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Sample records for large hawt wake

  1. Large HAWT wake measurement and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, A. H.; Wegley, H. L.; Buck, J. W.

    1995-05-01

    From the theoretical fluid dynamics point of view, the wake region of a large horizontal-axis wind turbine has been defined and described, and numerical models of wake behavior have been developed. Wind tunnel studies of single turbine wakes and turbine array wakes have been used to verify the theory and further refine the numerical models. However, the effects of scaling, rotor solidity, and topography on wake behavior are questions that remain unanswered. In the wind tunnel studies, turbines were represented by anything from scaled models to tea strainers or wire mesh disks whose solidity was equivalent to that of a typical wind turbine. The scale factor compensation for the difference in Reynolds number between the scale model and an actual turbine is complex, and not typically accounted for. Though it is wise to study the simpler case of wakes in flat topography, which can be easily duplicated in the wind tunnel, current indications are that wind turbine farm development is actually occurring in somewhat more complex terrain. Empirical wake studies using large horizontal-axis wind turbines have not been thoroughly composited, and, therefore, the results have not been applied to the well-developed theory of wake structure. The measurement programs have made use of both in situ sensor systems, such as instrumented towers, and remote sensors, such as kites and tethered, balloonborne anemometers. We present a concise overview of the work that has been performed, including our own, which is based on the philosophy that the MOD-2 turbines are probably their own best detector of both the momentum deficit and the induced turbulence effect downwind. Only the momentum deficit aspects of the wake/machine interactions have been addressed. Both turbine power output deficits and wind energy deficits as measured by the onsite meteorological towers have been analyzed from a composite data set. The analysis has also evidenced certain topographic influences on the operation of

  2. Large HAWT wake measurement and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, A. H.; Wegley, H. L.; Buck, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    From the theoretical fluid dynamics point of view, the wake region of a large horizontal-axis wind turbine has been defined and described, and numerical models of wake behavior have been developed. Wind tunnel studies of single turbine wakes and turbine array wakes have been used to verify the theory and further refine the numerical models. However, the effects of scaling, rotor solidity, and topography on wake behavior are questions that remain unanswered. In the wind tunnel studies, turbines were represented by anything from scaled models to tea strainers or wire mesh disks whose solidity was equivalent to that of a typical wind turbine. The scale factor compensation for the difference in Reynolds number between the scale model and an actual turbine is complex, and not typically accounted for. Though it is wise to study the simpler case of wakes in flat topography, which can be easily duplicated in the wind tunnel, current indications are that wind turbine farm development is actually occurring in somewhat more complex terrain. Empirical wake studies using large horizontal-axis wind turbines have not been thoroughly composited, and, therefore, the results have not been applied to the well-developed theory of wake structure. The measurement programs have made use of both in situ sensor systems, such as instrumented towers, and remote sensors, such as kites and tethered, balloonborne anemometers. We present a concise overview of the work that has been performed, including our own, which is based on the philosophy that the MOD-2 turbines are probably their own best detector of both the momentum deficit and the induced turbulence effect downwind. Only the momentum deficit aspects of the wake/machine interactions have been addressed. Both turbine power output deficits and wind energy deficits as measured by the onsite meteorological towers have been analyzed from a composite data set. The analysis has also evidenced certain topographic influences on the operation of

  3. Large HAWT (Horizontal-Axis Wind Turbine) wake measurement and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, A. H.; Wegley, H. L.; Buck, J. W.

    1984-05-01

    From the theoretical fluid dynamics point of view, the wake region of a large horizontal-axis wind turbine was defined and described, and numerical models of wake behavior were developed. Wind tunnel studies of single turbine wakes and turbine array wakes were used to verify the theory and further refine the numerical models. The effects of scaling, rotor solidity, and topography on wake behavior are questions that remain unanswered. In the wind tunnel studies, turbines were represented by anything from scaled models to tea strainers or wire mesh disks whose solidity was equivalent to that of a typical wind turbine. The scale factor compensation for the difference in Reynolds number between the scale model and an actual turbine is complex, and not typically accounted for. Though it is wise to study the simpler case of wakes in flat topography, current indications are that wind turbine farm development is actually occurring in somewhat more complex terrain.

  4. Unsteady Free-Wake Vortex Particle Model for HAWT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogateanu, R.; Frunzulicǎ, F.; Cardos, V.

    2010-09-01

    In the design of horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWT) one problem is to determine the aeroelastic behaviour of the rotor blades for the various wind inflow conditions. A step in this process is to predict with accuracy the aerodynamic loads on the blades. The Vortex Lattice Method (VLM) provides a transparent investigation concerning the role of various physical parameters which influence the aerodynamic problem. In this paper we present a method for the calculation of the non-uniform induced downwash of a HAWT rotor using the vortex ring model for the lifting surface coupled with an unsteady free-wake vortex particle model. Comparative studies between results obtained with different models of wake for a generic HAWT are presented.

  5. Performance and wake predictions of HAWTs in wind farms

    SciTech Connect

    Leclerc, C.; Masson, C.; Paraschivoiu, I.

    1997-12-31

    The present contribution proposes and describes a promising way towards performance prediction of an arbitrary array of turbines. It is based on the solution of the time-averaged, steady-state, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with an appropriate turbulence closure model. The turbines are represented by distributions of momentum sources in the Navier-Stokes equations. In this paper, the applicability and viability of the proposed methodology is demonstrated using an axisymmetric implementation. The k-{epsilon} model has been chosen for the closure of the time-averaged, turbulent flow equations and the properties of the incident flow correspond to those of a neutral atmospheric boundary layer. The proposed mathematical model is solved using a Control-Volume Finite Element Method (CVFEM). Detailed results have been obtained using the proposed method for an isolated wind turbine and for two turbines one behind another. In the case of an isolated turbine, accurate wake velocity deficit predictions are obtained and an increase in power due to atmospheric turbulence is found in agreement with measurements. In the case of two turbines, the proposed methodology provides an appropriate modelling of the wind-turbine wake and a realistic prediction of the performance degradation of the downstream turbine.

  6. A fully unsteady prescribed wake model for HAWT performance prediction in yawed flow

    SciTech Connect

    Coton, F.N.; Tongguang, Wang; Galbraith, R.A.M.; Lee, D.

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the development of a fast, accurate, aerodynamic prediction scheme for yawed flow on horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWTs). The method is a fully unsteady three-dimensional model which has been developed over several years and is still being enhanced in a number of key areas. The paper illustrates the current ability of the method by comparison with field data from the NREL combined experiment and also describes the developmental work in progress. In particular, an experimental test programme designed to yield quantitative wake convection information is summarised together with modifications to the numerical model which are necessary for meaningful comparison with the experiments. Finally, current and future work on aspects such as tower-shadow and improved unsteady aerodynamic modelling are discussed.

  7. A Large-eddy Simulation Study of Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Wakes in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamsoddin, Sina; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) offer some advantages over their horizontal axis counterparts, and are being considered as a viable alternative to conventional horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWTs). Nevertheless, a relative shortage of scientific, academic and technical investigations of VAWTs is observed in the wind energy community with respect to HAWTs. Having this in mind, in this work, we aim to study the wake of a single VAWT, placed in the atmospheric boundary layer, using large-eddy simulation (LES) coupled with actuator line model (ALM). It is noteworthy that this is the first time that such a study is being performed. To do this, for a typical 1 MW VAWT design, first, the variation of power coefficient with both the chord length of the blades and the tip-speed ratio is analyzed using LES-ALM, and an optimum combination of chord length and tip-speed ratio is obtained. Subsequently, the wake of a VAWT with these optimum specifications is thoroughly examined by showing different relevant mean and turbulent wake flow statistics. Keywords: vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT); VAWT wake; Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL); large eddy simulation (LES); actuator line model (ALM); turbulence.

  8. Turbulent large-scale structure effects on wake meandering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Y.-A.; Masson, C.; Aubrun, S.

    2015-06-01

    This work studies effects of large-scale turbulent structures on wake meandering using Large Eddy Simulations (LES) over an actuator disk. Other potential source of wake meandering such as the instablility mechanisms associated with tip vortices are not treated in this study. A crucial element of the efficient, pragmatic and successful simulations of large-scale turbulent structures in Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) is the generation of the stochastic turbulent atmospheric flow. This is an essential capability since one source of wake meandering is these large - larger than the turbine diameter - turbulent structures. The unsteady wind turbine wake in ABL is simulated using a combination of LES and actuator disk approaches. In order to dedicate the large majority of the available computing power in the wake, the ABL ground region of the flow is not part of the computational domain. Instead, mixed Dirichlet/Neumann boundary conditions are applied at all the computational surfaces except at the outlet. Prescribed values for Dirichlet contribution of these boundary conditions are provided by a stochastic turbulent wind generator. This allows to simulate large-scale turbulent structures - larger than the computational domain - leading to an efficient simulation technique of wake meandering. Since the stochastic wind generator includes shear, the turbulence production is included in the analysis without the necessity of resolving the flow near the ground. The classical Smagorinsky sub-grid model is used. The resulting numerical methodology has been implemented in OpenFOAM. Comparisons with experimental measurements in porous-disk wakes have been undertaken, and the agreements are good. While temporal resolution in experimental measurements is high, the spatial resolution is often too low. LES numerical results provide a more complete spatial description of the flow. They tend to demonstrate that inflow low frequency content - or large- scale turbulent structures - is

  9. Contrail Formation in Aircraft Wakes Using Large-Eddy Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paoli, R.; Helie, J.; Poinsot, T. J.; Ghosal, S.

    2002-01-01

    In this work we analyze the issue of the formation of condensation trails ("contrails") in the near-field of an aircraft wake. The basic configuration consists in an exhaust engine jet interacting with a wing-tip training vortex. The procedure adopted relies on a mixed Eulerian/Lagrangian two-phase flow approach; a simple micro-physics model for ice growth has been used to couple ice and vapor phases. Large eddy simulations have carried out at a realistic flight Reynolds number to evaluate the effects of turbulent mixing and wake vortex dynamics on ice-growth characteristics and vapor thermodynamic properties.

  10. Large Eddy Simulation of Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamsoddin, Sina; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2014-05-01

    In this study, large-eddy simulation (LES) is combined with a turbine model to investigate the wake behind a vertical-axis wind turbine (VAWT) in a three dimensional turbulent flow. Two methods are used to model the subgrid-scale (SGS) stresses: (a) the Smagorinsky model, and (b) the modulated gradient model. To parameterize the effects of the VAWT on the flow, two VAWT models are developed: (a) the actuator surface model (ASM), in which the time-averaged turbine-induced forces are distributed on a surface swept by the turbine blades, i.e. the actuator surface, and (b) the actuator line model (ALM), in which the instantaneous blade forces are only spatially distributed on lines representing the blades, i.e. the actuator lines. This is the first time that LES is applied and validated for simulation of VAWT wakes by using either the ASM or the ALM techniques. In both models, blade-element theory is used to calculate the lift and drag forces on the blades. The results are compared with flow measurements in the wake of a model straight-bladed VAWT, carried out in the Institute de Méchanique et Statistique de la Turbulence (IMST) water channel. Different combinations of SGS models with VAWT models are studied and a fairly good overall agreement between simulation results and measurement data is observed. In general, the ALM is found to better capture the unsteady-periodic nature of the wake and shows a better agreement with the experimental data compared with the ASM. The modulated gradient model is also found to be a more reliable SGS stress modeling technique, compared with the Smagorinsky model, and it yields reasonable predictions of the mean flow and turbulence characteristics of a VAWT wake using its theoretically-determined model coefficient. Keywords: Vertical-axis wind turbines (VAWTs); VAWT wake; Large-eddy simulation; Actuator surface model; Actuator line model; Smagorinsky model; Modulated gradient model

  11. Demonstrations to Wake Up Large Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howes, Ruth; Watson, James

    1982-01-01

    A general strategy and specific examples for demonstrations in large physics classes are given. Such "action" demonstrations may involve students moving around the class to demonstrate molecular behavior in different states of matter, and effect of heat in changing state. (JN)

  12. Large-Eddy Simulation of Supersonic Axisymmetric Bluff Body Wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tourbier, D.; Fasel, H. F.

    1997-11-01

    The time-dependent behavior of the turbulent wake of an axisymmetric bluff body is investigated using Large-Eddy Simulation (LES). The axisymmetric body is aligned with a supersonic free stream at a Mach number of M_∞ = 2.46 . It has been shown previously that this flow field is subject to an absolute instability for global Reynolds numbers higher than ReD = 30,000 . As a result of this instability large structures are present in the near wake and render the flow field highly unsteady. These structures have a strong influence on the global behavior of the flow field and thus on the overall drag of the body. Commonly used turbulence models (e.g. in RANS) fail to accurately describe the flow field and are inadequate for drag prediction. Preliminary LES calculations for global Reynolds numbers up to ReD = 400,000 using a Smagorinsky type subgrid-scale model with a fixed constant have shown qualitative agreement with experimental observations in terms of pressure distribution along the blunt base and magnitude of rms values in the wake. However, the model is too dissipative for most parts of the free shear layer emanating from the corner of the base and the evolution of structures in the close vicinity of the corner is suppressed. Therefore, a dynamic subgrid-scale model was implemented into the code and tested to evaluate the performance of the model for this flow configuration.

  13. Large Eddy Simulation of Aircraft Wake Vortices: Atmospheric Turbulence Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Jongil; Lin, Yuh-Lang; Arya, S. Pal; Kao, C.-T.

    1997-01-01

    Crow instability can develop in most atmospheric turbulence levels, however, the ring vortices may not form in extremely strong turbulence cases due to strong dissipation of the vortices. It appears that strong turbulence tends to accelerate the occurrences of Crow instability. The wavelength of the most unstable mode is estimated to be about 5b(sub 0), which is less than the theoretical value of 8.6b(sub 0) (Crow, 1970) and may be due to limited domain size and highly nonlinear turbulent flow characteristics. Three-dimensional turbulence can decay wake vortices more rapidly. Axial velocity may be developed by vertical distortion of a vortex pair due to Crow instability or large turbulent eddy motion. More experiments with various non-dimensional turbulence levels are necessary to get useful statistics of wake vortex behavior due to turbulence. Need to investigate larger turbulence length scale effects by enlarging domain size or using grid nesting.

  14. Cosmic string wakes and large-scale structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charlton, Jane C.

    1988-01-01

    The formation of structure from infinite cosmic string wakes is modeled for a universe dominated by cold dark matter (CDM). Cross-sectional slices through the wake distribution tend to outline empty regions with diameters which are not inconsistent with the range of sizes of the voids in the CfA slice of the universe. The topology of the wake distribution is found to be spongy rather than cell-like. Correlations between CDM wakes do not extend much beyond a horizon length, so it is unlikely that CDM wakes are responsible for the correlations between clusters of galaxies. An estimate of the fraction of matter to accrete onto CDM wakes indicates that wakes could be more important in galaxy formation than previously anticipated.

  15. The wake of a single vertical axis wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsky, Danielle A.; Leftwich, Megan C.

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to measure the wake of a Windspire vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT). In recent years, research on VAWTs has increased due to various potential advantages over the more common horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWTs). Unlike very large HAWTs, moderately sized-and virtually silent-VAWTs can be placed in urban and suburban regions where land space is limited. To date, many VAWT studies have assumed that the turbine has the same aerodynamic structure as a spinning cylinder despite a significant increase in geometric complexity. This experiment attempts to understand the fundamental wake structure of a single VAWT (and compare it to the wake structure of a spinning cylinder). In this experiment, a scaled-down VAWT is placed inside a wind tunnel under a controlled laboratory setting. A motor rotates the scale model at a constant angular speed. Stereo particle image velocimetry (PIV) is used to visualize the wake of the turbine and image processing techniques are used to quantify the velocity and vorticity of the wake.

  16. HAWT performance with dynamic stall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibbs, B. D.

    1986-02-01

    The effects of flow nonuniformities (wing shear, tower wake, yaw, and large-scale turbulence) on the performance of a horizontal axis wind turbine are calculated, accounting for dynamic stall. The PROP program was modified to incorporate and compare these effects with the uniform flow case. The MIT model, which predicts dynamic lift coefficients substantially higher than the static maximum values and includes a crude model of the vortex roll-off phenomenon, represented dynamic stall. As associated model for drag was also used. The dynamic stall model was tested against experimental data for three typical reduced frequencies. Good instantaneous correlation was obtained. The effects of nonuniformities with and without the dynamic stall were calculated using the Westinghouse Mod O and Enertech 44/25 turbines. Modeling the dynamic stall has little effect on performance. Furthermore, the performance with nonuniform flow differed only slightly from the uniform flow case. Thus the new PROP model provides a powerful general capability to handle nonuniform flows.

  17. Large-Eddy Simulations of Wind Turbine Wakes Subject to Different Atmospheric Stabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchfield, M.; Lundquist, J. K.; Lee, S.; Clifton, A.

    2014-12-01

    As a byproduct of energy extraction, wind turbines create a low-speed, turbulent wake that propagate downwind. When wind turbines are situated in a group, as in a wind plant, the interactions of these wakes with other turbines are important because wake effects decrease the efficiency of the wind plant, and they increase mechanical loads on individual turbines. Wakes propagate downstream differently depending on the inflow conditions, and these conditions are heavily dominated by atmospheric stability. For example, we know that wakes are more persistent in stable conditions than in unstable conditions. Also, stable conditions often have significant wind veer which skews wakes laterally. Different levels of turbulence intensity are associated with different atmospheric stability levels, and turbulence intensity acts to diffuse wakes and to cause wake meandering. Wake physics are complex, and to understand them better, a high-resolution representation of the flow is necessary. Measurements are difficult with current sensing equipment because of the sheer size of wakes and the unsteady atmospheric environment in which they are found. Numerical simulations complement measurements and provide a high-resolution representation of the entire three-dimensional, unsteady flow field. In this work, we use large-eddy simulation (LES), the highest fidelity type of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) feasible for high-Reynolds-number wake flow. LES directly resolves the larger, energy-containing turbulent scales and models the effects of the subgrid scales that the computational mesh cannot resolve. Our solver is based on the OpenFOAM open-source CFD toolbox. Turbines are modeled using rotating actuator lines. Here, we present our LES of the wake behind a modern 1.5 MW turbine subject to different inflow atmospheric stability. We will present results of wakes subject to stable (strongly and weakly stable), neutral, and unstable conditions. We are particularly interested in how

  18. Wake meandering statistics of a model wind turbine: Insights gained by large eddy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foti, Daniel; Yang, Xiaolei; Guala, Michele; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2016-08-01

    Wind tunnel measurements in the wake of an axial flow miniature wind turbine provide evidence of large-scale motions characteristic of wake meandering [Howard et al., Phys. Fluids 27, 075103 (2015), 10.1063/1.4923334]. A numerical investigation of the wake, using immersed boundary large eddy simulations able to account for all geometrical details of the model wind turbine, is presented here to elucidate the three-dimensional structure of the wake and the mechanisms controlling near and far wake instabilities. Similar to the findings of Kang et al. [Kang et al., J. Fluid Mech. 744, 376 (2014), 10.1017/jfm.2014.82], an energetic coherent helical hub vortex is found to form behind the turbine nacelle, which expands radially outward downstream of the turbine and ultimately interacts with the turbine tip shear layer. Starting from the wake meandering filtering used by Howard et al., a three-dimensional spatiotemporal filtering process is developed to reconstruct a three-dimensional meandering profile in the wake of the turbine. The counterwinding hub vortex undergoes a spiral vortex breakdown and the rotational component of the hub vortex persists downstream, contributing to the rotational direction of the wake meandering. Statistical characteristics of the wake meandering profile, along with triple decomposition of the flow field separating the coherent and incoherent turbulent fluctuations, are used to delineate the near and far wake flow structures and their interactions. In the near wake, the nacelle leads to mostly incoherent turbulence, while in the far wake, turbulent coherent structures, especially the azimuthal velocity component, dominate the flow field.

  19. HAWT performance with dynamic stall

    SciTech Connect

    Hibbs, B.D.

    1986-02-01

    In this report we calculated the effects of flow nonuniformities (wing shear, tower wake, yaw, and large-scale turbulence) on the performance of a horizontal axis wind turbine, accounting for dynamic stall. We modified the PROP program to incorporate and compare these effects with the uniform flow case. The MIT model, which predicts dynamic lift coefficients substantially higher than the static maximum values and includes a crude model of the vortex roll-off phenomenon, represented dynamic stall. As associated model for drag was also used. The dynamic stall model was tested against experimental data for three typical reduced frequencies. Good instantaneous correlation was obtained. The effects of nonuniformities with and without the dynamic stall were calculated using the Westinghouse Mod O and Enertech 44/25 turbines. Modeling the dynamic stall has little effect on performance. Furthermore, the performance with nonuniform flow differed only slightly from the uniform flow case. Thus the now PROP model provides a powerful general capability to handle nonuniform flows.

  20. NREL airfoil families for HAWTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangler, J. L.; Somers, D. M.

    1995-01-01

    The development of special-purpose airfoils for horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs) began in 1984 as a joint effort between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), formerly the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI), and Airfoils, Incorporated. Since that time seven airfoil families have been designed for various size rotors using the Eppler Airfoil Design and Analysis Code. A general performance requirement of the new airfoil families is that they exhibit a maximum lift coefficient (c(sub l,max)) which is relatively insensitive to roughness effects. The airfoil families address the needs of stall-regulated, variable-pitch, and variable-rpm wind turbines. For stall-regulated rotors, better peak-power control is achieved through the design of tip airfoils that restrain the maximum lift coefficient. Restrained maximum lift coefficient allows the use of more swept disc area for a given generator size. Also, for stall-regulated rotors, tip airfoils with high thickness are used to accommodate overspeed control devices. For variable-pitch and variable-rpm rotors, tip airfoils having a high maximum lift coefficient lend themselves to lightweight blades with low solidity. Tip airfoils having low thickness result in less drag for blades having full-span pitch control. Annual energy improvements from the NREL airfoil families are projected to be 23% to 35% for stall-regulated turbines, 8% to 20% for variable-pitch turbines, and 8% to 10% for variable-rpm turbines. The improvement for stall-regulated turbines has been verified in field tests.

  1. NREL airfoil families for HAWTs

    SciTech Connect

    Tangler, J L; Somers, D M

    1995-01-01

    The development of special-purpose airfoils for horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs) began in 1984 as a joint effort between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), formerly the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI), and Airfoils, Incorporated. Since that time seven airfoil families have been designed for various size rotors using the Eppler Airfoil Design and Analysis Code. A general performance requirement of the new airfoil families is that they exhibit a maximum lift coefficient (c{sub l,max}) which is relatively insensitive to roughness effects. The airfoil families address the needs of stall-regulated, variable-pitch, and variable-rpm wind turbines. For stall-regulated rotors, better peak-power control is achieved through the design of tip airfoils that restrain the maximum lift coefficient. Restrained maximum lift coefficient allows the use of more swept disc area for a given generator size. Also, for stall-regulated rotors, tip airfoils with high thickness are used to accommodate overspeed control devices. For variable-pitch and variable-rpm rotors, tip airfoils having a high maximum lift coefficient lend themselves to lightweight blades with low solidity. Tip airfoils having low thickness result in less drag for blades having full-span pitch control. Annual energy improvements from the NREL airfoil families are projected to be 23% to 35% for stall-regulated turbines, 8% to 20% for variable-pitch turbines, and 8% to 10% for variable-rpm turbines. The improvement for stall-regulated turbines has been verified in field tests.

  2. Exploring the wakes of large offshore wind farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emeis, S.; Siedersleben, S.; Lampert, A.; Platis, A.; Bange, J.; Djath, B.; Schulz-Stellenfleth, J.; Neumann, T.

    2016-09-01

    Offshore meteorological characteristics set specific conditions for the operation of offshore wind farms. One specific feature is low turbulence intensity which on the one hand reduces loads on turbines but on the other hand is the reason for much longer turbine and farm wakes than over land. The German Government is presently funding a research project called WIPAFF (Wind PArk Far Field) which heads for the analysis of properties and impacts of offshore wind park far fields. The focus is on the analysis of wind farm wakes, their interaction among each other and their regional climate impact. This is done by in-situ, extensive aircraft and satellite measurements and by operating meso-scale wind field models and an analytical wind farm model.

  3. Wind Turbine Wake Variability in a Large Wind Farm, Observed by Scanning Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, J. K.; Xiaoxia, G.; Aitken, M.; Quelet, P. T.; Rana, J.; Rhodes, M. E.; St Martin, C. M.; Tay, K.; Worsnop, R.; Irvin, S.; Rajewski, D. A.; Takle, E. S.

    2014-12-01

    Although wind turbine wake modeling is critical for accurate wind resource assessment, operational forecasting, and wind plant optimization, verification of such simulations is currently constrained by sparse datasets taken in limited atmospheric conditions, often of single turbines in isolation. To address this knowledge gap, our team deployed a WINDCUBE 200S scanning lidar in a 300-MW operating wind farm as part of the CWEX-13 field experiment. The lidar was deployed ~2000 m from a row of four turbines, such that wakes from multiple turbines could be sampled with horizontal scans. Twenty minutes of every hour were devoted to horizontal scans at ½ degree resolution at six different elevation angles. Twenty-five days of data were collected, with wind speeds at hub height ranging from quiescent to 14 m/s, and atmospheric stability varying from unstable to strongly stable. The example scan in Fig. 1a shows wakes from a row of four turbines propagating to the northwest. This extensive wake dataset is analyzed based on the quantitative approach of Aitken et al. (J. Atmos. Ocean. Technol. 2014), who developed an automated wake detection algorithm to characterize wind turbine wakes from scanning lidar data. We have extended the Aitken et al. (2014) method to consider multiple turbines in a single scan in order to classify the large numbers of wakes observed in the CWEX-13 dataset (Fig. 1b) during southerly flow conditions. The presentation will explore the variability of wake characteristics such as the velocity deficit and the wake width. These characteristics vary with atmospheric stability, atmospheric turbulence, and inflow wind speed. We find that the strongest and most persistent wakes occur at low to moderate wind speeds (region 2 of the turbine power curve) in stable conditions. We also present evidence that, in stable conditions with strong changes of wind direction with height, wakes propagate in different directions at different elevations above the surface

  4. On the large-scale structures formed by wakes of open cosmic strings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hara, Tetsuya; Morioka, Shoji; Miyoshi, Shigeru

    1990-01-01

    Large-scale structures of the universe have been variously described as sheetlike, filamentary, cellular, bubbles or spongelike. Recently cosmic strings became one of viable candidates for a galaxy formation scenario, and some of the large-scale structures seem to be simply explained by the open cosmic strings. According to this scenario, sheets are wakes which are traces of moving open cosmic strings where dark matter and baryonic matter have accumulated. Filaments are intersections of such wakes and high density regions are places where three wakes intersect almost orthogonally. The wakes formed at t sub eq become the largest surface density among all wakes, where t sub eq is the epoch when matter density equals to radiation density. If we assume that there is one open cosmic string per each horizon, then it can be explained that the typical distances among wakes, filaments and clusters are also approx. 10(exp 2) Mpc. This model does not exclude a much more large scale structure. Open cosmic string may move even now and accumulate cold dark matter after its traces. However, the surface density is much smaller than the ones formed at t sub eq. From this model, it is expected that the typical high density region will have extended features such as six filaments and three sheets and be surrounded by eight empty regions (voids). Here, the authors are mainly concerned with such structures and have made numerical simulations for the formation of such large scale structures.

  5. Wind turbine wake stability investigations using a vortex ring modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldacchino, Daniel; van Bussel, Gerard J. W.

    2014-12-01

    In the present study, a simple inviscid vortex ring (VR) modelling approach is used to represent the developing rotor wake. This allows a straightforward investigation and comparison of the impact of uniform, yawed and sheared flow conditions on the development of the rotor wake, with the additional possibility of including ground effect. The effect of instabilities on the development of the wake is manually introduced in the form of perturbations of strength, ring position and size. The phenomenon of vortex filament interaction or leapfrogging, could play a role in the observation of unsteady phenomena and is therefore also addressed. Such a study is hence performed in light of recent conflicting views on the causes of wake meandering: is the observed dynamic wake behaviour a result of large scale turbulent forcing or do more subtle and intrinsic wake instabilities play a role? This study concludes that the presence of the ground and external perturbations, most notably changes in the wake pitch and the rotor thrust coefficient, can significantly affect the steady development of the wake. The mutual vortex pairing instability, whilst displaying interesting periodic behaviour, does not correlate with periodic wake behaviour reported by Medici et al. [1]. However, in the absence of unsteady inflow, it is shown that the wake of a Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine (HAWT) is certainly prone to displaying unstable, dynamic behaviour caused by these additional factors.

  6. The effect of delta 3 on a yawing HAWT blade and on yaw dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, F. W.; Jones, R.

    1982-01-01

    A single degree of freedom aeroelastic computer model, WMSTAB3, was employed to perform a parametric analysis of HAWT blade behavior during yaw maneuvers. Over 1,000 different combinations of delta sub 3 and normal frequency were analyzed. The effect of delta sub 3 and flapping stiffness on flapping frequency, phase, and magnitude are discussed. The moments transmitted to the fixed system during yaw maneuvers were calculated and reduced to time constants of response to step changes in wind direction. The significance of the time constants for the configurations considered relative to yaw response rate and lag angle is discussed, along with their possible significance for large HAWT.

  7. Large-Eddy Simulations and Lidar Measurements of Vortex-Pair Breakup in Aircraft Wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewellen, D. C.; Lewellen, W. S.; Poole, L. R.; DeCoursey, R. J.; Hansen, G. M.; Hostetler, C. A.; Kent, G. S.

    1998-01-01

    Results of large-eddy simulations of an aircraft wake are compared with results from ground-based lidar measurements made at NASA Langley Research Center during the Subsonic Assessment Near-Field Interaction Flight Experiment field tests. Brief reviews of the design of the field test for obtaining the evolution of wake dispersion behind a Boeing 737 and of the model developed for simulating such wakes are given. Both the measurements and the simulations concentrate on the period from a few seconds to a few minutes after the wake is generated, during which the essentially two-dimensional vortex pair is broken up into a variety of three-dimensional eddies. The model and experiment show similar distinctive breakup eddies induced by the mutual interactions of the vortices, after perturbation by the atmospheric motions.

  8. Large-eddy simulations of wind farm production and long distance wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, O.; Nilsson, K.; Breton, S.-P.; Ivanell, S.

    2015-06-01

    The future development of offshore wind power will include many wind farms built in the same areas. It is known that wind farms produce long distance wakes, which means that we will see more occasions of farm to farm interaction, namely one wind farm operating in the wake of another wind farm. This study investigates how to perform accurate power predictions on large wind farms and how to assess the long distance wakes generated by these farms. The focus of this paper is the production's and wake's sensitivity to the extension of the grid as well as the turbulence when using Large-eddy simulations (LES) with pregenerated Mann turbulence. The aim is to determine an optimal grid which minimizes blockage effects and ensures constant resolution in the entire wake region at the lowest computational cost. The simulations are first performed in the absence of wind turbines in order to assess how the atmospheric turbulence and wind profile are evolving downstream (up to 12,000 m behind the position where the turbulence is imposed). In the second step, 10 turbines are added in the domain (using an actuator disc method) and their production is analyzed alongside the mean velocities in the domain. The blockage effects are tested using grids with different vertical extents. An equidistant region is used in order to ensure high resolution in the wake region. The importance of covering the entire wake structure inside the equidistant region is analyzed by decreasing the size of this region. In this step, the importance of the lateral size of the Mann turbulence box is also analyzed. In the results it can be seen that the flow is acceptably preserved through the empty domain if a larger turbulence box is used. The relative production is increased (due to blockage effects) for the last turbines using a smaller vertical domain, increased for a lower or narrower equidistant region (due to the smearing of the wake in the stretched area) and decreased when using a smaller turbulence

  9. Large-eddy simulation of spectral coherence in a wind turbine wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, A.; Crespo, A.; Migoya, E.; Garcia, J.

    2008-01-01

    This work is mainly dedicated to the study of the characteristics of spectral coherence of turbulence fluctuations in wind turbine wakes. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code has been implemented using a large-eddy simulation (LES) approach, which is thought to be conceptually more suitable for studying the turbulence evolution in a wind turbine wake. Comparisons with experimental data from the Nørrekær Enge II Windfarm, in Denmark, and with an analytical model proposed by Panofsky and Dutton have been performed, and the results are found to be in reasonable agreement with both.

  10. Vortex Particle-Mesh methods for large scale LES of aircraft wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatelain, Philippe; Duponcheel, Matthieu; Marichal, Yves; Winckelmans, Grégoire

    2015-11-01

    Vortex methods solve the NS equations in vorticity-velocity formulation. The present Particle-Mesh variant exploits the advantages of a hybrid approach: advection is handled by the particles while the mesh allows the evaluation of the differential operators and the use of fast Poisson solvers (here a Fourier-based solver which allows for unbounded directions and inlet/outlet boundaries). A lifting line approach models the vorticity sources in the flow; its immersed treatment efficiently captures the development of vorticity from thin sheets into 3-D field. Large scale simulations of aircraft wakes (including ``encounter'' cases where a following aircraft flies into the wake) are presented, which also demonstrate the performance of the methodology: the adequate treatment of particle distortion, the high-order discretization, and the multiscale subgrid models allow to capture wake dynamics with minimal spurious dispersion and diffusion.

  11. Influence of atmospheric stability on wind-turbine wakes: A large-eddy simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abkar, Mahdi; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2014-05-01

    In this study, large-eddy simulation is combined with a turbine model to investigate the influence of atmospheric stability on wind-turbine wakes. In the simulations, subgrid-scale turbulent fluxes are parameterized using tuning-free Lagrangian scale-dependent dynamic models. These models optimize the local value of the model coefficients based on the dynamics of the resolved scales. The turbine-induced forces are parameterized with an actuator-disk model with rotation. In this technique, blade-element theory is used to calculate the lift and drag forces acting on the blades. Emphasis is placed on the structure and characteristics of wind-turbine wakes in the cases where the incident flows to the turbine have the same mean velocity at the hub height but different stability conditions. The simulation results show that atmospheric stability has a significant effect on the spatial distribution of the mean velocity deficit and turbulent fluxes in the wake region. In particular, the magnitude of the velocity deficit increases with increasing stability in the atmosphere. In addition, the locations of the maximum turbulence intensity and turbulent stresses are closer to the turbine in convective boundary layer compared with neutral and stable ones. Detailed analysis of the resolved turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) budget inside the wake reveals also that the thermal stratification of the incoming wind considerably affects the magnitude and spatial distribution of the turbulent production, transport term and dissipation rate (transfer of energy to the subgrid scales). It is also shown that the near-wake region can be extended to a farther distance downstream in stable condition compared with neutral and unstable counterparts. In order to isolate the effect of atmospheric stability, additional simulations of neutrally-stratified atmospheric boundary layers are performed with the same turbulence intensity at hub height as convective and stable ones. The results show that the

  12. Wind turbine wakes in forest and neutral plane wall boundary layer large-eddy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröttle, Josef; Piotrowski, Zbigniew; Gerz, Thomas; Englberger, Antonia; Dörnbrack, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Wind turbine wake flow characteristics are studied in a strongly sheared and turbulent forest boundary layer and a neutral plane wall boundary layer flow. The reference simulations without wind turbine yield similar results as earlier large-eddy simulations by Shaw and Schumann (1992) and Porte-Agel et al. (2000). To use the fields from the homogeneous turbulent boundary layers on the fly as inflow fields for the wind turbine wake simulations, a new and efficient methodology was developed for the multiscale geophysical flow solver EULAG. With this method fully developed turbulent flow fields can be achieved upstream of the wind turbine which are independent of the wake flow. The large-eddy simulations reproduce known boundary-layer statistics as mean wind profile, momentum flux profile, and eddy dissipation rate of the plane wall and the forest boundary layer. The wake velocity deficit is more asymmetric above the forest and recovers faster downstream compared to the velocity deficit in the plane wall boundary layer. This is due to the inflection point in the mean streamwise velocity profile with corresponding turbulent coherent structures of high turbulence intensity in the strong shear flow above the forest.

  13. Effect of Large Finite-Size Wind Farms and Their Wakes on Atmospheric Boundary Layer Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ka Ling; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Through the use of large-eddy simulation, the effect of large finite-size wind farms and their wakes on conventionally-neutral atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) dynamics and power extraction is investigated. Specifically, this study focuses on a wind farm that comprises 25 rows of wind turbines, spanning a distance of 10 km. It is shown that large wind farms have a significant effect on internal boundary layer growth both inside and downwind of the wind farms. If the wind farm is large enough, the internal boundary layer interacts with the thermally-stratified free atmosphere above, leading to a modification of the ABL height and power extraction. In addition, it is shown that large wind farms create extensive wakes, which could have an effect on potential downwind wind farms. Specifically, for the case considered here, a power deficit as large as 8% is found at a distance of 10 km downwind from the wind farm. Furthermore, this study compares the wind farm wake dynamics for cases in which the conventionally neutral ABLs are driven by a unidirectional pressure gradient and Coriolis forces.

  14. Large Eddy Simulation of Wake Vortices in the Convective Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Yuh-Lang; Han, Jongil; Zhang, Jing; Ding, Feng; Arya, S. Pal; Proctor, Fred H.

    2000-01-01

    The behavior of wake vortices in a convective boundary layer is investigated using a validated large eddy simulation model. Our results show that the vortices are largely deformed due to strong turbulent eddy motion while a sinusoidal Crow instability develops. Vortex rising is found to be caused by the updrafts (thermals) during daytime convective conditions and increases with increasing nondimensional turbulence intensity eta. In the downdraft region of the convective boundary layer, vortex sinking is found to be accelerated proportional to increasing eta, with faster speed than that in an ideal line vortex pair in an inviscid fluid. Wake vortices are also shown to be laterally transported over a significant distance due to large turbulent eddy motion. On the other hand, the decay rate of the, vortices in the convective boundary layer that increases with increasing eta, is larger in the updraft region than in the downdraft region because of stronger turbulence in the updraft region.

  15. Investigation and validation of wake model combinations for large wind farm modelling in neutral atmospheric boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tromeur, E.; Puygrenier, S.; Sanquer, S.

    2016-09-01

    This study is focused on assessing the ability of two refined large wind farm models to describe the disturbance of the neutral atmospheric flow caused by large offshore wind farms. Sensitivity studies of internal boundary layer parameters are carried out. An optimum large wind farm correction is then proposed and combined with two different standard single wake models, the Park and EVM models. The large wind farm wake effect is evaluated and validated against measurements of two offshore wind farms at Horns Rev and Nysted and four standard wake models by computing velocity deficit and normalized power. All large wind farm models proposed were able to capture wake width to some degree and the decrease of power output moving through the wind farm. Despite some uncertainties, this very promising model combinations allows us to take into account the slowdown in large wind farms.

  16. Wind-tunnel modelling of the tip-speed ratio influence on the wake evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Victor P.; Kaltenbach, Hans-Jakob

    2016-09-01

    Wind-tunnel measurements on the near-wake evolution of a three bladed horizontal axis wind turbine model (HAWT) in the scale 1:O(350) operating in uniform flow conditions and within a turbulent boundary layer at different tip speed ratios are presented. Operational conditions are chosen to exclude Reynolds number effects regarding the turbulent boundary layer as well as the rotor performance. Triple-wire anemometry is used to measure all three velocity components in the mid-vertical and mid-horizontal plane, covering the range from the near- to the far-wake region. In order to analyse wake properties systematically, power and thrust coefficients of the turbine were measured additionally. It is confirmed that realistic modelling of the wake evolution is not possible in a low-turbulence uniform approach flow. Profiles of mean velocity and turbulence intensity exhibit large deviations between the low-turbulence uniform flow and the turbulent boundary layer, especially in the far-wake region. For nearly constant thrust coefficients differences in the evolution of the near-wake can be identified for tip speed ratios in the range from 6.5 to 10.5. It is shown that with increasing downstream distances mean velocity profiles become indistinguishable whereas for turbulence statistics a subtle dependency on the tip speed ratio is still noticeable in the far-wake region.

  17. Uncovering large-scale coherent structures in natural and forced turbulent wakes by combining PIV, POD, and FTLE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourentis, L.; Konstantinidis, E.

    2012-03-01

    Planar velocity data of the unsteady separated flow in the turbulent wake of a circular cylinder obtained by particle image velocimetry (PIV) are analyzed in order to visualize the large-scale coherent structures associated with alternating vortex shedding at a Reynolds number of 2,150. Two different cases are examined: unforced vortex shedding in the natural wake and vortex lock-on incited by forced perturbations superimposed in the inflow velocity. Proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) is employed to reconstruct the low-order wake dynamics from randomly sampled snapshots of the velocity field. The reconstructed flow is subsequently used to determine the evolution of the finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) fields which identify the Lagrangian coherent structures. The results demonstrate that the combination of methods employed offers a powerful visualization tool to uncover large-scale coherent structures and to exemplify vortex dynamics in natural and forced bluff-body wakes.

  18. Evaluation of Large-Scale Wing Vortex Wakes from Multi-Camera PIV Measurements in Free-Flight Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmer, Carl F. v.; Heider, André; Schröder, Andreas; Konrath, Robert; Agocs, Janos; Gilliot, Anne; Monnier, Jean-Claude

    Multiple-vortex systems of aircraft wakes have been investigated experimentally in a unique large-scale laboratory facility, the free-flight B20 catapult bench, ONERA Lille. 2D/2C PIV measurements have been performed in a translating reference frame, which provided time-resolved crossvelocity observations of the vortex systems in a Lagrangian frame normal to the wake axis. A PIV setup using a moving multiple-camera array and a variable double-frame time delay has been employed successfully. The large-scale quasi-2D structures of the wake-vortex system have been identified using the QW criterion based on the 2D velocity gradient tensor ∇H u, thus illustrating the temporal development of unequal-strength corotating vortex pairs in aircraft wakes for nondimensional times tU0/b≲45.

  19. Large Eddy Simulation of Aircraft Wake Vortices in a Homogeneous Atmospheric Turbulence: Vortex Decay and Descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Jongil; Lin, Yuh-Lang; Arya, S. Pal; Proctor, Fred H.

    1999-01-01

    The effects of ambient turbulence on decay and descent of aircraft wake vortices are studied using a validated, three-dimensional: large-eddy simulation model. Numerical simulations are performed in order to isolate the effect of ambient turbulence on the wake vortex decay rate within a neutrally-stratified atmosphere. Simulations are conducted for a range of turbulence intensities, by injecting wake vortex pairs into an approximately homogeneous and isotropic turbulence field. The decay rate of the vortex circulation increases clearly with increasing ambient turbulence level, which is consistent with field observations. Based on the results from the numerical simulations, simple decay models are proposed as functions of dimensionless ambient turbulence intensity (eta) and dimensionless time (T) for the circulation averaged over a range of radial distances. With good agreement with the numerical results, a Gaussian type of vortex decay model is proposed for weak turbulence: while an exponential type of Tortex decay model can be applied for strong turbulence. A relationship for the vortex descent based on above vortex decay model is also proposed. Although the proposed models are based on simulations assuming neutral stratification, the model predictions are compared to Lidar vortex measurements observed during stable, neutral, and unstable atmospheric conditions. In the neutral and unstable atmosphere, the model predictions appear to be in reasonable agreement with the observational data, while in the stably-stratified atmosphere, they largely underestimate the observed circulation decay with consistent overestimation of the observed vortex descent. The underestimation of vortex decay during stably-stratified conditions suggests that stratification has an important influence on vortex decay when ambient levels of turbulence are weak.

  20. Wind flow characteristics in the wakes of large wind turbines. Volume 1: Analytical model development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberle, W. R.

    1981-01-01

    A computer program to calculate the wake downwind of a wind turbine was developed. Turbine wake characteristics are useful for determining optimum arrays for wind turbine farms. The analytical model is based on the characteristics of a turbulent coflowing jet with modification for the effects of atmospheric turbulence. The program calculates overall wake characteristics, wind profiles, and power recovery for a wind turbine directly in the wake of another turbine, as functions of distance downwind of the turbine. The calculation procedure is described in detail, and sample results are presented to illustrate the general behavior of the wake and the effects of principal input parameters.

  1. Large Wind Turbine Rotor Design using an Aero-Elastic / Free-Wake Panel Coupling Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sessarego, Matias; Ramos-García, Néstor; Shen, Wen Zhong; Nørkær Sørensen, Jens

    2016-09-01

    Despite the advances in computing resources in the recent years, the majority of large wind-turbine rotor design problems still rely on aero-elastic codes that use blade element momentum (BEM) approaches to model the rotor aerodynamics. The present work describes an approach to wind-turbine rotor design by incorporating a higher-fidelity free-wake panel aero-elastic coupling code called MIRAS-FLEX. The optimization procedure includes a series of design load cases and a simple structural design code. Due to the heavy MIRAS-FLEX computations, a surrogate-modeling approach is applied to mitigate the overall computational cost of the optimization. Improvements in cost of energy, annual energy production, maximum flap-wise root bending moment, and blade mass were obtained for the NREL 5MW baseline wind turbine.

  2. Large Eddy Simulation of the meandering of a wind turbine wake with stochastically generated boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Yann-Aël; Masson, Christian; Aubrun, Sandrine

    2014-06-01

    Wind turbine wakes are known to be affected by the large atmospheric turbulent scales, which can cause trajectory variations within a wide frequency band. This phenomenon, called meandering, is suspected to be a cause of premature wear on turbines located inside wind farms. This work proposes a method to generate and apply synthetic turbulent velocity series as boundary conditions in a Large Eddy Simulation of an actuator disk in a flow with realistic turbulence characteristics. The stochastic generation method relies on the inverse Short-Time Fourier Transform (STFT) of a random vector field correlated in Fourier space according to the covariance tensor calculated from the homogeneous isotropic spectral tensor. In contrast with a single Fourier transform, the STFT allows the generation of arbitrarily large velocity fields. The generated series are used as boundary values on the inlet as well as on the lateral boundaries of the domain. This allows for sustained turbulent forcing on the whole length of the domain which is especially useful for a small computational domain relative to the size of the dominant turbulent scales.

  3. Helical vortex-based model of deterministic stresses for Large-Eddy-Simulation of a wind turbine wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracons, Marc; Meneveau, Charles; Parlange, Marc

    2008-11-01

    When representing a wind turbine in LES using a drag disk (e.g. A. Jimenez et al. 2007), the periodic effects due to the turbine's rotating elements remain unresolved. The periodic effects on the mean flow can be represented in a simulation using deterministic stresses in the wake. In this work, based on the Biot-Savart law with a helical vortex street and various simplifications, we develop an analytical expression for the deterministic, periodic velocity fluctuations in the wake. Then, the deterministic stress tensor is obtained by the product of the approximated fluctuating components of velocity, and integration over a helical period. The resulting model is implemented within a Large Eddy Simulation of an array of wind turbines, using the scale-dependent Lagrangian dynamic model (Bou-Zeid et al. 2005). The importance of the deterministic stresses on the computed wake structure is examined by varying the strength of the helical vortices.

  4. Comparison of the Dynamic Wake Meandering Model, Large-Eddy Simulation, and Field Data at the Egmond aan Zee Offshore Wind Plant: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Churchfield, M. J.; Moriarty, P. J.; Hao, Y.; Lackner, M. A.; Barthelmie, R.; Lundquist, J.; Oxley, G. S.

    2014-12-01

    The focus of this work is the comparison of the dynamic wake meandering model and large-eddy simulation with field data from the Egmond aan Zee offshore wind plant composed of 36 3-MW turbines. The field data includes meteorological mast measurements, SCADA information from all turbines, and strain-gauge data from two turbines. The dynamic wake meandering model and large-eddy simulation are means of computing unsteady wind plant aerodynamics, including the important unsteady meandering of wakes as they convect downstream and interact with other turbines and wakes. Both of these models are coupled to a turbine model such that power and mechanical loads of each turbine in the wind plant are computed. We are interested in how accurately different types of waking (e.g., direct versus partial waking), can be modeled, and how background turbulence level affects these loads. We show that both the dynamic wake meandering model and large-eddy simulation appear to underpredict power and overpredict fatigue loads because of wake effects, but it is unclear that they are really in error. This discrepancy may be caused by wind-direction uncertainty in the field data, which tends to make wake effects appear less pronounced.

  5. Spatial large-eddy simulations of contrail formation in the wake of an airliner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paoli, R.

    2015-12-01

    Contrails and contrail-cirrus are the most uncertain contributors to aviation radiative forcing. In order to reduce this uncertainty one needs to gain more knowledge on the physicochemical processes occurring in the aircraft plume, which eventually lead to the transformation of contrails into cirrus. To that end, the accurate prediction of the number of activated particles and their spatial and size distributions at the end of the jet regime may be helpful to initialize simulations in the following vortex regime. We present the results from spatial large-eddy simulations (LES) of contrail formation in the near-field wake of a generic (but full-scale) airliner that is representative of those used in long-haul flights in current fleets. The flow around the aircraft has been computed using a RANS code taking into account the full geometry that include the engines and the aerodynamic set-up for cruise conditions. The data have been reconstructed at a plane closely behind the trailing edge of the wing and used as inflow boundary conditions for the LES. We employ fully compressible 3D LES coupled to Lagrangian microphysical module that tracks parcels of ice particles individually. The ice microphysical model is simple yet it contains the basic thermodynamic ingredients to model soot activation and water vapor deposition. Compared to one-dimensional models or even RANS, LES allow for more accurate predictions of the mixing between exhaust and ambient air. Hence, the number of activated particles and the ice growth rate can be also determined with higher accuracy. This is particularly crucial for particles located at the edge of the jet that experience large gradients of temperature and humidity. The results of the fully coupled LES (where the gas phase and the particles are solved together) are compared to offline simulations where the ice microphysics model is run using thermodynamic data from pre-calculated particle trajectories extracted from inert LES (where ice

  6. Discrete Scale Invariance of Human Large EEG Voltage Deflections is More Prominent in Waking than Sleep Stage 2.

    PubMed

    Zorick, Todd; Mandelkern, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is typically viewed through the lens of spectral analysis. Recently, multiple lines of evidence have demonstrated that the underlying neuronal dynamics are characterized by scale-free avalanches. These results suggest that techniques from statistical physics may be used to analyze EEG signals. We utilized a publicly available database of fourteen subjects with waking and sleep stage 2 EEG tracings per subject, and observe that power-law dynamics of critical-state neuronal avalanches are not sufficient to fully describe essential features of EEG signals. We hypothesized that this could reflect the phenomenon of discrete scale invariance (DSI) in EEG large voltage deflections (LVDs) as being more prominent in waking consciousness. We isolated LVDs, and analyzed logarithmically transformed LVD size probability density functions (PDF) to assess for DSI. We find evidence of increased DSI in waking, as opposed to sleep stage 2 consciousness. We also show that the signatures of DSI are specific for EEG LVDs, and not a general feature of fractal simulations with similar statistical properties to EEG. Removing only LVDs from waking EEG produces a reduction in power in the alpha and beta frequency bands. These findings may represent a new insight into the understanding of the cortical dynamics underlying consciousness.

  7. Large Eddy Simulation of Wind Turbine Wake Dynamics in the Stable Boundary Layer Using the Weather Research and Forecasting Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitken, M.; Kosovic, B.; Mirocha, J. D.; Lundquist, J. K.

    2014-12-01

    To thoroughly verify the actuator disk model recently implemented in WRF for large eddy simulation (LES) of wind turbine wakes, simulations of various types of turbines and atmospheric conditions must be compared to full-scale field measurements of the real atmosphere. Here, numerical simulations are compared to nacelle-based scanning lidar measurements taken in stable atmospheric conditions during a field campaign conducted at a wind farm in the western United States. Using several wake characteristics—such as the velocity deficit, centerline location, and wake width—as metrics for model verification, the simulations show good agreement with the observations. Notably, the average velocity deficit was seen to be quite high in both the experiment and simulation, resulting from a low average wind speed and therefore high average turbine thrust coefficient. Moreover, new features—namely rotor tilt and drag from the nacelle and tower—were added to the existing actuator disk model in WRF-LES. Compared to the rotor, the effect of the tower and nacelle on the flow is relatively small but nevertheless important for an accurate representation of the entire turbine. Adding rotor tilt to the model causes the vertical location of the wake center to shift upward. Continued advancement of the actuator disk model in WRF-LES will help lead to optimized turbine siting and controls at wind farms.

  8. Discrete Scale Invariance of Human Large EEG Voltage Deflections is More Prominent in Waking than Sleep Stage 2

    PubMed Central

    Zorick, Todd; Mandelkern, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is typically viewed through the lens of spectral analysis. Recently, multiple lines of evidence have demonstrated that the underlying neuronal dynamics are characterized by scale-free avalanches. These results suggest that techniques from statistical physics may be used to analyze EEG signals. We utilized a publicly available database of fourteen subjects with waking and sleep stage 2 EEG tracings per subject, and observe that power-law dynamics of critical-state neuronal avalanches are not sufficient to fully describe essential features of EEG signals. We hypothesized that this could reflect the phenomenon of discrete scale invariance (DSI) in EEG large voltage deflections (LVDs) as being more prominent in waking consciousness. We isolated LVDs, and analyzed logarithmically transformed LVD size probability density functions (PDF) to assess for DSI. We find evidence of increased DSI in waking, as opposed to sleep stage 2 consciousness. We also show that the signatures of DSI are specific for EEG LVDs, and not a general feature of fractal simulations with similar statistical properties to EEG. Removing only LVDs from waking EEG produces a reduction in power in the alpha and beta frequency bands. These findings may represent a new insight into the understanding of the cortical dynamics underlying consciousness. PMID:26696860

  9. Discrete Scale Invariance of Human Large EEG Voltage Deflections is More Prominent in Waking than Sleep Stage 2.

    PubMed

    Zorick, Todd; Mandelkern, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is typically viewed through the lens of spectral analysis. Recently, multiple lines of evidence have demonstrated that the underlying neuronal dynamics are characterized by scale-free avalanches. These results suggest that techniques from statistical physics may be used to analyze EEG signals. We utilized a publicly available database of fourteen subjects with waking and sleep stage 2 EEG tracings per subject, and observe that power-law dynamics of critical-state neuronal avalanches are not sufficient to fully describe essential features of EEG signals. We hypothesized that this could reflect the phenomenon of discrete scale invariance (DSI) in EEG large voltage deflections (LVDs) as being more prominent in waking consciousness. We isolated LVDs, and analyzed logarithmically transformed LVD size probability density functions (PDF) to assess for DSI. We find evidence of increased DSI in waking, as opposed to sleep stage 2 consciousness. We also show that the signatures of DSI are specific for EEG LVDs, and not a general feature of fractal simulations with similar statistical properties to EEG. Removing only LVDs from waking EEG produces a reduction in power in the alpha and beta frequency bands. These findings may represent a new insight into the understanding of the cortical dynamics underlying consciousness. PMID:26696860

  10. Toward Understanding Wake Vortices and Atmospheric Turbulence Interactions Using Large-Eddy Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeCroix, David; Lin, Yuh-Lang; Arya, S. Pal; Kao, C.-T.; Shen, S.

    1997-01-01

    The vortices produced by an aircraft in flight are a complex phenomena created from a 'sheet of vorticity' leaving the trailing edge of the aircraft surfaces. This sheet tends to roll-up into two counter-rotating vortices. After a few spans downstream of the aircraft, the roll-up process is complete and the vortex pair may be characterized in a simple manner for modeling purposes. Our research will focus on what happens to these post roll-up vortices in the vicinity of an airport terminal. As the aircraft wake vortices descend, they are transported by the air mass which they are embedded and are decayed by both internal and external processes. In the vicinity of the airport, these external influences are usually due to planetary boundary layer (PBL) turbulence. Using large-eddy simulation (LES), one may simulate a variety of PBL conditions. In the LES method, turbulence is generated in the PBL as a response to surface heat flux, horizontal pressure gradient, wind shear, and/or stratification, and may produce convective or unstably stratified, neutral, or stably stratified PBL's. Each of these PBL types can occur during a typical diurnal cycle of the PBL. Thus it is important to be able to characterize these conditions with the LES method. Once this turbulent environment has been generated, a vortex pair will be introduced and the interactions are observed. The objective is to be able to quantify the PBL turbulence vortex interaction and be able to draw some conclusions of vortex behavior from the various scale interactions. This research is ongoing, and we will focus on what has been accomplished to date and the future direction of this research. We will discuss the model being used, show results that validate its use in the PBL, and present a nested-grid method proposed to analyze the entire PBL and vortex pair simultaneously.

  11. On the Large Scale Dynamics in the Wake of a Fractal Obstacle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higham, Jonathan; Brevis, Wernher

    2015-11-01

    In a water flume three-dimensional Particle Tracking Velocimetry is used to capture the turbulent wake of two full-width and wall-mounted obstacles: The first obstacle is a uniformly spaced array of square cylinders of same length-scale; the second is a three-iteration pre-fractal based on a the deterministic Sierpinski Carpet. Both obstacles emerge from the water surface and had the same porosity. For the description of the instantaneous vortical structures the velocity gradient tensor is analysed. It is found that whilst the largest length scales of the fractal dominated the vorticity field in the wake, the smaller length-scale within the obstacle caused intense vortical structures within the near field of the wake. To further investigate the spatio-temporal behaviour of the wake a simple and integrated use of the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) and Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD) is introduced. POD is used to rank the spatial structures relatable to the total variance (i.e. vorticity) while DMD is used to identify their dominant oscillation frequencies and spatial characteristics. From the POD it is clear that the largest length-scale creates spatially dominant structures, whilst the DMD extracts a set of oscillatory frequencies relatable to each fractal length-scale.

  12. Coalescing Wind Turbine Wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Churchfield, M.; Sirnivas, S.; Moriarty, P.; Nielsen, F. G.; Skaare, B.; Byklum, E.

    2015-06-01

    A team of researchers from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Statoil used large-eddy simulations to numerically investigate the merging wakes from upstream offshore wind turbines. Merging wakes are typical phenomena in wind farm flows in which neighboring turbine wakes consolidate to form complex flow patterns that are as yet not well understood. In the present study, three 6-MW turbines in a row were subjected to a neutrally stable atmospheric boundary layer flow. As a result, the wake from the farthest upstream turbine conjoined the downstream wake, which significantly altered the subsequent velocity deficit structures, turbulence intensity, and the global meandering behavior. The complexity increased even more when the combined wakes from the two upstream turbines mixed with the wake generated by the last turbine, thereby forming a “triplet” structure. Although the influence of the wake generated by the first turbine decayed with downstream distance, the mutated wakes from the second turbine continued to influence the downstream wake. Two mirror-image angles of wind directions that yielded partial wakes impinging on the downstream turbines yielded asymmetric wake profiles that could be attributed to the changing flow directions in the rotor plane induced by the Coriolis force. The turbine wakes persisted for extended distances in the present study, which is a result of low aerodynamic surface roughness typically found in offshore conditions.

  13. Coalescing Wind Turbine Wakes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; Churchfield, M.; Sirnivas, S.; Moriarty, P.; Nielsen, F. G.; Skaare, B.; Byklum, E.

    2015-06-18

    A team of researchers from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Statoil used large-eddy simulations to numerically investigate the merging wakes from upstream offshore wind turbines. Merging wakes are typical phenomena in wind farm flows in which neighboring turbine wakes consolidate to form complex flow patterns that are as yet not well understood. In the present study, three 6-MW turbines in a row were subjected to a neutrally stable atmospheric boundary layer flow. As a result, the wake from the farthest upstream turbine conjoined the downstream wake, which significantly altered the subsequent velocity deficit structures, turbulence intensity, and the global meandering behavior. The complexity increased even more when the combined wakes from the two upstream turbines mixed with the wake generated by the last turbine, thereby forming a "triplet" structure. Although the influence of the wake generated by the first turbine decayed with downstream distance, the mutated wakes from the second turbine continued to influence the downstream wake. Two mirror-image angles of wind directions that yielded partial wakes impinging on the downstream turbines yielded asymmetric wake profiles that could be attributed to the changing flow directions in the rotor plane induced by the Coriolis force. In conclusion, the turbine wakes persisted for extended distances in the present study, which is a result of low aerodynamic surface roughness typically found in offshore conditions

  14. Coalescing Wind Turbine Wakes

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, S.; Churchfield, M.; Sirnivas, S.; Moriarty, P.; Nielsen, F. G.; Skaare, B.; Byklum, E.

    2015-06-18

    A team of researchers from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Statoil used large-eddy simulations to numerically investigate the merging wakes from upstream offshore wind turbines. Merging wakes are typical phenomena in wind farm flows in which neighboring turbine wakes consolidate to form complex flow patterns that are as yet not well understood. In the present study, three 6-MW turbines in a row were subjected to a neutrally stable atmospheric boundary layer flow. As a result, the wake from the farthest upstream turbine conjoined the downstream wake, which significantly altered the subsequent velocity deficit structures, turbulence intensity, and the globalmore » meandering behavior. The complexity increased even more when the combined wakes from the two upstream turbines mixed with the wake generated by the last turbine, thereby forming a "triplet" structure. Although the influence of the wake generated by the first turbine decayed with downstream distance, the mutated wakes from the second turbine continued to influence the downstream wake. Two mirror-image angles of wind directions that yielded partial wakes impinging on the downstream turbines yielded asymmetric wake profiles that could be attributed to the changing flow directions in the rotor plane induced by the Coriolis force. In conclusion, the turbine wakes persisted for extended distances in the present study, which is a result of low aerodynamic surface roughness typically found in offshore conditions« less

  15. Large Eddy Simulation of Wind Turbine Wakes. Detailed Comparisons of Two Codes Focusing on Effects of Numerics and Subgrid Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Tossas, Luis A.; Churchfield, Matthew J.; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-06-18

    In this work we report on results from a detailed comparative numerical study from two Large Eddy Simulation (LES) codes using the Actuator Line Model (ALM). The study focuses on prediction of wind turbine wakes and their breakdown when subject to uniform inflow. Previous studies have shown relative insensitivity to subgrid modeling in the context of a finite-volume code. The present study uses the low dissipation pseudo-spectral LES code from Johns Hopkins University (LESGO) and the second-order, finite-volume OpenFOAMcode (SOWFA) from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. When subject to uniform inflow, the loads on the blades are found to be unaffected by subgrid models or numerics, as expected. The turbulence in the wake and the location of transition to a turbulent state are affected by the subgrid-scale model and the numerics.

  16. Large Eddy Simulation of wind turbine wakes: detailed comparisons of two codes focusing on effects of numerics and subgrid modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Tossas, Luis A.; Churchfield, Matthew J.; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-06-01

    In this work we report on results from a detailed comparative numerical study from two Large Eddy Simulation (LES) codes using the Actuator Line Model (ALM). The study focuses on prediction of wind turbine wakes and their breakdown when subject to uniform inflow. Previous studies have shown relative insensitivity to subgrid modeling in the context of a finite-volume code. The present study uses the low dissipation pseudo-spectral LES code from Johns Hopkins University (LESGO) and the second-order, finite-volume OpenFOAMcode (SOWFA) from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. When subject to uniform inflow, the loads on the blades are found to be unaffected by subgrid models or numerics, as expected. The turbulence in the wake and the location of transition to a turbulent state are affected by the subgrid-scale model and the numerics.

  17. Large Eddy Simulation of Wind Turbine Wakes. Detailed Comparisons of Two Codes Focusing on Effects of Numerics and Subgrid Modeling

    DOE PAGES

    Martinez-Tossas, Luis A.; Churchfield, Matthew J.; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-06-18

    In this work we report on results from a detailed comparative numerical study from two Large Eddy Simulation (LES) codes using the Actuator Line Model (ALM). The study focuses on prediction of wind turbine wakes and their breakdown when subject to uniform inflow. Previous studies have shown relative insensitivity to subgrid modeling in the context of a finite-volume code. The present study uses the low dissipation pseudo-spectral LES code from Johns Hopkins University (LESGO) and the second-order, finite-volume OpenFOAMcode (SOWFA) from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. When subject to uniform inflow, the loads on the blades are found to bemore » unaffected by subgrid models or numerics, as expected. The turbulence in the wake and the location of transition to a turbulent state are affected by the subgrid-scale model and the numerics.« less

  18. Transitional flow in the wake of a moderate to large height cylindrical roughness element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plogmann, B.; Würz, W.; Krämer, E.

    2015-12-01

    The effect of an isolated, cylindrical roughness on the stability of an airfoil boundary layer has been studied based on particle image velocimetry and hot-wire anemometry. The investigated roughness elements range from a sub-critical to a super-critical behavior with regard to the critical roughness Reynolds number. For the sub-critical case, the nonlinear disturbance growth in the near wake is governed by oblique Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) type modes. Further downstream, these disturbance modes are, however, damped with the mean flow stabilization and no dominant modes persist in the far wake. By contrast, in the transitional configuration the disturbance growth is increased, but still associated with a TS-type instability in the near-wake centerline region of the low-aspect (height-to-diameter) ratio element. That is, the disturbances in the centerline region show a similar behavior as known for 2D elements, whereas in the outer spanwise domain a Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) type, shear-layer instability is found, as previously reported for larger aspect ratio isolated elements. With increasing height and, thereby, aspect ratio of the roughness, the KH-type instability domain extends toward the centerline and, accordingly, the TS-type instability domain decreases. For high super-critical cases, transition is already triggered in the wall-normal and spanwise shear layers upstream and around the roughness. In the immediate wake, periodic shear-layer disturbances roll up into a—for isolated elements characteristic—shedding of vortices, which was not present at the lower roughness Reynolds number cases due to the decreased aspect ratio and, thereby, different instability mechanism.

