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Sample records for large population-based study

  1. The first large population based twin study of coeliac disease

    PubMed Central

    Greco, L; Romino, R; Coto, I; Di Cosmo, N; Percopo, S; Maglio, M; Paparo, F; Gasperi, V; Limongelli, M G; Cotichini, R; D'Agate, C; Tinto, N; Sacchetti, L; Tosi, R; Stazi, M A

    2002-01-01

    Background and aims: The genetic load in coeliac disease has hitherto been inferred from case series or anecdotally referred twin pairs. We have evaluated the genetic component in coeliac disease by estimating the concordance rate for the disease among twin pairs in a large population based study. Methods: The Italian Twin Registry was matched with the membership lists of a patient support group. Forty seven twin pairs were recruited and screened for antiendomysial (EMA) and antihuman-tissue transglutaminase (anti-tTG) antibodies; zygosity was verified by DNA fingerprinting and twins were typed for HLA class II DRB1 and DQB1 molecules. Results: Concordance rates for coeliac disease differ significantly between monozygotic (MZ) (0.86 probandwise and 0.75 pairwise) and dizygotic (DZ) (0.20 probandwise and 0.11 pairwise) twins. This is the highest concordance so far reported for a multifactorial disease. A logistic regression model, adjusted for age, sex, number of shared HLA haplotypes, and zygosity, showed that genotypes DQA1*0501/DQB1*0201 and DQA1*0301/DQB1*0302 (encoding for heterodimers DQ2 and DQ8, respectively) conferred to the non-index twin a risk of contracting the disease of 3.3 and 1.4, respectively. The risk of being concordant for coeliac disease estimated for the non-index twin of MZ pairs was 17 (95% confidence interval 2.1–134), independent of the DQ at risk genotype. Conclusion: This study provides substantial evidence for a very strong genetic component in coeliac disease, which is only partially due to the HLA region. PMID:11950806

  2. Challenges of cardiac image analysis in large-scale population-based studies.

    PubMed

    Medrano-Gracia, Pau; Cowan, Brett R; Suinesiaputra, Avan; Young, Alistair A

    2015-03-01

    Large-scale population-based imaging studies of preclinical and clinical heart disease are becoming possible due to the advent of standardized robust non-invasive imaging methods and infrastructure for big data analysis. This gives an exciting opportunity to gain new information about the development and progression of heart disease across population groups. However, the large amount of image data and prohibitive time required for image analysis present challenges for obtaining useful derived data from the images. Automated analysis tools for cardiac image analysis are only now becoming available. This paper reviews the challenges and possible solutions to the analysis of big imaging data in population studies. We also highlight the potential of recent large epidemiological studies using cardiac imaging to discover new knowledge on heart health and well-being.

  3. Costs of school scoliosis screening: a large, population-based study.

    PubMed

    Lee, C F; Fong, Daniel Y T; Cheung, Kenneth M C; Cheng, Jack C Y; Ng, Bobby K W; Lam, T P; Mak, K H; Yip, Paul S F; Luk, Keith D K

    2010-12-15

    This was a population-based retrospective study. To fully estimate the costs of the Hong Kong scoliosis screening program through a large, population-based study. School screening for scoliosis has often been criticized for having high costs. In fact, the screening cost that has reported varied widely, from less than 1 to more than 30 US dollars (USD) per child screened. This variation is mainly due to the incomplete inclusion of cost items. We examined the screening and medical histories of a cohort of 115,190 screened students who were in Grade 5 in 1995/96 or 1996/97. The average costs spent on screening, diagnosing, following, and treating this cohort of students were calculated. The total expenses in the screening centers increased steadily from USD 380,930 in 1995/96 to USD 2,417,824 in 2005/06. Based on the 115,190 students who were followed up until they were 19 years old or they left school, the costs of screening and diagnosing 1 student during adolescence were USD 17.94 and USD 2.08, respectively. Of the 1311 referrals who attended the specialist hospitals for diagnosis, 264 and 39 had been braced and operated on, respectively. The medical care cost averaged USD 34.61 per student screened. The cost of finding 1 student with a curvature ≥20° and 1 treated case were USD 4475.67 and USD 20,768.29 respectively. This was the largest study that has evaluated school scoliosis screening on students who were followed during their adolescence and accounted for all relevant costs. The cost per student screened in the scoliosis screening program in Hong Kong was comparable to that in Rochester, which had a similar protocol and was evaluated in a similar manner. The estimated costs can help the policy makers when they allocate healthcare resources.

  4. Arsenic exposure and impaired lung function. Findings from a large population-based prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Parvez, Faruque; Chen, Yu; Yunus, Mahbub; Olopade, Christopher; Segers, Stephanie; Slavkovich, Vesna; Argos, Maria; Hasan, Rabiul; Ahmed, Alauddin; Islam, Tariqul; Akter, Mahmud M; Graziano, Joseph H; Ahsan, Habibul

    2013-10-01

    Exposure to arsenic through drinking water has been linked to respiratory symptoms, obstructive lung diseases, and mortality from respiratory diseases. Limited evidence for the deleterious effects on lung function exists among individuals exposed to a high dose of arsenic. To determine the deleterious effects on lung function that exist among individuals exposed to a high dose of arsenic. In 950 individuals who presented with any respiratory symptom among a population-based cohort of 20,033 adults, we evaluated the association between arsenic exposure, measured by well water and urinary arsenic concentrations measured at baseline, and post-bronchodilator-administered pulmonary function assessed during follow-up. For every one SD increase in baseline water arsenic exposure, we observed a lower level of FEV1 (-46.5 ml; P < 0.0005) and FVC (-53.1 ml; P < 0.01) in regression models adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, socioeconomic status, betel nut use, and arsenical skin lesions status. Similar inverse relationships were observed between baseline urinary arsenic and FEV1 (-48.3 ml; P < 0.005) and FVC (-55.2 ml; P < 0.01) in adjusted models. Our analyses also demonstrated a dose-related decrease in lung function with increasing levels of baseline water and urinary arsenic. This association remained significant in never-smokers and individuals without skin lesions, and was stronger in male smokers. Among male smokers and individuals with skin lesions, every one SD increase in water arsenic was related to a significant reduction of FEV1 (-74.4 ml, P < 0.01; and -116.1 ml, P < 0.05) and FVC (-72.8 ml, P = 0.02; and -146.9 ml, P = 0.004), respectively. This large population-based study confirms that arsenic exposure is associated with impaired lung function and the deleterious effect is evident at low- to moderate-dose range.

  5. Sleep and academic performance in later adolescence: results from a large population-based study.

    PubMed

    Hysing, Mari; Harvey, Allison G; Linton, Steven J; Askeland, Kristin G; Sivertsen, Børge

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the current study was to assess the association between sleep duration and sleep patterns and academic performance in 16-19 year-old adolescents using registry-based academic grades. A large population-based study from Norway conducted in 2012, the youth@hordaland-survey, surveyed 7798 adolescents aged 16-19 years (53.5% girls). The survey was linked with objective outcome data on school performance. Self-reported sleep measures provided information on sleep duration, sleep efficiency, sleep deficit and bedtime differences between weekday and weekend. School performance [grade point average (GPA)] was obtained from official administrative registries. Most sleep parameters were associated with increased risk for poor school performance. After adjusting for sociodemographic information, short sleep duration and sleep deficit were the sleep measures with the highest odds of poor GPA (lowest quartile). Weekday bedtime was associated significantly with GPA, with adolescents going to bed between 22:00 and 23:00 hours having the best GPA. Also, delayed sleep schedule during weekends was associated with poor academic performance. The associations were somewhat reduced after additional adjustment for non-attendance at school, but remained significant in the fully adjusted models. In conclusion, the demonstrated relationship between sleep problems and poor academic performance suggests that careful assessment of sleep is warranted when adolescents are underperforming at school. Future studies are needed on the association between impaired sleep in adolescence and later functioning in adulthood.

  6. Sleep and use of electronic devices in adolescence: results from a large population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Hysing, Mari; Pallesen, Ståle; Stormark, Kjell Morten; Jakobsen, Reidar; Lundervold, Astri J; Sivertsen, Børge

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Adolescents spend increasingly more time on electronic devices, and sleep deficiency rising in adolescents constitutes a major public health concern. The aim of the present study was to investigate daytime screen use and use of electronic devices before bedtime in relation to sleep. Design A large cross-sectional population-based survey study from 2012, the youth@hordaland study, in Hordaland County in Norway. Setting Cross-sectional general community-based study. Participants 9846 adolescents from three age cohorts aged 16–19. The main independent variables were type and frequency of electronic devices at bedtime and hours of screen-time during leisure time. Outcomes Sleep variables calculated based on self-report including bedtime, rise time, time in bed, sleep duration, sleep onset latency and wake after sleep onset. Results Adolescents spent a large amount of time during the day and at bedtime using electronic devices. Daytime and bedtime use of electronic devices were both related to sleep measures, with an increased risk of short sleep duration, long sleep onset latency and increased sleep deficiency. A dose–response relationship emerged between sleep duration and use of electronic devices, exemplified by the association between PC use and risk of less than 5 h of sleep (OR=2.70, 95% CI 2.14 to 3.39), and comparable lower odds for 7–8 h of sleep (OR=1.64, 95% CI 1.38 to 1.96). Conclusions Use of electronic devices is frequent in adolescence, during the day as well as at bedtime. The results demonstrate a negative relation between use of technology and sleep, suggesting that recommendations on healthy media use could include restrictions on electronic devices. PMID:25643702

  7. Sleep and use of electronic devices in adolescence: results from a large population-based study.

    PubMed

    Hysing, Mari; Pallesen, Ståle; Stormark, Kjell Morten; Jakobsen, Reidar; Lundervold, Astri J; Sivertsen, Børge

    2015-02-02

    Adolescents spend increasingly more time on electronic devices, and sleep deficiency rising in adolescents constitutes a major public health concern. The aim of the present study was to investigate daytime screen use and use of electronic devices before bedtime in relation to sleep. A large cross-sectional population-based survey study from 2012, the youth@hordaland study, in Hordaland County in Norway. Cross-sectional general community-based study. 9846 adolescents from three age cohorts aged 16-19. The main independent variables were type and frequency of electronic devices at bedtime and hours of screen-time during leisure time. Sleep variables calculated based on self-report including bedtime, rise time, time in bed, sleep duration, sleep onset latency and wake after sleep onset. Adolescents spent a large amount of time during the day and at bedtime using electronic devices. Daytime and bedtime use of electronic devices were both related to sleep measures, with an increased risk of short sleep duration, long sleep onset latency and increased sleep deficiency. A dose-response relationship emerged between sleep duration and use of electronic devices, exemplified by the association between PC use and risk of less than 5 h of sleep (OR=2.70, 95% CI 2.14 to 3.39), and comparable lower odds for 7-8 h of sleep (OR=1.64, 95% CI 1.38 to 1.96). Use of electronic devices is frequent in adolescence, during the day as well as at bedtime. The results demonstrate a negative relation between use of technology and sleep, suggesting that recommendations on healthy media use could include restrictions on electronic devices. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  8. Survival of women with inflammatory breast cancer: a large population-based study.

    PubMed

    Dawood, S; Lei, X; Dent, R; Gupta, S; Sirohi, B; Cortes, J; Cristofanilli, M; Buchholz, T; Gonzalez-Angulo, A M

    2014-06-01

    Our group has previously reported that women with inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) continue to have worse outcome compared with those with non-IBC. We undertook this population-based study to see if there have been improvements in survival among women with stage III IBC, over time. We searched the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Registry to identify female patients diagnosed with stage III IBC between 1990 and 2010. Patients were divided into four groups according to year of diagnosis: 1990-1995, 1996-2000, 2001-2005, and 2006-2010. Breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared across groups using the log-rank test. Cox models were then fit to determine the association of year of diagnosis and BCSS after adjusting for patient and tumor characteristics. A total of 7679 patients with IBC were identified of whom 1084 patients (14.1%) were diagnosed between 1990 and 1995, 1614 patients (21.0%) between 1996 and 2000, 2683 patients (34.9%) between 2001 and 2005, and 2298 patients (29.9%) between 2006 and 2010. The 2-year BCSS for the whole cohort was 71%. Two-year BCSS were 62%, 67%, 72%, and 76% for patients diagnosed between 1990-1995, 1996-2000, 2001-2005, and 2006-2010, respectively (P < 0.0001). In the multivariable analysis, increasing year of diagnosis (modeled as a continuous variable) was associated with decreasing risks of death from breast cancer (HR = 0.98, 95% confidence interval 0.97-0.99, P < 0.0001). There has been a significant improvement in survival of patients diagnosed with IBC over a two-decade time span in this large population-based study. This suggests that therapeutic strategies researched and evolved in the context of non-IBC have also had a positive impact in women with IBC. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Arsenic Exposure and Impaired Lung Function. Findings from a Large Population-based Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Parvez, Faruque; Chen, Yu; Yunus, Mahbub; Olopade, Christopher; Segers, Stephanie; Slavkovich, Vesna; Argos, Maria; Hasan, Rabiul; Ahmed, Alauddin; Islam, Tariqul; Akter, Mahmud M.; Graziano, Joseph H.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Exposure to arsenic through drinking water has been linked to respiratory symptoms, obstructive lung diseases, and mortality from respiratory diseases. Limited evidence for the deleterious effects on lung function exists among individuals exposed to a high dose of arsenic. Objectives: To determine the deleterious effects on lung function that exist among individuals exposed to a high dose of arsenic. Methods: In 950 individuals who presented with any respiratory symptom among a population-based cohort of 20,033 adults, we evaluated the association between arsenic exposure, measured by well water and urinary arsenic concentrations measured at baseline, and post-bronchodilator–administered pulmonary function assessed during follow-up. Measurements and Main Results: For every one SD increase in baseline water arsenic exposure, we observed a lower level of FEV1 (−46.5 ml; P < 0.0005) and FVC (−53.1 ml; P < 0.01) in regression models adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, socioeconomic status, betel nut use, and arsenical skin lesions status. Similar inverse relationships were observed between baseline urinary arsenic and FEV1 (−48.3 ml; P < 0.005) and FVC (−55.2 ml; P < 0.01) in adjusted models. Our analyses also demonstrated a dose-related decrease in lung function with increasing levels of baseline water and urinary arsenic. This association remained significant in never-smokers and individuals without skin lesions, and was stronger in male smokers. Among male smokers and individuals with skin lesions, every one SD increase in water arsenic was related to a significant reduction of FEV1 (−74.4 ml, P < 0.01; and −116.1 ml, P < 0.05) and FVC (−72.8 ml, P = 0.02; and −146.9 ml, P = 0.004), respectively. Conclusions: This large population-based study confirms that arsenic exposure is associated with impaired lung function and the deleterious effect is evident at low- to moderate-dose range. PMID:23848239

  10. Blood donation in a large urban centre of southeast Brazil: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Moreno, E C; Bolina-Santos, E; Mendes-Oliveira, F; Miranda, C; Sabino, E C; Cioffi, J G M; Camargos, V; Caiaffa, W; Xavier, C C; Proietti, F A; Carneiro-Proietti, A B de Freitas

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to estimate the prevalence and characterise potential blood donors and non-donors in a well-populated and representative urban area of Southeastern Brazil. Studies on blood donation usually evaluate individuals who donate. Population-based studies may contribute to characterise those who never reach the blood centre, trying to increase the range of donors. This was a secondary analysis of a population-based survey and a blood donor motivation study [Recipient Epidemiology and Donor Evaluation study (REDS II) International]. In a cross-sectional study 4047 individuals representing a metropolitan area answered the question 'Have you ever donated blood at least once in your life?'. The profiles ('Yes/No') were compared. Non-donors from this reference population were compared with donors of a local blood center, in a case control analysis. A total of 69·0% of the population had never donated blood and was composed mostly of women, younger than 30 years old, people not contributing to social security and not subscribing to newspapers. In the case-control study, the likelihood of donating was higher for: men, younger than 50 years old, longer time of education, married, participating in political campaigns and with a good self-perception of health. The factors associated with no blood donation were: self-reported mixed or white race/ethnicity, income higher than two minimum wages and belonging to trade union, political, religious/spiritual, or other social group and worse self perception of health. This population-based study allowed us to characterise a high proportion of people that never reaches the blood centre. The results may be used to diversify the donor profile, creating strategies to target those least likely to donate blood, as women, white people and those with higher income and purchasing power. © 2016 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  11. Prevalence of Idiopathic Scoliosis in Chinese Schoolchildren: A Large, Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Hengwei, Fan; Zifang, Huang; Qifei, Wang; Weiqing, Tan; Nali, Deng; Ping, Yu; Junlin, Yang

    2016-02-01

    This is a population-based, cross-sectional study of school scoliosis screening program in mainland China. The aim of this study was to assess current prevalence and distribution of idiopathic scoliosis (IS) in schoolchildren and to compare with the results of previous studies. The feasibility and predictive values of scoliosis screening programs for school-age children remains controversial and many of these programs have recently been discontinued in different countries. Due to different race and medical model in China, it is not feasible to introduce these data without further study. Therefore, a reliable retrospective cohort study with a large sample size to ensure proper evaluation of school scoliosis screening is needed. Schoolchildren were initially screened by visual inspection of clinical signs, the forward-bending test, and the measurement of the angle of trunk rotation (ATR). Students suspected were rescreened, and then were referred for radiography or dismissed. The diagnosis and treatment were based on the Cobb angle. The personal information, demographic information, and results of tests performed were recorded and analyzed. A total of 99,695 children were screened, with a female-to-male ratio of 1:1.03. Around 6.56% of children screened were referred for radiography, and 5125 of them had confirmed diagnosis. The overall scoliosis prevalence rate was 5.14%. According to age and gender, 14- to 15-year-old girls had the highest prevalence rates (13.81%). And, the prevalence of IS in need of treatment was 0.64%. A prevalence rate of 13.1% was observed in girls with BMI less than 18 kg/m². The prevalence rate of IS was 5.14% in our study. Screening of 13- to 14- and 14- to 15-year-old girls identified a significant number who could benefit from preventive treatment. Low BMI may be a risk factor for IS. We present this study as a guide for studying the prevalence of IS and modifying our further research. 3.

  12. Delayed sleep phase syndrome in adolescents: prevalence and correlates in a large population based study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aims of this study were to estimate the prevalence of Delayed Sleep Phase Syndrome (DSPS) in adolescence, and to examine the association to insomnia and school non-attendance. Methods Data stem from a large population based study in Hordaland County in Norway conducted in 2012, the ung@hordaland study. In all, 10,220 adolescents aged 16–18 years (54% girls) provided self-reported data on a range of sleep parameters: DSPS was defined according to the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, Revised (ICSD-R) criteria, while insomnia was defined according to the Quantitative Criteria for Insomnia. Other sleep parameters included time in bed, sleep duration, sleep efficiency, oversleeping, sleep onset latency, wake after sleep onset, subjective sleep need, sleep deficiency, sleepiness and tiredness. Sleep data were calculated separately for weekdays and weekends. Data on school non-attendance were provided by official registers. Results The prevalence of DSPS was 3.3%, and significantly higher among girls (3.7%) than boys (2.7%). There was a strong overlap between DSPS and insomnia, with more than half of the adolescents with DSPS also meeting the criteria for insomnia (53.8% for boys and 57.1% for girls). Adolescents with DSPS had significantly higher odds ratios (OR) of non-attendance at school. After adjusting for sociodeographical factors, insomnia and depression, the adjusted ORs for days of non-attendance were OR = 3.22 (95% CI: 1.94-5.34) for boys and OR = 1.87 (95% CI: 1.25-2.80) for girls. A similar effect was found for hours of non-attendance for boys, with an adjusted OR = 3.05 (95% CI: 1.89-4.92). The effect for girls was no longer significant after full adjustment (OR =1.48 [95% CI: 0.94-2.32]). Conclusions This is one of the first studies to estimate the prevalence of DSPS in adolescents. The high prevalence of DSPS, and overlap with insomnia, in combination with the odds of school non-attendance, suggest that a broad

  13. Occupations associated with COPD risk in the large population-based UK Biobank cohort study.

    PubMed

    De Matteis, Sara; Jarvis, Deborah; Hutchings, Sally; Darnton, Andy; Fishwick, David; Sadhra, Steven; Rushton, Lesley; Cullinan, Paul

    2016-06-01

    analyses restricted to never-smokers and non-asthmatics. Selected occupations are associated with increased COPD risk in a large cross-sectional population-based UK study. Further analyses should confirm the extent to which these associations reflect exposures still of concern and where strengthened preventive action may be needed. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  14. Diabetes among non-obese Filipino Americans: Findings from a large population-based study.

    PubMed

    Fuller-Thomson, Esme; Roy, Adity; Chan, Keith Tsz-Kit; Kobayashi, Karen M

    2017-04-20

    Filipino Americans form the second-largest Asian American and Pacific Islanders subgroup. Growing evidence suggests that Filipino Americans have higher rates of diabetes than non-Hispanic whites. The key objectives of this study are 1) to determine the prevalence of diabetes in non-obese Filipino Americans compared to non-obese non-Hispanic whites, and 2) to identify risk factors for diabetes in non-obese Filipino men and women. Secondary analysis of population-based data from combined waves (2007, 2009 and 2011) of the adult California Health Interview Survey (CHIS). The study sample was restricted to non-obese Filipino Americans (n = 1629) and non-Hispanic whites (n = 72 072). Non-obese Filipino Americans had more than twice the odds of diabetes compared to non-Hispanic whites, even after correcting for several known risk factors (OR = 2.80, p < 0.001). For non-obese Filipino men, older age, poverty, cigarette smoking, and being overweight are associated with increased odds for diabetes, while older age was the only factor associated with diabetes among Filipina women. Diabetes prevention approaches need to be targeted towards non-obese Filipino Americans, due to their high risk of diabetes.

  15. Survival of patients with mixed phenotype acute leukemias: A large population-based study.

    PubMed

    Shi, Runhua; Munker, Reinhold

    2015-06-01

    Little is known about the incidence and treatment outcome of patients with acute biphenotypic leukemias. The World Health Organization (WHO) established the term of acute leukemia of ambiguous phenotype in 2001 (revised in 2008) introducing the term of mixed phenotype acute leukemias. Using the database of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry (SEER), we identified 313 patients with mixed phenotype acute leukemias and compared them with 14,739 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and 34,326 patients with acute myelogenous leukemias diagnosed between 2001 and 2011. As a further control group, 1777 patients were included who were not classified as myeloid, lymphoid or biphenotypic (other acute leukemias). The incidence of mixed phenotype acute leukemias is 0.35 cases/1,000,000 person-years. In a multivariate analysis, the prognosis depends strongly on age (as with other leukemias) and it has the worst outcome of all four types of leukemia. However, the prognosis has improved, comparing 2001-2005 with 2006-2011. We present the first comprehensive, population-based study of acute biphenotypic or mixed phenotype acute leukemias according to the WHO classification. Especially in older patients, the prognosis is unfavorable and new treatments should be investigated. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Early Childhood Experiences and Kindergarten Success: A Population-Based Study of a Large Urban Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fantuzzo, John W.; Rouse, Heather L.; McDermott, Paul A.; Sekino, Yumiko; Childs, Stephanie; Weiss, Andrea

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the unique protective influence of center-based early care and education experiences on kindergarten outcomes for children entering public school kindergarten. The 3,969 participants were geographically and demographically representative of an entire kindergarten cohort in a large urban school district. Child age, gender,…

  17. Early Childhood Experiences and Kindergarten Success: A Population-Based Study of a Large Urban Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fantuzzo, John W.; Rouse, Heather L.; McDermott, Paul A.; Sekino, Yumiko; Childs, Stephanie; Weiss, Andrea

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the unique protective influence of center-based early care and education experiences on kindergarten outcomes for children entering public school kindergarten. The 3,969 participants were geographically and demographically representative of an entire kindergarten cohort in a large urban school district. Child age, gender,…

  18. Thyroid dysfunction and anaemia in a large population-based study.

    PubMed

    M'Rabet-Bensalah, Khadija; Aubert, Carole E; Coslovsky, Michael; Collet, Tinh-Hai; Baumgartner, Christine; den Elzen, Wendy P J; Luben, Robert; Angelillo-Scherrer, Anne; Aujesky, Drahomir; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Rodondi, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    Anaemia and thyroid dysfunction are common and often co-occur. Current guidelines recommend the assessment of thyroid function in the work-up of anaemia, although evidence on this association is scarce. In the 'European Prospective Investigation of Cancer' (EPIC)-Norfolk population-based cohort, we aimed to examine the prevalence and type of anaemia (defined as haemoglobin <13 g/dl for men and <12 g/dl for women) according to different thyroid function groups. The mean age of the 8791 participants was 59·4 (SD 9·1) years and 55·2% were women. Thyroid dysfunction was present in 437 (5·0%) and anaemia in 517 (5·9%) participants. After excluding 121 participants with three most common causes of anaemia (chronic kidney disease, inflammation, iron deficiency), anaemia was found in 4·7% of euthyroid participants. Compared with the euthyroid group, the prevalence of anaemia was significantly higher in overt hyperthyroidism (14·6%, P < 0·01), higher with borderline significance in overt hypothyroidism (7·7%, P = 0·05) and not increased in subclinical thyroid dysfunction (5·0% in subclinical hypothyroidism, 3·3% in subclinical hyperthyroidism). Anaemia associated with thyroid dysfunction was mainly normocytic (94·0%), and rarely macrocytic (6·0%). The prevalence of anaemia was higher in overt hyperthyroidism, but not increased in subclinical thyroid dysfunction. Systematic measurement of thyroid-stimulating hormone in anaemic patients is likely to be useful only after excluding common causes of anaemia. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. The Association of Hot Red Chili Pepper Consumption and Mortality: A Large Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Chopan, Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    The evidence base for the health effects of spice consumption is insufficient, with only one large population-based study and no reports from Europe or North America. Our objective was to analyze the association between consumption of hot red chili peppers and mortality, using a population-based prospective cohort from the National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (NHANES) III, a representative sample of US noninstitutionalized adults, in which participants were surveyed from 1988 to 1994. The frequency of hot red chili pepper consumption was measured in 16,179 participants at least 18 years of age. Total and cause-specific mortality were the main outcome measures. During 273,877 person-years of follow-up (median 18.9 years), a total of 4,946 deaths were observed. Total mortality for participants who consumed hot red chili peppers was 21.6% compared to 33.6% for those who did not (absolute risk reduction of 12%; relative risk of 0.64). Adjusted for demographic, lifestyle, and clinical characteristics, the hazard ratio was 0.87 (P = 0.01; 95% Confidence Interval 0.77, 0.97). Consumption of hot red chili peppers was associated with a 13% reduction in the instantaneous hazard of death. Similar, but statistically nonsignificant trends were seen for deaths from vascular disease, but not from other causes. In this large population-based prospective study, the consumption of hot red chili pepper was associated with reduced mortality. Hot red chili peppers may be a beneficial component of the diet. PMID:28068423

  20. The Association of Hot Red Chili Pepper Consumption and Mortality: A Large Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Chopan, Mustafa; Littenberg, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    The evidence base for the health effects of spice consumption is insufficient, with only one large population-based study and no reports from Europe or North America. Our objective was to analyze the association between consumption of hot red chili peppers and mortality, using a population-based prospective cohort from the National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (NHANES) III, a representative sample of US noninstitutionalized adults, in which participants were surveyed from 1988 to 1994. The frequency of hot red chili pepper consumption was measured in 16,179 participants at least 18 years of age. Total and cause-specific mortality were the main outcome measures. During 273,877 person-years of follow-up (median 18.9 years), a total of 4,946 deaths were observed. Total mortality for participants who consumed hot red chili peppers was 21.6% compared to 33.6% for those who did not (absolute risk reduction of 12%; relative risk of 0.64). Adjusted for demographic, lifestyle, and clinical characteristics, the hazard ratio was 0.87 (P = 0.01; 95% Confidence Interval 0.77, 0.97). Consumption of hot red chili peppers was associated with a 13% reduction in the instantaneous hazard of death. Similar, but statistically nonsignificant trends were seen for deaths from vascular disease, but not from other causes. In this large population-based prospective study, the consumption of hot red chili pepper was associated with reduced mortality. Hot red chili peppers may be a beneficial component of the diet.

  1. Does urticaria risk increase in patients with celiac disease? A large population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Ludvigsson, Jonas F.; Lindelöf, Bernt; Rashtak, Shadi; Rubio-Tapia, Alberto; Murray, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Case reports and smaller case-control studies suggest an association between celiac disease (CD) and urticaria, but risk estimates have varied considerably across studies and as yet there are no studies on CD and the risk of future urticaria. Objective To examine the association between CD and urticaria. Methods We identified 28,900 patients with biopsy-verified CD (equal to Marsh stage 3) and compared them with 143,397 age- and sex-matched controls with regards to the risk of urticaria and chronic urticaria (duration ≥6 weeks). Hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated using a Cox regression model. Results During follow-up, 453 patients with CD and no previous diagnosis of urticaria developed urticaria (expected n=300) and 79 of these 453 had chronic urticaria (expected n=41). The corresponding HRs were 1.51 for any urticaria (95%CI=1.36–1.68) and 1.92 for chronic urticaria (95%CI=1.48–2.48). The absolute risk for urticaria in CD was 140/100,000 person-years (excess risk=47/100,000 person-years). Corresponding figures for chronic urticaria were 24/100,00 person-years and 12/100,000 person-years. Patients with CD were also at increased risk of having both urticaria (odds ratio, OR=1.31; 95%CI=1.12–1.52) and chronic urticaria (OR=1.54; 95%CI=1.08–2.18) prior to the CD diagnosis. Conclusion This study suggests that CD is associated with urticaria, especially chronic urticaria. PMID:24135663

  2. Diabetes and risk of incident cancer: a large population-based cohort study in Israel.

    PubMed

    Chodick, Gabriel; Heymann, Anthony D; Rosenmann, Lena; Green, Manfred S; Flash, Shira; Porath, Avi; Kokia, Ehud; Shalev, Varda

    2010-06-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus has been associated with an increased risk of a variety of cancers in observational studies, but few have reported the relationship between diabetes and cancer risk in men and women separately. The main goal of this retrospective cohort study was to evaluate the sex-specific risk of incident overall and site-specific cancer among people with DM compared with those without, who had no reported history of cancer at the start of the follow-up in January 2000. During an average of 8 years of follow-up (SD = 2.5), we documented 1,639 and 7,945 incident cases of cancer among 16,721 people with DM and 83,874 free of DM, respectively. In women, DM was associated with an adjusted hazard ratio of 1.96 (95% CI: 1.53-2.50) and 1.41 (95% CI: 1.20-1.66) for cancers of genital organs and digestive organs, respectively. A significantly reduced HR was observed for skin cancer (0.38; 95% CI: 0.22-0.66). In men with DM, there was no significant increase in overall risk of cancer. DM was related with a 47% reduction in the risk of prostate cancer. These findings suggest that the nature of the association between DM and cancer depends on sex and specific cancer site.

  3. Sodium-chloride Difference and Metabolic Syndrome: A Population-based Large-scale Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Toshihiro; Hashimoto, Yoshitaka; Tanaka, Muhei; Asano, Mai; Yamazaki, Masahiro; Oda, Yohei; Toda, Hitoshi; Marunaka, Yoshinori; Nakamura, Naoto; Fukui, Michiaki

    Objective Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with cardiovascular disease, which is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity. Hypernatremia and hypochloremia are also associated with an increased mortality. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the association between the sodium-chloride difference (Na(+)-Cl(-)) and MetS. Methods In this cross-sectional and retrospective cohort study, we enrolled 3,875 subjects and evaluated the relationship between Na(+)-Cl(-) and MetS using logistic regression analyses. MetS was diagnosed according to the joint interim statement when a subject had three or more of the following criteria: hypertension; hyperglycemia; hypertriglyceridemia; low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol; and abdominal obesity. Results There were 3,354 subjects without MetS and 521 subjects with MetS at baseline. The highest Na(+)-Cl(-) quartile (≥43 mmol/L) was associated with an increased risk of the presence of MetS compared to the lowest Na(+)-Cl(-) quartile (≤38 mmol/L) after adjusting for covariates, including age, sex, the body mass index, systolic blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, triglycerides, HDL cholesterol, creatinine, uric acid and lifestyle factors [multivariate odds ratio (OR) 1.81, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.17-2.84, p=0.0078]. After an 8-year follow-up, 658 out of 3,352 subjects were newly diagnosed with MetS. The highest Na(+)-Cl(-) quartile (≥43 mmol/L) was associated with an increased risk of the development of MetS compared to the lowest Na(+)-Cl(-) quartiles (≤38 mmol/L) after adjusting for covariates (multivariate OR 1.76, 95% CI 1.27-2.45, p=0.0007). Conclusion The sodium and chloride difference is associated with MetS.

  4. Association between multiple sclerosis and epilepsy: large population-based record-linkage studies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) and epilepsy are both fairly common and it follows that they may sometimes occur together in the same people by chance. We sought to determine whether hospitalisation for MS and hospitalisation for epilepsy occur together more often than expected by chance alone. Methods We analysed two datasets of linked statistical hospital admission records covering the Oxford Record Linkage Study area (ORLS, 1963–1998) and all England (1999–2011). In each, we calculated the rate of occurrence of hospital admission for epilepsy in people after admission for MS, compared with equivalent rates in a control cohort, and expressed the results as a relative risk (RR). Results The RR for hospital admission for epilepsy following an admission for MS was significantly high at 4.1 (95% confidence interval 3.1–5.3) in the ORLS and 3.3 (95% CI 3.1–3.4) in the all-England cohort. The RR for a first recorded admission for epilepsy 10 years and more after first recorded admission for MS was 4.7 (2.8–7.3) in ORLS and 3.9 (3.1–4.9) in the national cohort. The RR for the converse–MS following hospitalisation for epilepsy–was 2.5 (95% CI 1.7–3.5) in the ORLS and 1.9 (95% CI 1.8–2.1) in the English dataset. Conclusions MS and epilepsy occur together more commonly than by chance. One possible explanation is that an MS lesion acts as a focus of an epileptic seizure; but other possibilities are discussed. Clinicians should be aware of the risk of epilepsy in people with MS. The findings may also suggest clues for researchers in developing hypotheses about underlying mechanisms for the two conditions. PMID:24304488

  5. Mental health problems in adolescents with delayed sleep phase: results from a large population-based study in Norway.

    PubMed

    Sivertsen, Børge; Harvey, Allison G; Pallesen, Ståle; Hysing, Mari

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the current study was to compare mental health problems, resilience and family characteristics in adolescents with and without delayed sleep phase (DSP) in a population-based sample. Data were taken from the youth@hordaland-survey, a large population-based study in Hordaland County in Norway conducted in 2012. In all, 9338 adolescents aged 16-19 years (53.5% girls) provided self-reported data on a wide range of instruments assessing mental health symptoms, including depression, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive behaviours, attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD) symptoms, perfectionism, resilience and sleep. Measures of socioeconomic status were also included. Three hundred and six adolescents (prevalence 3.3%) were classified as having DSP [according to the International Classification of Sleep Disorders-2 (ICSD-2)] criteria. Adolescents with DSP reported higher levels of depression, anxiety and ADHD symptoms. Adolescents with DSP also exhibited significantly lower levels of resilience. The Cohen's d effect sizes ranged from small [obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD): d = 0.15] to moderate (inattention: d = 0.71). In the fully adjusted model, the significant predictors of DSP included inattention [odds ratio (OR): 2.11], lack of personal structure (OR: 2.07), low (OR: 1.85) and high (OR: 1.91) paternal education, parents not living together (OR: 1.81), hyperactivity/inattention (OR: 1.71) and poorer family economy (OR: 1.59). In conclusion, the high symptom load across a range of mental health measures suggests that a broad and thorough clinical approach is warranted when adolescents present with DSP. © 2014 European Sleep Research Society.

  6. Most people with long-duration type 1 diabetes in a large population-based study are insulin microsecretors.

    PubMed

    Oram, Richard A; McDonald, Timothy J; Shields, Beverley M; Hudson, Michelle M; Shepherd, Maggie H; Hammersley, Suzanne; Pearson, Ewan R; Hattersley, Andrew T

    2015-02-01

    Small studies using ultrasensitive C-peptide assays suggest endogenous insulin secretion is frequently detectable in patients with long-standing type 1 diabetes (T1D), but these studies do not use representative samples. We aimed to use the stimulated urine C-peptide-to-creatinine ratio (UCPCR) to assess C-peptide levels in a large cross-sectional, population-based study of patients with T1D. We recruited 924 patients from primary and secondary care in two U.K. centers who had a clinical diagnosis of T1D, were under 30 years of age when they received a diagnosis, and had a diabetes duration of >5 years. The median age at diagnosis was 11 years (interquartile range 6-17 years), and the duration of diabetes was 19 years (11-27 years). All provided a home postmeal UCPCR, which was measured using a Roche electrochemiluminescence assay. Eighty percent of patients (740 of 924 patients) had detectable endogenous C-peptide levels (UCPCR >0.001 nmol/mmol). Most patients (52%, 483 of 924 patients) had historically very low undetectable levels (UCPCR 0.0013-0.03 nmol/mmol); 8% of patients (70 of 924 patients) had a UCPCR ≥0.2 nmol/mmol, equivalent to serum levels associated with reduced complications and hypoglycemia. Absolute UCPCR levels fell with duration of disease. Age at diagnosis and duration of disease were independent predictors of C-peptide level in multivariate modeling. This population-based study shows that the majority of long-duration T1D patients have detectable urine C-peptide levels. While the majority of patients are insulin microsecretors, some maintain clinically relevant endogenous insulin secretion for many years after the diagnosis of diabetes. Understanding this may lead to a better understanding of pathogenesis in T1D and open new possibilities for treatment. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  7. A large population-based association study between HLA and KIR genotypes and measles vaccine antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Ovsyannikova, Inna G; Schaid, Daniel J; Larrabee, Beth R; Haralambieva, Iana H; Kennedy, Richard B; Poland, Gregory A

    2017-01-01

    Human antibody response to measles vaccine is highly variable in the population. Host genes contribute to inter-individual antibody response variation. The killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) are recognized to interact with HLA molecules and possibly influence humoral immune response to viral antigens. To expand on and improve our previous work with HLA genes, and to explore the genetic contribution of KIR genes to the inter-individual variability in measles vaccine-induced antibody responses, we performed a large population-based study in 2,506 healthy immunized subjects (ages 11 to 41 years) to identify HLA and KIR associations with measles vaccine-induced neutralizing antibodies. After correcting for the large number of statistical tests of allele effects on measles-specific neutralizing antibody titers, no statistically significant associations were found for either HLA or KIR loci. However, suggestive associations worthy of follow-up in other cohorts include B*57:01, DQB1*06:02, and DRB1*15:05 alleles. Specifically, the B*57:01 allele (1,040 mIU/mL; p = 0.0002) was suggestive of an association with lower measles antibody titer. In contrast, the DQB1*06:02 (1,349 mIU/mL; p = 0.0004) and DRB1*15:05 (2,547 mIU/mL; p = 0.0004) alleles were suggestive of an association with higher measles antibodies. Notably, the associations with KIR genotypes were strongly nonsignificant, suggesting that KIR loci in terms of copy number and haplotypes are not likely to play a major role in antibody response to measles vaccination. These findings refine our knowledge of the role of HLA and KIR alleles in measles vaccine-induced immunity.

  8. Chocolate consumption and risk of stroke among men and women: A large population-based, prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jia-Yi; Iso, Hiroyasu; Yamagishi, Kazumasa; Sawada, Norie; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2017-05-01

    Chocolate consumption may have a beneficial effect on cardiovascular health, but evidence from prospective cohort studies is still limited. We aimed to examine the prospective associations between chocolate consumption and risk of stroke among men and women in a large population-based cohort. A total of 38,182 men and 46,415 women aged 44-76 years, and free of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer at baseline in 1995 and 1998, were followed up until the end of 2009 and 2010, respectively. We obtained data on chocolate consumption for each participant using a self-administrated food frequency questionnaire that included 138 food and beverage items. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) of stroke in relation to chocolate consumption. During a median follow-up of 12.9 years, we identified 3558 incident strokes cases (2146 cerebral infarctions and 1396 hemorrhagic strokes). After adjustment for age, body mass index, life styles, dietary intakes, and other risk factors, chocolate consumption was associated with a significant lower risk of stroke in women (HR = 0.84; 95% CI, 0.71-0.99). However, the association in men was not significant (HR = 0.94; 95% CI, 0.80-1.10). In addition, the association did not vary by stroke subtypes in either men or women. Findings from this large Japanese cohort supported a significant inverse association between chocolate consumption and risk of developing stroke in women. However, residual confounding could not be excluded as an alternative explanation for our findings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A large population-based association study between HLA and KIR genotypes and measles vaccine antibody responses

    PubMed Central

    Ovsyannikova, Inna G.; Schaid, Daniel J.; Larrabee, Beth R.; Haralambieva, Iana H.; Kennedy, Richard B.; Poland, Gregory A.

    2017-01-01

    Human antibody response to measles vaccine is highly variable in the population. Host genes contribute to inter-individual antibody response variation. The killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) are recognized to interact with HLA molecules and possibly influence humoral immune response to viral antigens. To expand on and improve our previous work with HLA genes, and to explore the genetic contribution of KIR genes to the inter-individual variability in measles vaccine-induced antibody responses, we performed a large population-based study in 2,506 healthy immunized subjects (ages 11 to 41 years) to identify HLA and KIR associations with measles vaccine-induced neutralizing antibodies. After correcting for the large number of statistical tests of allele effects on measles-specific neutralizing antibody titers, no statistically significant associations were found for either HLA or KIR loci. However, suggestive associations worthy of follow-up in other cohorts include B*57:01, DQB1*06:02, and DRB1*15:05 alleles. Specifically, the B*57:01 allele (1,040 mIU/mL; p = 0.0002) was suggestive of an association with lower measles antibody titer. In contrast, the DQB1*06:02 (1,349 mIU/mL; p = 0.0004) and DRB1*15:05 (2,547 mIU/mL; p = 0.0004) alleles were suggestive of an association with higher measles antibodies. Notably, the associations with KIR genotypes were strongly nonsignificant, suggesting that KIR loci in terms of copy number and haplotypes are not likely to play a major role in antibody response to measles vaccination. These findings refine our knowledge of the role of HLA and KIR alleles in measles vaccine-induced immunity. PMID:28158231

  10. A large, population-based study of age-related associations between vaginal pH and human papillomavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Vaginal pH is related to genital tract inflammation and changes in the bacterial flora, both suggested cofactors for persistence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. To evaluate the relationship between vaginal pH and HPV, we analyzed data from our large population-based study in Guanacaste, Costa Rica. We examined vaginal pH and the risk of HPV infection, cytological abnormalities, and C. trachomatis infection. Methods Our study included 9,165 women aged 18-97 at enrollment with a total of 28,915 visits (mean length of follow-up = 3.4 years). Generalized estimating equations were used to evaluate the relationship between vaginal pH and HPV infection (both overall and single versus multiple types) and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL), the cytomorphic manifestation of HPV infection. The relationship between enrollment vaginal pH and C. trachomatis infection was assessed by logistic regression. Results were stratified by age at visit. Results Detection of HPV was positively associated with vaginal pH, mainly in women < 35 years (p-trend = 0.009 and 0.007 for women aged < 25 and 25-34 years, respectively). Elevated vaginal pH was associated with 30% greater risk of infection with multiple HPV types and with LSIL, predominantly in women younger than 35 and 65+ years of age. Detection of C. trachomatis DNA was associated with increased vaginal pH in women < 25 years (OR 2.2 95% CI 1.0-5.0). Conclusions Our findings suggest a possible association of the cervical microenvironment as a modifier of HPV natural history in the development of cervical precancer and cancer. Future research should include studies of vaginal pH in a more complex assessment of hormonal changes and the cervicovaginal microbiome as they relate to the natural history of cervical neoplasia. PMID:22316377

  11. Genetic and environmental influences on adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms: a large Swedish population-based study of twins.

    PubMed

    Larsson, H; Asherson, P; Chang, Z; Ljung, T; Friedrichs, B; Larsson, J-O; Lichtenstein, P

    2013-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) frequently persists into adulthood. Family and twin studies delineate a disorder with strong genetic influences among children and adolescents based on parent- and teacher-reported data but little is known about the genetic and environmental contribution to DSM-IV ADHD symptoms in adulthood. We therefore aimed to investigate the impact of genetic and environmental influences on the inattentive and hyperactive-impulsive symptoms of ADHD in adults. Twin methods were applied to self-reported assessments of ADHD symptoms from a large population-based Swedish twin study that included data from 15 198 Swedish male and female twins aged 20 to 46 years. The broad heritability [i.e., A + D, where A is an additive genetic factor and D (dominance) a non-additive genetic factor] was 37% (A = 11%, D = 26%) for inattention and 38% (A = 18%, D = 20%) for hyperactivity-impulsivity. The results also indicate that 52% of the phenotypic correlation between inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity (r = 0.43) was explained by genetic influences whereas the remaining part of the covariance was explained by non-shared environmental influences. These results were replicated across age strata. Our findings of moderate broad heritability estimates are consistent with previous literature on self-rated ADHD symptoms in older children, adolescents and adults and retrospective reports of self-rated childhood ADHD by adults but differ from studies of younger children with informant ratings. Future research needs to clarify whether our data indicate a true decrease in the heritability of ADHD in adults compared to children, or whether this relates to the use of self-ratings in contrast to informant data.

  12. Geomagnetic storms can trigger stroke: evidence from 6 large population-based studies in Europe and Australasia.

    PubMed

    Feigin, Valery L; Parmar, Priya G; Barker-Collo, Suzanne; Bennett, Derrick A; Anderson, Craig S; Thrift, Amanda G; Stegmayr, Birgitta; Rothwell, Peter M; Giroud, Maurice; Bejot, Yannick; Carvil, Phillip; Krishnamurthi, Rita; Kasabov, Nikola

    2014-06-01

    Although the research linking cardiovascular disorders to geomagnetic activity is accumulating, robust evidence for the impact of geomagnetic activity on stroke occurrence is limited and controversial. We used a time-stratified case-crossover study design to analyze individual participant and daily geomagnetic activity (as measured by Ap Index) data from several large population-based stroke incidence studies (with information on 11 453 patients with stroke collected during 16 031 764 person-years of observation) in New Zealand, Australia, United Kingdom, France, and Sweden conducted between 1981 and 2004. Hazard ratios and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Overall, geomagnetic storms (Ap Index 60+) were associated with 19% increase in the risk of stroke occurrence (95% CI, 11%-27%). The triggering effect of geomagnetic storms was most evident across the combined group of all strokes in those aged <65 years, increasing stroke risk by >50%: moderate geomagnetic storms (60-99 Ap Index) were associated with a 27% (95% CI, 8%-48%) increased risk of stroke occurrence, strong geomagnetic storms (100-149 Ap Index) with a 52% (95% CI, 19%-92%) increased risk, and severe/extreme geomagnetic storms (Ap Index 150+) with a 52% (95% CI, 19%-94%) increased risk (test for trend, P<2×10(-16)). Geomagnetic storms are associated with increased risk of stroke and should be considered along with other established risk factors. Our findings provide a framework to advance stroke prevention through future investigation of the contribution of geomagnetic factors to the risk of stroke occurrence and pathogenesis. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Preservation of the Semantic Verbal Fluency Advantage in a Large Population-Based Sample: Normative Data from the TILDA Study.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Roisin M; Coen, Robert F; Kenny, RoseAnne; Lawlor, Brian A

    2016-05-01

    It is widely believed that phonemic fluency is more difficult than naming exemplars from a semantic category. Normative data in this regard are scarce, and there is considerable disagreement in the literature regarding the pattern in normal ageing and neurodegenerative conditions. Our objective was to provide normative data for semantic phonemic discrepancy scores from a large sample of older adults. A total of 5780 community-dwelling older adults were included in this prospective, longitudinal study. Discrepancy scores were calculated by subtracting phonemic fluency score from semantic fluency score for each participant. Quantile regression was used to estimate normative values stratified for age. Subjects did better on testing of semantic fluency. The average discrepancy score was 9.18±6.89 words, (range, -20 to 37; n=5780). At the fiftieth percentile, those in their fifth decade produced 10 more "animals" than "letter F" words. Subjects scored one word less per decade, with an average of seven more "animal" words produced by those in their eighth decade. Our study is the first to provide normative data and confirms that, for animal versus letter F fluency, the semantic advantage persists into later life in a population-based sample of community-dwelling older adults. Given that a majority of clinical samples have confirmed a reverse of this pattern in Alzheimer's dementia (i.e., loss of semantic advantage in Alzheimer's disease, yielding a phonemic advantage), our findings support the clinical utility of brief fluency tests and encourage further research into their use in diagnosis and prediction of progression to dementia.

  14. Evidence of reproductive stoppage in families with autism spectrum disorder: a large, population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Thomas J; Windham, Gayle C; Anderson, Meredith; Croen, Lisa A; Grether, Judith K; Risch, Neil

    2014-08-01

    Few studies have examined the curtailment of reproduction (ie, stoppage) after the diagnosis of a child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). To examine stoppage in a large, population-based cohort of families in which a child has received a diagnosis of ASD. Individuals with ASD born from January 1, 1990, through December 31, 2003, were identified in the California Department of Developmental Services records, which were then linked to state birth certificates to identify full sibs and half-sibs and to obtain information on birth order and demographics. A total of 19,710 case families in which the first birth occurred within the study period was identified. These families included 39,361 individuals (sibs and half-sibs). Control individuals were randomly sampled from birth certificates and matched 2:1 to cases by sex, birth year, and maternal age, self-reported race/ethnicity, and county of birth after removal of children receiving services from the California Department of Developmental Services. Using similar linkage methods as for case families, 36,215 pure control families (including 75,724 total individuals) were identified that had no individuals with an ASD diagnosis. History of affected children. Stoppage was investigated by comparing the reproductive behaviors of parents after the birth of a child with ASD vs an unaffected child using a survival analysis framework for time to next birth and adjusting for demographic variables. For the first few years after the birth of a child with ASD, the parents' reproductive behavior was similar to that of control parents. However, birth rates differed in subsequent years; overall, families whose first child had ASD had a second child at a rate of 0.668 (95% CI, 0.635-0.701) that of control families, adjusted for birth year, birth weight, maternal age, and self-reported maternal race/ethnicity. Results were similar when a later-born child was the first affected child in the family. Reproductive curtailment was slightly

  15. Comprehensive Challenges for the Well Being of Young Children: A Population-Based Study of Publicly Monitored Risks in a Large Urban Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rouse, Heather L.; Fantuzzo, John W.; LeBoeuf, Whitney

    2011-01-01

    This population-based study investigated the unique and cumulative relations between risks that are monitored by public surveillance systems and academic and behavioral outcomes for an entire cohort of third graders in a large, urban public school system. Using integrated, administrative records from child welfare, public health, housing, and…

  16. Comprehensive Challenges for the Well Being of Young Children: A Population-Based Study of Publicly Monitored Risks in a Large Urban Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rouse, Heather L.; Fantuzzo, John W.; LeBoeuf, Whitney

    2011-01-01

    This population-based study investigated the unique and cumulative relations between risks that are monitored by public surveillance systems and academic and behavioral outcomes for an entire cohort of third graders in a large, urban public school system. Using integrated, administrative records from child welfare, public health, housing, and…

  17. Cadmium exposure and endometrial cancer risk: A large midwestern U.S. population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    McElroy, Jane A; Kruse, Robin L; Guthrie, James; Gangnon, Ronald E; Robertson, J David

    2017-01-01

    Estrogen-mimicking chemicals, such as cadmium, may be associated with increased susceptibility to hormone-dependent cancers, though supporting data are sparse, particularly for endometrial cancer. The Health and Environmental Exposure Research (HEER) study worked with the Arkansas Central Cancer Registry, Iowa Cancer Registry and Missouri Cancer Registry to obtain names of women diagnosed with endometrial cancer who were willing to be contacted for participation in our case control study. Voter registration lists from Iowa and Missouri were used to randomly select similarly aged women as represented in the case population. Participants were interviewed by telephone to obtain information on known or suspected endometrial risk factors. Urine kits were sent to participants for home collection and returned for analysis. Our case-control study consisted of 631 incident cases of endometrial cancer diagnosed from January 2010 to October 2012 and 879 age-matched population-based controls, ages 18-81 years (mean age 65 years). We quantified cadmium amounts in urine and standardized these values through creatinine adjustment. Using data from all survey completers, we developed a multivariable model for endometrial cancer. Creatinine-adjusted cadmium concentration was added to this model. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for endometrial cancer were calculated. After multivariable adjustment, higher creatinine-adjusted cadmium exposure was associated with a statistically significant increase of endometrial cancer risk (OR: 1.22; 95% CI: 1.03-1.44). Our results provide evidence that cadmium may increase the risk of endometrial cancer, possibly through estrogenic effects.

  18. Metabolic predispositions and increased risk of colorectal adenocarcinoma by anatomical location: a large population-based cohort study in Norway.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yunxia; Ness-Jensen, Eivind; Hveem, Kristian; Martling, Anna

    2015-11-15

    Whether different definitions of metabolic syndrome (MetS) are differently associated with colorectal adenocarcinoma (CA) by anatomical location is unclear. A population-based cohort study, the Cohort of Norway (CONOR) Study, was conducted in Norway from 1995 to 2010. Anthropometric measurements, blood samples, and lifestyle data were collected at recruitment. CAs were identified through linkage to the Norwegian Cancer Register. A composite index of MetS as defined by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) or/and the National Cholesterol Education Program's Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) and single components of MetS, including anthropometric factors, blood pressure, lipids, triglycerides, and glucose, were analyzed. Cox proportional hazards regression was performed to estimate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Significant associations between single MetS components and CA, except for reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and nonfasting glucose levels, were observed. MetS defined by 2 criteria separately showed a similar association with CA in general, and MetS defined by both the IDF and ATP III showed consistent results. Stronger associations were observed in the proximal colon among men (IDF: hazard ratio (HR) = 1.51, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.24, 1.84; ATP III: HR = 1.40, 95% CI: 1.15, 1.70) and in the rectum among women (IDF: HR = 1.42, 95% CI: 1.07, 1.89; ATP III: HR = 1.43, 95% CI: 1.08, 1.90).

  19. Prevalence of familial hypercholesterolemia: a meta-analysis of six large, observational, population-based studies in Poland

    PubMed Central

    Szafraniec, Krystyna; Polak, Maciej; Drygas, Wojciech; Piotrowski, Walerian; Zdrojewski, Tomasz; Jankowski, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a severely underdiagnosed and undertreated genetic disorder. Little is known about regional variation in the prevalence of FH, and information for Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) is scarce. This paper assesses the prevalence of FH and related cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in Poland. Material and methods We performed a meta-analysis of six population-based studies in Poland. The FH was assessed using the Dutch Lipids Clinics Network (DLCN) criteria. The categories “definite” (> 8 points) and “probable” (6–8 points) were combined into “potential FH”. Combined estimates of proportions across studies were pooled by meta-analysis with a random effects model. Results A total of 37,889 persons aged 20–79 years were included in the analysis. The distribution of DLCN scores was skewed, and there were only 7 cases of definite FH. Prevalence of potential FH was 404/100,000 people (95% CI = 277–531/100,000). Familial hypercholesterolemia was more prevalent in women than in men, and the prevalence was the highest in the age group 45–54 years in men and 55–64 years in women. After adjustment for age and sex, compared to participants with normal cholesterol, persons with potential FH had twice the prevalence of hypertension (p < 0.01); smoking was more prevalent by about 80% (p < 0.01) and hypertriglyceridemia was nine times more frequent (p < 0.001). There was no difference in the prevalence of low high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol or diabetes. Conclusions We believe that our study might facilitate the planning of a strategy to manage the disease at a population level, i.e. to develop a national strategy for the detection, diagnosis, and treatment of FH. PMID:27478447

  20. Exercise during pregnancy and risk of cesarean delivery in nulliparous women: a large population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Owe, Katrine Mari; Nystad, Wenche; Stigum, Hein; Vangen, Siri; Bø, Kari

    2016-12-01

    Vaginal delivery for the first birth is of great importance for further obstetric performance for the individual woman. Given the rising cesarean delivery rates worldwide over the past decades, a search for modifiable factors that are associated with cesarean delivery is needed. Exercise may be a modifiable factor that is associated with type of delivery, but the results of previous studies are not conclusive. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between exercise during pregnancy and cesarean delivery, both acute and elective, in nulliparous women. We conducted a population-based cohort study that involved 39,187 nulliparous women with a singleton pregnancy who were enrolled in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study between 2000 and 2009. All women answered 2 questionnaires in pregnancy weeks 17 and 30. Acute and elective cesarean delivery data were obtained from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway. Information on exercise frequency and type was assessed prospectively by questionnaires in pregnancy weeks 17 and 30. Generalized linear models estimated risk differences of acute and elective cesarean delivery for different frequencies and types of exercise during pregnancy weeks 17 and 30. We used restricted cubic splines to examine dose-response associations of exercise frequency and acute cesarean delivery. A test for nonlinearity was also conducted. The total cesarean delivery rate was 15.4% (n=6030), of which 77.8% (n=4689) was acute cesarean delivery. Exercise during pregnancy was associated with a reduced risk of cesarean delivery, particularly for acute cesarean delivery. A nonlinear association was observed for exercise frequency in weeks 17 and 30 and risk of acute cesarean delivery (test for nonlinearity, P=.003 and P=.027, respectively). The largest risk reduction was observed for acute cesarean delivery among women who exercised >5 times weekly during weeks 17 (-2.2%) and 30 (-3.6%) compared with nonexercisers (test for trend

  1. Insomnia as a risk factor for ill health: results from the large population-based prospective HUNT Study in Norway.

    PubMed

    Sivertsen, Børge; Lallukka, Tea; Salo, Paula; Pallesen, Ståle; Hysing, Mari; Krokstad, Steinar; Simon Øverland

    2014-04-01

    Insomnia co-occurs with many health problems, but less is known about the prospective associations. The aim of the current study was to investigate if insomnia predicts cumulative incidence of mental and physical conditions. Prospective population-based data from the two last Nord-Trøndelag Health Studies (HUNT2 in 1995–97 and HUNT3 in 2006–08), comprising 24 715 people in the working population, were used to study insomnia as a risk factor for incidence of physical and mental conditions. Insomnia was defined according to the 4th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV). Insomnia at HUNT2 was a significant risk factor for incidence of a range of both mental and physical conditions at HUNT3 11 years later. Most effects were only slightly attenuated when adjusting for confounding factors, and insomnia remained a significant risk factor for the following conditions in the adjusted analyses: depression [odds ratio (OR): 2.38, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.91–2.98], anxiety (OR: 2.08, 95% CI: 1.63–2.64), fibromyalgia (OR: 2.05, 95% CI: 1.51–2.79), rheumatoidarthritis (OR: 1.87, 95% CI: 1.29–2.52), whiplash (OR: 1.71, 95% CI: 1.21–2.41), arthrosis (OR: 1.68, 95% CI: 1.43–1.98), osteoporosis (OR:1.52, 95% CI: 1.14–2.01, headache (OR: 1.50, 95% CI: 1.16–1.95,asthma (OR: 1.47, 95% CI: 1.16–1.86 and myocardial infarction (OR:1.46, 95% CI: 1.06–2.00). Insomnia was also associated significantly with incidence of angina, hypertension, obesity and stroke in the crude analyses, but not after adjusting for confounders. We conclude that insomnia predicts cumulative incidence of several physical and mental conditions. These results may have important clinical implications, and whether or not treatment of insomnia would have a preventive value for both physical and mental conditions should be studied further.

  2. Linking exposures and health outcomes to a large population-based longitudinal study: the Millennium Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tyler C

    2011-07-01

    To describe current efforts and future potential for understanding long-term health of military service members by linking the Millennium Cohort Study data to exposures and health outcomes. The Millennium Cohort Study launched in 2001, before September 11 and the start of combat operations in Afghanistan and Iraq. Other substantial Department of Defense (DoD) health, personnel, and exposure databases are maintained in electronic form and may be linked by personal identifiers. More than 150,000 consenting members comprise the Millennium Cohort from all services, and include active duty, Reserve, and National Guard current and past members, and represent demographic, occupational, military, and health characteristics of the U.S. military. These prospective data offer symptom assessment, behavioral health, and self-reported exposures that may complement and fill gaps in capability presented by other DoD electronic health and exposure data. In conjunction with Millennium Cohort survey data, prospective individual-level exposure and health outcome assessment is crucial to understand and quantify any long-term health outcomes potentially associated with unique military occupational exposures.

  3. Optical Coherence Tomography in the UK Biobank Study – Rapid Automated Analysis of Retinal Thickness for Large Population-Based Studies

    PubMed Central

    Grossi, Carlota M.; Foster, Paul J.; Yang, Qi; Reisman, Charles A.; Chan, Kinpui; Peto, Tunde; Thomas, Dhanes; Patel, Praveen J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To describe an approach to the use of optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging in large, population-based studies, including methods for OCT image acquisition, storage, and the remote, rapid, automated analysis of retinal thickness. Methods In UK Biobank, OCT images were acquired between 2009 and 2010 using a commercially available “spectral domain” OCT device (3D OCT-1000, Topcon). Images were obtained using a raster scan protocol, 6 mm x 6 mm in area, and consisting of 128 B-scans. OCT image sets were stored on UK Biobank servers in a central repository, adjacent to high performance computers. Rapid, automated analysis of retinal thickness was performed using custom image segmentation software developed by the Topcon Advanced Biomedical Imaging Laboratory (TABIL). This software employs dual-scale gradient information to allow for automated segmentation of nine intraretinal boundaries in a rapid fashion. Results 67,321 participants (134,642 eyes) in UK Biobank underwent OCT imaging of both eyes as part of the ocular module. 134,611 images were successfully processed with 31 images failing segmentation analysis due to corrupted OCT files or withdrawal of subject consent for UKBB study participation. Average time taken to call up an image from the database and complete segmentation analysis was approximately 120 seconds per data set per login, and analysis of the entire dataset was completed in approximately 28 days. Conclusions We report an approach to the rapid, automated measurement of retinal thickness from nearly 140,000 OCT image sets from the UK Biobank. In the near future, these measurements will be publically available for utilization by researchers around the world, and thus for correlation with the wealth of other data collected in UK Biobank. The automated analysis approaches we describe may be of utility for future large population-based epidemiological studies, clinical trials, and screening programs that employ OCT imaging. PMID:27716837

  4. Sleep problems and depression in adolescence: results from a large population-based study of Norwegian adolescents aged 16-18 years.

    PubMed

    Sivertsen, Børge; Harvey, Allison G; Lundervold, Astri J; Hysing, Mari

    2014-08-01

    Both sleep problems and depression are common problems in adolescence, but well-defined large epidemiological studies on the relationship are missing in this age group. The aim of this study was to examine the association between depression and several sleep parameters, including insomnia, in a population-based study of adolescents aged 16-18 years, and to explore potential gender differences. A large population-based study in Hordaland County in Norway conducted in 2012, the ung@hordaland study, surveyed 10,220 adolescents aged 16-18 years (54% girls) about sleep and depression. The sleep assessment included measures of the basic sleep parameters for weekdays and weekends. Depression was defined as scoring above the 90th percentile on the total score of Short Moods and Feelings Questionnaire (SMFQ). There was a large overlap between insomnia and depression in both genders and across depressive symptoms. Depressed adolescents exhibited significantly shorter sleep duration and time in bed as well as significantly longer sleep onset latency (SOL) and wake after sleep onset (WASO). Adolescents with insomnia had a 4- to 5-fold increased odds of depression compared to good sleepers. There was also a significant interaction between insomnia, sleep duration and depression, with a more than eightfold increase in odds of depression for those who met criteria for insomnia and who slept <6 h. These associations held for both genders, but were stronger in boys. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first population-based study to investigate sleep and insomnia in relation to depression among adolescents. The findings call for increased awareness of sleep problems and depression as a major public health issue.

  5. Sleep and use of alcohol and drug in adolescence. A large population-based study of Norwegian adolescents aged 16 to 19 years.

    PubMed

    Sivertsen, Børge; Skogen, Jens Christoffer; Jakobsen, Reidar; Hysing, Mari

    2015-04-01

    Changes in sleep patterns and increased substance involvement are common in adolescence, but our knowledge of the nature of their association remains limited. The aim of this study was to examine the association between several sleep problems and sleep behaviours, and use and misuse of alcohol and illicit drugs using data from a large population-based sample. A large population-based study from Norway conducted in 2012, the youth@hordaland study, surveyed 9328 adolescents aged 16-19 years (54% girls). Self-reported sleep measures provided information on sleep duration, sleep deficit, weekday bedtime and bedtime difference and insomnia. The main dependent variables were frequency and amount of alcohol consumption and illicit drug use, in addition to the presence of alcohol and drug problems as measured by CRAFFT. The results showed that all sleep parameters were associated with substance involvement in a dose-response manner. Short sleep duration, sleep deficit, large bedtime differences and insomnia were all significantly associated with higher odds of all alcohol and drug use/misuse measures. The associations were only partly attenuated by sociodemographics factors and co-existing symptoms of depression and ADHD. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first population-based study to examine the association between sleep, and alcohol and drug use, by employing detailed measures of sleep behaviour and problems, as well as validated measures on consumption of alcohol and illicit drug use. The findings call for increased awareness of the link between sleep problems and alcohol and drugs use/misuse as a major public health issue. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Clinical effectiveness of school screening for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: a large population-based retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Luk, Keith D K; Lee, C F; Cheung, Kenneth M C; Cheng, Jack C Y; Ng, Bobby K W; Lam, T P; Mak, K H; Yip, Paul S F; Fong, Daniel Y T

    2010-08-01

    Retrospective cohort study. To evaluate the clinical effectiveness of school scoliosis screening using a large and long-term-followed cohort of students in Hong Kong. School screening for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis has been criticized as resulting in over-referrals for radiography and having low predictive values. Indeed, all but one previous retrospective cohort studies had no follow-up assessments of students until their skeletal maturity, leaving any late-developed curves undetected. The one study that completed this follow-up was well conducted but had low precisions due to its small sample size. A total of 157,444 students were eligible for a biennial scoliosis screening, and their screening results and medical records up to 19 years of age were available. Students first had forward bending test and angle of trunk rotation (ATR) performed. Those with ATR between 5 degrees and 14 degrees or signs of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis were assessed by moiré topography regularly. Students with an ATR >or=15 degrees , >or=2 moiré lines, or significant clinical signs were referred for radiography and had their Cobb angle measured. Of the 115,190 screened students in the cohort, 3228 (2.8%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.7%-2.9%) were referred for radiography. At the final follow-up, the positive predictive values were 43.6% (41.8%-45.3%) for a Cobb angle >or=20 degrees and 9.4% (8.4%-10.5%) for needing treatment, while the sensitivities were 88.1% (86.4%-89.6%) and 80.0% (75.6%-83.9%), respectively. This is the largest study that has demonstrated that school scoliosis screening in Hong Kong is predictive and sensitive with a low referral rate. Screening should thus be continued in order to facilitate early administration of conservative treatments.

  7. Increased waist circumference is independently associated with hypothyroidism in Mexican Americans: replicative evidence from two large, population-based studies.

    PubMed

    Mamtani, Manju; Kulkarni, Hemant; Dyer, Thomas D; Almasy, Laura; Mahaney, Michael C; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Comuzzie, Anthony G; Samollow, Paul B; Blangero, John; Curran, Joanne E

    2014-06-10

    Mexican Americans are at an increased risk of both thyroid dysfunction and metabolic syndrome (MS). Thus it is conceivable that some components of the MS may be associated with the risk of thyroid dysfunction in these individuals. Our objective was to investigate and replicate the potential association of MS traits with thyroid dysfunction in Mexican Americans. We conducted association testing for 18 MS traits in two large studies on Mexican Americans - the San Antonio Family Heart Study (SAFHS) and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2007-10. A total of 907 participants from 42 families in SAFHS and 1633 unrelated participants from NHANES 2007-10 were included in this study. The outcome measures were prevalence of clinical and subclinical hypothyroidism and thyroid function index (TFI) - a measure of thyroid function. For the SAFHS, we used polygenic regression analyses with multiple covariates to test associations in setting of family studies. For the NHANES 2007-10, we corrected for the survey design variables as needed for association analyses in survey data. In both datasets, we corrected for age, sex and their linear and quadratic interactions. TFI was an accurate indicator of clinical thyroid status (area under the receiver-operating-characteristic curve to detect clinical hypothyroidism, 0.98) in both SAFHS and NHANES 2007-10. Of the 18 MS traits, waist circumference (WC) showed the most consistent association with TFI in both studies independently of age, sex and body mass index (BMI). In the SAFHS and NHANES 2007-10 datasets, each standard deviation increase in WC was associated with 0.13 (p < 0.001) and 0.11 (p < 0.001) unit increase in the TFI, respectively. In a series of polygenic and linear regression models, central obesity (defined as WC ≥ 102 cm in men and ≥88 cm in women) was associated with clinical and subclinical hypothyroidism independent of age, sex, BMI and type 2 diabetes in both datasets

  8. Increased waist circumference is independently associated with hypothyroidism in Mexican Americans: replicative evidence from two large, population-based studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mexican Americans are at an increased risk of both thyroid dysfunction and metabolic syndrome (MS). Thus it is conceivable that some components of the MS may be associated with the risk of thyroid dysfunction in these individuals. Our objective was to investigate and replicate the potential association of MS traits with thyroid dysfunction in Mexican Americans. Methods We conducted association testing for 18 MS traits in two large studies on Mexican Americans – the San Antonio Family Heart Study (SAFHS) and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2007–10. A total of 907 participants from 42 families in SAFHS and 1633 unrelated participants from NHANES 2007–10 were included in this study. The outcome measures were prevalence of clinical and subclinical hypothyroidism and thyroid function index (TFI) – a measure of thyroid function. For the SAFHS, we used polygenic regression analyses with multiple covariates to test associations in setting of family studies. For the NHANES 2007–10, we corrected for the survey design variables as needed for association analyses in survey data. In both datasets, we corrected for age, sex and their linear and quadratic interactions. Results TFI was an accurate indicator of clinical thyroid status (area under the receiver-operating-characteristic curve to detect clinical hypothyroidism, 0.98) in both SAFHS and NHANES 2007–10. Of the 18 MS traits, waist circumference (WC) showed the most consistent association with TFI in both studies independently of age, sex and body mass index (BMI). In the SAFHS and NHANES 2007–10 datasets, each standard deviation increase in WC was associated with 0.13 (p < 0.001) and 0.11 (p < 0.001) unit increase in the TFI, respectively. In a series of polygenic and linear regression models, central obesity (defined as WC ≥ 102 cm in men and ≥88 cm in women) was associated with clinical and subclinical hypothyroidism independent of age, sex, BMI and

  9. Occupational self-coding and automatic recording (OSCAR): a novel web-based tool to collect and code lifetime job histories in large population-based studies.

    PubMed

    De Matteis, Sara; Jarvis, Deborah; Young, Heather; Young, Alan; Allen, Naomi; Potts, James; Darnton, Andrew; Rushton, Lesley; Cullinan, Paul

    2017-03-01

    Objectives The standard approach to the assessment of occupational exposures is through the manual collection and coding of job histories. This method is time-consuming and costly and makes it potentially unfeasible to perform high quality analyses on occupational exposures in large population-based studies. Our aim was to develop a novel, efficient web-based tool to collect and code lifetime job histories in the UK Biobank, a population-based cohort of over 500 000 participants. Methods We developed OSCAR (occupations self-coding automatic recording) based on the hierarchical structure of the UK Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) 2000, which allows individuals to collect and automatically code their lifetime job histories via a simple decision-tree model. Participants were asked to find each of their jobs by selecting appropriate job categories until they identified their job title, which was linked to a hidden 4-digit SOC code. For each occupation a job title in free text was also collected to estimate Cohen's kappa (κ) inter-rater agreement between SOC codes assigned by OSCAR and an expert manual coder. Results OSCAR was administered to 324 653 UK Biobank participants with an existing email address between June and September 2015. Complete 4-digit SOC-coded lifetime job histories were collected for 108 784 participants (response rate: 34%). Agreement between the 4-digit SOC codes assigned by OSCAR and the manual coder for a random sample of 400 job titles was moderately good [κ=0.45, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.42-0.49], and improved when broader job categories were considered (κ=0.64, 95% CI 0.61-0.69 at a 1-digit SOC-code level). Conclusions OSCAR is a novel, efficient, and reasonably reliable web-based tool for collecting and automatically coding lifetime job histories in large population-based studies. Further application in other research projects for external validation purposes is warranted.

  10. Early Parental and Child Predictors of Recurrent Abdominal Pain at School Age: Results of a Large Population-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramchandani, Paul G.; Stein, Alan; Hotopf, Matthew; Wiles, Nicola J.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To assess whether parental psychological and physical factors and child factors measured in the first year of life were associated with recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) in children at age 6 3/4 years. Method: A longitudinal cohort study (the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children), followed 8,272 children from pregnancy to age 6…

  11. Early Parental and Child Predictors of Recurrent Abdominal Pain at School Age: Results of a Large Population-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramchandani, Paul G.; Stein, Alan; Hotopf, Matthew; Wiles, Nicola J.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To assess whether parental psychological and physical factors and child factors measured in the first year of life were associated with recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) in children at age 6 3/4 years. Method: A longitudinal cohort study (the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children), followed 8,272 children from pregnancy to age 6…

  12. No evidence for a large difference in ALS frequency in populations of African and European origin: a population based study in inner city London.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Garcia, Ricardo; Scott, Kirsten M; Roche, Jose Carlos; Scotton, William; Martin, Naomi; Janssen, Anna; Goldstein, Laura H; Leigh, P Nigel; Ellis, Cathy M; Shaw, Christopher E; Al-Chalabi, Ammar

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies have suggested a lower incidence of ALS in people of African origin. We used a population based register in an urban setting from inner city London postcodes where there is a large population of people of African ancestry to compare the frequency of ALS in people of European and African origin. Population statistics stratified by age, gender and ethnicity were obtained from the 2001 census. Incidence and prevalence were calculated in each ethnic group. Results showed that in a population of 683,194, of which 22% were of African ancestry, 88 individuals with ALS were identified over a seven-year period, including 14 people with African ancestry. The adjusted incidence in people of African ancestry was 1.35 per 100,000 person-years (95% CI 0.72-2.3) and in those of European ancestry 1.97 per 100,000 person-years (95% CI 1.55-2.48). In conclusion, in this small population based study we could not detect a difference in rates of ALS between people of African ancestry and those of European ancestry.

