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Sample records for large eddy simultations

  1. Applied large eddy simulation.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Paul G; Lardeau, Sylvain

    2009-07-28

    Large eddy simulation (LES) is now seen more and more as a viable alternative to current industrial practice, usually based on problem-specific Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) methods. Access to detailed flow physics is attractive to industry, especially in an environment in which computer modelling is bound to play an ever increasing role. However, the improvement in accuracy and flow detail has substantial cost. This has so far prevented wider industrial use of LES. The purpose of the applied LES discussion meeting was to address questions regarding what is achievable and what is not, given the current technology and knowledge, for an industrial practitioner who is interested in using LES. The use of LES was explored in an application-centred context between diverse fields. The general flow-governing equation form was explored along with various LES models. The errors occurring in LES were analysed. Also, the hybridization of RANS and LES was considered. The importance of modelling relative to boundary conditions, problem definition and other more mundane aspects were examined. It was to an extent concluded that for LES to make most rapid industrial impact, pragmatic hybrid use of LES, implicit LES and RANS elements will probably be needed. Added to this further, highly industrial sector model parametrizations will be required with clear thought on the key target design parameter(s). The combination of good numerical modelling expertise, a sound understanding of turbulence, along with artistry, pragmatism and the use of recent developments in computer science should dramatically add impetus to the industrial uptake of LES. In the light of the numerous technical challenges that remain it appears that for some time to come LES will have echoes of the high levels of technical knowledge required for safe use of RANS but with much greater fidelity.

  2. Mesoscale Ocean Large Eddy Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Brodie; Fox-Kemper, Baylor; Bachman, Scott; Bryan, Frank

    2015-11-01

    The highest resolution global climate models (GCMs) can now resolve the largest scales of mesoscale dynamics in the ocean. This has the potential to increase the fidelity of GCMs. However, the effects of the smallest, unresolved, scales of mesoscale dynamics must still be parametrized. One such family of parametrizations are mesoscale ocean large eddy simulations (MOLES), but the effects of including MOLES in a GCM are not well understood. In this presentation, several MOLES schemes are implemented in a mesoscale-resolving GCM (CESM), and the resulting flow is compared with that produced by more traditional sub-grid parametrizations. Large eddy simulation (LES) is used to simulate flows where the largest scales of turbulent motion are resolved, but the smallest scales are not resolved. LES has traditionally been used to study 3D turbulence, but recently it has also been applied to idealized 2D and quasi-geostrophic (QG) turbulence. The MOLES presented here are based on 2D and QG LES schemes.

  3. Large Eddy Simulation of a Turbulent Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, A. T.; Mansour, Nagi N.

    2001-01-01

    Here we present the results of a Large Eddy Simulation of a non-buoyant jet issuing from a circular orifice in a wall, and developing in neutral surroundings. The effects of the subgrid scales on the large eddies have been modeled with the dynamic large eddy simulation model applied to the fully 3D domain in spherical coordinates. The simulation captures the unsteady motions of the large-scales within the jet as well as the laminar motions in the entrainment region surrounding the jet. The computed time-averaged statistics (mean velocity, concentration, and turbulence parameters) compare well with laboratory data without invoking an empirical entrainment coefficient as employed by line integral models. The use of the large eddy simulation technique allows examination of unsteady and inhomogeneous features such as the evolution of eddies and the details of the entrainment process.

  4. Large Eddy Simulations in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Wolfram

    2015-12-01

    In this review, the methodology of large eddy simulations (LES) is introduced and applications in astrophysics are discussed. As theoretical framework, the scale decomposition of the dynamical equations for neutral fluids by means of spatial filtering is explained. For cosmological applications, the filtered equations in comoving coordinates are also presented. To obtain a closed set of equations that can be evolved in LES, several subgrid-scale models for the interactions between numerically resolved and unresolved scales are discussed, in particular the subgrid-scale turbulence energy equation model. It is then shown how model coefficients can be calculated, either by dynamic procedures or, a priori, from high-resolution data. For astrophysical applications, adaptive mesh refinement is often indispensable. It is shown that the subgrid-scale turbulence energy model allows for a particularly elegant and physically well-motivated way of preserving momentum and energy conservation in adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) simulations. Moreover, the notion of shear-improved models for in-homogeneous and non-stationary turbulence is introduced. Finally, applications of LES to turbulent combustion in thermonuclear supernovae, star formation and feedback in galaxies, and cosmological structure formation are reviewed.

  5. Temporal Large-Eddy Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruett, C. D.; Thomas, B. C.

    2004-01-01

    In 1999, Stolz and Adams unveiled a subgrid-scale model for LES based upon approximately inverting (defiltering) the spatial grid-filter operator and termed .the approximate deconvolution model (ADM). Subsequently, the utility and accuracy of the ADM were demonstrated in a posteriori analyses of flows as diverse as incompressible plane-channel flow and supersonic compression-ramp flow. In a prelude to the current paper, a parameterized temporal ADM (TADM) was developed and demonstrated in both a priori and a posteriori analyses for forced, viscous Burger's flow. The development of a time-filtered variant of the ADM was motivated-primarily by the desire for a unifying theoretical and computational context to encompass direct numerical simulation (DNS), large-eddy simulation (LES), and Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes simulation (RANS). The resultant methodology was termed temporal LES (TLES). To permit exploration of the parameter space, however, previous analyses of the TADM were restricted to Burger's flow, and it has remained to demonstrate the TADM and TLES methodology for three-dimensional flow. For several reasons, plane-channel flow presents an ideal test case for the TADM. Among these reasons, channel flow is anisotropic, yet it lends itself to highly efficient and accurate spectral numerical methods. Moreover, channel-flow has been investigated extensively by DNS, and a highly accurate data base of Moser et.al. exists. In the present paper, we develop a fully anisotropic TADM model and demonstrate its utility in simulating incompressible plane-channel flow at nominal values of Re(sub tau) = 180 and Re(sub tau) = 590 by the TLES method. The TADM model is shown to perform nearly as well as the ADM at equivalent resolution, thereby establishing TLES as a viable alternative to LES. Moreover, as the current model is suboptimal is some respects, there is considerable room to improve TLES.

  6. Renormalization group formulation of large eddy simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yakhot, V.; Orszag, S. A.

    1985-01-01

    Renormalization group (RNG) methods are applied to eliminate small scales and construct a subgrid scale (SSM) transport eddy model for transition phenomena. The RNG and SSM procedures are shown to provide a more accurate description of viscosity near the wall than does the Smagorinski approach and also generate farfield turbulence viscosity values which agree well with those of previous researchers. The elimination of small scales causes the simultaneous appearance of a random force and eddy viscosity. The RNG method permits taking these into account, along with other phenomena (such as rotation) for large-eddy simulations.

  7. Large-Eddy Simulation and Multigrid Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Falgout,R D; Naegle,S; Wittum,G

    2001-06-18

    A method to simulate turbulent flows with Large-Eddy Simulation on unstructured grids is presented. Two kinds of dynamic models are used to model the unresolved scales of motion and are compared with each other on different grids. Thereby the behavior of the models is shown and additionally the feature of adaptive grid refinement is investigated. Furthermore the parallelization aspect is addressed.

  8. Large Eddy Simulation of Turbulent Combustion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-15

    Application to an HCCI Engine . Proceedings of the 4th Joint Meeting of the U.S. Sections of the Combustion Institute, 2005. [34] K. Fieweger...LARGE EDDY SIMULATION OF TURBULENT COMBUSTION Principle Investigator: Heinz Pitsch Flow Physics and Computation Department of Mechanical Engineering ...burners and engines found in modern, industrially relevant equipment. In the course of this transition of LES from a scientifically interesting method

  9. Large eddy simulation - The next five years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferziger, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    The prospect of major improvements in the performance of computers in the next five years means that large eddy simulation (LES), which has until now been strictly a research tool, may become a top-of-the-line engineering tool. In this paper, the historical development and past contributions of LES are reviewed. Then a discussion of the potential for applications of LES in new areas and of the developments needed to make LES a tool for the practicing engineer is given.

  10. Large eddy simulation in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scotti, Alberto

    2010-12-01

    Large eddy simulation (LES) is a relative newcomer to oceanography. In this review, both applications of traditional LES to oceanic flows and new oceanic LES still in an early stage of development are discussed. The survey covers LES applied to boundary layer flows, traditionally an area where LES has provided considerable insight into the physics of the flow, as well as more innovative applications, where new SGS closure schemes need to be developed. The merging of LES with large-scale models is also briefly reviewed.

  11. Large Eddy Simulation of Transitional Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayadi, Taraneh; Moin, Parviz

    2009-11-01

    A sixth order compact finite difference code is employed to investigate compressible Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of subharmonic transition of a spatially developing zero pressure gradient boundary layer, at Ma = 0.2. The computational domain extends from Rex= 10^5, where laminar blowing and suction excites the most unstable fundamental and sub-harmonic modes, to fully turbulent stage at Rex= 10.1x10^5. Numerical sponges are used in the neighborhood of external boundaries to provide non-reflective conditions. Our interest lies in the performance of the dynamic subgrid scale (SGS) model [1] in the transition process. It is observed that in early stages of transition the eddy viscosity is much smaller than the physical viscosity. As a result the amplitudes of selected harmonics are in very good agreement with the experimental data [2]. The model's contribution gradually increases during the last stages of transition process and the dynamic eddy viscosity becomes fully active and dominant in the turbulent region. Consistent with this trend the skin friction coefficient versus Rex diverges from its laminar profile and converges to the turbulent profile after an overshoot. 1. Moin P. et. al. Phys Fluids A, 3(11), 2746-2757, 1991. 2. Kachanov Yu. S. et. al. JFM, 138, 209-247, 1983.

  12. Statistical Ensemble of Large Eddy Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carati, Daniele; Rogers, Michael M.; Wray, Alan A.; Mansour, Nagi N. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A statistical ensemble of large eddy simulations (LES) is run simultaneously for the same flow. The information provided by the different large scale velocity fields is used to propose an ensemble averaged version of the dynamic model. This produces local model parameters that only depend on the statistical properties of the flow. An important property of the ensemble averaged dynamic procedure is that it does not require any spatial averaging and can thus be used in fully inhomogeneous flows. Also, the ensemble of LES's provides statistics of the large scale velocity that can be used for building new models for the subgrid-scale stress tensor. The ensemble averaged dynamic procedure has been implemented with various models for three flows: decaying isotropic turbulence, forced isotropic turbulence, and the time developing plane wake. It is found that the results are almost independent of the number of LES's in the statistical ensemble provided that the ensemble contains at least 16 realizations.

  13. Developing large eddy simulation for turbomachinery applications.

    PubMed

    Eastwood, Simon J; Tucker, Paul G; Xia, Hao; Klostermeier, Christian

    2009-07-28

    For jets, large eddy resolving simulations are compared for a range of numerical schemes with no subgrid scale (SGS) model and for a range of SGS models with the same scheme. There is little variation in results for the different SGS models, and it is shown that, for schemes which tend towards having dissipative elements, the SGS model can be abandoned, giving what can be termed numerical large eddy simulation (NLES). More complex geometries are investigated, including coaxial and chevron nozzle jets. A near-wall Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) model is used to cover over streak-like structures that cannot be resolved. Compressor and turbine flows are also successfully computed using a similar NLES-RANS strategy. Upstream of the compressor leading edge, the RANS layer is helpful in preventing premature separation. Capturing the correct flow over the turbine is particularly challenging, but nonetheless the RANS layer is helpful. In relation to the SGS model, for the flows considered, evidence suggests issues such as inflow conditions, problem definition and transition are more influential.

  14. Large-Eddy Simulation of Subsonic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuorinen, Ville; Wehrfritz, Armin; Yu, Jingzhou; Kaario, Ossi; Larmi, Martti; Boersma, Bendiks Jan

    2011-12-01

    The present study deals with development and validation of a fully explicit, compressible Runge-Kutta-4 (RK4) Navier-Stokes solver in the opensource CFD programming environment OpenFOAM. The background motivation is to shift towards explicit density based solution strategy and thereby avoid using the pressure based algorithms which are currently proposed in the standard OpenFOAM release for Large-Eddy Simulation (LES). This shift is considered necessary in strongly compressible flows when Ma > 0.5. Our application of interest is related to the pre-mixing stage in direct injection gas engines where high injection pressures are typically utilized. First, the developed flow solver is discussed and validated. Then, the implementation of subsonic inflow conditions using a forcing region in combination with a simplified nozzle geometry is discussed and validated. After this, LES of mixing in compressible, round jets at Ma = 0.3, 0.5 and 0.65 are carried out. Respectively, the Reynolds numbers of the jets correspond to Re = 6000, 10000 and 13000. Results for two meshes are presented. The results imply that the present solver produces turbulent structures, resolves a range of turbulent eddy frequencies and gives also mesh independent results within satisfactory limits for mean flow and turbulence statistics.

  15. Large-eddy simulation of compressible turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squires, Kyle D.

    1991-01-01

    The increase in the range of length scales with increasing Reynolds number limits the direct simulation of turbulent flows to relatively simple geometries and low Reynolds numbers. However, since most flows of engineering interest occur at much higher Reynolds number than is currently within the capabilities of full simulation, prediction of these flow fields can only be obtained by solving some suitably-averaged set of governing equations. In the traditional Reynolds-averaged approach, the Navier-Stokes equations are averaged over time. This in turn yields correlations between various turbulence fluctuations. It is these terms, e.g. the Reynolds stresses, for which a turbulence model must be derived. Turbulence modeling of incompressible flows has received a great amount of attention in the literature. An area of research that has received comparatively less attention is the modeling of compressible turbulent flows. An approach to simulating compressible turbulence at high Reynolds numbers is through the use of Large-Eddy Simulation (LES). In LES the dependent variables are decomposed into a large-scale (resolved) component and a sub-grid scale component. It is the small-scale components of the velocity field which are presumably more homogeneous than the large scales and, therefore, more easily modeled. Thus, it seems plausible that simpler models, which should be more universal in character than those employed in second-order closure schemes, may be developed for LES of compressible turbulence. The objective of the present research, therefore, is to explore models for the Large-Eddy Simulation of compressible turbulent flows. Given the recent successes of Zeman in second order closure modeling of compressible turbulence, model development was guided by principals employed in second-order closures.

  16. Large-eddy Advection in Evapotranspiration Estimates from an Array of Eddy Covariance Towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, X.; Evett, S. R.; Gowda, P. H.; Colaizzi, P. D.; Aiken, R.

    2014-12-01

    Evapotranspiration was continuously measured by an array of eddy covariance systems and large weighting lysimeter in a sorghum in Bushland, Texas in 2014. The advective divergence from both horizontal and vertical directions were measured through profile measurements above canopy. All storage terms were integrated from the depth of soil heat flux plate to the height of eddy covariance measurement. Therefore, a comparison between the eddy covariance system and large weighing lysimeter was conducted on hourly and daily basis. The results for the discrepancy between eddy covariance towers and the lysimeter will be discussed in terms of advection and storage contributions in time domain and frequency domain.

  17. Large eddy simulations of compressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grete, Philipp

    2017-02-01

    Supersonic, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is thought to play an important role in many processes - especially in astrophysics, where detailed three-dimensional observations are scarce. Simulations can partially fill this gap and help to understand these processes. However, direct simulations with realistic parameters are often not feasible. Consequently, large eddy simulations (LES) have emerged as a viable alternative. In LES the overall complexity is reduced by simulating only large and intermediate scales directly. The smallest scales, usually referred to as subgrid-scales (SGS), are introduced to the simulation by means of an SGS model. Thus, the overall quality of an LES with respect to properly accounting for small-scale physics crucially depends on the quality of the SGS model. While there has been a lot of successful research on SGS models in the hydrodynamic regime for decades, SGS modeling in MHD is a rather recent topic, in particular, in the compressible regime. In this thesis, we derive and validate a new nonlinear MHD SGS model that explicitly takes compressibility effects into account. A filter is used to separate the large and intermediate scales, and it is thought to mimic finite resolution effects. In the derivation, we use a deconvolution approach on the filter kernel. With this approach, we are able to derive nonlinear closures for all SGS terms in MHD: the turbulent Reynolds and Maxwell stresses, and the turbulent electromotive force (EMF). We validate the new closures both a priori and a posteriori. In the a priori tests, we use high-resolution reference data of stationary, homogeneous, isotropic MHD turbulence to compare exact SGS quantities against predictions by the closures. The comparison includes, for example, correlations of turbulent fluxes, the average dissipative behavior, and alignment of SGS vectors such as the EMF. In order to quantify the performance of the new nonlinear closure, this comparison is conducted from the

  18. Large eddy simulation of cavitating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanaskandan, Aswin; Mahesh, Krishnan

    2014-11-01

    Large eddy simulation on unstructured grids is used to study hydrodynamic cavitation. The multiphase medium is represented using a homogeneous equilibrium model that assumes thermal equilibrium between the liquid and the vapor phase. Surface tension effects are ignored and the governing equations are the compressible Navier Stokes equations for the liquid/vapor mixture along with a transport equation for the vapor mass fraction. A characteristic-based filtering scheme is developed to handle shocks and material discontinuities in non-ideal gases and mixtures. A TVD filter is applied as a corrector step in a predictor-corrector approach with the predictor scheme being non-dissipative and symmetric. The method is validated for canonical one dimensional flows and leading edge cavitation over a hydrofoil, and applied to study sheet to cloud cavitation over a wedge. This work is supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  19. Large eddy simulations in 2030 and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Piomelli, U

    2014-01-01

    Since its introduction, in the early 1970s, large eddy simulations (LES) have advanced considerably, and their application is transitioning from the academic environment to industry. Several landmark developments can be identified over the past 40 years, such as the wall-resolved simulations of wall-bounded flows, the development of advanced models for the unresolved scales that adapt to the local flow conditions and the hybridization of LES with the solution of the Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes equations. Thanks to these advancements, LES is now in widespread use in the academic community and is an option available in most commercial flow-solvers. This paper will try to predict what algorithmic and modelling advancements are needed to make it even more robust and inexpensive, and which areas show the most promise. PMID:25024415

  20. Large-eddy simulation of propeller noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Jacob; Mahesh, Krishnan

    2016-11-01

    We will discuss our ongoing work towards developing the capability to predict far field sound from the large-eddy simulation of propellers. A porous surface Ffowcs-Williams and Hawkings (FW-H) acoustic analogy, with a dynamic endcapping method (Nitzkorski and Mahesh, 2014) is developed for unstructured grids in a rotating frame of reference. The FW-H surface is generated automatically using Delaunay triangulation and is representative of the underlying volume mesh. The approach is validated for tonal trailing edge sound from a NACA 0012 airfoil. LES of flow around a propeller at design advance ratio is compared to experiment and good agreement is obtained. Results for the emitted far field sound will be discussed. This work is supported by ONR.

  1. Autonomic Closure for Large Eddy Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Ryan; Hamlington, Peter; Dahm, Werner J. A.

    2015-11-01

    A new autonomic subgrid-scale closure has been developed for large eddy simulation (LES). The approach poses a supervised learning problem that captures nonlinear, nonlocal, and nonequilibrium turbulence effects without specifying a predefined turbulence model. By solving a regularized optimization problem on test filter scale quantities, the autonomic approach identifies a nonparametric function that represents the best local relation between subgrid stresses and resolved state variables. The optimized function is then applied at the grid scale to determine unknown LES subgrid stresses by invoking scale similarity in the inertial range. A priori tests of the autonomic approach on homogeneous isotropic turbulence show that the new approach is amenable to powerful optimization and machine learning methods and is successful for a wide range of filter scales in the inertial range. In these a priori tests, the autonomic closure substantially improves upon the dynamic Smagorinsky model in capturing the instantaneous, statistical, and energy transfer properties of the subgrid stress field.

  2. Large Eddy Simulation of turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moin, P.; Mansour, N. N.; Reynolds, W. C.; Ferziger, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    The conceptual foundation underlying Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is summarized, and the numerical methods developed for simulation of the time-developing turbulent mixing layer and turbulent plane Poiseuille flow are discussed. Computational results show that the average Reynolds stress profile nearly attains the equilibrium shape which balances the downstream mean pressure gradient in the regions away from the walls. In the vicinity of the walls, viscous stresses are shown to be significant; together with the Reynolds stresses, these stresses balance the mean pressure gradient. It is stressed that the subgrid scale contribution to the total Reynolds stress is significant only in the vicinity of the walls. The continued development of LES is urged.

  3. Large eddy simulations in 2030 and beyond.

    PubMed

    Piomelli, U

    2014-08-13

    Since its introduction, in the early 1970s, large eddy simulations (LES) have advanced considerably, and their application is transitioning from the academic environment to industry. Several landmark developments can be identified over the past 40 years, such as the wall-resolved simulations of wall-bounded flows, the development of advanced models for the unresolved scales that adapt to the local flow conditions and the hybridization of LES with the solution of the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. Thanks to these advancements, LES is now in widespread use in the academic community and is an option available in most commercial flow-solvers. This paper will try to predict what algorithmic and modelling advancements are needed to make it even more robust and inexpensive, and which areas show the most promise.

  4. Large eddy simulation applications in gas turbines.

    PubMed

    Menzies, Kevin

    2009-07-28

    The gas turbine presents significant challenges to any computational fluid dynamics techniques. The combination of a wide range of flow phenomena with complex geometry is difficult to model in the context of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solvers. We review the potential for large eddy simulation (LES) in modelling the flow in the different components of the gas turbine during a practical engineering design cycle. We show that while LES has demonstrated considerable promise for reliable prediction of many flows in the engine that are difficult for RANS it is not a panacea and considerable application challenges remain. However, for many flows, especially those dominated by shear layer mixing such as in combustion chambers and exhausts, LES has demonstrated a clear superiority over RANS for moderately complex geometries although at significantly higher cost which will remain an issue in making the calculations relevant within the design cycle.

  5. Large-eddy simulations with wall models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabot, W.

    1995-01-01

    The near-wall viscous and buffer regions of wall-bounded flows generally require a large expenditure of computational resources to be resolved adequately, even in large-eddy simulation (LES). Often as much as 50% of the grid points in a computational domain are devoted to these regions. The dense grids that this implies also generally require small time steps for numerical stability and/or accuracy. It is commonly assumed that the inner wall layers are near equilibrium, so that the standard logarithmic law can be applied as the boundary condition for the wall stress well away from the wall, for example, in the logarithmic region, obviating the need to expend large amounts of grid points and computational time in this region. This approach is commonly employed in LES of planetary boundary layers, and it has also been used for some simple engineering flows. In order to calculate accurately a wall-bounded flow with coarse wall resolution, one requires the wall stress as a boundary condition. The goal of this work is to determine the extent to which equilibrium and boundary layer assumptions are valid in the near-wall regions, to develop models for the inner layer based on such assumptions, and to test these modeling ideas in some relatively simple flows with different pressure gradients, such as channel flow and flow over a backward-facing step. Ultimately, models that perform adequately in these situations will be applied to more complex flow configurations, such as an airfoil.

  6. Application of large eddy interaction model to a mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, S. N. B.

    1989-01-01

    The large eddy interaction model (LEIM) is a statistical model of turbulence based on the interaction of selected eddies with the mean flow and all of the eddies in a turbulent shear flow. It can be utilized as the starting point for obtaining physical structures in the flow. The possible application of the LEIM to a mixing layer formed between two parallel, incompressible flows with a small temperature difference is developed by invoking a detailed similarity between the spectra of velocity and temperature.

  7. Large eddy simulations of laminar separation bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadieux, Francois

    The flow over blades and airfoils at moderate angles of attack and Reynolds numbers ranging from ten thousand to a few hundred thousands undergoes separation due to the adverse pressure gradient generated by surface curvature. In many cases, the separated shear layer then transitions to turbulence and reattaches, closing off a recirculation region -- the laminar separation bubble. To avoid body-fitted mesh generation problems and numerical issues, an equivalent problem for flow over a flat plate is formulated by imposing boundary conditions that lead to a pressure distribution and Reynolds number that are similar to those on airfoils. Spalart & Strelet (2000) tested a number of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulence models for a laminar separation bubble flow over a flat plate. Although results with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model were encouraging, none of the turbulence models tested reliably recovered time-averaged direct numerical simulation (DNS) results. The purpose of this work is to assess whether large eddy simulation (LES) can more accurately and reliably recover DNS results using drastically reduced resolution -- on the order of 1% of DNS resolution which is commonly achievable for LES of turbulent channel flows. LES of a laminar separation bubble flow over a flat plate are performed using a compressible sixth-order finite-difference code and two incompressible pseudo-spectral Navier-Stokes solvers at resolutions corresponding to approximately 3% and 1% of the chosen DNS benchmark by Spalart & Strelet (2000). The finite-difference solver is found to be dissipative due to the use of a stability-enhancing filter. Its numerical dissipation is quantified and found to be comparable to the average eddy viscosity of the dynamic Smagorinsky model, making it difficult to separate the effects of filtering versus those of explicit subgrid-scale modeling. The negligible numerical dissipation of the pseudo-spectral solvers allows an unambiguous

  8. Large eddy simulation of trailing edge noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Jacob; Nitzkorski, Zane; Mahesh, Krishnan

    2015-11-01

    Noise generation is an important engineering constraint to many marine vehicles. A significant portion of the noise comes from propellers and rotors, specifically due to flow interactions at the trailing edge. Large eddy simulation is used to investigate the noise produced by a turbulent 45 degree beveled trailing edge and a NACA 0012 airfoil. A porous surface Ffowcs-Williams and Hawkings acoustic analogy is combined with a dynamic endcapping method to compute the sound. This methodology allows for the impact of incident flow noise versus the total noise to be assessed. LES results for the 45 degree beveled trailing edge are compared to experiment at M = 0 . 1 and Rec = 1 . 9 e 6 . The effect of boundary layer thickness on sound production is investigated by computing using both the experimental boundary layer thickness and a thinner boundary layer. Direct numerical simulation results of the NACA 0012 are compared to available data at M = 0 . 4 and Rec = 5 . 0 e 4 for both the hydrodynamic field and the acoustic field. Sound intensities and directivities are investigated and compared. Finally, some of the physical mechanisms of far-field noise generation, common to the two configurations, are discussed. Supported by Office of Naval research.

  9. Turbulence topologies predicted using large eddy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bing-Chen; Bergstrom, Donald J.; Yin, Jing; Yee, Eugene

    In this paper, turbulence topologies related to the invariants of the resolved velocity gradient and strain rate tensors are studied based on large eddy simulation. The numerical results presented in the paper were obtained using two dynamic models, namely, the conventional dynamic model of Lilly and a recently developed dynamic nonlinear subgrid scale (SGS) model. In contrast to most of the previous research investigations which have mainly focused on isotropic turbulence, the present study examines the influence of near-wall anisotropy on the flow topologies. The SGS effect on the so-called SGS dissipation of the discriminant is examined and it is shown that the SGS stress contributes to the deviation of the flow topology of real turbulence from that of the ideal restricted Euler flow. The turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) transfer between the resolved and subgrid scales of motion is studied, and the forward and backward scatters of TKE are quantified in the invariant phase plane. Some interesting phenomenological results have also been obtained, including a wing-shaped contour pattern for the density of the resolved enstrophy generation and the near-wall dissipation shift of the peak location (mode) in the joint probability density function of the invariants of the resolved strain rate tensor. The newly observed turbulence phenomenologies are believed to be important and an effort has been made to explain them on an analytical basis.

  10. Tidal generation of large sub-mesoscale eddy dipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callendar, W.; Klymak, J. M.; Foreman, M. G. G.

    2011-04-01

    Numerical simulations of tidal flow past Cape St. James on the south tip of Haida Gwai (Queen Charlotte Islands) are presented that indicate mesoscale dipoles are formed from coalescing tidal eddies. Observations in this region demonstrate robust eddy generation at the Cape, with the primary process being flow separation of buoyant or wind driven outflows forming large anti-cyclonic, negative potential vorticity, Haida Eddies. However, there are other times where dipoles are observed in satellites, indicating a source of positive potential vorticity must also be present. The simulations here build on previous work that implicates oscillating tidal flow past the cape in creating the positive vorticity. Small headland eddies of alternating vorticity are created each tide. During certain tidal cycles, the headland eddies coalesce and self organize in such a way as to create large >20-km diameter eddies that then self-advect into deep water. The self advection speed is faster than the beta drift of anti-cyclones, and the propagation direction appears to be more southerly than typical Haida Eddies, though the model contains no mean wind-driven flows. These eddies are smaller than Haida Eddies, but given their tidal origin, may represent a more consistent source of coastal water that is injected into to the interior of the subpolar gyre.

  11. Tidal generation of large sub-mesoscale eddy dipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callendar, W.; Klymak, J. M.; Foreman, M. G. G.

    2011-08-01

    Numerical simulations of tidal flow past Cape St. James on the south tip of Haida Gwaii (Queen Charlotte Islands) are presented that indicate mesoscale dipoles are formed from coalescing tidal eddies. Observations in this region demonstrate robust eddy generation at the Cape, with the primary process being flow separation of buoyant or wind driven outflows forming large anti-cyclonic, negative potential vorticity, Haida Eddies. However, there are other times where dipoles are observed in satellites, indicating a source of positive potential vorticity must also be present. The simulations here build on previous work that implicates oscillating tidal flow past the cape in creating the positive vorticity. Small headland eddies of alternating vorticity are created each tide. During certain tidal cycles, the headland eddies coalesce and self organize in such a way as to create large >20-km diameter eddies that then self-advect into deep water. The self advection speed is faster than the beta drift of anti-cyclones, and the propagation direction appears to be more southerly than typical Haida Eddies, though the model contains no mean wind-driven flows. These eddies are smaller than Haida Eddies, but given their tidal origin, may represent a more consistent source of coastal water that is injected into the interior of the subpolar gyre.

  12. Large Eddy Simulation of Powered Fontan Hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Delorme, Y.; Anupindi, K.; Kerlo, A.E.; Shetty, D.; Rodefeld, M.; Chen, J.; Frankel, S.

    2012-01-01

    Children born with univentricular heart disease typically must undergo three open heart surgeries within the first 2–3 years of life to eventually establish the Fontan circulation. In that case the single working ventricle pumps oxygenated blood to the body and blood returns to the lungs flowing passively through the Total Cavopulmonary Connection (TCPC) rather than being actively pumped by a subpulmonary ventricle. The TCPC is a direct surgical connection between the superior and inferior vena cava and the left and right pulmonary arteries. We have postulated that a mechanical pump inserted into this circulation providing a 3–5 mmHg pressure augmentation will reestablish bi-ventricular physiology serving as a bridge-to-recovery, bridge-to-transplant or destination therapy as a “biventricular Fontan” circulation. The Viscous Impeller Pump (VIP) has been proposed by our group as such an assist device. It is situated in the center of the 4-way TCPC intersection and spins pulling blood from the vena cavae and pushing it into the pulmonary arteries. We hypothesized that Large Eddy Simulation (LES) using high-order numerical methods are needed to capture unsteady powered and unpowered Fontan hemodynamics. Inclusion of a mechanical pump into the CFD further complicates matters due to the need to account for rotating machinery. In this study, we focus on predictions from an in-house high-order LES code (WenoHemo™) for unpowered and VIP-powered idealized TCPC hemodynamics with quantitative comparisons to Stereoscopic Particle Imaging Velocimetry (SPIV) measurements. Results are presented for both instantaneous flow structures and statistical data. Simulations show good qualitative and quantitative agreement with measured data. PMID:23177085

  13. Large eddy simulation of powered Fontan hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Delorme, Y; Anupindi, K; Kerlo, A E; Shetty, D; Rodefeld, M; Chen, J; Frankel, S

    2013-01-18

    Children born with univentricular heart disease typically must undergo three open heart surgeries within the first 2-3 years of life to eventually establish the Fontan circulation. In that case the single working ventricle pumps oxygenated blood to the body and blood returns to the lungs flowing passively through the Total Cavopulmonary Connection (TCPC) rather than being actively pumped by a subpulmonary ventricle. The TCPC is a direct surgical connection between the superior and inferior vena cava and the left and right pulmonary arteries. We have postulated that a mechanical pump inserted into this circulation providing a 3-5 mmHg pressure augmentation will reestablish bi-ventricular physiology serving as a bridge-to-recovery, bridge-to-transplant or destination therapy as a "biventricular Fontan" circulation. The Viscous Impeller Pump (VIP) has been proposed by our group as such an assist device. It is situated in the center of the 4-way TCPC intersection and spins pulling blood from the vena cavae and pushing it into the pulmonary arteries. We hypothesized that Large Eddy Simulation (LES) using high-order numerical methods are needed to capture unsteady powered and unpowered Fontan hemodynamics. Inclusion of a mechanical pump into the CFD further complicates matters due to the need to account for rotating machinery. In this study, we focus on predictions from an in-house high-order LES code (WenoHemo(TM)) for unpowered and VIP-powered idealized TCPC hemodynamics with quantitative comparisons to Stereoscopic Particle Imaging Velocimetry (SPIV) measurements. Results are presented for both instantaneous flow structures and statistical data. Simulations show good qualitative and quantitative agreement with measured data.

  14. Scalar excursions in large-eddy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matheou, Georgios; Dimotakis, Paul E.

    2016-12-01

    The range of values of scalar fields in turbulent flows is bounded by their boundary values, for passive scalars, and by a combination of boundary values, reaction rates, phase changes, etc., for active scalars. The current investigation focuses on the local conservation of passive scalar concentration fields and the ability of the large-eddy simulation (LES) method to observe the boundedness of passive scalar concentrations. In practice, as a result of numerical artifacts, this fundamental constraint is often violated with scalars exhibiting unphysical excursions. The present study characterizes passive-scalar excursions in LES of a shear flow and examines methods for diagnosis and assesment of the problem. The analysis of scalar-excursion statistics provides support of the main hypothesis of the current study that unphysical scalar excursions in LES result from dispersive errors of the convection-term discretization where the subgrid-scale model (SGS) provides insufficient dissipation to produce a sufficiently smooth scalar field. In the LES runs three parameters are varied: the discretization of the convection terms, the SGS model, and grid resolution. Unphysical scalar excursions decrease as the order of accuracy of non-dissipative schemes is increased, but the improvement rate decreases with increasing order of accuracy. Two SGS models are examined, the stretched-vortex and a constant-coefficient Smagorinsky. Scalar excursions strongly depend on the SGS model. The excursions are significantly reduced when the characteristic SGS scale is set to double the grid spacing in runs with the stretched-vortex model. The maximum excursion and volume fraction of excursions outside boundary values show opposite trends with respect to resolution. The maximum unphysical excursions increase as resolution increases, whereas the volume fraction decreases. The reason for the increase in the maximum excursion is statistical and traceable to the number of grid points (sample size

  15. Large Eddy Simulation of Cirrus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Ting; Cotton, William R.

    1999-01-01

    The Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) with mesoscale interactive nested-grids and a Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) version of RAMS, coupled to two-moment microphysics and a new two-stream radiative code were used to investigate the dynamic, microphysical, and radiative aspects of the November 26, 1991 cirrus event. Wu (1998) describes the results of that research in full detail and is enclosed as Appendix 1. The mesoscale nested grid simulation successfully reproduced the large scale circulation as compared to the Mesoscale Analysis and Prediction System's (MAPS) analyses and other observations. Three cloud bands which match nicely to the three cloud lines identified in an observational study (Mace et al., 1995) are predicted on Grid #2 of the nested grids, even though the mesoscale simulation predicts a larger west-east cloud width than what was observed. Large-eddy simulations (LES) were performed to study the dynamical, microphysical, and radiative processes in the 26 November 1991 FIRE 11 cirrus event. The LES model is based on the RAMS version 3b developed at Colorado State University. It includes a new radiation scheme developed by Harrington (1997) and a new subgrid scale model developed by Kosovic (1996). The LES model simulated a single cloud layer for Case 1 and a two-layer cloud structure for Case 2. The simulations demonstrated that latent heat release can play a significant role in the formation and development of cirrus clouds. For the thin cirrus in Case 1, the latent heat release was insufficient for the cirrus clouds to become positively buoyant. However, in some special cases such as Case 2, positively buoyant cells can be embedded within the cirrus layers. These cells were so active that the rising updraft induced its own pressure perturbations that affected the cloud evolution. Vertical profiles of the total radiative and latent heating rates indicated that for well developed, deep, and active cirrus clouds, radiative cooling and latent

  16. Effects of Eddy Viscosity on Time Correlations in Large Eddy Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Guowei; Rubinstein, R.; Wang, Lian-Ping; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Subgrid-scale (SGS) models for large. eddy simulation (LES) have generally been evaluated by their ability to predict single-time statistics of turbulent flows such as kinetic energy and Reynolds stresses. Recent application- of large eddy simulation to the evaluation of sound sources in turbulent flows, a problem in which time, correlations determine the frequency distribution of acoustic radiation, suggest that subgrid models should also be evaluated by their ability to predict time correlations in turbulent flows. This paper compares the two-point, two-time Eulerian velocity correlation evaluated from direct numerical simulation (DNS) with that evaluated from LES, using a spectral eddy viscosity, for isotropic homogeneous turbulence. It is found that the LES fields are too coherent, in the sense that their time correlations decay more slowly than the corresponding time. correlations in the DNS fields. This observation is confirmed by theoretical estimates of time correlations using the Taylor expansion technique. Tile reason for the slower decay is that the eddy viscosity does not include the random backscatter, which decorrelates fluid motion at large scales. An effective eddy viscosity associated with time correlations is formulated, to which the eddy viscosity associated with energy transfer is a leading order approximation.

  17. New Distributed Multipole Methods for Accurate Electrostatics for Large-Scale Biomolecular Simultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagui, Celeste

    2006-03-01

    An accurate and numerically efficient treatment of electrostatics is essential for biomolecular simulations, as this stabilizes much of the delicate 3-d structure associated with biomolecules. Currently, force fields such as AMBER and CHARMM assign ``partial charges'' to every atom in a simulation in order to model the interatomic electrostatic forces, so that the calculation of the electrostatics rapidly becomes the computational bottleneck in large-scale simulations. There are two main issues associated with the current treatment of classical electrostatics: (i) how does one eliminate the artifacts associated with the point-charges (e.g., the underdetermined nature of the current RESP fitting procedure for large, flexible molecules) used in the force fields in a physically meaningful way? (ii) how does one efficiently simulate the very costly long-range electrostatic interactions? Recently, we have dealt with both of these challenges as follows. In order to improve the description of the molecular electrostatic potentials (MEPs), a new distributed multipole analysis based on localized functions -- Wannier, Boys, and Edminston-Ruedenberg -- was introduced, which allows for a first principles calculation of the partial charges and multipoles. Through a suitable generalization of the particle mesh Ewald (PME) and multigrid method, one can treat electrostatic multipoles all the way to hexadecapoles all without prohibitive extra costs. The importance of these methods for large-scale simulations will be discussed, and examplified by simulations from polarizable DNA models.

  18. Stochastic Large Eddy Simulation of Geostrophic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadiga, B.; Livescu, D.; McKay, C. Q.

    2005-05-01

    Results are presented of (fine-scale) eddy-resolving simulations of different instances of turbulent quasi-geostrophic ocean circulation. A stochastic model for the effects of neglected subgrid degrees-of-freedom in coarse-scale simulations is proposed and the results compared to the fine simulations results as well as with existing models. As a precursor to the introduction of the models, we also study various aspects of the nonlinear rectification of stochastic forcing in quasi-geostrophic models of ocean circulation.

  19. Convergence of finite element approximations of large eddy motion.

    SciTech Connect

    Iliescu, T.; John, V.; Layton, W. J.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Otto-von-Guericke Univ.; Univ. of Pittsburgh

    2002-11-01

    This report considers 'numerical errors' in LES. Specifically, for one family of space filtered flow models, we show convergence of the finite element approximation of the model and give an estimate of the error. Keywords: Navier Stokes equations, large eddy simulation, finite element method I. INTRODUCTION Consider the (turbulent) flow of an incompressible fluid. One promising and common approach to the simulation of the motion of the large fluid structures is Large Eddy Simulation (LES). Various models are used in LES; a common one is to find (w, q), where w : {Omega}

  20. Large-Eddy Simulation of Wind-Plant Aerodynamics: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Churchfield, M. J.; Lee, S.; Moriarty, P. J.; Martinez, L. A.; Leonardi, S.; Vijayakumar, G.; Brasseur, J. G.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we present results of a large-eddy simulation of the 48 multi-megawatt turbines composing the Lillgrund wind plant. Turbulent inflow wind is created by performing an atmospheric boundary layer precursor simulation and turbines are modeled using a rotating, variable-speed actuator line representation. The motivation for this work is that few others have done wind plant large-eddy simulations with a substantial number of turbines, and the methods for carrying out the simulations are varied. We wish to draw upon the strengths of the existing simulations and our growing atmospheric large-eddy simulation capability to create a sound methodology for performing this type of simulation. We have used the OpenFOAM CFD toolbox to create our solver.

  1. Large Eddy Simulations and Turbulence Modeling for Film Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acharya, Sumanta

    1999-01-01

    The objective of the research is to perform Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) and Large Eddy Simulations (LES) for film cooling process, and to evaluate and improve advanced forms of the two equation turbulence models for turbine blade surface flow analysis. The DNS/LES were used to resolve the large eddies within the flow field near the coolant jet location. The work involved code development and applications of the codes developed to the film cooling problems. Five different codes were developed and utilized to perform this research. This report presented a summary of the development of the codes and their applications to analyze the turbulence properties at locations near coolant injection holes.

  2. NASA's Large-Eddy Simulation Research for Jet Noise Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeBonis, James R.

    2009-01-01

    Research into large-eddy simulation (LES) for application to jet noise is described. The LES efforts include in-house code development and application at NASA Glenn along with NASA Research Announcement sponsored work at Stanford University and Florida State University. Details of the computational methods used and sample results for jet flows are provided.

  3. Mind the gap: a guideline for large eddy simulation.

    PubMed

    George, William K; Tutkun, Murat

    2009-07-28

    This paper briefly reviews some of the fundamental ideas of turbulence as they relate to large eddy simulation (LES). Of special interest is how our thinking about the so-called 'spectral gap' has evolved over the past decade, and what this evolution implies for LES applications.

  4. Eddy-current examination of large-diameter insulated pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, J.C.

    1996-12-31

    A new concept eddy-current technique has been developed to examine large-diameter insulated pipes without removing the insulation, and in many cases, without securing system operation. The new concept allows the in-place examination of piping systems using an encircling eddy-current coil that is a proven eddy-current technology. Eliminating the requirement to secure or drain the system or to remove the insulation from the pipe provides significant cost savings. The new concept also provides a significantly higher percentage of inspection volume coverage than ultrasonic techniques despite limitations of pipe brackets and other physical obstructions. The technique has been demonstrated on copper, copper nickel and limited carbon steel pipe ranging from 4 to 8 inches in diameter with insulation thicknesses from 1 to 2 inches.

  5. Large-Eddy Simulation of Wind-Plant Aerodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Churchfield, M. J.; Lee, S.; Moriarty, P. J.; Martinez, L. A.; Leonardi, S.; Vijayakumar, G.; Brasseur, J. G.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we present results of a large-eddy simulation of the 48 multi-megawatt turbines composing the Lillgrund wind plant. Turbulent inflow wind is created by performing an atmospheric boundary layer precursor simulation, and turbines are modeled using a rotating, variable-speed actuator line representation. The motivation for this work is that few others have done large-eddy simulations of wind plants with a substantial number of turbines, and the methods for carrying out the simulations are varied. We wish to draw upon the strengths of the existing simulations and our growing atmospheric large-eddy simulation capability to create a sound methodology for performing this type of simulation. We used the OpenFOAM CFD toolbox to create our solver. The simulated time-averaged power production of the turbines in the plant agrees well with field observations, except with the sixth turbine and beyond in each wind-aligned. The power produced by each of those turbines is overpredicted by 25-40%. A direct comparison between simulated and field data is difficult because we simulate one wind direction with a speed and turbulence intensity characteristic of Lillgrund, but the field observations were taken over a year of varying conditions. The simulation shows the significant 60-70% decrease in the performance of the turbines behind the front row in this plant that has a spacing of 4.3 rotor diameters in this direction. The overall plant efficiency is well predicted. This work shows the importance of using local grid refinement to simultaneously capture the meter-scale details of the turbine wake and the kilometer-scale turbulent atmospheric structures. Although this work illustrates the power of large-eddy simulation in producing a time-accurate solution, it required about one million processor-hours, showing the significant cost of large-eddy simulation.

  6. Constrained Large Eddy Simulation of Separated Turbulent Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Zhenhua; Shi, Yipeng; Wang, Jianchun; Xiao, Zuoli; Yang, Yantao; Chen, Shiyi

    2011-11-01

    Constrained Large-eddy Simulation (CLES) has been recently proposed to simulate turbulent flows with massive separation. Different from traditional large eddy simulation (LES) and hybrid RANS/LES approaches, the CLES simulates the whole flow domain by large eddy simulation while enforcing a RANS Reynolds stress constraint on the subgrid-scale (SGS) stress models in the near-wall region. Algebraic eddy-viscosity models and one-equation Spalart-Allmaras (S-A) model have been used to constrain the Reynolds stress. The CLES approach is validated a posteriori through simulation of flow past a circular cylinder and periodic hill flow at high Reynolds numbers. The simulation results are compared with those from RANS, DES, DDES and other available hybrid RANS/LES methods. It is shown that the capability of the CLES method in predicting separated flows is comparable to that of DES. Detailed discussions are also presented about the effects of the RANS models as constraint in the near-wall layers. Our results demonstrate that the CLES method is a promising alternative towards engineering applications.

  7. Spectral analysis of large-eddy advection in ET from eddy covariance towers and a large weighting lysimeter

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Evapotranspiration was continuously measured by an array of eddy covariance systems and large weighting lysimeter in a cotton field in Bushland, Texas. The advective divergence from both horizontal and vertical directions were measured through profile measurements above canopy. All storage terms wer...

  8. Large Eddy Simulation of Homogeneous Rotating Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squires, Kyle D.; Mansour, Nagi N.; Cambon, Claude; Chasnov, Jeffrey R.; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Study of turbulent flows in rotating reference frames has proven to be one of the more challenging areas of turbulence research. The large number of theoretical, experimental, and computational studies performed over the years have demonstrated that the effect of solid-body rotation on turbulent flows is subtle and remains exceedingly difficult to predict. Because of the complexities associated with non-homogeneous turbulence, it is worthwhile to examine the effect of steady system rotation on the evolution of an initially isotropic turbulent flow. The assumption of statistical homogeneity considerably simplifies analysis and computation; calculation of homogeneous turbulence is further motivated since it possesses the essential physics found in more complex rotating flows. The principal objectives of the present study have therefore been to increase our fundamental understanding of turbulent flows in rotating reference frames through an examination of the asymptotic state of homogeneous rotating turbulence; particularly as to the existence of an asymptotic state which is self similar. Knowledge of an asymptotic similarity state permits prediction of the ultimate statistical evolution of the flow without requiring detailed knowledge of the complex, and not well understood, non-linear transfer processes. Aside from examination of possible similarity states in rotating turbulence, of further interest in this study has been an examination of the degree to which solid-body rotation induces a two-dimensional state in an initially isotropic flow.

  9. Large-eddy simulation formulation and implementation in HYDRA

    SciTech Connect

    McCallen, R.

    1995-12-05

    This report provides the equation formulation for a large-eddy simulation (LES) approach and Smagorinsky subgrid-scale (SGS) model for incompressible flow using the finite element method (FEM). This report also outlines the model implementation in the computer code HYDRA and the results of a coding check. The check was accomplished by running simple two- and three-element problems for a specified velocity field. The values of the eddy viscosity (the coefficient of proportionality in the SGS eddy diffusion model), the SGS diffusion term, and overall diffusion term (molecular plus SGS plus balancing tensor diffusivity) were compared to known hand-calculated values. Coding checks are best done by comparing the code-calculated solution to known analytical solutions. However, with LES turbulence modeling, these analytical solutions do not exist. It is also impossible to determine that the eddy viscosity is free of coding errors when performing code validation by comparing the LES to direct numerical simulations (DNS) (i.e., fine discretization with no turbulence model) or experimental results. Therefore, the coding checks presented here for a specified velocity field are necessary.

  10. Toward the large-eddy simulations of compressible turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erlebacher, G.; Hussaini, M. Y.; Speziale, C. G.; Zang, T. A.

    1987-01-01

    New subgrid-scale models for the large-eddy simulation of compressible turbulent flows are developed based on the Favre-filtered equations of motion for an ideal gas. A compressible generalization of the linear combination of the Smagorinsky model and scale-similarity model (in terms of Favre-filtered fields) is obtained for the subgrid-scale stress tensor. An analogous thermal linear combination model is also developed for the subgrid-scale heat flux vector. The three dimensionless constants associated with these subgrid-scale models are obtained by correlating with the results of direct numerical simulations of compressible isotropic turbulence performed on a 96 to the third power grid using Fourier collocation methods. Extensive comparisons between the direct and modeled subgrid-scale fields are provided in order to validate the models. Future applications of these compressible subgrid-scale models to the large-eddy simulation of supersonic aerodynamic flows are discussed briefly.

  11. The prospect of using large eddy and detached eddy simulations in engineering design, and the research required to get there

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Johan; Wang, Qiqi

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we try to look into the future to envision how large eddy and detached eddy simulations will be used in the engineering design process about 20–30 years from now. Some key challenges specific to the engineering design process are identified, and some of the critical outstanding problems and promising research directions are discussed. PMID:25024421

  12. The prospect of using large eddy and detached eddy simulations in engineering design, and the research required to get there.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Johan; Wang, Qiqi

    2014-08-13

    In this paper, we try to look into the future to envision how large eddy and detached eddy simulations will be used in the engineering design process about 20-30 years from now. Some key challenges specific to the engineering design process are identified, and some of the critical outstanding problems and promising research directions are discussed.

  13. Large-Eddy Simulations of Dust Devils and Convective Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiga, Aymeric; Barth, Erika; Gu, Zhaolin; Hoffmann, Fabian; Ito, Junshi; Jemmett-Smith, Bradley; Klose, Martina; Nishizawa, Seiya; Raasch, Siegfried; Rafkin, Scot; Takemi, Tetsuya; Tyler, Daniel; Wei, Wei

    2016-11-01

    In this review, we address the use of numerical computations called Large-Eddy Simulations (LES) to study dust devils, and the more general class of atmospheric phenomena they belong to (convective vortices). We describe the main elements of the LES methodology. We review the properties, statistics, and variability of dust devils and convective vortices resolved by LES in both terrestrial and Martian environments. The current challenges faced by modelers using LES for dust devils are also discussed in detail.

  14. Large-Eddy Simulation of turbine wake in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, J.; Troldborg, N.; Sørensen, N. N.; Patton, E. G.; Sullivan, P. P.

    2017-05-01

    We present Large-Eddy Simulation results of a turbine wake in realistic complex terrain with slopes above 0.5. By comparing simulations including and without the wind turbine we can estimate the induction factor, a, and we show how the presence of a strong recirculation zone in the terrain dictates the positioning of the wake. This last finding is in contrast to what would happen in gentle terrain with no substantial increase of turbulent kinetic energy in the terrain induced wakes.

  15. Toward large eddy simulation of turbulent flow over an airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Haecheon

    1993-01-01

    The flow field over an airfoil contains several distinct flow characteristics, e.g. laminar, transitional, turbulent boundary layer flow, flow separation, unstable free shear layers, and a wake. This diversity of flow regimes taxes the presently available Reynolds averaged turbulence models. Such models are generally tuned to predict a particular flow regime, and adjustments are necessary for the prediction of a different flow regime. Similar difficulties are likely to emerge when the large eddy simulation technique is applied with the widely used Smagorinsky model. This model has not been successful in correctly representing different turbulent flow fields with a single universal constant and has an incorrect near-wall behavior. Germano et al. (1991) and Ghosal, Lund & Moin have developed a new subgrid-scale model, the dynamic model, which is very promising in alleviating many of the persistent inadequacies of the Smagorinsky model: the model coefficient is computed dynamically as the calculation progresses rather than input a priori. The model has been remarkably successful in prediction of several turbulent and transitional flows. We plan to simulate turbulent flow over a '2D' airfoil using the large eddy simulation technique. Our primary objective is to assess the performance of the newly developed dynamic subgrid-scale model for computation of complex flows about aircraft components and to compare the results with those obtained using the Reynolds average approach and experiments. The present computation represents the first application of large eddy simulation to a flow of aeronautical interest and a key demonstration of the capabilities of the large eddy simulation technique.

  16. Toward the large-eddy simulation of compressible turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erlebacher, G.; Hussaini, M. Y.; Speziale, C. G.; Zang, T. A.

    1990-01-01

    New subgrid-scale models for the large-eddy simulation of compressible turbulent flows are developed and tested based on the Favre-filtered equations of motion for an ideal gas. A compressible generalization of the linear combination of the Smagorinsky model and scale-similarity model, in terms of Favre-filtered fields, is obtained for the subgrid-scale stress tensor. An analogous thermal linear combination model is also developed for the subgrid-scale heat flux vector. The two dimensionless constants associated with these subgrid-scale models are obtained by correlating with the results of direct numerical simulations of compressible isotropic turbulence performed on a 96(exp 3) grid using Fourier collocation methods. Extensive comparisons between the direct and modeled subgrid-scale fields are provided in order to validate the models. A large-eddy simulation of the decay of compressible isotropic turbulence (conducted on a coarse 32(exp 3) grid) is shown to yield results that are in excellent agreement with the fine grid direct simulation. Future applications of these compressible subgrid-scale models to the large-eddy simulation of more complex supersonic flows are discussed briefly.

  17. Large eddy simulation of the atmosphere on various scales.

    PubMed

    Cullen, M J P; Brown, A R

    2009-07-28

    Numerical simulations of the atmosphere are routinely carried out on various scales for purposes ranging from weather forecasts for local areas a few hours ahead to forecasts of climate change over periods of hundreds of years. Almost without exception, these forecasts are made with space/time-averaged versions of the governing Navier-Stokes equations and laws of thermodynamics, together with additional terms representing internal and boundary forcing. The calculations are a form of large eddy modelling, because the subgrid-scale processes have to be modelled. In the global atmospheric models used for long-term predictions, the primary method is implicit large eddy modelling, using discretization to perform the averaging, supplemented by specialized subgrid models, where there is organized small-scale activity, such as in the lower boundary layer and near active convection. Smaller scale models used for local or short-range forecasts can use a much smaller averaging scale. This allows some of the specialized subgrid models to be dropped in favour of direct simulations. In research mode, the same models can be run as a conventional large eddy simulation only a few orders of magnitude away from a direct simulation. These simulations can then be used in the development of the subgrid models for coarser resolution models.

  18. Applications of large eddy simulation methods to gyrokinetic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Bañón Navarro, A. Happel, T.; Teaca, B. [Applied Mathematics Research Centre, Coventry University, Coventry CV1 5FB; Max-Planck für Sonnensystemforschung, Max-Planck-Str. 2, D-37191 Katlenburg-Lindau; Max-Planck Jenko, F. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching; Max-Planck Hammett, G. W. [Max-Planck Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2014-03-15

    The large eddy simulation (LES) approach—solving numerically the large scales of a turbulent system and accounting for the small-scale influence through a model—is applied to nonlinear gyrokinetic systems that are driven by a number of different microinstabilities. Comparisons between modeled, lower resolution, and higher resolution simulations are performed for an experimental measurable quantity, the electron density fluctuation spectrum. Moreover, the validation and applicability of LES is demonstrated through a series of diagnostics based on the free energetics of the system.

  19. Model consistency in large eddy simulation of turbulent channel flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piomelli, Ugo; Ferziger, Joel H.; Moin, Parviz

    1988-01-01

    Combinations of filters and subgrid scale stress models for large eddy simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations are examined by a priori tests and numerical simulations. The structure of the subgrid scales is found to depend strongly on the type of filter used, and consistency between model and filter is essential to ensure accurate results. The implementation of consistent combinations of filter and model gives more accurate turbulence statistics than those obtained in previous investigations in which the models were chosen independently from the filter. Results and limitations of the a priori test are discussed. The effect of grid refinement is also examined.

  20. Large eddy simulation of the flow in a transpired channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piomelli, Ugo; Moin, Parviz; Ferziger, Joel

    1989-01-01

    The flow in a transpired channel has been computed by large eddy simulation. The numerical results compare very well with experimental data. Blowing decreases the wall shear stress and enhances turbulent fluctuations, while suction has the opposite effect. The wall layer thickness normalized by the local wall shear velocity and kinematic viscosity increases on the blowing side of the channel and decreases on the suction side. Suction causes more rapid decay of the spectra, larger mean streak spacing and higher two-point correlations. On the blowing side, the wall layer structures lie at a steeper angle to the wall, whereas on the suction side this angle is shallower.

  1. Contrail Formation in Aircraft Wakes Using Large-Eddy Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paoli, R.; Helie, J.; Poinsot, T. J.; Ghosal, S.

    2002-01-01

    In this work we analyze the issue of the formation of condensation trails ("contrails") in the near-field of an aircraft wake. The basic configuration consists in an exhaust engine jet interacting with a wing-tip training vortex. The procedure adopted relies on a mixed Eulerian/Lagrangian two-phase flow approach; a simple micro-physics model for ice growth has been used to couple ice and vapor phases. Large eddy simulations have carried out at a realistic flight Reynolds number to evaluate the effects of turbulent mixing and wake vortex dynamics on ice-growth characteristics and vapor thermodynamic properties.

  2. Large-eddy simulation of turbulent sheared convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sykes, R. I.; Henn, D. S.

    1989-04-01

    A series of large-eddy simulations of free and sheared convective flow between moving flat plates is presented. Results for free convection are compared with laboratory data. The ratio of friction velocity to the convective velocity scale is identified as an important parameter in sheared convective flow, determining the formation of longitudinal rolls. Rolls are found for ratios greater than 0.35, with aspect ratio decreasing as this parameter increases. It is shown that, in this regime, two-dimensional simulations with a proper choice of roll orientation and turbulence length-scale can produce correct velocity variances and roll aspect ratio.

  3. Laminar flow transition: A large-eddy simulation approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biringen, S.

    1982-01-01

    A vectorized, semi-implicit code was developed for the solution of the time-dependent, three dimensional equations of motion in plane Poiseuille flow by the large-eddy simulation technique. The code is tested by comparing results with those obtained from the solutions of the Orr-Sommerfeld equation. Comparisons indicate that finite-differences employed along the cross-stream direction act as an implicit filter. This removes the necessity of explicit filtering along this direction (where a nonhomogeneous mesh is used) for the simulation of laminar flow transition into turbulence in which small scale turbulence will be accounted for by a subgrid scale turbulence model.

  4. Large-eddy simulation of trans- and supercritical injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, H.; Niedermeier, C. A.; Jarczyk, M.; Pfitzner, M.; Hickel, S.; Adams, N. A.

    2016-07-01

    In a joint effort to develop a robust numerical tool for the simulation of injection, mixing, and combustion in liquid rocket engines at high pressure, a real-gas thermodynamics model has been implemented into two computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes, the density-based INCA and a pressure-based version of OpenFOAM. As a part of the validation process, both codes have been used to perform large-eddy simulations (LES) of trans- and supercritical nitrogen injection. Despite the different code architecture and the different subgrid scale turbulence modeling strategy, both codes yield similar results. The agreement with the available experimental data is good.

  5. Model consistency in large eddy simulation of turbulent channel flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piomelli, Ugo; Ferziger, Joel H.; Moin, Parviz

    1988-01-01

    Combinations of filters and subgrid scale stress models for large eddy simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations are examined by a priori tests and numerical simulations. The structure of the subgrid scales is found to depend strongly on the type of filter used, and consistency between model and filter is essential to ensure accurate results. The implementation of consistent combinations of filter and model gives more accurate turbulence statistics than those obtained in previous investigations in which the models were chosen independently from the filter. Results and limitations of the a priori test are discussed. The effect of grid refinement is also examined.

  6. Large eddy simulation of the flow in a transpired channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piomelli, Ugo; Moin, Parviz; Ferziger, Joel

    1989-01-01

    The flow in a transpired channel has been computed by large eddy simulation. The numerical results compare very well with experimental data. Blowing decreases the wall shear stress and enhances turbulent fluctuations, while suction has the opposite effect. The wall layer thickness normalized by the local wall shear velocity and kinematic viscosity increases on the blowing side of the channel and decreases on the suction side. Suction causes more rapid decay of the spectra, larger mean streak spacing and higher two-point correlations. On the blowing side, the wall layer structures lie at a steeper angle to the wall, whereas on the suction side this angle is shallower.

  7. On integrating large eddy simulation and laboratory turbulent flow experiments.

    PubMed

    Grinstein, Fernando F

    2009-07-28

    Critical issues involved in large eddy simulation (LES) experiments relate to the treatment of unresolved subgrid scale flow features and required initial and boundary condition supergrid scale modelling. The inherently intrusive nature of both LES and laboratory experiments is noted in this context. Flow characterization issues becomes very challenging ones in validation and computational laboratory studies, where potential sources of discrepancies between predictions and measurements need to be clearly evaluated and controlled. A special focus of the discussion is devoted to turbulent initial condition issues.

  8. Finecasting for renewable energy with large-eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonker, Harmen; Verzijlbergh, Remco

    2016-04-01

    We present results of a single, continuous Large-Eddy Simulation of actual weather conditions during the timespan of a full year, made possible through recent computational developments (Schalkwijk et al, MWR, 2015). The simulation is coupled to a regional weather model in order to provide an LES dataset that is representative of the daily weather of the year 2012 around Cabauw, the Netherlands. This location is chosen such that LES results can be compared with both the regional weather model and observations from the Cabauw observational supersite. The run was made possible by porting our Large-Eddy Simulation program to run completely on the GPU (Schalkwijk et al, BAMS, 2012). GPU adaptation allows us to reach much improved time-to-solution ratios (i.e. simulation speedup versus real time). As a result, one can perform runs with a much longer timespan than previously feasible. The dataset resulting from the LES run provides many avenues for further study. First, it can provide a more statistical approach to boundary-layer turbulence than the more common case-studies by simulating a diverse but representative set of situations, as well as the transition between situations. This has advantages in designing and evaluating parameterizations. In addition, we discuss the opportunities of high-resolution forecasts for the renewable energy sector, e.g. wind and solar energy production.

  9. Large eddy simulation of incompressible turbulent channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moin, P.; Reynolds, W. C.; Ferziger, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    The three-dimensional, time-dependent primitive equations of motion were numerically integrated for the case of turbulent channel flow. A partially implicit numerical method was developed. An important feature of this scheme is that the equation of continuity is solved directly. The residual field motions were simulated through an eddy viscosity model, while the large-scale field was obtained directly from the solution of the governing equations. An important portion of the initial velocity field was obtained from the solution of the linearized Navier-Stokes equations. The pseudospectral method was used for numerical differentiation in the horizontal directions, and second-order finite-difference schemes were used in the direction normal to the walls. The large eddy simulation technique is capable of reproducing some of the important features of wall-bounded turbulent flows. The resolvable portions of the root-mean square wall pressure fluctuations, pressure velocity-gradient correlations, and velocity pressure-gradient correlations are documented.

  10. Domain nesting for multi-scale large eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuka, Vladimir; Xie, Zheng-Tong

    2016-04-01

    The need to simulate city scale areas (O(10 km)) with high resolution within street canyons in certain areas of interests necessitates different grid resolutions in different part of the simulated area. General purpose computational fluid dynamics codes typically employ unstructured refined grids while mesoscale meteorological models more often employ nesting of computational domains. ELMM is a large eddy simulation model for the atmospheric boundary layer. It employs orthogonal uniform grids and for this reason domain nesting was chosen as the approach for simulations in multiple scales. Domains are implemented as sets of MPI processes which communicate with each other as in a normal non-nested run, but also with processes from another (outer/inner) domain. It should stressed that the duration of solution of time-steps in the outer and in the inner domain must be synchronized, so that the processes do not have to wait for the completion of their boundary conditions. This can achieved by assigning an appropriate number of CPUs to each domain, and to gain high efficiency. When nesting is applied for large eddy simulation, the inner domain receives inflow boundary conditions which lack turbulent motions not represented by the outer grid. ELMM remedies this by optional adding of turbulent fluctuations to the inflow using the efficient method of Xie and Castro (2008). The spatial scale of these fluctuations is in the subgrid-scale of the outer grid and their intensity will be estimated from the subgrid turbulent kinetic energy in the outer grid.

  11. Cosmological fluid mechanics with adaptively refined large eddy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, W.; Almgren, A. S.; Braun, H.; Engels, J. F.; Niemeyer, J. C.; Schulz, J.; Mekuria, R. R.; Aspden, A. J.; Bell, J. B.

    2014-06-01

    We investigate turbulence generated by cosmological structure formation by means of large eddy simulations using adaptive mesh refinement. In contrast to the widely used implicit large eddy simulations, which resolve a limited range of length-scales and treat the effect of turbulent velocity fluctuations below the grid scale solely by numerical dissipation, we apply a subgrid-scale model for the numerically unresolved fraction of the turbulence energy. For simulations with adaptive mesh refinement, we utilize a new methodology that allows us to adjust the scale-dependent energy variables in such a way that the sum of resolved and unresolved energies is globally conserved. We test our approach in simulations of randomly forced turbulence, a gravitationally bound cloud in a wind, and the Santa Barbara cluster. To treat inhomogeneous turbulence, we introduce an adaptive Kalman filtering technique that separates turbulent velocity fluctuations on resolved length-scales from the non-turbulent bulk flow. From the magnitude of the fluctuating component and the subgrid-scale turbulence energy, a total turbulent velocity dispersion of several 100 km s-1 is obtained for the Santa Barbara cluster, while the low-density gas outside the accretion shocks is nearly devoid of turbulence. The energy flux through the turbulent cascade and the dissipation rate predicted by the subgrid-scale model correspond to dynamical time-scales around 5 Gyr, independent of numerical resolution.

  12. A normal stress subgrid-scale eddy viscosity model in large eddy simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horiuti, K.; Mansour, N. N.; Kim, John J.

    1993-01-01

    The Smagorinsky subgrid-scale eddy viscosity model (SGS-EVM) is commonly used in large eddy simulations (LES) to represent the effects of the unresolved scales on the resolved scales. This model is known to be limited because its constant must be optimized in different flows, and it must be modified with a damping function to account for near-wall effects. The recent dynamic model is designed to overcome these limitations but is compositionally intensive as compared to the traditional SGS-EVM. In a recent study using direct numerical simulation data, Horiuti has shown that these drawbacks are due mainly to the use of an improper velocity scale in the SGS-EVM. He also proposed the use of the subgrid-scale normal stress as a new velocity scale that was inspired by a high-order anisotropic representation model. The testing of Horiuti, however, was conducted using DNS data from a low Reynolds number channel flow simulation. It was felt that further testing at higher Reynolds numbers and also using different flows (other than wall-bounded shear flows) were necessary steps needed to establish the validity of the new model. This is the primary motivation of the present study. The objective is to test the new model using DNS databases of high Reynolds number channel and fully developed turbulent mixing layer flows. The use of both channel (wall-bounded) and mixing layer flows is important for the development of accurate LES models because these two flows encompass many characteristic features of complex turbulent flows.

