation of some interesting parts of the large structure by a relatively simple optical measurement system.

  10. Symmetric log-domain diffeomorphic Registration: a demons-based approach.

    PubMed

    Vercauteren, Tom; Pennec, Xavier; Perchant, Aymeric; Ayache, Nicholas

    2008-01-01

    Modern morphometric studies use non-linear image registration to compare anatomies and perform group analysis. Recently, log-Euclidean approaches have contributed to promote the use of such computational anatomy tools by permitting simple computations of statistics on a rather large class of invertible spatial transformations. In this work, we propose a non-linear registration algorithm perfectly fit for log-Euclidean statistics on diffeomorphisms. Our algorithm works completely in the log-domain, i.e. it uses a stationary velocity field. This implies that we guarantee the invertibility of the deformation and have access to the true inverse transformation. This also means that our output can be directly used for log-Euclidean statistics without relying on the heavy computation of the log of the spatial transformation. As it is often desirable, our algorithm is symmetric with respect to the order of the input images. Furthermore, we use an alternate optimization approach related to Thirion's demons algorithm to provide a fast non-linear registration algorithm. First results show that our algorithm outperforms both the demons algorithm and the recently proposed diffeomorphic demons algorithm in terms of accuracy of the transformation while remaining computationally efficient. PMID:18979814

  11. Large Scale Deformation of the Western U.S. Cordillera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Richard A.

    2002-01-01

    The overall objective of the work that was conducted was to understand the present-day large-scale deformations of the crust throughout the western United States and in so doing to improve our ability to assess the potential for seismic hazards in this region. To address this problem, we used a large collection of Global Positioning System (GPS) networks which spans the region to precisely quantify present-day large-scale crustal deformations in a single uniform reference frame. Our results can roughly be divided into an analysis of the GPS observations to infer the deformation field across and within the entire plate boundary zone and an investigation of the implications of this deformation field regarding plate boundary dynamics.

  12. Large Scale Deformation of the Western US Cordillera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Richard A.

    2001-01-01

    Destructive earthquakes occur throughout the western US Cordillera (WUSC), not just within the San Andreas fault zone. But because we do not understand the present-day large-scale deformations of the crust throughout the WUSC, our ability to assess the potential for seismic hazards in this region remains severely limited. To address this problem, we are using a large collection of Global Positioning System (GPS) networks which spans the WUSC to precisely quantify present-day large-scale crustal deformations in a single uniform reference frame. Our work can roughly be divided into an analysis of the GPS observations to infer the deformation field across and within the entire plate boundary zone and an investigation of the implications of this deformation field regarding plate boundary dynamics.

  13. A large stroke magnetic fluid deformable mirror for focus control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Ling-kun; Wu, Zhi-zheng; Huang, Ming-shuang; Kong, Xiang-hui

    2016-03-01

    A liquid deformable mirror, which can provide a large stroke deflection more than 100 μm, is proposed for focus control. The deformable mirror utilizes the concept of magnetic fluid deformation shaped with electromagnetic fields to achieve concave or convex surface and to change the optical focus depth of the mirrors. The free surface of the magnetic fluid is coated with a thin layer of metal-liquid-like film (MELLF) prepared from densely packed silver nanoparticles to enhance the reflectance of the deformable mirror. The experimental results on the fabricated prototype magnetic fluid deformable mirror (MFDM) show that the desired concave/convex surface shape can be controlled precisely with a closed-loop adaptive optical system.

  14. Large-deformation modal coordinates for nonrigid vehicle dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Likins, P. W.; Fleischer, G. E.

    1972-01-01

    The derivation of minimum-dimension sets of discrete-coordinate and hybrid-coordinate equations of motion of a system consisting of an arbitrary number of hinge-connected rigid bodies assembled in tree topology is presented. These equations are useful for the simulation of dynamical systems that can be idealized as tree-like arrangements of substructures, with each substructure consisting of either a rigid body or a collection of elastically interconnected rigid bodies restricted to small relative rotations at each connection. Thus, some of the substructures represent elastic bodies subjected to small strains or local deformations, but possibly large gross deformations, in the hybrid formulation, distributed coordinates referred to herein as large-deformation modal coordinates, are used for the deformations of these substructures. The equations are in a form suitable for incorporation into one or more computer programs to be used as multipurpose tools in the simulation of spacecraft and other complex electromechanical systems.

  15. Large-scale deformation associated with ridge subduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, E.L.; Fisher, M.A.; Scholl, D. W.

    1993-01-01

    Continuum models are used to investigate the large-scale deformation associated with the subduction of aseismic ridges. Formulated in the horizontal plane using thin viscous sheet theory, these models measure the horizontal transmission of stress through the arc lithosphere accompanying ridge subduction. Modelling was used to compare the Tonga arc and Louisville ridge collision with the New Hebrides arc and d'Entrecasteaux ridge collision, which have disparate arc-ridge intersection speeds but otherwise similar characteristics. Models of both systems indicate that diffuse deformation (low values of the effective stress-strain exponent n) are required to explain the observed deformation. -from Authors

  16. Control and large deformations of marginal disordered structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugan, Arvind; Pinson, Matthew; Chen, Elizabeth

    Designed deformations, such as origami patterns, provide a way to make easily controlled mechanical metamaterials with tailored responses to external forces. We focus on an often overlooked regime of origami - non-linear deformations of large disordered origami patterns with no symmetries. We find that practical questions of control in origami have counterintuitive answers, because of intimate connections to spin glasses and neural networks. For example, 1 degree of freedom origami structures are actually difficult to control about the flat state with a single actuator; the actuator is thrown off by an exponential number of `red herring' zero modes for small deformations, all but one of which disappear at larger deformations. Conversely, structures with multiple programmed motions are much easier to control than expected - in fact, they are as easy to control as a dedicated single-motion structure if the number of programmed motions is below a threshold (`memory capacity').

  17. Deformation and recrystallization texture development in Fe-4%Si subjected to large shear deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kustas, A. B.; Sagapuram, D.; Chandrasekar, S.; Trumble, K. P.

    2015-04-01

    Machining is used as a deformation technique to impose large shear strains (γ ˜ 2) in a commercial Fe-4%Si alloy. The partial <111> and {110} - fiber texture components are generated throughout the as-deformed microstructure, which is expected of BCC metals deformed in simple shear. Using an annealing schedule similar to that in the commercial rolling process, samples retain the deformation texture, consistent with a continuous-type recrystallization mechanism. Fine-grained annealed samples reveal two different partial fiber orientations, one of which becomes the dominate texture, following the high-temperature growth treatment. The mechanisms of texture evolution and implications for texture control in the machining-based process are discussed.

  18. Large Scale Deformation of the Western U.S. Cordillera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Richard A.

    2002-01-01

    Over the past couple of years, with support from NASA, we used a large collection of data from GPS, VLBI, SLR, and DORIS networks which span the Western U.S. Cordillera (WUSC) to precisely quantify present-day large-scale crustal deformations in a single uniform reference frame. Our work was roughly divided into an analysis of these space geodetic observations to infer the deformation field across and within the entire plate boundary zone, and an investigation of the implications of this deformation field regarding plate boundary dynamics. Following the determination of the first generation WUSC velocity solution, we placed high priority on the dissemination of the velocity estimates. With in-kind support from the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, we constructed a web-site which allows anyone to access the data, and to determine their own velocity reference frame.

  19. Large Scale Deformation of the Western U.S. Cordillera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Richard A.

    2002-01-01

    Over the past couple of years, with support from NASA, we used a large collection of data from GPS, VLBI, SLR, and DORIS networks which span the Westem U.S. Cordillera (WUSC) to precisely quantify present-day large-scale crustal deformations in a single uniform reference frame. Our work was roughly divided into an analysis of these space geodetic observations to infer the deformation field across and within the entire plate boundary zone, and an investigation of the implications of this deformation field regarding plate boundary dynamics. Following the determination of the first generation WUSC velocity solution, we placed high priority on the dissemination of the velocity estimates. With in-kind support from the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, we constructed a web-site which allows anyone to access the data, and to determine their own velocity reference frame.

  20. Electrohydrodynamic deformation of drops and bubbles at large Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnitzer, Ory

    2015-11-01

    In Taylor's theory of electrohydrodynamic drop deformation by a uniform electric field, inertia is neglected at the outset, resulting in fluid velocities that scale with E2, E being the applied-field magnitude. When considering strong fields and low viscosity fluids, the Reynolds number predicted by this scaling may actually become large, suggesting the need for a complementary large-Reynolds-number analysis. Balancing viscous and electrical stresses reveals that the velocity scales with E 4 / 3. Considering a gas bubble, the external flow is essentially confined to two boundary layers propagating from the poles to the equator, where they collide to form a radial jet. Remarkably, at leading order in the Capillary number the unique scaling allows through application of integral mass and momentum balances to obtain a closed-form expression for the O (E2) bubble deformation. Owing to a concentrated pressure load at the vicinity of the collision region, the deformed profile features an equatorial dimple which is non-smooth on the bubble scale. The dynamical importance of internal circulation in the case of a liquid drop leads to an essentially different deformation mechanism. This is because the external boundary layer velocity attenuates at a short distance from the interface, while the internal boundary-layer matches with a Prandtl-Batchelor (PB) rotational core. The dynamic pressure associated with the internal circulation dominates the interfacial stress profile, leading to an O (E 8 / 3) deformation. The leading-order deformation can be readily determined, up to the PB constant, without solving the circulating boundary-layer problem. To encourage attempts to verify this new scaling, we shall suggest a favourable experimental setup in which inertia is dominant, while finite-deformation, surface-charge advection, and gravity effects are negligible.

  1. Holographic interferometry applied to the case of large deformations.

    PubMed

    Schumann, W

    1989-11-01

    This investigation in holographic interferometry concerns an approach to a systematic quasi-compensation by appropriate optical modifications at the reconstruction in order that the fringes of interference become visible in the case of large unknown object deformations. The relevant relations are established by using the aberration theory for the image formation in combination with elementary intrinsic differential geometry.

  2. Effective field theory of broken spatial diffeomorphisms

    DOE PAGES

    Lin, Chunshan; Labun, Lance Z.

    2016-03-17

    We study the low energy effective theory describing gravity with broken spatial diffeomorphism invariance. In the unitary gauge, the Goldstone bosons associated with broken diffeomorphisms are eaten and the graviton becomes a massive spin-2 particle with 5 well-behaved degrees of freedom. In this gauge, the most general theory is built with the lowest dimension operators invariant under only temporal diffeomorphisms. Imposing the additional shift and SO(3) internal symmetries, we analyze the perturbations on a FRW background. At linear perturbation level, the observables of this theory are characterized by five parameters, including the usual cosmological parameters and one additional coupling constantmore » for the symmetry-breaking scalars. In the de Sitter and Minkowski limit, the three Goldstone bosons are supermassive and can be integrated out, leaving two massive tensor modes as the only propagating degrees of freedom. In conclusion, we discuss several examples relevant to theories of massive gravity.« less

  3. Generic Rigidity for Circle Diffeomorphisms with Breaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocić, Saša

    2016-06-01

    We prove that {C^r}-smooth ({r > 2}) circle diffeomorphisms with a break, i.e., circle diffeomorphisms with a single singular point where the derivative has a jump discontinuity, are generically, i.e., for almost all irrational rotation numbers, not {C^{1+\\varepsilon}}-rigid, for any {\\varepsilon > 0}. This result complements our recent proof, joint with Khanin (Geom Funct Anal 24:2002-2028, 2014), that such maps are generically {C^1}-rigid. It stands in remarkable contrast to the result of Yoccoz (Ann Sci Ec Norm Sup 17:333-361, 1984) that {C^r}-smooth circle diffeomorphisms are generically {C^{r-1-κ}}-rigid, for any {κ > 0}.

  4. Effective field theory of broken spatial diffeomorphisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chunshan; Labun, Lance Z.

    2016-03-01

    We study the low energy effective theory describing gravity with broken spatial diffeomorphism invariance. In the unitary gauge, the Goldstone bosons associated with broken diffeomorphisms are eaten and the graviton becomes a massive spin-2 particle with 5 well-behaved degrees of freedom. In this gauge, the most general theory is built with the lowest dimension operators invariant under only temporal diffeomorphisms. Imposing the additional shift and SO(3) internal symmetries, we analyze the perturbations on a FRW background. At linear perturbation level, the observables of this theory are characterized by five parameters, including the usual cosmological parameters and one additional coupling constant for the symmetry-breaking scalars. In the de Sitter and Minkowski limit, the three Goldstone bosons are supermassive and can be integrated out, leaving two massive tensor modes as the only propagating degrees of freedom. We discuss several examples relevant to theories of massive gravity.

  5. An Inexact Newton–Krylov Algorithm for Constrained Diffeomorphic Image Registration*

    PubMed Central

    Mang, Andreas; Biros, George

    2016-01-01

    We propose numerical algorithms for solving large deformation diffeomorphic image registration problems. We formulate the nonrigid image registration problem as a problem of optimal control. This leads to an infinite-dimensional partial differential equation (PDE) constrained optimization problem. The PDE constraint consists, in its simplest form, of a hyperbolic transport equation for the evolution of the image intensity. The control variable is the velocity field. Tikhonov regularization on the control ensures well-posedness. We consider standard smoothness regularization based on H1- or H2-seminorms. We augment this regularization scheme with a constraint on the divergence of the velocity field (control variable) rendering the deformation incompressible (Stokes regularization scheme) and thus ensuring that the determinant of the deformation gradient is equal to one, up to the numerical error. We use a Fourier pseudospectral discretization in space and a Chebyshev pseudospectral discretization in time. The latter allows us to reduce the number of unknowns and enables the time-adaptive inversion for nonstationary velocity fields. We use a preconditioned, globalized, matrix-free, inexact Newton–Krylov method for numerical optimization. A parameter continuation is designed to estimate an optimal regularization parameter. Regularity is ensured by controlling the geometric properties of the deformation field. Overall, we arrive at a black-box solver that exploits computational tools that are precisely tailored for solving the optimality system. We study spectral properties of the Hessian, grid convergence, numerical accuracy, computational efficiency, and deformation regularity of our scheme. We compare the designed Newton–Krylov methods with a globalized Picard method (preconditioned gradient descent). We study the influence of a varying number of unknowns in time. The reported results demonstrate excellent numerical accuracy, guaranteed local deformation

  6. Large Deformation Constitutive Laws for Isotropic Thermoelastic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Plohr, Bradley J.; Plohr, Jeeyeon N.

    2012-07-25

    We examine the approximations made in using Hooke's law as a constitutive relation for an isotropic thermoelastic material subjected to large deformation by calculating the stress evolution equation from the free energy. For a general thermoelastic material, we employ the volume-preserving part of the deformation gradient to facilitate volumetric/shear strain decompositions of the free energy, its first derivatives (the Cauchy stress and entropy), and its second derivatives (the specific heat, Grueneisen tensor, and elasticity tensor). Specializing to isotropic materials, we calculate these constitutive quantities more explicitly. For deformations with limited shear strain, but possibly large changes in volume, we show that the differential equations for the stress components involve new terms in addition to the traditional Hooke's law terms. These new terms are of the same order in the shear strain as the objective derivative terms needed for frame indifference; unless the latter terms are negligible, the former cannot be neglected. We also demonstrate that accounting for the new terms requires that the deformation gradient be included as a field variable

  7. Fracture and adhesion in soft materials subjected to large deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Rong

    This dissertation studies large deformation elasticity with an aim to understand fracture and adhesion in soft polymeric materials. First, motivated by recent experiments using thin elastic membranes to measure interfacial adhesion, we propose a theory to describe the adhesive contact between an inflated hyperelastic membrane and a rigid substrate based on large deformation elasticity. A key result is the exact expression for the energy release rate in terms of local variables at the contact edge, which links adhesion to the contact angle. In addition, our theory allows two types of friction conditions between the membrane and the substrate: frictionless and no-slip contact. Numerical simulations for a neo-Hookean membrane are carried out to study the relation between applied pressure and contact area. The second part of this dissertation focuses on solving the asymptotic stress and deformation fields near the tip of a Mode I traction free plane stress crack in incompressible hyperelastic solids. We develop a method using hodograph transform to obtain the dominant singularity of the near tip deformation field. This method is particularly useful for severely strain hardening materials and is used to find out the crack tip stress and deformation fields for two types of soft materials: generalized neo-Hookean solids and an exponentially hardening solid. Our asymptotic solutions are verified using finite element simulations. The limitations of a previous result for the generalized neo-Hookean solids are resolved by our solution. Finally, we study the large deformation of an isolated penny-shaped crack in an infinite block of incompressible hyperelastic solid. The crack is subjected to remote tensile true stresses that are parallel (S) and normal (T) to the undeformed crack faces. We use finite element method to determine the energy release rates for different triaxiality ratios S/T. Our results shows that the energy release rate increases rapidly with S/T at finite

  8. Nonlinear formulation for flexible multibody system with large deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinyang; Hong, Jiazhen

    2007-02-01

    In this paper, nonlinear modeling for flexible multibody system with large deformation is investigated. Absolute nodal coordinates are employed to describe the displacement, and variational motion equations of a flexible body are derived on the basis of the geometric nonlinear theory, in which both the shear strain and the transverse normal strain are taken into account. By separating the inner and the boundary nodal coordinates, the motion equations of a flexible multibody system are assembled. The advantage of such formulation is that the constraint equations and the forward recursive equations become linear because the absolute nodal coordinates are used. A spatial double pendulum connected to the ground with a spherical joint is simulated to investigate the dynamic performance of flexible beams with large deformation. Finally, the resultant constant total energy validates the present formulation.

  9. Diffeomorphic metric mapping and probabilistic atlas generation of hybrid diffusion imaging based on BFOR signal basis.

    PubMed

    Du, Jia; Hosseinbor, A Pasha; Chung, Moo K; Bendlin, Barbara B; Suryawanshi, Gaurav; Alexander, Andrew L; Qiu, Anqi

    2014-10-01

    We first propose a large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping algorithm to align multiple b-value diffusion weighted imaging (mDWI) data, specifically acquired via hybrid diffusion imaging (HYDI). We denote this algorithm as LDDMM-HYDI. We then propose a Bayesian probabilistic model for estimating the white matter atlas from HYDIs. We adopt the work given in Hosseinbor et al. (2013) and represent the q-space diffusion signal with the Bessel Fourier orientation reconstruction (BFOR) signal basis. The BFOR framework provides the representation of mDWI in the q-space and the analytic form of the emsemble average propagator (EAP) reconstruction, as well as reduces memory requirement. In addition, since the BFOR signal basis is orthonormal, the L(2) norm that quantifies the differences in the q-space signals of any two mDWI datasets can be easily computed as the sum of the squared differences in the BFOR expansion coefficients. In this work, we show that the reorientation of the q-space signal due to spatial transformation can be easily defined on the BFOR signal basis. We incorporate the BFOR signal basis into the LDDMM framework and derive the gradient descent algorithm for LDDMM-HYDI with explicit orientation optimization. Additionally, we extend the previous Bayesian atlas estimation framework for scalar-valued images to HYDIs and derive the expectation-maximization algorithm for solving the HYDI atlas estimation problem. Using real HYDI datasets, we show that the Bayesian model generates the white matter atlas with anatomical details. Moreover, we show that it is important to consider the variation of mDWI reorientation due to a small change in diffeomorphic transformation in the LDDMM-HYDI optimization and to incorporate the full information of HYDI for aligning mDWI. Finally, we show that the LDDMM-HYDI outperforms the LDDMM algorithm with diffusion tensors generated from each shell of HYDI.

  10. Preliminary Results from the Large Volume Torsion (LVT) Deformation Apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, A. J.; Couvy, H.; Skemer, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    We present preliminary results from the Large Volume Torsion (LVT) apparatus, currently under development in the rock deformation lab at Washington University in St. Louis. The LVT is designed to deform disk-shaped samples (~4 mm in diameter) in torsion at lower-crustal to upper-mantle pressure and temperature conditions. Conceptually, the LVT complements and is similar in design to the Rotational Drickamer Apparatus (RDA) (Yamakazi & Karato, 2001), which deforms smaller samples at higher pressures. As part of our recent development efforts, benchmarking experiments were performed on Carrara marble. Samples were deformed in torsion at a strain rate of ~5 x 10-5 s-1 to moderate shear strains (γ ≤ 10) under lower crustal conditions (800°C, 2 GPa confining pressure). Microstructural observations from optical microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) show evidence for relict grain elongation and alignment; an increase in calcite twin density; and grain size reduction concurrent with recrystallized grain nucleation. Microstructural observations are comparable to data obtained from previous studies at lower pressure (e.g. Barnhoorn et al., 2004), confirming that the LVT provides reliable microstructural results.

  11. Large Deformation Behavior of Long Shallow Cylindrical Composite Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carper, Douglas M.; Hyer, Michael W.; Johnson, Eric R.

    1991-01-01

    An exact solution is presented for the large deformation response of a simply supported orthotropic cylindrical panel subjected to a uniform line load along a cylinder generator. The cross section of the cylinder is circular and deformations up to the fully snapped through position are investigated. The orthotropic axes are parallel to the generator and circumferential directions. The governing equations are derived using laminated plate theory, nonlinear strain-displacement relations, and applying variational principles. The response is investigated for the case of a panel loaded exactly at midspan and for a panel with the load offset from midspan. The mathematical formulation is one dimensional in the circumferential coordinate. Solutions are obtained in closed-form. An experimental apparatus was designed to load the panels. Experimental results of displacement controlled tests performed on graphite-epoxy curved panels are compared with analytical predictions.

  12. Nanosecond to Picosecond Instability Regimes for Solids Under Large Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, R.

    2013-06-01

    Modeling of physical, chemical, and mechanical behaviors of solids under large finite deformation requires identification and measurement of often ambiguous, interacting behaviors. For times less than a few nanoseconds mechanical processes are not constrained by macroscopic conditions of uniaxial strain. Rather, behaviors are consequences of inertial responses controlled by crystallography, chemistry and morphology. At every moment - at each particular place - responses are born anew. Response may be inferred from related measurements as typically assumed. Nevertheless when combined with other excitations or unknown instabilities, originally unresolved events may be significant or dominate. Notable are: large magnetic fields, large electric fields, structured loading, instrumentation with piezoelectric crystals or optical windows, ferroelectric crystals or ceramics, polymers; as well as ballotechnic reactions. Instabilities resulting from mass, thermal, thermochemical, or chemical accelerations (either, or, and) may readily lead to observable effects in interactive environments. Such instabilities are not quantitatively predictable today. Forward-looking modeling requires data from sub-nanosecond, three-dimensional acceleration measurements rather than engineering fixes. Interactions among mechanical, electronic, and optical processes are overt in the original piezoelectric 3-Zone Model of Neilson and Benedick, and recent and related work on finite-strain deformation science.

  13. The large deformation elastic response of woven Kevlar fabric

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, W.E.

    1991-01-01

    The large deformation elastic response of a plane woven Kevlar fabric is investigated analytically and experimentally. The analysis assumes the undeformed geometry to be a sequence of interlaced arcs of circles which reverse at each yarn midpoint, ad each yarn is modeled as an extensible elastical subject to certain compatibility conditions. Deflection-force relations for the fabric are determined in terms of the initial weave geometry and the elastic properties of the individual yarns. The theoretical results agree well with the results of experiments performed on a fabric woven from 400 denier Kevlar yarns under conditions of uniaxial loading in both warp and fill directions. 13 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Large anisotropic deformation of skyrmions in strained crystal.

    PubMed

    Shibata, K; Iwasaki, J; Kanazawa, N; Aizawa, S; Tanigaki, T; Shirai, M; Nakajima, T; Kubota, M; Kawasaki, M; Park, H S; Shindo, D; Nagaosa, N; Tokura, Y

    2015-07-01

    Mechanical control of magnetism is an important and promising approach in spintronics. To date, strain control has mostly been demonstrated in ferromagnetic structures by exploiting a change in magnetocrystalline anisotropy. It would be desirable to achieve large strain effects on magnetic nanostructures. Here, using in situ Lorentz transmission electron microscopy, we demonstrate that anisotropic strain as small as 0.3% in a chiral magnet of FeGe induces very large deformations in magnetic skyrmions, as well as distortions of the skyrmion crystal lattice on the order of 20%. Skyrmions are stabilized by the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, originating from a chiral crystal structure. Our results show that the change in the modulation of the strength of this interaction is amplified by two orders of magnitude with respect to changes in the crystal lattice due to an applied strain. Our findings may provide a mechanism to achieve strain control of topological magnetic structures based on the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction. PMID:26030654

  15. Large Deformation and Adhesive Contact Studies of Axisymmetric Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Laprade, Evan J.; Long, Rong; Pham, Jonathan; Lawrence, Jimmy; Emrick, Todd; Crosby, Alfred; Hui, Chung-Yuen; Shull, Kenneth R.

    2013-01-01

    A model membrane contact system consisting of an acrylic copolymer membrane and polydimethyl-siloxane substrate was utilized to evaluate a recently developed nonlinear large-deformation adhesive contact analysis. Direct measurements of the local membrane apex strain during non-contact inflation indicated that the neo-Hookean model provides an accurate measure of membrane strain and supports its use as the strain energy function for the analysis. A time dependent modulus emerges from the analysis, with principal tensions obtained from a comparison of predicted and experimental membrane profiles. A displacement controlled geometry was more easily modeled than the pressure controlled geometry, the applicability of the analysis was limited by wrinkling instabilities. The substantial viscoelastic behavior of these membranes made it difficult to describe the entire membrane with a single modulus, given the nonuniform deformation history of the membranes. Given the difficulty in determining membrane tension from the measured pressure and profile fits using the model, the peel energy was used as a simpler measure of adhesion. Using an analytical balance in the displacement controlled geometry, the membrane tension at the contact line was directly measured. Coupled with contact angle imaging, the peel energy was determined. For the model membranes studied, this peel energy described the membrane/substrate adhesive interactions quite well, giving well-defined peel energies that were independent of the detailed strain state of the membrane. PMID:23289644

  16. Large deformation and adhesive contact studies of axisymmetric membranes.

    PubMed

    Laprade, Evan J; Long, Rong; Pham, Jonathan T; Lawrence, Jimmy; Emrick, Todd; Crosby, Alfred J; Hui, Chung-Yuen; Shull, Kenneth R

    2013-02-01

    A model membrane contact system consisting of an acrylic copolymer membrane and a PDMS substrate was utilized to evaluate a recently developed nonlinear large-deformation adhesive contact analysis. Direct measurements of the local membrane apex strain during noncontact inflation indicated that the neo-Hookean model provides an accurate measure of membrane strain and supports its use as the strain energy function for the analysis. Two membrane contact geometries, exhibiting significantly different strain distributions during withdrawal, were investigated. The first examines the wet contact of an air pressurized membrane. The second looks at the dry contact of a fluid deformed membrane in which a stepper motor controls membrane-substrate separation. A time-dependent modulus emerges from the analysis, with principal tensions obtained from a comparison of predicted and experimental membrane profiles. The applicability of this numerical analysis for determining membrane tension, however, is limited by wrinkling instabilities and viscoelasticity. For this reason, a conceptually simpler method, based on the direct measurement of the membrane tension and contact angle, was also utilized. The traditional peel energy defined with this direct measurement accurately described the membrane/substrate adhesive interactions, giving well-defined peel energies that were independent of the detailed strain state of the membrane. PMID:23289644

  17. Temporally diffeomorphic cardiac motion estimation from three-dimensional echocardiography by minimization of intensity consistency error

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhijun; Ashraf, Muhammad; Sahn, David J.; Song, Xubo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Quantitative analysis of cardiac motion is important for evaluation of heart function. Three dimensional (3D) echocardiography is among the most frequently used imaging modalities for motion estimation because it is convenient, real-time, low-cost, and nonionizing. However, motion estimation from 3D echocardiographic sequences is still a challenging problem due to low image quality and image corruption by noise and artifacts. Methods: The authors have developed a temporally diffeomorphic motion estimation approach in which the velocity field instead of the displacement field was optimized. The optimal velocity field optimizes a novel similarity function, which we call the intensity consistency error, defined as multiple consecutive frames evolving to each time point. The optimization problem is solved by using the steepest descent method. Results: Experiments with simulated datasets, images of an ex vivo rabbit phantom, images of in vivo open-chest pig hearts, and healthy human images were used to validate the authors’ method. Simulated and real cardiac sequences tests showed that results in the authors’ method are more accurate than other competing temporal diffeomorphic methods. Tests with sonomicrometry showed that the tracked crystal positions have good agreement with ground truth and the authors’ method has higher accuracy than the temporal diffeomorphic free-form deformation (TDFFD) method. Validation with an open-access human cardiac dataset showed that the authors’ method has smaller feature tracking errors than both TDFFD and frame-to-frame methods. Conclusions: The authors proposed a diffeomorphic motion estimation method with temporal smoothness by constraining the velocity field to have maximum local intensity consistency within multiple consecutive frames. The estimated motion using the authors’ method has good temporal consistency and is more accurate than other temporally diffeomorphic motion estimation methods. PMID:24784402

  18. Cold work hardening of Al from shear deformation up to large strains

    SciTech Connect

    Les, P.; Zehetbauer, M.; Kopacz, I.; Rauch, E.F.

    1999-08-06

    Several deformation modes have been applied so far which exhibited stage IV and stage V hardening in large strain cold working. However, some deformation modes especially if applied to single crystals failed (1) because of limited deformation (tensile test and compression), (2) inhomogeneous deformation (torsion), (3) iterative deformation (wire drawing, rolling) allowing for recovery processes in between small deformation steps. Moreover, except for torsion test, none of the deformation modes is capable of measuring the strain rate sensitivity up to large strains at low deformation temperatures. Thus it was the aim of the present work to deform single and polycrystalline samples of Al 99.99% in a simple shear test which has been shown to achieve also the late stages of deformation. Moreover, it should make possible strain rate sensitivity measurements in parallel to the shear stress-strain characteristics. For single crystals at room temperature the shear test seems to be the only method which can provide such data.

  19. Elastic deformations disrupt structural superlubricity in large contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, Tristan A.; Pastewka, Lars; Robbins, Mark O.

    Force microscopy experiments observe ultra-low friction between solids with incommensurate lattice structures. This phenomenon is referred to as superlubricity and is due to a cancellation of lateral forces because surfaces sample all relative local configurations with equal probability. We use simulations to show that elasticity disrupts superlubricity in sufficiently large circular contacts. The simulations include atomic-scale geometry and reach micron-scales. For rigid solids, cancellation is complete except at the contact boundary. The static friction force per contact area, τ, falls as a power of contact radius, τ ~a - 3 / 2 . Elastic deformations limit this cancellation when the contact radius a is larger than a characteristic length scale set by the core width of interfacial dislocations, bcore. For a >bcore sliding of moderately incommensurate contacts is dominated by dislocation motion and, at large a, τ approaches a constant value near the Peierls stress needed to move edge dislocations. Surprisingly, the stress in commensurate contacts drops to nearly the same value at large a. We conclude that true structural lubricity does not occur in large contacts, although the constant shear stress drops rapidly with bcore. NSF IGERT, DAAD.

  20. Large deformation finite element analysis of undrained pile installation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konkol, Jakub; Bałachowski, Lech

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a numerical undrained analysis of pile jacking into the subsoil using Abaqus software suit has been presented. Two different approaches, including traditional Finite Element Method (FEM) and Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) formulation, were tested. In the first method, the soil was modelled as a two-phase medium and effective stress analysis was performed. In the second one (ALE), a single-phase medium was assumed and total stress analysis was carried out. The fitting between effective stress parameters and total stress parameters has been presented and both solutions have been compared. The results, discussion and verification of numerical analyzes have been introduced. Possible applications and limitations of large deformation modelling techniques have been explained.

  1. Comparison of external damping models in a large deformation problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae Wook; Kim, Hyun Woo; Ku, Hi Chun; Yoo, Wan Suk

    2009-09-01

    In many applications of flexible multibody dynamics, the magnitudes of damping forces are very small in comparison with the elastic and inertial forces. However, these small forces may have a very significant influence on responses near resonant frequencies. The role of damping is to remove the energy of a system by dissipation, and dissipative forces in structures can be the result of either internal or external damping. External damping includes aerodynamic and hydrodynamic drag and dissipation in the supports of structures, and internal damping is usually related to energy dissipation in materials. In large deformation problems, because of the flexibility of very thin structures, external damping is more important. Two types of damping models, proportional damping and quadratic damping, have been widely applied to flexible multibody dynamics. The advantages and weaknesses of the two damping models are considered in this study. To make up for the common drawbacks in these two models, a frequency-dependent generic damping model based on experimental modal analysis is proposed. The proposed damping model leads to a accurate correlation with experimental results because it directly uses the modal parameters of each mode obtained by experiment, and can represent exact high frequency behaviors simultaneously. To define and formulate a large deformation problem, the absolute nodal coordinate formulation (ANCF) was used, and computer simulations with the ANCF were compared to experimental results. Using the proposed experimental method, modal parameters and damping behaviors are extracted until 5th mode, which has a frequency of 89 Hz. It is shown that the common drawbacks of proportional and quadratic damping are complemented by the proposed generic damping model.

  2. Characterisation of Tensile Behaviour of a Dielectric Elastomer at Large Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, R. K.; Patra, K.

    2014-07-01

    This paper reports experimental characterisation of a dielectric elastomer which is used as a base material for electro-active polymer actuators and sensors. Specific deformation energy has been experimentally determined to characterise a dielectric acrylic elastomer for large elastic deformation. Specific deformation energy value was estimated from the experimental stress-strain data in the range between zero and chosen strain using trapezoidal method. The coefficients of variation of specific deformation energy measured at different strain values are reasonably low. Results show that specific deformation energy can be better indicator to the differences in large deformations of such material compared to elastic modulus or the slope at the given strain.

  3. A new concept for large deformable mirrors for extremely large telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Torben; Owner-Petersen, Mette; Ardeberg, Arne; Korhonen, Tapio

    2006-06-01

    For extremely large telescopes, there is strong need for thin deformable mirrors in the 3-4 m class. So far, feasibility of such mirrors has not been demonstrated. Extrapolation from existing techniques suggests that the mirrors could be highly expensive. We give a progress report on a study of an approach for construction of large deformable mirrors with a moderate cost. We have developed low-cost actuators and deflection sensors that can absorb mounting tolerances in the millimeter range, and we have tested prototypes in the laboratory. Studies of control laws for mirrors with thousands of sensors and actuators are in good progress and simulations have been carried out. Manufacturing of thin, glass mirror blanks is being studied and first prototypes have been produced by a slumping technique. Development of polishing procedures for thin mirrors is in progress.

  4. Interferogram formation in the presence of complex and large deformation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yun, S.-H.; Zebker, H.; Segall, P.; Hooper, A.; Poland, M.

    2007-01-01

    Sierra Negra volcano in Isabela island, Gala??pagos, erupted from October 22 to October 30 in 2005. During the 8 days of eruption, the center of Sierra Negra's caldera subsided about 5.4 meters. Three hours prior to the onset of the eruption, an earthquake (Mw 5.4) occurred, near the caldera. Because of the large and complex phase gradient due to the huge subsidence and the earthquake, it is difficult to form an interferogram inside the caldera that spans the eruption. The deformation is so large and spatially variable that the approximations used in existing InSAR software (ROI, ROI_PAC, DORIS, GAMMA) cannot properly coregister SAR image pairs spanning the eruption. We have developed here a two-step algorithm that can form intra-caldera interferograms from these data. The first step involves a "rubber-sheeting" SAR image coregistration. In the second step we use range offset estimates to mitigate the steep phase gradient. Using this new algorithm, we retrieve an interferogram with the best coverage to date inside the caldera of Sierra Negra. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. Breaking and Restoring of Diffeomorphism Symmetry in Discrete Gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Bahr, B.; Dittrich, B.

    2009-12-15

    We discuss the fate of diffeomorphism symmetry in discrete gravity. Diffeomorphism symmetry is typically broken by the discretization. This has repercussions for the observable content and the canonical formulation of the theory. It might however be possible to construct discrete actions, so-called perfect actions, with exact symmetries and we will review first steps towards this end.

  6. Anosov Diffeomorphisms and {γ}-Tilings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, João P.; Pinto, Alberto A.

    2016-07-01

    We consider a toral Anosov automorphism {G_γ:{mathbb{T}}_γto{mathbb{T}}_γ} given by {G_γ(x,y)=(ax+y,x)} in the { < v,w > } base, where {ainmathbb{N} backslash\\{1\\}}, {γ=1/(a+1/(a+1/ldots))}, {v=(γ,1)} and {w=(-1,γ)} in the canonical base of {{mathbb{R}}^2} and {{mathbb{T}}_γ={mathbb{R}}^2/(v{mathbb{Z}} × w{mathbb{Z}})}. We introduce the notion of {γ}-tilings to prove the existence of a one-to-one correspondence between (i) marked smooth conjugacy classes of Anosov diffeomorphisms, with invariant measures absolutely continuous with respect to the Lebesgue measure, that are in the isotopy class of {G_γ}; (ii) affine classes of {γ}-tilings; and (iii) {γ}-solenoid functions. Solenoid functions provide a parametrization of the infinite dimensional space of the mathematical objects described in these equivalences.

  7. New approach to nonrelativistic diffeomorphism invariance and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Rabin; Mukherjee, Pradip

    2016-04-01

    A comprehensive account of a new structured algorithm for obtaining nonrelativistic diffeomorphism invariances in both space and spacetime by gauging the Galilean symmetry in a generic nonrelativistic field theoretical model is provided. Various applications like the obtention of nonrelativistic diffeomorphism invariance, the introduction of the Chern-Simons term and its role in fractional quantum Hall effect, the induction of diffeomorphism in the irrotational fluid model, the abstraction of Newton-Cartan geometry, and the emergence of Horava-Lifshitz gravity are discussed in details.

  8. Fabric strain sensor integrated with CNPECs for repeated large deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Weijing

    Flexible and soft strain sensors that can be used in smart textiles for wearable applications are much desired. They should meet the requirements of low modulus, large working range and good fatigue resistance as well as good sensing performances. However, there were no commercial products available and the objective of the thesis is to investigate fabric strain sensors based on carbon nanoparticle (CNP) filled elastomer composites (CNPECs) for potential wearing applications. Conductive CNPECs were fabricated and investigated. The introduction of silicone oil (SO) significantly decreased modulus of the composites to less than 1 MPa without affecting their deformability and they showed good stability after heat treatment. With increase of CNP concentration, a percolation appeared in electrical resistivity and the composites can be divided into three ranges. I-V curves and impedance spectra together with electro-mechanical studies demonstrated a balance between sensitivity and working range for the composites with CNP concentrations in post percolation range, and were preferred for sensing applications only if the fatigue life was improved. Due to the good elasticity and failure resist property of knitted fabric under repeated extension, it was adopted as substrate to increase the fatigue life of the conductive composites. After optimization of processing parameters, the conductive fabric with CNP concentration of 9.0CNP showed linear I-V curves when voltage is in the range of -1 V/mm and 1 V/mm and negligible capacitive behavior when frequency below 103 Hz even with strain of 60%. It showed higher sensitivity due to the combination of nonlinear resistance-strain behavior of the CNPECs and non-even strain distribution of knitted fabric under extension. The fatigue life of the conductive fabric was greatly improved. Extended on the studies of CNPECs and the coated conductive fabrics, a fabric strain sensor was designed, fabricated and packaged. The Young's modulus of

  9. Strain localization in usnaturated soils with large deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, X.; Borja, R. I.

    2014-12-01

    Strain localization is a ubiquitous feature of granular materials undergoing nonhomogeneous deformation. In unsaturated porous media, how the localized deformation band is formed depends crucially on the degree of saturation, since fluid in the pores of a solid imposes a volume constraint on the deformation of the solid. When fluid flow is involved, the inception of the localized deformation band also depends on the heterogeneity of a material, which is quantified in terms of the spatial variation of density, the degree of saturation, and matric suction. We present a mathematical framework for coupled solid-deformation/fluid-diffusion in unsaturated porous media that takes into account material and geometric nonlinearities [1, 2]. The framework relies on the continuum principle of thermodynamics to identify an effective, or constitutive, stress for the solid matrix, and a water retention law that highlights the interdependence of degree of saturation, suction, and porosity of the material. We discuss the role of heterogeneity, quantified either deterministically or stochastically, on the development of a persistent shear band. We derive bifurcation conditions [3] governing the initiation of such a shear band. This research is inspired by current testing techniques that allow nondestructive and non-invasive measurement of density and the degree of saturation through high-resolution imaging [4]. The numerical simulations under plane strain condition demonstrate that the bifurcation not only manifests itself on the loading response curve and but also in the space of the degree of saturation, specific volume and suction stress. References[1] Song X, Borja RI, Mathematical framework for unsaturated flow in the finite deformation range. Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng 2014; 97: 658-686. [2] Song X, Borja RI, Finite deformation and fluid flow in unsaturated soils with random heterogeneity. Vadose Zone Journal 2014; doi:10.2136/vzj2013.07.0131. [3] Song X, Borja RI, Instability

  10. A multi-organ biomechanical model to analyze prostate deformation due to large deformation of the rectum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, Kristy K.; Ménard, Cynthia; Hensel, Jennifer; Jaffray, David A.

    2006-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with an endorectal receiver coil (ERC) provides superior visualization of the prostate gland and its surrounding anatomy at the expense of large anatomical deformation. The ability to correct for this deformation is critical to integrate the MR images into the CT-based treatment planning for radiotherapy. The ability to quantify and understand the physiological motion due to large changes in rectal filling can also improve the precision of image-guided procedures. The purpose of this study was to understand the biomechanical relationship between the prostate, rectum, and bladder using a finite element-based multi-organ deformable image registration method, 'Morfeus' developed at our institution. Patients diagnosed with prostate cancer were enrolled in the study. Gold seed markers were implanted in the prostate and MR scans performed with the ERC in place and its surrounding balloon inflated to varying volumes (0-100cc). The prostate, bladder, and rectum were then delineated, converted into finite element models, and assigned appropriate material properties. Morfeus was used to assign surface interfaces between the adjacent organs and deform the bladder and rectum from one position to another, obtaining the position of the prostate through finite element analysis. This approach achieves sub-voxel accuracy of image co-registration in the context of a large ERC deformation, while providing a biomechanical understanding of the multi-organ physiological relationship between the prostate, bladder, and rectum. The development of a deformable registration strategy is essential to integrate the superior information offered in MR images into the treatment planning process.

  11. Structure and Strength of IF Steel After Large Strain Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Niels; Huang, Xiaoxu; Kamikawa, Naoya

    Interstitial free (IF) steel with an ultrafine microstructure has been produced by three different routes: (i) cold rolling, (ii) accumulative roll-bonding (ARB) and (iii) martensitic transformation followed by cold rolling. The microstructure refines with increasing strain without saturation to a value of about 100 nm at an equivalent strain (ɛVM) of 8, which is the maximum strain investigated. At all strains a microscopic analysis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) shows that the microstructure is subdivided by dislocation boundaries and high-angle boundaries. For both cold rolled samples and ARB samples the flow stress increases as the boundary spacing decreases. For the finest structures this leads to a flow stress at room temperature in the range 900-1000 MPa. Finally structure-property relationships are discussed especially the effect of post-processing treatments by annealing and by low strain deformation.

  12. Research of autocollimating angular deformation measurement system for large-size objects control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turgalieva, Tatiana V.; Konyakhin, Igor A.

    2013-04-01

    Characteristics of the system were studied in laboratory conditions. The research confirmed effectiveness of the considered angular deformation measurement system for large-size objects such as the primary mirror of a radio telescope.

  13. Deformation measurement of individual cells in large populations using a single-cell microchamber array chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doh, I.; Lee, W. C.; Cho, Y.-H.; Pisano, A. P.; Kuypers, F. A.

    2012-04-01

    We analyze the deformability of individual red blood cells (RBCs) using SiCMA technology. Our approach is adequate to quickly measure large numbers of individual cells in heterogeneous populations. Individual cells are trapped in a large-scale array of micro-wells, and dielectrophoretic (DEP) force is applied to deform the cells. The simple structures of micro-wells and DEP electrodes facilitate the analysis of thousands of RBCs in parallel. This unique method allows the correlation of red cell deformation with cell surface and cytosolic characteristics to define the distribution of individual cellular characteristics in heterogeneous populations.

  14. Generic Diffeomorphisms with Superexponential Growth of Number of Periodic Orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaloshin, Vadim Yu.

    Let M be a smooth compact manifold of dimension at least 2 and Diffr(M) be the space of Cr smooth diffeomorphisms of M. Associate to each diffeomorphism f;isin; Diffr(M) the sequence Pn(f) of the number of isolated periodic points for f of period n. In this paper we exhibit an open set N in the space of diffeomorphisms Diffr(M) such for a Baire generic diffeomorphism f∈N the number of periodic points Pnf grows with a period n faster than any following sequence of numbers {an}n∈Z+ along a subsequence, i.e. Pn(f)>ani for some ni-->∞ with i-->∞. In the cases of surface diffeomorphisms, i.e. dim M≡2, an open set N with a supergrowth of the number of periodic points is a Newhouse domain. A proof of the man result is based on the Gontchenko-Shilnikov-Turaev Theorem [GST]. A complete proof of that theorem is also presented.

  15. Experiments to find constitutive relation for materials undergoing large deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariharaputhiran, H.; Saravanan, U.

    2010-03-01

    In this article, details about state of art custom built experimental set up to perform biaxial tests on thin sheets made of polymers or soft biological tissues is presented. This displacement controlled set up can apply and measure loads ranging from 0.01 N to 100 N. Then, the uniform or non-uniform surface deformation is determined from tracking a set of markers in 3D space using 2 CCD cameras. Using this setup both elastic and viscoelastic properties of the material could be characterized and the assumption of incompressibility verified. Following Rivlin and Saunders,1 the stored energy corresponding to vulcanized rubber, for stretch ratios less than 1.5, is found by systematically varying one of the variables in the stored energy function. This is achieved by performing biaxial extension tests in which the stretch ratio along one direction is held constant but varied between protocols and the stretch ratio in the perpendicular direction is increased gradually from 1 to 1.5. Then, the predictive capability of the stored energy function is examined by comparing its prediction for the uniaxial extension test with the actual experimental results. However, unlike Rivlin and Saunders, the stored energy is allowed to be either a function of the invariants of left Cauchy-Green stretch tensor (Rivlin2) or the invariants of Hencky strain (Criscione et al3) or the principal stretch ratios (Ogden4). None of the stored energy functions evaluated in this study is able to consistently predict the available experimental data.

  16. Experiments to find constitutive relation for materials undergoing large deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariharaputhiran, H.; Saravanan, U.

    2009-12-01

    In this article, details about state of art custom built experimental set up to perform biaxial tests on thin sheets made of polymers or soft biological tissues is presented. This displacement controlled set up can apply and measure loads ranging from 0.01 N to 100 N. Then, the uniform or non-uniform surface deformation is determined from tracking a set of markers in 3D space using 2 CCD cameras. Using this setup both elastic and viscoelastic properties of the material could be characterized and the assumption of incompressibility verified. Following Rivlin and Saunders,1 the stored energy corresponding to vulcanized rubber, for stretch ratios less than 1.5, is found by systematically varying one of the variables in the stored energy function. This is achieved by performing biaxial extension tests in which the stretch ratio along one direction is held constant but varied between protocols and the stretch ratio in the perpendicular direction is increased gradually from 1 to 1.5. Then, the predictive capability of the stored energy function is examined by comparing its prediction for the uniaxial extension test with the actual experimental results. However, unlike Rivlin and Saunders, the stored energy is allowed to be either a function of the invariants of left Cauchy-Green stretch tensor (Rivlin2) or the invariants of Hencky strain (Criscione et al3) or the principal stretch ratios (Ogden4). None of the stored energy functions evaluated in this study is able to consistently predict the available experimental data.

  17. Analysis of elastic micro optical components under large deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Kazunori; Shimoyama, Isao

    2003-01-01

    We describe a technique for analyzing the mechanical and optical properties of deformable optical elements that combines the finite element method, ray-tracing and birefringence measurement. We fabricated a pneumatically actuated microlens array on an elastic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) film to assess the proposed analysis technique. The lenses are 120 mum in diameter and arranged on the top surface of a 200 mum thick base film. The lenses are displaced by pneumatic actuators at the bottom of the film. The measured mechanical-optical properties of the PDMS test materials showed a good match with the calculation. The paths and retardation of light beams transmitted in the microlens array under several actuating conditions were then analyzed. The lens displacement of 21.8 mum was measured at an applied pressure of -45 kPa. At the same pressure, a ray-trace analysis showed that the actuator changed the visual axis of each lens by 5°, while the retardation was estimated to be within the order of 5 × 10-3 nm.

  18. Time-dependent recovery of passive neutrophils after large deformation.

    PubMed Central

    Tran-Son-Tay, R; Needham, D; Yeung, A; Hochmuth, R M

    1991-01-01

    Experiments are performed in which a passive human neutrophil is deformed into an elongated "sausage" shape by aspirating it into a small glass pipette. When expelled from the pipette the neutrophil recovers its natural spherical shape in approximately 1 minute. This recovery process is analyzed according to a Newtonian, liquid-drop model in which a variational method is used to simultaneously solve the hydrodynamic equations for low Reynolds-number flow and the equations for membrane equilibrium with a constant membrane tension. The theoretical model gives a good fit to the experimental data for a ratio of membrane cortical tension to cytoplasmic viscosity of approximately 1.7 x 10(-5) cm/s (0.17 micron/s). However, when the cell is held in the pipette for only a short time period of 5 s or less, and then expelled, the cell undergoes an initial, rapid elastic rebound suggesting that the cell behaves in this instance as a Maxwell viscoelastic liquid rather than a Newtonian liquid with constant cortical tension. PMID:1742456

  19. Finite element formulations for problems of large elastic-plastic deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmeeking, R. M.; Rice, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    An Eulerian finite element formulation is presented for problems of large elastic-plastic flow. The method is based on Hill's variational principle for incremental deformations, and is suited to isotropically hardening Prandtl-Reuss materials. The formulation is given in a manner which allows any conventional finite element program, for "small strain" elasticplastic analysis, to be simply and rigorously adapted to problems involving arbitrary amounts of deformation and arbitrary levels of stress in comparison to plastic deformation moduli. The method is applied to a necking bifurcation analysis of a bar in plane-strain tension. A unified general formulation of finite element equations, both Lagrangian and Eulerian, for large deformations, with arbitrary choice of the conjugate stress and strain measures, and a discussion is given of other proposed formulations for elastic-plastic finite element analysis at large strain.

  20. Finite-element formulations for problems of large elastic-plastic deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmeeking, R. M.; Rice, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    An Eulerian finite element formulation is presented for problems of large elastic-plastic flow. The method is based on Hill's variational principle for incremental deformations, and is ideally suited to isotropically hardening Prandtl-Reuss materials. Further, the formulation is given in a manner which allows any conventional finite element program, for 'small strain' elastic-plastic analysis, to be simply and rigorously adapted to problems involving arbitrary amounts of deformation and arbitrary levels of stress in comparison to plastic deformation moduli. The method is applied to a necking bifurcation analysis of a bar in plane-strain tension. The paper closes with a unified general formulation of finite element equations, both Lagrangian and Eulerian, for large deformations, with arbitrary choice of the conjugate stress and strain measures. Further, a discussion is given of other proposed formulations for elastic-plastic finite element analysis at large strain, and the inadequacies of some of these are commented upon.

  1. Large-Scale Deformation and Uplift Associated with Serpentinization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germanovich, L. N.; Lowell, R. P.; Smith, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Geologic and geophysical data suggest that partially serpentinized peridotites and serpentinites are a significant part of the oceanic lithosphere. All serpentinization reactions are exothermic and result in volume expansion as high as 40%. Volume expansion beneath the seafloor will lead to surface uplift and elevated stresses in the neighborhood of the region undergoing serpentinization. The serpentinization-induced stresses are likely to result in faulting or tensile fracturing that promote the serpentinization process by creating new permeability and allowing fluid access to fresh peridotite. To explore these issues, we developed a first-order model of crustal deformation by considering an inclusion undergoing transformation strain in an elastic half-space. Using solutions for inclusions of different shapes, orientations, and depths, we calculate the surface uplift and mechanical stresses generated by the serpentinization processes. We discuss the topographic features at the TAG hydrothermal field (Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 26°N), uplift of the Miyazaki Plain (Southwestern Japan), and tectonic history of the Atlantic Massif (inside corner high of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 30°N, and the Atlantis Transform Fault). Our analysis suggests that an anomalous salient of 3 km in diameter and 100 m high at TAG may have resulted from approximately 20% transformational strain in a region beneath the footwall of the TAG detachment fault. This serpentinization process tends to promote slip along some overlying normal faults, which may then enhance fluid pathways to the deeper crust to continue the serpentinization process. The serpentinization also favors slip and seismicity along the antithetic faults identified below the TAG detachment fault. Our solution for the Miyazaki Plain above the Kyushu-Palau subduction zone explains the observed uplift of 120 m, but the transformational strain needs only be 3%. Transformational strains associated with serpentinization in this region may

  2. The quantum holonomy-diffeomorphism algebra and quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aastrup, Johannes; Grimstrup, Jesper Møller

    2016-03-01

    We introduce the quantum holonomy-diffeomorphism ∗-algebra, which is generated by holonomy-diffeomorphisms on a three-dimensional manifold and translations on a space of SU(2)-connections. We show that this algebra encodes the canonical commutation relations of canonical quantum gravity formulated in terms of Ashtekar variables. Furthermore, we show that semiclassical states exist on the holonomy-diffeomorphism part of the algebra but that these states cannot be extended to the full algebra. Via a Dirac-type operator we derive a certain class of unbounded operators that act in the GNS construction of the semiclassical states. These unbounded operators are the type of operators, which we have previously shown to entail the spatial three-dimensional Dirac operator and Dirac-Hamiltonian in a semiclassical limit. Finally, we show that the structure of the Hamilton constraint emerges from a Yang-Mills-type operator over the space of SU(2)-connections.

  3. Automated registration of large deformations for adaptive radiation therapy of prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Godley, Andrew; Ahunbay, Ergun; Peng Cheng; Li, X. Allen

    2009-04-15

    Available deformable registration methods are often inaccurate over large organ variation encountered, for example, in the rectum and bladder. The authors developed a novel approach to accurately and effectively register large deformations in the prostate region for adaptive radiation therapy. A software tool combining a fast symmetric demons algorithm and the use of masks was developed in C++ based on ITK libraries to register CT images acquired at planning and before treatment fractions. The deformation field determined was subsequently used to deform the delivered dose to match the anatomy of the planning CT. The large deformations involved required that the bladder and rectum volume be masked with uniform intensities of -1000 and 1000 HU, respectively, in both the planning and treatment CTs. The tool was tested for five prostate IGRT patients. The average rectum planning to treatment contour overlap improved from 67% to 93%, the lowest initial overlap is 43%. The average bladder overlap improved from 83% to 98%, with a lowest initial overlap of 60%. Registration regions were set to include a volume receiving 4% of the maximum dose. The average region was 320x210x63, taking approximately 9 min to register on a dual 2.8 GHz Linux system. The prostate and seminal vesicles were correctly placed even though they are not masked. The accumulated doses for multiple fractions with large deformation were computed and verified. The tool developed can effectively supply the previously delivered dose for adaptive planning to correct for interfractional changes.

  4. Black hole entropy and Lorentz-diffeomorphism Noether charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Ted; Mohd, Arif

    2015-12-01

    We show that, in the first or second order orthonormal frame formalism, black hole entropy is the horizon Noether charge for a combination of diffeomorphism and local Lorentz symmetry involving the Lie derivative of the frame. The Noether charge for diffeomorphisms alone is unsuitable, since a regular frame cannot be invariant under the flow of the Killing field at the bifurcation surface. We apply this formalism to Lagrangians polynomial in wedge products of the frame field 1-form and curvature 2-form, including general relativity, Lovelock gravity, and "topological" terms in four dimensions.

  5. Large-Amplitude Deformation and Bond Breakage in Shock-Induced Reactions of Explosive Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Jeffrey

    The response of explosive molecules to large-amplitude mechanical deformation plays an important role in shock-induced reactions and the initiation of detonation in explosive materials. In this presentation, the response of a series of explosive molecules (nitromethane, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene [TNT], and 2,4,6-triamino-1,3,5-trinitrobenzene [TATB]) to a variety of large-amplitude deformations are examined using ab initio quantum chemical calculations. Large-amplitude motions that result in bond breakage are described, and the insights these results provide into both previous experimental observations and previous theoretical predictions of shock-induced reactions are discussed.

  6. The influence of large deformations on mechanical properties of sinusoidal ligament structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strek, Tomasz; Jopek, Hubert; Wojciechowski, Krzysztof W.

    2016-05-01

    Studies of mechanical properties of materials, both theoretical and experimental, usually deal with linear characteristics assuming a small range of deformations. In particular, not much research has been published devoted to large deformations of auxetic structures - i.e. structures exhibiting negative Poisson’s ratio. This paper is focused on mechanical properties of selected structures that are subject to large deformations. Four examples of structure built of sinusoidal ligaments are studied and for each geometry the impact of deformation size and geometrical parameters on the effective mechanical properties of these structures are investigated. It is shown that some of them are auxetic when compressed and non-auxetic when stretched. Geometrical parameters describing sinusoidal shape of ligaments strongly affect effective mechanical properties of the structure. In some cases of deformation, the increase of the value of amplitude of the sinusoidal shape decreases the effective Poisson’s ratio by 0.7. Therefore the influence of geometry, as well as the arrangement of ligaments allows for smart control of mechanical properties of the sinusoidal ligament structure being considered. Given the large deformation of the structure, both a linear elastic material model, and a hyperelastic Neo-Hookean material model are used.

  7. Development of patient-specific biomechanical models for predicting large breast deformation.

    PubMed

    Han, Lianghao; Hipwell, John H; Tanner, Christine; Taylor, Zeike; Mertzanidou, Thomy; Cardoso, Jorge; Ourselin, Sebastien; Hawkes, David J

    2012-01-21

    Physically realistic simulations for large breast deformation are of great interest for many medical applications such as cancer diagnosis, image registration, surgical planning and image-guided surgery. To support fast, large deformation simulations of breasts in clinical settings, we proposed a patient-specific biomechanical modelling framework for breasts, based on an open-source graphics processing unit-based, explicit, dynamic, nonlinear finite element (FE) solver. A semi-automatic segmentation method for tissue classification, integrated with a fully automated FE mesh generation approach, was implemented for quick patient-specific FE model generation. To solve the difficulty in determining material parameters of soft tissues in vivo for FE simulations, a novel method for breast modelling, with a simultaneous material model parameter optimization for soft tissues in vivo, was also proposed. The optimized deformation prediction was obtained through iteratively updating material model parameters to maximize the image similarity between the FE-predicted MR image and the experimentally acquired MR image of a breast. The proposed method was validated and tested by simulating and analysing breast deformation experiments under plate compression. Its prediction accuracy was evaluated by calculating landmark displacement errors. The results showed that both the heterogeneity and the anisotropy of soft tissues were essential in predicting large breast deformations under plate compression. As a generalized method, the proposed process can be used for fast deformation analyses of soft tissues in medical image analyses and surgical simulations. PMID:22173131

  8. Thermophoretically induced large-scale deformations around microscopic heat centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puljiz, Mate; Orlishausen, Michael; Köhler, Werner; Menzel, Andreas M.

    2016-05-01

    Selectively heating a microscopic colloidal particle embedded in a soft elastic matrix is a situation of high practical relevance. For instance, during hyperthermic cancer treatment, cell tissue surrounding heated magnetic colloidal particles is destroyed. Experiments on soft elastic polymeric matrices suggest a very long-ranged, non-decaying radial component of the thermophoretically induced displacement fields around the microscopic heat centers. We theoretically confirm this conjecture using a macroscopic hydrodynamic two-fluid description. Both thermophoretic and elastic effects are included in this theory. Indeed, we find that the elasticity of the environment can cause the experimentally observed large-scale radial displacements in the embedding matrix. Additional experiments confirm the central role of elasticity. Finally, a linearly decaying radial component of the displacement field in the experiments is attributed to the finite size of the experimental sample. Similar results are obtained from our theoretical analysis under modified boundary conditions.

  9. High-resolution adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope with dual deformable mirrors for large aberration correction

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D; Jones, S M; Silva, D A; Olivier, S S

    2007-01-25

    Scanning laser ophthalmoscopes with adaptive optics (AOSLO) have been shown previously to provide a noninvasive, cellular-scale view of the living human retina. However, the clinical utility of these systems has been limited by the available deformable mirror technology. In this paper, we demonstrate that the use of dual deformable mirrors can effectively compensate large aberrations in the human retina, making the AOSLO system a viable, non-invasive, high-resolution imaging tool for clinical diagnostics. We used a bimorph deformable mirror to correct low-order aberrations with relatively large amplitudes. The bimorph mirror is manufactured by Aoptix, Inc. with 37 elements and 18 {micro}m stroke in a 10 mm aperture. We used a MEMS deformable mirror to correct high-order aberrations with lower amplitudes. The MEMS mirror is manufactured by Boston Micromachine, Inc with 144 elements and 1.5 {micro}m stroke in a 3 mm aperture. We have achieved near diffraction-limited retina images using the dual deformable mirrors to correct large aberrations up to {+-} 3D of defocus and {+-} 3D of cylindrical aberrations with test subjects. This increases the range of spectacle corrections by the AO systems by a factor of 10, which is crucial for use in the clinical environment. This ability for large phase compensation can eliminate accurate refractive error fitting for the patients, which greatly improves the system ease of use and efficiency in the clinical environment.

  10. A finite element method for transient analysis of concurrent large deformation and mass transport in gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiaping; Zhao, Xuanhe; Suo, Zhigang; Jiang, Hanqing

    2009-05-01

    A gel is an aggregate of polymers and solvent molecules. The polymers crosslink into a three-dimensional network by strong chemical bonds and enable the gel to retain its shape after a large deformation. The solvent molecules, however, interact among themselves and with the network by weak physical bonds and enable the gel to be a conduit of mass transport. The time-dependent concurrent process of large deformation and mass transport is studied by developing a finite element method. We combine the kinematics of large deformation, the conservation of the solvent molecules, the conditions of local equilibrium, and the kinetics of migration to evolve simultaneously two fields: the displacement of the network and the chemical potential of the solvent. The finite element method is demonstrated by analyzing several phenomena, such as swelling, draining and buckling. This work builds a platform to study diverse phenomena in gels with spatial and temporal complexity.

  11. Diffeomorphic demons: efficient non-parametric image registration.

    PubMed

    Vercauteren, Tom; Pennec, Xavier; Perchant, Aymeric; Ayache, Nicholas

    2009-03-01

    We propose an efficient non-parametric diffeomorphic image registration algorithm based on Thirion's demons algorithm. In the first part of this paper, we show that Thirion's demons algorithm can be seen as an optimization procedure on the entire space of displacement fields. We provide strong theoretical roots to the different variants of Thirion's demons algorithm. This analysis predicts a theoretical advantage for the symmetric forces variant of the demons algorithm. We show on controlled experiments that this advantage is confirmed in practice and yields a faster convergence. In the second part of this paper, we adapt the optimization procedure underlying the demons algorithm to a space of diffeomorphic transformations. In contrast to many diffeomorphic registration algorithms, our solution is computationally efficient since in practice it only replaces an addition of displacement fields by a few compositions. Our experiments show that in addition to being diffeomorphic, our algorithm provides results that are similar to the ones from the demons algorithm but with transformations that are much smoother and closer to the gold standard, available in controlled experiments, in terms of Jacobians. PMID:19041946

  12. A satellite geodetic survey of large-scale deformation of volcanic centres in the central Andes.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Matthew E; Simons, Mark

    2002-07-11

    Surface deformation in volcanic areas usually indicates movement of magma or hydrothermal fluids at depth. Stratovolcanoes tend to exhibit a complex relationship between deformation and eruptive behaviour. The characteristically long time spans between such eruptions requires a long time series of observations to determine whether deformation without an eruption is common at a given edifice. Such studies, however, are logistically difficult to carry out in most volcanic arcs, as these tend to be remote regions with large numbers of volcanoes (hundreds to even thousands). Here we present a satellite-based interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) survey of the remote central Andes volcanic arc, a region formed by subduction of the Nazca oceanic plate beneath continental South America. Spanning the years 1992 to 2000, our survey reveals the background level of activity of about 900 volcanoes, 50 of which have been classified as potentially active. We find four centres of broad (tens of kilometres wide), roughly axisymmetric surface deformation. None of these centres are at volcanoes currently classified as potentially active, although two lie within about 10 km of volcanoes with known activity. Source depths inferred from the patterns of deformation lie between 5 and 17 km. In contrast to the four new sources found, we do not observe any deformation associated with recent eruptions of Lascar, Chile. PMID:12110886

  13. Large strain variable stiffness composites for shear deformations with applications to morphing aircraft skins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKnight, G. P.; Henry, C. P.