  13. Tobago Prostate Survey: Prostate Cancer Risk in a Large Population-Based Study of Men of African Descent

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-06-01

    control studies suggest that sex hormone related polymorphisms and surrogate hormone measures are related to prostate cancer. This Tobago population...our hypothesis that, as observed in African American men, Afro-Caribbean men experience a high risk for prostate cancer. Results from the pilot case

  14. Metabolic changes in urine during and after pregnancy in a large, multiethnic population-based cohort study of gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sachse, Daniel; Sletner, Line; Mørkrid, Kjersti; Jenum, Anne Karen; Birkeland, Kåre I; Rise, Frode; Piehler, Armin P; Berg, Jens Petter

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to identify novel markers for gestational diabetes (GDM) in the biochemical profile of maternal urine using NMR metabolomics. It also catalogs the general effects of pregnancy and delivery on the urine profile. Urine samples were collected at three time points (visit V1: gestational week 8-20; V2: week 28±2; V3 10-16 weeks post partum) from participants in the STORK Groruddalen program, a prospective, multiethnic cohort study of 823 healthy, pregnant women in Oslo, Norway, and analyzed using (1)H-NMR spectroscopy. Metabolites were identified and quantified where possible. PCA, PLS-DA and univariate statistics were applied and found substantial differences between the time points, dominated by a steady increase of urinary lactose concentrations, and an increase during pregnancy and subsequent dramatic reduction of several unidentified NMR signals between 0.5 and 1.1 ppm. Multivariate methods could not reliably identify GDM cases based on the WHO or graded criteria based on IADPSG definitions, indicating that the pattern of urinary metabolites above micromolar concentrations is not influenced strongly and consistently enough by the disease. However, univariate analysis suggests elevated mean citrate concentrations with increasing hyperglycemia. Multivariate classification with respect to ethnic background produced weak but statistically significant models. These results suggest that although NMR-based metabolomics can monitor changes in the urinary excretion profile of pregnant women, it may not be a prudent choice for the study of GDM.

  15. Estimation of dietary HCA intakes in a large-scale population-based prospective study in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Minatsu; Hanaoka, Tomoyuki; Nishioka, Sachiko; Kataoka, Hiroyuki; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2002-09-30

    Heterocyclic amines (HCAs) are known mutagens and animal carcinogens formed in cooked meat and fish. Japanese people generally consume more fish than animal meat, and chopped and stir-fried method of meat preparation is favored as much as the grilled cooking method. Therefore, it is supposed that the foods contributing to HCA intake in Japan are different from those in western countries. However, dietary HCA intake levels and their main sources have not been estimated in Japan. The purpose of this study was to assess individual intake levels of specific HCAs in subjects of the Japan Public Health Center (JPHC)-based prospective study on cancer and cardiovascular disease (JPHC study). Individual intake levels of six predominant HCAs (Trp-P-1, MeIQ, MeIQx, 7,8-DiMeIQx, 4,8-DiMeIQx, and PhIP) were calculated for 39035 JPHC study participants (18290 men and 20745 women) from four geographic areas (9412 from Iwate, 12018 from Akita, 9896 from Nagano, and 7709 from Okinawa) based on a self-reported food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Mean daily HCA intake levels (ng/kg per day) for subjects in the mainland areas (Iwate, Akita, and Nagano) were 1.06 (inter quartile range 0.50-1.35) in men and 1.10 (inter quartile range 0.53-1.40) in women. Mean daily HCA intake levels (ng/kg per day) for subjects in Okinawa Island were lower than those in the mainland; 0.83 (inter quartile range 0.33-1.04) in men and 0.92 (inter quartile range 0.33-1.18) in women. PhIP accounted for more than 60% of total HCA intake, followed by MeIQx and MeIQ. More than 50% of total HCA intake was derived from fish in the mainland, whereas more than 50% was from pork in Okinawa. Our study suggests that grilled fish are the major dietary sources of HCAs in Japanese, except those in Okinawa Island.

  16. Somatic Complaints Are Significantly Associated with Chronic Uninvestigated Dyspepsia and Its Symptoms: A Large Cross-sectional Population Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Zahra; Keshteli, Ammar Hassanzadeh; Feizi, Awat; Afshar, Hamid; Adibi, Payman

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Somatization may influence persistence and severity of symptoms in gastrointestinal diseases. Some studies suggest that somatization is associated with chronic uninvestigated dyspepsia (CUD); however, the association is unclear. We aimed to determine the association between the profiles of somatic complaints with CUD and its symptoms. Methods In a cross-sectional study conducted on 4763 Iranian adults, somatic complaints were assessed using a comprehensive 31-items questionnaire. Patients with CUD were identified by the Rome III diagnostic criteria. Profiles of somatic complaints were derived from factor analysis. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between extracted profiles with CUD and its symptoms. Results CUD, bothersome postprandial fullness, early satiation, and epigastric pain or burning was identified in 723 (15.2%), 384 (8.1%), 302 (6.3%), and 371 (7.8%) of the study population. The frequency of all 31 somatic complaints was significantly higher in patients with CUD compared with controls (P < 0.001), and the most frequent was severe fatigue (45.1%). The profiles of somatic complaints were extracted in 4 domains, including “psychological”, “gastrointestinal”, “neuro-skeletal”, and “pharyngeal-respiratory”. The psychological (OR, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.44–1.54), gastrointestinal (OR, 2.22; 95% CI, 2.09–2.37), neuro-skeletal (OR, 1.52; 95% CI, 1.44–1.59), and pharyngeal-respiratory (OR, 2.09; 95% CI, 1.94–2.25) profiles were significantly associated with greater odds of CUD. Conclusions CUD and its symptoms are strongly associated with higher levels of somatic complaints and their related extracted profiles. This perhaps explains that why it can be difficult to treat, however further prospective investigations are required to confirm these associations. PMID:27503912

  17. Applications of MALDI-TOF MS to large-scale human mtDNA population-based studies.

    PubMed

    Cerezo, María; Cerný, Viktor; Carracedo, Angel; Salas, Antonio

    2009-11-01

    Analysis of the mitochondrial DNA variation in populations is commonly carried out in many fields of biomedical research. We propose the analysis of mitochondrial DNA coding region SNP (mtSNP) variation to a high level of phylogenetic resolution based on MALDI-TOF MS. The African phylogeny has been chosen to test the applicability of the technique but any other part of the worldwide phylogeny (or any other mtSNP panel) could be equally suitable for MALDI-TOF MS genotyping. SNP selection thus aimed to fully cover all the mtSNPs defining major and minor branches of the known African tree, including, macro-haplogroup L, and haplogroups M1, and U6. A total of 230 mtSNPs were finally selected. We used tests samples collected from two different African locations, namely, Mozambique and Chad Basin. Different internal genotyping controls and other indirect approaches (e.g. phylogenetic checking coupled with automatic sequencing) were used in order to evaluate the reproducibility of the technique, which resulted to be 100% using samples previously subjected to whole genome amplification. The advantages of the MALDI-TOF MS are also discussed in comparison with other popular methods such as minisequencing, highlighting its high-throughput nature, which is particularly suitable for case-control medical studies, forensic databasing or population and anthropological studies.

  18. Quality, Rigour and Usefulness of Free-Text Comments Collected by a Large Population Based Longitudinal Study - ALSWH

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Jane Louise; Chojenta, Catherine; Loxton, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    While it is common practice for health surveys to include an open-ended question asking for additional comments, the responses to these questions are often not analysed or used by researchers as data. The current project employed an automated semantic program to assess the useability and thematic content of the responses to an open-ended free response item included in the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health (ALSWH) surveys. The study examined the comments of three cohorts of women, born between 1973–78, 1946–51, and 1921–26, from Survey 1 (in 1996) and Survey 5 (in 2007–2009). Findings revealed important differences in the health status of responders compared to non-responders. Across all three cohorts, and at both time points, women who commented tended to have poorer physical health (except for women aged 82–87) and social functioning, experienced more life events, were less likely to be partnered, and (except for women aged 18–23 years) more likely to have higher levels of education, than women who did not comment. Results for mental health were mixed. The analysis revealed differences between cohorts as well as changes over time. The most common themes to emerge for the 1973–78 cohort were health, time, pregnant and work, for the 1946–51 cohort, the most common themes were health, life, time and work, while for the 1921–26 cohort, the most common themes were husband, health and family. The concepts and frequency of concepts changed from the first to the fifth survey. For women in the 1973–78 cohort, pregnant emerged as a prevalent theme, while eating disappeared. Among women in the 1946–51 cohort, cancer, operation and medication emerged as prevalent themes, while for women in the 1921–26 cohort, the concept children disappeared, while family emerged. This analysis suggests that free-text comments are a valuable data source, suitable for content, thematic and narrative analysis, particularly when collected over time. PMID

  19. Urinary pH is a predictor of diabetes in men; a population based large scale cohort study.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Yoshitaka; Hamaguchi, Masahide; Nakanishi, Naoko; Ohbora, Akihiro; Kojima, Takao; Fukui, Michiaki

    2017-08-01

    Previous cross-sectional studies revealed that patients with type 2 diabetes were associated with low urine pH. However, the association between urinary pH and incident type 2 diabetes is still unclear. Thus, we investigated the association between urinary pH and incident type 2 diabetes. This is a 5-year observational study of 3119men. We divided participants into four groups according to quartile of urinary pH. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to calculate adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CIs for incident type 2 diabetes. We adjusted for age, body mass index, smoking, exercise, alcohol consumption, hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and impaired fasting glycaemia. In the follow-up examination, 113men diagnosed as diabetes. The proportion of incident diabetes was 6.9% (case/N=22/318) in the lowest urinary pH group (urinary pH = 5.0), 3.4% (46/1366) in the second lowest group (urinary pH = 5.5), 3.5% (30/856) in the third lowest group (urinary pH = 6.0) and 2.6% (15/579) in the highest group (urinary pH≥6.5). The lowest urinary pH group was associated with the increased risk of incident diabetes compared to the other urinary pH groups (multivariate OR=1.91, 95% CI 1.05-3.36, p=0.033 for the second lowest, multivariate OR=1.99, 95% CI 1.05-3.71, p=0.036 for the third lowest and multivariate OR 2.69, 95% CI 1.30-5.72, p=0.008 for the highest urinary pH groups). Low urine pH is an independent predictor of diabetes. We suggest that the urine pH can be an easy practical marker for diabetes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Seasonal Differences in Determinants of Time Location Patterns in an Urban Population: A Large Population-Based Study in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sewon; Lee, Kiyoung

    2017-06-22

    Time location patterns are a significant factor for exposure assessment models of air pollutants. Factors associated with time location patterns in urban populations are typically due to high air pollution levels in urban areas. The objective of this study was to determine the seasonal differences in time location patterns in two urban cities. A Time Use Survey of Korean Statistics (KOSTAT) was conducted in the summer, fall, and winter of 2014. Time location data from Seoul and Busan were collected, together with demographic information obtained by diaries and questionnaires. Determinants of the time spent at each location were analyzed by multiple linear regression and the stepwise method. Seoul and Busan participants had similar time location profiles over the three seasons. The time spent at own home, other locations, workplace/school and during walk were similar over the three seasons in both the Seoul and Busan participants. The most significant time location pattern factors were employment status, age, gender, monthly income, and spouse. Season affected the time spent at the workplace/school and other locations in the Seoul participants, but not in the Busan participants. The seasons affected each time location pattern of the urban population slightly differently, but overall there were few differences.

  1. Gender differences in psychotropic use across Europe: Results from a large cross-sectional, population-based study.

    PubMed

    Boyd, A; Van de Velde, S; Pivette, M; Ten Have, M; Florescu, S; O'Neill, S; Caldas-de-Almeida, J-M; Vilagut, G; Haro, J M; Alonso, J; Kovess-Masféty, V

    2015-09-01

    In many epidemiological studies, women have been observed to consume psychotropic medication more often than men. However, the consistency of this relationship across Europe, with differences in mental health care (MHC) resources and reimbursement policies, is unknown. Questions on 12-month psychotropic use (antidepressants, benzodiazepines, antipsychotics, mood stabilizers) were asked to 34,204 respondents from 10 European countries of the EU-World Mental Health surveys. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Fourth Edition) criteria were used to determine 12-month prevalence of mood/anxiety disorders using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (v3.0). For all participating countries, women were significantly more likely than men to use psychotropic medication within the previous 12 months (overall-OR=2.04, 95% CI: 1.81-2.31). This relationship remained significant after adjusting for common sociodemographic factors (age, income level, employment status, education, marital status) and country-level indicators (MHC provision, private household out-of-pocket expenditure, and Gender Gap Index). In multivariable gender-stratified risk-factor analysis, both women and men were more likely to have taken psychotropic medication with increasing age, decreasing income level, and mental health care use within the past 12 months, with no significant differences between genders. When only including participants with a mental disorder, gender differences overall were still significant with any 12-month mood disorder but not with any 12-month anxiety disorder, remaining so after adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics and country-level indicators. Women use psychotropic medication consistently more often than men, yet reasons for their use are similar between genders. These differences also appear to be contingent on the specific mental disorder. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. A large nationwide population-based case–control study of the association between intussusception and later celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Case reports and case series studies suggest a positive association between intussusception and celiac disease (CD). Methods We contacted Sweden’s 28 pathology departments and obtained data on 29,096 patients with biopsy-verified CD (equal to Marsh stage 3) through biopsy reports. Patients with CD were matched for age, sex, calendar period and county of residence with up to five reference individuals from the general population (n = 144,522). Cases of intussusception were identified from nationwide inpatient, hospital-based outpatient and day-surgery data from the Swedish Patient Register. Odds ratios (ORs) for future CD in patients with intussusception were estimated using conditional logistic regression. Results 34 (0.12%) individuals with CD had a diagnosis of intussusception vs. 143 (0.10%) reference individuals, suggesting that intussusception was not a risk factor for later CD (OR = 1.17; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.82–1.67). The OR for CD in patients with at least two records of intussusception was 0.40 (95% CI = 0.06–2.99). In contrast, a post-hoc analysis showed that CD was associated with a statistically significantly increased risk of intussusception after CD diagnosis (hazard ratio = 1.95; 95% CI = 1.01–3.77); however, this analysis was based on only 12 cases with both CD and intussusception. Conclusion We found no association between intussusception and future CD; and a mostly modest increased risk of intussusception after a diagnosis of CD. PMID:23679928

  3. Gender differences in mental disorders and suicidality in Europe: results from a large cross-sectional population-based study.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Anders; Van de Velde, Sarah; Vilagut, Gemma; de Graaf, Ron; O'Neill, Siobhan; Florescu, Silvia; Alonso, Jordi; Kovess-Masfety, Vivane

    2015-03-01

    When evaluating gender differences in mental disorders and suicidality, specifically between European countries, studies are sparse and frequently hindered by methodological issues, such as the limited items evaluated and inconsistent sampling designs. In ten European countries participating in the World Mental Health Survey Initiative, lifetime internalizing and externalizing disorders and suicidality were assessed among 37,289 respondents. Disorders were classified using DMS-IV criteria. Odds ratios (OR) for gender differences were calculated using logistic regression, while trends across age-groups were tested via gender × age interaction. Within countries, prevalence of any lifetime internalizing disorder ranged from 10.8% to 44.5% among women and 5.9% to 26.5% among men, with women having consistently higher odds than men (OR range: 1.52-2.73). Prevalence of any lifetime externalizing disorders ranged from 0.2% to 6.6% among women and 2.2% to 22.4% among men, with women having consistently lower odds than men (OR range: 0.05-0.35). Any lifetime suicide attempt was found in 0.8-5.4% of women and 0.3-2.4% of men, showing inconsistent relative gender-differences across countries (OR range: 0.77-4.72). Significant effects in gender OR across age-groups were not observed for any internalizing disorder or suicide attempt, yet were present for any externalizing disorder in France (p = 0.01), the Netherlands (p = 0.05), and Spain (p = 0.02). Mental disorders were assessed with the CIDI 3.0 and not psychiatric evaluations. Suicidality does not fully represent more important clinical events, such as suicide mortality. Consistent across European countries, internalizing disorders are more common among women and externalizing disorders among men, whereas gender differences in suicidality varied. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Vegetarian diet and all-cause mortality: Evidence from a large population-based Australian cohort - the 45 and Up Study.

    PubMed

    Mihrshahi, Seema; Ding, Ding; Gale, Joanne; Allman-Farinelli, Margaret; Banks, Emily; Bauman, Adrian E

    2017-04-01

    The vegetarian diet is thought to have health benefits including reductions in type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and obesity. Evidence to date suggests that vegetarians tend to have lower mortality rates when compared with non-vegetarians, but most studies are not population-based and other healthy lifestyle factors may have confounded apparent protective effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between categories of vegetarian diet (including complete, semi and pesco-vegetarian) and all-cause mortality in a large population-based Australian cohort. The 45 and Up Study is a cohort study of 267,180 men and women aged ≥45years in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. Vegetarian diet status was assessed by baseline questionnaire and participants were categorized into complete vegetarians, semi-vegetarians (eat meat≤once/week), pesco-vegetarians and regular meat eaters. All-cause mortality was determined by linked registry data to mid-2014. Cox proportional hazards models quantified the association between vegetarian diet and all-cause mortality adjusting for a range of potential confounding factors. Among 243,096 participants (mean age: 62.3years, 46.7% men) there were 16,836 deaths over a mean 6.1years of follow-up. Following extensive adjustment for potential confounding factors there was no significant difference in all-cause mortality for vegetarians versus non-vegetarians [HR=1.16 (95% CI 0.93-1.45)]. There was also no significant difference in mortality risk between pesco-vegetarians [HR=0.79 (95% CI 0.59-1.06)] or semi-vegetarians [HR=1.12 (95% CI 0.96-1.31)] versus regular meat eaters. We found no evidence that following a vegetarian diet, semi-vegetarian diet or a pesco-vegetarian diet has an independent protective effect on all-cause mortality.

  5. Sleep and body mass index in adolescence: results from a large population-based study of Norwegian adolescents aged 16 to 19 years

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to examine the association between body mass index (BMI) and sleep duration, insomnia and symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in adolescents. Methods Data were taken from a large population based study of 9,875 Norwegian adolescents aged 16–19. BMI was calculated from the self-reported body weight and categorized according to recommended age and gender specific cut offs for underweight, overweight and obesity. Detailed sleep parameters (sleep duration, insomnia, and OSA symptoms) were reported separately for weekdays and weekends. Data were analyzed using Pearson’s chi-squared test and ANOVAs for simple categorical and continuous comparisons, and multinomial logistic regressions for analyses adjusting for known confounders. Results There was evidence for a curvilinear relationship between BMI and both sleep duration and insomnia for girls, whereas the relationship was linear for boys. Compared to the average weekday sleep duration among adolescents in the normal weight range (6 hrs 29 min), both underweight (5 hrs 48 min), overweight (6 hrs 13 min) and obese (5 hrs 57 min) adolescents had shorter sleep duration. OSA symptoms were linearly associated with BMI. Controlling for demographical factors as well as physical activity did not attenuate the associations. Additional adjustment for depression reduced the association between insomnia and obesity to a non-significant level. The evidence for a link between both underweight and overweight/obesity, and short sleep duration and OSA symptoms remained in the fully adjusted analyses. The associations were generally stronger for girls. Conclusions This is one of the first population-based studies to investigate the relationship between sleep and BMI in adolescents while simultaneously controlling for important confounding factors. These findings require further research to investigate the temporal association between weights and sleep problems. PMID:25128481

  6. Patterns and predictors of sitting time over ten years in a large population-based Canadian sample: Findings from the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos).

    PubMed

    Gebel, Klaus; Pont, Sarah; Ding, Ding; Bauman, Adrian E; Chau, Josephine Y; Berger, Claudie; Prior, Jerilynn C

    2017-03-01

    Our objective was to describe patterns and predictors of sedentary behavior (sitting time) over 10 years among a large Canadian cohort. Data are from the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study, a prospective study of women and men randomly selected from the general population. Respondents reported socio-demographics, lifestyle behaviors and health outcomes in interviewer-administered questionnaires; weight and height were measured. Baseline data were collected between 1995 and 1997 (n = 9418; participation rate = 42%), and at 5- (n = 7648) and 10-year follow-ups (n = 5567). Total sitting time was summed across domain-specific questions at three time points and dichotomized into "low" (≤ 7 h/day) and "high" (> 7 h/day), based on recent meta-analytic evidence on time sitting and all-cause mortality. Ten-year sitting patterns were classified as "consistently high", "consistently low", "increased", "decreased", and "mixed". Predictors of sedentary behavior patterns were explored using chi-square tests, ANOVA and logistic regression. At baseline (mean age = 62.1 years ± 13.4) average sitting was 6.9 h/day; it was 7.0 at 5- and 10-year follow-ups (p for trend = 0.12). Overall 23% reported consistently high sitting time, 22% consistently low sitting, 14% decreased sitting, 17% increased sitting with 24% mixed patterns. Consistently high sitters were more likely to be men, university educated, full-time employed, obese, and to report consistently low physical activity levels. This is one of the first population-based studies to explore patterns of sedentary behavior (multi-domain sitting) within men and women over years. Risk classification of sitting among many adults changed during follow-up. Thus, studies of sitting and health would benefit from multiple measures of sitting over time.

  7. Increased risk for diabetes development in subjects with large variation in total cholesterol levels in 2,827,950 Koreans: A nationwide population-based study.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Eun-Jung; Han, Kyungdo; Ko, Seung-Hyun; Ko, Kyung-Soo; Lee, Won-Young

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies suggest a role for hyperlipidemia in the development of diabetes. The aim of this study is to analyze the relationship between variations of total cholesterol (TC) levels and the risk for type 2 diabetes development from a Korean nationwide population-based database. We examined the General Health Check-up sub-dataset of the Korean National Health Insurance Service (NHIS) of 2,827,950 participants who had at least three health check-ups between 2002 and 2007, and were not reported to have diabetes during that time. The variations of TC levels between the examinations were calculated as follows: [Formula: see text]. The examinees were divided into 10 groups according to TC variation, and the hazard ratio for diabetes development from 2007 to 2013, were analyzed. During the follow-up period, 3.4% of the participants had developed diabetes. The hazard ratio (HR) for diabetes development relative to the overall risk in the whole study population started to be higher than 1.0 from eighth decile of TC variation. The highest decile group showed an increased HR for diabetes development after adjustment for confounding variables (1.139; 95% confidence interval 1.116~1.163). These results were similar regardless of the use of anti-hyperlipidemic medication and baseline TC levels. The participants with a large variation in TC levels showed an increased risk for diabetes development, independent of the use of anti-hyperlipidemic medications. These results suggest a relationship between fluctuations in lipid levels and the development of type 2 diabetes.

  8. Falling in the elderly: Do statistical models matter for performance criteria of fall prediction? Results from two large population-based studies.

    PubMed

    Kabeshova, Anastasiia; Launay, Cyrille P; Gromov, Vasilii A; Fantino, Bruno; Levinoff, Elise J; Allali, Gilles; Beauchet, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    To compare performance criteria (i.e., sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, area under receiver operating characteristic curve and accuracy) of linear and non-linear statistical models for fall risk in older community-dwellers. Participants were recruited in two large population-based studies, "Prévention des Chutes, Réseau 4" (PCR4, n=1760, cross-sectional design, retrospective collection of falls) and "Prévention des Chutes Personnes Agées" (PCPA, n=1765, cohort design, prospective collection of falls). Six linear statistical models (i.e., logistic regression, discriminant analysis, Bayes network algorithm, decision tree, random forest, boosted trees), three non-linear statistical models corresponding to artificial neural networks (multilayer perceptron, genetic algorithm and neuroevolution of augmenting topologies [NEAT]) and the adaptive neuro fuzzy interference system (ANFIS) were used. Falls ≥1 characterizing fallers and falls ≥2 characterizing recurrent fallers were used as outcomes. Data of studies were analyzed separately and together. NEAT and ANFIS had better performance criteria compared to other models. The highest performance criteria were reported with NEAT when using PCR4 database and falls ≥1, and with both NEAT and ANFIS when pooling data together and using falls ≥2. However, sensitivity and specificity were unbalanced. Sensitivity was higher than specificity when identifying fallers, whereas the converse was found when predicting recurrent fallers. Our results showed that NEAT and ANFIS were non-linear statistical models with the best performance criteria for the prediction of falls but their sensitivity and specificity were unbalanced, underscoring that models should be used respectively for the screening of fallers and the diagnosis of recurrent fallers. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The descriptive epidemiology of delirium symptoms in a large population-based cohort study: results from the Medical Research Council Cognitive Function and Ageing Study (MRC CFAS).

    PubMed

    Davis, Daniel H J; Barnes, Linda E; Stephan, Blossom C M; MacLullich, Alasdair M J; Meagher, David; Copeland, John; Matthews, Fiona E; Brayne, Carol

    2014-07-28

    In the general population, the epidemiological relationships between delirium and adverse outcomes are not well defined. The aims of this study were to: (1) construct an algorithm for the diagnosis of delirium using the Geriatric Mental State (GMS) examination; (2) test the criterion validity of this algorithm against mortality and dementia risk; (3) report the age-specific prevalence of delirium as determined by this algorithm. Participant and informant data in a randomly weighted subsample of the Cognitive Function and Ageing Study were taken from a standardized assessment battery. The algorithmic definition of delirium was based on the DSM-IV classification. Outcomes were: proportional hazard ratios for death; odds ratios of dementia at 2-year follow-up. Data from 2197 persons (representative of 13,004) were used, median age 77 years, 64% women. Study-defined delirium was associated with a new dementia diagnosis at two years (OR 8.82, 95% CI 2.76 to 28.2) and death (HR 1.28, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.60), even after adjustment for acute illness severity. Similar associations were seen for study-defined subsyndromal delirium. Age-specific prevalence as determined by the algorithm increased with age from 1.8% in the 65-69 year age group to 10.1% in the ≥85 age group (p < 0.01 for trend). For study-defined subsyndromal delirium, age-specific period prevalence ranged from 8.2% (65-69 years) to 36.1% (≥85 years). These results demonstrate the possibility of constructing an algorithmic diagnosis for study-defined delirium using data from the GMS schedule, with predictive criterion validity for mortality and dementia risk. These are the first population-based analyses able to account prospectively for both illness severity and an earlier study diagnosis of dementia.

  10. Tea and coffee consumption and risk of oral cavity cancer: results of a large population-based case-control study, the ICARE study.

    PubMed

    Radoï, Loredana; Paget-Bailly, Sophie; Menvielle, Gwenn; Cyr, Diane; Schmaus, Annie; Carton, Matthieu; Guida, Florence; Cénée, Sylvie; Sanchez, Marie; Guizard, Anne-Valérie; Velten, Michel; Stücker, Isabelle; Luce, Danièle

    2013-06-01

    Results on the relationship between coffee and tea drinking and the risk of oral cavity cancer are contrasted. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relation between coffee and tea drinking and the risk of oral cavity cancer in France, a high incidence area. We conducted a population based case-control study with face-to-face interviews and standardized questionnaires (the ICARE study, Investigation of occupational and environmental causes of respiratory cancers). We used data from 689 cases of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma and 3481 controls. Odds-ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) associated with tea and coffee consumption (quantity, duration, cumulative consumption) were estimated by unconditional logistic regression with adjustment for age, gender, area of residence, education, body mass index, tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking. We observed inverse associations between oral cavity cancer and tea or coffee consumption (odds ratio, 0.39; 95% CI 0.21-0.70, for the highest quartile of tea consumption, and 0.60, 95% CI 0.34-1.05, for the highest quartile of coffee consumption). Exclusive tea or coffee consumption was associated with a reduced risk of oral cavity cancer and their joint effect was multiplicative. No differences in risk between men and women or between consumers of tobacco and alcohol and non-consumers were observed. The odds ratios related to the subsites usually included in the oropharynx (soft palate and base of the tongue) did not differ significantly from that observed for the other subsites of the oral cavity. Tea and coffee drinking may decrease the risk of oral cavity cancer through antioxidant components which play a role in the repair of cellular damages. These findings need further investigation in prospective studies and the underlying mechanisms in humans remain to be clarified. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Intake of fatty acids and antioxidants and pancreatic cancer in a large population-based case-control study in the San Francisco Bay Area

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Zhihong; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Wang, Furong; Chan, June M.; Bracci, Paige M.

    2010-01-01

    There are no well-established modifiable risk factors for pancreatic cancer except smoking. Some dietary factors have been associated with pancreatic cancer risk and require further study. We examined the associations among intake of specific fatty acids and antioxidants and risk of pancreatic cancer in a large population-based case-control study in the San Francisco Bay Area. Unconditional logistic regression models were used to compute odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) as estimates of relative risk. Positive associations were observed for high levels of the eight individual saturated fatty acids (4th vs. 1st quartile: ORs ranged from 1.6 to 2.6; all Ptrend<0.001), monounsaturated palmitoleic and oleic fatty acids [OR=1.6 (95%CI: 1.2-2.1) and 1.4 (95%CI: 1.1-1.9); both Ptrend <0.01], and polyunsaturated linolenic acid [OR=1.5 (95%CI: 1.1-2.0); Ptrend=0.02]. Inverse associations were observed for high levels of gadolic acid [4th vs. 1st quartile: OR=0.68 (95%CI: 0.50-0.92); Ptrend=0.007] and omega-3 fatty acids [≥0.85g/day vs. 1st quartile: OR=0.47 (95%CI: 0.25-0.90)]. An inverse association also was observed for high total intake of vitamin C [4th vs. 1st quartile: OR=0.69 (95%CI: 0.51-0.94); Ptrend=0.004] and of vitamin E [OR=0.67 (95%CI: 0.49-0.92); Ptrend=0.01]. Although similar decreased risks also were observed for high supplemental intake of these two vitamins (both Ptrend<0.01), no association was observed for intake from food alone. These results support the hypotheses that a high intake of saturated and certain monounsaturated fatty acids may increase the risk of pancreatic cancer, whereas greater intake of omega-3 fatty acids, vitamins C and E may reduce the risk. PMID:20104522

  12. In response to the December 2016 article entitled "Vegetarian diet and all-cause mortality: Evidence from a large population-based Australian cohort - the 45 and Up Study".

    PubMed

    Taylor, Nathan G A

    2017-07-01

    In response to the December 2016 article entitled "Vegetarian diet and all-cause mortality: Evidence from a large population-based Australian cohort - the 45 and Up Study". A brief analysis of the article with suggestions for interpretation and considerations for future research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. No Evidence for Synergy Between Human Papillomavirus Genotypes for the Risk of High-Grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions in a Large Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Wentzensen, Nicolas; Nason, Martha; Schiffman, Mark; Dodd, Lori; Hunt, William C.; Wheeler, Cosette M.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Multiple human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes may be independently or synergistically associated with risk of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSILs). We evaluated the risk of HSIL in women concomitantly infected with multiple HPV genotypes. Methods. A population-based stratified sample of 59 664 cervical cytology specimens from women residing in New Mexico were evaluated for cytologic abnormalities and HPV genotypes. We calculated the risk of HSIL in women infected with a single HPV genotype and the risk in those infected with multiple HPV genotypes. Results. The highest risk of HSIL was observed for HPV-16 (0.036), followed by HPV-33 (0.028), HPV-58 (0.024), and HPV-18 (0.022). For most types, we observed a greater risk of HSIL in women infected with multiple carcinogenic HPV types. In contrast, the risk of HSIL was similar in women infected with HPV-16 and other types, compared with women infected with HPV-16 only. We observed an increased but plateauing risk of HSIL in women infected with multiple types, compared with those infected with a single type, with risk ratios of 1.5 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2–1.8), 1.7 (95% CI, 1.3–2.4), and 1.4 (95% CI, 0.83–2.5) for women infected with 2, 3, and ≥4 genotypes, respectively. Conclusions. In the largest population-based study of HPV genotypes and cytologic outcomes so far, we did not see more than additive effects of HPV types on the risk of HSIL in women infected with multiple types. PMID:24179110

  14. Population-based study on infant mortality.

    PubMed

    Lima, Jaqueline Costa; Mingarelli, Alexandre Marchezoni; Segri, Neuber José; Zavala, Arturo Alejandro Zavala; Takano, Olga Akiko

    2017-03-01

    Although Brazil has reduced social, economic and health indicators disparities in the last decade, intra- and inter-regional differences in child mortality rates (CMR) persist in regions such as the state capital of Mato Grosso. This population-based study aimed to investigate factors associated with child mortality in five cohorts of live births (LB) of mothers living in Cuiabá (MT), Brazil, 2006-2010, through probabilistic linkage in 47,018 LB. We used hierarchical logistic regression analysis. Of the 617 child deaths, 48% occurred in the early neonatal period. CMR ranged from 14.6 to 12.0 deaths per thousand LB. The following remained independently associated with death: mothers without companion (OR = 1.32); low number of prenatal consultations (OR = 1.65); low birthweight (OR = 4.83); prematurity (OR = 3.05); Apgar ≤ 7 at the first minute (OR = 3.19); Apgar ≤ 7 at the fifth minute (OR = 4.95); congenital malformations (OR = 14.91) and male gender (OR = 1.26). CMR has declined in Cuiabá, however, there is need to guide public healthcare policies in the prenatal and perinatal period to reduce early neonatal mortality and further studies to identify the causes of preventable deaths.

  15. Severe neonatal hypernatraemia: a population based study.

    PubMed

    Oddie, Sam Joseph; Craven, Vanessa; Deakin, Kathryn; Westman, Janette; Scally, Andrew

    2013-09-01

    To describe incidence, presentation, treatment and short term outcomes of severe neonatal hypernatraemia (SNH, sodium ≥160 mmol/l). Prospective, population based surveillance study over 13 months using the British Paediatric Surveillance Unit. Cases were >33 weeks gestation at birth, fed breast or formula milk and <28 days of age at presentation. Of 62 cases of SNH reported (7, 95% CI 5.4 to 9.0 per 1 00 000 live births), 61 mothers had intended to achieve exclusive breast feeding. Infants presented at median day 6 (range 2-17) with median weight loss of 19.5% (range 8.9-30.9). 12 had jaundice and 57 weight loss as a presenting feature. 58 presented with weight loss ≥15%. 25 babies had not stooled in the 24 h prior to admission. Serum sodium fell by median 12.9 mmol/l per 24 h (range 0-30). No baby died, had seizures or coma or was treated with dialysis or a central line. At discharge, babies had regained 11% of initial birth weight after a median admission of 5 (range 2-14) days. 10 were exclusively breast fed on discharge from hospital. Neonatal hypernatraemia at this level, in this population, is strongly associated with weight loss. It occurs almost exclusively after attempts to initiate breast feeding, occurs uncommonly and does not appear to be associated with serious short term morbidities, beyond admission to hospital.

  16. Green tea drinking and risk of pancreatic cancer: a large-scale, population-based case-control study in urban Shanghai

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Zhang, Wei; Sun, Lu; Yu, Herbert; Ni, Quan-Xing; Risch, Harvey; Gao, Yu-Tang

    2012-01-01

    Background Little is known about the etiology of pancreatic cancer. Epidemiological studies on tea consumption and pancreatic cancer risk have been inconclusive. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the association between green tea drinking and the risk of pancreatic cancer in urban Shanghai, China. Methods In this population-based case-control study conducted in urban Shanghai, 908 cases of pancreatic cancer and 1067 healthy controls were recruited. Information on tea drinking, including type of tea, amount of tea consumption, temperature of tea, and the duration of regular tea drinking, were collected via interview questionnaire. Results We examined the association of multiple tea drinking habits with the risk of pancreatic cancer. In women, regular green tea drinking was associated with 32% reduction of pancreatic cancer risk (OR 0.68, 95% CI 0.48–0.96), compared to those who did not drink tea regularly. Increased consumption and longer duration of tea drinking were both associated with reduced pancreatic cancer risk in women. Among regular tea drinkers, lower temperature of tea was associated with reduced risk of pancreatic cancer in both men and women, independent of amount or duration of tea drinking. Conclusions Habits of green tea drinking, including regular drinking, amount of consumption, persistence of the habit, and tea temperature, may lower pancreatic cancer risk. PMID:22944495

  17. Costs and outcomes of the German disease management programme (DMP) for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)-A large population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Achelrod, Dmitrij; Welte, Tobias; Schreyögg, Jonas; Stargardt, Tom

    2016-09-01

    To curb costs and improve health outcomes in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a nationwide disease management programme (DMP) was introduced in Germany in 2005. Yet, its effectiveness has not been comprehensively evaluated. To examine the effects of the German COPD DMP over three years on costs and health resource utilisation from the payer perspective, process quality, morbidity and mortality. A retrospective, population-based cohort study design is applied, using administrative data. After eliminating differences in observable characteristics between the DMP and the control group with entropy balancing, difference-in-difference estimators were computed to account for time-invariant unobservable heterogeneity. 215,104 individuals were included into the analysis of whom 25,269 were enrolled in the DMP. DMP patients had a reduced mortality hazard ratio (0.89, 95%CI: 0.84-0.94) but incurred excess costs of €553 per year. DMP enrolees reveal higher healthcare utilisation with larger shares of individuals being hospitalised (3.14%), consulting an outpatient clinic due to exacerbations (11.13%) and pharmaceutical prescriptions (2.78). However, average length of hospitalisation due to COPD fell by 0.49 days, adherence to medication guidelines as well as indicators for morbidity improved. The German COPD DMP achieved significant improvements in mortality, morbidity and process quality, but at higher costs. Given the low ICER per life year gained, DMP COPD may constitute a cost-effective option to promote COPD population health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Dietary patterns and risk of pancreatic cancer in a large population-based case-control study in the San Francisco Bay Area.

    PubMed

    Chan, June M; Gong, Zhihong; Holly, Elizabeth A; Bracci, Paige M

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is highly lethal, and identifying modifiable risk factors could have substantial public health impact. In this population-based case-control study (532 cases, 1701 controls), we used principal component analysis and multivariable unconditional logistic regression models to examine whether a particular dietary pattern was associated with risk of pancreatic cancer, adjusting for other known risk factors. A prudent dietary pattern, characterized by greater intake of vegetables, fruit, fish, poultry, whole grains, and low-fat dairy, was associated with an approximate 50% reduction in pancreatic cancer risk among men [odds ratio (OR) = 0.51, 95% confidence intervals (CI) = 0.31-0.84, P trend = 0.001] and women (OR = 0.51, 95% CI = 0.29-0.90, P trend = 0.04). A Western dietary pattern, characterized by higher intake of red and processed meats, potato chips, sugary beverages, sweets, high fat dairy, eggs, and refined grains, was associated with a 2.4-fold increased risk of pancreatic cancer among men (95% CI = 1.3-4.2, P trend = 0.008) but was not associated with risk among women. Among men, those in the upper quintiles of the Western diet and lower quintiles of the prudent diet had a threefold increased risk. Consistent with what has been recommended for several other chronic diseases, consuming a diet rich in plant-based foods, whole grains, and white meat, might reduce risk of pancreatic cancer.

  19. Associations of four circulating chemokines with multiple atherosclerosis phenotypes in a large population-based sample: results from the dallas heart study.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Leticia; Rohatgi, Anand; Ayers, Colby R; Owens, Andrew W; Das, Sandeep R; Khera, Amit; McGuire, Darren K; de Lemos, James A

    2010-05-01

    Specific chemokines contribute to vascular inflammation and may be useful biomarkers to detect atherosclerosis. The chemokines CXCL1 and CCL11 have previously been studied in animal or human models of atherosclerosis, while CXCL2 and CCL23 have not. Among 2,454 subjects enrolled in the Dallas Heart Study, a multi-ethnic population-based sample, we measured plasma CCL11, CCL23, CXCL1, and CXCL2, and associated levels with coronary artery calcium (CAC) by computed tomography, and aortic wall thickness, plaque burden, and compliance by magnetic resonance imaging. Elevated chemokine levels were defined as greater than or equal to the median for CCL11 and CCL23 and greater than or equal to the upper detection limit for CXCL1 and CXCL2. Elevated CCL23 (P < 0.01) and CXCL1 (P = 0.01), but not CCL11 and CXCL2, associated with CAC in univariable analyses. After adjustment for traditional risk factors, elevated CCL23 remained associated with CAC (OR 1.3, 95% CI 1.0-1.7; P = 0.02), while the association with CXCL1 was modestly attenuated (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.0-2.1; P = 0.06). CCL23 also associated with aortic wall thickness, plaque, and compliance in univariable analyses (P < 0.05 for each), but these associations were attenuated after multivariable adjustment. The novel chemotactic protein, CCL23, which has not been previously studied in atherosclerosis, is independently associated with coronary atherosclerosis, suggesting that this chemokine merits further study in animal and human models.

  20. The cut-off values of anthropometric variables for predicting mild cognitive impairment in Malaysian older adults: a large population based cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Won, Huiloo; Abdul, Manaf Zahara; Mat Ludin, Arimi Fitri; Omar, Mohd Azahadi; Razali, Rosdinom; Shahar, Suzana

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Older adults are at risk of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and simple anthropometric measurements can be used to screen for this condition. Thus, the aim of this study was to explore the cut-off values of body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) for predicting the risk of MCI in older Malaysian adults. Methods A total of 2,240 Malaysian older adults aged ≥60 years were recruited using multistage random sampling in a population based cross-sectional study. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to determine the cut-off values of BMI and WC with optimum sensitivity and specificity for the detection of MCI. Age, gender, years of education, smoking habit, alcohol consumption, depression, and medical conditions were used as confounding factors in this analysis. Results A BMI cut-off value of 26 kg/m2 (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve [AUC] 0.725; sensitivity 90.5%; specificity 38.8%) was appropriate in identifying the risk of getting MCI in both men and women. The optimum WC cut-offs for likelihood of MCI were 90 cm (AUC 0.745; sensitivity 78.0%; specificity 59.8%) for men and 82 cm (AUC 0.714; sensitivity 84.3%; specificity 49.7%) for women. The optimum calf circumference (CC) cut-off values for identifying MCI were 29 cm (AUC 0.731; sensitivity 72.6%; specificity 61.1%) for men and 26 cm (AUC 0.598; sensitivity 79.1%; specificity 45.3%) for women. Conclusion The cut-off values could be advocated and used as part of the screening of MCI among older Malaysian adults. There is a need to further determine the predictive values of these cut-off points on outcomes through longitudinal study design. PMID:28223785

  1. Coexisting Psychiatric Problems and Stressful Life Events in Adults with Symptoms of ADHD--A Large Swedish Population-Based Study of Twins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedrichs, Bettina; Igl, Wilmar; Larsson, Henrik; Larsson, Jan-Olov

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the associations of subtypes of adult ADHD with other psychiatric problems, stressful life events, and sex differences. Method: Odds ratios were calculated using information from 17,899 participants from a population-based survey of adult twins born in Sweden between 1959 and 1985. Results: Symptoms of attention deficit…

  2. Coexisting Psychiatric Problems and Stressful Life Events in Adults with Symptoms of ADHD--A Large Swedish Population-Based Study of Twins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedrichs, Bettina; Igl, Wilmar; Larsson, Henrik; Larsson, Jan-Olov

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the associations of subtypes of adult ADHD with other psychiatric problems, stressful life events, and sex differences. Method: Odds ratios were calculated using information from 17,899 participants from a population-based survey of adult twins born in Sweden between 1959 and 1985. Results: Symptoms of attention deficit…

  3. Medullary carcinoma of the large intestine: a population based analysis.

    PubMed

    Thirunavukarasu, Pragatheeshwar; Sathaiah, Magesh; Singla, Smit; Sukumar, Shyam; Karunamurthy, Arivarasan; Pragatheeshwar, Kothai Divya; Lee, Kenneth K W; Zeh, Herbert; Kane, Kevin M; Bartlett, David L

    2010-10-01

    Medullary carcinoma (MC) of the colorectum is a relatively new histological type of adenocarcinoma characterized by poor glandular differentiation and intraepithelial lymphocytic infiltrate. To date, there has been no epidemiological study of this rare tumor type, which has now been incorporated as a separate entity in the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of colorectal cancers. We used the population-based registries of the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database to identify all cases of colorectal MC between 1973 and 2006 and compared them to poorly and undifferentiated colonic adenocarcinomas (PDA and UDA, respectively). We observed that MCs were rare tumors, constituting approximately 5-8 cases for every 10,000 colon cancers diagnosed, with a mean annual incidence of 3.47 (+/-0.75) per 10 million population. Mean age at diagnosis was 69.3 (+/-12.5) years, with incidence increasing with age. MCs were twice as common in females, who presented at a later age, with a lower stage and a trend towards favorable prognosis. MCs were extremely rare among African-Americans. MCs were most common in the proximal colon (74%), where they present at a later age than the sigmoid colon. There were no cases reliably identified in the rectum or appendix. Serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels (CEA) were elevated prior to first course of treatment in 40% of the patients. MCs were more commonly poorly differentiated (72%), with 22% being undifferentiated. MCs commonly presented with Stage II disease, with 10% presenting with metastases. Only one patient presented with N2b disease (>7 positive nodes). Early outcome analyses showed that MCs have 1- and 2-year relative survival rates of 92.7 and 73.8% respectively. Although MCs showed a trend towards better early overall survival, undifferentiated MCs present more commonly with Stage III, with comparatively worse early outcomes.

  4. The Impact of Rurality and Disadvantage on the Diagnostic Interval for Breast Cancer in a Large Population-Based Study of 3202 Women in Queensland, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Youl, Philippa H.; Aitken, Joanne F.; Turrell, Gavin; Chambers, Suzanne K.; Dunn, Jeffrey; Pyke, Christopher; Baade, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Delays in diagnosing breast cancer (BC) can lead to poorer outcomes. We investigated factors related to the diagnostic interval in a population-based cohort of 3202 women diagnosed with BC in Queensland, Australia. Interviews ascertained method of detection and dates of medical/procedural appointments, and clinical information was obtained from medical records. Time intervals were calculated from self-recognition of symptoms (symptom-detected) or mammogram (screen-detected) to diagnosis (diagnostic interval (DI)). The cohort included 1560 women with symptom-detected and 1642 with screen-detected BC. Symptom-detected women had higher odds of DI of >60 days if they were Indigenous (OR = 3.12, 95% CI = 1.40, 6.98); lived in outer regional (OR = 1.50, 95% CI = 1.09, 2.06) or remote locations (OR = 2.46, 95% CI = 1.39, 4.38); or presented with a “non-lump” symptom (OR = 1.84, 95% CI = 1.43, 2.36). For screen-detected BC, women who were Indigenous (OR = 2.36, 95% CI = 1.03, 5.80); lived in remote locations (OR = 2.35, 95% CI = 1.24, 4.44); or disadvantaged areas (OR = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.17, 2.43) and attended a public screening facility (OR = 2.10, 95% CI = 1.40, 3.17) had higher odds of DI > 30 days. Our study indicates a disadvantage in terms of DI for rural, disadvantaged and Indigenous women. Difficulties in accessing primary care and diagnostic services are evident. There is a need to identify and implement an efficient and effective model of care to minimize avoidable longer diagnostic intervals. PMID:27869758

  5. Similarity between generic and brand-name antihypertensive drugs for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease: evidence from a large population-based study.

    PubMed

    Corrao, Giovanni; Soranna, Davide; Merlino, Luca; Mancia, Giuseppe

    2014-10-01

    Although generic and earlier brand-name counterparts are bioequivalent, their equivalence in preventing relevant clinical outcomes is of concern. To compare effectiveness of generic and brand-name antihypertensive drugs for preventing the onset of cardiovascular (CV) outcomes. A population-based, nested case-control study was carried out by including the cohort of 78 520 patients from Lombardy (Italy) aged 18 years or older who were newly treated with antihypertensive drugs during 2005. Cases were the 2206 patients who experienced a hospitalization for CV disease from initial prescription until 2011. One control for each case was randomly selected from the same cohort that generated cases. Logistic regression was used to model the CV risk associated with starting on and/or continuing with generic or brand-name agents. There was no evidence that patients who started on generics experienced different CV risk than those on brand-name product (OR 0·86; 95% CI 0·63-1·17). Patients at whom generics were main dispensed had not significantly difference in CV outcomes than those mainly on brand-name agents (OR 1·19; 95% CI 0·86-1·63). Compared with patients who kept initial brand-name therapy, those who experienced brand-to-generic or generic-to-brand switches, and those always on generics, did not show differential CV risks, being the corresponding ORs (and 95% CIs), 1·18 (0·96-1·47), 0·87 (0·63-1·21) and 1·08 (0·80-1·46). Our findings do not support the notion that brand-name antihypertensive agents are superior to generics for preventing CV outcomes in the real-world clinical practice. © 2014 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  6. Whole grains and risk of pancreatic cancer in a large population-based case-control study in the San Francisco Bay Area, California.

    PubMed

    Chan, June M; Wang, Furong; Holly, Elizabeth A

    2007-11-15

    Epidemiologic data suggest that consumption of whole-grain products may be inversely associated with risk of pancreatic cancer. Grain intake was examined in a population-based case-control study of pancreatic cancer in the San Francisco Bay Area (1995-1999). A 131-item semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire was administered to 532 cases and 1,701 controls. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were computed as estimates of relative risk. Persons who consumed > or =2 servings of whole grains daily had a lower risk of pancreatic cancer than persons who consumed <1 serving/day (odds ratio (OR) = 0.60, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.31, 1.2; trend-p = 0.04). Similar results were observed for brown rice (OR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.44, 1.2; trend-p = 0.01) and tortillas (OR = 0.56, 95% CI: 0.35, 0.89; trend-p = 0.02). Consumption of doughnuts (> or =2 servings/week vs. <1 serving/month) conferred increased risk (OR = 1.8, 95% CI: 1.2, 2.7; trend-p = 0.003). Consumption of cooked breakfast cereals (> or =2 servings/week vs. <1 serving/month) was positively associated with risk (for oatmeal/oat bran, OR = 1.3, 95% CI: 1.0, 1.7; for other cooked breakfast cereals, OR = 2.1, 95% CI: 1.4, 3.3). Dietary fiber was inversely associated with risk (for highest quartile vs. lowest, OR = 0.65, 95% CI: 0.47, 0.89; trend-p = 0.02). These data provide some support for the hypothesis that consuming more whole-grain or high-fiber foods may reduce the risk of pancreatic cancer. Refined grains were not associated with risk.

  7. Anthropometric and Metabolic Risk Factors for ESRD Are Disease-Specific: Results from a Large Population-Based Cohort Study in Austria

    PubMed Central

    Zitt, Emanuel; Pscheidt, Constanze; Concin, Hans; Kramar, Reinhard; Lhotta, Karl; Nagel, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Background Anthropometric and metabolic risk factors for all-cause end-stage renal disease (ESRD) may vary in their impact depending on the specific primary renal disease. Methods In this Austrian population-based prospective cohort study (n = 185,341; 53.9% women) the following data were collected between 1985 and 2005: age, sex, body mass index (BMI), fasting blood glucose (FBG) from 1988, blood pressure, total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) and smoking status. These data were merged with the Austrian Dialysis and Transplant Registry to identify ESRD patients. Cox proportional hazards models were applied to calculate hazard ratios (HR) for all-cause ESRD as well as for cause-specific ESRD due to the following primary renal diseases: autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), vascular nephropathy (VN), diabetic nephropathy (DN) and other diseases (OD). Results During a mean follow-up of 17.5 years 403 participants developed ESRD (ADPKD 36, VN 97, DN 86, and OD 184). All parameters except TG and GGT were significantly associated with all-cause ESRD risk. Particular cause-specific ESRD risk factor patterns were found: for ADPKD increased risk from hypertension (HR 11.55); for VN from smoking (HR 1.81), hypertension (HR 2.37), TG (≥5.70 vs. <1.17 mmol/L: HR 9.27); for DN from smoking (HR 1.77), BMI (≥30 vs. 18.5–24.9 kg/m2: HR 7.55), FBG (≥6.94 vs. <5.55 mmol/L: HR 7.67), hypertension (HR 1.08), TG (≥5.70 vs. <1.17 mmol/L: HR 2.02), GGT (HR 2.14); and for OD from hypertension (HR 2.29), TG (≥5.70 vs. <1.17 mmol/L: HR 6.99) and TC (≥6.22 vs. <5.18 mmol/L: HR 1.56). Conclusions Particular anthropometric and metabolic ESRD risk factors differ in importance depending on the primary renal disease. This needs to be considered for future preventive and therapeutic strategies addressing cause-specific ESRD. PMID:27537361

  8. The menstrual disorder of teenagers (MDOT) study: determining typical menstrual patterns and menstrual disturbance in a large population-based study of Australian teenagers.

    PubMed

    Parker, M A; Sneddon, A E; Arbon, P

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to: (1) establish the typical experience of menstruation for senior high school girls and (2) determine how many experience considerable menstrual disturbance that could require further investigation and management of underlying pathology. Cross-sectional study. Senior High Schools in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT), Australia. A total of 1051 girls aged between 15 and 19 years. Data based on a quantitative survey. Self-reports of menstrual bleeding patterns, typical and atypical symptoms and morbidities. Typical menstruation in adolescence includes pain (93%), cramping (71%), premenstrual symptoms (96%) and mood disturbance (73%). Highly significant associations were found between increasing severity of menstrual pain, number of menstrual-related symptoms, interference with life activities and school absence. These associations indicate that approximately 25% of the sample had marked menstrual disturbance: 21% experienced severe pain; 26% school absence; 26% suffering five or more symptoms; > or =24% reporting moderate to high interference with four out of nine life activities. Approximately 10% reported atypical symptoms associated with menstruation. Diagnosis of menstrual pathology in the sample was low, even though 33% had seen a GP and 9% had been referred to a specialist. Menstrual pain and symptoms are common in teenagers. Girls indicating moderate to severe pain in association with a high number of menstrual symptoms, school absence and interference with life activities should be effectively managed to minimise menstrual morbidity. Those girls who do not respond to medical management should be considered for further investigation for possible underlying pathology, such as endometriosis.

  9. Methods and feasibility of collecting occupational data for a large population-based cohort study in the United States: the reasons for geographic and racial differences in stroke study.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Leslie A; Pulley, LeaVonne; Hein, Misty J; Howard, Virginia J

    2014-02-10

    Coronary heart disease and stroke are major contributors to preventable mortality. Evidence links work conditions to these diseases; however, occupational data are perceived to be difficult to collect for large population-based cohorts. We report methodological details and the feasibility of conducting an occupational ancillary study for a large U.S. prospective cohort being followed longitudinally for cardiovascular disease and stroke. Current and historical occupational information were collected from active participants of the REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study. A survey was designed to gather quality occupational data among this national cohort of black and white men and women aged 45 years and older (enrolled 2003-2007). Trained staff conducted Computer-Assisted Telephone Interviews (CATI). After a brief pilot period, interviewers received additional training in the collection of narrative industry and occupation data before administering the survey to remaining cohort members. Trained coders used a computer-assisted coding system to assign U.S. Census codes for industry and occupation. All data were double coded; discrepant codes were independently resolved. Over a 2-year period, 17,648 participants provided consent and completed the occupational survey (87% response rate). A total of 20,427 jobs were assigned Census codes. Inter-rater reliability was 80% for industry and 74% for occupation. Less than 0.5% of the industry and occupation data were uncodable, compared with 12% during the pilot period. Concordance between the current and longest-held jobs was moderately high. The median time to collect employment status plus narrative and descriptive job information by CATI was 1.6 to 2.3 minutes per job. Median time to assign Census codes was 1.3 minutes per rater. The feasibility of conducting high-quality occupational data collection and coding for a large heterogeneous population-based sample was demonstrated. We found

  10. Methods and feasibility of collecting occupational data for a large population-based cohort study in the United States: the reasons for geographic and racial differences in stroke study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Coronary heart disease and stroke are major contributors to preventable mortality. Evidence links work conditions to these diseases; however, occupational data are perceived to be difficult to collect for large population-based cohorts. We report methodological details and the feasibility of conducting an occupational ancillary study for a large U.S. prospective cohort being followed longitudinally for cardiovascular disease and stroke. Methods Current and historical occupational information were collected from active participants of the REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study. A survey was designed to gather quality occupational data among this national cohort of black and white men and women aged 45 years and older (enrolled 2003–2007). Trained staff conducted Computer-Assisted Telephone Interviews (CATI). After a brief pilot period, interviewers received additional training in the collection of narrative industry and occupation data before administering the survey to remaining cohort members. Trained coders used a computer-assisted coding system to assign U.S. Census codes for industry and occupation. All data were double coded; discrepant codes were independently resolved. Results Over a 2-year period, 17,648 participants provided consent and completed the occupational survey (87% response rate). A total of 20,427 jobs were assigned Census codes. Inter-rater reliability was 80% for industry and 74% for occupation. Less than 0.5% of the industry and occupation data were uncodable, compared with 12% during the pilot period. Concordance between the current and longest-held jobs was moderately high. The median time to collect employment status plus narrative and descriptive job information by CATI was 1.6 to 2.3 minutes per job. Median time to assign Census codes was 1.3 minutes per rater. Conclusions The feasibility of conducting high-quality occupational data collection and coding for a large heterogeneous

  11. A multi-stage approach to maximizing geocoding success in a large population-based cohort study through automated and interactive processes.

    PubMed

    Sonderman, Jennifer S; Mumma, Michael T; Cohen, Sarah S; Cope, Elizabeth L; Blot, William J; Signorello, Lisa B

    2012-05-01

    To enable spatial analyses within a large, prospective cohort study of nearly 86,000 adults enrolled in a 12-state area in the southeastern United States of America from 2002-2009, a multi-stage geocoding protocol was developed to efficiently maximize the proportion of participants assigned an address level geographic coordinate. Addresses were parsed, cleaned and standardized before applying a combination of automated and interactive geocoding tools. Our full protocol increased the non-Post Office (PO) Box match rate from 74.5% to 97.6%. Overall, we geocoded 99.96% of participant addresses, with only 5.2% at the ZIP code centroid level (2.8% PO Box and 2.3% non-PO Box addresses). One key to reducing the need for interactive geocoding was the use of multiple base maps. Still, addresses in areas with population density <44 persons/km2 were much more likely to require resource-intensive interactive geocoding than those in areas with >920 persons/km2 (odds ratio (OR) = 5.24; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 4.23, 6.49), as were addresses collected from participants during in-person interviews compared with mailed questionnaires (OR = 1.83; 95% CI = 1.59, 2.11). This study demonstrates that population density and address ascertainment method can influence automated geocoding results and that high success in address level geocoding is achievable for large-scale studies covering wide geographical areas.

  12. A multi-stage approach to maximizing geocoding success in a large population-based cohort study through automated and interactive processes

    PubMed Central

    Sonderman, Jennifer S.; Mumma, Michael T.; Cohen, Sarah S.; Cope, Elizabeth L.; Blot, William J.; Signorello, Lisa B.

    2013-01-01

    To enable spatial analyses within a large, prospective cohort study of nearly 86,000 adults enrolled in a 12-state area in the southeastern United States of America from 2002–2009, a multi-stage geocoding protocol was developed to efficiently maximize the proportion of participants assigned an address level geographic coordinate. Addresses were parsed, cleaned and standardized before applying a combination of automated and interactive geocoding tools. Our full protocol increased the non-Post Office (PO) Box match rate from 74.5% to 97.6%. Overall, we geocoded 99.96% of participant addresses, with only 5.2% at the ZIP code centroid level (2.8% PO Box and 2.3% non-PO Box addresses). One key to reducing the need for interactive geocoding was the use of multiple base maps. Still, addresses in areas with population density <44 persons/km2 were much more likely to require resource-intensive interactive geocoding than those in areas with >920 persons/km2 (odds ratio (OR) = 5.24; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 4.23, 6.49), as were addresses collected from participants during in-person interviews compared with mailed questionnaires (OR = 1.83; 95% CI = 1.59, 2.11). This study demonstrates that population density and address ascertainment method can influence automated geocoding results and that high success in address level geocoding is achievable for large-scale studies covering wide geographical areas. PMID:22639129

  13. Uncertainty induced by chest wall thickness assessment methods on lung activity estimation for plutonium and americium: a large population-based study.

    PubMed

    Broggio, D; Lechaftois, X; Franck, D

    2015-03-01

    In vivo lung counting aims at assessing the retained activity in the lungs. The calibration factor relating the measured counts to the worker's specific retained lung activity can be obtained by several means and strongly depends on the chest wall thickness. Here we compare, for 374 male nuclear workers, the activity assessed with a reference protocol, where the material equivalent chest wall thickness is known from ultrasound measurements, with two other protocols. The counting system is an array of four germanium detectors.It is found that non site-specific equations for the assessment of the chest wall thickness induce large biases in the assessment of activity. For plutonium isotopes or (241)Am the proportion of workers for whom the retained activity is within ± 10% of the reference one is smaller than 10%.The use of site-specific equations raises this proportion to 20% and 58% for plutonium and (241)Am, respectively.Finally, for the studied population, when site-specific equations are used for the chest wall thickness, the standard uncertainties for the lung activity are 42% and 12.5%, for plutonium and (241)Am, respectively. Due to the relatively large size of the studied population, these values are a relatively robust estimate of the uncertainties due to the assessment of the chest wall thickness for the current practice at this site.

  14. Haemangiomas and Associated Congenital Malformations in a Large Population-Based Sample of Infants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    Naval Health Research Center Haemangiomas and Associated Congenital Malformations in A Large Population-based Sample of Infants A. T...unlimited. Naval Health Research Center 140 Sylvester Road San Diego, California 92106 Haemangiomas and associated congenital malformations in a...Alcaraz JE, Smith TC. Haemangio- mas and associated congenital malformations in a large population-based sample of infants. Paediatric and Perinatal

  15. Genetic variants determining survival and fertility in an adverse African environment: a population-based large-scale candidate gene association study

    PubMed Central

    Koopman, Jacob J.E.; Pijpe, Jeroen; Böhringer, Stefan; van Bodegom, David; Eriksson, Ulrika K.; Sanchez-Faddeev, Hernando; Ziem, Juventus B.; Zwaan, Bas; Slagboom, P. Eline; de Knijff, Peter; Westendorp, Rudi G.J.

    2016-01-01

    Human survival probability and fertility decline strongly with age. These life history traits have been shaped by evolution. However, research has failed to uncover a consistent genetic determination of variation in survival and fertility. As an explanation, such genetic determinants have been selected in adverse environments, in which humans have lived during most of their history, but are almost exclusively studied in populations in modern affluent environments. Here, we present a large-scale candidate gene association study in a rural African population living in an adverse environment. In 4387 individuals, we studied 4052 SNPs in 148 genes that have previously been identified as possible determinants of survival or fertility in animals or humans. We studied their associations with survival comparing newborns, middle-age adults, and old individuals. In women, we assessed their associations with reported and observed numbers of children. We found no statistically significant associations of these SNPs with survival between the three age groups nor with women's reported and observed fertility. Population stratification was unlikely to explain these results. Apart from a lack of power, we hypothesise that genetic heterogeneity of complex phenotypes and gene-environment interactions prevent the identification of genetic variants explaining variation in survival and fertility in humans. PMID:27356285

  16. Subdural haemorrhages in infants: population based study

    PubMed Central

    Jayawant, S; Rawlinson, A; Gibbon, F; Price, J; Schulte, J; Sharples, P; Sibert, J R; Kemp, A M

    1998-01-01

    Objectives To identify the incidence, clinical outcome, and associated factors of subdural haemorrhage in children under 2 years of age, and to determine how such cases were investigated and how many were due to child abuse. Design Population based case series. Setting South Wales and south west England. Subjects Children under 2 years of age who had a subdural haemorrhage. We excluded neonates who developed subdural haemorrhage during their stay on a neonatal unit and infants who developed a subdural haemorrhage after infection or neurosurgical intervention. Main outcome measures Incidence and clinical outcome of subdural haemorrhage in infants, the number of cases caused by child abuse, the investigations such children received, and associated risk factors. Results Thirty three children (23 boys and 10 girls) were identified with subdural haemorrhage. The incidence was 12.8/100 000 children/year (95% confidence interval 5.4 to 20.2). Twenty eight cases (85%) were under 1 year of age. The incidence of subdural haemorrhage in children under 1 year of age was 21.0/100 000 children/year and was therefore higher than in the older children. The clinical outcome was poor: nine infants died and 15 had profound disability. Only 22 infants had the basic investigations of a full blood count, coagulation screen, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, skeletal survey or bone scan, and ophthalmological examination. In retrospect, 27 cases (82%) were highly suggestive of abuse. Conclusion Subdural haemorrhage is common in infancy and carries a poor prognosis; three quarters of such infants die or have profound disability. Most cases are due to child abuse, but in a few the cause is unknown. Some children with subdural haemorrhage do not undergo appropriate investigations. We believe the clinical investigation of such children should include a full multidisciplinary social assessment, an ophthalmic examination, a skeletal survey supplemented with a bone scan or a

  17. Maternal Continuing Folic Acid Supplementation after the First Trimester of Pregnancy Increased the Risk of Large-for-Gestational-Age Birth: A Population-Based Birth Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sufang; Ge, Xing; Zhu, Beibei; Xuan, Yujie; Huang, Kun; Rutayisire, Erigene; Mao, Leijing; Huang, Sanhuan; Yan, Shuangqin; Tao, Fangbiao

    2016-01-01

    Supplementation with folic acid (FA) was proven to prevent neural tube defects (NTDs) and was recommended worldwide before and during early pregnancy. However, much less is known regarding the role of FA after the 12th gestational week (GW). This study aimed to investigate the related effects of continued FA supplementation after the first trimester of pregnancy on fetal growth. The study subjects came from the Ma’anshan-Anhui Birth Cohort Study (MABC) that recruited 3474 pregnant women from the city of Ma’anshan in Anhui Province in China during the period of May 2013 to September 2014. The information on use of vitamin and mineral supplements was recorded in different periods (the first/second/third trimester of pregnancy). Small-for-gestational-age (SGA) births were live-born infants that were <10th percentile of birth weight, and large-for-gestational-age (LGA) births were live-born infants that were ≥90th percentile of birth weight according to nomograms based on gender and gestational age from the latest standards. We used multivariable logistic regression to evaluate the effects of FA supplement consumption in the second/third trimester of pregnancy on the risk of LGA and SGA. In addition, propensity score analysis was also performed to examine the effects. In this prospective birth cohort study conducted in Chinese women who had taken FA in the first trimester of pregnancy, we found that continued FA supplementation with 400 micrograms/day in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy significantly increased the risk of LGA (RR = 1.98 (1.29, 3.04)). This relation was strong or monotonic after adjusting for maternal age, newborn’s gender, maternal pre-pregnancy BMI, maternal education level, smoking, alcohol consumption and calcium supplementation. We did not observe that continuing FA supplementation after the first trimester of pregnancy remarkably decreased the risk of SGA. The propensity score analysis showed similar results. To confirm these

  18. Social capital in relation to depression, musculoskeletal pain, and psychosomatic symptoms: a cross-sectional study of a large population-based cohort of Swedish adolescents

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Social capital has lately received much attention in health research. The present study investigated whether two measures of subjective social capital were related to psychosomatic symptoms, musculoskeletal pain, and depression in a large population of Swedish adolescents. Methods A total of 7757 13-18 year old students anonymously completed the Survey of Adolescent Life in Vestmanland 2008 which included questions on sociodemographic background, neighbourhood social capital, general social trust, and ill health. Results Low neighbourhood social capital and low general social trust were associated with higher rates of psychosomatic symptoms, musculoskeletal pain, and depression. Individuals with low general social trust had more than three times increased odds of being depressed, three times increased odds of having many psychosomatic symptoms, and double the odds of having many symptoms of musculoskeletal pain. Conclusions The findings make an important contribution to the social capital - health debate by demonstrating relations between social capital factors and self-reported ill health in a young population. PMID:21092130

  19. First Definition of Reference Intervals of Liver Function Tests in China: A Large-Population-Based Multi-Center Study about Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chuanbao; Guo, Wei; Huang, Hengjian; Ma, Yueyun; Zhuang, Junhua; Zhang, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Background Reference intervals of Liver function tests are very important for the screening, diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of liver diseases. We aim to establish common reference intervals of liver function tests specifically for the Chinese adult population. Methods A total of 3210 individuals (20–79 years) were enrolled in six representative geographical regions in China. Analytes of ALT, AST, GGT, ALP, total protein, albumin and total bilirubin were measured using three analytical systems mainly used in China. The newly established reference intervals were based on the results of traceability or multiple systems, and then validated in 21 large hospitals located nationwide qualified by the National External Quality Assessment (EQA) of China. Results We had been established reference intervals of the seven liver function tests for the Chinese adult population and found there were apparent variances of reference values for the variables for partitioning analysis such as gender(ALT, GGT, total bilirubin), age(ALP, albumin) and region(total protein). More than 86% of the 21 laboratories passed the validation in all subgroup of reference intervals and overall about 95.3% to 98.8% of the 1220 validation results fell within the range of the new reference interval for all liver function tests. In comparison with the currently recommended reference intervals in China, the single side observed proportions of out of range of reference values from our study for most of the tests deviated significantly from the nominal 2.5% such as total bilirubin (15.2%), ALP (0.2%), albumin (0.0%). Most of reference intervals in our study were obviously different from that of other races. Conclusion These used reference intervals are no longer applicable for the current Chinese population. We have established common reference intervals of liver function tests that are defined specifically for Chinese population and can be universally used among EQA-approved laboratories located all

  20. Experience with multiple control groups in a large population-based case-control study on genetic and environmental risk factors.

    PubMed

    Pomp, E R; Van Stralen, K J; Le Cessie, S; Vandenbroucke, J P; Rosendaal, F R; Doggen, C J M

    2010-07-01

    We discuss the analytic and practical considerations in a large case-control study that had two control groups; the first control group consisting of partners of patients and the second obtained by random digit dialling (RDD). As an example of the evaluation of a general lifestyle factor, we present body mass index (BMI). Both control groups had lower BMIs than the patients. The distribution in the partner controls was closer to that of the patients, likely due to similar lifestyles. A statistical approach was used to pool the results of both analyses, wherein partners were analyzed with a matched analysis, while RDDs were analyzed without matching. Even with a matched analysis, the odds ratio with partner controls remained closer to unity than with RDD controls, which is probably due to unmeasured confounders in the comparison with the random controls as well as intermediary factors. However, when studying injuries as a risk factor, the odds ratio remained higher with partner control subjects than with RRD control subjects, even after taking the matching into account. Finally we used factor V Leiden as an example of a genetic risk factor. The frequencies of factor V Leiden were identical in both control groups, indicating that for the analyses of this genetic risk factor the two control groups could be combined in a single unmatched analysis. In conclusion, the effect measures with the two control groups were in the same direction, and of the same order of magnitude. Moreover, it was not always the same control group that produced the higher or lower estimates, and a matched analysis did not remedy the differences. Our experience with the intricacies of dealing with two control groups may be useful to others when thinking about an optimal research design or the best statistical approach.

  1. Experience with multiple control groups in a large population-based case–control study on genetic and environmental risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Pomp, E. R.; Van Stralen, K. J.; Le Cessie, S.; Vandenbroucke, J. P.; Doggen, C. J. M.

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the analytic and practical considerations in a large case–control study that had two control groups; the first control group consisting of partners of patients and the second obtained by random digit dialling (RDD). As an example of the evaluation of a general lifestyle factor, we present body mass index (BMI). Both control groups had lower BMIs than the patients. The distribution in the partner controls was closer to that of the patients, likely due to similar lifestyles. A statistical approach was used to pool the results of both analyses, wherein partners were analyzed with a matched analysis, while RDDs were analyzed without matching. Even with a matched analysis, the odds ratio with partner controls remained closer to unity than with RDD controls, which is probably due to unmeasured confounders in the comparison with the random controls as well as intermediary factors. However, when studying injuries as a risk factor, the odds ratio remained higher with partner control subjects than with RRD control subjects, even after taking the matching into account. Finally we used factor V Leiden as an example of a genetic risk factor. The frequencies of factor V Leiden were identical in both control groups, indicating that for the analyses of this genetic risk factor the two control groups could be combined in a single unmatched analysis. In conclusion, the effect measures with the two control groups were in the same direction, and of the same order of magnitude. Moreover, it was not always the same control group that produced the higher or lower estimates, and a matched analysis did not remedy the differences. Our experience with the intricacies of dealing with two control groups may be useful to others when thinking about an optimal research design or the best statistical approach. PMID:20549310

  2. Genetic and environmental contributions to the association between attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and alcohol dependence in adulthood: A large population-based twin study.

    PubMed

    Capusan, Andrea J; Bendtsen, Preben; Marteinsdottir, Ina; Kuja-Halkola, Ralf; Larsson, Henrik

    2015-09-01

    Previous research indicates that attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) frequently co-occurs with alcohol dependence; however, the extent to which shared genetic risk factors underpin this association remains unclear. The aim of this study is to investigate the relative importance of genetic, shared, and nonshared environmental factors for the overlap between ADHD and alcohol dependence in adults. Almost 18,000 adult twins aged 20-45 years, from more than 12,000 twin pairs (5,420 complete pairs), from the population-representative Swedish Twin Registry, were included. Self-ratings were used to assess symptoms of ADHD and alcohol dependence. Twin analysis was used to determine the role of additive genetic (A), shared (C), and nonshared environmental (E) factors. As a result, we found a significant association between ADHD and alcohol dependence (odds ratio 3.58; 95% confidence interval, 2.85-4.49). Twin analysis suggested that shared genetic risk factors explained 64% of the overlap between ADHD and alcohol dependence. Nonshared environmental factors accounted for the remaining 36%, whereas the contribution of shared environmental factors was minimal. We found no support for statistically significant sex differences in the overlap between ADHD and alcohol dependence. In conclusion the overlap between ADHD and alcohol dependence in adulthood was largely explained by shared genetic risk factors. This is an important step toward understanding the underlying nature of the risk of alcohol dependence in patients with ADHD and suggests that individuals with ADHD and their family members are important targets for alcohol prevention and treatment. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Predictors of Cerebral Palsy in Very Preterm Infants: The EPIPAGE Prospective Population-Based Cohort Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaino, Ghada; Khoshnood, Babak; Kaminski, Monique; Pierrat, Veronique; Marret, Stephane; Matis, Jacqueline; Ledesert, Bernard; Thiriez, Gerard; Fresson, Jeanne; Roze, Jean-Christophe; Zupan-Simunek, Veronique; Arnaud, Catherine; Burguet, Antoine; Larroque, Beatrice; Breart, Gerard; Ancel, Pierre-Yves

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the independent role of cerebral lesions on ultrasound scan, and several other neonatal and obstetric factors, as potential predictors of cerebral palsy (CP) in a large population-based cohort of very preterm infants. Method: As part of EPIPAGE, a population-based prospective cohort study, perinatal data…

  4. Predictors of Cerebral Palsy in Very Preterm Infants: The EPIPAGE Prospective Population-Based Cohort Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaino, Ghada; Khoshnood, Babak; Kaminski, Monique; Pierrat, Veronique; Marret, Stephane; Matis, Jacqueline; Ledesert, Bernard; Thiriez, Gerard; Fresson, Jeanne; Roze, Jean-Christophe; Zupan-Simunek, Veronique; Arnaud, Catherine; Burguet, Antoine; Larroque, Beatrice; Breart, Gerard; Ancel, Pierre-Yves

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the independent role of cerebral lesions on ultrasound scan, and several other neonatal and obstetric factors, as potential predictors of cerebral palsy (CP) in a large population-based cohort of very preterm infants. Method: As part of EPIPAGE, a population-based prospective cohort study, perinatal data…

  5. Ethnic differences in maternal dietary patterns are largely explained by socio-economic score and integration score: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Christine; Sletner, Line; Jenum, Anne K.; Mørkrid, Kjersti; Andersen, Lene F.; Birkeland, Kåre I.; Mosdøl, Annhild

    2013-01-01

    Background The impact of socio-economic position and integration level on the observed ethnic differences in dietary habits has received little attention. Objectives To identify and describe dietary patterns in a multi-ethnic population of pregnant women, to explore ethnic differences in odds ratio (OR) for belonging to a dietary pattern, when adjusted for socio-economic status and integration level and to examine whether the dietary patterns were reflected in levels of biomarkers related to obesity and hyperglycaemia. Design This cross-sectional study was a part of the STORK Groruddalen study. In total, 757 pregnant women, of whom 59% were of a non-Western origin, completed a food frequency questionnaire in gestational week 28±2. Dietary patterns were extracted through cluster analysis using Ward's method. Results Four robust clusters were identified where cluster 4 was considered the healthier dietary pattern and cluster 1 the least healthy. All non-European women as compared to Europeans had higher OR for belonging to the unhealthier dietary patterns 1–3 vs. cluster 4. Women from the Middle East and Africa had the highest OR, 21.5 (95% CI 10.6–43.7), of falling into cluster 1 vs. 4 as compared to Europeans. The ORs decreased substantially after adjusting for socio-economic score and integration score. A non-European ethnic origin, low socio-economic and integration scores, conduced higher OR for belonging to clusters 1, 2, and 3 as compared to cluster 4. Significant differences in fasting and 2-h glucose, fasting insulin, glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c), insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and total cholesterol were observed across the dietary patterns. After adjusting for ethnicity, differences in fasting insulin (p=0.015) and HOMA-IR (p=0.040) across clusters remained significant, despite low power. Conclusion The results indicate that socio-economic and integration level may explain a large proportion of the ethnic differences in dietary patterns. PMID

  6. Prevalence, Age Profile, and Associated Risk Factors for Hymenolepis nana Infection in a Large Population-Based Study in Northern Peru.