  13. Linear eddy mixing based tabulation and artificial neural networks for large eddy simulations of turbulent flames

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Baris Ali; Menon, Suresh

    2010-01-15

    A large eddy simulation (LES) sub-grid model is developed based on the artificial neural network (ANN) approach to calculate the species instantaneous reaction rates for multi-step, multi-species chemical kinetics mechanisms. The proposed methodology depends on training the ANNs off-line on a thermo-chemical database representative of the actual composition and turbulence (but not the actual geometrical problem) of interest, and later using them to replace the stiff ODE solver (direct integration (DI)) to calculate the reaction rates in the sub-grid. The thermo-chemical database is tabulated with respect to the thermodynamic state vector without any reduction in the number of state variables. The thermo-chemistry is evolved by stand-alone linear eddy mixing (LEM) model simulations under both premixed and non-premixed conditions, where the unsteady interaction of turbulence with chemical kinetics is included as a part of the training database. The proposed methodology is tested in LES and in stand-alone LEM studies of three distinct test cases with different reduced mechanisms and conditions. LES of premixed flame-turbulence-vortex interaction provides direct comparison of the proposed ANN method against DI and ANNs trained on thermo-chemical database created using another type of tabulation method. It is shown that the ANN trained on the LEM database can capture the correct flame physics with accuracy comparable to DI, which cannot be achieved by ANN trained on a laminar premix flame database. A priori evaluation of the ANN generality within and outside its training domain is carried out using stand-alone LEM simulations as well. Results in general are satisfactory, and it is shown that the ANN provides considerable amount of memory saving and speed-up with reasonable and reliable accuracy. The speed-up is strongly affected by the stiffness of the reduced mechanism used for the computations, whereas the memory saving is considerable regardless. (author)

  14. Large-eddy simulation using the finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    McCallen, R.C.; Gresho, P.M.; Leone, J.M. Jr.; Kollmann, W.

    1993-10-01

    In a large-eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent flows, the large-scale motion is calculated explicitly (i.e., approximated with semi-empirical relations). Typically, finite difference or spectral numerical schemes are used to generate an LES; the use of finite element methods (FEM) has been far less prominent. In this study, we demonstrate that FEM in combination with LES provides a viable tool for the study of turbulent, separating channel flows, specifically the flow over a two-dimensional backward-facing step. The combination of these methodologies brings together the advantages of each: LES provides a high degree of accuracy with a minimum of empiricism for turbulence modeling and FEM provides a robust way to simulate flow in very complex domains of practical interest. Such a combination should prove very valuable to the engineering community.

  15. Large Eddy Simulation of Cryogenic Injection Processes at Supercritical Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oefelein, Joseph C.; Garcia, Roberto (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper highlights results from the first of a series of hierarchical simulations aimed at assessing the modeling requirements for application of the large eddy simulation technique to cryogenic injection and combustion processes in liquid rocket engines. The focus is on liquid-oxygen-hydrogen coaxial injectors at a condition where the liquid-oxygen is injected at a subcritical temperature into a supercritical environment. For this situation a diffusion dominated mode of combustion occurs in the presence of exceedingly large thermophysical property gradients. Though continuous, these gradients approach the behavior of a contact discontinuity. Significant real gas effects and transport anomalies coexist locally in colder regions of the flow, with ideal gas and transport characteristics occurring within the flame zone. The current focal point is on the interfacial region between the liquid-oxygen core and the coaxial hydrogen jet where the flame anchors itself.

  16. Synthetic turbulence, fractal interpolation, and large-eddy simulation.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sukanta; Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2004-08-01

    Fractal interpolation has been proposed in the literature as an efficient way to construct closure models for the numerical solution of coarse-grained Navier-Stokes equations. It is based on synthetically generating a scale-invariant subgrid-scale field and analytically evaluating its effects on large resolved scales. In this paper, we propose an extension of previous work by developing a multiaffine fractal interpolation scheme and demonstrate that it preserves not only the fractal dimension but also the higher-order structure functions and the non-Gaussian probability density function of the velocity increments. Extensive a priori analyses of atmospheric boundary layer measurements further reveal that this multiaffine closure model has the potential for satisfactory performance in large-eddy simulations. The pertinence of this newly proposed methodology in the case of passive scalars is also discussed.

  17. Scale-Similar Models for Large-Eddy Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarghini, F.

    1999-01-01

    Scale-similar models employ multiple filtering operations to identify the smallest resolved scales, which have been shown to be the most active in the interaction with the unresolved subgrid scales. They do not assume that the principal axes of the strain-rate tensor are aligned with those of the subgrid-scale stress (SGS) tensor, and allow the explicit calculation of the SGS energy. They can provide backscatter in a numerically stable and physically realistic manner, and predict SGS stresses in regions that are well correlated with the locations where large Reynolds stress occurs. In this paper, eddy viscosity and mixed models, which include an eddy-viscosity part as well as a scale-similar contribution, are applied to the simulation of two flows, a high Reynolds number plane channel flow, and a three-dimensional, nonequilibrium flow. The results show that simulations without models or with the Smagorinsky model are unable to predict nonequilibrium effects. Dynamic models provide an improvement of the results: the adjustment of the coefficient results in more accurate prediction of the perturbation from equilibrium. The Lagrangian-ensemble approach [Meneveau et al., J. Fluid Mech. 319, 353 (1996)] is found to be very beneficial. Models that included a scale-similar term and a dissipative one, as well as the Lagrangian ensemble averaging, gave results in the best agreement with the direct simulation and experimental data.

  18. A family of dynamic models for large-eddy simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carati, D.; Jansen, K.; Lund, T.

    1995-01-01

    Since its first application, the dynamic procedure has been recognized as an effective means to compute rather than prescribe the unknown coefficients that appear in a subgrid-scale model for Large-Eddy Simulation (LES). The dynamic procedure is usually used to determine the nondimensional coefficient in the Smagorinsky (1963) model. In reality the procedure is quite general and it is not limited to the Smagorinsky model by any theoretical or practical constraints. The purpose of this note is to consider a generalized family of dynamic eddy viscosity models that do not necessarily rely on the local equilibrium assumption built into the Smagorinsky model. By invoking an inertial range assumption, it will be shown that the coefficients in the new models need not be nondimensional. This additional degree of freedom allows the use of models that are scaled on traditionally unknown quantities such as the dissipation rate. In certain cases, the dynamic models with dimensional coefficients are simpler to implement, and allow for a 30% reduction in the number of required filtering operations.

  19. Progress in the Variational Multiscale Formulation of Large Eddy Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen; Oberai, Assad

    2007-11-01

    In the variational multiscale (VMS) formulation of large eddy simulation subgrid models are introduced in the variational (or weak) formulation of the Navier Stokes equations and a-priori scale separation is accomplished using projection operators to create coarse and fine scales. This separation also leads to two sets of evolution equations: one for the coarse scales and another for the fine scales. The coarse scale equations are solved numerically while the fine scale equations are solved analytically to obtain an expression for the fine scales in terms of the coarse scales and hence achieve closure. Till date, the VMS formulation has lead to accurate results in the simulation of canonical turbulent flow problems. It has been implemented using spectral, finite element and finite volume methods. In this talk, for the incompressible Navier Stokes equations, we willpresent some new ideas for modeling the fine scales within the context of the VMS formulation and discuss their impact on the coarse scale solution. We will present a simple residual-based approximation for the fine scales that accurately models the cross-stress term and demonstrate that when this term is append with an eddy viscosity model for the Reynolds stress, a new mixed-model is obtained. The application of these ideas will be illustrated through some simple numerical examples.

  20. Large eddy simulation of mechanical mixing in anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Wu, Binxin

    2012-03-01

    A comprehensive study of anaerobic digestion requires an advanced turbulence model technique to accurately predict mixing flow patterns because the digestion process that involves mass transfer between anaerobes and their substrates is primarily dependent on detailed information about the fine structure of turbulence in the digesters. This study presents a large eddy simulation (LES) of mechanical agitation of non-Newtonian fluids in anaerobic digesters, in which the sliding mesh method is used to characterize the impeller rotation. The three subgrid scale (SGS) models investigated are: (i) Smagorinsky-Lilly model, (ii) wall-adapting local eddy-viscosity model, and (iii) kinetic energy transport (KET) model. The simulation results show that the three SGS models produce very similar flow fields. A comparison of the simulated and measured axial velocities indicates that the LES profile shapes are in general agreement with the experimental data but they differ markedly in velocity magnitudes. A check of impeller power and flow numbers demonstrates that all the SGS models give excellent predictions, with the KET model performing the best. Moreover, the performance of six Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes turbulence models are assessed and compared with the LES results.

  1. Large Eddy Simulation of Engineering Flows: A Bill Reynolds Legacy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moin, Parviz

    2004-11-01

    The term, Large eddy simulation, LES, was coined by Bill Reynolds, thirty years ago when he and his colleagues pioneered the introduction of LES in the engineering community. Bill's legacy in LES features his insistence on having a proper mathematical definition of the large scale field independent of the numerical method used, and his vision for using numerical simulation output as data for research in turbulence physics and modeling, just as one would think of using experimental data. However, as an engineer, Bill was pre-dominantly interested in the predictive capability of computational fluid dynamics and in particular LES. In this talk I will present the state of the art in large eddy simulation of complex engineering flows. Most of this technology has been developed in the Department of Energy's ASCI Program at Stanford which was led by Bill in the last years of his distinguished career. At the core of this technology is a fully implicit non-dissipative LES code which uses unstructured grids with arbitrary elements. A hybrid Eulerian/ Largangian approach is used for multi-phase flows, and chemical reactions are introduced through dynamic equations for mixture fraction and reaction progress variable in conjunction with flamelet tables. The predictive capability of LES is demonstrated in several validation studies in flows with complex physics and complex geometry including flow in the combustor of a modern aircraft engine. LES in such a complex application is only possible through efficient utilization of modern parallel super-computers which was recognized and emphasized by Bill from the beginning. The presentation will include a brief mention of computer science efforts for efficient implementation of LES.

  2. Film cooling from inclined cylindrical holes using large eddy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peet, Yulia V.

    2006-12-01

    The goal of the present study is to investigate numerically the physics of the flow, which occurs during the film cooling from inclined cylindrical holes, Film cooling is a technique used in gas turbine industry to reduce heat fluxes to the turbine blade surface. Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is performed modeling a realistic film cooling configuration, which consists of a large stagnation-type reservoir, feeding an array of discrete cooling holes (film holes) flowing into a flat plate turbulent boundary layer. Special computational methodology is developed for this problem, involving coupled simulations using multiple computational codes. A fully compressible LES code is used in the area above the flat plate, while a low Mach number LES code is employed in the plenum and film holes. The motivation for using different codes comes from the essential difference in the nature of the flow in these different regions. Flowfield is analyzed inside the plenum, film hole and a crossflow region. Flow inside the plenum is stagnating, except for the region close to the exit, where it accelerates rapidly to turn into the hole. The sharp radius of turning at the trailing edge of the plenum pipe connection causes the flow to separate from the downstream wall of the film hole. After coolant injection occurs, a complex flowfield is formed consisting of coherent vortical structures responsible for bringing hot crossflow fluid in contact with the walls of either the film hole or the blade, thus reducing cooling protection. Mean velocity and turbulent statistics are compared to experimental measurements, yielding good agreement for the mean flowfield and satisfactory agreement for the turbulence quantities. LES results are used to assess the applicability of basic assumptions of conventional eddy viscosity turbulence models used with Reynolds-averaged (RANS) approach, namely the isotropy of an eddy viscosity and thermal diffusivity. It is shown here that these assumptions do not hold

  3. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics method from a large eddy simulation perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Mascio, A.; Antuono, M.; Colagrossi, A.; Marrone, S.

    2017-03-01

    The Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method, often used for the modelling of the Navier-Stokes equations by a meshless Lagrangian approach, is revisited from the point of view of Large Eddy Simulation (LES). To this aim, the LES filtering procedure is recast in a Lagrangian framework by defining a filter that moves with the positions of the fluid particles at the filtered velocity. It is shown that the SPH smoothing procedure can be reinterpreted as a sort of LES Lagrangian filtering, and that, besides the terms coming from the LES convolution, additional contributions (never accounted for in the SPH literature) appear in the equations when formulated in a filtered fashion. Appropriate closure formulas are derived for the additional terms and a preliminary numerical test is provided to show the main features of the proposed LES-SPH model.

  4. Large-eddy simulation of turbulent circular jet flows

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S. C.; Sotiropoulos, F.; Sale, M. J.

    2002-07-01

    This report presents a numerical method for carrying out large-eddy simulations (LES) of turbulent free shear flows and an application of a method to simulate the flow generated by a nozzle discharging into a stagnant reservoir. The objective of the study was to elucidate the complex features of the instantaneous flow field to help interpret the results of recent biological experiments in which live fish were exposed to the jet shear zone. The fish-jet experiments were conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Hydropower Turbine Systems program. The experiments were designed to establish critical thresholds of shear and turbulence-induced loads to guide the development of innovative, fish-friendly hydropower turbine designs.

  5. Large eddy simulation of a wing-body junction flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Sungmin; Emory, Michael; Campos, Alejandro; Duraisamy, Karthik; Iaccarino, Gianluca

    2014-11-01

    We present numerical simulations of the wing-body junction flow experimentally investigated by Devenport & Simpson (1990). Wall-junction flows are common in engineering applications but relevant flow physics close to the corner region is not well understood. Moreover, performance of turbulence models for the body-junction case is not well characterized. Motivated by the insufficient investigations, we have numerically investigated the case with Reynolds-averaged Naiver-Stokes equation (RANS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) approaches. The Vreman model applied for the LES and SST k- ω model for the RANS simulation are validated focusing on the ability to predict turbulence statistics near the junction region. Moreover, a sensitivity study of the form of the Vreman model will also be presented. This work is funded under NASA Cooperative Agreement NNX11AI41A (Technical Monitor Dr. Stephen Woodruff)

  6. Time-Domain Filtering for Spatial Large-Eddy Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruett, C. David

    1997-01-01

    An approach to large-eddy simulation (LES) is developed whose subgrid-scale model incorporates filtering in the time domain, in contrast to conventional approaches, which exploit spatial filtering. The method is demonstrated in the simulation of a heated, compressible, axisymmetric jet, and results are compared with those obtained from fully resolved direct numerical simulation. The present approach was, in fact, motivated by the jet-flow problem and the desire to manipulate the flow by localized (point) sources for the purposes of noise suppression. Time-domain filtering appears to be more consistent with the modeling of point sources; moreover, time-domain filtering may resolve some fundamental inconsistencies associated with conventional space-filtered LES approaches.

  7. Large Eddy Simulation of Aircraft Wake Vortices: Atmospheric Turbulence Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Jongil; Lin, Yuh-Lang; Arya, S. Pal; Kao, C.-T.

    1997-01-01

    Crow instability can develop in most atmospheric turbulence levels, however, the ring vortices may not form in extremely strong turbulence cases due to strong dissipation of the vortices. It appears that strong turbulence tends to accelerate the occurrences of Crow instability. The wavelength of the most unstable mode is estimated to be about 5b(sub 0), which is less than the theoretical value of 8.6b(sub 0) (Crow, 1970) and may be due to limited domain size and highly nonlinear turbulent flow characteristics. Three-dimensional turbulence can decay wake vortices more rapidly. Axial velocity may be developed by vertical distortion of a vortex pair due to Crow instability or large turbulent eddy motion. More experiments with various non-dimensional turbulence levels are necessary to get useful statistics of wake vortex behavior due to turbulence. Need to investigate larger turbulence length scale effects by enlarging domain size or using grid nesting.

  8. Large-eddy simulation of a plane wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosal, Sandip; Rogers, M. M.

    1994-01-01

    Previously the theoretical development leading to the dynamic localization model (DLM) for large-eddy simulation (LES) was presented. The method has been successfully applied to isotropic turbulence, channel flow, and the flow over a backward-facing step. Here we apply the model to the computation of the temporally developing place wake. The two main objectives of this project are: (1) Use the model to perform an LES of a time developing plane wake and compare the results with direction numerical simulation (DNS) data to see if important statistical measures can be readily predicted, and to provide a relative evaluation of the several versions of the model in terms of predictive capability and cost; and (2) If the tests in (1) show that the model generates reliable predictions, then use the LES to study various aspects of the physics of turbulent wakes and mixing layers.

  9. Large-eddy simulation of transitional channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piomelli, Ugo; Zang, Thomas A.

    1990-01-01

    A large-eddy simulation (LES) of transition in plane channel flow was carried out. The LES results were compared with those of a fine direct numerical simulation (DNS), and with those of a coarse DNS that uses the same mesh as the LES, but does not use a residual stress model. While at the early stages of transition, LES and coarse DNS give the same results: the presence of the residual stress model was found to be necessary to predict accurately mean velocity and Reynolds stress profiles during the late stages of transition (after the second spike stage). The evolution of single Fourier modes is also predicted more accurately by the LES than by the DNS. As small scales are generated, the dissipative character of the residual stress starts to reproduce correctly the energy cascade. As transition progresses, the flow approaches its fully developed turbulent state, the subgrid scales tend towards equilibrium, and the model becomes more accurate.

  10. Large Eddy Simulation of FDA’s Idealized Medical Device

    PubMed Central

    Delorme, Yann T.; Anupindi, Kameswararao; Frankel, Steven H.

    2013-01-01

    A hybrid large eddy simulation (LES) and immersed boundary method (IBM) computational approach is used to make quantitative predictions of flow field statistics within the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) idealized medical device. An in-house code is used, hereafter (W enoHemo™), that combines high-order finite-difference schemes on structured staggered Cartesian grids with an IBM to facilitate flow over or through complex stationary or rotating geometries and employs a subgrid-scale (SGS) turbulence model that more naturally handles transitional flows [2]. Predictions of velocity and wall shear stress statistics are compared with previously published experimental measurements from Hariharan et al. [6] for the four Reynolds numbers considered. PMID:24187599

  11. Large-Eddy Simulation of Turbulent Wall-Pressure Fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, Bart A.

    1996-01-01

    Large-eddy simulations of a turbulent boundary layer with Reynolds number based on displacement thickness equal to 3500 were performed with two grid resolutions. The computations were continued for sufficient time to obtain frequency spectra with resolved frequencies that correspond to the most important structural frequencies on an aircraft fuselage. The turbulent stresses were adequately resolved with both resolutions. Detailed quantitative analysis of a variety of statistical quantities associated with the wall-pressure fluctuations revealed similar behavior for both simulations. The primary differences were associated with the lack of resolution of the high-frequency data in the coarse-grid calculation and the increased jitter (due to the lack of multiple realizations for averaging purposes) in the fine-grid calculation. A new curve fit was introduced to represent the spanwise coherence of the cross-spectral density.

  12. Computing transitional flows using wall-modeled large eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodart, Julien; Larsson, Johan

    2012-11-01

    To be applicable to complex aerodynamic flows at realistic Reynolds numbers, large eddy simulation (LES) must be combined with a model for the inner part of the boundary layer. Aerodynamic flows are, in general, sensitive to the location of boundary layer transition. While traditional LES can predict the transition location and process accurately, existing wall-modeled LES approaches can not. In the present work, the behavior of the wall-model is locally adapted using a sensor in the LES-resolved part of boundary layer. This sensor estimates whether the boundary layer is turbulent or not, in a way that does not rely on any homogeneous direction. The proposed method is validated on controlled transition scenarios on a flat plat boundary layer, and finally applied to the flow around a multi-element airfoil at realistic Reynolds number.

  13. Large Eddy Simulation of FDA's Idealized Medical Device.

    PubMed

    Delorme, Yann T; Anupindi, Kameswararao; Frankel, Steven H

    2013-12-01

    A hybrid large eddy simulation (LES) and immersed boundary method (IBM) computational approach is used to make quantitative predictions of flow field statistics within the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) idealized medical device. An in-house code is used, hereafter (W enoHemo(™) ), that combines high-order finite-difference schemes on structured staggered Cartesian grids with an IBM to facilitate flow over or through complex stationary or rotating geometries and employs a subgrid-scale (SGS) turbulence model that more naturally handles transitional flows [2]. Predictions of velocity and wall shear stress statistics are compared with previously published experimental measurements from Hariharan et al. [6] for the four Reynolds numbers considered.

  14. Implicit large eddy simulation of shock-driven material mixing.

    PubMed

    Grinstein, F F; Gowardhan, A A; Ristorcelli, J R

    2013-11-28

    Under-resolved computer simulations are typically unavoidable in practical turbulent flow applications exhibiting extreme geometrical complexity and a broad range of length and time scales. An important unsettled issue is whether filtered-out and subgrid spatial scales can significantly alter the evolution of resolved larger scales of motion and practical flow integral measures. Predictability issues in implicit large eddy simulation of under-resolved mixing of material scalars driven by under-resolved velocity fields and initial conditions are discussed in the context of shock-driven turbulent mixing. The particular focus is on effects of resolved spectral content and interfacial morphology of initial conditions on transitional and late-time turbulent mixing in the fundamental planar shock-tube configuration.

  15. Large Eddy Simulation of Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamsoddin, Sina; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2014-05-01

    In this study, large-eddy simulation (LES) is combined with a turbine model to investigate the wake behind a vertical-axis wind turbine (VAWT) in a three dimensional turbulent flow. Two methods are used to model the subgrid-scale (SGS) stresses: (a) the Smagorinsky model, and (b) the modulated gradient model. To parameterize the effects of the VAWT on the flow, two VAWT models are developed: (a) the actuator surface model (ASM), in which the time-averaged turbine-induced forces are distributed on a surface swept by the turbine blades, i.e. the actuator surface, and (b) the actuator line model (ALM), in which the instantaneous blade forces are only spatially distributed on lines representing the blades, i.e. the actuator lines. This is the first time that LES is applied and validated for simulation of VAWT wakes by using either the ASM or the ALM techniques. In both models, blade-element theory is used to calculate the lift and drag forces on the blades. The results are compared with flow measurements in the wake of a model straight-bladed VAWT, carried out in the Institute de Méchanique et Statistique de la Turbulence (IMST) water channel. Different combinations of SGS models with VAWT models are studied and a fairly good overall agreement between simulation results and measurement data is observed. In general, the ALM is found to better capture the unsteady-periodic nature of the wake and shows a better agreement with the experimental data compared with the ASM. The modulated gradient model is also found to be a more reliable SGS stress modeling technique, compared with the Smagorinsky model, and it yields reasonable predictions of the mean flow and turbulence characteristics of a VAWT wake using its theoretically-determined model coefficient. Keywords: Vertical-axis wind turbines (VAWTs); VAWT wake; Large-eddy simulation; Actuator surface model; Actuator line model; Smagorinsky model; Modulated gradient model

  16. Large eddy simulation subgrid model for soot prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Asrag, Hossam Abd El-Raouf Mostafa

    Soot prediction in realistic systems is one of the most challenging problems in theoretical and applied combustion. Soot formation as a chemical process is very complicated and not fully understood. The major difficulty stems from the chemical complexity of the soot formation process as well as its strong coupling with the other thermochemical and fluid processes that occur simultaneously. Soot is a major byproduct of incomplete combustion, having a strong impact on the environment as well as the combustion efficiency. Therefore, innovative methods is needed to predict soot in realistic configurations in an accurate and yet computationally efficient way. In the current study, a new soot formation subgrid model is developed and reported here. The new model is designed to be used within the context of the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) framework, combined with Linear Eddy Mixing (LEM) as a subgrid combustion model. The final model can be applied equally to premixed and non-premixed flames over any required geometry and flow conditions in the free, the transition, and the continuum regimes. The soot dynamics is predicted using a Method of Moments approach with Lagrangian Interpolative Closure (MOMIC) for the fractional moments. Since no prior knowledge of the particles distribution is required, the model is generally applicable. The current model accounts for the basic soot transport phenomena as transport by molecular diffusion and Thermophoretic forces. The model is first validated against experimental results for non-sooting swirling non-premixed and partially premixed flames. Next, a set of canonical premixed sooting flames are simulated, where the effect of turbulence, binary diffusivity and C/O ratio on soot formation are studied. Finally, the model is validated against a non-premixed jet sooting flame. The effect of the flame structure on the different soot formation stages as well as the particle size distribution is described. Good results are predicted with

  17. Large-Eddy Simulation Code Developed for Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeBonis, James R.

    2003-01-01

    A large-eddy simulation (LES) code was developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to provide more accurate and detailed computational analyses of propulsion flow fields. The accuracy of current computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods is limited primarily by their inability to properly account for the turbulent motion present in virtually all propulsion flows. Because the efficiency and performance of a propulsion system are highly dependent on the details of this turbulent motion, it is critical for CFD to accurately model it. The LES code promises to give new CFD simulations an advantage over older methods by directly computing the large turbulent eddies, to correctly predict their effect on a propulsion system. Turbulent motion is a random, unsteady process whose behavior is difficult to predict through computer simulations. Current methods are based on Reynolds-Averaged Navier- Stokes (RANS) analyses that rely on models to represent the effect of turbulence within a flow field. The quality of the results depends on the quality of the model and its applicability to the type of flow field being studied. LES promises to be more accurate because it drastically reduces the amount of modeling necessary. It is the logical step toward improving turbulent flow predictions. In LES, the large-scale dominant turbulent motion is computed directly, leaving only the less significant small turbulent scales to be modeled. As part of the prediction, the LES method generates detailed information on the turbulence itself, providing important information for other applications, such as aeroacoustics. The LES code developed at Glenn for propulsion flow fields is being used to both analyze propulsion system components and test improved LES algorithms (subgrid-scale models, filters, and numerical schemes). The code solves the compressible Favre-filtered Navier- Stokes equations using an explicit fourth-order accurate numerical scheme, it incorporates a compressible form of

  18. Large-Eddy Simulations of Flows in Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosovic, B.; Lundquist, K. A.

    2011-12-01

    Large-eddy simulation as a methodology for numerical simulation of turbulent flows was first developed to study turbulent flows in atmospheric by Lilly (1967). The first LES were carried by Deardorff (1970) who used these simulations to study atmospheric boundary layers. Ever since, LES has been extensively used to study canonical atmospheric boundary layers, in most cases flat plate boundary layers under the assumption of horizontal homogeneity. Carefully designed LES of canonical convective and neutrally stratified and more recently stably stratified atmospheric boundary layers have contributed significantly to development of better understanding of these flows and their parameterizations in large scale models. These simulations were often carried out using codes specifically designed and developed for large-eddy simulations of horizontally homogeneous flows with periodic lateral boundary conditions. Recent developments in multi-scale numerical simulations of atmospheric flows enable numerical weather prediction (NWP) codes such as ARPS (Chow and Street, 2009), COAMPS (Golaz et al., 2009) and Weather Research and Forecasting model, to be used nearly seamlessly across a wide range of atmospheric scales from synoptic down to turbulent scales in atmospheric boundary layers. Before we can with confidence carry out multi-scale simulations of atmospheric flows, NWP codes must be validated for accurate performance in simulating flows over complex or inhomogeneous terrain. We therefore carry out validation of WRF-LES for simulations of flows over complex terrain using data from Askervein Hill (Taylor and Teunissen, 1985, 1987) and METCRAX (Whiteman et al., 2008) field experiments. WRF's nesting capability is employed with a one-way nested inner domain that includes complex terrain representation while the coarser outer nest is used to spin up fully developed atmospheric boundary layer turbulence and thus represent accurately inflow to the inner domain. LES of a

  19. Large eddy simulation modelling of combustion for propulsion applications.

    PubMed

    Fureby, C

    2009-07-28

    Predictive modelling of turbulent combustion is important for the development of air-breathing engines, internal combustion engines, furnaces and for power generation. Significant advances in modelling non-reactive turbulent flows are now possible with the development of large eddy simulation (LES), in which the large energetic scales of the flow are resolved on the grid while modelling the effects of the small scales. Here, we discuss the use of combustion LES in predictive modelling of propulsion applications such as gas turbine, ramjet and scramjet engines. The LES models used are described in some detail and are validated against laboratory data-of which results from two cases are presented. These validated LES models are then applied to an annular multi-burner gas turbine combustor and a simplified scramjet combustor, for which some additional experimental data are available. For these cases, good agreement with the available reference data is obtained, and the LES predictions are used to elucidate the flow physics in such devices to further enhance our knowledge of these propulsion systems. Particular attention is focused on the influence of the combustion chemistry, turbulence-chemistry interaction, self-ignition, flame holding burner-to-burner interactions and combustion oscillations.

  20. Large-eddy simulation of flow past a circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wan; Pullin, Dale; Samtaney, Ravi; Zhang, Wei

    2015-11-01

    Wall-modeled, large-eddy simulations (LES) about a smooth-walled circular cylinder are described. The cylinder is of diameter D and is of extent 3 D in the span-wise direction. The stretched-vortex sub-grid scale model is used away from the cylinder wall, including regions of large-scale separated flow. At the wall this is coupled directly to an extended version of the virtual-wall model (VWM) of Chung & Pullin (2009). Here the wall-adjacent flow is modeled by wall-normal integration of both components of the wall-parallel momentum equation across a thin wall-layer whose thickness is small compared to that of the local boundary layer. This provides a wall-parallel, cell-scale estimate of the surface stress-vector field across the entire cylinder surface, and, with further assumptions, gives a slip-velocity boundary condition for the outer-flow LES. Flow separation is captured. The LES are done with a fourth-order accurate finite-difference method with span-wise periodic boundary conditions. A third-order semi-implicit Runge-Kutta method is used for temporal discretization. The LES methodology is verified by comparison with DNS at ReD = 3 , 900 . LES at larger Reynolds number will be discussed. Supported partially by KAUST OCRF Award No. URF/1/1394-01 and partially by NSF award CBET 1235605.

  1. Assessment of dynamic closure for premixed combustion large eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langella, Ivan; Swaminathan, Nedunchezhian; Gao, Yuan; Chakraborty, Nilanjan

    2015-09-01

    Turbulent piloted Bunsen flames of stoichiometric methane-air mixtures are computed using the large eddy simulation (LES) paradigm involving an algebraic closure for the filtered reaction rate. This closure involves the filtered scalar dissipation rate of a reaction progress variable. The model for this dissipation rate involves a parameter βc representing the flame front curvature effects induced by turbulence, chemical reactions, molecular dissipation, and their interactions at the sub-grid level, suggesting that this parameter may vary with filter width or be a scale-dependent. Thus, it would be ideal to evaluate this parameter dynamically by LES. A procedure for this evaluation is discussed and assessed using direct numerical simulation (DNS) data and LES calculations. The probability density functions of βc obtained from the DNS and LES calculations are very similar when the turbulent Reynolds number is sufficiently large and when the filter width normalised by the laminar flame thermal thickness is larger than unity. Results obtained using a constant (static) value for this parameter are also used for comparative evaluation. Detailed discussion presented in this paper suggests that the dynamic procedure works well and physical insights and reasonings are provided to explain the observed behaviour.

  2. A Method for Large Eddy Simulation of Acoustic Combustion Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, Clifton; Pierce, Charles; Moin, Parviz

    2002-11-01

    A method for performing Large Eddy Simulation of acoustic combustion instabilities is presented. By extending the low Mach number pressure correction method to the case of compressible flow, a numerical method is developed in which the Poisson equation for pressure is replaced by a Helmholtz equation. The method avoids the acoustic CFL condition by using implicit time advancement, leading to large efficiency gains at low Mach number. The method also avoids artificial damping of acoustic waves. The numerical method is attractive for the simulation of acoustic combustion instabilities, since these flows are typically at low Mach number, and the acoustic frequencies of interest are usually low. Both of these characteristics suggest the use of larger time steps than those allowed by an acoustic CFL condition. The turbulent combustion model used is the Combined Conserved Scalar/Level Set Flamelet model of Duchamp de Lageneste and Pitsch for partially premixed combustion. Comparison of LES results to the experiments of Besson et al will be presented.

  3. A Method for Large Eddy Simulation of Acoustic Combustion Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, Clifton; Moin, Parviz

    2003-11-01

    A method for performing Large Eddy Simulation of acoustic combustion instabilities is presented. By extending the low Mach number pressure correction method to the case of compressible flow, a numerical method is developed in which the Poisson equation for pressure is replaced by a Helmholtz equation. The method avoids the acoustic CFL condition by using implicit time advancement, leading to large efficiency gains at low Mach number. The method also avoids artificial damping of acoustic waves. The numerical method is attractive for the simulation of acoustics combustion instabilities, since these flows are typically at low Mach number, and the acoustic frequencies of interest are usually low. Additionally, new boundary conditions based on the work of Poinsot and Lele have been developed to model the acoustic effect of a long channel upstream of the computational inlet, thus avoiding the need to include such a channel in the computational domain. The turbulent combustion model used is the Level Set model of Duchamp de Lageneste and Pitsch for premixed combustion. Comparison of LES results to the reacting experiments of Besson et al. will be presented.

  4. Large Eddy Simulation of High-Speed, Premixed Ethylene Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramesh, Kiran; Edwards, Jack R.; Chelliah, Harsha; Goyne, Christopher; McDaniel, James; Rockwell, Robert; Kirik, Justin; Cutler, Andrew; Danehy, Paul

    2015-01-01

    A large-eddy simulation / Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (LES/RANS) methodology is used to simulate premixed ethylene-air combustion in a model scramjet designed for dual mode operation and equipped with a cavity for flameholding. A 22-species reduced mechanism for ethylene-air combustion is employed, and the calculations are performed on a mesh containing 93 million cells. Fuel plumes injected at the isolator entrance are processed by the isolator shock train, yielding a premixed fuel-air mixture at an equivalence ratio of 0.42 at the cavity entrance plane. A premixed flame is anchored within the cavity and propagates toward the opposite wall. Near complete combustion of ethylene is obtained. The combustor is highly dynamic, exhibiting a large-scale oscillation in global heat release and mass flow rate with a period of about 2.8 ms. Maximum heat release occurs when the flame front reaches its most downstream extent, as the flame surface area is larger. Minimum heat release is associated with flame propagation toward the cavity and occurs through a reduction in core flow velocity that is correlated with an upstream movement of the shock train. Reasonable agreement between simulation results and available wall pressure, particle image velocimetry, and OH-PLIF data is obtained, but it is not yet clear whether the system-level oscillations seen in the calculations are actually present in the experiment.

  5. Large eddy simulations of in-cylinder turbulent flows.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banaeizadeh, Araz; Afshari, Asghar; Schock, Harold; Jaberi, Farhad

    2007-11-01

    A high-order numerical model is developed and tested for large eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent flows in internal combustion (IC) engines. In this model, the filtered compressible Navier-Stokes equations in curvilinear coordinate systems are solved via a generalized high-order multi-block compact differencing scheme. The LES model has been applied to three flow configurations: (1) a fixed poppet valve in a sudden expansion, (2) a simple piston-cylinder assembly with a stationary open valve and harmonically moving flat piston, (3) a laboratory single-cylinder engine with three moving intake and exhaust valves. The first flow configuration is considered for studying the flow around the valves in IC engines. The second flow configuration is closer to that in IC engines but is based on a single stationary intake/exhaust valve and relatively simple geometry. It is considered in this work for better understating of the effects of moving piston on the large-scale unsteady vortical fluid motions in the cylinder and for further validation of our LES model. The third flow configuration includes all the complexities involve in a realistic single-cylinder IC engine. The predicted flow statistics by LES show good comparison with the available experimental data.

  6. Large-eddy simulation of the very stable boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinita, M. J.; Matheou, G.

    2016-12-01

    The stable boundary layer is ubiquitous and typically forms at night when the ground radiatively cools and in polar regions throughout the day. Stable stratification and the associated reduction in the energetic scales in combination with the large anisotropy of turbulent motions challenge numerical models. This modeling difficulty also affects large-eddy simulation (LES) methods leading to scarce LES results for very stable conditions. In contrast, the NWP of convective flows has greatly benefited from the ample availability of high quality LES data. In order to overcome these limitations, a novel LES model setup is developed to enable the modeling of very stable boundary layers. A series of Ekman layer-type boundary layers at various surface cooling rates, geotropic winds and latitudes (rotation rates) is presented. A temperature surface condition is applied in the LES. The surface heat flux is dynamically computed byresolving the surface layer since the often-used Monin-Obukhov similarity theory cannot represent very stable conditions. Depending on the conditions, the LES gracefully transitions to a direct numerical simulation (DNS) where the flow becomes fully resolved. Two stability regimes can be discerned based on vertical profiles of the Richardson number. Overall, the model predicts that turbulence is very resilient with respect to stability. Temperature and velocity fluctuations persist even at high Richardson numbers. The nature of the fluctuations, i.e., due to turbulence/overturning or waves, is discussed. Scaling relations and spectra are also presented and discussed.

  7. Numerical methods for large eddy simulation of acoustic combustion instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, Clifton T.

    Acoustic combustion instabilities occur when interaction between the combustion process and acoustic modes in a combustor results in periodic oscillations in pressure, velocity, and heat release. If sufficiently large in amplitude, these instabilities can cause operational difficulties or the failure of combustor hardware. In many situations, the dominant instability is the result of the interaction between a low frequency acoustic mode of the combustor and the large scale hydrodynamics. Large eddy simulation (LES), therefore, is a promising tool for the prediction of these instabilities, since both the low frequency acoustic modes and the large scale hydrodynamics are well resolved in LES. Problems with the tractability of such simulations arise, however, due to the difficulty of solving the compressible Navier-Stokes equations efficiently at low Mach number and due to the large number of acoustic periods that are often required for such instabilities to reach limit cycles. An implicit numerical method for the solution of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations has been developed which avoids the acoustic CFL restriction, allowing for significant efficiency gains at low Mach number, while still resolving the low frequency acoustic modes of interest. In the limit of a uniform grid the numerical method causes no artificial damping of acoustic waves. New, non-reflecting boundary conditions have also been developed for use with the characteristic-based approach of Poinsot and Lele (1992). The new boundary conditions are implemented in a manner which allows for significant reduction of the computational domain of an LES by eliminating the need to perform LES in regions where one-dimensional acoustics significantly affect the instability but details of the hydrodynamics do not. These new numerical techniques have been demonstrated in an LES of an experimental combustor. The new techniques are shown to be an efficient means of performing LES of acoustic combustion

  8. Three-dimensional large eddy simulation for jet aeroacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzun, Ali

    Future design of aircraft engines with low jet noise emissions undoubtedly needs a better understanding of noise generation in turbulent jets. Such an understanding, on the other hand, demands very reliable prediction tools. This study is therefore focused on developing a Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA) methodology that couples the near field unsteady flow field data computed by a 3-D Large Eddy Simulation (LES) code with various integral acoustic formulations for the far field noise prediction of turbulent jets. Turbulent jet simulations were performed at various Reynolds numbers. Comparisons of jet mean flow, turbulence statistics as well as jet aeroacoustics results with experimental data of jets at similar flow conditions were done and reasonable agreement was observed. The actual jet nozzle geometry was not included in the present simulations in order to keep the computational cost at manageable levels, therefore the jet shear layers downstream of the nozzle exit were modelled in an ad hoc fashion. As also observed by other researchers, the results obtained in the simulations were seen to be somewhat sensitive to the way the inflow forcing was done. The study of the effects of the eddy-viscosity based Smagorinsky subgrid-scale (SGS) model on noise predictions shows that the Smagorinsky model suppresses the resolved scale high-frequency noise. Simulations with filtering only suggest that treating the spatial filter as an implicit SGS model might be a good alternative. To our best knowledge, Lighthill's acoustic analogy was applied to a reasonably high Reynolds number jet for the first time in this study. A database greater than 1 Terabytes (TB) in size was post-processed using 1160 processors in parallel on a modern supercomputing platform for this purpose. It is expected that the current CAA methodology will yield better jet noise predictions when improved SGS models for both turbulence and high-frequency noise are incorporated into the LES code and when the

  9. Improved engine wall models for Large Eddy Simulation (LES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plengsaard, Chalearmpol

    Improved wall models for Large Eddy Simulation (LES) are presented in this research. The classical Werner-Wengle (WW) wall shear stress model is used along with near-wall sub-grid scale viscosity. A sub-grid scale turbulent kinetic energy is employed in a model for the eddy viscosity. To gain better heat flux results, a modified classical variable-density wall heat transfer model is also used. Because no experimental wall shear stress results are available in engines, the fully turbulent developed flow in a square duct is chosen to validate the new wall models. The model constants in the new wall models are set to 0.01 and 0.8, respectively and are kept constant throughout the investigation. The resulting time- and spatially-averaged velocity and temperature wall functions from the new wall models match well with the law-of-the-wall experimental data at Re = 50,000. In order to study the effect of hot air impinging walls, jet impingement on a flat plate is also tested with the new wall models. The jet Reynolds number is equal to 21,000 and a fixed jet-to-plate spacing of H/D = 2.0. As predicted by the new wall models, the time-averaged skin friction coefficient agrees well with experimental data, while the computed Nusselt number agrees fairly well when r/D > 2.0. Additionally, the model is validated using experimental data from a Caterpillar engine operated with conventional diesel combustion. Sixteen different operating engine conditions are simulated. The majority of the predicted heat flux results from each thermocouple location follow similar trends when compared with experimental data. The magnitude of peak heat fluxes as predicted by the new wall models is in the range of typical measured values in diesel combustion, while most heat flux results from previous LES wall models are over-predicted. The new wall models generate more accurate predictions and agree better with experimental data.

  10. Large-eddy simulation of unidirectional turbulent flow over dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omidyeganeh, Mohammad

    We performed large eddy simulation of the flow over a series of two- and three-dimensional dune geometries at laboratory scale using the Lagrangian dynamic eddy-viscosity subgrid-scale model. First, we studied the flow over a standard 2D transverse dune geometry, then bedform three-dimensionality was imposed. Finally, we investigated the turbulent flow over barchan dunes. The results are validated by comparison with simulations and experiments for the 2D dune case, while the results of the 3D dunes are validated qualitatively against experiments. The flow over transverse dunes separates at the dune crest, generating a shear layer that plays a crucial role in the transport of momentum and energy, as well as the generation of coherent structures. Spanwise vortices are generated in the separated shear; as they are advected, they undergo lateral instabilities and develop into horseshoe-like structures and finally reach the surface. The ejection that occurs between the legs of the vortex creates the upwelling and downdrafting events on the free surface known as "boils". The three-dimensional separation of flow at the crestline alters the distribution of wall pressure, which may cause secondary flow across the stream. The mean flow is characterized by a pair of counter-rotating streamwise vortices, with core radii of the order of the flow depth. Staggering the crestlines alters the secondary motion; two pairs of streamwise vortices appear (a strong one, centred about the lobe, and a weaker one, coming from the previous dune, centred around the saddle). The flow over barchan dunes presents significant differences to that over transverse dunes. The flow near the bed, upstream of the dune, diverges from the centerline plane; the flow close to the centerline plane separates at the crest and reattaches on the bed. Away from the centerline plane and along the horns, flow separation occurs intermittently. The flow in the separation bubble is routed towards the horns and leaves

  11. Large eddy simulation of a pumped- storage reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Launay, Marina; Leite Ribeiro, Marcelo; Roman, Federico; Armenio, Vincenzo

    2016-04-01

    The last decades have seen an increasing number of pumped-storage hydropower projects all over the world. Pumped-storage schemes move water between two reservoirs located at different elevations to store energy and to generate electricity following the electricity demand. Thus the reservoirs can be subject to important water level variations occurring at the daily scale. These new cycles leads to changes in the hydraulic behaviour of the reservoirs. Sediment dynamics and sediment budgets are modified, sometimes inducing problems of erosion and deposition within the reservoirs. With the development of computer performances, the use of numerical techniques has become popular for the study of environmental processes. Among numerical techniques, Large Eddy Simulation (LES) has arisen as an alternative tool for problems characterized by complex physics and geometries. This work uses the LES-COAST Code, a LES model under development in the framework of the Seditrans Project, for the simulation of an Upper Alpine Reservoir of a pumped-storage scheme. Simulations consider the filling (pump mode) and emptying (turbine mode) of the reservoir. The hydraulic results give a better understanding of the processes occurring within the reservoir. They are considered for an assessment of the sediment transport processes and of their consequences.

  12. Large eddy simulation of unsteady lean stratified premixed combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Duwig, C.; Fureby, C.

    2007-10-15

    Premixed turbulent flame-based technologies are rapidly growing in importance, with applications to modern clean combustion devices for both power generation and aeropropulsion. However, the gain in decreasing harmful emissions might be canceled by rising combustion instabilities. Unwanted unsteady flame phenomena that might even destroy the whole device have been widely reported and are subject to intensive studies. In the present paper, we use unsteady numerical tools for simulating an unsteady and well-documented flame. Computations were performed for nonreacting, perfectly premixed and stratified premixed cases using two different numerical codes and different large-eddy-simulation-based flamelet models. Nonreacting simulations are shown to agree well with experimental data, with the LES results capturing the mean features (symmetry breaking) as well as the fluctuation level of the turbulent flow. For reacting cases, the uncertainty induced by the time-averaging technique limited the comparisons. Given an estimate of the uncertainty, the numerical results were found to reproduce well the experimental data in terms both of mean flow field and of fluctuation levels. In addition, it was found that despite relying on different assumptions/simplifications, both numerical tools lead to similar predictions, giving confidence in the results. Moreover, we studied the flame dynamics and particularly the response to a periodic pulsation. We found that above a certain excitation level, the flame dynamic changes and becomes rather insensitive to the excitation/instability amplitude. Conclusions regarding the self-growth of thermoacoustic waves were drawn. (author)

  13. Inviscid Wall-Modeled Large Eddy Simulations for Improved Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikens, Kurt; Craft, Kyle; Redman, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    The accuracy of an inviscid flow assumption for wall-modeled large eddy simulations (LES) is examined because of its ability to reduce simulation costs. This assumption is not generally applicable for wall-bounded flows due to the high velocity gradients found near walls. In wall-modeled LES, however, neither the viscous near-wall region or the viscous length scales in the outer flow are resolved. Therefore, the viscous terms in the Navier-Stokes equations have little impact on the resolved flowfield. Zero pressure gradient flat plate boundary layer results are presented for both viscous and inviscid simulations using a wall model developed previously. The results are very similar and compare favorably to those from another wall model methodology and experimental data. Furthermore, the inviscid assumption reduces simulation costs by about 25% and 39% for supersonic and subsonic flows, respectively. Future research directions are discussed as are preliminary efforts to extend the wall model to include the effects of unresolved wall roughness. This work used the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE), which is supported by National Science Foundation grant number ACI-1053575. Computational resources on TACC Stampede were provided under XSEDE allocation ENG150001.

  14. Large Eddy Simulation of a Turbulent Buoyant Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardin, Paul E.

    1999-11-01

    Large Eddy Simulations of a helium-air turbulent plume are conducted in order to investigate the buoyancy induced vorticity production mechanisms of this flow. The inlet condition of the plume consists of a low velocity (0.35 m/sec) 1m diameter helium jet emitting upwards into air. This flow configuration is chosen to best match the experimental conditions of the non-reacting helium plume experiments taken at Sandia's FLAME facility. The compressible form of the Favre filtered Navier Stokes, species and energy equations are closed using localized dynamic Smagorinsky subgrid models . Numerical integration is performed using AUSM+ flux vector splitting that employs fifth order upwind biased interpolating stencils and advanced in time using second order Runge-Kutta along with pressure gradient scaling for improved temporal stability. The code uses MPI domain decomposition and is run on Sandia's ASCI red massively parallel computer. Results from the simulations highlight the buoyancy induced vorticity generation and entrainment properties of these flows and the effect of filter width on subgrid modeling. Comparisons to experimental data will be made whenever possible.

  15. A Large Eddy Simulation Study for upstream wind energy conditioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, V.; Calaf, M.; Parlange, M. B.

    2013-12-01

    The wind energy industry is increasingly focusing on optimal power extraction strategies based on layout design of wind farms and yaw alignment algorithms. Recent field studies by Mikkelsen et al. (Wind Energy, 2013) have explored the possibility of using wind lidar technology installed at hub height to anticipate incoming wind direction and strength for optimizing yaw alignment. In this work we study the benefits of using remote sensing technology for predicting the incoming flow by using large eddy simulations of a wind farm. The wind turbines are modeled using the classic actuator disk concept with rotation, together with a new algorithm that permits the turbines to adapt to varying flow directions. This allows for simulations of a more realistic atmospheric boundary layer driven by a time-varying geostrophic wind. Various simulations are performed to investigate possible improvement in power generation by utilizing upstream data. Specifically, yaw-correction of the wind-turbine is based on spatio-temporally averaged wind values at selected upstream locations. Velocity and turbulence intensity are also considered at those locations. A base case scenario with the yaw alignment varying according to wind data measured at the wind turbine's hub is also used for comparison. This reproduces the present state of the art where wind vanes and cup anemometers installed behind the rotor blades are used for alignment control.

  16. On the Computation of Sound by Large-Eddy Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piomelli, Ugo; Streett, Craig L.; Sarkar, Sutanu

    1997-01-01

    The effect of the small scales on the source term in Lighthill's acoustic analogy is investigated, with the objective of determining the accuracy of large-eddy simulations when applied to studies of flow-generated sound. The distribution of the turbulent quadrupole is predicted accurately, if models that take into account the trace of the SGS stresses are used. Its spatial distribution is also correct, indicating that the low-wave-number (or frequency) part of the sound spectrum can be predicted well by LES. Filtering, however, removes the small-scale fluctuations that contribute significantly to the higher derivatives in space and time of Lighthill's stress tensor T(sub ij). The rms fluctuations of the filtered derivatives are substantially lower than those of the unfiltered quantities. The small scales, however, are not strongly correlated, and are not expected to contribute significantly to the far-field sound; separate modeling of the subgrid-scale density fluctuations might, however, be required in some configurations.

  17. Study of Hydrokinetic Turbine Arrays with Large Eddy Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sale, Danny; Aliseda, Alberto

    2014-11-01

    Marine renewable energy is advancing towards commercialization, including electrical power generation from ocean, river, and tidal currents. The focus of this work is to develop numerical simulations capable of predicting the power generation potential of hydrokinetic turbine arrays-this includes analysis of unsteady and averaged flow fields, turbulence statistics, and unsteady loadings on turbine rotors and support structures due to interaction with rotor wakes and ambient turbulence. The governing equations of large-eddy-simulation (LES) are solved using a finite-volume method, and the presence of turbine blades are approximated by the actuator-line method in which hydrodynamic forces are projected to the flow field as a body force. The actuator-line approach captures helical wake formation including vortex shedding from individual blades, and the effects of drag and vorticity generation from the rough seabed surface are accounted for by wall-models. This LES framework was used to replicate a previous flume experiment consisting of three hydrokinetic turbines tested under various operating conditions and array layouts. Predictions of the power generation, velocity deficit and turbulence statistics in the wakes are compared between the LES and experimental datasets.

  18. Unsteady RANS and Large Eddy simulations of multiphase diesel injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philipp, Jenna; Green, Melissa; Akih-Kumgeh, Benjamin

    2015-11-01

    Unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) and Large Eddy Simulations (LES) of two-phase flow and evaporation of high pressure diesel injection into a quiescent, high temperature environment is investigated. Unsteady RANS and LES are turbulent flow simulation approaches used to determine complex flow fields. The latter allows for more accurate predictions of complex phenomena such as turbulent mixing and physio-chemical processes associated with diesel combustion. In this work we investigate a high pressure diesel injection using the Euler-Lagrange method for multiphase flows as implemented in the Star-CCM+ CFD code. A dispersed liquid phase is represented by Lagrangian particles while the multi-component gas phase is solved using an Eulerian method. Results obtained from the two approaches are compared with respect to spray penetration depth and air entrainment. They are also compared with experimental data taken from the Sandia Engine Combustion Network for ``Spray A''. Characteristics of primary and secondary atomization are qualitatively evaluated for all simulation modes.

  19. Large eddy simulations of a turbulent thermal plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhenghua H.

    2007-04-01

    Large eddy simulations of a three-dimensional turbulent thermal plume in an open environment have been carried out using a self-developed parallel computational fluid dynamics code SMAFS (smoke movement and flame spread) to study the thermal plume’s dynamics including its puffing, self-preserving and air entrainment. In the simulation, the sub-grid stress was modeled using both the standard Smagorinsky and the buoyancy modified Smagorinsky models, which were compared. The sub-grid scale (SGS) scalar flux in the filtered enthalpy transport equation was modeled based on a simple gradient transport hypothesis with constant SGS Prandtl number. The effect of the Smagorinsky model constant and the SGS Prandtl number were examined. The computation results were compared with experimental measurements, thermal plume theory and empirical correlations, showing good agreement. It is found that both the buoyancy modification and the SGS turbulent Prandtl number have little influence on simulation. However, the SGS model constant C s has a significant effect on the prediction of plume spreading, although it does not affect much the prediction of puffing.

  20. Large eddy simulations of blood dynamics in abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Vergara, Christian; Le Van, Davide; Quadrio, Maurizio; Formaggia, Luca; Domanin, Maurizio

    2017-09-01

    We study the effects of transition to turbulence in abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). The presence of transitional effects in such districts is related to the heart pulsatility and the sudden change of diameter of the vessels, and has been recorded by means of clinical measures as well as of computational studies. Here we propose, for the first time, the use of a large eddy simulation (LES) model to accurately describe transition to turbulence in realistic scenarios of AAA obtained from radiological images. To this aim, we post-process the obtained numerical solutions to assess significant quantities, such as the ensemble-averaged velocity and wall shear stress, the standard deviation of the fluctuating velocity field, and vortical structures educed via the so-called Q-criterion. The results demonstrate the suitability of the considered LES model and show the presence of significant transitional effects around the impingement region during the mid-deceleration phase. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Large eddy simulation for aerodynamics: status and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sagaut, Pierre; Deck, Sébastien

    2009-07-28

    The present paper provides an up-to-date survey of the use of large eddy simulation (LES) and sequels for engineering applications related to aerodynamics. Most recent landmark achievements are presented. Two categories of problem may be distinguished whether the location of separation is triggered by the geometry or not. In the first case, LES can be considered as a mature technique and recent hybrid Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS)-LES methods do not allow for a significant increase in terms of geometrical complexity and/or Reynolds number with respect to classical LES. When attached boundary layers have a significant impact on the global flow dynamics, the use of hybrid RANS-LES remains the principal strategy to reduce computational cost compared to LES. Another striking observation is that the level of validation is most of the time restricted to time-averaged global quantities, a detailed analysis of the flow unsteadiness being missing. Therefore, a clear need for detailed validation in the near future is identified. To this end, new issues, such as uncertainty and error quantification and modelling, will be of major importance. First results dealing with uncertainty modelling in unsteady turbulent flow simulation are presented.

  2. Large Eddy Simulations of Colorless Distributed Combustion Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulrahman, Husam F.; Jaberi, Farhad; Gupta, Ashwani

    2014-11-01

    Development of efficient and low-emission colorless distributed combustion (CDC) systems for gas turbine applications require careful examination of the role of various flow and combustion parameters. Numerical simulations of CDC in a laboratory-scale combustor have been conducted to carefully examine the effects of these parameters on the CDC. The computational model is based on a hybrid modeling approach combining large eddy simulation (LES) with the filtered mass density function (FMDF) equations, solved with high order numerical methods and complex chemical kinetics. The simulated combustor operates based on the principle of high temperature air combustion (HiTAC) and has shown to significantly reduce the NOx, and CO emissions while improving the reaction pattern factor and stability without using any flame stabilizer and with low pressure drop and noise. The focus of the current work is to investigate the mixing of air and hydrocarbon fuels and the non-premixed and premixed reactions within the combustor by the LES/FMDF with the reduced chemical kinetic mechanisms for the same flow conditions and configurations investigated experimentally. The main goal is to develop better CDC with higher mixing and efficiency, ultra-low emission levels and optimum residence time. The computational results establish the consistency and the reliability of LES/FMDF and its Lagrangian-Eulerian numerical methodology.

  3. Final Report: "Large-Eddy Simulation of Anisotropic MHD Turbulence"

    SciTech Connect

    Zikanov, Oleg

    2008-06-23

    To acquire better understanding of turbulence in flows of liquid metals and other electrically conducting fluids in the presence of steady magnetic fields and to develop an accurate and physically adequate LES (large-eddy simulation) model for such flows. The scientific objectives formulated in the project proposal have been fully completed. Several new directions were initiated and advanced in the course of work. Particular achievements include a detailed study of transformation of turbulence caused by the imposed magnetic field, development of an LES model that accurately reproduces this transformation, and solution of several fundamental questions of the interaction between the magnetic field and fluid flows. Eight papers have been published in respected peer-reviewed journals, with two more papers currently undergoing review, and one in preparation for submission. A post-doctoral researcher and a graduate student have been trained in the areas of MHD, turbulence research, and computational methods. Close collaboration ties have been established with the MHD research centers in Germany and Belgium.

  4. Unphysical scalar excursions in large-eddy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matheou, Georgios; Dimotakis, Paul

    2016-11-01

    The range of physically realizable values of passive scalar fields in any flow is bounded by their boundary values. The current investigation focuses on the local conservation of passive scalar concentration fields in turbulent flows and the ability of the large-eddy simulation (LES) method to observe the boundedness of passive scalar concentrations. In practice, as a result of numerical artifacts, this fundamental constraint is often violated with scalars exhibiting unphysical excursions. The present study characterizes passive-scalar excursions in LES of a turbulent shear flow and examines methods for error diagnosis. Typically, scalar-excursion errors are diagnosed as violations of global boundedness, i.e., detecting scalar-concentration values outside boundary/initial condition bounds. To quantify errors in mixed-fluid regions, a local scalar excursion error metric is defined with respect to the local non-diffusive limit. Analysis of such errors shows that unphysical scalar excursions in LES result from dispersive errors of the convection-term discretization where the subgrid-scale model (SGS) provides insufficient dissipation to produce a sufficiently smooth scalar field. Local scalar excursion errors are found not to be correlated with the local scalar-gradient magnitude. This work is supported by AFOSR, DOE, and Caltech.

  5. Large Eddy Simulation of Turbulent Flow in a Ribbed Pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Changwoo; Yang, Kyung-Soo

    2011-11-01

    Turbulent flow in a pipe with periodically wall-mounted ribs has been investigated by large eddy simulation with a dynamic subgrid-scale model. The value of Re considered is 98,000, based on hydraulic diameter and mean bulk velocity. An immersed boundary method was employed to implement the ribs in the computational domain. The spacing of the ribs is the key parameter to produce the d-type, intermediate and k-type roughness flows. The mean velocity profiles and turbulent intensities obtained from the present LES are in good agreement with the experimental measurements currently available. Turbulence statistics, including budgets of the Reynolds stresses, were computed, and analyzed to elucidate turbulence structures, especially around the ribs. In particular, effects of the ribs are identified by comparing the turbulence structures with those of smooth pipe flow. The present investigation is relevant to the erosion/corrosion that often occurs around a protruding roughness in a pipe system. This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (2010-0008457).

  6. Large-Eddy simulation of pulsatile blood flow.

    PubMed

    Paul, Manosh C; Mamun Molla, Md; Roditi, Giles

    2009-01-01

    Large-Eddy simulation (LES) is performed to study pulsatile blood flow through a 3D model of arterial stenosis. The model is chosen as a simple channel with a biological type stenosis formed on the top wall. A sinusoidal non-additive type pulsation is assumed at the inlet of the model to generate time dependent oscillating flow in the channel and the Reynolds number of 1200, based on the channel height and the bulk velocity, is chosen in the simulations. We investigate in detail the transition-to-turbulent phenomena of the non-additive pulsatile blood flow downstream of the stenosis. Results show that the high level of flow recirculation associated with complex patterns of transient blood flow have a significant contribution to the generation of the turbulent fluctuations found in the post-stenosis region. The importance of using LES in modelling pulsatile blood flow is also assessed in the paper through the prediction of its sub-grid scale contributions. In addition, some important results of the flow physics are achieved from the simulations, these are presented in the paper in terms of blood flow velocity, pressure distribution, vortices, shear stress, turbulent fluctuations and energy spectra, along with their importance to the relevant medical pathophysiology.

  7. Analysis of errors occurring in large eddy simulation.

    PubMed

    Geurts, Bernard J

    2009-07-28

    We analyse the effect of second- and fourth-order accurate central finite-volume discretizations on the outcome of large eddy simulations of homogeneous, isotropic, decaying turbulence at an initial Taylor-Reynolds number Re(lambda)=100. We determine the implicit filter that is induced by the spatial discretization and show that a higher order discretization also induces a higher order filter, i.e. a low-pass filter that keeps a wider range of flow scales virtually unchanged. The effectiveness of the implicit filtering is correlated with the optimal refinement strategy as observed in an error-landscape analysis based on Smagorinsky's subfilter model. As a point of reference, a finite-volume method that is second-order accurate for both the convective and the viscous fluxes in the Navier-Stokes equations is used. We observe that changing to a fourth-order accurate convective discretization leads to a higher value of the Smagorinsky coefficient C(S) required to achieve minimal total error at given resolution. Conversely, changing only the viscous flux discretization to fourth-order accuracy implies that optimal simulation results are obtained at lower values of C(S). Finally, a fully fourth-order discretization yields an optimal C(S) that is slightly lower than the reference fully second-order method.

  8. Properties of shallow convection from Large-Eddie simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denby, Leif; Herzog, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Utilizing Large-Eddie simulations (LES) of isolated individual convective clouds in an idealised conditionally unstable atmosphere and large-domain LES simulations of radiative-convective equilibrium (RCE) from the RICO measuring campaign (Rauber et al. 2007), vertical profiles of individual clouds and statistical properties of the cloud ensemble have been extracted and compared against predictions by an 1D entraining parcel model and against the cloud-ensemble model of the CCFM (Wagner and Graf 2010) convection scheme (which comprises a solution of a Lotka-Volterra population dynamics system). For the simulations of isolated clouds it was possible to achieve agreement with the entraining parcel model when simulations were carried out with 2D axisymmetry and the entrainment rate was prescribed using an entraining profile estimated from LES simulation using a passive tracer (in place of the traditional Morton- Turner entrainment rate parameterisation), this agreement was not achieved when comparing against 3D simulations. Integrating the entraining parcel model using the horizontal mean environment profile of the RCE simulation (and so the vertical profile as would be predicted by a climate model) it was not possible to achieve the variation in cloud-top height seen in the RCE simulation, even when greatly increasing the entrainment rate. However, if the near-environment of a convective cloud was used as the environmental profile the variation in cloud-top height was achieved (by varying the cloud-base state variables within values extracted from RCE simulation). This indicates that the near-cloud environment is significantly different that the horizontal mean environment and must be taken into account if the effect of entrainment is to be correctly captured in parameterisations for convection. Finally, size-distribution of convective clouds extracted from RCE simulation showed qualitative agreement with predictions of CCFM's spectrum model.

  9. Large-eddy simulation of combustion dynamics in swirling flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Christopher Pritchard

    The impact of premixer swirl number, S, and overall fuel equivalence ratio, phi, on the stability of a model swirl-stabilized, lean-premixed gas turbine combustor has been numerically investigated using a massively-parallel Large-Eddy Simulations Combustion Dynamics model. Through the use of a premixed combustion model, unsteady vortex-flame and acoustic-flame interactions are captured. It is observed that for flows with swirl intensity high enough to form Vortex-Breakdown (i.e., a phenomena associated with a large region of reverse or recirculating flow along the axis of rotation), the measured rms pressure amplitude (p') are attenuated significantly (over 6.6 dB reduction) compared to flows without this phenomena. The reduced p' amplitudes are accompanied by reduced longitudinal flame-front oscillations and reduced coherence in the shed vortices. Similar p' reduction levels are achieved through changes in the operating equivalence ratio, phi. Compared to the leanest equivalence ratio simulated (phi = 0.52), p' at a stoichiometric mixture is reduced by 6.0 dB. Methodologies for active control based on modulation of the inlet Swirl number (S, a measure of the intensity of swirl) and phi are also investigated. Open-loop control through S variation is demonstrated for a lean mixture with a significant reduction in the fluctuating mass-flow-rate and p' after a convective time-delay. A partially-premixed combustion model, which allows for variations in the local phi, is used to model both temporal and spatial variations in phi. It is found that the response time to changes in phi are much faster than those for changes in S. Also, it is shown that spatial variations in phi (or unmixedness) actually lead to p' attenuation in the current combustor configuration.

  10. Large eddy simulations of flow past a cubic obstacle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Kishan B.

    Turbulent flow over three dimensional obstacles is common in engineering and understanding of them is necessary to engineering design. This work is an effort to provide quantitative data on flows past three-dimensional bodies through large eddy simulations (LES). The flow over a cube mounted on a wall of a plane channel is studied. This flow exhibits characteristics common to this class of flows, including the three dimensionality of the mean flow, separation, and large scale unsteadiness. The goals of our study are to develop subgrid scale (SGS) models suitable for complex flows, to perform LES of these flows, and to use the results to aid in the identification of dynamically significant large scale structures. Included in this investigation are comparison of several SGS models, including a new model, and a study of some of the mean and unsteady characteristics of the flow. Cube flow LES were performed at both low and high Reynolds number (Reb = 3000 and 40000). The quality of results was verified by comparing them to an experiment. All the large scale features seen in the experiment are reproduced and the flow patterns are consistent with kinematic constraints. The mean flow is characterized by a strong horseshoe vortex upstream of the body, an arch vortex behind the body and vortices on the roof and the sides. The recirculation region above the roof has the strongest turbulence kinetic energy while the arch vortex has the largest turbulent shear stresses. Although the unsteady behavior is quite complicated, there are large-scale events that occur roughly periodically such as the motion of the horseshoe vortex and the vortices shed from the roof and the sides. Bimodal PDFs are typical of the region upstream of the obstacle, close to the wall. These are due to the existence of two distinct states of the flow. The dominant characteristic behind the obstacle is the quasi- periodic, alternate vortex shedding from the sides and the roof. The shedding frequency from

  11. Large-Eddy Simulation of Maritime Deep Tropical Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khairoutdinov, Marat F.; Krueger, Steve K.; Moeng, Chin-Hoh; Bogenschutz, Peter A.; Randall, David A.

    2009-04-01

    This study represents an attempt to apply Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) resolution to simulate deep tropical convection in near equilibrium for 24 hours over an area of about 205 × 205 km2, which is comparable to that of a typical horizontal grid cell in a global climate model. The simulation is driven by large-scale thermodynamic tendencies derived from mean conditions during the GATE Phase III field experiment. The LES uses 2048 × 2048 × 256 grid points with horizontal grid spacing of 100 m and vertical grid spacing ranging from 50 m in the boundary layer to 100 m in the free troposphere. The simulation reaches a near equilibrium deep convection regime in 12 hours. The simulated vertical cloud distribution exhibits a tri-modal vertical distribution of deep, middle and shallow clouds similar to that often observed in Tropics. A sensitivity experiment in which cold pools are suppressed by switching off the evaporation of precipitation results in much lower amounts of shallow and congestus clouds. Unlike the benchmark LES where the new deep clouds tend to appear along the edges of spreading cold pools, the deep clouds in the no-cold-pool experiment tend to reappear at the sites of the previous deep clouds and tend to be surrounded by extensive areas of sporadic shallow clouds. The vertical velocity statistics of updraft and downdraft cores below 6 km height are compared to aircraft observations made during GATE. The comparison shows generally good agreement, and strongly suggests that the LES simulation can be used as a benchmark to represent the dynamics of tropical deep convection on scales ranging from large turbulent eddies to mesoscale convective systems. The effect of horizontal grid resolution is examined by running the same case with progressively larger grid sizes of 200, 400, 800, and 1600 m. These runs show a reasonable agreement with the benchmark LES in statistics such as convective available potential energy, convective inhibition, cloud fraction

  12. Measurements and large eddy simulation of propagating premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Masri, A.R.; Cadwallader, B.J.; Ibrahim, S.S.