    2008-03-01

    Morphing or reconfigurable structures potentially allow for previously unattainable vehicle performance by permitting several optimized structures to be achieved using a single platform. The key to enabling this technology in applications such as aircraft wings, nozzles, and control surfaces, are new engineered materials which can achieve the necessary deformations but limit losses in parasitic actuation mass and structural efficiency (stiffness/weight). These materials should exhibit precise control of deformation properties and provide high stiffness when exercised through large deformations. In this work, we build upon previous efforts in segmented reinforcement variable stiffness composites employing shape memory polymers to create prototype hybrid composite materials that combine the benefits of cellular materials with those of discontinuous reinforcement composites. These composites help overcome two key challenges for shearing wing skins: the resistance to out of plane buckling from actuation induced shear deformation, and resistance to membrane deflections resulting from distributed aerodynamic pressure loading. We designed, fabricated, and tested composite materials intended for shear deformation and address out of plane deflections in variable area wing skins. Our designs are based on the kinematic engineering of reinforcement platelets such that desired microstructural kinematics is achieved through prescribed boundary conditions. We achieve this kinematic control by etching sheets of metallic reinforcement into regular patterns of platelets and connecting ligaments. This kinematic engineering allows optimization of materials properties for a known deformation pathway. We use mechanical analysis and full field photogrammetry to relate local scale kinematics and strains to global deformations for both axial tension loading and shear loading with a pinned-diamond type fixture. The Poisson ratio of the kinematically engineered composite is ~3x higher than

  14. Large Deformation Mechanisms, Plasticity, and Failure of an Individual Collagen Fibril With Different Mineral Content.

    PubMed

    Depalle, Baptiste; Qin, Zhao; Shefelbine, Sandra J; Buehler, Markus J

    2016-02-01

    Mineralized collagen fibrils are composed of tropocollagen molecules and mineral crystals derived from hydroxyapatite to form a composite material that combines optimal properties of both constituents and exhibits incredible strength and toughness. Their complex hierarchical structure allows collagen fibrils to sustain large deformation without breaking. In this study, we report a mesoscale model of a single mineralized collagen fibril using a bottom-up approach. By conserving the three-dimensional structure and the entanglement of the molecules, we were able to construct finite-size fibril models that allowed us to explore the deformation mechanisms which govern their mechanical behavior under large deformation. We investigated the tensile behavior of a single collagen fibril with various intrafibrillar mineral content and found that a mineralized collagen fibril can present up to five different deformation mechanisms to dissipate energy. These mechanisms include molecular uncoiling, molecular stretching, mineral/collagen sliding, molecular slippage, and crystal dissociation. By multiplying its sources of energy dissipation and deformation mechanisms, a collagen fibril can reach impressive strength and toughness. Adding mineral into the collagen fibril can increase its strength up to 10 times and its toughness up to 35 times. Combining crosslinks with mineral makes the fibril stiffer but more brittle. We also found that a mineralized fibril reaches its maximum toughness to density and strength to density ratios for a mineral density of around 30%. This result, in good agreement with experimental observations, attests that bone tissue is optimized mechanically to remain lightweight but maintain strength and toughness. PMID:26866939

  15. Large Deformation of an Elastic Rod with Structural Anisotropy Subjected to Fluid Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassani, Masoud; Mureithi, Njuki; Gosselin, Frederick

    2015-11-01

    In the present work, we seek to understand the fundamental mechanisms of three-dimensional reconfiguration of plants by studying the large deformation of a flexible rod in fluid flow. Flexible rods made of Polyurethane foam and reinforced with Nylon fibers are tested in a wind tunnel. The rods have bending-torsion coupling which induces a torsional deformation during asymmetric bending. A mathematical model is also developed by coupling the Kirchhoff rod theory with a semi-empirical drag formulation. Different alignments of the material frame with respect to the flow direction and a range of structural properties are considered to study their effect on the deformation of the flexible rod and its drag scaling. Results show that twisting causes the flexible rods to reorient and bend with the minimum bending rigidity. It is also found that the drag scaling of the rod in the large deformation regime is not affected by torsion. Finally, using a proper set of dimensionless numbers, the state of a bending and twisting rod is characterized as a beam undergoing a pure bending deformation.

  16. Large Deformation Mechanisms, Plasticity, and Failure of an Individual Collagen Fibril With Different Mineral Content.

    PubMed

    Depalle, Baptiste; Qin, Zhao; Shefelbine, Sandra J; Buehler, Markus J

    2016-02-01

    Mineralized collagen fibrils are composed of tropocollagen molecules and mineral crystals derived from hydroxyapatite to form a composite material that combines optimal properties of both constituents and exhibits incredible strength and toughness. Their complex hierarchical structure allows collagen fibrils to sustain large deformation without breaking. In this study, we report a mesoscale model of a single mineralized collagen fibril using a bottom-up approach. By conserving the three-dimensional structure and the entanglement of the molecules, we were able to construct finite-size fibril models that allowed us to explore the deformation mechanisms which govern their mechanical behavior under large deformation. We investigated the tensile behavior of a single collagen fibril with various intrafibrillar mineral content and found that a mineralized collagen fibril can present up to five different deformation mechanisms to dissipate energy. These mechanisms include molecular uncoiling, molecular stretching, mineral/collagen sliding, molecular slippage, and crystal dissociation. By multiplying its sources of energy dissipation and deformation mechanisms, a collagen fibril can reach impressive strength and toughness. Adding mineral into the collagen fibril can increase its strength up to 10 times and its toughness up to 35 times. Combining crosslinks with mineral makes the fibril stiffer but more brittle. We also found that a mineralized fibril reaches its maximum toughness to density and strength to density ratios for a mineral density of around 30%. This result, in good agreement with experimental observations, attests that bone tissue is optimized mechanically to remain lightweight but maintain strength and toughness.

  17. Large aperture deformable mirror with a transferred single-crystal silicon membrane actuated using large-stroke PZT Unimorph Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hishinumat, Yoshikazu; Yang, Eui - Hyeok (EH)

    2005-01-01

    We have demonstrated a large aperture (50 mm x 50 mm) continuous membrane deformable mirror (DM) with a large-stroke piezoelectric unimorph actuator array. The DM consists of a continuous, large aperture, silicon membrane 'transferred' in its entirety onto a 20 x 20 piezoelectric unimorph actuator array. A PZT unimorph actuator, 2.5 mm in diameter with optimized PZT/Si thickness and design showed a deflection of 5.7 [m at 20V. An assembled DM showed an operating frequency bandwidth of 30 kHz and influence function of approximately 30%.

  18. Tangential differential calculus and the finite element modeling of a large deformation elastic membrane problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansbo, Peter; Larson, Mats G.; Larsson, Fredrik

    2015-07-01

    We develop a finite element method for a large deformation membrane elasticity problem on meshed curved surfaces using a tangential differential calculus approach that avoids the use of classical differential geometric methods. The method is also applied to form finding problems.

  19. Large-Deformation Displacement Transfer Functions for Shape Predictions of Highly Flexible Slender Aerospace Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Fleischer, Van Tran

    2013-01-01

    Large deformation displacement transfer functions were formulated for deformed shape predictions of highly flexible slender structures like aircraft wings. In the formulation, the embedded beam (depth wise cross section of structure along the surface strain sensing line) was first evenly discretized into multiple small domains, with surface strain sensing stations located at the domain junctures. Thus, the surface strain (bending strains) variation within each domain could be expressed with linear of nonlinear function. Such piecewise approach enabled piecewise integrations of the embedded beam curvature equations [classical (Eulerian), physical (Lagrangian), and shifted curvature equations] to yield closed form slope and deflection equations in recursive forms.

  20. Large Area Stress Distribution in Crystalline Materials Calculated from Lattice Deformation Identified by Electron Backscatter Diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yongliang; Zhang, Lei; Hao, Xiaopeng; Wu, Yongzhong; Dai, Yuanbin; Tian, Yuan; Huo, Qin

    2014-01-01

    We report a method to obtain the stress of crystalline materials directly from lattice deformation by Hooke's law. The lattice deformation was calculated using the crystallographic orientations obtained from electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technology. The stress distribution over a large area was obtained efficiently and accurately using this method. Wurtzite structure gallium nitride (GaN) crystal was used as the example of a hexagonal crystal system. With this method, the stress distribution of a GaN crystal was obtained. Raman spectroscopy was used to verify the stress distribution. The cause of the stress distribution found in the GaN crystal was discussed from theoretical analysis and EBSD data. Other properties related to lattice deformation, such as piezoelectricity, can also be analyzed by this novel approach based on EBSD data. PMID:25091314

  1. Harnessing large deformation and instabilities of soft dielectrics: Theory, experiment, and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xuanhe; Wang, Qiming

    2014-06-01

    Widely used as insulators, capacitors, and transducers in daily life, soft dielectrics based on polymers and polymeric gels play important roles in modern electrified society. Owning to their mechanical compliance, soft dielectrics subject to voltages frequently undergo large deformation and mechanical instabilities. The deformation and instabilities can lead to detrimental failures in some applications of soft dielectrics such as polymer capacitors and insulating gels but can also be rationally harnessed to enable novel functions such as artificial muscle, dynamic surface patterning, and energy harvesting. According to mechanical constraints on soft dielectrics, we classify their deformation and instabilities into three generic modes: (i) thinning and pull-in, (ii) electro-creasing to cratering, and (iii) electro-cavitation. We then provide a systematic understanding of different modes of deformation and instabilities of soft dielectrics by integrating state-of-the-art experimental methods and observations, theoretical models, and applications. Based on the understanding, a systematic set of strategies to prevent or harness the deformation and instabilities of soft dielectrics for diverse applications are discussed. The review is concluded with perspectives on future directions of research in this rapidly evolving field.

  2. Diffeomorphism invariant cosmological symmetry in full quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beetle, Christopher; Engle, Jonathan S.; Hogan, Matthew E.; Mendonça, Phillip

    2016-06-01

    This paper summarizes a new proposal to define rigorously a sector of loop quantum gravity at the diffeomorphism invariant level corresponding to homogeneous and isotropic cosmologies, thereby enabling a detailed comparison of results in loop quantum gravity and loop quantum cosmology. The key technical steps we have completed are (a) to formulate conditions for homogeneity and isotropy in a diffeomorphism covariant way on the classical phase-space of general relativity, and (b) to translate these conditions consistently using well-understood techniques to loop quantum gravity. Some additional steps, such as constructing a specific embedding of the Hilbert space of loop quantum cosmology into a space of (distributional) states in the full theory, remain incomplete. However, we also describe, as a proof of concept, a complete analysis of an analogous embedding of homogeneous and isotropic loop quantum cosmology into the quantum Bianchi I model of Ashtekar and Wilson-Ewing. Details will appear in a pair of forthcoming papers.

  3. A dynamic tree-based registration could handle possible large deformations among MR brain images.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pei; Wu, Guorong; Gao, Yaozong; Yap, Pew-Thian; Shen, Dinggang

    2016-09-01

    Multi-atlas segmentation is a powerful approach to automated anatomy delineation via fusing label information from a set of spatially normalized atlases. For simplicity, many existing methods perform pairwise image registration, leading to inaccurate segmentation especially when shape variation is large. In this paper, we propose a dynamic tree-based strategy for effective large-deformation registration and multi-atlas segmentation. To deal with local minima caused by large shape variation, coarse estimates of deformations are first obtained via alignment of automatically localized landmark points. The dynamic tree capturing the structural relationships between images is then employed to further reduce misalignment errors. Evaluation based on two real human brain datasets, ADNI and LPBA40, shows that our method significantly improves registration and segmentation accuracy. PMID:27235894

  4. A Piezoelectric Unimorph Deformable Mirror Concept by Wafer Transfer for Ultra Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Eui-Hyeok; Shcheglov, Kirill

    2002-01-01

    Future concepts of ultra large space telescopes include segmented silicon mirrors and inflatable polymer mirrors. Primary mirrors for these systems cannot meet optical surface figure requirements and are likely to generate over several microns of wavefront errors. In order to correct for these large wavefront errors, high stroke optical quality deformable mirrors are required. JPL has recently developed a new technology for transferring an entire wafer-level mirror membrane from one substrate to another. A thin membrane, 100 mm in diameter, has been successfully transferred without using adhesives or polymers. The measured peak-to-valley surface error of a transferred and patterned membrane (1 mm x 1 mm x 0.016 mm) is only 9 nm. The mirror element actuation principle is based on a piezoelectric unimorph. A voltage applied to the piezoelectric layer induces stress in the longitudinal direction causing the film to deform and pull on the mirror connected to it. The advantage of this approach is that the small longitudinal strains obtainable from a piezoelectric material at modest voltages are thus translated into large vertical displacements. Modeling is performed for a unimorph membrane consisting of clamped rectangular membrane with a PZT layer with variable dimensions. The membrane transfer technology is combined with the piezoelectric bimorph actuator concept to constitute a compact deformable mirror device with a large stroke actuation of a continuous mirror membrane, resulting in a compact A0 systems for use in ultra large space telescopes.

  5. Breaking diffeomorphism invariance and tests for the emergence of gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Anber, Mohamed M.; Aydemir, Ufuk; Donoghue, John F.

    2010-04-15

    If general relativity is an emergent phenomenon, there may be small violations of diffeomorphism invariance. We propose a phenomenology of perturbatively small violations of general relativity by the inclusion of terms which break general covariance. These can be tested by matching to the parameterized post-Newtonian formalism. The most sensitive tests involve pulsar timing and provide an extremely strong bound, with a dimensionless constraint of order 10{sup -20} relative to gravitational strength.

  6. Large-deformation and high-strength amorphous porous carbon nanospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Weizhu; Mao, Shimin; Yang, Jia; Shang, Tao; Song, Hongguang; Mabon, James; Swiech, Wacek; Vance, John R.; Yue, Zhufeng; Dillon, Shen J.; Xu, Hangxun; Xu, Baoxing

    2016-04-01

    Carbon is one of the most important materials extensively used in industry and our daily life. Crystalline carbon materials such as carbon nanotubes and graphene possess ultrahigh strength and toughness. In contrast, amorphous carbon is known to be very brittle and can sustain little compressive deformation. Inspired by biological shells and honeycomb-like cellular structures in nature, we introduce a class of hybrid structural designs and demonstrate that amorphous porous carbon nanospheres with a thin outer shell can simultaneously achieve high strength and sustain large deformation. The amorphous carbon nanospheres were synthesized via a low-cost, scalable and structure-controllable ultrasonic spray pyrolysis approach using energetic carbon precursors. In situ compression experiments on individual nanospheres show that the amorphous carbon nanospheres with an optimized structure can sustain beyond 50% compressive strain. Both experiments and finite element analyses reveal that the buckling deformation of the outer spherical shell dominates the improvement of strength while the collapse of inner nanoscale pores driven by twisting, rotation, buckling and bending of pore walls contributes to the large deformation.

  7. Large-deformation and high-strength amorphous porous carbon nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weizhu; Mao, Shimin; Yang, Jia; Shang, Tao; Song, Hongguang; Mabon, James; Swiech, Wacek; Vance, John R; Yue, Zhufeng; Dillon, Shen J; Xu, Hangxun; Xu, Baoxing

    2016-01-01

    Carbon is one of the most important materials extensively used in industry and our daily life. Crystalline carbon materials such as carbon nanotubes and graphene possess ultrahigh strength and toughness. In contrast, amorphous carbon is known to be very brittle and can sustain little compressive deformation. Inspired by biological shells and honeycomb-like cellular structures in nature, we introduce a class of hybrid structural designs and demonstrate that amorphous porous carbon nanospheres with a thin outer shell can simultaneously achieve high strength and sustain large deformation. The amorphous carbon nanospheres were synthesized via a low-cost, scalable and structure-controllable ultrasonic spray pyrolysis approach using energetic carbon precursors. In situ compression experiments on individual nanospheres show that the amorphous carbon nanospheres with an optimized structure can sustain beyond 50% compressive strain. Both experiments and finite element analyses reveal that the buckling deformation of the outer spherical shell dominates the improvement of strength while the collapse of inner nanoscale pores driven by twisting, rotation, buckling and bending of pore walls contributes to the large deformation.

  8. Large-deformation and high-strength amorphous porous carbon nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weizhu; Mao, Shimin; Yang, Jia; Shang, Tao; Song, Hongguang; Mabon, James; Swiech, Wacek; Vance, John R; Yue, Zhufeng; Dillon, Shen J; Xu, Hangxun; Xu, Baoxing

    2016-01-01

    Carbon is one of the most important materials extensively used in industry and our daily life. Crystalline carbon materials such as carbon nanotubes and graphene possess ultrahigh strength and toughness. In contrast, amorphous carbon is known to be very brittle and can sustain little compressive deformation. Inspired by biological shells and honeycomb-like cellular structures in nature, we introduce a class of hybrid structural designs and demonstrate that amorphous porous carbon nanospheres with a thin outer shell can simultaneously achieve high strength and sustain large deformation. The amorphous carbon nanospheres were synthesized via a low-cost, scalable and structure-controllable ultrasonic spray pyrolysis approach using energetic carbon precursors. In situ compression experiments on individual nanospheres show that the amorphous carbon nanospheres with an optimized structure can sustain beyond 50% compressive strain. Both experiments and finite element analyses reveal that the buckling deformation of the outer spherical shell dominates the improvement of strength while the collapse of inner nanoscale pores driven by twisting, rotation, buckling and bending of pore walls contributes to the large deformation. PMID:27072412

  9. Large-deformation and high-strength amorphous porous carbon nanospheres

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Weizhu; Mao, Shimin; Yang, Jia; Shang, Tao; Song, Hongguang; Mabon, James; Swiech, Wacek; Vance, John R.; Yue, Zhufeng; Dillon, Shen J.; Xu, Hangxun; Xu, Baoxing

    2016-01-01

    Carbon is one of the most important materials extensively used in industry and our daily life. Crystalline carbon materials such as carbon nanotubes and graphene possess ultrahigh strength and toughness. In contrast, amorphous carbon is known to be very brittle and can sustain little compressive deformation. Inspired by biological shells and honeycomb-like cellular structures in nature, we introduce a class of hybrid structural designs and demonstrate that amorphous porous carbon nanospheres with a thin outer shell can simultaneously achieve high strength and sustain large deformation. The amorphous carbon nanospheres were synthesized via a low-cost, scalable and structure-controllable ultrasonic spray pyrolysis approach using energetic carbon precursors. In situ compression experiments on individual nanospheres show that the amorphous carbon nanospheres with an optimized structure can sustain beyond 50% compressive strain. Both experiments and finite element analyses reveal that the buckling deformation of the outer spherical shell dominates the improvement of strength while the collapse of inner nanoscale pores driven by twisting, rotation, buckling and bending of pore walls contributes to the large deformation. PMID:27072412

  10. A mesh density study for application to large deformation rolling process evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.A.

    1997-12-01

    When addressing large deformation through an elastic-plastic analysis the mesh density is paramount in determining the accuracy of the solution. However, given the nonlinear nature of the problem, a highly-refined mesh will generally require a prohibitive amount of computer resources. This paper addresses finite element mesh optimization studies considering accuracy of results and computer resource needs as applied to large deformation rolling processes. In particular, the simulation of the thread rolling manufacturing process is considered using the MARC software package and a Cray C90 supercomputer. Both mesh density and adaptive meshing on final results for both indentation of a rigid body to a specified depth and contact rolling along a predetermined length are evaluated.

  11. The microstructure origin of large strain plastically deformed SiC nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, X.; Jiang, J.; Hu, X.; Yuan, J.; Zhang, Y.; Han, X.; Zhang, Z.

    2008-08-01

    Surprisingly large strain plasticity has been demonstrated for ceramic SiC nanowires through in-situ deformation experiments near room temperature. This article reports a detailed electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) study of deformation-induced localized plastic zones in a bent SiC nanowire. Both the 'red shift' of the plasmon peak and the characteristic fine structure at Si L-edge absorption are consistent with local amorphisation of SiC. The recorded C K-edge fine structure is processed to remove the contribution from the surface amorphous carbon and the extracted C K-edge fine structure has no characteristic sp2-related pre-edge peak and hence is also consistent with amorphous SiC. These results suggest that the large strain plasticity in SiC nanowires is enabled by crystalline-to-amorphous transition.

  12. Mechanical behavior of polymer-grafted iron oxide nano particles under large shear deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Yang; Senses, Erkan; Akcora, Pinar; Stevens Institute of Technology Team

    2014-03-01

    Grafting particles with polymers is an effective strategy to control the dispersion and assembly of fillers that will enhance the structural and mechanical stability of polymer nanocomposites (PNCs). Viscoelastic properties of polymer-grafted nanoparticles (NPs) dispersed in homopolymer melts at nonlinear regimes are particularly important as nonlinearities are sensitive to any microstructural change. Her, we report on the nonlinear mechanical behavior of poly(styrene) (PS)-grafted iron oxide NPs in PS homopolymers to reveal the importance of brush-matrix interface and dynamic entanglement under large shear deformations. With oscillatory shear flow, wetting is enabled and long-range ordering of particles is achieved in the system where free chains are longer than the grafted one. We show that large oscillatory deformations can strengthen the interfaces that result in the enhanced mechanical properties. These shear-induced ordered particles can perform as reinforced polymer networks for energy absorbing application. We acknowledge financial support by NSF-CAREER-DMR (#1048865).

  13. Large Deformation Mechanisms, Plasticity, and Failure of an Individual Collagen Fibril With Different Mineral Content

    PubMed Central

    Depalle, Baptiste; Qin, Zhao; Shefelbine, Sandra J

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mineralized collagen fibrils are composed of tropocollagen molecules and mineral crystals derived from hydroxyapatite to form a composite material that combines optimal properties of both constituents and exhibits incredible strength and toughness. Their complex hierarchical structure allows collagen fibrils to sustain large deformation without breaking. In this study, we report a mesoscale model of a single mineralized collagen fibril using a bottom‐up approach. By conserving the three‐dimensional structure and the entanglement of the molecules, we were able to construct finite‐size fibril models that allowed us to explore the deformation mechanisms which govern their mechanical behavior under large deformation. We investigated the tensile behavior of a single collagen fibril with various intrafibrillar mineral content and found that a mineralized collagen fibril can present up to five different deformation mechanisms to dissipate energy. These mechanisms include molecular uncoiling, molecular stretching, mineral/collagen sliding, molecular slippage, and crystal dissociation. By multiplying its sources of energy dissipation and deformation mechanisms, a collagen fibril can reach impressive strength and toughness. Adding mineral into the collagen fibril can increase its strength up to 10 times and its toughness up to 35 times. Combining crosslinks with mineral makes the fibril stiffer but more brittle. We also found that a mineralized fibril reaches its maximum toughness to density and strength to density ratios for a mineral density of around 30%. This result, in good agreement with experimental observations, attests that bone tissue is optimized mechanically to remain lightweight but maintain strength and toughness. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Bone and Mineral Research (ASBMR). PMID:26866939

  14. Inflight optical measurement of antenna surfaces. [triangulation to measure deformations of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neiswander, R. S.

    1978-01-01

    A technology base was developed for a wide variety of applications oriented sensors to meet requirements for the fabrication, assembly, test, surface figure monitoring, and ultimately surface figure active control of large space antennas. An optical sensor technique is described which establishes an ideal centerline at each beam during fabrication or later during assembly. Deviations from the centerline, either in lateral deformation or in twist, are measured to produce limit warnings or to evoke active control at the building machine.

  15. Large deformation analysis of a dielectric elastomer membrane-spring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Tianhu; Cui, Leilei; Chen, Cheng

    2009-07-01

    Due to the capability of large strain, dielectric elastomers are promising for applications as transducers in cameras, robots, valves, pumps, energy harvesters and so on. The dielectric elastomer transducers are based on the deformation of a soft polymer membrane contracting in thickness and expanding in area, which is induced by the application of a voltage across the two compliant electrodes coated on both sides of the membrane. This paper focuses on the large deformation analysis of a dielectric elastomer membrane-spring system. The system is constructed from attaching a disk in the middle of a circular dielectric membrane and then connecting the disk with a spring. This configuration can be potentially used as a key part in valves. The basic governing equations describing the large out-of-plane deformations are formulated, and the obtained equations are solved numerically. The relations related to the displacement of the disk, the spring force, the applied voltage, and the parameters of spring including stiffness and initial length are illustrated. The results show the anticipated displacement of the disk can be controlled by adjusting the parameters of spring and the applied voltage individually or simultaneously, and the parameters of the spring, that is, stiffness and initial length, play an important role in the performance of the membrane-spring system.

  16. Transient elasticity and the rheology of polymeric fluids with large amplitude deformations.

    PubMed

    Müller, Oliver; Liu, Mario; Pleiner, Harald; Brand, Helmut R

    2016-02-01

    Transient elasticity is a systematic generalization of viscoelasticity. Its purpose is to give a coherent description of non-Newtonian effects displayed by soft-matter systems, especially polymer melts and solutions. Using the concept of transient elasticity we describe here a hydrodynamic model for polymeric fluids, which is applicable for large amplitude deformations. We present an energy density with only two independent parameters, which is compatible with all thermodynamic requirements and which reduces for small deformations to models studied previously. The expression discussed is simple enough to allow full analytic treatment and shows semiquantitative agreement with experimental data. This model is used to capture many of the interesting effects thought to be characteristic of polymer rheology for large deformations including viscosity overshoot near the onset of shear flow, the onset of elongational flows in situations for which there is no stationary solution as well as shear thinning and normal stress differences for a large range of shear rates. In addition, we analyze how well our model accounts for empirical relations including the Cox-Merz rule, the Yamamoto relation, and Gleißle's mirror relations. PMID:26986420

  17. Transient elasticity and the rheology of polymeric fluids with large amplitude deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Oliver; Liu, Mario; Pleiner, Harald; Brand, Helmut R.

    2016-02-01

    Transient elasticity is a systematic generalization of viscoelasticity. Its purpose is to give a coherent description of non-Newtonian effects displayed by soft-matter systems, especially polymer melts and solutions. Using the concept of transient elasticity we describe here a hydrodynamic model for polymeric fluids, which is applicable for large amplitude deformations. We present an energy density with only two independent parameters, which is compatible with all thermodynamic requirements and which reduces for small deformations to models studied previously. The expression discussed is simple enough to allow full analytic treatment and shows semiquantitative agreement with experimental data. This model is used to capture many of the interesting effects thought to be characteristic of polymer rheology for large deformations including viscosity overshoot near the onset of shear flow, the onset of elongational flows in situations for which there is no stationary solution as well as shear thinning and normal stress differences for a large range of shear rates. In addition, we analyze how well our model accounts for empirical relations including the Cox-Merz rule, the Yamamoto relation, and Gleißle's mirror relations.

  18. On the large Ω-deformations in the Nekrasov-Shatashvili limit of N={2}^{*} SYM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beccaria, Matteo

    2016-07-01

    We study the multi-instanton partition functions of the Ω-deformed N={2}^{*} SU(2) gauge theory in the Nekrasov-Shatashvili (NS) limit. They depend on the deformation parameters ɛ1, the scalar field expectation value a, and the hypermultiplet mass m. At fixed instanton number k, they are rational functions of ɛ1 , a, m and we look for possible regularities that admit a parametrical description in the number of instantons. In each instanton sector, the contribution to the deformed Nekrasov prepotential has poles for large deformation parameters. To clarify the properties of these singularities we exploit Bethe/gauge correspondence and examine the special ratios m/ɛ1 at which the associated spectral problem is n-gap. At these special points we illustrate several structural simpli-fications occurring in the partition functions. After discussing various tools to compute the prepotential, we analyze the non-perturbative corrections up to k = 24 instantons and present various closed expressions for the coefficients of the singular terms. Both the regular and singular parts of the prepotential are resummed over all instantons and compared successfully with the exact prediction from the spectral theory of the Lamé equation, showing that the pole singularities are an artifact of the instanton expansion. The analysis is fully worked out in the 1-gap case, but the final pole cancellation is proved for a generic ratio m/ɛ1 relating it to the gap width of the Lamé equation.

  19. Statistical shape analysis: From landmarks to diffeomorphisms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Miaomiao; Golland, Polina

    2016-10-01

    We offer a blazingly brief review of evolution of shape analysis methods in medical imaging. As the representations and the statistical models grew more sophisticated, the problem of shape analysis has been gradually redefined to accept images rather than binary segmentations as a starting point. This transformation enabled shape analysis to take its rightful place in the arsenal of tools for extracting and understanding patterns in large clinical image sets. We speculate on the future developments in shape analysis and potential applications that would bring this mathematically rich area to bear on clinical practice. PMID:27377332

  20. Large Deformation Analysis of a High Steep Slope Relating to the Laxiwa Reservoir, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Peng; Liu, Xiaoli; Hu, Senying; Li, Pujian

    2016-06-01

    The unstable rock slope in the Laxiwa reservoir area of the Yellow River upstream, China, shows the signs of gravitational and water-impounding induced large deformations over an area of 1.15 × 105 m2. Slope movements have been measured daily at more than 560 observation points since 2009, when the reservoir was first impounded. At two of these points, an average daily movement of around 60-80 mm has ever been observed since the beginning of the impounding. Based on the observed deformations and the geology of the site, a fluid-solid coupling model was then adopted to investigate the existing rockslide activity to better understand the mechanism underlying the large deformations. The results from the field observation, kinematic analysis and numerical modeling indicate that the slope instability is dominated by the strong structurally controlled unstable rock mass. Based on an integrated overview of these analyses, a new toppling mode, i.e. the so-called `conjugate block' mode, is proposed to explain the large deformation mechanism of the slope. The conjugate block is formed by a `dumping block' and toppling blocks. The large deformation of the slope is dominated by (1) a toppling component and (2) a subsiding bilinear wedge induced by planar sliding along the deep-seated faults. Following a thorough numerical analysis, it is concluded that small collapses of rock blocks along the slope will be more frequent with the impounding process continuing and the water level fluctuating during the subsequent operation period. Based on a shear strength reduction method and field monitoring, four controlling faults are identified and the instability of the loose structure in the surface layer is analyzed and discussed. The factor of safety against the sliding failure along the deep seated fractures in the slope is 1.72, which reveals that (1) the collapse of the free-standing fractured blocks cannot be ruled out and the volume of the unstable blocks may be greater than 100

  1. Hydrothermal fluid flow and deformation in large calderas: Inferences from numerical simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hurwitz, S.; Christiansen, L.B.; Hsieh, P.A.

    2007-01-01

    Inflation and deflation of large calderas is traditionally interpreted as being induced by volume change of a discrete source embedded in an elastic or viscoelastic half-space, though it has also been suggested that hydrothermal fluids may play a role. To test the latter hypothesis, we carry out numerical simulations of hydrothermal fluid flow and poroelastic deformation in calderas by coupling two numerical codes: (1) TOUGH2 [Pruess et al., 1999], which simulates flow in porous or fractured media, and (2) BIOT2 [Hsieh, 1996], which simulates fluid flow and deformation in a linearly elastic porous medium. In the simulations, high-temperature water (350??C) is injected at variable rates into a cylinder (radius 50 km, height 3-5 km). A sensitivity analysis indicates that small differences in the values of permeability and its anisotropy, the depth and rate of hydrothermal injection, and the values of the shear modulus may lead to significant variations in the magnitude, rate, and geometry of ground surface displacement, or uplift. Some of the simulated uplift rates are similar to observed uplift rates in large calderas, suggesting that the injection of aqueous fluids into the shallow crust may explain some of the deformation observed in calderas.

  2. Characterizing large-scale glaciotectonic sediment deformation using electrical resistivity methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aylsworth, R. L., Jr.; Van Dam, R. L.; Larson, G. J.; Jessee, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    Large-scale sediment deformation structures formed by glaciotectonic processes have been identified south of Ludington, USA. Here, several apparent clay diapirs rise from below beach level to near the top of an approximately 60 m high bluff along the eastern shore of Lake Michigan. Throughout the area, the surface topography and locations of springs indicate a complicated subsurface structure and a preferred pattern of groundwater drainage. Since public borehole information is sparse, it is not known whether the structures exposed in the bluff are true diapirs or ridges, and if the latter, what is their orientation. In this paper we present the results of field, laboratory, and modeling studies to characterize the inland extent and orientation of these deformation structures using galvanic-source electrical geophysical methods. We exploit the large electrical contrast between a sandy sedimentary layer and an underlying clayey silt sedimentary layer in which the deformation occurred. Constant-spread traverses and multi-electrode tomographic data demonstrate that at least one of the narrow structures extends a significant distance inland.

  3. Surface deformations as indicators of deep ebullition fluxes in a large northern peatland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glaser, P.H.; Chanton, J.P.; Morin, P.; Rosenberry, D.O.; Siegel, D.I.; Ruud, O.; Chasar, L.I.; Reeve, A.S.

    2004-01-01

    Peatlands deform elastically during precipitation cycles by small (??3 cm) oscillations in surface elevation. In contrast, we used a Global Positioning System network to measure larger oscillations that exceeded 20 cm over periods of 4-12 hours during two seasonal droughts at a bog and fen site in northern Minnesota. The second summer drought also triggered 19 depressuring cycles in an overpressured stratum under the bog site. The synchronicity between the largest surface deformations and the depressuring cycles indicates that both phenomena are produced by the episodic release of large volumes of gas from deep semi-elastic compartments confined by dense wood layers. We calculate that the three largest surface deformations were associated with the release of 136 g CH4 m-2, which exceeds by an order of magnitude the annual average chamber fluxes measured at this site. Ebullition of gas from the deep peat may therefore be a large and previously unrecognized source of radiocarbon depleted methane emissions from northern peatlands. Copyright 2004 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Thermal Deformation and RF Performance Analyses for the SWOT Large Deployable Ka-Band Reflectarray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, H.; Sunada, E.; Chaubell, J.; Esteban-Fernandez, D.; Thomson, M.; Nicaise, F.

    2010-01-01

    A large deployable antenna technology for the NASA Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) Mission is currently being developed by JPL in response to NRC Earth Science Tier 2 Decadal Survey recommendations. This technology is required to enable the SWOT mission due to the fact that no currently available antenna is capable of meeting SWOT's demanding Ka-Band remote sensing requirements. One of the key aspects of this antenna development is to minimize the effect of the on-orbit thermal distortion to the antenna RF performance. An analysis process which includes: 1) the on-orbit thermal analysis to obtain the temperature distribution; 2) structural deformation analysis to get the geometry of the antenna surface; and 3) the RF performance with the given deformed antenna surface has been developed to accommodate the development of this antenna technology. The detailed analysis process and some analysis results will be presented and discussed by this paper.

  5. High-rate Plastic Deformation of Nanocrystalline Tantalum to Large Strains: Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, R E

    2009-02-05

    Recent advances in the ability to generate extremes of pressure and temperature in dynamic experiments and to probe the response of materials has motivated the need for special materials optimized for those conditions as well as a need for a much deeper understanding of the behavior of materials subjected to high pressure and/or temperature. Of particular importance is the understanding of rate effects at the extremely high rates encountered in those experiments, especially with the next generation of laser drives such as at the National Ignition Facility. Here we use large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the high-rate deformation of nanocrystalline tantalum to investigate the processes associated with plastic deformation for strains up to 100%. We use initial atomic configurations that were produced through simulations of solidification in the work of Streitz et al [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, (2006) 225701]. These 3D polycrystalline systems have typical grain sizes of 10-20 nm. We also study a rapidly quenched liquid (amorphous solid) tantalum. We apply a constant volume (isochoric), constant temperature (isothermal) shear deformation over a range of strain rates, and compute the resulting stress-strain curves to large strains for both uniaxial and biaxial compression. We study the rate dependence and identify plastic deformation mechanisms. The identification of the mechanisms is facilitated through a novel technique that computes the local grain orientation, returning it as a quaternion for each atom. This analysis technique is robust and fast, and has been used to compute the orientations on the fly during our parallel MD simulations on supercomputers. We find both dislocation and twinning processes are important, and they interact in the weak strain hardening in these extremely fine-grained microstructures.

  6. Comparison of spacetime defects which are homeomorphic but not diffeomorphic

    SciTech Connect

    Klinkhamer, F. R. Sorba, F.

    2014-11-15

    Certain remnants of a quantum spacetime foam can be modeled by a distribution of defects embedded in a flat classical spacetime. The presence of such spacetime defects affects the propagation of elementary particles. In this article, we show explicitly that both topology and differential structure of the defects are important for the particle motion. Specifically, we consider three types of spacetime defects which are described by the same topological manifold R×(RP{sup 3}−(point)) but which are not diffeomorphic to each other. We investigate the propagation of a massless scalar field over the three different manifolds and find different solutions of the Klein–Gordon equation.

  7. Finite elements using absolute nodal coordinates for large-deformation flexible multibody dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrochenko, Oleg

    2008-06-01

    A family of structural finite elements using a modern absolute nodal coordinate formulation (ANCF) is discussed in the paper with many applicationsE This approach has been initiated in 1996 by A. Shabana. It introduces large displacements of 2D/3D finite elements relative to the global reference frame without using any local frame. The elements employ finite slopes as nodal variables and can be considered as generalizations of ordinary finite elements that use infinitesimal slopes. In contrast to other large deformation formulations, the equations of motion contain constant mass matrices and generalized gravity forces as well as zero centrifugal and Coriolis inertia forces. The only nonlinear term is a vector of elastic forces. This approach allows applying known abstractions of real elastic bodies: Euler-Bernoulli beams, Timoshenko beams and more general models as well as Kirchhoff and Mindlin plate theories. Shabana et al. proposed a sub-family of thick beam and plate finite elements with large deformations and employ the 3D theory of continuum mechanics. Despite the universality of such approach it has to use extra degrees of freedom when simulating thin beams and plates, which case is most important. In our research, we propose another sub-family of thin beams as well as rectangular and triangle plates. We use Kirchhoff plate theory with nonlinear strain-displacement relationships to obtain elastic forces. A number of static and dynamic simulation examples of problems with 2D/3D very elastic beams and plate underwent large displacements and/or deformations will be shown in the presentation.

  8. Synthetically chemical-electrical mechanism for controlling large scale reversible deformation of liquid metal objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Sheng, Lei; Liu, Jing

    2014-11-01

    Reversible deformation of a machine holds enormous promise across many scientific areas ranging from mechanical engineering to applied physics. So far, such capabilities are still hard to achieve through conventional rigid materials or depending mainly on elastomeric materials, which however own rather limited performances and require complicated manipulations. Here, we show a basic strategy which is fundamentally different from the existing ones to realize large scale reversible deformation through controlling the working materials via the synthetically chemical-electrical mechanism (SCHEME). Such activity incorporates an object of liquid metal gallium whose surface area could spread up to five times of its original size and vice versa under low energy consumption. Particularly, the alterable surface tension based on combination of chemical dissolution and electrochemical oxidation is ascribed to the reversible shape transformation, which works much more flexible than many former deformation principles through converting electrical energy into mechanical movement. A series of very unusual phenomena regarding the reversible configurational shifts are disclosed with dominant factors clarified. This study opens a generalized way to combine the liquid metal serving as shape-variable element with the SCHEME to compose functional soft machines, which implies huge potential for developing future smart robots to fulfill various complicated tasks.

  9. Synthetically chemical-electrical mechanism for controlling large scale reversible deformation of liquid metal objects

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Sheng, Lei; Liu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Reversible deformation of a machine holds enormous promise across many scientific areas ranging from mechanical engineering to applied physics. So far, such capabilities are still hard to achieve through conventional rigid materials or depending mainly on elastomeric materials, which however own rather limited performances and require complicated manipulations. Here, we show a basic strategy which is fundamentally different from the existing ones to realize large scale reversible deformation through controlling the working materials via the synthetically chemical-electrical mechanism (SCHEME). Such activity incorporates an object of liquid metal gallium whose surface area could spread up to five times of its original size and vice versa under low energy consumption. Particularly, the alterable surface tension based on combination of chemical dissolution and electrochemical oxidation is ascribed to the reversible shape transformation, which works much more flexible than many former deformation principles through converting electrical energy into mechanical movement. A series of very unusual phenomena regarding the reversible configurational shifts are disclosed with dominant factors clarified. This study opens a generalized way to combine the liquid metal serving as shape-variable element with the SCHEME to compose functional soft machines, which implies huge potential for developing future smart robots to fulfill various complicated tasks. PMID:25408295

  10. Research on the drawing process with a large total deformation wires of AZ31 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajor, T.; Muskalski, Z.; Suliga, M.

    2010-07-01

    Magnesium and their alloys have been extensively studied in recent years, not only because of their potential applications as light-weight engineering materials, but also owing to their biodegradability. Due to their hexagonal close-packed crystallographic structure, cold plastic processing of magnesium alloys is difficult. The preliminary researches carried out by the authors have indicated that the application of the KOBO method, based on the effect of cyclic strain path change, for the deformation of magnesium alloys, provides the possibility of obtaining a fine-grained structure material to be used for further cold plastic processing with large total deformation. The main purpose of this work is to present research findings concerning a detailed analysis of mechanical properties and changes occurring in the structure of AZ31 alloy wire during the multistage cold drawing process. The appropriate selection of drawing parameters and the application of multistep heat treatment operations enable the deformation of the AZ31 alloy in the cold drawing process with a total draft of about 90%.

  11. A large-deformation thin plate theory with application to one-atom-thick layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delfani, M. R.; Shodja, H. M.

    2016-02-01

    Nowadays, two-dimensional materials due to their vast engineering and biomedical applications have been the focus of many researches. The present paper proposes a large-deformation theory for thin plates with application to one-atom-thick layers (OATLs). The deformation is formulated exactly in the mathematical framework of Lagrangian description. In particular, an exact finite strain analysis is given - in addition to the usual strain tensor associated to the middle surface, the second and third fundamental forms of the middle surface of the deformed thin plate are also maintained in the analysis. Exact closed-form solutions for a uniaxially curved thin plate due to pure bending in one case and due to a combination of vertical and horizontal loading in another are obtained. As a special case of the latter problem, the exact solution for the plane-strain bulge test of thin plates is derived. Subsequently, the approximation of Vlassak and Nix [Vlassak, J.J., Nix, W.D., 1992. J. Mater. Res., 7(12), 3242-3249] for the load-deflection equation is recovered. The given numerical results are devoted to graphene as the most well-known OATL.

  12. Computational modelling of large deformations in layered-silicate/PET nanocomposites near the glass transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figiel, Łukasz; Dunne, Fionn P. E.; Buckley, C. Paul

    2010-01-01

    Layered-silicate nanoparticles offer a cost-effective reinforcement for thermoplastics. Computational modelling has been employed to study large deformations in layered-silicate/poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) nanocomposites near the glass transition, as would be experienced during industrial forming processes such as thermoforming or injection stretch blow moulding. Non-linear numerical modelling was applied, to predict the macroscopic large deformation behaviour, with morphology evolution and deformation occurring at the microscopic level, using the representative volume element (RVE) approach. A physically based elasto-viscoplastic constitutive model, describing the behaviour of the PET matrix within the RVE, was numerically implemented into a finite element solver (ABAQUS) using an UMAT subroutine. The implementation was designed to be robust, for accommodating large rotations and stretches of the matrix local to, and between, the nanoparticles. The nanocomposite morphology was reconstructed at the RVE level using a Monte-Carlo-based algorithm that placed straight, high-aspect ratio particles according to the specified orientation and volume fraction, with the assumption of periodicity. Computational experiments using this methodology enabled prediction of the strain-stiffening behaviour of the nanocomposite, observed experimentally, as functions of strain, strain rate, temperature and particle volume fraction. These results revealed the probable origins of the enhanced strain stiffening observed: (a) evolution of the morphology (through particle re-orientation) and (b) early onset of stress-induced pre-crystallization (and hence lock-up of viscous flow), triggered by the presence of particles. The computational model enabled prediction of the effects of process parameters (strain rate, temperature) on evolution of the morphology, and hence on the end-use properties.

  13. Deformation mechanisms, defects, heat treatment, and thermal conductivity in large grain niobium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieler, Thomas R.; Kang, Di; Baars, Derek C.; Chandrasekaran, Saravan; Mapar, Aboozar; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Wright, Neil T.; Pourboghrat, Farhang; Murphy, James E.; Compton, Chris C.; Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    2015-12-01

    The physical and mechanical metallurgy underlying fabrication of large grain cavities for superconducting radio frequency accelerators is summarized, based on research of 1) grain orientations in ingots, 2) a metallurgical assessment of processing a large grain single cell cavity and a tube, 3) assessment of slip behavior of single crystal tensile samples extracted from a high purity ingot slice before and after annealing at 800 °C / 2 h, 4) development of crystal plasticity models based upon the single crystal experiments, and 5) assessment of how thermal conductivity is affected by strain, heat treatment, and exposure to hydrogen. Because of the large grains, the plastic anisotropy of deformation is exaggerated, and heterogeneous strains and localized defects are present to a much greater degree than expected in polycrystalline material, making it highly desirable to computationally anticipate potential forming problems before manufacturing cavities.

  14. A 3D Frictional Segment-to-Segment Contact Method for Large Deformations and Quadratic Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Puso, M; Laursen, T; Solberg, J

    2004-04-01

    Node-on-segment contact is the most common form of contact used today but has many deficiencies ranging from potential locking to non-smooth behavior with large sliding. Furthermore, node-on-segment approaches are not at all applicable to higher order discretizations (e.g. quadratic elements). In a previous work, [3, 4] we developed a segment-to-segment contact approach for eight node hexahedral elements based on the mortar method that was applicable to large deformation mechanics. The approach proved extremely robust since it eliminated the over-constraint that caused 'locking' and provided smooth force variations in large sliding. Here, we extend this previous approach to treat frictional contact problems. In addition, the method is extended to 3D quadratic tetrahedrals and hexahedrals. The proposed approach is then applied to several challenging frictional contact problems that demonstrate its effectiveness.

  15. Deformation mechanisms, defects, heat treatment, and thermal conductivity in large grain niobium

    SciTech Connect

    Bieler, Thomas R. Kang, Di Baars, Derek C.; Chandrasekaran, Saravan; Mapar, Aboozar Wright, Neil T.; Ciovati, Gianluigi Myneni, Ganapati Rao; Pourboghrat, Farhang; Murphy, James E.; Compton, Chris C.

    2015-12-04

    The physical and mechanical metallurgy underlying fabrication of large grain cavities for superconducting radio frequency accelerators is summarized, based on research of 1) grain orientations in ingots, 2) a metallurgical assessment of processing a large grain single cell cavity and a tube, 3) assessment of slip behavior of single crystal tensile samples extracted from a high purity ingot slice before and after annealing at 800 °C / 2 h, 4) development of crystal plasticity models based upon the single crystal experiments, and 5) assessment of how thermal conductivity is affected by strain, heat treatment, and exposure to hydrogen. Because of the large grains, the plastic anisotropy of deformation is exaggerated, and heterogeneous strains and localized defects are present to a much greater degree than expected in polycrystalline material, making it highly desirable to computationally anticipate potential forming problems before manufacturing cavities.

  16. Brain atlas deformation in the presence of small and large space-occupying tumors.

    PubMed

    Dawant, B M; Hartmann, S L; Pan, Shiyan; Gadamsetty, S

    2002-01-01

    Brain atlases contain a wealth of information that could be used in radiation therapy or neurosurgical planning. Until now, however, when large space-occupying tumors and lesions drastically alter the shape of brain structures and substructures, atlas-based methods have been of limited use. In this work, we present a new technique that permits a brain atlas to be warped onto image volumes in which large lesions are present. First we show that a method previously used for atlas-based segmentation of normal brains can also be used for brains with small lesions. We then present an extension of this technique for brains with large lesions. This involves several steps: a global registration to bring the two volumes into approximate correspondence; a local registration to warp the atlas onto the patient volume; the seeding of the warped atlas with a tumor model derived from patient data; and the deformation of the seeded atlas. Global registration is performed using a mutual information criterion. The method we have used for atlas warping is derived from optical flow principles. Preliminary results obtained on real patient images are presented. These results indicate that the proposed method can be used to automatically segment structures of interest in brains with gross deformation. Potential areas of application for this method include automatic labeling of critical structures for radiation therapy and presurgical planning. PMID:12173876

  17. Shear bands in a bulk metallic glass after large plastic deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, D.D.; Wang, Y.B.; Liao, X.Z.; Shen, J.

    2012-10-23

    A transmission electron microscopy investigation is conducted to trace shear bands in a Zr{sub 53}Cu{sub 18.7}Ni{sub 12}Al{sub 16.3} bulk metallic glass after experiencing 4% plastic deformation. Shear band initiation, secondary shear band interactions, mature shear band broadening and the interactions of shear bands with shear-induced nanocrystals are captured. Results suggest that the plasticity of the bulk metallic glass is enhanced by complex shear bands and their interactions which accommodate large plastic strain and prevent catastrophic shear band propagation.

  18. Accounting for large amplitude protein deformation during in silico macromolecular docking.

    PubMed

    Bastard, Karine; Saladin, Adrien; Prévost, Chantal

    2011-02-22

    Rapid progress of theoretical methods and computer calculation resources has turned in silico methods into a conceivable tool to predict the 3D structure of macromolecular assemblages, starting from the structure of their separate elements. Still, some classes of complexes represent a real challenge for macromolecular docking methods. In these complexes, protein parts like loops or domains undergo large amplitude deformations upon association, thus remodeling the surface accessible to the partner protein or DNA. We discuss the problems linked with managing such rearrangements in docking methods and we review strategies that are presently being explored, as well as their limitations and success.

  19. The Koslowski-Sahlmann representation: gauge and diffeomorphism invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campiglia, Miguel; Varadarajan, Madhavan

    2014-04-01

    The discrete spatial geometry underlying loop quantum gravity (LQG) is degenerate almost everywhere. This is at apparent odds with the non-degeneracy of asymptotically flat metrics near spatial infinity. Koslowski generalized the LQG representation so as to describe states labeled by smooth non-degenerate triad fields. His representation was further studied by Sahlmann with a view to imposing gauge and spatial diffeomorphism invariance through group averaging methods. Motivated by the desire to model asymptotically flat quantum geometry by states with triad labels which are non-degenerate at infinity but not necessarily so in the interior, we initiate a generalization of Sahlmann’s considerations to triads of varying degeneracy. In doing so, we include delicate phase contributions to the averaging procedure which are crucial for the correct implementation of the gauge and diffeomorphism constraints, and whose existence can be traced to the background exponential functions recently constructed by one of us. Our treatment emphasizes the role of symmetries of quantum states in the averaging procedure. Semianalyticity, influential in the proofs of the beautiful uniqueness results for LQG, plays a key role in our considerations. As a by product, we re-derive the group averaging map for standard LQG, highlighting the role of state symmetries and explicitly exhibiting the essential uniqueness of its specification.

  20. A series of irreducible unitary representations of a group of diffeomorphisms of the half-line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanov, E. D.

    2016-07-01

    We present a family of unitary representations of a group of diffeomorphisms of a finite-dimensional real Euclidean space using a family of quasi-invariant measures. In the one-dimensional case, for a special kind of group diffeomorphisms of the halfline, we prove the irreducibility of the representations thus obtained.

  1. Constitutive modeling of large inelastic deformation of amorphous polymers: Free volume and shear transformation zone dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voyiadjis, George Z.; Samadi-Dooki, Aref

    2016-06-01

    Due to the lack of the long-range order in their molecular structure, amorphous polymers possess a considerable free volume content in their inter-molecular space. During finite deformation, these free volume holes serve as the potential sites for localized permanent plastic deformation inclusions which are called shear transformation zones (STZs). While the free volume content has been experimentally shown to increase during the course of plastic straining in glassy polymers, thermal analysis of stored energy due to the deformation shows that the STZ nucleation energy decreases at large plastic strains. The evolution of the free volume, and the STZs number density and nucleation energy during the finite straining are formulated in this paper in order to investigate the uniaxial post-yield softening-hardening behavior of the glassy polymers. This study shows that the reduction of the STZ nucleation energy, which is correlated with the free volume increase, brings about the post-yield primary softening of the amorphous polymers up to the steady-state strain value; and the secondary hardening is a result of the increased number density of the STZs, which is required for large plastic strains, while their nucleation energy is stabilized beyond the steady-state strain. The evolutions of the free volume content and STZ nucleation energy are also used to demonstrate the effect of the strain rate, temperature, and thermal history of the sample on its post-yield behavior. The obtained results from the model are compared with the experimental observations on poly(methyl methacrylate) which show a satisfactory consonance.

  2. Large-scale deformational systems in the South Polar Layered Deposits (Promethei Lingula, Mars): "Soft-sediment" and Deep-Seated Gravitational Slope Deformations Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guallini, Luca; Brozzetti, Francesco; Marinangeli, Lucia

    2012-08-01

    The present study is the first attempt at a detailed structural and kinematic analysis of large-scale deformational systems observed in the South Polar Layered Deposits (SPLDs) in the Promethei Lingula (PL) margins (Mars). By systematically collecting attitude data referable to previously unknown deformational structures and defining the cross-cut relationships of the structures, we reconstructed a deformational history consisting of two superimposed, well-defined stages. The first stage is dominated by large-scale strike-slip and transtensional faults arranged into conjugate systems and delimiting shear zones that show a wide range of subsidiary structures, including normal and reverse faults, drag folds, boudins, S-C tectonites and sub-horizontal interstratal shear planes marked by sygmoidal boudins. Other typical structures referable to this event are ductile folds (locally true convolute folds) and lobes (ball-and-pillow structures) affecting certain marker beds of the succession. We suggest that the structural assemblage might be the expression of a shallow soft-sediment tectonics that possibly occurred during warm periods of the South Pole climate. The second stage seems to affect the weaker and in certain cases pre-deformed stratigraphic levels of the SPLD succession. This stage is mainly characterized by extensional deformations caused by gravity. The consequence of the deformations is the nucleation of Deep-Seated Gravitational Slope Deformations (DSGSDs) marked by typical morphostructures, such as scarps, trenches and bulging basal contractant zones. These phenomena were never observed within an ice cap. According to terrestrial modeling, these slow collapses were caused by (1) the presence of detachment levels (i.e., subhorizontal bedding planes) along which the ice-sheet margins can slide and (2) the development of listric faults within the glacial mass, which merge with sub-horizontal shear planes in the subsurface. The presence of complex

  3. Magneto-induced large deformation and high-damping performance of a magnetorheological plastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Taixiang; Gong, Xinglong; Xu, Yangguang; Pang, Haoming; Xuan, Shouhu

    2014-10-01

    A magnetorheological plastomer (MRP) is a new kind of soft magneto-sensitive polymeric composite. This work reports on the large magneto-deforming effect and high magneto-damping performance of MRPs under a quasi-statical shearing condition. We demonstrate that an MRP possesses a magnetically sensitive malleability, and its magneto-mechanical behavior can be analytically described by the magneto-enhanced Bingham fluid-like model. The magneto-induced axial stress, which drives the deformation of the MRP with 70 wt % carbonyl iron powder, can be tuned in a large range from nearly 0.0 kPa to 55.4 kPa by an external 662.6 kA m-1 magnetic field. The damping performance of an MRP has a significant correlation with the magnetic strength, shear rate, carbonyl iron content and shear strain amplitude. For an MRP with 60 wt % carbonyl iron powder, the relative magneto-enhanced damping effect can reach as high as 716.2% under a quasi-statically shearing condition. Furthermore, the related physical mechanism is proposed, and we reveal that the magneto-induced, particle-assembled microstructure directs the magneto-mechanical behavior of the MRP.

  4. Large deformation contact mechanics of long rectangular membranes. I. Adhesionless contact

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Abhishek; Hui, Chung-Yuen

    2013-01-01

    In part I of this work, we study adhesionless contact of a long rectangular elastic membrane with a rigid substrate. Our model is based on finite strain theory and is valid for arbitrarily large deformations. Both frictionless and no-slip contact conditions are considered. Exact closed form solutions are obtained for frictionless contact. For small contact, the differences between these two contact conditions are small. However, significant differences occur for large contacts. For example, frictionless contact predicts a maximum pressure (and contact region) beyond which there is no solution; while the no-slip model places no restriction on both quantities. The effect of adhesion will be considered in part II of this work. PMID:24353471

  5. Rheological transition during large strain deformation of melting and crystallizing metapelites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Santanu; Burg, Jean-Pierre; Vigneresse, Jean-Louis; Mainprice, David

    2014-05-01

    Torsion experiments (γ>˙ =3 × 10-4 s-1) were performed to investigate the large strain (γmax = 15) rheology on quartz-muscovite aggregate as analogue to pelitic rocks undergoing melting and crystallization during deformation at 300 MPa confining pressure and 750°C temperature. Microstructures reveal four distinct but gradational stages of crystal-melt interactions during deformation—(a) solid state deformation, (b) initiation and domination of partial melting, (c) simultaneous partial melting and crystallization, and (d) domination of crystallization. The microstructural stages are linked to the rheology of the deforming samples. Partial melting starts at relatively low finite shear strains (γ = 1-3) showing approximately 60% strain softening. At γ = 4-10 the partially molten bulk material shows a steady state flow at low stress. Further crystallization of new crystals at the expense of melt between γ = 10 and 15 causes weak strain hardening until the material fails by developing brittle fractures. The stress exponent (n), calculated at γ = 1, 5, and 10, increases from ˜ 3 to ˜ 43, indicating a transition from power to power law breakdown or exponential flow of the bulk system. Hydrostatic experiments for equivalent times and conditions of the torsion experiments were also conducted to evaluate the reaction kinetics and microstructures under static conditions. The new experimental data establish that partially molten rock does not flow according to a constant strain rate-dependent power law (steady state) rheology. The rheological transition from strain rate sensitive to strain rate insensitive flow is interpreted as a function of melt-crystal ratio, their mutual interactions, and the evolution of microstructures in the partially molten rock.

  6. DR-TAMAS: Diffeomorphic Registration for Tensor Accurate Alignment of Anatomical Structures.

    PubMed

    Irfanoglu, M Okan; Nayak, Amritha; Jenkins, Jeffrey; Hutchinson, Elizabeth B; Sadeghi, Neda; Thomas, Cibu P; Pierpaoli, Carlo

    2016-05-15

    In this work, we propose DR-TAMAS (Diffeomorphic Registration for Tensor Accurate alignMent of Anatomical Structures), a novel framework for intersubject registration of Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) data sets. This framework is optimized for brain data and its main goal is to achieve an accurate alignment of all brain structures, including white matter (WM), gray matter (GM), and spaces containing cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Currently most DTI-based spatial normalization algorithms emphasize alignment of anisotropic structures. While some diffusion-derived metrics, such as diffusion anisotropy and tensor eigenvector orientation, are highly informative for proper alignment of WM, other tensor metrics such as the trace or mean diffusivity (MD) are fundamental for a proper alignment of GM and CSF boundaries. Moreover, it is desirable to include information from structural MRI data, e.g., T1-weighted or T2-weighted images, which are usually available together with the diffusion data. The fundamental property of DR-TAMAS is to achieve global anatomical accuracy by incorporating in its cost function the most informative metrics locally. Another important feature of DR-TAMAS is a symmetric time-varying velocity-based transformation model, which enables it to account for potentially large anatomical variability in healthy subjects and patients. The performance of DR-TAMAS is evaluated with several data sets and compared with other widely-used diffeomorphic image registration techniques employing both full tensor information and/or DTI-derived scalar maps. Our results show that the proposed method has excellent overall performance in the entire brain, while being equivalent to the best existing methods in WM.

  7. Deformation microstructures and timing of a large submarine landslide drilled offshore Martinique (IODP Exp. 340)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyard, H.; Le Friant, A.; Brunet, M.; Boudon, G.; Emmanuel, L.; Caron, B.; Villemant, B.; Feuillet, N.

    2015-12-01

    Flank-instabilities constitute a recurrent process in the long-term evolution of many volcanoes. A very large submarine landslide deposit (~2100 km2, ~300 km3) drilled southwest Martinique island during the IODP Exp. 340 in 2012 is likely associated with one (or more) major volcanic flank collapse of Mount Pelée during the Late Pleistocene. A recent study revealed that this D1/D2 deposit is emergent in its central part, frontally confined, and mainly comprises remobilized seafloor sediments rather than debris avalanche material from the volcanic edifice (Brunet et al., subm). Here, we investigate the sedimentary microstructures and timing of deformation from the central (Hole 1400B, ~37 km from the coastline) and distal (Hole 1399A, ~70 km from the coastline) units of the D1/D2 deposit, in order to better understand the emplacement dynamics of such potentially tsunamigenic submarine landslides. High resolution CT-Scan analyses were continuously performed on more than 300 m of sediment cores, in order to characterize and distinguish the internal architecture and the complex deformation features of the sediments at each drilling site. The establishment of the stratigraphy, based on δ18O measurements and AMS 14C dating, is still in progress and may confirm the possible link between the submarine landslide deposits and the flank collapse scars observed on the subaerial part of Martinique. These new insights into the timing and emplacement processes of this large submarine landslide will have important implications for tsunami hazards. ReferenceBrunet, M., Le Friant, A., Boudon, G., Lafuerza, S., Talling, P., Hornbach, M., Lebas, E., Guyard, H., and IODP Expedition 340 science party, submitted. Composition, geometry and emplacement dynamics of a large volcanic island landslide offshore Martinique: from volcano flank-collapse to seafloor sediment failure? Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems.

  8. Fluid–structure interaction involving large deformations: 3D simulations and applications to biological systems

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Fang-Bao; Dai, Hu; Luo, Haoxiang; Doyle, James F.; Rousseau, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional fluid–structure interaction (FSI) involving large deformations of flexible bodies is common in biological systems, but accurate and efficient numerical approaches for modeling such systems are still scarce. In this work, we report a successful case of combining an existing immersed-boundary flow solver with a nonlinear finite-element solid-mechanics solver specifically for three-dimensional FSI simulations. This method represents a significant enhancement from the similar methods that are previously available. Based on the Cartesian grid, the viscous incompressible flow solver can handle boundaries of large displacements with simple mesh generation. The solid-mechanics solver has separate subroutines for analyzing general three-dimensional bodies and thin-walled structures composed of frames, membranes, and plates. Both geometric nonlinearity associated with large displacements and material nonlinearity associated with large strains are incorporated in the solver. The FSI is achieved through a strong coupling and partitioned approach. We perform several validation cases, and the results may be used to expand the currently limited database of FSI benchmark study. Finally, we demonstrate the versatility of the present method by applying it to the aerodynamics of elastic wings of insects and the flow-induced vocal fold vibration. PMID:24415796

  9. Fluid-structure interaction involving large deformations: 3D simulations and applications to biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Fang-Bao; Dai, Hu; Luo, Haoxiang; Doyle, James F.; Rousseau, Bernard

    2014-02-01

    Three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction (FSI) involving large deformations of flexible bodies is common in biological systems, but accurate and efficient numerical approaches for modeling such systems are still scarce. In this work, we report a successful case of combining an existing immersed-boundary flow solver with a nonlinear finite-element solid-mechanics solver specifically for three-dimensional FSI simulations. This method represents a significant enhancement from the similar methods that are previously available. Based on the Cartesian grid, the viscous incompressible flow solver can handle boundaries of large displacements with simple mesh generation. The solid-mechanics solver has separate subroutines for analyzing general three-dimensional bodies and thin-walled structures composed of frames, membranes, and plates. Both geometric nonlinearity associated with large displacements and material nonlinearity associated with large strains are incorporated in the solver. The FSI is achieved through a strong coupling and partitioned approach. We perform several validation cases, and the results may be used to expand the currently limited database of FSI benchmark study. Finally, we demonstrate the versatility of the present method by applying it to the aerodynamics of elastic wings of insects and the flow-induced vocal fold vibration.

  10. An internal variable constitutive model for the large deformation of metals at high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Stuart; Anand, Lallit

    1988-01-01

    The advent of large deformation finite element methodologies is beginning to permit the numerical simulation of hot working processes whose design until recently has been based on prior industrial experience. Proper application of such finite element techniques requires realistic constitutive equations which more accurately model material behavior during hot working. A simple constitutive model for hot working is the single scalar internal variable model for isotropic thermal elastoplasticity proposed by Anand. The model is recalled and the specific scalar functions, for the equivalent plastic strain rate and the evolution equation for the internal variable, presented are slight modifications of those proposed by Anand. The modified functions are better able to represent high temperature material behavior. The monotonic constant true strain rate and strain rate jump compression experiments on a 2 percent silicon iron is briefly described. The model is implemented in the general purpose finite element program ABAQUS.

  11. Verification and large deformation analysis using the reproducing kernel particle method

    SciTech Connect

    Beckwith, Frank

    2015-09-01

    The reproducing kernel particle method (RKPM) is a meshless method used to solve general boundary value problems using the principle of virtual work. RKPM corrects the kernel approximation by introducing reproducing conditions which force the method to be complete to arbritrary order polynomials selected by the user. Effort in recent years has led to the implementation of RKPM within the Sierra/SM physics software framework. The purpose of this report is to investigate convergence of RKPM for verification and validation purposes as well as to demonstrate the large deformation capability of RKPM in problems where the finite element method is known to experience difficulty. Results from analyses using RKPM are compared against finite element analysis. A host of issues associated with RKPM are identified and a number of potential improvements are discussed for future work.

  12. CTH: A three-dimensional, large deformation, shock wave physics code

    SciTech Connect

    McGlaun, J.M.; Zeigler, F.J.; Thompson, S.L.