    PubMed

    Vilchez Barreto, Percy M; Gamboa, Ricardo; Santivañez, Saul; O'Neal, Seth E; Muro, Claudio; Lescano, Andrés G; Moyano, Luz-Maria; Gonzálvez, Guillermo; García, Hector H; For The Cysticercosis Working Group In Perú Cwgp

    2017-08-01

    Hymenolepis nana, the dwarf tapeworm, is a common intestinal infection of children worldwide. We evaluated infection and risk factor data that were previously collected from 14,761 children aged 2-15 years during a large-scale program in northern Peru. We found that 1,124 of 14,761 children (7.61%) had H. nana infection, a likely underestimate given that only a single stool sample was examined by microscopy for diagnosis. The strongest association with infection was lack of adequate water (adjusted prevalence ratio [aPR] 2.22, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.82-2.48) and sanitation infrastructure in the house (aPR 1.94, 95% CI 1.64-2.29). One quarter of those tested did not have a bathroom or latrine at home, which doubled their likelihood of infection. Similarly, one quarter did not have piped public water to the house, which also increased the likelihood of infection. Continued efforts to improve access to basic water and sanitation services will likely reduce the burden of infection in children for this and other intestinal infections.

  7. Health Impact of U.S. Military Service in a Large Population-based Military Cohort: Findings of the Millennium Cohort Study, 2001-2008

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    outlines how findings from the first 7 years of the Millennium Cohort Study have helped to address health concerns related to military service...standard health assessment instruments embedded in the study questionnaire found high inter- nal consistency for 14 of 16 health components [ 7 ]. Only...moderate stability was found for more dynamic variables [ 7 ]. Deployment and Deployment-Related Exposures A major objective when designing the

  8. Health impact of US military service in a large population-based military cohort: findings of the Millennium Cohort Study, 2001-2008

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Combat-intense, lengthy, and multiple deployments in Iraq and Afghanistan have characterized the new millennium. The US military's all-volunteer force has never been better trained and technologically equipped to engage enemy combatants in multiple theaters of operations. Nonetheless, concerns over potential lasting effects of deployment on long-term health continue to mount and are yet to be elucidated. This report outlines how findings from the first 7 years of the Millennium Cohort Study have helped to address health concerns related to military service including deployments. Methods The Millennium Cohort Study was designed in the late 1990s to address veteran and public concerns for the first time using prospectively collected health and behavioral data. Results Over 150 000 active-duty, reserve, and National Guard personnel from all service branches have enrolled, and more than 70% of the first 2 enrollment panels submitted at least 1 follow-up survey. Approximately half of the Cohort has deployed in support of operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. Conclusion The Millennium Cohort Study is providing prospective data that will guide public health policymakers for years to come by exploring associations between military exposures and important health outcomes. Strategic studies aim to identify, reduce, and prevent adverse health outcomes that may be associated with military service, including those related to deployment. PMID:21281496

  9. Models of population-based analyses for data collected from large extended families.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenyu; Lee, Elisa T; Howard, Barbara V; Fabsitz, Richard R; Devereux, Richard B; MacCluer, Jean W; Laston, Sandra; Comuzzie, Anthony G; Shara, Nawar M; Welty, Thomas K

    2010-12-01

    Large studies of extended families usually collect valuable phenotypic data that may have scientific value for purposes other than testing genetic hypotheses if the families were not selected in a biased manner. These purposes include assessing population-based associations of diseases with risk factors/covariates and estimating population characteristics such as disease prevalence and incidence. Relatedness among participants however, violates the traditional assumption of independent observations in these classic analyses. The commonly used adjustment method for relatedness in population-based analyses is to use marginal models, in which clusters (families) are assumed to be independent (unrelated) with a simple and identical covariance (family) structure such as those called independent, exchangeable and unstructured covariance structures. However, using these simple covariance structures may not be optimally appropriate for outcomes collected from large extended families, and may under- or over-estimate the variances of estimators and thus lead to uncertainty in inferences. Moreover, the assumption that families are unrelated with an identical family structure in a marginal model may not be satisfied for family studies with large extended families. The aim of this paper is to propose models incorporating marginal models approaches with a covariance structure for assessing population-based associations of diseases with their risk factors/covariates and estimating population characteristics for epidemiological studies while adjusting for the complicated relatedness among outcomes (continuous/categorical, normally/non-normally distributed) collected from large extended families. We also discuss theoretical issues of the proposed models and show that the proposed models and covariance structure are appropriate for and capable of achieving the aim.

  10. Awareness levels about breast cancer risk factors, early warning signs, and screening and therapeutic approaches among Iranian adult women: a large population based study using latent class analysis.

    PubMed

    Tazhibi, Mahdi; Feizi, Awat

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality among women throughout the world and in Iran. Lack of awareness and early detection program in developing country is a main reason for escalating the mortality. The present research was conducted to assess the Iranian women's level of knowledge about breast cancer risk factors, early warning signs, and therapeutic and screening approaches, and their correlated determinants. In a cross-sectional study, 2250 women before participating at a community based screening and public educational program in an institute of cancer research in Isfahan, Iran, in 2012 were investigated using a self-administered questionnaire about risk factors, early warning signs, and therapeutic and screening approaches of BC. Latent class regression as a comprehensive statistical method was used for evaluating the level of knowledge and its correlated determinants. Only 33.2%, 31.9%, 26.7%, and 35.8% of study participants had high awareness levels about screening approaches, risk factors, early warning signs and therapeutic modalities of breast cancer, respectively, and majority had poor to moderate knowledge levels. Most effective predictors of high level of awareness were higher educational qualifications, attending in screening and public educational programs, personal problem, and family history of BC, respectively. Results of current study indicated that the levels of awareness among study population about key elements of BC are low. These findings reenforce the continuing need for more BC education through conducting public and professional programs that are intended to raise awareness among younger, single women and those with low educational attainments and without family history.

  11. Awareness Levels about Breast Cancer Risk Factors, Early Warning Signs, and Screening and Therapeutic Approaches among Iranian Adult Women: A large Population Based Study Using Latent Class Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tazhibi, Mahdi

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective. Breast cancer (BC) continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality among women throughout the world and in Iran. Lack of awareness and early detection program in developing country is a main reason for escalating the mortality. The present research was conducted to assess the Iranian women's level of knowledge about breast cancer risk factors, early warning signs, and therapeutic and screening approaches, and their correlated determinants. Methods. In a cross-sectional study, 2250 women before participating at a community based screening and public educational program in an institute of cancer research in Isfahan, Iran, in 2012 were investigated using a self-administered questionnaire about risk factors, early warning signs, and therapeutic and screening approaches of BC. Latent class regression as a comprehensive statistical method was used for evaluating the level of knowledge and its correlated determinants. Results. Only 33.2%, 31.9%, 26.7%, and 35.8% of study participants had high awareness levels about screening approaches, risk factors, early warning signs and therapeutic modalities of breast cancer, respectively, and majority had poor to moderate knowledge levels. Most effective predictors of high level of awareness were higher educational qualifications, attending in screening and public educational programs, personal problem, and family history of BC, respectively. Conclusion. Results of current study indicated that the levels of awareness among study population about key elements of BC are low. These findings reenforce the continuing need for more BC education through conducting public and professional programs that are intended to raise awareness among younger, single women and those with low educational attainments and without family history. PMID:25295257

  12. Risk of bleeding and antibiotic use in patients receiving continuous phenprocoumon therapy. A case-control study nested in a large insurance- and population-based German cohort.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Sascha; Ihle, Peter; Harder, Sebastian; Schubert, Ingrid

    2014-05-05

    There is major concern about coumarins interacting with various drug classes and increasing the risk of overanticoagulation. The aim of the study was to assess bleeding risk in patients with concurrent use of antibiotics and phenprocoumon, the most widely prescribed coumarin in many European countries. We conducted a nested-case-control study within a cohort of 513,338 incident and continuous phenprocoumon users ≥ 18 years of age using claims data of the statutory health insurance company AOK, covering 30% of the German population. Bleeding risk associated with current use of antibiotics for systemic use (antibacterials/antimycotics) was calculated using conditional logistic regression in 13,785 cases with a bleeding event and 55,140 risk-set sampling-matched controls. Bleeding risk associated with any antibacterial use in phenprocoumon users was significantly increased [odds ratio (OR) 2.37, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.20-2.56]. The association was stronger for gastrointestinal than for cerebral bleeding (OR 2.09, 95% CI 1.84-2.38 and OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.03-1.74, respectively) and highest for other/unspecified bleeding (OR 2.92, 95% CI 2.62-3.26). Specific antibiotic classes were strongly associated with bleeding risk, e.g. cotrimoxazole (OR 3.86, 95% CI 3.08-4.84) and fluorquinolones (OR 3.13, 95% CI 2.74-3.59), among those highest for ofloxacin (OR 5.00, 95% CI 3.01-8.32). Combined use of phenprocoumon and antimycotics was not significantly associated with bleeding risk. Risk was not significantly modified by age (pint=0.25) or sex (pint=0.96). The association was stronger the closer the antibiotic exposure was to the bleeding event. Among continuous phenprocoumon users, antibiotics - particularly quinolones and cotrimoxazole - should be prescribed after careful consideration due to an increased bleeding risk. Close monitoring of international normalised ratio levels after prescription is recommended.

  13. Poor sleep quality associated with high risk of hypertension and elevated blood pressure in China: results from a large population-based study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ru-Qing; Qian, Zhengmin; Trevathan, Edwin; Chang, Jen-Jen; Zelicoff, Alan; Hao, Yuan-Tao; Lin, Shao; Dong, Guang-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Little information is available concerning the association between sleep quality and blood pressure (BP) in Chinese individuals. This study evaluated the association between sleep quality, as determined by the Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI), and hypertension in a rural Chinese population. Using a multistage cluster and random sampling method, a representative sample of 9404 adults aged 20-93 years in northeastern China was selected from 2012 to 2013. Sleep quality was assessed by PSQI, and trained observers measured BP. A sleep disorder (SD) was diagnosed for any participant with a score of 6 or greater. Overall, 1218 male participants (25.53%) and 1261 female participants (27.22%) were defined as having SDs. Compared with the normal subjects, participants with hypertension had higher global PSQI scores and subscores in all elements. The odds ratios (ORs) of hypertension, systolic hypertension and diastolic hypertension among participants with SDs were 2.38 (95% confidence interval (CI): 2.13-2.65), 2.52 (95% CI: 2.26-2.80) and 1.93 (95% CI: 1.74-2.14) in contrast to the reference group, respectively. The risk for hypertension in poor sleepers with subscores over 0 in all of the elements was significantly increased, with ORs ranging from 1.16 (95% CI: 1.04-2.30) to 3.88 (95% CI: 1.24-12.16). The global PSQI score and its components were associated with hypertension and high BP.

  14. Establishing a reference interval for serum anti-dsDNA antibody: A large Chinese Han population-based multi-center study

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Chuiwen; Zhang, Shulan; Hu, Chaojun; Li, Ping; Wu, Ziyan; Chen, Si; Li, Jing; Li, Liubing; Zhang, Fengchun; Li, Yongzhe

    2017-01-01

    Background A reference interval (RI) for the circulating concentration of anti-dsDNA antibody is essential for clinicians to interpret laboratory results and make clinical decisions. Therefore, we aimed to establish the RI for anti-dsDNA antibody in the Chinese Han population. Methods This study was designed and carried out in accordance with guideline C28-A3, which is proposed by the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. A total of 2,880 apparently healthy individuals were enrolled using a posteriori sampling. These individuals were recruited from four hospitals, representing the Han populations of north, south, east, and west China. Serum anti-dsDNA antibody levels were measured using the three analytical systems AESKU, EUROIMMUNE, and INOVA, which are the most commonly used systems in China. Individuals were stratified by gender, age, and region, and the RIs were obtained by nonparametric methods. Results Gender-specific RIs for serum anti-dsDNA antibody in the Chinese Han population were established. Conclusion This is the first exploration of the RI for anti-dsDNA antibody in the Chinese Han population. We have established gender-specific RIs for each assay method commonly used in China. PMID:28151970

  15. Associations of prenatal exposure to Ramadan with small stature and thinness in adulthood: results from a large Indonesian population-based study.

    PubMed

    van Ewijk, Reyn J G; Painter, Rebecca C; Roseboom, Tessa J

    2013-04-15

    A growing body of evidence suggests that maternal diet during pregnancy can lead to permanent alterations to the physiology of the fetus. It is unknown whether intermittent maternal fasting during Ramadan has long-term associations with the offspring's body composition. By using data from the third wave of the Indonesian Family Life Survey (2000), we compared the body mass indices (weight (kg)/height (m)(2)) of Muslims who had been in utero during Ramadan with those of Muslims who had not been in utero during Ramadan. Adult Muslims who had been in utero during Ramadan were slightly thinner than Muslims who had not been in utero during Ramadan (adjusted adult body mass index: -0.32, 95% confidence interval: -0.57, -0.06). Those who were conceived during Ramadan also had smaller stature, being on average 0.80 cm shorter than those who were not exposed to Ramadan prenatally. Among non-Muslims, no such associations were found. This study suggests that exposure to Ramadan during pregnancy may have lasting consequences for adult body size of the offspring.

  16. Television viewing and abdominal obesity in women according to smoking status: results from a large cross-sectional population-based study in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cortes, Taísa Rodrigues; Schlussel, Michael Maia; Franco-Sena, Ana Beatriz; Rebelo, Fernanda; Kac, Gilberto

    2013-03-01

    To investigate the associations between television viewing and abdominal obesity (AO) in Brazilian women, according to smoking status. Data of 13,262 adult women (18-49 years) from the 2006's Demographic Health Survey, a cross-sectional household study with complex probabilistic sample and national representativeness, were analyzed. AO, defined as waist circumference ≥ 80.0 cm, was the outcome. Television viewing frequency (≥ 5 times/week, 1-4 times/week, < 1 time/week) was the main exposure variable, and smoking status (yes or no) the main co-variable. Prevalence ratios were estimated using Poisson regression models separately for smokers and non-smokers. A statistically significant interaction term was observed between smoking status and television viewing (p < 0.05). Prevalence of AO among smokers who reported television viewing ≥ 5 times/week amounted to 59.0%, higher than the 35.0% for those with < 1 time/week television viewing (p-value = 0.020). The values for non-smokers were 55.2% and 55.7%, respectively. Smokers with television viewing ≥ 5 times/week were 1.7 times (95% CI: 1.1 - 2.5) more likely to pre-sent AO, compared to those who reported a frequency < 1 time/week. There was no significant association among non-smokers. Television viewing ≥ 5 times/week may increase the prevalence of AO among women who smoke. More detailed information on media use, as hours per day, may offer better estimates.

  17. Gastrointestinal symptoms in NSAID users in an 'average risk population': results of a large population-based study in randomly selected Dutch inhabitants.

    PubMed

    Tielemans, M M; van Rossum, L G M; Eikendal, T; Focks, J J; Laheij, R J F; Jansen, J B M J; van Oijen, M G H

    2014-04-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use is widespread and associated with gastrointestinal symptoms and complications. The aims of this study were to assess (i) gastrointestinal symptoms in users of prescribed and over-the-counter (OTC) NSAIDs and (ii) proton pump inhibitor (PPI) co-prescription rates in NSAID users at increased risk for gastrointestinal complications. Surveys were sent to a randomly selected sample of the adult Dutch general population in December 2008. Questions included demographics, gastrointestinal symptoms, medication use and comorbidity. Main outcome measure was presence of gastrointestinal symptoms. A total of 18,317 surveys were returned (response rate 35%), of which 16,758 surveys were eligible for analysis. Of these, 3233 participants (19%) reported NSAID use. NSAID users more frequently reported gastrointestinal symptoms than persons not using NSAIDs (33% vs. 24%, p < 0.01). Respondents who specified on prescription NSAID use (n = 683) were older, reported more comorbidity, and experienced more gastrointestinal symptoms (41%) compared with OTC users (n = 894, 33%, p < 0.01). This difference was not statistically significant after adjustment for confounders (0.99, 95% CI 0.71-1.37). In respondents with an increased gastrointestinal risk profile, PPI co-prescription rates were 51% for on prescription users and 25% for OTC users. Prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms was high in both prescribed and OTC NSAID users, emphasising the side effects of both types of NSAIDs. PPI co-prescription rates in NSAID users at risk for gastrointestinal complication were low. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Long-term outcome of insulin pump therapy in children with type 1 diabetes assessed in a large population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Stephanie R; Cooper, Matthew N; Jones, Timothy W; Davis, Elizabeth A

    2013-11-01

    We determined the impact of insulin pump therapy on long-term glycaemic control, BMI, rate of severe hypoglycaemia and diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in children. Patients on pump therapy at a single paediatric tertiary hospital were matched to patients treated by injections on the basis of age, duration of diabetes and HbA1c at the time of pump start. HbA1c, anthropometric data, episodes of severe hypoglycaemia and rates of hospitalisation for DKA were collected prospectively. A total of 345 patients on pump therapy were matched to controls on injections. The mean age, duration of diabetes at pump start and length of follow-up were 11.4 (± 3.5), 4.1 (± 3.0) and 3.5 (± 2.5) years, respectively. The mean HbA1c reduction in the pump cohort was 0.6% (6.6 mmol/mol). This improved HbA1c remained significant throughout the 7 years of follow-up. Pump therapy reduced severe hypoglycaemia from 14.7 to 7.2 events per 100 patient-years (p < 0.001). In contrast, severe hypoglycaemia increased in the non-pump cohort over the same period from 6.8 to 10.2 events per 100 patient-years. The rate of hospitalisation for DKA was lower in the pump cohort (2.3 vs 4.7 per 100 patient-years, p = 0.003) over the 1,160 patient-years of follow-up. This is the longest and largest study of insulin pump use in children and demonstrates that pump therapy provides a sustained improvement in glycaemic control, and reductions of severe hypoglycaemia and hospitalisation for DKA compared with a matched cohort using injections.

  19. Incidence of Radiologically Isolated Syndrome: A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Forslin, Y; Granberg, T; Jumah, A Antwan; Shams, S; Aspelin, P; Kristoffersen-Wiberg, M; Martola, J; Fredrikson, S

    2016-06-01

    Incidental MR imaging findings resembling MS in asymptomatic individuals, fulfilling the Okuda criteria, are termed "radiologically isolated syndrome." Those with radiologically isolated syndrome are at high risk of their condition converting to MS. The epidemiology of radiologically isolated syndrome remains largely unknown, and there are no population-based studies, to our knowledge. Our aim was to study the population-based incidence of radiologically isolated syndrome in a high-incidence region for MS and to evaluate the effect on radiologically isolated syndrome incidence when revising the original radiologically isolated syndrome criteria by using the latest radiologic classification for dissemination in space. All 2272 brain MR imaging scans in 1907 persons obtained during 2013 in the Swedish county of Västmanland, with a population of 259,000 inhabitants, were blindly evaluated by a senior radiologist and a senior neuroradiologist. The Okuda criteria for radiologically isolated syndrome were applied by using both the Barkhof and Swanton classifications for dissemination in space. Assessments of clinical data were performed by a radiology resident and a senior neurologist. The cumulative incidence of radiologically isolated syndrome was 2 patients (0.1%), equaling an incidence rate of 0.8 cases per 100,000 person-years, in a region with an incidence rate of MS of 10.2 cases per 100,000 person-years. There was no difference in the radiologically isolated syndrome incidence rate when applying a modified version of the Okuda criteria by using the newer Swanton classification for dissemination in space. Radiologically isolated syndrome is uncommon in a high-incidence region for MS. Adapting the Okuda criteria to use the dissemination in space-Swanton classification may be feasible. Future studies on radiologically isolated syndrome may benefit from a collaborative approach to ensure adequate numbers of participants. © 2016 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  20. Measurement of Adults’ Sedentary Time in Population-Based Studies

    PubMed Central

    Healy, Genevieve N.; Clark, Bronwyn K.; Winkler, Elisabeth A.H.; Gardiner, Paul A.; Brown, Wendy J.; Matthews, Charles E.

    2011-01-01

    Sedentary time (too much sitting) is increasingly being recognized as a distinct health risk behavior. This paper reviews the reliability and validity of self-reported and device-based sedentary time measures and provides recommendations for their use in population-based studies. The focus is on instruments that have been used in free-living, population-based research in adults. Data from the 2003–2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey are utilized to compare the descriptive epidemiology of sedentary time that arises from the use of different sedentary time measures. A key recommendation from this review is that, wherever possible, population-based monitoring of sedentary time should incorporate both self-reported measures (to capture important domain- and behavior-specific sedentary time information) and device-based measures (to measure both total sedentary time and patterns of sedentary time accumulation). PMID:21767730

  1. Association between the candidate susceptibility gene ACVR2A on chromosome 2q22 and pre-eclampsia in a large Norwegian population-based study (the HUNT study).

    PubMed

    Roten, Linda T; Johnson, Matthew P; Forsmo, Siri; Fitzpatrick, Elizabeth; Dyer, Thomas D; Brennecke, Shaun P; Blangero, John; Moses, Eric K; Austgulen, Rigmor

    2009-02-01

    Genome-wide scans in Icelandic, Australian/New Zealand and Finnish pedigrees have provided evidence for maternal susceptibility loci for pre-eclampsia on chromosome 2, although at different positions (Iceland: 2p13 and 2q23, Australia/New Zealand: 2p11-12 and 2q22, Finland: 2p25). In this project, a large population-based (n=65 000) nested case-control study was performed in Norway to further explore the association between positional candidate genes on chromosome 2q and pre-eclampsia, using single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). DNA samples from 1139 cases (women with one or more pre-eclamptic pregnancies) and 2269 controls (women with normal pregnancies) were genotyped using the Applied Biosystems SNPlex high-throughput genotyping assay. In total, 71 SNPs within positional candidate genes at 2q22-23 locus on chromosome 2 were genotyped in each individual. Genotype data were statistically analysed with the sequential oligogenic linkage analysis routines (SOLAR) computer package. Nominal evidence of association was found for six SNPs (rs1014064, rs17742134, rs1424941, rs2161983, rs3768687 and rs3764955) within the activin receptor type 2 gene (ACVR2A) (all P-values <0.05). The non-independence of statistical tests due to linkage disequilibrium between SNPs at a false discovery rate of 5% identifies our four best SNPs (rs1424941, rs1014064, rs2161983 and rs3768687) to remain statistically significant. The fact that populations with different ancestors (Iceland/Norway-Australia/New Zealand) demonstrate a common maternal pre-eclampsia susceptibility locus on chromosome 2q22-23, may suggest a general role of this locus, and possibly the ACVR2A gene, in pre-eclampsia pathogenesis.

  2. Fetal Growth and Childhood Cancer: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Henrik Toft; Grotmol, Tom; Engeland, Anders; Stephansson, Olof; Gissler, Mika; Tretli, Steinar; Troisi, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The etiology of childhood cancers is largely unknown. Studies have suggested that birth characteristics may be associated with risk. Our goal was to evaluate the risk of childhood cancers in relation to fetal growth. METHODS: We conducted a case-control study nested within Nordic birth registries. The study included cancer cases diagnosed in Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden among children born from 1967 to 2010 and up to 10 matched controls per case, totaling 17 698 cases and 172 422 controls. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were derived from conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: Risks of all childhood cancers increased with increasing birth weight (Ptrend ≤ .001). Risks of acute lymphoid leukemia and Wilms tumor were elevated when birth weight was >4000 g and of central nervous system tumors when birth weight was >4500 g. Newborns large for gestational age were at increased risk of Wilms tumor (OR: 2.1 [95% CI: 1.2–3.6]) and connective/soft tissue tumors (OR: 2.1 [95% CI: 1.1–4.4]). In contrast, the risk of acute myeloid leukemia was increased among children born small for gestational age (OR: 1.8 [95% CI: 1.1–3.1]). Children diagnosed with central nervous system tumors at <1 year of age had elevated risk with increasing head circumference (Ptrend < .001). Those with head circumference >39 cm had the highest risk (OR: 4.7 [95% CI: 2.5–8.7]). CONCLUSIONS: In this large, Nordic population-based study, increased risks for several childhood tumors were associated with measures of fetal growth, supporting the hypothesis that tumorigenesis manifesting in childhood is initiated in utero. PMID:24167169

  3. Importance of population-based studies in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Ronnie, George; Ve, Ramesh Sathyamangalam; Velumuri, Lokapavani; Asokan, Rashima; Vijaya, Lingam

    2011-01-01

    In the last decade, there have been reports on the prevalence of glaucoma from the Vellore Eye Survey, Andhra Pradesh Eye Diseases Survey, Aravind Comprehensive Eye Survey, Chennai Glaucoma Study and West Bengal Glaucoma Study. Population-based studies provide important information regarding the prevalence and risk factors for glaucoma. They also highlight regional differences in the prevalence of various types of glaucoma. It is possible to gather important insights regarding the number of persons affected with glaucoma and the proportion with undiagnosed disease. We reviewed the different population-based studies from India and compare their findings. The lacunae in ophthalmic care that can be inferred from these studies are identified and possible reasons and solutions are discussed. We also discuss the clinical relevance of the various findings, and how it reflects on clinical practice in the country. Since India has a significantly high disease burden, we examine the possibility of population-based screening for disease in the Indian context. PMID:21150021

  4. Cardiovascular Disease Risk in a Large, Population-Based Cohort of Breast Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Boekel, Naomi B; Schaapveld, Michael; Gietema, Jourik A; Russell, Nicola S; Poortmans, Philip; Theuws, Jacqueline C M; Schinagl, Dominic A X; Rietveld, Derek H F; Versteegh, Michel I M; Visser, Otto; Rutgers, Emiel J T; Aleman, Berthe M P; van Leeuwen, Flora E

    2016-04-01

    To conduct a large, population-based study on cardiovascular disease (CVD) in breast cancer (BC) survivors treated in 1989 or later. A large, population-based cohort comprising 70,230 surgically treated stage I to III BC patients diagnosed before age 75 years between 1989 and 2005 was linked with population-based registries for CVD. Cardiovascular disease risks were compared with the general population, and within the cohort using competing risk analyses. Compared with the general Dutch population, BC patients had a slightly lower CVD mortality risk (standardized mortality ratio 0.92, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.88-0.97). Only death due to valvular heart disease was more frequent (standardized mortality ratio 1.28, 95% CI 1.08-1.52). Left-sided radiation therapy after mastectomy increased the risk of any cardiovascular event compared with both surgery alone (subdistribution hazard ratio (sHR) 1.23, 95% CI 1.11-1.36) and right-sided radiation therapy (sHR 1.19, 95% CI 1.04-1.36). Radiation-associated risks were found for not only ischemic heart disease, but also for valvular heart disease and congestive heart failure (CHF). Risks were more pronounced in patients aged <50 years at BC diagnosis (sHR 1.48, 95% CI 1.07-2.04 for left- vs right-sided radiation therapy after mastectomy). Left- versus right-sided radiation therapy after wide local excision did not increase the risk of all CVD combined, yet an increased ischemic heart disease risk was found (sHR 1.14, 95% CI 1.01-1.28). Analyses including detailed radiation therapy information showed an increased CVD risk for left-sided chest wall irradiation alone, left-sided breast irradiation alone, and internal mammary chain field irradiation, all compared with right-sided breast irradiation alone. Compared with patients not treated with chemotherapy, chemotherapy used ≥1997 (ie, anthracyline-based chemotherapy) increased the risk of CHF (sHR 1.35, 95% CI 1.00-1.83). Radiation therapy regimens used in BC treatment

  5. Extensive alterations of the whole-blood transcriptome are associated with body mass index: results of an mRNA profiling study involving two large population-based cohorts.

    PubMed

    Homuth, Georg; Wahl, Simone; Müller, Christian; Schurmann, Claudia; Mäder, Ulrike; Blankenberg, Stefan; Carstensen, Maren; Dörr, Marcus; Endlich, Karlhans; Englbrecht, Christian; Felix, Stephan B; Gieger, Christian; Grallert, Harald; Herder, Christian; Illig, Thomas; Kruppa, Jochen; Marzi, Carola S; Mayerle, Julia; Meitinger, Thomas; Metspalu, Andres; Nauck, Matthias; Peters, Annette; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Reinmaa, Eva; Rettig, Rainer; Roden, Michael; Schillert, Arne; Schramm, Katharina; Steil, Leif; Strauch, Konstantin; Teumer, Alexander; Völzke, Henry; Wallaschofski, Henri; Wild, Philipp S; Ziegler, Andreas; Völker, Uwe; Prokisch, Holger; Zeller, Tanja

    2015-10-15

    Obesity, defined as pathologically increased body mass index (BMI), is strongly related to an increased risk for numerous common cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. It is particularly associated with insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, and systemic oxidative stress and represents the most important risk factor for type 2 diabetes (T2D). However, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying these associations are still not completely understood. Therefore, in order to identify potentially disease-relevant BMI-associated gene expression signatures, a transcriptome-wide association study (TWAS) on BMI was performed. Whole-blood mRNA levels determined by array-based transcriptional profiling were correlated with BMI in two large independent population-based cohort studies (KORA F4 and SHIP-TREND) comprising a total of 1977 individuals. Extensive alterations of the whole-blood transcriptome were associated with BMI: More than 3500 transcripts exhibited significant positive or negative BMI-correlation. Three major whole-blood gene expression signatures associated with increased BMI were identified. The three signatures suggested: i) a ratio shift from mature erythrocytes towards reticulocytes, ii) decreased expression of several genes essentially involved in the transmission and amplification of the insulin signal, and iii) reduced expression of several key genes involved in the defence against reactive oxygen species (ROS). Whereas the first signature confirms published results, the other two provide possible mechanistic explanations for well-known epidemiological findings under conditions of increased BMI, namely attenuated insulin signaling and increased oxidative stress. The putatively causative BMI-dependent down-regulation of the expression of numerous genes on the mRNA level represents a novel finding. BMI-associated negative transcriptional regulation of insulin signaling and oxidative stress management provide new insights into the pathogenesis of metabolic

  6. Metabolic syndrome in relation to Barrett’s esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma: results from a large population-based case-control study in the Clinical Practice Research Datalink

    PubMed Central

    Drahos, Jennifer; Li, Lin; Jick, Susan S.; Cook, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) causes local chronic inflammation that increases risks of Barrett’s esophagus (BE) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA), yet symptomatic GERD is absent in approximately half of all such patients. Obesity exacerbates GERD and is also a component of metabolic syndrome (MetS). We evaluated the hypothesis that MetS is a GERD-independent mechanism by which obesity is associated with increased risks of BE and EA using data from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink. BE cases (n=10,215) and EA cases (n=592) were each individually matched to five population controls based on age, sex, and general practice. MetS was defined as occurrence of at least three of the following: obesity, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and high cholesterol. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using conditional logistic regression. MetS was marginally associated with BE (OR=1.12, 95%CI 1.00–1.25). Similar effects were found for the individual component factors of obesity, hypertension, and high cholesterol. History of GERD modified the association (p-effect modification < 1E 5), with the MetS-BE association confined to patients without a history of GERD (OR=1.33, 95%CI 1.12–1.58). No association between MetS and risk of EA was detected in the main or stratified analyses. In this large population-based case-control study, individuals with MetS had a marginally increased risk of BE in the absence of GERD. The systemic inflammatory state (MetS) may represent a reflux-independent inflammatory pathway that increases the risk of BE. MetS did not increase risk of EA in this study population. PMID:26972225

  7. Population based screening for chronic kidney disease: cost effectiveness study

    PubMed Central

    Hemmelgarn, Brenda; Tonelli, Marcello; Au, Flora; Chiasson, T Carter; Dong, James; Klarenbach, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine the cost effectiveness of one-off population based screening for chronic kidney disease based on estimated glomerular filtration rate. Design Cost utility analysis of screening with estimated glomerular filtration rate alone compared with no screening (with allowance for incidental finding of cases of chronic kidney disease). Analyses were stratified by age, diabetes, and the presence or absence of proteinuria. Scenario and sensitivity analyses, including probabilistic sensitivity analysis, were performed. Costs were estimated in all adults and in subgroups defined by age, diabetes, and hypertension. Setting Publicly funded Canadian healthcare system. Participants Large population based laboratory cohort used to estimate mortality rates and incidence of end stage renal disease for patients with chronic kidney disease over a five year follow-up period. Patients had not previously undergone assessment of glomerular filtration rate. Main outcome measures Lifetime costs, end stage renal disease, quality adjusted life years (QALYs) gained, and incremental cost per QALY gained. Results Compared with no screening, population based screening for chronic kidney disease was associated with an incremental cost of $C463 (Canadian dollars in 2009; equivalent to about £275, €308, US $382) and a gain of 0.0044 QALYs per patient overall, representing a cost per QALY gained of $C104 900. In a cohort of 100 000 people, screening for chronic kidney disease would be expected to reduce the number of people who develop end stage renal disease over their lifetime from 675 to 657. In subgroups of people with and without diabetes, the cost per QALY gained was $C22 600 and $C572 000, respectively. In a cohort of 100 000 people with diabetes, screening would be expected to reduce the number of people who develop end stage renal disease over their lifetime from 1796 to 1741. In people without diabetes with and without hypertension, the cost per QALY gained

  8. Who Should Be Targeted for the Prevention of Birth Defects? A Latent Class Analysis Based on a Large, Population-Based, Cross-Sectional Study in Shaanxi Province, Western China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wenfang; Li, Danyang; Yang, Xue; Liu, Danli; Zhang, Min; Yan, Hong; Zeng, Lingxia

    2016-01-01

    Background The wide range and complex combinations of factors that cause birth defects impede the development of primary prevention strategies targeted at high-risk subpopulations. Methods Latent class analysis (LCA) was conducted to identify mutually exclusive profiles of factors associated with birth defects among women between 15 and 49 years of age using data from a large, population-based, cross-sectional study conducted in Shaanxi Province, western China, between August and October, 2013. The odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of associated factors and the latent profiles of indicators of birth defects and congenital heart defects were computed using a logistic regression model. Results Five discrete subpopulations of participants were identified as follows: No folic acid supplementation in the periconceptional period (reference class, 21.37%); low maternal education level + unhealthy lifestyle (class 2, 39.75%); low maternal education level + unhealthy lifestyle + disease (class 3, 23.71%); unhealthy maternal lifestyle + advanced age (class 4, 4.71%); and multi-risk factor exposure (class 5, 10.45%). Compared with the reference subgroup, the other subgroups consistently had a significantly increased risk of birth defects (ORs and 95% CIs: class 2, 1.75 and 1.21–2.54; class 3, 3.13 and 2.17–4.52; class 4, 5.02 and 3.20–7.88; and class 5, 12.25 and 8.61–17.42, respectively). For congenital heart defects, the ORs and 95% CIs were all higher, and the magnitude of OR differences ranged from 1.59 to 16.15. Conclusions A comprehensive intervention strategy targeting maternal exposure to multiple risk factors is expected to show the strongest results in preventing birth defects. PMID:27183231

  9. Who Should Be Targeted for the Prevention of Birth Defects? A Latent Class Analysis Based on a Large, Population-Based, Cross-Sectional Study in Shaanxi Province, Western China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhonghai; Cheng, Yue; Yang, Wenfang; Li, Danyang; Yang, Xue; Liu, Danli; Zhang, Min; Yan, Hong; Zeng, Lingxia

    2016-01-01

    The wide range and complex combinations of factors that cause birth defects impede the development of primary prevention strategies targeted at high-risk subpopulations. Latent class analysis (LCA) was conducted to identify mutually exclusive profiles of factors associated with birth defects among women between 15 and 49 years of age using data from a large, population-based, cross-sectional study conducted in Shaanxi Province, western China, between August and October, 2013. The odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of associated factors and the latent profiles of indicators of birth defects and congenital heart defects were computed using a logistic regression model. Five discrete subpopulations of participants were identified as follows: No folic acid supplementation in the periconceptional period (reference class, 21.37%); low maternal education level + unhealthy lifestyle (class 2, 39.75%); low maternal education level + unhealthy lifestyle + disease (class 3, 23.71%); unhealthy maternal lifestyle + advanced age (class 4, 4.71%); and multi-risk factor exposure (class 5, 10.45%). Compared with the reference subgroup, the other subgroups consistently had a significantly increased risk of birth defects (ORs and 95% CIs: class 2, 1.75 and 1.21-2.54; class 3, 3.13 and 2.17-4.52; class 4, 5.02 and 3.20-7.88; and class 5, 12.25 and 8.61-17.42, respectively). For congenital heart defects, the ORs and 95% CIs were all higher, and the magnitude of OR differences ranged from 1.59 to 16.15. A comprehensive intervention strategy targeting maternal exposure to multiple risk factors is expected to show the strongest results in preventing birth defects.

  10. Population-based case-control association studies.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Dana B; Scott, William K

    2012-07-01

    This unit provides an overview of the design and analysis of population-based case-control studies of genetic risk factors for complex disease. Considerations specific to genetic studies are emphasized. The unit reviews basic study designs differentiating case-control studies from others, presents different genetic association strategies (candidate gene, genome-wide association, and high-throughput sequencing), introduces basic methods of statistical analysis for case-control data and approaches to combining case-control studies, and discusses measures of association and impact. Admixed populations, controlling for confounding (including population stratification), consideration of multiple loci and environmental risk factors, and complementary analyses of haplotypes, genes, and pathways are briefly discussed. Readers are referred to basic texts on epidemiology for more details on general conduct of case-control studies.

  11. Presence of anticitrullinated protein antibodies in a large population-based cohort from the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    van Zanten, A; Arends, S; Roozendaal, C; Limburg, P C; Maas, F; Trouw, L A; Toes, R E M; Huizinga, T W J; Bootsma, H; Brouwer, E

    2017-07-01

    To determine the prevalence of anticitrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs) and their association with known rheumatoid arthritis (RA) risk factors in the general population. Lifelines is a multidisciplinary prospective population-based cohort study in the Netherlands. Cross-sectional data from 40 136 participants were used. The detection of ACPA was performed by measuring anti-CCP2 on the Phadia-250 analyser with levels ≥6.2 U/mL considered positive. An extensive questionnaire was taken on demographic and clinical information, including smoking, periodontal health and early symptoms of musculoskeletal disorders. RA was defined by a combination of self-reported RA, medication use for the indication of rheumatism and visiting a medical specialist within the last year. Of the total 40 136 unselected individuals, 401 (1.0%) had ACPA level ≥6.2 U/mL. ACPA positivity was significantly associated with older age, female gender, smoking, joint complaints, RA and first degree relatives with rheumatism. Of the ACPA-positive participants, 22.4% had RA (15.2% had defined RA according to our criteria and 7.2% self-reported RA only). In participants without RA, 311 (0.8%) were ACPA-positive. In the non-RA group, older age, smoking and joint complaints remained significantly more frequently present in ACPA-positive compared with ACPA-negative participants. In this large population-based study, the prevalence of ACPA levels ≥6.2 U/mL was 1.0% for the total group and 0.8% when excluding patients with RA. Older age, smoking and joint complaints were more frequently present in ACPA-positive Lifelines participants. To our knowledge, this study is the largest study to date on ACPA positivity in the general, mostly Caucasian population. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  12. Associations of aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug and paracetamol use with PSA-detected prostate cancer: findings from a large, population-based, case-control study (the ProtecT study).

    PubMed

    Murad, Ali S; Down, Liz; Davey Smith, George; Donovan, Jenny L; Athene Lane, Janet; Hamdy, Freddie C; Neal, David E; Martin, Richard M

    2011-03-15

    Evidence from laboratory studies suggests that chronic inflammation plays an important role in prostate cancer aetiology. This has resulted in speculation that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may protect against prostate cancer development. We analysed data from a cross-sectional case-control study (n(cases) = 1,016; n(controls) = 5,043), nested within a UK-wide population-based study that used prostate specific antigen (PSA) testing for identification of asymptomatic prostate cancers, to investigate the relationship of aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and paracetamol use with prostate cancer. In conditional logistic regression models accounting for stratum matching on age (5-year age bands) and recruitment centre, use of non-aspirin NSAIDs [odds ratio (OR) = 1.32; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.04-1.67] or all NSAIDs (OR = 1.25; 95% CI = 1.07-1.47) were positively associated with prostate cancer. There were weaker, not conventionally statistically significant, positive associations of aspirin (OR = 1.13; 95% CI = 0.94-1.36) and paracetamol (OR = 1.20; 95% CI = 0.90-1.60) with prostate cancer. Mutual adjustment for aspirin, non-aspirin NSAIDs or paracetamol made little difference to these results. There was no evidence of confounding by age, family history of prostate cancer, body mass index or self-reported diabetes. Aspirin, NSAID and paracetamol use were associated with reduced serum PSA concentrations amongst controls. Our findings do not support the hypothesis that NSAIDs reduce the risk of PSA-detected prostate cancer. Our conclusions are unlikely to be influenced by PSA detection bias because the inverse associations of aspirin, NSAID and paracetamol use with serum PSA would have attenuated (not generated) the observed positive associations.

  13. Unbiased methods for population-based association studies.

    PubMed

    Devlin, B; Roeder, K; Bacanu, S A

    2001-12-01

    Large, population-based samples and large-scale genotyping are being used to evaluate disease/gene associations. A substantial drawback to such samples is the fact that population substructure can induce spurious associations between genes and disease. We review two methods, called genomic control (GC) and structured association (SA), that obviate many of the concerns about population substructure by using the features of the genomes present in the sample to correct for stratification. The GC approach exploits the fact that population substructure generates "over dispersion" of statistics used to assess association. By testing multiple polymorphisms throughout the genome, only some of which are pertinent to the disease of interest, the degree of overdispersion generated by population substructure can be estimated and taken into account. The SA approach assumes that the sampled population, although heterogeneous, is composed of subpopulations that are themselves homogeneous. By using multiple polymorphisms throughout the genome, this "latent class method" estimates the probability sampled individuals derive from each of these latent subpopulations. GC has the advantage of robustness, simplicity, and wide applicability, even to experimental designs such as DNA pooling. SA is a bit more complicated but has the advantage of greater power in some realistic settings, such as admixed populations or when association varies widely across subpopulations. It, too, is widely applicable. Both also have weaknesses, as elaborated in our review.

  14. Etiology and clinical presentation of birth defects: population based study

    PubMed Central

    Carey, John C; Byrne, Janice L B; Krikov, Sergey; Botto, Lorenzo D

    2017-01-01

    Objective To assess causation and clinical presentation of major birth defects. Design Population based case cohort. Setting Cases of birth defects in children born 2005-09 to resident women, ascertained through Utah’s population based surveillance system. All records underwent clinical re-review. Participants 5504 cases among 270 878 births (prevalence 2.03%), excluding mild isolated conditions (such as muscular ventricular septal defects, distal hypospadias). Main outcome measures The primary outcomes were the proportion of birth defects with a known etiology (chromosomal, genetic, human teratogen, twinning) or unknown etiology, by morphology (isolated, multiple, minors only), and by pathogenesis (sequence, developmental field defect, or known pattern of birth defects). Results Definite cause was assigned in 20.2% (n=1114) of cases: chromosomal or genetic conditions accounted for 94.4% (n=1052), teratogens for 4.1% (n=46, mostly poorly controlled pregestational diabetes), and twinning for 1.4% (n=16, conjoined or acardiac). The 79.8% (n=4390) remaining were classified as unknown etiology; of these 88.2% (n=3874) were isolated birth defects. Family history (similarly affected first degree relative) was documented in 4.8% (n=266). In this cohort, 92.1% (5067/5504) were live born infants (isolated and non-isolated birth defects): 75.3% (4147/5504) were classified as having an isolated birth defect (unknown or known etiology). Conclusions These findings underscore the gaps in our knowledge regarding the causes of birth defects. For the causes that are known, such as smoking or diabetes, assigning causation in individual cases remains challenging. Nevertheless, the ongoing impact of these exposures on fetal development highlights the urgency and benefits of population based preventive interventions. For the causes that are still unknown, better strategies are needed. These can include greater integration of the key elements of etiology, morphology, and

  15. Predictors of Childhood Anxiety: A Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Few studies have explored predictors of early childhood anxiety. Objective To determine the prenatal, postnatal, and early life predictors of childhood anxiety by age 5. Methods Population-based, provincial administrative data (N = 19,316) from Manitoba, Canada were used to determine the association between demographic, obstetrical, psychosocial, medical, behavioral, and infant factors on childhood anxiety. Results Risk factors for childhood anxiety by age 5 included maternal psychological distress from birth to 12 months and 13 months to 5 years post-delivery and an infant 5-minute Apgar score of ≤7. Factors associated with decreased risk included maternal age < 20 years, multiparity, and preterm birth. Conclusion Identifying predictors of childhood anxiety is a key step to early detection and prevention. Maternal psychological distress is an early, modifiable risk factor. Future research should aim to disentangle early life influences on childhood anxiety occurring in the prenatal, postnatal, and early childhood periods. PMID:26158268

  16. Characterization of mitochondrial haplogroups in a large population-based sample from the United States.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Sabrina L; Goodloe, Robert; Brown-Gentry, Kristin; Pendergrass, Sarah A; Murdock, Deborah G; Crawford, Dana C

    2014-07-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups are valuable for investigations in forensic science, molecular anthropology, and human genetics. In this study, we developed a custom panel of 61 mtDNA markers for high-throughput classification of European, African, and Native American/Asian mitochondrial haplogroup lineages. Using these mtDNA markers, we constructed a mitochondrial haplogroup classification tree and classified 18,832 participants from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES). To our knowledge, this is the largest study to date characterizing mitochondrial haplogroups in a population-based sample from the United States, and the first study characterizing mitochondrial haplogroup distributions in self-identified Mexican Americans separately from Hispanic Americans of other descent. We observed clear differences in the distribution of maternal genetic ancestry consistent with proposed admixture models for these subpopulations, underscoring the genetic heterogeneity of the United States Hispanic population. The mitochondrial haplogroup distributions in the other self-identified racial/ethnic groups within NHANES were largely comparable to previous studies. Mitochondrial haplogroup classification was highly concordant with self-identified race/ethnicity (SIRE) in non-Hispanic whites (94.8 %), but was considerably lower in admixed populations including non-Hispanic blacks (88.3 %), Mexican Americans (81.8 %), and other Hispanics (61.6 %), suggesting SIRE does not accurately reflect maternal genetic ancestry, particularly in populations with greater proportions of admixture. Thus, it is important to consider inconsistencies between SIRE and genetic ancestry when performing genetic association studies. The mitochondrial haplogroup data that we have generated, coupled with the epidemiologic variables in NHANES, is a valuable resource for future studies investigating the contribution of mtDNA variation to human health and disease.

  17. Psoriasis and dyslipidaemia: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Dreiher, Jacob; Weitzman, Dahlia; Davidovici, Batya; Shapiro, Jonathan; Cohen, Arnon D

    2008-01-01

    Previous reports demonstrated an association between psoriasis and the metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study was to elucidate the association between psoriasis and dyslipidaemia. A cross-sectional study was performed utilizing a population-based database. Psoriasis patients were compared with enrollees without psoriasis regarding the prevalence of dyslipidaemia and lipid levels. Comparison of lipid levels was performed on a "low-risk" subset of subjects without diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular disease. The study included 10,669 psoriasis patients and 22,996 subjects without psoriasis. The prevalence of dyslipidaemia was significantly higher in psoriasis patients (odds ratio (OR) = 1.48, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.40-1.55). The association remained significant after controlling for confounders (OR = 1.19, 95% CI 1.12-1.26, p < 0.001). In multivariate analysis of the "low-risk" subset, triglyceride levels were higher in psoriasis patients and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were lower. This study supports previous reports of an association between psoriasis and lipid abnormalities.

  18. Refractory hypertension: determination of prevalence, risk factors, and comorbidities in a large, population-based cohort.

    PubMed

    Calhoun, David A; Booth, John N; Oparil, Suzanne; Irvin, Marguerite R; Shimbo, Daichi; Lackland, Daniel T; Howard, George; Safford, Monika M; Muntner, Paul

    2014-03-01

    Refractory hypertension is an extreme phenotype of antihypertensive treatment failure. Participants in the REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study, a large (n=30 239), population-based cohort were evaluated to determine the prevalence of refractory hypertension and associated cardiovascular risk factors and comorbidities. Refractory hypertension was defined as uncontrolled blood pressure (systolic/diastolic, ≥140/90 mm Hg) on ≥5 antihypertensive drug classes. Participants with resistant hypertension (systolic/diastolic, ≥140/90 mm Hg on ≥3 or <140/90 mm Hg on ≥4 antihypertensive classes) and all participants treated for hypertension served as comparator groups. Of 14 809 REGARDS participants receiving antihypertensive treatment, 78 (0.5%) had refractory hypertension. The prevalence of refractory hypertension was 3.6% among participants with resistant hypertension (n=2144) and 41.7% among participants on ≥5 antihypertensive drug classes. Among all participants with hypertension, black race, male sex, living in the stroke belt or buckle, higher body mass index, lower heart rate, reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate, albuminuria, diabetes mellitus, and history of stroke and coronary heart disease were associated with refractory hypertension. Compared with resistant hypertension, prevalence ratios for refractory hypertension were increased for blacks (3.00; 95% confidence interval, 1.68-5.37) and those with albuminuria (2.22; 95% confidence interval, 1.40-3.52) and diabetes mellitus (2.09; 95% confidence interval, 1.32-3.31). The median 10-year Framingham risk for coronary heart disease and stroke was higher among participants with refractory hypertension when compared with those with either comparator group. These data indicate that although resistant hypertension is relatively common among treated patients with hypertension, true antihypertensive treatment failure is rare.

  19. Refractory Hypertension: Determination of Prevalence, Risk Factors and Comorbidities in a Large, Population-Based Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Calhoun, David A.; Booth, John N.; Oparil, Suzanne; Irvin, Marguerite R.; Shimbo, Daichi; Lackland, Daniel T.; Howard, George; Safford, Monika M.; Muntner, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Refractory hypertension is an extreme phenotype of antihypertensive treatment failure. Participants in the REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study, a large (n=30,239), population-based cohort were evaluated to determine the prevalence of refractory hypertension and associated cardiovascular risk factors and comorbidities. Refractory hypertension was defined as uncontrolled blood pressure (systolic/diastolic ≥ 140/90 mm Hg) on ≥ 5 antihypertensive drug classes. Participants with resistant hypertension (systolic/diastolic ≥140/90 mm Hg on ≥ 3 or<140/90 mm Hg on ≥ 4 antihypertensive classes) and all treated hypertensive participants served as comparator groups. Of 14,809 REGARDS participants receiving antihypertensive treatment, 78 (0.5%) had refractory hypertension. The prevalence of refractory hypertension was 3.6% among participants with resistant hypertension(n=2,144) and 41.7% among participants on 5 or more antihypertensive drug classes. Among all hypertensive participants, African American race, male gender, living in the stroke belt or buckle, higher body mass index, lower heart rate, reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate, albuminuria, diabetes and history of stroke and coronary heart disease were associated with refractory hypertension. Compared to resistant hypertension, prevalence ratios for refractory hypertension were increased for African Americans (3.00, 95% CI 1.68 – 5.37) and those with albuminuria (2.22, 95% CI 1.40 – 3.52) and diabetes (2.09, 95% CI 1.32 – 3.31). The median 10-year Framingham risk for coronary heart disease and stroke was higher among participants with refractory hypertension compared to either comparator group. These data indicate that while resistant hypertension is relatively common among treated hypertensive patients, true antihypertensive treatment failure is rare. PMID:24324035

  20. Association of sialolithiasis with cholelithiasis: A population-based study.

    PubMed

    Hung, Shih-Han; Lin, Herng-Ching; Su, Chin-Hui; Chung, Shiu-Dong

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between cholelithiasis and developing sialolithiasis using a population-based coverage database. The data for this study were sourced from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database. We included 745 subjects with sialolithiasis as cases and 3725 sex-matched and age-matched subjects without sialolithiasis as controls. Chi-square test revealed a significant difference in the prevalence of prior cholelithiasis between the cases and controls (8.6% vs 4.1%; p < .001). Furthermore, conditional logistic regression analysis indicated that the odds ratio (OR) of prior cholelithiasis for the cases was 2.19 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.62-2.98) when compared with the controls after adjusting for monthly income, geographic location, urbanization level, and tobacco use disorder. The adjusted OR of prior cholelithiasis for cases was 2.20 (95% CI = 1.46-3.33) and 2.15 (95% CI = 1.38-3.42) than controls for men and women, respectively. This study demonstrates an association between sialolithiasis and cholelithiasis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Economic costs of social phobia: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Acarturk, C; Smit, Filip; de Graaf, R; van Straten, A; Ten Have, M; Cuijpers, P

    2009-06-01

    Information about the economic costs of social phobia is scant. In this study, we examine the economic costs of social phobia and subthreshold social phobia. Data were derived from the Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study (NEMESIS) which is a population-based prospective study (n=4,789). Costs related to health service uptake, patients' out-of-pocket expenses, and costs arising from production losses were calculated for the reference year 2003. The costs for people with social phobia were compared with the costs for people with no mental disorder. The annual per capita total costs of social phobia were euro 11,952 (95% CI=7,891-16,013) which is significantly higher than the total costs for people with no mental disorder, euro 2957 (95% CI=2690-3224). When adjusting for mental and somatic co-morbidity, the costs decreased to euro 6,100 (95% CI=2681-9519), or 136 million euro per year per 1 million inhabitants, which was still significantly higher than the costs for people with no mental disorder. The costs of subthreshold social phobia were also significantly higher than the costs for people without any mental disorder, at euro 4,687 (95% CI=2557-6816). The costs presented here are conservative lower estimates because we only included costs related to mental health services. The economic costs associated with social phobia are substantial, and those of subthreshold social phobia approach those of the full-blown disorder.

  2. Estimating glomerular filtration rate in a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Anoop; Lee, Kristine E; Klein, Barbara EK; Muntner, Paul; Brazy, Peter C; Cruickshanks, Karen J; Nieto, F Javier; Danforth, Lorraine G; Schubert, Carla R; Tsai, Michael Y; Klein, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    Background: Glomerular filtration rate (GFR)-estimating equations are used to determine the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in population-based studies. However, it has been suggested that since the commonly used GFR equations were originally developed from samples of patients with CKD, they underestimate GFR in healthy populations. Few studies have made side-by-side comparisons of the effect of various estimating equations on the prevalence estimates of CKD in a general population sample. Patients and methods: We examined a population-based sample comprising adults from Wisconsin (age, 43–86 years; 56% women). We compared the prevalence of CKD, defined as a GFR of <60 mL/min per 1.73 m2 estimated from serum creatinine, by applying various commonly used equations including the modification of diet in renal disease (MDRD) equation, Cockcroft–Gault (CG) equation, and the Mayo equation. We compared the performance of these equations against the CKD definition of cystatin C >1.23 mg/L. Results: We found that the prevalence of CKD varied widely among different GFR equations. Although the prevalence of CKD was 17.2% with the MDRD equation and 16.5% with the CG equation, it was only 4.8% with the Mayo equation. Only 24% of those identified to have GFR in the range of 50–59 mL/min per 1.73 m2 by the MDRD equation had cystatin C levels >1.23 mg/L; their mean cystatin C level was only 1 mg/L (interquartile range, 0.9–1.2 mg/L). This finding was similar for the CG equation. For the Mayo equation, 62.8% of those patients with GFR in the range of 50–59 mL/min per 1.73 m2 had cystatin C levels >1.23 mg/L; their mean cystatin C level was 1.3 mg/L (interquartile range, 1.2–1.5 mg/L). The MDRD and CG equations showed a false-positive rate of >10%. Discussion: We found that the MDRD and CG equations, the current standard to estimate GFR, appeared to overestimate the prevalence of CKD in a general population sample. PMID:20730018

  3. Stress and dysmenorrhoea: a population based prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, L; Wang, X; Wang, W; Chen, C; Ronnennberg, A; Guang, W; Huang, A; Fang, Z; Zang, T; Wang, L; Xu, X

    2004-01-01

    Background: Dysmenorrhoea is the most common gynaecological disorder in women of reproductive age. Despite the association between stress and pregnancy outcomes, few studies have examined the possible link between stress and dysmenorrhoea. Aims and Methods: Using a population based cohort of Chinese women, the independent effect of women's perceived stress in the preceding menstrual cycle on the incidence of dysmenorrhoea in the subsequent cycle was investigated prospectively. The analysis included 1160 prospectively observed menstrual cycles from 388 healthy, nulliparous, newly married women who intended to conceive. The perception of stress and the occurrence of dysmenorrhoea in each menstrual cycle were determined from daily diaries recorded by the women. Results: After adjustment for important covariates, the risk of dysmenorrhoea was more than twice as great among women with high stress compared to those with low stress in the preceding cycle (OR = 2.4; 95% CI 1.4 to 4.3). The risk of dysmenorrhoea was greatest among women with both high stress and a history of dysmenorrhoea compared to women with low stress and no history of dysmenorrhoea (OR = 10.4, 95% CI 4.9 to 22.3). Stress in the follicular phase of the preceding cycles had a stronger association with dysmenorrhoea than stress in the luteal phase of the preceding cycles. Conclusion: This study shows a significant association between stress and the incidence of dysmenorrhoea, which is even stronger among women with a history of dysmenorrhoea. PMID:15550609

  4. Central poststroke pain: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Klit, Henriette; Finnerup, Nanna Brix; Andersen, Grethe; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2011-04-01

    Central poststroke pain (CPSP) is a specific pain condition arising as a direct consequence of a cerebrovascular lesion. There is limited knowledge about the epidemiology and clinical characteristics of this often neglected but important consequence of stroke. In this population-based study, a questionnaire was sent out to all (n=964) stroke patients identified through the Danish National Indicator Project Stroke Database in Aarhus County, Denmark, between March 2004 and February 2005. All surviving patients who fulfilled 4 questionnaire criteria for possible CPSP (n=51) were selected for further clinical examination, and their pain was classified by using stringent and well-defined criteria and a detailed, standardized clinical examination. The minimum prevalence of definite or probable CPSP in this population is 7.3% and the prevalence of CPSP-like dysesthesia or pain is 8.6%. Pinprick hyperalgesia was present in 57%, cold allodynia in 40%, and brush-evoked dysesthesia in 51% of patients with CPSP. Because of its negative impact on quality of life and rehabilitation, pain is an important symptom to assess in stroke survivors.

  5. Young adults' trajectories of Ecstasy use: a population based study.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Andrew; Najman, Jake M; Hayatbakhsh, Reza; Plotnikova, Maria; Wells, Helene; Legosz, Margot; Kemp, Robert

    2013-11-01

    Young adults' Ecstasy use trajectories have important implications for individual and population-level consequences of Ecstasy use, but little relevant research has been conducted. This study prospectively examines Ecstasy trajectories in a population-based sample. Data are from the Natural History Study of Drug Use, a retrospective/prospective cohort study conducted in Australia. Population screening identified a probability sample of Ecstasy users aged 19-23 years. Complete data for 30 months of follow-up, comprising 4 time intervals, were available for 297 participants (88.4% of sample). Trajectories were derived using cluster analysis based on recent Ecstasy use at each interval. Trajectory predictors were examined using a generalized ordered logit model and included Ecstasy dependence (World Mental Health Composite International Diagnostic Instrument), psychological distress (Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale), aggression (Young Adult Self Report) and contextual factors (e.g. attendance at electronic/dance music events). Three Ecstasy trajectories were identified (low, intermediate and high use). At its peak, the high-use trajectory involved 1-2 days Ecstasy use per week. Decreasing frequency of use was observed for intermediate and high-use trajectories from 12 months, independently of market factors. Intermediate and high-use trajectory membership was predicted by past Ecstasy consumption (>70 pills) and attendance at electronic/dance music events. High-use trajectory members were unlikely to have used Ecstasy for more than 3 years and tended to report consistently positive subjective effects at baseline. Given the social context and temporal course of Ecstasy use, Ecstasy trajectories might be better understood in terms of instrumental rather than addictive drug use patterns. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Population-based study of presbyopia in Shahroud, Iran.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Hassan; Khabazkhoob, Mehdi; Jafarzadehpur, Ebrahim; Mehravaran, Shiva; Emamian, Mohammad Hassan; Yekta, AbbasAli; Shariati, Mohammad; Fotouhi, Akbar

    2012-12-01

    There is limited information regarding the prevalence of presbyopia in different parts of the world. The add power and the prevalence of presbyopia by age and gender in general population of Shahroud, north of Iran, were studied. Population-based cross-sectional study. Using random cluster sampling, 6311 people from the 40- to 64-year-old population of Shahroud were invited. Of the invited population, 5190 individuals (82.2%) participated in the study. Presbyopia was defined as the correction of near vision to logMAR 1 (N8 point) with at least 1 D of add power. Near visual acuity of participants was evaluated with a logMAR chart at a distance of 40 cm. Mean add power in the age groups of 40-44, 45-49, 50-54, 55-59 and 60-64 years was 0.65, 1.30, 1.70, 1.87 and 2.08 D, respectively. For each 5-year increase in age, a 0.35 D increase in add power was noted. The prevalence of presbyopia was 58.15% (95% confidence interval: 56.46-59.84). Presbyopia was more prevalent in women (P < 0.001) and increased with ageing more in women than in men (P < 0.001). Furthermore, in the 60-64-year-old age group, 11% of men and 23% of women were not presbyopic. Compared with other reports, the add power in different age groups was 0.5 D less, and presbyopia was less prevalent. More than 50% of the over 45-year-old individuals were presbyopic and 17% of the over 60 individuals were free of this condition. © 2012 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology © 2012 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  7. The role of flexible goal adjustment in the effect of informal caregiving on depressive symptoms: Evidence of a large population-based longitudinal study in Germany from 2002 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Hajek, André; König, Hans-Helmut

    2017-02-01

    To determine the role of flexible goal adjustment in the impact of informal caregiving on depressive symptoms, using a longitudinal approach. Data were gathered from the German Ageing Survey. This is a population-based longitudinal study among community-dwelling individuals aged 40 and above in Germany. Data were derived from the second (2002), third (2008) and fourth (2011) wave, drawing on 10,994 observations. Flexible goal adjustment was assessed using a scale by Brandstädter and Renner. Informal caregiving was measured by asking the individuals whether they provide informal care. Depressive symptoms were quantified by using the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale. Adjusting for several potential confounders, fixed effects regressions showed that the onset of informal caregiving markedly increased depressive symptoms. Furthermore, regressions revealed that this effect was significantly moderated by flexible goal adjustment. Our results highlight the importance of informal caregiving for depressive symptoms. Furthermore, the importance of flexible goal adjustment in the relation between informal caregiving and depressive symptoms should be emphasized. Efforts to increase flexible goal adjustment might be beneficial in reducing depressive symptoms among informal caregivers.

  8. Recurrence and mortality after first venous thromboembolism in a large population-based cohort.

    PubMed

    Arshad, N; Bjøri, E; Hindberg, K; Isaksen, T; Hansen, J-B; Braekkan, S K

    2017-02-01

    Essentials Reports on recurrence and mortality after a first venous thromboembolism (VTE) vary considerably. We describe rates of recurrence and mortality in patients with a first VTE from the Tromsø study. The overall recurrence rate was 3.9 per 100 person-years, but this varied widely with time. Despite advances in VTE management, the rates of adverse events are still fairly high. Background Previous reports on recurrence and mortality rates after a first episode of venous thromboembolism (VTE) vary considerably. Advances in the management and treatment of VTE during the last 15 years may have influenced the rates of clinical outcomes. Aim To estimate the rates of recurrence and mortality after a first VTE in patients recruited from a large population-based cohort. Method From the Tromsø study, patients (n = 710) with a first, symptomatic, objectively confirmed VTE were included and followed in the period 1994-2012. Recurrent episodes of VTE were identified from multiple sources and carefully validated by review of medical records. Incidence rates and cumulative incidence rates with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of VTE recurrence and mortality were calculated. Results The mean age of the patients was 68 years (range 28-102 years), and 166 (23.4%) had cancer at the time of first VTE. There were 114 VTE recurrences and 333 deaths during a median study period of 7.7 years (range 0.04-18.2 years). The risk of recurrence was highest during the first year. The overall 1-year recurrence rate was 7.8 (95% CI 5.8-10.6) per 100 person-years (PY), whereas the recurrence rate in the remaining follow-up period (1-18 years) was 3.0 (95% CI 2.4-3.8) per 100 PY. The overall 1-year all-cause mortality rate was 29.9 (95% CI 25.7-34.8) per 100 PY, and in those without cancer the corresponding rate was 23.6 (95% CI 17.8-31.3) per 100 PY. Conclusion Despite advances in VTE management, the rates of adverse events remained fairly high, particularly in the first year following a

  9. Recurrence of hyperemesis gravidarum across generations: population based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Skjærven, Rolv; Grjibovski, Andrej M; Gunnes, Nina; Vangen, Siri; Magnus, Per

    2010-01-01

    Objective To estimate the risk of hyperemesis gravidarum (hyperemesis) according to whether the daughters and sons under study were born after pregnancies complicated by hyperemesis. Design Population based cohort study. Setting Registry data from Norway. Participants Linked generational data from the medical birth registry of Norway (1967-2006): 544 087 units of mother and childbearing daughter and 399 777 units of mother and child producing son. Main outcome measure Hyperemesis in daughters in mother and childbearing daughter units and hyperemesis in female partners of sons in mother and child producing son units. Results Daughters who were born after a pregnancy complicated by hyperemesis had a 3% risk of having hyperemesis in their own pregnancy, while women who were born after an unaffected pregnancy had a risk of 1.1% (unadjusted odds ratio 2.9, 95% confidence interval 2.4 to 3.6). Female partners of sons who were born after pregnancies complicated by hyperemesis had a risk of 1.2% (1.0, 0.7 to 1.6). Daughters born after a pregnancy not complicated by hyperemesis had an increased risk of the condition if the mother had hyperemesis in a previous or subsequent pregnancy (3.2 (1.6 to 6.4) if hyperemesis had occurred in one of the mother’s previous pregnancies and 3.7 (1.5 to 9.1) if it had occurred in a later pregnancy). Adjustment for maternal age at childbirth, period of birth, and parity did not change the estimates. Restrictions to firstborns did not influence the results. Conclusions Hyperemesis gravidarum is more strongly influenced by the maternal genotype than the fetal genotype, though environmental influences along the maternal line cannot be excluded as contributing factors. PMID:21030362

  10. Maternal lifetime history of depression and depressive symptoms in the prenatal and early postnatal period do not predict infant-mother attachment quality in a large, population-based Dutch cohort study.

    PubMed

    Tharner, Anne; Luijk, Maartje P C M; van Ijzendoorn, Marinus H; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Hofman, Albert; Verhulst, Frank C; Tiemeier, Henning

    2012-01-01

    We examined the effects of maternal history of depressive disorder and the effects of depressive symptoms during pregnancy and the early postpartum period on attachment insecurity and disorganization. A total of 627 mother-infant dyads from the Generation R Study participated in a population-based cohort from fetal life onwards. Maternal history of depression was assessed by diagnostic interviews during pregnancy; maternal peri- and postnatal depressive symptoms were assessed with questionnaires in 506 of these women at 20 weeks pregnancy and two months postpartum; and infant-mother attachment security was observed when infants were aged 14 months. A history of maternal depressive disorder, regardless of severity or psychiatric comorbidity, was not associated with an increased risk of infant attachment insecurity or disorganization. Likewise, maternal peri- and postnatal depressive symptoms were not related to attachment insecurity or disorganization at 14 months. These results are important because mothers from otherwise low risk backgrounds often have previously been depressed or are struggling with non-clinical depressive symptoms during pregnancy and after giving birth. Our findings are discussed in terms of protective factors that may limit the potentially negative effects of maternal depressive symptoms on the infant-mother attachment relationship in the general population. The role of selective attrition and lack of information about the mothers' attachment status for the current null-findings are also discussed.

  11. Hypervolemia for hypertension pathophysiology: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Hür, Ender; Özişik, Melih; Ural, Cihan; Yildiz, Gürsel; Mağden, Kemal; Köse, Sennur Budak; Köktürk, Füruzan; Büyükuysal, Çağatay; Yildirim, Ibrahim; Süleymanlar, Gültekin; Ateş, Kenan; Duman, Soner

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension and hypervolemia relationship was proven among renal disease, although it is not known in normal population. Present study determines the fluid distribution defects in relation to blood pressure. In a population-based survey in Turkey demographics, height, weight, blood pressure, urine analysis, and serum creatinine measurements were recorded. Bioimpedance measured with the Body Composition Monitor. Total 2034 population of 71.6% male, mean age 47 ± 12.6 (18-89) years, systolic blood pressure (SBP) 134.7 ± 20, diastolic blood pressure 77.9 ± 11.6 mmHg. Body mass index (BMI) was 28.5 ± 4.5 (15.8-50.6) kg/m(2); overhydration was 0.05 ± 1.05 L. There was a correlation between extracellular water (ECW)/height and SBP (r = 0.21, P < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve with the performance of 0.60 (P < 0.001) that showed cut-off value of ECW/height was 10.06 L/m, with the 69% sensitivity and 45% specificity for SBP: 140 mmHg values. Risk factors for high SBP were increase of ECW/Height, age, BMI and presence of diabetes. ECW/height, SBP, and fat tissue index (FTI) increased in BMI categories (low, normal, and obese) and in diabetics. SBP and FTI were lower in smokers. High blood pressure may be accompanied by increased extracellular volume indices. In the future volume status assessment could be of use in evaluating the effectiveness of pharmacological intervention in the treatment of hypertension.

  12. Stratification of ALS patients' survival: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Marin, Benoît; Couratier, Philippe; Arcuti, Simona; Copetti, Massimiliano; Fontana, Andrea; Nicol, Marie; Raymondeau, Marie; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Preux, Pierre Marie

    2016-01-01

    The natural history of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and patient risk stratification are areas of considerable research interest. We aimed (1) to describe the survival of a representative cohort of French ALS patients, and (2) to identify covariates associated with various patterns of survival using a risk classification analysis. ALS patients recruited in the FRALim register (2000-2013) were included. Time-to-death analyses were performed using Kaplan-Meier method and Cox model. A recursive partitioning and amalgamation (RECPAM) algorithm analysis identified subgroups of patients with different patterns of survival. Among 322 patients, median survival times were 26.2 and 15.6 months from time of onset and of diagnosis, respectively. Four groups of patients were identified, depending on their baseline characteristics and survival (1) ALSFRS-R slope >0.46/month and definite or probable ALS (median survival time (MST) 10.6 months); (2) ALSFRS-R slope >0.46/month and possible or probable laboratory-supported ALS (MST: 18.1 months); (3) ALSFRS-R slope ≤0.46/month and definite or probable ALS (MST: 22.5 months), and (4) ALSFRS-R slope ≤0.46/month and possible or probable laboratory-supported ALS (MST: 37.6 months). Median survival time is among the shortest ever reported by a worldwide population-based study. This is probably related to the age structure of the patients (the oldest identified to date), driven by the underlying population (30 % of subjects older than 60 years). Further research in the field of risk stratification could help physicians better anticipate prognosis of ALS patients, and help improve the design of randomized controlled trials.

  13. Recurrent Wheezing in Infants: A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Belhassen, Manon; De Blic, Jacques; Laforest, Laurent; Laigle, Valérie; Chanut-Vogel, Céline; Lamezec, Liliane; Brouard, Jacques; Fauroux, Brigitte; de Pouvourville, Gérard; Ginoux, Marine; Van Ganse, Eric

    2016-04-01

    Recurrent wheezing (RW) has a significant impact on infants, caregivers, and society, but morbidity and related medical resource utilization (MRU) have not been thoroughly explored. The burden of RW needs to be documented with population-based data. The objective was to assess the characteristics, medical management, and MRU of RW infants identified from national claims data. Infants aged from 6 to 24 months, receiving ≥2 dispensations of respiratory drugs within 3 months, and presenting a marker of poor control (index date), were selected. During the 6 months after index date, MRU was described in the cohort and among 3 subgroups with more severe RW, defined as ≥4 dispensations of respiratory drugs, ≥3 dispensations of oral corticosteroids (OCS), or ≥1 hospitalization for respiratory symptoms. A total of 115,489 infants had RW, corresponding to 8.2% of subjects in this age group. During follow-up, 68.7% of infants received inhaled corticosteroids, but only 1.8 U (unit) were dispensed over 6 months, suggesting discontinuous use. Control was mostly inadequate: 61.7% of subjects received OCS, 80.2% antibiotics, and 71.2% short-acting beta-agonists, and medical/paramedical visits were numerous, particularly for physiotherapy. Severe RW concerned 39.0% of the cohort; 32.8% and 11.7% of infants had repeated use of respiratory drugs and OCS, respectively, and 5.5% were hospitalized for respiratory symptoms. In this real-life nation-wide study, RW was common and infants had poor control and high MRU. Interventions are needed to support adequate use of controller therapy, and to improve medical care.