    2006-07-15

    This paper presents an experimental and numerical study of unsteady turbulent premixed flames igniting in an initially stagnant mixture and propagating past solid obstacles. The objective here is to study the outstanding issue of flow-flame interactions in transient premixed combustion environments. Particular emphasis is placed on the burning rate and the structure of the flame front. The experimental configuration consists of a chamber with a square cross-section filled with a combustible mixture of propane-air ignited from rest. An array of baffle plates as well as geometrical obstructions of varying shapes and blockage ratios, are placed in the path of the flame as it propagates from the ignition source to the vented end of the enclosure. A range of flame propagation conditions are studied experimentally. Measurements are presented for pressure-time traces, high-speed images of the flame front, mean velocities obtained from particle imaging velocimetry and laser induced fluorescence images of the hydroxyl radical OH. Three-dimensional large eddy simulations (LES) are also made for a case where a square obstacle and an array of baffle plates are placed in the chamber. The dynamic Germano model and a simple flamelet combustion model are used at the sub-grid scale. The effects of grid size and sub-grid filter width are also discussed. Calculations and measurements are found to be in good agreement with respect to flame structure and peak overpressure. Turbulence levels increase significantly at the leading edge of the flame as it propagates past the array of baffle plates and the obstacle. With reference to the regime diagrams for turbulent premixed combustion, it is noted that the flame continues to lie in the zones of thin reactions or corrugated flamelets regardless of the stage of propagation along the chamber. (author)

  13. A perspective on large eddy simulation of problems in the nuclear industry

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, Y.A.; Pruitt, J.M.; Steininger, D.A.

    1995-12-01

    Because of the complex nature of coolant flow in nuclear reactors, current subchannel methods for light water reactor analysis are insufficient. The large eddy simulation method has been proposed as a computational tool for subchannel analysis. In large eddy simulation, large flow structures are computed while small scales are modeled, thereby decreasing computational time as compared with direct numerical simulation methods. Large eddy simulation has been used in complex geometry calculations providing good results in tube bundle cross-flow situations in steam generators. It is proposed that the large eddy simulation method be extended from single- to two-phase flow calculations to help in the prediction of the thermal diffusion of energy between adjacent subchannels.

  14. Large Eddy Simulation of Vertical Axis Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hezaveh, Seyed Hossein

    Due to several design advantages and operational characteristics, particularly in offshore farms, vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) are being reconsidered as a complementary technology to horizontal axial turbines (HAWTs). However, considerable gaps remain in our understanding of VAWT performance since they have been significantly less studied than HAWTs. This thesis examines the performance of isolated VAWTs based on different design parameters and evaluates their characteristics in large wind farms. An actuator line model (ALM) is implemented in an atmospheric boundary layer large eddy simulation (LES) code, with offline coupling to a high-resolution blade-scale unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) model. The LES captures the turbine-to-farm scale dynamics, while the URANS captures the blade-to-turbine scale flow. The simulation results are found to be in good agreement with existing experimental datasets. Subsequently, a parametric study of the flow over an isolated VAWT is carried out by varying solidities, height-to-diameter aspect ratios, and tip speed ratios. The analyses of the wake area and power deficits yield an improved understanding of the evolution of VAWT wakes, which in turn enables a more informed selection of turbine designs for wind farms. One of the most important advantages of VAWTs compared to HAWTs is their potential synergistic interactions that increase their performance when placed in close proximity. Field experiments have confirmed that unlike HAWTs, VAWTs can enhance and increase the total power production when placed near each other. Based on these experiments and using ALM-LES, we also present and test new approaches for VAWT farm configuration. We first design clusters with three turbines then configure farms consisting of clusters of VAWTs rather than individual turbines. The results confirm that by using a cluster design, the average power density of wind farms can be increased by as much as 60% relative to regular

  15. Refinement of a mesoscale model for large eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasset, Nicolas

    With the advent of wind energy technology, several methods have become mature and are seen today as standard for predicting and forecasting the wind. However, their results are still site dependent, and the increasing sizes of both modern wind turbines and wind farms tackle limits of existing methods. Some triggered processes extend to the junction between microscales and mesoscales.The main objectives of this thesis are thus to identify, implement and evaluate an approach allowing for microscale and mesoscale ABL flow modelling considering the various challenges of modern wind energy applications. A literature review of ABL flow modelling from microscales to mesoscales first provides an overview of the specificities and abilities of existing methods. The combined mesoscale/large eddy simulation (LES) modelling appears to be the most promising approach, and the Compressible Community Mesoscale Model (MC2) is elected as the basis of the method in which the components required for LES are added and implemented. A detailed description of the mathematical model and the numerical aspects of the various components of the LES-capable MC2 are then presented so that a complete view of the proposed approach along with the specificities of its implementation are provided. This further allows to introduce the enhancements and new components of the method (separation of volumetric and deviatoric Reynolds tensor terms, vertical staggering, subgrid scale models, 3D turbulent diffusion, 3D turbulent kinetic energy equation), as well as the adaptation of its operating mode to allow for LES (initialization, large scale geostrophic forcing, surface and lateral boundaries). Finally, fundamental aspects and new components of the proposed approach are evaluated based on theoretical 1D Ekman boundary layer and 3D unsteady shear and buoyancy driven homogeneous surface full ABL cases. The model behaviour at high resolution as well as the components required for LES in MC2 are all finely

  16. Large-eddy simulation in complex domains using the finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    McCallen, R.C.; Kornblum, B.T.; Kollman, W.

    1996-11-12

    Finite element methods (FEM) are demonstrated in combination with large-eddy simulations (LES) as a valuable tool for the study of turbulent, separating channel flows, specifically the flow over a backward facing step.

  17. Mesoscale Ocean Large Eddy Simulations Using High-resolution Ocean Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, B.; Fox-Kemper, B.; Bachman, S.; Bryan, F.; Bailey, D. A.

    2016-02-01

    Inaccurate parameterization of sub-grid eddies can cause excessive damping and spurious diapycnal mixing, especially in high-resolution [O(10km)] ocean models. The Mesoscale Ocean Large Eddy Simulation (MOLES) approach provides a framework for developing resolution- and flow-adaptive parameterizations of eddy effects. Large eddy simulation techniques are commonly used to simulate 3D turbulence, and MOLES is modified to be appropriate for the more two-dimensional nature of mesoscale ocean turbulence. However, the effect of MOLES in high-resolution ocean models has not been investigated extensively. We will contrast results, and cost, from a suite of idealized simulations of frontal spin-down (MITgcm) and from high-resolution global climate models (0.1o, POP2), under a variety of eddy parameterizations. These include MOLES based upon 2D turbulence theory, MOLES based upon quasi-geostrophic (QG) turbulence theory, and traditional biharmonic schemes. The idealized simulations show that MOLES (particularly QG) improves the spectral slopes of energy and enstrophy near the grid-scale when compared to more traditional eddy parameterizations, across a range of grid resolutions. In the high-resolution global climate model we compare the effect of different parameterizations on the spectral characteristics of the simulated flow, and on the large-scale transport. Using MOLES in a climate model results in greater energy and variability near the grid scale, and this produces a flow, which, spectrally, is more consistent with an inertial turbulent cascade and observations of eddy behavior.

  18. On the interaction of small and large eddies in two dimensional turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foias, C.; ate work.

    1987-01-01

    Some results concerning the interaction of small and large eddies to two dimensional turbulent flows are presented. It is shown that the amplitude of small structures decays exponentially to a small value, and from this is inferred a simplified interaction law of small and large eddies. Beside their intrinsic interest for the understanding of the physics of turbulence, these results lead to new numerical schemes to be studied in a separate work.

  19. Large eddy simulation of soot evolution in an aircraft combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Michael E.; Pitsch, Heinz

    2013-11-01

    An integrated kinetics-based Large Eddy Simulation (LES) approach for soot evolution in turbulent reacting flows is applied to the simulation of a Pratt & Whitney aircraft gas turbine combustor, and the results are analyzed to provide insights into the complex interactions of the hydrodynamics, mixing, chemistry, and soot. The integrated approach includes detailed models for soot, combustion, and the unresolved interactions between soot, chemistry, and turbulence. The soot model is based on the Hybrid Method of Moments and detailed descriptions of soot aggregates and the various physical and chemical processes governing their evolution. The detailed kinetics of jet fuel oxidation and soot precursor formation is described with the Radiation Flamelet/Progress Variable model, which has been modified to account for the removal of soot precursors from the gas-phase. The unclosed filtered quantities in the soot and combustion models, such as source terms, are closed with a novel presumed subfilter PDF approach that accounts for the high subfilter spatial intermittency of soot. For the combustor simulation, the integrated approach is combined with a Lagrangian parcel method for the liquid spray and state-of-the-art unstructured LES technology for complex geometries. Two overall fuel-to-air ratios are simulated to evaluate the ability of the model to make not only absolute predictions but also quantitative predictions of trends. The Pratt & Whitney combustor is a Rich-Quench-Lean combustor in which combustion first occurs in a fuel-rich primary zone characterized by a large recirculation zone. Dilution air is then added downstream of the recirculation zone, and combustion continues in a fuel-lean secondary zone. The simulations show that large quantities of soot are formed in the fuel-rich recirculation zone, and, furthermore, the overall fuel-to-air ratio dictates both the dominant soot growth process and the location of maximum soot volume fraction. At the higher fuel

  20. A Nonlinear Interactions Approximation Model for Large-Eddy Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haliloglu, Mehmet U.; Akhavan, Rayhaneh

    2003-11-01

    A new approach to LES modelling is proposed based on direct approximation of the nonlinear terms \\overlineu_iuj in the filtered Navier-Stokes equations, instead of the subgrid-scale stress, τ_ij. The proposed model, which we call the Nonlinear Interactions Approximation (NIA) model, uses graded filters and deconvolution to parameterize the local interactions across the LES cutoff, and a Smagorinsky eddy viscosity term to parameterize the distant interactions. A dynamic procedure is used to determine the unknown eddy viscosity coefficient, rendering the model free of adjustable parameters. The proposed NIA model has been applied to LES of turbulent channel flows at Re_τ ≈ 210 and Re_τ ≈ 570. The results show good agreement with DNS not only for the mean and resolved second-order turbulence statistics but also for the full (resolved plus subgrid) Reynolds stress and turbulence intensities.

  1. Large-Eddy Simulations of Baroclinic Instability and Turbulent Mixing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    lateral mixing of fluid properties across the unstable front, and the transition from strongly horizontal, geostrophic motion on the mesoscale to three...dimensional, quasi -isotropic, non-hydrostatic motion on turbulent scales. Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting...which can be removed from the system by either a gradual cascade of energy through progressively smaller scale, quasi -two-dimensional eddies or through

  2. Large Eddy Simulation Study for Fluid Disintegration and Mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Taskinoglu, Ezgi

    2011-01-01

    A new modeling approach is based on the concept of large eddy simulation (LES) within which the large scales are computed and the small scales are modeled. The new approach is expected to retain the fidelity of the physics while also being computationally efficient. Typically, only models for the small-scale fluxes of momentum, species, and enthalpy are used to reintroduce in the simulation the physics lost because the computation only resolves the large scales. These models are called subgrid (SGS) models because they operate at a scale smaller than the LES grid. In a previous study of thermodynamically supercritical fluid disintegration and mixing, additional small-scale terms, one in the momentum and one in the energy conservation equations, were identified as requiring modeling. These additional terms were due to the tight coupling between dynamics and real-gas thermodynamics. It was inferred that if these terms would not be modeled, the high density-gradient magnitude regions, experimentally identified as a characteristic feature of these flows, would not be accurately predicted without the additional term in the momentum equation; these high density-gradient magnitude regions were experimentally shown to redistribute turbulence in the flow. And it was also inferred that without the additional term in the energy equation, the heat flux magnitude could not be accurately predicted; the heat flux to the wall of combustion devices is a crucial quantity that determined necessary wall material properties. The present work involves situations where only the term in the momentum equation is important. Without this additional term in the momentum equation, neither the SGS-flux constant-coefficient Smagorinsky model nor the SGS-flux constant-coefficient Gradient model could reproduce in LES the pressure field or the high density-gradient magnitude regions; the SGS-flux constant- coefficient Scale-Similarity model was the most successful in this endeavor although not

  3. Large eddy simulation of a high aspect ratio combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirtas, Mehmet

    The present research investigates the details of mixture preparation and combustion in a two-stroke, small-scale research engine with a numerical methodology based on large eddy simulation (LES) technique. A major motivation to study such small-scale engines is their potential use in applications requiring portable power sources with high power density. The investigated research engine has a rectangular planform with a thickness very close to quenching limits of typical hydrocarbon fuels. As such, the combustor has a high aspect ratio (defined as the ratio of surface area to volume) that makes it different than the conventional engines which typically have small aspect ratios to avoid intense heat losses from the combustor in the bulk flame propagation period. In most other aspects, this engine involves all the main characteristics of traditional reciprocating engines. A previous experimental work has identified some major design problems and demonstrated the feasibility of cyclic combustion in the high aspect ratio combustor. Because of the difficulty of carrying out experimental studies in such small devices, resolving all flow structures and completely characterizing the flame propagation have been an enormously challenging task. The numerical methodology developed in this work attempts to complement these previous studies by providing a complete evolution of flow variables. Results of the present study demonstrated strengths of the proposed methodology in revealing physical processes occuring in a typical operation of the high aspect ratio combustor. For example, in the scavenging phase, the dominant flow structure is a tumble vortex that forms due to the high velocity reactant jet (premixed) interacting with the walls of the combustor. Since the scavenging phase is a long process (about three quarters of the whole cycle), the impact of the vortex is substantial on mixture preparation for the next combustion phase. LES gives the complete evolution of this flow

  4. Impact of space dependent eddy mixing on large ocean circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradal, M. A. S.; Gnanadesikan, A.; Abernathey, R. P.

    2016-02-01

    Throughout the ocean, mesoscale eddies stir tracers such as heat, oxygen, helium, dissolved CO2, affecting their spatial distribution. Recent work (Gnanadesikan et al., 2013) showed that changes in eddy stirring could result in changes of the volume of hypoxic and anoxic waters, leading to drastic consequences for ocean biogeochemical cycles. The parameterization of mesocale eddies in global climate models (GCMs) is two parts, based on the formulations of Redi (1982) and Gent and McWilliams (1990) which are associated with mixing parameters ARedi and AGM respectively. Numerous studies have looked at the sensitivity of ESMs to changing AGM, either alone or in combination with an ARedi parameter taken to be equivalent to the value of the AGM. By contrast the impact of the Redi parameterization in isolation remains unexplored. In a previous article, Pradal and Gnanadesikan, 2014, described the sensitivity of the climate system to a six fold increase in the Redi parameter. They found that increasing the isopycnal mixing coefficient tended to warm the climate of the planet overall, through an increase of heat absorption linked to a destabilization of the halocline in subpolar regions (particularly the Southern Ocean). This previous work varied a globally constant Redi parameter from 400m2/s to 2400m2/s. New estimates from altimetry (Abernathey and Marshall, 2013) better constrain the spatial patterns and range for the ARedi parameter. Does such spatial variation matter, and if so, where does matter? Following Gnanadesikan et al. (2013) and Pradal and Gnanadesikan, 2014 this study examines this question with a suite of Earth System Models.

  5. Large-Eddy Simulation of Boundary Layer Transition on Swept Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huai, Xiaoli; Joslin, Ronald D.; Piomelli, Ugo

    1993-01-01

    The large-eddy simulation of the spatial evolution of a stationary crossflow vortex packet in a three-dimensional boundary layer was performed. Although a coarse grid was used (compared to that required by a direct numerical simulation) the essential features of the disturbance evolution, such as the spanwise disturbance spreading and the vortex rollover, were captured accurately. The eddy viscosity became significant only in the late nonlinear stages of the simulation.

  6. Application of renormalization group theory to the large-eddy simulation of transitional boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piomelli, Ugo; Zang, Thomas A.; Speziale, Charles G.; Lund, Thomas S.

    1990-01-01

    An eddy viscosity model based on the renormalization group theory of Yakhot and Orszag (1986) is applied to the large-eddy simulation of transition in a flat-plate boundary layer. The simulation predicts with satisfactory accuracy the mean velocity and Reynolds stress profiles, as well as the development of the important scales of motion. The evolution of the structures characteristic of the nonlinear stages of transition is also predicted reasonably well.

  7. Application of renormalization group theory to the large-eddy simulation of transitional boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piomelli, Ugo; Zang, Thomas A.; Speziale, Charles G.; Lund, Thomas S.

    1990-01-01

    An eddy viscosity model based on the renormalization group theory of Yakhot and Orszag (1986) is applied to the large-eddy simulation of transition in a flat-plate boundary layer. The simulation predicts with satisfactory accuracy the mean velocity and Reynolds stress profiles, as well as the development of the important scales of motion. The evolution of the structures characteristic of the nonlinear stages of transition is also predicted reasonably well.

  8. Large Eddy Simulation for Oscillating Airfoils with Large Pitching and Surging Motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocher, Alexander; Cumming, Reed; Tran, Steven; Sahni, Onkar

    2016-11-01

    Many applications of interest involve unsteady aerodynamics due to time varying flow conditions (e.g. in the case of flapping wings, rotorcrafts and wind turbines). In this study, we formulate and apply large eddy simulation (LES) to investigate flow over airfoils at a moderate mean angle of attack with large pitching and surging motions. Current LES methodology entails three features: i) a combined subgrid scale model in the context of stabilized finite element methods, ii) local variational Germano identity (VGI) along with Lagrangian averaging, and iii) arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) description over deforming unstructured meshes. Several cases are considered with different types of motions including surge only, pitch only and a combination of the two. The flow structures from these cases are analyzed and the numerical results are compared to experimental data when available.

  9. Hybrid Reynolds-Averaged/Large Eddy Simulation of a Cavity Flameholder; Assessment of Modeling Sensitivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baurle, R. A.

    2015-01-01

    Steady-state and scale-resolving simulations have been performed for flow in and around a model scramjet combustor flameholder. The cases simulated corresponded to those used to examine this flowfield experimentally using particle image velocimetry. A variety of turbulence models were used for the steady-state Reynolds-averaged simulations which included both linear and non-linear eddy viscosity models. The scale-resolving simulations used a hybrid Reynolds-averaged / large eddy simulation strategy that is designed to be a large eddy simulation everywhere except in the inner portion (log layer and below) of the boundary layer. Hence, this formulation can be regarded as a wall-modeled large eddy simulation. This effort was undertaken to formally assess the performance of the hybrid Reynolds-averaged / large eddy simulation modeling approach in a flowfield of interest to the scramjet research community. The numerical errors were quantified for both the steady-state and scale-resolving simulations prior to making any claims of predictive accuracy relative to the measurements. The steady-state Reynolds-averaged results showed a high degree of variability when comparing the predictions obtained from each turbulence model, with the non-linear eddy viscosity model (an explicit algebraic stress model) providing the most accurate prediction of the measured values. The hybrid Reynolds-averaged/large eddy simulation results were carefully scrutinized to ensure that even the coarsest grid had an acceptable level of resolution for large eddy simulation, and that the time-averaged statistics were acceptably accurate. The autocorrelation and its Fourier transform were the primary tools used for this assessment. The statistics extracted from the hybrid simulation strategy proved to be more accurate than the Reynolds-averaged results obtained using the linear eddy viscosity models. However, there was no predictive improvement noted over the results obtained from the explicit

  10. Large Eddy Simulation of Wake Vortices in the Convective Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Yuh-Lang; Han, Jongil; Zhang, Jing; Ding, Feng; Arya, S. Pal; Proctor, Fred H.

    2000-01-01

    The behavior of wake vortices in a convective boundary layer is investigated using a validated large eddy simulation model. Our results show that the vortices are largely deformed due to strong turbulent eddy motion while a sinusoidal Crow instability develops. Vortex rising is found to be caused by the updrafts (thermals) during daytime convective conditions and increases with increasing nondimensional turbulence intensity eta. In the downdraft region of the convective boundary layer, vortex sinking is found to be accelerated proportional to increasing eta, with faster speed than that in an ideal line vortex pair in an inviscid fluid. Wake vortices are also shown to be laterally transported over a significant distance due to large turbulent eddy motion. On the other hand, the decay rate of the, vortices in the convective boundary layer that increases with increasing eta, is larger in the updraft region than in the downdraft region because of stronger turbulence in the updraft region.

  11. Rayleigh-Taylor mixing: direct numerical simulation and implicit large eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youngs, David L.

    2017-07-01

    Previous research into three-dimensional numerical simulation of self-similar mixing due to Rayleigh-Taylor instability is summarized. A range of numerical approaches has been used: direct numerical simulation, implicit large eddy simulation and large eddy simulation with an explicit model for sub-grid-scale dissipation. However, few papers have made direct comparisons between the various approaches. The main purpose of the current paper is to give comparisons of direct numerical simulations and implicit large eddy simulations using the same computational framework. Results are shown for four test cases: (i) single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability, (ii) self-similar Rayleigh-Taylor mixing, (iii) three-layer mixing and (iv) a tilted-rig Rayleigh-Taylor experiment. It is found that both approaches give similar results for the high-Reynolds number behavior. Direct numerical simulation is needed to assess the influence of finite Reynolds number.

  12. A local dynamic model for large eddy simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosal, Sandip; Lund, Thomas S.; Moin, Parviz

    1993-01-01

    The dynamic model is a method for computing the coefficient C in Smagorinsky's model for the subgrid-scale stress tensor as a function of position from the information already contained in the resolved velocity field rather than treating it as an adjustable parameter. A variational formulation of the dynamic model is described that removes the inconsistency associated with taking C out of the filtering operation. This model, however, is still unstable due to the negative eddy-viscosity. Next, three models are presented that are mathematically consistent as well as numerically stable. The first two are applicable to homogeneous flows and flows with at least one homogeneous direction, respectively, and are, in fact, a rigorous derivation of the ad hoc expressions used by previous authors. The third model in this set can be applied to arbitrary flows, and it is stable because the C it predicts is always positive. Finally, a model involving the subgrid-scale kinetic energy is presented which attempts to model backscatter. This last model has some desirable theoretical features. However, even though it gives results in LES that are qualitatively correct, it is outperformed by the simpler constrained variational models. It is suggested that one of the constrained variational models should be used for actual LES while theoretical investigation of the kinetic energy approach should be continued in an effort to improve its predictive power and to understand more about backscatter.

  13. Discussion of the potential and limitations of direct and large-eddy simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussaini, M. Y.; Speziale, Charles G.; Zang, Thomas A.

    1989-01-01

    The full text of the discussion paper presented at the Whither Turbulence Workshop on the potential and limitations of direct and large-eddy simulations is provided. Particular emphasis is placed on discussing the role of numerics and mathematical theory in direct simulations of both compressible and incompressible flows. A variety of unresolved issues with large-eddy simulations such as their implementation in high-order finite difference codes, problems with defiltering, and modifications to accommodate integrations to solid boundaries are elaborated on. These as well as other points are discussed in detail along with the authors' views concerning the prospects for future research.

  14. Relationships between persistent large-scale flow anomalies and variation in synoptic-scale eddy activity and cyclogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dole, Randall M.; Neilley, Peter P.

    1988-01-01

    Observational analyses to study the relationships between large-scale flow anomalies and variations in synoptic-scale eddy activity and cyclogenesis are presented. The way in which changes in the large-scale flow influence the behavior of synoptic-scale eddies and the way in which changes in eddies may feedback to influence the large-scale flow anomalies are examined. Situations characterized by differing large-scale flows are compared, showing well-defined diferences in synoptic-scale eddy activity. The net forcings of anomalous mean flows by eddies as deduced from tendency methods and E-vector analyses suggest that synoptic-scale eddies may play an important role in maintaining certain anomalous flow patterns such as blocking.

  15. On the large eddy simulation of turbulent flows in complex geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosal, Sandip

    1993-01-01

    Application of the method of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) to a turbulent flow consists of three separate steps. First, a filtering operation is performed on the Navier-Stokes equations to remove the small spatial scales. The resulting equations that describe the space time evolution of the 'large eddies' contain the subgrid-scale (sgs) stress tensor that describes the effect of the unresolved small scales on the resolved scales. The second step is the replacement of the sgs stress tensor by some expression involving the large scales - this is the problem of 'subgrid-scale modeling'. The final step is the numerical simulation of the resulting 'closed' equations for the large scale fields on a grid small enough to resolve the smallest of the large eddies, but still much larger than the fine scale structures at the Kolmogorov length. In dividing a turbulent flow field into 'large' and 'small' eddies, one presumes that a cut-off length delta can be sensibly chosen such that all fluctuations on a scale larger than delta are 'large eddies' and the remainder constitute the 'small scale' fluctuations. Typically, delta would be a length scale characterizing the smallest structures of interest in the flow. In an inhomogeneous flow, the 'sensible choice' for delta may vary significantly over the flow domain. For example, in a wall bounded turbulent flow, most statistical averages of interest vary much more rapidly with position near the wall than far away from it. Further, there are dynamically important organized structures near the wall on a scale much smaller than the boundary layer thickness. Therefore, the minimum size of eddies that need to be resolved is smaller near the wall. In general, for the LES of inhomogeneous flows, the width of the filtering kernel delta must be considered to be a function of position. If a filtering operation with a nonuniform filter width is performed on the Navier-Stokes equations, one does not in general get the standard large eddy

  16. New subgrid-scale models for large-eddy simulation of Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabbagh, F.; Trias, F. X.; Gorobets, A.; Oliva, A.

    2016-09-01

    At the crossroad between flow topology analysis and the theory of turbulence, a new eddy-viscosity model for Large-eddy simulation has been recently proposed by Trias et al.[PoF, 27, 065103 (2015)]. The S3PQR-model has the proper cubic near-wall behaviour and no intrinsic limitations for statistically inhomogeneous flows. In this work, the new model has been tested for an air turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection in a rectangular cell of aspect ratio unity and n span-wise open-ended distance. To do so, direct numerical simulation has been carried out at two Rayleigh numbers Ra = 108 and 1010, to assess the model performance and investigate a priori the effect of the turbulent Prandtl number. Using an approximate formula based on the Taylor series expansion, the turbulent Prandtl number has been calculated and revealed a constant and Ra-independent value across the bulk region equals to 0.55. It is found that the turbulent components of eddy-viscosity and eddy-diffusivity are positively prevalent to maintain a turbulent wind essentially driven by the mean buoyant force at the sidewalls. On the other hand, the new eddy-viscosity model is preliminary tested for the case of Ra = 108 and showed overestimation of heat flux within the boundary layer but fairly good prediction of turbulent kinetics at this moderate turbulent flow.

  17. Instability of the perfect subgrid model in implicit-filtering large eddy simulation of geostrophic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Nadiga, B T; Livescu, D

    2007-04-01

    We demonstrate, in the context of implicit-filtering large eddy simulations (LESs) of geostrophic turbulence, that while the attractor of a well-resolved statistically stationary turbulent flow can be reached in a coarsely resolved LES that is forced by the subgrid scale (SGS) terms diagnosed from the well-resolved computation, the attractor is generically unstable: the coarsely resolved LES system forced by the diagnosed SGS eddy terms has multiple attractors. This points to the importance of interpreting the diagnosed SGS forcing terms in a well-resolved computation or experiment from a combined physical-numerical point of view rather than from a purely physical point of view.

  18. Large eddy simulation of forest canopy flow for wildland fire modeling

    Treesearch

    Eric Mueller; William Mell; Albert Simeoni

    2014-01-01

    Large eddy simulation (LES) based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulators have obtained increasing attention in the wildland fire research community, as these tools allow the inclusion of important driving physics. However, due to the complexity of the models, individual aspects must be isolated and tested rigorously to ensure meaningful results. As wind is a...

  19. A posterirori study of models for large eddy simulations of drop-laden flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leboissetier, A.; Okong'o, N. A.; Bellan, J.

    2003-01-01

    Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is conducted of a three-dimensional temporal mixing layer whose stream is initially laden with liquid drops which may evaporate during the simulation. The gas-phase equations are written in Eulerian frame for two perfect gas species (carrier gas and vapor emanating from the drops), while the liquid-phase equations are written in a Lagrangian frame.

  20. Model consistency in the large eddy simulation of turbulent channel flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moin, Parviz; Ferziger, Joel H.; Piomelli, Ugo

    1987-01-01

    Various combinations of filters and subgrid scale stress models for large eddy simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations are studied by a priori tests and numerical simulations. Consistency between model and filter is found to be essential to ensure accurate results. Results and limitations of the a priori test are discussed. The effect of grid refinement is also examined.

  1. Wind Energy-Related Atmospheric Boundary Layer Large-Eddy Simulation Using OpenFOAM: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Churchfield, M.J.; Vijayakumar, G.; Brasseur, J.G.; Moriarty, P.J.

    2010-08-01

    This paper develops and evaluates the performance of a large-eddy simulation (LES) solver in computing the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) over flat terrain under a variety of stability conditions, ranging from shear driven (neutral stratification) to moderately convective (unstable stratification).

  2. Large eddy simulation of wire-wrapped fuel pins I: Hydrodynamics in a periodic array.

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, P.; Lottes, J.; Siegel, A.; Palmiotti, G.

    2007-01-01

    We present large-eddy simulations of flow in a wire-wrapped fuel assembly at subchannel Reynolds numbers of Re{sub h} = 4684-29184. The domain consists of a single pin in a hexagonally periodic array, corresponding to two interior subchannels. Periodic boundary conditions are also used in the axial direction over a single wire-wrap period.

  3. Model consistency in the large eddy simulation of turbulent channel flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moin, Parviz; Ferziger, Joel H.; Piomelli, Ugo

    1987-01-01

    Various combinations of filters and subgrid scale stress models for large eddy simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations are studied by a priori tests and numerical simulations. Consistency between model and filter is found to be essential to ensure accurate results. Results and limitations of the a priori test are discussed. The effect of grid refinement is also examined.

  4. Turbulent Eddy Viscosity and Large-Scale Convection in the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, Richard B.

    2000-01-01

    It is suggested here that the laminar character of the large-scale deep convective flows appearing in numerical simulations of the Sun's convective envelope arises from the effect of turbulent eddy viscosity. Previously, M. Schwarzchild suggested the same idea to explain the observed surface granulation in the Sun.

  5. A posterirori study of models for large eddy simulations of drop-laden flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leboissetier, A.; Okong'o, N. A.; Bellan, J.

    2003-01-01

    Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is conducted of a three-dimensional temporal mixing layer whose stream is initially laden with liquid drops which may evaporate during the simulation. The gas-phase equations are written in Eulerian frame for two perfect gas species (carrier gas and vapor emanating from the drops), while the liquid-phase equations are written in a Lagrangian frame.

  6. Large-Eddy Simulations and Lidar Measurements of Vortex-Pair Breakup in Aircraft Wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewellen, D. C.; Lewellen, W. S.; Poole, L. R.; DeCoursey, R. J.; Hansen, G. M.; Hostetler, C. A.; Kent, G. S.

    1998-01-01

    Results of large-eddy simulations of an aircraft wake are compared with results from ground-based lidar measurements made at NASA Langley Research Center during the Subsonic Assessment Near-Field Interaction Flight Experiment field tests. Brief reviews of the design of the field test for obtaining the evolution of wake dispersion behind a Boeing 737 and of the model developed for simulating such wakes are given. Both the measurements and the simulations concentrate on the period from a few seconds to a few minutes after the wake is generated, during which the essentially two-dimensional vortex pair is broken up into a variety of three-dimensional eddies. The model and experiment show similar distinctive breakup eddies induced by the mutual interactions of the vortices, after perturbation by the atmospheric motions.

  7. Application and comparison of two SGS models in large eddy simulation of free turbulent jet flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hong; Su, Mingde

    1999-03-01

    Large eddy simulations of spatially evolved turbulent round jets were presented. The two SGS models called the standard Smagorinsky's eddy viscosity model and the non-eddy viscosity stimulated small scale (SSS) model developed by Shah & Ferziger were applied. The Reynolds number of the flow was taken as 10000 based on the orifice diameter and the axial velocity in the orifice. The comparison between these two models showed that the standard Smagorinsky's viscosity model with Smagorinsky's constant of 0.1 underestimated the turbulent intensity, while the SSS model showed a better agreement with the experiment. Also the SSS model was used to investigate the development of vortex. The convective boundary condition at the outflow boundary was adopted to ensure less effect of noise on the upstream.

  8. Large-Eddy Simulations and Lidar Measurements of Vortex-Pair Breakup in Aircraft Wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewellen, D. C.; Lewellen, W. S.; Poole, L. R.; DeCoursey, R. J.; Hansen, G. M.; Hostetler, C. A.; Kent, G. S.

    1998-01-01

    Results of large-eddy simulations of an aircraft wake are compared with results from ground-based lidar measurements made at NASA Langley Research Center during the Subsonic Assessment Near-Field Interaction Flight Experiment field tests. Brief reviews of the design of the field test for obtaining the evolution of wake dispersion behind a Boeing 737 and of the model developed for simulating such wakes are given. Both the measurements and the simulations concentrate on the period from a few seconds to a few minutes after the wake is generated, during which the essentially two-dimensional vortex pair is broken up into a variety of three-dimensional eddies. The model and experiment show similar distinctive breakup eddies induced by the mutual interactions of the vortices, after perturbation by the atmospheric motions.

  9. Explicit filtering and exact reconstruction of the sub-filter stresses in large eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, Jonathan R.; Jameson, Antony

    2016-02-01

    Explicit filtering has the effect of reducing numerical or aliasing errors near the grid scale in large eddy simulation (LES). We use a differential filter, namely the inverse Helmholtz operator, which is readily applied to unstructured meshes. The filter is invertible, which allows the sub-filter scale (SFS) stresses to be exactly reconstructed in terms of the filtered solution. Unlike eddy viscosity models, the method of filtering and reconstruction avoids making any physical assumptions and is therefore valid in any flow regime. The sub-grid scale (SGS) stresses are not recoverable by reconstruction, but the second-order finite element method used here is an adequate source of numerical dissipation in lieu of an SGS model. Results for incompressible turbulent channel flow at Reτ = 180 are presented which show that explicit filtering and exact SFS reconstruction is a significant improvement over the standard LES approach of implicit filtering and eddy-viscosity SGS modelling.

  10. Large-eddy simulation of turbulent pipe flow at large Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Namiko; Pullin, Dale; Blackburn, Hugh

    2013-11-01

    We describe large-eddy simulations (LES), using a spectral-element method, of turbulent smooth- and rough-wall pipe flows. The spectral-element code SEMTEX was used (Blackburn and Sherwin J. Comput. Phys. 2004) in a mode where the axial direction is treated using Fourier modes, with a spectral-element representation within the cross-flow plane with Dirichlet boundary conditions on the circular pipe boundary. The stretched-vortex subgrid-stress model is utilized together with the wall-model of Chung and Pullin (JFM, 2009). For rough-wall flows, local subgrid roughness is incorporated by the addition of an empirical roughness function uτΔ+ (ks+) , where ks+ =ksuτ / ν and ks is the equivalent sand roughness. This is used in both the inner-scaling ansatz for the unsteady term of the wall-normal integration of the stream-wise momentum equation, and also in the log-like profile used to give a boundary condition for the outer-flow LES. Results will be discussed that include variation of the skin-friction coefficient as a function of both Reynolds number and the ratio of ks to the pipe radius, and also mean velocity profiles and some turbulence statistics.

  11. Large-scale large eddy simulation of nuclear reactor flows: Issues and perspectives

    DOE PAGES

    Merzari, Elia; Obabko, Aleks; Fischer, Paul; ...

    2016-11-03

    Numerical simulation has been an intrinsic part of nuclear engineering research since its inception. In recent years a transition is occurring toward predictive, first-principle-based tools such as computational fluid dynamics. Even with the advent of petascale computing, however, such tools still have significant limitations. In the present work some of these issues, and in particular the presence of massive multiscale separation, are discussed, as well as some of the research conducted to mitigate them. Petascale simulations at high fidelity (large eddy simulation/direct numerical simulation) were conducted with the massively parallel spectral element code Nek5000 on a series of representative problems.more » These simulations shed light on the requirements of several types of simulation: (1) axial flow around fuel rods, with particular attention to wall effects; (2) natural convection in the primary vessel; and (3) flow in a rod bundle in the presence of spacing devices. Finally, the focus of the work presented here is on the lessons learned and the requirements to perform these simulations at exascale. Additional physical insight gained from these simulations is also emphasized.« less

  12. Large-scale large eddy simulation of nuclear reactor flows: Issues and perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Merzari, Elia; Obabko, Aleks; Fischer, Paul; Halford, Noah; Walker, Justin; Siegel, Andrew; Yu, Yiqi

    2016-11-03

    Numerical simulation has been an intrinsic part of nuclear engineering research since its inception. In recent years a transition is occurring toward predictive, first-principle-based tools such as computational fluid dynamics. Even with the advent of petascale computing, however, such tools still have significant limitations. In the present work some of these issues, and in particular the presence of massive multiscale separation, are discussed, as well as some of the research conducted to mitigate them. Petascale simulations at high fidelity (large eddy simulation/direct numerical simulation) were conducted with the massively parallel spectral element code Nek5000 on a series of representative problems. These simulations shed light on the requirements of several types of simulation: (1) axial flow around fuel rods, with particular attention to wall effects; (2) natural convection in the primary vessel; and (3) flow in a rod bundle in the presence of spacing devices. Finally, the focus of the work presented here is on the lessons learned and the requirements to perform these simulations at exascale. Additional physical insight gained from these simulations is also emphasized.

  13. Large Eddy Simulation in the Computation of Jet Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mankbadi, R. R.; Goldstein, M. E.; Povinelli, L. A.; Hayder, M. E.; Turkel, E.

    1999-01-01

    Noise can be predicted by solving Full (time-dependent) Compressible Navier-Stokes Equation (FCNSE) with computational domain. The fluctuating near field of the jet produces propagating pressure waves that produce far-field sound. The fluctuating flow field as a function of time is needed in order to calculate sound from first principles. Noise can be predicted by solving the full, time-dependent, compressible Navier-Stokes equations with the computational domain extended to far field - but this is not feasible as indicated above. At high Reynolds number of technological interest turbulence has large range of scales. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) can not capture the small scales of turbulence. The large scales are more efficient than the small scales in radiating sound. The emphasize is thus on calculating sound radiated by large scales.

  14. Hybrid Reynolds-Averaged/Large Eddy Simulation of the Flow in a Model SCRamjet Cavity Flameholder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baurle, R. A.

    2016-01-01

    Steady-state and scale-resolving simulations have been performed for flow in and around a model scramjet combustor flameholder. Experimental data available for this configuration include velocity statistics obtained from particle image velocimetry. Several turbulence models were used for the steady-state Reynolds-averaged simulations which included both linear and non-linear eddy viscosity models. The scale-resolving simulations used a hybrid Reynolds-averaged/large eddy simulation strategy that is designed to be a large eddy simulation everywhere except in the inner portion (log layer and below) of the boundary layer. Hence, this formulation can be regarded as a wall-modeled large eddy simulation. This e ort was undertaken to not only assess the performance of the hybrid Reynolds-averaged / large eddy simulation modeling approach in a flowfield of interest to the scramjet research community, but to also begin to understand how this capability can best be used to augment standard Reynolds-averaged simulations. The numerical errors were quantified for the steady-state simulations, and at least qualitatively assessed for the scale-resolving simulations prior to making any claims of predictive accuracy relative to the measurements. The steady-state Reynolds-averaged results displayed a high degree of variability when comparing the flameholder fuel distributions obtained from each turbulence model. This prompted the consideration of applying the higher-fidelity scale-resolving simulations as a surrogate "truth" model to calibrate the Reynolds-averaged closures in a non-reacting setting prior to their use for the combusting simulations. In general, the Reynolds-averaged velocity profile predictions at the lowest fueling level matched the particle imaging measurements almost as well as was observed for the non-reacting condition. However, the velocity field predictions proved to be more sensitive to the flameholder fueling rate than was indicated in the measurements.

  15. Development of Large-Eddy Interaction Model for inhomogeneous turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, S. K.; Payne, F. R.

    1987-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the applicability of a currently proposed model, with minimum empiricism, for calculation of the Reynolds stresses and other turbulence structural quantities in a channel. The current Large-Eddy Interaction Model not only yields Reynolds stresses but also presents an opportunity to illuminate typical characteristic motions of large-scale turbulence and the phenomenological aspects of engineering models for two Reynolds numbers.

  16. Large-eddy simulation of a turbulent mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansour, N. N.; Ferziger, J. H.; Reynolds, W. C.

    1978-01-01

    The three dimensional, time dependent (incompressible) vorticity equations were used to simulate numerically the decay of isotropic box turbulence and time developing mixing layers. The vorticity equations were spatially filtered to define the large scale turbulence field, and the subgrid scale turbulence was modeled. A general method was developed to show numerical conservation of momentum, vorticity, and energy. The terms that arise from filtering the equations were treated (for both periodic boundary conditions and no stress boundary conditions) in a fast and accurate way by using fast Fourier transforms. Use of vorticity as the principal variable is shown to produce results equivalent to those obtained by use of the primitive variable equations.

  17. Implicit Large-Eddy Simulation of Transition and Turbulence Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinstein, Fernando

    2014-11-01

    In ILES, energy-containing large scales are resolved, and physics capturing numerics are used to spatially filter-out unresolved scales and implicitly model subgrid scale effects. Analysis of transition and decay in the ILES context are the focus of the present work. Euler based ILES is based on using the LANL RAGE code with triple-periodic boundary conditions on evenly spaced grids involving 64, 128, 256, and 512 cells in each direction; Navier-Stokes based isotropic turbulence data generated with the CFDNS code provided initial conditions for ILES. Effects of grid resolution on the ILES unsteady turbulence measures are examined in detail.

  18. Large-eddy transport in the surface layer over heterogeneous terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauder, M.; Eder, F.; De Roo, F.; Brugger, P.; Schmid, H. P. E.; Rotenberg, E.; Yakir, D.

    2015-12-01

    Surface heterogeneity and complex terrain invalidate to a certain extent basic assumptions behind the classical turbulence theory. One important classical concept is Townsend's hypothesis, which postulates that outer layer scale and inner layer scale turbulence do not interact. However, there is little knowledge to what extent large-scale eddies can affect near-surface fluxes. We shall investigate the relevance of large-eddy transport in the surface layer by an integrated approach combining field measurements and numerical simulations. Doppler lidar and tower-based turbulence measurements were conducted at the Yatir forest in Israel, which is surrounded by semi-arid shrubland. Vertical profiles of vertical and horizontal wind speed and direction were determined from Doppler lidar data. Eddy-covariance measurements were conducted at two sites. In addition, idealized large-eddy simulations (LES) were performed. A virtual control volume method allowed us to disentangle all components of the total surface flux. The daytime sensible heat flux over the forest was almost twice as large as over the surrounding shrubland. These very large differences in surface heating generated a secondary circulation, which was detected by the Doppler lidar measurements. Persistent updrafts were detected above the forest. Tower measurements at the shrubland site showed generally larger low-frequency contributions in spectra and co-spectra, and the energy balance ratio over the forest was 1.00, while it was only 0.81 at the shrubland site. LES results indicate that advection is the main cause for the lack of energy balance closure at the shrubland site. Over the forest, an equally large advective flux (in the opposite direction as over the shrubland) is almost completely balanced by horizontal flux divergence. We conclude that secondary circulations indeed exist over the Yatir forest, and that they can be detected from Doppler lidar data. Against the prediction of Townsend's hypothesis

  19. Requirements for large-eddy simulation of surface wind gusts in a mountain valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revell, Michael J.; Purnell, Don; Lauren, Michael K.

    1996-09-01

    During the passage of a front, data from a light-weight cup anemometer and wind vane, sited in a steep-walled glacial valley of the Mt Cook region of the Southern Alps of New Zealand, were analysed to derive a power spectrum of the wind velocity for periods between 0.5 and 16 min. The energy spectrum roughly followed a -5/3 power law over the range of periods from 0.5 4 min — as might be expected in the case of an inertial subrange of eddies. However, any inertial subrange clearly does not extend to periods longer than this. We suggest that the observed eddies were generated in a turbulent wake associated with flow separation at the ridge crests, and large eddies are shed at periods of 4 8 min or more. A compressible fluid-dynamic model, with a Smagorinsky turbulence closure scheme and a “law of the wall” at the surface, was used to calculate flow over a cross section through this area in neutrally stratified conditions. A range of parameters was explored to assess some of the requirements for simulating surface wind gusts in mountainous terrain in New Zealand. In order to approximate the observed wind spectrum at Tasman aerodrome, Mount Cook, we found the model must be three-dimensional, with a horizontal resolution better than 250 m and with a Reynolds-stress eddy viscosity of less than 5 m2 s-1. In two-dimensional simulations, the eddies were too big in size and in amplitude and at the surface this was associated with reversed flow extending too far downstream. In contrast the three-dimensional simulations gave a realistic gusting effect associated with large scale “cat's paws” (a bigger variety of those commonly seen over water downstream of moderate hills), with reversed flow only at the steep part of the lee slope. The simulations were uniformly improved by better resolution, at all tested resolutions down to 250 m mesh size. The spectra of large eddies simulated in steep terrain were not very sensitive to the details of the eddy stress formulation

  20. Large Eddy Simulations of Severe Convection Induced Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Nash'at; Proctor, Fred

    2011-01-01

    Convective storms can pose a serious risk to aviation operations since they are often accompanied by turbulence, heavy rain, hail, icing, lightning, strong winds, and poor visibility. They can cause major delays in air traffic due to the re-routing of flights, and by disrupting operations at the airports in the vicinity of the storm system. In this study, the Terminal Area Simulation System is used to simulate five different convective events ranging from a mesoscale convective complex to isolated storms. The occurrence of convection induced turbulence is analyzed from these simulations. The validation of model results with the radar data and other observations is reported and an aircraft-centric turbulence hazard metric calculated for each case is discussed. The turbulence analysis showed that large pockets of significant turbulence hazard can be found in regions of low radar reflectivity. Moderate and severe turbulence was often found in building cumulus turrets and overshooting tops.

  1. High Speed Jet Noise Prediction Using Large Eddy Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lele, Sanjiva K.

    2002-01-01

    Current methods for predicting the noise of high speed jets are largely empirical. These empirical methods are based on the jet noise data gathered by varying primarily the jet flow speed, and jet temperature for a fixed nozzle geometry. Efforts have been made to correlate the noise data of co-annular (multi-stream) jets and for the changes associated with the forward flight within these empirical correlations. But ultimately these emipirical methods fail to provide suitable guidance in the selection of new, low-noise nozzle designs. This motivates the development of a new class of prediction methods which are based on computational simulations, in an attempt to remove the empiricism of the present day noise predictions.

  2. Significant sink of ocean eddy energy near western boundaries and its potential influence on the large scale ocean circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, X.; Johnson, H. L.; Marshall, D. P.; Saenko, O. A.

    2012-04-01

    Ocean eddies generated through instability of the mean flow play a vital role in balancing the energy budget of the global ocean. In equilibrium, the sources and sinks of eddy energy have to be balanced. However, where and how eddy energy is removed remains a large source of uncertainty. Ocean eddies are observed to propagate westward at speeds similar to the phase speeds of classical Rossby waves, but what happens to the eddies when they encounter the western boundary is unclear. Using a simple reduced-gravity model and satellite altimetry data, we show that the western boundary acts as a ``graveyard'' for the westward-propagating ocean eddies. We estimate a convergence of eddy energy near the western boundary of approximately 0.1~0.3 terawatts, poleward of 10 degree of latitude. This energy is most likely scattered into high-wavenumber vertical modes, resulting in energy dissipation and diapycnal mixing. A set of sensitivity experiments are conducted using an ocean general circulation model to investigate the effect of this eddy energy sink on ocean stratification and large-scale circulation, through the impact of energy dissipation on diapycnal mixing. It is found that with the addition of the eddy energy sink, the deep ocean thermal structure becomes closer to that observed, and the overturning circulation and stratification in the abyss become stronger. The Drake Passage transport also increases and becomes closer to its observational estimates.

  3. Large-eddy simulation of a boundary layer with concave streamwise curvature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lund, Thomas S.

    1994-01-01

    Turbulence modeling continues to be one of the most difficult problems in fluid mechanics. Existing prediction methods are well developed for certain classes of simple equilibrium flows, but are still not entirely satisfactory for a large category of complex non-equilibrium flows found in engineering practice. Direct and large-eddy simulation (LES) approaches have long been believed to have great potential for the accurate prediction of difficult turbulent flows, but the associated computational cost has been prohibitive for practical problems. This remains true for direct simulation but is no longer clear for large-eddy simulation. Advances in computer hardware, numerical methods, and subgrid-scale modeling have made it possible to conduct LES for flows or practical interest at Reynolds numbers in the range of laboratory experiments. The objective of this work is to apply ES and the dynamic subgrid-scale model to the flow of a boundary layer over a concave surface.

  4. Improved turbulence models based on large eddy simulation of homogeneous, incompressible turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardino, J.; Ferziger, J. H.; Reynolds, W. C.

    1983-01-01

    The physical bases of large eddy simulation and subgrid modeling are studied. A subgrid scale similarity model is developed that can account for system rotation. Large eddy simulations of homogeneous shear flows with system rotation were carried out. Apparently contradictory experimental results were explained. The main effect of rotation is to increase the transverse length scales in the rotation direction, and thereby decrease the rates of dissipation. Experimental results are shown to be affected by conditions at the turbulence producing grid, which make the initial states a function of the rotation rate. A two equation model is proposed that accounts for effects of rotation and shows good agreement with experimental results. In addition, a Reynolds stress model is developed that represents the turbulence structure of homogeneous shear flows very well and can account also for the effects of system rotation.

  5. Large-eddy simulation of curved-geometry flows using contravariant components of velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Weixing; Xu, Hongyi; Khalid, Mahmood

    2011-01-01

    The current large-eddy simulation (LES) research makes use of the contravariant components as the dependent variables on a staggered grid system for the discretisation of the governing equations in curvilinear coordinates. This technology provides a possibility to investigate efficiently turbulent flows in complex geometries. To test and validate the recently developed in-house LES code, LESSGA (Large-Eddy Simulation on a Staggered Grid Arrangement), numerical simulations were performed for turbulent flows in a concentric annular pipe and transitional flows past an airfoil. In this article, the computed results of flows in a concentric annular pipe with a radius ratio of a = R inner/Router = 0.5 at ? and flows past an SD7003 airfoil at Rec = 60,000 and angle of attack α = 4° are compared with available experimental and DNS data. Technical difficulties experienced are also discussed.

  6. Explaining the Weddell Polynya--a large ocean eddy shed at Maud Rise.

    PubMed

    Holland, D M

    2001-06-01

    Satellite observations have shown the occasional occurrence of a large opening in the sea-ice cover of the Weddell Sea, Antarctica, a phenomenon known as the Weddell Polynya. The transient appearance, position, size, and shape of the polynya is explained here by a mechanism by which modest variations in the large-scale oceanic flow past the Maud Rise seamount cause a horizontal cyclonic eddy to be shed from its northeast flank. The shed eddy transmits a divergent Ekman stress into the sea ice, leading to a crescent-shaped opening in the pack. Atmospheric thermodynamical interaction further enhances the opening by inducing oceanic convection. A sea-ice-ocean computer model simulation vividly demonstrates how this mechanism fully accounts for the characteristics that mark Weddell Polynya events.

  7. Large eddy simulation of mixing between hot and cold sodium flows - comparison with experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Simoneau, J.P.; Noe, H.; Menant, B.

    1995-09-01

    The large eddy simulation is becoming a potential powerful tool for the calculation of turbulent flows. In nuclear liquid metal cooled fast reactors, the knowledge of the turbulence characteristics is of great interest for the prediction and the analysis of thermal stripping phenomena. The objective of this paper is to give a contribution in the evaluation of the large eddy simulation technique is an individual case. The problem chosen is the case of the mixing between hot and cold sodium flows. The computations are compared with available sodium tests. This study shows acceptable qualitative results but the simple model used is not able to predict the turbulence characteristics. More complex models including larger domains around the fluctuating zone and fluctuating boundary conditions could be necessary. Validation works are continuing.

  8. High-Accuracy Near-Surface Large-Eddy Simulation with Planar Topography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-03

    Incorrect prediction of vertical transport of CO2 and other greenhouse gases may affect related predictions of upper atmosphere chemistry. The... atmospheric boundary layer, ABL, planetary boundary layer, PBL, turbulent boundary layer REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT...in non peer-reviewed journals: Jan 2012, NREL National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) “Designing Large-Eddy Simulation of the Atmospheric Boundary

  9. Large-Eddy Simulation of Coherent Flow Structures within a Cubical Canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inagaki, Atsushi; Castillo, Marieta Cristina L.; Yamashita, Yoshimi; Kanda, Manabu; Takimoto, Hiroshi

    2012-02-01

    Instantaneous flow structures "within" a cubical canopy are investigated via large-eddy simulation. The main topics of interest are, (1) large-scale coherent flow structures within a cubical canopy, (2) how the structures are coupled with the turbulent organized structures (TOS) above them, and (3) the classification and quantification of representative instantaneous flow patterns within a street canyon in relation to the coherent structures. We use a large numerical domain (2,560 m × 2,560 m × 1,710 m) with a fine spatial resolution (2.5 m), thereby simulating a complete daytime atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), as well as explicitly resolving a regular array of cubes (40 m in height) at the surface. A typical urban ABL is numerically modelled. In this situation, the constant heat supply from roof and floor surfaces sustains a convective mixed layer as a whole, but strong wind shear near the canopy top maintains the surface layer nearly neutral. The results reveal large coherent structures in both the velocity and temperature fields "within" the canopy layer. These structures are much larger than the cubes, and their shapes and locations are shown to be closely related to the TOS above them. We classify the instantaneous flow patterns in a cavity, specifically focusing on two characteristic flow patterns: flushing and cavity-eddy events. Flushing indicates a strong upward motion, while a cavity eddy is characterized by a dominant vortical motion within a single cavity. Flushing is clearly correlated with the TOS above, occurring frequently beneath low-momentum streaks. The instantaneous momentum and heat transport within and above a cavity due to flushing and cavity-eddy events are also quantified.

  10. Turbulence Structure and Implications for Dispersion: Insights from Large-Eddy Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Calhoun, R; Cederwall, R; Street, R

    1999-10-04

    We have presented two flows where detailed knowledge of the fluid mechanics would appear to be crucial for accurate dispersion modeling. We expect that Large-eddy simulations (LES) will complement traditional dispersion modeling by providing both the ability to discern between cases where traditional models work well and cases where more complicated characterizations are necessary, and a method to investigate potentially unique flow features and turbulence structure for specific flow problems.

  11. Large Eddy Simulations of Transverse Combustion Instability in a Multi-Element Injector

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-27

    Briefing Charts 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 01 July 2016 - 27 July 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Large Eddy Simulations of Transverse Combustion...Simulations of  Transverse   Combustion Instability in a Multi‐Element Injector 2 History Damaged engine injector  faceplate caused by combustion...Purdue University Distribution Statement A: Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited. PA Clearance #16346 4 Transverse  Instability

  12. Direct-Numerical and Large-Eddy Simulations of a Non-Equilibrium Turbulent Kolmogorov Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodruff, S. L.; Shebalin, J. V.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1999-01-01

    A non-equilibrium form of turbulent Kolmogorov flow is set up by making an instantaneous change in the amplitude of the spatially-periodic forcing. It is found that the response of the flow to this instantaneous change becomes more dramatic as the wavenumber of the forcing is increased, and, at the same time, that the faithfulness with which the large-eddy-simulation results agree with the direct-numerical results decreases.

  13. Large-Eddy Simulation on turbulent flow and plume dispersion over a 2-dimensional hill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, H.; Nagai, H.

    2010-05-01

    The dispersion analysis of airborne contaminants including radioactive substances from industrial or nuclear facilities is an important issue for air quality maintenance and safety assessment. In Japan, many nuclear power plants are located at complex coastal terrains. In these cases, terrain effects on the turbulent flow and plume dispersion should be investigated. In this study, we perform Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) of turbulent flow and plume dispersion over a 2-dimensional hill flow and investigate the characteristics of mean and fluctuating concentrations.

  14. Isogeometric Variational Multiscale Large-Eddy Simulation of Fully-developed Turbulent Flow over a Wavy Wall

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    Isogeometric Variational Multiscale Large-Eddy Simulation of Fully-developed Turbulent Flow over a Wavy Wall K. Chang, T.J.R. Hughes, and V.M. Calo...Reference: K. Chang, T.J.R. Hughes, and V.M. Calo, "Isogeometric Variational Multiscale Large-Eddy Simulation of Fully-developed Turbulent Flow over a...REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Isogeometric Variational Multiscale Large-Eddy Simulation of Fully

  15. Underlying mechanism of numerical instability in large-eddy simulation of turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ida, Masato; Taniguchi, Nobuyuki

    2004-04-01

    This paper extends our recent theoretical work concerning the feasibility of stable and accurate computation of turbulence using a large eddy simulation [

    M. Ida and N. Taniguchi, Phys. Rev. E 68, 036705 (2003)
    ]. In our previous paper, it was shown, based on a simple assumption regarding the instantaneous streamwise velocity, that the application of the Gaussian filter to the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations can result in the appearance of a numerically unstable term that can be decomposed into positive and negative viscosities. That result raises the question as to whether an accurate solution can be achieved by a numerically stable subgrid-scale model. In the present paper, based on assumptions regarding the statistically averaged velocity, we present similar theoretical investigations to show that in several situations, the shears appearing in the statistically averaged velocity field numerically destabilize the fluctuation components because of the derivation of a numerically unstable term that represents negative diffusion in a fixed direction. This finding can explain the problematic numerical instability that has been encountered in large eddy simulations of wall-bounded flows. The present result suggests that this numerical problem is universal in large eddy simulations, and that if there is no failure in modeling, the resulting subgrid-scale model can still have unstable characteristics; that is, the known instability problems of several existing subgrid-scale models are not something that one may remove simply by an artificial technique, but must be taken seriously so as to treat them accurately.

  16. Nesting large-eddy simulations within mesoscale simulations for wind energy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lundquist, J K; Mirocha, J D; Chow, F K; Kosovic, B; Lundquist, K A

    2008-09-08

    With increasing demand for more accurate atmospheric simulations for wind turbine micrositing, for operational wind power forecasting, and for more reliable turbine design, simulations of atmospheric flow with resolution of tens of meters or higher are required. These time-dependent large-eddy simulations (LES), which resolve individual atmospheric eddies on length scales smaller than turbine blades and account for complex terrain, are possible with a range of commercial and open-source software, including the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. In addition to 'local' sources of turbulence within an LES domain, changing weather conditions outside the domain can also affect flow, suggesting that a mesoscale model provide boundary conditions to the large-eddy simulations. Nesting a large-eddy simulation within a mesoscale model requires nuanced representations of turbulence. Our group has improved the Weather and Research Forecasting model's (WRF) LES capability by implementing the Nonlinear Backscatter and Anisotropy (NBA) subfilter stress model following Kosovic (1997) and an explicit filtering and reconstruction technique to compute the Resolvable Subfilter-Scale (RSFS) stresses (following Chow et al, 2005). We have also implemented an immersed boundary method (IBM) in WRF to accommodate complex terrain. These new models improve WRF's LES capabilities over complex terrain and in stable atmospheric conditions. We demonstrate approaches to nesting LES within a mesoscale simulation for farms of wind turbines in hilly regions. Results are sensitive to the nesting method, indicating that care must be taken to provide appropriate boundary conditions, and to allow adequate spin-up of turbulence in the LES domain.

  17. Nesting Large-Eddy Simulations Within Mesoscale Simulations for Wind Energy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, J. K.; Mirocha, J. D.; Chow, F. K.; Kosovic, B.; Lundquist, K. A.

    2008-12-01

    With increasing demand for more accurate atmospheric simulations for wind turbine micrositing, for operational wind power forecasting, and for more reliable turbine design, simulations of atmospheric flow with resolution of tens of meters or higher are required. These time-dependent large-eddy simulations (LES) account for complex terrain and resolve individual atmospheric eddies on length scales smaller than turbine blades. These small-domain high-resolution simulations are possible with a range of commercial and open- source software, including the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. In addition to "local" sources of turbulence within an LES domain, changing weather conditions outside the domain can also affect flow, suggesting that a mesoscale model provide boundary conditions to the large-eddy simulations. Nesting a large-eddy simulation within a mesoscale model requires nuanced representations of turbulence. Our group has improved the Weather and Research Forecating model's (WRF) LES capability by implementing the Nonlinear Backscatter and Anisotropy (NBA) subfilter stress model following Kosoviæ (1997) and an explicit filtering and reconstruction technique to compute the Resolvable Subfilter-Scale (RSFS) stresses (following Chow et al, 2005). We have also implemented an immersed boundary method (IBM) in WRF to accommodate complex terrain. These new models improve WRF's LES capabilities over complex terrain and in stable atmospheric conditions. We demonstrate approaches to nesting LES within a mesoscale simulation for farms of wind turbines in hilly regions. Results are sensitive to the nesting method, indicating that care must be taken to provide appropriate boundary conditions, and to allow adequate spin-up of turbulence in the LES domain. This work is performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  18. Application of large-eddy simulation for trailing-edge noise prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Meng; Moin, Parviz

    Turbulent boundary layers near the trailing-edge of a lifting surface are known to generate intense, broadband scattering noise as well as surface pressure fluctuations. To numerically predict the trailing-edge noise requires that the noise-generating eddies over a wide range of length scales be adequately represented. Large-eddy simulation technique provides a promising tool for obtaining the unsteady wall-pressure fields and the acoustic source functions. In the present work, a large-eddy simulation is carried out for turbulent boundary layer flow past an asymmetrically beveled trailing-edge of a flat strut at a chord Reynolds number of 2.15 × 106. The computed velocity and surface pressure statistics compare reasonably well with the experimental measurements of Blake. The far-field acoustic calculation is facilitated by the integral solution to the Lighthill equation derived by Ffowcs Williams & Hall. Computations have been carried out to determine the far-field noise spectra, the source-term characteristics, and the requirement for the integration domain size. It is found that the present LES is adequate for predicting noise radiation over a wide frequency range. At the low frequency end, however, the spanwise source coherence estimated based on surface pressure fluctuations does not decay sufficiently, suggesting the need for a wider computational domain.

  19. Wind turbine wakes in forest and neutral plane wall boundary layer large-eddy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröttle, Josef; Piotrowski, Zbigniew; Gerz, Thomas; Englberger, Antonia; Dörnbrack, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Wind turbine wake flow characteristics are studied in a strongly sheared and turbulent forest boundary layer and a neutral plane wall boundary layer flow. The reference simulations without wind turbine yield similar results as earlier large-eddy simulations by Shaw and Schumann (1992) and Porte-Agel et al. (2000). To use the fields from the homogeneous turbulent boundary layers on the fly as inflow fields for the wind turbine wake simulations, a new and efficient methodology was developed for the multiscale geophysical flow solver EULAG. With this method fully developed turbulent flow fields can be achieved upstream of the wind turbine which are independent of the wake flow. The large-eddy simulations reproduce known boundary-layer statistics as mean wind profile, momentum flux profile, and eddy dissipation rate of the plane wall and the forest boundary layer. The wake velocity deficit is more asymmetric above the forest and recovers faster downstream compared to the velocity deficit in the plane wall boundary layer. This is due to the inflection point in the mean streamwise velocity profile with corresponding turbulent coherent structures of high turbulence intensity in the strong shear flow above the forest.

  20. Large eddy simulation of Rayleigh-Taylor instability using the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darlington, Rebecca Mattson

    This research addresses the application of a large eddy simulation (LES) to Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor instability. First, ALE simulations of simplified Rayleigh-Taylor instability are studied. The advantages of ALE over Eulerian simulations are shown. Next, the behavior of the LES is examined in a more complicated ALE simulation of Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The effects of eddy viscosity and stochastic backscatter are examined. The LES is also coupled with ALE to increase grid resolution in areas where it is needed. Finally, the methods studied above are applied to two sets of experimental simulations. In these simulations, ALE allows the mesh to follow expanding experimental targets, while LES can be used to mimic the effect of unresolved instability modes.

  1. Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) of a Compressible Mixing Layer and the Significance of Inflow Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mankbadi, Mina Reda; Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; Debonis, James R.

    2017-01-01

    In the context of Large Eddy Simulations (LES), the effects of inflow turbulence are investigated through the Synthetic Eddy Method (SEM). The growth rate of a turbulent compressible mixing layer corresponding to operating conditions of GeobelDutton Case 2 is investigated herein. The effects of spanwise width on the growth rate of the mixing layer is investigated such that spanwise width independence is reached. The error in neglecting inflow turbulence effects is quantified by comparing two methodologies: (1) Hybrid-RANS-LES methodology and (2) SEM-LES methodology. Best practices learned from Case 2 are developed herein and then applied to a higher convective mach number corresponding to Case 4 experiments of GeobelDutton.

  2. A dynamic hybrid subgrid-scale modeling framework for large eddy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maulik, Romit; San, Omer

    2016-11-01

    We put forth a dynamic modeling framework for sub-grid parameterization of large eddy simulation of turbulent flows based upon the use of the approximate deconvolution (AD) procedure to compute the eddy viscosity constant self-adaptively from the resolved flow quantities. In our proposed framework, the test filtering process of the standard dynamic model is replaced by the AD procedure and a posteriori error analysis is performed. The robustness of the model has been tested considering the Burgers, Kraichnan, Kolmogorov turbulence problems. Our numerical assessments for solving these canonical decaying turbulence problems show that the proposed approach could be used as a viable tool to address the turbulence closure problem due to its flexibility.

  3. Large eddy simulation of Rayleigh-Taylor instability using the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian method

    SciTech Connect

    Darlington, Rebecca Mattson

    1999-12-01

    This research addresses the application of a large eddy simulation (LES) to Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor instability. First, ALE simulations of simplified Rayleigh-Taylor instability are studied. The advantages of ALE over Eulerian simulations are shown. Next, the behavior of the LES is examined in a more complicated ALE simulation of Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The effects of eddy viscosity and stochastic backscatter are examined. The LES is also coupled with ALE to increase grid resolution in areas where it is needed. Finally, the methods studied above are applied to two sets of experimental simulations. In these simulations, ALE allows the mesh to follow expanding experimental targets, while LES can be used to mimic the effect of unresolved instability modes.

  4. Improving prediction of aerosol deposition in an idealized mouth using large-Eddy simulation.

    PubMed

    Matida, Edgar A; Finlay, Warren H; Breuer, Michael; Lange, Carlos F

    2006-01-01

    Monodisperse aerosol deposition in an idealized mouth geometry with a relatively small inlet diameter (D (in) = 3.0 mm) was studied numerically using a standard Large Eddy Simulation (LES). A steady inhalation flow rate of Q = 32.2 L/min was used. Thousands of particles (2.5, 3.7, and 5.0 microm in diameter and rho (f) = 912.0 kg/m(3) density) were released separately in the computational domain and aerosol deposition was determined. The total aerosol deposition results in this idealized mouth were in relatively good agreement when compared with measured data obtained in separate experiments, showing considerable improvement over the standard RANS/EIM (Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes/Eddy Interaction Model) approach.

  5. Active Control of Combustion Instability in a Ramjet Using Large-Eddy Simulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    INSTABILITY IN A RAMJET USING LARGE-EDDY SIMULATIONS S. Menon N.TIS CR.A,1i ()TiC TAB September 1992 1 , o -d 6 y ... . ... .. Prepared for t.Cft OFFICE OF...pressure oscillations initially show a large-aznplitude, low- frequency oscillatio that eventually decays o that a high-frequency oscillation at around...injec- tion were recently presented (M o ., 199•1) TP-276/02-91 10 4.1 Acsntlc Fedback Cesto l Active control through acoustic forcing was demonstrated

  6. Large Eddy Simulation of Spray Injection to Turbulent Flows from a Slit Nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Jun; Oshima, Nobuyuki; Oshima, Marie; Ito, Hisashi; Kubota, Masato

    Slit nozzles are used in some gasoline direct injection engines and makes fan shaped spray. Spray injecting flows to turbulent flows from a slit nozzle have been analyzed numerically using combination of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) and lagrangian Discrete Droplet Method (DDM). As a result, LES can resolve the internal structure of the spray and irregular droplet distribution made by small eddies that momentum of spray itself induced. In conventional Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) combined DDM calculation such eddies cannot be resolved, and also the internal spray structure or irregularity doesn't appear since all effects of turbulence are averaged. But such structure or irregularity is important for stable combustion in gasoline direct injection engines. Therefore the combination of LES and DDM method will play essential role for developing more robust and high efficient engines under wide operating conditions. We also proposed the way of constructing pseudo particle image in order to compare calculation results with sliced spray pictures obtained by experiments. We show time changes of the shape of brightness Probability Density Function (PDF) can be used to evaluate variance of spray droplets.

