Science.gov

Sample records for large radioactive particles

  1. Testing and assessment of a large BGO detector for beach monitoring of radioactive particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Graaf, E. R.; Rigollet, C.; Maleka, P. P.; Jones, D. G.

    2007-06-01

    The Beach Monitoring Steering Group (BMSG) was set up by UKAEA to explore whether improved systems for beach monitoring of radioactive particles are available. The BMSG commissioned the British Geological Survey (BGS) and the Nuclear Geophysics Division of the Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut (KVI/NGD), and other companies, to test their most sensitive system. This paper presents the results of trials in a specially created test facility at UKAEA Harwell with a large BGO detector. The detector's size and weight mean that it would be suitable for vehicle deployment but would be too large and heavy to carry in areas that could not be accessed by a vehicle. However, it would be possible to use the same methodology that is described here with a smaller detector capable of being carried in a backpack, albeit with reduced sensitivity for particle detection. The approach that we present is also applicable, with modifications, to the detection of offshore particles using a towed seabed detector.

  2. Dynamic radioactive particle source

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Murray E; Gauss, Adam Benjamin; Justus, Alan Lawrence

    2012-06-26

    A method and apparatus for providing a timed, synchronized dynamic alpha or beta particle source for testing the response of continuous air monitors (CAMs) for airborne alpha or beta emitters is provided. The method includes providing a radioactive source; placing the radioactive source inside the detection volume of a CAM; and introducing an alpha or beta-emitting isotope while the CAM is in a normal functioning mode.

  3. Particle beam generator using a radioactive source

    DOEpatents

    Underwood, David G.

    1993-01-01

    The apparatus of the present invention selects from particles emitted by a radioactive source those particles having momentum within a desired range and focuses the selected particles in a beam having at least one narrow cross-dimension, and at the same time attenuates potentially disruptive gamma rays and low energy particles. Two major components of the present invention are an achromatic bending and focusing system, which includes sector magnets and quadrupole, and a quadrupole doublet final focus system. Permanent magnets utilized in the apparatus are constructed of a ceramic (ferrite) material which is inexpensive and easily machined.

  4. Particle beam generator using a radioactive source

    DOEpatents

    Underwood, D.G.

    1993-03-30

    The apparatus of the present invention selects from particles emitted by a radioactive source those particles having momentum within a desired range and focuses the selected particles in a beam having at least one narrow cross-dimension, and at the same time attenuates potentially disruptive gamma rays and low energy particles. Two major components of the present invention are an achromatic bending and focusing system, which includes sector magnets and quadrupole, and a quadrupole doublet final focus system. Permanent magnets utilized in the apparatus are constructed of a ceramic (ferrite) material which is inexpensive and easily machined.

  5. Modification of Poisson Distribution in Radioactive Particle Counting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drotter, Michael T.

    This paper focuses on radioactive practicle counting statistics in laboratory and field applications, intended to aid the Health Physics technician's understanding of the effect of indeterminant errors on radioactive particle counting. It indicates that although the statistical analysis of radioactive disintegration is best described by a Poisson…

  6. Large Particle Titanate Sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2015-10-08

    This research project was aimed at developing a synthesis technique for producing large particle size monosodium titanate (MST) to benefit high level waste (HLW) processing at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Two applications were targeted, first increasing the size of the powdered MST used in batch contact processing to improve the filtration performance of the material, and second preparing a form of MST suitable for deployment in a column configuration. Increasing the particle size should lead to improvements in filtration flux, and decreased frequency of filter cleaning leading to improved throughput. Deployment of MST in a column configuration would allow for movement from a batch process to a more continuous process. Modifications to the typical MST synthesis led to an increase in the average particle size. Filtration testing on dead-end filters showed improved filtration rates with the larger particle material; however, no improvement in filtration rate was realized on a crossflow filter. In order to produce materials suitable for column deployment several approaches were examined. First, attempts were made to coat zirconium oxide microspheres (196 µm) with a layer of MST. This proved largely unsuccessful. An alternate approach was then taken synthesizing a porous monolith of MST which could be used as a column. Several parameters were tested, and conditions were found that were able to produce a continuous structure versus an agglomeration of particles. This monolith material showed Sr uptake comparable to that of previously evaluated samples of engineered MST in batch contact testing.

  7. Experience of monitoring beaches for radioactive particles.

    PubMed

    Davies, Mike; McCulloch, George; Adsley, Ian

    2007-09-01

    This paper discusses some of the theoretical and practical problems that are encountered in monitoring beaches for hot particles. The experience is from operating a near-continuous monitoring program, for a period of eight years, on beaches near the Dounreay site. The reliability and failure mechanisms of the monitoring systems used will be discussed, together with remedial actions employed. The viability and performance of several types and configurations of radiation detectors will be described, along with methods by which particles might be detected, given their response to buried particles. When large areas are being monitored at high spatial resolution, which is required for efficient particle detection, the volume of data recorded for audit purposes can be very large. The use and abuse of Geographical Information Systems for this work is described. Other practical aspects of performing surveys are also discussed, including understanding health-and-safety requirements; constraints imposed by weather, tides and tidal speed; the logistics of making vehicles available to perform the work; and how a particle should be recovered once detected.

  8. Retention of radioactive particles and associated effects in the filter-feeding marine mollusc Mytilus edulis.

    PubMed

    Jaeschke, B C; Lind, O C; Bradshaw, C; Salbu, B

    2015-01-01

    Radioactive particles are aggregates of radioactive atoms that may contain significant activity concentrations. They have been released into the environment from nuclear weapons tests, and from accidents and effluents associated with the nuclear fuel cycle. Aquatic filter-feeders can capture and potentially retain radioactive particles, which could then provide concentrated doses to nearby tissues. This study experimentally investigated the retention and effects of radioactive particles in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis. Spent fuel particles originating from the Dounreay nuclear establishment, and collected in the field, comprised a U and Al alloy containing fission products such as (137)Cs and (90)Sr/(90)Y. Particles were introduced into mussels in suspension with plankton-food or through implantation in the extrapallial cavity. Of the particles introduced with food, 37% were retained for 70 h, and were found on the siphon or gills, with the notable exception of one particle that was ingested and found in the stomach. Particles not retained seemed to have been actively rejected and expelled by the mussels. The largest and most radioactive particle (estimated dose rate 3.18 ± 0.06 Gyh(-1)) induced a significant increase in Comet tail-DNA %. In one case this particle caused a large white mark (suggesting necrosis) in the mantle tissue with a simultaneous increase in micronucleus frequency observed in the haemolymph collected from the muscle, implying that non-targeted effects of radiation were induced by radiation from the retained particle. White marks found in the tissue were attributed to ionising radiation and physical irritation. The results indicate that current methods used for risk assessment, based upon the absorbed dose equivalent limit and estimating the "no-effect dose" are inadequate for radioactive particle exposures. Knowledge is lacking about the ecological implications of radioactive particles released into the environment, for example potential

  9. A system for aerodynamically sizing ultrafine environmental radioactive particles

    SciTech Connect

    Olawoyin, L.

    1995-09-01

    The unattached environmental radioactive particles/clusters, produced mainly by {sup 222}Rn in indoor air, are usually few nanometers in size. The inhalation of these radioactive clusters can lead to deposition of radioactivity on the mucosal surface of the tracheobronchial tree. The ultimate size of the cluster together with the flow characteristics will determine the depositional site in the human lung and thus, the extent of damage that can be caused. Thus, there exists the need for the determination of the size of the radioactive clusters. However, the existing particle measuring device have low resolution in the sub-nanometer range. In this research, a system for the alternative detection and measurement of the size of particles/cluster in the less than 2 nm range have been developed. The system is a one stage impactor which has a solid state spectrometer as its impaction plate. It`s major feature is the nozzle-to-plate separation, L. The particle size collected changes with L and thus, particle size spectroscopy is achieved by varying L. The number of collected particles is determined by alpha spectroscopy. The size-discriminating ability of the system was tested with laboratory generated radon particles and it was subsequently used to characterize the physical (size) changes associated with the interaction of radon progeny with water vapor and short chain alcohols in various support gases. The theory of both traditional and high velocity jet impactors together with the design and evaluation of the system developed in this study are discussed in various chapters of this dissertation. The major results obtained in the course of the study are also presented.

  10. Effects of radioactive hot particles on pig skin

    SciTech Connect

    Kaurin, D.G.; Baum, J.W.; Schaefer, C.W.

    1997-06-01

    The purpose of these studies was to determine the incidence and severity of lesions resulting from very localized deposition of dose to skin from small (< 0.5 mm) discrete radioactive particles as produced in the work environments of nuclear reactors. Hanford mini-pigs were exposed, both on a slightly off the skin, to localized replicate doses from 0.31 to 64 Gy (averaged over 1 cm{sup 2} at 70 {mu}m depth unless noted otherwise) using Sc-46, Yb-175, Tm-170, and fissioned UC{sub 2} isotopes having maximum beta-particle energies from about 0.3 to 3 MeV. Erythema and scabs (indicating ulceration) were scored for up to 71 days post-irradiation. The responses followed normal cumulative probability distributions, and therefore, no true threshold could be defined. Hence, 10 and 50% scab incidence rates were deduced using probit analyses. The lowest dose which produced 10% incidence was about 1 Gy for Yb-175 (0.5 MeV maximum energy) beta particle exposures, and about 3 to 9 Gy for other isotopes. The histopathology of lesions was determined at several doses. Single exposures to doses as large as 1,790 Gy were also given, and results were observed for up to 144 days post-exposure. Severity of detriment was estimated by analyzing the results in terms of lesion diameter, persistence, and infection. Over 1,100 sites were exposed. Only two exposed sites became infected after doses near 5000 Gy; the lesions healed quickly on treatment. 105 refs., 145 figs., 47 tabs.

  11. Enhanced removal of radioactive particles by fluorocarbon surfactant solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, R.; Harling, O.K.

    1993-08-01

    The proposed research addressed the application of ESI`s particle removal process to the non-destructive decontamination of nuclear equipment. The cleaning medium used in this process is a solution of a high molecular weight fluorocarbon surfactant in an inert perfluorinated liquid which results in enhanced particle removal. The perfluorinated liquids of interest, which are recycled in the process, are nontoxic, nonflammable, and environmentally compatible, and do not present a hazard to the ozone layer. The information obtained in the Phase 1 program indicated that the proposed ESI process is technically effective and economically attractive. The fluorocarbon surfactant solutions used as working media in the ESI process survived exposure of up to 10 Mrad doses of gamma rays, and are considered sufficiently radiation resistant for the proposed process. Ultrasonic cleaning in perfluorinated surfactant solutions was found to be an effective method of removing radioactive iron (Fe 59) oxide particles from contaminated test pieces. Radioactive particles suspended in the process liquids could be quantitatively removed by filtration through a 0.1 um membrane filter. Projected economics indicate a pre-tax pay back time of 1 month for a commercial scale system.

  12. Induced radioactivity in and around high-energy particle accelerators.

    PubMed

    Vincke, Helmut; Theis, Chris; Roesler, Stefan

    2011-07-01

    Particle accelerators and their surroundings are locations of residual radioactivity production that is induced by the interaction of high-energy particles with matter. This paper gives an overview of the principles of activation caused at proton accelerators, which are the main machines operated at Conseil Européen pour la Recherche Nucléaire. It describes the parameters defining radio-nuclide production caused by beam losses. The second part of the paper concentrates on the analytic calculation of activation and the Monte Carlo approach as it is implemented in the FLUKA code. Techniques used to obtain, on the one hand, estimates of radioactivity in Becquerel and, on the other hand, residual dose rates caused by the activated material are discussed. The last part of the paper focuses on experiments that allow for benchmarking FLUKA activation calculations and on simulations used to predict activation in and around high-energy proton machines. In that respect, the paper addresses the residual dose rate that will be induced by proton-proton collisions at an energy of two times 7 TeV in and around the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector. Besides activation of solid materials, the air activation expected in the CMS cavern caused by this beam operation is also discussed.

  13. Influence of radioactivity on surface charging and aggregation kinetics of particles in the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Ha; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Lee, Ida; McFarlane, Joanna; Tsouris, Costas

    2014-01-01

    Radioactivity can influence surface interactions, but its effects on particle aggregation kinetics have not been included in transport modeling of radioactive particles. In this research, experimental and theoretical studies have been performed to investigate the influence of radioactivity on surface charging and aggregation kinetics of radioactive particles in the atmosphere. Radioactivity-induced charging mechanisms have been investigated at the microscopic level, and heterogeneous surface potential caused by radioactivity is reported. The radioactivity-induced surface charging is highly influenced by several parameters, such as rate and type of radioactive decay. A population balance model, including interparticle forces, has been employed to study the effects of radioactivity on particle aggregation kinetics in air. It has been found that radioactivity can hinder aggregation of particles because of similar surface charging caused by the decay process. Experimental and theoretical studies provide useful insights into the understanding of transport characteristics of radioactive particles emitted from severe nuclear events, such as the recent accident of Fukushima or deliberate explosions of radiological devices.

  14. Optimization of detector positioning in the radioactive particle tracking technique.

    PubMed

    Dubé, Olivier; Dubé, David; Chaouki, Jamal; Bertrand, François

    2014-07-01

    The radioactive particle tracking (RPT) technique is a non-intrusive experimental velocimetry and tomography technique extensively applied to the study of hydrodynamics in a great variety of systems. In this technique, arrays of scintillation detector are used to track the motion of a single radioactive tracer particle emitting isotropic γ-rays. This work describes and applies an optimization strategy developed to find an optimal set of positions for the scintillation detectors used in the RPT technique. This strategy employs the overall resolution of the detectors as the objective function and a mesh adaptive direct search (MADS) algorithm to solve the optimization problem. More precisely, NOMAD, a C++ implementation of the MADS algorithm is used. First, the optimization strategy is validated using simple cases with known optimal detector configurations. Next, it is applied to a three-dimensional axisymmetric system (i.e. a vertical cylinder, which could represent a fluidized bed, bubble column, riser or else). The results obtained using the optimization strategy are in agreement with what was previously recommended by Roy et al. (2002) for a similar system. Finally, the optimization strategy is used for a system consisting of a partially filled cylindrical tumbler. The application of insights gained by the optimization strategy is shown to lead to a significant reduction in the error made when reconstructing the position of a tracer particle. The results of this work show that the optimization strategy developed is sensitive to both the type of objective function used and the experimental conditions. The limitations and drawbacks of the optimization strategy are also discussed.

  15. Producing Large-Particle Monodisperse Latexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderhoff, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    Chemical process produces latex particles of relatively large, uniform size for use as size standards for instrument calibration. Process, based on seeding of mixture by very small latex particles, yields particles measuring 2 to 30 micrometer or more in average size. Produces monodisperse latexes in which deviation from average size is less than 2 percent. Particles used directly, without tedious separation procedures for removing off-size particles.

  16. [Prevalence of radioactive particles in the territory of Byelorussia and their contents in the lungs].

    PubMed

    Petriaev, E P; Sokolik, G A; Leĭnova, S L; Danil'chenko, E M

    1993-01-01

    Examination conducted in 1987--1988 included 200 samples of the autopsy material of subjects who died of various causes in different regions of Byelorussia. It revealed the presence of "hot" particles (i.e. particles with high specific radioactivity) in 50% of the samples taken from the northwest and in 70% of those from the southeast regions. A correlation was found to exist between the radioactive particles content in the soil, air and lungs of residents from the contaminated territory. It was shown that in 1990--1991, in contrast to 1987--1988, the particles content in a single lung sample reduced, which was associated both with mechanical removal of particles and their disintegration and, as a consequence with the accumulation of plutonium in the body. Study of radioactive particles distribution in the whole lung showed that at present they are found primarily in the lower segments.

  17. Radioactive Pollution Estimate for Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant by a Particle Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Keisuke; Ogawa, Susumu

    2016-06-01

    On Mar 12, 2011, very wide radioactive pollution occurred by a hydrogen explosion in Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant. A large amount of radioisotopes started with four times of explosions. With traditional atmospheric diffusion models could not reconstruct radioactive pollution in Fukushima. Then, with a particle model, this accident was reconstructed from meteorological archive and Radar- AMeDAS. Calculations with the particle model were carried out for Mar 12, 15, 18 and 20 when east southeast winds blew for five hours continuously. Meteorological archive is expressed by wind speeds and directions in five-km grid every hour with eight classes of height till 3000 m. Radar- AMeDAS is precipitation data in one-km grid every thirty minutes. Particles are ten scales of 0.01 to 0.1 mm in diameter with specific weight of 2.65 and vertical speeds given by Stokes equation. But, on Mar 15, it rained from 16:30 and then the particles fell down at a moment as wet deposit in calculation. On the other hand, the altitudes on the ground were given by DEM with 1 km-grid. The spatial dose by emitted radioisotopes was referred to the observation data at monitoring posts of Tokyo Electric Power Company. The falling points of radioisotopes were expressed on the map using the particle model. As a result, the same distributions were obtained as the surface spatial dose of radioisotopes in aero-monitoring by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. Especially, on Mar 15, the simulated pollution fitted to the observation, which extended to the northwest of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant and caused mainly sever pollution. By the particle model, the falling positions on the ground were estimated each particle size. Particles with more than 0.05 mm of size were affected by the topography and blocked by the mountains with the altitudes of more than 700 m. The particle model does not include the atmospheric stability, the source height, and deposit speeds. The

  18. Radioactive particles released to the environment from the Fukushima reactors-Confirmation is still needed.

    PubMed

    Salbu, Brit; Lind, Ole Christian

    2016-10-01

    After severe nuclear events, a major fraction of refractory radionuclides such as U and Pu are released to the environment in the form of radioactive particles. After the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident, Pu isotope ratio signals different from that of global fallout have been reported, indicating that spent fuel particles have been released from the reactors or reactor vessels. Radioactive particles containing (37) Cs and other volatile radionuclides, as well as a series of stable refractory metals (Cs, Fe, Zn, U, etc.), have been identified by several authors claiming that these particles originated from the FDNPP fuel. If so, long-lived radioactive isotopes of the refractory metals should have been identified in these particles. It is therefore most probable that volatile radionuclides released as gases during the accidents have deposited on available surfaces such as fly ash, forming condensation particles during release or transport. If spent fuel particles have been deposited in the FDNPP surroundings, information on particle characteristics influencing ecosystem transport, uptake, and effects is essential for assessing environmental impact and risk. More emphasis should therefore be put on the identification of hot spots in the FDNPP environment followed by the characterization of radioactive particles using nanoanalytical-microanalytical techniques to support environmental monitoring, as recommended in the present study. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2016;12:687-689. © 2016 SETAC.

  19. Aerodynamic beam generator for large particles

    DOEpatents

    Brockmann, John E.; Torczynski, John R.; Dykhuizen, Ronald C.; Neiser, Richard A.; Smith, Mark F.

    2002-01-01

    A new type of aerodynamic particle beam generator is disclosed. This generator produces a tightly focused beam of large material particles at velocities ranging from a few feet per second to supersonic speeds, depending on the exact configuration and operating conditions. Such generators are of particular interest for use in additive fabrication techniques.

  20. Preparation and quantification of radioactive particles for tracking hydrodynamic behavior in multiphase reactors.

    PubMed

    Yunos, Mohd Amirul Syafiq Mohd; Hussain, Siti Aslina; Yusoff, Hamdan Mohamed; Abdullah, Jaafar

    2014-09-01

    Radioactive particle tracking (RPT) has emerged as a promising and versatile technique that can provide rich information about a variety of multiphase flow systems. However, RPT is not an off-the-shelf technique, and thus, users must customize RPT for their applications. This paper presents a simple procedure for preparing radioactive tracer particles created via irradiation with neutrons from the TRIGA Mark II research reactor. The present study focuses on the performance evaluation of encapsulated gold and scandium particles for applications as individual radioactive tracer particles using qualitative and quantitative neutron activation analysis (NAA) and an X-ray microcomputed tomography (X-ray Micro-CT) scanner installed at the Malaysian Nuclear Agency.

  1. Charging and coagulation of radioactive and nonradioactive particles in the atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yong-ha; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Nenes, Athanasios; Tsouris, Costas

    2016-01-01

    Charging and coagulation influence one another and impact the particle charge and size distributions in the atmosphere. However, few investigations to date have focused on the coagulation kinetics of atmospheric particles accumulating charge. This study presents three approaches to include mutual effects of charging and coagulation on the microphysical evolution of atmospheric particles such as radioactive particles. The first approach employs ion balance, charge balance, and a bivariate population balance model (PBM) to comprehensively calculate both charge accumulation and coagulation rates of particles. The second approach involves a much simpler description of charging, and uses a monovariate PBM and subsequent effects of charge on particle coagulation. The third approach is further simplified assuming that particles instantaneously reach their steady-state charge distributions. It is found that compared to the other two approaches, the first approach can accurately predict time-dependent changes in the size and charge distributions of particles over a wide size range covering from the free molecule to continuum regimes. The other two approaches can reliably predict both charge accumulation and coagulation rates for particles larger than about 0.04 micrometers and atmospherically relevant conditions. These approaches are applied to investigate coagulation kinetics of particles accumulating charge in a radioactive neutralizer, the urban atmosphere, and an atmospheric system containing radioactive particles. Limitations of the approaches are discussed.

  2. Charging and coagulation of radioactive and nonradioactive particles in the atmosphere

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Yong-ha; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Nenes, Athanasios; ...

    2016-01-01

    Charging and coagulation influence one another and impact the particle charge and size distributions in the atmosphere. However, few investigations to date have focused on the coagulation kinetics of atmospheric particles accumulating charge. This study presents three approaches to include mutual effects of charging and coagulation on the microphysical evolution of atmospheric particles such as radioactive particles. The first approach employs ion balance, charge balance, and a bivariate population balance model (PBM) to comprehensively calculate both charge accumulation and coagulation rates of particles. The second approach involves a much simpler description of charging, and uses a monovariate PBM and subsequentmore » effects of charge on particle coagulation. The third approach is further simplified assuming that particles instantaneously reach their steady-state charge distributions. It is found that compared to the other two approaches, the first approach can accurately predict time-dependent changes in the size and charge distributions of particles over a wide size range covering from the free molecule to continuum regimes. The other two approaches can reliably predict both charge accumulation and coagulation rates for particles larger than about 0.04 micrometers and atmospherically relevant conditions. These approaches are applied to investigate coagulation kinetics of particles accumulating charge in a radioactive neutralizer, the urban atmosphere, and an atmospheric system containing radioactive particles. Limitations of the approaches are discussed.« less

  3. SYNTHESIS OF NON-RADIOACTIVE SLURRIES TO SIMULATE THE PROCESSING BEHAVIOR OF PARTICLES IN RADIOACTIVE WASTE SLURRIES 626-G

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D.; Lambert, D.; Eibling, R.; Newell, J.; Stone, M.