    1987-01-01

    CTH is a code system under development at Sandia National Laboratories to model multidimensional, multi-material, large deformation, strong shock physics. One-dimensional, two-dimensional and three-dimensional Eulerian capabilities have been implemented first. Highly accurate analytic and tabular equations of state with solid, liquid, vapor, gas-liquid mixed phase and solid-liquid mixed phase capabilities can be used. The architecture of CTH was designed to accommodate other numerical approaches such as Lagrangian or ALE methods. CTH was carefully structured to run fast on a CRAY XMP. It is highly vectorized and multitasked. We briefly discuss the models used in CTH, techniques used to multitask the code and example calculations.

  13. CTH: A three-dimensional, large deformation, shock wave physics code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGlaun, J. M.; Zeigler, F. J.; Thompson, S. L.

    1987-06-01

    CTH is a code system under development at Sandia National Laboratories to model multidimensional, multi-material, large deformation, strong shock physics. One-dimensional, two-dimensional and three-dimensional Eulerian capabilities have been implemented first. Highly accurate analytic and tabular equations of state with solid, liquid, vapor, gas-liquid mixed phase and solid-liquid mixed phase capabilities can be used. The architecture of CTH was designed to accommodate other numerical approaches such as Lagrangian or ALE methods. CTH was carefully structured to run fast on a CRAY XMP. It is highly vectorized and multitasked. We briefly discuss the models used in CTH, techniques used to multitask the code and example calculations.

  14. Geodetic characteristic of the postseismic deformation following the interplate large earthquake along the Japan Trench (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Y.; Hino, R.; Ariyoshi, K.; Matsuzawa, T.; Mishina, M.; Sato, T.; Inazu, D.; Ito, Y.; Tachibana, K.; Demachi, T.; Miura, S.

    2013-12-01

    On March 9, 2011 at 2:45 (UTC), an M7.3 interplate earthquake (hereafter foreshock) occurred ~45 km northeast of the epicenter of the M9.0 2011 Tohoku earthquake. This foreshock preceded the 2011 Tohoku earthquake by 51 hours. Ohta et al., (2012, GRL) estimated co- and postseismic afterslip distribution based on a dense GPS network and ocean bottom pressure gauge sites. They found the afterslip distribution was mainly concentrated in the up-dip extension of the coseismic slip. The coseismic slip and afterslip distribution of the foreshock were also located in the slip deficit region (between 20-40m slip) of the coiseismic slip of the M9.0 mainshock. The slip amount for the afterslip is roughly consistent with that determined by repeating earthquake analysis carried out in a previous study (Kato et al., 2012, Science). The estimated moment release for the afterslip reached magnitude 6.8, even within a short time period of 51 hours. They also pointed out that a volumetric strainmeter time series suggests that this event advanced with a rapid decay time constant (4.8 h) compared with other typical large earthquakes. The decay time constant of the afterslip may reflect the frictional property of the plate interface, especially effective normal stress controlled by fluid. For verification of the short decay time constant of the foreshock, we investigated the postseismic deformation characteristic following the 1989 and 1992 Sanriku-Oki earthquakes (M7.1 and M6.9), 2003 and 2005 Miyagi-Oki earthquakes (M6.8 and M7.2), and 2008 Fukushima-Oki earthquake (M6.9). We used four components extensometer at Miyako (39.59N, 141.98E) on the Sanriku coast for 1989 and 1992 event. For 2003, 2005 and 2008 events, we used volumetric strainmeter at Kinka-zan (38.27N, 141.58E) and Enoshima (38.27N, 141.60E). To extract the characteristics of the postseismic deformation, we fitted the logarithmic function. The estimated decay time constants for each earthquake had almost similar range (1

  15. On embedding a Morse-Smale diffeomorphism on a 3-manifold in a topological flow

    SciTech Connect

    Grines, Vyacheslav Z; Gurevich, E Ya; Medvedev, Vladislav S; Pochinka, Olga V

    2012-12-31

    In this paper, for the case of 3-dimensional manifolds, we solve the Palis problem on finding necessary and sufficient conditions for a Morse-Smale cascade to embed in a topological flow. The set of such cascades is open in the space of all diffeomorphisms, while the set of arbitrary diffeomorphisms that embed in a smooth flow is nowhere dense. Also, we consider a class of diffeomorphisms that embed in a topological flow and prove that a complete topological invariant for this class is similar to the Andronova-Maier scheme and the Peixoto graph. Bibliography: 26 titles.

  16. A 1-metre Ni coated CFRP demonstrator for large deformable mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Samantha J.; Doel, Peter; Brooks, David; Strangwood, Martin

    We present results from our current project to develop an alternative substrate for large deformable mirrors, particularly with the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) in mind. Our mirror substrate consists of a carbon-fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) core encapsulated in a thick (50µm) coating of nickel; the coating entirely covers the CFRP front, back and edges. The benefits of CFRP are: that it has high tensile strength, making it exceptionally resistant to breakage and able to withstand high inter-actuator forces; that it can be fabricated in large sections, allowing the production of a 2.6 m monolithic mirror, simplifying system control and eliminating additional diffraction/scattering introduced by segmented mirror systems; its low density (< 1800 kgm-3 for a Ni coated substrate). By the end of summer this year (2009) we aim to have constructed a 19 cm diameter fully actuated (37 piezo-stack actuators on a 29 mm triangular grid) prototype and a 1.0 m diameter substrate mounted on a static set of points to demonstrate the scalability of the technology. We discuss the processes involved in forming a Ni-CFRP mirror, the results obtained so far and a current status update.

  17. Concept, modeling, and performance prediction of a low-cost, large deformable mirror.

    PubMed

    Heimsten, Rikard; MacMynowski, Douglas G; Andersen, Torben; Owner-Petersen, Mette

    2012-02-10

    While it is attractive to integrate a deformable mirror (DM) for adaptive optics (AO) into the telescope itself rather than using relay optics within an instrument, the resulting large DM can be expensive, particularly for extremely large telescopes. A low-cost approach for building a large DM is to use voice-coil actuators connected to the back of the DM through suction cups. Use of such inexpensive voice-coil actuators leads to a poorly damped system with many structural modes within the desired bandwidth. Control of the mirror dynamics using electro-mechanical sensors is thus required for integration within an AO system. We introduce a distributed control approach, and we show that the "inner" back sensor control loop does not need to function at low frequencies, leading to significant cost reduction for the sensors. Incorporating realistic models of low-cost actuators and sensors together with an atmospheric seeing model, we demonstrate that the low-cost mirror strategy is feasible within a closed-loop AO system. PMID:22330282

  18. Numerical simulation of sloshing with large deforming free surface by MPS-LES method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xu-jie; Zhang, Huai-xin; Sun, Xue-yao

    2012-12-01

    Moving particle semi-implicit (MPS) method is a fully Lagrangian particle method which can easily solve problems with violent free surface. Although it has demonstrated its advantage in ocean engineering applications, it still has some defects to be improved. In this paper, MPS method is extended to the large eddy simulation (LES) by coupling with a sub-particle-scale (SPS) turbulence model. The SPS turbulence model turns into the Reynolds stress terms in the filtered momentum equation, and the Smagorinsky model is introduced to describe the Reynolds stress terms. Although MPS method has the advantage in the simulation of the free surface flow, a lot of non-free surface particles are treated as free surface particles in the original MPS model. In this paper, we use a new free surface tracing method and the key point is "neighbor particle". In this new method, the zone around each particle is divided into eight parts, and the particle will be treated as a free surface particle as long as there are no "neighbor particles" in any two parts of the zone. As the number density parameter judging method has a high efficiency for the free surface particles tracing, we combine it with the neighbor detected method. First, we select out the particles which may be mistreated with high probabilities by using the number density parameter judging method. And then we deal with these particles with the neighbor detected method. By doing this, the new mixed free surface tracing method can reduce the mistreatment problem efficiently. The serious pressure fluctuation is an obvious defect in MPS method, and therefore an area-time average technique is used in this paper to remove the pressure fluctuation with a quite good result. With these improvements, the modified MPS-LES method is applied to simulate liquid sloshing problems with large deforming free surface. Results show that the modified MPS-LES method can simulate the large deforming free surface easily. It can not only capture

  19. A combined crystal plasticity and graph-based vertex model of dynamic recrystallization at large deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellbin, Y.; Hallberg, H.; Ristinmaa, M.

    2015-06-01

    A mesoscale model of microstructure evolution is formulated in the present work by combining a crystal plasticity model with a graph-based vertex algorithm. This provides a versatile formulation capable of capturing finite-strain deformations, development of texture and microstructure evolution through recrystallization. The crystal plasticity model is employed in a finite element setting and allows tracing of stored energy build-up in the polycrystal microstructure and concurrent reorientation of the crystal lattices in the grains. This influences the progression of recrystallization as nucleation occurs at sites with sufficient stored energy and since the grain boundary mobility and energy is allowed to vary with crystallographic misorientation across the boundaries. The proposed graph-based vertex model describes the topological changes to the grain microstructure and keeps track of the grain inter-connectivity. Through homogenization, the macroscopic material response is also obtained. By the proposed modeling approach, grain structure evolution at large deformations as well as texture development are captured. This is in contrast to most other models of recrystallization which are usually limited by assumptions of one or the other of these factors. In simulation examples, the model is in the present study shown to capture the salient features of dynamic recrystallization, including the effects of varying initial grain size and strain rate on the transitions between single-peak and multiple-peak oscillating flow stress behavior. Also the development of recrystallization texture and the influence of different assumptions on orientation of recrystallization nuclei are investigated. Further, recrystallization kinetics are discussed and compared to classical JMAK theory. To promote computational efficiency, the polycrystal plasticity algorithm is parallelized through a GPU implementation that was recently proposed by the authors.

  20. The finite element absolute nodal coordinate formulation incorporated with surface stress effect to model elastic bending nanowires in large deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jin; Lilley, Carmen M.

    2009-08-01

    Surface stress was incorporated into the finite element absolute nodal coordinate formulation in order to model elastic bending of nanowires in large deformation. The absolute nodal coordinate formulation is a numerical method to model bending structures in large deformation. The generalized Young-Laplace equation was employed to model the surface stress effect on bending nanowires. Effects from surface stress and large deformation on static bending nanowires are presented and discussed. The results calculated with the absolute nodal coordinate formulation incorporated with surface stress show that the surface stress effect makes the bending nanowires behave like softer or stiffer materials depending on the boundary condition. The surface stress effect diminishes as the dimensions of the bending structures increase beyond the nanoscale. The developed algorithm is consistent with the classical absolute nodal coordinate formulation at the macroscale.

  1. Small and large deformation analysis with the p- and B-spline versions of the Finite Cell Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schillinger, Dominik; Ruess, Martin; Zander, Nils; Bazilevs, Yuri; Düster, Alexander; Rank, Ernst

    2012-10-01

    The Finite Cell Method (FCM) is an embedded domain method, which combines the fictitious domain approach with high-order finite elements, adaptive integration, and weak imposition of unfitted Dirichlet boundary conditions. For smooth problems, FCM has been shown to achieve exponential rates of convergence in energy norm, while its structured cell grid guarantees simple mesh generation irrespective of the geometric complexity involved. The present contribution first unhinges the FCM concept from a special high-order basis. Several benchmarks of linear elasticity and a complex proximal femur bone with inhomogeneous material demonstrate that for small deformation analysis, FCM works equally well with basis functions of the p-version of the finite element method or high-order B-splines. Turning to large deformation analysis, it is then illustrated that a straightforward geometrically nonlinear FCM formulation leads to the loss of uniqueness of the deformation map in the fictitious domain. Therefore, a modified FCM formulation is introduced, based on repeated deformation resetting, which assumes for the fictitious domain the deformation-free reference configuration after each Newton iteration. Numerical experiments show that this intervention allows for stable nonlinear FCM analysis, preserving the full range of advantages of linear elastic FCM, in particular exponential rates of convergence. Finally, the weak imposition of unfitted Dirichlet boundary conditions via the penalty method, the robustness of FCM under severe mesh distortion, and the large deformation analysis of a complex voxel-based metal foam are addressed.

  2. Study on internal flow and surface deformation of large droplet levitated by ultrasonic wave.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yutaka; Hyuga, Daisuke; Yamada, Shogo; Aoki, Kazuyoshi

    2006-09-01

    It is expected that new materials will be manufactured with containerless processing under the microgravity environment in space. Under the microgravity environment, handling technology of molten metal is important for such processes. There are a lot of previous studies about droplet levitation technologies, including the use of acoustic waves, as the holding technology. However, experimental and analytical information about the relationship between surface deformation and internal flow of a large levitated droplet is still unknown. The purpose of this study is to experimentally investigate the large droplet behavior levitated by the acoustic wave field and its internal flow. To achieve this, first, numerical simulation is conducted to clarify the characteristics of acoustic wave field. Second, the levitation characteristic and the internal flow of the levitated droplet are investigated by the ultrasonic standing wave under normal gravity environment. Finally, the levitation characteristic and internal flow of levitated droplet are observed under microgravity in an aircraft to compare results with the experiment performed under the normal gravity environment. PMID:17124114

  3. CTH: A three-dimensional large deformation, strong shock wave physics code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGlaun, J. M.; Thompson, S. L.; Elrick, M. G.

    1988-09-01

    CTH is a software system under development at Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque to model multidimensional, multi-material, large deformation, strong shock wave physics. One-dimensional, two-dimensional, and three-dimensional Eulerian meshes are currently available. CTH uses tabular or analytic equations of state that model solid, liquid, vapor, plasma, and mixed-phase materials. CTH can model elastic-plastic behavior, high explosives, fracture, and motion of fragments smaller than a computational cell. CTH was carefully structured to vectorize and multitask on the CRAY X-MP. Three-dimensional databases reside on the CRAY solid state disk with only five planes in core at once. The input/output to the solid state disk is overlapped with computations so there is no penalty for using the solid state disk. This allows very large problems to be run effectively. A sophisticated post-processor, CTHED, has been developed for interactive analysis using color graphics. This paper describes the architecture, database structure, models, and novel features of CTH. Special emphasis will be placed on the features that are novel to CTH or are not direct generalizations of two-dimensional models.

  4. CTH: A three-dimensional large deformation, strong shock wave physics code

    SciTech Connect

    McGlaun, J.M.; Thompson, S.L.; Elrick, M.G.

    1988-01-01

    CTH is a software system under development at Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque to model multidimensional, multi-material, large deformation, strong shock wave physics. One-dimensional, two-dimensional, and three-dimensional Eulerian meshes are currently available. CTH uses tabular or analytic equations of state that model solid, liquid, vapor, plasma, and mixed-phase materials. CTH can model elastic-plastic behavior, high explosives, fracture, and motion of fragments smaller than a computational cell. CTH was carefully structured to vectorize and multitask on the CRAY X-MP. Three-dimensional databases reside on the CRAY solid state disk with only five planes in core at once. The input/output to the solid state disk is overlapped with computations so there is no penalty for using the solid state disk. This allows very large problems to be run effectively. A sophisticated post-processor, CTHED, has been developed for interactive analysis using color graphics. This paper describes the architecture, database structure, models, and novel features of CTH. Special emphasis will be place on the features that are novel to CTH or are not direct generalizations of two-dimensional models. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  5. A Mortar Segment-to-Segment Frictional Contact Method for Large Deformations

    SciTech Connect

    Puso, M; Laursen, T

    2003-10-29

    Contact modeling is still one of the most difficult aspects of nonlinear implicit structural analysis. Most 3D contact algorithms employed today use node-on-segment approaches for contacting dissimilar meshes. Two pass node-on-segment contact approaches have the well known deficiency of locking due to over constraint. Furthermore, node-on-segment approaches suffer when individual nodes slide out of contact at contact surface boundaries or when contacting nodes slide from facet to facet. This causes jumps in the contact forces due to the discrete nature of the constraint enforcement and difficulties in convergence for implicit solution techniques. In a previous work, we developed a segment-to-segment contact approach based on the mortar method that was applicable to large deformation mechanics. The approach proved extremely robust since it eliminated the overconstraint which caused ''locking'' and provided smooth force variations in large sliding. Here, we extend this previous approach in to treat frictional contact problems. The proposed approach is then applied to several challenging frictional contact problems which demonstrate its effectiveness.

  6. Distributed deformation measurement of large space deployable mechanism based on FBG sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yanfang; Zhou, Zude; Liu, Yi; Liu, Mingyao; Li, Ruiya; Li, Tianliang

    2015-10-01

    Space deployable mechanisms are widely used, important and multi-purpose components in aerospace fields. In order to ensure the mechanism in normal situation after unfolded, detecting the deformation caused by huge temperature difference in real-time is necessary. This paper designed a deployable mechanism setup, completed its distributed deformation measurement by means of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors and BP neural network, proved the mechanism distributed strain takes place sequence and FBG sensor is capable for space deployable mechanisms deformation measuring.

  7. Atlas construction for dynamic (4D) PET using diffeomorphic transformations.

    PubMed

    Bieth, Marie; Lombaert, Hervé; Reader, Andrew J; Siddiqi, Kaleem

    2013-01-01

    A novel dynamic (4D) PET to PET image registration procedure is proposed and applied to multiple PET scans acquired with the high resolution research tomograph (HRRT), the highest resolution human brain PET scanner available in the world. By extending the recent diffeomorphic log-demons (DLD) method and applying it to multiple dynamic [11C]raclopride scans from the HRRT, an important step towards construction of a PET atlas of unprecedented quality for [11C]raclopride imaging of the human brain has been achieved. Accounting for the temporal dimension in PET data improves registration accuracy when compared to registration of 3D to 3D time-averaged PET images. The DLD approach was chosen for its ease in providing both an intensity and shape template, through iterative sequential pair-wise registrations with fast convergence. The proposed method is applicable to any PET radiotracer, providing 4D atlases with useful applications in high accuracy PET data simulations and automated PET image analysis. PMID:24579121

  8. Fluid-like flows in large-strain deformation of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeung, Ho; Sagapuram, Dinakar; Viswanathan, Koushik; Sundaram, Narayan; Mahato, Anirban; Trumble, Kevin; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    Laminar or smooth plastic flow, commonly observed in large deformation of metals, becomes unstable under certain conditions, resulting in inhomogeneous plastic flow. Using in situ imaging, we demonstrate the unique features of two inhomogeneous flow modes in metal plasticity -- the well-known shear band flow and the recently discovered sinuous flow -- and methods for suppressing them. Both modes occur via a two stage process -- nucleation and flow development. The nucleation stage results in a weak material zone and the development stage involves imposition of significant strains. In the case of shear bands, using additional micro-marker techniques, we show that the second stage is well described by a viscous slider model. As a result, controlling the second stage causes band formation to cease. We demonstrate the use of this method -- Passive Geometric Flow control -- to form long strips from metallic alloys that are difficult to form conventionally. For sinuous flow, nucleation and flow formation kinematics show remarkable resemblance with flows in complex fluids. The nucleation stage can be altered using suitable ink coatings on the free surface or by surface pre-straining, and we use this idea to demonstrate complete sinuous flow suppression. Membership pending.

  9. A coupled theory of fluid permeation and large deformations for elastomeric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chester, Shawn A.; Anand, Lallit

    2010-11-01

    An elastomeric gel is a cross-linked polymer network swollen with a solvent (fluid). A continuum-mechanical theory to describe the various coupled aspects of fluid permeation and large deformations (e.g., swelling and squeezing) of elastomeric gels is formulated. The basic mechanical force balance laws and the balance law for the fluid content are reviewed, and the constitutive theory that we develop is consistent with modern treatments of continuum thermodynamics, and material frame-indifference. In discussing special constitutive equations we limit our attention to isotropic materials, and consider a model for the free energy based on a Flory-Huggins model for the free energy change due to mixing of the fluid with the polymer network, coupled with a non-Gaussian statistical-mechanical model for the change in configurational entropy—a model which accounts for the limited extensibility of polymer chains. As representative examples of application of the theory, we study (a) three-dimensional swelling-equilibrium of an elastomeric gel in an unconstrained, stress-free state; and (b) the following one-dimensional transient problems: (i) free-swelling of a gel; (ii) consolidation of an already swollen gel; and (iii) pressure-difference-driven diffusion of organic solvents across elastomeric membranes.

  10. Large-scale deformed QRPA calculations of the gamma-ray strength function based on a Gogny force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martini, M.; Goriely, S.; Hilaire, S.; Péru, S.; Minato, F.

    2016-01-01

    The dipole excitations of nuclei play an important role in nuclear astrophysics processes in connection with the photoabsorption and the radiative neutron capture that take place in stellar environment. We present here the results of a large-scale axially-symmetric deformed QRPA calculation of the γ-ray strength function based on the finite-range Gogny force. The newly determined γ-ray strength is compared with experimental photoabsorption data for spherical as well as deformed nuclei. Predictions of γ-ray strength functions and Maxwellian-averaged neutron capture rates for Sn isotopes are also discussed.

  11. Large Deformation Properties of Red Blood Cell Membrane Based on a Higher Order Gradient Quasi-continuum Model.

    PubMed

    Wang, X Y; Wang, J B; Qiu, B B; Hu, L F

    2015-12-01

    Based on the proposed higher order gradient quasi-continuum model, the numerical investigations of the basic mechanical properties and deformation behaviors of human red blood cell (RBC) membrane under large deformation at room temperature (i.e., 300 K) are carried out in the present paper. The results show that RBC membrane is a nonlinear hyperelastic material. The mechanical properties of RBC membrane is dominated by isotropic nature at the stage of initial deformation, however, its anisotropic material properties emerge clearly with the loading increasing. The out-of-plane wrinkling of RBC membrane upon shear loading can be reproduced numerically. With the use of the so-called higher order Cauchy-Born rule as the kinematic description, the bending stiffness of RBC membrane can be considered conveniently.

  12. Constitutive modeling of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene under large-deformation and cyclic loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Bergström, J S; Kurtz, S M; Rimnac, C M; Edidin, A A

    2002-06-01

    When subjected to a monotonically increasing deformation state, the mechanical behavior of UHMWPE is characterized by a linear elastic response followed by distributed yielding and strain hardening at large deformations. During the unloading phases of an applied cyclic deformation process, the response is characterized by nonlinear recovery driven by the release of stored internal energy. A number of different constitutive theories can be used to model these experimentally observed events. We compare the ability of the J2-plasticity theory, the "Arruda-Boyce" model, the "Hasan-Boyce" model, and the "Bergström-Boyce" model to reproduce the observed mechanical behavior of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). In addition a new hybrid model is proposed, which incorporates many features of the previous theories. This hybrid model is shown to most effectively predict the experimentally observed mechanical behavior of UHMWPE. PMID:12013180

  13. Precisions Measurement for the Grasp of Welding Deformation amount of Time Series for Large-Scale Industrial Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, R.; Hamada, K.; Hirata, N.; Tamura, R.; Nishi, N.

    2015-05-01

    As well as the BIM of quality management in the construction industry, demand for quality management of the manufacturing process of the member is higher in shipbuilding field. The time series of three-dimensional deformation of the each process, and are accurately be grasped strongly demanded. In this study, we focused on the shipbuilding field, will be examined three-dimensional measurement method. The shipyard, since a large equipment and components are intricately arranged in a limited space, the installation of the measuring equipment and the target is limited. There is also the element to be measured is moved in each process, the establishment of the reference point for time series comparison is necessary to devise. In this paper will be discussed method for measuring the welding deformation in time series by using a total station. In particular, by using a plurality of measurement data obtained from this approach and evaluated the amount of deformation of each process.

  14. An automated landmark-based elastic registration technique for large deformation recovery from 4-D CT lung images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negahdar, Mohammadreza; Zacarias, Albert; Milam, Rebecca A.; Dunlap, Neal; Woo, Shiao Y.; Amini, Amir A.

    2012-03-01

    The treatment plan evaluation for lung cancer patients involves pre-treatment and post-treatment volume CT imaging of the lung. However, treatment of the tumor volume lung results in structural changes to the lung during the course of treatment. In order to register the pre-treatment volume to post-treatment volume, there is a need to find robust and homologous features which are not affected by the radiation treatment along with a smooth deformation field. Since airways are well-distributed in the entire lung, in this paper, we propose use of airway tree bifurcations for registration of the pre-treatment volume to the post-treatment volume. A dedicated and automated algorithm has been developed that finds corresponding airway bifurcations in both images. To derive the 3-D deformation field, a B-spline transformation model guided by mutual information similarity metric was used to guarantee the smoothness of the transformation while combining global information from bifurcation points. Therefore, the approach combines both global statistical intensity information with local image feature information. Since during normal breathing, the lung undergoes large nonlinear deformations, it is expected that the proposed method would also be applicable to large deformation registration between maximum inhale and maximum exhale images in the same subject. The method has been evaluated by registering 3-D CT volumes at maximum exhale data to all the other temporal volumes in the POPI-model data.

  15. ERS-ENVISAT InSAR deformation time-series: a powerful tool to investigate long term surface deformation of large areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanari, Riccardo

    2010-05-01

    Satellite time series have already provided key measurements to retrieve information on the dynamic nature of Earth surface processes. We exploit in this work the availability of the large archives of spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data acquired by the ERS-1/2 and ENVISAT sensors of the European Space Agency (ESA) during the 1992-2009 time period, in order to investigate long term surface deformation of large areas. To achieve this result we take advantage of the Differential SAR Interferometry (InSAR) algorithm referred to as Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) technique (Berardino et al., 2002), which allows us to generate mean deformation velocity maps and corresponding time-series by exploiting temporally overlapping SAR dataset collected by the ERS and ENVISAT sensors (Pepe et al., 2005). In particular, we focus on the results obtained by retrieving ERS-ENVISAT deformation time-series from 1992 till today in selected case studies relevant to different scenarios. We start from the analysis of the Mt. Etna volcano (Italy) and the Napoli Bay area (Italy), the latter including three volcanic systems (the Campi Flegrei caldera, the Somma-Vesuvio volcanic complex and the Ischia island) and the city of Napoli. In addition, we present the results relevant to the cities of Istanbul (Turkey) and Roma (Italy). The overall analyses are carried out by using averaged (multilook) InSAR interferograms with a spatial resolution of about 100 x 100 m. Moreover, in selected zones we further investigate localized phenomena by zooming in the areas of interest and carrying out a InSAR analysis at full spatial resolution scale (Lanari et al., 2004). In these cases we also exploit the doppler centroid variations of the post-2000 acquisitions of the ERS-2 sensor and the carrier frequency difference between the ERS-1/2 and the ENVISAT systems in order to maximize the number of investigated SAR pixels and to improve their geocoding. The presented results demonstrate the unique

  16. Higher order representation of the beam cross section deformation in large displacement finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pengfei; Gantoi, Florentina M.; Shabana, Ahmed A.

    2011-12-01

    Most existing beam formulations assume that the cross section of the beam remains rigid regardless of the amplitude of the displacement. The absolute nodal coordinate formulation (ANCF); however, allows for the deformation of the cross section and leads to a more general beam models that capture the coupling between different modes of displacement. This paper examines the effect of the order of interpolation on the modes of deformation of the beam cross section using ANCF finite elements. To this end, a new two-dimensional shear deformable ANCF beam element is developed. The new finite element employs a higher order of interpolation, and allows for new cross section deformation modes that cannot be captured using previously developed shear deformable ANCF beam elements. The element developed in this study relaxes the assumption of planar cross section; thereby allowing for including the effect of warping as well as for different stretch values at different points on the element cross section. The displacement field of the new element is assumed to be cubic in the axial direction and quadratic in the transverse direction. Using this displacement field, more expressions for the element extension, shear and the cross section stretch can be systematically defined. The change in the cross section area is measured using Nanson's formula. Measures of the shear angle, extension, and cross section stretch can also be systematically defined using coordinate systems defined at the element material points. Using these local coordinate systems, expressions for a nominal shear angle are obtained. The differences between the cross section deformation modes obtained using the new higher order element and those obtained using the previously developed lower order elements are highlighted. Numerical examples are presented in order to compare the results obtained using the new finite element and the results obtained using previously developed ANCF finite elements.

  17. Patterns of deformation and volcanic flows associated with lithospheric loading by large volcanoes on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgovern, Patrick J.; Solomon, Sean C.

    1993-01-01

    Magellan radar imaging and topography data are now available for a number of volcanoes on Venus greater than 100 km in radius. These data can be examined to reveal evidence of the flexural response of the lithosphere to the volcanic load. On Venus, erosion and sediment deposition are negligible, so tectonic evidence of deformation around large volcanoes should be evident except where buried by very young flows. Radar images reveal that most tectonic features and flow units on the flanks of these volcanoes have predominantly radial orientations. However, both Tepev Mons in Bell Regio and Sapas Mons in Atla Regio exhibit circumferential graben on their flanks. In addition, images reveal several flow units with an annular character around the north and west flanks of Tepev Mons. This pattern most likely results from ponding of flows in an annular flexural moat. Maat Mons in Atla Regio and Sif Mons in Eistla Regio are examples of volcanoes that lack circumferential graben and annular flows; discernible flow units and fractures on these constructs appear to be predominantly radial. Altimetry data can also provide evidence of flexural response. Tepev Mons is partially encircled by depressions that may be sections of a flexural moat that has not been completely filled. The locations of these depressions generally coincide with the annular flows described above. There is weaker evidence for such depressions around Maat Mons as well. The lack of circumferential tectonic features around most volcanoes on Venus might be explained by gradual moat filling and coverage by radial flows. The depressions around Tepev (and possible Maat) may indicate that this process is currently continuing. We use analytic models of plate flexure in an axisymmetric geometry to constrain the elastic plate thickness supporting Tepev Mons. If we consider the outer radius of the ponded flows to be the edge of a moat, we find that models with elastic plate thickness of 10-20 km fit best. Finite element

  18. Large-scale three-dimensional phase field simulation of γ '-rafting and creep deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ning; Shen, Chen; Mills, Michael; Wang, Yunzhi

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional phase field simulations of coupled γ/γ ‧ microstructural evolution and plastic deformation in single crystal Ni-Al are carried out at micrometer scales. Coherent γ/γ ‧ microstructures and plastic deformation in γ-channels are described using a single, consistent methodology based on Khachaturyan's phase field microelasticity approach to coherent precipitates and dislocations. In particular, a new set of phase fields is introduced to characterize local density of dislocations from individual active slip systems. To increase the length scale of the phase field simulations, the Kim-Kim-Suzuki (KKS) treatment of γ/γ ‧ interfaces was adopted. The rafting kinetics, precipitate-matrix inversion process and the corresponding creep deformation are characterized with respect to parameters such as applied stress and lattice misfit. The simulation results on γ ‧-rafting kinetics and morphological evolution of the γ/γ ‧ microstructures are compared with available experiment. The model can be used to carry out parametric studies of the effects of material and processing parameters such as alloy composition, external stress and working temperature on γ ‧-rafting kinetics, morphological evolution and the corresponding creep deformation.

  19. Measurements of very large deformations in potash salt in conjunction with an ongoing mining operation

    SciTech Connect

    Sattler, A.R.; Christensen, C.L.

    1980-01-01

    Room and pillar deformation were measured in conjunction with a relatively new type of mining operation in a southeastern New Mexico potash mine. The extraction ration was approximately 90 percent in a first mining operation. Due to severe deformations encountered, instrumentation had to be developed/modified for these measurements. This paper concentrates on experiment design, design of special instrumentation, field installation of equipment, and presentation of the data. Measurements made include extensometers in the pillar, in the floor and ceiling in the room between pillars, absolute level measurements, floor ceiling closure, and stress (strain) measurements. Associated laboratory rock mechanics measurements of samples from the mine are being done separately. Two separate room pillar complexes were instrumented. In the first complex, floor-ceiling deformations of approximately 1 inch/day and pillar deformations around 1/2 inch/day were measured. In the second complex, instrumentation was installed while the pillar was a part of a long wall and the subsequent sequential mining (long wall-pillar with only one adjoining room on one side - pillar in the middle of room pillar complex) was observed. Data return from this operation was good.

  20. Path-dependent J-integral evaluations around an elliptical hole for large deformation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unger, David J.

    2016-08-01

    An exact expression is obtained for a path-dependent J-integral for finite strains of an elliptical hole subject to remote tensile tractions under the Tresca deformation theory for a thin plate composed of non-work hardening material. Possible applications include an analytical resistance curve for the initial stage of crack propagation due to crack tip blunting.

  1. Deformations Associated With Large Interplate Earthquakes Along the Sumatra-Andaman Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, M.; Fukushima, Y.; Katagi, T.; Hashizume, M.; Satomura, M.; Wu, P.; Kato, T.

    2008-12-01

    Since the occurrence of the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake (Mw9.2), the Sumatra-Andaman Subduction zone has attracted geophysicists' attention. We have been carrying on CGPS observation in Thailand and Myanmar to detect postseismic deformation following this gigantic event. Since CGPS on land is not enough to clarify the detailed image of postseismic deformation, we also make InSAR analyses in Andaman and Phuket Islands. On September 12, 2007, another Mw8.4 event occurred SW off Sumatra. We report deformations observed with GPS and SAR including co- and postseismic deformation following this event. We have analyzed CGPS data up to the end of 2007 and detected postseismic displacements all over the Indochina peninsula. Phuket, which suffered from about 26cm coseismic displacement, has shifted by 26cm southwestward till July, 2007. Postseismic transient is clearly recognized and already exceeds coseismic movements at remote sites such as Bangkok and Chiang Mai in Thailand. We processed ALOS/PALSAR data in Andaman and Phuket islands. No remarkable deformation is found in Andaman and Phuket Islands, since the operation period of ALOS/PALSAR is not long enough and the wavelength of postseismic deformation may be much longer than the swath. We try to synthesize the postseismic displacement using a 3-D viscoelastic FEM model. Its results imply that viscoelastic relaxation in mantle with a typical mantle viscosity may play an important role for the observed postseismic transients except during the first six month. An extremely low viscosity is not required beneath the Andaman Sea, though this back arc is now actively opening. Coseismic motion following the 2007 Sumatra event is detected north of Benkgulu on the coast of southern Sumatra with InSAR. The largest LOS displacement of about 35cm is observed 100km NW of Bengkulu. Coseismic westward displacements of 3.5cm from the 2007 Sumatra event are also observed at Singapore, whose epicentral distance is about 700km, with

  2. An Anthropometric-Based Subject-Specific Finite Element Model of the Human Breast for Predicting Large Deformations

    PubMed Central

    Pianigiani, Silvia; Ruggiero, Leonardo; Innocenti, Bernardo

    2015-01-01

    The large deformation of the human breast threatens proper nodules tracking when the subject mammograms are used as pre-planning data for biopsy. However, techniques capable of accurately supporting the surgeons during biopsy are missing. Finite element (FE) models are at the basis of currently investigated methodologies to track nodules displacement. Nonetheless, the impact of breast material modeling on the mechanical response of its tissues (e.g., tumors) is not clear. This study proposes a subject-specific FE model of the breast, obtained by anthropometric measurements, to predict breast large deformation. A healthy breast subject-specific FE parametric model was developed and validated by Cranio-caudal (CC) and Medio-Lateral Oblique (MLO) mammograms. The model was successively modified, including nodules, and utilized to investigate the effect of nodules size, typology, and material modeling on nodules shift under the effect of CC, MLO, and gravity loads. Results show that a Mooney–Rivlin material model can estimate healthy breast large deformation. For a pathological breast, under CC compression, the nodules displacement is very close to zero when a linear elastic material model is used. Finally, when nodules are modeled, including tumor material properties, under CC, or MLO or gravity loads, nodules shift shows ~15% average relative difference. PMID:26734604

  3. Deformation of leaky-dielectric fluid globules under strong electric fields: Boundary layers and jets at large Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnitzer, Ory; Frankel, Itzchak; Yariv, Ehud

    2013-11-01

    In Taylor's theory of electrohydrodynamic drop deformation (Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A, vol. 291, 1966, pp. 159-166), inertia is neglected at the outset, resulting in fluid velocity that scales as the square of the applied-field magnitude. For large drops, with increasing field strength the Reynolds number predicted by this scaling may actually become large, suggesting the need for a complementary large-Reynolds-number investigation. Balancing viscous stresses and electrical shear forces in this limit reveals a different velocity scaling, with the 4/3-power of the applied-field magnitude. We focus here on the flow over a gas bubble. It is essentially confined to two boundary layers propagating from the poles to the equator, where they collide to form a radial jet. At leading order in the Capillary number, the bubble deforms due to (i) Maxwell stresses; (ii) the hydrodynamic boundary-layer pressure associated with centripetal acceleration; and (iii) the intense pressure distribution acting over the narrow equatorial deflection zone, appearing as a concentrated load. Remarkably, the unique flow topology and associated scalings allow to obtain a closed-form expression for this deformation through application of integral mass and momentum balances. On the bubble scale, the concentrated pressure load is manifested in the appearance of a non-smooth equatorial dimple.

  4. Large deformation solid-fluid interaction via a level set approach.

    SciTech Connect

    Schunk, Peter Randall; Noble, David R.; Baer, Thomas A.; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Notz, Patrick K.; Wilkes, Edward Dean

    2003-12-01

    Solidification and blood flow seemingly have little in common, but each involves a fluid in contact with a deformable solid. In these systems, the solid-fluid interface moves as the solid advects and deforms, often traversing the entire domain of interest. Currently, these problems cannot be simulated without innumerable expensive remeshing steps, mesh manipulations or decoupling the solid and fluid motion. Despite the wealth of progress recently made in mechanics modeling, this glaring inadequacy persists. We propose a new technique that tracks the interface implicitly and circumvents the need for remeshing and remapping the solution onto the new mesh. The solid-fluid boundary is tracked with a level set algorithm that changes the equation type dynamically depending on the phases present. This novel approach to coupled mechanics problems promises to give accurate stresses, displacements and velocities in both phases, simultaneously.

  5. Black hole entropy in the Chern-Simons-like theories of gravity and Lorentz-diffeomorphism Noether charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setare, M. R.; Adami, H.

    2016-01-01

    In the first order formalism of gravity theories, there are some theories which are not Lorentz-diffeomorphism covariant. In the framework of such theories we cannot apply the method of conserved charge calculation used in Lorentz-diffeomorphism covariant theories. In this paper we firstly introduce the total variation of a quantity due to an infinitesimal Lorentz-diffeomorphism transformation. Secondly, in order to obtain the conserved charges of Lorentz-diffeomorphism non-covariant theories, we extend the Tachikawa method [1]. This extension includes not only Lorentz gauge transformation but also the diffeomorphism. We apply this method to the Chern-Simons-like theories of gravity (CSLTG) and obtain a general formula for the entropy of black holes in those theories. Finally, some examples on CSLTG are provided and the entropy of the BTZ black hole is calculated in the context of the examples.

  6. Blocks or Continuous Deformation in Large-Scale Continental Geodynamics: Ptolemy Versus Copernicus, Kepler, and Newton (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnar, P. H.

    2010-12-01

    Tibetan Plateau illustrates this failing of plate tectonics (or crustal blocks) especially well. In particular, because of the large lateral variations in gravitational potential energy, it offers the best region in which to study dynamics of continental deformation.

  7. Application of Time Series Insar Technique for Deformation Monitoring of Large-Scale Landslides in Mountainous Areas of Western China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, T.; Lu, P.; Liu, C.; Wan, H.

    2016-06-01

    Western China is very susceptible to landslide hazards. As a result, landslide detection and early warning are of great importance. This work employs the SBAS (Small Baseline Subset) InSAR Technique for detection and monitoring of large-scale landslides that occurred in Li County, Sichuan Province, Western China. The time series INSAR is performed using descending scenes acquired from TerraSAR-X StripMap mode since 2014 to get the spatial distribution of surface displacements of this giant landslide. The time series results identify the distinct deformation zone on the landslide body with a rate of up to 150mm/yr. The deformation acquired by SBAS technique is validated by inclinometers from diverse boreholes of in-situ monitoring. The integration of InSAR time series displacements and ground-based monitoring data helps to provide reliable data support for the forecasting and monitoring of largescale landslide.

  8. SANTOS - a two-dimensional finite element program for the quasistatic, large deformation, inelastic response of solids

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, C.M.

    1997-07-01

    SANTOS is a finite element program designed to compute the quasistatic, large deformation, inelastic response of two-dimensional planar or axisymmetric solids. The code is derived from the transient dynamic code PRONTO 2D. The solution strategy used to compute the equilibrium states is based on a self-adaptive dynamic relaxation solution scheme, which is based on explicit central difference pseudo-time integration and artificial mass proportional damping. The element used in SANTOS is a uniform strain 4-node quadrilateral element with an hourglass control scheme to control the spurious deformation modes. Finite strain constitutive models for many common engineering materials are included. A robust master-slave contact algorithm for modeling sliding contact is implemented. An interface for coupling to an external code is also provided. 43 refs., 22 figs.

  9. Statistical model for the mechanical behavior of the tissue engineering non-woven fibrous matrices under large deformation.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Mohd Suhail; Pal, Anupam

    2014-09-01

    The fibrous matrices are widely used as scaffolds for the regeneration of load-bearing tissues due to their structural and mechanical similarities with the fibrous components of the extracellular matrix. These scaffolds not only provide the appropriate microenvironment for the residing cells but also act as medium for the transmission of the mechanical stimuli, essential for the tissue regeneration, from macroscopic scale of the scaffolds to the microscopic scale of cells. The requirement of the mechanical loading for the tissue regeneration requires the fibrous scaffolds to be able to sustain the complex three-dimensional mechanical loading conditions. In order to gain insight into the mechanical behavior of the fibrous matrices under large amount of elongation as well as shear, a statistical model has been formulated to study the macroscopic mechanical behavior of the electrospun fibrous matrix and the transmission of the mechanical stimuli from scaffolds to the cells via the constituting fibers. The study establishes the load-deformation relationships for the fibrous matrices for different structural parameters. It also quantifies the changes in the fiber arrangement and tension generated in the fibers with the deformation of the matrix. The model reveals that the tension generated in the fibers on matrix deformation is not homogeneous and hence the cells located in different regions of the fibrous scaffold might experience different mechanical stimuli. The mechanical response of fibrous matrices was also found to be dependent on the aspect ratio of the matrix. Therefore, the model establishes a structure-mechanics interdependence of the fibrous matrices under large deformation, which can be utilized in identifying the appropriate structure and external mechanical loading conditions for the regeneration of load-bearing tissues.

  10. Gauge theory of a group of diffeomorphisms. II. The conformal and de Sitter groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lord, Eric A.

    1986-12-01

    The extension of Hehl's Poincaré gauge theory to more general groups that include space-time diffeomorphisms is worked out for two particular examples, one corresponding to the action of the conformal group on Minkowski space, and the other to the action of the de Sitter group on de Sitter space, and the effect of these groups on physical fields.

  11. Thin zoom camera module by large-stroke micromachined deformable mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yu-Hung; Lin, Yu-Hung; Su, Guo-Dong J.

    2012-10-01

    Miniaturization is the key point to design image system for portable devices. Motor-driven lens technique is the traditional way to achieve auto-focus and zoom functions, this method usually requires a larger space and causes greater power consumption. Reflective optics is a technology not only can make the space application become more efficient and flexible, but also has the advantage that it induces low chromatic aberrations. In this paper, we use organic deformable mirror (DM) as reflective element of the system. PDMS used as an actuated membrane of DM has lower young's modulus and residual stress. The maximum stoke is 90 um and corresponding diopter is 39.964m(-1) . The system we designed with MEMS deformable mirror is a 5M pixel zoom image system which is only 10mm in thickness before packaging and 16mm in thickness after packaging. The smallest EFL (effective focal length) is 4.7 mm at full field angle of 52° and the f/# is 4.4. The longest EFL of the module is 9.4 mm and the f/# is 6.4.

  12. A model for large-scale plastic yield of the Gorda deformation zone

    SciTech Connect

    Denlinger, R.P. )

    1992-10-01

    A solution satisfying both continuity and force balance for an elastoplastic Gorda plate in planar coordinates is presented. Continuity on a plane is used to approximate continuity on a spherical surface due to the small area under consideration. The zone of plastic yield vs the seismicity does not change much with fault strength along the Mendocino. Due to the nature of the deformation, the direction of maximum shear stress near the Mendocino triple junction is between 40 and 50 deg to the Mendocino transform in both cases, but curves sharply in the neighborhood of the transform if the fault is strong. It is concluded that the strength of the Mendocino relative to the lithosphere varied over time. Five million years ago a change in pole position increased convergence of the Blanco fracture zone and Mendocino transform, exponentially increasing brittle shear stresses across the fault. Between 2.47 Ma and 1.8 Ma the convergence stabilized, and the resistance to sliding along the transform decayed back to residual levels. The relative slip along the fault during this time was about 1 km. As a result of this history, previous models either for flexural-slip or for right-lateral shear will fit the deformation at different times. 35 refs.

  13. Experimental Measurement and Quantification of Frictional Contact between Biological Surfaces Experiencing Large Deformation and Slip

    PubMed Central

    Gratz, Kenneth R.; Sah, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    Interactions between contacting biological surfaces may play significant roles in physiological and pathological processes. Theoretical models have described some special cases of contact, using one or more simplifying assumptions. Experimental quantification of contact could help to validate theoretical analyses. The objective of this study was to develop a general mathematical approach describing the dynamics of deformation and relative surface motion between contacting bodies and to implement this approach to describe the contact between two experimentally-tracked tissue surfaces. A theoretical formulation (in 2-D and 3-D) of contact using the movement of discrete tissue markers is described. The method was validated using theoretically-generated 3-D datasets, with < 1% error for a wide range of parameters. The method was applied to the contact loading of opposing articular cartilage tissues, where displacements of cell nuclei were tracked optically and used to quantify the movements and deformations of the surfaces. Compared to tissues with matched material properties, tissues with mis-matched material properties exhibited increased disparities in lateral expansion and relative motion (sliding) between the contacting surfaces. PMID:18329650

  14. Analyses of large quasistatic deformations of inelastic bodies by a new hybrid-stress finite element algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, K. W.; Atluri, S. N.

    1983-01-01

    A new hybrid-stress finite element algorithm, suitable for analyses of large, quasistatic, inelastic deformations, is presented. The algorithm is base upon a generalization of de Veubeke's complementary energy principle. The principal variables in the formulation are the nominal stress rate and spin, and thg resulting finite element equations are discrete versions of the equations of compatibility and angular momentum balance. The algorithm produces true rates, time derivatives, as opposed to 'increments'. There results a complete separation of the boundary value problem (for stress rate and velocity) and the initial value problem (for total stress and deformation); hence, their numerical treatments are essentially independent. After a fairly comprehensive discussion of the numerical treatment of the boundary value problem, we launch into a detailed examination of the numerical treatment of the initial value problem, covering the topics of efficiency, stability and objectivity. The paper is closed with a set of examples, finite homogeneous deformation problems, which serve to bring out important aspects of the algorithm.

  15. Learning layer-specific edges for segmenting retinal layers with large deformations.

    PubMed

    Karri, S P K; Chakraborthi, Debjani; Chatterjee, Jyotirmoy

    2016-07-01

    We present an algorithm for layer-specific edge detection in retinal optical coherence tomography images through a structured learning algorithm to reinforce traditional graph-based retinal layer segmentation. The proposed algorithm simultaneously identifies individual layers and their corresponding edges, resulting in the computation of layer-specific edges in 1 second. These edges augment classical dynamic programming based segmentation under layer deformation, shadow artifacts noise, and without heuristics or prior knowledge. We considered Duke's online data set containing 110 B-scans of 10 diabetic macular edema subjects with 8 retinal layers annotated by two experts for experimentation, and achieved a mean distance error of 1.38 pixels whereas that of the state-of-the-art was 1.68 pixels. PMID:27446714

  16. Learning layer-specific edges for segmenting retinal layers with large deformations

    PubMed Central

    Karri, S. P. K.; Chakraborthi, Debjani; Chatterjee, Jyotirmoy

    2016-01-01

    We present an algorithm for layer-specific edge detection in retinal optical coherence tomography images through a structured learning algorithm to reinforce traditional graph-based retinal layer segmentation. The proposed algorithm simultaneously identifies individual layers and their corresponding edges, resulting in the computation of layer-specific edges in 1 second. These edges augment classical dynamic programming based segmentation under layer deformation, shadow artifacts noise, and without heuristics or prior knowledge. We considered Duke’s online data set containing 110 B-scans of 10 diabetic macular edema subjects with 8 retinal layers annotated by two experts for experimentation, and achieved a mean distance error of 1.38 pixels whereas that of the state-of-the-art was 1.68 pixels. PMID:27446714

  17. PREDICTION OF HORIZONTAL DEFORMATION OF LARGE SCALE SEAWALL BY ELASTO-VISCOPLASTIC FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Takeshi; Niihara, Yuji; Yamada, Takemine; Ohno, Shintaro; Noguchi, Takatoshi; Miyata, Masafumi

    D runway at the Tokyo international airport (Haneda airport) consists of the land reclamation and pier sections. The design working life of the runway is given as 100 years. Steel pipe sheet-pile cellular seawall using high-strength pipe junction is applied to the connecting section between the land reclamation and pier sections. So as to achieve the long design working life, it is important for the design of the seawall to realize the accurate prediction of the long-term lateral displacement of the seawall due to the high embankment in the land reclamation section. In this paper, the authors conduct the soil/water coupled elasto-viscoplastic finite element analysis to evaluate the long-term lateral displacement of the cellular seawall. The constitutive model, proposed by Sekiguchi and Ohta (1977) with the modified cam clay type yield surface, is used in the analysis to improve the prediction accuracy of the deformation of soft clays.

  18. Combined Simulation and Experimental Study of Large Deformation of Red Blood Cells in Microfluidic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, David J.; Pivkin, Igor; Wong, Sophie Y.; Chiam, Keng-Hwee; Dao, Ming; Karniadakis, George Em; Suresh, Subra

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the biophysical characteristics of healthy human red blood cells (RBCs) traversing microfluidic channels with cross-sectional areas as small as 2.7 × 3 μm. We combine single RBC optical tweezers and flow experiments with corresponding simulations based on dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), and upon validation of the DPD model, predictive simulations and companion experiments are performed in order to quantify cell deformation and pressure–velocity relationships for different channel sizes and physiologically relevant temperatures. We discuss conditions associated with the shape transitions of RBCs along with the relative effects of membrane and cytosol viscosity, plasma environments, and geometry on flow through microfluidic systems at physiological temperatures. In particular, we identify a cross-sectional area threshold below which the RBC membrane properties begin to dominate its flow behavior at room temperature; at physiological temperatures this effect is less profound. PMID:21240637

  19. A multiscale overlapped coupling formulation for large-deformation strain localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, WaiChing; Mota, Alejandro

    2014-09-01

    We generalize the multiscale overlapped domain framework to couple multiple rate-independent standard dissipative material models in the finite deformation regime across different length scales. We show that a fully coupled multiscale incremental boundary-value problem can be recast as the stationary point that optimizes the partitioned incremental work of a three-field energy functional. We also establish inf-sup tests to examine the numerical stability issues that arise from enforcing weak compatibility in the three-field formulation. We also devise a new block solver for the domain coupling problem and demonstrate the performance of the formulation with one-dimensional numerical examples. These simulations indicate that it is sufficient to introduce a localization limiter in a confined region of interest to regularize the partial differential equation if loss of ellipticity occurs.

  20. Large-scale deformation related to the collision of the Aleutian Arc with Kamchatka

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gesit, Eric L.; Scholl, David W.

    1994-01-01

    The far western Aleutian Island Arc is actively colliding with Kamchatka. Westward motion of the Aleutian Arc is brought about by the tangential relative motion of the Pacific plate transferred to major, right-lateral shear zones north and south of the arc. Early geologic mapping of Cape Kamchatka (a promontory of Kamchatka along strike with the Aleutian Arc) revealed many similarities to the geology of the Aleutian Islands. Later studies support the notion that Cape Kamchatka is the farthest west Aleutian “island” and that it has been accreted to Kamchatka by the process of arc-continent collision. Deformation associated with the collision onshore Kamchatka includes gravimetrically determined crustal thickening and formation of a narrow thrust belt of intensely deformed rocks directly west of Cape Kamchatka. The trend of the thrust faults is concave toward the collision zone, indicating a radial distribution of maximum horizontal compressive stress. Offshore, major crustal faults trend either oblique to the Kamchatka margin or parallel to major Aleutian shear zones. These offshore faults are complex, accommodating both strike-slip and thrust displacements as documented by focal mechanisms and seismic reflection data. Earthquake activity is much higher in the offshore region within a zone bounded to the north by the northernmost Aleutian shear zone and to the west by an apparent aseismic front. Analysis of focal mechanisms in the region indicate that the present-day arc-continent “contact zone” is located directly east of Cape Kamchatka. In modeling the dynamics of the collision zone using thin viscous sheet theory, the rheological parameters are only partially constrained to values of n (the effective power law exponent) ≥ 3 and Ar(the Argand number) ≤ 30. These values are consistent with a forearc thermal profile of Kamchatka, previously determined from heat flow modeling. The thin viscous sheet modeling also indicates that onshore thrust faulting

  1. Long-term simulation of large deformation, mechano-chemical fluid-structure interactions in ALE and fully Eulerian coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frei, S.; Richter, T.; Wick, T.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we develop numerical schemes for mechano-chemical fluid-structure interactions with long-term effects. We investigate a model of a growing solid interacting with an incompressible fluid. A typical example for such a situation is the formation and growth of plaque in blood vessels. This application includes two particular difficulties: First, growth may lead to very large deformations, up to full clogging of the fluid domain. We derive a simplified set of equations including a fluid-structure interaction system coupled to an ODE model for plaque growth in Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) coordinates and in Eulerian coordinates. The latter novel technique is capable of handling very large deformations up to contact. The second difficulty stems from the different time scales: while the dynamics of the fluid demand to resolve a scale of seconds, growth typically takes place in a range of months. We propose a temporal two-scale approach using local small-scale problems to compute an effective wall stress that will enter a long-scale problem. Our proposed techniques are substantiated with several numerical tests that include comparisons of the Eulerian and ALE approaches as well as convergence studies.

  2. Mechanical characterization of the P56 mouse brain under large-deformation dynamic indentation

    PubMed Central

    MacManus, David B.; Pierrat, Baptiste; Murphy, Jeremiah G.; Gilchrist, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    The brain is a complex organ made up of many different functional and structural regions consisting of different types of cells such as neurons and glia, as well as complex anatomical geometries. It is hypothesized that the different regions of the brain exhibit significantly different mechanical properties, which may be attributed to the diversity of cells and anisotropy of neuronal fibers within individual brain regions. The regional dynamic mechanical properties of P56 mouse brain tissue in vitro and in situ at velocities of 0.71–4.28 mm/s, up to a deformation of 70 μm are presented and discussed in the context of traumatic brain injury. The experimental data obtained from micro-indentation measurements were fit to three hyperelastic material models using the inverse Finite Element method. The cerebral cortex elicited a stiffer response than the cerebellum, thalamus, and medulla oblongata regions for all velocities. The thalamus was found to be the least sensitive to changes in velocity, and the medulla oblongata was most compliant. The results show that different regions of the mouse brain possess significantly different mechanical properties, and a significant difference also exists between the in vitro and in situ brain. PMID:26898475

  3. Mechanical characterization of the P56 mouse brain under large-deformation dynamic indentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacManus, David B.; Pierrat, Baptiste; Murphy, Jeremiah G.; Gilchrist, Michael D.

    2016-02-01

    The brain is a complex organ made up of many different functional and structural regions consisting of different types of cells such as neurons and glia, as well as complex anatomical geometries. It is hypothesized that the different regions of the brain exhibit significantly different mechanical properties, which may be attributed to the diversity of cells and anisotropy of neuronal fibers within individual brain regions. The regional dynamic mechanical properties of P56 mouse brain tissue in vitro and in situ at velocities of 0.71–4.28 mm/s, up to a deformation of 70 μm are presented and discussed in the context of traumatic brain injury. The experimental data obtained from micro-indentation measurements were fit to three hyperelastic material models using the inverse Finite Element method. The cerebral cortex elicited a stiffer response than the cerebellum, thalamus, and medulla oblongata regions for all velocities. The thalamus was found to be the least sensitive to changes in velocity, and the medulla oblongata was most compliant. The results show that different regions of the mouse brain possess significantly different mechanical properties, and a significant difference also exists between the in vitro and in situ brain.

  4. Mechanical characterization of the P56 mouse brain under large-deformation dynamic indentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacManus, David B.; Pierrat, Baptiste; Murphy, Jeremiah G.; Gilchrist, Michael D.

    2016-02-01

    The brain is a complex organ made up of many different functional and structural regions consisting of different types of cells such as neurons and glia, as well as complex anatomical geometries. It is hypothesized that the different regions of the brain exhibit significantly different mechanical properties, which may be attributed to the diversity of cells and anisotropy of neuronal fibers within individual brain regions. The regional dynamic mechanical properties of P56 mouse brain tissue in vitro and in situ at velocities of 0.71-4.28 mm/s, up to a deformation of 70 μm are presented and discussed in the context of traumatic brain injury. The experimental data obtained from micro-indentation measurements were fit to three hyperelastic material models using the inverse Finite Element method. The cerebral cortex elicited a stiffer response than the cerebellum, thalamus, and medulla oblongata regions for all velocities. The thalamus was found to be the least sensitive to changes in velocity, and the medulla oblongata was most compliant. The results show that different regions of the mouse brain possess significantly different mechanical properties, and a significant difference also exists between the in vitro and in situ brain.

  5. Second-order estimates for the large-deformation response of particle-reinforced rubbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Pamies, Oscar; Ponte Castañeda, Pedro

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the application of a recently proposed 'second-order' homogenization method (J. Mech. Phys. Solids 50 (2002) 737-757) to the estimation of the effective behavior of hyperelastic composites subjected to finite deformations. The main feature of the method is the use of 'generalized' secant moduli that depend not only on the phases averages of the fields, but also on the phase covariance tensors. The use of the method is illustrated in the context of particle-, or fiber-reinforced elastomers and estimates analogous to the well-known Hashin-Shtrikman estimates for linear-elastic composites are generated. The new estimates improve on earlier estimates (J. Mech. Phys. Solids 48 (2000) 1389-1411) neglecting the use of fluctuations. In particular, the new estimates, unlike the earlier ones, are capable of recovering the exact incompressibility constraint when the matrix is also taken to be incompressible. To cite this article: O. Lopez-Pamies, P. Ponte Castañeda, C. R. Mecanique 331 (2003).

  6. Optic-electronic system for measuring the three-dimensional angular deformation of pipe sections at large constructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konyakhin, Igor; Hoang, Van Phong; Artemenko, Yury; Li, Renpu; Smekhov, Andrey

    2015-05-01

    The improved autocollimation system for measuring three-dimension angular deformations of pipe sections at large constructions as support tube of radio telescope mirror is analyzed. New type of the reflector for autocollimators is researched. The reflector is the trihedral mirror composition of three reflecting sides. It advantage is the measurement pitch, yaw and torsion as three angular rotation of controlled object. The second advantage of reflector is the measurements on the large work distances. Causes are the small value of the conversion coefficient and two orthogonal reference axes of trihedral reflector. The technical characteristics of the experimental setups of new reflector are presented. The features of trihedral reflector as the reflectors for optic-electronic autocollimators are discussed.

  7. Finite element analysis of large transient elastic-plastic deformations of simple structures, with application to the engine rotor fragment containment/deflection problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, R. W.; Witmer, E. A.

    1972-01-01

    Assumed-displacement versions of the finite-element method are developed to predict large-deformation elastic-plastic transient deformations of structures. Both the conventional and a new improved finite-element variational formulation are derived. These formulations are then developed in detail for straight-beam and curved-beam elements undergoing (1) Bernoulli-Euler-Kirchhoff or (2) Timoshenko deformation behavior, in one plane. For each of these categories, several types of assumed-displacement finite elements are developed, and transient response predictions are compared with available exact solutions for small-deflection, linear-elastic transient responses. The present finite-element predictions for large-deflection elastic-plastic transient responses are evaluated via several beam and ring examples for which experimental measurements of transient strains and large transient deformations and independent finite-difference predictions are available.

  8. Seismic observations of large-scale deformation at the bottom of fast-moving plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debayle, E.; Ricard, Y. R.

    2012-12-01

    We investigate the global SV-wave azimuthal anisotropy from a new dataset of around 375 000 fundamental and higher mode Rayleigh waveforms. Our azimuthal anisotropy model improves upon DKP2005 seismic model (Debayle et al., Nature 2005) through a larger dataset (expanded by a factor 3.8) and a new approach which allows us to better extract fundamental and higher mode information. Our results confirm that in average, azimuthal anisotropy is significant only in the uppermost 200-250 km of the upper mantle and weak below. A clear root square of age dependence of anisotropy is observed beneath oceanic plates. The anisotropy projected in the direction of plate motion is more or less proportional to the plate velocity. Plate-scale present-day deformation is remarkably well recorded beneath the fastest moving plates (Indo-Australian, Coco, Nazca, Philippine Sea and Pacific plates). Under these plates, the amplitude of anisotropy does not change much with the distance to the ridge, indicating that the lattice preferred orientation rotates and saturates quickly. Beneath slower plates, plate-motion parallel anisotropy is observed only locally, which suggests, not surprisingly that the convection flow is only partly controlled by the surface motion. Within the lithosphere itself, the anisotropy is weak and likely frozen in; rather aligned with the plate velocity at its age of formation which is recorded by the local age gradient, than with the present-day motion. Although for young ages, the difference between the velocity recorded by the isochrons and the present-day velocity is small, for ages larger than 80 ~myrs the anisotropy rotates with depth from the fossil direction in the lithosphere to the present-day direction in the asthenosphere. Under fast continents (mostly Australia and India), the present day velocity orients the anisotropy around 150-200 km depth.

  9. Locality and rapidity of the ultra-large elastic deformation of Nb nanowires in a NiTi phase-transforming matrix

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shan; Cui, Lishan; Hao, Shijie; Jiang, Daqiang; Liu, Yinong; Liu, Zhenyang; Mao, Shengcheng; Han, Xiaodong; Ren, Yang

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the elastic deformation behaviour of Nb nanowires embedded in a NiTi matrix. The Nb nanowires exhibited an ultra-large elastic deformation, which is found to be dictated by the martensitic transformation of the NiTi matrix, thus exhibiting unique characteristics of locality and rapidity. These are in clear contrast to our conventional observation of elastic deformations of crystalline solids, which is a homogeneous lattice distortion with a strain rate controlled by the applied strain. The Nb nanowires are also found to exhibit elastic-plastic deformation accompanying the martensitic transformation of the NiTi matrix in the case when the transformation strain of the matrix over-matches the elastic strain limit of the nanowires, or exhibit only elastic deformation in the case of under-matching. Such insight provides an important opportunity for elastic strain engineering and composite design. PMID:25341619

  10. Locality and rapidity of the ultra-large elastic deformation of Nb nanowires in a NiTi phase-transforming matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shan; Cui, Lishan; Hao, Shijie; Jiang, Daqiang; Liu, Yinong; Liu, Zhenyang; Mao, Shengcheng; Han, Xiaodong; Ren, Yang

    2014-10-24

    This study investigated the elastic deformation behaviour of Nb nanowires embedded in a NiTi matrix. The Nb nanowires exhibited an ultra-large elastic deformation, which is found to be dictated by the martensitic transformation of the NiTi matrix, thus exhibiting unique characteristics of locality and rapidity. These are in clear contrast to our conventional observation of elastic deformations of crystalline solids, which is a homogeneous lattice distortion with a strain rate controlled by the applied strain. The Nb nanowires are also found to exhibit elastic-plastic deformation accompanying the martensitic transformation of the NiTi matrix in the case when the transformation strain of the matrix over-matches the elastic strain limit of the nanowires, or exhibit only elastic deformation in the case of under-matching. Such insight provides an important opportunity for elastic strain engineering and composite design.

  11. Locality and rapidity of the ultra-large elastic deformation of Nb nanowires in a NiTi phase-transforming matrix

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Shan; Cui, Lishan; Hao, Shijie; Jiang, Daqiang; Liu, Yinong; Liu, Zhenyang; Mao, Shengcheng; Han, Xiaodong; Ren, Yang

    2014-10-24

    This study investigated the elastic deformation behaviour of Nb nanowires embedded in a NiTi matrix. The Nb nanowires exhibited an ultra-large elastic deformation, which is found to be dictated by the martensitic transformation of the NiTi matrix, thus exhibiting unique characteristics of locality and rapidity. These are in clear contrast to our conventional observation of elastic deformations of crystalline solids, which is a homogeneous lattice distortion with a strain rate controlled by the applied strain. The Nb nanowires are also found to exhibit elastic-plastic deformation accompanying the martensitic transformation of the NiTi matrix in the case when the transformation strainmore » of the matrix over-matches the elastic strain limit of the nanowires, or exhibit only elastic deformation in the case of under-matching. Such insight provides an important opportunity for elastic strain engineering and composite design.« less

  12. Numerical simulation and experimental validation of the large deformation bending and folding behavior of magneto-active elastomer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, Robert; Roche, Juan; Lofland, Samuel E.; vonLockette, Paris R.