  19. Large-Eddy Simulation Study of Wake Propagation and Power Production in an Array of Tidal-Current Turbines: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Churchfield, M. J.; Li, Y.; Moriarty, P. J.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents our initial work in performing large-eddy simulations of tidal turbine array flows. First, a horizontally-periodic precursor simulation is performed to create turbulent flow data. Then that data is used as inflow into a tidal turbine array two rows deep and infinitely wide. The turbines are modeled using rotating actuator lines, and the finite-volume method is used to solve the governing equations. In studying the wakes created by the turbines, we observed that the vertical shear of the inflow combined with wake rotation causes lateral wake asymmetry. Also, various turbine configurations are simulated, and the total power production relative to isolated turbines is examined. Staggering consecutive rows of turbines in the simulated configurations allows the greatest efficiency using the least downstream row spacing. Counter-rotating consecutive downstream turbines in a non-staggered array shows a small benefit. This work has identified areas for improvement, such as the use of a larger precursor domain to better capture elongated turbulent structures, the inclusion of salinity and temperature equations to account for density stratification and its effect on turbulence, improved wall shear stress modelling, and the examination of more array configurations.

  20. A large-eddy simulation study of wake propagation and power production in an array of tidal-current turbines.

    PubMed

    Churchfield, Matthew J; Li, Ye; Moriarty, Patrick J

    2013-02-28

    This paper presents our initial work in performing large-eddy simulations of tidal turbine array flows. First, a horizontally periodic precursor simulation is performed to create turbulent flow data. Then those data are used as inflow into a tidal turbine array two rows deep and infinitely wide. The turbines are modelled using rotating actuator lines, and the finite-volume method is used to solve the governing equations. In studying the wakes created by the turbines, we observed that the vertical shear of the inflow combined with wake rotation causes lateral wake asymmetry. Also, various turbine configurations are simulated, and the total power production relative to isolated turbines is examined. We found that staggering consecutive rows of turbines in the simulated configurations allows the greatest efficiency using the least downstream row spacing. Counter-rotating consecutive downstream turbines in a non-staggered array shows a small benefit. This work has identified areas for improvement. For example, using a larger precursor domain would better capture elongated turbulent structures, and including salinity and temperature equations would account for density stratification and its effect on turbulence. Additionally, the wall shear stress modelling could be improved, and more array configurations could be examined.

  1. Large-Eddy Simulation Study of Wake Propagation and Power Production in an Array of Tidal-Current Turbines: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Churchfield, M. J.; Li, Y.; Moriarty, P. J.

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents our initial work in performing large-eddy simulations of tidal turbine array flows. First, a horizontally-periodic precursor simulation is performed to create turbulent flow data. Then that data is used to determine the inflow into a tidal turbine array two rows deep and infinitely wide. The turbines are modeled using rotating actuator lines, and the finite-volume method is used to solve the governing equations. In studying the wakes created by the turbines, we observed that the vertical shear of the inflow combined with wake rotation causes lateral wake asymmetry. Also, various turbine configurations are simulated, and the total power production relative to isolated turbines is examined. Staggering consecutive rows of turbines in the simulated configurations allows the greatest efficiency using the least downstream row spacing. Counter-rotating consecutive downstream turbines in a non-staggered array shows a small benefit. This work has identified areas for improvement, such as the use of a larger precursor domain to better capture elongated turbulent structures, the inclusion of salinity and temperature equations to account for density stratification and its effect on turbulence, improved wall shear stress modeling, and the examination of more array configurations.

  2. A large-eddy simulation study of wake propagation and power production in an array of tidal-current turbines.

    PubMed

    Churchfield, Matthew J; Li, Ye; Moriarty, Patrick J

    2013-02-28

    This paper presents our initial work in performing large-eddy simulations of tidal turbine array flows. First, a horizontally periodic precursor simulation is performed to create turbulent flow data. Then those data are used as inflow into a tidal turbine array two rows deep and infinitely wide. The turbines are modelled using rotating actuator lines, and the finite-volume method is used to solve the governing equations. In studying the wakes created by the turbines, we observed that the vertical shear of the inflow combined with wake rotation causes lateral wake asymmetry. Also, various turbine configurations are simulated, and the total power production relative to isolated turbines is examined. We found that staggering consecutive rows of turbines in the simulated configurations allows the greatest efficiency using the least downstream row spacing. Counter-rotating consecutive downstream turbines in a non-staggered array shows a small benefit. This work has identified areas for improvement. For example, using a larger precursor domain would better capture elongated turbulent structures, and including salinity and temperature equations would account for density stratification and its effect on turbulence. Additionally, the wall shear stress modelling could be improved, and more array configurations could be examined. PMID:23319713

  3. Aeroelastic behavior of twist-coupled HAWT blades

    SciTech Connect

    Lobitz, D.W.; Veers, P.S.

    1998-12-31

    As the technology for horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWT) development matures, more novel techniques are required for the capture of additional amounts of energy, alleviation of loads and control of the rotor. One such technique employs the use of an adaptive blade that could sense the wind velocity or rotational speed in some fashion and accordingly modify its aerodynamic configuration to meet a desired objective. This could be achieved in either an active or passive manner, although the passive approach is much more attractive due to its simplicity and economy. As an example, a blade design might employ coupling between bending and/or extension, and twisting so that, as it bends and extends due to the action of the aerodynamic and inertial loads, it also twists modifying the aerodynamic performance in some way. These performance modifications also have associated aeroelastic effects, including effects on aeroelastic instability. To address the scope and magnitude of these effects a tool has been developed for investigating classical flutter and divergence of HAWT blades. As a starting point, an adaptive version of the uniform Combined Experiment Blade will be investigated. Flutter and divergence airspeeds will be reported as a function of the strength of the coupling and also be compared to those of generic blade counterparts.

  4. A large-domain approach for calculating ship boundary layers and wakes and wave fields for nonzero Froude number

    SciTech Connect

    Tahara, Y.; Stern, F.

    1996-09-01

    A large-domain approach is developed for calculating ship boundary layers and wakes and wave fields for nonzero Froude number. The Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes and continuity equations are solved with the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model, exact nonlinear kinematic and approximate dynamic free-surface boundary conditions, and a body/free-surface conforming grid. The results are validated through comparisons with data for the Series 60 C{sub B} = 0.6 ship model at low and high Froude numbers and results of a precursory interactive approach. Both approaches yield satisfactory results; however, the large-domain results indicate improved resolution of the flow close to the hull and wake centerplane and of the Froucle number differences due to near-wall turbulence modeling and non-linear free-surface boundary conditions. Additional evaluation is provided through discussion of the recent CFD Workshop Tokyo 1994, where both methods were among the best. Last, some concluding remarks are made. 20 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Implementation and assessment of turbine wake models in the Weather Research and Forecasting model for both mesoscale and large-eddy simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, M; Mirocha, J; Lundquist, J; Cleve, J

    2010-03-03

    Flow dynamics in large wind projects are influenced by the turbines located within. The turbine wakes, regions characterized by lower wind speeds and higher levels of turbulence than the surrounding free stream flow, can extend several rotor diameters downstream, and may meander and widen with increasing distance from the turbine. Turbine wakes can also reduce the power generated by downstream turbines and accelerate fatigue and damage to turbine components. An improved understanding of wake formation and transport within wind parks is essential for maximizing power output and increasing turbine lifespan. Moreover, the influence of wakes from large wind projects on neighboring wind farms, agricultural activities, and local climate are all areas of concern that can likewise be addressed by wake modeling. This work describes the formulation and application of an actuator disk model for studying flow dynamics of both individual turbines and arrays of turbines within wind projects. The actuator disk model is implemented in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, which is an open-source atmospheric simulation code applicable to a wide range of scales, from mesoscale to large-eddy simulation. Preliminary results demonstrate the applicability of the actuator disk model within WRF to a moderately high-resolution large-eddy simulation study of a small array of turbines.

  6. Design, analysis and testing of small, affordable HAWT rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pricop, Mihai V.; Niculescu, Mihai L.; Cojocaru, Marius G.; Barsan, Dorin

    2012-09-01

    The paper presents affordable technologies dedicated to design, CAD modelling and manufacturing of the small-medium HAWT rotors. Three numerical tools are developed: blade/rotor design, blade modelling for industry CATIA(CATScript) and blade modelling for small scale developers. Numerical analysis of the rotors is accomplished for both performance and noise level estimation using XFLOW (LES) and an in-house code (URANS). Results are presented for a 5KW rotor at the design point only, since computations are expensive. Developement examples are included as two rotors are designed, manufactured and tested for 1.5 and 5KW. A third one, rated for 20KW is under developement. Basic testing results are also included.

  7. Disaster, Deprivation and Death: Large but delayed infant mortality in the wake of Filipino tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anttila-Hughes, J. K.; Hsiang, S. M.

    2011-12-01

    Tropical cyclones are some of the most disastrous and damaging of climate events, and estimates of their destructive potential abound in the natural and social sciences. Nonetheless, there have been few systematic estimates of cyclones' impact on children's health. This is concerning because cyclones leave in their wake a swath of asset losses and economic deprivation, both known to be strong drivers of poor health outcomes among children. In this paper we provide a household-level estimate of the effect of tropical cyclones on infant mortality in the Philippines, a country with one of the most active cyclone climatologies in the world. We reconstruct historical cyclones with detailed spatial and temporal resolution, allowing us to estimate the multi-year effects of cyclones on individuals living in specific locations. We combine the cyclone reconstruction with woman-level fertility and mortality data from four waves of the Filipino Demographic and Health Survey, providing birth histories for over 55,000 women. In multiple regressions that control for year and region fixed effects as well as intra-annual climate variation, we find that there is a pronounced and robust increase in female infant mortality among poor families in the 12-24 months after storms hit. The estimated mortality rate among this demographic subgroup is much larger than official mortality rates reported by the Filipino government immediately after storms, implying that much of a cyclone's human cost arrives well after the storm has passed. We find that high infant mortality rates are associated with declines in poor families' income and expenditures, including consumption of food and medical services, suggesting that the mechanism by which these deaths are effected may be economic deprivation. These results indicate that a major health and welfare impact of storms has been thus far overlooked, but may be easily prevented through appropriately targeted income support policies.

  8. The Wake of a Single Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsky, Danielle

    Vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) pose various advantages over traditional horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWTs), including their smaller size and footprint, quiet operation, and ability to produce power under a greater variety of wind directions and wind speeds. To determine the optimal spacing of an array of VAWTs for maximum power output, an understanding of the fundamental wake structure of a single VAWT is needed. This study is among the first attempts to experimentally visualize the wake of a VAWT using stereo particle image velocimetry (PIV). A scale VAWT is placed inside a wind tunnel and a motor rotates the scale model at a constant rotational speed. Wake data at several Reynolds numbers and tip speed ratios indicate that vortices are shed by each blade of the spinning VAWT, demonstrating significant differences between the wake of a VAWT and a spinning cylinder.

  9. Cosmic string wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stebbins, Albert; Veeraraghavan, Shoba; Silk, Joseph; Brandenberger, Robert; Turok, Neil

    1987-01-01

    Accretion of matter onto wakes left behind by horizon-sized pieces of cosmic string is investigated, and the effects of wakes on the large-scale structure of the universe are determined. Accretion of cold matter onto wakes, the effects of a long string on fluids with finite velocity dispersion or sound speeds, the interactions between loops and wakes, and the conditions for wakes to survive disruption by loops are discussed. It is concluded that the most important wakes are those which were formed at the time of equal matter and radiation density. This leads to sheetlike overdense regions of galaxies with a mean separation in agreement with the scale of the bubbles of de Lapparent, Geller, and Huchra (1986). However, for the value of G(mu) favored from galaxy formation considerations in a universe with cold dark matter, a wake accretes matter from a distance of only about 1.5 Mpc, which is much less than the distance between the wakes.

  10. Investigating wind turbine impacts on near-wake flow using profiling Lidar data and large-eddy simulations with an actuator disk model

    DOE PAGES

    Mirocha, Jeffrey D.; Rajewski, Daniel A.; Marjanovic, Nikola; Lundquist, Julie K.; Kosovic, Branko; Draxl, Caroline; Churchfield, Matthew J.

    2015-08-27

    In this study, wind turbine impacts on the atmospheric flow are investigated using data from the Crop Wind Energy Experiment (CWEX-11) and large-eddy simulations (LESs) utilizing a generalized actuator disk (GAD) wind turbine model. CWEX-11 employed velocity-azimuth display (VAD) data from two Doppler lidar systems to sample vertical profiles of flow parameters across the rotor depth both upstream and in the wake of an operating 1.5 MW wind turbine. Lidar and surface observations obtained during four days of July 2011 are analyzed to characterize the turbine impacts on wind speed and flow variability, and to examine the sensitivity of thesemore » changes to atmospheric stability. Significant velocity deficits (VD) are observed at the downstream location during both convective and stable portions of four diurnal cycles, with large, sustained deficits occurring during stable conditions. Variances of the streamwise velocity component, σu, likewise show large increases downstream during both stable and unstable conditions, with stable conditions supporting sustained small increases of σu , while convective conditions featured both larger magnitudes and increased variability, due to the large coherent structures in the background flow. Two representative case studies, one stable and one convective, are simulated using LES with a GAD model at 6 m resolution to evaluate the compatibility of the simulation framework with validation using vertically profiling lidar data in the near wake region. Virtual lidars were employed to sample the simulated flow field in a manner consistent with the VAD technique. Simulations reasonably reproduced aggregated wake VD characteristics, albeit with smaller magnitudes than observed, while σu values in the wake are more significantly underestimated. The results illuminate the limitations of using a GAD in combination with coarse model resolution in the simulation of near wake physics, and validation thereof using VAD data.« less

  11. Investigating wind turbine impacts on near-wake flow using profiling Lidar data and large-eddy simulations with an actuator disk model

    SciTech Connect

    Mirocha, Jeffrey D.; Rajewski, Daniel A.; Marjanovic, Nikola; Lundquist, Julie K.; Kosovic, Branko; Draxl, Caroline; Churchfield, Matthew J.

    2015-08-27

    In this study, wind turbine impacts on the atmospheric flow are investigated using data from the Crop Wind Energy Experiment (CWEX-11) and large-eddy simulations (LESs) utilizing a generalized actuator disk (GAD) wind turbine model. CWEX-11 employed velocity-azimuth display (VAD) data from two Doppler lidar systems to sample vertical profiles of flow parameters across the rotor depth both upstream and in the wake of an operating 1.5 MW wind turbine. Lidar and surface observations obtained during four days of July 2011 are analyzed to characterize the turbine impacts on wind speed and flow variability, and to examine the sensitivity of these changes to atmospheric stability. Significant velocity deficits (VD) are observed at the downstream location during both convective and stable portions of four diurnal cycles, with large, sustained deficits occurring during stable conditions. Variances of the streamwise velocity component, σu, likewise show large increases downstream during both stable and unstable conditions, with stable conditions supporting sustained small increases of σu , while convective conditions featured both larger magnitudes and increased variability, due to the large coherent structures in the background flow. Two representative case studies, one stable and one convective, are simulated using LES with a GAD model at 6 m resolution to evaluate the compatibility of the simulation framework with validation using vertically profiling lidar data in the near wake region. Virtual lidars were employed to sample the simulated flow field in a manner consistent with the VAD technique. Simulations reasonably reproduced aggregated wake VD characteristics, albeit with smaller magnitudes than observed, while σu values in the wake are more significantly underestimated. The results illuminate the limitations of using a GAD in combination with coarse model resolution in the simulation of near wake physics, and validation thereof using VAD data.

  12. A Complete Procedure for Predicting and Improving the Performance of HAWT's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Abadi, Ali; Ertunç, Özgür; Sittig, Florian; Delgado, Antonio

    2014-06-01

    A complete procedure for predicting and improving the performance of the horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) has been developed. The first process is predicting the power extracted by the turbine and the derived rotor torque, which should be identical to that of the drive unit. The BEM method and a developed post-stall treatment for resolving stall-regulated HAWT is incorporated in the prediction. For that, a modified stall-regulated prediction model, which can predict the HAWT performance over the operating range of oncoming wind velocity, is derived from existing models. The model involves radius and chord, which has made it more general in applications for predicting the performance of different scales and rotor shapes of HAWTs. The second process is modifying the rotor shape by an optimization process, which can be applied to any existing HAWT, to improve its performance. A gradient- based optimization is used for adjusting the chord and twist angle distribution of the rotor blade to increase the extraction of the power while keeping the drive torque constant, thus the same drive unit can be kept. The final process is testing the modified turbine to predict its enhanced performance. The procedure is applied to NREL phase-VI 10kW as a baseline turbine. The study has proven the applicability of the developed model in predicting the performance of the baseline as well as the optimized turbine. In addition, the optimization method has shown that the power coefficient can be increased while keeping same design rotational speed.

  13. Torque-Matched Aerodynamic Shape Optimization of HAWT Rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Abadi, Ali; Ertunç, Özgür; Beyer, Florian; Delgado, Antonio

    2014-12-01

    Schmitz and Blade Element Momentum (BEM) theories are integrated to a gradient based optimization algorithm to optimize the blade shape of a horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT). The Schmitz theory is used to generate an initial blade design. BEM theory is used to calculate the forces, torque and power extracted by the turbine. The airfoil shape (NREL S809) is kept the same, so that the shape optimization comprises only the chord and the pitch angle distribution. The gradient based optimization of the blade shape is constrained to the torque-rotational speed characteristic of the generator, which is going to be a part of the experimental set-up used to validate the results of the optimization study. Hence, the objective of the optimization is the maximization of the turbines power coefficient Cp while keeping the torque matched to that of the generator. The wind velocities and the rotational speeds are limited to those achievable in the wind tunnel and by the generator, respectively. After finding the optimum blade shape with the maximum Cp within the given range of parameters, the Cp of the turbine is evaluated at wind-speeds deviating from the optimum operating condition. For this purpose, a second optimization algorithm is used to find out the correct rotational speed for a given wind-speed, which is again constrained to the generator's torque rotational speed characteristic. The design and optimization procedures are later validated by high-fidelity numerical simulations. The agreement between the design and the numerical simulations is very satisfactory.

  14. An experimental investigation on wind turbine aeromechanics and wake interferences among multiple wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozbay, Ahmet

    A comprehensive experimental study was conducted to investigate wind turbine aeromechanics and wake interferences among multiple wind turbines sited in onshore and offshore wind farms. The experiments were carried out in a large-scale Aerodynamic/Atmospheric Boundary Layer (AABL) Wind Tunnel available at Iowa State University. An array of scaled three-blade Horizontal Axial Wind Turbine (HAWT) models were placed in atmospheric boundary layer winds with different mean and turbulence characteristics to simulate the situations in onshore and offshore wind farms. The effects of the important design parameters for wind farm layout optimization, which include the mean and turbulence characteristics of the oncoming surface winds, the yaw angles of the turbines with respect to the oncoming surface winds, the array spacing and layout pattern, and the terrain topology of wind farms on the turbine performances (i.e., both power output and dynamic wind loadings) and the wake interferences among multiple wind turbines, were assessed in detail. The aeromechanic performance and near wake characteristics of a novel dual-rotor wind turbine (DRWT) design with co-rotating or counter-rotating configuration were also investigated, in comparison to a conventional single rotor wind turbine (SRWT). During the experiments, in addition to measuring dynamic wind loads (both forces and moments) and the power outputs of the scaled turbine models, a high-resolution Particle Image Velocity (PIV) system was used to conduct detailed flow field measurements (i.e., both free-run and phase-locked flow fields measurements) to reveal the transient behavior of the unsteady wake vortices and turbulent flow structures behind wind turbines and to quantify the characteristics of the wake interferences among the wind turbines sited in non-homogenous surface winds. A miniature cobra anemometer was also used to provide high-temporal-resolution data at points of interest to supplement the full field PIV

  15. PREFACE: Wake Conference 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barney, Andrew; Nørkær Sørensen, Jens; Ivanell, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    The 44 papers in this volume constitute the proceedings of the 2015 Wake Conference, held in Visby on the island of Gotland in Sweden. It is the fourth time this conference has been held. The Wake Conference series started in Visby, where it was held in 2009 and 2011. In 2013 it took place in Copenhagen where it was combined with the International Conference on Offshore Wind Energy and Ocean Energy. In 2015 it is back where it started in Visby, where it takes place at Uppsala University Campus Gotland, June 9th-11th. The global yearly production of electrical energy by wind turbines has grown tremendously in the past decade and it now comprises more than 3% of the global electrical power consumption. Today the wind power industry has a global annual turnover of more than 50 billion USD and an annual average growth rate of more than 20%. State-of-the-art wind turbines have rotor diameters of up to 150 m and 8 MW installed capacity. These turbines are often placed in large wind farms that have a total production capacity corresponding to that of a nuclear power plant. In order to make a substantial impact on one of the most significant challenges of our time, global warming, the industry's growth has to continue for a decade or two yet. This in turn requires research into the physics of wind turbine wakes and wind farms. Modern wind turbines are today clustered in wind farms in which the turbines are fully or partially influenced by the wake of upstream turbines. As a consequence, the wake behind the wind turbines has a lower mean wind speed and an increased turbulence level, as compared to the undisturbed flow outside the farm. Hence, wake interaction results in decreased total production of power, caused by lower kinetic energy in the wind, and an increase in the turbulence intensity. Therefore, understanding the physical nature of the vortices and their dynamics in the wake of a turbine is important for the optimal design of a wind farm. This conference is aimed

  16. Comparison of the far wake behind dual rotor and dual disk configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okulov, V. L.; Mikkelsen, R. F.; Naumov, I. V.; Litvinov, I. V.; Gesheva, E.; Sørensen, J. N.

    2016-09-01

    There is an increasing interest in studying the development of far wakes behind two or more interacting wind turbines in order to determine the influence of wake interaction in relation to the design of wind farms. The focus of this experimental study is to understand and describe the resulting wake features for two rotors subjected to different operating and spatial conditions. As a part of this, a comparison with the wake development behind two disks replacing the rotor models was performed to determine the difference between the two wake systems. LDA and Stereo PIV experiments were carried out to study the development of far wakes behind configurations of dual HAWT wind turbine rotors and dual circular disks. The setups were placed in the middle of a water flume. The initial flow in the flume is subjected to a very low turbulence level, limiting the influence of all external disturbances in order to focus the study to the inherent wake instability. As a result of the investigation, we obtained decays of profiles for the velocity deficit and turbulent pulsations in the far wakes behind both dual rotor and dual disk configurations. By using regression techniques to fit the obtained velocity profiles the experimental data were approximated by identical analytical models and compared to each other. An identical rational dependence with the same powers, but with different coefficients, was found for the two configurations.

  17. Absolute instability of the Gaussian wake profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.; Aggarwal, Arun K.

    1987-01-01

    Linear parallel-flow stability theory has been used to investigate the effect of viscosity on the local absolute instability of a family of wake profiles with a Gaussian velocity distribution. The type of local instability, i.e., convective or absolute, is determined by the location of a branch-point singularity with zero group velocity of the complex dispersion relation for the instability waves. The effects of viscosity were found to be weak for values of the wake Reynolds number, based on the center-line velocity defect and the wake half-width, larger than about 400. Absolute instability occurs only for sufficiently large values of the center-line wake defect. The critical value of this parameter increases with decreasing wake Reynolds number, thereby indicating a shrinking region of absolute instability with decreasing wake Reynolds number. If backflow is not allowed, absolute instability does not occur for wake Reynolds numbers smaller than about 38.

  18. A comparison of baseline aerodynamic performance of optimally-twisted versus non-twisted HAWT blades

    SciTech Connect

    Simms, D A; Robinson, M C; Hand, M M; Fingersh, L J

    1995-01-01

    NREL has completed the initial twisted blade field tests of the ``Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment.`` This test series continues systematic measurements of unsteady aerodynamic phenomena prevalent in stall-controlled horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWTs). The blade twist distribution optimizes power production at a single angle of attack along the span. Abrupt transitions into and out of stall are created due to rapid changes in inflow. Data from earlier experiments have been analyzed extensively to characterize the steady and unsteady response of untwisted blades. In this report, a characterization and comparison of the baseline aerodynamic performance of the twisted versus non-twisted blade sets will be presented for steady flow conditions.

  19. Wake fields and wake field acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, K.L.F.; Wilson, P.B.; Weiland, T.

    1984-12-01

    In this lecture we introduce the concepts of wake fields and wake potentials, examine some basic properties of these functions, show how they can be calculated, and look briefly at a few important applications. One such application is wake field acceleration. The wake field accelerator is capable of producing the high gradients required for future very high energy e/sup +/e/sup -/ linear colliders. The principles of wake field acceleration, and a brief description of experiments in progress in this area, are presented in the concluding section. 40 references, 27 figures.

  20. Exploration of the vortex wake behind of wind turbine rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massouh, F.; Dobrev, I.

    2007-07-01

    The present paper describes a wind tunnel study of flow downstream a small horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT). The experimental investigations were carried out with the use of particle image velocimetry (PIV). To obtain the flow field in the rotating frame of reference, the phase-locked technique was applied. Explorations were carried out in azimuth planes with different angles. The 3D velocity field was reconstituted by processing the images resulting from the explored azimuth planes. In addition to PIV investigations, hot-wire measurements were also carried out immediately behind the wind turbine rotor at different radial and axial distances. The obtained results are very useful to analyze wind turbine wake and to constitute a reference for CFD computation.

  1. Evolution of Rotor Wake in Swirling Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Haldidi, Basman; Atassi, Hafiz; Envia, Edmane; Podboy, Gary

    2000-01-01

    A theory is presented for modeling the evolution of rotor wakes as a function of axial distance in swirling mean flows. The theory, which extends an earlier work to include arbitrary radial distributions of mean swirl, indicates that swirl can significantly alter the wake structure of the rotor especially at large downstream distances (i.e., for moderate to large rotor-stator spacings). Using measured wakes of a representative scale model fan stage to define the mean swirl and initial wake perturbations, the theory is used to predict the subsequent evolution of the wakes. The results indicate the sensitivity of the wake evolution to the initial profile and the need to have complete and consistent initial definition of both velocity and pressure perturbations.

  2. Extraction of modal parameters from an operating HAWT using the Natural Excitation Technique (NExT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, G. H.

    The Natural Excitation Technique (NExT) is used to extract modal parameters (natural frequencies, modal damping, and mode shapes) from an operating Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine (HAWT). NExT uses the measured response from the turbine excited by the assumed broad-band, random wind input even though the excitation cannot be directly measured. The damping, measured using NExT, generally increased in the system as the wind speed increased. Such information can be used to aid in the verification and upgrade of codes which predict structural response of operating HAWT's and aid our understanding of the dynamics of wind turbines. The Northern Power Systems 100-kW machine is addressed. Strain data is available from this machine while operating at 72 rpm in 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 mph winds. The operational modal frequencies and mode shapes were measured for this machine. Reconstructions of the auto and cross spectra are used to verify the validity of the extracted parameters. The modal damping for two modes are presented for this range of wind speeds.

  3. Operational model updating of spinning finite element models for HAWT blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazquez, Antonio; Swartz, R. Andrew; Loh, Kenneth J.; Zhao, Yingjun; La Saponara, Valeria; Kamisky, Robert J.; van Dam, Cornelis P.

    2014-04-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) relies on collection and interrogation of operational data from the monitored structure. To make this data meaningful, a means of understanding how damage sensitive data features relate to the physical condition of the structure is required. Model-driven SHM applications achieve this goal through model updating. This study proposed a novel approach for updating of aero-elastic turbine blade vibrational models for operational horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs). The proposed approach updates estimates of modal properties for spinning HAWT blades intended for use in SHM and load estimation of these structures. Spinning structures present additional challenges for model updating due to spinning effects, dependence of modal properties on rotational velocity, and gyroscopic effects that lead to complex mode shapes. A cyclo-stationary stochastic-based eigensystem realization algorithm (ERA) is applied to operational turbine data to identify data-driven modal properties including frequencies and mode shapes. Model-driven modal properties are derived through modal condensation of spinning finite element models with variable physical parameters. Complex modes are converted into equivalent real modes through reduction transformation. Model updating is achieved through use of an adaptive simulated annealing search process, via Modal Assurance Criterion (MAC) with complex-conjugate modes, to find the physical parameters that best match the experimentally derived data.

  4. Modeling stability of flap-enabled HAWT blades using spinning finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazquez, A.; Swartz, R. Andrew; Dai, Qingli; Sun, Xiao

    2014-04-01

    Horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs) are growing in size and popularity for the generation of renewable energy to meet the world's ever increasing demand. Long-term safety and stability are major concerns related to the construction and use-phase of these structures. Braking and active pitch control are important tools to help maintain safe and stable operation, however variable cross-section control represents another possible tool as well. To properly evaluate the usefulness of this approach, modeling tools capable of representing the dynamic behavior of blades with conformable cross sections are necessary. In this study, a modeling method for representing turbine blades as a series of interconnected spinning finite elements (SPEs) is presented where the aerodynamic properties of individual elements may be altered to represent changes in the cross section due to conformability (e.g., use of a mechanical flap or a "smart" conformable surface). Such a model is expected to be highly valuable in design of control rules for HAWT blades with conformable elements. Sensitivity and stability of the modeling approach are explored.

  5. An unsteady vortex lattice method model of a horizontal axis wind turbine operating in an upstream rotor wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankin, D.; Graham, J. M. R.

    2014-12-01

    An unsteady formulation of the vortex lattice method, VLM, is presented that uses a force- free representation of the wake behind a horizontal axis wind turbine, HAWT, to calculate the aerodynamic loading on a turbine operating in the wake of an upstream rotor. A Cartesian velocity grid is superimposed over the computational domain to facilitate the representation of the atmospheric turbulence surrounding the turbine and wind shear. The wake of an upstream rotor is modelled using two methods: a mean velocity deficit with superimposed turbulence, based on experimental observations, and a purely numeric periodic boundary condition. Both methods are treated as frozen and propagated with the velocity grid. Measurements of the mean thrust and blade root bending moment on a three bladed horizontal axis rotor modelling a 5 MW HAWT at 1:250 scale were carried out in a wind tunnel. Comparisons are made between operation in uniform flow and in the wake of a similarly loaded rotor approximately 6.5 diameters upstream. The measurements were used to validate the output from the VLM simulations, assuming a completely rigid rotor. The trends in the simulation thrust predictions are found to compare well with the uniform flow case, except at low tip speed ratios where there are losses due to stall which are yet to be included in the model. The simple wake model predicts the mean deficit, whilst the periodic boundary condition captures more of the frequency content of the loading in an upstream wake. However, all the thrust loads are over-predicted. The simulation results severely overestimate the bending moment, which needs addressing. However, the reduction in bending due to the simple wake model is found to reflect the experimental data reasonably well.

  6. Simulation of wind turbine wakes using the actuator line technique.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Jens N; Mikkelsen, Robert F; Henningson, Dan S; Ivanell, Stefan; Sarmast, Sasan; Andersen, Søren J

    2015-02-28

    The actuator line technique was introduced as a numerical tool to be employed in combination with large eddy simulations to enable the study of wakes and wake interaction in wind farms. The technique is today largely used for studying basic features of wakes as well as for making performance predictions of wind farms. In this paper, we give a short introduction to the wake problem and the actuator line methodology and present a study in which the technique is employed to determine the near-wake properties of wind turbines. The presented results include a comparison of experimental results of the wake characteristics of the flow around a three-bladed model wind turbine, the development of a simple analytical formula for determining the near-wake length behind a wind turbine and a detailed investigation of wake structures based on proper orthogonal decomposition analysis of numerically generated snapshots of the wake. PMID:25583862

  7. Simulation of wind turbine wakes using the actuator line technique

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Jens N.; Mikkelsen, Robert F.; Henningson, Dan S.; Ivanell, Stefan; Sarmast, Sasan; Andersen, Søren J.

    2015-01-01

    The actuator line technique was introduced as a numerical tool to be employed in combination with large eddy simulations to enable the study of wakes and wake interaction in wind farms. The technique is today largely used for studying basic features of wakes as well as for making performance predictions of wind farms. In this paper, we give a short introduction to the wake problem and the actuator line methodology and present a study in which the technique is employed to determine the near-wake properties of wind turbines. The presented results include a comparison of experimental results of the wake characteristics of the flow around a three-bladed model wind turbine, the development of a simple analytical formula for determining the near-wake length behind a wind turbine and a detailed investigation of wake structures based on proper orthogonal decomposition analysis of numerically generated snapshots of the wake. PMID:25583862

  8. Simulation of wind turbine wakes using the actuator line technique.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Jens N; Mikkelsen, Robert F; Henningson, Dan S; Ivanell, Stefan; Sarmast, Sasan; Andersen, Søren J

    2015-02-28

    The actuator line technique was introduced as a numerical tool to be employed in combination with large eddy simulations to enable the study of wakes and wake interaction in wind farms. The technique is today largely used for studying basic features of wakes as well as for making performance predictions of wind farms. In this paper, we give a short introduction to the wake problem and the actuator line methodology and present a study in which the technique is employed to determine the near-wake properties of wind turbines. The presented results include a comparison of experimental results of the wake characteristics of the flow around a three-bladed model wind turbine, the development of a simple analytical formula for determining the near-wake length behind a wind turbine and a detailed investigation of wake structures based on proper orthogonal decomposition analysis of numerically generated snapshots of the wake.

  9. Airloads, wakes, and aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wayne

    1990-01-01

    Fundamental considerations regarding the theory of modeling of rotary wing airloads, wakes, and aeroelasticity are presented. The topics covered are: airloads and wakes, including lifting-line theory, wake models and nonuniform inflow, free wake geometry, and blade-vortex interaction; aerodynamic and wake models for aeroelasticity, including two-dimensional unsteady aerodynamics and dynamic inflow; and airloads and structural dynamics, including comprehensive airload prediction programs. Results of calculations and correlations are presented.

  10. Large-eddy simulation of circular cylinder flow at subcritical Reynolds number: Turbulent wake and sound radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Li; Zhang, Xing; He, Guowei

    2016-02-01

    The flows past a circular cylinder at Reynolds number 3900 are simulated using large-eddy simulation (LES) and the far-field sound is calculated from the LES results. A low dissipation energy-conserving finite volume scheme is used to discretize the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The dynamic global coefficient version of the Vreman's subgrid scale (SGS) model is used to compute the sub-grid stresses. Curle's integral of Lighthill's acoustic analogy is used to extract the sound radiated from the cylinder. The profiles of mean velocity and turbulent fluctuations obtained are consistent with the previous experimental and computational results. The sound radiation at far field exhibits the characteristic of a dipole and directivity. The sound spectra display the -5/3 power law. It is shown that Vreman's SGS model in company with dynamic procedure is suitable for LES of turbulence generated noise.

  11. Natural snowfall reveals large-scale flow structures in the wake of a 2.5-MW wind turbine.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jiarong; Toloui, Mostafa; Chamorro, Leonardo P; Guala, Michele; Howard, Kevin; Riley, Sean; Tucker, James; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2014-06-24

    To improve power production and structural reliability of wind turbines, there is a pressing need to understand how turbines interact with the atmospheric boundary layer. However, experimental techniques capable of quantifying or even qualitatively visualizing the large-scale turbulent flow structures around full-scale turbines do not exist today. Here we use snowflakes from a winter snowstorm as flow tracers to obtain velocity fields downwind of a 2.5-MW wind turbine in a sampling area of ~36 × 36 m(2). The spatial and temporal resolutions of the measurements are sufficiently high to quantify the evolution of blade-generated coherent motions, such as the tip and trailing sheet vortices, identify their instability mechanisms and correlate them with turbine operation, control and performance. Our experiment provides an unprecedented in situ characterization of flow structures around utility-scale turbines, and yields significant insights into the Reynolds number similarity issues presented in wind energy applications.

  12. Modeling the effect of control on the wake of a utility-scale turbine via large-eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaolei; Annoni, Jennifer; Seiler, Pete; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2014-06-01

    A model of the University of Minnesota EOLOS research turbine (Clipper Liberty C96) is developed, integrating the C96 torque control law with a high fidelity actuator line large- eddy simulation (LES) model. Good agreement with the blade element momentum theory is obtained for the power coefficient curve under uniform inflow. Three different cases, fixed rotor rotational speed ω, fixed tip-speed ratio (TSR) and generator torque control, have been simulated for turbulent inflow. With approximately the same time-averaged ω, the time- averaged power is in good agreement with measurements for all three cases. Although the time-averaged aerodynamic torque is nearly the same for the three cases, the root-mean-square (rms) of the aerodynamic torque fluctuations is significantly larger for the case with fixed ω. No significant differences have been observed for the time-averaged flow fields behind the turbine for these three cases.

  13. Wake Study Methods of Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suatean, Bogdan; Colidiuc, Alexandra; Galetuse, Stelian; Frunzulica, Florin

    2011-09-01

    Two different methods for determination of the aerodynamic performance of horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWT) are proposed in this paper. The methods presented have various levels of complexity to calculate the aerodynamic performances of HAWT, starting with a simple method, the lifting line method, and ending with a CFD approach.

  14. Aerial observations of Hawaii`s wake

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.B.; Grubisic, V.

    1993-11-01

    Under the influence of the east-northeasterly trade winds, the island of Hawaii generates a wake that extends about 200 km to the west-southwest. During the Hawaiian Rain Band Project (NCAR) Electra. The patterns of wind aerosol concentration revealed by these flights suggest that Hawaii`s wake consists of two large quasi-steady conterrotating eddies. The southern clockwise-rotating eddy carries a heavy aerosol load due to input from the Kilauea volcano. At the eastern end of the wake, the eddies are potentially warmer and more humid than the surrounding trade wind air. Several other features are discussed: sharp shear lines near the northern and southern tips of the island, dry and warm air bands along the shear lines, a small embedded wake behind the Kohala peninsula, wake centerline clouds, hydraulic jumps to the north and south of the island, a descending inversion connected with accelerating trade winds, and evidence for side-to-side wake movement.

  15. Coupling of a free wake vortex ring near-wake model with the Jensen and Larsen far-wake deficit models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Heemst, J. W.; Baldacchino, D.; Mehta, D.; van Bussel, G. J. W.

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a simple physical model to improve the currently used far-wake deficit models in the wind industry. The main improvement is deemed on the determination of the wake deficit in the near-wake. A Vortex Ring Model (VRM) is used to calculate the induced velocities in the near-wake, which are then coupled to the Jensen far-wake model and the Larsen far-wake model based on the concept of Eddy Viscosity (EV). The inviscid near-wake VRM is based on the shedding of discrete tip vortex rings released from a uniformly loaded actuator disc. The model is validated against wind tunnel measurements from experiments with a two- bladed turbine and a circular metal mesh with a uniform porosity to represent an actuator disc. The VRM shows a good agreement with the experimental data with respect to the wake deficit evolution. The VRM is coupled with two well-known engineering type far-wake models: the Jensen and Larsen wake deficit models. The results of the coupling of the VRM and the more elaborated Larsen far-wake model are compared against a 3D Large Eddy Simulation (LES) CFD model. This comparison shows the effect of different near-wake models on the development of centreline velocities in the far-wake. The centreline velocity deficit predicted by the VRM-Larsen model more closely matches LES calculations in comparison with the reference Larsen model.

  16. Coupled wake boundary layer model of windfarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Richard; Gayme, Dennice; Meneveau, Charles

    2014-11-01

    We present a coupled wake boundary layer (CWBL) model that describes the distribution of the power output in a windfarm. The model couples the traditional, industry-standard wake expansion/superposition approach with a top-down model for the overall windfarm boundary layer structure. Wake models capture the effect of turbine positioning, while the top-down approach represents the interaction between the windturbine wakes and the atmospheric boundary layer. Each portion of the CWBL model requires specification of a parameter that is unknown a-priori. The wake model requires the wake expansion rate, whereas the top-down model requires the effective spanwise turbine spacing within which the model's momentum balance is relevant. The wake expansion rate is obtained by matching the mean velocity at the turbine from both approaches, while the effective spanwise turbine spacing is determined from the wake model. Coupling of the constitutive components of the CWBL model is achieved by iterating these parameters until convergence is reached. We show that the CWBL model predictions compare more favorably with large eddy simulation results than those made with either the wake or top-down model in isolation and that the model can be applied successfully to the Horns Rev and Nysted windfarms. The `Fellowships for Young Energy Scientists' (YES!) of the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter supported by NWO, and NSF Grant #1243482.

  17. Wake field accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1986-02-01

    In a wake field accelerator a high current driving bunch injected into a structure or plasma produces intense induced fields, which are in turn used to accelerate a trailing charge or bunch. The basic concepts of wake field acceleration are described. Wake potentials for closed cavities and periodic structures are derived, as are wake potentials on a collinear path with a charge distribution. Cylindrically symmetric structures excited by a beam in the form of a ring are considered. (LEW)

  18. Summary of tower designs for large horizontal axis wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, G. R.; Savino, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    Towers for large horizontal axis wind turbines, machines with a rotor axis height above 30 meters and rated at more than 500 kW, have varied in configuration, materials of construction, type of construction, height, and stiffness. For example, the U.S. large HAWTs have utilized steel truss type towers and free-standing steel cylindrical towers. In Europe, the trend has been to use only free-standing and guyed cylindrical towers, but both steel and reinforced concrete have been used as materials of construction. These variations in materials of construction and type of construction reflect different engineering approaches to the design of cost effective towers for large HAWTs. Tower designs are the NASA/DOE Mod-5B presently being fabricated. Design goals and requirements that influence tower configuration, height and materials are discussed. In particular, experiences with United States large wind turbine towers are elucidated. Finally, current trends in tower designs for large HAWTs are highlighted.

  19. Status of wake and array loss research

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, D.L.

    1991-09-01

    In recent years, many projects have evaluated wind turbine wake effects and resultant array losses in both Europe and the United States. This paper examines the status of current knowledge about wake effects and array losses and suggests future research. Single-turbine wake characteristics have been studied extensively and are generally described well by existing theoretical models. Field measurements of wake effects in wind turbine arrays are largely limited to small arrays, with 2 to 4 rows of turbines. Few data have been published on wake effects within large arrays. Measurements of wake deficits downwind of large arrays that deficits are substantially larger and extend farther downwind than expected. Although array design models have been developed, these models have been tested and verified using only limited data from a few rows of wind turbines in complex terrain, whereas some of the largest arrays have more than 40 rows of wind turbines. Planned cooperative efforts with the wind industry will obtain existing data relevant to analyzing energy deficits within large arrays and identifying data sets for potential use in array model verification efforts. Future research being considered include a cooperative research experiment to obtain more definitive data on wake deficits and turbulence within and downwind of large arrays. 16 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Visualization on fish's wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuemin; Lu, Xiyun; Yin, Xiezhen

    2002-05-01

    In this paper an experiment on wake of Goldfish swimming unrestricted was conducted in a water tunnel. Method of color liquid was used to visualize the wake. Results show that there is reverse Karman vortex street in symmetrical plane of the wake and the Strouhal frequency of the fish is in the range 0.25-0.35. A 3D vortex ring chain model was presented.

  1. Commercial aircraft wake vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerz, Thomas; Holzäpfel, Frank; Darracq, Denis

    2002-04-01

    This paper discusses the problem of wake vortices shed by commercial aircraft. It presents a consolidated European view on the current status of knowledge of the nature and characteristics of aircraft wakes and of technical and operational procedures of minimizing and predicting the vortex strength and avoiding wake encounters. Methodological aspects of data evaluation and interpretation, like the description of wake ages, the characterization of wake vortices, and the proper evaluation of wake data from measurement and simulation, are addressed in the first part. In the second part an inventory of our knowledge is given on vortex characterization and control, prediction and monitoring of vortex decay, vortex detection and warning, vortex encounter models, and wake-vortex safety assessment. Each section is concluded by a list of questions and required actions which may help to guide further research activities. The primary objective of the joint international efforts in wake-vortex research is to avoid potentially hazardous wake encounters for aircraft. Shortened aircraft separations under appropriate meteorological conditions, whilst keeping or even increasing the safety level, is the ultimate goal. Reduced time delays on the tactical side and increased airport capacities on the strategic side will be the benefits of these ambitious ventures for the air transportation industry and services.

  2. CONTROL OF SLEEP AND WAKEFULNESS

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Ritchie E.; Basheer, Radhika; McKenna, James T.; Strecker, Robert E.; McCarley, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    This review summarizes the brain mechanisms controlling sleep and wakefulness. Wakefulness promoting systems cause low-voltage, fast activity in the electroencephalogram (EEG). Multiple interacting neurotransmitter systems in the brain stem, hypothalamus, and basal forebrain converge onto common effector systems in the thalamus and cortex. Sleep results from the inhibition of wake-promoting systems by homeostatic sleep factors such as adenosine and nitric oxide and GABAergic neurons in the preoptic area of the hypothalamus, resulting in large-amplitude, slow EEG oscillations. Local, activity-dependent factors modulate the amplitude and frequency of cortical slow oscillations. Non-rapid-eye-movement (NREM) sleep results in conservation of brain energy and facilitates memory consolidation through the modulation of synaptic weights. Rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep results from the interaction of brain stem cholinergic, aminergic, and GABAergic neurons which control the activity of glutamatergic reticular formation neurons leading to REM sleep phenomena such as muscle atonia, REMs, dreaming, and cortical activation. Strong activation of limbic regions during REM sleep suggests a role in regulation of emotion. Genetic studies suggest that brain mechanisms controlling waking and NREM sleep are strongly conserved throughout evolution, underscoring their enormous importance for brain function. Sleep disruption interferes with the normal restorative functions of NREM and REM sleep, resulting in disruptions of breathing and cardiovascular function, changes in emotional reactivity, and cognitive impairments in attention, memory, and decision making. PMID:22811426

  3. Control of sleep and wakefulness.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ritchie E; Basheer, Radhika; McKenna, James T; Strecker, Robert E; McCarley, Robert W

    2012-07-01

    This review summarizes the brain mechanisms controlling sleep and wakefulness. Wakefulness promoting systems cause low-voltage, fast activity in the electroencephalogram (EEG). Multiple interacting neurotransmitter systems in the brain stem, hypothalamus, and basal forebrain converge onto common effector systems in the thalamus and cortex. Sleep results from the inhibition of wake-promoting systems by homeostatic sleep factors such as adenosine and nitric oxide and GABAergic neurons in the preoptic area of the hypothalamus, resulting in large-amplitude, slow EEG oscillations. Local, activity-dependent factors modulate the amplitude and frequency of cortical slow oscillations. Non-rapid-eye-movement (NREM) sleep results in conservation of brain energy and facilitates memory consolidation through the modulation of synaptic weights. Rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep results from the interaction of brain stem cholinergic, aminergic, and GABAergic neurons which control the activity of glutamatergic reticular formation neurons leading to REM sleep phenomena such as muscle atonia, REMs, dreaming, and cortical activation. Strong activation of limbic regions during REM sleep suggests a role in regulation of emotion. Genetic studies suggest that brain mechanisms controlling waking and NREM sleep are strongly conserved throughout evolution, underscoring their enormous importance for brain function. Sleep disruption interferes with the normal restorative functions of NREM and REM sleep, resulting in disruptions of breathing and cardiovascular function, changes in emotional reactivity, and cognitive impairments in attention, memory, and decision making.

  4. PIV and Hotwire Measurement and Analysis of Tip Vortices and Turbulent Wake Generated by a Model Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, D.; Tan, Y. M.; Chamorro, L. P.; Arndt, R.; Sotiropoulos, F.; Sheng, J.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding vortical flow structures and turbulence in the wake flow behind a Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine (HAWT) has widespread applications in efficient blade design. Moreover, the knowledge of wake-turbine interactions allows us to devise optimal operational parameters, such as the spatial allocation and control algorithms of wind turbines, for a densely populated wind farm. To understand the influence of tip vortices on energy containing mean flow and turbulence, characteristics of vortical structures and turbulence must be quantified thoroughly. In this study, we conduct phase-locked Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements of the flow before and after a model HAWT, which is located in a zero-pressure gradient wind tunnel with a cross section of 1.7 × 1.7 m and a test section of 16 m in length. A three-blade model HAWT with a diameter of 605 mm and tip-speed ratio of 5 is used. PIV images are recorded by a 2048 × 2048 CCD camera and streamed at 6 Hz continuously; and phased locked with the passage of the blade at its vertical position. Each PIV measurement covers a 0.13 × 0.13 m2 sample area with the spatial resolution of 63 μm and a vector spacing of 0.5 mm. All experiments are conducted at the free-stream wind speed of 10 m/s. Flow fields at thirty consecutive downstream locations up to six rotor diameters and 144 mid chord lengths are measured. At each location, we obtain at least 10,000 instantaneous PIV realizations or 20,000 images. Three different configurations: single, dual, and trio turbines located at 5 rotor diameter upstream to each other, are examined experimentally. The flow statistics include mean wake velocity distributions, characteristics of tip vortices evolving downstream, fluctuation velocity, turbulent kinetic energy, stresses, and energy spectra. We find that tip vortices decay much faster in the wake of the upstream turbines (multiple-turbine configurations), whereas they maintain the coherence and strength behind a single

  5. Wind turbine wake detection with a single Doppler wind lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Barthelmie, R. J.

    2015-06-01

    Using scanning lidar wind turbine wakes can be probed in three dimensions to produce a wealth of temporally and spatially irregular data that can be used to characterize the wakes. Unlike data from a meteorological mast or upward pointing lidar, the spatial coordinates of the measurements are not fixed and the location of the wake also varies in three dimensions. Therefore the challenge is to provide automated detection algorithms to identify wakes and quantify wake characteristics from this type of dataset. Here an algorithm is developed and evaluated on data from a large wind farm in the Midwest. A scanning coherent Doppler wind lidar was configured to measure wind speed in the wake of a continuously yawing wind turbine for two days during the experiment and wake profiles were retrieved with input of wind direction information from the nearby meteorological mast. Additional challenges to the analysis include incomplete coverage of the entire wake due to the limited scanning domain, and large wind shear that can contaminate the wake estimate because of the height variation along the line-of-sight. However, the algorithm developed in this paper is able to automatically capture wakes in lidar data from Plan Position Indicator (PPI) scans and the resultant wake statistics are consistent with previous experiment's results.

  6. Review of Idealized Aircraft Wake Vortex Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Nashat N.; Proctor, Fred H.; Duparcmeur, Fanny M. Limon; Jacob, Don

    2014-01-01

    Properties of three aircraft wake vortex models, Lamb-Oseen, Burnham-Hallock, and Proctor are reviewed. These idealized models are often used to initialize the aircraft wake vortex pair in large eddy simulations and in wake encounter hazard models, as well as to define matched filters for processing lidar observations of aircraft wake vortices. Basic parameters for each vortex model, such as peak tangential velocity and circulation strength as a function of vortex core radius size, are examined. The models are also compared using different vortex characterizations, such as the vorticity magnitude. Results of Euler and large eddy simulations are presented. The application of vortex models in the postprocessing of lidar observations is discussed.

  7. Near wake velocity profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Porterio, J.L.F.; Page, R.H.; Przirembel, C.E.G.

    1984-02-01

    The development of the wake velocity profile behind a cylindrical blunt based body aligned with a subsonic uniform stream was experimentally investigated as a function of the momentum thickness of the approaching boundary layer and the transfer of mass into the recirculating region. Tests were conducted at M = 0.11 in an interference-free wind tunnel utilizing an upstream support system. Results indicate that the width of the wake increases with the thickness of the boundary layer while the velocity at the centerline decreases. Near wake mass transfer was found to alter centerline velocities while the width of the wake was not significantly altered. Wake centerline velocity development as a function of boundary layer thickness is presented for distances up to three diameters from the base.

  8. Analysis of vortex wake encounter upsets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. A.; Teper, G. L.

    1974-01-01

    The problem of an airplane being upset by encountering the vortex wake of a large transport on takeoff or landing is currently receiving considerable attention. This report describes the technique and results of a study to assess the effectiveness of automatic control systems in alleviating vortex wake upsets. A six-degree-of-freedom nonlinear digital simulation was used for this purpose. The analysis included establishing the disturbance input due to penetrating a vortex wake from an arbitrary position and angle. Simulations were computed for both a general aviation airplane and a commercial jet transport. Dynamic responses were obtained for the penetrating aircraft with no augmentation, and with various command augmentation systems, as well as with human pilot control. The results of this preliminary study indicate that attitude command augmentation systems can provide significant alleviation of vortex wake upsets; and can do it better than a human pilot.

  9. Wakes in Inertial Fusion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Ian Norman

    simulation particles are accounted for. Linear gain spectra including both effects are discussed. Extending the PIC simulations past when the seed exits the simulation domain reveals bursts of large-amplitude scattering in many cases, which do not occur in simulations without the seed pulse. These bursts can have amplitudes several times greater than the amplified seed pulse, and an examination of the orbits of particles trapped in the wake illustrates that the bursts are caused by a reduction of Landau damping due to particle trapping. This large-amplitude scattering is caused by the seed inducing a wake earlier in the simulation, thus modifying the distribution function. Performing simulations with longer duration seeds leads to parts of the seeds reaching amplitudes several times more than the steady-state linear theory results, similarly caused by a reduction of Landau damping. Simulations with continuous seeds demonstrate that the onset of inflation depends on the seed wavelength and incident intensity, and oscillations in the reflectivity are observed at a frequency equal to the difference between the seed frequency and the frequency at which the inflationary SRS grows. In the electron beam stopping studies, 3D PIC simulations are performed of relativistic electrons with a momentum of 10mec propagating in a cold FI core plasma. Some of the simulations use one simulation particle per real particle, and particle sizes much smaller than the interparitcle spacing. The wake made by a single electron is compared against that calculated using cold fluid theory assuming the phase velocity of the wake is near the speed of light. The results agree for the first wavelength of the wake. However, the shape of the wake changes for succeeding wavelengths and depends on the background plasma temperature, with the concavity pointing in the direction the electron is moving in cold plasmas and in the opposite direction as the plasma temperature increases. In the warm plasma the curvature

  10. Dissipation of turbulence in the wake of a wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Lundquist, J. K.; Bariteau, L.

    2014-11-06

    The wake of a wind turbine is characterized by increased turbulence and decreased wind speed. Turbines are generally deployed in large groups in wind farms, and so the behaviour of an individual wake as it merges with other wakes and propagates downwind is critical in assessing wind-farm power production. This evolution depends on the rate of turbulence dissipation in the wind-turbine wake, which has not been previously quantified in field-scale measurements. In situ measurements of winds and turbulence dissipation from the wake region of a multi-MW turbine were collected using a tethered lifting system (TLS) carrying a payload of high-rate turbulence probes. Ambient flow measurements were provided from sonic anemometers on a meteorological tower located near the turbine. Good agreement between the tower measurements and the TLS measurements was established for a case without a wind-turbine wake. When an operating wind turbine is located between the tower and the TLS so that the wake propagates to the TLS, the TLS measures dissipation rates one to two orders of magnitude higher in the wake than outside of the wake. These data, collected between two and three rotor diameters D downwind of the turbine, document the significant enhancement of turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate within the wind-turbine wake. These wake measurements suggest that it may be useful to pursue modelling approaches that account for enhanced dissipation. Furthermore. comparisons of wake and non-wake dissipation rates to mean wind speed, wind-speed variance, and turbulence intensity are presented to facilitate the inclusion of these measurements in wake modelling schemes.

  11. Dissipation of turbulence in the wake of a wind turbine

    DOE PAGES

    Lundquist, J. K.; Bariteau, L.

    2014-11-06

    The wake of a wind turbine is characterized by increased turbulence and decreased wind speed. Turbines are generally deployed in large groups in wind farms, and so the behaviour of an individual wake as it merges with other wakes and propagates downwind is critical in assessing wind-farm power production. This evolution depends on the rate of turbulence dissipation in the wind-turbine wake, which has not been previously quantified in field-scale measurements. In situ measurements of winds and turbulence dissipation from the wake region of a multi-MW turbine were collected using a tethered lifting system (TLS) carrying a payload of high-ratemore » turbulence probes. Ambient flow measurements were provided from sonic anemometers on a meteorological tower located near the turbine. Good agreement between the tower measurements and the TLS measurements was established for a case without a wind-turbine wake. When an operating wind turbine is located between the tower and the TLS so that the wake propagates to the TLS, the TLS measures dissipation rates one to two orders of magnitude higher in the wake than outside of the wake. These data, collected between two and three rotor diameters D downwind of the turbine, document the significant enhancement of turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate within the wind-turbine wake. These wake measurements suggest that it may be useful to pursue modelling approaches that account for enhanced dissipation. Furthermore. comparisons of wake and non-wake dissipation rates to mean wind speed, wind-speed variance, and turbulence intensity are presented to facilitate the inclusion of these measurements in wake modelling schemes.« less

  12. Wake Signature Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spedding, Geoffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    An accumulated body of quantitative evidence shows that bluff-body wakes in stably stratified environments have an unusual degree of coherence and organization, so characteristic geometries such as arrays of alternating-signed vortices have very long lifetimes, as measured in units of buoyancy timescales, or in the downstream distance scaled by a body length. The combination of pattern geometry and persistence renders the detection of these wakes possible in principle. It now appears that identifiable signatures can be found from many disparate sources: Islands, fish, and plankton all have been noted to generate features that can be detected by climate modelers, hopeful navigators in open oceans, or hungry predators. The various types of wakes are reviewed with notes on why their signatures are important and to whom. A general theory of wake pattern formation is lacking and would have to span many orders of magnitude in Reynolds number.

  13. NASA wake vortex research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stough, H. P., III; Greene, George C.; Stewart, Eric C.; Stuever, Robert A.; Jordan, Frank L., Jr.; Rivers, Robert A.; Vicroy, Dan D.

    1993-01-01

    NASA is conducting research that will enable safe improvements in the capacity of the nation's air transportation system. The wake-vortex hazard is a factor in establishing the minimum safe spacing between aircraft during landing and takeoff operations and, thus, impacts airport capacity. The ability to accurately model the wake hazard and determine safe separation distances for a wide range of aircraft and operational scenarios may provide the basis for significant increases in airport capacity. Current and planned NASA research is described which is focused on increasing airport capacity by safely reducing wake-hazard-imposed aircraft separations through advances in a number of technologies including vortex motion and decay prediction, vortex encounter modeling, wake-vortex hazard characterization, and in situ flow sensing.

  14. Contributions of the Stochastic Shape Wake Model to Predictions of Aerodynamic Loads and Power under Single Wake Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doubrawa, P.; Barthelmie, R. J.; Wang, H.; Churchfield, M. J.

    2016-09-01

    The contribution of wake meandering and shape asymmetry to load and power estimates is quantified by comparing aeroelastic simulations initialized with different inflow conditions: an axisymmetric base wake, an unsteady stochastic shape wake, and a large-eddy simulation with rotating actuator-line turbine representation. Time series of blade-root and tower base bending moments are analyzed. We find that meandering has a large contribution to the fluctuation of the loads. Moreover, considering the wake edge intermittence via the stochastic shape model improves the simulation of load and power fluctuations and of the fatigue damage equivalent loads. These results indicate that the stochastic shape wake simulator is a valuable addition to simplified wake models when seeking to obtain higher-fidelity computationally inexpensive predictions of loads and power.

  15. Optical influence of ship wakes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Lewis, Marlon; Bissett, W Paul; Johnson, Bruce; Kohler, Dave

    2004-05-20

    The optical variations observed within ship wakes are largely due to the generation of copious amounts of air bubbles in the upper ocean, a fraction of which accumulate as foam at the surface, where they release scavenged surfactants. Field experiments were conducted to test previous theoretical predictions of the variations in optical properties that result from bubble injection in the surface ocean. Variations in remote-sensing reflectance and size distribution of bubbles within the ship-wake zone were determined in three different optical water types: the clear equatorial Pacific Ocean, moderately turbid coastal waters, and very turbid coastal waters, the latter two of which were offshore of New Jersey. Bubbles introduced by moving vessels increased the backscattering in all cases, which in turn enhanced the reflectance over the entire visible and infrared wave bands. The elevated reflectance had different spectral characteristics in the three locations. The color of ship wakes appears greener in the open ocean, whereas little change in color was observed in near-coastal turbid waters, consistent with predictions. Colorless themselves, bubbles increase the reflected radiance and change the color of the ocean in a way that depends on the spectral backscattering and absorption of the undisturbed background waters. For remote observation from aircraft or satellite, the foam and added surfactants further enhance the reflectance to a degree dependent on the illumination and the viewing geometry.

  16. Crosswind Shear Gradient Affect on Wake Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Fred H.; Ahmad, Nashat N.

    2011-01-01

    Parametric simulations with a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model are used to explore the influence of crosswind shear on aircraft wake vortices. Previous studies based on field measurements, laboratory experiments, as well as LES, have shown that the vertical gradient of crosswind shear, i.e. the second vertical derivative of the environmental crosswind, can influence wake vortex transport. The presence of nonlinear vertical shear of the crosswind velocity can reduce the descent rate, causing a wake vortex pair to tilt and change in its lateral separation. The LES parametric studies confirm that the vertical gradient of crosswind shear does influence vortex trajectories. The parametric results also show that vortex decay from the effects of shear are complex since the crosswind shear, along with the vertical gradient of crosswind shear, can affect whether the lateral separation between wake vortices is increased or decreased. If the separation is decreased, the vortex linking time is decreased, and a more rapid decay of wake vortex circulation occurs. If the separation is increased, the time to link is increased, and at least one of the vortices of the vortex pair may have a longer life time than in the case without shear. In some cases, the wake vortices may never link.

  17. Wakes of Maneuvering Bodies in Stratified Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voropayev, S. I.; Fernando, H. J.

    2007-05-01

    We present the results of experimental/theoretical studies on large momentum eddies generated in late wakes of unsteady moving self-propelled bodies in stratified fluids. The experiments were conducted with scaled submarine model at high Reynolds numbers (50,000), corresponding to the fully turbulent flow regime. Dye visualization and PIV were used for flow diagnostics. When a self-propelled body makes a maneuver, e.g. accelerates, it imparts net momentum on the surrounding fluid. We show that in a stratified fluid this leads to impulsive momentum wakes with large, long-lived coherent vortices in the late flows, which may be used as a signature for identification of submarine wakes in oceanic thermocline. First, we consider dynamics and properties of such wakes in a linearly stratified fluid and present a model that permits to predict the main flow characteristics. Second, we consider wakes in a two layer stratified fluid (analog of the upper ocean) and show that such wakes may penetrate to the water surface; we present a model for this phenomenon and propose criteria for the penetration of wake signatures to the water surface in terms of main governing parameters (signature contrast versus confinement number). Finally, we consider the evolution of such momentum wake eddies in the field of decaying background turbulence, which mimics the oceanic thermocline, and show that for the flow configuration studied the contrast number remains sufficiently large and detectable wake imprints survive for a long period of time. Some pertinent estimates for submarines cruising in the upper ocean are also given. For more details see [1-3]. This study was supported by grant from the Office of Naval Research. 1. Voropayev S.I., Fernando H.J.S., Smirnov S.A. & Morrison R.J. 2006. On surface signatures generated by submersed momentum sources. Phys. Fluids, under revision. 2. Voropayev S.I., Fernando H.J.S. & Morrison R.J. 2006. Dipolar eddies in a stratified turbulent flow. J. Fluid

  18. Effects of blade bending on aerodynamic control of fluctuating loads on teetered HAWT rotors

    SciTech Connect

    Eggers, A.J. Jr.; Ashley, H.; Rock, S.M.; Chaney, K.; Digumarthi, R.

    1996-11-01

    Active aerodynamic control, in the form of closed-loop actuation of blade-tip ailerons or all-movable blades, is investigated as a means of increasing the structural fatigue life of HAWT rotors. The rotor considered is upwind and teetered, with two blades of diameter 29.2 m., fiberglass construction and other properties representative of modern light-weight construction. The paper begins with a review of prior work which studied the problem for an essentially rigid structure. For that and the present research, two loading conditions were invoked: exposure to a Rayleigh distribution of operating winds with vertical shear and a 15 percent superimposed spectrum of turbulence; and occasional exposure to 62 m/s hurricanes. Accounted for herein is the effect of flatwise bending flexibility on the loads spectra of root flatwise bending moment, thrust, and torque (both open loop and closed loop). Using Miner`s rule, the moments are converted to fatigue lives. With aerodynamic control, RMS flatwise moments for the flexible blade in turbulence are found to be less than {1/2} of those without control. At a fixed blade weight of 540 kg when hurricane loads are added, the aileron-controlled blade is designed by that limit-load condition. In contrast, the all-movable blade can be feather controlled in the high wind so that its life is dominated by turbulent loads. Simplified fatigue analysis permits weight reductions to be estimated which yield controlled blades capable of 30 years` operation with a safety factor of 11. The resulting weights are about 400 kg for the aileron-controlled blade, and 230 kg for the all-movable blade. However, such light-weight rotors require attention to other design considerations, such as start-stop cycles. Apart from limit loads, the methods of analysis are linearized (locally for aerodynamic loads). It follows that the results are likely to be meaningful in terms of comparative, rather than absolute, values of fatigue life and weight.