  14. Increasing incidence of cataract surgery: Population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Gollogly, Heidrun E.; Hodge, David O.; St. Sauver, Jennifer L.; Erie, Jay C.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE To estimate the incidence of cataract surgery in a defined population and to determine longitudinal cataract surgery patterns. SETTING Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. DESIGN Cohort study. METHODS Rochester Epidemiology Project (REP) databases were used to identify all incident cataract surgeries in Olmsted County, Minnesota, between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2011. Age-specific and sex-specific incidence rates were calculated and adjusted to the 2010 United States white population. Data were merged with previous REP data (1980 to 2004) to assess temporal trends in cataract surgery. Change in the incidence over time was assessed by fitting generalized linear models assuming a Poisson error structure. The probability of second-eye cataract surgery was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. RESULTS Included were 8012 cataract surgeries from 2005 through 2011. During this time, incident cataract surgery significantly increased (P < .001), peaking in 2011 with a rate of 1100 per 100 000 (95% confidence interval, 1050–1160). The probability of second-eye surgery 3, 12, and 24 months after first-eye surgery was 60%, 76%, and 86%, respectively, a significant increase compared with the same intervals in the previous 7 years (1998 to 2004) (P < .001). When merged with 1980 to 2004 REP data, incident cataract surgery steadily increased over the past 3 decades (P < .001). CONCLUSION Incident cataract surgery steadily increased over the past 32 years and has not leveled off, as reported in Swedish population-based series. Second-eye surgery was performed sooner and more frequently, with 60% of residents having second-eye surgery within 3-months of first-eye surgery. PMID:23820302

  15. Type D personality is a risk factor for psychosomatic symptoms and musculoskeletal pain among adolescents: a cross-sectional study of a large population-based cohort of Swedish adolescents.

    PubMed

    Condén, Emelie; Leppert, Jerzy; Ekselius, Lisa; Åslund, Cecilia

    2013-01-21

    Type D personality, or the "distressed personality", is a psychosocial factor associated with negative health outcomes, although its impact in younger populations is unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of Type D personality and the associations between Type D personality and psychosomatic symptoms and musculoskeletal pain among adolescences. A population-based, self-reported cross-sectional study conducted in Västmanland, Sweden with a cohort of 5012 students in the age between 15-18 years old. The participants completed the anonymous questionnaire Survey of Adolescent Life in Västmanland 2008 during class hour. Psychosomatic symptoms and musculoskeletal pain were measured through index measuring the presence of symptoms and how common they were. DS14 and its two component subscales of negative affectivity (NA) and social inhibition (SI) were measured as well. There was a difference depending on sex, where 10.4% among boys and 14.6% among girls (p = < 0.001) were defined as Type D personality. Boys and girls with a Type D personality had an approximately 2-fold increased odds of musculoskeletal pain and a 5-fold increased odds of psychosomatic symptoms. The subscale NA explained most of the relationship between Type D personality and psychosomatic symptoms and musculoskeletal pain. No interaction effect of NA and SI was found. There was a strong association between Type D personality and both psychosomatic symptoms and musculoskeletal pain where adolescent with a type D personality reported more symptoms. The present study contributes to the mapping of the influence of Type D on psychosomatic symptoms and musculoskeletal pain among adolescents.

  16. Insomnia in probable migraine: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyoung; Cho, Soo-Jin; Kim, Won-Joo; Yang, Kwang Ik; Yun, Chang-Ho; Chu, Min Kyung

    2016-12-01

    Insomnia is a common complaint among individuals with migraine. The close association between insomnia and migraine has been reported in clinic-based and population-based studies. Probable migraine (PM) is a migrainous headache which fulfills all but one criterion in the migraine diagnostic criteria. However, an association between insomnia and PM has rarely been reported. This study is to investigate the association between insomnia and PM in comparison with migraine using data from the Korean Headache-Sleep Study. The Korean Headache-Sleep Study is a nation-wide cross-sectional survey for all Korean adults aged 19-69 years. The survey was performed via face-to-face interview using a questionnaire on sleep and headache. If an individual's Insomnia Severity Index score was ≥15.5, she/he was diagnosed as having insomnia. Of 2695 participants, the prevalence of migraine, PM and insomnia was 5.3, 14.1 and 3.6 %, respectively. The prevalence of insomnia among subjects with PM was not significantly different compared to those with migraine (8.2 % vs. 9.1 %, p = 0.860). However, insomnia prevalence in subjects with PM was significantly higher than in non-headache controls (8.2 % vs. 1.8 %, p < 0.001). Insomnia Severity Index score was significantly higher in subjects with migraine compared to those with PM (6.8 ± 5.8 vs. 5.5 ± 5.8, p = 0.012). Headache frequency and Headache Impact Test-6 score were significantly higher in subjects with migraine and PM with insomnia compared to those without insomnia. Multivariable linear analyses showed that anxiety, depression, headache frequency and headache intensity were independent variables for contributing the ISI score among subjects with PM. The prevalence of insomnia among subjects with PM was not significantly different compared to those with migraine. Anxiety, depression, headache frequency and headache intensity were related with ISI score in subjects with PM.

  17. Cyberbullying among Finnish adolescents – a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cyberbullying, threatening or harassing another via the internet or mobile phones, does not cause physically harm and thus the consequences are less visible. Little research has been performed on the occurrence of cyberbullying among adolescents or the perception of its seriousness. Only a few population-based studies have been published, none of which included research on the witnessing of cyberbullying. Here, we examined exposure to cyberbullying during the last year, and its frequency and perceived seriousness among 12 to 18-year-old adolescents in Finland. We studied four dimensions of cyberbullying: being a victim, bully, or both victim and bully of cyberbullying, and witnessing the cyberbullying of friends. Methods Self-administered questionnaires, including four questions on cyberbullying, were mailed to a representative sample of 12-, 14-, 16-, and 18-year-old Finns in 2009 (the Adolescent Health and Lifestyle Survey). The respondents could answer via the internet or paper questionnaire. Results The number of respondents was 5516 and the response rate was 56%. Girls more often than boys reported experiencing at least one dimension of cyberbullying during the last year. The proportion was highest among 14-year-olds and lowest among 18-year-olds of both sexes. Among girls, the most commonly encountered dimension was witnessing the cyberbullying of friends (16%); and being a victim was slightly more common than being a bully (11% vs. 9%). Among boys, an equal proportion, approximately 10%, had been a victim, a bully, or had witnessed cyberbullying. The proportion of bully-victims was 4%. Serious and disruptive cyberbullying was experienced by 2% of respondents and weekly cyberbullying by 1%; only 0.5% of respondents had been bullied weekly and considered bullying serious and disruptive. Conclusions Adolescents are commonly exposed to cyberbullying, but it is rarely frequent or considered serious or disruptive. Cyberbullying exposure differed between

  18. Sexuality after a cancer diagnosis: A population-based study.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Sarah E; Wardle, Jane; Steptoe, Andrew; Fisher, Abigail

    2016-12-15

    This study explored differences in sexual activity, function, and concerns between cancer survivors and cancer-free controls in a population-based study. The data were from 2982 men and 3708 women who were 50 years old or older and were participating in the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. Sexual well-being was assessed with the Sexual Relationships and Activities Questionnaire, and cancer diagnoses were self-reported. There were no differences between cancer survivors and controls in levels of sexual activity (76.0% vs 78.5% for men and 58.2% vs 55.5% for women) or sexual function. Men and women with cancer diagnoses were more dissatisfied with their sex lives than controls (age-adjusted percentages: 30.9% vs 19.8% for men [P = .023] and 18.2% vs 11.8% for women [P = .034]), and women with cancer were more concerned about levels of sexual desire (10.2% vs 7.1%; P = .006). Women diagnosed < 5 years ago were more likely to report difficulty with becoming aroused (55.4% vs 31.8%; P = .016) and achieving orgasm (60.6% vs 28.3%; P < .001) and were more concerned about sexual desire (14.8% vs 7.1%; P = .007) and orgasmic experience (17.6% vs 7.1%; P = .042) than controls, but there were no differences in men. Self-reports of sexual activity and functioning in older people with cancer are broadly comparable to age-matched, cancer-free controls. There is a need to identify the causes of sexual dissatisfaction among long-term cancer survivors despite apparently normal levels of sexual activity and function for their age. The development of interventions addressing low sexual desire and problems with sexual functioning in women is also important and may be particularly relevant for cancer survivors after treatment. Cancer 2016;122:3883-3891. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Cancer Society.

  19. Cyberbullying among Finnish adolescents--a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Lindfors, Pirjo L; Kaltiala-Heino, Riittakerttu; Rimpelä, Arja H

    2012-11-23

    Cyberbullying, threatening or harassing another via the internet or mobile phones, does not cause physically harm and thus the consequences are less visible. Little research has been performed on the occurrence of cyberbullying among adolescents or the perception of its seriousness. Only a few population-based studies have been published, none of which included research on the witnessing of cyberbullying. Here, we examined exposure to cyberbullying during the last year, and its frequency and perceived seriousness among 12 to 18-year-old adolescents in Finland. We studied four dimensions of cyberbullying: being a victim, bully, or both victim and bully of cyberbullying, and witnessing the cyberbullying of friends. Self-administered questionnaires, including four questions on cyberbullying, were mailed to a representative sample of 12-, 14-, 16-, and 18-year-old Finns in 2009 (the Adolescent Health and Lifestyle Survey). The respondents could answer via the internet or paper questionnaire. The number of respondents was 5516 and the response rate was 56%. Girls more often than boys reported experiencing at least one dimension of cyberbullying during the last year. The proportion was highest among 14-year-olds and lowest among 18-year-olds of both sexes. Among girls, the most commonly encountered dimension was witnessing the cyberbullying of friends (16%); and being a victim was slightly more common than being a bully (11% vs. 9%). Among boys, an equal proportion, approximately 10%, had been a victim, a bully, or had witnessed cyberbullying. The proportion of bully-victims was 4%. Serious and disruptive cyberbullying was experienced by 2% of respondents and weekly cyberbullying by 1%; only 0.5% of respondents had been bullied weekly and considered bullying serious and disruptive. Adolescents are commonly exposed to cyberbullying, but it is rarely frequent or considered serious or disruptive. Cyberbullying exposure differed between sexes, such that girls more often than

  20. Older adults with acquired brain injury: a population based study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Acquired brain injury (ABI), which includes traumatic (TBI) and non-traumatic brain injury (nTBI), is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. The objective of this study was to examine the trends, characteristics, cause of brain injury, and discharge destination of hospitalized older adults aged 65 years and older with an ABI diagnosis in a population with universal access to hospital care. The profile of characteristics of patients with TBI and nTBI causes of injury was also compared. Methods A population based retrospective cohort study design with healthcare administrative databases was used. Data on acute care admissions were obtained from the Discharge Abstract Database and patients were identified using the International Classification of Diseases – Version 10 codes for Ontario, Canada from April 1, 2003 to March 31, 2010. Older adults were examined in three age groups – 65 to 74, 75 to 84, and 85+ years. Results From 2003/04 to 2009/10, there were 14,518 episodes of acute care associated with a TBI code and 51, 233 episodes with a nTBI code. Overall, the rate of hospitalized TBI and nTBI episodes increased with older age groups. From 2007/08 to 2009/10, the percentage of patients that stayed in acute care for 12 days or more and the percentage of patients with delayed discharge from acute care increased with age. The most common cause of TBI was falls while the most common type of nTBI was brain tumours. The percentage of patients discharged to long term care and complex continuing care increased with age and the percentage discharged home decreased with age. In-hospital mortality also increased with age. Older adults with TBI and nTBI differed significantly in demographic and clinical characteristics and discharge destination from acute care. Conclusions This study showed an increased rate of acute care admissions for both TBI and nTBI with age. It also provided additional support for falls prevention strategies to prevent injury

  1. Bladder cancer in Spain 2011: population based study.

    PubMed

    Miñana, B; Cózar, J M; Palou, J; Unda Urzaiz, M; Medina-Lopez, R A; Subirá Ríos, Jorge; de la Rosa-Kehrmann, F; Chantada-Abal, V; Lozano, F; Ribal, Maria J; Rodríguez Fernández, E; Castiñeiras Fernández, J; Concepción Masip, Tomás; Requena-Tapia, M J; Moreno-Sierra, J; Hevia, M; Gómez Rodríguez, A; Martínez-Ballesteros, C; Ramos, M; Amón Sesmero, José H; Pizá Reus, P; Bohorquez Barrientos, A; Rioja Sanz, Carlos; Gomez-Pascual, J Angel; Hidalgo Zabala, E; Parra Escobar, J L; Serrano, O

    2014-02-01

    We estimate the annual incidence of bladder cancer in Spain and describe the clinical profile of patients with bladder cancer enrolled in a population based study. Using the structure of the Spanish National Health System as a basis, in 2011 the AEU (Spanish Association of Urology) conducted this study with a representative sample from 26 public hospitals and a reference population of 10,146,534 inhabitants, comprising 21.5% of the Spanish population. A total of 4,285 episodes of bladder cancer were diagnosed, of which 2,476 (57.8%) were new cases and 1,809 (42.2%) were cases of recurrence, representing an estimated 11,539 new diagnoses annually in Spain. The incidence of bladder cancer in Spain, age adjusted to the standard European population, was 20.08 cases per 100,000 inhabitants (95% CI 13.9, 26.3). Of patients diagnosed with a first episode of bladder cancer 84.3% were male, generally older than 59 years (81.7%) with a mean ± SD age of 70.5 ± 11.4 years. Of these patients 87.5% presented with some type of clinical symptom, with macroscopic hematuria (90.8%) being the most commonly detected. The majority of primary tumors were nonmuscle invasive (76.7%) but included a high proportion of high grade tumors (43.7%). According to the ISUP (International Society of Urologic Pathology)/WHO (2004) classification 51.1% was papillary high grade carcinoma. Carcinoma in situ was found in 2.2% of primary and 5.8% of recurrent cases. The incidence of bladder cancer in Spain, age adjusted to the standard European population, confirms that Spain has one of the highest incidences in Europe. Most primary nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer corresponded to high risk patients but with a low detected incidence of carcinoma in situ. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Statistical genetics with application to population-based study design: a primer for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Beyene, Joseph; Pare, Guillaume

    2014-02-01

    With the completion of the entire human genome sequence and remarkable advances in genotyping technologies, there has been an increased interest in the application of genetics and genomics in biomedical research over the last decade. Large-scale population-based genetic association studies have now become routine and their application to several multifactorial diseases such as cardiovascular disorders has led to the identification of a number of novel susceptibility genes. However, to be able to interpret results from such studies, clinicians need to have a basic understanding of unique concepts and issues related to this fast-moving area of research. In this primer, we provide a broad overview of design, analysis, and methodological issues with a focus on population-based study design.

  3. Prevalence of microcephaly in Europe: population based study.

    PubMed

    Morris, Joan K; Rankin, Judith; Garne, Ester; Loane, Maria; Greenlees, Ruth; Addor, Marie-Claude; Arriola, Larraitz; Barisic, Ingeborg; Bergman, Jorieke E H; Csaky-Szunyogh, Melinda; Dias, Carlos; Draper, Elizabeth S; Gatt, Miriam; Khoshnood, Babak; Klungsoyr, Kari; Kurinczuk, Jennifer J; Lynch, Catherine; McDonnell, Robert; Nelen, Vera; Neville, Amanda J; O'Mahony, Mary T; Pierini, Anna; Randrianaivo, Hanitra; Rissmann, Anke; Tucker, David; Verellen-Dumoulin, Christine; de Walle, Hermien E K; Wellesley, Diana; Wiesel, Awi; Dolk, Helen

    2016-09-13

     To provide contemporary estimates of the prevalence of microcephaly in Europe, determine if the diagnosis of microcephaly is consistent across Europe, and evaluate whether changes in prevalence would be detected using the current European surveillance performed by EUROCAT (the European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies).  Questionnaire and population based observational study.  24 EUROCAT registries covering 570 000 births annually in 15 countries.  Cases of microcephaly not associated with a genetic condition among live births, fetal deaths from 20 weeks' gestation, and terminations of pregnancy for fetal anomaly at any gestation.  Prevalence of microcephaly (1 Jan 2003-31 Dec 2012) analysed with random effects Poisson regression models to account for heterogeneity across registries.  16 registries responded to the questionnaire, of which 44% (7/16) used the EUROCAT definition of microcephaly (a reduction in the size of the brain with a skull circumference more than 3 SD below the mean for sex, age, and ethnic origin), 19% (3/16) used a 2 SD cut off, 31% (5/16) were reliant on the criteria used by individual clinicians, and one changed criteria between 2003 and 2012. Prevalence of microcephaly in Europe was 1.53 (95% confidence interval 1.16 to 1.96) per 10 000 births, with registries varying from 0.4 (0.2 to 0.7) to 4.3 (3.6 to 5.0) per 10 000 (χ(2)=338, df=23, I(2)=93%). Registries with a 3 SD cut off reported a prevalence of 1.74 per 10 000 (0.86 to 2.93) compared with those with the less stringent 2 SD cut off of 1.21 per 10 000 (0.21 to 2.93). The prevalence of microcephaly would need to increase in one year by over 35% in Europe or by over 300% in a single registry to reach statistical significance (P<0.01).  EUROCAT could detect increases in the prevalence of microcephaly from the Zika virus of a similar magnitude to those observed in Brazil. Because of the rarity of microcephaly and discrepant diagnostic criteria, however, the smaller

  4. Prevalence of microcephaly in Europe: population based study

    PubMed Central

    Rankin, Judith; Garne, Ester; Loane, Maria; Greenlees, Ruth; Addor, Marie-Claude; Arriola, Larraitz; Barisic, Ingeborg; Bergman, Jorieke E H; Csaky-Szunyogh, Melinda; Dias, Carlos; Draper, Elizabeth S; Gatt, Miriam; Khoshnood, Babak; Klungsoyr, Kari; Kurinczuk, Jennifer J; Lynch, Catherine; McDonnell, Robert; Nelen, Vera; Neville, Amanda J; O’Mahony, Mary T; Pierini, Anna; Randrianaivo, Hanitra; Rissmann, Anke; Tucker, David; Verellen-Dumoulin, Christine; de Walle, Hermien E K; Wellesley, Diana; Wiesel, Awi; Dolk, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To provide contemporary estimates of the prevalence of microcephaly in Europe, determine if the diagnosis of microcephaly is consistent across Europe, and evaluate whether changes in prevalence would be detected using the current European surveillance performed by EUROCAT (the European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies). Design Questionnaire and population based observational study. Setting 24 EUROCAT registries covering 570 000 births annually in 15 countries. Participants Cases of microcephaly not associated with a genetic condition among live births, fetal deaths from 20 weeks’ gestation, and terminations of pregnancy for fetal anomaly at any gestation. Main outcome measures Prevalence of microcephaly (1 Jan 2003-31 Dec 2012) analysed with random effects Poisson regression models to account for heterogeneity across registries. Results 16 registries responded to the questionnaire, of which 44% (7/16) used the EUROCAT definition of microcephaly (a reduction in the size of the brain with a skull circumference more than 3 SD below the mean for sex, age, and ethnic origin), 19% (3/16) used a 2 SD cut off, 31% (5/16) were reliant on the criteria used by individual clinicians, and one changed criteria between 2003 and 2012. Prevalence of microcephaly in Europe was 1.53 (95% confidence interval 1.16 to 1.96) per 10 000 births, with registries varying from 0.4 (0.2 to 0.7) to 4.3 (3.6 to 5.0) per 10 000 (χ2=338, df=23, I2=93%). Registries with a 3 SD cut off reported a prevalence of 1.74 per 10 000 (0.86 to 2.93) compared with those with the less stringent 2 SD cut off of 1.21 per 10 000 (0.21 to 2.93). The prevalence of microcephaly would need to increase in one year by over 35% in Europe or by over 300% in a single registry to reach statistical significance (P<0.01). Conclusions EUROCAT could detect increases in the prevalence of microcephaly from the Zika virus of a similar magnitude to those observed in Brazil. Because of the rarity

  5. Combining family- and population-based imputation data for association analysis of rare and common variants in large pedigrees.

    PubMed

    Saad, Mohamad; Wijsman, Ellen M

    2014-11-01

    In the last two decades, complex traits have become the main focus of genetic studies. The hypothesis that both rare and common variants are associated with complex traits is increasingly being discussed. Family-based association studies using relatively large pedigrees are suitable for both rare and common variant identification. Because of the high cost of sequencing technologies, imputation methods are important for increasing the amount of information at low cost. A recent family-based imputation method, Genotype Imputation Given Inheritance (GIGI), is able to handle large pedigrees and accurately impute rare variants, but does less well for common variants where population-based methods perform better. Here, we propose a flexible approach to combine imputation data from both family- and population-based methods. We also extend the Sequence Kernel Association Test for Rare and Common variants (SKAT-RC), originally proposed for data from unrelated subjects, to family data in order to make use of such imputed data. We call this extension "famSKAT-RC." We compare the performance of famSKAT-RC and several other existing burden and kernel association tests. In simulated pedigree sequence data, our results show an increase of imputation accuracy from use of our combining approach. Also, they show an increase of power of the association tests with this approach over the use of either family- or population-based imputation methods alone, in the context of rare and common variants. Moreover, our results show better performance of famSKAT-RC compared to the other considered tests, in most scenarios investigated here.

  6. Familial risk of epilepsy: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Peljto, Anna L.; Barker-Cummings, Christie; Vasoli, Vincent M.; Leibson, Cynthia L.; Hauser, W. Allen; Buchhalter, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Almost all previous studies of familial risk of epilepsy have had potentially serious methodological limitations. Our goal was to address these limitations and provide more rigorous estimates of familial risk in a population-based study. We used the unique resources of the Rochester Epidemiology Project to identify all 660 Rochester, Minnesota residents born in 1920 or later with incidence of epilepsy from 1935–94 (probands) and their 2439 first-degree relatives who resided in Olmsted County. We assessed incidence of epilepsy in relatives by comprehensive review of the relatives’ medical records, and estimated age-specific cumulative incidence and standardized incidence ratios for epilepsy in relatives compared with the general population, according to proband and relative characteristics. Among relatives of all probands, cumulative incidence of epilepsy to age 40 was 4.7%, and risk was increased 3.3-fold (95% confidence interval 2.75–5.99) compared with population incidence. Risk was increased to the greatest extent in relatives of probands with idiopathic generalized epilepsies (standardized incidence ratio 6.0) and epilepsies associated with intellectual or motor disability presumed present from birth, which we denoted ‘prenatal/developmental cause’ (standardized incidence ratio 4.3). Among relatives of probands with epilepsy without identified cause (including epilepsies classified as ‘idiopathic’ or ‘unknown cause’), risk was significantly increased for epilepsy of prenatal/developmental cause (standardized incidence ratio 4.1). Similarly, among relatives of probands with prenatal/developmental cause, risk was significantly increased for epilepsies without identified cause (standardized incidence ratio 3.8). In relatives of probands with generalized epilepsy, standardized incidence ratios were 8.3 (95% confidence interval 2.93–15.31) for generalized epilepsy and 2.5 (95% confidence interval 0.92–4.00) for focal epilepsy. In relatives of

  7. Distribution of antiphospholipid antibodies in a large population-based German cohort.

    PubMed

    Manukyan, Davit; Rossmann, Heidi; Schulz, Andreas; Zeller, Tanja; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Binder, Harald; Münzel, Thomas; Beutel, Manfred E; Müller-Calleja, Nadine; Wild, Philipp S; Lackner, Karl J

    2016-10-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is the most common acquired thrombophilia. Diagnosis is based on clinical criteria and the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs) above the 99th percentile of a reference group. Data on the distribution of aPL in the population are limited. The distribution of aPL including diagnostic cutoffs should be determined in a population-based cohort. The Gutenberg Health Study (GHS) is a population-based cohort aged 35-74 years. We determined the presence of antibodies against cardiolipin (aCL, IgG, and IgM), β2-glycoprotein I (anti-β2GPI, IgG, and IgM), and domain 1 of β2-glycoprotein I (anti-domain 1, IgG) in a sample of 4979 participants. aPL titers were similar in the whole sample and in an apparently healthy subgroup of 1049 individuals. There was a strong age-dependent increase of both aCL and anti-β2GPI IgM, while aPL IgG titers were stable or tended to decrease with age. A relevant decrease was observed for aCL IgG in women and anti-domain 1 IgG in both sexes. There was no association of aPL titers with a history of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Our data show that for IgM aPL, age-dependent reference ranges should be used. In fact, the controversy regarding the clinical utility of IgM aPL might be related to the use of inappropriate reference ranges among other causes. In our population, aPLs were not associated with a history of VTE.

  8. A population-based study of the stratum corneum moisture

    PubMed Central

    de Farias Pires, Thiago; Azambuja, Ana Paula; Horimoto, Andrea Roseli Vançan Russo; Nakamura, Mary Sanae; de Oliveira Alvim, Rafael; Krieger, José Eduardo; Pereira, Alexandre Costa

    2016-01-01

    Background The stratum corneum (SC) has important functions as a bound-water modulator and a primary barrier of the human skin from the external environment. However, no large epidemiological study has quantified the relative importance of different exposures with regard to these functional properties. In this study, we have studied a large sample of individuals from the Brazilian population in order to understand the different relationships between the properties of SC and a number of demographic and self-perceived variables. Methods One thousand three hundred and thirty-nine individuals from a rural Brazilian population, who were participants of a family-based study, were submitted to a cross-sectional examination of the SC moisture by capacitance using the Corneometer® CM820 and investigated regarding environmental exposures, cosmetic use, and other physiological and epidemiological measurements. Self-perception-scaled questions about skin conditions were also applied. Results We found significant associations between SC moisture and sex, age, high sun exposure, and sunscreen use frequency (P<0.025). In specific studied sites, self-reported race and obesity were also found to show significant effects. Dry skin self-perception was also found to be highly correlated with the objective measurement of the skin. Other environmental effects on SC moisture are also reported. PMID:27143945

  9. Population-based study of presbyopia in Nicaragua.

    PubMed

    Hookway, Larry A; Frazier, Marcela; Rivera, Nelson; Ramson, Prasidh; Carballo, Luis; Naidoo, Kovin

    2016-11-01

    Uncorrected presbyopia can greatly impact a person's quality of life and employment prospects. Nicaragua is the poorest country in Latin America and there are no population-based reports of prevalence of presbyopia in Nicaragua. A cross-sectional population-based household survey was conducted. The sample was selected through random cluster sampling. Adults 35 years and older were enlisted through a door-to-door method using aged-based sampling. All enumerated household members 35 years and older were asked to attend a free visual acuity screening. Autorefraction was done and then uncorrected distance vision and near visual acuity were measured for all subjects. All those who had distance or near vision that was 6/12 or worse underwent a clinical examination, which included refraction at distance and near. Free spectacles were provided. Of the 3,390 subjects surveyed, 37.1 per cent reported that they wore spectacles on a regular basis. A total of 1,871 (55.2 per cent) of those enumerated were examined. The prevalence of near visual impairment (6/12 [N 6] or worse) was 79.6 per cent for the 35 to 49-year-old group, 97.3 per cent for the 50 to 64-year-old group and 96.7 per cent for the 65 and over group. Of those reporting for the examination, 82.2 per cent did not have glasses. Of those examined, 10 per cent did not need spectacles, four per cent were given spectacles for distance only, 38 per cent spectacles for distance and near, 42 per cent spectacles for near only and seven per cent were referred for medical evaluation due to ocular pathology. During the refractions, 91.5 per cent were corrected to 6/12 or better at distance and 89.4 per cent were corrected to 6/12 or better at near. The majority of the participants who were examined did not have the spectacles that they needed. Over one-third of those participants who presented without spectacles had distance vision better than 6/12 and could be improved to good near vision with ready-made near-only spectacles

  10. Provider communication on perinatal depression: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Farr, Sherry L; Ko, Jean Y; Burley, Kim; Gupta, Seema

    2016-02-01

    Women's lack of knowledge on symptoms of perinatal depression and treatment resources is a barrier to receiving care. We sought to estimate the prevalence and predictors of discussing depression with a prenatal care provider. We used the 2011 population-based data from 24 sites participating in the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (n = 32,827 women with recent live births) to examine associations between maternal characteristics and report that a prenatal care provider discussed with her what to do if feeling depressed during or after pregnancy. Overall, 71.9 % of women reported discussing perinatal depression with their prenatal care provider (range 60.7 % in New York City to 85.6 % in Maine). Women were more likely to report a discussion on perinatal depression with their provider if they they were 18-29 years of age than over 35 years of age compared to older (adjusted prevalence ratio [aPR] 18 to 19 y = 1.08, 20 to 24 y = 1.10, 25 to 29 y = 1.09), unmarried (aPR = 1.07) compared to married, had <12 years of education (aPR = 1.05) compared to > 12 years, and had no previous live births (aPR = 1.03) compared to ≥ 1 live births. Research is needed on effective ways to educate women about perinatal depression and whether increased knowledge on perinatal depression results in higher rates of treatment and shorter duration of symptoms.

  11. Epidemiological study of prostate cancer (EPICAP): a population-based case-control study in France.

    PubMed

    Menegaux, Florence; Anger, Antoinette; Randrianasolo, Hasina; Mulot, Claire; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Iborra, François; Bringer, Jean-Pierre; Leizour, Benoit; Thuret, Rodolphe; Lamy, Pierre-Jean; Rébillard, Xavier; Trétarre, Brigitte

    2014-02-19

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in male in most Western countries, including France. Despite a significant morbidity and mortality to a lesser extent, the etiology of prostate cancer remains largely unknown. Indeed, the only well-established risk factors to date are age, ethnicity and a family history of prostate cancer. We present, here, the rationale and design of the EPIdemiological study of Prostate CAncer (EPICAP), a population-based case-control study specifically designed to investigate the role of environmental and genetic factors in prostate cancer. The EPICAP study will particularly focused on the role of circadian disruption, chronic inflammation, hormonal and metabolic factors in the occurrence of prostate cancer. EPICAP is a population-based case-control study conducted in the département of Hérault in France. Eligible cases are all cases of prostate cancers newly diagnosed in 2012-2013 in men less than 75 years old and residing in the département of Hérault at the time of diagnosis. Controls are men of the same age as the cases and living in the département of Hérault, recruited in the general population.The sample will include a total of 1000 incident cases of prostate cancer and 1000 population-based controls over a 3-year period (2012-2014).The cases and controls are face-to-face interviewed using a standardized computed assisted questionnaire. The questions focus primarily on usual socio-demographic characteristics, personal and family medical history, lifestyle, leisure activities, residential and occupational history. Anthropometric measures and biological samples are also collected for cases and controls. The EPICAP study aims to answer key questions in prostate cancer etiology: (1) role of circadian disruption through the study of working hours, chronotype and duration/quality of sleep, (2) role of chronic inflammation and anti-inflammatory drugs, (3) role of hormonal and metabolic factors through a detailed questionnaire, (4

  12. Epidemiological study of prostate cancer (EPICAP): a population-based case–control study in France

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in male in most Western countries, including France. Despite a significant morbidity and mortality to a lesser extent, the etiology of prostate cancer remains largely unknown. Indeed, the only well-established risk factors to date are age, ethnicity and a family history of prostate cancer. We present, here, the rationale and design of the EPIdemiological study of Prostate CAncer (EPICAP), a population-based case–control study specifically designed to investigate the role of environmental and genetic factors in prostate cancer. The EPICAP study will particularly focused on the role of circadian disruption, chronic inflammation, hormonal and metabolic factors in the occurrence of prostate cancer. Methods/Design EPICAP is a population-based case–control study conducted in the département of Hérault in France. Eligible cases are all cases of prostate cancers newly diagnosed in 2012-2013 in men less than 75 years old and residing in the département of Hérault at the time of diagnosis. Controls are men of the same age as the cases and living in the département of Hérault, recruited in the general population. The sample will include a total of 1000 incident cases of prostate cancer and 1000 population-based controls over a 3-year period (2012-2014). The cases and controls are face-to-face interviewed using a standardized computed assisted questionnaire. The questions focus primarily on usual socio-demographic characteristics, personal and family medical history, lifestyle, leisure activities, residential and occupational history. Anthropometric measures and biological samples are also collected for cases and controls. Discussion The EPICAP study aims to answer key questions in prostate cancer etiology: (1) role of circadian disruption through the study of working hours, chronotype and duration/quality of sleep, (2) role of chronic inflammation and anti-inflammatory drugs, (3) role of hormonal and metabolic

  13. Preeclampsia and preterm delivery: A population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Davies, Emma L; Bell, Jacqueline S; Bhattacharya, Sohinee

    2016-11-01

    To determine the contribution of preeclampsia toward preterm birth in primiparous women. This large population-based case-control study used the Aberdeen Maternity and Neonatal Databank to analyze data on primiparous women with singleton pregnancies, who delivered between 1997 and 2012. A significant positive association was found between preeclampsia and preterm birth (adjusted odds ratio 4.43; 95% confidence interval 3.80-5.16). Magnitude of association varied according to the onset of delivery and year of delivery. Preeclampsia is an important contributor to preterm delivery in this setting and therefore a potentially useful condition to target in order to reduce preterm rates.

  14. Ophthalmic manifestations of tuberous sclerosis: a population based study

    PubMed Central

    Rowley, S; O'Callaghan, F; Osborne, J

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) has retinal and non-retinal ophthalmic manifestations. This study was designed to determine the prevalence of the ophthalmic manifestations and of refractive errors in a population of patients with TSC.
METHODS—179 patients identified were in a prevalence study of TSC in the south of England and 107 of these agreed to full ophthalmic examination which was successful in 100. Ophthalmic examination included examination of the eyelids, cover test, examination of the irides, dilation funduscopy using both direct and indirect ophthalmoscopy, and refraction using retinoscopy. Myopia was defined as a spherical equivalent <−0.5D and hyperopia as a spherical equivalent >+0.5D.
RESULTS—Retinal hamartomas were seen in 44 of the 100 patients. The commonest morphological type of hamartoma seen was the flat, translucent lesion in 31 of the 44 patients (70%). The multinodular "mulberry" lesion was seen in 24 of the 44 patients (55%) and the transitional type lesion was seen in four of the 44 patients (9%). Punched out areas of retinal depigmentation were seen in 39 of the 100 patients but only six of 100 controls. 27% of eyes were myopic, 22% were hyperopic, and 27% had astigmatism >0.75D. Of the non-retinal findings, 39 patients had angiofibromas of the eyelids, five had non-paralytic strabismus, and three had colobomas.
CONCLUSION—Apart from the higher prevalence of flat retinal hamartomas, the findings of this study compare closely with previous large clinic based series of TSC patients. Refractive findings were similar to previous studies of a similarly aged non-TSC population. This is the first series to document the statistically significant association of punched out chorioretinal depigmentation with TSC and the authors believe that it should be looked for as an aid to diagnosis.

 PMID:11264130

  15. Season of diagnosis is associated with overall survival in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma but not with Hodgkin's lymphoma - A population-based Swedish Lymphoma Register study.

    PubMed

    Székely, Elisabeth; Lindén, Ola; Peterson, Stefan; Jerkeman, Mats

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of season of diagnosis on the outcome of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). In this study, we included curatively treated DLBCL (n = 5875) and HL (n = 1693) patients, diagnosed between 2000 and 2011, based on data from the Swedish Lymphoma Register. Overall survival was significantly better for patients diagnosed with DLBCL during the summer months, but not for patients diagnosed with HL. The difference remained in a multivariable analysis adjusted for age, stage, performance status, number of extra nodal sites and year of diagnosis (HR 1.08; 95% CI 1.02-1.14, P = 0.0069). When analyzing the DLBCL patients according to gender in the multivariable model, the effect of season was shown to be restricted to male patients (HR = 1.09, 95% CI 1.01-1.17, P = 0.0269. In summary, season of diagnosis was shown to have impact on overall survival in male patients with DLBCL. Possible explanations of our results are the higher vitamin D level during the summer months, the effects of sunlight on the circadian rhythm and the immune system, or the lower risk of infectious disease during the summer. Further investigations are needed to explore these hypotheses. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Brief Report: Prevalence of Self-Injurious Behaviors among Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder--A Population-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soke, Gnakub N.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Hamman, Richard F.; Fingerlin, Tasha; Robinson, Cordelia; Carpenter, Laura; Giarelli, Ellen; Lee, Li-Ching; Wiggins, Lisa D.; Durkin, Maureen S.; DiGuiseppi, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    Self-injurious behaviors (SIB) have been reported in more than 30% of children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in clinic-based studies. This study estimated the prevalence of SIB in a large population-based sample of children with ASD in the United States. A total of 8,065 children who met the surveillance case definition for ASD in the…

  17. Brief Report: Prevalence of Self-Injurious Behaviors among Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder--A Population-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soke, Gnakub N.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Hamman, Richard F.; Fingerlin, Tasha; Robinson, Cordelia; Carpenter, Laura; Giarelli, Ellen; Lee, Li-Ching; Wiggins, Lisa D.; Durkin, Maureen S.; DiGuiseppi, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    Self-injurious behaviors (SIB) have been reported in more than 30% of children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in clinic-based studies. This study estimated the prevalence of SIB in a large population-based sample of children with ASD in the United States. A total of 8,065 children who met the surveillance case definition for ASD in the…

  18. Prevalence of Parkinson's disease in Baskale, Turkey: a population based study.

    PubMed

    Durmus, Hacer; Gokalp, Mehmet A; Hanagasi, Hasmet A

    2015-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease, and its prevalence rate varies between 15 and 250/100.000. The data on the prevalence of PD in Turkey are limited. In this study, we aimed to estimate the prevalence of PD in Baskale, Turkey. The study area is a rural small area in the eastern part Turkey, with a population of 26.991 inhabitants. The first stage of the study was undertaken between February and October 2011. Field workers performed a door to door population screening for the cardinal symptoms of PD and identified cases were reevaluated by an experienced movement disorders specialist. In this population based study, 19 PD patients were identified in the screened population, indicating that the estimated age standardized prevalence of PD in Turkey was 202/100.000. This study is the first large population based study for identifying prevalence of PD in Turkey. Our prevalence rate is slightly lower than those of European countries, which may be caused by ethnical differences or environmental factors.

  19. Mediterranean diet and telomere length in Nurses' Health Study: population based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Crous-Bou, Marta; Fung, Teresa T; Prescott, Jennifer; Julin, Bettina; Du, Mengmeng; Sun, Qi; Rexrode, Kathryn M; Hu, Frank B; De Vivo, Immaculata

    2014-12-02

    To examine whether adherence to the Mediterranean diet was associated with longer telomere length, a biomarker of aging. Population based cohort study. Nurses' Health Study, an ongoing prospective cohort study of 121,700 nurses enrolled in 1976; in 1989-90 a subset of 32,825 women provided blood samples. 4676 disease-free women from nested case-control studies within the Nurses' Health Study with telomere length measured who also completed food frequency questionnaires. Association between relative telomere lengths in peripheral blood leukocytes measured by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction and Alternate Mediterranean Diet score calculated from self reported dietary data. Greater adherence to the Mediterranean diet was associated with longer telomeres after adjustment for potential confounders. Least squares mean telomere length z scores were -0.038 (SE 0.035) for the lowest Mediterranean diet score groups and 0.072 (0.030) for the highest group (P for trend = 0.004). In this large study, greater adherence to the Mediterranean diet was associated with longer telomeres. These results further support the benefits of adherence to the Mediterranean diet for promoting health and longevity. © Crous-Bou et al 2014.

  20. Formula and breast feeding in infant food allergy: A population-based study.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Alice J; Koplin, Jennifer J; Lowe, Adrian J; Tang, Mimi Lk; Matheson, Melanie C; Robinson, Marnie; Peters, Rachel; Dharmage, Shyamali C; Allen, Katrina J

    2016-04-01

    To determine whether infant-feeding practices, including duration of exclusive breastfeeding and use of partially hydrolysed formula, modify the risk of developing infant food allergy. In an observational population-based study, 1 year olds were recruited from community immunisation clinics in Melbourne, Australia. Parent-reported data on infant-feeding practices and potential confounders were collected prior to infant skin prick testing for four food allergens. Sensitised infants attended hospital-based oral food challenges to establish food allergy status. Multiple logistic regression was used to investigate associations between breastfeeding and formula-feeding and infant food allergy adjusting for possible confounding variables. A total of 5276 (74% response) infants participated. Of the 4537 for whom food allergy status was determined, 515 (11.3%) were food allergic (challenge-proven in the context of skin prick testing positive (≥2 mm)). After adjusting for confounding variables, there was no association between duration of exclusive breastfeeding and food allergy. Use of partially hydrolysed formula did not reduce the risk of food allergy compared with cow's milk formula in the general population (adjusted odds ratios 1.03 (confidence interval 0.67-1.50)). Duration of exclusive breastfeeding and use of partially hydrolysed formula were not associated with food allergy at 1 year of age in this large population-based study. These findings have implications for population-based infant-feeding guidelines and do not support the use of partially hydrolysed formula for food allergy prevention. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2016 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  1. Burden of parkinsonism: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Guttman, Mark; Slaughter, Pamela M; Theriault, Marc-Erick; DeBoer, Donald P; Naylor, C David

    2003-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with a significant burden of illness and cost to society, which has been difficult to quantify. Our objective was to use linked administrative databases from the population of Ontario, Canada, to assess the prevalence of parkinsonism, physician- and drug-related costs, and hospital utilization for parkinsonian patients compared with age/sex matched controls. An inception cohort of parkinsonian cases from 1993/1994 was age and sex matched (1:2) to controls and followed for 6 years. Patients were identified by the diagnostic code for PD, the use of specific PD drugs, or a combination. The parkinsonian case cohort (15,304) was matched to (30,608) controls that did not have parkinsonism. The age-adjusted prevalence rates were 3.63 for men and for 3.24 women per 1,000 (increased by 5.4% for men and 9.8% for women). Physician costs were 1.4 times more, there were 1.44 times more hospital admissions, admissions were on average 1.19 times longer, and drug costs were 3.0 times more for parkinsonian cases. We conclude that the substantially higher physician and drug costs as well as hospitalization rates compared with controls clearly suggest that parkinsonism is associated with large direct costs to society.

  2. Population-based study of risk of breast cancer in carriers of BRCA2 mutation.

    PubMed

    Thorlacius, S; Struewing, J P; Hartge, P; Olafsdottir, G H; Sigvaldason, H; Tryggvadottir, L; Wacholder, S; Tulinius, H; Eyfjörd, J E

    1998-10-24

    Estimates of an 80-90% risk of breast cancer for carriers of germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are based on studies of families at high risk of breast cancer. Risk estimates for a population are possible if the mutation status of a representative sample of that population can be assessed. In Iceland, one common founder BRCA2 mutation occurs in 0.6% of the population. Iceland has a population-based cancer registry and a large collection of pedigrees, and estimation of cancer risk in mutation carriers is therefore possible. We studied 575 breast-cancer patients, 541 women and 34 men unselected for family history of breast cancer. Data on cancer in first-degree relatives were available from the cancer registry. Risk of cancer was estimated by comparing the history of cancer in first-degree relatives of carriers and non-carriers. 56 (10.4%) of the 541 women and 13 (38%) of the 34 men carried the 999del5 mutation. The estimated risk of breast cancer at age 50 for all female carriers of the 999del5 mutation was 17.0% (95% CI 9.1-25.9) and 37.2% (22.4-53.9) at age 70. The results of our population-based study show that the mean risk of breast cancer in carriers of mutation in BRCA2 is lower than previously suggested. Individual risk assessment will, however, have to take account of family history.

  3. Hyperthyroidism and erectile dysfunction: a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Keller, J; Chen, Y-K; Lin, H-C

    2012-01-01

    Dysthyroidism has been highlighted as a common endocrine disorder associated with erectile dysfunction (ED); however, to date, no large-scale population-based study has investigated the association between hyperthyroidism and ED. This case-control study aimed to explore the association between ED and hyperthyroidism using a population-based data set. In total, 6310 adult patients who received new diagnoses of ED were recruited as cases together with 18 930 matched enrollees with no history of ED who served as controls. Conditional logistic regressions were conducted to explore the association between ED and having been previously diagnosed with hyperthyroidism. In total, 569 (2.3%) of the 25 240 sampled subjects had been diagnosed with hyperthyroidism before the index date; hyperthyroidism was found in 207 (3.3%) cases and 362 (1.90%) controls. After adjusting for potential confounding factors, the odds ratio (OR) of prior hyperthyroidism among cases was 1.64 (95% confidence interval=1.37-1.96, P<0.001) than that of controls. No association was detected between prior hyperthyroidism and ED for the 18-30, 30-39 and >70 age groups. Subjects aged between 60 and 69 years had the highest ORs for prior hyperthyroidism among cases when compared to controls (OR=1.84; 95% confidence interval=1.20-2.84; P<0.001). Our study further confirms the existence of an association between ED and prior hyperthyroidism.

  4. Cancer survival in Africa, Asia, and Central America: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy; Swaminathan, Rajaraman; Brenner, Hermann; Chen, Kexin; Chia, Kee Seng; Chen, Jian Guo; Law, Stephen C K; Ahn, Yoon-Ok; Xiang, Yong Bing; Yeole, Balakrishna B; Shin, Hai Rim; Shanta, Viswanathan; Woo, Ze Hong; Martin, Nimit; Sumitsawan, Yupa; Sriplung, Hutcha; Barboza, Adolfo Ortiz; Eser, Sultan; Nene, Bhagwan M; Suwanrungruang, Krittika; Jayalekshmi, Padmavathiamma; Dikshit, Rajesh; Wabinga, Henry; Esteban, Divina B; Laudico, Adriano; Bhurgri, Yasmin; Bah, Ebrima; Al-Hamdan, Nasser

    2010-02-01

    Population-based cancer survival data, a key indicator for monitoring progress against cancer, are not widely available from countries in Africa, Asia, and Central America. The aim of this study is to describe and discuss cancer survival in these regions. Survival analysis was done for 341 658 patients diagnosed with various cancers from 1990 to 2001 and followed up to 2003, from 25 population-based cancer registries in 12 countries in sub-Saharan Africa (The Gambia, Uganda), Central America (Costa Rica), and Asia (China, India, Pakistan, Philippines, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, Turkey). 5-year age-standardised relative survival (ASRS) and observed survival by clinical extent of disease were determined. For cancers in which prognosis depends on stage at diagnosis, survival was highest in China, South Korea, Singapore, and Turkey and lowest in Uganda and The Gambia. 5-year ASRS ranged from 76-82% for breast cancer, 63-79% for cervical cancer, 71-78% for bladder cancer, and 44-60% for large-bowel cancers in China, Singapore, South Korea, and Turkey. Survival did not exceed 22% for any cancer site in The Gambia; in Uganda, survival did not exceed 13% for any cancer site except breast (46%). Variations in survival correlated with early detection initiatives and level of development of health services. The wide variation in cancer survival between regions emphasises the need for urgent investments in improving awareness, population-based cancer registration, early detection programmes, health-services infrastructure, and human resources. Association for International Cancer Research (AICR; St Andrews, UK), Association pour la Recherche sur le Cancer (ARC, Villejuif, France), and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (Seattle, USA). Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterizing Adolescent Prescription Misusers: A Population-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schepis, Ty S.; Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra

    2008-01-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the risk factors associated with the abuse of opiods, stimulants, tranquilizers and other sedatives among adolescents aged between 12 to 17 years and the presence of one more symptoms of a substance use disorder from prescription misuse. Results indicated that poor academic performance; enjoyment of…

  6. Characterizing Adolescent Prescription Misusers: A Population-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schepis, Ty S.; Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra

    2008-01-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the risk factors associated with the abuse of opiods, stimulants, tranquilizers and other sedatives among adolescents aged between 12 to 17 years and the presence of one more symptoms of a substance use disorder from prescription misuse. Results indicated that poor academic performance; enjoyment of…

  7. Propranolol Reduces Cancer Risk: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ping-Ying; Huang, Wen-Yen; Lin, Cheng-Li; Huang, Tzu-Chuan; Wu, Yi-Ying; Chen, Jia-Hong; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-07-01

    β-Blockers have been reported to exhibit potential anticancer effects in cancer cell lines and animal models. However, clinical studies have yielded inconsistent results regarding cancer outcomes and cancer risk when β-blockers were used. This study investigated the association between propranolol and cancer risk.Between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2011, a patient cohort was extracted from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000, a subset of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. A propranolol cohort (propranolol usage >6 months) and nonpropranolol cohort were matched using a propensity score. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of cancer associated with propranolol treatment.The study sample comprised 24,238 patients. After a 12-year follow-up period, the cumulative incidence for developing cancer was low in the propranolol cohort (HR: 0.75; 95% CI: 0.67-0.85; P < 0.001). Patients with propranolol treatment exhibited significantly lower risks of cancers in head and neck (HR: 0.58; 95% CI: 0.35-0.95), esophagus (HR: 0.35; 95% CI: 0.13-0.96), stomach (HR: 0.54; 95% CI: 0.30-0.98), colon (HR: 0.68; 95% CI: 0.49-0.93), and prostate cancers (HR: 0.52; 95% CI: 0.33-0.83). The protective effect of propranolol for head and neck, stomach, colon, and prostate cancers was most substantial when exposure duration exceeded 1000 days.This study supports the proposition that propranolol can reduce the risk of head and neck, esophagus, stomach, colon, and prostate cancers. Further prospective study is necessary to confirm these findings.

  8. Astigmatism in underserved rural areas: a population based study.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Hassan; Nabovati, Payam; Malekifar, Azam; Yekta, Abbasali; Ostadimoghaddam, Hadi; Jafarzadehpur, Ebrahim; Khabazkhoob, Mehdi

    2016-11-01

    Studying the prevalence of astigmatism and its related factors in underprivileged rural areas in Iran. Using random cluster sampling, two rural areas in the north and southwest of Iran were randomly selected, and 3851 persons over 1 year of age were invited to the study. In addition to recording demographics, retinoscopic refraction was conducted using baseline auto-refraction results. The prevalence of astigmatism was determined based on cylinder error cut-off points of 0.50 dioptre (D), 1.00, 2.00 and 3.00 D. Multiple logistic regression was used to assess variables' relationship with astigmatism. The prevalence of astigmatism as a cylinder error greater than 0.50 D was 35.6% (95% CI: 33.7-37.6); this was 34.0% (95% CI: 31.4-36.6) in women and 36.9% (95% CI: 33.9-39.9) in men. The lowest prevalence was seen in the 6-20 year old age group (13.6%) and the highest prevalence was found in individuals older than 70 years (82.5%). In the multiple logistic regression model, age and education level were significantly related to astigmatism. The prevalence rates of with-the-rule (WTR), against-the-rule (ATR), and oblique astigmatism were respectively 15.0%, 17.2%, and 3.5%. The prevalence of WTR astigmatism decreased with age, while the prevalence of ATR (and oblique astigmatism to a lesser extent) increased. The prevalence of astigmatism was similar to previous studies; however, there were considerable age-related changes. In particular, the prevalence of astigmatism in elderly people was substantial and of concern, particularly given that virtually none of this age group were wearing distance spectacles. © 2016 The Authors Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics © 2016 The College of Optometrists.

  9. [Adult asthma in Mexico City: a population-based study].

    PubMed

    García-Sancho, Cecilia; Fernández-Plata, Rosario; Martínez-Briseño, David; Franco-Marina, Francisco; Pérez-Padilla, José Rogelio

    2012-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of asthma and the association between sociodemographic characteristics, spirometry, respiratory symptoms, quality of life and sleep in adults > 40 years. This report is part of our study (Latin American Research Project Obstructive Pulmonary), held in Mexico City and the metropolitan area in 2003. We used logistic regression models adjusted for study design, where asthma was the dependent and independent variable respiratory symptoms, sociodemographic and clinical characteristics among others. The prevalence of physician-diagnosed asthma was: 3.3% in men and 6.2% in women. Decreased lung function in asthmatics was observed. In multivariate analysis, after adjusting for potential confounders, asthmatics had a higher risk of excessive daytime sleepiness more snoring [OR = 3.2 (95% CI 1.4-7.4), p= 0.008], and more frequent work absences due to respiratory problems [OR = 5.1 (95% CI 2.5-10.4), p<0.0001]. The prevalence of asthma was 5%. Asthmatics showed lower quality of life and lung function.

  10. Suicidal Decapitation by Hanging-A Population-based Study.

    PubMed

    Byard, Roger W; Gilbert, John D

    2017-09-08

    A prospective study was undertaken at Forensic Science SA over a 15-year period from July 2002 to June 2017 for all cases of adult (>18 years) suicidal hangings with decapitation. A total of 1446 cases of suicidal hangings were identified from a general population of approximately 1.5 million (1206 males-age range 18-97 years, average 42.6; and 240 females-age range 18-96 years, average 40.1). Only three cases of decapitation were found, all from long-drop hangings; these consisted of three males (ages 32-55 years; average 45 years). Spinal transections had occurred between the first and second, second and third, and third and fourth cervical vertebrae, respectively. In this study, the number of suicidal hangings with decapitation represented only 0.2% of the total number of hangings. These events are therefore extremely rare, most likely due to most suicidal hangings occurring from relatively low levels in a domestic environment. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  11. Stigmatisation in onychomycosis patients: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Szepietowski, Jacek C; Reich, Adam

    2009-07-01

    Patients with onychomycosis may experience significant psychosocial problems, similarly to other skin diseases. The objectives of this study were to analyse the level of stigmatisation among subjects with onychomycosis and the effect of anti-mycotic therapy on this feeling. This prospective study was carried out among 1684 patients (1050 women and 634 men, mean age 52.2 ± 15.5 years) with onychomycosis. All subjects were asked to fulfil the stigmatisation questionnaire at the baseline visit and after the completion of the anti-mycotic therapy. Stigmatisation level was assessed with reference to gender, age, education, type and duration of onychomycosis and the number of involved nails. Patients with onychomycosis reported markedly increased feeling of stigmatisation. Fingernail involvement was the major variable negatively influencing the stigmatisation level. Female patients and younger ones appeared to be more stigmatised. No significant relationships were found between stigmatisation level and education, number of involved fingernails or toenails, as well as the duration of onychomycosis. The anti-mycotic therapy resulted in significant reduction of all analysed aspects of stigmatisation to about 40% of the baseline level. Onychomycosis should be considered as an important problem for patients, significantly reducing their physical, mental and social well-being, also leading to marked stigmatisation of patients. © 2008 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Lens power in Iranian schoolchildren: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Hassan; Pakzad, Reza; Iribarren, Rafael; Khabazkhoob, Mehdi; Emamian, Mohammad Hassan; Fotouhi, Akbar

    2017-08-31

    To evaluate lens power (LP) in schoolchildren aged 6-12 years. This cross-sectional study was conducted in Shahroud, northeast Iran. The students were selected through random cluster sampling and underwent the measurements of biometry, uncorrected and corrected visual acuity, non-cycloplegic and cycloplegic refraction. The LP was calculated using the Bennett formula. Of 6624 invited children, 5620 (84.8%) participated in the study and data of 4870 children were finally analysed. The mean age of the participants was 9.7 years and 2277 participants (46.02%) were girls. The mean LPs were 22.86 dioptres (D) in total study population, 23.91 D in 6 and 22.10 D in 12-year-old children. The mean LP was higher in girls than boys (23.48 D vs 22.34 D), in rural children than urban children (23.17 D vs 22.83 D) and in children with hyperopia (23.25 D) than children with myopia or emmetropia (22.64 D and 22.86 D, respectively). In the multiple linear regression model, lens thickness (β=1.59, p<0.001), anterior chamber depth (β=2.21, p<0.001) and female sex (β=0.016, p=0.015) were associated with an increase in the LP, while axial length (AL) (β=-4.41, p<0.001), corneal power (CP) (β=-1.47, p<0.001), spherical equivalent (SE) (β=-1.50, p<0.001) and age (β=-0.005, p=0.001) were associated with a decrease in the LP. AL and sex had the highest and lowest impact on LP, respectively. LP decreased with age between 6 and 12 years and was associated with a shorter AL, deeper ACD, higher SE, thicker lens and lower CP. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. Fracture risk following bariatric surgery: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, K M; Haglind, E G C; Clowes, J A; Achenbach, S J; Atkinson, E J; Melton, L J; Kennel, K A

    2014-01-01

    The effects of bariatric surgery on skeletal health are poorly understood. We found that bariatric surgery patients are more prone to fracture when compared to the general population. While further studies of fracture risk in this population are needed, bone health should be discussed in bariatric surgery clinics. Bariatric surgery is an increasingly common treatment for medically complicated obesity. Adverse skeletal changes after bariatric surgery have been reported, but their clinical importance remains unknown. We hypothesized that bariatric surgery patients are at increased risk of fracture. We conducted a historical cohort study of fracture incidence among 258 Olmsted County, Minnesota, residents who underwent a first bariatric surgery in 1985-2004. Relative fracture risk was expressed as standardized incidence ratios (SIRs), while potential risk factors were evaluated by hazard ratios (HR) obtained from a time-to-fracture regression model. The mean (±SD) body mass index at bariatric surgery was 49.0 ± 8.4 kg/m(2), with an average age of 44 ± 10 years and 82% (212) females. Gastric bypass surgery was performed in 94% of cases. Median follow-up was 7.7 years (range, 6 days to 25 years), during which 79 subjects experienced 132 fractures. Relative risk for any fracture was increased 2.3-fold (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.8-2.8) and was elevated for a first fracture at the hip, spine, wrist, or humerus (SIR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.1-2.9), as well as for a first fracture at any other site (SIR, 2.5; 95% CI, 2.0-3.2). Better preoperative activity status was associated with a lower age-adjusted risk (HR, 0.4; 95% CI, 0.2-0.8) while prior fracture history was not associated with postoperative fracture risk. Bariatric surgery, which is accompanied by substantial biochemical, hormonal, and mechanical changes, is associated with an increased risk of fracture.

  14. Factors affecting outdoor exposure in winter: population-based study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäkinen, Tiina M.; Raatikka, Veli-Pekka; Rytkönen, Mika; Jokelainen, Jari; Rintamäki, Hannu; Ruuhela, Reija; Näyhä, Simo; Hassi, Juhani

    2006-09-01

    The extent of outdoor exposure during winter and factors affecting it were examined in a cross-sectional population study in Finland. Men and women aged 25-74 years from the National FINRISK 2002 sub-study ( n=6,591) were queried about their average weekly occupational, leisure-time and total cold exposure during the past winter. The effects of gender, age, area of residence, occupation, ambient temperature, self-rated health, physical activity and education on cold exposure were analysed. The self-reported median total cold exposure time was 7 h/week (8 h men, 6 h women),<1 h/week (2 h men, 0 h women) at work, 4 h/week (5 h men, 4 h women) during leisure time and 1 h/week (1 h men, 1.5 h women) while commuting to work. Factors associated with increased occupational cold exposure among men were: being employed in agriculture, forestry and industry/mining/construction or related occupations, being less educated and being aged 55-64 years. Factors associated with increased leisure-time cold exposure among men were: employment in industry/mining/construction or related occupations, being a pensioner or unemployed, reporting at least average health, being physically active and having college or vocational education. Among women, being a housewife, pensioner or unemployed and engaged in physical activity increased leisure-time cold exposure, and young women were more exposed than older ones. Self-rated health was positively associated with leisure time cold exposure in men and only to a minor extent in women. In conclusion, the subjects reported spending 4% of their total time under cold exposure, most of it (71%) during leisure time. Both occupational and leisure-time cold exposure is greater among men than women.

  15. Sunlight Exposure and Breast Density: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Sheng-Hui; So, Edwin; Lam, Tsz-ping; Woo, Jean; Yuen, PY; Qin, Ling; Ku, Susanna

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study aims to assess the association of sunlight exposure with breast cancer risk, measured by the breast density assessed from Tabár's mammographic pattern in Chinese women. Methods A total of 676 premenopausal women were recruited to participate in this study, in which 650 completed a validated sunlight exposure questionnaire via telephone. The mammograms were classified according to Tabár's classification for parenchyma, and patterns IV & V and I, II & III indicated respectively high and low risk mammographic patterns for breast cancer. The odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for sun exposure-related variables were estimated using unconditional logistic regression with adjustment for potential confounders. Results Among 646 participants, women with high breast cancer risk (Tabár's patterns IV &V) had less hours spent in the sun than those with low risk (I, II & III) at any age stage. A higher level of sunlight exposure was associated with a significantly lower risk having high risk Tabár's pattern. Women aged 40 to 44 years who were in the highest tertile of lifetime total hours spent in the sun had a multi-adjusted OR of 0.41 (95% CI, 0.18-0.92; p for trend=0.03) compared with those in the lowest tertile (>2.19 hr/day vs. <1.32 hr/day). For hours spent in the sun across the ages of 6 to 12 years, the comparable OR was 0.37 (95% CI, 0.15-0.91; p for trend=0.03). Conclusion These findings suggest that higher sunlight exposure is related to a lower risk of having high risk breast density pattern in premenopausal women. Our results also suggest the most relevant period of exposure is during earlier life. PMID:23843849

  16. A population based study of drowning in Canada.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Tessa; Tamim, Hala; Rotondi, Michael; Macpherson, Alison K

    2016-07-13

    Although water-related fatality rates have changed over time, the epidemiology of drowning in Canada has not recently been examined. In spite of the evidence supporting varying drowning death rates by age, information on how characteristics of drowning incidents differ by age group remains limited. The primary objective of this study was to examine the epidemiology of drowning in Canada. A secondary objective was to describe the characteristics of these drowning incidents as they vary by age group. A retrospective descriptive analysis was conducted using data that were collected for incidents occurring in Canada between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2012. The main outcome variable was a water-related fatality, in the majority of cases (94 %) the primary cause of death was drowning. Age specific frequencies, proportions and rates per 100,000 population were calculated and compared among six age groups. There were 2392 unintentional water-related fatalities identified in Canada between 2008 and 2012. Death rates (per 100,000) varied by age group 0-4 (1.05), 5-14 (0.57), 15-19 (1.27), 20-34 (1.70), 35-64 (1.44), 65+ (1.74). The male to female ratio was 5:1. Differences in the characteristics of drowning by age group were identified across: sex, body of water, urban versus rural location, time of year, activity type, purpose of activity, alcohol involvement, personal flotation device use, accompaniment, and whether a rescue was attempted. The study results suggest that there may be a need for drowning prevention strategies that are tailored to specific age groups. Rural areas in Canada may also benefit from targeted drowning prevention.

  17. Hodgkin lymphoma in Tyrol-a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Fong, Dominic; Steurer, Michael; Greil, Richard; Gunsilius, Eberhard; Spizzo, Gilbert; Gastl, Guenther; Tzankov, Alexandar

    2009-05-01

    We aimed to analyze the epidemiology, clinical characteristics, and outcome of patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) diagnosed in Tyrol. All patients with newly diagnosed HL between 1993 and 2005 were included in this study. Among the 158 cases included, nodular lymphocytic predominant HL (nodular paragranuloma) was identified in ten cases (6%) whereas the majority of patients had classical Hodgkin lymphoma. Age (p < 0.01), sex (p = 0.03), risk groups according to the German Hodgkin Study Group stratification (p < 0.01), and bone marrow infiltration (p < 0.01) were of prognostic significance considering overall survival (OS) whereas histological subtype and bulky disease were not. The 5- and 10-year OS rates for the total group were 89% and 85%, respectively. Notably, in patients with advanced-stage HL (n = 49), combined modality treatment resulted in significantly better OS than chemotherapy alone (p = 0.01). Three patients developed a second hematological malignancy and one patient developed breast cancer. However, five patients (3%) had a malignant hematological disorder before occurrence of HL. Concerning treatment-related toxicity, bleomycin-associated lung toxicity was observed in six (4%) patients and five (3%) developed lethal treatment-related infectious complications. Our results provide evidence that the incidence rate of HL in Tyrol is comparable to other Western countries. Modern risk-adapted treatment results in excellent long-term prognosis but may be complicated by serious nonhematological side effects, in particular, infections and bleomycin-induced lung toxicity. Furthermore, 3% of HL patients had an antecedent malignant hematological disease before occurrence of HL.

  18. Cancer incidence among Danish seafarers: a population based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Kaerlev, L; Hansen, J; Hansen, H; Nielsen, P

    2005-01-01

    Aims: Seafarers aboard oil and chemical tankers may be exposed to many chemicals, including substances like benzene that are known to be carcinogenic. Other seafarers are exposed to engine exhaust, different oil products, and chemicals used aboard and some years ago asbestos was also used extensively in ships. The aim of this study was to study cancer morbidity among Danish seafarers in relation to type of ship and job title. Methods: A cohort of all Danish seafarers during 1986–1999 (33 340 men; 11 291 women) registered by the Danish Maritime Authority with an employment history was linked with the nationwide Danish Cancer Registry and followed up for cancer until the end of 2002. The number of person years at risk was 517 518. Standardised incidence ratios (SIR) were estimated by use of the corresponding national rates. Results: The SIR of all cancers combined was higher than expected: 1.26 (95% CI 1.19 to 1.32) for men and 1.07 (95% CI 0.95 to 1.20) for women. This was mainly due to an excess of cancer of the larynx, lung, tongue, mouth, pharynx, oesophagus, pancreas, kidney, urinary bladder, colon, and bone as well as skin melanomas among men (the three latter borderline significantly increased), and an excess of cancer of the lung, rectum, and cervix uteri among women. The differences in risk pattern for lung cancer between the different job categories among men ranged in terms of SIR from 1.2 (95% CI 0.9 to 1.7) (engine officers) to 2.3 (1.6 to 3.3) (engine room crew), and 4.1 (2.1 to 7.4) among maintenance crew. Non-officers had a 1.5 times higher lung cancer risk than officers. No increased occurrence of all lymphatic and haematopoietic malignancies combined was found for employees on tankers, but the number of cases was limited to a total of 7. Conclusions: Danish seafarers, especially men, face an increased overall cancer risk, in particular a risk for lung cancer and other tobacco associated cancers. PMID:16234401

  19. Health Literacy in Taiwan: A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Duong, Van Tuyen; Lin, I-Feng; Sorensen, Kristine; Pelikan, Jürgen M; Van Den Broucke, Stephan; Lin, Ying-Chin; Chang, Peter Wushou

    2015-11-01

    Data on health literacy (HL) in the population is limited for Asian countries. This study aimed to test the validity of the Mandarin version of the European Health Literacy Survey Questionnaire (HLS-EU-Q) for use in the general public in Taiwan. Multistage stratification random sampling resulted in a sample of 2989 people aged 15 years and above. The HLS-EU-Q was validated by confirmatory factor analysis with excellent model data fit indices. The general HL of the Taiwanese population was 34.4 ± 6.6 on a scale of 50. Multivariate regression analysis showed that higher general HL is significantly associated with the higher ability to pay for medication, higher self-perceived social status, higher frequency of watching health-related TV, and community involvement but associated with younger age. HL is also associated with health status, health behaviors, and health care accessibility and use. The HLS-EU-Q was found to be a useful tool to assess HL and its associated factors in the general population.

  20. Birth order and mortality: a population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Barclay, Kieron; Kolk, Martin

    2015-04-01

    This study uses Swedish population register data to investigate the relationship between birth order and mortality at ages 30 to 69 for Swedish cohorts born between 1938 and 1960, using a within-family comparison. The main analyses are conducted with discrete-time survival analysis using a within-family comparison, and the estimates are adjusted for age, mother's age at the time of birth, and cohort. Focusing on sibships ranging in size from two to six, we find that mortality risk in adulthood increases with later birth order. The results show that the relative effect of birth order is greater among women than among men. This pattern is consistent for all the major causes of death but is particularly pronounced for mortality attributable to cancers of the respiratory system and to external causes. Further analyses in which we adjust for adult socioeconomic status and adult educational attainment suggest that social pathways only mediate the relationship between birth order and mortality risk in adulthood to a limited degree.

  1. Tracheostomy following severe ischemic stroke: a population based study

    PubMed Central

    Walcott, Brian P.; Kamel, Hooman; Castro, Brandyn; Kimberly, W. Taylor; Sheth, Kevin N.

    2013-01-01

    Goal Stroke can result in varying degrees of respiratory failure. Some patients require tracheostomy in order to facilitate weaning from mechanical ventilation, long-term airway protection, or a combination of the two. Little is known about the rate and predictors of this outcome in patients with severe stroke. We aim to determine the rate of tracheostomy after severe ischemic stroke. Materials & Methods Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database from 2007–2009, patients hospitalized with ischemic stroke were identified based on validated International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification codes. Next, patients with stroke were stratified based on whether they were treated with or without decompressive craniectomy, and the rate of tracheostomy for each group was determined. A logistic regression analysis was used to identify predictors of tracheostomy after decompressive craniectomy. Survey weights were used to obtain nationally representative estimates. Findings In 1,550,000 patients discharged with ischemic stroke nationwide, the rate of tracheostomy was 1.3% (95% CI, 1.2–1.4%), with a 1.3% (95% CI, 1.1–1.4%) rate in patients without decompressive craniectomy and a 33% (95% CI, 26–39%) rate in the surgical-treatment group. Logistic regression analysis identified pneumonia as being significantly associated with tracheostomy after decompressive craniectomy (OR 3.95; 95% CI 1.95–6.91). Conclusion Tracheostomy is common following decompressive craniectomy and is strongly associated with the development of pneumonia. Given its impact on patient function and potentially modifiable associated factors, tracheostomy may warrant further study as an important patient-centered outcome among patients with stroke. PMID:24103666

  2. Tracheostomy after severe ischemic stroke: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Brian P; Kamel, Hooman; Castro, Brandyn; Kimberly, W Taylor; Sheth, Kevin N

    2014-01-01

    Stroke can result in varying degrees of respiratory failure. Some patients require tracheostomy in order to facilitate weaning from mechanical ventilation, long-term airway protection, or a combination of the two. Little is known about the rate and predictors of this outcome in patients with severe stroke. We aim to determine the rate of tracheostomy after severe ischemic stroke. Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database from 2007 to 2009, patients hospitalized with ischemic stroke were identified based on validated International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision, Clinical Modification codes. Next, patients with stroke were stratified based on whether they were treated with or without decompressive craniectomy, and the rate of tracheostomy for each group was determined. A logistic regression analysis was used to identify predictors of tracheostomy after decompressive craniectomy. Survey weights were used to obtain nationally representative estimates. In 1,550,000 patients discharged with ischemic stroke nationwide, the rate of tracheostomy was 1.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2-1.4%), with a 1.3% (95% CI, 1.1-1.4%) rate in patients without decompressive craniectomy and a 33% (95% CI, 26-39%) rate in the surgical treatment group. Logistic regression analysis identified pneumonia as being significantly associated with tracheostomy after decompressive craniectomy (odds ratio, 3.95; 95% CI, 1.95-6.91). Tracheostomy is common after decompressive craniectomy and is strongly associated with the development of pneumonia. Given its impact on patient function and potentially modifiable associated factors, tracheostomy may warrant further study as an important patient-centered outcome among patients with stroke. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Associations of childhood eczema severity: A US population based study

    PubMed Central

    Silverberg, Jonathan I.; Simpson, Eric L.

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about predictors of eczema severity in the US population. We sought to determine the distribution and associations of childhood eczema severity in the US. We analyzed data from the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health, a prospective questionnaire-based study of a nationally representative sample of 91,642 children (0-17yr). The prevalence of childhood eczema was 12.97% (95% confidence interval [95% CI]=12.42–13.53); 67.0% (95% CI: 64.8–69.2) had mild, 26.0% (95% CI: 23.9–28.1) moderate and 7.0% (95% CI: 5.8–8.3) severe disease. There was significant statewide-variation of the distribution of eczema severity (Rao-Scott chi square, P=0.004), with highest rates of severe disease in Northeastern and Midwestern states. In univariate models, eczema severity was increased with older age, African-American and Hispanic race/ethnicity, lower household income, oldest child in the family, home with a single mother, lower paternal/maternal education level, maternal general health, maternal/paternal emotional health, dilapidated housing and garbage on the streets. In multivariate survey logistic regression models using stepwise and backward selection, moderate–severe eczema was associated with older age, lower household income and fair or poor maternal health, but inversely associated with birthplace outside the US. These data indicate that environmental and/or lifestyle factors play an important role in eczema severity. PMID:24819283

  4. Mammographic density and urbanization: a population-based screening study.

    PubMed

    Viel, Jean-François; Rymzhanova, Raouchan

    2012-03-01

    The high incidence of female breast cancer that has been consistently reported in urban areas could be mediated by breast density, which is considered to reflect the cumulative exposure of breast tissues to hormones. The aim of this study was to assess how mammographic density varies by the degree of urbanization. The population consisted of 55,597 cancer-free women, aged 50-59 years, who participated in a French breast cancer screening programme (Franche-Comté region) between 2005 and 2009. Ordered logistic regression was run with mammographic density as the outcome, and degree of urbanization as the independent variable, while adjusting for some known confounding factors. Multiple imputation was used to deal with missing data. A significant positive linear trend with urbanization was found in a univariate approach (P trend <10(-3)), and after adjusting for risk factors (P trend = 10(-3)). A negative and highly significant association with mammographic density was highlighted both for age at the time of mammography (odds ratio (OR) 0.41, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.39-0.43, per 10 years), and for low socioeconomic status (OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.67-0.75). The OR for hormone replacement therapy use was 1.51 (95% CI 1.43-1.58). Knowledge of this urbanization gradient in density (whatever its mechanism) may help to identify women who may require full-field digital mammography for the early detection of breast cancer, and could assist primary care providers in recommending the best screening strategy in a risk factor-based approach.

  5. Smoking during pregnancy: A population-based study.

    PubMed

    Oskarsdottir, Gudrun Nina; Sigurdsson, Hedinn; Gudmundsson, Kristjan G

    2017-02-01

    Tobacco is a major cause of disease and mortality in modern times. The risk of smoking in pregnancy is a serious threat to the development and future health of an unborn child. The aim of this study was to explore the epidemiological factors associated with smoking during pregnancy in a primary healthcare setting. All 856 maternity records at the Glaesibaer Health Care Centre in Reykjavik during 2006-2013 were reviewed and information on smoking habits investigated. The records showed that in 108 (12.2%) pregnancies, women smoked at first visit and 63 stopped smoking in early pregnancy, leaving 45 (5.3%) mothers smoking throughout the whole gestational period. The mean age of the smoking women was 27.8 years and for the non-smokers 29.7 years. Low social status (odds ratio (OR) = 2.66; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.19-5.96), previous mental health diagnosis (OR = 2.7; 95% CI: 1.3-5.6), and unstable relationship with a partner (OR = 3.78; 95% CI: 2.1-7.0) were associated with smoking. Smoking fewer cigarettes was associated with a 0.04-unit lower risk of smoking during pregnancy (OR = 0.04: 95% CI: 0.02-0.08). Our results indicated that the women who smoked during pregnancy were often heavy smokers and living without a partner. They were younger, had worse mental health, and a lower social status than those pregnant women who did not smoke. Bearing in mind the consequence of smoking in pregnancy, this subgroup should get increased assistance to quit smoking before and during early pregnancy, as well as appropriate medical and social support.

  6. Permanent sequelae in sports injuries: a population based study

    PubMed Central

    Marchi, A.; Di, B; Messi, G.; Gazzola, G.