  7. Direct and Large Eddy Simulation of turbulent channel flow with periodic pressure gradient.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scotti, Alberto; Piomelli, Ugo; Trowbridge, John

    1999-11-01

    The flow inside blood vessels or in internal combustion engines, or the motion due to gravity waves in shallow waters, have in common the fact that the external forcing that maintains the flow is unsteady. Despite their importance and ubiquitousness, however, turbulent flows with an imposed unsteadiness have received relatively little attention. Spalart [NASA Technical Memorandum 89460 (1987)] performed DNS of boundary-layer turbulence subject to a periodic pressure gradient with zero mean. More recently, Binder et al. [J. Fluid Mec., 267 (1995)] have measured turbulence statistics in a channel flow driven by an unsteady, periodic pressure gradient. We have performed direct numerical simulations of the same problem using a pseudospectral code. The database has been found in good agreement with the published results. We have explored the temporal and spatial relationship between the Reynold stress and the phase-averaged rate of strain. We find that, in agreement with the experiments, the computed eddy viscosity -uv/dU/dy is not in phase with the rate of strain; conventional eddy viscosity models are thus inadequate to deal with unsteadiness. It is arguable that, for unsteady flows, large-eddy simulations provide a better approach, since the small unresolved scales should adjust faster to changes in the rate of strain field. In particular, we explore a priori the performance of models based on the Germano identity.

  8. Large Eddy Simulation of Coupled Water and Carbon Exchange and Transport Through and Above Forest Canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drewry, D. T.; Albertson, J. D.

    2002-12-01

    There are outstanding questions surrounding the measurement and modeling of carbon and water fluxes over complex landscapes. Typically, forest fluxes are measured with the eddy covariance technique from a single tower. A unique study over a loblolly pine stand in the Duke Forest yielded high frequency velocity, temperature, water vapor and carbon dioxide fluxes from a network of six instrumented towers, simultaneously. In this talk we explore the canopy-atmosphere dynamics active during this experiment through the use of a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) code. The LES includes a numerical representation of the plant canopy structure, a biophysical process sub-model, and mixes the sources and sinks through the boundary layer with a filtered form of the Navier-Stokes equations. Through this combination of a spatially distributed dataset and a 3D model of canopy flows and processes we investigate the relative influences of canopy structure and meteorological forcing on observed and modeled fluxes. This work has implications for our understanding of the effects of canopy turbulence on eddy covariance flux measurements.

  9. Turbulence prediction in two-dimensional bundle flows using large eddy simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, W.A.; Hassan, Y.A.

    1995-09-01

    Turbulent flow is characterized by random fluctuations in the fluid velocity and by intense mixing of the fluid. Due to velocity fluctuations, a wide range of eddies exists in the flow field. Because these eddies carry mass, momentum, and energy, this enhanced mixing can sometimes lead to serious problems, such as tube vibrations in many engineering systems that include fluid-tube bundle combinations. Nuclear fuel bundles and PWR steam generators are existing examples in nuclear power plants. Fluid-induced vibration problems are often discovered during the operation of such systems because some of the fluid-tube interaction characteristics are not fully understood. Large Eddy Simulation, incorporated in a three dimensional computer code, became one of the promising techniques to estimate flow turbulence, predict and prevent of long-term tube fretting affecting PWR steam generators. the present turbulence investigations is a step towards more understanding of fluid-tube interaction characteristics by comparing the tube bundles with various pitch-to-diameter ratios were performed. Power spectral densities were used for comparison with experimental data. Correlations, calculations of different length scales in the flow domain and other important turbulent-related parameters were calculated. Finally, important characteristics of turbulent flow field were presented with the aid of flow visualization with tracers impeded in the flow field.

  10. Sub-grid scale modeling for large eddy simulations in analysis of shock-turbulence interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckingham, A. C.; Grun, J.

    1992-12-01

    We continue to study the influence of dynamic shock wave interactions on turbulence. The interactions may significantly increase turbulent energy and Reynolds stress. Strong support for tensor amplification is supplied by the sharp, transiently distorted strain field in the immediate neighborhood of the shock. Beyond this, there develops a gradual decay to a new, more modestly amplified state relative to the pre-shocked level. Practical interest is centered on the significantly altered, albeit shock localized, post-shock turbulent kinetic energy, eddy transport, eddy component mixing and diffusion, wall shear, and heat transfer. In the shock interaction and post-shock region, compressible two dimensional large eddy simulations (LES) are applied. A compressibility modified Smagorinsky model is adapted to represent the non-resolved sub-grid scales. Favre mass-weighted average space and time discretized compressible Navier-Stokes equations are used to represent the explicitly resolved grid scale motions. Predicted amplification levels, modal energy partition, shock translational to turbulence kinetic energy transfer, and viscoelastic response of turbulence to shock interaction are examined in comparison with available experimental evidence. A two-band dynamic eddy viscosity model representing the unresolved subgrid scale field is a possible replacement for the Smagorinsky model. Improvement is sought for predictions in the near wall region, under the influence of stochastic subgrid scale backscatter, and in the neighborhood of the shock. Wall-bounded supersonic compression comer flow experiments and hypersonic cylindrical shock wave turbulence interaction experiments are used as trial cases for test and comparison of the two classes of subgrid scale models.

  11. Parameter studies on the energy balance closure problem using large-eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Roo, Frederik; Banerjee, Tirtha; Mauder, Matthias

    2017-04-01

    The imbalance of the surface energy budget in eddy-covariance measurements is still a pending problem. A possible cause is the presence of land surface heterogeneity. Heterogeneities of the boundary layer scale or larger are most effective in influencing the boundary layer turbulence, and large-eddy simulations have shown that secondary circulations within the boundary layer can affect the surface energy budget. However, the precise influence of the surface characteristics on the energy imbalance and its partitioning is still unknown. To investigate the influence of surface variables on all the components of the flux budget under convective conditions, we set up a systematic parameter study by means of large-eddy simulation. For the study we use a virtual control volume approach, and we focus on idealized heterogeneity by considering spatially variable surface fluxes. The surface fluxes vary locally in intensity and these patches have different length scales. The main focus lies on heterogeneities of length scales of the kilometer scale and one decade smaller. For each simulation, virtual measurement towers are positioned at functionally different positions. We discriminate between the locally homogeneous towers, located within land use patches, with respect to the more heterogeneous towers, and find, among others, that the flux-divergence and the advection are strongly linearly related within each class. Furthermore, we seek correlators for the energy balance ratio and the energy residual in the simulations. Besides the expected correlation with measurable atmospheric quantities such as the friction velocity, boundary-layer depth and temperature and moisture gradients, we have also found an unexpected correlation with the temperature difference between sonic temperature and surface temperature. In additional simulations with a large number of virtual towers, we investigate higher order correlations, which can be linked to secondary circulations. In a companion

  12. Hybrid Reynolds-Averaged/Large-Eddy Simulations of a Coaxial Supersonic Free-Jet Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baurle, Robert A.; Edwards, Jack R.

    2010-01-01

    Reynolds-averaged and hybrid Reynolds-averaged/large-eddy simulations have been applied to a supersonic coaxial jet flow experiment. The experiment was designed to study compressible mixing flow phenomenon under conditions that are representative of those encountered in scramjet combustors. The experiment utilized either helium or argon as the inner jet nozzle fluid, and the outer jet nozzle fluid consisted of laboratory air. The inner and outer nozzles were designed and operated to produce nearly pressure-matched Mach 1.8 flow conditions at the jet exit. The purpose of the computational effort was to assess the state-of-the-art for each modeling approach, and to use the hybrid Reynolds-averaged/large-eddy simulations to gather insight into the deficiencies of the Reynolds-averaged closure models. The Reynolds-averaged simulations displayed a strong sensitivity to choice of turbulent Schmidt number. The initial value chosen for this parameter resulted in an over-prediction of the mixing layer spreading rate for the helium case, but the opposite trend was observed when argon was used as the injectant. A larger turbulent Schmidt number greatly improved the comparison of the results with measurements for the helium simulations, but variations in the Schmidt number did not improve the argon comparisons. The hybrid Reynolds-averaged/large-eddy simulations also over-predicted the mixing layer spreading rate for the helium case, while under-predicting the rate of mixing when argon was used as the injectant. The primary reason conjectured for the discrepancy between the hybrid simulation results and the measurements centered around issues related to the transition from a Reynolds-averaged state to one with resolved turbulent content. Improvements to the inflow conditions were suggested as a remedy to this dilemma. Second-order turbulence statistics were also compared to their modeled Reynolds-averaged counterparts to evaluate the effectiveness of common turbulence closure

  13. Approximate solutions of the filtered radiative transfer equation in large eddy simulations of turbulent reactive flows

    SciTech Connect

    Coelho, P.J.

    2009-05-15

    An analysis of the relevance of turbulence-radiation interaction in the numerical simulation of turbulent reactive flows is presented. A semi-causal stochastic model was used to generate a time-series of turbulent scalar fluctuations along optical paths of Sandia flame D, a widely studied piloted turbulent jet nonpremixed flame. The radiative transfer equation was integrated along these paths for every realization using a grid resolution typical of a direct numerical simulation. The correlated k-distribution method was employed to compute the radiative properties of the medium. The results were used to determine the ensemble average, as well as the extreme values, of quantities that indicate the importance of the turbulence-radiation interaction. Several approximate methods are then proposed to solve the filtered radiative transfer equation in the framework of large eddy simulations. The proposed methods are applicable along with combustion models that either assume the filtered probability density function of a conserved scalar or solve a transport equation for a joint scalar or joint scalar/velocity filtered density function. It is concluded that the errors resulting from neglecting the turbulence-radiation interaction in large eddy simulations are much lower than those found in Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes calculations. The optically thin fluctuation approximation may be extended to large eddy simulations yielding predictions in excellent agreement with the reference solution. If the turbulence-radiation interaction is accounted for using this approximation, the average relative error of the filtered total radiation intensity is generally below 0.3% for the studied flame. (author)

  14. Large eddy simulation of free surface turbulent flow in partly vegetated open channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaohui, Su; Li, C. W.

    2002-08-01

    A large eddy simulation (LES) model has been developed to simulate the hydrodynamic behaviour of turbulent flow in an open channel with a domain of vegetation. Vegetation is considered as an internal source of resistant force and turbulence energy. The model is modified from the LES model of Li and Wang (International Journal for Numerical Methods in Fluids 2000; 34), and is distinctive in that the subgrid scale turbulence is parameterized by a k-l model. The length scale of turbulence l is proportional to the grid size and the turbulence energy k is obtained from the solution of the turbulence energy transport equation. An operator splitting method, which splits the solution procedure into advection, diffusion and pressure propagation steps, is employed so that different numerical schemes can be used for the solution of different physical processes. The model has been applied to simulate open channel flow with transverse shear produced by vegetation drag. Some organized large eddies were found in the interface between the vegetated and non-vegetated regions and the organized structure clearly has a life cycle. At the interface the transverse velocity profile exhibits a steep gradient, which induces significant mass and momentum exchange, acts as a source of vorticity, and generates high Reynolds stresses. The logarithmic vertical velocity variation becomes uniform in the vegetated domain. The agreement between the numerical results and the experimental data (Tsujimoto and Kitamura, KHL Progressive Report '92, Hydrology Laboratory, Kanazawa University, Japan, 1992; 21) is satisfactory. The present k-l LES model is proven to be a useful tool for engineering applications, as it can simulate the dynamic development of large eddies and the associated intermittent turbulence. Copyright

  15. DG-FDF solver for large eddy simulation of compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sammak, Shervin; Brazell, Michael; Mavriplis, Dimitri; Givi, Peyman

    2016-11-01

    A new computational scheme is developed for large eddy simulation (LES) of compressible turbulent flows with the filtered density function (FDF) subgrid scale closure. This is a hybrid scheme, combining the discontinuous Galerkin (DG) Eulerian solver with a Lagrangian Monte Carlo FDF simulator. The methodology is shown to be suitable for LES, as a larger portion of the resolved energy is captured as the order of spectral approximation increases. Simulations are conducted of both subsonic and supersonic flows. The consistency and the overall performance of the DG-FDF solver are demonstrated, together with its shock capturing capabilities.

  16. New approximate boundary conditions for large eddy simulations of wall-bounded flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piomelli, Ugo; Ferziger, Joel; Moin, Parviz; Kim, John

    1989-01-01

    Two new approximate boundary conditions have been applied to the large eddy simulation of channel flow with and without transpiration. These new boundary conditions give more accurate results than those previously in use, and allow significant reduction of the required CPU time over simulations in which no-slip conditions are applied. Mean velocity profiles and turbulence intensities compare well both with experimental data and with the results of resolved simulations. The influence of the approximate boundary conditions remains confined near the point of application and does not affect the turbulence statistics in the core of the flow.

  17. Large-eddy simulation of flow in a plane, asymmetric diffuser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaltenbach, Hans-Jakob

    1993-01-01

    Recent improvements in subgrid-scale modeling as well as increases in computer power make it feasible to investigate flows using large-eddy simulation (LES) which have been traditionally studied with techniques based on Reynolds averaging. However, LES has not yet been applied to many flows of immediate technical interest. Preliminary results from LES of a plane diffuser flow are described. The long term goal of this work is to investigate flow separation as well as separation control in ducts and ramp-like geometries.

  18. Large Eddy Simulation of a Cavitating Multiphase Flow for Liquid Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cailloux, M.; Helie, J.; Reveillon, J.; Demoulin, F. X.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a numerical method for modelling a compressible multiphase flow that involves phase transition between liquid and vapour in the context of gasoline injection. A discontinuous compressible two fluid mixture based on the Volume of Fluid (VOF) implementation is employed to represent the phases of liquid, vapour and air. The mass transfer between phases is modelled by standard models such as Kunz or Schnerr-Sauer but including the presence of air in the gas phase. Turbulence is modelled using a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) approach to catch instationnarities and coherent structures. Eventually the modelling approach matches favourably experimental data concerning the effect of cavitation on atomisation process.

  19. Large eddy simulation in a turbulent jet exhausting into a submerged space or a cocurrent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, K. N.

    2011-01-01

    Results of large eddy simulations in a subsonic isothermal turbulent jet exhausting from a circular nozzle into a submerged space or a cocurrent flow are presented. The flow is described by space-averaged Navier-Stokes equations and by the RNG model of subgrid scale viscosity. Results computed for different values of the cocurrency parameter are compared with available results of numerical simulations and experimental data. The results obtained are found to agree well with measured data and to confirm the basic laws of variation of gas-dynamic and fluctuating parameters of submerged and cocurrent jets.

  20. On the development of noise-producing large-scale wavelike eddies in a turbulent jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merkine, L. O.; Liu, J. T. C.

    1974-01-01

    The development of large-scale wavelike eddies in a two-dimensional turbulent jet was studied. The basic mean flow develops from a mixing region type with an initial specified boundary layer thickness into a fully developed jet. The role of the varicose and sinuous modes as these develop in a growing mean flow is brought out. In general, it was found, for a given frequency parameter, the varicose mode has a shorter streamwise lifetime than the sinuous mode. The latter, for lower frequency ranges, persists past the end of the potential core only to be subject to dissolution by the more enhanced fine scale turbulent activity in that region.

  1. Mesh refinement in a two-dimensional large eddy simulation of a forced shear layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claus, R. W.; Huang, P. G.; Macinnes, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    A series of large eddy simulations are made of a forced shear layer and compared with experimental data. Several mesh densities were examined to separate the effect of numerical inaccuracy from modeling deficiencies. The turbulence model that was used to represent small scale, 3-D motions correctly predicted some gross features of the flow field, but appears to be structurally incorrect. The main effect of mesh refinement was to act as a filter on the scale of vortices that developed from the inflow boundary conditions.

  2. Large eddy simulations and direct numerical simulations of high speed turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, Peyman; Madnia, Cyrus K.; Steinberger, Craig J.

    1990-01-01

    This research is involved with the implementation of advanced computational schemes based on large eddy simulations (LES) and direct numerical simulations (DNS) to study the phenomenon of mixing and its coupling with chemical reactions in compressible turbulent flows. In the efforts related to LES, a research program to extend the present capabilities of this method was initiated for the treatment of chemically reacting flows. In the DNS efforts, the focus is on detailed investigations of the effects of compressibility, heat release, and non-equilibrium kinetics modelings in high speed reacting flows. Emphasis was on the simulations of simple flows, namely homogeneous compressible flows, and temporally developing high speed mixing layers.

  3. Near-Wall Models in Large Eddy Simulations of Flow Behind a Backward-Facing Step

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabot, W.

    1996-01-01

    Accurate large eddy simulation (LES) of a wall-bounded flow generally requires a near-wall resolution comparable to that in direct numerical simulation (DNS). As much as 50% of the total grid points and computational costs are expended in the near-wall regions in a typical simulation. This limits LES to fairly low Reynolds numbers on current computers. To perform practical flow applications at realistically high Reynolds numbers, such as flow over an airfoil, it is desirable to replace very thin, near-wall regions in the LES with easily and inexpensively computed wall models to specify the near-wall boundary conditions.

  4. New approximate boundary conditions for large eddy simulations of wall-bounded flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piomelli, Ugo; Ferziger, Joel; Moin, Parviz; Kim, John

    1989-01-01

    Two new approximate boundary conditions have been applied to the large eddy simulation of channel flow with and without transpiration. These new boundary conditions give more accurate results than those previously in use, and allow significant reduction of the required CPU time over simulations in which no-slip conditions are applied. Mean velocity profiles and turbulence intensities compare well both with experimental data and with the results of resolved simulations. The influence of the approximate boundary conditions remains confined near the point of application and does not affect the turbulence statistics in the core of the flow.

  5. Large-eddy simulations of viscoelastic isotropic turbulence with the FENE-P fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinho, Fernando T.; Ferreira, Pedro O.; B. da Silva, Carlos; Idmec/Feup Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    A new subgrid-scale (SGS) model developed for large-eddy simulations (LES) of dilute polymer solutions described by the Finitely Extensible Nonlinear Elastic constitutive equation closed with the Peterlin approximation (FENE-P), is presented. The filtered conformation tensor evolution equation uses the self-similarity of the polymer stretching terms, and the global equilibrium of the trace of the conformation tensor, while the SGS stresses are modelled with the classical Smagorinsky model. The new closure is assessed in direct numerical simulations (DNS) of forced isotropic turbulence using classical a-priori tests, and in a-posteriori (LES) showing excellent agreement with all the exact (filtered DNS) results.

  6. Large eddy simulation model for wind-driven sea circulation in coastal areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petronio, A.; Roman, F.; Nasello, C.; Armenio, V.

    2013-12-01

    In the present paper a state-of-the-art large eddy simulation model (LES-COAST), suited for the analysis of water circulation and mixing in closed or semi-closed areas, is presented and applied to the study of the hydrodynamic characteristics of the Muggia bay, the industrial harbor of the city of Trieste, Italy. The model solves the non-hydrostatic, unsteady Navier-Stokes equations, under the Boussinesq approximation for temperature and salinity buoyancy effects, using a novel, two-eddy viscosity Smagorinsky model for the closure of the subgrid-scale momentum fluxes. The model employs: a simple and effective technique to take into account wind-stress inhomogeneity related to the blocking effect of emerged structures, which, in turn, can drive local-scale, short-term pollutant dispersion; a new nesting procedure to reconstruct instantaneous, turbulent velocity components, temperature and salinity at the open boundaries of the domain using data coming from large-scale circulation models (LCM). Validation tests have shown that the model reproduces field measurement satisfactorily. The analysis of water circulation and mixing in the Muggia bay has been carried out under three typical breeze conditions. Water circulation has been shown to behave as in typical semi-closed basins, with an upper layer moving along the wind direction (apart from the anti-cyclonic veering associated with the Coriolis force) and a bottom layer, thicker and slower than the upper one, moving along the opposite direction. The study has shown that water vertical mixing in the bay is inhibited by a large level of stable stratification, mainly associated with vertical variation in salinity and, to a minor extent, with temperature variation along the water column. More intense mixing, quantified by sub-critical values of the gradient Richardson number, is present in near-coastal regions where upwelling/downwelling phenomena occur. The analysis of instantaneous fields has detected the presence of

  7. Grid-point requirements for large eddy simulation: Chapman's estimates revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Haecheon; Moin, Parviz

    2012-01-01

    Resolution requirements for large eddy simulation (LES), estimated by Chapman [AIAA J. 17, 1293 (1979)], are modified using accurate formulae for high Reynolds number boundary layer flow. The new estimates indicate that the number of grid points (N) required for wall-modeled LES is proportional to ReLx , but a wall-resolving LES requires N ˜ReLx 13 /7 , where Lx is the flat-plate length in the streamwise direction. On the other hand, direct numerical simulation, resolving the Kolmogorov length scale, requires N ˜ReLx 37 /14 .

  8. Numerical modelling of odour dispersion around a cubical obstacle using large eddy simulation.

    PubMed

    Dourado, Harerton Oliveira; Santos, Jane Meri; Reis, Neyval C; Mavroidis, Ilias

    2012-01-01

    In the present work two different large eddy simulation (LES) approaches, namely the Dynamic Smagorinsky model and the Wale model, are used to simulate the air flow and pollutant dispersion around a cubical obstacle. Results are compared with wind tunnel data (WT) and with results from the Smagorinsky LES model. Overall agreement was good between the different LES approaches and the WT results, both for the mean and fluctuating flow and concentration patterns. LES models can provide good estimates of concentration fluctuation intensity and enable the calculation of the intermittency factor. The model results indicate that LES is a viable tool for odour impact assessment.

  9. Large eddy simulation using high-resolution and high-order methods.

    PubMed

    Drikakis, D; Hahn, M; Mosedale, A; Thornber, B

    2009-07-28

    Restrictions on computing power make direct numerical simulation too expensive for complex flows; thus, the development of accurate large eddy simulation (LES) methods, which are industrially applicable and efficient, is required. This paper reviews recent findings about the leading order dissipation rate associated with high-resolution methods and improvements to the standard schemes for use in highly turbulent flows. Results from implicit LES are presented for a broad range of flows and numerical schemes, ranging from the second-order monotone upstream-centered schemes for conservation laws to very high-order (up to ninth-order) weighted essentially non-oscillatory schemes.

  10. Numerical Investigation on Large Scale Eddy Structure in Unsteady Pipe Elbow Flow at High Reynolds Number Conditions with Large Eddy Simulation Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masaaki; Ohshima, Hiroyuki

    Flow induced vibration in primary cooling system of the Japan Sodium cooled Fast Reactor (JSFR) has been investigated. The primary cooling system consists of a large diameter pipe and a pipe elbow with short curvature radius corresponding to its diameter (short-elbow). Flow-induced vibration by flow through the short-elbow is an important issue in design study of the JSFR, because it may affect to structural integrity of the piping. In this paper, numerical simulations for several pipe elbows with different pipe diameters and curvature radii in literature were conducted at Reynolds number conditions from Re=500 to 1.47x107 to investigate unsteady flow behavior through the short-elbow, including validation study of an in-house LES code (MUGTHES). Numerical results in each condition were compared with the experimental results in literature. Unsteady flow characteristics and pressure fluctuation generation mechanism in the short-elbow were clarified in relation to the large-scale eddy motion.

  11. A New Class of Hybrid Schemes Based on Large Eddy Simulation and Low-Dimensional Stochastic Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    McMurtry et al., 1992; Menon et aL, 1993; Calhoon & Menon, 1996, 1997; Smith & Menon, 1997, 1998; Sankaran & Menon, 2000; Chakravarthy & Menon, 2000,2001...Pires, A., and Heitor, M.V., Characteristics of turbulent heat transport in nonpremixed jet flames, Combust. Flame 124, 213-224 (2001). Calhoon , W.H...and Menon, S., Subgrid modeling for reacting large eddy simulations, AIAA 96- 0516 (1996). Calhoon , W.H., and Menon, S., Linear-eddy subgrid model

  12. Large eddy simulation of zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer based on different scaling laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wan; Samtaney, Ravi

    2013-11-01

    We present results of large eddy simulation (LES) for a smooth-wall, zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer. We employ the stretched vortex sub-grid-scale model in the simulations augmented by a wall model. Our wall model is based on the virtual-wall model introduced by Chung & Pullin (J. Fluid Mech 2009). An essential component of their wall model is an ODE governing the local wall-normal velocity gradient obtained using inner-scaling ansatz. We test two variants of the wall model based on different similarity laws: one is based on a log-law and the other on a power-law. The specific form of the power law scaling utilized is that proposed by George & Castillo (Appl. Mech. Rev. 1997), dubbed the ``GC Law''. Turbulent inflow conditions are generated by a recycling method, and applying scaling laws corresponding to the two variants of the wall model, and a uniform way to determine the inlet friction velocity. For Reynolds number based on momentum thickness, Reθ , ranging from 104 to 1012 it is found that the velocity profiles generally follow the log law form rather than the power law. For large Reynolds number asymptotic behavior, LES based on different scaling laws the boundary layer thickness and turbulent intensities do not show much difference. Supported by a KAUST funded project on large eddy simulation of turbulent flows. The IBM Blue Gene P Shaheen at KAUST was utilized for the simulations.

  13. Sunset decay of the convective turbulence with Large-Eddy Simulation under realistic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizza, U.; Miglietta, M. M.; Degrazia, G. A.; Acevedo, O. C.; Marques Filho, E. P.

    2013-10-01

    Large-Eddy Simulation is performed for a single day from the Cooperative Atmosphere-Surface Exchange Study (CASES-99) field program. This study investigates an observed case of evening transition boundary layer over land. Parameters of the ambient atmosphere in the LES-decay studies conducted so far were typically prescribed in an idealized form. To provide suitable data under the wide range of the PBL weather conditions, the LES should be able to adequately reproduce the PBL turbulence dynamics including-if possible-baroclinicity, radiation, large scale advection and not only be related to a decreasing surface heating. In addition LES-decay studies usually assume that the sensible heat flux decreases instantaneously or with a very short time scale. The main purpose of this investigation is to study the decay of boundary-layer average turbulent kinetic energy at sunset with Large-Eddy Simulation that is forced with realistic environment conditions. This allows investigating the Turbulent Kinetic Energy decay over the realistic time scale that is observed in the atmosphere. During the intermediate and last stage of decay of the boundary-layer average Turbulent Kinetic Energy the exponents of the decay power law t go from 2 to 6, as evidenced by experimental results and recent analytical modeling in the surface layer.

  14. Shifted periodic boundary conditions for large-eddy simulation of wind farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munters, Wim; Meneveau, Charles; Meyers, Johan

    2015-11-01

    In wall-bounded turbulent flow simulations, periodic boundary conditions combined with insufficiently long domains lead to persistent spanwise locking of large-scale turbulent structures. In the context of wind-farm large-eddy simulations, this effect induces artificial spanwise inhomogeneities in the time-averaged local wind conditions as seen by the wind turbines, leading to spurious differences in power prediction between otherwise equivalent columns of wind turbines in a wind farm (a column is defined here as a set of turbines parallel to the mean flow direction). We propose a shifted periodic boundary condition that eliminates this effect without the need for excessive streamwise domain lengths. Instead of straightforwardly reintroducing the velocity from the outlet plane back at the inlet, as in classic periodic boundary conditions, this plane is first shifted in the spanwise direction by a predefined and constant distance. The method is tested based on a set of direct numerical simulations of a turbulent channel flow, and large-eddy simulations of a high Reynolds number rough-wall half-channel flow. Finally, we apply the method in a precursor simulation, generating inlet conditions for a spatially developing wind-farm boundary layer. WM and JM are supported by the ERC (ActiveWindFarms, grant no: 306471). CM acknowledges support by the NSF (grant IIA-1243482, the WINDINSPIRE project).

  15. ENDLESS: An extended nonperiodic domain large-eddy simulation approach for scalar plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bicheng; Yang, Di; Meneveau, Charles; Chamecki, Marcelo

    2016-05-01

    Large-eddy simulation (LES) has proven to be a valuable tool for high-fidelity modeling of environmental and geophysical turbulent flows. An important application of LES is to study the transport of effluents (e.g. oils from a subsea blowout) in the ocean mixed layer (OML). Oil plumes being transported in the OML experience the action of shear-generated turbulence, Langmuir circulations, Ekman transport and submesoscale quasi-geostrophic eddies. To resolve such turbulent processes, grid sizes of a few meters are desirable while horizontal domain sizes of LES are typically restricted from hundreds of meters to a few kilometers, for LES to remain practically affordable. Yet transported oil plumes evolve to large scales extending to tens or even hundreds of kilometers. In this study, the Extended Nonperiodic Domain LES for Scalar transport (ENDLESS) is proposed as a multi-scale approach to tackle this challenge while being computationally affordable. The basic idea is to simulate the shear turbulence and Langmuir circulations on a small horizontal domain with periodic boundary conditions while the resulting transport velocity field is replicated periodically following adaptively the large-scale plume as it evolves spatially towards much larger scales. This approach also permits the superposition of larger-scale quasi two-dimensional flow motions on the oil advection, allowing for coupling with regional circulation models. A validation case and two sample applications to oil plume evolution in the OML are presented in order to demonstrate key features and computational speedup associated with the ENDLESS method.

  16. Physical consistency of subgrid-scale models for large-eddy simulation of incompressible turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvis, Maurits H.; Remmerswaal, Ronald A.; Verstappen, Roel

    2017-01-01

    We study the construction of subgrid-scale models for large-eddy simulation of incompressible turbulent flows. In particular, we aim to consolidate a systematic approach of constructing subgrid-scale models, based on the idea that it is desirable that subgrid-scale models are consistent with the mathematical and physical properties of the Navier-Stokes equations and the turbulent stresses. To that end, we first discuss in detail the symmetries of the Navier-Stokes equations, and the near-wall scaling behavior, realizability and dissipation properties of the turbulent stresses. We furthermore summarize the requirements that subgrid-scale models have to satisfy in order to preserve these important mathematical and physical properties. In this fashion, a framework of model constraints arises that we apply to analyze the behavior of a number of existing subgrid-scale models that are based on the local velocity gradient. We show that these subgrid-scale models do not satisfy all the desired properties, after which we explain that this is partly due to incompatibilities between model constraints and limitations of velocity-gradient-based subgrid-scale models. However, we also reason that the current framework shows that there is room for improvement in the properties and, hence, the behavior of existing subgrid-scale models. We furthermore show how compatible model constraints can be combined to construct new subgrid-scale models that have desirable properties built into them. We provide a few examples of such new models, of which a new model of eddy viscosity type, that is based on the vortex stretching magnitude, is successfully tested in large-eddy simulations of decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence and turbulent plane-channel flow.

  17. Sea salt aerosol deposition in the coastal zone: A large eddy simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Tinghao; Chamecki, Marcelo; Yu, Xiping

    2016-11-01

    Inland deposition of sea salt aerosol (SSA) particles emitted over the ocean is studied via numerical and theoretical models. The focus is on the large particles that contribute most to the total mass deposition. Large eddy simulations of idealized sea wind are used to investigate the development of the particle plume over land for different particle sizes and to validate some of the assumptions in the theoretical model. An existing theoretical modeling framework for particle dispersion in the atmospheric boundary layer is adapted to the problem of SSA deposition and it is shown to be adequate for the large particles of interest here. The decay of monodisperse SSA particle deposition flux with distance from the shoreline is shown to have a power-law behavior far from the shoreline. A complete model for predicting mass deposition as a function of distance is formulated and shown to present reasonable agreement with existing data.

  18. Characterizing the coherent structures in large eddy simulations of aligned windfarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mengqi; Stevens, Richard J. A. M.

    2017-05-01

    The present work studies the large coherent structures in large eddy simulations of windfarms using proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) method. In order to evaluate the effect of wind turbines on coherent structures, we consider three cases. One is a reference flow of a neutral atmospheric boundary layer and the other two are periodic and developing aligned windfarms. The number of wind turbines is large, 16 × 12 for periodic windfarm, and 12 × 12 for developing windfarm. The simulations are run for a long time in order to generate a sufficient database for POD analysis. In all cases, elongated streamwise counter rotating roll structures, covering 1 or 2 turbines in spanwise direction, are identified as the dominant POD mode. Another pattern, varying in streamwise direction, also appears in all the three cases.

  19. Large-eddy simulations of surface roughness parameter sensitivity to canopy-structure characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, K. D.; Bohrer, G.; Kenny, W. T.; Ivanov, V. Y.

    2015-04-01

    Surface roughness parameters, namely the roughness length and displacement height, are an integral input used to model surface fluxes. However, most models assume these parameters to be a fixed property of plant functional type and disregard the governing structural heterogeneity and dynamics. In this study, we use large-eddy simulations to explore, in silico, the effects of canopy-structure characteristics on surface roughness parameters. We performed a virtual experiment to test the sensitivity of resolved surface roughness to four axes of canopy structure: (1) leaf area index, (2) the vertical profile of leaf density, (3) canopy height, and (4) canopy gap fraction. We found roughness parameters to be highly variable, but uncovered positive relationships between displacement height and maximum canopy height, aerodynamic canopy height and maximum canopy height and leaf area index, and eddy-penetration depth and gap fraction. We also found negative relationships between aerodynamic canopy height and gap fraction, as well as between eddy-penetration depth and maximum canopy height and leaf area index. We generalized our model results into a virtual "biometric" parameterization that relates roughness length and displacement height to canopy height, leaf area index, and gap fraction. Using a decade of wind and canopy-structure observations in a site in Michigan, we tested the effectiveness of our model-driven biometric parameterization approach in predicting the friction velocity over heterogeneous and disturbed canopies. We compared the accuracy of these predictions with the friction-velocity predictions obtained from the common simple approximation related to canopy height, the values calculated with large-eddy simulations of the explicit canopy structure as measured by airborne and ground-based lidar, two other parameterization approaches that utilize varying canopy-structure inputs, and the annual and decadal means of the surface roughness parameters at the site

  20. Large-eddy simulations of surface roughness parameter sensitivity to canopy-structure characteristics

    DOE PAGES

    Maurer, K. D.; Bohrer, G.; Kenny, W. T.; ...

    2015-04-30

    Surface roughness parameters, namely the roughness length and displacement height, are an integral input used to model surface fluxes. However, most models assume these parameters to be a fixed property of plant functional type and disregard the governing structural heterogeneity and dynamics. In this study, we use large-eddy simulations to explore, in silico, the effects of canopy-structure characteristics on surface roughness parameters. We performed a virtual experiment to test the sensitivity of resolved surface roughness to four axes of canopy structure: (1) leaf area index, (2) the vertical profile of leaf density, (3) canopy height, and (4) canopy gap fraction.more » We found roughness parameters to be highly variable, but uncovered positive relationships between displacement height and maximum canopy height, aerodynamic canopy height and maximum canopy height and leaf area index, and eddy-penetration depth and gap fraction. We also found negative relationships between aerodynamic canopy height and gap fraction, as well as between eddy-penetration depth and maximum canopy height and leaf area index. We generalized our model results into a virtual "biometric" parameterization that relates roughness length and displacement height to canopy height, leaf area index, and gap fraction. Using a decade of wind and canopy-structure observations in a site in Michigan, we tested the effectiveness of our model-driven biometric parameterization approach in predicting the friction velocity over heterogeneous and disturbed canopies. We compared the accuracy of these predictions with the friction-velocity predictions obtained from the common simple approximation related to canopy height, the values calculated with large-eddy simulations of the explicit canopy structure as measured by airborne and ground-based lidar, two other parameterization approaches that utilize varying canopy-structure inputs, and the annual and decadal means of the surface roughness parameters at

  1. Flow dynamics at a river confluence on Mississippi River: field measurement and large eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Trung; Khosronejad, Ali; Bartelt, Nicole; Woldeamlak, Solomon; Peterson, Bonnie; Dewall, Petronella; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory, University of Minnesota Team; Minnesota Department of Transportation Team

    2015-11-01

    We study the dynamics of a river confluence on Mississippi River branch in the city of Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States. Field measurements by Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler using on-board GPS tracking were carried out for five campaigns in the summer of 2014 and 2015 to collect both river bed elevation data and flow fields. Large Eddy Simulation is carried out to simulate the flow field with the total of 100 million grid points for the domain length of 3.2 km. The simulation results agree well with field measurements at measured cross-sections. The results show the existence of wake mode on the mixing interface of two branches near the upstream junction corner. The mutual interaction between the shear layers emanating from the river banks leading to the formation of large scale energetic structures that leads to ``switching'' side of the flow coherent structures. Our result here is a feasibility study for the use of eddy-resolving simulations in predicting complex flow dynamics in medium-size natural rivers. This work is funded by Minnesota Dept. Transportation and Minnesota Institute of Supercomputing.

  2. Numerical investigation of high pressure and high Reynolds diffusion flame using Large Eddy Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichkoohi, Ali Lohrasbi; Tousi, Abolghasem Mesgarpour

    2014-10-01

    Today, with nonstop improvement in computational power, Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) is a high demanding research tool for predicting engineering flows. Such flows on high pressure condition like diesel engines is extensively employed in ground and marine transportation, oblige the designer to control and predict toxic pollutants, while maintaining or improving their high thermal efficiency. This becomes one of the main challenging issues in decades. In the present work, numerical investigation of diffusion flame dynamics is performed in the near-field of high-Reynolds jet flow on high pressure condition encountered in diesel engine applications. This work discusses the implementation of Partially Stirred Reactor (PaSR) combustion model by the approaches of large eddy simulation (LES). The simulation results show that LES, in comparison with Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulation predicts and captures transient phenomena very well. These phenomena such as unsteadiness and curvature are inherent in the near-field of high Reynolds diffusion flame. The outcomes of this research are compared and validated by other researchers' results. Detailed comparisons of the statistics show good agreement with the corresponding experiments.

  3. Simulation and Parameterization of the Turbulent Transport in the Hurricane Boundary Layer by Large Eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, P.

    2008-05-01

    Hurricane boundary layer (HBL) processes, especially, the structure of the coherent large eddy circulations (LECs) and their induced vertical transport, are not well understood. This paper introduces a large eddy simulation (LES) framework in a weather hindcasting mode developed from a multiple scale nested Weather Research & Forecasting (WRF) model. Using the WRF-LES, this study investigated the structure of the HBL LECs and the associated vertical transport during the landfall of Hurricane Ivan (2004). The simulation shows that the HBL LECs exist in a mean stable environment and consist of well defined updraft and downdraft. Statistically, the HBL LECs are only slightly skewed with the updrafts and downdrafts relatively evenly distributed spatially. The inversion base basically envelopes the upper boundary of LECs. The trough in between two adjacent LECs is where most entrainment takes place, whereas the crest of the LECs is where boundary layer air detrains out of the HBL. In such a way, LECs directly connect the surface, the HBL, and the main body of a hurricane vortex and enhance the exchange of energy, moisture, and momentum between them. It is found that the current boundary layer schemes significantly under-estimate the resolved turbulent fluxes due to the fact that the effects of LECs have not been included in the parameterizations. Based on the statistical structure of LECs simulated by the WRF-LES, this paper proposes a conceptual updraft-downdraft model that can potentially be implemented in weather forecasting models to parameterize the fluxes induced by the HBL LEC transport.

  4. Subgrid-scale models for large-eddy simulation of rotating turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvis, Maurits; Trias, Xavier; Abkar, Mahdi; Bae, Hyunji Jane; Lozano-Duran, Adrian; Verstappen, Roel

    2016-11-01

    This paper discusses subgrid models for large-eddy simulation of anisotropic flows using anisotropic grids. In particular, we are looking into ways to model not only the subgrid dissipation, but also transport processes, since these are expected to play an important role in rotating turbulent flows. We therefore consider subgrid-scale models of the form τ = - 2νt S +μt (SΩ - ΩS) , where the eddy-viscosity νt is given by the minimum-dissipation model, μt represents a transport coefficient; S is the symmetric part of the velocity gradient and Ω the skew-symmetric part. To incorporate the effect of mesh anisotropy the filter length is taken in such a way that it minimizes the difference between the turbulent stress in physical and computational space, where the physical space is covered by an anisotropic mesh and the computational space is isotropic. The resulting model is successfully tested for rotating homogeneous isotropic turbulence and rotating plane-channel flows. The research was largely carried out during the CTR SP 2016. M.S, and R.V. acknowledge the financial support to attend this Summer Program.

  5. Large-eddy simulations of a Salt Lake Valley cold-air pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosman, Erik T.; Horel, John D.

    2017-09-01

    Persistent cold-air pools are often poorly forecast by mesoscale numerical weather prediction models, in part due to inadequate parameterization of planetary boundary-layer physics in stable atmospheric conditions, and also because of errors in the initialization and treatment of the model surface state. In this study, an improved numerical simulation of the 27-30 January 2011 cold-air pool in Utah's Great Salt Lake Basin is obtained using a large-eddy simulation with more realistic surface state characterization. Compared to a Weather Research and Forecasting model configuration run as a mesoscale model with a planetary boundary-layer scheme where turbulence is highly parameterized, the large-eddy simulation more accurately captured turbulent interactions between the stable boundary-layer and flow aloft. The simulations were also found to be sensitive to variations in the Great Salt Lake temperature and Salt Lake Valley snow cover, illustrating the importance of land surface state in modelling cold-air pools.

  6. VS-FMDF and EPVS-FMDF for large eddy simulation of turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nik, Mehdi B.

    The first part of this dissertation is concerned with implementation of the joint “velocity-scalar filtered mass density function” (VS-FMDF) methodology for large eddy simulation (LES) of Sandia Flame D. This is a turbulent piloted non-premixed methane jet flame. In VS-FMDF, the effects of the subgrid scale chemical reaction and convection appear in closed forms. The modeled transport equation for the VS-FMDF is solved by a hybrid finite-difference/Monte Carlo scheme. For this flame (which exhibits little local extinction), a flamelet model is employed to relate the instantaneous composition to the mixture fraction. The LES predictions are compared with experimental data. It is shown that the methodology captures important features of the flame as observed experimentally. In the second part of this dissertation, the joint “energy-pressure-velocity-scalar filtered mass density function” (EPVS-FMDF) is developed as a new subgrid scale (SGS) model for LES of high-speed turbulent flows. In this model, the effects of compressibility are taken into account by including two additional thermodynamic variables: the pressure and the internal energy. The EPVS-FMDF is obtained by solving its modeled transport equation, in which the effect of convection appears in a closed form. The modeled EPVS-FMDF is employed for LES of a temporally developing mixing layer. Keywords: Large eddy simulation, filtered density function, turbulent reacting flows.

  7. A dynamic wall model for Large-Eddy simulations of wind turbine dedicated airfoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    J, Calafell; O, Lehmkuhl; A, Carmona; D, Pérez-Segarra C.; A, Oliva

    2014-06-01

    This work aims at modelling the flow behavior past a wind turbine dedicated airfoil at high Reynolds number and large angle of attack (AoA). The DU-93-W-210 airfoil has been selected. To do this, Large Eddy Simulations (LES) have been performed. Momentum equations have been solved with a parallel unstructured symmetry preserving formulation while the wall-adapting local-eddy viscosity model within a variational multi-scale framework (VMS- WALE) is used as the subgrid-scales model. Since LES calculations are still very expensive at high Reynolds Number, specially at the near-wall region, a dynamic wall model has been implemented in order to overcome this limitation. The model has been validated with a very unresolved Channel Flow case at Reτ = 2000. Afterwards, the model is also tested with the Ahmed Car case, that from the flow physics point of view is more similar to an stalled airfoil than the Channel Flow is, including flow features as boundary layer detachment and recirculations. This case has been selected because experimental results of mean velocity profiles are available. Finally, a flow around a DU-93-W-210 airfoil is computed at Re = 3 x 106 and with an AoA of 15°. Numerical results are presented in comparison with Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) or experimental data for all cases.

  8. Evaluation of Subgrid-Scale Models for Large Eddy Simulation of Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaisdell, Gregory A.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this project was to evaluate and develop subgrid-scale (SGS) turbulence models for large eddy simulations (LES) of compressible flows. During the first phase of the project results from LES using the dynamic SGS model were compared to those of direct numerical simulations (DNS) of compressible homogeneous turbulence. The second phase of the project involved implementing the dynamic SGS model in a NASA code for simulating supersonic flow over a flat-plate. The model has been successfully coded and a series of simulations has been completed. One of the major findings of the work is that numerical errors associated with the finite differencing scheme used in the code can overwhelm the SGS model and adversely affect the LES results. Attached to this overview are three submitted papers: 'Evaluation of the Dynamic Model for Simulations of Compressible Decaying Isotropic Turbulence'; 'The effect of the formulation of nonlinear terms on aliasing errors in spectral methods'; and 'Large-Eddy Simulation of a Spatially Evolving Compressible Boundary Layer Flow'.

  9. An Examination of Parameters Affecting Large Eddy Simulations of Flow Past a Square Cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mankbadi, M. R.; Georgiadis, N. J.

    2014-01-01

    Separated flow over a bluff body is analyzed via large eddy simulations. The turbulent flow around a square cylinder features a variety of complex flow phenomena such as highly unsteady vortical structures, reverse flow in the near wall region, and wake turbulence. The formation of spanwise vortices is often times artificially suppressed in computations by either insufficient depth or a coarse spanwise resolution. As the resolution is refined and the domain extended, the artificial turbulent energy exchange between spanwise and streamwise turbulence is eliminated within the wake region. A parametric study is performed highlighting the effects of spanwise vortices where the spanwise computational domain's resolution and depth are varied. For Re=22,000, the mean and turbulent statistics computed from the numerical large eddy simulations (NLES) are in good agreement with experimental data. Von-Karman shedding is observed in the wake of the cylinder. Mesh independence is illustrated by comparing a mesh resolution of 2 million to 16 million. Sensitivities to time stepping were minimized and sampling frequency sensitivities were nonpresent. While increasing the spanwise depth and resolution can be costly, this practice was found to be necessary to eliminating the artificial turbulent energy exchange.

  10. A spectral-element dynamic model for the Large-Eddy simulation of turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapelier, J.-B.; Lodato, G.

    2016-09-01

    A spectral dynamic modeling procedure for Large-Eddy simulation is introduced in the context of discontinuous finite element methods. The proposed sub-grid scale model depends on a turbulence sensor built from the computation of a polynomial energy spectrum in each of the discretization elements. The evaluation of the energy decay gives an estimation of the quality of the resolution in each element and allows for adapting the intensity of the sub-grid dissipation locally. This approach is simple, robust, efficient and it is shown that the sub-grid model adapts to the amount of numerical dissipation in order to provide an accurate representation of the true sub-grid stresses. The present approach is tested for the large-eddy simulation of transitional, fully-developed and wall-bounded turbulence. In particular, results are reported for the Taylor-Green vortex and periodic turbulent channel flows at moderate Reynolds number. For these configurations, the new model shows an accurate description of turbulent phenomena at relatively coarse resolutions.

  11. Large-eddy simulation of turbulent flow inside flexible vegetation canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razmi, A.; Nepf, H. M.; Chamecki, M.

    2016-12-01

    The impact of plant reconfiguration on flow within a seagrass canopy is simulated through large eddy simulation. Transport modeling inside these canopies is among the most challenging topics in fluid mechanics, due to the unsteady plant reconfiguration responding to unsteady periodic coherent flow structures. A Large-Eddy simulation model is developed to simulate the turbulent flow inside the canopy. The model solves the three-dimensional filtered momentum equation using a fully dealiased pseudo-spectral approach in the horizontal directions and a second-order centred finite-difference scheme in the vertical direction. The flow is driven by an imposed mean pressure gradient. The equations are closed using the Lagrangian scale-dependent dynamic Smagorinsky subgrid-scale (SGS) model. The model estimates the canopy drag force reduction in presence of the plant reconfiguration. The unsteady plant reconfiguration is modelled following existing formulations for plant posture as a function of flow velocity. The change in plant posture alters the drag force by altering the frontal area projected into each plane. Available lab measurements (Ghisalberti and Nepf 2006) are used for model calibration and validation for both rigid and flexible canopies. Velocity statistics, i.e., mean flow, Reynolds stress, rms-velocity and skewness of the model compare reasonably well with experimental data.

  12. Large eddy simulations of surface roughness parameter sensitivity to canopy-structure characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, K. D.; Bohrer, G.; Ivanov, V. Y.

    2014-11-01

    Surface roughness parameters are at the core of every model representation of the coupling and interactions between land-surface and atmosphere, and are used in every model of surface fluxes. However, most models assume these parameters to be a fixed property of plant functional type and do not vary them in response to spatial or temporal changes to canopy structure. In part, this is due to the difficulty of reducing the complexity of canopy structure and its spatiotemporal dynamic and heterogeneity to less than a handful of parameters describing its effects of atmosphere-surface interactions. In this study we use large-eddy simulations to explore, in silico, the effects of canopy structure characteristics on surface roughness parameters. We performed a virtual experiment to test the sensitivity of resolved surface roughness to four axes of canopy structure: (1) leaf area index, (2) the vertical profile of leaf density, (3) canopy height, and (4) canopy gap fraction. We found roughness parameters to be highly variable, but were able to find positive relationships between displacement height and maximum canopy height, aerodynamic canopy height and maximum canopy height and leaf area index, and eddy-penetration depth and gap fraction. We also found negative relationships between aerodynamic canopy height and gap fraction, and between eddy-penetration depth and maximum canopy height and leaf area index. Using a decade of wind and canopy structure observations in a site in Michigan, we tested the effectiveness of our model-resolved parameters in predicting the frictional velocity over heterogeneous and disturbed canopies. We compared it with three other semi-empirical models and with a decade of meteorological observations. We found that parameterizations with fixed representations of roughness performed relatively well. Nonetheless, some empirical approaches that incorporate seasonal and inter-annual changes to the canopy structure performed even better than models

  13. Idealized gas turbine combustor for performance research and validation of large eddy simulations.

    PubMed

    Williams, Timothy C; Schefer, Robert W; Oefelein, Joseph C; Shaddix, Christopher R

    2007-03-01

    This paper details the design of a premixed, swirl-stabilized combustor that was designed and built for the express purpose of obtaining validation-quality data for the development of large eddy simulations (LES) of gas turbine combustors. The combustor features nonambiguous boundary conditions, a geometrically simple design that retains the essential fluid dynamics and thermochemical processes that occur in actual gas turbine combustors, and unrestrictive access for laser and optical diagnostic measurements. After discussing the design detail, a preliminary investigation of the performance and operating envelope of the combustor is presented. With the combustor operating on premixed methane/air, both the equivalence ratio and the inlet velocity were systematically varied and the flame structure was recorded via digital photography. Interesting lean flame blowout and resonance characteristics were observed. In addition, the combustor exhibited a large region of stable, acoustically clean combustion that is suitable for preliminary validation of LES models.

  14. Large Eddy Simulation of Gravitational Effects on Transitional and Turbulent Gas-Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, Peyman; Jaberi, Farhad A.

    2001-01-01

    The basic objective of this work is to assess the influence of gravity on "the compositional and the spatial structures" of transitional and turbulent diffusion flames via large eddy simulation (LES), and direct numerical simulation (DNS). The DNS is conducted for appraisal of the various closures employed in LES, and to study the effect of buoyancy on the small scale flow features. The LES is based on our "filtered mass density function"' (FMDF) model. The novelty of the methodology is that it allows for reliable simulations with inclusion of "realistic physics." It also allows for detailed analysis of the unsteady large scale flow evolution and compositional flame structure which is not usually possible via Reynolds averaged simulations.

  15. Modelling of the subgrid scale wrinkling factor for large eddy simulation of turbulent premixed combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiesset, Fabien; Maurice, Guillaume; Halter, Fabien; Mazellier, Nicolas; Chauveau, Christian; Gökalp, Iskender

    2016-05-01

    We propose a model for assessing the unresolved wrinkling factor in the large eddy simulation of turbulent premixed combustion. It relies essentially on a power-law dependence of the wrinkling factor on the filter size and an original expression for the 'active' corrugating strain rate. The latter is written as the turbulent strain multiplied by an efficiency function that accounts for viscous effects and the kinematic constraint of Peters. This yields functional expressions for the fractal dimension and the inner cut-off length scale, the latter being (i) filter-size independent and (ii) consistent with the Damköhler asymptotic behaviours at both large and small Karlovitz numbers. A new expression for the wrinkling factor that incorporates finite Reynolds number effects is further proposed. Finally, the model is successfully assessed on an experimental filtered database.

  16. Large eddy simulation of combustion instability in a tripropellant air heater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Lei; Shen, Chibing

    2016-12-01

    This research is motivated by the issue associated with high frequency combustion instability. Large eddy simulation was performed to investigate spontaneous combustion instability in an air/LO2/C2H5OH tripropellant air heater. The simulation predicts self-excited transverse oscillations. Overall behavior of combustion instability including pressure time histories, mode shapes, Rayleigh index and unsteady response of the injector were studied in detail. Special emphasis was given to the flame behavior, droplet trajectories, pressure evolutions, and formation of large-scale vortical structures during combustion instability in present air heater. Furthermore, in contrast to previous investigations, a new process is identified in the simulation that may feed energy into the acoustic mode and drive combustion instability.

  17. Implicit Large Eddy Simulation of a wingtip vortex at Rec =1.2x106

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombard, Jean-Eloi; Moxey, Dave; Sherwin, Spencer; SherwinLab Team

    2015-11-01

    We present recent developments in numerical methods for performing a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of the formation and evolution of a wingtip vortex. The development of these vortices in the near wake, in combination with the large Reynolds numbers present in these cases, make these types of test cases particularly challenging to investigate numerically. To demonstrate the method's viability, we present results from numerical simulations of flow over a NACA 0012 profile wingtip at Rec = 1.2 x106 and compare them against experimental data, which is to date the highest Reynolds number achieved for a LES that has been correlated with experiments for this test case. Our model correlates favorably with experiment, both for the characteristic jetting in the primary vortex and pressure distribution on the wing surface. The proposed method is of general interest for the modeling of transitioning vortex dominated flows over complex geometries. McLaren Racing/Royal Academy of Engineering Research Chair.

  18. Artificial Fluid Properties for Large-Eddy Simulation of Compressible Turbulent Mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, A W

    2007-01-08

    An alternative methodology is described for Large-Eddy Simulation of flows involving shocks, turbulence and mixing. In lieu of filtering the governing equations, it is postulated that the large-scale behavior of an ''LES'' fluid, i.e., a fluid with artificial properties, will be similar to that of a real fluid, provided the artificial properties obey certain constraints. The artificial properties consist of modifications to the shear viscosity, bulk viscosity, thermal conductivity and species diffusivity of a fluid. The modified transport coefficients are designed to damp out high wavenumber modes, close to the resolution limit, without corrupting lower modes. Requisite behavior of the artificial properties is discussed and results are shown for a variety of test problems, each designed to exercise different aspects of the models. When combined with a 10th-order compact scheme, the overall method exhibits excellent resolution characteristics for turbulent mixing, while capturing shocks and material interfaces in crisp fashion.

  19. Martian dust devil statistics from high-resolution large-eddy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizawa, Seiya; Odaka, Masatsugu; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki O.; Sugiyama, Ko-ichiro; Nakajima, Kensuke; Ishiwatari, Masaki; Takehiro, Shin-ichi; Yashiro, Hisashi; Sato, Yousuke; Tomita, Hirofumi; Hayashi, Yoshi-Yuki

    2016-05-01

    Dust devils are one of the key elements in the Martian atmospheric circulation. In order to examine their statistics, we conducted high-resolution (up to 5 m) and wide-domain (about 20 × 20 km2) large-eddy simulations of the Martian daytime convective layer. Large numbers of dust devils developed spontaneously in the simulations, which enabled us to represent a quantitative consideration of Martian dust devil frequency distributions. We clarify the distributions of size and intensity, a topic of debate, and conclude that the maximum vertical vorticity of an individual dust devil has an exponential distribution, while the radius and circulation have power law distributions. A grid refinement experiment shows that the rate parameter of the vorticity distribution and the exponent of the circulation distribution are robust. The mode of the size distribution depends on the resolution, and it is suggested that the mode is less than 5 m.

  20. Estimating the effective Reynolds number in implicit large-eddy simulation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ye; Grinstein, Fernando F; Wachtor, Adam J; Haines, Brian M

    2014-01-01

    In implicit large-eddy simulation (ILES), energy-containing large scales are resolved, and physics capturing numerics are used to spatially filter out unresolved scales and to implicitly model subgrid scale effects. From an applied perspective, it is highly desirable to estimate a characteristic Reynolds number (Re)-and therefore a relevant effective viscosity-so that the impact of resolution on predicted flow quantities and their macroscopic convergence can usefully be characterized. We argue in favor of obtaining robust Re estimates away from the smallest scales of the simulated flow-where numerically controlled dissipation takes place and propose a theoretical basis and framework to determine such measures. ILES examples include forced turbulence as a steady flow case, the Taylor-Green vortex to address transition and decaying turbulence, and simulations of a laser-driven reshock experiment illustrating a fairly complex turbulence problem of current practical interest.

  1. Mean-state acceleration of cloud-resolving models and large eddy simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Jones, C. R.; Bretherton, C. S.; Pritchard, M. S.

    2015-10-29

    In this study, large eddy simulations and cloud-resolving models (CRMs) are routinely used to simulate boundary layer and deep convective cloud processes, aid in the development of moist physical parameterization for global models, study cloud-climate feedbacks and cloud-aerosol interaction, and as the heart of superparameterized climate models. These models are computationally demanding, placing practical constraints on their use in these applications, especially for long, climate-relevant simulations. In many situations, the horizontal-mean atmospheric structure evolves slowly compared to the turnover time of the most energetic turbulent eddies. We develop a simple scheme to reduce this time scale separation to accelerate themore » evolution of the mean state. Using this approach we are able to accelerate the model evolution by a factor of 2–16 or more in idealized stratocumulus, shallow and deep cumulus convection without substantial loss of accuracy in simulating mean cloud statistics and their sensitivity to climate change perturbations. As a culminating test, we apply this technique to accelerate the embedded CRMs in the Superparameterized Community Atmosphere Model by a factor of 2, thereby showing that the method is robust and stable to realistic perturbations across spatial and temporal scales typical in a GCM.« less

  2. Application of large eddy simulations for the parameterization of stable atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Emilia; Na, Ji Sung; Lee, Joon Sang; Kim, Young-Joon

    2013-04-01

    Authors investigated the parameter space of the stable atmospheric boundary layer by varying geostrophic winds, surface cooling rates and special/temporal resolutions using the large eddy simulations. The NCAR LES model based on a mixed pseudo-spectral finite difference method with third-order Runge-Kutta time stepping utilizing a staggered vertical grid and Smagorinsky subgrid-scale eddy viscosity model and PArallelized Les Model (PALM) based on a central finite differences method with a Cartesian staggered grid and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) model were used and compared. The basic structure of the potential temperature, winds, stochastic turbulent profile and TKE budget were analyzed and the vortical structure with horizontal layering in the stable atmospheric boundary layer was investigated. Based on these results, authors validated the state-of-the-art k-profile planetary boundary layer parameterization schemes of the global numerical weather prediction models. Han and Pan (2011), Lock et al. (2000) and YSU (Hong 2010) schemes are evaluated.

  3. Mean-state acceleration of cloud-resolving models and large eddy simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C. R.; Bretherton, C. S.; Pritchard, M. S.

    2015-10-29

    In this study, large eddy simulations and cloud-resolving models (CRMs) are routinely used to simulate boundary layer and deep convective cloud processes, aid in the development of moist physical parameterization for global models, study cloud-climate feedbacks and cloud-aerosol interaction, and as the heart of superparameterized climate models. These models are computationally demanding, placing practical constraints on their use in these applications, especially for long, climate-relevant simulations. In many situations, the horizontal-mean atmospheric structure evolves slowly compared to the turnover time of the most energetic turbulent eddies. We develop a simple scheme to reduce this time scale separation to accelerate the evolution of the mean state. Using this approach we are able to accelerate the model evolution by a factor of 2–16 or more in idealized stratocumulus, shallow and deep cumulus convection without substantial loss of accuracy in simulating mean cloud statistics and their sensitivity to climate change perturbations. As a culminating test, we apply this technique to accelerate the embedded CRMs in the Superparameterized Community Atmosphere Model by a factor of 2, thereby showing that the method is robust and stable to realistic perturbations across spatial and temporal scales typical in a GCM.

  4. Large Eddy Simulation of Surface Pressure Fluctuations on a Stalled Airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lele, Sanjiva; Kocheemoolayil, Joseph

    2016-11-01

    The surface pressure fluctuations beneath the separated flow over a turbine blade are believed to be responsible for a phenomenon known as Other Amplitude Modulation (OAM) of wind turbine noise. Developing the capability to predict stall noise from first-principles is a pacing item within the context of critically evaluating this conjecture. We summarize the progress made towards using large eddy simulations to predict stall noise. Successful prediction of pressure fluctuations on the airfoil surface beneath the suction side boundary layer is demonstrated in the near-stall and post-stall regimes. Previously unavailable two-point statistics necessary for characterizing the surface pressure fluctuations more completely are documented. The simulation results indicate that the space-time characteristics of pressure fluctuations on the airfoil surface change drastically in the near-stall and post-stall regimes. The changes are not simple enough to be accounted for by straight-forward scaling laws. The eddies responsible for surface pressure fluctuations and hence far-field noise are significantly more coherent across the span of the airfoil in the post-stall regime relative to the more canonical attached configurations.

  5. Large eddy simulation models for incompressible magnetohydrodynamics derived from the variational multiscale formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Sondak, David; Oberai, Assad A.

    2012-10-15

    Novel large eddy simulation (LES) models are developed for incompressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). These models include the application of the variational multiscale formulation of LES to the equations of incompressible MHD. Additionally, a new residual-based eddy viscosity model is introduced for MHD. A mixed LES model that combines the strengths of both of these models is also derived. The new models result in a consistent numerical method that is relatively simple to implement. The need for a dynamic procedure in determining model coefficients is no longer required. The new LES models are tested on a decaying Taylor-Green vortex generalized to MHD and benchmarked against classical LES turbulence models. The LES simulations are run in a periodic box of size [-{pi}, {pi}]{sup 3} with 32 modes in each direction and are compared to a direct numerical simulation (DNS) with 512 modes in each direction. The new models are able to account for the essential MHD physics which is demonstrated via comparisons of energy spectra. We also compare the performance of our models to a DNS simulation by Pouquet et al.['The dynamics of unforced turbulence at high Reynolds number for Taylor-Green vortices generalized to MHD,' Geophys. Astrophys. Fluid Dyn. 104, 115-134 (2010)], for which the ratio of DNS modes to LES modes is 262:144.

  6. Scalable High Performance Computing: Direct and Large-Eddy Turbulent Flow Simulations Using Massively Parallel Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Philip E.

    2004-01-01

    This final report contains reports of research related to the tasks "Scalable High Performance Computing: Direct and Lark-Eddy Turbulent FLow Simulations Using Massively Parallel Computers" and "Devleop High-Performance Time-Domain Computational Electromagnetics Capability for RCS Prediction, Wave Propagation in Dispersive Media, and Dual-Use Applications. The discussion of Scalable High Performance Computing reports on three objectives: validate, access scalability, and apply two parallel flow solvers for three-dimensional Navier-Stokes flows; develop and validate a high-order parallel solver for Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) problems; and Investigate and develop a high-order Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes turbulence model. The discussion of High-Performance Time-Domain Computational Electromagnetics reports on five objectives: enhancement of an electromagnetics code (CHARGE) to be able to effectively model antenna problems; utilize lessons learned in high-order/spectral solution of swirling 3D jets to apply to solving electromagnetics project; transition a high-order fluids code, FDL3DI, to be able to solve Maxwell's Equations using compact-differencing; develop and demonstrate improved radiation absorbing boundary conditions for high-order CEM; and extend high-order CEM solver to address variable material properties. The report also contains a review of work done by the systems engineer.

  7. Large-eddy simulation of 3-D corner separation in a linear compressor cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Feng; Ma, Wei; Zambonini, Gherardo; Boudet, Jérôme; Ottavy, Xavier; Lu, Lipeng; Shao, Liang

    2015-08-01

    The increase of the thrust/weight ratio of aircraft engines is extremely restricted by different 3-D flow loss mechanisms. One of them is the corner separation that can form at the junction between a blade suction side and a hub or shroud. In this paper, in order to further investigate the turbulent characteristics of corner separation, large-eddy simulation (LES) is conducted on a compressor cascade configuration using NACA65 blade profiles (chord based Reynolds number: 3.82 × 105), in comparison with the previous obtained experimental data. Using the shear-improved Smagorinsky model as subgrid-scale model, the LES gives a good description of the mean aerodynamics of the corner separation, especially for the blade surface static pressure coefficient and the total pressure losses. The turbulent dynamics is then analyzed in detail, in consideration of the turbulent structures, the one-point velocity spectra, and the turbulence anisotropy. Within the recirculation region, the energy appears to concentrate around the largest turbulent eddies, with fairly isotropic characteristics. Concerning the dynamics, an aperiodic shedding of hairpin vortices seems to induce an unsteadiness of the separation envelope.

  8. Investigations of Subsonic Compressible Boundary Layer Flows using Hybrid Large Eddy Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Sara Jo

    The objective of this thesis is to investigate the spatially developing turbulent compressible boundary layer on a flat plate using the Spalart-Allmaras Detached Eddy Simulation (SA-DES) model [22] and the Nichols-Nelson hybrid Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes/Large Eddy Simulation (RANS/LES) model [13] which have been implemented into the Wind-US 3.0 computational fluid dynamics code [30]; both of the hybrid approaches involve RANS modeling in the near-wall region and LES treatment in the outer region. Generation of unsteady turbulent inflow data is achieved via the prescribed energy spectrum method. The studies illustrated dependence on Reynolds number based on momentum thickness, Reθ, ranging from 3018 to 19430, and dependence on Mach number, M = 0.5 and M = 0.9. The SA-DES model predicted mean flow profiles to a satisfactory degree, and the Nichols-Nelson hybrid RANS/LES model adequately predicted density field fluctuations; the aero-thermal effects captured by the Nichols-Nelson model can be useful for near-field aero optics applications.

  9. Large-eddy simulations of impinging jets at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wen; Piomelli, Ugo

    2013-11-01

    We have performed large-eddy simulations of an impinging jet with embedded azimuthal vortices. We used a hybrid approach in which the near-wall layer is modelled using the RANS equations with the Spalart-Allmaras model, while away from the wall Lagrangian-averaged dynamic eddy-viscosity modelled LES is used. This method allowed us to reach Reynolds numbers that would be prohibitively expensive for wall-resolving LES. First, we compared the results of the hybrid calculation with a wall-resolved one at moderate Reynolds number, Re = 66 , 000 (based on jet diameter and velocity). The mean velocity and Reynolds stresses were in good agreement between the simulations, and, in particular, the generation of secondary vorticity at the wall and its liftup were captured well. The simulation cost was reduced by 86%. We then carried out simulations at Re = 266 , 000 and 1.3 million. The effect of Reynolds number on vortex development will be discussed. Canada Research Chair in Computational Turbulence, HPCVL-Sun Microsystems Chair in Computational Science and Engineering.