  19. Dynamic Wind Loads and Vortex Structures in the Wake of a Wind Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hui; Yang, Zifeng; Sarkar, Partha

    2010-11-01

    We report an experimental study to characterize the dynamic wind loads and evolution of wake vortex flow structures downstream of a horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT). The experiments were conducted in a wind tunnel with a wind turbine model placed in a boundary layer flow developed over rough and smooth surfaces in order to study the effects of roughness and the resulting velocity and turbulence fields on the wake characteristics and fatigue loads acting on the wind turbine. In addition to measuring dynamic wind loads (both aerodynamic forces and moments) acting on the wind turbine model using a six-component load cell, a high-resolution Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system was used to make phase-locked flow field measurements to quantify the time-evolution of the wake vortex and turbulence flow structures shedding from wind turbine blades. The detailed flow field measurements were correlated with the wind load measurements to elucidate the underlying physics associated with turbine power generation and fatigue loads acting on wind turbines.

  20. Approaches to Measuring the Effects of Wake-Promoting Drugs: A Focus on Cognitive Function

    PubMed Central

    Edgar, Christopher J.; Pace-Schott, Edward F.; Wesnes, Keith A.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives In clinical drug development, wakefulness and wake-promotion maybe assessed by a large number of scales and questionnaires. Objective assessment of wakefulness is most commonly made using sleep latency/maintenance of wakefulness tests, polysomnography and/or behavioral measures. The purpose of the present review is to highlight the degree of overlap in the assessment of wakefulness and cognition, with consideration of assessment techniques and the underlying neurobiology of both concepts. Design Reviews of four key areas were conducted: commonly used techniques in the assessment of wakefulness; neurobiology of sleep/wake and cognition; targets of wake promoting and/or cognition enhancing drugs; and ongoing clinical trials investigating wake promoting effects. Results There is clear overlap between the assessment of wakefulness and cognition. There are common techniques which may be used to assess both concepts; aspects of the neurobiology of both concepts may be closely related; and wake promoting drugs may have nootropic properties (and vice-versa). Clinical trials of wake promoting drugs often, though not routinely, assess aspects of cognition. Conclusions Routine and broad assessment of cognition in the development of wake promoting drugs may reveal important nootropic effects, which are not secondary to alertness/wakefulness, whilst existing cognitive enhancers may have under explored or unknown wake promoting properties. PMID:19565524

  1. Wind-Tunnel Simulation of the Wake of a Large Wind Turbine in a Stable Boundary Layer. Part 1: The Boundary-Layer Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, Philip E.; Pascheke, Frauke

    2014-04-01

    Measurements have been made in both a neutral and a stable boundary layer as part of an investigation of the wakes of wind turbines in an offshore environment, in the EnFlo stratified flow wind tunnel. The working section is long enough for the flow to have become very nearly invariant with streamwise distance. In order to be systematic, the flow profile generators of Irwin-type spires and surface roughness were the same for both neutral and stable conditions. Achieving the required profiles by adjusting the flow generators, even for neutral flow, is a highly iterative art, and the present results indicate that it will be no less iterative for a stable flow (as well as there being more conditions to meet), so this was not attempted in the present investigation. The stable-case flow conformed in most respects to Monin-Obukhov similarity in the surface layer. A linear temperature profile was applied at the working section inlet, resulting in a near-linear profile in the developed flow above the boundary layer and `strong' imposed stability, while the condition at the surface was `weak'. Aerodynamic roughness length (mean velocity) was not affected by stability even though the roughness Reynolds number , while the thermal roughness length was much smaller, as is to be expected. The neutral case was Reynolds-number independent, and by inference, the stable case was also Reynolds-number independent.

  2. Quantitative three-dimensional low-speed wake surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brune, G. W.

    1992-01-01

    Theoretical and practical aspects of conducting three-dimensional wake measurements in large wind tunnels are reviewed with emphasis on applications in low-speed aerodynamics. Such quantitative wake surveys furnish separate values for the components of drag, such as profile drag and induced drag, but also measure lift without the use of a balance. In addition to global data, details of the wake flowfield as well as spanwise distributions of lift and drag are obtained. The paper demonstrates the value of this measurement technique using data from wake measurements conducted by Boeing on a variety of low-speed configurations including the complex high-lift system of a transport aircraft.

  3. Direct Simulation and Theoretical Study of Sub- and Supersonic Wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey, Jean-Pierre

    Wakes are constitutive components of engineering, aeronautical and geophysical flows. Despite their canonical nature, many fundamental questions surrounding wakes remain unanswered. The present work studies the nature of archetypal planar splitter-plate wakes in the sub- and supersonic regimes from a theoretical as well as a numerical perspective. A highly-parallelizable computational fluid dynamic solver was developed, from scratch, for the very-large scale direct numerical simulations of high-speed free shear flows. Wakes maintain a near indelible memory of their origins; thus, changes to the state of the flow on the generating body lead to multiple self-similar states in the far wake. To understand the source of the lack of universality, three distinct wake evolution scenarios are investigated in the incompressible limit: the Kelvin-Helmholtz transition, the bypass transition in an asymmetric wake and the initially turbulent wake. The multiplicity of self-similar states is the result of a plurality of far wake structural organizations, which maintains the memory of the flow. The structural organization is predicated on the presence or absence of near wake anti-symmetric perturbations (as a result of shedding, instability modes and/or trailing edge receptivity). The plurality of large-scale structural organization contrasts with the commonality observed in the mid-sized structures, which are dominated by inclined vortical rods, and not, as previously assumed, by horseshoe structures. The compressibility effects are a direct function of the maximal velocity defect in the wake and are therefore only important in the transitional region - the far wake having an essentially incompressible character. The compressibility simultaneously modifies the growth rate and wavelength of the primary instability mode with a concomitant effect on the emerging transitional structures. As a direct result, the spanwise rollers have an increasing ellipticity and cross-wake domain of

  4. Meteorological Controls on Wind Turbine Wakes

    SciTech Connect

    Barthelmie, RJ; Hansen, KS; Pryor, SC

    2013-04-01

    The primary control on the magnitude of the power losses induced by wind turbine wakes in large wind farms is the hub-height wind speed via its link to the turbine thrust coefficient. Hence, at low to moderate wind speeds (between cut-in and rated turbine wind speeds) when the thrust coefficient is high, wake losses are proportionally larger and decrease to be virtually undetectable at wind speeds above rated wind speeds. Wind direction is also critical. Not only does it determine the effective spacing between turbines but also the wind speed distribution is primarily determined by synoptic forcing and typically has a predominant direction from which wind speeds tend to be higher (from southwest for much of the central United States and northern Europe). Two other interlinked variables, turbulence intensity (TI), and atmospheric stability also dictate wake losses. Quantifying, understanding, modeling, and predicting this complex and interdependent system is therefore critical to understanding and modeling wind farm power losses due to wakes, and to optimizing wind farm layout. This paper quantifies the impact of these variables on the power loss due to wakes using data from the large offshore wind farms located at Horns Rev and Nysted in Denmark.

  5. Wake Studies of Ornithopters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juarez, Alfredo; Harlow, Jacob; Allen, James; Ferreira de Sousa, Paulo

    2006-11-01

    This paper details experiments using a mechanical ornithopter flying in a low speed wind tunnel. Experiments were conducted for a Strouhal number of 0.3 and Reynolds number of 2300, Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and flow visualization was used to develop quantitative and qualitative information about the nature of the wake. The data shows that the wake is made of a series of discrete vortex rings. The impulse of these rings has been estimated with PIV data and the results correlate well with the lift required to sustain the ornithopter in flight.

  6. Spectral coherence in windturbine wakes

    SciTech Connect

    Hojstrup, J.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes an experiment at a Danish wind farm to investigate the lateral and vertical coherences in the nonequilibrium turbulence of a wind turbine wake. Two meteorological masts were instrumented for measuring profiles of mean speed, turbulence, and temperature. Results are provided graphically for turbulence intensities, velocity spectra, lateral coherence, and vertical coherence. The turbulence was somewhat influenced by the wake, or possibly from aggregated wakes further upstream, even at 14.5 diameters. Lateral coherence (separation 5m) seemed to be unaffected by the wake at 7.5 diameters, but the flow was less coherent in the near wake. The wake appeared to have little influence on vertical coherence (separation 13m). Simple, conventional models for coherence appeared to be adequate descriptions for wake turbulence except for the near wake situation. 3 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Dynamical features of the wake behind a pitching foil.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jian; Sun, Liping; Shao, Xueming

    2015-12-01

    As an extension of the previous study on the three-dimensional transition of the wake behind a pitching foil [Deng and Caulfield, Phys. Rev. E 91, 043017 (2015)], this investigation draws a comprehensive map on the pitching frequency-amplitude phase space. First, by fixing the Reynolds number at Re=1700 and varying the pitching frequency and amplitude, we identify three key dynamical features of the wake: first, the transition from Bénard-von Kármán (BvK) vortex streets to reverse BvK vortex streets, and second, the symmetry breaking of this reverse BvK wake leading to a deflected wake, and a further transition from two-dimensional (2D) wakes to three-dimensional (3D) wakes. The transition boundary between the 2D and 3D wakes lies top right of the wake deflection boundary, implying a correlation between the wake deflection and the 2D to 3D wake transition, confirming that this transition occurs after the wake deflection. This paper supports the previous extensive numerical studies under two-dimensional assumption at low Reynolds number, since it is indeed two dimensional except for the cases at very high pitching frequencies or large amplitudes. Furthermore, by three-dimensional direct numerical simulations (DNSs), we confirm the previous statement about the physical realizability of the short wavelength mode at β=30 (or λ(z)=0.21) for Re=1500. By comparing the three-dimensional vortical structures by DNSs with that from the reconstruction of Floquet modes, we find a good consistency between them, both exhibiting clear streamwise structures in the wake. PMID:26764810

  8. Using High-Fidelity Computational Fluid Dynamics to Help Design a Wind Turbine Wake Measurement Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchfield, M.; Wang, Q.; Scholbrock, A.; Herges, T.; Mikkelsen, T.; Sjöholm, M.

    2016-09-01

    We describe the process of using large-eddy simulations of wind turbine wake flow to help design a wake measurement campaign. The main goal of the experiment is to measure wakes and wake deflection that result from intentional yaw misalignment under a variety of atmospheric conditions at the Scaled Wind Farm Technology facility operated by Sandia National Laboratories in Lubbock, Texas. Prior simulation studies have shown that wake deflection may be used for wind-plant control that maximizes plant power output. In this study, simulations are performed to characterize wake deflection and general behavior before the experiment is performed to ensure better upfront planning. Beyond characterizing the expected wake behavior, we also use the large-eddy simulation to test a virtual version of the lidar we plan to use to measure the wake and better understand our lidar scan strategy options. This work is an excellent example of a “simulation-in-the-loop” measurement campaign.

  9. Waking Up to Waste

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vrdlovcova, Jill

    2005-01-01

    All homes and schools produce waste. Children may have been astonished at how much people throw away, and this could be the "wake-up call" that arouses their interest. At Carymoor Environmental Centre (an Eco-Centre in South Somerset) getting children involved in active waste reduction and recycling is a priority. Carymoor tries to model waste…

  10. Wake Vortex Advisory System (WakeVAS) Concept of Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutishauser, David; Lohr, Gary; Hamilton, David; Powers, Robert; McKissick, Burnell; Adams, Catherine; Norris, Edward

    2003-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has a long history of aircraft wake vortex research, with the most recent accomplishment of demonstrating the Aircraft VOrtex Spacing System (AVOSS) at Dallas/Forth Worth International Airport in July 2000. The AVOSS was a concept for an integration of technologies applied to providing dynamic wake-safe reduced spacing for single runway arrivals, as compared to current separation standards applied during instrument approaches. AVOSS included state-of-the-art weather sensors, wake sensors, and a wake behavior prediction algorithm. Using real-time data AVOSS averaged a 6% potential throughput increase over current standards. This report describes a Concept of Operations for applying the technologies demonstrated in the AVOSS to a variety of terminal operations to mitigate wake vortex capacity constraints. A discussion of the technological issues and open research questions that must be addressed to design a Wake Vortex Advisory System (WakeVAS) is included.

  11. Extension of an atmospheric dispersion model to include building wake effects

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, J.C.; Brower, R.P.; Corio, L.A.

    1999-07-01

    A modification to a dispersion model for the convective boundary layer (CBL) is proposed to deal with stack sources located on or near buildings and affected by the turbulent wake of the building. Wake effects are greatest within the near wake or cavity region close to the building. The approach is to combine an earlier wake model with the CBL model such that the appropriate concentration and dispersion limits are satisfied at short, intermediate, and large downwind distances.

  12. An exploratory investigation of a wake disruption technique for studying wake reestablishment time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, L. E.; Jones, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    An exploratory investigation was made of a wake disruption technique for studying the hypersonic-wake reestablishment time in a blowdown wind tunnel. In this technique, a highly underexpanded jet issuing from the base of a 10 deg half-angle cone totally disrupts and displaces the conventional wake. The jet was rapidly shut off by an explosively actuated valve and the time for wake reestablishment was measured. The tests were conducted in the Mach 6 high Reynolds number tunnel at a stagnation temperature of 506 K and stagnation pressure of 2.86 MPa. The model base jet stagnation pressure was 3.55 MPa at room temperature. High-speed schlieren motion pictures indicated that disappearance of the disrupting jet and reestablishment of the wake-recompression shock were probably occurring simultaneously and that the time disruptive-jet-air shutoff to wake recompression shock reestablishment was probably between 200 and 450 microseconds (flow lengths from 1.8 to 4.2). The values of flow lengths are about one-thord to one-half the values measured in impulse facilities in a previous study. This shorter time is believed to be largely due to difference in flow conditions between the jet disruption technique and impulse facilities.

  13. Effect of nacelle on wake meandering in a laboratory scale wind turbine using LES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foti, Daniel; Yang, Xiaolei; Guala, Michele; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2015-11-01

    Wake meandering, large scale motion in the wind turbine wakes, has considerable effects on the velocity deficit and turbulence intensity in the turbine wake from the laboratory scale to utility scale wind turbines. In the dynamic wake meandering model, the wake meandering is assumed to be caused by large-scale atmospheric turbulence. On the other hand, Kang et al. (J. Fluid Mech., 2014) demonstrated that the nacelle geometry has a significant effect on the wake meandering of a hydrokinetic turbine, through the interaction of the inner wake of the nacelle vortex with the outer wake of the tip vortices. In this work, the significance of the nacelle on the wake meandering of a miniature wind turbine previously used in experiments (Howard et al., Phys. Fluid, 2015) is demonstrated with large eddy simulations (LES) using immersed boundary method with fine enough grids to resolve the turbine geometric characteristics. The three dimensionality of the wake meandering is analyzed in detail through turbulent spectra and meander reconstruction. The computed flow fields exhibit wake dynamics similar to those observed in the wind tunnel experiments and are analyzed to shed new light into the role of the energetic nacelle vortex on wake meandering. This work was supported by Department of Energy DOE (DE-EE0002980, DE-EE0005482 and DE-AC04-94AL85000), and Sandia National Laboratories. Computational resources were provided by Sandia National Laboratories and the University of Minnesota Supercomputing.

  14. Passive Wake Vortex Control

    SciTech Connect

    Ortega, J M

    2001-10-18

    The collapse of the Soviet Union and ending of the Cold War brought about many significant changes in military submarine operations. The enemies that the US Navy faces today and in the future will not likely be superpowers armed with nuclear submarines, but rather smaller, rogue nations employing cheaper diesel/electric submarines with advanced air-independent propulsion systems. Unlike Cold War submarine operations, which occurred in deep-water environments, future submarine conflicts are anticipated to occur in shallow, littoral regions that are complex and noisy. Consequently, non-acoustic signatures will become increasingly important and the submarine stealth technology designed for deep-water operations may not be effective in these environments. One such non-acoustic signature is the surface detection of a submarine's trailing vortex wake. If a submarine runs in a slightly buoyant condition, its diving planes must be inclined at a negative angle of attack to generate sufficient downforce, which keeps the submarine from rising to the surface. As a result, the diving planes produce a pair of counter-rotating trailing vortices that propagate to the water surface. In previous deep-water operations, this was not an issue since the submarines could dive deep enough so that the vortex pair became incoherent before it reached the water surface. However, in shallow, littoral environments, submarines do not have the option of diving deep and, hence, the vortex pair can rise to the surface and leave a distinct signature that might be detectable by synthetic aperture radar. Such detection would jeopardize not only the mission of the submarine, but also the lives of military personnel on board. There has been another attempt to solve this problem and reduce the intensity of trailing vortices in the wakes of military submarines. The research of Quackenbush et al. over the past few years has been directed towards an idea called ''vortex leveraging.'' This active concept

  15. Radar manifestations of ship wakes in algae bloom zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mityagina, Marina I.; Lavrova, Olga Yu.

    2014-10-01

    Radar manifestations of ship wakes in zones of phytoplankton bloom are discussed. It is shown that these signatures can be regarded as indicators of biogenic activity. The main data are satellite radar images. Satellite visible (VIS) and infrared (IR) satellite data are also analyzed. The large amount of the available data allowed us to make some generalizations and obtain statistically reliable results concerning spatial and temporal variability of certain type of ship wake manifestations in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of the sea surface. Traditional classification of surface ship wakes manifestations in satellite SAR images specifies distinct features such as a dark trailing centreline region (turbulent wake), narrow V-wakes aligned at some angle to the ship's path (the Kelvin wake), and, sometimes, internal wave wakes generated under conditions of shallow stratification. Their characteristic lengths are reported to be up to tens of kilometers and they can last from tens of minutes up to one hour. Instances of radar signatures of the ship wakes dissimilar to the previously described were detected in radar images obtained in the course of a satellite monitoring campaign of the central and south-eastern Baltic. These ship wakes can be seen in satellite radar images as long bright strips of enhanced backscatter with characteristic length of up to several hundred kilometres lasting more than 5 hours. A hypothesis is put forward of the coherence of this type of ship wakes detected in sea surface radar imagery and areas of intensive biogenic activity under conditions of low near-surface winds. Statistics on their seasonal, spatial and year-to-year distribution are drawn. These results are compared with temporal and spatial variations in chlorophyll a concentration and intensity of phytoplankton bloom in the area of interest. Chlorophyll a concentration maps derived from satellite data are used, as well as those based on in situ measurements. The relation

  16. Development of a Wake Vortex Spacing System for Airport Capacity Enhancement and Delay Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinton, David A.; OConnor, Cornelius J.

    2000-01-01

    The Terminal Area Productivity project has developed the technologies required (weather measurement, wake prediction, and wake measurement) to determine the aircraft spacing needed to prevent wake vortex encounters in various weather conditions. The system performs weather measurements, predicts bounds on wake vortex behavior in those conditions, derives safe wake spacing criteria, and validates the wake predictions with wake vortex measurements. System performance to date indicates that the potential runway arrival rate increase with Aircraft VOrtex Spacing System (AVOSS), considering common path effects and ATC delivery variance, is 5% to 12% depending on the ratio of large and heavy aircraft. The concept demonstration system, using early generation algorithms and minimal optimization, is performing the wake predictions with adequate robustness such that only 4 hard exceedances have been observed in 1235 wake validation cases. This performance demonstrates the feasibility of predicting wake behavior bounds with multiple uncertainties present, including the unknown aircraft weight and speed, weather persistence between the wake prediction and the observations, and the location of the weather sensors several kilometers from the approach location. A concept for the use of the AVOSS system for parallel runway operations has been suggested, and an initial study at the JFK International Airport suggests that a simplified AVOSS system can be successfully operated using only a single lidar as both the weather sensor and the wake validation instrument. Such a selfcontained AVOSS would be suitable for wake separation close to the airport, as is required for parallel approach concepts such as SOIA.

  17. EEG microstates of wakefulness and NREM sleep.

    PubMed

    Brodbeck, Verena; Kuhn, Alena; von Wegner, Frederic; Morzelewski, Astrid; Tagliazucchi, Enzo; Borisov, Sergey; Michel, Christoph M; Laufs, Helmut

    2012-09-01

    classes in all NREM sleep stages might speak in favor of an in principle maintained large scale spatial brain organization from wakeful rest to NREM sleep. In N1 and N3 sleep, despite spectral EEG differences, the microstate maps and characteristics were surprisingly close to wakefulness. This supports the notion that EEG microstates might reflect a large scale resting state network architecture similar to preserved fMRI resting state connectivity. We speculate that the incisive functional alterations which can be observed during the transition to deep sleep might be driven by changes in the level and timing of activity within this architecture.

  18. [Wake disorders. I. Primary wake disorders].

    PubMed

    Billiard, M; Carlander, B

    1998-02-01

    Primary wake disorders encompass various conditions of excessive daytime sleepiness and/or increased nighttime sleep, of unknown origin beginning most often in adolescence and of chronic or recurrent natural history. The best known of these conditions is narcolepsy associating two major clinical features, irresistible episodes of sleep, sleep onset REM periods and an almost constant association with HLA DR2-DQ1. The prevalence of the condition is close to the one of multiple sclerosis but positive diagnosis requires most often over 10 years to be made. The treatment of excessive daytime sleepiness has recently benefited from a new non-amphetamine awakening compound, modafinil, active in 60 to 70 p. 100 of the cases. The treatment of cataplexy still relies on antidepressants, tricyclics or selective serotonin reuptake blockers. Major advances in pathophysiology and pathogeny have been obtained through a natural model of the disease, canine narcolepsy. Pharmacological studies point to the importance of alpha-1 b adrenergic mechanisms in cataplexy, while dopaminergic systems seem more involved in excessive daytime sleepiness. As concerns genetics, the HLA DQB1*0602 gene predisposes to narcolepsy. In the canine model it is mirrored by an autosomal recessive gene showing a strong homology with the human immunoglobulin gene mu-switch. Familial studies have shown that besides typical phenotypes, attenuated forms of the condition characterized by isolated recurrent daytime naps and/or lapses into sleep do exist. In addition one or several other genes may be involved. Narcolepsy is multifactorial, including one or several genes as well as environmental factors. Idiopathic hypersomnia is noted for very long night sleep, difficulty waking up and more or less constant excessive daytime sleepiness. In contrast with narcolepsy sleep in not refreshing. There is no polysomnographic or immunogenetic special feature. Idiopathic hypersomnia is 10 times less frequent than narcolepsy

  19. Wake field acceleration experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    Where and how will wake field acceleration devices find use for other than, possibly, accelerators for high energy physics. I don't know that this can be responsibly answered at this time. What I can do is describe some recent results from an ongoing experimental program at Argonne which support the idea that wake field techniques and devices are potentially important for future accelerators. Perhaps this will spawn expanded interest and even new ideas for the use of this new technology. The Argonne program, and in particular the Advanced Accelerator Test Facility (AATF), has been reported in several fairly recent papers and reports. But because this is a substantially new audience for the subject, I will include a brief review of the program and the facility before describing experiments. 10 refs., 7 figs.

  20. Direct Numerical Simulation of a Weakly Stratified Turbulent Wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redford, J. A.; Lund, T. S.; Coleman, Gary N.

    2014-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is used to investigate a time-dependent turbulent wake evolving in a stably stratified background. A large initial Froude number is chosen to allow the wake to become fully turbulent and axisymmetric before stratification affects the spreading rate of the mean defect. The uncertainty introduced by the finite sample size associated with gathering statistics from a simulation of a time-dependent flow is reduced, compared to earlier simulations of this flow. The DNS reveals the buoyancy-induced changes to the turbulence structure, as well as to the mean-defect history and the terms in the mean-momentum and turbulence-kinetic-energy budgets, that characterize the various states of this flow - namely the three-dimensional (essentially unstratified), non-equilibrium (or 'wake-collapse') and quasi-two-dimensional (or 'two-component') regimes observed elsewhere for wakes embedded in both weakly and strongly stratified backgrounds. The wake-collapse regime is not accompanied by transfer (or 'reconversion') of the potential energy of the turbulence to the kinetic energy of the turbulence, implying that this is not an essential feature of stratified-wake dynamics. The dependence upon Reynolds number of the duration of the wake-collapse period is demonstrated, and the effect of the details of the initial/near-field conditions of the wake on its subsequent development is examined.

  1. Vertical Axis Wind Turbine flows using a Vortex Particle-Mesh method: from near to very far wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backaert, Stephane; Chatelain, Philippe; Winckelmans, Gregoire; Kern, Stefan; Maeder, Thierry; von Terzi, Dominic; van Rees, Wim; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2012-11-01

    A Vortex Particle-Mesh (VPM) method with immersed lifting lines has been developed and validated. The vorticity-velocity formulation of the NS equations is treated in a hybrid way: particles handle advection while the mesh is used to evaluate the differential operators and for the fast Poisson solvers (here a Fourier-based solver which simultaneously allows for unbounded directions and inlet/outlet boundaries). Both discretizations communicate through high order interpolation. The immersed lifting lines handle the creation of vorticity from the blade elements and its early development. LES of Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) flows are performed, with a relatively fine resolution (128 and 160 grid points per blade) and for computational domains extending up to 6 D and 14 D downstream of the rotor. The wake complex development is captured in details, from the blades to the near wake coherent vortices, to the transitional ones, to the fully developed turbulent far wake. Mean flow statistics in planes (horizontal, vertical and cross) are also presented. A case with a realistic turbulent wind inflow is also considered. The physics are more complex than for HAWT flows. Computational resources provided by a PRACE award.

  2. A large aberrant stem ichthyosauriform indicating early rise and demise of ichthyosauromorphs in the wake of the end-Permian extinction.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Da-Yong; Motani, Ryosuke; Huang, Jian-Dong; Tintori, Andrea; Hu, Yuan-Chao; Rieppel, Olivier; Fraser, Nicholas C; Ji, Cheng; Kelley, Neil P; Fu, Wan-Lu; Zhang, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Contrary to the fast radiation of most metazoans after the end-Permian mass extinction, it is believed that early marine reptiles evolved slowly during the same time interval. However, emerging discoveries of Early Triassic marine reptiles are questioning this traditional view. Here we present an aberrant basal ichthyosauriform with a hitherto unknown body design that suggests a fast radiation of early marine reptiles. The new species is larger than coeval marine reptiles and has an extremely small head and a long tail without a fluke. Its heavily-built body bears flattened and overlapping gastral elements reminiscent of hupehsuchians. A phylogenetic analysis places the new species at the base of ichthyosauriforms, as the sister taxon of Cartorhynchus with which it shares a short snout with rostrally extended nasals. It now appears that ichthyosauriforms evolved rapidly within the first one million years of their evolution, in the Spathian (Early Triassic), and their true diversity has yet to be fully uncovered. Early ichthyosauromorphs quickly became extinct near the Early-Middle Triassic boundary, during the last large environmental perturbation after the end-Permian extinction involving redox fluctuations, sea level changes and volcanism. Marine reptile faunas shifted from ichthyosauromorph-dominated to sauropterygian-dominated composition after the perturbation. PMID:27211319

  3. A large aberrant stem ichthyosauriform indicating early rise and demise of ichthyosauromorphs in the wake of the end-Permian extinction

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Da-Yong; Motani, Ryosuke; Huang, Jian-Dong; Tintori, Andrea; Hu, Yuan-Chao; Rieppel, Olivier; Fraser, Nicholas C.; Ji, Cheng; Kelley, Neil P.; Fu, Wan-Lu; Zhang, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Contrary to the fast radiation of most metazoans after the end-Permian mass extinction, it is believed that early marine reptiles evolved slowly during the same time interval. However, emerging discoveries of Early Triassic marine reptiles are questioning this traditional view. Here we present an aberrant basal ichthyosauriform with a hitherto unknown body design that suggests a fast radiation of early marine reptiles. The new species is larger than coeval marine reptiles and has an extremely small head and a long tail without a fluke. Its heavily-built body bears flattened and overlapping gastral elements reminiscent of hupehsuchians. A phylogenetic analysis places the new species at the base of ichthyosauriforms, as the sister taxon of Cartorhynchus with which it shares a short snout with rostrally extended nasals. It now appears that ichthyosauriforms evolved rapidly within the first one million years of their evolution, in the Spathian (Early Triassic), and their true diversity has yet to be fully uncovered. Early ichthyosauromorphs quickly became extinct near the Early-Middle Triassic boundary, during the last large environmental perturbation after the end-Permian extinction involving redox fluctuations, sea level changes and volcanism. Marine reptile faunas shifted from ichthyosauromorph-dominated to sauropterygian-dominated composition after the perturbation. PMID:27211319

  4. Dynamic Gaussian wake meandering in a restricted nonlinear simulation framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretheim, Joel; Porte-Agel, Fernando; Gayme, Dennice; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-11-01

    Wake meandering can significantly impact the performance of large-scale wind farms. Simplified wake expansion (e.g., Jensen/PARK) models, which are commonly used in industry, lead to accurate predictions of certain wind farm performance characteristics (e.g., time- and row-averaged total power output). However, they are unable to capture certain temporal phenomena such as wake meandering, which can have profound effects on both power output and turbine loading. We explore a dynamic wake modeling framework based on the approach proposed by Larsen et al. (Wind Energy 11, 2008) whereby turbine ``wake elements'' are treated as passive tracers and advected by an averaged streamwise flow. Our wake elements are treated as Gaussian velocity deficit profiles (Bastankhah and Porte-Agel, Renew. Energy 70, 2014). A restricted nonlinear (RNL) model is used to capture the turbulent velocity fluctuations that are critical to the wake meandering phenomenon. The RNL system, which has been used in prior wall-turbulence studies, provides a computationally affordable way to model atmospheric turbulence, making it more reasonable for use in engineering models than the more accurate but computationally intensive approaches like large-eddy simulation. This work is supported by NSF (IGERT 0801471, SEP-1230788, and IIA-1243482, the WINDINSPIRE project).

  5. Wake in faint television meteors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, M. C.; Hawkes, Robert L.

    1992-01-01

    The two component dustball model was used in numerical lag computation. Detached grain lag is typically less than 2 km, with expected wakes of a few hundred meters. True wake in television meteors is masked by apparent wake due to the combined effects of image persistence and blooming. To partially circumvent this problem, we modified a dual MCP intensified CID video system by addition of a rotating shutter to reduce the effective exposure time to about 2.0 ms. Preliminary observations showed that only 2 of 27 analyzed meteors displayed statistically significant wake.

  6. Linear instability of supersonic plane wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papageorgiou, D. T.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper we present a theoretical and numerical study of the growth of linear disturbances in the high-Reynolds-number and laminar compressible wake behind a flat plate which is aligned with a uniform stream. No ad hoc assumptions are made as to the nature of the undisturbed flow (in contrast to previous investigations) but instead the theory is developed rationally by use of proper wake-profiles which satisfy the steady equations of motion. The initial growth of near wake perturbation is governed by the compressible Rayleigh equation which is studied analytically for long- and short-waves. These solutions emphasize the asymptotic structures involved and provide a rational basis for a nonlinear development. The evolution of arbitrary wavelength perturbations is addressed numerically and spatial stability solutions are presented that account for the relative importance of the different physical mechanisms present, such as three-dimensionality, increasing Mach numbers enough (subsonic) Mach numbers, there exists a region of absolute instability very close to the trailing-edge with the majority of the wake being convectively unstable. At higher Mach numbers (but still not large-hypersonic) the absolute instability region seems to disappear and the maximum available growth-rates decrease considerably. Three-dimensional perturbations provide the highest spatial growth-rates.

  7. Characterization of cavity wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidd, James A.

    Scope and Method of Study. This research focused on flow over deep cavities at subsonic speeds with emphasis on the wake downstream of the cavity. Cavity wake behaviors have not been studied in detail and are a major concern for air vehicles with cavities and in particular for optical sensor systems installed in cavities. Other key behaviors for sensor survival and performance are cavity resonance and turbulence scales in the shear layer. A wind tunnel test apparatus was developed to explore cavity and wake characteristics. It consisted of a test section insert for the OSU Indraft Wind Tunnel with an additional contraction cone for significantly increased speed. The test section included a variable depth cavity in a boundary layer splitter plate/fairing assembly, a Y-Z traverse and pitot rake with in-situ pressure transducers for high frequency response. Flows were measured over clean cavities with length to depth (L/D) ratios of 4 to 1/2 and on cavities with a porous fence for resonance suppression. Measurements were taken in streamwise and cross-stream sections to three cavity lengths downstream of the cavity trailing edge. Flow visualization using laser sheet and smoke injection was also used. Findings and Conclusions. The high speed insert demonstrated a significant new capability for the OSU wind tunnel, reaching speeds of 0.35 Mach (390 feet/second) in a 14"x14" test section. Inlet room flow was found to be quite unsteady and recommendations are made for improved flow and quantitative visualization. Key findings for cavity wake flow include its highly three dimensional nature with asymmetric peaks in cross section with boundary layer thicknesses and integral length scales several times that of a normal flat plate turbulent boundary layer (TBL). Turbulent intensities (TI) of 35% to 55% of freestream speeds were measured for the clean configuration. Fence configuration TI's were 20% to 35% of free stream and, in both configurations, TI's decayed to

  8. Wake Vortex Research in the USA (WakeNet-USA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Steve; Bryant, Wayne

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the cooperative work that FAA and NASA are engaged in to safely increase the capacity of the National Airspace System by studying the wake vortex operations. Wake vortex avoidance is a limiting factor in defining separation standards in the airport terminal area and could become a reducing separation standards in en route airspace.

  9. Experimental study of plane turbulent wakes in a shallow water layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Daoyi; Jirka, Gerhard H.

    1995-07-01

    Shallow two-dimensional turbulent wake flows have been studied experimentally on a large water table. In the experiments, the ambient Reynolds number Re h = UaH/ ν, in which Ua is the depth-averaged ambient velocity, H the water depth, and ν the kinematic viscosity, is large, well above a lower critical value of the order of 500 for open-channel flows so that the ambient base flow is fully turbulent. Different types of blunt bodies extending over the full depth are inserted in that base flow, including cylinders and flat solid and porous plates oriented transversely to the ambient flow. In all cases, the transverse body dimension D greatly exceeds the water depthy, D/H ≫ 1 . With that condition, the wake Reynolds number Re d = UaD/ ν is very large, greater than 10 4. The shallow near-wake characteristics of plane wakes from blunt bodies extending over the full water depth have been found to fall into one of three classes: (i) the vortex street (VS) type with an oscillating vortex shedding mechanism, (ii) the unsteady bubble (UB) wake type with flow instabilities growing downstream of a recirculating bubble attached to the body, and (iii) the steady bubble (SB) wake type with an attached bubble followed by a turbulent wake that contains no growing instabilities. When Re h > 1500, the flow classification is uniquely dependent on a shallow wake parameter, S = c fD/H in which cf is a quadratic law friction coefficient. For circular cylindrical bodies the VS-UB transition is characterized by a critical value, Sca ≈ 0.2, and the UB-SB transition by Scc ≈ 0.5. Solid plates, oriented transversely, differ by a factor of 1.25. The shallow far-wake behavior has been investigated with a special variable porosity wake device that reduces the wake velocity deficit and completely suppresses the VS instabilities in the near-field. Thus, only UB and SB wake types are found in that case. Furthermore, the shallow plane wake is obsserved to "stabilize" for large downstream

  10. 3-D Time-Accurate CFD Simulations of a Multi-Megawatt Slender Bladed HAWT under Yawed Inflow Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayed, M.; Lutz, Th.; Krämer, E.

    2016-09-01

    In the present study numerical investigations of a generic Multi-Megawatt slender bladed Horizontal-Axis Wind Turbine (HAWT) under yawed inflow conditions were conducted. A three-dimensional URANS flow solver based on structured overlapping meshes was used. The simulations were conducted at wind speeds of 7m/sec, 11 m/sec and 15 m/sec for different yaw angles ranging from +60° to -60°. It was concluded that, for below rated wind speeds, under small yaw angles (below ±15°) the magnitudes of the blade forces are slightly increased, while under high yaw angles (above ±15°) there is a significant decrease. Moreover, the load fluctuations, for the different yaw angles, have the same frequency but different amplitude and oscillation shape. It was concluded that at the above rated wind speed of 15 m/sec, the blade aerodynamic loads are significantly affected by the yaw inflow conditions and the magnitude values of the loads are decreased with increasing yaw angle. It can be concluded that the angle of attack and the tower interference are the utmost variables affecting the yawed turbines.

  11. Wake Measurements in ECN's Scaled Wind Farm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenaar, J. W.; Schepers, J. G.

    2014-12-01

    In ECN's scaled wind farm the wake evolution is studied in two different situations. A single wake is studied at two different locations downstream of a turbine and a single wake is studied in conjunction with a triple wake. Here, the wake is characterized by the relative wind speed, the turbulence intensity, the vertical wind speed and the turbulence (an)isotropy. Per situation all wake measurements are taken simultaneously together with the inflow conditions.

  12. Effects of Aircraft Wake Dynamics on Measured and Simulated NO(x) and HO(x) Wake Chemistry. Appendix B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewellen, D. C.; Lewellen, W. S.

    2001-01-01

    High-resolution numerical large-eddy simulations of the near wake of a B757 including simplified NOx and HOx chemistry were performed to explore the effects of dynamics on chemistry in wakes of ages from a few seconds to several minutes. Dilution plays an important basic role in the NOx-O3 chemistry in the wake, while a more interesting interaction between the chemistry and dynamics occurs for the HOx species. These simulation results are compared with published measurements of OH and HO2 within a B757 wake under cruise conditions in the upper troposphere taken during the Subsonic Aircraft Contrail and Cloud Effects Special Study (SUCCESS) mission in May 1996. The simulation provides a much finer grained representation of the chemistry and dynamics of the early wake than is possible from the 1 s data samples taken in situ. The comparison suggests that the previously reported discrepancy of up to a factor of 20 - 50 between the SUCCESS measurements of the [HO2]/[OH] ratio and that predicted by simplified theoretical computations is due to the combined effects of large mixing rates around the wake plume edges and averaging over volumes containing large species fluctuations. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using three-dimensional unsteady large-eddy simulations with coupled chemistry to study such phenomena.

  13. Wind farm array wake losses

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, R.W.; McCarthy, E.F.

    1997-12-31

    A wind turbine wake study was conducted in the summer of 1987 at an Altamont Pass wind electric generating facility. The wind speed deficits, turbulence, and power deficits from an array consisting of several rows of wind turbines is discussed. A total of nine different test configurations were evaluated for a downwind spacing ranging from 7 rotor diameters (RD) to 34 RD and a cross wind spacing of 1.3 RD and 2.7 RD. Wake power deficits of 15% were measured at 16 RD and power losses of a few percent were even measurable at 27 RD for the closer cross wind spacing. For several rows of turbines separated by 7-9 RD the wake zones overlapped and formed compound wakes with higher velocity deficits. The wind speed and direction turbulence in the wake was much higher than the ambient turbulence. The results from this study are compared to the findings from other similar field measurements.

  14. A Zoology of unstable modes in a stratified cylinder wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosco, Mickael; Meunier, Patrice

    2013-11-01

    Although the dynamics of a cylinder wake is well known and extremely rich for a homogeneous fluid, very few studies have been focused on stratified wakes despite the obvious extensive number of applications for geophysical flows and submarine wakes. The presence of the stratification may largely modify the dynamics of the wake. The study is devoted to understand the effect of the tilt and also of a strong stratification. So extensive experimental and numerical results have been investigated to describe the full dynamics of a tilted cylinder wake. For weak stratification and small tilt angle, the classical mode A found for a homogeneous fluid is still present, but for a large tilt angle, an instability appearing far from the cylinder is created. The case of a cylinder towed a very stratified fluid has been finally investigated. The dynamics is strongly modified and for moderate tilt angles, a new unstable mode appears with a structure similar to the Kelvin-Helmholtz billows (observed in the critical layer of a tilted stratified vortex), whereas for large tilt angles, another unstable mode characterized by a strong shear appears generated without a 2D von Karman structure. This reveals the rich dynamics of the cylinder wake in the presence of a stable stratification.

  15. Mach-like capillary-gravity wakes.

    PubMed

    Moisy, Frédéric; Rabaud, Marc

    2014-08-01

    We determine experimentally the angle α of maximum wave amplitude in the far-field wake behind a vertical surface-piercing cylinder translated at constant velocity U for Bond numbers Bo(D)=D/λ(c) ranging between 0.1 and 4.2, where D is the cylinder diameter and λ(c) the capillary length. In all cases the wake angle is found to follow a Mach-like law at large velocity, α∼U(-1), but with different prefactors depending on the value of Bo(D). For small Bo(D) (large capillary effects), the wake angle approximately follows the law α≃c(g,min)/U, where c(g,min) is the minimum group velocity of capillary-gravity waves. For larger Bo(D) (weak capillary effects), we recover a law α∼√[gD]/U similar to that found for ship wakes at large velocity [Rabaud and Moisy, Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 214503 (2013)]. Using the general property of dispersive waves that the characteristic wavelength of the wave packet emitted by a disturbance is of order of the disturbance size, we propose a simple model that describes the transition between these two Mach-like regimes as the Bond number is varied. We show that the new capillary law α≃c(g,min)/U originates from the presence of a capillary cusp angle (distinct from the usual gravity cusp angle), along which the energy radiated by the disturbance accumulates for Bond numbers of order of unity. This model, complemented by numerical simulations of the surface elevation induced by a moving Gaussian pressure disturbance, is in qualitative agreement with experimental measurements.

  16. Mach-like capillary-gravity wakes.

    PubMed

    Moisy, Frédéric; Rabaud, Marc

    2014-08-01

    We determine experimentally the angle α of maximum wave amplitude in the far-field wake behind a vertical surface-piercing cylinder translated at constant velocity U for Bond numbers Bo(D)=D/λ(c) ranging between 0.1 and 4.2, where D is the cylinder diameter and λ(c) the capillary length. In all cases the wake angle is found to follow a Mach-like law at large velocity, α∼U(-1), but with different prefactors depending on the value of Bo(D). For small Bo(D) (large capillary effects), the wake angle approximately follows the law α≃c(g,min)/U, where c(g,min) is the minimum group velocity of capillary-gravity waves. For larger Bo(D) (weak capillary effects), we recover a law α∼√[gD]/U similar to that found for ship wakes at large velocity [Rabaud and Moisy, Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 214503 (2013)]. Using the general property of dispersive waves that the characteristic wavelength of the wave packet emitted by a disturbance is of order of the disturbance size, we propose a simple model that describes the transition between these two Mach-like regimes as the Bond number is varied. We show that the new capillary law α≃c(g,min)/U originates from the presence of a capillary cusp angle (distinct from the usual gravity cusp angle), along which the energy radiated by the disturbance accumulates for Bond numbers of order of unity. This model, complemented by numerical simulations of the surface elevation induced by a moving Gaussian pressure disturbance, is in qualitative agreement with experimental measurements. PMID:25215822

  17. Particle Access and Charging Environments in the Lunar Wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Linda; Minow, Joseph; Singh, Nagendra; Araveti, Venkata S.; Venkiteswaran, Karthik

    2010-01-01

    A plasma wake a region of low density, high temperature plasma forms on the far side of the Moon when solar wind, magnetosheath, and magnetotail plasma flows past the Moon [Manka, 1973; Ogilvie et al., 1996; Farrell et al., 1998; Halekas et al., 2005]. Ion populations in these flows typically have much smaller thermal velocity than bulk speed and are therefore excluded from the plasma wake while the large thermal electron velocity allows the lighter negatively charged particles to stream ahead of the ions into the wake. Charge separation due to electrons streaming ahead of the ions into the wake from the wake boundary establishes an ambipolar electric field which impedes the motion of electron flow and accelerates ions into the wake [Ogilvie et al., 1996; Farrell et al., 1997]. We have conducted a theoretical study of acceleration (and deceleration) of charged particles in lunar plasma environments, which investigated the mechanisms responsible for allowing solar wind entry into the lunar wake, and for producing energetic particle distributions observed within the lunar wake. To this end, the investigation utilized a macroscale 3D hybrid particle-in-cell numerical model of the interaction of the Moon with external plasma environments to compute electric fields in the lunar environment for a variety of external plasma conditions and interplanetary magnetic field orientations. Ion dynamics were attained from the hybrid code while electron dynamics were determined by considering electron test particle trajectories through the fields established in the hybrid code. Results from the code will be presented to evaluate charging environments within the lunar wake.

  18. A new methodology for free wake analysis using curved vortex elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bliss, Donald B.; Teske, Milton E.; Quackenbush, Todd R.

    1987-01-01

    A method using curved vortex elements was developed for helicopter rotor free wake calculations. The Basic Curve Vortex Element (BCVE) is derived from the approximate Biot-Savart integration for a parabolic arc filament. When used in conjunction with a scheme to fit the elements along a vortex filament contour, this method has a significant advantage in overall accuracy and efficiency when compared to the traditional straight-line element approach. A theoretical and numerical analysis shows that free wake flows involving close interactions between filaments should utilize curved vortex elements in order to guarantee a consistent level of accuracy. The curved element method was implemented into a forward flight free wake analysis, featuring an adaptive far wake model that utilizes free wake information to extend the vortex filaments beyond the free wake regions. The curved vortex element free wake, coupled with this far wake model, exhibited rapid convergence, even in regions where the free wake and far wake turns are interlaced. Sample calculations are presented for tip vortex motion at various advance ratios for single and multiple blade rotors. Cross-flow plots reveal that the overall downstream wake flow resembles a trailing vortex pair. A preliminary assessment shows that the rotor downwash field is insensitive to element size, even for relatively large curved elements.

  19. WAKE ISLAND AIRFIELD TERMINAL, BUILDING 1502 LOOKING EAST WITH PHOTO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    WAKE ISLAND AIRFIELD TERMINAL, BUILDING 1502 LOOKING EAST WITH PHOTO SCALE CENTERED ON BUILDING (12/30/2008) - Wake Island Airfield, Terminal Building, West Side of Wake Avenue, Wake Island, Wake Island, UM

  20. Mathematical models for exotic wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Saikat; Stremler, Mark

    2014-11-01

    Vortex wakes are a common occurrence in the environment around us; the most famous example being the von Kármán vortex street with two vortices being shed by the bluff body in each cycle. However, frequently there can be many other more exotic wake configurations with different vortex arrangements, based on the flow parameters and the bluff body dimensions and/or its oscillation characteristics. Some examples include wakes with periodic shedding of three vortices (`P+S' mode) and four vortices (symmetric `2P' mode, staggered `2P' mode, `2C' mode). We present mathematical models for such wakes assuming two-dimensional potential flows with embedded point vortices. The spatial alignment of the vortices is inspired by the experimentally observed wakes. The idealized system follows a Hamiltonian formalism. Model-based analysis reveals a rich dynamics pertaining to the relative vortex motion in the mid-wake region. Downstream evolution of the vortices, as predicted from the model results, also show good correspondence with wake-shedding experiments performed on flowing soap films.

  1. Rotor wake mixing effects downstream of a compressor rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravindranath, A.; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental study of rotor wake was conducted in the trailing-edge and near-wake regions of a moderately loaded compressor rotor blade using a rotating triaxial hot-wire probe in a rotating frame of reference. The flow-field was surveyed very close to the trailing-edge as well as inside the annulus- and hub-wall boundary layers. The large amount of data acquired during this program has been analyzed to discern the decay effects as well as the spanwise variation of three components of velocity, three components of intensities and three components of shear stresses. The data set also include extensive information on the variation of the flow properties downstream. The other derived quantities include wake momentum thickness and deviation angles at various spanwise and downstream locations. These data are presented and interpreted, with emphasis on the downstream mixing as well as endwall-wake interaction effects.

  2. Turbulence structures in wind turbine wake: Effects of atmospheric stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaganagar, Kiran

    2014-11-01

    Turbulence structure in the wake behind full-scale horizontal-axis WT under the influence of realistic atmospheric turbulent flow conditions has been investigated using actuator-line-model based large-eddy-simulations. Wind turbine simulations have revealed that, in addition to wind shear and ABL turbulence, height-varying wind angle and low-level jets are ABL metrics that influence the structure of turbine wake. Turbulent mixing layer forms downstream of the WT, the strength and size of which decreases with increasing stability. Height dependent wind angle and turbulence are the ABL metrics influencing the lateral wake expansion. Further, ABL metrics strongly impact the evolution of tip and root vortices formed behind the rotor. Two factors play an important role in wake meandering: tip vortex merging due to the mutual inductance form of instability and the corresponding instability of the turbulent mixing layer. NSF CBET Energy for Sustainability.

  3. Wake survey techniques for objects with highly turbulent wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Biao

    The primary objective of this study is to develop practical and accurate wake survey techniques for determining the drag of bluff bodies that have highly turbulent wakes. The commonly used wake survey method, the simplified Jones' equation with pneumatic probe measurements, was found to be inadequate in such cases. This study consisted of an experimental investigation of several wind-tunnel models, a theoretical analysis of turbulence effects on pressure measurements, and an analysis of wake drag equations. The experimental investigation was performed in the Illinois 3- by 4-foot low-speed wind tunnel. In the test, the wake of a 1-inch diameter cylinder and two airfoils, an S809 and NACA 0012, with and without various ice simulations were surveyed in detail using several Pitot-static probes with different nose shapes and an X-hotwire. The cylinder results were used to validate the wake survey techniques. The drag of the airfoils with and without ice accretions was determined using the validated wake survey techniques. A theoretical analysis of the turbulence effect on total and static pressure measurements was presented and compared with experimental data. Methods for correcting the turbulence effect on pressure measurements were provided, and a technique for estimating the turbulence kinetic pressure using the uncorrected pressure measurements was developed. Turbulence was also found to play an important role in drag determination through Reynolds stresses and static pressure deficit in the wake. A new wake drag equation was derived to include the turbulence effects. It was found the turbulence contribution to profile drag was over 17% in the cylinder test, and over 10% in the test of airfoils with ice accretions. This dissertation for the first time analyzed the turbulence effect on the simplified Jones' equation with measurements using a Pitot probe, and found that this method includes a portion of the turbulence effect into account implicitly, depending on the

  4. Wake Turbulence Mitigation for Arrivals (WTMA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Daniel M.; Lohr, Gary W.; Trujillo, Anna C.

    2008-01-01

    The preliminary Wake Turbulence Mitigation for Arrivals (WTMA) concept of operations is described in this paper. The WTMA concept provides further detail to work initiated by the Wake Vortex Avoidance System Concept Evaluation Team and is an evolution of the Wake Turbulence Mitigation for Departure concept. Anticipated benefits about reducing wake turbulence separation standards in crosswind conditions, and candidate WTMA system considerations are discussed.

  5. Irregular sleep-wake syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Kanuther N, Harrington J, Lee-Chiong T. Circadian rhythm sleep disorders. Clin Chest Med . 2010;31:319-325. Zee PC, Vitello MV. Circadian rhythm sleep disorder: irregular sleep wake rhythm. Sleep Med ...

  6. Diagnosis, Cause, and Treatment Approaches for Delayed Sleep-Wake Phase Disorder.

    PubMed

    Magee, Michelle; Marbas, Emily M; Wright, Kenneth P; Rajaratnam, Shantha M W; Broussard, Josiane L

    2016-09-01

    Delayed sleep-wake phase disorder (DSWPD) is commonly defined as an inability to fall asleep and wake at societal times resulting in excessive daytime sleepiness. Although the cause is multifaceted, delays in sleep time are largely driven by misalignment between the circadian pacemaker and the desired sleep-wake timing schedule. Current treatment approaches focus on correcting the circadian delay; however, there is a lack of data investigating combined therapies for treatment of DSWPD. PMID:27542884

  7. Wake Shield Target Protection

    SciTech Connect

    Valmianski, Emanuil I.; Petzoldt, Ronald W.; Alexander, Neil B.

    2003-05-15

    The heat flux from both gas convection and chamber radiation on a direct drive target must be limited to avoid target damage from excessive D-T temperature increase. One of the possibilities of protecting the target is a wake shield flying in front of the target. A shield will also reduce drag force on the target, thereby facilitating target tracking and position prediction. A Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code was used to calculate convection heat loads as boundary conditions input into ANSYS thermal calculations. These were used for studying the quality of target protection depending on various shapes of shields, target-shield distance, and protective properties of the shield moving relative to the target. The results show that the shield can reduce the convective heat flux by a factor of 2 to 5 depending on pressure, temperature, and velocity. The protective effect of a shield moving relative to the target is greater than the protective properties of a fixed shield. However, the protective effect of a shield moving under the drag force is not sufficient for bringing the heat load on the target down to the necessary limit. Some other ways of diminishing heat flux using a protective shield are discussed.

  8. Properties of wind turbine wakes under various atmospheric stability conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Shengbai; Archer, Cristina

    2015-11-01

    Large-eddy simulations (LES) are performed to study the properties of wind turbine wakes under various atmospheric stability conditions. The Wind Turbine and Turbulence Simulator (WiTTS), a 4th-order finite-difference LES code is used for stable, neutral, and unstable conditions. The Coriolis forcing is also considered. Three cases are studied: isolated turbine, finite-size turbine array, and infinite wind farm. The results show strong correlations with stability. For the stable condition, the power extraction by an isolated turbine is highest, but the wake is also longest, thus the relative performance inside the array is lowest. In contrast, although the single-turbine power extraction is low for the unstable condition, the performance of downstream turbines is improved due to faster wake recovery. The wake shape is distorted by the stability-related wind veering. Therefore, the self-similar Gaussian wake deficit is not accurate. Here, a new wake model is proposed for correction. The infinite wind-farm case shows that the temperature near the ground is warmed by about 1 K for the stable condition, but the influence is almost negligible for the unstable and neutral conditions. For all conditions, the near-ground shear stress is reduced.

  9. Use of Plasma Actuators as a Moving-Wake Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corke, Thomas C.; Thomas, Flint O.; Klapetzky Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    The work documented in this report tests the concept of using plasma actuators as a simple and easy way to generate a simulated moving-wake and the disturbances associated with it in turbines. This wake is caused by the blades of the upstream stages of the turbine. Two types of devices, one constructed of arrays of NACA 0018 airfoils, and the one constructed of flat plates were studied. The airfoils or plates were equipped with surface mounted dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators, which were used to generate flow disturbances resembling moving-wakes. CTA hot-wire anemometry and flow visualization using a smoke-wire were used to investigate the wake independence at various spacings and downstream locations. The flat plates were found to produce better results than the airfoils in creating large velocity fluctuations in the free-stream flow. Different dielectric materials, plasma actuator locations, leading edge contours, angles of attack and plate spacings were investigated, some with positive results. The magnitudes of the velocity fluctuations were found to be comparable to existing mechanical moving-wake generators, thus proving the feasibility of using plasma actuators as a moving-wake generator.

  10. Studies of origin of three-dimensionality in laminar wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharib, Morteza

    1993-02-01

    Wind tunnel experiments, using hot-wire anemometry and smoke-wire flow visualization, were conducted to study the process of transition from laminar to turbulent flow of parallel and oblique vortex streets from circular cylinders. It was found that the origin and scale of three-dimensionality which appears at Reynolds numbers just below the transition from laminar to turbulent flow are dependent on the vortex shedding geometry in the near-wake. Oblique vortex streets develop large scale three-dimensional structures and undergo an early transition, i.e. at lower Reynolds numbers, when compared to parallel vortex streets. This is due to the presence of three-dimensionality in oblique wakes at pretransition Reynolds numbers, whereas parallel wakes remain laminar until the vortices themselves develop three-dimensional features. The downstream evolution of these two wake geometries from the primary Karman vortices to the far-wake vortical structures was also investigated. The far-wake structures are parallel to the cylinder axis for parallel shedding. For oblique shedding, these structures are initially parallel to the cylinder axis, but further downstream they develop a strong spanwise modulation whose wavelength is the spanwise distance between two consecutive Karman vortices of the same sign of vorticity.

  11. Wake Mitigation Strategies for Optimizing Wind Farm Power Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilip, Deepu; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Although wind turbines are designed individually for optimum power production, they are often arranged into groups of closely spaced turbines in a wind farm rather than in isolation. Consequently, most turbines in a wind farm do not operate in unobstructed wind flows, but are affected by the wakes of turbines in front of them. Such wake interference significantly reduces the overall power generation from wind farms and hence, development of effective wake mitigation strategies is critical for improving wind farm efficiency. One approach towards this end is based on the notion that the operation of each turbine in a wind farm at its optimum efficiency might not lead to optimum power generation from the wind farm as a whole. This entails a down regulation of individual turbines from its optimum operating point, which can be achieved through different methods such as pitching the turbine blades, changing the turbine tip speed ratio or yawing of the turbine, to name a few. In this study, large-eddy simulations of a two-turbine arrangement with the second turbine fully in the wake of the first are performed. Different wake mitigation techniques are applied to the upstream turbine, and the effects of these on its wake characteristics are investigated. Results for the combined power from the two turbines for each of these methods are compared to a baseline scenario where no wake mitigation strategies are employed. Analysis of the results shows the potential for improved power production from such wake control methods. It should be noted, however, that the magnitude of the improvement is strongly affected by the level of turbulence in the incoming atmospheric flow.

  12. Numerical study on wake characteristics of high-speed trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Shuan-Bao; Sun, Zhen-Xu; Guo, Di-Long; Chen, Da-Wei; Yang, Guo-Wei

    2013-12-01

    Intensive turbulence exists in the wakes of high speed trains, and the aerodynamic performance of the trailing car could deteriorate rapidly due to complicated features of the vortices in the wake zone. As a result, the safety and amenity of high speed trains would face a great challenge. This paper considers mainly the mechanism of vortex formation and evolution in the train flow field. A real CRH2 model is studied, with a leading car, a middle car and a trailing car included. Different running speeds and cross wind conditions are considered, and the approaches of unsteady Reynold-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) and detached eddy simulation (DES) are utilized, respectively. Results reveal that DES has better capability of capturing small eddies compared to URANS. However, for large eddies, the effects of two approaches are almost the same. In conditions without cross winds, two large vortex streets stretch from the train nose and interact strongly with each other in the wake zone. With the reinforcement of the ground, a complicated wake vortex system generates and becomes strengthened as the running speed increases. However, the locations of flow separations on the train surface and the separation mechanism keep unchanged. In conditions with cross winds, three large vortices develop along the leeward side of the train, among which the weakest one has no obvious influence on the wake flow while the other two stretch to the tail of the train and combine with the helical vortices in the train wake. Thus, optimization of the aerodynamic performance of the trailing car should be aiming at reducing the intensity of the wake vortex system.

  13. Wind turbine wake characterization using long-range Doppler lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitken, M.; Lundquist, J. K.; Hestmark, K.; Banta, R. M.; Pichugina, Y.; Brewer, A.

    2012-12-01

    Wind turbines extract energy from the freestream flow, resulting in a waked region behind the rotor which is characterized by reduced wind speed and increased turbulence. The velocity deficit in the wake diminishes with distance, as faster-moving air outside is gradually entrained. In a concentrated group of turbines, then, downwind machines experience very different inflow conditions compared to those in the front row. As utility-scale turbines rarely exist in isolation, detailed knowledge of the mean flow and turbulence structure inside wakes is needed to correctly model both power production and turbine loading at modern wind farms. To this end, the Turbine Wake and Inflow Characterization Study (TWICS) was conducted in the spring of 2011 to determine the reduction in wind speeds downstream from a multi-MW turbine located at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) near Boulder, Colorado. Full-scale measurements of wake dynamics are hardly practical or even possible with conventional sensors, such as cup anemometers mounted on meteorological (met) masts. Accordingly, the High Resolution Doppler Lidar (HRDL) developed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Earth System Research Laboratory was employed to investigate the formation and propagation of wakes under varying levels of ambient wind speed, shear, atmospheric stability, and turbulence. HRDL remotely senses line-of-sight wind velocities and has been used in several previous studies of boundary layer aerodynamics. With a fully steerable beam and a maximum range up to about 5 km, depending on atmospheric conditions, HRDL performed a comprehensive survey of the wind flow in front of and behind the turbine to study the shape, meandering, and attenuation of wakes. Due in large part to limited experimental data availability, wind farm wake modeling is still subject to an unacceptable amount of uncertainty, particularly in complex terrain. Here, analytical

  14. Blade design trade-offs using low-lift airfoils for stall-regulated HAWTs

    SciTech Connect

    Giguere, P.; Selig, M.S.; Tangler, J.L.

    1999-11-01

    A systematic blade design study was conducted to explore the trade-offs in using low-lift airfoils for a 750-kilowatt stall-regulated wind turbine. Tip-region airfoils having a maximum-lift coefficient ranging from 0.7--1.2 were considered in this study, with the main objective of identifying the practical lower limit for the maximum-life coefficient. Blades were optimized for both maximum annual energy production and minimum cost of energy using a method that takes into account aerodynamic and structural considerations. The results indicate that the effect of the maximum-lift coefficient on the cost of energy is small with a slight advantage to the highest maximum lift coefficient airfoils for the tip-region of the blade become more desirable as machine size increases, provided the airfoils yield acceptable stall characteristics. The conclusions are applicable to large wind turbines that use passive or active stall to regulate peak power.

  15. Numerical simulation of supersonic wake flow with parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, C.C.; Soetrisno, M.

    1995-07-01

    Simulating a supersonic wake flow field behind a conical body is a computing intensive task. It requires a large number of computational cells to capture the dominant flow physics and a robust numerical algorithm to obtain a reliable solution. High performance parallel computers with unique distributed processing and data storage capability can provide this need. They have larger computational memory and faster computing time than conventional vector computers. We apply the PINCA Navier-Stokes code to simulate a wind-tunnel supersonic wake experiment on Intel Gamma, Intel Paragon, and IBM SP2 parallel computers. These simulations are performed to study the mean flow in the near wake region of a sharp, 7-degree half-angle, adiabatic cone at Mach number 4.3 and freestream Reynolds number of 40,600. Overall the numerical solutions capture the general features of the hypersonic laminar wake flow and compare favorably with the wind tunnel data. With a refined and clustering grid distribution in the recirculation zone, the calculated location of the rear stagnation point is consistent with the 2D axisymmetric and 3D experiments. In this study, we also demonstrate the importance of having a large local memory capacity within a computer node and the effective utilization of the number of computer nodes to achieve good parallel performance when simulating a complex, large-scale wake flow problem.

  16. An evaluation of an empirical model for stall delay due to rotation for HAWTS

    SciTech Connect

    Tangler, J L; Selig, M S

    1997-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the Corrigan and Schillings stall delay model for predicting rotor performance for horizontal axis wind turbines. Two-dimensional (2D) wind tunnel characteristics with and without stall delay were used in the computer program PROP93 to predict performance for the NREL Combined Experiment Rotor (CER) and a lower solidity commercial machine. For the CER, predictions were made with a constant-chord/twisted blade and a hypothetical tapered/twisted blade. Results for the constant-chord/twisted blade were compared with CER data. Predicted performance using this empirical stall-delay method provided significant increases in peak power over 2D post-stall airfoil characteristics. The predicted peak power increase due to stall delay for the CER was found to be quite large (20% to 30%) as a result of its high blade solidity. For a more typical, lower-solidity commercial blade the predicted peak power increase was 15% to 20%. As described in the paper, correlation with test data was problematic due to factors not related to the stall-delay model.

  17. Blade Design Trade-Offs Using Low-Lift Airfoils for Stall-Regulated HAWTs

    SciTech Connect

    Giguere, P.; Selig, M. S.; Tangler, J. L.

    1999-04-08

    A systematic blade design study was conducted to explore the trade-offs in using low-lift airfoils for a 750-kilowatt stall-regulated wind turbine. Tip-region airfoils having a maximum lift coefficient ranging from 0.7-1.2 were considered in this study, with the main objective of identifying the practical lower limit for the maximum lift coefficient. Blades were optimized for both maximum annual energy production and minimum cost of energy using a method that takes into account aerodynamic and structural considerations. The results indicate that reducing the maximum lift coefficient below the upper limit considered in this study increases the cost of energy independently of the wind regime. As a consequence, higher maximum lift coefficient airfoils for the tip-region of the blade become more desirable as machine size increases, as long as they provide gentle stall characteristics. The conclusions are applicable to large wind turbines that use passive or active stall to regulate peak power.

  18. On the wake flow of asymmetrically beveled trailing edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Yaoyi; Pröbsting, Stefan; Stephens, David; Gupta, Abhineet; Morris, Scott C.

    2016-05-01

    Trailing edge and wake flows are of interest for a wide range of applications. Small changes in the design of asymmetrically beveled or semi-rounded trailing edges can result in significant difference in flow features which are relevant for the aerodynamic performance, flow-induced structural vibration and aerodynamically generated sound. The present study describes in detail the flow field characteristics around a family of asymmetrically beveled trailing edges with an enclosed trailing-edge angle of 25° and variable radius of curvature R. The flow fields over the beveled trailing edges are described using data obtained by particle image velocimetry (PIV) experiments. The flow topology for different trailing edges was found to be strongly dependent on the radius of curvature R, with flow separation occurring further downstream as R increases. This variation in the location of flow separation influences the aerodynamic force coefficients, which were evaluated from the PIV data using a control volume approach. Two-point correlations of the in-plane velocity components are considered to assess the structure in the flow field. The analysis shows large-scale coherent motions in the far wake, which are associated with vortex shedding. The wake thickness parameter yf is confirmed as an appropriate length scale to characterize this large-scale roll-up motion in the wake. The development in the very near wake was found to be critically dependent on R. In addition, high-speed PIV measurements provide insight into the spectral characteristics of the turbulent fluctuations. Based on the time-resolved flow field data, the frequency range associated with the shedding of coherent vortex pairs in the wake is identified. By means of time-correlation of the velocity components, turbulent structures are found to convect from the attached or separated shear layers without distinct separation point into the wake.