    1999-01-01

    AIM—To identify permanent sequelae after sports injuries in children and adolescents.
METHODS—In 1985, a prospective register was drawn up of all sports related injuries reported that year by the residents of Trieste, Italy aged 6-15 years. Moderate to severe injuries (scoring ⩾ 2 on the abbreviated injury scale (AIS)) were the object of a longitudinal clinical study. In 1988, 30.9% of the 220 subjects enrolled had sequelae. A further follow up was undertaken in 1997.
RESULTS—The follow up in 1997 involved 54 subjects (26 girls; average age 24.5 years). Subjective and objective sequelae, by now considered to be permanent, were found in 61.1%, corresponding to 15% of the AIS ⩾ 2 injuries recorded in 1985. The prevalence of sequelae was similar in the two sexes, in relation to the child's age at time of injury, and in the different sports practised. It was higher in relation to the severity of the lesion (89% of AIS 3injuries examined, 56% of AIS 2 injuries) and to the type of lesion and its location. With regard to AIS ⩾ 2 injuries, permanent sequelae were found in 50% of ankle fractures, 43% of elbow fractures, 33% of leg/foot fractures, 25% of knee sprains, and 23% of ankle sprains.
CONCLUSIONS—The frequency of sequelae in sports injuries in children and adolescents is high. The risk appears to be connected to certain anatomical and functional age characteristics. Prevention strategies should include specific assessment of physical fitness and adequate follow up after the accident, particularly rehabilitation.

 PMID:10490437

  7. Dental Prophylaxis and Osteoradionecrosis: A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Chang, C T; Liu, S P; Muo, C H; Tsai, C H; Huang, Y F

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association of different dental prophylactic modalities and osteoradionecrosis (ORN) and determine the risk of ORN under different timing periods of scaling, with the use chlorhexidine mouth rinse after surgery and with different strategies of fluoride gel application in head and neck cancer (HNC) participants. A cohort of 18,231 HNC participants, including 941 ORN patients and 17,290 matched control cases, were enrolled from a Longitudinal Health Insurance Database for Catastrophic Illness Patients (LHID-CIP) in Taiwan. Based on different dental prophylactic modalities before radiotherapy, including chlorhexidine mouth rinse, scaling, and fluoride gel, all HNC subjects were stratified into different groups. The Cox proportional hazard regression was used to compare ORN incidences under different dental prophylactic modalities. The results revealed that scaling and chlorhexidine mouth rinse were significantly related to ORN risk ( P = 0.004 and P < 0.0001). Chlorhexidine mouth rinse was highly correlated to ORN occurrence (hazard ratio [HR], 1.83-2.66), as exposure increased the risk by 2.43-fold among oral cancer patients, regardless of whether they had received major oral surgery or not. Oral cancer patients receiving scaling within 2 wk before radiotherapy increased their incidence of ORN by 1.28-fold compared with patients who had not undergone scaling within 6 mo. There is no significance of fluoride application for dental prophylaxis in increasing ORN occurrence. In conclusion, dental prophylaxis before radiotherapy is strongly correlated to ORN in HNC patients. Chlorhexidine exposure and dental scaling within 2 wk before radiotherapy is significantly related to ORN risk, especially in oral cancer patients. The use of 1.1% NaF topical application did not significantly increase the risk of ORN in HNC patients. An optimal dental prophylaxis protocol to reduce ORN should concern cancer location, cautious prescription

  8. Prevalence of trigeminal neuralgia and persistent idiopathic facial pain: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Daniel; Obermann, Mark; Yoon, Min-Suk; Poitz, Franziska; Hansen, Niels; Slomke, Marc-Andre; Dommes, Peter; Gizewski, Elke; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Katsarava, Zaza

    2011-11-01

    To estimate the lifetime prevalence of trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and persistent idiopathic facial pain (PIFP) in a population-based sample in Germany. A total of 3336 responders of 6000 contacted inhabitants of the city of Essen in Germany were screened using a self-assessment questionnaire. 327 individuals, who reported recurrent facial pain and randomly selected 150 (5% of 3009) screening negative subjects, received a phone interview by one of six neurologists and if necessary a face-to-face examination. Those with suspected TN or PIFP following the phone interview underwent neurological examination by two neurologists who were unaware of the presumed diagnosis. A random group of 25 (10% of 247) phone interview negative subjects was examined face-to-face. All suspected cases of PIFP received otorhinolaryngological examination and diagnostic cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In TN patients the number of vessel-nerve contacts was determined by thin-slice cranial MRI. Lifetime prevalence of TN was estimated to be 0.3% [10 of 3336; 95% CI 0.1-0.5%], of PIFP 0.03% [1 of 3336; 95% CI < 0.08%]. Thin-slice cranial MRI detected five vessel-nerve contacts and no symptomatic lesions in the 10 TN patients. This large population-based study revealed that TN and PIFP are rare facial pain disorders.

  9. The population-based Barcelona-Asymptomatic Intracranial Atherosclerosis Study (ASIA): rationale and design

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Large-artery intracranial atherosclerosis may be the most frequent cause of ischemic stroke worldwide. Traditional approaches have attempted to target the disease when it is already symptomatic. However, early detection of intracranial atherosclerosis may allow therapeutic intervention while the disease is still asymptomatic. The prevalence and natural history of asymptomatic intracranial atherosclerosis in Caucasians remain unclear. The aims of the Barcelona-ASymptomatic Intracranial Atherosclerosis (ASIA) study are (1) to determine the prevalence of ASIA in a moderate-high vascular risk population, (2) to study its prognostic impact on the risk of suffering future major ischemic events, and (3) to identify predictors of the development, progression and clinical expression of this condition. Methods/Design Cross-over and cohort, population-based study. A randomly selected representative sample of 1,503 subjects with a mild-moderate-high vascular risk (as defined by a REGICOR score ≥ 5%) and with neither a history of cerebrovascular nor ischemic heart disease will be studied. At baseline, all individuals will undergo extracranial and transcranial Color-Coded Duplex (TCCD) ultrasound examinations to detect presence and severity of extra and intracranial atherosclerosis. Intracranial stenoses will be assessed by magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Clinical and demographic variables will be recorded and blood samples will be drawn to investigate clinical, biological and genetic factors associated with the presence of ASIA. A long-term clinical and sonographic follow-up will be conducted thereafter to identify predictors of disease progression and of incident vascular events. Discussion The Barcelona-ASIA is a population-based study aiming to evaluate the prevalence and clinical importance of asymptomatic intracranial large-artery atherosclerosis in Caucasians. The ASIA project may provide a unique scientific resource to better understand the dynamics of

  10. Restless Legs Syndrome and Cognitive Function: A Population-based Cross-sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Rist, Pamela M; Elbaz, Alexis; Dufouil, Carole; Tzourio, Christophe; Kurth, Tobias

    2015-09-01

    Restless legs syndrome has been speculated to be linked to cognitive impairment through vascular risk factors or through its effect on sleep deprivation. Previous studies on the association between restless legs syndrome and cognitive function have been inconclusive. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of the association between restless legs syndrome and cognitive function using data from a large population-based study of elderly individuals residing in France. We used information from 2070 individuals from the Dijon, France center of the Three-City study who had available information on restless legs syndrome and cognitive functioning measures. Restless legs syndrome was assessed using the 4 minimal diagnostic criteria of the International Restless Legs Study Group. During the same wave in which restless legs syndrome status was assessed, cognitive functions also were assessed using 4 tests: Isaacs' test of verbal/category fluency, the Benton Visual Retention Test, the Trail Making Test B, and the Mini-Mental State Examination. We created a summary global cognitive score by summing the z scores for the 4 tests and used analysis of covariance to explore the association between restless legs syndrome and cognitive function. We did not observe any statistically significant differences in any cognitive z-score between those with restless legs syndrome and those without restless legs syndrome. The mean global z-score after multivariate adjustment was -0.003 (SE 0.173) for those with restless legs syndrome and -0.007 (SE 0.129) for those without restless legs syndrome (P-value = .98). Data from this large, population-based study do not suggest that restless legs syndrome is associated with prevalent cognitive deficits in elderly individuals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Response rates and selection problems, with emphasis on mental health variables and DNA sampling, in large population-based, cross-sectional and longitudinal studies of adolescents in Norway

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Selection bias is a threat to the internal validity of epidemiological studies. In light of a growing number of studies which aim to provide DNA, as well as a considerable number of invitees who declined to participate, we discuss response rates, predictors of lost to follow-up and failure to provide DNA, and the presence of possible selection bias, based on five samples of adolescents. Methods We included nearly 7,000 adolescents from two longitudinal studies of 18/19 year olds with two corresponding cross-sectional baseline studies at age 15/16 (10th graders), and one cross-sectional study of 13th graders (18/19 years old). DNA was sampled from the cheek mucosa of 18/19 year olds. Predictors of lost to follow-up and failure to provide DNA were studied by Poisson regression. Selection bias in the follow-up at age 18/19 was estimated through investigation of prevalence ratios (PRs) between selected exposures (physical activity, smoking) and outcome variables (general health, mental distress, externalizing problems) measured at baseline. Results Out of 5,750 who participated at age 15/16, we lost 42% at follow-up at age 18/19. The percentage of participants who gave their consent to DNA provision was as high as the percentage that consented to a linkage of data with other health registers and surveys, approximately 90%. Significant predictors of lost to follow-up and failure to provide DNA samples in the present genetic epidemiological study were: male gender; non-western ethnicity; postal survey compared with school-based; low educational plans; low education and income of father; low perceived family economy; unmarried parents; poor self-reported health; externalized symptoms and smoking, with some differences in subgroups of ethnicity and gender. The association measures (PRs) were quite similar among participants and all invitees, with some minor discrepancies in subgroups of non-western boys and girls. Conclusions Lost to follow-up had marginal

  12. Replication of the association between CHRNA4 rs1044396 and harm avoidance in a large population-based sample.

    PubMed

    Bey, Katharina; Lennertz, Leonhard; Markett, Sebastian; Petrovsky, Nadine; Gallinat, Jürgen; Gründer, Gerhard; Spreckelmeyer, Katja N; Wienker, Thomas F; Mobascher, Arian; Dahmen, Norbert; Thuerauf, Norbert; Kornhuber, Johannes; Kiefer, Falk; Toliat, Mohammad R; Nürnberg, Peter; Winterer, Georg; Wagner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Harm avoidance is a personality trait characterized by excessive worrying and fear of uncertainty, which has repeatedly been related to anxiety disorders. Converging lines of research in rodents and humans point towards an involvement of the nicotinic cholinergic system in the modulation of anxiety. Most notably, the rs1044396 polymorphism in the CHRNA4 gene, which codes for the α4 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, has been linked to negative emotionality traits including harm avoidance in a recent study. Against this background, we investigated the association between harm avoidance and the rs1044396 polymorphism using data from N=1673 healthy subjects, which were collected in the context of the German multi-centre study ׳Genetics of Nicotine Dependence and Neurobiological Phenotypes׳. Homozygous carriers of the C-allele showed significantly higher levels of harm avoidance than homozygous T-allele carriers, with heterozygous subjects exhibiting intermediate scores. The effect was neither modulated by age or gender nor by smoking status. By replicating previous findings in a large population-based sample for the first time, the present study adds to the growing evidence suggesting an involvement of nicotinic cholinergic mechanism in anxiety and negative emotionality, which may pose an effective target for medical treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  13. Gender-specific differences of interaction between obesity and air pollution on stroke and cardiovascular diseases in Chinese adults from a high pollution range area: A large population based cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiao-Di; Qian, Zhengmin; Vaughn, Michael G; Trevathan, Edwin; Emo, Brett; Paul, Gunther; Ren, Wan-Hui; Hao, Yuan-Tao; Dong, Guang-Hui

    2015-10-01

    Little information exists regarding the interaction effects of obesity with long-term air pollution exposure on cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and stroke in areas of high pollution. The aim of the present study is to examine whether obesity modifies CVD-related associations among people living in an industrial province of northeast China. We studied 24,845 Chinese adults, aged 18 to 74 years old, from three Northeastern Chinese cities in 2009 utilizing a cross-sectional study design. Body weight and height were measured by trained observers. Overweight and obesity were defined as a body mass index (BMI) between 25-29.9 and ≥30 kg/m(2), respectively. Prevalence rate and related risk factors of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases were investigated by a questionnaire. Three-year (2006-2008) average concentrations of particulate matter (PM10), sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxides (NO2), and ozone (O3) were measured by fixed monitoring stations. All the participants lived within 1 km of air monitoring sites. Two-level logistic regression (personal level and district-specific pollutant level) was used to examine these effects, controlling for covariates. We observed significant interactions between exposure and obesity on CVDs and stroke. The associations between annual pollutant concentrations and CVDs and stroke were strongest in obese subjects (OR 1.15-1.47 for stroke, 1.33-1.59 for CVDs), less strong in overweight subjects (OR 1.22-1.35 for stroke, 1.07-1.13 for CVDs), and weakest in normal weight subjects (OR ranged from 0.98-1.01 for stroke, 0.93-1.15 for CVDs). When stratified by gender, these interactions were significant only in women. Study findings indicate that being overweight and obese may enhance the effects of air pollution on the prevalence of CVDs and stroke in Northeastern metropolitan China. Further studies will be needed to investigate the temporality of BMI relative to exposure and onset of disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All

  14. Organochlorine Pesticides and Risk of Endometriosis: Findings from a Population-Based Case–Control Study

    PubMed Central

    De Roos, Anneclaire J.; Thompson, Mary Lou; Sathyanarayana, Sheela; Scholes, Delia; Barr, Dana Boyd; Holt, Victoria L.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Endometriosis is considered an estrogen-dependent disease. Persistent environmental chemicals that exhibit hormonal properties, such as organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), may affect endometriosis risk. Objective: We investigated endometriosis risk in relation to environmental exposure to OCPs. Methods: We conducted the present analyses using data from the Women’s Risk of Endometriosis (WREN) study, a population-based case–control study of endometriosis conducted among 18- to 49-year-old female enrollees of a large health care system in western Washington State. OCP concentrations were measured in sera from surgically confirmed endometriosis cases (n = 248) first diagnosed between 1996 and 2001 and from population-based controls (n = 538). We estimated odds ratios (OR) and 95% CIs using unconditional logistic regression, adjusting for age, reference date year, serum lipids, education, race/ethnicity, smoking, and alcohol intake. Results: Our data suggested increased endometriosis risk associated with serum concentrations of β-hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) (third vs. lowest quartile: OR = 1.7; 95% CI: 1.0, 2.8; highest vs. lowest quartile OR = 1.3; 95% CI: 0.8, 2.4) and mirex (highest vs. lowest category: OR = 1.5; 95% CI: 1.0, 2.2). The association between serum β-HCH concentrations and endometriosis was stronger in analyses restricting cases to those with ovarian endometriosis (third vs. lowest quartile: OR = 2.5; 95% CI: 1.5, 5.2; highest vs. lowest quartile: OR = 2.5; 95% CI: 1.1, 5.3). Conclusions: In our case–control study of women enrolled in a large health care system in the U.S. Pacific Northwest, serum concentrations of β-HCH and mirex were positively associated with endometriosis. Extensive past use of environmentally persistent OCPs in the United States or present use in other countries may affect the health of reproductive-age women. Citation: Upson K, De Roos AJ, Thompson ML, Sathyanarayana S, Scholes D, Barr DB, Holt VL. 2013

  15. Understanding Disabled Childhoods: What Can We Learn from Population-Based Studies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emerson, Eric

    2012-01-01

    This article illustrates the potential value of undertaking secondary analyses of large-scale population-based survey data to better inform our understanding of disabled childhoods. It is argued that while such approaches can never address the lived experience of growing up with disability, they can provide valuable insights into the ways in which…

  16. Data harmonization and federated analysis of population-based studies: the BioSHaRE project

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstracts Background Individual-level data pooling of large population-based studies across research centres in international research projects faces many hurdles. The BioSHaRE (Biobank Standardisation and Harmonisation for Research Excellence in the European Union) project aims to address these issues by building a collaborative group of investigators and developing tools for data harmonization, database integration and federated data analyses. Methods Eight population-based studies in six European countries were recruited to participate in the BioSHaRE project. Through workshops, teleconferences and electronic communications, participating investigators identified a set of 96 variables targeted for harmonization to answer research questions of interest. Using each study’s questionnaires, standard operating procedures, and data dictionaries, harmonization potential was assessed. Whenever harmonization was deemed possible, processing algorithms were developed and implemented in an open-source software infrastructure to transform study-specific data into the target (i.e. harmonized) format. Harmonized datasets located on server in each research centres across Europe were interconnected through a federated database system to perform statistical analysis. Results Retrospective harmonization led to the generation of common format variables for 73% of matches considered (96 targeted variables across 8 studies). Authenticated investigators can now perform complex statistical analyses of harmonized datasets stored on distributed servers without actually sharing individual-level data using the DataSHIELD method. Conclusion New Internet-based networking technologies and database management systems are providing the means to support collaborative, multi-center research in an efficient and secure manner. The results from this pilot project show that, given a strong collaborative relationship between participating studies, it is possible to seamlessly co

  17. Quality of life and psychological and gastrointestinal symptoms after cholecystectomy: a population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Talseth, Arne; Edna, Tom-Harald; Hveem, Kristian; Lydersen, Stian; Ness-Jensen, Eivind

    2017-01-01

    Objective The study aims to examine gastrointestinal symptoms, quality of life and the risk of psychological symptoms after cholecystectomy. Design This is a prospective population-based cohort study based on the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT) Norway. HUNT is a repeated health survey of the county population and includes a wide range of health-related items. In the present study, all 3 HUNT surveys were included, performed between 1984 and 2008. Selected items were scores on quality of life, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and selected gastrointestinal symptoms. Participants who underwent cholecystectomy for gallstone disease between 1 January 1990 and until 1 year before attending HUNT3 were compared with the remaining non-operated cohort. Associations between cholecystectomy and the postoperative scores and symptoms were assessed by multivariable regression models. Results Participants in HUNT1, HUNT2 and HUNT3 were 77 212 (89.4% of those invited), 65 237 (69.5%) and 50 807 (54.1%), respectively. In the study period, 931 participants were operated with cholecystectomy. Cholecystectomy was associated with an increased risk of diarrhoea and stomach pain postoperatively. In addition, cholecystectomy was associated with an increased risk of nausea postoperatively in men. We found no associations between cholecystectomy and quality of life, symptoms of anxiety and depression, constipation, heartburn, or acid regurgitation following surgery. Conclusions In this large population-based cohort study, cholecystectomy was associated with postoperative diarrhoea and stomach pain. Cholecystectomy for gallstone colic was associated with nausea in men. There were no associations between quality of life, symptoms of anxiety and depression, constipation, heartburn, or acid regurgitation. PMID:28761686

  18. Correlation between systemic lupus erythematosus and malignancies: a cross-sectional population-based study.

    PubMed

    Azrielant, Shir; Tiosano, Shmuel; Watad, Abdulla; Mahroum, Naim; Whitby, Aaron; Comaneshter, Doron; Cohen, Arnon D; Amital, Howard

    2017-01-14

    Autoimmune conditions reflect dysregulation of the immune system; this may be of clinical significance in the development of several malignancies. Previous studies show an association between systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and the development of malignancies; however, their investigations into the development of specific malignancies are inconsistent, and their external validity may be questionable. The main objective of this study is to investigate the association between the presence of SLE and various malignancies, in a large-scale population-based study. Data for this study was collected from Clalit Health Services, the largest state-mandated health service organization in Israel. All adult members diagnosed with SLE were included (n = 5018) and their age and sex-matched controls (n = 25,090), creating a cross-sectional population-based study. Medical records of all subjects were analyzed for documentation of malignancies. Logistic regression models were built separately for each malignant condition, controlling for age, gender, BMI, smoking, and socioeconomic status. Diagnosis of malignancy (of any type) was more prevalent in the SLE population (odds ratio [OR] 3.35, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.02-3.72). SLE diagnosis was also found to be independently associated with higher proportions of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (OR 3.02, 95% CI 2.72-3.33), Hodgkin lymphoma (OR 2.43, 95% CI 1.88-2.99), multiple myeloma (OR 2.57, 95% CI 1.85-3.28), cervix uteri malignancies (OR 1.65, 95% CI 1.10-2.20), and genital organ malignancies (OR 2.32, 95% CI 1.42-3.22), after adjustment for confounding variables. The presence of an SLE diagnosis was found to be independently associated with higher proportions of malignancies, particularly hematologic malignancies. These findings should be considered while treating SLE patients, and possibly supplement their screening routine.

  19. Bowel Obstruction in Elderly Ovarian Cancer Patients: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, Stephen J.; Winner, Megan; Hershman, Dawn L.; Wright, Jason D.; Feingold, Daniel L.; Allendorf, John D.; Neugut, Alfred I.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Bowel obstruction is a common pre-terminal event in abdominal/pelvic cancer that has mainly been described in small single-institution studies. We used a large, population-based database to investigate the incidence, management, and outcomes of obstruction in ovarian cancer patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS We identified patients with stages IC-IV ovarian cancer, aged 65 years or older, in the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database diagnosed between January 1, 1991 and December 31, 2005. We modeled predictors of inpatient hospitalization for bowel obstruction after cancer diagnosis, categorized management of obstruction, and analyzed the associations between treatment for obstruction and outcomes. RESULTS Of 8607 women with ovarian cancer, 1518 (17.6%) were hospitalized for obstruction subsequent to cancer diagnosis. Obstruction at cancer diagnosis (HR=2.17, 95% CI: 1.86–2.52) and mucinous tumor histology (HR=1.45, 95% CI: 1.15–1.83) were associated with increased risk of subsequent obstruction. Surgical management of obstruction was associated with lower 30-day mortality (13.4% in women managed surgically vs. 20.2% in women managed non-surgically), but equivalent survival after 30 days and equivalent rates of post-obstruction chemotherapy. Median post-obstruction survival was 382 days in women with obstructions of adhesive origin and 93 days in others. CONCLUSION In this large-scale, population-based assessment of patients with advanced ovarian cancer, nearly 20% of women developed bowel obstruction after cancer diagnosis. While obstruction due to adhesions did not signal the end of life, all other obstructions were pre-terminal events for the majority of patients regardless of treatment. PMID:23274561

  20. Metformin and breast cancer stage at diagnosis: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Lega, I.C.; Fung, K.; Austin, P.C.; Lipscombe, L.L.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The objective of the present study was to use a large, population-based cohort to examine the association between metformin and breast cancer stage at diagnosis while accounting for mammography differences. Methods We used data from Ontario administrative health databases to identify women 68 years of age or older with diabetes and invasive breast cancer diagnosed from 1 January 2007 to 31 December 2012. Adjusted logistic regression models were used to compare breast cancer stage at diagnosis (stages i and ii vs. iii and iv) between the women exposed and not exposed to metformin. We also examined the association between metformin use and estrogen receptor status, tumour size, and lymph node status in the subset of women for whom those data were available. Results We identified 3125 women with diabetes and breast cancer; 1519 (48.6%) had been exposed to metformin before their cancer diagnosis. Median age at breast cancer diagnosis was 76 years (interquartile range: 72–82 years), and mean duration of diabetes was 8.8 ± 5.9 years. In multivariable analyses, metformin exposure was not associated with an earlier stage of breast cancer (odds ratio: 0.98; 95% confidence interval: 0.81 to 1.19). In secondary analyses, metformin exposure was not associated with estrogen receptor–positive breast cancer, tumours larger than 2 cm, or positive lymph nodes. Conclusions This population-based study did not show an association between metformin use and breast cancer stage or tumour characteristics at diagnosis. Our study considered older women with long-standing diabetes, and therefore further studies in younger patients could be warranted. PMID:28490930

  1. Determinants of hyperhomocysteinemia in healthy and hypertensive subjects: A population-based study and systematic review.

    PubMed

    Han, Liyuan; Liu, Yanfen; Wang, Changyi; Tang, Linlin; Feng, Xiaoqi; Astell-Burt, Thomas; Wen, Qi; Duan, Donghui; Lu, Nanjia; Xu, Guodong; Wang, Kaiyue; Zhang, Lu; Gu, Kaibo; Chen, Sihan; Ma, Jianping; Zhang, Tao; You, Dingyun; Duan, Shiwei

    2017-10-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) is known to increase the risk of many diseases. Factors influencing HHcy in healthy and hypertensive subjects remain under-researched. A large population-based study was conducted in 60 communities from Shenzhen, China. Responses to standardized questions on lifestyle factors and blood samples were collected from all participants after a 12-h overnight fast. Multiple linear and multivariate logistic regressions were used to explore risk factors for HHcy. Results were then compared to those from a systematic review of English-language articles listed in Pubmed, EBSCOhost, Web of Science, Embase and Cochrane libraries that investigated HHcy risk factors in healthy and hypertensive subjects. A total of 1586 healthy (Male/Female = 642/944) and 5935 hypertensive subjects (Male/Female = 2928/3007) participated in our population-based study. In logistic regression analyses, age, BMI and creatinine (Cr) were risk factors, while being female, fruit intake and physical activity were protective factors for HHcy in healthy subjects. In hypertensive subjects, seven [age, smoking, salt intake, systolic blood pressure (SBP), uric acid, triglycerides (TG), and Cr] and four [female, fruit intake, total cholesterol (TC), and glucose] factors were associated with higher and lower HHcy respectively. The review of 71 studies revealed that potential risk factors for Hcy included nutritional, physiologic, lifestyle habits, ethnicity, genetics, interactions between gene-environment, gene-gene, gene-nutritional, environment-environment, nutritional-nutritional. Our study indicates the potential importance of increasing folic acid and vitamin B supplementation, daily fruit and vegetable intake, regular exercise and refraining from tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption as preventive strategies for Hcy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  2. Infective Endocarditis and Cancer Risk: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li-Min; Wu, Jung-Nan; Lin, Cheng-Li; Day, Jen-Der; Liang, Ji-An; Liou, Li-Ren; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated the possible relationship between endocarditis and overall and individual cancer risk among study participants in Taiwan.We used data from the National Health Insurance program of Taiwan to conduct a population-based, observational, and retrospective cohort study. The case group consisted of 14,534 patients who were diagnosed with endocarditis between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2010. For the control group, 4 patients without endocarditis were frequency matched to each endocarditis patient according to age, sex, and index year. Competing risks regression analysis was conducted to determine the effect of endocarditis on cancer risk.A large difference was noted in Charlson comorbidity index between endocarditis and nonendocarditis patients. In patients with endocarditis, the risk for developing overall cancer was significant and 119% higher than in patients without endocarditis (adjusted subhazard ratio = 2.19, 95% confidence interval = 1.98-2.42). Regarding individual cancers, in addition to head and neck, uterus, female breast and hematological malignancies, the risks of developing colorectal cancer, and some digestive tract cancers were significantly higher. Additional analyses determined that the association of cancer with endocarditis is stronger within the 1st 5 years after endocarditis diagnosis.This population-based cohort study found that patients with endocarditis are at a higher risk for colorectal cancer and other cancers in Taiwan. The risk was even higher within the 1st 5 years after endocarditis diagnosis. It suggested that endocarditis is an early marker of colorectal cancer and other cancers. The underlying mechanisms must still be explored and may account for a shared risk factor of infection in both endocarditis and malignancy.

  3. The LIFE Child study: a population-based perinatal and pediatric cohort in Germany.

    PubMed

    Poulain, Tanja; Baber, Ronny; Vogel, Mandy; Pietzner, Diana; Kirsten, Toralf; Jurkutat, Anne; Hiemisch, Andreas; Hilbert, Anja; Kratzsch, Jürgen; Thiery, Joachim; Fuchs, Michael; Hirsch, Christian; Rauscher, Franziska G; Loeffler, Markus; Körner, Antje; Nüchter, Matthias; Kiess, Wieland

    2017-01-31

    The LIFE Child study is a large population-based longitudinal childhood cohort study conducted in the city of Leipzig, Germany. As a part of LIFE, a research project conducted at the Leipzig Research Center for Civilization Diseases, it aims to monitor healthy child development from birth to adulthood and to understand the development of lifestyle diseases such as obesity. The study consists of three interrelated cohorts; the birth cohort, the health cohort, and the obesity cohort. Depending on age and cohort, the comprehensive study program comprises different medical, psychological, and sociodemographic assessments as well as the collection of biological samples. Optimal data acquisition, process management, and data analysis are guaranteed by a professional team of physicians, certified study assistants, quality managers, scientists and statisticians. Due to the high popularity of the study, more than 3000 children have already participated until the end of 2015, and two-thirds of them participate continuously. The large quantity of acquired data allows LIFE Child to gain profound knowledge on the development of children growing up in the twenty-first century. This article reports the number of available and analyzable data and demonstrates the high relevance and potential of the study.

  4. Association of the DBH polymorphism rs3025343 with smoking cessation in a large population-based sample.

    PubMed

    Hirvonen, Katariina; Korhonen, Tellervo; Salomaa, Veikko; Männistö, Satu; Kaprio, Jaakko

    2017-03-22

    Genetic variations in DBH-gene and its surroundings have been shown to associate with smoking behavior including smoking cessation in several studies. In this study we replicate and measure the effect size for association between DBH polymorphism rs3025343 and smoking cessation in a large population-based sample while examining environmental factors that could relate to the association. We studied 11,926 adult subjects from four surveys of the National FINRISK Study. The analysis was restricted to either current or former smokers. Logistic and linear regression analyses were conducted to investigate the relationships of the SNP, covariates, smoking cessation and smoking severity (cotinine, CPD). Gene-environment interactions were tested by likelihood-ratio test. The association between rs3025343 and smoking cessation (prevalence odds ratio, OR=1.12, p=0.094, 95%CI=0.98-1.30) was replicated identically with the GWAS study of The Tobacco and Genetics Consortium (OR=1.12, 95%CI=1.08-1.18). None of our tested phenotypes significantly influenced the association between rs3025343 and smoking cessation. Overall, marital status, education, depression, alcohol use, self-rated health and COPD showed phenotypic associations with smoking cessation, but the association of various phenotypes with smoking cessation did not vary by genotype. The current study replicates the effect size for the association between rs3025343 and smoking cessation despite lack of overall significance due to smaller sample size. We could not show environmental influences on the association of rs3025343 with smoking cessation. Our study replicates the direction and strength of the association of DBH polymorphism rs3025343 with smoking cessation. We could not detect environmental influences on the strength of the association of rs3025343 with smoking cessation, but the limited power of our analysis needs to be taken into account.

  5. Cardiovascular Disease Mortality After Chemotherapy or Surgery for Testicular Nonseminoma: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Chunkit; Fossa, Sophie D.; Milano, Michael T.; Sahasrabudhe, Deepak M.; Peterson, Derick R.; Travis, Lois B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Increased risks of incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients with testicular cancer (TC) given chemotherapy in European studies were largely restricted to long-term survivors and included patients from the 1960s. Few population-based investigations have quantified CVD mortality during, shortly after, and for two decades after TC diagnosis in the era of cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Patients and Methods Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) for CVD and absolute excess risks (AERs; number of excess deaths per 10,000 person-years) were calculated for 15,006 patients with testicular nonseminoma reported to the population-based Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program (1980 to 2010) who initially received chemotherapy (n = 6,909) or surgery (n = 8,097) without radiotherapy and accrued 60,065 and 81,227 person-years of follow-up, respectively. Multivariable modeling evaluated effects of age, treatment, extent of disease, and other factors on CVD mortality. Results Significantly increased CVD mortality occurred after chemotherapy (SMR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.78; n = 54) but not surgery (SMR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.60 to 1.07; n = 50). Significant excess deaths after chemotherapy were restricted to the first year after TC diagnosis (SMR, 5.31; AER, 13.90; n = 11) and included cerebrovascular disease (SMR, 21.72; AER, 7.43; n = 5) and heart disease (SMR, 3.45; AER, 6.64; n = 6). In multivariable analyses, increased CVD mortality after chemotherapy was confined to the first year after TC diagnosis (hazard ratio, 4.86; 95% CI, 1.25 to 32.08); distant disease (P < .05) and older age at diagnosis (P < .01) were independent risk factors. Conclusion This is the first population-based study, to our knowledge, to quantify short- and long-term CVD mortality after TC diagnosis. The increased short-term risk of CVD deaths should be further explored in analytic studies that enumerate incident events and can serve to develop comprehensive evidence-based approaches

  6. ALS and the Military: A Population-Based Study in the Danish Registries

    PubMed Central

    Seals, Ryan M.; Kioumourtzoglou, Marianthi-Anna; Gredal, Ole; Hansen, Johnni; Weisskopf, Marc G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Prior studies have suggested that military service may be associated with the development of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. We conducted a population-based case-control study in Denmark to assess whether occupation in the Danish military is associated with an increased risk of developing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Methods There were 3,650 incident cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis recorded in the Danish National Patient Registry between 1982 and 2009. Each case was matched to 100 age- and sex-matched population controls alive and free of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis on the date of the case diagnosis. Comprehensive occupational history was obtained from the Danish Pension Fund database, which began in 1964. Results 2.4% (n=8,922) of controls had a history of employment in the military prior to the index date. Military employees overall had an elevated rate of ALS (OR=1.3; 95% CI: 1.1-1.6). A ten-year increase in years employed by the military was associated with an odds ratio of 1.2 (95% CI: 1.0-1.4), and all quartiles of time employed were elevated. There was little suggestion of a pattern across calendar year of first employment, but there was some evidence that increasing age at first employment was associated with increased ALS rates. Rates were highest in the decade immediately following the end of employment (OR=1.6; 95% CI: 1.2-2.2). Conclusions In this large population-based case-control study, employment by the military is associated with increased rates of ALS. These findings are consistent with earlier findings that military service or employment may entail exposure to risk factors for ALS. PMID:26583610

  7. A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study of Migraine and Organic-Psychogenic Erectile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Szu-Hsien; Chuang, Eric; Chuang, Tien-Yow; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lin, Ming-Chia; Yen, Der-Jen; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract As chronic illnesses and chronic pain are related to erectile dysfunction (ED), migraine as a prevalent chronic disorder affecting lots of people all over the world may negatively affect quality of life as well as sexual function. However, a large-scale population-based study of erectile dysfunction and other different comorbidities in patients with migraine is quite limited. This cohort longitudinal study aimed to estimate the association between migraine and ED using a nationwide population-based database in Taiwan. The data used for this cohort study were retrieved from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000 in Taiwan. We identified 5015 patients with migraine and frequency matched 20,060 controls without migraine from 2000 to 2011. The occurrence of ED was followed up until the end of 2011. We used Cox proportional hazard regression models to analyze the risks of ED. The overall incidence of ED was 1.78-fold greater in the migraine cohort than in the comparison cohort (23.3 vs 10.5 per 10,000 person-years; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.31–2.41). Furthermore, patients with migraine were 1.75-fold more likely to develop organic ED (95% CI = 1.27–2.41) than were the comparison cohort. The migraine patients with anxiety had a 3.6-fold higher HR of having been diagnosed with ED than the comparison cohort without anxiety (95% CI, 2.10–6.18). The results support that patients with migraine have a higher incidence of being diagnosed with ED, particularly in the patient with the comorbidity of anxiety. PMID:26962838

  8. Unprovoked seizures after traumatic brain injury: A population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Mahler, Benno; Carlsson, Sofia; Andersson, Tomas; Adelöw, Cecilia; Ahlbom, Anders; Tomson, Torbjörn

    2015-09-01

    To quantify the risk of unprovoked seizures after traumatic brain injury (TBI) METHODS: We used the Stockholm Incidence Registry on Epilepsy to carry out a population-based case-control study, including 1,885 cases with incident unprovoked seizures from September 1, 2000 through August 31, 2008, together with 15,080 matched controls. Information of prior hospitalizations for TBI was obtained through record linkage with the Swedish National Inpatient Registry for the period 1980-2008. Relative risks (RRs) for unprovoked seizures were estimated after various TBI diagnoses, and influences of TBI severity and time since trauma were studied in detail. After hospitalization for mild TBI, the RR was 2.0 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.5-2.7). The RR was higher after brain contusion (5.9, 95% CI 2.4-15.0) or intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) (4.5, 95% CI 2.2-9.0), whereas a combination of both diagnoses led to a further sevenfold increase in RR (42.6, 95% CI 12.2-148.5). The risk was greatest during the first 6 months after severe TBI (RR 48.9, 95% CI 10.9-218.9) or mild TBI (RR 8.1, 95% CI 3.1-21.7), but was still elevated >10 years after any TBI. Herein we present a large population-based case-control study on TBI as a risk factor for unprovoked epileptic seizures, including cases of all ages with individually validated seizure diagnoses. The risk for epileptic seizures was substantially increased after TBI, especially during the first 6 months after the injury and in patients with a combination of ICH and brain contusion. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 International League Against Epilepsy.

  9. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and the Military: A Population-based Study in the Danish Registries.

    PubMed

    Seals, Ryan M; Kioumourtzoglou, Marianthi-Anna; Hansen, Johnni; Gredal, Ole; Weisskopf, Marc G

    2016-03-01

    Prior studies have suggested that military service may be associated with the development of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We conducted a population-based case-control study in Denmark to assess whether occupation in the Danish military is associated with an increased risk of developing ALS. There were 3,650 incident cases of ALS recorded in the Danish National Patient Registry between 1982 and 2009. Each case was matched to 100 age- and sex-matched population controls alive and free of ALS on the date of the case diagnosis. Comprehensive occupational history was obtained from the Danish Pension Fund database, which began in 1964. 2.4% (n = 8,922) of controls had a history of employment in the military before the index date. Military employees overall had an elevated rate of ALS (odds ratio [OR] = 1.3; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.1, 1.6). A 10-year increase in years employed by the military was associated with an OR of 1.2 (95% CI: 1.0, 1.4), and all quartiles of time employed were elevated. There was little suggestion of a pattern across calendar year of first employment, but there was some evidence that increasing age at first employment was associated with increased ALS rates. Rates were highest in the decade immediately following the end of employment (OR = 1.6; 95% CI: 1.2, 2.2). In this large population-based case-control study, employment by the military is associated with increased rates of ALS. These findings are consistent with earlier findings that military service or employment may entail exposure to risk factors for ALS.

  10. Sleep patterns and insomnia among adolescents: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Hysing, Mari; Pallesen, Ståle; Stormark, Kjell M; Lundervold, Astri J; Sivertsen, Børge

    2013-10-01

    The aim of the current study was to examine sleep patterns and rates of insomnia in a population-based study of adolescents aged 16-19 years. Gender differences in sleep patterns and insomnia, as well as a comparison of insomnia rates according to DSM-IV, DSM-V and quantitative criteria for insomnia (Behav. Res. Ther., 41, 2003, 427), were explored. We used a large population-based study in Hordaland county in Norway, conducted in 2012. The sample included 10,220 adolescents aged 16-18 years (54% girls). Self-reported sleep measurements included bedtime, rise time, time in bed, sleep duration, sleep efficiency, sleep onset latency, wake after sleep onset, rate and frequency and duration of difficulties initiating and maintaining sleep and rate and frequency of tiredness and sleepiness. The adolescents reported short sleep duration on weekdays (mean 6:25 hours), resulting in a sleep deficiency of about 2 h. A majority of the adolescents (65%) reported sleep onset latency exceeding 30 min. Girls reported longer sleep onset latency and a higher rate of insomnia than boys, while boys reported later bedtimes and a larger weekday-weekend discrepancy on several sleep parameters. Insomnia prevalence rates ranged from a total prevalence of 23.8 (DSM-IV criteria), 18.5 (DSM-V criteria) and 13.6% (quantitative criteria for insomnia). We conclude that short sleep duration, long sleep onset latency and insomnia were prevalent in adolescents. This warrants attention as a public health concern in this age group. © 2013 European Sleep Research Society.

  11. Hypothyroidism and Risk of Mild Cognitive Impairment in Elderly Persons - A Population Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Parsaik, Ajay K; Singh, Balwinder; Roberts, Rosebud O; Pankratz, Shane; Edwards, Kelly K.; Geda, Yonas E; Gharib, H; Boeve, Bradley F; Knopman, David S; Petersen, Ronald C

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Association of clinical and subclinical hypothyroidism with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is not established. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the association of clinical and subclinical hypothyroidism with MCI in a large population based cohort. DESIGN A cross-sectional, population-based study. SETTING Olmsted County, Minnesota. PARTICIPANTS Randomly selected participants were aged 70 to 89 years on October 1, 2004, and were without documented prevalent dementia. A total of 2,050 participants were evaluated and underwent in-person interview, neurological evaluation and neuropsychological testing to assess performance in memory, attention/executive function, visuospatial, and language domains. Subjects were diagnosed by consensus as cognitively normal, MCI or dementia according to published criteria. Clinical and subclinical hypothyroidism was ascertained from a medical records-linkage system. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Association of clinical and subclinical hypothyroidism with MCI. Results Among 1904 eligible participants, the frequency of MCI was 16% in 1450 subjects with normal thyroid function, 17% in 313 subjects with clinical hypothyroidism, and 18% in 141 subjects with subclinical hypothyroidism. After adjusting for covariates (age, gender, education, education years, sex, ApoE ε 4, depression, diabetes, hypertension, stroke, BMI and coronary artery disease) we found no significant association between clinical or subclinial hypothyroidism and MCI [OR 0.99 (95% CI 0.66–1.48) and OR 0.88 (95% CI 0.38–2.03) respectively]. No effect of gender interaction was seen on these effects. In stratified analysis, the odds of MCI with clinical and subclinical hypothyroidisn among males was 1.02 (95%CI, 0.57–1.82) and 1.29 (95%CI 0.68–2.44), among females was 1.04 (95% 0.66–1.66) and 0.86 (95% CI 0.37–2.02) respectively. Conclusion In this population based cohort of eldery, neither clinical nor subclinical hypothyrpodism was associated with MCI. Our findings

  12. Novel Anthropometry Based on 3D-Bodyscans Applied to a Large Population Based Cohort.

    PubMed

    Löffler-Wirth, Henry; Willscher, Edith; Ahnert, Peter; Wirkner, Kerstin; Engel, Christoph; Loeffler, Markus; Binder, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) whole body scanners are increasingly used as precise measuring tools for the rapid quantification of anthropometric measures in epidemiological studies. We analyzed 3D whole body scanning data of nearly 10,000 participants of a cohort collected from the adult population of Leipzig, one of the largest cities in Eastern Germany. We present a novel approach for the systematic analysis of this data which aims at identifying distinguishable clusters of body shapes called body types. In the first step, our method aggregates body measures provided by the scanner into meta-measures, each representing one relevant dimension of the body shape. In a next step, we stratified the cohort into body types and assessed their stability and dependence on the size of the underlying cohort. Using self-organizing maps (SOM) we identified thirteen robust meta-measures and fifteen body types comprising between 1 and 18 percent of the total cohort size. Thirteen of them are virtually gender specific (six for women and seven for men) and thus reflect most abundant body shapes of women and men. Two body types include both women and men, and describe androgynous body shapes that lack typical gender specific features. The body types disentangle a large variability of body shapes enabling distinctions which go beyond the traditional indices such as body mass index, the waist-to-height ratio, the waist-to-hip ratio and the mortality-hazard ABSI-index. In a next step, we will link the identified body types with disease predispositions to study how size and shape of the human body impact health and disease.

  13. Novel Anthropometry Based on 3D-Bodyscans Applied to a Large Population Based Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Löffler-Wirth, Henry; Willscher, Edith; Ahnert, Peter; Wirkner, Kerstin; Engel, Christoph; Loeffler, Markus; Binder, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) whole body scanners are increasingly used as precise measuring tools for the rapid quantification of anthropometric measures in epidemiological studies. We analyzed 3D whole body scanning data of nearly 10,000 participants of a cohort collected from the adult population of Leipzig, one of the largest cities in Eastern Germany. We present a novel approach for the systematic analysis of this data which aims at identifying distinguishable clusters of body shapes called body types. In the first step, our method aggregates body measures provided by the scanner into meta-measures, each representing one relevant dimension of the body shape. In a next step, we stratified the cohort into body types and assessed their stability and dependence on the size of the underlying cohort. Using self-organizing maps (SOM) we identified thirteen robust meta-measures and fifteen body types comprising between 1 and 18 percent of the total cohort size. Thirteen of them are virtually gender specific (six for women and seven for men) and thus reflect most abundant body shapes of women and men. Two body types include both women and men, and describe androgynous body shapes that lack typical gender specific features. The body types disentangle a large variability of body shapes enabling distinctions which go beyond the traditional indices such as body mass index, the waist-to-height ratio, the waist-to-hip ratio and the mortality-hazard ABSI-index. In a next step, we will link the identified body types with disease predispositions to study how size and shape of the human body impact health and disease. PMID:27467550

  14. Association of Sleep Disorders with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD): A Population-based Study.

    PubMed

    Mir, Heshaam M; Stepanova, Maria; Afendy, Hena; Cable, Rebecca; Younossi, Zobair M

    2013-09-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a major cause of chronic liver disease. In smaller studies, sleep apnea has been previously associated with NAFLD. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and independent associations of sleep disorders in patients with NAFLD using recent population-based data. Three cycles of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) conducted between 2005 and 2010 were used. The diagnosis of NAFLD was established as elevated liver enzymes in the absence of all other causes of chronic liver disease. Sleep disorders were diagnosed using sleep disorder questionnaires completed by NHANES participants, and included self-reported history of sleep apnea, insomnia, and restless leg syndrome. The prevalence of sleep disorders was compared between those with and without NAFLD. A total of 10,541 adult NHANES participants with complete demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were included. Of those, 15.0% had NAFLD and 7.2% reported having sleep disorders. Of those with sleep disorders, 64.7% reported history of sleep apnea, 16.0% had history of insomnia, and 4.0% had restless leg syndrome. Individuals with NAFLD were more likely to be male (53.8% vs. 45.7%, P < 0.0001), obese (50.1% vs. 33.4%, P < 0.0001) and had higher prevalence of sleep disorders (9.1% vs. 6.9%, P = 0.0118). In multivariate analysis, having any sleep disorder, sleep apnea and insomnia were all independently associated with NAFLD [OR (95% CI) = 1.40 (1.11-1.76), OR = 1.39 (0.98-1.97), and OR = 2.17 (1.19-3.95); respectively)]. This large population-based data suggests that NAFLD is associated with sleep disorders. Although the exact mechanism is unknown, this association is most likely through metabolic conditions associated with NAFLD.

  15. The impact of diabetes on prescription drug costs: the population-based Turin study.

    PubMed

    Bruno, G; Karaghiosoff, L; Merletti, F; Costa, G; De Maria, M; Panero, F; Segre, O; Cavallo-Perin, P; Gnavi, R

    2008-05-01

    The aim of our study was to compare prescription drug costs in diabetic and non-diabetic individuals in a large population-based Italian cohort covered by the National Health System. We identified diabetic residents in Turin on 31 July 2003 through multiple independent data sources (diabetes registry, hospital discharges and prescriptions data sources). All prescriptions registered in the 12 month period 1 August 2003 to 31 July 2004 were examined to compare prevalence of treatment and costs in diabetic (n = 33,797) and non-diabetic individuals (n = 863,876). A log-linear model was employed to estimate age- and sex-adjusted ratios of costs. Costs per person per year were 830.90euros in diabetic patients and 182.80euros in non-diabetic individuals (age- and sex-adjusted rate ratio 2.8, 95% CI 2.7-2.9). Diabetes treatment accounted for 18.5% of the total cost. Compared with non-diabetic individuals, the excess of expenditure was particularly high in diabetic patients aged <45 years (rate ratio 9.3), in those with type 1 diabetes (rate ratio 7.7) and in insulin users (rate ratio 4.8). The cost of diet-treated patients was similar to those treated with oral drugs. Diabetes was associated with an increased prevalence of treatment for most drug categories; one-third of the diabetic cohort received ACE inhibitors, anti-thrombotic drugs and statins. This population-based study shows that diabetes has a great impact on prescription drug costs, independently of main confounders, particularly in insulin-treated patients, suggesting that a wide range of comorbidities affect their health. Costs are expected to further increase if the transferability of knowledge provided by evidence-based guidelines on diabetic patients is completed over the coming years.

  16. Mind-Body Practice and Body Weight Status in a Large Population-Based Sample of Adults.

    PubMed

    Camilleri, Géraldine M; Méjean, Caroline; Bellisle, France; Hercberg, Serge; Péneau, Sandrine

    2016-04-01

    In industrialized countries characterized by a high prevalence of obesity and chronic stress, mind-body practices such as yoga or meditation may facilitate body weight control. However, virtually no data are available to ascertain whether practicing mind-body techniques is associated with weight status. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between the practice of mind-body techniques and weight status in a large population-based sample of adults. A total of 61,704 individuals aged ≥18 years participating in the NutriNet-Santé study (2009-2014) were included in this cross-sectional analysis conducted in 2014. Data on mind-body practices were collected, as well as self-reported weight and height. The association between the practice of mind-body techniques and weight status was assessed using multiple linear and multinomial logistic regression models adjusted for sociodemographic, lifestyle, and dietary factors. After adjusting for sociodemographic and lifestyle factors, regular users of mind-body techniques were less likely to be overweight (OR=0.68, 95% CI=0.63, 0.74) or obese (OR=0.55, 95% CI=0.50, 0.61) than never users. In addition, regular users had a lower BMI than never users (-3.19%, 95% CI=-3.71, -2.68). These data provide novel information about an inverse relationship between mind-body practice and weight status. If causal links were demonstrated in further prospective studies, such practice could be fostered in obesity prevention and treatment. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Increased risk of antidepressant use in childhood cancer survivors: a Danish population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Lund, Lasse Wegener; Winther, J F; Cederkvist, L; Andersen, K K; Dalton, S O; Appel, C W; Rechnitzer, C; Schmiegelow, K; Johansen, C

    2015-03-01

    Childhood cancer survivors are at risk of both somatic and mental late effects, but large population-based studies of depression are lacking. Risk of antidepressant use was evaluated in a population-based cohort of 5452 Danish children treated for cancer in 1975-2009 by linkage to the National Prescription Drug Database, which worldwide is the oldest nationwide registry of prescription medication. Hazard ratios (HRs) for antidepressant use were estimated in a Cox proportional hazards model stratified on sex, with population comparisons as referents. Overall, childhood cancer survivors were at increased risk of having antidepressants prescribed (HR, 1.4; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.3-1.5). The excess absolute risk of antidepressant use was 2.5 per 1000 person-years (95% CI, 1.7-3.3), equivalent to an excess of 2.5 survivors for every 100 survivors followed for 10years. Increased HRs of 30-50% were seen for survivors of cancers of all main groups (haematological malignancies, central nervous system (CNS) and solid tumors); the highest risk was among children treated with haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.2-3.1). Our data suggested that the risk was most pronounced for children treated in the most recent calendar periods (test for interaction between cancer and calendar periods: P<0.001), especially for survivors of haematological cancers (P=0.007). Interaction analysis of the effect of parental socioeconomic position and psychiatric disease on the association between childhood cancer and antidepressant use indicated no modifying effect. Childhood cancer survivors should be followed-up for depression. Our results indicate an increasing need for follow-up especially in survivors treated by more recent, intensive anticancer treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Food-Related Parenting Practices and Adolescent Weight Status: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    MacLehose, Richard F.; Fulkerson, Jayne A.; Crow, Scott; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine food-related parenting practices (pressure-to-eat and food restriction) among mothers and fathers of adolescents and associations with adolescent weight status within a large population-based sample of racially/ethnically and socioeconomically diverse parent-adolescent pairs. METHODS: Adolescents (N = 2231; 14.4 years old [SD = 2.0]) and their parents (N = 3431) participated in 2 coordinated population-based studies designed to examine factors associated with weight status and weight-related behaviors in adolescents. Adolescents completed anthropometric measurements and surveys at school. Parents (or other caregivers) completed questionnaires via mail or phone. RESULTS: Findings suggest that the use of controlling food-related parenting practices, including pressure-to-eat and restriction, is common among parents of adolescents. Mean restriction levels were significantly higher among parents of overweight and obese adolescents compared with nonoverweight adolescents. However, levels of pressure-to-eat were significantly higher among nonoverweight adolescents. Results indicate that fathers are more likely than mothers to engage in pressure-to-eat behaviors and boys are more likely than girls to be on the receiving end of parental pressure-to-eat. Parental report of restriction did not differ significantly by parent or adolescent gender. No significant interactions by race/ethnicity or socioeconomic status were seen in the relationship between restriction or pressure-to-eat and adolescent weight status. CONCLUSIONS: Given that there is accumulating evidence for the detrimental effects of controlling feeding practices on children’s ability to self-regulate energy intake, these findings suggest that parents should be educated and empowered through anticipatory guidance to encourage moderation rather than overconsumption and emphasize healthful food choices rather than restrictive eating patterns. PMID:23610202

  19. Food-related parenting practices and adolescent weight status: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Loth, Katie A; MacLehose, Richard F; Fulkerson, Jayne A; Crow, Scott; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2013-05-01

    To examine food-related parenting practices (pressure-to-eat and food restriction) among mothers and fathers of adolescents and associations with adolescent weight status within a large population-based sample of racially/ethnically and socioeconomically diverse parent-adolescent pairs. Adolescents (N = 2231; 14.4 years old [SD = 2.0]) and their parents (N = 3431) participated in 2 coordinated population-based studies designed to examine factors associated with weight status and weight-related behaviors in adolescents. Adolescents completed anthropometric measurements and surveys at school. Parents (or other caregivers) completed questionnaires via mail or phone. Findings suggest that the use of controlling food-related parenting practices, including pressure-to-eat and restriction, is common among parents of adolescents. Mean restriction levels were significantly higher among parents of overweight and obese adolescents compared with nonoverweight adolescents. However, levels of pressure-to-eat were significantly higher among nonoverweight adolescents. Results indicate that fathers are more likely than mothers to engage in pressure-to-eat behaviors and boys are more likely than girls to be on the receiving end of parental pressure-to-eat. Parental report of restriction did not differ significantly by parent or adolescent gender. No significant interactions by race/ethnicity or socioeconomic status were seen in the relationship between restriction or pressure-to-eat and adolescent weight status. Given that there is accumulating evidence for the detrimental effects of controlling feeding practices on children's ability to self-regulate energy intake, these findings suggest that parents should be educated and empowered through anticipatory guidance to encourage moderation rather than overconsumption and emphasize healthful food choices rather than restrictive eating patterns.

  20. Prevalence of Hidradenitis Suppurativa (HS): A Population-Based Study in Olmsted County, Minnesota

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Varun; Alikhan, Ali; Vazquez, Benjamin G.; Weaver, Amy L.; Davis, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a follicular occlusion disorder occurring in apocrine-rich regions of the skin. Estimates of the prevalence of this disorder have not been population-based. We sought to provide population-based information on the prevalence of HS in Olmsted County, Minnesota as of 1/1/2009. METHODS Rochester Epidemiology Project, a unique infrastructure that combines and makes accessible all medical records in Olmsted County since the 1960s, was used to collect population-based data on the prevalence of HS. RESULTS We identified 178 confirmed cases of HS that included 135 females and 43 males, and estimated the total sex- and age-adjusted prevalence in Olmsted County to be 127.8 per 100,000 or 0.13%. The total prevalence was significantly higher among women than men. CONCLUSION This study represents the first population-based investigation on the prevalence of HS. In this population-based cohort, HS was less prevalent than previous reports have suggested. PMID:25228133

  1. Mortality, Causes of Death and Associated Factors Relate to a Large HIV Population-Based Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Miró, Josep M.; Ocaña, Inma; Knobel, Hernando; Barberá, Maria Jesús; Humet, Victoria; Domingo, Pere; Gatell, Josep M.; Ribera, Esteve; Gurguí, Mercè; Marco, Andrés

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Antiretroviral therapy has led to a decrease in HIV-related mortality and to the emergence of non-AIDS defining diseases as competing causes of death. This study estimates the HIV mortality rate and their risk factors with regard to different causes in a large city from January 2001 to June 2013. Materials and Methods We followed-up 3137 newly diagnosed HIV non-AIDS cases. Causes of death were classified as HIV-related, non-HIV-related and external. We examined the effect of risk factors on survival using mortality rates, Kaplan-Meier plots and Cox models. Finally, we estimated survival for each main cause of death groups through Fine and Gray models. Mortality Results 182 deaths were found [14.0/1000 person-years of follow-up (py); 95% confidence interval (CI):12.0–16.1/1000 py], 81.3% of them had a known cause of death. Mortality rate by HIV-related causes and non-HIV-related causes was the same (4.9/1000 py; CI:3.7–6.1/1000 py), external was lower [1.7/1000 py; (1.0–2.4/1000 py)]. Survival Results Kaplan-Meier estimate showed worse survival in intravenous drug user (IDU) and heterosexuals than in men having sex with men (MSM). Factors associated with HIV-related causes of death include: IDU male (subHazard Ratio (sHR):3.2; CI:1.5–7.0) and <200 CD4 at diagnosis (sHR:2.7; CI:1.3–5.7) versus ≥500 CD4. Factors associated with non-HIV-related causes of death include: ageing (sHR:1.5; CI:1.4–1.7) and heterosexual female (sHR:2.8; CI:1.1–7.3) versus MSM. Factors associated with external causes of death were IDU male (sHR:28.7; CI:6.7–123.2) and heterosexual male (sHR:11.8; CI:2.5–56.4) versus MSM. Conclusion and Recommendation There are important differences in survival among transmission groups. Improved treatment is especially necessary in IDUs and heterosexual males. PMID:26716982

  2. Psychopathological mechanisms linking childhood traumatic experiences to risk of psychotic symptoms: analysis of a large, representative population-based sample.

    PubMed

    van Nierop, Martine; Lataster, Tineke; Smeets, Feikje; Gunther, Nicole; van Zelst, Catherine; de Graaf, Ron; ten Have, Margreet; van Dorsselaer, Saskia; Bak, Maarten; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Viechtbauer, Wolfgang; van Os, Jim; van Winkel, Ruud

    2014-03-01

    Different psychological models of trauma-induced psychosis have been postulated, often based on the observation of "specific" associations between particular types of childhood trauma (CT) and particular psychotic symptoms or the co-occurrence of delusions and hallucinations. However, the actual specificity of these associations remains to be tested. In 2 population-based studies with comparable methodology (Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study-1 [NEMESIS-1] and NEMESIS-2, N = 13 722), trained interviewers assessed CT, psychotic symptoms, and other psychopathology. Specificity of associations was assessed with mixed-effects regression models with multiple outcomes, a statistical method suitable to examine specificity of associations in case of multiple correlated outcomes. Associations with CT were strong and significant across the entire range of psychotic symptoms, without evidence for specificity in the relationship between particular trauma variables and particular psychotic experiences (PEs). Abuse and neglect were both associated with PEs (OR abuse: 2.12, P < .001; OR neglect: 1.96, P < .001), with no large or significant difference in effect size. Intention-to-harm experiences showed stronger associations with psychosis than CT without intent (χ(2) = 58.62, P < .001). Most trauma variables increased the likelihood of co-occurrence of delusions and hallucinations rather than either symptom in isolation. Intention to harm is the key component linking childhood traumatic experiences to psychosis, most likely characterized by co-occurrence of hallucinations and delusions, indicating buildup of psychotic intensification, rather than specific psychotic symptoms in isolation. No evidence was found to support psychological theories regarding specific associations between particular types of CT and particular psychotic symptoms.

  3. Service use and costs for persons experiencing chronic homelessness in Philadelphia: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Stephen R; Maguire, Marcella; Metraux, Stephen; Culhane, Dennis P

    2010-11-01

    This study is the first to examine the distribution of service utilization and costs with a population-based sample that experienced chronic homelessness in sheltered and unsheltered locations in a large U.S. city. This study used shelter and street outreach records from a large U.S. city to identify 2,703 persons who met federal criteria for chronic homelessness during a three-year period. Identifiers for these persons were matched to administrative records for psychiatric care, substance abuse treatment, and incarceration. Twenty percent of the persons who incurred the highest costs for services accounted for 60% of the total service costs of approximately $20 million a year (or approximately $12 million). Most of the costs for this quintile were for psychiatric care and jail stays. Eighty-one percent of the persons in the highest quintile had a diagnosis of a serious mental illness, and 83% of the persons in the lowest quintile had a history of substance abuse treatment without a diagnosis of a serious mental illness. Supportive housing models for people with serious mental illness who experience chronic homelessness may be associated with substantial cost offsets, because the use of acute care services diminishes in an environment of housing stability and access to ongoing support services. However, because persons with substance use issues and no recent history of mental health treatment used relatively fewer and less costly services, cost neutrality for these persons may require less service-intensive programs and smaller subsidies.

  4. A Population-Based Longitudinal Study of Depression in Children with Developmental Disabilities in Manitoba

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shooshtari, Shahin; Brownell, Marni; Dik, Natalia; Chateau, Dan; Yu, C. T.; Mills, Rosemary S. L.; Burchill, Charles A.; Wetzel, Monika

    2014-01-01

    In this population-based study, prevalence of depression was estimated and compared between children with and without developmental disability (DD). Twelve years of administrative data were linked to identify a cohort of children with DD living in the Canadian province of Manitoba. Children in the study cohort were matched with children without DD…

  5. Asthma and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: A Nationwide Population-Based Prospective Cohort Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Mu-Hong; Su, Tung-Ping; Chen, Ying-Sheue; Hsu, Ju-Wei; Huang, Kai-Lin; Chang, Wen-Han; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Bai, Ya-Mei

    2013-01-01

    Background: Previous cross-sectional studies have suggested an association between asthma and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), but the temporal relationship was not determined. Using a nationwide population-based prospective case-control cohort study (1:4, age-/gender-matched), we hypothesized that asthma in infanthood or early…

  6. Asthma and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: A Nationwide Population-Based Prospective Cohort Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Mu-Hong; Su, Tung-Ping; Chen, Ying-Sheue; Hsu, Ju-Wei; Huang, Kai-Lin; Chang, Wen-Han; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Bai, Ya-Mei

    2013-01-01

    Background: Previous cross-sectional studies have suggested an association between asthma and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), but the temporal relationship was not determined. Using a nationwide population-based prospective case-control cohort study (1:4, age-/gender-matched), we hypothesized that asthma in infanthood or early…

  7. A Population-Based Longitudinal Study of Depression in Children with Developmental Disabilities in Manitoba

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shooshtari, Shahin; Brownell, Marni; Dik, Natalia; Chateau, Dan; Yu, C. T.; Mills, Rosemary S. L.; Burchill, Charles A.; Wetzel, Monika

    2014-01-01

    In this population-based study, prevalence of depression was estimated and compared between children with and without developmental disability (DD). Twelve years of administrative data were linked to identify a cohort of children with DD living in the Canadian province of Manitoba. Children in the study cohort were matched with children without DD…

  8. Erectile Dysfunction in Patients with Sleep Apnea – A Nationwide Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yu-Chung; Yang, Chih-Jen; Wu, Meng-Ni; Hsu, Chung-Yao; Hwang, Shang-Jyh; Chong, Inn-Wen; Huang, Ming-Shyan

    2015-01-01

    Increased incidence of erectile dysfunction (ED) has been reported among patients with sleep apnea (SA). However, this association has not been confirmed in a large-scale study. We therefore performed a population-based cohort study using Taiwan National Health Insurance (NHI) database to investigate the association of SA and ED. From the database of one million representative subjects randomly sampled from individuals enrolled in the NHI system in 2010, we identified adult patients having SA and excluded those having a diagnosis of ED prior to SA. From these suspected SA patients, those having SA diagnosis after polysomnography were defined as probable SA patients. The dates of their first SA diagnosis were defined as their index dates. Each SA patient was matched to 30 randomly-selected, age-matched control subjects without any SA diagnosis. The control subjects were assigned index dates as their corresponding SA patients, and were ensured having no ED diagnosis prior to their index dates. Totally, 4,835 male patients with suspected SA (including 1,946 probable SA patients) were matched to 145,050 control subjects (including 58,380 subjects matched to probable SA patients). The incidence rate of ED was significantly higher in probable SA patients as compared with the corresponding control subjects (5.7 vs. 2.3 per 1000 patient-year; adjusted incidence rate ratio = 2.0 [95% CI: 1.8-2.2], p<0.0001). The cumulative incidence was also significantly higher in the probable SA patients (p<0.0001). In multivariable Cox regression analysis, probable SA remained a significant risk factor for the development of ED after adjusting for age, residency, income level and comorbidities (hazard ratio = 2.0 [95%CI: 1.5-2.7], p<0.0001). In line with previous studies, this population-based large-scale study confirmed an increased ED incidence in SA patients in Chinese population. Physicians need to pay attention to the possible underlying SA while treating ED patients. PMID:26177206

  9. A Population-Based Study of the Fractionation of Postlumpectomy Breast Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ashworth, Allison; Kong, Weidong; Whelan, Timothy; Mackillop, William J.

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: The optimal fractionation schedule of post lumpectomy radiation therapy remains controversial. The objective of this study was to describe the fractionation of post-lumpectomy radiation therapy (RT) in Ontario, before and after the seminal Ontario Clinical Oncology Group (OCOG) trial, which showed the equivalence of 16- and 25-fraction schedules. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective cohort study conducted by linking electronic treatment records to a population-based cancer registry. The study population included all patients who underwent lumpectomy for invasive breast cancer in Ontario, Canada, between 1984 and 2008. Results: Over the study period, 41,747 breast cancer patients received post lumpectomy radiation therapy to the breast only. Both 16- and 25-fraction schedules were commonly used throughout the study period. In the early 1980s, shorter fractionation schedules were used in >80% of cases. Between 1985 and 1995, the proportion of patients treated with shorter fractionation decreased to 48%. After completion of the OCOG trial, shorter fractionation schemes were once again widely adopted across Ontario, and are currently used in about 71% of cases; however, large intercenter variations in fractionation persisted. Conclusions: The use of shorter schedules of post lumpectomy RT in Ontario increased after completion of the OCOG trial, but the trial had a less normative effect on practice than expected.

  10. A Population-Based Study of Preschoolers' Food Neophobia and Its Associations with Food Preferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Catherine Georgina; Worsley, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This cross-sectional study was designed to investigate the relationships between food preferences, food neophobia, and children's characteristics among a population-based sample of preschoolers. Design: A parent-report questionnaire. Setting: Child-care centers, kindergartens, playgroups, day nurseries, and swimming centers. Subjects:…

  11. Relationship Status among Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Population-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedman, Brian H.; Kalb, Luther G.; Zablotsky, Benjamin; Stuart, Elizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite speculation about an 80% divorce rate among parents of children with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), very little empirical and no epidemiological research has addressed the issue of separation and divorce among this population. Data for this study was taken from the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health, a population-based,…

  12. Methods of Suicide among Cancer Patients: A Nationwide Population-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Kuo-Hsuan; Lin, Herng-Ching

    2010-01-01

    A 3-year nationwide population-based data set was used to explore methods of suicide (violent vs. nonviolent) and possible contributing factors among cancer patients in Taiwan. A total of 1,065 cancer inpatients who committed suicide were included as our study sample. The regression shows that those who had genitourinary cancer were 0.55 times (p…

  13. Long-Term Benefits of Full-Day Kindergarten: A Longitudinal Population-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brownell, M. D.; Nickel, N. C.; Chateau, D.; Martens, P. J.; Taylor, C.; Crockett, L.; Katz, A.; Sarkar, J.; Burland, E.; Goh, C. Y.

    2015-01-01

    In the first longitudinal, population-based study of full-day kindergarten (FDK) outcomes beyond primary school in Canada, we used linked administrative data to follow 15 kindergarten cohorts (n ranging from 112 to 736) up to grade 9. Provincial assessments conducted in grades 3, 7, and 8 and course marks and credits earned in grade 9 were…

  14. Mortality in Adults with Moderate to Profound Intellectual Disability: A Population-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyrer, F.; Smith, L. K.; McGrother, C. W.

    2007-01-01

    Background: People with intellectual disability (ID) experience a variety of health inequalities compared with the general population including higher mortality rates. This is the first UK population-based study to measure the extent of excess mortality in people with ID compared with the general population. Method: Indirectly standardized…

  15. Epilepsy Among Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Population-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jokiranta, Elina; Sourander, Andre; Suominen, Auli; Timonen-Soivio, Laura; Brown, Alan S.; Sillanpää, Matti

    2014-01-01

    The present population-based study examines associations between epilepsy and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The cohort includes register data of 4,705 children born between 1987 and 2005 and diagnosed as cases of childhood autism, Asperger's syndrome or pervasive developmental disorders--not otherwise specified. Each case was matched to four…

  16. Relationship Status among Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Population-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedman, Brian H.; Kalb, Luther G.; Zablotsky, Benjamin; Stuart, Elizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite speculation about an 80% divorce rate among parents of children with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), very little empirical and no epidemiological research has addressed the issue of separation and divorce among this population. Data for this study was taken from the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health, a population-based,…

  17. Epilepsy Among Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Population-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jokiranta, Elina; Sourander, Andre; Suominen, Auli; Timonen-Soivio, Laura; Brown, Alan S.; Sillanpää, Matti

    2014-01-01

    The present population-based study examines associations between epilepsy and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The cohort includes register data of 4,705 children born between 1987 and 2005 and diagnosed as cases of childhood autism, Asperger's syndrome or pervasive developmental disorders--not otherwise specified. Each case was matched to four…

  18. A Population-Based Study of Preschoolers' Food Neophobia and Its Associations with Food Preferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Catherine Georgina; Worsley, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This cross-sectional study was designed to investigate the relationships between food preferences, food neophobia, and children's characteristics among a population-based sample of preschoolers. Design: A parent-report questionnaire. Setting: Child-care centers, kindergartens, playgroups, day nurseries, and swimming centers. Subjects:…

  19. Measurement and Socio-Demographic Variation of Social Capital in a Large Population-Based Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nieminen, Tarja; Martelin, Tuija; Koskinen, Seppo; Simpura, Jussi; Alanen, Erkki; Harkanen, Tommi; Aromaa, Arpo

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The main objective of this study was to describe the variation of individual social capital according to socio-demographic factors, and to develop a suitable way to measure social capital for this purpose. The similarity of socio-demographic variation between the genders was also assessed. Data and methods: The study applied…

  20. Incidence of Erythromelalgia: A Population-Based Study in Olmsted County, Minnesota

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Kurtis B.; Davis, Mark D. P.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To estimate the population-based incidence of erythromelalgia. Background Only one report describing the incidence of erythromelalgia has been published previously. Study Design A population-based analysis of data from the Rochester Epidemiology Project. Setting Tertiary care medical center in Olmsted County, Minnesota (a rural county in the southeastern portion of the state). Patients Thirty-three residents of Olmsted County with a diagnosis of erythromelalgia during the study period. Methods Age- and sex-specific incidence rates of erythromelalgia were determined. Intervention None. Main Outcome Population-based incidence rate. Results The overall age- and sex-adjusted incidence rate (95% confidence interval) was 1.3 (0.8-1.7) per 100,000 people per year. The incidence of primary and secondary erythromelalgia was 1.1 (0.7-1.5) and 0.2 (0.02-0.4) per 100,000 people per year, respectively. The age-adjusted incidence rates (95% confidence interval) were 2.0 (1.2-2.7) per 100,000 women and 0.6 (0.1-1.1) per 100,000 men. The study was limited by the small sample size and potential variability in recognition of erythromelalgia. Conclusion The population-based incidence of erythromelalgia has increased with each decade in Olmsted County over the past 3 decades; overall incidence was 1.3 per 100,000 people per year. PMID:18713229

  1. Prevalence of exposure to suicide: A meta-analysis of population-based studies.

    PubMed

    Andriessen, Karl; Rahman, Bayzidur; Draper, Brian; Dudley, Michael; Mitchell, Philip B

    2017-05-01

    Those exposed to suicide are at increased risk of adverse outcomes including mental illness, impaired social functioning, and fatal and non-fatal suicidal behavior. However, it is unclear how many people are exposed to suicide in the general community. This first meta-analysis of population-based studies aimed to provide pooled estimates of past-year and lifetime prevalence of exposure to suicide among family, friends/peers, and all relationships. In addition, the study examined prevalence of exposure to suicide by age group: adolescents and adults. Systematic searches of the literature in Embase, Medline and PsycINFO identified eighteen studies that were included in the analysis. Pooled past-year prevalence was 4.31% (CI: 2.50 to 6.58) and life-time prevalence 21.83% (CI: 16.32 to 27.90). Both past-year and lifetime prevalences of exposure to suicide among friends and peers were significantly higher than the prevalence of exposure within families; there were no differences in the prevalence of exposure to suicide between adolescents and adults. Heterogeneity was highly significant. Future research should be conducted with large national representative samples and use standardised assessment instruments. Given the increased risks of adverse outcomes among those exposed to suicide, the high rate of exposure to suicide reported here has important ramifications for public health and mental health service delivery.

  2. Association between Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Appendicitis: A Population-Based Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Kao, Li-Ting; Tsai, Ming-Chieh; Lin, Herng-Ching; Lee, Cha-Ze

    2016-03-02

    Appendicitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are both prevalent diseases and might share similar pathological mechanisms. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between GERD and appendicitis using a large population-based dataset. This study used administrative claims data from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2005. We identified 7113 patients with appendicitis as cases, and 28452 matched patients without appendicitis as controls. This study revealed that GERD was found in 359 (5.05%) cases and 728 (2.56%) controls (p < 0.001). Conditional logistic regression shows that the adjusted odds ratio (OR) of GERD for cases was 2.05 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.08~2.33) compared to controls. The adjusted ORs of prior GERD for patients aged 18~39, 40~59, and ≥60 years with appendicitis were 1.96 (95% CI: 1.56~2.47), 2.36 (95% CI: 1.94~2.88), and 1.71 (95% CI: 1.31~2.22) than controls, respectively. We concluded that patients with appendicitis had higher odds of prior GERD than those without appendicitis regardless of age group.

  3. A population-based study of quantitative sensory testing in adolescents with and without chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Tham, See Wan; Palermo, Tonya M; Holley, Amy Lewandowski; Zhou, Chuan; Stubhaug, Audun; Furberg, Anne-Sofie; Nielsen, Christopher Sivert

    2016-12-01

    Quantitative sensory testing (QST) has been used to characterize pain sensitivity in individuals with and without pain conditions. Research remains limited in pediatric populations, hindering the ability to expand the utility of QST toward its potential application in clinical settings and clinical predictive value. The aims of this study were to examine pain sensitivity using QST in adolescents with chronic pain compared to adolescents without chronic pain and identify predictors of pain sensitivity. A population-based study conducted from 2010 to 2011 provided data on 941 adolescents, 197 were classified as having chronic pain and 744 were classified without chronic pain. Self-reported data on pain characteristics, psychological functioning, and QST responses were examined. The findings revealed lower pressure pain threshold and tolerance on the trapezius (P's = 0.03) in adolescents with chronic pain compared to adolescents without chronic pain, but no differences on heat or cold-pressor pain tasks. Female sex (P's = 0.02) and poorer psychological functioning (P's = 0.02) emerged as significant predictors of greater pain sensitivity across all pain modalities. Exploratory analyses revealed several associations between clinical pain characteristics and QST responses within the chronic pain cohort. Findings from this large pediatric sample provide comprehensive data that could serve as normative data on QST responses in adolescents with and without chronic pain. These findings lay the groundwork toward developing future QST research and study protocols in pediatric populations, taking into consideration sex and psychological distress.