  10. Large-Eddy Simulation of Transition to Turbulence in Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huai, Xiao-Li; Joslin, Ronald D.; Piomelli, Ugo

    1997-01-01

    Large-eddy simulation results for laminar-to-turbulent transition in a spatially developing boundary layer are presented. The disturbances are ingested into a laminar flow through an unsteady suction-and-blowing strip. The filtered, three-dimensional time- dependent Navier-Stokes equations are integrated numerically using spectral, high-order finite-difference, and three-stage low-storage Runge-Kutta methods. The buffer-domain technique is used for the outflow boundary condition. The localized dynamic model used to parameterize the subgrid-scale stresses begins to have a significant impact at the beginning of the nonlinear transition (or intermittency) region. The flow structures commonly found in experiments are also observed in the present simulation; the computed linear instability modes and secondary instability lambda-vortex structures are in agreement with the experiments, and the streak-like-structures and turbulent statistics compare with both the experiments and the theory. The physics captured in the present LES are consistent with the experiments and the full Navier-Stokes simulation (DNS), at a significant fraction of the DNS cost. A comparison of the results obtained with several SGS models shows that the localized model gives accurate results both in a statistical sense and in terms of predicting the dynamics of the energy-carrying eddies, without ad hoc adjustments.

  11. Requirements for Large Eddy Simulation Computations of Variable-Speed Power Turbine Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ameri, Ali A.

    2016-01-01

    Variable-speed power turbines (VSPTs) operate at low Reynolds numbers and with a wide range of incidence angles. Transition, separation, and the relevant physics leading to them are important to VSPT flow. Higher fidelity tools such as large eddy simulation (LES) may be needed to resolve the flow features necessary for accurate predictive capability and design of such turbines. A survey conducted for this report explores the requirements for such computations. The survey is limited to the simulation of two-dimensional flow cases and endwalls are not included. It suggests that a grid resolution necessary for this type of simulation to accurately represent the physics may be of the order of Delta(x)+=45, Delta(x)+ =2 and Delta(z)+=17. Various subgrid-scale (SGS) models have been used and except for the Smagorinsky model, all seem to perform well and in some instances the simulations worked well without SGS modeling. A method of specifying the inlet conditions such as synthetic eddy modeling (SEM) is necessary to correctly represent the inlet conditions.

  12. Three-Dimensional In Situ Measurements of a Large Anticyclonic Eddy and Surrounding Waters in the Eastern Caribbean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudzin, J. E.; Shay, L. K.; Jaimes de la Cruz, B.; Brewster, J.

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies of anticyclonic Caribbean eddies illustrate their pathways, horizontal scales, amplitudes and their relationship with the Caribbean Current. However, their vertical structure has remained unresolved from in situ observations and has not been thoroughly explained in literature. While these studies show that warm-core eddies (WCE) in the basin can evolve from North Brazil Current (NBC) rings together with current instabilities within the Caribbean, this finding hasn't been investigated using water mass characteristics. The vertical structure of a large anticyclonic eddy and the background flow in the Caribbean is examined using oceanic profilers deployed during a NOAA research aircraft study in September 2014 in the Eastern Caribbean Sea. Measurements of the overlying atmospheric boundary layer are also collected to examine air-sea processes over the warm feature. These novel measurements highlight three-dimensional temperature and salinity profiles for eddy and background regimes, including anomalous thermal structure compared to climatology, upper ocean buoyancy frequency, a residing barrier layer (BL), velocity structure, and water mass characteristics. Focus is directed towards how these observations compare to the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) given the connectivity of the two basins. Results suggest that the eddy's vertical structure is similar to WCEs in the GoM whereas its upper ocean stratification is relatively stronger due in part to a prevalent BL. Given the eddy's trajectory prior to sampling and the freshwater anomalies contained within, NBC ring influence is suspected. Atmospheric measurements show a somewhat unstable, moist boundary layer over the eddy. Three-dimensional in situ ocean measurements in these Caribbean eddies are key to furthering knowledge of the dominant air-sea interaction processes in the Intra-American Seas and their potential relationship with atmospheric boundary layer processes including tropical cyclone passage.

  13. A dynamic regularized gradient model of the subgrid-scale scalar flux for large eddy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balarac, G.; Le Sommer, J.; Meunier, X.; Vollant, A.

    2013-07-01

    Accurate predictions of scalar fields advected by a turbulent flow is needed for various industrial and geophysical applications. In the framework of large-eddy simulation (LES), a subgrid-scale (SGS) model for the subgrid-scale scalar flux has to be used. The gradient model (GM), which is derived from a Taylor series expansions of the filtering operation, is a well-known approach to model SGS scalar fluxes. This model is known to lead to high correlation level with the SGS scalar flux. However, this type of model cannot be used in practical LES because it does not lead to enough global scalar variance transfer from the large to the small scales. In this work, a regularization of the GM is proposed based on a physical interpretation of this model. The impact of the resolved velocity field on the resolved scalar gradient is decomposed into compressional, stretching, and rotational effects. It is shown that rotational effect is not associated with transfers of variance across scales. Conversely, the compressional effect is shown to lead to forward transfer, whereas the stretching effect leads to back-scatter of scalar variance. The proposed regularization is to neglect the stretching effect in the model formulation. The accuracy of this regularized gradient model (RGM) is tested in comparison with direct numerical simulations and compared with other classic SGS models. The accuracy of the RGM is evaluated in term of structural and functional performances, i.e., the model ability to locally approximate the SGS unknown term and to reproduce its global effect on tracer variance, respectively. It is found that the RGM associated with a dynamic procedure exhibits good performances in comparison with the standard dynamic eddy diffusivity model and the standard gradient model. In particular, the dynamic regularized gradient model (DRGM) provides a better prediction of scalar variance transfers than the standard gradient model. The DRGM is then evaluated in a series of large-eddy

  14. Field experimental study of the Smagorinsky model and application to large eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleissl, Jan

    Large-eddy simulation (LES) has become an indispensable tool for prediction of turbulent atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) flow. In LES, a subgrid-scale (SGS) model accounts for the dynamics of the unresolved scales of motion. The most widely used SGS model is an eddy-viscosity closure, the Smagorinsky model, which includes a parameter that must be prescribed in some fashion, the Smagorinsky constant cs. In this dissertation, cs is measured in a specifically designed field experiment. And, the ability of so-called dynamic SGS models to predict c s is studied based on the data obtained, as well as in numerical simulations. In the field study, two vertically separated horizontal arrays of 3d-sonic anemometers are placed in the atmospheric surface layer. Results indicate that cs is reduced when the integral scale of turbulence is small compared to the grid or filter scale, such as near the ground and in stable atmospheric conditions. The field data are processed further to test whether dynamic SGS models can predict the correct coefficient values. In the scale-invariant dynamic model (Germano et al. 1991), the coefficient is derived from various data test-filtered at a larger scale assuming that cs is the same as at scale Delta. The results show that cs is significantly underpredicted whenever Delta is larger than the large-scale limit of the inertial range. The scale-dependent dynamic model (Porte-Agel et al. 2000b) uses a second test-filter to deduce the dependence of cs on filtering scale. This model provides excellent predictions of cs and its dependence upon stability and height. Large eddy simulations of flow over a homogeneous surface with a diurnal heat flux forcing are conducted to study the prediction of c s over a wide range of stabilities in a numerical framework. The scale-invariant and scale-dependent Lagrangian dynamic SGS model are tested and compared to the field data. Consistent with the field studies, the prediction of cs from the scale

  15. Large-eddy simulation of flow past urban-like surfaces: A model validation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wai Chi; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2013-04-01

    Accurate prediction of atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) flow and its interaction with urban surfaces is critical for understanding the transport of momentum and scalars within and above cities. This, in turn, is essential for predicting the local climate and pollutant dispersion patterns in urban areas. Large-eddy simulation (LES) explicitly resolves the large-scale turbulent eddy motions and, therefore, can potentially provide improved understanding and prediction of flows inside and above urban canopies. This study focuses on developing and validating an LES framework to simulate flow past urban-like surfaces. In particular, large-eddy simulations were performed of flow past an infinite long two-dimensional (2D) building and an array of 3D cubic buildings. An immersed boundary (IB) method was employed to simulate both 2D and 3D buildings. Four subgrid-scale (SGS) models, including (i) the traditional Smagorinsky model, (ii) the Lagrangian dynamic model, (iii) the Lagrangian scale-dependent dynamic model, and (iv) the modulated gradient model, were evaluated using the 2D building case. The simulated velocity streamlines and the vertical profiles of the mean velocities and variances were compared with experimental results. The modulated gradient model shows the best overall agreement with the experimental results among the four SGS models. In particular, the flow recirculation, the reattachment position and the vertical profiles are accurately reproduced with a grid resolution of (Nx)x(Ny)x(Nz) =160x40x160 ((nx)x(nz) =13x16 covering the block). After validating the LES framework with the 2D building case, it was further applied to simulate a boundary-layer flow past a 3D building array. A regular aligned building array with seven rows of cubic buildings was simulated. The building spacings in the streamwise and spanwise directions were both equal to the building height. A developed turbulent boundary-layer flow was used as the incoming flow. The results were

  16. Wall-Resolved Large-Eddy Simulation of Flow Separation Over NASA Wall-Mounted Hump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uzun, Ali; Malik, Mujeeb R.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports the findings from a study that applies wall-resolved large-eddy simulation to investigate flow separation over the NASA wall-mounted hump geometry. Despite its conceptually simple flow configuration, this benchmark problem has proven to be a challenging test case for various turbulence simulation methods that have attempted to predict flow separation arising from the adverse pressure gradient on the aft region of the hump. The momentum-thickness Reynolds number of the incoming boundary layer has a value that is near the upper limit achieved by recent direct numerical simulation and large-eddy simulation of incompressible turbulent boundary layers. The high Reynolds number of the problem necessitates a significant number of grid points for wall-resolved calculations. The present simulations show a significant improvement in the separation-bubble length prediction compared to Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes calculations. The current simulations also provide good overall prediction of the skin-friction distribution, including the relaminarization observed over the front portion of the hump due to the strong favorable pressure gradient. We discuss a number of problems that were encountered during the course of this work and present possible solutions. A systematic study regarding the effect of domain span, subgrid-scale model, tunnel back pressure, upstream boundary layer conditions and grid refinement is performed. The predicted separation-bubble length is found to be sensitive to the span of the domain. Despite the large number of grid points used in the simulations, some differences between the predictions and experimental observations still exist (particularly for Reynolds stresses) in the case of the wide-span simulation, suggesting that additional grid resolution may be required.

  17. Large-eddy simulation for flow and dispersion in urban streets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zheng-Tong; Castro, Ian P.

    Large-eddy simulations (LES) with our recently developed inflow approach (Xie, Z.-T., Castro, I.P., 2008a. Efficient generation of inflow conditions for large-eddy simulation of street-scale flows. Flow Turbul. Combust., vol. 81(3), pp. 449-470.) have been used for flow and dispersion within a genuine city area - the DAPPLE site, located at the intersection of Marylebone Rd and Gloucester Pl in Central London. Numerical results up to second-order statistics are reported for a computational domain of 1.2 km (streamwise) × 0.8 km (lateral) × 0.2 km (in full scale), with a resolution down to approximately one meter in space and one second in time. They are in reasonable agreement with the experimental data. Such a comprehensive urban geometry is often, as here, composed of staggered, aligned, square arrays of blocks with non-uniform height and non-uniform base, street canyons and intersections. Both the integrative and local effect of flow and dispersion to these geometrical patterns were investigated. For example, it was found that the peaks of spatially averaged u rms, v rms, w rms and < u' w'> occurred neither at the mean height nor at the maximum height, but at the height of large and tall buildings. It was also found that the mean and fluctuating concentrations in the near-source field is highly dependent on the source location and the local geometry pattern, whereas in the far field (e.g. >0.1 km) they are not. In summary, it is demonstrated that full-scale resolution of around one meter is sufficient to yield accurate prediction of the flow and mean dispersion characteristics and to provide reasonable estimation of concentration fluctuations.

  18. Large-eddy simulations of turbulent flow for grid-to-rod fretting in nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Bakosi, J.; Christon, M. A.; Lowrie, R. B.; Pritchett-Sheats, L. A.; Nourgaliev, R. R.

    2013-07-12

    The grid-to-rod fretting (GTRF) problem in pressurized water reactors is a flow-induced vibration problem that results in wear and failure of the fuel rods in nuclear assemblies. In order to understand the fluid dynamics of GTRF and to build an archival database of turbulence statistics for various configurations, implicit large-eddy simulations of time-dependent single-phase turbulent flow have been performed in 3 × 3 and 5 × 5 rod bundles with a single grid spacer. To assess the computational mesh and resolution requirements, a method for quantitative assessment of unstructured meshes with no-slip walls is described. The calculations have been carried out using Hydra-TH, a thermal-hydraulics code developed at Los Alamos for the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light water reactors, a United States Department of Energy Innovation Hub. Hydra-TH uses a second-order implicit incremental projection method to solve the singlephase incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The simulations explicitly resolve the large scale motions of the turbulent flow field using first principles and rely on a monotonicity-preserving numerical technique to represent the unresolved scales. Each series of simulations for the 3 × 3 and 5 × 5 rod-bundle geometries is an analysis of the flow field statistics combined with a mesh-refinement study and validation with available experimental data. Our primary focus is the time history and statistics of the forces loading the fuel rods. These hydrodynamic forces are believed to be the key player resulting in rod vibration and GTRF wear, one of the leading causes for leaking nuclear fuel which costs power utilities millions of dollars in preventive measures. As a result, we demonstrate that implicit large-eddy simulation of rod-bundle flows is a viable way to calculate the excitation forces for the GTRF problem.

  19. Large-eddy simulations of turbulent flow for grid-to-rod fretting in nuclear reactors

    DOE PAGES

    Bakosi, J.; Christon, M. A.; Lowrie, R. B.; ...

    2013-07-12

    The grid-to-rod fretting (GTRF) problem in pressurized water reactors is a flow-induced vibration problem that results in wear and failure of the fuel rods in nuclear assemblies. In order to understand the fluid dynamics of GTRF and to build an archival database of turbulence statistics for various configurations, implicit large-eddy simulations of time-dependent single-phase turbulent flow have been performed in 3 × 3 and 5 × 5 rod bundles with a single grid spacer. To assess the computational mesh and resolution requirements, a method for quantitative assessment of unstructured meshes with no-slip walls is described. The calculations have been carriedmore » out using Hydra-TH, a thermal-hydraulics code developed at Los Alamos for the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light water reactors, a United States Department of Energy Innovation Hub. Hydra-TH uses a second-order implicit incremental projection method to solve the singlephase incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The simulations explicitly resolve the large scale motions of the turbulent flow field using first principles and rely on a monotonicity-preserving numerical technique to represent the unresolved scales. Each series of simulations for the 3 × 3 and 5 × 5 rod-bundle geometries is an analysis of the flow field statistics combined with a mesh-refinement study and validation with available experimental data. Our primary focus is the time history and statistics of the forces loading the fuel rods. These hydrodynamic forces are believed to be the key player resulting in rod vibration and GTRF wear, one of the leading causes for leaking nuclear fuel which costs power utilities millions of dollars in preventive measures. As a result, we demonstrate that implicit large-eddy simulation of rod-bundle flows is a viable way to calculate the excitation forces for the GTRF problem.« less

  20. Non-closure of the surface energy balance explained by phase difference between vertical velocity and scalars of large atmospheric eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhongming; Liu, Heping; Katul, Gabriel G.; Foken, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    It is now accepted that large-scale turbulent eddies impact the widely reported non-closure of the surface energy balance when latent and sensible heat fluxes are measured using the eddy covariance method in the atmospheric surface layer (ASL). However, a mechanistic link between large eddies and non-closure of the surface energy balance remains a subject of inquiry. Here, measured 10 Hz time series of vertical velocity, air temperature, and water vapor density collected in the ASL are analyzed for conditions where entrainment and/or horizontal advection separately predominate. The series are decomposed into small- and large- eddies based on a frequency cutoff and their contributions to turbulent fluxes are analyzed. Phase difference between vertical velocity and water vapor density associated with large eddies reduces latent heat fluxes, especially in conditions where advection prevails. Enlarged phase difference of large eddies linked to entrainment or advection occurrence leads to increased residuals of the surface energy balance.

  1. The role of large eddy fluctuations in the magnetic dynamics of the Madison Dynamo Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Elliot

    The Madison Dynamo Experiment (MDE), a liquid sodium magnetohydrodynamics experiment in a 1 m diameter sphere at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, had measured [in Spence et al., 2006] diamagnetic electrical currents in the experiment that violated an anti dynamo theorem for axisymmetric flow. The diamagnetic currents were instead attributed to nonaxisymmetric turbulent fluctuations. The experimental apparatus has been modified to reduce the strength of the large-scale turbulence driven by the shear layer in its flow. A 7.62 cm baffle was affixed to the equator of the machine to stabilize the shear layer. This reduction has correlated with a decrease in the magnetic fields, induced by the flow, which had been associated with the α and β effects of mean-field magnetohydrodynamics. The research presented herein presents the experimental evidence for reduced fluctuations and reduced mean field emfs, and provides a theoretical framework—based upon mean-field MHD—that connects the observations. The shapes of the large-scale velocity fluctuations are inferred by the spectra of induced magnetic fluctuations and measured in a kinematically similar water experiment. The Bullard and Gellman [1954] formalism demonstrates that the large-scale velocity fluctuations that are inhibited by the baffle can beat with the large-scale magnetic fluctuations that they produce to generate a mean-field emf of the sort measured in Spence et al. [2006]. This shows that the reduction of these large-scale eddies has brought the MDE closer to exciting a dynamo magnetic field. We also examine the mean-field like effects of large-scale (stable) eddies in the Dudley-James [1989] two-vortex dynamo (that the MDE was based upon). Rotating the axis of symmetry redefines the problem from one of an axisymmetric flow exciting a nonaxisymmetric field to one of a combination of axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric flows exciting a predominantly axisymmetric magnetic

  2. Large Eddy/Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes Simulations of CUBRC Base Heating Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salazar, Giovanni; Edwards, Jack R.; Amar, Adam J.

    2012-01-01

    ven with great advances in computational techniques and computing power during recent decades, the modeling of unsteady separated flows, such as those encountered in the wake of a re-entry vehicle, continues to be one of the most challenging problems in CFD. Of most interest to the aerothermodynamics community is accurately predicting transient heating loads on the base of a blunt body, which would result in reduced uncertainties and safety margins when designing a re-entry vehicle. However, the prediction of heat transfer can vary widely depending on the turbulence model employed. Therefore, selecting a turbulence model which realistically captures as much of the flow physics as possible will result in improved results. Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) models have become increasingly popular due to their good performance with attached flows, and the relatively quick turnaround time to obtain results. However, RANS methods cannot accurately simulate unsteady separated wake flows, and running direct numerical simulation (DNS) on such complex flows is currently too computationally expensive. Large Eddy Simulation (LES) techniques allow for the computation of the large eddies, which contain most of the Reynolds stress, while modeling the smaller (subgrid) eddies. This results in models which are more computationally expensive than RANS methods, but not as prohibitive as DNS. By complimenting an LES approach with a RANS model, a hybrid LES/RANS method resolves the larger turbulent scales away from surfaces with LES, and switches to a RANS model inside boundary layers. As pointed out by Bertin et al., this type of hybrid approach has shown a lot of promise for predicting turbulent flows, but work is needed to verify that these models work well in hypersonic flows. The very limited amounts of flight and experimental data available presents an additional challenge for researchers. Recently, a joint study by NASA and CUBRC has focused on collecting heat transfer data

  3. Large Eddy Simulation Of Gravitational Effects In Transitional And Turbulent Gas-Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaberi, Farhad A.; Givi, Peyman

    2003-01-01

    The influence of gravity on the spatial and the compositional structures of transitional and turbulent hydrocarbon diffusion flames are studies via large eddy simulation (LES) and direct numerical simulation (DNS) of round and planar jets. The subgrid-scale (SGS) closures in LES are based on the filtered mass density function (FMDF) methodology. The FMDF represents the joint probability density function (PDF) of the SGS scalars, and is obtained by solving its transport equation. The fundamental advantage of LES/FMDF is that it accounts for the effects of chemical reaction and buoyancy exactly. The methodology is employed for capturing some of the fundamental influences of gravity in equilibrium flames via realistic chemical kinetic schemes. Some preliminary investigation of the gravity effects in non-equilibrium flames is also conducted, but with idealized chemical kinetics models.

  4. Influences on the Height of the Stable Boundary Layer as seen in Large-Eddy Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kosovic, B; Lundquist, J K

    2004-03-29

    Numerical weather prediction (NWP) models and atmospheric dispersion models rely on parameterizations of planetary boundary layer height. In the case of a stable boundary layer, errors in boundary layer height estimation can result in gross errors in boundary-layer evolution and in prediction of turbulent mixing within the boundary layer. We use large-eddy simulations (LES) of moderately stable boundary layers to characterize the effects of various physical processes on stable boundary layers. The stable boundary layer height is assumed to be a function of surface friction velocity, geostrophic wind, Monin-Obukhov length, and the strength of the temperature inversion atop the stable boundary layer. This temperature inversion induces gravity waves with a frequency determined by the strength of the temperature inversion.

  5. Explaining the convector effect in canopy turbulence by means of large-eddy simulation

    DOE PAGES

    Banerjee, Tirtha; De Roo, Frederik; Mauder, Matthias

    2017-06-20

    Semi-arid forests are found to sustain a massive sensible heat flux in spite of having a low surface to air temperature difference by lowering the aerodynamic resistance to heat transfer (rH) – a property called the canopy convector effect (CCE). In this work large-eddy simulations are used to demonstrate that the CCE appears more generally in canopy turbulence. It is indeed a generic feature of canopy turbulence: rH of a canopy is found to reduce with increasing unstable stratification, which effectively increases the aerodynamic roughness for the same physical roughness of the canopy. This relation offers a sufficient condition to constructmore » a general description of the CCE. In addition, we review existing parameterizations for rH from the evapotranspiration literature and test to what extent they are able to capture the CCE, thereby exploring the possibility of an improved parameterization.« less

  6. Effect of submerged vegetation on solute transport in an open channel using large eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, J.; Dai, HC

    2016-11-01

    Existence of vegetation plays a significant effect on the flow velocity distributions, turbulence structures and solute mixing in an open channel. This paper has implemented a 3D large eddy simulation model for the flow and scalar transport in the open channel with vegetation. The model can produce a typical turbulence characteristics and concentration distribution with vegetation. The scalar transport mechanism is quantitatively explained by the turbulent Schmidt number, Reynolds flux, coherent structures and quadrant conditional analysis. A dominance of ejection-sweeping events occurs in the process of the momentum and scalar flux transport. The spectral analysis is used to identify the Kelvin-Helmholtz frequency. The turbulence characteristics of the length scale of vortexes, Kelvin-Helmholtz frequency and Reynolds stress etc. are analyzed with the vegetation density. The model quantitatively predicts the trend of decreasing in the concentration distribution along the flow direction with the increasing of vegetation density.

  7. Large-eddy simulation of a turbulent flow over a heavy vehicle with drag reduction devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangseung; Kim, Myeongkyun; You, Donghyun

    2015-11-01

    Aerodynamic drag contributes to a considerable amount of energy loss of heavy vehicles. To reduce the energy loss, drag reduction devices such as side skirts and boat tails, are often installed to the side and the rear of a heavy vehicle. In the present study, turbulent flow around a heavy vehicle with realistic geometric details is simulated using large-eddy simulation (LES), which is capable of providing unsteady flow physics responsible for aerodynamic in sufficient detail. Flow over a heavy vehicle with and without a boat tail and side skirts as drag reduction devices is simulated. The simulation results are validated against accompanying in-house experimental measurements. Effects of a boat tail and side skirts on drag reduction are discussed in detail. Supported by the Korea Agency for Infrastructure Technology Advancement (KAIA) Grant NTIS 1615007940.

  8. Conjugate heat transfer with Large Eddy Simulation for gas turbine components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchaine, Florent; Mendez, Simon; Nicoud, Franck; Corpron, Alban; Moureau, Vincent; Poinsot, Thierry

    2009-06-01

    CHT (Conjugate Heat Transfer) is a main design constraint for GT (gas turbines). Most existing CHT tools are developed for chained, steady phenomena. A fully parallel environment for CHT has been developed and applied to two configurations of interest for the design of GT. A reactive Large Eddy Simulations code and a solid conduction solver exchange data via a supervisor. A flame/wall interaction is used to assess the precision and the order of the coupled solutions. A film-cooled turbine vane is then studied. Thermal conduction in the blade implies lower wall temperature than adiabatic results and CHT reproduces the experimental cooling efficiency. To cite this article: F. Duchaine et al., C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  9. A survey of modelling methods for high-fidelity wind farm simulations using large eddy simulation.

    PubMed

    Breton, S-P; Sumner, J; Sørensen, J N; Hansen, K S; Sarmast, S; Ivanell, S

    2017-04-13

    Large eddy simulations (LES) of wind farms have the capability to provide valuable and detailed information about the dynamics of wind turbine wakes. For this reason, their use within the wind energy research community is on the rise, spurring the development of new models and methods. This review surveys the most common schemes available to model the rotor, atmospheric conditions and terrain effects within current state-of-the-art LES codes, of which an overview is provided. A summary of the experimental research data available for validation of LES codes within the context of single and multiple wake situations is also supplied. Some typical results for wind turbine and wind farm flows are presented to illustrate best practices for carrying out high-fidelity LES of wind farms under various atmospheric and terrain conditions.This article is part of the themed issue 'Wind energy in complex terrains'.

  10. Comparative Study of Reynolds Averaged and Embedded Large Eddy Simulations of a High Pressure Turbine Stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Sam; Jemcov, Aleksandar; Corke, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    An Embedded Large Eddy Simulation (ELES) approach is used to simulate the flow path through a high pressure turbine stage that includes the entry duct, stationary inlet and exit guide vanes, and a rotor. The flowfield around the rotor is simulated using LES. A Reynolds Averaged Simulation (RAS) is used for the rest of the flow domain. The interface between RAS and LES domains uses the RAS turbulence quantities as a means of obtaining length scales that are used in computing the vorticity required to trigger a proper energy cascade within the LES part of the flow field. The objective is to resolve the unsteady vortical motions that eminate from the gap between the rotor tip and duct walls that are presumably under-resolved in a RAS approach. A comparative analysis between RAS and ELES approaches for this turbomachinery problem is then presented. APS Fellow.

  11. Large-eddy simulation of turbulent flow with a surface-mounted two-dimensional obstacle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Kyung-Soo; Ferziger, Joel H.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, we perform a large eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent flow in a channel containing a two-dimensional obstacle on one wall using a dynamic subgrid-scale model (DSGSM) at Re = 3210, based on bulk velocity above the obstacle and obstacle height; the wall layers are fully resolved. The low Re enables us to perform a DNS (Case 1) against which to validate the LES results. The LES with the DSGSM is designated Case 2. In addition, an LES with the conventional fixed model constant (Case 3) is conducted to allow identification of improvements due to the DSGSM. We also include LES at Re = 82,000 (Case 4) using conventional Smagorinsky subgrid-scale model and a wall-layer model. The results will be compared with the experiment of Dimaczek et al.

  12. Large eddy simulations and direct numerical simulations of high speed turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, Peyman; Madnia, C. K.; Steinberger, C. J.; Tsai, A.

    1991-01-01

    This research is involved with the implementations of advanced computational schemes based on large eddy simulations (LES) and direct numerical simulations (DNS) to study the phenomenon of mixing and its coupling with chemical reactions in compressible turbulent flows. In the efforts related to LES, a research program was initiated to extend the present capabilities of this method for the treatment of chemically reacting flows, whereas in the DNS efforts, focus was on detailed investigations of the effects of compressibility, heat release, and nonequilibrium kinetics modeling in high speed reacting flows. The efforts to date were primarily focussed on simulations of simple flows, namely, homogeneous compressible flows and temporally developing hign speed mixing layers. A summary of the accomplishments is provided.

  13. Soot prediction by Large-Eddy Simulation of complex geometry combustion chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecocq, Guillaume; Hernández, Ignacio; Poitou, Damien; Riber, Eléonore; Cuenot, Bénédicte

    2013-01-01

    This article is dedicated to the modeling of soot production in Large-Eddy Simulations (LES) of complex geometries. Such computations impose a trade-off between accuracy and CPU cost which limits the choice of soot models to semi-empirical ones. As the presence of acetylene is a necessary condition for soot inception, the Leung et al. model that accounts for this feature is chosen and used in this work. However, acetylene concentration is not provided by the reduced chemistries used in LES of complex geometries and a methodology has been developed to predict this key species through a tabulation technique. With this methodology, the model of Leung et al. is first tested and validated against measured laminar premixed flames. Then, the soot prediction method is applied to the LES of the combustion chamber of a helicopter engine.

  14. Development of the Large Eddy Simulation Approach for Modeling Turbulent Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, R. C.; Smith, T. M.; DesJardin, P. E.; Voth, T. E.; Christon, M. A.

    2002-03-01

    This report describes research and development of the large eddy simulation (LES) turbulence modeling approach conducted as part of Sandia's laboratory directed research and development (LDRD) program. The emphasis of the work described here has been toward developing the capability to perform accurate and computationally affordable LES calculations of engineering problems using unstructured-grid codes, in wall-bounded geometries and for problems with coupled physics. Specific contributions documented here include (1) the implementation and testing of LES models in Sandia codes, including tests of a new conserved scalar--laminar flamelet SGS combustion model that does not assume statistical independence between the mixture fraction and the scalar dissipation rate, (2) the development and testing of statistical analysis and visualization utility software developed for Exodus II unstructured grid LES, and (3) the development and testing of a novel new LES near-wall subgrid model based on the one-dimensional Turbulence (ODT) model.

  15. Comparison between experiments and Large-Eddy Simulations of tip spiral structure and geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanell, S.; Leweke, T.; Sarmast, S.; Quaranta, H. U.; Mikkelsen, R. F.; Sørensen, J. N.

    2015-06-01

    Results from Large-Eddy Simulations using the actuator line technique have been validated against experimental results. The experimental rotor wake, which forms the basis for the comparison, was studied in a recirculating free-surface water channel, where a helical vortex was generated by a single-bladed rotor mounted on a shaft. An investigation of how the experimental blade geometry and aerofoil characteristics affect the results was performed. Based on this, an adjustment of the pitch setting was introduced, which is still well within the limits of the experimental uncertainty. Excellent agreement between the experimental and the numerical results was achieved concerning the circulation, wake expansion and pitch of the helical tip vortex. A disagreement was found regarding the root vortex position and the axial velocity along the centre line of the tip vortex. This work establishes a good base for further studies of more fundamental stability parameters of helical rotor wakes.

  16. Large-Eddy Simulation: Current Capabilities, Recommended Practices, and Future Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; Rizzetta, Donald P.; Fureby, Christer

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an activity by the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) Working Group of the AIAA Fluid Dynamics Technical Committee to (1) address the current capabilities of LES, (2) outline recommended practices and key considerations for using LES, and (3) identify future research needs to advance the capabilities and reliability of LES for analysis of turbulent flows. To address the current capabilities and future needs, a survey comprised of eleven questions was posed to LES Working Group members to assemble a broad range of perspectives on important topics related to LES. The responses to these survey questions are summarized with the intent not to be a comprehensive dictate on LES, but rather the perspective of one group on some important issues. A list of recommended practices is also provided, which does not treat all aspects of a LES, but provides guidance on some of the key areas that should be considered.

  17. Near-Wall Modeling for Large Eddy Simulation of Convective Heat Transfer in Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyun Wook; Moon, Kiyoung; Oztekin, Ezgi; McDermott, Randall; Lee, Changhoon; Choi, Jung-Il

    2012-11-01

    Necessity of the near-wall treatments for the large eddy simulation (LES) without resolving viscous layer is well known for providing a smooth transition from molecular to turbulent transport near wall region. We propose a simple but efficient approach based on modeling of wall shear stress and heat flux that enable accurate predictions of Nusselt number correlations for equilibrium boundary layers. The wall shear stress is directly modeled with Werner and Wengle (1991)'s power law model and wall heat flux is modeled with analogous wall laws between velocity and temperature with Kader (1981)'s empirical correlation. We perform the wall-modeled LES of turbulent convective heat transfer in a channel for various Prandtl numbers. The results show good agreement with the available experimental and numerical data. Supported by WCU (R31-10049) and EDISON (2012-0006663) program of NRF.

  18. Large Eddy Simulations of Turbulent Reacting Flows in an Opposed-Piston Two Stroke Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Shalabh; Schock, Harold; Jaberi, Farhad

    2013-11-01

    The two-phase filtered mass density function (FMDF) subgrid-scale model has been used for large eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent spray combustion in a generic single cylinder, opposed-piston, two-stroke engine configuration. The LES/FMDF is implemented via an efficient, hybrid numerical method in which the filtered compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved with a high-order, multi-block, compact differencing scheme, and the spray and FMDF are implemented with stochastic Lagrangian methods. The reliability and consistency of the numerical methods are established for the engine configuration by comparing the Eulerian and Lagrangian components of the LES/FMDF. The effects of various operating conditions like boost pressure, heat transfer model, fuel spray temperature, nozzle diameter, injection pressure, and injector configuration on the flow field, heat loss and the evolution of spray and combustion are studied.

  19. Numerical study of MPS method with large eddy simulation for fluid solid coupling problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    YANG, Chao; ZHANG, Huaixin; YAO, Huilan

    2017-02-01

    The Moving-Particle Semi-implicit method (MPS) is a kind of meshless Lagrangian calculation method. This method uses particles instead of mesh. In the pretreatment it works simply and conveniently and has high computational efficiency. In practical engineering, many of fluid problems are turbulent flows. Large eddy simulation is a major means of studying turbulence. Fluid-structure coupling is an independent branch of mechanics combined with fluid dynamics and solid mechanics, which is the hot and difficult area of research in many fields at present. In this paper, for the numerical simulation of turbulent flow with interaction of fluid-structure, the modified MPS-LES method is applied in two dimensional dam-break problem. It proves that MPS-LES method can be extended on solving the fluid-solid coupled problem.

  20. Large-eddy simulation of flow around an airfoil on a structured mesh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaltenbach, Hans-Jakob; Choi, Haecheon

    1995-01-01

    The diversity of flow characteristics encountered in a flow over an airfoil near maximum lift taxes the presently available statistical turbulence models. This work describes our first attempt to apply the technique of large-eddy simulation to a flow of aeronautical interest. The challenge for this simulation comes from the high Reynolds number of the flow as well as the variety of flow regimes encountered, including a thin laminar boundary layer at the nose, transition, boundary layer growth under adverse pressure gradient, incipient separation near the trailing edge, and merging of two shear layers at the trailing edge. The flow configuration chosen is a NACA 4412 airfoil near maximum lift. The corresponding angle of attack was determined independently by Wadcock (1987) and Hastings & Williams (1984, 1987) to be close to 12 deg. The simulation matches the chord Reynolds number U(sub infinity)c/v = 1.64 x 10(exp 6) of Wadcock's experiment.

  1. Large-eddy simulation of a three-stream MILD combustion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Ihme, Matthias; He, Guowei

    2011-11-01

    Large-eddy simulations (LES) of a three-stream burner system are performed. This burner is operated in the so-called moderate and intense low-oxygen dilution (MILD) combustion regime. An extended flamelet/progress variable (FPV) model is utilized, in which an additional scalar is introduced in order to account for the mixing between the three reactant streams. LES-calculations of three different operating conditions are performed, corresponding to increased levels of oxygen-dilution in the vitiated coflow. The extended FPV model accurately predicts effects of the oxygen-dilution on the flame-structure and heat- release, and model-predictions for temperature and major and minor species are in good agreements with the measurements.

  2. Explaining the convector effect in canopy turbulence by means of large-eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Tirtha; De Roo, Frederik; Mauder, Matthias

    2017-06-01

    Semi-arid forests are found to sustain a massive sensible heat flux in spite of having a low surface to air temperature difference by lowering the aerodynamic resistance to heat transfer (rH) - a property called the canopy convector effect (CCE). In this work large-eddy simulations are used to demonstrate that the CCE appears more generally in canopy turbulence. It is indeed a generic feature of canopy turbulence: rH of a canopy is found to reduce with increasing unstable stratification, which effectively increases the aerodynamic roughness for the same physical roughness of the canopy. This relation offers a sufficient condition to construct a general description of the CCE. In addition, we review existing parameterizations for rH from the evapotranspiration literature and test to what extent they are able to capture the CCE, thereby exploring the possibility of an improved parameterization.

  3. Large Eddy Simulation of Pollen Transport in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamecki, Marcelo; Meneveau, Charles; Parlange, Marc B.

    2007-11-01

    The development of genetically modified crops and questions about cross-pollination and contamination of natural plant populations enhanced the importance of understanding wind dispersion of airborne pollen. The main objective of this work is to simulate the dispersal of pollen grains in the atmospheric surface layer using large eddy simulation. Pollen concentrations are simulated by an advection-diffusion equation including gravitational settling. Of great importance is the specification of the bottom boundary conditions characterizing the pollen source over the canopy and the deposition process everywhere else. The velocity field is discretized using a pseudospectral approach. However the application of the same discretization scheme to the pollen equation generates unphysical solutions (i.e. negative concentrations). The finite-volume bounded scheme SMART is used for the pollen equation. A conservative interpolation scheme to determine the velocity field on the finite volume surfaces was developed. The implementation is validated against field experiments of point source and area field releases of pollen.

  4. Large eddy simulations and direct numerical simulations of high speed turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, P.; Madnia, C. K.; Steinberger, C. J.; Frankel, S. H.; Vidoni, T. J.

    1991-01-01

    The main objective is to extend the boundaries within which large eddy simulations (LES) and direct numerical simulations (DNS) can be applied in computational analyses of high speed reacting flows. In the efforts related to LES, we were concerned with developing reliable subgrid closures for modeling of the fluctuation correlations of scalar quantities in reacting turbulent flows. In the work on DNS, we focused our attention to further investigation of the effects of exothermicity in compressible turbulent flows. In our previous work, in the first year of this research, we have considered only 'simple' flows. Currently, we are in the process of extending our analyses for the purpose of modeling more practical flows of current interest at LaRC. A summary of our accomplishments during the third six months of the research is presented.

  5. Very Large Eddy Simulation Technique for Noise Prediction and Control in Turbomachinery and Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golubev, Vladimir V.

    2003-01-01

    The summer fellowship research project focused on further developing an advanced computational technique based on Very Large Eddy Simulation (VLES) for analysis and control of major sources of noise in turbomachinery and propulsion systems, including jet noise and fan noise. Major part of the work during the 10-week tenure dealt with implementing a low-order, implicit A-stable time-stepping scheme in the existing explicit VLES code of Dr. Ray Hixon. The preliminary plan of the work also included application of a new time marching formulation to the problem of viscous gust-airfoil interaction. Other research items selected for implementation (possibly in the future) included investigating a set of new subgrid turbulent models for the code, and code application to a number of test cases, including a supersonic jet and swirling flow downstream of a rotor stage.

  6. The effect of atmospheric stability on wind-turbine wakes: A large-eddy simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abkar, Mahdi; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2014-06-01

    In this study, large-eddy simulation is used to investigate the influence of atmospheric stability on wind-turbine wakes. In the simulations, tuning-free Lagrangian scale- dependent dynamic models are used to model the subgrid-scale turbulent fluxes, while the turbine-induced forces are parameterized with an actuator-disk model. Emphasis is placed on studying the structure and characteristics of turbine wake in the cases where the incident flow to the turbine has the same mean velocity at the hub height but different thermal stability condition. The simulation results show that the atmospheric stability has a significant effect on the spatial distribution of the mean velocity deficit and turbulent fluxes in the wake region. In particular, in the convective boundary layer, the wake recovers faster, and the locations of the maximum turbulence intensity and turbulent stresses are closer to the turbine compared with the neutral and stable cases.

  7. Large Eddy Simulation of an URBAN 2000 Experiment with Various Time-Dependent Forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, S T; Leach, M J

    2004-06-15

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. DOE and DHS, we have developed a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model for simulating airflow and dispersion of chemical/biological agents released in the urban environment. Our model, FEM3MP, is based on solving the three-dimensional, time-dependent, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on massively parallel computer platforms. The numerical algorithm uses the finite element method for accurate representation of complex building shapes and variable terrain, together with a semi-implicit projection method and modern iterative solvers for efficient time integration (Gresho and Chan, 1998). Physical processes treated in our code include turbulence modeling via the RANS (Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes) and LES (Large Eddy Simulation) approaches, atmospheric stability, aerosols, UV radiation decay, surface energy budget, and vegetative canopies, etc.

  8. Large eddy simulation of a particle-laden turbulent plane jet.

    PubMed

    Jin, Han-Hui; Luo, Kun; Fan, Jian-Ren; Cen, Ke-Fa

    2003-01-01

    Gas-solid two-phase turbulent plane jet is applied to many natural situations and in engineering systems. To predict the particle dispersion in the gas jet is of great importance in industrial applications and in the designing of engineering systems. A large eddy simulation of the two-phase plane jet was conducted to investigate the particle dispersion patterns. The particles with Stokes numbers equal to 0.0028, 0.3, 2.5, 28 (corresponding to particle diameter 1 microm, 10 microm, 30 microm, 100 microm, respectively) in Re = 11 300 gas flow were studied. The simulation results of gas phase motion agreed well with previous experimental results. And the simulation results of the solid particles motion showed that particles with different Stokes number have different spatial dispersion; and that particles with intermediate Stokes number have the largest dispersion ratio.

  9. Large eddy simulations and direct numerical simulations of high speed turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, P.; Madnia, C. K.; Steinberger, C. J.; Frankel, S. H.

    1992-01-01

    The basic objective of this research is to extend the capabilities of Large Eddy Simulations (LES) and Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) for the computational analyses of high speed reacting flows. In the efforts related to LES, we were primarily involved with assessing the performance of the various modern methods based on the Probability Density Function (PDF) methods for providing closures for treating the subgrid fluctuation correlations of scalar quantities in reacting turbulent flows. In the work on DNS, we concentrated on understanding some of the relevant physics of compressible reacting flows by means of statistical analysis of the data generated by DNS of such flows. In the research conducted in the second year of this program, our efforts focused on the modeling of homogeneous compressible turbulent flows by PDF methods, and on DNS of non-equilibrium reacting high speed mixing layers. Some preliminary work is also in progress on PDF modeling of shear flows, and also on LES of such flows.

  10. Large eddy simulation of flows around ground vehicles and other bluff bodies.

    PubMed

    Krajnovic, Sinisa

    2009-07-28

    A brief review of large eddy simulation (LES) applications for different bluff-body flows performed by the author and his co-workers is presented. Examples of flows range from simple cube flows characterized by sharp edge separation over a three-dimensional hill where LES relies on good near-wall resolution, to complex flows of a tall, finite cylinder that contains several flow regimes that cause different challenges to LES. The second part of the paper is devoted to flows around ground vehicles at moderate Reynolds numbers. Although the present review proves the applicability of LES for various bluff-body flows, an increase of the Reynolds number towards the operational speeds of ground vehicles requires accurate near-wall modelling for a successful LES.

  11. Large eddy simulation of high frequency oscillating flow in an asymmetric branching airway model.

    PubMed

    Nagels, Martin A; Cater, John E

    2009-11-01

    The implementation of artificial ventilation schemes is necessary when respiration fails. One approach involves the application of high frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) to the respiratory system. Oscillatory airflow in the upper bronchial tree can be characterized by Reynolds numbers as high as 10(4), hence, the flow presents turbulent features. In this study, transitional and turbulent flow within an asymmetric bifurcating model of the upper airway during HFOV are studied using large eddy simulation (LES) methods. The flow, characterized by a peak Reynolds number of 8132, is analysed using a validated LES model of a three-dimensional branching geometry. The pressures, velocities, and vorticity within the flow are presented and compared with prior models for branching flow systems. The results demonstrate how pendelluft occurs at asymmetric branches within the respiratory system. These results may be useful in optimising treatments using HFOV methods.

  12. Using Large Eddy Simulation for understanding vented gas explosions in the presence of obstacles.

    PubMed

    Di Sarli, Valeria; Di Benedetto, Almerinda; Russo, Gennaro

    2009-09-30

    In this work, a validated Large Eddy Simulation model of unsteady premixed flame propagation is used to study the phenomenology underlying vented gas explosions in the presence of obstacles. Computations are run of deflagrating flames in a small-scale combustion chamber closed at the bottom end and open at the opposite face. A single obstacle is centred inside the chamber. Methane-air mixtures of various compositions (ranging from lean to stoichiometric and rich), and obstacles with different area blockage ratios (30, 50 and 70%) and shapes (circular, rectangular and square cross-section in the flow direction) are investigated. All cases are initialized from stagnation. The competition between combustion rate and venting rate allows explaining both number and intensity of the overpressure peaks observed.

  13. Large Eddy Simulation of complex sidearms subject to solar radiation and surface cooling.

    PubMed

    Dittko, Karl A; Kirkpatrick, Michael P; Armfield, Steven W

    2013-09-15

    Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is used to model two lake sidearms subject to heating from solar radiation and cooling from a surface flux. The sidearms are part of Lake Audrey, NJ, USA and Lake Alexandrina, SA, Australia. The simulation domains are created using bathymetry data and the boundary is modelled with an Immersed Boundary Method. We investigate the cooling and heating phases with separate quasi-steady state simulations. Differential heating occurs in the cavity due to the changing depth. The resulting temperature gradients drive lateral flows. These flows are the dominant transport process in the absence of wind. Study in this area is important in water quality management as the lateral circulation can carry particles and various pollutants, transporting them to and mixing them with the main lake body.

  14. Evaluation of Smagorinsky variants in large-eddy simulations of wall-resolved plane channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Johan; Sagaut, Pierre

    2007-09-01

    In recent years, variational multiscale (VMS) Smagorinsky models have emerged as new models for large-eddy simulations (LES). A common version is the small-small variant, which uses a small-scale extraction of the LES solution, obtained by high-pass filtering the resolved velocity field, to express a Smagorinsky term. The subsequent small-scale extraction of this term is used as a model. In the current work, three formulations of the small-small VMS model are investigated in large-eddy simulations of the plane channel flow. The basic small-small formulation (Model A) is modified to explicitly incorporate effects of the LES filter and the high-pass filter (Model B). A third modification (Model C) is further inertial-range consistent, allowing the use of constant model coefficients for filters widths which are situated in a finite Reynolds-number inertial subrange. We aim to evaluate the performance of these models in the presence of walls. Therefore, channel-flow simulations are performed for Reτ=110, 300, 400, and 650. Further, the effect of changes in the shape of the high-pass filter used for the three models is investigated. A sharp cutoff filter and a Gaussian high-pass filter are considered. In addition, a range of high-pass-filter widths is included in the analysis. Evaluations of the skin-friction, mean-velocity profiles, Reynolds stresses, and spanwise velocity spectra are presented. We show that Model C is most insensitive to changes in Reynolds number and filter shape, closely followed by Model B. Model A is the most sensitive to the considered variations, and simulation quality depends in particular on variations in the filter shape.

  15. Large eddy simulations as a parameterization tool for canopy-structure X VOC-flux interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenny, William; Bohrer, Gil; Chatziefstratiou, Efthalia

    2015-04-01

    We have been working to develop a new post-processing model - High resolution VOC Atmospheric Chemistry in Canopies (Hi-VACC) - which resolves the dispersion and chemistry of reacting chemical species given their emission rates from the vegetation and soil, driven by high resolution meteorological forcing and wind fields from various high resolution atmospheric regional and large-eddy simulations. Hi-VACC reads in fields of pressure, temperature, humidity, air density, short-wave radiation, wind (3-D u, v and w components) and sub-grid-scale turbulence that were simulated by a high resolution atmospheric model. This meteorological forcing data is provided as snapshots of 3-D fields. We have tested it using a number of RAMS-based Forest Large Eddy Simulation (RAFLES) runs. This can then be used for parameterization of the effects of canopy structure on VOC fluxes. RAFLES represents both drag and volume restriction by the canopy over an explicit 3-D domain. We have used these features to show the effects of canopy structure on fluxes of momentum, heat, and water in heterogeneous environments at the tree-crown scale by modifying the canopy structure representing it as both homogeneous and realistically heterogeneous. We combine this with Hi-VACC's capabilities to model dispersion and chemistry of reactive VOCs to parameterize the fluxes of these reactive species with respect to canopy structure. The high resolution capabilities of Hi-VACC coupled with RAFLES allows for sensitivity analysis to determine important structural considerations in sub-grid-scale parameterization of these phenomena in larger models.

  16. Simulation and parameterization of the turbulent transport in the hurricane boundary layer by large eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ping

    2008-09-01

    Hurricane boundary layer (HBL) processes, especially the structure of the coherent large eddy circulations (LECs) and their induced vertical transport, are not well understood. This paper introduces a large eddy simulation (LES) framework in a weather hindcasting mode developed from a multiple scale nested Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Using the WRF-LES, this study investigated the structure of the HBL LECs and the associated vertical transport during the landfall of Hurricane Ivan (2004). The simulation shows that the HBL LECs exist in a mean stable environment and consist of well-defined updraft and downdraft. Statistically, the HBL LECs are only slightly skewed with the updrafts and downdrafts relatively evenly distributed spatially. The inversion base basically envelopes the upper boundary of LECs. The trough in between two adjacent LECs is where most entrainment takes place, whereas the crest of the LECs is where boundary layer air detrains out of the HBL. In such a way, LECs directly connect the surface, the HBL, and the main body of a hurricane vortex and enhance the exchange of energy, moisture, and momentum between them. It is found that the current boundary layer schemes significantly underestimate the resolved turbulent fluxes due to the fact that the effects of LECs have not been included in the parameterizations. On the basis of the statistical structure of LECs simulated by the WRF-LES, this paper proposes a conceptual updraft-downdraft model that can potentially be implemented in weather forecasting models to parameterize the fluxes induced by the HBL LEC transport.

  17. Reducing global turbulent resistivity by eliminating large eddies in a spherical liquid-sodium experiment.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, E J; Clark, M M; Nornberg, M D; Rahbarnia, K; Rasmus, A M; Taylor, N Z; Forest, C B; Spence, E J

    2011-06-24

    Three-wave turbulent interactions and the role of eddy size on the turbulent electromotive force are studied in a spherical liquid-sodium dynamo experiment. A symmetric, equatorial baffle reduces the amplitude of the largest-scale turbulent eddies, which is inferred from the magnetic fluctuations spectrum (measured by a 2D array of surface probes). Differential rotation in the mean flow is >2 times more effective in generating mean toroidal magnetic fields from the applied poloidal field (via the Ω effect) when the largest-scale eddies are eliminated, thus demonstrating that the global turbulent resistivity (the β effect from the largest-scale eddies) is reduced by a similar amount.

  18. The Role of Large-Coherent-Eddy Transport in the Atmospheric Surface Layer Based on CASES-99 Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jielun; Lenschow, Donald H.; LeMone, Margaret A.; Mahrt, Larry

    2016-07-01

    The analysis of momentum and heat fluxes from the Cooperative Atmosphere-Surface Exchange Study 1999 (CASES-99) field experiment is extended throughout the diurnal cycle following the investigation of nighttime turbulence by Sun et al. (J Atmos Sci 69:338-351, 2012). Based on the observations, limitations of Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST) are examined in detail. The analysis suggests that strong turbulent mixing is dominated by relatively large coherent eddies that are not related to local vertical gradients as assumed in MOST. The HOckey-Stick Transition (HOST) hypothesis is developed to explain the generation of observed large coherent eddies over a finite depth and the contribution of these eddies to vertical variations of turbulence intensity and atmospheric stratification throughout the diurnal cycle. The HOST hypothesis emphasizes the connection between dominant turbulent eddies and turbulence generation scales, and the coupling between the turbulence kinetic energy and the turbulence potential energy within the turbulence generation layer in determining turbulence intensity. For turbulence generation directly influenced by the surface, the HOST hypothesis recognizes the role of the surface both in the vertical variation of momentum and heat fluxes and its boundary effect on the size of the dominant turbulence eddies.

  19. An experimental search for near-wall boundary conditions for large eddy simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, S. K.

    1982-01-01

    Instantaneous wall shear stress and streamwise velocities have been measured simultaneously in a flat plate, turbulent boundary layer at moderate Reynolds number in an effort to provide experimental support for large eddy simulations. Data were obtained by using a buried-wire wall shear gage and a hot-wire rake positioned in the log region of the flow. All data processing was accomplished with digital data analysis techniques on a minicomputer. Fluctuations of the instantaneous U plus versus Y plus profiles about a mean law of the wall are shown to be significant and complex. Peak cross-correlation values between wall shear stress and the velocities are high and reflect the passage of a large structure inclined at a small angle to the wall. Estimates of this angle are consistent with those made by other investigators. Conditional sampling techniques were used to detect the passage of various sizes and types of flow disturbances (events) and to estimate their mean frequency of occurrence. Events characterized by large and sudden streamwise accelerations were found to be highly coherent throughout the log region and were strongly correlated with large fluctuations in wall shear-stress. Phase randomness between the near-wall quantities and the outer velocities was small. The results suggest that the flow events detected by conditional sampling applied to velocities in the log region may be related to the bursting process.

  20. Large Eddy Simulation of turbulent flow fields over three- dimensional alluvial dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, R. J.; Parsons, D. R.; Best, J.; Reesink, A. J. H.; Ockelford, A.

    2016-12-01

    Flow over fluvial dunes has been extensively studied and there is general understanding of the nature of the flow field over two dimensional dunes under equilibrium flow conditions. However, fluvial systems typically experience unsteady flow and therefore the sediment-water interface is constantly reorganizing to form complex three-dimensional morphologies (ripples, dunes and bar forms). Here we report on a numerical experiment which predicts flow over three dimensional dunes using Large Eddy Simulation (LES). Bed topography generated through flume experiments, where fine sand was water worked under a range of unsteady hydraulic conditions to generate quasi-equilibrium three dimensional bed forms, was measured with terrestrial LiDAR to create digital elevation models. This topography was then incorporated into a LES model, with a wall-adapting local eddy-viscosity turbulence model, through a Mass Flux Scaling algorithm, to generate three dimensional, high resolution space time prediction of flow over naturally formed dunes. The numerically predicted flows were analysed by standard Reynolds decomposition approaches, Eulerian and Lagrangian coherent flow structure identification methods and proper orthogonal decomposition. The results show that superimposed bed forms can cause changes in the nature of the classical separated flow regions and turbulence field. In particular, the number of locations where vortices are shed increase which causes coalescence of vortices. This increases the rate of transfer of turbulent kinetic energy into smaller scales. This has significant implications for the time dependent prediction of shear stress and as such for sediment transport dynamics which are required for an improved process understanding of three-dimensional bed form adjustment.

  1. Large eddy simulation of extinction and reignition with artificial neural networks based chemical kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Baris Ali; Menon, Suresh; Hawkes, Evatt R.

    2010-03-15

    Large eddy simulation (LES) of a non-premixed, temporally evolving, syngas/air flame is performed with special emphasis on speeding-up the sub-grid chemistry computations using an artificial neural networks (ANN) approach. The numerical setup for the LES is identical to a previous direct numerical simulation (DNS) study, which reported considerable local extinction and reignition physics, and hence, offers a challenging test case. The chemical kinetics modeling with ANN is based on a recent approach, and replaces the stiff ODE solver (DI) to predict the species reaction rates in the subgrid linear eddy mixing (LEM) model based LES (LEMLES). In order to provide a comprehensive evaluation of the current approach, additional information on conditional statistics of some of the key species and temperature are extracted from the previous DNS study and are compared with the LEMLES using ANN (ANN-LEMLES, hereafter). The results show that the current approach can detect the correct extinction and reignition physics with reasonable accuracy compared to the DNS. The syngas flame structure and the scalar dissipation rate statistics obtained by the current ANN-LEMLES are provided to further probe the flame physics. It is observed that, in contrast to H{sub 2}, CO exhibits a smooth variation within the region enclosed by the stoichiometric mixture fraction. The probability density functions (PDFs) of the scalar dissipation rates calculated based on the mixture fraction and CO demonstrate that the mean value of the PDF is insensitive to extinction and reignition. However, this is not the case for the scalar dissipation rate calculated by the OH mass fraction. Overall, ANN provides considerable computational speed-up and memory saving compared to DI, and can be used to investigate turbulent flames in a computationally affordable manner. (author)

  2. Hybrid Large Eddy Simulation / Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes Modeling in Directed Energy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilberter, Ilya Alexandrovich

    In this work, a hybrid Large Eddy Simulation / Reynolds-Averaged Navier Stokes (LES/RANS) turbulence model is applied to simulate two flows relevant to directed energy applications. The flow solver blends the Menter Baseline turbulence closure near solid boundaries with a Lenormand-type subgrid model in the free-stream with a blending function that employs the ratio of estimated inner and outer turbulent length scales. A Mach 2.2 mixing nozzle/diffuser system representative of a gas laser is simulated under a range of exit pressures to assess the ability of the model to predict the dynamics of the shock train. The simulation captures the location of the shock train responsible for pressure recovery but under-predicts the rate of pressure increase. Predicted turbulence production at the wall is found to be highly sensitive to the behavior of the RANS turbulence model. A Mach 2.3, high-Reynolds number, three-dimensional cavity flow is also simulated in order to compute the wavefront aberrations of an optical beam passing thorough the cavity. The cavity geometry is modeled using an immersed boundary method, and an auxiliary flat plate simulation is performed to replicate the effects of the wind-tunnel boundary layer on the computed optical path difference. Pressure spectra extracted on the cavity walls agree with empirical predictions based on Rossiter's formula. Proper orthogonal modes of the wavefront aberrations in a beam originating from the cavity center agree well with experimental data despite uncertainty about in flow turbulence levels and boundary layer thicknesses over the wind tunnel window. Dynamic mode decomposition of a planar wavefront spanning the cavity reveals that wavefront distortions are driven by shear layer oscillations at the Rossiter frequencies; these disturbances create eddy shocklets that propagate into the free-stream, creating additional optical wavefront distortion.

  3. Large eddy simulation of interacting barchan dunes in a steady, unidirectional flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omidyeganeh, Mohammad; Piomelli, Ugo; Christensen, Kenneth T.; Best, James L.

    2013-12-01

    Barchan dunes are bed forms found in many sedimentary environments with a limited supply of sediment, and may occur in isolation or in more complex dune fields. Barchans have a crescentic planform morphology with horns elongated in the downflow direction. To study flow over barchan dunes, we performed large eddy simulations in a channel with different interdune spacings at a flow Reynolds number, Re∞≃26,000 (based on the free stream velocity and channel height). The largest interdune spacing (2.38λ, where λ is the wavelength of the barchan dune) presents similar characteristics to a solitary dune in isolation, indicating that, at this distance, the sheltering effect of the upstream dune is rather weak. Barchan dunes induce two counterrotating streamwise vortices, one along each of the horns, which direct high-momentum fluid toward the symmetry plane and low-momentum fluid near the bed away from the centerline. The flow close to the centerline plane separates at the crest, but away from the centerline plane, and along the horns, flow separation occurs intermittently. The flow in the separation bubble is directed toward the horns and leaves the dune at its tips. The internal boundary layer developing on the bed downstream of the reattachment region develops similarly for various interdune spacings; the development slows down 14.5 dune heights downstream. The turbulent kinetic energy budgets show the importance of pressure transport and mean flow advection in transferring energy from the overlying wake layer to the internal boundary layer over the stoss side. For closely spaced dunes, the bed shear stress is 30% larger than at the largest spacing, and instantaneous coherent high- and low-speed streaks are shorter but stronger. Coherent eddies in the separated shear layer are generated more frequently for smaller interdune spacing, where they move farther away from the bed, toward the free surface, and remain located between the horns.

  4. Large-Eddy Simulation of the Evolving Stable Boundary Layer Over Flat Terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, R

    2002-01-02

    The stable boundary layer (SBL) in the atmosphere is of considerable interest because it is often the worse case scenario for air pollution studies and health effect assessments associated with the accidental release of toxic material. Traditional modeling approaches used in such studies do not simulate the non-steady character of the velocity field, and hence often overpredict concentrations while underpredicting spatial coverage of potentially harmful concentrations of airborne material. The challenge for LES is to be able to resolve the rather small energy-containing eddies of the SBL while still maintaining an adequate domain size. This requires that the subgrid-scale (SGS) parameterization of turbulence incorporate an adequate representation of turbulent energy transfer. Recent studies have shown that both upscale and downscale energy transfer can occur simultaneously, but that overall the net transfer is downscale. Including the upscale transfer of turbulent energy (energy backscatter) is particularly important near the ground and under stably-stratified conditions. The goal of this research is to improve the ability to realistically simulate the SBL. The large-eddy simulation (LES) approach with its subgrid-scale (SGS) turbulence model does a better job of capturing the temporally and spatially varying features of the SBL than do Reynolds-averaging models. The scientific objectives of this research are: (1) to characterize features of the evolving SBL structure for a range of meteorological conditions (wind speed and surface cooling), (2) to simulate realistically the transfer of energy between resolved and subgrid scales, and (3) to apply results to improve simulation of dispersion in the SBL.

  5. The role of large-scale eddies in the climate equilibrium. I - Fixed static stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Shuntai; Stone, Peter H.

    1993-01-01

    An efficient two-level model on a sphere that is based on the balance equations with fixed static stability is developed and used to study how eddies arising from baroclinic instability interact with the temperature structure. The model gives a much better simulation of the eddy momentum flux and of the total eddy forcing of the zonal-mean temperature and zonal wind fields than do quasi-geostrophic beta-plane models. Nonetheless, the results are qualitatively similar. The midlatitude eddy regimes range between two extreme cases. In one, the eddies have no effect on the temperature and zonal wind fields, and in the other (similar to the observed atmosphere), the eddy forcing of the temperature and zonal wind fields is dominated by the eddy heat flux. Quantitatively, some of the model's results differ significantly from those based on the quasi-geostrophic beta-plane. For example, the temperature structure is much more sensitive to the external forcing, and the eddy heat flux is less sensitive to the temperature structure.

  6. Regional Bowen ratio controls on afternoon moist convection: A large eddy simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Song-Lak

    2016-12-01

    This study examines the effect of the regional Bowen ratio β, the ratio of the domain-averaged surface sensible heat flux (SHF) to latent heat flux (LHF), on afternoon moist convection. With a temporally evolving but spatially uniform surface available energy over a mesoscale domain under a weak capping inversion, we run large eddy simulation of the afternoon convective boundary layer (CBL). We first prescribe a small β of 0.56 (a wet surface) and then the reversed large β of 1.80 (a dry surface) by switching the SHF and LHF fields. The perturbation fields of the fluxes are prescribed with the Fourier spectra of κ- 3 (κ is horizontal wave number; strong mesoscale heterogeneity) and κ0 (homogeneity). The large β cases have strong vertical buoyancy fluxes and produce more vigorous updrafts. In the heterogeneous, large β surface case, with the removal of convective inhibition over a mesoscale subdomain of large SHF, deep convection develops. In the heterogeneous, small β surface case, convective clouds develop but do not progress into precipitating convection. In the homogeneous surface cases, randomly distributed shallow clouds develop with significantly more and thicker clouds in the large β case. (Co)spectral analyses confirm the more vigorous turbulent thermals in the large β cases and reveal that the moisture advection by the surface heterogeneity-induced mesoscale flows makes the correlation between mesoscale temperature and moisture perturbations change from negative to positive, which facilitates the mesoscale pool of high relative humidity air just above the CBL top, a necessary condition for deep convection.

  7. Comparison of Turbulence-Chemistry Interaction Models in the Large Eddy Simulation of High-Speed Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenhai; Alabi, Ken; Ladeinde, Foluso; Lou, Zhipeng

    2016-11-01

    In this study, three turbulence-chemistry interaction models: the flamelet, eddy-breakup (EBU), and laminar chemistry models, are compared in the large-eddy simulation (LES) of high speed combustion. It is the case that the simple models still find extensive applications, with fairly acceptable results in many instances. The standard flamelet model developed for low Mach number flows has been modified to account for compressibility effects in supersonic combustion. The comparison exercise has been based on the bluff-body flames that occur under high-speed conditions.

  8. Large-eddy simulation of charged particle flows to model sandstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Mustafa; Cheng, Wan; Samtaney, Ravi

    2016-11-01

    Intense electric fields and lightning have been observed in sandstorms. It is proposed to investigate the physical mechanisms essential for production and sustenance of large-scale electric fields in sandstorms. Our central hypothesis is that the turbulent transport of charged sand particles is a necessary condition to attain sustained large-scale electric fields in sandstorms. Our investigation relies on simulating turbulent two-phase (air and suspended sand particles) flows in which the flow of air is governed by the filtered Navier-Stokes equations with a subgrid-scale model in a Large-Eddy-Simulation setting, while dust particles are modeled using the Eulerian approach using a version of the Direct Quadrature Method of Moments. For the fluid phase, the LES of incompressible turbulent boundary layer employs stretched spiral vortex subgrid-scale model and a virtual wall model similar to the work of Cheng, Pullin & Samtaney. We will quantify the effects of different sand particle distributions, and turbulent intensities on the root-mean-square of the generated electric fields. Supported by KAUST OCRF under Award Number URF/1/1704-01-01. The supercomputer Shaheen at KAUST is used for all simulations.

  9. Quantifying turbulent wall shear stress in a stenosed pipe using large eddy simulation.

    PubMed

    Gårdhagen, Roland; Lantz, Jonas; Carlsson, Fredrik; Karlsson, Matts

    2010-06-01

    Large eddy simulation was applied for flow of Re=2000 in a stenosed pipe in order to undertake a thorough investigation of the wall shear stress (WSS) in turbulent flow. A decomposition of the WSS into time averaged and fluctuating components is proposed. It was concluded that a scale resolving technique is required to completely describe the WSS pattern in a subject specific vessel model, since the poststenotic region was dominated by large axial and circumferential fluctuations. Three poststenotic regions of different WSS characteristics were identified. The recirculation zone was subject to a time averaged WSS in the retrograde direction and large fluctuations. After reattachment there was an antegrade shear and smaller fluctuations than in the recirculation zone. At the reattachment the fluctuations were the largest, but no direction dominated over time. Due to symmetry the circumferential time average was always zero. Thus, in a blood vessel, the axial fluctuations would affect endothelial cells in a stretched state, whereas the circumferential fluctuations would act in a relaxed direction.

  10. Large Eddy Simulations (LES) and Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) for the computational analyses of high speed reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, Peyman; Madnia, Cyrus K.; Steinberger, C. J.; Frankel, S. H.

    1992-01-01

    The principal objective is to extend the boundaries within which large eddy simulations (LES) and direct numerical simulations (DNS) can be applied in computational analyses of high speed reacting flows. A summary of work accomplished during the last six months is presented.

  11. Experimental study and large eddy simulation of effect of terrain slope on marginal burning in shrub fuel beds

    Treesearch

    Xiangyang Zhou; Shankar Mahalingam; David Weise

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a combined study of laboratory scale fire spread experiments and a three-dimensional large eddy simulation (LES) to analyze the effect of terrain slope on marginal burning behavior in live chaparral shrub fuel beds. Line fire was initiated in single species fuel beds of four common chaparral plants under various fuel bed configurations and ambient...

  12. Large eddy simulations of turbulent flows on graphics processing units: Application to film-cooling flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinn, Aaron F.

