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Sample records for large muscle afferents

  1. Extraocular muscle afferent signals modulate visual attention.

    PubMed

    Balslev, Daniela; Newman, William; Knox, Paul C

    2012-10-09

    Extraocular muscle afferent signals contribute to oculomotor control and visual localization. Prompted by the close links between the oculomotor and attention systems, it was investigated whether these proprioceptive signals also modulated the allocation of attention in space. A suction sclera contact lens was used to impose an eye rotation on the nonviewing, dominant eye. With their viewing, nondominant eye, participants (n = 4) fixated centrally and detected targets presented at 5° in the left or right visual hemifield. The position of the viewing eye was monitored throughout the experiment. As a control, visual localization was tested using finger pointing without visual feedback of the hand, whereas the nonviewing eye remained deviated. The sustained passive rotation of the occluded, dominant eye, while the other eye maintained central fixation, resulted in a lateralized change in the detectability of visual targets. In all participants, the advantage in speed and accuracy for detecting right versus left hemifield targets that occurred during a sustained rightward eye rotation of the dominant eye was reduced or reversed by a leftward eye rotation. The control experiment confirmed that the eye deviation procedure caused pointing errors consistent with an approximately 2° shift in perceived eye position, in the direction of rotation of the nonviewing eye. With the caveat of the small number of participants, these results suggest that extraocular muscle afferent signals modulate the deployment of attention in visual space.

  2. Human intersegmental reflexes from intercostal afferents to scalene muscles.

    PubMed

    McBain, Rachel A; Taylor, Janet L; Gorman, Robert B; Gandevia, Simon C; Butler, Jane E

    2016-10-01

    What is the central question of this study? The aim was to determine whether specific reflex connections operate between intercostal afferents and the scalene muscles in humans, and whether these connections operate after a clinically complete cervical spinal cord injury. What is the main finding and its importance? This is the first description of a short-latency inhibitory reflex connection between intercostal afferents from intercostal spaces to the scalene muscles in able-bodied participants. We suggest that this reflex is mediated by large-diameter afferents. This intercostal-to-scalene inhibitory reflex is absent after cervical spinal cord injury and may provide a way to monitor the progress of the injury. Short-latency intersegmental reflexes have been described for various respiratory muscles in animals. In humans, however, only short-latency reflex responses to phrenic nerve stimulation have been described. Here, we examined the reflex connections between intercostal afferents and scalene muscles in humans. Surface EMG recordings were made from scalene muscles bilaterally, in seven able-bodied participants and seven participants with motor- and sensory-complete cervical spinal cord injury (median 32 years postinjury, range 5 months to 44 years). We recorded the reflex responses produced by stimulation of the eighth or tenth left intercostal nerve. A short-latency (∼38 ms) inhibitory reflex was evident in able-bodied participants, in ipsilateral and contralateral scalene muscles. This bilateral intersegmental inhibitory reflex occurred in 46% of recordings at low stimulus intensities (at three times motor threshold). It was more frequent (in 75-85% of recordings) at higher stimulus intensities (six and nine times motor threshold), but onset latency (38 ± 9 ms, mean ± SD) and the size of inhibition (23 ± 10%) did not change with stimulus intensity. The reflex was absent in all participants with spinal cord injury. As the intercostal

  3. Reticulospinal actions on primary afferent depolarization of cutaneous and muscle afferents in the isolated frog neuraxis.

    PubMed

    González, H; Jiménez, I; Rudomin, P

    1993-01-01

    The effects of the brainstem reticular formation on the intraspinal excitability of low threshold cutaneous and muscle afferents were studied in the frog neuraxis isolated together with the right hindlimb nerves. Stimulation of low threshold fibers (less than two times threshold) in cutaneous nerves produced short latency, negative field potentials in the ipsilateral dorsal neuropil (200-400 microns depth) that reversed to positivity at deeper regions (500-700 microns). Stimulation of low threshold fibers (less than two times threshold) in muscle nerves produced, instead, negative response that acquired their maximum amplitude in the ventral neuropil (700-900 microns depth). These electrophysiological findings suggest, in agreement with observations in the cat, that low threshold cutaneous and muscle afferents end at different sites in the spinal cord. Intraspinal microstimulation applied within the dorsal neuropil produced antidromic responses in low threshold cutaneous afferents that were increased in size following stimulation of the dorsal or ventral roots, as well as of the brainstem reticular formation. This increase in excitability is interpreted as being due to primary afferent depolarization (PAD) of the intraspinal terminals of cutaneous fibers. Antidromic responses recorded in muscle nerves following intraspinal stimulation within the ventral neuropil were also increased following conditioning stimulation of adjacent dorsal or ventral roots. However, stimulation of the bulbar reticular formation produced practically no changes in the antidromic responses, but was able to inhibit the PAD of low threshold muscle afferents elicited by stimulation of the dorsal or ventral roots. It is suggested that the PAD of low threshold cutaneous and muscle afferents is mediated by independent sets of interneurons. Reticulospinal fibers would have excitatory connections with the interneurons mediating the PAD of cutaneous fibers and inhibitory connections with the

  4. Discharges in human muscle spindle afferents during a key-pressing task.

    PubMed

    Dimitriou, Michael; Edin, Benoni B

    2008-11-15

    Most manual tasks demand a delicate control of the wrist. Sensory information for this control, e.g. about the position and movement velocity of the hand, is assumed to be primarily provided by muscle spindle afferents. It is known that human muscle spindles in relaxed muscles behave as stretch receptors but it is unclear how they discharge during 'natural' hand movements, since their discharges can also be affected by extrafusal contractions and fusimotor activity. We therefore let subjects perform a centre-out-centre key-pressing task on buttons laid out in a 3 x 3 pattern, a task that allowed unconstrained hand and finger movements and required precise control of the wrist. Microneurography recordings from muscle spindle afferents of the wrist extensor muscles were obtained along with wrist kinematics and electromyographic signals. The discharge rates of afferents were more phase advanced than expected on the length of the radial wrist extensor, which acted as an anti-gravity muscle in the key-pressing task. As such, both acceleration and velocity had significant impacts on the discharge rate of primary afferents, velocity on that of secondary afferents, and length had no impact on either afferent type. The response patterns were different for the two types of muscle spindle afferents from the predominantly eccentrically contracting ulnar wrist extensor: muscle length and velocity had significant impacts on the ensemble response of secondary afferents whereas the primary afferents showed highly variable responses. Accordingly, good predictions of the radial ulnar angular velocity were possible from spindle ensemble responses (R(2) = 0.85) whereas length could be predicted only for phases with lengthening of the ulnar wrist extensor. There are several possible explanations for the unexpectedly large phase advance of spindle afferents in the radial wrist extensor. Given the compliance of tendons, for instance, the phase relationship between the muscle fascicle

  5. Connexions from large, ipsilateral hind limb muscle and skin afferents to the rostral main cuneate nucleus and to the nucleus X region in the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, H; Silfvenius, H

    1977-01-01

    1. Evidence is presented for an input from ipsilateral hind limb group I muscle afferents and low threshold cutaneous afferents, to cells in the rostral division of the main cuneate nucleus (rMCN) and in the region of the descending vestibular nucleus and the nucleus X of Brodal & Pompeiano (1957a), the (DV-X). 2. Thirteen group I-rMCN cells were recorded from. The functional properties of these cells were similar to those of nueleus Z (Landgren & Silfvenius, 1971; Johansson & Silfvenius, 1977a, b). The cells were monosynaptically linked to spinal dorsolateral fascicle (DLF) fibres. Nine cells projected to the contralateral thalamus, i.e. a second group I hind limb bulbothalamic tract is described. Ten cells were synaptically activated from the ipsilateral cerebellum from the anterior projection zone of the dorsal spinocerebellar tract (DSCT). Axon-collateral activation by DSCT fibres was established for two of these cells. They were both bulbothalamic relay cells. For the remaining eight cells, activated from the cerebellum, this was not proven. These cells could, however, either be linked to DSCT fibres or to short axon-collaterals of a cell body of unknown location. A projection from the rMCN to the cerebellum is described and agrees with recent anatomical findings. Two cells were not excited from the cerebellum. 3. Four rMCN cells were activated by cutaneous afferents with their secondary axons in the DLF. Suggestive evidence for a bulbothalamic cutaneous hind limb path via the rMCN is presented. Two cells were activated from the cerebellum, presumably via axon-collaterals of nonsegmental cells. 4. Eight group I-DV-X cells were recorded from. They were monosynaptically linked to spinal DLF fibres and resembled functionally the nucleus Z and rMCN cells when stimulated from the periphery. Two cells projected to the contralateral thalamus, and two others were synaptically excited. Seven cells were activated from the ipsilateral cerebellum. Two of them projected to

  6. Classification of muscle spindle afferents innervating the masseter muscle in rats.

    PubMed

    Masri, Radi; Ro, Jin Y; Dessem, Dean; Capra, Norman

    2006-09-01

    Taylor et al. [Taylor, A., Durbaba, R., Rodgers, J.F., 1992a. The classification of afferents from muscle spindles of the jaw-closing muscles of the cat. J Physiol 456, 609-628] developed a method to classify muscle spindle afferents using succinylcholine (Sch) and ramp and hold stretches. They demonstrated that cat jaw muscle spindle afferents show high proportion of intermediate responses to ramp and hold jaw stretch. Together with observations on the responses to Sch their data suggests that the majority of jaw muscle spindle afferents are influenced by a combination of nuclear bag(2) and nuclear chain fibres. Relatively few are influenced solely by nuclear bag(1) fibres. The purpose of this study was to categorize jaw muscle spindle afferent in rodents in response to ramp and hold stretches. Several measures were used to classify spindle afferents including (1) conduction velocity, (2) coefficient of variation (C.V.) of the interspike interval during jaw opening, and (3) the dynamic sensitivity and the initial discharge of spindle afferents before and after succinylcholine infusion (Sch, 100mg/kg, i.v.). Consistent with observations in the cat jaw muscles, the distribution of the conduction velocity and the C.V. of Vmes masseter afferents were unimodal. Therefore, these parameters were of little value in functional classification of spindle innervation. Succinylcholine injection either markedly increased the dynamic sensitivity or produced no change in Vmes afferents. Unlike cat jaw muscle spindle afferents, the effect of Sch on the initial discharge was not clearly separable from those responding or not responding to Sch. These results suggest that rat jaw muscle spindle afferents, have physiological properties that are primarily intermediate in nature and are likely to reflect a predominance of influence from nuclear bag(2) and chain fibres. However, the distinction between bag(2) and chain fibres influences is not as clearly defined in the rat compared to

  7. Patterns of connectivity of spinal interneurons with single muscle afferents.

    PubMed

    Quevedo, J; Eguibar, J R; Lomeli, J; Rudomin, P

    1997-07-01

    A technique was developed to measure, in the anesthetized and paralyzed cat under artificial ventilation, changes of excitability to intraspinal stimulation simultaneously in two different afferent fibers or in two collaterals of the same afferent fiber. Intraspinal stimulation reduced the threshold of single muscle afferent fibers ending in the intermediate nucleus. This effect was seen with strengths below those required to activate the afferent fiber tested (1.5-12 microA), occurred at a short latency (1.5-2.0 ms), reached a maximum between 15 and 30 ms, and lasted up to 100 ms. The effects produced by graded stimulation applied at the shortest conditioning-testing stimulus time intervals increased by fixed steps, suggesting recruitment of discrete elements, most likely of last-order interneurons mediating primary afferent depolarization (PAD). The short-latency increases in excitability produced by the weakest effective intraspinal stimuli were usually detected only in the collateral closest to the stimulating micropipette, indicating that the stimulated interneurons mediating PAD have spatially restricted actions. The short-latency PAD produced by intraspinal stimuli, as well as the PAD produced by stimulation of the posterior biceps and semitendinosus (PBSt) nerve or by stimulation of the bulbar reticular formation (RF), was depressed 19-30 min after the i.v. injection of 0.5 mg/kg of picrotoxin, suggesting that all these effects were mediated by GABAergic mechanisms. The PAD elicited by stimulation of muscle and/or cutaneous nerves was depressed following the i.v. injection of (-)-baclofen, whereas the PAD elicited in the same collateral by stimulation of the RF was baclofen-resistant. The short-latency PAD produced by intraspinal stimulation was not always depressed by i.v. injections of (-)-baclofen. Baclofen-sensitive and baclofen-resistant monosynaptic PADs could be produced in different collaterals of the same afferent fiber. The results suggest that

  8. Regenerating sprouts of axotomized cat muscle afferents express characteristic firing patterns to mechanical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, R D; Munson, J B

    1991-12-01

    1. In cats, we studied the physiological properties of regenerating sprouts of muscle afferent fibers and compared them with sprouts from cutaneous afferent fibers. 2. Muscle nerves to the triceps surae and cutaneous sural nerves were axotomized in the popliteal fossa, and the proximal ends were inserted into nerve cuffs. Six days later, we recorded action potentials from single Groups I and II muscle and mostly Group II cutaneous afferents driven by mechanostimulation of the cuff. 3. Most muscle afferent sprouts (91%) had a regular slowly adapting discharge in response to sustained mechanical displacement of the cuff, particularly to sustained stretch stimuli, whereas most cutaneous afferents (92%) did not. Muscle afferents were more likely to have a spontaneous discharge and afterdischarge. 4. Group II muscle afferent sprouts had lower stretch thresholds and a higher incidence of spontaneous discharge compared with Group I fiber sprouts, whereas Group I fibers had a higher incidence of high-frequency afterdischarge to mechanical stimuli. 5. We conclude that, 6 days after axotomy, regenerating sprouts of muscle afferents, particularly Group II afferents, have become mechanosensitive in the absence of a receptor target and exhibit physiological properties similar to those found when innervating their native muscle but significantly different from sprouts of cutaneous afferents. Expression of these native muscle afferent firing patterns after the inappropriate reinnervation of hairy skin may be due to inherent properties of the muscle afferent fiber.

  9. Muscle afferent excitability testing in spinal root-intact rats: dissociating peripheral afferent and efferent volleys generated by intraspinal microstimulation.

    PubMed

    Tomatsu, Saeka; Kim, Geehee; Confais, Joachim; Seki, Kazuhiko

    2017-02-01

    Presynaptic inhibition of the sensory input from the periphery to the spinal cord can be evaluated directly by intra-axonal recording of primary afferent depolarization (PAD) or indirectly by intraspinal microstimulation (excitability testing). Excitability testing is superior for use in normal behaving animals, because this methodology bypasses the technically challenging intra-axonal recording. However, use of excitability testing on the muscle or joint afferent in intact animals presents its own technical challenges. Because these afferents, in many cases, are mixed with motor axons in the peripheral nervous system, it is crucial to dissociate antidromic volleys in the primary afferents from orthodromic volleys in the motor axon, both of which are evoked by intraspinal microstimulation. We have demonstrated in rats that application of a paired stimulation protocol with a short interstimulus interval (ISI) successfully dissociated the antidromic volley in the nerve innervating the medial gastrocnemius muscle. By using a 2-ms ISI, the amplitude of the volleys evoked by the second stimulation was decreased in dorsal root-sectioned rats, but the amplitude did not change or was slightly increased in ventral root-sectioned rats. Excitability testing in rats with intact spinal roots indicated that the putative antidromic volleys exhibited dominant primary afferent depolarization, which was reasonably induced from the more dorsal side of the spinal cord. We concluded that excitability testing with a paired-pulse protocol can be used for studying presynaptic inhibition of somatosensory afferents in animals with intact spinal roots.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Excitability testing of primary afferents has been used to evaluate presynaptic modulation of synaptic transmission in experiments conducted in vivo. However, to apply this method to muscle afferents of animals with intact spinal roots, it is crucial to dissociate antidromic and orthodromic volleys induced by spinal

  10. Loss of neurotrophin-3 from smooth muscle disrupts vagal gastrointestinal afferent signaling and satiation

    PubMed Central

    Biddinger, Jessica E.; Baquet, Zachary C.; Jones, Kevin R.; McAdams, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    A large proportion of vagal afferents are dependent on neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) for survival. NT-3 is expressed in developing gastrointestinal (GI) smooth muscle, a tissue densely innervated by vagal mechanoreceptors, and thus could regulate their survival. We genetically ablated NT-3 from developing GI smooth muscle and examined the pattern of loss of NT-3 expression in the GI tract and whether this loss altered vagal afferent signaling or feeding behavior. Meal-induced c-Fos activation was reduced in the solitary tract nucleus and area postrema in mice with a smooth muscle-specific NT-3 knockout (SM-NT-3KO) compared with controls, suggesting a decrease in vagal afferent signaling. Daily food intake and body weight of SM-NT-3KO mice and controls were similar. Meal pattern analysis revealed that mutants, however, had increases in average and total daily meal duration compared with controls. Mutants maintained normal meal size by decreasing eating rate compared with controls. Although microstructural analysis did not reveal a decrease in the rate of decay of eating in SM-NT-3KO mice, they ate continuously during the 30-min meal, whereas controls terminated feeding after 22 min. This led to a 74% increase in first daily meal size of SM-NT-3KO mice compared with controls. The increases in meal duration and first meal size of SM-NT-3KO mice are consistent with reduced satiation signaling by vagal afferents. This is the first demonstration of a role for GI NT-3 in short-term controls of feeding, most likely involving effects on development of vagal GI afferents that regulate satiation. PMID:24068045

  11. Loss of neurotrophin-3 from smooth muscle disrupts vagal gastrointestinal afferent signaling and satiation.

    PubMed

    Fox, Edward A; Biddinger, Jessica E; Baquet, Zachary C; Jones, Kevin R; McAdams, Jennifer

    2013-12-01

    A large proportion of vagal afferents are dependent on neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) for survival. NT-3 is expressed in developing gastrointestinal (GI) smooth muscle, a tissue densely innervated by vagal mechanoreceptors, and thus could regulate their survival. We genetically ablated NT-3 from developing GI smooth muscle and examined the pattern of loss of NT-3 expression in the GI tract and whether this loss altered vagal afferent signaling or feeding behavior. Meal-induced c-Fos activation was reduced in the solitary tract nucleus and area postrema in mice with a smooth muscle-specific NT-3 knockout (SM-NT-3(KO)) compared with controls, suggesting a decrease in vagal afferent signaling. Daily food intake and body weight of SM-NT-3(KO) mice and controls were similar. Meal pattern analysis revealed that mutants, however, had increases in average and total daily meal duration compared with controls. Mutants maintained normal meal size by decreasing eating rate compared with controls. Although microstructural analysis did not reveal a decrease in the rate of decay of eating in SM-NT-3(KO) mice, they ate continuously during the 30-min meal, whereas controls terminated feeding after 22 min. This led to a 74% increase in first daily meal size of SM-NT-3(KO) mice compared with controls. The increases in meal duration and first meal size of SM-NT-3(KO) mice are consistent with reduced satiation signaling by vagal afferents. This is the first demonstration of a role for GI NT-3 in short-term controls of feeding, most likely involving effects on development of vagal GI afferents that regulate satiation.

  12. Presynaptic inhibition of muscle spindle and tendon organ afferents in the mammalian spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Rudomin, P

    1990-12-01

    More than 30 years ago, Frank and Fuortes proposed that the synaptic effectiveness of muscle spindle afferents associated with spinal motoneurones could be diminished by the activation of nerves from flexor muscles. Since that time, research has focused on disclosing the mode of operation and the spinal pathways involved in this presynaptic inhibitory control. Initially, it was assumed that the same last-order interneurones mediated presynaptic inhibition of both muscle spindle and tendon organ afferent fibres. More recent evidence indicates that the synaptic effectiveness of these two groups of afferents is controlled by separate sets of GABAergic interneurones synapsing directly with the intraspinal terminals of the afferent fibres. This unique arrangement allows for selective control of the information on muscle length or muscle tension, despite the convergence of muscle spindle and tendon organ afferents on second-order interneurones.

  13. Field potentials generated by group II muscle afferents in the lower-lumbar segments of the feline spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Riddell, J S; Hadian, M

    2000-01-01

    The actions of group II muscle afferents projecting to the lower-lumbar (L6 and L7) segments of the cat spinal cord were investigated by recording the cord dorsum and focal synaptic field potentials evoked by electrical stimulation of hindlimb muscle nerves. Cord dorsum potentials recorded over the lower-lumbar segments were generally much smaller than those produced by group II afferents terminating within the midlumbar and sacral segments. Only group II afferents of tibialis posterior produced potentials with an amplitude (mean maximal amplitude 39 μV, n = 7) approaching that of potentials over other segments. Focal synaptic potentials (mean maximal amplitudes 135–200 μV) were evoked by group II afferents of the following muscle nerves, listed in order of effectiveness: quadriceps, tibialis posterior (throughout L6 and L7), gastrocnemius soleus, flexor digitorum longus, posterior biceps-semitendinosus and popliteus (mainly within L7). Field potentials were recorded in the dorsal horn (laminae IV–V) and also more ventrally in a region which included the lateral part of the intermediate zone (lateral to the large group I intermediate field potentials) and often extended into the ventral horn (laminae V–VII). The latencies of the group II potentials are considered compatible with the monosynaptic actions of the fastest conducting group II muscle afferents. The results are compared with morphological evidence on the pattern of termination of group II muscle afferents in the lower-lumbar segments and with previous descriptions of the actions of group II muscle afferents in midlumbar and sacral segments. PMID:10618155

  14. Can loss of muscle spindle afferents explain the ataxic gait in Riley-Day syndrome?

    PubMed

    Macefield, Vaughan G; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Gutiérrez, Joel; Axelrod, Felicia B; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2011-11-01

    The Riley-Day syndrome is the most common of the hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (Type III). Among the well-recognized clinical features are reduced pain and temperature sensation, absent deep tendon reflexes and a progressively ataxic gait. To explain the latter we tested the hypothesis that muscle spindles, or their afferents, are absent in hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy III by attempting to record from muscle spindle afferents from a nerve supplying the leg in 10 patients. For comparison we also recorded muscle spindles from 15 healthy subjects and from two patients with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy IV, who have profound sensory disturbances but no ataxia. Tungsten microelectrodes were inserted percutaneously into fascicles of the common peroneal nerve at the fibular head. Intraneural stimulation within muscle fascicles evoked twitches at normal stimulus currents (10-30 µA), and deep pain (which often referred) at high intensities (1 mA). Microneurographic recordings from muscle fascicles revealed a complete absence of spontaneously active muscle spindles in patients with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy III; moreover, responses to passive muscle stretch could not be observed. Conversely, muscle spindles appeared normal in patients with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy IV, with mean firing rates of spontaneously active endings being similar to those recorded from healthy controls. Intraneural stimulation within cutaneous fascicles evoked paraesthesiae in the fascicular innervation territory at normal stimulus intensities, but cutaneous pain was never reported during high-intensity stimulation in any of the patients. Microneurographic recordings from cutaneous fascicles revealed the presence of normal large-diameter cutaneous mechanoreceptors in hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy III. Our results suggest that the complete absence of functional muscle spindles in these patients explains

  15. Projection of cat jaw muscle spindle afferents related to intrafusal fibre influence.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, A; Durbaba, R; Rodgers, J F

    1993-01-01

    1. A method of classification of muscle spindle afferents using succinylcholine (SCh) and ramp stretches has recently been described, which appears to estimate separately the strength of influence of bag1 (b1) and of bag2 (b2) intrafusal fibres. Increase in dynamic difference (delta DD) indicates b1 influence whilst increase in initial frequency (delta IF) indicates b2 influence. The significance of this classification has now been examined by correlation with the strength of synaptic projection of jaw muscle spindle afferents to the fifth motor nucleus (MotV) and the supratrigeminal region (STR) in anaesthetized cats. 2. Projection strength was estimated by computing the extracellular focal synaptic potential (FSP) from spike-triggered averages of 1024 sweeps at 100 microns intervals along tracks through STR and MotV. Trigger pulses were derived from spindle afferent cell bodies of the jaw-closer muscles recorded in the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus, and characterized by the effect of SCh on their responses to ramp-and-hold stretches. 3. The maximum size of FSPs in tracks traversing STR and MotV ranged from 2.08 to 36.99 microV with a mean of 7.55 microV. The amplitudes were bimodally distributed into roughly equal-sized groups with high and low amplitude FSPs. 4. Mean values of delta IF were significantly greater for the group with large FSPs than for those with small FSPs. There were no significant differences in delta DD. FSP amplitude was significantly positively correlated with delta IF, but not with delta DD. 5. Spindle afferents with high values of FSP amplitude in MotV had a wide range of values of delta DD (b1b2c and b2c groups), while units with large FSPs in STR were all in the b2c category. Some evidence is presented to indicate that this reflects a preferential projection of secondary afferents to the STR. 6. For those units with projection to both STR and to MotV, there was a significant positive correlation between FSP amplitude in the two nuclei

  16. Sensing vascular distension in skeletal muscle by slow conducting afferent fibers: neurophysiological basis and implication for respiratory control.

    PubMed

    Haouzi, Philippe; Chenuel, Bruno; Huszczuk, Andrew

    2004-02-01

    This review examines the evidence that skeletal muscles can sense the status of the peripheral vascular network through group III and IV muscle afferent fibers. The anatomic and neurophysiological basis for such a mechanism is the following: 1) a significant portion of group III and IV afferent fibers have been found in the vicinity and the adventitia of the arterioles and the venules; 2) both of these groups of afferent fibers can respond to mechanical stimuli; 3) a population of group III and IV fibers stimulated during muscle contraction has been found to be inhibited to various degrees by arterial occlusion; and 4) more recently, direct evidence has been obtained showing that a part of the group IV muscle afferent fibers is stimulated by venous occlusion and by injection of vasodilatory agents. The physiological relevance of sensing local distension of the vascular network at venular level in the muscles is clearly different from that of the large veins, since the former can directly monitor the degree of tissue perfusion. The possible involvement of this sensing mechanism in respiratory control is discussed mainly in the light of the ventilatory effects of peripheral vascular occlusions during and after muscular exercise. It is proposed that this regulatory system anticipates the chemical changes that would occur in the arterial blood during increased metabolic load and attempts to minimize them by adjusting the level of ventilation to the level of muscle perfusion, thus matching the magnitudes of the peripheral and pulmonary gas exchange.

  17. Persistence of PAD and presynaptic inhibition of muscle spindle afferents after peripheral nerve crush.

    PubMed

    Enríquez-Denton, M; Manjarrez, E; Rudomin, P

    2004-11-19

    Two to twelve weeks after crushing a muscle nerve, still before the damaged afferents reinnervate the muscle receptors, conditioning stimulation of group I fibers from flexor muscles depolarizes the damaged afferents [M. Enriquez, I. Jimenez, P. Rudomin, Changes in PAD patterns of group I muscle afferents after a peripheral nerve crush. Exp. Brain Res., 107 (1996), 405-420]. It is not known, however, if this primary afferent depolarization (PAD) is indeed related to presynaptic inhibition. We now show in the cat that 2-12 weeks after crushing the medial gastrocnemius nerve (MG), conditioning stimulation of group I fibers from flexors increases the excitability of the intraspinal terminals of both the intact lateral gastrocnemius plus soleus (LGS) and of the previously damaged MG fibers ending in the motor pool, because of PAD. The PAD is associated with the depression of the pre- and postsynaptic components of the extracellular field potentials (EFPs) evoked in the motor pool by stimulation of either the intact LGS or of the previously damaged MG nerves. These observations indicate, in contrast to what has been reported for crushed cutaneous afferents [K.W. Horch, J.W. Lisney, Changes in primary afferent depolarization of sensory neurones during peripheral nerve regeneration in the cat, J. Physiol., 313 (1981), 287-299], that shortly after damaging their peripheral axons, the synaptic efficacy of group I spindle afferents remains under central control. Presynaptic inhibitory mechanisms could be utilized to adjust the central actions of muscle afferents not fully recovered from peripheral lesions.

  18. Functional Organization of Cutaneous and Muscle Afferent Synapses onto Immature Spinal Lamina I Projection Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie

    2017-01-01

    It is well established that sensory afferents innervating muscle are more effective at inducing hyperexcitability within spinal cord circuits compared with skin afferents, which likely contributes to the higher prevalence of chronic musculoskeletal pain compared with pain of cutaneous origin. However, the mechanisms underlying these differences in central nociceptive signaling remain incompletely understood, as nothing is known about how superficial dorsal horn neurons process sensory input from muscle versus skin at the synaptic level. Using a novel ex vivo spinal cord preparation, here we identify the functional organization of muscle and cutaneous afferent synapses onto immature rat lamina I spino-parabrachial neurons, which serve as a major source of nociceptive transmission to the brain. Stimulation of the gastrocnemius nerve and sural nerve revealed significant convergence of muscle and cutaneous afferent synaptic input onto individual projection neurons. Muscle afferents displayed a higher probability of glutamate release, although short-term synaptic plasticity was similar between the groups. Importantly, muscle afferent synapses exhibited greater relative expression of Ca2+-permeable AMPARs compared with cutaneous inputs. In addition, the prevalence and magnitude of spike timing-dependent long-term potentiation were significantly higher at muscle afferent synapses, where it required Ca2+-permeable AMPAR activation. Collectively, these results provide the first evidence for afferent-specific properties of glutamatergic transmission within the superficial dorsal horn. A larger propensity for activity-dependent strengthening at muscle afferent synapses onto developing spinal projection neurons could contribute to the enhanced ability of these sensory inputs to sensitize central nociceptive networks and thereby evoke persistent pain in children following injury. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The neurobiological mechanisms underlying the high prevalence of chronic

  19. Modulation of jaw muscle spindle afferent activity following intramuscular injections with hypertonic saline.

    PubMed

    Ro, J Y; Capra, N F

    2001-05-01

    Transient noxious chemical stimulation of small diameter muscle afferents modulates jaw movement-related responses of caudal brainstem neurons. While it is likely that the effect is mediated from the spindle afferents in the mesencephalic nucleus (Vmes) via the caudally projecting Probst's tract, the mechanisms of pain induced modulations of jaw muscle spindle afferents is not known. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that jaw muscle nociceptors gain access to muscle spindle afferents in the same muscle via central mechanisms and alter their sensitivity. Thirty-five neurons recorded from the Vmes were characterized as muscle spindle afferents based on their responses to passive jaw movements, muscle palpation, and electrical stimulation of the masseter nerve. Each cell was tested by injecting a small volume (250 microl) of either 5% hypertonic and/or isotonic saline into the receptor-bearing muscle. Twenty-nine units were tested with 5% hypertonic saline, of which 79% (23/29) showed significant modulation of mean firing rates (MFRs) during one or more phases of ramp-and-hold movements. Among the muscle spindle primary-like units (n = 12), MFRs of 4 units were facilitated, five reduced, two showed mixed responses and one unchanged. In secondary-like units (n = 17), MFRs of 9 were facilitated, three reduced and five unchanged. Thirteen units were tested with isotonic saline, of which 77% showed no significant changes of MFRs. Further analysis revealed that the hypertonic saline not only affected the overall output of muscle spindle afferents, but also increased the variability of firing and altered the relationship between afferent signal and muscle length. These results demonstrated that activation of muscle nociceptors significantly affects proprioceptive properties of jaw muscle spindles via central neural mechanisms. The changes can have deleterious effects on oral motor function as well as kinesthetic sensibility.

  20. Are type III-IV muscle afferents required for a normal steady-state exercise hyperpnoea in humans?

    PubMed

    Dempsey, Jerome A; Blain, Grégory M; Amann, Markus

    2014-02-01

    When tested in isolation, stimuli associated with respiratory CO2 exchange, feedforward central command and type III-IV muscle afferent feedback have each been shown to be capable of eliciting exercise-like cardio-ventilatory responses, but their relative contributions in a setting of physiological exercise remains controversial. We reasoned that in order to determine whether any of these regulators are obligatory to the exercise hyperpnoea each needs to be removed or significantly diminished in a setting of physiological steady-state exercise, during which all recognized stimuli (and other potential modulators) are normally operative. In the past few years we and others have used intrathecal fentanyl, a μ-opiate receptor agonist, in humans to reduce the input from type III-IV opiate-sensitive muscle afferents. During various types of intensities and durations of exercise a sustained hypoventilation, as well as reduced systemic pressure and cardioacceleration, were consistently observed with this blockade. These data provide the basis for the hypothesis that type III-IV muscle afferents are obligatory to the hyperpnoea of mild to moderate intensity rhythmic, large muscle, steady-state exercise. We discuss the limitations of these studies, the reasons for their disagreement with previous negative findings, the nature of the muscle afferent feedback stimulus and the need for future investigations.

  1. Are type III–IV muscle afferents required for a normal steady-state exercise hyperpnoea in humans?

    PubMed Central

    Dempsey, Jerome A; Blain, Grégory M; Amann, Markus

    2014-01-01

    When tested in isolation, stimuli associated with respiratory CO2 exchange, feedforward central command and type III–IV muscle afferent feedback have each been shown to be capable of eliciting exercise-like cardio-ventilatory responses, but their relative contributions in a setting of physiological exercise remains controversial. We reasoned that in order to determine whether any of these regulators are obligatory to the exercise hyperpnoea each needs to be removed or significantly diminished in a setting of physiological steady-state exercise, during which all recognized stimuli (and other potential modulators) are normally operative. In the past few years we and others have used intrathecal fentanyl, a μ-opiate receptor agonist, in humans to reduce the input from type III–IV opiate-sensitive muscle afferents. During various types of intensities and durations of exercise a sustained hypoventilation, as well as reduced systemic pressure and cardioacceleration, were consistently observed with this blockade. These data provide the basis for the hypothesis that type III–IV muscle afferents are obligatory to the hyperpnoea of mild to moderate intensity rhythmic, large muscle, steady-state exercise. We discuss the limitations of these studies, the reasons for their disagreement with previous negative findings, the nature of the muscle afferent feedback stimulus and the need for future investigations. PMID:24000177

  2. Inhibitory action of forearm flexor muscle afferents on corticospinal outputs to antagonist muscles in humans

    PubMed Central

    Bertolasi, Laura; Priori, Alberto; Tinazzi, Michele; Bertasi, Valeria; Rothwell, John C

    1998-01-01

    To find out whether muscle afferents influence the excitability of corticospinal projections to antagonist muscles, we studied sixteen healthy subjects and one patient with a focal brain lesion. Using transcranial magnetic and electrical brain stimulation we tested the excitability of corticomotoneuronal connections to right forearm muscles at rest after conditioning stimulation of the median nerve at the elbow. Somatosensory potentials evoked by median nerve stimulation were also recorded in each subject. Test stimuli delivered at 13–19 ms after median nerve stimulation significantly inhibited EMG responses elicited in forearm extensor muscles by transcranial magnetic stimulation, but did not inhibit responses to electrical stimulation. In contrast, magnetically and electrically elicited responses in forearm flexor muscles were suppressed to the same extent. The higher the intensity of the test shocks, the smaller was the amount of median nerve-elicited inhibition. Inhibition in extensor muscles was also smaller during tonic wrist extension, or if the induced electrical stimulating current in the brain flowed from posterior to anterior over the motor strip rather than vice versa. Test responses evoked by magnetic transcranial stimulation in the first dorsal interosseous and in brachioradialis muscles were not inhibited after median nerve stimulation at the elbow. Stimulation of digital nerves failed to inhibit motor potentials in extensor muscles. Test stimuli delivered at 15 and 17 ms after radial nerve stimulation significantly inhibited EMG responses elicited in forearm flexor muscles by magnetic transcranial stimulation. In the patient with a focal thalamic lesion, who had dystonic postures and an absent N20 component of the somatosensory-evoked potentials but normal strength, median nerve stimulation failed to inhibit magnetically evoked responses in forearm extensor muscles. We propose that activation of median nerve muscle afferents can suppress the

  3. Spinal inhibition of phrenic motoneurones by stimulation of afferents from peripheral muscles.

    PubMed Central

    Eldridge, F L; Gill-Kumar, P; Millhorn, D E; Waldrop, T G

    1981-01-01

    1. Phrenic nerve responses to stimulation of calf muscle receptors or their afferents were studied in two groups of cats. One consisted of paralysed, vagotomized and functionally glomectomized animals with intact central nervous systems. The other included paralysed high (C1) spinal animals whose phrenic nerve activity was either spontaneously tonic or phasic, or evoked by activation of the intercostal-to-phrenic reflex. In both groups, end-tidal PCO2 was maintained at a constant level by means of a servo-controller. 2. Physical stimulation of calf muscles in animals with intact central respiratory controller and a generally facilitatory effect on frequency, with appropriate changes of both inspiratory and expiratory durations, and on peak magnitude of phrenic (neural tidal) activity. However, for the first few sec after onset of the stimulus, neural tidal activity was inhibited. 3. Physical stimulation of calf muscles or electrical stimulation of the tibial nerve in high spinal animals uniformly caused inhibition of spontaneous phrenic activity and that evoked by facilitatory conditioning stimuli. The degree of inhibition gradually decreased as muscle stimulation continued. Following offset of muscle stimulation, post-stimulus augmentation of phrenic activity occurred, with subsequent gradual return to control level over a period of 20-25 sec. 4. We conclude that stimulation of muscle afferents in the leg has a predominantly facilitatory respiratory effect when acting through brain stem controller mechanisms, but also has a purely inhibitory effect on phrenic motoneurones when acting via spinal mechanisms. 5. In addition, the findings are consistent with (1) progressive accommodation of phrenic motoneurones during continued inhibitory input, and (2) with a large and prolonged post-inhibitory rebound of excitability. PMID:7264986

  4. Interpretation of muscle spindle afferent nerve response to passive muscle stretch recorded with thin-film longitudinal intrafascicular electrodes.

    PubMed

    Djilas, Milan; Azevedo-Coste, Christine; Guiraud, David; Yoshida, Ken

    2009-10-01

    In this study, we explored the feasibility of estimating muscle length in passive conditions by interpreting nerve responses from muscle spindle afferents recorded with thin-film longitudinal intrafascicular electrodes. Afferent muscle spindle response to passive stretch was recorded in ten acute rabbit experiments. A newly proposed first-order model of muscle spindle response to passive sinusoidal muscle stretch manages to capture the relationship between afferent neural firing rate and muscle length. We demonstrate that the model can be used to track random motion trajectories with bandwidth from 0.1 to 1 Hz over a range of 4 mm with a muscle length estimation error of 0.3 mm (1.4 degrees of joint angle). When estimation is performed using four-channel ENG there is a 50% reduction in estimate variation, compared to using single-channel recordings.

  5. Organization of hindlimb muscle afferent projections to lumbosacral motoneurons in the chick embryo.

    PubMed

    Lee, M T; O'Donovan, M J

    1991-08-01

    We have examined the organization of muscle afferent projections to motoneurons in the lumbosacral spinal cord of chick embryos between stage 37, when muscle afferents first reach the motor nucleus, and stage 44, which is just before hatching. Connectivity between afferents and motoneurons was assessed by stimulating individual muscle nerves and recording the resulting motoneuron synaptic potentials intracellularly or electrotonically from other muscle nerves. Most of the recordings were made in the presence of DL-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV), picrotoxin, and strychnine to block long-latency excitatory and inhibitory pathways. Activation of muscle afferents evoked slow, positive potentials in muscle nerves but not in cutaneous nerves. These potentials were abolished in 0 mM Ca2+, 2mM Mn2+ solutions, indicating that they were generated by the action of chemical synapses. The muscle nerve recordings revealed a wide-spread pattern of excitatory connections between afferents and motoneurons innervating six different thigh muscles, which were not organized according to synergist-antagonist relationships. This pattern of connectivity was confirmed using intracellular recording from identified motoneurons, which allowed the latency of the responses to be determined. Short-latency potentials in motoneurons were produced by activation of homonymous afferents and the heteronymous afferents innervating the hip flexors sartorius and anterior iliotibialis. Stimulation of anterior iliotibialis afferents also resulted in some short-latency excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) in motoneurons innervating the knee extensor femorotibialis, though other connections were of longer latency. Afferents from the adductor, a hip extensor, did not evoke short-latency EPSPs in any of these three types of motoneurons. Short-latency, but not long-latency EPSPs, persisted during repetitive stimulation at 5 Hz, suggesting that they were mediated monosynaptically. Long

  6. Classification of longissimus lumborum muscle spindle afferents in the anaesthetized cat.

    PubMed

    Durbaba, R; Taylor, A; Ellaway, P H; Rawlinson, S

    2006-03-01

    Recordings have been made from 127 single muscle spindle afferents from the longissimus lumborum muscles of anaesthetized cats. They have been characterized by their responses to passive muscle stretch and the effects of succinylcholine (SCh) and by their sensitivity to vibration. The use of SCh permitted the assessment for each afferent of the influence of bag1 (b1) and bag2 (b2) intrafusal muscle fibres. From this, on the assumption that all afferents were affected by chain (c) fibres, they were classified in four groups: b1b2c (41.9%), b2c (51.4%), b1c (1.3%) and c (5.4%). All the afferents with b1 influence were able to respond one to one to vibration at frequencies above 100 Hz and were considered to belong to primary endings. On the basis of the vibration test, 64% of the b2c type afferents appeared to be primaries and 36% secondaries. Of the units classified as primaries, 41% were designated as b2c and would not therefore be able to respond to dynamic fusimotor activity. The significance of this relatively high proportion of b2c-type spindle primary afferents is discussed in relation to the specialized postural function of the back muscles.

  7. Effects of electrical and natural stimulation of skin afferents on the gamma-spindle system of the triceps surae muscle.

    PubMed

    Johansson, H; Sjölander, P; Sojka, P; Wadell, I

    1989-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the extent to which skin receptors might influence the responses of primary muscle spindle afferents via reflex actions on the fusimotor system. The experiments were performed on 43 cats anaesthetized with alpha-chloralose. The alterations in fusimotor activity were assessed from changes in the responses of the muscle spindle afferents to sinusoidal stretching of their parent muscles (triceps surae and plantaris). The mean rate of firing and the modulation of the afferent response were determined. Control measurements were made in absence of any cutaneous stimulation. Tests were made (a) during physiological stimulation of skin afferents of the ipsilateral pad or of the contralateral hindlimb, or (b) during repetitive electrical stimulation of the sural nerve in the ipsilateral hindlimb, or of sural or superficial peroneal nerve in the contralateral hindlimb. Of the total number of 113 units tested with repetitive electrical stimulation of the ipsilateral sural nerve (at 20 Hz), 24.8% exhibited predominantly dynamic fusimotor reflexes, 5.3% mixed or predominantly static fusimotor reflexes. One unit studied in a preparation with intact spinal cord exhibited static reflexes at low stimulation intensities and dynamic ones at higher stimulation strengths. The remaining units (69%) were uninfluenced. When the receptor-bearing muscle was held at constant length and a train of stimuli (at 20 Hz) was applied to the ipsilateral sural nerve, the action potentials in the primary muscle spindle afferent could be stimulus-locked to the 3rd or 4th pulse in the train (and to the pulses following thereafter), with a latency of about 24 ms from the effective pulse. This 1:1 pattern of driving seemed to be mediated via static and/or dynamic fusimotor neurons. Natural stimulation influenced comparatively few units (3 of 65 units tested from the ipsilateral pad and 10 of 98 tested from the contralateral hindlimb), but when the effects

  8. Interneurones in pathways from group II muscle afferents in sacral segments of the feline spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Jankowska, E; Riddell, J S

    1994-03-15

    1. Properties of dorsal horn interneurones that process information from group II muscle afferents in the sacral segments of the spinal cord have been investigated in the cat using both intracellular and extracellular recording. 2. The interneurones were excited by group II muscle afferents and cutaneous afferents but not by group I muscle afferents. They were most effectively excited by group II afferents of the posterior biceps, semitendinosus, triceps surae and quadriceps muscle nerves and by cutaneous afferents running in the cutaneous femoris, pudendal and sural nerves. The earliest synaptic actions were evoked monosynaptically and were very tightly locked to the stimuli. 3. EPSPs evoked monosynaptically by group II muscle afferents and cutaneous afferents of the most effective nerves were often cut short by disynaptic IPSPs. As a consequence of this negative feedback the EPSPs gave rise to single or double spike potentials and only a minority of interneurones responded with repetitive discharges. However, the neurones that did respond repetitively did so at a very high frequency of discharges (0.8-1.2 ms intervals between the first 2-3 spikes). 4. Sacral dorsal horn group II interneurones do not appear to act directly upon motoneurones because: (i) these interneurones are located outside the area within which last order interneurones have previously been found and (ii) the latencies of PSPs evoked in motoneurones by stimulation of the posterior biceps and semitendinosus, cutaneous femoris and pudendal nerves (i.e. the main nerves providing input to sacral interneurones) are compatible with a tri- but not with a disynaptic coupling. Spatial facilitation of EPSPs and IPSPs following synchronous stimulation of group II and cutaneous afferents of these nerves shows, however, that sacral interneurones may induce excitation or inhibition of motoneurones via other interneurones. 5. Comparison of the properties of group II interneurones in the sacral segments with

  9. Fusimotor reflexes in relaxed forearm muscles produced by cutaneous afferents from the human hand.

    PubMed Central

    Gandevia, S C; Wilson, L; Cordo, P J; Burke, D

    1994-01-01

    1. This study was designed to determine whether cutaneous receptors in the hand exert reflex effects on fusimotor neurones innervating relaxed muscles. Recordings were made from fifty-four muscle spindle afferents in the radial nerve while the arm was held relaxed in a supporting frame. Cutaneous afferents were activated by trains of stimuli at non-noxious levels to the superficial radial nerve or to the palmar surface of the fingers. 2. For the population of muscle spindle afferents, the mean discharge rate was 7.1 +/- 6.4 Hz (range 0-24 Hz). Thirty-three per cent had no background discharge, and this occurred significantly more often in finger extensors than wrist extensors. 3. Trains of cutaneous stimuli produced no change in the discharge rates of the majority of spindle endings irrespective of whether the spindle afferent had a background discharge or was given one by muscle stretch. However, with two of forty afferents, the stimuli produced an increase in discharge at latencies of 135 and 155 ms. 4. With a further fourteen muscle spindle endings, the dynamic responses to stretch were measured 100-400 ms after the trains of cutaneous stimuli. For four spindle afferents there was a statistically significant change in the dynamic response to stretch occurring at conditioned-stretch intervals of 100-200 ms. For two afferents the dynamic response decreased by 17 and 26% and for two others it increased by about 24 and 37%. 5. While these results support the view that the level of background fusimotor drive is low in the relaxed state, they suggest that there is some dynamic fusimotor drive to completely relaxed muscles operating on the human hand, and that this drive can be altered reflexly by cutaneous afferent inputs from the hand. Images Figure 4 PMID:7837105

  10. Changes in PAD patterns of group I muscle afferents after a peripheral nerve crush.

    PubMed

    Enríquez, M; Jiménez, I; Rudomin, P

    1996-01-01

    In the anesthetized cat we have analyzed the changes in primary afferent depolarization (PAD) evoked in single muscle spindle and tendon organ afferents at different times after their axons were crushed in the periphery and allowed to regenerate. Medial gastrocnemius (MG) afferents were depolarized by stimulation of group I fibers in the posterior biceps and semitendinosus nerve (PBSt), as soon as 2 weeks after crushing their axons in the periphery, in some cases before they could be activated by physiological stimulation of muscle receptors. Two to twelve weeks after crushing the MG nerve, stimulation of the PBSt produced PAD in all MG fibers reconnected with presumed muscle spindles and tendon organs. The mean amplitude of the PAD elicited in afferent fibers reconnected with muscle spindles was increased relative to values obtained from Ia fibers in intact (control) preparations, but remained essentially the same in fibers reconnected with tendon organs. Quite unexpectedly, we found that, between 2 and 12 weeks after crushing the MG nerve, stimulation of the bulbar reticular formation (RF) produced PAD in most afferent fibers reconnected with muscle spindle afferents. The mean amplitude of the PAD elicited in these fibers was significantly increased relative to the PAD elicited in muscle spindle afferents from intact preparations (from 0.08 +/- 0.4 to 0.47 +/- 0.34 mV). A substantial recovery was observed between 6 months and 2.5 years after the peripheral nerve injury. Stimulation of the sural (SU) nerve produced practically no PAD in muscle spindles from intact preparations, and this remained so in those afferents reconnected with muscle spindles impaled 2-12 weeks after the nerve crush. The mean amplitude of the PAD produced in afferent fibers reconnected with tendon organs by stimulation of the PBSt nerve and of the bulbar RF remained essentially the same as the PAD elicited in intact afferents. However, SU nerve stimulation produced a larger PAD in afferents

  11. Segmental and supraspinal control of synaptic effectiveness of functionally identified muscle afferents in the cat.

    PubMed

    Enríquez, M; Jiménez, I; Rudomin, P

    1996-01-01

    The present investigation documents the patterns of primary afferent depolarization (PAD) of single, functionally identified muscle afferents from the medial gastrocnemius nerve in the intact, anesthetized cat. Classification of the impaled muscle afferents as from muscle spindles or from tendon organs was made according to several criteria, which comprised measurement of conduction velocity and electrical threshold of the peripheral axons, and the maximal frequency followed by the afferent fibers during vibration, as well as the changes in discharge frequency during longitudinal stretch, the projection of the afferent fiber to the motor pool, and, in unparalyzed preparations, the changes in afferent activity during a muscle twitch. In confirmation of a previous study, we found that most muscle spindle afferents (46.1-66.6%, depending on the combination of criteria utilized for receptor classification) had a type A PAD pattern. That is, they were depolarized by stimulation of group I fibers of the posterior biceps and semitendinosus (PBSt) nerve, but not by stimulation of cutaneous nerves (sural and superficial peroneus) or the bulbar reticular formation (RF), which in many cases inhibited the PBSt-induced PAD. In addition, we found a significant fraction of muscle spindle primaries that were depolarized by stimulation of group I PBSt fibers and also by stimulation of the bulbar RF. Stimulation of cutaneous nerves produced PAD in 9.1-31.2% of these fibers (type B PAD pattern) and no PAD in 8.2-15.4% (type C PAD pattern). In contrast to muscle spindle afferents, only the 7.7-15.4% of fibers from tendon organs had a type A PAD pattern, 23-46.1% had a type B and 50-61.5% a type C PAD pattern. These observations suggest that the neuronal circuitry involved in the control of the synaptic effectiveness of muscle spindles and tendon organs is subjected to excitatory as well as to inhibitory influences from cutaneous and reticulospinal fibers. As shown in the accompanying

  12. Functional expression of α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by muscle afferent neurons

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, James C.; Ramachandra, Renuka; Mayne, Dustin R.

    2014-01-01

    The exercise pressor reflex (EPR) is generated by group III and IV muscle afferents during exercise to increase cardiovascular function. Muscle contraction is triggered by ACh, which is metabolized into choline that could serve as a signal of exercise-induced activity. We demonstrate that ACh can induce current in muscle afferents neurons isolated from male Sprague-Dawley rats. The nicotinic ACh receptors (nAChRs) appear to be expressed by some group III-IV neurons since capsaicin (TRPV1) and/or ATP (P2X) induced current in 56% of ACh-responsive neurons. α7- And α4β2-nAChRs have been shown to be expressed in sensory neurons. An α7-nAChR antibody stained 83% of muscle afferent neurons. Functional expression was demonstrated by using the specific α7-nAChR blockers α-conotoxin ImI (IMI) and methyllycaconitine (MLA). MLA inhibited ACh responses in 100% of muscle afferent neurons, whereas IMI inhibited ACh responses in 54% of neurons. Dihydro-β-erythroidine, an α4β2-nAChR blocker, inhibited ACh responses in 50% of muscle afferent neurons, but recovery from block was not observed. Choline, an α7-nAChR agonist, elicited a response in 60% of ACh-responsive neurons. Finally, we demonstrated the expression of α7-nAChR by peripherin labeled (group IV) afferent fibers within gastrocnemius muscles. Some of these α7-nAChR-positive fibers were also positive for P2X3 receptors. Thus choline could serve as an activator of the EPR by opening α7-nAChR expressed by group IV (and possible group III) afferents. nAChRs could become pharmacological targets for suppressing the excessive EPR activation in patients with peripheral vascular disease. PMID:24966300

  13. Intercostal muscles and purring in the cat: the influence of afferent inputs.

    PubMed

    Kirkwood, P A; Sears, T A; Stagg, D; Westgaard, R H

    1987-03-03

    Feline purring has previously been reported as originating in a central oscillator, independent of afferent inputs, and also as not involving expiratory muscles. Here we show, via electromyographic recordings from intercostal muscles, quantified by cross-correlation, that expiratory muscles can be involved and that even if the oscillator is central, reflex components nevertheless play a considerable part in the production of the periodic pattern of muscle activation seen during purring.

  14. Selective cortical control of information flow through different intraspinal collaterals of the same muscle afferent fiber.

    PubMed

    Eguibar, J R; Quevedo, J; Jiménez, I; Rudomin, P

    1994-04-18

    We have analyzed in the anesthetized cat the effects of electrical stimulation of the cerebral cortex on the intraspinal threshold of two collaterals belonging to the same muscle spindle or tendon organ afferent fiber. The results obtained provide, for the first time, direct evidence showing that the motor cortex is able to modify, in a highly selective manner, the synaptic effectiveness of individual collaterals of the same primary afferent fiber. This presynaptic control could function as a mechanism that allows funneling of information to specific groups of spinal neurons in the presence of extensive intraspinal branching of the afferent fibers.

  15. Assessment of the Potential Role of Muscle Spindle Mechanoreceptor Afferents in Chronic Muscle Pain in the Rat Masseter Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Somayeh; Athanassiadis, Tuija; Caram Salas, Nadia; Auclair, François; Thivierge, Benoît; Arsenault, Isabel; Rompré, Pierre; Westberg, Karl-Gunnar; Kolta, Arlette

    2010-01-01

    Background The phenotype of large diameter sensory afferent neurons changes in several models of neuropathic pain. We asked if similar changes also occur in “functional” pain syndromes. Methodology/Principal Findings Acidic saline (AS, pH 4.0) injections into the masseter muscle were used to induce persistent myalgia. Controls received saline at pH 7.2. Nocifensive responses of Experimental rats to applications of Von Frey Filaments to the masseters were above control levels 1–38 days post-injection. This effect was bilateral. Expression of c-Fos in the Trigeminal Mesencephalic Nucleus (NVmes), which contains the somata of masseter muscle spindle afferents (MSA), was above baseline levels 1 and 4 days after AS. The resting membrane potentials of neurons exposed to AS (n = 167) were hyperpolarized when compared to their control counterparts (n = 141), as were their thresholds for firing, high frequency membrane oscillations (HFMO), bursting, inward and outward rectification. The amplitude of HFMO was increased and spontaneous ectopic firing occurred in 10% of acid-exposed neurons, but never in Controls. These changes appeared within the same time frame as the observed nocifensive behaviour. Ectopic action potentials can travel centrally, but also antidromically to the peripheral terminals of MSA where they could cause neurotransmitter release and activation of adjacent fibre terminals. Using immunohistochemistry, we confirmed that annulospiral endings of masseter MSA express the glutamate vesicular transporter VGLUT1, indicating that they can release glutamate. Many capsules also contained fine fibers that were labelled by markers associated with nociceptors (calcitonin gene-related peptide, Substance P, P2X3 receptors and TRPV1 receptors) and that expressed the metabotropic glutamate receptor, mGluR5. Antagonists of glutamatergic receptors given together with the 2nd injection of AS prevented the hypersensitivity observed bilaterally but were

  16. Neck muscle afferents influence oromotor and cardiorespiratory brainstem neural circuits.

    PubMed

    Edwards, I J; Lall, V K; Paton, J F; Yanagawa, Y; Szabo, G; Deuchars, S A; Deuchars, J

    2015-01-01

    Sensory information arising from the upper neck is important in the reflex control of posture and eye position. It has also been linked to the autonomic control of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. Whiplash associated disorders (WAD) and cervical dystonia, which involve disturbance to the neck region, can often present with abnormalities to the oromotor, respiratory and cardiovascular systems. We investigated the potential neural pathways underlying such symptoms. Simulating neck afferent activity by electrical stimulation of the second cervical nerve in a working heart brainstem preparation (WHBP) altered the pattern of central respiratory drive and increased perfusion pressure. Tracing central targets of these sensory afferents revealed projections to the intermedius nucleus of the medulla (InM). These anterogradely labelled afferents co-localised with parvalbumin and vesicular glutamate transporter 1 indicating that they are proprioceptive. Anterograde tracing from the InM identified projections to brain regions involved in respiratory, cardiovascular, postural and oro-facial behaviours--the neighbouring hypoglossal nucleus, facial and motor trigeminal nuclei, parabrachial nuclei, rostral and caudal ventrolateral medulla and nucleus ambiguus. In brain slices, electrical stimulation of afferent fibre tracts lateral to the cuneate nucleus monosynaptically excited InM neurones. Direct stimulation of the InM in the WHBP mimicked the response of second cervical nerve stimulation. These results provide evidence of pathways linking upper cervical sensory afferents with CNS areas involved in autonomic and oromotor control, via the InM. Disruption of these neuronal pathways could, therefore, explain the dysphagic and cardiorespiratory abnormalities which may accompany cervical dystonia and WAD.

  17. Autonomic responses to exercise: group III/IV muscle afferents and fatigue.

    PubMed

    Amann, Markus; Sidhu, Simranjit K; Weavil, Joshua C; Mangum, Tyler S; Venturelli, Massimo

    2015-03-01

    Group III and IV muscle afferents originating in exercising limb muscle play a significant role in the development of fatigue during exercise in humans. Feedback from these sensory neurons to the central nervous system (CNS) reflexively increases ventilation and central (cardiac output) and peripheral (limb blood flow) hemodynamic responses during exercise and thereby assures adequate muscle blood flow and O2 delivery. This response depicts a key factor in minimizing the rate of development of peripheral fatigue and in optimizing aerobic exercise capacity. On the other hand, the central projection of group III/IV muscle afferents impairs performance and limits the exercising human via its diminishing effect on the output from spinal motoneurons which decreases voluntary muscle activation (i.e. facilitates central fatigue). Accumulating evidence from recent animal studies suggests the existence of two subtypes of group III/IV muscle afferents. While one subtype only responds to physiological and innocuous levels of endogenous intramuscular metabolites (lactate, ATP, protons) associated with 'normal', predominantly aerobic exercise, the other subtype only responds to higher and concurrently noxious levels of metabolites present in muscle during ischemic contractions or following, for example, hypertonic saline infusions. This review discusses the mechanisms through which group III/IV muscle afferent feedback mediates both central and peripheral fatigue in exercising humans. We also briefly summarize the accumulating evidence from recent animal and human studies documenting the existence of two subtypes of group III/IV muscle afferents and the relevance of this discovery to the interpretation of previous work and the design of future studies.

  18. AUTONOMIC RESPONSES TO EXERCISE: GROUP III/IV MUSCLE AFFERENTS AND FATIGUE

    PubMed Central

    Amann, Markus; Sidhu, Simranjit K; Weavil, Joshua; Mangum, Tyler; Venturelli, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Group III and IV muscle afferents originating in exercising limb muscle play a significant role in the development of fatigue during exercise in humans. Feedback from these sensory neurons to the central nervous system (CNS) reflexively increases ventilation and central (cardiac output) and peripheral (limb blood flow) hemodynamic responses during exercise and thereby assures adequate muscle blood flow and O2 delivery. This response depicts a key factor in minimizing the rate of development of peripheral fatigue and in optimizing aerobic exercise capacity. On the other hand, the central projection of group III/IV muscle afferents impairs performance and limits the exercising human via its diminishing effect on the output from spinal motoneurons which decreases voluntary muscle activation (i.e. facilitates central fatigue). Accumulating evidence from recent animal studies suggests the existence of two subtypes of group III/IV muscle afferents. While one subtype only responds to physiological and innocuous levels of endogenous intramuscular metabolites (lactate, ATP, protons) associated with ‘normal’, predominantly aerobic exercise, the other subtype only responds to higher and concurrently noxious levels of metabolites present in muscle during ischaemic contractions or following, for example, hypertonic saline infusions. This review discusses the mechanisms through which group III/IV muscle afferent feedback mediates both central and peripheral fatigue in exercising humans. We also briefly summarize accumulating evidence from recent animal and human studies documenting the existence of two subtypes of group III/IV muscle afferents and the relevance of this discovery for the interpretation of previous work and the design of future studies. PMID:25458423

  19. ATP-sensitive muscle afferents activate spinal trigeminal neurons with meningeal afferent input in rat - pathophysiological implications for tension-type headache.

    PubMed

    Nöbel, Moritz; Feistel, Stephan; Ellrich, Jens; Messlinger, Karl

    2016-12-01

    Tension-type headache and other primary headaches may be triggered or aggravated by disorders of pericranial muscles, which is possibly due to convergent or collateral afferent input from meningeal and muscular receptive areas. In rodent models high extracellular concentrations of ATP caused muscle nociception and central sensitization of second order neurons. In a rat model of meningeal nociception we asked if spinal trigeminal activity induced by ATP can be modulated by local anaesthesia of distinct muscles. Ongoing activity was recorded from spinal trigeminal neurons with afferent input from the cranial dura mater, the temporal muscle and neck muscles. The stable ATP analogue α,β-methylene adenosine 5'-triphosphate (α,β-meATP, 10 mM) was injected into the ipsilateral temporal muscle, 30 min later followed by injection of local anaesthetics (lidocaine, 2 %) into the ipsilateral neck muscles and/or the temporal muscle. Injection of α,β-meATP into the temporal muscle caused progressive increase in ongoing activity of most of the spinal trigeminal neurons within 30 min. Injection of lidocaine into the neck muscles and/or the temporal muscle reduced this activation to previous levels within 10 min. Distinct spinal trigeminal neurons processing meningeal nociceptive information are under the control of convergent afferent input from several pericranial muscles. Blockade of at least one of these inputs can normalize central trigeminal activity. This may explain why therapeutic manipulations of head muscles can be beneficial in primary headaches.

  20. Tonic Investigation Concept of Cervico-vestibular Muscle Afferents

    PubMed Central

    Dorn, Linda Josephine; Lappat, Annabelle; Neuhuber, Winfried; Scherer, Hans; Olze, Heidi; Hölzl, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Interdisciplinary research has contributed greatly to an improved understanding of the vestibular system. To date, however, very little research has focused on the vestibular system's somatosensory afferents. To ensure the diagnostic quality of vestibular somatosensory afferent data, especially the extra cranial afferents, stimulation of the vestibular balance system has to be precluded. Objective Sophisticated movements require intra- and extra cranial vestibular receptors. The study's objective is to evaluate an investigation concept for cervico-vestibular afferents with respect to clinical feasibility. Methods A dedicated chair was constructed, permitting three-dimensional trunk excursions, during which the volunteer's head remains fixed. Whether or not a cervicotonic provocation nystagmus (c-PN) can be induced with static trunk excursion is to be evaluated and if this can be influenced by cervical monophasic transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (c-TENS) with a randomized test group. 3D-video-oculography (VOG) was used to record any change in cervico-ocular examination parameters. The occurring nystagmuses were evaluated visually due to the small caliber of nystagmus amplitudes in healthy volunteers. Results The results demonstrate: no influence of placebo-controlled c-TENS on the spontaneous nystagmus; a significant increase of the vertical nystagmus on the 3D-trunk-excursion chair in static trunk flexion with cervical provocation in all young healthy volunteers (n = 49); and a significant difference between vertical and horizontal nystagmuses during static trunk excursion after placebo-controlled c-TENS, except for the horizontal nystagmus during trunk torsion. Conclusion We hope this cervicotonic investigation concept on the 3D trunk-excursion chair will contribute to new diagnostic and therapeutic perspectives on cervical pathologies in vestibular head-to-trunk alignment. PMID:28050208

  1. Spike sorting of muscle spindle afferent nerve activity recorded with thin-film intrafascicular electrodes.

    PubMed

    Djilas, Milan; Azevedo-Coste, Christine; Guiraud, David; Yoshida, Ken

    2010-01-01

    Afferent muscle spindle activity in response to passive muscle stretch was recorded in vivo using thin-film longitudinal intrafascicular electrodes. A neural spike detection and classification scheme was developed for the purpose of separating activity of primary and secondary muscle spindle afferents. The algorithm is based on the multiscale continuous wavelet transform using complex wavelets. The detection scheme outperforms the commonly used threshold detection, especially with recordings having low signal-to-noise ratio. Results of classification of units indicate that the developed classifier is able to isolate activity having linear relationship with muscle length, which is a step towards online model-based estimation of muscle length that can be used in a closed-loop functional electrical stimulation system with natural sensory feedback.

  2. Spinal projection of spindle afferents of the longissimus lumborum muscles of the cat.

    PubMed

    Durbaba, R; Taylor, A; Ellaway, P H; Rawlinson, S

    2007-04-15

    The connections and monosynaptic projections of muscle spindle afferents of individual heads of the longissimus lumborum have been studied in cats by natural stimulation, by electrical stimulation and by spike-triggered averaging from single identified afferents. The spindle afferents were classified by sensitivity to vibration and by the effect of succinylcholine on their response to ramp-and-hold muscle stretches. Axonal conduction and synaptic effects were recorded as field potentials and focal synaptic potentials during systematic exploration of the spinal cord in segments L1 to L4 with extracellular metal microelectrodes, singly and in linear arrays. Ascending branches of afferent axons within the cord had a significantly higher mean conduction velocity (CV: 56.5 m s(-1)) than descending branches (40.8 m s(-1)). The CV of ascending branches was significantly positively correlated with a measure of the strength of intrafusal bag(2) muscle fibre contacts, but not to a measure of bag(1) contacts. Two sites of monosynaptic excitatory projection in the cord were identified, namely to the intermediate region (laminae V, VI and VII) and to ventral horn region (laminae VIII and IX). In tests of 154 single afferents, signs of central projection were detected for 60, providing 122 regions of maximum negative focal synaptic potentials (FSPs) of mean amplitude 7.51 microV. Their longitudinal spacing indicated that axons gave off descending collaterals at intervals of 1.5-3.5 mm. Based on the amplitude of FSPs, the projection of secondary afferents is stronger than that of primaries in the intermediate region and possibly also in the ventral horn region. Evidence is also presented that spindle afferent input from different heads of the longissimus converges into any given spinal segment and that input in one spinal root projects to adjacent segments. It is concluded that the organization of the longissimus monosynaptic spindle input favours relatively tonic and diffuse

  3. Firing of antagonist small-diameter muscle afferents reduces voluntary activation and torque of elbow flexors

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, David S; McNeil, Chris J; Gandevia, Simon C; Taylor, Janet L

    2013-01-01

    During muscle fatigue, firing of small-diameter muscle afferents can decrease voluntary activation of the fatigued muscle. However, these afferents may have a more widespread effect on other muscles in the exercising limb. We examined if the firing of fatigue-sensitive afferents from elbow extensor muscles in the same arm reduces torque production and voluntary activation of elbow flexors. In nine subjects we examined voluntary activation of elbow flexors by measuring changes in superimposed twitches evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex during brief (2–3 s) maximal voluntary contractions (MVC). Inflation of a blood pressure cuff following a 2-min sustained MVC blocked blood flow to the fatigued muscle and maintained firing of small-diameter afferents. After a fatiguing elbow flexion contraction, maximal flexion torque was lower (26.0 ± 4.4%versus 67.9 ± 5.2% of initial maximal torque; means ±s.d.; P < 0.001) and superimposed twitches were larger (4.1 ± 1.1%versus 1.8 ± 0.2% ongoing MVC, P= 0.01) with than without ischaemia. After a fatiguing elbow extensor contraction, maximal flexion torque was also reduced (82.2 ± 4.9%versus 91.4 ± 2.3% of initial maximal torque; P= 0.007), superimposed twitches were larger (2.7 ± 0.7%versus 1.3 ± 0.2% ongoing MVC; P= 0.02) and voluntary activation lower (81.6 ± 8.2%versus 95.5 ± 6.9%; P= 0.04) with than without ischaemia. After a fatiguing contraction, voluntary drive to the fatigued muscles is reduced with continued input from small-diameter muscle afferents. Furthermore, fatigue of the elbow extensor muscles decreases voluntary drive to unfatigued elbow flexors of the same arm. Therefore, firing of small-diameter muscle afferents from one muscle can affect voluntary activation and hence torque generation of another muscle in the same limb. PMID:23652589

  4. Task-dependent effects evoked by foot muscle afferents on leg muscle activity in humans.

    PubMed

    Abbruzzese, M; Rubino, V; Schieppati, M

    1996-08-01

    The effect of low intensity electrical stimulation of the posterior tibial nerve (PTN) at the ankle on the active triceps surae (TS) muscles was studied in normal subjects, both in a prone position and while standing. PTN stimulation regularly evoked the H-reflex in the flexor digitorum brevis and, in the prone position, a short-latency facilitatory effect in the soleus muscle. During standing, the facilitatory effect was preceded by a clear-cut reduction in electromyograph (EMG) activity. The inhibition-facilitation sequence was evoked in the gastrocnemii under both conditions, on average, though individual differences were present. An EMG modulation similar to that observed under standing conditions was present also in the prone position when subjects pressed the sole of the foot against the wall. Stimulation of sural or digital nerves did not evoke similar effects. It is concluded that foot muscle afferents establish oligosynaptic connections transmitting mixed effects to the TS motoneuronal pool, and that contact with the sole of the foot plays an enabling role for the inhibitory pathway directed to the soleus muscle.

  5. Excitatory post-synaptic potentials from single muscle spindle afferents in external intercostal motoneurones of the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Kirkwood, P A; Sears, T A

    1982-01-01

    1. The discharges of muscle spindle afferents from the external intercostal muscles of anaesthetized, paralysed cats were recorded from dorsal roots in continuity. The dynamic responses, regularities of firing and conduction velocities of the afferents were measured and used to characterize the afferents as primary-like or secondary-like. 2. The synchronization of afferent discharges was investigated by the construction of cross-correlation histograms from the simultaneously recorded discharges of pairs of afferents. The discharges of primary-like afferents with high dynamic responses were found to be synchronized within a few msec. The cardiac pulse was a strong contributary factor in this synchronization. 3. Intracellular recordings were made from external intercostal motoneurones, and spike-triggered averaging was used to reveal unitary e.p.s.p.s evoked by muscle spindle afferents which were from the same spinal cord segment. Dorsal roots other than the rootlet containing the afferent were cut to prevent the synchronization of afferent discharges from affecting the averaged e.p.s.p.s. 4. For primary-like afferents the mean amplitude of the e.p.s.p.s was 171 microV and the mean connectivity (the proportion of motoneurones connected by one afferent) was between 42 and 48%. 5. The amplitudes and shapes of the e.p.s.p.s varied with the respiratory phase, usually being larger in inspiration than in expiration and sometimes also having a longer time course. In particular some e.p.s.p.s showed that components, only represent in inspiration, which were interpreted as indicating polysynaptic connexions gated by the respiratory cycle. 6. The results are discussed in comparison with the connexions of individual muscle spindle afferents from other muscles, with particular reference to the conduction velocities of the afferents. PMID:6461757

  6. Sympathetic modulation of muscle spindle afferent sensitivity to stretch in rabbit jaw closing muscles.

    PubMed

    Roatta, S; Windhorst, U; Ljubisavljevic, M; Johansson, H; Passatore, M

    2002-04-01

    Previous reports showed that sympathetic stimulation affects the activity of muscle spindle afferents (MSAs). The aim of the present work is to study the characteristics of sympathetic modulation of MSA response to stretch: (i) on the dynamic and static components of the stretch response, and (ii) on group Ia and II MSAs to evaluate potentially different effects. In anaesthetised rabbits, the peripheral stump of the cervical sympathetic nerve (CSN) was stimulated at 10 impulses s(-1) for 45-90 s. The responses of single MSAs to trapezoidal displacement of the mandible were recorded from the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus. The following characteristic parameters were determined from averaged trapezoidal responses: initial frequency (IF), peak frequency at the end of the ramp (PF), and static index (SI). From these, other parameters were derived: dynamic index (DI = PF - SI), dynamic difference (DD = PF - IF) and static difference (SD = SI - IF). The effects of CSN stimulation were also evaluated during changes in the state of intrafusal muscle fibre contraction induced by succinylcholine and curare. In a population of 124 MSAs, 106 units (85.4 %) were affected by sympathetic stimulation. In general, while changes in resting discharge varied among different units (Ia vs. II) and experimental conditions (curarised vs. non-curarised), ranging from enhancement to strong depression of firing, the amplitude of the response to muscle stretches consistently decreased. This was confirmed and detailed in a quantitative analysis performed on 49 muscle spindle afferents. In both the non-curarised (23 units) and curarised (26 units) condition, stimulation of the CSN reduced the response amplitude in terms of DD and SD, but hardly affected DI. The effects were equally present in both Ia and II units; they were shown to be independent from gamma drive and intrafusal muscle tone and not secondary to muscle hypoxia. Sympathetic action on the resting discharge (IF) was less

  7. Sympathetic modulation of muscle spindle afferent sensitivity to stretch in rabbit jaw closing muscles

    PubMed Central

    Roatta, S; Windhorst, U; Ljubisavljevic, M; Johansson, H; Passatore, M

    2002-01-01

    Previous reports showed that sympathetic stimulation affects the activity of muscle spindle afferents (MSAs). The aim of the present work is to study the characteristics of sympathetic modulation of MSA response to stretch: (i) on the dynamic and static components of the stretch response, and (ii) on group Ia and II MSAs to evaluate potentially different effects. In anaesthetised rabbits, the peripheral stump of the cervical sympathetic nerve (CSN) was stimulated at 10 impulses s−1 for 45–90 s. The responses of single MSAs to trapezoidal displacement of the mandible were recorded from the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus. The following characteristic parameters were determined from averaged trapezoidal responses: initial frequency (IF), peak frequency at the end of the ramp (PF), and static index (SI). From these, other parameters were derived: dynamic index (DI = PF - SI), dynamic difference (DD = PF - IF) and static difference (SD = SI - IF). The effects of CSN stimulation were also evaluated during changes in the state of intrafusal muscle fibre contraction induced by succinylcholine and curare. In a population of 124 MSAs, 106 units (85.4 %) were affected by sympathetic stimulation. In general, while changes in resting discharge varied among different units (Ia vs. II) and experimental conditions (curarised vs. non-curarised), ranging from enhancement to strong depression of firing, the amplitude of the response to muscle stretches consistently decreased. This was confirmed and detailed in a quantitative analysis performed on 49 muscle spindle afferents. In both the non-curarised (23 units) and curarised (26 units) condition, stimulation of the CSN reduced the response amplitude in terms of DD and SD, but hardly affected DI. The effects were equally present in both Ia and II units; they were shown to be independent from gamma drive and intrafusal muscle tone and not secondary to muscle hypoxia. Sympathetic action on the resting discharge (IF) was less

  8. Interactions between cutaneous and muscle afferent projections to cerebral cortex in man.

    PubMed

    Burke, D; Gandevia, S C; McKeon, B; Skuse, N F

    1982-04-01

    In order to demonstrate interactions between cutaneous and muscle afferent volleys in the ascending somatosensory pathways, different nerves of the lower limb were stimulated together in a conditioning-test paradigm, the changes in the earliest component of the cerebral potential evoked by the test stimulus being taken to indicate such an interaction. It was first confirmed that the cerebral potential evoked by stimulation of the posterior tibial nerve at the ankle is derived from muscle afferents in the mixed nerve and has shorter latencies than the cerebral potential evoked by purely cutaneous volleys in the sural nerve (see Burke et al. 1981). Complete suppression of the cerebral potential evoked by stimulation of muscle or cutaneous afferents was produced by conditioning volleys in a different nerve or in a different fascicle of the same nerve. The major factors determining the degree of suppression were found to be the relative sizes of the conditioning and test volleys and their timing, rather than whether the volleys were of cutaneous or muscular origin. It is concluded that the transmission of cutaneous or muscle afferent volleys to cortex can be profoundly altered in normal subjects by conditioning activity. The possibility that normal background afferent activity can similarly modify afferent transmission has implications for diagnostic studies, particularly when they are performed under non-standard conditions, such as in the operating theatre or intensive care unit. It is also concluded that, although a subject may perceive cutaneous paraesthesiae when the posterior tibial nerve is stimulated at the ankle, there may be no cutaneous component to the evoked cerebral potential.

