Science.gov

Sample records for large doe site

  1. Comprehensive, integrated, remote sensing at DOE sites

    SciTech Connect

    Lackey, J.G.; Burson, Z.G.

    1984-01-01

    The Department of Energy has established a program called Comprehensive, Integrated Remote Sensing (CIRS). The overall objective is to provide a state-of-the-art data base of remotely sensed data for all users of such information at large DOE sites. The primary types of remote sensing provided consist of the following: (1) large format aerial photography; (2) video from aerial platforms; (3) multispectral scanning; and (4) airborne nuclear radiometric surveys. Implementation of the CIRS Program began with field operations at the Savannah River Plant in 1982 and is continuing at that DOE site at a level of effort of about $1.5 m per year. Integrated remote sensing studies were subsequently extended to the West Valley Demonstration Project in the summer and fall of 1984. It is expected that the Program will eventually be extended to cover all large DOE sites on a continuing basis. 2 figures.

  2. Complexity of Groundwater Contaminants at DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, T.C.; Faybishenko, B.; Jordan, P.

    2010-12-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the remediation and long-term stewardship of one of the world's largest groundwater contamination portfolios, with a significant number of plumes containing various contaminants, and considerable total mass and activity. As of 1999, the DOE's Office of Environmental Management was responsible for remediation, waste management, or nuclear materials and facility stabilization at 144 sites in 31 states and one U.S. territory, out of which 109 sites were expected to require long-term stewardship. Currently, 19 DOE sites are on the National Priority List. The total number of contaminated plumes on DOE lands is estimated to be 10,000. However, a significant number of DOE sites have not yet been fully characterized. The most prevalent contaminated media are groundwater and soil, although contaminated sediment, sludge, and surface water also are present. Groundwater, soil, and sediment contamination are present at 72% of all DOE sites. A proper characterization of the contaminant inventory at DOE sites is critical for accomplishing one of the primary DOE missions -- planning basic research to understand the complex physical, chemical, and biological properties of contaminated sites. Note that the definitions of the terms 'site' and 'facility' may differ from one publication to another. In this report, the terms 'site,' 'facility' or 'installation' are used to identify a contiguous land area within the borders of a property, which may contain more than one plume. The term 'plume' is used here to indicate an individual area of contamination, which can be small or large. Even though several publications and databases contain information on groundwater contamination and remediation technologies, no statistical analyses of the contaminant inventory at DOE sites has been prepared since the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara. The DOE Groundwater Data Base (GWD) presents data as of 2003 for 221 groundwater plumes at 60 DOE sites

  3. Why Does a Large Prison Population Yield So Few Participants in a College Program Offered at Prison Sites?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, S. M. Steve

    A study was conducted to determine why such a small number (less than 2 percent) of the approximately 9,000 adult male prisoners housed in the 3 complexes of the California Institution for Men (Chino, California) in the mid-1980s were actively participating in the college program offered at the prison sites. Data were collected through interviews…

  4. Meteorological aspects of siting large wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Hiester, T.R.; Pennell, W.T.

    1981-01-01

    This report, which focuses on the meteorological aspects of siting large wind turbines (turbines with a rated output exceeding 100 kW), has four main goals. The first is to outline the elements of a siting strategy that will identify the most favorable wind energy sites in a region and that will provide sufficient wind data to make responsible economic evaluations of the site wind resource possible. The second is to critique and summarize siting techniques that were studied in the Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Energy Program. The third goal is to educate utility technical personnel, engineering consultants, and meteorological consultants (who may have not yet undertaken wind energy consulting) on meteorological phenomena relevant to wind turbine siting in order to enhance dialogues between these groups. The fourth goal is to minimize the chances of failure of early siting programs due to insufficient understanding of wind behavior.

  5. DOE/EPA Site Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-11-01

    This test plan is one of three sections of the Demonstration Plan that covers the startup, shakedown, and DOE portion of the Retech plasma centrifugal furnace (PCF-6) demonstration being conducted at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) in Butte, Montana. The CDIF is part of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The Demonstration Plan covers a projected maximum of 420 hours of testing. This includes a shakedown campaign consisting of three series of tests: furnace operational tests (Series 1), supplementary fuel tests (Series 2), and preliminary DOE tests (Series 3). The Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) test campaign and the sludge campaign are the main DOE tests. The RWMC campaign will process a feed material that simulates the nonradioactive buried waste components in Idaho; the sludge campaign will process a feed material that simulates typical water treatment plant sludge. The major objective of the RWMC Campaign is to determine the applicability of the (PCF-6) toward destruction of typical Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) wastes. In the sludge campaign, the PCF-6 will be fed a slurry of metal hydroxides, which is intended to represent a sludge from an industrial water treatment plant. The furnace will also be fed a soil that will be used to encapsulate the metals in the sludge. The objectives of the test are to determine if the furnace will produce a slag that is nonleachable by EP Toxicity methods. 3 figs., 7 tabs.

  6. Large Boulders at Landing Site

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-07-05

    Large boulders are visible in this enlargement of pictures taken by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) lander camera on July 4, 1997. The landing site is in the dry flood channel named Ares Valles. The boulders probably represent deposits from one of the catastrophic floods that carved the ancient channel. Between the rocks is brownish windblown soil. The gray-tan sky results from dust particles in the atmosphere. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00609

  7. Does Yellowstone need large fires

    SciTech Connect

    Romme, W.H. ); Turner, M.G.; Gardner, R.H.; Hargrove, W.W. )

    1994-06-01

    This paper synthesizes several studies initiated after the 1988 Yellowstone fires, to address the question whether the ecological effects of large fires differ qualitatively as well as quantitatively from small fires. Large burn patches had greater dominance and contagion of burn severity classes, and a higher proportion of crown fire. Burned aspen stands resprouted vigorously over an extensive area, but heavy ungulate browsing prevented establishment of new tree-sized stems. A burst of sexual reproduction occurred in forest herbs that usually reproduce vegetatively, and new aspen clones became established from seed - a rare event in this region. We conclude that the effects of large fires are qualitatively different, but less dramatically so than expected.

  8. DOE candidate site meteorological measurement program

    SciTech Connect

    Renne, D. S.; Sandusky, W. F.

    1980-01-01

    In March 1976, DOE issued an RFP to acquire, on a competitive basis, a group of candidate sites, proposed by utilities interested in the field testing program. A total of 17 candidate sites were selected from the 64 proposals submitted in response to the RFP. From these sites, five have been chosen thus far to receive turbines for field testing. This paper discusses the meteorological measurement activities at these sites and provides details of the measurement program as it exists in late 1979. In addition, the paper briefly discusses the directions this program will take in the near future, and the options interested electric service organizations have for participating in the program.

  9. Site characterization criteria (DOE-STD-1022-94) for natural phenomena hazards at DOE sites

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.C.; Ueng, T.S.; Boissonnade, A.C.

    1995-12-01

    This paper briefly summarizes requirements of site characterization for Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) at DOE sites. In order to comply with DOE Order 5480.28, site characterization criteria has been developed to provide site-specific information needed for development of NPH assessment criteria. Appropriate approaches are outlined to ensure that the current state-of-the-art methodologies and procedures are used in the site characterization. General and detailed site characterization requirements are provided in the areas of meteorology, hydrology, geology, seismology and geotechnical studies.

  10. Natural phenomena hazards assessment criteria for DOE sites: DOE Standard DOE-STD-1023-95

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.C.; Lu, S.C.; Boissonnade, A.C.

    1995-03-24

    This paper summarizes hazard assessment criteria (DOE-STD-1023-95) for Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) at DOE sites. The DOE has established policy and requirements for NPH mitigation for DOE sites and facilities using a graded approach by DOE Order 5480.28. The graded approach is implemented by five performance categories established for structures, systems, and components (SSCs) at DOE facilities based on criteria provided by DOE-STD-1021-93. In applying the design/evaluation criteria of DOE-STD-1020-94 for DOE facilities subjected to one of the natural phenomena hazards, the establishment of design basis load levels consistent with the corresponding performance category is required. This standard provides general criteria as well as specific criteria for natural phenomena hazard assessments to ensure that adequate design basis load levels are established for design and/or evaluation of DOE facilities.

  11. Technology needs for remediation: Hanford and other DOE sites

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, D.C.

    1993-01-01

    Technologies are being developed under the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) program to facilitate remediation of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) buried and stored low-level radioactive, transuranic (TRU), and mixed radioactive and hazardous buried wastes. The BWID program is being coordinated by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in southeastern Idaho, a DOE site that has large volumes of buried radioactive wastes. The program is currently focusing its efforts on the problems at INEL's Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). As specific technologies are successfully demonstrated, they will be available for transfer to applications at other DOE buried waste sites. The purpose of this study is to present buried waste technology needs that have been identified for DOE sites other than INEL.

  12. Environment - avoiding destructive remediation at DOE sites.

    SciTech Connect

    Whicker, F. W.; MacDonell, M. M.; Hinton, T. G.; Pinder, J. E., III; Habegger, L. J.; Environmental Assessment; usdoe

    2004-03-12

    Public perceptions and regulatory agreements have forced the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to spend tens of billions of dollars for environmental cleanup of relatively low levels of contamination of soil and water within the nuclear weapons complex. Much of this costly remediation has caused significant ecological damage, but has not resulted in corresponding reductions in public health risks. This Policy Forum offers a potential remedy involving continued federal control of the larger DOE lands and cleanup criteria based on long-term protection of ecosystems and public health, rather than criteria based on the protection of hypothetical future site residents. Recent DOE policy to avoid unnecessary environmental damage using a risk-based strategy is briefly described.

  13. Collaboration in long-term stewardship at DOE Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Moren, R. J.; Zeisloft, J. H.; Feist, E. T.; Brown, D.; Grindstaff, K. D.

    2013-01-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site comprises approximately 1,517 km{sup 2} (586 mi{sup 2}) of land in southeastern Washington. The site was established in 1943 as part of the Manhattan Project to produce plutonium for the nation's nuclear weapons program. As the Cold War era came to an end, the mission of the site transitioned from weapons production to environmental cleanup. As the River Corridor area of the site cleanup is completed, the mission for that portion of the site will transition from active cleanup to continued protection of environment through the Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) Program. The key to successful transition from cleanup to LTS is the unique collaboration among three (3) different DOE Programs and three (3) different prime contractors with each contractor having different contracts. The LTS Program at the site is a successful model of collaboration resulting in efficient resolution of issues and accelerated progress that supports DOE's Richland Office 2015 Vision for the Hanford Site. The 2015 Vision for the Hanford Site involves shrinking the active cleanup footprint of the surface area of the site to approximately 20 mi{sup 2} on the Central Plateau. Hanford's LTS Program is defined in DOE's planning document, Hanford Long-Term Stewardship Program Plan, DOE/RL-2010-35 Rev 1. The Plan defines the relationship and respective responsibilities between the federal cleanup projects and the LTS Program along with their respective contractors. The LTS Program involves these different parties (cleanup program and contractors) who must work together to achieve the objective for transition of land parcels. Through the collaborative efforts with the prime contractors on site over the past two years, 253.8 km{sup 2} (98 mi{sup 2}) of property has been successfully transitioned from the cleanup program to the LTS Program upon completion of active surface cleanup. Upcoming efforts in the near term will include transitioning another large

  14. Chinese large solar telescopes site survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu

    2017-04-01

    In order to observe the solar surface with unprecedentedly higher resolution, Chinse solar physics society decided to launch their solar site survey project in 2010 as the first step to look for the best candidate sites for the Chinese next-generation large-aperture solar telescopes, i.e., the 5-8 meter Chinese Giant Solar Telescope, and the 1 meter level coronagraph. We have built two long-term monitoring sites in Daocheng, with altitudes of around 4800 meters above the sea level located in the large Shangri-La mountain area, and we have collected systematic site data since 2014. Clear evidence, including the key parameters of seeing factor, sky brightness and water vapor content, has indicated that the large Shangri-La area owns the potential conditions of excellent seeing level and sufficient amount of clear-sky hours suitable for developing large solar telescopes. We will review the site survey progress and present the preliminary statistical results in this talk.

  15. Lessons learned with ISO 14001 at DOE sites

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkinson, C. H., LLNL

    1998-03-01

    ISO 14001 is the international standard for environmental management systems (EMS). The standard applies the `plan, do, check, act` management system model to assure that the environmental impacts of operations are fully considered in planning and facility operations. ISO 14001 has grown in popularity in both the public and the private sector and has seen increasing utility within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). While there is no final DOE policy or requirement for ISO 14001 EMS implementation, ISO 14001 commands an active presence at many DOE sites. In general, the impetus for ISO 14001 in the DOE complex has been either an initiative by site management contractors to improve performance, or an actual requirement in the new management contracts for the sites. Several DOE sites now are committed to implement EMS`s in conformance with ISO 14001: Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Hanford, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Kansas City Plant, Nevada Test Site, Savannah River Site (SRS), Waste Isolation Pilot Project (WIPP), West Valley. Several other DOE sites are expected to proceed in the near future with an EMS consistent with ISO 14001. However, not all sites are proceeding with an ISO 14001 EMS based on individual site business considerations. This paper describes the status of EMS implementation at these sites and identifies lessons learned that may be of use to other DOE sites.

  16. Survey of portable radiological instrumentation at 16 DOE sites

    SciTech Connect

    Coutts, G.W.; Hickman, D.

    1995-06-01

    The DOE-DP complex initiated a Radiological Instrument Standardization and Qualification Program to ensure the quality of radiological measurements within each DOE site. As part of the program, a complex-wide survey was conducted of all portable instruments in use at 16 DOE facilities. This paper presents the data gathered and suggests several possible standardization options.

  17. Safety Oversight of Decommissioning Activities at DOE Nuclear Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Zull, Lawrence M.; Yeniscavich, William

    2008-01-15

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) is an independent federal agency established by Congress in 1988 to provide nuclear safety oversight of activities at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facilities. The activities under the Board's jurisdiction include the design, construction, startup, operation, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities at DOE sites. This paper reviews the Board's safety oversight of decommissioning activities at DOE sites, identifies the safety problems observed, and discusses Board initiatives to improve the safety of decommissioning activities at DOE sites. The decommissioning of former defense nuclear facilities has reduced the risk of radioactive material contamination and exposure to the public and site workers. In general, efforts to perform decommissioning work at DOE defense nuclear sites have been successful, and contractors performing decommissioning work have a good safety record. Decommissioning activities have recently been completed at sites identified for closure, including the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, the Fernald Closure Project, and the Miamisburg Closure Project (the Mound site). The Rocky Flats and Fernald sites, which produced plutonium parts and uranium materials for defense needs (respectively), have been turned into wildlife refuges. The Mound site, which performed R and D activities on nuclear materials, has been converted into an industrial and technology park called the Mound Advanced Technology Center. The DOE Office of Legacy Management is responsible for the long term stewardship of these former EM sites. The Board has reviewed many decommissioning activities, and noted that there are valuable lessons learned that can benefit both DOE and the contractor. As part of its ongoing safety oversight responsibilities, the Board and its staff will continue to review the safety of DOE and contractor decommissioning activities at DOE defense nuclear sites.

  18. Does your web site draw new patients?

    PubMed

    Wallin, Wendy S

    2009-11-01

    The absence of scientific data forces orthodontists to guess at how best to design Internet sites that persuade prospective patients to call for appointments. This study was conducted to identify the Web-site factors that lead prospective patients to make appointments or, conversely, to reject a practice. Ten participants actively looking online for an orthodontist were recruited to participate. They reviewed 64 orthodontic Web sites in their geographic areas and rated their likelihood of calling each practice for an appointment. The sessions were videotaped. Analysis of participant comments, navigation patterns, and ratings suggested 25 distinguishing factors. Statistical analysis showed 10 Web-site characteristics that predict the success of an orthodontic Web site in attracting new patients.

  19. Site characterization and hazard assessment criteria for natural phenomena hazards at DOE sites

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.C.; Lu, S.C.; Ueng, T.S.; Boissonnade, A.C.

    1993-09-01

    This paper briefly summarizes requirements for site characterization and hazard assessment of Natural Phenomena Hazards for compliance with DOE Order 5480.28. The site characterization criteria for NPH evaluation are provided in a draft DOE-STD-1022-XX and the assessment criteria of natural phenomena hazards are provided in draft DOE-STD-1023-XX.

  20. Site characterization criteria (DOE-STD-1022-94) for natural phenomena hazards at DOE sites. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.C.; Ueng, Tzou-Shin; Boissonnade, A.C.

    1995-03-23

    This paper briefly summarizes requirements of site characterization for Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) at DOE sites. In order to comply with DOE Order 5480.28, site characterization criteria has been developed to provide site-specific information needed for development of NPH assessment criteria. Appropriate approaches are outlined to ensure that the current state-of-the-art methodologies and procedures are used in the site characterization. General and detailed site characterization requirements are provided in the areas of meteorology, hydrology, geology, seismology and geotechnical studies.

  1. Overview and History of DOE's Hanford Site - 12502

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, Karen; McCormick, Matt

    2012-07-01

    Hanford's DOE offices are responsible for one of the largest nuclear cleanup efforts in the world, cleaning up the legacy of nearly five decades of nuclear weapons production. Nowhere in the DOE Complex is cleanup more challenging than at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington. Hanford cleanup entails remediation of hundreds of large complex hazardous waste sites; disposition of nine production reactors and the preservation of one as a National Historic Landmark; demolition of hundreds of contaminated facilities including five enormous process canyons; remediation of billions of gallons of contaminated groundwater; disposition of millions of tons of low-level, mixed low-level, and transuranic waste; disposition of significant quantities of special nuclear material; storage and ultimate disposition of irradiated nuclear fuel; remediation of contamination deep in the soil that could impact groundwater; decontamination and decommissioning of hundreds of buildings and structures; and treatment of 56 million gallons of radioactive waste in 177 large underground tanks through the construction of a first-of-its-kind Waste Treatment Plant. Cleanup of the Hanford Site is a complex and challenging undertaking. The DOE Richland Operations Office has a vision and a strategy for completing Hanford's cleanup including the transition to post-cleanup activities. Information on the strategy is outlined in the Hanford Site Completion Framework. The framework describes three major components of cleanup - River Corridor, Central Plateau, and Tank Waste. It provides the context for individual cleanup actions by describing the key challenges and approaches for the decisions needed to complete cleanup. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), as regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), is implementing a strategy to achieve final cleanup decisions for the River Corridor portion of the Hanford Site. The DOE Richland

  2. Central Plateau Cleanup at DOE's Hanford Site - 12504

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, Jonathan

    2012-07-01

    The discussion of Hanford's Central Plateau includes significant work in and around the center of the Hanford Site - located about 7 miles from the Columbia River. The Central Plateau is the area to which operations will be shrunk in 2015 when River Corridor cleanup is complete. This work includes retrieval and disposal of buried waste from miles of trenches; the cleanup and closure of massive processing canyons; the clean-out and demolition to 'slab on grade' of the high-hazard Plutonium Finishing Plant; installation of key groundwater treatment facilities to contain and shrink plumes of contaminated groundwater; demolition of all other unneeded facilities; and the completion of decisions about remaining Central Plateau waste sites. A stated goal of EM has been to shrink the footprint of active cleanup to less than 10 square miles by 2020. By the end of FY2011, Hanford will have reduced the active footprint of cleanup by 64 percent exceeding the goal of 49 percent. By 2015, Hanford will reduce the active footprint of cleanup by more than 90 percent. The remaining footprint reduction will occur between 2015 and 2020. The Central Plateau is a 75-square-mile region near the center of the Hanford Site including the area designated in the Hanford Comprehensive Land Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement (DOE 1999) and Record of Decision (64 FR 61615) as the Industrial-Exclusive Area, a rectangular area of about 20 square miles in the center of the Central Plateau. The Industrial-Exclusive Area contains the 200 East and 200 West Areas that have been used primarily for Hanford's nuclear fuel processing and waste management and disposal activities. The Central Plateau also encompasses the 200 Area CERCLA National Priorities List site. The Central Plateau has a large physical inventory of chemical processing and support facilities, tank systems, liquid and solid waste disposal and storage facilities, utility systems, administrative facilities, and groundwater monitoring

  3. DOE site-specific threat assessment

    SciTech Connect

    West, D.J.; Al-Ayat, R.A.; Judd, B.R.

    1985-07-12

    A facility manager faced with the challenges of protecting a nuclear facility against potential threats must consider the likelihood and consequences of such threats, know the capabilities of the facility safeguards and security systems, and make informed decisions about the cost-effectivness of safeguards and security upgrades. To help meet these challenges, the San Francisco Operations Office of the Department of Energy, in conjunction with the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, has developed a site-specific threat assessment approach and a quantitative model to improve the quality and consistency of site-specific threat assessment and resultant security upgrade decisions at sensitive Department of Energy facilities. 5 figs.

  4. How often does ultrasound marking change the liver biopsy site?

    PubMed

    Riley, T R

    1999-11-01

    The aim of this study was to answer the question: How often does ultrasound change the liver biopsy position, when a percussion technique is applied, because of intervening structures? A secondary objective is to compare the performance of the hepatologist to a radiology technician to demonstrate safety of a self-training technique. One hundred sixty-five consecutive outpatient liver biopsies were studied. Using a standard percussion technique, a biopsy site was chosen and marked. Ultrasound was applied to the marked site. An adequate site was determined to be one without intervening structure within 6 cm of liver depth. If an intervening structure was found, an alternative site was chosen by ultrasound. Data recorded included reason for change of position, distance of moved site from original site, and complications. The first third of liver biopsies were done with assistance of a certified radiology technician performing ultrasound, the last two-thirds were done by the hepatologist after observing the first 64 biopsies. Ultrasound changed the position in 21 of 165 patients. The ultrasound caused an abortion of the procedure in 4 of 165 patients. Ultrasound changed management in 15.1% of patients. Reasons for change were lung (10 patients), gallbladder (6), large central vessel (4), >4-cm rim of ascites (2), colonic loop (1), slim liver edge (1), and focal liver lesions (1 patient). There was a 1.8% multiple pass rate. No serious complications occurred. Ultrasound changed management 15.1% of patients. A hepatologist could perform ultrasound marking after a period of observation, without compromising results. A low multiple pass rate was observed when applying ultrasound and percussion. Avoided structures could explain decrease in pain when ultrasound is applied.

  5. DOE/KEURP site operator program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-11-01

    Kansas State University, with funding support from federal, state, public, and private companies, is participating in the Department of Energy's Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program. Through participation in this program, Kansas State is displaying, testing, and evaluating electric or hybrid vehicle technology. This participation will provide organizations the opportunity to examine the latest EHV prototypes under actual operating conditions. KSU has purchased several electric cars and proposes to purchase additional electric vehicles.

  6. DOE site performance assessment activities. Radioactive Waste Technical Support Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    Information on performance assessment capabilities and activities was collected from eight DOE sites. All eight sites either currently dispose of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) or plan to dispose of LLW in the near future. A survey questionnaire was developed and sent to key individuals involved in DOE Order 5820.2A performance assessment activities at each site. The sites surveyed included: Hanford Site (Hanford), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site (NTS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Paducah), Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Portsmouth), and Savannah River Site (SRS). The questionnaire addressed all aspects of the performance assessment process; from waste source term to dose conversion factors. This report presents the information developed from the site questionnaire and provides a comparison of site-specific performance assessment approaches, data needs, and ongoing and planned activities. All sites are engaged in completing the radioactive waste disposal facility performance assessment required by DOE Order 5820.2A. Each site has achieved various degrees of progress and have identified a set of critical needs. Within several areas, however, the sites identified common needs and questions.

  7. Effluent emissions monitoring at the DOE Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Vance, L.W.

    1993-05-01

    There are numerous regulatory requirements controlling the effluent emissions monitoring at a U.S. Department of Energy site. This paper defines how these regulatory effluent emissions monitoring requirements and the Quality Assurance oversight of these requirements were implemented by Westinghouse Hanford Company, the operations contractor, at the DOE Hanford Site.

  8. High-level wastes: DOE names three sites for characterization

    SciTech Connect

    1986-07-01

    DOE announced in May 1986 that there will be there site characterization studies made to determine suitability for a high-level radioactive waste repository. The studies will include several test drillings to the proposed disposal depths. Yucca Mountain, Nevada; Deaf Smith Country, Texas, and Hanford, Washington were identified as the study sites, and further studies for a second repository site in the East were postponed. The affected states all filed suits in federal circuit courts because they were given no advance warning of the announcement of their selection or the decision to suspend work on a second repository. Criticisms of the selection process include the narrowing or DOE options.

  9. 2005 DOE Computer Graphics Forum Site Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Rebecca, S; Eric, B

    2005-04-15

    The Information Management and Graphics Group supports and develops tools that enhance our ability to access, display, and understand large, complex data sets. Activities include developing visualization software for terascale data exploration; running two video production labs; supporting graphics libraries and tools for end users; maintaining four PowerWalls and assorted other advanced displays; and providing integrated tools for searching, organizing, and browsing scientific data. The Data group supports Defense and Nuclear technologies (D&NT) Directorate. The group's visualization team has developed and maintains two visualization tools: MeshTV and VisIt. These are interactive graphical analysis tools for visualizing and analyzing data on two- and three-dimensional meshes. They also provide movie production support. Researchers in the Center for Applied Scientific Computing (CASC) work on various projects including the development of visualization and data mining techniques for terascale data exploration that are funded by ASC. The researchers also have LDRD projects and collaborations with other lab researchers, academia, and industry.

  10. LONG-TERM STEWARDSHIP AT DOE HANFORD SITE - 12575

    SciTech Connect

    MOREN RJ; GRINDSTAFF KD

    2012-01-11

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site is located in southeast Washington and consists of 1,518 square kilometers (586 square miles) of land. Established in 1943 as part of the Manhattan Project, Hanford workers produced plutonium for our nation's nuclear defense program until the mid 1980's. Since then, the site has been in cleanup mode that is being accomplished in phases. As we achieve remedial objectives and complete active cleanup, DOE will manage Hanford land under the Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) Program until completion of cleanup and the site becomes ready for transfer to the post cleanup landlord - currently planned for DOE's Office of Legacy Management (LM). We define Hanford's LTS Program in the ''Hanford Long-Term Stewardship Program Plan,'' (DOE/RL-201 0-35)[1], which describes the scope including the relationship between the cleanup projects and the LTS Program. DOE designed the LTS Program to manage and provide surveillance and maintenance (S&M) of institutional controls and associated monitoring of closed waste sites to ensure the protection of human health and the environment. DOE's Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and Hanford cleanup and operations contractors collaboratively developed this program over several years. The program's scope also includes 15 key activities that are identified in the DOE Program Plan (DOE/RL-2010-35). The LTS Program will transition 14 land segments through 2016. The combined land mass is approximately 570 square kilometers (220 square miles), with over 1,300 active and inactive waste sites and 3,363 wells. Land segments vary from buffer zone property with no known contamination to cocooned reactor buildings, demolished support facilities, and remediated cribs and trenches. DOE-RL will transition land management responsibilities from cleanup contractors to the Mission Support Contract (MSC), who will then administer the LTS Program for DOE-RL. This process requires an environment of cooperation between

  11. Nuclear waste: Status of DOE`s nuclear waste site characterization activities

    SciTech Connect

    1987-12-31

    Three potential nuclear waste repository sites have been selected to carry out characterization activities-the detailed geological testing to determine the suitability of each site as a repository. The sites are Hanford in south-central Washington State, Yucca Mountain in southern Nevada, and Deaf Smith in the Texas Panhandle. Two key issues affecting the total program are the estimations of the site characterization completion data and costs and DOE`s relationship with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission which has been limited and its relations with affected states and Indian tribes which continue to be difficult.

  12. Large Wood Storage Does Not Decrease Downstream Through a Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, M.; Pasternack, G. B.; Senter, A. E.; Dahlke, H. E.

    2013-12-01

    The storage of large wood in streams at the watershed scale has long been characterized as decreasing downstream due to a transport limitation in headwater streams, and a supply limitation in larger rivers. The objective of this study was to test this hypothesis through a field study in the Upper Yuba River watershed in Northern California, USA. While most studies surveyed within the wetted channel at selected reaches of different sizes, this study measured overbank deposits of large wood in addition to those in-channel to reflect the total storage within the active river corridor, and used a stratified random sampling scheme to see if relations held at the watershed scale. The watershed is large (2,874 km2), mountainous, mostly forested, and has been dramatically altered by human activities primarily related to gold mining. One hundred fourteen field sites of varied drainage area sizes were visited, inventoried for large wood (length > 1 m, diameter > 10 cm) storage within the active river corridor, and the volume storage per river length was calculated. Inclusion of floodplains in field surveys illuminates the fact that the distribution of large wood changes within the active river corridor, while the total storage does not decrease downstream. Among many watershed-scale control variables, such as drainage area, stream order, and upslope distance, the local amount of shrub cover and bankfull channel width were the only significant predictors of large wood storage in a multiple linear regression model, both with positive coefficients. A critical literature review was also conducted to investigate the evidence for the common conceptual model. Findings were that (1) the observed downstream trend of large wood storage is largely a function of the methods employed by each study, (2) the use of storage per channel area has confounded the commonly held conceptual model, due to its correlation with channel width, and (3) there is little evidence to support the hypothesis

  13. Union job fight boiling at DOE cleanup sites

    SciTech Connect

    Setzer, S.W.

    1993-11-15

    The US DOE is facing a growing jurisdictional dispute over which unions will perform the majority of clean-up work at its facilities. Unions affiliated with the AFL-CIO Metal Trades Council representing operations employees at the sites believe they have a fundamental right to work. Unions in the AFL-CIO's Building and Construction Trades Dept. insist that they have a clear mandate under federal labor law and the Davis-Bacon Act. The issue has heated up in recent weeks at the policy level and is boiling in a contentious dispute at DOE's Fernald site in Ohio.

  14. River Corridor Closure at DOE's Hanford Site - 12503

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, Jonathan; Franco, Joe

    2012-07-01

    The discussion of Hanford's River Corridor will cover work that has already been completed plus the work remaining to be done. This includes the buildings, waste sites, and groundwater plumes in the 300 Area; large-scale burial ground remediation in the 600 Area; plutonium production reactor dismantling and 'cocooning' along the river; preservation of the world's first full-scale plutonium production reactor; removal of more than 14 million tons of contaminated soil and debris along the Columbia River shoreline and throughout the River Corridor; and the excavation of buried waste sites in the river shore area. It also includes operating an EPA-permitted low-level waste disposal facility in the central portion of the site. At the completions of cleanup in 2015, Hanford's River Corridor will be the largest closure project ever completed by the Department of Energy. Cleanup of the River Corridor has been one of Hanford's top priorities since the early 1990's. This urgency has been due to the proximity of hundreds of waste sites to the Columbia River. In addition, removal of the sludge from K West Basin, near the river, remains a high priority. This 220-square-mile area of the Hanford Site sits on the edge of the last free-flowing stretch of the Columbia River. The River Corridor portion of the Hanford Site includes the 100 and 300 Areas along the south shore of the Columbia River. The 100 Areas contain nine retired plutonium production reactors. These areas are also the location of numerous support facilities and solid and liquid waste disposal sites that have contaminated groundwater and soil. The 300 Area, located just north of the city of Richland, contains fuel fabrication facilities, nuclear research and development facilities, and their associated solid and liquid waste disposal sites that have contaminated groundwater and soil. In order to ensure that cleanup actions address all threats to human health and the environment, the River Corridor includes the

  15. Technology needs for remediation: Hanford and other DOE sites. Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, D.C.

    1993-01-01

    Technologies are being developed under the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) program to facilitate remediation of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) buried and stored low-level radioactive, transuranic (TRU), and mixed radioactive and hazardous buried wastes. The BWID program is being coordinated by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in southeastern Idaho, a DOE site that has large volumes of buried radioactive wastes. The program is currently focusing its efforts on the problems at INEL`s Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). As specific technologies are successfully demonstrated, they will be available for transfer to applications at other DOE buried waste sites. The purpose of this study is to present buried waste technology needs that have been identified for DOE sites other than INEL.

  16. Hazardous waste shipment data collection from DOE sites

    SciTech Connect

    Page, L.A.; Kirkpatrick, T.D.; Stevens, L.

    1992-12-31

    Past practices at the US Department of Energy (DOE) sites for offsite release of hazardous waste are being reviewed to determine if radioactively contaminated hazardous wastes were released to commercial treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. Records indicating the presence of radioactivity in waste shipped to and treated at a commercial incineration facility led to a ban on offsite hazardous waste shipments and investigation of past practices for offsite release of hazardous waste from the DOE sites. A House of Representatives Interior and Insular Affairs Committee oversight hearing on potentially contaminated waste shipments to commercial facilities concluded that the main issue was the lack of a uniform national standard to govern disposal of mixed waste.

  17. Hazardous waste shipment data collection from DOE sites

    SciTech Connect

    Page, L.A.; Kirkpatrick, T.D. ); Stevens, L. )

    1992-01-01

    Past practices at the US Department of Energy (DOE) sites for offsite release of hazardous waste are being reviewed to determine if radioactively contaminated hazardous wastes were released to commercial treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. Records indicating the presence of radioactivity in waste shipped to and treated at a commercial incineration facility led to a ban on offsite hazardous waste shipments and investigation of past practices for offsite release of hazardous waste from the DOE sites. A House of Representatives Interior and Insular Affairs Committee oversight hearing on potentially contaminated waste shipments to commercial facilities concluded that the main issue was the lack of a uniform national standard to govern disposal of mixed waste.

  18. High resolution seismic reflection test at the DOE Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Narbutovskih, S.M.; Michelsen, F.B.; Clark, J.C.; Christensen, E.W.

    1995-04-01

    A recent test was conducted to ascertain the benefits of swept source technology for use at the DOE Hanford Site. Previous high resolution seismic surveys suffered from coherent noise interference, poor signal transmission and lack of borehole velocity control. P-wave data were collected with the T-2500 Minivib produced by IVI, Inc. and Oyo Geospace`s DAS-1 acquisition system. Results showed a significant increase m signal-to-noise ratio, increased resolving power and better depth penetration of the signal. It is concluded that swept source technology as part of a total systems approach, significantly expands the capabilities of the shallow high resolution seismic reflection method for use at the DOE Hanford Site.

  19. Updated Site Response Analyses for the Waste Treatment Plant, DOE Hanford, Site, Washington.

    SciTech Connect

    Youngs, Robert R.

    2007-06-29

    This document describes the calculations performed to develop updated relative amplification functions for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) facility at the DOE Hanford Site, Washington State. The original 2,000-year return period design spectra for the WTP were based on the results of a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) performed for the DOE Hanford Site by Geomatrix (1996). Geomatrix (1996) performed the PSHA using empirical soil-site ground motion models based primarily on recordings from California. As part of that study, site response analyses were performed to evaluate ground motions at the Hanford sites and California deep soil sites. As described in Appendix A of Geomatrix (1996), characteristic site profiles and dynamic soil properties representative of conditions at various Hanford sites and California deep soil strong motion recording stations were defined. Relative site responses of the Hanford profiles and California profiles were then compared. Based on the results of those site response analyses, it was concluded that ground motions at the Hanford sites underlain by deep soil deposits are similar in character to those on California deep soil sites and it was judged appropriate to use empirical deep soil site attenuation relationships based primarily on California ground motion data to develop design spectra for the Hanford sites. In a subsequent analysis, Geomatrix (2003) updated the site response analyses of Geomatrix (1996, Appendix A) to incorporate randomization of the California and Hanford profiles. The results of that analysis also led to the conclusion that the response of the Hanford profiles was similar to the response of deep soil sites in California.

  20. Updated Site Response Analyses for the Waste Treatment Plant, DOE Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Youngs RR

    2007-06-01

    This document describes the calculations performed to develop updated relative amplification functions for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) facility at the DOE Hanford Site, Washington State. The original 2,000-year return period design spectra for the WTP were based on the results of a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) performed for the DOE Hanford Site by Geomatrix (1996). Geomatrix (1996) performed the PSHA using empirical soil-site ground motion models based primarily on recordings from California. As part of that study, site response analyses were performed to evaluate ground motions at the Hanford sites and California deep soil sites. As described in Appendix A of Geomatrix (1996), characteristic site profiles and dynamic soil properties representative of conditions at various Hanford sites and California deep soil strong motion recording stations were defined. Relative site responses of the Hanford profiles and California profiles were then compared. Based on the results of those site response analyses, it was concluded that ground motions at the Hanford sites underlain by deep soil deposits are similar in character to those on California deep soil sites and it was judged appropriate to use empirical deep soil site attenuation relationships based primarily on California ground motion data to develop design spectra for the Hanford sites. In a subsequent analysis, Geomatrix (2003) updated the site response analyses of Geomatrix (1996, Appendix A) to incorporate randomization of the California and Hanford profiles. The results of that analysis also led to the conclusion that the response of the Hanford profiles was similar to the response of deep soil sites in California.

  1. DNAPLs at DOE sites: Background and assessment of characterization technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Junk, G.A.; Haas, W.J. Jr.

    1993-12-01

    The Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technology Integrated Program (CMST-IP) within the Office of Technology Development (OTD) has responsibility for identification, evaluation, and delivery of technologies needed for the work of the Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. This report addresses part of that responsibility by providing summary information on DNAPL site characterization. A dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) is a source of contamination that can persist in the subsurface for decades before dissipating completely into the vapor phase and groundwater. The DNAPL chemicals of particular concern to the DOE are chlorinated volatile organic compounds (Cl VOCS) such as carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}), trichloroethylene (TCE), and perchloroethylene (PCE). These Cl VOCs were used in multiple ton quantities at DOE sites and were often released to the subsurface. The predicted fate of released Cl VOC liquid is downward movement through the soil under the force of gravity. As it moves, some of the Cl VOC liquid becomes trapped in the soil pores as residual saturation. The liquid also moves rapidly downward if small fractures are present. This migration continues until an impermeable or semi-permeable layer is encountered. Then lateral movement or spreading occurs. The downward and lateral migration in the subsurface leads to DNAPL pools, lenses, and residual saturation that can cause long-term contamination of groundwater at levels well above drinking water standards. Although Cl VOCs have been detected as dissolved components in the groundwater and as vapor in the soil gas at several DOE sites, direct evidence of their presence as DNAPL is sparse and no measurements of the amounts of DNAPL present within a given volume of subsurface have been made. Consequently, unresolved DNAPL issues exist at DOE sites.

  2. Rocketdyne Propulsion & Power DOE Operations Annual Site Environmental Report 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Tuttle, R. J.

    1997-11-10

    This annual report discusses environmental monitoring at two manufacturing and test operations sites operated in the Los Angeles area by Rocketdyne Propulsion & Power of Boeing North American. Inc. (formerly Rockwell International Corporation). These are identified as the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL and the De Soto site. The sites have been used for manufacturing; R&D, engineering, and testing in a broad range of technical fields, primarily rocket engine propulsion and nuclear reactor technology. The De Soto site essentially comprises office space and light industry with no remaining radiological operations, and has little potential impact on the environment. The SSFL site, because of its large size (2.668 acres), warrants comprehensive monitoring to ensure protection of the environment.

  3. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2000. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Rocketdyne Propulsion & Power

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherford, Phil; Samuels, Sandy; Lee, Majelle

    2001-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2000 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of the Rocketdyne Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). In the past, these operations included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials, under the former Atomics International (AI) Division. Other activities included the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities for testing of liquid metal fast breeder components at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned company-operated, test facility within Area IV. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and subsequently, all radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the previously used nuclear facilities and associated site areas. Large-scale D&D activities of the sodium test facilities began in 1996. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year of 2000 continue to indicate no significant releases of radioactive material from Rocketdyne sites. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling. All radioactive wastes are processed for disposal at DOE disposal sites and other sites approved by DOE and licensed for radioactive waste. Liquid radioactive wastes are not released into the environment and do not constitute an exposure pathway.

  4. Site Environmental Report for calendar year 1998, DOE operations at Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherford, P.D.

    1999-09-22

    This Annual Site Environmental Report for 1998 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of the Rocketdyne Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) and De Soto facilities. In the past, these operations included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials, under the Atomics International (AI) Division. Other activities included the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities for testing of liquid metal fast breeder components at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned company-operated, test facility within Area IV. AI was merged into Rocketdyne in 1984 and many of the AI functions were transferred to existing Rocketdyne departments. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and subsequently, all radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the previously used nuclear facilities and associated site areas. Large-scale D and D activities of the sodium test facilities began in 1996. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year of 1998 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Rocketdyne sites. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, and direct radiation. All radioactive wastes are processed for disposal at DOE disposal sites and other sites approved by DOE and licensed for radioactive waste. Liquid radioactive wastes are not released into the environment and do not constitute an exposure pathway.

  5. Some lessons learned from the DOE site operator program

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, J.F.; Helton, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    Performance of electric vehicles (EVs) is being studied in an ongoing Site Operator Program, as part of the Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). More than 200 EVs are being operated by Site Operators in various geographical and climatic regions of the United States. Cold-weather operation of EVs is of particular interest. As expected, low temperatures affect a battery`s ability to accept a charge, which decreases EV range and increases operating costs. Battery types other than lead-acid are being evaluated such as nickel-iron, gelled electrolyte lead-acid, nickel-cadmium, and sodium-sulfur. Also, improved methods of collecting EV performance data are being implemented, thermal management systems are being tested, and a prototype ultracapacitor is being tested as a possible alternative to conventional batteries.

  6. Darwin : The Third DOE ARM TWP ARCS Site /

    SciTech Connect

    Clements, William E.; Jones, L. A.; Baldwin, T.; Nitschke, K.

    2002-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program began operations in its Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale in October 1996 when the first Atmospheric Radiation and Cloud Station (ARCS) began collecting data on Manus Island in Papua New Guinea (PNG). Two years later, in November 1998, a second ARCS began operations on the island of Nauru in the Central Pacific. Now a third ARCS has begun collecting data in Darwin, Australia. The Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites are operated through collaborative agreements with the PNG National Weather Service, The Nauru Department of Industry and Economic Development (IED), and the Australian Bureau of Meteorology's (BOM) Special Services Unit (SSU) respectively. All ARM TWP activities in the region are coordinated with the South Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP) based in Apia, Samoa. The Darwin ARM site and its role in the ARM TWP Program are discussed.

  7. New technologies aid DOE in site characterization, cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    The Department of Energy is using what reportedly is the world`s largest remotely operated mobile-work system to excavate a landfill contaminated with radioactive materials at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The 1,500-ton, self-propelled machine made by Sonsub Inc. (Houston) will span and excavate landfills up to 120 feet wide. As the unit digs, it will separate waste from the soil, package the waste for transport, then backfill the pit. DOE will use the machine to excavate Pit 9, a 400-foot-long, 120-foot-wide landfill that was used as a waste-disposal site in the 1960s. Using computer modeling applications to identify hazardous and radioactive wastes can protect workers from exposure and, in some cases, reduce remediation costs. Canberra Industries (Meridien, Conn.) in November was awarded a contract by EG and G Mound Applied Technologies to perform gamma spectroscopy radiological waste characterization on waste containers that have been stored since 1978 at the Mound site in Ohio. The 55-gallon drums and boxes at the site reportedly contain transuranic waste; however, officials say they anticipate that, once characterization is performed, about 25% of the waste will be downgraded to low-level waste (below 100nCI/gm). In another application involving landfill cleanup, Komar Industries Inc. (Groveport, Ohio) in late 1995 was contracted to design and construct a system for processing radioactive waste from an unnamed DOE landfill. The company says it will design a triauger with injector configuration to serve as a fully contained size-reduction, blending and feeding system that will allow engineers to blend a variety of wastes found at the site. Machined, O-ring, sealed surfaces will maintain a negative water column under normal operations. The system will be designed to handle pressures up to 10 bar, while the processor will have a 6-cubic-yard charge capacity and the ability to accept 15 to 20 charges per hour.

  8. Does Prebiopsy, Nonsterile Ultrasonography Gel Affect Biopsy-Site Asepsis?

    SciTech Connect

    Gurel, Kamil Karabay, Oguz; Gurel, Safiye; Hildebolt, Charles

    2008-01-15

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which the use of nonsterile gel, prior to antiseptic procedures in ultrasonography (US)-guided percutaneous biopsies, results in contamination of the biopsy site. Materials and Methods. Patients referred for US-guided percutaneous biopsies were included in this study. Transmission material used for US evaluation before biopsy-site antiseptic procedures were performed was either nonsterile gel or sterile saline. Patients were randomly assigned to two groups: nonsterile gel (n = 30) and sterile saline (n = 30). Before the transmission material was used and after antiseptic procedures were performed, microbial swabs of a 10-cm{sup 2}-diameter area were obtained at the biopsy site. Swabs were also obtained from the gel, saline, and povidine-iodine. Inoculated specimen plates were incubated at 37{sup o}C under aerobic conditions, and the numbers of colony-forming units recorded. Nominal logistic regression analysis was used to calculate the odds of postantisepsis bacterial growth (after antiseptic procedures were performed) based on group, gender, coincidental disease (diabetes, chronic renal failure, and malignancy), biopsy-site location (head and neck or breast and abdomen), and local factors (skin fold, skin tag, and hair). Results. The following odds ratios (adjusted for the other variables) and their 95% confidence intervals were calculated: (1) group (2.9 [0.8-11.1]; p = 0.10); (2) gender (1.2 [0.3-5.2]; p = 0.78); (3) coincidental disease (7.6 [0.9-166.7]; p = 0.09); (4) biopsy site location (6.2 [1.4-31.3]; p = 0.02); and (5) local factors (7.0 [1.6-36.0]; p = 0.01). No bacterial growth occurred with swabs obtained from gel, povidine-iodine, or saline. Conclusion. We conclude that nonsterile gel used prior to percutaneous biopsy does not affect biopsy-site asepsis.

  9. Collaboration in Long-Term Stewardship at DOE's Hanford Site - 13019

    SciTech Connect

    Moren, Rick; Brown, David; Feist, Ella; Grindstaff, Keith; Zeisloft, Jamie

    2013-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site comprises approximately 1,517 km{sup 2} (586 mi{sup 2}) of land in southeastern Washington. The site was established in 1943 as part of the Manhattan Project to produce plutonium for the nation's nuclear weapons program. As the Cold War era came to an end, the mission of the site transitioned from weapons production to environmental cleanup. As the River Corridor area of the site cleanup is completed, the mission for that portion of the site will transition from active cleanup to continued protection of environment through the Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) Program. The key to successful transition from cleanup to LTS is the unique collaboration among three (3) different DOE Programs and three (3) different prime contractors with each contractor having different contracts. The LTS Program at the site is a successful model of collaboration resulting in efficient resolution of issues and accelerated progress that supports DOE's Richland Office 2015 Vision for the Hanford Site. The 2015 Vision for the Hanford Site involves shrinking the active cleanup footprint of the surface area of the site to approximately 20 mi{sup 2} on the Central Plateau. Hanford's LTS Program is defined in DOE's planning document, Hanford Long-Term Stewardship Program Plan [1]. The Plan defines the relationship and respective responsibilities between the federal cleanup projects and the LTS Program along with their respective contractors. The LTS Program involves these different parties (cleanup program and contractors) who must work together to achieve the objective for transition of land parcels. Through the collaborative efforts with the prime contractors on site over the past two years,, 253.8 km{sup 2} (98 mi{sup 2}) of property has been successfully transitioned from the cleanup program to the LTS Program upon completion of active surface cleanup. Upcoming efforts in the near term will include transitioning another large parcel that

  10. Reactor-pumped laser facility at DOE`s Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Lipinski, R.J.

    1994-02-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is one excellent possibility for a laser power beaming site. It is in the low latitudes of the US, is in an exceptionally cloud-free area of the southwest, is already an area of restricted access (which enhances safety considerations), and possesses a highly-skilled technical team with extensive engineering and research capabilities from underground testing of our nation`s nuclear deterrence. The average availability of cloud-free clear line of site to a given point in space is about 84%. With a beaming angle of {plus_minus}60{degree} from the zenith, about 52 geostationary-orbit (GEO) satellites could be accessed continuously from NTS. In addition, the site would provide an average view factor of about 10% for orbital transfer from low earth orbit to GEO. One of the major candidates for a long-duration, high-power laser is a reactor-pumped laser being developed by DOE. The extensive nuclear expertise at NTS makes this site a prime candidate for utilizing the capabilities of a reactor pumped laser for power beaming. The site then could be used for many dual-use roles such as industrial material processing research, defense testing, and removing space debris.

  11. Reactor-pumped laser facility at DOE`s Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Lipinski, R.J.

    1994-12-31

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is one excellent possibility for a laser power beaming site. It is in the low latitudes of the US, is in an exceptionally cloud-free area of the southwest, is already an area of restricted access (which enhances safety considerations), and possesses a highly-skilled technical team with extensive engineering and research capabilities from underground testing of their nation`s nuclear deterrence. The average availability of cloud-free clear line of site to a given point in space is about 84%. With a beaming angle of {+-}60{degree} from the zenith, about 52 geostationary-orbit (GEO) satellites could be accessed continuously from NTS. In addition, the site would provide an average view factor of about 10% for orbital transfer from low earth orbit to GEO. One of the major candidates for a long-duration, high-power laser is a reactor-pumped laser being developed by DOE. The extensive nuclear expertise at NTS makes this site a prime candidate for utilizing the capabilities of a reactor pumped laser for power beaming. The site then could be used for many dual-use roles such as industrial material processing research, defense testing, and removing space debris.

  12. The Evolution of LTS at DOE's Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Moren, Richard J.; Grindstaff, Keith D.

    2013-11-12

    Hanford's Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) Program has evolved from a small, informal process, with minimal support, to a robust program that provides comprehensive transitions from cleanup contractors to long-term stewardship for post-cleanup requirements specified in the associated cleanup decision documents. The LTS Program has the responsibility for almost 100,000 acres of land, along with over 200 waste sites and will soon have six cocooned reactors. Close to 2,600 documents have been identified and tagged for storage in the LTS document library. The program has successfully completed six consecutive transitions over the last two years in support of the U.S. DOE Richland Operations Office's (DOE-RL) near-term cleanup objectives of significantly reducing the footprint of active cleanup operations for the River Corridor. The program has evolved from one that was initially responsible for defining and measuring Institutional Controls for the Hanford Site, to a comprehensive, post remediation surveillance and maintenance program that begins early in the transition process. In 2013, the first reactor area -- the cocooned 105-F Reactor and its surrounding 1,100 acres, called the F Area was transitioned. In another first, the program is expected to transition the five remaining cocooned reactors into the program through using a Transition and Turnover Package (TTP). As Hanford's LTS Program moves into the next few years, it will continue to build on a collaborative approach. The program has built strong relationships between contractors, regulators, tribes and stakeholders and with the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Legacy Management (LM). The LTS Program has been working with LM since its inception. The transition process utilized LM's Site Transition Framework as one of the initial requirement documents and the Hanford Program continues to collaborate with LM today. One example of this collaboration is the development of the LTS Program's records management

  13. Site Screening and Technical Guidance for Monitored Natural Attenuation at DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Borns, D.J.; Brady, P.V.; Brady, W.D.; Krupka, K.M.; Spalding, B.P.; Waters, R.D.; Zhang, P.

    1999-03-01

    Site Screening and Technical Guidance for Monitored Natural Attenuation at DOE Sites briefly outlines the biological and geochemical origins of natural attenuation, the tendency for natural processes in soils to mitigate contaminant transport and availability, and the means for relying on monitored natural attenuation (MNA) for remediation of contaminated soils and groundwaters. This report contains a step-by-step guide for (1) screening contaminated soils and groundwaters on the basis of their potential for remediation by natural attenuation and (2) implementing MNA consistent with EPA OSWER Directive 9200.4-17. The screening and implementation procedures are set up as a web-based tool (http://www.sandia.gov/eesector/gs/gc/na/mnahome.html) to assist US Department of Energy (DOE) site environmental managers and their staff and contractors to adhere to EPA guidelines for implementing MNA. This document is intended to support the Decision Maker's Framework Guide and Monitoring Guide both to be issued from DOE EM-40. Further technical advances may cause some of the approach outlined in this document to change over time.

  14. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1999. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Rocketdyne

    SciTech Connect

    2000-09-01

    OAK A271 Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1999. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Rocketdyne. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 1999 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of the Rocketdyne Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). In the past, these operations included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials under the former Atomics International Division. Other activities included the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities for testing of liquid metal fast breeder components at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility within Area IV. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and subsequently, all radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the previously used nuclear facilities and associated site areas. Large-scale D&D activities of the sodium test facilities began in 1996. This Annual Site Environmental Report provides information showing that there are no indications of any potential impact on public health and safety due to the operations conducted at the SSFL. All measures and calculations of off-site conditions demonstrate compliance with applicable regulations, which provide for protection of human health and the environment.

  15. Mapping of phosphorylation sites in polyomavirus large T antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Hassauer, M.; Scheidtmann, K.H.; Walter, G.

    1986-06-01

    The phosphorylation sites of polyomavirus large T antigen from infected or transformed cells were investigated. Tryptic digestion of large T antigen from infected, /sup 32/P/sub i/-labeled cells revealed seven major phosphopeptides. Five of these were phosphorylated only at serine residues, and two were phosphorylated at serine and threonine residues. The overall ratio of phosphoserine to phosphothreonine was 6:1. The transformed cell line B4 expressed two polyomavirus-specific phosphoproteins: large T antigen, which was only weakly phosphorylated, and a truncated form of large T antigen of 34,000 molecular weight which was heavily phosphorylated. Both showed phosphorylation patterns similar to that of large T antigen from infected cells. Peptide analyses of large T antigens encoded by the deletion mutants dl8 and dl23 or of specific fragments of wild-type large T antigen indicated that the phosphorylation sites are located in an amino-terminal region upstream of residue 194. The amino acid composition of the phosphopeptides as revealed by differential labeling with various amino acids indicated that several phosphopeptides contain overlapping sequences and that all phosphorylation sites are located in four tryptic peptides derived from a region between Met71 and Arg191. Two of the potential phosphorylation sites were identified as Ser81 and Thr187. The possible role of this modification of large T antigen is discussed.

  16. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2001. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Rocketdyne Propulsion & Power

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherford, Phil; Samuels, Sandy; Leee, Majelle

    2002-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2001 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of the Boeing Rocketdyne Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). In the past, these operations included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials under the former Atomics International (AI) Division. Other activities included the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities for testing of liquid metal fast breeder components at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility within Area IV. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and subsequently, all radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the previously used nuclear facilities and associated site areas. Closure of the sodium test facilities began in 1996. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year of 2001 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling. All radioactive wastes are processed for disposal at DOE disposal sites and other sites approved by DOE and licensed for radioactive waste. Liquid radioactive wastes are not released into the environment and do not constitute an exposure pathway. No structural debris from buildings, released for unrestricted use, was transferred to municipal landfills or recycled in 2001.

  17. Geospatial Optimization of Siting Large-Scale Solar Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Macknick, J.; Quinby, T.; Caulfield, E.; Gerritsen, M.; Diffendorfer, J.; Haines, S.

    2014-03-01

    Recent policy and economic conditions have encouraged a renewed interest in developing large-scale solar projects in the U.S. Southwest. However, siting large-scale solar projects is complex. In addition to the quality of the solar resource, solar developers must take into consideration many environmental, social, and economic factors when evaluating a potential site. This report describes a proof-of-concept, Web-based Geographical Information Systems (GIS) tool that evaluates multiple user-defined criteria in an optimization algorithm to inform discussions and decisions regarding the locations of utility-scale solar projects. Existing siting recommendations for large-scale solar projects from governmental and non-governmental organizations are not consistent with each other, are often not transparent in methods, and do not take into consideration the differing priorities of stakeholders. The siting assistance GIS tool we have developed improves upon the existing siting guidelines by being user-driven, transparent, interactive, capable of incorporating multiple criteria, and flexible. This work provides the foundation for a dynamic siting assistance tool that can greatly facilitate siting decisions among multiple stakeholders.

  18. Descriptions of representative contaminated sites and facilities within the DOE complex

    SciTech Connect

    Short, S.M.; Buck, J.W.; Clark, L.L.; Fletcher, J.F.; Glantz, C.S.; Holdren, G.R.; Huesties, L.R.; Williams, M.D.; Oates, L.

    1994-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated efforts to prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) that will analyze the existing environmental restoration and waste management program and evaluate alternatives for an integrated program. The alternatives being evaluated include (1) a {open_quotes}No Action{close_quotes} alternative as required by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), (2) an Applicable, Relevant, and Appropriate Requirements (ARAR)-driven alternative, (3) a land-use-driven alternative, (4) a health-risk-driven alternative, and (5) a combination land-use and health-risk-driven alternative. The analytical approach being taken to evaluate each of these alternatives is to perform a remedial engineering analysis and human health and ecosystem effects analyses on every contaminated site and facility in the DOE complex. One of Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s (PNL) roles in this approach has been to compile the source term and environmental setting data needed to drive each of these analyses. To date, over 10,000 individual contaminated sites and facilities located throughout the DOE complex of installations have been identified and at least some minimal data compiled on each. The PEIS analyses have been appreciably simplified by categorizing all of these contaminated sites and facilities into six broad categories: (1) contaminated buildings, (2) contaminated soils, (3) solid waste sites (e.g., burial grounds), (4) liquid containment structures (e.g., tanks), (5) surface water sites, and (6) contaminated groundwater sites. A report containing a complete description of each of these thousands of contaminated sites and facilities would be tremendously large and unwildy, as would separate reports describing the application of the analytical methodologies to each.

  19. Single-Site Laparoscopic Management of a Large Adnexal Mass

    PubMed Central

    Scribner, Dennis R.; Weiss, Patrice M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Single-site laparoscopy is gaining acceptance in many surgical fields including gynecology. The purpose of this report is to demonstrate the technique and outcome for removing a large adnexal mass through a single site. Case Description: A 41-y-old female was referred to gynecology oncology for increased abdominal girth for 3 mo. An ultrasound confirmed a benign-appearing, 37-cm left adnexal mass. The mass was removed through a single-site laparoscopic incision with the aid of drainage and a morcellator. The operating time was 84 min. The patient was discharged 2 h and 35 min later with full return to normal activity in 5 d. Conclusion: Large, benign-appearing adnexal masses can be managed safely with superior cosmetic results using single-site laparoscopy. PMID:23925036

  20. European Extremely Large Telescope Site Characterization I: Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernin, Jean; Muñoz-Tuñón, Casiana; Sarazin, Marc; Vazquez Ramió, Héctor; Varela, Antonia M.; Trinquet, Hervé; Delgado, José Miguel; Jiménez Fuensalida, Jesús; Reyes, Marcos; Benhida, Abdelmajid; Benkhaldoun, Zouhair; García Lambas, Diego; Hach, Youssef; Lazrek, M.; Lombardi, Gianluca; Navarrete, Julio; Recabarren, Pablo; Renzi, Victor; Sabil, Mohammed; Vrech, Rubén

    2011-11-01

    The site for the future European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) is already known to be Armazones, near Paranal (Chile). The selection was based on a variety of considerations, with an important one being the quality of the atmosphere for the astronomy planned for the ELT. We present an overview of the characterization of the atmospheric parameters of candidate sites, making use of standard procedures and instruments as carried out within the Framework Programme VI (FP6) of the European Union. We have achieved full characterization of the selected sites for the parameters considered. Further details on adaptive optics results and climatology will be the subject of two forthcoming articles. A summary of the results of the FP6 site-testing campaigns at the different sites is provided.

  1. 43 CFR 3832.1 - What does it mean to locate mining claims or sites?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What does it mean to locate mining claims or sites? 3832.1 Section 3832.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands... CLAIMS OR SITES Locating Mining Claims or Sites § 3832.1 What does it mean to locate mining claims or...

  2. 43 CFR 3832.1 - What does it mean to locate mining claims or sites?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What does it mean to locate mining claims or sites? 3832.1 Section 3832.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands... CLAIMS OR SITES Locating Mining Claims or Sites § 3832.1 What does it mean to locate mining claims...

  3. 43 CFR 3832.1 - What does it mean to locate mining claims or sites?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false What does it mean to locate mining claims or sites? 3832.1 Section 3832.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands... CLAIMS OR SITES Locating Mining Claims or Sites § 3832.1 What does it mean to locate mining claims...

  4. 43 CFR 3832.1 - What does it mean to locate mining claims or sites?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What does it mean to locate mining claims or sites? 3832.1 Section 3832.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands... CLAIMS OR SITES Locating Mining Claims or Sites § 3832.1 What does it mean to locate mining claims...

  5. Soil washing as a potential remediation technology for contaminated DOE sites

    SciTech Connect

    Devgun, J.S.; Beskid, N.J.; Natsis, M.E.; Walker, J.S.

    1993-03-01

    Frequently detected contaminants at US Department of Energy (DOE) sites include radionuclides, heavy metals, and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Remediation of these sites requires application of several technologies used in concert with each other, because no single technology is universally applicable. Special situations, such as mixed waste, generally require innovative technology development. This paper, however, focuses on contaminated soils, for which soil washing and vitrification technologies appear to have wide ranging application potential. Because the volumes of contaminated soils around the DOE complex are so large, soil washing can offer a potentially inexpensive way to effect remediation or to attain waste volume reduction. As costs for disposal of low-level and mixed wastes continue to rise, it is likely that volume-reduction techniques and in-situ containment techniques will become increasingly important. This paper reviews the status of the soil washing technology, examines the systems that are currently available, and discusses the potential application of this technology to some DOE sites, with a focus on radionuclide contamination and, primarily, uranium-contaminated soils

  6. Soil washing as a potential remediation technology for contaminated DOE sites

    SciTech Connect

    Devgun, J.S.; Beskid, N.J. ); Natsis, M.E. ); Walker, J.S. )

    1993-01-01

    Frequently detected contaminants at US Department of Energy (DOE) sites include radionuclides, heavy metals, and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Remediation of these sites requires application of several technologies used in concert with each other, because no single technology is universally applicable. Special situations, such as mixed waste, generally require innovative technology development. This paper, however, focuses on contaminated soils, for which soil washing and vitrification technologies appear to have wide ranging application potential. Because the volumes of contaminated soils around the DOE complex are so large, soil washing can offer a potentially inexpensive way to effect remediation or to attain waste volume reduction. As costs for disposal of low-level and mixed wastes continue to rise, it is likely that volume-reduction techniques and in-situ containment techniques will become increasingly important. This paper reviews the status of the soil washing technology, examines the systems that are currently available, and discusses the potential application of this technology to some DOE sites, with a focus on radionuclide contamination and, primarily, uranium-contaminated soils

  7. Comparison Analysis among Large Amount of SNS Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toriumi, Fujio; Yamamoto, Hitoshi; Suwa, Hirohiko; Okada, Isamu; Izumi, Kiyoshi; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro

    In recent years, application of Social Networking Services (SNS) and Blogs are growing as new communication tools on the Internet. Several large-scale SNS sites are prospering; meanwhile, many sites with relatively small scale are offering services. Such small-scale SNSs realize small-group isolated type of communication while neither mixi nor MySpace can do that. However, the studies on SNS are almost about particular large-scale SNSs and cannot analyze whether their results apply for general features or for special characteristics on the SNSs. From the point of view of comparison analysis on SNS, comparison with just several types of those cannot reach a statistically significant level. We analyze many SNS sites with the aim of classifying them by using some approaches. Our paper classifies 50,000 sites for small-scale SNSs and gives their features from the points of network structure, patterns of communication, and growth rate of SNS. The result of analysis for network structure shows that many SNS sites have small-world attribute with short path lengths and high coefficients of their cluster. Distribution of degrees of the SNS sites is close to power law. This result indicates the small-scale SNS sites raise the percentage of users with many friends than mixi. According to the analysis of their coefficients of assortativity, those SNS sites have negative values of assortativity, and that means users with high degree tend to connect users with small degree. Next, we analyze the patterns of user communication. A friend network of SNS is explicit while users' communication behaviors are defined as an implicit network. What kind of relationships do these networks have? To address this question, we obtain some characteristics of users' communication structure and activation patterns of users on the SNS sites. By using new indexes, friend aggregation rate and friend coverage rate, we show that SNS sites with high value of friend coverage rate activate diary postings

  8. Does an Interactive WebCT Site Help Students Learn?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elicker, Joelle D.; O'Malley, Alison L.; Williams, Christine M.

    2008-01-01

    We examined whether students with access to a supplemental course Web site enhanced with e-mail, discussion boards, and chat room capability reacted to it more positively than students who used a Web site with the same content but no communication features. Students used the Web sites on a voluntary basis. At the end of the semester, students…

  9. Does an Interactive WebCT Site Help Students Learn?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elicker, Joelle D.; O'Malley, Alison L.; Williams, Christine M.

    2008-01-01

    We examined whether students with access to a supplemental course Web site enhanced with e-mail, discussion boards, and chat room capability reacted to it more positively than students who used a Web site with the same content but no communication features. Students used the Web sites on a voluntary basis. At the end of the semester, students…

  10. 48 CFR 923.570 - Workplace substance abuse programs at DOE sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Workplace substance abuse... Workplace 923.570 Workplace substance abuse programs at DOE sites. (a) The Department of Energy (DOE), as...) Regulations concerning DOE's contractor workplace substance abuse programs are promulgated at 10 CFR part...

  11. 48 CFR 970.5223-3 - Agreement regarding Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE sites. 970.5223-3 Section 970.5223-3 Federal Acquisition... Agreement regarding Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE sites. As prescribed in 970.2305-4(a), the contracting officer shall insert the following provision: Agreement Regarding Workplace Substance...

  12. 48 CFR 970.5223-3 - Agreement regarding Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE sites. 970.5223-3 Section 970.5223-3 Federal Acquisition... Agreement regarding Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE sites. As prescribed in 970.2305-4(a), the contracting officer shall insert the following provision: Agreement Regarding Workplace Substance...

  13. 48 CFR 970.5223-3 - Agreement regarding Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE sites. 970.5223-3 Section 970.5223-3 Federal Acquisition... Agreement regarding Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE sites. As prescribed in 970.2305-4(a), the contracting officer shall insert the following provision: Agreement Regarding Workplace Substance...

  14. 48 CFR 970.5223-3 - Agreement regarding Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE sites. 970.5223-3 Section 970.5223-3 Federal Acquisition... Agreement regarding Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE sites. As prescribed in 970.2305-4(a), the contracting officer shall insert the following provision: Agreement Regarding Workplace Substance...

  15. 48 CFR 970.5223-3 - Agreement regarding Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE sites. 970.5223-3 Section 970.5223-3 Federal Acquisition... Agreement regarding Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE sites. As prescribed in 970.2305-4(a), the contracting officer shall insert the following provision: Agreement Regarding Workplace Substance...

  16. Analysis of surface moisture variations within large field sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, K. R.; Blanchard, B. J.; Witczak, M. W.; Schmugge, T. J.