    2009-09-03

    Process development using non-radioactive analogs to high-level radioactive waste slurries is an established cost effective alternative to working with actual samples of the real waste. Current simulated waste slurries, however, do not capture all of the physical behavior of real waste. New methods of preparing simulants are under investigation along with mechanisms for altering certain properties of finished simulants. These methods have achieved several notable successes recently in the areas of rheology and foaminess. Particle size is also being manipulated more effectively than in the past, though not independently of the rheological properties. The interaction between rheology and foaminess has exhibited counter-intuitive behavior with more viscous slurries being less foamy even though drainage of liquid from the foam lamellae should be inhibited by higher viscosities.

  4. Global scale deposition of radioactivity from a large scale exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, J.B.

    1983-10-01

    The global impact of radioactivity pertains to the continental scale and planetary scale deposition of the radioactivity in a delayed mode; it affects all peoples. Global deposition is distinct and separate from close-in fallout. Close-in fallout is delivered in a matter of a few days or less and is much studied in the literature of civilian defense. But much less studied is the matter of global deposition. The global deposition of radioactivity from the reference strategic exchange (5300 MT) leads to an estimated average whole body, total integrated dose of 20 rem for the latitudes of 30 to 50/sup 0/ in the Northern Hemisphere. Hotspots of deposited radioactivity can occur with doses of about 70 rem (winter) to 40 to 110 rem (summer) in regions like Europe, western Asia, western North Pacific, southeastern US, northeastern US, and Canada. The neighboring countries within a few hundred kilometers of areas under strategic nuclear attack can be impacted by the normal (termal close-in) fallout due to gravitational sedimentation with lethal radiation doses to unsheltered populations. In regard to the strategic scenario about 40% of the megatonage is assumed to be in a surface burst mode and the rest in the free air burst mode.

  5. Monte Carlo Library Least Square (MCLLS) Method for Multiple Radioactive Particle Tracking in BPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhijian; Lee, Kyoung; Gardner, Robin

    2010-03-01

    In This work, a new method of radioactive particles tracking is proposed. An accurate Detector Response Functions (DRF's) was developed from MCNP5 to generate library for NaI detectors with a significant speed-up factor of 200. This just make possible for the idea of MCLLS method which is used for locating and tracking the radioactive particle in a modular Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) by searching minimum Chi-square values. The method was tested to work pretty good in our lab condition with a six 2" X 2" NaI detectors array only. This method was introduced in both forward and inverse ways. A single radioactive particle tracking system with three collimated 2" X 2" NaI detectors is used for benchmark purpose.

  6. Speciation of radioactive soil particles in the Fukushima contaminated area by IP autoradiography and microanalyses.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Hiroki; Hatta, Tamao; Kitazawa, Hideaki; Yamada, Hirohisa; Yaita, Tsuyoshi; Kogure, Toshihiro

    2014-11-18

    Radioactive soil particles several tens of micrometers in size were collected from litter soil in the radiation contaminated area by the Fukushima nuclear plant accident and characterized using electron and X-ray microanalyses. The radioactive particles were discriminated by autoradiography using imaging plates (IP) on which microgrids were formed by laser ablation in order to find the particles under microscopy. Fifty radioactive particles were identified and classified into three types from their morphology and chemical composition, namely: (1) aggregates of clay minerals, (2) organic matter containing clay mineral particulates, and (3) weathered biotite originating from local granite. With respect to the second type, dissolution of the organic matter did not reduce the radiation, suggesting that the radionuclides were also fixed by the clay minerals. The weathered biotite grains have a plate-like shape with well-developed cleavages inside the grains, and kaolin group minerals and goethite filling the cleavage spaces. The reduction of the radiation intensity was measured before and after the trimming of the plate edges using a focused ion beam (FIB), to examine whether radioactive cesium primarily sorbed at frayed edges. The radiation was attenuated in proportion to the volume decrease by the edge trimming, implying that radioactive cesium was sorbed uniformly in the porous weathered biotite.

  7. Universal decay law in charged-particle emission and exotic cluster radioactivity.

    PubMed

    Qi, C; Xu, F R; Liotta, R J; Wyss, R

    2009-08-14

    A linear universal decay formula is presented starting from the microscopic mechanism of the charged-particle emission. It relates the half-lives of monopole radioactive decays with the Q values of the outgoing particles as well as the masses and charges of the nuclei involved in the decay. This relation is found to be a generalization of the Geiger-Nuttall law in alpha radioactivity and explains well all known cluster decays. Predictions on the most likely emissions of various clusters are presented.

  8. Estimation of Particle Flux and Remineralization Rate from Radioactive Disequilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Michael P. Bacon; Roger Francois

    2004-05-24

    Reactive radionuclides, such as the thorium isotopes, show measurable deficiencies in the oceanic water column because of their removal by chemical scavenging due to the particle flux. Measurement of the deficiency, coupled with measurement of the radionuclide concentration in particles, allows a determination of the effective particle sinking velocity. Results to date suggest that the effective particle sinking velocity is remarkably invariant with depth. This leads to the tentative suggestion that POC concentration profiles may, to a good approximation, be used directly to determine length scales for the remineralization of sinking organic matter. Further measurements are in progress to test this idea and to evaluate its limitations. Knowledge of the remineralization length scale is essential to an evaluation of the efficiency of the biological pump as a means for deep sequestering of carbon in the ocean.

  9. The assessment of doses and effects from intakes of radioactive particles.

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, J D; Stather, J W

    1996-01-01

    The behaviour of radionuclides after entry into the body and the radiation doses received by individual tissues depend on the chemical nature of the element, the physicochemical form of the intake, the radioactive half-life of the isotope and the type and energy of the emissions. Ingestion of radionuclides in insoluble particles will result in radiation doses being delivered to tissues of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract; other tissues will also be irradiated by nuclides with penetrating photons emissions (gamma) but doses may be largely confined to the GI tract for charged particle emissions (alpha, beta). Ingestion of more soluble forms will lead to greater absorption to blood and deposition in other tissues and therefore may result in greater doses to other tissues. Similar considerations apply to inhaled material and to the entry of radionuclides through cuts or wounds. For ingested materials, including particles, more information is needed on uptake and retention in intestinal tissues and consequent doses to sensitive cells, particularly for alpha emitters. There has been concern that the pattern of distribution of activity throughout irradiated tissues may influence the extent of damage, particularly for alpha emitters because of the localised deposition of energy and their greater relative biological effectiveness compared with beta/gamma emitters. Aggregation of activity has the potential to result in greater acute tissue damage and has been shown, for example, to result in focalised pneumonitis and fibrosis in the lung and ulceration of the skin. The main long-term effect of irradiation of tissues is the induction of malignant change, although hereditary disease may also be of concern following irradiation of the gonads. There are only limited data available to compare the effect on cancer induction of heterogeneous and homogeneous irradiation of tissues. However, the available information, for irradiation of the lung, skin or liver, indicates that in

  10. Sedimentation coefficient distributions of large particles.

    PubMed

    Schuck, Peter

    2016-07-21

    The spatial and temporal evolution of concentration boundaries in sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation reports on the size distribution of particles with high hydrodynamic resolution. For large particles such as large protein complexes, fibrils, viral particles, or nanoparticles, sedimentation conditions usually allow migration from diffusion to be neglected relative to sedimentation. In this case, the shape of the sedimentation boundaries of polydisperse mixtures relates directly to the underlying size-distributions. Integral and derivative methods for calculating sedimentation coefficient distributions g*(s) of large particles from experimental boundary profiles have been developed previously, and are recapitulated here in a common theoretical framework. This leads to a previously unrecognized relationship between g*(s) and the time-derivative of concentration profiles. Of closed analytical form, it is analogous to the well-known Bridgman relationship for the radial derivative. It provides a quantitative description of the effect of substituting the time-derivative by scan differences with finite time intervals, which appears as a skewed box average of the true distribution. This helps to theoretically clarify the differences between results from time-derivative method and the approach of directly fitting the integral definition of g*(s) to the entirety of experimental boundary data.

  11. RADIOACTIVE POSITRON EMITTER PRODUCTION BY ENERGETIC ALPHA PARTICLES IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, R. J.; Kozlovsky, B.; Share, G. H. E-mail: benz@wise.tau.ac.il

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of the 0.511 MeV positron-annihilation line from solar flares are used to explore the flare process in general and ion acceleration in particular. In flares, positrons are produced primarily by the decay of radioactive positron-emitting isotopes resulting from nuclear interactions of flare-accelerated ions with ambient solar material. Kozlovsky et al. provided ion-energy-dependent production cross sections for 67 positron emitters evaluated from their threshold energies (some <1 MeV nucleon{sup –1}) to a GeV nucleon{sup –1}, incorporating them into a computer code for calculating positron-emitter production. Adequate cross-section measurements were available for proton reactions, but not for α-particle reactions where only crude estimates were possible. Here we re-evaluate the α-particle cross sections using new measurements and nuclear reaction codes. In typical large gamma-ray line flares, proton reactions dominate positron production, but α-particle reactions will dominate for steeper accelerated-ion spectra because of their relatively low threshold energies. With the accelerated-{sup 3}He reactions added previously, the code is now reliable for calculating positron production from any distribution of accelerated-ion energies, not just those of typical flares. We have made the code available in the online version of the Journal. We investigate which reactions, projectiles, and ion energies contribute to positron production. We calculate ratios of the annihilation-line fluence to fluences of other gamma-ray lines. Such ratios can be used in interpreting flare data and in determining which nuclear radiation is most sensitive for revealing acceleration of low-energy ions at the Sun.

  12. Measurement of resuspended aerosol in the Chernobyl area. Part III. Size distribution and dry deposition velocity of radioactive particles during anthropogenic enhanced resuspension.

    PubMed

    Garger, E K; Paretzke, H G; Tschiersch, J

    1998-10-01

    During anthropogenic activities, such as agricultural soil management and traffic on unpaved roads, size distribution measurements were performed of atmospheric particulate radionuclides at a site in the Chernobyl 30-km exclusion zone. Analysis of cascade impactor measurements showed an increase of the total atmospheric radioactivity. In the cases of harrowing by a tractor and traffic on unpaved roads, a common shape of the size distribution was found with two maxima, the first in the 2-4 microm range, the second in the 12-20 microm range. The size distributions were compared to measurements during wind-driven resuspension. Particle number concentration measurements with an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer showed a dynamic dependence of the particle concentration in different size ranges on anthropogenic action. The increase of the mean concentration was for the large particles more than one order of magnitude higher than for fine particles during anthropogenic enhanced resuspension. From the measurement of the mass concentration, the radioactive loading could be estimated. An enrichment of radionuclides on resuspended particles (compared to soil particles) was found, with the highest enrichment for large particles. Micrometeorological considerations showed that large particles may frequently be subject to medium range transport. The dry deposition velocity was measured; the mean value of 0.026 m s(-1) +/- 0.016 m s(-1) is typical for 6-9 microm diameter particles.

  13. Monitor of the concentration of particles of dense radioactive materials in a stream of air

    DOEpatents

    Yule, Thomas J.

    1979-01-01

    A monitor of the concentration of particles of radioactive materials such as plutonium oxide in diameters as small as 1/2 micron includes in combination a first stage comprising a plurality of virtual impactors, a second stage comprising a further plurality of virtual impactors, a collector for concentrating particulate material, a radiation detector disposed near the collector to respond to radiation from collected material and means for moving a stream of air, possibly containing particulate contaminants, through the apparatus.

  14. Large gradual solar energetic particle events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Mihir; Giacalone, Joe

    2016-12-01

    Solar energetic particles, or SEPs, from suprathermal (few keV) up to relativistic (˜ few GeV) energies are accelerated near the Sun in at least two ways: (1) by magnetic reconnection-driven processes during solar flares resulting in impulsive SEPs, and (2) at fast coronal-mass-ejection-driven shock waves that produce large gradual SEP events. Large gradual SEP events are of particular interest because the accompanying high-energy ({>}10s MeV) protons pose serious radiation threats to human explorers living and working beyond low-Earth orbit and to technological assets such as communications and scientific satellites in space. However, a complete understanding of these large SEP events has eluded us primarily because their properties, as observed in Earth orbit, are smeared due to mixing and contributions from many important physical effects. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the current state of knowledge of these important phenomena, and summarizes some of the key questions that will be addressed by two upcoming missions—NASA’s Solar Probe Plus and ESA’s Solar Orbiter. Both of these missions are designed to directly and repeatedly sample the near-Sun environments where interplanetary scattering and transport effects are significantly reduced, allowing us to discriminate between different acceleration sites and mechanisms and to isolate the contributions of numerous physical processes occurring during large SEP events.

  15. Large-scale assembly of colloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hongta

    increase of the effective refractive index of the diffractive medium, resulting in the red-shift of the optical stop bands. The wavelength shift is linearly proportional to the vapor partial pressure for a spectrum of vapors. Optical simulation and theoretical prediction based on Kelvin equation suggest that a liquid film is formed on the walls of the macropores during vapor condensation. The third topic describes introducing doctor blade coating fabricated large area and low cost macroporous films for thermochromic smart windows, which are useful for energy control in glazed buildings. The fabricated macroporous polymer films exhibit brilliant colors and are capable of reflecting solar radiation when in-situ heated, and become transparent as cavities are filled with a solvent which has the same refractive index as that of the polymer when cooled to building temperature. The fourth topic reports the roll-to roll fabricated excellent water-repelling and self-cleaning macroporous polymer films. The size of the voids can be easily controlled by tuning the duration of an oxygen reactive-ion etching process prior to the removal of the templating silica spheres from silica colloidal-polymer composites. After surface functionalization with fluorosilane, superhydrophobic surface with large apparent water contact angle and small sliding angle can be obtained. The self-cleaning functionality can be achieved on superhydrophobic macroporous coatings by preventing bacterial contamination is further demonstrated. The fifth topic presented is that the template macroporous polymer films with interconnected voids and uniform interconnecting nanopores can be directly used as filtration membranes to achieve size-exclusive separation of particles. The results also demonstrate that more than 85% of small sized particles are recovered after filtration. The results also demonstrate that Escherichia coli can be filtrated by the from macroporous polymer films aqueous solution.

  16. Imaging of radioactive material and its host particle from the nuclear power plant accident in Japan by using imaging plate and electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Kouji; Zaizen, Yuji; Kimura, Tohru; Sakoh, Hiroshi; Igarashi, Yasuhito

    2013-04-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in Japan on March, 2012, dispersed radioactive materials. In the Meteorological Research Institute, where locates 170 km south west from the power plant, we collected two types of filter aerosol samples and wet and dry deposition particles before and after the accident. Using these samples, we analyzed 1) radioactivity using an imaging plate (IP), which visualizes the radioactivity of samples in a two-dimensional plane with space resolution ~0.05 mm and 2) shape and compositions of particles that host radioactive materials using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS). From the samples collected on March 15 and 21, we found radioactive spots on the filter samples using the IP, suggesting that radioactive materials, presumably Cs, were carried from the power plant. Radioactivity was also detected over the aggregates of dust particles in wet and dry deposition samples collected from March 2011. We did not find any detectable radioactive materials after the April when using the IP. We further investigated the radioactive spots using the SEM to identify the host particles of the radioactive materials and to detect radioactive materials from the EDS analysis. From the SEM analysis, we found that the particles on the filters include sulfate, mineral dust, and metals, but there were no particular particles or materials in the radioactive spots comparing to those in other area. The result suggests that the radioactive materials are hosted on the surface of other particles or inside them. We, so far, did not obtain any evidences that the radioactive materials are particulate with larger than 0.1 micro meter. Further analysis will need to identify the source of radioactive spots from individual particles using a manipulator as well as SEM and IP. Such studies will reveal where the radioactive materials exist in the environment, how they resuspend in the air, and how they could

  17. Rotary Reactor Makes Large Latex Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kornfeld, Dale M.

    1988-01-01

    Machine reduces gravitational effects interfering with particle growth. Reaction chamber rotates while polymerization of latex proceeds. Motor turns stirrer. Chamber made of stainless steel with glass windows.

  18. Small Particle May Answer Large Physics Questions

    SciTech Connect

    Hazi, A

    2005-09-20

    In one of those interesting intersections of particle physics, astrophysics, and cosmology, scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the University of California at Berkeley (UCB), the University of Florida (UF), and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) have joined together to try to pin down an elusive particle. This particle, called the axion, if it is found to exist and is not just a hypothesis, would be a long-sought relic from the first fractional second of the birth of the universe and one of the most weakly interacting particles known. Experimental verification of the existence of the axion would not only help ''balance the budget'' for the missing mass of the universe but also clear up one of the thorniest issues in particle physics.

  19. Detection of radioactive particles offshore by γ-ray spectrometry Part I: Monte Carlo assessment of detection depth limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maučec, M.; de Meijer, R. J.; Rigollet, C.; Hendriks, P. H. G. M.; Jones, D. G.

    2004-06-01

    A joint research project between the British Geological Survey and Nuclear Geophysics Division of the Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, Groningen, the Netherlands, was commissioned by the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority to establish the efficiency of a towed seabed γ-ray spectrometer for the detection of 137Cs-containing radioactive particles offshore Dounreay, Scotland. Using the MCNP code, a comprehensive Monte Carlo feasibility study was carried out to model various combinations of geological matrices, particle burial depth and lateral displacement, source activity and detector material. To validate the sampling and absolute normalisation procedures of MCNP for geometries including multiple (natural and induced) heterogeneous sources in environmental monitoring, a benchmark experiment was conducted. The study demonstrates the ability of seabed γ-ray spectrometry to locate radioactive particles offshore and to distinguish between γ count rate increases due to particles from those due to enhanced natural radioactivity. The information presented in this study will be beneficial for estimation of the inventory of 137Cs particles and their activity distribution and for the recovery of particles from the sea floor. In this paper, the Monte Carlo assessment of the detection limits is presented. The estimation of the required towing speed and acquisition times and their application to radioactive particle detection and discrimination offshore formed a supplementary part of this study.

  20. Hybrid dynamic radioactive particle tracking (RPT) calibration technique for multiphase flow systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khane, Vaibhav; Al-Dahhan, Muthanna H.

    2017-04-01

    The radioactive particle tracking (RPT) technique has been utilized to measure three-dimensional hydrodynamic parameters for multiphase flow systems. An analytical solution to the inverse problem of the RPT technique, i.e. finding the instantaneous tracer positions based upon instantaneous counts received in the detectors, is not possible. Therefore, a calibration to obtain a counts-distance map is needed. There are major shortcomings in the conventional RPT calibration method due to which it has limited applicability in practical applications. In this work, the design and development of a novel dynamic RPT calibration technique are carried out to overcome the shortcomings of the conventional RPT calibration method. The dynamic RPT calibration technique has been implemented around a test reactor with 1foot in diameter and 1 foot in height using Cobalt-60 as an isotopes tracer particle. Two sets of experiments have been carried out to test the capability of novel dynamic RPT calibration. In the first set of experiments, a manual calibration apparatus has been used to hold a tracer particle at known static locations. In the second set of experiments, the tracer particle was moved vertically downwards along a straight line path in a controlled manner. The obtained reconstruction results about the tracer particle position were compared with the actual known position and the reconstruction errors were estimated. The obtained results revealed that the dynamic RPT calibration technique is capable of identifying tracer particle positions with a reconstruction error between 1 to 5.9 mm for the conditions studied which could be improved depending on various factors outlined here.

  1. Structural studies of large nucleoprotein particles, vaults

    PubMed Central

    TANAKA, Hideaki; TSUKIHARA, Tomitake

    2012-01-01

    Vault is the largest nonicosahedral cytosolic nucleoprotein particle ever described. The widespread presence and evolutionary conservation of vaults suggest important biologic roles, although their functions have not been fully elucidated. X-ray structure of vault from rat liver was determined at 3.5 Å resolution. It exhibits an ovoid shape with a size of 40 × 40 × 67 nm3. The cage structure of vault consists of a dimer of half-vaults, with each half-vault comprising 39 identical major vault protein (MVP) chains. Each MVP monomer folds into 12 domains: nine structural repeat domains, a shoulder domain, a cap-helix domain and a cap-ring domain. Interactions between the 42-turn-long cap-helix domains are key to stabilizing the particle. The other components of vaults, telomerase-associated proteins, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases and small RNAs, are in location in the vault particle by electron microscopy. PMID:23060231

  2. Development of Labview based data acquisition and multichannel analyzer software for radioactive particle tracking system

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, Nur Aira Abd Yussup, Nolida; Ibrahim, Maslina Bt. Mohd; Abdullah, Nor Arymaswati; Mokhtar, Mukhlis B.; Abdullah, Jaafar B.; Hassan, Hearie B.

    2015-04-29

    A DAQ (data acquisition) software called RPTv2.0 has been developed for Radioactive Particle Tracking System in Malaysian Nuclear Agency. RPTv2.0 that features scanning control GUI, data acquisition from 12-channel counter via RS-232 interface, and multichannel analyzer (MCA). This software is fully developed on National Instruments Labview 8.6 platform. Ludlum Model 4612 Counter is used to count the signals from the scintillation detectors while a host computer is used to send control parameters, acquire and display data, and compute results. Each detector channel consists of independent high voltage control, threshold or sensitivity value and window settings. The counter is configured with a host board and twelve slave boards. The host board collects the counts from each slave board and communicates with the computer via RS-232 data interface.

  3. Particle-to-particle heterogeneous nature of coals. A case of large coal particles

    SciTech Connect

    Manovic, V.; Loncarevic, D.; Tokalic, R.