  19. Geometrical Wake of a Smooth Flat Collimator

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.V.; /SLAC

    2011-09-09

    A transverse geometrical wake generated by a beam passing through a smooth flat collimator with a gradually varying gap between the upper and lower walls is considered. Based on generalization of the approach recently developed for a smooth circular taper we reduce the electromagnetic problem of the impedance calculation to the solution of two much simpler static problems - a magnetostatic and an electrostatic ones. The solution shows that in the limit of not very large frequencies, the impedance increases with the ratio h/d where h is the width and d is the distance between the collimating jaws. Numerical results are presented for the NLC Post Linac collimator.

  20. Sleep and waking in a time-free environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, W. B.; Agnew, H. W., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The sleep and waking of 14 subjects in time-free environments were studied for 14 days. Half of the subjects had a heavy exercise regime. All subjects exhibited a longer-than-24-hr rhythm, but the groups did not differ from each other in this extension of the rhythm. There were large individual differences between subjects and large variations from the projected sleep and waking times. The overall amount of sleep increased in the environment, and there were marked increases in both shorter and longer sleep and waking period lengths. Exercise did not increase the overall amount of sleep but did increase the variability in the distribution of sleep. The overall distribution of sleep stages during sleep did not differ from baseline measures or between groups.

  1. Measurements of fish's wake by PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuemin; Wu, Yanfeng; Lu, Xiyun; Yin, Xiezhen

    2003-04-01

    In this paper an experiment on measurements of the wake of Goldfish carassius auratus swimming unrestricted was conducted in a water tunnel. Color liquid was used to visualize the wake of the fish and PIV was used to measure velocity field of the wake. Results show that there is reverse Karman vortex street in symmetrical plane of the fish's wake and the Strouhal frequency of the fish is about 0.35 udner the different experimental conditions. The distribution of velocity and vorticity in the wake of Goldfish was measured by PIV and formation of reverse Karman vortex street in the wake was studied in a model experiment.

  2. Meteorology and Wake Vortex Influence on American Airlines FL-587 Accident

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Fred H.; Hamilton, David W.; Rutishauser, David K.; Switzer, George F.

    2004-01-01

    The atmospheric environment surrounding the crash of American Airlines Flight 587 is investigated. Examined are evidence for any unusual atmospheric conditions and the potential for encounters with aircraft wake vortices. Computer simulations are carried out with two different vortex prediction models and a Large Eddy Simulation model. Wind models are proposed for studying aircraft and pilot response to the wake vortex encounter.

  3. Angular 21 cm power spectrum of a scaling distribution of cosmic string wakes

    SciTech Connect

    Hernández, Oscar F.; Wang, Yi; Brandenberger, Robert; Fong, José E-mail: wangyi@physics.mcgill.ca E-mail: jose.fong@ens-lyon.fr

    2011-08-01

    Cosmic string wakes lead to a large signal in 21 cm redshift maps at redshifts larger than that corresponding to reionization. Here, we compute the angular power spectrum of 21 cm radiation as predicted by a scaling distribution of cosmic strings whose wakes have undergone shock heating.

  4. Formation and Recovery of Cold Wake during Typhoon Fanapi (2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Jin, H.; Black, P. G.; Chen, S.; Doyle, J.; O'Neill, L. W.

    2012-12-01

    Cold anomaly of sea surface temperature (SST) is often created after the passage of a moving hurricane or typhoon. The SST reduction within these cold anomalies or cold wakes may reach 2C to 4C. The cold wakes may have important impact on the development of a tropical cyclone due to their control on the surface energy fluxes. This work is aimed at understanding the evolution of cold wake and its impacts on the boundary layers on both sides of the air-sea interface. During 2010 typhoon season, coupled Naval Research Laboratory COAMPS-Tropical Cyclone was used to provide real-time forecasts for ITOP (Impact of Typhoons on the Ocean in the Pacific) field experiment. Typhoon Fanapi started as a tropical depression on September 14, and turned into a Category 4 typhoon on September 18. Along its passage, Typhoon Fanapi produced a large area of cold wake, leading to about 2 degree C reductions in SST. The coupled COAMPS-TC realistically predicted the cold wake formation and recovery as well as the typhoon's track and intensity in general. We use combined coupled COAMPS-TC prediction and observation data collected during the ITOP IOP to investigate the characteristics of the cold wake evolution, evolution of atmospheric as well as oceanic boundary layers. The cold wake was predicted by the model on the right hand side of the storm track; it is driven by the strong shear mixing in the ocean mixed layer. The predicted maximum SST reduction within the wake is 2.5 C, a value very close to the AXBT and satellite observations. Because of this decrease in SST, a stable atmospheric boundary layer is formed, leading to decreases in the surface wind speed, sensible and latent heat fluxes. The predicted warming rate in the cold wake recovery process is comparable with the satellite observation, even though diurnal signal is much more significant in the model prediction. An important question is what determines the recovery time scale. Given the similar solar warming rate between the

  5. Wind tunnel investigation on wind turbine wakes and wind farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iungo, G. V.; Coëffé, J.; Porté-Agel, F.

    2012-04-01

    The interaction between atmospheric boundary layer and wind farms leads to flow modifications, which need to be deeply characterized in order to relate them to wind farm performance. The wake flow produced from a wind farm is the result of a strong interaction between multiple turbine wakes, so that the wind farm configuration turns out to be one of the dominant features to enhance power production. For the present work a wind tunnel investigation was carried out with hot-wire anemometry and velocity measurements performed with multi-hole pressure probes. The tested wind farms consist of miniature three-bladed wind turbine models. Preliminarily, the wake flow generated from a single wind turbine is surveyed, which is characterized by a strong velocity defect lying in proximity of the wind turbine hub height. The wake gradually recovers by moving downstream; the characteristics of the incoming boundary layer and wind turbulence intensity can strongly affect the wake recovery, and thus performance of following wind turbines. An increased turbulence level is typically detected downstream of each wind turbine for heights comparable to the wind turbine blade top-tip. These wake flow fluctuations produce increased fatigue loads on the following wind turbines within a wind farm, which could represent a significant hazard for real wind turbines. Dynamics of vorticity structures present in wind turbine wakes are also investigated; particular attention is paid to the downstream evolution of the tip helicoidal vortices and to oscillations of the hub vortex. The effect of wind farm layout on power production is deeply investigated. Particular emphasis is placed on studying how the flow adjusts as it moves inside the wind farm and can affect the power production. Aligned and staggered wind farm configurations are analysed, also with varying separation distances in the streamwise and spanwise directions. The present experimental results are being used to test and guide the

  6. Direct Numerical Simulations of Transitional/Turbulent Wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rai, Man Mohan

    2011-01-01

    The interest in transitional/turbulent wakes spans the spectrum from an intellectual pursuit to understand the complex underlying physics to a critical need in aeronautical engineering and other disciplines to predict component/system performance and reliability. Cylinder wakes have been studied extensively over several decades to gain a better understanding of the basic flow phenomena that are encountered in such flows. Experimental, computational and theoretical means have been employed in this effort. While much has been accomplished there are many important issues that need to be resolved. The physics of the very near wake of the cylinder (less than three diameters downstream) is perhaps the most challenging of them all. This region comprises the two detached shear layers, the recirculation region and wake flow. The interaction amongst these three components is to some extent still a matter of conjecture. Experimental techniques have generated a large percentage of the data that have provided us with the current state of understanding of the subject. More recently computational techniques have been used to simulate cylinder wakes, and the data from such simulations are being used to both refine our understanding of such flows as well as provide new insights. A few large eddy and direct numerical simulations (LES and DNS) of cylinder wakes have appeared in the literature in the recent past. These investigations focus on the low Reynolds number range where the cylinder boundary layer is laminar (sub-critical range). However, from an engineering point of view, there is considerable interest in the situation where the upper and/or lower boundary layer of an airfoil is turbulent, and these turbulent boundary layers separate from the airfoil to contribute to the formation of the wake downstream. In the case of cylinders, this only occurs at relatively large unit Reynolds numbers. However, in the case of airfoils, the boundary layer has the opportunity to transition

  7. Passive Wake Acoustics Measurements at Denver International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Frank Y.; Wassaf, Hadi; Dougherty, Robert P.; Clark, Kevin; Gulsrud, Andrew; Fenichel, Neil; Bryant, Wayne H.

    2004-01-01

    From August to September 2003, NASA conducted an extensive measurement campaign to characterize the acoustic signal of wake vortices. A large, both spatially as well as in number of elements, phased microphone array was deployed at Denver International Airport for this effort. This paper will briefly describe the program background, the microphone array, as well as the supporting ground-truth and meteorological sensor suite. Sample results to date are then presented and discussed. It is seen that, in the frequency range processed so far, wake noise is generated predominantly from a very confined area around the cores.

  8. Global stability analysis of turbulent 3D wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigas, Georgios; Sipp, Denis; Juniper, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    At low Reynolds numbers, corresponding to laminar and transitional regimes, hydrodynamic stability theory has aided the understanding of the dynamics of bluff body wake-flows and the application of effective control strategies. However, flows of fundamental importance to many industries, in particular the transport industry, involve high Reynolds numbers and turbulent wakes. Despite their turbulence, such wake flows exhibit organisation which is manifested as coherent structures. Recent work has shown that the turbulent coherent structures retain the shape of the symmetry-breaking laminar instabilities and only those manifest as large-scale structures in the near wake (Rigas et al., JFM vol. 750:R5 2014, JFM vol. 778:R2 2015). Based on the findings of the persistence of the laminar instabilities at high Reynolds numbers, we investigate the global stability characteristics of a turbulent wake generated behind a bluff three-dimensional axisymmetric body. We perform a linear global stability analysis on the experimentally obtained mean flow and we recover the dynamic characteristics and spatial structure of the coherent structures, which are linked to the transitional instabilities. A detailed comparison of the predictions with the experimental measurements will be provided.

  9. Cooling Signs in Wake Debate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Christina A.

    2011-01-01

    More than a year after dismantling a student-assignment policy based on socioeconomic diversity and setting off a wave of reaction that drew national attention, the Wake County, North Carolina, school board took a step that may turn down the temperature of the intense debate. The board, which has been deeply split on an assignment plan for the…

  10. Wake Vortex Encounter Model Validation Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicroy, Dan; Brandon, Jay; Greene, George C.; Rivers, Robert; Shah, Gautam; Stewart, Eric; Stuever, Robert; Rossow, Vernon

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this current research is to establish a database that validate/calibrate wake encounter analysis methods for fleet-wide application; and measure/document atmospheric effects on wake decay. Two kinds of experiments, wind tunnel experiments and flight experiments, are performed. This paper discusses the different types of tests and compares their wake velocity measurement.

  11. Momentumless and almost-momentumless wakes in a stratified fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spedding, Geoffrey; Meunier, Patrice

    2003-11-01

    Extensive measurements have been made on the wakes of towed spheres and other bodies for steady horizontal motion in a stratified fluid. It has been proposed, and largely verified, that these bluff body wakes can serve as canonical cases for the decay of initially turbulent motions in the presence of a stable background density gradient and applications have ranged from oceanography and climate modelling to prediction of signatures from undersea objects. While experimental data on momentumless wakes has been available for more than 25 years, it has not been in such quantitative detail as the towed body case and so the two have been difficult to compare directly. Here the similarity and scaling behaviour of mean and turbulence quantities are reported for slender and blunt bodies, at, or close to momentum balance. Results are then compared with literature values, and with the standard towed configuration, to identify those features that are general and those that are not.

  12. Numerical Modeling Studies of Wake Vortices: Real Case Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Shao-Hua; Ding, Feng; Han, Jongil; Lin, Yuh-Lang; Arya, S. Pal; Proctor, Fred H.

    1999-01-01

    A three-dimensional large-eddy simulation model, TASS, is used to simulate the behavior of aircraft wake vortices in a real atmosphere. The purpose for this study is to validate the use of TASS for simulating the decay and transport of wake vortices. Three simulations are performed and the results are compared with the observed data from the 1994-1995 Memphis field experiments. The selected cases have an atmospheric environment of weak turbulence and stable stratification. The model simulations are initialized with appropriate meteorological conditions and a post roll-up vortex system. The behavior of wake vortices as they descend within the atmospheric boundary layer and interact with the ground is discussed.

  13. 32 CFR 935.61 - Wake Island Court.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Wake Island Court. 935.61 Section 935.61... REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Judiciary § 935.61 Wake Island Court. (a) The trial judicial authority for Wake Island is vested in the Wake Island Court. (b) The Wake Island Court consists of one or more...

  14. 32 CFR 935.61 - Wake Island Court.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Wake Island Court. 935.61 Section 935.61... REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Judiciary § 935.61 Wake Island Court. (a) The trial judicial authority for Wake Island is vested in the Wake Island Court. (b) The Wake Island Court consists of one or more...

  15. 32 CFR 935.61 - Wake Island Court.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Wake Island Court. 935.61 Section 935.61... REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Judiciary § 935.61 Wake Island Court. (a) The trial judicial authority for Wake Island is vested in the Wake Island Court. (b) The Wake Island Court consists of one or more...

  16. 32 CFR 935.61 - Wake Island Court.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Wake Island Court. 935.61 Section 935.61... REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Judiciary § 935.61 Wake Island Court. (a) The trial judicial authority for Wake Island is vested in the Wake Island Court. (b) The Wake Island Court consists of one or more...

  17. 32 CFR 935.61 - Wake Island Court.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Wake Island Court. 935.61 Section 935.61... REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Judiciary § 935.61 Wake Island Court. (a) The trial judicial authority for Wake Island is vested in the Wake Island Court. (b) The Wake Island Court consists of one or more...

  18. Recent NASA Wake-Vortex Flight Tests, Flow-Physics Database and Wake-Development Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicroy, Dan D.; Vijgen, Paul M.; Reimer, Heidi M.; Gallegos, Joey L.; Spalart, Philippe R.

    1998-01-01

    A series of flight tests over the ocean of a four engine turboprop airplane in the cruise configuration have provided a data set for improved understanding of wake vortex physics and atmospheric interaction. An integrated database has been compiled for wake characterization and validation of wake-vortex computational models. This paper describes the wake-vortex flight tests, the data processing, the database development and access, and results obtained from preliminary wake-characterization analysis using the data sets.

  19. Genetic effects on sleep/wake variation of seizures

    PubMed Central

    Winawer, Melodie R.; Shih, Jerry; Beck, Erin S.; Hunter, Jessica E.; Epstein, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective There is a complex bidirectional relationship between sleep and epilepsy. Sleep/wake timing of seizures has been investigated for several individual seizure types and syndromes, but few large-scale studies of the timing of seizures exist in people with varied epilepsy types. In addition, the genetic contributions to seizure timing have not been well studied. Methods Sleep/wake timing of seizures was determined for 1,395 subjects in 546 families enrolled in the Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project (EPGP). We examined seizure timing among subjects with different epilepsy types, seizure types, epilepsy syndromes, and localization. We also examined the familial aggregation of sleep/wake occurrence of seizures. Results Seizures in nonacquired focal epilepsy (NAFE) were more likely to occur during sleep than seizures in generalized epilepsy (GE), for both convulsive (odds ratio [OR] 5.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.59–7.52) and nonconvulsive seizures (OR 4.2, 95% CI 2.48–7.21). Seizures occurring within 1 h of awakening were more likely to occur in patients with GE than with NAFE for both convulsive (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.54– 3.39) and nonconvulsive (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.04–2.66) seizures. Frontal onset seizures were more likely than temporal onset seizures to occur during sleep. Sleep/wake timing of seizures in first-degree relatives predicted timing of seizures in the proband. Significance We found that sleep/wake timing of seizures is associated with both epilepsy syndrome and seizure type. In addition, we provide the first evidence for a genetic contribution to sleep/wake timing of seizures in a large group of individuals with common epilepsy syndromes. PMID:26948972

  20. The 21 cm signature of cosmic string wakes

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenberger, Robert H.; Danos, Rebecca J.; Hernández, Oscar F.; Holder, Gilbert P. E-mail: rjdanos@physics.mcgill.ca E-mail: holder@physics.mcgill.ca

    2010-12-01

    We discuss the signature of a cosmic string wake in 21cm redshift surveys. Since 21cm surveys probe higher redshifts than optical large-scale structure surveys, the signatures of cosmic strings are more manifest in 21cm maps than they are in optical galaxy surveys. We find that, provided the tension of the cosmic string exceeds a critical value (which depends on both the redshift when the string wake is created and the redshift of observation), a cosmic string wake will generate an emission signal with a brightness temperature which approaches a limiting value which at a redshift of z+1 = 30 is close to 400 mK in the limit of large string tension. The signal will have a specific signature in position space: the excess 21cm radiation will be confined to a wedge-shaped region whose tip corresponds to the position of the string, whose planar dimensions are set by the planar dimensions of the string wake, and whose thickness (in redshift direction) depends on the string tension. For wakes created at z{sub i}+1 = 10{sup 3}, then at a redshift of z+1 = 30 the critical value of the string tension μ is Gμ = 6 × 10{sup −7}, and it decreases linearly with redshift (for wakes created at the time of equal matter and radiation, the critical value is a factor of two lower at the same redshift). For smaller tensions, cosmic strings lead to an observable absorption signal with the same wedge geometry.

  1. ASRS Reports on Wake Vortex Encounters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, Linda J.; Taube, Elisa Ann; Drew, Charles Robert; Barclay, Tommy Earl

    2010-01-01

    ASRS is conducting a structured callback research project of wake vortex incidents reported to the ASRS at all US airports, as well as wake encounters in the enroute environment. This study has three objectives: (1) Utilize the established ASRS supplemental data collection methodology and provide ongoing analysis of wake vortex encounter reports; (2) Document event dynamics and contributing factors underlying wake vortex encounter events; and (3) Support ongoing FAA efforts to address pre-emptive wake vortex risk reduction by utilizing ASRS reporting contributions.

  2. Wake shed by an accelerating carangiform fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Shang-Chieh; Yang, Jing-Tang

    2008-11-01

    We reveal an important fact that momentum change observed in the wake of an accelerating carangiform fish does not necessarily elucidate orientations of propulsive forces produced. An accelerating Crucian Carp (Carassius auratus) was found to shed a wake with net forward fluid momentum, which seemed drag-producing. Based on Newton's law, however, an accelerating fish is expected to shed a thrust wake with net rearward fluid momentum, rather than a drag wake. The unusual wake pattern observed is considered to be resulted primarily from the effect of pressure gradient created by accelerating movements of the fish. Ambient fluids tend to be sucked into low pressure zones behind an accelerating fish, resulting in forward orientations of jets recognizable in the wake. Accordingly, as to an accelerating fish, identifying force orientations from the wake requires considering also the effect of pressure gradient.

  3. Volumetric LiDAR scanning of a wind turbine wake and comparison with a 3D analytical wake model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbajo Fuertes, Fernando; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    and large-eddy simulation (LES) data of miniature wind turbine wakes, as well as LES data of real-scale wind-turbine wakes, but not yet with full-scale wind turbine wake measurements. [1] M. Bastankhah and F. Porté-Agel. A New Analytical Model For Wind-Turbine Wakes, in Renewable Energy, vol. 70, p. 116-123, 2014.

  4. Rainfall-enhanced blooming in typhoon wakes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Y-C; Oey, L-Y

    2016-01-01

    Strong phytoplankton blooming in tropical-cyclone (TC) wakes over the oligotrophic oceans potentially contributes to long-term changes in global biogeochemical cycles. Yet blooming has traditionally been discussed using anecdotal events and its biophysical mechanics remain poorly understood. Here we identify dominant blooming patterns using 16 years of ocean-color data in the wakes of 141 typhoons in western North Pacific. We observe right-side asymmetric blooming shortly after the storms, attributed previously to sub-mesoscale re-stratification, but thereafter a left-side asymmetry which coincides with the left-side preference in rainfall due to the large-scale wind shear. Biophysical model experiments and observations demonstrate that heavier rainfall freshens the near-surface water, leading to stronger stratification, decreased turbulence and enhanced blooming. Our results suggest that rainfall plays a previously unrecognized, critical role in TC-induced blooming, with potentially important implications for global biogeochemical cycles especially in view of the recent and projected increases in TC-intensity that harbingers stronger mixing and heavier rain under the storm. PMID:27545899

  5. Wake-induced vibrations in Tandem Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mysa, Ravi Chaithanya; Jaiman, Rajeev Kumar

    2015-11-01

    The upstream cylinder is fixed in the tandem cylinders arrangement. The downstream cylinder is placed at a distance of four diameters from the upstream cylinder in the free stream direction and is mounted on a spring. The dynamic response of the downstream cylinder is studied at Reynolds number of 10,000. The transverse displacement amplitude of the downstream cylinder is larger compared to that of single cylinder in the post-lock-in region. The transverse dynamic response of the downstream cylinder in the post-lock-in region is characterized by a dominant low frequency component compared to shed frequency, which is nearer to the structural natural frequency. The interaction of upstream wake with the downstream cylinder is carefully analyzed to understand the introduction of low frequency component in the transverse load along with the shed frequency. We found that the stagnation point moves in proportional to the velocity of the cylinder and is in-phase with the velocity. The low frequency component in the stagnation point movement on the downstream cylinder is sustained by the interaction of upstream wake. The frequencies in the movement of the stagnation point is reflected in the transverse load resulting in large deformation of the cylinder. The authors wish to acknowledge support from A*STAR- SERC and Singapore Maritime Institute.

  6. Observing the multiverse with cosmic wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleban, Matthew; Levi, Thomas S.; Sigurdson, Kris

    2013-02-01

    Current theories of the origin of the Universe, including string theory, predict the existence of a multiverse with many bubble universes. These bubble universes may collide, and collisions with ours produce cosmic wakes that enter our Hubble volume, appear as unusually symmetric disks in the cosmic microwave background, and disturb large scale structure. There is preliminary evidence consistent with one or more of these disturbances on our sky. However, other sources can produce similar features in the cosmic microwave background, and so additional signals are needed to verify their extra-universal origin. Here we find, for the first time, the detailed three-dimensional shape, temperature, and polarization signals of the cosmic wake of a bubble collision consistent with current observations. The polarization pattern has distinct features that when correlated with the corresponding temperature pattern are a unique and striking signal of a bubble collision. These features represent a verifiable prediction of the multiverse paradigm and might be detected by current or future experiments. A detection of a bubble collision would confirm the existence of the multiverse, provide compelling evidence for the string theory landscape, and sharpen our picture of the Universe and its origins.

  7. Rainfall-enhanced blooming in typhoon wakes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Y.-C.; Oey, L.-Y.

    2016-01-01

    Strong phytoplankton blooming in tropical-cyclone (TC) wakes over the oligotrophic oceans potentially contributes to long-term changes in global biogeochemical cycles. Yet blooming has traditionally been discussed using anecdotal events and its biophysical mechanics remain poorly understood. Here we identify dominant blooming patterns using 16 years of ocean-color data in the wakes of 141 typhoons in western North Pacific. We observe right-side asymmetric blooming shortly after the storms, attributed previously to sub-mesoscale re-stratification, but thereafter a left-side asymmetry which coincides with the left-side preference in rainfall due to the large-scale wind shear. Biophysical model experiments and observations demonstrate that heavier rainfall freshens the near-surface water, leading to stronger stratification, decreased turbulence and enhanced blooming. Our results suggest that rainfall plays a previously unrecognized, critical role in TC-induced blooming, with potentially important implications for global biogeochemical cycles especially in view of the recent and projected increases in TC-intensity that harbingers stronger mixing and heavier rain under the storm. PMID:27545899

  8. Unsteady wake of a rotating tire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombard, Jean-Eloi; Moxey, Dave; Xu, Hui; Sherwin, Spencer; Sherwin Lab Team

    2015-11-01

    For open wheel race-cars, such as IndyCar and Formula One, the wheels are responsible for 40% of the total drag. For road cars drag associated to the wheels and under-carriage can represent 60% of total drag at highway cruise speeds. Experimental observations have reported two or three pairs of counter rotating vortices, the relative importance of which still remains an open question, that interact to form a complex wake. Traditional RANS based methods are typically not well equipped to deal with such highly unsteady flows which motivates research into more physical, unsteady models. Leveraging a high-fidelity spectral/hp element based method a Large Eddy Simulation is performed to give further insight into unsteady characteristics of the wake. In particular the unsteady nature of both the jetting and top vortex pair is reported as well as the time and length scales associated with the vortex core trajectories. Correlation with experimentally obtained particle image velocimetry is presented. The authors acknowledge support from the United Kingdom Turbulence Consortium (UKTC) as well as from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) for access to ARCHER UK National Supercomputing Service.

  9. Rainfall-enhanced blooming in typhoon wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.-C.; Oey, L.-Y.

    2016-08-01

    Strong phytoplankton blooming in tropical-cyclone (TC) wakes over the oligotrophic oceans potentially contributes to long-term changes in global biogeochemical cycles. Yet blooming has traditionally been discussed using anecdotal events and its biophysical mechanics remain poorly understood. Here we identify dominant blooming patterns using 16 years of ocean-color data in the wakes of 141 typhoons in western North Pacific. We observe right-side asymmetric blooming shortly after the storms, attributed previously to sub-mesoscale re-stratification, but thereafter a left-side asymmetry which coincides with the left-side preference in rainfall due to the large-scale wind shear. Biophysical model experiments and observations demonstrate that heavier rainfall freshens the near-surface water, leading to stronger stratification, decreased turbulence and enhanced blooming. Our results suggest that rainfall plays a previously unrecognized, critical role in TC-induced blooming, with potentially important implications for global biogeochemical cycles especially in view of the recent and projected increases in TC-intensity that harbingers stronger mixing and heavier rain under the storm.

  10. The structure of cosmic string wakes

    SciTech Connect

    Sornborger, A.; Brandenberger, R.; Fryxell, B.; Olson, K.

    1997-06-01

    The clustering of baryons and cold dark matter induced by a single moving string is analyzed numerically, making use of the new three-dimensional Eulerian cosmological hydrocode of Sornborger {ital et al.}, which uses the piecewise parabolic method to track the baryons and the particle-in-cell method to evolve the dark matter particles. A long straight string moving with a speed comparable to c induces a planar overdensity (a {open_quotes}wake{close_quotes}). Since the initial perturbation is a velocity kick toward the plane behind the string and there is no initial Newtonian gravitational line source, the baryons are trapped in the center of the wake, leading to an enhanced baryon to dark matter ratio. The cold coherent flow leads to very low postshock temperatures of the baryonic fluid. In contrast, long strings with small-scale structure (which can be described by adding a Newtonian gravitational line source) move slowly and form filamentary objects. The large central pressure due to the gravitational potential causes the baryons to be expelled from the central regions and leads to a relative deficit in the baryon to dark matter ratio. In this case, the velocity of the baryons is larger, leading to high postshock temperatures. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Astronomical Society}

  11. Data-driven Reduced Order Model for prediction of wind turbine wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iungo, G. V.; Santoni-Ortiz, C.; Abkar, M.; Porté-Agel, F.; Rotea, M. A.; Leonardi, S.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper a new paradigm for prediction of wind turbine wakes is proposed, which is based on a reduced order model (ROM) embedded in a Kalman filter. The ROM is evaluated by means of dynamic mode decomposition performed on high fidelity LES numerical simulations of wind turbines operating under different operational regimes. The ROM enables to capture the main physical processes underpinning the downstream evolution and dynamics of wind turbine wakes. The ROM is then embedded within a Kalman filter in order to produce a time-marching algorithm for prediction of wind turbine wake flows. This data-driven algorithm enables data assimilation of new measurements simultaneously to the wake prediction, which leads to an improved accuracy and a dynamic update of the ROM in presence of emerging coherent wake dynamics observed from new available data. Thanks to its low computational cost, this numerical tool is particularly suitable for real-time applications, control and optimization of large wind farms.

  12. Reconstructing three-dimensional wake topology based on planar PIV measurements and pattern recognition analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, C.; Yarusevych, S.

    2016-10-01

    The present study presents a new technique for reconstructing the salient aspects of three-dimensional wake topology based on time-resolved, planar, two-component particle image velocimetry data collected in multiple orthogonal planes. The technique produces conditionally averaged flow field reconstructions based on a pattern recognition analysis of velocity fields. It is validated on the wake of a low-aspect ratio dual step cylinder geometry, consisting of a large diameter cylinder ( D) with small aspect ratio ( L/ D) attached to the mid-span of a small diameter cylinder ( d). For a dual step cylinders with D/ d = 2, and L/ D = 1, numerical and experimental data are considered for ReD = 150 (laminar wake) and for ReD = 2100 (turbulent wake). The results show that the proposed technique successfully reconstructs the dominant periodic wake vortex interactions and can be extended to a wide range of turbulent flows.

  13. Wake surveys of different car-body shapes with coloured isopressure maps

    SciTech Connect

    Cogotti, A.

    1984-01-01

    A technique to map the wake behind passenger cars with different rear end configurations has been developed in the full-scale automotive wind tunnel ''Pininfarina''. It is based on the measurement of total pressure in the wake, using a probe which is driven by a large traversing gear. Results are presented as coloured isopressure maps. Tests have been carried out on a 1:2.5 scale car model with two different front ends and eight different rear ends. The attainable body configurations are likely to cover the majority of passenger car shapes. Wake surveys have been conducted at several distances behind each car model in order to see the wake development. The paper shows and analyzes the results obtained for these sixteen car model configurations; it also emphasizes what kind of information can be obtained by this wake survey technique.

  14. Wake vortex alleviation using rapidly actuated segmented Gurney flaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matalanis, Claude G.

    All bodies that generate lift also generate circulation. The circulation generated by large commercial aircraft remains in their wake in the form of trailing vortices. These vortices can be hazardous to following aircraft due to their strength and persistence. To account for this, airports abide by spacing rules which govern the frequency with which aircraft can use their runways when operating in instrument flight rules. These spacing rules are the limiting factor on increasing airport capacity. We conducted an experimental and computational study to assess the potential for using rapidly actuated segmented Gurney flaps, also known as Miniature Trailing Edge Effectors (MiTEs), for active wake vortex alleviation. Wind tunnel tests were performed on a half-span model NACA 0012 wing equipped with an array of 13 independent MITE pairs. The chord-based Reynolds number was around 350,000. Each MiTE could extend 0.015 chord lengths perpendicular to the freestream on the pressure side of the wing. Pressure profiles and a five-hole probe survey in the near wake were used to examine the influence that the MiTEs had upon the wing aerodynamics and the vortex rollup process. Particle image velocimetry was used to measure the static and time-dependent response of the vortex in the intermediate wake to various MiTE actuation schemes. These results were used to form complete initial conditions for vortex filament computations of the far wake evolution. Results from these computations showed that the perturbations created by MiTEs could be used to excite a variety of three-dimensional inviscid vortex instabilities. Finally, the research performed on MiTEs led to the invention of a more practical wake alleviation device: the spanwise actuating Gurney flap. Prototype tests showed that this device could produce similar perturbations to the MiTEs.

  15. Influence of Coriolis forces on the structure and evolution of wind-turbine wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abkar, Mahdi; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2015-11-01

    In this study, large-eddy simulation (LES) is combined with a turbine model to investigate the effect of Coriolis forces on the structure and evolution of wind-turbine wakes. In order to isolate the Coriolis effect on the turbulent wake flow, two set of simulations are performed. In the first set of simulations, atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) flow is driven by the geostrophic forces including the effect of Earth's rotation, while in the second case, the ABL flow is driven by a unidirectional pressure gradient forcing. Both cases have the same mean horizontal velocity and turbulence intensity at the hub height. The simulation results show that the Coriolis forces significantly affect the spatial distribution of the mean velocity deficit and turbulence statistics in the wake region. In particular, it is found that the Coriolis effect, responsible for vertical wind veer, has important lateral wake stretching effects, which in turn significantly impacts the wake recovery and wake meandering characteristics downwind of the turbines. We also apply the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) to LES data of the wake. The results indicate a very high correlation between the most energetic modes and both maximum velocity deficit and wake meandering characteristics.

  16. Rotor Wake Development During the First Revolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAlister, Kenneth W.

    2003-01-01

    The wake behind a two-bladed model rotor in light climb was measured using particle image velocimetry, with particular emphasis on the development of the trailing vortex during the first revolution of the rotor. The distribution of vorticity was distinguished from the slightly elliptical swirl pattern. Peculiar dynamics within the void region may explain why the peak vorticity appeared to shift away from the center as the vortex aged, suggesting the onset of instability. The swirl and axial velocities (which reached 44 and 12 percent of the rotor-tip speed, respectively) were found to be asymmetric relative to the vortex center. In particular, the axial flow was composed of two concentrated zones moving in opposite directions. The radial distribution of the circulation rapidly increased in magnitude until reaching a point just beyond the core radius, after which the rate of growth decreased significantly. The core-radius circulation increased slightly with wake age, but the large-radius circulation appeared to remain relatively constant. The radial distributions of swirl velocity and vorticity exhibit self-similar behaviors, especially within the core. The diameter of the vortex core was initially about 10 percent of the rotor-blade chord, but more than doubled its size after one revolution of the rotor. According to vortex models that approximate the measured data, the core-radius circulation was about 79 percent of the large-radius circulation, and the large-radius circulation was about 67 percent of the maximum bound circulation on the rotor blade. On average, about 53 percent of the maximum bound circulation resides within the vortex core during the first revolution of the rotor.

  17. Numerical investigation of transitional compressible plane wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Paul Jeffrey

    Air flow in the wake region of a two-dimensional (plane) body with a blunt base has been studied using numerical simulations. The objective of this study is (1) to observe the behavior of large dynamic structures in the plane wake at several Mach numbers from low (almost incompressible) up to M = 2.46 and examine their effect on the base pressure, and (2) to address the nature of the instability in the shear layers bounding the wake flow at M = 2.46 and observe the structures that arise from this instability. A code was developed for this study which solves the compressible Navier-Stokes equations in two or three dimensions. This code may be used for either Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) or Large Eddy Simulations (LES). A spatial model is used, with the computational domain arranged around the trailing edge of a two-dimensional flat plate with a blunt base. Two-dimensional simulations were carried out at Mach numbers of M = 0.25, M = 1.20, and M = 2.46. At all Mach numbers, the flow was found to be unstable with respect to sinuous (antisymmetric) disturbances, with the critical Reynolds number increasing with increasing Mach number. These disturbances grow to a periodic state, and a Karman vortex street is formed. Examination of the supersonic cases revealed that expansion fans in the flow at the corners are the primary cause of the low base pressure, and that disruptions in the expansions raise the base pressure. At M = 2.46 and Reynolds numbers starting at Re = 100, 000, an intermittent shear layer instability was also found, excited by sinuous disturbances. The two instability 2 modes interact to produce a chaotic behavior. Above Re = 200, 000, the shear layer instability appears close to the base without sinuous disturbances, forming rows of vortices in the shear layers. Preliminary three-dimensional simulations were carried out at M = 2.46, examining the variation in the growth rate of three-dimensional disturbances with spanwise wavelength.

  18. Functional anatomy of the sleep-wakefulness cycle: wakefulness.

    PubMed

    Reinoso-Suárez, Fernando; de Andrés, Isabel; Garzón, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    Sleep is a necessary, diverse, periodic, and an active condition circadian and homeostatically regulated and precisely meshed with waking time into the sleep-wakefulness cycle (SWC). Photic retinal stimulation modulates the suprachiasmatic nucleus, which acts as the pacemaker for SWC rhythmicity. Both the light period and social cues adjust the internal clock, making the SWC a circadian, 24-h period in the adult human. Bioelectrical and behavioral parameters characterize the different phases of the SWC. For a long time, lesions and electrical stimulation of brain structures, as well as connection studies, were the main methods used to decipher the foundations of the functional anatomy of the SWC. That is why the first section of this review presents these early historical studies to then discuss the current state of our knowledge based on our understanding of the functional anatomy of the structures underlying the SWC. Supported by this description, we then present a detailed review and update of the structures involved in the phase of wakefulness (W), including their morphological, functional, and chemical characteristics, as well as their anatomical connections. The structures for W generation are known as the "ascending reticular activating system", and they keep and maintain the "thalamo-cerebral cortex unit" awake. This system originates from the neuronal groups located within the brainstem, hypothalamus, and basal forebrain, which use known neurotransmitters and whose neurons are more active during W than during the other SWC states. Thus, synergies among several of these neurotransmitters are necessary to generate the cortical and thalamic activation that is characteristic of the W state, with all the plastic qualities and nuances present in its different behavioral circumstances. Each one of the neurotransmitters exerts powerful influences on the information and cognitive processes as well as attentional, emotional, motivational, behavioral, and arousal

  19. Studies of aircraft wake chemistry and dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poppoff, I. G.; Farlow, N. H.; Anderson, L. B.

    1974-01-01

    Use of aerospace technology to study aircraft wakes is reviewed. It is shown how aerospace vehicles can be used to provide data for increased understanding of the atmosphere and of aircraft exhaust trails where knowledge is inadequate to evaluate fully the potential impact of the engine emissions. Models of aircraft near-field exhaust wakes are characterized by jet, vortex, and dispersion regimes. Wake growth in the jet regime is self-determined and rapid, whereas further spreading is inhibited in the vortex regime because of circulating vortex motion. Wake diffusion in the dispersion regime is initially influenced by aircraft induced turbulence but is dominated later by small-scale atmospheric turbulence. Computed fluid mechanical results show the importance of effects such as wake buoyancy, wind shear, turbulence, and traffic corridor exhaust buildup on dispersion of the wake. In the jet regime the exhaust characteristics and thermochemistry serve to illustrate initial chemical changes involving potential pollutant species.

  20. Study of electromagnetic composite scattering from a ship-generated internal wave wake and its underlying sea surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ning; Zhang, Min; Nie, Ding; Sun, Rong-Qing

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a numerical investigation of electromagnetic scattering from ship-generated internal wave wake and its underlying two-dimensional sea surfaces. The geometric modeling of internal wave wake and linear sea surfaces as well as nonlinear choppy wave model (CWM) sea surfaces are performed successively. Then, the normalized radar cross-section (NRCS) calculations are carried out using second-order small-slope approximation (SSA-2) in bistatic and monostatic configurations. To study the scattering characteristics of internal wave wakes that usually have a large coverage area, the calculations are performed in four successive regions. The results reflect that the scattering signals of four regions are distinguished from those of sea surface without wake; furthermore, the NRCSs for CWM sea surfaces with internal wave wakes are both larger than those of the linear sea surfaces with internal wave wakes in bistatic and monostatic configurations.

  1. Evaluation of Fast-Time Wake Vortex Models using Wake Encounter Flight Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Nashat N.; VanValkenburg, Randal L.; Bowles, Roland L.; Limon Duparcmeur, Fanny M.; Gloudesman, Thijs; van Lochem, Sander; Ras, Eelco

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a methodology for the integration and evaluation of fast-time wake models with flight data. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration conducted detailed flight tests in 1995 and 1997 under the Aircraft Vortex Spacing System Program to characterize wake vortex decay and wake encounter dynamics. In this study, data collected during Flight 705 were used to evaluate NASA's fast-time wake transport and decay models. Deterministic and Monte-Carlo simulations were conducted to define wake hazard bounds behind the wake generator. The methodology described in this paper can be used for further validation of fast-time wake models using en-route flight data, and for determining wake turbulence constraints in the design of air traffic management concepts.

  2. Wake characteristics of a model ornithopter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juarez, Alfredo; Harlow, Jacob; Allen, James; Ferreira de Sousa, Paulo

    2006-03-01

    This paper details unsteady wake measurements from a model Ornithopther flying in a wind tunnel at representative flight conditions. Testing over a range of Strouhal number, 0.1-0.3, shows that the unsteady wake is composed of coherent vortical structures that resemble vortex rings. A single ring is formed in the wake of each wing during one wing beat. Momentum balance from velocity field measurements are reconciled with unsteady lift and drag measurements from a drag balance.

  3. Verification of the SLC wake potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, K.; Weiland, T.

    1983-01-01

    The accurate knowledge of the monopole, dipole, and quadrupole wake potentials is essential for SLC. These wake potentials were previously computed by the modal method. The time domain code TBCI allows independent verification of these results. This comparison shows that the two methods agree to within 10% for bunch lengths down to 1 mm. TBCI results also indicate that rounding the irises gives at least a 10% reduction in the wake potentials.

  4. Determination of real-time predictors of the wind turbine wake meandering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Yann-Aël; Aubrun, Sandrine; Masson, Christian

    2015-03-01

    The present work proposes an experimental methodology to characterize the unsteady properties of a wind turbine wake, called meandering, and particularly its ability to follow the large-scale motions induced by large turbulent eddies contained in the approach flow. The measurements were made in an atmospheric boundary layer wind tunnel. The wind turbine model is based on the actuator disc concept. One part of the work has been dedicated to the development of a methodology for horizontal wake tracking by mean of a transverse hot wire rake, whose dynamic response is adequate for spectral analysis. Spectral coherence analysis shows that the horizontal position of the wake correlates well with the upstream transverse velocity, especially for wavelength larger than three times the diameter of the disc but less so for smaller scales. Therefore, it is concluded that the wake is actually a rather passive tracer of the large surrounding turbulent structures. The influence of the rotor size and downstream distance on the wake meandering is studied. The fluctuations of the lateral force and the yawing torque affecting the wind turbine model are also measured and correlated with the wake meandering. Two approach flow configurations are then tested: an undisturbed incoming flow (modelled atmospheric boundary layer) and a disturbed incoming flow, with a wind turbine model located upstream. Results showed that the meandering process is amplified by the presence of the upstream wake. It is shown that the coherence between the lateral force fluctuations and the horizontal wake position is significant up to length scales larger than twice the wind turbine model diameter. This leads to the conclusion that the lateral force is a better candidate than the upstream transverse velocity to predict in real time the meandering process, for either undisturbed (wake free) or disturbed incoming atmospheric flows.

  5. 32 CFR 935.60 - Wake Island Judicial Authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Wake Island Judicial Authority. 935.60 Section... INSULAR REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Judiciary § 935.60 Wake Island Judicial Authority. (a) The judicial authority under this part is vested in the Wake Island Court and the Wake Island Court of Appeals. (b)...

  6. 32 CFR 935.60 - Wake Island Judicial Authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Wake Island Judicial Authority. 935.60 Section... INSULAR REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Judiciary § 935.60 Wake Island Judicial Authority. (a) The judicial authority under this part is vested in the Wake Island Court and the Wake Island Court of Appeals. (b)...

  7. 32 CFR 935.60 - Wake Island Judicial Authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Wake Island Judicial Authority. 935.60 Section... INSULAR REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Judiciary § 935.60 Wake Island Judicial Authority. (a) The judicial authority under this part is vested in the Wake Island Court and the Wake Island Court of Appeals. (b)...

  8. 32 CFR 935.60 - Wake Island Judicial Authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Wake Island Judicial Authority. 935.60 Section... INSULAR REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Judiciary § 935.60 Wake Island Judicial Authority. (a) The judicial authority under this part is vested in the Wake Island Court and the Wake Island Court of Appeals. (b)...

  9. 32 CFR 935.60 - Wake Island Judicial Authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Wake Island Judicial Authority. 935.60 Section... INSULAR REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Judiciary § 935.60 Wake Island Judicial Authority. (a) The judicial authority under this part is vested in the Wake Island Court and the Wake Island Court of Appeals. (b)...

  10. Ship wake signatures in radar/optical images of the sea surface: observations and physical mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakov, S.; Kapustin, I.; Lazareva, T.

    2014-10-01

    Ship wakes can be clearly seen in satellite radar and optical images of the sea surface, and understanding of physical mechanisms responsible for the wake signatures is very important to develop methods of ship detection/identification. The wake surface signatures at small and intermediate stages are characterized by a smooth centerline area where surface waves are depressed due to the vessel turbulence and by a pair of rough bands at the sides of the centerline wake. At large wake ages two slick bands (a "railroad track" wake) appear instead of the rough bands, while the smooth centerline band is practically absent. In this paper results of field studies of the mean flow structure near the wake are presented. It is shown that two mean circulating currents ("rolls") rotating in the opposite directions are formed at two sides of the median vertical plane of the wake. Near the water surface the rolls result in diverging horizontal flows, decreasing near the wake edges. Wind waves propagating against the diverging currents are amplified due to a wave straining mechanism thus increasing the surface roughness. Film sampling was carried out when crossing the wakes and analysis of films collected within the "railroad" slick bands and outside the bands has revealed enhanced surface wave damping, obviously due to accumulation of surfactants in the slick bands; the surfactant compression is explained by the action of the diverging currents. The diverging currents as part of the rolls and the surfactant transport to the water surface are supposed to be associated with air bubbles generated by ship propellers.

  11. Sleep Pharmacogenetics: Personalized Sleep-Wake Therapy.

    PubMed

    Holst, Sebastian C; Valomon, Amandine; Landolt, Hans-Peter

    2016-01-01

    Research spanning (genetically engineered) animal models, healthy volunteers, and sleep-disordered patients has identified the neurotransmitters and neuromodulators dopamine, serotonin, norepinephrine, histamine, hypocretin, melatonin, glutamate, acetylcholine, γ-amino-butyric acid, and adenosine as important players in the regulation and maintenance of sleep-wake-dependent changes in neuronal activity and the sleep-wake continuum. Dysregulation of these neurochemical systems leads to sleep-wake disorders. Most currently available pharmacological treatments are symptomatic rather than causal, and their beneficial and adverse effects are often variable and in part genetically determined. To evaluate opportunities for evidence-based personalized medicine with present and future sleep-wake therapeutics, we review here the impact of known genetic variants affecting exposure of and sensitivity to drugs targeting the neurochemistry of sleep-wake regulation and the pathophysiology of sleep-wake disturbances. Many functional polymorphisms modify drug response phenotypes relevant for sleep. To corroborate the importance of these and newly identified variants for personalized sleep-wake therapy, human sleep pharmacogenetics should be complemented with pharmacogenomic investigations, research about sleep-wake-dependent pharmacological actions, and studies in mice lacking specific genes. These strategies, together with future knowledge about epigenetic mechanisms affecting sleep-wake physiology and treatment outcomes, may lead to potent and safe novel therapies for the increasing number of sleep-disordered patients (e.g., in aged populations).

  12. Multi-Model Ensemble Wake Vortex Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koerner, Stephan; Ahmad, Nash'at N.; Holzaepfel, Frank; VanValkenburg, Randal L.

    2015-01-01

    Several multi-model ensemble methods are investigated for predicting wake vortex transport and decay. This study is a joint effort between National Aeronautics and Space Administration and Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt to develop a multi-model ensemble capability using their wake models. An overview of different multi-model ensemble methods and their feasibility for wake applications is presented. The methods include Reliability Ensemble Averaging, Bayesian Model Averaging, and Monte Carlo Simulations. The methodologies are evaluated using data from wake vortex field experiments.

  13. Spatio-Temporal Reconstruction of Vortex Dynamics in Axisymmetric Wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brücker, C.

    2001-04-01

    With time recording Digital-Particle-Image Velocimetry and spatio-temporal reconstruction technique, we obtained detailed quantitative results of the evolution of the velocity and vorticity field in the wake of axisymmetric bluff bodies-a sphere and an axially oriented cylinder with an elliptic nose and a blunt base. Experiments were carried out for Reynolds numbers of Re=500, 700 and 1000 in the transition range from ``regular'' to ``irregular'' shedding. DPIV-recordings in radial cross-sections at several distances downstream of the bodies allowed us to reconstruct the dynamics of the streamwise vorticity over a large number of shedding cycles. Our results prove that the wake in this regime consists of a double-sided chain of oppositely oriented hairpin vortices. In addition, the results show a well-defined low-frequency modulation of the vortex shedding, with a distinct peak in the frequency spectrum at a Strouhal number of about Sr~0.05 (in case of the sphere). The wake pattern in this ``irregular'' shedding regime typically exhibits periodic packets of 3-4 ``regular'' shedding cycles which are interrupted by phases with less action. The results indicate the coexistence of a long-wave instability of axisymmetric wakes against helical waves in addition to the primary instability causing the vortex shedding process.

  14. Documentation of Atmospheric Conditions During Observed Rising Aircraft Wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, J. Allen; Rodgers, William G., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Flight tests were conducted in the fall of 1995 off the coast of Wallops Island, Virginia in order to determine characteristics of wake vortices at flight altitudes. A NASA Wallops Flight Facility C130 aircraft equipped with smoke generators produced visible wakes at altitudes ranging from 775 to 2225 m in a variety of atmospheric conditions, orientations (head wind, cross wind), and airspeeds. Meteorological and aircraft parameters were collected continuously from a Langley Research Center OV-10A aircraft as it flew alongside and through the wake vortices at varying distances behind the C130. Meteorological data were also obtained from special balloon observations made at Wallops. Differential GPS capabilities were on each aircraft from which accurate altitude profiles were obtained. Vortices were observed to rise at distances beyond a mile behind the C130. The maximum altitude was 150 m above the C130 in a near neutral atmosphere with significant turbulence. This occurred from large vertical oscillations in the wakes. There were several cases when vortices did not descend after a very short initial period and remained near generation altitude in a variety of moderately stable atmospheres and wind shears.

  15. Detection of wind wakes offshore from satellite SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, M. B.; Hasager, C. B.

    A study is presented on the mapping of ocean wind fields for detection of wind wakes downstream of an offshore wind farm. The study is based on ERS-2 Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) scenes obtained in 2003 over Horns Reef in the North Sea. A large offshore wind farm (80 wind turbines) is located 14-20 km offshore of Denmark on this submerged reef. Meteorological observations are available from an offshore mast; wind speed is measured at four heights up to 62 m and wind direction is measured at 60 m. Maps of wind speed are generated from geophysical model functions (CMOD-4, CMOD-IFR2) with a resolution of 400 m by 400 m using wind direction obtained from in-situ measurements as model input. The wind maps display zones of reduced mean wind speed downstream of the wind farm compared to upwind conditions. The reduction is approximately 10 % immediately behind the wind farm and the wake effect is vanishing over distances in the order of 10 km downstream. This is consistent with wake model predictions. Satellite SAR provides a good estimate of the propagation of wind wakes. Information on how structures affect the local wind climate is useful for wind energy purposes, particularly for siting of future offshore wind farms.

  16. Near-wake characteristics of a rotating dimpled sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jooha; Choi, Haecheon

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we investigate the characteristics of flow around a rotating dimpled sphere in the subcritical, critical and supercritical Reynolds number (Re) regimes. The experiment is performed in a wind tunnel at Re = 0 . 3 ×105 - 2 . 4 ×105 and the spin ratio (α ratio of surface velocity to the free-stream velocity) of 0 (no spin) - 2.6. We directly measure the drag and lift forces and the velocity field in the near wake using PIV and smoke visualization. In the subcritical Re regime, the wake of a stationary dimpled sphere shows large-scale wavy structures and the hairpin-shaped vortices are shed changing its azimuthal orientation quasi-randomly in time. As Re increases from subcritical to critical regime, the recirculation bubble length decreases significantly and the drag coefficient reduces rapidly to about 0.23. The wavelength of wake also decreases and the shedding orientation of the hairpin-shaped vortices becomes fixed in time. In the supercritical regime, both the recirculation bubble length and drag coefficient remain almost constant, whereas the wavelength of wake decreases further. With rotation, the recirculation bubbles disappear at very small α in the critical and supercritical regimes, resulting in a faster increase in the lift coefficient with α than that in the subcritical regime. Supported by 2011-0028032, 2014M3C1B1033980.

  17. Aircraft Wake Vortex Measurements at Denver International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougherty, Robert P.; Wang, Frank Y.; Booth, Earl R.; Watts, Michael E.; Fenichel, Neil; D'Errico, Robert E.

    2004-01-01

    Airport capacity is constrained, in part, by spacing requirements associated with the wake vortex hazard. NASA's Wake Vortex Avoidance Project has a goal to establish the feasibility of reducing this spacing while maintaining safety. Passive acoustic phased array sensors, if shown to have operational potential, may aid in this effort by detecting and tracking the vortices. During August/September 2003, NASA and the USDOT sponsored a wake acoustics test at the Denver International Airport. The central instrument of the test was a large microphone phased array. This paper describes the test in general terms and gives an overview of the array hardware. It outlines one of the analysis techniques that is being applied to the data and gives sample results. The technique is able to clearly resolve the wake vortices of landing aircraft and measure their separation, height, and sinking rate. These observations permit an indirect estimate of the vortex circulation. The array also provides visualization of the vortex evolution, including the Crow instability.

  18. Neuropharmacology of Sleep and Wakefulness

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Christopher J.; Baghdoyan, Helen A.; Lydic, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis The development of sedative/hypnotic molecules has been empiric rather than rational. The empiric approach has produced clinically useful drugs but for no drug is the mechanism of action completely understood. All available sedative/hypnotic medications have unwanted side effects and none of these medications creates a sleep architecture that is identical to the architecture of naturally occurring sleep. This chapter reviews recent advances in research aiming to elucidate the neurochemical mechanisms regulating sleep and wakefulness. One promise of rational drug design is that understanding the mechanisms of sedative/hypnotic action will significantly enhance drug safety and efficacy. PMID:21278831

  19. On the characteristics of the wake meandering of a marine hydrokinetic turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, S.

    2013-12-01

    Recently Kang et al. (Journal of Fluid Mechanics, submitted) showed that the hub vortex breakdown occurring downstream of a hydrokinetic turbine plays an important role in enhancing wake meandering. In this study the hub vortex breakdown and wake meandering phenomena are further examined using large-eddy simulation (Kang et al., Advances in Water Resources, 2012). Specifically, the effect of the incoming turbulence, the presence of hub and nacelle geometries, and the tip speed ratio of the rotor on the wake meandering and the hub vortex breakdown are examined.

  20. Gudden's dorsal tegmental nucleus is activated in carbachol-induced active (REM) sleep and active wakefulness.

    PubMed

    Torterolo, Pablo; Sampogna, Sharon; Morales, Francisco R; Chase, Michael H

    2002-07-19

    Previous studies have shown that GABAergic processes in the ponto-mesencephalic region of the brainstem are involved in the generation of wakefulness and active sleep (AS). The dorsal and ventral tegmental nuclei of Gudden (DTN and VTN, respectively) are known to contain a large population of GABAergic neurons. In the present study, utilizing Fos immunoreactivity as a marker of neuronal activity, it was determined that GABAergic DTN pars dorsalis neurons are active during active wakefulness and AS induced by carbachol, but not during quiet wakefulness or quiet sleep. In contrast, no differences in the number of Fos immunoreactive neurons were observed in the DTN pars ventralis and VTN across behavioral states.

  1. Large-scale wind turbine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, David A.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to show how structural technology was applied in the design of modern wind turbines, which were recently brought to an advanced stage of development as sources of renewable power. Wind turbine structures present many difficult problems because they are relatively slender and flexible; subject to vibration and aeroelastic instabilities; acted upon by loads which are often nondeterministic; operated continuously with little maintenance in all weather; and dominated by life-cycle cost considerations. Progress in horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWT) development was paced by progress in the understanding of structural loads, modeling of structural dynamic response, and designing of innovative structural response. During the past 15 years a series of large HAWTs was developed. This has culminated in the recent completion of the world's largest operating wind turbine, the 3.2 MW Mod-5B power plane installed on the island of Oahu, Hawaii. Some of the applications of structures technology to wind turbine will be illustrated by referring to the Mod-5B design. First, a video overview will be presented to provide familiarization with the Mod-5B project and the important components of the wind turbine system. Next, the structural requirements for large-scale wind turbines will be discussed, emphasizing the difficult fatigue-life requirements. Finally, the procedures used to design the structure will be presented, including the use of the fracture mechanics approach for determining allowable fatigue stresses.

  2. Large-scale wind turbine structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spera, David A.

    1988-05-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to show how structural technology was applied in the design of modern wind turbines, which were recently brought to an advanced stage of development as sources of renewable power. Wind turbine structures present many difficult problems because they are relatively slender and flexible; subject to vibration and aeroelastic instabilities; acted upon by loads which are often nondeterministic; operated continuously with little maintenance in all weather; and dominated by life-cycle cost considerations. Progress in horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWT) development was paced by progress in the understanding of structural loads, modeling of structural dynamic response, and designing of innovative structural response. During the past 15 years a series of large HAWTs was developed. This has culminated in the recent completion of the world's largest operating wind turbine, the 3.2 MW Mod-5B power plane installed on the island of Oahu, Hawaii. Some of the applications of structures technology to wind turbine will be illustrated by referring to the Mod-5B design. First, a video overview will be presented to provide familiarization with the Mod-5B project and the important components of the wind turbine system. Next, the structural requirements for large-scale wind turbines will be discussed, emphasizing the difficult fatigue-life requirements. Finally, the procedures used to design the structure will be presented, including the use of the fracture mechanics approach for determining allowable fatigue stresses.

  3. A comparison of two-and three-dimensional S809 airfoil properties for rough and smooth HAWT (Horizontal-Axis Wind Tunnel) rotor operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musial, W. D.; Butterfield, C. P.; Jenks, M. D.

    1990-02-01

    At the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI), we carried out tests to measure the effects of leading-edge roughness on an S809 airfoil using a 10-m, three-bladed, horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT). The rotor employed a constant-chord (.457 m) blade geometry with zero twist. Blade structural loads were measured with strain gages mounted at 9 spanwise locations. Airfoil pressure measurements were taken at the 80 percent spanwise station using 32 pressure taps distributed around the airfoil surface. Detailed inflow measurements were taken using nine R.M. Young Model 8002 propvane anemometers on a vertical plane array (VPA) located 10 m upwind of the test turbine in the prevailing wind direction. The major objective of this test was to determine the sensitivity of the S809 airfoil to roughness on a rotating wind turbine blade. We examined this effect by comparing several parameters. We compared power curves to show the sensitivity of whole rotor performance to roughness. We used pressure measurements to generate pressure distributions at the 80 percent span which operates at a Reynolds number (Re) of 800,000. We then integrated these distributions to determine the effect of roughness on the section's lift and pressure-drag coefficients.

  4. Sleep-waking discharge profiles of dorsal raphe nucleus neurons in mice.

    PubMed

    Sakai, K

    2011-12-01

    We have recorded, for the first time, in non-anesthetized, head-restrained mice, a total of 407 single units throughout the dorsal raphe nucleus (DR), which contains serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) neurons, during the complete wake-sleep cycle. The mouse DR was found to contain a large proportion (52.0%) of waking (W)-active neurons, together with many sleep-active (24.8%) and W/paradoxical sleep (PS)-active (18.4%) neurons and a few state-unrelated neurons (4.7%). The W-active, W/PS-active, and sleep-active neurons displayed a biphasic narrow or triphasic broad action potential. Of the 212 W-active neurons, 194 were judged serotonergic (5-HT W-active neurons) because of their triphasic long-duration action potential and low rate of spontaneous discharge, while the remaining 18 were judged non-serotonergic (non-5-HT W-active neurons) because of their biphasic narrow action potential and higher rate of spontaneous discharge. The 5-HT W-active neurons were subdivided into four groups, types I, II, III, and IV, on the basis of differences in firing pattern during wake-sleep states, their waking selectivity of discharge being in the order type I>type II>type III>type IV. During the transition from sleep to waking, the vast majority of waking-specific or waking-selective type I and II neurons discharged after onset of waking, as seen with non-5-HT W-specific neurons. Triphasic DR W/PS-active neurons were characterized by a low rate of spontaneous discharge and a similar distribution to that of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive, dopaminergic neurons. Triphasic DR slow-wave sleep (SWS)-active and SWS/PS neurons were also characterized by slow firing. At the transition from sleep to waking, sleep-selective neurons with no discharge activity during waking ceased firing before onset of waking, while, at the transition from waking to sleep, they fired after onset of sleep. The present study shows a marked heterogeneity and functional topographic organization of both

  5. Sleep-waking discharge profiles of dorsal raphe nucleus neurons in mice.

    PubMed

    Sakai, K

    2011-12-01

    We have recorded, for the first time, in non-anesthetized, head-restrained mice, a total of 407 single units throughout the dorsal raphe nucleus (DR), which contains serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) neurons, during the complete wake-sleep cycle. The mouse DR was found to contain a large proportion (52.0%) of waking (W)-active neurons, together with many sleep-active (24.8%) and W/paradoxical sleep (PS)-active (18.4%) neurons and a few state-unrelated neurons (4.7%). The W-active, W/PS-active, and sleep-active neurons displayed a biphasic narrow or triphasic broad action potential. Of the 212 W-active neurons, 194 were judged serotonergic (5-HT W-active neurons) because of their triphasic long-duration action potential and low rate of spontaneous discharge, while the remaining 18 were judged non-serotonergic (non-5-HT W-active neurons) because of their biphasic narrow action potential and higher rate of spontaneous discharge. The 5-HT W-active neurons were subdivided into four groups, types I, II, III, and IV, on the basis of differences in firing pattern during wake-sleep states, their waking selectivity of discharge being in the order type I>type II>type III>type IV. During the transition from sleep to waking, the vast majority of waking-specific or waking-selective type I and II neurons discharged after onset of waking, as seen with non-5-HT W-specific neurons. Triphasic DR W/PS-active neurons were characterized by a low rate of spontaneous discharge and a similar distribution to that of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive, dopaminergic neurons. Triphasic DR slow-wave sleep (SWS)-active and SWS/PS neurons were also characterized by slow firing. At the transition from sleep to waking, sleep-selective neurons with no discharge activity during waking ceased firing before onset of waking, while, at the transition from waking to sleep, they fired after onset of sleep. The present study shows a marked heterogeneity and functional topographic organization of both

  6. Effect of wakes from moving upstream rods on boundary layer separation from a high lift airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volino, Ralph J.

    2011-11-01

    Highly loaded airfoils in turbines allow power generation using fewer airfoils. High loading, however, can cause boundary layer separation, resulting in reduced lift and increased aerodynamic loss. Separation is affected by the interaction between rotating blades and stationary vanes. Wakes from upstream vanes periodically impinge on downstream blades, and can reduce separation. The wakes include elevated turbulence, which can induce transition, and a velocity deficit, which results in an impinging flow on the blade surface known as a ``negative jet.'' In the present study, flow through a linear cascade of very high lift airfoils is studied experimentally. Wakes are produced with moving rods which cut through the flow upstream of the airfoils, simulating the effect of upstream vanes. Pressure and velocity fields are documented. Wake spacing and velocity are varied. At low Reynolds numbers without wakes, the boundary layer separates and does not reattach. At high wake passing frequencies separation is largely suppressed. At lower frequencies, ensemble averaged velocity results show intermittent separation and reattachment during the wake passing cycle. Supported by NASA.

  7. Three dimensional mean flow and turbulence characteristics of the near wake of a compressor rotor blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravindranath, A.; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1980-01-01

    The investigation was carried out using the rotating hot wire technique. Measurements were taken inside the end wall boundary layer to discern the effect of annulus and hub wall boundary layer, secondary flow, and tip leakage on the wake structure. Static pressure gradients across the wake were measured using a static stagnation pressure probe insensitive to flow direction changes. The axial and the tangential velocity defects, the radial component of velocity, and turbulence intensities were found to be very large as compared to the near and far wake regions. The radial velocities in the trailing edge region exhibited characteristics prevalent in a trailing vortex system. Flow near the blade tips found to be highly complex due to interaction of the end wall boundary layers, secondary flows, and tip leakage flow with the wake. The streamwise curvature was found to be appreciable near the blade trailing edge. Flow properties in the trailing edge region are quite different compared to that in the near and far wake regions with respect to their decay characteristics, similarity, etc. Fourier decomposition of the rotor wake revealed that for a normalized wake only the first three coefficients are dominant.

  8. Kinetic electron and ion instability of the lunar wake simulated at physical mass ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Haakonsen, Christian Bernt Hutchinson, Ian H. Zhou, Chuteng

    2015-03-15

    The solar wind wake behind the moon is studied with 1D electrostatic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations using a physical ion to electron mass ratio (unlike prior investigations); the simulations also apply more generally to supersonic flow of dense magnetized plasma past non-magnetic objects. A hybrid electrostatic Boltzmann electron treatment is first used to investigate the ion stability in the absence of kinetic electron effects, showing that the ions are two-stream unstable for downstream wake distances (in lunar radii) greater than about three times the solar wind Mach number. Simulations with PIC electrons are then used to show that kinetic electron effects can lead to disruption of the ion beams at least three times closer to the moon than in the hybrid simulations. This disruption occurs as the result of a novel wake phenomenon: the non-linear growth of electron holes spawned from a narrow dimple in the electron velocity distribution. Most of the holes arising from the dimple are small and quickly leave the wake, approximately following the unperturbed electron phase-space trajectories, but some holes originating near the center of the wake remain and grow large enough to trigger disruption of the ion beams. Non-linear kinetic-electron effects are therefore essential to a comprehensive understanding of the 1D electrostatic stability of such wakes, and possible observational signatures in ARTEMIS data from the lunar wake are discussed.