    1979-01-01

    A statistical analysis was made on ground soils to define the general relationship and ranges of values of the field moisture relative to both the variance and coefficient of variation for a given test site and depth increment. The results of the variability study show that: (1) moisture variations within any given large field area are inherent and can either be controlled nor reduced; (2) neither a single value of the standard deviation nor coefficient of variation uniquely define the variability over the complete range of mean field moisture contents examined; and (3) using an upper bound standard deviation parameter clearly defines the maximum range of anticipated moisture variability. 87 percent of all large field moisture content standard deviations were less than 3 percent while about 96 percent of all the computed values had an upper bound of sigma=4 percent for these intensively sampled fields. The limit of accuracy curves of mean soil moisture measurements for large field sites relative to the required number of samples were determined.

  17. Framework for DOE mixed low-level waste disposal: Site fact sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Gruebel, M.M.; Waters, R.D.; Hospelhorn, M.B.; Chu, M.S.Y.

    1994-11-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is required to prepare and submit Site Treatment Plans (STPS) pursuant to the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCAct). Although the FFCAct does not require that disposal be addressed in the STPS, the DOE and the States recognize that treatment of mixed low-level waste will result in residues that will require disposal in either low-level waste or mixed low-level waste disposal facilities. As a result, the DOE is working with the States to define and develop a process for evaluating disposal-site suitability in concert with the FFCAct and development of the STPS. Forty-nine potential disposal sites were screened; preliminary screening criteria reduced the number of sites for consideration to twenty-six. The DOE then prepared fact sheets for the remaining sites. These fact sheets provided additional site-specific information for understanding the strengths and weaknesses of the twenty-six sites as potential disposal sites. The information also provided the basis for discussion among affected States and the DOE in recommending sites for more detailed evaluation.

  18. WWOX, large common fragile site genes, and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ge

    2015-01-01

    WWOX is a gene that spans an extremely large chromosomal region. It is derived from within chromosomal band 16q23.2 which is a region with frequent deletions and other alterations in a variety of different cancers. This chromosomal band also contains the FRA16D common fragile site (CFS). CFSs are chromosomal regions found in all individuals which are highly unstable. WWOX has also been demonstrated to function as a tumor suppressor that is involved in the development of many cancers. Two other highly unstable CFSs, FRA3B (3p14.2) and FRA6E (6q26), also span extremely large genes, FHIT and PARK2, respectively, and these two genes are also found to be important tumor suppressors. There are a number of interesting similarities between these three large CFS genes. In spite of the fact that they are derived from some of the most unstable chromosomal regions in the genome, they are found to be highly evolutionarily conserved and the chromosomal region spanning the mouse homologs of both WWOX and FHIT are also CFSs in mice. Many of the other CFSs also span extremely large genes and many of these are very attractive tumor suppressor candidates. WWOX is therefore a member of a very interesting family of very large CFS genes. PMID:25595185

  19. Apparent Surface Reflectance of the DOE ARM SGP CART Central Site Derived from AVIRIS Spectral Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.

    1998-01-01

    The primary objective of the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) is to acquire in situ and remote sensing data to improve cloud and atmospheric radiative models and parameterizations. As a consequence of this program, a large number of atmosphere and surface measurements are being acquired at the ARM SGP CART central site. NASA's Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) overflew this site on August 1, 1997. AVIRIS measures the upwelling spectral solar radiance from 400 to 2500 nm at 10-nm intervals. From 20 km altitude, these calibrated spectra are acquired as images of 11 by up to 800 km with 20-by-20 m spatial resolution. These data were acquired at the ARM SGP CART Central Site to first investigate derivation of atmospheric parameters from the measured spectra, second study the variation of these parameters, and third demonstrate the inversion of the calibrated radiance spectra to apparent surface reflectance. These objectives have been pursued with AVIRIS data at other sites for atmospheric water vapor and derivation of apparent surface reflectance.

  20. How Does a Multi-Site Institution Plan Effectively?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jefferson, Curtis F.

    A multi-site college plans effectively by having in place planning and evaluation systems that enhance its capability to respond effectively to changes in the environment in order to continue to provide high quality educational programs and services for the people in its service area. The effectiveness of these systems is dependent on clearly…

  1. Does Site-Based Management Increase Student Achievement?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muhammad, Bridgette D.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this review of literature is to determine if the literature suggests that site-based management increase student achievement. Original research findings done on 19 Michigan Title I schools using the Bureaucracy Theory, Systems Theory, and Human Resource Development Theory was reviewed. Also, qualitative studies on superintendents…

  2. Potential application of the Motorola MSR-20 Radar to DOE site security

    SciTech Connect

    Arlowe, D.; Rebeil, P.; Vigil, R.

    1993-09-01

    This paper describes the results of testing the MSR-20 radar and provides guidance on how this radar may be used to provide early detection and warning of approaching intruders beyond DOE facility site boundaries.

  3. 48 CFR 923.570 - Workplace substance abuse programs at DOE sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Workplace substance abuse... SAFETY, AND DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE Drug-Free Workplace 923.570 Workplace substance abuse programs at DOE... abuse programs are promulgated at 10 CFR part 707, Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE Sites....

  4. 48 CFR 923.570 - Workplace substance abuse programs at DOE sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Workplace substance abuse... SAFETY, AND DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE Drug-Free Workplace 923.570 Workplace substance abuse programs at DOE... abuse programs are promulgated at 10 CFR part 707, Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE Sites....

  5. 48 CFR 923.570 - Workplace substance abuse programs at DOE sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Workplace substance abuse... SAFETY, AND DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE Drug-Free Workplace 923.570 Workplace substance abuse programs at DOE... abuse programs are promulgated at 10 CFR part 707, Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE Sites....

  6. 48 CFR 923.570 - Workplace substance abuse programs at DOE sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Workplace substance abuse... SAFETY, AND DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE Drug-Free Workplace 923.570 Workplace substance abuse programs at DOE... abuse programs are promulgated at 10 CFR part 707, Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE Sites....

  7. EMP Attachment 3 DOE-SC PNNL Site Dose Assessment Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, Sandra F.

    2011-12-21

    This Dose Assessment Guidance (DAG) describes methods to use to determine the Maximally-Exposed Individual (MEI) location and to estimate dose impact to that individual under the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE-SC) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP). This guidance applies to public dose from radioactive material releases to the air from PNNL Site operations. This document is an attachment to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) and describes dose assessment guidance for radiological air emissions. The impact of radiological air emissions from the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE-SC) PNNL Site is indicated by dose estimates to a maximally exposed member of the public, referred to as the maximally exposed individual (MEI). Reporting requirements associated with dose to members of the public from radiological air emissions are in 40 CFR Part 61.94, WAC 246-247-080, and DOE Order 458.1. The DOE Order and state standards for dose from radioactive air emissions are consistent with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) dose standards in 40 CFR 61.92 (i.e., 10 mrem/yr to a MEI). Despite the fact that the current Contract Requirements Document (CRD) for the DOE-SC PNNL Site operations does not include the requirement to meet DOE CRD 458.1, paragraph 2.b, public dose limits, the DOE dose limits would be met when EPA limits are met.

  8. U.S. DOE's Emergency Communications Network Site Atlas Project

    SciTech Connect

    Coffey, J.R.

    1999-07-27

    Bechtel Nevada supports the US Department of Energy's Emergency Operations Center by providing Geographic Information System support in the areas of database maintenance, user interface, and daily emergency preparedness operations. This support includes preparation of a set of standardized atlases for many of the sites run by the Department of Energy. The atlases are created from one suite of ARC Macro Language programs that handles problems with producing consistent output for many maps in many different scales from data obtained from multiple sources and created at various scales. Flexibility and ease of change/update are the key benefits of this system.

  9. Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power. DOE Operations Annual Site Environmental Report, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, K. S.

    1998-11-23

    This .Annual Site Environmental Report for 1997 concentrates on the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of the Rocketdyne Santa Susana Field Laboratory) (SSFL) and De Soto facilities. In the past. these operations included development. fabrication. and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel and other radioactive materials, under the Atomics International Division (AI). Other activities included the operation of large scale liquid metal facilities for the testing of liquid metal fast breeder components at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC). a government owned company operated, test facility within Area IV. .AI was merged into Rocketdyne in 1981 and many of the AI functions were transferred to existing Rocketdyne departments. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and subsequently. all radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the previously used nuclear facilities and associated site areas. Large scale D&D activities of the sodium test facilities began in 1996.

  10. DOE/NASA Lewis large wind turbine program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    An overview of the large wind turbine activities managed by NASA is given. These activities include resuls from the first and second generation field machines (Mod-0A, -1, and -2), the status of the Department of Interior WTS-4 machine for which NASA is responsible for technical management, and the design phase of the third generation wind turbines (Mod-5).

  11. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2007. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ning; Rutherford, Phil; Lenox, Art; Blair, Lori; Amar, Ravnesh; Costa, Paul; Galvez, Lydia; Jameson, Blythe; Galvez, Lydia

    2008-09-30

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2007 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988; all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. In May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV were suspended until DOE completes the SSFL Area IV Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The environmental monitoring programs were continued throughout the year. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2007 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling. All radioactive wastes are processed for disposal at DOE disposal sites and/or other licensed sites approved by DOE for radioactive waste disposal. No liquid radioactive wastes were released into the environment in 2007.

  12. Does close temperature regulation affect surgical site infection rates?

    PubMed

    Leeds, Ira L; Wick, Elizabeth C; Melton, Genevieve B

    2014-01-01

    The argument for close temperature control, to which regulatory bodies have held health systems in an effort to reduce the burden of hospital-acquired infections, is not fully supported by current evidence. The literature is complex on the topic, and overinterpretation of historical data supporting close temperature regulation does not preclude an important recognition of these early works' contribution to high-quality surgical care. Avoidance of hypothermia through the regular use of active rewarming should be a routine part of safe surgical care. The biochemical basis of emphasizing temperature regulation is sound, and ample evidence shows the frank physiologic derangements seen when biological processes occur at suboptimal temperature. It is also recognized that patients tend to do better when warmed during the perioperative period, suggesting that warming devices are an important and essential adjunct to good perioperative care. Clinicians, researchers, and policymakers must be careful in how they apply these well-supported findings to process metrics in an era of limited resources with increasingly stringent quality guidelines and outcomes measures. Discrete temperature targets in current measures are not supported by the existing literature. Not only do these targets artificially anchor clinicians to temperature values with an inadequate scientific basis but they demand intensive resources from health institutions that could potentially be better used on quality requirements with stronger evidence of their ultimate effect on patient care.

  13. New instrument calibration facility for the DOE Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkie, W.H.; Polz, E.J.

    1993-12-31

    A new laboratory facility is being designed, constructed, and equipped at the Savannah River Site (SRS) as a fiscal year 1992 line item project. This facility will provide space and equipment for test, evaluation, repair, maintenance, and calibration of radiation monitoring instrumentation. The project will replace an obsolete facility and will allow implementation of program upgrades necessary to meet ANSI N323 requirements and National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) criteria for accreditation of federally owned secondary calibration laboratories. An outline of the project is presented including description, scope, cost, management organization, chronology, and current status. Selected design criteria and their impacts on the project are discussed. The upgraded SRS calibration program is described, and important features of the new facility and equipment that will accommodate this program are listed. The floor plan for the facility is shown, and equipment summaries and functional descriptions for each area are provided.

  14. Clustering in Large Networks Does Not Promote Upstream Reciprocity

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Naoki

    2011-01-01

    Upstream reciprocity (also called generalized reciprocity) is a putative mechanism for cooperation in social dilemma situations with which players help others when they are helped by somebody else. It is a type of indirect reciprocity. Although upstream reciprocity is often observed in experiments, most theories suggest that it is operative only when players form short cycles such as triangles, implying a small population size, or when it is combined with other mechanisms that promote cooperation on their own. An expectation is that real social networks, which are known to be full of triangles and other short cycles, may accommodate upstream reciprocity. In this study, I extend the upstream reciprocity game proposed for a directed cycle by Boyd and Richerson to the case of general networks. The model is not evolutionary and concerns the conditions under which the unanimity of cooperative players is a Nash equilibrium. I show that an abundance of triangles or other short cycles in a network does little to promote upstream reciprocity. Cooperation is less likely for a larger population size even if triangles are abundant in the network. In addition, in contrast to the results for evolutionary social dilemma games on networks, scale-free networks lead to less cooperation than networks with a homogeneous degree distribution. PMID:21998641

  15. Clustering in large networks does not promote upstream reciprocity.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Naoki

    2011-01-01

    Upstream reciprocity (also called generalized reciprocity) is a putative mechanism for cooperation in social dilemma situations with which players help others when they are helped by somebody else. It is a type of indirect reciprocity. Although upstream reciprocity is often observed in experiments, most theories suggest that it is operative only when players form short cycles such as triangles, implying a small population size, or when it is combined with other mechanisms that promote cooperation on their own. An expectation is that real social networks, which are known to be full of triangles and other short cycles, may accommodate upstream reciprocity. In this study, I extend the upstream reciprocity game proposed for a directed cycle by Boyd and Richerson to the case of general networks. The model is not evolutionary and concerns the conditions under which the unanimity of cooperative players is a Nash equilibrium. I show that an abundance of triangles or other short cycles in a network does little to promote upstream reciprocity. Cooperation is less likely for a larger population size even if triangles are abundant in the network. In addition, in contrast to the results for evolutionary social dilemma games on networks, scale-free networks lead to less cooperation than networks with a homogeneous degree distribution.

  16. DOE's Oak Ridge Site Kick Off Demolition of the K-27 Building

    SciTech Connect

    Cange, Sue; Rueter, Ken

    2016-02-10

    DOE's Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management kicked off demolition of the K-27 Building this month, moving closer to fulfilling Vision 2016 — removal of all gaseous diffusion buildings from the site by year’s end. As the site's last uranium enrichment building falls, it will mark the first-ever demolition and cleanup of a gaseous diffusion complex anywhere.

  17. ANL site response for the DOE FY1994 information resources management long-range plan

    SciTech Connect

    Boxberger, L.M.

    1992-03-01

    Argonne National Laboratory`s ANL Site Response for the DOE FY1994 Information Resources Management (IRM) Long-Range Plan (ANL/TM 500) is one of many contributions to the DOE information resources management long-range planning process and, as such, is an integral part of the DOE policy and program planning system. The Laboratory has constructed this response according to instructions in a Call issued in September 1991 by the DOE Office of IRM Policy, Plans and Oversight. As one of a continuing series, this Site Response is an update and extension of the Laboratory`s previous submissions. The response contains both narrative and tabular material. It covers an eight-year period consisting of the base year (FY1991), the current year (FY1992), the budget year (FY1993), the plan year (FY1994), and the out years (FY1995-FY1998). This Site Response was compiled by Argonne National Laboratory`s Computing and Telecommunications Division (CTD), which has the responsibility to provide leadership in optimizing computing and information services and disseminating computer-related technologies throughout the Laboratory. The Site Response consists of 5 parts: (1) a site overview, describes the ANL mission, overall organization structure, the strategic approach to meet information resource needs, the planning process, major issues and points of contact. (2) a software plan for DOE contractors, Part 2B, ``Software Plan FMS plan for DOE organizations, (3) computing resources telecommunications, (4) telecommunications, (5) printing and publishing.

  18. ANL site response for the DOE FY1994 information resources management long-range plan

    SciTech Connect

    Boxberger, L.M.

    1992-03-01

    Argonne National Laboratory's ANL Site Response for the DOE FY1994 Information Resources Management (IRM) Long-Range Plan (ANL/TM 500) is one of many contributions to the DOE information resources management long-range planning process and, as such, is an integral part of the DOE policy and program planning system. The Laboratory has constructed this response according to instructions in a Call issued in September 1991 by the DOE Office of IRM Policy, Plans and Oversight. As one of a continuing series, this Site Response is an update and extension of the Laboratory's previous submissions. The response contains both narrative and tabular material. It covers an eight-year period consisting of the base year (FY1991), the current year (FY1992), the budget year (FY1993), the plan year (FY1994), and the out years (FY1995-FY1998). This Site Response was compiled by Argonne National Laboratory's Computing and Telecommunications Division (CTD), which has the responsibility to provide leadership in optimizing computing and information services and disseminating computer-related technologies throughout the Laboratory. The Site Response consists of 5 parts: (1) a site overview, describes the ANL mission, overall organization structure, the strategic approach to meet information resource needs, the planning process, major issues and points of contact. (2) a software plan for DOE contractors, Part 2B, Software Plan FMS plan for DOE organizations, (3) computing resources telecommunications, (4) telecommunications, (5) printing and publishing.

  19. Colonic involvement in amebic liver abscess: does site matter?

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Amitava; Dadhich, Sunil; Bhargava, Narendra

    2014-01-01

    Background Colonic involvement in amebic liver abscess (ALA) occurs in more than half of the patients. However no studies have found any association between the site of the colonic lesions and location of abscesses in the liver. Thus, the present study was designed to find the correlation between colonic involvement in solitary and multiple ALAs. Methods This is a case control study of 80 patients allocated in two groups, the first with solitary (controls) and the second with multiple ALAs (cases). Colonoscopy was performed in all patients enrolled in the study. Results Solitary ALA was seen in 70% of patients whereas multiple ALAs in 30%. Colonic involvement in the form of erythema, inflammation and ulceration was seen in 77.5% of cases of ALA. 71.4 % cases of solitary ALA had colonic lesions compared to 91.6% cases of multiple ALAs (P=0.02). Most of the patients with multiple ALAs had involvement of the transverse and right colon (75%). Involvement of right colon was present in all patients with colonic involvement. A significant involvement of the right and transverse colon was seen in cases of multiple compared to solitary ALA (P<0.0001). Conclusion Colonic involvement is present in more than two thirds of patients with ALA. When colonic involvement is present, right colon lesion is universally present. Colonic involvement may extend beyond hepatic flexure in patients with multiple amebic ALAs, either involving right hepatic lobe or both lobes. PMID:24733082

  20. Kansas State University (KSU), DOE EV Site Operator Program

    SciTech Connect

    Hague, J.R.

    1992-11-17

    Kansas State University, with funding support from federal, state, public, and private companies, is participating in the Department of Energy's Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program. Through participation in this program, Kansas State is demonstrating, testing, and evaluating electric or hybrid vehicle technology. This participation will provide organizations the opportunity to examine the latest EHV prototypes under actual operating conditions. KSU proposes to purchase one (1) electric or hybrid van and four (4) electric cars during the first two years of this five-year program. KSU has purchased one G-Van built by Conceptor Industries, Toronto, Canada and has initiated a procurement order to purchase two (2) Soleq 1992 Ford EVcort station wagons. The G-Van has been signed in order for the public to be aware that this is an electric drive vehicle. Financial participant's names have been stenciled on the back door of the van. This vehicle is available for short term loan to interested utilities and companies. When other vehicles are obtained, the G-Van will be maintained on K-State's campus.

  1. Does Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery Minimize Surgical Site Infections?

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ravish Shammi; Dutta, Shumayou

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective review of prospectively collected data. Purpose To evaluate the incidence of surgical site infections (SSIs) in minimally invasive spine surgery (MISS) in a cohort of patients and compare with available historical data on SSI in open spinal surgery cohorts, and to evaluate additional direct costs incurred due to SSI. Overview of Literature SSI can lead to prolonged antibiotic therapy, extended hospitalization, repeated operations, and implant removal. Small incisions and minimal dissection intrinsic to MISS may minimize the risk of postoperative infections. However, there is a dearth of literature on infections after MISS and their additional direct financial implications. Methods All patients from January 2007 to January 2015 undergoing posterior spinal surgery with tubular retractor system and microscope in our institution were included. The procedures performed included tubular discectomies, tubular decompressions for spinal stenosis and minimal invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). The incidence of postoperative SSI was calculated and compared to the range of cited SSI rates from published studies. Direct costs were calculated from medical billing for index cases and for patients with SSI. Results A total of 1,043 patients underwent 763 noninstrumented surgeries (discectomies, decompressions) and 280 instrumented (TLIF) procedures. The mean age was 52.2 years with male:female ratio of 1.08:1. Three infections were encountered with fusion surgeries (mean detection time, 7 days). All three required wound wash and debridement with one patient requiring unilateral implant removal. Additional direct cost due to infection was $2,678 per 100 MISS-TLIF. SSI increased hospital expenditure per patient 1.5-fold after instrumented MISS. Conclusions Overall infection rate after MISS was 0.29%, with SSI rate of 0% in non-instrumented MISS and 1.07% with instrumented MISS. MISS can markedly reduce the SSI rate and can be an

  2. Geospatial optimization of siting large-scale solar projects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Macknick, Jordan; Quinby, Ted; Caulfield, Emmet; Gerritsen, Margot; Diffendorfer, James E.; Haines, Seth S.

    2014-01-01

    guidelines by being user-driven, transparent, interactive, capable of incorporating multiple criteria, and flexible. This work provides the foundation for a dynamic siting assistance tool that can greatly facilitate siting decisions among multiple stakeholders.

  3. Transuranic Contamination in Sediment and Groundwater at the U.S. DOE Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2009-08-20

    A review of transuranic radionuclide contamination in sediments and groundwater at the DOE’s Hanford Site was conducted. The review focused primarily on plutonium-239/240 and americium-241; however, other transuranic nuclides were discussed as well, including neptunium-237, plutonium-238, and plutonium-241. The scope of the review included liquid process wastes intentionally disposed to constructed waste disposal facilities such as trenches and cribs, burial grounds, and unplanned releases to the ground surface. The review did not include liquid wastes disposed to tanks or solid wastes disposed to burial grounds. It is estimated that over 11,800 Ci of plutonium-239, 28,700 Ci of americium-241, and 55 Ci of neptunium-237 have been disposed as liquid waste to the near surface environment at the Hanford Site. Despite the very large quantities of transuranic contaminants disposed to the vadose zone at Hanford, only minuscule amounts have entered the groundwater. Currently, no wells onsite exceed the DOE derived concentration guide for plutonium-239/240 (30 pCi/L) or any other transuranic contaminant in filtered samples. The DOE derived concentration guide was exceeded by a small fraction in unfiltered samples from one well (299-E28-23) in recent years (35.4 and 40.4 pCi/L in FY 2006). The primary reason that disposal of these large quantities of transuranic radionuclides directly to the vadose zone at the Hanford Site has not resulted in widespread groundwater contamination is that under the typical oxidizing and neutral to slightly alkaline pH conditions of the Hanford vadose zone, transuranic radionuclides (plutonium and americium in particular) have a very low solubility and high affinity for surface adsorption to mineral surfaces common within the Hanford vadose zone. Other important factors are the fact that the vadose zone is typically very thick (hundreds of feet) and the net infiltration rate is very low due to the desert climate. In some cases where

  4. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2003 DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Rocketdyne Propulsion & Power

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ning; Rutherford, Phil; Samuels, Sandy; Lee, Majelle

    2004-09-30

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2003 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing Rocketdyne’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). In the past, the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations at ETEC included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities at ETEC involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing liquid metal fast breeder components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988; all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Closure of the liquid metal test facilities began in 1996. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2003 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling.

  5. Demonstrating and Deploying Private Sector Technologies at DOE Sites - Issues to be Overcome

    SciTech Connect

    Bedick, R. C.

    2002-02-27

    The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) continues to pursue cost-effective, environmental cleanup of the weapons complex sites with a concomitant emphasis on deployment of innovative technologies as a means to this end. The EM Office of Science and Technology (OST) pursues a strategy that entails identification of technologies that have potential applications throughout the DOE complex: at multiple DOE sites and at multiple facilities on those sites. It further encourages a competitive procurement process for the various applications entailed in the remediation of a given facility. These strategies require a competitive private-sector supplier base to help meet EM needs. OST supports technology development and deployment through investments in partnerships with private industry to enhance the acceptance of their technology products within the DOE market. Since 1992, OST and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have supported the re search and development of technology products and services offered by the private sector. During this time, NETL has managed over 140 research and development projects involving industrial and university partners. These projects involve research in a broad range of EM related topics, including deactivation and decommissioning, characterization, monitoring, sensors, waste separation, groundwater remediation, robotics, and mixed waste treatment. Successful partnerships between DOE and Industry have resulted in viable options for EM's cleanup needs, and require continued marketing efforts to ensure that these technology solutions are used at multiple DOE sites and facilities.

  6. Does Infection Site Matter? A Systematic Review of Infection Site Mortality in Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Motzkus, Christine A; Luckmann, Roger

    2017-09-01

    Sepsis treatment protocols emphasize source control with empiric antibiotics and fluid resuscitation. Previous reviews have examined the impact of infection site and specific pathogens on mortality from sepsis; however, no recent review has addressed the infection site. This review focuses on the impact of infection site on hospital mortality among patients with sepsis. The PubMed database was searched for articles from 2001 to 2014. Studies were eligible if they included (1) one or more statistical models with hospital mortality as the outcome and considered infection site for inclusion in the model and (2) adult patients with sepsis, severe sepsis, or septic shock. Data abstracted included stage of sepsis, infection site, and raw and adjusted effect estimates. Nineteen studies were included. Infection sites most studied included respiratory (n = 19), abdominal (n = 19), genitourinary (n = 18), and skin and soft tissue infections (n = 11). Several studies found a statistically significant lower mortality risk for genitourinary infections on hospital mortality when compared to respiratory infections. Based on studies included in this review, the impact of infection site in patients with sepsis on hospital mortality could not be reliably estimated. Misclassification among infections and disease states remains a serious possibility in studies on this topic.

  7. Common fragile sites, extremely large genes, neural development and cancer.

    PubMed

    Smith, David I; Zhu, Yu; McAvoy, Sarah; Kuhn, Robert

    2006-01-28

    Common fragile sites (CFSs) are large regions of profound genomic instability found in all individuals. They are biologically significant due to their role in a number of genomic alterations that are frequently found in many different types of cancer. The first CFS to be cloned and characterized was FRA3B, the most active CFS in the human genome. Instability within this region extends for over 4.0 Mbs and contained within the center of this CFS is the FHIT gene spanning 1.5 Mbs of genomic sequence. There are frequent deletions and other alterations within this gene in multiple tumor types and the protein encoded by this gene has been demonstrated to function as a tumor suppressor in vitro and in vivo. In spite of this, FHIT is not a traditional mutational target in cancer and many tumors have large intronic deletions without any exonic alterations. There are several other very large genes found within CFS regions including Parkin (1.37 Mbs in FRA6E), GRID2 (1.47 Mbs within 4q22.3), and WWOX (1.11 Mbs within FRA16D). These genes also appear to function as tumor suppressors but are not traditional mutational targets in cancer. Each of these genes is highly conserved and the regions spanning them are CFSs in mice. We have now examined lists of the largest human genes and found forty that span over one megabase. Many of these are derived from chromosomal bands containing CFSs. BACs within these genes are being utilized as FISH probes to determine if these are also CFS genes. Thus far we have identified the following as CFS genes: CNTNAP2 (2.3 Mbs in FRA7I), DMD (2.09 Mbs in FRAXC), LRP1B (1.9 Mbs in FRA2F), CTNNA3 (1.78 Mbs in FRA10D), DAB1 (1.55 Mbs in FRA1B), and IL1RAPL1 (1.36 Mbs in FRAXC). Although, these genes are also not traditional mutational targets in cancer they do exhibit loss of expression in multiple tumor types suggesting that they may also function as tumor suppressors. Many of the large CFS genes are involved in neurological development. Parkin is

  8. Site environmental report for calendar year 2002. DOE operations at the Boeing Company, Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power

    SciTech Connect

    2003-09-30

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2002 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing' s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL)). In the past, the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations at ETEC included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities at ETEC involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing liquid metal fast breeder components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and, subsequently, all radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Closure of the liquid metal test facilities began in 1996. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2002 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property ( land, structures, waste), and recycling. All radioactive w astes are processed for disposal at DOE disposal sites and/or other licensed sites approved by DOE for radioactive waste disposal. No liquid radioactive wastes are released into the environment, and no structural debris from buildings w as transferred to municipal landfills or recycled in 2002.

  9. Review of Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) Assessments for the DOE Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, Robert L.; Ross, Steven B.

    2011-09-15

    The purpose of this review is to assess the need for updating Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) assessments for the DOE's Hanford Site, as required by DOE Order 420.1B Chapter IV, Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation, based on significant changes in state-of-the-art NPH assessment methodology or site-specific information. This review is an update and expansion to the September 2010 review of PNNL-19751, Review of Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) Assessments for the Hanford 200 Areas (Non-Seismic).

  10. Harnessing federal environmental expertise and focusing it on streamlining characterization and remediation at DOE`s Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, J.K.; Kane, D.A.; McGarry, T.A.

    1993-03-01

    At the US Department of Energy, Richland Field Office (DOE-RL) Hanford Site, environmental restoration is conducted under a Tri-Party Federal Facility Agreement between DOE-RL, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology). One result of a dispute resolution was the requirement to conduct an independent review of the policies, procedures, processes, and work practices associated with remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) activity at Hanford with a goal of reducing it to 30 months. Sixteen experienced and respected federal Environmental Restoration Program/Project Managers were brought to Hanford for a two-week intensive review of the program. This paper outlines the reasons for this tactic, the mechanics of funding the process, and the benefits of this unique approach.

  11. Seismically-induced soil amplification at the DOE Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant site

    SciTech Connect

    Sykora, D.W.; Haynes, M.E. . Geotechnical Lab.); Brock, W.R.; Hunt, R.J.; Shaffer, K.E. )

    1991-01-01

    A site-specific earthquake site response (soil amplification) study is being conducted for the Department of Energy (DOE), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). This study is pursuant to an upgraded Final Safety Analysis Report in accordance with requirements specified by DOE. The seismic hazard at PGDP is dominated by the New Madrid Seismic Zone. Site-specific synthetic earthquake records developed by others were applied independently to four soil columns with heights above baserock of about 325 ft. The results for the 1000-year earthquake event indicate that the site period is between 1.0 and 1.5 sec. Incident shear waves are amplified at periods of motion greater than 0.15 sec. The peak free-field horizontal acceleration, occurring at very low periods, is 0.28 g. 13 refs., 13 figs.

  12. Site/Systems Operations, Maintenance and Facilities Management of the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Site

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Susan

    2005-08-01

    This contract covered the site/systems operations, maintenance, and facilities management of the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Site.

  13. One program, multiple training sites: does site of family medicine training influence professional practice location?

    PubMed

    Jamieson, Jean L; Kernahan, Jill; Calam, Betty; Sivertz, Kristin S

    2013-01-01

    Numerous strategies have been suggested to increase recruitment of family physicians to rural communities and smaller regional centers. One approach has been to implement distributed postgraduate education programs where trainees spend substantial time in such communities. The purpose of the current study was to compare the eventual practice location of family physicians who undertook their postgraduate training through a single university but who were based in either metropolitan or distributed, non-metropolitan communities. Since 1998, the Department of Family Practice at the University of British Columbia in Canada has conducted an annual survey of its residents at 2, 5, and 10 years after completion of training. The authors received Ethics Board approval to use this anonymized data to identify personal and educational factors that predict future practice location. The overall response rate was 45%. At 2 years (N=222), residents trained in distributed sites were 15 times more likely to enter practice in rural communities, small towns and regional centers than those who trained in metropolitan teaching centers. This was even more predictive for retention in non-urban practice sites. Among the subgroup of physicians who remained in a single practice location for more than a year preceding the survey, those who trained in smaller sites were 36 times more likely to choose a rural or regional practice setting. While the vast majority of those trained in metropolitan sites chose an urban practice location, a subgroup of those with some rural upbringing were more likely to practice in rural or regional settings. Trainees from distributed sites considered themselves more prepared for practice regardless of ultimate practice location. Participation in a distributed postgraduate family medicine training site is an important predictor of a non-urban practice location. This effect persists for 10 years after completion of training and is independent of other predictors of

  14. DOE's Oak Ridge Site Kick Off Demolition of the K-27 Building

    ScienceCinema

    Cange, Sue; Rueter, Ken

    2016-07-12

    DOE's Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management kicked off demolition of the K-27 Building this month, moving closer to fulfilling Vision 2016 — removal of all gaseous diffusion buildings from the site by year’s end. As the site's last uranium enrichment building falls, it will mark the first-ever demolition and cleanup of a gaseous diffusion complex anywhere.

  15. Characterization of candidate DOE sites for fabricating MOX fuel for lead assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Holdaway, R.F.; Miller, J.W.; Sease, J.D.; Moses, R.J.; O`Connor, D.G.; Carrell, R.D.; Jaeger, C.D.; Thompson, M.L.; Strasser, A.A.

    1998-03-01

    The Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (MD) of the Department of Energy (DOE) is directing the program to disposition US surplus weapons-usable plutonium. For the reactor option for disposition of this surplus plutonium, MD is seeking to contract with a consortium, which would include a mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabricator and a commercial US reactor operator, to fabricate and burn MOX fuel in existing commercial nuclear reactors. This option would entail establishing a MOX fuel fabrication facility under the direction of the consortium on an existing DOE site. Because of the lead time required to establish a MOX fuel fabrication facility and the need to qualify the MOX fuel for use in a commercial reactor, MD is considering the early fabrication of lead assemblies (LAs) in existing DOE facilities under the technical direction of the consortium. The LA facility would be expected to produce a minimum of 1 metric ton heavy metal per year and must be operational by June 2003. DOE operations offices were asked to identify candidate sites and facilities to be evaluated for suitability to fabricate MOX fuel LAs. Savannah River Site, Argonne National Laboratory-West, Hanford, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory were identified as final candidates to host the LA project. A Site Evaluation Team (SET) worked with each site to develop viable plans for the LA project. SET then characterized the suitability of each of the five plans for fabricating MOX LAs using 28 attributes and documented the characterization to aid DOE and the consortium in selecting the site for the LA project. SET concluded that each option has relative advantages and disadvantages in comparison with other options; however, each could meet the requirements of the LA project as outlined by MD and SET.

  16. Land use and demography survey for a large superfund site

    SciTech Connect

    Hattemer-Frey, H.A.; Quinlan, R.E.; Krieger, G.R.; Lau, V.

    1994-12-31

    Inconsistencies in the exposure assessment process often arise when risk assessors are forced to make assumptions about the frequency and duration of exposures in the absence of site-specific data. EPA encourages the collection of site-specific data so that risks can be more accurately assessed on a case-by-case basis. Typically, estimates of exposure frequency and duration represent the largest source of uncertainty for non-food related exposure pathways, while the largest source of uncertainty for foodchain pathways stems primarily from estimating the fraction ingested that originated from the affected area. A Land Use and Demography Survey was conducted to obtain site-specific information on: (1) the amount of time individuals spend indoors, outdoors, and on or near affected areas; (2) recreational use of surface water bodies on-site; (3) the percentage of food items consumed that were raised or produced locally; and (4) other behavioral patterns and activities that could influence their exposure to site-related chemicals. More than 300 households were randomly selected and the residents personally interviewed. A wide variety of individuals ranging from children to elderly residents with vastly different recreational, behavioral, and consumption patterns were interviewed. This paper discusses the survey results in relation to EPA standard default exposure assumptions.

  17. 48 CFR 970.5223-4 - Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE Sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Workplace Substance Abuse... and Contract Clauses for Management and Operating Contracts 970.5223-4 Workplace Substance Abuse... 10 CFR part 707, Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE Sites, incorporated herein by...

  18. 48 CFR 970.5223-4 - Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE Sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Workplace Substance Abuse... and Contract Clauses for Management and Operating Contracts 970.5223-4 Workplace Substance Abuse... 10 CFR part 707, Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE Sites, incorporated herein by...

  19. 48 CFR 970.5223-4 - Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE Sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Workplace Substance Abuse... and Contract Clauses for Management and Operating Contracts 970.5223-4 Workplace Substance Abuse... 10 CFR part 707, Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE Sites, incorporated herein by...

  20. 48 CFR 970.5223-4 - Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE Sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Workplace Substance Abuse... and Contract Clauses for Management and Operating Contracts 970.5223-4 Workplace Substance Abuse... 10 CFR part 707, Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE Sites, incorporated herein by...

  1. 48 CFR 970.5223-4 - Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE Sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Workplace Substance Abuse... and Contract Clauses for Management and Operating Contracts 970.5223-4 Workplace Substance Abuse... 10 CFR part 707, Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE Sites, incorporated herein by...

  2. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2013. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect

    2014-06-30

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2013 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, operation and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder reactor components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward environmental restoration and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Liquid metal research and development ended in 2002. Since May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV have been suspended by the DOE, but the environmental monitoring and characterization programs have continued. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2013 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling. Due to the suspension of D&D activities in Area IV, no effluents were released into the atmosphere during 2013. Therefore, the potential radiation dose to the general public through airborne release was zero. Similarly, the radiation dose to an offsite member of the public (maximally exposed individual) due to direct radiation from SSFL is indistinguishable from background. All radioactive wastes are processed for disposal at DOE disposal sites and/or other licensed sites approved by DOE for radioactive waste

  3. Guide to radiological accident considerations for siting and design of DOE nonreactor nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Elder, J.; Graf, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    DOE Office of Nuclear Safety has sponsored preparation of a guidance document to aid field offices and contractors in their analyses of consequences of postulated major accidents. The guide addresses the requirements of DOE Orders 5480.1A, Chapter V, and 6430.1, including the general requirement that DOE nuclear facilities be sited, designed, and operated in accordance with standards, codes, and guides consistent with those applied to comparable licensed nuclear facilities. The guide includes both philosophical and technical information in the areas of: siting guidelines doses applied to an offsite reference person; consideration also given to an onsite reference person; physical parameters, models, and assumptions to be applied when calculating doses for comparison to siting criteria; and potential accident consequences other than radiological dose to a reference person which might affect siting and major design features of the facility, such as environmental contamination, population dose, and associated public health effects. Recommendations and/or clarifications are provided where this could be done without adding new requirements. In this regard, the guide is considered a valuable aid to the safety analyst, especially where requirements have been subject to inconsistent interpretation or where analysis methods are in transition, such as use of dose model (ICRP 2 or ICRP 30) or use of probabilistic methods of risk analysis in the siting and design of nuclear facilities.

  4. Guide to radiological accident considerations for siting and design of DOE nonreactor nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Elder, J.C.; Graf, J.M.; Dewart, J.M.; Buhl, T.E.; Wenzel, W.J.; Walker, L.J.; Stoker, A.K.

    1986-01-01

    This guide was prepared to provide the experienced safety analyst with accident analysis guidance in greater detail than is possible in Department of Energy (DOE) Orders. The guide addresses analysis of postulated serious accidents considered in the siting and selection of major design features of DOE nuclear facilities. Its scope has been limited to radiological accidents at nonreactor nuclear facilities. The analysis steps addressed in the guide lead to evaluation of radiological dose to exposed persons for comparison with siting guideline doses. Other possible consequences considered are environmental contamination, population dose, and public health effects. Choices of models and parameters leading to estimation of source terms, release fractions, reduction and removal factors, dispersion and dose factors are discussed. Although requirements for risk analysis have not been established, risk estimates are finding increased use in siting of major nuclear facilities, and are discussed in the guide. 3 figs., 9 tabs.

  5. Geology Report: Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site DOE/Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2006-07-01

    Surficial geologic studies near the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) were conducted as part of a site characterization program. Studies included evaluation of the potential for future volcanism and Area 3 fault activity that could impact waste disposal operations at the Area 3 RWMS. Future volcanic activity could lead to disruption of the Area 3 RWMS. Local and regional studies of volcanic risk indicate that major changes in regional volcanic activity within the next 1,000 years are not likely. Mapped basalts of Paiute Ridge, Nye Canyon, and nearby Scarp Canyon are Miocene in age. There is a lack of evidence for post-Miocene volcanism in the subsurface of Yucca Flat, and the hazard of basaltic volcanism at the Area 3 RWMS, within the 1,000-year regulatory period, is very low and not a forseeable future event. Studies included a literature review and data analysis to evaluate unclassified published and unpublished information regarding the Area 3 and East Branch Area 3 faults mapped in Area 3 and southern Area 7. Two trenches were excavated along the Area 3 fault to search for evidence of near-surface movement prior to nuclear testing. Allostratigraphic units and fractures were mapped in Trenches ST02 and ST03. The Area 3 fault is a plane of weakness that has undergone strain resulting from stress imposed by natural events and underground nuclear testing. No major vertical displacement on the Area 3 fault since the Early Holocene, and probably since the Middle Pleistocene, can be demonstrated. The lack of major displacement within this time frame and minimal vertical extent of minor fractures suggest that waste disposal operations at the Area 3 RWMS will not be impacted substantially by the Area 3 fault, within the regulatory compliance period. A geomorphic surface map of Yucca Flat utilizes the recent geomorphology and soil characterization work done in adjacent northern Frenchman Flat. The approach taken was to adopt the map unit boundaries (line

  6. Challenges of docking in large, flexible and promiscuous binding sites.

    PubMed

    Kotev, Martin; Soliva, Robert; Orozco, Modesto

    2016-10-15

    After decades of work, the correct determination of the binding mode of a small molecule into a target protein is still a challenging problem, whose difficulty depends on: (i) the sizes of the binding site and the ligand; (ii) the flexibility of both interacting partners, and (iii) the differential solvation of bound and unbound partners. We have evaluated the performance of standard rigid(receptor)/flexible(ligand) docking approaches with respect to last-generation fully flexible docking methods to obtain reasonable poses in a very challenging case: soluble Epoxide Hydrolase (sEH), a flexible protein showing different binding sites. We found that full description of the flexibility of both protein and ligand and accurate description of solvation leads to significant improvement in the ability of docking to reproduce well known binding modes, and at the same time capture the intrinsic binding promiscuity of the protein. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Peanut lectin-binding sites in large bowel carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cooper, H S

    1982-10-01

    Peanut lectin is known to bind to B-D-Gal-(1 leads to 3)-D-GalNac which provides antigenic determination for the T (TAg) blood group antigen. We examined 33 rectosigmoid carcinomas and 15 corresponding controls for their ability to express peanut lectin-binding sites. In controls one could localize TAg to the supranuclear portion of the cell, however, in cancers one noticed a cytostructural relocalization of TAg with the following two major patterns: localization to the region of the glycocalyx and localization intracytoplasmically in the apical portion of the cell. These two patterns were associated with glandular differentiation. Less frequently noted or in association with the above was a mucin glob-like pattern and/or a fine diffuse intracytoplasmic pattern associated with solid, nonglandular areas. The more poorly differentiated cancers less frequently expressed peanut lectin-binding sites. Benign (nontransitional zone) epithelium in those patients whose tumor expressed TAg was negative for peanut lectin-binding sites in 66 per cent of the cases. Reduced tumoral glycosyltransferases may explain this increased synthesis of TAg in cancers as compared with controls, if one considers TAg to be an incomplete glycoprotein of the MN blood group system.

  8. Superfund: Focusing on the nation at large. A decade of progress at National Priorities List sites

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    The publication summarizes the progress made in hazardous site clean-up of sites on the National Priorities List (NPL). It also provides a state-by-state summary of 422 improved sites. 'Superfund: Focusing on the Nation at Large' is supplemented by individual State books which contain detailed information on all 1,236 NPL sites.

  9. Long-Term Prediction of Large Earthquakes: When Does Quasi-Periodic Behavior Occur?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sykes, L. R.

    2003-12-01

    I argue that the prediction of large earthquakes for time scales of a few decades is possible for a number of fault segments along transform and subduction plate boundaries. A key parameter in ascertaining if forecasting is feasible is the size of the coefficient of variation, CV, the standard deviation of inter-event times of large earthquakes that rupture all or most of a given fault segment divided by T, the average repeat time. I address only large events, ones that rupture all or most of the downdip width of the seismogenic zone where velocity-weakening behavior occurs. Historic and paleoseismic data indicate that the segment that ruptured in the great 1946 Nankaido, Japan, earthquake broke 9 times in the previous 1060 years yielding T=118 years and CV=0.16. The adjacent zone that broke in 1944 exhibits similar behavior as does the Copper River delta, the site of 8 paleoseismic events dated by Plafker and Rubin (1994) above the rupture zone of the 1964 Alaska earthquake. Lindh (preceding abstract) finds that many fault segments in California have similar small values of CV. Paleoseismic data for inter-event times at Pallet Creek and Wrightwood, however, indicate a large CV. Those sites at situated along the San Andreas fault near the end of the 1857 rupture zone where slip was much smaller than in the Carrizo plain, rupture in large events to the northwest and southeast overlap and deformation is multibranched as plate motion is transferred in part to the San Jacinto fault. Plate boundary slip is confined to narrow zones along the 1944 and 1946 segments of the Nankai trough but is more diffuse in the Tokai-Suruga Bay region where the Izu Peninsula is colliding with the rest of Honshu and repeat times appear to be longer (and CV perhaps is larger). Dates of uplifted terraces likely give repeat times of inter-plate thrust events that are too long and large estimates of CV since imbricate faults within the upper plate that generate terraces do not rupture in

  10. Sulfur-Modified Zero-Valent Iron for Remediation Applications at DOE Sites - 13600

    SciTech Connect

    Fogwell, Thomas W.; Santina, Pete

    2013-07-01

    municipal water treatment applications. Sulfur-modified iron has been found to not only be an extremely economical treatment technology for municipal water supplies, where very large quantities of water must be treated economically, but it has also been demonstrated to immobilize technetium. It has the added benefit of eliminating several other harmful chemicals in water supplies. These include arsenic and selenium. In one large-scale evaluation study an integrated system implemented chemical reduction of nitrate with sulfur-modified iron followed by filtration for arsenic removal. The sulfur-modified iron that was used was an iron-based granular medium that has been commercially developed for the removal of nitrate, co-contaminants including uranium, vanadium and chromium, and other compounds from water. The independent study concluded that 'It is foreseen that the greatest benefit of this technology (sulfur-modified iron) is that it does not produce a costly brine stream as do the currently accepted nitrate removal technologies of ion exchange and reverse osmosis. This investigation confirmed that nitrate reduction via sulfur-modified iron is independent of the hydraulic loading rate. Future sulfur-modified iron treatment systems can be designed without restriction of the reactor vessel dimensions. Future vessels can be adapted to existing site constraints without being limited to height-to-width ratios that would exist if nitrate reduction were to depend on hydraulic loading rate'. Sulfur-modified iron was studied by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for its effectiveness in the reduction and permanent sequestration of technetium. The testing was done using Hanford Site groundwater together with sediment. The report stated, 'Under reducing conditions, TcO{sub 4} is readily reduced to TcIV, which forms highly insoluble oxides such at TcO{sub 2}.nH{sub 2}O. However, (re)oxidation of TcIV oxides can lead to remobilization. Under sulfidogenic conditions, most

  11. Ecological assessments at DOE hazardous waste sites: Current procedures and problems

    SciTech Connect

    Hlohowskyj, I.; Krummel, J.R.; Irving, J.S.; Vinikour, W.S.

    1989-01-01

    Major actions at US Department of Energy (DOE) hazardous waste sites require CERCLA compliance that meets NEPA considerations. Although NEPA compliance includes ecological considerations, neither the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) nor the DOE provide detailed guidance for conducting ecological assessments under NEPA. However, the identification of the form and magnitude of potential ecological impacts associated with a proposed action is directly dependent on the quality of the baseline data available for a particular site. Using the Surplus Facilities Management Program Weldon Spring site as an example, we discuss the collection of baseline ecological data for the site. This site is surrounded by approximately 17,000 acres of wildlife area. Available wildlife data consisted of qualitative, county-level species lists, and vegetation data was in the form of a regional qualitative narrative. Detailed site-specific occurrence data for listed species and high quality natural communities was provided by the Missouri Department of Conservation Heritage data base. 30 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  12. ACCELERATING CLOSURE AT DOE SITES WITH EM'S SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, J.S.; Toussaint, Craig R., Ph.D.; Gardner, E.J.

    2003-02-27

    Technical support is important for all U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities facing difficult technical issues, aggressive remediation schedules, and tight budgets. It is especially vital for closure sites, which typically are smaller and have fewer resources available to apply to remediation activities. In many cases, closure sites and other small sites no longer have staff with the expertise required to overcome technical barriers on their own. As closure deadlines approach, special technical expertise is needed to identify, evaluate, and implement new and innovative approaches that will result in significant cost and schedule improvement for the waste disposition pathway. Site ''problem holders'' must have access to world-class scientific and engineering expertise from DOE national laboratories and research facilities, private industry, and universities to address immediate critical problems. In order to have confidence in the feasibility and results of innovative approaches, site contractors need to have the benefit of the valuable experiences of technicians who have faced similar problems and found solutions. The DOE Environmental Management (EM) Science and Technology (S&T) program recognizes the need of the closure sites to solve problems aggressively and is highly responsive to this need. Technical support from the S&T program can take many forms, such as providing expertise, reviewing the baseline, addressing a specific technical problem, evaluating commercially available technologies, or co-funding a high-risk alternative. This paper describes the approach by which closure sites are quickly and easily able to obtain technical support from the S&T program and provides examples of successfully completed and ongoing technical solutions activities.

  13. Raman Lidar Water Vapor Measurements at the DOE SGP CART Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, David N.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA/GSFC Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL) was deployed to the Department of Energy's (DOE) Cloud and Radiation Testbed site in northern Oklahoma September - December, 2000 for two DOE sponsored field campaigns: 1) the Water Vapor Intensive Operations Experiment 2000 and 2) the Atmospheric Radiations Measurement First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Experiment Experiment (AFWEX). WvIOP2000 focussed on water vapor measurements in the lower troposphere while AFWEX focussed on upper tropospheric water vapor. For the first time ever, four water vapor lidars were operated simultaneously: one airborne and three ground-based systems. Intercomparisons of these measurements and others will be presented at the meeting.

  14. Understanding the Subsurface Reactive Transport of Transuranic Contaminants at DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, Mark O.; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.; Saiers, James E.; Shuh, David K.

    2013-12-20

    Our primary hypothesis is that actinides can interact with surfaces in fundamentally different ways than other metals, metalloids, and oxyanions and that this fundamental difference requires new approaches to studying and modeling transuranic sorption to minerals and geomedia. This project supports a key mission of the SBR program to develop sufficient scientific understanding such that DOE sites will be able to incorporate coupled physical, chemical, and biological processes into decision making for environmental management and long-term stewardship, while also supporting DOE’s commitment to education, training, and collaboration with DOE user facilities.

  15. Summary of the environmental dose models used at DOE nuclear sites in 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Mueller, M.A.

    1982-09-01

    Methods for assessing public exposure to radiation from normal operations at DOE facilities are reviewed in this report. This review includes a summary of the methods used in 1979 as described in annual environmental reports submitted by Department of Energy (DOE) contractors. The methods used ranged from estimating public doses based on environmental measurements and comparison to the DOE concentration guides, to complex methods using environmental pathway modeling and estimated radionuclide releases. No two sites used the same combination of measurements and pathway models in their analysis. While most sites used an atmospheric dispersion model to predict air concentrations of radioactive material, only about half of the sites provided enough information about the model used to permit proper model evaluation. The waterborne pathways related to drinking water or ingestion of fish were generally well described, while the external exposure or terrestrial food pathways were often not considered. The major recommendation resulting from this review was that complete documentations of the models used should be included either within the annual reports or as separate readily available documents. In addition, most sites could make better use of graphics (i.e., tables and figures) to better communicate the findings of their analyses.

  16. Convective signals from surface measurements at DOE ARM Tropical Western Pacific sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Long, C. N.; Mather, J. H.

    2008-12-01

    Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) signals have been detected using highly sampled observations (1-minute resolution) from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) Manus and Nauru sites. With downwelling shortwave radiative fluxes and derived shortwave fractional sky cover, and the statistical tools of wavelet, cross wavelet, and spectrum power, we report finding major convective signals and their phase change from surface observations spanning the periods from 1996 to 2006 for Manus and from 1998 to 2006 for Nauru. Our findings are confirmed with the satellite-retrieved values of precipitation from the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) and interpolated outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) satellite measurements from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) for the same location and period, though these products inherently represent large spatial scale. During the 1997-98 strong El Niño years, the MJO signals over both sites are weak. This is consistent with our current understanding. Overall, the MJO signal is much stronger and more persistent over Manus than over Nauru. We further composite 21 MJO events spanning the extended boreal winter period (November through the following April) from 1996 to 2006 for the Manus site, chosen using the NOAA Climate Prediction Center's MJO index over 140E. We find a strong modulation of the diurnal cycle by the MJO over Manus. In particular, our major findings are: 1) Daily average cloudiness is in phase with the MJO peak while the diurnal amplitude is out of phase; 2) The peak MJO phase is associated with enhanced early morning and suppressed late afternoon deep convection; 3) The convective precipitation lags the enhanced cloudiness in the morning by 3-6 hours; 4) Strong pre- conditioning of low and mid-level cloudiness is detected at about a 5-day lead of the MJO peak; and 5) The surface westerly wind

  17. DOE standard guidelines for use of probabilistic seismic hazard curves at Department of Energy sites

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-28

    This Standard is intended to provide guidance in the use of the seismic hazard curves developed by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). Experience to-date has shown that application of these methodologies can yield significantly different results. In response to this issue, a Seismic Working Group (SWG) has been formed at the Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters to coordinate the application of these methodologies within DOE in a consistent manner. The position developed by the SWG and contained in this Standard is intended for immediate use in developing seismic hazard estimates at DOE sites for the evaluation of new and existing, nuclear and non-nuclear DOE facilities. This Standard is needed not only to address the LLNL/EPRI issue but also to assure that state-of-the-art seismic hazard methods are incorporated into DOE standards as soon as possible. The DOE is currently involved in a joint program with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and EPRI to evaluate these existing probabilistic seismic hazard methodologies and to develop recommendations for an improved methodology for the 1990`s. The final product of this effort is expected to result in more stable hazard estimates and will supersede this Standard in approximately two years.

  18. DOE KSU EV Site Operator Program. [United States Department of Energy (DOE) Kansas State University (KSU) Electric Vehicle (EV)

    SciTech Connect

    Hague, J.R.; Steinert, R.A.; Nissen-Pfrang, T.

    1992-01-01

    Kansas State University, with funding from federal, state, public, and private companies, is participating in the DOE Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program. Kansas State is demonstrating, testing, and evaluating electric of hybrid vehicle technology. This will provide organizations the opportunity to examine the latest EHV prototypes under actual operating conditions. KSU proposes to purchase one (1) electric or hybrid van and four(4) electric cars during the first two years of this five-year program. KSU has purchased one G-Van built by Conceptor Industries, Toronto, Canada and has initiated a procurement order to purchase two (2) Soleq 1992 Ford EVcort station wagons. This quarter's report describes ongoing public relations activities and meetings as well as presenting performance data for the electric vehicles. (GHH)

  19. D Webgis and Visualization Issues for Architectures and Large Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Amicis, R.; Conti, G.; Girardi, G.; Andreolli, M.

    2011-09-01

    Traditionally, within the field of archaeology and, more generally, within the cultural heritage domain, Geographical Information Systems (GIS) have been mostly used as support to cataloguing activities, essentially operating as gateways to large geo-referenced archives of specialised cultural heritage information. Additionally GIS have proved to be essential to help cultural heritage institutions improve management of their historical information, providing the means for detection of otherwise hard-to-discover spatial patterns, supporting with computation tools necessary to perform spatial clustering, proximity and orientation analysis. This paper presents a platform developed to answer to both the aforementioned issues, by allowing geo-referenced cataloguing of multi-media resources of cultural relevance as well as access, in a user-friendly manner, through an interactive 3D geobrowser which operates as single point of access to the available digital repositories. The solution has been showcased in the context of "Festival dell'economia" (the Fair of Economics) a major event recently occurred in Trento, Italy and it has allowed visitors of the event to interactively access an extremely large repository of information, as well as their metadata, available across the area of the Autonomous Province of Trento, in Italy. Within the event, an extremely large repository was made accessible, via the network, through web-services, from a 3D interactive geobrowser developed by the authors. The 3D scene was enriched with a number of Points of Interest (POIs) linking to information available within various databases. The software package was deployed with a complex hardware set-up composed of a large composite panoramic screen covering a horizontal field of view of 240 degrees.

  20. Solar site test module. [DOE/NASA solar heating and cooling demonstration installations

    SciTech Connect

    Kissel, R.R.; Scott, D.R.

    1980-07-01

    A solar site test module using the Rockwell AIM 65 micro-computer is described. The module is designed to work at any site where an IBM site data acquisition system (SDAS) is installed and is intended primarily as a troubleshooting tool for DOE/NASA commercial solar heating and cooling system demonstration installations. It collects sensor information (temperatures, flow rates, etc.) and displays or prints it immediately in calibrated engineering units. It will read one sensor on demand, periodically read up to 10 sensors or periodically read all sensors. Performance calculations can also be included with sensor data. Unattended operation is possible to, e.g., monitor a group of sensors once per hour. Work is underway to add a data acquisition system to the test module so that it can be used at sites which have no SDAS.

  1. Geographic Information System Tools for Management of US DOE Sites - 13489

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, Cliff; Pilz, Elaine; Pawel, Steve

    2013-07-01

    The DOE Office of Legacy Management (LM) uses a variety of GIS tools to support long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS and M) activities at DOE closure sites. These geo-spatial applications provide access to data both for external public viewing and for internal analysis and decision making. LM uses a custom geo-spatial application called geo-spatial Environmental Mapping System (GEMS) that draws validated information from a database of 4.6 million analytical results and 232,000 water level measurements for 58 LTS and M sites. These data were collected from transferred sites over a period of 40 years. The database is used to capture and store historical environmental information such as analytical chemistry data, groundwater depths and elevations, well logs, well construction data, geo-referenced boundaries, site physical features, and sampling locations from LTS and M sites. Stakeholders, regulators, and project personnel can use this Web-based application and data to display information in several forms, such as a tabular report, a graph, and a geo-spatial display, or the data can be labeled or highlighted in a map view. Institutional controls, with their LTS and M requirements and documentation, have recently been incorporated into a prototype GEMS Web page for the Weldon Spring, Missouri, Site. LM uses multiple internal GIS viewers to help ensure the future protection of human health and the environment. For example, at the Rocky Flats, Colorado, Site, LM uses a GIS application to display real property interests on authoritative maps. Another project is used to facilitate discussions at stakeholder meetings for the Rocky Flats site's Original Landfill. The Uranium Leasing Program uses multiple interactive maps that assist in ongoing monitoring and the oversight of lease-holders' activities. (authors)

  2. Trade-offs between worker risk and public risk during remediation at DOE sites

    SciTech Connect

    Beam, B.N.; Morris, J.; Blaylock, B.; Travis, C.

    1995-06-01

    Within the next 30 years, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration Program will be responsible for remediating thousands of waste sites across the DOE complex. A major concern during remediation will be the protection of thousands of workers engaged in the remediation. In addition to well know safety hazards associated with conventional construction operations, remedial workers at DOE will encounter radiation and chemical exposures from radioactive, hazardous, and mixed waste. Although historically represented as minimal due to a paucity of data related to worker exposures during remediation, potential worker health risk is an important factor that must be taken into account in the selection of remedial strategies, and the potential risk reduction offered by a remedial strategy must be weighed against the potential worker risk incurred during its implementation. Analysis has shown a trend that the worker risk incurred outweighs,the benefits of risk reduction to the public.

  3. Synchronization of the DOE/NASA 100-kilowatt wind turbine generator with a large utility network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, L. J.

    1977-01-01

    The DOE/NASA 100 kilowatt wind turbine generator system was synchronized with a large utility network. The system equipments and procedures associated with the synchronization process were described. Time history traces of typical synchronizations were presented indicating that power and current transients resulting from the synchronizing procedure are limited to acceptable magnitudes.

  4. Gas release from the LUSI eruption site: large scale estimates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciarra, A.; Mazzini, A.; Etiope, G.; Husein, A.; Hadi, S.

    2015-12-01

    The spectacular Indonesian Lusi mud eruption started in May 2006 following to a 6.3 M earthquake striking the island of Java. Previous studies investigated the mechanisms of reactivation of the Watukosek fault system that crosses Lusi locality and continues to the NE of Java. Results show that the quake triggered lateral movement of this strike-slip system resulting in several aligned eruptions sites including Lusi. Geochemical studies of the erupted fluids reveal a mantle signature and point to a connection with the neighboring Arjuno-Welirang volcanic complex indicating that Lusi is a sedimentary hosted geothermal system. In order to better understand 1) the geometry of the Lusi subsurface plumbing system, 2) to estimate the type and the amount of gas released, and 3) how tectonic structures may control this activity, we conducted a comprehensive survey around the Lusi crater. We sampled more than 60 seepage sites to analyze the composition of the gas released and conducted a flux measurements survey of over 350 stations (CO2 and CH4). In addition we completed three CO2, CH4, radon profiles (120 points) perpendicular to the NE-SW oriented Watukosek strike-slip fault system and complemented that with geoelectric surveys. Results show that the whole area is characterized by diffused gas release through seeps, fractures, microfractures and soil degassing. Overall the highest gas flux were recorded at stations crossing the fractured zones that coincide with the position of the Watukosek fault system. The fractures release mainly CO2 (with peaks up to 400 g/m2day) and display higher temperatures (up to 41°C). This main shear zone is populated by numerous seeps that expel mostly CH4. Flux measurements in the seeping pools reveal that φCO2 is an order of magnitude higher than that measured in the fractures, and two orders of magnitude for φCH4. Radon measurements vary from 30 and 90 Bq/m3 on the edges of the study area to 6000 Bq/m3in the proximity of the faulted

  5. Activation of phenylalanine hydroxylase by phenylalanine does not require binding in the active site.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Kenneth M; Khan, Crystal A; Hinck, Cynthia S; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2014-12-16

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PheH), a liver enzyme that catalyzes the hydroxylation of excess phenylalanine in the diet to tyrosine, is activated by phenylalanine. The lack of activity at low levels of phenylalanine has been attributed to the N-terminus of the protein's regulatory domain acting as an inhibitory peptide by blocking substrate access to the active site. The location of the site at which phenylalanine binds to activate the enzyme is unknown, and both the active site in the catalytic domain and a separate site in the N-terminal regulatory domain have been proposed. Binding of catecholamines to the active-site iron was used to probe the accessibility of the active site. Removal of the regulatory domain increases the rate constants for association of several catecholamines with the wild-type enzyme by ∼2-fold. Binding of phenylalanine in the active site is effectively abolished by mutating the active-site residue Arg270 to lysine. The k(cat)/K(phe) value is down 10⁴ for the mutant enzyme, and the K(m) value for phenylalanine for the mutant enzyme is >0.5 M. Incubation of the R270K enzyme with phenylalanine also results in a 2-fold increase in the rate constants for catecholamine binding. The change in the tryptophan fluorescence emission spectrum seen in the wild-type enzyme upon activation by phenylalanine is also seen with the R270K mutant enzyme in the presence of phenylalanine. Both results establish that activation of PheH by phenylalanine does not require binding of the amino acid in the active site. This is consistent with a separate allosteric site, likely in the regulatory domain.

  6. Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power DOE Operations annual site environmental report 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, K.S.

    1998-11-23

    This annual report discusses environmental monitoring at two manufacturing and test sites operated in the Los Angeles area by Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power of Boeing North American, Inc. These are identified as Area 4 of the SSFL and the De Soto site. These sites have been used for research and development (R and D), engineering, and testing in a broad range of technical fields primarily in energy research and nuclear reactor technology. The De Soto site had research and development laboratories involved with nuclear research. This work was terminated in 1995 and only D and D activities will have potential for impact on the environment. Since 1956, Area 4 has been used for work with nuclear materials, including fabricating nuclear reactor fuels, testing nuclear reactors, and dissembling used fuel elements. This work ended in 1988 and subsequent efforts have been directed toward decommissioning and decontamination of the former nuclear facilities. The primary purpose of this report is to present information on environmental and effluent monitoring of DOE-sponsored activities to the regulatory agencies responsible for oversight. Information presented here concentrates on Area 4 at SSFL, which is the only area at SSFL where DOE operations were performed.

  7. TECHNICAL ASSESSMENT OF FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION FOR TANK WASTE PRETREATMENT AT THE DOE HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect

    HAMILTON, D.W.

    2006-01-03

    Radioactive wastes from one hundred seventy-seven underground storage tanks in the 200 Area of the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State will be retrieved, treated and stored either on site or at an approved off-site repository. DOE is currently planning to separate the wastes into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, which would be treated and permanently disposed in separate facilities. A significant volume of the wastes in the Hanford tanks is currently classified as medium Curie waste, which will require separation and treatment at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). Because of the specific challenges associated with treating this waste stream, DOE EM-21 funded a project to investigate the feasibility of using fractional crystallization as a supplemental pretreatment technology. The two process requirements for fractional crystallization to be successfully applied to Hanford waste include: (1) evaporation of water from the aqueous solution to enrich the activity of soluble {sup 137}Cs, resulting in a higher activity stream to be sent to the WTP, and (2) separation of the crystalline salts that are enriched in sodium, carbonate, sulfate, and phosphate and sufficiently depleted in {sup 137}Cs, to produce a second stream to be sent to Bulk Vitrification. Phase I of this project has just been completed by COGEMA/Georgia Institute of Technology. The purpose of this report is to document an independent expert review of the Phase I results with recommendations for future testing. A team of experts with significant experience at both the Hanford and Savannah River Sites was convened to conduct the review at Richland, Washington the week of November 14, 2005.

  8. Geothermal well site restoration and plug and abandonment of wells, DOE Gladys McCall test site, Cameron Parish, Louisiana and DOE Willis Hulin test site, Vermillion Parish, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Rinehart, Ben N.

    1994-08-01

    A report is presented on the final phase of an energy research program conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) involving two geothermal well sites in the State of Louisiana--the Gladys McCall site and the Willis Hulin site. The research program was intended to improve geothermal technology and to determine the efficacy of producing electricity commercially from geopressured resource sites. The final phase of the program consisted of plug and abandonment (P&A) of the wells and restoration of the well sites. Restoration involved (a) initial soil and water sampling and analysis; (b) removal and disposal of well pads, concrete, utility poles, and trash; (c) plugging of monitor and freshwater wells; and (d) site leveling and general cleanup. Restoration of the McCall site required removal of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM), which was costly and time-consuming. Exhibits are included that provide copies of work permits and authorizations, P&A reports, and cost and salvage reports. Site locations, grid maps, and photographs are provided.