    2009-07-01

    In the present paper, the results of investigation of the heterogeneous nature of coals are given. Microscopic observations of coals of different rank and mineral matter content were performed. The content of minerals and macerals and the size of their grains were determined in the coal samples. Two samples of lignite rich in minerals were analyzed in detail by measuring the ash content for each particle and batches containing numerous (100) coal particles. The additional analyses were performed with the particles before and after sink-float separation. The obtained results showed an increase of heterogeneity with mineral matter content. The statistical analysis showed that many particles should be used for an experiment for obtaining reliable data with a desired level of certainty. In the case of batch experiments with 5 g Kolubara B coal (about 100 particles, size 4.76-7.0 mm), the experiment should be repeated at least 7, 19, and 100 times in order to obtain a mean value in the confidence intervals 5.0%, 2.5%, and 1.0%, respectively, for a 95% probability (if sample heterogeneity is the only cause for variations in results). However, regardless of increase of reproducibility and repeatability of obtained results, a large amount of samples and numerous repetitions of experiments cannot exclude differences in experimental results between homogenous and heterogeneous samples.

  4. Size distribution of radioactive particles collected at Tokai, Japan 6 days after the nuclear accident.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yutaka; Yasuda, Kenichiro; Magara, Masaaki

    2014-06-01

    Airborne radioactive particles released by the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident in 2011 were collected with a cascade low-pressure impactor at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) in Tokai, Japan, 114 km south of the FDNPP. Size-fractionated samples were collected twice, in the periods of March 17-April 1, 2011, and May 9-13, 2011. These size-fractionated samplings were carried out in the earliest days at a short distance from the FDNPP. Radioactivity of short-lived nuclides (several ten days of half-life) was determined as well as (134)Cs and (137)Cs. The elemental composition of size-fractionated samples was also measured. In the first collection, the activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) of (129m)Te, (140)Ba, (134)Cs, (136)Cs and (137)Cs was 1.5-1.6 μm, while the diameter of (131)I was 0.45 μm. The diameters of (134)Cs and (137)Cs in the second collection were expressed as three peaks at <0.5 μm, 0.94 μm, and 7.8 μm. The (134)Cs/(137)Cs ratio of the first collection was 1.02 in total, but the ratio in the fine fractions was 0.91. A distribution map of (134)Cs/(137)Cs - (136)Cs/(137)Cs ratios was helpful in understanding the change of radioactive Cs composition. The Cs composition of size fractions <0.43 μm and the composition in the 1.1-2.1 μm range (including the AMAD of 1.5-1.6 μm) were similar to the calculated compositions of fuels in the reactors No. 1 and No. 3 at the FDNPP using the ORIGEN-II code. The Cs composition collected in May, 2011 was similar to the calculation results of reactor No. 2 fuel composition. The change of Cs composition implies that the radioactive Cs was released from the three reactors at the FDNPP via different processes.

  5. The weather dependence of particle size distribution of indoor radioactive aerosol associated with radon decay products.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, A M A; Tamaki, K; Moriizumi, J; Yamazawa, H; Iida, T

    2011-07-01

    This study was performed to measure the activity size distribution of aerosol particles associated with short-lived radon decay products in indoor air at Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan. The measurements were performed using a low pressure Andersen cascade impactor under variable meteorological conditions. The results showed that the greatest activity fraction was associated with aerosol particles in the accumulation size range (100-1000 nm) with a small fraction of nucleation mode (10-100 nm). Regarding the influence of the weather conditions, the decrease in the number of accumulation particles was observed clearly after rainfall without significant change in nucleation particles, which may be due to a washout process for the large particles.

  6. Packaging, Transportation, and Disposal Logistics for Large Radioactively Contaminated Reactor Decommissioning Components

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Mark S.

    2008-01-15

    The packaging, transportation and disposal of large, retired reactor components from operating or decommissioning nuclear plants pose unique challenges from a technical as well as regulatory compliance standpoint. In addition to the routine considerations associated with any radioactive waste disposition activity, such as characterization, ALARA, and manifesting, the technical challenges for large radioactively contaminated components, such as access, segmentation, removal, packaging, rigging, lifting, mode of transportation, conveyance compatibility, and load securing require significant planning and execution. In addition, the current regulatory framework, domestically in Titles 49 and 10 and internationally in TS-R-1, does not lend itself to the transport of these large radioactively contaminated components, such as reactor vessels, steam generators, reactor pressure vessel heads, and pressurizers, without application for a special permit or arrangement. This paper addresses the methods of overcoming the technical and regulatory challenges. The challenges and disposition decisions do differ during decommissioning versus component replacement during an outage at an operating plant. During decommissioning, there is less concern about critical path for restart and more concern about volume reduction and waste minimization. Segmentation on-site is an available option during decommissioning, since labor and equipment will be readily available and decontamination activities are routine. The reactor building removal path is also of less concern and there are more rigging/lifting options available. Radionuclide assessment is necessary for transportation and disposal characterization. Characterization will dictate the packaging methodology, transportation mode, need for intermediate processing, and the disposal location or availability. Characterization will also assist in determining if the large component can be transported in full compliance with the transportation

  7. Particle size analysis of radioactive aerosols formed by irradiation of argon using 65 MeV quasi-monoenergetic neutrons.

    PubMed

    Endo, A; Noguchi, H; Tanaka, Su; Kanda, Y; Oki, Y; Iida, T; Sato, K; Tsuda, S

    2002-04-01

    The size distributions of 38Cl and 39Cl aerosols formed from the irradiation of argon gas containing di-octyl phthalate (DOP) aerosols by 65 MeV quasi-monoenergetic neutrons were measured to study the formation mechanism of radioactive aerosols in high-energy radiation fields. Both the number size distribution and the activity-weighted size distribution were measured using an electrical low-pressure impactor. It was found that the 35Cl and 39Cl aerosols are formed by attachment of the radioactive atoms generated by the neutron-induced reaction to the DOP aerosol particles.

  8. Measured concentrations of radioactive particles in air in the vicinity of the Anaconda Uranium Mill

    SciTech Connect

    Momeni, M H; Kisieleski, W E

    1980-02-01

    Concentrations of radioactive particles (U-238, Th-230, Ra-226, and Pb-210) in air were measured in the vicinity of the Anaconda Uranium Mill, Bluewater, New Mexico. Airborne particles were collected at three stations for about two-thirds of a year using a continuous collection method at a sampling rate of 10 L/min, and also were measured in monthly composites collected periodically at four stations using high volume air samplers at a sampling rate of 1400 L/min. The ratios of concentrations of each radionuclide to the concentrations of U-238 indicate that the concentrations of the radionuclides are influenced principally by the proximity of the major sources of emission and the direction of the wind. In all cases, the concentration of Pb-210 exceeded that of U-238. The ratio of Pb-210/U-238 was 12.3 and 13.3 for stations dominated by the emissions from the tailings and ore pads, but was only 1.6 for the station dominated by the yellowcake stack emission. The ratio of the radionuclide concentrations measured by the two methods of sample collection was between 0.8 and 1.2 for uranium, radium, and lead at station 104, but was 0.28 to 1.7 for thorium, radium, and lead at stations 101 and 102. The average concentrations calculated from the measurements made in this study suggest that releases from the Anaconda mill were made well within the existing limits of the maximum permissible concentrations for inhalation exposure of the general public.

  9. Flow Mapping in a Gas-Solid Riser via Computer Automated Radioactive Particle Tracking (CARPT)

    SciTech Connect

    Muthanna Al-Dahhan; Milorad P. Dudukovic; Satish Bhusarapu; Timothy J. O'hern; Steven Trujillo; Michael R. Prairie

    2005-06-04

    Statement of the Problem: Developing and disseminating a general and experimentally validated model for turbulent multiphase fluid dynamics suitable for engineering design purposes in industrial scale applications of riser reactors and pneumatic conveying, require collecting reliable data on solids trajectories, velocities ? averaged and instantaneous, solids holdup distribution and solids fluxes in the riser as a function of operating conditions. Such data are currently not available on the same system. Multiphase Fluid Dynamics Research Consortium (MFDRC) was established to address these issues on a chosen example of circulating fluidized bed (CFB) reactor, which is widely used in petroleum and chemical industry including coal combustion. This project addresses the problem of lacking reliable data to advance CFB technology. Project Objectives: The objective of this project is to advance the understanding of the solids flow pattern and mixing in a well-developed flow region of a gas-solid riser, operated at different gas flow rates and solids loading using the state-of-the-art non-intrusive measurements. This work creates an insight and reliable database for local solids fluid-dynamic quantities in a pilot-plant scale CFB, which can then be used to validate/develop phenomenological models for the riser. This study also attempts to provide benchmark data for validation of Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) codes and their current closures. Technical Approach: Non-Invasive Computer Automated Radioactive Particle Tracking (CARPT) technique provides complete Eulerian solids flow field (time average velocity map and various turbulence parameters such as the Reynolds stresses, turbulent kinetic energy, and eddy diffusivities). It also gives directly the Lagrangian information of solids flow and yields the true solids residence time distribution (RTD). Another radiation based technique, Computed Tomography (CT) yields detailed time averaged local holdup profiles at

  10. Evaluation of the Transport of Natural Radioactive Materials in Large Lysimeters Using Hydrus-1D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontedeiro, E.; Cipriani, M.; van Genuchten, M.; Simunek, J.

    2007-12-01

    The mining industry in Brazil often uses raw materials that contain relatively high concentrations of naturally occurring radioactive materials (referred to as NORM). Ores of relatively low grade typically are used to produce refined metals of high purity (e.g., Nb, Ta, Sn, and Au) using pyrometallurgic processes. The final waste is a slag rich in natural radioactive contaminants (the U and Th decay series), which are then usually deposited in industrial landfills. To study the long-term fate and transport of radionuclides leached from the NORM wastes, several large (3 m deep) lysimeters were constructed at the Pocos de Caldas Laboratory of the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commision (CNEN). The lysimeters were packed with surface soils and slags from one of the mining sites in South East Brazil. Main purpose of our lysimeter experiments was to follow the dissolution and transport of radionuclides from the slags under natural climatic conditions. Leaching rates and radionuclide concentrations of the effluent were observed during a three-year time period. A variety of physical and chemical properties of the soils and slags (including laboratory batch equilibrium sorption values) were also determined. The data were analyzed using several computer software packages, including the STANMOD code for analytical modeling of decay chain transport during steady flow, the HYDRUS-1D code for variably-saturated flow and the transport of multiple solutes, and the HP1 code for a more comprehensive analysis of the geochemistry involved. In this presentation we describe the experimental setup and provide preliminary results of the theoretical analyses, especially those using HYDRUS-1D.

  11. RADIO-ACTIVE TRANSDUCER

    DOEpatents

    Wanetick, S.

    1962-03-01

    ABS>ure the change in velocity of a moving object. The transducer includes a radioactive source having a collimated beam of radioactive particles, a shield which can block the passage of the radioactive beam, and a scintillation detector to measure the number of radioactive particles in the beam which are not blocked by the shield. The shield is operatively placed across the radioactive beam so that any motion normal to the beam will cause the shield to move in the opposite direction thereby allowing more radioactive particles to reach the detector. The number of particles detected indicates the acceleration. (AEC)

  12. Large area nuclear particle detectors using ET materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this SBIR Phase 1 feasibility effort was to demonstrate the usefulness of Quantex electron-trapping (ET) materials for spatial detection of nuclear particles over large areas. This demonstration entailed evaluating the prompt visible scintillation as nuclear particles impinged on films of ET materials, and subsequently detecting the nuclear particle impingement information pattern stored in the ET material, by means of the visible-wavelength luminescence produced by near-infrared interrogation. Readily useful levels of scintillation and luminescence outputs are demonstrated.

  13. Thermophoretic motion of large heated aerosol spherical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malai, N. V.; Limanskaya, A. V.; Shchukin, E. R.

    2016-03-01

    The stationary motion of a large spherical aerosol particle in the external field of a temperature gradient in zero gravity is theoretically described using the Stokes approximation and the assumption that the average temperature of the particle surface differs considerably from the temperature of the surrounding gaseous medium. The gas dynamics equations are solved taking into account the power-law temperature dependence of the molecular transport coefficients (viscosity, thermal conductivity) and the density of the gaseous medium. Numerical estimates show that the dependence of the thermophoretic force and velocity on the average temperature of the particle surface is nonlinear.

  14. Computational modeling of single particle scattering over large distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, Rebecca; Plumley, Rajan; McCracken, Michael

    2016-09-01

    We present a Monte Carlo simulation of the propagation of a single particle through a large three-dimensional volume under the influence of individual scattering events. In such systems, short paths can be quickly and accurately simulated using random walks defined by individual scattering parameters, but the simulation time greatly increases as the size of the space grows. We present a method for reducing the overall simulation time by restricting the simulation to a cube of unit length; each `cell' is characterized by a set of parameters which dictate the distributions of allowable step lengths and polar scattering angles. We model propagation over large distances by constructing a lattice of cells with physical parameters that depend on position, such that the full set would represent a space within the entire volume available to the particle. With these, we propose the use of Markov chains to determine a probable path for the particle, thereby removing the need to simulate every step in the particle's path. For a single particle with constant velocity, we can use the step statistics to determine the travel time of the particle. We investigate the effect of scattering parameters such as average step distance and possible scattering angles on the probabilities of a cell.

  15. Characterization and Source Term Assessments of Radioactive Particles from Marshall Islands Using Non-Destructive Analytical Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Jernstrom, J; Eriksson, M; Simon, R; Tamborini, G; Bildstein, O; Carlos-Marquez, R; Kehl, S R; Betti, M; Hamilton, T

    2005-06-11

    A considerable fraction of radioactivity entering the environment from different nuclear events is associated with particles. The impact of these events can only be fully assessed where there is some knowledge about the mobility of particle bound radionuclides entering the environment. The behavior of particulate radionuclides is dependent on several factors, including the physical, chemical and redox state of the environment, the characteristics of the particles (e.g., the chemical composition, crystallinity and particle size) and on the oxidative state of radionuclides contained in the particles. Six plutonium-containing particles stemming from Runit Island soil (Marshall Islands) were characterized using non-destructive analytical and microanalytical methods. By determining the activity of {sup 239,240}Pu and {sup 241}Am isotopes from their gamma peaks structural information related to Pu matrix was obtained, and the source term was revealed. Composition and elemental distribution in the particles were studied with synchrotron radiation based micro X-ray fluorescence (SR-{mu}-XRF) spectrometry. Scanning electron microscope equipped with energy dispersive X-ray detector (SEMEDX) and secondary ion mass spectrometer (SIMS) were used to examine particle surfaces. Based on the elemental composition the particles were divided into two groups; particles with plain Pu matrix, and particles where the plutonium is included in Si/O-rich matrix being more heterogeneously distributed. All of the particles were identified as fragments of initial weapons material. As containing plutonium with low {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atomic ratio, {approx}2-6%, which corresponds to weapons grade plutonium, the source term was identified to be among the safety tests conducted in the history of Runit Island.

  16. Large Porous Hollow Particles: Lightweight Champions of Pulmonary Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Gharse, Sachin; Fiegel, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    The deep lungs provide an efficient pathway for drugs to transport into the systemic circulation, as the extremely large surface area and thin epithelial membrane enable rapid drug transport to the blood stream. To penetrate into the deep lungs, aerosol particles with aerodynamic diameters of 1–3 μm are optimal. Large porous hollow particles (LPHPs) can achieve this aerodynamic size range through enhanced porosity within the particles (typically < 0.4 g/cm3), which aerodynamically balances the large particle size (> 5 μm, up to 30 μm). The physical properties of these particles provide some key advantages compared to their small, nonporous counterparts through enhanced dispersibility, efficient deep lung deposition, and avoidance of phagocytic clearance. This review highlights the potential of LPHPs in pulmonary delivery of systemic drugs, with a focus on their critical attributes and key formulation aspects. In addition, three examples of LPHPs under development are presented to emphasize the potential of this technology to treat systemic diseases. PMID:26818876

  17. Denitrification by large NAT particles: the impact of reduced settling velocities and hints on particle characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woiwode, W.; Grooß, J.-U.; Oelhaf, H.; Molleker, S.; Borrmann, S.; Ebersoldt, A.; Frey, W.; Gulde, T.; Khaykin, S.; Maucher, G.; Piesch, C.; Orphal, J.

    2014-03-01

    Vertical redistribution of HNO3 through condensation, sedimentation and evaporation of large HNO3-containing particles inside polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) plays an important role in the chemistry of the Arctic winter stratosphere. In situ observations by the particle probe FSSP-100 during the RECONCILE campaign indicate unexpected large potential NAT (nitric acid trihydrate) particles inside PSCs. The observations can hardly be explained assuming particles with compact morphology and spherical shape due to limited growing time at temperatures below the existence temperature of NAT (TNAT). Utilizing simulations by the CLaMS and measurements by the airborne Fourier transform infrared spectrometer MIPAS-STR we study the impact of reduced settling velocities of NAT particles on vertical HNO3 redistribution. Reduced settling velocities are expected for spherical NAT particles with low mass density or aspheric NAT particles that might explain the maximum sizes of the particles observed in situ. The results of our study support the hypothesis that denitrification is produced by significantly aspheric (i.e. columnar) compact NAT particles which are characterised by reduced settling velocities.

  18. A new large-volume metal reference standard for radioactive waste management

    PubMed Central

    Tzika, F.; Hult, M.; Stroh, H.; Marissens, G.; Arnold, D.; Burda, O.; Kovář, P.; Suran, J.; Listkowska, A.; Tyminski, Z.

    2016-01-01

    A new large-volume metal reference standard has been developed. The intended use is for calibration of free-release radioactivity measurement systems and is made up of cast iron tubes placed inside a box of the size of a Euro-pallet (80 × 120 cm). The tubes contain certified activity concentrations of 60Co (0.290±0.006 Bq g−1) and 110mAg (3.05±0.09 Bq g−1) (reference date: 30 September 2013). They were produced using centrifugal casting from a smelt into which 60Co was first added and then one piece of neutron irradiated silver wire was progressively diluted. The iron castings were machined to the desirable dimensions. The final material consists of 12 iron tubes of 20 cm outer diameter, 17.6 cm inner diameter, 40 cm length/height and 245.9 kg total mass. This paper describes the reference standard and the process of determining the reference activity values. PMID:25977349

  19. A new large-volume metal reference standard for radioactive waste management.

    PubMed

    Tzika, F; Hult, M; Stroh, H; Marissens, G; Arnold, D; Burda, O; Kovář, P; Suran, J; Listkowska, A; Tyminski, Z

    2016-03-01

    A new large-volume metal reference standard has been developed. The intended use is for calibration of free-release radioactivity measurement systems and is made up of cast iron tubes placed inside a box of the size of a Euro-pallet (80 × 120 cm). The tubes contain certified activity concentrations of (60)Co (0.290 ± 0.006 Bq g(-1)) and (110m)Ag (3.05 ± 0.09 Bq g(-1)) (reference date: 30 September 2013). They were produced using centrifugal casting from a smelt into which (60)Co was first added and then one piece of neutron irradiated silver wire was progressively diluted. The iron castings were machined to the desirable dimensions. The final material consists of 12 iron tubes of 20 cm outer diameter, 17.6 cm inner diameter, 40 cm length/height and 245.9 kg total mass. This paper describes the reference standard and the process of determining the reference activity values.

  20. Mapping large areas of radioactively contaminated land with a self adapted, handheld, GPS coupled, scintillation detector.

    PubMed

    Paridaens, Johan

    2008-03-01

    In Belgium, during several decennia, a phosphate plant discharged radium chloride containing waste water into two small rivers. One of those is part of a hydrographically very complex ecosystem with lots of small tributaries and hundreds of hectares of flooding zones. Hence, the river banks and large parts of these flooding zones have become contaminated with radium, heavy metals and chlorides. During a foot campaign, using a home made portable data logging system, consisting of a commercial 2.5 kg NaI detector, a computer mouse sized GPS, and a small pocket PC, the radioactive contamination of about 600 ha of sometimes very rough terrain was measured and mapped. The resulting very detailed radium contamination maps shed a whole new light on the water flow patterns of the ecosystem. The apparatus can also be used for efficiently guiding sampling campaigns for investigating other types of contamination. The ground maps are also compared to existing maps from helicopter measurements, evaluating strengths and weaknesses from both methods.

  1. The large scale microwave background anisotropy in decaying particle cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Panek, M.

    1987-06-01

    We investigate the large-scale anisotropy of the microwave background radiation in cosmological models with decaying particles. The observed value of the quadrupole moment combined with other constraints gives an upper limit on the redshift of the decay z/sub d/ < 3-5. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  2. An experimental study of light scattering by large, irregular particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, Audrey F.; Hapke, Bruce W.

    1995-01-01

    The intensity and polarization of light scattered by a variety of types of artificial partices large compared to the wavelength were measured as a function of phase angle. Shape, surface roughness, absorption coefficient, and internal scattering coefficient were varied systematically and their effects studied. Scattering by clear, smooth-surfaced spheres is in quantitative agreement with the predictions of the geometrical optics (ray theory) approximation to physical optics (Mie theory). The phase functions of almost all of the particles measured have both forward and backward scattering lobes. A two-parameter, double Henyey-Greenstein function generally provides reasonably good descriptions of the data, while keeping the number of free parameters to the minimum necessary. On a double Henyey- Greenstein parameter plot all of the particles fall into an L-shaped area of restricted size in which the location is characteristic of the particle type. Formalisms based on the equivalent slab model are also given for estimating the scattering efficiency of a large, irregular particle. For most dielectric particles the transmitted, forward scattered light is partially negatively polarized. It is this component that is respopnsible for the well-known maximum in the polarization curves of planetary regoliths at phase angles around 100 deg. For phase angles between about 30 deg and 70 deg the internally scattered light is found to be randomly polarized in the particles studied here, so that the only contribution to the second component of the Stokes vector is by Fresnel reflection from the particle surface. If this empirical result is general, measurement of the second Stokes vector of the light scattered from a regolith at these angles may provide a method of remotely measuring the mean refractive index.

  3. [The Patterns of Behavior of Radioactive Particles in the Food Chain of Cattle and Transport in the Gastrointestinal Tract of Animals].

    PubMed

    Kozmin, G V; Yepimakhov, V G

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of the patterns of behavior of polydisperse radioactive silicate particles in the components of the food chain of cattle is presented. It is shown that the composition of the size distribution of radioactive particles taken into animal organisms differs from the original composition of the particles deposited on the surface of pasture vegetation, and from dispersion of the particles in the aboveground biomass of vegetation at the time of grazing. The intake of particles into animal organisms is reduced with the increase of their size, and for the particle fraction of 400-800 microns it is about 10 times less than for the fine fraction (< 100 microns). The mathematical compartment model ofthe transport of polydisperse radioactive particles in the digestive tract of cattle has been developed. It is found that the elimination rate of radioactive particles from the animal organism depends on their sizes. Deposition of particles on the fundic surface of the wall ventral sac of rumen and reticulum as well as their long stay in comparison with the chyme in abomasum was noted. The maximum levels of irradiation are formed in these parts of the digestive tract of cattle.