    2014-09-01

    This work seeks to provide a framework for the numerical simulation of magneto-active elastomer (MAE) composite structures for use in origami engineering applications. The emerging field of origami engineering employs folding techniques, an array of crease patterns traditionally on a single flat sheet of paper, to produce structures and devices that perform useful engineering operations. Effective means of numerical simulation offer an efficient way to optimize the crease patterns while coupling to the performance and behavior of the active material. The MAE materials used herein are comprised of nominally 30% v/v, 325 mesh barium hexafarrite particles embedded in Dow HS II silicone elastomer compound. These particulate composites are cured in a magnetic field to produce magneto-elastic solids with anisotropic magnetization, e.g. they have a preferred magnetic axis parallel to the curing axis. The deformed shape and/or blocked force characteristics of these MAEs are examined in three geometries: a monolithic cantilever as well as two- and four-segment composite accordion structures. In the accordion structures, patches of MAE material are bonded to a Gelest OE41 unfilled silicone elastomer substrate. Two methods of simulation, one using the Maxwell stress tensor applied as a traction boundary condition and another employing a minimum energy kinematic (MEK) model, are investigated. Both methods capture actuation due to magnetic torque mechanisms that dominate MAE behavior. Comparison with experimental data show good agreement with only a single adjustable parameter, either an effective constant magnetization of the MAE material in the finite element models (at small and moderate deformations) or an effective modulus in the minimum energy model. The four-segment finite element model was prone to numerical locking at large deformation. The effective magnetization and modulus values required are a fraction of the actual experimentally measured values which suggests a

  13. A multi-resolution strategy for a multi-objective deformable image registration framework that accommodates large anatomical differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alderliesten, Tanja; Bosman, Peter A. N.; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Bel, Arjan

    2014-03-01

    Currently, two major challenges dominate the field of deformable image registration. The first challenge is related to the tuning of the developed methods to specific problems (i.e. how to best combine different objectives such as similarity measure and transformation effort). This is one of the reasons why, despite significant progress, clinical implementation of such techniques has proven to be difficult. The second challenge is to account for large anatomical differences (e.g. large deformations, (dis)appearing structures) that occurred between image acquisitions. In this paper, we study a framework based on multi-objective optimization to improve registration robustness and to simplify tuning for specific applications. Within this framework we specifically consider the use of an advanced model-based evolutionary algorithm for optimization and a dual-dynamic transformation model (i.e. two "non-fixed" grids: one for the source- and one for the target image) to accommodate for large anatomical differences. The framework computes and presents multiple outcomes that represent efficient trade-offs between the different objectives (a so-called Pareto front). In image processing it is common practice, for reasons of robustness and accuracy, to use a multi-resolution strategy. This is, however, only well-established for single-objective registration methods. Here we describe how such a strategy can be realized for our multi-objective approach and compare its results with a single-resolution strategy. For this study we selected the case of prone-supine breast MRI registration. Results show that the well-known advantages of a multi-resolution strategy are successfully transferred to our multi-objective approach, resulting in superior (i.e. Pareto-dominating) outcomes.

  14. Seismic observations of large-scale deformation at the bottom of fast-moving plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debayle, Eric; Ricard, Yanick

    2013-08-01

    We present a new tomographic model of azimuthal anisotropy in the upper mantle, DR2012, and discuss in details the geodynamical causes of this anisotropy. Our model improves upon DKP2005 seismic model (Debayle et al., 2005) through a larger dataset (expanded by a factor ˜3.7) and a new approach which allows us to better extract fundamental and higher-mode information. Our results confirm that on average, azimuthal anisotropy is only significant in the uppermost 200-250 km of the upper mantle where it decreases regularly with depth. We do not see a significant difference in the amplitude of anisotropy beneath fast oceanic plates, slow oceanic plates or continents. The anisotropy projected onto the direction of present plate motion shows a very specific relation with the plate velocity; it peaks in the asthenosphere around 150 km depth, it is very weak for plate velocities smaller than 3 cm yr, increases significantly between 3 and 5 cm yr, and saturates for plate velocities larger than 5 cm yr. Plate-scale present-day deformation is remarkably well and uniformly recorded beneath the fastest-moving plates (India, Coco, Nazca, Australia, Philippine Sea and Pacific plates). Beneath slower plates, plate-motion parallel anisotropy is only observed locally, which suggests that the mantle flow below these plates is not controlled by the lithospheric motion (a minimum plate velocity of around 4 cm yr is necessary for a plate to organize the flow in its underlying asthenosphere). The correlation of oceanic anisotropy with the actual plate motion in the shallow lithosphere is very weak. A better correlation is obtained with the fossil accretion velocity recorded by the gradient of local seafloor age. The transition between frozen-in and active anisotropy occurs across the typical √{age} isotherm that defines the bottom of the thermal lithosphere around 1100 °C. Under fast continents (mostly under Australia and India), the present-day velocity orients also the anisotropy

  15. Seismic observations of large-scale deformation at the bottom of fast-moving plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debayle, Eric; Ricard, Yanick

    2014-05-01

    We present a new tomographic model of azimuthal anisotropy in the upper mantle and discuss in details the geodynamical causes of this anisotropy. Our model improves upon DKP2005 seismic model (Debayle et al., 2005) through a larger dataset (expanded by a factor ~ 4) and a new approach which allows us to better extract fundamental and higher mode information. Our results confirm that on average, azimuthal anisotropy is only significant in the uppermost 200-250 km of the upper mantle where it decreases regularly with depth. We do not see a significant difference in the amplitude of anisotropy beneath fast oceanic plates, slow oceanic plates or continents. The anisotropy projected onto the direction of present plate motion shows a very specific relation with the plate velocity; it peaks in the asthenosphere around 150 km depth, it is very weak for plate velocities smaller than 3 cm yr-1, increases significantly between 3 and 5 cm yr-1, and saturates for plate velocities larger than 5 cm yr-1. Plate-scale present-day deformation is remarkably well and uniformly recorded beneath the fastest moving plates (India, Coco, Nazca, Australia, Philippine Sea and Pacific plates). Beneath slower plates, plate-motion parallel anisotropy is only observed locally, which suggests that the mantle flow below these plates is not controlled by the lithospheric motion (a minimum plate velocity of around 4 cm yr-1 is necessary for a plate to organize the flow in its underlying asthenosphere). The correlation of oceanic anisotropy with the actual plate motion in the shallow lithosphere is very weak. A better correlation is obtained with the fossil accretion velocity recorded by the gradient of local seafloor age. The transition between frozen-in and active anisotropy occurs across the typical age- isotherm that defines the bottom of the thermal lithosphere around 1100 °C. Under fast continents (mostly under Australia and India), the present day velocity orients also the anisotropy in a

  16. Rare, large earthquakes at the laramide deformation front - Colorado (1882) and Wyoming (1984)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spence, W.; Langer, C.J.; Choy, G.L.

    1996-01-01

    The largest historical earthquake known in Colorado occurred on 7 November 1882. Knowledge of its size, location, and specific tectonic environment is important for the design of critical structures in the rapidly growing region of the Southern Rocky Mountains. More than one century later, on 18 October 1984, an mb 5.3 earthquake occurred in the Laramie Mountains, Wyoming. By studying the 1984 earthquake, we are able to provide constraints on the location and size of the 1882 earthquake. Analysis of broadband seismic data shows the 1984 mainshock to have nucleated at a depth of 27.5 ?? 1.0 km and to have ruptured ???2.7 km updip, with a corresponding average displacement of about 48 cm and average stress drop of about 180 bars. This high stress drop may explain why the earthquake was felt over an area about 3.5 times that expected for a shallow earthquake of the same magnitude in this region. A microearthquake survey shows aftershocks to be just above the mainshock's rupture, mostly in a volume measuring 3 to 4 km across. Focal mechanisms for the mainshock and aftershocks have NE-SW-trending T axes, a feature shared by most earthquakes in western Colorado and by the induced Denver earthquakes of 1967. The only data for the 1882 earthquake were intensity reports from a heterogeneously distributed population. Interpretation of these reports also might be affected by ground-motion amplification from fluvial deposits and possible significant focal depth for the mainshock. The primary aftershock of the 1882 earthquake was felt most strongly in the northern Front Range, leading Kirkham and Rogers (1985) to locate the epicenters of the aftershock and mainshock there. The Front Range is a geomorphic extension of the Laramie Mountains. Both features are part of the eastern deformation front of the Laramide orogeny. Based on knowledge of regional tectonics and using intensity maps for the 1984 and the 1967 Denver earthquakes, we reinterpret prior intensity maps for the 1882

  17. The energy release rate of a pressurized crack in soft elastic materials: effects of surface tension and large deformation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tianshu; Long, Rong; Hui, Chung-Yuen

    2014-10-21

    In this paper we present a theoretical study on how surface tension affects fracture of soft solids. In classical fracture theory, the resistance to fracture is partly attributed to the energy required to create new surfaces. Thus, the energy released to the crack tip must overcome the surface energy in order to propagate a crack. In soft materials, however, surface tension can cause significant deformation and can reduce the energy release rate for crack propagation by resisting the stretch of crack surfaces. We quantify this effect by studying the inflation of a penny-shaped crack in an infinite elastic body with applied pressure. To avoid numerical difficulty caused by singular fields near the crack tip, we derived an expression for the energy release rate which depends on the applied pressure, the surface tension, the inflated crack volume and the deformed crack area. This expression is evaluated using a newly developed finite element method with surface tension elements. Our calculation shows that, when the elasto-capillary number ω ≡ σ/Ea is sufficiently large, where σ is the isotropic surface tension, E is the small strain Young's modulus and a is the initial crack radius, both the energy release rate and the crack opening displacement of an incompressible neo-Hookean solid are significantly reduced by surface tension. For a sufficiently high elasto-capillary number, the energy release rate can be negative for applied pressure less than a critical amount, suggesting that surface tension can cause crack healing in soft elastic materials.

  18. Black hole entropy and the Hamiltonian formulation of diffeomorphism invariant theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. David

    1995-12-01

    Path integral methods are used to derive a general expression for the entropy of a black hole in a diffeomorphism invariant theory. The result, which depends on the variational derivative of the Lagrangian with respect to the Riemann tensor, agrees with the result obtained from Noether charge methods by Iyer and Wald. The method used here is based on the direct expression of the density of states as a path integral (the microcanonical functional integral). The analysis makes crucial use of the Hamiltonian form of the action. An algorithm for placing the action of a diffeomorphism invariant theory in Hamiltonian form is presented. Other path integral approaches to the derivation of black hole entropy include the Hilbert action surface term method and the conical deficit angle method. The relationships between these path integral methods are presented.

  19. Stabilization of non-minimum phase switched nonlinear systems with the concept of multi-diffeomorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouili, Khalil; Benhadj Braiek, Naceur

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we propose a control approach for the stabilization of a class of switched nonlinear systems where each mode may be non-minimum phase. The proposed approach is based on the exact input-output linearization and the Lyapunov stability theory. The main contribution in this work is to elaborate a strategy of switching that recourse to the concept of multi-diffeomorphism makes it possible to guarantee an improvement of the transient state compared to a feedback linearization based on one diffeomorphism. Specifically, we show the sufficient condition for the exponential stability and the exponential upper bound of the trajectory of the switched system. The theoretical results are applied to a non-minimum phase inverted cart-pendulum in order to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  20. Simultaneous Inverse Analysis Method of Fault Slip and Asthenosphere Viscosity Using Large Scale Finite Element Simulation of Postseismic Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agata, R.; Ichimura, T.; Hori, T.; Hirahara, K.; Hashimoto, C.; Hori, M.

    2015-12-01

    Inverse analysis of the coseismic/postseismic slip using postseismic deformation observation data is an important topic in geodetic inversion. Inverse analysis method may be improved by using numerical simulation (e.g. finite element (FE) method) of viscoelastic deformation, the model of which is of high-fidelity to the available high-resolution crustal data. The authors had been developing a large-scale simulation method using such FE high-fidelity models (HFM), assuming use of K computer, the current fastest supercomputer in Japan. In this study, we developed an inverse analysis method incorporating HFM, in which the asthenosphere viscosity and fault slip are estimated simultaneously, since the value of viscosity in the simulation is not trivial. We carried out numerical experiments using synthetic crustal deformation data. Based on Ichimura et al. (2013), we constructed an HFM in the domain of 2048x1536x850 km, which includes the Tohoku region in northeast Japan. We used the data set of JTOPO30 (2003), Koketsu et al. (2008) and CAMP standard model (Hashimoto et al. 2004) for the model geometry. The HFM is currently in 2km resolution, resulting in 0.5 billion degrees-of-freedom. The figure shows the overview of HFM. Synthetic crustal deformation data of three years after an earthquake in the location of GEONET, GPS/A observation points, and S-net were used. Inverse analysis was formulated as minimization of L2 norm of the difference between the FE simulation results and the observation data with respect to viscosity and fault slip, combining quasi-Newton algorithm with adjoint method. Coseismic slip was expressed by superposition of 53 subfaults, with four viscoelastic layers. We carried out 90 forward simulations, and the 57 parameters converged to the true values. Due to the fast computation method, it took only five hours using 2048 nodes (1/40 of entire resource) of K computer. In the future, we would like to also consider estimation of after slip and apply

  1. New phases of D ge 2 current and diffeomorphism algebras in particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Tze, Chia-Hsiung.

    1990-09-01

    We survey some global results and open issues of current algebras and their canonical field theoretical realization in D {ge} 2 dimensional spacetime. We assess the status of the representation theory of their generalized Kac-Moody and diffeomorphism algebras. Particular emphasis is put on higher dimensional analogs of fermi-bose correspondence, complex analyticity and the phase entanglements of anyonic solitons with exotic spin and statistics. 101 refs.

  2. Influence of large-strain deformation on the microstructure, texture, and mechanical response of tantalum bar

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, G.T. III; Bingert, S.R.; Chen, S.R.; Bingert, J.F.; Wright, S.I.

    1996-03-01

    Numerous studies have established the influence of impurities, crystallographic texture, temperature, and strain rate separately or collectively on the constitutive response of annealed tantalum, in particular plate Ta-stock. However, fewer detailed studies have examined the evolution of crystallographic texture and the mechanical response of tantalum bar or rod material following prestraining to large strains {epsilon} > I. In this paper the influence of large plastic prestraining on the microstructure evolution, texture evolution, and mechanical response of high-purity tantalum bar material is presented. Tantalum cylinders annealed at 1200 {degrees}C were quasi-statically upset forged, with intermediate lubrication, to true strains of 0.4, 0.95, and 1.85. Microstructural and textural banding within the starting Ta-bar was characterized in detail. It was found that different oriented bands evolved differently during large-strain forging leading to significant scatter in the mechanical response. Aspects of defect storage, work-hardening response, and texture evolution in Ta-bar as a function of forging strain are discussed.

  3. Large-strain, rigid-to-rigid deformation of bistable electroactive polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhibin; Yuan, Wei; Brochu, Paul; Chen, Bin; Liu, Zhitian; Pei, Qibing

    2009-11-01

    Thermoplastic poly(tert-butyl acrylate) (PTBA) is reported as an electroactive polymer that is rigid at ambient conditions and turns into a dielectric elastomer above a transition temperature. In the rubbery state, a PTBA thin film can be electrically actuated to strains up to 335% in area expansion. The calculated actuation pressure is 3.2 MPa. The actuation is made bistable by cooling to below glass transition temperature. The PTBA represents the bistable electroactive polymer (BSEP) that can be actuated to various largely strained, rigid shapes. The application of the BSEP for refreshable Braille display, an active tactile display, is also demonstrated.

  4. Multiscale Characterization of bcc Crystals Deformed to Large Extents of Strain

    SciTech Connect

    Florando, J; LeBlanc, M; Lassila, D; Bulatov, V; Rhee, M; Arsenlis, A; Becker, R; Jr., J M; Magid, K

    2007-02-20

    In an effort to help advance the predictive capability of LLNL's multiscale modeling program a new experimental technique has been developed to provide high fidelity data on metallic single crystals out to relatively large extents of strain. The technique uses a '6 Degrees of Freedom' testing apparatus in conjunction with a 3-D image correlation system. Utilizing this technique, a series of experiments have been performed that reveal unexpected behavior which cannot be explained using traditional crystal plasticity theory. In addition, analysis and characterization techniques have also been developed to help quantify the unexpected behavior. Interactions with multiscale modelers include the development of a possible mechanism that might explain the anomalous behavior, as well as the discovery of a new 4-node dislocation junction.

  5. Large deformation contact mechanics of a pressurized long rectangular membrane. II. Adhesive contact

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Abhishek; Hui, Chung-Yuen

    2013-01-01

    In part I of this work, we presented a theory for adhesionless contact of a pressurized neo-Hookean plane-strain membrane to a rigid substrate. Here, we extend our theory to include adhesion using a fracture mechanics approach. This theory is used to study contact hysteresis commonly observed in experiments. Detailed analysis is carried out to highlight the differences between frictionless and no-slip contact. Membrane detachment is found to be strongly dependent on adhesion: for low adhesion, the membrane ‘pinches-off’, whereas for large adhesions, it detaches unstably at finite contact (‘pull-off’). Expressions are derived for the critical adhesion needed for pinch-off to pull-off transition. Above a threshold adhesion, the membrane exhibits bistability, two stable states at zero applied pressure. The condition for bistability for both frictionless and no-slip boundary conditions is obtained explicitly. PMID:24353472

  6. Large deformation analysis of axisymmetric inhomogeneities including coupled elastic and plastic anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Brannon, R.M.

    1996-12-31

    A mathematical framework is developed for the study of materials containing axisymmetric inclusions or flaws such as ellipsoidal voids, penny-shaped cracks, or fibers of circular cross-section. The general case of nonuniform statistical distributions of such heterogeneities is attacked by first considering a spatially uniform distribution of flaws that are all oriented in the same direction. Assuming an isotropic substrate, the macroscopic material properties of this simpler microstructure naturally should be transversely isotropic. An orthogonal basis for the linear subspace consisting of all double-symmetric transversely-isotropic fourth-order tensors associated with a given material vector is applied to deduce the explicit functional dependence of the material properties of these aligned materials on the shared symmetry axis. The aligned and uniform microstructure seems geometrically simple enough that the macroscopic transversely isotropic properties could be derived in closed form. Since the resulting properties are transversely isotropic, the analyst must therefore be able to identify the appropriate coefficients of the transverse basis. Once these functions are identified, a principle of superposition of strain rates ay be applied to define an expectation integral for the composite properties of a material containing arbitrary anisotropic distributions of axisymmetric inhomogeneities. A proposal for coupling plastic anisotropy to the elastic anisotropy is presented in which the composite yield surface is interpreted as a distortion of the isotropic substrate yield surface; the distortion directions are coupled to the elastic anisotropy directions. Finally, some commonly assumed properties (such as major symmetry) of the Cauchy tangent stiffness tensor are shown to be inappropriate for large distortions of anisotropic materials.

  7. Topological strings and large N phase transitions I: Nonchiral expansion of q-deformed Yang-Mills theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caporaso, Nicola; Cirafici, Michele; Griguolo, Luca; Pasquetti, Sara; Seminara, Domenico; Szabo, Richard J.

    2006-01-01

    We examine the problem of counting bound states of BPS black holes on local Calabi-Yau threefolds which are fibrations over a Riemann surface by computing the partition function of q-deformed Yang-Mills theory on the Riemann surface. We study in detail the genus zero case and obtain, at finite N, the instanton expansion of the gauge theory. It can be written exactly as the partition function for U(N) Chern-Simons gauge theory on a Lens space, summed over all non-trivial vacua, plus a tower of non-perturbative instanton contributions. The correspondence between two and three dimensional gauge theories is elucidated by an explicit mapping between two-dimensional Yang-Mills instantons and flat connections on the Lens space. In the large N limit we find a peculiar phase structure in the model. At weak string coupling the theory reduces exactly to the trivial flat connection sector with instanton contributions exponentially suppressed, and the topological string partition function on the resolved conifold is reproduced in this regime. At a certain critical point all non-trivial vacua contribute, instantons are enhanced and the theory appears to undergo a phase transition into a strong coupling regime. We rederive these results by performing a saddle-point approximation to the exact partition function. We obtain a q-deformed version of the Douglas-Kazakov equation for two-dimensional Yang-Mills theory on the sphere, whose one-cut solution below the transition point reproduces the resolved conifold geometry. Above the critical point we propose a two-cut solution that should reproduce the chiral-antichiral dynamics found for black holes on the Calabi-Yau threefold and the Gross-Taylor string in the undeformed limit. The transition from the strong coupling phase to the weak coupling phase appears to be of third order.

  8. The energy release rate of a pressurized crack in soft elastic materials: effects of surface tension and large deformation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tianshu; Long, Rong; Hui, Chung-Yuen

    2014-10-21

    In this paper we present a theoretical study on how surface tension affects fracture of soft solids. In classical fracture theory, the resistance to fracture is partly attributed to the energy required to create new surfaces. Thus, the energy released to the crack tip must overcome the surface energy in order to propagate a crack. In soft materials, however, surface tension can cause significant deformation and can reduce the energy release rate for crack propagation by resisting the stretch of crack surfaces. We quantify this effect by studying the inflation of a penny-shaped crack in an infinite elastic body with applied pressure. To avoid numerical difficulty caused by singular fields near the crack tip, we derived an expression for the energy release rate which depends on the applied pressure, the surface tension, the inflated crack volume and the deformed crack area. This expression is evaluated using a newly developed finite element method with surface tension elements. Our calculation shows that, when the elasto-capillary number ω ≡ σ/Ea is sufficiently large, where σ is the isotropic surface tension, E is the small strain Young's modulus and a is the initial crack radius, both the energy release rate and the crack opening displacement of an incompressible neo-Hookean solid are significantly reduced by surface tension. For a sufficiently high elasto-capillary number, the energy release rate can be negative for applied pressure less than a critical amount, suggesting that surface tension can cause crack healing in soft elastic materials. PMID:25140489

  9. Topological strings and large N phase transitions II: chiral expansion of q-deformed Yang-Mills theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caporaso, Nicola; Cirafici, Michele; Griguolo, Luca; Pasquetti, Sara; Seminara, Domenico; Szabo, Richard J.

    2006-01-01

    We continue our study of the large N phase transition in q-deformed Yang-Mills theory on the sphere and its role in connecting topological strings to black hole entropy. We study in detail the chiral theory defined in terms of uncoupled single U(N) representations at large N and write down the resulting partition function by means of the topological vertex. The emergent toric geometry has three Kähler parameters, one of which corresponds to the expected fibration over Bbb P1. By taking a suitable double-scaling limit we recover the chiral Gross-Taylor string expansion. To analyse the phase transition we construct a matrix model which describes the chiral gauge theory. It has three distinct phases, one of which should be described by the closed topological string expansion. We verify this expectation by explicit comparison between the matrix model and the chiral topological string free energies. We also show that the critical point in the pertinent phase of the matrix model corresponds to a divergence of the topological string perturbation series.

  10. Robust Automated Amygdala Segmentation via Multi-Atlas Diffeomorphic Registration

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Jamie L.; Suh, Jung W.; Nacewicz, Brendon M.; Sutterer, Matthew J.; Cayo, Amelia A.; Stodola, Diane E.; Burghy, Cory A.; Wang, Hongzhi; Avants, Brian B.; Yushkevich, Paul A.; Essex, Marilyn J.; Pollak, Seth D.; Davidson, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    Here, we describe a novel method for volumetric segmentation of the amygdala from MRI images collected from 35 human subjects. This approach is adapted from open-source techniques employed previously with the hippocampus (Suh et al., 2011; Wang et al., 2011a,b). Using multi-atlas segmentation and machine learning-based correction, we were able to produce automated amygdala segments with high Dice (Mean = 0.918 for the left amygdala; 0.916 for the right amygdala) and Jaccard coefficients (Mean = 0.850 for the left; 0.846 for the right) compared to rigorously hand-traced volumes. This automated routine also produced amygdala segments with high intra-class correlations (consistency = 0.830, absolute agreement = 0.819 for the left; consistency = 0.786, absolute agreement = 0.783 for the right) and bivariate (r = 0.831 for the left; r = 0.797 for the right) compared to hand-drawn amygdala. Our results are discussed in relation to other cutting-edge segmentation techniques, as well as commonly available approaches to amygdala segmentation (e.g., Freesurfer). We believe this new technique has broad application to research with large sample sizes for which amygdala quantification might be needed. PMID:23226114

  11. Large Deformation Dynamic Response

    SciTech Connect

    Key, Samuel w.; Beisinger, Zelma E.; Krieg, Raymond D.

    1993-08-23

    HONDO2-SLA is used to compute the time-dependent displacements, velocities, accelerations, and stresses within elastic or inelastic, two-dimensional or axisymmetric or planar bodies of arbitrary shape and materials.

  12. MIND Demons for MR-to-CT Deformable Image Registration In Image-Guided Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Reaungamornrat, S.; De Silva, T.; Uneri, A.; Wolinsky, J.-P.; Khanna, A. J.; Kleinszig, G.; Vogt, S.; Prince, J. L.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Localization of target anatomy and critical structures defined in preoperative MR images can be achieved by means of multi-modality deformable registration to intraoperative CT. We propose a symmetric diffeomorphic deformable registration algorithm incorporating a modality independent neighborhood descriptor (MIND) and a robust Huber metric for MR-to-CT registration. Method The method, called MIND Demons, solves for the deformation field between two images by optimizing an energy functional that incorporates both the forward and inverse deformations, smoothness on the velocity fields and the diffeomorphisms, a modality-insensitive similarity function suitable to multi-modality images, and constraints on geodesics in Lagrangian coordinates. Direct optimization (without relying on an exponential map of stationary velocity fields used in conventional diffeomorphic Demons) is carried out using a Gauss-Newton method for fast convergence. Registration performance and sensitivity to registration parameters were analyzed in simulation, in phantom experiments, and clinical studies emulating application in image-guided spine surgery, and results were compared to conventional mutual information (MI) free-form deformation (FFD), local MI (LMI) FFD, and normalized MI (NMI) Demons. Result The method yielded sub-voxel invertibility (0.006 mm) and nonsingular spatial Jacobians with capability to preserve local orientation and topology. It demonstrated improved registration accuracy in comparison to the reference methods, with mean target registration error (TRE) of 1.5 mm compared to 10.9, 2.3, and 4.6 mm for MI FFD, LMI FFD, and NMI Demons methods, respectively. Validation in clinical studies demonstrated realistic deformation with sub-voxel TRE in cases of cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine. Conclusions A modality-independent deformable registration method has been developed to estimate a viscoelastic diffeomorphic map between preoperative MR and intraoperative CT. The

  13. MIND Demons for MR-to-CT deformable image registration in image-guided spine surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reaungamornrat, S.; De Silva, T.; Uneri, A.; Wolinsky, J.-P.; Khanna, A. J.; Kleinszig, G.; Vogt, S.; Prince, J. L.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: Localization of target anatomy and critical structures defined in preoperative MR images can be achieved by means of multi-modality deformable registration to intraoperative CT. We propose a symmetric diffeomorphic deformable registration algorithm incorporating a modality independent neighborhood descriptor (MIND) and a robust Huber metric for MR-to-CT registration. Method: The method, called MIND Demons, solves for the deformation field between two images by optimizing an energy functional that incorporates both the forward and inverse deformations, smoothness on the velocity fields and the diffeomorphisms, a modality-insensitive similarity function suitable to multi-modality images, and constraints on geodesics in Lagrangian coordinates. Direct optimization (without relying on an exponential map of stationary velocity fields used in conventional diffeomorphic Demons) is carried out using a Gauss-Newton method for fast convergence. Registration performance and sensitivity to registration parameters were analyzed in simulation, in phantom experiments, and clinical studies emulating application in image-guided spine surgery, and results were compared to conventional mutual information (MI) free-form deformation (FFD), local MI (LMI) FFD, and normalized MI (NMI) Demons. Result: The method yielded sub-voxel invertibility (0.006 mm) and nonsingular spatial Jacobians with capability to preserve local orientation and topology. It demonstrated improved registration accuracy in comparison to the reference methods, with mean target registration error (TRE) of 1.5 mm compared to 10.9, 2.3, and 4.6 mm for MI FFD, LMI FFD, and NMI Demons methods, respectively. Validation in clinical studies demonstrated realistic deformation with sub-voxel TRE in cases of cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine. Conclusions: A modality-independent deformable registration method has been developed to estimate a

  14. Large-Deformation Curling Actuators Based on Carbon Nanotube Composite: Advanced-Structure Design and Biomimetic Application.

    PubMed

    Chen, Luzhuo; Weng, Mingcen; Zhou, Zhiwei; Zhou, Yi; Zhang, Lingling; Li, Jiaxin; Huang, Zhigao; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Changhong; Fan, Shoushan

    2015-12-22

    In recent years, electroactive polymers have been developed as actuator materials. As an important branch of electroactive polymers, electrothermal actuators (ETAs) demonstrate potential applications in the fields of artificial muscles, biomimetic devices, robotics, and so on. Large-shape deformation, low-voltage-driven actuation, and ultrafast fabrication are critical to the development of ETA. However, a simultaneous optimization of all of these advantages has not been realized yet. Practical biomimetic applications are also rare. In this work, we introduce an ultrafast approach to fabricate a curling actuator based on a newly designed carbon nanotube and polymer composite, which completely realizes all of the above required advantages. The actuator shows an ultralarge curling actuation with a curvature greater than 1.0 cm(-1) and bending angle larger than 360°, even curling into a tubular structure. The driving voltage is down to a low voltage of 5 V. The remarkable actuation is attributed not only to the mismatch in the coefficients of thermal expansion but also to the mechanical property changes of materials during temperature change. We also construct an S-shape actuator to show the possibility of building advanced-structure actuators. A weightlifting walking robot is further designed that exhibits a fast-moving motion while lifting a sample heavier than itself, demonstrating promising biomimetic applications.

  15. Large-Deformation Curling Actuators Based on Carbon Nanotube Composite: Advanced-Structure Design and Biomimetic Application.

    PubMed

    Chen, Luzhuo; Weng, Mingcen; Zhou, Zhiwei; Zhou, Yi; Zhang, Lingling; Li, Jiaxin; Huang, Zhigao; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Changhong; Fan, Shoushan

    2015-12-22

    In recent years, electroactive polymers have been developed as actuator materials. As an important branch of electroactive polymers, electrothermal actuators (ETAs) demonstrate potential applications in the fields of artificial muscles, biomimetic devices, robotics, and so on. Large-shape deformation, low-voltage-driven actuation, and ultrafast fabrication are critical to the development of ETA. However, a simultaneous optimization of all of these advantages has not been realized yet. Practical biomimetic applications are also rare. In this work, we introduce an ultrafast approach to fabricate a curling actuator based on a newly designed carbon nanotube and polymer composite, which completely realizes all of the above required advantages. The actuator shows an ultralarge curling actuation with a curvature greater than 1.0 cm(-1) and bending angle larger than 360°, even curling into a tubular structure. The driving voltage is down to a low voltage of 5 V. The remarkable actuation is attributed not only to the mismatch in the coefficients of thermal expansion but also to the mechanical property changes of materials during temperature change. We also construct an S-shape actuator to show the possibility of building advanced-structure actuators. A weightlifting walking robot is further designed that exhibits a fast-moving motion while lifting a sample heavier than itself, demonstrating promising biomimetic applications. PMID:26512734

  16. Invariant conserved currents in gravity theories: Diffeomorphisms and local gauge symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obukhov, Yuri N.; Rubilar, Guillermo F.

    2007-12-01

    Previously, we developed a general method to construct invariant conserved currents and charges in gravitational theories with Lagrangians that are invariant under spacetime diffeomorphisms and local Lorentz transformations. This approach is now generalized to the case when the local Lorentz group is replaced by an arbitrary local gauge group. The particular examples include the Maxwell and Yang-Mills fields coupled to gravity with Abelian and non-Abelian local internal symmetries and the metric-affine gravity in which the local Lorentz spacetime group is extended to the local general linear group.

  17. Evaluation of GMI and PMI diffeomorphic-based demons algorithms for aligning PET and CT Images.

    PubMed

    Yang, Juan; Wang, Hongjun; Zhang, You; Yin, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Fusion of anatomic information in computed tomography (CT) and functional information in 18F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET) is crucial for accurate differentiation of tumor from benign masses, designing radiotherapy treatment plan and staging of cancer. Although current PET and CT images can be acquired from combined 18F-FDG PET/CT scanner, the two acquisitions are scanned separately and take a long time, which may induce potential positional errors in global and local caused by respiratory motion or organ peristalsis. So registration (alignment) of whole-body PET and CT images is a prerequisite for their meaningful fusion. The purpose of this study was to assess the performance of two multimodal registration algorithms for aligning PET and CT images. The proposed gradient of mutual information (GMI)-based demons algorithm, which incorporated the GMI between two images as an external force to facilitate the alignment, was compared with the point-wise mutual information (PMI) diffeomorphic-based demons algorithm whose external force was modified by replacing the image intensity difference in diffeomorphic demons algorithm with the PMI to make it appropriate for multimodal image registration. Eight patients with esophageal cancer(s) were enrolled in this IRB-approved study. Whole-body PET and CT images were acquired from a combined 18F-FDG PET/CT scanner for each patient. The modified Hausdorff distance (d(MH)) was used to evaluate the registration accuracy of the two algorithms. Of all patients, the mean values and standard deviations (SDs) of d(MH) were 6.65 (± 1.90) voxels and 6.01 (± 1.90) after the GMI-based demons and the PMI diffeomorphic-based demons registration algorithms respectively. Preliminary results on oncological patients showed that the respiratory motion and organ peristalsis in PET/CT esophageal images could not be neglected, although a combined 18F-FDG PET/CT scanner was used for image acquisition. The PMI diffeomorphic-based demons

  18. Breaking of spatial diffeomorphism invariance, inflation and the spectrum of cosmological perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Graef, L.L.; Brandenberger, R. E-mail: rhb@physics.mcgill.ca

    2015-10-01

    Standard inflationary models yield a characteristic signature of a primordial power spectrum with a red tensor and scalar tilt. Nevertheless, Cannone et al. [1] recently suggested that, by breaking the assumption of spatial diffeomorphism invariance in the context of the effective field theory of inflation, a blue tensor spectrum can be achieved without violating the Null Energy Condition. In this context, we explore in which cases the inflationary model of [2] can yield a blue tilt of the tensor modes along with a red tilt in the scalar spectrum. Ultimately, we analyze under which conditions the model of [3] can reproduce the specific consistency relation of String Gas Cosmology.

  19. ScanSAR interferometric processing using existing standard InSAR software for measuring large scale land deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Cunren; Zeng, Qiming; Jia, Jianying; Jiao, Jian; Cui, Xi'ai

    2013-02-01

    Scanning synthetic aperture radar (ScanSAR) mode is an efficient way to map large scale geophysical phenomena at low cost. The work presented in this paper is dedicated to ScanSAR interferometric processing and its implementation by making full use of existing standard interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) software. We first discuss the properties of the ScanSAR signal and its phase-preserved focusing using the full aperture algorithm in terms of interferometry. Then a complete interferometric processing flow is proposed. The standard ScanSAR product is decoded subswath by subswath with burst gaps padded with zero-pulses, followed by a Doppler centroid frequency estimation for each subswath and a polynomial fit of all of the subswaths for the whole scene. The burst synchronization of the interferometric pair is then calculated, and only the synchronized pulses are kept for further interferometric processing. After the complex conjugate multiplication of the interferometric pair, the residual non-integer pulse repetition interval (PRI) part between adjacent bursts caused by zero padding is compensated by resampling using a sinc kernel. The subswath interferograms are then mosaicked, in which a method is proposed to remove the subswath discontinuities in the overlap area. Then the following interferometric processing goes back to the traditional stripmap processing flow. A processor written with C and Fortran languages and controlled by Perl scripts is developed to implement these algorithms and processing flow based on the JPL/Caltech Repeat Orbit Interferometry PACkage (ROI_PAC). Finally, we use the processor to process ScanSAR data from the Envisat and ALOS satellites and obtain large scale deformation maps in the radar line-of-sight (LOS) direction.

  20. A numerical approach for simulating fluid structure interaction of flexible thin shells undergoing arbitrarily large deformations in complex domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmanov, Anvar; Le, Trung Bao; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2015-11-01

    We present a new numerical methodology for simulating fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems involving thin flexible bodies in an incompressible fluid. The FSI algorithm uses the Dirichlet-Neumann partitioning technique. The curvilinear immersed boundary method (CURVIB) is coupled with a rotation-free finite element (FE) model for thin shells enabling the efficient simulation of FSI problems with arbitrarily large deformation. Turbulent flow problems are handled using large-eddy simulation with the dynamic Smagorinsky model in conjunction with a wall model to reconstruct boundary conditions near immersed boundaries. The CURVIB and FE solvers are coupled together on the flexible solid-fluid interfaces where the structural nodal positions, displacements, velocities and loads are calculated and exchanged between the two solvers. Loose and strong coupling FSI schemes are employed enhanced by the Aitken acceleration technique to ensure robust coupling and fast convergence especially for low mass ratio problems. The coupled CURVIB-FE-FSI method is validated by applying it to simulate two FSI problems involving thin flexible structures: 1) vortex-induced vibrations of a cantilever mounted in the wake of a square cylinder at different mass ratios and at low Reynolds number; and 2) the more challenging high Reynolds number problem involving the oscillation of an inverted elastic flag. For both cases the computed results are in excellent agreement with previous numerical simulations and/or experiential measurements. Grid convergence tests/studies are carried out for both the cantilever and inverted flag problems, which show that the CURVIB-FE-FSI method provides their convergence. Finally, the capability of the new methodology in simulations of complex cardiovascular flows is demonstrated by applying it to simulate the FSI of a tri-leaflet, prosthetic heart valve in an anatomic aorta and under physiologic pulsatile conditions.

  1. Large-scale deformed quasiparticle random-phase approximation calculations of the γ -ray strength function using the Gogny force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martini, M.; Péru, S.; Hilaire, S.; Goriely, S.; Lechaftois, F.

    2016-07-01

    Valuable theoretical predictions of nuclear dipole excitations in the whole chart are of great interest for different nuclear applications, including in particular nuclear astrophysics. Here we present large-scale calculations of the E 1 γ -ray strength function obtained in the framework of the axially symmetric deformed quasiparticle random-phase approximation based on the finite-range Gogny force. This approach is applied to even-even nuclei, the strength function for odd nuclei being derived by interpolation. The convergence with respect to the adopted number of harmonic oscillator shells and the cutoff energy introduced in the 2-quasiparticle (2 -q p ) excitation space is analyzed. The calculations performed with two different Gogny interactions, namely D1S and D1M, are compared. A systematic energy shift of the E 1 strength is found for D1M relative to D1S, leading to a lower energy centroid and a smaller energy-weighted sum rule for D1M. When comparing with experimental photoabsorption data, the Gogny-QRPA predictions are found to overestimate the giant dipole energy by typically ˜2 MeV. Despite the microscopic nature of our self-consistent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov plus QRPA calculation, some phenomenological corrections need to be included to take into account the effects beyond the standard 2 -q p QRPA excitations and the coupling between the single-particle and low-lying collective phonon degrees of freedom. For this purpose, three prescriptions of folding procedure are considered and adjusted to reproduce experimental photoabsorption data at best. All of them are shown to lead to somewhat similar predictions of the E 1 strength, both at low energies and for exotic neutron-rich nuclei. Predictions of γ -ray strength functions and Maxwellian-averaged neutron capture rates for the whole Sn isotopic chain are also discussed and compared with previous theoretical calculations.

  2. QCD-like Theories on R_3\\times S_1: a Smooth Journey from Small to Large r(S_1)with Double-Trace Deformations

    SciTech Connect

    Shifman, Mikhail; Unsal, Mithat; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2008-02-22

    We consider QCD-like theories with one massless fermion in various representations of the gauge group SU(N). The theories are formulated on R{sub 3} x S{sub 1}. In the decompactification limit of large r(S{sub 1}) all these theories are characterized by confinement, mass gap and spontaneous breaking of a (discrete) chiral symmetry ({chi}SB). At small r(S{sub 1}), in order to stabilize the vacua of these theories at a center-symmetric point, we suggest to perform a double trace deformation. With these deformation, the theories at hand are at weak coupling at small r(S{sub 1}) and yet exhibit basic features of the large-r(S{sub 1}) limit: confinement and {chi}SB. We calculate the string tension, mass gap, bifermion condensates and {theta} dependence. The double-trace deformation becomes dynamically irrelevant at large r(S{sub 1}). Despite the fact that at small r(S{sub 1}) confinement is Abelian, while it is expected to be non-Abelian at large r(S{sub 1}), we argue that small and large-r(S{sub 1}) physics are continuously connected. If so, one can use small-r(S{sub 1}) laboratory to extract lessons about QCD and QCD-like theories on R{sub 4}.

  3. Magmatism and Eurekan deformation in the High Arctic Large Igneous Province: Age and geological constraints from North Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegner, C.; Storey, M.; Holm, P. M.; Thorarinsson, S. B.; Zhao, X.; Tappe, S.; Heaman, L.; Knudsen, M. F.

    2013-12-01

    Age, compositional and geological data show the High Arctic Large Igneous Province is unusual on two counts: first, magmatism was prolonged and include an initial tholeiitic phase (130-80 Ma) and a second alkaline phase (85-60 Ma); second, it was subsequently deformed during the Eurekan orogeny. New 40Ar-39Ar and U-Pb dating provides emplacement ages of 71-68 Ma for most of the Kap Washington alkaline volcanics of North Greenland, but with activity continuing down to 61 Ma. A thermal resetting age of 49-47 Ma is also identified in 40Ar-39Ar whole-rock data for trachyte flows. Patch perthite feldspars and coeval resetting of Rb-Sr isotopes by hydrothermal fluids provide further support for thermal overprinting, interpreted as a result of Eurekan compressional tectonism. The formation of the tholeiitic suite (130-80 Ma) appears to be associated with the opening of the Canada Basin and may have involved mantle plume action. Formation of the alkaline suite (85-60 Ma) is attributed to continental rifting in the Lincoln Sea area linked to seafloor spreading in the Labrador Sea and the Baffin Bay. The alkaline and tholeiitic suites of the High Arctic may therefore be unrelated. It is striking that High Arctic volcanism terminates at about the same time (c. 60 Ma) as magmatism in the North Atlantic Large Igneous Province begins. We suggest this is a corollary of a change from extensional to compressional tectonism in the High Arctic. In the period when Greenland moved together with Eurasia (>60 Ma), the separation from North America resulted in rift-related alkaline magmatism in the High Arctic. When Greenland subsequently moved as a separate plate (60-35 Ma), overlapping spreading on both sides pushed it northwards and volcanism in the High Arctic stopped due to compression. Evaluation of plate kinematic models shows that the relative northwards movement of Greenland culminated in the Eocene, coinciding with thermal resetting. We conclude that compression in North

  4. Comparison between spring network models and continuum constitutive laws: application to the large deformation of a capsule in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Omori, T; Ishikawa, T; Barthès-Biesel, D; Salsac, A-V; Walter, J; Imai, Y; Yamaguchi, T

    2011-04-01

    A capsule is a liquid drop enclosed by a solid, deformable membrane. To analyze the deformation of a capsule accurately, both the fluid mechanics of the internal and external fluids and the solid mechanics of the membrane must be solved precisely. Recently, many researchers have used discrete spring network models to express the membrane mechanics of capsules and biological cells. However, it is unclear whether such modeling is sufficiently accurate to solve for capsule deformation. This study examines the correlations between the mechanical properties of the discrete spring network model and continuum constitutive laws. We first compare uniaxial and isotropic deformations of a two-dimensional (2D) sheet, both analytically and numerically. The 2D sheet is discretized with four kinds of mesh to analyze the effect of the spring network configuration. We derive the relationships between the spring constant and continuum properties, such as the Young modulus, Poisson ratio, area dilation modulus, and shear modulus. It is found that the mechanical properties of spring networks are strongly dependent on the mesh configuration. We then calculate the deformation of a capsule under inflation and in a simple shear flow in the Stokes flow regime, using various membrane models. To achieve high accuracy in the flow calculation, a boundary-element method is used. Comparing the results between the different membrane models, we find that it is hard to express the area incompressibility observed in biological membranes using a simple spring network model.

  5. Deformation in lead zirconate titanate ceramics under large signal electric field loading measured by digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Di; Kamlah, Marc

    2015-11-01

    Digital image correlation, a noncontact and nondestructive method, was employed to monitor the deformation of lead zirconate titanate piezoelectric ceramics. This method is based on imaging a speckle pattern on the specimen surface during the test and subsequently correlating each image of the deformed pattern to that in the reference state. In our work, both longitudinal and transverse strains were calculated from imaging a bulk sample under a ±2 kV/mm electric field. Compared with linear variable displacement transducer data, the results from this correlation method were validated. At the same time, based on this optical technique, different strain-electric field butterfly loops can be drawn from correspondingly selected regions of interest. Combined with contour plots of strain on the surface of the sample, the deformation of bulk ceramic sample under uniaxial electric field loading without any mechanical constraints is proven to be highly homogenous under macro-observing scale.

  6. Restoration of four-dimensional diffeomorphism covariance in canonical general relativity: An intrinsic Hamilton-Jacobi approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salisbury, Donald; Renn, Jürgen; Sundermeyer, Kurt

    2016-02-01

    Classical background independence is reflected in Lagrangian general relativity through covariance under the full diffeomorphism group. We show how this independence can be maintained in a Hamilton-Jacobi approach that does not accord special privilege to any geometric structure. Intrinsic space-time curvature-based coordinates grant equal status to all geometric backgrounds. They play an essential role as a starting point for inequivalent semiclassical quantizations. The scheme calls into question Wheeler’s geometrodynamical approach and the associated Wheeler-DeWitt equation in which 3-metrics are featured geometrical objects. The formalism deals with variables that are manifestly invariant under the full diffeomorphism group. Yet, perhaps paradoxically, the liberty in selecting intrinsic coordinates is precisely as broad as is the original diffeomorphism freedom. We show how various ideas from the past five decades concerning the true degrees of freedom of general relativity can be interpreted in light of this new constrained Hamiltonian description. In particular, we show how the Kuchař multi-fingered time approach can be understood as a means of introducing full four-dimensional diffeomorphism invariants. Every choice of new phase space variables yields new Einstein-Hamilton-Jacobi constraining relations, and corresponding intrinsic Schrödinger equations. We show how to implement this freedom by canonical transformation of the intrinsic Hamiltonian. We also reinterpret and rectify significant work by Dittrich on the construction of “Dirac observables.”

  7. Afterslip and viscoelastic relaxation model inferred from the large-scale post-seismic deformation following the 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule earthquake (Chile)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, E.; Fleitout, L.; Vigny, C.; Garaud, J. D.

    2016-06-01

    Megathrust earthquakes of magnitude close to 9 are followed by large-scale (thousands of km) and long-lasting (decades), significant crustal and mantle deformation. This deformation can be observed at the surface and quantified with GPS measurements. Here we report on deformation observed during the 5 yr time span after the 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule Megathrust Earthquake (2010 February 27) over the whole South American continent. With the first 2 yr of those data, we use finite element modelling (FEM) to relate this deformation to slip on the plate interface and relaxation in the mantle, using a realistic layered Earth model and Burgers rheologies. Slip alone on the interface, even up to large depths, is unable to provide a satisfactory fit simultaneously to horizontal and vertical displacements. The horizontal deformation pattern requires relaxation both in the asthenosphere and in a low-viscosity channel along the deepest part of the plate interface and no additional low-viscosity wedge is required by the data. The vertical velocity pattern (intense and quick uplift over the Cordillera) is well fitted only when the channel extends deeper than 100 km. Additionally, viscoelastic relaxation alone cannot explain the characteristics and amplitude of displacements over the first 200 km from the trench and aseismic slip on the fault plane is needed. This aseismic slip on the interface generates stresses, which induce additional relaxation in the mantle. In the final model, all three components (relaxation due to the coseismic slip, aseismic slip on the fault plane and relaxation due to aseismic slip) are taken into account. Our best-fit model uses slip at shallow depths on the subduction interface decreasing as function of time and includes (i) an asthenosphere extending down to 200 km, with a steady-state Maxwell viscosity of 4.75 × 1018 Pa s; and (ii) a low-viscosity channel along the plate interface extending from depths of 55-135 km with viscosities below 1018 Pa s.

  8. Analysis of Large Quasistatic Deformations of Inelastic Solids by a New Stress Based Finite Element Method. Ph.D. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Kenneth W.

    1992-01-01

    A new hybrid stress finite element algorithm suitable for analyses of large quasistatic deformation of inelastic solids is presented. Principal variables in the formulation are the nominal stress rate and spin. The finite element equations which result are discrete versions of the equations of compatibility and angular momentum balance. Consistent reformulation of the constitutive equation and accurate and stable time integration of the stress are discussed at length. Examples which bring out the feasibility and performance of the algorithm conclude the work.

  9. Dynamic model of intrusion of magma and/or magmatic fluids in the large-scale deformation source of the Campi Flegrei caldera (Italy).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crescentini, Luca; Amoruso, Antonella; Luongo, Annamaria

    2015-04-01

    The Campi Flegrei (CF) caldera is located in a densely populated area close to Naples (Southern Italy). It is renowned as a site of continual slow vertical movements. After the last eruption in 1538, the caldera generally subsided until 1969 when minor uplift occurred. In the early 1970s this uplift became significant (~1.5 m max). A further large uplift episode occurred from 1982 to 1984 (~1.8 m max), and subsequently smaller uplift episodes have occurred since then. Amoruso et al. (2014a,b) have recently shown that the CF surface deformation field from 1980 to 2013 can be decomposed into two stationary parts. Large-scale deformation can be explained by a quasi-horizontal source, oriented NW to SE and mathematically represented by a pressurized finite triaxial ellipsoid (PTE) ~4 km deep, possibly related to the injection of magma and/or magmatic fluids from a deeper magma chamber into a sill, or pressurization of interconnected (micro)cavities. Residual deformation not accounted for by PTE is confined to the Solfatara fumarolic area and can be mathematically explained by a small (point) pressurized oblate spheroid (PS) ~2 km below the Solfatara fumarolic field, that has been equated with a poroelastic response of the substratum to pore pressure increases near the injection point of hot magmatic fluids into the hydrothermal system. A satisfying feature of this double source model is that the geometric source parameters of each are constant over the period 1980-2013 with the exception of volume changes (potencies). Several papers have ascribed CF deformation to the injection of magmatic fluids at the base of the hydrothermal system. All models predict complex spatial and temporal evolution of the deformation pattern and consequently contrast with the observed deformation pattern stationarity. Also recently proposed dynamic models of sill intrusion in a shallow volcanic environment do not satisfy the observed CF deformation pattern stationarity. We have developed an

  10. Planation surfaces as a record of medium to large wavelength deformation: the example of the Lake Albert Rift (Uganda) on the East African Dome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brendan, Simon; François, Guillocheau; Cécile, Robin; Jean, Braun; Olivier, Dauteuil; Massimo, Dall'Asta

    2016-04-01

    African relief is characterized by planation surfaces, some of them of continental scale. These surfaces are slightly deformed according to different wavelengths (x10 km; x100 km, x1000 km) which record both mantle dynamics (very long wavelength, x 1000 km) and lithosphere deformation (long wavelength deformation, x 100 km). Different types of these planation surfaces are recognized: - Etchplains capped by iron-duricrust which correspond to erosional nearly flat weathered surfaces resulting from the growth of laterites under warm and humid conditions. - Pediments which define mechanical erosional surfaces with concave or rectilinear profiles delimited by upslope scarps connected upstream with the upper landforms. We here focused on the Lake Albert Rift at the northern termination of the western branch of the East African Rift System of which the two branches are surimposed on the East-African Dome. Different wavelengths of deformation were characterized based on the 3D mapping of stepped planation surfaces: (1) very long wavelength deformations resulting from the uplift of the East African Dome; (2) long wavelength deformations resulting from the opening of the eastern branch and (3) medium wavelength deformations represented by the uplift of rift shoulders like the Rwenzori Mountains. The paleo-landscape reconstruction of Uganda shows the existence of four generations of landforms dated according to their geometrical relationships with volcanic rocks. A four stepped evolution of the Ugandan landforms is proposed: • 70 - 22 Ma: generation of two weathered planation surfaces (etchplain Uw and Iw). The upper one (Uw) records a very humid period culminating at time of the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (70-45 Ma). It corresponds to the African Surface. A first uplift of the East African Dome generates a second lower planation surface (Iw) connected to the Atlantic Ocean base level; • 17-2.7 Ma: planation of large pediplains connected to the local base level induced

  11. Influence of transverse-shear and large-deformation effects on the low-speed impact response of laminated composite plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Damodar R.; Starnes, James H., Jr.; Prasad, Chunchu B.

    1993-01-01

    An analytical procedure is presented for determining the transient response of simply supported, rectangular laminated composite plates subjected to impact loads from airgun-propelled or dropped-weight impactors. A first-order shear-deformation theory is included in the analysis to represent properly any local short-wave-length transient bending response. The impact force is modeled as a locally distributed load with a cosine-cosine distribution. A double Fourier series expansion and the Timoshenko small-increment method are used to determine the contact force, out-of-plane deflections, and in-plane strains and stresses at any plate location due to an impact force at any plate location. The results of experimental and analytical studies are compared for quasi-isotropic laminates. The results indicate that using the appropriate local force distribution for the locally loaded area and including transverse-shear-deformation effects in the laminated plate response analysis are important. The applicability of the present analytical procedure based on small deformation theory is investigated by comparing analytical and experimental results for combinations of quasi-isotropic laminate thicknesses and impact energy levels. The results of this study indicate that large-deformation effects influence the response of both 24- and 32-ply laminated plates, and that a geometrically nonlinear analysis is required for predicting the response accurately.

  12. Diffeomorphic susceptibility artifact correction of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruthotto, L.; Kugel, H.; Olesch, J.; Fischer, B.; Modersitzki, J.; Burger, M.; Wolters, C. H.

    2012-09-01

    Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging is a key investigation technique in modern neuroscience. In clinical settings, diffusion-weighted imaging and its extension to diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) are usually performed applying the technique of echo-planar imaging (EPI). EPI is the commonly available ultrafast acquisition technique for single-shot acquisition with spatial encoding in a Cartesian system. A drawback of these sequences is their high sensitivity against small perturbations of the magnetic field, caused, e.g., by differences in magnetic susceptibility of soft tissue, bone and air. The resulting magnetic field inhomogeneities thus cause geometrical distortions and intensity modulations in diffusion-weighted images. This complicates the fusion with anatomical T1- or T2-weighted MR images obtained with conventional spin- or gradient-echo images and negligible distortion. In order to limit the degradation of diffusion-weighted MR data, we present here a variational approach based on a reference scan pair with reversed polarity of the phase- and frequency-encoding gradients and hence reversed distortion. The key novelty is a tailored nonlinear regularization functional to obtain smooth and diffeomorphic transformations. We incorporate the physical distortion model into a variational image registration framework and derive an accurate and fast correction algorithm. We evaluate the applicability of our approach to distorted DTI brain scans of six healthy volunteers. For all datasets, the automatic correction algorithm considerably reduced the image degradation. We show that, after correction, fusion with T1- or T2-weighted images can be obtained by a simple rigid registration. Furthermore, we demonstrate the improvement due to the novel regularization scheme. Most importantly, we show that it provides meaningful, i.e. diffeomorphic, geometric transformations, independent of the actual choice of the regularization parameters.

  13. A New FE Modeling Method for Isothermal Local Loading Process of Large-scale Complex Titanium Alloy Components Based on DEFORM-3D

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Dawei; Yang He; Sun Zhichao; Fan Xiaoguang

    2010-06-15

    Isothermal local loading process provides a new way to form large-scale complex titanium alloy components. The forming process is characterized by an extreme size (large scale in global and compared small size in regional), multi-parameter effects, and complicated loading path. To establish a reasonable finite element model is one of the key problems urgently to be solved in the research and development of isothermal local loading forming process of large-scale complex titanium alloy components. In this paper, a new finite element model of the isothermal local loading process is developed under the DEFORM-3D environment based on the solution of some key techniques. The modeling method has the following features: (1) different meshing techniques are used in different loading areas and the number of meshed elements is determined according to the deformation characteristic in different local loading steps in order to improve computational efficiency; (2) the accurate magnitude of the friction factor under titanium alloy hot forming (isothermal forming) condition is adopted instead of the typical value for lubricated hot forming processes; (3) different FEM solvers are chosen at different stages according to the loading characteristic and the contact state; (4) in contrast to the local component model, a full 3D component is modeled to simulate the process. The 3D-FE model is validated by experimental data of a large-scale bulkhead forming under isothermal local loading. The model can describe the quantitative relationships between the forming conditions and the forming results. The results of the present study may provide a basis for studying the local deformation mechanism, selecting the reasonable parameters, optimizing the die design and the process control in isothermal local loading process of large-scale complex titanium alloy components.

  14. A New FE Modeling Method for Isothermal Local Loading Process of Large-scale Complex Titanium Alloy Components Based on DEFORM-3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dawei; Yang, He; Sun, Zhichao; Fan, Xiaoguang

    2010-06-01

    Isothermal local loading process provides a new way to form large-scale complex titanium alloy components. The forming process is characterized by an extreme size (large scale in global and compared small size in regional), multi-parameter effects, and complicated loading path. To establish a reasonable finite element model is one of the key problems urgently to be solved in the research and development of isothermal local loading forming process of large-scale complex titanium alloy components. In this paper, a new finite element model of the isothermal local loading process is developed under the DEFORM-3D environment based on the solution of some key techniques. The modeling method has the following features: (1) different meshing techniques are used in different loading areas and the number of meshed elements is determined according to the deformation characteristic in different local loading steps in order to improve computational efficiency; (2) the accurate magnitude of the friction factor under titanium alloy hot forming (isothermal forming) condition is adopted instead of the typical value for lubricated hot forming processes; (3) different FEM solvers are chosen at different stages according to the loading characteristic and the contact state; (4) in contrast to the local component model, a full 3D component is modeled to simulate the process. The 3D-FE model is validated by experimental data of a large-scale bulkhead forming under isothermal local loading. The model can describe the quantitative relationships between the forming conditions and the forming results. The results of the present study may provide a basis for studying the local deformation mechanism, selecting the reasonable parameters, optimizing the die design and the process control in isothermal local loading process of large-scale complex titanium alloy components.

  15. High content reduced graphene oxide reinforced copper with a bioinspired nano-laminated structure and large recoverable deformation ability

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Ding-Bang; Cao, Mu; Guo, Qiang; Tan, Zhanqiu; Fan, Genlian; Li, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Di

    2016-01-01

    By using CuO/graphene-oxide/CuO sandwich-like nanosheets as the building blocks, bulk nacre-inspired copper matrix nano-laminated composite reinforced by molecular-level dispersed and ordered reduced graphene oxide (rGO) with content as high as ∼45 vol% was fabricated via a combined process of assembly, reduction and consolidation. Thanks to nanoconfinement effect, reinforcing effect, as well as architecture effect, the nanocomposite shows increased specific strength and at least one order of magnitude greater recoverable deformation ability as compared with monolithic Cu matrix. PMID:27647264

  16. High content reduced graphene oxide reinforced copper with a bioinspired nano-laminated structure and large recoverable deformation ability.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Ding-Bang; Cao, Mu; Guo, Qiang; Tan, Zhanqiu; Fan, Genlian; Li, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Di

    2016-01-01

    By using CuO/graphene-oxide/CuO sandwich-like nanosheets as the building blocks, bulk nacre-inspired copper matrix nano-laminated composite reinforced by molecular-level dispersed and ordered reduced graphene oxide (rGO) with content as high as ∼45 vol% was fabricated via a combined process of assembly, reduction and consolidation. Thanks to nanoconfinement effect, reinforcing effect, as well as architecture effect, the nanocomposite shows increased specific strength and at least one order of magnitude greater recoverable deformation ability as compared with monolithic Cu matrix. PMID:27647264

  17. Afterslip and Viscoelastic Relaxation Model Inferred from the Large Scale Postseismic Deformation Following the 2010 Mw 8,8 Maule Earthquake (Chile)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigny, C.; Klein, E.; Fleitout, L.; Garaud, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    Postseismic deformation following the large subduction earthquake of Maule (Chile, Mw8.8, February 27th 2010) have been closely monitored with GPS from 70 km up to 2000 km away from the trench. They exhibit a behavior generally similar to that already observed after the Aceh and Tohoku-Oki earthquakes. Vertical uplift is observed on the volcanic arc and a moderate large scale subsidence is associated with sizeable horizontal deformation in the far-field (500-2000km from the trench). In addition, near-field data (70-200km from the trench) feature a rather complex deformation pattern. A 3D FE code (Zebulon Zset) is used to relate these deformation to slip on the plate interface and relaxation in the mantle. The mesh features a spherical shell-portion from the core-mantle boundary to the Earth's surface, extending over more than 60 degrees in latitude and longitude. The overridding and subducting plates are elastic, and the asthenosphere is viscoelastic. A viscoelastic Low Viscosity Channel (LVC) is also introduced along the plate interface. Both the asthenosphere and the channel feature Burger's rheologies and we invert for their mechanical properties and geometrical characteristics simultaneously with the afterslip distribution. The horizontal deformation pattern requires relaxation both in i) the asthenosphere extending down to 270km, with a 'long-term' viscosity of the order of 4.8.1018 Pa.s and ii) in the channel, that has to extend from depth of 50 to 150 km with viscosities slightly below 1018 Pa.s, to fit well the vertical velocity pattern (intense and quick uplift over the Cordillera). Aseismic slip on the plate interface, at shallow depth, is necessary to explain all the characteristics of the near-field displacements. We then detect two main patches of high slip, one updip of the coseismic slip distribution in the northernmost part of the rupture zone, and the other one downdip, at the latitude of Constitucion (35°S). We finally study the temporel

  18. ACCEPT: a three-dimensional finite element program for large deformation elastic-plastic-creep analysis of pressurized tubes (LWBR/AWBA Development Program)

    SciTech Connect

    Hutula, D.N.; Wiancko, B.E.

    1980-03-01

    ACCEPT is a three-dimensional finite element computer program for analysis of large-deformation elastic-plastic-creep response of Zircaloy tubes subjected to temperature, surface pressures, and axial force. A twenty-mode, tri-quadratic, isoparametric element is used along with a Zircaloy materials model. A linear time-incremental procedure with residual force correction is used to solve for the time-dependent response. The program features an algorithm which automatically chooses the time step sizes to control the accuracy and numerical stability of the solution. A contact-separation capability allows modeling of interaction of reactor fuel rod cladding with fuel pellets or external supports.

  19. Computer program: Jet 3 to calculate the large elastic plastic dynamically induced deformations of free and restrained, partial and/or complete structural rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, R. W.; Witmer, E. A.

    1972-01-01

    A user-oriented FORTRAN 4 computer program, called JET 3, is presented. The JET 3 program, which employs the spatial finite-element and timewise finite-difference method, can be used to predict the large two-dimensional elastic-plastic transient Kirchhoff-type deformations of a complete or partial structural ring, with various support conditions and restraints, subjected to a variety of initial velocity distributions and externally-applied transient forcing functions. The geometric shapes of the structural ring can be circular or arbitrarily curved and with variable thickness. Strain-hardening and strain-rate effects of the material are taken into account.

  20. A self-consistent mechanism for slow dynamic deformation and large tsunami generation for earthquakes in the shallow subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shuo

    2012-06-01

    Dynamic pore pressure changes in the overriding wedge above a shallow-dipping plate interface significantly affect the rupture dynamics of shallow subduction zone earthquakes and their tsunamigenesis. For a wedge on the verge of Coulomb failure everywhere including the basal fault, the dynamic pore pressure increase due to up-dip rupture propagation leads to widespread yielding within the wedge, which is greatly enhanced by the shallow dip of the fault. The widespread yielding reduces the stress drop, slip velocity, slip, and rupture velocity, giving rise to prolonged rupture duration, thus explaining many anomalous features of shallow subduction zone earthquakes. Significant inelastic seafloor uplift occurs in the case of a shallow fault dip, with the largest uplift located landward from the trench. Integrating this physical mechanism with existing seismic, geodetic, and tsunami observations can provide new insights into earthquake dynamics and deformation processes in shallow subduction zones.