  9. Uranium-Bearing Evaporite Mineralization Influencing Plume Persistence. Literature Review and DOE-LM Site Surveys

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2016-05-01

    This report on evaporite mineralization was completed as an Ancillary Work Plan for the Applied Studies and Technology program under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM). This study reviews all LM sites under Title I and Title II of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) and one Decontamination and Decommissioning site to provide (1) a summary of which sites have evaporite deposits, (2) any available quantitative geochemical and mineralogical analyses, and (3) references to relevant reports. In this study, “evaporite” refers to any secondary mineral precipitate that occurs due to a loss of water through evaporative processes. This includes efflorescent salt crusts, where this term refers to a migration of dissolved constituents to the surface with a resulting salt crust, where “salt” can refer to any secondary precipitate, regardless of constituents. The potential for the formation of evaporites at LM sites has been identified, and may have relevance to plume persistence issues. Evaporite deposits have the potential to concentrate and store contaminants at LM sites that could later be re-released. These deposits can also provide a temporary storage mechanism for carbonate, chloride, and sulfate salts along with uranium and other contaminants of concern (COCs). Identification of sites with evaporites will be used in a new technical task plan (TTP), Persistent Secondary Contaminant Sources (PeSCS), for any proposed additional sampling and analyses. This additional study is currently under development and will focus on determining if the dissolution of evaporites has the potential to hinder natural flushing strategies and impact plume persistence. This report provides an initial literature review on evaporites followed by details for each site with identified evaporites. The final summary includes a table listing of all relevant LM sites regardless of evaporite identification.

  10. Site Release Reports for C-Well Pipeline, UE-25 Large Rocks Test Site, and 29 GSF Test Pits

    SciTech Connect

    K.E. Rasmuson

    2002-04-02

    The U.S. Department of Energy has implemented a program to reclaim lands disturbed by site characterization at Yucca Mountain. Long term goals of the program are to re-establish processes on disturbed sites that will lead to self-sustaining plant communities. The Biological Opinion for Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Studies required that the U.S. Department of Energy develop a Reclamation Standards and Monitoring Plan to evaluate the success of reclamation efforts. According to the Reclamation Standards and Monitoring Plan, reclaimed sites will be monitored periodically, remediated if necessary, and eventually compared to an appropriate reference area to determine whether reclamation goals have been achieved and the site can be released from further monitoring. Plant cover, density, and species richness (success parameters) on reclaimed sites are compared to 60 percent of the values (success criteria) for the same parameters on the reference area. Small sites (less than 0.1 ha) are evaluated for release using qualitative methods while large sites (greater than 0.1 ha) are evaluated using quantitative methods. In the summer of 2000, 31 small sites reclaimed in 1993 and 1994 were evaluated for reclamation success and potential release from further monitoring. Plant density, cover, and species richness were estimated on the C-Well Pipeline, UE-25 Large Rocks test site, and 29 ground surface facility test pits. Evidence of erosion, reproduction and natural recruitment, exotic species abundance, and animal use (key attributes) also were recorded for each site and used in success evaluations. The C-Well Pipeline and ground surface facility test pits were located in a ''Larrea tridentata - Ephedra nevadensis'' vegetation association while the UE-25 Large Rocks test site was located in an area dominated by ''Coleogyne ramosissima and Ephedra nevadensis''. Reference areas in the same vegetation associations with similar slope and aspect were chosen for comparison to

  11. Mortality of older construction and craft workers employed at Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear sites.

    PubMed

    Dement, John M; Ringen, Knut; Welch, Laura S; Bingham, Eula; Quinn, Patricia

    2009-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) established medical screening programs at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation, Oak Ridge Reservation, the Savannah River Site, and the Amchitka site starting in 1996. Workers participating in these programs have been followed to determine their vital status and mortality experience through December 31, 2004. A cohort of 8,976 former construction workers from Hanford, Savannah River, Oak Ridge, and Amchitka was followed using the National Death Index through December 31, 2004, to ascertain vital status and causes of death. Cause-specific standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were calculated based on US death rates. Six hundred and seventy-four deaths occurred in this cohort and overall mortality was slightly less than expected (SMR = 0.93, 95% CI = 0.86-1.01), indicating a "healthy worker effect." However, significantly excess mortality was observed for all cancers (SMR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.13-1.45), lung cancer (SMR = 1.54, 95% CI = 1.24-1.87), mesothelioma (SMR = 5.93, 95% CI = 2.56-11.68), and asbestosis (SMR = 33.89, 95% CI = 18.03-57.95). Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was in excess at Oak Ridge and multiple myeloma was in excess at Hanford. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was significantly elevated among workers at the Savannah River Site (SMR = 1.92, 95% CI = 1.02-3.29). DOE construction workers at these four sites were found to have significantly excess risk for combined cancer sites included in the Department of Labor' Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program (EEOCIPA). Asbestos-related cancers were significantly elevated. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Does site specific labeling of sextant biopsy cores predict the site of extracapsular extension in radical prostatectomy surgical specimen.

    PubMed

    Taneja, S S; Penson, D F; Epelbaum, A; Handler, T; Lepor, H

    1999-10-01

    cores and base position of the positive biopsy as the most predictive variables for the site of extracapsular extension. When submitting biopsy specimens by individually labeled core or right versus left core, the positive predictive value of an individual positive core for the location of extracapsular extension is not sufficient to guide the surgical decision to spare or excise a neurovascular bundle. Therefore, the clinical information provided by individually labeled or right versus left core labeling does not justify the increased associated costs.

  13. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2009. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ning; Rutherford, Phil; Amar, Ravnesh

    2010-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2009 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder reactor components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Liquid metal research and development ended in 2002. Since May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV have been suspended by the DOE, but the environmental monitoring and characterization programs have continued. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2009 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling.

  14. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2011. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ning; Rutherford, Phil; Dassler, David

    2012-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2011 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, operation and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder reactor components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward environmental restoration and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Liquid metal research and development ended in 2002. Since May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV have been suspended by the DOE, but the environmental monitoring and characterization programs have continued. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2011 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling.

  15. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2008. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ning; Rutherford, Phil; Amar, Ravnesh

    2009-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2008 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder reactor components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988; all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. In May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV were suspended by the DOE. The environmental monitoring programs were continued throughout the year. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2008 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling.

  16. Site Environmental Report For Calendar Year 2012. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ning; Rutherford, Phil; Dassler, David

    2013-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2012 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, operation and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder reactor components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward environmental restoration and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Liquid metal research and development ended in 2002. Since May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV have been suspended by the DOE, but the environmental monitoring and characterization programs have continued. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2012 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling.

  17. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2010. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ning; Rutherford, Phil; Amar, Ravnesh

    2011-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2010 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder reactor components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Liquid metal research and development ended in 2002. Since May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV have been suspended by the DOE, but the environmental monitoring and characterization programs have continued. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2010 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling.

  18. Removal of Potential Phosphorylation Sites does not Alter Creatine Transporter Response to PKC or Substrate Availability.

    PubMed

    Santacruz, Lucia; Darrabie, Marcus D; Mishra, Rajashree; Jacobs, Danny O

    2015-01-01

    Creatine, Phosphocreatine, and creatine kinases, constitute an energy shuttle that links ATP production in mitochondria with cellular consumption sites. Myocytes and neurons cannot synthesize creatine and depend on uptake across the cell membrane by a specialized transporter to maintain intracellular creatine levels. Although recent studies have improved our understanding of creatine transport in cardiomyocytes, the structural elements underlying the creatine transporter protein regulation and the relevant intracellular signaling processes are unknown. The effects of pharmacological activation of kinases or phosphatases on creatine transport in cardiomyocytes in culture were evaluated. Putative phosphorylation sites in the creatine transporter protein were identified by bioinformatics analyses, and ablated using site-directed mutagenesis. Mutant transporter function and their responses to pharmacological PKC activation or changes in creatine availability in the extracellular environment, were evaluated. PKC activation decreases creatine transport in cardiomyocytes in culture. Elimination of high probability potential phosphorylation sites did not abrogate responses to PKC activation or substrate availability. Modulation of creatine transport in cardiomyocytes is a complex process where phosphorylation at predicted sites in the creatine transporter protein does not significantly alter activity. Instead, non-classical structural elements in the creatine transporter and/or interactions with regulatory subunits may modulate its activity. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Seismic design spectra 200 West and East Areas DOE Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Tallman, A.M.

    1995-12-31

    This document presents equal hazard response spectra for the W236A project for the 200 East and West new high-level waste tanks. The hazard level is based upon WHC-SD-W236A-TI-002, Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis, DOE Hanford Site, Washington. Spectral acceleration amplification is plotted with frequency (Hz) for horizontal and vertical motion and attached to this report. The vertical amplification is based upon the preliminary draft revision of Standard ASCE 4-86. The vertical spectral acceleration is equal to the horizontal at frequencies above 3.3Hz because of near-field, less than 15 km, sources.

  20. DOE Research Set-Aside Areas of the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, C.E.; Janecek, L.L.

    1997-08-31

    Designated as the first of seven National Environmental Research Parks (NERPs) by the Atomic Energy Commission (now the Department of Energy), the Savannah River Site (SRS) is an important ecological component of the Southeastern Mixed Forest Ecoregion located along the Savannah River south of Aiken, South Carolina. Integral to the Savannah River Site NERP are the DOE Research Set-Aside Areas. Scattered across the SRS, these thirty tracts of land have been set aside for ecological research and are protected from public access and most routine Site maintenance and forest management activities. Ranging in size from 8.5 acres (3.44 ha) to 7,364 acres (2,980 ha), the thirty Set-Aside Areas total 14,005 acres (5,668 ha) and comprise approximately 7% of the Site`s total area. This system of Set-Aside Areas originally was established to represent the major plant communities and habitat types indigenous to the SRS (old-fields, sandhills, upland hardwood, mixed pine/hardwood, bottomland forests, swamp forests, Carolina bays, and fresh water streams and impoundments), as well as to preserve habitats for endangered, threatened, or rare plant and animal populations. Many long-term ecological studies are conducted in the Set-Asides, which also serve as control areas in evaluations of the potential impacts of SRS operations on other regions of the Site. The purpose of this document is to give an historical account of the SRS Set-Aside Program and to provide a descriptive profile of each of the Set-Aside Areas. These descriptions include a narrative for each Area, information on the plant communities and soil types found there, lists of sensitive plants and animals documented from each Area, an account of the ecological research conducted in each Area, locator and resource composition maps, and a list of Site-Use permits and publications associated with each Set-Aside.

  1. Common fragile site profiling in epithelial and erythroid cells reveals that most recurrent cancer deletions lie in fragile sites hosting large genes.

    PubMed

    Le Tallec, Benoît; Millot, Gaël Armel; Blin, Marion Esther; Brison, Olivier; Dutrillaux, Bernard; Debatisse, Michelle

    2013-08-15

    Cancer genomes exhibit numerous deletions, some of which inactivate tumor suppressor genes and/or correspond to unstable genomic regions, notably common fragile sites (CFSs). However, 70%-80% of recurrent deletions cataloged in tumors remain unexplained. Recent findings that CFS setting is cell-type dependent prompted us to reevaluate the contribution of CFS to cancer deletions. By combining extensive CFS molecular mapping and a comprehensive analysis of CFS features, we show that the pool of CFSs for all human cell types consists of chromosome regions with genes over 300 kb long, and different subsets of these loci are committed to fragility in different cell types. Interestingly, we find that transcription of large genes does not dictate CFS fragility. We further demonstrate that, like CFSs, cancer deletions are significantly enriched in genes over 300 kb long. We now provide evidence that over 50% of recurrent cancer deletions originate from CFSs associated with large genes.

  2. Interim Safe Storage of Plutonium Production Reactors at the US DOE Hanford Site - 13438

    SciTech Connect

    Schilperoort, Daryl L.; Faulk, Darrin

    2013-07-01

    Nine plutonium production reactors located on DOE's Hanford Site are being placed into an Interim Safe Storage (ISS) period that extends to 2068. The Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for ISS [1] was completed in 1993 and proposed a 75-year storage period that began when the EIS was finalized. Remote electronic monitoring of the temperature and water level alarms inside the safe storage enclosure (SSE) with visual inspection inside the SSE every 5 years are the only planned operational activities during this ISS period. At the end of the ISS period, the reactor cores will be removed intact and buried in a landfill on the Hanford Site. The ISS period allows for radioactive decay of isotopes, primarily Co-60 and Cs-137, to reduce the dose exposure during disposal of the reactor cores. Six of the nine reactors have been placed into ISS by having an SSE constructed around the reactor core. (authors)

  3. Pacific Northwest Laboratory FY 1993 Site Maintenance Plan for maintenance of DOE nonnuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Bright, J.D.

    1992-09-28

    This Site Maintenance Plan has been developed for Pacific Northwest Laboratory's (PNL) Nonnuclear Facilities. It is based on requirements specified by US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 4330.4A, Chapter I, Change No. 4. The objective of this maintenance plan is to provide baseline information for compliance to the DOE Order 4330.4A, to identify needed improvements, and to document the planned maintenance budget for Fiscal Year (FY) 1993 and to estimate maintenance budgets for FY 1994 and FY 1995 for all PNL facilities. Using the results of the self-assessment, PNL has selected 12 of the 36 elements of the Maintenance Program defined by DOE Order 4330.4A, Chapter I, for improvement. The elements selected for improvement are: Facility Condition Inspections; Work Request (Order) System; Formal Job Planning and Estimating; Work Performance (Time) Standards; Priority System; Maintenance Procedures and Other Work-Related Documents; Scheduling System; Post Maintenance Testing; Backlog Work Control; Equipment Repair History and Vendor Information; Work Sampling; and Identification and Control. Based upon a graded approach and current funding, those elements considered most important have been selected as goals for earliest compliance. Commitment dates for these elements have been established for compliance. The remaining elements of noncompliance will be targeted for implementation during later budget periods.

  4. Pacific Northwest Laboratory FY 1993 Site Maintenance Plan for maintenance of DOE nonnuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Bright, J.D.

    1992-09-28

    This Site Maintenance Plan has been developed for Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s (PNL) Nonnuclear Facilities. It is based on requirements specified by US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 4330.4A, Chapter I, Change No. 4. The objective of this maintenance plan is to provide baseline information for compliance to the DOE Order 4330.4A, to identify needed improvements, and to document the planned maintenance budget for Fiscal Year (FY) 1993 and to estimate maintenance budgets for FY 1994 and FY 1995 for all PNL facilities. Using the results of the self-assessment, PNL has selected 12 of the 36 elements of the Maintenance Program defined by DOE Order 4330.4A, Chapter I, for improvement. The elements selected for improvement are: Facility Condition Inspections; Work Request (Order) System; Formal Job Planning and Estimating; Work Performance (Time) Standards; Priority System; Maintenance Procedures and Other Work-Related Documents; Scheduling System; Post Maintenance Testing; Backlog Work Control; Equipment Repair History and Vendor Information; Work Sampling; and Identification and Control. Based upon a graded approach and current funding, those elements considered most important have been selected as goals for earliest compliance. Commitment dates for these elements have been established for compliance. The remaining elements of noncompliance will be targeted for implementation during later budget periods.

  5. Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power DOE operations annual site environmental report 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Tuttle, R.J.

    1997-11-10

    Rocketdyne currently operates several facilities in the San Fernando Valley/Simi Valley area, for manufacturing, testing, and research and development (R and D). These operations include manufacturing liquid-fueled rocket engines, such as the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) and engines used for expendable launch vehicles used to place artificial satellites into orbit. This work includes fabrication and testing of rocket engines, lasers, and heat-transfer systems; and R and D in a wide range of high-technology fields, such as the electrical power system for the Space Station. Previously, this work also included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials, under the Atomics International Division (AI). AI was merged into Rocketdyne in 1984 and many of the AI functions were transferred to existing Rocketdyne departments. This nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and subsequently, all radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the previously used nuclear facilities and associated site areas. The majority of this work is done for the Department of Energy (DOE). This Annual Site Environmental Report for 1996 concentrates on the environmental conditions related to DOE operations at Area IV of SSFL and at De Soto.

  6. DEMONSTRATiON OF A SUBSURFACE CONTAINMENT SYSTEM FOR INSTALLATION AT DOE WASTE SITES

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas J. Crocker; Verna M. Carpenter

    2003-05-21

    Between 1952 and 1970, DOE buried mixed waste in pits and trenches that now have special cleanup needs. The disposal practices used decades ago left these landfills and other trenches, pits, and disposal sites filled with three million cubic meters of buried waste. This waste is becoming harmful to human safety and health. Today's cleanup and waste removal is time-consuming and expensive with some sites scheduled to complete cleanup by 2006 or later. An interim solution to the DOE buried waste problem is to encapsulate and hydraulically isolate the waste with a geomembrane barrier and monitor the performance of the barrier over its 50-yr lifetime. The installed containment barriers would isolate the buried waste and protect groundwater from pollutants until final remediations are completed. The DOE has awarded a contract to RAHCO International, Inc.; of Spokane, Washington; to design, develop, and test a novel subsurface barrier installation system, referred to as a Subsurface Containment System (SCS). The installed containment barrier consists of commercially available geomembrane materials that isolates the underground waste, similar to the way a swimming pools hold water, without disrupting hazardous material that was buried decades ago. The barrier protects soil and groundwater from contamination and effectively meets environmental cleanup standards while reducing risks, schedules, and costs. Constructing the subsurface containment barrier uses a combination of conventional and specialized equipment and a unique continuous construction process. This innovative equipment and construction method can construct a 1000-ft-long X 34-ft-wide X 30-ft-deep barrier at construction rates to 12 Wday (8 hr/day operation). Life cycle costs including RCRA cover and long-term monitoring range from approximately $380 to $590/cu yd of waste contained or $100 to $160/sq ft of placed barrier based upon the subsurface geology surrounding the waste. Project objectives for Phase I

  7. Design and construction of deinococcus radiodurans for biodegradation of organic toxins at radioactive DOE waste sites. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, M.J.; Wackett, L.P.; Minton, K.W.

    1998-06-01

    'A 1992 survey of DOE waste sites indicates that about 32% of soils and 45% of groundwaters at these sites contain radionuclides and metals plus an organic toxin class. The most commonly reported combinations of these hazardous compounds being radionuclides and metals (e.g., U, Pu, Cs, Pb, Cr, As) plus chlorinated hydrocarbons (e.g., trichloroethylene), fuel hydrocarbons (e.g., toluene), or polychlorinated biphenyls (e.g., Arochlor 1248). These wastes are some of the most hazardous pollutants and pose an increasing risk to human health as they leach into the environment. The objective of this research is to develop novel organisms, that are highly resistant to radiation and the toxic effects of metals and radionuclides, for in-situ bioremediation of organic toxins. Few organisms exist that are able to remediate such environmental organic pollutants, and among those that can, the bacteria belonging to the genus Pseudomonas are the most characterized. Unfortunately, these bacteria are very radiation sensitive. For example, Pseudomonas spp. is even more sensitive than Escherichia coli and, thus, is not suitable as a bioremediation host in environments subjected to radiation. By contrast, D. radiodurans, a natural soil bacterium, is the most radiation resistant organism yet discovered; it is several thousand times more resistant to ionizing radiation than Pseudomonas. The sophisticated gene transfer and expression systems the authors have developed for D. radiodurans over the last eight years make this organism an ideal candidate for high-level expression of genes that degrade organic toxins, in radioactive environments. The authors ultimate aim is to develop organisms and approaches that will be useful for remediating the large variety of toxic organic compounds found in DOE waste sites that are too radioactive to support other bioremediation organisms. This report summarizes work after the first 6 months of a 3-year project.'

  8. US Department of Energy DOE Nevada Operations Office, Nevada Test Site: Underground safety and health standards

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The Nevada Test Site Underground Safety and Health Standards Working Group was formed at the direction of John D. Stewart, Director, Nevada Test Site Office in April, 1990. The objective of the Working Group was to compile a safety and health standard from the California Tunnel Safety Orders and OSHA for the underground operations at the NTS, (excluding Yucca Mountain). These standards are called the NTS U/G Safety and Health Standards. The Working Group submits these standards as a RECOMMENDATION to the Director, NTSO. Although the Working Group considers these standards to be the most integrated and comprehensive standards that could be developed for NTS Underground Operations, the intent is not to supersede or replace any relevant DOE orders. Rather the intent is to collate the multiple safety and health references contained in DOE Order 5480.4 that have applicability to NTS Underground Operations into a single safety and heath standard to be used in the underground operations at the NTS. Each portion of the standard was included only after careful consideration by the Working Group and is judged to be both effective and appropriate. The specific methods and rationale used by the Working Group are outlined as follows: The letter from DOE/HQ, dated September 28, 1990 cited OSHA and the CTSO as the safety and health codes applicable to underground operations at the NTS. These mandated codes were each originally developed to be comprehensive, i.e., all underground operations of a particular type (e.g., tunnels in the case of the CTSO) were intended to be adequately regulated by the appropriate code. However, this is not true; the Working Group found extensive and confusing overlap in the codes in numerous areas. Other subjects and activities were addressed by the various codes in cursory fashion or not at all.

  9. US DOE-EM On-Site Disposal Cell Working Group - Fostering Communication On Performance Assessment Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Seitz, Roger R.; Suttora, Linda C.; Phifer, Mark

    2014-03-01

    On-site disposal cells are in use and being considered at several U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) sites as the final disposition for large amounts of waste associated with cleanup of contaminated areas and facilities. These facilities are typically developed with regulatory oversight from States and/or the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) in addition to USDOE. The facilities are developed to meet design standards for disposal of hazardous waste as well as the USDOE performance based standards for disposal of radioactive waste. The involvement of multiple and different regulators for facilities across separate sites has resulted in some differences in expectations for performance assessments and risk assessments (PA/RA) that are developed for the disposal facilities. The USDOE-EM Office of Site Restoration formed a working group to foster improved communication and sharing of information for personnel associated with these Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) disposal cells and work towards more consistent assumptions, as appropriate, for technical and policy considerations related to performance and risk assessments in support of a Record of Decision and Disposal Authorization Statement. The working group holds teleconferences, as needed, focusing on specific topics of interest. The topics addressed to date include an assessment of the assumptions used for performance assessments and risk assessments (PA/RAs) for on-site disposal cells, requirements and assumptions related to assessment of inadvertent intrusion, DOE Manual 435.1-1 requirements, and approaches for consideration of the long-term performance of liners and covers in the context of PAs. The working group has improved communication among the staff and oversight personnel responsible for onsite disposal cells and has provided a forum to identify and resolve common concerns.

  10. Spectroelectrochemical Sensor for Pertechnetate Applicable to Hanford and Other DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Heineman, William R.; Seliskar, Carl J.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Hubler, Timothy L.

    2009-09-28

    During the period of this grant several significant milestones have been passed pursuant to designing a fluorescence sensor for pertechnetate (TcO4-). They are as follows: Fluorescence spectroelectrochemistry and less than picomolar limit of detection for a model non-radioactive analyte have been demonstrated. The spectroelectrochemical sensor and associated instrumentation for fluorescence mode of operation have been made, are portable, and easily transported to and used at DOE sites. The sensor has sufficient selectivity for its application to complex samples, even including tank waste, that exist at DOE sites such as the Hanford Site. Pertechnetate has been preconcentrated in sensor films and electrochemically reduced. This is the first critical step in operation of a spectroelectrochemical sensor for TcO4-. New Tc complexes have been made that fluoresce and these complexes have been preconcentrated and electrochemically modulated in a sensor film leading to fluorescence modulation, which is the second critical step in operation of the spectroelectrochemical sensor for TcO4-. We have determined that fluorescence offers a means of dramatically improving the limit of detection. Based on measurements on our new fluorescent complexes of Tc, we estimate the limit of detection for the sensor to be 5 x 10-12M. In related work, we have shown that the sensitivity of the spectroelectrochemical sensor for some metal cations can be improved by forming a metal complex with better optical and electrochemical properties. In addition, some heavy metals can be detected with the spectroelectrochemical sensor by depositing them directly as metals on the sensor surface.

  11. Does Preoperative Bowel Preparation Reduce Surgical Site Infections During Elective Ventral Hernia Repair?

    PubMed

    Krpata, David M; Haskins, Ivy N; Phillips, Sharon; Prabhu, Ajita S; Rosenblatt, Steven; Poulose, Benjamin K; Rosen, Michael J

    2017-02-01

    To date, little is known about the benefits of preoperative bowel preparation in patients undergoing elective ventral hernia repair (VHR). The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of preoperative bowel preparation on 30-day wound events in patients undergoing elective VHR using the Americas Hernia Society Quality Collaborative (AHSQC). All patients undergoing elective VHR from January 2013 through January 2016 were identified within the AHSQC. Patients undergoing emergency VHR and those with a CDC wound class IV were excluded from our analysis. Patients were divided into 2 groups: Clean (CDC wound class I) and Contaminated (CDC wound classes II and III). The association of preoperative bowel preparation with 30-day wound events was investigated using logistic regression modeling. A total of 3,709 patients met inclusion criteria; 3,101 (83.6%) had CDC wound class I, and 608 (16.4%) had CDC wound classes II or III. Within the Clean group, patients who underwent preoperative bowel preparation were significantly more likely to experience a surgical site infection (SSI), surgical site occurrence (SSO), and surgical site occurrence requiring procedural intervention (SSOPI). Within the Contaminated group, patients who underwent preoperative bowel preparation were significantly more likely to experience an SSOPI. The use of preoperative bowel preparation in patients undergoing elective VHR does not reduce the risk of 30-day wound events. Copyright © 2016 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Site specific seismic hazard analysis at the DOE Kansas City Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, D.T.; Drury, M.A.; Meis, R.C.; Bieniawski, A.; Savy, J.B.; Llopis, J.L.; Constantino, C.; Hashimoto, P.S.; Campbell, K.W.

    1995-10-01

    A site specific seismic hazard analysis is being conducted for the Kansas City Plant to support an on-going structural evaluation of existing buildings. This project is part of the overall review of facilities being conducted by DOE. The seismic hazard was probabilistically defined at the theoretical rock outcrop by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The USArmy Engineer Waterways Experiment Station conducted a subsurface site investigation to characterize in situ S-wave velocities and other subsurface physical properties related to the geology in the vicinity of the Main Manufacturing Building (MMB) at the Bannister Federal Complex. The test program consisted of crosshole S-wave, seismic cone penetrometer testing,and laboratory soil analyses. The information acquired from this investigation was used in a site response analysis by City College of New York to determine the earthquake motion at grade. Ground response spectra appropriate for design and evaluation of Performance Category 1 and 2 structures, systems, and components were recommended. Effects of seismic loadings on the buildings will be used to aid in designing any structural modifications.

  13. A decision methodology for the evaluation of mixed low-level radioactive waste management options for DOE sites

    SciTech Connect

    Bassi, J.; Abashian, M.S.; Chakraborti, S.; Devarakonda, M.; Djordjevic, S.M.

    1993-03-01

    Currently, many DOE sites are developing site-specific solutions to manage their mixed low-level wastes. These site-specific MLLW programs often result in duplication of efforts between the different sites, and consequently, inefficient use of DOE system resources. A nationally integrated program for MLLW eliminates unnecessary duplication of effort, but requires a comprehensive analysis of waste management options to ensure that all site issues are addressed. A methodology for comprehensive analysis of the complete DOE MLLW system is being developed by DOE-HQ to establish an integrated and standardized solution for managing MLLW. To be effective, the comprehensive systems analysis must consider all aspects of MLLW management from cradle-to-grave (i.e. from MLLW generation to disposal). The results of the analysis will include recommendations for alternative management options for the complete DOE MLLW system based on various components such as effectiveness, cost, health and safety risks, and the probability of regulatory acceptance for an option. Because of the diverse nature of these various components and the associated difficulties in comparing between them, a decision methodology is being developed that will integrate the above components into a single evaluation scheme for performing relative comparisons between different MLLW management options. The remainder of this paper provides an overview of the roles and responsibilities of the various participants of the DOE MLLW Program, and discusses in detail the components involved in the development of the decision methodology for a comprehensive systems analysis.

  14. Analytical Electron Microscopy examination of uranium contamination at the DOE Fernald operation site

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Bates, J.K.; Cunnane, J.C.

    1993-02-01

    Analytical Electron Microscopy (AEM) has been used to identify uranium-bearing phases present in contaminated soils from the DOE Fernald operation site. A combination of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with backscattered electron detection (SEM/BSE), and AEM was used in isolating and characterizing uranium-rich regions of the contaminated soils. Soil samples were prepared for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) by ultramicrotomy using an embedding resin previously employed for aquatic colloids and biological samples. This preparation method allowed direct comparison between SEM and TEM images. At the macroscopic level much of the uranium appears to be associated with clays in the soils; however, electron beam analysis revealed that the uranium is present as discrete phases, including iron oxides, silicates (soddyite), phosphates (autunites), and fluorite. Only low levels of uranium were actually within the clay minerals. The distribution of uranium phases was inhomogeneous at the submicron level.

  15. SOFTWARE QUALITY ASSURANCE FOR EMERGENCY RESPONSE CONSEQUENCE ASSESSMENT MODELS AT DOE'S SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, C

    2007-12-17

    The Savannah River National Laboratory's (SRNL) Atmospheric Technologies Group develops, maintains, and operates computer-based software applications for use in emergency response consequence assessment at DOE's Savannah River Site. These applications range from straightforward, stand-alone Gaussian dispersion models run with simple meteorological input to complex computational software systems with supporting scripts that simulate highly dynamic atmospheric processes. A software quality assurance program has been developed to ensure appropriate lifecycle management of these software applications. This program was designed to meet fully the overall structure and intent of SRNL's institutional software QA programs, yet remain sufficiently practical to achieve the necessary level of control in a cost-effective manner. A general overview of this program is described.

  16. Feasibility studies on the use of TRUPACT-1 for on-site transportation of DOE LLW

    SciTech Connect

    Hills, C.R.; Banjac, V.; Heger, A.S. )

    1993-01-01

    In this paper the authors propose using TRUPACT-I, with modifications to its storage system, to facilitate on-site transportation of US Department of Energy (DOE) low-level waste (LLW). TRUPACT-I was designed as a type-B contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste transportation system for use in Waste Isolation Pilot Plant-related operations and was subjected to the required type-B container accident tests, which it successfully passed. Thus, from a safety standpoint, TRUPACT-1 is provided with double containment, impact limitation, and fire-retardant capabilities. Furthermore, because TRUPACT-1 was developed to transport CH-TRU waste, which is characterized by a higher total activity, larger decay heat, and higher dose rate than LLW, it would be overqualified for the requirements of LLW transportation.

  17. DOE KSU EV Site Operator Program. Year 1, fourth quarter report, April 1--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hague, J.R.; Steinert, R.A.; Nissen-Pfrang, T.

    1992-08-01

    Kansas State University, with funding from federal, state, public, and private companies, is participating in the DOE Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program. Kansas State is demonstrating, testing, and evaluating electric of hybrid vehicle technology. This will provide organizations the opportunity to examine the latest EHV prototypes under actual operating conditions. KSU proposes to purchase one (1) electric or hybrid van and four(4) electric cars during the first two years of this five-year program. KSU has purchased one G-Van built by Conceptor Industries, Toronto, Canada and has initiated a procurement order to purchase two (2) Soleq 1992 Ford EVcort station wagons. This quarter`s report describes ongoing public relations activities and meetings as well as presenting performance data for the electric vehicles. (GHH)

  18. Science To Support DOE Site Cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program Awards

    SciTech Connect

    Bredt, Paul R. ); Brockman, Fred J. ); Camaioni, Donald M. ); Felmy, Andrew R. ); Grate, Jay W. ); Hay, Benjamin P.; Hess, Nancy J. ); Meyer, Philip D. ); Murray, Christopher J. ); Pfund, David M. ); Su, Yali ); Thornton, Edward C. ); Weber, William J. ); Zachara, John M. )

    2001-06-19

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was awarded ten Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in fiscal year 1996, six in fiscal year 1997, nine in fiscal year 1998, seven in fiscal year 1999, and five in fiscal year 2000. All of the fiscal year 1996 award projects have published final reports. The 1997 and 1998 award projects have been completed or are nearing completion. Final reports for these awards will be published, so their annual updates will not be included in this document. This section summarizes how each of the 1999 and 2000 grants address significant U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. The 1999 and 2000 EMSP awards at PNNL are focused primarily in two areas: Tank Waste Remediation, and Soil and Groundwater Cleanup.

  19. Spectroelectrochemical Sensor for Pertechnetate Applicable to Hanford and Other DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Heineman, William R.; Seliskar, C.J.; Bryan, S.A.; Del Negro, A.S.; Hubler, T.L.

    2006-06-01

    The general aim of our work funded by DOE is the design and implementation of a new sensor technology that offers the unprecedented levels of specificity needed for analysis of the complex chemical mixtures found at DOE sites nationwide. The sensor is based on a unique combination of electrochemistry, spectroscopy and selective partitioning into a film that collectively provide an extraordinary level of selectivity for the target analyte. Our goal is a reversible sensor in which the fluorescent Tc-complex formed in the film is re-oxidized to TcO4 ? and free ligand. TcO4 ? in the film would then re-equilibrate with the sample. The sensor would therefore satisfy requirements for both applications described above. Making significant progress towards this goal has required us to discover new chemistry and spectroscopy for technetium itself. Indeed, we needed to find the first technetium complexes which fluoresced in solution at room temperature ? we have made that breakthrough discovery this last year. We are now in the unique position of being able to reach our goal of a reversible sensor for Tc.

  20. Runoff and erosion from native and reclaimed sites: Large versus small plots

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, M.K.; Buchanan, B.A.; Estrada, O.J.

    1990-12-31

    Runoff and erosion were compared using rainfall simulators on small (1 m{sup 2}) and large (3 x 10.67 m) runoff plots. Four small and two large plots were located on each of eight sites. These included two native sites dominated by bunchgrasses and shrubs on sandy dunes, two nearly barren badlands, two 10 year-old reclaimed sites treated with topdressing and dominated by bunchgrasses and shrubs, and two first year reclaimed sites treated with topdressing and dominated by annual forbs and wheat. Rainfall was more uniform and more easily controlled on small plots than large plots. Many small plots (at least eight) could be rained on each day by using wind screens while large plots required calm winds during simulated rainfall which was delayed for many days on numerous occasions. Results from small plots were as accurate and more precise than from large plots on native and reclaimed sites where slope lengths were truncated by shrubs and bunchgrasses. Runoff and erosion from small plots could be measured quickly and cheaply for evaluating reclamation success.

  1. Does ecosystem sensitivity to precipitation at the site-level conform to regional-scale predictions?.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Kevin R; Blair, John M; Smith, Melinda D; Knapp, Alan K

    2016-03-01

    Central to understanding global C cycle dynamics is the functional relationship between precipitation and net primary production (NPP). At large spatial (regional) scales, the responsiveness of aboveground NPP (ANPP) to interannual variation in annual precipitation (AP; ANPPsens) is inversely related to site-level ANPP, coinciding with turnover of plant communities along precipitation gradients. Within ecosystems experiencing chronic alterations in water availability, plant community change will also occur with unknown consequences for ANPPsens. To examine the role plant community shifts may play in determining alterations in site-level ANPPPsens, we experimentally increased precipitation by approximately 35% for two decades in a native Central U.S. grassland. Consistent with regional models, ANPPsens decreased initially as water availability and ANPP increased. However, ANPPsens shifted back to ambient levels when mesic species increased in abundance in the plant community. Similarly, in grassland sites with distinct mesic and xeric plant communities and corresponding 50% differences in ANPP, ANPPsens did not differ over almost three decades. We conclude that responses in ANPPsens to chronic alterations in water availability within an ecosystem may not conform to regional AP-ANPP patterns, despite expected changes in ANPP and plant communities. The result is unanticipated functional resistance to climate change at the site scale.

  2. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2006. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ning; Rutherford, Phil

    2007-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2006 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). In the past, the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988; all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Closure of the liquid metal test facilities began in 1996. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2006 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling.

  3. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2004. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company Santa Susana Field Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ning; Rutherford, Phil; Lee, Majelle

    2005-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2004 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). In the past, the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988; all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Closure of the liquid metal test facilities began in 1996. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2004 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling.

  4. EMP Attachment 1 DOE-SC PNNL Site Sampling and Analysis Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Kirsten M.

    2011-11-10

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) is written for the radiological environmental air surveillance program for the DOE-SC PNNL Site, Richland Washington. It provides the requirements for planning sampling events, and the requirements imposed on the analytical laboratory analyzing the air samples. The actual air sampling process is in procedure EPRP-AIR-029. The rationale for analyte selection, media, and sampling site location has been vetted through the data quality objectives (DQO) process (Barnett et al. 2010). The results from the DQO process have been reviewed and approved by the Washington State Department of Health. The DQO process (Barnett et al. 2010) identified seven specific radionuclides for analysis along with the need for gross alpha and gross beta radiological analyses. The analytes are {sup 241}Am, {sup 243}Am, {sup 244}Cm, {sup 60}Co, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, and {sup 233}U. The report also determined that air samples for particulates are the only sample matrix required for the monitoring program. These samples are collected on 47-mm glass-fiber filters.

  5. CLOSURE WELDING RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS CONTAINERS AT THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect

    CANNELL, G.R.

    2006-09-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) responsibility for the disposition of radioactive materials has given rise to several unique welding applications. Many of these materials require packaging into containers for either Interim or long-term storage. It is not uncommon that final container fabrication, i.e., closure welding, is performed with these materials already placed into the container. Closure welding is typically performed remote to the container, and routine post-weld testing and nondestructive examination (NDE) are often times not feasible. Fluor Hanford has packaged many such materials in recent years as park of the Site's cleanup mission. In lieu of post-weld testing and NDE, the Fluor-Hanford approach has been to establish weld quality through ''upfront'' development and qualification of welding parameters, and then ensure parameter compliance during welding. This approach requires a rigor not usually afforded to typical welding development activities, and may involve statistical analysis and extensive testing, including burst, drop, sensitive leak testing, etc. This paper provides an instructive review of the development and qualification activities associated with the closure of radioactive materials containers, including a brief report on activities for closure welding research reactor, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) overpacks at the Hanford Site.

  6. Division site positioning in bacteria: one size does not fit all.

    PubMed

    Monahan, Leigh G; Liew, Andrew T F; Bottomley, Amy L; Harry, Elizabeth J

    2014-01-01

    Spatial regulation of cell division in bacteria has been a focus of research for decades. It has been well studied in two model rod-shaped organisms, Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, with the general belief that division site positioning occurs as a result of the combination of two negative regulatory systems, Min and nucleoid occlusion. These systems influence division by preventing the cytokinetic Z ring from forming anywhere other than midcell. However, evidence is accumulating for the existence of additional mechanisms that are involved in controlling Z ring positioning both in these organisms and in several other bacteria. In some cases the decision of where to divide is solved by variations on a common evolutionary theme, and in others completely different proteins and mechanisms are involved. Here we review the different ways bacteria solve the problem of finding the right place to divide. It appears that a one-size-fits-all model does not apply, and that individual species have adapted a division-site positioning mechanism that best suits their lifestyle, environmental niche and mode of growth to ensure equal partitioning of DNA for survival of the next generation.

  7. Division site positioning in bacteria: one size does not fit all

    PubMed Central

    Monahan, Leigh G.; Liew, Andrew T. F.; Bottomley, Amy L.; Harry, Elizabeth J.

    2014-01-01

    Spatial regulation of cell division in bacteria has been a focus of research for decades. It has been well studied in two model rod-shaped organisms, Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, with the general belief that division site positioning occurs as a result of the combination of two negative regulatory systems, Min and nucleoid occlusion. These systems influence division by preventing the cytokinetic Z ring from forming anywhere other than midcell. However, evidence is accumulating for the existence of additional mechanisms that are involved in controlling Z ring positioning both in these organisms and in several other bacteria. In some cases the decision of where to divide is solved by variations on a common evolutionary theme, and in others completely different proteins and mechanisms are involved. Here we review the different ways bacteria solve the problem of finding the right place to divide. It appears that a one-size-fits-all model does not apply, and that individual species have adapted a division-site positioning mechanism that best suits their lifestyle, environmental niche and mode of growth to ensure equal partitioning of DNA for survival of the next generation. PMID:24550892

  8. Does the use of ultrasound affect contamination of musculoskeletal injections sites?

    PubMed

    Sherman, Thomas; Ferguson, Joseph; Davis, William; Russo, Matthew; Argintar, Evan

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic musculoskeletal injections require a clean or sterile skin preparation to minimize the risk of infections. Ultrasound guidance for this procedure requires the use of transmission gel in proximity to the injection site, and its effect on maintaining sterility is unknown. We asked: (1) Does sterile ultrasound transmission gel increase skin contamination during therapeutic orthopaedic injections? (2) Does nonsterile gel application result in increased contamination? (3) Does a manufacturer-approved ultrasound probe disinfecting agent in the form of 17.2% isopropanol and 0.28% diisobutylphenoxyethoxyethyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride wipes adequately decontaminate the ultrasound transducer? (4) Does 70% isopropyl alcohol effectively decontaminate skin for administration of musculoskeletal injections? Twenty-six healthy volunteers in an outpatient orthopaedic clinical setting were recruited. The subjects' skin was prepared to simulate a therapeutic intraarticular shoulder injection under ultrasound guidance. Four skin swabs for culture from each subject were taken: one sample before preparation with isopropyl alcohol, one sample after skin preparation, one after simulated injection procedure with sterile ultrasound transmission gel using the transducer, and one after mock procedure with nonsterile ultrasound transmission gel. In addition, samples were taken from the nonsterile ultrasound transmission gel and the transducer for culture analysis. Aerobic and anaerobic cultures were incubated during a 5-day period for bacterial species identification. Sterile ultrasound gel use results in an increase in skin contamination (odds ratio [OR], 9; 95% CI, 1.4-57.1; p=0.005). Compared with sterile gel use, application of nonsterile gel did not increase contamination proportion (OR, 1.1; 95% CI, 0.8-1.7; p=0.56). All cultures from nonsterile gel were negative. None of the samples cultured directly from the ultrasound probe were positive for bacteria (0%). Skin

  9. Department of Energy – Office of Science Pacific Northwest Site Office Environmental Monitoring Plan for the DOE-SC PNNL Site

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, Sandra F.; Meier, Kirsten M.; Barnett, J. Matthew; Bisping, Lynn E.; Poston, Ted M.; Rhoads, Kathleen

    2011-12-21

    The Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) manages the contract for operations at the U.S. Depart¬ment of Energy Office of Science (DOE-SC) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site in Richland, Washington. Radiological operations at the DOE-SC PNNL Site expanded in 2010 with the completion of facilities at the Physical Sciences Facility. As a result of the expanded radiological work at the site, the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH) has required that offsite environmental surveillance be conducted as part of the PNNL Site Radioactive Air Emissions License. The environ¬mental monitoring and surveillance requirements of various orders, regulations, and guidance documents consider emission levels and subsequent risk of negative human and environmental impacts. This Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) describes air surveillance activities at the DOE-SC PNNL Site. The determination of offsite environmental surveillance needs evolved out of a Data Quality Objectives process (Barnett et al. 2010) and Implementation Plan (Snyder et al. 2010). The entire EMP is a compilation of several documents, which include the Main Document (this text), Attachment 1: Sampling and Analysis Plan, Attachment 2: Data Management Plan, and Attachment 3: Dose Assessment Guidance.

  10. 25 CFR 900.220 - Does it make a difference whether the claim is large or small?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Does it make a difference whether the claim is large or small? 900.220 Section 900.220 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, AND INDIAN... EDUCATION ASSISTANCE ACT Post-Award Contract Disputes § 900.220 Does it make a difference whether the...

  11. 25 CFR 900.220 - Does it make a difference whether the claim is large or small?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Does it make a difference whether the claim is large or small? 900.220 Section 900.220 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, AND INDIAN... EDUCATION ASSISTANCE ACT Post-Award Contract Disputes § 900.220 Does it make a difference whether the...

  12. Large Crater Repair at Silver Flag Exercise Site, Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    Site, Tyndall Air Force Base , Florida G eo te ch ni ca l a nd S tr uc tu re s La bo ra to ry William D. Carruth, Lulu Edwards, Haley P. Bell...ERDC/GSL TR-15-27 August 2015 Large Crater Repair at Silver Flag Exercise Site, Tyndall Air Force Base , Florida William D. Carruth, Haley P. Bell...ft) craters at the Silver Flag Exercise Site in Tyndall Air Force Base , Florida. Modernized ADR technologies were successfully demonstrated in a

  13. Childhood leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma near large rural construction sites, with a comparison with Sellafield nuclear site.

    PubMed Central

    Kinlen, L. J.; Dickson, M.; Stiller, C. A.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine whether population mixing produced by large, non-nuclear construction projects in rural areas is associated with an increase in childhood leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. DESIGN--A study of the incidence of leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma among children living near large construction projects in Britain since 1945, situated more than 20 km from a population centre, involving a workforce of more than 1000, and built over three or more calendar years. For periods before 1962 mortality was studied. SETTING--Areas within 10 km of relevant sites, and the highland counties of Scotland with many hydroelectric schemes. SUBJECTS--Children aged under 15. RESULTS--A 37% excess of leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma at 0-14 years of age was recorded during construction and the following calendar year. The excesses were greater at times when construction workers and operating staff overlapped (72%), particularly in areas of relatively high social class. For several sites the excesses were similar to or greater than that near the nuclear site of Sellafield (67%), which is distinctive in its large workforce with many construction workers. Seascale, near Sellafield, with a ninefold increase had an unusually high proportion of residents in social class I. The only study parish of comparable social class also showed a significant excess, with a confidence interval that included the Seascale excess. CONCLUSION--The findings support the infection hypothesis and reinforce the view that the excess of childhood leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma near Sellafield has a similar explanation. PMID:7711579

  14. Large-scale control site selection for population monitoring: an example assessing Sage-grouse trends

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fedy, Bradley C.; O'Donnell, Michael; Bowen, Zachary H.

    2015-01-01

    Human impacts on wildlife populations are widespread and prolific and understanding wildlife responses to human impacts is a fundamental component of wildlife management. The first step to understanding wildlife responses is the documentation of changes in wildlife population parameters, such as population size. Meaningful assessment of population changes in potentially impacted sites requires the establishment of monitoring at similar, nonimpacted, control sites. However, it is often difficult to identify appropriate control sites in wildlife populations. We demonstrated use of Geographic Information System (GIS) data across large spatial scales to select biologically relevant control sites for population monitoring. Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus; hearafter, sage-grouse) are negatively affected by energy development, and monitoring of sage-grouse population within energy development areas is necessary to detect population-level responses. Weused population data (1995–2012) from an energy development area in Wyoming, USA, the Atlantic Rim Project Area (ARPA), and GIS data to identify control sites that were not impacted by energy development for population monitoring. Control sites were surrounded by similar habitat and were within similar climate areas to the ARPA. We developed nonlinear trend models for both the ARPA and control sites and compared long-term trends from the 2 areas. We found little difference between the ARPA and control sites trends over time. This research demonstrated an approach for control site selection across large landscapes and can be used as a template for similar impact-monitoring studies. It is important to note that identification of changes in population parameters between control and treatment sites is only the first step in understanding the mechanisms that underlie those changes. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  15. Development of a combined soil-wash/in-furnace vitrification system for soil remediation at DOE sites. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pegg, I.L.; Guo, Y.; Lahoda, E.J.; Lai, Shan-Tao; Muller, I.S.; Ruller, J.; Grant, D.C.

    1993-01-01

    This report addresses research and development of technologies for treatment of radioactive and hazardous waste streams at DOE sites. Weldon Spring raffinate sludges were used in a direct vitrification study to investigate their use as fluxing agents in glass formulations when blended with site soil. Storm sewer sediments from the Oak Ridge, TN, Y-12 facility were used for soil washing followed by vitrification of the concentrates. Both waste streams were extensively characterized. Testing showed that both mercury and uranium could be removed from the Y-12 soil by chemical extraction resulting in an 80% volume reduction. Thermal desorption was used on the contaminant-enriched minority fraction to separate the mercury from the uranium. Vitrification tests demonstrated that high waste loading glasses could be produced from the radioactive stream and from the Weldon Spring wastes which showed very good leach resistance, and viscosities and electrical conductivities in the range suitable for joule-heated ceramic melter (JHCM) processing. The conceptual process described combines soil washing, thermal desorption, and vitrification to produce clean soil (about 90% of the input waste stream), non-radioactive mercury, and a glass wasteform; the estimated processing costs for that system are about $260--$400/yd{sup 3}. Results from continuous melter tests performed using Duratek`s advanced JHCM (Duramelter) system are also presented. Since life cycle cost estimates are driven largely by volume reduction considerations, the large volume reductions possible with these multi-technology, blended waste stream approaches can produce a more leach resistant wasteform at a lower overall cost than alternative technologies such as cementation.

  16. Representing a Large Region with Few Sites: A New Approach for Studies on Small Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosamond, Madeline; Kaltenecker, Georgina; Mohamed, Mohamed; Taylor, William

    2015-04-01

    Many environmental studies attempt to characterize a large geographical region but financial and logistical constraints limit the number of field sites used. A systematic approach to site selection can ensure that an adequate range in the variables of interest is captured. We present a novel method to select small watersheds for a study examining relationships between agricultural land use, landscape characteristics and stream phosphorus export. This method reduces subjectivity and uses commonly-available geospatial datasets while considering practical constraints on site selections. We selected several variables representing agricultural P inputs or intensity and landscape susceptibility to P loss. We ordinated regional-scale data on cross plots and then superimposed potential field sites, picking those that covered the range shown, and over-representing areas with high P inputs losses. We represent an 110,000 km2 geographic area with 10 sites, with good coverage of four variables, using six sites from a previous study and four new sites. The site selection method can easily be adapted to studies with a variety of goals and settings. Additionally, ordinating watersheds or regions along axes (here, "agricultural" and "landscape") can provide insight into relationships among variables and help identify areas of particular concern, thus guiding stewardship and management programs. The largest challenge is resolution: small study watersheds (20 - 70 km2) may not be well represented by spatially and temporally coarse data.

  17. One size does not fit all: the emerging frontier in large-scale marine conservation.

    PubMed

    Toonen, Robert J; Wilhelm, T 'Aulani; Maxwell, Sara M; Wagner, Daniel; Bowen, Brian W; Sheppard, Charles R C; Taei, Sue M; Teroroko, Tukabu; Moffitt, Russell; Gaymer, Carlos F; Morgan, Lance; Lewis, Nai'a; Sheppard, Anne L S; Parks, John; Friedlander, Alan M

    2013-12-15

    On the 20th anniversary of the Convention on Biological Diversity, a network of very large marine protected areas (the Big Ocean network) has emerged as a key strategy in the move to arrest marine decline and conserve some of the last remaining relatively undisturbed marine areas on the globe. Here we outline the ecological, economic and policy benefits of very large-scale MPAs and show their disproportionate value to global marine conservation targets. In particular we point out that very large-scale MPAs are a critical component of reaching the Aichi targets of protecting 10% of global marine habitats by 2020, because in addition to encompassing entire ecosystems, they will bring forward the expected date of achievement by nearly three decades (2025 as opposed to 2054). While the need for small MPAs remains critical, large MPAs will complement and enhance these conservation efforts. Big Ocean sites currently contain more than 80% of managed area in the sea, and provide our best hope for arresting the global decline in marine biodiversity.

  18. 5 CFR 792.218 - Does the law apply only to on-site Federal child care centers that are utilized by Federal families?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Does the law apply only to on-site... Employees-What Is the Child Care Subsidy Program Legislation and to Whom Does It Apply? § 792.218 Does the law apply only to on-site Federal child care centers that are utilized by Federal families? The...

  19. 5 CFR 792.218 - Does the law apply only to on-site Federal child care centers that are utilized by Federal families?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Does the law apply only to on-site... Employees-What Is the Child Care Subsidy Program Legislation and to Whom Does It Apply? § 792.218 Does the law apply only to on-site Federal child care centers that are utilized by Federal families? The...

  20. THE ROLE OF LAND USE IN ENVIRONMENTAL DECISION MAKING AT THREE DOE MEGA-CLEANUP SITES FERNALD & ROCKY FLATS & MOUND

    SciTech Connect

    JEWETT MA

    2011-01-14

    This paper explores the role that future land use decisions have played in the establishment of cost-effective cleanup objectives and the setting of environmental media cleanup levels for the three major U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites for which cleanup has now been successfully completed: the Rocky Flats, Mound, and Fernald Closure Sites. At each site, there are distinct consensus-building histories throughout the following four phases: (1) the facility shut-down and site investigation phase, which took place at the completion of their Cold War nuclear-material production missions; (2) the decision-making phase, whereby stakeholder and regulatory-agency consensus was achieved for the future land-use-based environmental decisions confronting the sites; (3) the remedy selection phase, whereby appropriate remedial actions were identified to achieve the future land-use-based decisions; and (4) the implementation phase, whereby the selected remedial actions for these high-profile sites were implemented and successfully closed out. At each of the three projects, there were strained relationships and distrust between the local community and the DOE as a result of site contamination and potential health effects to the workers and local residents. To engage citizens and interested stakeholder groups - particularly in the role of final land use in the decision-making process, the site management teams at each respective site developed new public-participation strategies to open stakeholder communication channels with site leadership, technical staff, and the regulatory agencies. This action proved invaluable to the success of the projects and reaching consensus on appropriate levels of cleanup. With the implementation of the cleanup remedies now complete, each of the three DOE sites have become models for future environmental-remediation projects and associated decision making.

  1. Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project: Report from the DOE voluntary protection program onsite review, November 17--21, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-01-28

    This report summarizes the Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program (DOE-VPP) Review Team`s findings from the five-day onsite evaluation of the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP), conducted November 17--21, 1997. The site was evaluated against the program requirements contained in ``US Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program, Part 1: Program Elements`` to determine its success in implementing the five tenets of DOE-VPP. DOE-VPP consists of three programs, with names and functions similar to those in OSHA`s VPP. These programs are STAR, MERIT, and DEMONSTRATION. The STAR program is the core of DOE-VPP. The program is aimed at truly outstanding protectors of employee safety and health. The MERIT program is a steppingstone for contractors and subcontractors that have good safety and health programs but need time and DOE guidance to achieve STAR status. The DEMONSTRATION program is rarely used; it allows DOE to recognize achievements in unusual situations about which DOE needs to learn more before determining approval requirements for the STAR status.

  2. Final report for the geothermal well site restoration and plug and abandonment of wells: DOE Pleasant Bayou test site, Brazoria County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Rinehart, Ben N.; Seigel, Ben H.

    1994-03-13

    For a variety of reasons, thousands of oil and gas wells have been abandoned in the Gulf Coast Region of the United States. Many of these wells penetrated geopressured zones whose resource potential for power generation was undervalued or ignored. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Geopressured-Geothermal Research Program was chartered to improve geothermal technology to the point where electricity could be commercially produced from a substantial number of geopressured resource sites. This research program focused on relatively narrow technical issues that are unique to geopressured resources such as the ability to predict reservoir production capacity based on preliminary flow tests. Three well sites were selected for the research program. These are the Willis Hulin and Gladys McCall sites in Louisiana, and the Pleasant Bayou site in Texas. The final phase of this research project consists of plug and abandonment (P&A) of the wells and site restoration.

  3. Preliminary results of a seismic borehole test using downhole shaped charges at the DOE Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Narbutovskih, S.M.; Michelsen, F.

    1994-02-01

    Geophysical site characterization studies can be important steps in the process of designing and monitoring remediation at hazardous waste storage facilities. Use of seismic techniques for subsurface characterization at the DOE Hanford Site has been limited. One reason is the lack of borehole velocity control, and low-velocity sediments are highly attenuative. Consequently, standard techniques to provide velocity control are not adequate. Both Vertical Seismic Profiling and reversed VSP surveys are currently being investigated to provide velocity control and for subsurface imaging capabilities. Recently a jet perforating gun was used to perforate a doubled-cased borehole in the 200 West Area. Acoustic emissions were recorded from numerous depths to obtain velocity control for a previous surface survey conducted in the same area. Both P- and S-wave data were recorded simultaneously from multiple horizons using the DAS-1 seismograph and 3-component geophones. The data were analyzed for a variety of uses besides velocity control. Signal attenuation was studied as a function of source depth and offset distance to evaluate formation absorption while vertical resolution was determined from the frequency spectrum. Preliminary results indicate that adequate P-wave velocity control can be obtained even though the near-surface sediments are very attenuative. However, we conclude that the perforating gun produces little SH energy. Preliminary velocities indicate that reflection coefficients should be great enough to use surface techniques. Results from the frequency study suggest that a swept source for both surface and borehole surveys may be necessary to obtain required resolutions. Finally, signal attenuation as a function of formation facies suggest that seismic techniques may be useful in mapping perched water zones and for long term vadose zone monitoring.

  4. GSMT Education: Teaching about Adaptive Optics and Site Selection Using Extremely Large Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, R. T.; Pompea, S. M.

    2010-08-01

    Giant Segmented Mirror Telescopes (GSMT) represents the next generation of extremely large telescopes (ELT). Currently there are three active ELT projects, all established as international partnerships to build telescopes of greater than 20 meters aperture. Two of these have major participation by U.S. institutions: the Giant Magellan Telescope and the Thirty Meter Telescope. The ESO-ELT is under development by the European Southern Observatory and other European institutions. We have developed educational activities to accompany the design phase of these projects. The current activities focus on challenges faced in the design and site selection of a large telescope. The first module is on site selection. This online module is based on the successful Astronomy Village program model. Students evaluate several potential sites to decide where to build the GSMT. They must consider factors such as weather, light pollution, seeing, logistics, and geography. The second project has developed adaptive optics teaching units suitable for high school.

  5. CHARACTERIZING DOE HANFORD SITE WASTE ENCAPSULATION STORAGE FACILITY CELLS USING RADBALL

    SciTech Connect

    Farfan, E.; Coleman, R.

    2011-03-31

    RadBall{trademark} is a novel technology that can locate and quantify unknown radioactive hazards within contaminated areas, hot cells, and gloveboxes. The device consists of a colander-like outer tungsten collimator that houses a radiation-sensitive polymer semi-sphere. The collimator has a number of small holes with tungsten inserts; as a result, specific areas of the polymer are exposed to radiation becoming increasingly more opaque in proportion to the absorbed dose. The polymer semi-sphere is imaged in an optical computed tomography scanner that produces a high resolution 3D map of optical attenuation coefficients. A subsequent analysis of the optical attenuation data using a reverse ray tracing or backprojection technique provides information on the spatial distribution of gamma-ray sources in a given area forming a 3D characterization of the area of interest. RadBall{trademark} was originally designed for dry deployments and several tests, completed at Savannah River National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, substantiate its modeled capabilities. This study involves the investigation of the RadBall{trademark} technology during four submerged deployments in two water filled cells at the DOE Hanford Site's Waste Encapsulation Storage Facility.

  6. 76 FR 65212 - Caterpillar, Inc., Large Power Systems Division, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Gray...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-20

    ... Employment and Training Administration Caterpillar, Inc., Large Power Systems Division, Including On- Site... Adjustment Assistance on November 2, 2009, applicable to Caterpillar, Inc., Large Power Systems Division... Caterpillar, Inc., Large Power Systems Division. The Department has determined that these workers...

  7. Spectroelectrochemical Sensor for Pertechnetate Applicable to Hanford and Other DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Heineman, William R; Seliskar, Carl J; Bryan, Samuel A

    2012-09-18

    The general aim of our work funded by DOE is the design and implementation of a new sensor technology that offers unprecedented levels of specificity needed for analysis of the complex chemical mixtures found at DOE sites nationwide. The specific goal of this project was the development of a sensor for technetium (Tc) that is applicable to characterizing and monitoring the vadose zone and associated subsurface water at the Hanford Site and other DOE sites. The concept for the spectroelectrochemical sensor is innovative and represents a breakthrough in sensor technology. The sensor combines three modes of selectivity (electrochemistry, spectroscopy, and selective partitioning) into a single sensor to substantially improve selectivity. The sensor consists of a basic spectroelectrochemical configuration that we have developed under our previous DOE grants: a waveguide with an optically transparent electrode (OTE) that is coated with a thin chemically-selective film that preconcnetrates the analyte. The key to adapting this generic sensor to detect TcO4- and Tc complexes lies in the development of chemically-selective films that preconcentrate the analyte and, when necessary, chemically convert it into a complex with electrochemical and spectroscopic properties appropriate for sensing. Significant accomplishments were made in the general areas of synthesis and characterization of polymer films that efficiently preconcentrate the analyte, development and characterization of sensors and associated instrumentation, and synthesis and characterization of relevant Re and Tc complexes. Two new polymer films for the preconcentration step in the sensor were developed: partially sulfonated polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene-ran-butylene)-block-polystyrene (SSEBS) and phosphine containing polymer films. The latter was a directed polymer film synthesis that combined the proper electrostatic properties to attract TcO4- and also incorporated a suitable ligand for covalently trapping a

  8. Does survey method bias the description of northern goshawk nest-site structure?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daw, S.K.; DeStefano, S.; Steidl, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    Past studies on the nesting habitat of northern goshawks (Accipiter gentilis) often relied on nests found opportunistically, either during timber-sale operations, by searching apparently 'good' goshawk habitat, or by other search methods where areas were preselected based on known forest conditions. Therefore, a bias in the characterization of habitat surrounding northern goshawk nest sites may exist toward late-forest structure (large trees, high canopy closure). This potential problem has confounded interpretation of data on nesting habitat of northern goshawks and added to uncertainty in the review process to consider the species for federal listing as threatened or endangered. Systematic survey methods, which strive for complete coverage of an area and often use broadcasts of conspecific calls, have been developed to overcome these potential biases, but no study has compared habitat characteristics around nests found opportunistically with those found systematically. We compared habitat characteristics in a 0.4-ha area around nests found systematically (n = 27) versus those found opportunistically (n = 22) on 3 national forests in eastern Oregon. We found that both density of large trees (systematic: x?? = 16.4 ?? 3.1 trees/ha; x?? ?? SE; opportunistic: x?? = 21.3 ?? 3.2; P = 0.56) and canopy closure (systematic: x?? = 72 ?? 2%; opportunistic: x?? = 70 ?? 2%; P = 0.61) were similar around nests found with either search method. Our results diminish concern that past survey methods mischaracterized northern goshawk nest-site structure. However, because northern goshawks nest in a variety of forest cover types with a wide range of structural characteristics, these results do not decrease the value of systematic survey methods in determining the most representative habitat descriptions for northern goshawks. Rigorous survey protocols allow repeatability and comparability of monitoring efforts and results over time.

  9. A new algorithm for construction of coarse-grained sites of large biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Zhang, John Z H; Xia, Fei

    2016-04-05

    The development of coarse-grained (CG) models for large biomolecules remains a challenge in multiscale simulations, including a rigorous definition of CG representations for them. In this work, we proposed a new stepwise optimization imposed with the boundary-constraint (SOBC) algorithm to construct the CG sites of large biomolecules, based on the s cheme of essential dynamics CG. By means of SOBC, we can rigorously derive the CG representations of biomolecules with less computational cost. The SOBC is particularly efficient for the CG definition of large systems with thousands of residues. The resulted CG sites can be parameterized as a CG model using the normal mode analysis based fluctuation matching method. Through normal mode analysis, the obtained modes of CG model can accurately reflect the functionally related slow motions of biomolecules. The SOBC algorithm can be used for the construction of CG sites of large biomolecules such as F-actin and for the study of mechanical properties of biomaterials. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. European Extremely Large Telescope Site Characterization. II. High Angular Resolution Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez Ramió, Héctor; Vernin, Jean; Muñoz-Tuñón, Casiana; Sarazin, Marc; Varela, Antonia M.; Trinquet, Hervé; Delgado, José Miguel; Fuensalida, Jesús J.; Reyes, Marcos; Benhida, Abdelmajid; Benkhaldoun, Zouhair; García Lambas, Diego; Hach, Youssef; Lazrek, M.; Lombardi, Gianluca; Navarrete, Julio; Recabarren, Pablo; Renzi, Victor; Sabil, Mohammed; Vrech, Rubén

    2012-08-01

    This is the second article of a series devoted to European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) site characterization. In this article we present the main properties of the parameters involved in high angular resolution observations from the data collected in the site testing campaign of the E-ELT during the design study (DS) phase. Observations were made in 2008 and 2009, in the four sites selected to shelter the future E-ELT (characterized under the ELT-DS contract): Aklim mountain in Morocco, Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos (ORM) in Spain, Macón range in Argentina, and Cerro Ventarrones in Chile. The same techniques, instruments, and acquisition procedures were taken on each site. A multiple aperture scintillation sensor (MASS) and a differential image motion monitor (DIMM) were installed at each site. Global statistics of the integrated seeing, the free atmosphere seeing, the boundary layer seeing, and the isoplanatic angle were studied for each site, and the results are presented here. In order to estimate other important parameters, such as the coherence time of the wavefront and the overall parameter “coherence étendue,” additional information of vertical profiles of the wind speed was needed. Data were retrieved from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) archive. Ground wind speed was measured by automatic weather stations (AWS). More aspects of the turbulence parameters, such as their seasonal trend, their nightly evolution, and their temporal stability, were also obtained and analyzed.

  11. Does the Walker Lane extend through the Nevada test site region

    SciTech Connect

    Fridrich, C.; O'Leary, D. . Denver Federal Center)

    1993-04-01

    The southeastern terminus of the Walker Lane is poorly defined and poorly understood. Recent work in and around the Nevada Test Site (NTS) suggests the presence of a structural zone that may be an extension of the Walker Lane, and that may be continuous with the Las Vegas valley shear zone farther to the southeast. Unlike the Walker Lane, large through-going strike-slip faults have not been found in the NTS zone. Instead, the strike-slip faults present are few, are relatively short, commonly consist of diffuse fault zones, are interconnected poorly if at all, and largely appear to represent zones of accommodation between domains in which extension occurred at different times and to different degrees. However, the majority of these right-slip and left-slip faults are northwest-trending and northeast-trending, respectively, suggesting that plate motions may have played a role in the creation of these accommodation zones. An obstacle to understanding the NTS zone is that major ignimbrite sheets and calderas of the southwestern Nevada volcanic field (SNVF) formed in this zone at the height of late Tertiary tectonic activity, possibly burying much of the structural evidence. The NTS zone could represent an intersection of the Walker Lane with another major structural feature, a significant bend in the Walker Lane, or a transtensional tear that localized accommodation structures as well as the prominent late Miocene calderas of the SNVF. Ongoing field work is aimed at determining which of these and competing interpretations is best.

  12. Report on inspection of compliance with DOE Order 2030.4B at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    The purpose of this inspection was to evaluate contractor compliance at the Savannah River Site (SRS) with Department of Energy (DOE) Order 2030.4B, {open_quotes}Reporting Fraud, Waste, And Abuse To The Office Of Inspector General.{close_quotes} The specific objective was to determine if the SRS management and operating (M&O) contractors were complying with the requirements in Paragraph 6.c. of DOE Order 2030.4B. These requirements are: (1) annual notification to employees of their duty to report allegations of fraud, waste, abuse, corruption, or mismanagement; (2) display and publish the DOE Office of Inspector General (OIG) Hotline telephone number in common areas of buildings; (3) display and publish the DOE OIG Hotline number in telephone books and newsletters; and (4) notify the OIG cases referred to other law enforcement entities.