  9. The effect of experimental muscle pain on the amplitude and velocity sensitivity of jaw closing muscle spindle afferents.

    PubMed

    Masri, Radi; Ro, Jin Y; Capra, Norman

    2005-07-19

    The effect of experimental muscle pain on the amplitude and velocity sensitivity of muscle spindle primary afferent neurons in the trigeminal mesencephalic nucleus (Vmes) was examined. Extracellular recordings were made from 45 neurons designated as spindle primary- or secondary-like on the basis of their response to ramp-and-hold jaw movements. Velocity sensitivity was assessed in spindle primary-like afferents by calculating the mean dynamic index of each unit in response to three different velocities of jaw opening before and after intramuscular injection with hypertonic saline (HS, 5%, 100 microl). The amplitude sensitivity of all jaw muscle spindle afferents was assessed by calculating the mean firing rate of each unit in response to three different amplitudes of jaw openings during both the open and hold phases of the movement and with best-fit lines obtained, using linear regression analysis, before and after HS injection. The variance of the two regression lines obtained for each unit before and after the injection was compared using the coincidence test, and changes in intercept and slope were determined. Seventy-five percent of the primary-like units and 80% of the secondary-like units presented with changes in static behavior after HS injection. Thirty-six percent of the primary-like units showed changes in dynamic behavior. Injection of isotonic saline (control) did not alter the responses of the spindle afferent to jaw opening. Thus, our results demonstrate that the predominant effect of noxious stimulation was a shift in the amplitude sensitivity of both spindle primary-like and secondary-like afferents and, to a lesser extent, the velocity sensitivity of the spindle primary-like unit. In accordance with earlier studies in the cat hindlimb and neck muscles, these results suggest that the activation of masseter muscle nociceptor alters spindle afferent responses to stretch acting primarily through static gamma motor neurons.

  10. Mechanisms regulating the specificity and strength of muscle afferent inputs in the spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Mentis, George Z.; Alvarez, Francisco J.; Shneider, Neil A.; Siembab, Valerie C.; O'Donovan, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated factors controlling the development of connections between muscle spindle afferents, spinal motor neurons and inhibitory Renshaw cells. Several mutants were examined to establish the role of muscle spindles, muscle spindle-derived NT3 and excess NT3 in determining the specificity and strength of these connections. The findings suggest that although spindle-derived factors are not necessary for the initial formation and specificity of the synapses, spindle-derived NT3 seems necessary for strengthening homonymous connections between Ia afferents and motor neurons during the second postnatal week. We also found evidence for functional monosynaptic connections between sensory afferents and neonatal Renshaw cells although the density of these synapses decreases at P15. We conclude that muscle spindle synapses are weakened on Renshaw cells while they are strengthened on motor neurons. Interestingly, the loss of sensory synapses on Renshaw cells was reversed in mice over-expresssing NT3 in the periphery, suggesting that different levels of NT3 are required for functional maintenance and strengthening of spindle afferent inputs on motor neurons and Renshaw cells. PMID:20536937

  11. Mechanisms regulating the specificity and strength of muscle afferent inputs in the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Mentis, George Z; Alvarez, Francisco J; Shneider, Neil A; Siembab, Valerie C; O'Donovan, Michael J

    2010-06-01

    We investigated factors controlling the development of connections between muscle spindle afferents, spinal motor neurons, and inhibitory Renshaw cells. Several mutants were examined to establish the role of muscle spindles, muscle spindle-derived NT3, and excess NT3 in determining the specificity and strength of these connections. The findings suggest that although spindle-derived factors are not necessary for the initial formation and specificity of the synapses, spindle-derived NT3 seems necessary for strengthening homonymous connections between Ia afferents and motor neurons during the second postnatal week. We also found evidence for functional monosynaptic connections between sensory afferents and neonatal Renshaw cells although the density of these synapses decreases at P15. We conclude that muscle spindle synapses are weakened on Renshaw cells while they are strengthened on motor neurons. Interestingly, the loss of sensory synapses on Renshaw cells was reversed in mice overexpressing NT3 in the periphery, suggesting that different levels of NT3 are required for functional maintenance and strengthening of spindle afferent inputs on motor neurons and Renshaw cells.

  12. Afferent Innervation, Muscle Spindles, and Contractures Following Neonatal Brachial Plexus Injury in a Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Nikolaou, Sia; Hu, Liangjun; Cornwall, Roger

    2015-10-01

    We used an established mouse model of elbow flexion contracture after neonatal brachial plexus injury (NBPI) to test the hypothesis that preservation of afferent innervation protects against contractures and is associated with preservation of muscle spindles and ErbB signaling. A model of preganglionic C5 through C7 NBPI was first tested in mice with fluorescent axons using confocal imaging to confirm preserved afferent innervation of spindles despite motor end plate denervation. Preganglionic and postganglionic injuries were then created in wild-type mice. Four weeks later, we assessed total and afferent denervation of the elbow flexors by musculocutaneous nerve immunohistochemistry. Biceps muscle volume and cross-sectional area were measured by micro computed tomography. An observer who was blinded to the study protocol measured elbow flexion contractures. Biceps spindle and muscle fiber morphology and ErbB signaling pathway activity were assessed histologically and immunohistochemically. Preganglionic and postganglionic injuries caused similar total denervation and biceps muscle atrophy. However, after preganglionic injuries, afferent innervation was partially preserved and elbow flexion contractures were significantly less severe. Spindles degenerated after postganglionic injury but were preserved after preganglionic injury. ErbB signaling was inactivated in denervated spindles after postganglionic injury but ErbB signaling activity was preserved in spindles after preganglionic injury with retained afferent innervation. Preganglionic and postganglionic injuries were associated with upregulation of ErbB signaling in extrafusal muscle fibers. Contractures after NBPI are associated with muscle spindle degeneration and loss of spindle ErbB signaling activity. Preservation of afferent innervation maintained spindle development and ErbB signaling activity, and protected against contractures. Pharmacologic modulation of ErbB signaling, which is being investigated as a

  13. Characterization of muscle spindle afferents in the adult mouse using an in vitro muscle-nerve preparation.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Katherine A; Kloefkorn, Heidi E; Hochman, Shawn

    2012-01-01

    We utilized an in vitro adult mouse extensor digitorum longus (EDL) nerve-attached preparation to characterize the responses of muscle spindle afferents to ramp-and-hold stretch and sinusoidal vibratory stimuli. Responses were measured at both room (24°C) and muscle body temperature (34°C). Muscle spindle afferent static firing frequencies increased linearly in response to increasing stretch lengths to accurately encode the magnitude of muscle stretch (tested at 2.5%, 5% and 7.5% of resting length [Lo]). Peak firing frequency increased with ramp speeds (20% Lo/sec, 40% Lo/sec, and 60% Lo/sec). As a population, muscle spindle afferents could entrain 1:1 to sinusoidal vibrations throughout the frequency (10-100 Hz) and amplitude ranges tested (5-100 µm). Most units preferentially entrained to vibration frequencies close to their baseline steady-state firing frequencies. Cooling the muscle to 24°C decreased baseline firing frequency and units correspondingly entrained to slower frequency vibrations. The ramp component of stretch generated dynamic firing responses. These responses and related measures of dynamic sensitivity were not able to categorize units as primary (group Ia) or secondary (group II) even when tested with more extreme length changes (10% Lo). We conclude that the population of spindle afferents combines to encode stretch in a smoothly graded manner over the physiological range of lengths and speeds tested. Overall, spindle afferent response properties were comparable to those seen in other species, supporting subsequent use of the mouse genetic model system for studies on spindle function and dysfunction in an isolated muscle-nerve preparation.

  14. Characterization of Muscle Spindle Afferents in the Adult Mouse Using an In Vitro Muscle-Nerve Preparation

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Katherine A.; Kloefkorn, Heidi E.; Hochman, Shawn

    2012-01-01

    We utilized an in vitro adult mouse extensor digitorum longus (EDL) nerve-attached preparation to characterize the responses of muscle spindle afferents to ramp-and-hold stretch and sinusoidal vibratory stimuli. Responses were measured at both room (24°C) and muscle body temperature (34°C). Muscle spindle afferent static firing frequencies increased linearly in response to increasing stretch lengths to accurately encode the magnitude of muscle stretch (tested at 2.5%, 5% and 7.5% of resting length [Lo]). Peak firing frequency increased with ramp speeds (20% Lo/sec, 40% Lo/sec, and 60% Lo/sec). As a population, muscle spindle afferents could entrain 1:1 to sinusoidal vibrations throughout the frequency (10–100 Hz) and amplitude ranges tested (5–100 µm). Most units preferentially entrained to vibration frequencies close to their baseline steady-state firing frequencies. Cooling the muscle to 24°C decreased baseline firing frequency and units correspondingly entrained to slower frequency vibrations. The ramp component of stretch generated dynamic firing responses. These responses and related measures of dynamic sensitivity were not able to categorize units as primary (group Ia) or secondary (group II) even when tested with more extreme length changes (10% Lo). We conclude that the population of spindle afferents combines to encode stretch in a smoothly graded manner over the physiological range of lengths and speeds tested. Overall, spindle afferent response properties were comparable to those seen in other species, supporting subsequent use of the mouse genetic model system for studies on spindle function and dysfunction in an isolated muscle-nerve preparation. PMID:22745708

  15. Selective cortical and segmental control of primary afferent depolarization of single muscle afferents in the cat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Eguibar, J R; Quevedo, J; Rudomin, P

    1997-03-01

    This study was primarily aimed at investigating the selectivity of the cortico-spinal actions exerted on the pathways mediating primary afferent depolarization (PAD) of muscle spindle and tendon organ afferents ending within the intermediate nucleus at the L6-L7 segmental level. To this end we analyzed, in the anesthetized cat, the effects produced by electrical stimulation of sensory nerves and of the cerebral cortex on (a) the intraspinal threshold of pairs of single group I afferent fibers belonging to the same or to different hindlimb muscles and (b) the intraspinal threshold of two collaterals of the same muscle afferent fiber. Afferent fibers were classified in three categories, according to the effects produced by stimulation of segmental nerves and of the cerebral cortex. Twenty-five of 40 fibers (62.5%) were depolarized by stimulation of group I posterior biceps and semitendinosus (PBSt) or tibialis (Tib) fibers, but not by stimulation of the cerebral cortex or of cutaneous and joint nerves, which instead inhibited the PBSt- or Tib-induced PAD (type A PAD pattern, usually seen in Ia fibers). The remaining 15 fibers (37.5%) were all depolarized by stimulation of the PBSt or Tib nerves and the cerebral cortex. Stimulation of cutaneous and joint nerves produced PAD in 10 of those 15 fibers (type B PAD pattern) and inhibited the PBSt- or Tib-induced PAD in the 5 remaining fibers (type C PAD pattern). Fibers with a type B or C PAD pattern are likely to be Ib. Not all sites in the cerebral cortex inhibited with the same effectiveness the segmentally induced PAD of group I fibers with a type A PAD pattern. With the weakest stimulation of the cortical surface, the most effective sites that inhibited the PAD of individual fibers were surrounded by less effective sites, scattered all along the motor cortex (area 4gamma and 6) and sensory cortex (areas 3, 2 and 1), far beyond the area of projection of group I fibers from the hindlimb. With higher strengths of

  16. Emulated muscle spindle and spiking afferents validates VLSI neuromorphic hardware as a testbed for sensorimotor function and disease

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Chuanxin M.; Nandyala, Sirish K.; Sanger, Terence D.

    2014-01-01

    The lack of multi-scale empirical measurements (e.g., recording simultaneously from neurons, muscles, whole body, etc.) complicates understanding of sensorimotor function in humans. This is particularly true for the understanding of development during childhood, which requires evaluation of measurements over many years. We have developed a synthetic platform for emulating multi-scale activity of the vertebrate sensorimotor system. Our design benefits from Very Large Scale Integrated-circuit (VLSI) technology to provide considerable scalability and high-speed, as much as 365× faster than real-time. An essential component of our design is the proprioceptive sensor, or muscle spindle. Here we demonstrate an accurate and extremely fast emulation of a muscle spindle and its spiking afferents, which are computationally expensive but fundamental for reflex functions. We implemented a well-known rate-based model of the spindle (Mileusnic et al., 2006) and a simplified spiking sensory neuron model using the Izhikevich approximation to the Hodgkin–Huxley model. The resulting behavior of our afferent sensory system is qualitatively compatible with classic cat soleus recording (Crowe and Matthews, 1964b; Matthews, 1964, 1972). Our results suggest that this simplified structure of the spindle and afferent neuron is sufficient to produce physiologically-realistic behavior. The VLSI technology allows us to accelerate this behavior beyond 365× real-time. Our goal is to use this testbed for predicting years of disease progression with only a few days of emulation. This is the first hardware emulation of the spindle afferent system, and it may have application not only for emulation of human health and disease, but also for the construction of compliant neuromorphic robotic systems. PMID:25538613

  17. Emulated muscle spindle and spiking afferents validates VLSI neuromorphic hardware as a testbed for sensorimotor function and disease.

    PubMed

    Niu, Chuanxin M; Nandyala, Sirish K; Sanger, Terence D

    2014-01-01

    The lack of multi-scale empirical measurements (e.g., recording simultaneously from neurons, muscles, whole body, etc.) complicates understanding of sensorimotor function in humans. This is particularly true for the understanding of development during childhood, which requires evaluation of measurements over many years. We have developed a synthetic platform for emulating multi-scale activity of the vertebrate sensorimotor system. Our design benefits from Very Large Scale Integrated-circuit (VLSI) technology to provide considerable scalability and high-speed, as much as 365× faster than real-time. An essential component of our design is the proprioceptive sensor, or muscle spindle. Here we demonstrate an accurate and extremely fast emulation of a muscle spindle and its spiking afferents, which are computationally expensive but fundamental for reflex functions. We implemented a well-known rate-based model of the spindle (Mileusnic et al., 2006) and a simplified spiking sensory neuron model using the Izhikevich approximation to the Hodgkin-Huxley model. The resulting behavior of our afferent sensory system is qualitatively compatible with classic cat soleus recording (Crowe and Matthews, 1964b; Matthews, 1964, 1972). Our results suggest that this simplified structure of the spindle and afferent neuron is sufficient to produce physiologically-realistic behavior. The VLSI technology allows us to accelerate this behavior beyond 365× real-time. Our goal is to use this testbed for predicting years of disease progression with only a few days of emulation. This is the first hardware emulation of the spindle afferent system, and it may have application not only for emulation of human health and disease, but also for the construction of compliant neuromorphic robotic systems.

  18. Primary afferent depolarization of muscle afferents elicited by stimulation of joint afferents in cats with intact neuraxis and during reversible spinalization.

    PubMed

    Quevedo, J; Eguibar, J R; Jiménez, I; Schmidt, R F; Rudomin, P

    1993-11-01

    1. In the anesthetized and artificially ventilated cat, stimulation of the posterior articular nerve (PAN) with low strengths (1.2-1.4 x T) produced a small negative response (N1) in the cord dorsum of the lumbosacral spinal cord with a mean onset latency of 5.2 ms. Stronger stimuli (> 1.4 x T) produced two additional components (N2 and N3) with longer latencies (mean latencies 7.5 and 15.7 ms, respectively), usually followed by a slow positivity lasting 100-150 ms. With stimulus strengths above 10 x T there was in some experiments a delayed response (N4; mean latency 32 ms). 2. Activation of posterior knee joint nerve with single pulses and intensities producing N1 responses only, usually produced no dorsal root potentials (DRPs), or these were rather small. Stimulation with strengths producing N2 and N3 responses produced distinct DRPs. Trains of pulses were clearly more effective than single pulses in producing DRPs, even in the low-intensity range. 3. Cooling the thoracic spinal cord to block impulse conduction, increased the DRPs and the N3 responses produced by PAN stimulation without significantly affecting the N2 responses. Reversible spinalization also increased the DRPs produced by stimulation of cutaneous nerves. In contrast, the DRPs produced by stimulation of group I afferents from flexors were reduced. 4. Conditioning electrical stimulation of intermediate and high-threshold myelinated fibers in the PAN depressed the DRPs produced by stimulation of group I muscle and of cutaneous nerves. 5. Analysis of the intraspinal threshold changes of single Ia and Ib fibers has provided evidence that stimulation of intermediate and high threshold myelinated fibers in the posterior knee joint nerve inhibits the primary afferent depolarization (PAD) of Ia fibers, and may either produce PAD or inhibit the PAD in Ib fibers, in the same manner as stimulation of cutaneous nerves. In 7/16 group I fibers the inhibition of the PAD was increased during reversible

  19. Identification of different types of spinal afferent nerve endings that encode noxious and innocuous stimuli in the large intestine using a novel anterograde tracing technique.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Nick J; Kyloh, Melinda; Duffield, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, sensory stimuli in visceral organs, including those that underlie pain perception, are detected by spinal afferent neurons, whose cell bodies lie in dorsal root ganglia (DRG). One of the major challenges in visceral organs has been how to identify the different types of nerve endings of spinal afferents that transduce sensory stimuli into action potentials. The reason why spinal afferent nerve endings have been so challenging to identify is because no techniques have been available, until now, that can selectively label only spinal afferents, in high resolution. We have utilized an anterograde tracing technique, recently developed in our laboratory, which facilitates selective labeling of only spinal afferent axons and their nerve endings in visceral organs. Mice were anesthetized, lumbosacral DRGs surgically exposed, then injected with dextran-amine. Seven days post-surgery, the large intestine was removed. The characteristics of thirteen types of spinal afferent nerve endings were identified in detail. The greatest proportion of nerve endings was in submucosa (32%), circular muscle (25%) and myenteric ganglia (22%). Two morphologically distinct classes innervated myenteric ganglia. These were most commonly a novel class of intraganglionic varicose endings (IGVEs) and occasionally rectal intraganglionic laminar endings (rIGLEs). Three distinct classes of varicose nerve endings were found to innervate the submucosa and circular muscle, while one class innervated internodal strands, blood vessels, crypts of lieberkuhn, the mucosa and the longitudinal muscle. Distinct populations of sensory endings were CGRP-positive. We present the first complete characterization of the different types of spinal afferent nerve endings in a mammalian visceral organ. The findings reveal an unexpectedly complex array of different types of primary afferent endings that innervate specific layers of the large intestine. Some of the novel classes of nerve endings identified

  20. Autonomic control of the heart during exercise in humans: role of skeletal muscle afferents.

    PubMed

    Fisher, James P

    2014-02-01

    What is the topic of this review? The autonomic nervous system plays a key role in bringing about the cardiovascular responses to exercise necessitated by the increased metabolic requirements of the active skeletal muscle. The complex interaction of central and peripheral neural control mechanisms evokes a decrease in parasympathetic activity and an increase sympathetic activity to the heart during exercise. What advances does it highlight? This review presents some of the recent insights provided by human studies into the role of mechanically and metabolically sensitive skeletal muscle afferents in the regulation of cardiac autonomic control during exercise. The autonomic responses to exercise are orchestrated by the interactions of several central and peripheral neural mechanisms. This report focuses on the role of peripheral feedback from skeletal muscle afferents in the autonomic control of the heart during exercise in humans. Heart rate responses to passive calf stretch are abolished with cardiac parasympathetic blockade, indicating that the activation of mechanically sensitive skeletal muscle afferents (muscle mechanoreceptors) can inhibit cardiac parasympathetic activity and is likely to contribute to the increase in heart rate at the onset of exercise. Recent experiments show that the partial restriction of blood flow to the exercising skeletal muscles, to augment the activation of metabolically sensitive skeletal muscle afferents (muscle metaboreceptors) in humans, evokes an increase in heart rate that is attenuated with β1-adrenergic blockade, thus suggesting that this response is principally mediated via an increase in cardiac sympathetic activity. Heart rate remains at resting levels during isolated activation of muscle metaboreceptors with postexercise ischaemia following hand grip, unless cardiac parasympathetic activity is inhibited, whereupon a sympathetically mediated increase in heart rate is unmasked. During postexercise ischaemia following leg

  1. Skeletal muscle afferent regulation of bioassayable growth hormone in the rat pituitary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosselink, K. L.; Grindeland, R. E.; Roy, R. R.; Zhong, H.; Bigbee, A. J.; Grossman, E. J.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1998-01-01

    There are forms of growth hormone (GH) in the plasma and pituitary of the rat and in the plasma of humans that are undetected by presently available immunoassays (iGH) but can be measured by bioassay (bGH). Although the regulation of iGH release is well documented, the mechanism(s) of bGH release is unclear. On the basis of changes in bGH and iGH secretion in rats that had been exposed to microgravity conditions, we hypothesized that neural afferents play a role in regulating the release of these hormones. To examine whether bGH secretion can be modulated by afferent input from skeletal muscle, the proximal or distal ends of severed hindlimb fast muscle nerves were stimulated ( approximately 2 times threshold) in anesthetized rats. Plasma bGH increased approximately 250%, and pituitary bGH decreased approximately 60% after proximal nerve trunk stimulation. The bGH response was independent of muscle mass or whether the muscles were flexors or extensors. Distal nerve stimulation had little or no effect on plasma or pituitary bGH. Plasma iGH concentrations were unchanged after proximal nerve stimulation. Although there may be multiple regulatory mechanisms of bGH, the present results demonstrate that the activation of low-threshold afferents from fast skeletal muscles can play a regulatory role in the release of bGH, but not iGH, from the pituitary in anesthetized rats.

  2. Skeletal muscle afferent regulation of bioassayable growth hormone in the rat pituitary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosselink, K. L.; Grindeland, R. E.; Roy, R. R.; Zhong, H.; Bigbee, A. J.; Grossman, E. J.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1998-01-01

    There are forms of growth hormone (GH) in the plasma and pituitary of the rat and in the plasma of humans that are undetected by presently available immunoassays (iGH) but can be measured by bioassay (bGH). Although the regulation of iGH release is well documented, the mechanism(s) of bGH release is unclear. On the basis of changes in bGH and iGH secretion in rats that had been exposed to microgravity conditions, we hypothesized that neural afferents play a role in regulating the release of these hormones. To examine whether bGH secretion can be modulated by afferent input from skeletal muscle, the proximal or distal ends of severed hindlimb fast muscle nerves were stimulated ( approximately 2 times threshold) in anesthetized rats. Plasma bGH increased approximately 250%, and pituitary bGH decreased approximately 60% after proximal nerve trunk stimulation. The bGH response was independent of muscle mass or whether the muscles were flexors or extensors. Distal nerve stimulation had little or no effect on plasma or pituitary bGH. Plasma iGH concentrations were unchanged after proximal nerve stimulation. Although there may be multiple regulatory mechanisms of bGH, the present results demonstrate that the activation of low-threshold afferents from fast skeletal muscles can play a regulatory role in the release of bGH, but not iGH, from the pituitary in anesthetized rats.

  3. Cerebral, subcortical, and cerebellar activation evoked by selective stimulation of muscle and cutaneous afferents: an fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    Wardman, Daniel L.; Gandevia, Simon C.; Colebatch, James G.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We compared the brain areas that showed significant flow changes induced by selective stimulation of muscle and cutaneous afferents using fMRI BOLD imaging. Afferents arising from the right hand were studied in eight volunteers with electrical stimulation of the digital nerve of the index finger and over the motor point of the FDI muscle. Both methods evoked areas of significant activation cortically, subcortically, and in the cerebellum. Selective muscle afferent stimulation caused significant activation in motor‐related areas. It also caused significantly greater activation within the contralateral precentral gyrus, insula, and within the ipsilateral cerebellum as well as greater areas of reduced blood flow when compared to the cutaneous stimuli. We demonstrated separate precentral and postcentral foci of excitation with muscle afferent stimulation. We conclude, contrary to the findings with evoked potentials, that muscle afferents evoke more widespread cortical, subcortical, and cerebellar activation than do cutaneous afferents. This emphasizes the importance, for studies of movement, of matching the kinematic aspects in order to avoid the results being confounded by alterations in muscle afferent activation. The findings are consistent with clinical observations of the movement consequences of sensory loss and may also be the basis for the contribution of disturbed sensorimotor processing to disorders of movement. PMID:24771687

  4. Tactile stimulation with kinesiology tape alleviates muscle weakness attributable to attenuation of Ia afferents.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Yu

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged vibration stimulation to normal individuals could lead to muscle weakness attributable to attenuation of afferent feedback. This weakness is neurophysiologically similar to that seen in patients with knee injury. Theoretically, increasing input to gamma motor neurons could reverse this weakness. Sensory input to these neurons from skin could indirectly increase Ia afferent feedback. The present study examined the effect of this tactile stimulation in the form of Kinesiology tape on muscle weakness attributable to attenuation of afferent feedback. Randomized, crossover design. All participants were measured their eccentric maximal voluntary contractions under the 2 conditions (taping and non-taping). First, maximal voluntary contraction during eccentric contraction was measured as baseline. For the taping condition, Kinesiology tape was applied around each subject's knee joint during maximal voluntary contraction measurement after vibration. For the non-taping condition, tape was not applied during maximal voluntary contraction measurement after vibration. Mean percentage changes between pre- and post-vibration stimulation were compared between two conditions. Maximal voluntary contraction and average electromyography of taping condition was significantly larger than that of non-taping condition. Our results suggest that tactile stimulation in the form of Kinesiology tape inhibits the decline of both strength and electromyography. Alpha motor neuron activity attenuated by prolonged vibration would thus be partially rescued by tactile stimulation. These results indirectly suggest that stimulation of skin around the knee could counter quadriceps femoris weakness due to attenuated Ia afferent activity. Copyright © 2012 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Control of genioglossal muscle activity in the anesthetized piglet: the role of vagal afferents.

    PubMed

    Watchko, J F; O'Day, T L; Brozanski, B S; Vazquez, R L; Guthrie, R D

    1992-01-01

    We examined genioglossal muscle electromyogram activity during room air breathing and hyperoxic hypercapnia in 10 anesthetized (halothane) newborn piglets before and after bilateral midcervical vagotomy. With vagal afferents intact, genioglossal activity was absent during room air breathing in 10/10 study animals and was recruited in only 4/10 piglets during carbon dioxide breathing. After vagotomy, genioglossal activity remained absent in 9/10 study animals during room air breathing but was recruited in 10/10 piglets during the hypercapnic gas exposure at arterial CO2 tensions comparable to prevagotomy levels. We conclude that vagal afferent feedback modulates genioglossal activity in anesthetized newborn piglets and exerts an inhibitory influence on the activity of this muscle during hyperpnea induced by carbon dioxide breathing.

  6. Contributions of skin and muscle afferent input to movement sense in the human hand.

    PubMed

    Cordo, Paul J; Horn, Jean-Louis; Künster, Daniela; Cherry, Anne; Bratt, Alex; Gurfinkel, Victor

    2011-04-01

    In the stationary hand, static joint-position sense originates from multimodal somatosensory input (e.g., joint, skin, and muscle). In the moving hand, however, it is uncertain how movement sense arises from these different submodalities of proprioceptors. In contrast to static-position sense, movement sense includes multiple parameters such as motion detection, direction, joint angle, and velocity. Because movement sense is both multimodal and multiparametric, it is not known how different movement parameters are represented by different afferent submodalities. In theory, each submodality could redundantly represent all movement parameters, or, alternatively, different afferent submodalities could be tuned to distinctly different movement parameters. The study described in this paper investigated how skin input and muscle input each contributes to movement sense of the hand, in particular, to the movement parameters dynamic position and velocity. Healthy adult subjects were instructed to indicate with the left hand when they sensed the unseen fingers of the right hand being passively flexed at the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint through a previously learned target angle. The experimental approach was to suppress input from skin and/or muscle: skin input by anesthetizing the hand, and muscle input by unexpectedly extending the wrist to prevent MCP flexion from stretching the finger extensor muscle. Input from joint afferents was assumed not to play a significant role because the task was carried out with the MCP joints near their neutral positions. We found that, during passive finger movement near the neutral position in healthy adult humans, both skin and muscle receptors contribute to movement sense but qualitatively differently. Whereas skin input contributes to both dynamic position and velocity sense, muscle input may contribute only to velocity sense.

  7. Interneurones in pathways from group II muscle afferents in the lower-lumbar segments of the feline spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Riddell, J S; Hadian, M

    2000-01-01

    Interneurones receiving excitatory input from group II muscle afferents of hindlimb nerves and located in the lower-lumbar (L6-L7) segments of the cat spinal cord were investigated using both extracellular and intracellular recording. The interneurones were located mainly in the lateral parts of laminae IV-VII, dorsal and lateral to the main region in which interneurones with input from group I muscle afferents are located. Almost half the sample of interneurones (38 of 76) were characterized by an ipsilateral ascending projection within the lateral funiculus to the L4 level. The most powerful group II excitation was produced by afferents of the quadriceps and deep peroneal muscle nerves (which discharged 70–80 % of extracellularly recorded neurones) while group II afferents of tibialis posterior, posterior biceps-semitendinosus and gastrocnemius soleus were also highly effective (discharging 45–55 % of extracellularly recorded neurones). A proportion of intracellularly recorded group II EPSPs were monosynaptic. Seventy-five per cent of the extracellularly recorded interneurones were discharged by group II afferents of two or more muscle nerves and 43 % by afferents of three or more nerves. Group I muscle afferents evoked small EPSPs in over one-quarter of the intracellularly recorded interneurones and virtually all were strongly excited by cutaneous afferents. Evidence of excitatory input from joint, interosseous and group III muscle afferents was also observed. The properties of the interneurones are compared with those of others in the lumbosacral segments and the possibility that they may function as last-order premotor interneurones is discussed. PMID:10618156

  8. Rescue of neuronal function by cross-regeneration of cutaneous afferents into muscle in cats.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, H; Johnson, R D; Munson, J B

    1993-07-01

    1. This study investigates the relation between the peripheral innervation of low-threshold cutaneous afferents and the postsynaptic potentials elicited by electrical stimulation of those afferents. 2. In cats deeply anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium, cord dorsum potentials (CDPs) and postsynaptic potentials (PSPs) in spinal motoneurons were elicited by stimulation of the caudal cutaneous sural nerve (CCS), the lateral cutaneous sural nerve (LCS), and the medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscle nerve. We tested 1) unoperated cats, and cats in which CCS has been 2) chronically axotomized and ligated, 3) cut and self-reunited, 4) cut and cross-united with LCS, or 5) cut and cross-united with the MG. Terminal experiments were performed 3-36 mo after initial surgery. 3. In cats in which the CCS had been self-reunited or cross-united distally with LCS, tactile stimulation of the hairy skin normally innervated by the distal nerve activated afferents in the CCS central to the coaptation, indicating that former CCS afferents had regenerated into native or foreign skin, respectively. 4. In cats in which the CCS had been cross-united distally with the MG, both stretch and contraction of the MG muscle activated the former CCS afferents. 5. In unoperated cats, CDPs elicited by stimulation of CCS and of LCS exhibited a low-threshold N1 wave and a higher-threshold N2 wave. These waves were greatly delayed and appeared to merge after chronic axotomy of CCS. Regeneration of CCS into itself, into LCS, or into MG restored the normal latencies and configurations of these potentials. 6. In unoperated cats, stimulation of CCS, of LCS, and of MG each produced PSPs of characteristic configurations in the various subpopulations of motoneurons of the triceps surae. CDPs and PSPs elicited by the CCS cross-regenerated into LCS or MG were typical of those generated by the normal CCS, i.e., there was no evidence of respecification of central synaptic connections to bring accord between center

  9. The pattern of excitation of human lower limb motoneurones by probable group II muscle afferents

    PubMed Central

    Simonetta-Moreau, M; Marque, P; Marchand-Pauvert, V; Pierrot-Deseilligny, E

    1999-01-01

    Heteronymous group II effects were investigated in the human lower limb. Changes in firing probability of single motor units in quadriceps (Q), biceps (Bi), semitendinosus (ST), gastrocnemius medialis (GM) and tibialis anterior (TA) were studied after electrical stimuli between 1 and 3 times motor threshold (MT) applied to common peroneal (CP), superficial (SP) and deep (DP) peroneal, Bi and GM nerves in those nerve-muscle combinations without recurrent inhibition. Stimulation of the CP and Bi nerves evoked in almost all of the explored Q motor units a biphasic excitation with a low-threshold early peak, attributable to non-monosynaptic group I excitation, and a higher threshold late peak. When the CP nerve was cooled (or the stimulation applied to a distal branch, DP), the increase in latency was greater for the late than for the early peak, indicating that the late excitation is due to stimulation of afferents with a slower conduction velocity than group I fibres, presumably in the group II range. In ST motor units the group II excitation elicited by stimulation of the GM and SP nerves was particularly large and frequent, and the non-monosynaptic group I excitation was often replaced by an inhibition. A late group II-induced excitation from CP to Q motoneurones and from GM and SP to ST motoneurones was also observed when using the H reflex as a test. The electrical threshold and conduction velocity of the largest diameter fibres evoking the group II excitation were estimated to be 2·1 and 0·65 times those of the fastest Ia afferents, respectively. In the combinations tested in the present investigation the group II input seemed to be primarily of muscle origin. The potent heteronymous group II excitation of motoneurones of both flexors and extensors of the knee contrasted with the absence of a group II effect from DP to GM and from GM to TA. In none of the combinations explored was there any evidence for group II inhibition of motoneurones. The possible

  10. Single low-threshold afferents innervating the skin of the human foot modulate ongoing muscle activity in the upper limbs.

    PubMed

    Bent, Leah R; Lowrey, Catherine R

    2013-03-01

    We have shown for the first time that single cutaneous afferents in the foot dorsum have significant reflex coupling to motoneurons supplying muscles in the upper limb, particularly posterior deltoid and triceps brachii. These observations strengthen what we know from whole nerve stimulation, that skin on the foot and ankle can contribute to the modulation of interlimb muscles in distant innervation territories. The current work provides evidence of the mechanism behind the reflex, where one single skin afferent can evoke a reflex response, rather than a population. Nineteen of forty-one (46%) single cutaneous afferents isolated in the dorsum or plantar surface of the foot elicited a significant modulation of muscle activity in the upper limb. Identification of single afferents in this reflex indicates the strength of the connection and, ultimately, the importance of foot skin in interlimb coordination. The median response magnitude was 2.29% of background EMG, and the size of the evoked response did not significantly differ among the four mechanoreceptor classes (P > 0.1). Interestingly, although the distribution of afferents types did not differ across the foot dorsum, there was a significantly greater coupling response from receptors located on the medial aspect of the foot dorsum (P < 0.01). Furthermore, the most consistent coupling with upper limb muscles was demonstrated by type I afferents (fast and slowly adapting). This work contributes to the current literature on receptor specificity, supporting the view that individual classes of cutaneous afferents may subserve specific roles in kinesthesia, reflexes, and tactile perception.

  11. Afferent contribution to locomotor muscle activity during unconstrained overground human walking: an analysis of triceps surae muscle fascicles.

    PubMed

    af Klint, R; Cronin, N J; Ishikawa, M; Sinkjaer, T; Grey, M J

    2010-03-01

    Plantar flexor series elasticity can be used to dissociate muscle-fascicle and muscle-tendon behavior and thus afferent feedback during human walking. We used electromyography (EMG) and high-speed ultrasonography concomitantly to monitor muscle activity and muscle fascicle behavior in 19 healthy volunteers as they walked across a platform. On random trials, the platform was dropped (8 cm, 0.9 g acceleration) or held at a small inclination (up to +/-3 degrees in the parasagittal plane) with respect to level ground. Dropping the platform in the mid and late phases of stance produced a depression in the soleus muscle activity with an onset latency of about 50 ms. The reduction in ground reaction force also unloaded the plantar flexor muscles. The soleus muscle fascicles shortened with a minimum delay of 14 ms. Small variations in platform inclination produced significant changes in triceps surae muscle activity; EMG increased when stepping on an inclined surface and decreased when stepping on a declined surface. This sensory modulation of the locomotor output was concomitant with changes in triceps surae muscle fascicle and gastrocnemius tendon length. Assuming that afferent activity correlates to these mechanical changes, our results indicate that within-step sensory feedback from the plantar flexor muscles automatically adjusts muscle activity to compensate for small ground irregularities. The delayed onset of muscle fascicle movement after dropping the platform indicates that at least the initial part of the soleus depression is more likely mediated by a decrease in force feedback than length-sensitive feedback, indicating that force feedback contributes to the locomotor activity in human walking.

  12. Contribution of hind limb flexor muscle afferents to the timing of phase transitions in the cat step cycle.

    PubMed

    Hiebert, G W; Whelan, P J; Prochazka, A; Pearson, K G

    1996-03-01

    1. In this investigation, we tested the hypothesis that muscle spindle afferents signaling the length of hind-leg flexor muscles are involved in terminating extensor activity and initiating flexion during walking. The hip flexor muscle iliopsoas (IP) and the ankle flexors tibialis anterior (TA) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) were stretched or vibrated at various phases of the step cycle in spontaneously walking decerebrate cats. Changes in electromyogram amplitude, duration, and timing were then examined. The effects of electrically stimulating group I and II afferents in the nerves to TA and EDL also were examined. 2. Stretch of the individual flexor muscles (IP, TA, or EDL) during the stance phase reduced the duration of extensor activity and promoted the onset of flexor burst activity. The contralateral step cycle also was affected by the stretch, the duration of flexor activity being shortened and extensor activity occurring earlier. Therefore, stretch of the flexor muscles during the stance phase reset the locomotor rhythm to flexion ipsilaterally and extension contralaterally. 3. Results of electrically stimulating the afferents from the TA and EDL muscles suggested that different groups of afferents were responsible for the resetting of the step cycle. Stimulation of the TA nerve reset the locomotor step cycle when the stimulus intensity was in the group II range (2-5 xT). By contrast, stimulation of the EDL nerve generated strong resetting of the step cycle in the range of 1.2-1.4 xT, where primarily the group Ia afferents from the muscle spindles would be activated. 4. Vibration of IP or EDL during stance reduced the duration of the extensor activity by similar amounts to that produced by muscle stretch or by electrical stimulation of EDL at group Ia strengths. This suggests that the group Ia afferents from IP and EDL are capable of resetting the locomotor pattern generator. Vibration of TA did not affect the locomotor rhythm. 5. Stretch of IP or

  13. Influence of locomotor muscle afferent inhibition on the ventilatory response to exercise in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Olson, Thomas P; Joyner, Michael J; Eisenach, John H; Curry, Timothy B; Johnson, Bruce D

    2014-02-01

    What is the central question of this study? Patients with heart failure often develop ventilatory abnormalities at rest and during exercise, but the mechanisms underlying these abnormalities remain unclear. This study investigated the influence of inhibiting afferent neural feedback from locomotor muscles on the ventilatory response during exercise in heart failure patients. What is the main finding and its importance? Our results suggest that inhibiting afferent feedback from locomotor muscle via intrathecal opioid administration significantly reduces the ventilatory response to exercise in heart failure patients. Patients with heart failure (HF) develop ventilatory abnormalities at rest and during exercise, but the mechanism(s) underlying these abnormalities remain unclear. We examined whether the inhibition of afferent neural feedback from locomotor muscles during exercise reduces exercise ventilation in HF patients. In a randomized, placebo-controlled design, nine HF patients (age, 60 ± 2 years; ejection fraction, 27 ± 2%; New York Heart Association class 2 ± 1) and nine control subjects (age, 63 ± 2 years) underwent constant-work submaximal cycling (65% peak power) with intrathecal fentanyl (impairing the cephalad projection of opioid receptor-sensitive afferents) or sham injection. The hypercapnic ventilatory response was measured to determine whether cephalad migration of fentanyl occurred. There were no differences in hypercapnic ventilatory response within or between groups in either condition. Despite a lack of change in ventilation, tidal volume or respiratory rate, HF patients had a mild increase in arterial carbon dioxide (P(aCO(2)) and a decrease in oxygen (P(aO(2)); P < 0.05 for both) at rest. The control subjects demonstrated no change in P(aCO(2)), P(aO(2)), ventilation, tidal volume or respiratory rate at rest. In response to fentanyl during exercise, HF patients had a reduction in ventilation (63 ± 6 versus 44 ± 3 l min(-1), P < 0.05) due

  14. Functional Changes in Muscle Afferent Neurones in an Osteoarthritis Model: Implications for Impaired Proprioceptive Performance

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qi; Henry, James L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Impaired proprioceptive performance is a significant clinical issue for many who suffer osteoarthritis (OA) and is a risk factor for falls and other liabilities. This study was designed to evaluate weight-bearing distribution in a rat model of OA and to determine whether changes also occur in muscle afferent neurones. Methodology/Principal Findings Intracellular recordings were made in functionally identified dorsal root ganglion neurones in acute electrophysiological experiments on the anaesthetized animal following measurements of hind limb weight bearing in the incapacitance test. OA rats but not naïve control rats stood with less weight on the ipsilateral hind leg (P = 0.02). In the acute electrophysiological experiments that followed weight bearing measurements, action potentials (AP) elicited by electrical stimulation of the dorsal roots differed in OA rats, including longer AP duration (P = 0.006), slower rise time (P = 0.001) and slower maximum rising rate (P = 0.03). Depolarizing intracellular current injection elicited more APs in models than in naïve muscle afferent neurones (P = 0.01) indicating greater excitability. Axonal conduction velocity in model animals was slower (P = 0.04). Conclusions/Significance The present study demonstrates changes in hind limb stance accompanied by changes in the functional properties of muscle afferent neurones in this derangement model of OA. This may provide a possible avenue to explore mechanisms underlying the impaired proprioceptive performance and perhaps other sensory disorders in people with OA. PMID:22606297

  15. TRPA1 mediates amplified sympathetic responsiveness to activation of metabolically sensitive muscle afferents in rats with femoral artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Jihong; Lu, Jian; Li, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Autonomic responses to activation of mechanically and metabolically sensitive muscle afferent nerves during static contraction are augmented in rats with femoral artery occlusion. Moreover, metabolically sensitive transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily A, member 1 (TRPA1) has been reported to contribute to sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) and arterial blood pressure (BP) responses evoked by static muscle contraction. Thus, in the present study, we examined the mechanisms by which afferent nerves' TRPA1 plays a role in regulating amplified sympathetic responsiveness due to a restriction of blood flow directed to the hindlimb muscles. Our data show that 24–72 h of femoral artery occlusion (1) upregulates the protein levels of TRPA1 in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) tissues; (2) selectively increases expression of TRPA1 in DRG neurons supplying metabolically sensitive afferent nerves of C-fiber (group IV); and (3) enhances renal SNA and BP responses to AITC (a TRPA1 agonist) injected into the hindlimb muscles. In addition, our data demonstrate that blocking TRPA1 attenuates SNA and BP responses during muscle contraction to a greater degree in ligated rats than those responses in control rats. In contrast, blocking TRPA1 fails to attenuate SNA and BP responses during passive tendon stretch in both groups. Overall, results of this study indicate that alternations in muscle afferent nerves' TRPA1 likely contribute to enhanced sympathetically mediated autonomic responses via the metabolic component of the muscle reflex under circumstances of chronic muscle ischemia. PMID:26441669

  16. TRPA1 mediates amplified sympathetic responsiveness to activation of metabolically sensitive muscle afferents in rats with femoral artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jihong; Lu, Jian; Li, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Autonomic responses to activation of mechanically and metabolically sensitive muscle afferent nerves during static contraction are augmented in rats with femoral artery occlusion. Moreover, metabolically sensitive transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily A, member 1 (TRPA1) has been reported to contribute to sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) and arterial blood pressure (BP) responses evoked by static muscle contraction. Thus, in the present study, we examined the mechanisms by which afferent nerves' TRPA1 plays a role in regulating amplified sympathetic responsiveness due to a restriction of blood flow directed to the hindlimb muscles. Our data show that 24-72 h of femoral artery occlusion (1) upregulates the protein levels of TRPA1 in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) tissues; (2) selectively increases expression of TRPA1 in DRG neurons supplying metabolically sensitive afferent nerves of C-fiber (group IV); and (3) enhances renal SNA and BP responses to AITC (a TRPA1 agonist) injected into the hindlimb muscles. In addition, our data demonstrate that blocking TRPA1 attenuates SNA and BP responses during muscle contraction to a greater degree in ligated rats than those responses in control rats. In contrast, blocking TRPA1 fails to attenuate SNA and BP responses during passive tendon stretch in both groups. Overall, results of this study indicate that alternations in muscle afferent nerves' TRPA1 likely contribute to enhanced sympathetically mediated autonomic responses via the metabolic component of the muscle reflex under circumstances of chronic muscle ischemia.

  17. PAD patterns of physiologically identified afferent fibres from the medial gastrocnemius muscle.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, I; Rudomin, P; Solodkin, M

    1988-01-01

    Intracellular recordings were made in the barbiturate-anesthetized cat from single afferent fibres left in continuity with the medial gastrocnemius muscle to document the transmembrane potential changes produced in functionally identified fibres by stimulation of sensory nerves and of the contralateral red nucleus (RN). Fifty five fibres from muscle spindles had conduction velocities above 70 m/s and were considered as from group Ia. Stimulation of group I afferent fibres of the posterior biceps and semitendinosus nerve (PBSt) produced primary afferent depolarization (PAD) in 30 (54%) Ia fibres. Stimulation of the sural (SU) nerve produced no transmembrane potential changes in 39 (71%) group Ia fibres and dorsal root reflex-like activity (DRRs) in 16 (29%) fibres. In 17 out of 28 group Ia fibres (60.7%) SU conditioning inhibited the PAD generated by stimulation of the PBSt nerve. Facilitation of the PBSt-induced PAD by SU conditioning was not seen. Repetitive stimulation of the RN had mixed effects: it produced PAD in 1 out of 8 fibres and inhibited the PAD induced by PBSt stimulation in 2 other fibres. Nine fibres connected to muscle spindles had conduction velocities below 70 m/s and were considered to be group II afferents. No PAD was produced in these fibres by SU stimulation but DRRs were generated in 5 of them. In 23 out of 31 fibres identified as from tendon organs group I PBSt volleys produced PAD. However, stimulation of the SU nerve produced PAD only in 3 out of 34 fibres, no transmembrane potential changes in 30 fibres and DRRs in 1 fibre. The effects of SU conditioning on the PAD produced by PBSt stimulation were tested in 19 Ib fibres and were inhibitory in 12 of them. In 9 of these fibres SU alone produced no transmembrane potential changes. Repetitive stimulation of the RN produced PAD in 3 out of 9 Ib fibres. SU conditioning inhibited the RN-induced PAD. The present findings support the existence of an alternative inhibitory pathway from cutaneous

  18. Vagal intramuscular array afferents form complexes with interstitial cells of Cajal in gastrointestinal smooth muscle: Analogues of muscle spindle organs?

    PubMed Central

    Powley, Terry L.; Phillips, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Intramuscular arrays (IMAs), vagal mechanoreceptors that innervate gastrointestinal smooth muscle, have not been completely described structurally or functionally. To delineate more fully the architecture of IMAs and to consider the structure-function implications of the observations, the present experiment examined the organization of the IMA terminal arbors and the accessory tissue elements of those arbors. IMA terminal fields, labeled by injection of biotinylated dextran into the nodose ganglia, were examined in whole mounts of rat gastric smooth muscle double-labeled with immunohistochemistry for interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs; c-Kit) and/or inputs of different neuronal efferent transmitter (markers: TH, VChAT, and NOS) or afferent neuropeptidergic (CGRP) phenotypes. IMAs make extensive varicose and lamellar contacts with ICCs. In addition, axons of the multiple efferent and afferent phenotypes examined converge and articulate with IMA terminal arbors innervating ICCs. This architecture is consistent with the hypothesis that IMAs, or the multiply innervated IMA-ICC complexes they form, can function as stretch receptors. The tissue organization is also consonant with the proposal that those units can operate as functional analogues of muscle spindle organs. For electrophysiological assessments of IMA functions, experiments will need protocols that preserve both the complex architecture and the dynamic operations of IMA-ICC complexes. PMID:21530617

  19. Vagal intramuscular array afferents form complexes with interstitial cells of Cajal in gastrointestinal smooth muscle: analogues of muscle spindle organs?

    PubMed

    Powley, T L; Phillips, R J

    2011-07-14

    Intramuscular arrays (IMAs), vagal mechanoreceptors that innervate gastrointestinal smooth muscle, have not been completely described structurally or functionally. To delineate more fully the architecture of IMAs and to consider the structure-function implications of the observations, the present experiment examined the organization of the IMA terminal arbors and the accessory tissue elements of those arbors. IMA terminal fields, labeled by injection of biotinylated dextran into the nodose ganglia, were examined in whole mounts of rat gastric smooth muscle double-labeled with immunohistochemistry for interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs; c-Kit) and/or inputs of different neuronal efferent transmitter (markers: tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), and nitric oxide synthase (NOS)) or afferent neuropeptidergic (calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)) phenotypes. IMAs make extensive varicose and lamellar contacts with ICCs. In addition, axons of the multiple efferent and afferent phenotypes examined converge and articulate with IMA terminal arbors innervating ICCs. This architecture is consistent with the hypothesis that IMAs, or the multiply innervated IMA-ICC complexes they form, can function as stretch receptors. The tissue organization is also consonant with the proposal that those units can operate as functional analogues of muscle spindle organs. For electrophysiological assessments of IMA functions, experiments will need protocols that preserve both the complex architecture and the dynamic operations of IMA-ICC complexes.

  20. Role of afferent input in load-dependent plasticity of rat muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, F.; Umemoto, S.; Higo, Y.; Kawabe, N.; Wang, X. D.; Lan, Y. B.; Ohira, Y.

    We have been studying the role of afferent input in the plasticity of skeletal muscles. The present study was performed to investigate the mechanisms responsible for the deafferentation-related inhibition of the compensatory hypertrophy in rat soleus muscle. Adult male Wistar rats were randomly separated into the control, functionally overloaded (FO), and functionally overloaded + deafferentation (FO+DA) group. The tendons of plantaris and gastrocnemius muscles were transected in the FO rats. The dorsal roots of the spinal cord at the L4-5 segmental levels were additionally transected in the FO+DA rats. The sampling of the soleus was performed 2 weeks after the surgery and ambulation recovery. The single muscle fibers were isolated in low-calcium relaxing solution. Further, the myonuclei or argyrophilic nucleolar organizer regions (AgNORs) were stained. Significant increase of the fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) was seen in the FO, but not in the FO+DA, rats. The myonuclear number in fiber was significantly decreased by FO. Addition of DA to FO further promoted the reduction of myonuclear number. The mean nucleus size and DNA content in single nucleus in all groups were identical. Although a single or double AgNORs were seen in ~90% of myonuclei in the control rats, their distributions were 72 and 76% in the FO and FO+DA rats, respectively (p<0.05). More myonuclei containing 3-5 AgNORs were noted in the FO and FO+DA rats. The mean number of the AgNORs per myonucleus was 1.7 in the control, 2.1 in both FO and FO+DA rats (p<0.05). It was suggested that the FO-related increase of the number of AgNORs may be responsible for the induction of compensatory hypertrophy. It was also indicated that intact afferent input plays an essential role in these phenomena.

  1. Role of afferent input and mechanical load for size regulation of rat soleus muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, Fuminori; Matsuka, Yoshikazu; Oke, Yoshihiko; Higo, Yoko; Terada, Masahiro; Umemoto, Shiori; Kawabe, Naoko; Wang, Xiao Dong; Shinoda, Yo; Lan, Yong Bo; Fukuda, Hiroyuki; Ohmi, Shinobu; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    2005-08-01

    Effects of deafferentation on the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 (S6), 27 kDa heat shock protein (HSP27) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 were studied in rat soleus muscle. Adult male Wistar rats were randomly separated into the pre- and post- experimental control, functionally overloaded (FO), sham-operated, deafferentated (DA), FO+DA, and hindlimb-unloaded (U) groups. The distal tendons of left plantaris and gastrocnemius muscles were transected in the FO rats. The left dorsal roots of the spinal cord at the L4-5 segmental levels were transected in the DA rats. The rats in U were tail-suspended. The sampling of the soleus muscle was performed 2 weeks after the treatments shown above. The cytoplasmic fraction of the soleus muscle homogenate was used for the quantitative analyses of the phosphorylation levels of S6, HSP27, and ERK 1/2. The phosphorylation levels of these proteins were up-regulated by FO. On the contrary, the phosphorylation of all of these proteins was down-regulated by U and DA. Further, the FO-related increase of the protein phosphorylation was inhibited by additional treatment with DA. These results indicated that the afferent feedback plays crucial roles in the intramuscular regulation of the soleus muscle mass.

  2. Cortico-muscular synchronization by proprioceptive afferents from the tongue muscles during isometric tongue protrusion.

    PubMed

    Maezawa, Hitoshi; Mima, Tatsuya; Yazawa, Shogo; Matsuhashi, Masao; Shiraishi, Hideaki; Funahashi, Makoto

    2016-03-01

    Tongue movements contribute to oral functions including swallowing, vocalizing, and breathing. Fine tongue movements are regulated through efferent and afferent connections between the cortex and tongue. It has been demonstrated that cortico-muscular coherence (CMC) is reflected at two frequency bands during isometric tongue protrusions: the beta (β) band at 15-35Hz and the low-frequency band at 2-10Hz. The CMC at the β band (β-CMC) reflects motor commands from the primary motor cortex (M1) to the tongue muscles through hypoglossal motoneuron pools. However, the generator mechanism of the CMC at the low-frequency band (low-CMC) remains unknown. Here, we evaluated the mechanism of low-CMC during isometric tongue protrusion using magnetoencephalography (MEG). Somatosensory evoked fields (SEFs) were also recorded following electrical tongue stimulation. Significant low-CMC and β-CMC were observed over both hemispheres for each side of the tongue. Time-domain analysis showed that the MEG signal followed the electromyography signal for low-CMC, which was contrary to the finding that the MEG signal preceded the electromyography signal for β-CMC. The mean conduction time from the tongue to the cortex was not significantly different between the low-CMC (mean, 80.9ms) and SEFs (mean, 71.1ms). The cortical sources of low-CMC were located significantly posterior (mean, 10.1mm) to the sources of β-CMC in M1, but were in the same area as tongue SEFs in the primary somatosensory cortex (S1). These results reveal that the low-CMC may be driven by proprioceptive afferents from the tongue muscles to S1, and that the oscillatory interaction was derived from each side of the tongue to both hemispheres. Oscillatory proprioceptive feedback from the tongue muscles may aid in the coordination of sophisticated tongue movements in humans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The projection of jaw elevator muscle spindle afferents to fifth nerve motoneurones in the cat.

    PubMed

    Appenteng, K; O'Donovan, M J; Somjen, G; Stephens, J A; Taylor, A

    1978-06-01

    1. By spike-triggered averaging of intracellular synaptic noise it has been shown in pentobarbitone anaesthetized cats that jaw elevator muscle spindle afferents with their cell bodies in the mid-brain have a relatively weak monosynaptic projection to masseter and temporalis motoneurones. 2. Extending the spike-triggered averaging method to recording extracellular excitatory field potentials it has been shown that virtually all the spindles do project monosynaptically to the motoneurone pool. It is concluded that the general weakness of the projection is due to its restriction to a small proportion of the motoneurones, possibly those concerned most with tonic postural functions. 3. The shape of individual intracellular e.p.s.p.s together with the spatial distribution of extracellular excitatory potential fields provide some evidence for a dentrically weighted distribution of the synapses. 4. Evidence is presented that both primary- and secondary-type spindle afferents project monosynaptically, the secondary effects being some 71% of the strength of the primary ones.

  4. The projection of jaw elevator muscle spindle afferents to fifth nerve motoneurones in the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Appenteng, K; O'Donovan, M J; Somjen, G; Stephens, J A; Taylor, A

    1978-01-01

    1. By spike-triggered averaging of intracellular synaptic noise it has been shown in pentobarbitone anaesthetized cats that jaw elevator muscle spindle afferents with their cell bodies in the mid-brain have a relatively weak monosynaptic projection to masseter and temporalis motoneurones. 2. Extending the spike-triggered averaging method to recording extracellular excitatory field potentials it has been shown that virtually all the spindles do project monosynaptically to the motoneurone pool. It is concluded that the general weakness of the projection is due to its restriction to a small proportion of the motoneurones, possibly those concerned most with tonic postural functions. 3. The shape of individual intracellular e.p.s.p.s together with the spatial distribution of extracellular excitatory potential fields provide some evidence for a dentrically weighted distribution of the synapses. 4. Evidence is presented that both primary- and secondary-type spindle afferents project monosynaptically, the secondary effects being some 71% of the strength of the primary ones. PMID:149860

  5. The optimal neural strategy for a stable motor task requires a compromise between level of muscle cocontraction and synaptic gain of afferent feedback

    PubMed Central

    Dideriksen, Jakob L.; Negro, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Increasing joint stiffness by cocontraction of antagonist muscles and compensatory reflexes are neural strategies to minimize the impact of unexpected perturbations on movement. Combining these strategies, however, may compromise steadiness, as elements of the afferent input to motor pools innervating antagonist muscles are inherently negatively correlated. Consequently, a high afferent gain and active contractions of both muscles may imply negatively correlated neural drives to the muscles and thus an unstable limb position. This hypothesis was systematically explored with a novel computational model of the peripheral nervous system and the mechanics of one limb. Two populations of motor neurons received synaptic input from descending drive, spinal interneurons, and afferent feedback. Muscle force, simulated based on motor unit activity, determined limb movement that gave rise to afferent feedback from muscle spindles and Golgi tendon organs. The results indicated that optimal steadiness was achieved with low synaptic gain of the afferent feedback. High afferent gains during cocontraction implied increased levels of common drive in the motor neuron outputs, which were negatively correlated across the two populations, constraining instability of the limb. Increasing the force acting on the joint and the afferent gain both effectively minimized the impact of an external perturbation, and suboptimal adjustment of the afferent gain could be compensated by muscle cocontraction. These observations show that selection of the strategy for a given contraction implies a compromise between steadiness and effectiveness of compensations to perturbations. This indicates that a task-dependent selection of neural strategy for steadiness is necessary when acting in different environments. PMID:26203102

  6. Spinal μ-opioid receptor-sensitive lower limb muscle afferents determine corticospinal responsiveness and promote central fatigue in upper limb muscle

    PubMed Central

    Sidhu, Simranjit K; Weavil, Joshua C; Venturelli, Massimo; Garten, Ryan S; Rossman, Matthew J; Richardson, Russell S; Gmelch, Benjamin S; Morgan, David E; Amann, Markus

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the influence of group III/IV lower limb muscle afferents on the development of supraspinal fatigue and the responsiveness of corticospinal projections to an arm muscle. Eight males performed constant-load leg cycling exercise (80% peak power output) for 30 s (non-fatiguing) and to exhaustion (∼9 min; fatiguing) both under control conditions and with lumbar intrathecal fentanyl impairing feedback from μ-opioid receptor-sensitive lower limb muscle afferents. Voluntary activation (VA) of elbow flexors was assessed via transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) during maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) and corticospinal responsiveness was monitored via TMS-evoked potentials (MEPs) during a 25% MVC. Accompanied by a significant 5 ± 1% reduction in VA from pre- to post-exercise, elbow flexor MVC progressively decreased during the fatiguing trial (P < 0.05). By contrast, with attenuated feedback from locomotor muscle afferents, MVC and VA remained unchanged during fatiguing exercise (P > 0.3). MEPs decreased by 36 ± 6% (P < 0.05) from the start of exercise to exhaustion under control conditions, but this reduction was prevented with fentanyl blockade. Furthermore, fentanyl blockade prevented the significant increase in elbow flexor MEP observed from rest to non-fatiguing exercise under control conditions and resulted in a 14% lower corticospinal responsiveness during this short bout (P < 0.05). Taken together, in the absence of locomotor muscle fatigue, group III/IV-mediated leg muscle afferents facilitate responsiveness of the motor pathway to upper limb flexor muscles. By contrast, in the presence of cycling-induced leg fatigue, group III/IV locomotor muscle afferents facilitate supraspinal fatigue in remote muscle not involved in the exercise and disfacilitate, or inhibit, the responsiveness of corticospinal projections to upper limb muscles. PMID:25172953

  7. Group III/IV locomotor muscle afferents alter motor cortical and corticospinal excitability and promote central fatigue during cycling exercise

    PubMed Central

    Sidhu, Simranjit K.; Weavil, Joshua C.; Mangum, Tyler S.; Jessop, Jacob E.; Richardson, Russell S.; Morgan, David E.; Amann, Markus

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the influence of group III/IV muscle afferents on the development of central fatigue and corticospinal excitability during exercise. Methods Fourteen males performed cycling-exercise both under control-conditions (CTRL) and with lumbar intrathecal fentanyl (FENT) impairing feedback from leg muscle afferents. Transcranial magnetic- and cervicomedullary stimulation was used to monitor cortical versus spinal excitability. Results While fentanyl-blockade during non-fatiguing cycling had no effect on motor-evoked potentials (MEPs), cervicomedullary-evoked motor potentials (CMEPs) were 13 ± 3% higher (P < 0.05), resulting in a decrease in MEP/CMEP (P < 0.05). Although the pre- to post-exercise reduction in resting twitch was greater in FENT vs. CTRL (−53 ± 3% vs. −39 ± 3%; P < 0.01), the reduction in voluntary muscle activation was smaller (−2 ± 2% vs. −10 ± 2%; P < 0.05). Compared to the start of fatiguing exercise, MEPs and CMEPs were unchanged at exhaustion in CTRL. In contrast, MEPs and MEP/CMEP increased 13 ± 3% and 25 ± 6% in FENT (P < 0.05). Conclusion During non-fatiguing exercise, group III/IV muscle afferents disfacilitate, or inhibit, spinal motoneurons and facilitate motor cortical cells. In contrast, during exhaustive exercise, group III/IV muscle afferents disfacilitate/inhibit the motor cortex and promote central fatigue. Significance Group III/IV muscle afferents influence corticospinal excitability and central fatigue during whole-body exercise in humans. PMID:27866119

  8. Autonomic control of heart rate by metabolically sensitive skeletal muscle afferents in humans.

    PubMed

    Fisher, James P; Seifert, Thomas; Hartwich, Doreen; Young, Colin N; Secher, Niels H; Fadel, Paul J

    2010-04-01

    Isolated activation of metabolically sensitive skeletal muscle afferents (muscle metaboreflex) using post-exercise ischaemia (PEI) following handgrip partially maintains exercise-induced increases in arterial blood pressure (BP) and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (SNA), while heart rate (HR) declines towards resting values. Although masking of metaboreflex-mediated increases in cardiac SNA by parasympathetic reactivation during PEI has been suggested, this has not been directly tested in humans. In nine male subjects (23 +/- 5 years) the muscle metaboreflex was activated by PEI following moderate (PEI-M) and high (PEI-H) intensity isometric handgrip performed at 25% and 40% maximum voluntary contraction, under control (no drug), parasympathetic blockade (glycopyrrolate) and beta-adrenergic blockade (metoprolol or propranalol) conditions, while beat-to-beat HR and BP were continuously measured. During control PEI-M, HR was slightly elevated from rest (+3 +/- 2 beats min(-1)); however, this HR elevation was abolished with beta-adrenergic blockade (P < 0.05 vs. control) but augmented with parasympathetic blockade (+8 +/- 2 beats min(-1), P < 0.05 vs. control and beta-adrenergic blockade). The HR elevation during control PEI-H (+9 +/- 3 beats min(-1)) was greater than with PEI-M (P < 0.05), and was also attenuated with beta-adrenergic blockade (+4 +/- 2 beats min(-1), P < 0.05 vs. control), but was unchanged with parasympathetic blockade (+9 +/- 2 beats min(-1), P > 0.05 vs. control). BP was similarly increased from rest during PEI-M and further elevated during PEI-H (P < 0.05) in all conditions. Collectively, these findings suggest that the muscle metaboreflex increases cardiac SNA during PEI in humans; however, it requires a robust muscle metaboreflex activation to offset the influence of cardiac parasympathetic reactivation on heart rate.

  9. Autonomic control of heart rate by metabolically sensitive skeletal muscle afferents in humans

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, James P; Seifert, Thomas; Hartwich, Doreen; Young, Colin N; Secher, Niels H; Fadel, Paul J

    2010-01-01

    Isolated activation of metabolically sensitive skeletal muscle afferents (muscle metaboreflex) using post-exercise ischaemia (PEI) following handgrip partially maintains exercise-induced increases in arterial blood pressure (BP) and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (SNA), while heart rate (HR) declines towards resting values. Although masking of metaboreflex-mediated increases in cardiac SNA by parasympathetic reactivation during PEI has been suggested, this has not been directly tested in humans. In nine male subjects (23 ± 5 years) the muscle metaboreflex was activated by PEI following moderate (PEI-M) and high (PEI-H) intensity isometric handgrip performed at 25% and 40% maximum voluntary contraction, under control (no drug), parasympathetic blockade (glycopyrrolate) and β-adrenergic blockade (metoprolol or propranalol) conditions, while beat-to-beat HR and BP were continuously measured. During control PEI-M, HR was slightly elevated from rest (+3 ± 2 beats min−1); however, this HR elevation was abolished with β-adrenergic blockade (P < 0.05 vs. control) but augmented with parasympathetic blockade (+8 ± 2 beats min−1, P < 0.05 vs. control and β-adrenergic blockade). The HR elevation during control PEI-H (+9 ± 3 beats min−1) was greater than with PEI-M (P < 0.05), and was also attenuated with β-adrenergic blockade (+4 ± 2 beats min−1, P < 0.05 vs. control), but was unchanged with parasympathetic blockade (+9 ± 2 beats min−1, P > 0.05 vs. control). BP was similarly increased from rest during PEI-M and further elevated during PEI-H (P < 0.05) in all conditions. Collectively, these findings suggest that the muscle metaboreflex increases cardiac SNA during PEI in humans; however, it requires a robust muscle metaboreflex activation to offset the influence of cardiac parasympathetic reactivation on heart rate. PMID:20142272

  10. Short-latency tachycardia evoked by stimulation of muscle and cutaneous afferents.

    PubMed

    Gelsema, A J; Bouman, L N; Karemaker, J M

    1985-04-01

    The short-latency effect on heart rate of peripheral nerve stimulation was studied in decerebrate cats. Selective activation (17-40 microA, 100 Hz, 1 s long) of low-threshold fibers in the nerves to the triceps surae muscle yielded isometric contractions of maximal force that were accompanied by a cardiac cycle length shortening within 0.4 s from the start of stimulation. This effect was abolished by pharmacologically induced neuromuscular blockade. The cardiac cycle length shortening during paralysis reappeared after a 6- to 10-fold increase of the stimulation strength. Cutaneous (sural) nerve stimulation (15-25 microA, 100 Hz, 1 s long) elicited reflex contractions in the stimulated limb, which were also accompanied by a cardiac acceleration with similar latency. Paralysis prevented the reflex contractions and reduced the cardiac response in some cats and abolished it in others. The response reappeared in either case after a 5- to 10-fold increase of the stimulus strength. It is concluded that muscle nerve and cutaneous nerve activity both cause a similar cardiac acceleration with a latency of less than 0.4 s. The response to muscle nerve stimulation is elicited by activity in group III afferents. It is excluded that the cardiac response to nerve stimulation is secondary to a change in the respiratory pattern.

  11. Reflex control of posterior shoulder muscles from arm afferents in healthy people.

    PubMed

    Elliott, S C; Hanson, J R; Wellington, J; Alexander, C M

    2011-12-01

    In order to position the hand during functional tasks, control of the shoulder is required. Heteronymous reflexes from the upper limb to shoulder muscles are used to assist in this control. To investigate this further, the radial and ulnar nerves were stimulated at elbow level whilst surface electromyographic activity of posterior deltoid, infraspinatus and latissimus dorsi muscles were recorded. In addition, the cutaneous branch of the radial nerve and the skin of the fifth digit were stimulated in order to investigate any cutaneous contribution to reflex activity. Reflexes were evoked in all three of these shoulder muscles from hand and/or forearm afferents. However, the reflexes differed; whereas both excitatory and inhibitory reflexes were evoked in posterior deltoid and infraspinatus, the reflexes in latissimus dorsi were mainly excitatory. Cutaneomuscular reflexes were seldom evoked here, but when they were present they were generally evoked at longer latencies than the reflexes evoked by mixed nerve stimulation. The results suggest a role for reflexes originating from the forearm and/or hand in the control of the shoulder. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Contribution of Muscle Strength and Integration of Afferent Input to Postural Instability in Persons with Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Marigold, Daniel S.; Eng, Janice J.; Tokuno, Craig D.; Donnelly, Catherine A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To determine the relationship of muscle strength to postural sway in persons with stroke under standing conditions in which vision and ankle proprioception were manipulated. Methods Forty persons with stroke and 40 healthy older adult controls were recruited from the community and underwent balance testing consisting of six conditions that manipulate vision and somatosensory information while standing. Postural sway was measured during each condition. In addition, lower extremity joint torques and cutaneous sensation from the plantar surface of the foot were assessed. Results Postural sway was increased with more challenging standing conditions (i.e. when multiple sensory systems were manipulated) to a greater extent with the group with stroke compared to controls. Muscle strength was only correlated to sway during the most challenging conditions. Furthermore, a greater number of persons with stroke fell during the balance testing compared to controls. Conclusions Impairments in re-weighting/integrating afferent information, in addition to muscle weakness appear to contribute to postural instability and falls in persons with stroke. These findings can be used by clinicians to design effective interventions for improving postural control following stroke. PMID:15537993

  13. Skeletal muscle afferent fibres release substance P in the nucleus tractus solitarii of anaesthetized cats

    PubMed Central

    Potts, Jeffrey T; Fuchs, Ingbert E; Li, Jianhua; Leshnower, Bradley; Mitchell, Jere H

    1999-01-01

    (predominantly arterial baroreceptors) increases the extraneuronal concentration of substance P in the cNTS. Because substance P release was not completely abolished during muscle contraction following disruption of carotid sinus and vagus nerves it is proposed that: (1) afferent projections from contraction-sensitive skeletal muscle receptors may release substance P in the NTS; (2) neural input from muscle receptors activates substance P-containing neurones within the NTS; and (3) convergence of afferent input from skeletal muscle receptors and arterial baroreceptors onto substance P-containing neurones in the cNTS facilitates the release of substance P. The role of tachykininergic modulation of cardiorespiratory input is discussed. PMID:9882754

  14. Parallel reflex pathways from flexor muscle afferents evoking resetting and flexion enhancement during fictive locomotion and scratch in the cat.

    PubMed

    Stecina, Katinka; Quevedo, Jorge; McCrea, David A

    2005-11-15

    Reflex actions of muscle afferents in hindlimb flexor nerves were examined on ipsilateral motoneurone activity recorded in peripheral nerves during midbrain stimulation-evoked fictive locomotion and during fictive scratch in decerebrate cats. Trains of stimuli (15-30 shocks at 200 Hz) were delivered during the flexion phase at intensities sufficient to activate both group I and II afferents (5 times threshold, T). In many preparations tibialis anterior (TA) nerve stimulation terminated ongoing flexion and reset the locomotor cycle to extension (19/31 experiments) while extensor digitorum longus (EDL) stimulation increased and prolonged the ongoing flexor phase activity (20/33 preparations). The effects of sartorius, iliopsoas and peroneus longus muscle afferent stimulation were qualitatively similar to those of EDL nerve. Resetting to extension was seen only with higher intensity stimulation (5T) while ongoing flexor activity was often enhanced at group I intensity (2T) stimulation. The effects of flexor nerve stimulation were qualitatively similar during fictive scratch. Reflex reversals were consistently observed in some fictive locomotor preparations. In those cases, EDL stimulation produced a resetting to extension and TA stimulation prolonged the ongoing flexion phase. Occasionally reflex reversals occurred spontaneously during only one of several stimulus presentations. The variable and opposite actions of flexor afferents on the locomotor step cycle indicate the existence of parallel spinal reflex pathways. A hypothetical organization of reflex pathways from flexor muscle afferents to the spinal pattern generator networks with competing actions of group I and group II afferents on the flexor and extensor portions of this central circuitry is proposed.

  15. Effects of the calcium antagonist nifedipine on the afferent impulse activity of isolated cat muscle spindles.

    PubMed

    Fischer, M; Schäfer, S S

    2002-11-08

    The impulse activity of muscle spindles isolated from the cat tenuissimus muscle was investigated under varying concentrations of the L-type calcium channel blocker nifedipine. At a concentration of 25 microM nifedipine impulse activity was clearly diminished in both primary and secondary endings. However, low concentrations of the drug (5-10 microM) exerted unexpected excitatory effects. The dynamic properties of primary endings in particular were augmented; those of secondary endings were also increased, although only slightly. A detailed analysis of the afferent discharge patterns obtained under ramp-and-hold stretches yielded the following effects of 10 microM nifedipine. (1) The initial burst at the beginning of the ramp phase of a stretch was increased in primary endings; (2) the peak dynamic discharge frequency at the end of the ramp phase was considerably increased in most primary endings; (3) the sensitivity of the peak dynamic discharge value to varying amplitudes and velocities of stretch was significantly enhanced in primary endings, and also increased, although only slightly, in secondary endings; (4) the rise in the discharge frequency during the ramp phase of a stretch was augmented in both types of ending, the effect being again stronger in primary endings; (5) the fast adaptive decay of the impulse frequency following the ramp phase of a ramp-and-hold stretch was significantly increased in primary endings, but remained unaffected in secondary endings. The enhanced dynamic properties of primary endings were also observed under small sinusoidal stretch stimuli (10 microm, 40 Hz), where nifedipine induced a significant shift in the position of the 1:1 driven action potentials toward smaller phase values. In view of an increase in tension in the isolated muscle spindle and an increased initial burst in primary endings in the presence of nifedipine, it is suggested that the drug facilitates the attachment of cross-bridges in the poles of the intrafusal

  16. Effects of neonatal capsaicin deafferentation on neuromuscular adjustments, performance, and afferent activities from adult tibialis anterior muscle during exercise.