  1. Large in-plane deformation of RuO6 octahedron and ferromagnetism of bulk SrRuO3.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sanghyun; Zhang, J R; Torii, S; Choi, Seongil; Cho, Deok-Yong; Kamiyama, T; Yu, Jaejun; McEwen, K A; Park, Je-Geun

    2013-11-20

    SrRuO3 is a ferromagnetic metal with several unusual physical properties such as zero thermal expansion below Tc, so-called Invar behavior. Another anomalous feature is that the a-axis lattice constant is larger than the b-axis lattice constant, a clear deviation from the predictions of the Glazer structural description with rigid RuO6 octahedron motion. Using high resolution neutron diffraction techniques, we show how these two structural anomalies arise from the irregular in-plane deformation, i.e. plastic behavior of the RuO6 octahedron, a weak band Jahn-Teller distortion. We further demonstrate that the ferromagnetic instability of SrRuO3 is related to the temperature-induced localization of Ru 4d bands. PMID:24136614

  2. Advancing a smart air cushion system for preventing pressure ulcers using projection Moiré for large deformation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Sheng-Lin; Tsai, Tsung-Heng; Lee, Carina Jean-Tien; Hsu, Yu-Hsiang; Lee, Chih-Kung

    2016-03-01

    A pressure ulcer is one of the most important concerns for wheelchair bound patients with spinal cord injuries. A pressure ulcer is a localized injury near the buttocks that bear ischial tuberosity oppression over a long period of time. Due to elevated compression to blood vessels, the surrounding tissues suffer from a lack of oxygen and nutrition. The ulcers eventually lead to skin damage followed by tissue necrosis. The current medical strategy is to minimize the occurrence of pressure ulcers by regularly helping patients change their posture. However, these methods do not always work effectively or well. As a solution to fundamentally prevent pressure ulcers, a smart air cushion system was developed to detect and control pressure actively. The air cushion works by automatically adjusting a patient's sitting posture to effectively relieve the buttock pressure. To analyze the correlation between the dynamic pressure profiles of an air cell with a patient's weight, a projection Moiré system was adopted to measure the deformation of an air cell and its associated stress distribution. Combining a full-field deformation imaging with air pressure measured within an air cell, the patient's weight and the stress distribution can be simultaneously obtained. By integrating a full-field optical metrology with a time varying pressure sensor output coupled with different active air control algorithms for various designs, we can tailor the ratio of the air cells. Our preliminary data suggests that this newly developed smart air cushion has the potential to selectively reduce localized compression on the tissues at the buttocks. Furthermore, it can take a patient's weight which is an additional benefit so that medical personnel can reference it to prescribe the correct drug dosages.

  3. Influence of temperature- and depth-dependent viscosity structures on postseismic deformation predictions for the large 1946 Nankai subduction zone earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katagi, Takeshi; Yoshioka, Shoichi; Hashimoto, Manabu

    2008-06-01

    over Shikoku. The postseismic horizontal principal strain field for MODEL P2 is characterized by contractions in the N-S to NW-SE directions at amounts smaller than those for MODELs L1 and P1. Postseismic surface deformations for MODEL P3 are almost the same as those for MODEL P2. The observed postseismic vertical displacement and horizontal principal strain fields could not be explained by the viscoelastic response for the realistic viscoelastic structure models P2 and P3. This indicates that the effects of elastic and viscoelastic responses due to interplate coupling on the plate interface, after-slip at the extension of the coseismic slipped region, and poroelasticity should be taken into account to precisely estimate postseismic surface deformation. This also suggests that, in order to evaluate postseismic crustal deformations derived from a large interplate subduction zone earthquake, it is essential to use realistic temperature- and depth-dependent viscoelastic structure models.

  4. Topological duality between vortices and planar Skyrmions in BPS theories with area-preserving diffeomorphism symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, C.; Sanchez-Guillen, J.; Wereszczynski, A.; Zakrzewski, W. J.

    2013-01-01

    The Bogomol’nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) baby Skyrme models are submodels of baby Skyrme models, where the nonlinear sigma model term is suppressed. They have Skyrmion solutions saturating a BPS bound, and the corresponding static energy functional is invariant under area-preserving diffeomorphisms (APDs). Here we show that the solitons in the BPS baby Skyrme model, which carry a nontrivial topological charge Qb∈π2(S2) (a winding number), are dual to vortices in a BPS vortex model with a topological charge Qv∈π1(S1) (a vortex number), in the sense that there is a map between the BPS solutions of the two models. The corresponding energy densities of the BPS solutions of the two models are identical. A further consequence of the duality is that the dual BPS vortex models inherit the BPS property and the infinitely many symmetries (APDs) of the BPS baby Skyrme models. Finally, we demonstrate that the same topological duality continues to hold for the U(1) gauged versions of the models.

  5. Shape-based diffeomorphic registration on hippocampal surfaces using Beltrami holomorphic flow.

    PubMed

    Lui, Lok Ming; Wong, Tsz Wai; Thompson, Paul; Chan, Tony; Gu, Xianfeng; Yau, Shing-Tung

    2010-01-01

    We develop a new algorithm to automatically register hippocampal (HP) surfaces with complete geometric matching, avoiding the need to manually label landmark features. A good registration depends on a reasonable choice of shape energy that measures the dissimilarity between surfaces. In our work, we first propose a complete shape index using the Beltrami coefficient and curvatures, which measures subtle local differences. The proposed shape energy is zero if and only if two shapes are identical up to a rigid motion. We then seek the best surface registration by minimizing the shape energy. We propose a simple representation of surface diffeomorphisms using Beltrami coefficients, which simplifies the optimization process. We then iteratively minimize the shape energy using the proposed Beltrami Holomorphic flow (BHF) method. Experimental results on 212 HP of normal and diseased (Alzheimer's disease) subjects show our proposed algorithm is effective in registering HP surfaces with complete geometric matching. The proposed shape energy can also capture local shape differences between HP for disease analysis. PMID:20879331

  6. SU-F-BRF-03: Quality Assurance of Deformable Image Registration in Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, W.T.; Siebers, J.V.; Bzdusek, K.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To introduce methods to analyze Deformable Image Registration (DIR) and identify regions of potential DIR errors. Methods: DIR Deformable Vector Fields (DVFs) quantifying patient anatomic changes were evaluated using the Jacobian determinant and the magnitude of DVF curl as functions of tissue density and tissue type. These quantities represent local relative deformation and rotation, respectively. Large values in dense tissues can potentially identify non-physical DVF errors. For multiple DVFs per patient, histograms and visualization of DVF differences were also considered. To demonstrate the capabilities of methods, we computed multiple DVFs for each of five Head and Neck (H'N) patients (P1–P5) via a Fast-symmetric Demons (FSD) algorithm and via a Diffeomorphic Demons (DFD) algorithm, and show the potential to identify DVF errors. Results: Quantitative comparisons of the FSD and DFD registrations revealed <0.3 cm DVF differences in >99% of all voxels for P1, >96% for P2, and >90% of voxels for P3. While the FSD and DFD registrations were very similar for these patients, the Jacobian determinant was >50% in 9–15% of soft tissue and in 3–17% of bony tissue in each of these cases. The volumes of large soft tissue deformation were consistent for all five patients using the FSD algorithm (mean 15%±4% volume), whereas DFD reduced regions of large deformation by 10% volume (785 cm{sup 3}) for P4 and by 14% volume (1775 cm{sup 3}) for P5. The DFD registrations resulted in fewer regions of large DVF-curl; 50% rotations in FSD registrations averaged 209±136 cm{sup 3} in soft tissue and 10±11 cm{sup 3} in bony tissue, but using DFD these values were reduced to 42±53 cm{sup 3} and 1.1±1.5 cm{sup 3}, respectively. Conclusion: Analysis of Jacobian determinant and curl as functions of tissue density can identify regions of potential DVF errors by identifying non-physical deformations and rotations. Collaboration with Phillips Healthcare, as indicated in

  7. The Origin of Olivine B-Type Fabric in Naturally Deformed Peridotite: Insight from the Ronda Large-Scale Mantle Shear Zone (spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Précigout, J.; Hirth, G.

    2011-12-01

    peridotites were deformed at pressures lower than 2 GPa at sub-solidus conditions (Garrido et al., 2011), and 3) the A-type/B-type transition correlates with a decrease of temperature, grain size and fabric strength (Jindex) towards the inner shear zone. Our results moreover indicate that B-type fabric is somehow related to large-scale mantle shear zones, and hence it could characterize a signature of lithosphere-scale mantle strain localization.

  8. SU-E-J-108: Template Matching Based On Multiple Templates Can Improve the Tumor Tracking Performance When There Is Large Tumor Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, X; Lin, J; Diwanji, T; Mooney, K; D'Souza, W; Mistry, N

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Recently, template matching has been shown to be able to track tumor motion on cine-MRI images. However, artifacts such as deformation, rotation, and/or out-of-plane movement could seriously degrade the performance of this technique. In this work, we demonstrate the utility of multiple templates derived from different phases of tumor motion in reducing the negative effects of artifacts and improving the accuracy of template matching methods. Methods: Data from 2 patients with large tumors and significant tumor deformation were analyzed from a group of 12 patients from an earlier study. Cine-MRI (200 frames) imaging was performed while the patients were instructed to breathe normally. Ground truth tumor position was established on each frame manually by a radiation oncologist. Tumor positions were also automatically determined using template matching with either single or multiple (5) templates. The tracking errors, defined as the absolute differences in tumor positions determined by the manual and automated methods, when using either single or multiple templates were compared in both the AP and SI directions, respectively. Results: Using multiple templates reduced the tracking error of template matching. In the SI direction where the tumor movement and deformation were significant, the mean tracking error decreased from 1.94 mm to 0.91 mm (Patient 1) and from 6.61 mm to 2.06 mm (Patient 2). In the AP direction where the tumor movement was small, the reduction of the mean tracking error was significant in Patient 1 (from 3.36 mm to 1.04 mm), but not in Patient 2 ( from 3.86 mm to 3.80 mm). Conclusion: This study shows the effectiveness of using multiple templates in improving the performance of template matching when artifacts like large tumor deformation or out-of-plane motion exists. Accurate tumor tracking capabilities can be integrated with MRI guided radiation therapy systems. This work was supported in part by grants from NIH/NCI CA 124766 and Varian

  9. The Large Scale Tectonic Framework of SE Asia and the Deformation of the lithosphere Beneath Tibet and SW China (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Hilst, R. D.; Huang, H.; Yao, H.

    2010-12-01

    delineate the 3-D anisotropic structure of the crust and lithospheric mantle at length scales as small as 100 km beneath SE Asia. These inversions revealed (i) the presence of intra-crustal low velocity zones (perhaps bounded by major faults), (ii) a strong correlation between these low velocity zones and radial anisotropy (Vsh faster than Vsv), and (iii) that the pattern of crustal (azimuthal) anisotropy is quite different from that in the deep crust and mantle lithosphere. Furthermore, the spatial relationship with high heat flow, high (electrical) conductivity, and high Poisson’s ratio’s suggests that the crustal zones of low shear velocity are mechanically weak. Collectively, these inferences suggest that deformation is generally not vertically coherent and that (horizontal) ductile flow occurs (at least locally) in the deep crust of SE Tibet. Deformation of the lithosphere in SE Tibet may thus occur through interaction of geological units with and without crustal flow that are separated by major faults.

  10. Multivariate regression approaches for surrogate-based diffeomorphic estimation of respiratory motion in radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilms, M.; Werner, R.; Ehrhardt, J.; Schmidt-Richberg, A.; Schlemmer, H.-P.; Handels, H.

    2014-03-01

    Breathing-induced location uncertainties of internal structures are still a relevant issue in the radiation therapy of thoracic and abdominal tumours. Motion compensation approaches like gating or tumour tracking are usually driven by low-dimensional breathing signals, which are acquired in real-time during the treatment. These signals are only surrogates of the internal motion of target structures and organs at risk, and, consequently, appropriate models are needed to establish correspondence between the acquired signals and the sought internal motion patterns. In this work, we present a diffeomorphic framework for correspondence modelling based on the Log-Euclidean framework and multivariate regression. Within the framework, we systematically compare standard and subspace regression approaches (principal component regression, partial least squares, canonical correlation analysis) for different types of common breathing signals (1D: spirometry, abdominal belt, diaphragm tracking; multi-dimensional: skin surface tracking). Experiments are based on 4D CT and 4D MRI data sets and cover intra- and inter-cycle as well as intra- and inter-session motion variations. Only small differences in internal motion estimation accuracy are observed between the 1D surrogates. Increasing the surrogate dimensionality, however, improved the accuracy significantly; this is shown for both 2D signals, which consist of a common 1D signal and its time derivative, and high-dimensional signals containing the motion of many skin surface points. Eventually, comparing the standard and subspace regression variants when applied to the high-dimensional breathing signals, only small differences in terms of motion estimation accuracy are found.

  11. Multivariate regression approaches for surrogate-based diffeomorphic estimation of respiratory motion in radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Wilms, M; Werner, R; Ehrhardt, J; Schmidt-Richberg, A; Schlemmer, H-P; Handels, H

    2014-03-01

    Breathing-induced location uncertainties of internal structures are still a relevant issue in the radiation therapy of thoracic and abdominal tumours. Motion compensation approaches like gating or tumour tracking are usually driven by low-dimensional breathing signals, which are acquired in real-time during the treatment. These signals are only surrogates of the internal motion of target structures and organs at risk, and, consequently, appropriate models are needed to establish correspondence between the acquired signals and the sought internal motion patterns. In this work, we present a diffeomorphic framework for correspondence modelling based on the Log-Euclidean framework and multivariate regression. Within the framework, we systematically compare standard and subspace regression approaches (principal component regression, partial least squares, canonical correlation analysis) for different types of common breathing signals (1D: spirometry, abdominal belt, diaphragm tracking; multi-dimensional: skin surface tracking). Experiments are based on 4D CT and 4D MRI data sets and cover intra- and inter-cycle as well as intra- and inter-session motion variations. Only small differences in internal motion estimation accuracy are observed between the 1D surrogates. Increasing the surrogate dimensionality, however, improved the accuracy significantly; this is shown for both 2D signals, which consist of a common 1D signal and its time derivative, and high-dimensional signals containing the motion of many skin surface points. Eventually, comparing the standard and subspace regression variants when applied to the high-dimensional breathing signals, only small differences in terms of motion estimation accuracy are found. PMID:24557007

  12. Right ventricular strain analysis from three-dimensional echocardiography by using temporally diffeomorphic motion estimation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Meihua; Ashraf, Muhammad; Broberg, Craig S.; Sahn, David J.; Song, Xubo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Quantitative analysis of right ventricle (RV) motion is important for study of the mechanism of congenital and acquired diseases. Unlike left ventricle (LV), motion estimation of RV is more difficult because of its complex shape and thin myocardium. Although attempts of finite element models on MR images and speckle tracking on echocardiography have shown promising results on RV strain analysis, these methods can be improved since the temporal smoothness of the motion is not considered. Methods: The authors have proposed a temporally diffeomorphic motion estimation method in which a spatiotemporal transformation is estimated by optimization of a registration energy functional of the velocity field in their earlier work. The proposed motion estimation method is a fully automatic process for general image sequences. The authors apply the method by combining with a semiautomatic myocardium segmentation method to the RV strain analysis of three-dimensional (3D) echocardiographic sequences of five open-chest pigs under different steady states. Results: The authors compare the peak two-point strains derived by their method with those estimated from the sonomicrometry, the results show that they have high correlation. The motion of the right ventricular free wall is studied by using segmental strains. The baseline sequence results show that the segmental strains in their methods are consistent with results obtained by other image modalities such as MRI. The image sequences of pacing steady states show that segments with the largest strain variation coincide with the pacing sites. Conclusions: The high correlation of the peak two-point strains of their method and sonomicrometry under different steady states demonstrates that their RV motion estimation has high accuracy. The closeness of the segmental strain of their method to those from MRI shows the feasibility of their method in the study of RV function by using 3D echocardiography. The strain analysis of the

  13. Multivariate regression approaches for surrogate-based diffeomorphic estimation of respiratory motion in radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Wilms, M; Werner, R; Ehrhardt, J; Schmidt-Richberg, A; Schlemmer, H-P; Handels, H

    2014-03-01

    Breathing-induced location uncertainties of internal structures are still a relevant issue in the radiation therapy of thoracic and abdominal tumours. Motion compensation approaches like gating or tumour tracking are usually driven by low-dimensional breathing signals, which are acquired in real-time during the treatment. These signals are only surrogates of the internal motion of target structures and organs at risk, and, consequently, appropriate models are needed to establish correspondence between the acquired signals and the sought internal motion patterns. In this work, we present a diffeomorphic framework for correspondence modelling based on the Log-Euclidean framework and multivariate regression. Within the framework, we systematically compare standard and subspace regression approaches (principal component regression, partial least squares, canonical correlation analysis) for different types of common breathing signals (1D: spirometry, abdominal belt, diaphragm tracking; multi-dimensional: skin surface tracking). Experiments are based on 4D CT and 4D MRI data sets and cover intra- and inter-cycle as well as intra- and inter-session motion variations. Only small differences in internal motion estimation accuracy are observed between the 1D surrogates. Increasing the surrogate dimensionality, however, improved the accuracy significantly; this is shown for both 2D signals, which consist of a common 1D signal and its time derivative, and high-dimensional signals containing the motion of many skin surface points. Eventually, comparing the standard and subspace regression variants when applied to the high-dimensional breathing signals, only small differences in terms of motion estimation accuracy are found.

  14. On the possibility of viscoelastic deformation of the large south polar craters and true polar wander on the asteroid Vesta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, Saman; Dombard, Andrew J.

    2016-09-01

    The asteroid Vesta, located within the inner asteroid belt, is a differentiated body with a prominent rotational bulge. NASA's Dawn mission revealed the presence of two large, relatively shallow impact craters in the south polar region, one with a high-standing central peak. The shallowness and prominent central peak are reminiscent of large craters on some icy satellites that may have experienced strong topographic relaxation. The location of these basins near the south pole is also unusual and suggests true polar wander, which requires relaxation of the rotational bulge. Thus, we use the finite element method and a viscoelastic rheology to examine the feasibility of relaxation processes operating on Vesta. Given the plausible thermal state of Vesta by the decay of long-lived radioactive elements, we find that the lithosphere is not compliant enough to allow strong relaxation of the large south polar craters, and thus the peculiar morphology is possibly a product of the formation of these large basins at a planetary scale. Additionally, the asteroid has not been warm enough to permit the relaxation of the rotational bulge. Consequently, these craters both happened to form near the south pole, as unlikely as that is.

  15. Modeling and simulation framework for dynamic strain localization in elasto-viscoplastic metallic materials subject to large deformations

    DOE PAGES

    Mourad, Hashem Mourad; Bronkhorst, Curt Allan; Livescu, Veronica; Plohr, JeeYeon Nam; Cerreta, Ellen Kathleen

    2016-09-23

    This study describes a theoretical and computational framework for the treatment of adiabatic shear band formation in rate-sensitive polycrystalline metallic materials. From a computational perspective, accurate representation of strain localization behavior has been a long-standing challenge. In addition, the underlying physical mechanisms leading to the localization of plastic deformation are still not fully understood. The proposed framework is built around an enhanced-strain finite element formulation, designed to alleviate numerical pathologies known to arise in localization problems, by allowing a localization band of given finite width (weak discontinuity) to be embedded within individual elements. The mechanical threshold strength (MTS) model ismore » used to represent the temperature and strain rate-dependent viscoplastic response of the material. This classical flow stress model employs an internal state variable to quantify the effect of dislocation structure evolution (work hardening and recovery). In light of growing evidence suggesting that the softening effect of dynamic recrystallization may play a significant role, alongside thermal softening, in the process of shear band formation and growth, a simple dynamic recrystallization model is proposed and cast within the context of the MTS model with the aid of the aforementioned internal state variable. An initiation criterion for shear localization in rate and temperature-sensitive materials is introduced and used in the present context of high-rate loading, where material rate-dependence is pronounced and substantial temperature increases are achieved due to the dissipative nature of viscoplastic processes. In addition, explicit time integration is adopted to facilitate treatment of the dynamic problems under consideration, where strain rates in excess of 104 s–1 are typically attained. Two series of experiments are conducted on AISI 316L stainless steel, employing the commonly used top-hat sample

  16. An Analysis of Flight-Test Measurements of the Wing Structural Deformations in Rough Air of a Large Flexible Swept-Wing Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murrow, Harold N.

    1959-01-01

    An analysis is made of wing deflection and streamwise twist measurements in rough-air flight of a large flexible swept-wing bomber. Random-process techniques are employed in analyzing the data in order to describe the magnitude and characteristics of the wing deflection and twist responses to rough air. Power spectra and frequency-response functions for the wing deflection and twist responses at several spanwise stations are presented. The frequency-response functions describe direct and absolute response characteristics to turbulence and provide a convenient basis for assessing analytic calculation techniques. The wing deformations in rough air are compared with the expected deformations for quasi-static loadings of the same magnitude, and the amplifications are determined. The results obtained indicate that generally the deflections are amplified by a small amount, while the streamwise twists are amplified by factors of the order of 2.0. The magnitudes of both the deflection velocities and the twist angles are shown to have significant effects on the local angles of attack at the various stations and provide the main source of aerodynamic loading, particularly at frequencies in the vicinity of the first wing-vibration mode.

  17. Surface effect on the large amplitude periodic forced vibration of first-order shear deformable rectangular nanoplates with various edge supports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, R.; Gholami, R.

    2016-01-01

    Surface stress and surface inertia effects may play a significant role in the mechanical characteristics of nanostructures with a high surface to volume ratio. The objective of this study is to present a comprehensive study on the surface stress and surface inertia effects on the large amplitude periodic forced vibration of first-order shear deformable rectangular nanoplates. To this end, the Gurtin-Murdoch theory, first-order shear deformation theory (FSDT) and Hamilton's principle are employed to develop a non-classical continuum plate model capable of taking the surface stress and surface inertia effects and also the rotary and in-plane inertias into account. To solve numerically the geometrically nonlinear forced vibration of nanoplates with different boundary conditions, the generalized differential quadrature (GDQ) method, numerical Galerkin scheme, periodic time differential operators and pseudo arc-length continuation method are employed. The effects of parameters such as thickness, surface residual stress, surface elasticity, surface mass density, length-to-thickness ratio, width-to-thickness ratio and boundary conditions on the nonlinear forced vibration of rectangular nanoplates are fully investigated. The results demonstrate that surface effects on the nonlinear frequency response of aluminum (Al) nanoplate are more prominent in comparison with the silicon (Si) nanoplate.

  18. Two-dimensional strain-hardening membrane model for large deformation behavior of multiple red blood cells in high shear conditions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Computational modeling of Red Blood Cell (RBC) flow contributes to the fundamental understanding of microhemodynamics and microcirculation. In order to construct theoretical RBC models, experimental studies on single RBC mechanics have presented a material description for RBC membranes based on their membrane shear, bending and area moduli. These properties have been directly employed in 3D continuum models of RBCs but practical flow analysis with 3D models have been limited by their computationally expensive nature. As such, various researchers have employed 2D models to efficiently and qualitatively study microvessel flows. Currently, the representation of RBC dynamics using 2D models is a limited methodology that breaks down at high shear rates due to excessive and unrealistic stretching. Methods We propose a localized scaling of the 2D elastic moduli such that it increases with RBC local membrane strain, thereby accounting for effects such as the Poisson effect and membrane local area incompressibility lost in the 2D simplification. Validation of our 2D Large Deformation (2D-LD) RBC model was achieved by comparing the predicted RBC deformation against the 3D model from literature for the case of a single RBC in simple shear flow under various shear rates (dimensionless shear rate G = 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5). The multi-cell flow of RBCs (38% Hematocrit) in a 20 μm width microchannel under varying shear rates (50, 150, 150 s-1) was then simulated with our proposed model and the popularly-employed 2D neo-Hookean model in order to evaluate the efficacy of our proposed 2D-LD model. Results The validation set indicated similar RBC deformation for both the 2D-LD and the 3D models across the studied shear rates, highlighting the robustness of our model. The multi-cell simulation indicated that the 2D neo-Hookean model predicts noodle-like RBC shapes at high shear rates (G = 0.5) whereas our 2D-LD model maintains sensible RBC deformations. Conclusion

  19. Double metric, generalized metric, and α' -deformed double field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohm, Olaf; Zwiebach, Barton

    2016-03-01

    We relate the unconstrained "double metric" of the "α' -geometry" formulation of double field theory to the constrained generalized metric encoding the spacetime metric and b -field. This is achieved by integrating out auxiliary field components of the double metric in an iterative procedure that induces an infinite number of higher-derivative corrections. As an application, we prove that, to first order in α' and to all orders in fields, the deformed gauge transformations are Green-Schwarz-deformed diffeomorphisms. We also prove that to first order in α' the spacetime action encodes precisely the Green-Schwarz deformation with Chern-Simons forms based on the torsionless gravitational connection. This seems to be in tension with suggestions in the literature that T-duality requires a torsionful connection, but we explain that these assertions are ambiguous since actions that use different connections are related by field redefinitions.

  20. Resurgent deformation quantisation

    SciTech Connect

    Garay, Mauricio; Goursac, Axel de; Straten, Duco van

    2014-03-15

    We construct a version of the complex Heisenberg algebra based on the idea of endless analytic continuation. The algebra would be large enough to capture quantum effects that escape ordinary formal deformation quantisation. -- Highlights: •We construct resurgent deformation quantisation. •We give integral formulæ. •We compute examples which show that hypergeometric functions appear naturally in quantum computations.

  1. a Method to Achieve Large Volume, High Accuracy Photogrammetric Measurements Through the Use of AN Actively Deformable Sensor Mounting Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargeant, B.; Robson, S.; Szigeti, E.; Richardson, P.; El-Nounu, A.; Rafla, M.

    2016-06-01

    When using any optical measurement system one important factor to consider is the placement of the sensors in relation to the workpiece being measured. When making decisions on sensor placement compromises are necessary in selecting the best placement based on the shape and size of the object of interest and the desired resolution and accuracy. One such compromise is in the distance the sensors are placed from the measurement surface, where a smaller distance gives a higher spatial resolution and local accuracy and a greater distance reduces the number of measurements necessary to cover a large area reducing the build-up of errors between measurements and increasing global accuracy. This paper proposes a photogrammetric approach whereby a number of sensors on a continuously flexible mobile platform are used to obtain local measurements while the position of the sensors is determined by a 6DoF tracking solution and the results combined to give a single set of measurement data within a continuous global coordinate system. The ability of this approach to achieve both high accuracy measurement and give results over a large volume is then tested and areas of weakness to be improved upon are identified.

  2. New solutions of the hamiltonian and diffeomorphism constraints of quantum gravity from a highest weight loop representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldaya, V.; Navarro-Salas, J.

    1991-04-01

    We introduce a highest weight type representation of the Rovelli-Smolin algebra of loop observables for quantum gravity. In terms of this representation, new solutions of the hamiltonian and diffeomorphism constraints are given. Assuming the locality of the quantum hamiltonian constraint we show that any functional depending on the generalized link class of the disjoint union of arbitrary simple loops is a solution. Finally we argue that this is the general solution in the irreducible representation space. On leave of absence from the Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Universidad de Valencia, and IFIC, Centro Mixto Universidad de Valencia - CSIC, Burjassot, Spain.

  3. The Effect of Large Melt Fraction on the Deformation Behavior of Peridotite: Implications for the Rheology of Io' Mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, T.; Kohlstedt, D. L.

    2004-01-01

    One key constraint needed for refinement of the interior geochemical and geodynamic models of Io is the viscosity of the convecting partially- molten silicate mantle. To date, laboratory studies of partially molten mantle rocks have reached melt fractions up to approx.0.12, a value much smaller than thought to be appropriate for the asthenosphere of Io where the degree of partial melting may be 0.15 0.40 or higher. Therefore, we have performed a series of high temperature, triaxial compressive creep experiments on dry synthetic peridotites in a gas medium apparatus at a confining pressure of 300 MPa and temperatures from 1473 to 1573 K in order to understand the influence of large amounts of melt (0.15 < phi < 0.40) on the rheological behavior of partially molten rocks.

  4. Global and local large-deformation response of sub-micron, soft- and hard-particle filled polycarbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krop, Sam; Meijer, Han E. H.; van Breemen, Lambert C. A.

    2016-02-01

    Since polymers play an increasingly important role in both structural and tribological applications, understanding their intrinsic mechanical response is key. Therefore in the last few decades much effort has been devoted into the development of constitutive models that capture the polymers' intrinsic mechanical response quantitatively. An example is the Eindhoven Glassy Polymer model. In practice most polymers are filled, e.g. with hard particles or fibers, with colorants, or with soft particles that serve as impact modifiers. To characterize the influence of type and amount of filler particles on the intrinsic mechanical response, we designed model systems of polycarbonate with different volume fractions of small, order 100 nm sized, either hard or soft particles, and tested them in lubricated uniaxial compression experiments. To reveal the local effects on interparticle level, three-dimensional representative volume elements (RVEs) were constructed. The matrix material is modeled with the EGP model and the fillers with their individual mechanical properties. It is first shown that (only) 32 particles are sufficient to capture the statistical variations in these systems. Comparing the simulated response of the RVEs with the experiments demonstrates that in the small strain regime the stress is under-predicted since the polymer matrix is modeled by using only one single relaxation time. The yield- and the large strain response is captured well for the soft-particle filled systems while, for the hard-particles at increased filler loadings, the predictions are less accurate. This is likely caused by polymer-filler interactions that result in accelerated physical aging of the polymer matrix close to the surfaces. Modifying the Sa-parameter, that captures the thermodynamic state of the polymer matrix, allows us to correctly predict the macroscopic response after yield. The simulations reveal that all rate-dependencies of the different filled systems originate from

  5. Family of measures on a space of curves that are quasi-invariant with respect to some action of diffeomorphisms group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanov, Evgenii Dmitrievich

    2016-08-01

    A family of quasi-invariant measures on the special functional space of curves in a finite-dimensional Euclidean space with respect to the action of diffeomorphisms is constructed. The main result is an explicit expression for the Radon-Nikodym derivative of the transformed measure relative to the original one. The stochastic Ito integral allows to express the result in an invariant form for a wider class of diffeomorphisms. These measures can be used to obtain irreducible unitary representations of the diffeomorphisms group which will be studied in future research. A geometric interpretation of the action considered together with a generalization to the multidimensional case makes such representations applicable to problems of quantum mechanics.

  6. Conceptual Numerical Modeling of Large-Scale Footwall Behavior at the Kiirunavaara Mine, and Implications for Deformation Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svartsjaern, M.; Saiang, D.; Nordlund, E.; Eitzenberger, A.

    2016-03-01

    Over the last 30 years, the Kiirunavaara mine has experienced a slow but progressive fracturing and movement in the footwall rock mass, which is directly related to the sublevel caving (SLC) method utilized by Luossavaara-Kiirunavaara Aktiebolag (LKAB). As part of an ongoing work, this paper focuses on describing and explaining a likely evolution path of large-scale fracturing in the Kiirunavaara footwall. The trace of this fracturing was based on a series of damage mapping campaigns carried out over the last 2 years, accompanied by numerical modeling. Data collected from the damage mapping between mine levels 320 and 907 m was used to create a 3D surface representing a conceptual boundary for the extent of the damaged volume. The extent boundary surface was used as the basis for calibrating conceptual numerical models created in UDEC. The mapping data, in combination with the numerical models, indicated a plausible evolution path of the footwall fracturing that was subsequently described. Between levels 320 and 740 m, the extent of fracturing into the footwall appears to be controlled by natural pre-existing discontinuities, while below 740 m, there are indications of a curved shear or step-path failure. The step-path is hypothesized to be activated by rock mass heave into the SLC zone above the current extraction level. Above the 320 m level, the fracturing seems to intersect a subvertical structure that daylights in the old open pit slope. Identification of these probable damage mechanisms was an important step in order to determine the requirements for a monitoring system for tracking footwall damage. This paper describes the background work for the design of the system currently being installed.

  7. Haglund's Deformity

    MedlinePlus

    ... Is Haglund’s Deformity? Haglund’s deformity is a bony enlargement on the back of the heel. The soft ... the Achilles tendon becomes irritated when the bony enlargement rubs against shoes. This often leads to painful ...

  8. Large-deformation analysis of the elastic recoil of fibre layers in a Brinkman medium with application to the endothelial glycocalyx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yuefeng; Weinbaum, Sheldon; Spaan, Jos A. E.; Vink, Hans

    2006-05-01

    There is wide interest in the role of the endothelial surface layer (ESL) in transmitting blood shear stress to the intracellular cytoskeleton of the endothelial cell. However, very little is known about the mechanical properties of the glycocalyx or the flexural rigidity of the core proteins that comprise it. Vink, Duling & Spaan (FASEB J., vol. 13, 1999, p. A 11) measured the time-dependent restoration of the ESL after it had been nearly completely compressed by the passage of a white blood cell (WBC) in a tightly fitting capillary. Using this initial experiment, Weinbaum et al. (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, vol. 100, 2003, p. 7988) predicted that the core proteins have a flexural rigidity EI of 700 pN nm(2) , which is ˜1/20 the measured value for an actin filament. However, their analysis assumes small deflections and only the fibre motion is considered. In the present paper we report additional experiments and apply large-deformation theory for ‘elastica’ to describe the restoration of the fibres in a Brinkman medium which absorbs fluid as the ESL expands. We find that there are two phases in the fibre recoil: an initial phase for large compressions where the ESL thickness is <0.36 its undisturbed thickness, and the ends of the fibres overlap and are parallel to the capillary wall; and a second phase where the fibres assume a shape that is close to the solutions for an elastic bar with linearly distributed vertical loading. The predicted time-dependent change in thickness of the ESL provides remarkably good agreement with experiment and yields an estimate of 490 pN nm(2) for the flexural rigidity EI of the core protein fibres, which is unexpectedly close to that predicted by the linear theory in Weinbaum et al. (2003).

  9. Large scale 3D geometry of deformation structures in the Aar massif and overlying Helvetic nappes (Central Alps, Switzerland) - A combined remote sensing and field work approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumberger, R.; Wehrens, Ph.; Herwegh, M.

    2012-04-01

    Allowing deep insight into the formation history of a rock complex, shear zones, faults and joint systems represent important sources of geological information. The granitic rocks of the Haslital valley (Switzerland) show very good outcrop conditions to study these mechanical anisotropies. Furthermore, they permit a quantitative characterisation of the above-mentioned deformation structures on the large-scale, in terms of their 3D orientation, 3D spatial distribution, kinematics and evolution in 3D. A key problem while developing valid geological 3D models is the three-dimensional spatial distribution of geological structures, particularly with increasing distance from the surface. That is especially true in regions, where only little or even no "hard" underground data (e.g. bore holes, tunnel mappings and seismics) is available. In the study area, many subsurface data are available (e.g. cross sections, tunnel and pipeline mappings, bore holes etc.). Therefore, two methods dealing with the problems mentioned are developed: (1) A data acquisition, processing and visualisation method, (2) A methodology to improve the reliability of 3D models regarding the spatial trend of geological structures with increasing depth: 1) Using aerial photographs and a high-resolution digital elevation model, a GIS-based remote-sensing structural map of large-scale structural elements (shear zones, faults) of the study area was elaborated. Based on that lineament map, (i) a shear zone map was derived and (ii) a geostatistical analysis was applied to identify sub regions applicable for serving as field areas to test the methodology presented above. During fieldwork, the shear zone map was evaluated by verifying the occurrence and spatial distribution of the structures designated by remote sensing. Additionally, the geometry of the structures (e.g. 3D orientation, width, kinematics) was characterised and parameterised accordingly. These tasks were partially done using a GPS based Slate

  10. Principles of rock deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolas, A.

    1987-01-01

    This text focuses on the recent achievements in the analysis of rock deformation. It gives an analytical presentation of the essential structures in terms of kinetic and dynamic interpretation. The physical properties underlying the interpretation of rock structures are exposed in simple terms. Emphasized in the book are: the role of fluids in rock fracturing; the kinematic analysis of magnetic flow structures; the application of crystalline plasticity to the kinematic and dynamic analysis of the large deformation imprinted in many metamorphic rocks.

  11. Lorentz-diffeomorphism quasi-local conserved charges and Virasoro algebra in Chern-Simons-like theories of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setare, M. R.; Adami, H.

    2016-08-01

    The Chern-Simons-like theories of gravity (CSLTG) are formulated at first order formalism. In this formalism, the derivation of the entropy of a black hole on bifurcation surface, as a quasi-local conserved charge is problematic. In this paper we overcome these problems by considering the concept of total variation and the Lorentz-Lie derivative. We firstly find an expression for the ADT conserved current in the context of the CSLTG which is based on the concept of the Killing vector fields. Then, we generalize it to be conserved for all diffeomorphism generators. Thus, we can extract an off-shell conserved charge for any vector field which generates a diffeomorphism. The formalism presented here is based on the concept of quasi-local conserved charges which are off-shell. The charges can be calculated on any codimension two space-like surface surrounding a black hole and the results are independent of the chosen surface. By using the off-shell quasi-local conserved charge, we investigate the Virasoro algebra and find a formula to calculate the central extension term. We apply the formalism to the BTZ black hole solution in the context of the Einstein gravity and the Generalized massive gravity, then we find the eigenvalues of their Virasoro generators as well as the corresponding central charges. Eventually, we calculate the entropy of the BTZ black hole by the Cardy formula and we show that the result exactly matches the one obtained by the concept of the off-shell conserved charges.

  12. FeCoSiBNbCu bulk metallic glass with large compressive deformability studied by time-resolved synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoica, Mihai; Scudino, Sergio; Bednarčik, Jozef; Kaban, Ivan; Eckert, Jürgen

    2014-02-01

    By adding 0.5 at. % Cu to the strong but brittle [(Fe0.5Co0.5)0.75Si0.05B0.20]96Nb4 bulk metallic glass, fully amorphous rods with diameters up to 2 mm were obtained. The monolithic samples with 1 mm diameter revealed a fracture strain of 3.80% and a maximum stress of 4143 MPa upon compression, together with a slight work-hardening behavior. SEM micrographs of fractured samples did neither reveal any shear bands on the lateral surface nor the typical vein patterns which characterize ductile fracture. However, some layers appear to have flowed and this phenomenon took place before the brittle final fracture. An estimate of the temperature rise ΔT in the shear plane gives 1039 K, which is large enough to melt a layer of 120 nm. The overall performance and the macroscopic plastic strain depend on the interaction between cleavage-like and viscous flow-like features. Mechanical tests performed in-situ under synchrotron radiation allowed the calculation of the strain tensor components, using the reciprocal-space data and analyzing the shift of the first (the main) and the second broad peak positions in the X-ray diffraction patterns. The results revealed that each atomic shell may have a different stiffness, which may explain the macroscopic compressive plastic deformation. Also, there were no signs of (nano) crystallization induced by the applied stress, but the samples preserve a monolithic amorphous structure until catastrophic failure occurs.

  13. Stopping Criteria for Log-Domain Diffeomorphic Demons Registration: An Experimental Survey for Radiotherapy Application

    PubMed Central

    Peroni, M.; Golland, P.; Sharp, G. C.; Baroni, G.

    2016-01-01

    A crucial issue in deformable image registration is achieving a robust registration algorithm at a reasonable computational cost. Given the iterative nature of the optimization procedure an algorithm must automatically detect convergence, and stop the iterative process when most appropriate. This paper ranks the performances of three stopping criteria and six stopping value computation strategies for a Log-Domain Demons Deformable registration method simulating both a coarse and a fine registration. The analyzed stopping criteria are: (a) velocity field update magnitude, (b) mean squared error, and (c) harmonic energy. Each stopping condition is formulated so that the user defines a threshold ε, which quantifies the residual error that is acceptable for the particular problem and calculation strategy. In this work, we did not aim at assigning a value to ε, but to give insights in how to evaluate and to set the threshold on a given exit strategy in a very popular registration scheme. Experiments on phantom and patient data demonstrate that comparing the optimization metric minimum over the most recent three iterations with the minimum over the fourth to sixth most recent iterations can be an appropriate algorithm stopping strategy. The harmonic energy was found to provide best trade-off between robustness and speed of convergence for the analyzed registration method at coarse registration, but was outperformed by mean squared error when all the original pixel information is used. This suggests the need of developing mathematically sound new convergence criteria in which both image and vector field information could be used to detect the actual convergence, which could be especially useful when considering multi-resolution registrations. Further work should be also dedicated to study same strategies performances in other deformable registration methods and body districts. PMID:24000996

  14. Stopping Criteria for Log-Domain Diffeomorphic Demons Registration: An Experimental Survey for Radiotherapy Application.

    PubMed

    Peroni, M; Golland, P; Sharp, G C; Baroni, G

    2016-02-01

    A crucial issue in deformable image registration is achieving a robust registration algorithm at a reasonable computational cost. Given the iterative nature of the optimization procedure an algorithm must automatically detect convergence, and stop the iterative process when most appropriate. This paper ranks the performances of three stopping criteria and six stopping value computation strategies for a Log-Domain Demons Deformable registration method simulating both a coarse and a fine registration. The analyzed stopping criteria are: (a) velocity field update magnitude, (b) mean squared error, and (c) harmonic energy. Each stoping condition is formulated so that the user defines a threshold ∊, which quantifies the residual error that is acceptable for the particular problem and calculation strategy. In this work, we did not aim at assigning a value to e, but to give insights in how to evaluate and to set the threshold on a given exit strategy in a very popular registration scheme. Experiments on phantom and patient data demonstrate that comparing the optimization metric minimum over the most recent three iterations with the minimum over the fourth to sixth most recent iterations can be an appropriate algorithm stopping strategy. The harmonic energy was found to provide best trade-off between robustness and speed of convergence for the analyzed registration method at coarse registration, but was outperformed by mean squared error when all the original pixel information is used. This suggests the need of developing mathematically sound new convergence criteria in which both image and vector field information could be used to detect the actual convergence, which could be especially useful when considering multi-resolution registrations. Further work should be also dedicated to study same strategies performances in other deformable registration methods and body districts. PMID:24000996

  15. Spinal deformity.

    PubMed

    Bunnell, W P

    1986-12-01

    Spinal deformity is a relatively common disorder, particularly in teenage girls. Early detection is possible by a simple, quick visual inspection that should be a standard part of the routine examination of all preteen and teenage patients. Follow-up observation will reveal those curvatures that are progressive and permit orthotic treatment to prevent further increase in the deformity. Spinal fusion offers correction and stabilization of more severe degrees of scoliosis. PMID:3786010

  16. Deformation integrity monitoring for GNSS positioning services including local, regional and large scale hazard monitoring - the Karlsruhe approach and software(MONIKA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, R.

    2007-05-01

    GNSS-positioning services like SAPOS/ascos in Germany and many others in Europe, America and worldwide, usually yield in a short time their interdisciplinary and country-wide use for precise geo-referencing, replacing traditional low order geodetic networks. So it becomes necessary that possible changes of the reference stations' coordinates are detected ad hoc. The GNSS-reference-station MONitoring by the KArlsruhe approach and software (MONIKA) are designed for that task. The developments at Karlsruhe University of Applied Sciences in cooperation with the State Survey of Baden-Württemberg are further motivated by a the official resolution of the German state survey departments' association (Arbeitsgemeinschaft der Vermessungsverwaltungen Deutschland (AdV)) 2006 on coordinate monitoring as a quality-control duty of the GNSS-positioning service provider. The presented approach can - besides the coordinate control of GNSS-positioning services - also be used to set up any GNSS-service for the tasks of an area-wide geodynamical and natural disaster-prevention service. The mathematical model of approach, which enables a multivariate and multi-epochal design approach, is based on the GNSS-observations input of the RINEX-data of the GNSS service, followed by fully automatic processing of baselines and/or session, and a near-online setting up of epoch-state vectors and their covariance-matrices in a rigorous 3D network adjustment. In case of large scale and long-term monitoring situations, geodynamical standard trends (datum-drift, plate-movements etc.) are accordingly considered and included in the mathematical model of MONIKA. The coordinate-based deformation monitoring approach, as third step of the stepwise adjustments, is based on the above epoch-state vectors, and - splitting off geodynamics trends - hereby on a multivariate and multi-epochal congruency testing. So far, that no other information exists, all points are assumed as being stable and congruent reference

  17. The large volume press facility at ID06 beamline of the European synchrotron radiation facility as a High Pressure-High Temperature deformation apparatus.

    PubMed

    Guignard, Jeremy; Crichton, Wilson A

    2015-08-01

    We report here the newly developed deformation setup offered by the 20MN (2000T) multi-anvil press newly installed at sector 7 of the European synchrotron radiation facility, on the ID06 beamline. The press is a Deformation-DIA (D-DIA) type apparatus, and different sets of primary anvils can be used for deformation experiments, from 6 mm to 3 mm truncations, according to the target pressure needed. Pressure and temperature calibrations and gradients show that the central zone of the assemblies is stable. Positions of differential RAMs are controlled with a sub-micron precision allowing strain rate from 10(-4) to 10(-6) s(-1). Moreover, changing differential RAM velocity is immediately visible on sample, making faster reaching of steady state. Lattice stresses are determined by the shifting of diffraction peak with azimuth angle using a linear detector covering typically a 10° solid-angle in 2θ mounted on rotation perpendicular to the beam. Acquisition of diffraction pattern, at a typical energy of 55 keV, is less than a minute to cover the whole azimuth-2θ space. Azimuth and d-spacing resolution are respectively better than 1° and 10(-3) Å making it possible to quantify lattice stresses with a precision of ±20 MPa (for silicates, which have typically high values of elastic properties), in pure or simple shear deformation measurements. These mechanical data are used to build fully constrained flow laws by varying P-T-σ-ε̇ conditions with the aim to better understanding the rheology of Earth's mantle. Finally, through texture analysis, it is also possible to determine lattice preferred orientation during deformation by quantifying diffraction peak intensity variation with azimuth angle. This press is therefore included as one of the few apparatus that can perform such experiments combining with synchrotron radiation. PMID:26329238

  18. The large volume press facility at ID06 beamline of the European synchrotron radiation facility as a High Pressure-High Temperature deformation apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guignard, Jeremy; Crichton, Wilson A.

    2015-08-01

    We report here the newly developed deformation setup offered by the 20MN (2000T) multi-anvil press newly installed at sector 7 of the European synchrotron radiation facility, on the ID06 beamline. The press is a Deformation-DIA (D-DIA) type apparatus, and different sets of primary anvils can be used for deformation experiments, from 6 mm to 3 mm truncations, according to the target pressure needed. Pressure and temperature calibrations and gradients show that the central zone of the assemblies is stable. Positions of differential RAMs are controlled with a sub-micron precision allowing strain rate from 10-4 to 10-6 s-1. Moreover, changing differential RAM velocity is immediately visible on sample, making faster reaching of steady state. Lattice stresses are determined by the shifting of diffraction peak with azimuth angle using a linear detector covering typically a 10° solid-angle in 2θ mounted on rotation perpendicular to the beam. Acquisition of diffraction pattern, at a typical energy of 55 keV, is less than a minute to cover the whole azimuth-2θ space. Azimuth and d-spacing resolution are respectively better than 1° and 10-3 Å making it possible to quantify lattice stresses with a precision of ±20 MPa (for silicates, which have typically high values of elastic properties), in pure or simple shear deformation measurements. These mechanical data are used to build fully constrained flow laws by varying P-T- σ - ɛ ˙ conditions with the aim to better understanding the rheology of Earth's mantle. Finally, through texture analysis, it is also possible to determine lattice preferred orientation during deformation by quantifying diffraction peak intensity variation with azimuth angle. This press is therefore included as one of the few apparatus that can perform such experiments combining with synchrotron radiation.

  19. Optimization of Kinematic GPS Data Analysis for Large Surface Deformation from the July 2003 Dome Collapse at Soufrière Hills Volcano, Montserrat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, R. B.; Mattioli, G. S.; Braun, J.

    2013-12-01

    position parameters to increase the precision of GPS position estimates during the eruption. BGGY, a station located 48 km northeast on Antigua, was used as a control to optimize the parameters for modeling the atmospheric variations more accurately for this type of environment, since BGGY is subjected to the similar weather patterns but was unaffected by volcanic activity at SHV. The final stochastic parameters were selected to yield the lowest variance in the kinematic position time-series at BGGY, then, HERM was reprocessed using the same parameters. The apparent vertical movement at HERM has been reduced substantially, and now has a maximum of 2.5 cm with a variation of 30 cm in the zenith wet troposphere estimate. We conclude that the original default parameters used to process that GPS observations over-constrained possible atmospheric variation for this tropical environment, producing apparently large dynamic position changes. Our new results now reflect actual dynamic ground deformation during the massive dome collapse and may be used to develop improved models for volcanic processes that occur over time scales of minutes to hours at SHV and other tropical volcanoes.

  20. Voxel-based morphometric analysis in hypothyroidism using diffeomorphic anatomic registration via an exponentiated lie algebra algorithm approach.

    PubMed

    Singh, S; Modi, S; Bagga, D; Kaur, P; Shankar, L R; Khushu, S

    2013-03-01

    The present study aimed to investigate whether brain morphological differences exist between adult hypothyroid subjects and age-matched controls using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) with diffeomorphic anatomic registration via an exponentiated lie algebra algorithm (DARTEL) approach. High-resolution structural magnetic resonance images were taken in ten healthy controls and ten hypothyroid subjects. The analysis was conducted using statistical parametric mapping. The VBM study revealed a reduction in grey matter volume in the left postcentral gyrus and cerebellum of hypothyroid subjects compared to controls. A significant reduction in white matter volume was also found in the cerebellum, right inferior and middle frontal gyrus, right precentral gyrus, right inferior occipital gyrus and right temporal gyrus of hypothyroid patients compared to healthy controls. Moreover, no meaningful cluster for greater grey or white matter volume was obtained in hypothyroid subjects compared to controls. Our study is the first VBM study of hypothyroidism in an adult population and suggests that, compared to controls, this disorder is associated with differences in brain morphology in areas corresponding to known functional deficits in attention, language, motor speed, visuospatial processing and memory in hypothyroidism.

  1. Quaternary deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.D. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Displaced or deformed rock units and landforms record the past 2 m.y. of faulting, folding, uplift, and subsidence in California. Properly interpreted, such evidence provides a quantitative basis for predicting future earthquake activity and for relating many diverse structures and landforms to the 5 cm/yr of horizontal motion at the boundary between the North American and Pacific plates. Modern techniques of geologic dating and expanded research on earthquake hazards have greatly improved our knowledge of the San Andreas fault system. Much of this new knowledge has been gained since 1965, and that part which concerns crustal deformation during the past 2 m.y. is briefly summarized here.

  2. Large scale displacements and internal deformations of the Outer Western Carpathians during the Cenozoic as manifested in paleomagnetic rotations and in the magnetic fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Márton, Emö; Tokarski, Antek K.

    2016-04-01

    The paleomagnetic and magnetic anisotropy results interpreted in this presentation in terms of tectonics were obtained on the fine grained members, mostly mudstones/claystones, of the flysch from the Magura, the Silesian and the Dukla rootless nappes. The results are the best from the Upper Oligocene Krosno beds, which were affected by compression soon after deposition. These beds were available for sampling in the Silesian and Dukla nappes, but absent in the Magura nappe. Thus, in the latter older Paleogene strata were tested. A common feature of all sampled sediments is the low susceptibility (in the range of 10-4 SI or lower), weak remanence and the presence of pyrite. AMS measurements point to quite strong and probably repeated deformation in the Magura nappe, and the remanence is of-post-folding age. The AMS of the Silesian and Dukla nappes indicate weaker deformation, the orientations of the AMS lineations reflect compression. The remanence is of pre-folding age in the western and central segments of the Silesian nappe and is a mixture of pre and post-folding magnetization in the eastern segment. All the so far mentioned areas must have been affected by about 60° CCW rotation which followed the internal deformation. The Dukla nappe also rotated in the CCW sense, but the angle is far from well-defined. This can be attributed to the complicated internal structure of the nappe (e.g. presence of olistoliths) and non-removable overprint magnetizations. The relationship between local tectonic strikes and AMS lineations seems to imply that the ductile deformation responsible for the AMS lineations were acquired first, and the map-scale structures came into being during the CCW rotation of the studied segment of the nappe. AARM measurements documented that the fabrics of the ferrimagnetic minerals are often different from the orientation of the AMS fabrics. In such cases, they either fail to define an ellipsoid or the general orientations of the maxima are different

  3. Deformation mechanisms in experimentally deformed Boom Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desbois, Guillaume; Schuck, Bernhard; Urai, Janos

    2016-04-01

    Bulk mechanical and transport properties of reference claystones for deep disposal of radioactive waste have been investigated since many years but little is known about microscale deformation mechanisms because accessing the relevant microstructure in these soft, very fine-grained, low permeable and low porous materials remains difficult. Recent development of ion beam polishing methods to prepare high quality damage free surfaces for scanning electron microscope (SEM) is opening new fields of microstructural investigation in claystones towards a better understanding of the deformation behavior transitional between rocks and soils. We present results of Boom Clay deformed in a triaxial cell in a consolidated - undrained test at a confining pressure of 0.375 MPa (i.e. close to natural value), with σ1 perpendicular to the bedding. Experiments stopped at 20 % strain. As a first approximation, the plasticity of the sample can be described by a Mohr-Coulomb type failure envelope with a coefficient of cohesion C = 0.117 MPa and an internal friction angle ϕ = 18.7°. After deformation test, the bulk sample shows a shear zone at an angle of about 35° from the vertical with an offset of about 5 mm. We used the "Lamipeel" method that allows producing a permanent absolutely plane and large size etched micro relief-replica in order to localize and to document the shear zone at the scale of the deformed core. High-resolution imaging of microstructures was mostly done by using the BIB-SEM method on key-regions identified after the "Lamipeel" method. Detailed BIB-SEM investigations of shear zones show the following: the boundaries between the shear zone and the host rock are sharp, clay aggregates and clastic grains are strongly reoriented parallel to the shear direction, and the porosity is significantly reduced in the shear zone and the grain size is smaller in the shear zone than in the host rock but there is no evidence for broken grains. Comparison of microstructures

  4. How does the mid-crust accommodate deformation in large, hot collisional orogens? A review of recent research in the Himalayan orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottle, John M.; Larson, Kyle P.; Kellett, Dawn A.

    2015-09-01

    The presence of hot, weak crust is a central component of recent hypotheses that seek to explain the evolution of continent-continent collisions, and in particular may play an important role in accommodating the >3000 km of convergence within the Himalaya-Tibetan collision over the last ˜55 Myr. Models that implicate flow of semi-viscous midcrustal rocks south toward the front of the Himalayan orogen, 'channel flow', are able to account for many geologic observations in the Himalaya, while alternative models of collision, particularly 'thrust-wedge taper', demonstrate that much of the observed geology could have formed in the absence of a low-viscosity mid-crustal layer. Several recent studies, synthesized here, have prompted a shift from initial assumptions that channel flow and thrust-wedge taper processes are by definition mutually exclusive. These new studies reveal the presence of several tectonometamorphic discontinuities in the midcrust that appear to reflect a continuum of deformation in which both channel- and wedge-type processes operate in spatially and temporally distinct domains within the orogen, and further, that the system may migrate back and forth between these types of behavior. This continuum of deformation styles within the collisional system is of crucial importance for explaining the evolution of the Himalayan orogen and, hence, for understanding the evolution of Earth's many continent-continent collision zones.

  5. MEMS Actuated Deformable Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Papavasiliou, A; Olivier, S; Barbee, T; Walton, C; Cohn, M

    2005-11-10

    This ongoing work concerns the creation of a deformable mirror by the integration of MEMS actuators with Nanolaminate foils through metal compression boning. These mirrors will use the advantages of these disparate technologies to achieve dense actuation of a high-quality, continuous mirror surface. They will enable advanced adaptive optics systems in large terrestrial telescopes. While MEMS actuators provide very dense actuation with high precision they can not provide large forces typically necessary to deform conventional mirror surfaces. Nanolaminate foils can be fabricated with very high surface quality while their extraordinary mechanical properties enable very thin, flexible foils to survive the rigors of fabrication. Precise metal compression bonding allows the attachment of the fragile MEMS actuators to the thin nanolaminate foils without creating distortions at the bond sites. This paper will describe work in four major areas: (1) modeling and design, (2) bonding development, (3) nanolaminate foil development, (4) producing a prototype. A first-principles analytical model was created and used to determine the design parameters. A method of bonding was determined that is both strong, and minimizes the localized deformation or print through. Work has also been done to produce nanolaminate foils that are sufficiently thin, flexible and flat to be deformed by the MEMS actuators. Finally a prototype was produced by bonding thin, flexible nanolaminate foils to commercially available MEMS actuators.

  6. Crustal deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Kristine M.

    1995-07-01

    Geodetic measurements of crustal deformation provide direct tests of geophysical models which are used to describe the dynamics of the Earth. Although geodetic observations have been made throughout history, only in the last several hundred years have they been sufficiently precise for geophysical studies. In the 19th century, these techniques included leveling and triangulation. Approximately 25 years ago, trilateration measurements were initiated by the USGS (United States Geological Survey) to monitor active faults in the United States. Several years later, NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) begin an effort to measure plate tectonic motions on a global scale, using space geodetic techniques, VLBI (Very Long Baseline Interferometry) and SLR (Satellite Laser Ranging). The period covered by this report to the IUGG, 1991-1994, was a transition period in the field of crustal deformation. Trilateration measurements (previously the backbone of measurements across plate boundaries in the western United States and Alaska) have been abandoned. This system was labor-intensive, involved highly trained crews to carry out the observations, and only measured the length between sites. In addition, NASA drastically cut the budgets for VLBI and SLR during this period. Fixed site VLBI systems are still operational, but mobile VLBI measurements in North America have ceased. SLR measurements continue on a global scale, but the remaining crustal deformation measurements are now being made with the Global Positioning System (GPS). Nonetheless, because of the time scales involved, older geodetic data (including leveling, triangulation, and trilateration) continue to be important for many geophysical studies.

  7. Fabrication and evaluation of variable focus and large deformation plano-convex microlens based on non-ionic poly(vinyl chloride)/dibutyl adipate gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Youn; Yeo, Myoung; Shin, Eun-Jae; Park, Won-Hyeong; Jang, Jong-Seok; Nam, Byeong-Uk; Bae, Jin Woo

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a variable focus microlens module based on a transparent, electroactive, and non-ionic PVC/DBA gel. A non-ionic PVC/DBA (nPVC) gel on an ITO glass was confined beneath a rigid annular electrode, and applied pressure squeezed a bulge of the nPVC gel into the annular electrode, resulting in a hemispherical plano-convex nPVC gel microlens. The proposed nPVC gel microlens was analyzed and optimized. When voltage is applied to the circular perimeter (the annular electrode) of this fabricated microlens, electrically induced creep deformation of the nPVC gel occurs, changing its optical focal length. The focal length remarkably increases from 3.8 mm up to 14.3 mm with increasing applied voltages from 300 V to 800 V. Due to its compact, transparent, and electroactive characteristics, the proposed nPVC gel microlens can be easily inserted into small consumer electronic devices, such as digital cameras, camcorders, cell phones, and other portable optical devices.

  8. Videogrammetric Model Deformation Measurement Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.; Liu, Tian-Shu

    2001-01-01

    The theory, methods, and applications of the videogrammetric model deformation (VMD) measurement technique used at NASA for wind tunnel testing are presented. The VMD technique, based on non-topographic photogrammetry, can determine static and dynamic aeroelastic deformation and attitude of a wind-tunnel model. Hardware of the system includes a video-rate CCD camera, a computer with an image acquisition frame grabber board, illumination lights, and retroreflective or painted targets on a wind tunnel model. Custom software includes routines for image acquisition, target-tracking/identification, target centroid calculation, camera calibration, and deformation calculations. Applications of the VMD technique at five large NASA wind tunnels are discussed.

  9. Optic disc boundary segmentation from diffeomorphic demons registration of monocular fundus image sequences versus 3D visualization of stereo fundus image pairs for automated early stage glaucoma assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatti, Vijay; Hill, Jason; Mitra, Sunanda; Nutter, Brian

    2014-03-01

    Despite the current availability in resource-rich regions of advanced technologies in scanning and 3-D imaging in current ophthalmology practice, world-wide screening tests for early detection and progression of glaucoma still consist of a variety of simple tools, including fundus image-based parameters such as CDR (cup to disc diameter ratio) and CAR (cup to disc area ratio), especially in resource -poor regions. Reliable automated computation of the relevant parameters from fundus image sequences requires robust non-rigid registration and segmentation techniques. Recent research work demonstrated that proper non-rigid registration of multi-view monocular fundus image sequences could result in acceptable segmentation of cup boundaries for automated computation of CAR and CDR. This research work introduces a composite diffeomorphic demons registration algorithm for segmentation of cup boundaries from a sequence of monocular images and compares the resulting CAR and CDR values with those computed manually by experts and from 3-D visualization of stereo pairs. Our preliminary results show that the automated computation of CDR and CAR from composite diffeomorphic segmentation of monocular image sequences yield values comparable with those from the other two techniques and thus may provide global healthcare with a cost-effective yet accurate tool for management of glaucoma in its early stage.

  10. Modeling of Fluid Induced Deformation of the Upper Crust of the Earth: Tilt Investigations About the Large Scale Injection Experiment at the KTB/Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahr, T.; Jentzsch, G.; Gebauer, A.

    2006-12-01

    The injection experiment at the KTB started in June, 2004 with a medium injection rate of 180 liters/minute into the KTB pilot borehole (4000 meters deep). A tiltmeter array, consisting of five high resolution borehole tiltmeters of the ASKANIA type, was operating in the surrounding area of the KTB location from mid 2003 until September 2006. The tiltmeters have a resolution of better than 0.2 msec (about 1 nrad). The aim of the research project was to observe the induced deformation of the upper crust at kilometer scale and to interpret the observation by numerical modeling, together with the monitoring of induced seismicity in the area. We expect elastic as well as anelastic responses: Changes of the rheologic properties due to pore pressure increase will cause changes in the tidal parameters. Further we expect sudden changes of the drift curve as well as slow variations. For the separation of the induced drift signal it is necessary to eliminate locally induced interference, e.g. arising from groundwater variations. The ground water / pore pressure changes, observed at all stations show significant correlations with the recorded tilt signals. The reduction of these locally acting effects and also meteorological influences like barometric pressure changes or precipitation yield tilt signals, which are significantly correlated with the injection experiment: The hodograms, which describe the tip movement of the pendulum over ground, show a clear dominant drift away from the injection point for three stations. This corresponds with a bulge in the area where the injection takes place. The tilt amplitudes are in the order of some milliseconds. Parallel to the observations with the tiltmeter array we quantified the expected additional drift for different injection scenarios at each tiltmeter site, by numerical modeling using the program POEL. It can be demonstrated that the tilt signals caused by injection intervals of less than three days are not detectable by the

  11. Microstructure and rheology of a thermoreversible gel under large amplitude oscillatory shear (LAOS) deformation using time-resolved oscillatory rheo-small-angle neutron scattering (tOr-SANS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung Min; Gurnon, A. Kate; Wagner, Norman; Eberle, Aaron

    2013-03-01

    Large amplitude oscillatory shear (LAOS) rheology is an effective way of studying the nonlinear dynamics of complex fluids. Here, we present a new method for a direct, quantitative study of the microstructure under LAOS deformation in the framework of the alignment factor, Af. We use a model thermoreversible adhesive hard-sphere system composed of octadecyl-coated silica particles suspended in n-tetradecane. With temperature the particle potential is controlled and the system is shifted from behaving as a near hard-sphere to an adhesive hard-sphere system leading to aggregation and ultimately a dynamical arrest transition to macroscopic gelation. Time-resolved oscillatory rheo-small-angle neutron scattering (tOr-SANS) measurements in the 1-3 plane are performed by stroboscopically probing the structural evolution as a function of time during LAOS. Under strong shear, the 2D scattering pattern of the system in the gelled state exhibits a strong anisotropy commonly known as a ``butterfly'' pattern, which corresponds to the stretching of the microstructure along the flow direction. The first structure-Lissajous plots of this model system are presented in terms of an order parameter and Af as a function of instantaneous strain and strain rate. This new analysis demonstrates a novel method for simultaneously measuring the rheology and microstructure during a time-dependent deformation (LAOS).

  12. Deformable micro torque swimmer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Takuji; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Omori, Toshihiro; Imai, Yohsuke

    2015-11-01

    We investigated the deformation of a ciliate swimming freely in a fluid otherwise at rest. The cell body was modeled as a capsule with a hyper elastic membrane enclosing Newtonian fluid. Thrust forces due to the ciliary beat were modeled as torques distributed above the cell body. Effects of the membrane elasticity, the aspect ratio of cell's reference shape and the density difference between the cell and the surrounding fluid were investigated. The results showed that the cell deformed like heart shape when Capillary number (Ca) was sufficiently large, and the swimming velocity decreased as Ca was increased. The gravity effect on the membrane tension suggested that the upwards and downwards swimming velocities of Paramecium might be reglated by the calcium ion channels distributed locally around the anterior end. Moreover, the gravity induced deformation made a cell directed vertically downwards, which resulted in a positive geotaxis like behavior with physical origin. These results are important to understand physiology of ciliate's biological responses to mechanical stimuli.

  13. Single particle calculations for a Woods-Saxon potential with triaxial deformations, and large Cartesian oscillator basis (TRIAXIAL 2014, Third version of the code Triaxial)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed-Azizi, B.; Medjadi, D. E.