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations can be very computationally expensive, especially for Large Eddy Simulations (LES) and Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of turbulent ows. In LES the large, energy containing eddies are resolved by the computational mesh, but the smaller (sub-grid) scales are modeled. In DNS, all scales of turbulence are resolved, including the smallest dissipative (Kolmogorov) scales. Clusters of CPUs have been the standard approach for such simulations, but an emerging approach is the use of Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), which deliver impressive computing performance compared to CPUs. Recently there has been great interest in the scientific computing community to use GPUs for general-purpose computation (such as the numerical solution of PDEs) rather than graphics rendering. To explore the use of GPUs for CFD simulations, an incompressible Navier-Stokes solver was developed for a GPU. This solver is capable of simulating unsteady laminar flows or performing a LES or DNS of turbulent ows. The Navier-Stokes equations are solved via a fractional-step method and are spatially discretized using the finite volume method on a Cartesian mesh. An immersed boundary method based on a ghost cell treatment was developed to handle flow past complex geometries. The implementation of these numerical methods had to suit the architecture of the GPU, which is designed for massive multithreading. The details of this implementation will be described, along with strategies for performance optimization. Validation of the GPU-based solver was performed for fundamental bench-mark problems, and a performance assessment indicated that the solver was over an order-of-magnitude faster compared to a CPU. The GPU-based Navier-Stokes solver was used to study film-cooling flows via Large Eddy Simulation. In modern gas turbine engines, the film-cooling method is used to protect turbine blades from hot combustion gases. Therefore, understanding the physics of

  13. Large-eddy simulation of zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer with solid particle suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Mustafa; Samtaney, Ravi

    2015-11-01

    We present results of solid particles suspension and transport in a fully-developed turbulent boundary layer flow using large-eddy simulation of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. We adopt the Eulerian-Eulerian approach to simulating particle laden flow with a large number of particles, in which the particles are characterized by statistical descriptors. For the particulate phase, the direct quadrature method of moments (DQMOM) is chosen in which the weights and abscissas of the quadrature approximation are tracked directly rather than the moments themselves. The underlying approach in modeling the turbulence of fluid phase utilizes the stretched spiral vortex subgrid-scale model and a virtual wall model similar to the work proposed by Inoue & Pullin (J. Fluid Mech. 2011). The solver is verified against simple analytical solutions and the computational results are found to be in a good agreement with these. The capability of the new numerical solver will be exercised to investigate turbulent transport of sand in sandstorms. Finally, the adequacy and limitations of the solver will be discussed. Supported by the KAUST Office of Competitive Research Funds under Award No. URF/1/1704-01.

  14. On the large-eddy simulation of transitional wall-bounded flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piomelli, Ugo; Zang, Thomas A.; Speziale, Charles G.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1989-01-01

    The structure of the subgrid scale fields in plane channel flow has been studied at various stages of the transition process to turbulence. The residual stress and subgrid scale dissipation calculated using velocity fields generated by direct numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations are significantly different from their counterparts in turbulent flows. The subgrid scale dissipation changes sign over extended areas of the channel, indicating energy flow from the small scales to the large scales. This reversed energy cascade becomes less pronounced at the later stages of transition. Standard residual stress models of the Smagorinsky type are excessively dissipative. Rescaling the model constant improves the prediction of the total (integrated) subgrid scale dissipation, but not that of the local one. Despite the somewhat excessive dissipation of the rescaled Smagorinsky model, the results of a large eddy simulation of transition on a flat-plate boundary layer compare quite well with those of a direct simulation, and require only a small fraction of the computational effort. The inclusion of non-dissipative models, which could lead to further improvements, is proposed.

  15. The emerging role of large eddy simulation in industrial practice: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Hutton, A G

    2009-07-28

    That class of methods for treating turbulence gathered under the banner of large eddy simulation is poised to enter mainstream engineering practice. There is a growing body of evidence that such methods offer a significant stretch in industrial capability over solely Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS)-based modelling. A key enabling development will be the adaptation of innovative processor architectures, resulting from the huge investment in the gaming industry, to engineering analysis. This promises to reduce the computational burden to practicable levels. However, there are many lessons to be learned from the history of the past three decades. These lessons should be analysed in order to inform, if not modulate, the unfolding of this next cycle in the development of industrial modelling capability. This provides the theme for this paper, which is written very much from the standpoint of the informed practitioner rather than the innovator; someone with a strong motivation to improve significantly the competence with which industrial turbulent flows are treated. It is asserted that the reliable deployment of the methodology in the industrial context will prove to be a knowledge-based discipline, as was the case with RANS-based modelling, if not more so. The community at large should collectively make great efforts to put in place that knowledge base from which best practice advice can be derived at the very start of this cycle of advancement and continue to enrich it as the cycle progresses.

  16. Yaw control for power optimization of an array of turbines: large eddy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciri, Umberto; Rotea, Mario; Leonardi, Stefano

    2016-11-01

    Nowadays, advanced control systems are highly sought for the efficient operation of large clusters of wind turbines. The main objective is to mitigate wake interactions thus increasing annual energy production and/or limiting fatigue loads. Several control strategies have been proposed: generator torque, blade pitch angle and turbine yaw angle. Specifically, the introduction of a misalignment between the rotor plane and the wind direction (i.e. a non-zero yaw angle) causes the wake to laterally displace. Consequently, this phenomenon can potentially be exploited to avoid or reduce waked operations in aligned turbines configurations. However, the successful use of this strategy requires proper coordination between the individual machines in order to identify the optimal yaw angles. Because of the complex mechanisms which are expected to occur in this kind of flow, modeling inaccuracies may have a major impact on the results. As a consequence, a model-free approach is pursued, namely a Nested Extremum Seeking Control, coupled with Large-Eddy Simulations to assess the impact on performances of this control strategy, devise optimal settings and identify key interactions. This work is supported by NSF Award IIP 1362033, NSF IR/D program(while Dr. Rotea is serving at the NSF), NSF Grant N. 1243482. TACC is acknowledged for computational resources.

  17. Atmospheric stability effects on wind farm performance using large-eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, C. L.; Ghaisas, N.; Xie, S.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric stability has been recently found to have significant impacts on wind farm performance, especially since offshore and onshore wind farms are known to operate often under non-neutral conditions. Recent field observations have revealed that changes in stability are accompanied by changes in wind speed, direction, and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE). In order to isolate the effects of stability, large-eddy simulations (LES) are performed under neutral, stable, and unstable conditions, keeping the wind speed and direction unchanged at a fixed height. The Lillgrund wind farm, comprising of 48 turbines, is studied in this research with the Simulator for Offshore/Onshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA) developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Unlike most previous numerical simulations, this study does not impose periodic boundary conditions and therefore is ideal for evaluating the effects of stability in large, but finite, wind farms. Changes in power generation, velocity deficit, rate of wake recovery, TKE, and surface temperature are quantified as a function of atmospheric stability. The sensitivity of these results to wind direction is also discussed.

  18. Properties of young contrails - a parametrisation based on large eddy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unterstrasser, S.

    2015-10-01

    Contrail-cirrus is probably the largest climate forcing of aviation. The evolution of contrail-cirrus and their radiative impact depends on a multitude of atmospheric parameters, but also on the geometric and microphysical properties of the young contrails evolving into contrail-cirrus. The early evolution of contrails (t < 5 min) is dominated by an interplay of ice microphysics and wake vortex dynamics. Young contrails may undergo a fast vertical expansion due to a descent of the wake vortices and may lose a substantial fraction of their ice crystals due to adiabatic heating. The geometric depth H and total ice crystal number N of young contrails are highly variable and depend on many environmental and aircraft parameters. Both properties, H and N, affect the later properties of the evolving contrail-cirrus, as they control the extent of shear-induced spreading and sedimentation losses. In this study, we provide parametrisations of H and N after 5 min taking into account the effects of temperature, relative humidity, thermal stratification and aircraft type (mass, wing span, fuel burn). The parametrisations rely on a large data set of recent large-eddy simulations of young contrails. They are suited to be incorporated in larger-scale models in order to refine the present day contrail initialisations by considering the processes that strongly affect the contrail evolution during the vortex phase.

  19. Properties of young contrails - a parametrisation based on large-eddy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unterstrasser, Simon

    2016-02-01

    Contrail-cirrus is probably the largest climate forcing from aviation. The evolution of contrail-cirrus and its radiative impact depends not only on a multitude of atmospheric parameters, but also on the geometric and microphysical properties of the young contrails evolving into contrail-cirrus. The early evolution of contrails (t < 5 min) is dominated by an interplay of ice microphysics and wake vortex dynamics. Young contrails may undergo a fast vertical expansion due to a descent of the wake vortices and may lose a substantial fraction of their ice crystals due to adiabatic heating. The geometric depth H and total ice crystal number N of young contrails are highly variable and depend on many environmental and aircraft parameters. Both properties, H and N, affect the later properties of the evolving contrail-cirrus, as they control the extent of shear-induced spreading and sedimentation losses. In this study, we provide parametrisations of H and N after 5 min taking into account the effects of temperature, relative humidity, thermal stratification and aircraft type (mass, wing span, fuel burn). The parametrisations rely on a large data set of recent large-eddy simulations of young contrails. They are suited to be incorporated in larger-scale models in order to refine the present-day contrail initialisations by considering the processes that strongly affect the contrail evolution during the vortex phase.

  20. Large Eddy Simulation of Reacting Multiphase Flows in Complex Combustor Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apte, S.; Mahesh, K.; Iaccarino, G.; Constantinescu, G.; Ham, F.; Moin, P.

    2003-11-01

    We have developed a massively parallel computational tool (CDP) for large-eddy simulation (LES) of reacting multiphase flows in complex combustor geometries. A co-located, finite-volume scheme on unstructured grids is used to solve the low-Mach number equations for gaseous phase. The liquid phase is modeled by tracking a large number of computational particles in a Lagrangian framework with models for inter-phase mass, momentum, and energy transport. Complex physical phenomena of liquid atomization, droplet deformation, drag, and evaporation are captured using advanced subgrid models. A flamelet/progress variable appraoch by Pierce & Moin (2001) is used to compute non-premixed turbulent combustion. A series of validation studies in coaxial and realistic gas-turbine combustor geometries are performed to test the predictive capability of the solver. Specifically, simulations of non-premixed combustion, particle-laden swirling flows, droplet vaporization in coaxial-jet combustors and spray breakup in realistic injectors are performed and good agreement with avialable experimental data is obtained. This tool is now being used to perform simulations of turbulent spray flames in a realistic Pratt & Whitney gas-turbine combustion chamber using Department of Energy's computational resources under the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) project.

  1. A coupled large-eddy simulation sea ice model for simulating Arctic air mass transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrelos, Antonios; Ekman, Annica M. L.; Caballero, Rodrigo

    2017-04-01

    As warm, moist, maritime air masses are advected north over the high Arctic pack ice, the air mass is transformed with fog and low-level mixed-phase clouds typically forming below the surface temperature inversion. The moist air, and the clouds forming, influence strongly the surface energy fluxes and consequently the formation and melting of sea ice. Further cooling and drying of the air eventually result in cloud dissipation, and the boundary layer transforms into a clear state with strong surface radiative cooling. The processes of air mass transformation, cloud formation and cloud dissipation are challenging to represent in large-scale models, affecting our understanding of their sensitivity and contribution to climate warming. In order to obtain a more detailed understanding of these processes, and their influence on the surface energy balance, we employ atmospheric large-eddy simulation (LES) coupled to a simple sea ice model. In this presentation, we will show results from idealized simulations of winter Arctic air mass transformation for a range of different initial temperature and moisture profiles and discuss the potential impact on sea ice formation.

  2. Large-eddy simulation of turbulent flow past hydrokinetic turbine arrays in natural waterways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiropoulos, F.; Kang, S.; Yang, X.

    2012-12-01

    While a considerable amount of work has focused on studying the effects and performance of wind farms, very little is known about the performance of hydrokinetic turbine arrays in open channels such as rivers and oceans. Unlike large wind farms, where the vertical fluxes of momentum and energy from the atmospheric boundary layer comprise the main transport mechanisms, the presence of free surface in hydrokinetic turbine arrays inhibits vertical momentum transport. In addition, the complex bathymetry of natural waterways where turbine arrays are installed impacts the array efficiency and the turbulence-induced loads acting on the turbine blades. To computationally explore these issues we develop a numerical method capable of carrying our large-eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent flows past hydrokinetic turbine arrays mounted in natural waterways. The method employs the LES curvilinear immersed boundary (CURVIB) method of Kang et al. (Adv. in Water Resources, 2010) coupled with the actuator disk model for parameterizing the turbines. Simulations are carried out for the same turbine array placed both in a straight open channel and in a natural meandering stream to systematically investigate the effect of waterway bathymetry on array efficiency and power capture ability. Mean flow quantities and turbulence statistics within and downstream of the arrays will be analyzed and the effect of the turbine arrays as means for increasing the effective roughness of the channel bed will be extensively discussed.

  3. General-relativistic Large-eddy Simulations of Binary Neutron Star Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radice, David

    2017-03-01

    The flow inside remnants of binary neutron star (NS) mergers is expected to be turbulent, because of magnetohydrodynamics instability activated at scales too small to be resolved in simulations. To study the large-scale impact of these instabilities, we develop a new formalism, based on the large-eddy simulation technique, for the modeling of subgrid-scale turbulent transport in general relativity. We apply it, for the first time, to the simulation of the late-inspiral and merger of two NSs. We find that turbulence can significantly affect the structure and survival time of the merger remnant, as well as its gravitational-wave (GW) and neutrino emissions. The former will be relevant for GW observation of merging NSs. The latter will affect the composition of the outflow driven by the merger and might influence its nucleosynthetic yields. The accretion rate after black hole formation is also affected. Nevertheless, we find that, for the most likely values of the turbulence mixing efficiency, these effects are relatively small and the GW signal will be affected only weakly by the turbulence. Thus, our simulations provide a first validation of all existing post-merger GW models.

  4. Large eddy simulation of a turbulent non-reacting spray jet

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Bing; Banerjee, S; Liu, K; Rajamohan, D; Deur, J M; Xue, Qingluan; Som, Sibendu; Senecal, Peter Kelly; Pomraning, Eric

    2015-01-01

    We performed Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of a turbulent non-reacting n-Heptane spray jet, referred to as Spray H in the Engine Combustion Network (ECN), and executed a data analysis focused on key LES metrics such as fraction of resolved turbulent kinetic energy and similarity index. In the simulation, we used the dynamic structure model for the sub-grid stress, and the Lagrangian-based spray-parcel models coupled with the blob-injection model. The finest mesh-cell size used was characterized by an Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) cell size of 0.0625 mm. To obtain ensemble statistics, we performed 28 numerical realizations of the simulation. Demonstrated by the comparison with experimental data in a previous study [7], this LES has accurately predicted global quantities, such as liquid and vapor penetrations. The analysis in this work shows that 14 realizations of LES are sufficient to provide a reasonable representation of the average flow behavior that is benchmarked against the 28-realization ensemble. With the current mesh, numerical schemes, and sub-grid scale turbulence model, more than 95% of the turbulent kinetic energy is directly resolved in the flow regions of interest. The large-scale flow structures inferred from a statistical analysis reveal a region of disorganized flow around the peripheral region of the spray jet, which appears to be linked to the entrainment process.

  5. Insights into low-latitude cloud feedbacks from large-eddy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretherton, Christopher; Blossey, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Cloud feedbacks are a leading source of uncertainty in the climate sensitivity simulated by global climate models (GCMs). Low-latitude boundary-layer and cumulus cloud regimes are particularly problematic, because they are sustained by tight interactions between clouds and unresolved turbulent circulations. Large-eddy simulations (LES) using sub-100 m grid spacings better simulate such cloud regimes without need for complex models of subgrid variability of cloud and turbulence. Recently, multiday LES over small computational domains have elucidated marine boundary layer cloud response to specified aspects of greenhouse warming and the associated changes in large-scale dynamics and atmospheric radiative heating. The focus will be the CGILS LES intercomparisons and subsequent related work. Four primary contributing mechanisms of subtropical low cloud response are implicated, all with observational support. These are (1) thermodynamic: cloudiness reduction from warming and moistening of the atmosphere-ocean column, (2) radiative: cloudiness reduction from CO2 and H2O-induced increase in atmospheric emissivity aloft, (3) stability-induced: low cloud increase from increased lower-tropospheric stratification, and (4) dynamical: low cloud increase from reduced subsidence. LES as a group robustly suggest that the cloudiness reduction mechanisms typically dominate, giving positive shortwave cloud feedback in the subtropics consistent with the range simulated by conventional global climate models. Finally, a possible approach for better bridging the scale gap between LES and global models will be noted.

  6. Large eddy simulation of tip-leakage flow in an axial flow fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Keuntae; Choi, Haecheon; Choi, Seokho; Sa, Yongcheol; Kwon, Oh-Kyoung

    2016-11-01

    An axial flow fan with a shroud generates a complicated tip-leakage flow by the interaction of the axial flow with the fan blades and shroud near the blade tips. In this study, large eddy simulation is performed for tip-leakage flow in a forward-swept axial flow fan inside an outdoor unit of an air-conditioner, operating at the design condition of the Reynolds number of 547,000 based on the radius of blade tip and the tip velocity. A dynamic global model is used for a subgrid-scale model, and an immersed boundary method in a non-inertial reference frame is adopted. The present simulation clearly reveals the generation and evolution of tip-leakage vortex near the blade tip by the leakage flow. At the inception of the leakage vortex near the leading edge of the suction-side of the blade tip, the leakage vortex is composed of unsteady multiple vortices containing high-frequency fluctuations. As the leakage vortex develops downstream along a slant line toward the following blade, large and meandering movements of the leakage vortex are observed. Thus low-frequency broad peaks of velocity and pressure occur near the pressure surface. Supported by the KISTI Supercomputing Center (KSC-2016-C3-0027).

  7. Large eddy simulation and PIV experiments of air-water mixing tanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamankhan, Piroz

    2010-06-01

    The simulations and experiments of a turbulent bubbly flow are carried out in a cylindrical mixing vessel. Dynamics of the turbulent bubbly flow is visualized using a novel two-phase particle image velocimetry (PIV) with a combination of back lighting, digital masking and fluorescent tracer particles. Using an advanced technique, Mie's scattering at surfaces of bubbles is totally filtered out and, henceforth, images of tracer particles and of bubbles are obtained with high quality. In parallel to the comprehensive experimental studies, numerical results are obtained from large eddy simulations (LES) of the two-phase air-water mixer. The impeller-induced flow at the blade tip radius is modeled by using sliding mesh method. The results demonstrate the existence of large structures such as tip-vortex tips, and also some finer details. In addition, the stability of the jet is found to be connected with the fluctuations of the tip vortices whose dynamics are affected by the presence of bubbles. Numerical results are used to interpret the measurement data and to guide the refinement of consistent theoretical analyses. Such information is invaluable in the development of advanced theories capable of describing bubbly flows in the presence of complex liquid flow. This detailed information is of real significance in facilitating the design and scale-up of practical stirred tanks.

  8. Large Eddy Simulation of Airfoil Self-Noise at High Reynolds Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocheemoolayil, Joseph; Lele, Sanjiva

    2015-11-01

    The trailing edge noise section (Category 1) of the Benchmark Problems for Airframe Noise Computations (BANC) workshop features five canonical problems. No first-principles based approach free of empiricism and tunable coefficients has successfully predicted trailing edge noise for the five configurations to date. Our simulations predict trailing edge noise accurately for all five configurations. The simulation database is described in detail, highlighting efforts undertaken to validate the results through systematic comparison with dedicated experiments and establish insensitivity to grid resolution, domain size, alleatory uncertainties such as the tripping mechanism used to force transition to turbulence and epistemic uncertainties such as models for unresolved near-wall turbulence. Ongoing efforts to extend the predictive capability to non-canonical configurations featuring flow separation are summarized. A novel, large-span calculation that predicts the flow past a wind turbine airfoil in deep stall with unprecedented accuracy is presented. The simulations predict airfoil noise in the near-stall regime accurately. While the post-stall noise predictions leave room for improvement, significant uncertainties in the experiment might preclude a fair comparison in this regime. We thank Cascade Technologies Inc. for providing access to the CharLES toolkit - a massively-parallel, unstructured large eddy simulation framework.

  9. Computation of exhaust mixing noise using large-eddy simulation turbulence modeling and Lighthill's acoustic analogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schein, David Brian

    2004-04-01

    This research involves computational study of free, heated jet flow and resultant far-field sound performed using large-eddy simulation (LES) and Lighthill's acoustic analogy. A subgrid-scale model for small-scale compressible turbulence was developed using a combination of the popular Smagorinsky model and a deductive model. An existing software package for compressible flow field computation was substantially modified to perform temporal LES and aerosound simulations. Cases studied extend to large Reynolds number (Re), high subsonic (compressible) flow with realistic geometries more representative of aircraft engine exhausts than typically considered using direct numerical simulation (DNS). Flow-field fluctuations are stored over a period of time and used to calculate rms turbulence within the computational domain. The far-field sound and directivity is computed using the time-derivative form of Lighthill's source-integral result formulated in terms of quadrupole sources from the simulated flow field, which is integrated in time and contains the fluctuations set up by the time-varying stress tensor. A simulation for a WR19-4 turbofan engine exhaust (Re>106 based on exist velocity and diameter) is presented, and propagated jet noise results are compared with experimental acoustic data. Thesis advisor: William C. Meecham Copies of this thesis written in English can be obtained from

  10. Large-eddy simulation of particle-laden atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilie, Marcel; Smith, Stefan Llewellyn

    2008-11-01

    Pollen dispersion in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) is numerically investigated using a hybrid large-eddy simulation (LES) Lagrangian approach. Interest in prediction of pollen dispersion stems from two reasons, the allergens in the pollen grains and increasing genetic manipulation of plants leading to the problem of cross pollination. An efficient Eulerian-Lagrangian particle dispersion algorithm for the prediction of pollen dispersion in the atmospheric boundary layer is outlined. The volume fraction of the dispersed phase is assumed to be small enough such that particle-particle collisions are negligible and properties of the carrier flow are not modified. Only the effect of turbulence on particle motion has to be taken into account (one-way coupling). Hence the continuous phase can be treated separate from the particulate phase. The continuous phase is determined by LES in the Eulerian frame of reference whereas the dispersed phase is simulated in a Lagrangian frame of reference. Numerical investigations are conducted for the convective, neutral and stable boundary layer as well different topographies. The results of the present study indicate that particles with small diameter size follow the flow streamlines, behaving as tracers, while particles with large diameter size tend to follow trajectories which are independent of the flow streamlines. Particles of ellipsoidal shape travel faster than the ones of spherical shape.

  11. Underwater Oil Plume Intrusion from Deepwater Blowouts - A Large-Eddy Simulation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, D.; Chen, B.; Chamecki, M.; Meneveau, C. V.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of buoyancy-driven hydrocarbon plumes with the stably stratified deep-ocean environment plays a crucial role in the formation of underwater oil intrusions. As gas bubbles and oil droplets are released from an underwater oil well blowout, they induce a strong buoyancy flux that lifts entrained sea water to form an upward plume. Towards higher elevations, the stratification-induced negative buoyancy increases and eventually exceeds the gas/oil-induced buoyancy, causing the plume to decelerate and a large fraction of entrained sea water to peel off from the rising plume to form a fountain-like downward outer plume. During this peeling process, weakly buoyant particles (e.g. small oil droplets) are trapped and fall together with the detrained fluid, and then migrate horizontally at the equilibrium buoyancy depth, forming underwater oil intrusion layers. In this study, the complex plume dynamics and oil intrusion are studied using a large-eddy simulation (LES) model. The LES model captures the essential characteristics of the plume structure and the peeling/intrusion processes, and yields good agreement with prior laboratory experiments. Applying to the Deepwater Horizon oil well blowout condition, the LES model shows considerable underwater trapping and intrusion of oil droplets under various conditions, with the trapping rate significantly affected by the diameter of the oil droplet. This study is supported by Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative RFP-II research grant.

  12. Large-Eddy Simulation-Based Retrieval of Dissipation from Coherent Doppler Lidar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, Raghavendra; Calhoun, Ronald; Fernando, Harindra

    2010-07-01

    Accurate estimation of dissipation rate is important in understanding and analyzing turbulent flows found in environment and engineering processes. Many previous studies have focused on measuring the local dissipation rate at a single point or averaged dissipation rate over a suitable area. Since coherent Doppler lidar is capable of providing multi-point measurements covering a large spatial extent, it is well-suited for examining the distribution of dissipation in the atmosphere. In this paper, an approach is presented that is based on retrieving the dissipation rate from coherent Doppler lidar data using large-eddy simulation. Two Coherent Doppler lidars performed range height indicator (RHI) scans of a vertical/cross-barrier plane during the Terrain-induced Rotor Experiment (T-REX). Two-dimensional velocity vectors were retrieved using a least squares method. The velocity vectors retrieved from co-planar RHI scans are used to estimate subgrid scale (SGS) quantities through a known SGS parameterization. For the T-REX datasets analyzed, the dissipation rate was found to increase in the presence of rotors, subrotors, and, as expected, in regions of high wind shear. Owing to the presence of sharper gradients in subrotors, their dissipation rate is generally larger than that of rotors.

  13. Large eddy simulation study of spanwise spacing effects on secondary flows in turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliakbarimiyanmahaleh, Mohammad; Anderson, William

    2015-11-01

    The structure of turbulent flow over a complex topography composed of streamwise-aligned rows of cones with varying spanwise spacing, s is studied with large-eddy simulation (LES). Similar to the experimental study of Vanderwel and Ganapathisubramani, 2015: J. Fluid Mech., we investigate the relationship between secondary flow and s, for 0 . 25 <= s / δ <= 5 . For cases with s / δ > 2 , domain-scale rollers freely exist. These had previously been called ``turbulent secondary flows'' (Willingham et al., 2014: Phys. Fluids; Barros and Christensen, 2014: J. Fluid Mech.; Anderson et al., 2015: J. Fluid Mech.), but closer inspection of the statistics indicates these are a turbulent tertiary flow: they only remain ``anchored'' to the conical roughness elements for s / δ > 2 . For s / δ < 2 , turbulent tertiary flows are prevented from occupying the domain by virtue of proximity to adjacent, counter-rotating tertiary flows. Turbulent secondary flows are associated with the conical roughness elements. These turbulent secondary flows emanate from individual conical topographic elements and set the roughness sublayer depth. The turbulent secondary flows remain intact for large and small spacing. For s / δ < 1 , a mean tertiary flow is not present. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Sci. Research, Young Inv. Program (PM: Dr. R. Ponnoppan and Ms. E. Montomery) under Grant # FA9550-14-1-0394. Computational resources were provided by the Texas Adv. Comp. Center at the Univ. of Texas.

  14. Unsteady adjoint for large eddy simulation of a coupled turbine stator-rotor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talnikar, Chaitanya; Wang, Qiqi; Laskowski, Gregory

    2016-11-01

    Unsteady fluid flow simulations like large eddy simulation are crucial in capturing key physics in turbomachinery applications like separation and wake formation in flow over a turbine vane with a downstream blade. To determine how sensitive the design objectives of the coupled system are to control parameters, an unsteady adjoint is needed. It enables the computation of the gradient of an objective with respect to a large number of inputs in a computationally efficient manner. In this paper we present unsteady adjoint solutions for a coupled turbine stator-rotor system. As the transonic fluid flows over the stator vane, the boundary layer transitions to turbulence. The turbulent wake then impinges on the rotor blades, causing early separation. This coupled system exhibits chaotic dynamics which causes conventional adjoint solutions to diverge exponentially, resulting in the corruption of the sensitivities obtained from the adjoint solutions for long-time simulations. In this presentation, adjoint solutions for aerothermal objectives are obtained through a localized adjoint viscosity injection method which aims to stabilize the adjoint solution and maintain accurate sensitivities. Preliminary results obtained from the supercomputer Mira will be shown in the presentation.

  15. Large eddy simulation of unsteady wind farm behavior using advanced actuator disk models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moens, Maud; Duponcheel, Matthieu; Winckelmans, Gregoire; Chatelain, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    The present project aims at improving the level of fidelity of unsteady wind farm scale simulations through an effort on the representation and the modeling of the rotors. The chosen tool for the simulations is a Fourth Order Finite Difference code, developed at Universite catholique de Louvain; this solver implements Large Eddy Simulation (LES) approaches. The wind turbines are modeled as advanced actuator disks: these disks are coupled with the Blade Element Momentum method (BEM method) and also take into account the turbine dynamics and controller. A special effort is made here to reproduce the specific wake behaviors. Wake decay and expansion are indeed initially governed by vortex instabilities. This is an information that cannot be obtained from the BEM calculations. We thus aim at achieving this by matching the large scales of the actuator disk flow to high fidelity wake simulations produced using a Vortex Particle-Mesh method. It is obtained by adding a controlled excitation at the disk. We apply this tool to the investigation of atmospheric turbulence effects on the power production and on the wake behavior at a wind farm level. A turbulent velocity field is then used as inflow boundary condition for the simulations. We gratefully acknowledge the support of GDF Suez for the fellowship of Mrs Maud Moens.

  16. On the air motion in continental shallow cumulus clouds: large-eddy simulation versus radar observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Chandra, A.; Klein, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    Summertime observations for 13 years at Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are used to study air motion in non-precipitating fair-weather shallow cumulus clouds. A composite shallow cumulus case is constructed based on an ensemble of days with observed active shallow cumulus clouds. Large-scale forcing for this composite case is derived accordingly based on observation-constrained variational analysis and is used to drive the large-eddy simulation (LES), whose set-up is most suitable to make an apple-to-apple comparison with radar observation at the site. At the same time, a novel retrieval algorithm, which can remove the insects' contamination on radar reflectivity, is applied to millimeter cloud radar 10s observations to get vertical velocity of air motion in the shallow cumulus cloud ensembles. We then focus on the behavior of cloudy profiles with liquid water path greater than 80 g/m^2. This is done because we believe this portion of cloud makes a major contribution to the total mass flux and by so doing, the uncertainty is minimized in the comparison between observation and LES results. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-641597

  17. Unstructured Large Eddy Simulations of Hot Supersonic Jets from a Chevron Nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brès, Guillaume; Nichols, Joseph; Lele, Sanjiva; Ham, Frank

    2012-11-01

    Large eddy simulations (LES) are performed for heated supersonic turbulent jets issued from a converging-diverging round nozzle with chevrons. The unsteady flow processes and shock/turbulence interactions are investigated with the unstructured compressible flow solver ``Charles'' developed at Cascade Technologies. In this study, the complex geometry of the nozzle and chevrons (12 counts, 6° penetration) are explicitly included in the computational domain using unstructured body-fitted mesh and adaptive grid refinement. Sound radiation from the jet is computed using an efficient frequency-domain implementation of the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings equation. Noise predictions are compared to experimental measurements carried out at the United Technologies Research Center for the same nozzle and operating conditions. The initial blind comparisons show good agreement in terms of spectra shape and levels for both the near-field and far-field noise. The current results show that the simulations accurately capture the main flow and noise features, including the shock cells, broadband shock-associated noise and turbulent mixing noise. Additional analysis of the large database generated by the LES is ongoing, to further investigate jet noise sources and chevron effects. This work is supported by NAVAIR grant N68335-11-C-0026 managed by Dr. John Spyropoulos. The simulations were carried out at DoD supercomputer facilities in ERDC and AFRL as part of the HPC Challenge Project NAWCP30952C5.

  18. Large Eddy Simulation of the Diurnal Cycle in Southeast Pacific Stratocumulus

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, P; Bretherton, C

    2008-03-03

    This paper describes a series of 6 day large eddy simulations of a deep, sometimes drizzling stratocumulus-topped boundary layer based on forcings from the East Pacific Investigation of Climate (EPIC) 2001 field campaign. The base simulation was found to reproduce the observed mean boundary layer properties quite well. The diurnal cycle of liquid water path was also well captured, although good agreement appears to result partially from compensating errors in the diurnal cycles of cloud base and cloud top due to overentrainment around midday. At other times of the day, entrainment is found to be proportional to the vertically-integrated buoyancy flux. Model stratification matches observations well; turbulence profiles suggest that the boundary layer is always at least somewhat decoupled. Model drizzle appears to be too sensitive to liquid water path and subcloud evaporation appears to be too weak. Removing the diurnal cycle of subsidence had little effect on simulated cloud albedo. Simulations with changed droplet concentration and drizzle susceptibility showed large liquid water path differences at night, but differences were quite small at midday. Droplet concentration also had a significant impact on entrainment, primarily through droplet sedimentation feedback rather than through drizzle processes.

  19. Large eddy simulation of the gas-particle turbulent wake flow.

    PubMed

    Luo, Kun; Jin, Han-hui; Fan, Jian-ren; Cen, Ke-fa

    2004-01-01

    To find out the detailed characteristics of the coherent structures and associated particle dispersion in free shear flow, large eddy simulation method was adopted to investigate a two-dimensional particle-laden wake flow. The well-known Sub-grid Scale mode introduced by Smagorinsky was employed to simulate the gas flow field and Lagrangian approach was used to trace the particles. The results showed that the typical large-scale vortex structures exhibit a stable counter rotating arrangement of opposite sign, and alternately form from the near wall region, shed and move towards the downstream positions of the wake with the development of the flow. For particle dispersion, the Stokes number of particles is a key parameter. At the Stokes numbers of 1.4 and 3.8 the particles concentrate highly in the outer boundary regions. While the particles congregate densely in the vortex core regions at the Stokes number of 0.15, and the particles at Stokes number of 15 assemble in the vortex braid regions and the rib regions between the adjoining vortex structures.

  20. Large eddy simulation of the FDA benchmark nozzle for a Reynolds number of 6500.

    PubMed

    Janiga, Gábor

    2014-04-01

    This work investigates the flow in a benchmark nozzle model of an idealized medical device proposed by the FDA using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). It was in particular shown that a proper modeling of the transitional flow features is particularly challenging, leading to large discrepancies and inaccurate predictions from the different research groups using Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) modeling. In spite of the relatively simple, axisymmetric computational geometry, the resulting turbulent flow is fairly complex and non-axisymmetric, in particular due to the sudden expansion. The resulting flow cannot be well predicted with simple modeling approaches. Due to the varying diameters and flow velocities encountered in the nozzle, different typical flow regions and regimes can be distinguished, from laminar to transitional and to weakly turbulent. The purpose of the present work is to re-examine the FDA-CFD benchmark nozzle model at a Reynolds number of 6500 using large eddy simulation (LES). The LES results are compared with published experimental data obtained by Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and an excellent agreement can be observed considering the temporally averaged flow velocities. Different flow regimes are characterized by computing the temporal energy spectra at different locations along the main axis.

  1. Large-Eddy Simulations of Strongly Precipitating, Shallow, Stratocumulus-Topped Boundary Layers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Bjorn; Cotton, William R.; Feingold, Graham; Moeng, Chin-Hoh

    1998-12-01

    Large-eddy simulations that incorporate a size-resolving representation of cloud water are used to study the effect of heavy drizzle on PBL structure. Simulated surface precipitation rates average about 1 mm day1. Heavily drizzling simulations are compared to nondrizzling simulations under two nocturnal PBL regimes-one primarily driven by buoyancy and the other driven equally by buoyancy and shear. Drizzle implies a net latent heating in the cloud that leads to sharp reductions in both entrainment and the production of turbulent kinetic energy by buoyancy (particularly in downdrafts). Drizzle, which evaporates below cloud base, promotes a cooler and moister subcloud layer that further inhibits deep mixing. The cooling and moistening is in quantitative agreement with some observations and is shown to favor the formation of cumuli rising out of the subcloud layer. The cumuli, which are local in space and time, are responsible for most of the heat and moisture transport. They also appear to generate a larger-scale circulation that differs dramatically from the regularity typically found in nonprecipitating stratocumulus. Time-averaged turbulent fluxes of heat and moisture increase in the presence of precipitation, suggesting that drizzle (and drizzle-induced stratification) should not necessarily be taken as a sign of decoupling. Because drizzle primarily affects the vertical distribution of buoyancy, shear production of turbulent kinetic energy mitigates some of the effects described above. Based on large-eddy simulation the authors hypothesize that shallow, well-mixed, radiatively driven stratocumulus cannot persist in the presence of heavy drizzle. In accord with some simpler models, the simulated case with heavy precipitation promotes a reduction in both liquid-water path and entrainment. However, the simulations suggest that time-integrated cloud fraction may increase as a result of drizzle because thinner precipitating clouds may persist longer if the boundary

  2. Large eddy simulations of coal jet flame ignition using the direct quadrature method of moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedel, Julien

    The Direct Quadrature Method of Moments (DQMOM) was implemented in the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) tool ARCHES to model coal particles. LES coupled with DQMOM was first applied to nonreacting particle-laden turbulent jets. Simulation results were compared to experimental data and accurately modeled a wide range of particle behaviors, such as particle jet waviness, spreading, break up, particle clustering and segregation, in different configurations. Simulations also accurately predicted the mean axial velocity along the centerline for both the gas phase and the solid phase, thus demonstrating the validity of the approach to model particles in turbulent flows. LES was then applied to the prediction of pulverized coal flame ignition. The stability of an oxy-coal flame as a function of changing primary gas composition (CO2 and O2) was first investigated. Flame stability was measured using optical measurements of the flame standoff distance in a 40 kW pilot facility. Large Eddy Simulations (LES) of the facility provided valuable insight into the experimentally observed data and the importance of factors such as heterogeneous reactions, radiation or wall temperature. The effects of three parameters on the flame stand-off distance were studied and simulation predictions were compared to experimental data using the data collaboration method. An additional validation study of the ARCHES LES tool was then performed on an air-fired pulverized coal jet flame ignited by a preheated gas flow. The simulation results were compared qualitatively and quantitatively to experimental observations for different inlet stoichiometric ratios. LES simulations were able to capture the various combustion regimes observed during flame ignition and to accurately model the flame stand-off distance sensitivity to the stoichiometric ratio. Gas temperature and coal burnout predictions were also examined and showed good agreement with experimental data. Overall, this research shows that high

  3. Coupled large eddy simulation and discrete element model of bedload motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furbish, D.; Schmeeckle, M. W.

    2011-12-01

    We combine a three-dimensional large eddy simulation of turbulence to a three-dimensional discrete element model of turbulence. The large eddy simulation of the turbulent fluid is extended into the bed composed of non-moving particles by adding resistance terms to the Navier-Stokes equations in accordance with the Darcy-Forchheimer law. This allows the turbulent velocity and pressure fluctuations to penetrate the bed of discrete particles, and this addition of a porous zone results in turbulence structures above the bed that are similar to previous experimental and numerical results for hydraulically-rough beds. For example, we reproduce low-speed streaks that are less coherent than those over smooth-beds due to the episodic outflow of fluid from the bed. Local resistance terms are also added to the Navier-Stokes equations to account for the drag of individual moving particles. The interaction of the spherical particles utilizes a standard DEM soft-sphere Hertz model. We use only a simple drag model to calculate the fluid forces on the particles. The model reproduces an exponential distribution of bedload particle velocities that we have found experimentally using high-speed video of a flat bed of moving sand in a recirculating water flume. The exponential distribution of velocity results from the motion of many particles that are nearly constantly in contact with other bed particles and come to rest after short distances, in combination with a relatively few particles that are entrained further above the bed and have velocities approaching that of the fluid. Entrainment and motion "hot spots" are evident that are not perfectly correlated with the local, instantaneous fluid velocity. Zones of the bed that have recently experienced motion are more susceptible to motion because of the local configuration of particle contacts. The paradigm of a characteristic saltation hop length in riverine bedload transport has infused many aspects of geomorphic thought, including

  4. Sand waves in environmental flows: Insights gained by coupling large-eddy simulation with morphodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Khosronejad, Ali

    2016-02-01

    Sand waves arise in subaqueous and Aeolian environments as the result of the complex interaction between turbulent flows and mobile sand beds. They occur across a wide range of spatial scales, evolve at temporal scales much slower than the integral scale of the transporting turbulent flow, dominate river morphodynamics, undermine streambank stability and infrastructure during flooding, and sculpt terrestrial and extraterrestrial landscapes. In this paper, we present the vision for our work over the last ten years, which has sought to develop computational tools capable of simulating the coupled interactions of sand waves with turbulence across the broad range of relevant scales: from small-scale ripples in laboratory flumes to mega-dunes in large rivers. We review the computational advances that have enabled us to simulate the genesis and long-term evolution of arbitrarily large and complex sand dunes in turbulent flows using large-eddy simulation and summarize numerous novel physical insights derived from our simulations. Our findings explain the role of turbulent sweeps in the near-bed region as the primary mechanism for destabilizing the sand bed, show that the seeds of the emergent structure in dune fields lie in the heterogeneity of the turbulence and bed shear stress fluctuations over the initially flatbed, and elucidate how large dunes at equilibrium give rise to energetic coherent structures and modify the spectra of turbulence. We also discuss future challenges and our vision for advancing a data-driven simulation-based engineering science approach for site-specific simulations of river flooding.

  5. Stratification-Turbulence Feedbacks Limit Nonlinear Interactions Between Large-Scale Eddies in the Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, T.; Walker, C. C.

    2004-12-01

    It is generally held that atmospheric macroturbulence can be strongly nonlinear. Yet weakly nonlinear models successfully account for the length scales ( ˜4000~km), time scales ( ˜2~days), and for aspects of the structure of the energy-containing baroclinic eddies in the extratropics of the Earth atmosphere. Here we present theoretical arguments and simulations that suggest that the historic successes of weakly nonlinear models of atmospheric macroturbulence are not a coincidence but a result of self-organization of atmospheric macroturbulence into critical states of weak nonlinearity. A negative feedback between the extra\\-tro\\-pi\\-cal thermal stratification and atmospheric macroturbulence limits nonlinear eddy--eddy interactions and the concomitant inverse cascade of eddy energy from the length scales of baroclinic instability to larger scales. The theory and simulations point to fundamental constraints on the climate of Earth and other planets.

  6. Large eddy simulations of forest canopies for determination of biological dispersal by wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohrer, Gil

    Forest canopies interact with the atmosphere by emitting heat and moisture fluxes, by dragging the flow and by forming obstacles to the flow. Forests are heterogeneous with structural features at a vast range of length scale. The atmospheric effects of micro-scale canopy structures, which describe differences between individual trees, have so far been poorly studied. Changes to turbulence, flow patterns, and fluxes in and above the canopy strongly affect the dispersal of seeds and its ecological consequences because they are strongly dependent on the far "tail" of the dispersal distribution. The Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) is further developed to operate as a large-eddy simulation (LES) at high resolution with 3D heterogeneous forest canopies. This RAMS-based Forest LES (RAFLES) represents the canopy through drag, volume restriction by stems, and heat and moisture fluxes in the canopy domain. The model incorporates explicit canopy descriptions, which can be obtained from observations, or from the virtual-canopy generator, which is developed here. RAFLES is used to simulate noontime conditions for two days at the hardwood stand in the Duke Forest, representing two sets of atmospheric and canopy conditions. The results are evaluated against eddy-flux observations from these days. RAFLES compares well to the observed data. Comparison between artificial homogeneous cases and natural heterogeneous cases reveals that small-scale canopy heterogeneity affects the profiles of momentum and scalar fluxes, and modifies the spatial structure of the flow. Low areas in the canopy promote ejection events, which leads to a correlation between the canopy height and flow variables that extends up to four times the canopy height. Seed dispersal kernels simulated with RAFLES closely match those measured in seed release experiments in a temperate forest. It is also used to examine potential biases resulting from simplifications in common dispersal models, such as planar

  7. A new statistical model for subgrid dispersion in large eddy simulations of particle-laden flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muela, Jordi; Lehmkuhl, Oriol; Pérez-Segarra, Carles David; Oliva, Asensi

    2016-09-01

    Dispersed multiphase turbulent flows are present in many industrial and commercial applications like internal combustion engines, turbofans, dispersion of contaminants, steam turbines, etc. Therefore, there is a clear interest in the development of models and numerical tools capable of performing detailed and reliable simulations about these kind of flows. Large Eddy Simulations offer good accuracy and reliable results together with reasonable computational requirements, making it a really interesting method to develop numerical tools for particle-laden turbulent flows. Nonetheless, in multiphase dispersed flows additional difficulties arises in LES, since the effect of the unresolved scales of the continuous phase over the dispersed phase is lost due to the filtering procedure. In order to solve this issue a model able to reconstruct the subgrid velocity seen by the particles is required. In this work a new model for the reconstruction of the subgrid scale effects over the dispersed phase is presented and assessed. This innovative methodology is based in the reconstruction of statistics via Probability Density Functions (PDFs).

  8. Large-eddy simulation of flow through a plane, asymmetric diffuser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaltenbach, Hans-Jakob

    1994-01-01

    A challenge for traditional turbulence modeling, based on the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations, remains the accurate prediction of 'mild', adverse pressure-gradient driven separation from a smooth surface. With this study we want to explore the capability of large-eddy simulation to predict the separation which occurs on the deflected wall of an asymmetric, plane diffuser with opening angle of 10 deg. The flow through the plane diffuser exhibits some additional interesting physical phenomena which make it a challenging test case. In addition to 'mild' separation about halfway down the deflected ramp, the flow is characterized by a small backflow zone with stalled fluid in the rear part of the expanding section. The turbulent flow entering the diffuser is subject to combined adverse and radial pressure gradients stemming from the convex curvature. Finally the flow recovers into a developed, turbulent channel flow in the outlet section. Obi et al. provide measurements of mean flow, Reynolds stresses, and pressure recovery, which were obtained by means of LDV in a wind tunnel. The objective of this study is to investigate whether LES with the standard dynamic model is able to accurately predict the flow in the one-sided diffuser and to explore the resolution requirements and associated costs.

  9. Wall-Modeled Large-Eddy Simulation of Turbulent Flow Past an Airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wei; Zhang, Wei; Samtaney, Ravi

    2015-11-01

    We present wall-modeled large-eddy simulations (WMLES) for turbulent flows incompressible past an airfoil. The virtual wall model, originally developed by Chung & Pullin (J. of Fluid Mech., 2009), is extended to generalized curvilinear coordinates and implemented using a body-fitted structured C-grid for airfoils. This model dynamically couples the outer resolved region with the wall region, and imposes a slip velocity boundary condition for the filtered velocity field on the ``virtual'' wall. The virtual wall model is combined with the stretched spiral vortex sub-grid scale model in a self-consistent framework, which is tested in WMLES of flow past a NACA0012 airfoil at different Reynolds number (Re) and angle of attack. The numerical results show that the wall model is able to accurately predict mean flow characteristics, including the formation of the separation bubble. Some high-order turbulence quantities are also compared with the direct numerical simulation results (Re =104) of flow past the same airfoil. We will present verification test cases to quantify the effectiveness of the wall model in both attached and separated flow regimes. Supported by the KAUST Office of Competitive Research Funds under Award No. URF/1/1394-01. The IBM Blue Gene/P Shaheen at KAUST was utilized for the simulations.

  10. A Variable Mesh Spacing for Large-Eddy Simulation Models in the Convective Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degrazia, Gervásio Annes; Rizza, Umberto; Puhales, Franciano Scremin; Goulart, Antônio Gledson; Carvalho, Jonas; Welter, Guilherme Sausen; Marques Filho, Edson Pereira

    2009-05-01

    A variable vertical mesh spacing for large-eddy simulation (LES) models in a convective boundary layer (CBL) is proposed. The argument is based on the fact that in the vertical direction the turbulence near the surface in a CBL is inhomogeneous and therefore the subfilter-scale effects depend on the relative location between the spectral peak of the vertical velocity and the filter cut-off wavelength. From the physical point of view, this lack of homogeneity makes the vertical mesh spacing the principal length scale and, as a consequence, the LES filter cut-off wavenumber is expressed in terms of this characteristic length scale. Assuming that the inertial subrange initial frequency is equal to the LES filter cut-off frequency and employing fitting expressions that describe the observed convective turbulent energy one-dimensional spectra, it is feasible to derive a relation to calculate the variable vertical mesh spacing. The incorporation of this variable vertical grid within a LES model shows that both the mean quantities (and their gradients) and the turbulent statistics quantities are well described near to the ground level, where the LES predictions are known to be a challenging task.

  11. Large-Eddy Simulation using Orthogonal Projection onto Local Basis Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Stephen B.

    1999-11-01

    A new approach is described for the large-eddy simulation of inhomogeneous turbulent flows. The resolved velocity field is defined as a finite basis function representation in terms of local basis functions (e.g., B-splines or finite elements). The equations governing the resolved fields are therefore ordinary differential equations for the basis-function coefficients, rather than the partial differential equations that arise in the standard filtering approach (for inhomogeneous flows). As a consequence, issues of spatial numerical resolution and accuracy are avoided. The effects of the residual motions on the resolved fields are modelled directly in terms of the basis functions. In common with the MILES philosophy, the modelled term is significant only where the basis functions cannot accurately represent the non-linear terms; and its effect is to prevent oscillations in the fields. While the method is intended for the inhomogeneous turbulent flows governed by the Navier-Stokes equations, it is demonstrated in the simpler setting of Burgers' equation. The method is shown to perform well; and (for a given number of degrees of freedom) to be able to resolve a substantially greater range of lengthscales than the traditional methodology using the Smagorinsky model.

  12. Large eddy simulation of particle-laden flow in a duct with a 90° bend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Njobuenwu, D. O.; Fairweather, M.

    2011-12-01

    Large eddy simulation (LES) of particle-laden turbulent flow is studied for a square duct with a 90° bend and a radius of curvature of 1.5 times the duct width, and for a Reynolds number based on the bulk flow velocity of 100,000. A Lagrangian particle tracking technique is used to study the motion of particles experiencing drag, shear lift, buoyancy and gravitational forces in the flow. LES predictions capture important physical aspects of these flows known to occur in practice, unlike alternative Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) approaches, such as flow separation in the boundary layers around the bend entrance on the concave wall of the bend, and around the bend exit on the convex wall. The LES predicted flow and particle statistics are generally in good agreement with both experimental data used for validation purposes and RANS solutions, with r.m.s. fluctuating velocity predictions from the LES in particular being superior to values derived using the RANS technique.

  13. Improving Parameterization of Entrainment Rate for Shallow Convection with Aircraft Measurements and Large-Eddy Simulation

    DOE PAGES

    Lu, Chunsong; Liu, Yangang; Zhang, Guang J.; ...

    2016-02-01

    This work examines the relationships of entrainment rate to vertical velocity, buoyancy, and turbulent dissipation rate by applying stepwise principal component regression to observational data from shallow cumulus clouds collected during the Routine AAF [Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerial Facility] Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths (CLOWD) Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) field campaign over the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site near Lamont, Oklahoma. The cumulus clouds during the RACORO campaign simulated using a large eddy simulation (LES) model are also examined with the same approach. The analysis shows that a combination of multiple variables can better represent entrainment ratemore » in both the observations and LES than any single-variable fitting. Three commonly used parameterizations are also tested on the individual cloud scale. A new parameterization is therefore presented that relates entrainment rate to vertical velocity, buoyancy and dissipation rate; the effects of treating clouds as ensembles and humid shells surrounding cumulus clouds on the new parameterization are discussed. Physical mechanisms underlying the relationships of entrainment rate to vertical velocity, buoyancy and dissipation rate are also explored.« less

  14. Large-eddy and unsteady RANS simulations of a shock-accelerated heavy gas cylinder

    DOE PAGES

    Morgan, B. E.; Greenough, J. A.

    2015-04-08

    Two-dimensional numerical simulations of the Richtmyer–Meshkov unstable “shock-jet” problem are conducted using both large-eddy simulation (LES) and unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (URANS) approaches in an arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian hydrodynamics code. Turbulence statistics are extracted from LES by running an ensemble of simulations with multimode perturbations to the initial conditions. Detailed grid convergence studies are conducted, and LES results are found to agree well with both experiment and high-order simulations conducted by Shankar et al. (Phys Fluids 23, 024102, 2011). URANS results using a k–L approach are found to be highly sensitive to initialization of the turbulence lengthscale L and to the timemore » at which L becomes resolved on the computational mesh. As a result, it is observed that a gradient diffusion closure for turbulent species flux is a poor approximation at early times, and a new closure based on the mass-flux velocity is proposed for low-Reynolds-number mixing.« less

  15. Improving Parameterization of Entrainment Rate for Shallow Convection with Aircraft Measurements and Large-Eddy Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Chunsong; Liu, Yangang; Zhang, Guang J.; Wu, Xianghua; Endo, Satoshi; Cao, Le; Li, Yueqing; Guo, Xiaohao

    2016-02-01

    This work examines the relationships of entrainment rate to vertical velocity, buoyancy, and turbulent dissipation rate by applying stepwise principal component regression to observational data from shallow cumulus clouds collected during the Routine AAF [Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerial Facility] Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths (CLOWD) Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) field campaign over the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site near Lamont, Oklahoma. The cumulus clouds during the RACORO campaign simulated using a large eddy simulation (LES) model are also examined with the same approach. The analysis shows that a combination of multiple variables can better represent entrainment rate in both the observations and LES than any single-variable fitting. Three commonly used parameterizations are also tested on the individual cloud scale. A new parameterization is therefore presented that relates entrainment rate to vertical velocity, buoyancy and dissipation rate; the effects of treating clouds as ensembles and humid shells surrounding cumulus clouds on the new parameterization are discussed. Physical mechanisms underlying the relationships of entrainment rate to vertical velocity, buoyancy and dissipation rate are also explored.

  16. Wall-modeled large-eddy simulation of transonic airfoil buffet at high Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Yuma; Kawai, Soshi

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we conduct the wall-modeled large-eddy simulation (LES) of transonic buffet phenomena over the OAT15A supercritical airfoil at high Reynolds number. The transonic airfoil buffet involves shock-turbulent boundary layer interactions and shock vibration associated with the flow separation downstream of the shock wave. The wall-modeled LES developed by Kawai and Larsson PoF (2012) is tuned on the K supercomputer for high-fidelity simulation. We first show the capability of the present wall-modeled LES on the transonic airfoil buffet phenomena and then investigate the detailed flow physics of unsteadiness of shock waves and separated boundary layer interaction phenomena. We also focus on the sustaining mechanism of the buffet phenomena, including the source of the pressure waves propagated from the trailing edge and the interactions between the shock wave and the generated sound waves. This work was supported in part by MEXT as a social and scientific priority issue to be tackled by using post-K computer. Computer resources of the K computer was provided by the RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science (Project ID: hp150254).

  17. Modifications to WRF's dynamical core to improve the treatment of moisture for large-eddy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Heng; Endo, Satoshi; Wong, May; Skamarock, William C.; Klemp, Joseph B.; Fast, Jerome D.; Gustafson, William I.; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Wang, Hailong; Liu, Yangang; Lin, Wuyin

    2015-12-01

    Yamaguchi and Feingold (2012) note that the cloud fields in their large-eddy simulations (LESs) of marine stratocumulus using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model exhibit a strong sensitivity to time stepping choices. In this study, we reproduce and analyze this sensitivity issue using two stratocumulus cases, one marine and one continental. Results show that (1) the sensitivity is associated with spurious motions near the moisture jump between the boundary layer and the free atmosphere, and (2) these spurious motions appear to arise from neglecting small variations in water vapor mixing ratio (qv) in the pressure gradient calculation in the acoustic substepping portion of the integration procedure. We show that this issue is remedied in the WRF dynamical core by replacing the prognostic equation for the potential temperature θ with one for the moist potential temperature θm=θ(1 + 1.61qv), which allows consistent treatment of moisture in the calculation of pressure during the acoustic substeps. With this modification, the spurious motions and the sensitivity to the time stepping settings (i.e., the dynamic time step length and number of acoustic sub-steps) are eliminated in both of the example stratocumulus cases. This modification improves the applicability of WRF for LES applications, and possibly other models using similar dynamical core formulations, and also permits the use of longer time steps than in the original code.

  18. Large Eddy Simulation of Transient Flow, Solidification, and Particle Transport Processes in Continuous-Casting Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongqiu; Li, Linmin; Li, Baokuan; Jiang, Maofa

    2014-07-01

    The current study developed a coupled computational model to simulate the transient fluid flow, solidification, and particle transport processes in a slab continuous-casting mold. Transient flow of molten steel in the mold is calculated using the large eddy simulation. An enthalpy-porosity approach is used for the analysis of solidification processes. The transport of bubble and non-metallic inclusion inside the liquid pool is calculated using the Lagrangian approach based on the transient flow field. A criterion of particle entrapment in the solidified shell is developed using the user-defined functions of FLUENT software (ANSYS, Inc., Canonsburg, PA). The predicted results of this model are compared with the measurements of the ultrasonic testing of the rolled steel plates and the water model experiments. The transient asymmetrical flow pattern inside the liquid pool exhibits quite satisfactory agreement with the corresponding measurements. The predicted complex instantaneous velocity field is composed of various small recirculation zones and multiple vortices. The transport of particles inside the liquid pool and the entrapment of particles in the solidified shell are not symmetric. The Magnus force can reduce the entrapment ratio of particles in the solidified shell, especially for smaller particles, but the effect is not obvious. The Marangoni force can play an important role in controlling the motion of particles, which increases the entrapment ratio of particles in the solidified shell obviously.

  19. Large-eddy simulation of transitional flows using a co-located grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langari, Mostafa; Yang, Zhiyin; Page, Gary J.

    2013-04-01

    A large-eddy simulation (LES) of a transitional separated flow over a plate with a semi-circular leading at low (<0.2%) and high (5.6%) free-stream turbulence (FST) has been performed, using a co-located grid with the Rhie-Chow pressure smoothing. A numerical trip is used to produce a high FST level and a dynamic subgrid-scale model is also employed in the current study. The entire transition process leading to breakdown to turbulence has been shown clearly by the flow visualisations using instantaneous spanwise vorticities, and the differences between the low- and high-FST cases are clearly visible. Coherent structures are also visualised using isosurfaces of the Q-criterion, and for the high-FST case, the spanwise-oriented quasi-two-dimensional rolls, which are clearly present in the low-FST case, are not visible anymore. Detailed quantitative comparisons between the present LES results and experimental data and the previous LES results at low FST using a staggered grid have been done and a good agreement has been obtained, indicating that the current LES using a co-located grid with pressure smoothing can also predict transitional flows accurately.

  20. Large-eddy simulation of turbulent cavitating flow in a micro channel

    SciTech Connect

    Egerer, Christian P. Hickel, Stefan; Schmidt, Steffen J.; Adams, Nikolaus A.

    2014-08-15

    Large-eddy simulations (LES) of cavitating flow of a Diesel-fuel-like fluid in a generic throttle geometry are presented. Two-phase regions are modeled by a parameter-free thermodynamic equilibrium mixture model, and compressibility of the liquid and the liquid-vapor mixture is taken into account. The Adaptive Local Deconvolution Method (ALDM), adapted for cavitating flows, is employed for discretizing the convective terms of the Navier-Stokes equations for the homogeneous mixture. ALDM is a finite-volume-based implicit LES approach that merges physically motivated turbulence modeling and numerical discretization. Validation of the numerical method is performed for a cavitating turbulent mixing layer. Comparisons with experimental data of the throttle flow at two different operating conditions are presented. The LES with the employed cavitation modeling predicts relevant flow and cavitation features accurately within the uncertainty range of the experiment. The turbulence structure of the flow is further analyzed with an emphasis on the interaction between cavitation and coherent motion, and on the statistically averaged-flow evolution.

  1. Large-eddy simulations of flow around a circulation control airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Seonghyeon; Shariff, Karim

    2008-11-01

    Circulation control, proposed in NASA's Cruise Efficient Short Take-off and Landing (CESTOL) concept, has the potential to increase air-traffic throughput and reduce the noise footprint. Circulation control obtains a substantial increase in lift coefficient by using a wall-jet that blows tangentially on a rounded (Coanda) surface deflected at the trailing edge. The flow has proven to be difficult to reliably predict using Reynolds-averaged models. We undertake large-eddy simulations to better understand underlying mechanisms and create a database for modelers. Simulations are patterned after Novak et al.'s (1987) experiment, which, despite its faults, is the best documented to date. A Reynolds number of 10̂6 and two cases with low and high blowing are considered using Stanford's unstructured solver CDP. The upper surface begins with laminar to turbulent transition following a region of weak shear stress. Then strong favorable pressure gradient as the jet slot is approached leads to a raised log-law. There exists a region over the Coanda surface where the mean flow development collapses very well in wall-jet similarity coordinates, indicating that a portion of the near-wall region maintains classical wall-jet characteristics. At the present time, the lower surface has delayed transition due to lack of tripping in the simulations and considerable discrepancies with the experiments for second-order statistics.

  2. High-order Hybridized Discontinuous Galerkin methods for Large-Eddy Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Pablo; Nguyen, Ngoc-Cuong; Peraire, Jaime

    2016-11-01

    With the increase in computing power, Large-Eddy Simulation emerges as a promising technique to improve both knowledge of complex flow physics and reliability of flow predictions. Most LES works, however, are limited to simple geometries and low Reynolds numbers due to high computational cost. While most existing LES codes are based on 2nd-order finite volume schemes, the efficient and accurate prediction of complex turbulent flows may require a paradigm shift in computational approach. This drives a growing interest in the development of Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) methods for LES. DG methods allow for high-order, conservative implementations on complex geometries, and offer opportunities for improved sub-grid scale modeling. Also, high-order DG methods are better-suited to exploit modern HPC systems. In the spirit of making them more competitive, researchers have recently developed the hybridized DG methods that result in reduced computational cost and memory footprint. In this talk we present an overview of high-order hybridized DG methods for LES. Numerical accuracy, computational efficiency, and SGS modeling issues are discussed. Numerical results up to Re=460k show rapid grid convergence and excellent agreement with experimental data at moderate computational cost.

  3. A High-Resolution Capability for Large-Eddy Simulation of Jet Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeBonis, James R.

    2011-01-01

    A large-eddy simulation (LES) code that utilizes high-resolution numerical schemes is described and applied to a compressible jet flow. The code is written in a general manner such that the accuracy/resolution of the simulation can be selected by the user. Time discretization is performed using a family of low-dispersion Runge-Kutta schemes, selectable from first- to fourth-order. Spatial discretization is performed using central differencing schemes. Both standard schemes, second- to twelfth-order (3 to 13 point stencils) and Dispersion Relation Preserving schemes from 7 to 13 point stencils are available. The code is written in Fortran 90 and uses hybrid MPI/OpenMP parallelization. The code is applied to the simulation of a Mach 0.9 jet flow. Four-stage third-order Runge-Kutta time stepping and the 13 point DRP spatial discretization scheme of Bogey and Bailly are used. The high resolution numerics used allows for the use of relatively sparse grids. Three levels of grid resolution are examined, 3.5, 6.5, and 9.2 million points. Mean flow, first-order turbulent statistics and turbulent spectra are reported. Good agreement with experimental data for mean flow and first-order turbulent statistics is shown.

  4. Data-Informed Large-Eddy Simulation of Coastal Land-Air-Sea Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderer, A.; Hao, X.; Fernando, H. J.; Sotiropoulos, F.; Shen, L.

    2016-12-01

    The study of atmospheric flows in coastal areas has not been fully addressed due to the complex processes emerging from the land-air-sea interactions, e.g., abrupt change in land topography, strong current shear, wave shoaling, and depth-limited wave breaking. The available computational tools that have been applied to study such littoral regions are mostly based on open-ocean assumptions, which most times do not lead to reliable solutions. The goal of the present study is to better understand some of these near-shore processes, employing the advanced computational tools, developed in our research group. Our computational framework combines a large-eddy simulation (LES) flow solver for atmospheric flows, a sharp-interface immersed boundary method that can deal with real complex topographies (Calderer et al., J. Comp. Physics 2014), and a phase-resolved, depth-dependent, wave model (Yang and Shen, J. Comp. Physics 2011). Using real measured data taken in the FRF station in Duck, North Carolina, we validate and demonstrate the predictive capabilities of the present computational framework, which are shown to be in overall good agreement with the measured data under different wind-wave scenarios. We also analyse the effects of some of the complex processes captured by our simulation tools.

  5. On the properties of energy stable flux reconstruction schemes for implicit large eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeire, B. C.; Vincent, P. E.

    2016-12-01

    We begin by investigating the stability, order of accuracy, and dispersion and dissipation characteristics of the extended range of energy stable flux reconstruction (E-ESFR) schemes in the context of implicit large eddy simulation (ILES). We proceed to demonstrate that subsets of the E-ESFR schemes are more stable than collocation nodal discontinuous Galerkin methods recovered with the flux reconstruction approach (FRDG) for marginally-resolved ILES simulations of the Taylor-Green vortex. These schemes are shown to have reduced dissipation and dispersion errors relative to FRDG schemes of the same polynomial degree and, simultaneously, have increased Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) limits. Finally, we simulate turbulent flow over an SD7003 aerofoil using two of the most stable E-ESFR schemes identified by the aforementioned Taylor-Green vortex experiments. Results demonstrate that subsets of E-ESFR schemes appear more stable than the commonly used FRDG method, have increased CFL limits, and are suitable for ILES of complex turbulent flows on unstructured grids.

  6. Large-eddy Simulation of the Near-lip of a Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohr, Elaine; Yaworski, Michael; Jansen, Kenneth

    2003-11-01

    A M=0.6, Re=1.0 million cold jet flow with complex geometry is simulated to obtain high-fidelity near-field data and accurate dynamic information on the flow. Large Eddy Simulation (LES) on an unstructured grid is optimal for near-nozzle flow simulation. The modeled problem is a single-stream jet exiting a nozzle which can have tabs. It is too costly to simulate the full problem so the meshed domain is a representative sector of the flow with limited stream-wise extent. The jet flow is simulated using a stable, accurate, finite element method with hierarchic spatial basis, generalized-alpha method and 2nd order time integrator which yields accurate well controlled stabilization. A RANS solution is used as the inflow condition where velocity and temperature are specified for the jet and the entrainment. As RANS only gives averaged quantities the inflow boundary condition needs to be completed by specifying the fluctuations using scaled plane extraction boundary condition (SPEBC). The solution is rescaled from an internal downstream position using self-similarity flow profiles in turbulent boundary layers. This talk will show the need for SPEBC and present preliminary results.

  7. Large-Eddy Simulation of Shock-Wave Boundary Layer Interaction and its Control Using Sparkjet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guang; Yao, Yufeng; Fang, Jian; Gan, Tian; Lu, Lipeng

    2016-06-01

    Large-eddy simulation (LES) of an oblique shock-wave generated by an 8° sharp wedge impinging onto a spatially-developing Mach 2.3 turbulent boundary layer and their interactions has been carried out in this study. The Reynolds number based on the incoming flow property and the boundary layer displacement thickness at the impinging point without shock-wave is 20,000. The detailed numerical approaches are described and the inflow turbulence is generated using the digital filter method to avoid artificial temporal or streamwise periodicity. Numerical results are compared with the available wind tunnel PIV measurements of the same flow conditions. Further LES study on the control of flow separation due to the strong shock-viscous interaction is also conducted by using an active control actuator “SparkJet” concept. The single-pulsed characteristics of the control device are obtained and compared with the experiments. Instantaneous flowfield shows that the “SparkJet” promotes the flow mixing in the boundary layer and enhances its ability to resist the flow separation. The time and spanwise averaged skin friction coefficient distribution demonstrates that the separation bubble length is reduced by maximum 35% with the control exerted.

  8. Analysis on Turbulent Flows using Large-eddy Simulation on the Seaside Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamio, T.; Iida, M.; Arakawa, C.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study is the Large-eddy Simulation (LES) of the turbulent wind on the complex terrain, and the first results of the simulation are described. The authors tried to apply the LES code, which was developed as an atmospheric simulator in Japan Agency for the Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC), to the wind prediction for the wind energy. On the wind simulation, the highest problem would be the boundary conditions, and the case in this paper was simplified one. The case study in this paper is the west wind on a complex terrain site, which is the wind from sea for the site. The steady flow was employed for the inlet condition, because the wind on the sea is the low turbulent wind, and almost all the turbulence would be generated by the roughness of the ground surface. The wall function was employed as the surface condition on the ground surface. The computational domain size was about 8 × 3 × 2.5 km3, and the minimum cell size was about 10 × 10 × 3 m3. The computational results, the vertical profile of the averaged wind speed and the turbulence intensity, agreed with the measurement by the meteorological masts. Moreover, the authors tried the analysis of the turbulence characteristics. The power spectrum density model, and the cross spectrum analyses gave the knowledge of the turbulent characteristics on the complex terrain and the hints for the domain and grid of the numerical analysis.