  4. Population-based worksite obesity management interventions: a qualitative case study.

    PubMed

    Romney, Martha C; Thomson, Erin; Kash, Kathryn

    2011-06-01

    Due to the increased prevalence of obesity and associated direct and indirect costs to employers, weight management programs have become an integral component of employer and insurer benefits plans. The programs vary in foci, scope, breadth, and implementation. The aim of this study was to explore promising employer-sponsored population-based obesity management programs. A case study that utilized a telephonic semi-structured questionnaire was conducted with small and large organizations located in different regions of the United States that had been recruited to participate. Eight employers and 1 health care advocacy coalition who met the inclusion criteria were interviewed about features of their weight management programs. The case study revealed a number of themes consistent with reports in the literature and reflecting cited best practices. Key findings include confirmation that weight management is a significant component of the wellness strategy in all participating organizations because employers are invested in population health programs and cost savings. Based upon their experience and knowledge, occupational health specialists are responsible for designing, implementing, managing, and evaluating employee health programs. Almost all employers utilize electronic media as a prominent component of wellness and disease management initiatives. Experience has shown that incentives-both financial and nonmonetary-are effective motivators for employee engagement and outcomes. However, while employers report success, favorable outcomes have been difficult to quantify.

  5. Association between Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Appendicitis: A Population-Based Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Li-Ting; Tsai, Ming-Chieh; Lin, Herng-Ching; Lee, Cha-Ze

    2016-01-01

    Appendicitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are both prevalent diseases and might share similar pathological mechanisms. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between GERD and appendicitis using a large population-based dataset. This study used administrative claims data from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2005. We identified 7113 patients with appendicitis as cases, and 28452 matched patients without appendicitis as controls. This study revealed that GERD was found in 359 (5.05%) cases and 728 (2.56%) controls (p < 0.001). Conditional logistic regression shows that the adjusted odds ratio (OR) of GERD for cases was 2.05 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.08~2.33) compared to controls. The adjusted ORs of prior GERD for patients aged 18~39, 40~59, and ≥60 years with appendicitis were 1.96 (95% CI: 1.56~2.47), 2.36 (95% CI: 1.94~2.88), and 1.71 (95% CI: 1.31~2.22) than controls, respectively. We concluded that patients with appendicitis had higher odds of prior GERD than those without appendicitis regardless of age group. PMID:26932391

  6. A Population-based study of dementia in the oldest old: the Monzino 80-plus Study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite being the fastest growing and the most cognitively impaired age group, the oldest olds are under-represented in clinical research. The purpose of this study was to describe the design, methods, and baseline characteristics of the survey population and investigate possible differences in demographic, cognitive, functional, and behavioral characteristics between oldest old with and without any performance on cognitive tests and between oldest old alive and those deceased prior to the interview. Methods The Monzino 80-plus Study is a prospective door-to-door population-based survey among 80 years or older residents in the municipalities in the province of Varese, Italy. Dementia cases were identified with a one-phase design. Trained psychologists interviewed both the subject and a proxy informant. The interview included a comprehensive standardized questionnaire together with an array of rating scales and a multidomain cognitive battery to assess cognitive and functional ability, behavioral disturbances and mood. Results Information was available for 2,139 of the 2,428 registered individuals aged 80 years or older. Main baseline characteristics of the population are reported and discussed. In comparison with those living, elderly persons who had died before the first visit were older, had twice the rate of institutionalization, poorer cognitive performance and competence, and significantly greater instrumental and basic functional disability. The percentage of elderly persons, alive at baseline, without Mini-Mental State Examination rose rather evenly with age. Moreover, they had significantly worse cognitive competence and functional ability, and reported higher prevalences of depressive symptoms and problem behaviors than those with Mini-Mental State Examination. Conclusions Prospective investigation of a large population of oldest old can contribute significantly to understanding the relations between age, cognitive decline, and dementia

  7. Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Atherothrombotic Disease: A Population-Based Longitudinal Study in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wen-Hsien; Hsu, Po-Chao; Chu, Chun-Yuan; Su, Ho-Ming; Lee, Chee-Siong; Yen, Hsueh-Wei; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Voon, Wen-Chol; Lai, Wen-Ter; Sheu, Sheng-Hsiung

    2014-01-01

    Background Atherothrombotic diseases including cerebrovascular disease (CVD), coronary artery disease (CAD), and peripheral arterial disease (PAD), contribute to the major causes of death in the world. Although several studies showed the association between polyvascular disease and poor cardiovascular (CV) outcomes in Asian population, there was no large-scale study to validate this relationship in this population. Methods and Results This retrospective cohort study included patients with a diagnosis of CVD, CAD, or PAD from the database contained in the Taiwan National Health Insurance Bureau during 2001–2004. A total of 19954 patients were enrolled in this study. The atherothrombotic disease score was defined according to the number of atherothrombotic disease. The study endpoints included acute coronary syndrome (ACS), all strokes, vascular procedures, in hospital mortality, and so on. The event rate of ischemic stroke (18.2%) was higher than that of acute myocardial infarction (5.7%) in our patients (P = 0.0006). In the multivariate Cox regression analyses, the adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of each increment of atherothrombotic disease score in predicting ACS, all strokes, vascular procedures, and in hospital mortality were 1.41, 1.66, 1.30, and 1.14, respectively (P≦0.0169). Conclusions This large population-based longitudinal study in patients with atherothrombotic disease demonstrated the risk of subsequent ischemic stroke was higher than that of subsequent AMI. In addition, the subsequent adverse CV events including ACS, all stroke, vascular procedures, and in hospital mortality were progressively increased as the increase of atherothrombotic disease score. PMID:24647769

  8. Incidence of erythromelalgia: a population-based study in Olmsted County, Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Reed, K B; Davis, M D P

    2009-01-01

    To estimate the population-based incidence of erythromelalgia. Background Only one report describing the incidence of erythromelalgia has been published previously. A population-based analysis of data from the Rochester Epidemiology Project. Tertiary care medical centre in Olmsted County, Minnesota (a rural county in the south-eastern portion of the state). Thirty-three residents of Olmsted County with a diagnosis of erythromelalgia during the study period. Age- and sex-specific incidence rates of erythromelalgia were determined. None. Population-based incidence rate. The overall age- and sex-adjusted incidence rate (95% confidence interval, 95% CI) was 1.3 (0.8-1.7) per 100,000 people per year. The incidence of primary and secondary erythromelalgia was 1.1 (0.7-1.5) and 0.2 (0.02-0.4) per 100,000 people per year, respectively. The age-adjusted incidence rates (95% CI) were 2.0 (1.2-2.7) per 100,000 women and 0.6 (0.1-1.1) per 100,000 men. The study was limited by the small sample size and potential variability in recognition of erythromelalgia. The population-based incidence of erythromelalgia has increased with each decade in Olmsted County over the past three decades; overall incidence was 1.3 per 100,000 people per year, approximately 5 times higher than previously reported.

  9. Exploratory Factor Analysis of Self-Reported Symptoms in a Large, Population-Based Military Cohort

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-15

    to -.83 (lots of energy ). 6. Problem drinking (3.6 percent of total variance). All items from the PHQ designed to assess problem drinking loaded...highlighting the difficulty in disassociating the effects of question content, location, and response format on factor structure. Conclusions This study...Sound Health Care System , Seattle, WA, USA 3 Department of Preventive Medicine and Biometrics, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences

  10. Association between psychiatric disorders and osteoarthritis: a nationwide longitudinal population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shih-Wei; Wang, Wei-Te; Lin, Li-Fong; Liao, Chun-De; Liou, Tsan-Hon; Lin, Hui-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although the association between depressive disorders and osteoarthritis (OA) has been studied, the association of other psychiatric disorders with OA remains unclear. Here, we investigated whether psychiatric disorders are risk factors for OA. The data were obtained from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2005 of Taiwan. We collected the ambulatory care claim records of patients who were diagnosed with psychiatric disorders according to the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2008. The prevalence and adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of osteoarthritis among patients with psychiatric disorders and the control cohort were estimated. Of 74,393 patients with psychiatric disorders, 16,261 developed OA during the 7-year follow-up period. The crude HR for OA was 1.44 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.39–1.49), which was higher than that of the control cohort. The adjusted HR for OA was 1.42 (95% CI, 1.39–1.42) among patients with psychiatric disorders during the 7-year follow-up period. Further analysis revealed that affective psychoses, neurotic illnesses or personality disorders, alcohol and drug dependence or abuse, and other mental disorders were risk factors for OA. This large-scale longitudinal population-based study revealed that affective psychoses, personality disorders, and alcohol and drug dependence or abuse are risk factors for OA. PMID:27368019

  11. Bad sleep? Don't blame the moon! A population-based study.

    PubMed

    Haba-Rubio, José; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Tobback, Nadia; Andries, Daniela; Preisig, Martin; Kuehner, Christine; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gérard; Luca, Gianina; Tafti, Mehdi; Heinzer, Raphaël

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate if there is a significant effect of lunar phases on subjective and objective sleep variables in the general population. A total of 2125 individuals (51.2% women, age 58.8 ± 11.2 years) participating in a population-based cohort study underwent a complete polysomnography (PSG) at home. Subjective sleep quality was evaluated by a self-rating scale. Sleep electroencephalography (EEG) spectral analysis was performed in 759 participants without significant sleep disorders. Salivary cortisol levels were assessed at awakening, 30 min after awakening, at 11 am, and at 8 pm. Lunar phases were grouped into full moon (FM), waxing/waning moon (WM), and new moon (NM). Overall, there was no significant difference between lunar phases with regard to subjective sleep quality. We found only a nonsignificant (p = 0.08) trend toward a better sleep quality during the NM phase. Objective sleep duration was not different between phases (FM: 398 ± 3 min, WM: 402 ± 3 min, NM: 403 ± 3 min; p = 0.31). No difference was found with regard to other PSG-derived parameters, EEG spectral analysis, or in diurnal cortisol levels. When considering only subjects with apnea/hypopnea index of <15/h and periodic leg movements index of <15/h, we found a trend toward shorter total sleep time during FM (FM: 402 ± 4, WM: 407 ± 4, NM: 415 ± 4 min; p = 0.06) and shorter-stage N2 duration (FM: 178 ± 3, WM: 182 ± 3, NM: 188 ± 3 min; p = 0.05). Our large population-based study provides no evidence of a significant effect of lunar phases on human sleep. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Perceived weight discrimination in England: a population-based study of adults aged ⩾50 years

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, S E; Steptoe, A; Beeken, R J; Croker, H; Wardle, J

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite a wealth of experimental studies on weight bias, little is known about weight discrimination at the population level. This study examined the prevalence and socio-demographic correlates of perceived weight discrimination in a large population-based sample of older adults. Methods: Data were from 5307 adults in the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing; a population-based cohort of men and women aged ⩾50 years. Weight discrimination was reported for five domains (less respect/courtesy; treated as less clever; poorer treatment in medical settings; poorer service in restaurants/stores; threatened/harassed) at wave 5 (2010–2011). Height and weight were measured at wave 4 (2008–2009). We used logistic regression to test the odds of weight discrimination in relation to weight status, age, sex, wealth, education and marital status. Results: Perceived weight discrimination in any domain was reported by 4.6% of participants, ranging from 0.8% in the normal-weight participants through 0.9, 6.7, 24.2 and 35.1% in individuals who were overweight or met criteria for class I, II and III obesity. Overall, and in each situation, odds of perceived weight discrimination were higher in younger and less wealthy individuals. There was no interaction between weight status and any socio-demographic variable. Relative to normal-weight participants, odds ratios for any perceived weight discrimination were 1.13 (95% confidence interval 0.53–2.40) in those who were overweight, 8.86 (4.65–16.88) in those with class I obesity, 35.06 (18.30–67.16) in class II obese and 56.43 (27.72–114.87) in class III obese. Conclusions: Our results indicate that rates of perceived weight discrimination are comparatively low in individuals who are overweight or have class I obesity, but for those with class II/III obesity, >10% had experienced discrimination in each domain, and >20% had been treated with less respect or courtesy. These findings have implications for public

  13. Age-specific association of migraine with cryptogenic TIA and stroke: Population-based study.

    PubMed

    Li, Linxin; Schulz, Ursula G; Kuker, Wilhelm; Rothwell, Peter M

    2015-10-27

    To determine whether there is an association between previous migraine and cryptogenic TIA or ischemic stroke at older ages. We determined the age-specific associations of history of migraine and Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST) subtype of TIA and ischemic stroke in a population-based cohort study (Oxford Vascular Study; 2002-2012). Among 1,810 eligible patients with TIA or ischemic stroke, 668 (36.9%) had cryptogenic events, of whom 187 (28.0%) had previous migraine. Migraine was more commonly associated with cryptogenic events than with those of known etiology (odds ratio [OR] 1.73, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.38-2.16, p < 0.0001; cardioembolic 2.00, 1.50-2.66, p < 0.0001; large artery 1.75, 1.20-2.53, p = 0.003; small vessel 1.32, 0.95-1.83, p = 0.096). The association of migraine with cryptogenic events was independent of age, sex, and all measured vascular risk factors (RFs) (adjusted OR 1.68, 1.33-2.13, p < 0.0001) and was strongest at older ages (<55 years, OR 1.11, 0.55-2.23; 55-64 years, 1.48, 0.83-2.63; ≥65 years, 1.81, 1.39-2.36) and in patients without vascular RFs (0 RFs OR 2.62, 1.33-5.15; 1 RF 2.01, 1.35-3.01; 2 RFs 1.80, 1.21-2.68; 3 RFs 1.21, 0.71-2.07; 4 RFs 0.92, 0.28-2.99). Results were consistent for migraine with or without aura and for analyses excluding TIA or stratified by sex or vascular territory of event. In this population-based study of stroke etiology stratified by age, migraine was most strongly associated with cryptogenic TIA and ischemic stroke, particularly at older ages, suggesting a causal role or a shared etiology. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  14. Perceived weight discrimination in England: a population-based study of adults aged ⩾50 years.

    PubMed

    Jackson, S E; Steptoe, A; Beeken, R J; Croker, H; Wardle, J

    2015-05-01

    Despite a wealth of experimental studies on weight bias, little is known about weight discrimination at the population level. This study examined the prevalence and socio-demographic correlates of perceived weight discrimination in a large population-based sample of older adults. Data were from 5307 adults in the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing; a population-based cohort of men and women aged ⩾50 years. Weight discrimination was reported for five domains (less respect/courtesy; treated as less clever; poorer treatment in medical settings; poorer service in restaurants/stores; threatened/harassed) at wave 5 (2010-2011). Height and weight were measured at wave 4 (2008-2009). We used logistic regression to test the odds of weight discrimination in relation to weight status, age, sex, wealth, education and marital status. Perceived weight discrimination in any domain was reported by 4.6% of participants, ranging from 0.8% in the normal-weight participants through 0.9, 6.7, 24.2 and 35.1% in individuals who were overweight or met criteria for class I, II and III obesity. Overall, and in each situation, odds of perceived weight discrimination were higher in younger and less wealthy individuals. There was no interaction between weight status and any socio-demographic variable. Relative to normal-weight participants, odds ratios for any perceived weight discrimination were 1.13 (95% confidence interval 0.53-2.40) in those who were overweight, 8.86 (4.65-16.88) in those with class I obesity, 35.06 (18.30-67.16) in class II obese and 56.43 (27.72-114.87) in class III obese. Our results indicate that rates of perceived weight discrimination are comparatively low in individuals who are overweight or have class I obesity, but for those with class II/III obesity, >10% had experienced discrimination in each domain, and >20% had been treated with less respect or courtesy. These findings have implications for public policy and highlight the need for effective interventions

  15. Cortical thickness and inattention/hyperactivity symptoms in young children: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Mous, S E; Muetzel, R L; El Marroun, H; Polderman, T J C; van der Lugt, A; Jaddoe, V W; Hofman, A; Verhulst, F C; Tiemeier, H; Posthuma, D; White, T

    2014-11-01

    While many neuroimaging studies have investigated the neurobiological basis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), few have studied the neurobiology of attention problems in the general population. The ability to pay attention falls along a continuum within the population, with children with ADHD at one extreme of the spectrum and, therefore, a dimensional perspective of evaluating attention problems has an added value to the existing literature. Our goal was to investigate the relationship between cortical thickness and inattention and hyperactivity symptoms in a large population of young children. This study is embedded within the Generation R Study and includes 6- to 8-year-old children (n = 444) with parent-reported attention and hyperactivity measures and high-resolution structural imaging data. We investigated the relationship between cortical thickness across the entire brain and the Child Behavior Checklist Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Problems score. We found that greater attention problems and hyperactivity were associated with a thinner right and left postcentral gyrus. When correcting for potential confounding factors and multiple testing, these associations remained significant. In a large, population-based sample we showed that young (6- to 8-year-old) children who show more attention problems and hyperactivity have a thinner cortex in the region of the right and left postcentral gyrus. The postcentral gyrus, being the primary somatosensory cortex, reaches its peak growth early in development. Therefore, the thinner cortex in this region may reflect either a deviation in cortical maturation or a failure to reach the same peak cortical thickness compared with children without attention or hyperactivity problems.

  16. Prevalence of depressive symptoms and associated developmental disorders in preschool children: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Fuhrmann, Pia; Equit, Monika; Schmidt, Karin; von Gontard, Alexander

    2014-04-01

    Depression is an incapacitating disorder, which is often overlooked in preschool children. The aim of this study was to analyse the prevalence of depressive symptoms and co-occurring risk factors in a large, population-based sample of preschool children. All 653 children (of a total of 731) in a defined geographical area were assessed during the school-entry exam by community care paediatricians. In addition to clinical appraisal, parents filled out the Preschool Feelings Checklist, a 16-item screening instrument with good psychometric properties. The mean age was 6.2 years (range 5.0-7.6 years) and the sample included 344 boys and 305 girls. The prevalence of depressive symptoms of clinical relevance (total score ≥3) was 5.7% (37). There were no differences between boys and girls, and between younger (<6 years) and older (>6 years) children. Depressive symptoms were associated with parental separation and comorbid behavioural problems, but especially with developmental motor and speech problems and disorders. Migration to Germany had no influence. Depressive symptoms are common in preschool children and associated with developmental problems. Depression should be considered in children with speech and motor problems who are at special risk. Early detection and treatment are recommended.

  17. Population-based case-control teratogenic study of hydroxyprogesterone treatment during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Dudás, István; Gidai, János; Czeizel, Andrew E

    2006-12-01

    Hydroxyprogesterone, a synthetic progestin, was used for the treatment of pregnant women with threatened abortion and preterm delivery. Previous studies showed some association between hydroxyprogesterone use during early pregnancy and some specific congenital abnormalities. The population-based large Hungarian data set seemed to be appropriate to check this possible association. The Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital Abnormalities between 1980 and 1996 includes 22 843 cases with congenital abnormalities and 38 151 controls without any defect. 318 (1.4%) cases, while 433 (1.1%) controls had mothers with hydroxyprogesterone treatment during pregnancy (adjusted POR with 95% CI: 1.3, 1.1-1.5). However, there was no association between risk for any congenital abnormality group and a higher use of maternal hydroxyprogesterone treatment during the second and third month of gestation. On the other hand hydroxyprogesterone is not effective in the prevention of preterm delivery. In conclusion, there was no detectable risk for congenital abnormalities in the offspring of mothers with hydroxyprogesterone treatment during early pregnancy, however, there is no reasonable indication of this treatment during pregnancy.

  18. Lung Cancer and Occupation in a Population-based Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Consonni, Dario; De Matteis, Sara; Lubin, Jay H.; Wacholder, Sholom; Tucker, Margaret; Pesatori, Angela Cecilia; Caporaso, Neil E.; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Landi, Maria Teresa

    2010-01-01

    The authors examined the relation between occupation and lung cancer in the large, population-based Environment And Genetics in Lung cancer Etiology (EAGLE) case-control study. In 2002–2005 in the Lombardy region of northern Italy, 2,100 incident lung cancer cases and 2,120 randomly selected population controls were enrolled. Lifetime occupational histories (industry and job title) were coded by using standard international classifications and were translated into occupations known (list A) or suspected (list B) to be associated with lung cancer. Smoking-adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated with logistic regression. For men, an increased risk was found for list A (177 exposed cases and 100 controls; odds ratio = 1.74, 95% confidence interval: 1.27, 2.38) and most occupations therein. No overall excess was found for list B with the exception of filling station attendants and bus and truck drivers (men) and launderers and dry cleaners (women). The authors estimated that 4.9% (95% confidence interval: 2.0, 7.8) of lung cancers in men were attributable to occupation. Among those in other occupations, risk excesses were found for metal workers, barbers and hairdressers, and other motor vehicle drivers. These results indicate that past exposure to occupational carcinogens remains an important determinant of lung cancer occurrence. PMID:20047975

  19. Seasonal affective disorder and alcohol abuse disorder in a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Morales-Muñoz, Isabel; Koskinen, Seppo; Partonen, Timo

    2017-07-01

    Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a recurrent major depressive disorder with a seasonal pattern, which is characterized by sad mood, low energy, longer sleep duration and carbohydrate craving. Furthermore, seasonal changes in mood and behavior may be closely related to alcohol use disorder (AUD). Nevertheless, there is scarce research on the study of cognitive impairments in SAD and AUD. We aimed to examine the relationship between the prevalence between SAD and AUD patients, and how cognitive functioning might be related to these variables. To do this, a sample of 8135 Finnish subjects was invited to take part in the population-based Health 2011 Survey, of whom 5903 did participate and 4554 were interviewed for mental health status with the Munich version of Composite International Diagnostic Interview. They also completed the modified Seasonal Pattern Assessment Questionnaire, the Mini-Mental State Examination, the category (animals) verbal fluency test, and the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test. Our results reveal the existence of a strong link between SAD and AUD in a large sample of Finnish population, as well as association between SAD and short-term memory problems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The association between childhood physical abuse and dyslexia: findings from a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Fuller-Thomson, Esme; Hooper, Stephen R

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between a history of dyslexia and childhood physical abuse in a large population-based epidemiological sample. It was hypothesized that the prevalence of dyslexia would be significantly higher in individuals who reported a childhood history of physical abuse in comparison to those who did not report such a history. A secondary analysis examined data from respondents 18 years and older from the Saskatchewan and Manitoba sample of the 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS). There were 13,640 respondents ages 18 and older. Due to missing data, the final sample size was 13,054 respondents. One third (34.8%) of respondents who reported they had been physically abused during their childhood or adolescence also reported being diagnosed with dyslexia in comparison with 7.2% of those who did not report being physically abused (p < .001). Initial adjustments for sociodemographic variables produced an odds ratio (OR) for dyslexia that was more than 7 times higher (OR = 7.09; 95% confidence interval [CI] = [4.42, 11.35]) for those who had reported being physically abused in comparison with their peers who did not report such a history; with additional adjustments for other adverse childhood experiences, these odds decreased only slightly to 6.09 times higher (95% CI = [3.58, 10.35]). Further research is needed to understand the mechanism linking physical abuse and dyslexia.

  1. Occupations and lung cancer: a population-based case-control study in British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Yenugadhati, Nagarajkumar; Birkett, Nicholas J; Momoli, Franco; Krewski, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    An investigation based on a large population-based case-control study in British Columbia, Canada, was conducted to identify high-risk occupations for lung cancer by histological subtypes. Subjects were 14,755 male incident cancer cases for whom lifetime occupational histories and information on smoking and relevant covariates were collected. Occupational associations for 2998 lung cancer cases, including histological subtypes, were assessed by logistic regression using other cancer cases, excluding smoking-related cancers, as controls. An excess risk of lung cancer was found among workers in metal processing, bakers, and ship deck crew for all histological subtypes, and construction workers, chefs and cooks, and medical workers for specific histological subtypes. Occupational associations that are unique to histological subtypes of lung cancer were identified. Owing to a scarcity of literature in this area, future research needs to focus on confirming these histological associations, and identifying the risk from key exposures found within these occupations (e.g., medical radiation, electromagnetic fields, and cooking fumes).

  2. Lung cancer and occupation in a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Consonni, Dario; De Matteis, Sara; Lubin, Jay H; Wacholder, Sholom; Tucker, Margaret; Pesatori, Angela Cecilia; Caporaso, Neil E; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Landi, Maria Teresa

    2010-02-01

    The authors examined the relation between occupation and lung cancer in the large, population-based Environment And Genetics in Lung cancer Etiology (EAGLE) case-control study. In 2002-2005 in the Lombardy region of northern Italy, 2,100 incident lung cancer cases and 2,120 randomly selected population controls were enrolled. Lifetime occupational histories (industry and job title) were coded by using standard international classifications and were translated into occupations known (list A) or suspected (list B) to be associated with lung cancer. Smoking-adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated with logistic regression. For men, an increased risk was found for list A (177 exposed cases and 100 controls; odds ratio = 1.74, 95% confidence interval: 1.27, 2.38) and most occupations therein. No overall excess was found for list B with the exception of filling station attendants and bus and truck drivers (men) and launderers and dry cleaners (women). The authors estimated that 4.9% (95% confidence interval: 2.0, 7.8) of lung cancers in men were attributable to occupation. Among those in other occupations, risk excesses were found for metal workers, barbers and hairdressers, and other motor vehicle drivers. These results indicate that past exposure to occupational carcinogens remains an important determinant of lung cancer occurrence.

  3. Association of Sleep Disorders with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD): A Population-based Study

    PubMed Central

    Mir, Heshaam M.; Stepanova, Maria; Afendy, Hena; Cable, Rebecca; Younossi, Zobair M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a major cause of chronic liver disease. In smaller studies, sleep apnea has been previously associated with NAFLD. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and independent associations of sleep disorders in patients with NAFLD using recent population-based data. Methods Three cycles of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) conducted between 2005 and 2010 were used. The diagnosis of NAFLD was established as elevated liver enzymes in the absence of all other causes of chronic liver disease. Sleep disorders were diagnosed using sleep disorder questionnaires completed by NHANES participants, and included self-reported history of sleep apnea, insomnia, and restless leg syndrome. The prevalence of sleep disorders was compared between those with and without NAFLD. Results A total of 10,541 adult NHANES participants with complete demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were included. Of those, 15.0% had NAFLD and 7.2% reported having sleep disorders. Of those with sleep disorders, 64.7% reported history of sleep apnea, 16.0% had history of insomnia, and 4.0% had restless leg syndrome. Individuals with NAFLD were more likely to be male (53.8% vs. 45.7%, P < 0.0001), obese (50.1% vs. 33.4%, P < 0.0001) and had higher prevalence of sleep disorders (9.1% vs. 6.9%, P = 0.0118). In multivariate analysis, having any sleep disorder, sleep apnea and insomnia were all independently associated with NAFLD [OR (95% CI) = 1.40 (1.11–1.76), OR = 1.39 (0.98–1.97), and OR = 2.17 (1.19–3.95); respectively)]. Conclusions This large population-based data suggests that NAFLD is associated with sleep disorders. Although the exact mechanism is unknown, this association is most likely through metabolic conditions associated with NAFLD. PMID:25755498

  4. Outcomes in stage I testicular seminoma: a population-based study of 9193 patients.

    PubMed

    Beard, Clair J; Travis, Lois B; Chen, Ming-Hui; Arvold, Nils D; Nguyen, Paul L; Martin, Neil E; Kuban, Deborah A; Ng, Andrea K; Hoffman, Karen E

    2013-08-01

    Few studies have quantified temporal patterns of cause-specific mortality in contemporary cohorts of men with early-stage seminoma. Given that several management strategies can be applied in these patients, each resulting in excellent long-term survival, it is important to evaluate associated long-term sequelae. In particular, data describing long-term risks of cardiovascular disease (CVD) are conflicting. We identified 9193 men diagnosed with stage I seminoma (ages 15-70 years) in the population-based SEER registries (1973-2001). We calculated survival estimates, standardized mortality ratios (SMRs), and adjusted hazard rates (AHRs). During 121,037 person-years of follow-up (median, 12.3 years), 915 deaths (SMR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.16-1.32) were reported, with significant excesses for suicide (n = 39; SMR, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.06-1.98), infection (n = 58; SMR, 2.32; 95% CI, 1.80-3.00), and second malignant neoplasms (SMNs; n = 291; SMR, 1.81; 95% CI, 1.61-2.03), but not CVD (n = 201; SMR, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.80-1.05). After radiotherapy (78% patients), CVD deaths were not increased (n = 158; SMR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.76-1.04), in contrast to SMN deaths (n = 246; SMR, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.67-2.14). SMN mortality was higher among patients administered radiotherapy than among those not given radiotherapy (AHR, 1.36; 95% CI, 0.99-1.88; P = .059), with a cumulative 15-year risk of 2.64% (95% CI, 2.19-3.16). Suicide, although rare, accounted for 1 in 230 deaths. Modern radiotherapy as applied in this large population-based study is not associated with excess CVD mortality. Although increased all-cause mortality exists, cumulative SMN risk is considerably smaller than reported in historical series, but additional follow-up will be required to characterize long-term trends. The increased risk of suicide, previously unreported in men with stage I seminoma, requires confirmation. © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  5. Outcomes in Stage I Testicular Seminoma: A Population-Based Study of 9193 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Beard, Clair J.; Travis, Lois B.; Chen, Ming-Hui; Arvold, Nils D.; Nguyen, Paul L.; Martin, Neil E.; Kuban, Deborah A.; Ng, Andrea K.; Hoffman, Karen E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Few studies have quantified temporal patterns of cause-specific mortality in contemporary cohorts of men with early-stage seminoma. Given that several management strategies can be applied in these patients, each resulting in excellent long-term survival, it is important to evaluate associated long-term sequelae. In particular, data describing long-term risks of cardiovascular disease (CVD) are conflicting. METHODS We identified 9193 men diagnosed with stage I seminoma (ages 15–70 years) in the population-based SEER registries (1973–2001). We calculated survival estimates, standardized mortality ratios (SMRs), and adjusted hazard rates (AHRs). RESULTS During 121,037 person-years of follow-up (median, 12.3 years), 915 deaths (SMR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.16–1.32) were reported, with significant excesses for suicide (n =39; SMR, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.06–1.98), infection (n =58; SMR, 2.32; 95% CI, 1.80–3.00), and second malignant neoplasms (SMNs; n =291; SMR, 1.81; 95% CI, 1.61–2.03), but not CVD (n =201; SMR, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.80–1.05). After radiotherapy (78% patients), CVD deaths were not increased (n =158; SMR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.76–1.04), in contrast to SMN deaths (n =246; SMR, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.67–2.14). SMN mortality was higher among patients administered radiotherapy than among those not given radiotherapy (AHR, 1.36; 95% CI, 0.99–1.88; P =.059), with a cumulative 15-year risk of 2.64% (95% CI, 2.19–3.16). Suicide, although rare, accounted for 1 in 230 deaths. CONCLUSIONS Modern radiotherapy as applied in this large population-based study is not associated with excess CVD mortality. Although increased all-cause mortality exists, cumulative SMN risk is considerably smaller than reported in historical series, but additional follow-up will be required to characterize long-term trends. The increased risk of suicide, previously unreported in men with stage I seminoma, requires confirmation. PMID:23633409

  6. Hydatidiform mole and subsequent pregnancy outcome: a population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Joneborg, Ulrika; Eloranta, Sandra; Johansson, Anna L V; Marions, Lena; Weibull, Caroline E; Lambe, Mats

    2014-12-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate whether a history of hydatidiform mole (HM) is associated with an increased risk of adverse outcomes in subsequent pregnancies. This was a nationwide cohort study with data from population-based registers. The study population consisted of all children registered in the Swedish Medical Birth Register 1973-2009 (n = 3,730,825). Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated for adverse maternal and offspring pregnancy outcomes by maternal history of HM prior to the delivery, with children to women with no maternal history of HM as the reference. Risk estimates were adjusted for maternal age at delivery and maternal country of birth. A history of HM was not associated with an increased risk of adverse maternal outcomes in subsequent pregnancies (n = 5186). Women exposed to a molar pregnancy prior to the index birth were at an almost 25% increased risk of preterm birth (OR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.06-1.43), whereas women with at least 1 birth between the HM and the index birth were at an increased risk of a large-for-gestational-age birth and stillbirth (OR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.10-1.67 and OR, 1.81; 95% CI, 1.11-2.96, respectively). The risk of repeat mole was 0.4%. Women with a history of HM are at no increased risk of adverse maternal outcomes in subsequent pregnancies but have an increased risk of large-for-gestational-age birth, stillbirth, and preterm birth. However, in absolute terms, the risk of subsequent adverse offspring outcomes is very low. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Perinatal outcomes among women with bipolar disorder: a population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Mei-Dan, Elad; Ray, Joel G; Vigod, Simone N

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the risk of adverse perinatal outcomes among pregnant women previously hospitalized for bipolar disorder. We completed a population-based cohort study of women with a singleton delivery in Ontario, Canada (2003 to 2011). Women previously hospitalized for bipolar disorder (n = 1859) or major depressive disorder (n = 3724) were each compared to women without a documented mental illness (n = 432,358). Main study outcomes were preterm birth, severe small for gestational age <3rd percentile birthweight, and severe large for gestational age >97th percentile birthweight. Secondary outcomes included stillbirth, congenital malformations, neonatal morbidity and readmission to hospital <28 days. Odds ratios (ORs) were adjusted for maternal age, parity, prepregnancy obesity, substance use, and diabetes mellitus or hypertension before or during pregnancy. Bipolar disorder (adjusted OR [AOR], 1.95; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.68-2.26) and major depressive disorder (AOR, 1.91; 95% CI, 1.72-2.13) were each associated with preterm birth. Bipolar disorder was associated with severe large for gestational age (AOR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.03-1.67). Major depressive disorder was associated with severe small for gestational age (AOR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.05-1.42). Both mood disorder groups had significantly higher risk of congenital malformations, neonatal morbidity, and neonatal hospital readmission. Although study covariates explained some of the increased risk, we could not address all potential explanatory factors. Women previously hospitalized for bipolar disorder are at increased risk of adverse perinatal outcomes compared with the general population. Their level of risk is comparable to women previously hospitalized for major depressive disorder. These risks must be considered in the management of pregnant women with a history of major mood disorders. Attention to potentially modifiable risk factors such as obesity, diabetes, and hypertension before and during pregnancy could

  8. Initial guess by improved population-based intelligent algorithms for large inter-frame deformation measurement using digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jia-qing; Zeng, Pan; Lei, Li-ping; Ma, Yuan

    2012-03-01

    Digital image correlation (DIC) has received a widespread research and application in experimental mechanics. In DIC, the performance of subpixel registration algorithm (e.g., Newton-Raphson method, quasi-Newton method) relies heavily on the initial guess of deformation. In the case of small inter-frame deformation, the initial guess could be found by simple search scheme, the coarse-fine search for instance. While for large inter-frame deformation, it is difficult for simple search scheme to robustly estimate displacement parameters and deformation parameters simultaneously with low computational cost. In this paper, we proposed three improving strategies, i.e. Q-stage evolutionary strategy (T), parameter control strategy (C) and space expanding strategy (E), and then combined them into three population-based intelligent algorithms (PIAs), i.e. genetic algorithm (GA), differential evolution (DE) and particle swarm optimization (PSO), and finally derived eighteen different algorithms to calculate the initial guess for qN. The eighteen algorithms were compared in three sets of experiments including large rigid body translation, finite uniaxial strain and large rigid body rotation, and the results showed the effectiveness of proposed improving strategies. Among all compared algorithms, DE-TCE is the best which is robust, convenient and efficient for large inter-frame deformation measurement.

  9. Influence of lunar phases on suicide: the end of a myth? A population-based study.

    PubMed

    Biermann, Teresa; Estel, Dorothee; Sperling, Wolfgang; Bleich, Stefan; Kornhuber, Johannes; Reulbach, Udo

    2005-01-01

    The hypothesis of lunar influence on suicide remains widespread, despite the fact that little scientific evidence to substantiate it. We conducted a population-based study to assess the influence of the lunar phases on suicides according to age, sex, and chosen method. The study included all suicides in Middle Franconia between 1998 and 2003. From a population-based sample of 3351 events, the files of 3054 suicides (1949 males and 1105 females) were complete for the study variables. Data were categorized by lunar phase, sex, age, and chosen method-"violent" vs. "non-violent" acts. No significant relationship was detected between the full, absent, and moon's interphases and suicide incidence. Nevertheless, there was a weak association between the absent moon and choice of a non-violent suicide method in men aged less than the median of 40.2 yrs. There was no evidence of a relationship between suicide and lunar phase. Some explanations for this phenomenon are discussed.

  10. Strategies for recruiting representative samples of Asian Americans for a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Wong, Celeste K; Horn-Ross, Pamela L; Gee, Gilbert C; Shariff-Marco, Salma; Quach, Thu; Allen, Laura; Bautista, Roxanna; La Chica, Patricia Quema; Tseng, Winston; Chang, Pancho; Clarke, Christina A; Yang, Juan; Le, Gem M; Canchola, Alison; Irwin, Melinda L; Lee, Sandra Soo-Jin; Gomez, Scarlett Lin

    2016-10-01

    Data are limited on effective methods for recruiting persons, especially from ethnically diverse populations, into population-based studies. The goal of this study was to evaluate the variation among and representativeness of controls identified using multiple methods for a population-based case-control study of breast cancer among Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders (AANHPIs) in the San Francisco Bay Area. We used a unique combination of targeted recruitment strategies, including address-based sampling, community-based methods, and internet-based and media-based approaches for recruiting controls, frequency matched on age and ethnicity to a population-based sample of cases. To characterise the participating controls, we compared the distribution of sociodemographic characteristics and cancer risk factors between recruitment sources using χ(2) tests. To ensure that the controls we recruited were representative of the underlying at-risk population, we compared characteristics of the controls, by ethnicity and in aggregate, to data from the California Health Interview Survey (CHIS), and adjusted the relative mix of recruitment strategies throughout the study as needed to achieve representativeness. As expected, controls (n=483) recruited by any single method were not representative. However, when aggregated across methods, controls were largely representative of the underlying source population, as characterised by CHIS, with regard to the characteristics under study, including nativity, education, marital status and body mass index. A multimode approach using targeted recruitment strategies is an effective and feasible alternative to using a single recruitment method in identifying a representative, diverse control sample for population-based studies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. Rheumatoid Arthritis Was Negatively Associated with Alzheimer's Disease: A Population-Based Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Kao, Li-Ting; Kang, Jiunn-Horng; Lin, Herng-Ching; Huang, Chung-Chien; Lee, Hsin-Chien; Chung, Shiu-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Some of the prior literature investigated the potential association between rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) because these two diseases may share similar inflammatory mechanisms. Nevertheless, to date, findings of the previous literature are still controversial, and some methodological limitations were observed in those studies. The aim of this case-control study was to investigate the relationship between prior RA and AD using a large population-based dataset. This study used the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2005. We included 2271 patients with AD who had received prescriptions for acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs) as cases and 6813 patients without AD as controls in this study. In addition, we performed a conditional logistic regression to examine the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for prior RA between cases and controls. The study found that 330 (3.63%) of the total sampled patients had an RA diagnosis before the index date. Additionally, prior RA was found in 60 (2.64%) cases and in 270 (3.96%) controls. The conditional logistic regression analysis showed that the crude OR of prior RA for cases was 0.66 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.49~0.87) compared to controls. After adjusting for patients' geographic location, urbanization level, and comorbidities, the adjusted OR of prior RA for patients with AD was 0.73 (95% CI: 0.55~0.98) compared to those without AD. We concluded that there was an inverse association between prior RA and AD even after adjusting for potential confounders.

  12. Methamphetamine use and schizophrenia: a population-based cohort study in California.

    PubMed

    Callaghan, Russell C; Cunningham, James K; Allebeck, Peter; Arenovich, Tamara; Sajeev, Gautam; Remington, Gary; Boileau, Isabelle; Kish, Stephen J

    2012-04-01

    Clinical investigators in Japan have long suggested that exposure to methamphetamine might cause a persistent schizophrenia-like psychosis. This possibility is discounted in the Western literature. To investigate the relationship between drug use and later schizophrenia, the authors conducted a large-scale cohort study of drug users initially free of persistent psychosis. A population-based cohort study was conducted using data from California inpatient hospital discharge records from 1990 through 2000. Patients with methamphetamine-related conditions (N=42,412) and those with other drug use disorders (cannabis, cocaine, alcohol, and opioids) were propensity score-matched to individuals with primary appendicitis who served as a population proxy comparison group; the methamphetamine cohort was also matched to the other drug cohorts. Cox modeling was used to estimate differences between matched groups in the rates of subsequent admission with schizophrenia diagnoses. The methamphetamine cohort had a significantly higher risk of schizophrenia than the appendicitis group (hazard ratio=9.37) and the cocaine, opioid, and alcohol groups (hazard ratios ranging from 1.46 to 2.81), but not significantly different from that of the cannabis group. The risk of schizophrenia was higher in all drug cohorts than in the appendicitis group. Study limitations include difficulty in confirming schizophrenia diagnoses independent of drug intoxication and the possibility of undetected schizophrenia predating drug exposure. The study's findings suggest that individuals with methamphetamine-related disorders have a higher risk of schizophrenia than those with other drug use disorders, with the exception of cannabis use disorders. The elevated risk in methamphetamine users may be explained by shared etiological mechanisms involved in the development of schizophrenia.

  13. Cognition, structural brain changes and complicated grief. A population-based study.

    PubMed

    Saavedra Pérez, H C; Ikram, M A; Direk, N; Prigerson, H G; Freak-Poli, R; Verhaaren, B F J; Hofman, A; Vernooij, M; Tiemeier, H

    2015-05-01

    Several psychosocial risk factors for complicated grief have been described. However, the association of complicated grief with cognitive and biological risk factors is unclear. The present study examined whether complicated grief and normal grief are related to cognitive performance or structural brain volumes in a large population-based study. The present research comprised cross-sectional analyses embedded in the Rotterdam Study. The study included 5501 non-demented persons. Participants were classified as experiencing no grief (n = 4731), normal grief (n = 615) or complicated grief (n = 155) as assessed with the Inventory of Complicated Grief. All persons underwent cognitive testing (Mini-Mental State Examination, Letter-Digit Substitution Test, Stroop Test, Word Fluency Task, word learning test - immediate and delayed recall), and magnetic resonance imaging to measure general brain parameters (white matter, gray matter), and white matter lesions. Total brain volume was defined as the sum of gray matter plus normal white matter and white matter lesion volume. Persons with depressive disorders were excluded and analyses were adjusted for depressive symptoms. Compared with no-grief participants, participants with complicated grief had lower scores for the Letter-Digit Substitution Test [Z-score -0.16 v. 0.04, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.36 to -0.04, p = 0.01] and Word Fluency Task (Z-score -0.15 v. 0.03, 95% CI -0.35 to -0.02, p = 0.02) and smaller total volumes of brain matter (933.53 ml v. 952.42 ml, 95% CI -37.6 to -0.10, p = 0.04). Participants with complicated grief performed poorly in cognitive tests and had a smaller total brain volume. Although the effect sizes were small, these findings suggest that there may be a neurological correlate of complicated grief, but not of normal grief, in the general population.

  14. Hand, hip and knee osteoarthritis in a Norwegian population-based study - The MUST protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Knowledge about the prevalence and consequences of osteoarthritis (OA) in the Norwegian population is limited. This study has been designed to gain a greater understanding of musculoskeletal pain in the general population with a focus on clinically and radiologically confirmed OA, as well as risk factors, consequences, and management of OA. Methods/Design The Musculoskeletal pain in Ullensaker STudy (MUST) has been designed as an observational study comprising a population-based postal survey and a comprehensive clinical examination of a sub-sample with self-reported OA (MUST OA cohort). All inhabitants in Ullensaker municipality, Norway, aged 40 to 79 years receive the initial population-based postal survey questionnaire with questions about life style, general health, musculoskeletal pain, self-reported OA, comorbidities, health care utilisation, medication use, and functional ability. Participants who self-report OA in their hip, knee and/or hand joints are asked to attend a comprehensive clinical examination at Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, including a comprehensive medical examination, performance-based functional tests, different imaging modalities, cardiovascular assessment, blood and urine samples, and a number of patient-reported questionnaires including five OA disease specific instruments. Data will be merged with six national data registries. A subsample of those who receive the questionnaire has previously participated in postal surveys conducted in 1990, 1994, and 2004 with data on musculoskeletal pain and functional ability in addition to demographic characteristics and a number of health related factors. This subsample constitutes a population based cohort with 20 years follow-up. Discussion This protocol describes the design of an observational population-based study that will involve the collection of data from a postal survey on musculoskeletal pain, and a comprehensive clinical examination on those with self-reported hand, hip and

  15. Review article: the natural history of paediatric-onset ulcerative colitis in population-based studies.

    PubMed

    Fumery, M; Duricova, D; Gower-Rousseau, C; Annese, V; Peyrin-Biroulet, L; Lakatos, P L

    2016-02-01

    A better knowledge of the natural history of disabling chronic diseases is essential to improve patient management, evaluate the impact of treatment strategies and provide predictors for disabling disease and comprehensive information for patients. To summarise our current knowledge issued from population-based studies of the natural history of ulcerative colitis (UC) in children. We searched MEDLINE (source PubMed) and international conference abstracts, and included all population-based studies that evaluated long-term outcome of paediatric-onset (<17 years at diagnosis) UC. A total of 26 population-based studies were considered in this review from the total of 61 articles or abstracts screened. Most patients presented disease extension and about two-thirds of patients had pancolitis at the end of follow-up. One-half of patients experienced extra-intestinal manifestations and primary sclerosing cholangitis was observed in 5-10% of patients. Overall, patients did not appear to have any significant growth retardation or delayed puberty. About two-thirds of patients required corticosteroid therapy and up to 25% were steroid dependent. An increased use of thiopurines was observed and the most recent data indicate that up to one-half of patients were exposed to thiopurines and 10-30% were exposed to anti-tumour necrosis factor. One-half of patients required hospitalisations and 20% of patients required colectomy after a follow-up of 10 years. Paediatric-onset UC is characterised by a high rate of disease extension. About 20% of patients had been operated at 10-year follow-up. New population-based studies are needed to evaluate the impact of new treatment strategies comprising immunosuppressants and biologics. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Incidence of Dermatomyositis and Clinically Amyopathic Dermatomyositis: A Population-Based Study in Olmsted County, Minnesota

    PubMed Central

    Reeder, Margo J.; Wetter, David A.; Li, Xujian; Davis, Mark D. P.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To identify new and existing cases of dermatomyositis and its subtypes in Olmsted County, Minnesota, from 1976 through 2007, and to establish a population-based estimate of the incidence and prevalence of dermatomyositis and amyopathic dermatomyositis. Design Retrospective population-based study. Setting Community-based epidemiology project. Patients Using the Rochester Epidemiology Project, patients with a diagnosis of dermatomyositis were identified. Main Outcome Measures Incidence of dermatomyositis and clinically amyopathic dermatomyositis; risk of malignancy in clinically amyopathic dermatomyositis. Results Of the 29 patients identified, 6 (21%) of these had the clinically amyopathic subtype of dermatomyositis, and 22 (76%) were female. Overall age- and sex-adjusted incidence (95% confidence interval) of dermatomyositis including all subtypes was 9.63 (6.09-13.17) per 1,000,000 and was 2.08 (0.39-3.77) per 1,000,000 for clinically amyopathic dermatomyositis. Age- and sex-adjusted prevalence was 21.42 (13.07-29.77) per 100,000. Eight patients (28%) had a malignancy during the study period; risk of malignancy (odds ratio) for classic dermatomyositis compared with clinically amyopathic dermatomyositis was 4.61 but was not statistically significant (0.22-96.09) (P=.44). Conclusions Dermatomyositis is a rare disease, and clinically amyopathic dermatomyositis represents an estimated 20% of all dermatomyositis cases. Larger population-based studies are needed to estimate the risk of malignancy associated with subtypes of dermatomyositis, particularly clinically amyopathic dermatomyositis. PMID:20083689

  17. Epidemiology of chronic spontaneous urticaria: results from a nationwide, population-based study in Italy.

    PubMed

    Lapi, F; Cassano, N; Pegoraro, V; Cataldo, N; Heiman, F; Cricelli, I; Levi, M; Colombo, D; Zagni, E; Cricelli, C; Vena, G A

    2016-05-01

    Chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) is a common skin disease, but there is a paucity of precise epidemiological data on this disease. To obtain information on the epidemiology of CSU in Italy. The data source was the Health Search IMS Health Longitudinal Patient Database. The study population was formed by patients aged ≥ 15 years, registered with a total of 700 general practitioners, homogeneously distributed across Italy. An algorithm based on the International Classification of Diseases, ninth revision, Clinical Modification was used for the identification of patients with CSU. The annual prevalence and incidence rates of CSU over a 12-year period (2002-2013) were estimated, along with demographic and clinical determinants. The annual prevalence of CSU ranged from 0·02% in 2002 to 0·38% in 2013. The incidence was 0·10-1·50 per 1000 person-years. For both prevalence and incidence rates, female patients outnumbered male. The risk of CSU was statistically significantly higher in the presence of the following variables: obesity; anxiety, dissociative and somatoform disorders; malignancies; use of immunosuppressive drugs; and chronic use of systemic corticosteroids. History of autoimmune thyroiditis showed a trend towards an increased risk of CSU, though it was not statistically significant. Smoking was associated with a significantly reduced risk of CSU. Our findings on CSU prevalence are consistent with those obtained in previous studies. Furthermore, this large population-based study provides important information regarding the association of CSU with demographic and clinical determinants, which have been examined in the primary-care setting. © 2016 British Association of Dermatologists.

  18. Exhaled nitric oxide in a population-based study of southern California schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Linn, William S; Rappaport, Edward B; Berhane, Kiros T; Bastain, Tracy M; Avol, Edward L; Gilliland, Frank D

    2009-04-21

    Determinants of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) need to be understood better to maximize the value of FeNO measurement in clinical practice and research. Our aim was to identify significant predictors of FeNO in an initial cross-sectional survey of southern California schoolchildren, part of a larger longitudinal study of asthma incidence. During one school year, we measured FeNO at 100 ml/sec flow, using a validated offline technique, in 2568 children of age 7-10 yr. We estimated online (50 ml/sec flow) FeNO using a prediction equation from a separate smaller study with adjustment for offline measurement artifacts, and analyzed its relationship to clinical and demographic characteristics. FeNO was lognormally distributed with geometric means ranging from 11 ppb in children without atopy or asthma to 16 ppb in children with allergic asthma. Although effects of atopy and asthma were highly significant, ranges of FeNO for children with and without those conditions overlapped substantially. FeNO was significantly higher in subjects aged > 9, compared to younger subjects. Asian-American boys showed significantly higher FeNO than children of all other sex/ethnic groups; Hispanics and African-Americans of both sexes averaged slightly higher than non-Hispanic whites. Increasing height-for-age had no significant effect, but increasing weight-for-height was associated with decreasing FeNO. FeNO measured offline is a useful biomarker for airway inflammation in large population-based studies. Further investigation of age, ethnicity, body-size, and genetic influences is needed, since they may contribute to substantial variation in FeNO.

  19. Antioxidants and breast cancer risk- a population-based case-control study in Canada

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The effect of antioxidants on breast cancer is still controversial. Our objective was to assess the association between antioxidants and breast cancer risk in a large population-based case-control study. Methods The study population included 2,362 cases with pathologically confirmed incident breast cancer (866 premenopausal and 1,496 postmenopausal) and 2,462 controls in Canada. Intakes of antioxidants from diet and from supplementation as well as other potential risk factors for breast cancer were collected by a self-reported questionnaire. Results Compared with subjects with no supplementation, 10 years or longer supplementation of zinc had multivariable-adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of 0.46 (0.25-0.85) for premenopausal women, while supplementation of 10 years or longer of multiple vitamin, beta-carotene, vitamin C, vitamin E and zinc had multivariable-adjusted ORs (95% CIs) of 0.74 (0.59, 0.92), 0.58 (0.36, 0.95), 0.79 (0.63-0.99), 0.75 (0.58, 0.97), and 0.47 (0.28-0.78), respectively, for postmenopausal women. No significant effect of antioxidants from dietary sources (including beta-carotene, alpha-carotene, lycopene, lutein and zeaxanthin, vitamin C, vitamin E, selenium and zinc) or from supplementation less than 10 years was observed. Conclusions This study suggests that supplementation of zinc in premenopausal women, and supplementation of multiple vitamin, beta-carotene, vitamin C, vitamin E and zinc in postmenopausal women for 10 or more years may protect women from developing breast cancer. However, we were unable to determine the overall effect of total dose or intake from both diet and supplement. PMID:21864361

  20. Coffee drinking and risk of endometrial cancer – a population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Friberg, Emilie; Orsini, Nicola; Mantzoros, Christos S.; Wolk, Alicja

    2009-01-01

    Coffee drinking has been reported to have beneficial effects on insulin resistance which has been directly associated with endometrial cancer. Although a relationship between coffee consumption and endometrial cancer risk is biologically plausible, this hypothesis has been previously explored in only two prospective studies, with a small number of cases. We used data from the Swedish Mammography Cohort, a population-based prospective cohort study of 60 634 women. During 17.6 years of follow-up, 677 participants were diagnosed with incident endometrial cancer (adenocarcinoma). We examined the association between self-reported coffee consumption (at baseline 1987–90 and in 1997) and endometrial cancer risk using Cox proportional hazards models. Each additional cup (200g) of coffee per day was associated with a RR of 0.90 (95% CI 0.83–0.97). In women drinking four or more cups of coffee a day the risk reduction of endometrial cancer was RR 0.75 (95% CI 0.58–0.97) as compared to those who drank one cup or less. The association seemed largely confined to overweight and obese women, who showed a respective risk reduction of 12% (95% CI 0–23%) and 20% (95% CI 7–31%) for every cup of coffee, but was not observed among normal weight women. There was a statistically significant interaction between coffee consumption and body mass index (pinteraction <0.001). These data indicate that coffee consumption may be associated with decreased risk of endometrial cancer, especially among women with excessive body weight. If confirmed by other prospective studies, these results are of major public health significance. PMID:19585497

  1. Effective filtering strategies to improve data quality from population-based whole exome sequencing studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Genotypes generated in next generation sequencing studies contain errors which can significantly impact the power to detect signals in common and rare variant association tests. These genotyping errors are not explicitly filtered by the standard GATK Variant Quality Score Recalibration (VQSR) tool and thus remain a source of errors in whole exome sequencing (WES) projects that follow GATK’s recommended best practices. Therefore, additional data filtering methods are required to effectively remove these errors before performing association analyses with complex phenotypes. Here we empirically derive thresholds for genotype and variant filters that, when used in conjunction with the VQSR tool, achieve higher data quality than when using VQSR alone. Results The detailed filtering strategies improve the concordance of sequenced genotypes with array genotypes from 99.33% to 99.77%; improve the percent of discordant genotypes removed from 10.5% to 69.5%; and improve the Ti/Tv ratio from 2.63 to 2.75. We also demonstrate that managing batch effects by separating samples based on different target capture and sequencing chemistry protocols results in a final data set containing 40.9% more high-quality variants. In addition, imputation is an important component of WES studies and is used to estimate common variant genotypes to generate additional markers for association analyses. As such, we demonstrate filtering methods for imputed data that improve genotype concordance from 79.3% to 99.8% while removing 99.5% of discordant genotypes. Conclusions The described filtering methods are advantageous for large population-based WES studies designed to identify common and rare variation associated with complex diseases. Compared to data processed through standard practices, these strategies result in substantially higher quality data for common and rare association analyses. PMID:24884706

  2. Effective filtering strategies to improve data quality from population-based whole exome sequencing studies.

    PubMed

    Carson, Andrew R; Smith, Erin N; Matsui, Hiroko; Brækkan, Sigrid K; Jepsen, Kristen; Hansen, John-Bjarne; Frazer, Kelly A

    2014-05-02

    Genotypes generated in next generation sequencing studies contain errors which can significantly impact the power to detect signals in common and rare variant association tests. These genotyping errors are not explicitly filtered by the standard GATK Variant Quality Score Recalibration (VQSR) tool and thus remain a source of errors in whole exome sequencing (WES) projects that follow GATK's recommended best practices. Therefore, additional data filtering methods are required to effectively remove these errors before performing association analyses with complex phenotypes. Here we empirically derive thresholds for genotype and variant filters that, when used in conjunction with the VQSR tool, achieve higher data quality than when using VQSR alone. The detailed filtering strategies improve the concordance of sequenced genotypes with array genotypes from 99.33% to 99.77%; improve the percent of discordant genotypes removed from 10.5% to 69.5%; and improve the Ti/Tv ratio from 2.63 to 2.75. We also demonstrate that managing batch effects by separating samples based on different target capture and sequencing chemistry protocols results in a final data set containing 40.9% more high-quality variants. In addition, imputation is an important component of WES studies and is used to estimate common variant genotypes to generate additional markers for association analyses. As such, we demonstrate filtering methods for imputed data that improve genotype concordance from 79.3% to 99.8% while removing 99.5% of discordant genotypes. The described filtering methods are advantageous for large population-based WES studies designed to identify common and rare variation associated with complex diseases. Compared to data processed through standard practices, these strategies result in substantially higher quality data for common and rare association analyses.

  3. Estimated verbal IQ and the odds of problem gambling: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Rai, D; Hall, W; Bebbington, P; Skapinakis, P; Hassiotis, A; Weich, S; Meltzer, H; Moran, P; Brugha, T; Strydom, A; Farrell, M

    2014-06-01

    The neurocognitive deficits and other correlates of problem gambling are also observable in individuals with lower cognitive abilities, suggesting that a low IQ may be a determinant of problem gambling. There has been very little research into this possibility. This study aimed to investigate the characteristics associated with problem gambling in a large population-based study in England, with a particular focus on IQ. The Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey (APMS) 2007 comprised detailed interviews with 7403 individuals living in private households in England. Problem gambling was ascertained using a questionnaire based on DSM-IV criteria. Verbal IQ was estimated using the National Adult Reading Test (NART). Confounders included socio-economic and demographic factors, common mental disorders, impulsivity, smoking, and hazardous drug and alcohol use. More than two-thirds of the population reported engaging in some form of gambling in the previous year, but problem gambling was rare [prevalence 0.7%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.5-1.0]. The odds of problem gambling doubled with each standard deviation drop in estimated verbal IQ [adjusted odds ratio (OR) 2.1, 95% CI 1.3-3.4, p = 0.003], after adjusting for other characteristics associated with problem gambling including age, sex, socio-economic factors, drug and alcohol dependence, smoking, impulsivity and common mental disorders. There was no strong relationship observed between IQ and non-problem gambling. People with lower IQs may be at a higher risk of problem gambling. Further work is required to replicate and study the mechanisms behind these findings, and may aid the understanding of problem gambling and inform preventative measures and interventions.

  4. A Population-Based Study of Genetic Variation and Psychotic Experiences in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Zammit, Stanley; Hamshere, Marian; Dwyer, Sarah; Georgiva, Lyudmila; Timpson, Nic; Moskvina, Valentina; Richards, Alexander; Evans, David M; Lewis, Glyn; Jones, Peter; Owen, Michael J.; O’Donovan, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    Psychotic experiences are not uncommon in general population samples, but no studies have examined to what extent confirmed risk variants for schizophrenia are associated with such experiences. A total of 3483 children in a birth cohort study participated in semistructured interviews for psychotic experiences at ages 12 and 18. We examined whether (1) a composite measure of risk for schizophrenia conferred by common alleles (polygenic score) was associated with psychotic experiences, (2) variants with genome-wide evidence for association with schizophrenia were associated with psychotic experiences, and (3) we could identify genetic variants for psychotic experiences using a genome-wide association (GWA) approach. We found no evidence that a schizophrenia polygenic score, or variants showing genome-wide evidence of association with schizophrenia, were associated with adolescent psychotic experiences within the general population. In fact, individuals who had a higher number of risk alleles for genome-wide hits for schizophrenia showed a decreased risk of psychotic experiences. In the GWA study, no variants showed GWA for psychotic experiences, and there was no evidence that the strongest hits (P < 5 × 10−5) were enriched for variants associated with schizophrenia in large consortia. Although polygenic scores are weak tools for prediction of schizophrenia, they show strong evidence of association with this disorder. Our findings, however, lend little support to the hypothesis that psychotic experiences in population-based samples of adolescents share a comparable genetic architecture to schizophrenia, or that utilizing a broader and more common phenotype of psychotic experiences will be an efficient approach to increase understanding of the genetic etiology of schizophrenia. PMID:24174267

  5. Age, Sex, and Racial Differences in Neuroimaging Use in Acute Stroke: A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Vagal, A; Sanelli, P; Sucharew, H; Alwell, K A; Khoury, J C; Khatri, P; Woo, D; Flaherty, M; Kissela, B M; Adeoye, O; Ferioli, S; De Los Rios La Rosa, F; Martini, S; Mackey, J; Kleindorfer, D

    2017-10-01

    Limited information is available regarding differences in neuroimaging use for acute stroke work-up. Our objective was to assess whether race, sex, or age differences exist in neuroimaging use and whether these differences depend on the care center type in a population-based study. Patients with stroke (ischemic and hemorrhagic) and transient ischemic attack were identified in a metropolitan, biracial population using the Greater Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky Stroke Study in 2005 and 2010. Multivariable regression was used to determine the odds of advanced imaging use (CT angiography/MR imaging/MR angiography) for race, sex, and age. In 2005 and 2010, there were 3471 and 3431 stroke/TIA events, respectively. If one adjusted for covariates, the odds of advanced imaging were higher for younger (55 years or younger) compared with older patients, blacks compared with whites, and patients presenting to an academic center and those seen by a stroke team or neurologist. The observed association between race and advanced imaging depended on age; in the older age group, blacks had higher odds of advanced imaging compared with whites (odds ratio, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.12-1.61; P < .01), and in the younger group, the association between race and advanced imaging was not statistically significant. Age by race interaction persisted in the academic center subgroup (P < .01), but not in the nonacademic center subgroup (P = .58). No significant association was found between sex and advanced imaging. Within a large, biracial stroke/TIA population, there is variation in the use of advanced neuroimaging by age and race, depending on the care center type. © 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  6. The Moli-sani project: computerized ECG database in a population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Iacoviello, Licia; Rago, Livia; Costanzo, Simona; Di Castelnuovo, Augusto; Zito, Francesco; Assanelli, Deodato; Badilini, Fabio; Donati, Maria Benedetta; de Gaetano, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Computerized electrocardiogram (ECG) acquisition and interpretation may be extremely useful in handling analysis of data from large cohort studies and exploit research on the use of ECG data as prognostic markers for cardiovascular disease. The Moli-sani project (http://www.moli-sani.org) is a population-based cohort study aiming at evaluating the risk factors linked to chronic-degenerative disease with particular regard to cardiovascular disease and cancer and intermediate metabolic phenotypes such as hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, obesity, and metabolic syndrome. Between March 2005 and April 2010, 24 325 people aged 35 years or older, living in the Molise region (Italy), were randomly recruited. A follow-up based on linkage with hospital discharge records and mortality regional registry and reexamination of the cohort is ongoing and will be repeated at prefixed times. Each subject was administered questionnaires on personal and medical history, food consumption, quality of life (FS36), and psychometry. Plasma serum, cellular pellet, and urinary spots were stored in liquid nitrogen. Subjects were measured blood pressure, weight, height, and waist and hip circumferences, and underwent spirometry to evaluate pulmonary diffusion capacity, gas diffusion, and pulmonary volumes. Standard 12-lead resting ECG was performed by a Cardiette ar2100-view electrocardiograph and tracings stored in digital standard communication protocol format for subsequent analysis. The digital ECG database of the Moli-sani project is currently being used to assess the association between physiologic variables and pathophyiosiologic conditions and parameters derived from the ECG signal. This computerized ECG database represents a unique opportunity to identify and assess prognostic factors associated with cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Pregnancy outcomes in liver transplant patients, a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Ghazali, Sarah; Czuzoj-Shulman, Nicholas; Spence, Andrea R; Mishkin, Daniel S; Abenhaim, Haim A

    2017-02-01

    To determine the incidence of pregnancy in liver transplant (LT) patients in a large population-based cohort and to determine the maternal and fetal risks associated with these pregnancies. We conducted an age-matched cohort study using the US Healthcare and Utilization project-Nationwide Inpatient Sample from 2003-2011. We used unconditional logistic regression, adjusted for baseline characteristics, to estimate the likelihood of common obstetric complications in the LT group compared with age-matched nontransplant patients. There were 7 288 712 deliveries and an estimated incidence of 2.1 LTs/100 000 deliveries over the nine-year study period. LT patients had higher rates of maternal complications including hypertensive disorders (OR 6.5, 95% CI: 4.4-9.5), gestational diabetes (OR 1.9, 95% CI: 1.0-3.5), anemia (OR 3.2, 95% CI: 2.1-4.9), thrombocytopenia (OR 27.5, 95% CI: 12.7-59.8) and genitourinary tract infections (OR 4.2, 95% CI: 1.8-9.8). Deliveries among women with LT had higher risks of cesarean section (OR 2.9, 95% CI: 2.0-4.1), postpartum hemorrhage (OR 3.2, 95% CI: 1.7-6.2) and blood transfusion (OR 18.7, 95% CI: 8.5-41.0). Fetal complications in LT patients included preterm delivery (OR 4.7, 95% CI: 3.2-7.0), intrauterine growth restriction (OR 4.1, 95% CI: 2.1-7.7) and congenital anomalies (OR 6.0, 95% CI: 1.1-32.0). Although pregnancies in LT recipients are feasible, they are associated with a high rate of maternal and fetal morbidities. Close antenatal surveillance is recommended.

  8. Psychotropic drug use in adolescents born with an orofacial cleft: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Sofia; Merlo, Juan; Lyberg-Åhlander, Viveka; Psouni, Elia

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Being born with an orofacial cleft (OFC) can, due to an incomplete closure of the lip and/or palate, convey a deviant speech and/or deviant facial aesthetics, which may in turn increase the risk for poor psychological health later in life. Previous investigations have been based on small samples and self-reports, not distinguishing between the three different types of OFC: cleft lip (CL), CL and palate (CLP) and cleft palate only (CPO). We present a large population-based study, considering psychotropic drug use as a proxy for poor psychological health and distinguishing between three different types of OFC. Design and methods Using the Swedish Medical Birth Register, and linking to it the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register, the National Mortality Register, the Emigration Register and the National Inpatient Register, we identified all singletons born to native mothers in Sweden between 1987 and 1993, alive and residing in Sweden at the end of an 18-year follow-up period (N=626 109). We compared psychotropic drug use among individuals with and without OFC during the individuals’ adolescence (2005–2008) by multiple logistic regressions, using ORs with 95% CIs. Results When adjusted for potential confounders, having a CL (OR=1.63, 95% CI 1.08 to 2.46) or a CPO (OR=1.54, 95% CI 1.18 to 2.01) increased the risk of psychotropic drug use. Results were not significant regarding adolescents who had a CLP (OR=1.21, 95% CI 0.81 to 1.80). Conclusions Being born with a CL or a CPO increases the risk for psychotropic drug use in adolescence, but not for adolescents born with a CLP. Our findings suggest that, since the three OFC types are associated with different long-term risks of poor psychological health, the three groups should be studied separately concerning long-term psychosocial consequences. PMID:25838502

  9. Statins and hip fracture risk in men: a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Adams, Annette L; Shi, Jiaxiao M; Reynolds, Kristi; Haque, Reina; Cheetham, T Craig; Kawatkar, Aniket A; Fithian, Donald C; Jacobsen, Steven J

    2015-11-01

    To estimate the association between hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA inhibitor (statin) use and hip fracture. We conducted a population-based case-control study. Cases were 6774 male enrollees in a large managed care organization, aged 45 or more years, with an incident hip fracture from 1997 to 2006. Controls without fracture (n = 6774) were matched to cases on age, race, and medical center. Electronic information on pharmaceutical use was used to identify the dispensing of statins from 1991 forward. Overall, 1884 (27.8%) cases and 2150 controls (31.7%) used a statin before index date (matched odds ratio [mOR] = 0.81, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.74-0.87). Adjustment for comorbidity burden strengthened the magnitude of the overall association (mOR = 0.68, CI = 0.62-0.74). The adjusted association was similar across age groups but was strongest among men aged 80 years or more (mOR = 0.62, CI = 0.54-0.71) and was most pronounced in African Americans (mOR = 0.43, CI = 0.28-0.64). Greater duration of statin use did not alter the odds ratios. These data add to the growing evidence of a potential protective effect of statin use on bone health. However, these results need to be replicated in a prospective study that can account for confounding by indication which may explain these findings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Respiratory diseases and allergic sensitization in swine breeders: a population-based cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Galli, Luigina; Facchetti, Susanna; Raffetti, Elena; Donato, Francesco; D'Anna, Mauro

    2015-11-01

    The daily occupation as a swine breeder involves exposure to several bacterial components and organic dusts and inhalation of a large amount of allergens. To investigate the risk of respiratory diseases and atopy in swine breeders compared with the general population living in the same area. A population-based cross-sectional study was conducted in an agricultural area of northern Italy that enrolled a random sample of resident male breeders and non-breeders. Demographic features, comorbidities, and presence of allergic respiratory disease were retrieved through interview. Prick tests for common allergens were performed. An evaluation of pollen and mold in air samples taken inside and outside some swine confinement buildings also was performed. One hundred one male breeders (78 native-born, mean age ± SD 43.0 ± 11.1 years) and 82 non-breeders (43.0 ± 11.1 years) were enrolled. When restricting the analysis to native-born subjects, breeders vs non-breeders showed a lower prevalence of respiratory allergy (12.8% vs 31.1%, respectively, P = .002), asthma (6.4% vs 15.8%, P = .059), rhinitis (16.7% vs 51.2%, P < .001), persistent cough (5.1% vs 15.9%, P = .028), and sensitization to grass (7.7% vs 25.6%, P = .002). There was no difference in prick test positivity, polysensitization, nasal cytologic pattern, forced expiratory volume in 1 second, and the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 second to forced vital capacity between breeders and non-breeders. Air concentration of molds and pollens was lower inside than outside the swine buildings investigated, particularly when the pigs were inside vs outside the buildings. This study suggests that swine breeding does not increase, and might decrease, the risk of pollen sensitization and allergic disease. Copyright © 2015 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Occupation and malignant lymphoma: a population based case control study in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Mester, B; Nieters, A; Deeg, E; Elsner, G; Becker, N; Seidler, A

    2006-01-01

    Aims To identify occupations suspected to be associated with malignant lymphoma and to generate new hypotheses about occupational risks in a multicentre, population based case control study. Methods Male and female patients with malignant lymphoma (n = 710) aged 18–80 years of age were prospectively recruited in six study regions in Germany. For each newly recruited lymphoma case, a sex, region, and age matched control was drawn from the population registers. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for major occupations and industries were calculated using conditional logistic regression analysis, adjusted for smoking (in pack‐years) and alcohol consumption. Patients with specific lymphoma subentities were additionally compared with the entire control group using unconditional logistic regression analysis. Results The following economic/industrial sectors were positively associated with lymphoma: food products, beverages, tobacco; paper products, publishing and printing; and metals. Chemicals; real estate, renting, and business activities were negatively associated with lymphoma diagnosis. The authors observed an increased overall lymphoma risk among architects; maids; farmers; glass formers; and construction workers. Shoemaking and leather goods making was negatively associated with the lymphoma diagnosis (although based on small numbers). In the occupational group analysis of lymphoma subentities, Hodgkin's lymphoma was significantly associated only with rubber and plastic products making; diffuse large B cell lymphoma risk was considerably increased among metal processors; follicular lymphoma showed highly significant risk increases for several occupational groups (medical, dental, and veterinary workers; sales workers; machinery fitters; and electrical fitters); and multiple myeloma showed a particularly pronounced risk increase for farmers as well as for agriculture and animal husbandry workers. Conclusions The results partly confirm previously

  12. A Population Based Twin Study of DSM-5 Maladaptive Personality Domains.

    PubMed

    South, Susan C; Krueger, Robert F; Knudsen, Gun Peggy; Ystrom, Eivind; Czajkowski, Nikolai; Aggen, Steven H; Neale, Michael C; Gillespie, Nathan A; Kendler, Kenneth S; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted

    2016-10-31

    Personality disorders (PDs) can be partly captured by dimensional traits, a viewpoint reflected in the most recent Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fifth Edition (DSM-5) Alternative (Section III) Model for PD classification. The current study adds to the literature on the Alternative Model by examining the magnitude of genetic and environmental influences on 6 domains of maladaptive personality: negative emotionality, detachment, antagonism, disinhibition, compulsivity, and psychoticism. In a large, population-based sample (N = 2,293) of Norwegian male and female twin pairs, we investigated (a) if the domains demonstrated measurement invariance across gender at the phenotypic level, meaning that the relationships between the items and the latent factor were equivalent in men and women; and (b) if genetic and environmental influences on variation in these domains were equivalent across gender. Multiple group confirmatory factor modeling provided evidence that all 6 domain scale measurement models were gender-invariant. The best fitting biometric model for 4 of the 6 domains (negative emotionality, detachment, disinhibition, and compulsivity) was one in which genetic and environmental influences could be set invariant across gender. Evidence for sex differences in psychoticism was mixed, but the only clear evidence for quantitative sex differences was for the antagonism scale, with greater genetic influences found for men than women. Genetic influences across domains were moderate overall (19-37%), in line with previous research using symptom-based measures of PDs. This study adds to the very limited knowledge currently existing on the etiology of maladaptive personality traits. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Cutaneous melanoma in Latin America: a population-based descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Sortino-Rachou, Ana Maria; Curado, Maria Paula; Cancela, Marianna de Camargo

    2011-03-01

    Cutaneous melanoma incidences vary between geographic regions and are a health concern for Caucasians and for all ethnic populations. In Latin America, data from population-based cancer registries of cutaneous melanoma incidence rates have rarely been reported. We searched the Cancer Incidence in Five Continents volume IX (CI5-IX) database for cutaneous melanoma and select cases by topography (C43) from 11 population-based cancer registries in Latin America. Between 1998 and 2002, a total of 4,465 cutaneous melanoma cases were reported in Latin America. The average age-standardized incidence rates (per 100,000 persons-year) was 4.6 (male) and 4.3 (female). This study presents an overview of cutaneous melanoma incidence in Latin America, highlighting the need to enhance coverage of population-based cancer registries in Latin America, to allow for a better understanding of this neoplasm in the region. Thus it can help in implementing primary prevention programs for the whole Latino population. At this point in time, early detection messages should target young women and older men in Latin America.

  14. Digoxin use after diagnosis of breast cancer and survival: a population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Karasneh, Reema A; Murray, Liam J; Mc Menamin, Úna C; Hughes, Carmel M; Cardwell, Chris R

    2015-06-01

    Digoxin has been shown to have an estrogenic effect and is associated with increased risk of gynecomastia and estrogen-sensitive cancers such as breast and uterus cancer. These findings, particularly recent observations of increased breast cancer risk, raise questions about the safety of digoxin use in breast cancer patients. Therefore, we investigated whether digoxin use after breast cancer diagnosis increased the risk of breast cancer-specific mortality in breast cancer patients. A cohort of 17,842 breast cancer patients newly diagnosed from 1998 to 2009 was identified from English cancer registries (from the National Cancer Data Repository). This cohort was linked to the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (to provide digoxin and other prescription records) and to the Office of National Statistics mortality data (to identify breast cancer-specific deaths). Using time-dependent Cox regression models, unadjusted and adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for the association between post-diagnostic exposure to digoxin and breast cancer-specific and all-cause mortality. In 17,842 breast cancer patients, there were 2219 breast cancer-specific deaths. Digoxin users appeared to have increased breast cancer-specific mortality compared with non-users (HR 1.73; 95 % CI 1.39-2.15) but this association was entirely attenuated after adjustment for potential confounders (adjusted HR 0.91; 95 % CI 0.72-1.14). In this large population-based breast cancer cohort study, there was little evidence of an increase in breast cancer-specific mortality with digoxin use after diagnosis. These results provide some reassurance that digoxin use is safe in breast cancer patients.