    2014-11-01

    , WINDOWS 7, LINUX. RAM: 256 Mb (depending on nmax). Swap file: 4Gb (depending on nmax) Classification: 17.7. Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADSK_v2_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 176 (2007) 634 Nature of problem: The Single particle energies and the single particle wave functions are calculated from one-body Hamiltonian including a central field of Woods-Saxon type, a spin-orbit interaction, and the Coulomb potential for the protons. We consider only ellipsoidal (triaxial) shapes. The deformation of the nuclear shape is fixed by the usual Bohr parameters (β,γ). Solution method: The representative matrix of the Hamiltonian is built by means of the Cartesian basis of the anisotropic harmonic oscillator, and then diagonalized by a set of subroutines of the EISPACK library. Two quadrature methods of Gauss are employed to calculate respectively the integrals of the matrix elements of the Hamiltonian, and the integral defining the Coulomb potential. Two quantum numbers are conserved: the parity and the signature. Due to the Kramers degeneracy, only positive signature is considered. Therefore, calculations are made for positive and negative parity separately (with positive signature only). Reasons for new version: Now, there are several ways to obtain the eigenvalues and the eigenfunctions. The eigenvalues can be obtained from the subroutine ‘eigvals’ or from the array ‘energies’ or also from the formatted files ‘valuu.dat’, ‘eigenvalo.dat’, ‘eigenva.dat’ or better from the unformatted file ‘eigenvaunf.dat’. The eigenfunctions can be obtained straightforwardly in configuration space from the subroutine ‘eigfunc’ or by their components on the oscillator basis from the subroutine ‘compnts’. The latter are also recorded on a formatted file ‘componento.dat’ or on an unformatted file ‘componentounf.dat’. Summary of revisions: This version is

  14. Single particle calculations for a Woods-Saxon potential with triaxial deformations, and large Cartesian oscillator basis (TRIAXIAL 2014, Third version of the code Triaxial)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed-Azizi, B.; Medjadi, D. E.

    2014-11-01

    , WINDOWS 7, LINUX. RAM: 256 Mb (depending on nmax). Swap file: 4Gb (depending on nmax) Classification: 17.7. Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADSK_v2_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 176 (2007) 634 Nature of problem: The Single particle energies and the single particle wave functions are calculated from one-body Hamiltonian including a central field of Woods-Saxon type, a spin-orbit interaction, and the Coulomb potential for the protons. We consider only ellipsoidal (triaxial) shapes. The deformation of the nuclear shape is fixed by the usual Bohr parameters (β,γ). Solution method: The representative matrix of the Hamiltonian is built by means of the Cartesian basis of the anisotropic harmonic oscillator, and then diagonalized by a set of subroutines of the EISPACK library. Two quadrature methods of Gauss are employed to calculate respectively the integrals of the matrix elements of the Hamiltonian, and the integral defining the Coulomb potential. Two quantum numbers are conserved: the parity and the signature. Due to the Kramers degeneracy, only positive signature is considered. Therefore, calculations are made for positive and negative parity separately (with positive signature only). Reasons for new version: Now, there are several ways to obtain the eigenvalues and the eigenfunctions. The eigenvalues can be obtained from the subroutine ‘eigvals’ or from the array ‘energies’ or also from the formatted files ‘valuu.dat’, ‘eigenvalo.dat’, ‘eigenva.dat’ or better from the unformatted file ‘eigenvaunf.dat’. The eigenfunctions can be obtained straightforwardly in configuration space from the subroutine ‘eigfunc’ or by their components on the oscillator basis from the subroutine ‘compnts’. The latter are also recorded on a formatted file ‘componento.dat’ or on an unformatted file ‘componentounf.dat’. Summary of revisions: This version is

  15. Shape-correlated deformation statistics for respiratory motion prediction in 4D lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoxiao; Oguz, Ipek; Pizer, Stephen M.; Mageras, Gig S.

    2010-02-01

    4D image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) for free-breathing lungs is challenging due to the complicated respiratory dynamics. Effective modeling of respiratory motion is crucial to account for the motion affects on the dose to tumors. We propose a shape-correlated statistical model on dense image deformations for patient-specic respiratory motion estimation in 4D lung IGRT. Using the shape deformations of the high-contrast lungs as the surrogate, the statistical model trained from the planning CTs can be used to predict the image deformation during delivery verication time, with the assumption that the respiratory motion at both times are similar for the same patient. Dense image deformation fields obtained by diffeomorphic image registrations characterize the respiratory motion within one breathing cycle. A point-based particle optimization algorithm is used to obtain the shape models of lungs with group-wise surface correspondences. Canonical correlation analysis (CCA) is adopted in training to maximize the linear correlation between the shape variations of the lungs and the corresponding dense image deformations. Both intra- and inter-session CT studies are carried out on a small group of lung cancer patients and evaluated in terms of the tumor location accuracies. The results suggest potential applications using the proposed method.

  16. Large Alluvial Fans in the Araba Valley (Jordan) as a Record of Tectonic Deformation of the Southern Dead Sea Fault and Regional Paleoclimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Beon, M.; Klinger, Y.; Al-Qaryouti, M.; Meriaux, A.; Finkel, R. C.; Mayyas, O.; Ryerson, F. J.; Tapponnier, P.

    2007-12-01

    The Dead Sea fault is the 1000 km-long strike-slip fault that accommodates northward motion of Arabia relative to Sinai at a rate of about 5 mm/yr. This study focuses on the southern segment of this fault, the Wadi Araba fault. From the Dead Sea basin to the Gulf of Aqaba, the fault runs along an axial valley, about 20 km wide and 150 km long, bounded to the east by the Jordanian Plateau, reaching 1500 m in elevation and to the west by the Negev Plateau, lower in elevation (500-700 m). The Araba valley is floored with Plio-Quaternary deposits and in particular with large alluvial fans that are cut by the fault and offset relative to their feeding channel. We mapped the valley floor in details and dated some of these fans first to assess their lateral offset and further constrain the slip rate on the fault, and secondly to try to correlate alluvial fan aggradation periods in this arid/semi-arid environment to paleoclimatic variations at the regional and global scales. To identify the possible sources of the large alluvial fans, we analyzed the drainage network and the catchment basins on the valley rims based on SRTM3 topography. Previous study suggested that these fans were Pliocene and underwent offsets of 15 to 30 km. Ages as young as 50 to 350 kyr derived from 10Be exposure dating of 33 samples from the surface of some of these fans indicate that such offsets are very unlikely. Actual offsets have to be smaller. Preliminary reconstructions suggest offsets of 700-1300 m and 1600-2000 m for fans dated at 160 +/- 20 kyr and 330 +/- 22 kyr respectively, and offsets of 2.5-3.5 and 4.4-5.4 km for older fans that have not been dated yet. Consistent ages at different sites suggest simultaneous fan emplacement controlled by some external controlling factor such as climate variations. The correlation between these aggradation episodes and paleoclimatic variations would allow us to draw hypotheses on the age of these older surfaces. These preliminary results provide new

  17. Mechanical Failure Mode of Metal Nanowires: Global Deformation versus Local Deformation.

    PubMed

    Ho, Duc Tam; Im, Youngtae; Kwon, Soon-Yong; Earmme, Youn Young; Kim, Sung Youb

    2015-06-18

    It is believed that the failure mode of metal nanowires under tensile loading is the result of the nucleation and propagation of dislocations. Such failure modes can be slip, partial slip or twinning and therefore they are regarded as local deformation. Here we provide numerical and theoretical evidences to show that global deformation is another predominant failure mode of nanowires under tensile loading. At the global deformation mode, nanowires fail with a large contraction along a lateral direction and a large expansion along the other lateral direction. In addition, there is a competition between global and local deformations. Nanowires loaded at low temperature exhibit global failure mode first and then local deformation follows later. We show that the global deformation originates from the intrinsic instability of the nanowires and that temperature is a main parameter that decides the global or local deformation as the failure mode of nanowires.

  18. Mechanical Failure Mode of Metal Nanowires: Global Deformation versus Local Deformation

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Duc Tam; Im, Youngtae; Kwon, Soon-Yong; Earmme, Youn Young; Kim, Sung Youb

    2015-01-01

    It is believed that the failure mode of metal nanowires under tensile loading is the result of the nucleation and propagation of dislocations. Such failure modes can be slip, partial slip or twinning and therefore they are regarded as local deformation. Here we provide numerical and theoretical evidences to show that global deformation is another predominant failure mode of nanowires under tensile loading. At the global deformation mode, nanowires fail with a large contraction along a lateral direction and a large expansion along the other lateral direction. In addition, there is a competition between global and local deformations. Nanowires loaded at low temperature exhibit global failure mode first and then local deformation follows later. We show that the global deformation originates from the intrinsic instability of the nanowires and that temperature is a main parameter that decides the global or local deformation as the failure mode of nanowires. PMID:26087445

  19. Nanoscale Deformable Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strauss, Karl F.; Sheldon, Douglas J.

    2011-01-01

    Several missions and instruments in the conceptual design phase rely on the technique of interferometry to create detectable fringe patterns. The intimate emplacement of reflective material upon electron device cells based upon chalcogenide material technology permits high-speed, predictable deformation of the reflective surface to a subnanometer or finer resolution with a very high degree of accuracy. In this innovation, a layer of reflective material is deposited upon a wafer containing (perhaps in the millions) chalcogenic memory cells with the reflective material becoming the front surface of a mirror and the chalcogenic material becoming a means of selectively deforming the mirror by the application of heat to the chalcogenic material. By doing so, the mirror surface can deform anywhere from nil to nanometers in spots the size of a modern day memory cell, thereby permitting realtime tuning of mirror focus and reflectivity to mitigate aberrations caused elsewhere in the optical system. Modern foundry methods permit the design and manufacture of individual memory cells having an area of or equal to the Feature (F) size of the design (assume 65 nm). Fabrication rules and restraints generally require the instantiation of one memory cell to another no closer than 1.5 F, or, for this innovation, 90 nm from its neighbor in any direction. Chalcogenide is a semiconducting glass compound consisting of a combination of chalcogen ions, the ratios of which vary according to properties desired. It has been shown that the application of heat to cells of chalcogenic material cause a large alteration in resistance to the range of 4 orders of magnitude. It is this effect upon which chalcogenidebased commercial memories rely. Upon removal of the heat source, the chalcogenide rapidly cools and remains frozen in the excited state. It has also been shown that the chalcogenide expands in volume because of the applied heat, meaning that the coefficient of expansion of chalcogenic

  20. Deformable Registration of Feature-Endowed Point Sets Based on Tensor Fields

    PubMed Central

    Wassermann, Demian; Ross, James; Washko, George; Wells, William M.; San Jose-Estepar, Raul

    2014-01-01

    The main contribution of this work is a framework to register anatomical structures characterized as a point set where each point has an associated symmetric matrix. These matrices can represent problem-dependent characteristics of the registered structure. For example, in airways, matrices can represent the orientation and thickness of the structure. Our framework relies on a dense tensor field representation which we implement sparsely as a kernel mixture of tensor fields. We equip the space of tensor fields with a norm that serves as a similarity measure. To calculate the optimal transformation between two structures we minimize this measure using an analytical gradient for the similarity measure and the deformation field, which we restrict to be a diffeomorphism. We illustrate the value of our tensor field model by comparing our results with scalar and vector field based models. Finally, we evaluate our registration algorithm on synthetic data sets and validate our approach on manually annotated airway trees. PMID:25473253

  1. The role of regularization in deformable image registration for head and neck adaptive radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ciardo, D; Peroni, M; Riboldi, M; Alterio, D; Baroni, G; Orecchia, R

    2013-08-01

    Deformable image registration provides a robust mathematical framework to quantify morphological changes that occur along the course of external beam radiotherapy treatments. As clinical reliability of deformable image registration is not always guaranteed, algorithm regularization is commonly introduced to prevent sharp discontinuities in the quantified deformation and achieve anatomically consistent results. In this work we analyzed the influence of regularization on two different registration methods, i.e. B-Splines and Log Domain Diffeomorphic Demons, implemented in an open-source platform. We retrospectively analyzed the simulation computed tomography (CTsim) and the corresponding re-planning computed tomography (CTrepl) scans in 30 head and neck cancer patients. First, we investigated the influence of regularization levels on hounsfield units (HU) information in 10 test patients for each considered method. Then, we compared the registration results of the open-source implementation at selected best performing regularization levels with a clinical commercial software on the remaining 20 patients in terms of mean volume overlap, surface and center of mass distances between manual outlines and propagated structures. The regularized B-Splines method was not statistically different from the commercial software. The tuning of the regularization parameters allowed open-source algorithms to achieve better results in deformable image registration for head and neck patients, with the additional benefit of a framework where regularization can be tuned on a patient specific basis.

  2. Finite Deformation of Magnetoelastic Film

    SciTech Connect

    Barham, Matthew Ian

    2011-05-31

    A nonlinear two-dimensional theory is developed for thin magnetoelastic lms capable of large deformations. This is derived directly from three-dimensional theory. Signi cant simpli cations emerge in the descent from three dimensions to two, permitting the self eld generated by the body to be computed a posteriori. The model is specialized to isotropic elastomers with two material models. First weak magnetization is investigated leading to a free energy where magnetization and deformation are un-coupled. The second closely couples the magnetization and deformation. Numerical solutions are obtained to equilibrium boundary-value problems in which the membrane is subjected to lateral pressure and an applied magnetic eld. An instability is inferred and investigated for the weak magnetization material model.

  3. Deformation Mechanisms of Antigorite Serpentinite at Subduction Zone Conditions Determined from Experimentally and Naturally Deformed Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auzende, A. L.; Escartin, J.; Walte, N.; Guillot, S.; Hirth, G.; Frost, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    The rheology of serpentinite, and particularly that of antigorite-bearing rocks, is of prime importance for understanding subduction zone proceses, including decoupling between the downwelling slab and the overriding plate, exhumation of high-pressure rocks, fluids pathways and, more generally, mantle wedge dynamics. We present results from deformation-DIA experiments on antigorite serpentinite performed under conditions relevant of subduction zones (1-3.5 GPa ; 400-650°C). We complemented our study with a sample deformed in a Griggs-type apparatus at 1 GPa and 400°C (Chernak and Hirth, EPSL, 2010), and with natural samples from Cuba and the Alps deformed under blueschist/eclogitic conditions. Our observations on experimental samples of antigorite deformed within its stability field show that deformation is dominated by cataclastic flow; we can only document a minor contribution of plastic deformation. In naturally deformed samples, deformation-related plastic structures largely dominate strain accommodation, but we also document a minor contribution of brittle deformation. When dehydration occurs in experiments, plasticity increases, and is coupled to local embrittlement attributed to hydraulic fracturating due to the migration of dehydration fluids. Our results thus show that semibrittle deformation operates within and above the stability field of antigorite. We also document that the corrugated structure of antigorite has a control on the strain accommodation mechanisms under subduction conditions, with preferred inter and intra-cracking along (001) and gliding along both a and b. Deformation dominated by brittle processes, as observed in experiments, may occur during deformation at elevated (seismic?) strain rates, while plastic deformation, as observed in naturally deformed rocks, may correspond instead to low strain rates instead (aseismic creep?). We also discuss the role of antigorite rheology and mode of deformation on fluid transport.

  4. Active Beam Shaping System and Method Using Sequential Deformable Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Colin A. (Inventor); Pueyo, Laurent A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An active optical beam shaping system includes a first deformable mirror arranged to at least partially intercept an entrance beam of light and to provide a first reflected beam of light, a second deformable mirror arranged to at least partially intercept the first reflected beam of light from the first deformable mirror and to provide a second reflected beam of light, and a signal processing and control system configured to communicate with the first and second deformable mirrors. The first deformable mirror, the second deformable mirror and the signal processing and control system together provide a large amplitude light modulation range to provide an actively shaped optical beam.

  5. Strong crystal size effect on deformation twinning.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qian; Shan, Zhi-Wei; Li, Ju; Huang, Xiaoxu; Xiao, Lin; Sun, Jun; Ma, Evan

    2010-01-21

    Deformation twinning in crystals is a highly coherent inelastic shearing process that controls the mechanical behaviour of many materials, but its origin and spatio-temporal features are shrouded in mystery. Using micro-compression and in situ nano-compression experiments, here we find that the stress required for deformation twinning increases drastically with decreasing sample size of a titanium alloy single crystal, until the sample size is reduced to one micrometre, below which the deformation twinning is entirely replaced by less correlated, ordinary dislocation plasticity. Accompanying the transition in deformation mechanism, the maximum flow stress of the submicrometre-sized pillars was observed to saturate at a value close to titanium's ideal strength. We develop a 'stimulated slip' model to explain the strong size dependence of deformation twinning. The sample size in transition is relatively large and easily accessible in experiments, making our understanding of size dependence relevant for applications.

  6. Strong crystal size effect on deformation twinning.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qian; Shan, Zhi-Wei; Li, Ju; Huang, Xiaoxu; Xiao, Lin; Sun, Jun; Ma, Evan

    2010-01-21

    Deformation twinning in crystals is a highly coherent inelastic shearing process that controls the mechanical behaviour of many materials, but its origin and spatio-temporal features are shrouded in mystery. Using micro-compression and in situ nano-compression experiments, here we find that the stress required for deformation twinning increases drastically with decreasing sample size of a titanium alloy single crystal, until the sample size is reduced to one micrometre, below which the deformation twinning is entirely replaced by less correlated, ordinary dislocation plasticity. Accompanying the transition in deformation mechanism, the maximum flow stress of the submicrometre-sized pillars was observed to saturate at a value close to titanium's ideal strength. We develop a 'stimulated slip' model to explain the strong size dependence of deformation twinning. The sample size in transition is relatively large and easily accessible in experiments, making our understanding of size dependence relevant for applications. PMID:20090749

  7. Coseismic topography deformation at Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Xinyue; Lavier, Luc; Tan, Eh

    2016-04-01

    Subduction zones produce the largest earthquakes. However, our understanding of earthquakes' spatial-temporal occurrence and tectonic deformation at convergent margin is limited. Traditional view for subduction earthquake cycle contain three stages: Interseismic - superposition of steady elastic strain accumulation and occasional short-duration aseismic strain release, Coseismic - rapid opposite-direction release of accumulated elastic strain, and Postseismic - superposition of afterslips and viscoelastic flow in mantle wedge and lower crust. However, the way strain accumulated interseismically which is related to the generation of long-term deformation and uplift in the forearc region is still a matter of debate. Moreover, when integrated over time, coseismic uplift poorly matches the longer-term vertical deformation. To better understand these relationships, we investigate numerically how coseismic slip and long-term deformation (vertical uplift) accumulate and interact at subduction zones by using a robust, adaptive, multi-dimensional, finite element method solver, Dynearthsol3D, on a 2D continuum viscoelastoplastic model. We set the conditions in this model to a realistic convergent margin setting that resembles Sumatra region. By introducing bathymetric features, this research also explore mechanisms that could explain how strain accumulation in space and time is modified by the presence of large asperities at the subduction interface.

  8. Coseismic Topography Deformation at Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, X.; Lavier, L. L.; Tan, E.

    2015-12-01

    Subduction zones produce the largest earthquakes. However, our understanding of earthquakes' spatial-temporal occurrence and tectonic deformation at convergent margin is limited. Traditional view for subduction earthquake cycle contain three stages: Interseismic - superposition of steady elastic strain accumulation and occasional short-duration aseismic strain release, Coseismic - rapid opposite-direction release of accumulated elastic strain, and Postseismic - superposition of afterslips and viscoelastic flow in mantle wedge and lower crust. However, the way strain accumulated interseismically which is related to the generation of long-term deformation and uplift in the forearc region is still a matter of debate. Moreover, when integrated over time, coseismic uplift poorly matches the longer-term vertical deformation. To better understand these relationships, we investigate numerically how coseismic slip and long-term deformation (vertical uplift) accumulate and interact at subduction zones by using a robust, adaptive, multi-dimensional, finite element method solver, Dynearthsol3D, on a 2D continuum viscoelastoplastic model. We set the conditions in this model to a realistic convergent margin setting that resembles Sumatra region. By introducing bathymetric features, this research also explore mechanisms that could explain how strain accumulation in space and time is modified by the presence of large asperities at the subduction interface.

  9. Electrostatics of deformable lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Vorobyov, Igor; Bekker, Borislava; Allen, Toby W

    2010-06-16

    It was recently demonstrated that significant local deformations of biological membranes take place due to the fields of charged peptides and ions, challenging the standard model of membrane electrostatics. The ability of ions to retain their immediate hydration environment, combined with the lack of sensitivity of permeability to ion type or even ion pairs, led us to question the extent to which hydration energetics and electrostatics control membrane ion permeation. Using the arginine analog methyl-guanidinium as a test case, we find that although hydrocarbon electronic polarizability causes dramatic changes in ion solvation free energy, as well as a significant change (approximately 0.4 V) in the membrane dipole potential, little change in membrane permeation energetics occurs. We attribute this to compensation of solvation terms from polar and polarizable nonpolar components within the membrane, and explain why the dipole potential is not fully sensed in terms of the locally deformed bilayer interface. Our descriptions provide a deeper understanding of the translocation process and allow predictions for poly-ions, ion pairs, charged lipids, and lipid flip-flop. We also report simulations of large hydrophobic-ion-like membrane defects and the ionophore valinomycin, which exhibit little membrane deformation, as well as hydrophilic defects and the ion channel gramicidin A, to provide parallels to membranes deformed by unassisted ion permeation.

  10. Deformable bearing seat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreman, O. S., III (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A deformable bearing seat is described for seating a bearing assembly in a housing. The seat includes a seating surface in the housing having a first predetermined spheroidal contour when the housing is in an undeformed mode. The seating surface is deformable to a second predetermined spherically contoured surface when the housing is in a deformed mode. The seat is particularly adaptable for application to a rotating blade and mounting ring assembly in a gas turbine engine.

  11. Dielectric elastomer membranes undergoing inhomogeneous deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Tianhu; Zhao, Xuanhe; Suo, Zhigang

    2009-10-01

    Dielectric elastomers are capable of large deformation subject to an electric voltage and are promising for use as actuators, sensors, and generators. Because of large deformation, nonlinear equations of states, and diverse modes of failure, modeling the process of electromechanical transduction has been challenging. This paper studies a membrane of a dielectric elastomer deformed into an out-of-plane axisymmetric shape, a configuration used in a family of commercial devices known as the universal muscle actuators. The kinematics of deformation and charging, together with thermodynamics, leads to equations that govern the state of equilibrium. Numerical results indicate that the field in the membrane can be very inhomogeneous, and that the membrane is susceptible to several modes of failure, including electrical breakdown, loss of tension, and rupture by stretch. Care is needed in the design to balance the requirements of averting various modes of failure while using the material efficiently.

  12. Deformed discrete symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzano, Michele; Kowalski-Glikman, Jerzy

    2016-09-01

    We construct discrete symmetry transformations for deformed relativistic kinematics based on group valued momenta. We focus on the specific example of κ-deformations of the Poincaré algebra with associated momenta living on (a sub-manifold of) de Sitter space. Our approach relies on the description of quantum states constructed from deformed kinematics and the observable charges associated with them. The results we present provide the first step towards the analysis of experimental bounds on the deformation parameter κ to be derived via precision measurements of discrete symmetries and CPT.

  13. Fluctuations as stochastic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazinski, P. O.

    2008-04-01

    A notion of stochastic deformation is introduced and the corresponding algebraic deformation procedure is developed. This procedure is analogous to the deformation of an algebra of observables like deformation quantization, but for an imaginary deformation parameter (the Planck constant). This method is demonstrated on diverse relativistic and nonrelativistic models with finite and infinite degrees of freedom. It is shown that under stochastic deformation the model of a nonrelativistic particle interacting with the electromagnetic field on a curved background passes into the stochastic model described by the Fokker-Planck equation with the diffusion tensor being the inverse metric tensor. The first stochastic correction to the Newton equations for this system is found. The Klein-Kramers equation is also derived as the stochastic deformation of a certain classical model. Relativistic generalizations of the Fokker-Planck and Klein-Kramers equations are obtained by applying the procedure of stochastic deformation to appropriate relativistic classical models. The analog of the Fokker-Planck equation associated with the stochastic Lorentz-Dirac equation is derived too. The stochastic deformation of the models of a free scalar field and an electromagnetic field is investigated. It turns out that in the latter case the obtained stochastic model describes a fluctuating electromagnetic field in a transparent medium.

  14. Fluctuations as stochastic deformation.

    PubMed

    Kazinski, P O

    2008-04-01

    A notion of stochastic deformation is introduced and the corresponding algebraic deformation procedure is developed. This procedure is analogous to the deformation of an algebra of observables like deformation quantization, but for an imaginary deformation parameter (the Planck constant). This method is demonstrated on diverse relativistic and nonrelativistic models with finite and infinite degrees of freedom. It is shown that under stochastic deformation the model of a nonrelativistic particle interacting with the electromagnetic field on a curved background passes into the stochastic model described by the Fokker-Planck equation with the diffusion tensor being the inverse metric tensor. The first stochastic correction to the Newton equations for this system is found. The Klein-Kramers equation is also derived as the stochastic deformation of a certain classical model. Relativistic generalizations of the Fokker-Planck and Klein-Kramers equations are obtained by applying the procedure of stochastic deformation to appropriate relativistic classical models. The analog of the Fokker-Planck equation associated with the stochastic Lorentz-Dirac equation is derived too. The stochastic deformation of the models of a free scalar field and an electromagnetic field is investigated. It turns out that in the latter case the obtained stochastic model describes a fluctuating electromagnetic field in a transparent medium.

  15. Mounting with compliant cylinders for deformable mirrors.

    PubMed

    Reinlein, Claudia; Goy, Matthias; Lange, Nicolas; Appelfelder, Michael

    2015-04-01

    A method is presented to mount large aperture unimorph deformable mirrors by compliant cylinders (CC). The CCs are manufactured from a soft silicone, and shear testing is performed in order to evaluate the Young's modulus. A scale mirror model is assembled to evaluate mount-induced change of piezoelectric deformation, and its applicability for tightly focusing mirrors. Experiments do not show any decrease of piezoelectric stroke. Further it is shown that the changes of surface fidelity by the attachment of the deformable mirror to its mount are neglectable.

  16. GPS constraints on the kinematics of continental deformation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thatcher, W.

    2003-01-01

    Recent GPS observations from the western United States, New Zealand, central Greece, and Japan indicate that present-day continental deformation is typically focused in narrow deforming zones whose extent is much smaller than the intervening largely inactive regions. However, these narrow zones are heterogeneously distributed, reflecting the inherent heterogeneity of continental lithospheric strength and internal buoyancy. Plate driving and resisting forces stress plate boundary zones and plate interiors and drive deformation. These forces change continuously and discontinuously, leading to continental deformation that typically evolves and migrates with time. Magmatic and tectonic processes alter lithospheric rheology and internal buoyancy and also contribute to the time-varying character of continental deformation.

  17. Performance through Deformation and Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoldi, Katia

    2015-03-01

    Materials capable of undergoing large deformations like elastomers and gels are ubiquitous in daily life and nature. An exciting field of engineering is emerging that uses these compliant materials to design active devices, such as actuators, adaptive optical systems and self-regulating fluidics. Compliant structures may significantly change their architecture in response to diverse stimuli. When excessive deformation is applied, they may eventually become unstable. Traditionally, mechanical instabilities have been viewed as an inconvenience, with research focusing on how to avoid them. Here, I will demonstrate that these instabilities can be exploited to design materials with novel, switchable functionalities. The abrupt changes introduced into the architecture of soft materials by instabilities will be used to change their shape in a sudden, but controlled manner. Possible and exciting applications include materials with unusual properties such negative Poisson's ratio, phononic crystals with tunable low-frequency acoustic band gaps and reversible encapsulation systems.

  18. Information Geometry for Landmark Shape Analysis: Unifying Shape Representation and Deformation

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Adrian M.; Rangarajan, Anand

    2010-01-01

    Shape matching plays a prominent role in the comparison of similar structures. We present a unifying framework for shape matching that uses mixture models to couple both the shape representation and deformation. The theoretical foundation is drawn from information geometry wherein information matrices are used to establish intrinsic distances between parametric densities. When a parameterized probability density function is used to represent a landmark-based shape, the modes of deformation are automatically established through the information matrix of the density. We first show that given two shapes parameterized by Gaussian mixture models (GMMs), the well-known Fisher information matrix of the mixture model is also a Riemannian metric (actually, the Fisher-Rao Riemannian metric) and can therefore be used for computing shape geodesics. The Fisher-Rao metric has the advantage of being an intrinsic metric and invariant to reparameterization. The geodesic—computed using this metric—establishes an intrinsic deformation between the shapes, thus unifying both shape representation and deformation. A fundamental drawback of the Fisher-Rao metric is that it is not available in closed form for the GMM. Consequently, shape comparisons are computationally very expensive. To address this, we develop a new Riemannian metric based on generalized ϕ-entropy measures. In sharp contrast to the Fisher-Rao metric, the new metric is available in closed form. Geodesic computations using the new metric are considerably more efficient. We validate the performance and discriminative capabilities of these new information geometry-based metrics by pairwise matching of corpus callosum shapes. We also study the deformations of fish shapes that have various topological properties. A comprehensive comparative analysis is also provided using other landmark-based distances, including the Hausdorff distance, the Procrustes metric, landmark-based diffeomorphisms, and the bending energies of the

  19. Shape Function-Based Estimation of Deformation with Moving Cameras Attached to the Deforming Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokinen, O.; Ranta, I.; Haggrén, H.; Rönnholm, P.

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents a novel method to measure 3-D deformation of a large metallic frame structure of a crane under loading from one to several images, when the cameras need to be attached to the self deforming body, the structure sways during loading, and the imaging geometry is not optimal due to physical limitations. The solution is based on modeling the deformation with adequate shape functions and taking into account that the cameras move depending on the frame deformation. It is shown that the deformation can be estimated even from a single image of targeted points if the 3-D coordinates of the points are known or have been measured before loading using multiple cameras or some other measuring technique. The precision of the method is evaluated to be 1 mm at best, corresponding to 1:11400 of the average distance to the target.

  20. Dynamics of continental deformation in Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergnolle, M.; Calais, E.; Dong, L.

    2007-11-01

    The relevance of plate tectonics concepts to the description of deformation of large continental areas like Asia is subject to much debate. For some, the deformation of continents is better described by rigid motion of lithospheric blocks with strain concentrated along narrow fault zones. For others, it is better described by viscous flow of a continuously deforming solid in which faults play a minor role. Discriminating these end-member hypotheses requires spatially dense measurements of surface strain rates covering the whole deforming area. Here we revisit the issue of the forces and rheological structure that control present-day deformation in Asia. We use the "thin sheet" theory, with deformation driven by the balance of boundary and buoyancy stresses acting on a faulted lithosphere with laterally varying strength. Models are validated against a recent, homogeneous, GPS velocity field that covers most of Asia. In the models, deformation in compressional areas (Himalayas, Tien Shan, Altay) is well reproduced with strong coupling at the India/Eurasia plate contact, which allows for boundary forces to transfer into Asia. Southeastward motions observed in north and south China, however, require tensional, oceanward directed stresses, possibly generated by gravitational potential energy gradients across the Indonesian and Pacific subductions. Model and observed strain rates show that a large part of Asia undergoes no resolvable strain, with a kinematics apparently consistent with block- or plate-like motions. Internal strain, possibly continuous, is limited to high-elevation, mechanically weaker areas. Lateral variations of lithospheric strength appear to control the style of deformation in Asia, with a dynamics consistent with the thin sheet physical framework.

  1. Mid-Space-Independent Symmetric Data Term for Pairwise Deformable Image Registration

    PubMed Central

    Aganj, Iman; Iglesias, Juan Eugenio; Reuter, Martin; Sabuncu, Mert Rory; Fischl, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Aligning a pair of images in a mid-space is a common approach to ensuring that deformable image registration is symmetric – that it does not depend on the arbitrary ordering of the input images. The results are, however, generally dependent on the choice of the mid-space. In particular, the set of possible solutions is typically affected by the constraints that are enforced on the two transformations (that deform the two images), which are to prevent the mid-space from drifting too far from the native image spaces. The use of an implicit atlas has been proposed to define the mid-space for pairwise registration. In this work, we show that by aligning the atlas to each image in the native image space, implicit-atlas-based pairwise registration can be made independent of the mid-space, thereby eliminating the need for anti-drift constraints. We derive a new symmetric cost function that only depends on a single transformation morphing one image to the other, and validate it through diffeomorphic registration experiments on brain magnetic resonance images. PMID:26835520

  2. Dislocation processes and deformation twinning in nanocrystalline Al.

    SciTech Connect

    Yamakov, V.; Wolf, D.; Phillpot, S.R.; Gleiter, H.

    2002-01-29

    Using a recently developed, massively parallel molecular-dynamics (MD) code for the simulation of polycrystal plasticity, we analyze for the case of nanocrystalline Al the complex interplay among various dislocation and grain-boundary processes during low-temperature deformation. A unique aspect of this work, arising from our ability to deform to rather large plastic strains and to consider a rather large grain size, is the observation of deformation under very high grain-boundary and dislocation densities, i.e., in a deformation regime where they compete on an equal footing. We are thus able to identify the intra- and intergranular dislocation and grain-boundary processes responsible for the extensive deformation twinning observed in our simulations. This illustrates the ability of this type of simulations to capture novel atomic-level insights into the underlying deformation mechanisms not presently possible experimentally. smaller grain size, mobile dislocations must be nucleated from other sources, such as the GBs or grain junctions.

  3. Polygonal deformation bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonellini, Marco; Mollema, Pauline Nella

    2015-12-01

    We report for the first time the occurrence of polygonal faults in sandstone, which is compelling given that layer-bound polygonal fault systems have been observed so far only in fine-grained sediments such as clay and chalk. The polygonal faults are shear deformation bands that developed under shallow burial conditions via strain hardening in dm-wide zones. The edges of the polygons are 1-5 m long. The shear deformation bands are organized as conjugate faults along each edge of the polygon and form characteristic horst-like structures. The individual deformation bands have slip magnitudes ranging from a few mm to 1.5 cm; the cumulative average slip magnitude in a zone is up to 10 cm. The deformation bands heaves, in aggregate form, accommodate a small isotropic horizontal extension (strain <0.005). The individual shear deformation bands show abutting T-junctions, veering, curving, and merging where they mechanically interact. Crosscutting relationships are rare. The interactions of the deformation bands are similar to those of mode I opening fractures. The documented fault networks have important implications for evaluating the geometry of km-scale polygonal fault systems in the subsurface, top seal integrity, as well as constraining paleo-tectonic stress regimes.

  4. Polygonal deformation bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonellini, Marco; Mollema, Pauline Nella

    2015-12-01

    We report for the first time the occurrence of polygonal faults in sandstone, which is compelling given that layer-bound polygonal fault systems have been observed so far only in fine-grained sediments such as clay and chalk. The polygonal faults are shear deformation bands that developed under shallow burial conditions via strain hardening in dm-wide zones. The edges of the polygons are 1-5 m long. The shear deformation bands are organized as conjugate faults along each edge of the polygon and form characteristic horst-like structures. The individual deformation bands have slip magnitudes ranging from a few mm to 1.5 cm; the cumulative average slip magnitude in a zone is up to 10 cm. The deformation bands heaves, in aggregate form, accommodate a small isotropic horizontal extension (strain <0.005). The individual shear deformation bands show abutting T-junctions, veering, curving, and merging where they mechanically interact. Crosscutting relationships are rare. The interactions of the deformation bands are similar to those of mode I opening fractures. The documented fault networks have important implications for evaluating the geometry of km-scale polygonal fault systems in the subsurface, top seal integrity, as well as constraining paleo-tectonic stress regimes.

  5. Exactly isochoric deformations of soft solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggins, John S.; Wei, Z.; Mahadevan, L.

    2014-12-01

    Many materials of contemporary interest, such as gels, biological tissues and elastomers, are easily deformed but essentially incompressible. Traditional linear theory of elasticity implements incompressibility only to first order and thus permits some volume changes, which become problematically large even at very small strains. Using a mixed coordinate transformation originally due to Gauss, we enforce the constraint of isochoric deformations exactly to develop a linear theory with perfect volume conservation that remains valid until strains become geometrically large. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by calculating the response of an infinite soft isochoric solid to a point force that leads to a nonlinear generalization of the Kelvin solution. Our approach naturally generalizes to a range of problems involving deformations of soft solids and interfaces in two-dimensional and axisymmetric geometries, which we exemplify by determining the solution to a distributed load that mimics muscular contraction within the bulk of a soft solid.

  6. Reverse Kirner's deformity: case report.

    PubMed

    Lau, Yeong J; Tonkin, Michael A

    2009-03-01

    Kirner's deformity is a rare congenital deformity, usually of the little finger, with volar and radial bowing of the distal phalanx. The etiology of this deformity is unclear. We describe a case of a 9-year-old girl with radiographic changes classic for Kirner's deformity but with the curvature and nail changes in the dorsal direction.

  7. Deformation of orthodontic archwires over time.

    PubMed

    Wong, E K; Borland, D W; West, V C

    1994-10-01

    Most previous studies of archwire deformation over time (hereafter referred to as "time-dependent deformation of orthodontic wires") have been conducted at a constant room temperature. In the clinical situation however, arch wires are exposed to 37 degrees C as well as to periods of temperature increase when hot foods or fluids are ingested. The effects of the latter on time-dependent behaviour are largely unknown. Since the introduction of direct electric resistance heat treatment to superelastic nickel titanium wires, there have been no reports on its effect on time-dependent deformation. This study investigated the effects of repeated temperature increases (70 degrees C) on stainless steel, nickel titanium and beta titanium wires. The wires were deflected by approximately 3 and 5 mm on two jigs for periods of 1 minute, 1, 7, 14 and 28 days. Permanent deformation was measured optically with a measuring microscope and the amount of time-dependent deformation was calculated. Beta titanium wires demonstrated the greatest amount of time-dependent deformation; followed by non-superelastic nickel titanium, stainless steel, and superelastic nickel titanium. Exposure to repeated temperature (70 degrees C) increases and direct electric resistance heat treatment of superelastic nickel titanium did not affect time-dependent behaviour. PMID:8975645

  8. Measuring Crustal Deformation in the American West.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Thomas H.; Minster, J. Bernard

    1988-01-01

    Suggests that there is a close relationship between deformation in the western United States and the large-scale motions of tectonic plates. Introduces very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) as one of the space-geodetic techniques, vector addition of the VLBI data and geological data, and a new geodetic network. (YP)

  9. Interfacial Bubble Deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seymour, Brian; Shabane, Parvis; Cypull, Olivia; Cheng, Shengfeng; Feitosa, Klebert

    Soap bubbles floating at an air-water experience deformations as a result of surface tension and hydrostatic forces. In this experiment, we investigate the nature of such deformations by taking cross-sectional images of bubbles of different volumes. The results show that as their volume increases, bubbles transition from spherical to hemispherical shape. The deformation of the interface also changes with bubble volume with the capillary rise converging to the capillary length as volume increases. The profile of the top and bottom of the bubble and the capillary rise are completely determined by the volume and pressure differences. James Madison University Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4VA Consortium, Research Corporation for Advancement of Science.

  10. Crustal deformation and earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    The manner in which the Earth's surface deforms during the cycle of stress accumulation and release along major faults is investigated. In an investigation of the crustal deformation associated with a thin channel asthenosphere displacements are reduced from those computed for a half space asthenosphere. A previous finding by other workers that displacements are enhanced when flow is confined to a thin channel is based on several invalid approximations. The major predictions of the finite element model are that the near field postseismic displacements and strain rates are less than those for a half space asthenosphere and that the postseismic strain rates at intermediate distances are greater (in magnitude). The finite width of the asthenosphere ceases to have a significant impact on the crustal deformation pattern when its magnitude exceeds about three lithosphere thicknesses.

  11. Plate motion and deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Minster, B.; Prescott, W.; Royden, L.

    1991-02-01

    Our goal is to understand the motions of the plates, the deformation along their boundaries and within their interiors, and the processes that control these tectonic phenomena. In the broadest terms, we must strive to understand the relationships of regional and local deformation to flow in the upper mantle and the rheological, thermal and density structure of the lithosphere. The essential data sets which we require to reach our goal consist of maps of current strain rates at the earth's surface and the distribution of integrated deformation through time as recorded in the geologic record. Our success will depend on the effective synthesis of crustal kinematics with a variety of other geological and geophysical data, within a quantitative theoretical framework describing processes in the earth's interior. Only in this way can we relate the snapshot of current motions and earth structure provided by geodetic and geophysical data with long-term processes operating on the time scales relevant to most geological processes. The wide-spread use of space-based techniques, coupled with traditional geological and geophysical data, promises a revolution in our understanding of the kinematics and dynamics of plate motions over a broad range of spatial and temporal scales and in a variety of geologic settings. The space-based techniques that best address problems in plate motion and deformation are precise space-geodetic positioning -- on land and on the seafloor -- and satellite acquisition of detailed altimetric and remote sensing data in oceanic and continental areas. The overall science objectives for the NASA Solid Earth Science plan for the 1990's, are to Understand the motion and deformation of the lithosphere within and across plate boundaries'', and to understand the dynamics of the mantle, the structure and evolution of the lithosphere, and the landforms that result from local and regional deformation. 57 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Nanolaminate deformable mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Papavasiliou, Alexandros P.; Olivier, Scot S.

    2010-04-06

    A deformable mirror formed out of two layers of a nanolaminate foil attached to a stiff substrate is introduced. Deformation is provided by an electrostatic force between two of the layers. The internal stiffness of the structure allows for high-spatial-frequency shapes. The nanolaminate foil of the present invention allows for a high-quality mirror surface. The device achieves high precision in the vertical direction by using foils with accurately controlled thicknesses, but does not require high precision in the lateral dimensions, allowing such mirrors to be fabricated using crude lithography techniques. Such techniques allow structures up to about the meter scale to be fabricated.

  13. Nanolaminate deformable mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Papavasiliou, Alexandros P.; Olivier, Scot S.

    2009-04-14

    A deformable mirror formed out of two layers of a nanolaminate foil attached to a stiff substrate is introduced. Deformation is provided by an electrostatic force between two of the layers. The internal stiffness of the structure allows for high-spatial-frequency shapes. The nanolaminate foil of the present invention allows for a high-quality mirror surface. The device achieves high precision in the vertical direction by using foils with accurately controlled thicknesses, but does not require high precision in the lateral dimensions, allowing such mirrors to be fabricated using crude lithography techniques. Such techniques allow structures up to about the meter scale to be fabricated.

  14. Deformed Quantum Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inomata, Akira

    1997-03-01

    To understand possible physical consequences of quantum deformation, we investigate statistical behaviors of a quon gas. The quon is an object which obeys the minimally deformed commutator (or q-mutator): a a† - q a†a=1 with -1≤ q≤ 1. Although q=1 and q=-1 appear to correspond respectively to boson and fermion statistics, it is not easy to create a gas which unifies the boson gas and the fermion gas. We present a model which is able to interpolates between the two limits. The quon gas shows the Bose-Einstein condensation near the Boson limit in two dimensions.

  15. Lobster claw deformity.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Ashish; Agrawal, Rahul; Singh, Rajat; Agrawal, Romi; Agrawal, Seema

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous erythroid colony (EEC) syndrome comprise of three cardinal features, i.e. ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia and cleft lip. EEC itself has three different forms. Ectrodactyly (absence of one or more digits) can be present with clefting in the proximal portion of hand or foot known as split hand foot malformation (SHFM) or lobster claw deformity. SHFM can be of four types depending upon the different responsible chromosomal loci. SHFM-4 can be present as pure limb malformation (non-syndromic form). In this article, describes a rare case report of lobster claw deformity patient.

  16. Lobster claw deformity.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Ashish; Agrawal, Rahul; Singh, Rajat; Agrawal, Romi; Agrawal, Seema

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous erythroid colony (EEC) syndrome comprise of three cardinal features, i.e. ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia and cleft lip. EEC itself has three different forms. Ectrodactyly (absence of one or more digits) can be present with clefting in the proximal portion of hand or foot known as split hand foot malformation (SHFM) or lobster claw deformity. SHFM can be of four types depending upon the different responsible chromosomal loci. SHFM-4 can be present as pure limb malformation (non-syndromic form). In this article, describes a rare case report of lobster claw deformity patient. PMID:24992861

  17. Experimental deformation of a mafic rock - interplay between fracturing, reaction and viscous deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marti, Sina; Stünitz, Holger; Heilbronner, Renée; Plümper, Oliver; Drury, Martyn

    2016-04-01

    Deformation experiments were performed on natural Maryland Diabase (˜ 55% Plg, 42% Px, 3% accessories, 0.18 wt.-% H2O added) in a Griggs-type deformation apparatus in order to explore the brittle-viscous transition and the interplay between deformation and mineral reactions. Shear experiments at strain rates of ˜ 2e-5 /s are performed, at T=600, 700 and 800°C and confining pressures Pc=1.0 and 1.5 GPa. Deformation localizes in all experiments. Below 700°C, the microstructure is dominated by brittle deformation with a foliation formed by cataclastic flow and high strain accommodated along 3-5 major ultracataclasite shear bands. At 700°C, the bulk of the material still exhibits abundant microfractures, however, deformation localizes into an anastomosing network of shear bands (SB) formed from a fine-grained (<< 1 μm) mixture of newly formed Plg and Amph. These reaction products occur almost exclusively along syn-kinematic structures such as fractures and SB. Experiments at 800°C show extensive mineral reactions, with the main reaction products Amph+Plg (+Zo). Deformation is localized in broad C' and C SB formed by a fine-grained (0.1 - 0.8 μm) mixture of Plg+Amph (+Zo). The onset of mineral reactions in the 700°C experiments shows that reaction kinetics and diffusional mass transport are fast enough to keep up with the short experimental timescales. While in the 700°C experiments brittle processes kinematically contribute to deformation, fracturing is largely absent at 800°C. Diffusive mass transfer dominates. The very small grain size within SB favours a grain size sensitive deformation mechanism. Due to the presence of water (and relatively high supported stresses), dissolution-precipitation creep is interpreted to be the dominant strain accommodating mechanism. From the change of Amph coronas around Px clasts with strain, we can determine that Amph is re-dissolved at high stress sites while growing in low stress sites, showing the ability of Amph to

  18. Bulk metallic glasses deform via slip avalanches.

    PubMed

    Antonaglia, James; Wright, Wendelin J; Gu, Xiaojun; Byer, Rachel R; Hufnagel, Todd C; LeBlanc, Michael; Uhl, Jonathan T; Dahmen, Karin A

    2014-04-18

    For the first time in metallic glasses, we extract both the exponents and scaling functions that describe the nature, statistics, and dynamics of slip events during slow deformation, according to a simple mean field model. We model the slips as avalanches of rearrangements of atoms in coupled shear transformation zones (STZs). Using high temporal resolution measurements, we find the predicted, different statistics and dynamics for small and large slips thereby excluding self-organized criticality. The agreement between model and data across numerous independent measures provides evidence for slip avalanches of STZs as the elementary mechanism of inhomogeneous deformation in metallic glasses.

  19. Transfer involving deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, J.O.; Guidry, M.W.; Canto, L.F.

    1985-03-01

    Results are reviewed of 1- and 2-neutron transfer reactions at near-barrier energies for deformed nuclei. Rotational angular momentum and excitation patterns are examined. A strong tendency to populating high spin states within a few MeV of the yrast line is noted, and it is interpreted as preferential transfer to rotation-aligned states. 16 refs., 12 figs.

  20. Anisotropic Hydraulic Permeability Under Finite Deformation

    PubMed Central

    Ateshian, Gerard A.; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    The structural organization of biological tissues and cells often produces anisotropic transport properties. These tissues may also undergo large deformations under normal function, potentially inducing further anisotropy. A general framework for formulating constitutive relations for anisotropic transport properties under finite deformation is lacking in the literature. This study presents an approach based on representation theorems for symmetric tensor-valued functions and provides conditions to enforce positive semi-definiteness of the permeability or diffusivity tensor. Formulations are presented which describe materials that are orthotropic, transversely isotropic, or isotropic in the reference state, and where large strains induce greater anisotropy. Strain-induced anisotropy of the permeability of a solid-fluid mixture is illustrated for finite torsion of a cylinder subjected to axial permeation. It is shown that, in general, torsion can produce a helical flow pattern, rather than the rectilinear pattern observed when adopting a more specialized, unconditionally isotropic spatial permeability tensor commonly used in biomechanics. The general formulation presented in this study can produce both affine and non-affine reorientation of the preferred directions of material symmetry with strain, depending on the choice of material functions. This study addresses a need in the biomechanics literature by providing guidelines and formulations for anisotropic strain-dependent transport properties in porous-deformable media undergoing large deformations. PMID:21034145

  1. Monopole strength function of deformed superfluid nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoitsov, M.; Kortelainen, M.; Nakatsukasa, T.; Losa, C.; Nazarewicz, W.

    2011-10-01

    We present an efficient method for calculating strength functions using the finite-amplitude method (FAM) for deformed superfluid heavy nuclei within the framework of the nuclear density functional theory. We demonstrate that FAM reproduces strength functions obtained with the fully self-consistent quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA) at a fraction of the computational cost. As a demonstration, we compute the isoscalar and isovector monopole strengths for strongly deformed configurations in 100Zr and 240Pu by considering huge quasiparticle QRPA spaces. Our approach to FAM, based on Broyden's iterative procedure, opens the possibility for large-scale calculations of strength distributions in well-deformed superfluid nuclei across the nuclear landscape.

  2. Wear study under plastic deformation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, B. M.; Singhal, S.; Singh, D. V.

    1994-03-01

    Lubrication in metalworking processes is characterized by plastic deformation conditions resulting in generation of a large amount of virgin surface and of heat of deformation. The study of wear under these conditions is important from the point of view of product quality and tool/die wear. A laboratory study of wear under simulated plastic deformation conditions using pairs of mild steel and EN31 discs on an Amsler friction and wear testing machine was carried out. The worn surfaces and wear particles were examined by scanning electron microscopy. It was observed that wear with a mineral oil was greater than that with a vegetable oil. This paper analyzes the phenomenon through an examination of the surfaces and the wear particles.

  3. q-Deformed and c-Deformed Harmonic Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sogami, I. S.; Koizumi, K.; Mir-Kasimov, R. M.

    2003-10-01

    Hamilton functions of classical deformed oscillators (c-deformed oscillators) are derived from Hamiltonians of q-deformed oscillators of the Macfarlane and Dubna types. A new scale parameter, lq, with the dimension of length, is introduced to relate a dimensionless parameter characterizing the deformation with the natural length of the harmonic oscillator. Contraction from q-deformed oscillators to c-deformed oscillators is accomplished by keeping lq finite while taking the limit hbar → 0. The c-deformed Hamilton functions for both types of oscillators are found to be invariant under discrete translations: the step of the translation for the Dubna oscillator is half of that for the Macfarlane oscillator. The c-deformed oscillator of the Macfarlane type has propagating solutions in addition to localized ones. Reinvestigation of the q-deformed oscillator carried out in the light of these findings for the c-deformed systems proves that the q-deformed systems are invariant under the same translation symmetries as the c-deformed systems and have propagating waves of the Bloch type.

  4. Capillary deformations of bendable films.

    PubMed

    Schroll, R D; Adda-Bedia, M; Cerda, E; Huang, J; Menon, N; Russell, T P; Toga, K B; Vella, D; Davidovitch, B

    2013-07-01

    We address the partial wetting of liquid drops on ultrathin solid sheets resting on a deformable foundation. Considering the membrane limit of sheets that can relax compression through wrinkling at negligible energetic cost, we revisit the classical theory for the contact of liquid drops on solids. Our calculations and experiments show that the liquid-solid-vapor contact angle is modified from the Young angle, even though the elastic bulk modulus (E) of the sheet is so large that the ratio between the surface tension γ and E is of molecular size. This finding indicates a new elastocapillary phenomenon that stems from the high bendability of very thin elastic sheets rather than from material softness. We also show that the size of the wrinkle pattern that emerges in the sheet is fully predictable, thus resolving a puzzle in modeling "drop-on-a-floating-sheet" experiments and enabling a quantitative, calibration-free use of this setup for the metrology of ultrathin films.

  5. Deformation in the continental lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Physical Properties of Earth Materials Committee, a technical committee of AGU's Tectonophysics Section, is organizing a dinner/colloquium as part of the Fall Meeting in San Francisco, Calif. This event will be held Monday, December 3rd, in the Gold Rush Room of the Holiday Inn Golden Gateway Hotel at 1500 Van Ness St. There will be a no-host bar from 6:30 to 7:30 P.M., followed by dinner from 7:30 to 8:30 P.M. Paul Tapponnier will deliver the after-dinner talk, “Large-Scale Deformation Mechanisms in the Continental Lithosphere: Where Do We Stand?” It will start at 8:30 P.M. and a business meeting will follow at 9:30 P.M.

  6. Permanent deformation of flexible pavements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, S. F.; Broderick, B. V.; Pappin, J. W.

    1980-06-01

    Seven pairs of pavements with granular bases were tested under controlled conditions. One pavement in each pair contained fabric inclusions. An improved testing facility was developed, including: (1) servo-hydraulic system for the loading carriage; (2) amplification and read-out system for pressure cells; (3) linearizing unit for strain coils; (4) transducers for measuring vertical and resilient deflection; (5) techniques for measuring in situ strain on fabric inclusions; (6) extensive use of nuclear density meter to monitor pavement and foundation materials. The following conclusions are drawn: (1) No improvement in performance resulted from fabric inclusions. (2) No consistent reduction in in-situ stresses, resilient strains, or permanent strains was observed as a result of fabric inclusion. (3) No consistent improvement in densities resulted from fabric inclusions. (4) Some slip apparently occurred between fabric and soil on those pavements which involved large deformations. The slip occurred between fabric and crushed limestone base rather than between fabric and silty-clay subgrade.

  7. [Babies with cranial deformity].

    PubMed

    Feijen, Michelle M W; Claessens, Edith A W M Habets; Dovens, Anke J Leenders; Vles, Johannes S; van der Hulst, Rene R W J

    2009-01-01

    Plagiocephaly was diagnosed in a baby aged 4 months and brachycephaly in a baby aged 5 months. Positional or deformational plagio- or brachycephaly is characterized by changes in shape and symmetry of the cranial vault. Treatment options are conservative and may include physiotherapy and helmet therapy. During the last two decades the incidence of positional plagiocephaly has increased in the Netherlands. This increase is due to the recommendation that babies be laid on their backs in order to reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome. We suggest the following: in cases of positional preference of the infant, referral to a physiotherapist is indicated. In cases of unacceptable deformity of the cranium at the age 5 months, moulding helmet therapy is a possible treatment option. PMID:19857299

  8. Probing deformed quantum commutators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Matteo A. C.; Giani, Tommaso; Paris, Matteo G. A.

    2016-07-01

    Several quantum gravity theories predict a minimal length at the order of magnitude of the Planck length, under which the concepts of space and time lose their physical meaning. In quantum mechanics, the insurgence of such a minimal length can be described by introducing a modified position-momentum commutator, which in turn yields a generalized uncertainty principle, where the uncertainty on position measurements has a lower bound. The value of the minimal length is not predicted by theories and must be estimated experimentally. In this paper, we address the quantum bound to the estimability of the minimal uncertainty length by performing measurements on a harmonic oscillator, which is analytically solvable in the deformed algebra induced by the deformed commutation relations.

  9. Deformed wing virus.

    PubMed

    de Miranda, Joachim R; Genersch, Elke

    2010-01-01

    Deformed wing virus (DWV; Iflaviridae) is one of many viruses infecting honeybees and one of the most heavily investigated due to its close association with honeybee colony collapse induced by Varroadestructor. In the absence of V.destructor DWV infection does not result in visible symptoms or any apparent negative impact on host fitness. However, for reasons that are still not fully understood, the transmission of DWV by V.destructor to the developing pupae causes clinical symptoms, including pupal death and adult bees emerging with deformed wings, a bloated, shortened abdomen and discolouration. These bees are not viable and die soon after emergence. In this review we will summarize the historical and recent data on DWV and its relatives, covering the genetics, pathobiology, and transmission of this important viral honeybee pathogen, and discuss these within the wider theoretical concepts relating to the genetic variability and population structure of RNA viruses, the evolution of virulence and the development of disease symptoms.

  10. Congenital idiopathic clubfoot deformities.

    PubMed

    Kyzer, S P; Stark, S L

    1995-03-01

    Clubfoot is a birth defect that is marked primarily by a deformed talus (ie, ankle) and calcaneous (ie, heel) that give the foot a characteristic "club-like" appearance. In congenital idiopathic clubfoot (ie, talipes equinovarus), the infant's foot points downward (ie, equinus) and turns inward (ie, varus), while the forefoot curls toward the heel (ie, adduction). This congenital disorder has an incidence of 1 in 400 live births, with boys affected twice as often as girls. Unilateral clubfoot is somewhat more common than bilateral clubfoot and may occur as an isolated defect or in association with other disorders (eg, chromosomal aberrations, cerebral palsy, spina bifida, arthrogryposis). Infantile clubfoot deformity is painless and is correctable with early diagnosis and prompt treatment. PMID:7778903

  11. Partially segmented deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, E.S.; Smith, J.R.; Salmon, J.T.; Monjes, J.A.

    1991-05-21

    A partially segmented deformable mirror is formed with a mirror plate having a smooth and continuous front surface and a plurality of actuators to its back surface. The back surface is divided into triangular areas which are mutually separated by grooves. The grooves are deep enough to make the plate deformable and the actuators for displacing the mirror plate in the direction normal to its surface are inserted in the grooves at the vertices of the triangular areas. Each actuator includes a transducer supported by a receptacle with outer shells having outer surfaces. The vertices have inner walls which are approximately perpendicular to the mirror surface and make planar contacts with the outer surfaces of the outer shells. The adhesive which is used on these contact surfaces tends to contract when it dries but the outer shells can bend and serve to minimize the tendency of the mirror to warp. 5 figures.

  12. Partially segmented deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, Erlan S.; Smith, James R.; Salmon, J. Thaddeus; Monjes, Julio A.

    1991-01-01

    A partially segmented deformable mirror is formed with a mirror plate having a smooth and continuous front surface and a plurality of actuators to its back surface. The back surface is divided into triangular areas which are mutually separated by grooves. The grooves are deep enough to make the plate deformable and the actuators for displacing the mirror plate in the direction normal to its surface are inserted in the grooves at the vertices of the triangular areas. Each actuator includes a transducer supported by a receptacle with outer shells having outer surfaces. The vertices have inner walls which are approximately perpendicular to the mirror surface and make planar contacts with the outer surfaces of the outer shells. The adhesive which is used on these contact surfaces tends to contract when it dries but the outer shells can bend and serve to minimize the tendency of the mirror to warp.

  13. Covariant deformed oscillator algebras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quesne, Christiane

    1995-01-01

    The general form and associativity conditions of deformed oscillator algebras are reviewed. It is shown how the latter can be fulfilled in terms of a solution of the Yang-Baxter equation when this solution has three distinct eigenvalues and satisfies a Birman-Wenzl-Murakami condition. As an example, an SU(sub q)(n) x SU(sub q)(m)-covariant q-bosonic algebra is discussed in some detail.

  14. Postlaminectomy cervical deformity.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Harel; Haid, Regis W; Rodts, Gerald E; Mummaneni, Praveen V

    2003-09-15

    Postlaminectomy cervical kyphosis is an important consideration when performing surgery. Identifying factors predisposing to postoperative deformity is essential. The goal is to prevent postlaminectomy cervical kyphosis while exposing the patient to minimal additional morbidity. When postlaminectomy kyphosis does occur, surgical correction is often required and performed via an anterior, posterior, or combined approach. The authors discuss the indications for surgical approaches as well as clinical results. PMID:15347223

  15. Deformation of wrinkled graphene.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheling; Kinloch, Ian A; Young, Robert J; Novoselov, Kostya S; Anagnostopoulos, George; Parthenios, John; Galiotis, Costas; Papagelis, Konstantinos; Lu, Ching-Yu; Britnell, Liam

    2015-04-28

    The deformation of monolayer graphene, produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), on a polyester film substrate has been investigated through the use of Raman spectroscopy. It has been found that the microstructure of the CVD graphene consists of a hexagonal array of islands of flat monolayer graphene separated by wrinkled material. During deformation, it was found that the rate of shift of the Raman 2D band wavenumber per unit strain was less than 25% of that of flat flakes of mechanically exfoliated graphene, whereas the rate of band broadening per unit strain was about 75% of that of the exfoliated material. This unusual deformation behavior has been modeled in terms of mechanically isolated graphene islands separated by the graphene wrinkles, with the strain distribution in each graphene island determined using shear lag analysis. The effect of the size and position of the Raman laser beam spot has also been incorporated in the model. The predictions fit well with the behavior observed experimentally for the Raman band shifts and broadening of the wrinkled CVD graphene. The effect of wrinkles upon the efficiency of graphene to reinforce nanocomposites is also discussed. PMID:25765609

  16. Deformation of Wrinkled Graphene

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The deformation of monolayer graphene, produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), on a polyester film substrate has been investigated through the use of Raman spectroscopy. It has been found that the microstructure of the CVD graphene consists of a hexagonal array of islands of flat monolayer graphene separated by wrinkled material. During deformation, it was found that the rate of shift of the Raman 2D band wavenumber per unit strain was less than 25% of that of flat flakes of mechanically exfoliated graphene, whereas the rate of band broadening per unit strain was about 75% of that of the exfoliated material. This unusual deformation behavior has been modeled in terms of mechanically isolated graphene islands separated by the graphene wrinkles, with the strain distribution in each graphene island determined using shear lag analysis. The effect of the size and position of the Raman laser beam spot has also been incorporated in the model. The predictions fit well with the behavior observed experimentally for the Raman band shifts and broadening of the wrinkled CVD graphene. The effect of wrinkles upon the efficiency of graphene to reinforce nanocomposites is also discussed. PMID:25765609

  17. Treatment of Madelung's deformity.

    PubMed

    Saffar, P; Badina, A

    2015-12-01

    Treatment of Madelung's deformity is still controversial. We reviewed retrospectively 19 patients with Madelung's deformity (two bilateral, 21 cases) who underwent surgery to the radius and ulna to improve range of motion, decrease pain and improve appearance of the wrist. Nineteen patients underwent 21 distal radial osteotomy procedures using three different techniques: subtraction, addition or dome osteotomy. Ulnar shortening and redirection of the distal ulna was performed in 12 cases; a long oblique osteotomy was used in 10 of these cases. The Sauvé-Kapandji technique was performed in five cases, an ulnar distal epiphysiodesis in two cases and a combination of osteotomy and epiphysiodesis in one case. The aim was to reduce the distal radial slope and to restore the orientation and congruity of the distal radio-ulnar joint and to improve its function. Pain was reduced as a result of the procedure: more than 75% of the cases had no or intermittent pain at the review. Pronation improved from 63° to 68° (P=0.467, not significant) and supination improved from 48° to 72° on average (P=0.034, significant). Grip strength increased from 11 to 18 kgf (P=0.013, significant). Madelung's deformity is not always a benign condition and it responds well to corrective osteotomies. PMID:26525609

  18. Surface Deformation in Imperial Valley, Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eneva, M.; Adams, D.; Falorni, G.; Morgan, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Imperial Valley in southern California is subjected to significant tectonic deformation resulting from the relative movement of the North American and Pacific plates. It is characterized by large earthquakes, frequent swarm activity, and aseismic events. High heat flow makes possible the operation of geothermal fields, some of which cause man-made surface displacements superimposed on the tectonic deformation. We apply radar interferometry (InSAR) to analyze Envisat ASAR data for the period 2003-2010. The SqueeSAR technique is used to obtain deformation time series and annual rates at numerous locations of permanent and distributed scatterers (PS and DS). SqueeSAR works very well in agricultural areas, where conventional differential InSAR (DinSAR) fails. We observe differential movements marking the Superstition Hills, San Andreas, and Imperial faults. The Imperial fault traverses agricultural fields, where DInSAR does not work and thus our SqueeSAR observations are the first for this fault (Fig. 1). We also observe steps in the deformation time series around the Superstition Hills fault from an October 2006 aseismic event and the April 2010 M7.2 earthquake south of the U.S.-Mexico border. Significant annual deformation rates are detected in the current geothermal fields. For example, subsidence of up to -50 mm/year is seen at the Salton Sea field (Fig. 2), and both subsidence and uplift are seen at Heber. We also determine the deformation baseline at prospective geothermal fields, thus making it possible in the future to distinguish between man-made and tectonic causes of surface deformation. Fig. 1. Line-of-sight (LOS) deformation indicates differential displacement on both sides of Imperial Fault. Movements away from the satellite are shown in yellow to red, and towards the satellite in blue. Larger deformation is associated with two geothermal fields, Heber (to the south-west) and East Mesa (to the east). Fig. 2. Subsidence in the Salton Sea geothermal

  19. Deformation of the Dirac equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faizal, Mir; Kruglov, Sergey I.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we will first clarify the physical meaning of having a minimum measurable time. Then we will combine the deformation of the Dirac equation due to the existence of minimum measurable length and time scales with its deformation due to the doubly special relativity. We will also analyze this deformed Dirac equation in curved spacetime, and observe that this deformation of the Dirac equation also leads to a nontrivial modification of general relativity. Finally, we will analyze the stochastic quantization of this deformed Dirac equation on curved spacetime.