  9. Wake development in turbulent subsonic axisymmetric flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porteiro, J. L. F.; Perez-Villar, V.

    1996-07-01

    The development of the wake velocity and turbulence profiles behind a cylindrical blunt based body aligned with a subsonic uniform stream was experimentally investigated as a function of the momentum thickness of the approaching boundary layer and the transfer of mass into the recirculating region. Measurements were made just outside of the recirculating region at distances of 1.5, 2 and 3 diameters downstream of the cylinder. Results indicate that, even at these short distances from the cylinder base, the velocity profiles are similar. They also show that the width of the wake increases with the thickness of the boundary layer while the velocity at the centerline decreases. Near wake mass transfer was found to alter centerline velocities while the width of the wake was not significantly altered. Wake centerline velocity development as a function of boundary layer thickness is presented for distances up to three diameters from the base.

  10. Dreaming and waking: similarities and differences revisited.

    PubMed

    Kahan, Tracey L; LaBerge, Stephen P

    2011-09-01

    Dreaming is often characterized as lacking high-order cognitive (HOC) skills. In two studies, we test the alternative hypothesis that the dreaming mind is highly similar to the waking mind. Multiple experience samples were obtained from late-night REM sleep and waking, following a systematic protocol described in Kahan (2001). Results indicated that reported dreaming and waking experiences are surprisingly similar in their cognitive and sensory qualities. Concurrently, ratings of dreaming and waking experiences were markedly different on questions of general reality orientation and logical organization (e.g., the bizarreness or typicality of the events, actions, and locations). Consistent with other recent studies (e.g., Bulkeley & Kahan, 2008; Kozmová & Wolman, 2006), experiences sampled from dreaming and waking were more similar with respect to their process features than with respect to their structural features.

  11. The Neurobiology of Sleep and Wakefulness.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Michael D; Kilduff, Thomas S

    2015-12-01

    Cortical electroencephalographic activity arises from corticothalamocortical interactions, modulated by wake-promoting monoaminergic and cholinergic input. These wake-promoting systems are regulated by hypothalamic hypocretin/orexins, while GABAergic sleep-promoting nuclei are found in the preoptic area, brainstem and lateral hypothalamus. Although pontine acetylcholine is critical for REM sleep, hypothalamic melanin-concentrating hormone/GABAergic cells may "gate" REM sleep. Daily sleep-wake rhythms arise from interactions between a hypothalamic circadian pacemaker and a sleep homeostat whose anatomical locus has yet to be conclusively defined. Control of sleep and wakefulness involves multiple systems, each of which presents vulnerability to sleep/wake dysfunction that may predispose to physical and/or neuropsychiatric disorders.

  12. Monitoring Wake Vortices for More Efficient Airports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Wake vortices are generated by all aircraft during flight. The larger the aircraft, the stronger the wake, so the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) separates aircraft to ensure wake turbulence has no effect on approaching aircraft. Currently, though, the time between planes is often larger than it needs to be for the wake to dissipate. This unnecessary gap translates into arrival and departure delays, but since the wakes are invisible, the delays are nearly inevitable. If, however, the separation between aircraft can be reduced safely, then airport capacity can be increased without the high cost of additional runways. Scientists are currently studying these patterns to identify and introduce new procedures and technologies that safely increase airport capacity. NASA, always on the cutting edge of aerospace research, has been contributing knowledge and testing to these endeavors.

  13. Numerical Simulations of the Wake of Kauai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Todd P.; Sharman, Robert D.; Frehlich, Rod G.; Brown, John M.

    2006-09-01

    This study uses a series of numerical simulations to examine the structure of the wake of the Hawaiian island of Kauai. The primary focus is on the conditions on 26 June 2003, which was the day of the demise of the Helios aircraft within Kauai’s wake. The simulations show that, in an east-northeasterly trade wind flow, Kauai produces a well-defined wake that can extend 40 km downstream of the island. The wake is bounded to the north and south by regions of strong vertical and horizontal shear—that is, shear lines. These shear lines mark the edge of the wake in the horizontal plane and are aligned approximately parallel to the upstream flow direction at each respective height. The highest-resolution simulations show that these shear lines can become unstable and break down through Kelvin Helmholtz instability. The breakdown generates turbulent eddies that are advected both downstream and into the recirculating wake flow. Turbulence statistics are estimated from the simulation using a technique that analyzes model-derived structure functions. A number of sensitivity studies are also completed to determine the influence of the upstream conditions on the structure of the wake. These simulations show that directional shear controls the tilt of the wake in the north south plane with height. These simulations also show that at lower incident wind speeds the wake has a qualitatively similar structure but is less turbulent. At higher wind speeds, the flow regime changes, strong gravity waves are generated, and the wake is poorly defined. These results are consistent with previous idealized studies of stratified flow over isolated obstacles.

  14. The role of turbulent mixing in wind turbine wake recovery and wind array performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruh, Wolf-Gerrit; Creech, Angus; Maguire, Eoghan

    2014-05-01

    The effect of wind turbine wakes in large offshore wind energy arrays can be a substantial factor in affecting the performance of turbines inside the array. Turbulent mixing plays a key role in the wake recovery, having a significant effect on the length over which the wake is strong enough to affect the performance other turbines significantly. We aim to highlight how turbulence affects wind turbine wakes, first by examining a high resolution CFD model of a single turbine wake validated by LIDAR measurements [1], and secondly with a much larger CFD simulation of Lillgrund offshore wind farm, validated with SCADA data [2]. By comparing the decay rates behind single turbines in environments of different surrounding surface features, ranging from ideal free-slip wind tunnels to mixed-vegetation hills, we suggest that the decay rate of turbine wakes are enhanced by free-stream turbulence, created by topography and ground features. In the context of Lillgrund wind farm, observations and computational results suggest that the wakes created by the turbines in the leading row facing the wind decay much slower than those in second row, or further into the turbine array. This observation can be explained by the diffusive action of upwind turbulence breaking up the wake generated by a turbine rotor. Angus CW Creech, Wolf-Gerrit Früh, Peter Clive (2012). Actuator volumes and hradaptive methods for threedimensional simulation of wind turbine wakes and performance. Wind Energy Vol.15, 847 - 863. Angus C.W. Creech, Wolf-Gerrit Früh, A. Eoghan Maguire (2013). High-resolution CFD modelling of Lillgrund Wind farm. Renewable Energies and Power Quality Journal, Vol. 11

  15. Determination of Wind Turbine Near-Wake Length Based on Stability Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sørensen, Jens N.; Mikkelsen, Robert; Sarmast, Sasan; Ivanell, Stefan; Henningson, Dan

    2014-06-01

    A numerical study on the wake behind a wind turbine is carried out focusing on determining the length of the near-wake based on the instability onset of the trailing tip vortices shed from the turbine blades. The numerical model is based on large-eddy simulations (LES) of the Navier-Stokes equations using the actuator line (ACL) method. The wake is perturbed by applying stochastic or harmonic excitations in the neighborhood of the tips of the blades. The flow field is then analyzed to obtain the stability properties of the tip vortices in the wake of the wind turbine. As a main outcome of the study it is found that the amplification of specific waves (traveling structures) along the tip vortex spirals is responsible for triggering the instability leading to wake breakdown. The presence of unstable modes in the wake is related to the mutual inductance (vortex pairing) instability where there is an out-of-phase displacement of successive helix turns. Furthermore, using the non-dimensional growth rate, it is found that the pairing instability has a universal growth rate equal to π/2. Using this relationship, and the assumption that breakdown to turbulence occurs once a vortex has experienced sufficient growth, we provide an analytical relationship between the turbulence intensity and the stable wake length. The analysis leads to a simple expression for determining the length of the near wake. This expression shows that the near wake length is inversely proportional to thrust, tip speed ratio and the logarithmic of the turbulence intensity.

  16. Application of Three-Component PIV to a Hovering Rotor Wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, Gloria K.; Lourenco, Luiz; Heineck, James T.; Wadcock, Alan J.; Abrego, Anita I.; Aiken, Edwin W. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The key to accurate predictions of rotorcraft aerodynamics, acoustics, and dynamics lies in the accurate representation of the rotor wake. The vortical wake computed by rotorcraft CFD analyses typically suffer from numerical dissipation before the first blade passage. With some a priori knowledge of the wake trajectory, grid points can be concentrated along the trajectory to minimize the dissipation. Comprehensive rotorcraft analyses based on lifting-line theory rely on classical vortex models and/or semi-empirical information about the tip vortex structure. Until the location, size, and strength of the trailed tip vortex can be measured over a range of wake ages, the analyses will continue to be adjusted on a trial and error basis in order to correctly predict blade airloads, acoustics, dynamics, and performance. Using the laser light sheet technique, tip vortex location can be acquired in a straightforward manner. Measuring wake velocities and vortex core size, however, has been difficult and tedious using point-measurement techniques such as laser velocimetry. Recently, the Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique has proven to be an efficient method for acquiring velocity measurements over relatively large areas and volumes of a rotor wake. The work reported to date, however, has been restricted to 2-component velocity measurements of the rotor wake. Three-component velocity measurements of a hovering rotor wake were acquired at NASA Ames Research Center in May 1999. This experiment represents a major step toward understanding the detailed structure of a rotor wake. This paper will focus primarily on the experimental technique used in acquiring this data. The accuracy and limitations of the current technique will also be discussed. Representative velocity field measurements will be included.

  17. Molecular wake shield gas analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    Techniques for measuring and characterizing the ultrahigh vacuum in the wake of an orbiting spacecraft are studied. A high sensitivity mass spectrometer that contains a double mass analyzer consisting of an open source miniature magnetic sector field neutral gas analyzer and an identical ion analyzer is proposed. These are configured to detect and identify gas and ion species of hydrogen, helium, nitrogen, oxygen, nitric oxide, and carbon dioxide and any other gas or ion species in the 1 to 46 amu mass range. This range covers the normal atmospheric constituents. The sensitivity of the instrument is sufficient to measure ambient gases and ion with a particle density of the order of one per cc. A chemical pump, or getter, is mounted near the entrance aperture of the neutral gas analyzer which integrates the absorption of ambient gases for a selectable period of time for subsequent release and analysis. The sensitivity is realizable for all but rare gases using this technique.

  18. Wind shear and vortex wake research in UK, 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodfield, A. A.

    1983-01-01

    A wind shear and vortex wake and their impact on aircraft were investigated. The systems and advice to help pilots, and rational scientific methods to assist in advising certification authorities and those interested in improving flight safety were developed. Wind Shear and Vortex Wakes are related, they are both invisible enemies of aircraft in the form of large disturbances in the atmosphere, both cause major accidents. Problems of building wakes at airports are is considered. Research on wind shear was initiated by the American FAA following the Boston, New York and Denver accidents to civil airliners. This resulted in: useful advice to pilots about wind shear; better attempts by the meteorologists at forecasting wind shear conditions; and useful ideas for wind shear measurement and warning systems. Three major research tasks are outstanding: (1) Worldwide measurements to give reliable estimates of probability and details of the forms of large wind shears; (2) Developments of real time wind shear measuring systems for ground or airborne use; and (3) Establishing relationships between measured wind shear and the potential hazard to an aircraft, or class of aircraft.

  19. Simulation of spray dispersion in a simplified heavy vehicle wake

    SciTech Connect

    Paschkewitz, J S

    2006-01-13

    Simulations of spray dispersion in a simplified tractor-trailer wake have been completed with the goal of obtaining a better understanding of how to mitigate this safety hazard. The Generic Conventional Model (GCM) for the tractor-trailer was used. The impact of aerodynamic drag reduction devices, specifically trailer-mounted base flaps, on the transport of spray in the vehicle wake was considered using the GCM. This analysis demonstrated that base flaps including a bottom plate may actually worsen motorist visibility because of the interaction of fine spray with large vortex flows in the wake. This work suggests that to use computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to design and evaluate spray mitigation strategies the jet or sheet breakup processes can be modeled using an array of injectors of small (< 0.1 mm) water droplets; however the choice of size distribution, injection locations, directions and velocities is largely unknown and requires further study. Possible containment strategies would include using flow structures to 'focus' particles into regions away from passing cars or surface treatments to capture small drops.

  20. Wake evolution and trailing vortex instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odemark, Ylva; Fransson, Jens H. M.

    2011-11-01

    The production losses and inhomogeneous loads of wind power turbines placed in the wake of another turbine is a well-known problem when building new wind power farms, and a subject of intensive research. The present work aims at developing an increased understanding of the behaviour of turbine wakes, with special regard to wake evolution and the stability of the trailing vortices. Single point velocity measurements with hot-wire anemometry were performed in the wake of a small-scale model turbine. The model was placed in the middle of the wind tunnel test section, outside the boundary layers from the wind tunnel walls. In order to study the stability of the wake and the trailing vortices, a disturbance was introduced at the end of the nacelle. This was accomplished through two orifices perpendicular to the main flow, which were connected to a high-pressure tank and two fast-switching valves. Both varicose and sinusoidal modes of different frequencies could be triggered. By also triggering the measurements on the blade passage, the meandering of the wake and the disturbance frequency, phase averaged results could be computed. The results for different frequencies as well as studies of wake evolution will be presented.

  1. 'Waking activity': the neglected state of infancy.

    PubMed

    Becker, P T; Thoman, E B

    1982-08-01

    The significance of the waking activity state was investigated using naturalistic observations of 20 infants at 2, 3, 4 and 5 weeks of age. Sleep and wake states were recorded at 10-s intervals throughout a 7-h day, along with co-occurring behaviors of the mother. The infant's behavioral state was classified as 'waking activity' when the eyes were open but unfocused, and there was diffuse motor activity. Thus the infant was not alert, drowsy, dazed, or crying. Infants showed individual consistency in amount of waking activity over weeks, although this state composed only 4.4% of the total observation. The mean amount of waking activity over weeks was related to an index of stability in state organization, as measured by the consistency of state profiles over weeks. Profile consistency was assessed by an ANOVA for each infant's data. Separate stability indexes were derived for that portion of the day when the infants were alone, and for that portion when they were with their mothers. Infants with higher levels of waking activity had lower state stability scores in each context. The results indicate that waking activity is a behavioral state which reflects overall state control and is therefore significant for an understanding of brain-behavior relationships.

  2. Atmospheric and Wake Turbulence Impacts on Wind Turbine Fatigue Loadings

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; Churchfield, M.; Moriarty, P.; Jonkman, J.; Michalakes, J.

    2012-01-01

    Large-eddy simulations of atmospheric boundary layers under various stability and surface roughness conditions are performed to investigate the turbulence impact on wind turbines. In particular, the aeroelastic responses of the turbines are studied to characterize the fatigue loading of the turbulence present in the boundary layer and in the wake of the turbines. Two utility-scale 5-MW turbines that are separated by seven rotor diameters are placed in a 3 km by 3 km by 1 km domain. They are subjected to atmospheric turbulent boundary layer flow and data is collected on the structural response of the turbine components. The surface roughness was found to increase the fatigue loads while the atmospheric instability had a small influence. Furthermore, the downstream turbines yielded higher fatigue loads indicating that the turbulent wakes generated from the upstream turbines have significant impact.

  3. Mathematical model for the analysis of wind-turbine wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, M.-K.; Yocke, M. A.; Myers, T. C.

    1983-02-01

    The concept of wind farms with clustered wind turbines at a given site seems to offer an attractive means for extracting wind power on a large scale. Techniques for minimizing the effect of upstream wind-turbine wakes on downstream wind turbines are needed to optimize overall performance of the wind-turbine array. A numerical model for prediction of the interaction of the wind turbine with the prevailing wind flow is described. The model is based on a numerical solution of the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations for the planetary boundary layer with the hydrostatic approximation. Three different hypothetical wind-turbine configurations are analyzed to demonstrate the utility of this model. Model predictions from the present study compare favorably with the basic characteristics of measured wind-turbine wakes.

  4. Effect of nonlinear chirped Gaussian laser pulse on plasma wake field generation

    SciTech Connect

    Afhami, Saeedeh; Eslami, Esmaeil

    2014-08-15

    An ultrashort laser pulse propagating in plasma can excite a nonlinear plasma wake field which can accelerate charged particles up to GeV energies within a compact space compared to the conventional accelerator devices. In this paper, the effect of different kinds of nonlinear chirped Gaussian laser pulse on wake field generation is investigated. The numerical analysis of our results depicts that the excitation of plasma wave with large and highly amplitude can be accomplished by nonlinear chirped pulses. The maximum amplitude of excited wake in nonlinear chirped pulse is approximately three times more than that of linear chirped pulse. In order to achieve high wake field generation, chirp parameters and functions should be set to optimal values.

  5. Simulation of evolution of the two cylinders plasma wake under the electric discharge influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gembarzhevskii, G. V.; Lednev, A. K.; Osipenko, K. Yu.

    2015-12-01

    We consider a close wake behind a pair of cylinders at a Reynolds number of Re ~ 1000 defined by the cylinder diameter in the case of small aspect ratio of cylinders, H/D ≈ 3.5. The large-scale structure of such a wake represents a f low like two interacting Karman streets and it is modeled by two coupled Van der Pol oscillators. The mutual inf luence of closely located Karman streets is accounted for by nonlinear (of a general parabolic type) terms in the equations for oscillators. Moreover, the equations are generalized with allowance for explicit dependence of the oscillation frequency on its amplitude. Within the framework of this three-parametric model, five collective modes of the wake behind cylinders were found. In addition, there are the domains of model parameters where qualitatively different modes of intermittent wake exist.

  6. Properties of the wake of small Langmuir probes on sounding rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bering, E. A.

    1975-01-01

    Split Langmuir probes have been used to study the near wake of small Langmuir probes on sounding rockets. Experiments have been performed on two rocket flights using planar disk and cylindrical geometries, and the results are presented. Significant wake perturbations in plasma density and temperature were found due to the probe body itself, even though the probes were of the order of or smaller than the Debye length. The largest effects of the wake are seen in the electron collection characteristics of the probe. The wake of small probes show apparent magnetic field aligned structure, even though the probes were much smaller than the ion gyroradius. On one flight, a space charge potential large enough to substantially alter photoemission, -3.5 volts, was observed.

  7. The NASA-Langley Wake Vortex Modelling Effort in Support of an Operational Aircraft Spacing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Fred H.

    1998-01-01

    Two numerical modelling efforts, one using a large eddy simulation model and the other a numerical weather prediction model, are underway in support of NASA's Terminal Area Productivity program. The large-eddy simulation model (LES) has a meteorological framework and permits the interaction of wake vortices with environments characterized by crosswind shear, stratification, humidity, and atmospheric turbulence. Results from the numerical simulations are being used to assist in the development of algorithms for an operational wake-vortex aircraft spacing system. A mesoscale weather forecast model is being adapted for providing operational forecast of winds, temperature, and turbulence parameters to be used in the terminal area. This paper describes the goals and modelling approach, as well as achievements obtained to date. Simulation results will be presented from the LES model for both two and three dimensions. The 2-D model is found to be generally valid for studying wake vortex transport, while the 3-D approach is necessary for realistic treatment of decay via interaction of wake vortices and atmospheric boundary layer turbulence. Meteorology is shown to have an important affect on vortex transport and decay. Presented are results showing that wake vortex transport is unaffected by uniform fog or rain, but wake vortex transport can be strongly affected by nonlinear vertical change in the ambient crosswind. Both simulation and observations show that atmospheric vortices decay from the outside with minimal expansion of the core. Vortex decay and the onset three-dimensional instabilities are found to be enhanced by the presence of ambient turbulence.

  8. A Critical Review of the Transport and Decay of Wake Vortices in Ground Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarpkaya, T.

    2004-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the transport and decay of wake vortices in ground effect and cites a need for a physics-based parametric model. The encounter of a vortex with a solid body is always a complex event involving turbulence enhancement, unsteadiness, and very large gradients of velocity and pressure. Wake counter in ground effect is the most dangerous of them all. The interaction of diverging, area-varying, and decaying aircraft wake vortices with the ground is very complex because both the vortices and the flow field generated by them are altered to accommodate the presence of the ground (where there is very little room to maneuver) and the background turbulent flow. Previous research regarding vortex models, wake vortex decay mechanisms, time evolution within in ground effect of a wake vortex pair, laminar flow in ground effect, and the interaction of the existing boundary layer with a convected vortex are reviewed. Additionally, numerical simulations, 3-dimensional large-eddy simulations, a probabilistic 2-phase wake vortex decay and transport model and a vortex element method are discussed. The devising of physics-based, parametric models for the prediction of (operational) real-time response, mindful of the highly three-dimensional and unsteady structure of vortices, boundary layers, atmospheric thermodynamics, and weather convective phenomena is required. In creating a model, LES and field data will be the most powerful tools.

  9. Measurement of High Reynolds Number Near-Field Turbulent Sphere Wakes under Stratified Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalumuck, Kenneth; Brandt, Alan; Decker, Kirk; Shipley, Kara

    2015-11-01

    To characterize the near-field of a stratified wake at Reynolds numbers, Re = 2 x 105 - 106, experiments were conducted with a large diameter (0.5 m) sphere towed through a thermally stratified fresh water lake. Stratification produced BV frequencies, N, up to 0.07/s (42 cph) resulting in Froude numbers F = U/ND >= 15. The submerged sphere and associated instrumentation including two Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters (ADVs) and an array of fast response thermistors were affixed to a common frame towed over a range of speeds. Three components of the instantaneous wake velocities were obtained simultaneously at two cross-wake locations with the ADVs while density fluctuations were inferred from temperature measurements made by the thermistors. These measurements were used to determine the mean, rms, and spectra of all three components of the turbulent velocity field and density fluctuations at multiple locations. The turbulence power spectra follow the expected -5/3 slope with wavenumber. Existing stratified near-field wake data for spheres are for Re =104 and less, and only a very limited set of data under unstratified conditions exists at these large values of Re. Those data are primarily measurements of the sphere drag, surface pressure distribution, and separation rather than in wake turbulence. Advances in CFD modeling have enabled simulations at these high Reynolds numbers without quantitative data available for validation. Sponsored by ONR Turbulence and Wakes program.

  10. Analyzing complex wake-terrain interactions and its implications on wind-farm performance.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabib, Mandar; Rasheed, Adil; Fuchs, Franz

    2016-09-01

    Rotating wind turbine blades generate complex wakes involving vortices (helical tip-vortex, root-vortex etc.).These wakes are regions of high velocity deficits and high turbulence intensities and they tend to degrade the performance of down-stream turbines. Hence, a conservative inter-turbine distance of up-to 10 times turbine diameter (10D) is sometimes used in wind-farm layout (particularly in cases of flat terrain). This ensures that wake-effects will not reduce the overall wind-farm performance, but this leads to larger land footprint for establishing a wind-farm. In-case of complex-terrain, within a short distance (say 10D) itself, the nearby terrain can rise in altitude and be high enough to influence the wake dynamics. This wake-terrain interaction can happen either (a) indirectly, through an interaction of wake (both near tip vortex and far wake large-scale vortex) with terrain induced turbulence (especially, smaller eddies generated by small ridges within the terrain) or (b) directly, by obstructing the wake-region partially or fully in its flow-path. Hence, enhanced understanding of wake- development due to wake-terrain interaction will help in wind farm design. To this end the current study involves: (1) understanding the numerics for successful simulation of vortices, (2) understanding fundamental vortex-terrain interaction mechanism through studies devoted to interaction of a single vortex with different terrains, (3) relating influence of vortex-terrain interactions to performance of a wind-farm by studying a multi-turbine wind-farm layout under different terrains. The results on interaction of terrain and vortex has shown a much faster decay of vortex for complex terrain compared to a flatter-terrain. The potential reasons identified explaining the observation are (a) formation of secondary vortices in flow and its interaction with the primary vortex and (b) enhanced vorticity diffusion due to increased terrain-induced turbulence. The implications of

  11. Experimental evaluation of a flat wake theory for predicting rotor inflow-wake velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John C.

    1992-01-01

    The theory for predicting helicopter inflow-wake velocities called flat wake theory was correlated with several sets of experimental data. The theory was developed by V. E. Baskin of the USSR, and a computer code known as DOWN was developed at Princeton University to implement the theory. The theory treats the wake geometry as rigid without interaction between induced velocities and wake structure. The wake structure is assumed to be a flat sheet of vorticity composed of trailing elements whose strength depends on the azimuthal and radial distributions of circulation on a rotor blade. The code predicts the three orthogonal components of flow velocity in the field surrounding the rotor. The predictions can be utilized in rotor performance and helicopter real-time flight-path simulation. The predictive capability of the coded version of flat wake theory provides vertical inflow patterns similar to experimental patterns.

  12. A comparison of two- and three-dimensional S809 airfoil properties for rough and smooth HAWT (horizontal-axis wind turbine) rotor operation

    SciTech Connect

    Musial, W.D.; Butterfield, C.P.; Jenks, M.D.

    1990-02-01

    At the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI), we carried out tests to measure the effects of leading-edge roughness on an S809 airfoil using a 10-m, three-bladed, horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT). The rotor employed a constant-chord (.457 m) blade geometry with zero twist. Blade structural loads were measured with strain gages mounted at 9 spanwise locations. Airfoil pressure measurements were taken at the 80% spanwise station using 32 pressure taps distributed around the airfoil surface. Detailed inflow measurements were taken using nine R.M. Young Model 8002 propvane anemometers on a vertical plane array (VPA) located 10 m upwind of the test turbine in the prevailing wind direction. The major objective of this test was to determine the sensitivity of the S809 airfoil to roughness on a rotating wind turbine blade. We examined this effect by comparing several parameters. We compared power curves to show the sensitivity of whole rotor performance to roughness. We used pressure measurements to generate pressure distributions at the 80% span which operates at a Reynolds number (Re) of 800,000. We then integrated these distributions to determine the effect of roughness on the section's lift and pressure-drag coefficients. We also used the shapes of these distributions to understand how roughness affects the aerodynamic forces on the airfoil. We also compared rough and smooth wind tunnel data to the rotating blade data to study the effects of blade rotation on the aerodynamic behavior of the airfoil below, near, and beyond stall. 13 refs., 11 figs.

  13. Imaging doppler lidar for wind turbine wake profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Bossert, David J.

    2015-11-19

    An imaging Doppler lidar (IDL) enables the measurement of the velocity distribution of a large volume, in parallel, and at high spatial resolution in the wake of a wind turbine. Because the IDL is non-scanning, it can be orders of magnitude faster than conventional coherent lidar approaches. Scattering can be obtained from naturally occurring aerosol particles. Furthermore, the wind velocity can be measured directly from Doppler shifts of the laser light, so the measurement can be accomplished at large standoff and at wide fields-of-view.

  14. On the wake of a Darrieus turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Base, T. E.; Phillips, P.; Robertson, G.; Nowak, E. S.

    1981-01-01

    The theory and experimental measurements on the aerodynamic decay of a wake from high performance vertical axis wind turbine are discussed. In the initial experimental study, the wake downstream of a model Darrieus rotor, 28 cm diameter and a height of 45.5 cm, was measured in a Boundary Layer Wind Tunnel. The wind turbine was run at the design tip speed ratio of 5.5. It was found that the wake decayed at a slower rate with distance downstream of the turbine, than a wake from a screen with similar troposkein shape and drag force characteristics as the Darrieus rotor. The initial wind tunnel results indicated that the vertical axis wind turbines should be spaced at least forty diameters apart to avoid mutual power depreciation greater than ten per cent.

  15. Investigation of aircraft vortex wake structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, N. A.; Turchak, L. I.

    2014-11-01

    In this work we analyze the mechanisms of formation of the vortex wake structure of aircraft with different wing shape in the plan flying close to or away from the underlying surface cleaned or released mechanization wing.

  16. A wake detector for wind farm control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottasso, C. L.; Cacciola, S.; Schreiber, J.

    2015-06-01

    The paper describes an observer capable of detecting the impingement on a wind turbine rotor of the wake of an upstream machine. The observer estimates the local wind speed and turbulence intensity on the left and right parts of the rotor disk. The estimation is performed based on blade loads measured by strain gages or optical fibers, sensors which are becoming standard equipment on many modern machines. A lower wind speed and higher turbulence intensity on one part of the rotor, possibly in conjunction with other information, can then be used to infer the presence of a wake impinging on the disk. The wake state information is useful for wind plant control strategies, as for example wake deflection by active yawing. In addition, the local wind speed estimates may be used for a rough evaluation of the vertical wind shear.

  17. [Central mechanisms of sleep-wakefulness cycle].

    PubMed

    Koval'zon, V M

    2011-01-01

    Brief anatomical, physiological and neurochemical basics of the regulation of wakefulness, slow wave (NREM) sleep and paradoxical (REM) sleep are regarded as representing by the end of the first decade of the second millennium.

  18. Secure Wake-Up Scheme for WBANs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing-Wei; Ameen, Moshaddique Al; Kwak, Kyung-Sup

    Network life time and hence device life time is one of the fundamental metrics in wireless body area networks (WBAN). To prolong it, especially those of implanted sensors, each node must conserve its energy as much as possible. While a variety of wake-up/sleep mechanisms have been proposed, the wake-up radio potentially serves as a vehicle to introduce vulnerabilities and attacks to WBAN, eventually resulting in its malfunctions. In this paper, we propose a novel secure wake-up scheme, in which a wake-up authentication code (WAC) is employed to ensure that a BAN Node (BN) is woken up by the correct BAN Network Controller (BNC) rather than unintended users or malicious attackers. The scheme is thus particularly implemented by a two-radio architecture. We show that our scheme provides higher security while consuming less energy than the existing schemes.

  19. Effects of benzodiazepines on sleep and wakefulness

    PubMed Central

    Roth, T.; Zorick, F.; Sicklesteel, Jeanne; Stepanski, E.

    1981-01-01

    The differential effects of short and long acting benzodiazepines on sleeping and waking behaviour are discussed, with particular reference to hypnotic efficacy, and their effects on the structure of sleep and daytime function. PMID:6133532

  20. On the wake of a Darrieus turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Base, T. E.; Phillips, P.; Robertson, G.; Nowak, E. S.

    1981-05-01

    The theory and experimental measurements on the aerodynamic decay of a wake from high performance vertical axis wind turbine are discussed. In the initial experimental study, the wake downstream of a model Darrieus rotor, 28 cm diameter and a height of 45.5 cm, was measured in a Boundary Layer Wind Tunnel. The wind turbine was run at the design tip speed ratio of 5.5. It was found that the wake decayed at a slower rate with distance downstream of the turbine, than a wake from a screen with similar troposkein shape and drag force characteristics as the Darrieus rotor. The initial wind tunnel results indicated that the vertical axis wind turbines should be spaced at least forty diameters apart to avoid mutual power depreciation greater than ten per cent.

  1. Turbulent Plane Wakes Subjected to Successive Strains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Michael M.

    2003-01-01

    Six direct numerical simulations of turbulent time-evolving strained plane wakes have been examined to investigate the response of a wake to successive irrotational plane strains of opposite sign. The orientation of the applied strain field has been selected so that the flow is the time-developing analogue of a spatially developing wake evolving in the presence of either a favourable or an adverse streamwise pressure gradient. The magnitude of the applied strain rate a is constant in time t until the total strain e(sup at) reaches about four. At this point, a new simulation is begun with the sign of the applied strain being reversed (the original simulation is continued as well). When the total strain is reduced back to its original value of one, yet another simulation is begun with the sign of the strain being reversed again back to its original sign. This process is done for both initially "favourable" and initially "adverse" strains, providing simulations for each of these strain types from three different initial conditions. The evolution of the wake mean velocity deficit and width is found to be very similar for all the adversely strained cases, with both measures rapidly achieving exponential growth at the rate associated with the cross-stream expansive strain e(sup at). In the "favourably" strained cases, the wake widths approach a constant and the velocity deficits ultimately decay rapidly as e(sup -2at). Although all three of these cases do exhibit the same asymptotic exponential behaviour, the time required to achieve this is longer for the cases that have been previously adversely strained (by at approx. equals 1). These simulations confirm the generality of the conclusions drawn in Rogers (2002) regarding the response of plane wakes to strain. The evolution of strained wakes is not consistent with the predictions of classical self-similar analysis; a more general equilibrium similarity solution is required to describe the results. At least for the cases

  2. Mesoscale wake clouds in Skylab pictures.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujita, T. T.; Tecson, J. J.

    1974-01-01

    The recognition of cloud patterns formed in the wake of orographic obstacles was investigated using pictures from Skylab, for the purpose of estimating atmospheric motions. The existence of ship-wake-type wave clouds in contrast to vortex sheets were revealed during examination of the pictures, and an attempt was made to characterize the pattern of waves as well as the transition between waves and vortices. Examples of mesoscale cloud patterns which were analyzed photogrammetrically and meteorologically are presented.

  3. Wake-Vortex Hazards During Cruise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, Vernon J.; James, Kevin D.; Nixon, David (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Even though the hazard posed by lift-generated wakes of subsonic transport aircraft has been studied extensively for approach and departure at airports, only a small amount of effort has gone into the potential hazard at cruise altitude. This paper reports on a studio of the wake-vortex hazard during cruise because encounters may become more prevalent when free-flight becomes available and each aircraft, is free to choose its own route between destinations. In order to address the problem, the various fluid-dynamic stages that vortex wakes usually go through as they age will be described along with estimates of the potential hazard that each stage poses. It appears that a rolling-moment hazard can be just as severe at cruise as for approach at airports, but it only persists for several minutes. However, the hazard posed by the downwash in the wake due to the lift on the generator aircraft persists for tens of minutes in a long narrow region behind the generating aircraft. The hazard consists of severe vertical loads when an encountering aircraft crosses the wake. A technique for avoiding vortex wakes at cruise altitude will be described. To date the hazard posed by lift-generated vortex wakes and their persistence at cruise altitudes has been identified and subdivided into several tasks. Analyses of the loads to be encounter and are underway and should be completed shortly. A review of published literature on the subject has been nearly completed (see text) and photographs of vortex wakes at cruise altitudes have been taken and the various stages of decay have been identified. It remains to study and sort the photographs for those that best illustrate the various stages of decay after they are shed by subsonic transport aircraft at cruise altitudes. The present status of the analysis and the paper are described.

  4. Near Wake of an Inflating Parachute Canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desabrais, Kenneth; Johari, Hamid

    2001-11-01

    The near wake of a parachute canopy inflating in a constant freestream was experimentally investigated in a water tunnel at a Re = 30,000. The temporal evolution of the velocity field immediately downstream of the canopy was measured along with the canopy diameter and force. The inflation of the canopy occurs in three stages. In the initial stage, the flow is fully attached to the surface of the canopy. During this stage, the canopy diameter increases substantially but the drag only rises gradually. The next stage of inflation initiates when the boundary layer separates from the canopy surface near the apex of the canopy. The drag rapidly increases at this point and achieves its maximum value. Subsequently, the drag sharply declines even while the canopy diameter continues to increase. During this stage of inflation, the boundary layer separation point moves from the apex region towards the canopy skirt. The final stage of inflation occurs once the separated shear layer, originating at the canopy skirt, rolls-up into a large vortex ring. The drag achieves a local minimum during the final stage, while the diameter achieves its maximum value.

  5. A preliminary characterization of parachute wake recontact

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, J.H.; Macha, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    A series of tests was conducted on a 10-ft.-diameter ringslot parachute with a geometric porosity of 20% to establish the conditions under which ''wake recontact'' occurs. The vertical helicopter drop tests covered a range of mass ratios from 0.5 to 3.0 and a range of Froude numbers from 70 to 400. Data consisted of velocity time histories obtained using a laser tracker and diameter time histories obtained from photometric data. A collapse parameter based on the ratio of the maximum parachute diameter to the subsequent minimum diameter was correlated with the mass ratio M/sub R/ and the Froude number Fr or equivalently with the initial to final velocity ratio V/sub o//V/sub t/. For large values of V/sub o//V/sub t/ the collapse parameter R/sub c/ appears to be a function of M/sub R/ alone. Non-dimensional opening time and ''collapse time'' data were also correlated with M/sub R/ and V/sub o//V/sub t/. 11 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Non-linear plasma wake growth of electron holes

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, I. H.; Haakonsen, C. B.; Zhou, C.

    2015-03-15

    An object's wake in a plasma with small Debye length that drifts across the magnetic field is subject to electrostatic electron instabilities. Such situations include, for example, the moon in the solar wind and probes in magnetized laboratory plasmas. The instability drive mechanism can equivalently be considered drift down the potential-energy gradient or drift up the density-gradient. The gradients arise because the plasma wake has a region of depressed density and electrostatic potential into which ions are attracted along the field. The non-linear consequences of the instability are analysed in this paper. At physical ratios of electron to ion mass, neither linear nor quasilinear treatment can explain the observation of large-amplitude perturbations that disrupt the ion streams well before they become ion-ion unstable. We show here, however, that electron holes, once formed, continue to grow, driven by the drift mechanism, and if they remain in the wake may reach a maximum non-linearly stable size, beyond which their uncontrolled growth disrupts the ions. The hole growth calculations provide a quantitative prediction of hole profile and size evolution. Hole growth appears to explain the observations of recent particle-in-cell simulations.

  7. Direct numerical simulations of a spatially developing plane wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maekawa, Hiroshi; Mansour, Nagi N.

    1992-01-01

    In the present paper, direct numerical methods by which to simulate the spatially developing free shear flows in the transitional region are described and the numerical results of a spatially developing plane wake are presented. The incompressible time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations were solved using Pade finite difference approximations in the streamwise direction, a mapped pseudospectral Fourier method in the cross-stream direction, and a third-order compact Runge-Kutta scheme for time advancement. The unstable modes of the Orr-Sommerfeld equations were used to perturb the inlet of the wake. Statistical analyses were performed and some numerical results were compared with experimental measurements. When only the fundamental mode is forced, the energy spectra show amplification of the fundamental and its higher harmonics. In this case, unperturbed alternate vortices develop in the saturation region of the wake. The phase jitter around the fundamental frequency plays a critical role in generating vortices of random shape and spacing. Large- and small-scale distortions of the fundamental structure are observed. Pairing of vortices of the same sign is observed, as well as vortex coupling of vortices of the opposite sign.

  8. Vortex Core Size in the Rotor Near-Wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A.

    2003-01-01

    Using a kinetic energy conservation approach, a number of simple analytic expressions are derived for estimating the core size of tip vortices in the near-wake of rotors in hover and axial-flow flight. The influence of thrust, induced power losses, advance ratio, and vortex structure on rotor vortex core size is assessed. Experimental data from the literature is compared to the analytical results derived in this paper. In general, three conclusions can be drawn from the work in this paper. First, the greater the rotor thrust, t h e larger the vortex core size in the rotor near-wake. Second, the more efficient a rotor is with respect to induced power losses, the smaller the resulting vortex core size. Third, and lastly, vortex core size initially decreases for low axial-flow advance ratios, but for large advance ratios core size asymptotically increases to a nominal upper limit. Insights gained from this work should enable improved modeling of rotary-wing aerodynamics, as well as provide a framework for improved experimental investigations of rotor a n d advanced propeller wakes.

  9. Use of Individual Flight Corridors to Avoid Vortex Wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, Vernon J.

    2001-01-01

    Vortex wakes of aircraft pose a hazard to following aircraft until the energetic parts of their flow fields have decayed to a harmless level. It is suggested here that in-trail spacings between aircraft can be significantly and safely reduced by designing an individual, vortex-free flight corridor for each aircraft. Because each aircraft will then have its own flight corridor, which is free of vortex wakes while in use by the assigned aircraft, the time intervals between aircraft operations can be safely reduced to the order of seconds. The productivity of airports can then be substantially increased. How large the offset distances between operational corridors need to be to have them vortex free, and how airports need to be changed to accommodate an individual flight-corridor process for landing and takeoff operations, are explored. Estimates are then made of the productivity of an individual flight-corridor system as a function of the in-trail time interval between operations for various values of wake decay time, runway width, and the velocity of a sidewind. The results confirm the need for short time intervals between aircraft operations if smaller offset distances and increased productivity are to be achieved.

  10. Wakefulness Is Governed by GABA and Histamine Cotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiao; Ye, Zhiwen; Houston, Catriona M.; Zecharia, Anna Y.; Ma, Ying; Zhang, Zhe; Uygun, David S.; Parker, Susan; Vyssotski, Alexei L.; Yustos, Raquel; Franks, Nicholas P.; Brickley, Stephen G.; Wisden, William

    2015-01-01

    Summary Histaminergic neurons in the tuberomammilary nucleus (TMN) of the hypothalamus form a widely projecting, wake-active network that sustains arousal. Yet most histaminergic neurons contain GABA. Selective siRNA knockdown of the vesicular GABA transporter (vgat, SLC32A1) in histaminergic neurons produced hyperactive mice with an exceptional amount of sustained wakefulness. Ablation of the vgat gene throughout the TMN further sharpened this phenotype. Optogenetic stimulation in the caudate-putamen and neocortex of “histaminergic” axonal projections from the TMN evoked tonic (extrasynaptic) GABAA receptor Cl− currents onto medium spiny neurons and pyramidal neurons. These currents were abolished following vgat gene removal from the TMN area. Thus wake-active histaminergic neurons generate a paracrine GABAergic signal that serves to provide a brake on overactivation from histamine, but could also increase the precision of neocortical processing. The long range of histamine-GABA axonal projections suggests that extrasynaptic inhibition will be coordinated over large neocortical and striatal areas. PMID:26094607

  11. Histamine in the regulation of wakefulness.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Mahesh M

    2011-02-01

    The histaminergic system is exclusively localized within the posterior hypothalamus with projection to almost all the major regions of the central nervous system. Strong and consistent evidence exist to suggest that histamine, acting via H₁ and/or H₃ receptor has a pivotal role in the regulation of sleep-wakefulness. Administration of histamine or H₁ receptor agonists induces wakefulness, whereas administration of H₁ receptor antagonists promotes sleep. The H₃ receptor functions as an auto-receptor and regulates the synthesis and release of histamine. Activation of H₃ receptor reduces histamine release and promotes sleep. Conversely, blockade of H₃ receptor promotes wakefulness. Histamine release in the hypothalamus and other target regions is highest during wakefulness. The histaminergic neurons display maximal activity during the state of high vigilance, and cease their activity during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. The cerebrospinal levels of histamine are reduced in diseased states where hypersomnolence is a major symptom. The histamine deficient L-histidine decarboxylase knockout (HDC KO) mice display sleep fragmentation and increased REM sleep during the light period along with profound wakefulness deficit at dark onset, and in novel environment. Similar results have been obtained when histamine neurons are lesioned. These studies strongly implicate the histaminergic neurons of the TMN to play a critical role in the maintenance of high vigilance state during wakefulness.

  12. HISTAMINE IN THE REGULATION OF WAKEFULNESS

    PubMed Central

    Thakkar, Mahesh M.

    2010-01-01

    The histaminergic system is exclusively localized within the posterior hypothalamus with projection to almost all the major regions of the central nervous system. Strong and consistent evidence exist to suggest that histamine, acting via H1 and/or H3 receptor has a pivotal role in the regulation of sleep-wakefulness. Administration of histamine or H1 receptor agonists induced wakefulness, whereas administration of H1 receptor antagonists promoted sleep. The H3 receptor functions as an auto-receptor and regulates the synthesis and release of histamine. Activation of H3 receptor decreased histamine release and promoted sleep. Conversely, blockade of H3 receptor promoted wakefulness. Histamine release in the hypothalamus and other target regions was highest during wakefulness. The histaminergic neurons displayed maximal activity during the state of vigilance, and cease their activity during NREM and REM sleep. The cerebrospinal levels of histamine were reduced in diseased states where hypersomnolence was a major symptom. The histamine deficient HDC KO mice displayed sleep fragmentation and increased REM sleep during the light period along with profound wakefulness deficit at dark onset, and in novel environment. Similar results were obtained when histamine neurons were lesioned. These studies strongly implicate the histaminergic neurons of the TMN to play a critical role in the maintenance of high vigilance state during wakefulness. PMID:20851648

  13. Wake structure of axial-flow hydrokinetic turbines in tri-frame arrangement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chawdhary, Saurabh; Yang, Xiaolei; Hill, Craig; Khosronejad, Ali; Guala, Michele; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2015-11-01

    Marine and hydro-kinetic (MHK) energy hold promise for future of sustainable energy generation. Tri-frame of turbines, three turbines mounted on vertices of a triangle, are an effective way to build a power producing array of hydrokinetic turbines in marine environment. Large eddy simulation (LES) is used to simulate the flow past a tri-frame and characterize its wake. Full geometry of all three turbines in the tri-frame is resolved using the Curvilinear Immersed Boundary (CURVIB) method of Kang et al. (2011). High fidelity solution of flow field is obtained owing to the inclusion of detailed geometry of the turbines. Excellent agreement is obtained with the experiments conducted in a flume at Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL). The wake evolution of the three turbines is compared to that of an isolated single turbine. The differences in wake dynamics are highlighted to elucidate the importance of turbine wake interaction in an array. The simulations indicate lower levels of TKE and lower levels of momentum deficit in the wake of the upstream turbine of tri-frame compared to the other turbines. Analysis of the far wake recovery is useful for the optimal MHK array design. This work was supported by NSF grant IIP-1318201. The simulations were carried out at the Minnesota Supercomputing Institute.

  14. Wind Turbine Wake Characterization with Remote Sensing and Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitken, Matthew Lawrence

    Because of the dense arrays at most wind farms, the region of disturbed flow downstream of an individual turbine leads to reduced power production and increased structural loading for its leeward counterparts. Currently, wind farm wake modeling, and hence turbine layout optimization, suffer from an unacceptable degree of uncertainty, largely because of a lack of adequate experimental data for model verification. Accordingly, wake measurements were taken in two separate experiments, (1) using the ground-based High Resolution Doppler Lidar (HRDL) developed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in the Turbine Wake and Inflow Characterization Study (TWICS) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and (2) using nacelle-based long-range lidar at a wind farm in the western United States. The vantage point from the nacelle is favorable in that scans can more consistently transect the central part of the wake. The work presented here outlines a set of quantitative procedures for determining critical parameters from these extensive datasets---such as the velocity deficit, the size of the wake boundary, and the location of the wake centerline---and the results are categorized by ambient wind speed, turbulence, and atmospheric stability. Despite specific reference to lidar, the methodology is general and can be applied to extract wake characteristics from other remote sensor datasets, as well as output from numerical simulations. In an effort to help advance computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of wind turbine wake dynamics, experimental results are compared to a large eddy simulation (LES) of a turbine operating in the stable boundary layer using the actuator disk parameterization in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model. With the wake characteristics described above as metrics for model verification, the simulations show good agreement with the observations. Moreover, new features---namely rotor tilt and drag from the

  15. Chronic Decrease in Wakefulness and Disruption of Sleep-Wake Behavior after Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Skopin, Mark D.; Kabadi, Shruti V.; Viechweg, Shaun S.; Mong, Jessica A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can cause sleep-wake disturbances and excessive daytime sleepiness. The pathobiology of sleep disorders in TBI, however, is not well understood, and animal models have been underused in studying such changes and potential underlying mechanisms. We used the rat lateral fluid percussion (LFP) model to analyze sleep-wake patterns as a function of time after injury. Rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep, non-REM (NREM) sleep, and wake bouts during light and dark phases were measured with electroencephalography and electromyography at an early as well as chronic time points after LFP. Moderate TBI caused disturbances in the ability to maintain consolidated wake bouts during the active phase and chronic loss of wakefulness. Further, TBI resulted in cognitive impairments and depressive-like symptoms, and reduced the number of orexin-A-positive neurons in the lateral hypothalamus. PMID:25242371

  16. Identification and quantification of vortical structures in wind turbine wakes for operational wake modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marichal, Y.; De Visscher, I.; Chatelain, P.; Winckelmans, G.

    2016-09-01

    The present paper describes a method to quantify the vortical structure characteristics from simulation results of the flow past a wind turbine, with the aim to develop an accurate, physics-based operational wake model. The wake centerline is first identified. Then, the flow characteristics are extracted by fitting a vorticity-based wake skeleton onto the velocity deficit profiles defined around the centerline and measured at several downstream distances from the rotor. The simulation results were obtained using a hybrid Vortex Particle-Mesh approach combined with an immersed Lifting Line technique to account for the blades. The characterization of the identified vortex wake structure lays a basis for the development of an operational wake model based on strong physical grounds.

  17. Chronic decrease in wakefulness and disruption of sleep-wake behavior after experimental traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Skopin, Mark D; Kabadi, Shruti V; Viechweg, Shaun S; Mong, Jessica A; Faden, Alan I

    2015-03-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can cause sleep-wake disturbances and excessive daytime sleepiness. The pathobiology of sleep disorders in TBI, however, is not well understood, and animal models have been underused in studying such changes and potential underlying mechanisms. We used the rat lateral fluid percussion (LFP) model to analyze sleep-wake patterns as a function of time after injury. Rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep, non-REM (NREM) sleep, and wake bouts during light and dark phases were measured with electroencephalography and electromyography at an early as well as chronic time points after LFP. Moderate TBI caused disturbances in the ability to maintain consolidated wake bouts during the active phase and chronic loss of wakefulness. Further, TBI resulted in cognitive impairments and depressive-like symptoms, and reduced the number of orexin-A-positive neurons in the lateral hypothalamus.

  18. Dynamic wake prediction and visualization with uncertainty analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holforty, Wendy L. (Inventor); Powell, J. David (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A dynamic wake avoidance system utilizes aircraft and atmospheric parameters readily available in flight to model and predict airborne wake vortices in real time. A novel combination of algorithms allows for a relatively simple yet robust wake model to be constructed based on information extracted from a broadcast. The system predicts the location and movement of the wake based on the nominal wake model and correspondingly performs an uncertainty analysis on the wake model to determine a wake hazard zone (no fly zone), which comprises a plurality of wake planes, each moving independently from another. The system selectively adjusts dimensions of each wake plane to minimize spatial and temporal uncertainty, thereby ensuring that the actual wake is within the wake hazard zone. The predicted wake hazard zone is communicated in real time directly to a user via a realistic visual representation. In an example, the wake hazard zone is visualized on a 3-D flight deck display to enable a pilot to visualize or see a neighboring aircraft as well as its wake. The system substantially enhances the pilot's situational awareness and allows for a further safe decrease in spacing, which could alleviate airport and airspace congestion.

  19. Lagrangian structures and mixing in the wake of a streamwise oscillating cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagney, N.; Balabani, S.

    2016-04-01

    Lagrangian analysis is capable of revealing the underlying structure and complex phenomena in unsteady flows. We present particle-image velocimetry measurements of the wake of a cylinder undergoing streamwise vortex-induced vibrations and calculate the Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponents (FTLE) in backward- and forward-time. The FTLE fields are compared to the phase-averaged vorticity fields for the four different wake modes observed while the cylinder experiences streamwise vortex-induced vibrations. The backward-time FTLE fields characterise the formation of vortices, with the roll up of spiral-shaped ridges coinciding with the roll up of the shear layers to form the vortices. Ridges in the forward-time fields tend to lie perpendicular to the flow direction and separate nearby vortices. The shedding of vortices coincides with a "peel off" process in the forward-time FTLE fields, in which a ridge connected to the cylinder splits into two strips, one of which moves downstream. Particular attention is given to the "wake breathing" process, in which the streamwise motion of the cylinder causes both shear layers to roll up simultaneously and two vortices of opposite sign to be shed into the wake. In this case, the ridges in forward-time FTLE fields are shown to define "vortex cells," in which the new vortices form, and the FTLE fields allow the wake to be decomposed into three distinct regions. Finally, the mixing associated with each wake mode is examined, and it is shown that cross-wake mixing is significantly enhanced when the vibration amplitude is large and the vortices are shed alternately. However, while the symmetric shedding induces large amplitude vibrations, no increase in mixing is observed relative to the von Kármán vortex street observed behind near-stationary bodies.

  20. Characterization of wake effects and loading status of wind turbine arrays under different inflow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiangyu

    The objective of the present work is to improve the accuracy of Actuator Line Modeling (ALM) in predicting the unsteady aerodynamic loadings on turbine blades and turbine wake by assessing different methods used to determine the relative velocity between the rotating blades and wind. ALM is incorporated into a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) solver in OpenFOAM (Open Field Operations and Manipulations). The aerodynamic loadings are validated by experiment results from National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Turbine wakes are validated by predictions of large eddy simulation using exact 3D blade geometries from a two-blade NREL Phase VI turbine. Three different relative velocity calculation methods are presented: iterative process in Blade Element Momentum (BEM) theory, local velocity sampling, and Lagrange-Euler Interpolation (LEI). Loadings and wakes obtained from these three methods are compared. It is discovered that LEI functions better than the conventional BEM with iterative process in both loading and wake prediction. Then LES-ALM with LEI is performed on a small wind farm deploying five NREL Phase VI turbines in full wake setting. The power outputs and force coefficients of downstream turbines are evaluated. The LES-ALM with LEI is also performed on a small wind farm deploying 25 NREL Phase VI turbines with different inflow angles (from full wake setting to partial wake setting). The power outputs and force coefficients of each turbine are evaluated under different inflow angles (the angle the rotor has to turn to make the rotor plane face the incoming wind) (0, 5, 15, 30 and 45 degree). The power coefficient distributions and thrust coefficient distributions of the wind farm under each inflow angle are compared. The range of inflow angle which is best for power generation is also discussed. The results demonstrate that the LES-ALM with LEI has the potential to optimize wind farm arrangement and pitch angle of individual turbines.

  1. Wake Dynamics in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Over Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markfort, Corey D.

    The goal of this research is to advance our understanding of atmospheric boundary layer processes over heterogeneous landscapes and complex terrain. The atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) is a relatively thin (˜ 1 km) turbulent layer of air near the earth's surface, in which most human activities and engineered systems are concentrated. Its dynamics are crucially important for biosphere-atmosphere couplings and for global atmospheric dynamics, with significant implications on our ability to predict and mitigate adverse impacts of land use and climate change. In models of the ABL, land surface heterogeneity is typically represented, in the context of Monin-Obukhov similarity theory, as changes in aerodynamic roughness length and surface heat and moisture fluxes. However, many real landscapes are more complex, often leading to massive boundary layer separation and wake turbulence, for which standard models fail. Trees, building clusters, and steep topography produce extensive wake regions currently not accounted for in models of the ABL. Wind turbines and wind farms also generate wakes that combine in complex ways to modify the ABL. Wind farms are covering an increasingly significant area of the globe and the effects of large wind farms must be included in regional and global scale models. Research presented in this thesis demonstrates that wakes caused by landscape heterogeneity must be included in flux parameterizations for momentum, heat, and mass (water vapor and trace gases, e.g. CO2 and CH4) in ABL simulation and prediction models in order to accurately represent land-atmosphere interactions. Accurate representation of these processes is crucial for the predictions of weather, air quality, lake processes, and ecosystems response to climate change. Objectives of the research reported in this thesis are: 1) to investigate turbulent boundary layer adjustment, turbulent transport and scalar flux in wind farms of varying configurations and develop an improved

  2. Infrared imaging simulation and detection of ship wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li; Chen, Xuan; Chang, Shizheng; Xu, Enchi; Wang, Xingyu; Wang, Ye; Zhao, Xiaolong; Du, Yongchen; Kou, Wei; Fan, Chunli

    2015-10-01

    The thermal wake would be formed owing to the cooling water or exhaust heat discharged by ship, and the cold wake could be formed by the cool water in the lower part of sea stirred up by the ship propeller or vortexes. Owing to the difference of surface temperature and emissivity between the ship wake and the surrounding ocean the ship wake will be easily detected by the infrared detecting system. The wave of wake also could be detected by the difference of reflected radiance between the background and the Kelvin wake of ship. In this paper the simulating models of infrared imaging of ship wake are developed based on the selfradiation of wake, the reflected radiance of the sky and sun and the transmitted radiance of atmosphere, and the infrared imaging signatures of ship wake are investigated. The results show that the infrared imaging signatures of ship wake can be really simulated by the models proposed in this paper. The effects of the detecting height, the angle of view, the NETD of detector and the temperature of wake on the infrared imaging signatures of ship wake are studied. The temperature difference between the ship wake and surrounding ocean is a main fact which effects on the detecting distance. The infrared imaging signatures of ship wake in 8-14μm wave band is stronger than that in 2-5μm wave band whenever the temperature of ship wake is warmer or cooler than the surrounding ocean. Further, the infrared imaging of thermal wake is investigated in the homogenous water and temperature stratified water at different speed of a ship and different flow rate and depth of the discharged water in a water tank. The spreading and decaying laws of infrared signature of ship wake are obtained experimentally. The results obtained in this paper have an important application in the infrared remote sensing of ship wake.

  3. The wake of hovering flight in bats.

    PubMed

    Håkansson, Jonas; Hedenström, Anders; Winter, York; Johansson, L Christoffer

    2015-08-01

    Hovering means stationary flight at zero net forward speed, which can be achieved by animals through muscle powered flapping flight. Small bats capable of hovering typically do so with a downstroke in an inclined stroke plane, and with an aerodynamically active outer wing during the upstroke. The magnitude and time history of aerodynamic forces should be reflected by vorticity shed into the wake. We thus expect hovering bats to generate a characteristic wake, but this has until now never been studied. Here we trained nectar-feeding bats, Leptonycteris yerbabuenae, to hover at a feeder and using time-resolved stereoscopic particle image velocimetry in conjunction with high-speed kinematic analysis we show that hovering nectar-feeding bats produce a series of bilateral stacked vortex loops. Vortex visualizations suggest that the downstroke produces the majority of the weight support, but that the upstroke contributes positively to the lift production. However, the relative contributions from downstroke and upstroke could not be determined on the basis of the wake, because wake elements from down- and upstroke mix and interact. We also use a modified actuator disc model to estimate lift force, power and flap efficiency. Based on our quantitative wake-induced velocities, the model accounts for weight support well (108%). Estimates of aerodynamic efficiency suggest hovering flight is less efficient than forward flapping flight, while the overall energy conversion efficiency (mechanical power output/metabolic power) was estimated at 13%.

  4. Inlet Guide Vane Wakes Including Rotor Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, R. T.; Fleeter, S.

    2001-02-01

    Fundamental experiments are described directed at the investigation of forcing functions generated by an inlet guide vane (IGV) row, including interactions with the downstream rotor, for application to turbomachine forced response design systems. The experiments are performed in a high-speed research fan facility comprised of an IGV row upstream of a rotor. IGV-rotor axial spacing is variable, with the IGV row able to be indexed circumferentially, thereby allowing measurements to be made across several IGV wakes. With an IGV relative Mach number of 0.29, measurements include the IGV wake pressure and velocity fields for three IGV-rotor axial spacings. The decay characteristics of the IGV wakes are compared to the Majjigi and Gliebe empirical correlations. After Fourier decomposition, a vortical-potential gust splitting analysis is implemented to determine the vortical and potential harmonic wake gust forcing functions both upstream and downstream of the rotor. Higher harmonics of the vortical gust component of the IGV wakes are found to decay at a uniform rate due to viscous diffusion.

  5. The wake of hovering flight in bats.

    PubMed

    Håkansson, Jonas; Hedenström, Anders; Winter, York; Johansson, L Christoffer

    2015-08-01

    Hovering means stationary flight at zero net forward speed, which can be achieved by animals through muscle powered flapping flight. Small bats capable of hovering typically do so with a downstroke in an inclined stroke plane, and with an aerodynamically active outer wing during the upstroke. The magnitude and time history of aerodynamic forces should be reflected by vorticity shed into the wake. We thus expect hovering bats to generate a characteristic wake, but this has until now never been studied. Here we trained nectar-feeding bats, Leptonycteris yerbabuenae, to hover at a feeder and using time-resolved stereoscopic particle image velocimetry in conjunction with high-speed kinematic analysis we show that hovering nectar-feeding bats produce a series of bilateral stacked vortex loops. Vortex visualizations suggest that the downstroke produces the majority of the weight support, but that the upstroke contributes positively to the lift production. However, the relative contributions from downstroke and upstroke could not be determined on the basis of the wake, because wake elements from down- and upstroke mix and interact. We also use a modified actuator disc model to estimate lift force, power and flap efficiency. Based on our quantitative wake-induced velocities, the model accounts for weight support well (108%). Estimates of aerodynamic efficiency suggest hovering flight is less efficient than forward flapping flight, while the overall energy conversion efficiency (mechanical power output/metabolic power) was estimated at 13%. PMID:26179990

  6. Wake Vortex Study at Wallops Island

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The air flow from the wing of this agricultural plane is made by a technique that uses colored smoke rising from the ground. The swirl at the wingtip traces the aircraft's wake vortex, which exerts a powerful influence on the flow field behind the plane. Because of wake vortex, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) requires aircraft to maintain set distances behind each other when they land. A joint NASA-FAA program aimed at boosting airport capacity, however, is aimed at determining conditions under which planes may fly closer together. NASA researchers are studying wake vortex with a variety of tools, from supercomputers to wind tunnels to actual flight tests in research aircraft. Their goal is to fully understand the phenomenon, then use that knowledge to create an automated system that could predict changing wake vortex conditions at airports. Pilots already know, for example, that they have to worry less about wake vortex in rough weather because windy conditions cause them to dissipate more rapidly.

  7. DIELECTRIC WAKE FIELD RESONATOR ACCELERATOR MODULE

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2013-11-06

    Results are presented from experiments, and numerical analysis of wake fields set up by electron bunches passing through a cylindrical or rectangular dielectric-lined structure. These bunches excite many TM-modes, with Ez components of the wake fields sharply localized on the axis of the structure periodically behind the bunches. The experiment with the cylindrical structure, carried out at ATF Brookhaven National Laboratory, used up to three 50 MeV bunches spaced by one wake field period (21 cm) to study the superposition of wake fields by measuring the energy loss of each bunch after it passed through the 53-cm long dielectric element. The millimeter-wave spectrum of radiation excited by the passage of bunches is also studied. Numerical analysis was aimed not only to simulate the behavior of our device, but in general to predict dielectric wake field accelerator performance. It is shown that one needs to match the radius of the cylindrical dielectric channel with the bunch longitudinal rms-length to achieve optimal performance.

  8. The wake of hovering flight in bats

    PubMed Central

    Håkansson, Jonas; Hedenström, Anders; Winter, York; Johansson, L. Christoffer

    2015-01-01

    Hovering means stationary flight at zero net forward speed, which can be achieved by animals through muscle powered flapping flight. Small bats capable of hovering typically do so with a downstroke in an inclined stroke plane, and with an aerodynamically active outer wing during the upstroke. The magnitude and time history of aerodynamic forces should be reflected by vorticity shed into the wake. We thus expect hovering bats to generate a characteristic wake, but this has until now never been studied. Here we trained nectar-feeding bats, Leptonycteris yerbabuenae, to hover at a feeder and using time-resolved stereoscopic particle image velocimetry in conjunction with high-speed kinematic analysis we show that hovering nectar-feeding bats produce a series of bilateral stacked vortex loops. Vortex visualizations suggest that the downstroke produces the majority of the weight support, but that the upstroke contributes positively to the lift production. However, the relative contributions from downstroke and upstroke could not be determined on the basis of the wake, because wake elements from down- and upstroke mix and interact. We also use a modified actuator disc model to estimate lift force, power and flap efficiency. Based on our quantitative wake-induced velocities, the model accounts for weight support well (108%). Estimates of aerodynamic efficiency suggest hovering flight is less efficient than forward flapping flight, while the overall energy conversion efficiency (mechanical power output/metabolic power) was estimated at 13%. PMID:26179990

  9. Wake imaging system applications at the Boeing Aerodynamics Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowder, O. P.

    1985-10-01

    The wake imaging system (WIS) for rapid mappings of wind-tunnel model flowfields is described and a summary of recent results is presented. Three different types of systems are discussed. These are: (1) photographic WIS in low-speed wind tunnels, (2) computer graphics WIS in transonic wind tunnels, and (3) flying-strut traverser for large low-speed wind tunnels. In addition, progress toward developing a low intrusive WIS for high-pressure transonic wind tunnels and for flight test applications is described.

  10. Evidence that aerodynamic effects, including dynamic stall, dictate HAWT structural loads and power generation in highly transient time frames

    SciTech Connect

    Shipley, D.E.; Miller, M.S.; Robinson, M.C.; Luttges, M.W.; Simms, D.A.

    1994-08-01

    Aerodynamic data collected from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory`s Combined Experiment have shown three distinct performance regimes when the turbine is operated under relatively steady flow conditions. Operating at blade angles of attack below static stall, excellent agreement is achieved with two-dimensional wind tunnel data. Around the static stall angle, the cycle average normal force produced is greater than the static test data. Span locations near the hub produce extremely large values of normal force coefficient, well in excess of the two-dimensional data results. These performance regimes have been shown to be a function of the three-dimensional flow structure and cycle averaged dynamic stall effects. Power generation and root bending moments have also been shown to be directly dependent on the inflow wind velocity. Aerodynamic data, including episodes of dynamic stall, have been correlated on a cycle by cycle basis with the structural and power generation characteristics of a horizontal axis wind turbine. Instantaneous unsteady forces and resultant power generation indicate that peak transient levels can significantly exceed cycle averaged values. Strong coupling between transient aerodynamic and resonant response of the turbine was also observed. These results provide some initial insight into the contribution of unsteady aerodynamics on undesirable turbine structural response and fatigue life.