  13. Using large Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) Sites as Analogs to Study the Mechanical Behavior of Large CO2 Storage Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonneville, A.; Sullivan, E. C.; Heggy, E.; Dermond, J.; Sweeney, M.

    2010-12-01

    One of the main issues in the sequestration of large volumes of anthropogenic CO2 in the deep subsurface is to determine the field-scale induced displacements of fluids (mainly saline water) and their consequences on the mechanical behavior of the reservoir and surroundings. A quantifiable estimation of that displacement can be made by combining the robust, cost effective and repeatable geophysical techniques of microgravity and INSAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar INterferometry). The determination of the density distribution of materials in the subsurface and its evolution with time potentially provides a cost effective monitoring technique to determine field-scale displacements of reservoir fluids induced by injection of liquid or gas. At the same time, the accurate measurement of temporal ground deformation reflects geomechanical responses and spatial changes. With micro-gravimeters and DGPS, very small gravity anomalies can now be mapped as well as their evolution with time. Displacements of the ground surface can also be measured very precisely through satellite radar interferometry (INSAR). Each of these methods has been implemented on a few occasions on active storage fields (natural gas storage or CO2 pilot sites) and recently with success for INSAR Techniques at the commercial CO2 sequestration site at In Salah, Algeria. However, these technologies are largely uncalibrated for diverse environmental settings like vegetated or urban areas for example. We propose to field test and evaluate these techniques in an active large volume aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) project where sufficient geological data and documented time series exist to create realistic models of mass distribution and surface motion displacement for comparison with gravity and radar interferometry observations. The results will be used as analogs to CO2 storage sites with the appropriate scaling in volume and physical properties for CO2 injection, as well as direct examples of sites where CO

  14. When and where does preferential flow matter - from observation to large scale modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiler, Markus; Leistert, Hannes; Steinbrich, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Preferential flow can be of relevance in a wide range of soils and the interaction of different processes and factors are still difficult to assess. As most studies (including our own studies) focusing on the effect of preferential flow are based on relatively high precipitation rates, there is always the question how relevant preferential flow is under natural conditions, considering the site specific precipitation characteristics, the effect of the drying and wetting cycle on the initial soil water condition and shrinkage cracks, the site specific soil properties, soil structure and rock fragments, and the effect of plant roots and soil fauna (e.g. earthworm channels). In order to assess this question, we developed the distributed, process-based model RoGeR (Runoff Generation Research) to include a large number relevant features and processes of preferential flow in soils. The model was developed from a large number of process based research and experiments and includes preferential flow in roots, earthworm channels, along rock fragments and shrinkage cracks. We parameterized the uncalibrated model at a high spatial resolution of 5x5m for the whole state of Baden-Württemberg in Germany using LiDAR data, degree of sealing, landuse, soil properties and geology. As the model is an event based model, we derived typical event based precipitation characteristics based on rainfall duration, mean intensity and amount. Using the site-specific variability of initial soil moisture derived from a water balance model based on the same dataset, we simulated the infiltration and recharge amounts of all event classes derived from the event precipitation characteristics and initial soil moisture conditions. The analysis of the simulation results allowed us to extracts the relevance of preferential flow for infiltration and recharge considering all factors above. We could clearly see a strong effect of the soil properties and land-use, but also, particular for clay rich soils a

  15. Large Scale Site Response variation in the Central and Eastern U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yassminh, R.; Sandvol, E. A.; Gallegos, A. C.; Ranasinghe, N. R.

    2015-12-01

    Central and eastern United States (CEUS) is considered to be less seismically active compared with western United States; however, these few earthquakes are felt over much larger distances and have the potential to cause damages over a very large area. The earthquake ground motions vary due to the site conditions that effect strongly the propagation and localized amplification of regional seismic waves. Lg, is the most destructive regional phase for stable continental paths due to its large amplitudes due to low attenuation. The United States combined seismic network that includes EarthScope Transportable Array (TA), offer excellent station coverage for all of the CEUS. The availability of regional and local seismic records provided the resources to study and understand the characteristics of the site amplification of high frequency regional waves. The goal of this project to understand the physical characteristics of regional high frequency phases and the factors effecting these phases. We have used 40 earthquakes with magnitudes between 4 and 5 Mw and distances range between 20 - 2000 km. We collected approximately 8000 seismograms recorded on Transport Array (TA) component of USArray. We employed to methods to estimate the site effect: Nakamura technique (Nakamura, 1989), Horizontal over vertical spectral ratio (HVSR), applied on the shear wave part of seismic event and on the ambient noise. We also employed a Reverse two station method (RTS), which eliminates the source effect and includes the attenuation factor Q in calculating the site response (Chun et al., 1987). In order to correlate the site effect results, the shear wave velocity was calculated for each TA stations by modeling Horizontal/ vertical ratio of the first part of the P waves. The comparison between the two methods suggests we are able to estimate regional variations in site amplification of regional waves. Comparisons of this site amplification with Vs30m suggest that there is only a weak

  16. Does Preadmission Cutaneous Chlorhexidine Preparation Reduce Surgical Site Infections After Total Hip Arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Bhaveen H; Jauregui, Julio J; Murray, Daniel P; Mont, Michael A

    2016-07-01

    Periprosthetic hip infections are among the most catastrophic complications after total hip arthroplasty (THA). We had previously proven that the use of chlorhexidine cloths before surgery may help decrease these infections; hence, we increased the size of the previously reported cohort. (1) Does a preadmission chlorhexidine cloth skin preparation protocol decrease the risk of surgical site infection in patients undergoing THA? (2) When stratified using the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) risk categories, which categories are associated with risk reduction from the preadmission chlorhexidine preparation protocol? Between 2007 and 2013, a group of 998 patients used chlorhexidine cloths before surgery, whereas a group of 2846 patients did not use them and underwent standard perioperative disinfection only. Patient records were reviewed to determine the development of periprosthetic infection in both groups of patients. Patients without the preoperative chlorhexidine gluconate disinfection protocol had a higher risk of infections (infections with protocol: six of 995 [0.6%]; infections in control: 46 of 2846 [1.62%]; relative risk: 2.68 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.15-0.26]; p = 0.0226). When stratified based on risk category, no differences were detected; preadmission chlorhexidine preparation was not associated with reduced infection risk for low, medium, and high NHSN risk categories (p = 0.386, 0.153, and 0.196, respectively). The results of our study suggest that this cloth application appears to reduce the risk of infection in patients undergoing THA. When stratified by risk categories, we found no difference in the infection rate, but these findings were underpowered. Although future multicenter randomized trials will need to confirm these preliminary findings, the intervention is inexpensive and is unlikely to be risky and so might be considered on the basis of this retrospective, comparative study. Level III, therapeutic study.

  17. Research on jet mixing of settled sludges in nuclear waste tanks at Hanford and other DOE sites: A historical perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, M.R.; Onishi, Y.; Shekarriz, R.

    1997-09-01

    Jet mixer pumps will be used in the Hanford Site double-shell tanks to mobilize and mix the settled solids layer (sludge) with the tank supernatant liquid. Predicting the performance of the jet mixer pumps has been the subject of analysis and testing at Hanford and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) waste sites. One important aspect of mixer pump performance is sludge mobilization. The research that correlates mixer pump design and operation with the extent of sludge mobilization is the subject of this report. Sludge mobilization tests have been conducted in tanks ranging from 1/25-scale (3 ft-diameter) to full scale have been conducted at Hanford and other DOE sites over the past 20 years. These tests are described in Sections 3.0 and 4.0 of this report. The computational modeling of sludge mobilization and mixing that has been performed at Hanford is discussed in Section 5.0.

  18. Savannah River Site Eastern Transportation Hub: A Concept For a DOE Eastern Packaging, Staging and Maintenance Center - 13143

    SciTech Connect

    England, Jeffery L.; Adams, Karen; Maxted, Maxcine; Ruff Jr, Clarence; Albenesius, Andrew; Bowers, Mark D.; Fountain, Geoffrey; Hughes, Michael; Gordon, Sydney; O'Connor, Stephen

    2013-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is working to de-inventory sites and consolidate hazardous materials for processing and disposal. The DOE administers a wide range of certified shipping packages for the transport of hazardous materials to include Special Nuclear Material (SNM), radioactive materials, sealed sources and radioactive wastes. A critical element to successful and safe transportation of these materials is the availability of certified shipping packages. There are over seven thousand certified packagings (i.e., Type B/Type AF) utilized within the DOE for current missions. The synergistic effects of consolidated maintenance, refurbishment, testing, certification, and costing of these services would allow for efficient management of the packagings inventory and to support anticipated future in-commerce shipping needs. The Savannah River Site (SRS) receives and ships radioactive materials (including SNM) and waste on a regular basis for critical missions such as consolidated storage, stabilization, purification, or disposition using H-Canyon and HB-Line. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has the technical capability and equipment for all aspects of packaging management. SRS has the only active material processing facility in the DOE complex and is one of the sites of choice for nuclear material consolidation. SRS is a logical location to perform maintenance and periodic testing of the DOE fleet of certified packagings. This initiative envisions a DOE Eastern Packaging Staging and Maintenance Center (PSMC) at the SRS and a western hub at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), an active DOE Regional Disposal Site. The PSMC's would be the first place DOE would go to meet their radioactive packaging needs and the primary locations projects would go to disposition excess packaging for beneficial reuse. These two hubs would provide the centralized management of a packaging fleet rather than the current approach to design, procure, maintain and dispose

  19. A Large-Sized Phytobezoar Located on the Rare Site of the Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jee Eun; Kim, Gi Ae; Kim, Ga Hee; Yoon, Da Lim; Jeon, Sung Jin; Jung, Hwoon-Yong; Kim, Jin-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Bezoars are concretions of undigested material and are most often observed in the stomach. They can occur at any site in the gastrointestinal tract; however, duodenal localization is very rare. We report the case of a 71-year-old male who had undergone subtotal gastrectomy with gastroduodenostomy and experienced severe epigastric discomfort, abdominal pain, and vomiting for a few days. An approximately 7×8 cm-sized mass was found on an abdominal computed tomography scan. On following endoscopy, a large bezoar was revealed in the duodenum and was removed using an endoscopic removal technique, assisted by a large amount of Coca-Cola infusion. PMID:23964339

  20. Financial Management of a Large Multi-site Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sheffet, Alice J.; Flaxman, Linda; Tom, MeeLee; Hughes, Susan E.; Longbottom, Mary E.; Howard, Virginia J.; Marler, John R.; Brott, Thomas G.

    2014-01-01

    Background The Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy versus Stenting Trial (CREST) received five years’ funding ($21,112,866) from the National Institutes of Health to compare carotid stenting to surgery for stroke prevention in 2,500 randomized participants at 40 sites. Aims Herein we evaluate the change in the CREST budget from a fixed to variable-cost model and recommend strategies for the financial management of large-scale clinical trials. Methods Projections of the original grant’s fixed-cost model were compared to the actual costs of the revised variable-cost model. The original grant’s fixed-cost budget included salaries, fringe benefits, and other direct and indirect costs. For the variable-cost model, the costs were actual payments to the clinical sites and core centers based upon actual trial enrollment. We compared annual direct and indirect costs and per-patient cost for both the fixed and variable models. Differences between clinical site and core center expenditures were also calculated. Results Using a variable-cost budget for clinical sites, funding was extended by no-cost extension from five to eight years. Randomizing sites tripled from 34 to 109. Of the 2,500 targeted sample size, 138 (5.5%) were randomized during the first five years and 1,387 (55.5%) during the no-cost extension. The actual per-patient costs of the variable model were 9% ($13,845) of the projected per-patient costs ($152,992) of the fixed model. Conclusions Performance-based budgets conserve funding, promote compliance, and allow for additional sites at modest additional cost. Costs of large-scale clinical trials can thus be reduced through effective management without compromising scientific integrity. PMID:24661748

  1. Using 3D Geologic Models to Synthesize Large and Disparate Datasets for Site Characterization and Verification Purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillesheim, M. B.; Rautman, C. A.; Johnson, P. B.; Powers, D. W.

    2008-12-01

    As we are all aware, increases in computing power and efficiency have allowed for the development of many modeling codes capable of processing large and sometimes disparate datasets (e.g., geological, hydrological, geochemical, etc). Because people sometimes have difficulty visualizing in three dimensions (3D) or understanding how multiple figures of various geologic features relate as a whole, 3D geologic models can be excellent tools to illustrate key concepts and findings, especially to lay persons, such as stakeholders, customers, and other concerned parties. In this presentation, we will show examples of 3D geologic modeling efforts using data collected during site characterization and verification work at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The WIPP is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility located in southeastern New Mexico, designed for the safe disposal of transuranic wastes resulting from U.S. defense programs. The 3D geologic modeling efforts focused on refining our understanding of the WIPP site by integrating a variety of geologic data. Examples include: overlaying isopach surfaces of unit thickness and overburden thickness, a map of geologic facies changes, and a transmissivity field onto a 3D structural map of a geologic unit of interest. In addition, we also present a 4D hydrogeologic model of the effects of a large-scale pumping test on water levels. All these efforts have provided additional insights into the controls on transmissivity and flow in the WIPP vicinity. Ultimately, by combining these various types of data we have increased our understanding of the WIPP site's hydrogeologic system, which is a key aspect of continued certification. Sandia is a multi program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04- 94AL85000. This research is funded by WIPP programs administered by the Office of Environmental

  2. Performance Comparison of Systematic Methods for Rigorous Definition of Coarse-Grained Sites of Large Biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuwei; Cao, Zexing; Zhang, John Zenghui; Xia, Fei

    2017-02-27

    Construction of coarse-grained (CG) models for large biomolecules used for multiscale simulations demands a rigorous definition of CG sites for them. Several coarse-graining methods such as the simulated annealing and steepest descent (SASD) based on the essential dynamics coarse-graining (ED-CG) or the stepwise local iterative optimization (SLIO) based on the fluctuation maximization coarse-graining (FM-CG), were developed to do it. However, the practical applications of these methods such as SASD based on ED-CG are subject to limitations because they are too expensive. In this work, we extend the applicability of ED-CG by combining it with the SLIO algorithm. A comprehensive comparison of optimized results and accuracy of various algorithms based on ED-CG show that SLIO is the fastest as well as the most accurate algorithm among them. ED-CG combined with SLIO could give converged results as the number of CG sites increases, which demonstrates that it is another efficient method for coarse-graining large biomolecules. The construction of CG sites for Ras protein by using MD fluctuations demonstrates that the CG sites derived from FM-CG can reflect the fluctuation properties of secondary structures in Ras accurately.

  3. Tunable mechanical monolithic sensors for large band low frequency monitoring and characterization of sites and structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone, F.; Giordano, G.; Acernese, F.; Romano, R.

    2016-10-01

    Among the different mechanical architectures present in literature, the Watts linkage is one of the most promising ones for the implementation of a new class of mechanical accelerometers (horizontal, vertical and angular). In this paper, we present monolithic implementations of uniaxial and triaxial mechanical seismometers and accelerometers based on the UNISA Folded Pendulum mechanical configuration, optimized for low frequency characterization of sites (including underground sites) and structures as inertial sensor (seismometer). This mechanical architecture allows the design and implementation of very large band monolithic sensors (10-7Hz 102 Hz), whose sensitivities for the most common applications are defined by the noise introduced by their readouts (e.g. ¡ 10-12 m/sqrt(Hz) with classical LVDT readouts). These unique features, coupled other relevant properties like scalability, compactness, lightness, high directivity, frequency tunability (typical resonance frequencies in the band 10-1 Hz 102 Hz), very high immunity to environmental noises and low cost make this class of sensors very effective for the implementation of uniaxial (horizontal and/or vertical) and triaxial seismometers and accelerometers for ground, space and underwater applications, including UHV and cryogenics ones. Typical applications of this class of monolithic sensors are in the field of earthquake engineering, seismology, geophysics, civil engineering, characterization of sites (including underground sites), structures (e.g. buildings, bridges, historical monuments), and, in general, in all applications requiring large band-low frequency performances coupled with high sensitivities and compactness.

  4. Large zinc cation occupancy of octahedral sites in mechanically activated zinc ferrite powders

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, S. A.; Harris, V. G.; Hamdeh, H. H.; Ho, J. C.

    2000-05-08

    The cation site occupancy of a mechanically activated nanocrystalline zinc ferrite powder was determined as (Zn{sub 0.55}{sup 2+}Fe{sub 0.18}{sup 3+}){sub tet}[Zr{sub 0.45}{sup 2+}Fe{sub 1.82}{sup 3+}]{sub oct}O{sub 4} through analysis of extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements, showing a large redistribution of cations between sites compared to normal zinc ferrite samples. The overpopulation of cations in the octahedral sites was attributed to the ascendance in importance of the ionic radii over the crystal energy and bonding coordination in determining which interstitial sites are occupied in this structurally disordered powder. Slight changes are observed in the local atomic environment about the zinc cations, but not the iron cations, with respect to the spinel structure. The presence of Fe{sup 3+} on both sites is consistent with the measured room temperature magnetic properties. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  5. Nonlinear Site Response Due to Large Ground Acceleration: Observation and Computer Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, S.; Furumura, T.; Sasatani, T.

    2009-12-01

    We studied nonlinear site response due to large ground acceleration during the 2003 off-Miyagi Earthquake (Mw7.0) in Japan by means of horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio analysis of S-wave motion. The results were then confirmed by finite-difference method (FDM) simulation of nonlinear seismic wave propagation. A nonlinear site response is often observed at soft sediment sites, and even at hard bedrock sites which are covered by thin soil layers. Nonlinear site response can be induced by strong ground motion whose peak ground acceleration (PGA) exceeds about 100 cm/s/s, and seriously affects the amplification of high frequency ground motion and PGA. Noguchi and Sasatani (2008) developed an efficient technique for quantitative evaluation of nonlinear site response using the horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio of S-wave (S-H/V) derived from strong ground motion records, based on Wen et al. (2006). We applied this technique to perform a detailed analysis of the properties of nonlinear site response based on a large amount of data recorded at 132 K-NET and KiK-net strong motion stations in Northern Japan during the off-Miyagi Earthquake. We succeeded in demonstrating a relationship between ground motion level, nonlinear site response and surface soil characteristics. For example, the seismic data recorded at KiK-net IWTH26 showed obvious characteristics of nonlinear site response when the PGA exceeded 100 cm/s/s. As the ground motion level increased, the dominant peak of S-H/V shifted to lower frequency, the high frequency level of S-H/V dropped, and PGA amplification decreased. On the other hand, the records at MYGH03 seemed not to be affected by nonlinear site response even for high ground motion levels in which PGA exceeds 800 cm/s/s. The characteristics of such nonlinear site amplification can be modeled by evaluating Murnaghan constants (e.g. McCall, 1994), which are the third-order elastic constants. In order to explain the observed characteristics of

  6. An exposure assessment of radionuclide emissions associated with potential mixed-low level waste disposal facilities at fifteen DOE sites

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardi, D.A.; Socolof, M.L.

    1996-05-01

    A screening method was developed to compare the doses received via the atmospheric pathway at 15 potential DOE MLLW (mixed low-level waste) sites. Permissible waste concentrations were back calculated using the radioactivity NESHAP (National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants) in 40 FR 61 (DOE Order 5820.2A performance objective). Site-specific soil and meteorological data were used to determine permissible waste concentrations (PORK). For a particular radionuclide, perks for each site do not vary by more than one order of magnitude. perks of {sup 14}C are about six orders of magnitude more restrictive than perks of {sup 3}H because of differences in liquid/vapor partitioning, decay, and exposure dose. When comparing results from the atmospheric pathway to the water and intruder pathways, {sup 14}C disposal concentrations were limited by the atmospheric pathway for most arid sites; for {sup 3}H, the atmospheric pathway was not limiting at any of the sites. Results of this performance evaluation process are to be used for planning for siting of disposal facilities.

  7. Does Injection Site Matter? A Randomized Controlled Trial to Evaluate Different Entry Site Efficacy of Knee Intra-articular Injections.

    PubMed

    Dávila-Parrilla, Ariel; Santaella-Santé, Borja; Otero-López, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Complaints of knee pain secondary to early osteoarthritis may account for up to 30% of visits to primary care physicians. Due to the proposed inflammatory changes in early osteoarthritis, intra-articular injections of corticosteroids (IACS) have been considered as an option for disease progression modification, pain control, and improvement of function. However, some studies have suggested poor accuracy rates of IA injections depending on the entry site chosen. It is therefore the aim of this study to evaluate the efficacy of IA knee corticosteroid injection in reducing pain and improving function in patients with early osteoarthritis and whether the low accuracy rates reported with the Anterolateral joint line injection site translate to worse functional and pain outcome measures as compared to Suprapatellar lateral injections. The study was carried out as an open-label, randomized controlled trial with 60 sequential patients recruited. Simple randomization separated groups into anterolateral joint line or suprapatellar lateral injection sites. Improvements were measured with WOMAC and VAS scores after injection of Lidocaine and steroid solution. Patients receiving IACS injections had a measurable improvement in self-reported outcomes as evidenced by standard deviation change in WOMAC and VAS scores. The majority of patients had a clinically significant improvement in VAS scores as compared to their initial measures with a notable amount of patients improving significantly as well on their WOMAC scores, irrespective of the injection site chosen. We have therefore continued the use of palpation-guided intra-articular knee injections in an effort to reduce costs as compared to other injection modalities with positive results in our osteoarthritis patients.

  8. Does the DNA methylase Eco dam pair nucleotide sequences to form site-specific duplexes?

    PubMed

    Buryanov YaI; Zinoviev, V V; Vienozhinskis, M T; Malygin, E G; Nesterenko, V F; Popov, S G; Gorbunov YuA

    1984-03-12

    The Eco dam methylase is active on denatured DNA and single-stranded synthetic oligonucleotides containing GATC sites. The results suggest that on interaction with single-stranded oligonucleotides the Eco dam methylase is able to form a duplex structure within the GATC site, and that this duplex site is a substrate for enzyme.

  9. Does Preadmission Cutaneous Chlorhexidine Preparation Reduce Surgical Site Infections After Total Knee Arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Bhaveen H; Zhou, Peter L; Jauregui, Julio J; Mont, Michael A

    2016-07-01

    Many preventive methodologies seek to reduce the risk of surgical site infections after total knee arthroplasty (TKA), including the use of preoperative chlorhexidine baths and cloths. Although we have demonstrated in previous studies that this may be an efficacious method for infection prevention, our study was underpowered and we therefore set out to evaluate this with a larger sample size. (1) Does a preadmission chlorhexidine cloth skin preparation protocol decrease the risk of surgical site infection in patients undergoing TKA? (2) When stratified using the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) risk categories, which categories are associated with risk reduction from the preadmission chlorhexidine preparation protocol? In our study, all patients (3717 total) who had undergone primary or revision TKA at a single institution between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2013, were identified, of whom 991 patients used the chlorhexidine cloths before surgery and 2726 patients did not. All patients were provided cloths with instructions before surgery; however, as a result of a lack of compliance, we were able to substratify patients into treatment and control cohorts. Additionally, we substratified patients by NHSN risk category to determine differences in infection between the two cohorts (cloth versus no cloth). Patient medical records and an infection-tracking database were reviewed to determine the development of periprosthetic infection (patients who had superficial infections were excluded from our study) in both groups after 1 year surveillance. We then calculated relative risk reductions with use of chlorhexidine gluconate and stratified results based on NHSN risk category. Use of a preoperative chlorhexidine cloth skin preparation protocol is associated with reduced relative risk of periprosthetic infection after TKA (infections with protocol: three of 991 [0.3%]; infections in control: 52 of 2726 [1.9%]; relative risk [RR]: 6.3 [95% confidence interval

  10. DISSS/PSDB - Personnel Security Database Modernization Project: Compilation of data gathered from DOE Operations Office`s site visits

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, R.; Sweeney, D.

    1995-03-15

    This document is a compilation of the information gathered from visits to the DOE Operations Offices. The purpose of these visits was to gather requirements for the modernization of the personnel security database. The initial phase of visits were to sites which had known local systems to augment CPCI. They were; Rocky Flats, Richland, Las Vegas, Savannah River, Oak Ridge, and Oakland. The second phase of site visits were to; Headquarters, Schenectady, Pittsburgh, Idaho Falls, Chicago, and Albuquerque. We also visited the NRC. At each site we reviewed the current clearance process in use at the field office. If the site had a local personnel security database (PSDB), we also reviewed the current PSDB processing. Each meeting was began with the a discussion on the purpose of the meeting and the background of the redesign effort.

  11. Hydrological Tracer Studies at a DOE IFRC Site in Rifle, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, M.; Williams, K. H.; Berman, E. S.; Conrad, M. E.

    2010-12-01

    Research activities at the Department of Energy Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site in Rifle, Colorado, have demonstrated that uranium can successfully be removed from groundwater through stimulation of indigenous metal-reducing bacteria, such as members of the Geobacteraceae. While such removal strategies may be effective over short timescales, the large inventory of uranium sorbed to aquifer sediments contributes to a diffuse and widespread contaminant plume at the Rifle site, leading to persistent uranium contamination of groundwater. Complicating the long-term plume behavior are seasonal changes in aquifer properties (e.g. fluctuating water levels, variations in dissolved oxygen and organic carbon, etc.) that accompany snowmelt and elevated river stage in the Colorado River. As the impact of such changes on contaminant behavior at Rifle is poorly understood, development of novel methods, such as isotopic techniques, is warranted to better constrain aquifer flow properties and resolve surface water-groundwater interactions that may influence long-term uranium mobility. In addition to floodplain scale (ca. 10 hectare) studies of uranium mobility, ongoing research at Rifle is investigating coupled approaches to desorb and reductively immobilize pools of sorbed and aqueous uranium. Performed as part of the “Super 8” field experiment (2010), a variety of conservative and non-conservative chemical compounds were injected into the Rifle aquifer to assess transport properties and quantify rates of reductive immobilization of uranium under different alkalinity conditions. Conservative tracers included sodium bromide (20mM), deuterium (500‰), and O-18 (25‰), whereas reactive amendments included sodium bicarbonate (50mM) and sodium acetate (6mM); the latter two were designed to enhance desorption of uranium from sediments and stimulate the activity of uranium-reducing microorganisms, respectively. The need to introduce the reactive amendments at

  12. Mortality of older construction and craft workers employed at department of energy (DOE) nuclear sites: follow-up through 2011.

    PubMed

    Ringen, Knut; Dement, John; Welch, Laura; Bingham, Eula; Quinn, Patricia; Chen, Anna; Haas, Scott

    2015-02-01

    The Building Trades National Medical Screening Program (BTMed) was established in 1996 to provide occupational medicine screening examinations for construction workers who have worked at US Department of Energy nuclear sites. Workers participating in BTMed between 1998 and 2011 were followed to determine their vital status and mortality experience through December 31, 2011. The cohort includes 18,803 BTMed participants and 2,801 deaths. Cause-specific Standardized Mortality Ratios (SMRs) were calculated based on US death rates. Mortality was elevated for all causes, all cancers, cancers of the trachea, bronchus, and lung and lymphatic and hematopoietic system, mesothelioma, COPD, and asbestosis. Construction workers employed at DOE sites have a significantly increased risk for occupational illnesses. Risks are associated with employment during all time periods covered including after 1980. The cancer risks closely match the cancers identified for DOE compensation from radiation exposures. Continued medical surveillance is important. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Does "Instrumentation" Like Miami's Tequesta Site Generate Environmentally Significant Information About Weather or Different Phenomena, Including Regional and Other Warming Trends?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochs, Michael Ann; Mc Leod, Roger D.; Mc Leod, David M.

    2002-10-01

    We detect certain blue light and other phenomena near Miami's Tequesta site during inclement weather. When the Hopi or Mi'Kmaw seem to be involved in "rainmaking" or "weather-influencing" activities, far larger implications exist. Culturally available information equivalent to that from our technological gadgetry has to accumulate data for dependable modeling of natural phenomena. The result would be a set of specialized observations and their tabulations comparable to the Mayan codicils. Also, a sufficiently broad worldview is needed so that the Hopi, for example, could correctly articulate a legend equivalent to knowledge of north and south magnetic poles. Global views implied are sufficient to indicate awareness of large-scale implications of culturally held, and secret, data. An observant society detecting correlations with weather anomalies, as at Miami's Tequesta site, might predict regional drought. *This paper does not necessarily represent the views of the U.S. E.P.A.

  14. Large-N Seismic Deployment at the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, T.; Snelson, C. M.; Mellors, R. J.; Pitarka, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is multi-institutional and multi-disciplinary project that consists of a series of chemical explosion experiments at the Nevada National Security Site. The goal of SPE is to understand the complicated effect of earth structures on source energy partitioning and seismic wave propagation, develop and validate physics-based monitoring, and ultimately better discriminate low-yield nuclear explosions from background seismicity. Deployment of a large number of seismic sensors is planned for SPE to image the full 3-D wavefield with about 500 three-component sensors and 500 vertical component sensors. This large-N seismic deployment will operate near the site of SPE-5 shot for about one month, recording the SPE-5 shot, ambient noise, and additional controlled-sources. This presentation focuses on the design of the large-N seismic deployment. We show how we optimized the sensor layout based on the geological structure and experiment goals with a limited number of sensors. In addition, we will also show some preliminary record sections from deployment. This work was conducted under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25946 with the U.S. Department of Energy.

  15. Improved localization of phosphorylation sites in simian virus 40 large T antigen.

    PubMed Central

    van Roy, F; Fransen, L; Fiers, W

    1983-01-01

    The location of phosphorylation sites in the large T antigen of simian virus 40 has been studied both by partial chemical cleavage and by partial proteolysis of various forms of large T. These included the full-size wild-type molecule with an apparent molecular weight of 88,000, deleted molecules coded for by the mutants dl1265 and dl1263, and several shortened derivatives generated by the action of a cellular protease. These molecules differed from each other by variations in the carboxy-terminal end. In contrast, a ubiquitous but minor large T form with a molecular weight of 91,000 was found to be modified in the amino-terminal half of the molecule. In addition to the phosphorylation of threonine at position 701 (K.-H. Scheidtmann et al., J. Virol. 38:59-69, 1981), two other discrete domains of phosphorylation were recognized, one at either side of the molecule. The amino-terminal region was located between positions 81 and 124 and contained both phosphothreonine and phosphoserine residues. The carboxy-terminal region was located between approximate positions 500 and 640 and contained at least one phosphoserine residue but no phosphothreonine. The presence in the phosphorylated domains of large T of known recognition sequences for different types of protein kinases is discussed, together with possible functions of large T associated with these domains. Images PMID:6296439

  16. Mutation of large T-antigen-binding site A, but not site B or C, eliminates stalling by RNA polymerase II in the intergenic region of polyomavirus DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Bertin, J; Sunstrom, N A; Acheson, N H

    1993-01-01

    During transcription of the late strand of polyomavirus DNA, RNA polymerase II stalls and accumulates nearby the binding sites on viral DNA recognized by polyomavirus large T antigen. Stalling by RNA polymerases is eliminated when thermolabile large T antigen is inactivated by using a temperature-sensitive virus mutant (J. Bertin, N.-A. Sunstrom, P. Jain, and N. H. Acheson, Virology 189:715-724, 1992). To determine whether stalling by RNA polymerases is mediated through the interaction of large T antigen with one or more of its binding sites, viable polyomavirus mutants that contain altered large-T-antigen-binding sites were constructed. Point mutations were introduced by site-directed mutagenesis into the multiple, clustered G(A/G)GGC pentanucleotides known to be the target sequence for large T-antigen binding. Mutation of the G(A/G)GGC pentanucleotides in the first two binding sites encountered by RNA polymerases in the intergenic region (sites C and B) had no detectable effect on stalling as measured by transcriptional run-on analysis. However, mutation of the two GAGGC pentanucleotides in binding site A, which lies adjacent to the origin of viral DNA replication, eliminated stalling by RNA polymerases. We conclude that binding of large T antigen to site A blocks elongation by RNA polymerase II. Further characterization of virus containing mutated site A did not reveal any effects on early transcription levels or on virus DNA replication. However, the mutant virus gave rise to small plaques, suggesting impairment in some stage of virus growth. Stalling of RNA polymerases by large T antigen bound to the intergenic region of viral DNA may function to prevent transcription from displacing proteins whose binding is required for the normal growth of polyomavirus. Images PMID:8396655

  17. Does transcription play a role in creating a condensin binding site?

    PubMed

    Bernard, Pascal; Vanoosthuyse, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    The highly conserved condensin complex is essential for the condensation and integrity of chromosomes through cell division. Published data argue that high levels of transcription contribute to specify some condensin-binding sites on chromosomes but the exact role of transcription in this process remains elusive. Here we discuss our recent data addressing the role of transcription in establishing a condensin-binding site.

  18. 40 CFR 63.7882 - What site remediation sources at my facility does this subpart affect?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... processes. (2) Remediation material management units. Remediation material management unit means a tank... entire group of remediation material management units used for the site remediations at your site. For... process vent, as defined in § 63.7957, is not a remediation material management unit, but instead this...

  19. Message spreading in networks with stickiness and persistence: Large clustering does not always facilitate large-scale diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Pengbi; Tang, Ming; Wu, Zhi-Xi

    2014-09-01

    Recent empirical studies have confirmed the key roles of complex contagion mechanisms such as memory, social reinforcement, and decay effects in information diffusion and behavior spreading. Inspired by this fact, we here propose a new agent-based model to capture the whole picture of the joint action of the three mechanisms in information spreading, by quantifying the complex contagion mechanisms as stickiness and persistence, and carry out extensive simulations of the model on various networks. By numerical simulations as well as theoretical analysis, we find that the stickiness of the message determines the critical dynamics of message diffusion on tree-like networks, whereas the persistence plays a decisive role on dense regular lattices. In either network, the greater persistence can effectively make the message more invasive. Of particular interest is that our research results renew our previous knowledge that messages can spread broader in networks with large clustering, which turns out to be only true when they can inform a non-zero fraction of the population in the limit of large system size.

  20. Simultaneous non-contiguous deletions using large synthetic DNA and site-specific recombinases

    PubMed Central

    Krishnakumar, Radha; Grose, Carissa; Haft, Daniel H.; Zaveri, Jayshree; Alperovich, Nina; Gibson, Daniel G.; Merryman, Chuck; Glass, John I.

    2014-01-01

    Toward achieving rapid and large scale genome modification directly in a target organism, we have developed a new genome engineering strategy that uses a combination of bioinformatics aided design, large synthetic DNA and site-specific recombinases. Using Cre recombinase we swapped a target 126-kb segment of the Escherichia coli genome with a 72-kb synthetic DNA cassette, thereby effectively eliminating over 54 kb of genomic DNA from three non-contiguous regions in a single recombination event. We observed complete replacement of the native sequence with the modified synthetic sequence through the action of the Cre recombinase and no competition from homologous recombination. Because of the versatility and high-efficiency of the Cre-lox system, this method can be used in any organism where this system is functional as well as adapted to use with other highly precise genome engineering systems. Compared to present-day iterative approaches in genome engineering, we anticipate this method will greatly speed up the creation of reduced, modularized and optimized genomes through the integration of deletion analyses data, transcriptomics, synthetic biology and site-specific recombination. PMID:24914053

  1. Estimating site occupancy and detection probability parameters for meso- and large mammals in a coastal eosystem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Connell, Allan F.; Talancy, Neil W.; Bailey, Larissa L.; Sauer, John R.; Cook, Robert; Gilbert, Andrew T.

    2006-01-01

    Large-scale, multispecies monitoring programs are widely used to assess changes in wildlife populations but they often assume constant detectability when documenting species occurrence. This assumption is rarely met in practice because animal populations vary across time and space. As a result, detectability of a species can be influenced by a number of physical, biological, or anthropogenic factors (e.g., weather, seasonality, topography, biological rhythms, sampling methods). To evaluate some of these influences, we estimated site occupancy rates using species-specific detection probabilities for meso- and large terrestrial mammal species on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA. We used model selection to assess the influence of different sampling methods and major environmental factors on our ability to detect individual species. Remote cameras detected the most species (9), followed by cubby boxes (7) and hair traps (4) over a 13-month period. Estimated site occupancy rates were similar among sampling methods for most species when detection probabilities exceeded 0.15, but we question estimates obtained from methods with detection probabilities between 0.05 and 0.15, and we consider methods with lower probabilities unacceptable for occupancy estimation and inference. Estimated detection probabilities can be used to accommodate variation in sampling methods, which allows for comparison of monitoring programs using different protocols. Vegetation and seasonality produced species-specific differences in detectability and occupancy, but differences were not consistent within or among species, which suggests that our results should be considered in the context of local habitat features and life history traits for the target species. We believe that site occupancy is a useful state variable and suggest that monitoring programs for mammals using occupancy data consider detectability prior to making inferences about species distributions or population change.

  2. A large scale geophysical survey in the archaeological site of Europos (northern Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsokas, G. N.; Giannopoulos, A.; Tsourlos, P.; Vargemezis, G.; Tealby, J. M.; Sarris, A.; Papazachos, C. B.; Savopoulou, T.

    1994-04-01

    The results of a large scale exploration of an archaeological site by geophysical means are presented and discussed. The operation took place in the site where the ruins of the ancient city of Europos are buried. This site is in northern Greece. Resistivity prospecting was employed to detect the remnants of wall foundations in the place where the main urban complex of the ancient city once stood. The data were transformed in an image form depicting, thus, the spatial variation of resistivity in a manner that resembles the plane view of the ruins that could have been drawn if an excavation had taken place. This image revealed the urban plan of the latest times of the life of the city. Trial excavations verified the geophysical result. Magnetic prospecting in the same area complemented the resistivity data. The exact location of the fire hearths, kilns and remnants of collapsed roofs were spotted. Magnetic gradient measurements were taken in an area out of the main complex of the ancient city and revealed the location of several kilns. One of these locations was excavated and a pottery kiln was discovered. The resistivity prospecting in one of the graveyards of the ancient city showed anomalies which were expected and corresponded to monumental tombs. The locations of a few of them were excavated and large burial structures were revealed. Ground probing radar profiles were measured over the tombs which showed pronounced resistivity anomalies, so far unearthed. The relatively high resolving ability of the method assisted the interpretation in the sense that a few attributes were added. In the presented case, it was concluded that a particular tomb consists of two rooms and that it is roofless.

  3. EMP Attachment 2 DOE-SC PNNL Site Data Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Bisping, Lynn E.

    2011-12-21

    This Data Management Plan (DMP) describes the data management processes and activities under the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site Environmental Monitoring Plan. The activities currently in the Plan are limited to offsite environmental surveillance of PNNL Site radiological releases to the air. The DMP provides guidance on data capture, processing and transmittal, and database configuration management. The requirements for the PNNL Site Environmental Monitoring (SEM) Database and associated records are documented in order to assure that vital data are recorded accurately, stored in a manner that retains data integrity, and are suitable for analyst to use. Protocols and procedures must ensure the data will be adequate and robust.

  4. Non-random inactivation of large common fragile site genes in different cancers.

    PubMed

    McAvoy, S; Ganapathiraju, S C; Ducharme-Smith, A L; Pritchett, J R; Kosari, F; Perez, D S; Zhu, Y; James, C D; Smith, D I

    2007-01-01

    The common fragile sites are regions of profound genomic instability found in all individuals. The full size of each region of instability ranges from under one megabase (Mb) to greater than 10 Mbs. At least half of the CFS regions have been found to span extremely large genes that spanned from 600 kb to greater than 2.0 Mbs. The large CFS genes are also very interesting from a cancer perspective as several of them, including FHIT and WWOX, have already demonstrated the capacity to function as tumor suppressor genes, both in vitro and in vivo. We estimate that there may be 40-50 large genes localized in CFS regions. The expression of a number of the large CFS genes has been previously shown to be lost in many different cancers and this is frequently associated with a worse clinical outcome for patients. To determine if there was selection for the inactivation of different large CFS genes in different cancers, we examined the expression of 13 of the 20 known large CFS genes: FHIT, WWOX, PARK2, GRID2, NBEA, DLG2, RORA isoforms 1 and 4, DAB1, CNTNAP2, DMD, IL1RAPL1, IMMP2L and LARGE in breast, ovarian, endometrial and brain cancers using real-time RT-PCR analysis. Each cancer had a distinct profile of different large CFS genes that were inactivated. Interestingly, in breast, ovarian and endometrial cancers there were some cancers that had inactivation of expression of none or only one of the tested genes, while in other specimens there was inactivation of multiple tested genes. Brain cancers had inactivation of many of the tested genes, a number of which function in normal neurological development. We find that there is no relationship between the frequency that any specific CFS is expressed and the frequency that the gene from that region is inactivated in different cancers. Instead, it appears that different cancers select for the inactivation of different large CFS genes. Copyright (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Environmental Characteristics of EPA, NRC, and DOE Sites Contaminated with Radioactive Substances

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This report is one of several documents developed cooperatively by the Interagency Environmental Pathway Modeling Workgroup to help bring a uniform approach to solving environmental modeling problems common to site remediation and restoration efforts.

  6. Developing of the large-bore powder gun for the Nevada test site

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Brian J; Esparza, James S

    2009-01-01

    Plate-impact experiments on single stage guns provide very planar loading conditions suitable for studying complex phenomena such as phase transitions and material strength, and provide important data useful for constraining and validating predictive models. The objective of the current work was to develop a large-bore (3.5-inches or greater) powder gun capable of accelerating projectiles to moderately high velocities (greater than 2.25 km/s) for impact experiments at Nevada Test Site. This gun will span a performance gap between existing gun facilities and provide a means of examining phenomena over a wide range of stresses and time-scales. Advantages of the large-bore gun include the capability to load multiple samples simultaneously, the use of large diameter samples that significantly extend the time duration of the experiment, and minimal tilt (no bow). This new capability required the development of a disposable confinement system that used an explosively driven closure method to prevent contamination from moving up into the gun system. Experimental results for both the gun system and the explosive valve are presented.

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF THE LARGE-BORE POWDER GUN FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, B.J.; Esparza, J.

    2009-12-28

    Plate-impact experiments on single stage guns provide very planar loading conditions suitable for studying complex phenomena such as phase transitions and material strength, and provide important data useful for constraining and validating predictive models. The objective of the current work was to develop a large-bore (3.5'' or greater) powder gun capable of accelerating projectiles to moderately high velocities (greater than 2.25 km/s) for impact experiments at Nevada Test Site. This gun will span a performance gap between existing gun facilities and provide a means of examining phenomena over a wide range of stresses and time-scales. Advantages of the large-bore gun include the capability to load multiple samples simultaneously, the use of large diameter samples that significantly extend the time duration of the experiment, and minimal tilt (no bow). This new capability required the development of a disposable confinement system that used an explosively driven closure method to prevent contamination from moving up into the gun system. Experimental results for both the gun system and the explosive valve are presented.

  8. Does living near a Superfund site contribute to higher polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) exposure?

    PubMed

    Choi, Anna L; Levy, Jonathan I; Dockery, Douglas W; Ryan, Louise M; Tolbert, Paige E; Altshul, Larisa M; Korrick, Susan A

    2006-07-01

    We assessed determinants of cord serum polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) levels among 720 infants born between 1993 and 1998 to mothers living near a PCB-contaminated Superfund site in Massachusetts, measuring the sum of 51 PCB congeners (capital sigmaPCB) and ascertaining maternal address, diet, sociodemographics, and exposure risk factors. Addresses were geocoded to obtain distance to the Superfund site and neighborhood characteristics. We modeled log10(capital sigmaPCB) as a function of potential individual and neighborhood risk factors, mapping model residuals to assess spatial correlates of PCB exposure. Similar analyses were performed for light (mono-tetra) and heavy (penta-deca) PCBs to assess potential differences in exposure pathways as a function of relative volatility. PCB-118 (relatively prevalent in site sediments and cord serum) was assessed separately. The geometric mean of capital sigmaPCB levels was 0.40 (range, 0.068-18.14) ng/g serum. Maternal age and birthplace were the strongest predictors of capital sigmaPCB levels. Maternal consumption of organ meat and local dairy products was associated with higher and smoking and previous lactation with lower capital sigmaPCB levels. Infants born later in the study had lower capital sigmaPCB levels, likely due to temporal declines in exposure and site remediation in 1994-1995. No association was found between capital sigmaPCB levels and residential distance from the Superfund site. Similar results were found with light and heavy PCBs and PCB-118. Previously reported demographic (age) and other (lactation, smoking, diet) correlates of PCB exposure, as well as local factors (consumption of local dairy products and Superfund site dredging) but not residential proximity to the site, were important determinants of cord serum PCB levels in the study community.

  9. Environmental dose assessment methods for normal operations at DOE nuclear sites

    SciTech Connect

    Strenge, D.L.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Corley, J.P.

    1982-09-01

    Methods for assessing public exposure to radiation from normal operations at DOE facilities are reviewed in this report. The report includes a discussion of environmental doses to be calculated, a review of currently available environmental pathway models and a set of recommended models for use when environmental pathway modeling is necessary. Currently available models reviewed include those used by DOE contractors, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and other organizations involved in environmental assessments. General modeling areas considered for routine releases are atmospheric transport, airborne pathways, waterborne pathways, direct exposure to penetrating radiation, and internal dosimetry. The pathway models discussed in this report are applicable to long-term (annual) uniform releases to the environment: they do not apply to acute releases resulting from accidents or emergency situations.

  10. Splicing in Caenorhabditis elegans does not require an AG at the 3' splice acceptor site.

    PubMed Central

    Aroian, R V; Levy, A D; Koga, M; Ohshima, Y; Kramer, J M; Sternberg, P W

    1993-01-01

    The dinucleotide AG, found at the 3' end of virtually all eukaryotic pre-mRNA introns, is thought to be essential for splicing. Reduction-of-function mutations in two Caenorhabditis elegans genes, the receptor tyrosine kinase gene let-23 and the collagen gene dpy-10, both alter the AG at the end of a short (ca. 50-nucleotide) intron to AA. The in vivo effects of these mutations were studied by sequencing polymerase chain reaction-amplified reverse-transcribed RNA isolated from the two mutants. As expected, we find transcripts that splice to a cryptic AG, skip an exon, and retain an unspliced intron. However, we also find significant levels of splicing at the mutated 3' splice site (AA) and at nearby non-AG dinucleotides. Our results indicate that for short C. elegans introns an AG is not required for splicing at either the correct 3' splice site or incorrect sites. Analysis of a splice site mutant involving a longer, 316-nucleotide C. elegans intron indicates that an AG is also not required there for splicing. We hypothesize that elements besides the invariant AG, e.g., an A-U-rich region, a UUUC motif, and/or a potential branch point sequence, are directing the selection of the 3' splice site and that in wild-type genes these elements cooperate so that proper splicing occurs. Images PMID:8417357

  11. Cyanide does more to inhibit heme enzymes, than merely serving as an active-site ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Parashar, Abhinav; Venkatachalam, Avanthika; Gideon, Daniel Andrew; Manoj, Kelath Murali

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • Cyanide (CN) is a well-studied toxic principle, known to inhibit heme-enzymes. • Inhibition is supposed to result from CN binding at the active site as a ligand. • Diverse heme enzymes’ CN inhibition profiles challenge prevailing mechanism. • Poor binding efficiency of CN at low enzyme concentrations and ligand pressures. • CN-based diffusible radicals cause ‘non-productive electron transfers’ (inhibition). - Abstract: The toxicity of cyanide is hitherto attributed to its ability to bind to heme proteins’ active site and thereby inhibit their activity. It is shown herein that the long-held interpretation is inadequate to explain several observations in heme-enzyme reaction systems. Generation of cyanide-based diffusible radicals in heme-enzyme reaction milieu could shunt electron transfers (by non-active site processes), and thus be detrimental to the efficiency of oxidative outcomes.

  12. Site Selection for DOE/JIP Gas Hydrate Drilling in the Northern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Collett, T.S.; Riedel, M.; Cochran, J.R.; Boswell, R.M.; Kumar, Pushpendra; Sathe, A.V.

    2008-07-01

    Studies of geologic and geophysical data from the offshore of India have revealed two geologically distinct areas with inferred gas hydrate occurrences: the passive continental margins of the Indian Peninsula and along the Andaman convergent margin. The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) Expedition 01 was designed to study the occurrence of gas hydrate off the Indian Peninsula and along the Andaman convergent margin with special emphasis on understanding the geologic and geochemical controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate in these two diverse settings. NGHP Expedition 01 established the presence of gas hydrates in Krishna- Godavari, Mahanadi and Andaman basins. The expedition discovered one of the richest gas hydrate accumulations yet documented (Site 10 in the Krishna-Godavari Basin), documented the thickest and deepest gas hydrate stability zone yet known (Site 17 in Andaman Sea), and established the existence of a fully-developed gas hydrate system in the Mahanadi Basin (Site 19).

  13. Does reintroducing large wood influence the hydraulic landscape of a lowland river system?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matheson, Adrian; Thoms, Martin; Reid, Michael

    2017-09-01

    Our understanding of the effectiveness of reintroduced large wood for restoration is largely based on studies from high energy river systems. By contrast, few studies of the effectiveness of reintroducing large wood have been undertaken on large, low energy, lowland river systems: river systems where large wood is a significant physical feature on the in-channel environment. This study investigated the effect of reintroduced large wood on the hydraulic landscape of the Barwon-Darling River, Australia, at low flows. To achieve this, the study compared three hydraulic landscapes of replicated reference (naturally wooded), control (unwooded,) and managed (wood reintroduced) treatments on three low flow periods. These time periods were prior to the reintroduction of large wood to managed reaches; several months after the reintroduction of large wood into the managed reaches; and then more than four years after wood reintroduction following several large flood events. Hydraulic landscapes of reaches were characterised using a range of spatial measures calculated from velocity measurements taken with a boat-mounted Acoustic Doppler Profiler. We hypothesised that reintroduced large wood would increase the diversity of the hydraulic landscape at low flows and that managed reaches would be more similar to the reference reaches. Our results suggest that the reintroduction of large wood did not significantly change the character of the hydraulic landscape at the reach scale after several months (p = 0.16) or several years (p = 0.29). Overall, the character of the hydraulic landscape in the managed reaches was more similar to the hydraulic landscape of the control reaches than the hydraulic landscape of the reference reaches, at low flows. Some variability in the hydraulic landscapes was detected over time, and this may reflect reworking of riverbed sediments and sensitivity to variation in discharge. The lack of a response in the low flow hydraulic landscape to the

  14. Cyanide does more to inhibit heme enzymes, than merely serving as an active-site ligand.

    PubMed

    Parashar, Abhinav; Venkatachalam, Avanthika; Gideon, Daniel Andrew; Manoj, Kelath Murali

    2014-12-12

    The toxicity of cyanide is hitherto attributed to its ability to bind to heme proteins' active site and thereby inhibit their activity. It is shown herein that the long-held interpretation is inadequate to explain several observations in heme-enzyme reaction systems. Generation of cyanide-based diffusible radicals in heme-enzyme reaction milieu could shunt electron transfers (by non-active site processes), and thus be detrimental to the efficiency of oxidative outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Does distant homology with Evf reveal a lipid binding site in Bacillus thuringiensis cytolytic toxins?

    PubMed

    Rigden, Daniel J

    2009-05-19

    The Cry and Cyt classes of insecticidal toxins derived from the sporulating bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis are valuable substitutes for synthetic pesticides in agricultural contexts. Crystal structures and many biochemical data have provided insights into their molecular mechanisms, generally thought to involve oligomerization and pore formation, but have not localised the site on Cyt toxins responsible for selective binding of phospholipids containing unsaturated fatty acids. Here, distant homology between the structure of Cyt toxins and Erwinia virulence factor (Evf) is demonstrated which, along with sequence conservation analysis, allows a putative lipid binding site to be localised in the toxins.

  16. Directed Evolution of RebH for Site Selective Halogenation of Large, Biologically Active Molecules**

    PubMed Central

    Payne, James T.; Poor, Catherine B.

    2015-01-01

    We recently characterized the substrate scope of wild-type RebH and evolved variants of this enzyme with improved stability for biocatalysis. The substrate scopes of both RebH and the stabilized variants, however, are limited primarily to compounds similar in size to tryptophan. We have now used a substrate walking approach to further evolve RebH variants with expanded substrate scope. Two particularly notable variants were identified: 3-SS, which provides high conversion of tricyclic tryptoline derivatives; and 4-V, which accepts a broad range of large indoles and carbazoles. This constitutes the first reported use of directed evolution to enable functionalization of substrates not accepted by wild-type RebH and demonstrates the utility of RebH variants for site-selective halogenation of biologically active compounds. PMID:25678465

  17. Large Scale Helium Liquefaction and Considerations for Site Services for a Plant Located in Algeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froehlich, P.; Clausen, J. J.

    2008-03-01

    The large-scale liquefaction of helium extracted from natural gas is depicted. Based on a block diagram the process chain, starting with the pipeline downstream of the natural-gas plant to the final storage of liquid helium, is explained. Information will be provided about the recent experiences during installation and start-up of a bulk helium liquefaction plant located in Skikda, Algeria, including part-load operation based on a reduced feed gas supply. The local working and ambient conditions are described, including challenging logistic problems like shipping and receiving of parts, qualified and semi-qualified subcontractors, basic provisions and tools on site, and precautions to sea water and ambient conditions. Finally, the differences in commissioning (technically and evaluation of time and work packages) to European locations and standards will be discussed.

  18. A Large-Scale Assessment of Nucleic Acids Binding Site Prediction Programs

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Zhichao; Westhof, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Computational prediction of nucleic acid binding sites in proteins are necessary to disentangle functional mechanisms in most biological processes and to explore the binding mechanisms. Several strategies have been proposed, but the state-of-the-art approaches display a great diversity in i) the definition of nucleic acid binding sites; ii) the training and test datasets; iii) the algorithmic methods for the prediction strategies; iv) the performance measures and v) the distribution and availability of the prediction programs. Here we report a large-scale assessment of 19 web servers and 3 stand-alone programs on 41 datasets including more than 5000 proteins derived from 3D structures of protein-nucleic acid complexes. Well-defined binary assessment criteria (specificity, sensitivity, precision, accuracy…) are applied. We found that i) the tools have been greatly improved over the years; ii) some of the approaches suffer from theoretical defects and there is still room for sorting out the essential mechanisms of binding; iii) RNA binding and DNA binding appear to follow similar driving forces and iv) dataset bias may exist in some methods. PMID:26681179

  19. Commercial WWW Site Appeal: How Does It Affect Online Food and Drink Consumers' Purchasing Behavior?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Gregory K.; Manning, Barbara J.

    1998-01-01

    Reports on an online survey of consumer attitudes toward online storefronts marketing barbecue sauce, cheese, olive oil, potato chips, and other specialty food products. The relationship between consumer attitudes toward Web sites and the likelihood of purchase, as well as demographic factors related to online food and drink buying, are described.…

  20. Commercial WWW Site Appeal: How Does It Affect Online Food and Drink Consumers' Purchasing Behavior?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Gregory K.; Manning, Barbara J.

    1998-01-01

    Reports on an online survey of consumer attitudes toward online storefronts marketing barbecue sauce, cheese, olive oil, potato chips, and other specialty food products. The relationship between consumer attitudes toward Web sites and the likelihood of purchase, as well as demographic factors related to online food and drink buying, are described.…

  1. Does repeated human intrusion alter use of wildland sites by red squirrels? Multiyear experimental evidence

    Treesearch

    Kevin J. Gutzwiller; Samuel K. Riffell

    2008-01-01

    Intrusion by humans into wildlife habitat during recreational activities has become a worldwide conservation concern. Low levels of intrusion, which occur frequently in many wildlands, could influence use of sites by red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) and have important ramifications for conservation. Red squirrels can influence forest...

  2. Donor site morbidity of the fasciocutaneous radial forearm flap: what does the patient really bother?

    PubMed Central

    de Witt, Christien A.; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M.; Quak, Jasper J.; Leemans, C. René

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was the evaluation of donor site morbidity in head and neck cancer patients after reconstruction using a free vascularized radial forearm flap with emphasis on subjective complaints. Fifty patients who underwent at least 6 months before a reconstruction using a free vascularized radial forearm flap were asked to fill out two questionnaires regarding cosmetics and sensibility and forearm disabilities. Furthermore, a function test including movement extensions (flexion–extension, ulnar–radial deviation and pronation–supination), strength (pinch and grip) and temperature (digiti I and V) of the donor and non-donor site were measured and compared. Thirty-five percent of the patients reported no complaints regarding cosmetics and sensibility and 75% mentioned no forearm disabilities. There was no difference in movement extensions, temperature and grip strength between donor and non-donor sites. The difference in pinch strength appeared to be significant (p < 0.001). The total score of the questionnaire on forearm disabilities correlated significantly with extension, pronation and grip strength of the donor arm. Donor site morbidity of the radial forearm flap measured by objective functional tests was limited but subjective self-ratings revealed complaints regarding cosmestics and sensibility and to a lesser extent regarding forearm disability. The present data may be used for solid patient counselling. PMID:17323087

  3. Thinning young oak stands on poor sites in southern New Jersey does not pay

    Treesearch

    S. Little; H. A. Somes

    1956-01-01

    Between 1933 and 1940 the Civilian Conservation Corps undertook many cultural operations in the state forests of southern New Jersey; one of the most common was thinnings in predominantly oak stands on upland sites. The thinnings varied from very light - removing only trees that would soon die - to very heavy. They were usually justified on the prevalent notion that...

  4. INNOVATIVE ALARA TOOLS AND WORK PRACTICES USED AT THE DOE HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect

    WAGGONER LO

    2010-02-12

    The Hanford Nuclear Reservation occupies an area of 586 square miles in southeastern Washington state. The site was created as part of the World War II Manhattan Project to produce weapons grade plutonium. A multitude of old reactor plants, processing facilities, underground tank farms, contaminated soil and ground water remain and are part of an on-going environmental cleanup mission of the site. The Columbia River bisects Hanford, and the concern is that the river will become contaminated if the sources of contamination are not removed. Currently facilities are being removed, the ground water is being treated, and contaminated soil is being transferred to an approved burial ground about 15 miles away from the River located in the center of the Hanford Site The remaining facilities and adjacent structures are undergoing D&D (decontaminate and demolish) and to date, significant progress has been made. During this presentation, I will discuss how we are using innovative tools and work practices to D&D these Hanford Site facilities.

  5. Ferruginous hawk nesting on the US DOE Hanford Site: Case history of a recent invasion caused by transmission lines

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzner, R.E.; Newell, R.L.

    1989-04-01

    Ferruginous hawks were an uncommon nesting raptor on the US DOE Hanford Site prior to 1987, with only one or two pairs nesting each year. In 1987, four pair were found nesting on transmission towers. In 1988, seven pairs were observed nesting on the towers. This recent increase in nesting pairs may correspond to an acceptance phenomena related to age of the transmission towers. The increase may be due to an overall increase in the population of ferruginous hawks in Washington. 12 refs., 4 figs.

  6. BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLING AND ENVIRONMENTAL STABILITY OF PLUTONIUM RELEVANT TO LONG-TERM STEWARDSHIP OF DOE SITES

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, A.J.; Gillow, J.B.; Dodge, C.J.

    2006-06-01

    Pu is generally considered to be relatively immobile in the terrestrial environment, with the exception of transport via airborne and erosion mechanisms. More recently the transport of colloidal forms of Pu is being studied as a mobilization pathway from subsurface contaminated soils and sediments. The overall objective of this research is to understand the biogeochemical cycling of Pu in environments of interest to long-term DOE stewardship issues. Microbial processes are central to the immobilization of Pu species, through the metabolism of organically complexed Pu species and Pu associated with extracellular carrier phases and the creation of environments favorable for retardation of Pu transport.

  7. BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLING AND ENVIRONMENTAL STABILITY OF PLUTONIUM RELEVANT TO LONG-TERM STEWARDSHIP OF DOE SITES.

    SciTech Connect

    FRANCIS, A.J.; GILLOW, J.P.; DODGE, C.J.

    2006-11-16

    Pu is generally considered to be relatively immobile in the terrestrial environment, with the exception of transport via airborne and erosion mechanisms. More recently the transport of colloidal forms of Pu is being studied as a mobilization pathway from subsurface contaminated soils and sediments. The overall objective of this research is to understand the biogeochemical cycling of Pu in environments of interest to long-term DOE stewardship issues. Microbial processes are central to the immobilization of Pu species, through the metabolism of organically complexed Pu species and Pu associated with extracellular carrier phases and the creation of environments favorable for retardation of Pu transport.

  8. Tailoring Release Protocols to Individual Species and Sites: One Size Does Not Fit All

    PubMed Central

    Moseby, Katherine E.; Hill, Brydie M.; Lavery, Tyrone H.

    2014-01-01

    Reintroduction programs for threatened species often include elaborate release strategies designed to improve success, but their advantages are rarely tested scientifically. We used a set of four experiments to demonstrate that the influence of release strategies on short-term reintroduction outcomes is related to both intrinsic and extrinsic factors. We compared different reintroduction strategies for three mammal species in an arid environment where exotic mammalian predators were removed. Wild greater stick-nest rats selected vegetation shelter sites with greater structural density than captive-bred rats, travelled further from the release site and experienced lower rates of mortality. In comparison, there was no difference in mortality or movement between wild and captive-bred greater bilbies. Burrowing bettongs and greater bilbies were also subjected to immediate and delayed release strategies and whilst no difference was detected in bilbies, bettongs that were subjected to delayed releases lost less weight and took less time to establish burrows than those that were immediately released. Interspecific differences in treatment response were attributed to predation risk, the nature of the release site, and behavioural traits such as shelter investment and sociality. Our varied results highlight the inadequacies of review articles focusing on optimum release protocols due to their attempt to generalise across species and release sites. We provide an example of a predictive model to guide future release strategy experimentation that recognises the range of intrinsic and extrinsic factors influencing reintroduction outcomes. We encourage researchers to treat programs experimentally, identify individual site and species characters that may influence release strategies and record data on movements, mortality, weight dynamics, and settling times and distances. The inherent issues of small sample size and low statistical power that plague most reintroduction

  9. Tailoring release protocols to individual species and sites: one size does not fit all.

    PubMed

    Moseby, Katherine E; Hill, Brydie M; Lavery, Tyrone H

    2014-01-01

    Reintroduction programs for threatened species often include elaborate release strategies designed to improve success, but their advantages are rarely tested scientifically. We used a set of four experiments to demonstrate that the influence of release strategies on short-term reintroduction outcomes is related to both intrinsic and extrinsic factors. We compared different reintroduction strategies for three mammal species in an arid environment where exotic mammalian predators were removed. Wild greater stick-nest rats selected vegetation shelter sites with greater structural density than captive-bred rats, travelled further from the release site and experienced lower rates of mortality. In comparison, there was no difference in mortality or movement between wild and captive-bred greater bilbies. Burrowing bettongs and greater bilbies were also subjected to immediate and delayed release strategies and whilst no difference was detected in bilbies, bettongs that were subjected to delayed releases lost less weight and took less time to establish burrows than those that were immediately released. Interspecific differences in treatment response were attributed to predation risk, the nature of the release site, and behavioural traits such as shelter investment and sociality. Our varied results highlight the inadequacies of review articles focusing on optimum release protocols due to their attempt to generalise across species and release sites. We provide an example of a predictive model to guide future release strategy experimentation that recognises the range of intrinsic and extrinsic factors influencing reintroduction outcomes. We encourage researchers to treat programs experimentally, identify individual site and species characters that may influence release strategies and record data on movements, mortality, weight dynamics, and settling times and distances. The inherent issues of small sample size and low statistical power that plague most reintroduction

  10. Support for site testing of the European Extremely Large Telescope: precipitable water vapor over Paranal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerber, Florian; Querel, Richard R.; Hanuschik, Reinhard W.; Chacón, Arlette; Caneo, Marta; Cortes, Lissette; Cure, Michel; Illanes, Lizett; Naylor, David A.; Smette, Alain; Sarazin, Marc; Rabanus, David; Tompkins, Gregory

    2010-07-01

    In support of characterization of potential sites for the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) the European Southern Observatory (ESO), the Institute for Space Imaging Science (ISIS) and the astrometeorology group of the Universidad Valparaiso have jointly established an improved understanding of atmospheric precipitable water vapour (PWV) above ESO's La Silla Paranal Observatory. In a first step, 8 years worth of high resolution near-IR spectra taken with VLT-UVES have been statistically analysed to reconstruct the PWV history above Paranal. To this end a radiative transfer model of Earth's atmosphere (BTRAM) developed by ISIS has been used. A median PWV of 2.1 mm is found for Paranal based on UVES data covering the period 2001-2008. Furthermore we conclude that Paranal can serve as a reference site for Northern Chile due to the stable atmospheric conditions in the region. The median offset between Paranal and Armazones is derived to be 0.3 mm, but local arbitrary variations of a few tenths of a mm between the sites have been found by measurement. In order to better understand the systematics involved two dedicated campaigns were conducted in August and November 2009. Several methods for determining the water column were employed, including radiosonde launches, continuous measurements by infrared radiometer, and VLT instruments operating at various wavelengths: CRIRES, UVES, VISIR and X-shooter. In a first for astronomical instruments all methods have been evaluated with respect to the radiosondes, the established standard in atmospheric research. Agreement between the radiosondes and the IR radiometer (IRMA) is excellent while all other astronomical methods covering a wavelength range from 700 - 20000 nm have also been successfully validated in a quantitative manner. All available observations were compared to satellite estimates of water vapour above the observatory in an attempt to ground-truth the satellite data. GOES can successfully be used for site

  11. Report on the development of the large-bore powder gun for the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    B.J. Jensen

    2009-03-01

    Experiments are needed to locate phase boundaries and to provide both Hugoniot data and off-Hugoniot data (such as principle isentrope, refreezing, dynamic strength, etc.) achieved through complex loading paths. The objective of the current work was to de- velop a large bore (3.5 inch or greater) powder gun capable of accelerating projectiles to moderately high velocities exceeding 2 km/s for impact experiments. A total of 24 ex- periments were performed to measure the projectile velocity, breech strain, and projectile tilt to demonstrate the performance of the gun up to the maximum breech capacity of 16 pounds of propellant. Physics experiments using a multislug method were performed to obtain sound speed and Hugoniot for shocked cerium metal and to demonstrate the ability of the large bore gun to conduct well-defined, plate-impact experiments. In addition, six experiments were performed on the prototype containment system to examine the ability of the launcher and containment system to withstand the impact event and contain the propellant gases and impact debris postshot. The data presented here were essential for qualification of the launcher for experiments to be conducted at the U1a complex of the Nevada Test Site.