  4. Automated single particle detection and tracking for large microscopy datasets

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Rhodri S.; Yang, Lei; Dun, Alison; Smyth, Annya M.; Duncan, Rory R.; Rickman, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in optical microscopy have enabled the acquisition of very large datasets from living cells with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolutions. Our ability to process these datasets now plays an essential role in order to understand many biological processes. In this paper, we present an automated particle detection algorithm capable of operating in low signal-to-noise fluorescence microscopy environments and handling large datasets. When combined with our particle linking framework, it can provide hitherto intractable quantitative measurements describing the dynamics of large cohorts of cellular components from organelles to single molecules. We begin with validating the performance of our method on synthetic image data, and then extend the validation to include experiment images with ground truth. Finally, we apply the algorithm to two single-particle-tracking photo-activated localization microscopy biological datasets, acquired from living primary cells with very high temporal rates. Our analysis of the dynamics of very large cohorts of 10 000 s of membrane-associated protein molecules show that they behave as if caged in nanodomains. We show that the robustness and efficiency of our method provides a tool for the examination of single-molecule behaviour with unprecedented spatial detail and high acquisition rates. PMID:27293801

  5. Use of a size-resolved 1-D resuspension scheme to evaluate resuspended radioactive material associated with mineral dust particles from the ground surface.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Masahide; Mikami, Masao; Tanaka, Taichu Y; Igarashi, Yasuhito; Kita, Kazuyuki; Yamada, Yutaka; Yoshida, Naohiro; Toyoda, Sakae; Satou, Yukihiko; Kinase, Takeshi; Ninomiya, Kazuhiko; Shinohara, Atsushi

    2017-01-01

    A size-resolved, one-dimensional resuspension scheme for soil particles from the ground surface is proposed to evaluate the concentration of radioactivity in the atmosphere due to the secondary emission of radioactive material. The particle size distributions of radioactive particles at a sampling point were measured and compared with the results evaluated by the scheme using four different soil textures: sand, loamy sand, sandy loam, and silty loam. For sandy loam and silty loam, the results were in good agreement with the size-resolved atmospheric radioactivity concentrations observed at a school ground in Tsushima District, Namie Town, Fukushima, which was heavily contaminated after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in March 2011. Though various assumptions were incorporated into both the scheme and evaluation conditions, this study shows that the proposed scheme can be applied to evaluate secondary emissions caused by aeolian resuspension of radioactive materials associated with mineral dust particles from the ground surface. The results underscore the importance of taking soil texture into account when evaluating the concentrations of resuspended, size-resolved atmospheric radioactivity.

  6. Dry deposition of large, airborne particles onto a surrogate surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eugene; Kalman, David; Larson, Timothy

    Simultaneous measurements of particle dry deposition flux and airborne number concentration in the open atmosphere were made using three different types of artificially generated particles in the size range 10-100 μm - perlite, diatomaceous earth and glass beads. A combination of gravimetric analysis, automated microscopy and sonic anemometry provided size-resolved estimates of both the inertial and gravitational components of the quasi-laminar layer particle deposition velocity, ( Vd) b, as a function of size. Eddy inertial deposition efficiency ( ηdI) was determined as a function of dimensionless eddy Stokes number (Stk e). In the range 3particles and gases to environmental surfaces. DOE Report PNL-SA-6721, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Richland, WA), used in several regulatory models, significantly under-predicted (up to seven times) ( Vd) b for large particles ( da>10 μm).

  7. Blended particle filters for large-dimensional chaotic dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Majda, Andrew J; Qi, Di; Sapsis, Themistoklis P

    2014-05-27

    A major challenge in contemporary data science is the development of statistically accurate particle filters to capture non-Gaussian features in large-dimensional chaotic dynamical systems. Blended particle filters that capture non-Gaussian features in an adaptively evolving low-dimensional subspace through particles interacting with evolving Gaussian statistics on the remaining portion of phase space are introduced here. These blended particle filters are constructed in this paper through a mathematical formalism involving conditional Gaussian mixtures combined with statistically nonlinear forecast models compatible with this structure developed recently with high skill for uncertainty quantification. Stringent test cases for filtering involving the 40-dimensional Lorenz 96 model with a 5-dimensional adaptive subspace for nonlinear blended filtering in various turbulent regimes with at least nine positive Lyapunov exponents are used here. These cases demonstrate the high skill of the blended particle filter algorithms in capturing both highly non-Gaussian dynamical features as well as crucial nonlinear statistics for accurate filtering in extreme filtering regimes with sparse infrequent high-quality observations. The formalism developed here is also useful for multiscale filtering of turbulent systems and a simple application is sketched below.

  8. Possible approach to cleaning 'problematic' LRW with large contents of suspended particles, oils and other organic substances

    SciTech Connect

    Ilin, V.; Karlin, Yu.; Laurson, A.; Volkov, Eu.; Dmitriev, S.

    2007-07-01

    A general structural scheme for cleaning 'problematic' liquid radioactive wastes (LRW) containing a large amount of suspended particles, oils and other organic substances has been proposed. The technological scheme includes two main stages: 1) separation of suspended particles, oil product emulsions and the larger part of colloidal particles from LRW by filtration, 2) purification of radioactive waters from radionuclides by membrane-sorption to the levels of radiation safety norms applied. The filtration stage is considered as a three-step process of 'problematic' LRW treatment including: 1) 'problematic' LRW extraction from storage tanks with a robot type device intended for washing out the bottom sediment (slurry), 2) separation of suspended particles, oil product emulsions and larger part of colloidal particles from LRW by filtration through porous or gauze diaphragms of 0.1 to 10 {mu}m pores (cells) in size, 3) concentration of separated slurry up to 100-200 g/l. Two main options of the membrane-sorption technologies, AQUA-EXPRESS and Reverse Osmosis, for LRW purification have been considered. Two possible options of porous or gauze diaphragms productivity and lifetime increase between their surface regenerations have been shown: 1) possibility of an oxidizer introduction into initial LRW, 2) possibility to rotate a filtering element (disk or cylinder type). (authors)

  9. Using Atmospheric Dispersion Theory to Inform the Design of a Short-lived Radioactive Particle Release Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Rishel, Jeremy P.; Keillor, Martin E.; Arrigo, Leah M.; Baciak, James E.; Detwiler, Rebecca S.; Kernan, Warnick J.; Kirkham, Randy R.; Milbrath, Brian D.; Seifert, Allen; Seifert, Carolyn E.; Smart, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric dispersion theory can be used to predict ground deposition of particulates downwind of a radionuclide release. This paper utilizes standard formulations found in Gaussian plume models to inform the design of an experimental release of short-lived radioactive particles into the atmosphere. Specifically, a source depletion algorithm is used to determine the optimum particle size and release height that maximizes the near-field deposition while minimizing the both the required source activity and the fraction of activity lost to long-distance transport. The purpose of the release is to provide a realistic deposition pattern that might be observed downwind of a small-scale vent from an underground nuclear explosion. The deposition field will be used, in part, to investigate several techniques of gamma radiation survey and spectrometry that could be utilized by an On-Site Inspection team under the verification regime of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty.

  10. The Delay of Low-energy Particle Populations in Association with Large Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Dayeh, M.; Desai, M. I.; Dwyer, J. R.; Rassoul, H. K.; Mason, G.; Mazur, J.

    2008-05-01

    Using ~0.045-10 MeV/nucleon ion data from ACE/ULEIS, we have found that a substantial number of shock- associated solar energetic particle events (~20 events) have significant delays in the arrival of the low- energy component beyond what is expected from the travel time of energetic particles from the sun to the earth at 1 AU. Indeed, for some events, after correcting for the velocity dispersion, the low energy component (~sub- MeV/nucleon) is almost completely absent while the high-energy component (E > 1 MeV/nucleon) has very large enhancements. SEP events with the most dramatic initial depletion of low-energy particles are accompanied by large proton fluxes and have large enhancements of the low-energy particles later, in coincidence with the arrival of the interplanetary shock, a day or two after the start of the event. In addition, these events show Fe/O enhancements during the periods in which the low-energy component is depleted and lower Fe/O values once the shock arrives. These new observations appear to be explained by the trapping of particles with low energy-to-charge (E/Q) ratios in the vicinity of the shock by magnetohydrodynamic waves, possibly generated by high energy protons streaming along the magnetic field lines.

  11. High-rate axial-field ionization chamber for particle identification of Radioactive beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desouza, Romualdo; Vadas, Justin; Singh, Varinderjit; Visser, G.; Alexander, A.; Hudan, S.; Huston, J.; Wiggins, B.; Chbihi, A.; Famiano, M.; Bischak, M.

    2017-01-01

    The design, construction and performance characteristics of a simple axial-field ionization chamber suitable for identifying ions in a radioactive beam are presented. The detector is optimized for use with low-energy radioactive beams (<) 5 MeV/A. A fast charge sensitive amplifier (CSA) integrated into the detector design is also described. Coupling this fast CSA to the axial field ionization chamber produces an output pulse with a rise-time of 60 to 70 ns and a fall time of 100 ns, making the detector capable of sustaining a relatively high rate while providing a time resolution of 6 to 8 ns. Tests with an α source establish the detector energy resolution as 8 % for an energy deposit of 3.5 MeV. Beam tests indicate that the detector is an effective tool for the characterization of low-energy radioactive beams at beam intensities up to 3 x 105 ions/s. Supported by the U.S. DOE under Award # DE-FG02-88ER-40404 and the NSF under Grant No. 1342962.

  12. High-rate axial-field ionization chamber for particle identification of radioactive beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadas, J.; Singh, Varinderjit; Visser, G.; Alexander, A.; Hudan, S.; Huston, J.; Wiggins, B. B.; Chbihi, A.; Famiano, M.; Bischak, M. M.; deSouza, R. T.

    2016-11-01

    The design, construction and performance characteristics of a simple axial-field ionization chamber suitable for identifying ions in a radioactive beam are presented. Optimized for use with low-energy radioactive beams (< 5 MeV / A) the detector presents only three 0.5 μm/cm2 foils to the beam in addition to the detector gas. A fast charge sensitive amplifier (CSA) integrated into the detector design is also described. Coupling this fast CSA to the axial field ionization chamber produces an output pulse with a risetime of 60-70 ns and a fall time of 100 ns, making the detector capable of sustaining a relatively high rate and providing a time resolution of 6-8 ns. Tests with an α source establish the detector energy resolution as ∼ 8 % for an energy deposit of ∼3.5 MeV. The energy resolution with beams of 2.5 and 4.0 MeV/A 39K ions and the dependence of the energy resolution on beam intensity is measured. At an instantaneous rate of 3×105 ions/s the energy resolution has degraded to 14% with a pileup of 12%. The good energy resolution of this detector at rates up to 3×105 ions/s makes it an effective tool in the characterization of low-energy radioactive beams.

  13. Denitrification by large NAT particles: the impact of reduced settling velocities and hints on particle characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woiwode, W.; Grooß, J.-U.; Oelhaf, H.; Molleker, S.; Borrmann, S.; Ebersoldt, A.; Frey, W.; Gulde, T.; Khaykin, S.; Maucher, G.; Piesch, C.; Orphal, J.

    2014-10-01

    Vertical redistribution of HNO3 through large HNO3-containing particles associated with polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) plays an important role in the chemistry of the Arctic winter stratosphere. During the RECONCILE (Reconciliation of essential process parameters for an enhanced predictability of Arctic stratospheric ozone loss and its climate interactions) campaign, apparently very large NAT (nitric acid trihydrate) particles were observed by the airborne in situ probe FSSP-100 (Molleker et al., 2014). Our analysis shows that the FSSP-100 observations associated with the flight on 25 January 2010 cannot easily be explained assuming compact spherical NAT particles due to much too short growing time at temperatures below the existence temperature of NAT (TNAT). State-of-the-art simulations using CLaMS (Chemical Lagrangian Model of the Stratosphere; Grooß et al., 2014) suggest considerably smaller particles. We consider the hypothesis that the simulation reproduces the NAT particle masses in a realistic way, but that real NAT particles may have larger apparent sizes compared to compact spherical particles, e.g. due to non-compact morphology or aspheric shape. Our study focuses on the consequence that such particles would have reduced settling velocities compared to compact spheres, altering the vertical redistribution of HNO3. Utilising CLaMS simulations, we investigate the impact of reduced settling velocities of NAT particles on vertical HNO3 redistribution and compare the results with observations of gas-phase HNO3 by the airborne Fourier transform spectrometer MIPAS-STR associated with two RECONCILE flights. The MIPAS-STR observations confirm conditions consistent with denitrification by NAT particles for the flight on 25 January 2010 and show good agreement with the simulations within the limitations of the comparison. Best agreement is found if settling velocities between 100 and 50% relative to compact spherical particles are considered (slight preference

  14. LARGE PARTICLES IN ACTIVE ASTEROID P/2010 A2

    SciTech Connect

    Jewitt, David; Ishiguro, Masateru; Agarwal, Jessica

    2013-02-10

    The previously unknown asteroid P/2010 A2 rose to prominence in 2010 by forming a transient, comet-like tail consisting of ejected dust. The observed dust production was interpreted as the result of either a hypervelocity impact with a smaller body or a rotational disruption. We have re-observed this object, finding that large particles remain a full orbital period after the initial outburst. In the intervening years, particles smaller than {approx}3 mm in radius have been dispersed by radiation pressure, leaving only larger particles in the trail. Since the total mass is dominated by the largest particles, the radiation pressure filtering allows us to obtain a more reliable estimate of the debris mass than was previously possible. We find that the mass contained in the debris is {approx}5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} kg (assumed density 3000 kg m{sup -3}), the ratio of the total debris mass to the nucleus mass is {approx}0.1, and that events like P/2010 A2 contribute <3% to the Zodiacal dust production rate. Physical properties of the nucleus and debris are also determined.

  15. Large-timestep mover for particle simulations of arbitrarilymagnetized species

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R.H.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.; Vay, J-L.

    2007-03-26

    For self-consistent ion-beam simulations including electron motion, it is desirable to be able to follow electron dynamics accurately without being constrained by the electron cyclotron timescale. To this end, we have developed a particle-advance that interpolates between full particle dynamics and drift motion. By making a proper choice of interpolation parameter, simulation particles experience physically correct parallel dynamics, drift motion, and gyroradius when the timestep is large compared to the cyclotron period, though the effective gyro frequency is artificially low; in the opposite timestep limit, the method approaches a conventional Boris particle push. By combining this scheme with a Poisson solver that includes an interpolated form of the polarization drift in the dielectric response, the movers utility can be extended to higher-density problems where the plasma frequency of the species being advanced exceeds its cyclotron frequency. We describe a series of tests of the mover and its application to simulation of electron clouds in heavy-ion accelerators.

  16. Searches for Axionlike Particles with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Andrea; Meyer, Manuel; Sanchez-Conde, Miguel; Wood, Matthew; LAT Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Axionlike particles (ALPs) are dark-matter candidates that occur in a variety of extensions of the Standard Model. These particles could leave signatures in gamma rays, due to the coupling of ALPs to photons in external electromagnetic fields. To date, observations with Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) provide the strongest constraints on the photon-ALP coupling for ALP masses between 0.5 and 20 neV. Here, we summarize these constraints and present the sensitivity to detect an ALP induced gamma-ray burst from a Galactic core-collapse supernova. ALPs would be produced in the stellar medium via the Primakoff effect and convert into gamma rays in the Galactic magnetic field. Fermi LAT observations would be able to probe couplings where ALPs could constitute the entirety of dark matter. Below 1 neV, the Fermi-LAT sensitivity would surpass that of future laboratory experiments by one order of magnitude.

  17. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics method from a large eddy simulation perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Mascio, A.; Antuono, M.; Colagrossi, A.; Marrone, S.

    2017-03-01

    The Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method, often used for the modelling of the Navier-Stokes equations by a meshless Lagrangian approach, is revisited from the point of view of Large Eddy Simulation (LES). To this aim, the LES filtering procedure is recast in a Lagrangian framework by defining a filter that moves with the positions of the fluid particles at the filtered velocity. It is shown that the SPH smoothing procedure can be reinterpreted as a sort of LES Lagrangian filtering, and that, besides the terms coming from the LES convolution, additional contributions (never accounted for in the SPH literature) appear in the equations when formulated in a filtered fashion. Appropriate closure formulas are derived for the additional terms and a preliminary numerical test is provided to show the main features of the proposed LES-SPH model.

  18. Transient thermal analysis for radioactive liquid mixing operations in a large-scaled tank

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. Y.; Smith, III, F. G.

    2014-07-25

    A transient heat balance model was developed to assess the impact of a Submersible Mixer Pump (SMP) on radioactive liquid temperature during the process of waste mixing and removal for the high-level radioactive materials stored in Savannah River Site (SRS) tanks. The model results will be mainly used to determine the SMP design impacts on the waste tank temperature during operations and to develop a specification for a new SMP design to replace existing longshaft mixer pumps used during waste removal. The present model was benchmarked against the test data obtained by the tank measurement to examine the quantitative thermal response of the tank and to establish the reference conditions of the operating variables under no SMP operation. The results showed that the model predictions agreed with the test data of the waste temperatures within about 10%.

  19. Transient thermal analysis for radioactive liquid mixing operations in a large-scaled tank

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, S. Y.; Smith, III, F. G.

    2014-07-25

    A transient heat balance model was developed to assess the impact of a Submersible Mixer Pump (SMP) on radioactive liquid temperature during the process of waste mixing and removal for the high-level radioactive materials stored in Savannah River Site (SRS) tanks. The model results will be mainly used to determine the SMP design impacts on the waste tank temperature during operations and to develop a specification for a new SMP design to replace existing longshaft mixer pumps used during waste removal. The present model was benchmarked against the test data obtained by the tank measurement to examine the quantitative thermalmore » response of the tank and to establish the reference conditions of the operating variables under no SMP operation. The results showed that the model predictions agreed with the test data of the waste temperatures within about 10%.« less

  20. Work in progress: transcatheter embolization of renal cell carcinoma with radioactive infarct particles

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, E.K.; Sullivan, J.; DeKernion, J.B.

    1983-05-01

    Treatment by radioactive infarct implant is advocated for patients who have renal cell carcinoma with distant metastases. The radioactive infarct implants were placed into the primary tumor, and when feasible into metastases, by transcatheter embolization. Metastases to the skeleton, liver, lungs, adrenals, and retroperitoneal muscles were also seeded; metastases to the central nervous system, pancreas, and spleen, as well as most pulmonary metastases, proved inaccessible to this approach. The effectiveness of this treatment modality was shown by improved cumulative survival rates (59% for patients with metastases and at risk at two years and 50% for those at risk at five years). The best results were obtained when treating patients who had skeletal metastases (90% survival of those at risk at two years and 60% at five years). Measurable palliation factors, such as decrease in the size of the primary lesion, weight gain, and control of bleeding and pain, were indicators of treatment response and were observed in the majority of patients. Remissions were signaled by weight gain, normalization of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and disappearance or decrease of tumor markers. Some evidence suggests that the salutary results may be based on significant reduction of tumor burden, temporary local control of tumor, and improved general immunocompetence.

  1. Transport of large particles in flow through porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imdakm, A. O.; Sahimi, Muhammad

    1987-12-01

    There is considerable evidence indicating that significant reduction in the efficiency of many processes in porous media, such as enhancing oil recovery, heterogeneous chemical reactions, deep-bed filtration, gel permeation, and liquid chromatography, is due to the reduction in the permeability of the pore space. This reduction is due to the transport of particles, whose sizes are comparable with those of the pores, and the subsequent blocking of the pores by various mechanisms. In this paper we develop a novel Monte Carlo method for theoretical modeling of this phenomenon. Particles of various sizes are injected into the medium, and their migration in the flow field is modeled by a random walk whose transition porbability is proportional to the local pore fluxes. Pores are blocked and their flow capacity is reduced (or vanished) when large particles pass through them (and reduce their flow) or totally block them. The permeability of the medium can ultimately vanish and, therefore, this phenomenon is a percolation process. Various quantities of interest such as the variations of the permeability with process time and the distribution of pore-plugging times are computed. The critical exponent characterizing the vanishing of the permeability near the percolation threshold appears to be different from that of percolation conductivity. The agreement between our results and the available experimental data is excellent.

  2. Studies of Nuclear Structure using Radioactive Decay and a Large Array of Compton Suppressed Ge Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, John L.

    2000-11-01

    Radioactive decay has long played a role in contributing to the elucidation of nuclear structure. However compared to in-beam gamma-ray spectroscopy, which has been combined with the extraordinary power of multi-detector arrays, radioactive decay scheme studies have been carried out usually with rather modest detector set-ups (two detectors, no Compton suppression). An extensive program to rectify this situation has been initiated using the "8-PI spectrometer"[1]. This is an array of 20 Compton-suppressed Ge detectors with exceptional stability and peak-to-total ratio. Experiments performed[2] recently at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, to better characterize nuclear deformation properties and the onset of deformation in nuclei, will be described. Future plans for the study of nuclei far from beta stability at the TRIUMF/ISAC Facility using the 8-PI spectrometer will also be outlined. [1] J.P.Martin et al., Nucl.Instr.Meth. A 257, 301 (1987). [2] See, e.g., W.D.Kulp et al. Bull.Am.Phys.Soc. 44, 63 (1999); W.D.Kulp et al., ibid., Williamsburg Meeting, Oct 4-7 (2000).

  3. Nucleon-Alpha Particle Disequilibrium and Short-Lived r-Process Radioactivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, B. S.; Clayton, D. D.; Chellapilla, S.; The, L.-S.