  9. Modifications to WRFs dynamical core to improve the treatment of moisture for large-eddy simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Xiao, Heng; Endo, Satoshi; Wong, May; ...

    2015-10-29

    Yamaguchi and Feingold (2012) note that the cloud fields in their large-eddy simulations (LESs) of marine stratocumulus using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model exhibit a strong sensitivity to time stepping choices. In this study, we reproduce and analyze this sensitivity issue using two stratocumulus cases, one marine and one continental. Results show that (1) the sensitivity is associated with spurious motions near the moisture jump between the boundary layer and the free atmosphere, and (2) these spurious motions appear to arise from neglecting small variations in water vapor mixing ratio (qv) in the pressure gradient calculation in themore » acoustic sub-stepping portion of the integration procedure. We show that this issue is remedied in the WRF dynamical core by replacing the prognostic equation for the potential temperature θ with one for the moist potential temperature θm=θ(1+1.61qv), which allows consistent treatment of moisture in the calculation of pressure during the acoustic sub-steps. With this modification, the spurious motions and the sensitivity to the time stepping settings (i.e., the dynamic time step length and number of acoustic sub-steps) are eliminated in both of the example stratocumulus cases. In conclusion, this modification improves the applicability of WRF for LES applications, and possibly other models using similar dynamical core formulations, and also permits the use of longer time steps than in the original code.« less

  10. A velocity divergence constraint for large-eddy simulation of low-Mach flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermott, Randall J.

    2014-10-01

    The velocity divergence (rate of fluid volumetric expansion) is a flow field quantity of fundamental importance in low-Mach flows. It directly affects the local mass density and therefore the local temperature through the equation of state. In this paper, starting from the conservative form of the sensible enthalpy transport equation, we derive a discrete divergence constraint for use in large-eddy simulation (LES) of low-Mach flows. The result accounts for numerical transport of mass and energy, which is difficult to eliminate in relatively coarse, engineering LES calculations when total variation diminishing (TVD) scalar transport schemes are employed. Without the correction terms derived here, unresolved (numerical) mixing of gas species with different heat capacities or molecular weights may lead to erroneous mixture temperatures and ultimately to an imbalance in the energy budget. The new formulation is implemented in a publicly available LES code called the Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS). Accuracy of the flow solver for transport is demonstrated using the method of manufactured solutions. The conservation properties of the present scheme are demonstrated on two simple energy budget test cases, one involving a small fire in a compartment with natural ventilation and another involving mixing of two gases with different thermal properties.

  11. Large eddy simulation for predicting turbulent heat transfer in gas turbines.

    PubMed

    Tafti, Danesh K; He, Long; Nagendra, K

    2014-08-13

    Blade cooling technology will play a critical role in the next generation of propulsion and power generation gas turbines. Accurate prediction of blade metal temperature can avoid the use of excessive compressed bypass air and allow higher turbine inlet temperature, increasing fuel efficiency and decreasing emissions. Large eddy simulation (LES) has been established to predict heat transfer coefficients with good accuracy under various non-canonical flows, but is still limited to relatively simple geometries and low Reynolds numbers. It is envisioned that the projected increase in computational power combined with a drop in price-to-performance ratio will make system-level simulations using LES in complex blade geometries at engine conditions accessible to the design process in the coming one to two decades. In making this possible, two key challenges are addressed in this paper: working with complex intricate blade geometries and simulating high-Reynolds-number (Re) flows. It is proposed to use the immersed boundary method (IBM) combined with LES wall functions. A ribbed duct at Re=20 000 is simulated using the IBM, and a two-pass ribbed duct is simulated at Re=100 000 with and without rotation (rotation number Ro=0.2) using LES with wall functions. The results validate that the IBM is a viable alternative to body-conforming grids and that LES with wall functions reproduces experimental results at a much lower computational cost.

  12. Investigation of Turbulent Tip Leakage Vortex in an Axial Water Jet Pump with Large Eddy Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hah, Chunill; Katz, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Detailed steady and unsteady numerical studies were performed to investigate tip clearance flow in an axial water jet pump. The primary objective is to understand physics of unsteady tip clearance flow, unsteady tip leakage vortex, and cavitation inception in an axial water jet pump. Steady pressure field and resulting steady tip leakage vortex from a steady flow analysis do not seem to explain measured cavitation inception correctly. The measured flow field near the tip is unsteady and measured cavitation inception is highly transient. Flow visualization with cavitation bubbles shows that the leakage vortex is oscillating significantly and many intermittent vortex ropes are present between the suction side of the blade and the tip leakage core vortex. Although the flow field is highly transient, the overall flow structure is stable and a characteristic frequency seems to exist. To capture relevant flow physics as much as possible, a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) calculation and a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) were applied for the current investigation. The present study reveals that several vortices from the tip leakage vortex system cross the tip gap of the adjacent blade periodically. Sudden changes in local pressure field inside tip gap due to these vortices create vortex ropes. The instantaneous pressure filed inside the tip gap is drastically different from that of the steady flow simulation. Unsteady flow simulation which can calculate unsteady vortex motion is necessary to calculate cavitation inception accurately even at design flow condition in such a water jet pump.

  13. Large eddy simulations of time-dependent and buoyancy-driven channel flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabot, William H.

    1993-01-01

    The primary goal of this work has been to assess the performance of the dynamic SGS model in the large eddy simulation (LES) of channel flows in a variety of situations, viz., in temporal development of channel flow turned by a transverse pressure gradient and especially in buoyancy-driven turbulent flows such as Rayleigh-Benard and internally heated channel convection. For buoyancy-driven flows, there are additional buoyant terms that are possible in the base models, and one objective has been to determine if the dynamic SGS model results are sensitive to such terms. The ultimate goal is to determine the minimal base model needed in the dynamic SGS model to provide accurate results in flows with more complicated physical features. In addition, a program of direct numerical simulation (DNS) of fully compressible channel convection has been undertaken to determine stratification and compressibility effects. These simulations are intended to provide a comparative base for performing the LES of compressible (or highly stratified, pseudo-compressible) convection at high Reynolds number in the future.

  14. Large-Eddy Simulations of Noise Generation in Supersonic Jets at Realistic Engine Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Junhui; Corrigan, Andrew; Kailasanath, K.; Taylor, Brian

    2015-11-01

    Large-eddy simulations (LES) have been carried out to investigate the noise generation in highly heated supersonic jets at temperatures similar to those observed in high-performance jet engine exhausts. It is found that the exhaust temperature of high-performance jet engines can range from 1000K at an intermediate power to above 2000K at a maximum afterburning power. In low-temperature jets, the effects of the variation of the specific heat ratio as well as the radial temperature profile near the nozzle exit are small and are ignored, but it is not clear whether those effects can be also ignored in highly heated jets. The impact of the variation of the specific heat ratio is assessed by comparing LES results using a variable specific heat ratio with those using a constant specific heat ratio. The impact on both the flow field and the noise distributions are investigated. Because the total temperature near the nozzle wall can be substantially lower than the nozzle total temperature either due to the heating loss through the nozzle wall or due to the cooling applied near the wall, this lower wall temperature may impact the temperature in the shear layer, and thus impact the noise generation. The impact of the radial temperature profile on the jet noise generation is investigated by comparing results of lower nozzle wall temperatures with those of the adiabatic wall condition.

  15. Investigation of Reynolds stresses in a 3D idealized urban area using large eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowardhan, Akshay; Pardyjak, Eric; Senocak, Inanc; Brown, Michael

    2007-11-01

    Large eddy simulation (LES) of neutral flow through an array of cubes has been conducted with periodic boundary conditions in horizontal directions. In this paper, we first describe the model formulation and validate the simulation by comparing the mean flow and turbulence statistics with wind-tunnel experimental data from a cube array of buildings. The LES model is then used to investigate the physical mechanisms that lead to the low turbulent stresses that have been reported in the lower half of the urban canopy layer. To do this, the urban boundary layer is conceptually broken down into three distinct regions: (a) the urban roughness sub-layer, (b) street channels (roads with axis aligned with mean wind direction aloft) and (c) street canyons (roads with axis normal to the mean wind direction aloft). The distribution of the Reynolds stresses differs significantly amongst these regions. In a complex urban area, these regions can be observed intermittently at the same physical location, thus, stresses with opposite signs have the potential to cancel each other and on average yield a low magnitude. In this paper, mean turbulence statistics and spectra from high resolution LES have been analyzed for these scenarios and the results have been interpreted.

  16. Large Eddy Simulation of wind turbines using the actuator line model and immersed boundary method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoni, Christian; Carrasquillo-Solís, Kenneth; Leonardi, Stefano

    2014-11-01

    Despite the growth of the energy extracted from wind turbines, the flow physics is still not fully understood even under ideal operational conditions. Large Eddy Simulations of the turbulent flow past a wind turbine in a channel have been performed. The numerical setup reproduces the experiment performed in a wind tunnel at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NUST). The code is based on a finite difference scheme with a fractional step and Runge-Kutta, which couples the actuator line model (ALM) and the Immersed Boundary Method (IBM). Two simulations were performed, one neglecting the tower and nacelle resulting in the rotating blades only, the other modeling both the rotating blades as well as the tower and nacelle with IBM. Results relative to the simulation with tower and nacelle have a very good agreement with experiments. Profiles of turbulent kinetic energy shows that the effect of the tower and nacelle is not confined to the hub region but extend to the entire rotor. In addition we placed the wind turbine over an undulated topography to understand how it affects the performances and wake of a wind turbine. Comparison with the results obtained for the smooth wall show an interaction between the rough wall and the wake. The numerical simulations were performed on XSEDE TACC under Grant No. CTS070066. The present work is supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF), Grant IIA-1243482 (WINDINSPIRE).

  17. Large eddy simulation of dilute bubbly turbulent flows for aerating hydrofoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajit, Mohammad; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2014-11-01

    We have proposed a formulation for the large eddy simulation of dilute bubbly flows by converting the governing equations to a more loosely-coupled form. This formulation provides an efficient numerical procedure for two-way coupling of bubbly flows at low gas holdups. Subgrid-scale turbulence modeling is based on the dynamic procedure of Germano for the liquid phase and the Jakobson approach for the gas phase. Wall-modeling is implemented using the method of Cabot & Moin. Our approach is employed to simulate flow over aerating hydrofoils at different angles of attack. A structured body-fitted C-grid is employed for domain discretization. Validation of our computational code, for C-grids, is carried out by simulating single-phase flows over a NACA0012 airfoil (20° AOA) with laminar flow and an E387 airfoil (6° AOA) with turbulent flow. Comparisons with available computational and experimental data in terms of time averaged drag coefficient, lift coefficient, separation bubble length, and reattachment point proves the validity of our computational code. The aerating hydrofoil simulation utilizes a NACA0015 hydrofoil, for which experiments were carried out at Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory. Comparisons between computational and experimental datasets show promising results. This work is supported by the U.S. Dept. of Energy and the Hydro Reasearch Foundation.

  18. Large Eddy Simulation of a cooling impinging jet to a turbulent crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiou, Michail; Papalexandris, Miltiadis

    2015-11-01

    In this talk we report on Large Eddy Simulations of a cooling impinging jet to a turbulent channel flow. The impinging jet enters the turbulent stream in an oblique direction. This type of flow is relevant to the so-called ``Pressurized Thermal Shock'' phenomenon that can occur in pressurized water reactors. First we elaborate on issues related to the set-up of the simulations of the flow of interest such as, imposition of turbulent inflows, choice of subgrid-scale model and others. Also, the issue of the commutator error due to the anisotropy of the spatial cut-off filter induced by non-uniform grids is being discussed. In the second part of the talk we present results of our simulations. In particular, we focus on the high-shear and recirculation zones that are developed and on the characteristics of the temperature field. The budget for the mean kinetic energy of the resolved-scale turbulent velocity fluctuations is also discussed and analyzed. Financial support has been provided by Bel V, a subsidiary of the Federal Agency for Nuclear Control of Belgium.

  19. Large Eddy Simulation of Flow Over Surface-Mounted Cube Using a Spectral Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandala, Sriharsha; Rempfer, Dietmar

    2010-11-01

    Unsteady three dimensional flow over a surface-mounted cube, with its rich set of features like flow turbulence, upstream boundary layer separation, curved mixing layer, unsteady three dimensional wake, etc., provides an excellent test case for evaluating the performance of CFD codes. We are developing a parallel spectral element code, SpecSolve, with the objective of modeling incompressible flows in complex geometries. The code is based on the fractional step method and uses the operator-integrating factor splitting scheme for temporal integration. In this talk, we provide a brief overview of the algorithm and implementation details. We present results from large-eddy simulations of flow over a surface-mounted cube using SpecSolve. The Reynolds number, based on bulk flow velocity and height of the cube, is 40,000. The dynamic Smagorinsky model is used for modeling turbulence. These results are compared with experimental data of Martinuzzi and Tropea, LES results of Shah and Ferziger and our FLUENT LES simulations.

  20. Large Eddy Simulations on Vertical Axis Hydrokinetic Turbines and flow phenomena analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillaud, N.; Balarac, G.; Goncalvès, E.; Zanette, J.

    2016-11-01

    Large Eddy Simulations have been performed on a Vertical Axis Hydrokinetic Turbine (VAHT) at various tip speed ratios. The turbine power coefficient and the flow through the turbine show good agreement with experimental data. To better understand the evolution of the VAHT power coefficient through the tip speed ratios the contribution of the VAHT main regions to the global power coefficient has been evaluated. At the optimal tip speed ratio (λ = 2) blade tip vortex and blade/arm connection drag generate losses and decrease the efficiency of the regions around the blade tip and blade/arm connection. The region around the blade tip is the most degraded. When the tip speed ratio decreases to λ = 1, deep dynamic stall with the presence of a Leading Edge Vortex is observed at early angular positions and leads to the power coefficient drop. The power coefficient drop around the blade tip and the blade/arm connection happens at higher angular position than on the middle part of the blade. For a tip speed ratio higher than optimal, the region around the blade/arm connection shows the highest decrease in efficiency. Despite its small height compared to the blade this region is responsible for about 36% of the VAHT power coefficient decrease at λ = 2.5.

  1. Large Eddy simulation of turbulent hydrogen-fuelled supersonic combustion in an air cross-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingenito, A.; Cecere, D.; Giacomazzi, E.

    2013-09-01

    The main aim of this article is to provide a theoretical understanding of the physics of supersonic mixing and combustion. Research in advanced air-breathing propulsion systems able to push vehicles well beyond is of interest around the world. In a scramjet, the air stream flow captured by the inlet is decelerated but still maintains supersonic conditions. As the residence time is very short , the study of an efficient mixing and combustion is a key issue in the ongoing research on compressible flows. Due to experimental difficulties in measuring complex high-speed unsteady flowfields, the most convenient way to understand unsteady features of supersonic mixing and combustion is to use computational fluid dynamics. This work investigates supersonic combustion physics in the Hyshot II combustion chamber within the Large Eddy simulation framework. The resolution of this turbulent compressible reacting flow requires: (1) highly accurate non-dissipative numerical schemes to properly simulate strong gradients near shock waves and turbulent structures away from these discontinuities; (2) proper modelling of the small subgrid scales for supersonic combustion, including effects from compressibility on mixing and combustion; (3) highly detailed kinetic mechanisms (the Warnatz scheme including 9 species and 38 reactions is adopted) accounting for the formation and recombination of radicals to properly predict flame anchoring. Numerical results reveal the complex topology of the flow under investigation. The importance of baroclinic and dilatational effects on mixing and flame anchoring is evidenced. Moreover, their effects on turbulence-scale generation and the scaling law are analysed.

  2. Hybrid Large-Eddy/Reynolds-Averaged Simulation of a Supersonic Cavity Using VULCAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinlan, Jesse; McDaniel, James; Baurle, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Simulations of a supersonic recessed-cavity flow are performed using a hybrid large-eddy/Reynolds-averaged simulation approach utilizing an inflow turbulence recycling procedure and hybridized inviscid flux scheme. Calorically perfect air enters a three-dimensional domain at a free stream Mach number of 2.92. Simulations are performed to assess grid sensitivity of the solution, efficacy of the turbulence recycling, and the effect of the shock sensor used with the hybridized inviscid flux scheme. Analysis of the turbulent boundary layer upstream of the rearward-facing step for each case indicates excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. Mean velocity and pressure results are compared to Reynolds-averaged simulations and experimental data for each case and indicate good agreement on the finest grid. Simulations are repeated on a coarsened grid, and results indicate strong grid density sensitivity. Simulations are performed with and without inflow turbulence recycling on the coarse grid to isolate the effect of the recycling procedure, which is demonstrably critical to capturing the relevant shear layer dynamics. Shock sensor formulations of Ducros and Larsson are found to predict mean flow statistics equally well.

  3. LES-COAST: a large eddy simulation tool for coastal hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armenio, V.; Roman, F.

    2009-04-01

    We discuss a LES methodology for large-scale, environmental problems. Specifically we discuss peculiar features of the model LES-COAST, developed by IE-Fluids, University of Trieste, for the Italian Agency of Environmental Protection (APAT). The model is suited for marine, complex-geometry, anisotropic problems, typically occuring in coastal engineering. The model solves the curvilinear-coordinate formulation of the filtered Navier-Stokes equation using finite differences over structured grids. Geometrical complexity is managed using immersed boundaries as described in Roman et al. (Computer & Fluids, in press, 2009). A new wall-layer parametrization is used to model the near wall layer which cannot be directly resolved in applicative high Reynolds number applications. Due to grid anisotropy occurring in coastal problems a two-SGS eddy viscosity model has been developed. Examples of application of the model are also discussed. Specifically we show some results of the simulation of the Tevere river runoff in the Tyrrhenian sea and of the three-dimensional transport and mixing in the Muggia Bay (Gulf of Trieste) under breeze forcing. The numerical model is presently used for research as well for consultant activity for the prediction of dispersion phenomena in shallow-water near-shore areas.

  4. Investigation of particle-laden flow in a straight duct using large eddy simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Fairweather, M.; Yao, J.

    2007-07-01

    A particle-laden turbulent flow in a square duct is predicted using large eddy simulation (LES). The simulation is performed for a Reynolds number of 35,500, and correctly predicts the existence of secondary flows and their effects on the mean flow. The results are also in good qualitative agreement with experimental data obtained at different Reynolds numbers. One-way coupling is assumed between solid particles and the fluid, and a particle equation of motion, including Stokes drag, lift, buoyancy and gravity force terms, solved using a Lagrangian particle tracking technique. Three sizes of particle (1, 50 and 100 {mu}m) are considered, and results demonstrate that size has a significant effect on particle dispersion and deposition in the duct flow. As particle size increases, therefore, they tend to settle on the floor of the duct, with less dispersion in the fluid phase. The study demonstrates the usefulness of LES for nuclear waste processing applications since secondary flows occur in many practically-relevant flows, and since it is desirable that the two-phase waste mixture is kept as homogeneous as possible to prevent, or at least discourage, the settling out of solid particles to form a bed which can promote pipe blockages. (authors)

  5. Large-eddy simulation of heat transfer from impinging slot jets

    SciTech Connect

    Cziesla, T.; Tandogan, E.; Mitra, N.K.

    1997-07-01

    Impinging jet flows have become a well-established object of investigation in recent years because of their increasing significance in both fundamental and applied fluid mechanics. Examples of a wide range of applications, are the drying of textiles, film, and paper; annealing of glass; processing of some metals and glass; cooling of gas turbine components and the outer wall of combustors and electronic equipment; and freezing of tissue. Here Nusselt number distributions are presented for impinging jet flow of an array of slot nozzles (rectangular jets). The tools to calculate the present turbulent flow are large-eddy simulation (LES) using a dynamic subgrid stress model and the direct numerical simulation (DNS). The numerical code has been validated by comparing computed Nusselt number distributions on the impingement plate for two-dimensional flow with experimental results. A comparison between LES using a logarithmic law of the wall and the DNS shows good agreement of Nusselt number in the Reynolds number range of 600--3,000. The velocity profile at the feed tube exit strongly influences the maximum heat transfer at the stagnation point.

  6. Large-eddy simulation of cavitating nozzle flow and primary jet break-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ã-rley, F.; Trummler, T.; Hickel, S.; Mihatsch, M. S.; Schmidt, S. J.; Adams, N. A.

    2015-08-01

    We employ a barotropic two-phase/two-fluid model to study the primary break-up of cavitating liquid jets emanating from a rectangular nozzle, which resembles a high aspect-ratio slot flow. All components (i.e., gas, liquid, and vapor) are represented by a homogeneous mixture approach. The cavitating fluid model is based on a thermodynamic-equilibrium assumption. Compressibility of all phases enables full resolution of collapse-induced pressure wave dynamics. The thermodynamic model is embedded into an implicit large-eddy simulation (LES) environment. The considered configuration follows the general setup of a reference experiment and is a generic reproduction of a scaled-up fuel injector or control valve as found in an automotive engine. Due to the experimental conditions, it operates, however, at significantly lower pressures. LES results are compared to the experimental reference for validation. Three different operating points are studied, which differ in terms of the development of cavitation regions and the jet break-up characteristics. Observed differences between experimental and numerical data in some of the investigated cases can be caused by uncertainties in meeting nominal parameters by the experiment. The investigation reveals that three main mechanisms promote primary jet break-up: collapse-induced turbulent fluctuations near the outlet, entrainment of free gas into the nozzle, and collapse events inside the jet near the liquid-gas interface.

  7. Parallel distributed, reciprocal Monte Carlo radiation in coupled, large eddy combustion simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunsaker, Isaac L.

    Radiation is the dominant mode of heat transfer in high temperature combustion environments. Radiative heat transfer affects the gas and particle phases, including all the associated combustion chemistry. The radiative properties are in turn affected by the turbulent flow field. This bi-directional coupling of radiation turbulence interactions poses a major challenge in creating parallel-capable, high-fidelity combustion simulations. In this work, a new model was developed in which reciprocal monte carlo radiation was coupled with a turbulent, large-eddy simulation combustion model. A technique wherein domain patches are stitched together was implemented to allow for scalable parallelism. The combustion model runs in parallel on a decomposed domain. The radiation model runs in parallel on a recomposed domain. The recomposed domain is stored on each processor after information sharing of the decomposed domain is handled via the message passing interface. Verification and validation testing of the new radiation model were favorable. Strong scaling analyses were performed on the Ember cluster and the Titan cluster for the CPU-radiation model and GPU-radiation model, respectively. The model demonstrated strong scaling to over 1,700 and 16,000 processing cores on Ember and Titan, respectively.

  8. Large-eddy simulations of a turbulent Coanda jet on a circulation control airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishino, Takafumi; Hahn, Seonghyeon; Shariff, Karim

    2010-12-01

    Large-eddy simulations are performed of a turbulent Coanda jet separating from a rounded trailing edge of a simplified circulation control airfoil model. The freestream Reynolds number based on the airfoil chord is 0.49×106, the jet Reynolds number based on the jet slot height is 4470, and the ratio of the peak jet velocity to the freestream velocity is 3.96. Three different grid resolutions are used to show that their effect is very small on the mean surface pressure distribution, which agrees very well with experiments, as well as on the mean velocity profiles over the Coanda surface. It is observed that the Coanda jet becomes fully turbulent just downstream of the jet exit, accompanied by asymmetric alternating vortex shedding behind a thin (but blunt) jet blade splitting the jet and the external flow. A number of "backward-tilted" hairpin vortices (i.e., the head of each hairpin being located upstream of the legs) are observed around the outer edge of the jet over the Coanda surface. These hairpins create strong upwash between the legs and weak downwash around them, contributing to turbulent mixing of the high-momentum jet below the hairpins and the low-momentum external flow above them. The probability density distribution of velocity fluctuations is shown to be highly asymmetric in this region, consistent with the observation that the hairpin vortices create strong upwash and weak downwash. Turbulent structures inside the jet, its spreading rate, and self-similarity are also discussed.

  9. Scale-adaptive subgrid-scale modelling for large-eddy simulation of turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Changping; Xiao, Zuoli; Li, Xinliang

    2017-03-01

    The proportionality between the subgrid-scale (SGS) drain rate of kinetic energy and the viscous dissipation rate of the resolved motions is studied a priori by filtering a given fully resolved field and evaluating a generic form of the hypothesized energy spectrum. The ratio of the SGS drain to the resolved dissipation, on which a balance condition for the SGS dissipation across an arbitrary grid scale is founded, is shown to be independent of the turbulence Reynolds number, and can be described by a function in terms of the averaged mesh Reynolds number. Such a balance condition can serve as a physical constraint in the SGS modeling to account for the scale effects of the model coefficient(s). Scale-adaptive dynamic Smagorinsky-Lilly model and mixed nonlinear model are formulated for large-eddy simulation of transitional and/or turbulent flows in such a way that the constraint is satisfied. The newly proposed scale-adaptive dynamic SGS models are validated in simulations of homogeneous isotropic turbulence and turbulent channel flow, and prove to be superior over traditional dynamic SGS models.

  10. Large Eddy Simulation Study on Arctic Marine Clouds: the Effect of Aerosol-Cloud Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raatikainen, T.; Ahola, J.; Tonttila, J.; Romakkaniemi, S.; Laaksonen, A.; Korhonen, H.

    2016-12-01

    Dynamics of marine stratocumulus clouds depend on radiative cooling from cloud tops, turbulent transport of moisture and heat from the sea surface, and the availability of atmospheric aerosols to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). These processes and especially aerosol-cloud interactions can be examined with a recently developed Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model UCLALES-SALSA (Tonttila et al., Geosci. Model Dev. Discuss., 2016). Unlike most other LES models, UCLALES-SALSA has fully interactive sectional description for aerosols and liquid and frozen cloud species. UCLALES-SALSA simulations are initialized using atmospheric observations from the Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS). First, the model is used to examine the effects of initial total aerosol number concentration on cloud properties. In agreement with several observations, lowering aerosol number concentration decreases cloud lifetime by increasing drizzle and precipitation rates, which further decreases aerosol number concentration. The second test includes comparison between model versions with different microphysics. The new sectional approach seems to produce thicker and more persistent clouds than a two moment model version (Stevens et al., J. Atmos. Sci., 1999) even when the models are tuned to have equal cloud droplet number concentrations. The third part of the study is focused on the effect of ice on cloud properties. Preliminary results indicate that the current cloud case is so warm that the liquid phase dominates, but further studies are ongoing. In general, the results show that cloud evolution depends on aerosol-cloud interactions.

  11. An explicit filtering method for large eddy simulation of compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Joseph; Lechner, Richard; Foysi, Holger; Sesterhenn, Joern; Friedrich, Rainer

    2003-08-01

    A method for large eddy simulation (LES) is presented in which the sub-grid-scale modeling is achieved by filtering procedures alone. The procedure derives from a deconvolution model, and provides a mathematically consistent approximation of unresolved terms arising from any type of nonlinearity. The formal steps of primary filtering to obtain LES equations, approximate deconvolution to construct the subgrid model term and regularization are combined into an equivalent filter. This filter should be an almost perfect low pass filter below a cut-off wavenumber and then fall off smoothly. The procedure has been applied to a pressure-velocity-entropy formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations for compressible flow to perform LES of two fully developed, turbulent, supersonic channel flows and has been assessed by comparison against direct numerical simulation (DNS) data. Mach numbers are 1.5 and 3.0, and Reynolds numbers are 3000 and 6000, respectively. Effects of filter cut-off location, choice of differentiation scheme (a fifth-order compact upwind formula and a symmetric sixth-order compact formula were used), and grid refinement are examined. The effects are consistent with, and are readily understood by reference to, filtering characteristics of the differentiation and the LES filter. All simulations demonstrate a uniform convergence towards their respective DNS solutions.

  12. Large-Eddy Simulations of Plasma Flow Control on a GOE735 Wind Turbine Airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czulak, Alexander; Franck, Jennifer

    2015-11-01

    Active flow control using plasma actuation was studied for the GOE735 airfoil and compared to non-actuated baseline cases using numerical simulations. This investigation considers two-dimensional simulations at a Reynolds number of 1,000 using direct numerical simulation (DNS) as well as three-dimensional simulations at a Reynolds number of 50,000 and 100,000 using large-eddy simulation (LES). Plasma actuation is applied in terms of a source term within the boundary layer close to the airfoil surface. Angles of attack of 0°, 5° and 15° were considered, and control is shown to be effective at increasing the lift coefficient, decreasing the drag coefficient and reducing the root mean squared deviation of both lift and drag. An analysis of the flow physics reveals that the actuated cases delay the point of separation, reduce the wake width and diminish the size and strength of the shed vortices. For this particular airfoil, there are significant differences in Reynolds number in terms of the baseline flow, control effectiveness and performance factors such as lift and drag.

  13. Study on wake structure characteristics of a slotted micro-ramp with large-eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xiangrui; Chen, Yaohui; Dong, Gang; Liu, Yixin

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, a novel slotted ramp-type micro vortex generator (slotted micro-ramp) for flow separation control is simulated in the supersonic flow of Ma = 1.5, based on large eddy simulation combined with the finite volume method. The wake structure characteristics and control mechanisms of both slotted and standard micro-ramps are presented and discussed. The results show that the wake of standard micro-ramp includes a primary counter-rotating streamwise vortex pair, a train of vortex rings, and secondary vortices. The slotted micro-ramp has more complicated wake structures, which contain a confluent counter-rotating streamwise vortex pair and additional streamwise vortices, with the same rotation generated by slot and the vortex rings enveloping the vortex pair. The additional vortices generated by the slot of the micro-ramp can mix with the primary counter-rotating vortex pair, extend the life time, and strengthen the vortex intensity of primary vortex pair. Moreover, the slot can effectively alleviate, or even eliminate the backflow and decrease the profile drag induced by the standard micro-ramp, therefore improving the efficiency of separation control.

  14. Development and Implementation of an Online Chemistry Module to a Large Eddy Simulation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forkel, Renate; Banzhaf, Sabine; Kanani-Sühring, Farah; Ketelsen, Klaus; Khan, Basit; Maronga, Björn; Mauder, Matthias; Raasch, Siegfried

    2017-04-01

    Large Eddy Simulation (LES) models permit to resolve relevant scales of turbulent motion, so that these models can capture the inherent unsteadiness of atmospheric turbulence and advection. However, LES models are so far hardly applied for urban air quality studies, in particular chemical transformation of pollutants. Within the BMBF (Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung) funded joint project MOSAIK (Modellbasierte Stadtplanung und Anwendung im Klimawandel / Model-based city planning and application in climate change) the state of the art LES model PALM (Parallelized LES Model; Maronga et al, 2015, Geosci. Model Dev., 8, doi:10.5194/gmd-8-2515-2015) is extended by an atmospheric chemistry scheme. Due to the high computational demands of a LES based model, compromises in the description of chemical processes are required. Therefore, a reduced chemistry mechanism, which includes only major pollutants namely O3, NO, NO2, CO, a highly simplified VOC chemistry and a small number of products have been implemented. For practical applications, our approach is to go beyond the simulation of single street canyons to chemical transformation, advection and deposition of air pollutants in the larger urban canopy. Tests of chemistry schemes and initial studies of chemistry-turbulence interactions are presented.

  15. Large Eddy Simulation of Motion-Induced Contaminant Transports in Room Compartments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jung-Il; Edwards, Jack

    2011-11-01

    Large eddy simulation (LES) of contaminant transports due to complex human and door motions is conducted for characterizing the effect of the motion-induced wakes on the contaminant transports in room compartments where a contaminated and clean room are connected by a vestibule. We utilize a LES technique with an immersed-boundary method for moving objects (Choi et al., JCP 2007; Choi and Edwards, Indoor Air 2008) and extend the technique to include Eulerian descriptions of gas-phase contaminant transport as well as thermal energy transfer. We demonstrate details of contaminant transport due to human- and door-motion induced wake development during a short-duration event involving the movement of a person (or persons) from a contaminated room, through a vestibule, into a clean room. Parametric studies that capture the effects of human walking pattern, door operation, over-pressure level, and vestibule size are systematically conducted. The results of parameteric studies will be shown in the final presentation. Supported by DARPA/SPO program (HR0011-05-C-0157) and WCU program (R31-10049) of NRF.

  16. Analysis of noise radiation mechanisms in hot subsonic jet from a validated large eddy simulation solution

    SciTech Connect

    Lorteau, Mathieu Cléro, Franck Vuillot, François

    2015-07-15

    In the framework of jet noise computation, a numerical simulation of a subsonic turbulent hot jet is performed using large-eddy simulation. A geometrical tripping is used in order to trigger the turbulence at the nozzle exit. In a first part, the validity of the simulation is assessed by comparison with experimental measurements. The mean and rms velocity fields show good agreement, so do the azimuthal composition of the near pressure field and the far field spectra. Discrepancies remain close to the nozzle exit which lead to a limited overestimation of the pressure levels in both near and far fields, especially near the 90{sup ∘} angular sector. Two point correlation analyses are then applied to the data obtained from the simulation. These enable to link the downstream acoustic radiation, which is the main direction of radiation, to pressure waves developing in the shear layer and propagating toward the potential core end. The intermittency of the downstream acoustic radiation is evidenced and related to the coherent structures developing in the shear layer.

  17. Large-eddy simulation of flow past a real-life stream restoration structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Seokkoo; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2011-11-01

    We carry out high-resolution large-eddy simulation (LES) of flow around a rock vane, which is a widely used stream restoration structure. Mean velocities and turbulence statistics collected downstream of the rock vane installed in a laboratory flume are compared with the LES results. The comparisons demonstrate that the LES is able to accurately predict the measured mean velocities and turbulence statistics. The simulation shows that the rock vane effectively directs the oncoming flow away from the structure and creates a reduced velocity region in the downstream region. The computed results also reveal that the rock vane creates strong secondary helical flow that directs the near-bed flow toward the sidewall to which the rock vane is attached. This finding points to the conclusion that the downstream secondary flow can create deposition of sediments near the sidewall in a mobile bed condition, which can serve as an important mechanism for protecting near-bank scour in natural streams. This work was supported by National Center for Earth-surface Dynamics (NCED), ECORIVER21 project in South Korea, National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) and Minnesota Supercomputing Institue (MSI).

  18. Large-eddy simulation of nitrogen injection at trans- and supercritical conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Müller, Hagen; Pfitzner, Michael; Niedermeier, Christoph A.; Matheis, Jan; Hickel, Stefan

    2016-01-15

    Large-eddy simulations (LESs) of cryogenic nitrogen injection into a warm environment at supercritical pressure are performed and real-gas thermodynamics models and subgrid-scale (SGS) turbulence models are evaluated. The comparison of different SGS models — the Smagorinsky model, the Vreman model, and the adaptive local deconvolution method — shows that the representation of turbulence on the resolved scales has a notable effect on the location of jet break-up, whereas the particular modeling of unresolved scales is less important for the overall mean flow field evolution. More important are the models for the fluid’s thermodynamic state. The injected fluid is either in a supercritical or in a transcritical state and undergoes a pseudo-boiling process during mixing. Such flows typically exhibit strong density gradients that delay the instability growth and can lead to a redistribution of turbulence kinetic energy from the radial to the axial flow direction. We evaluate novel volume-translation methods on the basis of the cubic Peng-Robinson equation of state in the framework of LES. At small extra computational cost, their application considerably improves the simulation results compared to the standard formulation. Furthermore, we found that the choice of inflow temperature is crucial for the reproduction of the experimental results and that heat addition within the injector can affect the mean flow field in comparison to results with an adiabatic injector.

  19. Large-eddy simulation of cavitating nozzle flow and primary jet break-up

    SciTech Connect

    Örley, F. Trummler, T.; Mihatsch, M. S.; Schmidt, S. J.; Adams, N. A.; Hickel, S.

    2015-08-15

    We employ a barotropic two-phase/two-fluid model to study the primary break-up of cavitating liquid jets emanating from a rectangular nozzle, which resembles a high aspect-ratio slot flow. All components (i.e., gas, liquid, and vapor) are represented by a homogeneous mixture approach. The cavitating fluid model is based on a thermodynamic-equilibrium assumption. Compressibility of all phases enables full resolution of collapse-induced pressure wave dynamics. The thermodynamic model is embedded into an implicit large-eddy simulation (LES) environment. The considered configuration follows the general setup of a reference experiment and is a generic reproduction of a scaled-up fuel injector or control valve as found in an automotive engine. Due to the experimental conditions, it operates, however, at significantly lower pressures. LES results are compared to the experimental reference for validation. Three different operating points are studied, which differ in terms of the development of cavitation regions and the jet break-up characteristics. Observed differences between experimental and numerical data in some of the investigated cases can be caused by uncertainties in meeting nominal parameters by the experiment. The investigation reveals that three main mechanisms promote primary jet break-up: collapse-induced turbulent fluctuations near the outlet, entrainment of free gas into the nozzle, and collapse events inside the jet near the liquid-gas interface.

  20. Optimization of a Turbine Blade Trailing Edge using Large Eddy Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blonigan, Patrick; Talnikar, Chaitanya; Bodart, Julien; Pierce, Brian; Bose, Sanjeeb; Wang, Qiqi

    2014-11-01

    As for many turbomachinery components, heat transfer and pressure loss are the key quantities influencing the design of turbine blades. To compute correct heat transfer and pressure loss data, flow features such as boundary layer transition and flow separation must be captured accurately. While traditional Computation Fluid Dynamics models such as Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) struggle to capture these features accurately, Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is able to. This talk discusses an optimization study of a turbine blade trailing edge. The design of turbine blades involves two classical competing objectives: minimizing pressure loss and minimizing heat transfer to the blade. This trade-off is especially apparent for the design of the blade's trailing edge. The study was conducted using a novel Bayesian optimization technique developed by the authors. The optimization algorithm is combined with a massively parallel LES solver and the results for a number of trailing edge designs including the optimal geometry will be presented and their implications for turbine blade design will be discussed.

  1. Large eddy simulation study of scalar transport in fully developed wind-turbine array boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calaf, Marc; Parlange, Marc B.; Meneveau, Charles

    2011-12-01

    Wind harvesting is fast becoming an important alternative source of energy. As wind farms become larger, they begin to attain scales at which two-way interactions with the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) must be taken into account. Several studies have shown that there is a quantifiable effect of wind farms on the local meteorology, mainly through changes in the land-atmosphere fluxes of heat and moisture. In particular, the observed trends suggest that wind farms increase fluxes at the surface and this could be due to increased turbulence in the wakes. Conversely, simulations and laboratory experiments show that underneath wind farms, the friction velocity is decreased due to extraction of momentum by the wind turbines, a factor that could decrease scalar fluxes at the surface. In order to study this issue in more detail, a suite of large eddy simulations of an infinite (fully developed) wind turbine array boundary layer, including scalar transport from the ground surface without stratification, is performed. Results show an overall increase in the scalar fluxes of about 10%-15% when wind turbines are present in the ABL, and that the increase does not strongly depend upon wind farm loading as described by the turbines' thrust coefficient and the wind turbines spacings. A single-column analysis including scalar transport shows that the presence of wind farms can be expected to increase slightly the scalar transport from the bottom surface and that this slight increase is due to a delicate balance between two strong opposing trends.

  2. Development of an advanced actuator disk model for Large-Eddy Simulation of wind farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moens, Maud; Duponcheel, Matthieu; Winckelmans, Gregoire; Chatelain, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    This work aims at improving the fidelity of the wind turbine modelling for Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) of wind farms, in order to accurately predict the loads, the production, and the wake dynamics. In those simulations, the wind turbines are accounted for through actuator disks. i.e. a body-force term acting over the regularised disk swept by the rotor. These forces are computed using the Blade Element theory to estimate the normal and tangential components (based on the local simulated flow and the blade characteristics). The local velocities are modified using the Glauert tip-loss factor in order to account for the finite number of blades; the computation of this correction is here improved thanks to a local estimation of the effective upstream velocity at every point of the disk. These advanced actuator disks are implemented in a 4th order finite difference LES solver and are compared to a classical Blade Element Momentum method and to high fidelity wake simulations performed using a Vortex Particle-Mesh method in uniform and turbulent flows.

  3. Quantifying Turbulent Kinetic Energy in an Aortic Coarctation with Large Eddy Simulation and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lantz, Jonas; Ebbers, Tino; Karlsson, Matts

    2012-11-01

    In this study, turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) in an aortic coarctation was studied using both a numerical technique (large eddy simulation, LES) and in vivo measurements using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). High levels of TKE are undesirable, as kinetic energy is extracted from the mean flow to feed the turbulent fluctuations. The patient underwent surgery to widen the coarctation, and the flow before and after surgery was computed and compared to MRI measurements. The resolution of the MRI was about 7 × 7 voxels in axial cross-section while 50x50 mesh cells with increased resolution near the walls was used in the LES simulation. In general, the numerical simulations and MRI measurements showed that the aortic arch had no or very low levels of TKE, while elevated values were found downstream the coarctation. It was also found that TKE levels after surgery were lowered, indicating that the diameter of the constriction was increased enough to decrease turbulence effects. In conclusion, both the numerical simulation and MRI measurements gave very similar results, thereby validating the simulations and suggesting that MRI measured TKE can be used as an initial estimation in clinical practice, while LES results can be used for detailed quantification and further research of aortic flows.

  4. Exploring shallow sunspot formation by using Implicit Large-eddy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho, F. J.; Guerrero, G.; Smolarkiewicz, P. K.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Mansour, N. N.

    2017-10-01

    The mechanism by which sunspots are generated at the surface of the sun remains unclear. In the current literature two types of explanations can be found. The first one is related to the buoyant emergence of toroidal magnetic fields generated at the tachocline. The second one states that active regions are formed, from initially diffused magnetic flux, by MHD instabilities that develop in the near-surface layers of the Sun. Using the anelastic MHD code EULAG we address the problem of sunspot formation by performing implicit large-eddy simulations of stratified magneto-convection in a domain that resembles the near-surface layers of the Sun. The development of magnetic structures is explored as well as their effect on the convection dynamics. By applying a homogeneous magnetic field over an initially stationary hydrodynamic convective state, we investigate the formation of self-organized magnetic structures in the range of the initial magnetic field strength, 0.01 < B 0/B eq < 0.5, where B eq is the characteristic equipartition field strength.

  5. Large Eddy Simulation of Turbulent Flow and Dispersion in Urban Areas and Forest Canopies

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, S T

    2004-04-09

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. DOE and DHS, we have developed a CFD model for simulating flow and dispersion of chemical and biological agents released in the urban environment. Our model, FEM3MP (Chan and Stevens, 2000), is based on solving the three-dimensional, time-dependent, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on massively parallel computer platforms. The model uses the finite element method for accurate representation of complex building shapes and variable terrain, together with a semi-implicit projection method and modern iterative solvers for efficient time integration (Gresho and Chan, 1998). Physical processes treated include turbulence modeling via the RANS (Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes) and LES (Large Eddy Simulation) approaches, atmospheric stability, aerosols, UV radiation decay, surface energy budget, and vegetative canopies, etc. Predictions from our model are continuously being verified and validated against data from wind tunnel (Chan and Stevens, 2000; Chan, et al., 2001) and field experiments (Chan, et al., 2002, 2003; Lee, et al., 2002; Humphreys, et al., 2003; and Calhoun, et al., 2004). Discussed below are several examples to illustrate the use of FEM3MP in simulating flow and dispersion in urban areas and forest canopies, with model results compared against available field measurements.

  6. Recent advances in large-eddy simulation of spray and coal combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, L. X.

    2013-07-01

    Large-eddy simulation (LES) is under its rapid development and is recognized as a possible second generation of CFD methods used in engineering. Spray and coal combustion is widely used in power, transportation, chemical and metallurgical, iron and steel making, aeronautical and astronautical engineering, hence LES of spray and coal two-phase combustion is particularly important for engineering application. LES of two-phase combustion attracts more and more attention; since it can give the detailed instantaneous flow and flame structures and more exact statistical results than those given by the Reynolds averaged modeling (RANS modeling). One of the key problems in LES is to develop sub-grid scale (SGS) models, including SGS stress models and combustion models. Different investigators proposed or adopted various SGS models. In this paper the present author attempts to review the advances in studies on LES of spray and coal combustion, including the studies done by the present author and his colleagues. Different SGS models adopted by different investigators are described, some of their main results are summarized, and finally some research needs are discussed.

  7. The hybridized Discontinuous Galerkin method for Implicit Large-Eddy Simulation of transitional turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, P.; Nguyen, N. C.; Peraire, J.

    2017-05-01

    We present a high-order Implicit Large-Eddy Simulation (ILES) approach for transitional aerodynamic flows. The approach encompasses a hybridized Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method for the discretization of the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations, and a parallel preconditioned Newton-GMRES solver for the resulting nonlinear system of equations. The combination of hybridized DG methods with an efficient solution procedure leads to a high-order accurate NS solver that is competitive to alternative approaches, such as finite volume and finite difference codes, in terms of computational cost. The proposed approach is applied to transitional flows over the NACA 65-(18)10 compressor cascade and the Eppler 387 wing at Reynolds numbers up to 460,000. Grid convergence studies are presented and the required resolution to capture transition at different Reynolds numbers is investigated. Numerical results show rapid convergence and excellent agreement with experimental data. In short, this work aims to demonstrate the potential of high-order ILES for simulating transitional aerodynamic flows. This is illustrated through numerical results and supported by theoretical considerations.

  8. Large-Eddy Simulation of a Shock Train in a Duct with Side Walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Brandon; Duraisamy, Karthik; Lele, Sanjiva

    2012-11-01

    Large-eddy simulation (LES) is utilized to investigate the three-dimensionality of a shock train in a constant-area isolator model with fully resolved side walls (M∞ = 1.61, Reθ ~ 1660). Flow conditions and geometry are selected to match experimental conditions investigated by Carroll (1988); although Reynolds number is reduced to ensure adequate mesh resolution. Simulations with spanwise periodic boundary conditions are first performed, the results of which are compared to experiment and validated with a three-level grid refinement study. The same shock train interaction is then simulated in a three-dimensional, low-aspect ratio rectangular duct geometry with particular emphasis placed on characterizing secondary corner flows and the effects of these corner flows on the location and structure of the shock train. It is found, for instance, that location of the initial shock is particularly sensitive to the effects of spanwise confinement. Most significantly, it is observed that the same pressure ratio which results in a stable shock train with periodic boundary conditions may result in isolator unstart when side-wall effects are fully resolved.

  9. Large Eddy Simulations and an Analysis of the Flow Field of a Radially Lobed Nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Noushin; Sekaran, Aarthi

    2015-11-01

    Lobed nozzles have been a subject of regained interest over the past couple of decades owing to their established mixing capabilities. Despite experimental (Hu et al., 1999 and Hu et al., 2008) and limited numerical studies (Boulenouar et al. 2011 and Cooper et al., 2005), the exact nature of the jet ensuing from this nozzle is yet to be completely understood. The present numerical study is intended to complement prior experimental investigation, involving the analysis of the flow field downstream of a six lobed nozzle (Amini et al., 2012). Preliminary results (presented at DFD 2014, Amin and Sekaran), which involved three dimensional simulations of the full domain via URANS and Large Eddy Simulations (LES) were used to assess the domain extents and simulation technique. Based on these results it was seen that LES were able to capture the region of interest satisfactorily and a qualitative corroboration with previous studies was obtained. The study is thus extended to analyzing the flow originating from within the nozzle, following it downstream in order to confirm the vortical interaction mechanisms inside the lobed nozzle.

  10. Large-eddy simulation of heavy particle dispersion in wall-bounded turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvetti, M. V.

    2015-03-01

    Capabilities and accuracy issues in Lagrangian tracking of heavy particles in velocity fields obtained from large-eddy simulations (LES) of wall-bounded turbulent flows are reviewed. In particular, it is shown that, if no subgrid scale (SGS) model is added to the particle motion equations, particle preferential concentration and near-wall accumulation are significantly underestimated. Results obtained with SGS modeling for the particle motion equations based on approximate deconvolution are briefly recalled. Then, the error purely due to filtering in particle tracking in LES flow fields is singled out and analyzed. The statistical properties of filtering errors are characterized in turbulent channel flow both from an Eulerian and a Lagrangian viewpoint. Implications for stochastic SGS modeling in particle motion equations are briefly outlined. The author is retracting this article due to a significant overlap in content from three previously published papers [Phys. Fluids 20, 040603 (2008); Phys. Fluids 24, 045103 (2012); Acta Mech. 201(1-4), 277 (2008)], which constitutes dual publication. The author would like to apologize for any inconvenience this has caused. The article is retracted from the scientific record with effect from 12 January 2017.

  11. Large eddy simulation of shock train in a convergent-divergent nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, Seyed Mahmood; Roohi, Ehsan

    2014-12-01

    This paper discusses the suitability of the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) turbulence modeling for the accurate simulation of the shock train phenomena in a convergent-divergent nozzle. To this aim, we selected an experimentally tested geometry and performed LES simulation for the same geometry. The structure and pressure recovery inside the shock train in the nozzle captured by LES model are compared with the experimental data, analytical expressions and numerical solutions obtained using various alternative turbulence models, including k-ɛ RNG, k-ω SST, and Reynolds stress model (RSM). Comparing with the experimental data, we observed that the LES solution not only predicts the "locations of the first shock" precisely, but also its results are quite accurate before and after the shock train. After validating the LES solution, we investigate the effects of the inlet total pressure on the shock train starting point and length. The effects of changes in the back pressure, nozzle inlet angle (NIA) and wall temperature on the behavior of the shock train are investigated by details.

  12. Large-eddy simulation of propeller wake at design operating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Praveen; Mahesh, Krishnan

    2016-11-01

    Understanding the propeller wake is crucial for efficient design and optimized performance. The dynamics of the propeller wake are also central to physical phenomena such as cavitation and acoustics. Large-eddy simulation is used to study the evolution of the wake of a five-bladed marine propeller from near to far field at design operating condition. The computed mean loads and phase-averaged flow field show good agreement with experiments. The propeller wake consisting of tip and hub vortices undergoes streamtube contraction, which is followed by the onset of instabilities as evident from the oscillations of the tip vortices. Simulation results reveal a mutual induction mechanism of instability where instead of the tip vortices interacting among themselves, they interact with the smaller vortices generated by the roll-up of the blade trailing edge wake in the near wake. Phase-averaged and ensemble-averaged flow fields are analyzed to explain the flow physics. This work is supported by ONR.

  13. Prediction of the Ignition Phases in Aeronautical and Laboratory Burners using Large Eddy Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gicquel, L. Y. M.; Staffelbach, G.; Sanjose, M.; Boileau, M.

    2009-12-01

    Being able to ignite or reignite a gas turbine engine in a cold and rarefied atmosphere is a critical issue for many aeronautical gas turbine manufacturers. From a fundamental point of view, the ignition of the first burner and the flame propagation from one burner to another are two phenomena that are usually not studied. The present work presents on-going and past Large Eddy Simulations (LES) on this specific subject and as investigated at CERFACS (European Centre for Research and Advanced Training in Scientific Computation) located in Toulouse, France. Validation steps and potential difficulties are underlined to ensure reliability of LES for such problems. Preliminary LES results on simple burners are then presented, followed by simulations of a complete ignition sequence in an annular helicopter chamber. For all cases and when possible, two-phase or purely gaseous LES have been applied to the experimentally simplified or the full geometries. For the latter, massively parallel computing (700 processors on a Cray XT3 machine) was essential to perform the computation. Results show that liquid fuel injection has a strong influence on the ignition times and the rate at which the flame progresses from burner to burner. The propagation speed characteristic of these phenomena is much higher than the turbulent flame speed. Based on an in-depth analysis of the computational data, the difference in speed is mainly identified as being due to thermal expansion and the flame speed is strongly modified by the main burner aerodynamics issued by the swirled injection.

  14. Large eddy simulation of wind-induced interunit dispersion around multistory buildings.

    PubMed

    Ai, Z T; Mak, C M

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies regarding interunit dispersion used Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) models and thus obtained only mean dispersion routes and re-entry ratios. Given that the envelope flow around a building is highly fluctuating, mean values could be insufficient to describe interunit dispersion. This study investigates the wind-induced interunit dispersion around multistory buildings using the large eddy simulation (LES) method. This is the first time interunit dispersion has been investigated transiently using a LES model. The quality of the selected LES model is seriously assured through both experimental validation and sensitivity analyses. Two aspects are paid special attention: (i) comparison of dispersion routes with those provided by previous RANS simulations and (ii) comparison of timescales with those of natural ventilation and the survival times of pathogens. The LES results reveal larger dispersion scopes than the RANS results. Such larger scopes could be caused by the fluctuating and stochastic nature of envelope flows, which, however, is canceled out by the inherent Reynolds-averaged treatment of RANS models. The timescales of interunit dispersion are comparable with those of natural ventilation. They are much shorter than the survival time of most pathogens under ordinary physical environments, indicating that interunit dispersion is a valid route for disease transmission. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. From large-eddy simulation to multi-UAVs sampling of shallow cumulus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamraoui, Fayçal; Roberts, Greg; Burnet, Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    In-situ sampling of clouds that can provide simultaneous measurements at satisfying spatio-temporal resolutions to capture 3D small scale physical processes continues to present challenges. This project (SKYSCANNER) aims at bringing together cloud sampling strategies using a swarm of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) based on Large-eddy simulation (LES). The multi-UAV-based field campaigns with a personalized sampling strategy for individual clouds and cloud fields will significantly improve the understanding of the unresolved cloud physical processes. An extensive set of LES experiments for case studies from ARM-SGP site have been performed using MesoNH model at high resolutions down to 10 m. The carried out simulations led to establishing a macroscopic model that quantifies the interrelationship between micro- and macrophysical properties of shallow convective clouds. Both the geometry and evolution of individual clouds are critical to multi-UAV cloud sampling and path planning. The preliminary findings of the current project reveal several linear relationships that associate many cloud geometric parameters to cloud related meteorological variables. In addition, the horizontal wind speed indicates a proportional impact on cloud number concentration as well as triggering and prolonging the occurrence of cumulus clouds. In the framework of the joint collaboration that involves a Multidisciplinary Team (including institutes specializing in aviation, robotics and atmospheric science), this model will be a reference point for multi-UAVs sampling strategies and path planning.

  16. A Wall Model for Large-Eddy Simulation of Compressible Channel Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, Barrett T.

    A wall model for the large-eddy simulation (LES) of compressible channel flows with isothermal walls is presented, which extends the incompressible model of Chung and Pullin (Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 2009). The wall model computes the local, instantaneous wall shear stress and heat flux, which are then applied as wall boundary conditions, by solving two time-dependent, parameter-free ordinary differential equations (ODEs) at each time step. These ODEs are obtained by integrating the LES momentum and internal energy equations in the wall-normal direction from the wall to the first grid point placed in the log layer. In contrast to so-called "wall-resolved" LES, employment of this wall model allows use of relatively coarse computational meshes of fixed size, independent of Reynolds number. The wall model is first validated by comparing the LES results at M = 0.15 and friction Reynolds number 2003 to the direct numerical simulation (DNS) results of Hoyas and Jimenez (Physics of Fluids, 2006), and at M = 0.7 and friction Reynolds number 186 to the DNS results of Wei and Pollard (Computers & Fluids, 2011). Results are then presented for LES of channel flows at M = 0.15 and M = 0.7, over a three-order-of-magnitude range of friction Reynolds numbers, on a uniform mesh with 256 x 32 x 128 grid points in the streamwise, wall-normal, and spanwise directions.

  17. Large-eddy simulation of bubble-driven plume in stably stratified flow.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Di; Chen, Bicheng; Socolofsky, Scott; Chamecki, Marcelo; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-11-01

    The interaction between a bubble-driven plume and stratified water column plays a vital role in many environmental and engineering applications. As the bubbles are released from a localized source, they induce a positive buoyancy flux that generates an upward plume. As the plume rises, it entrains ambient water, and when the plume rises to a higher elevation where the stratification-induced negative buoyancy is sufficient, a considerable fraction of the entrained fluid detrains, or peels, to form a downward outer plume and a lateral intrusion layer. In the case of multiphase plumes, the intrusion layer may also trap weakly buoyant particles (e.g., oil droplets in the case of a subsea accidental blowout). In this study, the complex plume dynamics is studied using large-eddy simulation (LES), with the flow field simulated by hybrid pseudospectral/finite-difference scheme, and the bubble and dye concentration fields simulated by finite-volume scheme. The spatial and temporal characteristics of the buoyant plume are studied, with a focus on the effects of different bubble buoyancy levels. The LES data provide useful mean plume statistics for evaluating the accuracy of 1-D engineering models for entrainment and peeling fluxes. Based on the insights learned from the LES, a new continuous peeling model is developed and tested. Study supported by the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GoMRI).

  18. Prediction of wall shear-stress fluctuations in wall-modeled large-eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, George; Howland, Michael; Lozano-Duran, Adrian; Moin, Parviz

    2016-11-01

    Wall-modeled large-eddy simulation (WMLES) is emerging as a viable and affordable tool for predicting mean flow statistics in high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layers. Recently, we examined the performance of two RANS-based wall models in prediction of wall pressure and shear stress fluctuations which are important in flow/structure interaction problems. Whereas the pressure statistics were predicted with reasonable accuracy, the magnitude of wall shear stress fluctuations was severely underestimated. The present study expands on this finding to characterize in more detail the capabilities of wall models for predicting τw'. Predictions of several wall models in high Reynolds number channel flows (Reτ = 2000) will be presented. Additionally, a recent empirical inner-outer model for τw' is reconstructed using channel flow DNS database , and it is coupled to WMLES to assess its performance as a predictive model in LES. The majority of this work was carried out during the 16th biannual Center for Turbulence Research (CTR) summer program, 2016. George Park was partially supported through NASA under the Subsonic Fixed-Wing Program (Grant No. NNX11AI60A).

  19. Progress-variable approach for large-eddy simulation of turbulent combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Charles David

    A new approach to chemistry modeling for large eddy simulation of turbulent reacting flows is developed. Instead of solving transport equations for all of the numerous species in a typical chemical mechanism and modeling the unclosed chemical source terms, the present study adopts an indirect mapping approach, whereby all of the detailed chemical processes are mapped to a reduced system of tracking scalars. Presently, only two such scalars are considered: a mixture fraction variable, which tracks the mixing of fuel and oxidizer, and a progress variable, which tracks the global extent-of-reaction of the local mixture. The mapping functions, which describe all of the detailed chemical processes with respect to the tracking variables, are determined by solving quasi-steady diffusion-reaction equations with complex chemical kinetics and multicomponent mass diffusion. The performance of the new model is compared to fast chemistry and steady flamelet models for predicting velocity, species concentration, and temperature fields in a methane-fueled coaxial jet combustor for which experimental data are available. The progress-variable approach is able to capture the unsteady, lifted flame dynamics observed in the experiment, and to obtain good agreement with the experimental data and significantly outperform the fast chemistry and steady flamelet models, which both predict an attached flame.

  20. Large-eddy simulation of nitrogen injection at trans- and supercritical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Hagen; Niedermeier, Christoph A.; Matheis, Jan; Pfitzner, Michael; Hickel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Large-eddy simulations (LESs) of cryogenic nitrogen injection into a warm environment at supercritical pressure are performed and real-gas thermodynamics models and subgrid-scale (SGS) turbulence models are evaluated. The comparison of different SGS models — the Smagorinsky model, the Vreman model, and the adaptive local deconvolution method — shows that the representation of turbulence on the resolved scales has a notable effect on the location of jet break-up, whereas the particular modeling of unresolved scales is less important for the overall mean flow field evolution. More important are the models for the fluid's thermodynamic state. The injected fluid is either in a supercritical or in a transcritical state and undergoes a pseudo-boiling process during mixing. Such flows typically exhibit strong density gradients that delay the instability growth and can lead to a redistribution of turbulence kinetic energy from the radial to the axial flow direction. We evaluate novel volume-translation methods on the basis of the cubic Peng-Robinson equation of state in the framework of LES. At small extra computational cost, their application considerably improves the simulation results compared to the standard formulation. Furthermore, we found that the choice of inflow temperature is crucial for the reproduction of the experimental results and that heat addition within the injector can affect the mean flow field in comparison to results with an adiabatic injector.

  1. Effects of mesh resolution on large eddy simulation of reacting flows in complex geometry combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Boudier, G.; Gicquel, L.Y.M.; Poinsot, T.J.

    2008-10-15

    The power of current parallel computers is becoming sufficient to apply large eddy simulation (LES) tools to reacting flows not only in academic configurations but also in real gas turbine chambers. The most limiting factor in performing LES of real systems is the mesh size, which directly controls the overall cost of the simulation, so that the effects of mesh resolution on LES results become a key issue. In the present work, an unstructured compressible LES solver is used to compute the reacting flow in a domain corresponding to a sector of a realistic helicopter chamber. Three grids ranging from 1.2 to 44 million elements are used for LES and results are compared in terms of mean and fluctuating fields as well as of pressure spectra. Results show that the mean temperature, reaction rate, and velocity fields are almost insensitive to the grid size. The RMS field of the resolved velocity is also reasonably independent of the mesh, while the RMS fields of temperature exhibit more sensitivity to the grid, as expected from the fact that most of the combustion process proceeds at small scales. The acoustic field exhibits a limited sensitivity to the mesh, suggesting that LES is adapted to the computation of combustion instabilities in complex systems. (author)

  2. Characteristics of vertical velocity in marine stratocumulus: comparison of large eddy simulations with observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Huan; Liu, Yangang; Daum, Peter H.; Senum, Gunnar I.; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2008-10-01

    We simulated a marine stratus deck sampled during the Marine Stratus/Stratocumulus Experiment (MASE) with a three-dimensional large eddy simulation (LES) model at different model resolutions. Various characteristics of the vertical velocity from the model simulations were evaluated against those derived from the corresponding aircraft in situ observations, focusing on standard deviation, skewness, kurtosis, probability density function (PDF), power spectrum, and structure function. Our results show that although the LES model captures reasonably well the lower-order moments (e.g., horizontal averages and standard deviations), it fails to simulate many aspects of the higher-order moments, such as kurtosis, especially near cloud base and cloud top. Further investigations of the PDFs, power spectra, and structure functions reveal that compared to the observations, the model generally underestimates relatively strong variations on small scales. The results also suggest that increasing the model resolutions improves the agreements between the model results and the observations in virtually all of the properties that we examined. Furthermore, the results indicate that a vertical grid size <10 m is necessary for accurately simulating even the standard-deviation profile, posing new challenges to computer resources.

  3. A time and space correlated turbulence synthesis method for Large Eddy Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Hugo G.; Paz, Rodrigo R.

    2013-02-01

    In the present work the problem of generating synthesized turbulence at inflow boundaries of the simulation domain is addressed in the context of the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) method. To represent adequately certain statistical properties of a turbulent process, we propose a synthesized turbulence method which is based on previous works (Huang et al., 2010; Smirnov et al., 2001) [15,28]. For this purpose, time and space correlations are introduced strictly in the mathematical formulation of the synthetic turbulence inflow data. It is demonstrated that the proposed approach inherits the properties of the methods on which it is based while presents some particular advantages as well. The strategy of imposing conditions on the inlet velocity field through turbulence synthesis is implemented in the parallel multiphysics code called PETSc-FEM (http://www.cimec.org.ar/petscfem) primarily targeted to calculations throughout finite elements on general unstructured 2D and 3D grids. We present several numerical tests in order to validate and evaluate the method describing the dynamic phenomena that take place in “real-life” problems, such as a swirling turbulent flow inside a diffuser and the airflow around a vehicle model inside a wind tunnel at high Reynolds number.

  4. Large-eddy simulation of oxygen transport and depletion in waterbodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalo, Carlo; Piomelli, Ugo; Boegman, Leon

    2010-11-01

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) in water plays an important role in lake and marine ecosystems. Agricultural runoff may spur excessive plant growth on the water surface; when the plants die they sink to the bottom of the water bodies and decompose, consuming oxygen. Significant environmental (and economic) damage may result from the loss of aquatic life caused by the oxygen depletion. The study of DO transport and depletion dynamics in water bodies has, therefore, become increasingly important. We study this phenomenon by large-eddy simulations performed at laboratory scale. The equations governing the transport of momentum and of a scalar (the DO) in the fluid are coupled to a biochemical model for DO depletion in the permeable sediment bed [Higashino et al., Water Res. (38) 1, 2004)], and to an equation for the fluid transpiration in the porous medium. The simulations are in good agreement with previous calculations and experiments. We show that the results are sensitive to the biochemical and fluid dynamical properties of the sediment, which are very difficult to determine experimentally.

  5. Sensitivity of Stratocumulus Optical Depths to Droplet Concentrations: Satellite Observations and Large-Eddy Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackerman, A. S.; Stevens, D. E.; Toon, O. B.; Coakley, J. A., Jr.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A number of observations and simulations have shown that increased droplet concentrations in ship tracks increase their total cross-sectional area, thereby enhancing cloud albedo and providing a negative (cooling) radiative forcing at the surface and the top of the atmosphere. In some cases cloud water has been found to be enhanced in ship tracks, which has been attributed to suppression of drizzle and implies an enhanced susceptibility of cloud albedo to droplet concentrations. However, observations from aircraft and satellite indicate that on average cloud water is instead reduced in daytime ship tracks. Such a reduction in liquid water may be attributable to cloud-burning caused by solar heating by soot within the ship exhaust, or by increased precipitation resulting from giant nuclei in the ship exhaust. We will summarize the observational evidence and present results from large-eddy simulations that evaluate these mechanisms. Along the way we will present our insights into the interpretation of satellite retrievals of cloud microphysical properties.

  6. Reduction of Cloud Water in Ship Tracks: Observations and Large-Eddy Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackerman, A. S.; Stevens, D. E.; Toon, O. B.; Coakley, J. A., Jr.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Ship tracks represent a natural laboratory to study the effects of aerosols on clouds. A number of observations and simulations have shown that increased droplet concentrations in ship tracks increase their total cross-sectional area, thereby enhancing cloud albedo and providing a negative radiative forcing at the surface and the top of the atmosphere. In some cases, cloud water has been found to be enhanced in ship tracks, which has been attributed to suppression of drizzle and implies an enhanced susceptibility of cloud albedo to droplet concentrations. However, more recently compiled observations indicate that cloud water is instead reduced in daytime ship tracks on average. Such a response is consistent with cloud-burning due to solar absorption by soot (the semi-direct radiative forcing of aerosols), recently suggested to be suppressing trade cumulus cloud coverage over the Indian Ocean. We will summarize observational evidence and present large-eddy simulations that consider these competing mechanisms in the effects of aerosols on cloud albedo.

  7. A minimum dissipation scalar transport model for large-eddy simulation of turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abkar, Mahdi; Bae, Hyun J.; Moin, Parviz

    2016-11-01

    Minimum-dissipation models are a simple alternative to the Smagorinsky-type approaches to parameterize the sub-filter scale turbulent fluxes in large-eddy simulation. A recently derived minimum-dissipation model for sub-filter stress tensor is the AMD model and has many desirable properties. It is more cost effective than the dynamic Smagorinsky model, it appropriately switches off in laminar and transitional flows, and it is consistent with the theoretic sub-filter stress tensor on both isotropic and anisotropic grids. In this study, an extension of this approach to modeling the sub-filter scalar flux is proposed. The performance of the AMD model is tested in the simulation of a high Reynolds number, rough wall, boundary layer flow with a constant and uniform surface scalar flux. The simulation results obtained from the AMD model show good agreement with well-established empirical correlations and theoretical predictions of the resolved flow statistics. In particular, the AMD model is capable to accurately predict the expected surface-layer similarity profiles and power spectra for both velocity and scalar concentration.