  12. 3D modelling of facade features on large sites acquired by vehicle based laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulaassal, H.; Landes, T.; Grussenmeyer, P.

    2011-12-01

    Mobile mapping laser scanning systems have become more and more widespread for the acquisition of millions of 3D points on large and geometrically complex urban sites. Vehicle-based Laser Scanning (VLS) systems travel many kilometers while acquiring raw point clouds which are registered in real time in a common coordinate system. Improvements of the acquisition steps as well as the automatic processing of the collected point clouds are still a conundrum for researchers. This paper shows some results obtained by application, on mobile laser scanner data, of segmentation and reconstruction algorithms intended initially to generate individual vector facade models using stationary Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS) data. The operating algorithms are adapted so as to take into account characteristics of VLS data. The intrinsic geometry of a point cloud as well as the relative geometry between registered point clouds are different from that obtained by a static TLS. The amount of data provided by this acquisition technique is another issue. Such particularities should be taken into consideration while processing this type of point clouds. The segmentation of VLS data is carried out based on an adaptation of RANSAC algorithm. Edge points of each element are extracted by applying a second algorithm. Afterwards, the vector models of each facade element are reconstructed. In order to validate the results, large samples with different characteristics have been introduced in the developed processing chain. The limitations as well as the capabilities of each process will be emphasized in terms of geometry and processing time.

  13. Seismic Hazard Characterization at the DOE Savannah River Site (SRS): Status report

    SciTech Connect

    Savy, J.B.

    1994-06-24

    The purpose of the Seismic Hazard Characterization project for the Savannah River Site (SRS-SHC) is to develop estimates of the seismic hazard for several locations within the SRS. Given the differences in the geology and geotechnical characteristics at each location, the estimates of the seismic hazard are to allow for the specific local conditions at each site. Characterization of seismic hazard is a critical factor for the design of new facilities as well as for the review and potential retrofit of existing facilities at SRS. The scope of the SRS seismic hazard characterization reported in this document is limited to the Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA). The goal of the project is to provide seismic hazard estimates based on a state-of-the-art method which is consistent with developments and findings of several ongoing studies which are deemed to bring improvements in the state of the seismic hazard analyses.

  14. Site Selection for DOE/JIP Gas Hydrate Drilling in the Northern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, D.R.; Shelander, D.; Dai, J.; McConnell, D.; Shedd, W.; Frye, M.; Ruppel, C.; Boswell, R.; Jones, E.; Collett, T.S.; Rose, K.; Dugan, B.; Wood, W.; Latham, T.

    2008-07-01

    In the late spring of 2008, the Chevron-led Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project (JIP) expects to conduct an exploratory drilling and logging campaign to better understand gas hydrate-bearing sands in the deepwater Gulf of Mexico. The JIP Site Selection team selected three areas to test alternative geological models and geophysical interpretations supporting the existence of potential high gas hydrate saturations in reservoir-quality sands. The three sites are near existing drill holes which provide geological and geophysical constraints in Alaminos Canyon (AC) lease block 818, Green Canyon (GC) 955, and Walker Ridge (WR) 313. At the AC818 site, gas hydrate is interpreted to occur within the Oligocene Frio volcaniclastic sand at the crest of a fold that is shallow enough to be in the hydrate stability zone. Drilling at GC955 will sample a faulted, buried Pleistocene channel-levee system in an area characterized by seafloor fluid expulsion features, structural closure associated with uplifted salt, and abundant seismic evidence for upward migration of fluids and gas into the sand-rich parts of the sedimentary section. Drilling at WR313 targets ponded sheet sands and associated channel/levee deposits within a minibasin, making this a non-structural play. The potential for gas hydrate occurrence at WR313 is supported by shingled phase reversals consistent with the transition from gas-charged sand to overlying gas-hydrate saturated sand. Drilling locations have been selected at each site to 1) test geological methods and models used to infer the occurrence of gas hydrate in sand reservoirs in different settings in the northern Gulf of Mexico; 2) calibrate geophysical models used to detect gas hydrate sands, map reservoir thicknesses, and estimate the degree of gas hydrate saturation; and 3) delineate potential locations for subsequent JIP drilling and coring operations that will collect samples for comprehensive physical property, geochemical and other

  15. Site selection for DOE/JIP gas hydrate drilling in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutchinson, Deborah; Shelander, Dianna; Dai, J.; McConnell, D.; Shedd, William; Frye, Matthew; Ruppel, Carolyn; Boswell, R.; Jones, Emrys; Collett, Timothy S.; Rose, Kelly K.; Dugan, Brandon; Wood, Warren T.

    2008-01-01

    n the late spring of 2008, the Chevron-led Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project (JIP) expects to conduct an exploratory drilling and logging campaign to better understand gas hydrate-bearing sands in the deepwater Gulf of Mexico. The JIP Site Selection team selected three areas to test alternative geological models and geophysical interpretations supporting the existence of potential high gas hydrate saturations in reservoir-quality sands. The three sites are near existing drill holes which provide geological and geophysical constraints in Alaminos Canyon (AC) lease block 818, Green Canyon (GC) 955, and Walker Ridge (WR) 313. At the AC818 site, gas hydrate is interpreted to occur within the Oligocene Frio volcaniclastic sand at the crest of a fold that is shallow enough to be in the hydrate stability zone. Drilling at GC955 will sample a faulted, buried Pleistocene channel-levee system in an area characterized by seafloor fluid expulsion features, structural closure associated with uplifted salt, and abundant seismic evidence for upward migration of fluids and gas into the sand-rich parts of the sedimentary section. Drilling at WR313 targets ponded sheet sands and associated channel/levee deposits within a minibasin, making this a non-structural play. The potential for gas hydrate occurrence at WR313 is supported by shingled phase reversals consistent with the transition from gas-charged sand to overlying gas-hydrate saturated sand. Drilling locations have been selected at each site to 1) test geological methods and models used to infer the occurrence of gas hydrate in sand reservoirs in different settings in the northern Gulf of Mexico; 2) calibrate geophysical models used to detect gas hydrate sands, map reservoir thicknesses, and estimate the degree of gas hydrate saturation; and 3) delineate potential locations for subsequent JIP drilling and coring operations that will collect samples for comprehensive physical property, geochemical and other

  16. Does the site of anastomosis for esophagectomy affect long-term quality of life?

    PubMed

    Wormald, J C R; Bennett, J; van Leuven, M; Lewis, M P N

    2016-01-01

    Long-term survival after esophagectomy is improving, and hence, quality of life (QOL) of these patients has become a priority. There has been extensive debate regarding the optimal site of surgical anastomosis (cervical or intrathoracic). We aimed to evaluate the impact of anastomotic site on long-term QOL postesophagectomy. Quality of life questionnaires (European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer [EORTC] C-30 and OG-25) were sent to patients surviving over 3 years following esophagectomy. The data were analyzed by site of esophagogastric anastomosis: intrathoracic or cervical. EORTC C-30 data were compared against the reference population data. Of the patients, 62 responded (82%) with a median time postsurgery of 6.1 years (range 3-12 years). Patient demographics were comparable. There was no significant difference between cervical or intrathoracic anastomosis groups for functional or symptom scores, focusing on dysphagia (cervical = 8.8 vs. intrathoracic = 17.6, P = 0.24), odynophagia (cervical = 13.4 vs. intrathoracic = 16.1, P = 0.68) and swallowing problems (cervical = 8.1 vs. intrathoracic = 13.4, P = 0.32). There was no difference in overall health score between groups (cervical = 70.5 vs. intrathoracic = 71.6, P = 0.46). Overall general health score was comparable with the reference population (esophagectomy group P = 70.9 ± 22.1 vs. reference population = 71.2 ± 22.4, P = 0.93). There is no difference in long-term QOL after esophagectomy between patients with a cervical or intrathoracic anastomosis. Scores compare favorably with EORTC reference data. Survival after esophagectomy is associated with recovery of QOL in the long term, regardless of site of anastomosis and despite worse gastrointestinal-related symptoms.

  17. Generic guidelines versus site-specific assessments: Does marriage make sense?

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudet, C.L.; Keenleyside, K.A.; Smith, S.L.; Kent, R.A.; Wong, M.P.

    1995-12-31

    The maintenance, protection and restoration of a high level of environmental quality requires the availability of practical scientific tools. Environmental quality guidelines (also called criteria) are one such scientific tool that help measure progress towards these goals. These guidelines provide scientific benchmarks that can offer consistency and clarity in defining scientific measures for environmental quality that are easily understood, communicated, and implemented as the basis for management decisions. At the same time, debate exists over the use of generic guidelines versus site-specific risk assessments. It is the contention that generic and site-specific approaches are not mutually exclusive, but complementary decision-support tools and that any apparent controversy stems from an incomplete understanding of the nature and intent of generic environmental quality guidelines or from the use of guidelines in the absence of a coherent framework. The authors advocate an approach that marries the strengths of the generic and site-specific approaches and promotes consistent, scientifically-defensible decisions that support broad societal goals for environmental protection. Using Canadian environmental quality guidelines as an example, they provide an overview of the role of environmental quality guidelines in decision-making, with concrete examples of their implementation in addressing specific environmental quality issues.

  18. Site of intrauterine artificial insemination in the bitch does not affect sperm distribution within the uterus.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, F B; Malm, C; Henry, M; Gheller, V A; Serakides, R; Neves, M M; Macedo, S P; Figueiredo, M S; Andrade, M E J; Chaves, M S; Silva, M X; Rezende, C M F; Melo, E G

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the distribution of frozen-thawed spermatozoa within the uterine lumen and oviducts following intrauterine laparoscopic deposition at two sites. Twelve bitches of unknown reproductive history were randomly distributed into two groups. Semen (3 ml containing 300 × 10(6) frozen-thawed spermatozoa) was infused at the uterine body (UB group) or at the cranial tip of the left uterine horn. A 22-G catheter was used to access the uterine lumen. Sperm cell distribution was evaluated after ovariohysterectomy performed 3 h after artificial insemination (AI). There was no difference between groups in mean time to perform AI. Spermatozoa were detected in all uterine segments, including the tip of both horns, but none was detected in the oviduct. The 22-G catheter facilitated deposition of semen in the uterine lumen, particularly at the UB site. Sperm cell distribution occurred evenly along both horns, independent of the site of semen deposition.

  19. Does underwater flash photography affect the behaviour, movement and site persistence of seahorses?

    PubMed

    Harasti, D; Gladstone, W

    2013-11-01

    The effect of flash photography on seahorse species has never been tested. An experiment was established to test the effect of flash photography and the handling of Hippocampus whitei, a medium-sized seahorse species endemic to Australia, on their behavioural responses, movements and site persistence. A total of 24 H. whitei were utilized in the experiment with eight in each of the three treatments (flash photography, handling and control). The effect of underwater flash photography on H. whitei movements was not significant; however, the effect of handling H. whitei to take a photograph had a significant effect on their short-term behavioural responses to the photographer. Kaplan-Meier log-rank test revealed that there was no significant difference in site persistence of H. whitei from each of the three treatments and that flash photography had no long-term effects on their site persistence. It is concluded that the use of flash photography by divers is a safe and viable technique with H. whitei, particularly if photographs can be used for individual identification purposes. © 2013 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  20. Clinical course and prognosis of musculoskeletal pain in patients referred for physiotherapy: does pain site matter?

    PubMed

    de Vos Andersen, Nils-Bo; Kent, Peter; Hjort, Jakob; Christiansen, David Høyrup

    2017-03-29

    Danish patients with musculoskeletal disorders are commonly referred for primary care physiotherapy treatment but little is known about their general health status, pain diagnoses, clinical course and prognosis. The objectives of this study were to 1) describe the clinical course of patients with musculoskeletal disorders referred to physiotherapy, 2) identify predictors associated with a satisfactory outcome, and 3) determine the influence of the primary pain site diagnosis relative to those predictors. This was a prospective cohort study of patients (n = 2,706) newly referred because of musculoskeletal pain to 30 physiotherapy practices from January 2012 to May 2012. Data were collected via a web-based questionnaire 1-2 days prior to the first physiotherapy consultation and at 6 weeks, 3 and 6 months, from clinical records (including primary musculoskeletal symptom diagnosis based on the ICPC-2 classification system), and from national registry data. The main outcome was the Patient Acceptable Symptom State. Potential predictors were analysed using backwards step-wise selection during longitudinal Generalised Estimating Equation regression modelling. To assess the influence of pain site on these associations, primary pain site diagnosis was added to the model. Of the patients included, 66% were female and the mean age was 48 (SD 15). The percentage of patients reporting their symptoms as acceptable was 32% at 6 weeks, 43% at 3 months and 52% at 6 months. A higher probability of satisfactory outcome was associated with place of residence, being retired, no compensation claim, less frequent pain, shorter duration of pain, lower levels of disability and fear avoidance, better mental health and being a non-smoker. Primary pain site diagnosis had little influence on these associations, and was not predictive of a satisfactory outcome. Only half of the patients rated their symptoms as acceptable at 6 months. Although satisfactory outcome was difficult to

  1. INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL REVIEW OF THE BUILDING 100 PLUME, FORMER DOE PINELLAS SITE (YOUNG - RAINEY STAR CENTER), LARGO, FLORIDA

    SciTech Connect

    Eddy-Dilek, C.; Rossabi, J.; Amidon, M.; Riha, B.; Kaback, D.

    2010-07-30

    Contaminated groundwater associated with Building 100 at the Young-Rainey Science, Technology, and Research Center, formerly the DOE Pinellas plant, is the primary remedial challenge that remains to be addressed at the site. Currently, Building 100 is an active industrial facility that is now owned and operated by the Pinellas county government. Groundwater samples collected from monitoring wells recently installed near the southern boundary of the site suggest that contaminated groundwater has migrated off the plant site. In response to the challenges presented by the Building 100 plume, the Office of Legacy Management (LM) requested assistance from the DOE Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation (EM-32) to provide a review team to make technical recommendations so that they can efficiently and effectively address characterization and remediation of the plume. The review team was unanimous in the conclusion that a dynamic strategy that combines a phased implementation of direct push samplers, sensors, and tools can be used to better delineate the extent of contamination, control plume migration, and rapidly remediate the contaminated groundwater at the site. The initial efforts of the team focused on reviewing the site history and data, organizing the information into a conceptual model, identifying appropriate technologies, and recommending an integrated strategy. The current groundwater data from the site indicate a two-lobed plume extending to the east and south. To the east vinyl chloride is the primary contaminant of concern, to the south, vinyl chloride and cis1, 2-DCE are the primary contaminants. The limited data that are available suggest that reductive dechlorination of the TCE is already occurring but is not sufficient to prevent offsite migration of low concentrations of TCE daughter products. The team recommends that DOE pursue a strategy that builds on the natural cleansing capacity of the subsurface with reductive methods including biostimulation

  2. Biogeochemical Cycling and Environmental Stability of Pu Relevant to Long-Term Stewardship of DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Santschi, Peter H.

    2006-06-01

    The overall objective of this proposed research is to understand the biogeochemical cycling of Pu in environments of interest to long-term DOE stewardship issues. Central to Pu cycling (transport initiation to immobilization) is the role of microorganisms. The hypothesis underlying this proposal is that microbial activity is the causative agent in initiating the mobilization of Pu in near-surface environments: through the transformation of Pu associated with solid phases, production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) carrier phases, and the creation of microenvironments. Also, microbial processes are central to the immobilization of Pu species, through the metabolism of organically complexed Pu species and Pu associated with extracellular carrier phases and the creation of environments favorable for Pu transport retardation.

  3. Biogeochemical Cycling and Environmental Stability of Pu Relevant to Long-Term Stewardship of DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, Arokiasamy J.; Santschi, Peter H.; Honeyman, Bruce D.

    2005-06-01

    The overall objective of this proposed research is to understand the biogeochemical cycling of Pu in environments of interest to long-term DOE stewardship issues. Central to Pu cycling (transport initiation to immobilization) is the role of microorganisms. The hypothesis underlying this proposal is that microbial activity is the causative agent in initiating the mobilization of Pu in near-surface environments: through the transformation of Pu associated with solid phases, production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) carrier phases, and the creation of microenvironments. Also, microbial processes are central to the immobilization of Pu species, through the metabolism of organically complexed Pu species and Pu associated with extracellular carrier phases and the creation of environments favorable for Pu transport retardation.

  4. Biogeochemical Cycling and Environmental Stability of Pu Relevant to Long-Term Stewardship of DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Honeyman, Bruce D.; Francis, A.J.; Gillow, Jeffrey B.; Dodge, Cleveland J.; Santschi, Peter H.; Chin-Chang Hung; Diaz, Angelique; Tinnacher, Ruth; Roberts, Kimberly; Schwehr, Kathy

    2006-04-05

    The overall objective of this research is to understand the biogeochemical cycling of Pu in environments of interest to long-term DOE stewardship issues. Central to Pu cycling (transport initiation and immobilization) is the role of microorganisms. The hypothesis underlying this work is that microbial activity is the causative agent in initiating the mobilization of Pu in near-surface environments: through the transformation of Pu associated with solid phases, production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) carrier phases and the creation of microenvironments. Also, microbial processes are central to the immobilization of Pu species, through the metabolism of organically complexed Pu species and Pu associated with extracellular carrier phases and the creation of environments favorable for Pu transport retardation.

  5. Site of initial diabetes education does not affect metabolic outcomes in children with T1DM.

    PubMed

    Tonyushkina, Ksenia N; Visintainer, Paul F; Jasinski, Christopher F; Wadzinski, Thomas L; Allen, Holley F

    2014-03-01

    To determine the difference in metabolic outcomes at 1 and 2 yr post type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) diagnosis in children depending on the site of initial diabetes education: inpatient, vs. outpatient, vs. mixed locations. A retrospective chart review was performed for all patients with new onset antibody positive T1DM, aged 1-18 yr old, diagnosed in 2004-2009, and followed for at least 1 yr in a diabetes program at a tertiary academic health care center. Patients were divided into three groups based on the site of initial diabetes education: inpatient, outpatient, and mixed locations. The primary outcome was A1c at 1 and 2 yr. We enrolled 238 children (133 boys), mean (± SD) age 9.9 (± 4.1). A1c levels did not differ among inpatient, outpatient, and mixed location groups at 1 and 2 yr post diagnosis (p = 0.85 and p = 0.69, respectively) and the long-acting insulin doses were similar at 1 and 2 yr (p = 0.18 and p = 0.15, respectively). There was no difference in the number of acute diabetes complications between the groups. At 1 yr, 21.8% of outpatient-educated children were on insulin pump therapy in contrast to 14.7% of inpatient and 2.7% of mixed educated groups (p = 0.04). Families of children with new onset T1DM can be successfully and safely educated in a clinic setting. An 'education' admission for a medically stable patient is not necessary most of the time, however, clinical judgment and careful assessment of the family's coping and learning capabilities are important when determining the site of education. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. An Application of Hydraulic Tomography to a Large-Scale Fractured Granite Site, Mizunami, Japan.

    PubMed

    Zha, Yuanyuan; Yeh, Tian-Chyi J; Illman, Walter A; Tanaka, Tatsuya; Bruines, Patrick; Onoe, Hironori; Saegusa, Hiromitsu; Mao, Deqiang; Takeuchi, Shinji; Wen, Jet-Chau

    2016-11-01

    While hydraulic tomography (HT) is a mature aquifer characterization technology, its applications to characterize hydrogeology of kilometer-scale fault and fracture zones are rare. This paper sequentially analyzes datasets from two new pumping tests as well as those from two previous pumping tests analyzed by Illman et al. (2009) at a fractured granite site in Mizunami, Japan. Results of this analysis show that datasets from two previous pumping tests at one side of a fault zone as used in the previous study led to inaccurate mapping of fracture and fault zones. Inclusion of the datasets from the two new pumping tests (one of which was conducted on the other side of the fault) yields locations of the fault zone consistent with those based on geological mapping. The new datasets also produce a detailed image of the irregular fault zone, which is not available from geological investigation alone and the previous study. As a result, we conclude that if prior knowledge about geological structures at a field site is considered during the design of HT surveys, valuable non-redundant datasets about the fracture and fault zones can be collected. Only with these non-redundant data sets, can HT then be a viable and robust tool for delineating fracture and fault distributions over kilometer scales, even when only a limited number of boreholes are available. In essence, this paper proves that HT is a new tool for geologists, geophysicists, and engineers for mapping large-scale fracture and fault zone distributions. © 2016, National Ground Water Association.

  7. Prospecting for natural attenuation: Coupled geophysical-biogeochemical studies at DOE's Rifle IFRC site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, K. H.; Kukkadapu, R. K.; Long, P. E.; Flores Orozco, A.; Kemna, A.

    2011-12-01

    Research activities at the Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site in Rifle, Colorado (USA) are designed to integrate geochemical, biological, and hydrological studies to enhance our understanding of subsurface uranium mobility. While much of the research activities at the site have focused on stimulating subsurface microbial activity through acetate amendment, there is growing interest in the role that natural biogeochemical processes play in constraining uranium mobility in the aquifer. Such processes constitute a form of natural uranium attenuation in the subsurface and are inferred to result from elevated concentrations of natural organic matter associated with alluvial sediments. Referred to as naturally reduced zones (NRZ's), they are characterized by the presence of reduced and/or magnetic mineral phases (e.g. FeS, FeS2, and Fe3O4), elevated Fe(II), and refractory organic carbon compounds (e.g. roots, twigs, and cones). Elevated rates of microbial activity associated with NRZ's and their mineralogical makeup act to sequester uranium from groundwater at levels higher that background alluvium. Their unique composition within a matrix of relatively oxidized, low-bioactivity sediments constitutes a potential target for a variety of exploration geophysical techniques, such as induced polarization and magnetic susceptibility. Both methods have been successfully applied at the Rifle IFRC site to delineate the ubiquity and extent of NRZ's across the floodplain. Sediments recovered from drilling targets identified through the use of exploration geophysical techniques have identified elevated uranium concentrations associated with both magnetite and framboid pyrite; however, the extent to which such minerals are the direct product of in situ microbial activity remains unknown. While diverse, the microbial community composition of NRZ's suggest dominance by fermentative organisms capable of degrading lignitic carbon to low molecular weight organic

  8. Design and Construction of Deinococcus Radiodurans for Biodegradation of Organic Toxins at Radioactive DOE Waste Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Michael J. Daly; Lawrence P. Wackett; James K. Fredrickson

    2001-04-22

    Seventy million cubic meters of ground and three trillion liters of groundwater have been contaminated by leaking radioactive waste generated in the United States during the Cold War. A cleanup technology is being developed based on the extremely radiation resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans that is being engineered to express bioremediating functions. Research aimed at developing D. radiodurans for organic toxin degradation in highly radioactive waste sites containing radionuclides, heavy metals, and toxic organic compounds was started by this group.Work funded by the existing grant has already contributed to eleven papers on the fundamental biology of D. radiodurans and its design for bioremediation of highly radioactive waste environments

  9. Planted Black Walnut Does Well on Cleared Forest Sites -- if Competition is Controlled

    Treesearch

    John E. Krajicek

    1975-01-01

    After seven growing seasons, survival of black walnut seedlings planted in cleared forest openings did not differ by competition control treatments. The trees grew somewhat larger where all competing vegetation was controlled but almost as large where only herbaceous competition was controlled. Controlling only woody vegetation was no better than no control of any...

  10. Polyomavirus Large T Antigen Binds Cooperatively to Its Multiple Binding Sites in the Viral Origin of DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yu-Cai; Acheson, Nicholas H.

    1998-01-01

    Polyomavirus large T antigen binds to multiple 5′-G(A/G)GGC-3′ pentanucleotide sequences in sites 1/2, A, B, and C within and adjacent to the origin of viral DNA replication on the polyomavirus genome. We asked whether the binding of large T antigen to one of these sites could influence binding to other sites. We discovered that binding to origin DNA is substantially stronger at pH 6 to 7 than at pH 7.4 to 7.8, a range often used in DNA binding assays. Large T antigen-DNA complexes formed at pH 6 to 7 were stable, but a fraction of these complexes dissociated at pH 7.6 and above upon dilution or during electrophoresis. Increased binding at low pH is therefore due at least in part to increased stability of protein-DNA complexes, and binding at higher pH values is reversible. Binding to fragments of origin DNA in which one or more sites were deleted or inactivated by point mutations was measured by nitrocellulose filter binding and DNase I footprinting. The results showed that large T antigen binds cooperatively to its four binding sites in viral DNA, suggesting that the binding of this protein to one of these sites stabilizes its binding to other sites via protein-protein contacts. Sites A, B, and C may therefore augment DNA replication by facilitating the binding of large T antigen to site 1/2 at the replication origin. ATP stabilized large T antigen-DNA complexes against dissociation in the presence, but not the absence, of site 1/2, and ATP specifically enhanced protection against DNase I digestion in the central 10 to 12 bp of site 1/2, at which hexamers are believed to form and begin unwinding DNA. We propose that large T antigen molecules bound to these multiple sites on origin DNA interact with each other to form a compact protein-DNA complex and, furthermore, that ATP stimulates their assembly into hexamers at site 1/2 by a “handover” mechanism mediated by these protein-protein contacts. PMID:9696829

  11. Cooperativity within proximal phosphorylation sites is revealed from large-scale proteomics data

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Phosphorylation is the most prevalent post-translational modification on eukaryotic proteins. Multisite phosphorylation enables a specific combination of phosphosites to determine the speed, specificity and duration of biological response. Until recent years, the lack of high quality data limited the possibility for analyzing the properties of phosphorylation at the proteome scale and in the context of a wide range of conditions. Thanks to advances of mass spectrometry technologies, thousands of phosphosites from in-vivo experiments were identified and archived in the public domain. Such resource is appropriate to derive an unbiased view on the phosphosites properties in eukaryotes and on their functional relevance. Results We present statistically rigorous tests on the spatial and functional properties of a collection of ~70,000 reported phosphosites. We show that the distribution of phosphosites positioning along the protein tends to occur as dense clusters of Serine/Threonines (pS/pT) and between Serine/Threonines and Tyrosines, but generally not as much between Tyrosines (pY) only. This phenomenon is more ubiquitous than anticipated and is pertinent for most eukaryotic proteins: for proteins with ≥ 2 phosphosites, 54% of all pS/pT sites are within 4 amino acids of another site. We found a strong tendency for clustered pS/pT to be activated by the same kinase. Large-scale analyses of phosphopeptides are thus consistent with a cooperative function within the cluster. Conclusions We present evidence supporting the notion that clusters of pS/pT but generally not pY should be considered as the elementary building blocks in phosphorylation regulation. Indeed, closely positioned sites tend to be activated by the same kinase, a signal that overrides the tendency of a protein to be activated by a single or only few kinases. Within these clusters, coordination and positional dependency is evident. We postulate that cellular regulation takes advantage of such

  12. Computer modeling of large asteroid impacts into continental and oceanic sites: Atmospheric, cratering, and ejecta dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roddy, D. J.; Schuster, S. H.; Rosenblatt, M.; Grant, L. B.; Hassig, P. J.; Kreyenhagen, K. N.

    1988-01-01

    Numerous impact cratering events have occurred on the Earth during the last several billion years that have seriously affected our planet and its atmosphere. The largest cratering events, which were caused by asteroids and comets with kinetic energies equivalent to tens of millions of megatons of TNT, have distributed substantial quantities of terrestrial and extraterrestrial material over much or all of the Earth. In order to study a large-scale impact event in detail, computer simulations were completed that model the passage of a 10 km-diameter asteroid through the Earth's atmosphere and the subsequent cratering and ejecta dynamics associated with impact of the asteroid into two different targets, i.e., an oceanic site and a continental site. The calcuations were designed to broadly represent giant impact events that have occurred on the Earth since its formation and specifically represent an impact cratering event proposed to have occurred at the end of Cretaceous time. Calculation of the passage of the asteroid through a U.S. Standard Atmosphere showed development of a strong bow shock that expanded radially outward. Behind the shock front was a region of highly shock compressed and intensely heated air. Behind the asteroid, rapid expansion of this shocked air created a large region of very low density that also expanded away from the impact area. Calculations of the cratering events in both the continental and oceanic targets were carried to 120 s. Despite geologic differences, impacts in both targets developed comparable dynamic flow fields, and by approx. 29 s similar-sized transient craters approx. 39 km deep and approx. 62 km across had formed. For all practical purposes, the atmosphere was nearly completely removed from the impact area for tens of seconds, i.e., air pressures were less than fractions of a bar out to ranges of over 50 km. Consequently, much of the asteroid and target materials were ejected upward into a near vacuum. Effects of secondary

  13. DOE/KEURP Site Operator Program year 5 first quarter report, July 1-- September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    Kansas State University, with funding support from federal, state, public, and private companies, is participating in the Department of Energy` s Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program. Through participation in this program, Kansas State is displaying, testing, and evaluating electric or hybrid vehicle technology. This participation will provide organizations the opportunity to examine the latest EHV prototypes under actual operating conditions. KSU now has two electric cars. Both are electric conversion vehicles from Soleq Corporation out of Chicago. KSU in conjunction with KEURP also initiated procurement for the purchase of four (4) Chevy S-10 pickup trucks. Since the supplier, GE-Spartan, canceled its effort concerning the production of vehicles other appropriate sources were sought. Today, K-State and the Kansas Utilities are working with Troy Design and Manufacturing (TDM), Redford, Michigan. TDM is working with Ford Motor Company and expects to become the first certified electric vehicle Quality Vehicle Modifier (QVM). Kansas State has entered into an agreement to assist TDM in supporting the infrastructure and technical manual development for these vehicles. The Soleq EVcorts have not been signed to illustrate to the public that it is an electric vehicle. Magnetic signs have been made for special functions to ensure sponsor support is recognized and acknowledged. As soon as TDM`s Ford Ranger electric vehicles are delivered they will be used throughout the state by utility companies that are participating with K-State`s Site Operator Program.

  14. Analyzing contraction of full thickness skin grafts in time: Choosing the donor site does matter.

    PubMed

    Stekelenburg, Carlijn M; Simons, Janine M; Tuinebreijer, Wim E; van Zuijlen, Paul P M

    2016-11-01

    In reconstructive burn surgery full thickness skin grafts (FTSGs) are frequently preferred over split thickness skin grafts because they are known to provide superior esthetic results and less contraction. However, the contraction rate of FTSGs on the long term has never been studied. The surface area of FTSGs of consecutive patients was measured during surgery and at their regular follow up (at approximately 1, 6,13 and 52 weeks postoperatively) by means of 3D-stereophotogrammetry. Linear regression analysis was conducted to assess the influence of age, recipient- and donor site and operation indication. 38 FTSGs in 26 patients, with a mean age of 37.4 (SD 21.9) were evaluated. A significant reduction in remaining surface area to 79.1% was observed after approximately 6 weeks (p=0.002), to 85.9% after approximately 13 weeks (p=0.040) and to 91.5% after approximately 52 weeks (p=0.033). Grafts excised from the trunk showed significantly less contraction than grafts excised from the extremities (94.0% vs. 75.7% p=0.036). FTSGs showed a significant reduction in surface area, followed by a relaxation phase, but remained significantly smaller. Furthermore, the trunk should be preferred as donor site location over the extremities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  15. Does Transumbilical Incision Influence Surgical Site Infection Rates of the Laparoscopic Sigmoidectomy and Anterior Resection?

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Masashi; Tanaka, Keitaro; Asakuma, Mitsuhiro; Kondo, Keisaku; Isii, Masatsugu; Hamamoto, Hiroki; Okuda, Junji; Uchiyama, Kazuhisa

    2015-12-01

    Laparoscopic surgery is widespread and is safe and effective for the management of patients with colorectal cancer. However, surgical site infection (SSI) remains an unresolved complication. The present study investigated the comparative effect of supraumbilical incision versus transumbilical incision (TU) on the incidence of SSI in patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery for colon cancer. Medical records from patients with colorectal cancer who underwent laparoscopic sigmoid and rectosigmoid colon surgeries with either supraumbilical incision (n = 150) or TU (n = 150) were retrospectively reviewed. There was no difference in demographics, comorbidities, or operative variables between the two groups. The transumbilical group and the supraumbilical group were comparable with regards to overall SSI (6.0% vs 4.0%; P = 0.4062), superficial SSI (6.0% vs 3.3%; P = 0.2704), and deep SSI (0% vs 0.7%; P = 0.2385). SSI developed after laparoscopic sigmoid and rectosigmoid colon cancer surgery in 15 (5.0%) of the 300 patients. Of these superficial SSI, all wounds were in the left lower quadrant incision, and the transumbilical port sites did not become infected. Univariate analysis failed to identify any risk factors for SSI. Avoidance of the umbilicus offers no benefit with regard to SSI compared with TU.

  16. Does remote sensing help translating local SGD investigation to large spatial scales?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moosdorf, N.; Mallast, U.; Hennig, H.; Schubert, M.; Knoeller, K.; Neehaul, Y.

    2016-02-01

    Within the last 20 years, studies on submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) have revealed numerous processes, temporal behavior and quantitative estimations as well as best-practice and localization methods. This plethora on information is valuable regarding the understanding of magnitude and effects of SGD for the respective location. Yet, since given local conditions vary, the translation of local understanding, magnitudes and effects to a regional or global scale is not trivial. In contrast, modeling approaches (e.g. 228Ra budget) tackling SGD on a global scale do provide quantitative global estimates but have not been related to local investigations. This gap between the two approaches, local and global, and the combination and/or translation of either one to the other represents one of the mayor challenges the SGD community currently faces. But what if remote sensing can provide certain information that may be used as translation between the two, similar to transfer functions in many other disciplines allowing an extrapolation from in-situ investigated and quantified SGD (discrete information) to regional scales or beyond? Admittedly, the sketched future is ambitious and we will certainly not be able to present a solution to the raised question. Nonetheless, we will show a remote sensing based approach that is already able to identify potential SGD sites independent on location or hydrogeological conditions. Based on multi-temporal thermal information of the water surface as core of the approach, SGD influenced sites display a smaller thermal variation (thermal anomalies) than surrounding uninfluenced areas. Despite the apparent simplicity, the automatized approach has helped to localize several sites that could be validated with proven in-situ methods. At the same time it embodies the risk to identify false positives that can only be avoided if we can `calibrate' the so obtained thermal anomalies to in-situ data. We will present all pros and cons of our

  17. DOE large horizontal axis wind turbine development at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linscott, B. S.

    1982-01-01

    Large wind turbine activities managed by NASA Lewis are reviewed. These activities include results from the first and second generation field machines (Mod-OA, -1, and -2), the status of the Department of Interior WTS-4 machine for which NASA is responsible for technical management, and the design phase of the third generation wind turbines (Mod-5).

  18. Why does large relative humidity with respect to ice persist in cirrus ice clouds?

    PubMed

    Bogdan, A; Molina, M J

    2009-12-24

    According to observations, a large relative humidity with respect to ice, RH(i) > 100%, often persists outside and inside upper tropospheric cirrus ice clouds. The persistence of the large in-cloud RH(i) means that H(2)O is slowly deposited onto cloud ice crystals. This unusual physical situation is similar to one in which a released body would slowly fall owing to gravitation. Here we present a physical mechanism which can be responsible for the persistence of large in-cloud RH(i). We find that clear-sky RH(i) up to 176% can be built up prior to the formation of ice cirrus by the homogeneous freezing of aqueous droplets containing H(2)SO(4) and HNO(3). As the droplets are cooled, a phase separation, which occurs during freezing, leads to the formation of a residual solution coating around the ice crystals formed. The coating can serve as a shield, slowing the rate of ice growth by approximately 10(3) in comparison with uncoated ice, and this can be a reason for the persistence of the large in-cloud RH(i).

  19. DOE large horizontal axis wind turbine development at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linscott, B. S.

    Large wind turbine activities managed by NASA Lewis are reviewed. These activities include results from the first and second generation field machines (Mod-OA, -1, and -2), the status of the Department of Interior WTS-4 machine for which NASA is responsible for technical management, and the design phase of the third generation wind turbines (Mod-5).

  20. Breeding site selection by coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) in relation to large wood additions and factors that influence reproductive success

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Steven M.; Dunham, Jason B.; McEnroe, Jeffery R.; Lightcap, Scott W.

    2014-01-01

    The fitness of female Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) with respect to breeding behavior can be partitioned into at least four fitness components: survival to reproduction, competition for breeding sites, success of egg incubation, and suitability of the local environment near breeding sites for early rearing of juveniles. We evaluated the relative influences of habitat features linked to these fitness components with respect to selection of breeding sites by coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). We also evaluated associations between breeding site selection and additions of large wood, as the latter were introduced into the study system as a means of restoring habitat conditions to benefit coho salmon. We used a model selection approach to organize specific habitat features into groupings reflecting fitness components and influences of large wood. Results of this work suggest that female coho salmon likely select breeding sites based on a wide range of habitat features linked to all four hypothesized fitness components. More specifically, model parameter estimates indicated that breeding site selection was most strongly influenced by proximity to pool-tail crests and deeper water (mean and maximum depths). Linkages between large wood and breeding site selection were less clear. Overall, our findings suggest that breeding site selection by coho salmon is influenced by a suite of fitness components in addition to the egg incubation environment, which has been the emphasis of much work in the past.

  1. Forecasting surface-layer atmospheric parameters at the Large Binocular Telescope site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchi, Alessio; Masciadri, Elena; Fini, Luca

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we quantify the performance of an automated weather forecast system implemented on the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) site at Mt Graham (Arizona) in forecasting the main atmospheric parameters close to the ground. The system employs a mesoscale non-hydrostatic numerical model (Meso-Nh). To validate the model, we compare the forecasts of wind speed, wind direction, temperature and relative humidity close to the ground with the respective values measured by instrumentation installed on the telescope dome. The study is performed over a large sample of nights uniformly distributed over 2 yr. The quantitative analysis is done using classical statistical operators [bias, root-mean-square error (RMSE) and σ] and contingency tables, which allows us to extract complementary key information, such as the percentage of correct detections (PC) and the probability of obtaining a correct detection within a defined interval of values (POD). The results of our study indicate that the model performance in forecasting the atmospheric parameters we have just cited are very good, in some cases excellent: RMSE for temperature is below 1°C, for relative humidity it is 14 per cent and for the wind speed it is around 2.5 m s-1. The relative error of the RMSE for wind direction varies from 9 to 17 per cent depending on the wind speed conditions. This work is performed in the context of the ALTA (Advanced LBT Turbulence and Atmosphere) Center project, whose final goal is to provide forecasts of all the atmospheric parameters and the optical turbulence to support LBT observations, adaptive optics facilities and interferometric facilities.

  2. Understanding dopant site preferences in doped iron oxide nanoparticles: Does a relaxed unit cell in nanoparticle alter the site preference within the spinel structure?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pool, Vanessa LaVelle Karandi

    The dopant behavior of spinels has been investigated for over half a century and yet new insight into this class of materials is still being made today. The dominating question has been "Into which site in the spinel structure does the dopant substitute?". In this work, we will explore this question for the nanoparticle regime. Through this work the potential for a relaxation of the normal strains that can arise in a bulk crystal structure is demonstrated in nanoparticles. The hypothesis that this relaxation can lead to unconventional dopant site preferences for dopants in an iron oxide spinel structure is demonstrated. Nanoparticles ranging from 6 nm to 15 nm in diameter have been synthesized with vanadium, manganese, zinc and gallium doped into the iron oxide spinels. The size and structure of the nanoparticles was investigated with transmission electron microscope and X-ray scattering pair distribution functions. The dopant's valence state was investigated with X-ray absorption spectroscopy and the coordination and magnetic properties of the materials were investigated with X-ray magnetic circular dichroism. Alternating current magnetic susceptibility was used to determine the degree of interaction between the particles, and in the case of non-interacting particles, anisotropy energies were extracted. In this study the dopant atoms were found to behave similarly to their bulk counterparts, with the important exception of manganese and vanadium. Manganese doped iron-oxide nanoparticles show clear evidence of crystalline relaxation. Vanadium substituted into the preferred tetrahedral site in the nanoparticle form, unlike the bulk behavior. Both observations are attributed to the accommodating relaxation found in nanoparticles.

  3. Innovative Direct Push Technologies for Characterization of the 216-Z-9 Trench at DOE's Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Bratton, W.; Moser, K.; Holm, R.; Morse, J.; Tortoso, A.

    2008-07-01

    Because of the significant radiological and chemical hazards present at the 216-Z-9 Trench at the US Department of Energy Hanford Site, the only practical subsurface characterization methods are those that minimize or control airborne vapors and particles. This study evaluates and compares the performance of two Direct Push Technologies (Hydraulic Hammer Rig (HHR) and Cone Penetrometer Testing (CPT)) with traditional cable tool drilling in similar difficult geologic conditions. The performance was based on the depth of penetration, the ability to collect representative vadose zone soil samples, the penetration rate, and the relative cost. The HHR achieved deeper penetration depths and faster penetration rates than CPT techniques, while still maintaining the waste minimization benefits of direct push technologies. Although cable tool drilling achieved the deepest penetration, the safety and disposal concerns due to the soil cuttings that were generated made this drilling approach both slow and costly compared to the direct push techniques. (authors)

  4. Morphology of muscle attachment sites in the modern human hand does not reflect muscle architecture.

    PubMed

    Williams-Hatala, E M; Hatala, K G; Hiles, S; Rabey, K N

    2016-06-23

    Muscle attachment sites (entheses) on dry bones are regularly used by paleontologists to infer soft tissue anatomy and to reconstruct behaviors of extinct organisms. This method is commonly applied to fossil hominin hand bones to assess their abilities to participate in Paleolithic stone tool behaviors. Little is known, however, about how or even whether muscle anatomy and activity regimes influence the morphologies of their entheses, especially in the hand. Using the opponens muscles from a sample of modern humans, we tested the hypothesis that aspects of hand muscle architecture that are known to be influenced by behavior correlate with the size and shape of their associated entheses. Results show no consistent relationships between these behaviorally-influenced aspects of muscle architecture and entheseal morphology. Consequently, it is likely premature to infer patterns of behavior, such as stone tool making in fossil hominins, from these same entheses.

  5. Performance of in situ chemical oxidation field demonstrations at DOE sites

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, S.R.; West, O.R.; Siegrist, R.L.; Holden, W.L.

    1997-04-01

    Researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have been investigating the use of in situ chemical oxidation to remediate organic contaminants (VOCs, SVOCs, and PCBs) in soils and groundwater at the laboratory and field scales. Field scale design parameters (e.g., oxidant loading rates and oxidant delivery techniques) are often dictated by site conditions (e.g., soil properties and initial contaminant concentrations). Chemical destruction of organic compounds can be accomplished using a variety of oxidants. Recent research has involved field scale in situ chemical oxidation demonstrations using H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and KMnO{sub 4} in conjunction with soil mixing as the oxidant delivery mechanism. A description of some of these fields activities and future field-scale work is presented here.

  6. Zero-valent iron for the removal of soluble uranium in simulated DOE site groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Bostick, W.D.; Jarabek, R.J.; Fiedor, J.N.

    1997-12-31

    Groundwater at the Bear Creek Valley Characterization Area, located at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, is contaminated with regulated metals and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) due to former site activities and disposal practices. The contaminant of principle concern, from the perspective of protecting human health, is soluble uranium, which is present in some waters at concentrations up to a few parts-per-million. We present product speciation and relative reaction kinetics; for removal of soluble uranium under oxic and anoxic conditions with use of zero-valent iron. Under oxic conditions, U(VI) is rapidly and strongly sorbed to hydrous ferric oxide particulate ({open_quotes}rust{close_quotes}), whereas uranium is slowly and incompletely reduced to U(IV) under anoxic conditions.

  7. Morphology of muscle attachment sites in the modern human hand does not reflect muscle architecture

    PubMed Central

    Williams-Hatala, E. M.; Hatala, K. G.; Hiles, S.; Rabey, K. N.

    2016-01-01

    Muscle attachment sites (entheses) on dry bones are regularly used by paleontologists to infer soft tissue anatomy and to reconstruct behaviors of extinct organisms. This method is commonly applied to fossil hominin hand bones to assess their abilities to participate in Paleolithic stone tool behaviors. Little is known, however, about how or even whether muscle anatomy and activity regimes influence the morphologies of their entheses, especially in the hand. Using the opponens muscles from a sample of modern humans, we tested the hypothesis that aspects of hand muscle architecture that are known to be influenced by behavior correlate with the size and shape of their associated entheses. Results show no consistent relationships between these behaviorally-influenced aspects of muscle architecture and entheseal morphology. Consequently, it is likely premature to infer patterns of behavior, such as stone tool making in fossil hominins, from these same entheses. PMID:27334440

  8. Tumour location within the breast: Does tumour site have prognostic ability?

    PubMed

    Rummel, Seth; Hueman, Matthew T; Costantino, Nick; Shriver, Craig D; Ellsworth, Rachel E

    2015-01-01

    Tumour location within the breast varies with the highest frequency in the upper outer quadrant (UOQ) and lowest frequency in the lower inner quadrant (LIQ). Whether tumour location is prognostic is unclear. To determine whether tumour location is prognostic, associations between tumour site and clinicopathological characteristics were evaluated. All patients enrolled in the Clinical Breast Care Project whose tumour site-UOQ, upper inner quadrant (UIQ), central, LIQ, lower outer quadrant (LOQ)-was determined by a single, dedicated breast pathologist were included in this study. Patients with multicentric disease (n = 122) or tumours spanning multiple quadrants (n = 381) were excluded from further analysis. Clinicopathological characteristics were analysed using chi-square tests for univariate analysis with multivariate analysis performed using principal components analysis (PCA) and multiple logistic regression. Significance was defined as P < 0.05. Of the 980 patients with defined tumour location, 30 had bilateral disease. Tumour location in the UOQ (51.5%) was significantly higher than in the UIQ (15.6%), LOQ (14.2%), central (10.6%), or LIQ (8.1%). Tumours in the central quadrant were significantly more likely to have higher tumour stage (P = 0.003) and size (P < 0.001), metastatic lymph nodes (P < 0.001), and mortality (P = 0.011). After multivariate analysis, only tumour size and lymph node status remained significantly associated with survival. Evaluation of tumour location as a prognostic factor revealed that although tumours in the central region are associated with less favourable outcome, these associations are not independent of location but rather driven by larger tumour size. Tumours in the central region are more difficult to detect mammographically, resulting in larger tumour size at diagnosis and thus less favourable prognosis. Together, these data demonstrate that tumour location is not an independent prognostic factor.

  9. Large, motile epifauna interact strongly with harpacticoid copepods and polychaetes at a bathyal site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thistle, David; Eckman, James E.; Paterson, Gordon L. J.

    2008-03-01

    Strengths of interactions among groups of animals in deep-sea-sediment communities are poorly known. Large, motile epifauna (LME) such as sea cucumbers, star fishes, and demersal fishes occur in the deep sea and are sources of predation, disturbance, and habitat alteration and thus have the potential to interact strongly with infauna. At a site off the southwestern coast of the United States (32°57.3'N, 117°32.2'W, 780 m depth), we excluded the LME from five 75- ×75-cm plots with cages. After 143 d, we sampled these plots and five plots of the same size paired with them as controls. Abundances of harpacticoid copepods and polychaetes were significantly lower in cages than in controls. In several cages, nematodes and kinorhynchs were also dramatically less abundant than in paired controls. Results suggest that LME ordinarily affect the infaunal assemblage in such a way that harpacticoids and polychaetes (and perhaps nematodes and kinorhynchs) can maintain higher abundances than they can in the absence of LME, indicating that strong interactions can influence the organization of deep-sea-sediment communities. In a multivariate analysis of environmental parameters, cage and control samples were intermixed, so if the effect is transmitted by alterations of the environment by the LME, the nature of the alterations must be relatively local and remains to be discovered.

  10. Does lower Omega allow a resolution of the large-scale structure problem?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph; Vittorio, Nicola

    1987-01-01

    The intermediate angular scale anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background, peculiar velocities, density correlations, and mass fluctuations for both neutrino and baryon-dominated universes with Omega less than one are evaluated. The large coherence length associated with a low-Omega, hot dark matter-dominated universe provides substantial density fluctuations on scales up to 100 Mpc: there is a range of acceptable models that are capable of producing large voids and superclusters of galaxies and the clustering of galaxy clusters, with Omega roughly 0.3, without violating any observational constraint. Low-Omega, cold dark matter-dominated cosmologies are also examined. All of these models may be reconciled with the inflationary requirement of a flat universe by introducing a cosmological constant 1-Omega.

  11. Does lower Omega allow a resolution of the large-scale structure problem?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph; Vittorio, Nicola

    1987-01-01

    The intermediate angular scale anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background, peculiar velocities, density correlations, and mass fluctuations for both neutrino and baryon-dominated universes with Omega less than one are evaluated. The large coherence length associated with a low-Omega, hot dark matter-dominated universe provides substantial density fluctuations on scales up to 100 Mpc: there is a range of acceptable models that are capable of producing large voids and superclusters of galaxies and the clustering of galaxy clusters, with Omega roughly 0.3, without violating any observational constraint. Low-Omega, cold dark matter-dominated cosmologies are also examined. All of these models may be reconciled with the inflationary requirement of a flat universe by introducing a cosmological constant 1-Omega.

  12. Prevalence of feral swine disturbance at important archaeological sites over a large landscape in Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engeman, Richard M.; Meyer, Joseph S.; Allen, John B.

    2017-01-01

    Feral swine are globally known as one of the most destructive invasive vertebrates, damaging native habitats, native plants and animals, agriculture, infrastructure, spreading diseases. There has been little quantification on their disturbance to archaeological sites across a broad landscape. Over 6 years we inspected 293 significant archaeological sites for swine disturbance across a vast area. We found a 42% prevalence of swine disturbance among all sites, with prevalence not distinguishable among prehistoric sites, historic sites, and sites with both components. The areas of disturbance mapped within three historic homestead sites showed 5-26% of total site surface area rooted. Disturbance was not evident upon re-inspection of one of these sites after 18 months, indicating how evidence of disturbance can be obscured in this environment. Thus, our observed 42% prevalence of disturbance should be considered a minimum for disturbance occurring through time. Artifacts depths were <10 cm of the surface at 85% of the sites and <20 cm of the surface for 90% of the sites. Feral swine rooting commonly exceeds 20 cm in depth, especially in soft sandy substrates typical of Florida, making the great majority of the studied sites highly vulnerable to artifact damage or displacement.

  13. Prevalence of feral swine disturbance at important archaeological sites over a large landscape in Florida.

    PubMed

    Engeman, Richard M; Meyer, Joseph S; Allen, John B

    2017-01-10

    Feral swine are globally known as one of the most destructive invasive vertebrates, damaging native habitats, native plants and animals, agriculture, infrastructure, spreading diseases. There has been little quantification on their disturbance to archaeological sites across a broad landscape. Over 6 years we inspected 293 significant archaeological sites for swine disturbance across a vast area. We found a 42% prevalence of swine disturbance among all sites, with prevalence not distinguishable among prehistoric sites, historic sites, and sites with both components. The areas of disturbance mapped within three historic homestead sites showed 5-26% of total site surface area rooted. Disturbance was not evident upon re-inspection of one of these sites after 18 months, indicating how evidence of disturbance can be obscured in this environment. Thus, our observed 42% prevalence of disturbance should be considered a minimum for disturbance occurring through time. Artifacts depths were <10 cm of the surface at 85% of the sites and <20 cm of the surface for 90% of the sites. Feral swine rooting commonly exceeds 20 cm in depth, especially in soft sandy substrates typical of Florida, making the great majority of the studied sites highly vulnerable to artifact damage or displacement.

  14. Prevalence of feral swine disturbance at important archaeological sites over a large landscape in Florida

    PubMed Central

    Engeman, Richard M.; Meyer, Joseph S.; Allen, John B.

    2017-01-01

    Feral swine are globally known as one of the most destructive invasive vertebrates, damaging native habitats, native plants and animals, agriculture, infrastructure, spreading diseases. There has been little quantification on their disturbance to archaeological sites across a broad landscape. Over 6 years we inspected 293 significant archaeological sites for swine disturbance across a vast area. We found a 42% prevalence of swine disturbance among all sites, with prevalence not distinguishable among prehistoric sites, historic sites, and sites with both components. The areas of disturbance mapped within three historic homestead sites showed 5–26% of total site surface area rooted. Disturbance was not evident upon re-inspection of one of these sites after 18 months, indicating how evidence of disturbance can be obscured in this environment. Thus, our observed 42% prevalence of disturbance should be considered a minimum for disturbance occurring through time. Artifacts depths were <10 cm of the surface at 85% of the sites and <20 cm of the surface for 90% of the sites. Feral swine rooting commonly exceeds 20 cm in depth, especially in soft sandy substrates typical of Florida, making the great majority of the studied sites highly vulnerable to artifact damage or displacement. PMID:28071758

  15. Does the DFT Self-Interaction Error Affect Energies Calculated in Proteins with Large QM Systems?

    PubMed

    Fouda, Adam; Ryde, Ulf

    2016-11-08

    We have examined how the self-interaction error in density-functional theory (DFT) calculations affects energies calculated on large systems (600-1000 atoms) involving several charged groups. We employ 18 different quantum mechanical (QM) methods, including Hartree-Fock, as well as pure, hybrid, and range-separated DFT methods. They are used to calculate reaction and activation energies for three different protein models in vacuum, in a point-charge surrounding, or with a continuum-solvent model. We show that pure DFT functionals give rise to a significant delocalization of the charges in charged groups in the protein, typically by ∼0.1 e, as evidenced from the Mulliken charges. This has a clear effect on how the surroundings affect calculated reaction and activation energies, indicating that these methods should be avoided for DFT calculations on large systems. Fortunately, methods such as CAM-B3LYP, BHLYP, and M06-2X give results that agree within a few kilojoules per mole, especially when the calculations are performed in a point-charge surrounding. Therefore, we recommend these methods to estimate the effect of the surroundings with large QM systems (but other QM methods may be used to study the intrinsic reaction and activation energies).

  16. Does primary productivity modulate the indirect effects of large herbivores? A global meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Daskin, Joshua H; Pringle, Robert M

    2016-07-01

    Indirect effects of large mammalian herbivores (LMH), while much less studied than those of apex predators, are increasingly recognized to exert powerful influences on communities and ecosystems. The strength of these effects is spatiotemporally variable, and several sets of authors have suggested that they are governed in part by primary productivity. However, prior theoretical and field studies have generated conflicting results and predictions, underscoring the need for a synthetic global analysis. We conducted a meta-analysis of the direction and magnitude of large mammalian herbivore-initiated indirect interactions using 67 published studies comprising 456 individual responses. We georeferenced 41 of these studies (comprising 253 responses from 33 locations on five continents) to a satellite-derived map of primary productivity. Because predator assemblages might also influence the impact of large herbivores, we conducted a similar analysis using a global map of large carnivore species richness. In general, LMH reduced the abundance of other consumer species and also tended to reduce consumer richness, although the latter effect was only marginally significant. There was a pronounced reduction in the strength of negative (i.e. suppressive, due e.g., to competition) indirect effects of LMH on consumer abundance in more productive ecosystems. In contrast, positive (facilitative) indirect effects were not significantly correlated with productivity, likely because these comprised a more heterogeneous array of mechanisms. We found no effect of carnivore species richness on herbivore-initiated indirect effect strength. Our findings help to resolve the fundamental problem of ecological contingency as it pertains to the strength of an understudied class of multitrophic interactions. Moreover, these results will aid in predicting the indirect effects of anthropogenic wildlife declines and irruptions, and how these effects might be mediated by climatically driven shifts

  17. 1997 annual report on waste generation and waste minimization progress as required by DOE Order 5400.1, Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Segall, P.

    1998-04-13

    Hanford`s missions are to safely clean up and manage the site`s legacy wastes, and to develop and deploy science and technology. Through these missions Hanford will contribute to economic diversification of the region. Hanford`s environmental management or cleanup mission is to protect the health and safety of the public, workers, and the environment; control hazardous materials; and utilize the assets (people, infra structure, site) for other missions. Hanford`s science and technology mission is to develop and deploy science and technology in the service of the nation including stewardship of the Hanford Site. Pollution Prevention is a key to the success of these missions by reducing the amount of waste to be managed and identifying/implementing cost effective waste reduction projects. Hanford`s original mission, the production of nuclear materials for the nation`s defense programs, lasted more than 40 years, and like most manufacturing operations, Hanford`s operations generated large quantities of waste and pollution. However, the by-products from Hanford operations pose unique problems like radiation hazards, vast volumes of contaminated water and soil, and many contaminated structures including reactors, chemical plants and evaporation ponds. The cleanup activity is an immense and challenging undertaking, which includes characterization and decommissioning of 149 single shell storage tanks, treating 28 double shell tanks, safely disposing of over 2,100 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel stored on site, removing numerous structures, and dealing with significant solid waste, ground water, and land restoration issues.

  18. Manipulating subsurface colloids to enhance cleanups of DOE waste sites. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Gschwend, P.M.

    1998-06-01

    'This project seeks to increase the effectiveness of pump and treat systems for removal of pollutants from sandy aquifers. Pollutants which sorb strongly to aquifer solids are not efficiently remediated using pump and treat technologies. However, if the sorbents most active in immobilizing pollutants (e.g., clays, humics, and iron oxides) were dispersed into colloidal size particles (colloid mobilization), these colloids and their associated pollutants might be pumped from aquifers. At a chromium contaminated sandy aquifer, this project seeks to: (1) understand the forces which stabilize colloidal particles in the aquifer, (2) devise solutions which will disrupt these colloid stabilizing forces, and (3) demonstrate the effectiveness of colloid mobilization as a remediation technique for removing sorbed chromium from the aquifer. This progress report summarizes work completed after 1 1/2 years of a three-year project. The efforts have focused on remediation of a chromium contaminated aquifer located on the property of National Chromium in northeastern Connecticut. Work to date may be divided into three areas: (1) site characterization; (2) identification of colloid binding forces and development of an effective colloid dispersion treatment; and (3) field testing of the aquifer remediation strategy.'

  19. Does wine glass size influence sales for on-site consumption? A multiple treatment reversal design.

    PubMed

    Pechey, Rachel; Couturier, Dominique-Laurent; Hollands, Gareth J; Mantzari, Eleni; Munafò, Marcus R; Marteau, Theresa M

    2016-06-07

    Wine glass size can influence both perceptions of portion size and the amount poured, but its impact upon purchasing and consumption is unknown. This study aimed to examine the impact of wine glass size on wine sales for on-site consumption, keeping portion size constant. In one establishment (with separate bar and restaurant areas) in Cambridge, England, wine glass size (Standard; Larger; Smaller) was changed over eight fortnightly periods. The bar and restaurant differ in wine sales by the glass vs. by the bottle (93 % vs. 63 % by the glass respectively). Daily wine volume purchased was 9.4 % (95 % CI: 1.9, 17.5) higher when sold in larger compared to standard-sized glasses. This effect seemed principally driven by sales in the bar area (bar: 14.4 % [3.3, 26.7]; restaurant: 8.2 % [-2.5, 20.1]). Findings were inconclusive as to whether sales were different with smaller vs. standard-sized glasses. The size of glasses in which wine is sold, keeping the portion size constant, can affect consumption, with larger glasses increasing consumption. The hypothesised mechanisms for these differential effects need to be tested in a replication study. If replicated, policy implications could include considering glass size amongst alcohol licensing requirements. ISRCTN registry: ISRCTN12018175 . Registered 12(th) May 2015.

  20. DOE/KEURP site operator program. Year 3, Second Quarter Report, October 1--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    Kansas State University, with funding support from federal, state, public, and private companies, is participating in the Department of Energy`s Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program. Through participation in this program, Kansas State is displaying, testing, and evaluating electric or hybrid vehicle technology. This participation will provide organizations the opportunity to examine the latest EHV prototypes under actual operating conditions. KSU has purchased several electric cars and proposes to purchase additional electric vehicles. KSU has purchased one G-Van built by Conceptor Industries, Toronto, Canada and has procured two (2) Soleq 1993 Ford EVcort station wagons. During calendar year 1994, the Kansas` electric vehicle program expects to purchase a minimum of four and a maximum of eleven additional electric vehicles. The G-Van was signed in order for the public to be aware that it was an electric vehicle. Financial participants` names have been stenciled on the back door of the van. The Soleq EvCorts have not been signed. In order to demonstrate the technology as feasible, the EvCorts were deliberately not signed. The goal is to generate a public perception that this vehicle is no different from any similar internal combustion engine vehicle. Magnetic signs have been made for special functions to ensure sponsor support is recognized and acknowledged.

  1. Introduction to the GRI/DOE Field Fracturing Multi-Site Project

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, R.E.; Middlebrook, M.L.; Warpinski, N.R.; Cleary, M.P.; Branagan, P.T.

    1993-12-31

    The objective of the Field Fracturing Multi-Sites Project is to conduct field experiments and analyze data that will result in definitive determinations of hydraulic fracture dimensions using remote well and treatment well diagnostic techniques. In addition, experiments will be conducted to provide data that will resolve significant unknowns with regard to hydraulic fracture modeling, fracture fluid rheology and fracture treatment design. These experiments will be supported by a well-characterized subsurface environment, as well as surface facilities and equipment that are conducive to acquiring high-quality data. It is anticipated that the primary benefit of the project experiments will be the development and widespread commercialization of new fracture diagnostics technologies to determine fracture length, height, width and azimuth. Data resulting from these new technologies can then be used to prove and refine the 3D fracture model mechanisms. It is also anticipated that data collected and analyzed in the project will define the correct techniques for determining fracture closure pressure. The overall impact of the research will be to provide a foundation for a fracture diagnostic service industry and hydraulic fracture optimization based on measured fracture response.

  2. Does the three site Higgsless model survive the electroweak precision tests at loop?

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, Tomohiro; Tanabashi, Masaharu; Matsuzaki, Shinya

    2008-09-01

    We complete the list of one-loop renormalization group equations and matching conditions relevant for the computation of the electroweak precision parameters S and T in the three site Higgsless model. We obtain one-loop formulas for S and T expressed in terms of physical observables such as the Kaluza-Klein (KK) gauge boson mass M{sub W{sup '}}, the KK fermion mass M, and the KK gauge boson (W{sup '}) couplings with light quarks and leptons g{sub W{sup '}}{sub ff}. It is shown that these physical observables, M{sub W{sup '}}, M, and g{sub W{sup '}}{sub ff} are severely constrained by the electroweak precision data. Unlike the tree level analysis on the ideally delocalized fermion, we find that perfect fermiophobity of W{sup '} is ruled out by the precision data. We also study the cutoff dependence of our analysis. Although the model is nonrenormalizable, the dependence on the cutoff parameter {lambda} is shown to be nonsignificant.

  3. Multiple new-particle growth pathways observed at the US DOE Southern Great Plains field site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodshire, Anna L.; Lawler, Michael J.; Zhao, Jun; Ortega, John; Jen, Coty; Yli-Juuti, Taina; Brewer, Jared F.; Kodros, Jack K.; Barsanti, Kelley C.; Hanson, Dave R.; McMurry, Peter H.; Smith, James N.; Pierce, Jeffery R.

    2016-07-01

    New-particle formation (NPF) is a significant source of aerosol particles into the atmosphere. However, these particles are initially too small to have climatic importance and must grow, primarily through net uptake of low-volatility species, from diameters ˜ 1 to 30-100 nm in order to potentially impact climate. There are currently uncertainties in the physical and chemical processes associated with the growth of these freshly formed particles that lead to uncertainties in aerosol-climate modeling. Four main pathways for new-particle growth have been identified: condensation of sulfuric-acid vapor (and associated bases when available), condensation of organic vapors, uptake of organic acids through acid-base chemistry in the particle phase, and accretion of organic molecules in the particle phase to create a lower-volatility compound that then contributes to the aerosol mass. The relative importance of each pathway is uncertain and is the focus of this work. The 2013 New Particle Formation Study (NPFS) measurement campaign took place at the DOE Southern Great Plains (SGP) facility in Lamont, Oklahoma, during spring 2013. Measured gas- and particle-phase compositions during these new-particle growth events suggest three distinct growth pathways: (1) growth by primarily organics, (2) growth by primarily sulfuric acid and ammonia, and (3) growth by primarily sulfuric acid and associated bases and organics. To supplement the measurements, we used the particle growth model MABNAG (Model for Acid-Base chemistry in NAnoparticle Growth) to gain further insight into the growth processes on these 3 days at SGP. MABNAG simulates growth from (1) sulfuric-acid condensation (and subsequent salt formation with ammonia or amines), (2) near-irreversible condensation from nonreactive extremely low-volatility organic compounds (ELVOCs), and (3) organic-acid condensation and subsequent salt formation with ammonia or amines. MABNAG is able to corroborate the observed differing growth

  4. An alternative screening model for the estimation of outdoor air concentration at large contaminated sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verginelli, Iason; Nocentini, Massimo; Baciocchi, Renato

    2017-09-01

    Simplified analytical solutions of fate and transport models are often used to carry out risk assessment on contaminated sites, to evaluate the long-term air quality in relation to volatile organic compounds in either soil or groundwater. Among the different assumptions employed to develop these solutions, in this work we focus on those used in the ASTM-RBCA ;box model; for the evaluation of contaminant dispersion in the atmosphere. In this simple model, it is assumed that the contaminant volatilized from the subsurface is dispersed in the atmosphere within a mixing height equal to two meters, i.e. the height of the breathing zone. In certain cases, this simplification could lead to an overestimation of the outdoor air concentration at the point of exposure. In this paper we first discuss the maximum source lengths (in the wind direction) for which the application of the ;box model; can be considered acceptable. Specifically, by comparing the results of ;box model; with the SCREEN3 model of U.S.EPA we found that under very stable atmospheric conditions (class F) the ASTM-RBCA approach provides acceptable results for source lengths up to 200 m while for very unstable atmospheric conditions (class A and B) the overestimation of the concentrations at the point of the exposure can be already observed for source lengths of only 10 m. In the latter case, the overestimation of the ;box model; can be of more than one order of magnitude for source lengths above 500 m. To overcome this limitation, in this paper we introduce a simple analytical solution that can be used for the calculation of the concentration at the point of exposure for large contaminated sites. The method consists in the introduction of an equivalent mixing zone height that allows to account for the dispersion of the contaminants along the source length while keeping the simplistic ;box model; approach that is implemented in most of risk assessment tools that are based on the ASTM-RBCA standard (e.g. RBCA

  5. Persistence of uranium groundwater plumes: contrasting mechanisms at two DOE sites in the groundwater-river interaction zone.