  15. Sex ratio of congenital abnormalities in the function of maternal age: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Csermely, Gyula; Urbán, Robert; Czeizel, Andrew E; Veszprémi, Béla

    2015-05-01

    Maternal age effect is well-known in the origin of numerical chromosomal aberrations and some isolated congenital abnormalities (CAs). The sex ratio (SR), i.e. number of males divided by the number of males and females together, of most CAs deviates from the SR of newborn population (0.51). The objective of this analysis was to evaluate the possible association of maternal age with the SR of isolated CAs in a population-based large dataset of the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital Abnormalities, 1980-1996. First, SR of 24 CA entities/groups was estimated in 21,494 patients with isolated CA. In the next step SR of different maternal age groups was compared to the mean SR of the given CA-groups. The SR of four CA-groups showed some deviation in certain maternal age groups. Cases with anencephaly had female excess in young mothers (<25 years). Cases with skull's CAs particularly craniosynostosis had a male excess in cases born to women over 30 years. Two other CA groups (cleft lip ± palate and valvar pulmonic stenosis within the group of right-sided obstructive defect of heart) had significant deviation in SR of certain maternal age groups from the mean SR, but these deviations were not harmonized with joining age groups and thus were considered as a chance effect due to multiple testing. In conclusion, our study did not suggest that in general SR of isolated CAs might be modified by certain maternal age groups with some exception such as anencephaly and craniosynostosis. © 2014 Japanese Teratology Society.

  16. Incidence and risk of seizures in Alzheimer's disease: A nationwide population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chia-Hsiung; Liu, Chia-Jen; Ou, Shuo-Ming; Yeh, Chiu-Mei; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Lin, Yung-Yang; Wang, Shuu-Jiun

    2015-09-01

    The reported incidence and risk factors mediating seizures in Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been extremely inconsistent and relevant data is lacking in Asia. We investigated the incidence rate and risk of seizures in AD and in a large, nationwide cohort from Han Chinese. A retrospective population-based study was conducted on the data from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database from 2000 to 2010. To reduce selection bias, we applied propensity scores, wherein 981 patients with AD were matched to 3835 non-AD controls from a pool of 1000,000 randomly sampled cohort dataset. This approach was based on age, sex, comorbidities and previous brain conditions. Incidence rate, cumulative incidence and hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated. During the 10-year follow-up period (mean follow-up time, 4.02 years), 44 out of 937 AD patients (4.7%) developed seizures. The incidence rate in the AD cohort (11.9 per 1000 person-years) was higher than that in the matched cohort (5.7 per 1000 person-years), with an adjusted HR of 1.85 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.20-2.83, p=0.005). The mean duration from the diagnosis of AD to the occurrence of seizure is 3.6 years. The Cox regression analysis revealed that AD itself is a significant predictor after adjustment for confounders (HR=2.01, 95% CI, 1.40-2.90, p<0.001). Moreover, age is an independent predictor, with an adjusted HR of 1.03 (95% CI, 1.00-1.05, p=0.019). In conclusion, seizure occurrence in AD is more common than in the matched cohort. Notably, advanced age carries a higher risk for development of seizures in patients with AD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Sexual activity and concerns in people with coronary heart disease from a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Steptoe, Andrew; Jackson, Sarah E; Wardle, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Objective Sexual activity is a central component of intimate relationships, but sexual function may be impaired by coronary heart disease (CHD). There have been few representative population-based comparisons of sexual behaviour and concerns in people with and without CHD. We therefore investigated these issues in a large nationally representative sample of older people. Methods We analysed cross-sectional data from 2979 men and 3711 women aged 50 and older from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. Sexual behaviour and concerns were assessed by validated self-completion questionnaire and analyses were weighted for non-response. Covariates included age, partnerships status and comorbidities. Results There were 376 men and 279 women with CHD. Men with CHD were less likely to be sexually active (68.7% vs 80.0%, adjusted OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.47 to 0.81), thought less about sex (74.7% vs 81.9%, OR 0.72, CI 0.54 to 0.95), and reported more erectile difficulties (47.4% vs 38.1%, OR 1.46, CI 1.10 to 1.93) than men without CHD. Effects were more pronounced among those diagnosed within the past 4 years. Women diagnosed <4 years ago were also less likely to be sexually active (35.4% vs 55.6%, OR 0.44, CI 0.23 to 0.84). There were few differences in concerns about sexual activity. Cardiovascular medication showed weak associations with erectile dysfunction. Conclusions There is an association between CHD and sexual activity, particularly among men, but the impact of CHD is limited. More effective advice after diagnosis might reverse the reduction in sexual activity, leading to improved quality of life. PMID:27126394

  18. The Prevalence of Peyronie's Disease in the United States: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Stuntz, Mark; Perlaky, Anna; des Vignes, Franka; Kyriakides, Tassos; Glass, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Peyronie’s disease (PD) is a connective tissue disorder which can result in penile deformity. The prevalence of diagnosed PD in the United States (US) has been estimated to be 0.5% in adult males, but there is limited additional information comparing definitive and probable PD cases. We conducted a population-based survey to assess PD prevalence using a convenience-sample of adult men participating in the ResearchNow general population panel. Respondents were categorized according to PD status (definitive, probable, no PD) and segmented by US geographic region, education, and income levels. Of the 7,711 respondents, 57 (0.7%) had definitive PD while 850 (11.0%) had probable PD. Using univariate logistic regression modeling, older age (18–24 vs 24+) (OR = 0.721; 95% CI = 0.570,0.913), Midwest/Northeast/West geographic region (South vs Midwest/Northeast/West) (OR = 0.747; 95% CI = 0.646,0.864), and higher income level (<25K vs 25K+) (OR = 0.820; 95% CI = 0.673,0.997) were each significantly associated with reduced odds of having a definitive/probable PD diagnosis compared with no PD diagnosis. When all three variables were entered in a stepwise multivariable logistic regression, only age (OR = 0.642; 95% CI = 0.497, 0.828) and region (OR = 0.752; 95% CI = 0.647, 0.872) remained significant. This study is the first to report PD prevalence by geographic region and income, and it advocates that the prevalence of PD in the US may be higher than previously cited. Further, given the large discrepancy between definitive PD cases diagnosed by a physician and probable cases not diagnosed by a physician, much more needs to be done to raise awareness of this disease. PMID:26907743

  19. Sexual orientation disparities in physical health: age and gender effects in a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Bränström, Richard; Hatzenbuehler, Mark L; Pachankis, John E

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies have identified substantial health disparities between lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) individuals compared to heterosexuals. However, possible variation in sexual orientation health disparities by age and according to gender remains largely unexplored. To examine physical health disparities between LGB and heterosexual individuals in a general population sample in Sweden, to explore potential age and gender differences in these disparities, and to test potential mechanisms underlying any observed disparities. Between 2008 and 2013, 60,922 individuals (16-84 years of age) responded to nationwide population-based health surveys. In the sample, 430 (0.7%) individuals self-identified as gay/lesbian and 757 (1.3%) self-identified as bisexual. Logistic and negative binomial regression analyses were used to explore health disparities based on sexual orientation. Overall, LGB individuals were more likely to report worse self-rated health as well as more physical health symptoms (e.g., pain, insomnia, dermatitis, tinnitus, intestinal problems) and conditions (e.g., diabetes, asthma, high blood pressure) compared to heterosexuals. However, these physical health disparities differed by age. Disparities were largest among adolescents and young adults and generally smallest in older age groups. Health behaviors and elevated reports of exposure to perceived discrimination, victimization, and threats of violence among sexual minorities partially explained the sexual orientation disparities in physical health. Age emerged as an important effect modifier of physical health disparities based on sexual orientation. Gender-specific findings suggest that sexual orientation disparities persist into adulthood for women but are gradually attenuated for older age groups; in contrast, for men, these disparities disappear starting with young adults. These results support a developmental model of minority stress and physical health among LGB individuals.

  20. Early sexual debut in Norwegian youth with epilepsy: A population-based study.

    PubMed

    Lossius, Morten I; Alfstad, Kristin Å; Van Roy, Betty; Mowinckel, Petter; Clench-Aas, Jocelyne; Gjerstad, Leif; Nakken, Karl O

    2016-03-01

    In comparison with controls, youth with epilepsy (YWE) have greater psychosocial problems. However, information about their sexual behavior is sparse. We have performed a large, population-based questionnaire study to examine differences in sexual behavior between YWE and controls. A randomly chosen cohort of youth (13-19 years) from Akershus county, Norway (n=19,995) was asked to complete a questionnaire anonymously with questions on epilepsy and sexual activity. The response rate was 85%. Two hundred forty-seven participants reported having or having had epilepsy, i.e., a lifetime epilepsy prevalence of 1.2%. Compared with controls, a higher proportion of YWE reported having had sexual intercourse (43.6% vs. 35.3%, p=0.009). The mean age at sexual debut was significantly lower in YWE than in controls (14.0 years vs. 15.0 years, p<0.001), and this was particularly marked among boys. A higher proportion of YWE reported not having used contraceptives at their last sexual intercourse compared with controls (31.6% vs. 22.3%, p=0.03). Ten percent of YWE, compared with 2% of the controls, reported that they had been forced into their first sexual intercourse. In YWE, some aspects of sexual behavior differ from those of their peers, with earlier sexual debut and less frequent use of contraceptives. More attention should be directed toward this subject, aiming at avoiding unwanted pregnancies and potential emotional traumas in this already vulnerable patient group. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Prevalence of sun exposure and its associated factors in southern Brazil: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Duquia, Rodrigo Pereira; Menezes, Ana Maria Baptista; Almeida, Hiram Larangeira de; Reichert, Felipe Fossati; Santos, Iná da Silva dos; Haack, Ricardo Lanzetta; Horta, Bernardo Lessa

    2013-01-01

    Sunlight exposure is responsible for a large number of dermatological diseases. We estimated the prevalence of sunlight exposure and its associated factors in adults from southern Brazil in a cross-sectional, population-based study. We investigated a representative sample of individuals aged ≥ 20 years (n=3,136). Sunlight exposure and its associated factors were evaluated in two distinct situations: at leisure time and at work. The time period investigated ranged from December 2004 to March 2005, comprising 120 days of the highest ultraviolet index in the urban area of the city of Pelotas, in southern Brazil. The participants were asked about sunlight exposure for at least 20 minutes between 10 A.M. and 4 P.M. The analysis was stratified by sex, and sunlight exposure was grouped into five categories. Among the 3,136 participants, prevalence of sunlight exposure at the beach was 32.8% (95% CI, 30.3 - 35.2) and 26.3% (95% CI, 24.2 28.3) among men and women, respectively. The prevalence at work was 39.8% (95% CI, 37.2 - 42.4) among men and 10.5% (95% CI, 9.1 - 12.0) among women. Age was inversely associated with sunlight exposure. Family income and achieved schooling were positively associated with sunlight exposure at leisure time and inversely associated with sunglight exposure at work. Self-reported skin color was not associated. Knowledge of any friend or relative who has been affected by skin cancer was positively associated with sunlight exposure among men at work. Despite the media campaigns on the harmful effects of excessive sunlight exposure, we found a high prevalence of sunlight exposure during a period of high ultraviolet index.

  2. Complications of epilepsy surgery in Sweden 1996-2010: a prospective, population-based study.

    PubMed

    Bjellvi, Johan; Flink, Roland; Rydenhag, Bertil; Malmgren, Kristina

    2015-03-01

    Detailed risk information is essential for presurgical patient counseling and surgical quality assessments in epilepsy surgery. This study was conducted to investigate major and minor complications related to epilepsy surgery in a large, prospective series. The Swedish National Epilepsy Surgery Register provides extensive population-based data on all patients who were surgically treated in Sweden since 1990. The authors have analyzed complication data for therapeutic epilepsy surgery procedures performed between 1996 and 2010. Complications are classified as major (affecting daily life and lasting longer than 3 months) or minor (resolving within 3 months). A total of 865 therapeutic epilepsy surgery procedures were performed between 1996 and 2010, of which 158 were reoperations. There were no postoperative deaths. Major complications occurred in 26 procedures (3%), and minor complications in 65 (7.5%). In temporal lobe resections (n = 523), there were 15 major (2.9%) and 41 minor complications (7.8%); in extratemporal resections (n = 275) there were 9 major (3.3%) and 22 minor complications (8%); and in nonresective procedures (n = 67) there were 2 major (3%) and 2 minor complications (3%). The risk for any complication increased significantly with age (OR 1.26 per 10-year interval, 95% CI 1.09-1.45). Compared with previously published results from the same register, there is a trend toward lower complication rates, especially in patients older than 50 years. This is the largest reported prospective series of complication data in epilepsy surgery. The complication rates comply well with published results from larger single centers, confirming that epilepsy surgery performed in the 6 Swedish centers is safe. Patient age should be taken into account when counseling patients before surgery.

  3. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors and Active Tuberculosis: A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiunn-Yih; Lee, Meng-Tse Gabriel; Lee, Si-Huei; Lee, Shih-Hao; Tsai, Yi-Wen; Hsu, Shou-Chien; Chang, Shy-Shin; Lee, Chien-Chang

    2016-05-01

    Numerous epidemiological data suggest that the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEis) can improve the clinical outcomes of pneumonia. Tuberculosis (TB) is an airborne bacteria like pneumonia, and we aimed to find out whether the use of ACEis can decrease the risk of active TB.We conducted a nested case-control analysis by using a 1 million longitudinally followed cohort, from Taiwan national health insurance research database. The rate ratios (RRs) for TB were estimated by conditional logistic regression, and adjusted using a TB-specific disease risk score (DRS) with 71 TB-related covariates.From January, 1997 to December, 2011, a total of 75,536 users of ACEis, and 7720 cases of new active TB were identified. Current use (DRS adjusted RR, 0.87 [95% CI, 0.78-0.97]), but not recent and past use of ACEis, was associated with a decrease in risk of active TB. Interestingly, it was found that chronic use (>90 days) of ACEis was associated with a further decrease in the risk of TB (aRR, 0.74, [95% CI, 0.66-0.83]). There was also a duration response effect, correlating decrease in TB risk with longer duration of ACEis use. The decrease in TB risk was also consistent across all patient subgroups (age, sex, heart failure, cerebrovascular diseases, myocardial infraction, renal diseases, and diabetes) and patients receiving other cardiovascular medicine.In this large population-based study, we found that subjects with recent and chronic use of ACEis were associated with decrease in TB risk.

  4. A population-based case-control teratologic study of oral dipyrone treatment during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bánhidy, Ferenc; Acs, Nándor; Puhó, Erzsébet; Czeizel, Andrew E

    2007-01-01

    To study the possible human teratogenic effect of oral dipyrone, an antipyretic and analgesic drug treatment during pregnancy. The analysis of cases with different congenital abnormalities and their matched population controls without congenital abnormalities, in addition to a comparison between cases and malformation controls (Down's syndrome) in the population-based, large data set of the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital Abnormalities, 1980-1996. 22 843 neonates or fetuses with congenital abnormalities (cases), 38 151 matched newborns without congenital abnormalities (population controls) and 834 neonates or fetuses with Down's syndrome (malformation controls). 25 congenital abnormality groups. 1382 (6%) cases, 1911 (5%) population controls and 74 (8.9%) malformation controls were born to mothers treated with dipyrone during pregnancy. The case-matched population control analysis showed a higher rate of diaphragmatic defect (adjusted prevalence odds ratio [POR] 2.7; 95% CI 1.0, 6.8), cardiovascular malformations (POR 1.3; 95% CI 1.0, 1.7) and other isolated congenital abnormalities (POR 1.8; 95% CI 1.1, 2.9) after oral dipyrone treatment during the second and third months of gestation, i.e. in the critical period for most major congenital abnormalities. However, the evaluation of only medically recorded dipyrone use did not confirm these possible associations. The comparison of dipyrone treatment between 25 congenital abnormalities groups and malformation controls as the referent group also did not show any difference in the dipyrone use during the second and third months of gestation. The higher occurrence of dipyrone treatment in the case mothers compared with population control mothers can be explained by recall bias and/or chance. However, the higher rate of diaphragmatic congenital abnormalities can be considered as a signal and merits further investigation.

  5. Prevalence of sun exposure and its associated factors in southern Brazil: a population-based study*

    PubMed Central

    Duquia, Rodrigo Pereira; Menezes, Ana Maria Baptista; de Almeida, Hiram Larangeira; Reichert, Felipe Fossati; dos Santos, Iná da Silva; Haack, Ricardo Lanzetta; Horta, Bernardo Lessa

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Sunlight exposure is responsible for a large number of dermatological diseases. OBJECTIVE We estimated the prevalence of sunlight exposure and its associated factors in adults from southern Brazil in a cross-sectional, population-based study. METHODS We investigated a representative sample of individuals aged ≥ 20 years (n=3,136). Sunlight exposure and its associated factors were evaluated in two distinct situations: at leisure time and at work. The time period investigated ranged from December 2004 to March 2005, comprising 120 days of the highest ultraviolet index in the urban area of the city of Pelotas, in southern Brazil. The participants were asked about sunlight exposure for at least 20 minutes between 10 A.M. and 4 P.M. The analysis was stratified by sex, and sunlight exposure was grouped into five categories. RESULTS Among the 3,136 participants, prevalence of sunlight exposure at the beach was 32.8% (95% CI, 30.3 - 35.2) and 26.3% (95% CI, 24.2 28.3) among men and women, respectively. The prevalence at work was 39.8% (95% CI, 37.2 - 42.4) among men and 10.5% (95% CI, 9.1 - 12.0) among women. Age was inversely associated with sunlight exposure. Family income and achieved schooling were positively associated with sunlight exposure at leisure time and inversely associated with sunglight exposure at work. Self-reported skin color was not associated. Knowledge of any friend or relative who has been affected by skin cancer was positively associated with sunlight exposure among men at work. CONCLUSION Despite the media campaigns on the harmful effects of excessive sunlight exposure, we found a high prevalence of sunlight exposure during a period of high ultraviolet index. PMID:24068126

  6. Interaction of workplace demands and cardiovascular reactivity in progression of carotid atherosclerosis: population based study.

    PubMed Central

    Everson, S. A.; Lynch, J. W.; Chesney, M. A.; Kaplan, G. A.; Goldberg, D. E.; Shade, S. B.; Cohen, R. D.; Salonen, R.; Salonen, J. T.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the combined influence of workplace demands and changes in blood pressure induced by stress on the progression of carotid atherosclerosis. DESIGN: Population based follow up study of unestablished as well as traditional risk factors for carotid atherosclerosis, ischaemic heart disease, and other outcomes. SETTING: Eastern Finland. SUBJECTS: 591 men aged 42-60 who were fully employed at baseline and had complete data on the measures of carotid atherosclerosis, job demands, blood pressure reactivity, and covariates. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Change in ultrasonographically assessed intima-media thickness of the right and left common carotid arteries from baseline to 4 year follow up. RESULTS: Significant interactions between workplace demands and stress induced reactivity were observed for all measures of progression (P < 0.04). Men with large changes in systolic blood pressure (20 mm Hg or greater) in anticipation of a maximal exercise test and with high job demands had 10-40% greater progression of mean (0.138 v 0.123 mm) and maximum (0.320 v 0.261 mm) intima-media thickness and plaque height (0.347 v 0.264) than men who were less reactive and had fewer job demands. Similar results were obtained after excluding men with prevalent ischaemic heart disease at baseline. Findings were strongest among men with at least 20% stenosis or non-stenotic plaque at baseline. In this subgroup reactive men with high job demands had more than 46% greater atherosclerotic progression than the others. Adjustment for atherosclerotic risk factors did not alter the results. CONCLUSIONS: Men who showed stress induced blood pressure reactivity and who reported high job demands experienced the greatest atherosclerotic progression, showing the association between dispositional risk characteristics and contextual determinants of disease and suggesting that behaviourally evoked cardiovascular reactivity may have a role in atherogenesis. PMID:9055713

  7. Sexual activity and concerns in people with coronary heart disease from a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Steptoe, Andrew; Jackson, Sarah E; Wardle, Jane

    2016-07-15

    Sexual activity is a central component of intimate relationships, but sexual function may be impaired by coronary heart disease (CHD). There have been few representative population-based comparisons of sexual behaviour and concerns in people with and without CHD. We therefore investigated these issues in a large nationally representative sample of older people. We analysed cross-sectional data from 2979 men and 3711 women aged 50 and older from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. Sexual behaviour and concerns were assessed by validated self-completion questionnaire and analyses were weighted for non-response. Covariates included age, partnerships status and comorbidities. There were 376 men and 279 women with CHD. Men with CHD were less likely to be sexually active (68.7% vs 80.0%, adjusted OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.47 to 0.81), thought less about sex (74.7% vs 81.9%, OR 0.72, CI 0.54 to 0.95), and reported more erectile difficulties (47.4% vs 38.1%, OR 1.46, CI 1.10 to 1.93) than men without CHD. Effects were more pronounced among those diagnosed within the past 4 years. Women diagnosed <4 years ago were also less likely to be sexually active (35.4% vs 55.6%, OR 0.44, CI 0.23 to 0.84). There were few differences in concerns about sexual activity. Cardiovascular medication showed weak associations with erectile dysfunction. There is an association between CHD and sexual activity, particularly among men, but the impact of CHD is limited. More effective advice after diagnosis might reverse the reduction in sexual activity, leading to improved quality of life. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  8. Time trends in outcome of subarachnoid hemorrhage: Population-based study and systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lovelock, C E; Rinkel, G J E; Rothwell, P M

    2010-05-11

    Treatment of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) has changed substantially over the last 25 years but there is a lack of reliable population-based data on whether case-fatality or functional outcomes have improved. We determined changes in the standardized incidence and outcome of SAH in the same population between 1981 and 1986 (Oxford Community Stroke Project) and 2002 and 2008 (Oxford Vascular Study). In a meta-analysis with other population-based studies, we used linear regression to determine time trends in outcome. There were no reductions in incidence of SAH (RR = 0.79, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.48-1.29, p = 0.34) and in 30-day case-fatality (RR = 0.67, 95% CI 0.39-1.13, p = 0.14) in the Oxford Vascular Study vs Oxford Community Stroke Project, but there was a decrease in overall mortality (RR = 0.47, 0.23-0.97, p = 0.04). Following adjustment for age and baseline SAH severity, patients surviving to hospital had reduced risk of death or dependency (modified Rankin score > 3) at 12 months in the Oxford Vascular Study (RR = 0.51, 0.29-0.88, p = 0.01). Among 32 studies covering 39 study periods from 1980 to 2005, 7 studied time trends within single populations. Unadjusted case-fatality fell by 0.9% per annum (0.3-1.5, p = 0.007) in a meta-analysis of data from all studies, and by 0.9% per annum (0.2-1.6%, p = 0.01) within the 7 population studies. Mortality due to subarachnoid hemorrhage fell by about 50% in our study population over the last 2 decades, due mainly to improved outcomes in cases surviving to reach hospital. This improvement is consistent with a significant decrease in case-fatality over the last 25 years in our pooled analysis of other similar population-based studies.

  9. Measuring Stress Before and During Pregnancy: A Review of Population-Based Studies of Obstetric Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Witt, Whitney; Litzelman, Kristin; Cheng, Erika R; Wakeel, Fathima; Barker, Emily S.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Mounting evidence from clinic and convenience samples suggests that stress is an important predictor of adverse obstetric outcomes. Using a proposed theoretical framework, this review identified and synthesized the population-based literature on the measurement of stress prior to and during pregnancy in relation to obstetric outcomes. Methods Population-based, peer-reviewed empirical articles that examined stress prior to or during pregnancy in relation to obstetric outcomes were identified in the PubMed and PsycInfo databases. Articles were evaluated to determine the domain(s) of stress (environmental, psychological, and/or biological), period(s) of stress (preconception and/or pregnancy), and strength of the association between stress and obstetric outcomes. Results Thirteen studies were evaluated. The identified studies were all conducted in developed countries. The majority of studies examined stress only during pregnancy (n=10); three examined stress during both the preconception and pregnancy periods (n=3). Most studies examined the environmental domain (e.g., life events) only (n=9), two studies examined the psychological domain only, and two studies examined both. No study incorporated a biological measure of stress. Environmental stressors before and during pregnancy were associated with worse obstetric outcomes, although some conflicting findings exist. Conclusions Few population-based studies have examined stress before or during pregnancy in relation to obstetric outcomes. Although considerable variation exists in the measurement of stress across studies, environmental stress increased the risk for poor obstetric outcomes. Additional work using a lifecourse approach is needed to fill the existing gaps in the literature and to develop a more comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms by which stress impacts obstetric outcomes. PMID:23447085

  10. Measuring stress before and during pregnancy: a review of population-based studies of obstetric outcomes.

    PubMed

    Witt, Whitney P; Litzelman, Kristin; Cheng, Erika R; Wakeel, Fathima; Barker, Emily S

    2014-01-01

    Mounting evidence from clinic and convenience samples suggests that stress is an important predictor of adverse obstetric outcomes. Using a proposed theoretical framework, this review identified and synthesized the population-based literature on the measurement of stress prior to and during pregnancy in relation to obstetric outcomes. Population-based, peer-reviewed empirical articles that examined stress prior to or during pregnancy in relation to obstetric outcomes were identified in the PubMed and PsycInfo databases. Articles were evaluated to determine the domain(s) of stress (environmental, psychological, and/or biological), period(s) of stress (preconception and/or pregnancy), and strength of the association between stress and obstetric outcomes. Thirteen studies were evaluated. The identified studies were all conducted in developed countries. The majority of studies examined stress only during pregnancy (n = 10); three examined stress during both the preconception and pregnancy periods (n = 3). Most studies examined the environmental domain (e.g. life events) only (n = 9), two studies examined the psychological domain only, and two studies examined both. No study incorporated a biological measure of stress. Environmental stressors before and during pregnancy were associated with worse obstetric outcomes, although some conflicting findings exist. Few population-based studies have examined stress before or during pregnancy in relation to obstetric outcomes. Although considerable variation exists in the measurement of stress across studies, environmental stress increased the risk for poor obstetric outcomes. Additional work using a lifecourse approach is needed to fill the existing gaps in the literature and to develop a more comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms by which stress impacts obstetric outcomes.

  11. Scoliosis and the Subsequent Risk of Depression: A Nationwide Population-based Cohort Study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wei-Pin; Lin, Yaleng; Huang, Hsiao-Ling; Lu, Hsing-Fang; Wang, Shih-Tien; Chi, Ying-Chen; Hung, Kuo-Sheng; Chen, Hsiang-Yin

    2016-02-01

    A retrospective cohort study by using the Taiwanese National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). The purpose of this study is to conduct a large-scale cohort study to investigate the relationship between scoliosis and depression. The association between scoliosis and depression has rarely been studied in Asian populations. The study cohort consisted of patients with diagnosis of scoliosis between 2003 and 2005 (N = 1409). A comparison cohort was constructed from five age- and gender-matched control subjects selected via random sampling (N = 7045). Data on adjusted hazard ratios (AHRs) of depression, 5-year freedom from depression rates, and risk factors for depression for the two cohorts were compared. All subjects were tracked for 5 years from the date of cohort entry to identify the development of depression. Cox proportional hazard regressions were performed to evaluate the 5-year freedom from depression rates. This study is supported by the University research grant without any study-specific conflicts. During the 5-year follow-up period, 116 and 307 depression patients belonged to the scoliosis cohort and the comparison cohort, respectively. The AHRs of depression in patients with scoliosis was higher [AHR 1.95; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.58-2.42; P < 0.001] than that of the controls during the 5-year follow-up. The risk of depression also demonstrated to be age-dependent for scoliosis patients. The middle-age (41-65 years old) and young adults (18-40 years old) scoliosis patients had higher AHRs (middle-age: AHR 2.45; 95% CI 1.67-3.59; P < 0.05; young adult: AHR 1.99; 95% CI 1.41-2.82; P < 0.05). The population-based study indicated that patients with scoliosis may have an increased risk of depression. Health care professionals should consider designing and planning effective psychological prevention and treatment for scoliosis patients. 4.

  12. Male breast cancer according to tumor subtype and race: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Chavez-Macgregor, Mariana; Clarke, Christina A; Lichtensztajn, Daphne; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N; Giordano, Sharon H

    2013-05-01

    Breast cancer occurs rarely in men. To the authors' knowledge, no population-based estimates of the incidence of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer or of the distribution of breast cancer subtypes among male breast cancer patients have been published to date. Therefore, the objective of the current study was to explore breast tumor subtype distribution by race/ethnicity among men in the large, ethnically diverse population of California. This study included men who were diagnosed with invasive breast cancer between 2005 and 2009 with known estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) (together, hormone receptor [HR]) status and HER2 status reported to the California Cancer Registry. Among the men with HR-positive tumors, survival probabilities between groups were compared using log-rank tests. Six hundred six patients were included. The median age at diagnosis was 68 years. Four hundred ninety-four men (81.5%) had HR-positive tumors (defined as ER-positive and/or PR-positive and HER2-negative). Ninety men (14.9%) had HER2-positive tumors, and 22 (3.6%) had triple receptor-negative (TN) tumors. Among the patients with HR-positive tumors, non-Hispanic black men and Hispanic men were more likely to have PR-negative tumors than non-Hispanic white men. No statistically significant differences in survival were observed according to tumor subtype (P = .08). Differences in survival according to race/ethnicity were observed among all patients (P = .087) and among those with HR-positive tumors (P = .0170), and non-Hispanic black men had poorer outcomes. In this large, representative cohort of men with breast cancer, the distribution of tumor subtypes was different from that reported for women and varied by patient race/ethnicity. Non-Hispanic black men were more likely to have TN tumors and ER-positive/PR-negative tumors than white men. Copyright © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  13. Statin adherence and the risk of Parkinson's disease: A population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Rozani, Violetta; Giladi, Nir; El-Ad, Baruch; Gurevich, Tanya; Tsamir, Judith; Hemo, Beatriz; Peretz, Chava

    2017-01-01

    While experimental data provided some compelling evidence on the benefits of statins on dopaminergic neurons, observational studies reported conflicting results regarding the potential of statins to effect the risk of Parkinson's disease (PD). To evaluate the association between changes in statin adherence over time and PD risk. A population-based cohort of new statin users (ages 40-79, years 1999-2012) was derived from a large Israeli healthcare services organization. Data included history of statin purchases and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. Personal statin adherence was measured annually by the proportion of days covered (PDC). PD was detected employing a drug-tracer approach. Stratified (by sex, LDL-C levels at baseline and age) Cox proportional hazards models with time-dependent covariates were used to compute adjusted Hazard Ratio (HR) with 95%CI. The cohort included 232,877 individuals, 49.3% men. Mean age at first statin purchase was 56.5 (±9.8) years for men and 58.7 (±9.2) years for women. PDC distribution for the whole follow up period differed between men and women: medians 58.3% and 54.1% respectively. During a mean follow up of 7.6 (±3.4) years, 2,550 (1.1%) PD cases were identified. In a 1-year lagged analysis, we found no association between annual statin adherence and PD risk in all age-groups regardless of statin type and potency. Age-pooled HR (95%CI) for men and women with LDL-C levels at baseline ≤160mg/dL were: 0.99 (0.99-1.01), 1.01 (1.00-1.02); and for men and women with LDL-C >160mg/dL levels: 0.99 (0.98-1.01), 0.97 (0.98-1.01). Our findings suggest that statin adherence over time does not affect PD risk. Future studies should use large-scale cohorts and refining assessments of long-term profiles in statin adherence.

  14. Survival and early recourse to care for dementia: A population based study.

    PubMed

    Pimouguet, Clément; Delva, Fleur; Le Goff, Mélanie; Stern, Yaakov; Pasquier, Florence; Berr, Claudine; Tzourio, Christophe; Dartigues, Jean-François; Helmer, Catherine

    2015-04-01

    A large proportion of dementia cases are still undiagnosed. Although early dementia care has been hypothesized to benefit both patients and families, evidence-based benefits are lacking. Thus, investigating the benefits for newly demented persons according to their recourse to care in the "real life" appears critical. We examined the relation between initial care recourse care and demented individuals' survival in a large cohort of incident dementia cases screened in a prospective population-based cohort, the Three-City Study. We assessed recourse to care for cognitive complaint at the early beginning of dementia when incident cases were screened. We classified patients in three categories: no care recourse, general practitioner consultation or specialist consultation. We used proportional hazard regression models to test the association between recourse to care and mortality, adjusting on socio-demographical and clinical characteristics. Two hundred and fifty-three incident dementia participants were screened at the 2 year or 4 year follow-up. One third of the incident demented individuals had not consulted a physician for cognitive problems. Eighty-six (34.0%) individuals had reported a cognitive problem only to their general practitioner (GP) and 80 (31.6%) had consulted a specialist. Mean duration of follow-up after incident dementia was 5.1 years, during which 146 participants died. After adjustment on potential confounders, participants who had consulted a specialist early in the disease course presented a poorer survival than those who did not consult any physician (hazard ratio = 1.64, 95% confidence interval 1.03-2.62). There was a trend but no significant differential survival profile between participants who complained to their GP and those without any care recourse. Neither recourse to a specialist nor recourse to GP improve survival of new dementia cases. Those who had consulted a specialist early in the disease course even reported a worse life

  15. Reliability of hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis assessment methods for use in population-based studies

    PubMed Central

    Wand, Gary S.; Malhotra, Saurabh; Kamel, Ihab; Horton, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Population-based studies have been hampered in exploring hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis (HPA) activity as a potential explanatory link between stress-related and metabolic disorders due to their lack of incorporation of reliable measures of chronic cortisol exposure. The purpose of this review is to summarize current literature on the reliability of HPA axis measures and to discuss the feasibility of performing them in population-based studies. We identified articles through PubMed using search terms related to cortisol, HPA axis, adrenal imaging, and reliability. The diurnal salivary cortisol curve (generated from multiple salivary samples from awakening to midnight) and 11 p.m. salivary cortisol had the highest between-visit reliabilities (r = 0.63–0.84 and 0.78, respectively). The cortisol awakening response and dexamethasone-suppressed cortisol had the next highest between-visit reliabilities (r = 0.33–0.67 and 0.42–0.66, respectively). Based on our own data, the inter-reader reliability (rs) of adrenal gland volume from non-contrast CT was 0.67–0.71 for the left and 0.47–0.70 for the right adrenal glands. While a single 8 a.m. salivary cortisol is one of the easiest measures to perform, it had the lowest between-visit reliability (R = 0.18–0.47). Based on the current literature, use of sampling multiple salivary cortisol measures across the diurnal curve (with awakening cortisol), dexamethasone-suppressed cortisol, and adrenal gland volume are measures of HPA axis tone with similar between-visit reliabilities which likely reflect chronic cortisol burden and are feasible to perform in population-based studies. PMID:21533585

  16. Etiology and management of esophageal food impaction: a population based study.

    PubMed

    Gretarsdottir, Helga M; Jonasson, Jon Gunnlaugur; Björnsson, Einar S

    2015-05-01

    Esophageal food impaction (FI) is a common clinical problem with limited information on incidence. Previous population based studies are lacking. The incidence, main etiological factors, recurrence and outcome of FI was determined in the present study in a population based setting. This was a study of consecutive adult patients who presented with FI from 2008 to 2013 at the National University Hospital of Iceland. The mean crude incidence rate of FI was calculated. Retrospective analysis was undertaken on relevant clinical data such as type of bolus, management, complications, recurrence rate, risk factors for recurrence, and outcome. Overall 308 patients had endoscopically confirmed FI, males 199/308 (65%), median age 62 years. The mean crude incidence was 25 per 100,000 inhabitants per year. The types of FI was meat (68%), fish (12%), vegetable (4%) and other food/objects (16%). Causes for the FI included: esophageal strictures (45%), hiatal hernia (22%), eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) (16%) and esophageal carcinoma (2%). Recurrence appeared in 21%, in which 24/48 (50%) had EoE vs. 40/260 (15%) in others (p = 0.0001). The removal of the foreign body was successful in 98% of the cases during the first endoscopy. Endoscopic associated complications included four (1.3%) aspirations, one (0.3%) esophageal perforation and one Boerhaave syndrome at presentation (both had EoE). The incidence of FI is the highest reported to date. EoE was strongly associated with recurrence of FI. In a population based setting endoscopy is a safe and effective procedure for removing FI.

  17. Secondary depression in severe anxiety disorders: a population-based cohort study in Denmark

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Sandra M; Petersen, Liselotte; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mors, Ole; Mortensen, Preben B; Laursen, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Depression and anxiety disorders are highly comorbid conditions and a worldwide disease burden; however, large-scale studies delineating their association are scarce. In this retrospective study, we aimed to assess the effect of severe anxiety disorders on the risk and course of depression. Methods We did a population-based cohort study with prospectively gathered data in Denmark using data from three Danish population registers: The Danish Civil Registration System, the Danish Psychiatric Central Register, and the Danish National Hospital Registry. We selected the cohort from people born in Denmark between Jan 1, 1955, and Dec 31, 2002, who we followed up from Jan 1, 1994, to Dec 31, 2012. The cohort was restricted to individuals with known parents. First, we investigated the effect of specific anxiety diagnoses on risk of single depressive episodes and recurrent depressive disorder. Second, we investigated the effect of comorbid anxiety on risk of readmission for depression, adjusting for sex, age, calendar year, parental age, place at residence at time of birth, and the interaction of age with sex. Findings We included 3 380 059 individuals in our study cohort. The adjusted incidence rate ratio (IRR) for single depressive episodes was 3·0 (95% CI 2·8–3·1, p<0·0001) and for recurrent depressive disorder was 5·0 (4·8–5·2) in patients with severe anxiety disorders compared with the general population. Compared with control individuals, the offspring of parents with anxiety disorders were more likely to be diagnosed with single depressive episodes (1·9, 1·8–2·0) or recurrent depressive disorder (2·1, 1·9–2·2). Comorbid anxiety increased the readmission rates in both patients with single depressive episodes and patients with recurrent depressive disorder. Interpretation Severe anxiety constitutes a significant risk factor for depression. Focusing on specific anxiety disorders might help to identify individuals at risk of

  18. Secondary depression in severe anxiety disorders: a population-based cohort study in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Meier, Sandra M; Petersen, Liselotte; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mors, Ole; Mortensen, Preben B; Laursen, Thomas M

    2015-06-01

    Depression and anxiety disorders are highly comorbid conditions and a worldwide disease burden; however, large-scale studies delineating their association are scarce. In this retrospective study, we aimed to assess the effect of severe anxiety disorders on the risk and course of depression. We did a population-based cohort study with prospectively gathered data in Denmark using data from three Danish population registers: The Danish Civil Registration System, the Danish Psychiatric Central Register, and the Danish National Hospital Registry. We selected the cohort from people born in Denmark between Jan 1, 1955, and Dec 31, 2002, who we followed up from Jan 1, 1994, to Dec 31, 2012. The cohort was restricted to individuals with known parents. First, we investigated the effect of specific anxiety diagnoses on risk of single depressive episodes and recurrent depressive disorder. Second, we investigated the effect of comorbid anxiety on risk of readmission for depression, adjusting for sex, age, calendar year, parental age, place at residence at time of birth, and the interaction of age with sex. We included 3,380,059 individuals in our study cohort. The adjusted incidence rate ratio (IRR) for single depressive episodes was 3·0 (95% CI 2·8-3·1, p<0·0001) and for recurrent depressive disorder was 5·0 (4·8-5·2) in patients with severe anxiety disorders compared with the general population. Compared with control individuals, the offspring of parents with anxiety disorders were more likely to be diagnosed with single depressive episodes (1·9, 1·8-2·0) or recurrent depressive disorder (2·1, 1·9-2·2). Comorbid anxiety increased the readmission rates in both patients with single depressive episodes and patients with recurrent depressive disorder. Severe anxiety constitutes a significant risk factor for depression. Focusing on specific anxiety disorders might help to identify individuals at risk of depression, thereby providing new insights for prevention and

  19. Trajectories of maternal depression: a 27-year population-based prospective study.

    PubMed

    Najman, J M; Plotnikova, M; Williams, G M; Alati, R; Mamun, A A; Scott, J; Wray, N; Clavarino, A M

    2017-02-01

    To identify distinct trajectories of depression experienced by a population-based sample of women over a 27-year period and to assess the validity of the derived trajectories. The Mater University of Queensland Study of Pregnancy is a birth cohort study which commenced in 1981. Women (N = 6753) were interviewed at their first clinic visit, at 6 months, then 5, 14, 21 and 27 years after the birth of their child, using the Delusions Symptoms - States Inventory. Some 3561 (52.7%) women were followed up at 27 years, with 3337 (49.4%) of the sample completing the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI). Depression trajectories over a 27-year period were identified using Latent Class Growth Modelling (LCGM). LCGM was used to identify respondents with similar patterns of depression over a 27-year period. At the 27-year follow-up women who completed the CIDI, were stratified according to their trajectory group membership. Three trajectory groups, each with different life-course patterns of depression were identified. The low/no symptoms of depression trajectory group comprised 48.4% of women. The mid-depression group (41.7%) had a consistent pattern of occasional symptoms of depression. The high/escalating trajectory group comprised 9.9% of the women in the study. We then examined each trajectory group based on their completion of the CIDI at the 27-year follow-up. Using the CIDI, 27.0% of women in the study had met the DSM-IV criteria for lifetime ever depression by their mean age of 46.5 years. The responses to the CIDI differed greatly for each of the trajectory groups, suggesting that the trajectories validly reflect different life histories of depression. The high/escalating trajectory group had an earlier age of first onset, more frequent episodes, longer duration of each episode of depression and experienced higher levels of impairment for their episodes of depression. For the high symptoms trajectory group, clinically significant depression is estimated

  20. Statin Use Reduces Prostate Cancer All-Cause Mortality: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li-Min; Lin, Ming-Chia; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chang, Shih-Ni; Liang, Ji-An; Lin, I-Ching; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-09-01

    Studies have suggested that statin use is related to cancer risk and prostate cancer mortality. We conducted a population-based cohort study to determine whether using statins in prostate cancer patients is associated with reduced all-cause mortality rates. Data were obtained from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. The study cohort comprised 5179 patients diagnosed with prostate cancer who used statins for at least 6 months between January 1, 1998 and December 31, 2010. To form a comparison group, each patient was randomly frequency-matched (according to age and index date) with a prostate cancer patient who did not use any type of statin-based drugs during the study period. The study endpoint was mortality. The hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were estimated using Cox regression models. Among prostate cancer patients, statin use was associated with significantly decreased all-cause mortality (adjusted HR = 0.65; 95% CI = 0.60-0.71). This phenomenon was observed among various types of statin, age groups, and treatment methods. Analyzing the defined daily dose of statins indicated that both low- and high-dose groups exhibited significantly decreased death rates compared with nonusers, suggesting a dose-response relationship. The results of this population-based cohort study suggest that using statins reduces all-cause mortality among prostate cancer patients, and a dose-response relationship may exist.

  1. On estimation of time-dependent attributable fraction from population-based case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Chen, Ying Qing; Hsu, Li

    2017-01-18

    Population attributable fraction (PAF) is widely used to quantify the disease burden associated with a modifiable exposure in a population. It has been extended to a time-varying measure that provides additional information on when and how the exposure's impact varies over time for cohort studies. However, there is no estimation procedure for PAF using data that are collected from population-based case-control studies, which, because of time and cost efficiency, are commonly used for studying genetic and environmental risk factors of disease incidences. In this article, we show that time-varying PAF is identifiable from a case-control study and develop a novel estimator of PAF. Our estimator combines odds ratio estimates from logistic regression models and density estimates of the risk factor distribution conditional on failure times in cases from a kernel smoother. The proposed estimator is shown to be consistent and asymptotically normal with asymptotic variance that can be estimated empirically from the data. Simulation studies demonstrate that the proposed estimator performs well in finite sample sizes. Finally, the method is illustrated by a population-based case-control study of colorectal cancer.

  2. A population-based descriptive study of housefire deaths in North Carolina.

    PubMed Central

    Patetta, M J; Cole, T B

    1990-01-01

    We report a population-based study of housefire deaths in North Carolina in 1985 using data obtained from fire investigators and the North Carolina medical examiner system. The crude death rate was 3.2 per 100,000 population; age-specific death rates were highest for ages 75-84 years. Death rates for Whites were one-third as high as death rates for other races. Of those decedents tested for alcohol, 56 percent had blood alcohol levels greater than or equal to 22 mmol/L. Most fatal fires were caused by heating units or cigarettes. PMID:2382752

  3. School performance and the risk of suicidal thoughts in young adults: population-based study.

    PubMed

    Kosidou, Kyriaki; Dalman, Christina; Fredlund, Peeter; Magnusson, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Although low school performance is related to attempted and completed suicide, its relationship with suicidal thoughts has been less clear. We conducted a population-based study including 10081 individuals aged 18-29 years in Stockholm, Sweden, and found a clear positive gradient in the risk of lifetime suicidal thoughts with decreasing levels of compulsory school leaving grades. This relationship was somewhat attenuated but remained significant in multivariate models accounting for family background, severe adult psychopathology and adult socioeconomic conditions. School failure is associated with an increased risk of experiencing suicidal thoughts and may also increase the tendency of acting upon them.

  4. Suicide by people in a community justice pathway: population-based nested case–control study

    PubMed Central

    King, Carlene; Senior, Jane; Webb, Roger T.; Millar, Tim; Piper, Mary; Pearsall, Alison; Humber, Naomi; Appleby, Louis; Shaw, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    The elevated risk of suicide in prison and after release is a well-recognised and serious problem. Despite this, evidence concerning community-based offenders' suicide risk is sparse. We conducted a population-based nested case–control study of all people in a community justice pathway in England and Wales. Our data show 13% of general population suicides were in community justice pathways before death. Suicide risks were highest among individuals receiving police cautions, and those having recent, or impending prosecution for sexual offences. Findings have implications for the training and practice of clinicians identifying and assessing suicidality, and offering support to those at elevated risk. PMID:26159602

  5. Population-based study of giant cell tumor of bone in Sweden (1983-2011).

    PubMed

    Amelio, Justyna M; Rockberg, Julia; Hernandez, Rohini K; Sobocki, Patrik; Stryker, Scott; Bach, Bruce A; Engellau, Jacob; Liede, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    Giant-cell tumor of bone (GCTB) is a locally aggressive histologically benign neoplasm with a less common malignant counterpart. Longitudinal data sources on GCTB are sparse, limited to single institution case series or surgical outcomes studies. The Swedish Cancer Registry is one of the few national population-based databases recording GCTB, representing a unique source to study GCTB epidemiology. We estimated incidence rate (IR) and overall mortality rates based on registry data. We identified patients with a GCTB diagnosis in the Swedish Cancer Registry from 1983 to 2011: benign (ICD-7 196.0-196.9; PAD 741) and malignant (PAD 746). Results were stratified by age at diagnosis, gender, and anatomical lesion location. The cohort included 337 GCTB cases (IR of 1.3 per million persons per year). The majority (n=310) had primary benign GCTB (IR of 1.2 per million per year). Median age at diagnosis was 34 years (range 10-88) with 54% (n=183) females. Malignant to benign ratio for women was 0.095 (16/167) and for men 0.077 (11/143). Incidence was highest in the 20-39 years age group (IR of 2.1 per million per year). The most common lesion sites were distal femur and proximal tibia. Mortality at 20 years from diagnosis was 14% (n=48) and was slightly higher for axial (17%; n=6) and pelvic (17%; n=4) lesions. Recurrence occurred in 39% of primary benign cases and 75% of primary malignant cases. In our modern population-based series primary malignant cases were uncommon (8%), peak incidence 20-39 years with slight predominance in women. Recurrence rates remain significant with overall 39% occurring in benign GCTB, and 75% in malignant form. The linkage between databases allowed the first population based estimates of the proportion of patients who received surgery at initial GCTB diagnosis, and those who also received subsequent surgeries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Induced abortion, pregnancy loss and intimate partner violence in Tanzania: a population based study.

    PubMed

    Stöckl, Heidi; Filippi, Veronique; Watts, Charlotte; Mbwambo, Jessie K K

    2012-03-05

    Violence by an intimate partner is increasingly recognized as an important public and reproductive health issue. The aim of this study is to investigate the extent to which physical and/or sexual intimate partner violence is associated with induced abortion and pregnancy loss from other causes and to compare this with other, more commonly recognized explanatory factors. This study analyzes the data of the Tanzania section of the WHO Multi-Country Study on Women's Health and Domestic Violence, a large population-based cross-sectional survey of women of reproductive age in Dar es Salaam and Mbeya, Tanzania, conducted from 2001 to 2002. All women who answered positively to at least one of the questions about specific acts of physical or sexual violence committed by a partner towards her at any point in her life were considered to have experienced intimate partner violence. Associations between self reported induced abortion and pregnancy loss with intimate partner violence were analysed using multiple regression models. Lifetime physical and/or sexual intimate partner violence was reported by 41% and 56% of ever partnered, ever pregnant women in Dar es Salaam and Mbeya respectively. Among the ever pregnant, ever partnered women, 23% experienced involuntary pregnancy loss, while 7% reported induced abortion. Even after adjusting for other explanatory factors, women who experienced intimate partner violence were 1.6 (95%CI: 1.06,1.60) times more likely to report an pregnancy loss and 1.9 (95%CI: 1.30,2.89) times more likely to report an induced abortion. Intimate partner violence had a stronger influence on induced abortion and pregnancy loss than women's age, socio-economic status, and number of live born children. Intimate partner violence is likely to be an important influence on levels of induced abortion and pregnancy loss in Tanzania. Preventing intimate partner violence may therefore be beneficial for maternal health and pregnancy outcomes. © 2012 Stöckl et al

  7. Fetal growth and risk of stillbirth: a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Radek; Hansen, Nellie I; Willinger, Marian; Reddy, Uma M; Parker, Corette B; Pinar, Halit; Silver, Robert M; Dudley, Donald J; Stoll, Barbara J; Saade, George R; Koch, Matthew A; Rowland Hogue, Carol J; Varner, Michael W; Conway, Deborah L; Coustan, Donald; Goldenberg, Robert L

    2014-04-01

    Stillbirth is strongly related to impaired fetal growth. However, the relationship between fetal growth and stillbirth is difficult to determine because of uncertainty in the timing of death and confounding characteristics affecting normal fetal growth. We conducted a population-based case-control study of all stillbirths and a representative sample of live births in 59 hospitals in five geographic areas in the US. Fetal growth abnormalities were categorized as small for gestational age (SGA) (<10th percentile) or large for gestational age (LGA) (>90th percentile) at death (stillbirth) or delivery (live birth) using population, ultrasound, and individualized norms. Gestational age at death was determined using an algorithm that considered the time-of-death interval, postmortem examination, and reliability of the gestational age estimate. Data were weighted to account for the sampling design and differential participation rates in various subgroups. Among 527 singleton stillbirths and 1,821 singleton live births studied, stillbirth was associated with SGA based on population, ultrasound, and individualized norms (odds ratio [OR] [95% CI]: 3.0 [2.2 to 4.0]; 4.7 [3.7 to 5.9]; 4.6 [3.6 to 5.9], respectively). LGA was also associated with increased risk of stillbirth using ultrasound and individualized norms (OR [95% CI]: 3.5 [2.4 to 5.0]; 2.3 [1.7 to 3.1], respectively), but not population norms (OR [95% CI]: 0.6 [0.4 to 1.0]). The associations were stronger with more severe SGA and LGA (<5th and >95th percentile). Analyses adjusted for stillbirth risk factors, subset analyses excluding potential confounders, and analyses in preterm and term pregnancies showed similar patterns of association. In this study 70% of cases and 63% of controls agreed to participate. Analysis weights accounted for differences between consenting and non-consenting women. Some of the characteristics used for individualized fetal growth estimates were missing and were replaced with reference

  8. TGF-alpha genotypes, oral clefts, and environmental risk factors: A population-based California study

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, G.M.; Wasserman, C.R.; Lammer, E.J.

    1994-09-01

    Several studies have shown a relation between genetic variation at the TGF-alpha locus and oral clefts. These studies had limited sample sizes and also lacked data on additional factors potentially related to clefting. We investigated the influence on clefting from risk factors, such as maternal smoking, dependent on TFG-alpha genotype. This was accomplished using a large population-bases case-control study of fetuses and liveborn infants with oral clefts among a 1987-89 cohort of California births (N=548,844). To obtain data on potential risk factors, telephone interviews were conducted with mothers of 731 (84.5% of eligible) cleft cases, and 734 (78.2%) nonmalformed controls. DNA was obtained from newborn screening bloodspots and genotyped by using SSCP designed to detect the Taq1 RFLP. Among mothers who completed an interview, genotyping results were available for 571 (78.1%) cases and 640 (87.2%) controls. Compared to controls, the risk estimate for TGF-alpha polymorphism as measured by the odds ratio was: 0.99 (95% confidence interval 0.64, 1.5) for isolated cleft lip {plus_minus}palate; 0.88 (0.33, 2.2) for nonisolated cleft lip {plus_minus}palate; 1.6 (0.94, 2.8) for isolated cleft palate; 1.9 (0.82, 4.3) for nonisolated cleft palate; and 2.2 (0.99, 5.0) for clefts with known etiology. This dataset also revealed 1.4 to 2-fold increased risks for maternal cigarette smoking > 19 cigs/day in early pregnancy. Among these heavy smokers, risk of clefting was even more increased for infants with the TGF-alpha polymorphism. Our data suggest an association between the TGF-alpha uncommon allele and some phenotypic subgroups as well as provide evidence for a genetic-environment interaction between maternal smoking and the variant in the etiology of clefting. The fraction of cases possibly attributed to this interaction, however, was small.

  9. Fetal Growth and Risk of Stillbirth: A Population-Based Case–Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Bukowski, Radek; Hansen, Nellie I.; Willinger, Marian; Reddy, Uma M.; Parker, Corette B.; Pinar, Halit; Silver, Robert M.; Dudley, Donald J.; Stoll, Barbara J.; Saade, George R.; Koch, Matthew A.; Rowland Hogue, Carol J.; Varner, Michael W.; Conway, Deborah L.; Coustan, Donald; Goldenberg, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Stillbirth is strongly related to impaired fetal growth. However, the relationship between fetal growth and stillbirth is difficult to determine because of uncertainty in the timing of death and confounding characteristics affecting normal fetal growth. Methods and Findings We conducted a population-based case–control study of all stillbirths and a representative sample of live births in 59 hospitals in five geographic areas in the US. Fetal growth abnormalities were categorized as small for gestational age (SGA) (<10th percentile) or large for gestational age (LGA) (>90th percentile) at death (stillbirth) or delivery (live birth) using population, ultrasound, and individualized norms. Gestational age at death was determined using an algorithm that considered the time-of-death interval, postmortem examination, and reliability of the gestational age estimate. Data were weighted to account for the sampling design and differential participation rates in various subgroups. Among 527 singleton stillbirths and 1,821 singleton live births studied, stillbirth was associated with SGA based on population, ultrasound, and individualized norms (odds ratio [OR] [95% CI]: 3.0 [2.2 to 4.0]; 4.7 [3.7 to 5.9]; 4.6 [3.6 to 5.9], respectively). LGA was also associated with increased risk of stillbirth using ultrasound and individualized norms (OR [95% CI]: 3.5 [2.4 to 5.0]; 2.3 [1.7 to 3.1], respectively), but not population norms (OR [95% CI]: 0.6 [0.4 to 1.0]). The associations were stronger with more severe SGA and LGA (<5th and >95th percentile). Analyses adjusted for stillbirth risk factors, subset analyses excluding potential confounders, and analyses in preterm and term pregnancies showed similar patterns of association. In this study 70% of cases and 63% of controls agreed to participate. Analysis weights accounted for differences between consenting and non-consenting women. Some of the characteristics used for individualized fetal growth estimates were missing

  10. Design of PREVENCION: a population-based study of cardiovascular disease in Peru.

    PubMed

    Medina-Lezama, Josefina; Chirinos, Julio A; Zea Díaz, Humberto; Morey, Oscar; Bolanos, Juan F; Munoz-Atahualpa, Edgar; Chirinos-Pacheco, Julio

    2005-11-02

    Latin America is undergoing the epidemiologic transition that occurred earlier in developed countries, and is likely to face a gigantic epidemic of heart disease in the next few years unless urgent action is taken. The first essential component of any effective cardiovascular disease (CVD) control program is to establish reliable estimates of cardiovascular disease-related morbidity and mortality. However, such data from population-based studies in Latin America are still lacking. In this paper, we present the design and operation of PREVENCION (Estudio Peruano de Prevalencia de Enfermedades Cardiovasculares, for Peruvian Study of the Prevalence of Cardiovascular diseases). PREVENCION is an ongoing population-based study on a representative sample of the civilian non-institutionalized population of the second largest city in Peru. Its population is comparable to the rest of the Peruvian urban population and closely resembles other Latin American populations in countries such as Bolivia and Ecuador. Our study will contribute to the enormous task of understanding and preventing CVD in Latin America.

  11. Safety and Long-term Outcomes of Congenital Ptosis Surgery: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Mokhtarzadeh, Ali; Bradley, Elizabeth A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To report the long-term outcomes of childhood ptosis surgery in a population-based setting over a 46-year period. Methods In this population-based cohort study, the medical records of all patients who were residents of Olmsted County, Minnesota, diagnosed as having blepharoptosis and having undergone surgical management prior to 19 years of age (between January 1, 1965, and December 31, 2010), were retrospectively reviewed. Age at time of surgery, type of surgery, duration of follow-up, number and nature of revisions, degree of amblyopia, and postoperative lagophthalmos and dry eye were documented. Results Forty-seven children meeting inclusion criteria underwent ptosis surgery. The median age at time of first surgery was 5.6 years (range: 1.5 to 17.7 years). Fifteen of 47 (31.9%) patients required a second procedure. Three of 47 (6.4%) patients underwent three procedures. The median time was 1.1 years (range: 0.03 to 7.8 years) between the first and second surgery and 6.0 years (range: 0.3 to 6.1 years) between the second and third procedure. Seven of 47 (14.9%) patients had amblyopia. Nineteen of 47 (40.4%) patients were noted to have lagophthalmos and 3 of 47 (6.4%) presented for symptomatic dry eye postoperatively. Conclusions In this population-based setting, more than half of children with ptosis required only a single surgical procedure, although a significant proportion required two procedures. Postoperative lagophthalmos is common, but symptomatic dry eye is rare. PMID:27281828

  12. Population-based study of lymphoma in Germany: rationale, study design and first results.

    PubMed

    Becker, Nikolaus; Deeg, Evelin; Nieters, Alexandra

    2004-07-01

    A multi-centre, population-based case-control study of lymphoma among adults was conducted in Germany from 1999-2003. The study comprised 700 incident cases (Hodgkin lymphomas and non Hodgkin's lymphoma, NHL) in the age range 18-80 years and 700 age-, sex- and area-matched controls obtained from population registries. Diagnosis was based on the REAL/WHO classification. Information on demographic characteristics, lifestyle, medical history and occupation was obtained by in-person interviews. Each participant was asked for a 24 ml blood sample. First results are focused on basic demographic characteristics, contact to animals, childhood diseases and vaccinations. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using conditional logistic regression. The ORs for lymphoma were decreased for exposure to sheep and goats (OR = 0.7; 95% CI = 0.5-0.9), for rabbits and hare (OR = 0.7; 95% CI = 0.5-0.9), measles infection (OR = 0.6; 95% CI = 0.5-0.9), Bordetella pertussis infection (OR = 0.7; 95% CI = 0.6-0.95), and tetanus vaccination (OR = 0.5; 95% CI = 0.3-0.9). Increased risk of lymphoma was associated with exposure to cattle (OR = 1.3; 95% CI = 1.03-1.7) and immunization for tuberculosis (OR = 1.5; 95% CI = 0.997-2.4). The results of this study are partly consistent with the hygiene hypothesis. The inconsistencies of some of the findings with an explanation by the Th1/Th2 paradigm, however, warrant further research and may indicate that broader explanatory concepts are needed.

  13. Intracerebral Hemorrhage in the Oldest Old: A Population-Based Study (Vantaa 85+)

    PubMed Central

    Tanskanen, Maarit; Mäkelä, Mira; Myllykangas, Liisa; Rastas, Sari; Sulkava, Raimo; Paetau, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Aims: Very elderly subjects represent the fastest growing population in the world. Most of the recent studies on intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) have been carried out on younger patients and/or preferably using novel radiological techniques. We investigated the prevalence, risk factors, and histopathological characteristics of the ICH in the oldest old. Materials and methods: The brains of 300 autopsied individuals (248 females, 52 males, mean age at death 92.4 ± 3.7 years) were investigated as part of the prospective population-based Vantaa 85+ study. After macroscopic investigation, the presence and extent of microscopic brain hemorrhages (MH) were analyzed by counting the number of iron containing macrophages (siderophages) by Prussian blue staining. Deposits with >5 siderophages were defined as MH+, forming a subgroup of MH. Genotyping of apolipoprotein E (APOE) and the analysis of microscopic (MI) or larger infarctions and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) were performed using standardized methods. Regression analysis was used to predict the presence of ICH, with and without co-localized CAA, and was adjusted for age at death and gender. Results: The prevalence of macroscopic ICH was 2.3% in total; consisting of 1% large lobar hemorrhage (LH), 1% deep hemorrhage (DH), and 0.3% of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). 62% had MH and 15.3% MH+. All MH+ lesions were found to be >2 mm wide. 55.9% of subjects with MH and 81.2% of those with MH+ showed MH/MH+ and CAA in the same brain region (MHCAA and MH+CAA, respectively). MH was associated with none of the neuropathological or clinical conditions, nor with the APOE carrier status. The subjects with MH+, MHCAA or MH+CAA carried the APOE ε4 allele more frequently than controls (OR 3.681, 3.291, 7.522, respectively). Siderophages in MH+CAA co-localized with CAA and with two-thirds of the MI in the tissue sections. Conclusion: Macroscopic ICH was rare in the very elderly. MH was frequent and clinically

  14. Intracerebral hemorrhage in the oldest old: a population-based study (vantaa 85+).

    PubMed

    Tanskanen, Maarit; Mäkelä, Mira; Myllykangas, Liisa; Rastas, Sari; Sulkava, Raimo; Paetau, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Very elderly subjects represent the fastest growing population in the world. Most of the recent studies on intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) have been carried out on younger patients and/or preferably using novel radiological techniques. We investigated the prevalence, risk factors, and histopathological characteristics of the ICH in the oldest old. The brains of 300 autopsied individuals (248 females, 52 males, mean age at death 92.4 ± 3.7 years) were investigated as part of the prospective population-based Vantaa 85+ study. After macroscopic investigation, the presence and extent of microscopic brain hemorrhages (MH) were analyzed by counting the number of iron containing macrophages (siderophages) by Prussian blue staining. Deposits with >5 siderophages were defined as MH+, forming a subgroup of MH. Genotyping of apolipoprotein E (APOE) and the analysis of microscopic (MI) or larger infarctions and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) were performed using standardized methods. Regression analysis was used to predict the presence of ICH, with and without co-localized CAA, and was adjusted for age at death and gender. The prevalence of macroscopic ICH was 2.3% in total; consisting of 1% large lobar hemorrhage (LH), 1% deep hemorrhage (DH), and 0.3% of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). 62% had MH and 15.3% MH+. All MH+ lesions were found to be >2 mm wide. 55.9% of subjects with MH and 81.2% of those with MH+ showed MH/MH+ and CAA in the same brain region (MHCAA and MH+CAA, respectively). MH was associated with none of the neuropathological or clinical conditions, nor with the APOE carrier status. The subjects with MH+, MHCAA or MH+CAA carried the APOE ε4 allele more frequently than controls (OR 3.681, 3.291, 7.522, respectively). Siderophages in MH+CAA co-localized with CAA and with two-thirds of the MI in the tissue sections. Macroscopic ICH was rare in the very elderly. MH was frequent and clinically insignificant. MH+ was rare but closely related with the APOE

  15. Consumption of spicy foods and total and cause specific mortality: population based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jun; Qi, Lu; Yu, Canqing; Yang, Ling; Guo, Yu; Chen, Yiping; Bian, Zheng; Sun, Dianjianyi; Du, Jianwei; Ge, Pengfei; Tang, Zhenzhu; Hou, Wei; Li, Yanjie; Chen, Junshi; Chen, Zhengming; Li, Liming

    2015-08-04

    To examine the associations between the regular consumption of spicy foods and total and cause specific mortality. Population based prospective cohort study. China Kadoorie Biobank in which participants from 10 geographically diverse areas across China were enrolled between 2004 and 2008. 199,293 men and 288,082 women aged 30 to 79 years at baseline after excluding participants with cancer, heart disease, and stroke at baseline. Consumption frequency of spicy foods, self reported once at baseline. Total and cause specific mortality. During 3,500,004 person years of follow-up between 2004 and 2013 (median 7.2 years), a total of 11,820 men and 8404 women died. Absolute mortality rates according to spicy food consumption categories were 6.1, 4.4, 4.3, and 5.8 deaths per 1000 person years for participants who ate spicy foods less than once a week, 1 or 2, 3 to 5, and 6 or 7 days a week, respectively. Spicy food consumption showed highly consistent inverse associations with total mortality among both men and women after adjustment for other known or potential risk factors. In the whole cohort, compared with those who ate spicy foods less than once a week, the adjusted hazard ratios for death were 0.90 (95% confidence interval 0.84 to 0.96), 0.86 (0.80 to 0.92), and 0.86 (0.82 to 0.90) for those who ate spicy food 1 or 2, 3 to 5, and 6 or 7 days a week, respectively. Compared with those who ate spicy foods less than once a week, those who consumed spicy foods 6 or 7 days a week showed a 14% relative risk reduction in total mortality. The inverse association between spicy food consumption and total mortality was stronger in those who did not consume alcohol than those who did (P=0.033 for interaction). Inverse associations were also observed for deaths due to cancer, ischemic heart diseases, and respiratory diseases. In this large prospective study, the habitual consumption of spicy foods was inversely associated with total and certain cause specific mortality

  16. Burden of diabetes mellitus estimated with a longitudinal population-based study using administrative databases.

    PubMed

    Scalone, Luciana; Cesana, Giancarlo; Furneri, Gianluca; Ciampichini, Roberta; Beck-Peccoz, Paolo; Chiodini, Virginio; Mangioni, Silvia; Orsi, Emanuela; Fornari, Carla; Mantovani, Lorenzo Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    To assess the epidemiologic and economic burden of diabetes mellitus (DM) from a longitudinal population-based study. Lombardy Region includes 9.9 million individuals. Its DM population was identified through a data warehouse (DENALI), which matches with a probabilistic linkage demographic, clinical and economic data of different Healthcare Administrative databases. All individuals, who, during the year 2000 had an hospital discharge with a IDC-9 CM code 250.XX, and/or two consecutive prescriptions of drugs for diabetes (ATC code A10XXXX) within one year, and/or an exemption from co-payment healthcare costs specific for DM, were selected and followed up to 9 years. We calculated prevalence, mortality and healthcare costs (hospitalizations, drugs and outpatient examinations/visits) from the National Health Service's perspective. We identified 312,223 eligible subjects. The study population (51% male) had a mean age of 66 (from 0.03 to 105.12) years at the index date. Prevalence ranged from 0.4% among subjects aged ≤45 years to 10.1% among those >85 years old. Overall 43.4 deaths per 1,000 patients per year were estimated, significantly (p<0.001) higher in men than women. Overall, 3,315€/patient-year were spent on average: hospitalizations were the cost driver (54.2% of total cost). Drugs contributed to 31.5%, outpatient claims represented 14.3% of total costs. Thirty-five percent of hospital costs were attributable to cerebro-/cardiovascular reasons, 6% to other complications of DM, and 4% to DM as a main diagnosis. Cardiovascular drugs contributed to 33.5% of total drug costs, 21.8% was attributable to class A (16.7% to class A10) and 4.3% to class B (2.4% to class B01) drugs. Merging different administrative databases can provide with many data from large populations observed for long time periods. DENALI shows to be an efficient instrument to obtain accurate estimates of burden of diseases such as diabetes mellitus.

  17. Burden of Diabetes Mellitus Estimated with a Longitudinal Population-Based Study Using Administrative Databases

    PubMed Central

    Scalone, Luciana; Cesana, Giancarlo; Furneri, Gianluca; Ciampichini, Roberta; Beck-Peccoz, Paolo; Chiodini, Virginio; Mangioni, Silvia; Orsi, Emanuela; Fornari, Carla; Mantovani, Lorenzo Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the epidemiologic and economic burden of diabetes mellitus (DM) from a longitudinal population-based study. Research Design and Methods Lombardy Region includes 9.9 million individuals. Its DM population was identified through a data warehouse (DENALI), which matches with a probabilistic linkage demographic, clinical and economic data of different Healthcare Administrative databases. All individuals, who, during the year 2000 had an hospital discharge with a IDC-9 CM code 250.XX, and/or two consecutive prescriptions of drugs for diabetes (ATC code A10XXXX) within one year, and/or an exemption from co-payment healthcare costs specific for DM, were selected and followed up to 9 years. We calculated prevalence, mortality and healthcare costs (hospitalizations, drugs and outpatient examinations/visits) from the National Health Service’s perspective. Results We identified 312,223 eligible subjects. The study population (51% male) had a mean age of 66 (from 0.03 to 105.12) years at the index date. Prevalence ranged from 0.4% among subjects aged ≤45 years to 10.1% among those >85 years old. Overall 43.4 deaths per 1,000 patients per year were estimated, significantly (p<0.001) higher in men than women. Overall, 3,315€/patient-year were spent on average: hospitalizations were the cost driver (54.2% of total cost). Drugs contributed to 31.5%, outpatient claims represented 14.3% of total costs. Thirty-five percent of hospital costs were attributable to cerebro−/cardiovascular reasons, 6% to other complications of DM, and 4% to DM as a main diagnosis. Cardiovascular drugs contributed to 33.5% of total drug costs, 21.8% was attributable to class A (16.7% to class A10) and 4.3% to class B (2.4% to class B01) drugs. Conclusions Merging different administrative databases can provide with many data from large populations observed for long time periods. DENALI shows to be an efficient instrument to obtain accurate estimates of burden of diseases such as

  18. Consumption of spicy foods and total and cause specific mortality: population based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Jun; Qi, Lu; Yu, Canqing; Yang, Ling; Guo, Yu; Chen, Yiping; Bian, Zheng; Sun, Dianjianyi; Du, Jianwei; Ge, Pengfei; Tang, Zhenzhu; Hou, Wei; Chen, Junshi; Chen, Zhengming

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the associations between the regular consumption of spicy foods and total and cause specific mortality. Design Population based prospective cohort study. Setting China Kadoorie Biobank in which participants from 10 geographically diverse areas across China were enrolled between 2004 and 2008. Participants 199 293 men and 288 082 women aged 30 to 79 years at baseline after excluding participants with cancer, heart disease, and stroke at baseline. Main exposure measures Consumption frequency of spicy foods, self reported once at baseline. Main outcome measures Total and cause specific mortality. Results During 3 500 004 person years of follow-up between 2004 and 2013 (median 7.2 years), a total of 11 820 men and 8404 women died. Absolute mortality rates according to spicy food consumption categories were 6.1, 4.4, 4.3, and 5.8 deaths per 1000 person years for participants who ate spicy foods less than once a week, 1 or 2, 3 to 5, and 6 or 7 days a week, respectively. Spicy food consumption showed highly consistent inverse associations with total mortality among both men and women after adjustment for other known or potential risk factors. In the whole cohort, compared with those who ate spicy foods less than once a week, the adjusted hazard ratios for death were 0.90 (95% confidence interval 0.84 to 0.96), 0.86 (0.80 to 0.92), and 0.86 (0.82 to 0.90) for those who ate spicy food 1 or 2, 3 to 5, and 6 or 7 days a week, respectively. Compared with those who ate spicy foods less than once a week, those who consumed spicy foods 6 or 7 days a week showed a 14% relative risk reduction in total mortality. The inverse association between spicy food consumption and total mortality was stronger in those who did not consume alcohol than those who did (P=0.033 for interaction). Inverse associations were also observed for deaths due to cancer, ischemic heart diseases, and respiratory diseases. Conclusion In this large prospective study, the habitual

  19. Prevalence of dementia in the oldest old: the Monzino 80-plus population based study.

    PubMed

    Lucca, Ugo; Tettamanti, Mauro; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Tiraboschi, Pietro; Landi, Cristina; Sacco, Leonardo; Garrì, Mariateresa; Ammesso, Sonia; Bertinotti, Chiara; Biotti, Anna; Gargantini, Elena; Piedicorcia, Alessandro; Nobili, Alessandro; Pasina, Luca; Franchi, Carlotta; Djade, Codjo Djignefa; Riva, Emma; Recchia, Angela

    2015-03-01

    Epidemiological studies commonly include too few of the oldest old to provide accurate prevalence rates of dementia in older age groups. Estimates of the number of those affected, necessary for healthcare planning, are thus flawed. The objective is to estimate the prevalence of dementia and levels of dementia severity in a very large population of oldest old and to investigate the relation between age and dementia prevalence in the extreme ages. The Monzino 80-plus is a population-based study among residents 80 years or older in Varese province, Italy. Dementia cases were identified using a one-phase design. The survey was conducted in the participant's place of residence, whether home or institution. Both participants and informants were interviewed. Information was available for 2504 of the 2813 residents (89%). In all, 894 individuals (714 women and 180 men) met the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (fourth edition) criteria for dementia, for a standardized prevalence of 25.3% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 23.4, 27.2%), 28.5% (95% CI: 26.2, 30.9) in women and 18.6% (95% CI: 15.2, 21.9) in men. Age-specific prevalence estimates of dementia increased with age from 15.7% at age 80 to 84 years to 65.9% at age 100 years and higher. For women, prevalence continued to rise after age 100 years, from 64.8% at age 100 to 101 years to 76.1% at age 102 to 107 years. After age 85 years prevalence rates tended to rise linearly, on average 2.6% per year in women and 1.8% in men. About 80% of the cases were moderate or severe. The frequency of mild dementia decreased and that of severe dementia increased with age. One-quarter of 80-plus year olds are affected by dementia, mostly moderate or severe. Prevalence rates of dementia do not level off, but continue to rise gradually even in the extreme ages. Copyright © 2015 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Once is Rarely Enough: A Population-Based Study of Reoperations after Postmastectomy Breast Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Amanda; Baxter, Nancy; Camacho, Ximena; Lau, Cindy; Zhong, Toni

    2015-10-01

    Postmastectomy breast reconstruction (PMBR) aims to surgically restore a breast mound following mastectomy. However, additional surgical procedures after PMBR can lead to increased postsurgical morbidity and healthcare utilization. The primary purpose of our study was to determine the overall population-based reoperation rates following PMBR in Ontario, Canada. We conducted a population-based retrospective cohort study that included women aged 18-65 years who underwent a prophylactic or therapeutic mastectomy with immediate or delayed PMBR between April 1, 2002 and March 31, 2008. Reoperations to the breast or donor site used for reconstruction were identified using the Ontario Health Insurance Plan billing codes submitted by general or plastic surgeons. Reoperations were categorized as anticipated, unanticipated major, unanticipated minor, or oncologic. Patients were followed from the date of their PMBR to March 31, 2013, or death. Overall, 3972 women underwent PMBR between April 1, 2002 and March 31, 2008. Among them, 3504 (88%) underwent at least one reoperation during an average follow-up of 5.1 years. The median number of procedures per patient was two (mean 2.4, range 0-26). One of ten patients had three or more unanticipated major reoperations during the follow-up period. Our results provide the first long-term population-level data on the current state of PMBR reoperation rates. The results from this study will inform patient-physician surgical decision-making and provide quantitative expectations of morbidity related to PMBR.