  11. Evidence that aerodynamic effects, including dynamic stall, dictate HAWT structural loads and power generation in highly transient time frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipley, D. E.; Miller, M. S.; Robinson, M. C.; Luttges, M. W.; Simms, D. A.

    1994-08-01

    Aerodynamic data collected from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Combined Experiment have shown three distinct performance regimes when the turbine is operated under relatively steady flow conditions. Operating at blade angles of attack below static stall, excellent agreement is achieved with two-dimensional wind tunnel data. Around the static stall angle, the cycle average normal force produced is greater than the static test data. Span locations near the hub produce extremely large values of normal force coefficient, well in excess of the two-dimensional data results. These performance regimes have been shown to be a function of the three-dimensional flow structure and cycle averaged dynamic stall effects. Power generation and root bending moments have also been shown to be directly dependent on the inflow wind velocity. Aerodynamic data, including episodes of dynamic stall, have been correlated on a cycle by cycle basis with the structural and power generation characteristics of a horizontal axis wind turbine. Instantaneous unsteady forces and resultant power generation indicate that peak transient levels can significantly exceed cycle averaged values. Strong coupling between transient aerodynamic and resonant response of the turbine was also observed. These results provide some initial insight into the contribution of unsteady aerodynamics on undesirable turbine structural response and fatigue life.

  12. A numerical study of wind turbine wakes under various atmospheric stability conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Shengbai

    The goal of this research is to investigate the properties of wind turbine wakes and their interactions with the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) via large-eddy simulations (LES) with special emphasis on the effects of atmospheric stability. The ABL is considered stable when the ground surface is cooler than the air, unstable when the opposite happens, and neutral when the temperature effect is negligible. In the literature, neutral conditions have been studied extensively, whereas the effects of stability have not. A new LES code, named Wind Turbine and Turbulence Simulator (WiTTS), was developed based on finite-difference (FD) schemes. First, the code's sensitivity to numerous aspects of the FD LES, such as the subgrid-scale (SGS) model, resolution, numerical treatment of the convective term, and filter types, was analyzed by simulating a neutral ABL. It was found that the Lagrangian-averaged scale-dependent (LASD) SGS model performs better than other scale-invariant Smagorinsky-type models. Second, the WiTTS was used to study the wakes from a miniature wind turbine inside a wind tunnel, following the setup of past experimental and numerical studies. It was found that those wakes are spatially anisotropic, with lateral growth faster than the vertical. Based on this, a new wake model is proposed and the Gaussian-type self-similarity is obtained for this simplified scenario. Third, to study a more realistic ABL, the stability conditions have been considered by the Boussinesq approximation and by varying thermal conditions on the ground surface, together with a constant Coriolis force. The LES results indicate that the properties of utility-scale wind turbine wakes are strongly correlated to the stability conditions. The wake recovery is enhanced by the increased turbulence due to buoyant convection in the unstable ABL, while in the stable ABL the spreading of the wake is significantly larger in the lateral direction than in the vertical direction. The stability

  13. A numerical investigation of the wake structure of vertical axis wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaras, Elias; Posa, Antonio; Leftwich, Megan

    2014-11-01

    Recent field-testing has shown that vertical axis wind turbines (VAWT) in wind farm configurations have the potential to reach higher power densities, when compared to the more widespread horizontal axis turbines. A critical component in achieving this goal is a good understanding of the wake structure and how it is influenced by operating conditions. In the present study the Large-Eddy Simulation technique is adopted to characterize the wake of a small vertical axis wind turbine and to explore its dependence on the value of its Tip Speed Ratio (TSR). It will be shown that its wake significantly differs from that of a spinning cylinder, often adopted to model this typology of machines: the displacement of the momentum deficit towards the windward side follows the same behavior, but turbulence is higher on the leeward side. An initial increase of the momentum deficit is observed moving downstream, with central peaks in the core of the near wake for both momentum and turbulent kinetic energy, especially at lower TSRs. No back-flow is produced downstream of the turbine. The interaction between blades is stronger at higher values of the TSR, while the production of coherent structures is enhanced at lower TSRs, with large rollers populating the leeward side of the wake.

  14. Photon acceleration in plasma wake wave

    SciTech Connect

    Bu, Zhigang; Shen, Baifei Yi, Longqing; Zhang, Hao; Huang, Shan; Li, Shun

    2015-04-15

    The photon acceleration effect in a laser wake field is investigated based on photon Hamiltonian dynamics. A test laser pulse is injected into a plasma wave at an incident angle θ{sub i}, which could slow down the photon velocity along the propagating direction of the wake wave so as to increase the acceleration distance for the photons. The photon trapping condition is analyzed in detail, and the maximum frequency shift of the trapped photon is obtained. The acceleration gradient and dephasing length are emphatically studied. The compression of the test laser pulse is examined and used to interpret the acceleration process. The limit of finite transverse width of the wake wave on photon acceleration is also discussed.

  15. Circadian Rhythm Sleep-Wake Disorders.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Sabra M; Reid, Kathryn J; Zee, Phyllis C

    2015-12-01

    The circadian system regulates the timing and expression of nearly all biological processes, most notably, the sleep-wake cycle, and disruption of this system can result in adverse effects on both physical and mental health. The circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders (CRSWDs) consist of 5 disorders that are due primarily to pathology of the circadian clock or to a misalignment of the timing of the endogenous circadian rhythm with the environment. This article outlines the nature of these disorders, the association of many of these disorders with psychiatric illness, and available treatment options.

  16. Ship wake detection by Raman lidar.

    PubMed

    Bunkin, Alexey F; Klinkov, Vladimir K; Lukyanchenko, Vladislav A; Pershin, Sergey M

    2011-02-01

    We carried out a remote study of ship wakes by optical methods. Both Mie and Raman scattering signals and their evolution were simultaneously recorded by gated detector (intensified CCD). The Mie scattering signal was detectable within 1 min after water disturbance by a high-speed boat. According to an approximation of experimental data, Raman signal fluctuations can be detected for a much longer time under the same conditions. We have demonstrated that Raman spectroscopy is substantially more sensitive to water perturbation compared to conventional acoustic (sonar) technique and can be used for ship wake detection and monitoring.

  17. Cylinder wakes in flowing soap films

    SciTech Connect

    Vorobieff, P.; Ecke, R.E. ); Vorobieff, P. )

    1999-09-01

    We present an experimental characterization of cylinder wakes in flowing soap films. From instantaneous velocity and thickness fields, we find the vortex-shedding frequency, mean-flow velocity, and mean-film thickness. Using the empirical relationship between the Reynolds and Strouhal numbers obtained for cylinder wakes in three dimensions, we estimate the effective soap-film viscosity and its dependence on film thickness. We also compare the decay of vorticity with that in a simple Rankine vortex model with a dissipative term to account for air drag. [copyright] [ital 1999] [ital The American Physical Society

  18. Roughness Effects on Wind-Turbine Wake Dynamics in a Boundary-Layer Wind Tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlas, E.; Buckingham, S.; van Beeck, J.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing demand in wind energy has resulted in increasingly clustered wind farms, and raised the interest in wake research dramatically in the last couple of years. To this end, the present work employs an experimental approach with scaled three-bladed wind-turbine models in a large boundary-layer wind-tunnel. Time-resolved measurements are carried out with a three-component hot-wire anemometer in the mid-vertical plane of the wake up to a downstream distance of eleven turbine diameters. The major issue addressed is the wake dynamics i.e. the flow and turbulence characteristics as well as spectral content under two different neutral boundary-layer inflow conditions. The wind tunnel is arranged with and without roughened surfaces in order to mimic moderately rough and smooth conditions. The inflow characterization is carried out by using all three velocity components, while the rest of the study is focused on the streamwise component's evolution. The results show an earlier wake recovery, i.e. the velocity deficit due to the turbine is less persistent for the rough case due to higher incoming turbulence levels. This paves the way for enhanced mixing from higher momentum regions of the boundary layer towards the centre of the wake. The investigation on the turbulent shear stresses is in line with this observation as well. Moreover, common as well as distinguishing features of the turbulent-scales evolution are detected for rough and smooth inflow boundary-layer conditions. Wake meandering disappears for rough inflow conditions but persists for smooth case with a Strouhal number similar to that of a solid disk wake.

  19. Vortex-wake interactions of a flapping foil that models animal swimming and flight.

    PubMed

    Lentink, David; Muijres, Florian T; Donker-Duyvis, Frits J; van Leeuwen, Johan L

    2008-01-01

    The fluid dynamics of many swimming and flying animals involves the generation and shedding of vortices into the wake. Here we studied the dynamics of similar vortices shed by a simple two-dimensional flapping foil in a soap-film tunnel. The flapping foil models an animal wing, fin or tail in forward locomotion. The vortical flow induced by the foil is correlated to (the resulting) thickness variations in the soap film. We visualized these thickness variations through light diffraction and recorded it with a digital high speed camera. This set-up enabled us to study the influence of foil kinematics on vortex-wake interactions. We varied the dimensionless wavelength of the foil (lambda*=4-24) at a constant dimensionless flapping amplitude (A*=1.5) and geometric angle of attack amplitude (A(alpha,geo)=15 degrees ). The corresponding Reynolds number was of the order of 1000. Such values are relevant for animal swimming and flight. We found that a significant leading edge vortex (LEV) was generated by the foil at low dimensionless wavelengths (lambda*<10). The LEV separated from the foil for all dimensionless wavelengths. The relative time (compared with the flapping period) that the unstable LEV stayed above the flapping foil increased for decreasing dimensionless wavelengths. As the dimensionless wavelength decreased, the wake dynamics evolved from a wavy von Kármán-like vortex wake shed along the sinusoidal path of the foil into a wake densely packed with large interacting vortices. We found that strongly interacting vortices could change the wake topology abruptly. This occurred when vortices were close enough to merge or tear each other apart. Our experiments show that relatively small changes in the kinematics of a flapping foil can alter the topology of the vortex wake drastically.

  20. Hub vortex instability and wake dynamics in axial flow wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foti, Daniel; Howard, Kevin; Yang, Xiaolei; Guala, Michele; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2014-11-01

    The near wake region of an axial flow wind turbine has two distinct shear layers: an outer tip vortex shear layer, which rotates in the same direction as the rotor, and an inner counter-rotating hub vortex shear layer. Recent simulations (Kang et al., J. Fluid Mech. 744, 376 (2014)), corroborated with experiments (Chamorro et al., J. Fluid Mech. 716, 658 (2013)), showed that the hub vortex can undergo spiral vortex breakdown immediately downstream of the turbine. The precessing hub vortex core intercepts and interacts with the tip vortex shear layer causing the large-scale wake meandering motions in the far wake to intensify. These results were obtained for an axial flow hydrokinetic turbine in a turbulent open channel flow. Here we integrate high-resolution LES with experiments to show that a hub vortex instability also occurs in the near wake of a wind turbine in a wind tunnel. We show that the interactions of the hub vortex with the outer flow have significant effects on the wake meandering amplitude and frequency. Our results reinforce the conclusions of Kang et al. (2014) that the hub vortex must be included in wake models to simulate wake interactions at the power plant scale and optimize turbine siting for realistic terrain and wind conditions. This work was supported by DOE (DE-EE0002980, DE-EE0005482 and DE-AC04-94AL85000), the NSF (IIP-1318201), the IREE early career award (UMN) and NSF CAREER: Geophysical Flow Control (CBET-1351303). Computational resources were provided by MSI.

  1. NOWVIV - Nowcasting wake vortex impact variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tafferner, A.; Birke, L.; Frech, M.

    2003-04-01

    A central task of the ongoing DLR project "Wirbelschleppe" (Wake Vortex) is to forecast meteorological quantities which influence the behaviour of wake vortices of landing aircraft. In the first place these are wind, temperature and turbulence, resp. the vertical shear thereof, which impact the lateral drift and turbulent decay of wake vortices. For this purpose the nowcasting system NOWVIV has been developed at DLR. It combines operational forecasts of the Lokal Modell (LM; Doms and Schaettler 1999) of the German weather service DWD with a high-resolution forecasting system. For the latter, the NOAA/FSL version of the mesoscale model MM5 (Grell et al. 2000) has been adapted to particular sites. Orography, land use, and soil type have been generated from available data sources for a 80 km square domain centered on a particular airport with a horizontal resolution of 2.1 km. As a good representation of the boundary layer is of particular importance for predicting wake vortex impact variables, the vertical spacing of model layers has been selected rather small throughout the lower model atmosphere, starting with 20 m at the ground and increasing to about 60 m at 2 km height. NOWVIV delivers vertical profiles of vortex impact variables, which are used by the wake prediction model ``P2P'' developed at DLR (Holzaepfel 2002) to predict wake vortex behaviour. During the two field campaigns ``WakeOP'' and ``WakeTOUL'' in April/May 2001 and May/June 2002 which aimed at measuring (by lidar) and predicting wake vortex behaviour of landing aircraft, NOWVIV has been run in an operational mode for the airports of Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany) and Tarbes (France). A statistical evaluation of the NOWVIV forecasting performance during these campaigns achieved satisfactory results as compared to local measurements of wind and temperature from radio acoustic sounding instruments (Frech et al. 2002). However, there are uncertainties in the daily variation of the boundary layer. Also, the

  2. Shear layer approximation of Navier-Stokes steady equations for non-axisymmetric wind turbine wakes: Description, verification and first application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trabucchi, Davide; Vollmer, Lukas; Kühn, Martin

    2016-09-01

    The number of turbines installed in offshore wind farms has strongly increased in the last years and at the same time the need for more precise estimation of the wind farm efficiency. For this reason, the wind energy community could benefit from more accurate models for multiple wakes. Existing engineering models can only simulate single wakes, which are superimposed if they are interacting in a wind farm. This method is a practical solution, but it is not fully supported by a physical background. The limitation to single wakes is given by the assumption that the wake is axisymmetric. As alternative, we propose a new shear model which is based on the existing engineering wake models, but is extended to simulate also non- axisymmetric wakes. In this paper, we present the theoretical background of the model and two application cases. First, we proved that for axisymmetric wakes the new model is equivalent to a commonly used engineering model. Then, we evaluated the improvements of the new model for the simulation of a non-axisymmetric wake using a large eddy simulation as reference. The results encourage the further development of the model, and promise a successful application for the simulation of multiple wakes.

  3. A comparison of dispersion calculations in bluff body wakes using LES and unsteady RANS

    SciTech Connect

    Paschkewitz, J S

    2006-01-19

    Accurate modeling of the dispersion behavior of sprays or particles is critical for a variety of problems including combustion, urban pollution or release events, and splash and spray transport around heavy vehicles. Bluff body wakes are particularly challenging since these flows are both highly separated and strongly unsteady. Attempting to model the dispersion of droplets or particles interacting with bluff body wakes is even more difficult since small differences in the flow field encountered by particles can lead to large differences in the dispersion behavior. Particles with finite inertia can exhibit additional complicating effects such as preferential concentration. In this preliminary study, we consider the dispersion of solid particles in the wake of a rectangular plane at a Reynolds number (Re) of 10000 and that of droplets in the wake of a simplified tractor-trailer geometry at Re = 2 x 10{sup 6} using both the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) and Unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) turbulence modeling approaches. The calculations were performed using identical meshes for both the LES and URANS models. Particle stresses are not backcoupled to the carrier fluid velocity solution. In the case of the rectangular plane wake, the LES calculation predicts a finer-scale and more persistent wake structure than the URANS one; the resulting particle dispersion is considerably ({approx} 40%) underpredicted for low inertia particles. For the case of the simplified tractor-trailer geometry, although the LES is underresolved, similar trends are observed with strong differences in the vertical and horizontal dispersion of the smallest particles. These results suggest that it may be necessary to use LES to accurately capture the dispersion behavior of small, low inertia particles or droplets, but that URANS may be sufficient for problems in which only large particles with substantial inertia are of primary concern.

  4. Dynamics of wakes downstream of wind turbine towers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, M. H.; Wentz, W. H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The near field wakes downstream of circular cylinders and of 12 sided cylinders were surveyed in a wind tunnel. Local velocity and velocity deficit diagrams are presented. The variation of turbulence in the wake was surveyed and the frequency of the periodic component of wake motion was determined. Differences between wakes of circular cylinders and of 12 sided cylinders are discussed. Also effects of strakes, orientation of the 12 sided cylinders, and rounding of the corners are noted.

  5. A comparison of wake characteristics of model and prototype buildings in transverse winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, E., Jr.; Phataraphruk, P.; Chang, J.

    1978-01-01

    Previously measured mean velocity and turbulence intensity profiles in the wake of a 26.8-m long building 3.2 m high and transverse to the wind direction in an atmospheric boundary layer several hundred meters thick were compared with profiles at corresponding stations downstream of a 1/50-scale model on the floor of a large meteorological wind tunnel in a boundary layer 0.61 m in thickness. The validity of using model wake data to predict full scale data was determined. Preliminary results are presented which indicate that disparities result from differences in relative depth of logarithmic layers, surface roughness, and the proximity of upstream obstacles.

  6. Numerical study on bifurcations in the wake of a circular disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianzhi; Wu, Guang; Zhong, Wei; Liu, Minghou

    2014-05-01

    Using Large-eddy simulation (LES), the dynamics in the wake of a circular disk with an aspect ratio of d/w = 5 is numerically studied. The circular disk is normal to the main flow, and Reynolds number ranges from 115 to 300. The first bifurcation is confirmed for Re = 120, leading to the steady state mode with a reflectional symmetry and a double-thread wake extending to the downstream. The Hopf bifurcation is found for Re = 152, and the planar symmetry is lost, which is different from that observed in the sphere wake; it is called the "reflectional-symmetry-breaking (RSB)" mode and the hairpin vortices in this mode are always shedding in a fixed orientation. The third bifurcation is captured for Re = 166, which is named the "standing wave (SW)" mode; the planar symmetry lost in RSB mode is recovered and the hairpin vortices are shedding in the oppositely sided orientations, unlike the ones observed in the sphere wake. The fourth bifurcation, referred to as "zigzag (ZZ)" mode, is observed for Re = 265 and the planar symmetry is lost again; the hairpin vortices are shedding in an irregular orientation and propagating in a zigzagged way; and a few small-scale structures begin to appear. Three different vortex shedding regimes are found in RSB, SW and ZZ modes, respectively. Results show that the recirculation region plays a significant role in the mode transitions, and the stagnation point of recirculation zone is conjectured to be the initial region causing the wake instability.

  7. Numerical investigation of the near wake of generic space launcher systems at transonic and supersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Statnikov, V.; Glatzer, C.; Meiß, J.-H.; Meinke, M.; Schröder, W.

    2013-06-01

    Numerical simulations of the near wake of generic rocket configurations are performed at transonic and supersonic freestream conditions to improve the understanding of the highly intricate near wake structures. The Reynolds number in both flow regimes is 106 based on the main body diameter, i. e., specific freestream conditions of ESA's Ariane launcher trajectory. The geometry matches models used in experiments in the framework of the German Transregional Collaborative Research Center TRR40. Both axisymmetric wind tunnel models possess cylindrical sting supports, representing a nozzle to allow investigations of a less disturbed wake flow. A zonal approach consisting of a Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) and a large-eddy simulation (LES) is applied. It is shown that the highly unsteady transonic wake flow at Ma∞ = 0.7 is characterized by the expanding separated shear layer, while the Mach 6.0 wake is defined by a shock, expansion waves, and a recompression region. In both cases, an instantaneous view on the base characteristics reveals complex azimuthal flow structures even for axisymmetric geometries. The flow regimes are discussed by comparing the aerodynamic characteristics, such as the size of the recirculation region and the turbulent kinetic energy.

  8. Transient wake and trajectory of free falling cones with various apex angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yaqing; Hamed, Ali M.; Chamorro, Leonardo P.

    2015-11-01

    The early free-fall stages of cones with a density ratio 1.18 and apex angles of 30°, 45°, 60°, and 90° were studied using a wireless 3-axis gyroscope and accelerometer to describe the cone 3D motions, while the induced flow in the near wake was captured using particle image velocimetry. The Reynolds number based on the cone diameter and the velocity at which the cone reaches the first local velocity maximum is found to set the limit between two distinctive states. Before this Re is reached the departure from the vertical path and cone rotations are insignificant, while relatively rapid growth is observed after this Re. Sequences of vertical velocity, swirling strength, LES-decomposed velocity, and pressure fields shows the formation and growth of a large and initially symmetric recirculation bubble at the cone base and highlights the presence of a symmetric 3D vortex rollup dominating the near-wake in the early stages of the fall. Later, the shear layer at the edge of the wake manifests in the shedding of Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices that, due to the nature of the recirculation bubble, reorganize to constitute a part of the rollup. Later in the fall, the wake loses its symmetry and shows a high population of vortical structures leading to turbulence. The asymmetric wake leads to strong interactions between the flow field and the cone creating complex feedback loops.

  9. Rarefaction shock in the near wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diebold, D.; Hershkowitz, N.; Eliezer, S.

    1987-01-01

    Laboratory experiments and fluid theory find a stationary rarefaction shock in the near wake of an electrically grounded obstacle placed in a steady state, supersonic plasma flow. The shock is only found when two electron temperatures, differing by at least an order of magnitude, are present. These shocks are analogous to rarefaction shocks in plasma free expansions.

  10. Explicit expressions of impedances and wake functions

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; Bane, K,; /SLAC

    2010-10-01

    Sections 3.2.4 and 3.2.5 of the Handbook of Accelerator Physics and Engineering on Landau damping are combined and updated. The new addition includes impedances and wakes for multi-layer beam pipe, optical model, diffraction model, and cross-sectional transition.

  11. Wake County Public School System Design Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wake County Public School System, Raleigh, NC.

    The Wake County Public School System has published its guidelines for planning and design of functional, cost effective, and durable educational facilities that are attractive and enhance the students' educational experience. The guidelines present basic planning requirement and design criteria for the entire construction process, including: codes…

  12. Radiative Forcing Over Ocean by Ship Wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatebe, Charles K.; Wilcox, E.; Poudyal, R.; Wang, J.

    2011-01-01

    Changes in surface albedo represent one of the main forcing agents that can counteract, to some extent, the positive forcing from increasing greenhouse gas concentrations. Here, we report on enhanced ocean reflectance from ship wakes over the Pacific Ocean near the California coast, where we determined, based on airborne radiation measurements that ship wakes can increase reflected sunlight by more than 100%. We assessed the importance of this increase to climate forcing, where we estimated the global radiative forcing of ship wakes to be -0.00014 plus or minus 53% Watts per square meter assuming a global distribution of 32331 ships of size of greater than or equal to 100000 gross tonnage. The forcing is smaller than the forcing of aircraft contrails (-0.007 to +0.02 Watts per square meter), but considering that the global shipping fleet has rapidly grown in the last five decades and this trend is likely to continue because of the need of more inter-continental transportation as a result of economic globalization, we argue that the radiative forcing of wakes is expected to be increasingly important especially in harbors and coastal regions.

  13. Ram side of Wake Shield Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The ram side of the Wake Shield Facility (WSF) is in the grasp of the Space Shuttle Discovery's Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm in this 70mm frame. Clouds over the Atlantic Ocean and the blackness of space share the backdrop for the picture.

  14. Explicit Expressions of Impedances and Wake Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; Bane, K,; /SLAC

    2012-06-11

    Sections 3.2.4 and 3.2.5 of the Handbook of Accelerator Physics and Engineering on Landau damping are combined and updated. The new addition includes impedances and wakes for multi-layer beam pipe, optical model, diffraction model, and cross-sectional transition.

  15. [Analytic therapy by the wake-dream].

    PubMed

    Rocca, R E

    1985-12-01

    The author goes through process of treatment by Robert Desoille's Wake-Dream analysis in an effort to expose the psychodynamics involved. In the first place, he approaches the problem of commencement of therapy up to the constitution of the framework inherent to the Wake-Dream. This presupposes a peculiar dissociation into several "me"; and a work method that may be thought of as progressive set up of a "personal mythology", through the various method stages, which in turn entails the task of binding and integrating every temporal and spatial dimension of psychism. The technique's therapeutic mechanics are based essentially in this work method. He also deals with the problem of transference and resistance and with the segregation of process phases just as they arise in medicine. On the basis of a text by Freud and of the aforementioned criteria, he supports the "analytical" nature of the Wake-Dream (in a sense similar to the term in psychoanalysis), in spite of the fact that the latter is not derived from psychoanalysis and is completely different from it as regards technique. Wake-Dream and psychoanalysis are bradly coincident as far as theorical hypotheses supporting them are concerned.

  16. Transverse wake field simulations for the ILC acceleration structure

    SciTech Connect

    Solyak, N.; Lunin, A.; Yakovlev, V.; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    Details of wake potential simulation in the acceleration structure of ILC, including the RF cavities and input/HOM couplers are presented. Transverse wake potential dependence is described versus the bunch length. Beam emittance dilution caused by main and HOM couplers is estimated, followed by a discussion of possible structural modifications allowing a reduction of transverse wake potential.

  17. 32 CFR 707.10 - Wake illumination light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Wake illumination light. 707.10 Section 707.10... RESPECT TO ADDITIONAL STATION AND SIGNAL LIGHTS § 707.10 Wake illumination light. Naval vessels may display a white spot light located near the stern to illuminate the wake....

  18. Active Wake Redirection Control to Improve Energy Yield (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Churchfield, M. J.; Fleming, P.; DeGeorge, E.; Bulder, B; White, S. M.

    2014-10-01

    Wake effects can dramatically reduce the efficiency of waked turbines relative to the unwaked turbines. Wakes can be deflected, or 'redirected,' by applying yaw misalignment to the turbines. Yaw misalignment causes part of the rotor thrust vector to be pointed in the cross-stream direction, deflecting the flow and the wake. Yaw misalignment reduces power production, but the global increase in wind plant power due to decreased wake effect creates a net increase in power production. It is also a fairly simple control idea to implement at existing or new wind plants. We performed high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics simulations of the wake flow of the proposed Fishermen's Atlantic City Windfarm (FACW) that predict that under certain waking conditions, wake redirection can increase plant efficiency by 10%. This means that by applying wake redirection control, for a given watersheet area, a wind plant can either produce more power, or the same amount of power can be produced with a smaller watersheet area. With the power increase may come increased loads, though, due to the yaw misalignment. If misalignment is applied properly, or if layered with individual blade pitch control, though, the load increase can be mitigated. In this talk we will discuss the concept of wake redirection through yaw misalignment and present our CFD results of the FACW project. We will also discuss the implications of wake redirection control on annual energy production, and finally we will discuss plans to implement wake redirection control at FACW when it is operational.

  19. 32 CFR 707.10 - Wake illumination light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Wake illumination light. 707.10 Section 707.10... RESPECT TO ADDITIONAL STATION AND SIGNAL LIGHTS § 707.10 Wake illumination light. Naval vessels may display a white spot light located near the stern to illuminate the wake....

  20. 32 CFR 707.10 - Wake illumination light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Wake illumination light. 707.10 Section 707.10... RESPECT TO ADDITIONAL STATION AND SIGNAL LIGHTS § 707.10 Wake illumination light. Naval vessels may display a white spot light located near the stern to illuminate the wake....

  1. 32 CFR 707.10 - Wake illumination light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Wake illumination light. 707.10 Section 707.10... RESPECT TO ADDITIONAL STATION AND SIGNAL LIGHTS § 707.10 Wake illumination light. Naval vessels may display a white spot light located near the stern to illuminate the wake....

  2. Features of airplane vortex wake decay in cruise flight and in land proximity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosnyakov, I. S.; Sudakov, G. G.

    2016-10-01

    The cases of the vortex wake decay after the large aircraft are considered for the case of cruise flight and near the ground. It is shown that the scenarios of destruction process are principally different from each other. The physical features of the phenomenon are described and the two models for description of such phenomenon are compared.

  3. Wake modes of rotationally oscillating circular cylinder in cross-flow and its relationship with heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellappan, Prabu

    Wake formation is an important problem in engineering due to its effect on phenomena such as vortex induced vibrations and heat transfer. While prior work has focused on the wake formation due to vortex shedding from stationary, stream-wise, and transversely oscillating cylinders, limited information is available on the effect of rotary oscillations on wake formation. The relationship between wake formation and heat transfer is also not fully understood. Therefore, a series of experiments were conducted to determine the effect of rotationally oscillating cylinders on wake formation and its relationship with heat transfer. Experiments were carried out at Re = 150 and 750 in a water tunnel for oscillation frequencies from 0.67 to 3.5 times the natural shedding frequency and peak-to-peak oscillation amplitudes up to 320°. Experiments were performed at the lower Re using an unheated cylinder. Two sets of experiments were performed at the higher Re, one with the cylinder unheated and the other with the cylinder heated. Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV) was used to identify and map wake modes (coherent vortical structures in the wake) to various regions of the parameter space. Previously unknown wake modes that are synchronized over two and three times the forcing frequency were also discovered. Experiments were also performed at Re = 750 to measure the heat transfer rate for a large number of cases in the parameter space. Significant heat transfer enhancement was observed under certain forcing conditions and the regions of the parameter space where this occurs was found to correspond to locked-on wake mode regions. Other factors, such as the tangential velocity and the formation length were also found to affect the heat transfer under certain conditions.

  4. Effects of incoming surface wind conditions on the wake characteristics and dynamic wind loads acting on a wind turbine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Wei; Ozbay, Ahmet; Hu, Hui

    2014-12-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to examine the effects of incoming surface wind conditions on the wake characteristics and dynamic wind loads acting on a wind turbine model. The experimental study was performed in a large-scale wind tunnel with a scaled three-blade Horizontal Axial Wind Turbine model placed in two different types of Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) winds with distinct mean and turbulence characteristics. In addition to measuring dynamic wind loads acting on the model turbine by using a force-moment sensor, a high-resolution Particle Image Velocimetry system was used to achieve detailed flow field measurements to characterize the turbulent wake flows behind the model turbine. The measurement results reveal clearly that the discrepancies in the incoming surface winds would affect the wake characteristics and dynamic wind loads acting on the model turbine dramatically. The dynamic wind loads acting on the model turbine were found to fluctuate much more significantly, thereby, much larger fatigue loads, for the case with the wind turbine model sited in the incoming ABL wind with higher turbulence intensity levels. The turbulent kinetic energy and Reynolds stress levels in the wake behind the model turbine were also found to be significantly higher for the high turbulence inflow case, in comparison to those of the low turbulence inflow case. The flow characteristics in the turbine wake were found to be dominated by the formation, shedding, and breakdown of various unsteady wake vortices. In comparison with the case with relatively low turbulence intensities in the incoming ABL wind, much more turbulent and randomly shedding, faster dissipation, and earlier breakdown of the wake vortices were observed for the high turbulence inflow case, which would promote the vertical transport of kinetic energy by entraining more high-speed airflow from above to re-charge the wake flow and result in a much faster recovery of the velocity deficits in the

  5. Synergistic Effects of Turbine Wakes and Atmospheric Stability on Power Production at an Onshore Wind Farm

    SciTech Connect

    Wharton, S; Lundquist, J K; Marjanovic, N

    2012-01-25

    recovers to its inflow velocity is dependent on the amount ambient turbulence, the amount of wind shear, and topographical and structural effects. The maximum velocity deficit is estimated to occur at 1-2 D but can be longer under low levels of ambient turbulence. Our understanding of turbine wakes comes from wind tunnel experiments, field experiments, numerical simulations, and from studies utilizing both experimental and modeling methods. It is well documented that downwind turbines in multi-Megawatt wind farms often produce less power than upwind turbine rows. These wake-induced power losses have been estimated from 5% to up to 40% depending on the turbine operating settings (e.g., thrust coefficient), number of turbine rows, turbine size (e.g., rotor diameter and hub-height), wind farm terrain, and atmospheric flow conditions (e.g., ambient wind speed, turbulence, and atmospheric stability). Early work by Elliott and Cadogan suggested that power data for different turbulent conditions be segregated to distinguish the effects of turbulence on wind farm power production. This may be especially important for downwind turbines within wind farms, as chaotic and turbulent wake flows increase stress on downstream turbines. Impacts of stability on turbine wakes and power production have been examined for a flat terrain, moderate size (43 turbines) wind farm in Minnesota and for an offshore, 80 turbine wind farm off the coast of Denmark. Conzemius found it difficult to distinguish wakes (i.e., downwind velocity deficits) when the atmosphere was convective as large amounts of scatter were present in the turbine nacelle wind speed data. This suggested that high levels of turbulence broke-up the wake via large buoyancy effects, which are generally on the order of 1 km in size. On the other hand, they found pronounced wake effects when the atmosphere was very stable and turbulence was either suppressed or the length scale was reduced as turbulence in this case was mechanically

  6. PIV velocity measurements in the wake of an obstruction simulating a Taylor bubble in a duct

    SciTech Connect

    Vassallo, P.; Kumar, R.

    1997-06-01

    Mean velocity measurements in the wake of an obstruction simulating a Taylor bubble (or slug) have been obtained using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) in a duct. Two flow rates were established: one represented the flow behind a large gas slug rising in quiescent fluid and the other represented an idealized slug rising with a higher relative velocity, as typically found in higher void fraction churn-turbulent flow. The results indicate that, in a reference frame fixed to the slug, the flow around the sides of the slug behaves like wall bounded jets which eventually merge downstream of the slug. The ratio of wake volume to slug volume is nearly the same for both Reynolds numbers tested (i.e., 3.0 at Re = 3,628 and 2.9 at Re = 7.257) although the measurements suggest that the wake size decreases somewhat as the Reynolds number is increased.

  7. Wake-induced unsteady stagnation-region heat-transfer measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magari, P. J.; Lagraff, L. E.

    1992-01-01

    Results of an experimental investigation of wake-induced unsteady heat transfer in the stagnation region of a cylinder are presented. A quasi-steady representation of the stator/rotor interaction in a gas turbine using two stationary cylinders in crossflow is created. Time-averaged and time-resolved heat-transfer results are obtained over a wide range of Reynolds numbers at two Mach numbers: one incompressible and one transonic. The augmentation of the heat transfer in the stagnation region due to wake unsteadiness is documented by comparison with isolated cylinder tests. The time-averaged heat-transfer rate at the stagnation line, expressed in terms of the Frossling number, is found to reach a maximum independent of the Reynolds number. The power spectra and cross correlation of the heat-transfer signals in the stagnation region reveal the importance of large vortical structures shed from the upstream wake generator.

  8. [Simulation of UV spectra from the wake of a stony meteor in the upper atmosphere].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Da-wei; Chen, Bo

    2005-11-01

    For stony meteors thrusting through a region with an altitude between 100-90 km in the upper atmosphere at different initial geocentric velocities, the effective temperatures are calculated based on Sparrow's particle-collision theory. Assuming different mixture ratios, particle number densities of certain dominant components that might exist in the wake of a stony meteor at a velocity of 72 km x s(-1) are given. Using a large-scale spectral synthesis code called Cloudy, UV radiation within the 240-400 nm band of the wake of such a meteor is simulated, and relative intensities of several expected strong emission lines are predicted. Comparison shows that our prediction of the spectrum of a meteor wake, which has an effective temperature of 5 680 K and a fractional vapor pressure of 0.1 Pa, is fairly close to the observational results.

  9. A Study of the Development of Steady and Periodic Unsteady Turbulent Wakes Through Curved Channels at Positive, Zero, and Negative Streamwise Pressure Gradients, Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schobeiri, M. T.; John, J.

    1996-01-01

    The turbomachinery wake flow development is largely influenced by streamline curvature and streamwise pressure gradient. The objective of this investigation is to study the development of the wake under the influence of streamline curvature and streamwise pressure gradient. The experimental investigation is carried out in two phases. The first phase involves the study of the wake behind a stationary circular cylinder (steady wake) in curved channels at positive, zero, and negative streamwise pressure gradients. The mean velocity and Reynolds stress components are measured using a X-hot-film probe. The measured quantities obtained in probe coordinates are transformed to a curvilinear coordinate system along the wake centerline and are presented in similarity coordinates. The results of the steady wakes suggest strong asymmetry in velocity and Reynolds stress components. However, the velocity defect profiles in similarity coordinates are almost symmetrical and follow the same distribution as the zero pressure gradient straight wake. The results of Reynolds stress distributions show higher values on the inner side of the wake than the outer side. Other quantities, including the decay of maximum velocity defect, growth of wake width, and wake integral parameters, are also presented for the three different pressure gradient cases of steady wake. The decay rate of velocity defect is fastest for the negative streamwise pressure gradient case and slowest for the positive pressure gradient case. Conversely, the growth of the wake width is fastest for the positive streamwise pressure gradient case and slowest for the negative streamwise pressure gradient. The second phase studies the development of periodic unsteady wakes generated by the circular cylinders of the rotating wake generator in a curved channel at zero streamwise pressure gradient. Instantaneous velocity components of the periodic unsteady wakes, measured with a stationary X-hot-film probe, are analyzed by the

  10. Higher Education in Katrina's Wake

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Cheryl

    2005-01-01

    Anyone who has ever complained that colleges and universities are highly bureaucratic entities, almost inherently incapable of moving quickly, should be gratified by what we saw in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. With amazing swiftness, colleges and universities across the country--from large publics to small privates to community and…

  11. Study of the ablative effects on tektites: Atmosphere entry of a swarm of tektites. [shielding by hypersonic wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepri, P.; Chen, K. K.

    1977-01-01

    The large variety of ablation markings observed on recovered tektites lead to the previously proposed swarm wake model which states that the lead peripheral tektites bore the blunt of aerodynamic heating upon entry, and that the bulk of tektites in the wake enjoyed partial shielding at the expense of the leaders. Further considerations are presented in support of this model. Quantitative assessments indicate that wake shielding might indeed have provided for substantially less heating than would have been experienced by a tektite entering an undisturbed atmosphere along a similar trajectory. For the case of strong wake shielding it is even possible that the surface temperature of a falling tektite had barely reached its melting point. In the distribution of tektites, there is a size band (near R = 0.5 cm) which is least susceptible to melting.

  12. Application of laser velocimetry to aircraft wake-vortex measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciffone, D. L.; Orloff, K. L.

    1977-01-01

    The theory and use of a laser velocimeter that makes simultaneous measurements of vertical and longitudinal velocities while rapidly scanning a flow field laterally are described, and its direct application to trailing wake-vortex research is discussed. Pertinent measurements of aircraft wake-vortex velocity distributions obtained in a wind tunnel and water towing tank are presented. The utility of the velocimeter to quantitatively assess differences in wake velocity distributions due to wake dissipating devices and span loading changes on the wake-generating model is also demonstrated.

  13. Early results from the SWECS Rotor Wake Measurement Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, A. C.

    Tests were conducted to quantitatively measure the nature and extent of the far wake of a horizontal-axis wind turbine. The tests were conducted at the Department of Transportation, Transportation Test Center in Pueblo, Colorado using controlled velocity tests. Early results presented in this paper show the width and downwind extent of the mean velocity wake. The measured interdependence of the wake strength and SWECS power coefficient is also presented. It is shown that the mean velocity wake is detectable on the wake centerline 14 at rotor diameters from the rotor hub.

  14. Storm-centric view of Tropical Cyclone oceanic wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentemann, C. L.; Scott, J. P.; Smith, D.

    2012-12-01

    Tropical cyclones (TCs) have a dramatic impact on the upper ocean. Storm-generated oceanic mixing, high amplitude near-inertial currents, upwelling, and heat fluxes often warm or cool the surface ocean temperatures over large regions near tropical cyclones. These SST anomalies occur to the right (Northern Hemisphere) or left (Southern Hemisphere) of the storm track, varying along and across the storm track. These wide swaths of temperature change have been previously documented by in situ field programs as well as IR and visible satellite data. The amplitude, temporal and spatial variability of these surface temperature anomalies depend primarily upon the storm size, storm intensity, translational velocity, and the underlying ocean conditions. Tropical cyclone 'cold wakes' are usually 2 - 5 °C cooler than pre-storm SSTs, and persist for days to weeks. Since storms that occur in rapid succession typically follow similar paths, the cold wake from one storm can affect development of subsequent storms. Recent studies, on both warm and cold wakes, have mostly focused on small subsets of global storms because of the amount of work it takes to co-locate different data sources to a storm's location. While a number of hurricane/typhoon websites exist that co-locate various datasets to TC locations, none provide 3-dimensional temporal and spatial structure of the ocean-atmosphere necessary to study cold/warm wake development and impact. We are developing a global 3-dimensional storm centric database for TC research. The database we propose will include in situ data, satellite data, and model analyses. Remote Sensing Systems (RSS) has a widely-used storm watch archive which provides the user an interface for visually analyzing collocated NASA Quick Scatterometer (QuikSCAT) winds with GHRSST microwave SSTs and SSM/I, TMI or AMSR-E rain rates for all global tropical cyclones 1999-2009. We will build on this concept of bringing together different data near storm locations when

  15. Diminished tektite ablation in the wake of a swarm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepri, P.; Chen, K. K.; Okeefe, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Observations of ablation markings on tektite surfaces reveal that a large variation in aerodynamic heating must have occurred among the members of a swarm during atmospheric entry. In a few cases, the existence of jagged features indicates that these tektite surfaces may have barely reached the melting temperature. Such an observation seems to be incompatible with the necessarily large heating rates suffered by other tektites which exhibit the ring wave melt flow. A reconciliation is proposed in the form of a wake shielding model which is a natural consequence of swarm entry. Calculations indicate that the observed ablation variations are actually possible for swarm entry at greater than escape velocity. This aerodynamic conclusion provides support for the arguments favoring extraterrestrial origin of tektites.

  16. Proceedings of the NASA First Wake Vortex Dynamic Spacing Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creduer, Leonard (Editor); Perry, R. Brad (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    A Government and Industry workshop on wake vortex dynamic spacing systems was conducted on May 13-15, 1997, at the NASA Langley Research Center. The purpose of the workshop was to disclose the status of ongoing NASA wake vortex R&D to the international community and to seek feedback on the direction of future work to assure an optimized research approach. Workshop sessions examined wake vortex characterization and physics, wake sensor technologies, aircraft/wake encounters, terminal area weather characterization and prediction, and wake vortex systems integration and implementation. A final workshop session surveyed the Government and Industry perspectives on the NASA research underway and related international wake vortex activities. This document contains the proceedings of the workshop including the presenters' slides, the discussion following each presentation, the wrap-up panel discussion, and the attendees' evaluation feedback.

  17. Flow in the near wake of hemispherical parachute shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Jeffrey; Carnasciali, Maria-Isabel; Kandis, Mike

    2012-11-01

    A CFD study was conducted using ANSYS to investigate the pitch-stability of several hemispherical parachute geometries at varying Reynolds numbers. In actuality, the parachute itself is not a rigid body and large variations in the parachute geometry can occur due to the flexibility of the parachute fabric. This factor combined with flow through gaps/open areas provide for a much more complex wake than that of a simple bluff body like a disc or sphere. In some cases, Vortex Shedding or alternating vortices are generated which cause oscillations in the axial (i.e., drag force) and normal (i.e., lift force) forces that lead to pitching/oscillations. This study investigated the flow in the near wake of hemispherical parachute shapes (assumed to be rigid) having various sized gaps/open areas positioned at distinct locations to determine which designs resulted in ``less severe'' Vortex Shedding. The design features (i.e., size and location of the gaps) that provided the smallest variation/fluctuation in the normal forces were identified and compared to actual parachute designs.

  18. POD Analysis of Jet-Plume/Afterbody-Wake Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Nathan E.; Seiner, John M.; Jansen, Bernard J.; Gui, Lichuan; Sockwell, Shuan; Joachim, Matthew

    2009-11-01

    The understanding of the flow physics in the base region of a powered rocket is one of the keys to designing the next generation of reusable launchers. The base flow features affect the aerodynamics and the heat loading at the base of the vehicle. Recent efforts at the National Center for Physical Acoustics at the University of Mississippi have refurbished two models for studying jet-plume/afterbody-wake interactions in the NCPA's 1-foot Tri-Sonic Wind Tunnel Facility. Both models have a 2.5 inch outer diameter with a nominally 0.5 inch diameter centered exhaust nozzle. One of the models is capable of being powered with gaseous H2 and O2 to study the base flow in a fully combusting senario. The second model uses hi-pressure air to drive the exhaust providing an unheated representative flow field. This unheated model was used to acquire PIV data of the base flow. Subsequently, a POD analysis was performed to provide a first look at the large-scale structures present for the interaction between an axisymmetric jet and an axisymmetric afterbody wake. PIV and Schlieren data are presented for a single jet-exhaust to free-stream flow velocity along with the POD analysis of the base flow field.

  19. Dynamic modeling of a turbulent axisymmetric bluff-body wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigas, Georgios; Morgans, Aimee; Morrison, Jonathan

    2013-11-01

    En route to chaos the stable laminar wake past axisymmetric bluff bodies undergoes two well-documented transitions by increasing the Reynolds number: a steady bifurcation of the m = 1 azimuthal mode followed by an unsteady bifurcation with m = +/- 1 , the latter giving rise to periodic shedding of vortices with opposite signs, known as vortex shedding. In this study we present experimental evidence that these structures persist far from the critical points at high Reynolds numbers (Re = 2 ×105). We show that a low-order model based on the normal form describing the codimension-two bifurcation captures accurately the dynamic behavior of the large-scale coherent structures associated with the destabilized modes, if noise is appropriately accounted for in the model. The model is validated based on simultaneous aerodynamic force measurements on the base of an axisymmetric bullet-shaped body and Time-Resolved Stereo PIV in the near wake. Finally, we extend the model to include external forcing when periodic blowing and suction is applied at the base below the point of separation.

  20. Separation of circadian and wake duration-dependent modulation of EEG activation during wakefulness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cajochen, C.; Wyatt, J. K.; Czeisler, C. A.; Dijk, D. J.

    2002-01-01

    The separate contribution of circadian rhythmicity and elapsed time awake on electroencephalographic (EEG) activity during wakefulness was assessed. Seven men lived in an environmental scheduling facility for 4 weeks and completed fourteen 42.85-h 'days', each consisting of an extended (28.57-h) wake episode and a 14.28-h sleep opportunity. The circadian rhythm of plasma melatonin desynchronized from the 42.85-h day. This allowed quantification of the separate contribution of circadian phase and elapsed time awake to variation in EEG power spectra (1-32 Hz). EEG activity during standardized behavioral conditions was markedly affected by both circadian phase and elapsed time awake in an EEG frequency- and derivation-specific manner. The nadir of the circadian rhythm in alpha (8-12 Hz) activity in both fronto-central and occipito-parietal derivations occurred during the biological night, close to the crest of the melatonin rhythm. The nadir of the circadian rhythm of theta (4.5-8 Hz) and beta (20-32 Hz) activity in the fronto-central derivation was located close to the onset of melatonin secretion, i.e. during the wake maintenance zone. As time awake progressed, delta frequency (1-4.5 Hz) and beta (20-32 Hz) activity rose monotonically in frontal derivations. The interaction between the circadian and wake-dependent increase in frontal delta was such that the intrusion of delta was minimal when sustained wakefulness coincided with the biological day, but pronounced during the biological night. Our data imply that the circadian pacemaker facilitates frontal EEG activation during the wake maintenance zone, by generating an arousal signal that prevents the intrusion of low-frequency EEG components, the propensity for which increases progressively during wakefulness.

  1. Probing Neutrino Hierarchy and Chirality via Wakes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hong-Ming; Pen, Ue-Li; Chen, Xuelei; Inman, Derek

    2016-04-01

    The relic neutrinos are expected to acquire a bulk relative velocity with respect to the dark matter at low redshifts, and neutrino wakes are expected to develop downstream of the dark matter halos. We propose a method of measuring the neutrino mass based on this mechanism. This neutrino wake will cause a dipole distortion of the galaxy-galaxy lensing pattern. This effect could be detected by combining upcoming lensing surveys with a low redshift galaxy survey or a 21 cm intensity mapping survey, which can map the neutrino flow field. The data obtained with LSST and Euclid should enable us to make a positive detection if the three neutrino masses are quasidegenerate with each neutrino mass of ∼0.1  eV, and a future high precision 21 cm lensing survey would allow the normal hierarchy and inverted hierarchy cases to be distinguished, and even the right-handed Dirac neutrinos may be detectable.

  2. Introduction to wakefields and wake potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1989-01-01

    What are wakefields and wake potentials, and why are these concepts useful in the physics of linear accelerators and storage rings We approach this question by first reviewing the basic physical concepts which underlie the mathematical formalism. We then present a summary of the various techniques that have been developed to make detailed calculations of wake potentials. Finally, we give some applications to current problems of interest in accelerator physics. No attempt at completeness can be made in an introductory article of modest length. Rather, we try to give a broad overview and to list key references for more detailed study. It will also be apparent that the last chapter on this subject, with all the loose ends neatly tied up, has yet to be written. There are subtle points, there are controversial questions, and active calculations to resolve these questions are continuing at the time of this writing. 61 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Wake-up call: a bioterrorism exercise.

    PubMed

    Tyre, T E

    2001-12-01

    Operation Wake-Up Call was a simulated bioterrorism exercise conducted in Waukesha County, Wisconsin (Metropolitan Milwaukee) on November 6, 1999. The purpose of the exercise was to test and evaluate the emergency response capability of local municipal, county, state, federal, and reserve military agencies to a weapons of mass destruction terrorist act. The exercise simulated a biological agent (Bacillus anthracis spores) release, a hostage-taking event, and the management of multiple biological and conventional weapons casualties that overwhelmed local first responders' capability. The exercise involved local, county, state, and federal agencies in a joint operational environment featuring integrated command and control systems. This report describes the primary purpose, goals, and assumptions of the exercise and reports on the evaluation of Wake-Up Call by the participating agencies.

  4. Experimental Study of the Effects of Periodic Unsteady Wakes on Flow Separation in Low Pressure Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozturk, Burak; Schobeiri, Meinhard T.

    2009-01-01

    The present study, which is the first of a series of investigations of low pressure turbine (LPT) boundary layer aerodynamics, is aimed at providing detailed unsteady boundary layer flow information to understand the underlying physics of the inception, onset, and extent of the separation zone. A detailed experimental study on the behavior of the separation zone on the suction surface of a highly loaded LPT-blade under periodic unsteady wake flow is presented. Experimental investigations were performed on a large-scale, high-subsonic unsteady turbine cascade research facility with an integrated wake generator and test section unit. Blade Pak B geometry was used in the cascade. The wakes were generated by continuously moving cylindrical bars device. Boundary layer investigations were performed using hot wire anemometry at Reynolds number of 110,000, based on the blade suction surface length and the exit velocity, for one steady and two unsteady inlet flow conditions, with the corresponding passing frequencies, wake velocities, and turbulence intensities. The reduced frequencies cover the entire operation range of LP-turbines. In addition to the unsteady boundary layer measurements, blade surface pressure measurements were performed at Re = 50,000, 75,000, 100,000, 110,000, and 125,000. For each Reynolds number, surface pressure measurements are carried out at one steady and two periodic unsteady inlet flow conditions. Detailed unsteady boundary layer measurement identifies the onset and extension of the separation zone as well as its behavior under unsteady wake flow. The results, presented in ensemble-averaged and contour plot forms, help to understand the physics of the separation phenomenon under periodic unsteady wake flow.

  5. Wake flow pattern modified by small control cylinders at low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, C.-H.; Chiou, L.-C.; Chen, C.-C.

    2007-08-01

    Passive wake control behind a circular cylinder in uniform flow is studied by numerical simulation for ReD ranging from 80 to 300. Two small control cylinders, with diameter d/D=1/8, are placed at x/D=0.5 and y/D=±0.6. Unlike the 1990 results of Strykowski and Sreenivasan, in the present study, the vortex street behind the main cylinder still exists but the fluctuating lift and the form drag on the main cylinder reduces significantly and monotonously as the Reynolds number increases from 80 to 300. Obstruction of the control cylinders to the incoming flow deflects part of the fluid to pass through the gap between the main and control cylinders, forming two symmetric streams. These streams not only eliminate the flow separation along the rear surface of the main cylinder, they also merge toward the wake centerline to create an advancing momentum in the immediate near-wake region. These two effects significantly reduce the wake width behind the main cylinder and lead to monotonous decrease of the form drag as the Reynolds number increases. As the Reynolds number gets higher, a large amount of the downstream advancing momentum significantly delays the vortex formation farther downstream, leading to a more symmetric flow structure in the near-wake region of the main cylinder. As the Reynolds number increases from 80 to 300, both increasing symmetry of the flow structure in the near-wake and significant delay of the vortex formation are the main reasons for the fluctuating lift to decrease monotonously.

  6. Numerical investigation of transitional supersonic axisymmetric wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandberg, Richard D.; Fasel, Hermann F.

    2006-09-01

    Transitional supersonic axisymmetric wakes are investigated by conducting various numerical experiments. The main objective is to identify hydrodynamic instability mechanisms in the flow at M {=} 2.46 for several Reynolds numbers, and to relate these to coherent structures that are found from various visualization techniques. The premise for this approach is the assumption that flow instabilities lead to the formation of coherent structures. Three high-order accurate compressible codes were developed in cylindrical coordinates for this work: a spatial Navier Stokes (N-S) code to conduct direct numerical simulations (DNS), a linearized N-S code for linear stability investigations using axisymmetric basic states, and a temporal N-S code for performing local stability analyses. The ability of numerical simulations to exclude physical effects deliberately is exploited. This includes intentionally eliminating certain azimuthal/helical modes by employing DNS for various circumferential domain sizes. With this approach, the impact of structures associated with certain modes on the global wake-behaviour can be scrutinized. Complementary spatial and temporal calculations are carried out to investigate whether instabilities are of local or global nature. Circumstantial evidence is presented that absolutely unstable global modes within the recirculation region co-exist with convectively unstable shear-layer modes. The flow is found to be absolutely unstable with respect to modes k {>} 0 for Re_D {>} 5000 and with respect to the axisymmetric mode k {=} 0 for Re_D {>} 100 000. It is concluded that azimuthal modes k {=} 2 and k {=} 4 are the dominant modes in the trailing wake, producing a ‘four-lobe’ wake pattern. Two possible mechanisms responsible for the generation of longitudinal structures within the recirculation region are suggested.

  7. Wake Vortex Advisory System (WakeVAS) Evaluation of Impacts on the National Airspace System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jeremy C.; Dollyhigh, Samuel M.

    2005-01-01

    This report is one of a series that describes an ongoing effort in high-fidelity modeling/simulation, evaluation and analysis of the benefits and performance metrics of the Wake Vortex Advisory System (WakeVAS) Concept of Operations being developed as part of the Virtual Airspace Modeling and Simulation (VAMS) project. A previous study, determined the overall increases in runway arrival rates that could be achieved at 12 selected airports due to WakeVAS reduced aircraft spacing under Instrument Meteorological Conditions. This study builds on the previous work to evaluate the NAS wide impacts of equipping various numbers of airports with WakeVAS. A queuing network model of the National Airspace System, built by the Logistics Management Institute, Mclean, VA, for NASA (LMINET) was used to estimate the reduction in delay that could be achieved by using WakeVAS under non-visual meteorological conditions for the projected air traffic demand in 2010. The results from LMINET were used to estimate the total annual delay reduction that could be achieved and from this, an estimate of the air carrier variable operating cost saving was made.

  8. Periodic forcing of a Turbulent Axisymmetric Wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Jonathan; Qubain, Ala

    2008-11-01

    The near wake of a blunt, axisymmetric body subject to periodic forcing is investigated. A high-fidelity speaker located inside the cylinder is used to generate a pulsed jet from a small circumferential gap located on the underside of the separating boundary layer, with its axis aligned in the streamwise direction. A detailed investigation of the growth of the disturbances is performed using hot wires, PIV and base-pressure transducers. It is shown that, with azimuthal symmetric forcing (m =0), the base pressure may be reduced by 30% at ``low'' frequencies or increased by 10%, at ``high'' frequencies with consistent changes to the velocity field. As in previous, similar investigations, it is shown that the important scaling parameter is the boundary-layer momentum thickness at separation - in contrast to other geometries such as a 2D bluff body for example, where the von Kármán vortex shedding is universal, or control of separating-reattaching flows, where a range of actuation frequencies is often effective. Moreover, caution is required when comparing to other axisymmetric bodies because the wake is quite sensitive to boundary conditions and the nature of separation from the body. Many previous studies have demonstrated successful alterations of the wake of a 3D bluff body, all using passive geometric modifications.

  9. Relation of dreams to waking concerns.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Rosalind; Agargun, Mehmet Y; Kirkby, Jennifer; Friedman, Julie Kabat

    2006-03-30

    To test that dreams are influenced by the pre-sleep waking emotional concerns of the sleeper and have an effect on waking adaptation, 20 depressed and 10 control subjects, who were all going through a divorce, were enrolled in a repeated measures study lasting 5 months. A Current Concerns test was administered on three occasions before nights when every REM period was interrupted to record recalled mental content. The degree of waking concern about the ex-spouse correlated significantly with the number of dreams in which the former partner appeared as a dream character. Those who were in remission at the follow-up evaluation had a higher percentage of well-developed dreams than those who remained depressed. Dreams of the former spouse reported by those in remission differed from those who remained depressed in the expression of dream affect and in the within-dream linkage among units of associated memory material. Dreams of the former spouse that are reported by those who are not in remission lack affect and connection to other memories.

  10. Wake fields in SLAC Linac Collimators

    SciTech Connect

    Novokhatski, Alexander; Decker, F. -J.; Smith, H.; Sullivan, M.

    2014-12-02

    When a beam travels near collimator jaws, it gets an energy loss and a transverse kick due to the backreaction of the beam field diffracted from the jaws. The effect becomes very important for an intense short bunch when a tight collimation of the background beam halo is required. In the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC a collimation system is used to protect the undulators from radiation due to particles in the beam halo. The halo is most likely formed from gun dark current or dark current in some of the accelerating sections. However, collimators are also responsible for the generation of wake fields. The wake field effect from the collimators not only brings an additional energy jitter and change in the trajectory of the beam, but it also rotates the beam on the phase plane, which consequently leads to a degradation of the performance of the Free Electron Laser at the Linac Coherent Light Source. In this paper, we describe a model of the wake field radiation in the SLAC linac collimators. We use the results of a numerical simulation to illustrate the model. Based on the model, we derive simple formulas for the bunch energy loss and the average kick. In addition, we also present results from experimental measurements that confirm our model.

  11. The effect of space-charge and wake fields in the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Macridin, Alexandru; Spentzouris, Panagiotis; Amundson, James; Spentzouris, Linda; McCarron, Daniel; /IIT, Chicago

    2011-03-01

    We calculate the impedance and the wake functions for laminated structures with parallel-planes and circular geometries. We critically examine the approximations used in the literature for the coupling impedance in laminated chambers and find that most of them are not justified because the wall surface impedance is large. A comparison between the flat and the circular geometry impedance is presented. We use the wake fields calculated for the Fermilab Booster laminated magnets in realistic beam simulations using the Synergia code. We find good agreement between our calculation of the coherent tune shift at injection energy and the experimental measurements. In this paper we calculate the impedance and the wake functions for laminated structures with parallel-planes and circular geometries. First the coupling impedance is derived as a function of the wall surface impedance. Then the surface impedance is calculated by solving Maxwell's equations inside the lamination and the crack regions. We find that the commonly used resistive-wall approximations, good for metallic pipes with small surface impedance, are not valid in the laminated structures where the surface impedance is large. Realistic Synergia simulations of the Booster machine with wake fields predict transverse coherent tune shifts in good agreement with the experiment.

  12. Predictive simulation of wind turbine wake interaction with an adaptive lattice Boltzmann method for moving boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deiterding, Ralf; Wood, Stephen L.

    2015-11-01

    Operating horizontal axis wind turbines create large-scale turbulent wake structures that affect the power output of downwind turbines considerably. The computational prediction of this phenomenon is challenging as efficient low dissipation schemes are necessary that represent the vorticity production by the moving structures accurately and are able to transport wakes without significant artificial decay over distances of several rotor diameters. We have developed the first version of a parallel adaptive lattice Boltzmann method for large eddy simulation of turbulent weakly compressible flows with embedded moving structures that considers these requirements rather naturally and enables first principle simulations of wake-turbine interaction phenomena at reasonable computational costs. The presentation will describe the employed algorithms and present relevant verification and validation computations. For instance, power and thrust coefficients of a Vestas V27 turbine are predicted within 5% of the manufacturer's specifications. Simulations of three Vestas V27-225kW turbines in triangular arrangement analyze the reduction in power production due to upstream wake generation for different inflow conditions.

  13. Transition and Turbulence Modeling for Blunt-Body Wake Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nance, Robert P.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Hassan, H. A.

    1997-01-01

    Aerobraking has been proposed as an efficient means of decelerating spacecraft for planetary missions. Most current aerobrake designs feature a blunt forebody shielding the payload from the intense heat generated during atmospheric entry. Although this forebody will absorb the largest portion of the heat pulse, accurate prediction of heating in the near wake is of great importance, since large local heating values can occur at points of shear-layer impingement. In order to address the various issues associated with these blunt-body wake flowfields, the Advisory Group for Aerospace Research and Development (AGARD) formed Working Group 18 in 1992. One of the objectives of this activity was to examine real-gas effects in high-speed flow fields around a 70 deg. blunted cone. To date, many researchers have conducted experiments using this geometry in various facilities, such as the Large Energy National Shock (LENS) tunnel at Cubric/Calspan and the HEG shock tunnel at DLR-Goettingen. Several computational studies have also been conducted in concert with these tests. Many of the experimental results have indicated the possible presence of a transitional shear layer through a large increase in heat transfer downstream of the reattachment point. The presence of transition could in fact lead to much higher peak heating than if the separated flow is entirely laminar or turbulent. In the shock-tunnel tests, however, it is difficult to separate such viscous-flow phenomena from real-gas effects. In order to help make this distinction, Horvath et al. recently conducted a set of experiments in the NASA Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Tunnel, and compared the results to laminar Navier-Stokes calculations. They found heat-transfer distributions similar to those obtained in the high-enthalpy facilities, with the measured peak heating along the sting support markedly greater than that predicted by the laminar computations. These trends point to the need to find transitional and turbulent

  14. PIV measurements of near wake behind a U-grooved cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, H.-C.; Lee, S.-J.

    2003-08-01

    The flow structure around a circular cylinder with U-grooved surfaces has been investigated experimentally. The results were compared with that of a smooth cylinder having the same diameter. Drag force and turbulence statistics of wake behind each cylinder were measured for Reynolds numbers based on the cylinder diameter (/D=60mm) in the range ReD=8×103-1.4×105. At ReD=1.4×105, the U-type grooves reduce the drag coefficient acting on the cylinder by 18.6%, compared with that of smooth cylinder. The flow characteristics of wake behind the U-grooved cylinder have been analyzed using two kinds of particle image velocimetry (PIV) velocity measurement techniques, cinematic PIV and high-resolution PIV. Consecutive instantaneous velocity fields were measured using the cinematic PIV technique at time interval of 5ms, corresponding to about 1% of the vortex shedding frequency of the wake. The instantaneous velocity fields measured with the high-resolution PIV technique were ensemble-averaged to get the spatial distributions of turbulent statistics including turbulent intensities and turbulent kinetic energy. For the case of smooth cylinder, large-scale vortices formed behind the cylinder maintain round shape and do not spread out noticeably in the near wake. However, for the case of U-grooved cylinder, the vortices are largely distorted and spread out significantly as they go downstream. The longitudinal grooves seem to shift the location of spanwise vortices toward the cylinder, reducing the vortex formation region, compared with the smooth cylinder. The sharp peaks of longitudinal U-shaped grooves also suppress the formation of large-scale secondary streamwise vortices. The secondary vortices are broken into smaller eddies, reducing turbulent kinetic energy in the near-wake region.

  15. Increasing length of wakefulness and modulation of hypocretin-1 in the wake-consolidated squirrel monkey.

    PubMed

    Zeitzer, Jamie M; Buckmaster, Christine L; Lyons, David M; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2007-10-01

    The neuropeptides hypocretins (orexins), the loss of which results in the sleep disorder narcolepsy, are hypothesized to be involved in the consolidation of wakefulness and have been proposed to be part of the circadian-driven alertness signal. To elucidate the role of hypocretins in the consolidation of human wakefulness we examined the effect of wake extension on hypocretin-1 in squirrel monkeys, primates that consolidate wakefulness during the daytime as do humans. Wake was extended up to 7 h with hypocretin-1, cortisol, ghrelin, leptin, locomotion, and feeding, all being assayed. Hypocretin-1 (P < 0.01), cortisol (P < 0.001), and locomotion (P < 0.005) all increased with sleep deprivation, while ghrelin (P = 0.79) and leptin (P = 1.00) did not change with sleep deprivation. Using cross-correlation and multivariate modeling of these potential covariates along with homeostatic pressure (a measure of time awake/asleep), we found that time of day and homeostatic pressure together explained 44% of the variance in the hypocretin-1 data (P < 0.001), while cortisol did not significantly contribute to the overall hypocretin-1 variance. Locomotion during the daytime, but not during the nighttime, helped explain < 5% of the hypocretin-1 variance (P < 0.05). These data are consistent with earlier evidence indicating that in the squirrel monkey hypocretin-1 is mainly regulated by circadian inputs and homeostatic sleep pressure. Concomitants of wakefulness that affect hypocretin-1 in polyphasic species, such as locomotion, food intake, and food deprivation, likely have a more minor role in monophasic species, such as humans. PMID:17686881

  16. Performance and wake conditions of a rotor located in the wake of an obstacle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumov, I. V.; Kabardin, I. K.; Mikkelsen, R. F.; Okulov, V. L.; Sørensen, J. N.