    PubMed

    Dousset, Erick; Marqueste, Tanguy; Decherchi, Patrick; Jammes, Yves; Grelot, Laurent

    2004-06-01

    To investigate the role played by muscle afferents in the sensorimotor loops, we measured the effects of capsaicin injection in newborns on the mechano- and metabosensitive discharges and the running performance at adulthood. Female Sprague Dawley rats received a subcutaneous injection of either 50 mg/kg capsaicin or solvent (10% ethanol, 10% Tween 80 in 0.9% saline) during their second day of life. These two groups were compared with a control, untreated group. Four months later, treadmill running performance and muscle afferent (mechanosensitive and metabosensitive) activities from the tibialis anterior muscle were measured. The capsaicin-treated group demonstrated a reduced maximal exercise capacity (time to exhaustion) and a reduced response of muscle metabosensitive fibers (group III and IV nerve endings) to the examined stimuli (arterial KCl and lactic acid injections, electrically induced fatigue) compared with the sham-injected solvent and control groups. Group IV afferent responses were absent in the compound nerve action potentials evoked by peripheral nerve stimulation. The response to mechanosensitive fibers to tendon vibration was also affected in the capsaicin group compared with the control and sham-injected groups, which presented a bimodal response corresponding to the activation of muscle spindles and Golgi tendon organs. Finally, measurements of the force developed by the tibialis anterior muscle from the beginning to the end of a 3-min muscle stimulation revealed a more significant fall in the capsaicin group compared with the others. The present experiments reveal that the pharmacological alteration of muscular metabosensitive afferent resulted in drastic changes in the neuromuscular sensory encoding and in the central neural network that could accelerate failure of the task during fatigue. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Afferent-induced facilitation of primary motor cortex excitability in the region controlling hand muscles in humans.

    PubMed

    Devanne, H; Degardin, A; Tyvaert, L; Bocquillon, P; Houdayer, E; Manceaux, A; Derambure, P; Cassim, F

    2009-08-01

    Sensory inputs from cutaneous and limb receptors are known to influence motor cortex network excitability. Although most recent studies have focused on the inhibitory influences of afferent inputs on arm motor responses evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), facilitatory effects are rarely considered. In the present work, we sought to establish how proprioceptive sensory inputs modulate the excitability of the primary motor cortex region controlling certain hand and wrist muscles. Suprathreshold TMS pulses were preceded either by median nerve stimulation (MNS) or index finger stimulation with interstimulus intervals (ISIs) ranging from 20 to 200 ms (with particular focus on 40-80 ms). Motor-evoked potentials recorded in the abductor pollicis brevis (APB), first dorsalis interosseus and extensor carpi radialis muscles were strongly facilitated (by up to 150%) by MNS with ISIs of around 60 ms, whereas digit stimulation had only a weak effect. When MNS was delivered at the interval that evoked the optimal facilitatory effect, the H-reflex amplitude remained unchanged and APB motor responses evoked with transcranial electric stimulation were not increased as compared with TMS. Afferent-induced facilitation and short-latency intracortical inhibition (SICI) and intracortical facilitation (ICF) mechanisms are likely to interact in cortical circuits, as suggested by the strong facilitation observed when MNS was delivered concurrently with ICF and the reduction of SICI following MNS. We conclude that afferent-induced facilitation is a mechanism which probably involves muscle spindle afferents and should be considered when studying sensorimotor integration mechanisms in healthy and disease situations.

  18. Static γ-motoneurones couple group Ia and II afferents of single muscle spindles in anaesthetised and decerebrate cats

    PubMed Central

    Gladden, M H; Matsuzaki, H

    2002-01-01

    Ideas about the functions of static γ-motoneurones are based on the responses of primary and secondary endings to electrical stimulation of single static γ-axons, usually at high frequencies. We compared these effects with the actions of spontaneously active γ-motoneurones. In anaesthetised cats, afferents and efferents were recorded in intramuscular nerve branches to single muscle spindles. The occurrence of γ-spikes, identified by a spike shape recognition system, was linked to video-taped contractions of type-identified intrafusal fibres in the dissected muscle spindles. When some static γ-motoneurones were active at low frequency (< 15 Hz) they coupled the firing of group Ia and II afferents. Activity of other static γ-motoneurones which tensed the intrafusal fibres appeared to enhance this effect. Under these conditions the secondary ending responded at shorter latency than the primary ending. In another series of experiments on decerebrate cats, responses of primary and secondary endings of single muscle spindles to activation of γ-motoneurones by natural stimuli were compared with their responses to electrical stimulation of single γ-axons supplying the same spindle. Electrical stimulation mimicked the natural actions of γ-motoneurones on either the primary or the secondary ending, but not on both together. However, γ-activity evoked by natural stimuli coupled the firing of afferents with the muscle at constant length, and also when it was stretched. Analysis showed that the timing and tightness of this coupling determined the degree of summation of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) evoked by each afferent in α-motoneurones and interneurones contacted by terminals of both endings, and thus the degree of facilitation of reflex actions of group II afferents. PMID:12181298

  19. The Dynamics of Voluntary Force Production in Afferented Muscle Influence Involuntary Tremor

    PubMed Central

    Laine, Christopher M.; Nagamori, Akira; Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    Voluntary control of force is always marked by some degree of error and unsteadiness. Both neural and mechanical factors contribute to these fluctuations, but how they interact to produce them is poorly understood. In this study, we identify and characterize a previously undescribed neuromechanical interaction where the dynamics of voluntary force production suffice to generate involuntary tremor. Specifically, participants were asked to produce isometric force with the index finger and use visual feedback to track a sinusoidal target spanning 5–9% of each individual's maximal voluntary force level. Force fluctuations and EMG activity over the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) muscle were recorded and their frequency content was analyzed as a function of target phase. Force variability in either the 1–5 or 6–15 Hz frequency ranges tended to be largest at the peaks and valleys of the target sinusoid. In those same periods, FDS EMG activity was synchronized with force fluctuations. We then constructed a physiologically-realistic computer simulation in which a muscle-tendon complex was set inside of a feedback-driven control loop. Surprisingly, the model sufficed to produce phase-dependent modulation of tremor similar to that observed in humans. Further, the gain of afferent feedback from muscle spindles was critical for appropriately amplifying and shaping this tremor. We suggest that the experimentally-induced tremor may represent the response of a viscoelastic muscle-tendon system to dynamic drive, and therefore does not fall into known categories of tremor generation, such as tremorogenic descending drive, stretch-reflex loop oscillations, motor unit behavior, or mechanical resonance. Our findings motivate future efforts to understand tremor from a perspective that considers neuromechanical coupling within the context of closed-loop control. The strategy of combining experimental recordings with physiologically-sound simulations will enable thorough

  20. Kinesthetic perception based on integration of motor imagery and afferent inputs from antagonistic muscles with tendon vibration.

    PubMed

    Shibata, E; Kaneko, F

    2013-04-29

    The perceptual integration of afferent inputs from two antagonistic muscles, or the perceptual integration of afferent input and motor imagery are related to the generation of a kinesthetic sensation. However, it has not been clarified how, or indeed whether, a kinesthetic perception would be generated by motor imagery if afferent inputs from two antagonistic muscles were simultaneously induced by tendon vibration. The purpose of this study was to investigate how a kinesthetic perception would be generated by motor imagery during co-vibration of the two antagonistic muscles at the same frequency. Healthy subjects participated in this experiment. Illusory movement was evoked by tendon vibration. Next, the subjects imaged wrist flexion movement simultaneously with tendon vibration. Wrist flexor and extensor muscles were vibrated according to 4 patterns such that the difference between the two vibration frequencies was zero. After each trial, the perceived movement sensations were quantified on the basis of the velocity and direction of the ipsilateral hand-tracking movements. When the difference in frequency applied to the wrist flexor and the extensor was 0Hz, no subjects perceived movements without motor imagery. However, during motor imagery, the flexion velocity of the perceived movement was higher than the flexion velocity without motor imagery. This study clarified that the afferent inputs from the muscle spindle interact with motor imagery, to evoke a kinesthetic perception, even when the difference in frequency applied to the wrist flexor and extensor was 0Hz. Furthermore, the kinesthetic perception resulting from integrations of vibration and motor imagery increased depending on the vibration frequency to the two antagonistic muscles. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Group III/IV muscle afferents limit the intramuscular metabolic perturbation during whole body exercise in humans

    PubMed Central

    Mangum, Tyler S.; Sidhu, Simranjit K.; Weavil, Joshua C.; Hureau, Thomas J.; Jessop, Jacob E.; Bledsoe, Amber D.; Richardson, Russell S.; Amann, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Key points The purpose of this study was to determine the role of group III/IV muscle afferents in limiting the endurance exercise‐induced metabolic perturbation assayed in muscle biopsy samples taken from locomotor muscle.Lumbar intrathecal fentanyl was used to attenuate the central projection of μ‐opioid receptor‐sensitive locomotor muscle afferents during a 5 km cycling time trial.The findings suggest that the central projection of group III/IV muscle afferent feedback constrains voluntary neural ‘drive’ to working locomotor muscle and limits the exercise‐induced intramuscular metabolic perturbation.Therefore, the CNS might regulate the degree of metabolic perturbation within locomotor muscle and thereby limit peripheral fatigue. It appears that the group III/IV muscle afferents are an important neural link in this regulatory mechanism, which probably serves to protect locomotor muscle from the potentially severe functional impairment as a consequence of severe intramuscular metabolic disturbance. Abstract To investigate the role of metabo‐ and mechanosensitive group III/IV muscle afferents in limiting the intramuscular metabolic perturbation during whole body endurance exercise, eight subjects performed 5 km cycling time trials under control conditions (CTRL) and with lumbar intrathecal fentanyl impairing lower limb muscle afferent feedback (FENT). Vastus lateralis muscle biopsies were obtained before and immediately after exercise. Motoneuronal output was estimated through vastus lateralis surface electromyography (EMG). Exercise‐induced changes in intramuscular metabolites were determined using liquid and gas chromatography‐mass spectrometry. Quadriceps fatigue was quantified by pre‐ to post‐exercise changes in potentiated quadriceps twitch torque (ΔQTsingle) evoked by electrical femoral nerve stimulation. Although motoneuronal output was 21 ± 12% higher during FENT compared to CTRL (P < 0.05), time to complete the time trial

  2. Raphe magnus and reticulospinal actions on primary afferent depolarization of group I muscle afferents in the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Quevedo, J; Eguibar, J R; Jiménez, I; Rudomin, P

    1995-01-01

    1. In the anaesthetized cat, electrical stimulation of the bulbar reticular formation produced a short latency (2.1 +/- 0.3 ms) positive potential in the cord dorsum. In contrast, stimulation of the nucleus raphe magnus with strengths below 50 microA evoked a slow negative potential with a mean latency of 5.5 +/- 0.6 ms that persisted after sectioning the contralateral pyramid and was abolished by sectioning the ipsilateral dorsolateral funiculus. 2. The field potentials evoked by stimulation of the bulbar reticular formation and of the nucleus raphe magnus had a different intraspinal distribution, suggesting activation of different sets of segmental interneurones. 3. Stimulation of these two supraspinal nuclei produced primary afferent depolarization (PAD) in single Ib fibres and inhibited the PAD elicited by group I volleys in single Ia fibres. The inhibition of the PAD of Ia fibres produced by reticulospinal and raphespinal inputs appears to be exerted on different interneurones along the PAD pathway. 4. It is concluded that, although reticulospinal and raphespinal pathways have similar inhibitory effects on PAD of Ia fibres, and similar excitatory effects on the PAD of Ib fibres, their actions are conveyed by partly independent pathways. This would allow their separate involvement in the control of posture and movement. Images Figure 6 PMID:7738852

  3. Raphe magnus and reticulospinal actions on primary afferent depolarization of group I muscle afferents in the cat.

    PubMed

    Quevedo, J; Eguibar, J R; Jiménez, I; Rudomin, P

    1995-02-01

    1. In the anaesthetized cat, electrical stimulation of the bulbar reticular formation produced a short latency (2.1 +/- 0.3 ms) positive potential in the cord dorsum. In contrast, stimulation of the nucleus raphe magnus with strengths below 50 microA evoked a slow negative potential with a mean latency of 5.5 +/- 0.6 ms that persisted after sectioning the contralateral pyramid and was abolished by sectioning the ipsilateral dorsolateral funiculus. 2. The field potentials evoked by stimulation of the bulbar reticular formation and of the nucleus raphe magnus had a different intraspinal distribution, suggesting activation of different sets of segmental interneurones. 3. Stimulation of these two supraspinal nuclei produced primary afferent depolarization (PAD) in single Ib fibres and inhibited the PAD elicited by group I volleys in single Ia fibres. The inhibition of the PAD of Ia fibres produced by reticulospinal and raphespinal inputs appears to be exerted on different interneurones along the PAD pathway. 4. It is concluded that, although reticulospinal and raphespinal pathways have similar inhibitory effects on PAD of Ia fibres, and similar excitatory effects on the PAD of Ib fibres, their actions are conveyed by partly independent pathways. This would allow their separate involvement in the control of posture and movement.

  4. Effects of PAD on conduction of action potentials within segmental and ascending branches of single muscle afferents in the cat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Lomelí, J; Castillo, L; Linares, P; Rudomin, P

    2000-11-01

    In anesthetized and paralyzed cats under artificial respiration, we examined the extent to which primary afferent depolarization (PAD) might affect invasion of action potentials in intraspinal axonal and/or terminal branches of single muscle afferents. To this end, one stimulating micropipette was placed at the L6 spinal level within the intermediate or motor nucleus, and another one at the L3 level, in or close to Clarke's column. Antidromically conducted responses produced in single muscle afferents by stimulation at these two spinal levels were recorded from fine lateral gastrocnemius nerve filaments. In all fibers examined, stimulation of one branch, with strengths producing action potentials, increased the intraspinal threshold of the other branch when applied at short conditioning testing stimulus intervals (<1.5-2.0 ms), because of the refractoriness produced by the action potentials invading the tested branch. Similar increases in the intraspinal threshold were found in branches showing tonic PAD and also during the PAD evoked by stimulation of group I afferent fibers in muscle nerves. It is concluded that during tonic or evoked PAD, axonal branches in the dorsal columns and myelinated terminals of muscle afferents ending deep in the L6 and L3 segmental levels continue to be invaded by action potentials. These findings strengthen the view that presynaptic inhibition of muscle afferents produced by activation of GABAergic mechanisms is more likely to result from changes in the synaptic effectiveness of the afferent terminals than from conduction failure because of PAD.

  5. Dual Modulation of Nociception and Cardiovascular Reflexes during Peripheral Ischemia through P2Y1 Receptor-Dependent Sensitization of Muscle Afferents.

    PubMed

    Queme, Luis F; Ross, Jessica L; Lu, Peilin; Hudgins, Renita C; Jankowski, Michael P

    2016-01-06

    Numerous musculoskeletal pain disorders are based in dysfunction of peripheral perfusion and are often comorbid with altered cardiovascular responses to muscle contraction/exercise. We have recently found in mice that 24 h peripheral ischemia induced by a surgical occlusion of the brachial artery (BAO) induces increased paw-guarding behaviors, mechanical hypersensitivity, and decreased grip strength. These behavioral changes corresponded to increased heat sensitivity as well as an increase in the numbers of chemosensitive group III/IV muscle afferents as assessed by an ex vivo forepaw muscles/median and ulnar nerves/dorsal root ganglion (DRG)/spinal cord (SC) recording preparation. Behaviors also corresponded to specific upregulation of the ADP-responsive P2Y1 receptor in the DRGs. Since group III/IV muscle afferents have separately been associated with regulating muscle nociception and exercise pressor reflexes (EPRs), and P2Y1 has been linked to heat responsiveness and phenotypic switching in cutaneous afferents, we sought to determine whether upregulation of P2Y1 was responsible for the observed alterations in muscle afferent function, leading to modulation of muscle pain-related behaviors and EPRs after BAO. Using an afferent-specific siRNA knockdown strategy, we found that inhibition of P2Y1 during BAO not only prevented the increased mean blood pressure after forced exercise, but also significantly reduced alterations in pain-related behaviors. Selective P2Y1 knockdown also prevented the increased firing to heat stimuli and the BAO-induced phenotypic switch in chemosensitive muscle afferents, potentially through regulating membrane expression of acid sensing ion channel 3. These results suggest that enhanced P2Y1 in muscle afferents during ischemic-like conditions may dually regulate muscle nociception and cardiovascular reflexes. Our current results suggest that P2Y1 modulates heat responsiveness and chemosensation in muscle afferents to play a key role in

  6. Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) in mouse skeletal muscle afferents are heteromers composed of ASIC1a, ASIC2, and ASIC3 subunits

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Mamta; Benson, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are expressed in skeletal muscle afferents, in which they sense extracellular acidosis and other metabolites released during ischemia and exercise. ASICs are formed as homotrimers or heterotrimers of several isoforms (ASIC1a, ASIC1b, ASIC2a, ASIC2b, and ASIC3), with each channel displaying distinct properties. To dissect the ASIC composition in muscle afferents, we used whole-cell patch-clamp recordings to study the properties of acid-evoked currents (amplitude, pH sensitivity, the kinetics of desensitization and recovery from desensitization, and pharmacological modulation) in isolated, labeled mouse muscle afferents from wild-type (C57BL/6J) and specific ASIC−/− mice. We found that ASIC-like currents in wild-type muscle afferents displayed fast desensitization, indicating that they are carried by heteromeric channels. Currents from ASIC1a−/− muscle afferents were less pH-sensitive and displayed faster recovery, currents from ASIC2−/− mice showed diminished potentiation by zinc, and currents from ASIC3−/− mice displayed slower desensitization than those from wild-type mice. Finally, ASIC-like currents were absent from triple-null mice lacking ASIC1a, ASIC2a, and ASIC3. We conclude that ASIC1a, ASIC2a, and ASIC3 heteromers are the principle channels in skeletal muscle afferents. These results will help us understand the role of ASICs in exercise physiology and provide a molecular target for potential drug therapies to treat muscle pain.—Gautam, M., Benson, C. J. Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) in mouse skeletal muscle afferents are heteromers composed of ASIC1a, ASIC2, and ASIC3 subunits. PMID:23109675

  7. Using vertebral movement and intact paraspinal muscles to determine the distribution of intrafusal fiber innervation of muscle spindle afferents in the anesthetized cat.

    PubMed

    Reed, William R; Cao, Dong-Yuan; Ge, Weiqing; Pickar, Joel G

    2013-03-01

    Increasing our knowledge regarding intrafusal fiber distribution and physiology of paraspinal proprioceptors may provide key insights regarding proprioceptive deficits in trunk control associated with low back pain and lead to more effective clinical intervention. The use of vertebral movement as a means to reliably stretch paraspinal muscles would greatly facilitate physiological study of paraspinal muscle proprioceptors where muscle tendon isolation is either very difficult or impossible. The effects of succinylcholine (SCh) on 194 muscle spindle afferents from lumbar longissimus or multifidus muscles in response to computer-controlled, ramp-and-hold movements of the L(6) vertebra were investigated in anesthetized cats. Paraspinal muscles were stretched by moving the L(6) vertebra 1.5-1.7 mm in the dorsal-ventral direction. Initial frequency (IF), dynamic difference (DD), their changes (∆) following SCh injection (100-400 μg kg(-1)), and post-SCh dynamic difference (SChDD) were measured. Muscle spindle intrafusal fiber terminations were classified as primary or secondary fibers as well as bag(1) (b(1)c), bag(2) (b(2)c), b(1)b(2)c, or chain (c) fibers. Intrafusal fiber subpopulations were distinguished using logarithmic transformation of SChDD and ∆IF distributions as established by previous investigators. Increases in DD indicate strength of b(1)c influence while increases in IF indicate strength of b(2)c influence. Out of 194 afferents, 46.9 % of afferents terminated on b(2)c fibers, 46.4 % on b(1)b(2)c fibers, 1 % on b(1)c fibers, and 5.7 % terminated on c fibers. Based on these intrafusal fiber subpopulation distributions, controlled vertebral movement can effectively substitute for direct tendon stretch and allow further investigation of paraspinal proprioceptors in this anatomically complex body region.

  8. On the contribution of group III and IV muscle afferents to the circulatory response to rhythmic exercise in humans

    PubMed Central

    Amann, Markus; Runnels, Sean; Morgan, David E; Trinity, Joel D; Fjeldstad, Anette S; Wray, D Walter; Reese, Van R; Richardson, Russell S

    2011-01-01

    Abstract We investigated the role of skeletal muscle afferent feedback in circulatory control during rhythmic exercise in humans. Nine healthy males performed single leg knee-extensor exercise (15/30/45 watts, 3 min each) under both control conditions (Ctrl) and with lumbar intrathecal fentanyl impairing μ-opioid receptor-sensitive muscle afferents. Cardiac output and femoral blood flow were determined, and femoral arterial/venous blood samples were collected during the final minute of each workload. To rule out cephalad migration of fentanyl to the brainstem, we documented unchanged resting ventilatory responses to different levels of hypercapnia. There were no haemodynamic differences between conditions at rest. However, during exercise cardiac output was ∼20% lower with fentanyl blockade compared to control (P < 0.05), secondary to a 6% and 13% reduction in heart rate and stroke volume, respectively. Throughout exercise mean arterial pressure (MAP) was reduced by 7% (P < 0.01) which is likely to have contributed to the 15% fall in femoral blood flow. However, MAP was not completely responsible for this peripheral haemodynamic change as vascular conductance was also attenuated (∼9%). Evidence of increasing noradrenaline spillover (P = 0.09) implicated an elevation in sympathetic outflow in this response. The attenuated femoral blood flow during exercise with fentanyl was associated with a 17% reduction in leg O2 delivery (P < 0.01) and a concomitant rise in the arteriovenous O2 difference (4–9%), but leg O2 consumption remained 7–13% lower than control (P < 0.05). Our findings reveal an essential contribution of continuous muscle afferent feedback to ensure the appropriate haemodynamic and ultimately metabolic response to rhythmic exercise in humans. PMID:21646407

  9. Excitability changes of terminal arborizations of single Ia and Ib afferent fibers produced by muscle and cutaneous conditioning volleys.

    PubMed

    Willis, W D; Núnez, R; Rudomín, P

    1976-11-01

    1. In cats anesthetized with sodium pentobarbital, recordings were made from dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cells having a peripheral process in the gastrocnemius-soleus (GS) nerve. The GS nerve was left in continuity with the muscle to allow identification of group Ia and Ib fibers by responses of the receptors to muscle stretch and contraction. The central processes of the DRG cells were activated antidromically by stimulation within the spinal cord so that changes in the excitability of the fibers could be examined following conditioning volleys in muscle and cutaneous nerves. 2. Recordings were made from 44 DRG cells. Of these, 15 were group Ia and 9 group Ib afferents of the GS nerve. 3. Of 15 Ia fibers, 12 were activated antidromically by stimulation in the motor nucleus, but no Ib fibers were discharged by such stimulation. Ib fibers could be antidromically activated by stimulation in the intermediate nucleus. 4. The central processes of the Ia DRG cells had slower conduction velocities than did the peripheral processes. 5. The thresholds to electrical stimulation of the peripheral processes of Ia and Ib fibers of the GS nerve showed considerable overlap. 6. All of the Ia DRG cells tested showed an increased excitability following conditioning volleys in the biceps-semitendinosus (BST) nerve. The increase in excitability was produced by the largest fibers of the BST nerve. 7. Stimulation of the sural (SU) or superficial peroneal (SP) cutaneous nerves also increased the excitability of some Ia fibers. However, other Ia fibers were unaffected, and in two cases the excitability was reduced. 8. The excitability of group Ib fibers was increased by conditioning volleys in the BST, SU, or SP nerves. 9. It is concluded that cutaneous volleys produce a mixture of primary afferent depolarization and primary afferent hyperpolarization in Ia fibers of anesthetized cats. Such converse actions probably cancel in excitability tests using population responses. 10. The

  10. Membrane Receptors Involved in Modulation of Responses of Spinal Dorsal Horn Interneurons Evoked by Feline Group II Muscle Afferents

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Kimberly J.; Bannatyne, B. Anne; Jankowska, Elzbieta; Krutki, Piotr; Maxwell, David J.

    2007-01-01

    Modulatory actions of a metabotropic 5-HT1A&7 membrane receptor agonist and antagonist [(+/−)-8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)-tetralin; N-[2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl]-N-(2-pyridinyl) cyclohexane-carboxamide] and an ionotropic 5-HT3 membrane receptor agonist and antagonist [2-methyl-serotonin (2-Me 5-HT); N-(1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl)-6-chloro-4-methyl-3-oxo-3,4-dihydro-2H-1,4-benzoxazine-8-carboxamide hydrochloride] were investigated on dorsal horn interneurons mediating reflex actions of group II muscle afferents. All drugs were applied ionophoretically in deeply anesthetized cats. Effects of agonists were tested on extracellularly recorded responses of individual interneurons evoked by electrical stimulation of group II afferents in a muscle nerve. Effects of antagonists were tested against the depression of these responses after stimulation of raphe nuclei. The results show that both 5-HT1A&7 and 5-HT3 membrane receptors are involved in counteracting the activation of dorsal horn interneurons by group II afferents. Because only quantitative differences were found within the sample of the tested neurons, these results suggest that modulatory actions of 5-HT on excitatory and inhibitory interneurons might be similar. The relationship between 5-HT axons and axons immunoreactive for the 5-HT3A receptor subunit, which contact dorsal horn interneurons, was analyzed using immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Contacts from both types of axons were found on all interneurons, but their distribution and density varied, and there was no obvious relationship between them. In two of six interneurons, 5-HT3A-immunoreactive axons formed ring-like arrangements around the cell bodies. In previous studies, axons possessing 5-HT3 receptors were found to be excitatory, and as 2-Me 5-HT depressed transmission to dorsal horn interneurons, the results indicate that 5-HT operates at 5-HT3 receptors presynaptic to these neurons to depress excitatory transmission

  11. Short-latency inhibition of soleus motoneurones by impulses in Ia afferents from the gastrocnemius muscle in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Gritti, I; Schieppati, M

    1989-01-01

    1. The possibility that the Ia afferent fibres from the gastrocnemius medialis muscle could be responsible for a decrease in excitability of the soleus motor pool was investigated. 2. The soleus H reflex, evoked by tibial nerve stimulation in the popliteal fossa, was conditioned by a single stimulus to the gastrocnemius medialis nerve at various stimulus intensities and conditioning-test intervals. Care was taken to avoid spread of current from the conditioning stimulus to the tibial nerve, and the results obtained by surface stimulation were compared with those obtained by stimulation through a needle whose tip was positioned closer to the nerve. 3. Stimulation of the gastrocnemius medialis nerve induced two short-lasting periods of inhibition in the soleus H reflex, peaking at about 0 and 5 ms of conditioning-test delay. The early inhibition could begin at a stimulus strength as low as 0.5 x MTh (the Motor Threshold). The later inhibition appeared on greater stimulus strength than the earlier. 4. Prolonged vibration of the Achilles tendon abolished the capability of the conditioning stimulus to induce the short-latency inhibition of the soleus H reflex. 5. By stimulating the gastrocnemius medialis nerve at two points separated by a known distance, the conduction velocity of the fibres responsible for the early inhibition was estimated, and found to be around 100 m s-1. 6. Isometric leg flexion, accomplished by tonic activation of gastrocnemius medialis and lateralis but not soleus, was able to induce an inhibition of the soleus H reflex even at very low levels of gastrocnemius electromyographic activity. 7. These findings strongly suggest the existence of an inhibitory effect of primary spindle afferent fibres from the gastrocnemius medialis muscle onto the soleus motor pool. This is not unexpected, since the gastrocnemius medialis muscle can be either agonist or antagonist to the soleus muscle in the performance of different movements. PMID:2607459

  12. Short-latency inhibition of soleus motoneurones by impulses in Ia afferents from the gastrocnemius muscle in humans.

    PubMed

    Gritti, I; Schieppati, M

    1989-09-01

    1. The possibility that the Ia afferent fibres from the gastrocnemius medialis muscle could be responsible for a decrease in excitability of the soleus motor pool was investigated. 2. The soleus H reflex, evoked by tibial nerve stimulation in the popliteal fossa, was conditioned by a single stimulus to the gastrocnemius medialis nerve at various stimulus intensities and conditioning-test intervals. Care was taken to avoid spread of current from the conditioning stimulus to the tibial nerve, and the results obtained by surface stimulation were compared with those obtained by stimulation through a needle whose tip was positioned closer to the nerve. 3. Stimulation of the gastrocnemius medialis nerve induced two short-lasting periods of inhibition in the soleus H reflex, peaking at about 0 and 5 ms of conditioning-test delay. The early inhibition could begin at a stimulus strength as low as 0.5 x MTh (the Motor Threshold). The later inhibition appeared on greater stimulus strength than the earlier. 4. Prolonged vibration of the Achilles tendon abolished the capability of the conditioning stimulus to induce the short-latency inhibition of the soleus H reflex. 5. By stimulating the gastrocnemius medialis nerve at two points separated by a known distance, the conduction velocity of the fibres responsible for the early inhibition was estimated, and found to be around 100 m s-1. 6. Isometric leg flexion, accomplished by tonic activation of gastrocnemius medialis and lateralis but not soleus, was able to induce an inhibition of the soleus H reflex even at very low levels of gastrocnemius electromyographic activity. 7. These findings strongly suggest the existence of an inhibitory effect of primary spindle afferent fibres from the gastrocnemius medialis muscle onto the soleus motor pool. This is not unexpected, since the gastrocnemius medialis muscle can be either agonist or antagonist to the soleus muscle in the performance of different movements.

  13. Muscle afferent potential (`A-wave') in the surface electromyogram of a phasic stretch reflex in normal humans

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Alex. M.; Michie, Patricia T.; Glue, Leonard C. T.

    1972-01-01

    The experiments reported in this paper tested the hypothesis that the afferent potential elicited by a tendon tap in an isometrically recorded phasic stretch reflex can be detected in the surface EMG of normal humans when appropriate techniques are used. These techniques involved (1) training the subjects to relax mentally and physically so that the EMG was silent before and immediately after the diphasic MAP which reflects a highly synchronous discharge of afferent impulses from low threshold muscle stretch receptors after a tendon tap, and (2) using a data retrieval computer to summate stimulus-locked potentials in the EMG over a series of 16 samples using taps of uniform peak force and duration on the Achilles tendon to elicit the tendon jerk in the calf muscles. A discrete, diphasic potential (`A-wave') was recorded from EMG electrodes placed on the surface of the skin over the medial gastrocnemius muscle. The `A-wave' afferent potential had the opposite polarity to the corresponding efferent MAP. Under control conditions of relaxation the `A-wave' had a latency after the onset of the tap of 2 msec, the peak to peak amplitude was of the order of 5 μV and the duration was in the range of 6 to 10 msec. Further experiments were conducted to show that the `A-wave' (1) was not an artefact of the instrumentation used, (2) had a threshold at low intensities of stimulation, and (3) could be reliably augmented by using a Jendrassik manoeuvre compared with the potential observed during control (relaxation) conditions. The results support the conclusion that the `A-wave' emanates from the pool of muscle spindles which discharges impulses along group Ia nerve fibres in response to the phasic stretch stimulus because the primary ending of the spindles is known to initiate the stretch reflex and the spindles can be sensitized by fusimotor impulses so that their threshold is lowered as a result of a Jendrassik manoeuvre. The finding has important implications for the

  14. A comparative study of changes operated by sympathetic nervous system activation on spindle afferent discharge and on tonic vibration reflex in rabbit jaw muscles.

    PubMed

    Passatore, M; Deriu, F; Grassi, C; Roatta, S

    1996-03-07

    The effect of sympathetic activation on the spindle afferent response to vibratory stimuli eliciting the tonic vibration reflex in jaw closing muscles was studied in precollicularly decerebrate rabbits. Stimulation of the cervical sympathetic trunk, at frequencies within the physiologic range, consistently induced a decrease in spindle response to muscle vibration, which was often preceded by a transient enhancement. Spindle discharge was usually correlated with the EMG activity in the masseter muscle and the tension reflexly developed by jaw muscles. The changes in spindle response to vibration were superimposed on variations of the basal discharge which exhibited different patterns in the studied units, increases in the firing rate being more frequently observed. These effects were mimicked by close arterial injection of the selective alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine. Data presented here suggest that sympathetically-induced modifications of the tonic vibration reflex are due to changes exerted on muscle spindle afferent information.

  15. The role of proprioceptive afferents in the control of respiratory muscles.

    PubMed

    von Euler, C

    1973-01-01

    Building largely on the results of previous studies of motor control in respiration the role of proprioceptive control of respiratory movements is discussed with particular reference to the significance of the following points: (i) The co-activation of fusimotor and alpha motoneurons in load compensation and in the control of velocity and force of the respiratory movements. (ii) The convergence onto the same intercostal spindle of fusimotor fibres for respiratory movements and for postural activity. (iii) The difference between proprioceptive control of intercostal muscles on the one hand and the diaphragm on the other, and of the control of the phrenic motoneuron pool exerted by intercostal proprioceptors. (iv) The cerebellar control both of the fusimotor-alpha balance between the indirect drive of the intercostal motoneurons and of the responsiveness of the phrenic motoneuron pool to respiratory and reflex influences. (v) Results suggesting spinobulbar reflex effects on the control of rate and depth of respiration from muscle and joint receptors of the thoracic wall.

  16. Tonic differential supraspinal modulation of PAD and PAH of segmental and ascending intraspinal collaterals of single group I muscle afferents in the cat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Rudomin, P; Lomelí, J; Quevedo, J

    2004-11-01

    We compared in the anesthetized cat the effects of reversible spinalization by cold block on primary afferent depolarization (PAD) and primary afferent hyperpolarization (PAH) elicited in pairs of intraspinal collaterals of single group I afferents from the gastrocnemius nerve, one of the pairs ending in the L3 segment, around the Clarke's column nuclei, and the other in the L6 segment within the intermediate zone. PAD in each collateral was estimated by independent computer-controlled measurement of the intraspinal current required to maintain a constant probability of antidromic firing. The results indicate that the segmental and ascending collaterals of individual afferents are subjected to a tonic PAD of descending origin affecting in a differential manner the excitatory and inhibitory actions of cutaneous and joint afferents on the pathways mediating the PAD of group I fibers. The PAD-mediating networks appear to function as distributed systems whose output will be determined by the balance of the segmental and supraspinal influences received at that moment. It is suggested that the descending differential modulation of PAD enables the intraspinal arborizations of the muscle afferents to function as dynamic systems, in which information transmitted to segmental reflex pathways and to Clarke's column neurons by common sources can be decoupled by sensory and descending inputs, and funneled to specific targets according to the motor tasks to be performed.

  17. Differential modulation of primary afferent depolarization of segmental and ascending intraspinal collaterals of single muscle afferents in the cat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Rudomin, P; Lomelí, J; Quevedo, J

    2004-06-01

    We examined primary afferent depolarization (PAD) in the anesthetized cat elicited in 109 pairs of intraspinal collaterals of single group I afferents from the gastrocnemius nerve, one of the pair ending in the L3 segment, around the Clarke's column nuclei, and the other in the L6 segment within the intermediate zone. Tests for refractoriness were made to assess whether the responses produced by intraspinal stimulation in the L3 and L6 segments were due to activation of collaterals of the same afferent fiber. PAD in each collateral was estimated by independent computer-controlled measurement of the intraspinal current required to maintain a constant probability of antidromic firing. In most fibers, stimulation of the ipsilateral posterior biceps and semitendinosus (PBSt) nerve with trains of pulses maximal for group I afferents had a qualitatively similar effect but produced a larger PAD in the L6 than in the L3 collaterals. Stimulation of cutaneous nerves (sural and superficial peroneus) with single pulses and of the posterior articular nerve, the ipsilateral reticular formation, nucleus raphe magnus and contralateral motor cortex with trains of pulses often had qualitatively different effects. They could produce PAD and/or facilitate the PBSt-induced PAD in one collateral, and produce PAH and/or inhibit the PAD in the other collateral. These patterns could be changed in a differential manner by sensory or supraspinal conditioning stimulation. In summary, the present investigation suggests that the segmental and ascending collaterals of individual afferents are not fixed routes for information transmission, but parts of dynamic systems in which information transmitted to segmental reflex pathways and to Clarke's column neurons by common sources can be decoupled by sensory and descending inputs and funneled to specific targets according to the motor tasks to be performed.

  18. Central alterations of neuromuscular function and feedback from group III-IV muscle afferents following exhaustive high-intensity one-leg dynamic exercise.

    PubMed

    Pageaux, Benjamin; Angius, Luca; Hopker, James G; Lepers, Romuald; Marcora, Samuele M

    2015-06-15

    The aims of this investigation were to describe the central alterations of neuromuscular function induced by exhaustive high-intensity one-leg dynamic exercise (OLDE, study 1) and to indirectly quantify feedback from group III-IV muscle afferents via muscle occlusion (MO, study 2) in healthy adult male humans. We hypothesized that these central alterations and their recovery are associated with changes in afferent feedback. Both studies consisted of two time-to-exhaustion tests at 85% peak power output. In study 1, voluntary activation level (VAL), M-wave, cervicomedullary motor evoked potential (CMEP), motor evoked potential (MEP), and MEP cortical silent period (CSP) of the knee extensor muscles were measured. In study 2, mean arterial pressure (MAP) and leg muscle pain were measured during MO. Measurements were performed preexercise, at exhaustion, and after 3 min recovery. Compared with preexercise values, VAL was lower at exhaustion (-13 ± 13%, P < 0.05) and after 3 min of recovery (-6 ± 6%, P = 0.05). CMEP area/M area was lower at exhaustion (-38 ± 13%, P < 0.01) and recovered after 3 min. MEP area/M area was higher at exhaustion (+25 ± 27%, P < 0.01) and after 3 min of recovery (+17 ± 20%, P < 0.01). CSP was higher (+19 ± 9%, P < 0.01) only at exhaustion and recovered after 3 min. Markers of afferent feedback (MAP and leg muscle pain during MO) were significantly higher only at exhaustion. These findings suggest that the alterations in spinal excitability and CSP induced by high-intensity OLDE are associated with an increase in afferent feedback at exhaustion, whereas central fatigue does not fully recover even when significant afferent feedback is no longer present. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Role for NGF in augmented sympathetic nerve response to activation of mechanically and metabolically sensitive muscle afferents in rats with femoral artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jian; Xing, Jihong; Li, Jianhua

    2012-10-15

    Arterial blood pressure and heart rate responses to static contraction of the hindlimb muscles are greater in rats whose femoral arteries were previously ligated than in control rats. Also, the prior findings demonstrate that nerve growth factor (NGF) is increased in sensory neurons-dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons of occluded rats. However, the role for endogenous NGF in engagement of the augmented sympathetic and pressor responses to stimulation of mechanically and/or metabolically sensitive muscle afferent nerves during static contraction after femoral artery ligation has not been specifically determined. In the present study, both afferent nerves and either of them were activated by muscle contraction, passive tendon stretch, and arterial injection of lactic acid into the hindlimb muscles. Data showed that femoral occlusion-augmented blood pressure response to contraction was significantly attenuated by a prior administration of the NGF antibody (NGF-Ab) into the hindlimb muscles. The effects of NGF neutralization were not seen when the sympathetic nerve and pressor responses were evoked by stimulation of mechanically sensitive muscle afferent nerves with tendon stretch in occluded rats. In addition, chemically sensitive muscle afferent nerves were stimulated by lactic acid injected into arterial blood supply of the hindlimb muscles after the prior NGF-Ab, demonstrating that the reflex muscle responses to lactic acid were significantly attenuated. The results of this study further showed that NGF-Ab attenuated an increase in acid-sensing ion channel subtype 3 (ASIC3) of DRG in occluded rats. Moreover, immunohistochemistry was employed to examine the number of C-fiber and A-fiber DRG neurons. The data showed that distribution of DRG neurons with different thin fiber phenotypes was not notably altered when NGF was infused into the hindlimb muscles. However, NGF increased expression of ASIC3 in DRG neurons with C-fiber but not A-fiber. Overall, these data

  20. Serotonin-gated inward currents are three times more frequent in rat hairy skin sensory afferents than in those innervating the skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Fierro, Leonardo

    2017-01-01

    Tight whole-cell patch clamp was performed in 191 DiI (1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3'3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate) retrogradely labeled rat sensory afferents from skin shoulders ( n = 93) and biceps femoris muscles ( n = 98). 5-HT-gated inward currents were evoked with 50-µM serotonin (5-HT; 5-hydroxytryptamine), and their frequency and current densities were compared between skin and skeletal muscle sensory afferents. To evaluate if 5-HT-gated inward currents coexist with other ligand-gated currents, the skin and skeletal muscle sensory afferents were also sequentially exposed to external solution at pH 6.8, ATP (50 µM), and capsaicin (1 µM). 5-HT evoked inward currents in 72% (67 of 93) of hairy skin sensory afferents and in only 24% (24 of 98) of skeletal muscle sensory afferents, and this difference was statistically significant ( p < 0.0000, chi-square test). The current densities obtained in hairy skin and skeletal muscle sensory afferents were not significantly different. They were -45.8 ± 7.7 and -32.4 ± 10.5 pA/pF, respectively (mean ± SEM, p < 0.30734). These results indicate that 5-HT-gated inward currents are three times more frequently evoked in small- to medium-sized sensory afferents (25-40 µm) innervating the hairy skin than on those innervating the skeletal muscle. When cells were gathered in two clusters, the difference was four times larger in the small-sized cluster (25-32 µm) and two times larger in the medium-sized cluster (33-40 µm). The results can be explained if the superficial somatic (cutaneous) nociceptive system is more exposed than the deep somatic nociceptive system (musculoskeletal) to physical and chemical stimuli inducing 5-HT-mediated inflammatory pain.

  1. Serotonin-gated inward currents are three times more frequent in rat hairy skin sensory afferents than in those innervating the skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Tight whole-cell patch clamp was performed in 191 DiI (1,1′-dioctadecyl-3,3,3′3′-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate) retrogradely labeled rat sensory afferents from skin shoulders (n = 93) and biceps femoris muscles (n = 98). 5-HT-gated inward currents were evoked with 50-µM serotonin (5-HT; 5-hydroxytryptamine), and their frequency and current densities were compared between skin and skeletal muscle sensory afferents. To evaluate if 5-HT-gated inward currents coexist with other ligand-gated currents, the skin and skeletal muscle sensory afferents were also sequentially exposed to external solution at pH 6.8, ATP (50 µM), and capsaicin (1 µM). 5-HT evoked inward currents in 72% (67 of 93) of hairy skin sensory afferents and in only 24% (24 of 98) of skeletal muscle sensory afferents, and this difference was statistically significant (p < 0.0000, chi-square test). The current densities obtained in hairy skin and skeletal muscle sensory afferents were not significantly different. They were −45.8 ± 7.7 and −32.4 ± 10.5 pA/pF, respectively (mean ± SEM, p < 0.30734). These results indicate that 5-HT-gated inward currents are three times more frequently evoked in small- to medium-sized sensory afferents (25–40 µm) innervating the hairy skin than on those innervating the skeletal muscle. When cells were gathered in two clusters, the difference was four times larger in the small-sized cluster (25–32 µm) and two times larger in the medium-sized cluster (33–40 µm). The results can be explained if the superficial somatic (cutaneous) nociceptive system is more exposed than the deep somatic nociceptive system (musculoskeletal) to physical and chemical stimuli inducing 5-HT-mediated inflammatory pain. PMID:28868961

  2. Efferents and afferents in an intact muscle nerve: background activity and effects of sural nerve stimulation in the cat.

    PubMed

    Bessou, P; Joffroy, M; Pagès, B

    1981-11-01

    1. The background activity was observed in gamma and alpha efferent fibres and in group I and II fibres innervating the muscle gastrocnemius lateralis or medialis. The reflex effects of ipsilateral and contralateral sural nerve stimulations on the muscle efferents were analysed together with their consequences upon the afferents of the same muscle. The observations were made in the decerebrated cat without opening the neural loops between the muscle and the spinal cord.2. The multi-unit discharges of each category of fibres were obtained, on line, by an original electronic device (Joffroy, 1975, 1980) that sorted the action potentials from the whole electrical activity of a small branch of gastrocnemius lateralis or medialis nerve according to the direction and velocity of propagation of the potentials.3. The small nerve may be regarded as a representative sample of different functional groups of fibres conducting faster than 12 m.sec(-1) and supplying gastrocnemius muscles.4. Some gamma efferents were always tonically firing except when a transient flaccid state developed. Usually the alpha efferents were silent, probably because the muscle was fixed close to the minimal physiological length.5. Separate and selective stimulations of Abeta, Adelta and C fibres of ipsilateral and contralateral sural nerve showed that each group could induce the excitation of gamma neurones. The reciprocal inhibition period of alpha efferents during a flexor reflex was only once accompanied by a small decrease in gamma-firing.6. The reflex increase of over-all frequency of gamma efferents resulted from an increased firing rate of tonic gamma neurones and from the recruitment of gamma neurones previously silent. When the gamma efferents in the small nerve naturally occurred in two subgroups, the slower-conducting subgroup (mainly composed of tonic gamma axons) was activated before the faster-conducting subgroup (mostly composed by gamma axons with no background discharge). Some rare

  3. Jaw muscle afferent firing during an isotonic jaw-positioning task in the monkey.

    PubMed

    Larson, C R; Finocchio, D V; Smith, A; Luschei, E S

    1983-07-01

    The activity of jaw muscle receptors was studied by recording neurons in the mesencephalic nucleus of the trigeminal nerve in monkeys trained to control the position and movement of their mandible. Jaw position was measured by a weighted lever resting on the mandibular incisors. The force required to maintain the position of the lever was varied; in most cases it was either 25 or 360 g. Firing rates of neurons were related to stationary mandibular positions and to the velocity of movements during intervals when the movement velocity was constant. Of 49 neurons studied in detail, 21 fired at rates that were consistently and linearly related to static incisal openings. This static position sensitivity was typically about 5 spikes/mm of incisal opening. Most position-sensitive neurons fired at higher rates during opening movements and at lower rates during closing movements than would be accounted for by their position sensitivity. This sensitivity to the velocity of movement was not linear, however; slow closing movements sometimes did not produce a decrease in firing rate, and an actual increase during muscle shortening was seen in a few instances. The position sensitivity of eight neurons was evaluated during different loading conditions; in no case did it change substantially. Of the remaining 28 neurons, 26 fired at high rates during all opening movements and either stopped firing or fired at low, sporadic rates during closing movements. The static position sensitivity of these neurons was weak and variable both within and between neurons. The velocity sensitivity of these stretch-sensitive neurons was very nonlinear. Except for a range of slow movements (+/- 5 mm/s), the firing rate was maximal (200 spikes/s or higher) for most opening movements and zero for most closing movements. Maximal firing rates were higher when the loads being moved were increased from 25 to 360 g. The majority of position-sensitive neurons exhibited a large interspike

  4. Complex interactions of NO/cGMP/PKG systems on Ca2+ signaling in afferent arteriolar vascular smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Arendshorst, William J.

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about the effects of nitric oxide (NO) and the cyclic GMP (cGMP)/protein kinase G (PKG) system on Ca2+ signaling in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) of resistance vessels in general and afferent arterioles in particular. We tested the hypotheses that cGMP-, Ca2+-dependent big potassium channels (BKCa2+) buffer the Ca2+ response to depolarization by high extracellular KCl and that NO inhibits adenosine diphosphoribose (ADPR) cyclase, thereby reducing the Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release. We isolated rat afferent arterioles, utilizing the magnetized microsphere method, and measured cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) with fura-2, a preparation in which endothelial cells do not participate in [Ca2+]i responses. KCl (50 mM)-induced depolarization causes an immediate increase in [Ca2+]i of 151 nM. The blockers Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (of nitric oxide synthase), 1,2,4-oxodiazolo-[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ, of guanylyl cyclase), KT-5823 (of PKG activation), and iberiotoxin (IBX, of BKCa2+ activity) do not alter the [Ca2+]i response to KCl, suggesting no discernible endogenous NO production under basal conditions. The NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) reduces the [Ca2+]i response to 77 nM; IBX restores the response to control values. These data show that activation of BKCa2+ in the presence of NO/cGMP provides a brake on KCl-induced [Ca2+]i responses. Experiments with the inhibitor of cyclic ADPR 8-bromo-cyclic ADPR (8-Br-cADPR) and SNP + downstream inhibitors of PKG and BKCa2+ suggest that NO inhibits ADPR cyclase in intact arterioles. When we pretreat afferent arterioles with 8-bromoguanosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (8-Br-cGMP; 10 μM), the response to KCl is 143 nM. However, in the presence of both IBX and 8-Br-cGMP, we observe a surprising doubling of the [Ca2+]i response to KCl. In summary, we present evidence for effects of the NO/cGMP/PKG system to reduce [Ca2+]i, via activation of BKCa2+ and possibly by inhibition of ADPR cyclase

  5. Long-Term Effects of Botulinum Toxin Complex Type A Injection on Mechano- and Metabo-Sensitive Afferent Fibers Originating from Gastrocnemius Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Guillaume; Marqueste, Tanguy; Decherchi, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate long term effects of motor denervation by botulinum toxin complex type A (BoNT/A) from Clostridium Botulinum, on the afferent fibers originating from the gastrocnemius muscle of rats. Animals were divided in 2 experimental groups: 1) untreated animals acting as control and 2) treated animals in which the toxin was injected in the left muscle, the latter being itself divided into 3 subgroups according to their locomotor recovery with the help of a test based on footprint measurements of walking rats: i) no recovery (B0), ii) 50% recovery (B50) and iii) full recovery (B100). Then, muscle properties, metabosensitive afferent fiber responses to potassium chloride (KCl) and lactic acid injections and Electrically-Induced Fatigue (EIF), and mechanosensitive responses to tendon vibrations were measured. At the end of the experiment, rats were killed and the toxin injected muscles were weighted. After toxin injection, we observed a complete paralysis associated to a loss of force to muscle stimulation and a significant muscle atrophy, and a return to baseline when the animals recover. The response to fatigue was only decreased in the B0 group. The responses to KCl injections were only altered in the B100 groups while responses to lactic acid were altered in the 3 injected groups. Finally, our results indicated that neurotoxin altered the biphasic pattern of response of the mechanosensitive fiber to tendon vibrations in the B0 and B50 groups. These results indicated that neurotoxin injection induces muscle afferent activity alterations that persist and even worsen when the muscle has recovered his motor activity. PMID:26485650

  6. Long-Term Effects of Botulinum Toxin Complex Type A Injection on Mechano- and Metabo-Sensitive Afferent Fibers Originating from Gastrocnemius Muscle.

    PubMed

    Caron, Guillaume; Marqueste, Tanguy; Decherchi, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate long term effects of motor denervation by botulinum toxin complex type A (BoNT/A) from Clostridium Botulinum, on the afferent fibers originating from the gastrocnemius muscle of rats. Animals were divided in 2 experimental groups: 1) untreated animals acting as control and 2) treated animals in which the toxin was injected in the left muscle, the latter being itself divided into 3 subgroups according to their locomotor recovery with the help of a test based on footprint measurements of walking rats: i) no recovery (B0), ii) 50% recovery (B50) and iii) full recovery (B100). Then, muscle properties, metabosensitive afferent fiber responses to potassium chloride (KCl) and lactic acid injections and Electrically-Induced Fatigue (EIF), and mechanosensitive responses to tendon vibrations were measured. At the end of the experiment, rats were killed and the toxin injected muscles were weighted. After toxin injection, we observed a complete paralysis associated to a loss of force to muscle stimulation and a significant muscle atrophy, and a return to baseline when the animals recover. The response to fatigue was only decreased in the B0 group. The responses to KCl injections were only altered in the B100 groups while responses to lactic acid were altered in the 3 injected groups. Finally, our results indicated that neurotoxin altered the biphasic pattern of response of the mechanosensitive fiber to tendon vibrations in the B0 and B50 groups. These results indicated that neurotoxin injection induces muscle afferent activity alterations that persist and even worsen when the muscle has recovered his motor activity.

  7. Contribution of peripheral afferents to the activation of the soleus muscle during walking in humans.

    PubMed

    Yang, J F; Stein, R B; James, K B

    1991-01-01

    Small, rapid stretches were applied to the soleus muscle during the stance phase of walking by lifting the forefoot with a pneumatic device. Stretch responses were induced in the soleus muscle by the disturbance. The amplitude and time course of the responses from the soleus muscle were a function of both the kinematics of the disturbance and the time in the step cycle when the disturbance was applied. The step cycle was divided into 16 equal time parts, and data obtained within each of these parts were averaged together. The electromyographic (EMG) response of the soleus muscle showed a time course that was similar to the time course of the angular velocity induced by the disturbance at the ankle. Three linear equations were used to predict the EMG response from the soleus muscle as a function of the angular kinematics of the disturbance: 1) velocity, 2) velocity and displacement, 3) velocity, displacement and acceleration. Introduction of a pure delay between the EMG and the kinematics substantially improved the predictions. Most of the variance (70%) in the EMG response could be accounted for by the velocity of the disturbance alone with an optimal delay (average 38 ms). Inclusion of a displacement term significantly increased the variance accounted for (85%), but further addition of an acceleration term did not. Since the velocity of the disturbance accounted for most of the variance, the reflex gain was estimated from the velocity coefficient. This coefficient increased in a ramp-like fashion through the early part of the stance phase, qualitatively similar to the increase in the H-reflex.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Type III-IV muscle afferents are not required for steady-state exercise hyperpnea in healthy subjects and patients with COPD or heart failure.

    PubMed

    Poon, Chi-Sang; Song, Gang

    2015-09-15

    Blockade of group III-IV muscle afferents by intrathecal injection of the μ-opioid agonist fentanyl (IF) in humans has been variously reported to depress exercise hyperpnea in some studies but not others. A key unanswered question is whether such an effect is transient or persists in the steady state. Here we show that in healthy subjects undergoing constant-load cycling exercise IF significantly slows the transient exercise ventilatory kinetics but has no discernible effect on the ventilatory response when exercise is sufficiently prolonged. Thus, the ventilatory response to group III-IV muscle afferents input in healthy subjects is not a simple reflex but acts like a high-pass filter with maximum sensitivity during early-phase exercise and is reset in the late phase. In patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) IF causes sustained CO2 retention not only during exercise but also in the resting state, where muscle afferents feedback is minimal. In patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), IF also elicits sustained decreases in the exercise ventilatory response but with little or no resultant CO2 retention due to concomitant decreases in physiological VD/VT (dead space-to-ventilation ratio). These results support the proposition that optimal long-term regulation of exercise hyperpnea in health and in disease is determined centrally by the respiratory controller through the continuing adaptation of an internal model which dynamically tracks the metabolic CO2 load and the ventilatory inefficiency 1/1-VD/VT that must be overcome for the maintenance of arterial PCO2 homeostasis, rather than being reflexively driven by group III-IV muscle afferents feedback per se. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Within-step modulation of leg muscle activity by afferent feedback in human walking

    PubMed Central

    Klint, Richard af; Nielsen, Jens Bo; Cole, Jonathan; Sinkjaer, Thomas; Grey, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    To maintain smooth and efficient gait the motor system must adjust for changes in the ground on a step-to-step basis. In the present study we investigated the role of sensory feedback as 19 able-bodied human subjects walked over a platform that mimicked an uneven supporting surface. Triceps surae muscle activation was assessed during stance as the platform was set to different inclinations (±3 deg, ±2 deg and 0 deg rotation in a parasagittal plane about the ankle). Normalized triceps surae muscle activity was significantly increased when the platform was inclined (2 deg: 0.153 ± 0.051; 3 deg: 0.156 ± 0.053) and significantly decreased when the platform was declined (−3 deg: 0.133 ± 0.048; −2 deg: 0.132 ± 0.049) compared with level walking (0.141 ± 0.048) for the able-bodied subjects. A similar experiment was performed with a subject who lacked proprioception and touch sensation from the neck down. In contrast with healthy subjects, no muscle activation changes were observed in the deafferented subject. Our results demonstrate that the ability to compensate for small irregularities in the ground surface relies on automatic within-step sensory feedback regulation rather than conscious predictive control. PMID:18669536

  10. Jaw muscle spindle afferents coordinate multiple orofacial motoneurons via common premotor neurons in rats: an electrophysiological and anatomical study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingdong; Luo, Pifu; Ro, Jin Y; Xiong, Huangui

    2012-12-13

    Jaw muscle spindle afferents (JMSA) in the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus (Vme) project to the parvocellular reticular nucleus (PCRt) and dorsomedial spinal trigeminal nucleus (dm-Vsp). A number of premotor neurons that project to the trigeminal motor nucleus (Vmo), facial nucleus (VII) and hypoglossal nucleus (XII) are also located in the PCRt and dm-Vsp. In this study, we examined whether these premotor neurons serve as common relay pool for relaying JMSA to multiple orofacial motoneurons. JMSA inputs to the PCRt and dm-Vsp neurons were verified by recording extracellular responses to electrical stimulation of the caudal Vme or masseter nerve, mechanical stimulation of jaw muscles and jaw opening. After recording, biocytin in recording electrode was inotophorized into recording sites. Biocytin-Iabeled fibers traveled to the Vmo, VII, XII, and the nucleus ambiguus (Amb). Labeled boutons were seen in close apposition with Nissl-stained motoneurons in the Vmo, VII, XII and Amb. In addition, an anterograde tracer (biotinylated dextran amine) was iontophorized into the caudal Vme, and a retrograde tracer (Cholera toxin B subunit) was delivered into either the VII or Xll to identify VII and XII premotor neurons that receive JMSA input. Contacts between labeled Vme neuronal boutons and premotor neurons were observed in the PCRt and adjacent dm-Vsp. Confocal microscopic observations confirmed close contacts between Vme boutons and VII and XII premotor neurons. This study provides evidence that JMSA may coordinate activities of multiple orofacial motor nuclei, including Vmo, VII, XII and Amb in the brainstem via a common premotor neuron pool.

  11. Abnormal vibration induced illusion of movement in essential tremor: evidence for abnormal muscle spindle afferent function

    PubMed Central

    Frima, N; Grunewald, R

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: Vibration induced illusion of movement (VIIM) is abnormal in patients with idiopathic focal dystonia, an abnormality which corrects with fatigue of the vibrated muscle. Since dystonia and essential tremor sometimes coexist in families, we investigated the perception of VIIM and the effect of fatigue on VIIM in patients with essential tremor. Methods: VIIM in 18 patients with essential tremor was compared with VIIM in 18 healthy control participants before and after volitional fatigue of the vibrated muscles. Results: Vibration of the immobilised biceps produced a subnormal VIIM in patients with essential tremor (12.81° (SEM 2.15)) compared with healthy control subjects (28.55° (1.66)). The perception increased following volitional fatigue of the vibrated arm in patients with essential tremor (16.23° (2.50)) but not in healthy controls (27.55° (1.66)). No difference was observed in patients with alcohol or non-alcohol responsive tremor. Conclusions: The VIIM decreased with increasing age in healthy control subjects. Abnormal VIIM implies abnormal sensorimotor processing in patients with essential tremor, similar to that found in idiopathic focal dystonia, and the change of the perception with age could explain the age related onset of the disorder. PMID:15607995

  12. Immunostaining for the α3 isoform of the Na+/K+-ATPase is selective for functionally identified muscle spindle afferents in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Parekh, A; Campbell, A J M; Djouhri, L; Fang, X; McMullan, S; Berry, C; Acosta, C; Lawson, S N

    2010-01-01

    Muscle spindle afferent (MSA) neurons can show rapid and sustained firing. Immunostaining for the α3 isoform of the Na+/K+-ATPase (α3) in some large dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and large intrafusal fibres suggested α3 expression in MSAs (Dobretsov et al. 2003), but not whether α3-immunoreactive DRG neuronal somata were exclusively MSAs. We found that neuronal somata with high α3 immunointensity were neurofilament-rich, suggesting they have A-fibres; we therefore focussed on A-fibre neurons to determine the sensory properties of α3-immunoreactive neurons. We examined α3 immunointensity in 78 dye-injected DRG neurons whose conduction velocities and hindlimb sensory receptive fields were determined in vivo. A dense perimeter or ring of staining in a subpopulation of neurons was clearly overlying the soma membrane and not within satellite cells. Neurons with clear α3 rings (n = 23) were all MSAs (types I and II); all MSAs had darkly stained α3 rings, that tended to be darker in MSA1 than MSA2 units. Of 52 non-MSA A-fibre neurons including nociceptive and cutaneous low-threshold mechanoreceptive (LTM) neurons, 50 had no discernable ring, while 2 (Aα/β cutaneous LTMs) had weakly stained rings. Three of three C-nociceptors had no rings. MSAs with strong ring immunostaining also showed the strongest cytoplasmic staining. These findings suggest that α3 ring staining is a selective marker for MSAs. The α3 isoform of the Na+/K+-ATPase has previously been shown to be activated by higher Na+ levels and to have greater affinity for ATP than the α1 isoform (in all DRG neurons). The high α3 levels in MSAs may enable the greater dynamic firing range in MSAs. PMID:20807787

  13. [Readjustment of the efferent activity of the scratching generator in response to stimulation of muscle afferents of the hindlimb of the decerebrate immobilized cat].

    PubMed

    Shimanskiĭ, Iu P; Baev, K V

    1987-01-01

    Rebuildings of the scratching generator activity caused by phasic electrical stimulation of ipsilateral hindlimb muscle nerves during different hindlimb positions were studied in decerebrated immobilized cats. Strong dependence of these rebuildings on the stimulation phase was observed. The character of the "scratch" cycle duration rebuilding was formed by the scratching generator tendency to bring efferent activity into such correlation with the stimulus that the stimulation moment coincided with the moment of efferent activity phase triggering. Phasic altering of the efferent activity intensity rebuilding was observed against a background of "aiming" and "scratching" activity correlation shift in the direction of strengthening activation of muscles innervated by the stimulated nerve. This rebuilding was intensified when the hindlimb deflects from the aimed position in the direction of corresponding muscles stretching. Physiological sense of "rebuilding absence phases" is discussed. It is postulated that absence of the duration and intensity changes can be achieved simultaneously only with definite correlation between phase and intensity of the afferent impulsation burst.

  14. Calcitonin gene-related peptide produces skeletal muscle vasodilation following antidromic stimulation of unmyelinated afferents in the dorsal root in rats.

    PubMed

    Sato, A; Sato, Y; Shimura, M; Uchida, S

    2000-04-07

    In anesthetized rats, the contribution of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) to antidromic vasodilation of skeletal muscle blood flow (MBF) following electrical stimulation of muscle afferent was investigated by measuring biceps femoris MBF using laser Doppler flowmetry. Repetitive antidromic electrical stimulation of unmyelinated C fibers in ipsilateral dorsal roots at the 3rd-5th lumbar segments for 30 s caused an increase in MBF for 3-15 min (mean 4.5 min) without significant change in systemic arterial blood pressure. The increase in skeletal MBF started about 10 s after the onset of stimulation, and peaked at approximately 130% of the control value at about 30 s after the end of the 30 s period of stimulation. The MBF response was totally abolished by topical application of hCGRP (8-37), a CGRP receptor antagonist. It is concluded that antidromic vasodilation in skeletal muscles following stimulation of unmyelinated C afferents in dorsal roots is independent of systemic blood pressure and is mediated essentially by CGRP. It is suggested that this CGRP-related antidromic vasodilation may be important in the clinical improvement of skeletal MBF produced by physical therapy, e.g. acupuncture.

  15. Primary afferent depolarization and flexion reflexes produced by radiant heat stimulation of the skin.

    PubMed

    Burke, R E; Rudomin, P; Vyklický, L; Zajac, F E

    1971-02-01

    1. The reflex effects of pulses of intense radiant heat applied to the skin of the central plantar pad have been studied in unanaesthetized (decerebrate) spinal cats.2. Pad heat pulses produced flexion of the ipsilateral hind limb and increased ipsilateral flexor monosynaptic reflexes, due to post-synaptic excitation of flexor alpha motoneurones. These effects were accompanied by reduction of extensor monosynaptic reflexes and post-synaptic inhibition of extensor motoneurones.3. Ipsilateral (and contralateral) pad heat pulses consistently evoked negative dorsal root potentials (DRPs) as well as increased excitability of both cutaneous and group Ib muscle afferent terminals. The excitability of group Ia afferents was sometimes also increased during pad heat pulses, but to a lesser extent.4. Pad heat pulses produced negative DRPs in preparations in which positive DRP components could be demonstrated following electrical stimulation of both skin and muscle nerves.5. The motor and primary afferent effects of heat pulses always accompanied one another, beginning after the pad surface temperature had reached rather high levels (usually 48-55 degrees C).6. Negative DRPs increased excitability of cutaneous and group Ib afferents, and motoneurone activation produced by pad heat pulses was essentially unmodified when conduction in large myelinated afferents from the central plantar pad was blocked by cooling the posterior tibial nerve trunk.7. It is concluded that adequate noxious activation of cutaneous afferents of small diameter produces primary afferent depolarization in a variety of large diameter afferent fibres, as well as post-synaptic effects in alpha motoneurones.

  16. Primary afferent depolarization and flexion reflexes produced by radiant heat stimulation of the skin

    PubMed Central

    Burke, R. E.; Rudomin, P.; Vyklický, L.; Zajac, F. E.

    1971-01-01

    1. The reflex effects of pulses of intense radiant heat applied to the skin of the central plantar pad have been studied in unanaesthetized (decerebrate) spinal cats. 2. Pad heat pulses produced flexion of the ipsilateral hind limb and increased ipsilateral flexor monosynaptic reflexes, due to post-synaptic excitation of flexor alpha motoneurones. These effects were accompanied by reduction of extensor monosynaptic reflexes and post-synaptic inhibition of extensor motoneurones. 3. Ipsilateral (and contralateral) pad heat pulses consistently evoked negative dorsal root potentials (DRPs) as well as increased excitability of both cutaneous and group Ib muscle afferent terminals. The excitability of group Ia afferents was sometimes also increased during pad heat pulses, but to a lesser extent. 4. Pad heat pulses produced negative DRPs in preparations in which positive DRP components could be demonstrated following electrical stimulation of both skin and muscle nerves. 5. The motor and primary afferent effects of heat pulses always accompanied one another, beginning after the pad surface temperature had reached rather high levels (usually 48-55° C). 6. Negative DRPs increased excitability of cutaneous and group Ib afferents, and motoneurone activation produced by pad heat pulses was essentially unmodified when conduction in large myelinated afferents from the central plantar pad was blocked by cooling the posterior tibial nerve trunk. 7. It is concluded that adequate noxious activation of cutaneous afferents of small diameter produces primary afferent depolarization in a variety of large diameter afferent fibres, as well as post-synaptic effects in alpha motoneurones. PMID:5575337

  17. Pharmacology of airway afferent nerve activity

    PubMed Central

    Undem, Bradley J; Carr, Michael J

    2001-01-01

    Afferent nerves in the airways serve to regulate breathing pattern, cough, and airway autonomic neural tone. Pharmacologic agents that influence afferent nerve activity can be subclassified into compounds that modulate activity by indirect means (e.g. bronchial smooth muscle spasmogens) and those that act directly on the nerves. Directly acting agents affect afferent nerve activity by interacting with various ion channels and receptors within the membrane of the afferent terminals. Whether by direct or indirect means, most compounds that enter the airspace will modify afferent nerve activity, and through this action alter airway physiology. PMID:11686889

  18. The phase difference between neural drives to antagonist muscles in essential tremor is associated with the relative strength of supraspinal and afferent input.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Juan A; Dideriksen, Jakob L; Holobar, Ales; Ibáñez, Jaime; Glaser, Vojko; Romero, Juan P; Benito-León, Julián; Pons, José L; Rocon, Eduardo; Farina, Dario

    2015-06-10

    The pathophysiology of essential tremor (ET), the most common movement disorder, is not fully understood. We investigated which factors determine the variability in the phase difference between neural drives to antagonist muscles, a long-standing observation yet unexplained. We used a computational model to simulate the effects of different levels of voluntary and tremulous synaptic input to antagonistic motoneuron pools on the tremor. We compared these simulations to data from 11 human ET patients. In both analyses, the neural drive to muscle was represented as the pooled spike trains of several motor units, which provides an accurate representation of the common synaptic input to motoneurons. The simulations showed that, for each voluntary input level, the phase difference between neural drives to antagonist muscles is determined by the relative strength of the supraspinal tremor input to the motoneuron pools. In addition, when the supraspinal tremor input to one muscle was weak or absent, Ia afferents provided significant common tremor input due to passive stretch. The simulations predicted that without a voluntary drive (rest tremor) the neural drives would be more likely in phase, while a concurrent voluntary input (postural tremor) would lead more frequently to an out-of-phase pattern. The experimental results matched these predictions, showing a significant change in phase difference between postural and rest tremor. They also indicated that the common tremor input is always shared by the antagonistic motoneuron pools, in agreement with the simulations. Our results highlight that the interplay between supraspinal input and spinal afferents is relevant for tremor generation.

  19. Anatomy and Physiology of Phrenic Afferent Neurons.

    PubMed

    Nair, Jayakrishnan; Streeter, Kristi A; Turner, Sara M F; Sunshine, Michael D; Bolser, Donald C; Fox, Emily J; Davenport, Paul W; Fuller, David D

    2017-08-23

    Large diameter myelinated phrenic afferents discharge in phase with diaphragm contraction and smaller diameter fibers discharge across the respiratory cycle. In this article, we review the phrenic afferent literature and highlight areas in need of further study. We conclude that 1) activation of both myelinated and non-myelinated phrenic sensory afferents can influence respiratory motor output on a breath-by-breath basis; 2) the relative impact of phrenic afferents substantially increases with diaphragm work and fatigue; 3) activation of phrenic afferents has a powerful impact on sympathetic motor outflow, and 4) phrenic afferents contribute to diaphragm somatosensation and the conscious perception of breathing. Much remains to be learned regarding the spinal and supraspinal distribution and synaptic contacts of myelinated and non-myelinated phrenic afferents. Similarly, very little is known regarding the potential role of phrenic afferent neurons in triggering or modulating expression of respiratory neuroplasticity. Copyright © 2017, Journal of Neurophysiology.

  20. The effects of centrally acting muscle relaxants on the intrathecal noradrenaline-induced facilitation of the flexor reflex mediated by group II afferent fibers in rats.

    PubMed

    Sakitama, K

    1993-11-01

    The effects of centrally acting muscle relaxants on the flexor reflex mediated by group II afferent fibers (group II flexor reflex) in anesthetized intact rats and on the intrathecal noradrenaline-HCl-induced facilitation of the group II flexor reflex in anesthetized spinal rats were investigated. In anesthetized intact rats, mephenesin, tolperisone-HCl, chlorpromazine-HCl and baclofen inhibited the group II flexor reflex dose-dependently, whereas the inhibitory effect of tizanidine-HCl was bell-shaped. The effect of diazepam tended to be saturated. In anesthetized spinal rats, mephenesin, tolperisone-HCl, chlorpromazine-HCl, diazepam and baclofen also depressed the group II flexor reflex, but tizanidine-HCl slightly increased it. The intrathecal noradrenaline-HCl-induced facilitation of the group II flexor reflex was not affected by mephenesin or diazepam, but was inhibited by tizanidine-HCl, tolperisone-HCl, chlorpromazine-HCl and baclofen. These results suggest that compounds with centrally acting muscle relaxant activity depress the group II flexor reflex in different manners, and the inhibition of descending noradrenergic tonic facilitation within the spinal cord participates in the depressant action of the group II flexor reflex produced by tolperisone-HCl, tizanidine-HCl, chlorpromazine-HCl and baclofen.

  1. Firing patterns and functional roles of different classes of spinal afferents in rectal nerves during colonic migrating motor complexes in mouse colon.

    PubMed

    Zagorodnyuk, Vladimir P; Kyloh, Melinda; Brookes, Simon J; Nicholas, Sarah J; Spencer, Nick J

    2012-08-01

    The functional role of the different classes of visceral afferents that innervate the large intestine is poorly understood. Recent evidence suggests that low-threshold, wide-dynamic-range rectal afferents play an important role in the detection and transmission of visceral pain induced by noxious colorectal distension in mice. However, it is not clear which classes of spinal afferents are activated during naturally occurring colonic motor patterns or during intense contractions of the gut smooth muscle. We developed an in vitro colorectum preparation to test how the major classes of rectal afferents are activated during spontaneous colonic migrating motor complex (CMMC) or pharmacologically induced contraction. During CMMCs, circular muscle contractions increased firing in low-threshold, wide-dynamic-range muscular afferents and muscular-mucosal afferents, which generated a mean firing rate of 1.53 ± 0.23 Hz (n = 8) under isotonic conditions and 2.52 ± 0.36 Hz (n = 17) under isometric conditions. These low-threshold rectal afferents were reliably activated by low levels of circumferential stretch induced by increases in length (1-2 mm) or load (1-3 g). In a small proportion of cases (5 of 34 units), some low-threshold muscular and muscular-mucosal afferents decreased their firing rate during the peak of the CMMC contractions. High-threshold afferents were never activated during spontaneous CMMC contractions or tonic contractions induced by bethanechol (100 μM). High-threshold rectal afferents were only activated by intense levels of circumferential stretch (10-20 g). These results show that, in the rectal nerves of mice, low-threshold, wide-dynamic-range muscular and muscular-mucosal afferents are excited during contraction of the circular muscle that occurs during spontaneous CMMCs. No activation of high-threshold rectal afferents was detected during CMMCs or intense contractile activity in naïve mouse colorectum.

  2. The organization of primary afferent depolarization in the isolated spinal cord of the frog

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, D. O.; Rudomin, P.