    PubMed

    Zachara, John M; Long, Philip E; Bargar, John; Davis, James A; Fox, Patricia; Fredrickson, Jim K; Freshley, Mark D; Konopka, Allan E; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P; Rockhold, Mark L; Williams, Kenneth H; Yabusaki, Steve B

    2013-04-01

    We examine subsurface uranium (U) plumes at two U.S. Department of Energy sites that are located near large river systems and are influenced by groundwater-river hydrologic interaction. Following surface excavation of contaminated materials, both sites were projected to naturally flush remnant uranium contamination to levels below regulatory limits (e.g., 30 μg/L or 0.126 μmol/L; U.S. EPA drinking water standard), with 10 years projected for the Hanford 300 Area (Columbia River) and 12 years for the Rifle site (Colorado River). The rate of observed uranium decrease was much lower than expected at both sites. While uncertainty remains, a comparison of current understanding suggests that the two sites have common, but also different mechanisms controlling plume persistence. At the Hanford 300 A, the persistent source is adsorbed U(VI) in the vadose zone that is released to the aquifer during spring water table excursions. The release of U(VI) from the vadose zone and its transport within the oxic, coarse-textured aquifer sediments is dominated by kinetically-limited surface complexation. Modeling implies that annual plume discharge volumes to the Columbia River are small (site, slow oxidation of naturally reduced, contaminant U(IV) in the saturated zone and a continuous influx of U(VI) from natural, up-gradient sources influence plume persistence. Rate-limited mass transfer and surface complexation also control U(VI) migration velocity in the sub-oxic Rifle groundwater. Flux of U(VI) from the vadose zone at the Rifle site may be locally important, but it is not the dominant process that sustains the plume. A wide range in microbiologic functional diversity exists at both sites. Strains of Geobacter and other metal reducing bacteria are present at low natural abundance that are capable of enzymatic U(VI) reduction in localized zones of accumulated detrital organic carbon or after organic carbon amendment. Major differences between the

  6. Persistence of uranium groundwater plumes: Contrasting mechanisms at two DOE sites in the groundwater-river interaction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachara, John M.; Long, Philip E.; Bargar, John; Davis, James A.; Fox, Patricia; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Freshley, Mark D.; Konopka, Allan E.; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Yabusaki, Steve B.

    2013-04-01

    We examine subsurface uranium (U) plumes at two U.S. Department of Energy sites that are located near large river systems and are influenced by groundwater-river hydrologic interaction. Following surface excavation of contaminated materials, both sites were projected to naturally flush remnant uranium contamination to levels below regulatory limits (e.g., 30 μg/L or 0.126 μmol/L; U.S. EPA drinking water standard), with 10 years projected for the Hanford 300 Area (Columbia River) and 12 years for the Rifle site (Colorado River). The rate of observed uranium decrease was much lower than expected at both sites. While uncertainty remains, a comparison of current understanding suggests that the two sites have common, but also different mechanisms controlling plume persistence. At the Hanford 300 A, the persistent source is adsorbed U(VI) in the vadose zone that is released to the aquifer during spring water table excursions. The release of U(VI) from the vadose zone and its transport within the oxic, coarse-textured aquifer sediments is dominated by kinetically-limited surface complexation. Modeling implies that annual plume discharge volumes to the Columbia River are small (< one pore volume). At the Rifle site, slow oxidation of naturally reduced, contaminant U(IV) in the saturated zone and a continuous influx of U(VI) from natural, up-gradient sources influence plume persistence. Rate-limited mass transfer and surface complexation also control U(VI) migration velocity in the sub-oxic Rifle groundwater. Flux of U(VI) from the vadose zone at the Rifle site may be locally important, but it is not the dominant process that sustains the plume. A wide range in microbiologic functional diversity exists at both sites. Strains of Geobacter and other metal reducing bacteria are present at low natural abundance that are capable of enzymatic U(VI) reduction in localized zones of accumulated detrital organic carbon or after organic carbon amendment. Major differences between

  7. Persistence of uranium groundwater plumes: Contrasting mechanisms at two DOE sites in the groundwater-river interaction zone

    SciTech Connect

    Zachara, John M.; Long, Philip E.; Bargar, John; Davis, James A.; Fox, Patricia M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Freshley, Mark D.; Konopka, Allan; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Yabusaki, Steven B.

    2013-04-01

    We examine subsurface uranium (U) plumes at two U.S. Department of Energy sites that are located near large river systems and that are influenced by groundwater-river hydrologic interaction. Following surface excavation of contaminated materials, both sites were projected to naturally flush remnant uranium contamination to levels below regulatory limits (e.g., 30 µg/L or 0.126 µmol/L; U.S. EPA drinking water standard), with 10 years projected for the Hanford 300 Area (Columbia River) and 12 years for the Rifle site (Colorado River). The rate of observed uranium decrease was much lower than expected at both sites. While uncertainty remains, a comparison of current understanding suggests that the two sites have common, but also different mechanisms controlling plume persistence. At the Hanford 300 A, the persistent source is adsorbed U(VI) in the vadose zone that is released to the aquifer during spring water table excursions. The release of U(VI) from the vadose zone and its transport within the oxic, coarse-textured aquifer sediments is dominated by kinetically-limited surface complexation. Modeling implies that annual plume discharge volumes to the Columbia River are small (< one pore volume). At the Rifle site, slow oxidation of naturally reduced, contaminant U(IV) in the saturated zone and a continuous influx of U(VI) from natural, up-gradient sources influences plume persistence. Rate-limited mass transfer and surface complexation also control U(VI) migration velocity in the sub-oxic Rifle groundwater. Flux of U(VI) from the vadose zone at the Rifle site may be locally important, but it is not the dominant process that sustains the plume. A wide range in microbiologic functional diversity exists at both sites. Strains of Geobacter and other metal reducing bacteria are present at low natural abundance that are capable of enzymatic U(VI) reduction in localized zones of accumulated detrital organic carbon or after organic carbon amendment. Major differences

  8. Does hydrologic circulation mask frictional heat on faults after large earthquakes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulton, Patrick M.; Harris, Robert N.; Saffer, Demian M.; Brodsky, Emily E.

    2010-09-01

    Knowledge of frictional resistance along faults is important for understanding the mechanics of earthquakes and faulting. The clearest in situ measure of fault friction potentially comes from temperature measurements in boreholes crossing fault zones within a few years of rupture. However, large temperature signals from frictional heating on faults have not been observed. Unambiguously interpreting the coseismic frictional resistance from small thermal perturbations observed in borehole temperature profiles requires assessing the impact of other potentially confounding thermal processes. We address several issues associated with quantifying the temperature signal of frictional heating including transient fluid flow associated with the earthquake, thermal disturbance caused by borehole drilling, and heterogeneous thermal physical rock properties. Transient fluid flow is investigated using a two-dimensional coupled fluid flow and heat transport model to evaluate the temperature field following an earthquake. Simulations for a range of realistic permeability, frictional heating, and pore pressure scenarios show that high permeabilities (>10-14 m2) are necessary for significant advection within the several years after an earthquake and suggest that transient fluid flow is unlikely to mask frictional heat anomalies. We illustrate how disturbances from circulating fluids during drilling diffuse quickly leaving a robust signature of frictional heating. Finally, we discuss the utility of repeated borehole temperature profiles for discriminating between different interpretations of thermal perturbations. Our results suggest that temperature anomalies from even low friction should be detectable at depths >1 km 1 to 2 years after a large earthquake and that interpretations of low friction from existing data are likely robust.

  9. How does soil organic carbon vary across large catchments? An assessment of geomorphic and hydrologic influences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, Greg; Kunkel, Veikko; Welss, Tony

    2017-04-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) concentration is presumed to vary at the hillslope and catchment scale however there are few studies that have examined SOC at the large catchment scale as well as over a number of years. Here we quantify SOC across two large catchments which have similar soils, topography, orientation and landuse in south-eastern Australia. These catchments of area 575 km2 and 675 km2 display similar patterns of SOC which significantly increases with elevation in line with the rainfall gradient. One catchment, the 575km2 Krui catchment has been sampled in 2006 and 2014 with no significant difference in SOC concentration found despite 10 years of drought and extreme rainfall events followed by above average rainfall. SOC was also found to be correlated with vegetation as quantified by both Landsat and MODIS satellite data with vegetation patterns found to relatively stable over the study period. Further work will investigate this relationship as it is likely that the increased rainfall with elevation is a major driver in the variation in vegetation pattern. SOC concentration was also found to be related to soil erosion and deposition as quantified by the environmental tracer 137Cs. Overall the results suggest that SOC is robust at decadal time scales and is strongly spatially related to topography. Model results based on topographic relationships of the spatial distribution of SOC will be demonstrated.

  10. Does HIV-1 mRNA 5'-untranslated region bear an internal ribosome entry site?

    PubMed

    Smirnova, Victoria V; Terenin, Ilya M; Khutornenko, Anastasia A; Andreev, Dmitri E; Dmitriev, Sergey E; Shatsky, Ivan N

    2016-02-01

    Unspliced human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) mRNA is capped and therefore can be translated via conventional scanning mechanism. In addition, its 5' untranslated region (5'UTR) is thought to function as an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) during G2/M-phase of cell cycle or when cap-dependent translation is inhibited. Recently, customary methods of internal initiation demonstrating have been challenged, and consequently existence of certain IRESs of cellular origin has been put under question. Since a precise knowledge of translation initiation mechanism used by HIV may be important for cure development, presence of the IRES in HIV-1 mRNA demands a careful reexamination using contemporary stringent criteria. The key point of our strategy is to compare translation efficiency of bicistronic mRNA bearing HIV-1 unspliced mRNA 5' UTR in the intercistronic position to that of the corresponding capped monocistronic mRNA. This approach allows determination of internal initiation contribution into the overall level of particular mRNA translation. We found that both in cell-free systems and in cultured cells monocistronic mRNA with HIV-1 unspliced mRNA 5'UTR is translated significantly better than bicistronic one. Importantly, it is also true for G2/M-phase stalled cells or for cells under conditions of inhibited cap-dependent translation. Thus, in our hands contribution of internal ribosome entry into the overall level of translation driven by HIV-1 unspliced mRNA 5'UTR is negligible, and 5'-dependent scanning is a primary mechanism of its translation initiation.

  11. Does chlorhexidine and povidone-iodine preoperative antisepsis reduce surgical site infection in cranial neurosurgery?

    PubMed

    Davies, B M; Patel, H C

    2016-07-01

    Introduction Surgical site infection (SSI) is a significant cause of postoperative morbidity and mortality. Effective preoperative antisepsis is a recognised prophylactic, with commonly used agents including chlorhexidine (CHG) and povidone-iodine (PVI). However, there is emerging evidence to suggest an additional benefit when they are used in combination. Methods We analysed data from our prospective SSI database on patients undergoing clean cranial neurosurgery between October 2011 and April 2014. We compared the case-mix adjusted odds of developing a SSI in patients undergoing skin preparation with CGH or PVI alone or in combination. Results SSIs were detected in 2.6% of 1146 cases. Antisepsis with PVI alone was performed in 654 (57%) procedures, while 276 (24%) had CHG alone and 216 (19%) CHG and PVI together. SSIs were associated with longer operating time (p<0.001) and younger age (p=0.03). Surgery type (p<0.001) and length of operation (p<0.001) were significantly different between antisepsis groups. In a binary logistic regression model, CHG and PVI was associated with a significant reduction in the likelihood of developing an SSI (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.12, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.02-0.63) than either agent alone. There was no difference in SSI rates between CHG and PVI alone (AOR 0.60, 95% CI 0.24-1.5). Conclusions Combination skin preparation with CHG and PVI significantly reduced SSI rates compared to CHG or PVI alone. A prospective, randomized study validating these findings is now warranted.

  12. Does chlorhexidine and povidone-iodine preoperative antisepsis reduce surgical site infection in cranial neurosurgery?

    PubMed Central

    Davies, BM; Patel, HC

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Surgical site infection (SSI) is a significant cause of postoperative morbidity and mortality. Effective preoperative antisepsis is a recognised prophylactic, with commonly used agents including chlorhexidine (CHG) and povidone-iodine (PVI). However, there is emerging evidence to suggest an additional benefit when they are used in combination. Methods We analysed data from our prospective SSI database on patients undergoing clean cranial neurosurgery between October 2011 and April 2014. We compared the case-mix adjusted odds of developing a SSI in patients undergoing skin preparation with CGH or PVI alone or in combination. Results SSIs were detected in 2.6% of 1146 cases. Antisepsis with PVI alone was performed in 654 (57%) procedures, while 276 (24%) had CHG alone and 216 (19%) CHG and PVI together. SSIs were associated with longer operating time (p<0.001) and younger age (p=0.03). Surgery type (p<0.001) and length of operation (p<0.001) were significantly different between antisepsis groups. In a binary logistic regression model, CHG and PVI was associated with a significant reduction in the likelihood of developing an SSI (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.12, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.02–0.63) than either agent alone. There was no difference in SSI rates between CHG and PVI alone (AOR 0.60, 95% CI 0.24–1.5). Conclusions Combination skin preparation with CHG and PVI significantly reduced SSI rates compared to CHG or PVI alone. A prospective, randomized study validating these findings is now warranted. PMID:27055411

  13. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2005. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect

    2006-09-30

    This annual report describes the environmental monitoring programs related to the Department of Energy’s (DOE) activities at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) facility located in Ventura County, California during 2005. Part of the SSFL facility, known as Area IV, had been used for DOE’s activities since the 1950s. A broad range of energy related research and development (R&D) projects, including nuclear technologies projects, was conducted at the site. All the nuclear R&D operations in Area IV ceased in 1988. Current efforts are directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and closure of facilities used for liquid metal research.

  14. Multiple new-particle growth pathways observed at the US DOE Southern Great Plains field site

    DOE PAGES

    Hodshire, Anna L.; Lawler, Michael J.; Zhao, Jun; ...

    2016-07-28

    New-particle formation (NPF) is a significant source of aerosol particles into the atmosphere. However, these particles are initially too small to have climatic importance and must grow, primarily through net uptake of low-volatility species, from diameters  ∼  1 to 30–100 nm in order to potentially impact climate. There are currently uncertainties in the physical and chemical processes associated with the growth of these freshly formed particles that lead to uncertainties in aerosol-climate modeling. Four main pathways for new-particle growth have been identified: condensation of sulfuric-acid vapor (and associated bases when available), condensation of organic vapors, uptake of organic acids through acid–base chemistrymore » in the particle phase, and accretion of organic molecules in the particle phase to create a lower-volatility compound that then contributes to the aerosol mass. The relative importance of each pathway is uncertain and is the focus of this work. The 2013 New Particle Formation Study (NPFS) measurement campaign took place at the DOE Southern Great Plains (SGP) facility in Lamont, Oklahoma, during spring 2013. Measured gas- and particle-phase compositions during these new-particle growth events suggest three distinct growth pathways: (1) growth by primarily organics, (2) growth by primarily sulfuric acid and ammonia, and (3) growth by primarily sulfuric acid and associated bases and organics. To supplement the measurements, we used the particle growth model MABNAG (Model for Acid–Base chemistry in NAnoparticle Growth) to gain further insight into the growth processes on these 3 days at SGP. MABNAG simulates growth from (1) sulfuric-acid condensation (and subsequent salt formation with ammonia or amines), (2) near-irreversible condensation from nonreactive extremely low-volatility organic compounds (ELVOCs), and (3) organic-acid condensation and subsequent salt formation with ammonia or amines. MABNAG is able to corroborate the

  15. What does large randomized trials tell us about the fractionation sensitivity of prostate cancer?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Høyer, M.

    2017-01-01

    Seven randomized clinical trials have tested the use of moderate hypofractionation (2.1-3.5 Gy per fraction) compared to conventional fractionation (1.8-2.0 Gy per fraction) in radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer. The trails find that moderate hypofractionation results in acceptable PSA-control and morbidities that are comparable to conventional fractionation schedules. Extrapolation of the results from the earliest randomized trials indicated a low α/β- values for prostate cancer, but the more recent – and large – studies suggest that the value is moderately or considerably higher. Moderate hypofractionation schedules (ie. 20 x 3 Gy) are now being implemented in routine practice. They are cost-effective and convinient, but they are not consistantly concordant with fractionation sensitivity parameters extrapolated from clinical trials on moderate hypofractionation of prostate cancer.

  16. Hiding an elephant: heavy sterile neutrino with large mixing angle does not contradict cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezrukov, F.; Chudaykin, A.; Gorbunov, D.

    2017-06-01

    We study a model of a keV-scale sterile neutrino with a relatively large mixing with the Standard Model sector. Usual considerations predict active generation of such particles in the early Universe, which leads to constraints from the total Dark Matter density and absence of X-ray signal from sterile neutrino decay. These bounds together may deem any attempt of creation of the keV scale sterile neutrino in the laboratory unfeasible. We argue that for models with a hidden sector coupled to the sterile neutrino these bounds can be evaded, opening new perspectives for the direct studies at neutrino experiments such as Troitsk ν-mass and KATRIN. We estimate the generation of sterile neutrinos in scenarios with the hidden sector dynamics keeping the sterile neutrinos either massless or superheavy in the early Universe. In both cases the generation by oscillations from active neutrinos in plasma is suppressed.

  17. Implementation of Enhanced Attenuation at the DOE Mound Site OU-1 Landfill: Accelerating Progress and Reducing Costs

    SciTech Connect

    Hooten, Gwendolyn; Cato, Rebecca; Looney, Brian

    2016-03-06

    At the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Legacy Management, Mound, Ohio, Site, chlorinated organic contaminants (cVOCs) originating from the former solid-waste landfill have impacted groundwater in Operable Unit 1 (OU-1). The baseline groundwater remedy was groundwater pump and treat (P&T). Since the source materials have been removed from the landfill, the Mound core team, which consists of DOE, US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA), Ohio EPA, and other stakeholders, is assessing the feasibility of switching from the active P&T remedy to a passive attenuation-based remedy. Toward this end, an enhanced attenuation (EA) strategy based on the creation of structured geochemical zones was developed. This EA strategy addresses the residual areas of elevated cVOCs in soil and groundwater while minimizing the rebound of groundwater concentrations above regulatory targets (e.g., maximum contaminant levels [MCLs]) and avoiding plume expansion while the P&T system is turned off. The EA strategy has improved confidence and reduced risk on the OU-1 groundwater transition path to monitored natural attenuation (MNA). To better evaluate the EA strategy, DOE is conducting a field demonstration to evaluate the use of edible oils to enhance the natural attenuation processes. The field demonstration is designed to determine whether structured geochemical zones can be established that expedite the attenuation of cVOCs in the OU-1 groundwater. The EA approach at OU-1 was designed based on “structured geochemical zones” and relies on groundwater flow through a succession of anaerobic and aerobic zones. The anaerobic zones stimulate relatively rapid degradation of the original solvent source compounds (e.g., cVOCs such as tetrachloroethene [PCE] and trichloroethene [TCE]). The surrounding aerobic areas encourage relatively rapid degradation of daughter products (such as dichloroethene [DCE] and vinyl chloride [VC]) as well as enhanced cometabolism of TCE resulting from

  18. Processing capabilties for the elimination of contaminated metal scrapyards at DOE/ORO-managed sites. [Metal smelting facility

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, J.E.; Williams, L.C.

    1982-01-01

    Capabilities exist for reducing all the contaminated nickel, aluminum, and copper scrap to ingot form by smelting. Processing these metals at existing facilities could be completed in about 5 or 6 years. However, these metals represent only about 20% of the total metal inventories currently on hand at the DOE/ORO-managed sites. No provisions have been made for the ferrous scrap. Most of the ferrous scrap is unclassified and does not require secured storage. Also, the potential resale value of the ferrous scrap at about $100 per ton is very low in comparison. Consequently, this scrap has been allowed to accumulate. With several modifications and equipment additions, the induction melter at PGDP could begin processing ferrous scrap after its commitment to nickel and aluminum. The PGDP smelter is a retrofit installation, and annual throughput capabilities are limited. Processing of the existing ferrous scrap inventories would not be completed until the FY 1995-2000 time frame. An alternative proposal has been the installation of induction melters at the other two enrichment facilities. Conceptual design of a generic metal smelting facility is under way. The design study includes capital and operating costs for scrap preparation through ingot storage at an annual throughput of 10,000 tons per year. Facility design includes an induction melter with the capability of melting both ferrous and nonferrous metals. After three years of operation with scrapyard feed, the smelter would have excess capacity to support on-site decontamination and decomissioning projects or upgrading programs. The metal smelting facility has been proposed for FY 1984 line item funding with start-up operations in FY 1986.

  19. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 141-C Large Animal Barn and Biology Laboratory (Hog Barn), Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-027

    SciTech Connect

    R. A. Carlson

    2006-05-24

    The 141-C waste site is a former large animal barn and biology laboratory within the 100-F Area experimental animal farm. Strontium-90, arsenic, and multiple polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were detected within residual demolition debris at concentrations exceeding cleanup criteria. The site has been remediated by removing approximately 900 bank cubic meters of soil and debris within the former building footprint to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility. The results of verification sampling demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also showed that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  20. Estimation of sulfate trends at selected national park service sites: Does the wet deposition record parallel the aerosol record?

    SciTech Connect

    Shealy, R.T.; Bowersox, V.C.

    1997-12-31

    Recently temporal trends in sulfate concentration in fine-particle aerosols have been measured at a set of twelve National Park Service (NPS) sites using the Interagency Monitoring of Visual Environments (IMPROVE) network. Trends were computed for each climatological season over the period 1982-1993. The distribution of trend direction was nearly symmetric; of the 48 possible site-season combinations, 11 were negative, 8 positive, and the remainder exhibited no trend. These are surprising findings in the context of nearly constant SO{sub 2} emissions in the East over this period (EPA, 1991) and generally-decreasing trends over the entire US computed from wet deposition sulfate concentrations collected by the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN). Of particular interest are the three largest positive trends: Grand Canyon exhibited a 4.2% increase in winter, Great Smoky Mountains had an increase of 3.9% in summer, and Shenandoah had an increase of 3.7% in summer, Recently, the latter two sites have been studied over a period more recent than the original study (1982-1995) and the trends are smaller, but they remain positive. It has been suggested that these findings are a statistical artifact: that in a large set of trend tests over many sites and seasons, a few will by chance be found to have statistically significant positive trends, even under the condition of no trends.A special study was undertaken using the subset of the NPS sites with co-located IMPROVE and NADP/NTN samplers. Direct comparison of aerosol sulfur and wet deposition sulfate trends is done to determine their relationship to each other. The NPS sites that qualify as candidates in the study are: Shenandoah, Great Smoky Mountains, Glacier, Yosemite, Grand Canyon, Mesa Verde, and Big Bend Parks.

  1. How long does it take to assemble the magmas that feed large basaltic fissure eruptions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonds, M.; Hartley, M. E.; Morgan, D. J.; Maclennan, J.; Mutch, E. J. F.; Neave, D.

    2016-12-01

    Petrological constraints on timescales of pre-eruptive crystal storage and transport provide a vital framework for interpretation of seismic, geodetic and gas monitoring data in regions where large fissure eruptions occur. The AD 1783 Laki eruption, southeast Iceland, is one of the best-documented small-scale analogues to a flood basalt eruption. Here we use Fe-Mg interdiffusion in olivine and Mg diffusion in plagioclase to assess the timescales required to assemble the Laki magma prior to eruption. Olivine macrocrysts in Laki magmatic tephra display two to three distinct compositional zones, indicative of crystallization and storage in different magmatic environments. Most olivines have core compositions of Fo<76, and rim compositions of Fo69-Fo74 that are close to equilibrium with the Laki melt. The most probable Fe-Mg diffusion timescale for these olivines is 7.8 days, representing a characteristic crystal residence time in the carrier melt. The timescales coincide with historical accounts of strong earthquakes in southeast Iceland, which we interpret as being associated with dissociation of crystal mushes and initiation of dyke propagation to the surface. A small population of olivines with Fo>81 cores preserve diffusion timescales of 125 days, reflecting crystallization and storage in mid-crustal magma chambers. Plagioclase macrocrysts from Laki display more complex textures, with high-anorthite (An≥85) cores, oscillatory-zoned mantles, and low-anorthite (An 60) rims. Reverse fractional crystallization models demonstrate that the high-An plagioclase cores could not have crystallized from the Laki parental melt, but grew from depleted, high-Ca/Na primary mantle melts. High-An plagioclase cores were thus entrained into the Laki magma at an early stage of its evolution. Element diffusion across plagioclase core-mantle boundaries provides an upper estimate for timescales of magma assembly in the lower to mid-crust. Modelling Mg diffusion across these zones

  2. Blood does not buy goodwill: allowing culling increases poaching of a large carnivore.

    PubMed

    Chapron, Guillaume; Treves, Adrian

    2016-05-11

    Quantifying environmental crime and the effectiveness of policy interventions is difficult because perpetrators typically conceal evidence. To prevent illegal uses of natural resources, such as poaching endangered species, governments have advocated granting policy flexibility to local authorities by liberalizing culling or hunting of large carnivores. We present the first quantitative evaluation of the hypothesis that liberalizing culling will reduce poaching and improve population status of an endangered carnivore. We show that allowing wolf (Canis lupus) culling was substantially more likely to increase poaching than reduce it. Replicated, quasi-experimental changes in wolf policies in Wisconsin and Michigan, USA, revealed that a repeated policy signal to allow state culling triggered repeated slowdowns in wolf population growth, irrespective of the policy implementation measured as the number of wolves killed. The most likely explanation for these slowdowns was poaching and alternative explanations found no support. When the government kills a protected species, the perceived value of each individual of that species may decline; so liberalizing wolf culling may have sent a negative message about the value of wolves or acceptability of poaching. Our results suggest that granting management flexibility for endangered species to address illegal behaviour may instead promote such behaviour.

  3. How does the foraging behavior of large herbivores cause different associational plant defenses?

    PubMed

    Huang, Yue; Wang, Ling; Wang, Deli; Zeng, De-Hui; Liu, Chen

    2016-02-05

    The attractant-decoy hypothesis predicts that focal plants can defend against herbivory by neighboring with preferred plant species when herbivores make decisions at the plant species scale. The repellent-plant hypothesis assumes that focal plants will gain protection by associating with nonpreferred neighbors when herbivores are selective at the patch scale. However, herbivores usually make foraging decisions at these scales simultaneously. The net outcomes of the focal plant vulnerability could depend on the spatial scale at which the magnitude of selectivity by the herbivores is stronger. We quantified and compared the within- and between-patch overall selectivity index (OSI) of sheep to examine the relationships between associational plant effects and herbivore foraging selectivity. We found that the sheep OSI was stronger at the within- than the between-patch scale, but focal plant vulnerability followed both hypotheses. Focal plants defended herbivory with preferred neighbors when the OSI difference between the two scales was large. Focal plants gained protection with nonpreferred neighbors when the OSI difference was narrowed. Therefore, the difference in selectivity by the herbivores between the relevant scales results in different associational plant defenses. Our study suggests important implications for understanding plant-herbivore interactions and grassland management.

  4. Blood does not buy goodwill: allowing culling increases poaching of a large carnivore

    PubMed Central

    Chapron, Guillaume; Treves, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Quantifying environmental crime and the effectiveness of policy interventions is difficult because perpetrators typically conceal evidence. To prevent illegal uses of natural resources, such as poaching endangered species, governments have advocated granting policy flexibility to local authorities by liberalizing culling or hunting of large carnivores. We present the first quantitative evaluation of the hypothesis that liberalizing culling will reduce poaching and improve population status of an endangered carnivore. We show that allowing wolf (Canis lupus) culling was substantially more likely to increase poaching than reduce it. Replicated, quasi-experimental changes in wolf policies in Wisconsin and Michigan, USA, revealed that a repeated policy signal to allow state culling triggered repeated slowdowns in wolf population growth, irrespective of the policy implementation measured as the number of wolves killed. The most likely explanation for these slowdowns was poaching and alternative explanations found no support. When the government kills a protected species, the perceived value of each individual of that species may decline; so liberalizing wolf culling may have sent a negative message about the value of wolves or acceptability of poaching. Our results suggest that granting management flexibility for endangered species to address illegal behaviour may instead promote such behaviour. PMID:27170719

  5. Spectroelectrochemical Sensor for Pertechnetate Applicable to Hanford and Other DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Heineman, William R.

    2004-12-01

    New film materials for pertechnetate: A new film material comprised of quaternized poly(4-vinylpyridine) cross-linked with 1,10-diiododecane has been developed for use in the spectroelectrochemical sensor. Films were prepared in a one-pot synthesis by stirring poly(4-vinylpyridine), cross-linker and methyl iodide in 1-butanol for 1 h, after which the solution was spin-coating onto ITO-glass. Film thickness was varied either by changing the spin rate or by dilution of the original precursor solution. The thinnest film prepared was 30 nm; the thickest 930 nm. Spectroscopic ellipsometry was used to study the dynamics of film changes on soaking in aqueous salt solution and on preconcentrating model analyte ferrocyanide. The results document that, on hydration, films expanded by almost 90% in 0.1 M KNO3, then contracted slightly when ferrocyanide solution was introduced probably due to electrostatic cross-linking. IR spectroscopy was used to determine the extent of quaternization of the film. For a polymer solution stirred for 1 h, films were about 20% quaternized. This can be increased to {approx}30% by adding more solvent to the precursor solution and stirring for an additional hour. Solubility of the partially cross-linked material was a factor that limited the quaternization process. Use of a more appropriate solvent may enable greater quaternization. A more quaternized film should preconcentrate more pertechnetate by virtue of having a higher density of charged binding sites. Film ruggedness is critical. To investigate this, films on ITO-glass were soaked in methanol and butanol overnight, in 0.1M KNO3, and in 0.1M KNO3 adjusted to pH 12 and pH 2 for 30 days. Each film was then tested as a spectroelectrochemical sensor for model analyte ferrocyanide. The results showed only the pH 2 conditioned sensor behaved abnormally. The film soaked in pH 2 electrolyte delaminated but did not dissolve. Delamination was most likely due to the acid digestion of the ITO layer of

  6. Recombination Can Initiate and Terminate at a Large Number of Sites within the Rosy Locus of Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Clark, S. H.; Hilliker, A. J.; Chovnick, A.

    1988-01-01

    This report presents the results of a recombination experiment designed to question the existence of special sites for the initiation or termination of a recombination heteroduplex within the region of the rosy locus. Intragenic recombination events were monitored between two physically separated rosy mutant alleles ry(301) and ry(2) utilizing DNA restriction site polymorphisms as genetic markers. Both ry(301) and ry(2) are known from previous studies to be associated with gene conversion frequencies an order of magnitude lower than single site mutations. The mutations are associated with large, well defined insertions located as internal sites within the locus in prior intragenic mapping studies. On the molecular map, they represent large insertions approximately 2.7 kb apart in the second and third exons, respectively, of the XDH coding region. The present study monitors intragenic recombination in a mutant heterozygous genotype in which DNA homology is disrupted by these large discontinuities, greater than the region of DNA homology and flanking both sides of the locus. If initiation/or termination requires separate sites at either end of the locus, then intragenic recombination within the rosy locus of the heterozygote should be eliminated. Contrary to expectation, significant recombination between these sites is seen. PMID:2834266

  7. Productivity of a large-wheeled skidder and roller chopper for preparing sites.

    Treesearch

    Edwin S. Miyata; Helmuth M. Steinhilb; Glenn D. Mroz; Lynne A. Coyer

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the results of a field test of a Pettibone Master 1500 skidder and Flecor Corporation SS812 roller chopper for site preparation work in Wisconsin. Includes cost, productivity, and effectiveness of site preparation on 23.4 acres (9.47 ha).

  8. A large sample of binary quasars: Does quasar bias tracks from Mpc scale to kpc scales?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eftekharzadeh, Sarah; Myers, Adam D.; Djorgovski, Stanislav G.; Graham, Matthew J.

    2017-01-01

    We present the most precise estimate to date of the bias of quasars on very small scales, based on a measurement of the clustering of 47 spectroscopically confirmed binary quasars with proper transverse separations of ~25 h^{-1} kpc. The quasars in our sample, which is an order-of-magnitude larger than previous samples, are targeted using a Kernel Density Estimation technique (KDE) applied to Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging over most of the SDSS area. Our sample is "complete," in that all possible pairs of binary quasars across our area of interest have been spectroscopically confirmed from a combination of previous surveys and our own long-slit observational campaign. We determine the projected correlation function of quasars (\\bar W_p) in four bins of proper transverse scale over the range 17.0 \\lesssim R_{prop} \\lesssim 36.2 h^{-1} kpc. Due to our large sample size, our measured projected correlation function in each of these four bins of scale is more than twice as precise as any previous measurement made over our {\\em full} range of scales. We also measure the bias of our quasar sample in four slices of redshift across the range 0.43 \\le z \\le 2.26 and compare our results to similar measurements of how quasar bias evolves on Mpc-scales. This measurement addresses the question of whether it is reasonable to assume that quasar bias evolves with redshift in a similar fashion on both Mpc and kpc scales. Our results can meaningfully constrain the one-halo term of the Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) of quasars and how it evolves with redshift. This work was partially supported by NSF grant 1515404.

  9. Does higher education hone cognitive functioning and learning efficacy? Findings from a large and diverse sample.

    PubMed

    Guerra-Carrillo, Belén; Katovich, Kiefer; Bunge, Silvia A

    2017-01-01

    Attending school is a multifaceted experience. Students are not only exposed to new knowledge but are also immersed in a structured environment in which they need to respond flexibly in accordance with changing task goals, keep relevant information in mind, and constantly tackle novel problems. To quantify the cumulative effect of this experience, we examined retrospectively and prospectively, the relationships between educational attainment and both cognitive performance and learning. We analyzed data from 196,388 subscribers to an online cognitive training program. These subscribers, ages 15-60, had completed eight behavioral assessments of executive functioning and reasoning at least once. Controlling for multiple demographic and engagement variables, we found that higher levels of education predicted better performance across the full age range, and modulated performance in some cognitive domains more than others (e.g., reasoning vs. processing speed). Differences were moderate for Bachelor's degree vs. High School (d = 0.51), and large between Ph.D. vs. Some High School (d = 0.80). Further, the ages of peak cognitive performance for each educational category closely followed the typical range of ages at graduation. This result is consistent with a cumulative effect of recent educational experiences, as well as a decrement in performance as completion of schooling becomes more distant. To begin to characterize the directionality of the relationship between educational attainment and cognitive performance, we conducted a prospective longitudinal analysis. For a subset of 69,202 subscribers who had completed 100 days of cognitive training, we tested whether the degree of novel learning was associated with their level of education. Higher educational attainment predicted bigger gains, but the differences were small (d = 0.04-0.37). Altogether, these results point to the long-lasting trace of an effect of prior cognitive challenges but suggest that new learning

  10. How Does Sex Influence Multimorbidity? Secondary Analysis of a Large Nationally Representative Dataset.

    PubMed

    Agur, Karolina; McLean, Gary; Hunt, Kate; Guthrie, Bruce; Mercer, Stewart W

    2016-03-31

    Multimorbidity increases with age and is generally more common in women, but little is known about sex effects on the "typology" of multimorbidity. We have characterized multimorbidity in a large nationally representative primary care dataset in terms of sex in ten year age groups from 25 years to 75 years and over, in a cross-sectional analysis of multimorbidity type (physical-only, mental-only, mixed physical and mental; and commonest conditions) for 1,272,685 adults in Scotland. Our results show that women had more multimorbidity overall in every age group, which was most pronounced in the 45-54 years age group (women 26.5% vs. men 19.6%; difference 6.9 (95% CI 6.5 to 7.2). From the age of 45, physical-only multimorbidity was consistently more common in men, and physical-mental multimorbidity more common in women. The biggest difference in physical-mental multimorbidity was found in the 75 years and over group (women 30.9% vs. men 21.2%; difference 9.7 (95% CI 9.1 to 10.2). The commonest condition in women was depression until the age of 55 years, thereafter hypertension. In men, drugs misuse had the highest prevalence in those aged 25-34 years, depression for those aged 35-44 years, and hypertension for 45 years and over. Depression, pain, irritable bowel syndrome and thyroid disorders were more common in women than men across all age groups. We conclude that the higher overall prevalence of multimorbidity in women is mainly due to more mixed physical and mental health problems. The marked difference between the sexes over 75 years especially warrants further investigation.

  11. Does higher education hone cognitive functioning and learning efficacy? Findings from a large and diverse sample

    PubMed Central

    Guerra-Carrillo, Belén; Katovich, Kiefer

    2017-01-01

    Attending school is a multifaceted experience. Students are not only exposed to new knowledge but are also immersed in a structured environment in which they need to respond flexibly in accordance with changing task goals, keep relevant information in mind, and constantly tackle novel problems. To quantify the cumulative effect of this experience, we examined retrospectively and prospectively, the relationships between educational attainment and both cognitive performance and learning. We analyzed data from 196,388 subscribers to an online cognitive training program. These subscribers, ages 15–60, had completed eight behavioral assessments of executive functioning and reasoning at least once. Controlling for multiple demographic and engagement variables, we found that higher levels of education predicted better performance across the full age range, and modulated performance in some cognitive domains more than others (e.g., reasoning vs. processing speed). Differences were moderate for Bachelor’s degree vs. High School (d = 0.51), and large between Ph.D. vs. Some High School (d = 0.80). Further, the ages of peak cognitive performance for each educational category closely followed the typical range of ages at graduation. This result is consistent with a cumulative effect of recent educational experiences, as well as a decrement in performance as completion of schooling becomes more distant. To begin to characterize the directionality of the relationship between educational attainment and cognitive performance, we conducted a prospective longitudinal analysis. For a subset of 69,202 subscribers who had completed 100 days of cognitive training, we tested whether the degree of novel learning was associated with their level of education. Higher educational attainment predicted bigger gains, but the differences were small (d = 0.04–0.37). Altogether, these results point to the long-lasting trace of an effect of prior cognitive challenges but suggest that new

  12. THE DEACTIVATION DECONTAMINATION & DECOMMISSIONING OF THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) A FORMER PLUTONIUM PROCESSING FACILITY AT DOE HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect

    CHARBONEAU, S.L.

    2006-02-01

    The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) was constructed as part of the Manhattan Project during World War II. The Manhattan Project was developed to usher in the use of nuclear weapons to end the war. The primary mission of the PFP was to provide plutonium used as special nuclear material (SNM) for fabrication of nuclear devices for the war effort. Subsequent to the end of World War II, the PFP's mission expanded to support the Cold War effort through plutonium production during the nuclear arms race and later the processing of fuel grade mixed plutonium-uranium oxide to support DOE's breeder reactor program. In October 1990, at the close of the production mission for PFP, a shutdown order was prepared by the Department of Energy (DOE) in Washington, DC and issued to the Richland DOE field office. Subsequent to the shutdown order, a team from the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) analyzed the hazards at PFP associated with the continued storage of certain forms of plutonium solutions and solids. The assessment identified many discrete actions that were required to stabilize the different plutonium forms into stable form and repackage the material in high integrity containers. These actions were technically complicated and completed as part of the PFP nuclear material stabilization project between 1995 and early 2005. The completion of the stabilization project was a necessary first step in deactivating PFP. During stabilization, DOE entered into negotiations with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the State of Washington and established milestones for the Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D) of the PFP. The DOE and its contractor, Fluor Hanford (Fluor), have made great progress in deactivating, decontaminating and decommissioning the PFP at the Hanford Site as detailed in this paper. Background information covering the PFP D&D effort includes descriptions of negotiations with the State of Washington concerning consent-order milestones

  13. Transition and Transfer of Remediated Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) Sites from U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, Cliff; Castillo, Darina; Fatherly, Nicki; Miller, Michele

    2016-03-06

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) expects to receive the transfer of 10 FUSRAP Sites from the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) over the next 10 years; however, the timing of the transfers is highly dependent upon federal funding of the ongoing remedial actions. When remediation for each site is complete and the 2-year operations and maintenance period has concluded, each site will transfer from USACE to DOE for long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS&M). US DOE’s Office of Legacy Management (LM) will accept program responsibility for these sites and conduct LTS&M activities required to maintain protectiveness, preserve site-specific knowledge, and retain the cleanup and stewardship records while keeping stakeholders informed. Since the last FUSRAP site transfer occurred in 2007, LM in coordination with USACE intends to establish a transition process to promote the seamless transfer of sites from the time when the first record of decision is signed to the completion of FUSRAP activities. The approach to transfer active FUSRAP sites to completed sites status has been historically outlined in foundational documents such as the 1999 Memorandum of Understanding and supporting letters of agreement between the two agencies. As more complex FUSRAP sites are completed, this transition process will provide a model between the two agencies to communicate future long-term care liabilities. Ultimately, the FUSRAP transition process is structured to acquire and preserve site knowledge and information necessary for protecting the environment and public health. As of 2015, LM has transitioned and accepted programmatic responsibility for over 90 sites. From LM’s perspective, successful transition of any site includes understanding the long-term environmental liabilities. LM uses site transition framework requirements from past transitions to develop site-specific transition plans. Site-specific transition plans are developed by LM in coordination with USACE and executed

  14. DOE's Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board: The Roles, Work, and Assessment of the Constituent Local Boards - 13587

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, Catherine; Freeman, Jenny; Cantrell, Yvette

    2013-07-01

    The charter for the Department of Energy's Environmental Management (EM) Site-Specific Advisory Board (SSAB) was approved under the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA) in 1994. With a unique mandate to provide public input on issues associated with the cleanup of nuclear legacy sites in the U.S., the EM SSAB comprises eight local boards, which are based at major EM sites. While each board is unique to the community in which it is located and reflects the diversity of the local population, the boards are governed by FACA, related regulations, and DOE policies that are intended to standardize agency advisory board operations. The EM SSAB local boards are made up of a diverse group of citizens who want to understand the mission and goals of the EM program and to help EM achieve those goals for the benefit of their communities. Some are quite passionate about their mission; others need to be coaxed into active participation. Maintaining productive relationships and a supportive environment for effective board operations is the challenge of board management for DOE EM and the board members themselves. DOE draws on research findings and best practices literature from academics and practitioners in the field of public involvement in its board management practices. The EM SSAB is also evaluated annually under the law to ensure that the investment of taxpayer dollars in the board is warranted in light of the contributions of the board. Further evaluation takes place at the agency and site levels in order to identify what aspects of board functioning the agency and board members find important to its success and to address areas where improvement is needed. Board contributions, compliance factors, and measurable outcomes related to board products and process areas are key to agency commitment to ongoing support of the boards and to participant satisfaction and thus continued member involvement. In addition to evaluation of these factors in improving board effectiveness

  15. Enrichment of H3K9me2 on Unsynapsed Chromatin in Caenorhabditis elegans Does Not Target de Novo Sites.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yiqing; Yang, Bing; Li, Yini; Xu, Xia; Maine, Eleanor M

    2015-07-08

    Many organisms alter the chromatin state of unsynapsed chromosomes during meiotic prophase, a phenomenon hypothesized to function in maintaining germline integrity. In Caenorhabditis elegans, histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation (H3K9me2) is detected by immunolabeling as enriched on unsynapsed meiotic chromosomes. Loss of the SET domain protein, MET-2, greatly reduces H3K9me2 abundance and results in germline mortality. Here, we used him-8 mutations to disable X chromosome synapsis and performed a combination of molecular assays to map the sites of H3K9me2 accumulation, evaluate H3K9me2 abundance in germline vs. whole animals, and evaluate the impact of H3K9me2 loss on the germline transcriptome. Our data indicate that H3K9me2 is elevated broadly across the X chromosome and at defined X chromosomal sites in him-8 adults compared with controls. H3K9me2 levels are also elevated to a lesser degree at sites on synapsed chromosomes in him-8 adults compared with controls. These results suggest that MET-2 activity is elevated in him-8 mutants generally as well as targeted preferentially to the unsynapsed X. Abundance of H3K9me2 and other histone H3 modifications is low in germline chromatin compared with whole animals, which may facilitate genome reprogramming during gametogenesis. Loss of H3K9me2 has a subtle impact on the him-8 germline transcriptome, suggesting H3K9me2 may not be a major regulator of developmental gene expression in C. elegans. We hypothesize H3K9me2 may have a structural function critical for germline immortality, and a greater abundance of these marks may be required when a chromosome does not synapse.

  16. Enrichment of H3K9me2 on Unsynapsed Chromatin in Caenorhabditis elegans Does Not Target de Novo Sites

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yiqing; Yang, Bing; Li, Yini; Maine, Eleanor M.

    2015-01-01

    Many organisms alter the chromatin state of unsynapsed chromosomes during meiotic prophase, a phenomenon hypothesized to function in maintaining germline integrity. In Caenorhabditis elegans, histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation (H3K9me2) is detected by immunolabeling as enriched on unsynapsed meiotic chromosomes. Loss of the SET domain protein, MET-2, greatly reduces H3K9me2 abundance and results in germline mortality. Here, we used him-8 mutations to disable X chromosome synapsis and performed a combination of molecular assays to map the sites of H3K9me2 accumulation, evaluate H3K9me2 abundance in germline vs. whole animals, and evaluate the impact of H3K9me2 loss on the germline transcriptome. Our data indicate that H3K9me2 is elevated broadly across the X chromosome and at defined X chromosomal sites in him-8 adults compared with controls. H3K9me2 levels are also elevated to a lesser degree at sites on synapsed chromosomes in him-8 adults compared with controls. These results suggest that MET-2 activity is elevated in him-8 mutants generally as well as targeted preferentially to the unsynapsed X. Abundance of H3K9me2 and other histone H3 modifications is low in germline chromatin compared with whole animals, which may facilitate genome reprogramming during gametogenesis. Loss of H3K9me2 has a subtle impact on the him-8 germline transcriptome, suggesting H3K9me2 may not be a major regulator of developmental gene expression in C. elegans. We hypothesize H3K9me2 may have a structural function critical for germline immortality, and a greater abundance of these marks may be required when a chromosome does not synapse. PMID:26156747

  17. Plutonium in groundwater at the 100K-Area of the U.S. DOE Hanford Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Minhan; Buesseler, Ken O.; Pike, Steven M.

    2005-02-01

    We examined the concentration, size distribution, redox state and isotopic composition of plutonium (Pu) in groundwater at the 100K-Area at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site. Total concentrations of Pu isotopes were extremely low (10 -4 to 10 -6 pCi/kg, ≈10 4 to 10 6 atoms/kg) but measurable for the first time in the 100K-Area wells using mass spectrometric analyses that are much more sensitive than alpha spectroscopy methods used previously. Size fractionation data from two wells suggest that 7-29% of the Pu is associated with colloids, operationally defined here as particles between 1 kDa-0.2 μm in size. These colloids were collected using a 1 kDa cross-flow ultrafiltration (CFF) system developed specifically for groundwater actinide studies to include careful controls both in the field and during processing to ensure in situ geochemical conditions are maintained and size separations can be well characterized. Pu in this colloidal fraction was exclusively in the more reduced Pu(III/IV) form, consistent with the higher affinity of Pu in the lower oxidation states for particle surfaces. While the overall concentrations of Pu were low, the Pu isotopic composition suggests at least two local sources of groundwater Pu, namely, local Hanford reactor operations at the 100K-Area and spent nuclear fuel from the N-reactor, which was stored in concrete pools at this site. Differences between this site and the Savannah River Site (SRS) are noted, since groundwater Pu at the F-Area seepage basin at SRS has been found using these same methods, to be characterized by lower colloidal abundances and higher oxidation states. This difference is not directly attributable to groundwater redox potential or geochemical conditions, but rather the physical-chemical difference in Pu sources, which at SRS appear to be dominated downstream from the seepage basins by decay of 244Cm, resulting in more oxidized forms of 240Pu. There is no clear evidence for colloid

  18. Plutonium in groundwater at the 100K-Area of the U.S. DOE Hanford Site.

    PubMed

    Dai, Minhan; Buesseler, Ken O; Pike, Steven M

    2005-02-01

    We examined the concentration, size distribution, redox state and isotopic composition of plutonium (Pu) in groundwater at the 100K-Area at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site. Total concentrations of Pu isotopes were extremely low (10(-4) to 10(-6) pCi/kg, approximately 10(4) to 10(6) atoms/kg) but measurable for the first time in the 100K-Area wells using mass spectrometric analyses that are much more sensitive than alpha spectroscopy methods used previously. Size fractionation data from two wells suggest that 7-29% of the Pu is associated with colloids, operationally defined here as particles between 1 kDa-0.2 microm in size. These colloids were collected using a 1 kDa cross-flow ultrafiltration (CFF) system developed specifically for groundwater actinide studies to include careful controls both in the field and during processing to ensure in situ geochemical conditions are maintained and size separations can be well characterized. Pu in this colloidal fraction was exclusively in the more reduced Pu(III/IV) form, consistent with the higher affinity of Pu in the lower oxidation states for particle surfaces. While the overall concentrations of Pu were low, the Pu isotopic composition suggests at least two local sources of groundwater Pu, namely, local Hanford reactor operations at the 100K-Area and spent nuclear fuel from the N-reactor, which was stored in concrete pools at this site. Differences between this site and the Savannah River Site (SRS) are noted, since groundwater Pu at the F-Area seepage basin at SRS has been found using these same methods, to be characterized by lower colloidal abundances and higher oxidation states. This difference is not directly attributable to groundwater redox potential or geochemical conditions, but rather the physical-chemical difference in Pu sources, which at SRS appear to be dominated downstream from the seepage basins by decay of 244Cm, resulting in more oxidized forms of 240Pu. There is no clear evidence

  19. GOSAT-OCO-2 synergetic CO2 observations over calibration & validation sites and large emission sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuze, A.; Shiomi, K.; Suto, H.; Kataoka, F.; Crisp, D.; Schwandner, F. M.; Bruegge, C. J.; Taylor, T.; Kawakami, S.

    2015-12-01

    GOSAT and OCO-2 have different observation strategies. TANSO-FTS onboard GOSAT has wide spectral coverage from SWIR to TIR and an agile pointing system at the expense of spatial context, while OCO-2 targets CO2with higher spatial resolution using imaging grating spectrometers. Since the early phase of the two projects, both teams have worked in calibration and validation to demonstrate the effectiveness of satellite greenhouse gases observation. In 2008, the pre-launch cross-calibration agreement between GOSAT and OCO radiometers was better than 2% when measuring the traceable GOSAT calibration sphere (Sakuma et. al, 2010). Since GOSAT's launch in 2009, annual joint vicarious calibration campaigns at the Railroad Valley (RRV) playa have estimated radiometric degradation factors with time at an uncertainty of 7%. (Kuze et al., 2014). After OCO-2 launch, two independent measurements can now be compared to distinguish common forward calculation errors such as molecule absorption line parameters, solar lines and light-path modification by aerosol scattering from instrument-specific errors. On 25 Mach 2015, both GOSAT and OCO-2 targeted RRV simultaneously. The measured radiance spectra at the top of the atmosphere agree within 5% for all common bands. On June 29 and July 1 during the 7th RRV campaign, coincidence observation of GOSAT, OCO-2, AJAX airplane, radiosonde, and FTS and radiometers on the ground, provided surface albedo, BRDF, temperature, humidity CO2 and CH4 density to demonstrate consistency between forward radiative transfer calculation and satellite measured data. Both GOSAT and OCO-2 have been regularly targeting the TCCON site at Lamont and large emission sources such as mega cities and oil fields and glint over the ocean. Retrieved parameters such as surface albedo, pressure, column averaged mole fraction and aerosol related parameters can be compared firstly where aerosol optical thickness is low and topography is flat, and then over aerosol

  20. Progress in evaluation of radionuclide geochemical information developed by DOE high-level nuclear waste repository site projects. Annual report, October 1984-September 1985. Volume 4

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, R.E.; Arnold, W.D.; Blencoe, J.G.; Jacobs, G.K.; Kelmers, A.D.; Seeley, F.G.; Whatley, S.K.

    1986-05-01

    Information pertaining to the potential geochemical behavior of radionuclides at candidate sites for a high-level radioactive waste repository, which is being developed by projects within the Department of Energy (DOE), is being evaluated by Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). During this report period, emphasis was placed on the evaluation of information pertinent to the Hanford site in southeastern Washington. Results on the sorption/solubility behavior of technetium, neptunium, and uranium in the basalt/water geochemical system are summarized and compared to the results of DOE. Also, summaries of results are reported from two geochemical modeling studies: (1) an evaluation of the information developed by DOE on the native copper deposits of Michigan as a natural analog for the emplacement of copper canisters in a repository in basalt, and (2) calculation of the solubility and speciation of radionuclides for representative groundwaters from the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada.

  1. Final Report on DOE Project entitled Dynamic Optimized Advanced Scheduling of Bandwidth Demands for Large-Scale Science Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ramamurthy, Byravamurthy

    2014-05-05

    In this project, developed scheduling frameworks for dynamic bandwidth demands for large-scale science applications. In particular, we developed scheduling algorithms for dynamic bandwidth demands in this project. Apart from theoretical approaches such as Integer Linear Programming, Tabu Search and Genetic Algorithm heuristics, we have utilized practical data from ESnet OSCARS project (from our DOE lab partners) to conduct realistic simulations of our approaches. We have disseminated our work through conference paper presentations and journal papers and a book chapter. In this project we addressed the problem of scheduling of lightpaths over optical wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) networks. We published several conference papers and journal papers on this topic. We also addressed the problems of joint allocation of computing, storage and networking resources in Grid/Cloud networks and proposed energy-efficient mechanisms for operatin optical WDM networks.

  2. El Observatorio de San Pedro Mártir: A World-Class Site for Large Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehinger, P.

    2007-06-01

    This paper outlines the characteristics of San Pedro Mártir as a super site for major astronomical telescopes. The extremely dark sky, high percentage of clear nights year round, excellent seeing, low water vapor content, and related logistical matters make SPM the number one choice for major new telescope projects. Clearly, SPM is a most attractive site, affording ease of access by land, sea, and air, with significantly shorter supply lines and same day access from Santa Cruz, Pasadena, Tucson, San Diego, Mexico City, and other astronomical centers.

  3. Proposed Holistic Strategy for the Closure of F-Area, A Large Nuclear Industrial Complex at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    SHEDROW, CB

    2004-02-10

    F-Area is a large nuclear complex located near the center of the Department of Energy's (DOEs) Savannah River Site in South Carolina. The present closure strategy for F-Area is based on established SRS protocol for a site-specific, graded approach to deactivation and decommissioning. Uncontaminated facilities will be closed under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Facilities requiring removal or in-situ disposition of residual chemical and/or radiological inventories will be decommissioned under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The F-Area Tank Farm, which is permitted under the Clean Water Act, will be closed in accordance with an industrial wastewater closure plan. F-Area closure will also involve the near- and long-term remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater resources. The proposed holistic F-Area closure strategy would enhance the existing project-specific SRS closure protocol by incorporating a comprehensive area-wide groundwater modeling tool, or Composite Analysis. The use of this methodology would allow for the assessment of the relative impacts of individual projects, as well as the cumulative effect of all F-Area closure actions, on area groundwater resources. Other critical elements of the proposed strategy include (i) the consistent use of site-specific Risk Assessments (RAs) and Performance Assessments (PAs), (ii) the closer integration of selected soil and groundwater closure projects and near-term D and D projects, and (iii) the creation of an Area Core Team (ACT) consisting of DOE and selected regulator decision-makers to direct area D and D and environmental restoration activities. This holistic approach would facilitate the effective targeting of agency resources on high priority projects whose closure would have the greatest impact on achieving the desired area-wide risk-based end-state and accelerate delisting of F-Area from the National Priority List (NPL).

  4. Large lateral movement of transmembrane helix S5 is not required for substrate access to the active site of rhomboid intramembrane protease.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yi; Ha, Ya

    2013-06-07

    Rhomboids represent an evolutionarily ancient protease family. Unlike most other proteases, they are polytopic membrane proteins and specialize in cleaving transmembrane protein substrates. The polar active site of rhomboid protease is embedded in the membrane and normally closed. For the bacterial rhomboid GlpG, it has been proposed that one of the transmembrane helices (S5) of the protease can rotate to open a lateral gate, enabling substrate to enter the protease from inside the membrane. Here, we studied the conformational change in GlpG by solving the cocrystal structure of the protease with a mechanism-based inhibitor. We also examined the lateral gating model by cross-linking S5 to a neighboring helix (S2). The crystal structure shows that inhibitor binding displaces a capping loop (L5) from the active site but causes only minor shifts in the transmembrane helices. Cross-linking S5 and S2, which not only restricts the lateral movement of S5 but also prevents substrate from passing between the two helices, does not hinder the ability of the protease to cleave a membrane protein substrate in detergent solution and in reconstituted membrane vesicles. Taken together, these data suggest that a large lateral movement of the S5 helix is not required for substrate access to the active site of rhomboid protease.

  5. Large Lateral Movement of Transmembrane Helix S5 Is Not Required for Substrate Access to the Active Site of Rhomboid Intramembrane Protease*

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yi; Ha, Ya

    2013-01-01

    Rhomboids represent an evolutionarily ancient protease family. Unlike most other proteases, they are polytopic membrane proteins and specialize in cleaving transmembrane protein substrates. The polar active site of rhomboid protease is embedded in the membrane and normally closed. For the bacterial rhomboid GlpG, it has been proposed that one of the transmembrane helices (S5) of the protease can rotate to open a lateral gate, enabling substrate to enter the protease from inside the membrane. Here, we studied the conformational change in GlpG by solving the cocrystal structure of the protease with a mechanism-based inhibitor. We also examined the lateral gating model by cross-linking S5 to a neighboring helix (S2). The crystal structure shows that inhibitor binding displaces a capping loop (L5) from the active site but causes only minor shifts in the transmembrane helices. Cross-linking S5 and S2, which not only restricts the lateral movement of S5 but also prevents substrate from passing between the two helices, does not hinder the ability of the protease to cleave a membrane protein substrate in detergent solution and in reconstituted membrane vesicles. Taken together, these data suggest that a large lateral movement of the S5 helix is not required for substrate access to the active site of rhomboid protease. PMID:23609444

  6. Improved Species-Specific Lysine Acetylation Site Prediction Based on a Large Variety of Features Set

    PubMed Central

    Wuyun, Qiqige; Zheng, Wei; Zhang, Yanping; Ruan, Jishou; Hu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a major post-translational modification. It plays a vital role in numerous essential biological processes, such as gene expression and metabolism, and is related to some human diseases. To fully understand the regulatory mechanism of acetylation, identification of acetylation sites is first and most important. However, experimental identification of protein acetylation sites is often time consuming and expensive. Therefore, the alternative computational methods are necessary. Here, we developed a novel tool, KA-predictor, to predict species-specific lysine acetylation sites based on support vector machine (SVM) classifier. We incorporated different types of features and employed an efficient feature selection on each type to form the final optimal feature set for model learning. And our predictor was highly competitive for the majority of species when compared with other methods. Feature contribution analysis indicated that HSE features, which were firstly introduced for lysine acetylation prediction, significantly improved the predictive performance. Particularly, we constructed a high-accurate structure dataset of H.sapiens from PDB to analyze the structural properties around lysine acetylation sites. Our datasets and a user-friendly local tool of KA-predictor can be freely available at http://sourceforge.net/p/ka-predictor. PMID:27183223

  7. DMD and IL1RAPL1: two large adjacent genes localized within a common fragile site (FRAXC) have reduced expression in cultured brain tumors.

    PubMed

    McAvoy, S; Ganapathiraju, S; Perez, D S; James, C D; Smith, D I

    2007-01-01

    Common fragile sites (CFSs) are large regions of profound genomic instability found in all individuals. Spanning the center of the two most frequently expressed CFS regions, FRA3B (3p14.3) and FRA16D (16q23.2), are the 1.5 Mb FHIT gene and the 1.0 Mb WWOX gene. These genes are frequently deleted and/or altered in many different cancers. Both FHIT and WWOX have been demonstrated to function as tumor suppressors, both in vitro and in vivo. A number of other large CFS genes have been identified and are also frequently inactivated in multiple cancers. Based on these data, several additional very large genes were tested to determine if they were derived from within CFS regions, but DCC and RAD51L1 were not. However, the 2.0 Mb DMD gene and its immediately distal neighbor, the 1.8 Mb IL1RAPL1 gene are CFS genes contained within the FRAXC CFS region (Xp21.2-->p21.1). They are abundantly expressed in normal brain but were dramatically underexpressed in every brain tumor cell line and xenograft (derived from an intracranial model of glioblastoma multiforme) examined. We studied the expression of eleven other large CFS genes in the same panel of brain tumor cell lines and xenografts and found reduced expression of multiple large CFS genes in these samples. In this report we show that there is selective loss of specific large CFS genes in different cancers that does not appear to be mediated by the relative instability within different CFS regions. Further, the inactivation of multiple large CFS genes in xenografts and brain tumor cell lines may help to explain why this type of cancer is highly aggressive and associated with a poor clinical outcome.

  8. Decondensation of chromosomal 45S rDNA sites in Lolium and Festuca genotypes does not result in karyotype instability.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Laiane Corsini; Jankowska, Maja; Fuchs, Joerg; Mittelmann, Andréa; Techio, Vânia Helena; Houben, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Fragile sites (FSs) in plants have been described for species like Lolium and other grasses. Whereas in humans FSs were shown to be involved in genome instabilities; the consequences of FSs expression in plants are not known yet. To evaluate whether FSs cause karyotype instabilities, we assessed the frequency of micronuclei and lagging chromosomes in meristematic cells, the stability of the DNA content, and the occurrence of neocentromeres in the presumed chromosomal fragments of Lolium perenne, Lolium multiflorum, Festuca arrundinacea, and two Festulolium hybrids. The cell cycle analysis along with flow cytometric genome size measurements showed high stability in all genomes evaluated. Neocentromeric activity was neither observed in the presumed fragments nor in any other chromosomal region, then this is not the mechanism responsible by the stability. However, Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a 45S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) probe in combination with YOYO staining of metaphasic chromosomes showed that many extended nucleolus organizing region (NOR) form very thin YOYO-positive chromatin fibers connecting the acentric 'fragment' with the centromere-containing chromosome region. The obtained data indicate that the expression of FSs does not result in genome instabilities or neocentromere formation. The FS-containing 45S rDNA carrying chromatin fibers undergo a cell cycle and gene activity-dependent dynamic decondensation process.

  9. Supplement Analysis for Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project, Boone Pond Acclimation Site (DOE/EIS-0169-SA-08)

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Patricia R.

    2004-04-07

    Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project – Under the Monitoring and Evaluation Program (M&E), the coho acclimation research task would be modified to include a new site located in the upper Yakima south of Cle Elum, WA. The Yakima Fisheries Project Final Environmental Impact Statement (YFP EIS) (USDOE/BPA 1996) analyzed impacts of undertaking fishery research and mitigation activities in the Yakima River Basin. The EIS focused on the impacts of construction, operation and maintenance of anadromous fish production facilities in order to conduct research designed to increase knowledge of supplementation techniques. Spring chinook were the priority species analyzed in the EIS, however, Coho feasibility studies, potential harvest benefits, and predation impacts for returning natural production of Coho salmon to the Yakima River Basin were also evaluated. Subsequent Supplement Analyses (SA’s) have analyzed the potential impacts of research activities relating to this experimental design program (DOE/EIS-0169-SA-01 through SA-07). The purpose of this Supplement Analysis (SA) is to determine if a Supplemental EIS (SEIS) is needed to analyze the changes proposed in the Yakima Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) Coho Program feasibility studies.

  10. [Pre-operative smoking cessation does not always reduce the incidence of surgical site infection after gastrointestinal surgery].

    PubMed

    Kuri, Michioki; Yamada, Terumasa; Nakagawa, Masashi; Tanigami, Hironobu; Kishi, Yoshihiko

    2011-02-01

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recommend pre-operative smoking cessation to reduce the risk of surgical site infection (SSI). However, whether pre-operative smoking cessation reduces the incidence of SSI for gastrointestinal surgery is unclear. We investigated whether pre-operative smoking cessation reduces the incidence of SSI among patients undergoing gastrointestinal surgery. The study subjects were 512 consecutive patients undergoing gastrointestinal surgery at Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases. SSI occurrence was determined by the hospital SSI surveillance team. Pre-operative smoking status was obtained by interview, and the patients were divided into four groups. Information on age, sex, operation time, operational organ, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status (ASA-PS), elective or emergency surgery, co-existing procedures, use of scopes, ileo-colostomy, properties of drain tube, use of floss, and wound contamination was obtained from the medical records. The relationship between smoking status and incidence of SSI, and risk factors associated with the incidence of SSI were investigated. SSI occurred in 83 patients. Pre-operative smoking status had no relation with the incidence of SSI. Operation time, gallbladder and pancreatic surgery, colon surgery, emergency surgery, co-existing procedures, ilea-colostomy, closed drain, usage of floss, and wound contamination were related significantly with SSI. Pre-operative smoking cessation does not reduce the incidence of SSI. However, since continuation of smoking has no benefits for the safety of surgery, anesthesiologists must advice patients to quit smoking before surgery.

  11. Ten Steps to Conducting a Large, Multi-Site, Longitudinal Investigation of Language and Reading in Young Children.

    PubMed

    Farquharson, Kelly; Murphy, Kimberly A

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes methodological procedures involving execution of a large-scale, multi-site longitudinal study of language and reading comprehension in young children. Researchers in the Language and Reading Research Consortium (LARRC) developed and implemented these procedures to ensure data integrity across multiple sites, schools, and grades. Specifically, major features of our approach, as well as lessons learned, are summarized in 10 steps essential for successful completion of a large-scale longitudinal investigation in early grades. Over 5 years, children in preschool through third grade were administered a battery of 35 higher- and lower-level language, listening, and reading comprehension measures (RCM). Data were collected from children, their teachers, and their parents/guardians at four sites across the United States. Substantial and rigorous effort was aimed toward maintaining consistency in processes and data management across sites for children, assessors, and staff. With appropriate planning, flexibility, and communication strategies in place, LARRC developed and executed a successful multi-site longitudinal research study that will meet its goal of investigating the contribution and role of language skills in the development of children's listening and reading comprehension. Through dissemination of our design strategies and lessons learned, research teams embarking on similar endeavors can be better equipped to anticipate the challenges.