  20. Linking lithosphere deformation and sedimentary basin formation over multiple scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huismans, Ritske S.

    2016-04-01

    Here we focus on the relationships between tectonic deformation and sedimentary basin formation. Resolving the interaction and feedback between tectonic crust-lithosphere scale deformation and surface processes through erosion of elevated areas and formation of sedimentary basins over multiple scales has been a long-standing challenge. While forward process based models have been successful at showing that a feedback is expected between tectonic deformation and redistribution of mass at the earth's surface by erosion, transport, and deposition, demonstrating this coupling for natural systems has been an even greater challenge and is strongly debated. Observational constraints on crust-lithosphere deformation and surface processes are typically collected at highly varying spatial and temporal scales, while forward process based models are typically run at either very large lithosphere-mantle scale, or at the scale of the sedimentary basin making it difficult to investigate and explore the detailed interaction and feedback between these systems. Here I will report on recent advances in forward modelling linking crust-lithosphere deformation with surface processes over a large range of scales resolving tectonic plate scale deformation and sedimentary basin formation at stratigraphic scales. The forward numerical models indicate a linkage and interaction between the structural style of thick-skinned large-scale mountain belt and rift-passive margin formation, erosion-transport-deposition processes operating at the surface, and the thin-skinned deformation occurring in the associated sedimentary basins.

  1. Linking lithosphere deformation and sedimentary basin formation over multiple scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huismans, Ritske S.

    2014-05-01

    In the spirit of Peter Ziegler we are interested in and explore the relationships between tectonic deformation and sedimentary basin formation. Resolving the interaction and feedback between tectonic crust-lithosphere scale deformation and surface processes through erosion of elevated areas and formation of sedimentary basins over multiple scales has been a long-standing challenge. While forward process based models have been successful at showing that a feedback is expected between tectonic deformation and redistribution of mass at the earth's surface by erosion, transport, and deposition, demonstrating this coupling for natural systems has been an even greater challenge and is strongly debated. Observational constraints on crust-lithosphere deformation and surface processes are typically collected at highly varying spatial and temporal scales, while forward process based models are typically run at either very large lithosphere-mantle scale, or at the scale of the sedimentary basin making it difficult to investigate and explore the detailed interaction and feedback between these systems. Here I will report on recent advances in forward modelling linking crust-lithosphere deformation with surface processes over a large range of scales resolving tectonic plate scale deformation and sedimentary basin formation at stratigraphic scales. The forward numerical models indicate a linkage and interaction between the structural style of thick-skinned large-scale mountain belt and rift-passive margin formation, erosion-transport-deposition processes operating at the surface, and the thin-skinned deformation occurring in the associated sedimentary basins.

  2. Subglacial till: the deforming glacier bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Meer, Jaap J. M.; Menzies, John; Rose, James

    2003-07-01

    "Till is a sediment and is perhaps more variable than any sediment known by a single name." R.F. Flint 1957 Glacial and Pleistocene Geology Tills are commonly classified according to the perceived process of deposition. However, it is increasingly recognised that this classification, which is mainly based on macroscopic field data, has severe limitations. At the same time the concept of the deforming glacier bed has become more realistic as a framework for discussing tills and their properties, and this (tectonic) concept is irreconcilable with the existing (depositional) till classification scheme. Over the last 20 years large thin sections have been used to study tills, which has provided new insights into the textural and structural properties of tills. These results have revolutionised till sedimentology as they show that, in the main, subglacial tills possess deformational characteristics. Depositional properties are rare. Based on this new insight the process of subglacial till formation is discussed in terms of glacier/ice sheet basal velocity, clay, water and carbonate content and the variability of these properties in space and time. The end result of this discussion is: till, the deforming glacier bed. To distinguish subglacial till from depositional sediments the term 'tectomict' is proposed. Within the single framework of subglacial till as the deforming glacier bed, many textural, structural and geomorphological features of till beds can be more clearly and coherently explained and understood.

  3. Postseismic Deformation in the Central Andaman Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchakayala, J. P.; Smalley, R.; Bilham, R.; Lowry, A.; Batacharjee, A.

    2005-12-01

    The December 26, 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake generated horizontal displacements at Port Blair totaling 3.08 m and vertical subsidence of 0.6-0.9m, indicating 1.6 m arc normal and 6.2±0.6 m dextral coseismic slip on the plate interface. Displacements occurred steadily beginning 10 minutes after the mainshock and were largely complete within 30 minutes after the mainshock. Although continuous GPS measurements were not initiated until 24 days after the mainshock by us and other groups, it is possible from these records to inferthat postseismic deformation in this interval did not exceed 10% of the coseismic displacements. Postseismic deformation continues at present at an exponentially decaying rate. Between January and June 2005, Port Blair has moved 4.5 cm south, 15 cm west and 10 cm up, suggesting postseismic slip downdip of the coseismic rupture and/or viscoelastic relaxation of the mantle. Elastic models of the region based on GPS coseismic slip observations provided by Center for Earth Science Studies (CESS) are consistent with reports of uplift from the islands: North Sentinel (50 km west of Port Blair) rose by 1.0±0.2 m, Port Blair and Middle Andaman subsided by about 1 m and Havelock Island (32 km east) showed no significant vertical deformation. We report data from five campaign sites in the Andaman Islands measured thrice since the earthquake that permit viscoelastic and afterslip models of postseismic deformation to be developed and assessed.

  4. Deformation of a micro-torque swimmer

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Takuji; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Imai, Yohsuke; Omori, Toshihiro; Matsunaga, Daiki

    2016-01-01

    The membrane tension of some kinds of ciliates has been suggested to regulate upward and downward swimming velocities under gravity. Despite its biological importance, deformation and membrane tension of a ciliate have not been clarified fully. In this study, we numerically investigated the deformation of a ciliate swimming freely in a fluid otherwise at rest. The cell body was modelled as a capsule with a hyperelastic membrane enclosing a Newtonian fluid. Thrust forces due to the ciliary beat were modelled as torques distributed above the cell body. The effects of membrane elasticity, the aspect ratio of the cell's reference shape, and the density difference between the cell and the surrounding fluid were investigated. The results showed that the cell deformed like a heart shape, when the capillary number was sufficiently large. Under the influence of gravity, the membrane tension at the anterior end decreased in the upward swimming while it increased in the downward swimming. Moreover, gravity-induced deformation caused the cells to move gravitationally downwards or upwards, which resulted in a positive or negative geotaxis-like behaviour with a physical origin. These results are important in understanding the physiology of a ciliate's biological responses to mechanical stimuli. PMID:26997893

  5. Crustal deformation along the San Andreas, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Victor C.

    1992-03-01

    The goal is to achieve a better understanding of the regional and local deformation and crustal straining processes in western North America, particularly the effects of the San Andreas and nearby faults on the spatial and temporal crustal deformation behavior. Construction of theoretical models based on the mechanics of coupled elastic plate, viscoelastic foundation and large scale crack mechanics provide a rational basis for the interpretation of seismic and aseismic anomalies and expedite efforts in forecasting the stability of plate boundary deformation. Special focus is placed on the three dimensional time dependent surface deformation due to localized slippage in a elastic layer coupled to a visco-elastic substrate. The numerical analysis is based on a 3-D boundary element technique. Extension to visco-elastic coupling demands the derivation of 3-D time dependent Green's function. This method was applied to analyze the viscoelastic surface displacements due to a dislocated embedded patch. Surface uplift as a function of time and position are obtained. Comparisons between surface uplift for long and short dislocated patches are made.

  6. Crustal deformation along the San Andreas, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Victor C.

    1992-01-01

    The goal is to achieve a better understanding of the regional and local deformation and crustal straining processes in western North America, particularly the effects of the San Andreas and nearby faults on the spatial and temporal crustal deformation behavior. Construction of theoretical models based on the mechanics of coupled elastic plate, viscoelastic foundation and large scale crack mechanics provide a rational basis for the interpretation of seismic and aseismic anomalies and expedite efforts in forecasting the stability of plate boundary deformation. Special focus is placed on the three dimensional time dependent surface deformation due to localized slippage in a elastic layer coupled to a visco-elastic substrate. The numerical analysis is based on a 3-D boundary element technique. Extension to visco-elastic coupling demands the derivation of 3-D time dependent Green's function. This method was applied to analyze the viscoelastic surface displacements due to a dislocated embedded patch. Surface uplift as a function of time and position are obtained. Comparisons between surface uplift for long and short dislocated patches are made.

  7. Ultrasoft, highly deformable microgels.

    PubMed

    Bachman, Haylee; Brown, Ashley C; Clarke, Kimberly C; Dhada, Kabir S; Douglas, Alison; Hansen, Caroline E; Herman, Emily; Hyatt, John S; Kodlekere, Purva; Meng, Zhiyong; Saxena, Shalini; Spears, Mark W; Welsch, Nicole; Lyon, L Andrew

    2015-03-14

    Microgels are colloidally stable, hydrogel microparticles that have previously been used in a range of (soft) material applications due to their tunable mechanical and chemical properties. Most commonly, thermo and pH-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAm) microgels can be fabricated by precipitation polymerization in the presence of the co-monomer acrylic acid (AAc). Traditionally pNIPAm microgels are synthesized in the presence of a crosslinking agent, such as N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (BIS), however, microgels can also be synthesized under 'crosslinker free' conditions. The resulting particles have extremely low (<0.5%), core-localized crosslinking resulting from rare chain transfer reactions. AFM nanoindentation of these ultralow crosslinked (ULC) particles indicate that they are soft relative to crosslinked microgels, with a Young's modulus of ∼10 kPa. Furthermore, ULC microgels are highly deformable as indicated by a high degree of spreading on glass surfaces and the ability to translocate through nanopores significantly smaller than the hydrodynamic diameter of the particles. The size and charge of ULCs can be easily modulated by altering reaction conditions, such as temperature, monomer, surfactant and initiator concentrations, and through the addition of co-monomers. Microgels based on the widely utilized, biocompatible polymer polyethylene glycol (PEG) can also be synthesized under crosslinker free conditions. Due to their softness and deformability, ULC microgels are a unique base material for a wide variety of biomedical applications including biomaterials for drug delivery and regenerative medicine.

  8. Deformation of Diopside Single Crystal at Mantle Pressure 2 TEM Characterization of Deformation Microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    E Amiguet; P Cordier; P Raterron

    2011-12-31

    The dislocation microstructures of diopside single crystals deformed at high-pressure (4 {<=} P {<=} 9 GPa), high-temperature (1100{sup o} {<=} T {<=} 1400 {sup o}C) using a Deformation-DIA high-pressure apparatus (D-DIA) have been characterized by transmission electron microscopy using weak-beam dark-field (WBDF), precession electron diffraction (PED), large-angle convergent-beam electron diffraction (LACBED) and the thickness-fringe method. Dislocation glide is the dominant deformation mechanism under these conditions. The 1/2<110>{l_brace}110{r_brace} glide is controlled by lattice friction on the edge segments and shows extensive cross-slip. The [001] glide occurs mostly on {l_brace}110{r_brace}; no evidence for [001](010) glide has been found. The [100] dislocations bear a strong lattice friction probably due to complex (out of glide) core structures.

  9. Overview of deformable mirror technologies for adaptive optics and astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madec, P.-Y.

    2012-07-01

    From the ardent bucklers used during the Syracuse battle to set fire to Romans’ ships to more contemporary piezoelectric deformable mirrors widely used in astronomy, from very large voice coil deformable mirrors considered in future Extremely Large Telescopes to very small and compact ones embedded in Multi Object Adaptive Optics systems, this paper aims at giving an overview of Deformable Mirror technology for Adaptive Optics and Astronomy. First the main drivers for the design of Deformable Mirrors are recalled, not only related to atmospheric aberration compensation but also to environmental conditions or mechanical constraints. Then the different technologies available today for the manufacturing of Deformable Mirrors will be described, pros and cons analyzed. A review of the Companies and Institutes with capabilities in delivering Deformable Mirrors to astronomers will be presented, as well as lessons learned from the past 25 years of technological development and operation on sky. In conclusion, perspective will be tentatively drawn for what regards the future of Deformable Mirror technology for Astronomy.

  10. Parametric inference in the large data limit using maximally informative models.

    PubMed

    Kinney, Justin B; Atwal, Gurinder S

    2014-04-01

    Motivated by data-rich experiments in transcriptional regulation and sensory neuroscience, we consider the following general problem in statistical inference: when exposed to a high-dimensional signal S, a system of interest computes a representation R of that signal, which is then observed through a noisy measurement M. From a large number of signals and measurements, we wish to infer the "filter" that maps S to R. However, the standard method for solving such problems, likelihood-based inference, requires perfect a priori knowledge of the "noise function" mapping R to M. In practice such noise functions are usually known only approximately, if at all, and using an incorrect noise function will typically bias the inferred filter. Here we show that in the large data limit, this need for a precharacterized noise function can be circumvented by searching for filters that instead maximize the mutual information I[M; R] between observed measurements and predicted representations. Moreover, if the correct filter lies within the space of filters being explored, maximizing mutual information becomes equivalent to simultaneously maximizing every dependence measure that satisfies the data processing inequality. It is important to note that maximizing mutual information will typically leave a small number of directions in parameter space unconstrained. We term these directions diffeomorphic modes and present an equation that allows these modes to be derived systematically. The presence of diffeomorphic modes reflects a fundamental and nontrivial substructure within parameter space, one that is obscured by standard likelihood-based inference.

  11. Deformation analysis of boron/aluminum specimens by moire interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, Daniel; Guo, Yifan; Czarnek, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Whole-field surface deformations were measured for two slotted tension specimens from multiply laminates, one with 0 deg fiber orientation in the surface ply and the other with 45 deg orientation. Macromechanical and micromechanical details were revealed using high-sensitivity moire interferometry. Although global deformations of all plies were essentially equal, numerous random or anomalous features were observed. Local deformations of adjacent 0 deg and 45 deg plies were very different, both near the slot and remote from it, requiring large interlaminar shear strains for continuity. Shear strains were concentrated in the aluminum matrix. For 45 deg plies, a major portion of the deformation was by shear; large plastic slip of matrix occurred at random locations in 45 deg plies, wherein groups of fibers slipped relative to other groups. Shear strains in the interior, between adjacent fibers, were larger than the measured surface strains.

  12. Shape Determination for Deformed Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Lie-Quan; Akcelik, Volkan; Chen, Sheng; Ge, Lixin; Li, Zenghai; Ng, Cho; Xiao, Liling; Ko, Kwok; Ghattas, Omar; /Texas U.

    2006-10-04

    A realistic superconducting RF cavity has its shape deformed comparing to its designed shape due to the loose tolerance in the fabrication process and the frequency tuning for its accelerating mode. A PDE-constrained optimization problem is proposed to determine the deformation of the cavity. A reduce space method is used to solve the PDE-constrained optimization problem where design sensitivities were computed using a continuous adjoint approach. A proof-of-concept example is given in which the deformation parameters of a single cavity-cell with two different types of deformation were computed.

  13. Soft bond-deformation paths in superhard γ-boron.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Sun, Hong; Chen, Changfeng

    2010-11-19

    We report surprisingly soft covalent bond-deformation paths in recently discovered superhard γ-boron. First-principles calculations reveal an intriguing mechanism for bond transformation mediated by three-center bonding, which reduces considerably the rigidity and directionality of the two-center covalent bonds in γ-boron. It leads to much lower strength and large plastic deformation along the selected paths. These results establish a new type of bond-deformation pattern in γ-boron, which expands our knowledge about structural transformation in strong covalent solids.

  14. Soft Bond-Deformation Paths in Superhard γ-Boron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wei; Sun, Hong; Chen, Changfeng

    2010-11-01

    We report surprisingly soft covalent bond-deformation paths in recently discovered superhard γ-boron. First-principles calculations reveal an intriguing mechanism for bond transformation mediated by three-center bonding, which reduces considerably the rigidity and directionality of the two-center covalent bonds in γ-boron. It leads to much lower strength and large plastic deformation along the selected paths. These results establish a new type of bond-deformation pattern in γ-boron, which expands our knowledge about structural transformation in strong covalent solids.

  15. Modelling highly deformable metal extrusion using SPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Mahesh; Cleary, Paul W.

    2015-05-01

    Computational modelling is often used to reduce trial extrusions through accurate defect prediction. Traditionally, metal extrusion is modelled using mesh based finite element methods. However, large plastic deformations can lead to heavy re-meshing and numerical diffusion. Here we use the mesh-less smoothed particle hydrodynamics method since it allows simulation of large deformations without re-meshing and the tracking of history dependent properties such as plastic strain making it suitable for defect prediction. The variation in plastic strain and deformation for aluminium alloy in a cylindrical 3D geometry with extrusion ratio and die angle is evaluated. The extrusion process is found to have three distinct phases consisting of an initial sharp rise in extrusion force, a steady phase requiring constant force and terminating in a sharp decline in force as metal is completely extruded. Deformation and plastic strain increased significantly with extrusion ratio but only moderately with die angle. Extrusion force increased by 150 % as the extrusion ratio increased from 2:1 to 4:1 but had only a marginal change with die angle. A low strain zone in the centre of the extruded product was found to be a function of extrusion ratio but was persistent and did not vary with die angle. Simulation of a complex 3D building industry component showed large variations in plastic strain along the length of the product at two scales. These were due to change in metal behaviour as extrusion progressed from phase 1 to phase 2. A stagnation zone at the back of the die was predicted that could lead to the "funnel" or "pipe" defect.

  16. Global organization of tectonic deformation on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilotti, Frank; Connors, Chris; Suppe, John

    1993-01-01

    The geographic organization of surface deformation on Venus as on Earth is a key to understanding the global tectonic system. To date we have mapped the distribution of three unambiguous tectonic land forms on Venus: (1) linear foldbelts analogous to those at plate margins of the Earth; (2) linear rift zones, analogous to continental rifts on the Earth; and (3) distributed plains deformation in the form of wrinkle ridges and extensional faults and fractures. The linear foldbelts are the dominant structural style in the Northern Hemisphere; ninety percent of the planet's foldbelts lie above the equator. In contrast, compressive deformation in the Southern Hemisphere is dominated by two large, sweeping patterns of wrinkle ridges. The two hemispheres are divided by an equatorial region that is largely covered by rift zones and several large tessera blocks. A tectonic model of generally poleward convergence of the Northern Hemisphere explains the distribution of foldbelts and rift zones. In our model, a northern hemispherical plate (or system of plates) moves poleward and deforms along discrete, predominately longitudinal bands. We recognize four types of foldbelts based on their relationships to other large-scale tectonic features on Venus. There are foldbelts that lie within the low plains, foldbelts associated with coronae, novae and chasmata, foldbelts that lie at the margins of poly-deformed tessera plateaus, and the folded mountain belts around Lakshmi Planum. We see a geometric increase in the area of fold belts when normalized to percent area at a given latitude. This increase is consistent with our model of poleward convergence. Also, the orientations of most foldbelts are either approximately north-south or parallel to lines of latitude in the northern hemisphere. This observation is also consistent with the model in that the longitudinal bands are the result of the decreasing area of the sphere as the plate moves poleward and the latitudinal belts are the

  17. Twinning in nanocrystalline Ni by severe plastic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, X. Y.; Cheng, Z. Y.; Wu, X.; Wang, T. C.; Hong, Y. S.

    2006-02-01

    Deformation twinning is confirmed upon large plastic deformation in nanocrystalline (nc) Ni by transmission electron microscopy examinations. New and compelling evidence has been obtained for several twinning mechanisms that operate in nc grains, with the grain boundary emission of partial dislocations determined as the most proficient. Twinning in nc Ni may be interpreted in terms of molecular dynamics simulation based on generalized planar fault energy curves.

  18. Experimental deformation of rocksalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handin, J.; Russell, J. E.; Carter, N. L.

    Using newly designed apparatus for triaxial-compression testing of 10 by 20-cm cores of Avery Island rocksalt at constant strain-rates between 10-4 and 10-6/s, temperatures between 100° and 200°C, and confining pressures of 3.4 and 20 MPa, comparing our data with those of other workers on the same material, and observing natural deformations of rocksalt, we find that (1) constant-strain-rate and quasi-constant stress-rate tests (both often called quasi-static compression tests) yield essentially similar stress-strain relations, and these depend strongly on strain rate and temperature, but not confining pressure; (2) fracture excluded, the deformation mechanisms observed for differential stresses between 0.5 and 20 MPa are intracrystal-line slip (dislocation glide and cross-slip) and polygonization (dislocation glide and climb by ion-vacancy pipe diffusion); (3) the same steady-state strain rate ɛ., and flow stress are reached at the same temperature in both constant-strain-rate and constant-stress (creep) tests, but the strain-time data from transient creep tests do not match the strain-hardening data unless the initial strain, ɛ0 (time-dependent in rocksalt) is accounted for; in creep tests the clock is not started until the desired constant stress is reached; (4) because the stress-strain curve contains the entire history of the deformation, the constant-strain-rate test rather than the creep test may well be preferred as the source of constitutive data; (5) furthermore, if the stress or temperature of the creep test is too low to achieve the steady state in laboratory time, one cannot predict the steady-state flow stress or strain rate from the transient response alone, whereas we can estimate them rather well from constant-strain-rate data even when strain rates are too high or temperatures too low to reach the steady state within a few hours; (6) the so-called "baseline creep law", giving creep strain, ɛ = ea[1-exp(-ξt)]+ɛ. ss t, where ea, ξ, and

  19. IBA in deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Casten, R.F.; Warner, D.D.

    1982-01-01

    The structure and characteristic properties and predictions of the IBA in deformed nuclei are reviewed, and compared with experiment, in particular for /sup 168/Er. Overall, excellent agreement, with a minimum of free parameters (in effect, two, neglecting scale factors on energy differences), was obtained. A particularly surprising, and unavoidable, prediction is that of strong ..beta.. ..-->.. ..gamma.. transitions, a feature characteristically absent in the geometrical model, but manifest empirically. Some discrepancies were also noted, principally for the K=4 excitation, and the detailed magnitudes of some specific B(E2) values. Considerable attention is paid to analyzing the structure of the IBA states and their relation to geometric models. The bandmixing formalism was studied to interpret both the aforementioned discrepancies and the origin of the ..beta.. ..-->.. ..gamma.. transitions. The IBA states, extremely complex in the usual SU(5) basis, are transformed to the SU(3) basis, as is the interaction Hamiltonian. The IBA wave functions appear with much simplified structure in this way as does the structure of the associated B(E2) values. The nature of the symmetry breaking of SU(3) for actual deformed nuclei is seen to be predominantly ..delta..K=0 mixing. A modified, and more consistent, formalism for the IBA-1 is introduced which is simpler, has fewer free parameters (in effect, one, neglecting scale factors on energy differences), is in at least as good agreement with experiment as the earlier formalism, contains a special case of the 0(6) limit which corresponds to that known empirically, and appears to have a close relationship to the IBA-2. The new formalism facilitates the construction of contour plots of various observables (e.g., energy or B(E2) ratios) as functions of N and chi/sub Q/ which allow the parameter-free discussion of qualitative trajectories or systematics.

  20. Novel optical fiber sensor for deformation measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di, Haiting; Sun, Suping; Yu, Jianqiang; Liu, Renqiang

    2010-10-01

    A light intensity modulation optical fiber sensor, which can measure deformation directly, has been developed. A light leakage zone is introduced on one side of fiber to increase the sensitivity of fiber under deformation. The machining process of sensor is considered. Hand carving, milling and embossing methods are introduced to produce the light leakage zone respectively, and the comparison between these methods is carried out. To obtain the static curve of sensor, cantilevered beam, simple support beam and cylinders are used respectively to measure little and large deformation. The static characters of sensor, such as sensitivity and measurement range, are analyzed from the static curve. The experimental results show that the sensor can distinguish the direction of deformation (positive bending and negative bending). Positive bending increases the throughput of light, and is distinguishable from negative bending, which decreases the throughput. The output of sensor is linear with curvature when the curvature radius is larger than 60mm. The response of sensor is a cosine function with the direction of deformation and there is a maximum sensitivity direction (perpendicular to the light leakage zone plane and passing through the axis of the fiber) and a minimum sensitivity direction (parallel to light leakage zone plane and pass through the axis of the fiber). The dynamic responds of attenuation vibration and sawtooth input signal are studied. Comparison between the optical fiber sensor, untreated fiber and strain gauge shows that the sensor is 400 times of untreated fiber in sensitivity and is more advantageous in measurement of thin structures. The sensor is easily made by multi-mode plastic optical fiber and the detection equipments are very simple, therefore it is small in size, simple in structure and low in cost, which make the sensor can be widely used in various fields.

  1. Interferometric smart material for measuring permanent deformations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, K.

    1996-05-01

    This paper has presented a novel interferometric smart material using closely spaced micro-indentations as sensors for recording permanent deformations. The information can be retrieved from the interference fringe patterns of laser light reflected and diffracted from the ISM indentations. Practically, the interference fringes are monitored with linear photodiode arrays in conjunction with a microcomputer based digital data acquisition system. The measurement can be conducted at any convenient time and needs not conflict with in-situ operations. Validity and accuracy of the method have been confirmed by the comparison with standard measurements. The ISM acts like a smart material to memorize permanent deformations. Different from the ISG and ISR real-time measuring techniques, the ISM measurement may be performed at any convenient time, and large deformations can be measured. The ISM method competes with other optical methods for its extremely compact sensors and applicability to production environments. It measures the indentation separations through analyzing the interference fringe patterns and has a better accuracy than a microscope. It is applicable to curved surfaces and notched regions in large structures.

  2. User's guide to computer programs JET 5A and CIVM-JET 5B to calculate the large elastic-plastic dynamically-induced deformations of multilayer partial and/or complete structural rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, R. W. H.; Stagliano, T. R.; Witmer, E. A.; Spilker, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    These structural ring deflections lie essentially in one plane and, hence, are called two-dimensional (2-d). The structural rings may be complete or partial; the former may be regarded as representing a fragment containment ring while the latter may be viewed as a 2-d fragment-deflector structure. These two types of rings may be either free or supported in various ways (pinned-fixed, locally clamped, elastic-foundation supported, mounting-bracket supported, etc.). The initial geometry of each ring may be circular or arbitrarily curved; uniform-thickness or variable-thickness rings may be analyzed. Strain-hardening and strain-rate effects of initially-isotropic material are taken into account. An approximate analysis utilizing kinetic energy and momentum conservation relations is used to predict the after-impact velocities of each fragment and of the impact-affected region of the ring; this procedure is termed the collision-imparted velocity method (CIVM) and is used in the CIVM-JET 5 B program. This imparted-velocity information is used in conjunction with a finite-element structural response computation code to predict the transient, large-deflection, elastic-plastic responses of the ring. Similarly, the equations of motion of each fragment are solved in small steps in time. Provisions are made in the CIVM-JET 5B code to analyze structural ring response to impact attack by from 1 to 3 fragments, each with its own size, mass, translational velocity components, and rotational velocity. The effects of friction between each fragment and the impacted ring are included.

  3. Improved image registration by sparse patch-based deformation estimation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minjeong; Wu, Guorong; Wang, Qian; Lee, Seong-Whan; Shen, Dinggang

    2015-01-15

    Despite intensive efforts for decades, deformable image registration is still a challenging problem due to the potential large anatomical differences across individual images, which limits the registration performance. Fortunately, this issue could be alleviated if a good initial deformation can be provided for the two images under registration, which are often termed as the moving subject and the fixed template, respectively. In this work, we present a novel patch-based initial deformation prediction framework for improving the performance of existing registration algorithms. Our main idea is to estimate the initial deformation between subject and template in a patch-wise fashion by using the sparse representation technique. We argue that two image patches should follow the same deformation toward the template image if their patch-wise appearance patterns are similar. To this end, our framework consists of two stages, i.e., the training stage and the application stage. In the training stage, we register all training images to the pre-selected template, such that the deformation of each training image with respect to the template is known. In the application stage, we apply the following four steps to efficiently calculate the initial deformation field for the new test subject: (1) We pick a small number of key points in the distinctive regions of the test subject; (2) for each key point, we extract a local patch and form a coupled appearance-deformation dictionary from training images where each dictionary atom consists of the image intensity patch as well as their respective local deformations; (3) a small set of training image patches in the coupled dictionary are selected to represent the image patch of each subject key point by sparse representation. Then, we can predict the initial deformation for each subject key point by propagating the pre-estimated deformations on the selected training patches with the same sparse representation coefficients; and (4) we

  4. Elastocapillary Deformations and Fracture of Soft Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Karen; Grzelka, Marion; Bostwick, Joshua

    When a droplet is placed on the surface of a soft gel, the surface deforms by an amount proportional to the elastocapillary length calculated from the ratio of surface tension and elastic modulus. For sufficiently large deformations, the gel can fracture due to the forces generated under the liquid-gel contact line. We observe that a starburst of channel fractures forms at the surface of the gel, driven by fluid propagating away from the central droplet. To understand the initiation of these cracks, we model the substrate as an incompressible, linear-elastic solid and quantify the elastic response. This provides quantitative agreement with experimental measurements of the number of fracture arms as a function of material properties and geometric parameters. In addition, we find that the initiation process is thermally-activated, with delay time that decreases as a function of the elastocapillary length.

  5. Regional Deformation Studies with GRACE and GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. L.; Elosequi, P.; Tamisiea, M.; Mitrovica, J. X.

    2005-01-01

    GRACE data indicate large seasonal variations in gravity that have been shown to be to be related to climate-driven fluxes of surface water. Seasonal redistribution of surface mass deforms the Earth, and our previous study using GRACE data demonstrate that annual radial deformations of +/-13 mm in the region of Amazon River Basin were observed by both GRACE and ten GPS sites in the region. For the GRACE determinations, we estimate in a least-squares solution for each Stokes coefficient parameters that represent the amplitudes of the annual variation. We then filter these parameters based on a statistical test that uses the scatter of the postfit residuals. We demonstrate by comparison to the GPS amplitudes that this method is more accurate, for this region, than Gaussian smoothing. Our model for the temporal behavior of the gravity coefficients includes a rate term, and although the time series are noisy, the glacial isostatic adjustment signal over Hudson s Bay can be observed. .

  6. Monopole Strength Function of Deformed Superfluid Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Stoitsov, M. V.; Kortelainen, E. M.; Nakatsukasa, T.; Losa, C.; Nazarewicz, Witold

    2011-01-01

    We present an efficient method for calculating strength functions using the finite amplitude method (FAM) for deformed superfluid heavy nuclei within the framework of the nuclear density functional theory. We demonstrate that FAM reproduces strength functions obtained with the fully self-consistent quasi-particle random-phase approximation (QRPA) at a fraction of computational cost. As a demonstration, we compute the isoscalar and isovector monopole strength for strongly deformed configurations in ^{240}Pu by considering huge quasi-particle QRPA spaces. Our approach to FAM, based on Broyden's iterative procedure, opens the possibility for large-scale calculations of strength distributions in well-bound and weakly bound nuclei across the nuclear landscape.

  7. Grain boundary engineering of highly deformable ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Mecartney, M.L.

    2000-07-01

    Highly deformable ceramics can be created with the addition of intergranular silicate phases. These amorphous intergranular phases can assist in superplastic deformation by relieving stress concentrations and minimizing grain growth if the appropriate intergranular compositions are selected. Examples from 3Y-TZP and 8Y-CSZ ceramics are discussed. The grain boundary chemistry is analyzed by high resolution analytical TEM is found to have a strong influence on the cohesion of the grains both at high temperature and at room temperature. Intergranular phases with a high ionic character and containing large ions with a relatively weak bond strength appear to cause premature failure. In contrast, intergranular phases with a high degree of covalent character and similar or smaller ions than the ceramic and a high ionic bond strength are the best for grain boundary adhesion and prevention of both cavitation at high temperatures and intergranular fracture at room temperature.

  8. High strain rate deformation of layered nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Hwang; Veysset, David; Singer, Jonathan P; Retsch, Markus; Saini, Gagan; Pezeril, Thomas; Nelson, Keith A; Thomas, Edwin L

    2012-01-01

    Insight into the mechanical behaviour of nanomaterials under the extreme condition of very high deformation rates and to very large strains is needed to provide improved understanding for the development of new protective materials. Applications include protection against bullets for body armour, micrometeorites for satellites, and high-speed particle impact for jet engine turbine blades. Here we use a microscopic ballistic test to report the responses of periodic glassy-rubbery layered block-copolymer nanostructures to impact from hypervelocity micron-sized silica spheres. Entire deformation fields are experimentally visualized at an exceptionally high resolution (below 10 nm) and we discover how the microstructure dissipates the impact energy via layer kinking, layer compression, extreme chain conformational flattening, domain fragmentation and segmental mixing to form a liquid phase. Orientation-dependent experiments show that the dissipation can be enhanced by 30% by proper orientation of the layers. PMID:23132014

  9. Viscoelastic deformation near active plate boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, S. N.

    1986-01-01

    Model deformations near the active plate boundaries of Western North America using space-based geodetic measurements as constraints are discussed. The first six months of this project were spent gaining familarity with space-based measurements, accessing the Crustal Dynamics Data Information Computer, and building time independent deformation models. The initial goal was to see how well the simplest elastic models can reproduce very long base interferometry (VLBI) baseline data. From the Crustal Dynamics Data Information Service, a total of 18 VLBI baselines are available which have been surveyed on four or more occasions. These data were fed into weighted and unweighted inversions to obtain baseline closure rates. Four of the better quality lines are illustrated. The deformation model assumes that the observed baseline rates result from a combination of rigid plate tectonic motions plus a component resulting from elastic strain build up due to a failure of the plate boundary to slip at the full plate tectonic rate. The elastic deformation resulting from the locked plate boundary is meant to portray interseismic strain accumulation. During and shortly after a large interplate earthquake, these strains are largely released, and points near the fault which were previously retarded suddenly catch up to the positions predicted by rigid plate models. Researchers judge the quality of fit by the sum squares of weighted residuals, termed total variance. The observed baseline closures have a total variance of 99 (cm/y)squared. When the RM2 velocities are assumed to model the data, the total variance increases to 154 (cm/y)squared.

  10. Capillary deformations of bendable films.

    PubMed

    Schroll, R D; Adda-Bedia, M; Cerda, E; Huang, J; Menon, N; Russell, T P; Toga, K B; Vella, D; Davidovitch, B

    2013-07-01

    We address the partial wetting of liquid drops on ultrathin solid sheets resting on a deformable foundation. Considering the membrane limit of sheets that can relax compression through wrinkling at negligible energetic cost, we revisit the classical theory for the contact of liquid drops on solids. Our calculations and experiments show that the liquid-solid-vapor contact angle is modified from the Young angle, even though the elastic bulk modulus (E) of the sheet is so large that the ratio between the surface tension γ and E is of molecular size. This finding indicates a new elastocapillary phenomenon that stems from the high bendability of very thin elastic sheets rather than from material softness. We also show that the size of the wrinkle pattern that emerges in the sheet is fully predictable, thus resolving a puzzle in modeling "drop-on-a-floating-sheet" experiments and enabling a quantitative, calibration-free use of this setup for the metrology of ultrathin films. PMID:23863002

  11. Particle-Based Simulation of Shock-Induced Deformation of Elastic Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamura, Y.; Sugimoto, T.; Nakayama, K.

    Shock-induced deformations of solid bodies are of practical interest to those who are concerned with explosive processing of materials, demolition of buildings, precautions against accidental explosions, etc. In order to simulate the shock-induced deformations of solid bodies, a large number of numerical codes based on continuum mechanics, which are called hydrocodes, have been developed so far [1, 2]. When the amount of deformation is relatively small, Lagrangian hydrocodes have been used to simulate the dynamic response of shock-loaded materials. When the deformation is large, Eulerian hydrocodes have been utilized instead. This is because the computational grids distorted along with the deformation of materials in the Lagrangian approach make the simulations either inaccurate or unstable, while the Eulerian approach where grids are fixed in space can handle such large deformations of materials. On the contrary, material interfaces that are precisely defined in the Lagrangian approach are not traced exactly in the Eulerian one.

  12. Deformation Mechanisms of Gum Metals Under Nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankaran, Rohini Priya

    defect structures to applied loading, we perform ex-situ nanoindentation. Nanoindentation is a convenient method as the plastic deformation is localized and probes a nominally defect free volume of the material. We subsequently characterize the defect structures in these alloys with both conventional TEM and advanced techniques such as HAADF HRSTEM and nanoprobe diffraction. These advanced techniques allow for a more thorough understanding of the observed deformation features. The main findings from this investigation are as follows. As expected we observe that a non-equilibrium phase, o, is present in the leaner beta-stabilized alloy, ST Ref-1. We do not find any direct evidence of secondary phases in STGM, and we find the beta phase in CWGM, along with lath microstructure with subgrain structure consisting of dislocation cell networks. Upon nanoindentation, we find twinning accompanied by beta nucleation on the twin boundary in ST Ref-1 samples. This result is consistent with previous findings and is reasonable considering the alloy is unstable with respect to beta transformation. We find deformation nanotwinning in cold worked gum metals under nanoindentation, which is initially surprising. We argue that when viewed as a nanocrystalline material, such a deformation mechanism is consistent with previous work, and furthermore, a deformation nanotwinned structure does not preclude an ideal shear mechanism from operating in the alloy. Lastly, we observe continuous lattice rotations in STGM under nanoindentation via nanoprobe diffraction. With this technique, for the first time we can demonstrate that the lattice rotations are truly continuous at the nanoscale. We can quantify this lattice rotation, and find that even though the rotation is large, it may be mediated by a reasonable geometrically necessary dislocation density, and note that similar rotations are typically observed in other materials under nanoindentation. HRSTEM and conventional TEM data confirm the

  13. [Spectrum research on metamorphic and deformation of tectonically deformed coals].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Shi; Ju, Yi-Wen; Hou, Quan-Lin; Lin, Hong

    2011-08-01

    The structural and compositive evolution of tectonically deformed coals (TDCs) and their influencing factors were investigated and analyzed in detail through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and laser Raman spectra analysis. The TDC samples (0.7% < Ro,max <3.1%) were collected from Huaibei coalfield with different deformation mechanisms and intensity. The FTIR of TDCs shows that the metamorphism and the deformation affect the degradation and polycondensation process of macromolecular structure to different degree. The Raman spectra analysis indicates that secondary structure defects can be produced mainly by structural deformation, also the metamorphism influences the secondary structure defects and aromatic structure. Through comprehensive analysis, it was discussed that the ductile deformation could change to strain energy through the increase and accumulation of dislocation in molecular structure units of TDC, and it could make an obvious influence on degradation and polycondensation. While the brittle deformation could change to frictional heat energy and promote the metamorphism and degradation of TDC structure, but has less effect on polycondensation. Furthermore, degradation is the main reason for affecting the structural evolution of coal in lower metamorphic stage, and polycondensation is the most important controlling factor in higher metamorphic stage. Under metamorphism and deformation, the small molecules which break and fall off from the macromolecular tructure of TDC are preferentially replenished and embedded into the secondary structure defects or the residual aromatic rings were formed into aromatic structure by polycondensation. This process improved the stability of coal structure. It is easier for ductile deformation of coal to induce the secondary structure defects than brittle deformation.

  14. [Spectrum research on metamorphic and deformation of tectonically deformed coals].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Shi; Ju, Yi-Wen; Hou, Quan-Lin; Lin, Hong

    2011-08-01

    The structural and compositive evolution of tectonically deformed coals (TDCs) and their influencing factors were investigated and analyzed in detail through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and laser Raman spectra analysis. The TDC samples (0.7% < Ro,max <3.1%) were collected from Huaibei coalfield with different deformation mechanisms and intensity. The FTIR of TDCs shows that the metamorphism and the deformation affect the degradation and polycondensation process of macromolecular structure to different degree. The Raman spectra analysis indicates that secondary structure defects can be produced mainly by structural deformation, also the metamorphism influences the secondary structure defects and aromatic structure. Through comprehensive analysis, it was discussed that the ductile deformation could change to strain energy through the increase and accumulation of dislocation in molecular structure units of TDC, and it could make an obvious influence on degradation and polycondensation. While the brittle deformation could change to frictional heat energy and promote the metamorphism and degradation of TDC structure, but has less effect on polycondensation. Furthermore, degradation is the main reason for affecting the structural evolution of coal in lower metamorphic stage, and polycondensation is the most important controlling factor in higher metamorphic stage. Under metamorphism and deformation, the small molecules which break and fall off from the macromolecular tructure of TDC are preferentially replenished and embedded into the secondary structure defects or the residual aromatic rings were formed into aromatic structure by polycondensation. This process improved the stability of coal structure. It is easier for ductile deformation of coal to induce the secondary structure defects than brittle deformation. PMID:22007412

  15. Nonaffine chain and primitive path deformation in crosslinked polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, J. D.; Goulbourne, N. C.

    2016-08-01

    Chains in a polymer network deform nonaffinely at small length scales due to the ability for extensive microscopic rearrangement. Classically, the conformations of an individual chain can be described solely by an end-to-end length. This picture neglects interchain interactions and therefore does not represent the behavior of a real polymer network. The primitive path concept provides the additional detail to represent interchain entanglements, and techniques have recently been developed to identify the network of primitive paths in a polymer simulation. We use coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) to track both chain end-to-end and primitive path deformation in crosslinked polymer networks. The range of simulated materials includes short chain unentangled networks to long, entangled chain networks. Both chain end-to-end and primitive path length are found to be linear functions of the applied deformation, and a simple relationship describes the behavior of a network in response to large stretch uniaxial, pure shear, and equi-biaxial deformations. As expected, end-to-end chain length deformation is nonaffine for short chain networks, and becomes closer to affine for networks of long, entangled chains. However, primitive path deformation is found to always be nonaffine, even for long, entangled chains. We demonstrate how the microscopic constraints of crosslinks and entanglements affect nonaffine chain deformation as well as the simulated elastic behavior of the different networks.

  16. Dynamic Concrete Beam Deformation Measuremnet with 3d Range Cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, X.; Lichti, D.

    2012-07-01

    Concrete beams are used to construct bridges and other structures. Due to the traffic overloading or the decaying state of structures, deformation of bridges or other structures occurs frequently. Therefore, the requirement to measure concrete beam deformation, as integral components of structures, is well recognized. Many imaging techniques such as digital cameras, laser scanners and range cameras have been proven to be accurate and cost-effective methods for large-area measurement of deformation under static loading conditions. However, for obtaining useful information about the behaviour of the beams or monitoring real-time bridge deformation, the ability to measurement deformation under dynamic loading conditions is also necessary. This paper presents a relatively low-cost and high accuracy imaging technique to measure the deformation of concrete beams in response to dynamic loading with range cameras. However, due to the range camera measurement principle, target movement could lead to motion artefacts that degrade range measurement accuracy. The results of simulated and real-data investigation into the motion artefacts show that the lower sampling frequency leads to the more significant motion artefact. The results from real data experiments have indicated that periodic deformation can be recovered with sub-millimetre accuracy when the 3 Hz and 4 mm amplitude target motion is sampled at a rate of least 20 Hz and with 31 MHz range camera modulation frequency. When the modulation frequency is 29 MHz, the best sampling frequency is 20 Hz to keep the error under sub-millimetre.

  17. Distinct element modeling of deformation bands in sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonellini, Marco A.; Pollard, David D.

    1995-08-01

    We have conducted numerical experiments with the distinct element method to study factors that control the development of deformation bands in sandstone. These experiments show how sorting and initial porosity of the host rock control the development and the mode of deformation in the area of strain localization. The results of the numerical experiments are in qualitative agreement with field and microstructural observations of deformation bands at Arches National Park (Utah). In our numerical experiments sand grains are modeled as cylindrical elements that move in response to externally applied boundary conditions. Systems of elements that have a large variability in radius and/or loose packing deform at lower applied stresses than systems of elements that have a uniform radius and/or tight packing. The mode of deformation in the first kind of aggregate is particulate flow, where elements of different sizes move easily with respect to each other due to a low degree of interlocking. The mode of deformation in the second kind of aggregates is localized failure on small deformation bands. Shear bands in our numerical experiments nucleate as a zone of dilatancy and propagate via organization of dilatant zones into discrete faults. The presence of a flaw in the form of a 'weak' grain promotes the nucleation and propagation of shear bands.

  18. Deforming the hippocampal map.

    PubMed

    Touretzky, David S; Weisman, Wendy E; Fuhs, Mark C; Skaggs, William E; Fenton, Andre A; Muller, Robert U

    2005-01-01

    To investigate conjoint stimulus control over place cells, Fenton et al. (J Gen Physiol 116:191-209, 2000a) recorded while rats foraged in a cylinder with 45 degrees black and white cue cards on the wall. Card centers were 135 degrees apart. In probe trials, the cards were rotated together or apart by 25 degrees . Firing field centers shifted during these trials, stretching and shrinking the cognitive map. Fenton et al. (2000b) described this deformation with an ad hoc vector field equation. We consider what sorts of neural network mechanisms might be capable of accounting for their observations. In an abstract, maximum likelihood formulation, the rat's location is estimated by a conjoint probability density function of landmark positions. In an attractor neural network model, recurrent connections produce a bump of activity over a two-dimensional array of cells; the bump's position is influenced by landmark features such as distances or bearings. If features are chosen with appropriate care, the attractor network and maximum likelihood models yield similar results, in accord with previous demonstrations that recurrent neural networks can efficiently implement maximum likelihood computations (Pouget et al. Neural Comput 10:373-401, 1998; Deneve et al. Nat Neurosci 4:826-831, 2001). PMID:15390166

  19. Supersymmetric q-deformed quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Traikia, M. H.; Mebarki, N.

    2012-06-27

    A supersymmetric q-deformed quantum mechanics is studied in the weak deformation approximation of the Weyl-Heisenberg algebra. The corresponding supersymmetric q-deformed hamiltonians and charges are constructed explicitly.

  20. Involvement of valgus hindfoot deformity in hallux valgus deformity in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shutaro; Hirao, Makoto; Tsuboi, Hideki; Akita, Shosuke; Matsushita, Masato; Ohshima, Shiro; Saeki, Yukihiko; Hashimoto, Jun

    2014-09-01

    The involvement of valgus hindfoot deformity in hallux valgus deformity was confirmed in a rheumatoid arthritis case with a destructive valgus hindfoot deformity. Correction of severe valgus, calcaneal lateral offset, and pronated foot deformity instantly normalized hallux valgus deformities postoperatively. Thus, careful hindfoot status evaluation is important when assessing forefoot deformity, including hallux valgus, in rheumatoid arthritis cases.

  1. Perceptual transparency from image deformation.

    PubMed

    Kawabe, Takahiro; Maruya, Kazushi; Nishida, Shin'ya

    2015-08-18

    Human vision has a remarkable ability to perceive two layers at the same retinal locations, a transparent layer in front of a background surface. Critical image cues to perceptual transparency, studied extensively in the past, are changes in luminance or color that could be caused by light absorptions and reflections by the front layer, but such image changes may not be clearly visible when the front layer consists of a pure transparent material such as water. Our daily experiences with transparent materials of this kind suggest that an alternative potential cue of visual transparency is image deformations of a background pattern caused by light refraction. Although previous studies have indicated that these image deformations, at least static ones, play little role in perceptual transparency, here we show that dynamic image deformations of the background pattern, which could be produced by light refraction on a moving liquid's surface, can produce a vivid impression of a transparent liquid layer without the aid of any other visual cues as to the presence of a transparent layer. Furthermore, a transparent liquid layer perceptually emerges even from a randomly generated dynamic image deformation as long as it is similar to real liquid deformations in its spatiotemporal frequency profile. Our findings indicate that the brain can perceptually infer the presence of "invisible" transparent liquids by analyzing the spatiotemporal structure of dynamic image deformation, for which it uses a relatively simple computation that does not require high-level knowledge about the detailed physics of liquid deformation. PMID:26240313

  2. Inelastic deformation in crystalline rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, H.; Borja, R. I.

    2011-12-01

    The elasto-plastic behavior of crystalline rocks, such as evaporites, igneous rocks, or metamorphic rocks, is highly dependent on the behavior of their individual crystals. Previous studies indicate that crystal plasticity can be one of the dominant micro mechanisms in the plastic deformation of crystal aggregates. Deformation bands and pore collapse are examples of plastic deformation in crystalline rocks. In these cases twinning within the grains illustrate plastic deformation of crystal lattice. Crystal plasticity is governed by the plastic deformation along potential slip systems of crystals. Linear dependency of the crystal slip systems causes singularity in the system of equations solving for the plastic slip of each slip system. As a result, taking the micro-structure properties into account, while studying the overall behavior of crystalline materials, is quite challenging. To model the plastic deformation of single crystals we use the so called `ultimate algorithm' by Borja and Wren (1993) implemented in a 3D finite element framework to solve boundary value problems. The major advantage of this model is that it avoids the singularity problem by solving for the plastic slip explicitly in sub steps over which the stress strain relationship is linear. Comparing the results of the examples to available models such as Von Mises we show the significance of considering the micro-structure of crystals in modeling the overall elasto-plastic deformation of crystal aggregates.

  3. Friction and deformation behavior of single-crystal silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    Friction and deformation studies were conducted with single-crystal silicon carbide in sliding contact with diamond. When the radius of curvature of the spherical diamond rider was large (0.3), deformation of silicon carbide was primarily elastic. Under these conditions the friction coefficient was low and did not show a dependence on the silicon carbide orientation. Further, there was no detectable cracking of the silicon carbide surfaces. When smaller radii of curvature of the spherical diamond riders (0.15 and 0.02 mm) or a conical diamond rider was used, plastic grooving occured and the silicon carbide exhibited anisotropic friction and deformation behavior. Under these conditions the friction coefficient depended on load. Anisotropic friction and deformation of the basal plane of silicon carbide was controlled by the slip system. 10101120and cleavage of1010.

  4. Lattice-Boltzmann method for Stokes flow of Deformable Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jingshu; Ding, E.-Jiang; Aidun, Cyrus

    2006-11-01

    Predicting the rheology of deformable particles suspended in viscous fluid is important in industrial and biological transport applications. We combine a Stokes lattice-Boltzmann Model (SLBM) and Lattice Spring Model (LSM) to capture the dynamics of particles with deformable membrane with enclosed fluid. We simulate blood flow in a small vessel which has deformable arterial wall and red blood cell (RBC) membrane. We find that the flow is affected by the physical properties of wall, membrane and enclosed fluid and these are very important in the hemodynamic applications. The combination of SLBM-LSM can calculate the mesoscale blood flow close to the endothelial surface layer (ESL) or its subset, the glycocalyx layer. And it is also a strong tool to capture the multiphase flow with large number of deformable particles.

  5. 3D deformation field throughout the interior of materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Huiqing; Lu, Wei-Yang

    2013-09-01

    This report contains the one-year feasibility study for our three-year LDRD proposal that is aimed to develop an experimental technique to measure the 3D deformation fields inside a material body. In this feasibility study, we first apply Digital Volume Correlation (DVC) algorithm to pre-existing in-situ Xray Computed Tomography (XCT) image sets with pure rigid body translation. The calculated displacement field has very large random errors and low precision that are unacceptable. Then we enhance these tomography images by setting threshold of the intensity of each slice. DVC algorithm is able to obtain accurate deformation fields from these enhanced image sets and the deformation fields are consistent with the global mechanical loading that is applied to the specimen. Through this study, we prove that the internal markers inside the pre-existing tomography images of aluminum alloy can be enhanced and are suitable for DVC to calculate the deformation field throughout the material body.

  6. Compensation of Gravity-Induced Structural Deformations on a Beam- Waveguide Antenna Using a Deformable Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbriale, W. A.; Moore, M.; Rochblatt, D. J.; Veruttipong, W.

    1995-01-01

    At the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) Goldstone Complex, a 34-meter- diameter beam-waveguide antenna, DSS-13, was constructed in 1988-1990 and has become an integral part of an advanced systems program and a test bed for technologies being developed to introduce Ka-band (32 GHz) frequencies into the DSN. A method for compensating the gravity- induced structural deformations in this large antenna is presented.

  7. Thalidomide deformities and their nerve supply.

    PubMed Central

    McCredie, J; North, K; de Iongh, R

    1984-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that thalidomide acts upon the embryonic peripheral nervous system rather than upon mesenchyme. Pregnant rabbits were given oral thalidomide (150 mg/kg/day) on Days 7-11 of gestation. Fetuses were removed at laparotomy, under anaesthesia, on Day 29 of gestation. Seven fetuses with partial or total absence of the tibia, five treated fetuses without deformities, and four untreated controls were photographed, radiographed, killed and fixed for histological examination. Sciatic nerves were dissected and transverse sections were taken from an identical site. Total fascicular area, myelinated fibre number, fibre density and diameter distribution were obtained. There was a significant reduction in total fascicular area, and in the number of large diameter fibres in all treated animals. There was a significant depletion of total fibre numbers in deformed fetuses compared with controls. These findings are similar to the quantitative changes described in human adult subjects with thalidomide polyneuropathy, and are consistent with primary axonal degeneration in both instances. It is concluded that thalidomide acts upon embryonic nerves rather than on mesenchyme, and that dysmelic deformities of the limbs are secondary to toxic embryonic neuropathy. It is suggested that skeletal defects result when irreversible damage to the nerves reduces the transverse fascicular area below a critical minimum threshold. Images Fig. 1 (cont.) Fig. 1 Fig. 4 PMID:6490524

  8. Deformable mirrors based on magnetic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laird, Phil R.; Borra, Ermanno F.; Bergamasco, Rosangela; Gingras, Julie; Truong, Long; Ritcey, Anna

    2004-10-01

    The trend towards ever larger telescopes and more advanced adaptive optics systems such as multi-conjugate adaptive optics is driving the need for deformable mirrors with a large number of low cost actuators. Other applications require strokes larger than those readily available from conventional mirrors. Magnetically deformable liquid mirrors are a potential solution to both these problems. Depositing a thin silver colloid known as a metal liquid-like film (MELLF) on the ferrofluid surface solves the problem of low reflectivity of pure ferrofluids. This combination provides a liquid optical surface that can be precisely shaped in a magnetic field. We have demonstrated a reflective coating that is stable for more than 30 days with a reflectivity of 50% in the near infrared. Additional experiments indicate that MELLF coatings can provide near infrared reflectivity values in excess of 80%. We also report on recent response time measurements of liquid deformable mirrors. We have demonstrated liquid mirror actuators with slew rates of 800 μm/s, corresponding to an actuator bandwidth of approximately 40 Hz and 80 Hz for strokes of 10 μm and 5 μm respectively.

  9. NMR study on mechanisms of ionic polymer-metal composites deformation with water content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zicai; Chen, Hualing; Wang, Yongquan; Luo, Bin; Chang, Longfei; Li, Bo; Chen, Luping

    2011-10-01

    Ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMCs) exhibit a large dynamic bending deformation under exterior electric field. The states and proportions of water within the IPMCs have great effect on the IPMCs deformation properties. This letter investigates the influence of the proportion changes of different types of water on the deformation, which may disclose the working mechanisms of the IPMCs. We give a deformation trend of IPMCs with the reduction of water content firstly. Then by the method of nuclear magnetic resonance, various water types (water bonded to sulfonates, loosely bound water and free water) of IPMCs and their proportions are investigated in the drying process which corresponds to their different deformation states. It is obtained that the deformation properties of IPMCs depend strongly on their water content and the excess free water is responsible for the relaxation deformation.

  10. Sensing surface mechanical deformation using active probes driven by motor proteins

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Daisuke; Nitta, Takahiro; Kabir, Arif Md. Rashedul; Sada, Kazuki; Gong, Jian Ping; Konagaya, Akihiko; Kakugo, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Studying mechanical deformation at the surface of soft materials has been challenging due to the difficulty in separating surface deformation from the bulk elasticity of the materials. Here, we introduce a new approach for studying the surface mechanical deformation of a soft material by utilizing a large number of self-propelled microprobes driven by motor proteins on the surface of the material. Information about the surface mechanical deformation of the soft material is obtained through changes in mobility of the microprobes wandering across the surface of the soft material. The active microprobes respond to mechanical deformation of the surface and readily change their velocity and direction depending on the extent and mode of surface deformation. This highly parallel and reliable method of sensing mechanical deformation at the surface of soft materials is expected to find applications that explore surface mechanics of soft materials and consequently would greatly benefit the surface science. PMID:27694937

  11. Sensing surface mechanical deformation using active probes driven by motor proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Daisuke; Nitta, Takahiro; Kabir, Arif Md. Rashedul; Sada, Kazuki; Gong, Jian Ping; Konagaya, Akihiko; Kakugo, Akira

    2016-10-01

    Studying mechanical deformation at the surface of soft materials has been challenging due to the difficulty in separating surface deformation from the bulk elasticity of the materials. Here, we introduce a new approach for studying the surface mechanical deformation of a soft material by utilizing a large number of self-propelled microprobes driven by motor proteins on the surface of the material. Information about the surface mechanical deformation of the soft material is obtained through changes in mobility of the microprobes wandering across the surface of the soft material. The active microprobes respond to mechanical deformation of the surface and readily change their velocity and direction depending on the extent and mode of surface deformation. This highly parallel and reliable method of sensing mechanical deformation at the surface of soft materials is expected to find applications that explore surface mechanics of soft materials and consequently would greatly benefit the surface science.

  12. The role of crustal quartz in controlling Cordilleran deformation.

    PubMed

    Lowry, Anthony R; Pérez-Gussinyé, Marta

    2011-03-17

    Large-scale deformation of continents remains poorly understood more than 40 years after the plate tectonic revolution. Rock flow strength and mass density variations both contribute to stress, so both are certain to be important, but these depend (somewhat nebulously) on rock type, temperature and whether or not unbound water is present. Hence, it is unclear precisely how Earth material properties translate to continental deformation zones ranging from tens to thousands of kilometres in width, why deforming zones are sometimes interspersed with non-deforming blocks and why large earthquakes occasionally rupture in otherwise stable continental interiors. An important clue comes from observations that mountain belts and rift zones cyclically form at the same locations despite separation across vast gulfs of time (dubbed the Wilson tectonic cycle), accompanied by inversion of extensional basins and reactivation of faults and other structures formed in previous deformation events. Here we show that the abundance of crustal quartz, the weakest mineral in continental rocks, may strongly condition continental temperature and deformation. We use EarthScope seismic receiver functions, gravity and surface heat flow measurements to estimate thickness and seismic velocity ratio, v(P)/v(S), of continental crust in the western United States. The ratio v(P)/v(S) is relatively insensitive to temperature but very sensitive to quartz abundance. Our results demonstrate a surprising correlation of low crustal v(P)/v(S) with both higher lithospheric temperature and deformation of the Cordillera, the mountainous region of the western United States. The most plausible explanation for the relationship to temperature is a robust dynamical feedback, in which ductile strain first localizes in relatively weak, quartz-rich crust, and then initiates processes that promote advective warming, hydration and further weakening. The feedback mechanism proposed here would not only explain

  13. The role of crustal quartz in controlling Cordilleran deformation.

    PubMed

    Lowry, Anthony R; Pérez-Gussinyé, Marta

    2011-03-17

    Large-scale deformation of continents remains poorly understood more than 40 years after the plate tectonic revolution. Rock flow strength and mass density variations both contribute to stress, so both are certain to be important, but these depend (somewhat nebulously) on rock type, temperature and whether or not unbound water is present. Hence, it is unclear precisely how Earth material properties translate to continental deformation zones ranging from tens to thousands of kilometres in width, why deforming zones are sometimes interspersed with non-deforming blocks and why large earthquakes occasionally rupture in otherwise stable continental interiors. An important clue comes from observations that mountain belts and rift zones cyclically form at the same locations despite separation across vast gulfs of time (dubbed the Wilson tectonic cycle), accompanied by inversion of extensional basins and reactivation of faults and other structures formed in previous deformation events. Here we show that the abundance of crustal quartz, the weakest mineral in continental rocks, may strongly condition continental temperature and deformation. We use EarthScope seismic receiver functions, gravity and surface heat flow measurements to estimate thickness and seismic velocity ratio, v(P)/v(S), of continental crust in the western United States. The ratio v(P)/v(S) is relatively insensitive to temperature but very sensitive to quartz abundance. Our results demonstrate a surprising correlation of low crustal v(P)/v(S) with both higher lithospheric temperature and deformation of the Cordillera, the mountainous region of the western United States. The most plausible explanation for the relationship to temperature is a robust dynamical feedback, in which ductile strain first localizes in relatively weak, quartz-rich crust, and then initiates processes that promote advective warming, hydration and further weakening. The feedback mechanism proposed here would not only explain

  14. Microstructure evolution of compressible granular systems under large deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Marcial; Cuitiño, Alberto M.

    2016-08-01

    We report three-dimensional particle mechanics static calculations that predict the microstructure evolution during die-compaction of elastic spherical particles up to relative densities close to one. We employ a nonlocal contact formulation that remains predictive at high levels of confinement by removing the classical assumption that contacts between particles are formulated locally as independent pair-interactions. The approach demonstrates that the coordination number depends on the level of compressibility, i.e., on Poisson's ratio, of the particles. Results also reveal that distributions of contact forces between particles and between particles and walls, although similar at jamming onset, are very different at full compaction. Particle-wall forces are in remarkable agreement with experimental measurements reported in the literature, providing a unifying framework for bridging experimental boundary observations with bulk behavior.

  15. Large deformation of self-oscillating polymer gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Shingo; Kato, Terukazu; Otsuka, Yuji; Hosoya, Naoki; Cianchetti, Matteo; Laschi, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    A self-oscillating gel is a system that generates an autonomous volume oscillation. This oscillation is powered by the chemical energy of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction, which demonstrates metal ion redox oscillation. A self-oscillating gel is composed of Poly-N -isopropylacrylamide (PNIPAAm) with a metal ion. In this study, we found that the displacement of the volume oscillation in a self-oscillating gel could be controlled by its being subjected to a prestraining process. We also revealed the driving mechanism of the self-oscillating gel from the point of view of thermodynamics. We observed that the polymer-solvent interaction parameter χ is altered by the redox changes to the metal ion incorporated in the self-oscillating gel. The prestraining process leads to changes in χ and changes in enthalpy and entropy when the self-oscillating gel is in a reduced and oxidized state. We found that nonprestrained gel samples oscillate in a poor solution (χ >0.5 ) and prestrained gel samples oscillate in a good solution (χ <0.5 ).

  16. Developing a molecular picture for polymer glasses under large deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shi-Qing; Cheng, Shiwang; Wang, Panpan

    2014-03-01

    Polymer glasses differ from most other types of glassy materials because they can be ductile under tensile extension. Remarkably, a ductile polymer can turn brittle and vice versa. For example, upon cooling, the glass changes from ductile to brittle at a temperature known as the brittle-ductile transition temperature (BDT). Aging causes the ductile glass to be brittle. Mechanical ``rejuvenation'' or pressurization brings a brittle glass into a ductile state. Finally, one glass can be ductile 100 degrees below Tg while another polymer is already brittle even just 10 degree below Tg. Polystyrene and bisphenol A polycarbonate are at the two extremes in the family of polymer glasses. How to rationale such a wide range of behavior in terms of a molecular picture has been a challenging task. What is the role of ``chain entanglement''? Since many of the procedures including the temperature change do not alter the ``chain entanglement'', it is clearly insufficient to explain the nature of the BDT in terms of the entanglement density. Our work attempts to answer the question of what then is the role of chain networking. We have formulated a molecular picture that presents a unifying and coherent explanation for all the known phenomenology concerning the BDT and condition for crazing. This work is supported, in part, by NSF (CMMI-0926522 and DMR-1105135).

  17. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of fracture and deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, S. J.; Beazley, D. M.; Lomdahl, P. S.; Holian, B. L.

    1996-08-01

    We have discussed the prospects of applying massively parallel molecular dynamics simulation to investigate brittle versus ductile fracture behaviors and dislocation intersection. This idea is illustrated by simulating dislocation emission from a three-dimensional crack. Unprecedentedly, the dislocation loops emitted from the crack fronts have been observed. It is found that dislocation-emission modes, jogging or blunting, are very sensitive to boundary conditions and interatomic potentials. These 3D phenomena can be effectively visualized and analyzed by a new technique, namely, plotting only those atoms within the certain ranges of local potential energies.

  18. Numerical Simulation of Gas-Solid Interfaces with Large Deformations

    SciTech Connect

    Vorobiev, O.Y.; Lomov, I.N.

    2000-02-01

    A method of treatment of multimaterial interfaces on Eulerian grids is developed which works well for mixtures of materials with diverse compressibilities and shear moduli. This makes it possible to use this method not only for problems of gas dynamics and solid mechanics but also to model fluid-structure interaction problems.

  19. Anisotropic Ripple Deformation in Phosphorene.

    PubMed

    Kou, Liangzhi; Ma, Yandong; Smith, Sean C; Chen, Changfeng

    2015-05-01

    Two-dimensional materials tend to become crumpled according to the Mermin-Wagner theorem, and the resulting ripple deformation may significantly influence electronic properties as observed in graphene and MoS2. Here, we unveil by first-principles calculations a new, highly anisotropic ripple pattern in phosphorene, a monolayer black phosphorus, where compression-induced ripple deformation occurs only along the zigzag direction in the strain range up to 10%, but not the armchair direction. This direction-selective ripple deformation mode in phosphorene stems from its puckered structure with coupled hinge-like bonding configurations and the resulting anisotropic Poisson ratio. We also construct an analytical model using classical elasticity theory for ripple deformation in phosphorene under arbitrary strain. The present results offer new insights into the mechanisms governing the structural and electronic properties of phosphorene crucial to its device applications.