    1973-01-01

    1. The organization of primary afferent depolarization (PAD) produced by excitation of peripheral sensory and motor nerves was studied in the frog cord isolated with hind limb nerves. 2. Dorsal root potentials from sensory fibres (DR-DRPs) were evoked on stimulation of most sensory nerves, but were largest from cutaneous, joint and flexor muscle afferents. With single shock stimulation the largest cutaneous and joint afferent fibres gave DR-DRPs, but potentials from muscle nerves resulted from activation of sensory fibres with thresholds to electrical stimulation higher than 1·2-1·5 times the threshold of the most excitable fibres in the nerve. This suggests that PAD from muscle afferents is probably due to excitation of extrafusal receptors. 3. Dorsal root potentials produced by antidromic activation of motor fibres (VR-DRPs) were larger from extensor muscles and smaller or absent from flexor muscles. The VR-DRPs were produced by activation of the lowest threshold motor fibres. 4. Three types of interactions were found between test and conditioning DRPs from the same or different nerves. With maximal responses occlusion was usually pronounced. At submaximal levels linear summation occurred. Near threshold the conditioning stimulus frequently resulted in a large facilitation of the test DRP. All three types of interactions were found with two DR-DRPs, two VR-DRPs or one DR-DRP and one VR-DRP. 5. The excitability of sensory nerve terminals from most peripheral nerves was increased during the DR-DRP. The magnitude of the excitability increase varied roughly with the magnitude of the DR-DRP evoked by the conditioning stimulus. 6. There was a marked excitability increase of cutaneous and extensor muscle afferent terminals during the VR-DRP. Flexor muscle afferent terminals often showed no excitability changes to ventral root stimulation. In those experiments where afferent terminals from flexor muscles did show an excitability increase, the effects were smaller than

  3. Phase relation changes between the firings of alpha and gamma-motoneurons and muscle spindle afferents in the sacral micturition centre during continence functions in brain-dead human and patients with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Schalow, G

    2010-01-01

    1. Single-nerve fibre action potentials (APs) were recorded with 2 pairs of wire electrodes from lower sacral nerve roots during surgery in patients with spinal cord injury and in a brain-dead human. Conduction velocity distribution histograms were constructed for afferent and efferent fibres, nerve fibre groups were identified and simultaneous impulse patterns of alpha and gamma-motoneurons and secondary muscle spindle afferents (SP2) were constructed. Temporal relations between afferent and efferent APs were analyzed by interspike interval (II) and phase relation changes to explore the coordinated self-organization of somatic and parasympathetic neuronal networks in the sacral micturition centre during continence functions under physiologic (brain-dead) and pathophysiologic conditions (spinal cord injury). 2. In a paraplegic with hyperreflexia of the bladder, urinary bladder stretch (S1) and tension receptor afferents (ST) fired already when the bladder was empty, and showed a several times higher bladder afferent activity increase upon retrograde bladder filling than observed in the brain-dead individual. Two alpha2-motoneurons (FR) innervating the external bladder sphincter were already oscillatory firing to generate high activity levels when the bladder was empty. They showed activity levels with no bladder filling, comparable to those measured at a bladder filling of 600 ml in the brain-dead individual. A bladder storage volume of 600 ml was thus lost in the paraplegic, due to a too high bladder afferent input to the sacral micturition center, secondary to inflammation and hypertrophy of the detrusor. 3. In a brain-dead human, 2 phase relations existed per oscillation period of 160 ms between the APs of a sphincteric oscillatory firing alpha2-motoneuron, a dynamic fusimotor and a secondary muscle spindle afferent fibre. Following stimulation of mainly somatic afferent fibres, the phase relations changed only little. 4. In a paraplegic with dyssynergia of the

  4. Afferent control of human stance and gait: evidence for blocking of group I afferents during gait.

    PubMed

    Dietz, V; Quintern, J; Berger, W

    1985-01-01

    The cerebral potentials (c.p.) evoked by electrical stimulation of the tibial nerve during stance and in the various phases of gait of normal subjects were compared with the c.p. and leg muscle e.m.g. responses evoked by perturbations of stance and gait. Over the whole step cycle of gait the c.p. evoked by an electrical stimulus were of smaller amplitude (3 microV and 9 microV, respectively) than that seen in the stance condition, and appeared with a longer latency (mean times to first positive peak: 63 and 43 ms, respectively). When the electrical stimulus was applied during stance after ischaemic blockade of group I afferents, the c.p. were similar to those evoked during gait. The c.p. evoked by perturbations were larger in amplitude than those produced by the electrical stimulus, but similar in latencies in both gait and stance (mean 26 microV and 40 microV; 65 ms and 42 ms, respectively) and configurations. The large gastrocnemius e.m.g. responses evoked by the stance and gait perturbations arose with a latency of 65 to 70 ms. Only in the stance condition was a smaller, shorter latency (40 ms) response seen. It is concluded that during gait the signals of group I afferents are blocked at both segmental and supraspinal levels which was tested by tibial nerve stimulation. It is suggested that the e.m.g. responses induced in the leg by gait perturbations are evoked by group II afferents and mediated via a spinal pathway. The c.p. evoked during gait most probably reflect the processing of this group II input by supraspinal motor centres for the coordination of widespread arm and trunk muscle activation, necessary to restablish body equilibrium.

  5. Large Polyglutamine Repeats Cause Muscle Degeneration in SCA17 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shanshan; Yang, Su; Guo, Jifeng; Yan, Sen; Gaertig, Marta A.; Li, Shihua; Li, Xiao-Jiang

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY In polyglutamine (polyQ) diseases, large polyQ repeats cause juvenile cases with different symptoms than adult-onset patients, who carry smaller expanded polyQ repeats. The mechanisms behind the differential pathology mediated by different polyQ repeat lengths remain unknown. By studying knock-in mouse models of spinal cerebellar ataxia-17 (SCA17), we found that a large polyQ (105 glutamines) in the TATA box-binding protein (TBP) preferentially causes muscle degeneration and reduces the expression of muscle-specific genes. Direct expression of TBP with different polyQ repeats in mouse muscle revealed that muscle degeneration is mediated only by the large polyQ repeats. Different polyQ repeats differentially alter TBP’s interaction with neuronal and muscle-specific transcription factors. As a result, the large polyQ repeat decreases the association of MyoD with TBP and DNA promoters. Our findings suggest that specific alterations in protein interactions by large polyQ repeats may account for the unique pathology in juvenile polyQ diseases. PMID:26387956

  6. The influence of pain on masseter spindle afferent discharge.

    PubMed

    Capra, Norman F; Hisley, Calvin K; Masri, Radi M

    2007-04-01

    Muscle spindles provide proprioceptive feedback supporting normal patterns of motor activity and kinesthetic sensibility. During mastication, jaw muscle spindles play an important role in monitoring and regulating the chewing cycle and the bite forces generated during mastication. Both acute and chronic orofacial pain disorders are associated with changes in proprioceptive feedback and motor function. Experimental jaw muscle pain also alters the normal response of masseter spindle afferents to ramp and hold jaw movements. It has been proposed that altered motor function and proprioceptive input results from group III muscle afferent modulation of the fusimotor system which alters spindle afferent sensitivity in limb muscles. The response to nociceptive stimuli may enhance or reduce the response of spindle afferents to proprioceptive stimuli. Several experimental observations suggesting the possibility that a similar mechanism also functions in jaw muscles are presented in this report. First, evidence is provided to show that nociceptive stimulation of the masseter muscle primarily influences the amplitude sensitivity of spindle afferents with relatively little effect on the dynamic sensitivity. Second, reversible inactivation of the caudal trigeminal nuclei attenuates the nociceptive modulation of spindle afferents. Finally, functionally identified gamma-motoneurons in the trigeminal motor nucleus are modulated by intramuscular injection with algesic substances. Taken together, these results suggest that pain-induced modulation of spindle afferent responses are mediated by small diameter muscle afferents and that this modulation is dependent, in part, on the relay of muscle nociceptive information from trigeminal subnucleus caudalis onto trigeminal gamma-motoneurons. The implication of these results will be considered in light of current theories on the relationship between jaw muscle pain and oral motor function.

  7. The Influence of Pain on Masseter Spindle Afferent Discharge

    PubMed Central

    Capra, Norman F.; Hisley, Calvin K.; Masri, Radi M.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Muscle spindles provide proprioceptive feedback supporting normal patterns of motor activity and kinesthetic sensibility. During mastication, jaw muscle spindles play an important role in monitoring and regulating the chewing cycle and the bite forces generated during mastication. Both acute and chronic orofacial pain disorders are associated with changes in proprioceptive feedback and motor function. Experimental jaw muscle pain also alters the normal response of masseter spindle afferents to ramp and hold jaw movements [1]. It has been proposed that altered motor function and proprioceptive input results from group III muscle afferent modulation of the fusimotor system which alters spindle afferent sensitivity in limb muscles[2]. The response to nociceptive stimuli may enhance or reduce the response of spindle afferents to proprioceptive stimuli. Several experimental observations suggesting the possibility that a similar mechanism also functions in jaw muscles are presented in this report. First, evidence is provided to show that nociceptive stimulation of the masseter muscle primarily influences the amplitude sensitivity of spindle afferents with relatively little effect on the dynamic sensitivity [3]. Second, reversible inactivation of the caudal trigeminal nuclei attenuates the nociceptive modulation of spindle afferents. Finally, functionally identified gamma-motoneurons in the trigeminal motor nucleus are modulated by intramuscular injection with algesic substances. Taken together, these results suggest that pain-induced modulation of spindle afferent responses are mediated by small diameter muscle afferents and that this modulation is dependent, in part, on the relay of muscle nociceptive information from trigeminal subnucleus caudalis onto trigeminal gamma-motoneurons. The implication of these results will be considered in light of current theories on the relationship between jaw muscle pain and oral motor function. PMID:17126284

  8. Activation of GLP-1 receptors on vascular smooth muscle cells reduces the autoregulatory response in afferent arterioles and increases renal blood flow.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Elisa P; Poulsen, Steen S; Kissow, Hannelouise; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Deacon, Carolyn F; Jensen, Boye L; Holst, Jens J; Sorensen, Charlotte M

    2015-04-15

    Glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 has a range of extrapancreatic effects, including renal effects. The mechanisms are poorly understood, but GLP-1 receptors have been identified in the kidney. However, the exact cellular localization of the renal receptors is poorly described. The aim of the present study was to localize renal GLP-1 receptors and describe GLP-1-mediated effects on the renal vasculature. We hypothesized that renal GLP-1 receptors are located in the renal microcirculation and that activation of these affects renal autoregulation and increases renal blood flow. In vivo autoradiography using (125)I-labeled GLP-1, (125)I-labeled exendin-4 (GLP-1 analog), and (125)I-labeled exendin 9-39 (GLP-1 receptor antagonist) was performed in rodents to localize specific GLP-1 receptor binding. GLP-1-mediated effects on blood pressure, renal blood flow (RBF), heart rate, renin secretion, urinary flow rate, and Na(+) and K(+) excretion were investigated in anesthetized rats. Effects of GLP-1 on afferent arterioles were investigated in isolated mouse kidneys. Specific binding of (125)I-labeled GLP-1, (125)I-labeled exendin-4, and (125)I-labeled exendin 9-39 was observed in the renal vasculature, including afferent arterioles. Infusion of GLP-1 increased blood pressure, RBF, and urinary flow rate significantly in rats. Heart rate and plasma renin concentrations were unchanged. Exendin 9-39 inhibited the increase in RBF. In isolated murine kidneys, GLP-1 and exendin-4 significantly reduced the autoregulatory response of afferent arterioles in response to stepwise increases in pressure. We conclude that GLP-1 receptors are located in the renal vasculature, including afferent arterioles. Activation of these receptors reduces the autoregulatory response of afferent arterioles to acute pressure increases and increases RBF in normotensive rats. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Fetal muscle gene therapy/gene delivery in large animals.

    PubMed

    Abi-Nader, Khalil N; David, Anna L

    2011-01-01

    Gene delivery to the fetal muscles is a potential strategy for the early treatment of muscular dystrophies. In utero muscle gene therapy can also be used to treat other genetic disorders such as hemophilia, where the missing clotting proteins may be secreted from the treated muscle. In the past few years, studies in small animal models have raised the hopes that a phenotypic cure can be obtained after fetal application of gene therapy. Studies of efficacy and safety in large animals are, however, essential before clinical application can be considered in the human fetus. For this reason, the development of clinically applicable strategies for the delivery of gene therapy to the fetal muscles is of prime importance. In this chapter, we describe the protocols for in utero ultrasound-guided gene delivery to the ovine fetal muscle in early gestation. In particular, procedures to inject skeletal muscle groups such as the thigh and thoracic musculature and targeting the diaphragm in the fetus are described in detail.

  10. Cerebellar and afferent ataxias.

    PubMed

    Pandolfo, Massimo; Manto, Mario

    2013-10-01

    Ataxia is the predominant manifestation of many acquired and inherited neurologic disorders affecting the cerebellum, its connections, and the afferent proprioceptive pathways. This article reviews the phenomenology and etiologies of cerebellar and afferent ataxias and provides indications for a rational approach to diagnosis and management. The pathophysiology of ataxia is being progressively understood and linked to the functional organization of the cerebellum. The impact of cerebellar diseases on different neurologic functions has been better defined and shown not to be limited to loss of motor coordination. The role of autoimmunity is increasingly recognized as a cause of sporadic cases of ataxia. Large collaborative studies of long duration are providing crucial information on the clinical spectrum and natural history of both sporadic ataxias (such as the cerebellar form of multiple system atrophy) and inherited ataxias. New dominant and recessive ataxia genes have been identified. On the therapeutic front, progress mostly concerns the development of treatments for Friedreich ataxia. Ataxia is the clinical manifestation of a wide range of disorders. In addition to accurate clinical assessment, MRI plays a major role in the diagnostic workup, allowing us to distinguish degenerative conditions from those due to other types of structural damage to the cerebellar or proprioceptive systems. Diagnostic algorithms based on clinical features, imaging, and neurophysiologic and biochemical parameters can be used to guide genetic testing for hereditary ataxias, the diagnosis of which is likely to be greatly improved by the introduction of new-generation DNA-sequencing approaches. Some rare forms of ataxia can be treated, so their diagnosis should not be missed. Proven symptomatic treatments for ataxia are still lacking, but intensive physical therapy appears to be helpful.

  11. Excitatory actions of mushroom poison (acromelic acid) on unmyelinated muscular afferents in the rat.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Toru; Tomotoshi, Kimihiko; Mizumura, Kazue

    2009-06-05

    Ingestion of a poisonous mushroom, Clitocybe acromelalga, results in strong and long-lasting allodynia, burning pain, redness and swelling in the periphery of the body. Acromelic acid (ACRO), a kainate analogue isolated from the mushroom, is assumed to be involved in the poisoning. ACRO has two isomers, ACRO-A and ACRO-B. The potency of ACRO-A is a million times higher than that of ACRO-B for induction of allodynia when intrathecally administered in mice. The effect of ACRO on the primary afferents of somatic tissues remains largely unknown. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of ACRO-A on the response behavior of unmyelinated afferents in the skeletal muscle. For this purpose single fiber recordings of C-afferents were made from rat extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle-common peroneal nerve preparations in vitro. Intramuscular injections of ACRO-A at three different concentrations (10(-12), 10(-10) and 10(-8)M, 5 microl over 5s) near the receptive field in the EDL muscle elicited excitation of C-afferents (12%, 50% and 44%, respectively). ACRO-A at the concentration of 10(-10)M induced the strongest excitation. The incidence of ACRO-A responsive fibers at the concentration of 10(-10) and 10(-8)M was significantly higher than that at 10(-12)M. The responses to mechanical and heat stimulations did not differ between ACRO-A sensitive and insensitive fibers. These results clearly demonstrated the powerful excitatory action of ACRO-A on mechanosensitive unmyelinated afferents in the rat skeletal muscle.

  12. Effects of stimulation of group I afferents from flexor muscles on heterosynaptic facilitation of monosynaptic reflexes produced by Ia and descending inputs: a test for presynaptic inhibition.

    PubMed

    Rudomin, P; Jiménez, I; Enriquez, M

    1991-01-01

    1. In the chloralose anesthetized cat, conditioning stimulation of group I flexor afferents depresses the monosynaptic potentials generated by Ia afferents in single spinal motoneurons or in populations of motoneurons without affecting the monosynaptic potentials produced by stimulation of descending fibers in the ipsilateral ventromedial fasciculus (VMF). 2. Heterosynaptic facilitation of monosynaptic reflexes was used to test changes in the presynaptic effectiveness of excitatory inputs with direct connections with motoneurons. We found that the heterosynaptic facilitation of Ia origin was reduced by conditioning stimulation of group I afferents from flexors, without affecting the heterosynaptic facilitation produced by stimulation of the VMF. 3. These results confirm and expand previous observations showing that the synaptic effectiveness of descending fibers synapsing with motoneurons is not subjected to a presynaptic control mechanism of the type acting on Ia fiber terminals, and provide further basis for the use of changes in heterosynaptic facilitation of monosynaptic reflexes of Ia origin as an estimate of changes in presynaptic inhibition of Ia fibers (Hultborn et al. 1987a).

  13. The perceptions of force and of movement in a man without large myelinated sensory afferents below the neck.

    PubMed Central

    Cole, J D; Sedgwick, E M

    1992-01-01

    1. Motor memory and the sense of effort have been investigated in a man with a complete large fibre sensory neuropathy for over 16 years. The perceptions of pain, heat, cold and muscular fatigue remained but he was without perceptions of light touch and proprioception below the neck. 2. The subject was able to discriminate weights held in the hand with an accuracy only slightly worse than control subjects (20 g in 200 g) when forearm movement and visual inspection were allowed. With eyes shut however he could only distinguish a weight of 200 g from 400 g. It is concluded that a crude sense of effort remains which may have a peripheral origin. 3. A limited motor memory was also present, which allowed him to maintain a posture or continue a simple repetitive movement. No novel movement was possible without visual feedback. 4. Differences in movement ability between this subject and others with similar if less pure sensory neuropathies are ascribed to rehabilitation. PMID:1522522

  14. Genetic Tracing of Nav1.8-Expressing Vagal Afferents in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Gautron, Laurent; Sakata, Ichiro; Udit, Swalpa; Zigman, Jeffrey M.; Wood, John N.; Elmquist, Joel K.

    2012-01-01

    Nav1.8 is a tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channel present in large subsets of peripheral sensory neurons, including both spinal and vagal afferents. In spinal afferents, Nav1.8 plays a key role in signaling different types of pain. Little is known, however, about the exact identity and role of Nav1.8-expressing vagal neurons. Here we generated mice with restricted expression of tdTomato fluorescent protein in all Nav1.8-expressing afferent neurons. As a result, intense fluorescence was visible in the cell bodies, central relays, and sensory endings of these neurons, revealing the full extent of their innervation sites in thoracic and abdominal viscera. For instance, vagal and spinal Nav1.8-expressing endings were seen clearly within the gastrointestinal mucosa and myenteric plexus, respectively. In the gastrointestinal muscle wall, labeled endings included a small subset of vagal tension receptors but not any stretch receptors. We also examined the detailed inner-vation of key metabolic tissues such as liver and pancreas and evaluated the anatomical relationship of Nav1.8-expressing vagal afferents with select enteroendocrine cells (i.e., ghrelin, glucagon, GLP-1). Specifically, our data revealed the presence of Nav1.8-expressing vagal afferents in several metabolic tissues and varying degrees of proximity between Nav1.8-expressing mucosal afferents and enteroendocrine cells, including apparent neuroendocrine apposition. In summary, this study demonstrates the power and versatility of the Cre-LoxP technology to trace identified visceral afferents, and our data suggest a previously unrecognized role for Nav1.8-expressing vagal neurons in gastrointestinal functions. PMID:21618224

  15. Why adductor magnus muscle is large: the function based on muscle morphology in cadavers.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, M; Suzuki, D; Ito, H; Fujimiya, M; Uchiyama, E

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine anatomical properties of the adductor magnus through a detailed classification, and to hypothesize its function and size to gather enough information about morphology. Ten cadaveric specimens of the adductor magnus were used. The muscle was separated into four portios (AM1-AM4) based on the courses of the corresponding perforating arteries, and its volume, muscle length, muscle fiber length and physiological cross-sectional area were assessed. The architectural characteristics of these four portions of the adductor magnus were then classified with the aid of principal component analysis. The results led us into demarcating the most proximal part of the adductor magnus (AM1) from the remaining parts (AM2, AM3, and AM4). Classification of the adductor magnus in terms of architectural characteristics differed from the more traditional anatomical distinction. The AM2, AM3, and AM4, having longer muscle fiber lengths than the AM1, appear to be designed as displacers for moving the thigh through a large range of motion. The AM1 appears instead to be oriented principally toward stabilizing the hip joint. The large mass of the adductor magnus should thus be regarded as a complex of functionally differentiable muscle portions. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Modulation of synaptic transmission from segmental afferents by spontaneous activity of dorsal horn spinal neurones in the cat.

    PubMed

    Manjarrez, E; Rojas-Piloni, J G; Jimenez, I; Rudomin, P

    2000-12-01

    We examined, in the anaesthetised cat, the influence of the neuronal ensembles producing spontaneous negative cord dorsum potentials (nCDPs) on segmental pathways mediating primary afferent depolarisation (PAD) of cutaneous and group I muscle afferents and on Ia monosynaptic activation of spinal motoneurones. The intraspinal distribution of the field potentials associated with the spontaneous nCDPs indicated that the neuronal ensembles involved in the generation of these potentials were located in the dorsal horn of lumbar segments, in the same region of termination of low-threshold cutaneous afferents. During the occurrence of spontaneous nCDPs, transmission from low-threshold cutaneous afferents to second order neurones in laminae III-VI, as well as transmission along pathways mediating PAD of cutaneous and Ib afferents, was facilitated. PAD of Ia afferents was instead inhibited. Monosynaptic reflexes of flexors and extensors were facilitated during the spontaneous nCDPs. The magnitude of the facilitation was proportional to the amplitude of the 'conditioning' spontaneous nCDPs. This led to a high positive correlation between amplitude fluctuations of spontaneous nCDPs and fluctuations of monosynaptic reflexes. Stimulation of low-threshold cutaneous afferents transiently reduced the probability of occurrence of spontaneous nCDPs as well as the fluctuations of monosynaptic reflexes. It is concluded that the spontaneous nCDPs were produced by the activation of a population of dorsal horn neurones that shared the same functional pathways and involved the same set of neurones as those responding monosynaptically to stimulation of large cutaneous afferents. The spontaneous activity of these neurones was probably the main cause of the fluctuations of the monosynaptic reflexes observed under anaesthesia and could provide a dynamic linkage between segmental sensory and motor pathways.

  17. Modulation of synaptic transmission from segmental afferents by spontaneous activity of dorsal horn spinal neurones in the cat

    PubMed Central

    Manjarrez, E; Rojas-Piloni, J G; Jiménez, I; Rudomin, P

    2000-01-01

    We examined, in the anaesthetised cat, the influence of the neuronal ensembles producing spontaneous negative cord dorsum potentials (nCDPs) on segmental pathways mediating primary afferent depolarisation (PAD) of cutaneous and group I muscle afferents and on Ia monosynaptic activation of spinal motoneurones. The intraspinal distribution of the field potentials associated with the spontaneous nCDPs indicated that the neuronal ensembles involved in the generation of these potentials were located in the dorsal horn of lumbar segments, in the same region of termination of low-threshold cutaneous afferents. During the occurrence of spontaneous nCDPs, transmission from low-threshold cutaneous afferents to second order neurones in laminae III-VI, as well as transmission along pathways mediating PAD of cutaneous and Ib afferents, was facilitated. PAD of Ia afferents was instead inhibited. Monosynaptic reflexes of flexors and extensors were facilitated during the spontaneous nCDPs. The magnitude of the facilitation was proportional to the amplitude of the ‘conditioning’ spontaneous nCDPs. This led to a high positive correlation between amplitude fluctuations of spontaneous nCDPs and fluctuations of monosynaptic reflexes. Stimulation of low-threshold cutaneous afferents transiently reduced the probability of occurrence of spontaneous nCDPs as well as the fluctuations of monosynaptic reflexes. It is concluded that the spontaneous nCDPs were produced by the activation of a population of dorsal horn neurones that shared the same functional pathways and involved the same set of neurones as those responding monosynaptically to stimulation of large cutaneous afferents. The spontaneous activity of these neurones was probably the main cause of the fluctuations of the monosynaptic reflexes observed under anaesthesia and could provide a dynamic linkage between segmental sensory and motor pathways. PMID:11101653

  18. An electron microscopic study of terminals of rapidly adapting mechanoreceptive afferent fibers in the cat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Semba, K; Masarachia, P; Malamed, S; Jacquin, M; Harris, S; Yang, G; Egger, M D

    1985-02-08

    The intra-axonal horseradish peroxidase technique was used to examine the central terminals of 7 A beta primary afferent fibers from rapidly adapting (RA) mechanoreceptors in the glabrous skin of the cat's hindpaw. At the light microscopic level, labelled collaterals were seen to bear occasional boutonlike swellings, mostly (75-82%) of the en passant type. These swellings were distributed more or less uniformly from lamina III to a dorsal part of lamina VI in the dorsal horn, over a maximum longitudinal extent of about 4 mm. At the electron microscopic level, we observed that labelled boutons of RA afferent fibers were 1.0 to 3.3 micrometers in longest sectional dimension, and contained clear, round synaptic vesicles. They frequently formed asymmetric axospinous and axodendritic synapses and commonly appeared to receive contacts from unlabelled structures containing flattened or pleomorphic vesicles plus occasional large dense-cored vesicles. The examination of synaptic connectivity over the entire surface of individual boutons indicated that RA afferent boutons each made contacts with an average of one spine and one dendrite and, in addition, appeared to be postsynaptic to an average of two unlabelled vesicle-containing structures. This synaptic organization was, in general, more complex than that we had seen previously in Pacinian corpuscle (PC) and slowly adapting (SA) type I mechanoreceptive afferent fibers. Our findings indicate that RA, SA, and PC afferent terminals, while displaying some differential synaptic organizations, have many morphological and synaptological characteristics in common. These afferent terminals, in turn, seem to be generally distinguishable from the terminals of muscle spindle Ia afferents or unmyelinated primary afferents.

  19. Low-threshold mechanoreceptive afferents in the human lingual nerve.

    PubMed

    Trulsson, M; Essick, G K

    1997-02-01

    Intrafascicular multiunit activity and impulses in single mechanoreceptive afferents were recorded from the human lingual nerve with permucosally inserted tungsten microelectrodes. Nylon filaments and blunt glass probes were used for mechanical stimulation of the mucosa of the dorsal surface of the tongue. The innervation territories of nine nerve fascicles were mapped during multiunit recordings. All fascicle fields included the tip of the tongue, suggesting a particularly high innervation density for this area. Thirty-three single mechanoreceptive afferents were isolated and studied. Of these afferents, 22 were characterized by very small mucosal receptive fields (range: 1-19.6 mm2; geometric mean: 2.4 mm2) and responded to extremely low mechanical forces (force threshold range: 0.03-2 mN; geometric mean: 0.15 mN). As such, it was concluded that these "superficial" units terminated near the surface of the tongue. The remaining 11 units responded to probing of large areas of the tongue (> 200 mm2) and exhibited high force thresholds (> or = 4 mN). It was concluded that these "deep" units terminated in the muscle mass of the tongue. Fourteen of the superficial units were classified as rapidly adapting and resembled the fast-adapting type I afferents described for the glabrous skin of the human hand. The rapidly adapting units responded both during the application and removal of, but not during maintenance of, the mechanical stimuli on the receptive field. Two types of slowly adapting responses were observed. One type (characteristic of only 2 units) was characterized by a pronounced sensitivity to force change during the application and removal of the mechanical stimuli and an irregular static discharge during maintenance of the stimulus on the receptive field. In contrast, the other six units exhibited a weak sensitivity to force change, a highly regular static discharge, and spontaneous activity. As such, these two types of slowly adapting units resembled the

  20. Patterns of primary afferent depolarization of segmental and ascending intraspinal collaterals of single joint afferents in the cat.

    PubMed

    Rudomin, P; Lomelí, J

    2007-01-01

    We have examined in the anesthetized cat the threshold changes produced by sensory and supraspinal stimuli on intraspinal collaterals of single afferents from the posterior articular nerve (PAN). Forty-eight fibers were tested in the L3 segment, in or close to Clarke's column, and 70 fibers in the L6-L7 segments within the intermediate zone. Of these, 15 pairs of L3 and L6-L7 collaterals were from the same afferent. Antidromically activated fibers had conduction velocities between 23 and 74 m/s and peripheral thresholds between 1.1 and 4.7 times the threshold of the most excitable fibers (xT), most of them below 3 xT. PAN afferents were strongly depolarized by stimulation of muscle afferents and by cutaneous afferents, as well as by stimulation of the bulbar reticular formation and the midline raphe nuclei. Stimulation of muscle nerves (posterior biceps and semitendinosus, quadriceps) produced a larger PAD (primary afferent depolarization) in the L6-L7 than in the L3 terminations. Group II were more effective than group I muscle afferents. As with group I muscle afferents, the PAD elicited in PAN afferents by stimulation of muscle nerves could be inhibited by conditioning stimulation of cutaneous afferents. Stimulation of the cutaneous sural and superficial peroneal nerves increased the threshold of few terminations (i.e., produced primary afferent hyperpolarization, PAH) and reduced the threshold of many others, particularly of those tested in the L6-L7 segments. Yet, there was a substantial number of terminals where these conditioning stimuli had minor or no effects. Autogenetic stimulation of the PAN with trains of pulses increased the intraspinal threshold in 46% and reduced the threshold in 26% of fibers tested in the L6-L7 segments (no tests were made with trains of pulses on fibers ending in L3). These observations indicate that PAN afferents have a rather small autogenetic PAD, particularly if this is compared with the effects of heterogenetic stimulation

  1. Tonic and phasic differential GABAergic inhibition of synaptic actions of joint afferents in the cat.

    PubMed

    Rudomin, P; Hernández, E; Lomelí, J

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the functional organization of the spinal neuronal networks activated by myelinated afferent fibers in the posterior articular nerve (PAN) of the anesthetized cat. Particular attention was given to the tonic and phasic GABAa inhibitory modulation of these networks. Changes in the synaptic effectiveness of the joint afferents were inferred from changes in the intraspinal focal potentials produced by electrical stimulation of the PAN. We found that conditioning stimulation of cutaneous nerves (sural, superficial peroneus and saphenous) and of the nucleus raphe magnus often inhibited, in a differential manner, the early and late components of the intraspinal focal potentials produced by stimulation of low and high threshold myelinated PAN afferents, respectively. The degree of the inhibition depended on the strength of both the conditioning and test stimuli and on the segmental level of recording. Conditioning stimulation of group I muscle afferents was less effective, but marked depression of the early and late focal potentials was produced by stimuli exceeding 5 xT. The i.v. injection of 1-2.5 mg/kg of picrotoxin, a GABAa blocker, had relatively minor effects on the early components of the PAN focal potentials, but was able to induce a significant increase of the late components. It also reduced the inhibitory effects of cutaneous and joint nerve conditioning on PAN focal responses. Conditioning autogenetic stimulation with high-frequency trains depressed the PAN focal potentials. The late components of the PAN responses remained depressed several minutes after discontinuing the conditioning train, even after picrotoxin administration. The present observations indicate that the neuronal networks activated by the low threshold PAN afferents show a relatively small post-activation depression and appear to be subjected to a minor tonic inhibitory GABAa control. In contrast, the pathways activated by stimulation of high threshold

  2. Afferent Nerve Regulation of Bladder Function in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    de Groat, William C.; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2012-01-01

    The afferent innervation of the urinary bladder consists primarily of small myelinated (Aδ) and unmyelinated (C-fiber) axons that respond to chemical and mechanical stimuli. Immunochemical studies indicate that bladder afferent neurons synthesize several putative neurotransmitters, including neuropeptides, glutamic acid, aspartic acid, and nitric oxide. The afferent neurons also express various types of receptors and ion channels, including transient receptor potential channels, purinergic, muscarinic, endothelin, neurotrophic factor, and estrogen receptors. Patch-clamp recordings in dissociated bladder afferent neurons and recordings of bladder afferent nerve activity have revealed that activation of many of these receptors enhances neuronal excitability. Afferent nerves can respond to chemicals present in urine as well as chemicals released in the bladder wall from nerves, smooth muscle, inflammatory cells, and epithelial cells lining the bladder lumen. Pathological conditions alter the chemical and electrical properties of bladder afferent pathways, leading to urinary urgency, increased voiding frequency, nocturia, urinary incontinence, and pain. Neurotrophic factors have been implicated in the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the sensitization of bladder afferent nerves. Neurotoxins such as capsaicin, resiniferatoxin, and botulinum neurotoxin that target sensory nerves are useful in treating disorders of the lower urinary tract. PMID:19655106

  3. Afferent innervation patterns of the saccule in pigeons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakir, M.; Huss, D.; Dickman, J. D.

    2003-01-01

    The innervation patterns of vestibular saccular afferents were quantitatively investigated in pigeons using biotinylated dextran amine as a neural tracer and three-dimensional computer reconstruction. Type I hair cells were found throughout a large portion of the macula, with the highest density observed in the striola. Type II hair cells were located throughout the macula, with the highest density in the extrastriola. Three classes of afferent innervation patterns were observed, including calyx, dimorph, and bouton units, with 137 afferents being anatomically reconstructed and used for quantitative comparisons. Calyx afferents were located primarily in the striola, innervated a number of type I hair cells, and had small innervation areas. Most calyx afferent terminal fields were oriented parallel to the anterior-posterior axis and the morphological polarization reversal line. Dimorph afferents were located throughout the macula, contained fewer type I hair cells in a calyceal terminal than calyx afferents and had medium sized innervation areas. Bouton afferents were restricted to the extrastriola, with multi-branching fibers and large innervation areas. Most of the dimorph and bouton afferents had innervation fields that were oriented dorso-ventrally but were parallel to the neighboring reversal line. The organizational morphology of the saccule was found to be distinctly different from that of the avian utricle or lagena otolith organs and appears to represent a receptor organ undergoing evolutionary adaptation toward sensing linear motion in terrestrial and aerial species.

  4. Piezo2 expression in corneal afferent neurons.

    PubMed

    Bron, Romke; Wood, Rhiannon J; Brock, James A; Ivanusic, Jason J

    2014-09-01

    Recently, a novel class of mechanically sensitive channels has been identified and have been called Piezo channels. In this study, we explored Piezo channel expression in sensory neurons supplying the guinea pig corneal epithelium, which have well-defined modalities in this species. We hypothesized that a proportion of corneal afferent neurons express Piezo2, and that these neurons are neurochemically distinct from corneal polymodal nociceptors or cold-sensing neurons. We used a combination of retrograde tracing to identify corneal afferent neurons and double label in situ hybridization and/or immunohistochemistry to determine their molecular and/or neurochemical profile. We found that Piezo2 expression occurs in ∼26% of trigeminal ganglion neurons and 30% of corneal afferent neurons. Piezo2 corneal afferent neurons are almost exclusively non-calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-immunoreactive (-IR), medium- to large-sized neurons that are NF200-IR, suggesting they are not corneal polymodal nociceptors. There was no coexpression of Piezo2 and transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily M member 8 (TRPM8) transcripts in any corneal afferent neurons, further suggesting that Piezo2 is not expressed in corneal cold-sensing neurons. We also noted that TRPM8-IR or CGRP-IR corneal afferent neurons are almost entirely small and lack NF200-IR. Piezo2 expression occurs in a neurochemically distinct subpopulation of corneal afferent neurons that are not polymodal nociceptors or cold-sensing neurons, and is likely confined to a subpopulation of pure mechano-nociceptors in the cornea. This provides the first evidence in an in vivo system that Piezo2 is a strong candidate for a channel that transduces noxious mechanical stimuli. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Presynaptic selection of afferent inflow in the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Rudomin, P

    1999-01-01

    The synaptic effectiveness of sensory fibers ending in the spinal cord of vertebrates can be centrally controlled by means of specific sets of GABAergic interneurons that make axo-axonic synapses with the terminal arborizations of the afferent fibers. In the steady state, the intracellular concentration of chloride ions in these terminals is higher than that predicted from a passive distribution, because of an active transport mechanism. Following the release of GABA by spinal interneurons and activation of GABA(A) receptors in the afferent terminals, there is an outwardly directed efflux of chloride ions that produces primary afferent depolarization (PAD) and reduces transmitter release (presynaptic inhibition). Studies made by intrafiber recording of PAD, or by measuring changes in the intraspinal threshold of single afferent terminals (which is reduced during PAD), have further indicated that muscle and cutaneous afferents have distinctive, but modifiable PAD patterns in response to segmental and descending stimuli. This has suggested that PAD and presynaptic inhibition in the various types of afferents is mediated by separate sets of last-order GABAergic interneurons. Direct activation, by means of intraspinal microstimulation, of single or small groups of last-order PAD-mediating interneurons shows that the monosynaptic PAD elicited in Ia and Ib afferents can remain confined to some sets of the intraspinal collaterals and not spread to nearby collaterals. The local character of PAD allows cutaneous and descending inputs to selectively inhibit the PAD of segmental and ascending intraspinal collaterals of individual muscle spindle afferents. It thus seems that the intraspinal branches of the sensory fibers are not hard wired routes that diverge excitation to spinal neurons, but are instead dynamic pathways that can be centrally controlled to address information to selected neuronal targets. This feature appears to play an important role in the selection of

  6. Using complementary DNA from MyoD-transduced fibroblasts to sequence large muscle genes.

    PubMed

    Waddell, Leigh B; Monnier, Nicole; Cooper, Sandra T; North, Kathryn N; Clarke, Nigel F

    2011-08-01

    Large muscle genes are often sequenced using complementary DNA (cDNA) made from muscle messenger RNA (mRNA) to reduce the cost and workload associated with sequencing from genomic DNA. Two potential barriers are the availability of a frozen muscle biopsy, and difficulties in detecting nonsense mutations due to nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD). We present patient examples showing that use of MyoD-transduced fibroblasts as a source of muscle-specific mRNA overcomes these potential difficulties in sequencing large muscle-related genes. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. A method for the study of the effects of combining multiple pseudorandom fusimotor stimulation on the responses of muscle-spindle primary-ending afferents.

    PubMed

    Hulliger, Manuel; Banks, Robert W

    2009-03-30

    We describe a new method of investigation of the integrative action of fusimotor inputs in mammalian muscle spindles by stimulation of multiple fusimotor axons using independent pseudorandom pulse trains, each of low mean rate with pseudorandomly distributed stimulus intervals. Technically it was feasible only because of the development of (1) a novel, highly efficient approach to functional isolation of fusimotor efferents in ventral-root filaments, which we have called the isodyne strategy; (2) a real-time, microprocessor-based stimulus artefact cancellation device (SACAD); and (3) a highly adjustable, multi-branch stimulation electrode array. The general approach of using multiple, independent, pseudorandom stimulation of several input channels has wider applications in controlled-activation paradigms.

  8. Hill-type muscle model parameters determined from experiments on single muscles show large animal-to-animal variation.

    PubMed

    Blümel, Marcus; Guschlbauer, Christoph; Daun-Gruhn, Silvia; Hooper, Scott L; Büschges, Ansgar

    2012-11-01

    Models built using mean data can represent only a very small percentage, or none, of the population being modeled, and produce different activity than any member of it. Overcoming this "averaging" pitfall requires measuring, in single individuals in single experiments, all of the system's defining characteristics. We have developed protocols that allow all the parameters in the curves used in typical Hill-type models (passive and active force-length, series elasticity, force-activation, force-velocity) to be determined from experiments on individual stick insect muscles (Blümel et al. 2012a). A requirement for means to not well represent the population is that the population shows large variation in its defining characteristics. We therefore used these protocols to measure extensor muscle defining parameters in multiple animals. Across-animal variability in these parameters can be very large, ranging from 1.3- to 17-fold. This large variation is consistent with earlier data in which extensor muscle responses to identical motor neuron driving showed large animal-to-animal variability (Hooper et al. 2006), and suggests accurate modeling of extensor muscles requires modeling individual-by-individual. These complete characterizations of individual muscles also allowed us to test for parameter correlations. Two parameter pairs significantly co-varied, suggesting that a simpler model could as well reproduce muscle response.

  9. Hill-type muscle model parameters determined from experiments on single muscles show large animal-to-animal variation

    PubMed Central

    Blümel, Marcus; Guschlbauer, Christoph; Daun-Gruhn, Silvia; Hooper, Scott L.; Büschges, Ansgar

    2012-01-01

    Models built using mean data can represent only a very small percentage, or none, of the population being modeled, and produce different activity than any member of it. Overcoming this ‘averaging’ pitfall requires measuring, in single individuals in single experiments, all of the system’s defining characteristics. We have developed protocols that allow all the parameters in the curves used in typical Hill-type models (passive and active force-length, series elasticity, force-activation, force-velocity) to be determined from experiments on individual stick insect muscles (Blümel et al. 2011a). A requirement for means to not well represent the population is that the population shows large variation in its defining characteristics. We therefore used these protocols to measure extensor muscle defining parameters in multiple animals. Across-animal variability in these parameters can be very large, ranging from 1.3 to 17-fold. This large variation is consistent with earlier data in which extensor muscle responses to identical motor neuron driving showed large animal-to-animal variability (Hooper et al. 2006), and suggests accurate modeling of extensor muscles requires modeling individual-by-individual. These complete characterizations of individual muscles also allowed us to test for parameter correlations. Two parameter pairs significantly co-varied, suggesting that a simpler model could as well reproduce muscle response. PMID:23132430

  10. Intrathecal fentanyl blockade of afferent neural feedback from skeletal muscle during exercise in heart failure patients: Influence on circulatory power and pulmonary vascular capacitance.

    PubMed

    Van Iterson, Erik H; Snyder, Eric M; Joyner, Michael J; Johnson, Bruce D; Olson, Thomas P

    2015-12-15

    Secondary pulmonary hypertension is common in heart failure (HF) patients. We hypothesized that inhibition of feedback from locomotor muscle group III/IV neurons contributes to reduced pulmonary vascular pressures independent of changes in cardiac function during exercise in HF. 9 HF patients (ages, 60 ± 2; EF, 26.7 ± 1.9%; New York Heart Association classes, I-III) and 9 age/gender matched controls (ages, 63 ± 2) completed five-minutes of constant-load cycling (65% Workloadpeak) with intrathecal fentanyl or placebo on randomized separate days. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), end-tidal partial pressure of CO2 (PETCO2), and oxygen consumption (VO2) were measured at rest and exercise. Non-invasive surrogates for cardiac power (circulatory power, CircP=VO2 × MAP), stroke volume (oxygen pulse, O2pulse=VO2/HR), and pulmonary arterial pressure (GXCAP=O2pulse × PETCO2) were calculated. At rest and end-exercise, differences between fentanyl versus placebo were not significant for CircP in HF or controls. Differences between fentanyl versus placebo for GXCAP were not significant at rest in HF or controls. At end-exercise, GXCAP was significantly higher with fentanyl versus placebo in HF (691 ± 59 versus 549 ± 38 mL/beat × mmHg), but not controls (536 ± 59 versus 474 ± 43 mL/beat × mmHg). Slopes (rest to end-exercise) for GXCAP were significantly higher with fentanyl versus placebo in HF (95.1 ± 9.8 versus 71.6 ± 6.0 mL/beat × mmHg), but not controls (74.3 ± 9.5 versus 60.8 ± 6.5 mL/beat × mmHg). CircP slopes did not differ between fentanyl versus placebo in HF or controls (p>0.05). We conclude that feedback from locomotor muscle group III/IV neurons may evoke increases in pulmonary vascular pressures independent of changes in cardiac function during exercise in HF. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Jaw-muscle fiber architecture in tufted capuchins favors generating relatively large muscle forces without compromising jaw gape.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Andrea B; Vinyard, Christopher J

    2009-12-01

    Tufted capuchins (sensu lato) are renowned for their dietary flexibility and capacity to exploit hard and tough objects. Cebus apella differs from other capuchins in displaying a suite of craniodental features that have been functionally and adaptively linked to their feeding behavior, particularly the generation and dissipation of relatively large jaw forces. We compared fiber architecture of the masseter and temporalis muscles between C. apella (n=12) and two "untufted" capuchins (C. capucinus, n=3; C. albifrons, n=5). These three species share broadly similar diets, but tufted capuchins occasionally exploit mechanically challenging tissues. We tested the hypothesis that tufted capuchins exhibit architectural properties of their jaw muscles that facilitate relatively large forces including relatively greater physiologic cross-sectional areas (PCSA), more pinnate fibers, and lower ratios of mass to tetanic tension (Mass/P(0)). Results show some evidence supporting these predictions, as C. apella has relatively greater superficial masseter and temporalis PCSAs, significantly so only for the temporalis following Bonferroni adjustment. Capuchins did not differ in pinnation angle or Mass/P(0). As an architectural trade-off between maximizing muscle force and muscle excursion/contraction velocity, we also tested the hypothesis that C. apella exhibits relatively shorter muscle fibers. Contrary to our prediction, there are no significant differences in relative fiber lengths between tufted and untufted capuchins. Therefore, we attribute the relatively greater PCSAs in tufted capuchins primarily to their larger muscle masses. These findings suggest that relatively large jaw-muscle PCSAs can be added to the suite of masticatory features that have been functionally linked to the exploitation of a more resistant diet by C. apella. By enlarging jaw-muscle mass to increase PCSA, rather than reducing fiber lengths and increasing pinnation, tufted capuchins appear to have

  12. Jaw-muscle fiber architecture in tufted capuchins favors generating relatively large muscle forces without compromising jaw gape

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Andrea B.; Vinyard, Christopher J.

    2009-01-01

    Cebus apella is renowned for its dietary flexibility and capacity to exploit hard and tough objects. Cebus apella differs from other capuchins in displaying a suite of craniodental features that have been functionally and adaptively linked to their feeding behavior, particularly the generation and dissipation of relatively large jaw forces. We compared fiber architecture of the masseter and temporalis muscles between the tufted capuchin (C. apella; n = 12 ) and two “untufted” capuchins (C. capuchinus, n = 3; C. albifrons, n = 5). These three species share broadly similar diets, but tufted capuchins occasionally exploit mechanically challenging tissues. We tested the hypothesis that C. apella exhibits architectural properties of their jaw muscles that facilitate relatively large forces, including relatively greater physiologic cross-sectional areas (PCSA), more pinnate fibers, and lower ratios of mass to tetanic tension (Mass/P0). Results show some evidence supporting these predictions, as C. apella has relatively greater superficial masseter, whole masseter, and temporalis PCSAs, significantly so only for the temporalis following Bonferroni adjustment. Capuchins did not differ in pinnation angle or Mass/P0. As an architectural trade-off between maximizing muscle force and muscle excursion/contraction velocity, we also tested the hypothesis that C. apella exhibits relatively shorter muscle fibers. Contrary to our prediction, there are no significant differences in relative fiber lengths between tufted and untufted capuchins. Therefore, we attribute the relatively greater PCSAs in C. apella primarily to their larger muscle masses. These findings suggest that relatively large jaw-muscle PCSAs can be added to the suite of masticatory features that have been functionally linked to the exploitation of a more resistant diet by C. apella. By enlarging jaw-muscle mass to increase PCSA, rather than reducing fiber lengths and increasing pinnation, tufted capuchins appear

  13. Integrative transcriptomics and proteomics analysis of longissimus dorsi muscles of Canadian double-muscled Large White pigs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuqin; Han, Wenpeng; Jiang, Shunyan; Zhao, Chunjiang; Wu, Changxin

    2016-02-10

    Canadian double-muscled Large White pigs are characterized by notable muscle mass, showing high daily gain and lean rate and good meat quality. In order to identify the major genes or proteins involved in muscle hyperplasia and hypertrophy, three pairs of full-sib pigs with extreme muscle mass difference from Canadian Large White were selected as experimental animals at 3 months age. The phenotypic differences of longissimus dorsi muscles (LD) were investigated with microarray and proteomics (2-DE, MALDI-TOF-MS), and results were verified by real-time PCR and western bolting respectively. The gene expressing profiling identified 57 and 260 and 147 differently expressed genes (DEGs) from the three pairs respectively with Bayesian statistics and significant analysis of microarrays (SAM) (p<0.05, q<0.05, fold>2). From the network of these DEGs, some major genes were displayed, such as EGF, PPARG, FN1, SERPINE1, MYC, JUN, involved in Wnt, MAPK and TGF-β signal pathway respectively, which mainly participated in cell differentiation and proliferation. In parallel, proteomics analyses revealed 50 differently expressed protein (DEP) spots with mass spectrum, and 33 spots of them were found annotated, which took part in energy metabolism and the structure and contraction of muscle fiber. In brief, our integrated study provides a good foundation for the further study on the genetic mechanism of the double muscle traits in pigs.

  14. Vagal Afferent Innervation of the Lower Esophageal Sphincter

    PubMed Central

    Powley, Terry L.; Baronowsky, Elizabeth A.; Gilbert, Jared M.; Hudson, Cherie N.; Martin, Felecia N.; Mason, Jacqueline K.; McAdams, Jennifer L.; Phillips, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    To supply a fuller morphological characterization of the vagal afferents innervating the lower esophageal sphincter (LES), specifically to label vagal terminals in the tissues forming the LES in the gastroesophageal junction, the present experiment employed injections of dextran biotin into the nodose ganglia of rats. Four types of vagal afferents innervated the LES. Clasp and sling muscle fibers were directly and prominently innervated by intramuscular arrays (IMAs). Individual IMA terminals subtended about 16° of arc of the esophageal circumference, and, collectively, the terminal fields were distributed within the muscle ring to establish a 360° annulus of mechanoreceptors in the sphincter wall. 3D morphometry of the terminals established that, compared to sling muscle IMAs, clasp muscle IMAs had more extensive arbors and larger receptive fields. In addition, at the cardia, local myenteric ganglia between smooth muscle sheets and striated muscle bundles were innervated by intraganglionic laminar endings (IGLEs), in a pattern similar to the innervation of the myenteric plexus throughout the stomach and esophagus. Finally, as previously described, the principle bundle of sling muscle fibers that links LES sphincter tissue to the antropyloric region of the lesser curvature was innervated by exceptionally long IMAs as well as by unique web ending specializations at the distal attachment of the bundle. Overall, the specialized varieties of densely distributed vagal afferents innervating the LES underscore the conclusion that these sensory projections are critically involved in generating LES reflexes and may be promising targets for managing esophageal dysfunctions. PMID:23583280

  15. [Characteristics of unitary afferent discharges of neuromuscular spindles in man].

    PubMed

    Mano, T; Takagi, S; Mitarai, G

    1976-01-01

    The primary ending of muscle spindle in man shows a dynamic and static sensitivity to stretch, but the dynamic and vibratory sensitivities as well as conduction velocity of the afferent fibres seem to be relatively low in comparison to those described in the cat.

  16. Afferents contributing to autogenic inhibition of gastrocnemius following electrical stimulation of its tendon.

    PubMed

    Khan, Serajul I; Burne, John A

    2009-07-28

    Electrical stimulation of the Achilles tendon produced strong reflex inhibition of the ongoing voluntary EMG activity in the two heads of the gastrocnemius (GA) muscle in all tested subjects. The inhibition was seen clearly in both averaged and single sweep surface EMG records. The inhibitory response was produced without electrical (M wave) or mechanical, (muscle twitch) signs of direct muscle stimulation. The onset latency and duration for the first period of inhibition (I(1)) were 47-49 ms and 67 ms, respectively. A second inhibition (I(2)) had an onset latency of 187-193 ms and duration under 40 ms. Non-noxious stimuli in the range of 2.6-7.6 x mean perceptual threshold, when delivered to four locations over the GA tendon, all produced clear inhibition of the voluntary muscle activity. The inhibition was maximal when the cathode was a large metal plate located near the musculotendinous junction and decreased approximately linearly with distances more distal to that site. The effect of passive muscle stretch on the electrically induced tendon reflex inhibition (TRE) was tested at ankle joint angles incremented in steps of 20 degrees. It was found that TRE is strongly dependent on joint angle, being maximal in the fully stretched muscle. TRE was lost completely after partial tibial nerve block. In comparison, GA inhibition produced by cutaneous (sural) nerve stimulation was of a higher threshold, longer latency and persisted after partial tibial nerve block. We thus demonstrated a powerful autogenic inhibition in the lower limb arising from tendon afferents in conscious subjects that is increased by passive muscle stretch and likely to originate from group I tendon afferents.

  17. A predictive model of muscle excitations based on muscle modularity for a large repertoire of human locomotion conditions

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Vargas, Jose; Sartori, Massimo; Dosen, Strahinja; Torricelli, Diego; Pons, Jose L.; Farina, Dario

    2015-01-01

    Humans can efficiently walk across a large variety of terrains and locomotion conditions with little or no mental effort. It has been hypothesized that the nervous system simplifies neuromuscular control by using muscle synergies, thus organizing multi-muscle activity into a small number of coordinative co-activation modules. In the present study we investigated how muscle modularity is structured across a large repertoire of locomotion conditions including five different speeds and five different ground elevations. For this we have used the non-negative matrix factorization technique in order to explain EMG experimental data with a low-dimensional set of four motor components. In this context each motor components is composed of a non-negative factor and the associated muscle weightings. Furthermore, we have investigated if the proposed descriptive analysis of muscle modularity could be translated into a predictive model that could: (1) Estimate how motor components modulate across locomotion speeds and ground elevations. This implies not only estimating the non-negative factors temporal characteristics, but also the associated muscle weighting variations. (2) Estimate how the resulting muscle excitations modulate across novel locomotion conditions and subjects. The results showed three major distinctive features of muscle modularity: (1) the number of motor components was preserved across all locomotion conditions, (2) the non-negative factors were consistent in shape and timing across all locomotion conditions, and (3) the muscle weightings were modulated as distinctive functions of locomotion speed and ground elevation. Results also showed that the developed predictive model was able to reproduce well the muscle modularity of un-modeled data, i.e., novel subjects and conditions. Muscle weightings were reconstructed with a cross-correlation factor greater than 70% and a root mean square error less than 0.10. Furthermore, the generated muscle excitations matched

  18. Contribution of vagal afferents to respiratory reflexes evoked by acute inhalation of ozone in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Schelegle, E.S.; Carl, M.L.; Coleridge, H.M.; Coleridge, J.C.; Green, J.F. )

    1993-05-01

    Acute inhalation of ozone induces vagally mediated rapid shallow breathing and bronchoconstriction. In spontaneously breathing anesthetized dogs, we attempted to determine whether afferent vagal C-fibers in the lower airways contributed to these responses. Dogs inhaled 3 ppm ozone for 40-70 min into the lower trachea while cervical vagal temperature was maintained successively at 37, 7, and 0 degrees C. At 37 degrees C, addition of ozone to the inspired air decreased tidal volume and dynamic lung compliance and increased breathing frequency, total lung resistance, and tracheal smooth muscle tension. Ozone still evoked significant effects when conduction in myelinated vagal axons was blocked selectively by cooling the nerves to 7 degrees C. Ozone-induced effects were largely abolished when nonmyelinated vagal axons were blocked by cooling to 0 degree C, breathing during ozone inhalation at 0 degree C being generally similar to that during air breathing at 0 degree C, except that minute volume and inspiratory flow were higher. We conclude that afferent vagal C-fibers in the lower airways make a major contribution to the acute respiratory effects of ozone and that nonvagal afferents contribute to the effects that survive vagal blockade.

  19. Complex impairment of IA muscle proprioceptors following traumatic or neurotoxic injury

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Jacob A.; Nardelli, Paul; Gabriel, Hanna M.; Deardorff, Adam S.; Cope, Timothy C.

    2016-01-01

    The health of primary sensory afferents supplying muscle has to be a first consideration in assessing deficits in proprioception and related motor functions. Here we discuss the role of a particular proprioceptor, the IA muscle spindle proprioceptor in causing movement disorders in response to either regeneration of a sectioned peripheral nerve or damage from neurotoxic chemotherapy. For each condition, there is a single preferred and widely repeated explanation for disability of movements associated with proprioceptive function. We present a mix of published and preliminary findings from our laboratory, largely from in vivo electrophysiological study of treated rats to demonstrate newly discovered IA afferent defects that seem likely to make important contributions to movement disorders. First, we argue that reconnection of regenerated IA afferents with inappropriate targets, although often repeated as the reason for lost stretch–reflex contraction, is not a complete explanation. We present evidence that despite successful recovery of stretch-evoked sensory signaling, peripherally regenerated IA afferents retract synapses made with motoneurons in the spinal cord. Second, we point to evidence that movement disability suffered by human subjects months after discontinuation of oxaliplatin (OX) chemotherapy for some is not accompanied by peripheral neuropathy, which is the acknowledged primary cause of disability. Our studies of OX-treated rats suggest a novel additional explanation in showing the loss of sustained repetitive firing of IA afferents during static muscle stretch. Newly extended investigation reproduces this effect in normal rats with drugs that block Na+ channels apparently involved in encoding static IA afferent firing. Overall, these findings highlight multiplicity in IA afferent deficits that must be taken into account in understanding proprioceptive disability, and that present new avenues and possible advantages for developing effective treatment

  20. Complex impairment of IA muscle proprioceptors following traumatic or neurotoxic injury.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Jacob A; Nardelli, Paul; Gabriel, Hanna M; Deardorff, Adam S; Cope, Timothy C

    2015-08-01

    The health of primary sensory afferents supplying muscle has to be a first consideration in assessing deficits in proprioception and related motor functions. Here we discuss the role of a particular proprioceptor, the IA muscle spindle proprioceptor in causing movement disorders in response to either regeneration of a sectioned peripheral nerve or damage from neurotoxic chemotherapy. For each condition, there is a single preferred and widely repeated explanation for disability of movements associated with proprioceptive function. We present a mix of published and preliminary findings from our laboratory, largely from in vivo electrophysiological study of treated rats to demonstrate newly discovered IA afferent defects that seem likely to make important contributions to movement disorders. First, we argue that reconnection of regenerated IA afferents with inappropriate targets, although often repeated as the reason for lost stretch-reflex contraction, is not a complete explanation. We present evidence that despite successful recovery of stretch-evoked sensory signaling, peripherally regenerated IA afferents retract synapses made with motoneurons in the spinal cord. Second, we point to evidence that movement disability suffered by human subjects months after discontinuation of oxaliplatin (OX) chemotherapy for some is not accompanied by peripheral neuropathy, which is the acknowledged primary cause of disability. Our studies of OX-treated rats suggest a novel additional explanation in showing the loss of sustained repetitive firing of IA afferents during static muscle stretch. Newly extended investigation reproduces this effect in normal rats with drugs that block Na(+) channels apparently involved in encoding static IA afferent firing. Overall, these findings highlight multiplicity in IA afferent deficits that must be taken into account in understanding proprioceptive disability, and that present new avenues and possible advantages for developing effective

  1. Early postnatal development of GABAergic presynaptic inhibition of Ia proprioceptive afferent connections in mouse spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Sonner, Patrick M; Ladle, David R

    2013-04-01

    Sensory feedback is critical for normal locomotion and adaptation to external perturbations during movement. Feedback provided by group Ia afferents influences motor output both directly through monosynaptic connections and indirectly through spinal interneuronal circuits. For example, the circuit responsible for reciprocal inhibition, which acts to prevent co-contraction of antagonist flexor and extensor muscles, is driven by Ia afferent feedback. Additionally, circuits mediating presynaptic inhibition can limit Ia afferent synaptic transmission onto central neuronal targets in a task-specific manner. These circuits can also be activated by stimulation of proprioceptive afferents. Rodent locomotion rapidly matures during postnatal development; therefore, we assayed the functional status of reciprocal and presynaptic inhibitory circuits of mice at birth and compared responses with observations made after 1 wk of postnatal development. Using extracellular physiological techniques from isolated and hemisected spinal cord preparations, we demonstrate that Ia afferent-evoked reciprocal inhibition is as effective at blocking antagonist motor neuron activation at birth as at 1 wk postnatally. In contrast, at birth conditioning stimulation of muscle nerve afferents failed to evoke presynaptic inhibition sufficient to block functional transmission at synapses between Ia afferents and motor neurons, even though dorsal root potentials could be evoked by stimulating the neighboring dorsal root. Presynaptic inhibition at this synapse was readily observed, however, at the end of the first postnatal week. These results indicate Ia afferent feedback from the periphery to central spinal circuits is only weakly gated at birth, which may provide enhanced sensitivity to peripheral feedback during early postnatal experiences.

  2. Requirement of neuronal connexin36 in pathways mediating presynaptic inhibition of primary afferents in functionally mature mouse spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Bautista, Wendy; Nagy, James I; Dai, Yue; McCrea, David A

    2012-01-01

    Electrical synapses formed by gap junctions containing connexin36 (Cx36) promote synchronous activity of interneurones in many regions of mammalian brain; however, there is limited information on the role of electrical synapses in spinal neuronal networks. Here we show that Cx36 is widely distributed in the spinal cord and is involved in mechanisms that govern presynaptic inhibition of primary afferent terminals. Electrophysiological recordings were made in spinal cord preparations from 8- to 11-day-old wild-type and Cx36 knockout mice. Several features associated with presynaptic inhibition evoked by conditioning stimulation of low threshold hindlimb afferents were substantially compromised in Cx36 knockout mice. Dorsal root potentials (DRPs) evoked by low intensity stimulation of sensory afferents were reduced in amplitude by 79% and in duration by 67% in Cx36 knockouts. DRPs were similarly affected in wild-types by bath application of gap junction blockers. Consistent with presynaptic inhibition of group Ia muscle spindle afferent terminals on motoneurones described in adult cats, conditioning stimulation of an adjacent dorsal root evoked a long duration inhibition of monosynaptic reflexes recorded from the ventral root in wild-type mice, and this inhibition was antagonized by bicuculline. The same conditioning stimulation failed to inhibit monosynaptic reflexes in Cx36 knockout mice. Immunofluorescence labelling for Cx36 was found throughout the dorsal and ventral horns of the spinal cord of juvenile mice and persisted in mature animals. In deep dorsal horn laminae, where interneurones involved in presynaptic inhibition of large diameter muscle afferents are located, cells were extensively dye-coupled following intracellular neurobiotin injection. Coupled cells displayed Cx36-positive puncta along their processes. Our results indicate that gap junctions formed by Cx36 in spinal cord are required for maintenance of presynaptic inhibition, including the

  3. The effects of antidromic discharges on orthodromic firing of primary afferents in the cat.

    PubMed

    Gossard, J P; Bouyer, L; Rossignol, S

    1999-04-17

    This study investigated the effects of antidromically conducted nerve impulses on the transmission of orthodromic volleys in primary afferents of the hindlimb in decerebrated paralyzed cats. Two protocols were used: (A) Single skin and muscle afferents (N=20) isolated from the distal part of cut dorsal rootlets (L7-S1) were recorded while stimulation was applied more caudally. The results showed that during the trains of three to 20 stimuli, the orthodromic firing frequency decreased or ceased, depending on the frequency of stimulation. Remarkably, subsequent to these trains, the occurrence of orthodromic spikes could be delayed for hundreds of ms (15/20 afferents) and sometimes stopped for several seconds (10/20 afferents). Longer stimulation trains, simulating antidromic bursts reported during locomotion, caused a progressive decrease, and a slow recovery of, orthodromic firing frequency (7/20 afferents), indicating a cumulative long-lasting depressing effect from successive bursts. (B) Identified stretch-sensitive muscle afferents were recorded intra-axonally and antidromic spikes were evoked by the injection of square pulses of current through the micropipette. In this case, one to three antidromic spikes were sufficient to delay the occurrence of the next orthodromic spike by more than one control inter-spike interval. If the control inter-spike interval was decreased by stretching the muscle, the delay evoked by antidromic spikes decreased proportionally. Overall, these findings suggest that antidromic activity could alter the mechanisms underlying spike generation in peripheral sensory receptors and modify the orthodromic discharges of afferents during locomotion.

  4. Specific and potassium components in the depolarization of the la afferents in the spinal cord of the cat.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, I; Rudomin, P; Solodkin, M; Vyklicky, L

    1983-08-01

    In the cat spinal cord, primary afferent depolarization (PAD) of group Ia fibers of extensor muscles is produced by high-frequency stimulation (100 Hz) of group I muscle flexor afferents without significant increases in extracellular potassium. On the other hand, the PAD produced by stimulation of mixed and pure cutaneous nerves correlates well with increases in potassium ions. We conclude that the PAD produced by group I muscle afferents results from the activation of specific pathways making axo-axonic synapses with the Ia fiber terminals. The PAD of Ia fibers resulting from activation of cutaneous nerves involves instead unspecific accumulation of potassium ions.

  5. Afferent innervation of the utricular macula in pigeons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Si, Xiaohong; Zakir, Mridha Md; Dickman, J. David

    2003-01-01

    Biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) was used to retrogradely label afferents innervating the utricular macula in adult pigeons. The pigeon utriclar macula consists of a large rectangular-shaped neuroepithelium with a dorsally curved anterior edge and an extended medioposterior tail. The macula could be demarcated into several regions based on cytoarchitectural differences. The striola occupied 30% of the macula and contained a large density of type I hair cells with fewer type II hair cells. Medial and lateral extrastriola zones were located outside the striola and contained only type II hair cells. A six- to eight-cell-wide band of type II hair cells existed near the center of the striola. The reversal line marked by the morphological polarization of hair cells coursed throughout the epithelium, near the peripheral margin, and through the center of the type II band. Calyx afferents innervated type I hair cells with calyceal terminals that contained between 2 and 15 receptor cells. Calyx afferents were located only in the striola region, exclusive of the type II band, had small total fiber innervation areas and low innervation densities. Dimorph afferents innervated both type I and type II hair cells with calyceal and bouton terminals and were primarily located in the striola region. Dimorph afferents had smaller calyceal terminals with few type I hair cells, extended fiber branches with bouton terminals and larger innervation areas. Bouton afferents innervated only type II hair cells in the extrastriola and type II band regions. Bouton afferents innervating the type II band had smaller terminal fields with fewer bouton terminals and smaller innervation areas than fibers located in the extrastriolar zones. Bouton afferents had the most bouton terminals on the longest fibers, the largest innervation areas with the highest innervation densities of all afferents. Among all afferents, smaller terminal innervation fields were observed in the striola and large fields were

  6. Afferent innervation of the utricular macula in pigeons.

    PubMed

    Si, Xiaohong; Zakir, Mridha Md; Dickman, J David

    2003-03-01

    Biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) was used to retrogradely label afferents innervating the utricular macula in adult pigeons. The pigeon utriclar macula consists of a large rectangular-shaped neuroepithelium with a dorsally curved anterior edge and an extended medioposterior tail. The macula could be demarcated into several regions based on cytoarchitectural differences. The striola occupied 30% of the macula and contained a large density of type I hair cells with fewer type II hair cells. Medial and lateral extrastriola zones were located outside the striola and contained only type II hair cells. A six- to eight-cell-wide band of type II hair cells existed near the center of the striola. The reversal line marked by the morphological polarization of hair cells coursed throughout the epithelium, near the peripheral margin, and through the center of the type II band. Calyx afferents innervated type I hair cells with calyceal terminals that contained between 2 and 15 receptor cells. Calyx afferents were located only in the striola region, exclusive of the type II band, had small total fiber innervation areas and low innervation densities. Dimorph afferents innervated both type I and type II hair cells with calyceal and bouton terminals and were primarily located in the striola region. Dimorph afferents had smaller calyceal terminals with few type I hair cells, extended fiber branches with bouton terminals and larger innervation areas. Bouton afferents innervated only type II hair cells in the extrastriola and type II band regions. Bouton afferents innervating the type II band had smaller terminal fields with fewer bouton terminals and smaller innervation areas than fibers located in the extrastriolar zones. Bouton afferents had the most bouton terminals on the longest fibers, the largest innervation areas with the highest innervation densities of all afferents. Among all afferents, smaller terminal innervation fields were observed in the striola and large fields were

  7. Afferent innervation of the utricular macula in pigeons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Si, Xiaohong; Zakir, Mridha Md; Dickman, J. David

    2003-01-01

    Biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) was used to retrogradely label afferents innervating the utricular macula in adult pigeons. The pigeon utriclar macula consists of a large rectangular-shaped neuroepithelium with a dorsally curved anterior edge and an extended medioposterior tail. The macula could be demarcated into several regions based on cytoarchitectural differences. The striola occupied 30% of the macula and contained a large density of type I hair cells with fewer type II hair cells. Medial and lateral extrastriola zones were located outside the striola and contained only type II hair cells. A six- to eight-cell-wide band of type II hair cells existed near the center of the striola. The reversal line marked by the morphological polarization of hair cells coursed throughout the epithelium, near the peripheral margin, and through the center of the type II band. Calyx afferents innervated type I hair cells with calyceal terminals that contained between 2 and 15 receptor cells. Calyx afferents were located only in the striola region, exclusive of the type II band, had small total fiber innervation areas and low innervation densities. Dimorph afferents innervated both type I and type II hair cells with calyceal and bouton terminals and were primarily located in the striola region. Dimorph afferents had smaller calyceal terminals with few type I hair cells, extended fiber branches with bouton terminals and larger innervation areas. Bouton afferents innervated only type II hair cells in the extrastriola and type II band regions. Bouton afferents innervating the type II band had smaller terminal fields with fewer bouton terminals and smaller innervation areas than fibers located in the extrastriolar zones. Bouton afferents had the most bouton terminals on the longest fibers, the largest innervation areas with the highest innervation densities of all afferents. Among all afferents, smaller terminal innervation fields were observed in the striola and large fields were

  8. Characterising skeletal muscle under large strain using eccentric and Fourier Transform-rheology.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kristy; Cheng, Shaokoon; Jugé, Lauriane; Bilston, Lynne E

    2015-11-05

    Characterising the passive anisotropic properties of soft tissues has been largely limited to the linear viscoelastic regime and shear loading is rarely done in the large deformation regime, despite the physiological significance of such properties. This paper demonstrates the use of eccentric rheology, which allows the anisotropy of skeletal muscle to be investigated. The large amplitude oscillatory strain properties of skeletal muscle were also investigated using Fourier Transform-rheology. Histology was used to qualitatively assess the microstructure changes induced by large strain. Results showed that skeletal muscle was strongly anisotropic in the linear regime. The storage and loss moduli were found to be significantly different (p<0.05) between the three fibre alignment groups; for the group tested with fibres perpendicular to plane of shear was 12.3±1.3 kPa and 3.0±0.35 kPa, parallel to shear direction was 10.6±1.2 kPa and 2.4±0.23 kPa, and perpendicular to shear direction was 5.5±0.90 kPa and 1.3±0.21 kPa. The appearance and growth of higher order harmonics at large strain was different in the three testing directions indicating that the anisotropy of muscle affects skeletal muscle behaviour in the nonlinear regime. Histological analysis showed an increasing destruction of extracellular matrix and the rearrangement of fibres with increasing strain indicating mechanical damage at strains of larger than 10%. These microstructural changes could contribute to the complex nonlinear behaviour in skeletal muscle. This paper demonstrates a method of characterising the anisotropic properties in skeletal muscle under large strain whilst giving meaningful information on the physical response of tissue at various strains.

  9. [Electrophysiological characteristics of the isolated muscle spindle in rats].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xue-Hong; Fan, Xiao-Li; Song, Xin-Ai; Shi, Lei

    2011-06-25

    The aim of this study was to observe the electrophysiological characteristics of the isolated rat muscle spindle. The muscle spindle was isolated from rat soleus and the afferent discharge of the isolated muscle spindle was recorded by air-gap technique. In the basic physiological salt solution, the spontaneous impulses of muscle spindle were at a lower level with irregular intervals. The mean frequency of afferents was (51.78 ± 25.63) impulses/1 000 s (n = 13). The muscle spindle afferents were significantly increased and maintained over time by the addition of certain amino acids during the observation. The number of the action potential recorded per 1 000 s was 200-1 000 [mean: (687.62 ± 312.56) impulses/1 000 s, n = 17]. In addition to the typical propagated action potential, a large number of abortive spikes were observed. The results indicate that the activities of isolated muscle spindles in rats can be well maintained by the addition of certain amino acids. The results initially establish and provide the possibility for further research conducted in isolated rat muscle spindles.

  10. Local control of information flow in segmental and ascending collaterals of single afferents.

    PubMed

    Lomelí, J; Quevedo, J; Linares, P; Rudomin, P

    1998-10-08

    In the vertebrate spinal cord, the activation of GABA(gamma-amino-butyric acid)-releasing interneurons that synapse with intraspinal terminals of sensory fibres leading into the central nervous system (afferent fibres) produces primary afferent depolarization and presynaptic inhibition. It is not known to what extent these presynaptic mechanisms allow a selective control of information transmitted through specific sets of intraspinal branches of individual afferents. Here we study the local nature of the presynaptic control by measuring primary afferent depolarization simultaneously in two intraspinal collaterals of the same muscle spindle afferent. One of these collaterals ends at the L6-L7 segmental level in the intermediate nucleus, and the other ascends to segment L3 within Clarke's column, the site of origin of spinocerebellar neurons. Our results indicate that there are central mechanisms that are able to affect independently the synaptic effectiveness of segmental and ascending collaterals of individual muscle spindle afferents. Focal control of presynaptic inhibition thus allows the intraspinal branches of afferent fibres to function as a dynamic assembly that can be fractionated to convey information to selected neuronal targets. This may be a mechanism by which different spinal postsynaptic targets that are coupled by sensory input from a common source could be uncoupled.

  11. Muscle activation described with a differential equation model for large ensembles of locally coupled molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Sam

    2014-10-01

    Molecular motors, by turning chemical energy into mechanical work, are responsible for active cellular processes. Often groups of these motors work together to perform their biological role. Motors in an ensemble are coupled and exhibit complex emergent behavior. Although large motor ensembles can be modeled with partial differential equations (PDEs) by assuming that molecules function independently of their neighbors, this assumption is violated when motors are coupled locally. It is therefore unclear how to describe the ensemble behavior of the locally coupled motors responsible for biological processes such as calcium-dependent skeletal muscle activation. Here we develop a theory to describe locally coupled motor ensembles and apply the theory to skeletal muscle activation. The central idea is that a muscle filament can be divided into two phases: an active and an inactive phase. Dynamic changes in the relative size of these phases are described by a set of linear ordinary differential equations (ODEs). As the dynamics of the active phase are described by PDEs, muscle activation is governed by a set of coupled ODEs and PDEs, building on previous PDE models. With comparison to Monte Carlo simulations, we demonstrate that the theory captures the behavior of locally coupled ensembles. The theory also plausibly describes and predicts muscle experiments from molecular to whole muscle scales, suggesting that a micro- to macroscale muscle model is within reach.