    2002-01-01

    r-Process yields can be extremely sensitive to expansion parameters when a persistent disequilibrium between free nucleons and alpha particles is present. This may provide a natural scenario for understanding the variation of heavy and light r-process isotopes in different r-process events. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  4. Process for preparation of large-particle-size monodisperse latexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderhoff, J. W.; Micale, F. J.; El-Aasser, M. S.; Kornfeld, D. M. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Monodisperse latexes having a particle size in the range of 2 to 40 microns are prepared by seeded emulsion polymerization in microgravity. A reaction mixture containing smaller monodisperse latex seed particles, predetermined amounts of monomer, emulsifier, initiator, inhibitor and water is placed in a microgravity environment, and polymerization is initiated by heating. The reaction is allowed to continue until the seed particles grow to a predetermined size, and the resulting enlarged particles are then recovered. A plurality of particle-growing steps can be used to reach larger sizes within the stated range, with enlarge particles from the previous steps being used as seed particles for the succeeding steps. Microgravity enables preparation of particles in the stated size range by avoiding gravity related problems of creaming and settling, and flocculation induced by mechanical shear that have precluded their preparation in a normal gravity environment.

  5. Sampling for Airborne Radioactivity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    compared to betas, gammas and neutrons. For an airborne radioactivity detection system, it is most important to be able to detect alpha particles and... Airborne radioactive particles may emit alpha, beta, gamma or neutron radiation, depending on which radioisotope is present. From a health perspective...

  6. An integrated micromechanical large particle in flow sorter (MILPIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuad, Nurul M.; Skommer, Joanna; Friedrich, Timo; Kaslin, Jan; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2015-06-01

    At present, the major hurdle to widespread deployment of zebrafish embryo and larvae in large-scale drug development projects is lack of enabling high-throughput analytical platforms. In order to spearhead drug discovery with the use of zebrafish as a model, platforms need to integrate automated pre-test sorting of organisms (to ensure quality control and standardization) and their in-test positioning (suitable for high-content imaging) with modules for flexible drug delivery. The major obstacle hampering sorting of millimetre sized particles such as zebrafish embryos on chip-based devices is their substantial diameter (above one millimetre), mass (above one milligram), which both lead to rapid gravitational-induced sedimentation and high inertial forces. Manual procedures associated with sorting hundreds of embryos are very monotonous and as such prone to significant analytical errors due to operator's fatigue. In this work, we present an innovative design of a micromechanical large particle in-flow sorter (MILPIS) capable of analysing, sorting and dispensing living zebrafish embryos for drug discovery applications. The system consisted of a microfluidic network, revolving micromechanical receptacle actuated by robotic servomotor and opto-electronic sensing module. The prototypes were fabricated in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) transparent thermoplastic using infrared laser micromachining. Elements of MILPIS were also fabricated in an optically transparent VisiJet resin using 3D stereolithography (SLA) processes (ProJet 7000HD, 3D Systems). The device operation was based on a rapidly revolving miniaturized mechanical receptacle. The latter function was to hold and position individual fish embryos for (i) interrogation, (ii) sorting decision-making and (iii) physical sorting..The system was designed to separate between fertilized (LIVE) and non-fertilized (DEAD) eggs, based on optical transparency using infrared (IR) emitters and receivers embedded in the system

  7. Implementation Strategies for Large-Scale Transport Simulations Using Time Domain Particle Tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painter, S.; Cvetkovic, V.; Mancillas, J.; Selroos, J.

    2008-12-01

    Time domain particle tracking is an emerging alternative to the conventional random walk particle tracking algorithm. With time domain particle tracking, particles are moved from node to node on one-dimensional pathways defined by streamlines of the groundwater flow field or by discrete subsurface features. The time to complete each deterministic segment is sampled from residence time distributions that include the effects of advection, longitudinal dispersion, a variety of kinetically controlled retention (sorption) processes, linear transformation, and temporal changes in groundwater velocities and sorption parameters. The simulation results in a set of arrival times at a monitoring location that can be post-processed with a kernel method to construct mass discharge (breakthrough) versus time. Implementation strategies differ for discrete flow (fractured media) systems and continuous porous media systems. The implementation strategy also depends on the scale at which hydraulic property heterogeneity is represented in the supporting flow model. For flow models that explicitly represent discrete features (e.g., discrete fracture networks), the sampling of residence times along segments is conceptually straightforward. For continuous porous media, such sampling needs to be related to the Lagrangian velocity field. Analytical or semi-analytical methods may be used to approximate the Lagrangian segment velocity distributions in aquifers with low-to-moderate variability, thereby capturing transport effects of subgrid velocity variability. If variability in hydraulic properties is large, however, Lagrangian velocity distributions are difficult to characterize and numerical simulations are required; in particular, numerical simulations are likely to be required for estimating the velocity integral scale as a basis for advective segment distributions. Aquifers with evolving heterogeneity scales present additional challenges. Large-scale simulations of radionuclide

  8. Induced radioactivities in concrete constituents irradiated by high-energy particles.

    PubMed

    Kondo, K; Hirayama, H; Ban, S; Taino, M; Ishii, H

    1984-06-01

    The powdered concrete constituents of magnetite ore, pyrites ore, marble, gravel and Portland cement were prepared and irradiated by 12- GeV protons and secondary particles at the slow extracted beam line of the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics ( KEK ) 12- GeV proton synchrotron. The saturated activities for individual nuclides produced were calculated, and the time variation of photon exposure rate due to the residual activities was also evaluated for each sample. The exposure rates ranked in the following order: magnetite ore greater than pyrites ore greater than gravel greater than or equal to cement greater than marble. The levels of photon exposure rates from heavy, ordinary and marble concretes were also estimated on the basis of the results obtained for each constituent. It is suggested that the use of marble concrete in the inside wall of accelerator tunnels can reduce considerably the exposure to the accelerator maintenance workers, compared with heavy and ordinary concretes commonly used.

  9. Detailed deposition density maps constructed by large-scale soil sampling for gamma-ray emitting radioactive nuclides from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kimiaki; Tanihata, Isao; Fujiwara, Mamoru; Saito, Takashi; Shimoura, Susumu; Otsuka, Takaharu; Onda, Yuichi; Hoshi, Masaharu; Ikeuchi, Yoshihiro; Takahashi, Fumiaki; Kinouchi, Nobuyuki; Saegusa, Jun; Seki, Akiyuki; Takemiya, Hiroshi; Shibata, Tokushi

    2015-01-01

    Soil deposition density maps of gamma-ray emitting radioactive nuclides from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) accident were constructed on the basis of results from large-scale soil sampling. In total 10,915 soil samples were collected at 2168 locations. Gamma rays emitted from the samples were measured by Ge detectors and analyzed using a reliable unified method. The determined radioactivity was corrected to that of June 14, 2011 by considering the intrinsic decay constant of each nuclide. Finally the deposition maps were created for (134)Cs, (137)Cs, (131)I, (129m)Te and (110m)Ag. The radioactivity ratio of (134)Cs-(137)Cs was almost constant at 0.91 regardless of the locations of soil sampling. The radioactivity ratios of (131)I and (129m)Te-(137)Cs were relatively high in the regions south of the Fukushima NPP site. Effective doses for 50 y after the accident were evaluated for external and inhalation exposures due to the observed radioactive nuclides. The radiation doses from radioactive cesium were found to be much higher than those from the other radioactive nuclides.

  10. Human exposure to large solar particle events in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Shinn, J. L.; Curtis, S. B.

    1992-01-01

    Whenever energetic solar protons produced by solar particle events traverse bulk matter, they undergo various nuclear and atomic collision processes which significantly alter the physical characteristics and biologically important properties of their transported radiation fields. These physical interactions and their effect on the resulting radiation field within matter are described within the context of a recently developed deterministic, coupled neutron-proton space radiation transport computer code (BRYNTRN). Using this computer code, estimates of human exposure in interplanetary space, behind nominal (2 g/sq cm) and storm shelter (20 g/sq cm) thicknesses of aluminum shielding, are made for the large solar proton event of August 1972. Included in these calculations are estimates of cumulative exposures to the skin, ocular lens, and bone marrow as a function of time during the event. Risk assessment in terms of absorbed dose and dose equivalent is discussed for these organs. Also presented are estimates of organ exposures for hypothetical, worst-case flare scenarios. The rate of dose equivalent accumulation places this situation in an interesting region of dose rate between the very low values of usual concern in terrestrial radiation environments and the high-dose-rate values prevalent in radiation therapy.

  11. Human exposure to large solar particle events in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Shinn, J. L.; Curtis, S. B.

    Whenever energetic solar protons produced by solar particle events traverse bulk matter, they undergo various nuclear and atomic collision processes which significantly alter the physical characteristics and biologically important properties of their transported radiation fields. These physical interactions and their effect on the resulting radiation field within matter are described within the context of a recently developed deterministic, coupled neutron-proton space radiation transport computer code (BRYNTRN). Using this computer code, estimates of human exposure in interplanetary space, behind nominal (2 g/cm2) and storm shelter (20 g/cm2) thicknesses of aluminum shielding, are made for the large solar proton event of August 1972. Included in these calculations are estimates of cumulative exposures to the skin, ocular lens, and bone marrow as a function of time during the event. Risk assessment in terms of absorbed dose and dose equivalent is discussed for these organs. Also presented are estimates of organ exposures for hypothetical, worst-case flare scenarios. The rate of dose equivalent accumulation places this situation in an interesting region of dose rate between the very low values of usual concern in terrestrial radiation environments and the high dose rate values prevalent in radiation therapy.

  12. Laser Plasma Particle Accelerators: Large Fields for Smaller Facility Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Esarey, Eric H.; Schroeder, Carl B.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Leemans, Wim P.; Bruhwiler, David L.; Cary, John R.; Cowan, Ben; Durant, Marc; Hamill, Paul; Messmer, Peter; Mullowney, Paul; Nieter, Chet; Paul, Kevin; Shasharina, Svetlana; Veitzer, Seth; Weber, Gunther; Rubel, Oliver; Ushizima, Daniela; Bethel, Wes; Wu, John

    2009-03-20

    Compared to conventional particle accelerators, plasmas can sustain accelerating fields that are thousands of times higher. To exploit this ability, massively parallel SciDAC particle simulations provide physical insight into the development of next-generation accelerators that use laser-driven plasma waves. These plasma-based accelerators offer a path to more compact, ultra-fast particle and radiation sources for probing the subatomic world, for studying new materials and new technologies, and for medical applications.

  13. Experimental detection of alpha-particles from the radioactive decay of natural bismuth.

    PubMed

    de Marcillac, Pierre; Coron, Noël; Dambier, Gérard; Leblanc, Jacques; Moalic, Jean-Pierre

    2003-04-24

    The only naturally occurring isotope of bismuth, 209Bi, is commonly regarded as the heaviest stable isotope. But like most other heavy nuclei abundant in nature and characterized by an exceptionally long lifetime, it is metastable with respect to alpha-decay. However, the decay usually evades observation because the nuclear structure of 209Bi gives rise to an extremely low decay probability and, moreover, generates low-energy alpha-particles difficult to detect. Indeed, dedicated experiments attempting to record the alpha-decay of 209Bi in nuclear emulsions failed. However, scintillating bolometers operated at temperatures below 100 mK offer improved detection efficiency and sensitivity, whereas a broad palette of targets could be available. Here we report the successful use of this method for the unambiguous detection of 209Bi alpha-decay in bismuth germanate detectors cooled to 20 mK. We measure an energy release of 3,137 +/- 1 (statistical) +/- 2 (systematic) keV and a half-life of (1.9 +/- 0.2) x 10(19) yr, which are in agreement with expected values.

  14. Heavy particle radioactivity from superheavy nuclei leading to 298114 daughter nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhosh, K. P.; Priyanka, B.

    2014-09-01

    The feasibility for the alpha decay and the heavy particle decay from the even-even superheavy (SH) nuclei with Z = 116- 124 has been studied within the Coulomb and proximity potential model (CPPM). Our predicted half lives agree well with the values evaluated using the Universal formula for cluster decay (UNIV) of Poenaru et al., the Universal Decay Law (UDL) of Qi et al., and the Scaling Law of Horoi et al. The spontaneous fission half lives of the corresponding parents have also been evaluated using the semi-empirical formula of Santhosh et al. Within our fission model, we have studied the cluster formation probability for various clusters and the maximum cluster formation probability is found for the decay accompanying 298114. In the plots for log10 (T1/2) against the neutron number of the daughter in the corresponding decay, the half life is found to be the minimum for the decay leading to 298114 (Z = 114, N = 184). Most of the predicted half lives are well within the present upper limit for measurements (T1/2 <1030 s) and the computed alpha half lives for 290,292Lv agree well with the experimental data.

  15. Microscale simulations of shock interaction with large assembly of particles for developing point-particle models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Siddharth; Neal, Chris; Mehta, Yash; Sridharan, Prasanth; Jackson, Thomas; Balachandar, S.

    2017-01-01

    Micrsoscale simulations are being conducted for developing point-particle and other related models that are needed for the mesoscale and macroscale simulations of explosive dispersal of particles. These particle models are required to compute (a) instantaneous aerodynamic force on the particle and (b) instantaneous net heat transfer between the particle and the surrounding. A strategy for a sequence of microscale simulations has been devised that allows systematic development of the hybrid surrogate models that are applicable at conditions representative of the explosive dispersal application. The ongoing microscale simulations seek to examine particle force dependence on: (a) Mach number, (b) Reynolds number, and (c) volume fraction (different particle arrangements such as cubic, face-centered cubic (FCC), body-centered cubic (BCC) and random). Future plans include investigation of sequences of fully-resolved microscale simulations consisting of an array of particles subjected to more realistic time-dependent flows that progressively better approximate the actual problem of explosive dispersal. Additionally, effects of particle shape, size, and number in simulation as well as the transient particle deformation dependence on various parameters including: (a) particle material, (b) medium material, (c) multiple particles, (d) incoming shock pressure and speed, (e) medium to particle impedance ratio, (f) particle shape and orientation to shock, etc. are being investigated.

  16. Radioactive Iodine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Phone Home » Radioactive Iodine Leer en Español Radioactive Iodine Iodine is essential for proper function of the ... that takes up and holds onto iodine. Radioactive Iodine FAQs WHAT IS RADIOACTIVE IODINE (RAI)? Iodine, in ...

  17. Large deformation micromechanics of particle filled acrylics at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunel, Eray Mustafa

    The main aim of this study is to investigate stress whitening and associated micro-deformation mechanism in thermoformed particle filled acrylic sheets. For stress whitening quantification, a new index was developed based on image histograms in logarithmic scale of gray level. Stress whitening levels in thermoformed acrylic composites was observed to increase with increasing deformation limit, decreasing forming rate and increasing forming temperatures below glass transition. Decrease in stress whitening levels above glass transition with increasing forming temperature was attributed to change in micro-deformation behavior. Surface deformation feature investigated with scanning electron microscopy showed that source of stress whitening in thermoformed samples was a combination of particle failure and particle disintegration depending on forming rate and temperature. Stress whitening level was strongly correlated to intensity of micro-deformation features. On the other hand, thermoformed neat acrylics displayed no surface discoloration which was attributed to absence of micro-void formation on the surface of neat acrylics. Experimental damage measures (degradation in initial, secant, unloading modulus and strain energy density) have been inadequate in describing damage evolution in successive thermoforming applications on the same sample at different levels of deformation. An improved version of dual-mechanism viscoplastic material model was proposed to predict thermomechanical behavior of neat acrylics under non-isothermal conditions. Simulation results and experimental results were in good agreement and failure of neat acrylics under non-isothermal conditions ar low forming temperatures were succesfully predicted based on entropic damage model. Particle and interphase failure observed in acrylic composites was studied in a multi-particle unit cell model with different volume fractions. Damage evolution due to particle failure and interphase failure was simulated

  18. Monte Carlo calculations of the HPGe detector efficiency for radioactivity measurement of large volume environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Azbouche, Ahmed; Belgaid, Mohamed; Mazrou, Hakim

    2015-08-01

    A fully detailed Monte Carlo geometrical model of a High Purity Germanium detector with a (152)Eu source, packed in Marinelli beaker, was developed for routine analysis of large volume environmental samples. Then, the model parameters, in particular, the dead layer thickness were adjusted thanks to a specific irradiation configuration together with a fine-tuning procedure. Thereafter, the calculated efficiencies were compared to the measured ones for standard samples containing (152)Eu source filled in both grass and resin matrices packed in Marinelli beaker. From this comparison, a good agreement between experiment and Monte Carlo calculation results was obtained highlighting thereby the consistency of the geometrical computational model proposed in this work. Finally, the computational model was applied successfully to determine the (137)Cs distribution in soil matrix. From this application, instructive results were achieved highlighting, in particular, the erosion and accumulation zone of the studied site.

  19. Mie Scattering by Ensembles of Particles with Very Large Size Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, S.

    2006-10-01

    MIEX is a computer program for the simulation of Mie scattering in case of arbitrarily large size parameters. The elements of the scattering matrix, efficiency factors as well as the corresponding cross sections, the albedo and the scattering asymmetry parameter are calculated. Single particles as well as particle ensembles consisting of several components and particle size distributions can be considered.

  20. Production of large-particle-size monodisperse latexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderhoff, J. W.; El-Aasser, M. L.; Micale, F. J.; Sudol, E. D.; Tseng, C. M.; Silwanowicz, A.

    1984-01-01

    The research program achieved two objectives: (1) it has refined and extended the experimental techniques for preparing monodisperse latexes in quantity on the ground up to a particle diameter of 10 microns; and (2) it has demonstrated that a microgravity environment can be used to grow monodisperse latexes to larger sizes, where the limitations in size have yet to be defined. The experimental development of the monodisperse latex reactor (MLR) and the seeded emulsion polymerizations carried out in the laboratory prototype of the flight hardware, as a function of the operational parameters is discussed. The emphasis is directed towards the measurement, interpretation, and modeling of the kinetics of seeded emulsion polymerization and successive seeded emulsion polymerization. The recipe development of seeded emulsion polymerization as a function of particle size is discussed. The equilibrium swelling of latex particles with monomers was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. Extensive studies are reported on both the type and concentration of initiators, surfactants, and inhibitors, which eventually led to the development of the flight recipes. The experimental results of the flight experiments are discussed, as well as the experimental development of inhibition of seeded emulsion polymerization in terms of time of inhibition and the effect of inhibitors on the kinetics of polymerization.

  1. Design and Validation Testing of TruckScan to Assay Large Sacks of Fukushima Radioactive Debris on a Truck

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Atsuo; Bronson, Frazier

    2015-07-01

    As a result of the March 2011 earthquake and resulting tsunami in Japan, there was a serious accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant. This accident has contaminated soil and vegetation in a wide area around the plant. Decontamination projects over the last 4 years have resulted in large numbers of 1 cubic meter canvas bags of debris, commonly called Super Sacks [SS]. These are currently stored nearby where they were generated, but starting in 2015, they will be moved to various Interim Storage Facilities [ISF]. Trucks will typically carry 8-20 of these SSs. When the trucks arrive at the ISF they need to be rapidly sorted into groups according to radioactivity level, for efficient subsequent processing. Canberra Industries, Inc. [CI] has designed a new truck monitoring system 'TruckScan' for use at these ISFs. The TruckScan system must measure the entire truck loaded with multiple closely packed SSs, and generate a nuclide specific assay report showing the radioactivity in each individual SS. The Canberra-Japan office, along with Obayashi Corporation have performed validation testing to demonstrate to the regulatory authorities that the proposed technique was sufficiently accurate. These validation tests were conducted at a temporary storage area in Fukushima prefecture. Decontaminated waste of various representative types and of various levels of radioactivity was gathered and mixed to create homogeneous volumes. These volumes were sampled multiple times and assayed with laboratory HPGe detectors to determine the reference concentration of each pile. Multiple SSs were loaded from each pile. Some of the SSs were filled 50% full, others 75% full, and others 100% full, to represent the typical loading configuration of the existing SSs in the field. The content of the SSs are either sand, soil, or vegetation with densities ranging from 0.3 g/cc - 1.6 g/cc. These SSs with known concentrations of Cs-134 and Cs-137 were then loaded onto trucks in a variety

  2. Preparation of large-particle-size monodisperse latexes in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderhoff, J. W.; El-Aasser, M. S.; Micale, F. J.; Sudol, E. D.; Tseng, C. M.; Silwanowicz, A.; Sheu, H. R.; Kornfeld, D. M.

    1986-01-01

    Results are reported of latex sphere polymerization experiments performed on two flights of the Columbia and three flights of the Challenger. The trials were carried out because polymerization of the spheres in space avoids coagulation, nucleation of a new crop of particles, and excessive stirring requirements, and allows growth of spheres larger than 4 microns diam. The Monodisperse Latex Reactor (MLR) held four stirred 100 cc sealed stainless steel cylindrical containers. The mixtures were monitored for the conversion times, volume decreases as spheres formed and the mixture temperature. The spheres were grown from 0.19 micron seeds. Details of the flight preparation efforts are outlined. In flights which did not experience mechanical malfunctions spheres 3-30 microns diam were grown that had noticeably lower size variations than did the ground-based control particles. The 10 micron diam spheres grown on STS-6 were accepted as standard reference material by the NBS and became the first products made in space to be commercially sold on earth; the 30 micron spheres also became NBS standards. The experiments confirmed all projected benefits of producing the spheres in space, as well as provided the opportunity to grow more larger offsize spheres by finishing the growths on earth.

  3. An experimental and theoretical investigation on torrefaction of a large wet wood particle.

    PubMed

    Basu, Prabir; Sadhukhan, Anup Kumar; Gupta, Parthapratim; Rao, Shailendra; Dhungana, Alok; Acharya, Bishnu

    2014-05-01

    A competitive kinetic scheme representing primary and secondary reactions is proposed for torrefaction of large wet wood particles. Drying and diffusive, convective and radiative mode of heat transfer is considered including particle shrinking during torrefaction. The model prediction compares well with the experimental results of both mass fraction residue and temperature profiles for biomass particles. The effect of temperature, residence time and particle size on torrefaction of cylindrical wood particles is investigated through model simulations. For large biomass particles heat transfer is identified as one of the controlling factor for torrefaction. The optimum torrefaction temperature, residence time and particle size are identified. The model may thus be integrated with CFD analysis to estimate the performance of an existing torrefier for a given feedstock. The performance analysis may also provide useful insight for design and development of an efficient torrefier.