  8. Minimum-dissipation scalar transport model for large-eddy simulation of turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abkar, Mahdi; Bae, Hyun J.; Moin, Parviz

    2016-08-01

    Minimum-dissipation models are a simple alternative to the Smagorinsky-type approaches to parametrize the subfilter turbulent fluxes in large-eddy simulation. A recently derived model of this type for subfilter stress tensor is the anisotropic minimum-dissipation (AMD) model [Rozema et al., Phys. Fluids 27, 085107 (2015), 10.1063/1.4928700], which has many desirable properties. It is more cost effective than the dynamic Smagorinsky model, it appropriately switches off in laminar and transitional flows, and it is consistent with the exact subfilter stress tensor on both isotropic and anisotropic grids. In this study, an extension of this approach to modeling the subfilter scalar flux is proposed. The performance of the AMD model is tested in the simulation of a high-Reynolds-number rough-wall boundary-layer flow with a constant and uniform surface scalar flux. The simulation results obtained from the AMD model show good agreement with well-established empirical correlations and theoretical predictions of the resolved flow statistics. In particular, the AMD model is capable of accurately predicting the expected surface-layer similarity profiles and power spectra for both velocity and scalar concentration.

  9. Large-eddy and unsteady RANS simulations of a shock-accelerated heavy gas cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, B. E.; Greenough, J. A.

    2015-04-08

    Two-dimensional numerical simulations of the Richtmyer–Meshkov unstable “shock-jet” problem are conducted using both large-eddy simulation (LES) and unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (URANS) approaches in an arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian hydrodynamics code. Turbulence statistics are extracted from LES by running an ensemble of simulations with multimode perturbations to the initial conditions. Detailed grid convergence studies are conducted, and LES results are found to agree well with both experiment and high-order simulations conducted by Shankar et al. (Phys Fluids 23, 024102, 2011). URANS results using a k–L approach are found to be highly sensitive to initialization of the turbulence lengthscale L and to the time at which L becomes resolved on the computational mesh. As a result, it is observed that a gradient diffusion closure for turbulent species flux is a poor approximation at early times, and a new closure based on the mass-flux velocity is proposed for low-Reynolds-number mixing.

  10. A Parallel, Finite-Volume Algorithm for Large-Eddy Simulation of Turbulent Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Trong T.

    1999-01-01

    A parallel, finite-volume algorithm has been developed for large-eddy simulation (LES) of compressible turbulent flows. This algorithm includes piecewise linear least-square reconstruction, trilinear finite-element interpolation, Roe flux-difference splitting, and second-order MacCormack time marching. Parallel implementation is done using the message-passing programming model. In this paper, the numerical algorithm is described. To validate the numerical method for turbulence simulation, LES of fully developed turbulent flow in a square duct is performed for a Reynolds number of 320 based on the average friction velocity and the hydraulic diameter of the duct. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) results are available for this test case, and the accuracy of this algorithm for turbulence simulations can be ascertained by comparing the LES solutions with the DNS results. The effects of grid resolution, upwind numerical dissipation, and subgrid-scale dissipation on the accuracy of the LES are examined. Comparison with DNS results shows that the standard Roe flux-difference splitting dissipation adversely affects the accuracy of the turbulence simulation. For accurate turbulence simulations, only 3-5 percent of the standard Roe flux-difference splitting dissipation is needed.

  11. Large eddy simulation of flows in industrial compressors: a path from 2015 to 2035

    PubMed Central

    Gourdain, N.; Sicot, F.; Duchaine, F.; Gicquel, L.

    2014-01-01

    A better understanding of turbulent unsteady flows is a necessary step towards a breakthrough in the design of modern compressors. Owing to high Reynolds numbers and very complex geometry, the flow that develops in such industrial machines is extremely hard to predict. At this time, the most popular method to simulate these flows is still based on a Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes approach. However, there is some evidence that this formalism is not accurate for these components, especially when a description of time-dependent turbulent flows is desired. With the increase in computing power, large eddy simulation (LES) emerges as a promising technique to improve both knowledge of complex physics and reliability of flow solver predictions. The objective of the paper is thus to give an overview of the current status of LES for industrial compressor flows as well as to propose future research axes regarding the use of LES for compressor design. While the use of wall-resolved LES for industrial multistage compressors at realistic Reynolds number should not be ready before 2035, some possibilities exist to reduce the cost of LES, such as wall modelling and the adaptation of the phase-lag condition. This paper also points out the necessity to combine LES to techniques able to tackle complex geometries. Indeed LES alone, i.e. without prior knowledge of such flows for grid construction or the prohibitive yet ideal use of fully homogeneous meshes to predict compressor flows, is quite limited today. PMID:25024422

  12. Large eddy simulation for predicting turbulent heat transfer in gas turbines

    PubMed Central

    Tafti, Danesh K.; He, Long; Nagendra, K.

    2014-01-01

    Blade cooling technology will play a critical role in the next generation of propulsion and power generation gas turbines. Accurate prediction of blade metal temperature can avoid the use of excessive compressed bypass air and allow higher turbine inlet temperature, increasing fuel efficiency and decreasing emissions. Large eddy simulation (LES) has been established to predict heat transfer coefficients with good accuracy under various non-canonical flows, but is still limited to relatively simple geometries and low Reynolds numbers. It is envisioned that the projected increase in computational power combined with a drop in price-to-performance ratio will make system-level simulations using LES in complex blade geometries at engine conditions accessible to the design process in the coming one to two decades. In making this possible, two key challenges are addressed in this paper: working with complex intricate blade geometries and simulating high-Reynolds-number (Re) flows. It is proposed to use the immersed boundary method (IBM) combined with LES wall functions. A ribbed duct at Re=20 000 is simulated using the IBM, and a two-pass ribbed duct is simulated at Re=100 000 with and without rotation (rotation number Ro=0.2) using LES with wall functions. The results validate that the IBM is a viable alternative to body-conforming grids and that LES with wall functions reproduces experimental results at a much lower computational cost. PMID:25024418

  13. An investigation of the dynamics of marine propeller tip vortices using large-eddy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Seth; Balaras, Elias

    2012-11-01

    The ability to capture the dynamics of tip vortices, which are generated by marine propellers, is of major interest to naval hydrodynamics designers. The tip vortex of a propeller has a direct impact on performance and acoustics. Additionally, the tip vortex is a major source of erosion damage on downstream components such as rudders and stators. In the present study we utilize large-eddy simulations to compute the flow around a generic, 7-bladed, right-handed submarine propeller in open water testing configuration. We considered three different advance coefficients at Reynolds number (based on the radius and advance speed) of the order of 300,000. The governing equations are discretized on a structured grid in cylindrical coordinates and the boundary conditions on the surface of the propeller, which is not aligned with the grid lines, are introduced using an immersed boundary method. Approximately 1 billion points is used in the computation box. Tip vortices are identified by low pressure areas and the second invariant of the velocity gradient tensor (Q-criterium). In general, the vortex core radius contracts with the acceleration in the wake, and then maintains a constant radius for a certain distance before becoming unstable. Stability is affected by the advance ratio. Work supported by ONR.

  14. Wall-Resolved Large-Eddy Simulation of Turbulent Flow Past a NACA0012 Airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wei; Zhang, Wei; Samtaney, Ravi

    2014-11-01

    Large-eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent flow past a NACA0012 airfoil is performed at angle of attack (AoA) 3o and Rec = 2 . 3 ×104 . The filtered incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are spatially discretized using an energy conservative fourth-order scheme developed by Morinishi et al. (J. of Comput. Phys., 1998), and the subgrid-scale (SGS) tensor is modeled by the stretched-vortex SGS model developed by Pullin and co-workers (Phys. of Fluids, 2000, J. of Fluid Mech., 2009). An extension of the original stretched-vortex SGS model is utilized to resolve the streak-like structures in the near-wall flow regions. The mean velocity and turbulence intensity profiles on airfoil surface and in wake are validated against experimental data reported in Dong-Ha Kim et al. (AIAA, 2009). To further verify our LES capacity, some high-order turbulence quantities are also compared with the DNS results produced by our in-house DNS code. The effect of grid-refinement on the wall-resolved LES approach is also discussed. Supported by KAUST OCRF funded CRG project on simulation of turbulent flows over bluff bodies and airfoils.

  15. Dynamic non-equilibrium wall-modeling for large eddy simulation at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Soshi; Larsson, Johan

    2013-01-01

    A dynamic non-equilibrium wall-model for large-eddy simulation at arbitrarily high Reynolds numbers is proposed and validated on equilibrium boundary layers and a non-equilibrium shock/boundary-layer interaction problem. The proposed method builds on the prior non-equilibrium wall-models of Balaras et al. [AIAA J. 34, 1111-1119 (1996)], 10.2514/3.13200 and Wang and Moin [Phys. Fluids 14, 2043-2051 (2002)], 10.1063/1.1476668: the failure of these wall-models to accurately predict the skin friction in equilibrium boundary layers is shown and analyzed, and an improved wall-model that solves this issue is proposed. The improvement stems directly from reasoning about how the turbulence length scale changes with wall distance in the inertial sublayer, the grid resolution, and the resolution-characteristics of numerical methods. The proposed model yields accurate resolved turbulence, both in terms of structure and statistics for both the equilibrium and non-equilibrium flows without the use of ad hoc corrections. Crucially, the model accurately predicts the skin friction, something that existing non-equilibrium wall-models fail to do robustly.

  16. Large eddy simulations and direct numerical simulations of high speed turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, P.; Frankel, S. H.; Adumitroaie, V.; Sabini, G.; Madnia, C. K.

    1993-01-01

    The primary objective of this research is to extend current capabilities of Large Eddy Simulations (LES) and Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) for the computational analyses of high speed reacting flows. Our efforts in the first two years of this research have been concentrated on a priori investigations of single-point Probability Density Function (PDF) methods for providing subgrid closures in reacting turbulent flows. In the efforts initiated in the third year, our primary focus has been on performing actual LES by means of PDF methods. The approach is based on assumed PDF methods and we have performed extensive analysis of turbulent reacting flows by means of LES. This includes simulations of both three-dimensional (3D) isotropic compressible flows and two-dimensional reacting planar mixing layers. In addition to these LES analyses, some work is in progress to assess the extent of validity of our assumed PDF methods. This assessment is done by making detailed companions with recent laboratory data in predicting the rate of reactant conversion in parallel reacting shear flows. This report provides a summary of our achievements for the first six months of the third year of this program.

  17. Low-Dissipation Advection Schemes Designed for Large Eddy Simulations of Hypersonic Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Jeffrey A.; Baurle, Robert A.; Fisher, Travis C.; Quinlan, Jesse R.; Black, William S.

    2012-01-01

    The 2nd-order upwind inviscid flux scheme implemented in the multi-block, structured grid, cell centered, finite volume, high-speed reacting flow code VULCAN has been modified to reduce numerical dissipation. This modification was motivated by the desire to improve the codes ability to perform large eddy simulations. The reduction in dissipation was accomplished through a hybridization of non-dissipative and dissipative discontinuity-capturing advection schemes that reduces numerical dissipation while maintaining the ability to capture shocks. A methodology for constructing hybrid-advection schemes that blends nondissipative fluxes consisting of linear combinations of divergence and product rule forms discretized using 4th-order symmetric operators, with dissipative, 3rd or 4th-order reconstruction based upwind flux schemes was developed and implemented. A series of benchmark problems with increasing spatial and fluid dynamical complexity were utilized to examine the ability of the candidate schemes to resolve and propagate structures typical of turbulent flow, their discontinuity capturing capability and their robustness. A realistic geometry typical of a high-speed propulsion system flowpath was computed using the most promising of the examined schemes and was compared with available experimental data to demonstrate simulation fidelity.

  18. Modifications to WRFs dynamical core to improve the treatment of moisture for large-eddy simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Heng; Endo, Satoshi; Wong, May; Skamarock, William C.; Klemp, Joseph B.; Fast, Jerome D.; Gustafson, Jr., William I.; Vogelmann, Andrew; Wang, Hailong; Liu, Yangang; Lin, Wuyin

    2015-10-29

    Yamaguchi and Feingold (2012) note that the cloud fields in their large-eddy simulations (LESs) of marine stratocumulus using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model exhibit a strong sensitivity to time stepping choices. In this study, we reproduce and analyze this sensitivity issue using two stratocumulus cases, one marine and one continental. Results show that (1) the sensitivity is associated with spurious motions near the moisture jump between the boundary layer and the free atmosphere, and (2) these spurious motions appear to arise from neglecting small variations in water vapor mixing ratio (qv) in the pressure gradient calculation in the acoustic sub-stepping portion of the integration procedure. We show that this issue is remedied in the WRF dynamical core by replacing the prognostic equation for the potential temperature θ with one for the moist potential temperature θm=θ(1+1.61qv), which allows consistent treatment of moisture in the calculation of pressure during the acoustic sub-steps. With this modification, the spurious motions and the sensitivity to the time stepping settings (i.e., the dynamic time step length and number of acoustic sub-steps) are eliminated in both of the example stratocumulus cases. In conclusion, this modification improves the applicability of WRF for LES applications, and possibly other models using similar dynamical core formulations, and also permits the use of longer time steps than in the original code.

  19. Large-eddy simulations of stratification layer erosion by a jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obabko, Aleksandr; Merzari, Elia; Tomboulides, Ananias; Aithal, Shashi; Fischer, Paul

    2014-11-01

    Following Fukushima disaster, the OECD/NEA has chosen the PANDA experiment for 2014 benchmark exercise where predictive capabilities of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools are tested for multispecies convection in notorious regime of transition from turbulent to laminar flow and from forced to natural convection. Accurate prediction of these phenomena will beneficial for a range of applications including reactor thermal-hydraulics where it will further our understanding of reactor behavior during accidents and help design safer and more efficient reactors for a carbon-free energy option. In fact, the convection and mixing flow in the containment played an important role in the Fukushima accident as the buoyant hydrogen gas mixed with oxygen and detonated resulting in significant destruction and radioactive pollution. Here we present the three-dimensional large-eddy (LES) simulations of the PANDA experiment with the spectral-element open-source code Nek5000. The results are compared and contrasted for a range of parameters using Boussinesq and low-Mach number approximations. Partially funded by DOE NE NEAMS Program and used ALCF resources supported by the DOE Office of Science under Contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  20. Large eddy simulation for atmospheric boundary layer flow over flat and complex terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yi; Stoellinger, Michael; Naughton, Jonathan

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we present Large Eddy Simulation (LES) results of atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) flow over complex terrain with neutral stratification using the OpenFOAM-based simulator for on/offshore wind farm applications (SOWFA). The complete work flow to investigate the LES for the ABL over real complex terrain is described including meteorological-tower data analysis, mesh generation and case set-up. New boundary conditions for the lateral and top boundaries are developed and validated to allow inflow and outflow as required in complex terrain simulations. The turbulent inflow data for the terrain simulation is generated using a precursor simulation of a flat and neutral ABL. Conditionally averaged met-tower data is used to specify the conditions for the flat precursor simulation and is also used for comparison with the simulation results of the terrain LES. A qualitative analysis of the simulation results reveals boundary layer separation and recirculation downstream of a prominent ridge that runs across the simulation domain. Comparisons of mean wind speed, standard deviation and direction between the computed results and the conditionally averaged tower data show a reasonable agreement.

  1. Large-eddy simulation of airflow and heat transfer in a general ward of hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Md. Farhad; Himika, Taasnim Ahmed; Molla, Md. Mamun

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, a very popular alternative computational technique, the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) has been used for Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) of airflow and heat transfer in general ward of hospital. Different Reynolds numbers have been used to study the airflow pattern. In LES, Smagorinsky turbulence model has been considered and a discussion has been conducted in brief. A code validation has been performed comparing the present results with benchmark results for lid-driven cavity problem and the results are found to agree very well. LBM is demonstrated through simulation in forced convection inside hospital ward with six beds with a partition in the middle, which acted like a wall. Changes in average rate of heat transfer in terms of average Nusselt numbers have also been recorded in tabular format and necessary comparison has been showed. It was found that partition narrowed the path for airflow and once the air overcame this barrier, it got free space and turbulence appeared. For higher turbulence, the average rate of heat transfer increased and patients near the turbulence zone released maximum heat and felt more comfortable.

  2. Large Eddy Simulation of the Effects of Plasma Actuation Strength on Film Cooling Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guozhan; Chen, Fu; Li, Linxi; Song, Yanping

    2016-11-01

    In this article, numerical investigation of the effects of different plasma actuation strengths on the film cooling flow characteristics has been conducted using large eddy simulation (LES). For this numerical research, the plasma actuator is placed downstream of the trailing edge of the film cooling hole and a phenomenological model is employed to provide the electric field generated by it, resulting in the body forces. Our results show that as the plasma actuation strength grows larger, under the downward effect of the plasma actuation, the jet trajectory near the cooling hole stays closer to the wall and the recirculation region observably reduces in size. Meanwhile, the momentum injection effect of the plasma actuation also actively alters the distributions of the velocity components downstream of the cooling hole. Consequently, the influence of the plasma actuation strength on the Reynolds stress downstream of the cooling hole is remarkable. Furthermore, the plasma actuation weakens the strength of the kidney shaped vortex and prevents the jet from lifting off the wall. Therefore, with the increase of the strength of the plasma actuation, the coolant core stays closer to the wall and tends to split into two distinct regions. So the centerline film cooling efficiency is enhanced, and it is increased by 55% at most when the plasma actuation strength is 10.

  3. Effect of stable stratification on dispersion within urban street canyons: A large-eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xian-Xiang; Britter, Rex; Norford, Leslie K.

    2016-11-01

    This study employs a validated large-eddy simulation (LES) code with high tempo-spatial resolution to investigate the effect of a stably stratified roughness sublayer (RSL) on scalar transport within an urban street canyon. The major effect of stable stratification on the flow and turbulence inside the street canyon is that the flow slows down in both streamwise and vertical directions, a stagnant area near the street level emerges, and the vertical transport of momentum is weakened. Consequently, the transfer of heat between the street canyon and overlying atmosphere also gets weaker. The pollutant emitted from the street level 'pools' within the lower street canyon, and more pollutant accumulates within the street canyon with increasing stability. Under stable stratification, the dominant mechanism for pollutant transport within the street canyon has changed from ejections (flow carries high-concentration pollutant upward) to unorganized motions (flow carries high-concentration pollutant downward), which is responsible for the much lower dispersion efficiency under stable stratifications.

  4. Quantifying turbulent wall shear stress in a subject specific human aorta using large eddy simulation.

    PubMed

    Lantz, Jonas; Gårdhagen, Roland; Karlsson, Matts

    2012-10-01

    In this study, large-eddy simulation (LES) is employed to calculate the disturbed flow field and the wall shear stress (WSS) in a subject specific human aorta. Velocity and geometry measurements using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are taken as input to the model to provide accurate boundary conditions and to assure the physiological relevance. In total, 50 consecutive cardiac cycles were simulated from which a phase average was computed to get a statistically reliable result. A decomposition similar to Reynolds decomposition is introduced, where the WSS signal is divided into a pulsating part (due to the mass flow rate) and a fluctuating part (originating from the disturbed flow). Oscillatory shear index (OSI) is plotted against time-averaged WSS in a novel way, and locations on the aortic wall where elevated values existed could easily be found. In general, high and oscillating WSS values were found in the vicinity of the branches in the aortic arch, while low and oscillating WSS were present in the inner curvature of the descending aorta. The decomposition of WSS into a pulsating and a fluctuating part increases the understanding of how WSS affects the aortic wall, which enables both qualitative and quantitative comparisons.

  5. Application of monotone integrated large eddy simulation to Rayleigh-Taylor mixing.

    PubMed

    Youngs, David L

    2009-07-28

    Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability occurs when a dense fluid rests on top of a light fluid in a gravitational field. It also occurs in an equivalent situation (in the absence of gravity) when an interface between fluids of different density is accelerated by a pressure gradient, e.g. in inertial confinement fusion implosions. Engineering models (Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes models) are needed to represent the effect of mixing in complex applications. However, large eddy simulation (LES) currently makes an essential contribution to understanding the mixing process and calibration or validation of the engineering models. In this paper, three cases are used to illustrate the current role of LES: (i) mixing at a plane boundary, (ii) break-up of a layer of dense fluid due to RT instability, and (iii) mixing in a simple spherical implosion. A monotone integrated LES approach is preferred because of the need to treat discontinuities in the flow, i.e. the initial density discontinuities or shock waves. Of particular interest is the influence of initial conditions and how this needs to be allowed for in engineering modelling. It is argued that loss of memory of the initial conditions is unlikely to occur in practical applications.

  6. Dynamic dose assessment by Large Eddy Simulation of the near-range atmospheric dispersion.

    PubMed

    Vervecken, Lieven; Camps, Johan; Meyers, Johan

    2015-03-01

    In order to improve the simulation of the near-range atmospheric dispersion of radionuclides, computational fluid dynamics is becoming increasingly popular. In the current study, Large-Eddy Simulation is used to examine the time-evolution of the turbulent dispersion of radioactive gases in the atmospheric boundary layer, and it is coupled to a gamma dose rate model that is based on the point-kernel method with buildup factors. In this way, the variability of radiological dose rate from cloud shine due to instantaneous turbulent mixing processes can be evaluated. The steady release in an open field of (41)Ar and (133)Xe for 4 different release heights is studied, thus covering radionuclides that decay with a high-energy gamma and a low-energy gamma, respectively. Based on these simulations, the variability of dose rates at ground level for different averaging times in the dose measurements is analyzed. It is observed that turbulent variability in the wind field can lead to dose estimates that are underestimated by up to a factor of four when conventional long-term measurements are used to estimate the dose from short-term exposures.

  7. Large eddy simulation of flows in industrial compressors: a path from 2015 to 2035.

    PubMed

    Gourdain, N; Sicot, F; Duchaine, F; Gicquel, L

    2014-08-13

    A better understanding of turbulent unsteady flows is a necessary step towards a breakthrough in the design of modern compressors. Owing to high Reynolds numbers and very complex geometry, the flow that develops in such industrial machines is extremely hard to predict. At this time, the most popular method to simulate these flows is still based on a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes approach. However, there is some evidence that this formalism is not accurate for these components, especially when a description of time-dependent turbulent flows is desired. With the increase in computing power, large eddy simulation (LES) emerges as a promising technique to improve both knowledge of complex physics and reliability of flow solver predictions. The objective of the paper is thus to give an overview of the current status of LES for industrial compressor flows as well as to propose future research axes regarding the use of LES for compressor design. While the use of wall-resolved LES for industrial multistage compressors at realistic Reynolds number should not be ready before 2035, some possibilities exist to reduce the cost of LES, such as wall modelling and the adaptation of the phase-lag condition. This paper also points out the necessity to combine LES to techniques able to tackle complex geometries. Indeed LES alone, i.e. without prior knowledge of such flows for grid construction or the prohibitive yet ideal use of fully homogeneous meshes to predict compressor flows, is quite limited today.

  8. Large eddy simulation of LDL surface concentration in a subject specific human aorta.

    PubMed

    Lantz, Jonas; Karlsson, Matts

    2012-02-02

    The development of atherosclerosis is correlated to the accumulation of lipids in the arterial wall, which, in turn, may be caused by the build-up of low-density lipoproteins (LDL) on the arterial surface. The goal of this study was to model blood flow within a subject specific human aorta, and to study how the LDL surface concentration changed during a cardiac cycle. With measured velocity profiles as boundary conditions, a scale-resolving technique (large eddy simulation, LES) was used to compute the pulsatile blood flow that was in the transitional regime. The relationship between wall shear stress (WSS) and LDL surface concentration was investigated, and it was found that the accumulation of LDL correlated well with WSS. In general, regions of low WSS corresponded to regions of increased LDL concentration and vice versa. The instantaneous LDL values changed significantly during a cardiac cycle; during systole the surface concentration was low due to increased convective fluid transport, while in diastole there was an increased accumulation of LDL on the surface. Therefore, the near-wall velocity was investigated at four representative locations, and it was concluded that in regions with disturbed flow the LDL concentration had significant temporal changes, indicating that LDL accumulation is sensitive to not only the WSS but also near-wall flow.

  9. Large eddy simulation of a stenosed artery using a femoral artery pulsatile flow profile.

    PubMed

    Barber, Tracie J; Simmons, Anne

    2011-07-01

    Computational fluid dynamics simulation of stenosed arteries allows the analysis of quantities including wall shear stress, velocity, and pressure; detailed in vivo measurement is difficult yet the analysis of the fluid dynamics related to stenosis is important in understanding the likely causes and ongoing effects on the integrity of the vessel. In this study, a three-dimensional Large Eddy Simulation is conducted of a 50% occluded vessel, with a typical femoral artery profile used as the transient inlet conditions. The fluid is assumed to be homogenous, Newtonian and incompressible and the walls are assumed rigid. The stenosis is axisymmetric, however the three-dimensional study allows for a flow field that is not axisymmetric and results show significant three-dimensionality. High values of wall shear stress and oscillatory values of wall shear stress (varying in both space time) are observed. The results of the study give insight into the time-varying flow structures for a mildly stenosed artery and indicate that three-dimensional simulations may be important to gain a complete understanding of the flow field.

  10. Numerical analysis of blood flow through an elliptic stenosis using large eddy simulation.

    PubMed

    Jabir, E; Lal, S Anil

    2016-08-01

    The presence of a stenosis caused by the abnormal narrowing of the lumen in the artery tree can cause significant variations in flow parameters of blood. The original flow, which is believed to be laminar in most situations, may turn out to turbulent by the geometric perturbation created by the stenosis. Flow may evolve to fully turbulent or it may relaminarise back according to the intensity of the perturbation. This article reports the numerical simulation of flow through an eccentrically located asymmetric stenosis having elliptical cross section using computational fluid dynamics. Large eddy simulation technique using dynamic Smagorinsky sub-grid scale model is applied to capture the turbulent features of flow. Analysis is carried out for two situations: steady inflow as ideal condition and pulsatile inflow corresponding to the actual physiological condition in common carotid artery. The spatially varying pulsatile inflow waveforms are mathematically derived from instantaneous mass flow measurements available in the literature. Carreau viscosity model is used to estimate the effect of non-Newtonian nature of blood. The present simulations for steady and pulsatile conditions show that post-stenotic flow field undergoes transition to turbulence in all cases. The characteristics of mean and turbulent flow fields have been presented and discussed in detail.

  11. Large eddy simulation of bluff body stabilized premixed and partially premixed combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porumbel, Ionut

    Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of bluff body stabilized premixed and partially premixed combustion close to the flammability limit is carried out in this thesis. The main goal of the thesis is the study of the equivalence ratio effect on flame stability and dynamics in premixed and partially premixed flames. An LES numerical algorithm able to handle the entire range of combustion regimes and equivalence ratios is developed for this purpose. The algorithm has no ad-hoc adjustable model parameters and is able to respond automatically to variations in the inflow conditions, without user intervention. Algorithm validation is achieved by conducting LES of reactive and non-reactive flow. Comparison with experimental data shows good agreement for both mean and unsteady flow properties. In the reactive flow, two scalar closure models, Eddy Break-Up (EBULES) and Linear Eddy Mixing (LEMLES), are used and compared. Over important regions, the flame lies in the Broken Reaction Zone regime. Here, the EBU model assumptions fail. In LEMLES, the reaction-diffusion equation is not filtered, but resolved on a linear domain and the model maintains validity. The flame thickness predicted by LEMLES is smaller and the flame is faster to respond to turbulent fluctuations, resulting in a more significant wrinkling of the flame surface when compared to EBULES. As a result, LEMLES captures better the subtle effects of the flame-turbulence interaction, the flame structure shows higher complexity, and the far field spreading of the wake is closer to the experimental observations. Three premixed (φ = 0.6, 0.65, and 0.75) cases are simulated. As expected, for the leaner case (φ = 0.6) the flame temperature is lower, the heat release is reduced and vorticity is stronger. As a result, the flame in this case is found to be unstable. In the rich case (φ = 0.75), the flame temperature is higher, and the spreading rate of the wake is increased due to the higher amount of heat release. The ignition

  12. A Year-Long Large-Eddy Simulation of the Weather over the Cabauw Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebesma, P.

    2015-12-01

    Results are presented of two large-eddy simulation (LES) runs of the entire year 2012 centered at the Cabauw observational supersite in the Netherlands. The LES is coupled to a regional weather model that provides the large-scale information. The simulations provide three-dimensional continuous time series of LES-generated turbulence and clouds, which can be compared in detail to the extensive observational dataset of Cabauw. The LES dataset is available from the authors on request. This type of LES setup has a number of advantages. First, it can provide a more statistical approach to the study of turbulent atmospheric flow than the more common case studies, since a diverse but representative set of conditions is covered, including numerous transitions. This has advantages in the design and evaluation of parameterizations. Second, the setup can provide valuable information on the quality of the LES model when applied to such a wide range of conditions. Last, it also provides the possibility to emulate observation techniques. This might help detect limitations and potential problems of a variety of measurement techniques. The LES runs are evaluated through a comparison with observations from the observational supersite and with results from the ''parent'' large-scale model. The long time series that are generated, in combination with information on the spatial structure, provide a novel opportunity to study time scales ranging from seconds to seasons. This facilitates a study of the power spectrum of horizontal and vertical wind speed variance to identify the dominant variance-containing time scales.

  13. Discontinuous Galerkin methodology for Large-Eddy Simulations of wind turbine airfoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frére, A.; Sørensen, N. N.; Hillewaert, K.; Winckelmans, G.

    2016-09-01

    This paper aims at evaluating the potential of the Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) methodology for Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) of wind turbine airfoils. The DG method has shown high accuracy, excellent scalability and capacity to handle unstructured meshes. It is however not used in the wind energy sector yet. The present study aims at evaluating this methodology on an application which is relevant for that sector and focuses on blade section aerodynamics characterization. To be pertinent for large wind turbines, the simulations would need to be at low Mach numbers (M ≤ 0.3) where compressible approaches are often limited and at large Reynolds numbers (Re ≥ 106) where wall-resolved LES is still unaffordable. At these high Re, a wall-modeled LES (WMLES) approach is thus required. In order to first validate the LES methodology, before the WMLES approach, this study presents airfoil flow simulations at low and high Reynolds numbers and compares the results to state-of-the-art models used in industry, namely the panel method (XFOIL with boundary layer modeling) and Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS). At low Reynolds number (Re = 6 x 104), involving laminar boundary layer separation and transition in the detached shear layer, the Eppler 387 airfoil is studied at two angles of attack. The LES results agree slightly better with the experimental chordwise pressure distribution than both XFOIL and RANS results. At high Reynolds number (Re = 1.64 x 106), the NACA4412 airfoil is studied close to stall condition. In this case, although the wall model approach used for the WMLES is very basic and not supposed to handle separation nor adverse pressure gradients, all three methods provide equivalent accuracy on averaged quantities. The present work is hence considered as a strong step forward in the use of LES at high Reynolds numbers.

  14. New near-wall models with dynamic subgrid scale closure for large eddy simulation in curvilinear coordinates for complex geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsamian, Hagop Raffi

    2000-10-01

    This dissertation presents modifications and improvements to the dynamic subgrid scale model and introduces a new wall model. These are applied to the large eddy simulation technique in curvilinear coordinates. They are then validated and tested in three-dimensional complex geometries. The large eddy simulation method captures many scales of turbulence up to the grid size. A closure model is used to simulate subgrid turbulence. The Smagorinsky and dynamic subgrid models are presented and tested. The dynamic model overcomes many of the deficiencies of the Smagorinsky subgrid scale model. Spatial and temporal low-pass filters have been introduced in the dynamic subgrid scale model for numerical stability. No practical differences have been observed between the Smagorinsky and dynamic models. Several near-wall models are considered for the large eddy simulation technique. A local averaging technique makes these models applicable to complex geometries. A new model is introduced which overcomes planar averaging near the wall and captures ejection and sweep effects. Special treatment of inlet boundary conditions was introduced. These models have been implemented in a large eddy simulation computer program that uses a strongly conservative curvilinear coordinate formulation. The covariant projections are used as the dependent variables in a staggered methodology. The body fitted grids are advantageous in complex geometry descriptions. Results are validated in a lid driven cavity flow at Reynolds number of 10000. A single tube in a channel is simulated to show the applicability of the models to complex geometries with attachment and separation as well as end-wall effects. The shedding effect was captured and turbulence characteristics were acceptable. One million nodes were used in a large eddy simulation of a three-dimensional tube bundle at Reynolds number of 21700. Results are presented in the form of visualization and compared with available experimental data. The

  15. Coupled large-eddy simulation and morphodynamics of a large-scale river under extreme flood conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosronejad, Ali; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Stony Brook University Team

    2016-11-01

    We present a coupled flow and morphodynamic simulations of extreme flooding in 3 km long and 300 m wide reach of the Mississippi River in Minnesota, which includes three islands and hydraulic structures. We employ the large-eddy simulation (LES) and bed-morphodynamic modules of the VFS-Geophysics model to investigate the flow and bed evolution of the river during a 500 year flood. The coupling of the two modules is carried out via a fluid-structure interaction approach using a nested domain approach to enhance the resolution of bridge scour predictions. The geometrical data of the river, islands and structures are obtained from LiDAR, sub-aqueous sonar and in-situ surveying to construct a digital map of the river bathymetry. Our simulation results for the bed evolution of the river reveal complex sediment dynamics near the hydraulic structures. The numerically captured scour depth near some of the structures reach a maximum of about 10 m. The data-driven simulation strategy we present in this work exemplifies a practical simulation-based-engineering-approach to investigate the resilience of infrastructures to extreme flood events in intricate field-scale riverine systems. This work was funded by a Grant from Minnesota Dept. of Transportation.

  16. Large-Eddy Simulation of the Flat-plate Turbulent Boundary Layer at High Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Michio

    The near-wall, subgrid-scale (SGS) model [Chung and Pullin, "Large-eddy simulation and wall-modeling of turbulent channel flow'', J. Fluid Mech. 631, 281--309 (2009)] is used to perform large-eddy simulations (LES) of the incompressible developing, smooth-wall, flat-plate turbulent boundary layer. In this model, the stretched-vortex, SGS closure is utilized in conjunction with a tailored, near-wall model designed to incorporate anisotropic vorticity scales in the presence of the wall. The composite SGS-wall model is presently incorporated into a computer code suitable for the LES of developing flat-plate boundary layers. This is then used to study several aspects of zero- and adverse-pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers. First, LES of the zero-pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer are performed at Reynolds numbers Retheta based on the free-stream velocity and the momentum thickness in the range Retheta = 103-1012. Results include the inverse skin friction coefficient, 2/Cf , velocity profiles, the shape factor H, the Karman "constant", and the Coles wake factor as functions of Re theta. Comparisons with some direct numerical simulation (DNS) and experiment are made, including turbulent intensity data from atmospheric-layer measurements at Retheta = O (106). At extremely large Retheta , the empirical Coles-Fernholz relation for skin-friction coefficient provides a reasonable representation of the LES predictions. While the present LES methodology cannot of itself probe the structure of the near-wall region, the present results show turbulence intensities that scale on the wall-friction velocity and on the Clauser length scale over almost all of the outer boundary layer. It is argued that the LES is suggestive of the asymptotic, infinite Reynolds-number limit for the smooth-wall turbulent boundary layer and different ways in which this limit can be approached are discussed. The maximum Retheta of the present simulations appears to be limited by machine

  17. Assessment of large-eddy simulation in capturing preferential concentration of heavy particles in isotropic turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Guodong; Zhang, Jian; He, Guo-Wei; Wang, Lian-Ping

    2010-12-01

    Particle-laden turbulent flow is a typical non-equilibrium process characterized by particle relaxation time τp and the characteristic timescale of the flows τf, in which the turbulent mixing of heavy particles is related to different scales of fluid motions. The preferential concentration (PC) of heavy particles could be strongly affected by fluid motion at dissipation-range scales, which presents a major challenge to the large-eddy simulation (LES) approach. The errors in simulated PC by LES are due to both filtering and the subgrid scale (SGS) eddy viscosity model. The former leads to the removal of the SGS motion and the latter usually results in a more spatiotemporally correlated vorticity field. The dependence of these two factors on the flow Reynolds number is assessed using a priori and a posteriori tests, respectively. The results suggest that filtering is the dominant factor for the under-prediction of the PC for Stokes numbers less than 1, while the SGS eddy viscosity model is the dominant factor for the over-prediction of the PC for Stokes numbers between 1 and 10. The effects of the SGS eddy viscosity model on the PC decrease as the Reynolds number and Stokes number increase. LES can well predict the PC for particle Stokes numbers larger than 10. An SGS model for particles with small and intermediate Stokes numbers is needed to account for the effects of the removed SGS turbulent motion on the PC.

  18. Large eddy simulation for evaluating scale-aware subgrid cloud parameterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Chen, Baode; Bao, Jian-Wen

    2016-04-01

    We present results from an ongoing project that uses a Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) model to simulate deep organized convection in the extratropics for the purpose of evaluating scale-aware subgrid convective parameterizations. The simulation is carried out for a classical idealized supercell thunderstorm (Weisman and Klemp, 1982), using a total of 1201 × 1201 × 200 grid points at 100 m spacing in both the horizontal and vertical directions. The characteristics of simulated clouds exhibit a multi-mode vertical distribution ranging from deep to shallow clouds, which is similar to that observed in the real world. To use the LES dataset for evaluating scale-aware subgrid cloud parameterizations, the same case is also run with progressively larger grid sizes of 200 m, 400 m, 600 m, 1 km and 3 km. These simulations show a reasonable agreement with the benchmark LES in statistics such as convective available potential energy, convective inhibition, cloud fraction and precipitation rates. They provide useful information about the effect of horizontal grid resolution on the subgrid convective parameterizations. All these simulations reveal a similar multi-mode cloud distribution in the vertical direction. However, there are differences in the updraft-core cloud statistics, and convergence of statistical properties is found only between the LES benchmark and the simulation with grid size smaller than 400 m. Analysis of the LES results indicates that (1) the average subgrid mass flux increases as the horizontal grid size increases; (2) the vertical scale of subgrid transport varies spatially, suggesting a system dependence; and (3) at even 1 km, sub-grid convective transport is still large enough to be accounted for through parameterization.

  19. Wall-resolved large-eddy simulation of flow past a circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, W.; Pullin, D. I.; Samtaney, R.

    2016-11-01

    Wall-resolved large-eddy simulations (LES) about a smooth-walled circular cylinder are described over a range of Reynolds number from ReD = 3 . 9 ×103 (subcritical) to above the drag crisis, ReD = 8 . 5 ×105 (supercritical), where D is the cylinder diameter. The span-wise domain is 3 D for ReD <=105 and D otherwise. The numerical method is a fourth-order finite-difference discretization on a standard curvilinear O-grid. The stretched-vortex sub-grid scale model is used in the whole domain, including regions of large-scale separated flow. For ReD <=105 , calculations of the skin-friction coefficient versus polar angle θ along the cylinder surface and its dependence on ReD are well captured in comparison with experimental data. Proper separation behavior is observed. For high ReD , a fine mesh 8192 × 1024 × 256 is used. It is found that a blowing/suction-type perturbation of the wall-normal velocity along a span-wise strip, with angular position at θ = 50 -60o , is then required in order to produce flow separation in accordance with experiment at Reynolds numbers in the drag-crisis regime. Results presented will focus on the skin-friction behavior and details of flow separation. Supported partially by KAUST OCRF Award No. URF/1/1394-01 and partially by NSF award CBET 1235605. The Cray XC40, Shaheen, at KAUST was utilized for all simulations.

  20. Multiblock High Order Large Eddy Simulation of Powered Fontan Hemodynamics: Towards Computational Surgery.

    PubMed

    Delorme, Yann T; Rodefeld, Mark D; Frankel, Steven H

    2017-01-17

    Children born with only one functional ventricle must typically undergo a series of three surgeries to obtain the so-called Fontan circulation in which the blood coming from the body passively flows from the Vena Cavae (VCs) to the Pulmonary Arteries (PAs) through the Total Cavopulmonary Connection (TCPC). The circulation is inherently inefficient due to the lack of a subpulmonary ventricle. Survivors face the risk of circulatory sequelae and eventual failure for the duration of their lives. Current efforts are focused on improving the outcomes of Fontan palliation, either passively by optimizing the TCPC, or actively by using mechanical support. We are working on a chronic implant that would be placed at the junction of the TCPC, and would provide the necessary pressure augmentation to re-establish a circulation that recapitulates a normal two-ventricle circulation. This implant is based on the Von Karman viscous pump and consists of a vaned impeller that rotates inside the TCPC. To evaluate the performance of such a device, and to study the flow features induced by the presence of the pump, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is used. CFD has become an important tool to understand hemodynamics owing to the possibility of simulating quickly a large number of designs and flow conditions without any harm for patients. The transitional and unsteady nature of the flow can make accurate simulations challenging. We developed and in-house high order Large Eddy Simulation (LES) solver coupled to a recent Immersed Boundary Method (IBM) to handle complex geometries. Multiblock capability is added to the solver to allow for efficient simulations of complex patient specific geometries. Blood simulations are performed in a complex patient specific TCPC geometry. In this study, simulations without mechanical assist are performed, as well as after virtual implantation of the temporary and chronic implants being developed. Instantaneous flow structures, hepatic factor distribution

  1. Large eddy simulations of a transcritical round jet submitted to transverse acoustic modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Flesca, M.; Schmitt, T.; Ducruix, S.; Candel, S.

    2016-05-15

    This article reports numerical computations of a turbulent round jet of transcritical fluid (low temperature nitrogen injected under high pressure conditions) surrounded by the same fluid at rest under supercritical conditions (high temperature and high pressure) and submitted to transverse acoustic modulations. The numerical framework relies on large eddy simulation in combination with a real-gas description of thermodynamics and transport properties. A stationary acoustic field is obtained by modulating the normal acoustic velocity at the lateral boundaries of the computational domain. This study specifically focuses on the interaction of the jet with the acoustic field to investigate how the round transcritical jet changes its shape and mixes with the surrounding fluid. Different modulation amplitudes and frequencies are used to sweep a range of conditions. When the acoustic field is established in the domain, the jet length is notably reduced and the jet is flattened in the spanwise direction. Two regimes of oscillation are identified: for low Strouhal numbers a large amplitude motion is observed, while for higher Strouhal numbers the jet oscillates with a small amplitude around the injector axis. The minimum length is obtained for a Strouhal number of 0.3 and the jet length increases with increasing Strouhal numbers after reaching this minimum value. The mechanism of spanwise deformation is shown to be linked with dynamical effects resulting from reduction of the pressure in the transverse direction in relation with increased velocities on the two sides of the jet. A propagative wave is then introduced in the domain leading to similar effects on the jet, except that a bending is also observed in the acoustic propagation direction. A kinematic model, combining hydrodynamic and acoustic contributions, is derived in a second stage to represent the motion of the jet centerline. This model captures details of the numerical simulations quite well. These various

  2. Wake meandering statistics of a model wind turbine: Insights gained by large eddy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foti, Daniel; Yang, Xiaolei; Guala, Michele; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2016-08-01

    Wind tunnel measurements in the wake of an axial flow miniature wind turbine provide evidence of large-scale motions characteristic of wake meandering [Howard et al., Phys. Fluids 27, 075103 (2015), 10.1063/1.4923334]. A numerical investigation of the wake, using immersed boundary large eddy simulations able to account for all geometrical details of the model wind turbine, is presented here to elucidate the three-dimensional structure of the wake and the mechanisms controlling near and far wake instabilities. Similar to the findings of Kang et al. [Kang et al., J. Fluid Mech. 744, 376 (2014), 10.1017/jfm.2014.82], an energetic coherent helical hub vortex is found to form behind the turbine nacelle, which expands radially outward downstream of the turbine and ultimately interacts with the turbine tip shear layer. Starting from the wake meandering filtering used by Howard et al., a three-dimensional spatiotemporal filtering process is developed to reconstruct a three-dimensional meandering profile in the wake of the turbine. The counterwinding hub vortex undergoes a spiral vortex breakdown and the rotational component of the hub vortex persists downstream, contributing to the rotational direction of the wake meandering. Statistical characteristics of the wake meandering profile, along with triple decomposition of the flow field separating the coherent and incoherent turbulent fluctuations, are used to delineate the near and far wake flow structures and their interactions. In the near wake, the nacelle leads to mostly incoherent turbulence, while in the far wake, turbulent coherent structures, especially the azimuthal velocity component, dominate the flow field.

  3. Spatial large-eddy simulations of contrail formation in the wake of an airliner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paoli, R.

    2015-12-01

    Contrails and contrail-cirrus are the most uncertain contributors to aviation radiative forcing. In order to reduce this uncertainty one needs to gain more knowledge on the physicochemical processes occurring in the aircraft plume, which eventually lead to the transformation of contrails into cirrus. To that end, the accurate prediction of the number of activated particles and their spatial and size distributions at the end of the jet regime may be helpful to initialize simulations in the following vortex regime. We present the results from spatial large-eddy simulations (LES) of contrail formation in the near-field wake of a generic (but full-scale) airliner that is representative of those used in long-haul flights in current fleets. The flow around the aircraft has been computed using a RANS code taking into account the full geometry that include the engines and the aerodynamic set-up for cruise conditions. The data have been reconstructed at a plane closely behind the trailing edge of the wing and used as inflow boundary conditions for the LES. We employ fully compressible 3D LES coupled to Lagrangian microphysical module that tracks parcels of ice particles individually. The ice microphysical model is simple yet it contains the basic thermodynamic ingredients to model soot activation and water vapor deposition. Compared to one-dimensional models or even RANS, LES allow for more accurate predictions of the mixing between exhaust and ambient air. Hence, the number of activated particles and the ice growth rate can be also determined with higher accuracy. This is particularly crucial for particles located at the edge of the jet that experience large gradients of temperature and humidity. The results of the fully coupled LES (where the gas phase and the particles are solved together) are compared to offline simulations where the ice microphysics model is run using thermodynamic data from pre-calculated particle trajectories extracted from inert LES (where ice

  4. Numerics and subgrid-scale modeling in large eddy simulations of stratocumulus clouds.

    PubMed

    Pressel, Kyle G; Mishra, Siddhartha; Schneider, Tapio; Kaul, Colleen M; Tan, Zhihong

    2017-06-01

    Stratocumulus clouds are the most common type of boundary layer cloud; their radiative effects strongly modulate climate. Large eddy simulations (LES) of stratocumulus clouds often struggle to maintain fidelity to observations because of the sharp gradients occurring at the entrainment interfacial layer at the cloud top. The challenge posed to LES by stratocumulus clouds is evident in the wide range of solutions found in the LES intercomparison based on the DYCOMS-II field campaign, where simulated liquid water paths for identical initial and boundary conditions varied by a factor of nearly 12. Here we revisit the DYCOMS-II RF01 case and show that the wide range of previous LES results can be realized in a single LES code by varying only the numerical treatment of the equations of motion and the nature of subgrid-scale (SGS) closures. The simulations that maintain the greatest fidelity to DYCOMS-II observations are identified. The results show that using weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) numerics for all resolved advective terms and no explicit SGS closure consistently produces the highest-fidelity simulations. This suggests that the numerical dissipation inherent in WENO schemes functions as a high-quality, implicit SGS closure for this stratocumulus case. Conversely, using oscillatory centered difference numerical schemes for momentum advection, WENO numerics for scalars, and explicitly modeled SGS fluxes consistently produces the lowest-fidelity simulations. We attribute this to the production of anomalously large SGS fluxes near the cloud tops through the interaction of numerical error in the momentum field with the scalar SGS model.

  5. Large Eddy Simulation of Aircraft Wake Vortices in a Homogeneous Atmospheric Turbulence: Vortex Decay and Descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Jongil; Lin, Yuh-Lang; Arya, S. Pal; Proctor, Fred H.

    1999-01-01

    The effects of ambient turbulence on decay and descent of aircraft wake vortices are studied using a validated, three-dimensional: large-eddy simulation model. Numerical simulations are performed in order to isolate the effect of ambient turbulence on the wake vortex decay rate within a neutrally-stratified atmosphere. Simulations are conducted for a range of turbulence intensities, by injecting wake vortex pairs into an approximately homogeneous and isotropic turbulence field. The decay rate of the vortex circulation increases clearly with increasing ambient turbulence level, which is consistent with field observations. Based on the results from the numerical simulations, simple decay models are proposed as functions of dimensionless ambient turbulence intensity (eta) and dimensionless time (T) for the circulation averaged over a range of radial distances. With good agreement with the numerical results, a Gaussian type of vortex decay model is proposed for weak turbulence: while an exponential type of Tortex decay model can be applied for strong turbulence. A relationship for the vortex descent based on above vortex decay model is also proposed. Although the proposed models are based on simulations assuming neutral stratification, the model predictions are compared to Lidar vortex measurements observed during stable, neutral, and unstable atmospheric conditions. In the neutral and unstable atmosphere, the model predictions appear to be in reasonable agreement with the observational data, while in the stably-stratified atmosphere, they largely underestimate the observed circulation decay with consistent overestimation of the observed vortex descent. The underestimation of vortex decay during stably-stratified conditions suggests that stratification has an important influence on vortex decay when ambient levels of turbulence are weak.

  6. Numerics and subgrid‐scale modeling in large eddy simulations of stratocumulus clouds

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Siddhartha; Schneider, Tapio; Kaul, Colleen M.; Tan, Zhihong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Stratocumulus clouds are the most common type of boundary layer cloud; their radiative effects strongly modulate climate. Large eddy simulations (LES) of stratocumulus clouds often struggle to maintain fidelity to observations because of the sharp gradients occurring at the entrainment interfacial layer at the cloud top. The challenge posed to LES by stratocumulus clouds is evident in the wide range of solutions found in the LES intercomparison based on the DYCOMS‐II field campaign, where simulated liquid water paths for identical initial and boundary conditions varied by a factor of nearly 12. Here we revisit the DYCOMS‐II RF01 case and show that the wide range of previous LES results can be realized in a single LES code by varying only the numerical treatment of the equations of motion and the nature of subgrid‐scale (SGS) closures. The simulations that maintain the greatest fidelity to DYCOMS‐II observations are identified. The results show that using weighted essentially non‐oscillatory (WENO) numerics for all resolved advective terms and no explicit SGS closure consistently produces the highest‐fidelity simulations. This suggests that the numerical dissipation inherent in WENO schemes functions as a high‐quality, implicit SGS closure for this stratocumulus case. Conversely, using oscillatory centered difference numerical schemes for momentum advection, WENO numerics for scalars, and explicitly modeled SGS fluxes consistently produces the lowest‐fidelity simulations. We attribute this to the production of anomalously large SGS fluxes near the cloud tops through the interaction of numerical error in the momentum field with the scalar SGS model. PMID:28943997

  7. Large eddy simulations of a transcritical round jet submitted to transverse acoustic modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Flesca, M.; Schmitt, T.; Ducruix, S.; Candel, S.

    2016-05-01

    This article reports numerical computations of a turbulent round jet of transcritical fluid (low temperature nitrogen injected under high pressure conditions) surrounded by the same fluid at rest under supercritical conditions (high temperature and high pressure) and submitted to transverse acoustic modulations. The numerical framework relies on large eddy simulation in combination with a real-gas description of thermodynamics and transport properties. A stationary acoustic field is obtained by modulating the normal acoustic velocity at the lateral boundaries of the computational domain. This study specifically focuses on the interaction of the jet with the acoustic field to investigate how the round transcritical jet changes its shape and mixes with the surrounding fluid. Different modulation amplitudes and frequencies are used to sweep a range of conditions. When the acoustic field is established in the domain, the jet length is notably reduced and the jet is flattened in the spanwise direction. Two regimes of oscillation are identified: for low Strouhal numbers a large amplitude motion is observed, while for higher Strouhal numbers the jet oscillates with a small amplitude around the injector axis. The minimum length is obtained for a Strouhal number of 0.3 and the jet length increases with increasing Strouhal numbers after reaching this minimum value. The mechanism of spanwise deformation is shown to be linked with dynamical effects resulting from reduction of the pressure in the transverse direction in relation with increased velocities on the two sides of the jet. A propagative wave is then introduced in the domain leading to similar effects on the jet, except that a bending is also observed in the acoustic propagation direction. A kinematic model, combining hydrodynamic and acoustic contributions, is derived in a second stage to represent the motion of the jet centerline. This model captures details of the numerical simulations quite well. These various

  8. Large Eddy Simulation and Field Experiments of Pollen Transport in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamecki, M.; Meneveau, C.; Parlange, M. B.; van Hout, R.

    2006-12-01

    Dispersion of airborne pollen by the wind has been a subject of interest for botanists and allergists for a long time. More recently, the development of genetically modified crops and questions about cross-pollination and subsequent contamination of natural plant populations has brought even more interest to this field. A critical question is how far from the source field pollen grains will be advected. Clearly the answer depends on the aerodynamic properties of the pollen, geometrical properties of the field, topography, local vegetation, wind conditions, atmospheric stability, etc. As a consequence, field experiments are well suited to provide some information on pollen transport mechanisms but are limited to specific field and weather conditions. Numerical simulations do not have this drawback and can be a useful tool to study pollen dispersal in a variety of configurations. It is well known that the dispersion of particles in turbulent fields is strongly affected by the large scale coherent structures. Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is a technique that allows us to study the typical distances reached by pollen grains and, at the same time, resolve the larger coherent structures present in the atmospheric boundary layer. The main objective of this work is to simulate the dispersal of pollen grains in the atmospheric surface layer using LES. Pollen concentrations are simulated by an advection-diffusion equation including gravitational settling. Of extreme importance is the specification of the bottom boundary conditions characterizing the pollen source over the canopy and the deposition process everywhere else. In both cases we make use of the theoretical profile for suspended particles derived by Kind (1992). Field experiments were performed to study the applicability of the theoretical profile to pollen grains and the results are encouraging. Airborne concentrations as well as ground deposition from the simulations are compared to experimental data to validate the

  9. An immersed boundary method for direct and large eddy simulation of stratified flows in complex geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapaka, Narsimha R.; Sarkar, Sutanu

    2016-10-01

    A sharp-interface Immersed Boundary Method (IBM) is developed to simulate density-stratified turbulent flows in complex geometry using a Cartesian grid. The basic numerical scheme corresponds to a central second-order finite difference method, third-order Runge-Kutta integration in time for the advective terms and an alternating direction implicit (ADI) scheme for the viscous and diffusive terms. The solver developed here allows for both direct numerical simulation (DNS) and large eddy simulation (LES) approaches. Methods to enhance the mass conservation and numerical stability of the solver to simulate high Reynolds number flows are discussed. Convergence with second-order accuracy is demonstrated in flow past a cylinder. The solver is validated against past laboratory and numerical results in flow past a sphere, and in channel flow with and without stratification. Since topographically generated internal waves are believed to result in a substantial fraction of turbulent mixing in the ocean, we are motivated to examine oscillating tidal flow over a triangular obstacle to assess the ability of this computational model to represent nonlinear internal waves and turbulence. Results in laboratory-scale (order of few meters) simulations show that the wave energy flux, mean flow properties and turbulent kinetic energy agree well with our previous results obtained using a body-fitted grid (BFG). The deviation of IBM results from BFG results is found to increase with increasing nonlinearity in the wave field that is associated with either increasing steepness of the topography relative to the internal wave propagation angle or with the amplitude of the oscillatory forcing. LES is performed on a large scale ridge, of the order of few kilometers in length, that has the same geometrical shape and same non-dimensional values for the governing flow and environmental parameters as the laboratory-scale topography, but significantly larger Reynolds number. A non-linear drag law

  10. Large-eddy simulations of wind farm production and long distance wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, O.; Nilsson, K.; Breton, S.-P.; Ivanell, S.

    2015-06-01

    The future development of offshore wind power will include many wind farms built in the same areas. It is known that wind farms produce long distance wakes, which means that we will see more occasions of farm to farm interaction, namely one wind farm operating in the wake of another wind farm. This study investigates how to perform accurate power predictions on large wind farms and how to assess the long distance wakes generated by these farms. The focus of this paper is the production's and wake's sensitivity to the extension of the grid as well as the turbulence when using Large-eddy simulations (LES) with pregenerated Mann turbulence. The aim is to determine an optimal grid which minimizes blockage effects and ensures constant resolution in the entire wake region at the lowest computational cost. The simulations are first performed in the absence of wind turbines in order to assess how the atmospheric turbulence and wind profile are evolving downstream (up to 12,000 m behind the position where the turbulence is imposed). In the second step, 10 turbines are added in the domain (using an actuator disc method) and their production is analyzed alongside the mean velocities in the domain. The blockage effects are tested using grids with different vertical extents. An equidistant region is used in order to ensure high resolution in the wake region. The importance of covering the entire wake structure inside the equidistant region is analyzed by decreasing the size of this region. In this step, the importance of the lateral size of the Mann turbulence box is also analyzed. In the results it can be seen that the flow is acceptably preserved through the empty domain if a larger turbulence box is used. The relative production is increased (due to blockage effects) for the last turbines using a smaller vertical domain, increased for a lower or narrower equidistant region (due to the smearing of the wake in the stretched area) and decreased when using a smaller turbulence

  11. Large eddy simulation of a large wind-turbine array in a conventionally neutral atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allaerts, Dries; Meyers, Johan

    2015-06-01

    Under conventionally neutral conditions, the boundary layer is frequently capped by an inversion layer, which counteracts vertical entrainment of kinetic energy. Very large wind farms are known to depend on vertical entrainment to transport energy from above the farm towards the turbines. In this study, large eddy simulations of an infinite wind-turbine array in a conventionally neutral atmospheric boundary layer are performed. By carefully selecting the initial potential-temperature profile, the influence of the height and the strength of a capping inversion on the power output of a wind farm is investigated. Results indicate that both the height and the strength have a significant effect on the boundary layer flow, and that the height of the neutral boundary layer is effectively controlled by the capping inversion. In addition, it is shown that the vertical entrainment rate decreases for increasing inversion strength or height. In our infinite wind-farm simulations, varying the inversion characteristics leads to differences in power extraction on the order of 13% ± 0.2% (for increasing the strength from 2.5 to 10 K), and 31% ± 0.4% (for increasing the height from 500 to 1500 m). A detailed analysis of the mean kinetic-energy equation is included, showing that the variation in power extraction originates from the work done by the driving pressure gradient related to the boundary layer height and the geostrophic angle, while entrainment of kinetic energy from the free atmosphere does not play a significant role. Also, the effect of inversion strength on power extraction is energetically not related to different amounts of energy entrained, but explained by a difference in boundary layer growth, leading to higher boundary layers for lower inversion strengths. We further present a simple analytical model that allows to obtain wind-farm power output and driving power for the fully developed regime as function of Rossby number and boundary layer height.

  12. Study of Near-Surface Models in Large-Eddy Simulations of a Neutrally Stratified Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senocak, I.; Ackerman, A. S.; Kirkpatrick, M. P.; Stevens, D. E.; Mansour, N. N.

    2004-01-01

    Large-eddy simulation (LES) is a widely used technique in armospheric modeling research. In LES, large, unsteady, three dimensional structures are resolved and small structures that are not resolved on the computational grid are modeled. A filtering operation is applied to distinguish between resolved and unresolved scales. We present two near-surface models that have found use in atmospheric modeling. We also suggest a simpler eddy viscosity model that adopts Prandtl's mixing length model (Prandtl 1925) in the vicinity of the surface and blends with the dynamic Smagotinsky model (Germano et al, 1991) away from the surface. We evaluate the performance of these surface models by simulating a neutraly stratified atmospheric boundary layer.

  13. Assessment of Gradient-Based Similarity Functions in the Stable Boundary Layer Derived from a Large-Eddy Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorbjan, Zbigniew

    2017-06-01

    Gradient-based similarity functions, evaluated based on data generated by a large-eddy simulation model of the stably stratified boundary layer, are compared with analogous similarity functions, derived from field observations in the surface layer during the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) experiment in the Arctic. The comparison is performed in terms of explicit and implicit local scaling systems, for the temperature and momentum fluxes, standard deviations of the vertical velocity and of temperature, as well as dissipation rates for the turbulent kinetic energy and for the temperature variance. The comparison shows the best agreement of the SHEBA-based similarity functions with analogous functions evaluated using the large-eddy simulation data in the range of the Richardson number 0.01<{ Ri}< 0.1.

  14. An approximate deconvolution model for large-eddy simulation with application to incompressible wall-bounded flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolz, S.; Adams, N. A.; Kleiser, L.

    2001-04-01

    The approximate deconvolution model (ADM) for the large-eddy simulation of incompressible flows is detailed and applied to turbulent channel flow. With this approach an approximation of the unfiltered solution is obtained by repeated filtering. Given a good approximation of the unfiltered solution, the nonlinear terms of the filtered Navier-Stokes equations can be computed directly. The effect of nonrepresented scales is modeled by a relaxation regularization involving a secondary filter operation. Large-eddy simulations are performed for incompressible channel flow at Reynolds numbers based on the friction velocity and the channel half-width of Reτ=180 and Reτ=590. Both simulations compare well with direct numerical simulation (DNS) data and show a significant improvement over results obtained with classical subgrid scale models such as the standard or the dynamic Smagorinsky model. The computational cost of ADM is lower than that of dynamic models or the velocity estimation model.

  15. Assessment of Gradient-Based Similarity Functions in the Stable Boundary Layer Derived from a Large-Eddy Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorbjan, Zbigniew

    2017-02-01

    Gradient-based similarity functions, evaluated based on data generated by a large-eddy simulation model of the stably stratified boundary layer, are compared with analogous similarity functions, derived from field observations in the surface layer during the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) experiment in the Arctic. The comparison is performed in terms of explicit and implicit local scaling systems, for the temperature and momentum fluxes, standard deviations of the vertical velocity and of temperature, as well as dissipation rates for the turbulent kinetic energy and for the temperature variance. The comparison shows the best agreement of the SHEBA-based similarity functions with analogous functions evaluated using the large-eddy simulation data in the range of the Richardson number 0.01<{ Ri}< 0.1.

  16. Investigation of natural gas plume dispersion using mobile observations and large eddy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulton, Dana R.; Li, Qi; Golston, Levi; Pan, Da; Bou-Zeid, Elie; Fitts, Jeff; Lane, Haley; Lu, Jessica; Zondlo, Mark A.

    2016-04-01

    Recent work suggests the distribution of methane emissions from fracking operations is skewed with a small percentage of emitters contributing a large proportion of the total emissions. These sites are known as 'super-emitters.' The Marcellus shale, the most productive natural gas shale field in the United States, has received less intense focus for well-level emissions and is here used as a test site for targeted analysis between current standard trace-gas advection practices and possible improvements via advanced modeling techniques. The Marcellus shale is topographically complex, making traditional techniques difficult to implement and evaluate. For many ground based mobile studies, the inverse Gaussian plume method (IGM) is used to produce emission rates. This method is best applied to well-mixed plumes from strong point sources and may not currently be well-suited for use with disperse weak sources, short-time frame measurements or data collected in complex terrain. To assess the quality of IGM results and to improve source-strength estimations, a robust study that combines observational data with a hierarchy of models of increasing complexity will be presented. The field test sites were sampled with multiple passes using a mobile lab as well as a stationary tower. This mobile lab includes a Garmin GPS unit, Vaisala weather station (WTX520), LICOR 7700 CH4 open path sensor and LICOR 7500 CO2/H2O open path sensor. The sampling tower was constructed consisting of a Metek uSonic-3 Class A sonic anemometer, and an additional LICOR 7700 and 7500. Data were recorded for at least one hour at these sites. The modeling will focus on large eddy simulations (LES) of the wind and CH4 concentration fields for these test sites. The LES model used 2 m horizontal and 1 m vertical resolution and was integrated in time for 45 min for various test sites under stable, neutral and unstable conditions. It is here considered as the reference to which various IGM approaches can be

  17. Large Eddy simulation of turbulence: A subgrid scale model including shear, vorticity, rotation, and buoyancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canuto, V. M.

    1994-06-01

    The Reynolds numbers that characterize geophysical and astrophysical turbulence (Re approximately equals 108 for the planetary boundary layer and Re approximately equals 1014 for the Sun's interior) are too large to allow a direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the fundamental Navier-Stokes and temperature equations. In fact, the spatial number of grid points N approximately Re9/4 exceeds the computational capability of today's supercomputers. Alternative treatments are the ensemble-time average approach, and/or the volume average approach. Since the first method (Reynolds stress approach) is largely analytical, the resulting turbulence equations entail manageable computational requirements and can thus be linked to a stellar evolutionary code or, in the geophysical case, to general circulation models. In the volume average approach, one carries out a large eddy simulation (LES) which resolves numerically the largest scales, while the unresolved scales must be treated theoretically with a subgrid scale model (SGS). Contrary to the ensemble average approach, the LES+SGS approach has considerable computational requirements. Even if this prevents (for the time being) a LES+SGS model to be linked to stellar or geophysical codes, it is still of the greatest relevance as an 'experimental tool' to be used, inter alia, to improve the parameterizations needed in the ensemble average approach. Such a methodology has been successfully adopted in studies of the convective planetary boundary layer. Experienc e with the LES+SGS approach from different fields has shown that its reliability depends on the healthiness of the SGS model for numerical stability as well as for physical completeness. At present, the most widely used SGS model, the Smagorinsky model, accounts for the effect of the shear induced by the large resolved scales on the unresolved scales but does not account for the effects of buoyancy, anisotropy, rotation, and stable stratification. The latter phenomenon

  18. Coordinated Parameterization Development and Large-Eddy Simulation for Marine and Arctic Cloud-Topped Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bretherton, Christopher S.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this project was to compare observations of marine and arctic boundary layers with (i) parameterization systems used in climate and weather forecast models, and (ii) two and three dimensional eddy resolving (LES) models for turbulent fluid flow. Based on this comparison, we hoped to better understand, predict, and parameterize the boundary layer structure and cloud amount, type and thickness as functions of large scale conditions that are predicted by global climate models.

  19. Large-Eddy/Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes Simulation of Shock-Train Development in a Coil-Laser Diffuser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-06

    train formation and reactant mixing in a model Chemical Oxygen Iodine Laser (COIL) unit. The configuration consists of a converging-diverging nozzle, a...appear to influence the mixing process in the lasing cavity significantly. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Large-eddy simulation, chemical oxygen iodine lasers...model Chemical Oxygen Iodine Laser (COIL) unit. The configuration consists of a converging-diverging nozzle, a lasing cavity, and a diffuser. The

  20. A novel multiblock immersed boundary method for large eddy simulation of complex arterial hemodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anupindi, Kameswararao; Delorme, Yann; Shetty, Dinesh A.; Frankel, Steven H.

    2013-12-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations are becoming a reliable tool to understand hemodynamics, disease progression in pathological blood vessels and to predict medical device performance. Immersed boundary method (IBM) emerged as an attractive methodology because of its ability to efficiently handle complex moving and rotating geometries on structured grids. However, its application to study blood flow in complex, branching, patient-specific anatomies is scarce. This is because of the dominance of grid nodes in the exterior of the fluid domain over the useful grid nodes in the interior, rendering an inevitable memory and computational overhead. In order to alleviate this problem, we propose a novel multiblock based IBM that preserves the simplicity and effectiveness of the IBM on structured Cartesian meshes and enables handling of complex, anatomical geometries at a reduced memory overhead by minimizing the grid nodes in the exterior of the fluid domain. As pathological and medical device hemodynamics often involve complex, unsteady transitional or turbulent flow fields, a scale resolving turbulence model such as large eddy simulation (LES) is used in the present work. The proposed solver (here after referred as WenoHemo), is developed by enhancing an existing in-house high-order incompressible flow solver that was previously validated for its numerics and several LES models by Shetty et al. (2010) [33]. In the present work, WenoHemo is systematically validated for additional numerics introduced, such as IBM and the multiblock approach, by simulating laminar flow over a sphere and laminar flow over a backward facing step respectively. Then, we validate the entire solver methodology by simulating laminar and transitional flow in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Finally, we perform blood flow simulations in the challenging clinically relevant thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA), to gain insights into the type of fluid flow patterns that exist in pathological