  12. Short-latency afferent inhibition in chronic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Aaron Z.; Mi, Yiqun P.; Nelson, Aimee J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Short-latency afferent inhibition (SAI) results when somatosensory afferent input inhibits the corticospinal output from primary motor cortex (M1). The present study examined SAI in the flexor carpi radialis (FCR) muscle in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) and uninjured controls. Methods Short-latency afferent inhibition (SAI) was evoked by stimulating the median nerve at the elbow at intervals of 15, 20 and 25 ms in advance of a transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) pulse over M1. SAI was tested with the FCR at rest and also during ~20% of maximum voluntary contraction. Corticospinal output was assessed through measuring both motor thresholds and motor evoked potential (MEP) recruitment curves. The afferent volley was assessed via the N20–P25 amplitude of the somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) and the amplitude of sensory nerve action potentials (SNAP) recorded over the median nerve at the elbow. Results SAI is reduced in SCI in both the contracted and non-contracted FCR muscle. MEP recruitment curves and thresholds were decreased in SCI only in the active state and not the resting state. N20–P25 amplitude was similar between groups in both the resting and active states although SNAP was significantly reduced in SCI at rest. Conclusions We conclude that reduced SAI in SCI is likely attributed to neuroplasticity altering the intrinsic M1 circuitry mediating SAI and/or reduced afferent input traversing a direct thalamocortical route to M1. These data provide a new avenue of research aimed at identifying therapeutic approaches to alter SAI to improve upper limb function in individuals with SCI. PMID:28123808

  13. Permanent reorganization of Ia afferent synapses on motoneurons after peripheral nerve injuries

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Francisco J.; Bullinger, Katie L.; Titus, Haley E.; Nardelli, Paul; Cope, Timothy C.

    2010-01-01

    After peripheral nerve injuries to a motor nerve the axons of motoneurons and proprioceptors are disconnected from the periphery and monosynaptic connections from group I afferents and motoneurons become diminished in the spinal cord. Following successful reinnervation in the periphery, motor strength, proprioceptive sensory encoding, and Ia afferent synaptic transmission on motoneurons partially recover. Muscle stretch reflexes, however, never recover and motor behaviors remain uncoordinated. In this review, we summarize recent findings that suggest that lingering motor dysfunction might be in part related to decreased connectivity of Ia afferents centrally. First, sensory afferent synapses retract from lamina IX causing a permanent relocation of the inputs to more distal locations and significant disconnection from motoneurons. Second, peripheral reconnection between proprioceptive afferents and muscle spindles is imperfect. As a result, a proportion of sensory afferents that retain central connections with motoneurons might not reconnect appropriately in the periphery. A hypothetical model is proposed in which the combined effect of peripheral and central reconnection deficits might explain the failure of muscle stretch to initiate or modulate firing of many homonymous motoneurons. PMID:20536938

  14. Influences of neck afferents on sympathetic and respiratory nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Bolton, P S; Kerman, I A; Woodring, S F; Yates, B J

    1998-11-15

    It is well established that the vestibular system influences the sympathetic nervous system and the respiratory system; presumably, vestibulosympathetic and vestibulorespiratory responses participate in maintaining stable blood pressure and blood oxygenation during movement and changes in posture. Many brainstem neurons that generate vestibulospinal reflexes integrate signals from the labyrinth and neck muscles to distinguish between head movements on a stable body and whole body movements. In the present study, responses were recorded from the splanchnic (sympathetic), hypoglossal (inspiratory) and abdominal (expiratory) nerves during stimulation of the C2 dorsal root ganglion or C2 or C3 nerve branches innervating dorsal neck muscles. Stimulation of neck afferents using low current intensities, in many cases less than twice the threshold for producing an afferent volley recordable from the cord dorsum, elicited changes in sympathetic and respiratory nerve activity. These data suggest that head rotation on a stable body would elicit both cervical and vestibular inputs to respiratory motoneurons and sympathetic preganglionic neurons. The effects of cervical afferent stimulation on abdominal, splanchnic and hypoglossal nerve activity were not abolished by transection of the brainstem caudal to the vestibular nuclei; thus, pathways in addition to those involving the vestibular nuclei are involved in relaying cervical inputs to sympathetic preganglionic neurons and respiratory motoneurons. Transection of the C1-3 dorsal roots enhanced responses of the splanchnic and abdominal nerves to pitch head rotations on a fixed body but diminished responses of the hypoglossal nerve. Thus, neck and vestibular afferent influences on activity of respiratory pump muscles and sympathetic outflow appear to be antagonistic, so that responses will occur during whole body movements but not head movements on a stationary trunk. In contrast, neck and vestibular influences on tongue

  15. Peripheral innervation patterns of vestibular nerve afferents in the bullfrog utriculus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, Richard A.; Schuff, N. R.

    1994-01-01

    Vestibular nerve afferents innervating the bullfrog utriculus differ in their response dynamics and sensitivity to natural stimulation. They also supply hair cells that differ markedly in hair bundle morphology. To examine the peripheral innervation patterns of individual utricular afferents more closely, afferent fibers were labeled by the extracellular injection of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) into the vestibular nerve after sectioning the vestibular nerve medial to Scarpa's ganglion to allow the degeneration of sympathetic and efferent fibers. The peripheral arborizations of individual afferents were then correlated with the diameters of their parent axons, the regions of the macula they innervate, and the number and type of hair cells they supply. The utriculus is divided by the striola, a narrow zone of distinctive morphology, into media and lateral parts. Utiricular afferents were classified as striolar or extrastriolar according to the epithelial entrance of their parent axons and the location of their terminal fields. In general, striolar afferents had thicker parent axons, fewer subepithelial bifurcations, larger terminal fields, and more synaptic endings than afferents in extrstriolar regions. Afferents in a juxtastriolar zone, immediately adjacent to the medial striola, had innervation patterns transitional between those in the striola and more peripheral parts of the medial extrastriola. moast afferents innervated only a single macular zone. The terminal fields of striolar afferents, with the notable exception of a few afferents with thin parent axons, were generally confined to one side of the striola. Hair cells in the bullfrog utriculus have perviously been classified into four types based on hair bundle morphology. Afferents in the extrastriolar and juxtastriolar zones largely or exclusively innervated Type B hair cells, the predominant hair cell type in the utricular macula. Striolar afferents supplied a mixture of four hair cell types, but largely

  16. Large Muscle Development: Arizona HSST/CDA Competency Based Training Module #26.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Cheryl

    The purpose of this Child Development Associate (CDA) training module is to help the CDA intern learn to assess the child's level of large muscle development and provide appropriate activities to foster motor coordination. Objectives are stipulated, activities for achieving each objective are suggested, and an assessment checklist is provided. A…

  17. Outcomes after muscle flap vs prosthetic patch repair for large congenital diaphragmatic hernias.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Ahmed; Struijs, Marie-Chantal; Ein, Sigmund H; Langer, Jacob C; Chiu, Priscilla P L

    2010-01-01

    Repair of large congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) defects still pose a significant challenge, as the defects cannot be repaired primarily. Two techniques have been widely used: autologous anterior abdominal wall muscle flap and prosthetic patch. The latter has been used more often. Our goal was to compare the short-term and long-term outcomes of these 2 approaches. This is a retrospective review of all neonates undergoing CDH repair at our institution from 1969 to 2006. Of 188 children undergoing surgery for CDH, primary repair could not be accomplished in 51 infants (27%). Nineteen had muscle flap repair, and 32 had prosthetic patch repair (Gore-Tex [W.L. Gore and Associates, Flagstaff, AZ], n = 15; Marlex [Bard Inc, Cranston, NJ], n = 9; Surgisis [Cook, Bloomington, IN], n = 5; SILASTIC [Dow Corning, Midland, MI], n = 3). There was no significant difference in gestational age or birth weight between groups. Three patients developed an abdominal wall defect at the muscle flap donor site, but none required surgical intervention. Chest wall deformities were found in 9 patients, 3 after a muscle flap and 6 after a prosthetic patch (P = .7). Postoperative bowel obstruction occurred in 3 muscle flap patients and 1 patch patient (P = .2). There were 10 recurrences among survivors: 2 after a muscle flap and 8 after a prosthetic patch (P = .3) There were 2 deaths among the muscle flap patients (10%), and 3 deaths among the prosthetic patch repair patients (9%) (P = .1). Results were confirmed after controlling for age and comorbidities between both groups in a multivariate logistic regression. These results suggest that autologous anterior abdominal wall muscle flap and prosthetic patch repairs provide similar short-term and long-term outcomes. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Nonabsorbable versus absorbable sutures in large, hang-back medial rectus muscle recessions.

    PubMed

    Awadein, Ahmed; Marsh, Justin D; Guyton, David L

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the value of nonabsorbable sutures in reducing the incidence of consecutive exotropia after large, "hang-back" medial rectus recessions. The medical records of patients who underwent medial rectus recession of ≥6.5 mm in individuals ≤2 years of age, or ≥7.0 mm in those >2 years were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were divided into two groups based on suture material used: absorbable, polyglactin 910 sutures (44 patients); nonabsorbable, polyester sutures (50 patients). Preoperative measurements, ductions, strabismus surgery, and postoperative results were analyzed. Inadequate anchoring of the medial rectus muscle was suspected when consecutive exotropia developed 4-7 weeks after surgery after initial satisfactory alignment and was confirmed if during reoperation the medial rectus muscle appeared recessed >2 mm beyond the originally intended recession. Consecutive exotropia due to inadequate anchoring of the medial rectus muscle occurred in 11 of 66 muscles (17%) in the absorbable suture group. The muscle was found 6-10 mm posterior to the intended recession. Limited duction in the field of action of the involved medial rectus muscle occurred in 9 of the 11 muscles (82%). None of the eyes with nonabsorbable sutures showed inadequate anchoring. The incidence of consecutive exotropia was higher in the absorbable suture group (30%) than in the nonabsorbable suture group (6%) (P < 0.005). Using nonabsorbable suture for large, hang-back medial rectus recessions greatly reduces the incidence of consecutive exotropia that can occur when absorbable suture dissolves. Copyright © 2016 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Electrophysiological property and chemical sensitivity of primary afferent neurons that innervate rat whisker hair follicles

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Ryo

    2016-01-01

    Whisker hair follicles are sensory organs that sense touch and perform tactile discrimination in animals, and they are sites where sensory impulses are initiated when whisker hairs touch an object. The sensory signals are then conveyed by whisker afferent fibers to the brain for sensory perception. Electrophysiological property and chemical sensitivity of whisker afferent fibers, important factors affecting whisker sensory processing, are largely not known. In the present study, we performed patch-clamp recordings from pre-identified whisker afferent neurons in whole-mount trigeminal ganglion preparations and characterized their electrophysiological property and sensitivity to ATP, serotonin and glutamate. Of 97 whisker afferent neurons examined, 67% of them are found to be large-sized (diameter ≥45 µm) cells and 33% of them are medium- to small-sized (diameter <45 µm) cells. Almost every large-sized whisker afferent neuron fires a single action potential but many (40%) small/medium-sized whisker afferent neurons fire multiple action potentials in response to prolonged stepwise depolarization. Other electrophysiological properties including resting membrane potential, action potential threshold, and membrane input resistance are also significantly different between large-sized and small/medium-sized whisker afferent neurons. Most large-sized and many small/medium-sized whisker afferent neurons are sensitive to ATP and/or serotonin, and ATP and/or serotonin could evoke strong inward currents in these cells. In contrast, few whisker afferent neurons are sensitive to glutamate. Our results raise a possibility that ATP and/or serotonin may be chemical messengers involving sensory signaling for different types of rat whisker afferent fibers. PMID:27927797

  20. An engineered muscle flap for reconstruction of large soft tissue defects

    PubMed Central

    Shandalov, Yulia; Egozi, Dana; Koffler, Jacob; Dado-Rosenfeld, Dekel; Ben-Shimol, David; Freiman, Alina; Shor, Erez; Kabala, Aviva; Levenberg, Shulamit

    2014-01-01

    Large soft tissue defects involve significant tissue loss, requiring surgical reconstruction. Autologous flaps are occasionally scant, demand prolonged transfer surgery, and induce donor site morbidity. The present work set out to fabricate an engineered muscle flap bearing its own functional vascular pedicle for repair of a large soft tissue defect in mice. Full-thickness abdominal wall defect was reconstructed using this engineered vascular muscle flap. A 3D engineered tissue constructed of a porous, biodegradable polymer scaffold embedded with endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and/or myoblasts was cultured in vitro and then implanted around the femoral artery and veins before being transferred, as an axial flap, with its vascular pedicle to reconstruct a full-thickness abdominal wall defect in the same mouse. Within 1 wk of implantation, scaffolds showed extensive functional vascular density and perfusion and anastomosis with host vessels. At 1 wk posttransfer, the engineered muscle flaps were highly vascularized, were well-integrated within the surrounding tissue, and featured sufficient mechanical strength to support the abdominal viscera. Thus, the described engineered muscle flap, equipped with an autologous vascular pedicle, constitutes an effective tool for reconstruction of large defects, thereby circumventing the need for both harvesting autologous flaps and postoperative scarification. PMID:24711414

  1. An engineered muscle flap for reconstruction of large soft tissue defects.

    PubMed

    Shandalov, Yulia; Egozi, Dana; Koffler, Jacob; Dado-Rosenfeld, Dekel; Ben-Shimol, David; Freiman, Alina; Shor, Erez; Kabala, Aviva; Levenberg, Shulamit

    2014-04-22

    Large soft tissue defects involve significant tissue loss, requiring surgical reconstruction. Autologous flaps are occasionally scant, demand prolonged transfer surgery, and induce donor site morbidity. The present work set out to fabricate an engineered muscle flap bearing its own functional vascular pedicle for repair of a large soft tissue defect in mice. Full-thickness abdominal wall defect was reconstructed using this engineered vascular muscle flap. A 3D engineered tissue constructed of a porous, biodegradable polymer scaffold embedded with endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and/or myoblasts was cultured in vitro and then implanted around the femoral artery and veins before being transferred, as an axial flap, with its vascular pedicle to reconstruct a full-thickness abdominal wall defect in the same mouse. Within 1 wk of implantation, scaffolds showed extensive functional vascular density and perfusion and anastomosis with host vessels. At 1 wk posttransfer, the engineered muscle flaps were highly vascularized, were well-integrated within the surrounding tissue, and featured sufficient mechanical strength to support the abdominal viscera. Thus, the described engineered muscle flap, equipped with an autologous vascular pedicle, constitutes an effective tool for reconstruction of large defects, thereby circumventing the need for both harvesting autologous flaps and postoperative scarification.

  2. Age-Related Changes in Vagal Afferents Innervating the Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Robert J.; Walter, Gary C.; Powley, Terry L.

    2009-01-01

    Recent progress in understanding visceral afferents, some of it reviewed in the present issue, serves to underscore how little is known about the aging of the visceral afferents in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. In spite of the clinical importance of the issue--with age, GI function often becomes severely compromised--only a few initial observations on age-related structural changes of visceral afferents are available. Primary afferent cell bodies in both the nodose ganglia and dorsal root ganglia lose Nissl material and accumulate lipofucsin, inclusions, aggregates, and tangles. Additionally, in changes that we focus on in the present review, vagal visceral afferent terminals in both the muscle wall and the mucosa of the GI tract exhibit age-related structural changes. In aged animals, both of the vagal terminal types examined, namely intraganglionic laminar endings and villus afferents, exhibit dystrophic or regressive morphological changes. These neuropathies are associated with age-related changes in the structural integrity of the target organs of the affected afferents, suggesting that local changes in trophic environment may give rise to the aging of GI innervation. Given the clinical relevance of GI tract aging, a more complete understanding both of how aging alters the innervation of the gut and of how such changes might be mitigated should be made research priorities. PMID:19665435

  3. The free diffusion of macromolecules in tissue-engineered skeletal muscle subjected to large compression strains.

    PubMed

    Gefen, Amit; Cornelissen, Lisette H; Gawlitta, Debby; Bader, Dan L; Oomens, Cees W J

    2008-01-01

    Pressure-related deep tissue injury (DTI) represents a severe pressure ulcer, which initiates in compressed muscle tissue overlying a bony prominence and progresses to more superficial tissues until penetrating the skin. Individual subjects with impaired motor and/or sensory capacities are at high risk of developing DTI. Impaired diffusion of critical metabolites in compressed muscle tissue may contribute to DTI, and impaired diffusion of tissue damage biomarkers may further impose a problem in developing early detection blood tests. We hypothesize that compression of muscle tissue between a bony prominence and a supporting surface locally influences the diffusion capacity of muscle. The objective of this study was therefore, to determine the effects of large compression strains on free diffusion in a tissue-engineered skeletal muscle model. Diffusion was measured with a range of fluorescently labeled dextran molecules (10, 20, 150kDa) whose sizes were representative of both hormones and damage biomarkers. We used fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) to compare diffusion coefficients (D) of the different dextrans between the uncompressed and compressed (48-60% strain) states. In a separate experiment, we simulated the effects of local partial muscle ischemia in vivo, by reducing the temperature of compressed specimens from 37 to 34 degrees C. Compared to the D in the uncompressed model system, values in the compressed state were significantly reduced by 47+/-22% (p<0.02). A 3 degrees C temperature decrease further reduced D in the compressed specimens by 10+/-6% (p<0.05). In vivo, the effects of large strains and ischemia are likely to be summative, and hence, the present findings suggest an important role of impaired diffusion in the etiology of DTI, and should also be considered when developing biochemical screening methods for early detection of DTI.

  4. Allodynia mediated by C-tactile afferents in human hairy skin

    PubMed Central

    Nagi, Saad S; Rubin, Troy K; Chelvanayagam, David K; Macefield, Vaughan G; Mahns, David A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract We recently showed a contribution of low-threshold cutaneous mechanoreceptors to vibration-evoked changes in the perception of muscle pain. Neutral-touch stimulation (vibration) of the hairy skin during underlying muscle pain evoked an overall increase in pain intensity, i.e. allodynia. This effect appeared to be dependent upon cutaneous afferents, as allodynia was abolished by intradermal anaesthesia. However, it remains unclear whether allodynia results from activation of a single class of cutaneous afferents or the convergence of inputs from multiple classes. Intriguingly, no existing human study has examined the contribution of C-tactile (CT) afferents to allodynia. Detailed psychophysical observations were made in 29 healthy subjects (18 males and 11 females). Sustained muscle pain was induced by infusing hypertonic saline (HS: 5%) into tibialis anterior muscle (TA). Sinusoidal vibration (200 Hz–200 μm) was applied to the hairy skin overlying TA. Pain ratings were recorded using a visual analogue scale (VAS). In order to evaluate the role of myelinated and unmyelinated cutaneous afferents in the expression of vibration-evoked allodynia, compression block of the sciatic nerve, and low-dose intradermal anaesthesia (Xylocaine 0.25%) were used, respectively. In addition, the modulation of muscle pain by gentle brushing (1.0 and 3.0 cm s−1) – known to excite CT fibres – was examined. Brushing stimuli were applied to the hairy skin with all fibres intact and following the blockade of myelinated afferents. During tonic muscle pain (VAS 4–6), vibration evoked a significant and reproducible increase in muscle pain (allodynia) that persisted following compression of myelinated afferents. During compression block, the sense of vibration was abolished, but the vibration-evoked allodynia persisted. In contrast, selective anaesthesia of unmyelinated cutaneous afferents abolished the allodynia, whereas the percept of vibration remained unaffected

  5. Input-output functions of vestibular afferent responses to air-conducted clicks in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hong; Tang, Xuehui; Wei, Wei; Maklad, Adel; Mustain, William; Rabbitt, Richard; Highstein, Steve; Allison, Jerome; Zhou, Wu

    2014-02-01

    Sound-evoked vestibular myogenic potentials recorded from the sternocleidomastoid muscles (the cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potential or cVEMP) and the extraocular muscles (the ocular VEMP or oVEMP) have proven useful in clinical assessment of vestibular function. VEMPs are commonly interpreted as a test of saccular function, based on neurophysiological evidence showing activation of saccular afferents by intense acoustic click stimuli. However, recent neurophysiological studies suggest that the clicks used in clinical VEMP tests activate vestibular end organs other than the saccule. To provide the neural basis for interpreting clinical VEMP testing results, the present study examined the extent to which air-conducted clicks differentially activate the various vestibular end organs at several intensities and durations in Sprague-Dawley rats. Single unit recordings were made from 562 vestibular afferents that innervated the otoliths [inferior branch otolith (IO) and superior branch otolith (SO)], the anterior canal (AC), the horizontal canal (HC), and the posterior canal (PC). Clicks higher than 60 dB SL (re-auditory brainstem response threshold) activated both semicircular canal and otolith organ afferents. Clicks at or below 60 dB SL, however, activated only otolith organ afferents. Longer duration clicks evoked larger responses in AC, HC, and SO afferents, but not in IO afferents. Intra-axonal recording and labeling confirmed that sound sensitive vestibular afferents innervated the horizontal and anterior canal cristae as well as the saccular and utricular maculae. Interestingly, all sound sensitive afferents are calyx-bearing fibers. These results demonstrate stimulus-dependent acoustic activation of both semicircular canals and otolith organs, and suggest that sound activation of vestibular end organs other than the saccule should not be ruled out when designing and interpreting clinical VEMP tests.

  6. Reconstruction of a large upper arm defect with muscle sparing latissimus dorsi.

    PubMed

    Cadenelli, Pierfrancesco; Bordoni, Daniele; Ornelli, Matteo; Radaelli, Stefano

    2016-08-23

    Reconstruction of large soft tissue defects in the upper arm represents a challenge for the reconstructive surgeon. The latissimus dorsi flap is widely used and preferred for this latter type of reconstruction due to its reliability and versatility, although sacrificing the entire muscle can lead to higher incidences of postoperative seroma and functional disability. The recent introduction of the perforator-based flap concept has led to an evolution in upper extremity reconstruction by significantly reducing donor-site morbidity and simultaneously ensuring optimal soft tissues coverage. We report a case of a large soft tissue defect of the posterolateral part of the upper arm, consequent to a sarcoma resection, in which a muscle-sparing latissimus dorsi technique was used to obtain total soft tissue coverage. A 2-year follow-up showed a satisfactory functional result and no evidence of recurrence.

  7. Reconstruction of Large Perineal and Pelvic Wounds Using Gracilis Muscle Flaps.

    PubMed

    Chong, Tae W; Balch, Glen C; Kehoe, Siobhan M; Margulis, Vitaly; Saint-Cyr, Michel

    2015-10-01

    The reconstruction of large defects after abdominoperineal resections and pelvic exenterations has traditionally been accomplished with vertical rectus myocutaneous flaps (VRAMs). For patients requiring two ostomies, robot-assisted abdominoperineal resections (APRs), and to avoid the morbidity of a VRAM harvest, the authors have used the gracilis muscle flap to reconstruct the large dead space in these patients. A retrospective analysis of 16 consecutive APRs (10 with concomitant pelvic exenterations) reconstructed with gracilis flaps during a 2-year period was performed. Gracilis muscle flaps were used to obliterate the dead space after primary skin closure was ensured with adduction of the legs. All 16 patients had locally advanced cancers and had received neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiation. Of these 16 patients, 10 had pelvic exenterations. All the patients had reconstruction with gracilis flaps (6 bilateral flaps). One major wound complication in the perineum occurred as a result of an anastomotic leak in the pelvis, but this was managed with conservative dressing changes. Three patients had skin separation in the perineum greater than 5 mm with intact subcutaneous closure. No patients required operative debridement or revision of their perineal reconstruction. No perineal hernias or gross dehiscence of the skin closure occurred. Large pelvic and perineal reconstructions can be safely accomplished with gracilis muscle flaps and should be considered as an alternative to abdominal-based flaps.

  8. Differential activation of sympathetic discharge to skin and skeletal muscle in humans.

    PubMed

    Vissing, S F

    1997-01-01

    emanates from the rostral brain. The other is that a contraction induced reflex arises in chemically and mechanically sensitive muscle afferents. Although animal studies have provided experimental support for both theories, studies in humans with direct recordings of muscle sympathetic nerve activity have only provided convincing evidence for the muscle afferent theory. The present experiments are the first in humans to provide direct evidence in support of the "central motor command" theory. In addition, these experiments demonstrated a highly dissociated pattern of sympathetic activation to skin and skeletal muscle. Thus, during static handgrip exercise sympathetic outflow to skin of the resting limb showed an initial burst of activity preceding the onset of tension development. This was followed by an increase in sympathetic activity that continued throughout the exercise period. Sympathetic outflow to resting muscle showed a slow pattern of response with a latent period between the onset of exercise and the onset of sympathetic activation. Stimulation of central command during neuromuscular blockade evoked large increases in skin sympathetic discharge with only minor increases in muscle sympathetic discharge. During stimulation of metaboreceptor afferents with post-handgrip muscle ischaemia, muscle sympathetic nerve activity was maintained while skin sympathetic nerve activity showed an immediate return to pre-exercise levels. These data provide evidence that during moderate levels of static exercise sympathetic activation of skin is predominantly influenced by central motor command. In contrast, sympathetic activation of muscle is to a large extent driven by feedback from metaboreceptor afferents in the working muscle.

  9. Large-Dose Epinephrine Reduces Skeletal Muscle Blood Flow Under General Anesthesia in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Terakawa, Yui; Ichinohe, Tatsuya

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the effect of an epinephrine continuous infusion on muscle blood flow in rabbits. Sixteen male Japan White rabbits were randomly allocated to 1 of 2 groups: epinephrine continuous infusion at 0.01 μg/kg/min (Ep-0.01 group, n = 8) and at 0.1 μg/kg/ min (Ep-0.1 group, n = 8). The observed variables were heart rate, femoral artery blood pressure, common carotid artery blood flow (CCBF), masseter muscle blood flow (MBF), and quadriceps muscle blood flow (QBF). In the Ep-0.01 group, CCBF, MBF, and QBF were increased by 14, 22, and 21% from respective control values. In contrast, in the Ep-0.1 group, CCBF, MBF and QBF were decreased by 10, 30, and 27% from respective control values. There were no differences in the percentage change between MBF and QBF during epinephrine continuous infusion. Positive correlations were observed between CCBF and MBF and between CCBF and QBF. In conclusion, skeletal muscle blood flow was increased during the small-dose epinephrine infusion, whereas it was decreased during large-dose infusion. PMID:23050751

  10. Molecular characterization and expression patterns of emerin (EMD) gene in skeletal muscle between Meishan and Large White pigs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Xiao, Xia; Wang, Linjie

    2016-03-15

    The emerin protein is a nuclear membrane protein and has important functions in muscle development, regeneration, and cell signal transduction. However, knowledge regarding emerin in the domestic animal is limited. In this study, we cloned and characterized the pig emerin (EMD) gene. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that the EMD gene was expressed at the highest level in the heart and fat at 120d. However, the fetal skeletal muscles displayed a greater abundance of EMD mRNA than that in skeletal muscles at postnatal development stages. In addition, the expression level of EMD at 60 day was significantly higher (p<0.05) in Meishan than Large White pigs. Pig EMD protein displayed the sarcolemma and perinuclear distribution in skeletal muscle sections, and there was no distribution change of EMD in skeletal muscle sections between Large White and Meishan pigs. These studies provide useful information for further research on the functions of pig EMD gene in skeletal muscle.

  11. Gastric vagal afferent modulation by leptin is influenced by food intake status

    PubMed Central

    Kentish, Stephen J; O'Donnell, Tracey A; Isaacs, Nicole J; Young, Richard L; Li, Hui; Harrington, Andrea M; Brierley, Stuart M; Wittert, Gary A; Blackshaw, L Ashley; Page, Amanda J

    2013-01-01

    Energy intake is strongly influenced by vagal afferent signals from the stomach, and is also modulated by leptin. Leptin may be secreted from gastric epithelial cells, so we aimed to determine the direct effect of leptin on gastric vagal afferents under different feeding conditions. Female C57BL/6 mice were fed standard laboratory diet, high-fat diet or were food restricted. The expression of leptin receptor (Lep-R) and its signal transduction molecules in vagal afferents was determined by retrograde tracing and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, and the relationship between leptin-immunopositive cells and gastric vagal afferent endings determined by anterograde tracing and leptin immunohistochemistry. An in vitro preparation was used to determine the functional effects of leptin on gastric vagal afferents and the second messenger pathways involved. Leptin potentiated vagal mucosal afferent responses to tactile stimuli, and epithelial cells expressing leptin were found close to vagal mucosal endings. After fasting or diet-induced obesity, potentiation of mucosal afferents by leptin was lost and Lep-R expression reduced in the cell bodies of gastric mucosal afferents. These effects in diet-induced obese mice were accompanied by a reduction in anatomical vagal innervation of the gastric mucosa. In striking contrast, after fasting or diet-induced obesity, leptin actually inhibited responses to distension in tension receptors. The inhibitory effect on gastric tension receptors was mediated through phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent activation of large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels. The excitatory effect of leptin on gastric mucosal vagal afferents was mediated by phospholipase C-dependent activation of canonical transient receptor potential channels. These data suggest the effect of leptin on gastric vagal afferent excitability is dynamic and related to the feeding state. Paradoxically, in obesity, leptin may reduce responses to

  12. Large-scale Models Reveal the Two-component Mechanics of Striated Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Jarosch, Robert

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive explanation of striated muscle mechanics and contraction on the basis of filament rotations. Helical proteins, particularly the coiled-coils of tropomyosin, myosin and α-actinin, shorten their H-bonds cooperatively and produce torque and filament rotations when the Coulombic net-charge repulsion of their highly charged side-chains is diminished by interaction with ions. The classical “two-component model” of active muscle differentiated a “contractile component” which stretches the “series elastic component” during force production. The contractile components are the helically shaped thin filaments of muscle that shorten the sarcomeres by clockwise drilling into the myosin cross-bridges with torque decrease (= force-deficit). Muscle stretch means drawing out the thin filament helices off the cross-bridges under passive counterclockwise rotation with torque increase (= stretch activation). Since each thin filament is anchored by four elastic α-actinin Z-filaments (provided with force-regulating sites for Ca2+ binding), the thin filament rotations change the torsional twist of the four Z-filaments as the “series elastic components”. Large scale models simulate the changes of structure and force in the Z-band by the different Z-filament twisting stages A, B, C, D, E, F and G. Stage D corresponds to the isometric state. The basic phenomena of muscle physiology, i. e. latency relaxation, Fenn-effect, the force-velocity relation, the length-tension relation, unexplained energy, shortening heat, the Huxley-Simmons phases, etc. are explained and interpreted with the help of the model experiments. PMID:19330099

  13. Neck afferent involvement in cardiovascular control during movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolton, P. S.; Ray, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    It is well established that labyrinth and neck afferent information contributes to the regulation of somatomotor function during movement and changes in posture. There is also convincing evidence that the vestibular system participates in the modulation of sympathetic outflow and cardiovascular function during changes in posture, presumably to prevent orthostatic hypotension. However, the labyrinth organs do not provide any signals concerning body movements with respect to the head. In contrast, the neck receptors, particularly muscle spindles, are well located and suited to provide information about changes in body position with respect to the head and vestibular signals. Studies in the cat suggest that neck afferent information may modulate the vestibulosympathetic reflex responses to head-neck movements. There is some evidence in the cat to suggest involvement of low threshold mechanoreceptors. However, human studies do not indicate that low threshold mechanoreceptors in the neck modulate cardiovascular responses. The human studies are consistent with the studies in the cat in that they demonstrate the importance of otolith activation in mediating cardiovascular and sympathetic responses to changes in posture. This paper briefly reviews the current experimental evidence concerning the involvement of neck afferent information in the modulation of cardiovascular control during movement and changes in posture.

  14. Neck afferent involvement in cardiovascular control during movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolton, P. S.; Ray, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    It is well established that labyrinth and neck afferent information contributes to the regulation of somatomotor function during movement and changes in posture. There is also convincing evidence that the vestibular system participates in the modulation of sympathetic outflow and cardiovascular function during changes in posture, presumably to prevent orthostatic hypotension. However, the labyrinth organs do not provide any signals concerning body movements with respect to the head. In contrast, the neck receptors, particularly muscle spindles, are well located and suited to provide information about changes in body position with respect to the head and vestibular signals. Studies in the cat suggest that neck afferent information may modulate the vestibulosympathetic reflex responses to head-neck movements. There is some evidence in the cat to suggest involvement of low threshold mechanoreceptors. However, human studies do not indicate that low threshold mechanoreceptors in the neck modulate cardiovascular responses. The human studies are consistent with the studies in the cat in that they demonstrate the importance of otolith activation in mediating cardiovascular and sympathetic responses to changes in posture. This paper briefly reviews the current experimental evidence concerning the involvement of neck afferent information in the modulation of cardiovascular control during movement and changes in posture.

  15. Comparative Analyses between Skeletal Muscle miRNAomes from Large White and Min Pigs Revealed MicroRNAs Associated with Postnatal Muscle Hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Xihui; Wang, Ligang; Ni, Hemin; Wang, Lixian; Qi, Xiaolong; Xing, Shuhan; Guo, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanism regulated by microRNAs (miRNAs) that underlies postnatal hypertrophy of skeletal muscle is complex and remains unclear. Here, the miRNAomes of longissimus dorsi muscle collected at five postnatal stages (60, 120, 150, 180, and 210 days after birth) from Large White (commercial breed) and Min pigs (indigenous breed of China) were analyzed by Illumina sequencing. We identified 734 miRNAs comprising 308 annotated miRNAs and 426 novel miRNAs, of which 307 could be considered pig-specific. Comparative analysis between two breeds suggested that 60 and 120 days after birth were important stages for skeletal muscle hypertrophy and intramuscular fat accumulation. A total of 263 miRNAs were significantly differentially expressed between two breeds at one or more developmental stages. In addition, the differentially expressed miRNAs between every two adjacent developmental stages in each breed were determined. Notably, ssc-miR-204 was significantly more highly expressed in Min pig skeletal muscle at all postnatal stages compared with its expression in Large White pig skeletal muscle. Based on gene ontology and KEGG pathway analyses of its predicted target genes, we concluded that ssc-miR-204 may exert an impact on postnatal hypertrophy of skeletal muscle by regulating myoblast proliferation. The results of this study will help in elucidating the mechanism underlying postnatal hypertrophy of skeletal muscle modulated by miRNAs, which could provide valuable information for improvement of pork quality and human myopathy.

  16. Hair cell tufts and afferent innervation of the bullfrog crista ampullaris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Steven F.; Lewis, Edwin R.

    1990-01-01

    Within the bullfrog semicircular canal crista, hair cell tuft types were defined and mapped with the aid of scanning electron microscopy. Dye-filled planar afferent axons had mean distal axonal diameters of 1.6-4.9 microns, highly branched arbors, and contacted 11-24 hair cells. Dye-filled isthmus afferent axons had mean distal axonal diameters of 1.8-7.9 microns, with either small or large field arbors contacting 4-9 or 25-31 hair cells. The estimated mean number of contacts per innervated hair cell was 2.2 for planar and 1.3 for isthmus afferent neurons. Data on evoked afferent responses were available only for isthmus units that were observed to respond to our microrotational stimuli. Of 21 such afferent neurons, eight were successfully dye-filled. Within this sample, high-gain units had large field arbors and lower-gain units had small field arbors. The sensitivity of each afferent neuron was analyzed in terms of noise equivalent input (NEI), the stimulus amplitude for which the afferent response amplitude is just equivalent to the rms deviation of the instantaneous spike rate. NEI for isthmus units varied from 0.63 to 8.2 deg/s; the mean was 3.2 deg/s.

  17. Optimization of Large Gel 2D Electrophoresis for Proteomic Studies of Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Patrick W.; Densmore, Allison; Bloch, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    We describe improved methods for large format, 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) that improve protein solubility and recovery, minimize proteolysis, and reduce the loss of resolution due to contaminants and manipulations of the gels, and thus enhance quantitative analysis of protein spots. Key modifications are: (i) the use of 7M urea + 2 M thiourea, instead of 9M urea, in sample preparation and in the tops of the gel tubes; (ii) standardized deionization of all solutions containing urea with a mixed bed ion exchange resin and removal of urea from the electrode solutions; and (iii) use of a new gel tank and cooling device that eliminate the need to run two separating gels in the SDS dimension. These changes make 2D-GE analysis more reproducible and sensitive, with minimal artifacts. Application of this method to the soluble fraction of muscle tissues reliably resolves ~1800 protein spots in adult human skeletal muscle and over 2800 spots in myotubes. PMID:22589104

  18. Optimization of large gel 2D electrophoresis for proteomic studies of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Reed, Patrick W; Densmore, Allison; Bloch, Robert J

    2012-04-01

    We describe improved methods for large format, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) that improve protein solubility and recovery, minimize proteolysis, and reduce the loss of resolution due to contaminants and manipulations of the gels, and thus enhance quantitative analysis of protein spots. Key modifications are: (i) the use of 7 M urea and 2 M thiourea, instead of 9 M urea, in sample preparation and in the tops of the gel tubes; (ii) standardized deionization of all solutions containing urea with a mixed bed ion exchange resin and removal of urea from the electrode solutions; and (iii) use of a new gel tank and cooling device that eliminate the need to run two separating gels in the SDS dimension. These changes make 2DE analysis more reproducible and sensitive, with minimal artifacts. Application of this method to the soluble fraction of muscle tissues reliably resolves ~1800 protein spots in adult human skeletal muscle and over 2800 spots in myotubes.

  19. Hemispheric asymmetry and somatotopy of afferent inhibition in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Helmich, R C G; Bäumer, T; Siebner, H R; Bloem, B R; Münchau, A

    2005-11-01

    A conditioning electrical stimulus to a digital nerve can inhibit the motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) in adjacent hand muscles elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to the contralateral primary motor cortex (M1) when given 25-50 ms before the TMS pulse. This is referred to as short-latency afferent inhibition (SAI). We studied inter-hemispheric differences (Experiment 1) and within-limb somatotopy (Experiment 2) of SAI in healthy right-handers. In Experiment 1, conditioning electrical pulses were applied to the right or left index finger (D2) and MEPs were recorded from relaxed first dorsal interosseus (FDI) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscles ipsilateral to the conditioning stimulus. We found that SAI was more pronounced in right hand muscles. In Experiment 2, electrical stimulation was applied to the right D2 and MEPs were recorded from ipsilateral FDI, extensor digitorum communis (EDC) and biceps brachii (BB) muscles. The amount of SAI did not differ between FDI, EDC and BB muscles. These data demonstrate inter-hemispheric differences in the processing of cutaneous input from the hand, with stronger SAI in the dominant left hemisphere. We also found that SAI occurred not only in hand muscles adjacent to electrical digital stimulation, but also in distant hand and forearm and also proximal arm muscles. This suggests that SAI induced by electrical D2 stimulation is not focal and somatotopically specific, but a more widespread inhibitory phenomenon.

  20. Effect of afferent feedback and central motor commands on soleus H-reflex suppression during arm cycling.

    PubMed

    Hundza, S R; de Ruiter, Geoff C; Klimstra, M; Zehr, E Paul

    2012-12-01

    Suppression of soleus H-reflex amplitude in stationary legs is seen during rhythmic arm cycling. We examined the influence of various arm-cycling parameters on this interlimb reflex modulation to determine the origin of the effect. We previously showed the suppression to be graded with the frequency of arm cycling but not largely influenced by changes in peripheral input associated with crank length. Here, we more explicitly explored the contribution of afferent feedback related to arm movement on the soleus H-reflex suppression. We explored the influence of load and rate of muscle stretch by manipulating crank-load and arm-muscle vibration during arm cycling. Furthermore, internally driven ("Active") and externally driven ("Passive") arm cycling was compared. Soleus H-reflexes were evoked with tibial nerve stimulation during stationary control and rhythmic arm-cycling conditions, including: 1) six different loads; 2) with and without vibration to arm muscles; and 3) Active and Passive conditions. No significant differences were seen in the level of suppression between the different crank loads or between conditions with and without arm-muscle vibration. Furthermore, in contrast to the clear effect seen during active cycling, passive arm cycling did not significantly suppress the soleus H-reflex amplitude. Current results, in conjunction with previous findings, suggest that the afferent feedback examined in these studies is not the primary source responsible for soleus H-reflex suppression. Instead, it appears that central motor commands (supraspinal or spinal in origin) associated with frequency of arm cycling are relatively more dominant sources.

  1. Modelling spinal circuitry involved in locomotor pattern generation: insights from the effects of afferent stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Rybak, Ilya A; Stecina, Katinka; Shevtsova, Natalia A; McCrea, David A

    2006-01-01

    A computational model of the mammalian spinal cord circuitry incorporating a two-level central pattern generator (CPG) with separate half-centre rhythm generator (RG) and pattern formation (PF) networks has been developed from observations obtained during fictive locomotion in decerebrate cats. Sensory afferents have been incorporated in the model to study the effects of afferent stimulation on locomotor phase switching and step cycle period and on the firing patterns of flexor and extensor motoneurones. Here we show that this CPG structure can be integrated with reflex circuits to reproduce the reorganization of group I reflex pathways occurring during locomotion. During the extensor phase of fictive locomotion, activation of extensor muscle group I afferents increases extensor motoneurone activity and prolongs the extensor phase. This extensor phase prolongation may occur with or without a resetting of the locomotor cycle, which (according to the model) depends on the degree to which sensory input affects the RG and PF circuits, respectively. The same stimulation delivered during flexion produces a temporary resetting to extension without changing the timing of following locomotor cycles. The model reproduces this behaviour by suggesting that this sensory input influences the PF network without affecting the RG. The model also suggests that the different effects of flexor muscle nerve afferent stimulation observed experimentally (phase prolongation versus resetting) result from opposing influences of flexor group I and II afferents on the PF and RG circuits controlling the activity of flexor and extensor motoneurones. The results of modelling provide insights into proprioceptive control of locomotion. PMID:17008375

  2. Susceptibility to Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage: a Cluster Analysis with a Large Sample.

    PubMed

    Damas, F; Nosaka, K; Libardi, C A; Chen, T C; Ugrinowitsch, C

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the responses of indirect markers of exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) among a large number of young men (N=286) stratified in clusters based on the largest decrease in maximal voluntary contraction torque (MVC) after an unaccustomed maximal eccentric exercise bout of the elbow flexors. Changes in MVC, muscle soreness (SOR), creatine kinase (CK) activity, range of motion (ROM) and upper-arm circumference (CIR) before and for several days after exercise were compared between 3 clusters established based on MVC decrease (low, moderate, and high responders; LR, MR and HR). Participants were allocated to LR (n=61), MR (n=152) and HR (n=73) clusters, which depicted significantly different cluster centers of 82%, 61% and 42% of baseline MVC, respectively. Once stratified by MVC decrease, all muscle damage markers were significantly different between clusters following the same pattern: small changes for LR, larger changes for MR, and the largest changes for HR. Stratification of individuals based on the magnitude of MVC decrease post-exercise greatly increases the precision in estimating changes in EIMD by proxy markers such as SOR, CK activity, ROM and CIR. This indicates that the most commonly used markers are valid and MVC orchestrates their responses, consolidating the role of MVC as the best EIMD indirect marker.

  3. Reconstruction of large head and neck deformities: experience with free gracilis muscle and myocutaneous flaps.

    PubMed

    Del Frari, Barbara; Schoeller, Thomas; Wechselberger, Gottfried

    2010-01-01

    Microvascular free flaps continue to revolutionize coverage options in head and neck reconstruction. The authors describe their experience with the gracilis free flap and the myocutaneous gracilis free flap with reconstruction of head and neck defects. Eleven patients underwent 12 free tissue transfer to the head and neck region. The reconstruction was performed with the transverse myocutaneous gracilis (TMG) flap (n = 7) and the gracilis muscle flap with skin graft (n = 5). The average patient age was 63.4 years (range, 17-82 years). The indications for this procedure were tumor and haemangioma resections. The average patient follow-up was 20.7 months (range, 1 month-5.7 years). Total flap survival was 100%. There were no partial flap losses. Primary wound healing occurred in all cases. Recipient site morbidities included one hematoma. In our experience for reconstruction of moderate volume and surface area defects, muscle flaps with skin graft provide a better color match and skin texture relative to myocutaneous or fasciocutaneous flaps. The gracilis muscle free flap is not widely used for head and neck reconstruction but has the potential to give good results. As a filling substance for large cavities, the transverse myocutaneus gracilis flap has many advantages including reliable vascular anatomy, relatively great plasticity and a concealed donor area.

  4. Tonic muscle pain does not increase fusimotor drive to human leg muscles: implications for chronic muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Fazalbhoy, Azharuddin; Macefield, Vaughan G; Birznieks, Ingvars

    2013-06-01

    Experimental pain induced in animals has shown that noxious stimulation of group III and IV afferents increases the firing of muscle spindles via a reflex excitation of fusimotor (γ) motoneurones. Chronic muscle pain has been hypothesized to develop as a result of a vicious cycle involving this mechanism. In order to explore the effects of long-lasting muscle pain on the fusimotor system, single unit muscle spindle afferents were recorded from 15 subjects. Afferent activity was recorded from foot and ankle extensor muscles whilst infusing hypertonic saline into the tibialis anterior muscle of the ipsilateral leg, producing moderate-strong pain lasting for ∼60 min. A change in fusimotor drive was inferred by observing changes in the mean discharge rate of spontaneously active muscle spindle afferents. Homonymous and heteronymous muscles remained relaxed and showed no increase in activity, arguing against any fusimotor-driven increase in motor activity, and there was no net change in the firing of muscle spindle afferents. We conclude that long-lasting stimulation of group III and IV afferents fails to excite fusimotor neurones and increase muscle spindle discharge. Accordingly, the vicious cycle theory has no functional basis for the development of myalgia in human subjects.

  5. The torque-velocity relationship in large human muscles: maximum voluntary versus electrically stimulated behaviour.

    PubMed

    Pain, Matthew T G; Young, Fraser; Kim, Jinwoo; Forrester, Stephanie E

    2013-02-22

    The in vivo maximum voluntary torque-velocity profile for large muscle groups differs from the in vitro tetanic profile with lower than expected eccentric torques. Using sub-maximal transcutaneous electrical stimulation has given torque-velocity profiles with an eccentric torque plateau ∼1.4 times the isometric value. This is closer to, but still less than, the in vitro tetanic profiles with plateaus between 1.5 and 1.9 times isometric. This study investigated the maximum voluntary and sub-maximum transcutaneous electrical stimulated torque-angle-angular velocity profiles for the knee extensors and flexors in a group of healthy males. Fifteen male subjects performed maximum voluntary and sub-maximum electrically stimulated (∼40% for extensors and ∼20% for flexors) eccentric and concentric knee extension and flexions on an isovelocity dynamometer at velocities ranging from ±50°s(-1) to ±400°s(-1). The ratio of peak eccentric to peak isometric torque (T(ecc)/T(0)) was compared between the maximum voluntary and electrically stimulated conditions for both extensors and flexors, and between muscle groups. Under maximum voluntary conditions the peak torque ratio, T(ecc)/T(0), remained close to 1 (0.9-1.2) while for the electrically stimulated conditions it was significantly higher (1.4-1.7; p<0.001) and within the range of tetanic values reported from in vitro studies. In all but one case there was no significant difference in ratios between the extensors and flexors. The results showed that even the largest muscle groups have an intrinsic T(ecc)/T(0) comparable with in vitro muscle tests, and it can be ascertained from appropriate in vivo testing.

  6. Differential action of (-)-baclofen on the primary afferent depolarization produced by segmental and descending inputs.

    PubMed

    Quevedo, J; Eguibar, J R; Jiménez, I; Rudomin, P

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the present series of experiments was to analyze, in anesthetized and paralyzed cats, the effects of (-)-baclofen and picrotoxin on the primary afferent depolarization (PAD) generated in single Ib afferent fibers by either intraspinal microstimulation or stimulation of the segmental and descending pathways. PAD was estimated by recording dorsal root potentials and by measuring the changes in the intraspinal activation threshold of single Ib muscle afferent fibers. The PAD elicited by stimulation of group I muscle or cutaneous afferents was readily depressed and often abolished 20-40 min after the intravenous injection of 1-2 mg/kg (-)-baclofen. In contrast, the same amounts of (-)-baclofen produced a relatively small depression of the PAD elicited by stimulation of the brainstem reticular formation (RF). The monosynaptic PAD produced in single Ib fibers by intraspinal microstimulation within the intermediate nucleus was depressed and sometimes abolished following the i.v. injections of 1-2 mg/kg (-)-baclofen. Twenty to forty minutes after the i.v. injection of picrotoxin (0.5-1 mg/kg), there was a strong depression of the PAD elicited by stimulation of muscle and cutaneous afferents as well as of the PAD produced by stimulation of the RF and the PAD produced by intraspinal microstimulation. The results obtained suggest that, in addition to its action on primary afferents, (-)-baclofen may depress impulse activity and/or transmitter release in a population of last-order GABAergic interneurons that mediate the PAD of Ib fibers. The existence of GABAb autoreceptors in last-order interneurons mediating the PAD may function as a self-limiting mechanism controlling the synaptic efficacy of these interneurons.

  7. Serotonin, Dopamine and Noradrenaline Adjust Actions of Myelinated Afferents via Modulation of Presynaptic Inhibition in the Mouse Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    García-Ramírez, David L.; Calvo, Jorge R.; Hochman, Shawn; Quevedo, Jorge N.

    2014-01-01

    Gain control of primary afferent neurotransmission at their intraspinal terminals occurs by several mechanisms including primary afferent depolarization (PAD). PAD produces presynaptic inhibition via a reduction in transmitter release. While it is known that descending monoaminergic pathways complexly regulate sensory processing, the extent these actions include modulation of afferent-evoked PAD remains uncertain. We investigated the effects of serotonin (5HT), dopamine (DA) and noradrenaline (NA) on afferent transmission and PAD. Responses were evoked by stimulation of myelinated hindlimb cutaneous and muscle afferents in the isolated neonatal mouse spinal cord. Monosynaptic responses were examined in the deep dorsal horn either as population excitatory synaptic responses (recorded as extracellular field potentials; EFPs) or intracellular excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). The magnitude of PAD generated intraspinally was estimated from electrotonically back-propagating dorsal root potentials (DRPs) recorded on lumbar dorsal roots. 5HT depressed the DRP by 76%. Monosynaptic actions were similarly depressed by 5HT (EFPs 54%; EPSCs 75%) but with a slower time course. This suggests that depression of monosynaptic EFPs and DRPs occurs by independent mechanisms. DA and NA had similar depressant actions on DRPs but weaker effects on EFPs. IC50 values for DRP depression were 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0 µM for 5HT, DA and NA, respectively. Depression of DRPs by monoamines was nearly-identical in both muscle and cutaneous afferent-evoked responses, supporting a global modulation of the multimodal afferents stimulated. 5HT, DA and NA produced no change in the compound antidromic potentials evoked by intraspinal microstimulation indicating that depression of the DRP is unrelated to direct changes in the excitability of intraspinal afferent fibers, but due to metabotropic receptor activation. In summary, both myelinated afferent-evoked DRPs and monosynaptic transmission in the

  8. Serotonin, dopamine and noradrenaline adjust actions of myelinated afferents via modulation of presynaptic inhibition in the mouse spinal cord.

    PubMed

    García-Ramírez, David L; Calvo, Jorge R; Hochman, Shawn; Quevedo, Jorge N

    2014-01-01

    Gain control of primary afferent neurotransmission at their intraspinal terminals occurs by several mechanisms including primary afferent depolarization (PAD). PAD produces presynaptic inhibition via a reduction in transmitter release. While it is known that descending monoaminergic pathways complexly regulate sensory processing, the extent these actions include modulation of afferent-evoked PAD remains uncertain. We investigated the effects of serotonin (5HT), dopamine (DA) and noradrenaline (NA) on afferent transmission and PAD. Responses were evoked by stimulation of myelinated hindlimb cutaneous and muscle afferents in the isolated neonatal mouse spinal cord. Monosynaptic responses were examined in the deep dorsal horn either as population excitatory synaptic responses (recorded as extracellular field potentials; EFPs) or intracellular excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). The magnitude of PAD generated intraspinally was estimated from electrotonically back-propagating dorsal root potentials (DRPs) recorded on lumbar dorsal roots. 5HT depressed the DRP by 76%. Monosynaptic actions were similarly depressed by 5HT (EFPs 54%; EPSCs 75%) but with a slower time course. This suggests that depression of monosynaptic EFPs and DRPs occurs by independent mechanisms. DA and NA had similar depressant actions on DRPs but weaker effects on EFPs. IC50 values for DRP depression were 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0 µM for 5HT, DA and NA, respectively. Depression of DRPs by monoamines was nearly-identical in both muscle and cutaneous afferent-evoked responses, supporting a global modulation of the multimodal afferents stimulated. 5HT, DA and NA produced no change in the compound antidromic potentials evoked by intraspinal microstimulation indicating that depression of the DRP is unrelated to direct changes in the excitability of intraspinal afferent fibers, but due to metabotropic receptor activation. In summary, both myelinated afferent-evoked DRPs and monosynaptic transmission in the

  9. Different types of spinal afferent nerve endings in stomach and esophagus identified by anterograde tracing from dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Nick J; Kyloh, Melinda; Beckett, Elizabeth A; Brookes, Simon; Hibberd, Tim

    2016-10-15

    In visceral organs of mammals, most noxious (painful) stimuli as well as innocuous stimuli are detected by spinal afferent neurons, whose cell bodies lie in dorsal root ganglia (DRGs). One of the major unresolved questions is the location, morphology, and neurochemistry of the nerve endings of spinal afferents that actually detect these stimuli in the viscera. In the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract, there have been many anterograde tracing studies of vagal afferent endings, but none on spinal afferent endings. Recently, we developed a technique that now provides selective labeling of only spinal afferents. We used this approach to identify spinal afferent nerve endings in the upper GI tract of mice. Animals were anesthetized, and injections of dextran-amine were made into thoracic DRGs (T8-T12). Seven days post surgery, mice were euthanized, and the stomach and esophagus were removed, fixed, and stained for calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Spinal afferent axons were identified that ramified extensively through many rows of myenteric ganglia and formed nerve endings in discrete anatomical layers. Most commonly, intraganglionic varicose endings (IGVEs) were identified in myenteric ganglia of the stomach and varicose simple-type endings in the circular muscle and mucosa. Less commonly, nerve endings were identified in internodal strands, blood vessels, submucosal ganglia, and longitudinal muscle. In the esophagus, only IGVEs were identified in myenteric ganglia. No intraganglionic lamellar endings (IGLEs) were identified in the stomach or esophagus. We present the first identification of spinal afferent endings in the upper GI tract. Eight distinct types of spinal afferent endings were identified in the stomach, and most of them were CGRP immunoreactive. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:3064-3083, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. A novel method of selective ablation of afferent renal nerves by periaxonal application of capsaicin

    PubMed Central

    Foss, Jason D.; Wainford, Richard D.; Engeland, William C.; Fink, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    Renal denervation has been shown to lower arterial pressure in some hypertensive patients, yet it remains unclear whether this is due to ablation of afferent or efferent renal nerves. To investigate the role of afferent renal nerves in arterial pressure regulation, previous studies have used methods that disrupt both renal and nonrenal afferent signaling. The present study was conducted to develop and validate a technique for selective ablation of afferent renal nerves that does not disrupt other afferent pathways. To do this, we adapted a technique for sensory denervation of the adrenal gland by topical application of capsaicin and tested the hypothesis that exposure of the renal nerves to capsaicin (renal-CAP) causes ablation of afferent but not efferent renal nerves. Renal-CAP had no effect on renal content of the efferent nerve markers tyrosine hydroxylase and norepinephrine; however, the afferent nerve marker, calcitonin gene-related peptide was largely depleted from the kidney 10 days after intervention, but returned to roughly half of control levels by 7 wk postintervention. Moreover, renal-CAP abolished the cardiovascular responses to acute pharmacological stimulation of afferent renal nerves. Renal-CAP rats showed normal weight gain, as well as cardiovascular and fluid balance regulation during dietary sodium loading. To some extent, renal-CAP did blunt the bradycardic response and increase the dipsogenic response to increased salt intake. Lastly, renal-CAP significantly attenuated the development of deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt hypertension. These results demonstrate that renal-CAP effectively causes selective ablation of afferent renal nerves in rats. PMID:25411365

  11. A novel method of selective ablation of afferent renal nerves by periaxonal application of capsaicin.

    PubMed

    Foss, Jason D; Wainford, Richard D; Engeland, William C; Fink, Gregory D; Osborn, John W

    2015-01-15

    Renal denervation has been shown to lower arterial pressure in some hypertensive patients, yet it remains unclear whether this is due to ablation of afferent or efferent renal nerves. To investigate the role of afferent renal nerves in arterial pressure regulation, previous studies have used methods that disrupt both renal and nonrenal afferent signaling. The present study was conducted to develop and validate a technique for selective ablation of afferent renal nerves that does not disrupt other afferent pathways. To do this, we adapted a technique for sensory denervation of the adrenal gland by topical application of capsaicin and tested the hypothesis that exposure of the renal nerves to capsaicin (renal-CAP) causes ablation of afferent but not efferent renal nerves. Renal-CAP had no effect on renal content of the efferent nerve markers tyrosine hydroxylase and norepinephrine; however, the afferent nerve marker, calcitonin gene-related peptide was largely depleted from the kidney 10 days after intervention, but returned to roughly half of control levels by 7 wk postintervention. Moreover, renal-CAP abolished the cardiovascular responses to acute pharmacological stimulation of afferent renal nerves. Renal-CAP rats showed normal weight gain, as well as cardiovascular and fluid balance regulation during dietary sodium loading. To some extent, renal-CAP did blunt the bradycardic response and increase the dipsogenic response to increased salt intake. Lastly, renal-CAP significantly attenuated the development of deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt hypertension. These results demonstrate that renal-CAP effectively causes selective ablation of afferent renal nerves in rats.

  12. C-tactile afferent stimulating touch carries a positive affective value

    PubMed Central

    Pawling, Ralph; Cannon, Peter R.; McGlone, Francis P.; Walker, Susannah C.

    2017-01-01

    The rewarding sensation of touch in affiliative interactions is hypothesized to be underpinned by a specialized system of nerve fibers called C-Tactile afferents (CTs), which respond optimally to slowly moving, gentle touch, typical of a caress. However, empirical evidence to support the theory that CTs encode socially relevant, rewarding tactile information in humans is currently limited. While in healthy participants, touch applied at CT optimal velocities (1-10cm/sec) is reliably rated as subjectively pleasant, neuronopathy patients lacking large myelinated afferents, but with intact C-fibres, report that the conscious sensation elicited by stimulation of CTs is rather vague. Given this weak perceptual impact the value of self-report measures for assessing the specific affective value of CT activating touch appears limited. Therefore, we combined subjective ratings of touch pleasantness with implicit measures of affective state (facial electromyography) and autonomic arousal (heart rate) to determine whether CT activation carries a positive affective value. We recorded the activity of two key emotion-relevant facial muscle sites (zygomaticus major—smile muscle, positive affect & corrugator supercilii—frown muscle, negative affect) while participants evaluated the pleasantness of experimenter administered stroking touch, delivered using a soft brush, at two velocities (CT optimal 3cm/sec & CT non-optimal 30cm/sec), on two skin sites (CT innervated forearm & non-CT innervated palm). On both sites, 3cm/sec stroking touch was rated as more pleasant and produced greater heart rate deceleration than 30cm/sec stimulation. However, neither self-report ratings nor heart rate responses discriminated stimulation on the CT innervated arm from stroking of the non-CT innervated palm. In contrast, significantly greater activation of the zygomaticus major (smiling muscle) was seen specifically to CT optimal, 3cm/sec, stroking on the forearm in comparison to all other

  13. C-tactile afferent stimulating touch carries a positive affective value.

    PubMed

    Pawling, Ralph; Cannon, Peter R; McGlone, Francis P; Walker, Susannah C

    2017-01-01

    The rewarding sensation of touch in affiliative interactions is hypothesized to be underpinned by a specialized system of nerve fibers called C-Tactile afferents (CTs), which respond optimally to slowly moving, gentle touch, typical of a caress. However, empirical evidence to support the theory that CTs encode socially relevant, rewarding tactile information in humans is currently limited. While in healthy participants, touch applied at CT optimal velocities (1-10cm/sec) is reliably rated as subjectively pleasant, neuronopathy patients lacking large myelinated afferents, but with intact C-fibres, report that the conscious sensation elicited by stimulation of CTs is rather vague. Given this weak perceptual impact the value of self-report measures for assessing the specific affective value of CT activating touch appears limited. Therefore, we combined subjective ratings of touch pleasantness with implicit measures of affective state (facial electromyography) and autonomic arousal (heart rate) to determine whether CT activation carries a positive affective value. We recorded the activity of two key emotion-relevant facial muscle sites (zygomaticus major-smile muscle, positive affect & corrugator supercilii-frown muscle, negative affect) while participants evaluated the pleasantness of experimenter administered stroking touch, delivered using a soft brush, at two velocities (CT optimal 3cm/sec & CT non-optimal 30cm/sec), on two skin sites (CT innervated forearm & non-CT innervated palm). On both sites, 3cm/sec stroking touch was rated as more pleasant and produced greater heart rate deceleration than 30cm/sec stimulation. However, neither self-report ratings nor heart rate responses discriminated stimulation on the CT innervated arm from stroking of the non-CT innervated palm. In contrast, significantly greater activation of the zygomaticus major (smiling muscle) was seen specifically to CT optimal, 3cm/sec, stroking on the forearm in comparison to all other stimuli

  14. Central distribution of nociceptive intradental afferent nerve fibers in the rat.

    PubMed

    Bombardi, C; Chiocchetti, R; Brunetti, O; Grandis, A; Lucchi, M L; Bortolami, R

    2006-08-01

    The central distribution of intradental afferent nerve fibers was investigated by combining electron microscopic observations with a selective method for inducing degeneration of the A delta- and C-type afferent fibers. Degenerating terminals were found on the proprioceptive mesencephalic trigeminal neurons and on dendrites in the neuropil of the trigeminal motor nucleus after application of capsaicin to the rat's lower incisor tooth pulp. The results give anatomical evidence of new sites of central projection of intradental A delta- and C-type fibers whereby the nociceptive information from the tooth pulp can affect jaw muscle activity.

  15. Compensatory hypertrophy of the teres minor muscle after large rotator cuff tear model in adult male rat.

    PubMed

    Ichinose, Tsuyoshi; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Shitara, Hitoshi; Shimoyama, Daisuke; Iizuka, Haku; Koibuchi, Noriyuki; Takagishi, Kenji

    2016-02-01

    Rotator cuff tear (RCT) is a common musculoskeletal disorder in the elderly. The large RCT is often irreparable due to the retraction and degeneration of the rotator cuff muscle. The integrity of the teres minor (TM) muscle is thought to affect postoperative functional recovery in some surgical treatments. Hypertrophy of the TM is found in some patients with large RCTs; however, the process underlying this hypertrophy is still unclear. The objective of this study was to determine if compensatory hypertrophy of the TM muscle occurs in a large RCT rat model. Twelve Wistar rats underwent transection of the suprascapular nerve and the supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons in the left shoulder. The rats were euthanized 4 weeks after the surgery, and the cuff muscles were collected and weighed. The cross-sectional area and the involvement of Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling were examined in the remaining TM muscle. The weight and cross-sectional area of the TM muscle was higher in the operated-on side than in the control side. The phosphorylated Akt/Akt protein ratio was not significantly different between these sides. The phosphorylated-mTOR/mTOR protein ratio was significantly higher on the operated-on side. Transection of the suprascapular nerve and the supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons activates mTOR signaling in the TM muscle, which results in muscle hypertrophy. The Akt-signaling pathway may not be involved in this process. Nevertheless, activation of mTOR signaling in the TM muscle after RCT may be an effective therapeutic target of a large RCT. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Fatty acid profiles of muscle from large yellow croaker (Pseudosciaena crocea R.) of different age

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hong-gang; Chen, Li-hong; Xiao, Chao-geng; Wu, Tian-xing

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the fatty acid profiles of muscle from large yellow croaker (Pseudosciaena crocea R.) of different age. One- and two-year-old fish were cultured in floating net cages and sampled randomly for analysis. Moisture, protein, lipid and ash contents were determined by methods of Association of Analytical Chemist (AOAC) International. Fatty acid profile was determined by gas chromatography. Crude protein, fat, moisture and ash contents showed no significant differences between the two age groups. The contents of total polyunsaturated fatty acids and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) were significantly higher and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) content was significantly lower in the two-year-old large yellow croaker than in the one-year-old (P<0.05). No significant differences were observed in the contents of total saturated fatty acids and monounsaturated fatty acids, or the ratio of n-3/n-6 fatty acids among the large yellow croakers of the two age groups. We conclude that large yellow croakers are good food sources of EPA and DHA. PMID:19235275

  17. Muscle spindle responses to horizontal support surface perturbation in the anesthetized cat: insights into the role of autogenic feedback in whole body postural control

    PubMed Central

    Nardelli, Paul; Cope, Timothy C.; Nichols, T. Richard

    2012-01-01

    Intact cats and humans respond to support surface perturbations with broadly tuned, directionally sensitive muscle activation. These muscle responses are further sensitive to initial stance widths (distance between feet) and perturbation velocity. The sensory origins driving these responses are not known, and conflicting hypotheses are prevalent in the literature. We hypothesize that the direction-, stance-width-, and velocity-sensitive muscle response during support surface perturbations is driven largely by rapid autogenic proprioceptive pathways. The primary objective of this study was to obtain direct evidence for our hypothesis by establishing that muscle spindle receptors in the intact limb can provide appropriate information to drive the muscle response to whole body postural perturbations. Our second objective was to determine if spindle recordings from the intact limb generate the heightened sensitivity to small perturbations that has been reported in isolated muscle experiments. Maintenance of this heightened sensitivity would indicate that muscle spindles are highly proficient at detecting even small disturbances, suggesting they can provide efficient feedback about changing postural conditions. We performed intraaxonal recordings from muscle spindles in anesthetized cats during horizontal, hindlimb perturbations. We indeed found that muscle spindle afferents in the intact limb generate broadly tuned but directionally sensitive activation patterns. These afferents were also sensitive to initial stance widths and perturbation velocities. Finally, we found that afferents in the intact limb have heightened sensitivity to small perturbations. We conclude that muscle spindle afferents provide an array of important information about biomechanics and perturbation characteristics highlighting their potential importance in generating appropriate muscular response during a postural disturbance. PMID:22673334

  18. Muscle spindle responses to horizontal support surface perturbation in the anesthetized cat: insights into the role of autogenic feedback in whole body postural control.

    PubMed

    Honeycutt, Claire F; Nardelli, Paul; Cope, Timothy C; Nichols, T Richard

    2012-09-01

    Intact cats and humans respond to support surface perturbations with broadly tuned, directionally sensitive muscle activation. These muscle responses are further sensitive to initial stance widths (distance between feet) and perturbation velocity. The sensory origins driving these responses are not known, and conflicting hypotheses are prevalent in the literature. We hypothesize that the direction-, stance-width-, and velocity-sensitive muscle response during support surface perturbations is driven largely by rapid autogenic proprioceptive pathways. The primary objective of this study was to obtain direct evidence for our hypothesis by establishing that muscle spindle receptors in the intact limb can provide appropriate information to drive the muscle response to whole body postural perturbations. Our second objective was to determine if spindle recordings from the intact limb generate the heightened sensitivity to small perturbations that has been reported in isolated muscle experiments. Maintenance of this heightened sensitivity would indicate that muscle spindles are highly proficient at detecting even small disturbances, suggesting they can provide efficient feedback about changing postural conditions. We performed intraaxonal recordings from muscle spindles in anesthetized cats during horizontal, hindlimb perturbations. We indeed found that muscle spindle afferents in the intact limb generate broadly tuned but directionally sensitive activation patterns. These afferents were also sensitive to initial stance widths and perturbation velocities. Finally, we found that afferents in the intact limb have heightened sensitivity to small perturbations. We conclude that muscle spindle afferents provide an array of important information about biomechanics and perturbation characteristics highlighting their potential importance in generating appropriate muscular response during a postural disturbance.

  19. Function and regulation of large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K+ channel in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiang-Qun; Zhang, Lubo

    2012-09-01

    Large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK(Ca)) channels are abundantly expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells. Activation of BK(Ca) channels leads to hyperpolarization of cell membrane, which in turn counteracts vasoconstriction. Therefore, BK(Ca) channels have an important role in regulation of vascular tone and blood pressure. The activity of BK(Ca) channels is subject to modulation by various factors. Furthermore, the function of BK(Ca) channels are altered in both physiological and pathophysiological conditions, such as pregnancy, hypertension and diabetes, which has dramatic impacts on vascular tone and hemodynamics. Consequently, compounds and genetic manipulation that alter activity and expression of the channel might be of therapeutic interest.

  20. Re-utilization of Schwann cells during ingrowth of ventral root afferents in perinatal kittens.

    PubMed

    Nilsson Remahl, A Ingela M; Masterman, Thomas; Risling, Mårten

    2008-08-01

    Ventral roots in all mammalian species, including humans, contain significant numbers of unmyelinated axons, many of them afferents transmitting nociceptive signals from receptive fields in skin, viscera, muscles and joints. Observations in cats indicate that these afferents do not enter the spinal cord via the ventral root, but rather turn distally and enter the dorsal root. Some unmyelinated axons are postganglionic autonomic efferents that innervate blood vessels of the root and the pia mater. In the feline L7 segment, a substantial proportion of unmyelinated axons are not detectable until late in perinatal development. The mechanisms inducing this late ingrowth, and the recruitment of Schwann cells (indispensable, at this stage, for axonal survival and sustenance), are unknown. We have counted axons and Schwann cells in both ends of the L7 ventral root in young kittens and made the following observations. (1) The total number of axons detectable in the root increased throughout the range of investigated ages. (2) The number of myelinated axons was similar in the root's proximal and distal ends. The increased number of unmyelinated axons with age is thus due to increased numbers of small unmyelinated axons. (3) The number of separated large probably promyelin axons was about the same in the proximal and distal ends of the root. (4) Schwann cells appeared to undergo redistribution, from myelinated to unmyelinated axons. (5) During redistribution of Schwann cells they first appear as aberrant Schwann cells and then become endoneurial X-cells temporarily free of axonal contact. We hypothesize that unmyelinated axons invade the ventral root from its distal end, that this ingrowth is particularly intense during the first postnatal month and that disengaged Schwann cells, eliminated from myelinated motoneuron axons, provide the ingrowing axons with structural and trophic support.

  1. A computational model for estimating recruitment of primary afferent fibers by intraneural stimulation in the dorsal root ganglia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourbeau, D. J.; Hokanson, J. A.; Rubin, J. E.; Weber, D. J.

    2011-10-01

    Primary afferent microstimulation has been proposed as a method for activating cutaneous and muscle afferent fibers to restore tactile and proprioceptive feedback after limb loss or peripheral neuropathy. Large populations of primary afferent fibers can be accessed directly by implanting microelectrode arrays in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), which provide a compact and stable target for stimulating a diverse group of sensory fibers. To gain insight into factors affecting the number and types of primary afferents activated, we developed a computational model that simulates the recruitment of fibers in the feline L7 DRG. The model comprises two parts. The first part is a single-fiber model used to describe the current-distance relation and was based on the McIntyre-Richardson-Grill model for excitability. The second part uses the results of the singe-fiber model and published data on fiber size distributions to predict the probability of recruiting a given number of fibers as a function of stimulus intensity. The range of intensities over which exactly one fiber was recruited was approximately 0.5-5 µA (0.1-1 nC per phase); the stimulus intensity at which the probability of recruiting exactly one fiber was maximized was 2.3 µA. However, at 2.3 µA, it was also possible to recruit up to three fibers, albeit with a lower probability. Stimulation amplitudes up to 6 µA were tested with the population model, which showed that as the amplitude increased, the number of fibers recruited increased exponentially. The distribution of threshold amplitudes predicted by the model was similar to that previously reported by in vivo experimentation. Finally, the model suggested that medium diameter fibers (7.3-11.5 µm) may be recruited with much greater probability than large diameter fibers (12.8-16 µm). This model may be used to efficiently test a range of stimulation parameters and nerve morphologies to complement results from electrophysiology experiments and to aid in the

  2. Mechanically insensitive afferents (MIAs) in cutaneous nerves of monkey.

    PubMed

    Meyer, R A; Davis, K D; Cohen, R H; Treede, R D; Campbell, J N

    1991-10-11

    A problem in the study of nociceptors is that intense stimuli are used to locate the receptive field (RF), and thus the receptor may be damaged before the first responses are recorded. In addition, some nociceptors do not respond to the mechanical stimuli often used to search for the RF. To overcome these problems, an electrical search technique was developed to locate the RF of cutaneous nociceptors. In the hairy skin of anesthetized monkey, we used this technique to locate the RF of 63 A delta-fibers and 22 C-fibers that had extremely high thresholds or were unresponsive to mechanical stimuli. We refer to these afferents as mechanically insensitive afferents (MIAs). Ten A delta-fiber MIAs had a short latency response to stepped heat stimuli and could be responsible for first pain sensation. Five A delta-fiber MIAs and one C-fiber MIA did not respond to mechanical or heat stimuli but did respond to injection into the electrical RF of an artificial inflammatory soup containing histamine, bradykinin, prostaglandin E1, and serotonin. These chemoreceptors might be responsible for the pain and itch sensations that result from chemical stimuli. Some MIAs became more responsive to mechanical stimuli after injection into the RF of the inflammatory soup and, thus, may contribute to the hyperalgesia to mechanical stimuli associated with cutaneous injury. A large proportion of the A delta-fiber (48%) and C-fiber (30%) afferents in this study were insensitive to mechanical stimuli. The role of these MIAs in sensation needs to be studied further. The electrical search technique enables a systematic study of these afferents to be performed. This technique may also be of use to identify and characterize dorsal horn neurons that have inputs from MIAs.