  20. ROCK DEFORMATION. Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    2002-05-24

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on ROCK DEFORMATION was held at II Ciocco from 5/19/02 thru 5/24/02. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  1. Shear deformation in granular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bardenhagen, S.G.; Brackbill, J.U.; Sulsky, D.L.

    1998-12-31

    An investigation into the properties of granular materials is undertaken via numerical simulation. These simulations highlight that frictional contact, a defining characteristic of dry granular materials, and interfacial debonding, an expected deformation mode in plastic bonded explosives, must be properly modeled. Frictional contact and debonding algorithms have been implemented into FLIP, a particle in cell code, and are described. Frictionless and frictional contact are simulated, with attention paid to energy and momentum conservation. Debonding is simulated, with attention paid to the interfacial debonding speed. A first step toward calculations of shear deformation in plastic bonded explosives is made. Simulations are performed on the scale of the grains where experimental data is difficult to obtain. Two characteristics of deformation are found, namely the intermittent binding of grains when rotation and translation are insufficient to accommodate deformation, and the role of the binder as a lubricant in force chains.

  2. Variable focal length deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Headley, Daniel; Ramsey, Marc; Schwarz, Jens

    2007-06-12

    A variable focal length deformable mirror has an inner ring and an outer ring that simply support and push axially on opposite sides of a mirror plate. The resulting variable clamping force deforms the mirror plate to provide a parabolic mirror shape. The rings are parallel planar sections of a single paraboloid and can provide an on-axis focus, if the rings are circular, or an off-axis focus, if the rings are elliptical. The focal length of the deformable mirror can be varied by changing the variable clamping force. The deformable mirror can generally be used in any application requiring the focusing or defocusing of light, including with both coherent and incoherent light sources.

  3. Anatomy of gravitationally deformed slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chigira, Masahiro; Yamasaki, Shintaro; Hariyama, Takehiro

    2010-05-01

    Deep-seated gravitational slope deformation is the deformation of rocks as well as slope surfaces, but the internal structures have not been well observed and described before. This is mainly due to the difficulty in obtaining undisturbed samples from underground. We analyzed the internal deformational structures of gravitationally deformed slopes by using high quality drilled cores obtained by hybrid drilling technique, which has been recently developed and can recover very fragile materials that could not be taken by the conventional drilling techniques. Investigated slopes were gravitationally deformed out-facing slopes of pelitic schist and shale. The slope surfaces showed deformational features of small steps, depressions, knobs, and linear depressions, but had no major main scarp and landslide body with well-defined outline. This is indicative of slow, deep-seated gravitational deformation. Most of these small deformational features are hidden by vegetations, but they are detected by using airborne laser scanner. Drilled cores showed that the internal deformation is dominated by the slip and tearing off along foliations. Slippage along foliations is conspicuous in pelitic schist: Pelitic schist is sheared, particularly along black layers, which are rich in graphite and pyrite. Graphite is known to be a solid lubricant in material sciences, which seems to be why shearing occurs along the black layers. Rock mass between two slip layers is sheared, rotated, fractured, and pulverized; undulation of bedding or schistosity could be the nucleation points of fracturing. Tearing off along foliations is also the major deformation mode, which forms jagged morphology of rock fragments within shear zones. Rock fragments with jagged surface are commonly observed in "gouge", which is very different from tectonic gouge. This probably reflects the low confining pressures during their formation. Microscopic to mesoscopic openings along fractures are commonly observed with

  4. Symmetries in Connection Preserving Deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ormerod, Christopher M.

    2011-05-01

    We wish to show that the root lattice of Bäcklund transformations of the q-analogue of the third and fourth Painlevé equations, which is of type (A2+A1)(1), may be expressed as a quotient of the lattice of connection preserving deformations. Furthermore, we will show various directions in the lattice of connection preserving deformations present equivalent evolution equations under suitable transformations. These transformations correspond to the Dynkin diagram automorphisms.

  5. A novel three-dimensional mesh deformation method based on sphere relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xuan; Li, Shuixiang

    2015-10-01

    In our previous work (2013) [19], we developed a disk relaxation based mesh deformation method for two-dimensional mesh deformation. In this paper, the idea of the disk relaxation is extended to the sphere relaxation for three-dimensional meshes with large deformations. We develop a node based pre-displacement procedure to apply initial movements on nodes according to their layer indices. Afterwards, the nodes are moved locally by the improved sphere relaxation algorithm to transfer boundary deformations and increase the mesh quality. A three-dimensional mesh smoothing method is also adopted to prevent the occurrence of the negative volume of elements, and further improve the mesh quality. Numerical applications in three-dimension including the wing rotation, bending beam and morphing aircraft are carried out. The results demonstrate that the sphere relaxation based approach generates the deformed mesh with high quality, especially regarding complex boundaries and large deformations.

  6. Mixing of discontinuously deforming media.

    PubMed

    Smith, L D; Rudman, M; Lester, D R; Metcalfe, G

    2016-02-01

    Mixing of materials is fundamental to many natural phenomena and engineering applications. The presence of discontinuous deformations-such as shear banding or wall slip-creates new mechanisms for mixing and transport beyond those predicted by classical dynamical systems theory. Here, we show how a novel mixing mechanism combining stretching with cutting and shuffling yields exponential mixing rates, quantified by a positive Lyapunov exponent, an impossibility for systems with cutting and shuffling alone or bounded systems with stretching alone, and demonstrate it in a fluid flow. While dynamical systems theory provides a framework for understanding mixing in smoothly deforming media, a theory of discontinuous mixing is yet to be fully developed. New methods are needed to systematize, explain, and extrapolate measurements on systems with discontinuous deformations. Here, we investigate "webs" of Lagrangian discontinuities and show that they provide a template for the overall transport dynamics. Considering slip deformations as the asymptotic limit of increasingly localised smooth shear, we also demonstrate exactly how some of the new structures introduced by discontinuous deformations are analogous to structures in smoothly deforming systems. PMID:26931594

  7. Active compressive intraoceanic deformation: early stages of ophiolites emplacement?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamot-Rooke, Nicolas; Delescluse, Matthias; Montési, Laurent

    2010-05-01

    Oceanic lithosphere is strong and continental lithosphere is weak. As a result, there is relatively little deformation in the oceanic domain away from plate boundaries. However, the interior of oceanic lithosphere does deform when highly stressed. We review here places where intraoceanic compression is at work. In the more than 30 years since the first observations of active compressive intraplate deformation in the Central Indian Ocean through seismic profiling (Eittreim et al., 1972), compressive deformation has been identified in a variety of other oceanic tectonic settings: as a result of small differential motion between large plates (between North America and South America in the Central Atlantic; between Eurasia and Nubia offshore Gibraltar; between Macquarie and Australia plates in the Southern Ocean), within back-arcs (northwest Celebes Sea, Okushiri Ridge in the Japan Sea, on the eastern border of the Caroline plate), and ahead of subduction (Zenisu Ridge off Nankai Trough). Deformation appears to be more diffuse when larger plates are involved, and more localized for younger plates, perhaps in relation with the increasing rigidity of oceanic plates with age. The best example of diffuse deformation studied so far remains the Central Indian Ocean. Numerous marine data have been collected in this area, including shallow and deep seismic, heat flow measurements, multibeam bathymetry. The present-day deformation field has been modeled using GPS and earthquakes as far field and near field constraints respectively. Reactivation of the oceanic fabric (including for portions of the Indo-Australian plate which are now in subduction as evidenced by the September 2009 Padang earthquake), selective fault abandonment (Delescluse et al., 2008) and serpentinization (Delescluse and Chamot-Rooke, 2008) are some of the important processes that shape the present-day pattern of deformation. These rare intraplate deformation areas constitute excellent natural laboratories to

  8. Perioperative Assessment of Myocardial Deformation

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Andra E.; Alfirevic, Andrej; Sessler, Daniel I.; Popovic, Zoran B.; Thomas, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of left ventricular performance improves risk assessment and guides anesthetic decisions. However, the most common echocardiographic measure of myocardial function, the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), has important limitations. LVEF is limited by subjective interpretation which reduces accuracy and reproducibility, and LVEF assesses global function without characterizing regional myocardial abnormalities. An alternative objective echocardiographic measure of myocardial function is thus needed. Myocardial deformation analysis, which performs quantitative assessment of global and regional myocardial function, may be useful for perioperative care of surgical patients. Myocardial deformation analysis evaluates left ventricular mechanics by quantifying strain and strain rate. Strain describes percent change in myocardial length in the longitudinal (from base to apex) and circumferential (encircling the short-axis of the ventricle) direction and change in thickness in the radial direction. Segmental strain describes regional myocardial function. Strain is a negative number when the ventricle shortens longitudinally or circumferentially and is positive with radial thickening. Reference values for normal longitudinal strain from a recent meta-analysis using transthoracic echocardiography are (mean ± SD) −19.7 ± 0.4%, while radial and circumferential strain are 47.3 ± 1.9 and −23.3 ± 0.7%, respectively. The speed of myocardial deformation is also important and is characterized by strain rate. Longitudinal systolic strain rate in healthy subjects averages −1.10 ± 0.16 sec−1. Assessment of myocardial deformation requires consideration of both strain (change in deformation), which correlates with LVEF, and strain rate (speed of deformation), which correlates with rate of rise of left ventricular pressure (dP/dt). Myocardial deformation analysis also evaluates ventricular relaxation, twist, and untwist, providing new and noninvasive methods to

  9. Preferred orientation in experimentally deformed stishovite: implications for deformation mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaercher, P. M.; Zepeda-Alarcon, E.; Prakapenka, V.; Kanitpanyacharoen, W.; Smith, J.; Sinogeikin, S. V.; Wenk, H. R.

    2014-12-01

    The crystal structure of the high pressure SiO2 polymorph stishovite has been studied in detail, yet little is known about its deformation mechanisms. Information about how stishovite deforms under stress is important for understanding subduction of quartz-bearing crustal rocks into the mantle. Particularly, stishovite is elastically anisotropic and thus development of crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) during deformation may contribute to seismic anomalies in the mantle. We converted a natural sample of flint to stishovite in a laser heated diamond anvil cell and compressed the stishovite aggregate up to 38 GPa. Diffraction patterns were collected in situ in radial geometry at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) and the Advanced Photon Source (APS) to examine development of CPO during deformation. We find that (001) poles preferentially align with the compression direction and infer deformation mechanisms leading to the observed CPO with visco-plastic self consistent (VPSC) polycrystal plasticity models. Our results show pyramidal and basal slip are most likely active at high pressure and ambient temperature, in agreement with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of rutile (TiO2) and paratellurite (TeO2), which are isostructural to stishovite. Conversely other TEM studies of stishovite done at higher temperature suggest dominant prismatic slip. This indicates that a variety of slip systems may be active in stishovite, depending on conditions. As a result, stishovite's contribution to the seismic signature in the mantle may vary as a function of pressure and temperature and thus depth.

  10. Development of large aperture composite adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kmetik, Viliam; Vitovec, Bohumil; Jiran, Lukas; Nemcova, Sarka; Zicha, Josef; Inneman, Adolf; Mikulickova, Lenka; Pavlica, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Large aperture composite adaptive optics for laser applications is investigated in cooperation of Institute of Plasma Physic, Department of Instrumentation and Control Engineering FME CTU and 5M Ltd. We are exploring opportunity of a large-size high-power-laser deformable-mirror production using a lightweight bimorph actuated structure with a composite core. In order to produce a sufficiently large operational free aperture we are developing new technologies for production of flexible core, bimorph actuator and deformable mirror reflector. Full simulation of a deformable-mirrors structure was prepared and validated by complex testing. A deformable mirror actuation and a response of a complicated structure are investigated for an accurate control of the adaptive optics. An original adaptive optics control system and a bimorph deformable mirror driver were developed. Tests of material samples, components and sub-assemblies were completed. A subscale 120 mm bimorph deformable mirror prototype was designed, fabricated and thoroughly tested. A large-size 300 mm composite-core bimorph deformable mirror was simulated and optimized, fabrication of a prototype is carried on. A measurement and testing facility is modified to accommodate large sizes optics.

  11. Unimorph deformable mirror for space telescopes: design and manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Rausch, Peter; Verpoort, Sven; Wittrock, Ulrich

    2015-07-27

    Large space telescopes made of deployable and lightweight structures suffer from aberrations caused by thermal deformations, gravitational release, and alignment errors which occur during the deployment procedure. An active optics system would allow on-site correction of wave-front errors, and ease the requirements on thermal and mechanical stability of the optical train. In the course of a project funded by the European Space Agency we have developed and manufactured a unimorph deformable mirror based on piezoelectric actuation. The mirror is able to work in space environment and is designed to correct for large aberrations of low order with high surface fidelity. This paper discusses design, manufacturing and performance results of the deformable mirror. PMID:26367605

  12. Unimorph deformable mirror for space telescopes: design and manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Rausch, Peter; Verpoort, Sven; Wittrock, Ulrich

    2015-07-27

    Large space telescopes made of deployable and lightweight structures suffer from aberrations caused by thermal deformations, gravitational release, and alignment errors which occur during the deployment procedure. An active optics system would allow on-site correction of wave-front errors, and ease the requirements on thermal and mechanical stability of the optical train. In the course of a project funded by the European Space Agency we have developed and manufactured a unimorph deformable mirror based on piezoelectric actuation. The mirror is able to work in space environment and is designed to correct for large aberrations of low order with high surface fidelity. This paper discusses design, manufacturing and performance results of the deformable mirror.

  13. Structure modulated electrostatic deformable mirror for focus and geometry control.

    PubMed

    Nam, Saekwang; Park, Suntak; Yun, Sungryul; Park, Bongje; Park, Seung Koo; Kyung, Ki-Uk

    2016-01-11

    We suggest a way to electrostatically control deformed geometry of an electrostatic deformable mirror (EDM) based on geometric modulation of a basement. The EDM is composed of a metal coated elastomeric membrane (active mirror) and a polymeric basement with electrode (ground). When an electrical voltage is applied across the components, the active mirror deforms toward the stationary basement responding to electrostatic attraction force in an air gap. Since the differentiated gap distance can induce change in electrostatic force distribution between the active mirror and the basement, the EDMs are capable of controlling deformed geometry of the active mirror with different basement structures (concave, flat, and protrusive). The modulation of the deformed geometry leads to significant change in the range of the focal length of the EDMs. Even under dynamic operations, the EDM shows fairly consistent and large deformation enough to change focal length in a wide frequency range (1~175 Hz). The geometric modulation of the active mirror with dynamic focus tunability can allow the EDM to be an active mirror lens for optical zoom devices as well as an optical component controlling field of view.

  14. Controlled deformation of vesicles by flexible structured media

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui; Zhou, Ye; Martínez-González, José A.; Hernández-Ortiz, Juan P.; Abbott, Nicholas L.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2016-01-01

    Liquid crystalline (LC) materials, such as actin or tubulin networks, are known to be capable of deforming the shape of cells. Here, elements of that behavior are reproduced in a synthetic system, namely, a giant vesicle suspended in a LC, which we view as a first step toward the preparation of active, anisotropic hybrid systems that mimic some of the functionality encountered in biological systems. To that end, we rely on a coupled particle-continuum representation of deformable networks in a nematic LC represented at the level of a Landau–de Gennes free energy functional. Our results indicate that, depending on its elastic properties, the LC is indeed able to deform the vesicle until it reaches an equilibrium, anisotropic shape. The magnitude of the deformation is determined by a balance of elastic and surface forces. For perpendicular anchoring at the vesicle, a Saturn ring defect forms along the equatorial plane, and the vesicle adopts a pancake-like, oblate shape. For degenerate planar anchoring at the vesicle, two boojum defects are formed at the poles of the vesicle, which adopts an elongated, spheroidal shape. During the deformation, the volume of the topological defects in the LC shrinks considerably as the curvature of the vesicle increases. These predictions are confirmed by our experimental observations of spindle-like shapes in experiments with giant unilamellar vesicles with planar anchoring. We find that the tension of the vesicle suppresses vesicle deformation, whereas anchoring strength and large elastic constants promote shape anisotropy. PMID:27532056

  15. Controlled deformation of vesicles by flexible structured media.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Zhou, Ye; Martínez-González, José A; Hernández-Ortiz, Juan P; Abbott, Nicholas L; de Pablo, Juan J

    2016-08-01

    Liquid crystalline (LC) materials, such as actin or tubulin networks, are known to be capable of deforming the shape of cells. Here, elements of that behavior are reproduced in a synthetic system, namely, a giant vesicle suspended in a LC, which we view as a first step toward the preparation of active, anisotropic hybrid systems that mimic some of the functionality encountered in biological systems. To that end, we rely on a coupled particle-continuum representation of deformable networks in a nematic LC represented at the level of a Landau-de Gennes free energy functional. Our results indicate that, depending on its elastic properties, the LC is indeed able to deform the vesicle until it reaches an equilibrium, anisotropic shape. The magnitude of the deformation is determined by a balance of elastic and surface forces. For perpendicular anchoring at the vesicle, a Saturn ring defect forms along the equatorial plane, and the vesicle adopts a pancake-like, oblate shape. For degenerate planar anchoring at the vesicle, two boojum defects are formed at the poles of the vesicle, which adopts an elongated, spheroidal shape. During the deformation, the volume of the topological defects in the LC shrinks considerably as the curvature of the vesicle increases. These predictions are confirmed by our experimental observations of spindle-like shapes in experiments with giant unilamellar vesicles with planar anchoring. We find that the tension of the vesicle suppresses vesicle deformation, whereas anchoring strength and large elastic constants promote shape anisotropy. PMID:27532056

  16. Deformation of second and third quantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faizal, Mir

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we will deform the second and third quantized theories by deforming the canonical commutation relations in such a way that they become consistent with the generalized uncertainty principle. Thus, we will first deform the second quantized commutator and obtain a deformed version of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation. Then we will further deform the third quantized theory by deforming the third quantized canonical commutation relation. This way we will obtain a deformed version of the third quantized theory for the multiverse.

  17. Evaluation of 14 nonlinear deformation algorithms applied to human brain MRI registration

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Arno; Andersson, Jesper; Ardekani, Babak A.; Ashburner, John; Avants, Brian; Chiang, Ming-Chang; Christensen, Gary E.; Collins, D. Louis; Gee, James; Hellier, Pierre; Song, Joo Hyun; Jenkinson, Mark; Lepage, Claude; Rueckert, Daniel; Thompson, Paul; Vercauteren, Tom; Woods, Roger P.; Mann, J. John; Parsey, Ramin V.

    2009-01-01

    All fields of neuroscience that employ brain imaging need to communicate their results with reference to anatomical regions. In particular, comparative morphometry and group analysis of functional and physiological data require coregistration of brains to establish correspondences across brain structures. It is well established that linear registration of one brain to another is inadequate for aligning brain structures, so numerous algorithms have emerged to nonlinearly register brains to one another. This study is the largest evaluation of nonlinear deformation algorithms applied to brain image registration ever conducted. Fourteen algorithms from laboratories around the world are evaluated using 8 different error measures. More than 45,000 registrations between 80 manually labeled brains were performed by algorithms including: AIR, ANIMAL, ART, Diffeomorphic Demons, FNIRT, IRTK, JRD-fluid, ROMEO, SICLE, SyN, and four different SPM5 algorithms (“SPM2-type” and regular Normalization, Unified Segmentation, and the DARTEL Toolbox). All of these registrations were preceded by linear registration between the same image pairs using FLIRT. One of the most significant findings of this study is that the relative performances of the registration methods under comparison appear to be little affected by the choice of subject population, labeling protocol, and type of overlap measure. This is important because it suggests that the findings are generalizable to new subject populations that are labeled or evaluated using different labeling protocols. Furthermore, we ranked the 14 methods according to three completely independent analyses (permutation tests, one-way ANOVA tests, and indifference-zone ranking) and derived three almost identical top rankings of the methods. ART, SyN, IRTK, and SPM's DARTEL Toolbox gave the best results according to overlap and distance measures, with ART and SyN delivering the most consistently high accuracy across subjects and label sets

  18. DAM Safety and Deformation Monitoring in Dams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkan, Y.; Bilgi, S.; Potts, L.; Miiama, J.; Mahgoub, M.; Rahman, S.

    2013-12-01

    Water is the life and necessity to water is increasing day by day with respect to the World population, rising of living standards and destruction of nature. Thus, the importance of water and water structures have been increasing gradually. Dams are among the most important engineering structures used for water supplies, flood controls, agricultural purposes as well as drinking and hydroelectric power. There are about 150.000 large size dams in the World. Especially after the Second World War, higher and larger capacity dams have been constructed. Dams create certain risks like the other manmade structures. No one knows precisely how many dam failures have occurred in the World, whereas hundreds of dam failures have occurred throughout the U.S. history. Some basic physical data are very important for assessing the safety and performance of dams. These are movement, water pressure, seepage, reservoir and tail-water elevations, local seismic activities, total pressure, stress and strain, internal concrete temperature, ambient temperature and precipitation. These physical data are measured and monitored by the instruments and equipment. Dams and their surroundings have to be monitored by using essential methods at periodic time intervals in order to determine the possible changes that may occur over the time. Monitoring programs typically consist of; surveillance or visual observation. These programs on dams provide information for evaluating the dam's performance related to the design intent and expected changes that could affect the safety performance of the dam. Additionally, these programs are used for investigating and evaluating the abnormal or degrading performance where any remedial action is necessary. Geodetic and non-geodetic methods are used for monitoring. Monitoring the performance of the dams is critical for producing and maintaining the safe dams. This study provides some information, safety and the techniques about the deformation monitoring of the

  19. Deformation Behavior of Nanoporous Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, J; Hodge, A M; Hamza, A V

    2007-11-28

    Nanoporous open-cell foams are a rapidly growing class of high-porosity materials (porosity {ge} 70%). The research in this field is driven by the desire to create functional materials with unique physical, chemical and mechanical properties where the material properties emerge from both morphology and the material itself. An example is the development of nanoporous metallic materials for photonic and plasmonic applications which has recently attracted much interest. The general strategy is to take advantage of various size effects to introduce novel properties. These size effects arise from confinement of the material by pores and ligaments, and can range from electromagnetic resonances to length scale effects in plasticity. In this chapter we will focus on the mechanical properties of low density nanoporous metals and how these properties are affected by length scale effects and bonding characteristics. A thorough understanding of the mechanical behavior will open the door to further improve and fine-tune the mechanical properties of these sometimes very delicate materials, and thus will be crucial for integrating nanoporous metals into products. Cellular solids with pore sizes above 1 micron have been the subject of intense research for many years, and various scaling relations describing the mechanical properties have been developed.[4] In general, it has been found that the most important parameter in controlling their mechanical properties is the relative density, that is, the density of the foam divided by that of solid from which the foam is made. Other factors include the mechanical properties of the solid material and the foam morphology such as ligament shape and connectivity. The characteristic internal length scale of the structure as determined by pores and ligaments, on the other hand, usually has only little effect on the mechanical properties. This changes at the submicron length scale where the surface-to-volume ratio becomes large and the effect

  20. Recursively minimally-deformed oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katriel, J.; Quesne, C.

    1996-04-01

    A recursive deformation of the boson commutation relation is introduced. Each step consists of a minimal deformation of a commutator [a,a°]=fk(... ;n̂) into [a,a°]qk+1=fk(... ;n̂), where ... stands for the set of deformation parameters that fk depends on, followed by a transformation into the commutator [a,a°]=fk+1(...,qk+1;n̂) to which the deformed commutator is equivalent within the Fock space. Starting from the harmonic oscillator commutation relation [a,a°]=1 we obtain the Arik-Coon and Macfarlane-Biedenharn oscillators at the first and second steps, respectively, followed by a sequence of multiparameter generalizations. Several other types of deformed commutation relations related to the treatment of integrable models and to parastatistics are also obtained. The ``generic'' form consists of a linear combination of exponentials of the number operator, and the various recursive families can be classified according to the number of free linear parameters involved, that depends on the form of the initial commutator.

  1. Mixing of discontinuously deforming media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, L. D.; Rudman, M.; Lester, D. R.; Metcalfe, G.

    2016-02-01

    Mixing of materials is fundamental to many natural phenomena and engineering applications. The presence of discontinuous deformations—such as shear banding or wall slip—creates new mechanisms for mixing and transport beyond those predicted by classical dynamical systems theory. Here, we show how a novel mixing mechanism combining stretching with cutting and shuffling yields exponential mixing rates, quantified by a positive Lyapunov exponent, an impossibility for systems with cutting and shuffling alone or bounded systems with stretching alone, and demonstrate it in a fluid flow. While dynamical systems theory provides a framework for understanding mixing in smoothly deforming media, a theory of discontinuous mixing is yet to be fully developed. New methods are needed to systematize, explain, and extrapolate measurements on systems with discontinuous deformations. Here, we investigate "webs" of Lagrangian discontinuities and show that they provide a template for the overall transport dynamics. Considering slip deformations as the asymptotic limit of increasingly localised smooth shear, we also demonstrate exactly how some of the new structures introduced by discontinuous deformations are analogous to structures in smoothly deforming systems.

  2. Transverse deformations of extreme horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Carmen; Lucietti, James

    2016-04-01

    We consider the inverse problem of determining all extreme black hole solutions to the Einstein equations with a prescribed near-horizon geometry. We investigate this problem by considering infinitesimal deformations of the near-horizon geometry along transverse null geodesics. We show that, up to a gauge transformation, the linearised Einstein equations reduce to an elliptic PDE for the extrinsic curvature of a cross-section of the horizon. We deduce that for a given near-horizon geometry there exists a finite dimensional moduli space of infinitesimal transverse deformations. We then establish a uniqueness theorem for transverse deformations of the extreme Kerr horizon. In particular, we prove that the only smooth axisymmetric transverse deformation of the near-horizon geometry of extreme Kerr, such that cross-sections of the horizon are marginally trapped surfaces, corresponds to that of the extreme Kerr black hole. Furthermore, we determine all smooth and biaxisymmetric transverse deformations of the near-horizon geometry of the five-dimensional extreme Myers-Perry black hole with equal angular momenta. We find a three parameter family of solutions such that cross-sections of the horizon are marginally trapped, which is more general than the known black hole solutions. We discuss the possibility that they correspond to new five-dimensional vacuum black holes.

  3. Quantifying torso deformity in scoliosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajemba, Peter O.; Kumar, Anish; Durdle, Nelson G.; Raso, V. James

    2006-03-01

    Scoliosis affects the alignment of the spine and the shape of the torso. Most scoliosis patients and their families are more concerned about the effect of scoliosis on the torso than its effect on the spine. There is a need to develop robust techniques for quantifying torso deformity based on full torso scans. In this paper, deformation indices obtained from orthogonal maps of full torso scans are used to quantify torso deformity in scoliosis. 'Orthogonal maps' are obtained by applying orthogonal transforms to 3D surface maps. (An 'orthogonal transform' maps a cylindrical coordinate system to a Cartesian coordinate system.) The technique was tested on 361 deformed computer models of the human torso and on 22 scans of volunteers (8 normal and 14 scoliosis). Deformation indices from the orthogonal maps correctly classified up to 95% of the volunteers with a specificity of 1.00 and a sensitivity of 0.91. In addition to classifying scoliosis, the system gives a visual representation of the entire torso in one view and is viable for use in a clinical environment for managing scoliosis.

  4. Near real-time skin deformation mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacenjar, Steve; Chen, Suzie; Jafri, Madiha; Wall, Brian; Pedersen, Richard; Bezozo, Richard

    2013-02-01

    A novel in vivo approach is described that provides large area mapping of the mechanical properties of the skin in human patients. Such information is important in the understanding of skin health, cosmetic surgery[1], aging, and impacts of sun exposure. Currently, several methods have been developed to estimate the local biomechanical properties of the skin, including the use of a physical biopsy of local areas of the skin (in vitro methods) [2, 3, and 4], and also the use of non-invasive methods (in vivo) [5, 6, and 7]. All such methods examine localized areas of the skin. Our approach examines the local elastic properties via the generation of field displacement maps of the skin created using time-sequence imaging [9] with 2D digital imaging correlation (DIC) [10]. In this approach, large areas of the skin are reviewed rapidly, and skin displacement maps are generated showing the contour maps of skin deformation. These maps are then used to precisely register skin images for purposes of diagnostic comparison. This paper reports on our mapping and registration approach, and demonstrates its ability to accurately measure the skin deformation through a described nulling interpolation process. The result of local translational DIC alignment is compared using this interpolation process. The effectiveness of the approach is reported in terms of residual RMS, image entropy measures, and differential segmented regional errors.

  5. Micro-deformation and texture in engineering materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiwanuka, Robert

    This DPhil project is set in the context of single crystal elasticity-plasticity finite element modelling. Its core objective was to develop and implement a methodology for predicting the evolution of texture in single and dual-phase material systems. This core objective has been successfully achieved. Modelling texture evolution entails essentially modelling large deformations (as accurately as possible) and taking account of the deformation mechanisms that cause texture to change. The most important deformation mechanisms are slip and twinning. Slip has been modelled in this project and care has been taken to explore conditions where it is the dominant deformation mechanism for the materials studied. Modelling slip demands that one also models dislocations since slip is assumed to occur by the movement of dislocations. In this project a model for geometrically necessary dislocations has been developed and validated against experimental measurements.A texture homogenisation technique which relies on interpretation of EBSD data in order to allocate orientation frequencies based on representative area fractions has been developed. This has been coupled with a polycrystal plasticity RVE framework allowing for arbitrarily sized RVEs and corresponding allocation of crystallographic orientation. This has enabled input of experimentally measured initial textures into the CPFE model allowing for comparison of predictions against measured post-deformation textures, with good agreement obtained. The effect of texture on polycrystal physical properties has also been studied. It has been confirmed that texture indeed has a significant role in determining the average physical properties of a polycrystal.The thesis contributes to the following areas of micro-mechanics materials research: (i) 3D small deformation crystal plasticity finite element (CPFE) modelling, (ii) geometrically necessary dislocation modelling, (iii) 3D large deformation CPFE modelling, (iv) texture

  6. Characteristics of aluminum alloy microplastic deformation in different structural states

    SciTech Connect

    Seregin, G.V.; Efimenko, L.L.; Leonov, M.V.

    1995-07-01

    The solution to the problem of improving the mechanical properties (including cyclic strength) of structural materials is largely dependent on our knowledge of the laws governing the development of microplastic deformations in them. The effect of heat and mechanical treatment on the elastoplastic properties and fatigue resistance of the commercial aluminum alloys AK4-1 and D16 is analyzed.

  7. Near-limit drop deformation and secondary breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiang, Lien-Peng

    1994-01-01

    An experimental study of the deformation and breakup of liquid drops subjected to both shock wave and steady disturbances is described, emphasizing effects of Weber number, We, and Ohnesorge number, Oh, for various deformation and breakup regimes. Measurements included pulsed shadowgraphy and holography to find drop deformation and drag properties prior to breakup, as well as drop sizes and velocities after breakup. Simplified phenomenological theories were used to help interpret and correlate the measurements. For shock wave disturbances, drop deformation and breakup regimes were identified in terms of We and Oh: regimes at low Oh included no deformation, nonoscillatory deformation, oscillatory deformation, bag breakup, multimode breakup, and shear breakup as We is increased. For We less than 1000, breakup no longer is possible for Oh greater than 10 while 5 percent deformation no longer is possible for Oh greater than 1000. Unified temporal scaling of deformation and breakup processes was observed in terms of a characteristic breakup time that largely was a function of Oh. Prior to breakup, the drag coefficient evolved from the properties of spheres to those of thin disks as drop deformation progressed. Measurements of drop properties after secondary breakup were limited to low Oh conditions. Drop size distributions after breakup satisfied Simmon's universal root normal distribution function in all three breakup regimes, after removing the core drop from the drop population for shear breakup. The Sauter mean diameter after breakup was correlated successfully, independent of the breakup regime, based on consideration of drop stripping in the shear breakup regime. The size and velocity of the core drop after shear breakup were correlated separately, based on the observation that the end of drop stripping corresponded to a constant Eotvos number. The relative velocities of the drop liquid were significantly reduced during secondary breakup, due both to the large

  8. Shock metamorphism of deformed quartz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gratz, Andrew J.; Christie, John; Tyburczy, James; Ahrens, Thomas; Pongratz, Peter

    1988-01-01

    The effect produced by shock loading (to peak pressures of 12 and 24) on deformed synthetic quartz containing a dislocation and abundant bubbles and small inclusions was investigated, and the relationships between preexisting dislocation density shock lamellae in the target material were examined. The resultant material was found to be inhomogeneously deformed and extremely fractured. Results of TEM examinations indicate that no change in dislocation density was caused by shock loading except in regions containing shock lamellae, where the dislocation density was lowered. The shock-induced defects tend to nucleate on and be controlled by preexisting stress concentrators; shock lamellae, glassy veins, and most curviplanar defects form in tension, presumably during release. An extremely mobile silica fluid is formed and injected into fractures during release, which forcibly removes crystalline fragments from vein walls. It is concluded that shock deformation in quartz is dominated by fracture and melting.

  9. Chaetal deformities in aquatic oligochaeta

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkhurst, R.O.; Wetzel, M.J.

    1994-12-31

    Gross deformities in the chaetae of specimens of the tubificid Potamothrix hammoniensis were described by Milbrink from Lake Vaenern, Sweden. This lake is one of the most mercury-polluted major lakes of the world. Statistical tests showed a highly significant correlation between the incidence of deformities and the mercury concentration in the sediments. Changes in the pulp and paper mill process led to marked reduction in specimens with deformities. Similarly modified specimens of various species have been observed at a number of sites contaminated with heavy metals or oil residues in North America. Experimental work on chaetal form has demonstrated changes due to conductivity which have also been observed in saline inland waters. These experiments suggest that chaetae may be shed and replaced by worms every few days. EDX observation of chaetae indicated that metals may accumulate in them, and so provide a potential depuration mechanism. Independent physiological studies suggest that worms may be capable of regulating their metal levels.

  10. Redistribution of Core-forming Melt During Shear Deformation of Partially Molten Peridotite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hustoft, J. W.; Kohlstedt, D. L.

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the role of deformation on the distribution of core-forming melt in a partially molten peridotite, samples of olivine-basalt-iron sulfide were sheared to large strains. Dramatic redistribution of sulfide and silicate melts occur during deformation. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  11. Avoiding symmetry-breaking spatial non-uniformity in deformable image registration via a quasi-volume-preserving constraint.

    PubMed

    Aganj, Iman; Reuter, Martin; Sabuncu, Mert R; Fischl, Bruce

    2015-02-01

    The choice of a reference image typically influences the results of deformable image registration, thereby making it asymmetric. This is a consequence of a spatially non-uniform weighting in the cost function integral that leads to general registration inaccuracy. The inhomogeneous integral measure--which is the local volume change in the transformation, thus varying through the course of the registration--causes image regions to contribute differently to the objective function. More importantly, the optimization algorithm is allowed to minimize the cost function by manipulating the volume change, instead of aligning the images. The approaches that restore symmetry to deformable registration successfully achieve inverse-consistency, but do not eliminate the regional bias that is the source of the error. In this work, we address the root of the problem: the non-uniformity of the cost function integral. We introduce a new quasi-volume-preserving constraint that allows for volume change only in areas with well-matching image intensities, and show that such a constraint puts a bound on the error arising from spatial non-uniformity. We demonstrate the advantages of adding the proposed constraint to standard (asymmetric and symmetrized) demons and diffeomorphic demons algorithms through experiments on synthetic images, and real X-ray and 2D/3D brain MRI data. Specifically, the results show that our approach leads to image alignment with more accurate matching of manually defined neuroanatomical structures, better tradeoff between image intensity matching and registration-induced distortion, improved native symmetry, and lower susceptibility to local optima. In summary, the inclusion of this space- and time-varying constraint leads to better image registration along every dimension that we have measured it. PMID:25449738

  12. Microstructure of deformed graywacke sandstones

    SciTech Connect

    Dengler, L.A.

    1980-03-05

    Microsctures in low-permeability graywacke sandstones were studied by optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). SEM specimens were prepared by ion-bombardment of thick polished samples. The undeformed rock contains grains in a matrix composed primarily of authigenic chlorite and kaolinite. Chlorite platelets are randomly arranged in face-to-edge relation to one another. Kaolinite occurs as pseudohexagonal crystals stacked face-to-face in pore filling books. Uniaxial-stress experiments covered a range of confining pressures from .1 to 600 MPa. Below 50 MPa confining pressure, intergranular fracturing occurs within the fault zone and near the sample's cylindrical surface. Between 100 and 300 MPa confining pressure, fault zones contain highly fractured grains, gauge and slickensides on grain surfaces. At 600 MPa, the sample contains a diffuse shear zone of highly fractured grains and no well-defined fault. In all samples, the distribution of microcracks is heterogeneous. Different clay minerals exhibit different modes of deformation. Chlorite structure responds to applied stress by compaction, reducing both pore size and volume. Chlorite platelets are plastically deformed in even the least strained samples. Kaolinite does not deform plastically in any of the samples examined. Deformation of kaolinite is restricted to toppling of the book structure. Dilatant crack growth was studied in two samples unloaded prior to failure. Uniaxially-strained samples deform primarily along grain boundaries, producing intergranular cracks and realignment of chlorite platelets. Intragranular crack density is linearly related to axial-strain, although grains are less fractured than in uniaxially-stressed samples tested at equivalent mean pressures. Cracks are rarely longer than a grain diameter. Nuclear-explosively deformed samples were recovered after the Rio Blanco gas stimulation experiment. (JGB)

  13. Effects of Structural Deformation and Tube Chirality on Electronic Conductance of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svizhenko, Alexei; Maiti, Amitesh; Anantram, M. P.; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A combination of large scale classical force-field (UFF), density functional theory (DFT), and tight-binding Green's function transport calculations is used to study the electronic properties of carbon nanotubes under the twist, bending, and atomic force microscope (AFM)-tip deformation. We found that in agreement with experiment a significant change in electronic conductance can be induced by AFM-tip deformation of metallic zigzag tubes and by twist deformation of armchair tubes. The effect is explained in terms of bandstructure change under deformation.

  14. Controllable objective with deformable mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Agafonov, V V; Safronov, A G

    2004-03-31

    A new optical device - an objective with deformable mirrors and parameters controlled in the dynamic regime is proposed. The computer simulation of the objective is performed. The dependences of some parameters of the objective on the control voltage are determined. The simulation showed that the ranges of control of the rear focal segment and the focal distance for the objective with the focal distance 602 mm were 1057 and 340 mm, respectively, which is substantially greater than in the control of an equivalent deformable mirror. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  15. Analytical volcano deformation source models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lisowski, Michael; Dzurisin, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Primary volcanic landforms are created by the ascent and eruption of magma. The ascending magma displaces and interacts with surrounding rock and fluids as it creates new pathways, flows through cracks or conduits, vesiculates, and accumulates in underground reservoirs. The formation of new pathways and pressure changes within existing conduits and reservoirs stress and deform the surrounding rock. Eruption products load the crust. The pattern and rate of surface deformation around volcanoes reflect the tectonic and volcanic processes transmitted to the surface through the mechanical properties of the crust.

  16. Fourth order deformed general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuttell, Peter D.; Sakellariadou, Mairi

    2014-11-01

    Whenever the condition of anomaly freedom is imposed within the framework of effective approaches to loop quantum cosmology, one seems to conclude that a deformation of general covariance is required. Here, starting from a general deformation we regain an effective gravitational Lagrangian including terms up to fourth order in extrinsic curvature. We subsequently constrain the form of the corrections for the homogeneous case, and then investigate the conditions for the occurrence of a big bounce and the realization of an inflationary era, in the presence of a perfect fluid or scalar field.

  17. Cavity coalescence in superplastic deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Stowell, M.J.; Livesey, D.W.; Ridley, N.

    1984-01-01

    An analysis of the probability distribution function of particles randomly dispersed in a solid has been applied to cavitation during superplastic deformation and a method of predicting cavity coalescence developed. Cavity size distribution data were obtained from two microduplex nickel-silver alloys deformed superplastically to various extents at elevated temperature, and compared to theoretical predictions. Excellent agreement occurred for small void sizes but the model underestimated the number of voids in the largest size groups. It is argued that the discrepancy results from a combination of effects due to non-random cavity distributions and to enhanced growth rates and incomplete spheroidization of the largest cavities.

  18. Space-based monitoring of ground deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobakht Ersi, Fereydoun; Safari, Abdolreza; Gamse, Sonja

    2016-07-01

    Ground deformation monitoring is valuable to understanding of the behaviour of natural phenomena. Space-Based measurement systems such as Global Positioning System are useful tools for continuous monitoring of ground deformation. Ground deformation analysis based on space geodetic techniques have provided a new, more accurate, and reliable source of information for geodetic positioning which is used to detect deformations of the Ground surface. This type of studies using displacement fields derived from repeated measurments of space-based geodetic networks indicates how crucial role the space geodetic methods play in geodynamics. The main scope of this contribution is to monitor of ground deformation by obtained measurements from GPS sites. We present ground deformation analysis in three steps: a global congruency test on daily coordinates of permanent GPS stations to specify in which epochs deformations occur, the localization of the deformed GPS sites and the determination of deformations.

  19. Localised and distributed deformation in the lithosphere: the example of the Dead Sea valleys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, G. C.; Deves, M.; Agnon, A.; Klinger, Y.

    2010-12-01

    The Earth’s lithosphere can be regarded as a strain softening elasto-plastic material. In the lab, such materials have been shown to deform in a brittle or a ductile manner depending on the applied geometric boundary conditions. Deformation in the lithosphere is usually thought to depend only on pressure, temperature and material composition with variations of these parameters determining the deformation style but the importance of boundary conditions has been largely ignored. By taking deformation associated with the Dead Sea (Jordan and Araba) valleys as an example, we demonstrate how boundary conditions control the deformation style causing some deformation to localise on a through-going strike-slip fault (~ 65%) but also requiring deformation associated with valley opening and change of valley strike to remain distributed (~35%). We show that while faults become weak, zones of distributed deformation remain strong and dissipate most energy. These results change dramatically our view of the deformation of the lithosphere, the strength of plate boundaries and more generally of the deformation of strain softening elasto-plastic materials.

  20. Free Form Deformation-Based Image Registration Improves Accuracy of Traction Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jorge-Peñas, Alvaro; Izquierdo-Alvarez, Alicia; Aguilar-Cuenca, Rocio; Vicente-Manzanares, Miguel; Garcia-Aznar, José Manuel; Van Oosterwyck, Hans; de-Juan-Pardo, Elena M; Ortiz-de-Solorzano, Carlos; Muñoz-Barrutia, Arrate

    2015-01-01

    Traction Force Microscopy (TFM) is a widespread method used to recover cellular tractions from the deformation that they cause in their surrounding substrate. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is commonly used to quantify the substrate's deformations, due to its simplicity and efficiency. However, PIV relies on a block-matching scheme that easily underestimates the deformations. This is especially relevant in the case of large, locally non-uniform deformations as those usually found in the vicinity of a cell's adhesions to the substrate. To overcome these limitations, we formulate the calculation of the deformation of the substrate in TFM as a non-rigid image registration process that warps the image of the unstressed material to match the image of the stressed one. In particular, we propose to use a B-spline -based Free Form Deformation (FFD) algorithm that uses a connected deformable mesh to model a wide range of flexible deformations caused by cellular tractions. Our FFD approach is validated in 3D fields using synthetic (simulated) data as well as with experimental data obtained using isolated endothelial cells lying on a deformable, polyacrylamide substrate. Our results show that FFD outperforms PIV providing a deformation field that allows a better recovery of the magnitude and orientation of tractions. Together, these results demonstrate the added value of the FFD algorithm for improving the accuracy of traction recovery. PMID:26641883

  1. Constrained Deformable-Layer Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, H.

    2006-12-01

    The improvement on traveltime tomography depends on improving data coverage and tomographic methodology. The data coverage depends on the spatial distribution of sources and stations, as well as the extent of lateral velocity variation that may alter the raypaths locally. A reliable tomographic image requires large enough ray hit count and wide enough angular range between traversing rays over the targeted anomalies. Recent years have witnessed the advancement of traveltime tomography in two aspects. One is the use of finite frequency kernels, and the other is the improvement on model parameterization, particularly that allows the use of a priori constraints. A new way of model parameterization is the deformable-layer tomography (DLT), which directly inverts for the geometry of velocity interfaces by varying the depths of grid points to achieve a best traveltime fit. In contrast, conventional grid or cell tomography seeks to determine velocity values of a mesh of fixed-in-space grids or cells. In this study, the DLT is used to map crustal P-wave velocities with first arrival data from local earthquakes and two LARSE active surveys in southern California. The DLT solutions along three profiles are constrained using known depth ranges of the Moho discontinuity at 21 sites from a previous receiver function study. The DLT solutions are generally well resolved according to restoration resolution tests. The patterns of 2D DLT models of different profiles match well at their intersection locations. In comparison with existing 3D cell tomography models in southern California, the new DLT models significantly improve the data fitness. In comparison with the multi-scale cell tomography conducted for the same data, while the data fitting levels of the DLT and the multi-scale cell tomography models are compatible, the DLT provides much higher vertical resolution and more realistic description of the undulation of velocity discontinuities. The constraints on the Moho depth

  2. Extracting Cell Stiffness from Real-Time Deformability Cytometry: Theory and Experiment.

    PubMed

    Mietke, Alexander; Otto, Oliver; Girardo, Salvatore; Rosendahl, Philipp; Taubenberger, Anna; Golfier, Stefan; Ulbricht, Elke; Aland, Sebastian; Guck, Jochen; Fischer-Friedrich, Elisabeth

    2015-11-17

    Cell stiffness is a sensitive indicator of physiological and pathological changes in cells, with many potential applications in biology and medicine. A new method, real-time deformability cytometry, probes cell stiffness at high throughput by exposing cells to a shear flow in a microfluidic channel, allowing for mechanical phenotyping based on single-cell deformability. However, observed deformations of cells in the channel not only are determined by cell stiffness, but also depend on cell size relative to channel size. Here, we disentangle mutual contributions of cell size and cell stiffness to cell deformation by a theoretical analysis in terms of hydrodynamics and linear elasticity theory. Performing real-time deformability cytometry experiments on both model spheres of known elasticity and biological cells, we demonstrate that our analytical model not only predicts deformed shapes inside the channel but also allows for quantification of cell mechanical parameters. Thereby, fast and quantitative mechanical sampling of large cell populations becomes feasible.

  3. Geoid, topography, and convection-driven crustal deformation on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Mark; Hager, Bradford H.; Solomon, Sean C.

    1992-01-01

    High-resolution Magellan images and altimetry of Venus reveal a wide range of styles and scales of surface deformation that cannot readily be explained within the classical terrestrial plate tectonic paradigm. The high correlation of long-wavelength topography and gravity and the large apparent depths of compensation suggest that Venus lacks an upper-mantle low-viscosity zone. A key difference between Earth and Venus may be the degree of coupling between the convecting mantle and the overlying lithosphere. Mantle flow should then have recognizable signatures in the relationships between surface topography, crustal deformation, and the observed gravity field.

  4. Interpretation of postseismic deformation with a viscoelastic relaxation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahr, J.; Wyss, M.

    1980-01-01

    A viscoelastic relaxation model is used to interpret postseismic surface deformation for the large-magnitude Aleutian earthquakes of 1957 and 1965. The lithosphere and asthenosphere are modeled as elastic solids with an anomalous viscoelastic inclusion below the island arc volcanoes. It is found that the observed postseismic surface deformation is a corollary of the known island arc structure. A satisfactory fit to the uplift following the 1957 earthquake is found for a viscoelastic volume with 80-km width extending from a depth of 50 to 200 km.

  5. Ferroelectric actuator testing for deformable-mirror applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costello, Thomas P.; Schell, John D.

    1992-01-01

    Low voltage ferroelectric microdisplacement actuators are excellent candidates for use in zonal correction deformable mirrors (DMs) used in adaptive optical systems. Selection/specification is a critical process, however, since the device's electro-mechanical performance largely determines the mirror performance, and its electrical load characteristics strongly influence the cost of drive electronics. Several commercially available low voltage actuator devices were tested to establish a database for new DM designs. Both quasi-static and dynamic response characteristics were investigated. Test results are presented and conclusions are drawn concerning the merits of each device for typical deformable mirror applications.

  6. Deformation Mechanisms of Gum Metals Under Nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankaran, Rohini Priya

    defect structures to applied loading, we perform ex-situ nanoindentation. Nanoindentation is a convenient method as the plastic deformation is localized and probes a nominally defect free volume of the material. We subsequently characterize the defect structures in these alloys with both conventional TEM and advanced techniques such as HAADF HRSTEM and nanoprobe diffraction. These advanced techniques allow for a more thorough understanding of the observed deformation features. The main findings from this investigation are as follows. As expected we observe that a non-equilibrium phase, o, is present in the leaner beta-stabilized alloy, ST Ref-1. We do not find any direct evidence of secondary phases in STGM, and we find the beta phase in CWGM, along with lath microstructure with subgrain structure consisting of dislocation cell networks. Upon nanoindentation, we find twinning accompanied by beta nucleation on the twin boundary in ST Ref-1 samples. This result is consistent with previous findings and is reasonable considering the alloy is unstable with respect to beta transformation. We find deformation nanotwinning in cold worked gum metals under nanoindentation, which is initially surprising. We argue that when viewed as a nanocrystalline material, such a deformation mechanism is consistent with previous work, and furthermore, a deformation nanotwinned structure does not preclude an ideal shear mechanism from operating in the alloy. Lastly, we observe continuous lattice rotations in STGM under nanoindentation via nanoprobe diffraction. With this technique, for the first time we can demonstrate that the lattice rotations are truly continuous at the nanoscale. We can quantify this lattice rotation, and find that even though the rotation is large, it may be mediated by a reasonable geometrically necessary dislocation density, and note that similar rotations are typically observed in other materials under nanoindentation. HRSTEM and conventional TEM data confirm the

  7. A tumor growth model with deformable ECM

    PubMed Central

    Sciumè, G; Santagiuliana, R; Ferrari, M; Decuzzi, P; Schrefler, B A

    2015-01-01

    Existing tumor growth models based on fluid analogy for the cells do not generally include the extracellular matrix (ECM), or if present, take it as rigid. The three-fluid model originally proposed by the authors and comprising tumor cells (TC), host cells (HC), interstitial fluid (IF) and an ECM, considered up to now only a rigid ECM in the applications. This limitation is here relaxed and the deformability of the ECM is investigated in detail. The ECM is modeled as a porous solid matrix with Green-elastic and elasto-visco-plastic material behavior within a large strain approach. Jauman and Truesdell objective stress measures are adopted together with the deformation rate tensor. Numerical results are first compared with those of a reference experiment of a multicellular tumor spheroid (MTS) growing in vitro, then three different tumor cases are studied: growth of an MTS in a decellularized ECM, growth of a spheroid in the presence of host cells and growth of a melanoma. The influence of the stiffness of the ECM is evidenced and comparison with the case of a rigid ECM is made. The processes in a deformable ECM are more rapid than in a rigid ECM and the obtained growth pattern differs. The reasons for this are due to the changes in porosity induced by the tumor growth. These changes are inhibited in a rigid ECM. This enhanced computational model emphasizes the importance of properly characterizing the biomechanical behavior of the malignant mass in all its components to correctly predict its temporal and spatial pattern evolution. PMID:25427284

  8. Ground Deformation Extraction Using Visible Images and LIDAR Data in Mining Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wenmin; Wu, Lixin

    2016-06-01

    Recognition and extraction of mining ground deformation can help us understand the deformation process and space distribution, and estimate the deformation laws and trends. This study focuses on the application of ground deformation detection and extraction combining with high resolution visible stereo imagery, LiDAR observation point cloud data and historical data. The DEM in large mining area is generated using high-resolution satellite stereo images, and ground deformation is obtained through time series analysis combined with historical DEM data. Ground deformation caused by mining activities are detected and analyzed to explain the link between the regional ground deformation and local deformation. A district of covering 200 km2 around the West Open Pit Mine in Fushun of Liaoning province, a city located in the Northeast China is chosen as the test area for example. Regional and local ground deformation from 2010 to 2015 time series are detected and extracted with DEMs derived from ZY-3 images and LiDAR point DEMs in the case study. Results show that the mean regional deformation is 7.1 m of rising elevation with RMS 9.6 m. Deformation of rising elevation and deformation of declining elevation couple together in local area. The area of higher elevation variation is 16.3 km2 and the mean rising value is 35.8 m with RMS 15.7 m, while the deformation area of lower elevation variation is 6.8 km2 and the mean declining value is 17.6 m with RMS 9.3 m. Moreover, local large deformation and regional slow deformation couple together, the deformation in local mining activities has expanded to the surrounding area, a large ground fracture with declining elevation has been detected and extracted in the south of West Open Pit Mine, the mean declining elevation of which is 23.1 m and covering about 2.3 km2 till 2015. The results in this paper are preliminary currently; we are making efforts to improve more precision results with invariant ground control data for validation.

  9. Deformations of Flat Unsymmetric Laminates Subjected to Inplane Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, Michael W.; Ochinero, Tomoya T.; Majeed, Majed

    2004-01-01

    The geometrically nonlinear deformation response of initially flat unsymmetric cross-ply laminates subjected to an inplane compressive load and two sets of boundary conditions is studied. Stability of the deformations is considered. At issue is whether or not the plate remains flat with increased compressive loading, and whether it buckles. A semi-infinite unsymmetric cross-ply laminate is used to show the combined effects of geometric nonlinearities and bending-stretch coupling. Finite element results for finite laminates are then presented, and it is shown that to a large degree the boundary conditions control the character of the deformation response. It appears that clamped boundary conditions support buckling behavior, in the classic sense of bifurcation, whereas simply-supported conditions do not.

  10. Videogrammetric Model Deformation Measurement Technique for Wind Tunnel Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrows, Danny A.

    2006-01-01

    Videogrammetric measurement technique developments at NASA Langley were driven largely by the need to quantify model deformation at the National Transonic Facility (NTF). This paper summarizes recent wind tunnel applications and issues at the NTF and other NASA Langley facilities including the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel, 31-Inch Mach 10 Tunnel, 8-Ft high Temperature Tunnel, and the 20-Ft Vertical Spin Tunnel. In addition, several adaptations of wind tunnel techniques to non-wind tunnel applications are summarized. These applications include wing deformation measurements on vehicles in flight, determining aerodynamic loads based on optical elastic deformation measurements, measurements on ultra-lightweight and inflatable space structures, and the use of an object-to-image plane scaling technique to support NASA s Space Exploration program.

  11. Modeling AFM Induced Mechanical Deformation of Living Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, R E; McElfresh, M; Balhorn, R; Allen, M J; Belak, J

    2002-11-15

    Finite element modeling has been applied to study deformation of living cells in Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and particularly Recognition Force Microscopy (RFM). The abstract mechanical problem of interest is the response to RFM point loads of an incompressible medium enclosed in a fluid membrane. Cells are soft systems, susceptible to large deformations in the course of an RFM measurement. Often the local properties such as receptor anchoring forces, the reason for the measurement, are obscured by the response of the cell as a whole. Modeling can deconvolute these effects. This facilitates experimental efforts to have reproducible measurements of mechanical and chemical properties at specific kinds of receptor sites on the membrane of a living cell. In this article we briefly review the RFM technique for cells and the problems it poses, and then report on recent progress in modeling the deformation of cells by a point load.

  12. Inelastic stress analyses at finite deformation through complementary energy approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atluri, S. N.; Reed, K. W.

    1983-01-01

    A new hybrid-stress finite element algorithm, suitable for analyses of large, quasistatic, inelastic deformations, is presented. The algorithm is based upon a generalization of de Veubeke's (1972) complementary energy principle. The principal variables in the formulation are the nominal stress rate and spin, and the resulting finite element equations are discrete versions of the equations of compatibility and angular momentum balance. The algorithm produces true rates, time derivatives, as opposed to 'increments'. There results a boundary value problem (for stress rate and velocity) and an initial value problem (for total stress and deformation). A discussion of the numerical treatment of the boundary value problem is followed by a detailed examination of the numerical treatment of the initial value problem, covering the topics of efficiency, stability, and objectivity. The paper is closed with a set of examples, finite homogeneous deformation problems, which serve to bring out important aspects of the algorithm.

  13. A Comprehensive System for Intraoperative 3D Brain Deformation Recovery

    PubMed Central

    DeLorenzo, Christine; Papademetris, Xenophon; Vives, Kenneth P.; Spencer, Dennis D.; Duncan, James S.

    2010-01-01

    During neurosurgery, brain deformation renders preoperative images unreliable for localizing pathologic structures. In order to visualize the current brain anatomy, it is necessary to nonrigidly warp these preoperative images to reflect the intraoperative brain. This can be accomplished using a biomechanical model driven by sparse intraoperative information. In this paper, a linear elastic model of the brain is developed which can infer volumetric brain deformation given the cortical surface displacement. This model was tested on both a realistic brain phantom and in vivo, proving its ability to account for large brain deformations. Also, an efficient semiautomatic strategy for preoperative cortical feature detection is outlined, since accurate segmentation of cortical features can aid intraoperative cortical surface tracking. PMID:18044612

  14. Ruthenium Aluminides: Deformation Mechanisms and Substructure Development

    SciTech Connect

    Tresa M. Pollock

    2005-05-11

    Structural and functional materials that can operate in severe, high temperature environments are key to the operation of a wide range of energy generation systems. Because continued improvements in the energy efficiency of these systems is critical, the need for new materials with higher temperature capabilities is inevitable. Intermetallic compounds, with strong bonding and generally high melting points offer this possibility for a broad array of components such as coatings, electrode materials, actuators and/or structural elements. RuAl is a very unusual intermetallic compound among the large number of B2compounds that have been identified and investigated to date. This material has a very high melting temperature of 2050?C, low thermal expansion, high thermal conductivity and good corrosion resistance. Unlike most other high temperature B2 intermetallics, RuAl possesses good intrinsic deformability at low temperatures. In this program fundamental aspects of low and high temperature mechanical properties and deformation mechanisms in binary and higher order RuAl-based systems have been investigated. Alloying additions of interest included platinum, boron and niobium. Additionally, preliminary studies on high temperature oxidation behavior of these materials have been conducted.

  15. Neurological complications in adult spinal deformity surgery.

    PubMed

    Iorio, Justin A; Reid, Patrick; Kim, Han Jo

    2016-09-01

    The number of surgeries performed for adult spinal deformity (ASD) has been increasing due to an aging population, longer life expectancy, and studies supporting an improvement in health-related quality of life scores after operative intervention. However, medical and surgical complication rates remain high, and neurological complications such as spinal cord injury and motor deficits can be especially debilitating to patients. Several independent factors potentially influence the likelihood of neurological complications including surgical approach (anterior, lateral, or posterior), use of osteotomies, thoracic hyperkyphosis, spinal region, patient characteristics, and revision surgery status. The majority of ASD surgeries are performed by a posterior approach to the thoracic and/or lumbar spine, but anterior and lateral approaches are commonly performed and are associated with unique neural complications such as femoral nerve palsy and lumbar plexus injuries. Spinal morphology, such as that of hyperkyphosis, has been reported to be a risk factor for complications in addition to three-column osteotomies, which are often utilized to correct large deformities. Additionally, revision surgeries are common in ASD and these patients are at an increased risk of procedure-related complications and nervous system injury. Patient selection, surgical technique, and use of intraoperative neuromonitoring may reduce the incidence of complications and optimize outcomes. PMID:27250041

  16. Fluid-Driven Deformation of a Soft Granular Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMinn, Christopher W.; Dufresne, Eric R.; Wettlaufer, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Compressing a porous, fluid-filled material drives the interstitial fluid out of the pore space, as when squeezing water out of a kitchen sponge. Inversely, injecting fluid into a porous material can deform the solid structure, as when fracturing a shale for natural gas recovery. These poromechanical interactions play an important role in geological and biological systems across a wide range of scales, from the propagation of magma through Earth's mantle to the transport of fluid through living cells and tissues. The theory of poroelasticity has been largely successful in modeling poromechanical behavior in relatively simple systems, but this continuum theory is fundamentally limited by our understanding of the pore-scale interactions between the fluid and the solid, and these problems are notoriously difficult to study in a laboratory setting. Here, we present a high-resolution measurement of injection-driven poromechanical deformation in a system with granular microsctructure: We inject fluid into a dense, confined monolayer of soft particles and use particle tracking to reveal the dynamics of the multiscale deformation field. We find that a continuum model based on poroelasticity theory captures certain macroscopic features of the deformation, but the particle-scale deformation field exhibits dramatic departures from smooth, continuum behavior. We observe particle-scale rearrangement and hysteresis, as well as petal-like mesoscale structures that are connected to material failure through spiral shear banding.

  17. Vesicle deformation and poration under strong dc electric fields.

    PubMed

    Sadik, Mohamed M; Li, Jianbo; Shan, Jerry W; Shreiber, David I; Lin, Hao

    2011-06-01

    When subject to applied electric pulses, a lipid membrane exhibits complex responses including electrodeformation and electroporation. In this work, the electrodeformation of giant unilamellar vesicles under strong dc electric fields was investigated. Specifically, the degree of deformation was quantified as a function of the applied field strength and the electrical conductivity ratio of the fluids inside and outside of the vesicles. The vesicles were made from L-α-phosphatidylcholine with diameters ranging from 14 to 30 μm. Experiments were performed with field strengths ranging from 0.9 to 2.0 kV/cm, and intra-to-extra-vesicular conductivity ratios varying between 1.92 and 53.0. With these parametric configurations, the vesicles exhibited prolate elongations along the direction of the electric field. The degree of deformation was, in general, significant. In some cases, the aspect ratio of a deformed vesicle exceeded 10, representing a strong-deformation regime previously not explored. The aspect ratio scaled quadratically with the field strength, and increased asymptotically to a maximum value at high conductivity ratios. Appreciable area and volumetric changes were observed both during and after pulsation, indicating the concurrence of electroporation. A theoretical model is developed to predict these large deformations in the strongly permeabilized limit, and the results are compared with the experimental data. Both agreements and discrepancies are found, and the model limitations and possible extensions are discussed.

  18. Highly deformable bones: unusual deformation mechanisms of seahorse armor.

    PubMed

    Porter, Michael M; Novitskaya, Ekaterina; Castro-Ceseña, Ana Bertha; Meyers, Marc A; McKittrick, Joanna

    2013-06-01

    Multifunctional materials and devices found in nature serve as inspiration for advanced synthetic materials, structures and robotics. Here, we elucidate the architecture and unusual deformation mechanisms of seahorse tails that provide prehension as well as protection against predators. The seahorse tail is composed of subdermal bony plates arranged in articulating ring-like segments that overlap for controlled ventral bending and twisting. The bony plates are highly deformable materials designed to slide past one another and buckle when compressed. This complex plate and segment motion, along with the unique hardness distribution and structural hierarchy of each plate, provide seahorses with joint flexibility while shielding them against impact and crushing. Mimicking seahorse armor may lead to novel bio-inspired technologies, such as flexible armor, fracture-resistant structures or prehensile robotics.

  19. Preferred orientation in experimentally deformed stishovite: implications for deformation mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaercher, Pamela M.; Zepeda-Alarcon, Eloisa; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Kanitpanyacharoen, Waruntorn; Smith, Jesse S.; Sinogeikin, Stanislav; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf

    2015-04-01

    Although the crystal structure of the high-pressure SiO2 polymorph stishovite has been studied in detail, little is known about the development of crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) during deformation in stishovite. Insight into CPO and associated deformation mechanics of stishovite would provide important information for understanding subduction of quartz-bearing crustal rocks into the mantle. To study CPO development, we converted a natural sample of flint to stishovite in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell and compressed the stishovite aggregate up to 38 GPa. We collected diffraction patterns in radial geometry to examine in situ development of crystallographic preferred orientation and find that (001) poles preferentially align with the compression direction. Viscoplastic self-consistent modeling suggests the most likely slip systems at high pressure and ambient temperature are pyramidal and basal slip.

  20. Ishtar deformed belts: Evidence for deformation from below?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, V. L.; Phillips, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    The mountain belts of Ishtar Terra are unique on Venus. Models for their formation include mantle upwelling, mantle downwelling, and horizontal convergence. The present forms of these models are too simple to predict surface strain, topography, or gravity. More detailed models will require specific constraints as imposed by geologic relations. In order to develop specific constraints for geodynamic models, we examine the geology of Ishtar Terra as viewed in Magellan SAR imagery in an attempt to interpret regional surface strain patterns. In this paper, we present geologic and structural relations that leads us to postulate that Ishtar deformed belts result from shear forces within the mantle acting on the lithosphere, and not by horizontal forces from colliding plates. We propose that the surface strains result from differential strain and displacement of domains within the upper mantle, and that further analysis of Ishtar deformation may allow us to identify individual domains within the mantle, and to constrain displacement trajectories between domains.