  4. Large scale structure forecast constraints on particle production during inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Chantavat, Teeraparb; Gordon, Christopher; Silk, Joseph

    2011-05-15

    Bursts of particle production during inflation provide a well-motivated mechanism for creating bumplike features in the primordial power spectrum. Current data constrain these features to be less than about 5% the size of the featureless primordial power spectrum at wave numbers of about 0.1h Mpc{sup -1}. We forecast that the Planck cosmic microwave background experiment will be able to strengthen this constraint to the 0.5% level. We also predict that adding data from a square kilometer array galaxy redshift survey would improve the constraint to about the 0.1% level. For features at larger wave numbers, Planck will be limited by Silk damping and foregrounds, while the square kilometer array will be limited by nonlinear effects. We forecast, for a cosmic inflation probe galaxy redshift survey, that similar constraints can be achieved up to about a wave number of 1.0h Mpc{sup -1}.

  5. Radioactive Decay

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Radioactive decay is the emission of energy in the form of ionizing radiation. Example decay chains illustrate how radioactive atoms can go through many transformations as they become stable and no longer radioactive.

  6. Large Area Directed Self-Assembly of Sub-10 nm Particles with Single Particle Positioning Resolution.

    PubMed

    Asbahi, Mohamed; Mehraeen, Shafigh; Wang, Fuke; Yakovlev, Nikolai; Chong, Karen S L; Cao, Jianshu; Tan, Mei Chee; Yang, Joel K W

    2015-09-09

    Directed self-assembly of nanoparticles (DSA-n) holds great potential for device miniaturization in providing patterning resolution and throughput that exceed existing lithographic capabilities. Although nanoparticles excel at assembling into regular close-packed arrays, actual devices on the other hand are often laid out in sparse and complex configurations. Hence, the deterministic positioning of single or few particles at specific positions with low defect density is imperative. Here, we report an approach of DSA-n that satisfies these requirements with less than 1% defect density over micrometer-scale areas and at technologically relevant sub-10 nm dimensions. This technique involves a simple and robust process where a solvent film containing sub-10 nm gold nanoparticles climbs against gravity to coat a prepatterned template. Particles are placed individually into nanoscale cavities, or between nanoposts arranged in varying degrees of geometric complexity. Brownian dynamics simulations suggest a mechanism in which the particles are pushed into the template by a nanomeniscus at the drying front. This process enables particle-based self-assembly to access the sub-10 nm dimension, and for device fabrication to benefit from the wealth of chemically synthesized nanoparticles with unique material properties.

  7. Large area nuclear particle detectors using ET materials, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrigley, Charles Y.; Storti, George M.; Walter, Lee; Mathews, Scott

    1990-01-01

    This report presents work done under a Phase 2 SBIR contract for demonstrating large area detector planes utilizing Quantex electron trapping materials as a film medium for storing high-energy nuclide impingement information. The detector planes utilize energy dissipated by passage of the high-energy nuclides to produce localized populations of electrons stored in traps. Readout of the localized trapped electron populations is effected by scanning the ET plane with near-infrared, which frees the trapped electrons and results in optical emission at visible wavelengths. The effort involved both optimizing fabrication technology for the detector planes and developing a readout system capable of high spatial resolution for displaying the recorded nuclide passage tracks.

  8. Modeling large RNAs and ribonucleoprotein particles using molecular mechanics techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, A; Tan, R K; Harvey, S C

    1994-01-01

    There is a growing body of low-resolution structural data that can be utilized to devise structural models for large RNAs and ribonucleoproteins. These models are routinely built manually. We introduce an automated refinement protocol to utilize such data for building low-resolution three-dimensional models using the tools of molecular mechanics. In addition to specifying the positions of each nucleotide, the protocol provides quantitative estimates of the uncertainties in those positions, i.e., the resolution of the model. In typical applications, the resolution of the models is about 10-20 A. Our method uses reduced representations and allows us to refine three-dimensional structures of systems as big as the 16S and 23S ribosomal RNAs, which are about one to two orders of magnitude larger than nucleic acids that can be examined by traditional all-atom modeling methods. Nonatomic resolution structural data--secondary structure, chemical cross-links, chemical and enzymatic footprinting patterns, protein positions, solvent accessibility, and so on--are combined with known motifs in RNA structure to predict low-resolution models of large RNAs. These structural constraints are imposed on the RNA chain using molecular mechanics-type potential functions with parameters based on the quality of experimental data. Surface potential functions are used to incorporate shape and positional data from electron microscopy image reconstruction experiments into our models. The structures are optimized using techniques of energy refinement to get RNA folding patterns. In addition to providing a consensus model, the method finds the range of models consistent with the data, which allows quantitative evaluation of the resolution of the model. The method also identifies conflicts in the experimental data. Although our protocol is aimed at much larger RNAs, we illustrate these techniques using the tRNA structure as an example and test-bed. Images FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 PMID:7521223

  9. Shape characterization of a large nonspherical particle by use of its Fraunhofer diffraction pattern.

    PubMed

    Borovoi, A; Naats, E; Oppel, U; Grishin, I

    2000-04-20

    We characterize the shape of a large nonspherical particle by means of the two-dimensional Fourier transformation of its diffraction pattern, called the S function. The main properties of S functions are considered. Some ways in which to retrieve the geometric parameters of a particle by use of its S function are discussed. In particular, the parameter of nonsphericity of a particle is defined by means of the S function.

  10. Field line and Particle orbit Analysis in the Periphery of the Large Helical Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Yutaka; Oikawa, Shun-ichi; Watanabe, Tsuguhiro

    2002-07-01

    Magnetic field lines and particle orbits were analyzed in the periphery of the Large Helical Device (LHD), which is called the chaotic field line region in this paper. The widths of the chaotic field line region were numerically identified for the standard LHD configuration with the magnetic axis position Rax = 3.75 m and for an improved confinement configuration with Rax = 3.6 m. It was found that the reflected particles include of what we have named chaotic particles and non-chaotic particles. Most of the reflected particles are mirror-confined with strong adiabaticity in the chaotic field line region. The remaining reflected particles, named type-A and type-B particles, are harmful to confinement. We found by detailed analysis of the vacuum magnetic field in the LHD that there exist loss canals that are the open intersections of |\\mbi{B}| = const. and \\mbi{B} \\cdot \

  11. Large eddy simulation of a particle-laden turbulent plane jet.

    PubMed

    Jin, Han-Hui; Luo, Kun; Fan, Jian-Ren; Cen, Ke-Fa

    2003-01-01

    Gas-solid two-phase turbulent plane jet is applied to many natural situations and in engineering systems. To predict the particle dispersion in the gas jet is of great importance in industrial applications and in the designing of engineering systems. A large eddy simulation of the two-phase plane jet was conducted to investigate the particle dispersion patterns. The particles with Stokes numbers equal to 0.0028, 0.3, 2.5, 28 (corresponding to particle diameter 1 microm, 10 microm, 30 microm, 100 microm, respectively) in Re = 11 300 gas flow were studied. The simulation results of gas phase motion agreed well with previous experimental results. And the simulation results of the solid particles motion showed that particles with different Stokes number have different spatial dispersion; and that particles with intermediate Stokes number have the largest dispersion ratio.

  12. Integral light-scattering and absorption characteristics of large, nonspherical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokhanovsky, Alexander A.; Macke, Andreas

    1997-11-01

    We obtain and analyze simple analytical formulas for asymmetry parameters and absorption cross sections of large, nonspherical particles. The formulas are based on the asymptotic properties of these characteristics at strong and weak absorption of radiation inside particles. The absorption cross section depends on parameter , which determines the value of the light-absorption cross section for weakly absorbing particles. It is larger for nonspherical scatterers. The asymmetry parameter depends on two parameters. The first is the asymmetry parameter g0 of a nonspherical, transparent particle with the same shape as an absorbing one. The second parameter, , determines the strength of the influence of light absorption on the value of the asymmetry parameter. Parameter is larger for nonspherical particles. One can find these three parameters ( , g0 , and ) using a ray-tracing code (RTC) for nonabsorbing and weakly absorbing particles. The RTC can then be used to check the accuracy of the equations at any absorption for hexagonal cylinders and spheroids. It is found that the error of computing the absorption cross section and 1 -g (g is the asymmetry parameter) is less than 20% at the refractive index of particles n = 1.333. Values for asymmetry parameters of large, nonabsorbing, spheroidal particles with different aspect ratios are tabulated for the first time to our knowledge. They do not depend on the size of particles and can serve as an independent check of the accuracy of T-matrix codes for large parameters.

  13. Production of Large-Particle-Size Monodisperse Latexes in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderhoff, J. W.; Micale, F. J.; El-Aasser, M. S.; Kornfeld, M.

    1985-01-01

    A latex is a suspension of very tiny (micrometer-size) plastic spheres in water, stabilized by emulsifiers. The growth of billions of these tiny plastic spheres to sizes larger than can be grown on Earth is attempted while keeping all of them exactly the same size and perfectly spherical. Thus far on several of the Monodisperse Latex Reactor (MLR) flights, the latex spheres have been returned to Earth with standard deviations of better than 1.4%. In microgravity the absence of buoyancy effects has allowed growth of the balls up to 30 micrometers in diameter thus far. The MLR has now flown 5 times on the Shuttle. The MLR has now produced the first commercial space product; that is the first commercial material ever manufactured in space and marketed on Earth. Once it is demonstrated that these large-size-monodisperse latexes can be routinely produced in quantity and quality, they can be marketed for many types of scientific applications. They can be used in biomedical research for such things as drug carriers and tracers in the body, human and animal blood flow studies, membrane and pore-sizing in the body, and medical diagnostic tests.

  14. A distribution of large particles in the coma of Comet 103P/Hartley 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Michael S.; Lindler, Don J.; Bodewits, Dennis; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Lisse, Carey M.; Kolokolova, Ludmilla; Kissel, Jochen; Hermalyn, Brendan

    2013-02-01

    The coma of Comet 103P/Hartley 2 has a significant population of large particles observed as point sources in images taken by the Deep Impact spacecraft. We measure their spatial and flux distributions, and attempt to constrain their composition. The flux distribution of these particles implies a very steep size distribution with power-law slopes ranging from -6.6 to -4.7. The radii of the particles extend up to 20 cm, and perhaps up to 2 m, but their exact sizes depend on their unknown light scattering properties. We consider two cases: bright icy material, and dark dusty material. The icy case better describes the particles if water sublimation from the particles causes a significant rocket force, which we propose as the best method to account for the observed spatial distribution. Solar radiation is a plausible alternative, but only if the particles are very low density aggregates. If we treat the particles as mini-nuclei, we estimate they account for <16-80% of the comet's total water production rate (within 20.6 km). Dark dusty particles, however, are not favored based on mass arguments. The water production rate from bright icy particles is constrained with an upper limit of 0.1-0.5% of the total water production rate of the comet. If indeed icy with a high albedo, these particles do not appear to account for the comet's large water production rate.

  15. The detection of large HNO3-containing particles in the winter Arctic stratosphere.

    PubMed

    Fahey, D W; Gao, R S; Carslaw, K S; Kettleborough, J; Popp, P J; Northway, M J; Holecek, J C; Ciciora, S C; McLaughlin, R J; Thompson, T L; Winkler, R H; Baumgardner, D G; Gandrud, B; Wennberg, P O; Dhaniyala, S; McKinney, K; Peter, T; Salawitch, R J; Bui, T P; Elkins, J W; Webster, C R; Atlas, E L; Jost, H; Wilson, J C; Herman, R L; Kleinböhl, A; von König, M

    2001-02-09

    Large particles containing nitric acid (HNO3) were observed in the 1999/2000 Arctic winter stratosphere. These in situ observations were made over a large altitude range (16 to 21 kilometers) and horizontal extent (1800 kilometers) on several airborne sampling flights during a period of several weeks. With diameters of 10 to 20 micrometers, these sedimenting particles have significant potential to denitrify the lower stratosphere. A microphysical model of nitric acid trihydrate particles is able to simulate the growth and sedimentation of these large sizes in the lower stratosphere, but the nucleation process is not yet known. Accurate modeling of the formation of these large particles is essential for understanding Arctic denitrification and predicting future Arctic ozone abundances.

  16. Optical assessment of large marine particles: Development of an imaging and analysis system for quantifying large particle distributions and fluxes. Final report, June 1992--May 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, I.D.; Gardner, W.D.

    1997-04-01

    The central goal of DOE`s Ocean Margin Program (OMP) has been to determine whether continental shelves are quantitatively significant in removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and isolating it via burial in sediments or exporting it to the open ocean. The overall objective of this work within OMP was to develop an instrument package to measure the large aggregate population of particles in the shelf/slope environment at a rate sufficient to integrate the observed particle distributions into the coupled physical and biogeochemical models necessary to understand the shelf and slope as a system. Pursuant to this the authors have developed a video and optical instrument package (LAPS: Large Aggregate Profiling System) and assembled the computer and software methods to routinely measure a wide spectrum of the large aggregate population of particles in the shelf/slope environment. This particle population, encompassing the `marine snow` size particles (dia. > 0.5 mm), is thought to be the major pathway of material flux in the ocean. The instrument package collects aggregate abundance and size spectrum data using two video camera/strobe subsystems with a third subsystem collecting CTD, beam attenuation and fluorescence data. Additionally, measurements of particle flux were made with sediment traps deployed on the continental slope in conjunction with the physical oceanography mooring program. The authors envisioned a three stages development of the instrument package: (1) design, assembly, and laboratory testing of all components and the package as a whole, (2) a short period of laboratory and field testing of the instrument package to determine the best operational parameters, and (3) operations within a framework of complementary analytical sampling such as an appropriate process study funded under the OMP. The first two stages were covered by this proposal and completed. The third stage was limited to scoping work with the LAPS and deployment of sediment traps.

  17. Observation of quantum particles on a large space-time scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landau, L. J.

    1994-10-01

    A quantum particle observed on a sufficiently large space-time scale can be described by means of classical particle trajectories. The joint distribution for large-scale multiple-time position and momentum measurements on a nonrelativistic quantum particle moving freely in R v is given by straight-line trajectories with probabilities determined by the initial momentum-space wavefunction. For large-scale toroidal and rectangular regions the trajectories are geodesics. In a uniform gravitational field the trajectories are parabolas. A quantum counting process on free particles is also considered and shown to converge in the large-space-time limit to a classical counting process for particles with straight-line trajectories. If the quantum particle interacts weakly with its environment, the classical particle trajectories may undergo random jumps. In the random potential model considered here, the quantum particle evolves according to a reversible unitary one-parameter group describing elastic scattering off static randomly distributed impurities (a quantum Lorentz gas). In the large-space-time weak-coupling limit a classical stochastic process is obtained with probability one and describes a classical particle moving with constant speed in straight lines between random jumps in direction. The process depends only on the ensemble value of the covariance of the random field and not on the sample field. The probability density in phase space associated with the classical stochastic process satisfies the linear Boltzmann equation for the classical Lorentz gas, which, in the limit h→0, goes over to the linear Landau equation. Our study of the quantum Lorentz gas is based on a perturbative expansion and, as in other studies of this system, the series can be controlled only for small values of the rescaled time and for Gaussian random fields. The discussion of classical particle trajectories for nonrelativistic particles on a macroscopic spacetime scale applies also to

  18. Catalytic Metal Free Production of Large Cage Structure Carbon Particles: A Candidate for Hydrogen Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimura, Yuki; Nuth, Joseph A., III; Ferguson, Frank T.

    2005-01-01

    We will demonstrate that carbon particles consisting of large cages can be produced without catalytic metal. The carbon particles were produced in CO gas as well as by introduction of 5% methane gas into the CO gas. The gas-produced carbon particles were able to absorb approximately 16.2 wt% of hydrogen. This value is 2.5 times higher than the 6.5 wt% goal for the vehicular hydrogen storage proposed by the Department of Energy in the USA. Therefore, we believe that this carbon particle is an excellent candidate for hydrogen storage for fuel cells.

  19. Apparatuses and methods for detecting, identifying and quantitating radioactive nuclei and methods of distinguishing neutron stimulation of a radiation particle detector from gamma-ray stimulation of a detector

    DOEpatents

    Cole, Jerald D.; Drigert, Mark W.; Reber, Edward L.; Aryaeinejad, Rahmat

    2001-01-01

    In one aspect, the invention encompasses a method of detecting radioactive decay, comprising: a) providing a sample comprising a radioactive material, the radioactive material generating decay particles; b)providing a plurality of detectors proximate the sample, the detectors comprising a first set and a second set, the first set of the detectors comprising liquid state detectors utilizing liquid scintillation material coupled with photo tubes to generate a first electrical signal in response to decay particles stimulating the liquid scintillation material, the second set of the detectors comprising solid state detectors utilizing a crystalline solid to generate a second electrical signal in response to decay particles stimulating the crystalline solid; c) stimulating at least one of the detectors to generate at least one of the first and second electrical signals, the at least one of the first and second electrical signals being indicative of radioactive decay in the sample. In another aspect, the invention encompasses an apparatus for identifying and quantitating radioactive nuclei of a sample comprising radioactive material that decays to generate neutrons and high-energy .gamma.-rays.

  20. ORNL radioactive waste operations

    SciTech Connect

    Sease, J.D.; King, E.M.; Coobs, J.H.; Row, T.H.

    1982-01-01

    Since its beginning in 1943, ORNL has generated large amounts of solid, liquid, and gaseous radioactive waste material as a by-product of the basic research and development work carried out at the laboratory. The waste system at ORNL has been continually modified and updated to keep pace with the changing release requirements for radioactive wastes. Major upgrading projects are currently in progress. The operating record of ORNL waste operation has been excellent over many years. Recent surveillance of radioactivity in the Oak Ridge environs indicates that atmospheric concentrations of radioactivity were not significantly different from other areas in East Tennesseee. Concentrations of radioactivity in the Clinch River and in fish collected from the river were less than 4% of the permissible concentration and intake guides for individuals in the offsite environment. While some radioactivity was released to the environment from plant operations, the concentrations in all of the media sampled were well below established standards.

  1. The "AQUASCOPE" simplified model for predicting 89,90Sr, 131I, and 134,137Cs in surface waters after a large-scale radioactive fallout.

    PubMed

    Smith, J T; Belova, N V; Bulgakov, A A; Comans, R N J; Konoplev, A V; Kudelsky, A V; Madruga, M J; Voitsekhovitch, O V; Zibold, G

    2005-12-01

    Simplified dynamic models have been developed for predicting the concentrations of radiocesium, radiostrontium, and I in surface waters and freshwater fish following a large-scale radioactive fallout. The models are intended to give averaged estimates for radionuclides in water bodies and in fish for all times after a radioactive fallout event. The models are parameterized using empirical data collected for many lakes and rivers in Belarus, Russia, Ukraine, UK, Finland, Italy, The Netherlands, and Germany. These measurements span a long time period after fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing and following the Chernobyl accident. The models thus developed were tested against independent measurements from the Kiev Reservoir and Chernobyl Cooling Pond (Ukraine) and the Sozh River (Belarus) after the Chernobyl accident, from Lake Uruskul (Russia), following the Kyshtym accident in 1957, and from Haweswater Reservoir (UK), following atmospheric nuclear weapons testing. The AQUASCOPE models (implemented in EXCEL spreadsheets) and model documentation are available free of charge from the corresponding author.

  2. Novel Optical Diagnostic Techniques for Studying Particle Deposition Upon Large Cylinders in a Sheared Suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoda, M.; Bailey, B. C.

    2000-01-01

    On a twelve-month voyage to Mars, one astronaut will require at least two tons of potable water and two tons of pure oxygen. Efficient, reliable fluid reclamation is therefore necessary for manned space exploration. Space habitats require a compact, flexible, and robust apparatus capable of solid-fluid mechanical separation over a wide range of fluid and particle densities and particle sizes. In space, centrifugal filtration, where particles suspended in fluid are captured by rotating fixed-fiber mat filters, is a logical candidate for mechanical separation. Non-colloidal particles are deposited on the fibers due to inertial impaction or direct interception. Since rotation rates are easily adjustable, inertial effects are the most practical way to control separation rates for a wide variety of multiphase mixtures in variable gravity environments. Understanding how fluid inertia and differential fluid-particle inertia, characterized by the Reynolds and Stokes numbers, respectively, affect deposition is critical in optimizing filtration in a microgravity environment. This work will develop non-intrusive optical diagnostic techniques for directly visualizing where and when non-colloidal particles deposit upon, or contact, solid surfaces: 'particle proximity sensors'. To model particle deposition upon a single filter fiber, these sensors will be used in ground-based experiments to study particle dynamics as in the vicinity of a large (compared with the particles) cylinder in a simply sheared (i.e., linearly-varying, zero-mean velocity profile) neutrally-buoyant, refractive-index matched solid-liquid suspension.

  3. A Small Radioactive Source in a Large Media - Localization by Multi-detector Measurement. The Case of a Lung Counter

    SciTech Connect

    Alfassi, Z. B.; Pelled, O.; German, U.

    2008-08-14

    Considerable errors in the determination of radioactive contamination in lungs can be induced if there is no homogeneous distribution, as assumed for the calibration. Modern lung counter systems use several detectors, and the count rate ratios of the detectors can be used for localization of the radioactive contamination, enabling the use of correction algorithms. This greatly reduces the errors in the determination of the activity. Further reduction of the errors can be obtained by simultaneous analysis of several gamma lines (if several energies are emitted by the radioisotope), and by optimizing the number and location of the detectors. This presentation deals with the case of a point source of natural uranium in human lungs.

  4. Processing of radioactive waste by the use of low energy ({le} 100 MeV) charged particle accelerators. Optimization problems

    SciTech Connect

    Mushnikov, V.N.; Ozhigov, L.S.; Khizhnyak, N.A.

    1993-12-31

    The radiation processing of long-lived radiotoxic elements is based on transmutation reactions under the action of various particles and energies. Among the different particle sources the most promising is the proton accelerator. The present work studied the process of radiation deactivation in the stationary proton flux as functions of their flux density and energy. The Bateman-Robinson differential equations were solved.

  5. Large eddy simulation of the gas-particle turbulent wake flow.

    PubMed

    Luo, Kun; Jin, Han-hui; Fan, Jian-ren; Cen, Ke-fa

    2004-01-01

    To find out the detailed characteristics of the coherent structures and associated particle dispersion in free shear flow, large eddy simulation method was adopted to investigate a two-dimensional particle-laden wake flow. The well-known Sub-grid Scale mode introduced by Smagorinsky was employed to simulate the gas flow field and Lagrangian approach was used to trace the particles. The results showed that the typical large-scale vortex structures exhibit a stable counter rotating arrangement of opposite sign, and alternately form from the near wall region, shed and move towards the downstream positions of the wake with the development of the flow. For particle dispersion, the Stokes number of particles is a key parameter. At the Stokes numbers of 1.4 and 3.8 the particles concentrate highly in the outer boundary regions. While the particles congregate densely in the vortex core regions at the Stokes number of 0.15, and the particles at Stokes number of 15 assemble in the vortex braid regions and the rib regions between the adjoining vortex structures.