  3. Termination of electroreceptor and mechanical lateral line afferents in the mormyrid acousticolateral area.

    PubMed

    Bell, C C; Russell, C J

    1978-12-01

    The projection regions of electroreceptor and mechanical lateral line afferents in electric fish of the mormyridae family are described. Electroreceptor afferents from the posterior dorsal skin run in the dorsal branch of the posterior lateral line nerve. Electroreceptor afferents from ventral skin and mechanical lateral line afferents and efferents run in the ventral branch of the nerve. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) injections into each branch resulted in filling of its central terminals with the marker enzyme. The method yields a Golgi-like staining of afferent terminals, allowing some aspects of their morphology to be described. Comparison of results from dorsal and ventral branch injections shows the separate medullary regions to which electroreceptor and mechanical afferents project, and also demonstrates four separate somatotopic maps within the electroreceptor region. Mechanical afferents end predominantly ipsilaterally in nucleus anterior and eminentia granularis as has been suggested by others. Ipsilateral endings in nucleus octavius are also seen. Electroreceptor afferents end exclusively in the cortex and nucleus of posterior lateral line lobe (PLLL). Within the cortex there are three distinct maps of the skin surface which are separated from each other by discontinuities in the cellular layers. Somatotopic mapping is also present in the nucleus of PLLL though it is less precise than in the cortical zones. Large club endings of the cells of this nucleus are filled with HRP. Labeled cells are seen within a small midline nucleus located at the level of the eighth nerve just above the medial longitudinal fasciculus. These are probably the cell bodies of lateral line efferents.

  4. Open-book Splitting of a Distally Based Peroneus Brevis Muscle Flap to Cover Large Leg and Ankle Defects

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Large soft-tissue defects in the lower leg and ankle are a major problem for plastic surgeons. Many local flaps that are either proximally or distally based have been previously described to cover small defects. Larger defects may require a distant flap that is either pedicled or free. The peroneus brevis muscle flap is a well-known distally based safe flap that is used to cover a small defect. Methods: Ten distally based peroneus brevis muscle flaps were elevated in 10 patients (8 males and 2 females) with major lower third leg and ankle defects that were 6–12 cm in length and 6–10 cm in width, with open-book splitting of the proximal portion of the muscle to cover these large defects. Results: Flap survival was excellent, and partial skin graft loss in two cases healed with dressing. The average flap length was 10 cm, ranging between 6 and 12 cm. The average flap width was 8 cm, ranging between 6 and 10 cm. The donor site also healed uneventful. Conclusions: Open-book splitting of the distally based peroneus brevis muscle flap is ideally suited for moderate to large defects in the distal third of the lower leg and ankle. This modification of the distally based peroneus brevis muscle flap offers a convincing alternative for covering large defects of up to 12 × 10 cm in the distal leg and ankle region. PMID:26893997

  5. The role of the renal afferent and efferent nerve fibers in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Lindsea C.; May, Clive N.; Yao, Song T.

    2015-01-01

    Renal nerves contain afferent, sensory and efferent, sympathetic nerve fibers. In heart failure (HF) there is an increase in renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), which can lead to renal vasoconstriction, increased renin release and sodium retention. These changes are thought to contribute to renal dysfunction, which is predictive of poor outcome in patients with HF. In contrast, the role of the renal afferent nerves remains largely unexplored in HF. This is somewhat surprising as there are multiple triggers in HF that have the potential to increase afferent nerve activity, including increased venous pressure and reduced kidney perfusion. Some of the few studies investigating renal afferents in HF have suggested that at least the sympatho-inhibitory reno-renal reflex is blunted. In experimentally induced HF, renal denervation, both surgical and catheter-based, has been associated with some improvements in renal and cardiac function. It remains unknown whether the effects are due to removal of the efferent renal nerve fibers or afferent renal nerve fibers, or a combination of both. Here, we review the effects of HF on renal efferent and afferent nerve function and critically assess the latest evidence supporting renal denervation as a potential treatment in HF. PMID:26483699

  6. The role of the renal afferent and efferent nerve fibers in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Booth, Lindsea C; May, Clive N; Yao, Song T

    2015-01-01

    Renal nerves contain afferent, sensory and efferent, sympathetic nerve fibers. In heart failure (HF) there is an increase in renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), which can lead to renal vasoconstriction, increased renin release and sodium retention. These changes are thought to contribute to renal dysfunction, which is predictive of poor outcome in patients with HF. In contrast, the role of the renal afferent nerves remains largely unexplored in HF. This is somewhat surprising as there are multiple triggers in HF that have the potential to increase afferent nerve activity, including increased venous pressure and reduced kidney perfusion. Some of the few studies investigating renal afferents in HF have suggested that at least the sympatho-inhibitory reno-renal reflex is blunted. In experimentally induced HF, renal denervation, both surgical and catheter-based, has been associated with some improvements in renal and cardiac function. It remains unknown whether the effects are due to removal of the efferent renal nerve fibers or afferent renal nerve fibers, or a combination of both. Here, we review the effects of HF on renal efferent and afferent nerve function and critically assess the latest evidence supporting renal denervation as a potential treatment in HF.

  7. Myelinated primary afferents of the sacral spinal cord responding to slow filling and distension of the cat urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Häbler, H J; Jänig, W; Koltzenburg, M

    1993-04-01

    1. A total of sixty-five sacral afferent neurones with myelinated fibres supplying the urinary bladder was recorded from the sacral roots S2 in anaesthetized cats. All afferent units were identified with electrical stimulation of the pelvic nerve. The discharge properties were quantitatively evaluated using slow filling at rates of 1-2 ml min-1 and isotonic distension to preset pressure levels. Eight afferents were studied prior to and after acute sacral de-efferentation of the urinary bladder. 2. All afferent units were silent when the bladder was empty and responded in a graded manner to an increase of intravesical pressure. During slow filling the level of afferent activity correlated closely with the level of the intravesical pressure. All afferents behaved like slowly adapting mechanoreceptors with both a dynamic and static component of their discharge. With the exception of two units the intraluminal pressure threshold was below 25 mmHg. Thus virtually all myelinated afferents respond in the pressure range that is reached during a non-painful micturition cycle. 3. The stimulus-response functions of the afferents were similar regardless of whether intravesical pressure was increased by slow filling or by distension. However, during slow filling stimulation response functions often exhibited steeper slopes between 5 and 25 mmHg indicating that relatively small changes of intravesical pressure result in large changes of afferent activity. Nevertheless, all units displayed monotonically increasing stimulus response functions throughout the innocuous and noxious pressure level. 4. The stimulus-response functions of the afferent neurones did not change after acute de-efferentation of the urinary bladder, although the rapid phasic fluctuations of afferent activity that are produced by small contractions of the urinary bladder under normal conditions largely disappeared. This means that contractions and distension activate the afferent endings by a common mechanism

  8. Myelinated primary afferents of the sacral spinal cord responding to slow filling and distension of the cat urinary bladder.

    PubMed Central

    Häbler, H J; Jänig, W; Koltzenburg, M

    1993-01-01

    1. A total of sixty-five sacral afferent neurones with myelinated fibres supplying the urinary bladder was recorded from the sacral roots S2 in anaesthetized cats. All afferent units were identified with electrical stimulation of the pelvic nerve. The discharge properties were quantitatively evaluated using slow filling at rates of 1-2 ml min-1 and isotonic distension to preset pressure levels. Eight afferents were studied prior to and after acute sacral de-efferentation of the urinary bladder. 2. All afferent units were silent when the bladder was empty and responded in a graded manner to an increase of intravesical pressure. During slow filling the level of afferent activity correlated closely with the level of the intravesical pressure. All afferents behaved like slowly adapting mechanoreceptors with both a dynamic and static component of their discharge. With the exception of two units the intraluminal pressure threshold was below 25 mmHg. Thus virtually all myelinated afferents respond in the pressure range that is reached during a non-painful micturition cycle. 3. The stimulus-response functions of the afferents were similar regardless of whether intravesical pressure was increased by slow filling or by distension. However, during slow filling stimulation response functions often exhibited steeper slopes between 5 and 25 mmHg indicating that relatively small changes of intravesical pressure result in large changes of afferent activity. Nevertheless, all units displayed monotonically increasing stimulus response functions throughout the innocuous and noxious pressure level. 4. The stimulus-response functions of the afferent neurones did not change after acute de-efferentation of the urinary bladder, although the rapid phasic fluctuations of afferent activity that are produced by small contractions of the urinary bladder under normal conditions largely disappeared. This means that contractions and distension activate the afferent endings by a common mechanism

  9. Pharmacologically Distinct Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Drive Efferent-Mediated Excitation in Calyx-Bearing Vestibular Afferents

    PubMed Central

    Kewin, Kevin; Jordan, Paivi M.; Cameron, Peter; Klapczynski, Marcin; McIntosh, J. Michael; Crooks, Peter A.; Dwoskin, Linda P.; Lysakowski, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of vestibular efferent neurons rapidly excites the resting discharge of calyx/dimorphic (CD) afferents. In turtle, this excitation arises when acetylcholine (ACh), released from efferent terminals, directly depolarizes calyceal endings by activating nicotinic ACh receptors (nAChRs). Although molecular biological data from the peripheral vestibular system implicate most of the known nAChR subunits, specific information about those contributing to efferent-mediated excitation of CD afferents is lacking. We sought to identify the nAChR subunits that underlie the rapid excitation of CD afferents and whether they differ from α9α10 nAChRs on type II hair cells that drive efferent-mediated inhibition in adjacent bouton afferents. We recorded from CD and bouton afferents innervating the turtle posterior crista during electrical stimulation of vestibular efferents while applying several subtype-selective nAChR agonists and antagonists. The α9α10 nAChR antagonists, α-bungarotoxin and α-conotoxin RgIA, blocked efferent-mediated inhibition in bouton afferents while leaving efferent-mediated excitation in CD units largely intact. Conversely, 5-iodo-A-85380, sazetidine-A, varenicline, α-conotoxin MII, and bPiDDB (N,N-dodecane-1,12-diyl-bis-3-picolinium dibromide) blocked efferent-mediated excitation in CD afferents without affecting efferent-mediated inhibition in bouton afferents. This pharmacological profile suggested that calyceal nAChRs contain α6 and β2, but not α9, nAChR subunits. Selective blockade of efferent-mediated excitation in CD afferents distinguished dimorphic from calyx afferents by revealing type II hair cell input. Dimorphic afferents differed in having higher mean discharge rates and a mean efferent-mediated excitation that was smaller in amplitude yet longer in duration. Molecular biological data demonstrated the expression of α9 in turtle hair cells and α4 and β2 in associated vestibular ganglia. PMID:25716861

  10. Receptive properties of myelinated primary afferents innervating the inflamed urinary bladder of the cat.

    PubMed

    Häbler, H J; Jänig, W; Koltzenburg, M

    1993-02-01

    1. The present study has investigated the receptive properties of myelinated mechanoreceptive primary afferents innervating the inflamed urinary bladder of the cat. In 15 experiments, 20 units were recorded from the dorsal and 3 from the ventral root S2. Before inflammation the afferents had no resting activity and responded consistently to increases of intravesical pressure evoked by isotonic distension or isovolumetric contractions. All units were studied before and after the onset of an acute inflammation induced by intraluminal injection of mustard (1-2.5%) or turpentine oil (50%), which are known to induce an acute cystitis. 2. Eleven out of 14 units tested with mustard oil and 5/9 units tested with turpentine oil were activated at short latency. The response could not be explained by a concomitant increase of intraluminal pressure resulting from the intravesical injection of the irritant. This suggests that a large proportion of mechanosensitive afferents has an additional chemosensitivity. 3. After removal of the irritants and with empty bladder, all afferent units exhibited irregular ongoing activity with intermittent high-frequency bursts. Such ongoing activity was entirely absent in myelinated afferents supplying the noninflamed bladder. The median rate of ongoing activity was significantly higher after mustard oil (1.65 imp/s) than after turpentine oil treatment (0.05 imp/s) 1 h after chemical stimulation. Post-hoc analysis revealed that afferents that developed high levels of ongoing activity had steeper stimulus response functions to changes of intravesical pressure before inflammation. 4. The stimulus-response function of vesical afferents changed characteristically in the inflamed bladder. Within 30 min of mustard oil treatment, the responses of some units to bladder filling was transiently enhanced, but later the units desensitized to this stimulus. However, there was no significant change of the stimulus-response function of six afferents studied

  11. Movement and afferent representations in human motor areas: a simultaneous neuroimaging and transcranial magnetic/peripheral nerve-stimulation study

    PubMed Central

    Shitara, H.; Shinozaki, T.; Takagishi, K.; Honda, M.; Hanakawa, T.

    2013-01-01

    Neuroimaging combined with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to primary motor cortex (M1) is an emerging technique that can examine motor-system functionality through evoked activity. However, because sensory afferents from twitching muscles are widely represented in motor areas the amount of evoked activity directly resulting from TMS remains unclear. We delivered suprathreshold TMS to left M1 or gave electrical right median nerve stimulation (MNS) in 18 healthy volunteers while simultaneously conducting functional magnetic resonance imaging and monitoring with electromyography (EMG). We examined in detail the localization of TMS-, muscle afferent- and superficial afferent-induced activity in M1 subdivisions. Muscle afferent- and TMS-evoked activity occurred mainly in rostral M1, while superficial afferents generated a slightly different activation distribution. In 12 participants who yielded quantifiable EMG, differences in brain activity ascribed to differences in movement-size were adjusted using integrated information from the EMGs. Sensory components only explained 10–20% of the suprathreshold TMS-induced activity, indicating that locally and remotely evoked activity in motor areas mostly resulted from the recruitment of neural and synaptic activity. The present study appears to justify the use of fMRI combined with suprathreshold TMS to M1 for evoked motor network imaging. PMID:24062660

  12. Spinal cord thermosensitivity: An afferent phenomenon?

    PubMed Central

    Brock, James A.; McAllen, Robin M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We review the evidence for thermoregulatory temperature sensors in the mammalian spinal cord and reach the following conclusions. 1) Spinal cord temperature contributes physiologically to temperature regulation. 2) Parallel anterolateral ascending pathways transmit signals from spinal cooling and spinal warming: they overlap with the respective axon pathways of the dorsal horn neurons that are driven by peripheral cold- and warm-sensitive afferents. 3) We hypothesize that these ‘cold’ and ‘warm’ ascending pathways transmit all extracranial thermosensory information to the brain. 4) Cutaneous cold afferents can be activated not only by cooling the skin but also by cooling sites along their axons: we consider that this is functionally insignificant in vivo. 5) By a presynaptic action on their central terminals, local spinal cooling enhances neurotransmission from incoming ‘cold’ afferent action potentials to second order neurons in the dorsal horn; this effect disappears when the spinal cord is warm. 6) Spinal warm sensitivity is due to warm-sensitive miniature vesicular transmitter release from afferent terminals in the dorsal horn: this effect is powerful enough to excite second order neurons in the ‘warm’ pathway independently of any incoming sensory traffic. 7) Distinct but related presynaptic mechanisms at cold- and warm-sensitive afferent terminals can thus account for the thermoregulatory actions of spinal cord temperature. PMID:27857953

  13. Afferent Connectivity of the Zebrafish Habenulae

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Katherine J.; Hawkins, Thomas A.; Yáñez, Julián; Anadón, Ramón; Wilson, Stephen W.; Folgueira, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    The habenulae are bilateral nuclei located in the dorsal diencephalon that are conserved across vertebrates. Here we describe the main afferents to the habenulae in larval and adult zebrafish. We observe afferents from the subpallium, nucleus rostrolateralis, posterior tuberculum, posterior hypothalamic lobe, median raphe; we also see asymmetric afferents from olfactory bulb to the right habenula, and from the parapineal to the left habenula. In addition, we find afferents from a ventrolateral telencephalic nucleus that neurochemical and hodological data identify as the ventral entopeduncular nucleus (vENT), confirming and extending observations of Amo et al. (2014). Fate map and marker studies suggest that vENT originates from the diencephalic prethalamic eminence and extends into the lateral telencephalon from 48 to 120 hour post-fertilization (hpf). No afferents to the habenula were observed from the dorsal entopeduncular nucleus (dENT). Consequently, we confirm that the vENT (and not the dENT) should be considered as the entopeduncular nucleus “proper” in zebrafish. Furthermore, comparison with data in other vertebrates suggests that the vENT is a conserved basal ganglia nucleus, being homologous to the entopeduncular nucleus of mammals (internal segment of the globus pallidus of primates) by both embryonic origin and projections, as previously suggested by Amo et al. (2014). PMID:27199671

  14. Cross-Modal Calibration of Vestibular Afference for Human Balance

    PubMed Central

    Héroux, Martin E; Law, Tammy C. Y.; Fitzpatrick, Richard C.; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    To determine how the vestibular sense controls balance, we used instantaneous head angular velocity to drive a galvanic vestibular stimulus so that afference would signal that head movement was faster or slower than actual. In effect, this changed vestibular afferent gain. This increased sway 4-fold when subjects (N = 8) stood without vision. However, after a 240 s conditioning period with stable balance achieved through reliable visual or somatosensory cues, sway returned to normal. An equivalent galvanic stimulus unrelated to sway (not driven by head motion) was equally destabilising but in this situation the conditioning period of stable balance did not reduce sway. Reflex muscle responses evoked by an independent, higher bandwidth vestibular stimulus were initially reduced in amplitude by the galvanic stimulus but returned to normal levels after the conditioning period, contrary to predictions that they would decrease after adaptation to increased sensory gain and increase after adaptation to decreased sensory gain. We conclude that an erroneous vestibular signal of head motion during standing has profound effects on balance control. If it is unrelated to current head motion, the CNS has no immediate mechanism of ignoring the vestibular signal to reduce its influence on destabilising balance. This result is inconsistent with sensory reweighting based on disturbances. The increase in sway with increased sensory gain is also inconsistent with a simple feedback model of vestibular reflex action. Thus, we propose that recalibration of a forward sensory model best explains the reinterpretation of an altered reafferent signal of head motion during stable balance. PMID:25894558

  15. A comparative analysis of the encapsulated end-organs of mammalian skeletal muscles and of their sensory nerve endings.

    PubMed

    Banks, R W; Hulliger, M; Saed, H H; Stacey, M J

    2009-06-01

    to be located closer to the main divisions of the nerve. Next, based on a sample of tendon organs from several hind-foot muscles of the cat, we demonstrate the existence in at least a large proportion of tendon organs of a structural substrate to account for multiple spike-initiation sites and pacemaker switching, namely the distribution of sensory terminals supplied by the different first-order branches of the Ib afferent to separate, parallel, tendinous compartments of individual tendon organs. We then show that the numbers of spindles, tendon organs and paciniform corpuscles vary independently in a sample of (mainly) hind-foot muscles of the cat. Grouping muscles by anatomical region in the cat indicated the existence of a gradual proximo-distal decline in the overall average size of the afferent complement of muscle spindles from axial through hind limb to intrinsic foot muscles, but with considerable muscle-specific variability. Finally, we present some comparative data on muscle-spindle afferent complements of rat, rabbit and guinea pig, one particularly notable feature being the high incidence of multiple primary endings in the rat.

  16. Human muscle spindle sensitivity reflects the balance of activity between antagonistic muscles.

    PubMed

    Dimitriou, Michael

    2014-10-08

    Muscle spindles are commonly considered as stretch receptors encoding movement, but the functional consequence of their efferent control has remained unclear. The "α-γ coactivation" hypothesis states that activity in a muscle is positively related to the output of its spindle afferents. However, in addition to the above, possible reciprocal inhibition of spindle controllers entails a negative relationship between contractile activity in one muscle and spindle afferent output from its antagonist. By recording spindle afferent responses from alert humans using microneurography, I show that spindle output does reflect antagonistic muscle balance. Specifically, regardless of identical kinematic profiles across active finger movements, stretch of the loaded antagonist muscle (i.e., extensor) was accompanied by increased afferent firing rates from this muscle compared with the baseline case of no constant external load. In contrast, spindle firing rates from the stretching antagonist were lowest when the agonist muscle powering movement (i.e., flexor) acted against an additional resistive load. Stepwise regressions confirmed that instantaneous velocity, extensor, and flexor muscle activity had a significant effect on spindle afferent responses, with flexor activity having a negative effect. Therefore, the results indicate that, as consequence of their efferent control, spindle sensitivity (gain) to muscle stretch reflects the balance of activity between antagonistic muscles rather than only the activity of the spindle-bearing muscle.

  17. Electrophysiological characterization of human rectal afferents

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Kheng-Seong; Brookes, Simon J.; Montes-Adrian, Noemi A.; Mahns, David A.

    2016-01-01

    It is presumed that extrinsic afferent nerves link the rectum to the central nervous system. However, the anatomical/functional existence of such nerves has never previously been demonstrated in humans. Therefore, we aimed to identify and make electrophysiological recordings in vitro from extrinsic afferents, comparing human rectum to colon. Sections of normal rectum and colon were procured from anterior resection and right hemicolectomy specimens, respectively. Sections were pinned and extrinsic nerves dissected. Extracellular visceral afferent nerve activity was recorded. Neuronal responses to chemical [capsaicin and “inflammatory soup” (IS)] and mechanical (Von Frey probing) stimuli were recorded and quantified as peak firing rate (range) in 1-s intervals. Twenty-eight separate nerve trunks from eight rectums were studied. Of these, spontaneous multiunit afferent activity was recorded in 24 nerves. Peak firing rates increased significantly following capsaicin [median 6 (range 3–25) spikes/s vs. 2 (1–4), P < 0.001] and IS [median 5 (range 2–18) spikes/s vs. 2 (1–4), P < 0.001]. Mechanosensitive “hot spots” were identified in 16 nerves [median threshold 2.0 g (range 1.4–6.0 g)]. In eight of these, the threshold decreased after IS [1.0 g (0.4–1.4 g)]. By comparison, spontaneous activity was recorded in only 3/30 nerves studied from 10 colons, and only one hot spot (threshold 60 g) was identified. This study confirms the anatomical/functional existence of extrinsic rectal afferent nerves and characterizes their chemo- and mechanosensitivity for the first time in humans. They have different electrophysiological properties to colonic afferents and warrant further investigation in disease states. PMID:27789454

  18. Electrophysiological characterization of human rectal afferents.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kheng-Seong; Brookes, Simon J; Montes-Adrian, Noemi A; Mahns, David A; Gladman, Marc A

    2016-12-01

    It is presumed that extrinsic afferent nerves link the rectum to the central nervous system. However, the anatomical/functional existence of such nerves has never previously been demonstrated in humans. Therefore, we aimed to identify and make electrophysiological recordings in vitro from extrinsic afferents, comparing human rectum to colon. Sections of normal rectum and colon were procured from anterior resection and right hemicolectomy specimens, respectively. Sections were pinned and extrinsic nerves dissected. Extracellular visceral afferent nerve activity was recorded. Neuronal responses to chemical [capsaicin and "inflammatory soup" (IS)] and mechanical (Von Frey probing) stimuli were recorded and quantified as peak firing rate (range) in 1-s intervals. Twenty-eight separate nerve trunks from eight rectums were studied. Of these, spontaneous multiunit afferent activity was recorded in 24 nerves. Peak firing rates increased significantly following capsaicin [median 6 (range 3-25) spikes/s vs. 2 (1-4), P < 0.001] and IS [median 5 (range 2-18) spikes/s vs. 2 (1-4), P < 0.001]. Mechanosensitive "hot spots" were identified in 16 nerves [median threshold 2.0 g (range 1.4-6.0 g)]. In eight of these, the threshold decreased after IS [1.0 g (0.4-1.4 g)]. By comparison, spontaneous activity was recorded in only 3/30 nerves studied from 10 colons, and only one hot spot (threshold 60 g) was identified. This study confirms the anatomical/functional existence of extrinsic rectal afferent nerves and characterizes their chemo- and mechanosensitivity for the first time in humans. They have different electrophysiological properties to colonic afferents and warrant further investigation in disease states. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  19. The CYP450 hydroxylase pathway contributes to P2X receptor-mediated afferent arteriolar vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X; Inscho, E W; Bondlela, M; Falck, J R; Imig, J D

    2001-11-01

    This study was conducted to test the hypothesis that the cytochrome P-450 (CYP450) metabolite 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) contributes to the afferent arteriolar response to P2 receptor activation. Afferent arteriolar responses to ATP, the P2X agonist, alpha,beta-methylene ATP and the P2Y agonist UTP were determined before and after treatment with the selective CYP450 hydroxylase inhibitor, N-methylsulfonyl-12,12-dibromododec-11-enamide (DDMS) or the 20-HETE antagonist, 20-hydroxyeicosa-6(Z),15(Z)-dienoic acid (20-HEDE). Stimulation with 1.0 and 10 microM ATP elicited an initial preglomerular vasoconstriction of 12 +/- 1% and 45 +/- 4% and a sustained vasoconstriction of 11 +/- 1% and 11 +/- 2%, respectively. DDMS or 20-HEDE significantly attenuated the sustained afferent arteriolar constrictor response to ATP. alpha,beta-Methylene ATP (1 microM) induced a rapid initial afferent vasoconstriction of 64 +/- 3%, which partially recovered to a stable diameter 10 +/- 1% smaller than control. Both DDMS and 20-HEDE significantly attenuated the initial vasoconstriction and abolished the sustained vasoconstrictor response to alpha,beta-methylene ATP. UTP decreased afferent diameter by 50 +/- 5% and 20-HEDE did not change this response. In addition, the ATP-induced increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration in preglomerular microvascular smooth muscle cells was significantly attenuated by 20-HEDE. Taken together, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that the CYP450 metabolite 20-HETE participates in the afferent arteriolar response to activation of P2X receptors.

  20. EARLY POSTNATAL OVERNUTRITION: POTENTIAL ROLES OF GASTROINTESTINAL VAGAL AFFERENTS AND BRAIN-DERIVED NEUROTROPHIC FACTOR

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Edward A.; Biddinger, Jessica E.

    2012-01-01

    Abnormal perinatal nutrition (APN) results in a predisposition to develop obesity and the metabolic syndrome and thus may contribute to the prevalence of these disorders. Obesity, including that which develops in organisms exposed to APN, has been associated with increased meal size. Vagal afferents of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract contribute to regulation of meal size by transmitting satiation signals from gut-to-brain. Consequently, APN could increase meal size by altering this signaling, possibly through changes in expression of factors that control vagal afferent development or function. Here two studies that addressed these possibilities are reviewed. First, meal patterns, meal microstructure, and the structure and density of vagal afferents that innervate the intestine were examined in mice that experienced early postnatal overnutrition (EPO). These studies provided little evidence for EPO effects on vagal afferents as it did not alter meal size or vagal afferent density or structure. However, these mice exhibited modest hyperphagia due to a satiety deficit. In parallel, the possibility that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) could mediate APN effects on vagal afferent development was investigated. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor was a strong candidate because APN alters BDNF levels in some tissues and BDNF knockout disrupts development of vagal sensory innervation of the GI tract. Surprisingly, smooth muscle-specific BDNF knockout resulted in early-onset obesity and hyperphagia due to increases in meal size and frequency. Microstructure analysis revealed decreased decay of intake rate during a meal in knockouts, suggesting loss of vagal negative feedback contributed to their increase in meal size. However, meal-induced c-Fos activation within the dorsal vagal complex suggested this effect could be due to augmentation of vago-vagal reflexes. A model is proposed to explain how high-fat diet consumption produces increased obesity in organisms exposed

  1. Single voltage-dependent chloride-selective channels of large conductance in cultured rat muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Blatz, A L; Magleby, K L

    1983-01-01

    Single-channel currents of an anion-selective channel in the plasma membrane of cultured rat muscle cells (myotubes) were recorded with the patch-clamp technique (Hamill, O.P., A. Marty, E. Neher, B. Sakmann, and F.J. Sigworth, 1981. Pfluegers Arch. Eur. J. Physiol., 391:85-100). The channel is selective for Cl- over cations, and has an unusually large single-channel conductance of approximately 430 pS in symmetrical 143 mM KCl. The channel is often active at 0 mV, opening and closing spontaneously. When active, steps from 0 mV to either negative or positive membrane potentials close the channel to an apparent inactivated state. The mean effective time that a channel is open before it inactivates is approximately 1.19 s for steps to -30 mV and 0.48 s for steps to +30 mV. Returning the membrane potential to 0 mV results in recovery from inactivation. Calcium ions are not required for channel activity. PMID:6311302

  2. Specific and nonspecific mechanisms involved in generation of PAD of group Ia afferents in cat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, I; Rudomín, P; Solodkin, M; Vyklický, L

    1984-11-01

    In the spinal cord of the anesthetized cat, we measured the changes in extracellular concentration of potassium ions [K+]e and the negative DC shifts produced by stimulation of muscle, cutaneous and mixed afferent nerves, together with alterations in the threshold of single group Ia fibers that were tested at the same site as the potassium measurements. This approach provided information on the extent to which the excitability changes of single Ia-fibers can be correlated with the changes in [K+]e occurring at the same site. Stimulation of the tibial (TIB) nerve and of the cutaneous sural (SU), and superficial peroneous (SP) nerve (100-Hz trains lasting 30-60 s) with stimulus strengths of 10-15 times threshold increased the concentration of [K+]e in the dorsal horn by 2-5 mmol/l above the resting value of 3 mmol/l. This was in clear contrast with the very small [K+]e increases produced at the same site during stimulation of muscle nerves, such as the posterior biceps and semitendinosus (PBSt), gastrocnemius soleus (GS), and deep peroneus (DP), which were generally smaller than 0.25 mmol/l. Stimulation of the PBSt and GS muscle nerves did produce small, but clear, increases of [K+]e (up to 0.3 mmol/l) in the region of the intermediate nucleus, where these fibers synapse with second order cells. These changes were nevertheless smaller than those produced at the same site by stimulation of the TIB, SU, and SP nerves. The peak amplitudes of the [K+]e transients produced by long-lasting 100-Hz trains applied to cutaneous and/or to muscle nerves showed a linear relationship with the amplitudes of the slow negative DC shifts, which were simultaneously recorded from the NaCl barrel of the potassium electrode assembly. Stimulus trains (100 Hz) applied to group I muscle afferents (PBSt and DP) very effectively reduced the threshold for intraspinal activation of individual group I GS fibers but produced negligible negative DC shifts at the same site. On the other hand, 100-Hz

  3. An Attempt to Make a Large-Scale Stacked-Type Electrostatic Actuator for Artificial Muscles of Robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Makoto; Saneyoshi, Keiji

    This research introduces the structure and the prototypes of a large-scale stacked-type electrostatic actuator (LSEA) which developed as an artificial muscle of robots. LSEA is lightweight and can have large force and long stroke. In addition, the structure can prevent the gaps between the facing electrodes from overextending. We also measured the spring property and the generative force by measuring the force as a function of stretch length.

  4. Sensory Feedback in Interlimb Coordination: Contralateral Afferent Contribution to the Short-Latency Crossed Response during Human Walking

    PubMed Central

    Gervasio, Sabata; Voigt, Michael; Kersting, Uwe G.; Farina, Dario; Sinkjær, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    A constant coordination between the left and right leg is required to maintain stability during human locomotion, especially in a variable environment. The neural mechanisms underlying this interlimb coordination are not yet known. In animals, interneurons located within the spinal cord allow direct communication between the two sides without the need for the involvement of higher centers. These may also exist in humans since sensory feedback elicited by tibial nerve stimulation on one side (ipsilateral) can affect the muscles activation in the opposite side (contralateral), provoking short-latency crossed responses (SLCRs). The current study investigated whether contralateral afferent feedback contributes to the mechanism controlling the SLCR in human gastrocnemius muscle. Surface electromyogram, kinematic and kinetic data were recorded from subjects during normal walking and hybrid walking (with the legs moving in opposite directions). An inverse dynamics model was applied to estimate the gastrocnemius muscle proprioceptors’ firing rate. During normal walking, a significant correlation was observed between the magnitude of SLCRs and the estimated muscle spindle secondary afferent activity (P = 0.04). Moreover, estimated spindle secondary afferent and Golgi tendon organ activity were significantly different (P ≤ 0.01) when opposite responses have been observed, that is during normal (facilitation) and hybrid walking (inhibition) conditions. Contralateral sensory feedback, specifically spindle secondary afferents, likely plays a significant role in generating the SLCR. This observation has important implications for our understanding of what future research should be focusing on to optimize locomotor recovery in patient populations. PMID:28060839

  5. Group I extensor afferents evoke disynaptic EPSPs in cat hindlimb extensor motorneurones during fictive locomotion.

    PubMed Central

    Angel, M J; Guertin, P; Jiménez, T; McCrea, D A

    1996-01-01

    1. Intracellular recording from extensor motoneurones in paralysed decerebrate cats was used to examine the distribution of short-latency non-monosynaptic excitation by group I afferents during fictive locomotion produced by stimulation of the mesencephalic locomotor region (MLR). 2. During the extension but not the flexion phase of fictive locomotion, stimulation of ankle extensor nerves at 1.2-2.0 times threshold evoked excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) in motoneurones innervating hip, knee and ankle extensors. Disynaptic EPSPs were also evoked by selective activation of group Ia muscle spindle afferents by muscle stretch. 3. The central latencies of these group I-evoked EPSPs (mean, 1.55 ms) suggest their mediation by a disynaptic pathway with a single interneurone interposed between extensor group I afferents and extensor motoneurones. Disynaptic EPSPs were also evoked during periods of spontaneous locomotion following the cessation of MLR stimulation. 4. Hip extensor motoneurones received disynaptic EPSPs during extension following stimulation of both homonymous and ankle extensor nerves. Stimulation of hip extensor nerves did not evoke disynaptic EPSPs in ankle extensor motoneurones. 5. The appearance of disynaptic EPSPs during extension appears to result from cyclic disinhibition of an unidentified population of excitatory spinal interneurones and not postsynaptic voltage-dependent conductances in motoneurones or phasic presynaptic inhibition of group I afferents during flexion. 6. The reorganization of group I reflexes during fictive locomotion includes the appearance of disynaptic excitation of hip, knee and ankle extensor motoneurones. This excitatory reflex is one of the mechanisms by which group I afferents can enhance extensor activity and increase force production during stance. PMID:8865080

  6. Expression of the transient receptor potential channels TRPV1, TRPA1 and TRPM8 in mouse trigeminal primary afferent neurons innervating the dura

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Migraine and other headache disorders affect a large percentage of the population and cause debilitating pain. Activation and sensitization of the trigeminal primary afferent neurons innervating the dura and cerebral vessels is a crucial step in the “headache circuit”. Many dural afferent neurons respond to algesic and inflammatory agents. Given the clear role of the transient receptor potential (TRP) family of channels in both sensing chemical stimulants and mediating inflammatory pain, we investigated the expression of TRP channels in dural afferent neurons. Methods We used two fluorescent tracers to retrogradely label dural afferent neurons in adult mice and quantified the abundance of peptidergic and non-peptidergic neuron populations using calcitonin gene-related peptide immunoreactivity (CGRP-ir) and isolectin B4 (IB4) binding as markers, respectively. Using immunohistochemistry, we compared the expression of TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels in dural afferent neurons with the expression in total trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons. To examine the distribution of TRPM8 channels, we labeled dural afferent neurons in mice expressing farnesylated enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFPf) from a TRPM8 locus. We used nearest-neighbor measurement to predict the spatial association between dural afferent neurons and neurons expressing TRPA1 or TRPM8 channels in the TG. Results and conclusions We report that the size of dural afferent neurons is significantly larger than that of total TG neurons and facial skin afferents. Approximately 40% of dural afferent neurons exhibit IB4 binding. Surprisingly, the percentage of dural afferent neurons containing CGRP-ir is significantly lower than those of total TG neurons and facial skin afferents. Both TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels are expressed in dural afferent neurons. Furthermore, nearest-neighbor measurement indicates that TRPA1-expressing neurons are clustered around a subset of dural afferent neurons. Interestingly, TRPM

  7. Afferent baroreflex failure in familial dysautonomia.

    PubMed

    Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Axelrod, Felicia; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2010-11-23

    Familial dysautonomia (FD) is due to a genetic deficiency of the protein IKAP, which affects development of peripheral neurons. Patients with FD display complex abnormalities of the baroreflex of unknown cause. To test the hypothesis that the autonomic phenotype of FD is due to selective impairment of afferent baroreceptor input, we examined the autonomic and neuroendocrine responses triggered by stimuli that either engage (postural changes) or bypass (cognitive/emotional) afferent baroreflex pathways in 50 patients with FD and compared them to those of normal subjects and to those of patients with pure autonomic failure (PAF), a disorder with selective impairment of efferent autonomic neurons. During upright tilt, in patients with FD and in patients with PAF blood pressure fell markedly but the heart rate increased in PAF and decreased in FD. Plasma norepinephrine levels failed to increase in both groups. Vasopressin levels increased appropriately in patients with PAF but failed to increase in patients with FD. Head-down tilt increased blood pressure in both groups but increased heart rate only in patients with FD. Mental stress evoked a marked increase in blood pressure and heart rate in patients with FD but little change in those with PAF. The failure to modulate sympathetic activity and to release vasopressin by baroreflex-mediated stimuli together with marked sympathetic activation during cognitive tasks indicate selective failure of baroreceptor afference. These findings indicate that IKAP is critical for the development of afferent baroreflex pathways and has therapeutic implications in the management of these patients.

  8. Methods for chronic recording of EMG activity from large numbers of hindlimb muscles in awake rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Heather M.; Griffin, Darcy M.; Belhaj-Saïf, Abderraouf; Lee, Sang-Pil; Cheney, Paul D.

    2010-01-01

    Studies of the neural control of movement often rely on the ability to record EMG activity during natural behavioral tasks over long periods of time. Increasing the number of recorded muscles and the time over which recordings are made allows more rigorous answers to many questions related to the descending control of motor output. Chronic recording of EMG activity from multiple hindlimb muscles has been reported in the cat but few studies have been done in non-human primates. This paper describes two chronic EMG implant methods that are minimally invasive, relatively non-traumatic and capable of recording from large numbers of hindlimb muscles simultaneously for periods of many months to years. PMID:20346976

  9. Isolation of TRPV1 independent mechanisms of spontaneous and asynchronous glutamate release at primary afferent to NTS synapses.

    PubMed

    Fenwick, Axel J; Wu, Shaw-Wen; Peters, James H

    2014-01-01

    Cranial visceral afferents contained within the solitary tract (ST) contact second-order neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and release the excitatory amino acid glutamate via three distinct exocytosis pathways; synchronous, asynchronous, and spontaneous release. The presence of TRPV1 in the central terminals of a majority of ST afferents conveys activity-dependent asynchronous glutamate release and provides a temperature sensitive calcium conductance which largely determines the rate of spontaneous vesicle fusion. TRPV1 is present in unmyelinated C-fiber afferents and these facilitated forms of glutamate release may underlie the relative strength of C-fibers in activating autonomic reflex pathways. However, pharmacological blockade of TRPV1 signaling eliminates only ~50% of the asynchronous profile and attenuates the temperature sensitivity of spontaneous release indicating additional thermosensitive calcium influx pathways may exist which mediate these forms of vesicle release. In the present study we isolate the contribution of TRPV1 independent forms of glutamate release at ST-NTS synapses. We found ST afferent innervation at NTS neurons and synchronous vesicle release from TRPV1 KO mice was not different to control animals; however, only half of TRPV1 KO ST afferents completely lacked asynchronous glutamate release. Further, temperature driven spontaneous rates of vesicle release were not different from 33 to 37°C between control and TRPV1 KO afferents. These findings suggest additional temperature dependent mechanisms controlling asynchronous and thermosensitive spontaneous release at physiological temperatures, possibly mediated by additional thermosensitive TRP channels in primary afferent terminals.

  10. Rates of ubiquitin conjugation increase when muscles atrophy, largely through activation of the N-end rule pathway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, V.; Baracos, V.; Sarraf, P.; Goldberg, A. L.

    1998-01-01

    The rapid loss of muscle mass that accompanies many disease states, such as cancer or sepsis, is primarily a result of increased protein breakdown in muscle, and several observations have suggested an activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Accordingly, in extracts of atrophying muscles from tumor-bearing or septic rats, rates of 125I-ubiquitin conjugation to endogenous proteins were found to be higher than in control extracts. On the other hand, in extracts of muscles from hypothyroid rats, where overall proteolysis is reduced below normal, the conjugation of 125I-ubiquitin to soluble proteins decreased by 50%, and treatment with triiodothyronine (T3) restored ubiquitination to control levels. Surprisingly, the N-end rule pathway, which selectively degrades proteins with basic or large hydrophobic N-terminal residues, was found to be responsible for most of these changes in ubiquitin conjugation. Competitive inhibitors of this pathway that specifically block the ubiquitin ligase, E3alpha, suppressed most of the increased ubiquitin conjugation in the muscle extracts from tumor-bearing and septic rats. These inhibitors also suppressed ubiquitination in normal extracts toward levels in hypothyroid extracts, which showed little E3alpha-dependent ubiquitination. Thus, the inhibitors eliminated most of the differences in ubiquitination under these different pathological conditions. Moreover, 125I-lysozyme, a model N-end rule substrate, was ubiquitinated more rapidly in extracts from tumor-bearing and septic rats, and more slowly in those from hypothyroid rats, than in controls. Thus, the rate of ubiquitin conjugation increases in atrophying muscles, and these hormone- and cytokine-dependent responses are in large part due to activation of the N-end rule pathway.

  11. Rates of ubiquitin conjugation increase when muscles atrophy, largely through activation of the N-end rule pathway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, V.; Baracos, V.; Sarraf, P.; Goldberg, A. L.

    1998-01-01

    The rapid loss of muscle mass that accompanies many disease states, such as cancer or sepsis, is primarily a result of increased protein breakdown in muscle, and several observations have suggested an activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Accordingly, in extracts of atrophying muscles from tumor-bearing or septic rats, rates of 125I-ubiquitin conjugation to endogenous proteins were found to be higher than in control extracts. On the other hand, in extracts of muscles from hypothyroid rats, where overall proteolysis is reduced below normal, the conjugation of 125I-ubiquitin to soluble proteins decreased by 50%, and treatment with triiodothyronine (T3) restored ubiquitination to control levels. Surprisingly, the N-end rule pathway, which selectively degrades proteins with basic or large hydrophobic N-terminal residues, was found to be responsible for most of these changes in ubiquitin conjugation. Competitive inhibitors of this pathway that specifically block the ubiquitin ligase, E3alpha, suppressed most of the increased ubiquitin conjugation in the muscle extracts from tumor-bearing and septic rats. These inhibitors also suppressed ubiquitination in normal extracts toward levels in hypothyroid extracts, which showed little E3alpha-dependent ubiquitination. Thus, the inhibitors eliminated most of the differences in ubiquitination under these different pathological conditions. Moreover, 125I-lysozyme, a model N-end rule substrate, was ubiquitinated more rapidly in extracts from tumor-bearing and septic rats, and more slowly in those from hypothyroid rats, than in controls. Thus, the rate of ubiquitin conjugation increases in atrophying muscles, and these hormone- and cytokine-dependent responses are in large part due to activation of the N-end rule pathway.

  12. Unmyelinated visceral afferents exhibit frequency dependent action potential broadening while myelinated visceral afferents do not.

    PubMed

    Li, Bai-Yan; Feng, Bin; Tsu, Hwa Y; Schild, John H

    2007-06-21

    Sensory information arising from visceral organ systems is encoded into action potential trains that propagate along afferent fibers to target nuclei in the central nervous system. These information streams range from tight patterns of action potentials that are well synchronized with the sensory transduction event to irregular, patternless discharge with no clear correlation to the sensory input. In general terms these afferent pathways can be divided into unmyelinated and myelinated fiber types. Our laboratory has a long standing interest in the functional differences between these two types of afferents in terms of the preprocessing of sensory information into action potential trains (synchrony, frequency, duration, etc.), the reflexogenic consequences of this sensory input to the central nervous system and the ionic channels that give rise to the electrophysiological properties of these unique cell types. The aim of this study was to determine whether there were any functional differences in the somatic action potential characteristics of unmyelinated and myelinated vagal afferents in response to different rates of sensory nerve stimulation. Our results showed that activity and frequency-dependent widening of the somatic action potential was quite prominent in unmyelinated but not myelinated vagal afferents. Spike broadening often leads to increased influx of Ca(2+) ions that has been associated with a diverse range of modulatory mechanisms both at the cell body and central synaptic terminations (e.g. increased neurotransmitter release.) We conclude that our observations are indicative of fundamentally different mechanisms for neural integration of sensory information arising from unmyelinated and myelinated vagal afferents.

  13. The effect of stimulation of Golgi tendon organs and spindle receptors from hindlimb extensor muscles on supraspinal descending inhibitory mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Magherini, P C; Pompeiano, O; Seguin, J J

    1973-02-01

    Experiments were performed in precollicular decerebrate cats to investigate whether proprioceptive volleys originating from Golgi tendon organs and muscle spindles may activate supraspinal descending inhibitory mechanisms. Conditioning stimulation of the distal stump of ventral root filaments of L7 or S1 leading to isometric contraction of the gastrocnemius-soleus (GS) muscle inhibited the monosynaptic reflex elicited by stimulation of the ipsilateral plantaris-flexor digitorum and hallucis longus (Pl-FDHL) nerve. The amount and the time course of this Golgi inhibition were greatly increased by direct cross-excitation of the intramuscular branches of the group Ia afferents due to ephaptic stimulation of the sensory fibers, which occurred when a large number of a fibers had been synchronously activated. The postsynaptic and the presynaptic nature of these inhibitory effects, as well as their segmental origin, have been discussed. In no instance, however, did the stimulation of Golgi tendon organs elicit any late inhibition of the test monosynaptic reflex, which could be attributed to a spino-bulbo-spinal (SBS) reflex. Conditioning stimulation of both primary and secondary endings of muscle spindles, induced by dynamic stretch of the lateral gastrocnemius-soleus (LGS) muscle, was unable to elicit any late inhibition of the medial gastrocnemius (MG) monosynaptic reflex. The only changes observed in this experimental condition were a facilitation of the test reflex during the dynamic stretch of the LGS, followed at the end of the stimulus by a prolonged depression. These effects however were due to segmental interactions, since they persisted after postbrachial section of the spinal cord. Intravenous injection of an anticholinesterase, at a dose which greatly potentiated the SBS reflex inhibition produced by conditioning stimulation of the dorsal root L6, did not alter the changes in time course of the test reflex induced either by muscle contraction or by dynamic

  14. Thyroid Hormone Signaling in Male Mouse Skeletal Muscle Is Largely Independent of D2 in Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Werneck-de-Castro, Joao P.; Fonseca, Tatiana L.; Ignacio, Daniele L.; Fernandes, Gustavo W.; Andrade-Feraud, Cristina M.; Lartey, Lattoya J.; Ribeiro, Marcelo B.; Ribeiro, Miriam O.; Gereben, Balazs

    2015-01-01

    The type 2 deiodinase (D2) activates the prohormone T4 to T3. D2 is expressed in skeletal muscle (SKM), and its global inactivation (GLOB-D2KO mice) reportedly leads to skeletal muscle hypothyroidism and impaired differentiation. Here floxed Dio2 mice were crossed with mice expressing Cre-recombinase under the myosin light chain 1f (cre-MLC) to disrupt D2 expression in the late developmental stages of skeletal myocytes (SKM-D2KO). This led to a loss of approximately 50% in D2 activity in neonatal and adult SKM-D2KO skeletal muscle and about 75% in isolated SKM-D2KO myocytes. To test the impact of Dio2 disruption, we measured soleus T3 content and found it to be normal. We also looked at the expression of T3-responsive genes in skeletal muscle, ie, myosin heavy chain I, α-actin, myosin light chain, tropomyosin, and serca 1 and 2, which was preserved in neonatal SKM-D2KO hindlimb muscles, at a time that coincides with a peak of D2 activity in control animals. In adult soleus the baseline level of D2 activity was about 6-fold lower, and in the SKM-D2KO soleus, the expression of only one of five T3-responsive genes was reduced. Despite this, adult SKM-D2KO animals performed indistinguishably from controls on a treadmill test, running for approximately 16 minutes and reached a speed of about 23 m/min; muscle strength was about 0.3 mN/m·g body weight in SKM-D2KO and control ankle muscles. In conclusion, there are multiple sources of D2 in the mouse SKM, and its role is limited in postnatal skeletal muscle fibers. PMID:26214036

  15. Thyroid Hormone Signaling in Male Mouse Skeletal Muscle Is Largely Independent of D2 in Myocytes.

    PubMed

    Werneck-de-Castro, Joao P; Fonseca, Tatiana L; Ignacio, Daniele L; Fernandes, Gustavo W; Andrade-Feraud, Cristina M; Lartey, Lattoya J; Ribeiro, Marcelo B; Ribeiro, Miriam O; Gereben, Balazs; Bianco, Antonio C

    2015-10-01

    The type 2 deiodinase (D2) activates the prohormone T4 to T3. D2 is expressed in skeletal muscle (SKM), and its global inactivation (GLOB-D2KO mice) reportedly leads to skeletal muscle hypothyroidism and impaired differentiation. Here floxed Dio2 mice were crossed with mice expressing Cre-recombinase under the myosin light chain 1f (cre-MLC) to disrupt D2 expression in the late developmental stages of skeletal myocytes (SKM-D2KO). This led to a loss of approximately 50% in D2 activity in neonatal and adult SKM-D2KO skeletal muscle and about 75% in isolated SKM-D2KO myocytes. To test the impact of Dio2 disruption, we measured soleus T3 content and found it to be normal. We also looked at the expression of T3-responsive genes in skeletal muscle, ie, myosin heavy chain I, α-actin, myosin light chain, tropomyosin, and serca 1 and 2, which was preserved in neonatal SKM-D2KO hindlimb muscles, at a time that coincides with a peak of D2 activity in control animals. In adult soleus the baseline level of D2 activity was about 6-fold lower, and in the SKM-D2KO soleus, the expression of only one of five T3-responsive genes was reduced. Despite this, adult SKM-D2KO animals performed indistinguishably from controls on a treadmill test, running for approximately 16 minutes and reached a speed of about 23 m/min; muscle strength was about 0.3 mN/m·g body weight in SKM-D2KO and control ankle muscles. In conclusion, there are multiple sources of D2 in the mouse SKM, and its role is limited in postnatal skeletal muscle fibers.

  16. The anisotropic mechanical behaviour of passive skeletal muscle tissue subjected to large tensile strain.

    PubMed

    Takaza, Michael; Moerman, Kevin M; Gindre, Juliette; Lyons, Garry; Simms, Ciaran K

    2013-01-01

    The passive mechanical properties of muscle tissue are important for many biomechanics applications. However, significant gaps remain in our understanding of the three-dimensional tensile response of passive skeletal muscle tissue to applied loading. In particular, the nature of the anisotropy remains unclear and the response to loading at intermediate fibre directions and the Poisson's ratios in tension have not been reported. Accordingly, tensile tests were performed along and perpendicular to the muscle fibre direction as well as at 30°, 45° and 60° to the muscle fibre direction in samples of Longissimus dorsi muscle taken from freshly slaughtered pigs. Strain was measured using an optical non-contact method. The results show the transverse or cross fibre (TT') direction is broadly linear and is the stiffest (77 kPa stress at a stretch of 1.1), but that failure occurs at low stretches (approximately λ=1.15). In contrast the longitudinal or fibre direction (L) is nonlinear and much less stiff (10 kPa stress at a stretch of 1.1) but failure occurs at higher stretches (approximatelyλ=1.65). An almost sinusoidal variation in stress response was observed at intermediate angles. The following Poisson's ratios were measured: VLT=VLT'=0.47, VTT'=0.28 and VTL=0.74. These observations have not been previously reported and they contribute significantly to our understanding of the three dimensional deformation response of skeletal muscle tissue.

  17. Functional variation of neck muscles and their relation to feeding style in Tyrannosauridae and other large theropod dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Snively, Eric; Russell, Anthony P

    2007-08-01

    Reconstructed neck muscles of large theropod dinosaurs suggest influences on feeding style that paralleled variation in skull mechanics. In all examined theropods, the head dorsiflexor m. transversospinalis capitis probably filled in the posterior dorsal concavity of the neck, for a more crocodilian- than avian-like profile in this region. The tyrannosaurine tyrannosaurids Daspletosaurus and Tyrannosaurus had relatively larger moment arms for latero-flexion by m. longissimus capitis superficialis and m. complexus than albertosaurine tyrannosaurids, and longer dorsiflexive moment arms for m. complexus. Areas of dorsiflexor origination are significantly larger relative to neck length in adult Tyrannosaurus rex than in other tyrannosaurids, suggesting relatively large muscle cross-sections and forces. Tyrannosaurids were not particularly specialized for neck ventro-flexion. In contrast, the hypothesis that Allosaurus co-opted m. longissimus capitis superficialis for ventro-flexion is strongly corroborated. Ceratosaurus had robust insertions for the ventro-flexors m. longissimus capitis profundus and m. rectus capitis ventralis. Neck muscle morphology is consistent with puncture-and-pull and powerful shake feeding in tyrannosaurids, relatively rapid strikes in Allosaurus and Ceratosaurus, and ventroflexive augmentation of weaker jaw muscle forces in the non tyrannosaurids.

  18. Membrane Mechanics of Primary Afferent Neurons in the Dorsal Root Ganglia of Rats.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Hirosato; Gu, Jianguo G

    2017-04-25

    Membrane mechanics is an important biological factor regulating many cellular functions including cell motility, intercellular and intracellular signaling, gene expression, and membrane ion channel activity. Primary afferent neurons transduce sensory information about temperature, touch, and pain. These sensory functions may be profoundly affected by the states of primary afferent neuron mechanics. However, membrane mechanics of primary afferent neurons is largely unknown. In this study, we established the optical trapping technique for determining membrane mechanics of cultured primary afferent neurons of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). We further determined the roles of cytoskeleton and membrane lipids in DRG neuron mechanics. We found that DRG neurons had a plasma membrane tension of ∼54 pN/μm, and the tension was significantly decreased to ∼29 pN/μm by cytochalasin D treatment to disrupt actin cytoskeleton and increased to ∼79 pN/μm by methyl-β-cyclodextrin treatment to sequester membrane cholesterol. DRG neuron membrane stiffness was not significantly affected by the cytoskeleton disruption but was significantly increased after cholesterol sequestration. Our findings elucidate membrane mechanical properties of primary afferent neurons, which provide, to our knowledge, a new perspective on their sensory functions. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Vagal innervation of intestines: afferent pathways mapped with new en bloc horseradish peroxidase adaptation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng-Bin; Powley, Terry L

    2007-08-01

    Neural tracers have not typically been employed to determine the pathways followed by axons between their perikarya and target tissues. We have adapted the tetramethylbenzidine method for horseradish peroxidase (HRP) to stain fibers en bloc in organs and thus to delineate axonal trajectories. We have also applied this protocol to characterize the pathways that vagal afferents follow to the intestines. The protocol confirms that the proximal segment of the duodenum receives afferents carried in the vagal hepatic branch and demonstrates that vagal afferents innervating the remainder of the small and large intestines course through multiple fascicles derived from the celiac branches of the abdominal vagus. These fascicles divide, intermingle, and reorganize along the abdominal aorta and superior mesenteric artery (SMA), but not along the inferior mesenteric artery, and then project to the intestines with secondary arteries that branch from the SMA. The inferior pancreaticoduodenal, jejunal, middle colic, right colic, and ileocecocolic arteries all carry vagal afferents to segments of the intestines. As the arteries derived from the SMA divide repeatedly into successively finer branches and course to the intestines, the vagal afferent fascicles (typically a pair) running with each arterial branch also divide. These divisions generate sets/pairs of finer fascicles coursing with even the highest order arterial radicles. The vagal fascicles enter the intestinal wall with the vessels and appear to innervate the organ near the point of entry. The results verify the practicality and sensitivity of the en bloc HRP technique and suggest that the protocol could delineate other peripheral pathways.

  20. A role for chloride in the suppressive effect of acetylcholine on afferent vestibular activity.

    PubMed

    Pantoja, A M; Holt, J C; Guth, P S

    1997-10-01

    Afferents of the frog semicircular canal (SCC) respond to acetylcholine (ACh) application (0.3-1.0 mM) with a facilitation of their activity while frog saccular afferents respond with suppression (Guth et al., 1994). All recordings are of resting (i.e., non-stimulated) multiunit activity as previously reported (Guth et al., 1994). Substitution of 80% of external chloride (Cl-) by large, poorly permeant anions of different structures (isethionate, methanesulfonate, methylsulfate, and gluconate) reduced the suppressive effect of ACh in the frog saccular afferents. This substitution did not affect the facilitatory response of SCC afferents to ACh. Chloride channel blockers were also used to test further whether Cl- is involved in the ACh suppressive effect. These included: niflumic and flufenamic acids, picrotoxin, 5-nitro-2-(-3-phenylpropylamino)benzoic acid (NPPB), and 4,4'-dinitrostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DNDS). As with the Cl- substitutions, all of these agents reduced the suppressive response to ACh in the saccule, but not the facilitatory response seen in the SCC. The suppressive effect of ACh on saccular afferents is considered to be due to activation of a nicotinic-like receptor (Guth et al., 1994; Guth and Norris, 1996). Taking into account the effects of both Cl- substitutions and Cl- channel blockers, we conclude that changes in Cl- availability influence the suppressive effect of ACh and that therefore Cl- may be involved in this effect.

  1. Antidromic discharges of dorsal root afferents in the neonatal rat.

    PubMed

    Vinay, L; Brocard, F; Fellippa-Marques, S; Clarac, F

    1999-01-01

    Presynaptic inhibition of primary afferents can be evoked from at least three sources in the adult animal: 1) by stimulation of several supraspinal structures; 2) by spinal reflex action from sensory inputs; or 3) by the activity of spinal locomotor networks. The depolarisation in the intraspinal afferent terminals which is due, at least partly, to the activation of GABA(A) receptors may be large enough to reach firing threshold and evoke action potentials that are antidromically conducted into peripheral nerves. Little is known about the development of presynaptic inhibition and its supraspinal control during ontogeny. This article, reviewing recent experiments performed on the in vitro brainstem/spinal cord preparation of the neonatal rat, demonstrates that a similar organisation is present, to some extent, in the new-born rat. A spontaneous activity consisting of antidromic discharges can be recorded from lumbar dorsal roots. The discharges are generated by the underlying afferent terminal depolarizations reaching firing threshold. The number of antidromic action potentials increases significantly in saline solution with chloride concentration reduced to 50% of control. Bath application of the GABA(A) receptor antagonist, bicuculline (5-10 microM) blocks the antidromic discharges almost completely. Dorsal root discharges are therefore triggered by chloride-dependent GABA(A) receptor-mediated mechanisms; 1) activation of descending pathways by stimulation delivered to the ventral funiculus (VF) of the spinal cord at the C1 level; 2) activation of sensory inputs by stimulation of a neighbouring dorsal root; or 3) pharmacological activation of the central pattern generators for locomotion evokes antidromic discharges in dorsal roots. VF stimulation also inhibited the response to dorsal root stimulation. The time course of this inhibition overlapped with that of the dorsal root discharge suggesting that part of the inhibition of the monosynaptic reflex may be

  2. Purinergic signaling in cochleovestibular hair cells and afferent neurons

    PubMed Central

    Dulon, Didier

    2010-01-01

    Purinergic signaling in the mammalian cochleovestibular hair cells and afferent neurons is reviewed. The scope includes P2 and P1 receptors in the inner hair cells (IHCs) of the cochlea, the type I spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) that convey auditory signals from IHCs, the vestibular hair cells (VHCs) in the vestibular end organs (macula in the otolith organs and crista in the semicircular canals), and the vestibular ganglion neurons (VGNs) that transmit postural and rotatory information from VHCs. Various subtypes of P2X ionotropic receptors are expressed in IHCs as well as P2Y metabotropic receptors that mobilize intracellular calcium. Their functional roles still remain speculative, but adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) could regulate the spontaneous activity of the hair cells during development and the receptor potentials of mature hair cells during sound stimulation. In SGNs, P2Y metabotropic receptors activate a nonspecific cation conductance that is permeable to large cations as NMDG+ and TEA+. Remarkably, this depolarizing nonspecific conductance in SGNs can also be activated by other metabotropic processes evoked by acetylcholine and tachykinin. The molecular nature and the role of this depolarizing channel are unknown, but its electrophysiological properties suggest that it could lie within the transient receptor potential channel family and could regulate the firing properties of the afferent neurons. Studies on the vestibular partition (VHC and VGN) are sparse but have also shown the expression of P2X and P2Y receptors. There is still little evidence of functional P1 (adenosine) receptors in the afferent system of the inner ear. PMID:20806012

  3. Changes in muscle spindle firing in response to length changes of neighboring muscles.

    PubMed

    Smilde, Hiltsje A; Vincent, Jake A; Baan, Guus C; Nardelli, Paul; Lodder, Johannes C; Mansvelder, Huibert D; Cope, Tim C; Maas, Huub

    2016-06-01

    Skeletal muscle force can be transmitted to the skeleton, not only via its tendons of origin and insertion but also through connective tissues linking the muscle belly to surrounding structures. Through such epimuscular myofascial connections, length changes of a muscle may cause length changes within an adjacent muscle and hence, affect muscle spindles. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of epimuscular myofascial forces on feedback from muscle spindles in triceps surae muscles of the rat. We hypothesized that within an intact muscle compartment, muscle spindles not only signal length changes of the muscle in which they are located but can also sense length changes that occur as a result of changing the length of synergistic muscles. Action potentials from single afferents were measured intra-axonally in response to ramp-hold release (RHR) stretches of an agonistic muscle at different lengths of its synergist, as well as in response to synergist RHRs. A decrease in force threshold was found for both soleus (SO) and lateral gastrocnemius afferents, along with an increase in length threshold for SO afferents. In addition, muscle spindle firing could be evoked by RHRs of the synergistic muscle. We conclude that muscle spindles not only signal length changes of the muscle in which they are located but also local length changes that occur as a result of changing the length and relative position of synergistic muscles. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Changes in muscle spindle firing in response to length changes of neighboring muscles

    PubMed Central

    Smilde, Hiltsje A.; Vincent, Jake A.; Baan, Guus C.; Nardelli, Paul; Lodder, Johannes C.; Mansvelder, Huibert D.; Cope, Tim C.

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle force can be transmitted to the skeleton, not only via its tendons of origin and insertion but also through connective tissues linking the muscle belly to surrounding structures. Through such epimuscular myofascial connections, length changes of a muscle may cause length changes within an adjacent muscle and hence, affect muscle spindles. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of epimuscular myofascial forces on feedback from muscle spindles in triceps surae muscles of the rat. We hypothesized that within an intact muscle compartment, muscle spindles not only signal length changes of the muscle in which they are located but can also sense length changes that occur as a result of changing the length of synergistic muscles. Action potentials from single afferents were measured intra-axonally in response to ramp-hold release (RHR) stretches of an agonistic muscle at different lengths of its synergist, as well as in response to synergist RHRs. A decrease in force threshold was found for both soleus (SO) and lateral gastrocnemius afferents, along with an increase in length threshold for SO afferents. In addition, muscle spindle firing could be evoked by RHRs of the synergistic muscle. We conclude that muscle spindles not only signal length changes of the muscle in which they are located but also local length changes that occur as a result of changing the length and relative position of synergistic muscles. PMID:27075540

  5. Stretchable Multichannel Electromyography Sensor Array Covering Large Area for Controlling Home Electronics with Distinguishable Signals from Multiple Muscles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Namyun; Lim, Taehoon; Song, Kwangsun; Yang, Sung; Lee, Jongho

    2016-08-17

    Physiological signals provide important information for biomedical applications and, more recently, in the form of wearable electronics for active interactions between bodies and external environments. Multiple physiological sensors are often required to map distinct signals from multiple points over large areas for more diverse applications. In this paper, we present a reusable, multichannel, surface electromyography (EMG) sensor array that covers multiple muscles over relatively large areas, with compliant designs that provide different levels of stiffness for repetitive uses, without backing layers. Mechanical and electrical characteristics along with distinct measurements from different muscles demonstrate the feasibility of the concept. The results should be useful to actively control devices in the environment with one array of wearable sensors, as demonstrated with home electronics.

  6. Physiological recruitment of motor units by high-frequency electrical stimulation of afferent pathways.

    PubMed

    Dideriksen, Jakob L; Muceli, Silvia; Dosen, Strahinja; Laine, Christopher M; Farina, Dario

    2015-02-01

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) is commonly used in rehabilitation, but electrically evoked muscle activation is in several ways different from voluntary muscle contractions. These differences lead to challenges in the use of NMES for restoring muscle function. We investigated the use of low-current, high-frequency nerve stimulation to activate the muscle via the spinal motoneuron (MN) pool to achieve more natural activation patterns. Using a novel stimulation protocol, the H-reflex responses to individual stimuli in a train of stimulation pulses at 100 Hz were reliably estimated with surface EMG during low-level contractions. Furthermore, single motor unit recruitment by afferent stimulation was analyzed with intramuscular EMG. The results showed that substantially elevated H-reflex responses were obtained during 100-Hz stimulation with respect to a lower stimulation frequency. Furthermore, motor unit recruitment using 100-Hz stimulation was not fully synchronized, as it occurs in classic NMES, and the discharge rates differed among motor units because each unit was activated only after a specific number of stimuli. The most likely mechanism behind these observations is the temporal summation of subthreshold excitatory postsynaptic potentials from Ia fibers to the MNs. These findings and their interpretation were also verified by a realistic simulation model of afferent stimulation of a MN population. These results suggest that the proposed stimulation strategy may allow generation of considerable levels of muscle activation by motor unit recruitment that resembles the physiological conditions.

  7. Neuropeptide Y-mediated sex- and afferent-specific neurotransmissions contribute to sexual dimorphism of baroreflex afferent function

    PubMed Central

    He, Jian-Li; Yuan, Mei; Zhao, Miao; Wang, Jian-Xin; He, Jian; Wang, Lu-Qi; Guo, Xin-Jing; Zuo, Meng; Zhao, Shu-Yang; Ma, Mei-Na; Li, Jun-Nan; Shou, Weinian; Qiao, Guo-Fen; Li, Bai-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background Molecular and cellular mechanisms of neuropeptide-Y (NPY)-mediated gender-difference in blood pressure (BP) regulation are largely unknown. Methods Baroreceptor sensitivity (BRS) was evaluated by measuring the response of BP to phenylephrine/nitroprusside. Serum NPY concentration was determined using ELISA. The mRNA and protein expression of NPY receptors were assessed in tissue and single-cell by RT-PCR, immunoblot, and immunohistochemistry. NPY was injected into the nodose while arterial pressure was monitored. Electrophysiological recordings were performed on nodose neurons from rats by patch-clamp technique. Results The BRS was higher in female than male and ovariectomized rats, while serum NPY concentration was similar among groups. The sex-difference was detected in Y1R, not Y2R protein expression, however, both were upregulated upon ovariectomy and canceled by estrogen replacement. Immunostaining confirmed Y1R and Y2R expression in myelinated and unmyelinated afferents. Single-cell PCR demonstrated that Y1R expression/distribution was identical between A- and C-types, whereas, expressed level of Y2R was ∼15 and ∼7 folds higher in Ah- and C-types than A-types despite similar distribution. Activation of Y1R in nodose elevated BP, while activation of Y2R did the opposite. Activation of Y1R did not alter action potential duration (APD) of A-types, but activation of Y2R- and Y1R/Y2R in Ah- and C-types frequency-dependently prolonged APD. N-type ICa was reduced in A-, Ah- and C-types when either Y1R, Y2R, or both were activated. The sex-difference in Y1R expression was also observed in NTS. Conclusions Sex- and afferent-specific expression of Neuropeptide-Y receptors in baroreflex afferent pathway may contribute to sexual-dimorphic neurocontrol of BP regulation. PMID:27623075

  8. Muscle spindle and fusimotor activity in locomotion.

    PubMed

    Ellaway, Peter H; Taylor, Anthony; Durbaba, Rade

    2015-08-01

    Mammals may exhibit different forms of locomotion even within a species. A particular form of locomotion (e.g. walk, run, bound) appears to be selected by supraspinal commands, but the precise pattern, i.e. phasing of limbs and muscles, is generated within the spinal cord by so-called central pattern generators. Peripheral sense organs, particularly the muscle spindle, play a crucial role in modulating the central pattern generator output. In turn, the feedback from muscle spindles is itself modulated by static and dynamic fusimotor (gamma) neurons. The activity of muscle spindle afferents and fusimotor neurons during locomotion in the cat is reviewed here. There is evidence for some alpha-gamma co-activation during locomotion involving static gamma motoneurons. However, both static and dynamic gamma motoneurons show patterns of modulation that are distinct from alpha motoneuron activity. It has been proposed that static gamma activity may drive muscle spindle secondary endings to signal the intended movement to the central nervous system. Dynamic gamma motoneuron drive appears to prime muscle spindle primary endings to signal transitions in phase of the locomotor cycle. These findings come largely from reduced animal preparations (decerebrate) and require confirmation in freely moving intact animals.

  9. Development, plasticity and modulation of visceral afferents

    PubMed Central

    Christianson, Julie A.; Bielefeldt, Klaus; Altier, Christophe; Cenac, Nicolas; Davis, Brian M.; Gebhart, Gerald F.; High, Karin W.; Kollarik, Marian; Randich, Alan; Undem, Brad; Vergnolle, Nathalie

    2010-01-01

    Visceral pain is the most common reason for doctor visits in the US. Like somatic pain, virtually all visceral pain sensations begin with the activation of primary sensory neurons innervating the viscera and/or the blood vessels associated with these structures. Visceral afferents also play a central role in tissue homeostasis. Recent studies show that in addition to monitoring the state of the viscera, they perform efferent functions through the release of small molecules (e.g. peptides like CGRP) that can drive inflammation, thereby contributing to the development of visceral pathologies (e.g. diabetes Razavi, R., Chan, Y., Afifiyan, F.N., Liu, X.J., Wan, X., Yantha, J., Tsui, H., Tang, L., Tsai, S., Santamaria, P., Driver, J.P., Serreze, D., Salter, M.W., Dosch, H.M., 2006. TRPV1+ sensory neurons control beta cell stress and islet inflammation in autoimmune diabetes, Cell 127 1123–1135). Visceral afferents are heterogeneous with respect to their anatomy, neurochemistry and function. They are also highly plastic in that their cellular environment continuously influences their response properties. This plasticity makes them susceptible to long-term changes that may contribute significantly to the development of persistent pain states such as those associated with irritable bowel syndrome, pancreatitis, and visceral cancers. This review examines recent insights into visceral afferent anatomy and neurochemistry and how neonatal insults can affect the function of these neurons in the adult. New approaches to the treatment of visceral pain, which focus on primary afferents, will also be discussed. PMID:19150371

  10. Afferent baroreflex failure in familial dysautonomia

    PubMed Central

    Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Axelrod, Felicia; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2010-01-01

    Background: Familial dysautonomia (FD) is due to a genetic deficiency of the protein IKAP, which affects development of peripheral neurons. Patients with FD display complex abnormalities of the baroreflex of unknown cause. Methods: To test the hypothesis that the autonomic phenotype of FD is due to selective impairment of afferent baroreceptor input, we examined the autonomic and neuroendocrine responses triggered by stimuli that either engage (postural changes) or bypass (cognitive/emotional) afferent baroreflex pathways in 50 patients with FD and compared them to those of normal subjects and to those of patients with pure autonomic failure (PAF), a disorder with selective impairment of efferent autonomic neurons. Results: During upright tilt, in patients with FD and in patients with PAF blood pressure fell markedly but the heart rate increased in PAF and decreased in FD. Plasma norepinephrine levels failed to increase in both groups. Vasopressin levels increased appropriately in patients with PAF but failed to increase in patients with FD. Head-down tilt increased blood pressure in both groups but increased heart rate only in patients with FD. Mental stress evoked a marked increase in blood pressure and heart rate in patients with FD but little change in those with PAF. Conclusion: The failure to modulate sympathetic activity and to release vasopressin by baroreflex-mediated stimuli together with marked sympathetic activation during cognitive tasks indicate selective failure of baroreceptor afference. These findings indicate that IKAP is critical for the development of afferent baroreflex pathways and has therapeutic implications in the management of these patients. GLOSSARY FD = familial dysautonomia; FVR = forearm vascular resistance; PAF = pure autonomic failure. PMID:21098405

  11. Vagal expiratory afferent discharges during spontaneous breathing.

    PubMed

    Wei, J Y; Shen, E

    1985-06-03

    Expiratory discharges in cervical afferent vagal fibres during spontaneous respiration were observed in anesthetized animals (17 rabbits, 4 cats and 2 monkeys). The percentages of such units among the total observed fibres was 11% in rabbits, 5% in monkeys, 2% in cats. All the experiments were done after section of the recurrent laryngeal nerve and the abdominal branches of the vagus nerve. Changing the intraesophageal pressure from +15 mm Hg to -25 mm Hg by injection or suction of air into or out of the esophagus, of which the abdominal end had been ligated, did not affect the expiratory discharges significantly suggesting that the receptors were not in the esophagus. Injection of air into the lungs to elevate the intratracheal pressure to 5 mm, 10 mm or 15 mm Hg could not excite such receptors. Collapse of the lungs caused by artificial pneumothorax produced continuous discharges in such fibres. Inflation of collapsed lungs by an artificial respiration pump stopped the sustained discharges immediately. The average conduction velocity of the afferent fibres was 25.5 m/s. It seems that this is a type of slowly adapting, low threshold pulmonary receptor with medium sized afferent fibres. The adequate stimulus of such receptors is deflation of the lungs. The possible advantage of participation of such receptors, in addition to the pulmonary stretch (inflation) receptors, in regulation of normal respiration is discussed in the light of the concept of 'paired receptors'.