  1. Clinical features and outcomes of childhood hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: results from a national population-based study.

    PubMed

    Nugent, Alan W; Daubeney, Piers E F; Chondros, Patty; Carlin, John B; Colan, Steven D; Cheung, Michael; Davis, Andrew M; Chow, C W; Weintraub, Robert G

    2005-08-30

    Population-based studies have provided insight into the natural history of adult hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, but comparable information for affected children is lacking. All Australian children who presented with primary cardiomyopathy at 0 to 10 years of age between January 1, 1987, and December 31, 1996, were enrolled in a longitudinal cohort study. A single cardiologist reviewed serial cardiac investigations on each subject. A total of 80 subjects with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were identified. An underlying syndromal, genetic, or metabolic condition was identified in 46 subjects (57.5%). There were no cases of sudden death at presentation. Left ventricular outflow tract obstruction was present in 32 subjects (40%); right ventricular outflow obstruction was present in 10 (12.5%). Freedom from death or transplantation was 83% (95% CI, 73 to 90) 5 years after presentation and 76% (95% CI, 62 to 86) 10 years after presentation. By proportional-hazards regression analysis, risk factors for death or transplantation included concentric left ventricular hypertrophy, age at presentation <1 year, lower initial fractional shortening Z score, and increasing left ventricular posterior wall thickness relative to body surface area. At the latest follow-up, 54 of 65 surviving subjects had no symptoms, and 46 were receiving no regular medication. Syndromal, genetic, and metabolic causes predominate in children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Ventricular outflow tract obstruction is common. The clinical status of long-term survivors is good. This population-based study identifies children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy who are at risk of adverse events.

  2. Postmenopausal hormone therapy and ductal carcinoma in situ: A population-based case control study

    PubMed Central

    Calvocoressi, Lisa; Stowe, Meredith H.; Carter, Darryl; Claus, Elizabeth B.

    2013-01-01

    Background and aim The relationship between hormone therapy (HT) and invasive breast cancer has been extensively investigated, but the relationship between HT and in situ breast cancer has received relatively little attention. We examined the relationship between HT and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) among postmenopausal women who participated in a population-based case control study in Connecticut, USA. Methods This analysis included 1,179 post-menopausal women (603 controls and 576 cases), who comprised a subset of a population-based case-control study that included all incident cases of breast carcinoma in situ (BCIS) in Connecticut and frequency-matched controls by 5-year age intervals. Results We found no association between DCIS and ever use of any HT (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 0.85, 95 % confidence interval (CI): 0.65-1.11); of estrogen alone (adjusted OR = 0.93; 95 % CI: 0.68-1.29) or of estrogen and progesterone (adjusted OR = 0.75; 95 % CI: 0.52-1.08). There was also no association between DCIS and current use of these hormones. In addition, estimated risk of DCIS did not increase with duration of use of these preparations. Conclusions These results add to a small literature that remains inconclusive. To determine whether HT poses risk of in situ breast cancer, larger studies with greater power and precise control of important covariates (e.g., mammography screening) are needed, as are meta-analyses of available data. PMID:22317899

  3. Cancer patients' awareness about their diagnosis: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Nord, C; Mykletun, A; Fosså, S D

    2003-12-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate Norwegian cancer patients' awareness of their prior cancer diagnosis in a general population-based study. A cross-sectional population-based study of cancer patients' responses to the index question: 'Do you have or have you had cancer?' was carried out. We assessed correctness of the response in relation to cancer site, date of diagnosis, marital status, age and education. Smoking was chosen as a marker of health awareness. A total of 65,330 persons participated in the Nord-Trøndelag Health Survey (HUNT-II), performed in 1995-1997. The database of HUNT-II was merged with the Cancer Registry of Norway (CRN), thus identifying each of the 2983 (4 percent) participants with an invasive cancer diagnosis. Excluding basal cell epithelioma, a total of 20 percent of the patients denied their prior cancer diagnosis. This group consisted mainly of men (54 percent) and those who were diagnosed as very young or as elderly. More smokers than non-smokers were unaware of their prior malignancy (24 percent versus 20 percent). A 20 percent rate of patients who denied their former malignancy is surprisingly and unacceptably high. Disclosure of a cancer diagnosis should help the patient to develop increased health awareness. It should enable a person to report his or her former cancer diagnosis when necessary.

  4. Arterial waveform parameters in a large, population-based sample of adults: relationships with ethnicity and lifestyle factors.

    PubMed

    Sluyter, J D; Hughes, A D; Thom, S A McG; Lowe, A; Camargo, C A; Hametner, B; Wassertheurer, S; Parker, K H; Scragg, R K R

    2016-12-22

    Little is known about how aortic waveform parameters vary with ethnicity and lifestyle factors. We investigated these issues in a large, population-based sample. We carried out a cross-sectional analysis of 4798 men and women, aged 50-84 years from Auckland, New Zealand. Participants were 3961 European, 321 Pacific, 266 Maori and 250 South Asian people. We assessed modifiable lifestyle factors via questionnaires, and measured body mass index (BMI) and brachial blood pressure (BP). Suprasystolic oscillometry was used to derive aortic pressure, from which several haemodynamic parameters were calculated. Heavy alcohol consumption and BMI were positively related to most waveform parameters. Current smokers had higher levels of aortic augmentation index than non-smokers (difference=3.7%, P<0.0001). Aortic waveform parameters, controlling for demographics, antihypertensives, diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD), were higher in non-Europeans than in Europeans. Further adjustment for brachial BP or lifestyle factors (particularly BMI) reduced many differences but several remained. Despite even further adjustment for mean arterial pressure, pulse rate, height and total:high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, compared with Europeans, South Asians had higher levels of all measured aortic waveform parameters (for example, for backward pressure amplitude: β=1.5 mm Hg; P<0.0001), whereas Pacific people had 9% higher loge (excess pressure integral) (P<0.0001). In conclusion, aortic waveform parameters varied with ethnicity in line with the greater prevalence of CVD among non-white populations. Generally, this was true even after accounting for brachial BP, suggesting that waveform parameters may have increased usefulness in capturing ethnic variations in cardiovascular risk. Heavy alcohol consumption, smoking and especially BMI may partially contribute to elevated levels of these parameters.Journal of Human Hypertension advance online publication, 22 December 2016; doi:10

  5. Exploration of ADHD Subtype Definitions and Co-Occurring Psychopathology in a Missouri Population-Based Large Sibship Sample.

    PubMed

    Reiersen, Angela M; Todorov, Alexandre A

    2013-03-01

    There is some debate regarding the utility of Attention-Deficit/ Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) subtypes as currently defined. Differences in co-occurring psychopathology among subtypes would support the validity of subtype definitions. To explore how ADHD subtype relates to co-occurring psychopathology in a large population-based sample of children and adolescents (n=5744). Parents completed the Strengths and Weaknesses of ADHD-symptoms and Normal behavior (SWAN) questionnaire, the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS). Methods including discriminant analysis, principal components analysis, and fractional polynomial regression were used to examine the relationship between ADHD diagnostic subtypes and co-occurring psychopathology. Children with different ADHD subtypes show differences on several CBCL subscales. A combination of CBCL subscales and SRS score had good ability to discriminate ADHD subtypes. Conversely, for the same overall number of ADHD symptoms, individuals who present with both inattentive and hyperactive/impulsive symptoms exhibit higher severity of co-occurring psychopathology on a summary measure derived from principal components analysis of the CBCL subscales and SRS. This includes some subjects who fail to meet the DSM-IV-TR ADHD symptom criterion due to having less than 6 inattentive and less than six hyperactive-impulsive symptoms, yet have ADHD symptom severity similar to those with the inattentive or hyperactive-impulsive subtype. Several convergent lines of analysis provide support for the continued use of ADHD subtypes (or current presentation symptom profiles), as evidenced by differences in co-existing psychopathlogy. We also found that current diagnostic criteria may fail to identify a potentially impaired group of individuals who have low-to-moderate levels of both inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity. Under the upcoming DSM-5, it will be important for clinicians to consider the option of giving

  6. Population-based multicase-control study in common tumors in Spain (MCC-Spain): rationale and study design.

    PubMed

    Castaño-Vinyals, Gemma; Aragonés, Nuria; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Martín, Vicente; Llorca, Javier; Moreno, Victor; Altzibar, Jone M; Ardanaz, Eva; de Sanjosé, Sílvia; Jiménez-Moleón, José Juan; Tardón, Adonina; Alguacil, Juan; Peiró, Rosana; Marcos-Gragera, Rafael; Navarro, Carmen; Pollán, Marina; Kogevinas, Manolis

    2015-01-01

    We present the protocol of a large population-based case-control study of 5 common tumors in Spain (MCC-Spain) that evaluates environmental exposures and genetic factors. Between 2008-2013, 10,183 persons aged 20-85 years were enrolled in 23 hospitals and primary care centres in 12 Spanish provinces including 1,115 cases of a new diagnosis of prostate cancer, 1,750 of breast cancer, 2,171 of colorectal cancer, 492 of gastro-oesophageal cancer, 554 cases of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) and 4,101 population-based controls matched by frequency to cases by age, sex and region of residence. Participation rates ranged from 57% (stomach cancer) to 87% (CLL cases) and from 30% to 77% in controls. Participants completed a face-to-face computerized interview on sociodemographic factors, environmental exposures, occupation, medication, lifestyle, and personal and family medical history. In addition, participants completed a self-administered food-frequency questionnaire and telephone interviews. Blood samples were collected from 76% of participants while saliva samples were collected in CLL cases and participants refusing blood extractions. Clinical information was recorded for cases and paraffin blocks and/or fresh tumor samples are available in most collaborating hospitals. Genotyping was done through an exome array enriched with genetic markers in specific pathways. Multiple analyses are planned to assess the association of environmental, personal and genetic risk factors for each tumor and to identify pleiotropic effects. This study, conducted within the Spanish Consortium for Biomedical Research in Epidemiology & Public Health (CIBERESP), is a unique initiative to evaluate etiological factors for common cancers and will promote cancer research and prevention in Spain. Copyright © 2014 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Distribution of conjunctival ultraviolet autoflourescence in a population-based study: the Norfolk Island Eye Study

    PubMed Central

    Sherwin, J C; Hewitt, A W; Kearns, L S; Coroneo, M T; Griffiths, L R; Mackey, D A

    2011-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to describe the distribution of conjunctival ultraviolet autofluorescence (UVAF) in an adult population. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional, population-based study in the genetic isolate of Norfolk Island, South Pacific Ocean. In all, 641 people, aged 15 to 89 years, were recruited. UVAF and standard (control) photographs were taken of the nasal and temporal interpalpebral regions bilaterally. Differences between the groups for non-normally distributed continuous variables were assessed using the Wilcoxon–Mann–Whitney ranksum test. Trends across categories were assessed using Cuzick's non-parametric test for trend or Kendall's rank correlation τ. Results Conjunctival UVAF is a non-parametric trait with a positively skewed distribution. Median amount of conjunctival UVAF per person (sum of four measurements; right nasal/temporal and left nasal/temporal) was 28.2 mm2 (interquartile range 14.5–48.2). There was an inverse, linear relationship between UVAF and advancing age (P<0.001). Males had a higher sum of UVAF compared with females (34.4 mm2 vs23.2 mm2, P<0.0001). There were no statistically significant differences in area of UVAF between right and left eyes or between nasal and temporal regions. Conclusion We have provided the first quantifiable estimates of conjunctival UVAF in an adult population. Further data are required to provide information about the natural history of UVAF and to characterise other potential disease associations with UVAF. UVR protective strategies should be emphasised at an early age to prevent the long-term adverse effects on health associated with excess UVR. PMID:21494284

  8. Frequency of and risk factors for the surgical resection of nonmalignant colorectal polyps: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Le Roy, Florence; Manfredi, Sylvain; Hamonic, Stéphanie; Piette, Christine; Bouguen, Guillaume; Riou, Françoise; Bretagne, Jean-François

    2016-03-01

    The management of patients with colon polyps who are referred to surgery remains uncharacterized in a population-based setting. The aims of this study were to determine the frequency, risk factors, and outcomes of patients referred for surgical resection of colorectal polyps. All patients who underwent a colonoscopy for positive fecal occult blood test in the setting of a population-based colorectal cancer screening program in France between 2003 and 2012 were analyzed. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients undergoing colorectal surgery for polyps without invasive carcinoma. Logistic regression analysis was applied to identify risk factors for surgical resection. Among 4251 patients with at least one colorectal polyp, 175 (4.1 %) underwent colorectal surgery. Risk factors for surgery included size, proximal polyp location, advanced histology (villous or high grade dysplasia), the endoscopy center, and colonoscopy performed during the first half of the study period. Subgroup analysis of 3475 colonoscopies performed by 22 endoscopists who performed at least 50 colonoscopies during the study period, identified the endoscopist as an additional risk factor. The adjusted proportions of referrals to surgery ranged from 0 to 46.6 % per endoscopist for polyps ≥ 20  mm (median 20.2 %). Overall, surgical complications occurred in 24.0 %, and one patient died following surgery (0.5 %). None of the 175 patients who underwent surgery were referred to a tertiary endoscopic center prior to surgery. In this population-based study, 4.1 % of patients with nonmalignant polyps were referred for surgical resection. The endoscopist was one important factor that was associated with surgical referral. To further decrease the proportion of inappropriate surgery in patients, endoscopists should refer their patients with large or difficult polyps to expert endoscopists prior to surgery. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Hemiplegic Shoulder Pain Reduces Quality of Life After Acute Stroke: A Prospective Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Adey-Wakeling, Zoe; Liu, Enwu; Crotty, Maria; Leyden, James; Kleinig, Timothy; Anderson, Craig S; Newbury, Jonathon

    2016-10-01

    Hemiplegic shoulder pain is a common complication of stroke. The primary aim of this study was to determine the association of hemiplegic shoulder pain with health-related quality of life at 12 months after first stroke in a population-based registry. The secondary aim was to identify other factors associated with health-related quality-of-life outcomes. A prospective population-based study in a geographically defined region of Adelaide, South Australia was conducted. Multiple ascertainment methods identified all cases of stroke within a 12-month period. Objective and subjective measures were undertaken at baseline and at 4 and 12 months' follow-up. Multiple regression analyses identified independent variables (including exposure to shoulder pain and depression, 12-month dependence, access to formal rehabilitation) associated with health-related quality of life, defined by the summary index score derived from EuroQol-5D-3L at 12 months post-stroke. Hemiplegic shoulder pain, depression, increased dependency, stroke severity, and absence of initial rehabilitation were each associated with reduction in quality of life. Age, sex, stroke type, Oxfordshire classification, and discharge destination were not related to quality of life. Hemiplegic shoulder pain reduces health-related quality of life at 12 months. More effort should be directed towards screening and management of this frequent complication of stroke.

  10. Weight Concerns Among Finnish Ever-Smokers: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Concern over weight gain after smoking cessation has been hypothesized to discourage quit attempts and consequently reduce smoking cessation rates. The aim of this study was to examine the association between smoking status and weight concerns among a population-based sample of Finnish ever-smokers. Methods: Data were collected in conjunction with the National FINRISK 2007 Study from a population-based sample of 25- to 74-yearold Finns. These analyses were based on a subsample of 1,614 ever-smokers. Participants were divided into 4 groups (daily smokers, occasional smokers, recent quitters, and former smokers) based on the self-reported smoking status. Weight concerns were analyzed as a sum score including 6 items (range 0–24). Regression analyses were used to examine the association between smoking status and weight concerns, while adjusting for multiple confounders. Results: Smoking status was significantly associated with weight concerns, current daily smokers reporting the highest levels of weight concerns. After adjusting for potential confounders (age, gender, body mass index, socioeconomic status, and health behavior), the weight concerns of daily smokers remained significantly higher in comparison with all other groups. Although women were more concerned about their weight than men, no gender-specific associations were found between weight concerns and smoking status. Conclusions: Current daily smokers are more concerned about their weight than recent quitters, as well as former and occasional smokers. Weight concerns should be taken into account in tobacco dependence treatment. PMID:23547276

  11. Assaults in the elderly--a population-based study with victim and perpetrator characteristics.

    PubMed

    Biermann, Teresa; Dippel, Olga; Bergner, Matthias; Keller, Jochen; Coffey, Claire; Sperling, Wolfgang; Bleich, Stefan; Kornhuber, Johannes; Reulbach, Udo

    2011-05-01

    The aim of the present epidemiological study was to investigate characteristics of assaults in the elderly aged 65 years and above from the perspective of the victim and perpetrator. This population-based study included 23,142 assaults (according to §§ 224/226 StGB of German criminal law) that were recorded in Bavaria, Germany, from 1999 to 2005. The population-based ratio of serious crimes of battery for the elderly in comparison with the reference population was markedly lower (0.10; 95% CI: 0.09-0.11) in suspects aged more than 65 years and 0.08 (95% CI: 0.07-0.09) for the injured above 65 years. Elderly perpetrators differed significantly concerning the manner of the assault (p < 0.001). They committed less crimes in urban areas (56.1% vs. 68.8%) and were victimized significantly more in rural areas (p < 0.001; 41.2% vs. 30.2%). Violence in the elderly differs from that of the younger population. Further research is warranted to establish prevention measures. © 2011 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  12. Colorectal Cancer Prognosis Following Obesity Surgery in a Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Tao, Wenjing; Konings, Peter; Hull, Mark A; Adami, Hans-Olov; Mattsson, Fredrik; Lagergren, Jesper

    2017-05-01

    Obesity surgery involves mechanical and physiological changes of the gastrointestinal tract that might promote colorectal cancer progression. Thus, we hypothesised that obesity surgery is associated with poorer prognosis in patients with colorectal cancer. This nationwide population-based cohort study included all patients with an obesity diagnosis who subsequently developed colorectal cancer in Sweden from 1980 to 2012. The exposure was obesity surgery, and the main and secondary outcomes were disease-specific mortality and all-cause mortality, respectively. Cox proportional hazard survival models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), adjusted for sex, age, calendar year and education level. The exposed and unexposed cohort included 131 obesity surgery and 1332 non-obesity surgery patients with colorectal cancer. There was a statistically significant increased rate of colorectal cancer deaths following obesity surgery (disease-specific HR 1.50, 95% CI 1.00-2.19). When analysed separately, the mortality rate was more than threefold increased in rectal cancer patients with prior obesity surgery (disease-specific HR 3.70, 95% CI 2.00-6.90), while no increased mortality rate was found in colon cancer patients (disease-specific HR 1.10, 85% CI 0.67-1.70). This population-based study among obese individuals found a poorer prognosis in colorectal cancer following obesity surgery, which was primarily driven by the higher mortality rate in rectal cancer.

  13. Newly Diagnosed Anemia Increases Risk of Parkinson's disease: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chien Tai; Huang, Yao Hsien; Liu, Hung Yi; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Chan, Lung; Chien, Li-Nien

    2016-07-14

    Anemia and low hemoglobin have been identified to increase Parkinson's disease (PD) risk. This population-based cohort study investigated PD risk in newly diagnosed anemic patients by using data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. All newly diagnosed anemic patients (n = 86,334) without a history of stroke, neurodegenerative diseases, traumatic brain injury, major operations, or blood loss diseases were enrolled. A cohort of nonanemic controls, 1:1 matched with anemic patients on the basis of the demographics and pre-existing medical conditions, was also included. Competing risk analysis was used to evaluate PD risk in anemic patients compared with that in their matched controls. The adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) of PD risk in the anemic patients was 1.36 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.22-1.52, p < 0.001). Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) patients tended to exhibit a higher PD risk (aHR: 1.49; 95% CI: 1.24-1.79, p < 0.001). Furthermore, Iron supplement did not significantly affect the PD risk: the aHRs for PD risk were 1.32 (95% CI: 1.07-1.63, p < 0.01) and 1.86 (95% CI: 1.46-2.35, p < 0.001) in IDA patients with and without iron supplementation, respectively. The population-based cohort study indicated newly diagnosed anemia increases PD risk.

  14. Cardiovascular disease and diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: A population based study.

    PubMed

    Kioumourtzoglou, Marianthi-Anna; Seals, Ryan M; Gredal, Ole; Mittleman, Murray A; Hansen, Johnni; Weisskopf, Marc G

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a rapidly fatal neurodegenerative disease of unknown etiology. We investigated the association between ALS diagnosis and prior cardiovascular disease (CVD), and CVD-specific, hospital admissions in the Danish population. We conducted a population based nested case-control study, including 3182 Danish residents diagnosed with ALS at age ≥20 years (1982-2009) and 100 randomly selected controls for each case, matched on age, gender and vital status. We estimated odds ratios (OR) associated with CVD, and CVD-specific hospital admissions, adjusting for socioeconomic and marital status, region of residence and past diabetes and obesity diagnoses. The estimated adjusted OR for any CVD admission at least three years prior to the date of ALS diagnosis was 1.15 (95% CI 1.04-1.27). Our results varied across cause-specific admissions; for atherosclerosis the OR was 1.36 (95% CI 1.02-1.80) and for ischemic heart disease 1.14 (95% CI 0.99-1.31), while we observed no association with hypertensive and cerebrovascular diseases. Adjusting for or stratifying by COPD status, a cigarette-smoking correlate, did not change our results. In conclusion, in our population based study we found evidence for a moderately elevated association with CVD that was stronger for specific conditions, such as atherosclerosis. Our findings may have important implications for ALS pathogenesis.

  15. Posterior segment eye disease in sub-Saharan Africa: review of recent population-based studies

    PubMed Central

    Bastawrous, Andrew; Burgess, Philip I; Mahdi, Abdull M; Kyari, Fatima; Burton, Matthew J; Kuper, Hannah

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the burden of posterior segment eye diseases (PSEDs) in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Methods We reviewed published population-based data from SSA and other relevant populations on the leading PSED, specifically glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration, as causes of blindness and visual impairment in adults. Data were extracted from population-based studies conducted in SSA and elsewhere where relevant. Results PSEDs, when grouped or as individual diseases, are a major contributor to blindness and visual impairment in SSA. PSED, grouped together, was usually the second leading cause of blindness after cataract, ranging as a proportion of blindness from 13 to 37%. Conclusions PSEDs are likely to grow in importance as causes of visual impairment and blindness in SSA in the coming years as populations grow, age and become more urban in lifestyle. African-based cohort studies are required to help estimate present and future needs and plan services to prevent avoidable blindness. PMID:24479434

  16. Enterobius vermicularis infection in schoolchildren: a large-scale survey 6 years after a population-based control.

    PubMed

    Wang, L-C; Hwang, K-P; Chen, E-R

    2010-01-01

    Pinworm infection remains prevalent in children in many parts of the world. This study was designed to determine the prevalence of this infection in schoolchildren in Taiwan after the termination of the 15-year population-based control project in 2001. Our results showed that 2.4% of 118 190 children in 385 primary schools were found to have enterobiasis by two-consecutive-day adhesive cellophane perianal swabs. The prevalences were significantly different in the 25 counties/cities surveyed (0.6-6.6%). A significantly higher prevalence was found in boys (2.6%) than in girls (2.2%) and the prevalence decreased by grade from 3.8% in grade 1 to 1.0% in grade 6. In the primary schools, 9.1% had positive rates 10%. In addition, pinworm infection was found to be significantly associated with the socioeconomic status, personal hygiene and sanitary conditions of the children. The results indicate that the overall prevalence of enterobiasis remains at a low level after the control programme was transferred to the local governments.

  17. Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome in Australia: A population-based study, 2012-2014.

    PubMed

    Mehr, Sam; Frith, Katie; Barnes, Elizabeth H; Campbell, Dianne E

    2017-04-18

    Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) is a non-IgE-mediated gastrointestinal allergic disorder. Large population-based FPIES studies are lacking. We sought to determine the incidence and clinical characteristics of FPIES in Australian infants. An Australia-wide survey (2012-2014) was undertaken through the Australian Paediatric Surveillance Unit, with monthly notification of new cases of acute FPIES in infants aged less than 24 months by 1400 participating pediatricians. Two hundred thirty infants with FPIES were identified. The incidence of FPIES in Australian infants (<24 months) was 15.4/100,000/y. Median age of first episode, diagnosis, and notification were 5, 7, and 10 months, respectively. There was no sex predilection. Seven percent of infants had siblings with a history of FPIES, and 5% reacted during exclusive breast-feeding. Sixty-eight had a single food trigger (20% had 2 and 12% had ≥3 food triggers). The most common FPIES triggers were rice (45%), cow's milk (33%), and egg (12%). Fifty-one percent of infants reacted on their first known exposure. Infants with FPIES to multiple versus single food groups were younger at the initial episode (4.6 vs 5.8 months [mean], P = .001) and more frequently had FPIES to fruits, vegetables, or both (66% vs 21%, P < .0001). Infants exclusively breast-fed for more than 4 months had a trend toward lower rates of FPIES to multiple food groups (23% vs 36%, P = .06). Sixty-four percent of infants with FPIES to multiple foods, which included cow's milk, had coassociated FPIES to solid foods. Forty-two percent of infants with FPIES to fish reacted to other food groups. FPIES is not rare, with an estimated incidence of 15.4/100,000/y. Rice is the most common food trigger in Australia. Factors associated with FPIES to multiple foods included early-onset disease and FPIES to fruits, vegetables, or both. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Alcohol consumption and survival of colorectal cancer patients: a population-based study from Germany.

    PubMed

    Walter, Viola; Jansen, Lina; Ulrich, Alexis; Roth, Wilfried; Bläker, Hendrik; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hoffmeister, Michael; Brenner, Hermann

    2016-06-01

    Studies on the association between alcohol consumption and colorectal cancer (CRC) prognosis have yielded inconsistent results. The associations of lifetime and 1-y prediagnostic alcohol consumption with relevant prognostic outcomes were evaluated in a large population-based cohort of CRC patients. In 2003-2010, 3121 patients diagnosed with CRC were interviewed on sociodemographic and lifestyle factors, medication, and comorbidities. Cancer recurrence, vital status, and cause of death were documented for a median follow-up time of 4.8 y. With the use of Cox proportional hazard regression, associations between lifetime and recent alcohol consumption and overall, CRC-specific, recurrence-free, and disease-free survival were analyzed. In this patient cohort with a median age of 69 y at diagnosis, lifetime abstainers showed poorer overall [adjusted HR (aHR): 1.25; 95% CI: 1.03, 1.52] and CRC-specific (aHR: 1.37; 95% CI: 1.10, 1.70) survival than lifetime light drinkers (women: >0-12 g/d; men: >0-24 g/d). Lifetime heavy drinkers showed poorer overall (aHR: 1.37; 95% CI: 1.06, 1.78) and disease-free (aHR: 1.38; 95% CI: 1.09, 1.74) survival. Alcohol abstaining in the year before diagnosis was associated with poorer overall (aHR: 1.42; 95% CI: 1.20, 1.68), CRC-specific (aHR: 1.38; 95% CI: 1.13, 1.68), and disease-free (aHR: 1.23; 95% CI: 1.05, 1.44) survival. Lifetime abstainers with nonmetastatic disease showed poorer CRC-specific (aHR: 1.48; 95% CI: 1.10, 2.00) and recurrence-free (aHR: 1.32; 95% CI: 1.02, 1.70) survival. Wine abstaining but not beer or liquor abstaining was associated with poorer survival. Associations between alcohol consumption and prognosis varied according to presence of diabetes and age. Prediagnostic alcohol abstaining and heavy drinking were associated with poorer survival after a CRC diagnosis than light drinking. The protective effects of light consumption might be restricted to wine, and associations might differ according to age and presence

  19. The clustering of smear-positive tuberculosis in Dabat, Ethiopia: a population based cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    Tadesse, Takele; Demissie, Meaza; Berhane, Yemane; Kebede, Yigzaw; Abebe, Markos

    2013-01-01

    In Ethiopia where tuberculosis epidemic remains high, studies that describe hotspots of the disease are unavailable. This study tried to detect the spatial distribution and clustering of smear-positive tuberculosis cases in Dabat, Ethiopia. A population-based cross sectional study conducted in the Dabat Health and Demographic Surveillance System site from October 2010 to September 2011 identified smear-positive tuberculosis cases. Trained field workers collected demographic and location data from each study participant through house-to-house visits. A spatial scan statistic was used to identify purely spatial and space-time clusters of tuberculosis among permanent residents. Two significant (p<0.001) spatial and space-time clusters were identified in the study district. Tuberculosis is concentrated in certain geographic locations in Dabat, Ethiopia. This kind of clustering can be common in the country, so the National Tuberculosis Control Program can be more effective by identifying such clusters and targeting interventions.

  20. Survival rate of breast cancer patients in Malaysia: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Nor Aini; Wan Mahiyuddin, Wan Rozita; Muhammad, Nor Asiah; Ali, Zainudin Mohamad; Ibrahim, Lailanor; Ibrahim Tamim, Nor Saleha; Mustafa, Amal Nasir; Kamaluddin, Muhammad Amir

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Malaysian women. Other than hospital-based results, there are no documented population-based survival rates of Malaysian women for breast cancers. This population- based retrospective cohort study was therefore conducted. Data were obtained from Health Informatics Centre, Ministry of Health Malaysia, National Cancer Registry and National Registration Department for the period from 1st Jan 2000 to 31st December 2005. Cases were captured by ICD-10 and linked to death certificates to identify the status. Only complete data were analysed. Survival time was calculated from the estimated date of diagnosis to the date of death or date of loss to follow-up. Observed survival rates were estimated by Kaplan- Meier method using SPSS Statistical Software version 17. A total of 10,230 complete data sets were analysed. The mean age at diagnosis was 50.6 years old. The overall 5-year survival rate was 49% with median survival time of 68.1 months. Indian women had a higher survival rate of 54% compared to Chinese women (49%) and Malays (45%). The overall 5-year survival rate of breast cancer patient among Malaysian women was still low for the cohort of 2000 to 2005 as compared to survival rates in developed nations. Therefore, it is necessary to enhance the strategies for early detection and intervention.

  1. The contribution of chromosomal abnormalities to congenital heart defects: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Robert J; Rasmussen, Sonja A; Botto, Lorenzo D; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany; Martin, Christa L; Cragan, Janet D; Shin, Mikyong; Correa, Adolfo

    2011-12-01

    We aimed to assess the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities among infants with congenital heart defects (CHDs) in an analysis of population-based surveillance data. We reviewed data from the Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program, a population-based birth-defects surveillance system, to assess the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities among live-born infants and fetal deaths with CHDs delivered from January 1, 1994, to December 31, 2005. Among 4430 infants with CHDs, 547 (12.3%) had a chromosomal abnormality. CHDs most likely to be associated with a chromosomal abnormality were interrupted aortic arch (type B and not otherwise specified; 69.2%), atrioventricular septal defect (67.2%), and double-outlet right ventricle (33.3%). The most common chromosomal abnormalities observed were trisomy 21 (52.8%), trisomy 18 (12.8%), 22q11.2 deletion (12.2%), and trisomy 13 (5.7%). In conclusion, in our study, approximately 1 in 8 infants with a CHD had a chromosomal abnormality. Clinicians should have a low threshold at which to obtain testing for chromosomal abnormalities in infants with CHDs, especially those with certain types of CHDs. Use of new technologies that have become recently available (e.g., chromosomal microarray) may increase the identified contribution of chromosomal abnormalities even further.

  2. Real world epidemiology of myeloproliferative neoplasms: a population based study in Korea 2004-2013.

    PubMed

    Byun, Ja Min; Kim, Young Jin; Youk, Taemi; Yang, John Jeongseok; Yoo, Jongha; Park, Tae Sung

    2017-03-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), with an expected increment in number, impose substantial economic and social burdens. To this end, we conducted a nationwide population-based descriptive epidemiology study. We also investigated medical cost associated with MPNs. Prevalence was the highest for essential thrombocythemia (ET) (range 4.1-9.0 per 100,000), followed by polycythemia vera (PV) (range 2.8-5.4 per 100,000) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF) (range 0.5-0.9 per 100,000). ET incurred the highest cumulative total cost at US$35 million and the most frequent hospital visits, while PMF incurred the highest average cost per person at US$5000. The mean hemoglobin level was 16.9 ± 2.2 g/dL for PV males and 15.5 ± 2.7 g/dL for PV females. Further analyses on hemoglobin levels showed the true positive rate of PV from the significantly elevated hemoglobin group (defined as >18.5 g/dL for men and >16.5 g/dL for women) was 3.01% and that of MPNs was 3.1%. Here, we provide the biggest population-based report on MPN epidemiology that can readily be used as a representative Asian data.

  3. Smoldering multiple myeloma risk factors for progression: a Danish population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Sørrig, Rasmus; Klausen, Tobias W; Salomo, Morten; Vangsted, Annette J; Østergaard, Brian; Gregersen, Henrik; Frølund, Ulf Christian; Andersen, Niels F; Helleberg, Carsten; Andersen, Kristian T; Pedersen, Robert S; Pedersen, Per; Abildgaard, Niels; Gimsing, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Several risk scores for disease progression in patients with smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) have been proposed; however, all have been developed using single-center registries. To examine risk factors for time to progression (TTP) to multiple myeloma (MM) for SMM, we analyzed a nationwide population-based cohort of 321 patients with newly diagnosed SMM registered within the Danish Multiple Myeloma Registry between 2005 and 2014. Significant univariable risk factors for TTP were selected for multivariable Cox regression analyses. We found that both an M-protein ≥30 g/L and immunoparesis significantly influenced TTP (HR 2.7, 95%CI (1.5;4.7), P = 0.001, and HR 3.3, 95%CI (1.4;7.8), P = 0.002, respectively). High free light chain (FLC) ratio did not significantly influence TTP in our cohort. Therefore, our data do not support recent IMWG proposal of identifying patients with FLC ratio above 100 as having ultra high-risk of transformation to MM. Using only immunoparesis and M-protein ≥30 g/L, we created a scoring system to identify low-, intermediate-, and high-risk SMM. This first population-based study of patients with SMM confirms that an M-protein ≥30 g/L and immunoparesis remain important risk factors for progression to MM. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. A systematic review of the effect of retention methods in population-based cohort studies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Longitudinal studies are of aetiological and public health relevance but can be undermined by attrition. The aim of this paper was to identify effective retention strategies to increase participation in population-based cohort studies. Methods Systematic review of the literature to identify prospective population-based cohort studies with health outcomes in which retention strategies had been evaluated. Results Twenty-eight studies published up to January 2011 were included. Eleven of which were randomized controlled trials of retention strategies (RCT). Fifty-seven percent of the studies were postal, 21% in-person, 14% telephone and 7% had mixed data collection methods. A total of 45 different retention strategies were used, categorised as 1) incentives, 2) reminder methods, repeat visits or repeat questionnaires, alternative modes of data collection or 3) other methods. Incentives were associated with an increase in retention rates, which improved with greater incentive value. Whether cash was the most effective incentive was not clear from studies that compared cash and gifts of similar value. The average increase in retention rate was 12% for reminder letters, 5% for reminder calls and 12% for repeat questionnaires. Ten studies used alternative data collection methods, mainly as a last resort. All postal studies offered telephone interviews to non-responders, which increased retention rates by 3%. Studies that used face-to-face interviews increased their retention rates by 24% by offering alternative locations and modes of data collection. Conclusions Incentives boosted retention rates in prospective cohort studies. Other methods appeared to have a beneficial effect but there was a general lack of a systematic approach to their evaluation. PMID:21504610

  5. How risky is caring for emergency patients at risk of malpractice litigation: a population based epidemiological study of Taiwan's experiences

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Che-Ming; Tsai, Shin-Han; Chiu, Wen-Ta

    2009-01-01

    Background Emergency medicine has generally been considered a high risk specialty. The purpose of this study is to assess the risk of being sued in the district courts for caring emergency room (ER) patients from the perspective of epidemiology. Methods This research was designed to be a retrospective population based cohort study. We intended to find out the incidence of litigations arising from ER patients and that of birth inpatients in Taiwan, and computed their relative risks. The inclusion criterion was set to be incidents transpired in the time period of 1998 to 2002. The study materials included the reimbursement claim dataset of the National Health Insurance from 1998 to 2002, and the district court decision database of the Judicial Yuan from 1999 to 2006. Results The average annual incidence rate of becoming a plaintiff for ER patients is 0.86 per million, and for birth patients is 33.5 per million. There is a statistically significant difference between birth patients and ER patients. The relative risk comparing ER patients against birth inpatients is 0.03. Conclusion The findings of this population based study indicate that the patient population emergency physicians are facing in Taiwan have relatively lower risks of developing litigation in comparison with the patients that come to give birth. Due to the large volume of ER patients, malpractice still pose a major threat in the emergency department, and misdiagnosis remains the major complaint of plaintiffs in subsequent litigations. PMID:19761596

  6. Relationship between lunar phases and serious crimes of battery: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Biermann, Teresa; Asemann, Rita; McAuliffe, Carmel; Ströbel, Armin; Keller, Jochen; Sperling, Wolfgang; Bleich, Stefan; Kornhuber, Johannes; Reulbach, Udo

    2009-01-01

    The hypothesis of a lunar influence on human abnormal behavior is still widespread, although research has led to conflicting findings. Therefore, a population-based study to assess the influence of lunar phases on violent crimes was conducted. The study included all serious crimes of battery (aggravated assaults) committed in Middle Franconia (Bavaria, Germany) between 1999 and 2005 (n = 23 142). Data were analyzed regarding lunar phase, sex, and place of crime scene (outdoor vs indoor). No significant associations between full, absent, and the moon's interphases and serious crimes of battery could be detected. Furthermore, a Fourier analysis was conducted that failed to produce an association between violence and the moon's phases. Several possible explanations for the presented results are discussed including biological and social mechanisms. The present study fails to find a significant association between lunar phases and crimes of battery.

  7. Occupation and risk of pancreatic cancer: a population-based case-control study in iowa.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yawei; Cantor, Kenneth P; Lynch, Charles F; Zhu, Yong; Zheng, Tongzhang

    2005-04-01

    Previous epidemiological studies have inconsistently linked various occupations and industries to pancreatic cancer risk. We analyzed data from a population-based case-control study conducted in Iowa involving 376 histologically confirmed incident pancreatic cancer cases and 2434 control subjects. A significantly increased risk was observed among men who worked in the following industries: chemical and allied products, transportation, and elementary and secondary schools. Increased risks also were observed in men who were employed as truck drivers; railroad brake, signal, and switch operators; purchasing agents and buyers; teachers; insurance agents; and retail supervisors. Among women, a significantly increased risk of pancreatic cancer was found for employment in furniture and home furnishing stores, and a borderline significantly increased risk among textile sewing machine operators and tenders. Working in several occupations and industries was associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer in this study, and these associations warrant further investigation.

  8. Relationship of body mass index and prostate specific antigen in a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Ian M; Leach, Robin; Troyer, Dean; Pollock, Brad; Naylor, Susan; Higgins, Betsy

    2004-01-01

    This study was designed to use a prospectively analyzed, population-based, multiethnic cohort of men to determine if there is a relationship between one measure of obesity/overweight (Body Mass Index) and Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA). A total of 1565 men without a prior diagnosis of prostate cancer were prospectively enrolled in the San Antonio study of Biomarkers Of Risk (SABOR) Clinical and Epidemiologic Center of the Early Detection Research Network of the National Cancer Institute. Body Mass Index (BMI) was compared with serum PSA levels, stratifying by ethnic group. No relationship was found between BMI and PSA in any ethnic group or in the cohort as a whole. This study suggests that there is no increased risk of overdetection of prostate cancer among obese men due to an elevation in PSA.

  9. Chronic lower respiratory diseases among demolition and cement workers: a population-based register study

    PubMed Central

    Mølgaard, Ellen Fischer; Hannerz, Harald; Tüchsen, Finn; Brauer, Charlotte; Kirkeskov, Lilli

    2013-01-01

    Objective To estimate standardised hospitalisation ratios (SHR) for chronic lower respiratory diseases among demolition and cement workers in Denmark, 1995–2009. Design This is a population-based register study on data from ‘the Occupational Hospitalisation Register’. SHR of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was calculated for both demolition and cement workers. Settings Register study with data from all hospitals in Denmark. Participants 895 demolition workers and 5633 cement and concrete workers were included in the study and all economical active men were used as reference group. Results We found a statistically significant high SHR for the cement workers, SHR=134 (95% CI 117 to 153). The SHR for demolition workers was 131 (95% CI 87 to 188). Conclusions We find a higher risk of being hospitalised due to COPD in cement and concrete workers (significant) and demolition workers (insignificant) compared to gainfully employed men. PMID:23315517

  10. Chronic lower respiratory diseases among demolition and cement workers: a population-based register study.

    PubMed

    Mølgaard, Ellen Fischer; Hannerz, Harald; Tüchsen, Finn; Brauer, Charlotte; Kirkeskov, Lilli

    2013-01-11

    To estimate standardised hospitalisation ratios (SHR) for chronic lower respiratory diseases among demolition and cement workers in Denmark, 1995-2009. This is a population-based register study on data from 'the Occupational Hospitalisation Register'. SHR of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was calculated for both demolition and cement workers. Register study with data from all hospitals in Denmark. 895 demolition workers and 5633 cement and concrete workers were included in the study and all economical active men were used as reference group. We found a statistically significant high SHR for the cement workers, SHR=134 (95% CI 117 to 153). The SHR for demolition workers was 131 (95% CI 87 to 188). We find a higher risk of being hospitalised due to COPD in cement and concrete workers (significant) and demolition workers (insignificant) compared to gainfully employed men.

  11. Hyperthyroidism is a risk factor for developing adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder: a nationwide longitudinal population-based study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-Wei; Lin, Jia-Wei; Wang, Wei-Te; Wu, Chin-Wen; Liou, Tsan-Hon; Lin, Hui-Wen

    2014-02-25

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence and risk of adhesive capsulitis among hyperthyroidism patients. The data were obtained from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2005 (LHID 2005) in Taiwan, using 1 million participants and a prospective population-based 7-year cohort study of survival analysis. The ambulatory-care claim records of patients diagnosed according to the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes relating to hyperthyroidism between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2007, were obtained. The prevalence and the adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of adhesive capsulitis among hyperthyroid patients and the control group were estimated. Of 4472 hyperthyroid patients, 162 (671/100,000 person-years) experienced adhesive capsulitis during the 24,122 person-year follow-up period. The crude HR of stroke was 1.26 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06 to 1.49), which was larger than that of the control group. The adjusted HR of developing adhesive capsulitis was 1.22 (95% CI, 1.03 to 1.45) for hyperthyroid patients during the 7-year follow-up period, which achieved statistical significance. The results of our large-scale longitudinal population-based study indicated that hyperthyroidism is an independent risk factor of developing adhesive capsulitis.

  12. Reoperation Rates After Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion for Cervical Spondylotic Radiculopathy and Myelopathy: A National Population-based Study.

    PubMed

    Park, Moon Soo; Ju, Young-Su; Moon, Seong-Hwan; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Oh, Jae Keun; Makhni, Melvin C; Riew, K Daniel

    2016-10-15

    National population-based cohort study. To compare the reoperation rates between cervical spondylotic radiculopathy and myelopathy in a national population of patients. There is an inherently low incidence of reoperation after surgery for cervical degenerative disease. Therefore, it is difficult to sufficiently power studies to detect differences between reoperation rates of different cervical diagnoses. National population-based databases provide large, longitudinally followed cohorts that may help overcome this challenge. We used the Korean Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service national database to select our study population. We included patients with the diagnosis of cervical spondylotic radiculopathy or myelopathy who underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion from January 2009 to June 2014. We separated patients into two groups based on diagnosis codes: cervical spondylotic radiculopathy or cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Age, sex, presence of diabetes, osteoporosis, associated comorbidities, number of operated cervical disc levels, and hospital types were considered potential confounding factors. The overall reoperation rate was 2.45%. The reoperation rate was significantly higher in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy than in patients with cervical radiculopathy (myelopathy: P = 0.0293, hazard ratio = 1.433, 95% confidence interval 1.037-1.981). Male sex, presence of diabetes or associated comorbidities, and hospital type were noted to be risk factors for reoperation. The reoperation rate after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion was higher for cervical spondylotic myelopathy than for cervical spondylotic radiculopathy in a national population of patients. 3.

  13. A population-based study of familial hemiplegic migraine suggests revised diagnostic criteria.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, L L; Eriksen, M K; Roemer, S F; Andersen, I; Olesen, J; Russell, M B

    2002-06-01

    Familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited subtype of migraine with aura. The clinical characteristics of FHM have been described previously in selected materials or case studies, but population-based studies are important in order to analyse the full spectrum of the disorder. The aim of the present study was to perform a systematic search for familial cases of migraine with an aura that included motor weakness in order to generate non-selected material of as many FHM cases as possible in the Danish population of 5.2 million inhabitants, and to compare this material with already available population-based clinical descriptions of migraine with typical aura (MA). Due to the rarity of FHM, traditional population-based methods were not feasible. Therefore, the search strategy employed a computer search of the National Patient Register, screening >27 000 case records from headache clinics and private neurologists, and advertisements. A total of 147 affected FHM patients from 44 families were identified. FHM patients most often had all four 'typical' aura symptoms (visual, sensory, aphasic and motor symptoms) and all had at least two of these aura symptoms during FHM attacks. The motor, sensory and visual aura symptoms were all similar in type to the motor, sensory and visual aura symptoms in MA, but FHM had a statistically significantly longer duration of the visual and sensory aura symptoms, and these and other aura symptoms often fulfilled the criteria of the International Headache Society for prolonged aura. In addition, 69% had basilar migraine (BM) symptoms during FHM attacks. The order of the aura symptoms was usually visual, followed by sensory, aphasic, motor and, lastly, basilar-type migraine symptoms. Headache was present in 99% of FHM patients during FHM attacks, whereas the aura symptoms more often occurred without headache in MA. Headache duration was significantly longer in FHM compared with MA. Based on these data, we

  14. Effect of Leukocyte Telomere Length on Total and Regional Brain Volumes in a Large Population-Based Cohort

    PubMed Central

    King, Kevin S.; Kozlitina, Julia; Rosenberg, Roger N.; Peshock, Ronald M.; McColl, Roderick W.; Garcia, Christine K.

    2017-01-01

    Importance Telomere length has been associated with dementia and psychological stress, but its relationship with human brain size is unknown. Objective To determine if peripheral blood telomere length is associated with brain volume. Design, Setting, and Participants Peripheral blood leukocyte telomere length and brain volumes were measured for 1960 individuals in the Dallas Heart Study, a population-based, probability sample of Dallas County, Texas, residents, with a median (25th-75th percentile) age of 50 (42-58) years. Global and 48 regional brain volumes were assessed from the automated analysis of magnetic resonance imaging. Main Outcomes and Measures Telomere length and global and regional brain volumes. Results Leukocyte telomere length was associated with total cerebral volume (β [SE], 0.06 [0.01], P <.001) including white and cortical gray matter volume (β [SE], 0.04 [0.01], P = .002; β [SE], 0.07 [0.02], P <.001, respectively), independent of age, sex, ethnicity, and total intracranial volume. While age was associated with the size of most subsegmental regions of the cerebral cortex, telomere length was associated with certain subsegmental regions. Compared with age, telomere length (TL) explained a sizeable proportion of the variance in volume of the hippocampus, amygdala, and inferior temporal region (hippocampus: βTL [SE], 0.08 [0.02], R2, 0.91% vs βage [SE], −0.16 [0.02], R2, 3.80%; amygdala: βTL [SE], 0.08 [0.02], R2, 0.78% vs βage [SE], −0.19 [0.02], R2,4.63%; inferior temporal: βTL [SE], 0.07 [0.02], R2, 0.92% vs βage [SE], −0.14 [0.02], R2, 3.98%) (P <.001 for all). The association of telomere length and the size of the inferior and superior parietal, hippocampus, and fusiform regions was stronger in individuals older than 50 years than younger individuals (inferior parietal: β>50 [SE], 0.13 [0.03], P <.001 vs β≤50 [SE], 0.02 [0.02], P = .51, P for interaction = .001; superior parietal: β>50 [SE], 0.11 [0.03], P <.001 vs

  15. A population-based study of hospital care costs during five years after TIA and stroke

    PubMed Central

    Luengo-Fernandez, Ramon; Gray, Alastair M.; Rothwell, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Few studies have evaluated long-term costs after stroke onset, with almost no cost data for TIA. We studied hospital costs during the 5 years after TIA or stroke in a population-based study. Methods Patients from a UK population-based cohort study (Oxford Vascular Study) were recruited from 2002 to 2007. Analysis was based on follow-up until 2010. Hospital resource usage was obtained from patients’ hospital records and valued using 2008/09 unit costs. As not all patients had full 5-year follow-up, we used non-parametric censoring techniques. Results Among 485 TIA and 729 stroke patients ascertained and included, mean censor-adjusted 5-year hospital costs after index stroke were $25,741 (95% CI: 23,659-27,914), with costs varying considerably by severity: $21,134 after minor stroke, $33,119 after moderate stroke, and $28,552 after severe stroke. For the 239 surviving stroke patients who had reached final follow-up, mean costs were $24,383 (20,156-28,595), with over half of costs ($12,972) being incurred in the first year after the event. After index TIA, the mean censor-adjusted 5-year costs were $18,091 (15,947-20,258). A multivariate analysis showed that event severity, recurrent stroke and coronary events after the index event were independent predictors of 5-year costs. Differences by stroke subtype were mostly explained by stroke severity and subsequent events. Conclusions Long-term hospital costs after TIA and stroke are considerable, but are mainly incurred over the first year after the index event. Event severity and suffering subsequent stroke and coronary events after the index event accounted for much of the increase in costs. PMID:23160884

  16. Systemic inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Elevated circulating levels of several inflammatory biomarkers have been described in selected patient populations with COPD, although less is known about their population-based distribution. The aims of this study were to compare the levels of several systemic biomarkers between stable COPD patients and healthy subjects from a population-based sample, and to assess their distribution according to clinical variables. Methods This is a cross-sectional study design of participants in the EPI-SCAN study (40-80 years of age). Subjects with any other condition associated with an inflammatory process were excluded. COPD was defined as a post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC < 0.70. The reference group was made of non-COPD subjects without respiratory symptoms, associated diseases or prescription of medication. Subjects were evaluated with quality-of-life questionnaires, spirometry and 6-minute walk tests. Serum C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukins (IL-6 and IL-8), alpha1-antitrypsin, fibrinogen, albumin and nitrites/nitrates (NOx) were measured. Results We compared 324 COPD patients and 110 reference subjects. After adjusting for gender, age, BMI and tobacco consumption, COPD patients showed higher levels of CRP (0.477 ± 0.023 vs. 0.376 ± 0.041 log mg/L, p = 0.049), TNF-α (13.12 ± 0.59 vs. 10.47 ± 1.06 pg/mL, p = 0.033), IL-8 (7.56 ± 0.63 vs. 3.57 ± 1.13 pg/ml; p = 0.033) and NOx (1.42 ± 0.01 vs. 1.36 ± 0.02 log nmol/l; p = 0.048) than controls. In COPD patients, serum concentrations of some biomarkers were related to severity and their exercise tolerance was related to serum concentrations of CRP, IL-6, IL-8, fibrinogen and albumin. Conclusions Our results provide population-based evidence that COPD is independently associated with low-grade systemic inflammation, with a different inflammatory pattern than that observed in healthy subjects. PMID:20500811

  17. [Knowledge on risk factors for chronic diseases: a population-based study].

    PubMed

    Borges, Thiago Terra; Rombaldi, Airton José; Knuth, Alan Goularte; Hallal, Pedro C

    2009-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate public awareness of the association between four behavioral factors (sedentary lifestyle, smoking, alcohol abuse, and inadequate diet) and eight diseases (diabetes, hypertension, AIDS, osteoporosis, lung cancer, depression, liver cirrhosis, and acute myocardial infarction). We conducted a population-based cross-sectional study including 2,096 individuals 10 years or older. A random clustered sampling strategy was used. For each behavioral factor, a knowledge score was constructed, ranging from zero to eight points. The highest mean score was observed for inadequate diet (5.3), followed by smoking (5.1), sedentary lifestyle (4.7), and alcohol abuse (4.5). Overall, higher knowledge scores were observed among people with high socioeconomic status and more schooling, and in intermediate age groups. Government health promotion strategies are needed to raise public awareness of risk factors for chronic diseases.

  18. [Visual, hearing, and physical disability: prevalence and associated factors in a population-based study].

    PubMed

    Castro, Shamyr Sulyvan de; César, Chester Luiz Galvão; Carandina, Luana; Barros, Marilisa Berti Azevedo; Alves, Maria Cecília Goi Porto; Goldbaum, Moises

    2008-08-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of disabilities according to demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, as well as to determine the main causes. The research used data from two population-based health surveys in São Paulo State, Brazil, in 2002 and 2003, designed with complex sampling techniques. Interviewees that reported disabilities comprised the study sample, according to the database variables. Prevalence of any disability was 110.8; visual disability, 62; hearing disability, 44; and physical disability, 13.3. Prevalence rates for disabilities varied according to age, gender, and schooling. Prevalence of hearing and physical disability was higher among men. The principal cause of disabilities was the disease itself. External causes were also one of the causative factors in disabilities. Disabilities increased with age and were more prevalent among women and persons with less schooling, and the principal causes were diseases and injuries.

  19. Occupation and thyroid cancer: a population-based case-control study in Connecticut

    PubMed Central

    Ba, Yue; Huang, Huang; Lerro, Catherine C.; Li, Shuzhen; Zhao, Nan; Li, Anqi; Ma, Shuangge; Udelsman, Robert; Zhang, Yawei

    2016-01-01

    Objective The study aims to explore the associations between various occupations and thyroid cancer risk. Methods A population-based case-control study involving 462 histologically confirmed incident cases and 498 controls was conducted in Connecticut in 2010–2011. Results A significantly increased risk of thyroid cancer, particularly papillary microcarcinoma, was observed for those working as the healthcare practitioners and technical workers, health diagnosing and treating practitioners and registered nurses. Those working in building and grounds cleaning, maintenance occupations, pest control, retail sales, and customer service also had increased risk for papillary thyroid cancer. Subjects who worked as cooks, janitors, cleaners, and customer service representatives were at an increased risk of papillary thyroid cancer with tumor size >1 cm. Conclusions Certain occupations were associated with an increased risk of thyroid cancer, with some tumor size and subtype specificity. PMID:26949881

  20. The Effects of Social Reforms on Mental Disability in China: Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenjie; Zhang, Lei; Li, Ning; Guo, Chao; Chen, Gong; Zheng, Xiaoying

    2016-04-01

    Few studies have explored how mental disabilities have changed with the waves of Chinese social reforms that occurred between 1912 and 2006. The present study evaluated population-based data from the Second China National Sample Survey on Disability to investigate these trends and their effects on mental disabilities. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate the association between social reforms and mental disabilities. The confounding variables considered were as follows: survey age, gender, residence in 2006, ethnicity, and living arrangements in 2006. The highest risks of mental disabilities were observed in subjects born during the Mao Zedong era. Subjects who experienced social turbulence during their early development may have increased risks of mental disabilities in adulthood. The results and discussion herein contribute to our understanding of mental disabilities in China within the context of changing political, socioeconomic, and health system conditions and a developing mental health system. © 2016 APJPH.

  1. A population based study of reporting patterns and characteristics of men who abuse their female partners

    PubMed Central

    Peek-Asa, C; Zwerling, C; Young, T; Stromquist, A; Burmeister, L; Merchant, J

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This study estimates the prevalence of male abusive behavior reported by men and their female partners and identifies characteristics of abusive men. Design: Baseline survey from a population based cohort study of general health. Setting: A rural county in Iowa, USA. Subjects: 572 men and their cohabitating female partners. Main outcome measures: Male-to-female physical, emotional, and sexual abuse reported by either partner. Results: In this cohort, 13.6% of men had performed at least one act of physical abuse and 34.9% emotional abuse. More than 45% of abusive men reported their own behaviors. Alcohol problems, antisocial personality characteristics, depressive symptoms, and financial stress were all positively associated with both physical and emotional abuse, but suicidal thoughts were less likely among abusers. Conclusion: Identification of common characteristics of abusive men may predict proclivity towards partner violence and barriers to behavior modification. PMID:15933412

  2. Lifestyle Correlates of Female Snus Use and Smoking: A Large Population-Based Survey of Women in Norway.

    PubMed

    Kvaavik, Elisabeth; Lund, Ingeborg; Nygård, Mari; Hansen, Bo Terning

    2016-04-01

    While smoking in Norway has become less prevalent, snus use has increased, including among women. The aims of this study were to describe female snus use and its correlates, and to contrast patterns of snus use and smoking. In 2011-2012, data on tobacco use, age, education, alcohol consumption, sexual behaviors, and physical activity were collected from a population based sample of 13 756 Norwegian women aged 18-45 years, using a self-administered questionnaire. Ever-use prevalence of snus ranged from 29.6% to 4.5% among those aged 18-19 years and 40-45 years, respectively. In contrast, the corresponding figures for smoking were 24.1% and 44.1%. Among snus users, 54.1% and 22.8% of 18-19 and 40 to 45-year-olds had never smoked, respectively. Debut age for snus use increased markedly with age, and was higher than debut age for smoking. Female snus use was positively associated with intermediate education, alcohol consumption, number of sexual partners, and hard physical activity. Smoking was also positively associated with alcohol consumption and number of sexual partners, but negatively associated with physical activity and education. While most snus users among older women were former or current smokers, this was not the case among younger women. Low snus debut age and extensive snus use among younger women suggest that measures to reduce snus use should be targeted at young adolescents. The correlates of female snus use and smoking were not identical, and were similar to those previously documented for men. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Risk of uterine, ovarian and breast cancer following pelvic inflammatory disease: a nationwide population-based retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Shen, Cheng-Che; Hu, Li-Yu; Yang, Albert C; Chiang, Yung-Yen; Hung, Jeng-Hsiu; Tsai, Shih-Jen

    2016-11-03

    Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is characterized by infection and inflammation of the upper genital tract in women and is associated with health sequelae. We used a nationwide population-based retrospective cohort study to explore the relationship between PID and the subsequent development of gynecological cancers including ovarian, breast or uterine cancer. We identified subjects diagnosed with PID between January 1(st), 2000 and December 31(st), 2002 in the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. A comparison cohort constructed for patients without PID were matched according to age and sex. All PID patients and control groups were observed until diagnosed with ovarian, breast or uterine cancer, or until death, withdrawal from the NHI system, or until December 31(st), 2009. The PID cohort consisted of 32,268 patients, and an equal number of matched controls without PID. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of ovarian, breast or uterine cancer in subjects with PID were: HR 1.326 (95 % confidence interval: 0.775-2.269), HR: 1.039 (95 % confidence interval: 0.862-1.252), and HR: 1.439 (95 % confidence interval: 0.853-2.426) respectively in comparison with controls during follow-up. This large nationwide population-based cohort study suggests that there is no increased risk for ovarian, breast or uterine cancer among women who have PID compared to a matching population.

  4. Maternal Glycemia and Risk of Large-for-Gestational-Age Babies in a Population-Based Screening

    PubMed Central

    Kerényi, Zsuzsa; Tamás, Gyula; Kivimäki, Mika; Péterfalvi, Andrea; Madarász, Eszter; Bosnyák, Zsolt; Tabák, Adam G.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Gestational diabetes is a risk factor for large-for-gestational-age (LGA) newborns, but many LGA babies are born to mothers with normal glucose tolerance. We aimed to clarify the association of maternal glycemia across the whole distribution with birth weight and risk of LGA births in mothers with normal glucose tolerance. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We undertook a population-based gestational diabetes screening in an urban area of Hungary in 2002–2005. All singleton pregnancies of mothers ≥18 years of age, without known diabetes or gestational diabetes (World Health Organization criteria) and data on a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test at 22–30 weeks of gestation, were included (n = 3,787, 78.9% of the target population). LGA was determined as birth weight greater than the 90th percentile using national sex- and gestational age–specific charts. RESULTS Mean ± SD maternal age was 30 ± 4 years, BMI was 22.6 ± 4.0 kg/m2, fasting blood glucose was 4.5 ± 0.5 mmol/l, and postload glucose was 5.5 ± 1.0 mmol/l. The mean birth weight was 3,450 ± 476 g at 39.2 ± 1.2 weeks of gestation. There was a U-shaped association of maternal fasting glucose with birth weight (Pcurve = 0.004) and risk of having an LGA baby (lowest values between 4 and 4.5 mmol/l, Pcurve = 0.0004) with little change after adjustments for clinical characteristics. The association of postload glucose with birth weight (P = 0.03) and the risk of an LGA baby (P = 0.09) was weaker and linear. CONCLUSIONS Both low and high fasting glucose values at 22–30 weeks of gestation are associated with increased risk of an LGA newborn. We suggest that the excess risk related to low glucose reflects the increased use of nutrients by LGA fetuses that also affects the mothers' fasting glucose. PMID:19729526

  5. Epidemiology, Management, and Survival of Peritoneal Carcinomatosis from Colorectal Cancer: A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Quere, P; Facy, O; Manfredi, S; Jooste, V; Faivre, J; Lepage, C; Bouvier, A-M

    2015-08-01

    Modern chemotherapy aims to improve long-term survival for selected patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis. Publications suggest promising results, but the spread of these new aggressive treatment strategies in the general population is not well known. The aim of this study was to draw a picture of epidemiology, management, and survival in synchronous and metachronous peritoneal carcinomatosis from colorectal cancer. The cumulative risk of metachronous peritoneal carcinomatosis was estimated in patients resected for cure. Net survival rates were calculated for synchronous and metachronous peritoneal carcinomatosis. The study was conducted with the use of the Burgundy Digestive Cancer Registry. Overall, 9174 primary colorectal cancers registered between 1976 and 2011 by the population-based digestive cancer registry were considered. In total, 7% of patients were diagnosed with synchronous peritoneal carcinomatosis. The 5-year cumulative risk of metachronous peritoneal carcinomatosis was 6%, and the stage of the colorectal cancer at diagnosis was the major risk factor. Other independent risk factors were mucinous adenocarcinoma, ulceroinfiltrating tumors, and diagnosis after obstruction or perforation. The proportion of patients resected for cure was 11% and 9% for synchronous and metachronous peritoneal carcinomatosis, and 3-year overall net survival was 8% and 5%. The corresponding rates after resection for cure were 21% and 17%. There was a dramatic increase in the proportion of patients receiving systemic chemotherapy: from 11% before 1997 to 48% in 2011 for synchronous peritoneal carcinomatosis and from 3% to 38% for metachronous peritoneal carcinomatosis. This is a retrospective observational population-based study. Peritoneal carcinomatosis complicating colorectal cancer is a major reason for treatment failure. This study identified patients at a high risk of developing peritoneal carcinomatosis who may benefit from specific surveillance. New therapeutic

  6. Epidemiology for primary brain tumors: a nationwide population-based study.

    PubMed

    Darlix, Amélie; Zouaoui, Sonia; Rigau, Valérie; Bessaoud, Faiza; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Mathieu-Daudé, Hélène; Trétarre, Brigitte; Bauchet, Fabienne; Duffau, Hugues; Taillandier, Luc; Bauchet, Luc

    2017-02-01

    Primary central nervous system tumors (PCNST) are rare tumors responsible for high mortality and morbidity. Their epidemiology is poorly known, and clinical data are scarcely analyzed at a national level. In this study, we aimed at providing descriptive epidemiological data and incidence rates for all histological subtypes of PCNST according to the WHO classification. We conducted a nationwide population-based study of all newly diagnosed and histologically confirmed PCNST in France, between 2006 and 2011. A total of 57,816 patients were included: male 46.4%, median age at diagnosis 56 years old (range 0-99). For all newly diagnosed PCNST with histological confirmation the crude incidence rate was 15.5/10(5) per 100,000 person-years. To enable international comparisons, standardized rates were calculated: 14.1/10(5) (population of reference: USA), 14.5/10(5) (population of reference: Europe), and 12.0/10(5) (population of reference: world). 23.4% of samples were cryopreserved. Resection was performed in 79.1% of cases. Results are detailed (incidence rate, sex ratio, median age at diagnosis, number of cryopreserved samples, and type of surgery) for each of the 143 histological subtypes of PCNST, including all rare tumors. For example, incidence rates (population of reference: USA) were 0.018/10(5) for anaplastic gangliogliomas, 0.054/10(5) for malignant meningiomas, and 0.036/10(5) for hemangiopericytomas. Our study is the first to describe incidence rates and epidemiological data for all histological subtypes of PCNST, including rare tumors, at a national level. Its methodology ensures the exhaustiveness of the data collection for histologically-proven cases. Histological population-based studies have many perspectives in the field of clinical epidemiology and research.

  7. Self-esteem and Mortality: Prospective Evidence from a Population-based Study

    PubMed Central

    STAMATAKIS, KATHERINE A.; LYNCH, JOHN; EVERSON, SUSAN A.; RAGHUNATHAN, TRIVELLORE; SALONEN, JUKKA T.; KAPLAN, GEORGE A.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Self-esteem is considered to be importantly associated with both psychosocial states such as depression as well as physical health. There are no population-based studies that examine the association between self-esteem and mortality. The objective of this study was to assess whether low self-esteem was prospectively associated with increased risk of death in a population-based sample of Finnish men. METHODS A sample of 2682 male residents of Kuopio, Finland were interviewed and followed prospectively as part of the Kuopio Ischemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study (KIHD). Characteristics of the KIHD sample at baseline included self-esteem, measured by the Rosenberg ten-item scale, socioeconomic factors, behavioral risk factors, other psychosocial characteristics, and prevalent diseases. Mortality was ascertained through linkage to the Finnish national death registry. We assessed the relationship between self-esteem and all-cause mortality using Cox proportional hazards models. RESULTS Low self-esteem was associated with a two-fold [hazard ratio (HR) = 2.0, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.3–3.2] increase in age-adjusted mortality. This relationship was partially explained by behavioral and socioeconomic factors, and prevalent diseases, and fully explained by other psychosocial characteristics (hopelessness, depression, cynical hostility, and sullenness). When adjusted for hopelessness alone there was no increased risk associated with low self-esteem (HR = 1.3, 95% CI = 0.8–2.2). CONCLUSIONS This study found no association between self-esteem and all-cause mortality after adjustment for other psychosocial characteristics, primarily hopelessness. Our understanding of the observed relationships between some psychosocial factors and mortality may be improved by simultaneous measurement of multiple psychosocial domains, thus diminishing the potential for residual confounding. PMID:14664781

  8. Ewing's sarcoma family of tumors in Finland during 1990-2009: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Serlo, Joni A; Helenius, Ilkka J; Sampo, Mika; Vettenranta, Kim; Saarinen-Pihkala, Ulla M; Kivivuori, Sanna-Maria; Riikonen, Pekka; Kivioja, Aarne; Böhling, Tom; Kallajoki, Markku; Ristimäki, Ari; Vasama, Kaija; Tarkkanen, Maija

    2013-05-01

    Ewing's sarcoma family of tumors (ESFTs) are rare bone and soft tissue tumors characterized by specific genetic alterations. Our aim was to carry out a nationwide analysis of ESFT, to survey the treatments used and to report the five-year disease specific and event-free survival rates (EFS and DSS). The study data was gathered from the Finnish National Cancer Registry and all five University Hospitals and consisted of 76 bone and soft tissue ESFT patients diagnosed during 1990-2009. Their medical records were reviewed and data on their disease, treatments, complications and outcome were analyzed. The five-year EFS and DSS of patients with localized disease at diagnosis (n = 57) were 70% and 60%, respectively. Factors contributing to DSS and EFS were the axial vs. peripheral site of primary tumor and adequate surgical resection of the primary tumor. DSS was also affected by patient's age at diagnosis and the treatment employed. The five-year DSS of patients with metastatic disease at diagnosis (n = 19) was 33% and both preoperative and high dose chemotherapy were associated with improved survival. Population-based studies including both bone and soft tissue ESFTs are few. In this nationwide, population-based study on Finnish bone and soft tissue ESFT patients, we find their treatment successful and results comparable to those previously published. Absence of metastases, young age at diagnosis and a peripheral primary tumor site were associated with a better prognosis. It seems that surgical resection of the primary tumor should be performed whenever adequate resection margins can be achieved. The role of high dose chemotherapy merits further studies in this setting.

  9. Dietary fatty acids and insulin secretion: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Rojo-Martínez, G; Esteva, I; Ruiz de Adana, M S; García-Almeida, J M; Tinahones, F; Cardona, F; Morcillo, S; García-Escobar, E; García-Fuentes, E; Soriguer, F

    2006-10-01

    Few epidemiological studies have examined the relationship of dietary fatty acids, especially MUFA, with the interrelation between insulin secretion and insulin resistance. We assessed the relation of dietary fatty acids with insulin secretion in a free-living population. This cross-sectional, population-based study was undertaken in Pizarra, a small town in Spain. Anthropometrical data were collected for 1226 persons selected randomly from the municipal census, 538 of whom (randomly chosen) were given a prospective, quantitative, 7-day nutritional questionnaire. The fatty acid composition of the serum phospholipids was used as a biological marker of the type of fat consumed. Beta-cell function (betaCFI) and insulin-resistance index (IRI) were estimated by the Homeostasis Model Assessment. To determine which factors influence the variability of the betaCFI, we analyzed the variance of the betaCFI according to sex, the presence of carbohydrate metabolism disorders and the different components of the diet, adjusting the models for age, body mass index (BMI) and IRI. The dietary MUFA and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) contributed to the variability of the betaCFI, whereas only the proportion of serum phospholipid MUFA, but neither the saturated fatty acids nor the PUFA accounted for part of the variability of the betaCFI in a multiple regression analysis. The results of this population-based study corroborate the results of other clinical and experimental studies suggesting a favorable relationship of MUFA with beta-cell insulin secretion. Fondo de Investigación Sanitaria, Junta de Andalucía and the Asociación Maimónides.

  10. Socioeconomic differences in childhood injury: a population based epidemiologic study in Ontario, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Faelker, T.; Pickett, W.; Brison, R.

    2000-01-01

    Objective—To determine whether risks for childhood injury vary according to socioeconomic gradients. Design—Population based, retrospective study. The percentage of individuals living below the poverty line (described ecologically using census data) was the primary measure of socioeconomic status. Setting—Catchment area of a tertiary medical centre that provides emergency services to all area residents. Area residents aged 0–19 years during 1996 were included. Observations—Injuries that occurred during 1996 were identified by an emergency department based surveillance system. The study population was divided into socioeconomic grades based upon percentages of area residents living below the poverty line. Multiple Poisson regression analyses were used to quantify associations and assess the statistical significance of trends. Results—5894 childhood injuries were identified among 35 380 eligible children; 985 children with missing socioeconomic data were excluded. A consistent relation between poverty and injury was evident. Children in the highest grade (indicating higher poverty levels) experienced injury rates that were 1.67 (95% confidence interval 1.48 to 1.89) higher than those in the lowest grade (adjusted relative risk for grades 1-V: 1.00,1.10,1.22,1.42, 1.67; ptrend<0.001). These patterns were observed within age/sex strata; for home, recreational, and fall injuries; and for injuries of minor and moderate severities. Conclusions—Socioeconomic differences in childhood injury parallel mortality and morbidity gradients identified in adult populations. This study confirms that this health gradient is observable in a population of children using emergency department data. Given the population based nature of this study, these findings are likely to be reflected in other settings. The results suggest the need for targeted injury prevention efforts among children from economically disadvantaged populations, although the exact requirements of the

  11. Acute hospital, community, and indirect costs of stroke associated with atrial fibrillation: population-based study.

    PubMed

    Hannon, Niamh; Daly, Leslie; Murphy, Sean; Smith, Samantha; Hayden, Derek; Ní Chróinín, Danielle; Callaly, Elizabeth; Horgan, Gillian; Sheehan, Orla; Honari, Bahman; Duggan, Joseph; Kyne, Lorraine; Dolan, Eamon; Williams, David; Wiley, Miriam; Kelly, Peter J

    2014-12-01

    No economic data from population-based studies exist on acute or late hospital, community, and indirect costs of stroke associated with atrial fibrillation (AF-stroke). Such data are essential for policy development, service planning, and cost-effectiveness analysis of new therapeutic agents. In a population-based prospective study of incident and recurrent stroke treated in hospital and community settings, we investigated direct (healthcare related) and indirect costs for a 2-year period. Survival, disability, poststroke residence, and healthcare use were determined at 90 days, 1 year, and 2 years. Acute hospital cost was determined using a case-mix approach, and other costs using a bottom-up approach (2007 prices). In 568 patients ascertained in 1 year (2006), the total estimated 2-year cost was $33.84 million. In the overall sample, AF-stroke accounted for 31% (177) of patients, but a higher proportion of costs (40.5% of total and 45% of nursing home costs). On a per-patient basis compared with non-AF-stroke, AF-stroke was associated with higher total (P<0.001) and acute hospital costs (P<0.001), and greater nursing home (P=0.001) and general practitioner (P<0.001) costs among 90-day survivors. After stratification by stroke severity in survivors, AF was associated with 2-fold increase in costs in patients with mild-moderate (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, 0-15) stroke (P<0.001) but not in severe stroke (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale ≥16; P=0.7). In our population study, AF-stroke was associated with substantially higher total, acute hospital, nursing home, and general practitioner costs per patient. Targeted programs to identify AF and prevent AF-stroke may have significant economic benefits, in addition to health benefits. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. A Population Based Epidemiological Study of Emergency Department Visits for Anaphylaxis in Florida

    PubMed Central

    Harduar-Morano, Laurel; Simon, Michael R.; Watkins, Sharon; Blackmore, Carina

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous population-based analyses of emergency department (ED) visits for anaphylaxis have been limited to small populations in limited geographic areas, focused on children, or have included patients who had allergic conditions other than anaphylaxis. The objective of this study was to describe the epidemiology and risk factors among patients with anaphylaxis presenting to Florida EDs. Methods 2751 patients with anaphylaxis were identified for 2005-2006 within ED records using the International Classification of Disease, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) and a validated ICD-9-CM based algorithm. Age and sex specific rates were calculated. Regression analyses were used to determine relative risks for anaphylaxis due to various triggers (food, venom, medication