  6. Optical assessment of large marine particles: development of an imaging and analysis system for quantifying large particle distributions and fluxes. Annual report, 1993-1994

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, I.D.; Gardner, W.D.

    1994-12-31

    The central goal of DOE`s Ocean Margin Program (OMP) is to determine whether continental shelves are quantitatively significant in removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and isolating it via burial in sediments or exporting it to the open ocean (Program Announcement, 1991). A major component of the OMP will be to measure carbon flux on the shelf and across the shelf to the slope and open ocean. In the first round of OMP funding we proposed to develop an optical instrument package and the analytical techniques to measure a wide spectrum of the large aggregate population of particles in the shelf/slope environment. This particle population, encompassing the ``marine snow`` size particles (diameters > 0.5 mm), is thought to be the major pathway of material flux in the ocean (McCave, 1975; Asper, 1987; Walsh and Gardner, 1992). The overall objective of this proposal was to develop an instrument package and the analytical techniques to precisely measure a wide spectrum of the large aggregate population of particles in the shelf/slope environment at a rate sufficient to integrate the observed particle distributions into the coupled physical and biogeochemical models necessary to understand the shelf and slope as a system. We envisioned three stages of development of the instrument package: (1) design, assembly, and laboratory testing of all components and the package as a whole, (2) a short period of laboratory and field testing of the instrument package to determine the best operational parameters, and (3) operations within a framework of complementary analytical sampling such as an appropriate process study funded under the OMP. The first two stages were covered by this proposal. A renewal proposal follows to cover the third stage. 6 figs.

  7. Use of incomplete energy recovery for the energy compression of large energy spread charged particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Douglas, David R.; Benson, Stephen V.

    2007-01-23

    A method of energy recovery for RF-base linear charged particle accelerators that allows energy recovery without large relative momentum spread of the particle beam involving first accelerating a waveform particle beam having a crest and a centroid with an injection energy E.sub.o with the centroid of the particle beam at a phase offset f.sub.o from the crest of the accelerating waveform to an energy E.sub.full and then recovering the beam energy centroid a phase f.sub.o+Df relative to the crest of the waveform particle beam such that (E.sub.full-E.sub.o)(1+cos(f.sub.o+Df))>dE/2 wherein dE=the full energy spread, dE/2=the full energy half spread and Df=the wave form phase distance.

  8. Do large fluorescent particles enhance the modulation efficiency of ultrasound-modulated fluorescence?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan; Yuan, Baohong; Vignola, Joseph

    2011-03-01

    The question of whether particle size affects modulation efficiency, defined as the ratio of ultrasound-modulated fluorescence (UMF) signal to DC (direct current) signal, of the fluorescence emission from four different sized fluorescent particles was investigated experimentally. The four particles are streptavidin-conjugated Alexa Fluo 647 ({5 nm in diameter) and three carboxylate-modified fluorescent microspheres (FM) with different diameters of 0.02, 0.2, and 1.0 μm. Modulation efficiency was evaluated as a function of the fluorophore size and fluorophore concentration. The modulation efficiency was improved about two times when the size of the fluorescent particles is increased from 5 nm to 1 μm. This result implies that using large fluorescence particles can slightly improve the modulation efficiency but the improvement is limited.

  9. Trajectory Studies of Large HNO3-Containing PSC Particles in the Arctic: Evidence for the Role of NAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKinney, K. A.; Wennberg, P. O.; Dhaniyala, S.; Fahey, D. W.; Northway, M. J.; Kuenzi, K. F.; Kleinboehl, A.; Sinnhuber, M.; Kuellmann, H.; Bremer, H.; Mahoney, M. J.; Bui, T. P.

    2004-01-01

    Large (5 to >20 micron diameter) nitric-acid-containing polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particles were observed in the Arctic stratosphere during the winter of 1999-2000. We use a particle growth and sedimentation model to investigate the environment in which these particles grew and the likely phase of the largest particles. Particle trajectory calculations show that, while simulated nitric acid dihydrate (NAD) particle sizes are significantly smaller than the observed maximum particle sizes, nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) particle trajectories are consistent with the largest observed particle sizes.

  10. Theory of resistive magnetohydrodynamic instabilities excited by energetic-trapped particles in large-size tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Biglari, H.; Chen, L.; White, R.B.

    1987-02-01

    It is shown that, in present-day large-size tokamaks, finite resistivity modifies qualitatively the stability properties of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities resonantly excited by the unfavorable processional drift of energetic-trapped particles, i.e., the so-called ''fishbone''-type instabilities. Specifically, it is found that (1) the n = 1 energetic-trapped particle-induced internal kink (''fishbone'') instability is strongly stabilized by resistive dissipation and (2) finite resistivity lowers considerably the threshold conditions for resonant excitations of high-n ballooning/interchange modes. The possibility of exciting fishbones by alpha particles in ignition experiments is also considered.

  11. Large-eddy simulation of particle-laden atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilie, Marcel; Smith, Stefan Llewellyn

    2008-11-01

    Pollen dispersion in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) is numerically investigated using a hybrid large-eddy simulation (LES) Lagrangian approach. Interest in prediction of pollen dispersion stems from two reasons, the allergens in the pollen grains and increasing genetic manipulation of plants leading to the problem of cross pollination. An efficient Eulerian-Lagrangian particle dispersion algorithm for the prediction of pollen dispersion in the atmospheric boundary layer is outlined. The volume fraction of the dispersed phase is assumed to be small enough such that particle-particle collisions are negligible and properties of the carrier flow are not modified. Only the effect of turbulence on particle motion has to be taken into account (one-way coupling). Hence the continuous phase can be treated separate from the particulate phase. The continuous phase is determined by LES in the Eulerian frame of reference whereas the dispersed phase is simulated in a Lagrangian frame of reference. Numerical investigations are conducted for the convective, neutral and stable boundary layer as well different topographies. The results of the present study indicate that particles with small diameter size follow the flow streamlines, behaving as tracers, while particles with large diameter size tend to follow trajectories which are independent of the flow streamlines. Particles of ellipsoidal shape travel faster than the ones of spherical shape.

  12. Data Compression Algorithm Architecture for Large Depth-of-Field Particle Image Velocimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bos, Brent; Memarsadeghi, Nargess; Kizhner, Semion; Antonille, Scott

    2013-01-01

    A large depth-of-field particle image velocimeter (PIV) is designed to characterize dynamic dust environments on planetary surfaces. This instrument detects lofted dust particles, and senses the number of particles per unit volume, measuring their sizes, velocities (both speed and direction), and shape factors when the particles are large. To measure these particle characteristics in-flight, the instrument gathers two-dimensional image data at a high frame rate, typically >4,000 Hz, generating large amounts of data for every second of operation, approximately 6 GB/s. To characterize a planetary dust environment that is dynamic, the instrument would have to operate for at least several minutes during an observation period, easily producing more than a terabyte of data per observation. Given current technology, this amount of data would be very difficult to store onboard a spacecraft, and downlink to Earth. Since 2007, innovators have been developing an autonomous image analysis algorithm architecture for the PIV instrument to greatly reduce the amount of data that it has to store and downlink. The algorithm analyzes PIV images and automatically reduces the image information down to only the particle measurement data that is of interest, reducing the amount of data that is handled by more than 10(exp 3). The state of development for this innovation is now fairly mature, with a functional algorithm architecture, along with several key pieces of algorithm logic, that has been proven through field test data acquired with a proof-of-concept PIV instrument.

  13. Large Eddy Simulation of Transient Flow, Solidification, and Particle Transport Processes in Continuous-Casting Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongqiu; Li, Linmin; Li, Baokuan; Jiang, Maofa

    2014-07-01

    The current study developed a coupled computational model to simulate the transient fluid flow, solidification, and particle transport processes in a slab continuous-casting mold. Transient flow of molten steel in the mold is calculated using the large eddy simulation. An enthalpy-porosity approach is used for the analysis of solidification processes. The transport of bubble and non-metallic inclusion inside the liquid pool is calculated using the Lagrangian approach based on the transient flow field. A criterion of particle entrapment in the solidified shell is developed using the user-defined functions of FLUENT software (ANSYS, Inc., Canonsburg, PA). The predicted results of this model are compared with the measurements of the ultrasonic testing of the rolled steel plates and the water model experiments. The transient asymmetrical flow pattern inside the liquid pool exhibits quite satisfactory agreement with the corresponding measurements. The predicted complex instantaneous velocity field is composed of various small recirculation zones and multiple vortices. The transport of particles inside the liquid pool and the entrapment of particles in the solidified shell are not symmetric. The Magnus force can reduce the entrapment ratio of particles in the solidified shell, especially for smaller particles, but the effect is not obvious. The Marangoni force can play an important role in controlling the motion of particles, which increases the entrapment ratio of particles in the solidified shell obviously.

  14. Investigation of particle-laden flow in a straight duct using large eddy simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Fairweather, M.; Yao, J.

    2007-07-01

    A particle-laden turbulent flow in a square duct is predicted using large eddy simulation (LES). The simulation is performed for a Reynolds number of 35,500, and correctly predicts the existence of secondary flows and their effects on the mean flow. The results are also in good qualitative agreement with experimental data obtained at different Reynolds numbers. One-way coupling is assumed between solid particles and the fluid, and a particle equation of motion, including Stokes drag, lift, buoyancy and gravity force terms, solved using a Lagrangian particle tracking technique. Three sizes of particle (1, 50 and 100 {mu}m) are considered, and results demonstrate that size has a significant effect on particle dispersion and deposition in the duct flow. As particle size increases, therefore, they tend to settle on the floor of the duct, with less dispersion in the fluid phase. The study demonstrates the usefulness of LES for nuclear waste processing applications since secondary flows occur in many practically-relevant flows, and since it is desirable that the two-phase waste mixture is kept as homogeneous as possible to prevent, or at least discourage, the settling out of solid particles to form a bed which can promote pipe blockages. (authors)

  15. An experimental approach to measure particle deposition in large circular ventilation ducts.

    PubMed

    Da, Guillaume; Géhin, Evelyne; Ben-Othmane, Mourad; Havet, Michel; Solliec, Camille; Motzkus, Charles

    2015-04-01

    The topic of this study is related to airborne particle dynamics in indoor environments. Lab-scale experiments have been performed to investigate particle deposition velocity to six different surfaces orientations (with respect to gravity) for fully developed turbulent flow in horizontal large circular ventilation ducts. Monodispersed aerosol particles (1-6 μm) were used in the deposition experiments. A very low particle mass (40 ng) was measured reliably above background level on duct surfaces by a means of a nondestructive stencil technique associated with fluorescence analysis. For 2-6 μm particles (diffusion and impaction regime), deposition rates to floors were much greater than rates to the ceiling and greater than rates to the wall. For 1-μm particles, the effect of surface orientation to particle deposition was not significant. Results were compared to the very few similar and published studies. This work was conducted in the frame of the CleanAirNet project which aimed at producing new knowledge, models, and techniques to help controlling the safety food stuffs, through a better control of aerosol particle (bioaerosols) transport and deposition in the ventilation networks of the food industry.

  16. Optical assessment of large marine particles: development of an imaging and analysis sytem for quantifying large particle distributions and fluxes. Annual report, 1992-1993

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, I.D.; Gardner, W.D.

    1994-05-01

    The central goal of DOE`s Ocean Margin Program (OMP) is to determine whether continental shelves are quantitatively significant in removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and isolating it via burial in sediments or exporting it to the open ocean (Program Announcement, 1991). A major component of the OMP will be to measure carbon flux on the shelf and across the shelf to the slope and open ocean. We are developing a video and optical instrument package (LAPS: Large Aggregate Profiling System) and the analytical techniques to precisely measure a wide spectrum of the large aggregate population of particles in the shelf/slope environment. This particle population, encompassing the ``marine snow`` size particles (diameters > 0.5 mm), is thought to be the major pathway of material flux in the ocean (McCave, 1975; Asper, 1987; Walsh and Gardner, 1992). Our goal is to use aggregate abundance and size spectrum data along with the CTD, beam attenuation and fluorescence data collected with our instrument package to collect data rapidly, repeatedly and accurately such that it is both linkable to carbon flux and usable in biophysical models. Additionally, measurements of particle flux will be made with sediment traps deployed on the continental slope in conjunction with the physical oceanography program. The combination of profiles and sections of aggregate data along with the measured mass flux and chemistry from the sediment traps will allow for a robust estimate of the mass transport and flux of organic carbon via the aggregate pathway. The LAPS will be tested in the field area during a cruise in June/July 1994. Sediment traps will also be deployed on that cruise to make the first comparisons between measured flux and aggregate abundance in the field area. Efforts to streamline the image processing have resulted in a suite of programs to handle data from capture to binned data. 5 refs.

  17. Computational fluid dynamics simulations of particle deposition in large-scale, multigenerational lung models.

    PubMed

    Walters, D Keith; Luke, William H

    2011-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has emerged as a useful tool for the prediction of airflow and particle transport within the human lung airway. Several published studies have demonstrated the use of Eulerian finite-volume CFD simulations coupled with Lagrangian particle tracking methods to determine local and regional particle deposition rates in small subsections of the bronchopulmonary tree. However, the simulation of particle transport and deposition in large-scale models encompassing more than a few generations is less common, due in part to the sheer size and complexity of the human lung airway. Highly resolved, fully coupled flowfield solution and particle tracking in the entire lung, for example, is currently an intractable problem and will remain so for the foreseeable future. This paper adopts a previously reported methodology for simulating large-scale regions of the lung airway (Walters, D. K., and Luke, W. H., 2010, "A Method for Three-Dimensional Navier-Stokes Simulations of Large-Scale Regions of the Human Lung Airway," ASME J. Fluids Eng., 132(5), p. 051101), which was shown to produce results similar to fully resolved geometries using approximate, reduced geometry models. The methodology is extended here to particle transport and deposition simulations. Lagrangian particle tracking simulations are performed in combination with Eulerian simulations of the airflow in an idealized representation of the human lung airway tree. Results using the reduced models are compared with those using the fully resolved models for an eight-generation region of the conducting zone. The agreement between fully resolved and reduced geometry simulations indicates that the new method can provide an accurate alternative for large-scale CFD simulations while potentially reducing the computational cost of these simulations by several orders of magnitude.

  18. Large Field of View Particle-Image Velocimetry (LF-PIV): Design and Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pol, Suhas; Hoffman, John; Balasubramaniam, Balakumar; P-23, LANL Team

    2011-11-01

    We discuss the challenges and limitations associated with the development of a Large Field of View Particle Image Velocimetry (LF-PIV) diagnostic that is capable of resolving large scale motions (3m x 1m per camera) in gas phase laboratory experiments. While this diagnostic is developed for the measurement of wakes and local inflow conditions around research wind turbines, the design considerations provided here are also relevant for the application of LF-PIV to atmospheric boundary layer, rotorcraft dynamics and large-scale wind tunnel flows. Scaling laws associated with LF-PIV systems are presented along with the performance analysis of low-density, large diameter Expancel particles that appear to be promising candidates for LF-PIV seeding. Comparison of data obtained by LF-PIV measurements (2MP camera) and regular format sized PIV measurements show an agreement of within 1% for mean velocity and 8% for turbulent statistics respectively. Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM, USA.

  19. Diffusion-limited attachment of large spherical particles to flexible membrane-immobilized receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P; Höök, Fredrik

    2015-05-01

    Relatively large (~100 nm) spherical particles, e.g., virions, vesicles, or metal nanoparticles, often interact with short (<10 nm) flexible receptors immobilized in a lipid membrane or on other biologically relevant surfaces. The attachment kinetics of such particles may be limited globally by their diffusion toward a membrane or locally by diffusion around receptors. The detachment kinetics, also, can be limited by diffusion. Focusing on local diffusion limitations and using suitable approximations, we present expressions for the corresponding rate constants and identify their dependence on particle size and receptor length. We also illustrate features likely to be observed in such kinetics for particles (e.g., vesicles) with a substantial size distribution. The results obtained are generic and can be used to interpret a variety of situations. For example, we estimate upper values of virion attachment rate constants and clarify the likely effect of vesicle size distribution on previously observed non-exponential kinetics of vesicle detachment.

  20. A Two-Level, Discrete Particle Approach for Large-Scale Simulation of Colloidal Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzwinel, Witold; Yuen, David A.

    Most numerical techniques employed for aggregation simulation are based on equilibrium growth assumption and Smoluchowski theory. We present a new two-level discrete particle model, which can be employed in simulating large colloidal clusters in highly nonequilibrium physical conditions. We consider the system of colloidal particles (CP) interacting via conservative CP-CP repulsive-attractive two-body forces, which is initially mixed in a dissipative solvent. In order to obtain a high-resolution picture of colloidal dynamics, we employ around 20 million particles consisting of two kinds of particles. For bridging the spatio-temporal scales between nanoscale colloidal and the solvent particles (SP), the solvent is modeled by dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) fluid. We focus on the systems size for which the CP-SP interactions can also be described by the DPD forces. Unlike previous numerical techniques, the two-level particle model can display much more realistic physics, thus allowing for the simulation of aggregation for various types of colloids and solvent liquids in a broad range of conditions. We show that not only large and static clusters but also the initial stages of aggregation evolution can be better scrutinized. The large-scale simulation results obtained in two-dimensions show that the mean cluster size grows with time t according to the power law tκ. Because of the time-dependence of growth mechanism, the value of κ necessarily must change. We have first κ=1 with a value of 1 achieved asymptotically with time. We can also discern intermediate-scale structures. We emphasize that the method developed here can be easily extended to algorithms dealing with multi-level hierarchy and multiphase fluid dynamics.

  1. Bulk GaN alpha-particle detector with large depletion region and improved energy resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qiang; Mulligan, Padhraic; Wang, Jinghui; Chuirazzi, William; Cao, Lei

    2017-03-01

    An alpha-particle detector was fabricated using a freestanding n-type bulk GaN wafer with a Au/Ni/GaN sandwich Schottky structure. Current-voltage measurements at room temperature revealed a Schottky contact with a leakage current of 7.53±0.3 nA at a reverse bias of 200 V. The detector had a large depletion depth that can capture much of the energy from 5.486 MeV alpha particles emitted from a 241Am source. The resolution of its alpha-particle energy spectrum was improved to 2.2±0.2% at 5.486 MeV under a bias of 550 V. This superior resolution was attributed to the shortening of the carrier transit time and the large energy deposition within the large depletion depth, i.e., 27 μm at -550 V, which all resulted in a more complete charge collection. A model developed using the ATLAS simulation framework from Silvaco Inc. was employed to study the charge collection process. The simulation results were found to agree closely with the experimental results. This detector will be beneficial for research at neutron scattering facilities, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, and the Large Hadron Collider, among other institutions, where the Si-based charged particle detectors could be quickly degraded in an intense radiation field.

  2. Self-ducting of large-amplitude whistler waves. [wave-particle interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenzel, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    Whistler waves are launched from an electric dipole of length L in a large-volume laboratory plasma. With increasing wave amplitude, the radiation pattern narrows and finally forms a duct of diameter approximately equal to L. The ducted waves propagate nearly undamped. The observed nonlinear effects are explained by wave-particle interactions.

  3. Tuning the bridging attraction between large hard particles by the softness of small microgels.

    PubMed

    Luo, Junhua; Yuan, Guangcui; Han, Charles C

    2016-09-20

    In this study, the attraction between large hard polystyrene (PS) spheres is studied by using three types of small microgels as bridging agents. One is a purely soft poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) microgel, the other two have a non-deformable PS hard core surrounded by a soft PNIPAM shell but are different in the core-shell ratio. The affinity for bridging the large PS spheres is provided and thus affected by the PNIPAM constituent in the microgels. The bridging effects caused by the microgels can be indirectly incorporated into their influence on the effective attraction interaction between the large hard spheres, since the size of the microgels is very small in comparison to the size of the PS hard spheres. At a given volume fraction of large PS spheres, they behave essentially as hard spheres in the absence of small microgels. By gradually adding the microgels, the large spheres are connected to each other through the bridging of small particles until the attraction strength reaches a maximum value, after which adding more small particles slowly decreases the effective attraction strength and eventually the large particles disperse individually when saturated adsorption is achieved. The aggregation and gelation behaviors triggered by these three types of small microgels are compared and discussed. A way to tune the strength and range of the short-range attractive potential via changing the softness of bridging microgels (which can be achieved either by using core-shell microgels or by changing the temperature) is proposed.

  4. Lightcurves and revised masses of the large particles at comet 103P/Hartley 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Michael S.; Farnham, Tony L.; Hermalyn, Brendan; Bodewits, Dennis; A'Hearn, Michael F.

    2015-11-01

    Comet 103P/Hartley 2 is a hyperactive comet. Such comets have nuclei with surface areas comparable to the surface area required to sustain their water production rates, implying the surface is near 100% active. However, images of the nucleus and inner coma by the Deep Impact Flyby spacecraft show signficant localized activity, dominated by a single strong active area (A'Hearn et al. 2011, Science 332, 1396). This active area seems to be driven by carbon dioxide ice sublimation, which releases water ice into the coma (Protopapa et al. 2014, Icarus 238, 191). It has been hypothesized that this water-ice-rich material is the origin of the comet's hyperactivity, but this has not yet been definitively demonstrated.The Deep Imact spacecraft also imaged thousands of point sources surrounding the nucleus of the comet (A'Hearn et al. 2011). These sources are particles ejected by the comet, the largest of which is estimated to have a radius between 30 and 400 cm. The wide range in the radius estimate is due to the unknown photometric properties of the particles. If the particles are icy, they may contribute a significant fraction of the comet's water production rate (Kelley et al. 2013, Icarus 222, 634).To better elucidate the physical properties of the particles, we generated particle lightcurves, based on the identifications of Hermalyn et al. (2013, Icarus 222, 625) and a an independent (manual) particle search. We find no clear correlation with time or phase angle, suggesting the lightcurves are primarily driven by particle shape rather than sublimation, fragmentation, or phase effects. Three lightcurves are double-peaked, indicating rotation periods near 75 to 300 s. At least one other lightcurve suggests a rotation period of order 20 s.We also present corrections to the analysis of Kelley et al. (2013) that decrease the total large particle population mass estimates by two orders of magnitude. Despite the revision, the large particles may still account for the comet

  5. Superficially porous particles with 1000Å pores for large biomolecule high performance liquid chromatography and polymer size exclusion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Brian M; Schuster, Stephanie A; Boyes, Barry E; Shields, Taylor J; Miles, William L; Haynes, Mark J; Moran, Robert E; Kirkland, Joseph J; Schure, Mark R

    2017-03-17

    To facilitate mass transport and column efficiency, solutes must have free access to particle pores to facilitate interactions with the stationary phase. To ensure this feature, particles should be used for HPLC separations which have pores sufficiently large to accommodate the solute without restricted diffusion. This paper describes the design and properties of superficially porous (also called Fused-Core(®), core shell or porous shell) particles with very large (1000Å) pores specifically developed for separating very large biomolecules and polymers. Separations of DNA fragments, monoclonal antibodies, large proteins and large polystyrene standards are used to illustrate the utility of these particles for efficient, high-resolution applications.