  12. Phrenic nerve afferent activation of neurons in the cat SI cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Paul W; Reep, Roger L; Thompson, Floyd J

    2010-03-01

    Stimulation of respiratory afferents elicits neural activity in the somatosensory region of the cerebral cortex in humans and animals. Respiratory afferents have been stimulated with mechanical loads applied to breathing and electrical stimulation of respiratory nerves and muscles. It was hypothesized that stimulation of the phrenic nerve myelinated afferents will activate neurons in the 3a and 3b region of the somatosensory cortex. This was investigated in cats with electrical stimulation of the intrathoracic phrenic nerve and C(5) root of the phrenic nerve. The somatosensory cortical response to phrenic afferent stimulation was recorded from the cortical surface, contralateral to the phrenic nerve, ispilateral to the phrenic nerve and with microelectrodes inserted into the cortical site of the surface dipole. Short-latency, primary cortical evoked potentials (1 degrees CEP) were recorded with stimulation of myelinated afferents of the intrathoracic phrenic nerve in the contralateral post-cruciate gyrus of all animals (n = 42). The mean onset and peak latencies were 8.5 +/- 5.7 ms and 21.8 +/- 9.8 ms, respectively. The rostro-caudal surface location of the 1 degrees CEP was found between the rostral edge of the post-cruciate dimple (PCD) and the rostral edge of the ansate sulcus, medio-lateral location was between 2 mm lateral to the sagittal sulcus and the lateral end of the cruciate sulcus. Histological examination revealed that the 1 degrees CEP sites were recorded over areas 3a and 3b of the SI somatosensory cortex. Intracortical activation of 16 neurons with two patterns of neural activity was recorded: (1) short-latency, short-duration activation of neurons and (2) long-latency, long-duration activation of neurons. Short-latency neurons had a mean onset latency of 10.4 +/- 3.1 ms and mean burst duration of 10.1 +/- 3.2 ms. The short-latency units were recorded at an average depth of 1.7 +/- 0.5 mm below the cortical surface. The long-latency neurons had a

  13. NIAC Phase I Study Final Report on Large Ultra-Lightweight Photonic Muscle Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritter, Joe

    2016-01-01

    way to make large inexpensive deployable mirrors where the cost is measured in millions, not billions like current efforts. For example we seek an interim goal within 10 years of a Hubble size (2.4m) primary mirror weighing 1 pound at a cost of 10K in materials. Described here is a technology using thin ultra lightweight materials where shape can be controlled simply with a beam of light, allowing imaging with incredibly low mass yet precisely shaped mirrors. These " Photonic Muscle" substrates will eventually make precision control of giant s p a c e apertures (mirrors) possible. OCCAM substrates make precision control of giant ultra light-weight mirror apertures possible. This technology is posed to create a revolution in remote sensing by making large ultra lightweight space telescopes a fiscal and material reality over the next decade.

  14. Models of utricular bouton afferents: role of afferent-hair cell connectivity in determining spike train regularity.

    PubMed

    Holmes, William R; Huwe, Janice A; Williams, Barbara; Rowe, Michael H; Peterson, Ellengene H

    2017-05-01

    Vestibular bouton afferent terminals in turtle utricle can be categorized into four types depending on their location and terminal arbor structure: lateral extrastriolar (LES), striolar, juxtastriolar, and medial extrastriolar (MES). The terminal arbors of these afferents differ in surface area, total length, collecting area, number of boutons, number of bouton contacts per hair cell, and axon diameter (Huwe JA, Logan CJ, Williams B, Rowe MH, Peterson EH. J Neurophysiol 113: 2420-2433, 2015). To understand how differences in terminal morphology and the resulting hair cell inputs might affect afferent response properties, we modeled representative afferents from each region, using reconstructed bouton afferents. Collecting area and hair cell density were used to estimate hair cell-to-afferent convergence. Nonmorphological features were held constant to isolate effects of afferent structure and connectivity. The models suggest that all four bouton afferent types are electrotonically compact and that excitatory postsynaptic potentials are two to four times larger in MES afferents than in other afferents, making MES afferents more responsive to low input levels. The models also predict that MES and LES terminal structures permit higher spontaneous firing rates than those in striola and juxtastriola. We found that differences in spike train regularity are not a consequence of differences in peripheral terminal structure, per se, but that a higher proportion of multiple contacts between afferents and individual hair cells increases afferent firing irregularity. The prediction that afferents having primarily one bouton contact per hair cell will fire more regularly than afferents making multiple bouton contacts per hair cell has implications for spike train regularity in dimorphic and calyx afferents.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Bouton afferents in different regions of turtle utricle have very different morphologies and afferent-hair cell connectivities. Highly detailed computational

  15. Population Coding of Forelimb Joint Kinematics by Peripheral Afferents in Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Umeda, Tatsuya; Seki, Kazuhiko; Sato, Masa-aki; Nishimura, Yukio; Kawato, Mitsuo; Isa, Tadashi

    2012-01-01

    Various peripheral receptors provide information concerning position and movement to the central nervous system to achieve complex and dexterous movements of forelimbs in primates. The response properties of single afferent receptors to movements at a single joint have been examined in detail, but the population coding of peripheral afferents remains poorly defined. In this study, we obtained multichannel recordings from dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in cervical segments of monkeys. We applied the sparse linear regression (SLiR) algorithm to the recordings, which selects useful input signals to reconstruct movement kinematics. Multichannel recordings of peripheral afferents were performed by inserting multi-electrode arrays into the DRGs of lower cervical segments in two anesthetized monkeys. A total of 112 and 92 units were responsive to the passive joint movements or the skin stimulation with a painting brush in Monkey 1 and Monkey 2, respectively. Using the SLiR algorithm, we reconstructed the temporal changes of joint angle, angular velocity, and acceleration at the elbow, wrist, and finger joints from temporal firing patterns of the DRG neurons. By automatically selecting a subset of recorded units, the SLiR achieved superior generalization performance compared with a regularized linear regression algorithm. The SLiR selected not only putative muscle units that were responsive to only the passive movements, but also a number of putative cutaneous units responsive to the skin stimulation. These results suggested that an ensemble of peripheral primary afferents that contains both putative muscle and cutaneous units encode forelimb joint kinematics of non-human primates. PMID:23112841

  16. Modulation of long-latency afferent inhibition by the amplitude of sensory afferent volley.

    PubMed

    Turco, Claudia V; El-Sayes, Jenin; Fassett, Hunter J; Chen, Robert; Nelson, Aimee J

    2017-07-01

    Long-latency afferent inhibition (LAI) is the inhibition of the transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) motor-evoked potentials (MEP) by the sensory afferent volley following electrical stimulation of a peripheral nerve. It is unknown how the activation of sensory afferent fibers relates to the magnitude of LAI. This study investigated the relationship between LAI and the sensory nerve action potentials (SNAP) from the median nerve (MN) and the digital nerves (DN) of the second digit. LAI was obtained by delivering nerve stimulation 200 ms before a TMS pulse delivered over the motor cortex. Experiment 1 assessed the magnitude of LAI following stimulation of the contralateral MN or DN using nerve stimulus intensities relative to the maximum SNAP (SNAPmax) of that nerve and two TMS intensities (0.5- and 1-mV MEP). Results indicate that MN LAI is maximal at ~50% SNAPmax, when presumably all sensory afferents are recruited for TMS of 0.5-mV MEP. For DN, LAI appears at ~50% SNAPmax and does not increase with further recruitment of sensory afferents. Experiment 2 investigated the magnitude of LAI following ipsilateral nerve stimulation at intensities relative to SNAPmax Results show minimal LAI evoked by ipsilateral MN and no LAI following ipsilateral DN stimulation. Implications for future studies investigating LAI include adjusting nerve stimulation to 50% SNAPmax to obtain maximal LAI. Additionally, MN LAI can be used as a marker for neurological disease or injury by using a nerve stimulation intensity that can evoke a depth of LAI capable of increasing or decreasing.NEW & NOTEWORTHY This is the first investigation of the relationship between long-latency afferent inhibition (LAI) and the sensory afferent volley. Differences exist between median and digital nerve LAI. For the median nerve, LAI increases until all sensory fibers are presumably recruited. In contrast, digital nerve LAI does not increase with the recruitment of additional sensory fibers but rather is

  17. New Types of Artificial Muscles for Large Stroke and High Force Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-10

    of steel plate. Actuation of the sheets can be used for optimizing nanotube electrodes for organic light-emitting displays, solar cells , charge... solar cells , charge stripping from ion beams, and cold electron field emission. The work on aerogel muscles stimulated development of novel reel...such applications as self-cleaning textiles and Graetzel solar cells . The ability to make biscrolled yarns having Fermat, Archimedean, and dual

  18. Voltage-dependent sodium (NaV) channels in group IV sensory afferents

    PubMed Central

    Elmslie, Keith S

    2016-01-01

    Patients with intermittent claudication suffer from both muscle pain and an exacerbated exercise pressor reflex. Excitability of the group III and group IV afferent fibers mediating these functions is controlled in part by voltage-dependent sodium (NaV) channels. We previously found tetrodotoxin-resistant NaV1.8 channels to be the primary type in muscle afferent somata. However, action potentials in group III and IV afferent axons are blocked by TTX, supporting a minimal role of NaV1.8 channels. To address these apparent differences in NaV channel expression between axon and soma, we used immunohistochemistry to identify the NaV channels expressed in group IV axons within the gastrocnemius muscle and the dorsal root ganglia sections. Positive labeling by an antibody against the neurofilament protein peripherin was used to identify group IV neurons and axons. We show that >67% of group IV fibers express NaV1.8, NaV1.6, or NaV1.7. Interestingly, expression of NaV1.8 channels in group IV somata was significantly higher than in the fibers, whereas there were no significant differences for either NaV1.6 or NaV1.7. When combined with previous work, our results suggest that NaV1.8 channels are expressed in most group IV axons, but that, under normal conditions, NaV1.6 and/or NaV1.7 play a more important role in action potential generation to signal muscle pain and the exercise pressor reflex. PMID:27385723

  19. Egr3-Dependent Muscle Spindle Stretch Receptor Intrafusal Muscle Fiber Differentiation and Fusimotor Innervation Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira Fernandes, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Muscle stretch proprioceptors (muscle spindles) are required for stretch reflexes and locomotor control. Proprioception abnormalities are observed in many human neuropathies, but the mechanisms involved in establishing and maintaining muscle spindle innervation and function are still poorly understood. During skeletal muscle development, sensory (Ia-afferent) innervation induces contacted myotubes to transform into intrafusal muscle fibers that form the stretch receptor core. The transcriptional regulator Egr3 is induced in Ia-afferent contacted myotubes by Neuregulin1 (Nrg1)/ErbB receptor signaling and it has an essential role in spindle morphogenesis and function. Because Egr3 is widely expressed during development and has a pleiotropic function, whether Egr3 functions primarily in skeletal muscle, Ia-afferent neurons, or in Schwann cells that myelinate Ia-afferent axons remains unresolved. In the present studies, cell-specific ablation of Egr3 in mice showed that it has a skeletal muscle autonomous function in stretch receptor development. Moreover, using genetic tracing, we found that Ia-afferent contacted Egr3-deficient myotubes were induced in normal numbers, but their development was blocked to generate one to two shortened fibers that failed to express some characteristic myosin heavy chain (MyHC) proteins. These “spindle remnants” persisted into adulthood, remained innervated by Ia-afferents, and expressed neurotrophin3 (NT3), which is required for Ia-afferent neuron survival. However, they were not innervated by fusimotor axons and they did not express glial derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), which is essential for fusimotor neuron survival. These results demonstrate that Egr3 has an essential role in regulating gene expression that promotes normal intrafusal muscle fiber differentiation and fusimotor innervation homeostasis. PMID:25855173

  20. Egr3-dependent muscle spindle stretch receptor intrafusal muscle fiber differentiation and fusimotor innervation homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Oliveira Fernandes, Michelle; Tourtellotte, Warren G

    2015-04-08

    Muscle stretch proprioceptors (muscle spindles) are required for stretch reflexes and locomotor control. Proprioception abnormalities are observed in many human neuropathies, but the mechanisms involved in establishing and maintaining muscle spindle innervation and function are still poorly understood. During skeletal muscle development, sensory (Ia-afferent) innervation induces contacted myotubes to transform into intrafusal muscle fibers that form the stretch receptor core. The transcriptional regulator Egr3 is induced in Ia-afferent contacted myotubes by Neuregulin1 (Nrg1)/ErbB receptor signaling and it has an essential role in spindle morphogenesis and function. Because Egr3 is widely expressed during development and has a pleiotropic function, whether Egr3 functions primarily in skeletal muscle, Ia-afferent neurons, or in Schwann cells that myelinate Ia-afferent axons remains unresolved. In the present studies, cell-specific ablation of Egr3 in mice showed that it has a skeletal muscle autonomous function in stretch receptor development. Moreover, using genetic tracing, we found that Ia-afferent contacted Egr3-deficient myotubes were induced in normal numbers, but their development was blocked to generate one to two shortened fibers that failed to express some characteristic myosin heavy chain (MyHC) proteins. These "spindle remnants" persisted into adulthood, remained innervated by Ia-afferents, and expressed neurotrophin3 (NT3), which is required for Ia-afferent neuron survival. However, they were not innervated by fusimotor axons and they did not express glial derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), which is essential for fusimotor neuron survival. These results demonstrate that Egr3 has an essential role in regulating gene expression that promotes normal intrafusal muscle fiber differentiation and fusimotor innervation homeostasis.

  1. Cytochrome P450 and cyclooxygenase metabolites contribute to the endothelin-1 afferent arteriolar vasoconstrictor and calcium responses.

    PubMed

    Imig, J D; Pham, B T; LeBlanc, E A; Reddy, K M; Falck, J R; Inscho, E W

    2000-01-01

    Arachidonic acid metabolites contribute to the endothelin-1 (ET-1)-induced decrease in renal blood flow, but the vascular sites of action are unknown. Experiments performed in vitro used the rat juxtamedullary nephron preparation combined with videomicroscopy. The response of afferent arterioles to ET-1 was determined before and after cytochrome P450 (CYP450) or cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition. Afferent arteriolar diameter averaged 20+/-1 microm (n=17) at a renal perfusion pressure of 100 mm Hg. Superfusion with 0.001 to 10 nmol/L ET-1 caused a graded decrease in diameter of the afferent arteriole. Vessel diameter decreased by 30+/-2% and 41+/-2% in response to 1 and 10 nmol/L ET-1, respectively. The afferent arteriolar response to ET-1 was significantly attenuated during administration of the CYP450 hydroxylase inhibitor N-methylsulfonyl-12,12-dibromododec-11-enamide (DDMS), such that afferent arteriolar diameter decreased by 19+/-3% and 22+/-3% in response to 1 and 10 nmol/L ET-1, respectively. COX inhibition also greatly attenuated the vasoconstriction elicited by ET-1, whereas the CYP450 epoxygenase inhibitor N-methylsulfonyl-6-(2-proparglyoxyphenyl) hexanamide enhanced the ET-1-mediated vascular response. Additional studies were performed using freshly isolated smooth muscle cells prepared from preglomerular microvessels. Renal microvascular smooth muscle cells were loaded with the calcium-sensitive dye fura 2 and studied by use of single-cell fluorescence microscopy. Basal renal microvascular smooth muscle cell [Ca(2+)](i) averaged 95+/-3 nmol/L (n=42). ET-1 (10 nmol/L) increased microvascular smooth muscle cell [Ca(2+)](i) to a peak value of 731+/-75 nmol/L before stabilizing at 136+/-8 nmol/L. Administration of DDMS or the COX inhibitor indomethacin significantly attenuated the renal microvascular smooth muscle cell calcium response to ET-1. These data demonstrate that CYP450 hydroxylase and COX arachidonic acid metabolites contribute importantly to the

  2. A quantitative study of the central projection patterns of unmyelinated ventral root afferents in the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Häbler, H J; Jänig, W; Koltzenburg, M; McMahon, S B

    1990-01-01

    1. The ventral roots of the spinal cord contain a large number of unmyelinated primary afferent neurones. There is some controversy, however, about the function of these fibres and the route of their central projection. Here we have used electrophysiological techniques to quantify the central projection patterns of these neurones in the segment S2 of adult chloralose-anaesthesized cats. 2. A total of 1185 single unmyelinated units were recorded in small filaments isolated from intact and de-efferented ventral roots or intact dorsal roots of the segment S2 in nineteen cats. The projection patterns of these neurones were tested using supramaximal electrical stimulation of the pelvic and pudendal nerve (the main tributaries of the spinal nerve of this segment) and of the segmental companion root (dorsal or ventral as appropriate). 3. The principal finding of this study is that 85% of unmyelinated afferent axons in the ventral root are direct and exclusive projections. They constitute a separate class of afferents which is only capable of transmitting information from the periphery via the ventral roots. However, the proportion of these fibres that enter the central nervous system is unknown and it seems likely that some of them peter out as they approach the spinal cord and end blindly. The functional role of such afferents remains obscure. 4. For the remaining 15% of unmyelinated ventral root afferents, a projection into the segmental dorsal root was found. The majority of those fibres (about two-thirds) are primary afferent neurones innervating the pia mater. Some of these units had a small spot-like receptive field and responded to mechanical stimuli such as pressure and stretch of the root. They did not have axon projections in a peripheral nerve. 5. A few (5%) unmyelinated ventral root fibres are collateral branches of normal primary afferents projecting through the dorsal root. These trifurcating neurones are a small population which make up only some 0.5% of

  3. Spatial orientation of semicircular canals and afferent sensitivity vectors in pigeons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, J. D.

    1996-01-01

    Rotational head motion in vertebrates is detected by the semicircular canal system, whose innervating primary afferent fibers carry information about movement in specific head planes. The semicircular canals have been qualitatively examined over a number of years, and the canal planes have been quantitatively characterized in several animal species. The present study first determined the geometric relationship between individual semicircular canals and between the canals and the stereotactic head planes in pigeons. Stereotactic measurements of multiple points along the circumference of the bony canals were taken, and the measured points fitted with a three-dimensional planar surface. Direction normals to the plane's surface were calculated and used to define angles between semicircular canal pairs. Because of the unusual shape of the anterior semicircular canals in pigeons, two planes, a major and a minor, were fitted to the canal's course. Calculated angle values for all canals indicated that the horizontal and posterior semicircular canals are nearly orthogonal, but the anterior canals have substantial deviations from orthogonality with other canal planes. Next, the responses of the afferent fibers that innervate each of the semicircular canals to 0.5 Hz sinusoidal rotation about an earth-vertical axis were obtained. The head orientation relative to the rotation axis was systematically varied so that directions of maximum sensitivity for each canal afferent could be determined. These sensitivity vectors were then compared with the canal plane direction normals. The afferents that innervated specific semicircular canals formed homogeneous clusters of sensitivity vectors in different head planes. The horizontal and posterior afferents had average sensitivity vectors that were largely co-incident with the innervated canal plane direction normals. Anterior canal afferents, however, appeared to synthesize contributions from the major and minor plane components of the

  4. Hair-Cell Versus Afferent Adaptation in the Semicircular Canals

    PubMed Central

    Rabbitt, R. D.; Boyle, R.; Holstein, G. R.; Highstein, S. M.

    2010-01-01

    The time course and extent of adaptation in semicircular canal hair cells was compared to adaptation in primary afferent neurons for physiological stimuli in vivo to study the origins of the neural code transmitted to the brain. The oyster toadfish, Opsanus tau, was used as the experimental model. Afferent firing-rate adaptation followed a double-exponential time course in response to step cupula displacements. The dominant adaptation time constant varied considerably among afferent fibers and spanned six orders of magnitude for the population (~1 ms to >1,000 s). For sinusoidal stimuli (0.1–20 Hz), the rapidly adapting afferents exhibited a 90° phase lead and frequency-dependent gain, whereas slowly adapting afferents exhibited a flat gain and no phase lead. Hair-cell voltage and current modulations were similar to the slowly adapting afferents and exhibited a relatively flat gain with very little phase lead over the physiological bandwidth and dynamic range tested. Semicircular canal microphonics also showed responses consistent with the slowly adapting subset of afferents and with hair cells. The relatively broad diversity of afferent adaptation time constants and frequency-dependent discharge modulations relative to hair-cell voltage implicate a subsequent site of adaptation that plays a major role in further shaping the temporal characteristics of semicircular canal afferent neural signals. PMID:15306633

  5. Domestication causes large-scale effects on gene expression in rainbow trout: analysis of muscle, liver and brain transcriptomes.

    PubMed

    Tymchuk, Wendy; Sakhrani, Dionne; Devlin, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Domestication has produced faster-growing strains of animals for use in agriculture, but selection has been applied with little knowledge of the underlying genetic changes that arose throughout the process. Mammals and birds have been domesticated for thousands of years whereas fish have been domesticated only recently; therefore, wild progenitor strains remain for comparison. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) have undergone intensive selection and domesticated strains grow more rapidly than extant wild strains. To assess physiological pathways altered by domestication, whole-genome mRNA expression was measured in brain, muscle and liver of size-matched domestic and wild trout using a 16K (cGRASP) salmonid microarray. A large number of genes differed between strains, ranging from 3% of genes in brain to 9% in muscle. Domestic fish had more down-regulated genes in the brain relative to wild fish, whereas more genes were up-regulated in domestic liver and muscle. Relative to wild fish, there was a down-regulation of cell division and an up-regulation of structural genes in the brain of domestic fish. In liver from domestic fish, there was an up-regulation of genes related to transport with a down-regulation of lipid binding. Analysis of the functional categories for muscle indicated that most pathways, including pathways related to metabolism and catabolism, were up-regulated in domestic fish. Comparison of these results to other genomic studies on transgenic, domestic and wild salmonids suggests that similar physiological pathways are altered systemically to support faster rates of growth, regardless of the underlying genetic alteration that has caused the altered growth.

  6. Analysis of Proprioceptive Sensory Innervation of the Mouse Soleus: A Whole-Mount Muscle Approach

    PubMed Central

    Sonner, Martha J.; Walters, Marie C.; Ladle, David R.

    2017-01-01

    Muscle proprioceptive afferents provide feedback critical for successful execution of motor tasks via specialized mechanoreceptors housed within skeletal muscles: muscle spindles, supplied by group Ia and group II afferents, and Golgi tendon organs, supplied by group Ib afferents. The morphology of these proprioceptors and their associated afferents has been studied extensively in the cat soleus, and to a lesser degree, in the rat; however, quantitative analyses of proprioceptive innervation in the mouse soleus are comparatively limited. The present study employed genetically-encoded fluorescent reporting systems to label and analyze muscle spindles, Golgi tendon organs, and the proprioceptive sensory neuron subpopulations supplying them within the intact mouse soleus muscle using high magnification confocal microscopy. Total proprioceptive receptors numbered 11.3 ± 0.4 and 5.2 ± 0.2 for muscle spindles and Golgi tendon organs, respectively, and these receptor counts varied independently (n = 27 muscles). Analogous to findings in the rat, muscle spindles analyzed were most frequently supplied by two proprioceptive afferents, and in the majority of instances, both were classified as primary endings using established morphological criteria. Secondary endings were most frequently observed when spindle associated afferents totaled three or more. The mean diameter of primary and secondary afferent axons differed significantly, but the distributions overlap more than previously observed in cat and rat studies. PMID:28122055

  7. Generalized multifield Von-Karman equations for large deflection of artificial muscle plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michopoulos, John G.

    2004-07-01

    Recent advances in manufacturing of multifunctional materials that respond to multi-field excitation have motivated the design and prototyping of sensing and actuating devices for various applications aiming to improve functionality and decrease overall cost. Computer aided design is one of the techniques utilized for achieving these goals. However, it requires the development and integration of behavioral evolution models for the respective materials. This paper addresses the initiation of an effort to develop a computational implementation of a theoretical methodology for describing such systems in a way that allows accurate prediction of their behavior within their state space. Continuum mechanics, irreversible thermodynamics, and electrodynamics are utilized to derive the general four dimensional multiphysics field equations of materials used for artificial muscle applications along with the appropriate constitutive theories. The generalized nonlinear Von-Karman equations expressing the behavior of multi-field artificial muscle-based materials are derived as a special case of electric multi-hygrothermoelasticity developed as the closest theory for modeling the behavior electro-hygro-thermo-elasto-active materials. Numerical solution examples of these equations are presented for the case of an ionic polymeric material structure.

  8. Intramuscular dissection of a large ganglion cyst into the gastrocnemius muscle.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Luke T; Freedman, Harold L

    2012-07-01

    Ganglion cysts are lesions resulting from the myxoid degeneration of the connective tissue associated with joint capsules and tendon sheaths. Most common around the wrist joint, ganglion cysts may be found elsewhere in the body, including in and around the knee joint. Uncommonly, ganglion cysts can present intramuscularly. Previous reports document the existence of intramuscular ganglia, often without histologic confirmation. This article describes a case of an intramuscular ganglion cyst in the medial gastrocnemius muscle of a 53-year-old woman. The patient initially presented for discomfort associated with the lesion. Examination was consistent with intramuscular cystic lesion of unknown etiology. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging revealed the origin of the mass at the semimembranosus-gastrocnemius bursa. Because of its location, the mass was initially suspected to be a dissecting Baker's cyst, an uncommon but previously reported diagnosis. The patient underwent surgical excision, and examination of the intact specimen revealed a thin, fibrous, walled cyst with no lining epithelium, which was consistent with a ganglion cyst. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report in the orthopedic literature of a ganglion cyst dissecting into the gastrocnemius muscle. Because ganglion cysts commonly require excision for definitive treatment and do not respond well to treatment measures implemented for Baker's cysts, including resection of underlying meniscal tears, the authors believe it is important for orthopedic surgeons to be able to distinguish between Baker's and other cysts associated with the knee joint, including ganglion cysts, which may require more definitive treatment.

  9. Role of nerve and muscle factors in the development of rat muscle spindles.

    PubMed

    Kucera, J; Walro, J M; Reichler, J

    1989-10-01

    The soleus muscles of fetal rats were examined by electron microscopy to determine whether the early differentiation of muscle spindles is dependent upon sensory innervation, motor innervation, or both. Simple unencapsulated afferent-muscle contacts were observed on the primary myotubes at 17 and 18 days of gestation. Spindles, encapsulations of muscle fibers innervated by afferents, could be recognized early on day 18 of gestation. The full complement of spindles in the soleus muscle was present at day 19, in the region of the neuromuscular hilum. More afferents innervated spindles at days 18 and 19 of gestation than at subsequent developmental stages, or in adult rats; hence, competition for available myotubes may exist among afferents early in development. Some of the myotubes that gave rise to the first intrafusal (bag2) fiber had been innervated by skeletomotor (alpha) axons prior to their incorporation into spindles. However, encapsulated intrafusal fibers received no motor innervation until fusimotor (gamma) axons innervated spindles 3 days after the arrival of afferents and formation of spindles, at day 20. The second (bag1) intrafusal fiber was already formed when gamma axons arrived. Thus, the assembly of bag1 and bag2 intrafusal fibers occurs in the presence of sensory but not gamma motor innervation. However, transient innervation of future bag2 fibers by alpha axons suggests that both sensory and alpha motor neurons may influence the initial stages of bag2 fiber assembly. The confinement of nascent spindles to a localized region of the developing muscle and the limited number of spindles in developing muscles in spite of an abundance of afferents raise the possibility that afferents interact with a special population of undifferentiated myotubes to form intrafusal fibers.

  10. Error correction in bimanual coordination benefits from bilateral muscle activity: evidence from kinesthetic tracking.

    PubMed

    Ridderikhoff, Arne; Peper, C Lieke E; Beek, Peter J

    2007-07-01

    Although previous studies indicated that the stability properties of interlimb coordination largely result from the integrated timing of efferent signals to both limbs, they also depend on afference-based interactions. In the present study, we examined contributions of afference-based error corrections to rhythmic bimanual coordination using a kinesthetic tracking task. Furthermore, since we found in previous research that subjects activated their muscles in the tracked (motor-driven) arm, we examined the functional significance of this activation to gain more insight into the processes underlying this phenomenon. To these aims, twelve subjects coordinated active movements of the right hand with motor-driven oscillatory movements of the left hand in two coordinative patterns: in-phase (relative phase 0 degrees) and antiphase (relative phase 180 degrees). They were either instructed to activate the muscles in the motor-driven arm as if moving along with the motor (active condition), or to keep these muscles as relaxed as possible (relaxed condition). We found that error corrections were more effective in in-phase than in antiphase coordination, resulting in more adequate adjustments of cycle durations to compensate for timing errors detected at the start of each cycle. In addition, error corrections were generally more pronounced in the active than in the relaxed condition. This activity-related difference was attributed to the associated bilateral neural control signals (as estimated using electromyography), which provided an additional reference (in terms of expected sensory consequences) for afference-based error corrections. An intimate relation was revealed between the (integrated) motor commands to both limbs and the processing of afferent feedback.

  11. Calcium-Fluxing Glutamate Receptors Associated With Primary Gustatory Afferent Terminals In Goldfish (Carassius auratus)

    PubMed Central

    Huesa, Gema; Ikenaga, Takanori; Böttger, Bärbel; Finger, Thomas E.

    2008-01-01

    Presynaptic ionotropic glutamate receptors modulate transmission at primary afferent synapses in several glutamatergic systems. In order to test whether primary gustatory afferent fibers express Ca++ permeable AMPA/kainate receptors, we utilized kainate-stimulated uptake of Co++ along with immunocytochemistry for the Ca++-binding proteins (CaBPs), calbindin and calretinin to investigate the primary gustatory afferents in goldfish (Carassius auratus). In goldfish, the primary gustatory nucleus (equivalent to the gustatory portion of the nucleus of the solitary tract) includes the vagal lobe, which is a large, laminated structure protruding dorsally from the medulla. Kainate-stimulated uptake of Co++ (a measure of Ca++-fluxing glutamate receptors) shows punctate staining distributed in the distinct laminar pattern matching the layers of termination of the primary gustatory afferent fibers. In addition, CaBP immunocytochemistry, which correlates highly with expression of Ca++ permeable AMPA/kainate receptors, shows a laminar pattern of distribution similar to that found with kainite-stimulated cobalt uptake. Nearly all neurons of the vagal gustatory ganglion show Co++ uptake and are immunopositive for CaBPs. Transection of the vagus nerve proximal to the ganglion results in loss of such punctate Co++ uptake and of punctate CaBP staining as soon as 4 days post-lesion. These results are consonant with the presence of Ca++ fluxing glutamate receptors on the presynaptic terminals of primary gustatory terminals, providing an avenue for modulation of primary gustatory input. PMID:18067143

  12. Role of primary afferents in the developmental regulation of motor axon synapse numbers on Renshaw cells.

    PubMed

    Siembab, Valerie C; Gomez-Perez, Laura; Rotterman, Travis M; Shneider, Neil A; Alvarez, Francisco J

    2016-06-15

    Motor function in mammalian species depends on the maturation of spinal circuits formed by a large variety of interneurons that regulate motoneuron firing and motor output. Interneuron activity is in turn modulated by the organization of their synaptic inputs, but the principles governing the development of specific synaptic architectures unique to each premotor interneuron are unknown. For example, Renshaw cells receive, at least in the neonate, convergent inputs from sensory afferents (likely Ia) and motor axons, raising the question of whether they interact during Renshaw cell development. In other well-studied neurons, such as Purkinje cells, heterosynaptic competition between inputs from different sources shapes synaptic organization. To examine the possibility that sensory afferents modulate synaptic maturation on developing Renshaw cells, we used three animal models in which afferent inputs in the ventral horn are dramatically reduced (ER81(-/-) knockout), weakened (Egr3(-/-) knockout), or strengthened (mlcNT3(+/-) transgenic). We demonstrate that increasing the strength of sensory inputs on Renshaw cells prevents their deselection and reduces motor axon synaptic density, and, in contrast, absent or diminished sensory afferent inputs correlate with increased densities of motor axons synapses. No effects were observed on other glutamatergic inputs. We conclude that the early strength of Ia synapses influences their maintenance or weakening during later development and that heterosynaptic influences from sensory synapses during early development regulates the density and organization of motor inputs on mature Renshaw cells.

  13. Role of primary afferents in the developmental regulation of motor axon synapse numbers on Renshaw cells

    PubMed Central

    Siembab, Valerie C.; Gomez-Perez, Laura; Rotterman, Travis M.; Shneider, Neil A.; Alvarez, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    Motor function in mammalian species depends on the maturation of spinal circuits formed by a large variety of interneurons that regulate motoneuron firing and motor output. Interneuron activity is in turn modulated by the organization of their synaptic inputs, but the principles governing the development of specific synaptic architectures unique to each premotor interneuron are unknown. For example, Renshaw cells receive, at least in the neonate, convergent inputs from sensory afferents (likely Ia) and motor axons raising the question of whether they interact during Renshaw cell development. In other well-studied neurons, like Purkinje cells, heterosynaptic competition between inputs from different sources shapes synaptic organization. To examine the possibility that sensory afferents modulate synaptic maturation on developing Renshaw cells, we used three animal models in which afferent inputs in the ventral horn are dramatically reduced (Er81(−/−) knockout), weakened (Egr3(−/−) knockout) or strengthened (mlcNT3(+/−) transgenic). We demonstrate that increasing the strength of sensory inputs on Renshaw cells prevents their de-selection and reduces motor axon synaptic density and, in contrast, absent or diminished sensory afferent inputs correlate with increased densities of motor axons synapses. No effects were observed on other glutamatergic inputs. We conclude that the early strength of Ia synapses influences their maintenance or weakening during later development and that heterosynaptic influences from sensory synapses during early development regulates the density and organization of motor inputs on mature Renshaw cells. PMID:26660356

  14. Afferent control of walking: are there distinct deficits associated to loss of fibres of different diameter?

    PubMed

    Nardone, Antonio; Corna, Stefano; Turcato, Anna Maria; Schieppati, Marco

    2014-02-01

    To compare the gait pattern in patients affected by different types of neuropathy. We recruited healthy subjects (HS, n=38), patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) (n=10) and patients with diabetic neuropathy (DNP) (n=12). Neuropathy impairment score and neuropathy score were assessed. Body sway during quiet stance, and spatio-temporal gait parameters were recorded. Most patients had reduced or absent tendon-tap reflexes. Strength of foot dorsiflexor muscles (p<0.05) and conduction velocity (CV) of leg nerves (p<0.0001) were more impaired in CMT1A than DNP, whereas joint-position sense was more affected (p<0.05) in DNP. Body sway while standing was larger in DNP compared to CMT1A and HS (p<0.01 and p<0.0001 respectively). During gait, the distribution of foot sole contact pressure was abnormal in CMT1A (p<0.05) but not in DNP. Velocity and step length were decreased, and foot yaw angle at foot flat increased, in DNP with respect to CMT1A and HS (both variables, p<0.001). Gait velocity and step length were decreased (p<0.005) also in CMT1A, but to a smaller extent than in DNP, so that the difference between patient groups was significant (p<0.0005). Duration of the double support was protracted in DNP compared to CMT1A and HS (p<0.0005). For DNP only, velocity of gait and duration of single support were correlated (p<0.05) both to sway path and lower limb muscle strength. Changes in both body sway and stance phase of gait were larger in DNP than CMT1A, indicating more impaired static and dynamic control of balance when neuropathy affects the small in addition to the large afferent fibres. Diminished somatosensory input from the smaller fibres rather than muscle weakness or foot deformity plays a critical role in the modulation of the support phase of gait. The analysis of balance and gait in patients with neuropathy can offer a tool for understanding the nature and functional impact of the neuropathy and should be included in their functional

  15. Large Asymmetric Hypertrophy of Rectus Abdominis Muscle in Professional Tennis Players

    PubMed Central

    Sanchis-Moysi, Joaquin; Idoate, Fernando; Dorado, Cecilia; Alayón, Santiago; Calbet, Jose A. L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To determine the volume and degree of asymmetry of the musculus rectus abdominis (RA) in professional tennis players. Methods The volume of the RA was determined using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 8 professional male tennis players and 6 non-active male control subjects. Results Tennis players had 58% greater RA volume than controls (P = 0.01), due to hypertrophy of both the dominant (34% greater volume, P = 0.02) and non-dominant (82% greater volume, P = 0.01) sides, after accounting for age, the length of the RA muscle and body mass index (BMI) as covariates. In tennis players, there was a marked asymmetry in the development of the RA, which volume was 35% greater in the non-dominant compared to the dominant side (P<0.001). In contrast, no side-to-side difference in RA volume was observed in the controls (P = 0.75). The degree of side-to-side asymmetry increased linearly from the first lumbar disc to the pubic symphysis (r = 0.97, P<0.001). Conclusions Professional tennis is associated with marked hypertrophy of the musculus rectus abdominis, which achieves a volume that is 58% greater than in non-active controls. Rectus abdominis hypertrophy is more marked in the non-dominant than in the dominant side, particularly in the more distal regions. Our study supports the concept that humans can differentially recruit both rectus abdominis but also the upper and lower regions of each muscle. It remains to be determined if this disequilibrium raises the risk of injury. PMID:21209832

  16. Large asymmetric hypertrophy of rectus abdominis muscle in professional tennis players.

    PubMed

    Sanchis-Moysi, Joaquin; Idoate, Fernando; Dorado, Cecilia; Alayón, Santiago; Calbet, Jose A L

    2010-12-31

    To determine the volume and degree of asymmetry of the musculus rectus abdominis (RA) in professional tennis players. The volume of the RA was determined using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 8 professional male tennis players and 6 non-active male control subjects. Tennis players had 58% greater RA volume than controls (P = 0.01), due to hypertrophy of both the dominant (34% greater volume, P = 0.02) and non-dominant (82% greater volume, P = 0.01) sides, after accounting for age, the length of the RA muscle and body mass index (BMI) as covariates. In tennis players, there was a marked asymmetry in the development of the RA, which volume was 35% greater in the non-dominant compared to the dominant side (P<0.001). In contrast, no side-to-side difference in RA volume was observed in the controls (P = 0.75). The degree of side-to-side asymmetry increased linearly from the first lumbar disc to the pubic symphysis (r = 0.97, P<0.001). Professional tennis is associated with marked hypertrophy of the musculus rectus abdominis, which achieves a volume that is 58% greater than in non-active controls. Rectus abdominis hypertrophy is more marked in the non-dominant than in the dominant side, particularly in the more distal regions. Our study supports the concept that humans can differentially recruit both rectus abdominis but also the upper and lower regions of each muscle. It remains to be determined if this disequilibrium raises the risk of injury.

  17. Acute strength exercise and the involvement of small or large muscle mass on plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels.

    PubMed

    Correia, Paulo Roberto; Pansani, Aline; Machado, Felipe; Andrade, Marilia; Silva, Antonio Carlos da; Scorza, Fulvio Alexandre; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Arida, Ricardo Mario

    2010-01-01

    Blood neurotrophins, such as the brain-derived neurotrophic factor, are considered to be of great importance in mediating the benefits of physical exercise. In this study, the effect of acute strength exercise and the involvement of small versus large muscle mass on the levels of plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor were evaluated in healthy individuals. The concentric strengths of knee (large) and elbow (small) flexor and extensor muscles were measured on two separate days. Venous blood samples were obtained from 16 healthy subjects before and after exercise. The levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the plasma did not significantly increase after both arm and leg exercise. There was no significant difference in the plasma levels of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the arms and legs. The present results demonstrate that acute strength exercise does not induce significant alterations in the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor plasma concentrations in healthy individuals. Considering that its levels may be affected by various factors, such as exercise, these findings suggest that the type of exercise program may be a decisive factor in altering peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

  18. Intensity and frequency dependence of laryngeal afferent inputs to respiratory hypoglossal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Mifflin, S W

    1997-12-01

    Inspiratory hypoglossal motoneurons (IHMs) mediate contraction of the genioglossus muscle and contribute to the regulation of upper airway patency. Intracellular recordings were obtained from antidromically identified IHMs in anesthetized, vagotomized cats, and IHM responses to electrical activation of superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) afferent fibers at various frequencies and intensities were examined. SLN stimulus frequencies <2 Hz evoked an excitatory-inhibitory postsynaptic potential (EPSP-IPSP) sequence or only an IPSP in most IHMs that did not change in amplitude as the stimulus was maintained. During sustained stimulus frequencies of 5-10 Hz, there was a reduction in the amplitude of SLN-evoked IPSPs with time with variable changes in the EPSP. At stimulus frequencies >25 Hz, the amplitude of EPSPs and IPSPs was reduced over time. At a given stimulus frequency, increasing stimulus intensity enhanced the decay of the SLN-evoked postsynaptic potentials (PSPs). Frequency-dependent attenuation of SLN inputs to IHMs also occurred in newborn kittens. These results suggest that activation of SLN afferents evokes different PSP responses in IHMs depending on the stimulus frequency. At intermediate frequencies, inhibitory inputs are selectively filtered so that excitatory inputs predominate. At higher frequencies there was no discernible SLN-evoked PSP temporally locked to the SLN stimuli. Alterations in SLN-evoked PSPs could play a role in the coordination of genioglossal contraction during respiration, swallowing, and other complex motor acts where laryngeal afferents are activated.

  19. Neuronal pathways from foot pad afferents to hindlimb motoneurons in the low spinalized cats.

    PubMed

    Wada, N; Kanda, Y; Takayama, R

    1998-07-01

    Experiments were performed on 16 adult spinalized (L2) cats. Postsynaptic potentials (PSPs) produced by electrical stimulation of afferent nerves innervating foot pads were recorded from hindlimb motoneurons innervating the following hindlimb muscles: the posterior biceps and semitendinosus (PBSt), anterior biceps and semimembranosus (ABSm), lateral gastrocnemius and soleus (LGS), medial gastrocnemius (MG), plantaris (P1), tibialis anterior (TA), popliteus (Pop), flexor digitorum longus and flexor hallucis longus (FDHL) and peroneus longus (Per.l). The rate of occurrence of different types of PSPs (EPSPs, IPSPs and mixed PSPs), the size of the PSPs and their central latencies were analyzed for each group of motoneurons to identify the neural pathways from the afferents innervating foot pads to hindlimb motoneurons. The rates of occurrence of different types of PSPs did not depend on the foot pad stimulated in PBSt, ABSm and LGS motoneurons, but for other groups of motoneurons their rates of occurrence depended on the foot pad stimulated. It was often noted that the size of PSPs in the same motoneurons differed according to the foot pad stimulated. Measurements of the central latencies of the PSPs indicated that the shortest neural pathways for EPSPs and IPSPs were disynaptic (central latencies < 1.8 ms). The functional role of neuronal pathways from afferent nerves innervating foot pads to hindlimb motoneurons could be to maintain stability of the foot during different postural and motor activities.

  20. Glutamate pharmacology and metabolism in peripheral primary afferents: physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kenneth E; Hoffman, E Matthew; Sutharshan, Mathura; Schechter, Ruben

    2011-06-01

    In addition to using glutamate as a neurotransmitter at central synapses, many primary sensory neurons release glutamate from peripheral terminals. Primary sensory neurons with cell bodies in dorsal root or trigeminal ganglia produce glutaminase, the synthetic enzyme for glutamate, and transport the enzyme in mitochondria to peripheral terminals. Vesicular glutamate transporters fill neurotransmitter vesicles with glutamate and they are shipped to peripheral terminals. Intense noxious stimuli or tissue damage causes glutamate to be released from peripheral afferent nerve terminals and augmented release occurs during acute and chronic inflammation. The site of action for glutamate can be at the autologous or nearby nerve terminals. Peripheral nerve terminals contain both ionotropic and metabotropic excitatory amino acid receptors (EAARs) and activation of these receptors can lower the activation threshold and increase the excitability of primary afferents. Antagonism of EAARs can reduce excitability of activated afferents and produce antinociception in many animal models of acute and chronic pain. Glutamate injected into human skin and muscle causes acute pain. Trauma in humans, such as arthritis, myalgia, and tendonitis, elevates glutamate levels in affected tissues. There is evidence that EAAR antagonism at peripheral sites can provide relief in some chronic pain sufferers. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Fine motor control of the jaw following alteration of orofacial afferent inputs.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Abhishek; Castrillon, Eduardo; Trulsson, Mats; Svensson, Krister G; Svensson, Peter

    2017-03-01

    The study was designed to investigate if alteration of different orofacial afferent inputs would have different effects on oral fine motor control and to test the hypothesis that reduced afferent inputs will increase the variability of bite force values and jaw muscle activity, and repeated training with splitting of food morsel in conditions with reduced afferent inputs would decrease the variability and lead to optimization of bite force values and jaw muscle activity. Forty-five healthy volunteers participated in a single experimental session and were equally divided into incisal, mucosal, and block anesthesia groups. The participants performed six series (with ten trials) of a standardized hold and split task after the intervention with local anesthesia was made in the respective groups. The hold and split forces along with the corresponding jaw muscle activity were recorded and compared to a reference group. The hold force and the electromyographic (EMG) activity of the masseter muscles during the hold phase were significantly higher in the incisal and block anesthesia group, as compared to the reference group (P < 0.001). However, there was no significant effect of groups on the split force (P = 0.975) but a significant decrease in the EMG activity of right masseter in mucosal anesthesia group as compared to the reference group (P = 0.006). The results also revealed that there was no significant effect of local anesthesia on the variability of the hold and split force (P < 0.677). However, there was a significant decrease in the variability of EMG activity of the jaw closing muscles in the block anesthesia group as compared to the reference group (P < 0.041), during the hold phase and a significant increase in the variability of EMG activity of right masseter in the mucosal anesthesia group (P = 0.021) along with a significant increase in the EMG activity of anterior temporalis muscle in the incisal anesthesia group, compared to the reference

  2. Identification of large intergenic non-coding RNAs in bovine muscle using next-generation transcriptomic sequencing.

    PubMed

    Billerey, Coline; Boussaha, Mekki; Esquerré, Diane; Rebours, Emmanuelle; Djari, Anis; Meersseman, Cédric; Klopp, Christophe; Gautheret, Daniel; Rocha, Dominique

    2014-06-19

    The advent of large-scale gene expression technologies has helped to reveal in eukaryotic cells, the existence of thousands of non-coding transcripts, whose function and significance remain mostly poorly understood. Among these non-coding transcripts, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are the least well-studied but are emerging as key regulators of diverse cellular processes. In the present study, we performed a survey in bovine Longissimus thoraci of lincRNAs (long intergenic non-coding RNAs not overlapping protein-coding transcripts). To our knowledge, this represents the first such study in bovine muscle. To identify lincRNAs, we used paired-end RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) to explore the transcriptomes of Longissimus thoraci from nine Limousin bull calves. Approximately 14-45 million paired-end reads were obtained per library. A total of 30,548 different transcripts were identified. Using a computational pipeline, we defined a stringent set of 584 different lincRNAs with 418 lincRNAs found in all nine muscle samples. Bovine lincRNAs share characteristics seen in their mammalian counterparts: relatively short transcript and gene lengths, low exon number and significantly lower expression, compared to protein-encoding genes. As for the first time, our study identified lincRNAs from nine different samples from the same tissue, it is possible to analyse the inter-individual variability of the gene expression level of the identified lincRNAs. Interestingly, there was a significant difference when we compared the expression variation of the 418 lincRNAs with the 10,775 known selected protein-encoding genes found in all muscle samples. In addition, we found 2,083 pairs of lincRNA/protein-encoding genes showing a highly significant correlated expression. Fourteen lincRNAs were selected and 13 were validated by RT-PCR. Some of the lincRNAs expressed in muscle are located within quantitative trait loci for meat quality traits. Our study provides a glimpse into the linc

  3. Effects of periodontal afferent inputs on corticomotor excitability in humans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Boudreau, S; Wang, M; Wang, K; Sessle, B; Arendt-Nielsen, L; Svensson, P

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine in humans whether local anaesthesia (LA) or nociceptive stimulation of the periodontal ligaments affects the excitability of the face primary motor cortex (MI) related to the tongue and jaw muscles, as measured by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Twelve healthy volunteers (11 men, 1 woman, 25.3 +/- 4.2 years) participated in two 3-h sessions separated by 7 days. The LA carbocain or the nociceptive irritant capsaicin was randomly injected into the periodontal ligament of the lower right central incisor. In both sessions, TMS-motor evoked potential (MEP) stimulus-response curves and corticomotor maps were acquired for the tongue and masseter muscles before (baseline) and at 5, 30 and 60 min post-application of carbocain or capsaicin. Transcranial magnetic stimulation-MEP stimulus-response curves were also acquired at these time points for the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) as an internal control. Burning pain intensity and mechanical sensitivity ratings to a von Frey filament applied to the application site were recorded on an electronic visual analogue scale (VAS). All subjects reported a decreased mechanical sensitivity (anova: P = 0.004) in the LA session and a burning pain sensation (VAS peak pain: 6.4 +/- 1.0) in the capsaicin session. No significant changes in cortical excitability of the MI, as reflected by TMS-MEP stimulus-response curves or corticomotor maps for the tongue, masseter or FDI were found between baseline and post-injection for the LA (anovas: P > 0.22) or capsaicin (anovas: P > 0.16) sessions. These findings suggest that a transient loss or perturbation in periodontal afferent input to the brain from a single incisor is insufficient to cause changes in corticomotor excitability of the face MI, as measured by TMS in humans.

  4. Effect of peripheral afferent alteration of the lateral ankle ligaments on dynamic stability.

    PubMed

    Myers, Joseph B; Riemann, Bryan L; Hwang, Ji-Hye; Fu, Freddie H; Lephart, Scott M

    2003-01-01

    The sensorimotor influence of the lateral ankle ligaments in muscle activation is unclear. The lateral ankle ligaments have significant sensorimotor influence on muscle activation. Controlled laboratory study. Muscle-firing characteristics in response to a high-speed inversion perturbation and during gait were assessed in 13 normal subjects. Solutions (1.5% lidocaine or a placebo of saline) were injected bilaterally into the anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments (1.5 ml per ligament) to alter peripheral afferent influence. Subjects were again tested with the same protocol. The protective response of the anterior tibialis and peroneal muscles during inversion perturbation and mean muscle activation amplitude decreased during running after both injections. After injection, no significant differences were seen for muscle reflex latencies, maximum amplitude, time to maximum amplitude during inversion perturbation, or mean amplitude during walking. The lateral ankle ligaments have a sensorimotor influence on muscle activation. Induced edema from the injected solutions may have altered the sensorimotor influence of the lateral ankle ligaments, thereby inhibiting the dynamic ankle stabilizers. This finding suggests that dynamic stability may be compromised because of swelling after joint injury.

  5. Position sense at the human forearm after conditioning elbow muscles with isometric contractions.

    PubMed

    Tsay, A; Allen, T J; Proske, U

    2015-09-01

    These experiments were designed to test the idea that, in a forearm position-matching task, it is the difference in afferent signals coming from the antagonist muscles of the forearm that determines the perceived position of the arm. In one experiment, flexor and then extensor muscles of the reference arm were conditioned by isometric voluntary contractions while the arm was held at the test angle, approximately 45° from the horizontal. At the same time, indicator arm flexor muscles were contracted while the arm was flexed, or extensors were contracted while it was extended. After an indicator flexor contraction, during matching, subjects made large errors in the direction of flexion, by 9.3° relative to the reference arm and after an indicator extensor contraction by 7.4° in the direction of extension. In the second experiment, with reference muscles conditioned as before, slack was introduced in indicator muscles by a combination of muscle contraction and stretch. This was expected to lower levels of afferent activity in indicator muscles. The subsequent matching experiment yielded much smaller errors than before, 1.4° in the direction of flexion. In both experiments, signal levels coming from the reference arm remained the same and what changed was the level of indicator signal. The fact that matching errors were small when slack was introduced in indicator muscles supported the view that the signal coming from reference muscles was also small. It was concluded that the brain is concerned with the signal difference from the antagonist pair of each arm and with the total signal difference between the two arms.

  6. Superoxide modulates myogenic contractions of mouse afferent arterioles.

    PubMed

    Lai, En Yin; Wellstein, Anton; Welch, William J; Wilcox, Christopher S

    2011-10-01

    Reactive oxygen species enhance or impair autoregulation. Because superoxide is a vasoconstrictor, we tested the hypothesis that stretch generates superoxide that mediates myogenic responses. Increasing perfusion pressure of mouse isolated perfused renal afferent arterioles from 40 to 80 mm Hg reduced their diameter by 13.3±1.8% (P<0.001) and increased reactive oxygen species (ethidium: dihydroethidium fluorescence) by 9.8±2.3% (P<0.05). Stretch-induced fluorescence was reduced significantly (P<0.05) by incubation with Tempol (3.7±0.8%), pegylated superoxide dismutase (3.2±1.0%), or apocynin (3.5±0.9%) but not by pegylated catalase, L-nitroarginine methylester, or Ca(2+)-free medium, relating it to Ca(2+)-independent vascular superoxide. Compared with vehicle, basal tone and myogenic contractions were reduced significantly (P<0.05) by pegylated superoxide dismutase (5.4±0.8), Tempol (4.1±1.0%), apocynin (1.0±1.3%), and diphenyleneiodinium (3.9±0.9%) but not by pegylated catalase (10.1±1.6%). L-Nitroarginine methylester enhanced basal tone, but neither it (15.8±3.3%) nor endothelial NO synthase knockout (10.2±1.8%) significantly changed myogenic contractions. Tempol had no further effect after superoxide dismutase but remained effective after catalase. H(2)O(2) >50 μmol/L caused contractions but at 25 μmol/L inhibited myogenic responses (7.4±0.8%; P<0.01). In conclusion, increasing the pressure within afferent arterioles led to Ca(2+)-independent increased vascular superoxide production from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, which enhanced myogenic contractions largely independent of NO, whereas H(2)O(2) impaired pressure-induced contractions but was not implicated in the normal myogenic response.

  7. Staining of Human Thyroarytenoid Muscle with Myosin Antibodies Reveals Some Unique Extrafusal Fibers, but no Muscle Spindles

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, Carla A.; Rosen, Clark; Georgelis, George; Horton, Michael J.; Mooney, Mark P.; Sciote, James J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary This study describes the myosin composition of extrafusal and intrafusal muscle fibers found in the human thyroarytenoid (TA) and sternohyoid (control) muscles. We sought to determine the presence of muscle spindles in the TA muscle, and to identify unusual extrafusal fiber types, using the commonly accepted approach of tissue stainng with myosin isoform specific antibodies. Extrafusal fibers are organized into motor units, which subsequently produce muscle movement, whereas intrafusal fibers compose muscle spindles, the primary stretch receptor that provides afferent (feed back) information to the nervous system for regulation of motor unit length and tonicity. Immunohistochemical identification of muscle spindles was confirmed in sternohyoid, but not in TA samples; however, some extrafusal fibers contained tonic myosin. These results indicate that human TA muscle functions similar to some mammalian extraocular muscle, performing unloaded (non-weight bearing) contractions without afferent information from native muscle spindles. PMID:12825656

  8. Visualization of spinal afferent innervation in the mouse colon by AAV8-mediated GFP expression

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Daniel J.; Dykstra, Jaclyn A.; Riedl, Maureen S.; Kitto, Kelley F.; Honda, Christopher N.; McIvor, R. Scott; Fairbanks, Carolyn A.; Vulchanova, Lucy

    2012-01-01

    Background Primary afferent neurons whose cell bodies reside in thoracolumbar and lumbosacral dorsal root ganglia (DRG) innervate colon and transmit sensory signals from colon to spinal cord under normal conditions and conditions of visceral hypersensitivity. Histologically, these extrinsic afferents cannot be differentiated from intrinsic fibers of enteric neurons because all known markers label neurons of both populations. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors are capable of transducing DRG neurons after intrathecal administration. We hypothesized that AAV-driven overexpression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in DRG would enable visualization of extrinsic spinal afferents in colon separately from enteric neurons. Methods Recombinant AAV serotype 8 (rAAV8) vector carrying the GFP gene was delivered via direct lumbar puncture. GFP labeling in DRG and colon was examined using immunohistochemistry. Key Results Analysis of colon from rAAV8-GFP treated mice demonstrated GFP-immunoreactivity (GFP-ir) within mesenteric nerves, smooth muscle layers, myenteric plexus, submucosa and mucosa, but not in cell bodies of enteric neurons. Notably, GFP-ir co-localized with CGRP and TRPV1 in mucosa, myenteric plexus, and globular-like clusters surrounding nuclei within myenteric ganglia. Additionally, GFP-positive fibers were observed in close association with blood vessels of mucosa and submucosa. Analysis of GFP-ir in thoracolumbar and lumbosacral DRG revealed that levels of expression in colon and L6 DRG appeared to be related. Conclusions and Inferences These results demonstrate the feasibility of gene transfer to mouse colonic spinal sensory neurons using intrathecal delivery of AAV vectors and the utility of this approach for histological analysis of spinal afferent nerve fibers within colon. PMID:23252426

  9. Presynaptic modulation of Ia afferents in young and old adults when performing force and position control.

    PubMed

    Baudry, Stéphane; Maerz, Adam H; Enoka, Roger M

    2010-02-01

    The present work investigated presynaptic modulation of Ia afferents in the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) when young and old adults exerted a wrist extension force either to support an inertial load (position control) or to achieve an equivalent constant torque against a rigid restraint (force control) at 5, 10, and 15% of the maximal force. H reflexes were evoked in the ECR by stimulating the radial nerve above the elbow. A conditioning stimulus was applied to the median nerve above the elbow to assess presynaptic inhibition of homonymous Ia afferents (D1 inhibition) or at the wrist (palmar branch) to assess the ongoing presynaptic inhibition of heteronymous Ia afferents that converge onto the ECR motor neuron pool (heteronymous Ia facilitation). The young adults had less D1 inhibition and greater heteronymous Ia facilitation during the position task (79 and 132.1%, respectively) compared with the force task (69.1 and 115.1%, respectively, P < 0.05). In contrast, the old adults exhibited no difference between the two tasks for either D1 inhibition ( approximately 72%) or heteronymous Ia facilitation ( approximately 114%). Contraction intensity did not influence the amount of D1 inhibition or heteronymous Ia facilitation for either group of subjects. The amount of antagonist coactivation was similar between tasks for young adults, whereas it was greater in the position task for old adults (P = 0.02). These data indicate that in contrast to young adults, old adults did not modulate presynaptic inhibition of Ia afferents when controlling the position of a compliant load but rather increased coactivation of the antagonist muscle.

  10. Effects of movement-related afferent inputs on spinal reflexes evoked by transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation during robot-assisted passive stepping.

    PubMed

    Masugi, Yohei; Kawashima, Noritaka; Inoue, Daisuke; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2016-08-03

    Studies of robot-assisted passive stepping paradigms have reported that movement-related afferent inputs strongly inhibit the excitability of the Hoffmann (H) reflex in the soleus (Sol) during walking. However, it is unknown if movement-related afferent inputs have the same effect on the excitability of spinal reflexes in the other lower-limb muscles that are involved in normal walking in healthy subjects. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of movement-related afferent inputs on the spinal reflexes in lower-limb muscles during walking. Spinal reflexes that were elicited by transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation (tSCS) were recorded during passive air standing and air stepping at three stepping velocities (stride frequencies: 14, 25, and 36 strides/min). The amplitude of the spinal reflexes was reduced in most of the recorded muscles during passive air stepping compared with air standing. Furthermore, in the Sol and lateral gastrocnemius, the amplitude of the reflexes during air stepping significantly decreased as stride frequency increased. These results demonstrate that movement-related afferent inputs inhibit spinal reflexes in the Sol and other lower-limb muscles during walking. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Significance of peripheral afferent input to the alpha-motoneurone pool for enhancement of tremor during an isometric fatiguing contraction.

    PubMed

    Cresswell, A G; Löscher, W N

    2000-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the contribution of peripheral afferent input to the enhancement of isometric tremor during a sustained submaximal isometric contraction. It was hypothesised that during muscle fatigue, when excitatory drive is high, peripheral afferent input may augment oscillations in the stretch reflex arc and result in bursting motor-unit activity and increased tremor. Nine healthy subjects maintained isometric plantar flexions at 30% of their maximum voluntary contraction until the limit of endurance, under three test conditions. Two paradigms were used to reduce afferent input to the triceps surae alpha-motoneurone pool: (1) continued vibration of the Achilles tendon, and (2) ischaemic partial block of the tibial nerve. These were compared to a control experiment, in which there was no intervention. By recording H-reflexes from the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles, it was possible to assess the effectiveness of reducing the afferent input. When H-reflex suppression had stabilised, the fatiguing contraction was commenced and tremor was computed from the continuously recorded torque signal. Superimposed maximum twitches were elicited as indirect measures of excitatory drive. The increase in tremor root mean square throughout the fatiguing contraction was significantly less for both the vibration and ischaemic conditions. Furthermore, tremor mean power frequency decreased significantly with endurance time in the control experiment, while no significant change was seen in the other two experimental conditions. It is concluded that the enhancement of isometric tremor seen during a fatiguing submaximal isometric contraction is facilitated by peripheral afferent input to the alpha-motoneurone pool.

  12. Response properties of pigeon otolith afferents to linear acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Si, X.; Angelaki, D. E.; Dickman, J. D.

    1997-01-01

    In the present study, the sensitivity to sinusoidal linear accelerations in the plane of the utricular macula was tested in afferents. The head orientation relative to the translation axis was varied in order to determine the head position that elicited the maximal and minimal responses for each afferent. The response gain and phase values obtained to 0.5-Hz and 2-Hz linear acceleration stimuli were then plotted as a function of head orientation and a modified cosine function was fit to the data. From the best-fit cosine function, the predicted head orientations that would produce the maximal and minimal response gains were estimated. The estimated maximum response gains to linear acceleration in the utricular plane for the afferents varied between 75 and 1420 spikes s-1 g-1. The mean maximal gains for all afferents to 0.5-Hz and 2-Hz sinusoidal linear acceleration stimuli were 282 and 367 spikes s-1 g-1, respectively. The minimal response gains were essentially zero for most units. The response phases always led linear acceleration and remained constant for each afferent, regardless of head orientation. These response characteristics indicate that otolith afferents are cosine tuned and behave as one-dimensional linear accelerometers. The directions of maximal sensitivity to linear acceleration for the afferents varied throughout the plane of the utricle; however, most vectors were directed out of the opposite ear near the interaural axis. The response dynamics of the afferents were tested using stimulus frequencies ranging between 0.25 Hz and 10 Hz (0.1 g peak acceleration). Across stimulus frequencies, most afferents had increasing gains and constant phase values. These dynamic properties for individual afferents were fit with a simple transfer function that included three parameters: a mechanical time constant, a gain constant, and a fractional order distributed adaptation operator.

  13. Microcystin accumulation in liver and muscle of tilapia in two large Brazilian hydroelectric reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Deblois, Charles P; Aranda-Rodriguez, Rocio; Giani, Alessandra; Bird, David F

    2008-03-01

    The objective of this study was to measure levels of the toxin microcystin in different tissues of fish known to feed on cyanobacteria during toxic bloom events. Wild Nile and redbreast tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus and Tilapia rendalli) were sampled from the catch of artisanal fishermen at eutrophic stations of Funil and Furnas reservoirs in southeastern Brazil. Phytoplankton communities in the two reservoirs were quite different taxonomically, but not dissimilar in microcystin content (200 microg g dry weight (DW) seston(-1) at Funil, 800 microg gDW seston(-1) at Furnas). All of the 27 fish sampled contained microcystin, ranging from 0.8 to 32.1 microg g liver(-1) and from 0.9 to 12.0 ng g muscle(-1). Most microcystin variants found in seston were also found in fish liver. T. rendalli had the lowest concentration in both tissues when compared to O. niloticus. In both reservoirs, one of every four fish sampled, always O. niloticus, had a level of microcystins beyond the World Health Organization tolerable daily intake (8 ng g tissue(-1)) and represented a risk for consumers. It is possible that closer study of inter-species variability in toxin burden in cyanobacteria-impacted water bodies will permit the development of guidelines for fish consumption that will better protect public health.

  14. Innocuous, Not Noxious, Input Activates PKCγ Interneurons of the Spinal Dorsal Horn via Myelinated Afferent Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Braz, Joao M.; Skinner, Kate; Llewellyn-Smith, Ida J.; Basbaum, Allan I.

    2008-01-01

    Protein kinase C γ (PKCγ), which is concentrated in interneurons of the inner part of lamina II of the dorsal horn, has been implicated in injury-induced allodynia, a condition wherein pain is produced by innocuous stimuli. Although it is generally assumed that these interneurons receive input from the nonpeptidergic, IB4-positive subset of nociceptors, the fact that PKCγ cells do not express Fos in response to noxious stimulation suggests otherwise. Here, we demonstrate that the terminal field of the nonpeptidergic population of nociceptors, in fact, lies dorsal to that of PKCγ interneurons. There was also no overlap between the PKCγ-expressing interneurons and the transganglionic tracer wheat germ agglutinin which, after sciatic nerve injection, labels all unmyelinated nociceptors. However, transganglionic transport of the β-subunit of cholera toxin, which marks the medium-diameter and large-diameter myelinated afferents that transmit non-noxious information, revealed extensive overlap with the layer of PKCγ interneurons. Furthermore, expression of a transneuronal tracer in myelinated afferents resulted in labeling of PKCγ interneurons. Light and electron microscopic double labeling further showed that the VGLUT1 subtype of vesicular glutamate transmitter, which is expressed in myelinated afferents, marks synapses that are presynaptic to the PKCγ interneurons. Finally, we demonstrate that a continuous non-noxious input, generated by walking on a rotarod, induces Fos in the PKCγ interneurons. These results establish that PKCγ interneurons are activated by myelinated afferents that respond to innocuous stimuli, which suggests that injury-induced mechanical allodynia is transmitted through a circuit that involves PKCγ interneurons and non-nociceptive, VGLUT1-expressing myelinated primary afferents. PMID:18685019

  15. Activation of intestinal spinal afferent endings by changes in intra-mesenteric arterial pressure

    PubMed Central

    Humenick, A; Chen, B N; Wiklendt, L; Spencer, N J; Zagorodnyuk, V P; Dinning, P G; Costa, M; Brookes, S J H

    2015-01-01

    Spinal sensory neurons innervate many large blood vessels throughout the body. Their activation causes the hallmarks of neurogenic inflammation: vasodilatation through the release of the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide and plasma extravasation via tachykinins. The same vasodilator afferent neurons show mechanical sensitivity, responding to crushing, compression or axial stretch of blood vessels – responses which activate pain pathways and which can be modified by cell damage and inflammation. In the present study, we tested whether spinal afferent axons ending on branching mesenteric arteries (‘vascular afferents’) are sensitive to increased intravascular pressure. From a holding pressure of 5 mmHg, distension to 20, 40, 60 or 80 mmHg caused graded, slowly adapting increases in firing of vascular afferents. Many of the same afferent units showed responses to axial stretch, which summed with responses evoked by raised pressure. Many vascular afferents were also sensitive to raised temperature, capsaicin and/or local compression with von Frey hairs. However, responses to raised pressure in single, isolated vessels were negligible, suggesting that the adequate stimulus is distortion of the arterial arcade rather than distension per se. Increasing arterial pressure often triggered peristaltic contractions in the neighbouring segment of intestine, an effect that was mimicked by acute exposure to capsaicin (1 μm) and which was reduced after desensitisation to capsaicin. These results indicate that sensory fibres with perivascular endings are sensitive to pressure-induced distortion of branched arteries, in addition to compression and axial stretch, and that they contribute functional inputs to enteric motor circuits. PMID:26010893

  16. Incremental large and small muscle mass exercise in patients with heart failure: evidence of preserved peripheral haemodynamics and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, F.; Wagner, P. D.; Richardson, R. S.

    2015-01-01

    Aim Doubt still remains as to whether peripheral vascular and skeletal muscle dysfunction accompanies the compromised cardiac function associated with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). The aim of this study was to examine the effect of HFrEF on the haemodynamic and metabolic responses to exercise with both a large (cycle) and a small [knee extensor (KE)] muscle mass in comparison with well-matched healthy controls (Ctrls). Methods Utilizing blood sampling and thermodilution blood flow measurements, we studied incremental cycle and KE exercise in 12 patients with HFrEF (ejection fraction: 25 ± 3%) and eight Ctrls. Results Incremental cycle exercise in both groups [heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF): 23 ± 1 to 116 ± 10; Ctrls: 22 ± 1 to 137 ± 5 W] resulted in a similar rise in blood flow (HFrEF: 1525 ± 132 to 4216 ± 408; Ctrls: 1774 ± 161 to 4713 ± 448 mL min−1), oxygen uptake (HFrEF: 206 ± 24 to 586 ± 34; Ctrls: 252 ± 21 to 747 ± 89 mL min−1) and lactate efflux across the leg (HFrEF: 479 ± 122 to 4929 ± 1255; Ctrls: 537 ± 155 to 5776 ± 1010 mM min−1). Vascular resistance fell similarly in both groups with increasing exercise intensity (HFrEF: 66 ± 10 to 24 ± 3; Ctrls: 69 ± 12 to 24 ± 4 mmHg L−1 min−1). Incremental KE exercise also revealed similar haemodynamic and metabolic responses in both Ctrls and patients. Conclusion Although assessed in a relatively small cohort, these data reveal that, when compared with well-matched healthy Ctrls, alterations in peripheral haemodynamics and skeletal muscle metabolism during exercise may not be an obligatory accompaniment to HFrEF. PMID:25393513

  17. Incremental large and small muscle mass exercise in patients with heart failure: evidence of preserved peripheral haemodynamics and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Esposito, F; Wagner, P D; Richardson, R S

    2015-03-01

    Doubt still remains as to whether peripheral vascular and skeletal muscle dysfunction accompanies the compromised cardiac function associated with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). The aim of this study was to examine the effect of HFrEF on the haemodynamic and metabolic responses to exercise with both a large (cycle) and a small [knee extensor (KE)] muscle mass in comparison with well-matched healthy controls (Ctrls). Utilizing blood sampling and thermodilution blood flow measurements, we studied incremental cycle and KE exercise in 12 patients with HFrEF (ejection fraction: 25 ± 3%) and eight Ctrls. Incremental cycle exercise in both groups [heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF): 23 ± 1 to 116 ± 10; Ctrls: 22 ± 1 to 137 ± 5 W] resulted in a similar rise in blood flow (HFrEF: 1525 ± 132 to 4216 ± 408; Ctrls: 1774 ± 161 to 4713 ± 448 mL min(-1)), oxygen uptake (HFrEF: 206 ± 24 to 586 ± 34; Ctrls: 252 ± 21 to 747 ± 89 mL min(-1)) and lactate efflux across the leg (HFrEF: 479 ± 122 to 4929 ± 1255; Ctrls: 537 ± 155 to 5776 ± 1010 mm min(-1)). Vascular resistance fell similarly in both groups with increasing exercise intensity (HFrEF: 66 ± 10 to 24 ± 3; Ctrls: 69 ± 12 to 24 ± 4 mmHg L(-1) min(-1) ). Incremental KE exercise also revealed similar haemodynamic and metabolic responses in both Ctrls and patients. Although assessed in a relatively small cohort, these data reveal that, when compared with well-matched healthy Ctrls, alterations in peripheral haemodynamics and skeletal muscle metabolism during exercise may not be an obligatory accompaniment to HFrEF. © 2014 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Diabetes downregulates large-conductance Ca2+-activated potassium beta 1 channel subunit in retinal arteriolar smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    McGahon, Mary K; Dash, Durga P; Arora, Aruna; Wall, Noreen; Dawicki, Jennine; Simpson, David A; Scholfield, C Norman; McGeown, J Graham; Curtis, Tim M

    2007-03-16

    Retinal vasoconstriction and reduced retinal blood flow precede the onset of diabetic retinopathy. The pathophysiological mechanisms that underlie increased retinal arteriolar tone during diabetes remain unclear. Normally, local Ca(2+) release events (Ca(2+)-sparks), trigger the activation of large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+)(BK)-channels which hyperpolarize and relax vascular smooth muscle cells, thereby causing vasodilatation. In the present study, we examined BK channel function in retinal vascular smooth muscle cells from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. The BK channel inhibitor, Penitrem A, constricted nondiabetic retinal arterioles (pressurized to 70mmHg) by 28%. The BK current evoked by caffeine was dramatically reduced in retinal arterioles from diabetic animals even though caffeine-evoked [Ca(2+)](i) release was unaffected. Spontaneous BK currents were smaller in diabetic cells, but the amplitude of Ca(2+)-sparks was larger. The amplitudes of BK currents elicited by depolarizing voltage steps were similar in control and diabetic arterioles and mRNA expression of the pore-forming BKalpha subunit was unchanged. The Ca(2+)-sensitivity of single BK channels from diabetic retinal vascular smooth muscle cells was markedly reduced. The BKbeta1 subunit confers Ca(2+)-sensitivity to BK channel complexes and both transcript and protein levels for BKbeta1 were appreciably lower in diabetic retinal arterioles. The mean open times and the sensitivity of BK channels to tamoxifen were decreased in diabetic cells, consistent with a downregulation of BKbeta1 subunits. The potency of blockade by Pen A was lower for BK channels from diabetic animals. Thus, changes in the molecular composition of BK channels could account for retinal hypoperfusion in early diabetes, an idea having wider implications for the pathogenesis of diabetic hypertension.

  19. Fatigue-related firing of muscle nociceptors reduces voluntary activation of ipsilateral but not contralateral lower limb muscles.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, David S; Fitzpatrick, Siobhan C; Gandevia, Simon C; Taylor, Janet L

    2015-02-15

    During fatiguing upper limb exercise, maintained firing of group III/IV muscle afferents can limit voluntary drive to muscles within the same limb. It is not known if this effect occurs in the lower limb. We investigated the effects of group III/IV muscle afferent firing from fatigued ipsilateral and contralateral extensor muscles and ipsilateral flexor muscles of the knee on voluntary activation of the knee extensors. In three experiments, we examined voluntary activation of the knee extensors by measuring changes in superimposed twitches evoked by femoral nerve stimulation. Subjects attended on 2 days for each experiment. On one day a sphygmomanometer cuff occluded blood flow of the fatigued muscles to maintain firing of group III/IV muscle afferents. After a 2-min extensor contraction (experiment 1; n = 9), mean voluntary activation was lower with than without maintained ischemia (47 ± 19% vs. 87 ± 8%, respectively; P < 0.001). After a 2-min knee flexor maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) (experiment 2; n = 8), mean voluntary activation was also lower with than without ischemia (59 ± 21% vs. 79 ± 9%; P < 0.01). After the contralateral (left) MVC (experiment 3; n = 8), mean voluntary activation of the right leg was similar with or without ischemia (92 ± 6% vs. 93 ± 4%; P = 0.65). After fatiguing exercise, activity in group III/IV muscle afferents reduces voluntary activation of the fatigued muscle and nonfatigued antagonist muscles in the same leg. However, group III/IV muscle afferents from the fatigued left leg had no effect on the unfatigued right leg. This suggests that any "crossover" of central fatigue in the lower limbs is not mediated by group III/IV muscle afferents. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Effect of Microgravity on Afferent Innervation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Presentations and publications are: (1) an audiovisual summary web presentation on results from SLM-MIR avian experiments. A color presentation summarizing results from the SLM-MIR and STS-29 avian experiments; (2) color threshold and ratio of S 100B MAP5, NF68/200, GABA and GAD; (3) chicken (Gallus domesticus) inner ear afferents; (4) microgravity in the STS-29 Space Shuttle Discovery affected the vestibular system of chick embryos; (5) expression of S 100B in sensory and secretory cells of the vertebrate inner ear; (6) otoconia biogenesis, phylogeny, composition and functional attributes;(7) the glycan keratin sulfate in inner ear crystals; (8) elliptical-P cells in the avian perilymphatic interface of the tegmentum vasculosum; and (9) LAMP2c and S100B upregulation in brain stem after VIIIth nerve deafferentation.