  12. Ten Steps to Conducting a Large, Multi-Site, Longitudinal Investigation of Language and Reading in Young Children

    PubMed Central

    Farquharson, Kelly; Murphy, Kimberly A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper describes methodological procedures involving execution of a large-scale, multi-site longitudinal study of language and reading comprehension in young children. Researchers in the Language and Reading Research Consortium (LARRC) developed and implemented these procedures to ensure data integrity across multiple sites, schools, and grades. Specifically, major features of our approach, as well as lessons learned, are summarized in 10 steps essential for successful completion of a large-scale longitudinal investigation in early grades. Method: Over 5 years, children in preschool through third grade were administered a battery of 35 higher- and lower-level language, listening, and reading comprehension measures (RCM). Data were collected from children, their teachers, and their parents/guardians at four sites across the United States. Substantial and rigorous effort was aimed toward maintaining consistency in processes and data management across sites for children, assessors, and staff. Conclusion: With appropriate planning, flexibility, and communication strategies in place, LARRC developed and executed a successful multi-site longitudinal research study that will meet its goal of investigating the contribution and role of language skills in the development of children's listening and reading comprehension. Through dissemination of our design strategies and lessons learned, research teams embarking on similar endeavors can be better equipped to anticipate the challenges. PMID:27064308

  13. Reconstruction of measurable three-dimensional point cloud model based on large-scene archaeological excavation sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chun-Sen; Zhang, Meng-Meng; Zhang, Wei-Xing

    2017-01-01

    This paper outlines a low-cost, user-friendly photogrammetric technique with nonmetric cameras to obtain excavation site digital sequence images, based on photogrammetry and computer vision. Digital camera calibration, automatic aerial triangulation, image feature extraction, image sequence matching, and dense digital differential rectification are used, combined with a certain number of global control points of the excavation site, to reconstruct the high precision of measured three-dimensional (3-D) models. Using the acrobatic figurines in the Qin Shi Huang mausoleum excavation as an example, our method solves the problems of little base-to-height ratio, high inclination, unstable altitudes, and significant ground elevation changes affecting image matching. Compared to 3-D laser scanning, the 3-D color point cloud obtained by this method can maintain the same visual result and has advantages of low project cost, simple data processing, and high accuracy. Structure-from-motion (SfM) is often used to reconstruct 3-D models of large scenes and has lower accuracy if it is a reconstructed 3-D model of a small scene at close range. Results indicate that this method quickly achieves 3-D reconstruction of large archaeological sites and produces heritage site distribution of orthophotos providing a scientific basis for accurate location of cultural relics, archaeological excavations, investigation, and site protection planning. This proposed method has a comprehensive application value.

  14. Large-scale mapping of transposable element insertion sites using digital encoding of sample identity.

    PubMed

    Gohl, Daryl M; Freifeld, Limor; Silies, Marion; Hwa, Jennifer J; Horowitz, Mark; Clandinin, Thomas R

    2014-03-01

    Determining the genomic locations of transposable elements is a common experimental goal. When mapping large collections of transposon insertions, individualized amplification and sequencing is both time consuming and costly. We describe an approach in which large numbers of insertion lines can be simultaneously mapped in a single DNA sequencing reaction by using digital error-correcting codes to encode line identity in a unique set of barcoded pools.

  15. Challenges with Final Status Surveys at a Large Decommissioning Site - 13417

    SciTech Connect

    Downey, Heath; Collopy, Peter; Shephard, Eugene; Walter, Nelson; Conant, John

    2013-07-01

    As part of decommissioning a former nuclear fuel manufacturing site, one of the crucial final steps is to conduct Final Status Surveys (FSS) in order to demonstrate compliance with the release criteria. At this decommissioning site, the area for FSS was about 100 hectares (248 acres) and included varying terrain, wooded areas, ponds, excavations, buildings and a brook. The challenges in performing the FSS included determining location, identifying FSS units, logging gamma walkover survey data, determining sample locations, managing water in excavations, and diverting water in the brook. The approaches taken to overcome these challenges will be presented in the paper. The paper will present and discuss lessons learned that will aid others in the FSS process. (authors)

  16. Building a Large, Successful Web Site on a Shoestring: A Decade of Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frick, Theodore W.; Su, Bude; An, Yun-Jo

    2004-01-01

    How did we build a site that has grown to more than 6,000 Web pages and 50 million hits per year--with a few part-time people, with no budget for the first five years, and a minimal budget the next five? We will describe an efficient and effective design process fundamental to our strategy that is essentially a method of disciplined inquiry. Our…

  17. Estimation of unit hydrographs for large floods at ungaged sites in Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holnbeck, S.R.; Parrett, Charles

    1993-01-01

    Methods were developed for estimating unit hydro- graphs at ungaged sites in Montana using either the Clark or dimensionless unit-hydrograph method. Flood hydrograph data for 26 U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations and rainfall data were used together with a rainfall-runoff simulation model (HEC-1) to derive unit hydrographs and important unit-hydrograph variables. A multiple- regression analysis relating four unit-hydrograph variables (time of concentration, basin-storage coefficient, Snyder standard lag, and dimensionless peak discharge) to basin characteristics showed a significant (95 percent confidence level) relation only with drainage area for time of concentration, basin-storage coefficient, and Snyder standard lag. In the regression relation for dimensionless peak discharge, the only significant basin characteristic was basin factor, a function of channel length, distance from the basin centroid to mouth, and channel slope. An alternative equation based only on drainage area was almost as reliable. Regression equations for estimating basin-storage coefficient and dimensionless peak discharge had coefficients of determination (r sq) ranging from 0.19 to 0.47. An average dimensionless unit hydrograph was determined for the 26 sites, and a method was developed for adjusting its magnitude and shape to account for site-specific information. The 26 derived unit hydrographs were compared with those calculated by the described estimation methods. The two methods performed about equally well in matching derived unit-hydrograph peaks and shapes. (USGS)

  18. STEAM REFORMING TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION FOR THE DESTRUCTION OF ORGANICS ON ACTUAL DOE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE TANK 48H WASTE 9138

    SciTech Connect

    Burket, P

    2009-02-24

    This paper describes the design of the Bench-scale Steam Reformer (BSR); a processing unit for demonstrating steam reforming technology on actual radioactive waste [1]. It describes the operating conditions of the unit used for processing a sample of Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 48H waste. Finally, it compares the results from processing the actual waste in the BSR to processing simulant waste in the BSR to processing simulant waste in a large pilot scale unit, the Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR), operated at Hazen Research Inc. in Golden, CO. The purpose of this work was to prove that the actual waste reacted in the same manner as the simulant waste in order to validate the work performed in the pilot scale unit which could only use simulant waste.

  19. Characterization of uranium contaminated soils from DOE Fernald Environmental Management Project Site: Results of Phase 1 characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.; Marsh, J.D. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The Integrated Demonstration (ID) for remediation of uranium- contaminated soils has been established by the DOE Office of Technology Development. The Fernald (Feed Materials Production Center) site was selected as the DOE facility for the field demonstration. The principle objective of this ID is to evaluate and compare the versatility, efficiency, and economics of various technologies that may be combined into systems for the removal of uranium from contaminated soils. Several leaching solutions were employed to determine their effectiveness in extracting uranium from the soil. The extractants and their means of preparation were: 0.1 N nitric acid [HNO{sub 3}]: 6.25 mL of concentrated nitric acid was diluted to 1 L with distilled water; 2% ammonium carbonate [(NH{sub 4}){sub 2}CO{sub 3}]: 20 g of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}CO{sub 3} was dissolved in distilled water and diluted to 1 L; 5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl): 50 mL of NaOCl reagent (Cl < 6%) was diluted to 1 L with distilled water; 0.1 M ethylenediaminetetraacetric acid, disodium salt (EDTA): 37.224 g EDTA was dissolved in distilled water and diluted to 1 L; 2% citric acid monohydrate solution (H{sub 3}C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O{sub 7}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O): 20 g of critic acid was diluted to 1 L with distilled water; 0.1 M hydroxylamine-hydrochloride (NH{sub 2}OH{center_dot}HCl) in 0.01 N nitric acid: 6.95 g (NH{sub 2}OH{center_dot}HCl) was dissolved and diluted to 1 L with 0.01 N HNO{sub 3}. The 0.01 N nitric acid was prepared by diluting 3 mL concentrated nitric acid to 5 L with distilled water; and the sodium citrate-bicarbonate-dithionite (CBD) method: 0.3 M sodium citrate (88 g tribasic sodium citrate, Na{sub 3}C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O{sub 7}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O, per liter); 1 M sodium bicarbonate (84 g NaHCO{sub 3} per liter); and 5 g sodium dithionite, Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 4}.

  20. Characterization of uranium contaminated soils from DOE Fernald Environmental Management Project Site: Results of Phase 1 characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.; Marsh, J.D. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The Integrated Demonstration (ID) for remediation of uranium- contaminated soils has been established by the DOE Office of Technology Development. The Fernald (Feed Materials Production Center) site was selected as the DOE facility for the field demonstration. The principle objective of this ID is to evaluate and compare the versatility, efficiency, and economics of various technologies that may be combined into systems for the removal of uranium from contaminated soils. Several leaching solutions were employed to determine their effectiveness in extracting uranium from the soil. The extractants and their means of preparation were: 0.1 N nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}): 6.25 mL of concentrated nitric acid was diluted to 1 L with distilled water; 2% ammonium carbonate ((NH{sub 4}){sub 2}CO{sub 3}): 20 g of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}CO{sub 3} was dissolved in distilled water and diluted to 1 L; 5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl): 50 mL of NaOCl reagent (Cl < 6%) was diluted to 1 L with distilled water; 0.1 M ethylenediaminetetraacetric acid, disodium salt (EDTA): 37.224 g EDTA was dissolved in distilled water and diluted to 1 L; 2% citric acid monohydrate solution (H{sub 3}C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O{sub 7}{center dot}H{sub 2}O): 20 g of critic acid was diluted to 1 L with distilled water; 0.1 M hydroxylamine-hydrochloride (NH{sub 2}OH{center dot}HCl) in 0.01 N nitric acid: 6.95 g (NH{sub 2}OH{center dot}HCl) was dissolved and diluted to 1 L with 0.01 N HNO{sub 3}. The 0.01 N nitric acid was prepared by diluting 3 mL concentrated nitric acid to 5 L with distilled water; and the sodium citrate-bicarbonate-dithionite (CBD) method: 0.3 M sodium citrate (88 g tribasic sodium citrate, Na{sub 3}C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O{sub 7}{center dot}2H{sub 2}O, per liter); 1 M sodium bicarbonate (84 g NaHCO{sub 3} per liter); and 5 g sodium dithionite, Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 4}.

  1. Successful treatment of a LifeSite Hemodialysis Access System pocket infection with large-volume kanamycin solution irrigation.

    PubMed

    Ross, John R

    2003-07-01

    Bridge devices-dialysis catheters and subcutaneous access devices-play a critical role in increasing the placement of arteriovenous (AV) fistulas by providing hemodialysis vascular access while AV fistulas mature. The LifeSite Hemodialysis Access System (Vasca Inc, Tewskburg, MA), a fully implantable, subcutaneous dual valve access system, has been shown to have lower complication rates, higher blood flow rates, and better long-term device survival than conventional tunneled hemodialysis catheters, indicating it may better meet the requirements for optimally bridging to a fistula. This case study of a 48-year-old black man undergoing chronic hemodialysis for renal failure because of insulin-dependent diabetes describes a simple approach for resolving localized pocket infections associated with the LifeSite System by drip irrigation of the valves and tissue pockets with an antibiotic solution. Eight weeks after implantation of the LifeSite System, the patient exhibited symptoms of infection of the lateral LifeSite valve tissue pocket, which on culture was shown to be caused by Staphylococcus aureus. Flushing the LifeSite valve and tissue pocket with a large volume of kanamycin solution, in conjunction with intravenous vancomycin and routine irrigation of the valve with isopropyl alcohol, resolved the infection after 1 treatment. The LifeSite System successfully bridged the patient to a transposed basilic vein fistula created through a 2-stage surgical procedure. The LifeSite System provided uninterrupted access for hemodialysis over a period of 6 months while the fistula matured. The LifeSite System should allow surgeons to attempt fistula construction in more patients, including diabetics, access-challenged patients, and patients with small vessels, who may benefit from a nontraditional surgical approach toward fistula creation.

  2. Performance evaluation of the technical capabilities of DOE sites for disposal of mixed low-level waste: Volume 3, Site evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, R.D.; Gruebel, M.M.

    1996-03-01

    A team of analysts designed and conducted a performance evaluation to estimate the technical capabilities of fifteen Department of Energy sites for disposal of mixed low-level waste (i.e., waste that contains both low-level radioactive materials and hazardous constituents). Volume 1 summarizes the process for selecting the fifteen sites, the methodology used in the evaluation, and the conclusions derived from the evaluation. Volume 2 provides details about the site-selection process, the performance-evaluation methodology, and the overall results of the analysis. Volume 3 contains detailed evaluations of the fifteen sites and discussion of the results for each site.

  3. Anza palaeoichnological site. Late Cretaceous. Morocco. Part II. Problems of large dinosaur trackways and the first African Macropodosaurus trackway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masrour, Moussa; Lkebir, Noura; Pérez-Lorente, Félix

    2017-10-01

    The Anza site shows large ichnological surfaces indicating the coexistence in the same area of different vertebrate footprints (dinosaur and pterosaur) and of different types (tridactyl and tetradactyl, semiplantigrade and rounded without digit marks) and the footprint variability of long trackways. This area may become a world reference in ichnology because it contains the second undebatable African site with Cretaceous pterosaur footprints - described in part I - and the first African site with Macropodosaurus footprints. In this work, problems related to long trackways are also analyzed, such as their sinuosity, the order-disorder of the variability (long-short) of the pace length and the difficulty of morphological classification of the theropod footprints due to their morphological variability.

  4. Triaxial tunable mechanical monolithic sensors for large band low frequency monitoring and characterization of sites and structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone, F.; Giordano, G.; Acernese, F.; Romano, R.

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes the application of the monolithic UNISA Folded Pendulum, optimized as inertial sensor (seismometer) for low frequency applications for characterization of sites (including underground sites) and structures (e.g. buildings, bridges, historical monuments), but, in general, for applications requiring large band low-frequency performances coupled with high sensitivities. The main characteristics of this class of sensors are high sensitivity, large measurement band, compactness, lightness, scalability, tunability of the resonance frequency, low thermal noise and very good immunity to environmental noises. The horizontal and vertical versions of folded pendulum allow an effective state-of-the-art mechanical implementation of triaxial sensors, configurable both as seismometer and/or as accelerometer.

  5. Binding site and elution behavior of DNA and other large biomolecules in monolithic anion-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Shuichi; Yoshimoto, Noriko; Tarmann, Christina; Jungbauer, Alois

    2009-03-27

    Our previous study has shown that there is a good correlation between the number of charges of DNA (from trimer to 50-mer) and the number of binding sites B in electrostatic interaction chromatography (ion-exchange chromatography, IEC). It was also found that high salt (NaCl) concentration is needed to elute large DNAs (>0.6M). In this paper we further performed experiments with large DNAs (up to 95-mer polyT and polyA) and charged liposome particles of different sizes (ca. 30, 50 and 100 nm) with a monolithic anion-exchange disk in order to understand the binding and elution mechanism of very large charged biomolecules or particles. The peak salt (NaCl) concentration increased with increasing DNA length. However, above 50-mer DNAs the value did not increase significantly with DNA length (ca. 0.65-0.70 M). For liposome particles of different sizes the peak salt concentration (ca. 0.62 M) was similar and slightly lower than that for large DNAs (ca. 0.65-0.70 M). The binding site values (ca. 25-30) are smaller than those for large DNAs. When arginine was used as a mobile phase modulator, the elution position of polyA and polyT became very close whereas in NaCl gradient elution polyT appeared after polyA eluted. This was mainly due to suppression of hydrophobic interaction by arginine.

  6. Support for site testing of the European Extremely Large Telescope: precipitable water vapor over La Silla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Querel, Richard R.; Kerber, Florian; Lo Curto, Gaspare; Thomas-Osip, Joanna E.; Prieto, Gabriel; Chacón, Arlette; Cuevas, Omar; Pozo, Diana; Marín, Julio; Naylor, David A.; Curé, Michel; Sarazin, Marc S.; Guirao, Carlos; Avila, Gerardo

    2010-07-01

    The European Southern Observatory (ESO), the Institute for Space Imaging Science (ISIS) and the AstroMeteorology group at the Universidad de Valparaiso collaborated on a project to understand the precipitable water vapour (PWV) over the La Silla Paranal Observatory. Both La Silla and Paranal were studied with the goal of using them as reference sites to evaluate potential E-ELT sites. As ground-based infrared astronomy matures, our understanding of the atmospheric conditions over the observatories becomes paramount, specifically water vapour since it is the principle source of atmospheric opacity at infrared wavelengths. Several years of archival optical spectra (FEROS) have been analysed to reconstruct the PWV history above La Silla using an atmospheric radiative transfer model (BTRAM) developed by ISIS. In order to better understand the systematics involved, a dedicated atmospheric water vapour measurement campaign was conducted in May 2009 in close collaboration with Las Campanas observatory and the GMT site testing team. Several methods of determining the water column were employed, including radiosonde launches, continuous measurements by infrared radiometers (IRMA), a compact echelle spectrograph (BACHES) and several high-resolution optical echelle spectrographs (FEROS, HARPS and MIKE). All available observations were compared to concurrent satellite estimates of water vapour in an attempt to ground-truth the satellite data. We present a comparison of the methods used, and results from the archival study and measurement campaign. A mean PWV of 3.4 ± 2.4 mm is found for La Silla using FEROS data covering the period 2005-2009. Important lessons on the strengths and limitations of satellite data are presented. The value of a stand-alone high time resolution PWV monitor has been demonstrated in the context of parallel observations from Las Campanas and La Silla.

  7. Methods for environmental monitoring of DOE waste disposal and storage sites. Semiannual progress report, November 1, 1985--March 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, R.; Revis, N.

    1986-12-31

    This progress report contains an account of recent research efforts carried out at the Oak Ridge Research Institute, to raise antibodies in New Zealand White Rabbits which are specific for various strains of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans bacteria. It is then intended to use the antibodies, in a subsequent phase of the project, to develop one or more ELISAs, which would be used to analyze, both in the laboratory and in the field, the numbers and extent of dispersion of these microorganisms at acid mine drainage sites. This is important because it is the metabolic consequences of unrestricted dissemination of these bacteria which are responsible in large measure for the environmentally damaging acid run-off. Efforts to control the proliferation of these microorganisms have been relatively unfocused up to the present, because of the lack of suitably discriminating methods of assaying the effects of treatment. In this report, the authors describe the work carried out in the first section of the project, which has been concerned with the raising of the antibodies to the Thiobacillus ferrooxidans cultures. They given an account of how the various cultures were grown, how they were treated before being injected into rabbits, the injection protocol, how the animals were bled, and how the formation of IgG and its degree of specificity was assessed. Finally, they describe how large quantities of the various IgG fractions were prepared, and how and where they were stored.

  8. Environmental Assessment for DOE permission for off-loading activities to support the movement of Millstone Unit 2 steam generator sub-assemblies across the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), for the proposed granting of DOE permission of offloading activities to support the movement Millstone Unit 2 steam generator sub-assemblies (SGSAs) across the Savannah River Site (SRS). Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required, and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact. On the basis of the floodplain/wetlands assessment in the EA, DOE has determined that there is no practicable alternative to the proposed activities and that the proposed action has been designed to minimize potential harm to or within the floodplain of the SRS boat ramp. No wetlands on SRS would be affected by the proposed action.

  9. Progress in evaluation of radionuclide geochemical information developed by DOE high-level nuclear waste repository site projects: report for January-March 1985. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Kelmers, A.D.; Seeley, F.G.; Arnold, W.D.; Blencoe, J.G.; Meyer, R.E.; Jacobs, G.K.; Whatley, S.K.

    1985-09-01

    Geochemical information relevant to the retention of radionuclides by the Hanford Site (in basalt) and the Yucca Mountain site (in tuff), candidate high-level nuclear waste geologic repositories being developed by US Department of Energy (DOE) projects, is being evaluated by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Our evaluation of the sorption of technetium by basalt/groundwater systems was essentially completed this quarter and the results summarized; we conclude that the experimental methodology and results reported by the DOE for the Hanford Site have not conclusively established that significant retardation of technetium migration may be provided by phases present in the basalts of the Hanford Site. We have shown that sodium boltwoodite is the saturating uranium solid phase in two basalt/groundwater systems. Because thermodynamic data are not available for sodium boltwoodite, calculated solubilities for uranium are erroneous in these systems. Results of radionuclide solubility/speciation calculations, published by the DOE for the Yucca Mountain site, were evaluated this quarter under our geochemical modeling task. We express concerns relative to the inherent limitations of such calculations. Samples of Yucca Mountain tuff and J-13 well water were received for use in our planned radionuclide sorption/solubility experiments. These Yucca Mountain materials will be used to evaluate radionuclide sorption and apparent concentration limit values published by the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) project. 40 refs., 5 figs., 16 tabs.

  10. Does Acute Maternal Stress in Pregnancy Affect Infant Health Outcomes? Examination of a Large Cohort of Infants Born After the Terrorist Attacks of September 11, 2001

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Spandorfer S, Grill E, Davis O, Fasouliotis S, Rosenwaks Z: Septem- ber 11th in New York City (NYC): the effect of a catastrophe on IVF outcome in a...Naval Health Research Center Does acute maternal stress in pregnancy affect infant health outcomes ? Examination of A Large Cohort of Infants Born...California 92106 BioMed CentralBMC Public Health ssOpen AcceResearch article Does acute maternal stress in pregnancy affect infant health outcomes

  11. Basaloid large cell lung carcinoma presenting as cutaneous metastasis at the colostomy site after abdominoperineal resection for rectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sabater-Marco, Vicente; García-García, José Angel; Roig-Vila, José Vicente

    2013-08-01

    The occurrence of a tumor at the colostomy site after abdominoperineal resection for rectal carcinoma is rare and it may be related to a previously resected carcinoma or another primary tumor. We report a 61-year-old man who developed an ulcerated skin nodule at her colostomy site 6 years after resection of a rectal adenocarcinoma. Histopathologically, the skin nodule was composed of atypical large and pleomorphic cells with high mitotic rate and they were arranged in nests and within lymphatic channels in the dermis. The neoplastic cells were immunoreactive for cytokeratin (CK) AE1/3, CK7, CK34ßE12, epithelial membrane antigen and vimentin while detection of human papillomavirus and Epstein-Barr virus DNA was negative. A diagnosis of basaloid large cell carcinoma of pulmonary origin was suggested and it was confirmed by computed tomography-guided fine needle aspiration of a right subpleural mass. A metastatic tumor at the colostomy site is an exceptional finding and may be the first manifestation of lung cancer, especially if it consist of pleomorphic large cells with high mitotic rate and basaloid immunophenotype.

  12. QuickMap: a public tool for large-scale gene therapy vector insertion site mapping and analysis.

    PubMed

    Appelt, J-U; Giordano, F A; Ecker, M; Roeder, I; Grund, N; Hotz-Wagenblatt, A; Opelz, G; Zeller, W J; Allgayer, H; Fruehauf, S; Laufs, S

    2009-07-01

    Several events of insertional mutagenesis in pre-clinical and clinical gene therapy studies have created intense interest in assessing the genomic insertion profiles of gene therapy vectors. For the construction of such profiles, vector-flanking sequences detected by inverse PCR, linear amplification-mediated-PCR or ligation-mediated-PCR need to be mapped to the host cell's genome and compared to a reference set. Although remarkable progress has been achieved in mapping gene therapy vector insertion sites, public reference sets are lacking, as are the possibilities to quickly detect non-random patterns in experimental data. We developed a tool termed QuickMap, which uniformly maps and analyzes human and murine vector-flanking sequences within seconds (available at www.gtsg.org). Besides information about hits in chromosomes and fragile sites, QuickMap automatically determines insertion frequencies in +/- 250 kb adjacency to genes, cancer genes, pseudogenes, transcription factor and (post-transcriptional) miRNA binding sites, CpG islands and repetitive elements (short interspersed nuclear elements (SINE), long interspersed nuclear elements (LINE), Type II elements and LTR elements). Additionally, all experimental frequencies are compared with the data obtained from a reference set, containing 1 000 000 random integrations ('random set'). Thus, for the first time a tool allowing high-throughput profiling of gene therapy vector insertion sites is available. It provides a basis for large-scale insertion site analyses, which is now urgently needed to discover novel gene therapy vectors with 'safe' insertion profiles.

  13. Calibration of a large water-Cherenkov detector at the Sierra Negra site of LAGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo, A.; Moreno, E.; Carrasco, E.; Torres, I.; Carramiñana, A.; Bonilla, M.; Salazar, H.; Conde, R.; Alvarez, W.; Alvarez, C.; Araujo, C.; Areso, O.; Arnaldi, H.; Asorey, H.; Audelo, M.; Barros, H.; Bonnett, M.; Calderon, R.; Calderon, M.; Campos-Fauth, A.; Carramiñana, A.; Carrasco, E.; Carrera, E.; Cazar, D.; Cifuentes, E.; Collogo, D.; Conde, R.; Cotzomi, J.; Dasso, S.; De Castro, A.; De La Torre, J.; De León, R.; Estupiñan, A.; Galindo, A.; García, L.; Gomez Berisso, M.; González, M.; Guevara, W.; Gulisano, A. M.; Hernández, H.; Jaimes, A.; López, J.; Mantilla, C.; Martín, R.; Martinez-Mendez, A.; Martínez, O.; Martins, E.; Macías-Meza, J. J.; Mayo-García, R.; Melo, T.; Mendoza, J.; Miranda, P.; Montes, E.; Morales, E.; Morales, I.; Moreno, E.; Murrugarra, C.; Nina, C.; Núñez, L. A.; Núñez-Castiñeyra, A.; Otiniano, L.; Peña-Rodríguez, J.; Perenguez, J.; Pérez, H.; Pérez, Y.; Pérez, G.; Pinilla-Velandia, S.; Ponce, E.; Quishpe, R.; Quispe, F.; Ramelli, M.; Reyes, K.; Rivera, H.; Rodriguez, J.; Rodríguez-Ferreira, J.; Rodríguez-Pascual, M.; Romero, M.; Rubio-Montero, A. J.; Salazar, H.; Salinas, J.; Sarmiento-Cano, C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sofo Haro, M.; Suárez-Durán, M.; Subieta, M.; Tello, J.; Ticona, R.; Torres, I.; Torres-Niõ, L.; Truyenque, J.; Valencia-Otero, M.; Vargas, S.; Vásquez, N.; Villaseñor, L.; Zamalloa, M.; Zavala, L.

    2017-07-01

    The Latin American Giant Observatory (LAGO) is an international network of water-Cherenkov detectors (WCD) set in different sites across Latin America. On top of the Sierra Negra volcano in Mexico at an altitude of 4530 m, LAGO has completed its first out of three instrumented detector. It consists of a cylindrical water tank with a diameter of 7.3 m and a height of 1 m and a total detection area of 40 m2 that is sectioned in four equal slices. In this work we present the full calibration procedure of this detector and the initial measurements of stability in rate. We also derive the effective area to gamma-ray bursts for the complete array using the LAGO simulation chain, based on CORSIKA and GEANT4.

  14. A systematic, large-scale comparison of transcription factor binding site models.

    PubMed

    Hombach, Daniela; Schwarz, Jana Marie; Robinson, Peter N; Schuelke, Markus; Seelow, Dominik

    2016-05-21

    The modelling of gene regulation is a major challenge in biomedical research. This process is dominated by transcription factors (TFs) and mutations in their binding sites (TFBSs) may cause the misregulation of genes, eventually leading to disease. The consequences of DNA variants on TF binding are modelled in silico using binding matrices, but it remains unclear whether these are capable of accurately representing in vivo binding. In this study, we present a systematic comparison of binding models for 82 human TFs from three freely available sources: JASPAR matrices, HT-SELEX-generated models and matrices derived from protein binding microarrays (PBMs). We determined their ability to detect experimentally verified "real" in vivo TFBSs derived from ENCODE ChIP-seq data. As negative controls we chose random downstream exonic sequences, which are unlikely to harbour TFBS. All models were assessed by receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis. While the area-under-curve was low for most of the tested models with only 47 % reaching a score of 0.7 or higher, we noticed strong differences between the various position-specific scoring matrices with JASPAR and HT-SELEX models showing higher success rates than PBM-derived models. In addition, we found that while TFBS sequences showed a higher degree of conservation than randomly chosen sequences, there was a high variability between individual TFBSs. Our results show that only few of the matrix-based models used to predict potential TFBS are able to reliably detect experimentally confirmed TFBS. We compiled our findings in a freely accessible web application called ePOSSUM ( http:/mutationtaster.charite.de/ePOSSUM/ ) which uses a Bayes classifier to assess the impact of genetic alterations on TF binding in user-defined sequences. Additionally, ePOSSUM provides information on the reliability of the prediction using our test set of experimentally confirmed binding sites.

  15. Does induction of labor for constitutionally large-for-gestational-age fetuses identified in utero reduce maternal morbidity?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    policy of induction of labor for women with a constitutionally large-for-gestational-age fetus among women without diabetes does not reduce maternal morbidity. PMID:24885981

  16. Identification of Primary Mediastinal Large B-cell Lymphoma at Nonmediastinal Sites by Gene Expression Profiling.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ji; Wright, George; Rosenwald, Andreas; Steidl, Christian; Gascoyne, Randy D; Connors, Joseph M; Mottok, Anja; Weisenburger, Dennis D; Greiner, Timothy C; Fu, Kai; Smith, Lynette; Rimsza, Lisa M; Jaffe, Elaine S; Campo, Elias; Martinez, Antonio; Delabie, Jan; Braziel, Rita M; Cook, James R; Ott, German; Vose, Julie M; Staudt, Louis M; Chan, Wing C

    2015-10-01

    Mediastinal involvement is considered essential for the diagnosis of primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma (PMBL). However, we have observed cases of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) with features of PMBL but without detectable mediastinal involvement. The goal was to assess our previously established gene expression profiling (GEP) signature for PMBL in classifying these cases. In a large series of DLBCL cases, we identified 24 cases with a GEP signature of PMBL, including 9 cases with a submission diagnosis of DLBCL consistent with PMBL (G-PMBL-P) and 15 cases with a submission diagnosis of DLBCL. The pathology reviewers agreed with the diagnosis in the 9 G-PMBL-P cases. Among the other 15 DLBCL cases, 11 were considered to be PMBL or DLBCL consistent with PMBL, 3 were considered to be DLBCL, and 1 case was a gray-zone lymphoma with features intermediate between DLBCL and classical Hodgkin lymphoma. All 9 G-PMBL-P and 9 of the 15 DLBCL cases (G-PMBL-M) had demonstrated mediastinal involvement at presentation. Interestingly, 6 of the 15 DLBCL cases (G-PMBL-NM) had no clinical or radiologic evidence of mediastinal involvement. The 3 subgroups of PMBL had otherwise similar clinical characteristics, and there were no significant differences in overall survival. Genetic alterations of CIITA and PDL1/2 were detected in 26% and 40% of cases, respectively, including 1 G-PMBL-NM case with gain of PDL1/2. In conclusion, PMBL can present as a nonmediastinal tumor without evidence of mediastinal involvement, and GEP offers a more precise diagnosis of PMBL.

  17. A Year-Long Large-Eddy Simulation of the Weather over the Cabauw Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebesma, P.

    2015-12-01

    Results are presented of two large-eddy simulation (LES) runs of the entire year 2012 centered at the Cabauw observational supersite in the Netherlands. The LES is coupled to a regional weather model that provides the large-scale information. The simulations provide three-dimensional continuous time series of LES-generated turbulence and clouds, which can be compared in detail to the extensive observational dataset of Cabauw. The LES dataset is available from the authors on request. This type of LES setup has a number of advantages. First, it can provide a more statistical approach to the study of turbulent atmospheric flow than the more common case studies, since a diverse but representative set of conditions is covered, including numerous transitions. This has advantages in the design and evaluation of parameterizations. Second, the setup can provide valuable information on the quality of the LES model when applied to such a wide range of conditions. Last, it also provides the possibility to emulate observation techniques. This might help detect limitations and potential problems of a variety of measurement techniques. The LES runs are evaluated through a comparison with observations from the observational supersite and with results from the ''parent'' large-scale model. The long time series that are generated, in combination with information on the spatial structure, provide a novel opportunity to study time scales ranging from seconds to seasons. This facilitates a study of the power spectrum of horizontal and vertical wind speed variance to identify the dominant variance-containing time scales.

  18. Large amplitude undulations of evening site diffuse aurorae. Optical characteristics and conditions of generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobjev, V. G.; Roldugin, V. C.; Yagodkina, O. I.

    2015-01-01

    Optical characteristics of large amplitude undulations (LAU) of diffuse aurorae observed by all-sky cameras at Kola Peninsula on December 28, 2010 were examined. Both interplanetary medium conditions and characteristics of magnetic activity before and during LAU were analyzed. It was shown that the development of undulations could be activated by sharp short-living of ˜20 minutes solar wind dynamic pressure impulse and existence of the undulations during about two hours was supported by electric field of stationary magnetospheric convection originated from large smoothly changed southward IMF Bz component of about -12nT. The altitude of undulation luminosity determined by triangulation method was 120 ± 10 km. The undulations amplitude changed from about 100 to 300 km and the average wavelength was ˜250 km. The undulations were observed moving westward with the average phase velocity of ˜0.7 km/s. The pass of DMSP F16 spacecraft just along "the tongue" of undulations showed that the wave of luminosity was located in the region of the predominantly ion (proton) precipitation with the average energy of particles of ˜18 keV. Rayed auroral structures were observed continuously in the region of diffuse aurorae during time interval of LAU existence. These structures were observed moving westward with the velocity of about 2 km/s that corresponds to the northward electric field of ˜100 mV/m.

  19. Using a Consensus Conference to Characterize Regulatory Concerns Regarding Bioremediation of Radionuclides and Heavy Metals in Mixed Waste at DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Denise Lach; Stephanie Sanford

    2006-09-01

    A consensus workshop was developed and convened with ten state regulators to characterize concerns regarding emerging bioremediation technology to be used to clean-up radionuclides and heavy metals in mixed wastes at US DOE sites. Two questions were explored: integrated questions: (1) What impact does participation in a consensus workshop have on the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of state regulators regarding bioremediation technology? (2) How effective is a consensus workshop as a strategy for eliciting and articulating regulators’ concerns regarding the use of bioremediation to clean up radionuclides and heavy metals in mixed wastes at U.S. Department of Energy Sites around the county? State regulators met together for five days over two months to learn about bioremediation technology and develop a consensus report of their recommendations regarding state regulatory concerns. In summary we found that panel members: - quickly grasped the science related to bioremediation and were able to effectively interact with scientists working on complicated issues related to the development and implementation of the technology; - are generally accepting of in situ bioremediation, but concerned about costs, implementation (e.g., institutional controls), and long-term effectiveness of the technology; - are concerned equally about technological and implementation issues; and - believed that the consensus workshop approach to learning about bioremediation was appropriate and useful. Finally, regulators wanted decision makers at US DOE to know they are willing to work with DOE regarding innovative approaches to clean-up at their sites, and consider a strong relationship between states and the DOE as critical to any effective clean-up. They do not want perceive themselves to be and do not want others to perceive them as barriers to successful clean-up at their sites.

  20. Large scale and long term application of bioslurping: the case of a Greek petroleum refinery site.

    PubMed

    Gidarakos, E; Aivalioti, M

    2007-11-19

    This paper presents the course and the remediation results of a 4-year application of bioslurping technology on the subsurface of a Greek petroleum refinery, which is still under full operation and has important and complicated subsurface contamination problems, mainly due to the presence of light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPL). About 55 wells are connected to the central bioslurping unit, while a mobile bioslurping unit is also used whenever and wherever is necessary. Moreover, there are about 120 additional wells for the monitoring of the subsurface of the facilities that cover a total area of 1,000,000 m(2). An integrated monitoring program has also been developed and applied on the site, including frequent LNAPL layer depth and thickness measurements, conduction of bail-down and recovery tests, sampling and chemical analysis of the free oil phase, etc., so as to evaluate the remediation technique's efficiency and ensure a prompt tracing of any new potential leak. Despite the occurrence of new leaks within the last 4 years and the observed entrapment of LNAPL in the vadoze zone, bioslurping has managed to greatly restrict the original plume within certain and relatively small parts of the refinery facilities.

  1. Deciphering Protein Kinase Specificity through Large-Scale Analysis of Yeast Phosphorylation Site Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Janine; Kim, Philip M.; Lam, Hugo Y. K.; Piccirillo, Stacy; Zhou, Xiuqiong; Jeschke, Grace R.; Sheridan, Douglas L.; Parker, Sirlester A.; Desai, Ved; Jwa, Miri; Cameroni, Elisabetta; Niu, Hengyao; Good, Matthew; Remenyi, Attila; Ma, Jia-Lin Nianhan; Sheu, Yi-Jun; Sassi, Holly E.; Sopko, Richelle; Chan, Clarence S. M.; De Virgilio, Claudio; Hollingsworth, Nancy M.; Lim, Wendell A.; Stern, David F.; Stillman, Bruce; Andrews, Brenda J.; Gerstein, Mark B.; Snyder, Michael; Turk, Benjamin E.

    2010-01-01

    Phosphorylation is a universal mechanism for regulating cell behavior in eukaryotes. Although protein kinases are known to target short linear sequence motifs on their substrates, the rules for kinase substrate recognition are not completely understood. We used a rapid peptide screening approach to determine consensus phosphorylation site motifs targeted by 61 of the 122 kinases in Saccharomyces cerevisae. Correlation of these motifs with kinase primary sequence has uncovered previously unappreciated rules for determining specificity within the kinase family, including a residue determining P−3 Arg specificity among members of the CMGC group of kinases. Furthermore, computational scanning of the yeast proteome enabled the prediction of thousands of new kinase-substrate relationships. We experimentally verified several candidate substrates of the Prk1 family of kinases in vitro and in vivo, and we identified a protein substrate of the kinase Vhs1. Together, these results elucidate how kinase catalytic domains recognize their phosphorylation targets and suggest general avenues for the identification of new kinase substrates across eukaryotes. PMID:20159853

  2. DOE ORDER 435.1, IMPLEMENTATION AND COMPLIANCE DECLARATION AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE AND ACROSS THE DOE COMPLEX IN CONTRAST TO CURRENT PUSHBACK EFFORTS FROM THE ''TOP-TO-BOTTOM'' REVIEW

    SciTech Connect

    GOLDSTON, WELFORD T.; SMITH, WINCHESTER IV

    2003-02-27

    DOE issued Order 435.1, ''Radioactive Waste Management,'' on July 9, 1999 for immediate implementation. The requirements for Low Level Mixed, Transuranic, and High Level Waste have been completely rewritten. The entire DOE complex has been struggling with how to implement these new requirements within the one year required timeframe. This paper will chronicle the implementation strategy and actual results of the work to carry out that strategy at the Savannah River Site. DOE-SR and the site contractors worked closely together to implement each of the new requirements across the SRS, crossing many barriers and providing innovative solutions to the many problems that surfaced throughout the year. The results are that SRS declared compliance with all of the requirements of the Order within the prescribed timeframe. The challenge included all waste types in SRS facilities and programs that handle LLW, MLLW, TRU, and HLW. This paper will describe the implementation details for development of Radioactive Waste Management Basis for each facility, Identification of Wastes with No Path to Disposal, Waste Incidental to Reprocessing Determinations, Low Level Waste 90-Day Staging and One Year Limits for Storage Programs, to name a few of the requirements that were addressed by the SRS 435.1 Implementation Team. This paper will trace the implementation, problems (both technical and administrative), and the current pushback efforts associated with the DOE ''Top-to-Bottom'' review.

  3. On-Site Evaluation of Large Components Using Saft and Tofd Ultrasonic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spies, M.; Rieder, H.; Dillhöfer, A.

    2011-06-01

    This contribution addresses ultrasonic inspection and evaluation of welds in large components. An approach has been developed in order to enhance the reliability of welded ship propellers. The Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique (SAFT) has been modified with regard to the curved surfaces and the sound attenuation of cast Ni-Al bronzes. For weld inspection in steels the Time-of-Flight Diffraction technique (TOFD) can provide additional information for specific defect orientations. Both techniques have been combined in view of the determination of defect sizes and shapes in longitudinal welds of pipes with diameters of up to 48 inches. Details on the inspection and evaluation concepts as well as experimental results are presented.

  4. Consensus topography in the ATP binding site of the simian virus 40 and polyomavirus large tumor antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, M.K.; Smith, T.F.; Lathrop, R.H.; Livingston, D.M.; Webster, T.A.

    1987-06-01

    The location and sequence composition of a consensus element of the nucleotide binding site in both simian virus 40 (SV40) and polyomavirus (PyV) large tumor antigens (T antigens) can be predicted with the assistance of a computer-based pattern-matching system, ARIADNE. The latter was used to optimally align elements of T antigen primary sequence and predicted secondary structure with a descriptor for a mononucleotide binding fold. Additional consensus elements of the nucleotide binding site in these two proteins were derived from comparisons of T antigen primary and predicted secondary structures with x-ray structures of the nucleotide binding sites in four otherwise unrelated proteins. Each of these elements was predicted to be encompassed within a 110-residue segment that is highly conserved between the two T antigens residues 418-528 in SV 40 T antigen and residues 565-675 in PyV. Results of biochemical and immunologic experiments on the nucleotide binding behavior of these proteins using (/sup 32/P)-Amp-labeled SV40 T antigen, were found to be consistent with these predictions. Taken together, the latter have resulted in a topological model of the ATP binding site in these two oncogene products.

  5. Large-scale determinants of intestinal schistosomiasis and intermediate host snail distribution across Africa: does climate matter?

    PubMed

    Stensgaard, Anna-Sofie; Utzinger, Jürg; Vounatsou, Penelope; Hürlimann, Eveline; Schur, Nadine; Saarnak, Christopher F L; Simoonga, Christopher; Mubita, Patricia; Kabatereine, Narcis B; Tchuem Tchuenté, Louis-Albert; Rahbek, Carsten; Kristensen, Thomas K

    2013-11-01

    The geographical ranges of most species, including many infectious disease agents and their vectors and intermediate hosts, are assumed to be constrained by climatic tolerances, mainly temperature. It has been suggested that global warming will cause an expansion of the areas potentially suitable for infectious disease transmission. However, the transmission of infectious diseases is governed by a myriad of ecological, economic, evolutionary and social factors. Hence, a deeper understanding of the total disease system (pathogens, vectors and hosts) and its drivers is important for predicting responses to climate change. Here, we combine a growing degree day model for Schistosoma mansoni with species distribution models for the intermediate host snail (Biomphalaria spp.) to investigate large-scale environmental determinants of the distribution of the African S. mansoni-Biomphalaria system and potential impacts of climatic changes. Snail species distribution models included several combinations of climatic and habitat-related predictors; the latter divided into "natural" and "human-impacted" habitat variables to measure anthropogenic influence. The predictive performance of the combined snail-parasite model was evaluated against a comprehensive compilation of historical S. mansoni parasitological survey records, and then examined for two climate change scenarios of increasing severity for 2080. Future projections indicate that while the potential S. mansoni transmission area expands, the snail ranges are more likely to contract and/or move into cooler areas in the south and east. Importantly, we also note that even though climate per se matters, the impact of humans on habitat play a crucial role in determining the distribution of the intermediate host snails in Africa. Thus, a future contraction in the geographical range size of the intermediate host snails caused by climatic changes does not necessarily translate into a decrease or zero-sum change in human

  6. Citizen Contributions to the Closure of High-Level Waste (HLW) Tanks 18 and 19 at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) - 13448

    SciTech Connect

    Lawless, W.F.

    2013-07-01

    Citizen involvement in DOE's decision-making for the environmental cleanup from DOE's management of its nuclear wastes across the DOE complex has had a positive effect on the cleanup of its SRS site, characterized by an acceleration of cleanup not only for the Transuranic wastes at SRS, but also for DOE's first two closures of HLW tanks, both of which occurred at SRS. The Citizens around SRS had pushed successfully for the closures of Tanks 17 and 20 in 1997, becoming the first closures of HLW tanks under regulatory guidance in the USA. However, since then, HLW tank closures ceased due to a lawsuit, the application of new tank clean-up technology, interagency squabbling between DOE and NRC over tank closure criteria, and finally and almost fatally, from budget pressures. Despite an agreement with its regulators for the closure of Tanks 18 and 19 by the end of calendar year 2012, the outlook in Fall 2011 to close these two tanks had dimmed. It was at this point that the citizens around SRS became reengaged with tank closures, helping DOE to reach its agreed upon milestone. (authors)

  7. Enhancement of Polymerase Activity of the Large Fragment in DNA Polymerase I from Geobacillus stearothermophilus by Site-Directed Mutagenesis at the Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yi; Zhang, Beilei; Wang, Meng; Ou, Yanghui

    2016-01-01

    The large fragment of DNA polymerase I from Geobacillus stearothermophilus GIM1.543 (Bst DNA polymerase) with 5′-3′ DNA polymerase activity while in absence of 5′-3′ exonuclease activity possesses high thermal stability and polymerase activity. Bst DNA polymerase was employed in isothermal multiple self-matching initiated amplification (IMSA) which amplified the interest sequence with high selectivity and was widely applied in the rapid detection of human epidemic diseases. However, the detailed information of commercial Bst DNA polymerase is unpublished and well protected by patents, which makes the high price of commercial kits. In this study, wild-type Bst DNA polymerase (WT) and substitution mutations for improving the efficiency of DNA polymerization were expressed and purified in E. coli. Site-directed substitutions of four conserved residues (Gly310, Arg412, Lys416, and Asp540) in the activity site of Bst DNA polymerase influenced efficiency of polymerizing dNTPs. The substitution of residue Gly310 by alanine or leucine and residue Asp540 by glutamic acid increased the efficiency of polymerase activity. All mutants with higher polymerizing efficiency were employed to complete the rapid detection of EV71-associated hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) by IMSA approach with relatively shorter period which is suitable for the primary diagnostics setting in rural and underdeveloped areas. PMID:27981047

  8. Proceedings of the eighth annual DOE low-level waste management forum: Technical Session 2, Site closure

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-02-01

    This volume on site closure or site stabilization and closure, centers on a number of major issues which have been identified by the contractor community as requiring resolution before the topic of site stabilization and closure can be laid to rest. All papers, seven total, in this volume have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (AT)

  9. Rate of Contamination Removal of Two Phyto-remediation Sites at the DOE Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, A.C.; Baird, D.R.

    2006-07-01

    This paper describes applications of phyto-remediation at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), a Department of Energy (DOE) Facility that enriched uranium from the early 1950's until 2000. Phyto-remediation has been implemented to assist in the removal of TCE (trichloroethylene) in the groundwater at two locations at the PORTS facility: the X-740 area and the X-749/X-120 area. Phyto-remediation technology is based on the ability of certain plants species (in this case hybrid poplar trees) and their associated rhizo-spheric microorganisms to remove, degrade, or contain chemical contaminants located in the soil, sediment, surface water, groundwater, and possibly even the atmosphere. Phyto-remediation technology is a promising clean-up solution for a wide variety of pollutants and sites. Mature trees, such as the hybrid poplar, can consume up to 3,000 gallons of groundwater per acre per day. Organic compounds are captured in the trees' root systems. These organic compounds are degraded by ultraviolet light as they are transpired along with the water vapor through the leaves of the trees. The phyto-remediation system at the X-740 area encompasses 766 one-year old hybrid poplar trees (Populus nigra x nigra, Populus nigra x maximowiczii, and Populus deltoides x nigra) that were planted 10 feet apart in rows 10 feet to 20 feet apart, over an area of 2.6 acres. The system was installed to manage the VOC contaminant plume. At the X749/X-120 area, a phyto-remediation system of 2,640 hybrid poplar trees (Populus nigra x maximowiczii) was planted in seven areas/zones to manage the VOC contaminant plume. The objectives of these systems are to remove contamination from the groundwater and to prevent further migration of contaminants. The goal of these remediation procedures is to achieve completely mature and functional phyto-remediation systems within two years of the initial planting of the hybrid poplar trees at each planting location. There is a direct

  10. A Large and Phylogenetically Diverse Class of Type 1 Opsins Lacking a Canonical Retinal Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Erin A.; Yao, Andrew I.; Seitzer, Phillip M.; Kind, Tobias; Wang, Ting; Eigenheer, Rich; Shao, Katie S. Y.; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Facciotti, Marc T.

    2016-01-01

    Opsins are photosensitive proteins catalyzing light-dependent processes across the tree of life. For both microbial (type 1) and metazoan (type 2) opsins, photosensing depends upon covalent interaction between a retinal chromophore and a conserved lysine residue. Despite recent discoveries of potential opsin homologs lacking this residue, phylogenetic dispersal and functional significance of these abnormal sequences have not yet been investigated. We report discovery of a large group of putatively non-retinal binding opsins, present in a number of fungal and microbial genomes and comprising nearly 30% of opsins in the Halobacteriacea, a model clade for opsin photobiology. We report phylogenetic analyses, structural modeling, genomic context analysis and biochemistry, to describe the evolutionary relationship of these recently described proteins with other opsins, show that they are expressed and do not bind retinal in a canonical manner. Given these data, we propose a hypothesis that these abnormal opsin homologs may represent a novel family of sensory opsins which may be involved in taxis response to one or more non-light stimuli. If true, this finding would challenge our current understanding of microbial opsins as a light-specific sensory family, and provides a potential analogy with the highly diverse signaling capabilities of the eukaryotic G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), of which metazoan type 2 opsins are a light-specific sub-clade. PMID:27327432

  11. A Large and Phylogenetically Diverse Class of Type 1 Opsins Lacking a Canonical Retinal Binding Site.

    PubMed

    Becker, Erin A; Yao, Andrew I; Seitzer, Phillip M; Kind, Tobias; Wang, Ting; Eigenheer, Rich; Shao, Katie S Y; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Facciotti, Marc T

    2016-01-01

    Opsins are photosensitive proteins catalyzing light-dependent processes across the tree of life. For both microbial (type 1) and metazoan (type 2) opsins, photosensing depends upon covalent interaction between a retinal chromophore and a conserved lysine residue. Despite recent discoveries of potential opsin homologs lacking this residue, phylogenetic dispersal and functional significance of these abnormal sequences have not yet been investigated. We report discovery of a large group of putatively non-retinal binding opsins, present in a number of fungal and microbial genomes and comprising nearly 30% of opsins in the Halobacteriacea, a model clade for opsin photobiology. We report phylogenetic analyses, structural modeling, genomic context analysis and biochemistry, to describe the evolutionary relationship of these recently described proteins with other opsins, show that they are expressed and do not bind retinal in a canonical manner. Given these data, we propose a hypothesis that these abnormal opsin homologs may represent a novel family of sensory opsins which may be involved in taxis response to one or more non-light stimuli. If true, this finding would challenge our current understanding of microbial opsins as a light-specific sensory family, and provides a potential analogy with the highly diverse signaling capabilities of the eukaryotic G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), of which metazoan type 2 opsins are a light-specific sub-clade.

  12. Dust Processing Near Sites of High-Mass Star Formation in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hony, Sacha; Madden, S.; Rubin, D.; Oey, M. S.; Galliano, F.; Whitney, B.; Meade, M.; Babler, B.; Indebetouw, R.; Hora, J.; Gordon, K.; Engelbracht, C.; For, B.; Block, M.; Misselt, K.; Meixner, M.; Vijh, U.; Leitherer, C.

    2006-12-01

    We present a study into the properties of the dust and complex molecules in and around selected Hii regions in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The analysis is based on the Spitzer program SAGE (Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution). Because of the lower metallicity environment, dust shielding is reduced and the effects of the ultraviolet radiation carry further than in the Milky way. Because of this these Hii regions may well be better representatives of star forming regions in the more distant universe. We present the mid-IR spectral energy distributions (SEDs) as a function of radial distance to the center of the clusters: LHA 120-N4, N11, N63 and N105. These regions span a wide range in luminosities. The observed variations in SED are interpreted in terms of the varying incident radiation-field and changing abundances of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), transiently heated very small grains (VSG) to submicron-sized grains in thermal equilibrium, i.e. in terms of the varying grain-size distribution. This analysis allows us to quantify the dust destruction and/or processing-rate due to photoevaporation and the typical distance scale on which Hii regions impact their surroundings.

  13. Flood Assessment at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site and the Proposed Hazardous Waste Storage Unit, DOE/Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Schmeltzer, J. S.; Millier, J. J.; Gustafson, D. L.

    1993-01-01

    A flood assessment at the Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) and the proposed Hazardous Waste Storage Unit (HWSU) in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) was performed to determine the 100-year flood hazard at these facilities. The study was conducted to determine whether the RWMS and HWSU are located within a 100-year flood hazard as defined by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, and to provide discharges for the design of flood protection.

  14. Recording Large Extracellular Spikes in Microchannels along Many Axonal Sites from Individual Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowska, Marta K.; Bakkum, Douglas J.; Rompani, Santiago B.; Hierlemann, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The numerous connections between neuronal cell bodies, made by their dendrites and axons, are vital for information processing in the brain. While dendrites and synapses have been extensively studied, axons have remained elusive to a large extent. We present a novel platform to study axonal physiology and information processing based on combining an 11,011-electrode high-density complementary metal-oxide semiconductor microelectrode array with a poly(dimethylsiloxane) channel device, which isolates axons from somas and, importantly, significantly amplifies recorded axonal signals. The combination of the microelectrode array with recording and stimulation capability with the microfluidic isolation channels permitted us to study axonal signal behavior at great detail. The device, featuring two culture chambers with over 30 channels spanning in between, enabled long-term recording of single spikes from isolated axons with signal amplitudes of 100 μV up to 2 mV. Propagating signals along axons could be recorded with 10 to 50 electrodes per channel. We (i) describe the performance and capabilities of our device for axonal electrophysiology, and (ii) present novel data on axonal signals facilitated by the device. Spontaneous action potentials with characteristic shapes propagated from somas along axons between the two compartments, and these unique shapes could be used to identify individual axons within channels that contained many axonal branches. Stimulation through the electrode array facilitated the identification of somas and their respective axons, enabling interfacing with different compartments of a single cell. Complex spike shapes observed in channels were traced back to single cells, and we show that more complicated spike shapes originate from a linear superposition of multiple axonal signals rather than signal distortion by the channels. PMID:25734567

  15. Low-level liquid waste disposal at the Savannah River Site: A large scale demonstration of saltstone

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, S.B.; Wilhite, E.L.

    1990-01-01

    Lysimeters are large-scale, field experiments used at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to measure the effect of percolating rainfall on the release of contaminants from wasteforms. The saltstone lysimeters described are demonstrations of a disposal concept for a low-level radioactive waste resulting from the processing of high-level defense waste for vitrification. Results from the lysimeters confirm the efficacy of the slag formulation in retaining chromium and technetium. Lysimeter results were also useful in validating mathematical models used in predicting environmental effects of saltstone disposal in engineered vaults. 7 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Low-level liquid waste disposal at the Savannah River Site: A large scale demonstration of saltstone

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, S.B.; Wilhite, E.L.

    1990-12-31

    Lysimeters are large-scale, field experiments used at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to measure the effect of percolating rainfall on the release of contaminants from wasteforms. The saltstone lysimeters described are demonstrations of a disposal concept for a low-level radioactive waste resulting from the processing of high-level defense waste for vitrification. Results from the lysimeters confirm the efficacy of the slag formulation in retaining chromium and technetium. Lysimeter results were also useful in validating mathematical models used in predicting environmental effects of saltstone disposal in engineered vaults. 7 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Does minimally invasive surgery have a lower risk of surgical site infections compared with open spinal surgery?

    PubMed

    Ee, Wen Wei Gerard; Lau, Wen Liang Joel; Yeo, William; Von Bing, Yap; Yue, Wai Mun

    2014-06-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) ranges from 1.9% to 5.5% in most large series. Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) has been postulated to reduce SSI rates. (1) Is MIS associated with a lower incidence of SSI compared with open spinal surgery? (2) Are there other independent risk factors associated with SSI? (3) What bacteria are most common in spinal SSI? Medical records of 2299 patients who underwent transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, laminectomy, or discectomy were analyzed and selected for a nested case-control analysis. Twenty-seven cases with SSI were matched with 162 control subjects without SSI stratified based on procedure performed within 28 days of the case's date of surgery. Patients were identified from an institutional database at a tertiary care hospital. MIS involved spinal procedures performed through a tubular retractor system. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Patients undergoing open spinal surgery were 5.77 times more likely to develop SSI compared with MIS approaches (odds ratio [OR], 5.77; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0-32.7; p = 0.048). Also, from the multivariate regression model, diabetes (OR, 4.7; 95% CI, 1.3-17.0; p = 0.018), number of levels operated on (OR, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.6-7.5; p = 0.001), and body mass index (OR, 1.2; 95% CI, 1.0-1.3; p = 0.010) were predictive of an increased risk in SSI. Staphylococcus aureus was most frequently identified, being present in 12 of 21 (52.4%) patients in whom positive cultures were obtained. Four of the 12 patients had methicillin-resistant S aureus infection. In our series, MIS has a lower incidence of SSI. The risk factors predictive of SSI should be further evaluated in well-designed prospective trials. Level III, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  18. Breast Cancer Laterality Does Not Influence Survival in a Large Modern Cohort: Implications for Radiation-Related Cardiac Mortality

    SciTech Connect

    Rutter, Charles E.; Chagpar, Anees B.; Evans, Suzanne B.

    2014-10-01

    Objectives: Radiation therapy for left-sided breast cancer has been associated with an elevated risk of cardiac mortality, based on studies predating treatment planning based on computed tomography. This study assessed the impact of tumor laterality on overall survival (OS) in a large cohort treated with modern techniques, to indirectly determine whether left-sided treatment remains associated with increased cardiac mortality. Methods and Materials: Patients treated for breast cancer with breast conserving surgery and adjuvant external beam radiation therapy were identified in the National Cancer Database, and OS was compared based on tumor laterality using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Separate analyses were performed for noninvasive and invasive carcinoma and for breast-only and breast plus regional nodal radiation therapy. Multivariate regression analysis of OS was performed with demographic, pathologic, and treatment variables as covariates to adjust for factors associated with breast cancer–specific survival. Results: We identified 344,831 patients whose cancer was diagnosed from 1998 to 2006 with a median follow-up time of 6.04 years (range, 0-14.17 years). Clinical, tumor, and treatment characteristics were similar between laterality groups. Regional nodal radiation was used in 14.2% of invasive cancers. No OS difference was noted based on tumor laterality for patients treated with breast-only (hazard ratio [HR] 0.984, P=.132) and breast plus regional nodal radiation therapy (HR 1.001, P=.957). In multivariate analysis including potential confounders, OS was identical between left and right sided cancers (HR 1.002, P=.874). No significant OS difference by laterality was observed when analyses were restricted to patients with at least 10 years of follow-up (n=27,725), both in patients treated with breast-only (HR 0.955, P=.368) and breast plus regional nodal radiation therapy (HR 0.859, P=.155). Conclusions: Radiation therapy for left-sided breast cancer does

  19. Breast cancer laterality does not influence survival in a large modern cohort: implications for radiation-related cardiac mortality.

    PubMed

    Rutter, Charles E; Chagpar, Anees B; Evans, Suzanne B

    2014-10-01

    Radiation therapy for left-sided breast cancer has been associated with an elevated risk of cardiac mortality, based on studies predating treatment planning based on computed tomography. This study assessed the impact of tumor laterality on overall survival (OS) in a large cohort treated with modern techniques, to indirectly determine whether left-sided treatment remains associated with increased cardiac mortality. Patients treated for breast cancer with breast conserving surgery and adjuvant external beam radiation therapy were identified in the National Cancer Database, and OS was compared based on tumor laterality using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Separate analyses were performed for noninvasive and invasive carcinoma and for breast-only and breast plus regional nodal radiation therapy. Multivariate regression analysis of OS was performed with demographic, pathologic, and treatment variables as covariates to adjust for factors associated with breast cancer-specific survival. We identified 344,831 patients whose cancer was diagnosed from 1998 to 2006 with a median follow-up time of 6.04 years (range, 0-14.17 years). Clinical, tumor, and treatment characteristics were similar between laterality groups. Regional nodal radiation was used in 14.2% of invasive cancers. No OS difference was noted based on tumor laterality for patients treated with breast-only (hazard ratio [HR] 0.984, P=.132) and breast plus regional nodal radiation therapy (HR 1.001, P=.957). In multivariate analysis including potential confounders, OS was identical between left and right sided cancers (HR 1.002, P=.874). No significant OS difference by laterality was observed when analyses were restricted to patients with at least 10 years of follow-up (n=27,725), both in patients treated with breast-only (HR 0.955, P=.368) and breast plus regional nodal radiation therapy (HR 0.859, P=.155). Radiation therapy for left-sided breast cancer does not appear to increase the risk of death in this national

  20. Reaction rate constants of H-abstraction by OH from large ketones: measurements and site-specific rate rules.

    PubMed

    Badra, Jihad; Elwardany, Ahmed E; Farooq, Aamir

    2014-06-28

    Reaction rate constants of the reaction of four large ketones with hydroxyl (OH) are investigated behind reflected shock waves using OH laser absorption. The studied ketones are isomers of hexanone and include 2-hexanone, 3-hexanone, 3-methyl-2-pentanone, and 4-methl-2-pentanone. Rate constants are measured under pseudo-first-order kinetics at temperatures ranging from 866 K to 1375 K and pressures near 1.5 atm. The reported high-temperature rate constant measurements are the first direct measurements for these ketones under combustion-relevant conditions. The effects of the position of the carbonyl group (C=O) and methyl (CH3) branching on the overall rate constant with OH are examined. Using previously published data, rate constant expressions covering, low-to-high temperatures, are developed for acetone, 2-butanone, 3-pentanone, and the hexanone isomers studied here. These Arrhenius expressions are used to devise rate rules for H-abstraction from various sites. Specifically, the current scheme is applied with good success to H-abstraction by OH from a series of n-ketones. Finally, general expressions for primary and secondary site-specific H-abstraction by OH from ketones are proposed as follows (the subscript numbers indicate the number of carbon atoms bonded to the next-nearest-neighbor carbon atom, the subscript CO indicates that the abstraction is from a site next to the carbonyl group (C=O), and the prime is used to differentiate different neighboring environments of a methylene group):

  1. Impact on demersal fish of a large-scale and deep sand extraction site with ecosystem-based landscaped sandbars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, Maarten F.; Baptist, Martin J.; van Hal, Ralf; de Boois, Ingeborg J.; Lindeboom, Han J.; Hoekstra, Piet

    2014-06-01

    For the seaward harbour extension of the Port of Rotterdam in the Netherlands, approximately 220 million m3 sand was extracted between 2009 and 2013. In order to decrease the surface area of direct impact, the authorities permitted deep sand extraction, down to 20 m below the seabed. Biological and physical impacts of large-scale and deep sand extraction are still being investigated and largely unknown. For this reason, we investigated the colonization of demersal fish in a deep sand extraction site. Two sandbars were artificially created by selective dredging, copying naturally occurring meso-scale bedforms to increase habitat heterogeneity and increasing post-dredging benthic and demersal fish species richness and biomass. Significant differences in demersal fish species assemblages in the sand extraction site were associated with variables such as water depth, median grain size, fraction of very fine sand, biomass of white furrow shell (Abra alba) and time after the cessation of sand extraction. Large quantities of undigested crushed white furrow shell fragments were found in all stomachs and intestines of plaice (Pleuronectes platessa), indicating that it is an important prey item. One and two years after cessation, a significant 20-fold increase in demersal fish biomass was observed in deep parts of the extraction site. In the troughs of a landscaped sandbar however, a significant drop in biomass down to reference levels and a significant change in species assemblage was observed two years after cessation. The fish assemblage at the crests of the sandbars differed significantly from the troughs with tub gurnard (Chelidonichthys lucerna) being a Dufrêne-Legendre indicator species of the crests. This is a first indication of the applicability of landscaping techniques to induce heterogeneity of the seabed although it remains difficult to draw a strong conclusion due the lack of replication in the experiment. A new ecological equilibrium is not reached after 2

  2. Proceedings of the tenth annual DOE low-level waste management conference: Session 2: Site performance assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    This document contains twelve papers on various aspects of low-level radioactive waste management. Topics of this volume include: performance assessment methodology; remedial action alternatives; site selection and site characterization procedures; intruder scenarios; sensitivity analysis procedures; mathematical models for mixed waste environmental transport; and risk assessment methodology. Individual papers were processed separately for the database. (TEM)

  3. Status of Progress Made Toward Safety Analysis and Technical Site Evaluations for DOE Managed HLW and SNF.

    SciTech Connect

    Sevougian, S. David; Stein, Emily; Gross, Michael B; Hammond, Glenn Edward; Frederick, Jennifer M; Mariner, Paul

    2016-11-01

    The Spent Fuel and Waste Science and Technology (SFWST) Campaign of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) is conducting research and development (R&D) on generic deep geologic disposal systems (i.e., repositories). This report describes specific activities in FY 2016 associated with the development of a Defense Waste Repository (DWR)a for the permanent disposal of a portion of the HLW and SNF derived from national defense and research and development (R&D) activities of the DOE.

  4. Basic data report for drilling and hydrologic testing of drillhole DOE-2 at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIIP) site

    SciTech Connect

    Mercer, J.W.; Beauheim, R.L.; Snyder, R.P.; Fairer, G.M.

    1987-04-01

    Drillhole DOE-2 was drilled to investigate a structural depression marked by the downward displacement of stratigraphic markers in the Salado Formation. Contrary to several hypotheses, halite layers were thicker in the lower part of the Salado, not thinner as a result of any removal of halite. The upper Castile anhydrite in Drillhole DOE-2 is anomalously thick and is strongly deformed relative to the anhydrite in adjacent drillholes. In contrast, the halite was <8 ft thick and significantly thinner than usually encountered. The lower Castile anhydrite appears to be normal. The depression within the correlated marker beds in the Salado Formation in Drillhole DOE-2 is interpreted as a result of gravity-driven deformation of the underlying Castile Formation. Several stratigraphic units were hydrologically tested in Drillhole DOE-2. Testing of the unsaturated lower portion of the Dewey Lake Red Beds was unsuccessful because of exceptionally small rates of fluid intake. Drill-stem tests were conducted in five intervals in the Rustler Formation, over the Marker Bed 138-139 interval in the Salado formation, and over three sandstone members of the Bell Canyon Formation. A pumping test was conducted in the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation. Pressure-pulse tests were conducted over the entire Salado Formation. Fluid samples were collected from the Culebra Dolomite Member and from the Hays Member of the Bell Canyon Formation. 31 refs., 31 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Does Regular Online Testing Enhance Student Learning in the Numerical Sciences? Robust Evidence from a Large Data Set

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angus, Simon D.; Watson, Judith

    2009-01-01

    While a number of studies have been conducted on the impact of online assessment and teaching methods on student learning, the field does not seem settled around the promised benefits of such approaches. It is argued that the reason for this state of affairs is that few studies have been able to control for a number of confounding factors in…

  6. Does on-site chaplaincy enhance the health and well being of fly-in, fly-out (FIFO) personnel?

    PubMed

    Ebert, Angela; Strehlow, Karin

    2016-10-06

    Issue addressed: The fly-in, fly-out (FIFO) work style has been linked to mental-health and interpersonal issues and a need for strategies that maintain a healthy workforce. This study investigated whether 24/7 on-site chaplains deliver a service that promotes the health and well being of FIFO personnel.Methods: A phenomenological approach was used to explore the perceptions of FIFO personnel working in different roles and organisational sections on a remote mine site in Western Australia. Multi-pronged strategies recruited 29 participants who represented management, supervisors, workers and support staff. Participants took part in semistructured interviews conducted either one-on-one or in pairs.Results: Chaplains were described as making a valuable contribution to the physical and mental health of FIFO personnel. Specific aspects of the service such as active outreach, effective trust building and the on-site availability were identified as central to the service being accessed and overcoming barriers embedded in mining culture and masculinity.Conclusions: On-site chaplaincy appears to be effective in promoting the physical and mental health of FIFO personnel working at a remote mine site.So what?: This promising model of active on-site outreach offered by chaplains is set apart from existing FIFO support structures. We recommend further exploration of its potential to become part of an integrated health-support system in the mining sector and other industries.