    2016-09-01

    Obstacles like forests, ridges and hills can strongly affect the velocity profile in front of a wind turbine rotor. The present work aims at quantifying the influence of nearby located obstacles on the performance and wake characteristics of a downstream located wind turbine. Here the influence of an obstacle in the form of a cylindrical disk was investigated experimentally in a water flume. A model of a three-bladed rotor, designed using Glauert's optimum theory at a tip speed ratio λ = 5, was placed in the wake of a disk with a diameter close to the one of the rotor. The distance from the disk to the rotor was changed from 4 to 8 rotor diameters, with the vertical distance from the rotor axis varied 0.5 and 1 rotor diameters. The associated turbulent intensity of the incoming flow to the rotor changed 3 to '6% due to the influence of the disk wake. In the experiment, thrust characteristics and associated pulsations as a function of the incoming flow structures were measured by strain gauges. The flow condition in front of the rotor was measured with high temporal accuracy using LDA and power coefficients were determine as function of tip speed ratio for different obstacle positions. Furthermore, PIV measurements were carried out to study the development of the mean velocity deficit profiles of the wake behind the wind turbine model under the influence of the wake generated by the obstacle. By use of regression techniques to fit the velocity profiles it was possible to determine velocity deficits and estimate length scales of the wake attenuation.

  17. Wake-up transceivers for structural health monitoring of bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumberg, T.; Kokert, J.; Younesi, V.; Koenig, S.; Reindl, L. M.

    2016-04-01

    In this article we present a wireless sensor network to monitor the structural health of a large-scale highway bridge in Germany. The wireless sensor network consists of several sensor nodes that use wake-up receivers to realize latency free and low-power communication. The sensor nodes are either equipped with very accurate tilt sensor developed by Northrop Grumman LITEF GmbH or with a Novatel OEM615 GNSS receiver. Relay nodes are required to forward measurement data to a base station located on the bridge. The base station is a gateway that transmits the local measurement data to a remote server where it can be further analyzed and processed. Further on, we present an energy harvesting system to supply the energy demanding GNSS sensor nodes to realize long term monitoring.

  18. Wake Modes and Heat Transfer from Rotationally Oscillating Cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellappan, Prabu; Pottebaum, Tait

    2012-11-01

    Wake formation is an important problem in engineering due to its effect on phenomena such as vortex induced vibrations and heat transfer. While prior work has focused on the wake formation due to vortex shedding from stationary and oscillating cylinders, limited information is available on the relationship between wake modes and heat transfer from rotationally oscillating cylinders. Experiments were carried out at Re=150 and 750, using an electrically heated cylinder, in a water tunnel for oscillation frequencies from 0.67 to 3.5 times the natural shedding frequency and peak-to-peak oscillation amplitudes up to 320. DPIV was used to identify and map wake modes to various regions of the parameter space. Temperature data from a thermocouple embedded in the cylinder was used to calculate heat transfer rates. Correlation between heat transfer enhancement and certain wake mode regions were observed in the parameter space. The relationship between wake formation and heat transfer enhancement will be described.

  19. Reduction in parachute drag due to forebody wake effects

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, C.W.; Johnson, D.W.

    1981-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate approximate analytical methods for predicting the reduction in parachute drag due to forebody wake effects. The drag of a 20/sup 0/ conical ribbon parachute was measured at several axial stations behind an ogive-cylinder forebody with and without fins. The same parachute was tested in undisturbed flow (where wake effects were negligible) so that the effects of suspension line length on parachute drag could be separated from the drag losses caused by the turbulent wake. Total head pressure surveys were made across the forebody wake and integrated across the canopy skirt area to determine the effective dynamic pressure acting on the parachute. Experimental results confirmed the validity of the underlying physical model of the parachute/wake interaction: the ratio of parachute drag behind a forebody divided by wake-free parachute drag is equal to the ratio of effective dynamic pressure acting on the parachute divided by freestream dynamic pressure.

  20. Detailed field test of yaw-based wake steering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, P.; Churchfield, M.; Scholbrock, A.; Clifton, A.; Schreck, S.; Johnson, K.; Wright, A.; Gebraad, P.; Annoni, J.; Naughton, B.; Berg, J.; Herges, T.; White, J.; Mikkelsen, T.; Sjöholm, M.; Angelou, N.

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes a detailed field-test campaign to investigate yaw-based wake steering. In yaw-based wake steering, an upstream turbine intentionally misaligns its yaw with respect to the inflow to deflect its wake away from a downstream turbine, with the goal of increasing total power production. In the first phase, a nacelle-mounted scanning lidar was used to verify wake deflection of a misaligned turbine and calibrate wake deflection models. In the second phase, these models were used within a yaw controller to achieve a desired wake deflection. This paper details the experimental design and setup. All data collected as part of this field experiment will be archived and made available to the public via the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmosphere to Electrons Data Archive and Portal.

  1. Transient Resistive Wall Wake for Very Short Bunches

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.; /SLAC

    2005-05-13

    The catch up distance for the resistive wall wake in a round pipe is approximately equal to the square of the pipe radius divided by the bunch length. The standard formulae for this wake are applicable at distances much larger than the catch up distance. In this paper, we calculate the resistive wall wake at distances compared with the catch up distance assuming a constant wall conductivity.

  2. Initialization and Simulation of Three-Dimensional Aircraft Wake Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, Robert L.; Zheng, Z. C.

    1997-01-01

    This paper studies the effects of axial velocity profiles on vortex decay, in order to properly initialize and simulate three-dimensional wake vortex flow. Analytical relationships are obtained based on a single vortex model and computational simulations are performed for a rather practical vortex wake, which show that the single vortex analytical relations can still be applicable at certain streamwise sections of three-dimensional wake vortices.

  3. Evaluation of Fast-Time Wake Vortex Prediction Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Fred H.; Hamilton, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Current fast-time wake models are reviewed and three basic types are defined. Predictions from several of the fast-time models are compared. Previous statistical evaluations of the APA-Sarpkaya and D2P fast-time models are discussed. Root Mean Square errors between fast-time model predictions and Lidar wake measurements are examined for a 24 hr period at Denver International Airport. Shortcomings in current methodology for evaluating wake errors are also discussed.

  4. Wake coupling to full potential rotor analysis code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, Francisco J.; Chang, I-Chung; Oh, Byung K.

    1990-01-01

    The wake information from a helicopter forward flight code is coupled with two transonic potential rotor codes. The induced velocities for the near-, mid-, and far-wake geometries are extracted from a nonlinear rigid wake of a standard performance and analysis code. These, together with the corresponding inflow angles, computation points, and azimuth angles, are then incorporated into the transonic potential codes. The coupled codes can then provide an improved prediction of rotor blade loading at transonic speeds.

  5. Engineering models for merging wakes in wind farm optimization applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machefaux, E.; Larsen, G. C.; Murcia Leon, J. P.

    2015-06-01

    The present paper deals with validation of 4 different engineering wake superposition approaches against detailed CFD simulations and covering different turbine interspacing, ambient turbulence intensities and mean wind speeds. The first engineering model is a simple linear superposition of wake deficits as applied in e.g. Fuga. The second approach is the square root of sums of squares approach, which is applied in the widely used PARK program. The third approach, which is presently used with the Dynamic Wake Meandering (DWM) model, assumes that the wake affected downstream flow field to be determined by a superposition of the ambient flow field and the dominating wake among contributions from all upstream turbines at any spatial position and at any time. The last approach developed by G.C. Larsen is a newly developed model based on a parabolic type of approach, which combines wake deficits successively. The study indicates that wake interaction depends strongly on the relative wake deficit magnitude, i.e. the deficit magnitude normalized with respect to the ambient mean wind speed, and that the dominant wake assumption within the DWM framework is the most accurate.

  6. Flow visualization study of the MOD-2 wind turbine wake

    SciTech Connect

    Liu H.T.; Waite, J.W.; Hiester, T.R.; Tacheron, P.H.; Srnsky, R.A.

    1983-06-01

    The specific objectives of the study reported were: to determine the geometry of the MOD-2 wind turbine wake in terms of wake height and width as a function of downstream distance under two conditions of atmospheric stability; to estimate the mean velocity deficit at several downstream stations in the turbine wake; and to investigate the behavior of the rotor-generated vortices, particularly their configuration and persistence. The background of the wake problem is briefly examined, including a discussion of the critical issues that the flow visualization study addresses. Experimental techniques and data analysis methods are described in detail. (LEW)

  7. Rotor wake characteristics of a transonic axial flow fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, M. D.; Gertz, J.; Epstein, A.; Strazisar, A. J.

    1985-01-01

    State of the art turbomachinery flow analysis codes are not capable of predicting the viscous flow features within turbomachinery blade wakes. Until efficient 3D viscous flow analysis codes become a reality there is therefore a need for models which can describe the generation and transport of blade wakes and the mixing process within the wake. To address the need for experimental data to support the development of such models, high response pressure measurements and laser anemometer velocity measurements were obtained in the wake of a transonic axial flow fan rotor.

  8. The three-dimensional evolution of a plane wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maekawa, H.; Moser, R. D.; Mansour, N. N.

    1993-01-01

    In the past three decades, linear stability analysis has led to a comprehensive understanding of the linear stages of transition in plane wakes. Our understanding of the nonlinear and turbulent stages is less developed. Nonlinear theory developed by Papageorgiou and Smith was used to study the long-wavelength regime in wakes. The nonlinear and turbulent stages were investigated experimentally, and few numerical studies examined the early nonlinear stages of forced wakes. The evolution of three dimensional disturbances in an incompressible wake is investigated using direct numerical simulations. The instantaneous three-dimaensional structures and corresponding statistics are presented.

  9. Wake shape and its effects on aerodynamic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emdad, H.; Lan, C. E.

    1986-01-01

    The wake shape under symmetrical flight conditions and its effects on aerodynamic characteristics are examined. In addition, the effect of wake shape in sideslip and discrete vortices such as strake or forebody vortex on lateral characteristics is presented. The present numerical method for airplane configurations, which is based on discretization of the vortex sheet into vortex segments, verified the symmetrical and asymmetrical roll-up process of the trailing vortices. Also, the effect of wing wake on tail planes is calculated. It is concluded that at high lift the assumption of flat wake for longitudinal and lateral-directional characteristics should be reexamined.

  10. Flight-deck display of neighboring aircraft wake vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holforty, Wendy L.

    Over the coming decades, aviation operations are predicted to rise steadily, increasing the burden on already congested and constrained airspace. A major factor governing the safe minimum separation distance between aircraft is the hazard generated by the wake of neighboring aircraft. Unaware of their proximity to other traffic, aircraft have encountered the wake turbulence of neighboring aircraft tens of miles ahead of them with serious or fatal consequences. The wake display described herein is a perspective view, synthetic vision, flight deck display that enables flight crews to "see" neighboring aircraft, as well as their wakes via a predictive algorithm. Capable of enhancing the situational awareness with respect to the wake-vortex encounter hazard by enabling the flight crew to see the relative position of their aircraft with respect to the wake hazard, the display may allow for a decrease in the standard aircraft spacing to those now used in VFR conditions and an increase in airport and airspace capacity. At present, there is no mechanism in place in the National Airspace System that warns pilots of potential wake vortex encounters. The concept of a wake vortex display addresses the need for a real-time wake vortex avoidance scheme available directly to the pilot. The wake display has been evaluated under both simulated and actual flight conditions. Thirteen pilots with flight experience ranging from a student pilot to commercial airline and military pilots served as pilot test subjects evaluating the display under simulated conditions. The pilot test subjects completed a survey concerning their knowledge and understanding of wake vortices prior to the simulation data trials and, after the trials, they completed a pilot evaluation and postflight survey rating their experience and providing feedback for the display design. One test pilot and four guest pilots flew the display during the in-flight evaluations incorporating three wake encounter scenarios. They

  11. Influence of turbulence on the wake of a marine current turbine simulator.

    PubMed

    Blackmore, T; Batten, W M J; Bahaj, A S

    2014-10-01

    Marine current turbine commercial prototypes have now been deployed and arrays of multiple turbines under design. The tidal flows in which they operate are highly turbulent, but the characteristics of the inflow turbulence have not being considered in present design methods. This work considers the effects of inflow turbulence on the wake behind an actuator disc representation of a marine current turbine. Different turbulence intensities and integral length scales were generated in a large eddy simulation using a gridInlet, which produces turbulence from a grid pattern on the inlet boundary. The results highlight the significance of turbulence on the wake profile, with a different flow regime occurring for the zero turbulence case. Increasing the turbulence intensity reduced the velocity deficit and shifted the maximum deficit closer to the turbine. Increasing the integral length scale increased the velocity deficit close to the turbine due to an increased production of turbulent energy. However, the wake recovery was increased due to the higher rate of turbulent mixing causing the wake to expand. The implication of this work is that marine current turbine arrays could be further optimized, increasing the energy yield of the array when the site-specific turbulence characteristics are considered.

  12. Influence of turbulence on the wake of a marine current turbine simulator.

    PubMed

    Blackmore, T; Batten, W M J; Bahaj, A S

    2014-10-01

    Marine current turbine commercial prototypes have now been deployed and arrays of multiple turbines under design. The tidal flows in which they operate are highly turbulent, but the characteristics of the inflow turbulence have not being considered in present design methods. This work considers the effects of inflow turbulence on the wake behind an actuator disc representation of a marine current turbine. Different turbulence intensities and integral length scales were generated in a large eddy simulation using a gridInlet, which produces turbulence from a grid pattern on the inlet boundary. The results highlight the significance of turbulence on the wake profile, with a different flow regime occurring for the zero turbulence case. Increasing the turbulence intensity reduced the velocity deficit and shifted the maximum deficit closer to the turbine. Increasing the integral length scale increased the velocity deficit close to the turbine due to an increased production of turbulent energy. However, the wake recovery was increased due to the higher rate of turbulent mixing causing the wake to expand. The implication of this work is that marine current turbine arrays could be further optimized, increasing the energy yield of the array when the site-specific turbulence characteristics are considered. PMID:25294966

  13. A Mathematical Model towards Understanding the Mechanism of Neuronal Regulation of Wake-NREMS-REMS States

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rupesh; Bose, Amitabha; Mallick, Birendra Nath

    2012-01-01

    In this study we have constructed a mathematical model of a recently proposed functional model known to be responsible for inducing waking, NREMS and REMS. Simulation studies using this model reproduced sleep-wake patterns as reported in normal animals. The model helps to explain neural mechanism(s) that underlie the transitions between wake, NREMS and REMS as well as how both the homeostatic sleep-drive and the circadian rhythm shape the duration of each of these episodes. In particular, this mathematical model demonstrates and confirms that an underlying mechanism for REMS generation is pre-synaptic inhibition from substantia nigra onto the REM-off terminals that project on REM-on neurons, as has been recently proposed. The importance of orexinergic neurons in stabilizing the wake-sleep cycle is demonstrated by showing how even small changes in inputs to or from those neurons can have a large impact on the ensuing dynamics. The results from this model allow us to make predictions of the neural mechanisms of regulation and patho-physiology of REMS. PMID:22905114

  14. Effects of energetic coherent motions on the power and wake of an axial-flow turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamorro, L. P.; Hill, C.; Neary, V. S.; Gunawan, B.; Arndt, R. E. A.; Sotiropoulos, F.

    2015-05-01

    A laboratory experiment examined the effects of energetic coherent motions on the structure of the wake and power fluctuations generated by a model axial-flow hydrokinetic turbine. The model turbine was placed in an open-channel flow and operated under subcritical conditions. The incoming flow was locally perturbed with vertically oriented cylinders of various diameters. An array of three acoustic Doppler velocimeters aligned in the cross-stream direction and a torque transducer were used to collect high-resolution and synchronous measurements of the three-velocity components of the incoming and wake flow as well as the turbine power. A strong scale-to-scale interaction between the large-scale and broadband turbulence shed by the cylinders and the turbine power revealed how the turbulence structure modulates the turbine behavior. In particular, the response of the turbine to the distinctive von Kármán-type vortices shed from the cylinders highlighted this phenomenon. The mean and fluctuating characteristics of the turbine wake are shown to be very sensitive to the energetic motions present in the flow. Tip vortices were substantially dampened and the near-field mean wake recovery accelerated in the presence of energetic motions in the flow. Strong coherent motions are shown to be more effective than turbulence levels for triggering the break-up of the spiral structure of the tip-vortices.

  15. Influence of turbulence on the wake of a marine current turbine simulator

    PubMed Central

    Blackmore, T.; Batten, W. M. J.; Bahaj, A. S.

    2014-01-01

    Marine current turbine commercial prototypes have now been deployed and arrays of multiple turbines under design. The tidal flows in which they operate are highly turbulent, but the characteristics of the inflow turbulence have not being considered in present design methods. This work considers the effects of inflow turbulence on the wake behind an actuator disc representation of a marine current turbine. Different turbulence intensities and integral length scales were generated in a large eddy simulation using a gridInlet, which produces turbulence from a grid pattern on the inlet boundary. The results highlight the significance of turbulence on the wake profile, with a different flow regime occurring for the zero turbulence case. Increasing the turbulence intensity reduced the velocity deficit and shifted the maximum deficit closer to the turbine. Increasing the integral length scale increased the velocity deficit close to the turbine due to an increased production of turbulent energy. However, the wake recovery was increased due to the higher rate of turbulent mixing causing the wake to expand. The implication of this work is that marine current turbine arrays could be further optimized, increasing the energy yield of the array when the site-specific turbulence characteristics are considered. PMID:25294966

  16. Feedback Control of Bistability in the Turbulent Wake of an Ahmed Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brackston, Rowan; Wynn, Andrew; Garcia de La Cruz, Juan Marcos; Rigas, Georgios; Morrison, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    Three-dimensional bluff body wakes have seen considerable interest in recent years, not least because of their relevance to road vehicles. A key feature of these wakes is spatial symmetry breaking, reminiscent of the large scale structures observed during the laminar and transitional regimes. For the flat backed Ahmed body, this feature manifests itself as a bistability of the wake in which the flow switches randomly between two asymmetric states. This feature is associated with instantaneous lateral forces on the body as well as increased pressure drag. Starting from the modelling approach of Rigas et al. (J. Fluid Mech. 778, R2, 2015)we identify a linearised model for this mode of the flow, obtaining parameters via a system identification. The identified model is then used to design a linear feedback controller with the aim of restoring the flow to the unstable, symmetric state. The controller is implemented experimentally at Re ~ 3 ×105 and is found to both suppress the bistability of the flow and reduce the drag on the body. Furthermore, the control system is found to have a positive energy balance, providing a key demonstration of efficient feedback control applied to a 3D bluff body at Reynolds numbers representative of road vehicle wakes.

  17. A Simple Analytical Model for Batoid Wake topology and Propulsive Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivia Y Alvarado, Pablo; Srivatsa, Karthik

    2013-11-01

    Batoids swim by forcing waves along their large pectoral fins. These waves determine the topology of the shed wakes and the resulting propulsive forces. An understanding of the relation between fin kinematics and wake topology is essential to control vehicles that use batoid-like fin propulsion. Simulations of the fluid-structure interactions during fin motions provide information of the changes in wake topology and the propulsive forces that result with variations in fin kinematics. However, simulations require computing power usually not available in mobile robots and cannot be used for real time control. An alternative is to develop simple qualitative models whose errors can be compensated by closed loop feedback controllers. Here we describe an analytical model that can be used to predict wake geometry and resulting propulsive forces in batoid-like fins. The model incorporates important fin kinematic parameters such as wave number, amplitude envelope, and flapping frequency. Dye flow visualization and particle image velocimetry along with force measurements confirm the model applicability to batoid-like fin propulsion. This work was funded in whole or in part by the Singapore National Research Foundation (NRF) through the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART).

  18. Recent wake turbulence flight test programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tymczyszyn, J. J.; Barber, M. R.

    1974-01-01

    In early flight tests the size and intensity of the wake vortexes generated by aircraft ranging in size from the Learjet to the C-5A and the B-747 were studied to determine the effects of aircraft configuration, weight, and speed. Early problems were related to vortex marking, the measurement of separation distance, and test techniques. Recent tests conducted with B-747 showed that vortexes were alleviated by reducing the deflection of the outboard flaps. It was found that a more rapid dissipation of the vortex system can be obtained through alterations in the span lift distribution.

  19. Helices in the wake of precipitation fronts.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Shibi; Lagzi, István; Molnár, Ferenc; Rácz, Zoltán

    2013-08-01

    A theoretical study of the emergence of helices in the wake of precipitation fronts is presented. The precipitation dynamics is described by the Cahn-Hilliard equation and the fronts are obtained by quenching the system into a linearly unstable state. Confining the process onto the surface of a cylinder and using the pulled-front formalism, our analytical calculations show that there are front solutions that propagate into the unstable state and leave behind a helical structure. We find that helical patterns emerge only if the radius of the cylinder R is larger than a critical value R>R(c), in agreement with recent experiments. PMID:24032809

  20. Ecological chaos in the wake of invasion.

    PubMed Central

    Sherratt, J A; Lewis, M A; Fowler, A C

    1995-01-01

    Irregularities in observed population densities have traditionally been attributed to discretization of the underlying dynamics. We propose an alternative explanation by demonstrating the evolution of spatiotemporal chaos in reaction-diffusion models for predator-prey interactions. The chaos is generated naturally in the wake of invasive waves of predators. We discuss in detail the mechanism by which the chaos is generated. By considering a mathematical caricature of the predator-prey models, we go on to explain the dynamical origin of the irregular behavior and to justify our assertion that the behavior we present is a genuine example of spatiotemporal chaos. Images Fig. 7 PMID:7708678

  1. [Sleep and wakefulness drugs and their indications].

    PubMed

    Bourin, M

    2007-07-01

    This paper is a review of the use of drugs in sleep and wakefulness disorders. Insomnia is more often a symptom than an autonomic disorder. Good knowledge of the clinical facts is required before prescribing hypnotics. Sedative drugs are potentially hypnotics; yet, melatonin is not sedative and may be considered to resynchronise of sleep phases. Stimulant drugs are prescribed in attention disorders; methylphenidate is the more frequently used. Narcolepsy, which is characterized by daytime sleepiness and irresistible episodes of sleep, is treated by an alpha1 noradrenergic stimulant modafinil which has no amphetaminic properties.

  2. Thermal wake/vessel detection technique

    DOEpatents

    Roskovensky, John K.; Nandy, Prabal; Post, Brian N

    2012-01-10

    A computer-automated method for detecting a vessel in water based on an image of a portion of Earth includes generating a thermal anomaly mask. The thermal anomaly mask flags each pixel of the image initially deemed to be a wake pixel based on a comparison of a thermal value of each pixel against other thermal values of other pixels localized about each pixel. Contiguous pixels flagged by the thermal anomaly mask are grouped into pixel clusters. A shape of each of the pixel clusters is analyzed to determine whether each of the pixel clusters represents a possible vessel detection event. The possible vessel detection events are represented visually within the image.

  3. Wakes from arrays of buildings. [flight safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, E., Jr.; Lin, S. H.

    1982-01-01

    Experiments were carried out in a small wind tunnel in which atmospheric flow around buildings was simulated. Arrays of one, two, three, and four model buildings were tested, and wake profiles of velocity and turbulence were measured. The data indicate the effect of the buildings on the wind environment encountered by aircraft during landing or takeoff operations. It was possible to use the results to locate the boundaries of the air regions affected by the obstacles and to recommend preferred arrangements of buildings to maximize light safety.

  4. [Metacommunication in waking and hypnotic states].

    PubMed

    Granone, F

    1981-10-27

    A definition is given of the terms "communication" and "metacommunication", "language" and "metalanguage", and the several types of relationships that may arise in communication: "symmetrical competitive", "integrative complementary", "metacomplementary", and "paradoxical", Reference is made to the "spontaneity" and "simulation" that may arise in communication and metacommunication, during both wakefulness, conscious states in barbituric subnarcosis, and hypnosis. The question of metacommunication during the induction of hypnosis and during the hypnotic relationship is examined, stress being placed on the parapsycholgical metacommunications that may take place during some forms of self- or hetero-induced hypnotic consciousness.

  5. Wake Sensor Evaluation Program and Results of JFK-1 Wake Vortex Sensor Intercomparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, Ben C., Jr.; Burnham, David C.; Rudis, Robert P.

    1997-01-01

    The overall approach should be to: (1) Seek simplest, sufficiently robust, integrated ground based sensor systems (wakes and weather) for AVOSS; (2) Expand all sensor performance cross-comparisons and data mergings in on-going field deployments; and (3) Achieve maximal cost effectiveness through hardware/info sharing. An effective team is in place to accomplish the above tasks.

  6. Neuronal activity of orexin and non-orexin waking-active neurons during wake-sleep states in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, K; Lin, J-S; Sakai, K

    2008-05-15

    Using extracellular single unit recordings alone or in combination with neurobiotin juxtacellular labeling and orexin (hypocretin) immunohistochemistry in the mouse, we have recorded a total of 452 neurons in the orexin neuron field of the posterior hypothalamus. Of these, 76 exhibited tonic discharge highly specific to wakefulness, referred to as waking-active neurons. They showed differences from each other in terms of spike shape, activity profile, and response to an arousing sound stimulus and could be classified into three groups on the basis of spike shape as: 1) biphasic broad; 2) biphasic narrow; and 3) triphasic. Waking-active neurons characterized by biphasic broad spikes were orexin-immunopositive, whereas those characterized by either biphasic narrow or triphasic broad spikes were orexin-immunonegative. Unlike waking-specific histamine neurons, all orexin and non-orexin waking-active neurons exhibited slow (<10 Hz) tonic discharges during wakefulness and ceased firing shortly after the onset of electroencephalogram (EEG) synchronization (deactivation), the EEG sign of sleep (drowsy state). They remained virtually silent during slow-wave sleep, but displayed transient discharges during paradoxical (or rapid eye movement) sleep. During the transition from sleep to wakefulness, both orexin and triphasic non-orexin neurons fired in clusters prior to the onset of EEG activation, the EEG sign of wakefulness, and responded with a short latency to an arousing sound stimulus given during sleep. In contrast, the biphasic narrow non-orexin neurons fired in single spikes either prior to, or after, EEG activation during the same transition and responded to the stimulus with a longer latency. The activity of all waking-active neurons preceded the return of muscle tonus at the transition from paradoxical sleep to wakefulness. These data support the view that the activity of orexin and non-orexin waking-active neurons in the posterior hypothalamus plays an important

  7. Multiscale plant wakes, turbulence and non linear scaling flexible effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vila, Teresa; Redondo, Jose M.; Velasco, David

    2010-05-01

    We present velocity ADV measurements and flow visualization of the turbulent wakes behind plant arrays, as these are often fractal in nature, we compare the multifractal spectra and the turbulence structure behind the wakes. Both statistical measures allowing to calculate integral lengthscales and their profiles modified by the plant cannopies [1,2] as well as intermittency and spectral behaviour are also measured [3,4]. We distinguish several momentum transfer mechanisms between the cannopy and the flow, an internal one where lateral turbulent tensions are dominant, and another one just above the plant average height dominated by vertical Reynolds stresses. Visualization of flow over individual plant models show the role of coherent vortices triggered by plant elasticity. The deformation rate of the plants and their Youngs modulus may be correlated with overal plant drag and geometry. This is modified strongly in fractal canopies. Large turbulent integral scales are linked to rugosity and the scaling of the waves.[5,6] Pearlescence experiments where local shear is visualized and numerical simulations of Fractal grids are compared following [7]. [1] Nepf,H.M. Drag, turbulence and diffusion in flow through emergent vegetation. Water Resources Res. 35(2)(1999) [2] Ben Mahjoub,O., Redondo J.M. and Babiano A. Jour.Structure functions in complex flows. Flow Turbulence and Combustion 59, 299-313. [3] El-Hakim, O. Salama, M. Velocity distribution inside and above branched flexible roughness. ASCE Journal of Irrigation and Drainage Engineering, Vol. 118, No 6, (November/December 1992) 914-927. [4] Finnigan,J. Turbulence in plant canopies. Annu. Rev. Fluid Mech. 2000 , Vol. 32: 519-571. [5] Ikeda, S., Kanazawa, M. Three- dimensional organized vortices above flexible water plants. ASCE Journal of Hydraulic Engineering, Vol. 122, No 11, (1996) 634-640. [6] Velasco, D.,Bateman A.,Redondo J.M and Medina V. An open channel flow experimental and theorical study of resistance and

  8. Modeling and simulation of high-speed wake flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnhardt, Michael Daniel

    High-speed, unsteady flows represent a unique challenge in computational hypersonics research. They are found in nearly all applications of interest, including the wakes of reentry vehicles, RCS jet interactions, and scramjet combustors. In each of these examples, accurate modeling of the flow dynamics plays a critical role in design performance. Nevertheless, literature surveys reveal that very little modern research effort has been made toward understanding these problems. The objective of this work is to synthesize current computational methods for high-speed flows with ideas commonly used to model low-speed, turbulent flows in order to create a framework by which we may reliably predict unsteady, hypersonic flows. In particular, we wish to validate the new methodology for the case of a turbulent wake flow at reentry conditions. Currently, heat shield designs incur significant mass penalties due to the large margins applied to vehicle afterbodies in lieu of a thorough understanding of the wake aerothermodynamics. Comprehensive validation studies are required to accurately quantify these modeling uncertainties. To this end, we select three candidate experiments against which we evaluate the accuracy of our methodology. The first set of experiments concern the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) parachute system and serve to demonstrate that our implementation produces results consistent with prior studies at supersonic conditions. Second, we use the Reentry-F flight test to expand the application envelope to realistic flight conditions. Finally, in the last set of experiments, we examine a spherical capsule wind tunnel configuration in order to perform a more detailed analysis of a realistic flight geometry. In each case, we find that current 1st order in time, 2nd order in space upwind numerical methods are sufficiently accurate to predict statistical measurements: mean, RMS, standard deviation, and so forth. Further potential gains in numerical accuracy are

  9. Gradual wavelet reconstruction of the velocity increments for turbulent wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keylock, C. J.; Stresing, R.; Peinke, J.

    2015-02-01

    This work explores the properties of the velocity increment distributions for wakes of contrasting local Reynolds number and nature of generation (a cylinder wake and a multiscale-forced case, respectively). It makes use of a technique called gradual wavelet reconstruction (GWR) to generate constrained randomizations of the original data, the nature of which is a function of a parameter, ϑ. This controls the proportion of the energy between the Markov-Einstein length (˜ 0.8 Taylor scales) and integral scale that is fixed in place in the synthetic data. The properties of the increments for these synthetic data are then compared to the original data as a function of ϑ. We write a Fokker-Planck equation for the evolution of the velocity increments as a function of spatial scale, r, and, in line with previous work, expand the drift and diffusion terms in terms up to fourth order in the increments and find no terms are relevant beyond the quadratic terms. Only the linear contribution to the expansion of the drift coefficient is non-zero and it exhibits a consistent scaling with ϑ for different flows above a low threshold. For the diffusion coefficient, we find a local Reynolds number independence in the relation between the constant term and ϑ for the multiscale-forced wakes. This term characterizes small scale structure and can be contrasted with the results for the Kolmogorov capacity of the zero-crossings of the velocity signals, which measures structure over all scales and clearly distinguishes between the types of forcing. Using GWR shows that results for the linear and quadratic terms in the expansion of the diffusion coefficient are significant, providing a new means for identifying intermittency and anomalous scaling in turbulence datasets. All our data showed a similar scaling behavior for these parameters irrespective of forcing type or Reynolds number, indicating a degree of universality to the anomalous scaling of turbulence. Hence, these terms are a

  10. Helicopter rotor wake geometry and its influence in forward flight. Volume 1: Generalized wake geometry and wake effect on rotor airloads and performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egolf, T. A.; Landgrebe, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    An analytic investigation to generalize wake geometry of a helicopter rotor in steady level forward flight and to demonstrate the influence of wake deformation in the prediction of rotor airloads and performance is described. Volume 1 presents a first level generalized wake model based on theoretically predicted tip vortex geometries for a selected representative blade design. The tip vortex distortions are generalized in equation form as displacements from the classical undistorted tip vortex geometry in terms of vortex age, blade azimuth, rotor advance ratio, thrust coefficient, and number of blades. These equations were programmed to provide distorted wake coordinates at very low cost for use in rotor airflow and airloads prediction analyses. The sensitivity of predicted rotor airloads, performance, and blade bending moments to the modeling of the tip vortex distortion are demonstrated for low to moderately high advance ratios for a representative rotor and the H-34 rotor. Comparisons with H-34 rotor test data demonstrate the effects of the classical, predicted distorted, and the newly developed generalized wake models on airloads and blade bending moments. Use of distorted wake models results in the occurrence of numerous blade-vortex interactions on the forward and lateral sides of the rotor disk. The significance of these interactions is related to the number and degree of proximity to the blades of the tip vortices. The correlation obtained with the distorted wake models (generalized and predicted) is encouraging.

  11. When wings touch wakes: understanding locomotor force control by wake wing interference in insect wings.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Fritz-Olaf

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the fluid dynamics of force control in flying insects requires the exploration of how oscillating wings interact with the surrounding fluid. The production of vorticity and the shedding of vortical structures within the stroke cycle thus depend on two factors: the temporal structure of the flow induced by the wing's own instantaneous motion and the flow components resulting from both the force production in previous wing strokes and the motion of other wings flapping in close proximity. These wake-wing interactions may change on a stroke-by-stroke basis, confronting the neuro-muscular system of the animal with a complex problem for force control. In a single oscillating wing, the flow induced by the preceding half stroke may lower the wing's effective angle of attack but permits the recycling of kinetic energy from the wake via the wake capture mechanism. In two-winged insects, the acceleration fields produced by each wing may strongly interact via the clap-and-fling mechanism during the dorsal stroke reversal. Four-winged insects must cope with the fact that the flow over their hindwings is affected by the presence of the forewings. In these animals, a phase-shift between the stroke cycles of fore- and hindwing modulates aerodynamic performance of the hindwing via leading edge vortex destruction and changes in local flow condition including wake capture. Moreover, robotic wings demonstrate that phase-lag during peak performance and the strength of force modulation depend on the vertical spacing between the two stroke planes and the size ratio between fore- and hindwing. This study broadly summarizes the most prominent mechanisms of wake-wing and wing-wing interactions found in flapping insect wings and evaluates the consequences of these processes for the control of locomotor forces in the behaving animal.

  12. Observation of high-resolution wind fields and offshore wind turbine wakes using TerraSAR-X imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gies, Tobias; Jacobsen, Sven; Lehner, Susanne; Pleskachevsky, Andrey

    2014-05-01

    1. Introduction Numerous large-scale offshore wind farms have been built in European waters and play an important role in providing renewable energy. Therefore, knowledge of behavior of wakes, induced by large wind turbines and their impact on wind power output is important. The spatial variation of offshore wind turbine wake is very complex, depending on wind speed, wind direction, ambient atmospheric turbulence and atmospheric stability. In this study we demonstrate the application of X-band TerraSAR-X (TS-X) data with high spatial resolution for studies on wind turbine wakes in the near and far field of the offshore wind farm Alpha Ventus, located in the North Sea. Two cases which different weather conditions and different wake pattern as observed in the TS-X image are presented. 2. Methods The space-borne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is a unique sensor that provides two-dimensional information on the ocean surface. Due to their high resolution, daylight and weather independency and global coverage, SARs are particularly suitable for many ocean and coastal applications. SAR images reveal wind variations on small scales and thus represent a valuable means in detailed wind-field analysis. The general principle of imaging turbine wakes is that the reduced wind speed downstream of offshore wind farms modulates the sea surface roughness, which in turn changes the Normalized Radar Cross Section (NRCS, denoted by σ0) in the SAR image and makes the wake visible. In this study we present two cases at the offshore wind farm Alpha Ventus to investigate turbine-induced wakes and the retrieved sea surface wind field. Using the wind streaks, visible in the TS-X image and the shadow behind the offshore wind farm, induced by turbine wake, the sea surface wind direction is derived and subsequently the sea surface wind speed is calculated using the latest generation of wind field algorithm XMOD2. 3. Case study alpha ventus Alpha Ventus is located approximately 45 km from the

  13. Wake potentials of the ILC Interaction Region

    SciTech Connect

    Novokhatski, A.; /SLAC

    2011-08-16

    The vacuum chamber of the ILC Interaction Region (IR) is optimized for best detector performance. It has special shaping to minimize additional backgrounds due to the metal part of the chamber. Also, for the same reason this thin vacuum chamber does not have water cooling. Therefore, small amounts of power, which may be deposited in the chamber, can be enough to raise the chamber to a high temperature. One of the sources of 'heating' power is the electromagnetic field of the beam. This field diffracts by non-regularities of the beam pipe and excites free-propagating fields, which are then absorbed by the pipe wall. In addition we have a heating power of the image currents due to finite conductivity of the metallic wall. We will discuss these effects as updating the previous results. The conclusions of this report are: (1) The amount of the beam energy loss in IR is almost equal to the energy loss in one ILC (TESLA) accelerating cryo-module; (2) Addition energy spread at IR is very small; (3) Spectrum of the wake fields is limited 300 GHz; (4) Average power of the wake fields excited in IR is 30 W for nominal ILC parameters; and (5) Pulse power in this case is 6 kilowatts.

  14. Probing Neutrino Hierarchy and Chirality via Wakes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hong-Ming; Pen, Ue-Li; Chen, Xuelei; Inman, Derek

    2016-04-01

    The relic neutrinos are expected to acquire a bulk relative velocity with respect to the dark matter at low redshifts, and neutrino wakes are expected to develop downstream of the dark matter halos. We propose a method of measuring the neutrino mass based on this mechanism. This neutrino wake will cause a dipole distortion of the galaxy-galaxy lensing pattern. This effect could be detected by combining upcoming lensing surveys with a low redshift galaxy survey or a 21 cm intensity mapping survey, which can map the neutrino flow field. The data obtained with LSST and Euclid should enable us to make a positive detection if the three neutrino masses are quasidegenerate with each neutrino mass of ∼0.1  eV, and a future high precision 21 cm lensing survey would allow the normal hierarchy and inverted hierarchy cases to be distinguished, and even the right-handed Dirac neutrinos may be detectable. PMID:27104695

  15. Dynamics of wake structure in clapping propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Daegyoum; Gharib, Morteza

    2009-11-01

    Some animals such as insects and frogs use a pair of symmetric flaps for locomotion. In some cases, these flappers operate in close proximity or even touch each other. In order to understand the underlying physics of these kinds of motion, we have studied the wake structures induced by clapping and their associated thrust performance. A simple mechanical model with two acrylic plates was used to simulate the power stroke of the clapping motion and three-dimensional flow fields were obtained using defocusing digital particle image velocimetry. Our studies show that the process of vortex connection plays a critical role in forming a downstream closed vortex loop. Under some kinematic conditions, this vortex loop changes its shape dynamically, which is analogous to the process of an elliptical vortex ring switching its minor and major axis. As the length of the plate along the rotating shaft decreases to change an aspect ratio, the downstream motion of the vortex is retarded due to the outward motion of side edge vortices and less propulsive force is generated per the surface area of the plate. The impact of compliance and stroke angle of the plate on wake structures and thrust magnitudes are also presented.

  16. [Controlling sleep/wakefulness using optogenetics].

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Akihiro

    2015-08-01

    Optogenetics is a recently developed experimental technique to control the activity of neurons using light. Optogenetics shows its power to reveal the physiological role of specific neural circuits in the brain. In particular, manipulation of a specific type of neurons using optogenetics with high accuracy timing enables us to analyze causality between neural activity and initiation of animal behaviors. However, to manipulate the activity of specific neurons in vivo, there are two critical steps to succeed in manipulation of the neural activity and control of the behavior of individual animals. The first step is an adequate number of molecules of light-activated protein that has to be expressed in the cell membrane of the neurons of interest. The second step is the optical system to illuminate the targeted neurons with enough intensity of light to activate the light-activated protein. We applied optogenetics to hypothalamic peptidergic neurons such as orexin/hypocretin neurons or melanin concentrating hormone (MCH) neurons. These neurons are implicated in sleep/wakefulness regulation. In this mini review, I will show the regulatory mechanism of sleep/wakefulness by these neurons using optogenetics.

  17. Brain mechanisms that control sleep and waking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, Jerome

    This review paper presents a brief historical survey of the technological and early research that laid the groundwork for recent advances in sleep-waking research. A major advance in this field occurred shortly after the end of World War II with the discovery of the ascending reticular activating system (ARAS) as the neural source in the brain stem of the waking state. Subsequent research showed that the brain stem activating system produced cortical arousal via two pathways: a dorsal route through the thalamus and a ventral route through the hypothalamus and basal forebrain. The nuclei, pathways, and neurotransmitters that comprise the multiple components of these arousal systems are described. Sleep is now recognized as being composed of two very different states: rapid eye movements (REMs) sleep and non-REM sleep. The major findings on the neural mechanisms that control these two sleep states are presented. This review ends with a discussion of two current views on the function of sleep: to maintain the integrity of the immune system and to enhance memory consolidation.

  18. Scaling differences of heartbeat excursions between wake and sleep periods.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Vargas, L; Reyes-Ramírez, I; Hernández-Pérez, R; Angulo-Brown, F

    2011-01-01

    We study the statistical properties of excursions in heart interbeat time series. An excursion is defined as the time employed by a walker to return to its mean value. We consider the homeostatic property of the heartbeat dynamics as a departing point to characterize the dynamics of excursions in beat-to-beat fluctuations. Scaling properties of excursions during wake and sleep periods from two groups are compared: 16 healthy subjects and 11 patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). We find that the cumulative distributions of excursions for both groups follow stretched exponential functions given by g(τ)~e(-aτ(b)) with different fitting parameters a and b, leading to different decaying rates. Our results show that the average characteristic scale associated with the excursion distributions is greater for healthy data compared to CHF patients whereas sleep-wake transitions are more significant for healthy data. Next, we explore changes in the distributions of excursions when considering (i) a shifted mean value to define an excursion and (ii) the sum of the kth excursion successor. Besides, the presence of temporal correlations in the excursions sequences is evaluated by means of the detrended fluctuation analysis. We observe the presence of long-range correlations for healthy subjects, whereas for the CHF group, correlations are described by two regimes; over short scales the fluctuations are close to uncorrelated noise, and for large scales the fluctuations reveal long-range correlations. Finally, we apply a stability analysis of excursions based on the Allan variance which reveals that healthy dynamics is more stable than heart failure excursions. PMID:21187233

  19. Rolling with the flow: bumblebees flying in unsteady wakes.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Sridhar; Crall, James D; Fisher, Alex; Combes, Stacey A

    2013-11-15

    Our understanding of how variable wind in natural environments affects flying insects is limited because most studies of insect flight are conducted in either smooth flow or still air conditions. Here, we investigate the effects of structured, unsteady flow (the von Karman vortex street behind a cylinder) on the flight performance of bumblebees (Bombus impatiens). Bumblebees are 'all-weather' foragers and thus frequently experience variable aerial conditions, ranging from fully mixed, turbulent flow to unsteady, structured vortices near objects such as branches and stems. We examined how bumblebee flight performance differs in unsteady versus smooth flow, as well as how the orientation of unsteady flow structures affects their flight performance, by filming bumblebees flying in a wind tunnel under various flow conditions. The three-dimensional flight trajectories and orientations of bumblebees were quantified in each of three flow conditions: (1) smooth flow, (2) the unsteady wake of a vertical cylinder (inducing strong lateral disturbances) and (3) the unsteady wake of a horizontal cylinder (inducing strong vertical disturbances). In both unsteady conditions, bumblebees attenuated the disturbances induced by the wind quite effectively, but still experienced significant translational and rotational fluctuations as compared with flight in smooth flow. Bees appeared to be most sensitive to disturbance along the lateral axis, displaying large lateral accelerations, translations and rolling motions in response to both unsteady flow conditions, regardless of orientation. Bees also displayed the greatest agility around the roll axis, initiating voluntary casting maneuvers and correcting for lateral disturbances mainly through roll in all flow conditions. Both unsteady flow conditions reduced the upstream flight speed of bees, suggesting an increased cost of flight in unsteady flow, with potential implications for foraging patterns and colony energetics in natural

  20. Rolling with the flow: bumblebees flying in unsteady wakes.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Sridhar; Crall, James D; Fisher, Alex; Combes, Stacey A

    2013-11-15

    Our understanding of how variable wind in natural environments affects flying insects is limited because most studies of insect flight are conducted in either smooth flow or still air conditions. Here, we investigate the effects of structured, unsteady flow (the von Karman vortex street behind a cylinder) on the flight performance of bumblebees (Bombus impatiens). Bumblebees are 'all-weather' foragers and thus frequently experience variable aerial conditions, ranging from fully mixed, turbulent flow to unsteady, structured vortices near objects such as branches and stems. We examined how bumblebee flight performance differs in unsteady versus smooth flow, as well as how the orientation of unsteady flow structures affects their flight performance, by filming bumblebees flying in a wind tunnel under various flow conditions. The three-dimensional flight trajectories and orientations of bumblebees were quantified in each of three flow conditions: (1) smooth flow, (2) the unsteady wake of a vertical cylinder (inducing strong lateral disturbances) and (3) the unsteady wake of a horizontal cylinder (inducing strong vertical disturbances). In both unsteady conditions, bumblebees attenuated the disturbances induced by the wind quite effectively, but still experienced significant translational and rotational fluctuations as compared with flight in smooth flow. Bees appeared to be most sensitive to disturbance along the lateral axis, displaying large lateral accelerations, translations and rolling motions in response to both unsteady flow conditions, regardless of orientation. Bees also displayed the greatest agility around the roll axis, initiating voluntary casting maneuvers and correcting for lateral disturbances mainly through roll in all flow conditions. Both unsteady flow conditions reduced the upstream flight speed of bees, suggesting an increased cost of flight in unsteady flow, with potential implications for foraging patterns and colony energetics in natural

  1. Planetary Ion fluxes in the Venus Wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-de-Tejada, H.; Lundin, R.; Durand-Manterola, H.; Barabash, S.; Zhang, T. L.; Sauvaud, J. A.; Reyes-Ruiz, M.

    2012-09-01

    Measurements conducted with the ASPERA-4 instrument and the magnetometer of the Venus Express spacecraft show that the kinetic pressure of planetary O+ ions measured in the Venus wake can be significantly larger than the local magnetic pressure and, as a result, those ions are not being driven by magnetic forces but by the kinetic energy of the solar wind. Beams of planetary O+ ions with those properties have been detected in several orbits of the Venus Express through the wake as the spacecraft traverses by the noon-midnight plane along its near polar trajectory. Peak values of the kinetic pressure of the O+ ions are sufficient to produce superalfvenic flow conditions. It is suggested that such O+ ion beams are eroded from the magnetic polar regions of the Venus ionosphere where the solar wind carves out plasma channels that extend downstream from those regions. Issues related to the acceleration of planetary ions as the solar wind interacts with the Venus ionosphere are related to the energetics of the plasma. When the kinetic pressure of the particle populations involved in the interaction is smaller than the local magnetic pressure the latter will be dominant and hence the particles will follow trajectories dictated by the magnetic field. Such conditions should occur by the magnetic barrier that is formed over the dayside Venus ionosphere where the interplanetary magnetic fluxes pile up thus leading to enhanced values of the magnetic field intensity. Different conditions are expected when the kinetic pressure of the plasma is larger than the local magnetic pressure. In this case the latter will be convected by the particle fluxes as it occurs in the superalfvenic solar wind. Plasma conditions applicable to the planetary ions that stream in the Venus wake and that have been removed from the Venus ionosphere can be examined using the plasma and magnetic field data obtained from the Venus Express (VEX) measurements. A suitable example is provided by the plasma and

  2. Directional information flows between brain hemispheres during presleep wake and early sleep stages.

    PubMed

    Bertini, Mario; Ferrara, Michele; De Gennaro, Luigi; Curcio, Giuseppe; Moroni, Fabio; Vecchio, Fabrizio; De Gasperis, Marco; Rossini, Paolo Maria; Babiloni, Claudio

    2007-08-01

    Neuroscientists' efforts to better understand the underlying processes of human consciousness are growing in a variety of multidisciplinary approaches. Relevant within these are the studies aimed at exploring the physiological substratum of the propagation and reduction of cerebral-namely, corticocortical-communication flows. However, the preferential direction of the information flow between brain hemispheres is as yet largely unknown. It is the aim of the present research to study the communication flows between brain hemispheres, their directionality, and their regional variations across wake-sleep states. A second aim is to investigate the possibility of an association between different brain rhythms and different preferred directions of the information flow. Scalp electroencephalograms (EEGs) were recorded in 10 normal volunteers from wakefulness to early sleep stages (viz., resting wakefulness, sleep stages 2 and 4, and rapid eye movement [REM] of the first sleep cycle). EEG rhythms of interest were delta (1-4 Hz), theta (5-7 Hz), alpha (8-11 Hz), sigma (12-15 Hz), and beta (16-30 Hz). The direction of the interhemispheric information flow was evaluated by computing directed transformation function from these EEG rhythms. Interhemispheric directional flows varied as a function of the state of consciousness (wake and early sleep stages) and in relation to different cerebral areas. Across wake to sleep states, we found that delta and beta rhythms convey interhemispheric signals with opposite directions: preferred right to left hemisphere direction for delta and left to right for beta rhythms. A log correlation confirmed that the trend of low to high EEG frequencies-traditionally associated with an increasing state of vigilance-was significantly related to the direction of the communication flow from the left to right hemisphere. This evidence might open the way for a variety of research lines on different psychophysiological and pathological conditions. PMID

  3. Numerical Modeling Studies of Wake Vortex Transport and Evolution Within the Planetary Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Yuh-Lang; Arya, S. Pal; Kaplan, Michael L.; Shen, Shaohua

    1998-01-01

    In support of the wake vortex effect of the Terminal Area Productivity program, we have put forward four tasks to be accomplished in our proposal. The first task is validation of two-dimensional wake vortex-turbulence interaction. The second task is investigation of three-dimensional interaction between wake vortices and atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) turbulence. The third task is ABL studies. The, fourth task is addition of a Klemp-Durran condition at the top boundary for TASS model. The accomplishment of these tasks will increase our understanding of the dynamics of wake vortex and improve forecasting systems responsible for air safety and efficiency. The first two tasks include following three parts: (a) Determine significant length scale for vortex decay and transport, especially the length scales associated with the onset of Crow instability (Crow, 1970); (b) Study the effects of atmospheric turbulence on the decay of the wake vortices; and (c) Determine the relationships between decay rate, transport properties and atmospheric parameters based on large eddy simulation (LES) results and the observational data. These parameters may include turbulence kinetic energy, dissipation rate, wind shear and atmospheric stratification. The ABL studies cover LES modeling of turbulence structure within planetary boundary layer under transition and stable stratification conditions. Evidences have shown that the turbulence in the stable boundary layer can be highly intermittent and the length scales of eddies are very small compared to those in convective case. We proposed to develop a nesting grid mesh scheme and a modified Klemp-Durran conditions (Klemp and Wilhelmson, 1978) at the top boundary for TASS model to simulate planetary boundary layer under stable stratification conditions. During the past year, our group has made great efforts to carry out the above mentioned four tasks simultaneously. The work accomplished in the last year will be described in the next

  4. Distributed forcing flow control in the wake of a blunt trailing edge profiled body using plasma actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naghib-Lahouti, A.; Hangan, H.; Lavoie, P.

    2015-03-01

    A modern flow control technique for reducing the drag associated with the periodic shedding of von Kármán vortices in the wake of a blunt trailing edge profiled body is presented. The technique involves distributed forcing of the wake flow using an array of dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators, with a spanwise spacing matched to the spanwise wavelength of the dominant secondary wake instability. The experiments include measurement of the velocity field in multiple vertical and horizontal planes in the wake using particle image velocimetry, as well as base pressure, at Reynolds numbers of 2000, 3000, and 5000 based on trailing edge thickness. The flow control technique causes elongation of the vortex formation region across the span, and significant reduction of the fluctuating and total drag forces, up to a maximum of 94% and 18%, respectively. The effectiveness of the flow control technique is shown to be dependent on the induced momentum coefficient. Proper orthogonal decomposition analysis is used to investigate the mechanism of interaction of the flow control technique with the wake flow. Two distinct flow regimes are observed depending on the induced momentum coefficient. The effect of the control on the wake flow structure in the first regime is similar to those observed in previous studies involving mild spanwise-periodic geometric perturbations at the trailing edge, where control leads to streamwise displacement of the vortices and a shift in shedding frequency. However, an incremental increase in the momentum coefficient leads to a second flow regime similar to those previously observed in the case of large-amplitude geometric perturbations, with an almost complete attenuation of vortex shedding in the near-wake region.

  5. Antagonism of rat orexin receptors by almorexant attenuates central chemoreception in wakefulness in the active period of the diurnal cycle.

    PubMed

    Li, Aihua; Nattie, Eugene

    2010-08-01

    Central chemoreception, the highly sensitive ventilatory response to small changes in CO(2)/pH, involves many sites. Hypothalamic orexin neurons are CO(2) sensitive in vitro, prepro-orexin knockout mice have a reduced CO(2) response prominently in wakefulness, and focal antagonism of the orexin receptor 1 (OX(1)R) in two central chemoreceptor sites, the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) or the medullary raphé, results in a reduction of the CO(2) response predominately in wakefulness (-30% and -16%, respectively). Here we hypothesize that acute and selective inhibition of both orexin receptors (OX(1)R and OX(2)R) at all central locations by an orally administered dual orexin receptor antagonist, almorexant, will substantially attenuate the CO(2) response in a vigilance-state- and diurnal-cycle-dependent manner. We found that almorexant attenuated the CO(2) response by 26% only in wakefulness during the dark period of the diurnal cycle to a level observed during NREM sleep in the light period in controls suggesting that the sleep-wake difference in the CO(2) response can be in large part attributed to orexin. Almorexant also decreased wakefulness and increased NREM and REM sleep during the dark period, as previously reported, and unexpectedly decreased the number of sighs and post-sigh apnoeas during wakefulness in both the light and the dark period and during both wakefulness and NREM sleep in the dark period. The results support our hypothesis that the orexin system participates importantly in central chemoreception in a vigilance-state- and diurnal-cycle-dependent manner and indicate a role for orexin in the important process of sighing.

  6. Characteristics of proton velocity distribution functions in the near-lunar wake from Chandrayaan-1/SWIM observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhanya, M. B.; Bhardwaj, Anil; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Barabash, Stas; Alok, Abhinaw; Wieser, Martin; Holmström, Mats; Wurz, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Due to the high absorption of solar wind plasma on the lunar dayside, a large scale wake structure is formed downstream of the Moon. However, recent in-situ observations have revealed the presence of protons in the near-lunar wake (100 km to 200 km from the surface). The solar wind, either directly or after interaction with the lunar surface (including magnetic anomalies), is the source of these protons in the near-wake region. Using the entire data from the SWIM sensor of the SARA experiment onboard Chandrayaan-1, we analyzed the velocity distribution of the protons observed in the near-lunar wake. The average velocity distribution functions, computed in the solar wind rest frame, were further separated based on the angle between the upstream solar wind velocity and the IMF. Although the protons enter the wake parallel as well as perpendicular to the IMF, the velocity distribution were not identical for the different IMF orientations, indicating the control of IMF in the proton entry processes. Several proton populations were identified from the velocity distribution and their possible entry mechanism were inferred based on the characteristics of the velocity distribution. These entry mechanisms include (i) diffusion of solar wind protons into the wake along IMF, (ii) the solar wind protons with finite gyro-radii that are aided by the wake boundary electric field, (iii) solar wind protons with gyro-radii larger than lunar radii from the tail of the solar wind velocity distribution, and (iv) scattering of solar wind protons from the dayside lunar surface or from magnetic anomalies. In order to gain more insight into the entry mechanisms associated with different populations, backtracing is carried out for each of these populations. For most of the populations, the source of the protons obtained from backtracing is found to be in agreement with that inferred from the velocity distribution. There are few populations that could not be explained by the known mechanisms

  7. Dynamics of the vortex wakes of flying and swimming vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Rayner, J M

    1995-01-01

    The vortex wakes of flying and swimming animals provide evidence of the history of aero- and hydrodynamic force generation during the locomotor cycle. Vortex-induced momentum flux in the wake is the reaction of forces the animal imposes on its environment, which must be in equilibrium with inertial and external forces. In flying birds and bats, the flapping wings generate lift both to provide thrust and to support the weight. Distinct wingbeat and wake movement patterns can be identified as gaits. In flow visualization experiments, only two wake patterns have been identified: a vortex ring gait with inactive upstroke, and a continuous vortex gait with active upstroke. These gaits may be modelled theoretically by free vortex and lifting line theory to predict mechanical energy consumption, aerodynamic forces and muscle activity. Longer-winged birds undergo a distinct gait change with speed, but shorter-winged species use the vortex ring gait at all speeds. In swimming fish, the situation is more complex: the wake vortices form a reversed von Kármán vortex street, but little is known about the mechanism of generation of the wake, or about how it varies with speed and acceleration or with body form and swimming mode. An unresolved complicating factor is the interaction between the drag wake of the flapping fish body and the thrusting wake from the tail.

  8. Experimental study on wake structure of single rising clean bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Ayaka; Takedomi, Yuta; Shirota, Minori; Sanada, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Masao

    2007-11-01

    Wake structure of clean bubble rising in quiescent silicone oil solution of photochromic dye is experimentally studied. A single bubble is generated, immediately after UV sheet light illuminates the part of the liquid just above the bubble generation nozzle in order to activate photochromic dye. Once the bubble passes across the colored part of the liquid, the bubble is accompanied by some portion of activated dye tracers; hence the flow structure in the rear of the single rising bubble is visualized. We capture stereo images of both wake structure and bubble motion. We study how wake structure changes with the increase in bubble size. We observe the stable axisymmetric wake structure, which is called `standing eddy' when bubble size is relatively small, and then wake structure becomes unstable and starts to oscillate with the increase in bubble size. With further increase in bubble size, a pair of streamwise vortices, which is called `double thread', is observed. We discuss in detail this transition from the steady wake to unsteady wake structure, especially double thread wake development and hairpin vortices shedding, in relation to the transition from rectilinear to spiral or zigzag bubble motions.

  9. On the investigation of cascade and turbomachinery rotor wake characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, R.; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1975-01-01

    The objective of the investigation reported in this thesis is to study the characteristics of a turbomachinery rotor wake, both analytically and experimentally. The constitutive equations for the rotor wake are developed using generalized tensors and a non-inertial frame of reference. Analytical and experimental investigation is carried out in two phases; the first phase involved the study of a cascade wake in the absence of rotation and three dimensionality. In the second phase the wake of a rotor is studied. Simplified two- and three-dimensional models are developed for the prediction of the mean velocity profile of the cascade and the rotor wake, respectively, using the principle of self-similarity. The effect of various major parameters of the rotor and the flow geometry is studied on the development of a rotor wake. Laws governing the decay of the wake velocity defect in a cascade and rotor wake as a function of downstream distance from the trailing edge, pressure gradient and other parameters are derived.

  10. Dynamics of the vortex wakes of flying and swimming vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Rayner, J M

    1995-01-01

    The vortex wakes of flying and swimming animals provide evidence of the history of aero- and hydrodynamic force generation during the locomotor cycle. Vortex-induced momentum flux in the wake is the reaction of forces the animal imposes on its environment, which must be in equilibrium with inertial and external forces. In flying birds and bats, the flapping wings generate lift both to provide thrust and to support the weight. Distinct wingbeat and wake movement patterns can be identified as gaits. In flow visualization experiments, only two wake patterns have been identified: a vortex ring gait with inactive upstroke, and a continuous vortex gait with active upstroke. These gaits may be modelled theoretically by free vortex and lifting line theory to predict mechanical energy consumption, aerodynamic forces and muscle activity. Longer-winged birds undergo a distinct gait change with speed, but shorter-winged species use the vortex ring gait at all speeds. In swimming fish, the situation is more complex: the wake vortices form a reversed von Kármán vortex street, but little is known about the mechanism of generation of the wake, or about how it varies with speed and acceleration or with body form and swimming mode. An unresolved complicating factor is the interaction between the drag wake of the flapping fish body and the thrusting wake from the tail. PMID:8571221

  11. Similarity Theory for an Axisymmetric Turbulent Wake with Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wosnik, Martin

    2011-11-01

    Axisymmetric wakes are special cases of turbulent shear flows in the sense that the local Reynolds number based on velocity deficit and wake width decreases with downstream position. Recently, Johansson et al. (Physics of Fluids, 15, no.3, 603-617, 2003) showed that two distinct similarity solutions for the non-swirling axisymmetric turbulent wake exist - one for infinite and one for low local Reynolds number. Every axisymmetric wake, no matter how high the initial Reynolds number, will eventually transition to the low Reynolds number similarity state in the far wake. Here equilibrium similarity considerations are applied to axisymmetric turbulent wakes with rotation (swirl), as can be found downstream of wind or hydrokinetic turbines. By examining under which conditions the reduced momentum and Reynolds stress transport equations for swirling wakes as well as the momentum integrals admit to similarity solutions, asymptotic scaling relations for the decay of velocity deficit and swirl are found. Swirl is introduced as an initial condition, and additional constraints on the similarity solution are introduced from the turbine (wake generator) operating parameters, e.g., tip speed ratio, angular induction, etc. The consequences of having a non-point source of thrust (drag) and angular momentum are investigated. Implications of the findings on the operation of wind and hydrokinetic turbines and turbine arrays are discussed.

  12. Data-driven RANS for prediction of wind turbine wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iungo, Giacomo Valerio; Viola, Francesco; Ciri, Umberto; Camarri, Simone; Rotea, Mario A.; Leonardi, Stefano

    2015-11-01

    Wind turbine wakes are highly turbulent flows resulting from the interaction between the atmospheric boundary layer and wake vorticity structures. Measurement technologies, such as wind LiDARs, are currently available to perform velocity measurements in a set of locations of wakes past utility-scale wind turbines; however, computational methods are still needed to predict wake downstream evolution. In this work, a low-computational cost and accurate algorithm is proposed for prediction of the spatial evolution of wind turbine wakes. Reynolds-averaged Navier Stokes equations (RANS) are formulated in cylindrical coordinates and simplified by using a boundary layer type approximation. Turbulence effects are taken into account with a mixing length model calibrated on the available observations. In this study, observations of wind turbine wakes consist in LES data of wakes produced by a wind turbine operating with different incoming wind and loading conditions. The mixing length calibrated on the LES data is constant in the near wake and only affected by the incoming turbulence, whereas further downstream it increases roughly linearly with the downstream position and with increased slope for increasing rotational speed of the turbine.

  13. The behavior of the wake behind a heated circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khashehchi, Morteza; Hooman, Kamel; Queensland Geothermal Energy Centre of Excellence (QGECE) Team

    2013-11-01

    The thermal effects on the characteristics of the wake behind a circular cylinder operating in the mixed convection regime are considered at relatively high Reynolds number using Particle Image Velocimetry. The experiments were conducted in a horizontal wind tunnel with the heated cylinder placed horizontally. With such assumptions, the direction of the thermally induced buoyancy force acting on the fluid surrounding the heated cylinder would be perpendicular to the flow direction. Experiments were conducted for three Reynolds numbers 1000, 2000 and 4000, where each of them were run at three different temperatures 25, 50 and 75°C. By adjusting different temperatures in different Reynolds numbers, the corresponding Richardson number (RiD = Gr/Re2) was varied between 0.0 (unheated) and 10, resulting in a change in the heat transfer process from forced convection to mixed convection. With increasing temperature of the heated cylinder, significant modifications of the wake flow pattern and wake vortex shedding process were clearly revealed. In low Richardson number, the size of the wake and the vortex shedding process in the wake was found to be quite similar to that of an unheated cylinder. As the Richardson number increased, the wake vortex shedding process was found to be altered and the relative position of the first detached vortices respect to the second one is changed. It was also found that the shedding frequency of the wake vortex structures and the wake closure length decreased with increasing Richardson number.

  14. 46 CFR 277.1 - Guam, Midway and Wake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Guam, Midway and Wake. 277.1 Section 277.1 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING SUBSIDIZED VESSELS AND OPERATORS DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN TRADE; INTERPRETATIONS § 277.1 Guam, Midway and Wake. Steamship...