  1. Effects of ginsenoside on large-conductance K(Ca) channels in human corporal smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Sung, H H; Chae, M R; So, I; Jeon, J-H; Park, J K; Lee, S W

    2011-01-01

    Ginseng was known to be an effective natural product that enhances penile erection. However, the precise biological function and mechanisms of action of ginseng with regard to erectile function remain unknown. The principal objective of this study was to identify ginsenoside (principal molecular ingredients of ginseng)-induced activation of large-conductance K(Ca) channel in human corporal smooth muscle cells, and to determine ginseng's mechanism of action on penile erection. Electrophysiological studies using cultured human corporal smooth muscle cells were conducted. We evaluated the effects of total ginsenosides (TGS) and ginsenoside Rg3 on large-conductance K(Ca) channel by determining whole-cell currents and single-channel activities. There was an increase in outward current dependent on TGS concentration (at +60 mV, 1 μg ml(-1); 168.3±59.3%, n=6, P<0.05, 10 μg ml(-1); 173.2±36.8%, n=4, P<0.05, 50 μg ml(-1); 295.3±62.3%, n=19, P<0.001, 100 μg ml(-1); and 462.3±97.1%, n=5, P<0.001) and Rg3 concentration (at +60 mV, 1 μM (0.78 μg ml(-1)); 222.8±64.8%, n=11, P<0.0001, 10 μM; 672.6±137.1%, n=10, P<0.0001, 50 μM; and 1713.3±234.7%, n=15, P<0.001) in the solution that was blocked completely by tetraethylammonium (TEA). Channel opening in cell-attached mode and channel activity in the inside-out membrane patches was also increased significantly by 50 μg of TGS or 10 μM of Rg3. The results of this study suggested that the activation of large-conductance K(Ca) channels by ginsenoside could be one mechanism of ginsenoside-induced relaxation in corporal smooth muscle.

  2. Chicken (Gallus domesticus) inner ear afferents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hara, H.; Chen, X.; Hartsfield, J. F.; Hara, J.; Martin, D.; Fermin, C. D.

    1998-01-01

    Neurons from the vestibular (VG) and the statoacoustic (SAG) ganglion of the chick (Gallus domesticus) were evaluated histologically and morphometrically. Embryos at stages 34 (E8 days), 39 (E13 days) and 44 (E18 days) were sacrificed and temporal bones microdissected. Specimens were embedded in JB-4 methacrylate plastic, and stained with a mixture of 0.2% toluidine blue (TB) and 0.1% basic Fuschin in 25% ethanol or with a mixture of 2% TB and 1% paraphenylenediamine (PDA) for axon and myelin measurement study. Images of the VIIIth nerve were produced by a V150 (R) color imaging system and the contour of 200-300 neuronal bodies (perikarya) was traced directly on a video screen with a mouse in real time. The cross-sectional area of VG perikarya was 67.29 micrometers2 at stage 34 (E8), 128.46 micrometers2 at stage 39 (E13) and 275.85 micrometers2 at stage 44 (E18). The cross-sectional area of SAG perikarya was 62.44 micrometers2 at stage 34 (E8), 102.05 micrometers2 at stage 39 (E13) and 165.02 micrometers2 at stage 44 (E18). A significant cross-sectional area increase of the VG perikarya between stage 39 (E13) and stage 44 (E18) was determined. We randomly measured the cross-sectional area of myelin and axoplasm of hatchling afferent nerves, and found a correspondence between axoplasmic and myelin cross-sectional area in the utricular, saccular and semicircular canal nerve branches of the nerve. The results suggest that the period between stage 34 (E8) and 39 (E13) is a critical period for afferent neuronal development. Physiological and behavioral vestibular properties of developing and maturing hatchlings may change accordingly. The results compliment previous work by other investigators and provide valuable anatomical measures useful to correlate physiological data obtained from stimulation of the whole nerve or its parts.

  3. Tonic postganglionic sympathetic inhibition induced by afferent renal nerves?

    PubMed

    Ditting, Tilmann; Freisinger, Wolfgang; Siegel, Kirsten; Fiedler, Christian; Small, Lisa; Neuhuber, Winfried; Heinlein, Sonja; Reeh, Peter W; Schmieder, Roland E; Veelken, Roland

    2012-02-01

    Other than efferent sympathetic innervation, the kidney has peptidergic afferent fibers expressing TRPV1 receptors and releasing substance P. We tested the hypothesis that stimulation of afferent renal nerve activity with the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin inhibits efferent renal sympathetic nerve activity tonically by a neurokinin 1 receptor-dependant mechanism. Anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats were instrumented as follows: (1) arterial and venous catheters for recording of blood pressure and heart rate and drug administration; (2) left-sided renal arterial catheter for selective intrarenal administration of the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin (3.3, 6.6, 10, 33*10(-7) m; 10 μL; after 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes, respectively) to stimulate afferent renal nerve activity; (3) right-sided bipolar electrode for continuous renal sympathetic nerve recording; and (4) specialized renal pelvic and renal artery catheters to separate pelvic from intrarenal afferent activity. Before and after intrarenal capsaicin application, increasing intravenous doses of the neurokinin 1 receptor blocker RP67580 were given. Intrarenal capsaicin decreased integrated renal sympathetic activity from 65.4±13.0 mV*s (baseline) to 12.8±3.2 mV*s (minimum; P<0.01). This sustained renal sympathetic inhibition reached its minimum within 70 minutes and was not directly linked to the transient electric afferent response to be expected with intrarenal capsaicin. Suppressed renal sympathetic activity transiently but completely recovered after intravenous administration of the neurokinin 1 blocker (maximum: 120.3±19.4 mV*s; P<0.01). Intrarenal afferent activity could be unequivocally separated from pelvic afferent activity. For the first time we provide direct evidence that afferent intrarenal nerves provide a tonically acting sympathoinhibitory system, which seems to be rather mediated by neurokinin release acting via neurokinin 1 receptor pathways rather than by electric afferent effects on central sympathetic

  4. Increase in group II excitation from ankle muscles to thigh motoneurones during human standing

    PubMed Central

    Marchand-Pauvert, Véronique; Nicolas, Guillaume; Marque, Philippe; Iglesias, Caroline; Pierrot-Deseilligny, Emmanuel

    2005-01-01

    In standing subjects, we investigated the excitation of quadriceps (Q) motoneurones by muscle afferents from tibialis anterior (TA) and the excitation of semitendinosus (ST) motoneurones by muscle afferents from gastrocnemius medialis (GM). Standing with a backward lean stretches the anterior muscle pair (TA and Q) and they must be cocontracted to maintain balance. Equally, forward lean stretches the posterior muscle pair (GM and ST) and they must be cocontracted. We used these conditions of enhanced lean to increase the influence of γ static motoneurones on muscle spindle afferents, which enhances the background input from these afferents to extrafusal motoneurones. The effects of the conditioning volleys on motoneurone excitability was estimated using the modulation of the on-going rectified EMG and of the H reflex. Stimulation of afferents from TA in the deep peroneal nerve at 1.5–2 × MT (motor threshold) evoked early group I and late group II excitation of Q motoneurones. Stimulation of afferents in the GM nerve at 1.3–1.8 MT evoked only late group II excitation of ST motoneurones. The late excitation produced by the group II afferents was significantly greater when subjects were standing and leaning than when they voluntarily cocontracted the same muscle pairs at the same levels of activation. The early effect produced by the group I afferents was unchanged. We propose that this increase in excitation by group II afferents reflects a posture-related withdrawal of a tonic inhibition that is exerted by descending noradrenergic control and is specific to the synaptic actions of group II afferents. PMID:15860524

  5. Reflex inhibition of cutaneous and muscle vasoconstrictor neurons during stimulation of cutaneous and muscle nociceptors.

    PubMed

    Kirillova-Woytke, Irina; Baron, Ralf; Jänig, Wilfrid

    2014-05-01

    Cutaneous (CVC) and muscle (MVC) vasoconstrictor neurons exhibit typical reflex patterns to physiological stimulation of somatic and visceral afferent neurons. Here we tested the hypothesis that CVC neurons are inhibited by stimulation of cutaneous nociceptors but not of muscle nociceptors and that MVC neurons are inhibited by stimulation of muscle nociceptors but not of cutaneous nociceptors. Activity in the vasoconstrictor neurons was recorded from postganglionic axons isolated from the sural nerve or the lateral gastrocnemius-soleus nerve in anesthetized rats. The nociceptive afferents were excited by mechanical stimulation of the toes of the ipsilateral hindpaw (skin), by hypertonic saline injected into the ipsi- or contralateral gastrocnemius-soleus muscle, or by heat or noxious cold stimuli applied to the axons in the common peroneal nerve or tibial nerve. The results show that CVC neurons are inhibited by noxious stimulation of skin but not by noxious stimulation of skeletal muscle and that MVC neurons are inhibited by noxious stimulation of skeletal muscle but not by noxious stimulation of skin. These inhibitory reflexes are mostly lateralized and are most likely organized in the spinal cord. Stimulation of nociceptive cold-sensitive afferents does not elicit inhibitory or excitatory reflexes in CVC or MVC neurons. The reflex inhibition of activity in CVC or MVC neurons generated by stimulation of nociceptive cutaneous or muscle afferents during tissue injury leads to local increase of blood flow, resulting in an increase of transport of immunocompetent cells, proteins, and oxygen to the site of injury and enhancing the processes of healing.

  6. N-acetylcysteine alters apoptotic gene expression in axotomised primary sensory afferent subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Reid, Adam J; Shawcross, Susan G; Hamilton, Alex E; Wiberg, Mikael; Terenghi, Giorgio

    2009-10-01

    Novel approaches are required in peripheral nerve injury management because current surgical techniques, which do not address axotomy-induced neuronal death, lead to deficient sensory recovery. Sensory neuronal death has functional preference with cutaneous neurons dying in great numbers whilst muscle afferents survive axotomy. This offers the potential of comparing similar cell types that suffer distinct fates upon nerve injury. Here, a novel approach, combining in vivo rat nerve injury model with laser microdissection and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, identifies crucial disparities in apoptotic gene expression attributable to subpopulations of differing sensory modalities and examines the response to N-acetylcysteine (NAC) therapy. We show that axotomised muscle afferent neurons survive injury due to a neuroprotective response which markedly downregulates Bax and caspase-3 mRNA. In contrast, axotomised cutaneous sensory neurons significantly upregulate caspase-3 and alter both Bcl-2 and Bax expression such that pro-apoptotic Bax predominates. N-Acetylcysteine (NAC) intervention promotes neuroprotection of cutaneous sensory neurons through considerable upregulation of Bcl-2 and downregulation of both Bax and caspase-3 mRNA. The data presented identifies differential activation of apoptotic genes in axotomised neuronal subpopulations. Furthermore, NAC therapy instigates apoptotic gene expression changes in axotomised neurons, thereby offering pharmacotherapeutic potential in the clinical treatment of nerve injury.

  7. Musings on the wanderer: what's new in our understanding of vago-vagal reflexes? I. Morphology and topography of vagal afferents innervating the GI tract.

    PubMed

    Powley, Terry L; Phillips, Robert J

    2002-12-01

    An understanding of the events initiating vago-vagal reflexes requires knowledge of mechanisms of transduction by vagal afferents. Such information presumes an understanding of receptor morphology and location. Anatomic studies have recently characterized two types of vagal afferents, both putative mechanoreceptors distributed in gastrointestinal (GI) smooth muscle. These two receptors are highly specialized in that they 1) are morphologically distinct, 2) have different smooth muscle targets, 3) form complexes with dissimilar accessory cells, and 4) vary in their regional distributions throughout the GI tract. By comparison, information on the architecture and regional distributions of other classes of vagal afferents, notably chemoreceptors, has only begun to accumulate. Progress on the study of the two mechanoreceptors, however, illustrates general principles and delineates experimental issues that may apply to other submodalities of vagal afferents. By extension from morphological and physiological observations on the two species of smooth muscle endings, it is reasonable to hypothesize that additional classes of vagal receptors are also differentiated morphologically and that they vary in structure, accessory cells, regional distributions, and other features. A full appreciation of vago-vagal reflexes will require thorough structural and regional analyses of each of the types of vagal receptors within the GI tract.

  8. Muscle spindles in human tibialis anterior encode muscle fascicle length changes.

    PubMed

    Day, James; Bent, Leah R; Birznieks, Ingvars; Macefield, Vaughan G; Cresswell, Andrew G

    2017-04-01

    Muscle spindles provide exquisitely sensitive proprioceptive information regarding joint position and movement. Through passively driven length changes in the muscle-tendon unit (MTU), muscle spindles detect joint rotations because of their in-parallel mechanical linkage to muscle fascicles. In human microneurography studies, muscle fascicles are assumed to follow the MTU and, as such, fascicle length is not measured in such studies. However, under certain mechanical conditions, compliant structures can act to decouple the fascicles, and, therefore, the spindles, from the MTU. Such decoupling may reduce the fidelity by which muscle spindles encode joint position and movement. The aim of the present study was to measure, for the first time, both the changes in firing of single muscle spindle afferents and changes in muscle fascicle length in vivo from the tibialis anterior muscle (TA) during passive rotations about the ankle. Unitary recordings were made from 15 muscle spindle afferents supplying TA via a microelectrode inserted into the common peroneal nerve. Ultrasonography was used to measure the length of an individual fascicle of TA. We saw a strong correlation between fascicle length and firing rate during passive ankle rotations of varying rates (0.1-0.5 Hz) and amplitudes (1-9°). In particular, we saw responses observed at relatively small changes in muscle length that highlight the sensitivity of the TA muscle to small length changes. This study is the first to measure spindle firing and fascicle dynamics in vivo and provides an experimental basis for further understanding the link between fascicle length, MTU length, and spindle firing patterns.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Muscle spindles are exquisitely sensitive to changes in muscle length, but recordings from human muscle spindle afferents are usually correlated with joint angle rather than muscle fascicle length. In this study, we monitored both muscle fascicle length and spindle firing from the human tibialis

  9. Reflex control of locomotion as revealed by stimulation of cutaneous afferents in spontaneously walking premammillary cats.

    PubMed

    Duysens, J

    1977-07-01

    1. Stimulation of different hindlimb nerves in spontaneously walking premammillary cats was used in order to examine the effects of sensory input on the rhythmic motor output. 2. Stimulation of the tibial or sural nerve at low intensities caused the burst of activity in the triceps surae or semimembranosus to be prolonged if stimuli were given during the extension phase. When applied during the flexion phase, the same stimuli shortened the burst of activity in the pretibial flexors and induced an early onset of the extensor activity, except if stimuli were given at the very beginning of the flexion phase, when flexor burst prolongations or rebounds were observed instead. 3. These effects were related to activation of large cutaneous afferents in these nerves since the results could be duplicated by low-intensity stimulation of the tibial nerve at the ankle or by direct stimulation of the pad. 4. In contrast, activation of smaller afferents by high-intensity stimulation resulted prolongations of the flexor burst and/or shortenings of the extensor burst for stimuli applied before or during these bursts, respectively. 5. It was concluded that the large and small cutaneous afferents make, respectively, inhibitory and excitatory connections with the central structure involved in the generation of flexion during walking.

  10. Primary afferent response to signals in the intestinal lumen.

    PubMed

    Raybould, H

    2001-02-01

    The first recordings of vagal afferent nerve fibre activity were performed by Paintal in the early 1950s. In these experiments, he showed that phenyldiguanide (later recognized as a 5-HT3 receptor agonist) stimulated the firing of C-fibres innervating the intestine. In the following years, ample physiological and psychological studies have demonstrated the importance of afferent information arising from the gut in the regulation of gastrointestinal function and behaviour. Many stimuli are capable of eliciting these functional effects and of stimulating afferent fibre discharge, including mechanical, chemical, nutrient- and immune-derived stimuli. Studies in the last 10 years have begun to focus on the precise sensory transduction mechanisms by which these visceral primary afferent nerve terminals are activated and, like the contribution by Zhu et al. in this issue of The Journal of Physiology, are revealing some novel and exciting findings.

  11. Vagal afferent stimulation as a cardioprotective strategy? Introducing the concept.

    PubMed

    Fallen, Ernest L

    2005-10-01

    The effect of vagal afferent signaling on cardioinhibition has been well known for over 130 years. Both experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated not only the potential adverse effect of unrestrained sympathoexcitation in high risk patients with ischemic heart disease but the potential for cardioprotection by programmed vagal activity. The vasodepressor and negative chronotropic effects of efferent vagal stimulation has been a cause for concern. However it is becoming clear that favorable shifts towards increased cardiac vagal modulation can be achieved by vagal afferent nerve stimulation. This phasic effect appears to operate though central medullary pathways. Thus by engaging vagal afferent fibers in humans there is the possibility that one can exploit the benefits of central cardioinhibition without adversely affecting heart rate, respiration or hemodynamics. This commentary explores the background and rationale for considering vagal afferent stimulation as a plausible cardioprotective strategy.

  12. Vagal Afferent Innervation of the Airways in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mazzone, Stuart B.

    2016-01-01

    Vagal sensory neurons constitute the major afferent supply to the airways and lungs. Subsets of afferents are defined by their embryological origin, molecular profile, neurochemistry, functionality, and anatomical organization, and collectively these nerves are essential for the regulation of respiratory physiology and pulmonary defense through local responses and centrally mediated neural pathways. Mechanical and chemical activation of airway afferents depends on a myriad of ionic and receptor-mediated signaling, much of which has yet to be fully explored. Alterations in the sensitivity and neurochemical phenotype of vagal afferent nerves and/or the neural pathways that they innervate occur in a wide variety of pulmonary diseases, and as such, understanding the mechanisms of vagal sensory function and dysfunction may reveal novel therapeutic targets. In this comprehensive review we discuss historical and state-of-the-art concepts in airway sensory neurobiology and explore mechanisms underlying how vagal sensory pathways become dysfunctional in pathological conditions. PMID:27279650

  13. Scaling factor relating conduction velocity and diameter for myelinated afferent nerve fibres in the cat hind limb.

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, I A; Kalu, K U

    1979-01-01

    1. Compound action potentials were recorded from certain muscle and cutaneous nerves in normal and chronically de-efferentated hind limbs of cats during stimulation of the appropriate dorsal spinal roots, 2. The peaks for groups I, II and III in the compound action potential were correlated with the corresponding peaks in the fibre-diameter histograms of the same de-efferentated nerve after processing it for light microscopy. 3. The scaling factor (ratio of conduction velocity in m/sec to total diameter in micrometer) was not constant for all sizes of fibre nor did it increase progressively with fibre size. Evidence is presented that a logarithmic relation between conduction velocity and fibre diameter is not appropriate. 4. In muscle nerves the scaling factor for fibres fixed by glutaraldehyde perfusion and embedded in Epon was 5.7 for group I afferent fibres and 4.6 for myelinated fibres in both group II and group III. 5. In cutaneous nerves the scaling factor was 5.6 for large fibres (group I or Abeta) and 4.6 for small fibres (group III or Adelta). 6. The scaling factor for group I fibres is the same as was found previously for alpha-efferent fibres, and that for groups II and III is the same as for gamma-efferent fibres (Boyd & Davey, 1968). 7. The possibility that there is a clear discontinuity in scaling factor between fibres in groups I and alpha, and those in other functional groups, is discussed. 8. It is concluded that there must be some structural feature of alpha and group I fibres which differs from that of smaller myelinated fibres. It is likely that a difference in the relative thickness of the myelin sheath is involved and possibly also in the conductances responsible for generating the action potential. Images Plate 1 PMID:458657

  14. Compressive optic neuropathy secondary to a lateral rectus muscle dermoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Tannan, Anjali; Jhaveri, Miral; Moftakhar, Roham; Munich, Stephan; Harbhajanka, Aparna; Cohen, Adam J

    2015-01-01

    A 48-year-old man presented 2 weeks after sudden OS vision loss. On examination, the patient had decreased OS visual acuity, an ipsilateral afferent pupil defect, and proptosis. MRI of the orbit with and without gadolinium showed a large, enhancing heterogeneous mass extending to the orbital apex. Uncomplicated resection was performed and pathology was consistent with a dermoid cyst. Postoperatively, the patient had improved visual acuity and minimal lateral rectus dysfunction. There are only 4 reported cases of dermoid cysts located within the lateral rectus muscle, albeit this is the first case describing a compressive optic neuropathy in the setting of an orbital dermoid cyst.

  15. Acid-sensing by airway afferent nerves

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Lu-Yuan; Gu, Qihai; Xu, Fadi; Hong, Ju-Lun

    2013-01-01

    Inhalation of acid aerosol or aspiration of acid solution evokes a stimulatory effect on airway C-fiber and Aδ afferents, which in turn causes airway irritation and triggers an array of defense reflex responses (e.g., cough, reflex bronchoconstriction, etc.). Tissue acidosis can also occur locally in the respiratory tract as a result of ischemia or inflammation, such as in the airways of asthmatic patients during exacerbation. The action of proton on the airway sensory neurons is generated by activation of two different current species: a transient (rapidly activating and inactivating) current mediated through the acid-sensing ion channels, and a slowly activating and sustained current mediated through the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptor. In view of the recent findings that the expression and/or sensitivity of TRPV1 are up-regulated in the airway sensory nerves during chronic inflammatory reaction, the proton-evoked irritant effects on these nerves may play an important part in the manifestation of various symptoms associated with airway inflammatory diseases. PMID:23524016

  16. Neurogenic muscle cramps.

    PubMed

    Katzberg, Hans D

    2015-08-01

    Muscle cramps are sustained, painful contractions of muscle and are prevalent in patients with and without medical conditions. The objective of this review is to present updates on the mechanism, investigation and treatment of neurogenic muscle cramps. PubMed and Embase databases were queried between January 1980 and July 2014 for English-language human studies. The American Academy of Neurology classification of studies (classes I-IV) was used to assess levels of evidence. Mechanical disruption, ephaptic transmission, disruption of sensory afferents and persistent inward currents have been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurogenic cramps. Investigations are directed toward identifying physiological triggers or medical conditions predisposing to cramps. Although cramps can be self-limiting, disabling or sustained muscle cramps should prompt investigation for underlying medical conditions. Lifestyle modifications, treatment of underlying conditions, stretching, B-complex vitamins, diltiezam, mexiletine, carbamazepine, tetrahydrocannabinoid, leveteracitam and quinine sulfate have shown evidence for treatment.

  17. Cystitis increases colorectal afferent sensitivity in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Brumovsky, Pablo Rodolfo; Feng, Bin; Xu, Linjing; McCarthy, Carly Jane; Gebhart, G F

    2009-12-01

    Studies in humans and rodents suggest that colon inflammation promotes urinary bladder hypersensitivity and, conversely, that cystitis contributes to colon hypersensitivity, events referred to as cross-organ sensitization. To investigate a potential peripheral mechanism, we examined whether cystitis alters the sensitivity of pelvic nerve colorectal afferents. Male C57BL/6 mice were treated with cyclophosphamide (CYP) or saline, and the mechanosensitive properties of single afferent fibers innervating the colorectum were studied with an in vitro preparation. In addition, mechanosensitive receptive endings were exposed to an inflammatory soup (IS) to study sensitization. Urinary bladder mechanosensitive afferents were also tested. We found that baseline responses of stretch-sensitive colorectal afferents did not differ between treatment groups. Whereas IS excited a proportion of colorectal afferents CYP treatment did not alter the magnitude of this response. However, the number of stretch-sensitive fibers excited by IS was increased relative to saline-treated mice. Responses to IS were not altered by CYP treatment, but the proportion of IS-responsive fibers was increased relative to saline-treated mice. In bladder, IS application increased responses of muscular afferents to stretch, although no differences were detected between saline- and CYP-treated mice. In contrast, their chemosensitivity to IS was decreased in the CYP-treated group. Histological examination revealed no changes in colorectum and modest edema and infiltration in the urinary bladder of CYP-treated mice. In conclusion, CYP treatment increased mechanical sensitivity of colorectal muscular afferents and increased the proportion of chemosensitive colorectal afferents. These data support a peripheral contribution to cross-organ sensitization of pelvic organs.

  18. Visceral perception: sensory transduction in visceral afferents and nutrients.

    PubMed

    Raybould, H E

    2002-07-01

    The possible mechanisms that may be involved in nutrient detection in the wall of the gastrointestinal tract are reviewed. There is strong functional and electrophysiological evidence that both intrinsic and extrinsic primary afferent neurones mediate mechano- and chemosensitive responses in the gastrointestinal tract. This review focuses on the extrinsic afferent pathways as these are the ones that convey information to the central nervous system which is clearly necessary for perception to occur.

  19. Tyrosine Hydroxylase Expression in Type II Cochlear Afferents in Mice.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Pankhuri; Wu, Jingjing Sherry; Zimmerman, Amanda; Fuchs, Paul; Glowatzki, Elisabeth

    2017-02-01

    Acoustic information propagates from the ear to the brain via spiral ganglion neurons that innervate hair cells in the cochlea. These afferents include unmyelinated type II fibers that constitute 5 % of the total, the majority being myelinated type I neurons. Lack of specific genetic markers of type II afferents in the cochlea has been a roadblock in studying their functional role. Unexpectedly, type II afferents were visualized by reporter proteins induced by tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-driven Cre recombinase. The present study was designed to determine whether TH-driven Cre recombinase (TH-2A-CreER) provides a selective and reliable tool for identification and genetic manipulation of type II rather than type I cochlear afferents. The "TH-2A-CreER neurons" radiated from the spiral lamina, crossed the tunnel of Corti, turned towards the base of the cochlea, and traveled beneath the rows of outer hair cells. Neither the processes nor the somata of TH-2A-CreER neurons were labeled by antibodies that specifically labeled type I afferents and medial efferents. TH-2A-CreER-positive processes partially co-labeled with antibodies to peripherin, a known marker of type II afferents. Individual TH-2A-CreER neurons gave off short branches contacting 7-25 outer hair cells (OHCs). Only a fraction of TH-2A-CreER boutons were associated with CtBP2-immunopositive ribbons. These results show that TH-2A-CreER provides a selective marker for type II versus type I afferents and can be used to describe the morphology and arborization pattern of type II cochlear afferents in the mouse cochlea.

  20. Differential central projections of vestibular afferents in pigeons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, J. D.; Fang, Q.

    1996-01-01

    The question of whether a differential distribution of vestibular afferent information to central nuclear neurons is present in pigeons was studied using neural tracer compounds. Discrete tracing of afferent fibers innervating the individual semicircular canal and otolith organs was produced by sectioning individual branches of the vestibular nerve that innervate the different receptor organs and applying crystals of horseradish peroxidase, or a horseradish peroxidase/cholera toxin mixture, or a biocytin compound for neuronal uptake and transport. Afferent fibers and their terminal distributions within the brainstem and cerebellum were visualized subsequently. Discrete areas in the pigeon central nervous system that receive primary vestibular input include the superior, dorsal lateral, ventral lateral, medial, descending, and tangential vestibular nuclei; the A and B groups; the intermediate, medial, and lateral cerebellar nuclei; and the nodulus, the uvula, and the paraflocculus. Generally, the vertical canal afferents projected heavily to medial regions in the superior and descending vestibular nuclei as well as the A group. Vertical canal projections to the medial and lateral vestibular nuclei were observed but were less prominent. Horizontal canal projections to the superior and descending vestibular nuclei were much more centrally located than those of the vertical canals. A more substantial projection to the medial and lateral vestibular nuclei was seen with horizontal canal afferents compared to vertical canal fibers. Afferents innervating the utricle and saccule terminated generally in the lateral regions of all vestibular nuclei in areas that were separate from the projections of the semicircular canals. In addition, utricular fibers projected to regions in the vestibular nuclei that overlapped with the horizontal semicircular canal terminal fields, whereas saccular afferents projected to regions that received vertical canal fiber terminations. Lagenar

  1. Differential central projections of vestibular afferents in pigeons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, J. D.; Fang, Q.

    1996-01-01

    The question of whether a differential distribution of vestibular afferent information to central nuclear neurons is present in pigeons was studied using neural tracer compounds. Discrete tracing of afferent fibers innervating the individual semicircular canal and otolith organs was produced by sectioning individual branches of the vestibular nerve that innervate the different receptor organs and applying crystals of horseradish peroxidase, or a horseradish peroxidase/cholera toxin mixture, or a biocytin compound for neuronal uptake and transport. Afferent fibers and their terminal distributions within the brainstem and cerebellum were visualized subsequently. Discrete areas in the pigeon central nervous system that receive primary vestibular input include the superior, dorsal lateral, ventral lateral, medial, descending, and tangential vestibular nuclei; the A and B groups; the intermediate, medial, and lateral cerebellar nuclei; and the nodulus, the uvula, and the paraflocculus. Generally, the vertical canal afferents projected heavily to medial regions in the superior and descending vestibular nuclei as well as the A group. Vertical canal projections to the medial and lateral vestibular nuclei were observed but were less prominent. Horizontal canal projections to the superior and descending vestibular nuclei were much more centrally located than those of the vertical canals. A more substantial projection to the medial and lateral vestibular nuclei was seen with horizontal canal afferents compared to vertical canal fibers. Afferents innervating the utricle and saccule terminated generally in the lateral regions of all vestibular nuclei in areas that were separate from the projections of the semicircular canals. In addition, utricular fibers projected to regions in the vestibular nuclei that overlapped with the horizontal semicircular canal terminal fields, whereas saccular afferents projected to regions that received vertical canal fiber terminations. Lagenar

  2. Modulation of human muscle spindle discharge by arterial pulsations--functional effects and consequences.

    PubMed

    Birznieks, Ingvars; Boonstra, Tjeerd W; Macefield, Vaughan G

    2012-01-01

    Arterial pulsations are known to modulate muscle spindle firing; however, the physiological significance of such synchronised modulation has not been investigated. Unitary recordings were made from 75 human muscle spindle afferents innervating the pretibial muscles. The modulation of muscle spindle discharge by arterial pulsations was evaluated by R-wave triggered averaging and power spectral analysis. We describe various effects arterial pulsations may have on muscle spindle afferent discharge. Afferents could be "driven" by arterial pulsations, e.g., showing no other spontaneous activity than spikes generated with cardiac rhythmicity. Among afferents showing ongoing discharge that was not primarily related to cardiac rhythmicity we illustrate several mechanisms by which individual spikes may become phase-locked. However, in the majority of afferents the discharge rate was modulated by the pulse wave without spikes being phase locked. Then we assessed whether these influences changed in two physiological conditions in which a sustained increase in muscle sympathetic nerve activity was observed without activation of fusimotor neurones: a maximal inspiratory breath-hold, which causes a fall in systolic pressure, and acute muscle pain, which causes an increase in systolic pressure. The majority of primary muscle spindle afferents displayed pulse-wave modulation, but neither apnoea nor pain had any significant effect on the strength of this modulation, suggesting that the physiological noise injected by the arterial pulsations is robust and relatively insensitive to fluctuations in blood pressure. Within the afferent population there was a similar number of muscle spindles that were inhibited and that were excited by the arterial pulse wave, indicating that after signal integration at the population level, arterial pulsations of opposite polarity would cancel each other out. We speculate that with close-to-threshold stimuli the arterial pulsations may serve as an

  3. The effects of experimental muscle and skin pain on the static stretch sensitivity of human muscle spindles in relaxed leg muscles

    PubMed Central

    Birznieks, Ingvars; Burton, Alexander R; Macefield, Vaughan G

    2008-01-01

    Animal studies have shown that noxious inputs onto γ-motoneurons can cause an increase in the activity of muscle spindles, and it has been proposed that this causes a fusimotor-driven increase in muscle stiffness that is believed to underlie many chronic pain syndromes. To test whether experimental pain also acts on the fusimotor system in humans, unitary recordings were made from 19 spindle afferents (12 Ia, 7 II) located in the ankle and toe extensors or peronei muscles of awake human subjects. Muscle pain was induced by bolus intramuscular injection of 0.5 ml 5% hypertonic saline into tibialis anterior (TA); skin pain was induced by 0.2 ml injection into the overlying skin. Changes in fusimotor drive to the muscle spindles were inferred from changes in the mean discharge frequency and discharge variability of spindle endings in relaxed muscle. During muscle pain no afferents increased their discharge activity: seven afferents (5 Ia, 2 II) showed a decrease and six (4 Ia, 2 II) afferents were not affected. During skin pain of 13 afferents discharge rate increased in one (Ia) and decreased in two (1 Ia, 1 II). On average, the overall discharge rate decreased during muscle pain by 6.1% (P < 0.05; Wilcoxon), but remained essentially the same during skin pain. There was no detectable correlation between subjective pain level and the small change in discharge rate of muscle spindles. Irrespective of the type of pain, discharge variability parameters were not influenced (P > 0.05; Wilcoxon). We conclude that, contrary to the ‘vicious cycle’ hypothesis, acute activation of muscle or skin nociceptors does not cause a reflex increase in fusimotor drive in humans. Rather, our results are more aligned with the pain adaptation model, based on clinical studies predicting pain-induced reductions of agonist muscle activity. PMID:18403422

  4. Mast cells drive mesenteric afferent signalling during acute intestinal ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wen; Kirkup, Anthony J; Grundy, David

    2011-08-01

    Acute intestinal ischaemia stimulates visceral afferent nerves but the mechanisms responsible for this excitation are not fully understood. Mast cells may participate in this process as they are known to signal to mesenteric afferents during intestinal anaphylaxis and contribute to early inflammation and neuronal damage in response to cerebral ischaemia. We therefore hypothesised that mast cells are early responders to acute intestinal ischaemia and their activation initiates rapid signalling to the CNS via the excitation of mesenteric afferents. Primary afferent firing was recorded from a mesenteric nerve bundle supplying a segment of jejunum in anaesthetized adult rats. Acute focal ischaemia was produced by clamping theme senteric vessels for 8 min, and reperfusion followed removal of the vessel clip. Two episodes of ischaemia–reperfusion (I–R) separated by a 30 min interval were performed. Drugs or their vehicles were administered 10 min before the 2nd I–R episode. Ischaemia caused a reproducible, intense and biphasic afferent firing that was temporally dissociated from the concomitantly triggered complex pattern of intestinal motor activity. The L-type calcium channel blocker, nifedipine, significantly attenuated this afferent firing by a mechanism independent of its action on intestinal tone. Ischaemia-induced afferent firing was also abrogated by the mast cell stabilizer, doxantrazole, and the H1 histamine receptor antagonist, pyrilamine. In contrast, the nicotinic receptor antagonist, hexamethonium, and the N-type calcium channel toxin, ω-conotoxin GVIA, each reduced the ischaemia-evoked motor inhibition but not the concurrent afferent discharge. Similarly, the cyclooxygenase inhibitor, naproxen, had no effect on the ischaemic afferent response but reduced the intestinal tone shortly from the onset of ischaemia to the early period of reperfusion. These data support a critical role for mast cell-derived histamine in the direct chemoexcitation of

  5. The Effects of Group Relaxation Training/Large Muscle Exercise, and Parental Involvement on Attention to Task, Impulsivity, and Locus of Control among Hyperactive Boys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Sally S.; Omizo, Michael M.

    1984-01-01

    The study examined the effects of group relaxation training/large muscle exercise and parental involvement on attention to task, impulsivity, and locus of control among 34 hyperactive boys. Following treatment both experimental groups recorded significantly higher attention to task, lower impulsivity, and lower locus of control scores. (Author/CL)

  6. The Effects of Group Relaxation Training/Large Muscle Exercise, and Parental Involvement on Attention to Task, Impulsivity, and Locus of Control among Hyperactive Boys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Sally S.; Omizo, Michael M.

    1984-01-01

    The study examined the effects of group relaxation training/large muscle exercise and parental involvement on attention to task, impulsivity, and locus of control among 34 hyperactive boys. Following treatment both experimental groups recorded significantly higher attention to task, lower impulsivity, and lower locus of control scores. (Author/CL)

  7. Reflex influences on muscle spindle activity in relaxed human leg muscles.

    PubMed

    Gandevia, S C; Miller, S; Aniss, A M; Burke, D

    1986-07-01

    The study was designed to determine whether low-threshold cutaneous and muscle afferents from the foot reflexly activate gamma-motoneurons innervating relaxed muscles of the leg. In 15 experiments multiunit recordings were made from 21 nerve fascicles innervating triceps surae or tibialis anterior. In a further nine experiments the activity of 19 identified single muscle spindle afferents was recorded, 13 from triceps surae, 5 from tibialis anterior, and 1 from extensor digitorum longus. Trains of electrical stimuli (5 stimuli, 300 Hz) were delivered to the sural nerve at the ankle (intensity, twice sensory threshold) and the posterior tibial nerve at the ankle (intensity, 1.1 times motor threshold for the small muscles of the foot). In addition, a tap on the appropriate tendon at varying times after the stimuli was used to assess the dynamic responsiveness of the afferents under study. The conditioning electrical stimuli did not change the discharge of single spindle afferents. Recordings of rectified and averaged multiunit activity also revealed no change in the overall level of background neural activity following the electrical stimuli. The afferent responses to tendon taps did not differ significantly whether or not they were preceded by stimulation of the sural or posterior tibial nerves. These results suggest that low-threshold afferents from the foot do not produce significant activation of fusimotor neurons in relaxed leg muscles, at least as judged by their ability to alter the discharge of muscle spindle afferents. As there may be no effective background activity in fusimotor neurons innervating relaxed human muscles, it is possible that these inputs from the foot could influence the fusimotor system during voluntary contractions when the fusimotor neurons have been brought to firing threshold. In one subject trains of stimuli were delivered to the posterior tibial nerve at painful levels (30 times motor threshold). They produced an acceleration of the

  8. Defects in glycosylation impair satellite stem cell function and niche composition in the muscles of the dystrophic Large(myd) mouse.

    PubMed

    Ross, Jacob; Benn, Abigail; Jonuschies, Jacqueline; Boldrin, Luisa; Muntoni, Francesco; Hewitt, Jane E; Brown, Susan C; Morgan, Jennifer E

    2012-10-01

    The dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex (DGC) is found at the muscle fiber sarcolemma and forms an essential structural link between the basal lamina and internal cytoskeleton. In a set of muscular dystrophies known as the dystroglycanopathies, hypoglycosylation of the DGC component α-dystroglycan results in reduced binding to basal lamina components, a loss in structural stability, and repeated cycles of muscle fiber degeneration and regeneration. The satellite cells are the key stem cells responsible for muscle repair and reside between the basal lamina and sarcolemma. In this study, we aimed to determine whether pathological changes associated with the dystroglycanopathies affect satellite cell function. In the Large(myd) mouse dystroglycanopathy model, satellite cells are present in significantly greater numbers but display reduced proliferation on their native muscle fibers in vitro, compared with wild type. However, when removed from their fiber, proliferation in culture is restored to that of wild type. Immunohistochemical analysis of Large(myd) muscle reveals alterations to the basal lamina and interstitium, including marked disorganization of laminin, upregulation of fibronectin and collagens. Proliferation and differentiation of wild-type satellite cells is impaired when cultured on substrates such as collagen and fibronectin, compared with laminins. When engrafted into irradiated tibialis anterior muscles of mdx-nude mice, wild-type satellite cells expanded on laminin contribute significantly more to muscle regeneration than those expanded on fibronectin. These results suggest that defects in α-dystroglycan glycosylation are associated with an alteration in the satellite cell niche, and that regenerative potential in the dystroglycanopathies may be perturbed.

  9. SA1 and RA afferent responses to static and vibrating gratings.

    PubMed

    Bensmaïa, S J; Craig, J C; Yoshioka, T; Johnson, K O

    2006-03-01

    SA1 and RA afferent fibers differ both in their ability to convey information about the fine spatial structure of tactile stimuli and in their frequency sensitivity profiles. In the present study, we investigated the extent to which the spatial resolution of the signal conveyed by SA1 and RA fibers depends on the temporal properties of the stimulus. To that end, we recorded the responses evoked in SA1 and RA fibers of macaques by static and vibrating gratings that varied in spatial period, vibratory frequency, and amplitude. Gratings were oriented either parallel to the long axis of the finger (vertical) or perpendicular to it (horizontal). We examined the degree to which afferent responses were dependent on the spatial period, vibratory frequency, amplitude, and orientation of the gratings. We found that the spatial modulation of the afferent responses increased as the spatial period of the gratings increased; the spatial modulation was the same for static and vibrating gratings, despite large differences in evoked spike rates; the spatial modulation in SA1 responses was independent of stimulus amplitude over the range of amplitudes tested, whereas RA modulation decreased slightly as the stimulus amplitude increased; vertical gratings evoked stronger and more highly modulated responses than horizontal gratings; the modulation in SA1 responses was higher than that in RA responses at all frequencies and amplitudes. The behavioral consequences of these neurophysiological findings are examined in a companion paper.

  10. External copper inhibits the activity of the large-conductance calcium- and voltage-sensitive potassium channel from skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Morera, F J; Wolff, D; Vergara, C

    2003-03-01

    We have characterized the effect of external copper on the gating properties of the large-conductance calcium- and voltage-sensitive potassium channel from skeletal muscle, incorporated into artificial bilayers. The effect of Cu2+ was evaluated as changes in the gating kinetic properties of the channel after the addition of this ion. We found that, from concentrations of 20 microM and up, copper induced a concentration- and time-dependent decrease in channel open probability. The inhibition of channel activity by Cu2+ could not be reversed by washing or by addition of the copper chelator, bathocuproinedisulfonic acid. However, channel activity was appreciably restored by the sulfhydryl reducing agent dithiothreitol. The effect of copper was specific since other transition metal divalent cations such as Ni2+, Zn2+ or Cd2+ did not affect BK(Ca) channel activity in the same concentration range. These results suggest that external Cu2+-induced inhibition of channel activity was due to direct or indirect oxidation of key amino-acid sulfhydryl groups that might have a role in channel gating.

  11. Slow temporal filtering may largely explain the transformation of stick insect (Carausius morosus) extensor motor neuron activity into muscle movement.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Scott L; Guschlbauer, Christoph; von Uckermann, Géraldine; Büschges, Ansgar

    2007-09-01

    Understanding how nervous systems generate behavior requires understanding how muscles transform neural input into movement. The stick insect extensor tibiae muscle is an excellent system in which to study this issue because extensor motor neuron activity is highly variable during single leg walking and extensor muscles driven with this activity produce highly variable movements. We showed earlier that spike number, not frequency, codes for extensor amplitude during contraction rises, which implies the muscle acts as a slow filter on the time scale of burst interspike intervals (5-10 ms). We examine here muscle response to spiking variation over entire bursts, a time scale of hundreds of milliseconds, and directly measure muscle time constants. Muscle time constants differ during contraction and relaxation, and contraction time constants, although variable, are always extremely slow (200-700 ms). Models using these data show that extremely slow temporal filtering alone can explain much of the observed transform properties. This work also revealed an unexpected (to us) ability of slow filtering to transform steadily declining inputs into constant amplitude outputs. Examination of the effects of time constant variability on model output showed that variation within an SD primarily altered output amplitude, but variation across the entire range also altered contraction shape. These substantial changes suggest that understanding the basis of this variation is central to predicting extensor activity and that the animal could theoretically vary muscle time constant to match extensor response to changing behavioral need.

  12. Unmyelinated afferents constitute a second system coding tactile stimuli of the human hairy skin.

    PubMed

    Vallbo, A B; Olausson, H; Wessberg, J

    1999-06-01

    Impulses were recorded from unmyelinated afferents innervating the forearm skin of human subjects using the technique of microneurography. Units responding to innocuous skin deformation were selected. The sample (n = 38) was split into low-threshold units (n = 27) and high-threshold units (n = 11) on the basis of three distinctive features, i.e., thresholds to skin deformation, size of response to innocuous skin deformation, and differential response to sharp and blunt stimuli. The low-threshold units provisionally were denoted tactile afferents on the basis of their response properties, which strongly suggest that they are coding some feature of tactile stimuli. They exhibited, in many respects, similar functional properties as described for low-threshold C-mechanoreceptive units in other mammals. However, a delayed acceleration, not previously demonstrated, was observed in response to long-lasting innocuous indentations. It was concluded that human hairy skin is innervated by a system of highly sensitive mechanoreceptive units with unmyelinated afferents akin to the system previously described in other mammals. The confirmation that the system is present in the forearm skin and not only in the face area where it first was identified suggests a largely general distribution although there are indications that the tactile C afferents may be lacking in the very distal parts of the limbs. The functional role of the system remains to be assessed although physiological properties of the sense organs invite to speculations that the slow tactile system might have closer relations to limbic functions than to cognitive and motor functions.

  13. Respiratory pattern changes produced by intercostal muscle/rib vibration.

    PubMed

    Bolser, D C; Lindsey, B G; Shannon, R

    1988-06-01

    Large-amplitude vibration of the intercostal muscles/ribs has an inhibitory effect on inspiratory motor output. This effect has been attributed, in part, to the stimulation of intercostal muscle tendon organs. Intercostal muscle/rib vibration can also produce a decrease or increase in respiratory frequency. Studies were conducted 1) to determine whether, in addition to intercostal tendon organs, costovertebral joint mechanoreceptors (CVJR's) contribute to the inspiratory inhibitory effect of intercostal muscle/rib vibration (IMV) and 2) to explain the different respiratory frequency responses to IMV previously reported. Phrenic (C5) activity was monitored in paralyzed thoracotomized, artificially ventilated cats. Vibration (125 Hz) at amplitudes greater than 1,200 micron of one T6 intercostal space in decerebrated vagotomized rats reduced phrenic activity. This response was still present but weaker in some animals after denervation of the T6 intercostal muscles. Subsequent denervation of the T6 CVJR's by dorsal root sections eliminated this effect. Respiratory frequency decreased during simultaneous vibration (greater than 1,200 micron) of the T5 and T7 intercostal spaces in vagotomized cats. Respiratory frequency increased during IMV of two intercostal spaces (greater than 1,300 micron) in vagal intact cats. The use of different anesthetics (pentobarbital, allobarbital) did not alter these results. We conclude that CVJR's may contribute to the inhibitory effect of IMV on medullary inspiratory activity. The presence or absence of pulmonary vagal afferents can account for the different respiratory frequency responses to IMV, and different anesthetics did not influence these results.

  14. Force encoding in muscle spindles during stretch of passive muscle.

    PubMed

    Blum, Kyle P; Lamotte D'Incamps, Boris; Zytnicki, Daniel; Ting, Lena H

    2017-09-01

    Muscle spindle proprioceptive receptors play a primary role in encoding the effects of external mechanical perturbations to the body. During externally-imposed stretches of passive, i.e. electrically-quiescent, muscles, the instantaneous firing rates (IFRs) of muscle spindles are associated with characteristics of stretch such as length and velocity. However, even in passive muscle, there are history-dependent transients of muscle spindle firing that are not uniquely related to muscle length and velocity, nor reproduced by current muscle spindle models. These include acceleration-dependent initial bursts, increased dynamic response to stretch velocity if a muscle has been isometric, and rate relaxation, i.e., a decrease in tonic IFR when a muscle is held at a constant length after being stretched. We collected muscle spindle spike trains across a variety of muscle stretch kinematic conditions, including systematic changes in peak length, velocity, and acceleration. We demonstrate that muscle spindle primary afferents in passive muscle fire in direct relationship to muscle force-related variables, rather than length-related variables. Linear combinations of whole muscle-tendon force and the first time derivative of force (dF/dt) predict the entire time course of transient IFRs in muscle spindle Ia afferents during stretch (i.e., lengthening) of passive muscle, including the initial burst, the dynamic response to lengthening, and rate relaxation following lengthening. Similar to acceleration scaling found previously in postural responses to perturbations, initial burst amplitude scaled equally well to initial stretch acceleration or dF/dt, though later transients were only described by dF/dt. The transient increase in dF/dt at the onset of lengthening reflects muscle short-range stiffness due to cross-bridge dynamics. Our work demonstrates a critical role of muscle cross-bridge dynamics in history-dependent muscle spindle IFRs in passive muscle lengthening conditions

  15. Primary sensory afferent innervation of the developing superficial dorsal horn in the South American opossum Monodelphis domestica.

    PubMed

    Kitchener, Peter D; Hutton, Elspeth J; Knott, Graham W

    2006-03-01

    Monodelphis is more advanced than the hindlimbs, we found little evidence of a significant delay in the invasion of the spinal cord by primary afferents in cervical and lumbar regions. These observations, together with the broadly similar maturational appearance of histological sections of rostral and caudal spinal cord, suggest that, unlike the limbs they innervate, the spinal regions do not exhibit a large rostrocaudal gradient in their maturation.

  16. Organization of Vagal Afferents in Pylorus: Mechanoreceptors Arrayed for High Sensitivity and Fine Spatial Resolution?

    PubMed Central

    Powley, Terry L.; Hudson, Cherie N.; McAdams, Jennifer L.; Baronowsky, Elizabeth A.; Martin, Felecia N.; Mason, Jacqueline K.; Phillips, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    The pylorus is innervated by vagal mechanoreceptors that project to gastrointestinal smooth muscle, but the distributions and specializations of vagal endings in the sphincter have not been fully characterized. To evaluate their organization, the neural tracer dextran biotin was injected into the nodose ganglia of rats. Following tracer transport, animals were perfused, and their pylori and antra were prepared as whole mounts. Specimens were processed to permanently label the tracer, and subsets were counterstained with Cuprolinic blue or immunostained for c-Kit. Intramuscular arrays (IMAs) in the circular muscle comprised the principal vagal afferent innervation of the sphincter. These pyloric ring IMAs were densely distributed and evidenced a variety of structural specializations. Morphometric comparisons between the arbors innervating the pylorus and a corresponding sample of IMAs in the adjacent antral circular muscle highlighted that sphincter IMAs branched profusely, forming more than twice as many branches as did antral IMAs (means of 405 vs. 165, respectively), and condensed their numerous neurites into compact receptive fields (~48% of the area of antral IMAs) deep in the circular muscle (~6 μm above the submucosa). Separate arbors of IMAs in the sphincter interdigitated and overlapped to form a 360° band of mechanoreceptors encircling the pyloric canal. The annulus of vagal IMA arbors, putative stretch receptors tightly intercalated in the sphincter ring and situated near the lumen of the pyloric canal, creates an architecture with the potential to generate gut reflexes on the basis of pyloric sensory maps of high sensitivity and fine spatial resolution. PMID:24656895

  17. Activity in sympathetic neurons supplying skin and skeletal muscle in spinal cats.

    PubMed

    Kümmel, H

    1983-01-01

    In anesthetized cats with intact neuraxis, vasoconstrictor neurons supplying skeletal muscle (MVC) and hairy and hairless skin (CVC), and sudomotor neurons innervating sweat glands (SM), exhibit distinct reflex patterns. MVC and SM are largely under excitatory, CVC under inhibitory control of various afferent input systems from the body surface and from the viscera. In chronic spinal animals all 3 types of sympathetic neurons exhibit some resting activity without cardiac and respiratory modulation. Sixty to 150 days after isolation of the neural circuits within the sympathetic systems within the spinal cord from their descending control systems by spinalization, these reflex patterns are very similar to those in animals with intact neuraxis. Important changes which do occur after spinalization are the following: CVC neurons are excited by stimulation of visceral afferents in spinal animals but inhibited in animals with intact neuraxis; noxious stimulation of skin leads to long-lasting after-effects in CVC and SM neurons in spinal animals. Comparison of reflexes among spinal animals and animals with intact neuraxis indicates that spinal circuits are probably important for the functioning of the sympathetic systems. It is possible that these circuits determine the typical reaction patterns seen in the sympathetic systems by integrating multisensory information from primary afferents and information from spinal descending fiber tracts.

  18. Gut vagal afferents differentially modulate innate anxiety and learned fear.

    PubMed

    Klarer, Melanie; Arnold, Myrtha; Günther, Lydia; Winter, Christine; Langhans, Wolfgang; Meyer, Urs

    2014-05-21

    Vagal afferents are an important neuronal component of the gut-brain axis allowing bottom-up information flow from the viscera to the CNS. In addition to its role in ingestive behavior, vagal afferent signaling has been implicated modulating mood and affect, including distinct forms of anxiety and fear. Here, we used a rat model of subdiaphragmatic vagal deafferentation (SDA), the most complete and selective vagal deafferentation method existing to date, to study the consequences of complete disconnection of abdominal vagal afferents on innate anxiety, conditioned fear, and neurochemical parameters in the limbic system. We found that compared with Sham controls, SDA rats consistently displayed reduced innate anxiety-like behavior in three procedures commonly used in preclinical rodent models of anxiety, namely the elevated plus maze test, open field test, and food neophobia test. On the other hand, SDA rats exhibited increased expression of auditory-cued fear conditioning, which specifically emerged as attenuated extinction of conditioned fear during the tone re-exposure test. The behavioral manifestations in SDA rats were associated with region-dependent changes in noradrenaline and GABA levels in key areas of the limbic system, but not with functional alterations in the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal grand stress. Our study demonstrates that innate anxiety and learned fear are both subjected to visceral modulation through abdominal vagal afferents, possibly via changing limbic neurotransmitter systems. These data add further weight to theories emphasizing an important role of afferent visceral signals in the regulation of emotional behavior.

  19. Vagal afferent control of abdominal expiratory activity in response to hypoxia and hypercapnia in rats.

    PubMed

    Lemes, Eduardo V; Zoccal, Daniel B

    2014-11-01

    In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that vagal afferent information modulates the pattern of expiratory response to hypercapnia and hypoxia. Simultaneous recordings of airflow, diaphragmatic (DIA) and oblique abdominal muscle (ABD) activities were performed in anesthetized (urethane, 1.2g/kg), tracheostomized, spontaneously breathing male Wistar rats (290-320g, n=12). The animals were exposed to hypercapnia (7 and 10% CO2 for 5min) and hypoxia (7% O2 for 1min) before and after bilateral vagotomy. We verified that the percentage increase in DIA burst amplitude elicited by hypercapnia and hypoxia episodes was similar between intact and vagotomized rats (P>0.05). In contrast, hypercapnia and hypoxia promoted a marked increase in ABD activity in vagotomized, but not in intact rats (P<0.01). These amplified expiratory motor changes after vagotomy were associated with enhanced expiratory airflow (P<0.01) and augmented tidal volume responses (P<0.01). Our data indicates that, in anesthetized conditions, the removal of peripheral afferent inputs facilitates the processing of active expiration in response to hypercapnia and hypoxia in rats.

  20. Effect of Experimental Cutaneous Hand Pain on Corticospinal Excitability and Short Afferent Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Mercier, Catherine; Gagné, Martin; Reilly, Karen T.; Bouyer, Laurent J.

    2016-01-01

    Sensorimotor integration is altered in people with chronic pain. While there is substantial evidence that pain interferes with neural activity in primary sensory and motor cortices, much less is known about its impact on integrative sensorimotor processes. Here, the short latency afferent inhibition (SAI) paradigm was used to assess sensorimotor integration in the presence and absence of experimental cutaneous heat pain applied to the hand. Ulnar nerve stimulation was combined with transcranial magnetic stimulation to condition motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in the first dorsal interosseous muscle. Four interstimulus intervals (ISI) were tested, based on the latency of the N20 component of the afferent sensory volley (N20−5 ms, N20+2 ms, N20+4 ms, N20+10 ms). In the PAIN condition, MEPs were smaller compared to the NEUTRAL condition (p = 0.005), and were modulated as a function of the ISI (p = 0.012). Post-hoc planned comparisons revealed that MEPs at N20+2 and N20+4 were inhibited compared to unconditioned MEPs. However, the level of inhibition (SAI) was similar in the PAIN and NEUTRAL conditions. This suggests that the interplay between pain and sensorimotor integration is not mediated through direct and rapid pathways as assessed by SAI, but rather might involve higher-order integrative areas. PMID:27690117

  1. Effect of Experimental Cutaneous Hand Pain on Corticospinal Excitability and Short Afferent Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Mercier, Catherine; Gagné, Martin; Reilly, Karen T; Bouyer, Laurent J

    2016-09-29

    Sensorimotor integration is altered in people with chronic pain. While there is substantial evidence that pain interferes with neural activity in primary sensory and motor cortices, much less is known about its impact on integrative sensorimotor processes. Here, the short latency afferent inhibition (SAI) paradigm was used to assess sensorimotor integration in the presence and absence of experimental cutaneous heat pain applied to the hand. Ulnar nerve stimulation was combined with transcranial magnetic stimulation to condition motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in the first dorsal interosseous muscle. Four interstimulus intervals (ISI) were tested, based on the latency of the N20 component of the afferent sensory volley (N20-5 ms, N20+2 ms, N20+4 ms, N20+10 ms). In the PAIN condition, MEPs were smaller compared to the NEUTRAL condition (p = 0.005), and were modulated as a function of the ISI (p = 0.012). Post-hoc planned comparisons revealed that MEPs at N20+2 and N20+4 were inhibited compared to unconditioned MEPs. However, the level of inhibition (SAI) was similar in the PAIN and NEUTRAL conditions. This suggests that the interplay between pain and sensorimotor integration is not mediated through direct and rapid pathways as assessed by SAI, but rather might involve higher-order integrative areas.

  2. Caenorhabditis elegans Kettin, a Large Immunoglobulin-like Repeat Protein, Binds to Filamentous Actin and Provides Mechanical Stability to the Contractile Apparatuses in Body Wall Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Kanako; Yu, Robinson; Mohri, Kurato

    2006-01-01

    Kettin is a large actin-binding protein with immunoglobulin-like (Ig) repeats, which is associated with the thin filaments in arthropod muscles. Here, we report identification and functional characterization of kettin in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that one of the monoclonal antibodies that were raised against C. elegans muscle proteins specifically reacts with kettin (Ce-kettin). We determined the entire cDNA sequence of Ce-kettin that encodes a protein of 472 kDa with 31 Ig repeats. Arthropod kettins are splice variants of much larger connectin/titin-related proteins. However, the gene for Ce-kettin is independent of other connectin/titin-related genes. Ce-kettin localizes to the thin filaments near the dense bodies in both striated and nonstriated muscles. The C-terminal four Ig repeats and the adjacent non-Ig region synergistically bind to actin filaments in vitro. RNA interference of Ce-kettin caused weak disorganization of the actin filaments in body wall muscle. This phenotype was suppressed by inhibiting muscle contraction by a myosin mutation, but it was enhanced by tetramisole-induced hypercontraction. Furthermore, Ce-kettin was involved in organizing the cytoplasmic portion of the dense bodies in cooperation with α-actinin. These results suggest that kettin is an important regulator of myofibrillar organization and provides mechanical stability to the myofibrils during contraction. PMID:16597697

  3. Piezo2 Expression in Mechanosensitive Dental Primary Afferent Neurons.

    PubMed

    Won, J; Vang, H; Lee, P R; Kim, Y H; Kim, H W; Kang, Y; Oh, S B

    2017-07-01

    Mechanosensitive ion channels have been suggested to be expressed in dental primary afferent (DPA) neurons to transduce the movement of dentinal fluid since the proposal of hydrodynamic theory. Piezo2, a mechanosensitive, rapidly inactivating (RI) ion channel, has been recently identified in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons to mediate tactile transduction. Here, we examined the expression of Piezo2 in DPA neurons by in situ hybridization, single-cell reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, and whole-cell patch-clamp recordings. DPA neurons with Piezo2 messenger RNA (mRNA) or Piezo2-like currents were further characterized based on their neurochemical and electrophysiological properties. Piezo2 mRNA was found mostly in medium- to large-sized DPA neurons, with the majority of these neurons also positive for Nav1.8, CGRP, and NF200, whereas only a minor population was positive for IB4 and peripherin. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings revealed Piezo2-like, RI currents evoked by mechanical stimulation in a subpopulation of DPA neurons. RI currents were pharmacologically blocked by ruthenium red, a compound known to block Piezo2, and were also reduced by small interfering RNA-mediated Piezo2 knockdown. Piezo2-like currents were observed almost exclusively in IB4-negative DPA neurons, with the current amplitude larger in capsaicin-insensitive DPA neurons than the capsaicin-sensitive population. Our findings show that subpopulation of DPA neurons is indeed mechanically sensitive. Within this subpopulation of mechanosensitive DPA neurons, we have identified the Piezo2 ion channel as a potential transducer for mechanical stimuli, contributing to RI inward currents. Piezo2-positive DPA neurons were characterized as medium- to large-sized neurons with myelinated A-fibers, containing nociceptive peptidergic neurotransmitters.

  4. Overexpression of LARGE suppresses muscle regeneration via down-regulation of insulin-like growth factor 1 and aggravates muscular dystrophy in mice.

    PubMed

    Saito, Fumiaki; Kanagawa, Motoi; Ikeda, Miki; Hagiwara, Hiroki; Masaki, Toshihiro; Ohkuma, Hidehiko; Katanosaka, Yuki; Shimizu, Teruo; Sonoo, Masahiro; Toda, Tatsushi; Matsumura, Kiichiro

    2014-09-01

    Several types of muscular dystrophy are caused by defective linkage between α-dystroglycan (α-DG) and laminin. Among these, dystroglycanopathy, including Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD), results from abnormal glycosylation of α-DG. Recent studies have shown that like-acetylglucosaminyltransferase (LARGE) strongly enhances the laminin-binding activity of α-DG. Therefore, restoration of the α-DG-laminin linkage by LARGE is considered one of the most promising possible therapies for muscular dystrophy. In this study, we generated transgenic mice that overexpress LARGE (LARGE Tg) and crossed them with dy(2J) mice and fukutin conditional knockout mice, a model for laminin α2-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy (MDC1A) and FCMD, respectively. Remarkably, in both the strains, the transgenic overexpression of LARGE resulted in an aggravation of muscular dystrophy. Using morphometric analyses, we found that the deterioration of muscle pathology was caused by suppression of muscle regeneration. Overexpression of LARGE in C2C12 cells further demonstrated defects in myotube formation. Interestingly, a decreased expression of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) was identified in both LARGE Tg mice and LARGE-overexpressing C2C12 myotubes. Supplementing the C2C12 cells with IGF-1 restored the defective myotube formation. Taken together, our findings indicate that the overexpression of LARGE aggravates muscular dystrophy by suppressing the muscle regeneration and this adverse effect is mediated via reduced expression of IGF-1. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Evidence that antidromically stimulated vagal afferents activate inhibitory neurones innervating guinea-pig trachealis.

    PubMed Central

    Canning, B J; Undem, B J

    1994-01-01

    -selective agonist, acetyl-[Arg6, Sar9, Met (O2)11]-SP(6-11), elicited oesophagus-dependent relaxations of the trachealis that were abolished by oesophagus removal. Furthermore, pretreatment with the NK1-selective antagonists, CP 96345 and CP 99994, or pretreatment with a concentration of SR 48968 that also blocks NK3 receptors, markedly attenuated relaxations elicited by stimulation of the capsaicin-sensitive vagal pathways. 6. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that relaxations elicited by stimulation of capsaicin-sensitive vagal afferents involve tachykinin-mediated activation of peripheral NANC inhibitory neurones that are in some way associated with the oesophagus. The data also indicate that airway smooth muscle tone might be regulated by peripheral reflexes initiated by activation of capsaicin-sensitive afferent fibres. PMID:7869272

  6. Laparoscopy in Afferent Loop Obstruction Presenting as Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Pettinato, Giovanna; Romessis, Matheos; Ferrari Bravo, Andrea; Barozzi, Geraldine; Giovanetti, Maurizio

    2006-01-01

    Background: We describe an afferent loop obstruction caused by an adhesion band in a case of distal gastrectomy with Roux-en-Y end-to-side jejunal anastomosis for cancer. Methods: An initial clinical presentation of acute pancreatitis was ruled out by a computed tomography scan, which revealed intestinal obstruction; it was then confirmed on laparoscopy. Definitive treatment was laparoscopic adhesiolysis. A complete review of the literature concerning afferent loop obstructions is presented. Results: The treatment was successful, with minimal postoperative pain, and the 5-day hospital stay was uncomplicated. The patient remains asymptomatic at 1-year follow-up. Conclusions: The authors advocate minimally invasive surgery as a complete diagnostic and therapeutic alternative to emergency laparotomy in cases where afferent loop syndrome is suspected, and acknowledge that prompt surgery has a higher rate of success and reduces operative morbidity and mortality. PMID:16882437

  7. The role of gastrointestinal vagal afferent fibres in obesity

    PubMed Central

    Kentish, Stephen J; Page, Amanda J

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) vagal afferents are a key mediatory of food intake. Through a balance of responses to chemical and mechanical stimuli food intake can be tightly controlled via the ascending satiety signals initiated in the GI tract. However, vagal responses to both mechanical and chemical stimuli are modified in diet-induced obesity (DIO). Much of the research to date whilst in relatively isolated/controlled circumstances indicates a shift between a balance of orexigenic and anorexigenic vagal signals to blunted anorexigenic and potentiated orexigenic capacity. Although the mechanism responsible for the DIO shift in GI vagal afferent signalling is unknown, one possible contributing factor is the gut microbiota. Nevertheless, whatever the mechanism, the observed changes in gastrointestinal vagal afferent signalling may underlie the pathophysiological changes in food consumption that are pivotal for the development and maintenance of obesity. PMID:25433079

  8. Transplantation of tectal tissue in rats. I. Organization of transplants and pattern of distribution of host afferents within them

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, R.D.; Harvey, A.R.

    1981-01-01

    We have examined the maturation of tectal tissue transplanted from fetal rats to the midbrain of newborns and have characterized the distribution of host retinal and cortical afferents within the transplants. The transplants develop characteristic internal order and connections which distinguish them from either embryonic cortex or retina placed in the same region. Host retinal afferents project to clearly circumscribed regions, where they synapse mainly on small dendrites or dendritic spines, and only rarely on vesicle-containing profiles. The retinorecipient areas contain few stained axons in neurofibrillar preparations and are almost always located at the surface of the transplant. There is very little overlap in the input from the two eyes into a single transplant even though the projections from each eye may lie adjacent to one another. Cortical afferents spread more broadly in the transplants, but are largely absent from areas of optic termination and from other more deeply located regions with sparse fiber staining properties. The observations suggest that when placed close to its normal location, tectal tissue can develop a number of features characteristic of normal superior colliculus. Appreciation of the internal order of the transplants makes it possible to investigate the cortical and retinal afferent pathways using physiological techniques.

  9. Determinants of Spatial and Temporal Coding by Semicircular Canal Afferents

    PubMed Central

    Highstein, Stephen M.; Rabbitt, Richard D.; Holstein, Gay R.; Boyle, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    The vestibular semicircular canals are internal sensors that signal the magnitude, direction, and temporal properties of angular head motion. Fluid mechanics within the 3-canal labyrinth code the direction of movement and integrate angular acceleration stimuli over time. Directional coding is accomplished by decomposition of complex angular accelerations into 3 biomechanical components—one component exciting each of the 3 ampullary organs and associated afferent nerve bundles separately. For low-frequency angular motion stimuli, fluid displacement within each canal is proportional to angular acceleration. At higher frequencies, above the lower corner frequency, real-time integration is accomplished by viscous forces arising from the movement of fluid within the slender lumen of each canal. This results in angular velocity sensitive fluid displacements. Reflecting this, a subset of afferent fibers indeed report angular acceleration to the brain for low frequencies of head movement and report angular velocity for higher frequencies. However, a substantial number of afferent fibers also report angular acceleration, or a signal between acceleration and velocity, even at frequencies where the endolymph displacement is known to follow angular head velocity. These non-velocity-sensitive afferent signals cannot be attributed to canal biomechanics alone. The responses of non-velocity-sensitive cells include a mathematical differentiation (first-order or fractional) imparted by hair-cell and/or afferent complexes. This mathematical differentiation from velocity to acceleration cannot be attributed to hair cell ionic currents, but occurs as a result of the dynamics of synaptic transmission between hair cells and their primary afferent fibers. The evidence for this conclusion is reviewed below. PMID:15845995

  10. Fatigue-related firing of distal muscle nociceptors reduces voluntary activation of proximal muscles of the same limb.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, David S; McNeil, Chris J; Gandevia, Simon C; Taylor, Janet L

    2014-02-15

    With fatiguing exercise, firing of group III/IV muscle afferents reduces voluntary activation and force of the exercised muscles. These afferents can also act across agonist/antagonist pairs, reducing voluntary activation and force in nonfatigued muscles. We hypothesized that maintained firing of group III/IV muscle afferents after a fatiguing adductor pollicis (AP) contraction would decrease voluntary activation and force of AP and ipsilateral elbow flexors. In two experiments (n = 10) we examined voluntary activation of AP and elbow flexors by measuring changes in superimposed twitches evoked by ulnar nerve stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex, respectively. Inflation of a sphygmomanometer cuff after a 2-min AP maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) blocked circulation of the hand for 2 min and maintained firing of group III/IV muscle afferents. After a 2-min AP MVC, maximal AP voluntary activation was lower with than without ischemia (56.2 ± 17.7% vs. 76.3 ± 14.6%; mean ± SD; P < 0.05) as was force (40.3 ± 12.8% vs. 57.1 ± 13.8% peak MVC; P < 0.05). Likewise, after a 2-min AP MVC, elbow flexion voluntary activation was lower with than without ischemia (88.3 ± 7.5% vs. 93.6 ± 3.9%; P < 0.05) as was torque (80.2 ± 4.6% vs. 86.6 ± 1.0% peak MVC; P < 0.05). Pain during ischemia was reported as Moderate to Very Strong. Postfatigue firing of group III/IV muscle afferents from the hand decreased voluntary drive and force of AP. Moreover, this effect decreased voluntary drive and torque of proximal unfatigued muscles, the elbow flexors. Fatigue-sensitive group III/IV muscle nociceptors act to limit voluntary drive not only to fatigued muscles but also to unfatigued muscles within the same limb.

  11. Differential localization of vesicular glutamate transporters and peptides in corneal afferents to trigeminal nucleus caudalis.

    PubMed

    Hegarty, Deborah M; Tonsfeldt, Karen; Hermes, Sam M; Helfand, Helen; Aicher, Sue A

    2010-09-01

    Trigeminal afferents convey nociceptive information from the corneal surface of the eye to the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis (Vc). Trigeminal afferents, like other nociceptors, are thought to use glutamate and neuropeptides as neurotransmitters. The current studies examined whether corneal afferents contain both neuropeptides and vesicular glutamate transporters. Corneal afferents to the Vc were identified by using cholera toxin B (CTb). Corneal afferents project in two clusters to the rostral and caudal borders of the Vc, regions that contain functionally distinct nociceptive neurons. Thus, corneal afferents projecting to these two regions were examined separately. Dual immunocytochemical studies combined CTb with either calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), substance P (SP), vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGluT1), or VGluT2. Corneal afferents were more likely to contain CGRP than SP, and corneal afferents projecting to the rostral region were more likely to contain CGRP than afferents projecting caudally. Overall, corneal afferents were equally likely to contain VGluT1 or VGluT2. Together, 61% of corneal afferents contained either VGluT1 or VGluT2, suggesting that some afferents lack a VGluT. Caudal corneal afferents were more likely to contain VGluT2 than VGluT1, whereas rostral corneal afferents were more likely to contain VGluT1 than VGluT2. Triple-labeling studies combining CTb, CGRP, and VGluT2 showed that very few corneal afferents contain both CGRP and VGluT2, caudally (1%) and rostrally (2%). These results suggest that most corneal afferents contain a peptide or a VGluT, but rarely both. Our results are consistent with a growing literature suggesting that glutamatergic and peptidergic sensory afferents may be distinct populations.

  12. Nociceptive primary afferents: they have a mind of their own

    PubMed Central

    Carlton, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Nociceptive primary afferents have three surprising properties: they are highly complex in their expression of neurotransmitters and receptors and most probably participate in autocrine and paracrine interactions; they are capable of exerting tonic and activity-dependent inhibitory control over incoming nociceptive input; they can generate signals in the form of dorsal root reflexes that are transmitted antidromically out to the periphery and these signals can result in neurogenic inflammation in the innervated tissue. Thus, nociceptive primary afferents are highly complicated structures, capable of modifying input before it is ever transmitted to the central nervous system and capable of altering the tissue they innervate. PMID:24879874

  13. Greater eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage by large versus small range of motion with the same end-point

    PubMed Central

    Fochi, AG; Damas, F; Berton, R; Alvarez, I; Miquelini, M; Salvini, TF

    2016-01-01

    Several factors can affect the magnitude of eccentric exercise (ECC)-induced muscle damage, but little is known regarding the effect of the range of motion (ROM) in ECC-induced muscle damage. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether elbow flexor ECC with 120° of ROM (from 60° of elbow flexion until elbow full extension - 180° [120ROM]) induces a greater magnitude of muscle damage compared with a protocol with 60° of ROM (120-180° of elbow flexion [60ROM]). Twelve healthy young men (age: 22 ± 3.1 years; height: 1.75 ± 0.05 m; body mass: 75.6 ± 13.6 kg) performed the ECC with 120ROM and 60ROM using different arms in a random order separated by 2 weeks and were tested before and 24, 48, 72 and 96 h after ECC for maximal voluntary isometric contraction torque (MVC-ISO), ROM and muscle soreness. The 120ROM protocol showed greater changes and effect sizes (ES) for MVC-ISO (-35%, ES: 1.97), ROM (-11.5°, ES: 1.27) and muscle soreness (19 mm, ES: 1.18) compared with the 60ROM protocol (-23%, ES: 0.93; -12%, ES: 0.56; 17°, ES: 0.63; 8 mm, ES: 1.07, respectively). In conclusion, ECC of the elbow flexors with 120° of ROM promotes a greater magnitude of muscle damage compared with a protocol with 60° of ROM, even when both protocols are performed at long muscle lengths. PMID:27601784

  14. The effect of type of afferent feedback timed with motor imagery on the induction of cortical plasticity.

    PubMed

    Mrachacz-Kersting, N; Voigt, M; Stevenson, Ajt; Aliakbaryhosseinabadi, S; Jiang, N; Dremstrup, K; Farina, D

    2017-08-28

    A peripherally generated afferent volley that arrives at the peak negative (PN) phase during the movement related cortical potential (MRCP) induces significant plasticity at the cortical level in healthy individuals and chronic stroke patients. Transferring this type of associative brain-computer interface (BCI) intervention into the clinical setting requires that the proprioceptive input is comparable to the techniques implemented during the rehabilitation process. These consist mainly of functional electrical stimulation (FES) and passive movement induced by an actuated orthosis. In this study, we compared these two interventions (BCIFES and BCIpassive) where the afferent input was timed to arrive at the motor cortex during the PN of the MRCP. Twelve healthy participants attended two experimental sessions. They were asked to perform 30 dorsiflexion movements timed to a cue while continuous electroencephalographic (EEG) data were collected from FP1, Fz, FC1, FC2, C3, Cz, C4, CP1, CP2, and Pz, according to the standard international 10-20 system. MRCPs were extracted and the PN time calculated. Next, participants were asked to imagine the same m