  7. Who and What Does Involvement Involve? A Multi-Sited Field Study of Involvement of Relatives in Danish Psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Oute, Jeppe; Petersen, Anders; Huniche, Lotte

    2015-01-01

    This article gives an account of aspects of a multi-sited field study of involvement of relatives in Danish psychiatry. By following metaphors of involvement across three sites of the psychiatric system-a family site, a clinical site and a policy site-the first author (J.O.) investigated how, and on what grounds, involvement of relatives is perceived in Danish psychiatry. Paradoxically, the current understanding of involvement of relatives fails to take into consideration the perspectives of the relatives per se and families that were being studied. By analyzing involvement from a discourse theoretical perspective laid out by Ernesto Laclau and Chantal Mouffe, the aim of this study is to show how the dominant discourse about involvement at the political and clinical sites is constituted by understandings of mentally ill individuals and by political objectives of involvement. The analysis elucidates how a psycho-ideological discourse positions the mentally ill person as weak, incapable, and ineffective. By contrast, the supporting relative is positioned as a strong, capable, and effective co-therapist. Furthermore, the analysis considers how this dominant discourse of involvement is constituted by a broader discourse of neoliberalism and market orientation, which justifies involvement as a subtle institutionalization of social control. The article highlights that the role of the relative as a co-therapist may be contested by the families' discourse, which emphasizes issues concerning the responsibility toward the mental health of the ill individual as well as toward the psychological milieu of the family.

  8. Volunteers Oriented Interface Design for the Remote Navigation of Rescue Robots at Large-Scale Disaster Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhixiao; Ito, Kazuyuki; Saijo, Kazuhiko; Hirotsune, Kazuyuki; Gofuku, Akio; Matsuno, Fumitoshi

    This paper aims at constructing an efficient interface being similar to those widely used in human daily life, to fulfill the need of many volunteer rescuers operating rescue robots at large-scale disaster sites. The developed system includes a force feedback steering wheel interface and an artificial neural network (ANN) based mouse-screen interface. The former consists of a force feedback steering control and a six monitors’ wall. It provides a manual operation like driving cars to navigate a rescue robot. The latter consists of a mouse and a camera’s view displayed in a monitor. It provides a semi-autonomous operation by mouse clicking to navigate a rescue robot. Results of experiments show that a novice volunteer can skillfully navigate a tank rescue robot through both interfaces after 20 to 30 minutes of learning their operation respectively. The steering wheel interface has high navigating speed in open areas, without restriction of terrains and surface conditions of a disaster site. The mouse-screen interface is good at exact navigation in complex structures, while bringing little tension to operators. The two interfaces are designed to switch into each other at any time to provide a combined efficient navigation method.

  9. Reporting the first 3 years of 225-GHz opacity measurements at the site of the Large Millimeter Telescope Alfonso Serrano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeballos, M.; Ferrusca, D.; Contreras R., J.; Hughes, D. H.

    2016-07-01

    The Large Millimeter Telescope Alfonso Serrano (LMT) is located in Puebla, Mexico, at an altitude of 4580 m. It is currently the largest single-dish telescope constructed to observe the Universe at wavelengths between 0.85 and 4 mm. Identifying interstellar molecules, exploring dense dark clouds, and understanding the properties of cold matter and interstellar dust in the local and distant Universe are among its main scientific goals. Since June 2013, the LMT has conducted four shared-risk early science campaigns* observing at 1.1 mm (AzTEC), and 3 mm (RSR) with the aid of a new meteorological and radiometer system to guide the flexibility scheduling of observing time. Here we report measurements of the atmospheric opacity taken with this radiometer at 225 GHz between June 2013 and April 2016. These measurements show that the LMT site has exceptional weather conditions with opacities < 0:06 25% of its observing time during the driest months of December, January and February, excellent weather conditions with opacities < 0:1 50% of the same time, and opacities below 0.28 80% of the time during the entire dry season, making it a very convenient site for sub-millimeter/millimeter astronomy.

  10. Does sex-ratio selection influence nest-site choice in a reptile with temperature-dependent sex determination?

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Timothy S.; Maciel, Jessica A.; Janzen, Fredric J.

    2013-01-01

    Evolutionary theory predicts that dioecious species should produce a balanced primary sex ratio maintained by frequency-dependent selection. Organisms with environmental sex determination, however, are vulnerable to maladaptive sex ratios, because environmental conditions vary spatio-temporally. For reptiles with temperature-dependent sex determination, nest-site choice is a behavioural maternal effect that could respond to sex-ratio selection, as mothers could adjust offspring sex ratios by choosing nest sites that will have particular thermal properties. This theoretical prediction has generated decades of empirical research, yet convincing evidence that sex-ratio selection is influencing nesting behaviours remains absent. Here, we provide the first experimental evidence from nature that sex-ratio selection, rather than only viability selection, is probably an important component of nest-site choice in a reptile with temperature-dependent sex determination. We compare painted turtle (Chrysemys picta) neonates from maternally selected nest sites with those from randomly selected nest sites, observing no substantive difference in hatching success or survival, but finding a profound difference in offspring sex ratio in the direction expected based on historical records. Additionally, we leverage long-term data to reconstruct our sex ratio results had the experiment been repeated in multiple years. As predicted by theory, our results suggest that sex-ratio selection has shaped nesting behaviour in ways likely to enhance maternal fitness. PMID:24266033

  11. Alcohol drinking does not affect postoperative surgical site infection or anastomotic leakage: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Shabanzadeh, Daniel Mønsted; Sørensen, Lars Tue

    2014-02-01

    Alcohol abuse appears to increase postoperative complications, but clinical trials have reported conflicting results. The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to clarify how alcohol drinking affects postoperative surgical site infection and anastomotic leakage and to determine the impact of perioperative alcohol intervention. The databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CENTRAL were searched. Observational studies assessing surgical site infection and anastomotic leakage for alcohol drinkers and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) studying perioperative alcohol interventions were included. Meta-analyses were performed with random effects models. Methodological quality was assessed by the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale and Cochrane methodology. Fifteen observational studies and 2 RCTs were identified. Meta-analyses were performed for alcohol drinkers vs nondrinkers and moderate drinkers (≤ 2 U/day), respectively. No difference between alcohol drinkers and nondrinkers was found. When drinkers and moderate drinkers were compared, a significantly higher incidence of surgical site infection and anastomotic leakage was found in unadjusted studies. In the meta-analysis of studies adjusting for smoking and age, alcohol drinking did not significantly affect surgical site infection and anastomotic leakage. The RCTs did not show any effect of perioperative alcohol abstinence or pharmacological withdrawal treatment on outcome. Alcohol drinking is not an independent risk factor for surgical site infection and anastomotic leakage. Interventions which aim to make patients quit alcohol or treat withdrawal symptoms do not seem to affect the surgical outcomes of interest.

  12. Automated calculation of the evapotranspiration and crop coefficients for a large number of peatland sites using diurnal groundwater table fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, Eike; Bechtold, Michel; Dettmann, Ullrich; Tiemeyer, Bärbel

    2014-05-01

    Evapotranspiration is one of the main processes controlling peatland hydrology. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from peatlands are in turn strongly controlled by the groundwater table. Through the increasing political and scientific interest to reduce GHG emissions, monitoring and modelling strategies to optimize re-wetting strategies and to quantify GHG emissions are needed. To achieve these aims, an accurate determination of the evapotranspiration as an essential part of the water balance is required. Many different approaches are known to determine the evapotranspiration. They are mostly either expensive or hard to parameterize. Plant specific crop coefficients (Kc-values) are an option to calculate plant-specific evapotranspiration but due to the lack of Kc-values for typical peatland vegetation types more data on evapotranspiration from peatlands in the temperate zone are required. Furthermore, simple methods to estimate evapotranspiration are needed especially for monitoring projects. Diurnal groundwater table fluctuations caused by root water uptake and groundwater inflow can be used to calculate daily evapotranspiration rates. This approach was first described by White (1932) who compared groundwater recovery rates at night to the decline during daytime. Besides the groundwater table data only the specific yield (Sy) is needed to calculate evapotranspiration. However, the method has some limitations because not all days can be evaluated which leads to data gaps during rainy and very dry or very wet periods. This study presents an automated method to calculate the specific yield, evapotranspiration and crop coefficients for a large number of sites covering all major peatland types and their typical land uses in Germany. As an input for our method, only groundwater level, precipitation and grass reference evapotranspiration (ET0) data is required. In a first step, the groundwater level data was smoothed by a LOESS function. In a second step, site-specific SY

  13. Scoping evaluation of the technical capabilities of DOE sites for disposal of hazardous metals in mixed low-level waste

    SciTech Connect

    Gruebel, M.M.; Waters, R.D.; Langkopf, B.S.

    1997-05-01

    A team of analysts designed and conducted a scoping evaluation to estimate the technical capabilities of fifteen Department of Energy sites for disposal of the hazardous metals in mixed low-level waste (i.e., waste that contains both low-level radioactive materials and hazardous constituents). Eight hazardous metals were evaluated: arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, selenium, and silver. The analysis considered transport only through the groundwater pathway. The results are reported as site-specific estimates of maximum concentrations of each hazardous metal in treated mixed low-level waste that do not exceed the performance measures established for the analysis. Also reported are site-specific estimates of travel times of each hazardous metal to the point of compliance.

  14. How well does the Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project classification predict the site and size of the infarct on brain imaging?

    PubMed Central

    Mead, G; Lewis, S; Wardlaw, J; Dennis, M; Warlow, C

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—The Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project (OCSP) classification is a simple clinical scheme for subdividing first ever acute stroke. Several small studies have shown that when an infarct is visible on CT or MRI, the classification predicts its site in about three quarters of patients. The aim was to further investigate this relation in a much larger cohort of patients in hospital with ischaemic stroke.
METHODS—Between 1994 and 1997, inpatients and outpatients with ischaemic stroke were assessed by one of several stroke physicians who noted the OCSP classification. A neuroradiologist classified the site and extent of recent infarction on CT or MRI.
RESULTS—Of 1012 patients with ischaemic stroke, 655 (65%) had recent visible infarcts. These radiological lesions were appropriate to the clinical classification in 69/87 (79%) patients with a total anterior circulation syndrome, 213/298 (71%) with a partial anterior circulation syndrome, 105/144 (73%) with a lacunar syndrome, and 105/126 (83%) with a posterior circulation syndrome. Overall, 75% of patients with visible infarcts were correctly classified clinically. If patients without a visible infarct did have an appropriate lesion in the brain (best case), the classification would have correctly predicted its site and size in 849/1012 (84%) patients, compared with only 492/1012 (49%) in the worst case scenario.
CONCLUSION—The OCSP classification predicted the site of infarct in three quarters of patients. When an infarct is visible on brain imaging, the site of the infarct should guide the use of further investigations, but if an infarct is not seen, the OCSP classification could be used to predict its likely size and site.

 PMID:10766882

  15. Redd site selection and spawning habitat use by fall chinook salmon: The importance of geomorphic features in large rivers

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, D.R. |; Dauble, D.D.

    1998-09-01

    Knowledge of the three-dimensional connectivity between rivers and groundwater within the hyporheic zone can be used to improve the definition of fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) spawning habitat. Information exists on the microhabitat characteristics that define suitable salmon spawning habitat. However, traditional spawning habitat models that use these characteristics to predict available spawning habitat are restricted because they can not account for the heterogeneous nature of rivers. The authors present a conceptual spawning habitat model for fall chinook salmon that describes how geomorphic features of river channels create hydraulic processes, including hyporheic flows, that influence where salmon spawn in unconstrained reaches of large mainstem alluvial rivers. Two case studies based on empirical data from fall chinook salmon spawning areas in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River are presented to illustrate important aspects of the conceptual model. The authors suggest that traditional habitat models and the conceptual model be combined to predict the limits of suitable fall chinook salmon spawning habitat. This approach can incorporate quantitative measures of river channel morphology, including general descriptors of geomorphic features at different spatial scales, in order to understand the processes influencing redd site selection and spawning habitat use. This information is needed in order to protect existing salmon spawning habitat in large rivers, as well as to recover habitat already lost.

  16. Large amplification of ground motion at rock sites within a fault zone in Nocera Umbra (central Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, F.; Azzara, R.; Bellucci, F.; Caserta, A.; Cultrera, G.; Mele, G.; Palombo, B.; Rovelli, A.; Boschi, E.

    During the two mainshocks of September 26, 1997 inthe Umbria-Marche border a strong-motion accelerographrecorded peak ground accelerations as large as 0.6 g,approximately, in the town of Nocera Umbra, atdistances of 10 to 15 km from the epicentres. Thisvalue is significantly larger than expected on thebasis of the usual regressions with magnitude anddistance. A broad-band amplification up to a factor of10 was consistently estimated in previous papers,using both weak and strong motion data recorded at theaccelerograph site during local moderate earthquakes.To study the cause of this amplification we deployedsix seismologic stations across the tectonic contactbetween the Ceno-Mesozoic limestone and the Mesozoicmarly sandstone where the accelerograph is installed.Seismograms of 21 shallow aftershocks in the magnituderange from 2.2 to 4.0 and a subcrustal Mw = 5.3event are analysed. Regardless of epicentre location,waveforms show a large complexity in an approximately200 m wide band adjacent to the tectonic contact. Thisis interpreted as the effect of trapped waves in thehighly fractured, lower velocity materials within thefault zone.

  17. Tissue classification of large-scale multi-site MR data using fuzzy k-nearest neighbor method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghayoor, Ali; Paulsen, Jane S.; Kim, Regina E. Y.; Johnson, Hans J.

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes enhancements to automate classification of brain tissues for multi-site degenerative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data analysis. Processing of large collections of MR images is a key research technique to advance our understanding of the human brain. Previous studies have developed a robust multi-modal tool for automated tissue classification of large-scale data based on expectation maximization (EM) method initialized by group-wise prior probability distributions. This work aims to augment the EM-based classification using a non-parametric fuzzy k-Nearest Neighbor (k-NN) classifier that can model the unique anatomical states of each subject in the study of degenerative diseases. The presented method is applicable to multi-center heterogeneous data analysis and is quantitatively validated on a set of 18 synthetic multi-modal MR datasets having six different levels of noise and three degrees of bias-field provided with known ground truth. Dice index and average Hausdorff distance are used to compare the accuracy and robustness of the proposed method to a state-of-the-art classification method implemented based on EM algorithm. Both evaluation measurements show that presented enhancements produce superior results as compared to the EM only classification.

  18. The GABA agonist THIP a muscimol analogue, does not interfere with the benzodiazepine binding site on rats cortical membranes.

    PubMed

    Maurer, R

    1979-04-01

    THIP, a cyclic analogue of muscimol, is a powerful GABA agonist. It is as active as GABA in displacing [3H]muscimol from its binding site to cerebellar membranes (IC50 = 31.5 +/- 2.5 mM). However, unlike muscimol or GABA, it is devoid of any modulatory interaction with the benzodiazepine binding site on rat's cortical membranes. Homotaurine, isoguvacine and imidazole acetic acid are less active than muscimol and GABA for increasing the affinity of [3H]diazepam to cortical membrane preparations.

  19. [DOE method for evaluating environmental and waste management samples: Revision 1, Addendum 1

    SciTech Connect

    Goheen, S.C.

    1995-04-01

    The US Dapartment of Energy`s (DOE`s) environmental and waste management (EM) sampling and analysis activities require that large numbers of samples be analyzed for materials characterization, environmental surveillance, and site-remediation programs. The present document, DOE Methods for Evaluating Environmental and Waste Management Samples (DOE Methods), is a supplemental resource for analyzing many of these samples.

  20. Utilization of a continuous external tissue expansion system to assist in primary closure of a large anterolateral thigh donor site defect.

    PubMed

    Silver, Andrew G; Baynosa, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    Primary closure of a large anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap donor site defect with the assistance of an external tissue expansion system is presented. The dimensions of this donor site (12 cm × 40 cm) and its percentage of leg circumference (34%) would make this site likely to require skin grafting or further flap coverage based on the results of previously published literature.

  1. The Challenges and Benefits of Employing a Mobile Research Fellow to Facilitate Team Work on a Large, Interdisciplinary, Multi-Sited Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugden, Fraser; Punch, Samantha

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few years research funding has increasingly moved in favour of large, multi-partner, interdisciplinary and multi-site research projects. This article explores the benefits and challenges of employing a full-time research fellow to work across multiple field sites, with all the local research teams, on an international,…

  2. The Challenges and Benefits of Employing a Mobile Research Fellow to Facilitate Team Work on a Large, Interdisciplinary, Multi-Sited Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugden, Fraser; Punch, Samantha

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few years research funding has increasingly moved in favour of large, multi-partner, interdisciplinary and multi-site research projects. This article explores the benefits and challenges of employing a full-time research fellow to work across multiple field sites, with all the local research teams, on an international,…

  3. Framing Innovation: Does an Instructional Vision Help Superintendents Gain Acceptance for a Large-Scale Technology Initiative?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flanagan, Gina E.

    2014-01-01

    There is limited research that outlines how a superintendent's instructional vision can help to gain acceptance of a large-scale technology initiative. This study explored how superintendents gain acceptance for a large-scale technology initiative (specifically a 1:1 device program) through various leadership actions. The role of the instructional…

  4. Framing Innovation: Does an Instructional Vision Help Superintendents Gain Acceptance for a Large-Scale Technology Initiative?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flanagan, Gina E.

    2014-01-01

    There is limited research that outlines how a superintendent's instructional vision can help to gain acceptance of a large-scale technology initiative. This study explored how superintendents gain acceptance for a large-scale technology initiative (specifically a 1:1 device program) through various leadership actions. The role of the instructional…

  5. Enhancements to and Characterization of the Very Early Time Electromagnetic (VETEM) Prototype Instrument and Applications to Shallow Subsurface Imaging at Sites in the DOE Complex - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, D.L.; Chew, W.C.

    2000-12-01

    Field tests and deployments of VETEM is a flexible and highly effective new system for electromagnetic imaging that offers significant new 3D electromagnetic imaging capabilities in the shallow subsurface. Important new numerical modeling techniques have been produced, which are applicable to electromagnetic subsurface imaging, and suggest further research and development. In addition, this research has also produced a flexible, fast, and fully functional prototype VETEM system that has produced some remarkable subsurface images, has bridged the gap between pure research and applications, and is now available for use at DOE sites that have shallow subsurface imaging needs.

  6. Science to support DOE site cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program awards. Fiscal year 1998 mid-year progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was awarded ten (10) Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in Fiscal Year 1996 and six (6) in Fiscal Year 1997. This section summarizes how each grant addresses significant US Department of Energy (DOE) cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. This research is focused primarily in four areas: Tank Waste Remediation, Spent Nuclear Fuel and Nuclear Materials, Soil and Groundwater Cleanup, and Health Effects.

  7. Science to support DOE site cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program awards. Fiscal year 1997 mid-year progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was awarded ten Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in Fiscal Year 1996. This report gives a summary of how each grant is addressing significant DOE cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. This research is primarily focused in three areas--Tank Waste Remediation, Soil and Groundwater Cleanup, and Health Effects.

  8. Science to Support DOE Site Cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program Awards-Fiscal Year 1999 Mid-Year Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Peurrung, L.M.

    1999-06-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was awarded ten Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in fiscal year 1996, six in fiscal year 1997, and eight in fiscal year 1998. This section summarizes how each grant addresses significant U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. This research is focused primarily in five areas: Tank Waste Remediation, Decontamination and Decommissioning, Spent Nuclear Fuel and Nuclear Materials, Soil and Groundwater Clean Up, and Health Effects.

  9. Using a Consensus Conference to Characterize Regulatory Concerns Regarding Bioremediation of Radionuclides and Heavy Metals in Mixed Wastes at DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Lach, Denise

    2005-06-01

    We have spent this first part of the project preparing background material for conference participants and making arrangements for the conference itself. Material regarding state regulatory constraints to the use of bioremediation in the cleanup of radionuclides and heavy metals at DOE sites around the country has been added to the Bioremediation Briefing paper for participants. The Steering Committee has been formulated and will hold their first meeting via phone conference on Monday, September 13, 2005. On the agenda is identification of conference participants, experts, and initial issues likely to be addressed. Human Subjects approval has been secured from the University. The ''pre-test'' has been developed and is ready to implement. The Consensus Conference will be held in Phoenix, AZ during January and February 2005; we are working with the Chamber of Commerce to find an appropriate site.

  10. Does the spillage of petroleum products in Anopheles breeding sites have an impact on the pyrethroid resistance?

    PubMed Central

    Djouaka, Rousseau F; Bakare, Adekunle A; Bankole, Honore S; Doannio, Julien MC; Coulibaly, Ousmane N; Kossou, Hortense; Tamo, Manuele; Basene, Harcourt I; Popoola, OK; Akogbeto, Martin C

    2007-01-01

    Background The emergence of Anopheles populations capable of withstanding lethal doses of insecticides has weakened the efficacy of most insecticide based strategies of vector control and, has highlighted the need for further studies on the mechanisms of insecticide resistance and the various factors selecting resistant populations of mosquitoes. This research targeted the analysis of breeding sites and the oviposition behaviour of susceptible and resistant populations of Anopheles in localities of spilled petroleum products. The aim was to establish the possible contribution of oil spillage in the selection of pyrethroid resistance in malaria vectors. Methods Anopheles breeding sites were identified and the insecticide susceptibility of the Anopheles gambiae populations mapped in 15 localities of South Western Nigeria. The presence of oil particles as well as the turbidity, the dissolved oxygen and the pH of each identified breeding site was recorded. Data were cross-analysed to correlate the habitat types and the insecticide susceptibility status of emerging mosquitoes. The second phase of this study was basically a laboratory model to provide more information on the implication of the spillage of petroleum on the selection of pyrethroid resistance in An. gambiae. Results Moderate levels of resistance following exposure to permethrin-impregnated papers were recorded with the majority of An. gambiae samples collected in the South Western Nigeria. Data from this study established a link between the constituency of the breeding sites and the resistance status of the emerging Anopheles. Conclusion This study has revealed the segregational occupation of breeding habitats by pyrethroid resistant and susceptible strains of An. gambiae in south-western Nigeria. Compiled results from field and laboratory research point out clear relationships between oil spillage and pyrethroid resistance in malaria vectors. The identification of this factor of resistance could serve as

  11. Multi-site and nasal swabbing for carriage of Staphylococcus aureus: what does a single nose swab predict?

    PubMed

    Young, B C; Votintseva, A A; Foster, D; Godwin, H; Miller, R R; Anson, L W; Walker, A S; Peto, T E A; Crook, D W; Knox, K

    2017-07-01

    Carriage of Staphylococcus aureus is a risk for infections. Targeted decolonization reduces postoperative infections but depends on accurate screening. To compare detection of S. aureus carriage in healthy individuals between anatomical sites and nurse- versus self-swabbing; also to determine whether a single nasal swab predicted carriage over four weeks. Healthy individuals were recruited via general practices. After consent, nurses performed multi-site swabbing (nose, throat, and axilla). Participants performed nasal swabbing twice-weekly for four weeks. Swabs were returned by mail and cultured for S. aureus. All S. aureus isolates underwent spa typing. Persistent carriage in individuals returning more than three self-swabs was defined as culture of S. aureus from all or all but one self-swabs. In all, 102 individuals underwent multi-site swabbing; S. aureus carriage was detected from at least one site from 40 individuals (39%). There was no difference between nose (29/102, 28%) and throat (28/102, 27%) isolation rates: the combination increased total detection rate by 10%. Ninety-nine patients returned any self-swab, and 96 returned more than three. Nasal carriage detection was not significantly different on nurse or self-swab [28/99 (74%) vs 26/99 (72%); χ(2): P=0.75]. Twenty-two out of 25 participants with first self-swab positive were persistent carriers and 69/71 with first self-swab negative were not, giving high positive predictive value (88%), and very high negative predictive value (97%). Nasal swabs detected the majority of carriage; throat swabs increased detection by 10%. Self-taken nasal swabs were equivalent to nurse-taken swabs and predicted persistent nasal carriage over four weeks. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. An analysis of free flap failure using the ACS NSQIP database. Does flap site and flap type matter?

    PubMed

    Kwok, Alvin C; Agarwal, Jayant P

    2017-09-01

    We sought to use the NSQIP database to determine the national rate and predictors of free flap failure based upon flap sites and flap types. Free flaps were identified using the 2005-2010 NSQIP database. We examined overall flap failure rates as well as failure rates based upon flap sites (head and neck, extremities, trunk, and breast) and flap types (muscle, fascial, skin, bone, and bowel flaps). Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to determine predictors of flap failure. There were 1,187 microvascular free tissue transfers identified. The overall flap failure rate was 5.1%. Head and neck flaps had the highest rate of free flap failure at 7.7%. Prolonged operative time is an independent predictor of flap failure for all free flaps (OR: 2.383, P = 0.0013). When examining predictors of failure by flap site, free flaps to the breast with prolonged operative time are independently associated with flap failure (OR: 2.288, P = 0.0152). When examining predictors of flap failure by flap type, muscle based free flaps with an ASA classification ≥3 are associated with flap failure (P = 0.0441). Risk factors for free flap failure differ based upon flap site and flap type. Prolonged operative time is an independent risk factor for the failure of free flaps used for breast reconstruction. An ASA classification ≥3 is associated with the failure of free muscle based flaps. Our findings identify actionable areas that may help to improve free flap success. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. 1994 Annual report on waste generation and waste minimization progress as required by DOE Order 5400.1, Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    Many Waste Minimization/Pollution Prevention successes at the Hanford Site occur every day without formal recognition. A few of the successful projects are: T-Plant helps facilities reuse equipment by offering decontamination services for items such as gas cylinders, trucks, and railcars, thus saving disposal and equipment replacement costs. Custodial Services reviewed its use of 168 hazardous cleaning products, and, through a variety of measures, replaced them with 38 safer substitutes, one for each task. Scrap steel contaminated with low level radioactivity from the interim stabilization of 107-K and 107-C was decontaminated and sold to a vendor for recycling. Site-wide programs include the following: the Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (P2OA) program at the Hanford site was launched during 1994, including a training class, a guidance document, technical assistance, and goals; control over hazardous materials purchased was achieved by reviewing all purchase requisitions of a chemical nature; the Office Supply Reuse Program was established to redeploy unused or unwanted office supply items. In 1994, pollution prevention activities reduced approximately 274,000 kilograms of hazardous waste, 2,100 cubic meters of radioactive and mixed waste, 14,500,000 kilograms of sanitary waste, and 215,000 cubic meters off liquid waste and waste water. Pollution Prevention activities also saved almost $4.2 million in disposal, product, and labor costs. Overall waste generation increased in 1994 due to increased work and activity typical for a site with an environmental restoration mission. However, without any Waste Minimization/Pollution Prevention activities, solid radioactive waste generation at Hanford would have been 25% higher, solid hazardous waste generation would have been 30% higher, and solid sanitary waste generation would have been 60% higher.

  14. Can MODIS cloud fraction fully represent the diurnal and seasonal variations at DOE ARM SGP and Manus sites?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang; Zhao, Chuanfeng

    2017-01-01

    Though cloud fraction (CF) from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) has been widely used, it remains unclear whether it can fully represent the diurnal variations. This study evaluates the time representation (i.e., satellite passes' mean value per day to represent daily average value) error in MODIS CF by using daytime-only total sky cover and continuous day-and-night radar/lidar CF (Active Remote Sensing of Clouds product, ARSCL) from 2000 to 2010 for two Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program climate regime sites of Southern Great Plains (SGP) and Manus. By comparing the daily averaged CFs from ARSCL between using all hourly and using the MODIS-passing-time observations, it shows a correlation coefficient of 0.93 (0.88) and root mean square deviation (RMSD) of 12.68% (13.27%) over SGP (Manus) site for daily averaged CFs. Differently, it shows a better correlation coefficient of 0.97 (0.97) and smaller RMSD of 2.98% (3.97%) over SGP (Manus) site for monthly averaged CFs. These suggest that considerable errors could be introduced while using the MODIS CF observed at several fixed time points a day to represent average CF at different time scales. Monthly time representation errors have also been evaluated for daytime only and nighttime only, which show even larger values. A further analysis shows that uncertainties caused by the time representation account for about 23% (21%) of the total differences between surface and MODIS CFs over SGP (Manus) site at monthly time scale.

  15. Does the Site of Anterior Tracheal Puncture Affect the Success Rate of Retrograde Intubation? A Prospective, Manikin-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Eric A.; Arheart, Kristopher L.; Fischler, Kenneth E.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Retrograde intubation is useful for obtaining endotracheal access when direct laryngoscopy proves difficult. The technique is a practical option in the “cannot intubate / can ventilate” scenario. However, it is equally useful as an elective technique in awake patients with anticipated difficult airways. Many practitioners report difficulty successfully advancing the endotracheal tube due to anatomical obstructions and the acute angle of the anterograde guide. The purpose of this study was to test whether a more caudal tracheal puncture would increase the success rate. Methods. Twenty-four anesthesiology residents were randomly assigned to either a cricothyroid or a cricotracheal puncture group. Each was instructed how to perform the technique and then attempted it on a manikin at their assigned site. Data collection included whether the trachea was intubated, the number of attempts required, and the total time. Results. Both groups displayed a high degree of success. While the group assigned to the cricotracheal site required significantly more time to perform the procedure, they accomplished it in fewer attempts than the cricothyroid group. Conclusion. Retrograde intubation performed via a cricotracheal puncture site, while more time consuming, resulted in fewer attempts to advance the endotracheal tube and may reduce in vivo laryngeal trauma. PMID:23878535

  16. Biphasic competition between opiates and enkephalins: does it indicate the existence of a common high affinity (mu-1) binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Sarne, Y.; Kenner, A.

    1987-08-03

    Displacement from brain membranes of labeled opiates by low concentrations of enkephalins and of labeled enkephalins by low concentrations of opiates has been previously explained by the existance of a common high affinity site termed mu-1. An alternative interpretation of the same results is that the trough seen in the low concentration zone of the displacement curves represents cross binding of mu and delta opioid ligands to delta and mu receptors, respectively. In three sets of experiments with brain membranes, the size of the trough is shown to be dependent on the labeled ligand used: The ratio between the size of troughs seen with (TH)D-Ala, D-Leu enkephalin and with (TH)morphine varies with experimental conditions (storage of membranes at 4C for 72h), with ratio of mu:delta receptors (e.g. in thalamus and cortex which are enriched in mu and delta sites, respectively) and with pretreatment of membranes with naloxonazine. These results cannot be explained by a common high affinity site, but rather by binding of (TH)D-Ala, D-Leu enkephalin to mu and of (TH)morphine to delta opioid receptors. 17 references, 3 figures.

  17. Does Social Belonging to Primary Groups Protect Young People From the Effects of Pro-Suicide Sites?

    PubMed

    Minkkinen, Jaana; Oksanen, Atte; Näsi, Matti; Keipi, Teo; Kaakinen, Markus; Räsänen, Pekka

    2016-01-01

    The Internet has facilitated the existence of extreme and pathological communities that share information about ways to complete suicide or to deliberately harm or hurt oneself. This material is user-generated and easily accessible. The present study analyzed the buffering effect of social belonging to a primary group in the situation of pro-suicide site exposure. Cross-national data were collected from the US, UK, Germany, and Finland in spring 2013 and 2014 from respondents aged 15-30 years (N = 3,567). Data were analyzed by using linear regression separately for women and men for each country. A higher level of belonging to a primary group buffered the negative association of pro-suicide site exposure with mental health, measured as happiness, although the results were not consistent in the subgroups. US male subjects showed a significant buffering effect of the sense of belonging to family while the belonging to friends had a buffering effect among four other subgroups: British female and male subjects and Finnish female and male subjects. The results underline the positive potential of primary groups to shield young people's mental health in the situation of pro-suicide site exposure.

  18. Povidone Iodine Ointment Application to the Vaccination Site Does Not Alter Immunoglobulin G Antibody Response to Smallpox Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Pugh, Christine; Brown, Elizabeth S; Quinn, Xiaofei; Korman, Lawrence; Dyas, Beverly K; Ulrich, Robert G; Pittman, Phillip R

    2016-01-01

    U.S. military personnel deployed to high-risk areas receive the live vaccinia virus (VACV) smallpox vaccine ACAM2000. VACV shedding from the vaccination site can result in autoinoculation and contact transmission. We previously found that the application of povidone iodine ointment (PIO) to the scarification site reduced viral shedding without altering the antibody response, as measured by plaque reduction neutralization or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. In this study, we used protein microarray assays to measure the amount of immunoglobulin G antibody bound to (1) ACAM2000 itself and (2) individual VACV antigens that are present within ACAM2000. We assessed antibody binding in sera from primary smallpox vaccinees who applied PIO to the scarification site beginning on day 7 (PIO group) and from those who did not apply PIO (control group). In both cohorts, the postvaccination antibody response-in terms of antibody binding, both to ACAM2000 and to 11 individual VACV antigens-was significantly greater than the prevaccination response (all p < 0.0001). The postvaccination antibody binding levels of vaccinees in the PIO group did not differ from those of control vaccinees. These findings further support the topical application of PIO, starting on day 7, to reduce the viral shedding associated with smallpox vaccination.

  19. Record of Technical Change {number_sign}1 for ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 143: Area 25 Contaminated Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada,'' Revision 1, DOE/NV 506

    SciTech Connect

    US DOE Nevada Operations Office

    1999-07-21

    This Record of Technical Change updates the technical information provided in ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 143: Area 25 Contaminated Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada,'' Revision 0, DOE/NV-506

  20. Record of Technical Change {number_sign}1 to ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 135: Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada,'' Revision 0, DOE/NV--543

    SciTech Connect

    US DOE Nevada Operations Office

    1999-06-01

    This Record of Technical Change provides updates to the technical information in ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 135: Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada,'' Revision 0, DOE/NV--543

  1. Record of Technical Change {number_sign}2 for ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 240: Area 25 Vehicle Washdown, Nevada Test Site, Nevada,'' Revision 0, DOE/NV--532

    SciTech Connect

    USDOE Nevada Operations Office

    2000-03-16

    This Record of Technical Change updates the technical informatioin provided in ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 240: Area 25 Vehicle Washdown, Nevada Test Site, Nevada,'' Revision 0, DOE/NV--532.

  2. Record of Technical Change {number_sign}1 to ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 261: Test Cell A Leachfield System, Nevada Test Site, Nevada,'' Revision 0, DOE/NV-519

    SciTech Connect

    US DOE Nevada Operations Office

    2000-02-25

    This Record of Technical Change provides updates to the technical information included in ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 261: Test Cell A Leachfield System, Nevada Test Site, Nevada,'' DOE/NV--519.

  3. Electron spin resonance analysis of tooth enamel does not indicate exposures to large radiation doses in a large proportion of distally-exposed A-bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Yuko; Kodama, Yoshiaki; Cullings, Harry M; Miyazawa, Chuzo; Nakamura, Nori

    2011-01-01

    The atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki led to two different types of radiation exposure; one was direct and brief and the other was indirect and persistent. The latter (so-called exposure to residual radiation) resulted from the presence of neutron activation products in the soil, or from fission products present in the fallout. Compared with the doses from direct exposures, estimations of individual doses from residual radiation have been much more complicated, and estimates vary widely among researchers. The present report bases its conclusions on radiation doses recorded in tooth enamel from survivors in Hiroshima. Those survivors were present at distances of about 3 km or greater from the hypocenter at the time of the explosion, and have DS02 estimated doses (direct exposure doses) of less than 5 mGy (and are regarded as control subjects). Individual doses were estimated by measuring CO(2)(-) radicals in tooth enamel with the electron spin resonance (ESR; or electron paramagnetic resonance, EPR) method. The results from 56 molars donated by 49 survivors provided estimated doses which vary from -200 mGy to 500 mGy, and the median dose was 17 mGy (25% and 75% quartiles are -54 mGy and 137 mGy, respectively) for the buccal parts and 13 mGy (25% and 75% quartiles: -49 mGy and 87 mGy, respectively) for the lingual parts of the molars. Three molars had ESR-estimated doses of 300 to 400 mGy for both the buccal and lingual parts, which indicates possible exposures to excess doses of penetrating radiation, although the origin of such radiation remains to be determined. The results did not support claims that a large fraction of distally-exposed survivors received large doses (e.g. 1 Gy) of external penetrating radiation resulting from residual radiation.

  4. [Does living nearby a garbage dumping site degrade the quality of life? A case study based on Shin-dong Myeon residents, Chun-cheon Si].

    PubMed

    Lee, Myung Kyung; Choi, Jun Yeol; Kim, In Kyoung; Cho, Yeong-Ah; Kim, Young-Shin; Jung, Hye Jin; Kim, Li Na; Lee, Young Kyu; Cho, Youngtae

    2006-07-01

    This study aims to examine if a garbage dumping site has real and negative influence on the quality of life (QOL) for the nearby residents. The net effects of the residential distance from the garbage dumping site and from the garbage truck route were investigated for five domains of the QOL. Two hundred fifty seven Shin-dong Myeon residents, Chun-cheon Si, participated in a self-administrated survey. The Shin-dong Myeon garbage dumping site began operating in 1996. ANCOVA with generalized linear models and multiple regression analysis were performed. Descriptive analyses show that a residence nearby a garbage dumping site is negatively associated with the physical and environmental domains of the QOL. The residential distance from the garbage truck route does not exert any significant effect on various domains of QOL, except for the environmental domain. On the multivariate analysis, the residents living near the garbage dumping site tended to have a significantly negative QOL in the physical and environmental domains. However, the distance from the garbage truck route did not show a significant nor substantial effect on the QOL. The demographic and socioeconomic control variables are associated with a number of the QOL domains, and their patterns are consistent with the general expectations. The results indicated that a garbage dumping site is considered to be an environmental hazard among the nearby residents according to the lower scores on the physical and environmental domains of the QOL. The findings from this study provide comprehensive\\ understanding on the residents' QOL, and they may help politicians and policy makers make decisions for appropriate interventions.

  5. Hydraulic fracture model and diagnostics verification at GRI/DOE multi-site projects and tight gas sand program support. Final report, July 28, 1993--February 28, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, J.E.

    1997-12-31

    The Mesaverde Group of the Piceance Basin in western Colorado has been a pilot study area for government-sponsored tight gas sand research for over twenty years. Early production experiments included nuclear stimulations and massive hydraulic fracture treatments. This work culminated in the US Department of Energy (DOE)`s Multiwell Experiment (MWX), a field laboratory designed to study the reservoir and production characteristics of low permeability sands. A key feature of MWX was an infrastructure which included several closely spaced wells that allowed detailed characterization of the reservoir through log and core analysis, and well testing. Interference and tracer tests, as well as the use of fracture diagnostics gave further information on stimulation and production characteristics. Thus, the Multiwell Experiment provided a unique opportunity for identifying the factors affecting production from tight gas sand reservoirs. The purpose of this operation was to support the gathering of field data that may be used to resolve the number of unknowns associated with measuring and modeling the dimensions of hydraulic fractures. Using the close-well infrastructure at the Multiwell Site near Rifle, Colorado, this operation focused primarily on the field design and execution of experiments. The data derived from the experiments were gathered and analyzed by DOE team contractors.

  6. Does canopy mean N concentration explain differences in light use efficiency in 14 eddy-covariance sites?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltoniemi, Mikko; Pulkkinen, Minna; Kolari, Pasi; Mäkelä, Annikki

    2010-05-01

    Production efficiency models aim at explaining variation of vegetation productivity with climatic input and information on vegetation cover often obtained from satellite observations. It has been acknowledged that different plant species differ in their potential to assimilate carbon dioxide per unit of PAR (i.e light use efficiency, LUE). Subsequently, some LUE-based models apply different LUE-coefficients for different plant functional types. Leaf N concentrations differ between plant species, and related differences in light saturated photosynthesis rate (A_max) have been detected. How much these differences affect the ecosystem production or LUE is more obscure. Canopies acclimate to prevailing environmental conditions, which causes variation e.g. in the proportion of leaves exposed to direct sunlight, leaf morphology, structure,orientation, and vertical N distibution. Furthermore, a fair proportion of photosynthesis occurs during cloudy days, in which case high A_max is unessential, and number of these days differs by location. We studied if canopy mean N concentration could explain differences in LUE derived for 14 forest sites using eddy-covariance measurements. The largest actual LUE was estimated for each site directly as an upper percentile of the ratio of Gross Primary Production (GPP) to absorbed PAR. Potential LUE for each site, on the other hand, was estimated by parameterising a LUE-based production efficiency model (Prelued), which accounts for daily changes in weather (temperature, VPD, PAR). In this model structure, the LUE-parameter for each site, can be interpreted as the potential LUE under optimal environmental conditions, i.e when the environment is not limiting production at all. Averages of the largest actual LUE and potential LUE were higher in deciduous sites than in conifer sites. Canopy mean N correlated weakly with both the largest actual and potential LUE, and the correlation was also significant in conifer subset in the former case

  7. Does the site of platelet sequestration predict the response to splenectomy in adult patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura?

    PubMed

    Navez, Julie; Hubert, Catherine; Gigot, Jean-François; Navez, Benoit; Lambert, Catherine; Jamar, François; Danse, Etienne; Lannoy, Valérie; Jabbour, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Splenectomy is the only potentially curative treatment for chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) in adults. However, one-third of the patients relapse without predictive factors identified. We evaluate the predictive value of the site of platelet sequestration on the response to splenectomy in patients with ITP. Eighty-two consecutive patients with ITP treated by splenectomy between 1992 and 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Platelet sequestration site was studied by (111)Indium-oxinate-labeled platelets in 93% of patients. Response to splenectomy was defined at last follow-up as: complete response (CR) for platelet count (PC) ≥100 × 10(9)/L, response (R) for PC≥30 × 10(9)/L and <100 × 10(9)/L with absence of bleeding, no response (NR) for PC<30 × 10(3)/L or significant bleeding. Laparoscopic splenectomy was performed in 81 patients (conversion rate of 16%), and open approach in one patient. Median follow-up was 57 months (range, 1-235). Platelet sequestration study was performed in 93% of patients: 50 patients (61%) exhibited splenic sequestration, 9 (11%) hepatic sequestration and 14 patients (17%) mixed sequestration. CR was obtained in 72% of patients, R in 25% and NR in 4% (two with splenic sequestration, one with hepatic sequestration). Preoperative PC, age at diagnosis, hepatic sequestration and male gender were significant for predicting CR in univariate analysis, but only age (HR = 1.025 by one-year increase, 95% CI [1.004-1.047], p = 0.020) and pre-operative PC (HR = 0.112 for > 100 versus <=100, 95% CI [0.025-0.493], p = 0.004) were significant predictors of recurrence-free survival in multivariate analysis. Response to splenectomy was independent of the site of platelet sequestration in patients with ITP. Pre-operative platelet sequestration study in these patients cannot be recommended.

  8. X-ray Spectroscopic Investigation of the Distribution and Speciation of Uranium in Contaminated Sediments From the DOE's Hanford Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, J. G.; Zachara, J. M.; Heald, S. M.; Brown, G. E.

    2002-12-01

    Extensive uranium contamination of the subsurface at the Department of Energy's Hanford site has occurred through the leakage of significant quantities of high-level nuclear waste. Over 25 tons of uranium have been spilled into the vadose zone in the 200 and 300 Areas at the site, with sizable groundwater plumes present or developing. An understanding of the speciation and distribution of uranium in the vadose zone is needed to predict the future migration of uranium into groundwater. We have applied synchrotron-based x-ray spectroscopic techniques to characterize the speciation of uranium in contaminated sediments from under tank BX-102 in the 200 Area, and from disposals ponds and areas adjacent to waste storage areas in the 300 Area. X-ray fluorescence microprobe (μ-XRF) studies of BX-102 samples shows uranium distributed heterogeneously, occurring in discrete particles <5 mm in diameter. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopic studies demonstrate that >95% of the uranium occurs as U(VI) in all samples. In the BX-102 samples, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy suggests that the primary uranium species is an uranophane-group mineral, most likely boltwoodite. Two samples from the 300 area also contain uranium primarily as an uranophane-group mineral, whereas one sample contains a mixture of phases, and one appears to contain primarily adsorbed U(VI). These differences may reflect different waste sources and water exposures. These studies suggest that an uranophane-group mineral is the primary phase controlling the geochemistry of U at the Hanford site. X-ray microdiffraction studies of these samples will also be presented.

  9. Does prenatal care at community-based health centers result in infant primary care at these sites?

    PubMed

    Chung, Esther K; McCollum, Kelly F; Elo, Irma T; Culhane, Jennifer F

    2006-01-01

    To describe where women receiving prenatal care (PNC) at community-based health centers (CBHCs) go for infant primary care, and to assess reasons for and factors associated with leaving CBHCs and using other practices for infant care. A prospective survey of women receiving PNC at CBHCs from February 2000 to February 2002 was conducted. In-person, prepartum, and postpartum surveys included questions about sociodemographic and health characteristics, and health services use. Among 1,107 primarily low-income, African American mothers, 60% of women left CBHCs and used other practices for their infants due to dissatisfaction, inconvenience, referral to and perceived expertise at other sites, and insurance changes. Leaving CBHCs was associated with being white, Latina, US born, educated beyond high school, single, owning a car, using non-CBHC practices for prepregnancy care, and having child health insurance. Among those who left, 48% used hospital-based clinics (HBCs) and 52% used private practices (PPs). Mothers using HBCs, when compared to those using PPs, were more likely to be African American (AOR = 6.83; 95% CI: 3.82, 12.22) or Latina (AOR = 5.60; 95% CI: 2.79, 11.24), dissatisfied with their PNC (AOR = 2.02; 95% CI: 1.05, 3.89) and to leave CBHCs because of insurance changes (AOR = 2.27; 95% CI: 1.18, 4.39) and perceived pediatric expertise at other sites (AOR = 4.81; 95% CI: 2.53, 9.11). The majority of women in our study left CBHCs and used other sites for pediatric care. Higher education, having child health insurance, and car ownership were associated with leaving CBHCs. Among women who left, race/ethnicity and perceived pediatric expertise were major factors associated with using HBCs rather than PPs.

  10. Large-Eddy Simulation of Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Flow Through a Wind Farm Sited on Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamsoddin, Sina; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2016-11-01

    Large-eddy simulation (LES) has recently been well validated and applied in the context of wind turbines over flat terrain; however, to date its accuracy has not been tested systematically in the case of turbine-wake flows over topography. Here, we investigate the wake flow in a wind farm situated on hilly terrain using LES for a case where wind-tunnel experimental data are available. To this end, first boundary-layer flow is simulated over a two-dimensional hill in order to characterize the spatial distribution of the mean velocity and the turbulence statistics. A flow simulation is then performed through a wind farm consisting of five horizontal-axis wind turbines sited over the same hill in an aligned layout. The resulting flow characteristics are compared with the former case, i.e., without wind turbines. To assess the validity of the simulations, the results are compared with the wind-tunnel measurements. It is found that LES can reproduce the flow field effectively, and, specifically, the speed-up over the hilltop and the velocity deficit and turbulence intensity enhancement induced by the turbines are well captured by the simulations. Besides, the vertical profiles of the mean velocity and turbulence intensity at different streamwise positions match well those for the experiment. In addition, another numerical experiment is carried out to show how higher (and more realistic) thrust coefficients of the turbines lead to stronger wakes and, at the same time, higher turbulence intensities.

  11. Weather monitor station and 225 GHz radiometer system installed at Sierra Negra: the Large Millimeter Telescope site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrusca, D.; Contreras R., J.

    2014-07-01

    The Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT) is a 50-m dish antenna designed to observe in the wavelength range of 0.85 to 4 mm at an altitude of 4600 m on the summit of Sierra Negra Puebla, Mexico. The telescope has a new atmospheric monitoring system that allows technical staff and astronomers to evaluate the conditions at the site and have enough information to operate the antenna in safe conditions, atmospheric data is also useful to schedule maintenance activities and conduct scientific observations, opacity data is used to calibrate the astronomical data and evaluate the quality of the sky at millimeter wavelengths. In this paper we describe the integration of a weather atmospheric monitoring system and a 225 GHz radiometer to the facilities around the telescope and also describe the hardware integration of these systems and the software methodology used to save and process the data and then make it available in real time to the astronomers and outside world through an internet connection. Finally we present a first set of atmospheric measurements and statistics taken with this new equipment during the wet and dry seasons of 2013/2014.

  12. Optimized Energy Management for Large Organizations Utilizing an On-Site PHEV fleet, Storage Devices and Renewable Electricity Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Dashora, Yogesh; Barnes, J. Wesley; Pillai, Rekha S; Combs, Todd E; Hilliard, Michael R

    2012-01-01

    Abstract This paper focuses on the daily electricity management problem for organizations with a large number of employees working within a relatively small geographic location. The organization manages its electric grid including limited on-site energy generation facilities, energy storage facilities, and plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) charging stations installed in the parking lots. A mixed integer linear program (MILP) is modeled and implemented to assist the organization in determining the temporal allocation of available resources that will minimize energy costs. We consider two cost compensation strategies for PHEV owners: (1) cost equivalent battery replacement reimbursement for utilizing vehicle to grid (V2G) services from PHEVs; (2) gasoline equivalent cost for undercharging of PHEV batteries. Our case study, based on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) campus, produced encouraging results and substantiates the importance of controlled PHEV fleet charging as opposed to uncontrolled charging methods. We further established the importance of realizing V2G capabilities provided by PHEVs in terms of significantly reducing energy costs for the organization.

  13. Large-Eddy Simulation of Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Flow Through a Wind Farm Sited on Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamsoddin, Sina; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2017-04-01

    Large-eddy simulation (LES) has recently been well validated and applied in the context of wind turbines over flat terrain; however, to date its accuracy has not been tested systematically in the case of turbine-wake flows over topography. Here, we investigate the wake flow in a wind farm situated on hilly terrain using LES for a case where wind-tunnel experimental data are available. To this end, first boundary-layer flow is simulated over a two-dimensional hill in order to characterize the spatial distribution of the mean velocity and the turbulence statistics. A flow simulation is then performed through a wind farm consisting of five horizontal-axis wind turbines sited over the same hill in an aligned layout. The resulting flow characteristics are compared with the former case, i.e., without wind turbines. To assess the validity of the simulations, the results are compared with the wind-tunnel measurements. It is found that LES can reproduce the flow field effectively, and, specifically, the speed-up over the hilltop and the velocity deficit and turbulence intensity enhancement induced by the turbines are well captured by the simulations. Besides, the vertical profiles of the mean velocity and turbulence intensity at different streamwise positions match well those for the experiment. In addition, another numerical experiment is carried out to show how higher (and more realistic) thrust coefficients of the turbines lead to stronger wakes and, at the same time, higher turbulence intensities.

  14. 1995 Annual report on waste generation and waste mainization progress as required by DOE order 5400.1, Hanford site

    SciTech Connect

    Betsch, M.D.

    1996-09-24

    While waste generation numbers are important, the true measure of success is waste minimized. Many Waste Minimization/Pollution Prevention (WMin/P2) successes at the Hanford Site occur every day without formal recognition as pollution prevention, as they have become part of a culture of best management practices. As an example, the success of the excess and reuse program, both informal and formal, documents the Wmin/P2 culture that exists in the pollution prevention representatives and employees at the facilities.

  15. Implementation of DOE/NFDI D&D Cost Estimating Tool (POWERtool) for Initiative Facilities at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, W. E.; WSRC; Baker, S. B. III, Cutshall, C. M.; Crouse, J. L.

    2003-02-26

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has embarked on an aggressive D&D program to reduce the footprint of excess facilities. Key to the success of this effort is the preparation of accurate cost estimates for decommissioning. SRS traditionally uses ''top-down'' rough order-of-magnitude (ROM) estimating for decommissioning cost estimates. A second cost estimating method (POWERtool) using a ''bottoms-up'' approach has been applied to many of the SRS excess facilities in the T and D-area. This paper describes the use of both estimating methods and compares the estimated costs to actual costs of 5 facilities that were decommissioned in 2002.

  16. Location of Si vacancies and [Ti(OSi)4] and [Ti(OSi)3OH] sites in the MFI framework: a large cluster and full ab initio study.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shuping; Si, Hongzong; Fu, Aiping; Chu, Tianshu; Tian, Fenghui; Duan, Yun-Bo; Wang, Jianguo

    2011-02-10

    Titanium silicalite-1 (TS-1) is an important catalyst for selective oxidation reactions. However, the nature and structure of the active sites and the mechanistic details of the catalytic reactions over TS-1 have not been well-understood, leaving a continuous debate on the genesis of active sites on the TS-1 surface in the literature. In this work, the location of Si vacancies and [Ti(OSi)(4)] and [Ti(OSi)(3)OH] sites in the MFI (Framework Type Code of ZSM-5 (Zeolite Socony Mobile-Five)) framework has been studied using a full ab initio method with 40T clusters with a Si:Ti molar ratio of 39:1. It was shown that the former four energetically favorable sites for Si vacancies are T6, T12, T4, and T8 and for Ti centers of [Ti(OSi)(4)] are T10, T4, T8 and T11, being partially the same sites. Whether by replacing Si vacancies or substituting the fully coordinated Si sites, the most preferential site for Ti is T10, which indicates that the insertion mechanism does not affect the favorable sites of Ti in the MFI lattice. For the defective [Ti(OSi)(3)OH] sites, it was found that the Si vacancy at T6 with a Ti at its neighboring T9 site (T6-def-T9-Ti pair) is the most energetically favorable one, followed by a T6-def-T5-Ti pair with a small energy gap. These findings are significant to elucidate the nature of the active sites and the mechanism of reactions catalyzed by TS-1 and to design the TS-1 catalyst.

  17. Does Positive Selection Drive Transcription Factor Binding Site Turnover? A Test with Drosophila Cis-Regulatory Modules

    PubMed Central

    He, Bin Z.; Holloway, Alisha K.; Maerkl, Sebastian J.; Kreitman, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Transcription factor binding site(s) (TFBS) gain and loss (i.e., turnover) is a well-documented feature of cis-regulatory module (CRM) evolution, yet little attention has been paid to the evolutionary force(s) driving this turnover process. The predominant view, motivated by its widespread occurrence, emphasizes the importance of compensatory mutation and genetic drift. Positive selection, in contrast, although it has been invoked in specific instances of adaptive gene expression evolution, has not been considered as a general alternative to neutral compensatory evolution. In this study we evaluate the two hypotheses by analyzing patterns of single nucleotide polymorphism in the TFBS of well-characterized CRM in two closely related Drosophila species, Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila simulans. An important feature of the analysis is classification of TFBS mutations according to the direction of their predicted effect on binding affinity, which allows gains and losses to be evaluated independently along the two phylogenetic lineages. The observed patterns of polymorphism and divergence are not compatible with neutral evolution for either class of mutations. Instead, multiple lines of evidence are consistent with contributions of positive selection to TFBS gain and loss as well as purifying selection in its maintenance. In discussion, we propose a model to reconcile the finding of selection driving TFBS turnover with constrained CRM function over long evolutionary time. PMID:21572512

  18. Does size matter? An examination of problem gamblers' skin conductance responses to large and small magnitude rewards.

    PubMed

    Lole, Lisa; Gonsalvez, Craig J

    2017-10-01

    Previous research has shown that individuals with substance use disorder equally value small and large magnitude rewards. This has led some researchers to conceptualize the problematic behaviors associated with this disorder as being, at least in part, caused by a deficiency in processing reward stimuli. Considering the documented similarities between substance use disorder and disordered gambling, the current study sought to investigate whether problem gamblers also display such an aberrant pattern of incentive processing. Skin conductance responses (SCRs) to small and large magnitude wins were recorded from 16 problem gamblers (PGs) and 16 healthy controls (HCs) while they completed a computer-simulated electronic gaming machine task. The results show that, while large wins elicited greater SCRs compared to small wins for the HC group, no difference in SCR amplitude was found following large and small wins in the PG group. These findings suggest that problem gamblers may be less effective at evaluating the value of incentives, and are discussed in terms of relevant theoretical frameworks. © 2017 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  19. Studying Teacher Selection of Resources in an Ultra-Large Scale Interactive System: Does Metadata Guide the Way?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abramovich, Samuel; Schunn, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Ultra-large-scale interactive systems on the Internet have begun to change how teachers prepare for instruction, particularly in regards to resource selection. Consequently, it is important to look at how teachers are currently selecting resources beyond content or keyword search. We conducted a two-part observational study of an existing popular…

  20. Does Time Spent Online Have an Influence on Student Performance? Evidence for a Large Business Studies Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korkofingas, Con; Macri, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines, using regression modelling, whether a statistically significant relationship exists between the time spent by a student using the course website and the student's assessment performance for a large third year university business forecasting course. We utilise the online tracking system in Blackboard, a web-based software…

  1. Does Decision Quality (Always) Increase with the Size of Information Samples? Some Vicissitudes in Applying the Law of Large Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiedler, Klaus; Kareev, Yaakov

    2006-01-01

    Adaptive decision making requires that contingencies between decision options and their relative assets be assessed accurately and quickly. The present research addresses the challenging notion that contingencies may be more visible from small than from large samples of observations. An algorithmic account for such a seemingly paradoxical effect…

  2. Does Decision Quality (Always) Increase with the Size of Information Samples? Some Vicissitudes in Applying the Law of Large Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiedler, Klaus; Kareev, Yaakov

    2006-01-01

    Adaptive decision making requires that contingencies between decision options and their relative assets be assessed accurately and quickly. The present research addresses the challenging notion that contingencies may be more visible from small than from large samples of observations. An algorithmic account for such a seemingly paradoxical effect…

  3. Studying Teacher Selection of Resources in an Ultra-Large Scale Interactive System: Does Metadata Guide the Way?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abramovich, Samuel; Schunn, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Ultra-large-scale interactive systems on the Internet have begun to change how teachers prepare for instruction, particularly in regards to resource selection. Consequently, it is important to look at how teachers are currently selecting resources beyond content or keyword search. We conducted a two-part observational study of an existing popular…

  4. Kansas State University: DOE/KEURP Site Operator Program. Year 4, fourth quarterly report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    Kansas State University, in support of a DOE and Kansas Electric Utilities Research Program subject contract, continues to test, evaluate, demonstrate, and develop electric vehicle and infrastructure technology. K-State is operating two Soleq EVcort vehicles. During this reporting period both vehicles were brought back to full operational status after warranty service was completed by Soleq. Vehicle failures occurred due to three unrelated battery cable failures in addition to the replacement of one battery. Both vehicles are being operated on a routine basis. K-State, along with York Technical College, has established a relationship with Troy Design and Manufacturing (TDM) Redford, Michigan. K-State has ordered no less than four Ford Ranger electric trucks from TDM. K-State is involved in the steering committee that is monitoring and refining information to direct the design and testing of these new technology vehicles. TDM should become the first automotive manufacturer certified by one of the Big Three under their Quality Vehicle Manufacturer program. Kansas State University and the Kansas Electric Utility Research Program look forward to working with TDM on their new EV program.

  5. Methods for environmental monitoring of DOE waste disposal and storage sites. Semiannual progress report, April 1, 1988--September 30, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Hadden, C.T.; Benson, S.B.; Osborne, T.R.; Revis, N.W.

    1988-12-31

    Perchloroethylene (PCE) is a persistent environmental contaminant whose chemical stability and hydrophobicity have made it difficult to remove from contaminated groundwater. PCE is also toxic and has been implicated as a carcinogen. This study was aimed at assessing methods for biological degradation of PCE. As a part of the study, the authors have characterized possible products of the degradation of PCE, and have determined the effects of detergents and solvents on the water solubility of PCE and on the toxic effects of PCE on bacteria. The authors have also isolated PCE-resistant microorganisms from monitoring wells at Y-12. To date all of the PCE-resistant bacteria isolated from the monitoring wells have been of the genus Bacillus. One of these isolates appears to be able to degrade PCE, as indicated by the disappearance of PCE from cultures of growing cells. The organism does not grow on PCE as the sole carbon source, so degradation of the solvent must occur by cometabolism.

  6. Progress in evaluation of radionuclide geochemical information developed by DOE high-level nuclear waste repository site projects; Report for October 1987--June 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, R.E.; Arnold, W.D.; O`Kelley, G.D.; Case, F.I.; Land, J.F.

    1989-08-01

    Information that is being developed by projects within the Department of Energy (DOE) pertinent to the potential geochemical behavior of radionuclides at candidate sites for a high-level radioactive waste repository is being evaluated by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). During this report period, all experiments were conducted with tuff from the proposed high-level nuclear waste site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The principal emphasis in this report period was on column studies of migration of uranium and technetium in water from well J-13 at the Yucca Mountain site. Columns 1 cm in diameter and about 5 cm long were constructed and carefully packed with ground tuff. The characteristics of the columns were tested by determination of elution curves of tritium and TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}. Elution peaks obtained in past studies with uranium were asymmetrical and the shapes were often complex, observations that suggested irreversibilities in the sorption reaction. To try to understand these observations, the effects of flow rate and temperature on uranium migration were studied in detail. Sorption ratios calculated from the elution peaks became larger as the flow rate decreased and as the temperature increased. These observations support the conclusion that the sorption of uranium is kinetically hindered. To confirm this, batch sorption ratio experiments were completed for uranium as a function of time for a variety of conditions.

  7. Glycoconjugate with Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I-binding sites in normal mucosa, adenoma, and carcinoma of the human large bowel.

    PubMed

    Yonezawa, S; Nakamura, T; Tanaka, S; Sato, E

    1982-10-01

    Cancerous lesions and nonneoplastic mucosa of surgically extirpated specimens from 94 patients with colorectal carcinoma (of the right colon, 31 patients; of the left colon, 29 patients; and of the rectum, 34 patients) and endoscopically polypectomized specimens from 18 patients with rectal adenoma were examined with fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated or horse-radish peroxidase-conjugated Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I) specific to a certain terminal alpha-L-fucosyl residue in glycoconjugates. Of the 31 patients with right colon cancers, 22 showed positive UEA-I binding in the neoplastic cell apexes, apical luminal borders, and luminal secretions. The adjacent nonneoplastic mucosa of all 31 patients, however, demonstrated positive UEA-I binding in the goblet cell mucus. UEA-I binding was positive for 23 of the 29 left colon cancers and for 28 of the 34 rectal cancers, although UEA-I binding was not revealed in the adjacent nonneoplastic mucosa for most of the cases. Of the 18 rectal adenomas, 12 specimens showed positive UEA-I binding in the apical secretions of their adenoma cells. Marked regional differences of UEA-I binding in the nonneoplastic mucosae indicated that the constituents of glycoprotein with UEA-I binding sites in goblet cell mucus differed significantly between the human right and left large bowels. Positive UEA-I binding in many rectal cancerous and adenomatous lesions suggested that a neoplastic glycoprotein with alpha-L-fucosyl residue was produced or that the terminal carbohydrate structure of glycoprotein present in the nonneoplastic mucosa was altered to bind easily with UEA-I after the neoplastic transformation had occurred. A possible relation of this UEA-I binding to blood group H(O) substance is discussed.

  8. Does Disposing of Construction and Demolition Debris in Unlined Landfills Impact Groundwater Quality? Evidence from 91 Landfill Sites in Florida.

    PubMed

    Powell, Jon T; Jain, Pradeep; Smith, Justin; Townsend, Timothy G; Tolaymat, Thabet M

    2015-08-04

    More than 1,500 construction and demolition debris (CDD) landfills operate in the United States (U.S.), and U.S. federal regulations do not require containment features such as low-permeability liners and leachate collection systems for these facilities. Here we evaluate groundwater quality from samples collected in groundwater monitoring networks at 91 unlined, permitted CDD landfills in Florida, U.S. A total of 460,504 groundwater sample results were analyzed, with a median of 10 years of quarterly or semiannual monitoring data per site including more than 400 different chemical constituents. Downgradient concentrations of total dissolved solids, sulfate, chloride, iron, ammonia-nitrogen, and aluminum were greater than upgradient concentrations (p < 0.05). At downgradient wells where sulfate concentrations were greater than 150 mg/L (approximately 10% of the maximum dissolved sulfate concentration in water, which suggests the presence of leachate from the landfill), iron and arsenic were detected in 91% and 43% of samples, with median concentrations of 1,900 μg/L and 11 μg/L, respectively. These results show that although health-based standards can be exceeded at unlined CDD landfills, the magnitude of detected chemical concentrations is generally small and reflective of leached minerals from components (wood, concrete, and gypsum drywall) that comprise the bulk of discarded CDD by mass.

  9. Ambient Air Temperature Does Not Predict whether Small or Large Workers Forage in Bumble Bees (Bombus impatiens)

    PubMed Central

    Couvillon, Margaret J.; Fitzpatrick, Ginny; Dornhaus, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Bumble bees are important pollinators of crops and other plants. However, many aspects of their basic biology remain relatively unexplored. For example, one important and unusual natural history feature in bumble bees is the massive size variation seen between workers of the same nest. This size polymorphism may be an adaptation for division of labor, colony economics, or be nonadaptive. It was also suggested that perhaps this variation allows for niche specialization in workers foraging at different temperatures: larger bees might be better suited to forage at cooler temperatures and smaller bees might be better suited to forage at warmer temperatures. This we tested here using a large, enclosed growth chamber, where we were able to regulate the ambient temperature. We found no significant effect of ambient or nest temperature on the average size of bees flying to and foraging from a suspended feeder. Instead, bees of all sizes successfully flew and foraged between 16°C and 36°C. Thus, large bees foraged even at very hot temperatures, which we thought might cause overheating. Size variation therefore could not be explained in terms of niche specialization for foragers at different temperatures. PMID:26005222

  10. Stochast