  15. 46 CFR 277.1 - Guam, Midway and Wake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Guam, Midway and Wake. 277.1 Section 277.1 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING SUBSIDIZED VESSELS AND OPERATORS DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN TRADE; INTERPRETATIONS § 277.1 Guam, Midway and Wake. Steamship...

  16. 46 CFR 277.1 - Guam, Midway and Wake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Guam, Midway and Wake. 277.1 Section 277.1 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING SUBSIDIZED VESSELS AND OPERATORS DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN TRADE; INTERPRETATIONS § 277.1 Guam, Midway and Wake. Steamship...

  17. 46 CFR 277.1 - Guam, Midway and Wake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Guam, Midway and Wake. 277.1 Section 277.1 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING SUBSIDIZED VESSELS AND OPERATORS DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN TRADE; INTERPRETATIONS § 277.1 Guam, Midway and Wake. Steamship...

  18. 46 CFR 277.1 - Guam, Midway and Wake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Guam, Midway and Wake. 277.1 Section 277.1 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING SUBSIDIZED VESSELS AND OPERATORS DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN TRADE; INTERPRETATIONS § 277.1 Guam, Midway and Wake. Steamship...

  19. Basal forebrain control of wakefulness and cortical rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Anaclet, Christelle; Pedersen, Nigel P.; Ferrari, Loris L.; Venner, Anne; Bass, Caroline E.; Arrigoni, Elda; Fuller, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    Wakefulness, along with fast cortical rhythms and associated cognition, depend on the basal forebrain (BF). BF cholinergic cell loss in dementia and the sedative effect of anti-cholinergic drugs have long implicated these neurons as important for cognition and wakefulness. The BF also contains intermingled inhibitory GABAergic and excitatory glutamatergic cell groups whose exact neurobiological roles are unclear. Here we show that genetically targeted chemogenetic activation of BF cholinergic or glutamatergic neurons in behaving mice produced significant effects on state consolidation and/or the electroencephalogram but had no effect on total wake. Similar activation of BF GABAergic neurons produced sustained wakefulness and high-frequency cortical rhythms, whereas chemogenetic inhibition increased sleep. Our findings reveal a major contribution of BF GABAergic neurons to wakefulness and the fast cortical rhythms associated with cognition. These findings may be clinically applicable to manipulations aimed at increasing forebrain activation in dementia and the minimally conscious state. PMID:26524973

  20. Wakes of Self-propelled Bodies in Stratified Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voropayev, S. I.; Fernando, H. J. S.

    2008-11-01

    Using high Reynolds number (Re=10^4-10^5) experiments, the dynamics of stratified momentum wakes of self-propelled underwater and surface bodies were studied in (i) deep linearly stratified (deep ocean pycnocline), (ii) two layer (shallow pycnocline), and (iii) surface stratified (turbocline) fluids, and theoretical models wee advanced to explain the flow behavior. These models: (i) predict conditions under which submerged wakes signatures penetrate to the water surface, as expressed by the Confinement and Contrast numbers, and (ii) describe IR (infra-red) surface wakes signatures, as expressed by the Contrast and modified Froude numbers. If decaying turbulence is present surrounding the wake, the penetration of wake signature to the surface is still possible. Estimates for typical oceanic cases are given. PIV, LIF and high sensitivity Infrared Imaging cameras were employed for flow diagnostics.

  1. Tau protein role in sleep-wake cycle.

    PubMed

    Cantero, Jose L; Hita-Yañez, Eva; Moreno-Lopez, Bernardo; Portillo, Federico; Rubio, Alicia; Avila, Jesus

    2010-01-01

    Evidence has shown that the lack of tau produces subtle changes in neuronal structure and modest impairment in complex behaviors, suggesting compensatory mechanisms carried out by other neuronal microtubule-associated proteins. Here we show major abnormalities in sleep-wake cycle of tau-deficient animals including increased wakefulness duration and decreased non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep time, a higher number of state transitions between NREM and wake, and shortened sleep bouts. Altered sleep structure in tau-/- mice was accompanied by a significant decline in delta power together with an enhanced spectral density of sleep spindles during NREM sleep. No significant differences were observed in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep between the two mouse strains. Taken together, these results suggest that tau indirectly participates in the regulation of the sleep-wake cycle modulating not only the control and maintenance of global brain states but also the cerebral oscillatory patterns underlying sleep-wake states.

  2. [About evolution of sleep-wakefulness cycle in vertebrates].

    PubMed

    Oganesian, G A; Aristakesian, E A; Vataev, S I

    2012-10-01

    Data about behavioral, somato-vegetative and neurophysiological parameters of sleep and wakefulness in insects, cold- and warm-blooded vertebrates are provided. Hypotheses existing now about evolutionary formation of separate sleep phases and stages in vertebrates are considered. In the review are shown the data about correlations of quantitative characteristics of sleep and wake in some mammals with basic metabolic rate, lifestyle, environmental habits. The original experimental results at formation of neurophysiological characteristics of sleep and wake in vertebrates, phylogeny and in ontogeny of mature and immature mammals are provided in detail. On the basis of own concepts about evolutionary development of sleep-wakefulness cycle in vertebrates the interactions of telencephalic, diencephalic and rhombencepalic parts of brain in the processes of cycle wakefulness cycle integration are discussed. PMID:23401913

  3. Collimator wake fields in the SLC final focus

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmermann, F.; Bane, K.L.F.; Ng, C.K.

    1996-06-01

    The SLC final focus system accommodates 29 fixed or adjustable collimators for machine protection and background reduction. By amplifying pulse to pulse orbit variations and by generating emittance growth, collimator wake fields may degrade the beam quality at the interaction point (IP). In the SLC final focus, collimator half apertures are larger than the bunch length, so that the standard collimator wake formula of Bane and Morton does not apply. Numerical wake field calculations for SLC parameters agree quite well with the high frequency impedance of a step out transition. Due to the nature of a final focus system, the wake field kicks from all collimators add coherently, and the overall impact on luminosity can be significant. This paper suggests that collimator wake fields in the final focus provide a possible explanation for the 30% discrepancy between expected and measured luminosity in the 1994/95 SLC run.

  4. Dynamics of sleep-wake transitions during sleep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, C.-C.; Nunes Amaral, L. A.; Havlin, S.; Ivanov, P. Ch.; Penzel, T.; Peter, J.-H.; Stanley, H. E.

    2002-03-01

    We study the dynamics of the awakening during the night for healthy subjects and find that the wake and the sleep periods exhibit completely different behavior: the durations of wake periods are characterized by a scale-free power law distribution, while the durations of sleep periods have an exponential distribution with a characteristic time scale. We find that the characteristic time scale of sleep periods changes throughout the night. In contrast, there is no measurable variation in the power law behavior for the durations of wake periods. We develop a stochastic model which agrees with the data and suggests that the difference in the dynamics of sleep and wake states arises from the constraints on the number of microstates in the sleep-wake system.

  5. Basal forebrain control of wakefulness and cortical rhythms.

    PubMed

    Anaclet, Christelle; Pedersen, Nigel P; Ferrari, Loris L; Venner, Anne; Bass, Caroline E; Arrigoni, Elda; Fuller, Patrick M

    2015-11-03

    Wakefulness, along with fast cortical rhythms and associated cognition, depend on the basal forebrain (BF). BF cholinergic cell loss in dementia and the sedative effect of anti-cholinergic drugs have long implicated these neurons as important for cognition and wakefulness. The BF also contains intermingled inhibitory GABAergic and excitatory glutamatergic cell groups whose exact neurobiological roles are unclear. Here we show that genetically targeted chemogenetic activation of BF cholinergic or glutamatergic neurons in behaving mice produced significant effects on state consolidation and/or the electroencephalogram but had no effect on total wake. Similar activation of BF GABAergic neurons produced sustained wakefulness and high-frequency cortical rhythms, whereas chemogenetic inhibition increased sleep. Our findings reveal a major contribution of BF GABAergic neurons to wakefulness and the fast cortical rhythms associated with cognition. These findings may be clinically applicable to manipulations aimed at increasing forebrain activation in dementia and the minimally conscious state.

  6. What to do With Wake-Up Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    Wake-up stroke, defined as the situation where a patient awakens with stroke symptoms that were not present prior to falling asleep, represents roughly 1 in 5 acute ischemic strokes and remains a therapeutic dilemma. Patients with wake-up stroke were excluded from most ischemic stroke treatment trials and are often not eligible for acute reperfusion therapy in clinical practice, leading to poor outcomes. Studies of neuroimaging with standard noncontrast computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and multimodal perfusion-based CT and MRI suggest wake-up stroke may occur shortly before awakening and may assist in selecting patients for acute reperfusion therapies. Pilot studies of wake-up stroke treatment based on these neuroimaging features are promising but have limited generalizability. Ongoing randomized treatment trials using neuroimaging-based patient selection may identify a subset of patients with wake-up stroke that can safely benefit from acute reperfusion therapies. PMID:26288674

  7. Effects of initial conditions on the development of curved wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weygandt, James H.; Mehta, Rabindra D.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been conducted on the three-dimensional structure of curved plane wakes developing from tripped and untripped initial boundary layers. The effects of mild stream-wise curvature on a wake generated at the trailing edge of a slowly tapering splitter plate were investigated at a Reynolds number of about 30,000. With the initial boundary layers turbulent, spatially-stationary streamwise vorticity was not observed. The curvature affected the wake growth and defect-decay rates, but in different ways for each of the two initial conditions. The effects of curvature were also apparent in the Reynolds stress results, especially in the primary shear stress distributions, which showed that the levels on the unstable side were increased significantly compared to those for a straight wake, while those on the stable side were decreased, with the effect stronger in the initially laminar wake.

  8. Contrail ice particles in aircraft wakes and their climatic importance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, Ulrich; JeßBerger, Philipp; Voigt, Christiane

    2013-06-01

    Measurements of gaseous (NO, NOy, SO2, HONO) and ice particle concentrations in young contrails in primary and secondary wakes of aircraft of different sizes (B737, A319, A340, A380) are used to investigate ice particle formation behind aircraft. The gas concentrations are largest in the primary wake and decrease with increasing altitude in the secondary wake, as expected for passive trace gases and aircraft-dependent dilution. In contrast, the measured ice particle concentrations were found larger in the secondary wake than in the primary wake. The contrails contain more ice particles than expected for previous black carbon (soot) estimates. The ice concentrations may result from soot-induced ice nucleation for a soot number emission index of 1015 kg-1. For a doubled ice particle concentration in young contrails, a contrail cirrus model computes about 60% increases of global radiative forcing by contrail cirrus because of simultaneous increases in optical depth, age, and cover.

  9. Quiet airfoils for small and large wind turbines

    DOEpatents

    Tangler, James L.; Somers, Dan L.

    2012-06-12

    Thick airfoil families with desirable aerodynamic performance with minimal airfoil induced noise. The airfoil families are suitable for a variety of wind turbine designs and are particularly well-suited for use with horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWTs) with constant or variable speed using pitch and/or stall control. In exemplary embodiments, a first family of three thick airfoils is provided for use with small wind turbines and second family of three thick airfoils is provided for use with very large machines, e.g., an airfoil defined for each of three blade radial stations or blade portions defined along the length of a blade. Each of the families is designed to provide a high maximum lift coefficient or high lift, to exhibit docile stalls, to be relatively insensitive to roughness, and to achieve a low profile drag.

  10. The Role of Turbulence in Chemical and Dynamical Processes in the Near-Field Wake of Subsonic Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewellen, D. C.; Lewellen, W. Steve

    2002-01-01

    During this grant, covering the period from September 1998 to December 2001, we continued the investigation of the role of turbulent mixing in the wake of subsonic aircraft initiated in 1994 for NASA's Atmospheric Effects of Aviation Project. The goal of the research has been to provide sufficient understanding and quantitative analytical capability to assess the dynamical, chemical, and microphysical interactions in the near-field wake that have the greatest potential to influence the global atmospheric impact of the projected fleet of subsonic aircraft. Through large-eddy simulations we have shown that turbulence in the early wake dynamics can have a strong effect on both the ice microphysics of contrail evolution and on wake chemistry. The wake vortex dynamics are the primary determinant of the vertical extent of the contrail; this together with the local wind shear largely determines the horizontal extent. The fraction of the initial ice crystals surviving the wake vortex dynamics, their spatial distribution, and the ice mass distribution are all sensitive to the aircraft type, assumed initial ice crystal number, and ambient humidity and turbulence conditions. Our model indicates that there is a significant range of conditions for which a smaller aircraft such as a B737 produces as significant a persistent contrail as a larger aircraft such as a B747, even though the latter consumes almost five times as much fuel. Large-eddy simulations of the near wake of a B757 provided a fine-grained chemical-dynamical representation of simplified NOx - HOx chemistry in wakes of ages from a few seconds to several minutes. By sampling the simulated data in a manner similar to that of in situ aircraft measurements it was possible to provide a likely explanation for a puzzle uncovered in the 1996 SUCCESS flight measurements of OH and HO2 The results illustrate the importance of considering fluid dynamics effects in interpreting chemistry results when mixing rates and species

  11. Accuracy of the actuator disc-RANS approach for predicting the performance and wake of tidal turbines.

    PubMed

    Batten, W M J; Harrison, M E; Bahaj, A S

    2013-02-28

    The actuator disc-RANS model has widely been used in wind and tidal energy to predict the wake of a horizontal axis turbine. The model is appropriate where large-scale effects of the turbine on a flow are of interest, for example, when considering environmental impacts, or arrays of devices. The accuracy of the model for modelling the wake of tidal stream turbines has not been demonstrated, and flow predictions presented in the literature for similar modelled scenarios vary significantly. This paper compares the results of the actuator disc-RANS model, where the turbine forces have been derived using a blade-element approach, to experimental data measured in the wake of a scaled turbine. It also compares the results with those of a simpler uniform actuator disc model. The comparisons show that the model is accurate and can predict up to 94 per cent of the variation in the experimental velocity data measured on the centreline of the wake, therefore demonstrating that the actuator disc-RANS model is an accurate approach for modelling a turbine wake, and a conservative approach to predict performance and loads. It can therefore be applied to similar scenarios with confidence.

  12. Accuracy of the actuator disc-RANS approach for predicting the performance and wake of tidal turbines.

    PubMed

    Batten, W M J; Harrison, M E; Bahaj, A S

    2013-02-28

    The actuator disc-RANS model has widely been used in wind and tidal energy to predict the wake of a horizontal axis turbine. The model is appropriate where large-scale effects of the turbine on a flow are of interest, for example, when considering environmental impacts, or arrays of devices. The accuracy of the model for modelling the wake of tidal stream turbines has not been demonstrated, and flow predictions presented in the literature for similar modelled scenarios vary significantly. This paper compares the results of the actuator disc-RANS model, where the turbine forces have been derived using a blade-element approach, to experimental data measured in the wake of a scaled turbine. It also compares the results with those of a simpler uniform actuator disc model. The comparisons show that the model is accurate and can predict up to 94 per cent of the variation in the experimental velocity data measured on the centreline of the wake, therefore demonstrating that the actuator disc-RANS model is an accurate approach for modelling a turbine wake, and a conservative approach to predict performance and loads. It can therefore be applied to similar scenarios with confidence. PMID:23319711

  13. Comparing offshore wind farm wake observed from satellite SAR and wake model results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bay Hasager, Charlotte

    2014-05-01

    Offshore winds can be observed from satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR). In the FP7 EERA DTOC project, the European Energy Research Alliance project on Design Tools for Offshore Wind Farm Clusters, there is focus on mid- to far-field wind farm wakes. The more wind farms are constructed nearby other wind farms, the more is the potential loss in annual energy production in all neighboring wind farms due to wind farm cluster effects. It is of course dependent upon the prevailing wind directions and wind speed levels, the distance between the wind farms, the wind turbine sizes and spacing. Some knowledge is available within wind farm arrays and in the near-field from various investigations. There are 58 offshore wind farms in the Northern European seas grid connected and in operation. Several of those are spaced near each other. There are several twin wind farms in operation including Nysted-1 and Rødsand-2 in the Baltic Sea, and Horns Rev 1 and Horns Rev 2, Egmond aan Zee and Prinses Amalia, and Thompton 1 and Thompton 2 all in the North Sea. There are ambitious plans of constructing numerous wind farms - great clusters of offshore wind farms. Current investigation of offshore wind farms includes mapping from high-resolution satellite SAR of several of the offshore wind farms in operation in the North Sea. Around 20 images with wind farm wake cases have been retrieved and processed. The data are from the Canadian RADARSAT-1/-2 satellites. These observe in microwave C-band and have been used for ocean surface wind retrieval during several years. The satellite wind maps are valid at 10 m above sea level. The wakes are identified in the raw images as darker areas downwind of the wind farms. In the SAR-based wind maps the wake deficit is found as areas of lower winds downwind of the wind farms compared to parallel undisturbed flow in the flow direction. The wind direction is clearly visible from lee effects and wind streaks in the images. The wind farm wake cases

  14. The Life and Death of Desegregation Policy in Wake County Public School System and Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Sheneka M.; Houck, Eric A.

    2013-01-01

    The state of North Carolina is one of few states in the South in which two large districts committed to desegregating schools in the early 1970s. However, the state's two largest districts, Charlotte-Mecklenberg Schools (CMS) and Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) have experienced ups and downs in their policy commitment to desegregated…

  15. An experimental study on the aeromechanics and wake characteristics of a novel twin-rotor wind turbine in a turbulent boundary layer flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenyu; Tian, Wei; Ozbay, Ahmet; Sharma, Anupam; Hu, Hui

    2016-09-01

    The aeromechanic performance and wake characteristics of a novel twin-rotor wind turbine (TRWT) design, which has an extra set of smaller, auxiliary rotor blades appended in front of the main rotor, was evaluated experimentally, in comparison with those of a conventional single-rotor wind turbine (SRWT) design. The comparative study was performed in a large-scale wind tunnel with scaled TRWT and SRWT models mounted in the same incoming turbulent boundary layer flow. In addition to quantifying power outputs and the dynamic wind loadings acting on the model turbines, the wake characteristics behind the model turbines were also measured by using a particle image velocimetry system and a Cobra anemometry probe. The measurement results reveal that, while the TRWT design is capable of harnessing more wind energy from the same incoming airflow by reducing the roots losses incurred in the region near the roots of the main rotor blades, it also cause much greater dynamic wind loadings acting on the TRWT model and higher velocity deficits in the near wake behind the TRWT model, in comparison with those of the SRWT case. Due to the existence of the auxiliary rotor, more complex vortex structures were found to be generated in the wake behind the TRWT model, which greatly enhanced the turbulent mixing in the turbine wake, and caused a much faster recovery of the velocity deficits in the turbine far wake. As a result, the TRWT design was also found to enable the same downstream turbine to generate more power when sited in the wake behind the TRWT model than that in the SRWT wake, i.e., by mitigating wake losses in typical wind farm settings.

  16. First comparison of LES of an offshore wind turbine wake with dual-Doppler lidar measurement in the offshore wind farm "alpha ventus"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, L.; Trabucchi, D.; Witha, B.; van Dooren, M.; Trujillo, J. J.; Schneemann, J.; Kühn, M.

    2014-12-01

    The planning of offshore wind farms is still tainted with high risks due to unknown power losses and a higher level of fatigue loads due to wake effects. Recently, Large Eddy Simulations (LES) are more and more used for simulating offshore wind turbine wakes as they resolve the atmospheric turbulence as well as the wake turbulence.However, for an application of LES wind fields to assess offshore wind farm flow a proper validation with measured data is necessary.Several methods have been investigated at the University of Oldenburg to compare LES wind fields and lidar measurements. In this study we apply one of these methods to validate wake simulations of a single wake of a 5MW wind turbine in the German offshore wind farm "alpha ventus" with processed dual-Doppler lidar measurements in the same wind farm.The simulations are performed with the LES model PALM, which has been enhanced by two different approaches of actuator models to simulate the wake of single wind turbines and the interaction of wakes in wind farms. Effects of tower and nacelle are regarded as well as simple turbine control mechanisms. The simulations are initialized with comparable atmospheric conditions as during the time of lidar operation by using measurements from the adjacent meteorological mast FINO 1.Plan Position Indicator (PPI) measurements have been performed with two long-range wind lidars installed at different opposing platforms at the border of the wind farm. A Cartesian grid was overlapped to the scanned region and a dual-Doppler algorithm was applied in order to estimate the horizontal stationary wind field on the grid nodes. To our knowledge, the presented study is one of the first validations of LES wake simulations with lidar measurements and first which validates offshore LES wake simulations with 2D lidar data.

  17. Sound Generation by Aircraft Wake Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, Jay C.; Wang, Frank Y.

    2003-01-01

    This report provides an extensive analysis of potential wake vortex noise sources that might be utilized to aid in their tracking. Several possible mechanisms of aircraft vortex sound generation are examined on the basis of discrete vortex dynamic models and characteristic acoustic signatures calculated by application of vortex sound theory. It is shown that the most robust mechanisms result in very low frequency infrasound. An instability of the vortex core structure is discussed and shown to be a possible mechanism for generating higher frequency sound bordering the audible frequency range. However, the frequencies produced are still low and cannot explain the reasonably high-pitched sound that has occasionally been observed experimentally. Since the robust mechanisms appear to generate only very low frequency sound, infrasonic tracking of the vortices may be warranted.

  18. Rosetta - waking up and then some

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M. G. G. T.; Altobelli, N.; Jansen, F.; Kueppers, M.; Schwehm, G.; Alexander, C.; Barthelemy, M.; Geiger, B.; Moissl, R.; Vallat, C.; Grieger, B.; Schmidt, A.

    2013-09-01

    The Rosetta Mission is the third cornerstone mission (after XMM and Cluster/SOHO) of the ESA programme Horizon 2000. The aim of the mission is to map the comet 67-P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko by remote sensing, to examine its environment insitu and its evolution in the inner solar system. The lander Philae will be the first device to land on a comet and perform in-situ science on the surface. Launched in March 2004 and after a number of gravity assists and various asteroid fly -bys, the spacecraft entered deep space hibernation in June 2011. Nearly 10 years after launch on 20th January 2014 at 10:00 UTC the spacecraft will wake up for comet rendez-vous preparation. This presentation will provide a brief overview of the mission up to date and provide an insight into the exciting years we have ahead of us as Rosetta reaches and studies its target.

  19. Bubble size measurements in a bubbly wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karn, Ashish; Hong, Jiarong; Ellis, Christopher; Arndt, Roger

    2014-11-01

    Measurements of bubble size distribution are ubiquitous in many industrial applications. Conventional methods using image analysis to measure bubble size are limited in their robustness and applicability in highly turbulent bubbly flows. These flows usually impose significant challenges for image processing such as a wide range of bubble size distribution, spatial and temporal inhomogeneity of image background including in-focus and out-of-focus bubbles, as well as the excessive presence of bubble clusters. This talk introduces a multi-level image analysis approach to detect a wide size range of bubbles and resolve bubble clusters from images obtained in a turbulent bubbly wake of a ventilated hydrofoil. The proposed approach was implemented to derive bubble size and air ventilation rate from the synthetic images and the experiments, respectively. The results show a great promise in its applicability for online monitoring of bubbly flows in a number of industrial applications. Sponsored by Office of Naval Research and the Department of Energy.

  20. [The unresponsive wakefulness syndrome: Dutch perspectives].

    PubMed

    van Erp, W S; Lavrijsen, J C M; Koopmans, R T C M

    2016-01-01

    The unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (UWS), formerly known as the vegetative state, is one of the most dramatic outcomes of acquired brain injury. Patients with UWS open their eyes spontaneously but demonstrate only reflexive behavior; there are no signs of consciousness. Research shows that, for years now, the Netherlands has the world's lowest documented prevalence of UWS. Unfortunately, this small group of vulnerable patients does not receive the care it needs. Access to specialized rehabilitation is limited, misdiagnosis rates are high and a substantial number of UWS patients receive life-prolonging treatment beyond chances of recovery, despite a framework allowing for discontinuation of such treatment once recovery of consciousness has become unlikely. By comparing data from 2012 with that of 2003, this paper illustrates the current situation and outlook for UWS patients in the Netherlands and makes recommendations for the optimization of treatment and care, as well as for future research. PMID:27484418

  1. Wake Field Effects in the APT Linac.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurennoy, Sergey

    1998-04-01

    The 1.7-GeV 100-mA CW proton linac is now under design for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) Project. While wake-field effects are usually considered negligible in proton linacs, an analysis for the APT accelerator has been performed to exclude potential problems at such a high current leading to beam losses. Loss factors and resonance frequency spectra of various discontinuities of the vacuum chamber are investigated, both analytically and using 2-D and 3-D simulation codes with a single bunch as well as with many bunches. The only noticeable effect is the HOM heating of the 5-cell superconducting cavities. However, it has an acceptable level and will be further reduced by HOM couplers.

  2. [Facilitation of a state of wakefulness by semi-chronic treatment with sulbutiamin (Arcalion) in Macaca mulatta].

    PubMed

    Balzamo, E; Vuillon-Cacciuttolo, G

    1982-12-01

    Cortical electroencephalographic (EEG) activities and nycthemeral states of vigilance organization were studied in 6 adult rhesus monkeys during subchronic administration (10 days) of Sulbutiamin, a synthesized derivative of thiamine (300 mg/kg/day). Sulbutiamin induced the following modifications: (1) In the EEG activities: increase in occurrence of fast rhythms (over 28 c/sec) during waking and also during slow sleep (SS) in which their amplitude doubled. SS spindles increased in number and amplitude. (2) In vigilance organization: waking was enhanced all along the 24 h recording and SS was reorganized (particularly at night), mostly light sleep: large decrease in stage 2 duration, increase in stage 1. REM sleep duration remained stable. These changes, occurring at around day 5 of the treatment, were more pronounced on day 10 and disappeared 2-5 days after withdrawal. This study demonstrated the clear action of Sulbutiamin upon the mechanisms regulating waking and light sleep. PMID:7170385

  3. The dynamics of charged particles in the near wake of a very negatively charged body - Laboratory experiment and numerical simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, M. Alvin; Chan, Chung; Cooke, David L.; Tautz, Maurice F.

    1989-01-01

    A numerical simulation that is cylindrical in configuration space and three-dimensional in velocity space has been initiated to test a model for the near-wake dynamics of a very negatively charged body, with reference to the plasma environment around spacecraft. The simulation parameters were closely matched to those of a laboratory experiment so that the results can be compared directly. The laboratory study showed that the electrons and ions can display different temporal features in the filling-in of the wake; and that they can both be found within one body diameter of an object with a highly negative body potential. It was also found that the temperature of the electrons in the very near wake could be somewhat colder than the ambient value, suggesting the possibility of a filtering mechanism being operative there. The simulation results to date largely corroborate the density findings.

  4. Statistical Study of the Lunar Plasma Wake Outer Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ames, W. F.; Brain, D. A.; Poppe, A.; Halekas, J. S.; McFadden, J. P.; Glassmeier, K.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2012-12-01

    The Moon does not have an intrinsic magnetic field and lacks the conductivity necessary to develop an induced magnetosphere. Therefore, the interaction of the Moon with the solar wind is dominated by impact absorption of solar wind particles on the day side and the generation of a plasma wake on the night side. A plasma density gradient forms between the flowing solar wind and the plasma wake, causing solar wind plasma to gradually refill the wake region. Electrons fill the wake first, pulling ions in after them via ambi-polar diffusion. Despite the existence of comprehensive new plasma measurements of the lunar wake region, relatively little attention has been devoted to the shape and variability in location of its outer boundary. Improved knowledge of this boundary condition for the physical processes associated with wake refilling would provide useful tests for simulations and theoretical models of the lunar plasma interaction. The ARTEMIS (Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence, and Electrodynamics of the Moon's Interaction with the Sun) spacecraft mission is a two-probe lunar mission derived from the THEMIS (Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions During Substorms) mission, repurposed to study the lunar space and planetary environment. Over the course of the mission there have been numerous passes of the ARTEMIS spacecraft through the lunar wake, at distances of up to seven lunar radii from the Moon. They have occurred for a variety of external conditions. We present a statistical study of tens of selected wake-crossing events of the ARTEMIS probes in 2011, using data primarily from the ARTEMIS fluxgate magnetometers (FGMs) and electrostatic analyzers (ESAs) to identify when the spacecraft entered and exited the wake. We study the shape of the outer wake boundary and its response to external conditions using two different techniques: one defines the wake boundary by a sharp decrease in ion density, the other by a decrease in magnetic field magnitude

  5. Stratospheric aircraft exhaust plume and wake chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miake-Lye, R. C.; Martinez-Sanchez, M.; Brown, R. C.; Kolb, C. E.; Worsnop, D. R.; Zahniser, M. S.; Robinson, G. N.; Rodriguez, J. M.; Ko, M. K. W.; Shia, R-L.

    1993-01-01

    Progress to date in an ongoing study to analyze and model emissions leaving a proposed High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) from when the exhaust gases leave the engine until they are deposited at atmospheric scales in the stratosphere is documented. A kinetic condensation model was implemented to predict heterogeneous condensation in the plume regime behind an HSCT flying in the lower stratosphere. Simulations were performed to illustrate the parametric dependence of contrail droplet growth on the exhaust condensation nuclei number density and size distribution. Model results indicate that the condensation of water vapor is strongly dependent on the number density of activated CN. Incorporation of estimates for dilution factors into a Lagrangian box model of the far-wake regime with scale-dependent diffusion indicates negligible decrease in ozone and enhancement of water concentrations of 6-13 times background, which decrease rapidly over 1-3 days. Radiative calculations indicate a net differential cooling rate of the plume about 3K/day at the beginning of the wake regime, with a total subsidence ranging between 0.4 and 1 km. Results from the Lagrangian plume model were used to estimate the effect of repeated superposition of aircraft plumes on the concentrations of water and NO(y) along a flight corridor. Results of laboratory studies of heterogeneous chemistry are also described. Kinetics of HCl, N2O5 and ClONO2 uptake on liquid sulfuric acid were measured as a function of composition and temperature. Refined measurements of the thermodynamics of nitric acid hydrates indicate that metastable dihydrate may play a role in the nucleation of more stable trihydrates PSC's.

  6. Assessing the Influence of Wake Dynamics on the Performance and Aeroelastic Behavior of Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kecskemety, Krista Marie

    While wind turbine farms are currently rapidly expanding, there are numerous technological challenges that must be overcome before wind energy represents a significant contributor to energy generation in the United States. One of the primary challenges is accurately accounting for the aerodynamic environment. This dissertation is focused on improving the aerodynamic modeling through the incorporation of wake effects. A comprehensive verification and validation of the NREL FAST code, which has been enhanced to include a Free Vortex Wake (FVW) model was conducted. The verification and validation is carried out through a comparison of wake geometry, blade lift distribution, wind turbine power and force and moment coefficients using a combination of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and experimental data. The results are also compared against Blade Element Momentum Theory (BEM), and results from an extensive experimental campaign by NREL on the prediction capabilities of wind turbine modeling tools. Results indicate that the enhanced aeroelastic code generally provides improved predictions. However, in several notable cases the predictions are only marginally improved, or even worse, than those generated using Blade Element Momentum Theory aerodynamics. After verification and validation of the model, the impact of including the free vortex wake model in the presence of turbulent flow was also examined. The inclusion of turbulence created large differences between BEM and FVW in predictions of rotor loading and power, however the amplitude of the turbulence did not have a large impact on the difference between the FVW and BEM. In addition to loading and power predictions, the structural response (tip deflections and root bending moments) of the wind turbine is investigated in the presence of turbulent inflow. The results indicate that the turbulence intensity and spectral model have a significant effect on the importance of the wake dynamics in modeling the tip

  7. On the transient dynamics of the wake and trajectory of free falling cones with various apex angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamed, Ali M.; Jin, Yaqing; Chamorro, Leonardo P.

    2015-11-01

    The early free fall stages of cones with a density ratio 1.18 and apex angles of 30°, 45°, 60°, and 90° were studied using a wireless 3-axis gyroscope and accelerometer to describe the cone 3D motions, while particle image velocimetry was used to capture the induced flow in the near wake. The Reynolds number based on the cones diameter and the velocity at which the cone reaches the first local velocity maximum is found to consistently set the limit between two distinctive states. Relatively rapid growth in the cone nutation and departure from the vertical axis is observed after this Re is reached. Sequences of vertical velocity, swirling strength, LES-decomposed velocity, and pressure fields show the formation and growth of a large and initially symmetric recirculation bubble at the cone base. Those also highlight the presence of a symmetric 3D vortex rollup dominating the near wake in the early stages of the fall. A shear layer develops at the edge of the wake and manifests in the periodic shedding of Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices that, due to the nature of the recirculation bubble, reorganize to constitute a part of the rollup. Later in the fall, the wake loses symmetry and shows high population of vortical structures leading to turbulence. The asymmetric wake leads to strong interactions between the flow field and the cone evidenced by the shedding of a part of the 3D large-scale vortex rollup. This shedding process along with the cone rotation around its own axis provides a possible explanation of the helical wake structure observed in other studies.

  8. A turbulent wake as a tracer of 30,000 years of Mira's mass loss history.

    PubMed

    Martin, D Christopher; Seibert, Mark; Neill, James D; Schiminovich, David; Forster, Karl; Rich, R Michael; Welsh, Barry Y; Madore, Barry F; Wheatley, Jonathan M; Morrissey, Patrick; Barlow, Tom A

    2007-08-16

    Mira is one of the first variable stars ever discovered and it is the prototype (and also the nearest example) of a class of low-to-intermediate-mass stars in the late stages of stellar evolution. These stars are relatively common and they return a large fraction of their original mass to the interstellar medium (ISM) (ref. 2) through a processed, dusty, molecular wind. Thus stars in Mira's stage of evolution have a direct impact on subsequent star and planet formation in their host galaxy. Previously, the only direct observation of the interaction between Mira-type stellar winds and the ISM was in the infrared. Here we report the discovery of an ultraviolet-emitting bow shock and turbulent wake extending over 2 degrees on the sky, arising from Mira's large space velocity and the interaction between its wind and the ISM. The wake is visible only in the far ultraviolet and is consistent with an unusual emission mechanism whereby molecular hydrogen is excited by turbulent mixing of cool molecular gas and shock-heated gas. This wind wake is a tracer of the past 30,000 years of Mira's mass-loss history and provides an excellent laboratory for studying turbulent stellar wind-ISM interactions. PMID:17700694

  9. A turbulent wake as a tracer of 30,000 years of Mira's mass loss history.

    PubMed

    Martin, D Christopher; Seibert, Mark; Neill, James D; Schiminovich, David; Forster, Karl; Rich, R Michael; Welsh, Barry Y; Madore, Barry F; Wheatley, Jonathan M; Morrissey, Patrick; Barlow, Tom A

    2007-08-16

    Mira is one of the first variable stars ever discovered and it is the prototype (and also the nearest example) of a class of low-to-intermediate-mass stars in the late stages of stellar evolution. These stars are relatively common and they return a large fraction of their original mass to the interstellar medium (ISM) (ref. 2) through a processed, dusty, molecular wind. Thus stars in Mira's stage of evolution have a direct impact on subsequent star and planet formation in their host galaxy. Previously, the only direct observation of the interaction between Mira-type stellar winds and the ISM was in the infrared. Here we report the discovery of an ultraviolet-emitting bow shock and turbulent wake extending over 2 degrees on the sky, arising from Mira's large space velocity and the interaction between its wind and the ISM. The wake is visible only in the far ultraviolet and is consistent with an unusual emission mechanism whereby molecular hydrogen is excited by turbulent mixing of cool molecular gas and shock-heated gas. This wind wake is a tracer of the past 30,000 years of Mira's mass-loss history and provides an excellent laboratory for studying turbulent stellar wind-ISM interactions.

  10. Wind Tunnel Investigation of the Near-wake Flow Dynamics of a Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi-Tari, P.; Siddiqui, K.; Refan, M.; Hangan, H.

    2014-06-01

    Experiments conducted in a large wind tunnel set-up investigate the 3D flow dynamics within the near-wake region of a horizontal axis wind turbine. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements quantify the mean and turbulent components of the flow field. Measurements are performed in multiple adjacent horizontal planes in order to cover the area behind the rotor in a large radial interval, at several locations downstream of the rotor. The measurements were phase-locked in order to facilitate the re-construction of the threedimensional flow field. The mean velocity and turbulence characteristics clearly correlate with the near-wake vortex dynamics and in particular with the helical structure of the flow, formed immediately behind the turbine rotor. Due to the tip and root vortices, the mean and turbulent characteristics of the flow are highly dependent on the azimuth angle in regions close to the rotor and close to the blade tip and root. Further from the rotor, the characteristics of the flow become phase independent. This can be attributed to the breakdown of the vortical structure of the flow, resulting from the turbulent diffusion. In general, the highest levels of turbulence are observed in shear layer around the tip of the blades, which decrease rapidly downstream. The shear zone grows in the radial direction as the wake moves axially, resulting in velocity recovery toward the centre of the rotor due to momentum transport.

  11. Wake Modes of Rotationally Oscillating Cylinders at low Re

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellappan, Prabu; Pottebaum, Tait

    2011-11-01

    Vortex shedding from bluff bodies is important in various engineering applications because the wake can have many effects, including exciting vibrations in structures and altering convective heat transfer. While vortex shedding from cylinders in cross-flow and cylinders undergoing transverse and in-line oscillations has been studied extensively, only limited data is available for rotational oscillations and is mainly limited to spectral analysis of the wake. Water tunnel experiments were carried out at Re = 150 to investigate the wake of a rotationally oscillating cylinder for oscillation frequencies from 0.67 to 3.5 times the natural shedding frequency and peak-to-peak oscillation amplitudes up to 320°. DPIV was used to study both the near and far wake within this parameter space. Well-defined patterns of wake vortices were observed in distinct regions of the parameter space, similar to the wake modes of transversely oscillating cylinders in cross-flow. In portions of the parameter space for which information exists in the literature the wake modes are well-related to spectral data. Variants of modes in previously unexplored regions are explained in terms of harmonics. The initial application of these results to understanding heat transfer enhancement from rotationally oscillating cylinders will also be addressed.

  12. Neuroligin-1 links neuronal activity to sleep-wake regulation

    PubMed Central

    El Helou, Janine; Bélanger-Nelson, Erika; Freyburger, Marlène; Dorsaz, Stéphane; Curie, Thomas; La Spada, Francesco; Gaudreault, Pierre-Olivier; Beaumont, Éric; Pouliot, Philippe; Lesage, Frédéric; Frank, Marcos G.; Franken, Paul; Mongrain, Valérie

    2013-01-01

    Maintaining wakefulness is associated with a progressive increase in the need for sleep. This phenomenon has been linked to changes in synaptic function. The synaptic adhesion molecule Neuroligin-1 (NLG1) controls the activity and synaptic localization of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors, which activity is impaired by prolonged wakefulness. We here highlight that this pathway may underlie both the adverse effects of sleep loss on cognition and the subsequent changes in cortical synchrony. We found that the expression of specific Nlg1 transcript variants is changed by sleep deprivation in three mouse strains. These observations were associated with strain-specific changes in synaptic NLG1 protein content. Importantly, we showed that Nlg1 knockout mice are not able to sustain wakefulness and spend more time in nonrapid eye movement sleep than wild-type mice. These changes occurred with modifications in waking quality as exemplified by low theta/alpha activity during wakefulness and poor preference for social novelty, as well as altered delta synchrony during sleep. Finally, we identified a transcriptional pathway that could underlie the sleep/wake-dependent changes in Nlg1 expression and that involves clock transcription factors. We thus suggest that NLG1 is an element that contributes to the coupling of neuronal activity to sleep/wake regulation. PMID:23716671

  13. Wake Vortex Field Measurement Program at Memphis, Tennessee: Data Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, S. D.; Dasey, T. J.; Freehart, R. E.; Heinrichs, R. M.; Mathews, M. P.; Perras, G. H.; Rowe, G. S.

    1997-01-01

    Eliminating or reducing current restrictions in the air traffic control system due to wake vortex considerations would yield increased capacity, decreased delays, and cost savings. Current wake vortex separation standards are widely viewed as very conservative under most conditions. However, scientific uncertainty about wake vortex behavior under different atmospheric conditions remains a barrier to development of an adaptive vortex spacing system. The objective of the wake vortex field measurement efforts during December, 1994 and August, 1995 at Memphis, TN were to record wake vortex behavior for varying atmospheric conditions and types of aircraft. This effort is part of a larger effort by the NASA Langley Research Center to develop an Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS) as an element of the Terminal Area Productivity (TAP) program. The TAP program is being performed in concert with the FAA Terminal Air Traffic Control Automation (TATCA) program and ATC Automation. Wake vortex behavior was observed using a mobile continuous-wave (CW) coherent laser Doppler radar (lidar) developed at Lincoln Laboratory. This lidar features a number of improvements over previous systems, including the first-ever demonstration of an automatic wake vortex detection and tracking algorithm.

  14. Basal forebrain circuit for sleep-wake control.

    PubMed

    Xu, Min; Chung, Shinjae; Zhang, Siyu; Zhong, Peng; Ma, Chenyan; Chang, Wei-Cheng; Weissbourd, Brandon; Sakai, Noriaki; Luo, Liqun; Nishino, Seiji; Dan, Yang

    2015-11-01

    The mammalian basal forebrain (BF) has important roles in controlling sleep and wakefulness, but the underlying neural circuit remains poorly understood. We examined the BF circuit by recording and optogenetically perturbing the activity of four genetically defined cell types across sleep-wake cycles and by comprehensively mapping their synaptic connections. Recordings from channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2)-tagged neurons revealed that three BF cell types, cholinergic, glutamatergic and parvalbumin-positive (PV+) GABAergic neurons, were more active during wakefulness and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep (wake/REM active) than during non-REM (NREM) sleep, and activation of each cell type rapidly induced wakefulness. By contrast, activation of somatostatin-positive (SOM+) GABAergic neurons promoted NREM sleep, although only some of them were NREM active. Synaptically, the wake-promoting neurons were organized hierarchically by glutamatergic→cholinergic→PV+ neuron excitatory connections, and they all received inhibition from SOM+ neurons. Together, these findings reveal the basic organization of the BF circuit for sleep-wake control.

  15. Near and far wake structures behind freely flying bats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunk, Cosima; Swartz, Sharon M.; Breuer, Kenneth S.

    2014-11-01

    While pseudo-volumetric reconstructions of the wakes of flying animals, based on transverse (Trefftz) wake measurements, have become a well-established tool in the study of animal aerodynamics in recent years, there are a number of concerns that persist regarding their use in estimating drag and flight efficiency. Here we report on stereo particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements behind freely flying bats (Eptesicus fuscus) in both the transverse and streamwise planes. The streamwise plane measurements are taken on the wing as well as in the near and far wake region up to eight chord lengths behind the bat. By organizing the data according to the flight speed, wingbeat phase and the spanwise position of the laser sheet on the wing we are able to connect specific features of the wing and body geometry with observed wake structures and thereby construct a detailed time-space map of the wake. Furthermore, we can quantitatively assess wake distortion and assess the validity of lift and drag estimates based on transverse wake measurements. Supported by AFOSR.

  16. Vortex wake alleviation studies with a variable twist wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holbrook, G. T.; Dunham, D. M.; Greene, G. C.

    1985-01-01

    Vortex wake alleviation studies were conducted in a wind tunnel and a water towing tank using a multisegmented wing model which provided controlled and measured variations in span load. Fourteen model configurations are tested at a Reynolds number of one million and a lift coefficient of 0.6 in the Langley 4- by 7-Meter Tunnel and the Hydronautics Ship Model Basin water tank at Hydronautics, Inc., Laurel, Md. Detailed measurements of span load and wake velocities at one semispan downstream correlate well with each other, with inviscid predictions of span load and wake roll up, and with peak trailing-wing rolling moments measured in the far wake. Average trailing-wing rolling moments are found to be an unreliable indicator of vortex wake intensity because vortex meander does not scale between test facilities and free-air conditions. A tapered-span-load configuration, which exhibits little or no drag penalty, is shown to offer significant downstream wake alleviation to a small trailing wing. The greater downstream wake alleviation achieved with the addition of spoilers to a flapped-wing configuration is shown to result directly from the high incremental drag and turbulence associated with the spoilers and not from the span load alteration they cause.

  17. Signature of cosmic string wakes in the CMB polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Danos, Rebecca J.; Brandenberger, Robert H.; Holder, Gil

    2010-07-15

    We calculate a signature of cosmic strings in the polarization of the cosmic microwave background. We find that ionization in the wakes behind moving strings gives rise to extra polarization in a set of rectangular patches in the sky whose length distribution is scale-invariant. The length of an individual patch is set by the comoving Hubble radius at the time the string is perturbing the cosmic microwave background. The polarization signal is largest for string wakes produced at the earliest post-recombination time, and for an alignment in which the photons cross the wake close to the time the wake is created. The maximal amplitude of the polarization relative to the temperature quadrupole is set by the overdensity of free electrons inside a wake which depends on the ionization fraction f inside the wake. For a cosmic string wake coming from an idealized string segment, the signal can be as high as 0.06 {mu}K in degree scale polarization for a string at high redshift (near recombination) and a string tension {mu} given by G{mu}=10{sup -7}.

  18. Atmospheric and Wake Turbulence Impacts on Wind Turbine Fatigue Loading: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; Churchfield, M.; Moriarty, P.; Jonkman, J.; Michalakes, J.

    2011-12-01

    Large-eddy simulations of atmospheric boundary layers under various stability and surface roughness conditions are performed to investigate the turbulence impact on wind turbines. In particular, the aeroelastic responses of the turbines are studied to characterize the fatigue loading of the turbulence present in the boundary layer and in the wake of the turbines. Two utility-scale 5 MW turbines that are separated by seven rotor diameters are placed in a 3 km by 3 km by 1 km domain. They are subjected to atmospheric turbulent boundary layer flow and data is collected on the structural response of the turbine components. The surface roughness was found to increase the fatigue loads while the atmospheric instability had a small influence. Furthermore, the downstream turbines yielded higher fatigue loads indicating that the turbulent wakes generated from the upstream turbines have significant impact.

  19. Numerical Study of Wake Vortex Interaction with the Ground Using the Terminal Area Simulation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Fred H.; Han, Jongil

    1999-01-01

    A sensitivity study for the in-ground effect on aircraft wake vortices has been conducted using a validated large eddy simulation model. The numerical results are compared with observed data and show good agreement for vortex decay and lateral vortex transport. The vortex decay rate is strongly influenced by the ground, but appears somewhat insensitive to ambient turbulence. In addition, the results show that the ground can affect the trajectory and descent-rate of a wake vortex pair at elevations up to about 3 b(sub o) (where b(sub o) is the initial vortex separation). However, the ground does not influence the average circulation of the vortices until the cores descend to within about 0.6 b(sub o), after which time the ground greatly enhances their rate of demise. Vortex rebound occurs in the simulations, but is more subtle than shown in previous numerical studies.

  20. Viscous-inviscid interaction method including wake effects for three-dimensional wing-body configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streett, C. L.

    1981-01-01

    A viscous-inviscid interaction method has been developed by using a three-dimensional integral boundary-layer method which produces results in good agreement with a finite-difference method in a fraction of the computer time. The integral method is stable and robust and incorporates a model for computation in a small region of streamwise separation. A locally two-dimensional wake model, accounting for thickness and curvature effects, is also included in the interaction procedure. Computation time spent in converging an interacted result is, many times, only slightly greater than that required to converge an inviscid calculation. Results are shown from the interaction method, run at experimental angle of attack, Reynolds number, and Mach number, on a wing-body test case for which viscous effects are large. Agreement with experiment is good; in particular, the present wake model improves prediction of the spanwise lift distribution and lower surface cove pressure.

  1. Melatonin and Sleep-Wake Rhythms before and after Ocular Lens Replacement in Elderly Humans

    PubMed Central

    Giménez, Marina; Beersma, Domien; Daan, Serge; van der Pol, Bert; Kanis, Martijn; van Norren, Dick; Gordijn, Marijke

    2016-01-01

    Light of short wavelengths has been shown to play a key role in non-image forming responses. Due to aging, the ocular lens becomes more yellow reducing the transmission of short wavelengths in the elderly. In the present study, we make use of cataract surgery to investigate the effects of a relative increase of short wavelength transmission on melatonin- and sleep-wake rhythms (N = 14). We observed, on average, a delay of the sleep-wake and the nocturnal melatonin rhythms after cataract surgery. This delay is tentatively attributed to a relatively large increase of light transmittance in the evening hours more than an increase of the already relatively high light intensities found in the daytime. The later phase that we observed after cataract surgery (clear lens) as compared to the earlier phase observed before cataract (yellowish lens) is in agreement with the general later phase reported in the young (clear lens) population. PMID:26891336

  2. Prediction of BVI noise patterns and correlation with wake interaction locations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcolini, Michael A.; Martin, Ruth M.; Lorber, Peter F.; Egolf, T. A.

    1992-01-01

    High resolution fluctuating airloads data were acquired during a test of a contemporary design United Technologies model rotor in the Duits-Nederlandse Windtunnel (DNW). The airloads are used as input to the noise prediction program WOPWOP, in order to predict the blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise field on a large plane below the rotor. Trends of predicted advancing and retreating side BVI noise levels and directionality as functions of flight condition are presented. The measured airloads have been analyzed to determine the BVI locations on the blade surface, and are used to interpret the predicted BVI noise radiation patterns. Predicted BVI locations are obtained using the free wake model in CAMRAD/JA, the UTRC Generalized Forward Flight Distorted Wake Model, and the UTRC FREEWAKE analysis. These predicted BVI locations are compared with those obtained from the measured pressure data.

  3. Wind turbine wake tracking and its correlations with wind turbine monitoring sensors. Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubrun, S.; Torres Garcia, E.; Boquet, M.; Coupiac, O.; Girard, N.

    2016-09-01

    Within the frame of the French project ANR SMARTEOLE, a 6-month measurement campaign has been set-up in the north of France to study the wake behaviour of two wind turbines, with an original set-up using: one ground based scanning LIght Detection And Ranging system (LIDAR), 2 nacelle-mounted LIDARs and a nacelle-embedded 2-axis inclinometer. The present paper will give first insight into the results and describe the different post-processing strategies used to prepare the data to be cross-correlated; within the project the final objective is to characterise the influence of the large-scale atmospheric turbulent eddies on the overall wind turbine nacelle displacement and wind turbine wake behaviour.

  4. The Long Range Persistence of Wakes Behind a Row of Roughness Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. E.; Sescu, Adrian; Duck, Peter W.; Choudhari, Meelan

    2010-01-01

    We consider a periodic array of relatively small roughness elements whose spanwise separation is of the order of the local boundary-layer thickness and construct a local asymptotic high-Reynolds-number solution that is valid in the vicinity of the roughness. The resulting flow decays on the very short streamwise length scale of the roughness, but the solution eventually becomes invalid at large downstream distances and a new solution has to be constructed in the downstream region. This latter result shows that the roughness-generated wakes can persist over very long streamwise distances, which are much longer than the distance between the roughness elements and the leading edge. Detailed numerical results are given for the far wake structure.

  5. Dynamic wake distortion model for helicopter maneuvering flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jinggen

    A new rotor dynamic wake distortion model, which can be used to account for the rotor transient wake distortion effect on inflow across the rotor disk during helicopter maneuvering and transitional flight in both hover and forward flight conditions, is developed. The dynamic growths of the induced inflow perturbation across rotor disk during different transient maneuvers, such as a step pitch or roll rate, a step climb rate and a step change of advance ratio are investigated by using a dynamic vortex tube analysis. Based on the vortex tube results, a rotor dynamic wake distortion model, which is expressed in terms of a set of ordinary differential equations, with rotor longitudinal and lateral wake curvatures, wake skew and wake spacing as states, is developed. Also, both the Pitt-Peters dynamic inflow model and the Peters-He finite state inflow model for axial or forward flight are augmented to account for rotor dynamic wake distortion effect during helicopter maneuvering flight. To model the aerodynamic interaction among main rotor, tail rotor and empennage caused by rotor wake curvature effect during helicopter maneuvering flight, a reduced order model based on a vortex tube analysis is developed. Both the augmented Pitt-Peters dynamic inflow model and the augmented Peters-He finite state inflow model, combined with the developed dynamic wake distortion model, together with the interaction model are implemented in a generic helicopter simulation program of UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter and the simulated vehicle control responses in both time domain and frequency domain are compared with flight test data of a UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter in both hover and low speed forward flight conditions.

  6. Assessment of a wake vortex flight test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spangler, S. B.; Dillenius, M. F. E.; Schwind, R. G.; Nielsen, J. N.

    1974-01-01

    A proposed flight test program to measure the characteristics of wake vortices behind a T-33 aircraft was investigated. A number of facets of the flight tests were examined to define the parameters to be measured, the anticipated vortex characteristics, the mutual interference between the probe aircraft and the wake, the response of certain instruments to be used in obtaining measurements, the effect of condensation on the wake vortices, and methods of data reduction. Recommendations made as a result of the investigation are presented.

  7. First Lunar Wake Passage of ARTEMIS: Discrimination of Wake Effects and Solar Wind Fluctuations by 3D Hybrid Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiehle, S.; Plaschke, F.; Motschmann, U.; Glassmeier, K. H.; Auster, H. U.; Angelopoulos, V.; Mueller, J.; Kriegel, H.; Georgescu, E.; Halekas, J.; Sibeck, D. G.; McFadden, J. P.

    2011-01-01

    The spacecraft P1 of the new ARTEMIS (Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence, and Electrodynamics of the Moon's Interaction with the Sun) mission passed the lunar wake for the first time on February 13, 2010. We present magnetic field and plasma data of this event and results of 3D hybrid simulations. As the solar wind magnetic field was highly dynamic during the passage, a simulation with stationary solar wind input cannot distinguish whether distortions were caused by these solar wind variations or by the lunar wake; therefore, a dynamic real-time simulation of the flyby has been performed. The input values of this simulation are taken from NASA OMNI data and adapted to the P1 data, resulting in a good agreement between simulation and measurements. Combined with the stationary simulation showing non-transient lunar wake structures, a separation of solar wind and wake effects is achieved. An anisotropy in the magnitude of the plasma bulk flow velocity caused by a non-vanishing magnetic field component parallel to the solar wind flow and perturbations created by counterstreaming ions in the lunar wake are observed in data and simulations. The simulations help to interpret the data granting us the opportunity to examine the entire lunar plasma environment and, thus, extending the possibilities of measurements alone: A comparison of a simulation cross section to theoretical predictions of MHD wave propagation shows that all three basic MHD modes are present in the lunar wake and that their expansion governs the lunar wake refilling process.

  8. Circadian Sleep-Wake Rhythm of Older Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maaskant, Marijke; van de Wouw, Ellen; van Wijck, Ruud; Evenhuis, Heleen M.; Echteld, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    The circadian sleep-wake rhythm changes with aging, resulting in a more fragmented sleep-wake pattern. In individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID), brain structures regulating the sleep-wake rhythm might be affected. The aims of this study were to compare the sleep-wake rhythm of older adults with ID to that of older adults in the general…

  9. Wake Vortex Inverse Model User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, David; Delisi, Donald

    2008-01-01

    NorthWest Research Associates (NWRA) has developed an inverse model for inverting landing aircraft vortex data. The data used for the inversion are the time evolution of the lateral transport position and vertical position of both the port and starboard vortices. The inverse model performs iterative forward model runs using various estimates of vortex parameters, vertical crosswind profiles, and vortex circulation as a function of wake age. Forward model predictions of lateral transport and altitude are then compared with the observed data. Differences between the data and model predictions guide the choice of vortex parameter values, crosswind profile and circulation evolution in the next iteration. Iterations are performed until a user-defined criterion is satisfied. Currently, the inverse model is set to stop when the improvement in the rms deviation between the data and model predictions is less than 1 percent for two consecutive iterations. The forward model used in this inverse model is a modified version of the Shear-APA model. A detailed description of this forward model, the inverse model, and its validation are presented in a different report (Lai, Mellman, Robins, and Delisi, 2007). This document is a User's Guide for the Wake Vortex Inverse Model. Section 2 presents an overview of the inverse model program. Execution of the inverse model is described in Section 3. When executing the inverse model, a user is requested to provide the name of an input file which contains the inverse model parameters, the various datasets, and directories needed for the inversion. A detailed description of the list of parameters in the inversion input file is presented in Section 4. A user has an option to save the inversion results of each lidar track in a mat-file (a condensed data file in Matlab format). These saved mat-files can be used for post-inversion analysis. A description of the contents of the saved files is given in Section 5. An example of an inversion input

  10. Modal parameter extraction from large operating structures using ambient excitation

    SciTech Connect

    James, G.H. III; Carne, T.G.; Mayes, R.L.

    1995-12-31

    A technique called the Natural Excitation Technique or has been developed to response extract response parameters from large operational structure when subjected to random and unmeasured forces such as wind, road noise, aerodynamics, or waves. Six applications of NExT to ambient excitation testing and NExT analysis are surveyed in this paper with a minimum of technical detail. In the first application, NExT was applied to a controlled-yaw Horizontal-Axis Wind Turbine (HAWT). By controlling the yaw degree of freedom an important class of rotating coordinate system effects are reduced. A new shape extraction procedure was applied to this data set with good results. The second application was to a free-yaw HAWT. The complexity of the response has prompted further analytical studies and the development of a specialized visualization package. The third application of NExT was to a parked three-bladed Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) in which traditional modal testing could not excite all modes of interest. The shape extraction process used cross-correlation functions directly in a time-domain shape-fitting routine. The fourth application was to ground transportation systems. Ongoing work to improve driver and passenger comfort in tractor-trailer vehicles and to refine automobile body and tire models will use NExT. NExT has been used to process ambient vibration data for Finite Element Model correlation and is being used to study Structural Health Monitoring with ambient excitation. Shape fitting was performed using amplitude and phase information taken directly from the cross-spectra. The final application is to an offshore structure. This work is on-going, however initial studies have found a high-modal density, high noise content, and sparse data set.

  11. Ship wake-detection procedure using conjugate gradient trained artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Fitch, J.P.; Lehman, S.K.; Dowla, F.U.; Lu, S.Y.; Johansson, E.M.; Goodman, D.M. )

    1991-09-01

    This paper reports that a method has been developed to reduce large two-dimensional images to significantly smaller feature lists. These feature lists overcome the problem of storing and manipulating large amounts of data. A new artificial neural network using conjugate gradient training methods, operating on sets of feature lists, was successfully trained to determine the presence or absence of wakes in synthetic aperture radar images. A comparison has been made between the different conjugate gradient and steepest-descent training methods and has demonstrated the superiority of the former over the latter.

  12. Wakes and precursor soliton excitations by a moving charged object in a plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar Tiwari, Sanat; Sen, Abhijit

    2016-02-01

    We study the evolution of nonlinear ion acoustic wave excitations due to a moving charged source in a plasma. Our numerical investigations of the full set of cold fluid equations go beyond the usual weak nonlinearity approximation and show the existence of a rich variety of solutions including wakes, precursor solitons, and "pinned" solitons that travel with the source velocity. These solutions represent a large amplitude generalization of solutions obtained in the past for the forced Korteweg deVries equation and can find useful applications in a variety of situations in the laboratory and in space, wherever there is a large relative velocity between the plasma and a charged object.

  13. Theoretical modelling of wakes from retractable flapping wings in forward flight.

    PubMed

    Parslew, Ben; Crowther, William J

    2013-01-01

    A free-wake method is used to simulate the wake from retractable, jointed wings. The method serves to complement existing experimental studies that visualise flying animal wakes. Simulated wakes are shown to be numerically convergent for a case study of the Rock Pigeon in minimum power cruising flight. The free-wake model is robust in simulating wakes for a range of wing geometries and dynamics without requiring changes to the numerical method. The method is found to be useful for providing low order predictions of wake geometries. However, it is not well suited to reconstructing 3d flowfields as solutions are sensitive to the numerical mesh node locations.

  14. Wind Turbine Wake-Redirection Control at the Fishermen's Atlantic City Windfarm: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Churchfield, M.; Fleming, P.; Bulder, B.; White, S.

    2015-05-06

    In this paper, we will present our work towards designing a control strategy to mitigate wind turbine wake effects by redirecting the wakes, specifically applied to the Fishermen’s Atlantic City Windfarm (FACW), proposed for deployment off the shore of Atlantic City, New Jersey. As wind turbines extract energy from the air, they create low-speed wakes that extend behind them. Full wake recovery Full wake recovery to the undisturbed wind speed takes a significant distance. In a wind energy plant the wakes of upstream turbines may travel downstream to the next row of turbines, effectively subjecting them to lower wind speeds, meaning these waked turbines will produce less power.

  15. Theoretical modelling of wakes from retractable flapping wings in forward flight

    PubMed Central

    Crowther, William J.

    2013-01-01

    A free-wake method is used to simulate the wake from retractable, jointed wings. The method serves to complement existing experimental studies that visualise flying animal wakes. Simulated wakes are shown to be numerically convergent for a case study of the Rock Pigeon in minimum power cruising flight. The free-wake model is robust in simulating wakes for a range of wing geometries and dynamics without requiring changes to the numerical method. The method is found to be useful for providing low order predictions of wake geometries. However, it is not well suited to reconstructing 3d flowfields as solutions are sensitive to the numerical mesh node locations. PMID:23882442

  16. Theoretical modelling of wakes from retractable flapping wings in forward flight.

    PubMed

    Parslew, Ben; Crowther, William J

    2013-01-01

    A free-wake method is used to simulate the wake from retractable, jointed wings. The method serves to complement existing experimental studies that visualise flying animal wakes. Simulated wakes are shown to be numerically convergent for a case study of the Rock Pigeon in minimum power cruising flight. The free-wake model is robust in simulating wakes for a range of wing geometries and dynamics without requiring changes to the numerical method. The method is found to be useful for providing low order predictions of wake geometries. However, it is not well suited to reconstructing 3d flowfields as solutions are sensitive to the numerical mesh node locations. PMID:23882442

  17. Dynamics of sleep/wake determination--Normal and abnormal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahowald, Mark W.; Schenck, Carlos H.; O'Connor, Kevin A.

    1991-10-01

    Virtually all members of the animal kingdom experience a relentless and powerful cycling of states of being: wakefulness, rapid eye movement sleep, and nonrapid eye movement sleep. Each of these states is composed of a number of physiologic variables generated in a variety of neural structures. The predictable oscillations of these states are driven by presumed neural pacemakers which are entrained to the 24 h geophysical environment by the light/dark cycle. Experiments in nature have indicated that wake/sleep rhythm perturbations may occur either involving desynchronization of the basic 24 h wake/sleep cycle within the geophysical 24 h cycle (circadian rhythm disturbances) or involving the rapid oscillation or incomplete declaration of state (such as narcolepsy). The use of phase spaces to describe states of being may be of interest in the description of state determination in both illness and health. Some fascinating clinical and experimental phenomena may represent bifurcations in the sleep/wake control system.

  18. Influence of unsteady wake on a turbulent separation bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, S.; Sung, H. J.

    An experimental study was made of turbulent separated and reattaching flow over a blunt body, where unsteady wake was generated by a spoked-wheel type of wake generator with cylindrical rods. The influence of unsteady wake was scrutinized by altering the rotation direction (clockwise and counter-clockwise) and the normalized passing frequency (0<=StH<=0.20). The Reynolds number based on the cylindrical rod was Red=375. A phase-averaging technique was employed to characterize the unsteady wake. The effect of different rotation directions, which gave a significant reduction of xR, was examined in detail. The wall pressure fluctuations on the blunt body were analyzed in terms of the spectrum and the coherence.

  19. Wake Fields in the Super B Factory Interaction Region

    SciTech Connect

    Weathersby, Stephen; Novokhatski, Alexander; /SLAC

    2011-06-02

    The geometry of storage ring collider interaction regions present an impedance to beam fields resulting in the generation of additional electromagnetic fields (higher order modes or wake fields) which affect the beam energy and trajectory. These affects are computed for the Super B interaction region by evaluating longitudinal loss factors and averaged transverse kicks for short range wake fields. Results indicate at least a factor of 2 lower wake field power generation in comparison with the interaction region geometry of the PEP-II B-factory collider. Wake field reduction is a consderation in the Super B design. Transverse kicks are consistent with an attractive potential from the crotch nearest the beam trajectory. The longitudinal loss factor scales as the -2.5 power of the bunch length. A factor of 60 loss factor reduction is possible with crotch geometry based on an intersecting tubes model.

  20. Some wake-related operational limitations of rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyson, H. H.

    1980-01-01

    Wind tunnel measurements show that the wake of a rotor, except at near hovering speeds, is not like that of a propeller. The wake is more like that of a wing except that, because of the slow speeds, the wake velocities may be much greater. The helicopter can produce a wake hazard to following light aircraft that is disproportionately great compared to an equivalent fixed wing aircraft. This hazard should be recognized by both pilots and airport controllers when operating in congested areas. Ground effect is generally counted as a blessing since it allows overloaded takeoffs; however, it also introduces additional operation problems. These problems include premature blade stall in hover, settling in forward transition, shuddering in approach to touchdown and complicatons with yaw control. Some of these problems were treated analytically in an approximate manner and reasonable experiment agreement was obtained. An awareness of these effects can prepare the user for their appearance and their consequences.