  6. Measurements of radioactive contaminants in semiconductor materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Michael S.; Rodbell, Kenneth P.; Murray, Conal E.; McNally, Brendan D.

    2016-12-01

    The emission of alpha particles from materials used to manufacture semiconductors can contribute substantially to the single-event upset rate. The alpha particles originate from contamination in the materials, or from radioactive isotopes, themselves. In this review paper, we discuss the sources of the radioactivity and the measurement methods to detect the emitted particles.

  7. Potential nucleation scavenging of smoke particles over large fires: A parametric study

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, L L; Penner, J E

    1987-08-01

    During hypothesized nuclear exchanges massive fires may be ignited and inject large amounts of smoke into the atmosphere. Considerable evidence has been accumulated to suggest that nucleation scavenging where smoke particles serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) may be an important mechanism for incorporating these particles into cloud water. The fraction of smoke particles that act as CCN depends on the cloud environment as well as the affinity of the smoke particles to water. A numerical model of the detailed microphysics of condensation growth on aerosol and cloud drop distributions is employed to produce a parametric study of the dependence of nucleation to a range of conditions. We consider aerosol number concentrations of 10/sup 9//m/sup 3/ to 10/sup 13//m/sup 3/, updraft speeds from 1 to 100 m/s and aerosol particles from fully water soluble to insoluble but wettable. The study provides insight into how well we must characterize smoke particles in order to predict the fraction that act as CCN given the dynamical environment.

  8. Large-eddy simulation of heavy particle dispersion in wall-bounded turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvetti, M. V.

    2015-03-01

    Capabilities and accuracy issues in Lagrangian tracking of heavy particles in velocity fields obtained from large-eddy simulations (LES) of wall-bounded turbulent flows are reviewed. In particular, it is shown that, if no subgrid scale (SGS) model is added to the particle motion equations, particle preferential concentration and near-wall accumulation are significantly underestimated. Results obtained with SGS modeling for the particle motion equations based on approximate deconvolution are briefly recalled. Then, the error purely due to filtering in particle tracking in LES flow fields is singled out and analyzed. The statistical properties of filtering errors are characterized in turbulent channel flow both from an Eulerian and a Lagrangian viewpoint. Implications for stochastic SGS modeling in particle motion equations are briefly outlined. The author is retracting this article due to a significant overlap in content from three previously published papers [Phys. Fluids 20, 040603 (2008); Phys. Fluids 24, 045103 (2012); Acta Mech. 201(1-4), 277 (2008)], which constitutes dual publication. The author would like to apologize for any inconvenience this has caused. The article is retracted from the scientific record with effect from 12 January 2017.

  9. Alpha-particle radiotherapy: For large solid tumors diffusion trumps targeting.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Charles; Sempkowski, Michelle; Holleran, Timothy; Linz, Thomas; Bertalan, Thomas; Josefsson, Anders; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Morgenstern, Alfred; Sofou, Stavroula

    2017-06-01

    Diffusion limitations on the penetration of nanocarriers in solid tumors hamper their therapeutic use when labeled with α-particle emitters. This is mostly due to the α-particles' relatively short range (≤100 μm) resulting in partial tumor irradiation and limited killing. To utilize the high therapeutic potential of α-particles against solid tumors, we designed non-targeted, non-internalizing nanometer-sized tunable carriers (pH-tunable liposomes) that are triggered to release, within the slightly acidic tumor interstitium, highly-diffusive forms of the encapsulated α-particle generator Actinium-225 ((225)Ac) resulting in more homogeneous distributions of the α-particle emitters, improving uniformity in tumor irradiation and increasing killing efficacies. On large multicellular spheroids (400 μm-in-diameter), used as surrogates of the avascular areas of solid tumors, interstitially-releasing liposomes resulted in best growth control independent of HER2 expression followed in performance by (a) the HER2-targeting radiolabeled antibody or (b) the non-responsive liposomes. In an orthotopic human HER2-negative mouse model, interstitially-releasing (225)Ac-loaded liposomes resulted in the longest overall and median survival. This study demonstrates the therapeutic potential of a general strategy to bypass the diffusion-limited transport of radionuclide carriers in solid tumors enabling interstitial release from non-internalizing nanocarriers of highly-diffusing and deeper tumor-penetrating molecular forms of α-particle emitters, independent of cell-targeting.

  10. Large-eddy simulation of charged particle flows to model sandstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Mustafa; Cheng, Wan; Samtaney, Ravi

    2016-11-01

    Intense electric fields and lightning have been observed in sandstorms. It is proposed to investigate the physical mechanisms essential for production and sustenance of large-scale electric fields in sandstorms. Our central hypothesis is that the turbulent transport of charged sand particles is a necessary condition to attain sustained large-scale electric fields in sandstorms. Our investigation relies on simulating turbulent two-phase (air and suspended sand particles) flows in which the flow of air is governed by the filtered Navier-Stokes equations with a subgrid-scale model in a Large-Eddy-Simulation setting, while dust particles are modeled using the Eulerian approach using a version of the Direct Quadrature Method of Moments. For the fluid phase, the LES of incompressible turbulent boundary layer employs stretched spiral vortex subgrid-scale model and a virtual wall model similar to the work of Cheng, Pullin & Samtaney. We will quantify the effects of different sand particle distributions, and turbulent intensities on the root-mean-square of the generated electric fields. Supported by KAUST OCRF under Award Number URF/1/1704-01-01. The supercomputer Shaheen at KAUST is used for all simulations.

  11. Management of large radicular cyst associated with amalgam particles in cystic lining.

    PubMed

    Borkar, Swati A; Dhupar, Vikas; Gadkar, Abhilasha M; Nivedita, C K V S

    2016-01-01

    The failure of amalgam retrofilling and presence of an associated cystic lesion makes surgical endodontic intervention inevitable. Amalgam retrofilling can also give rise to mucoperiosteal tattoo formation and allow incorporation of amalgam particles in the cystic lining. Such a finding has not yet been reported in the endodontic literature. This case report describes the successful endodontic management of a large radicular cyst associated with failed amalgam retrofilling, mucoperiosteal tattoo and amalgam particles dispersed in the epithelial cystic lining. All four mandibular incisors associated with the lesion presented with Weine Type II canal anatomy. The follow-up revealed clinical and radiographic signs of healing.

  12. Development of a large-area silicon α-particle detector.

    PubMed

    Tran, Linh T; Prokopovich, Dale A; Lerch, Michael L F; Petasecca, Marco; Siegele, Rainer; Reinhard, Mark I; Perevertaylo, Vladimir; Rosenfeld, Anatoly B

    2014-09-01

    Circular ion-implanted silicon detector of α-particles with a large, 5-cm(2), sensitive area has been developed. An advantage of the detector is that the detector surface is easily cleanable with chemicals. The hardened surface of the detector shows no signs of deterioration of the spectroscopic and electrical characteristics upon repeated cleaning. The energy resolution along the diameters of the detector was (1.0±0.1)% for the 5.486-MeV α-particles. Detailed tests of the charge collection efficiency and uniformity of the detector entrance window were also performed with a 5.5-MeV He(2+) microbeam.

  13. ISIS observations of auroral particles and large-scale Birkeland currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klumpar, D. M.

    1981-01-01

    Simultaneous electron and positive ion observations made with single-component magnetic perturbations on the ISIS-2 satellite are used to compare and contrast the relationships between primary and secondary auroral particle distributions at 5 eV-15 keV, and the large-scale Birkeland currents, in the pre- and post-midnight local time sectors. No unique relation is found between the regions of the Birkeland current system and regions of auroral particle distribution, though repeatable systematics in the region of upward-directed current are observed, and little evidence exists in either local time sector for the direct detection of the downward current-associated current carriers.

  14. Nonlinear d--ta-f Simulation Studies of Intense Charged Particle Beams with Large Temperature Anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Edward A. Startsev; Ronald C. Davidson; Hong Qin

    2002-05-07

    In this paper, a 3-D nonlinear perturbative particle simulation code (BEST) [H. Qin, R.C. Davidson and W.W. Lee, Physical Review Special Topics on Accelerators and Beams 3 (2000) 084401] is used to systematically study the stability properties of intense nonneutral charged particle beams with large temperature anisotropy (T{sub {perpendicular}b} >> T{sub {parallel}b}). The most unstable modes are identified, and their eigen frequencies, radial mode structure, and nonlinear dynamics are determined for axisymmetric perturbations with {partial_derivative}/{partial_derivative}{theta} = 0.

  15. Design considerations for large field particle image velocimetery (LF-PIV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pol, S. U.; Balakumar, B. J.

    2013-02-01

    We discuss the challenges and limitations associated with the development of a large field of view particle image velocimetry (LF-PIV) diagnostic, capable of resolving large-scale motions (>1 m per camera) in gas phase laboratory and field experiments. While this diagnostic is developed for the measurement of wakes and local inflow conditions around research wind turbines, the design considerations provided here are also relevant for the application of LF-PIV to atmospheric boundary layer, rotorcraft dynamics and large-scale wind tunnel flows. Measurements over an area of 0.75 m × 1.0 m on a confined vortex were obtained using a standard 2MP camera, with the potential for increasing this area significantly using 11MP cameras. The cameras in this case were oriented orthogonal to the measurement plane receiving only the side-scattered component of light from the particles. Scaling laws associated with LF-PIV systems are also presented along with the performance analysis of low-density, large diameter Expancel particles, that appear to be promising candidates for LF-PIV seeding.

  16. Analysis of volatiles present in interplanetary dust and stratospheric particles collected on large area collectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmetz, C. P.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Blanford, G. E.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented from an analysis of six chondritic interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and 22 other stratospheric particles collected on large-area collector, carried out in order to obtain information on the nature, distribution, and form of volatiles in IDPs. A laser microprobe/mass spectrometer (LMMS) was used to extract volatile elements and molecules from particles larger than 10 microns, and an improved hexane rinsing technique was developed for the removal of contaminants. Results show that, because of contamination from silicone oil, freon, and hexane, most of the LMMS signal from IDPs can be interpreted as arising from contamination. Therefore, a species was not considered indigenous unless the signal was an order of magnitude greater in abundance than that released from a pure contaminant coated on gold.

  17. Automated 3D trajectory measuring of large numbers of moving particles.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hai Shan; Zhao, Qi; Zou, Danping; Chen, Yan Qiu

    2011-04-11

    Complex dynamics of natural particle systems, such as insect swarms, bird flocks, fish schools, has attracted great attention of scientists for years. Measuring 3D trajectory of each individual in a group is vital for quantitative study of their dynamic properties, yet such empirical data is rare mainly due to the challenges of maintaining the identities of large numbers of individuals with similar visual features and frequent occlusions. We here present an automatic and efficient algorithm to track 3D motion trajectories of large numbers of moving particles using two video cameras. Our method solves this problem by formulating it as three linear assignment problems (LAP). For each video sequence, the first LAP obtains 2D tracks of moving targets and is able to maintain target identities in the presence of occlusions; the second one matches the visually similar targets across two views via a novel technique named maximum epipolar co-motion length (MECL), which is not only able to effectively reduce matching ambiguity but also further diminish the influence of frequent occlusions; the last one links 3D track segments into complete trajectories via computing a globally optimal assignment based on temporal and kinematic cues. Experiment results on simulated particle swarms with various particle densities validated the accuracy and robustness of the proposed method. As real-world case, our method successfully acquired 3D flight paths of fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) group comprising hundreds of freely flying individuals.

  18. An inventory of particle and gaseous emissions from large aircraft thrust engine operations at an airport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazaheri, M.; Johnson, G. R.; Morawska, L.

    2011-07-01

    Published particle number emission factors for aircraft operations remain very sparse and so far such emissions have not been included in the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) databases. This work addresses this gap in knowledge by utilizing recent progress in the quantification of aircraft particle emissions. Annual emissions of particle number (PN), particle mass (PM 2.5) and NO x throughout the aircraft landing and takeoff (LTO) cycles and ground running procedures (GRP) are presented for aircraft using Brisbane Airport BNE (domestic and international). The aircraft are grouped according to an airframe based classification system. The resulting data are then used to develop an emissions inventory for large aircraft thrust engine operations on the ground, during LTO cycles and GRP, at the Airport. Annual PN, PM 2.5 and NO x emissions from large aircraft operations during LTO cycles and GRP at BNE were 1.98 × 10 24 yr -1, 1.35 × 10 4 kg yr -1 and 8.13 × 10 5 kg yr -1, respectively. Results showed that LTO cycles contribute more than 97% of these annual emissions at BNE in comparison to GRP related emissions. Analysis of the LTO cycle contribution to the daily emissions showed that the contribution of the climbout mode is considerably higher than for other individual LTO operational modes. Emissions during aircraft departures were significantly higher than those during arrival operations, due to the higher aircraft engine emission rates during takeoff and climbout.

  19. Large-eddy simulation of zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer with solid particle suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Mustafa; Samtaney, Ravi

    2015-11-01

    We present results of solid particles suspension and transport in a fully-developed turbulent boundary layer flow using large-eddy simulation of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. We adopt the Eulerian-Eulerian approach to simulating particle laden flow with a large number of particles, in which the particles are characterized by statistical descriptors. For the particulate phase, the direct quadrature method of moments (DQMOM) is chosen in which the weights and abscissas of the quadrature approximation are tracked directly rather than the moments themselves. The underlying approach in modeling the turbulence of fluid phase utilizes the stretched spiral vortex subgrid-scale model and a virtual wall model similar to the work proposed by Inoue & Pullin (J. Fluid Mech. 2011). The solver is verified against simple analytical solutions and the computational results are found to be in a good agreement with these. The capability of the new numerical solver will be exercised to investigate turbulent transport of sand in sandstorms. Finally, the adequacy and limitations of the solver will be discussed. Supported by the KAUST Office of Competitive Research Funds under Award No. URF/1/1704-01.

  20. Landscape of supersymmetric particle mass hierarchies and their signature space at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Daniel; Liu, Zuowei; Nath, Pran

    2007-12-21

    The minimal supersymmetric standard model with soft breaking has a large landscape of supersymmetric particle mass hierarchies. This number is reduced significantly in well-motivated scenarios such as minimal supergravity and alternatives. We carry out an analysis of the landscape for the first four lightest particles and identify at least 16 mass patterns, and provide benchmarks for each. We study the signature space for the patterns at the CERN Large Hadron Collider by analyzing the lepton+ (jet> or =2) + missing P{T} signals with 0, 1, 2, and 3 leptons. Correlations in missing P{T} are also analyzed. It is found that even with 10 fb{-1} of data a significant discrimination among patterns emerges.

  1. Development of Detonation Flame Sprayed Cu-Base Coatings Containing Large Ceramic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, Wolfgang; Vogli, Evelina; Nebel, Jan

    2007-12-01

    Metal-matrix composites (MMCs) containing large ceramic particles as superabrasives are typically used for grinding stone, minerals, and concrete. Sintering and brazing are the key manufacturing technologies for grinding tool production. However, restricted geometry flexibility and the absence of repair possibilities for damaged tool surfaces, as well as difficulties of controlling material interfaces, are the main weaknesses of these production processes. Thermal spraying offers the possibility to avoid these restrictions. The research for this paper investigated a fabrication method based on the use of detonation flame spraying technology to bond large superabrasive particles (150-600 μm, needed for grinding minerals and stones) in a metallic matrix. Layer morphology and bonding quality are evaluated with respect to superabrasive material, geometry, spraying, and powder-injection parameters. The influence of process temperature and the possibilities of thermal treatment of MMC layers are analyzed.

  2. Particle physics and polyedra proximity calculation for hazard simulations in large-scale industrial plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plebe, Alice; Grasso, Giorgio

    2016-12-01

    This paper describes a system developed for the simulation of flames inside an open-source 3D computer graphic software, Blender, with the aim of analyzing in virtual reality scenarios of hazards in large-scale industrial plants. The advantages of Blender are of rendering at high resolution the very complex structure of large industrial plants, and of embedding a physical engine based on smoothed particle hydrodynamics. This particle system is used to evolve a simulated fire. The interaction of this fire with the components of the plant is computed using polyhedron separation distance, adopting a Voronoi-based strategy that optimizes the number of feature distance computations. Results on a real oil and gas refining industry are presented.

  3. In-situ sampling of a large-scale particle simulation for interactive visualization and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Woodring, Jonathan L; Ahrens, James P; Heitmann, Katrin

    2010-12-09

    We propose storing a random sampling of data from large scale particle simulations, such as the Roadrunner Universe MC{sup 3} cosmological simulation, to be used for interactive post-analysis and visualization. Simulation data generation rates will continue to be far greater than storage bandwidth rates and other limiting technologies by many orders of magnitude. This implies that only a very small fraction of data generated by the simulation can ever be stored and subsequently post-analyzed. The limiting technology in this situation is analogous to the problem in many population surveys: there aren't enough human resources to query a large population. To cope with the lack of resources, statistical sampling techniques are used to create a representative data set of a large population. Mirroring that situation, we propose to store a simulation-time random sampling of the particle data to cope with the bOlllenecks and support interactive, exploratory post-analysis. The particle samples are immediately stored in a level-ol-detail format for post-visualization and analysis, which amortizes the cost of post-processing for interactive visualization. Additionally, we incorporate a system for recording and visualizing sample approximation error information for confidence and importance highlighting.

  4. Eulerian models for particle trajectory crossing in turbulent flows over a large range of Stokes numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Rodney O.; Vie, Aymeric; Laurent, Frederique; Chalons, Christophe; Massot, Marc

    2012-11-01

    Numerous applications involve a disperse phase carried by a gaseous flow. To simulate such flows, one can resort to a number density function (NDF) governed a kinetic equation. Traditionally, Lagrangian Monte-Carlo methods are used to solve for the NDF, but are expensive as the number of numerical particles needed must be large to control statistical errors. Moreover, such methods are not well adapted to high-performance computing because of the intrinsic inhomogeneity of the NDF. To overcome these issues, Eulerian methods can be used to solve for the moments of the NDF resulting in an unclosed Eulerian system of hyperbolic conservation laws. To obtain closure, in this work a multivariate bi-Gaussian quadrature is used, which can account for particle trajectory crossing (PTC) over a large range of Stokes numbers. This closure uses up to four quadrature points in 2-D velocity phase space to capture large-scale PTC, and an anisotropic Gaussian distribution around each quadrature point to model small-scale PTC. Simulations of 2-D particle-laden isotropic turbulence at different Stokes numbers are employed to validate the Eulerian models against results from the Lagrangian approach. Good agreement is found for the number density fields over the entire range of Stokes numbers tested. Research carried out at the Center for Turbulence Research 2012 Summer Program.

  5. Large space system - Charged particle environment interaction technology. [effects on high voltage solar array performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, N. J.; Roche, J. C.; Grier, N. T.

    1979-01-01

    Large high-voltage space power systems proposed for future applications in both low earth orbit and geosynchronous altitudes must operate in the space charged-particle environment with possible interactions between this environment and the high-voltage surfaces. The paper reviews the ground experimental work to provide indicators for the interactions that could exist in the space power system. A preliminary analytical model of a large space power system is constructed using the existing NASA Charging Analyzer Program, and its performance in geosynchronous orbit is evaluated. The analytical results are used to illustrate the regions where detrimental interactions could exist and to establish areas where future technology is required.

  6. Nonuniformities in the angle of repose and packing fraction of large heaps of particles.

    PubMed

    Topić, Nikola; Gallas, Jason A C; Pöschel, Thorsten

    2012-09-21

    We report a numerical investigation of the structural properties of very large three-dimensional heaps of particles produced by ballistic deposition from extended circular dropping areas. Very large heaps are found to contain three new geometrical characteristics not observed before: they may have two external angles of repose, an internal angle of repose, and four distinct packing fraction (density) regions. Such characteristics are shown to be directly correlated with the size of the dropping zone. In addition, we also describe how noise during the deposition affects the final heap structure.

  7. Radioactive cesium dynamics derived from hydrographic observations in the Abukuma River Estuary, Japan.

    PubMed

    Kakehi, Shigeho; Kaeriyama, Hideki; Ambe, Daisuke; Ono, Tsuneo; Ito, Shin-ichi; Shimizu, Yugo; Watanabe, Tomowo

    2016-03-01

    Large quantities of radioactive materials were released into the air and the ocean as a result of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident, caused by the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and the subsequent major tsunami off the Pacific coast. There is much concern about radioactive contamination in both the watershed of the Abukuma River, which flows through Fukushima Prefecture, and its estuary, where it discharges into the sea in Miyagi Prefecture. We investigated radioactive cesium dynamics using mixing diagrams obtained from hydrographic observations of the Abukuma River Estuary. Particulate radioactive cesium dominates the cesium load in the river, whereas the dissolved form dominates in the sea. As the salinity increased from <0.1 to 0.1-2.3, the mixing diagram showed that dissolved radioactive cesium concentrations increased, because of desorption. Desorption from suspended particles explained 36% of dissolved radioactive cesium in estuarine water. However, the dissolved and particulate radioactive cesium concentrations in the sea decreased sharply because of dilution. It is thought that more than 80% of the discharged particulate radioactive cesium was deposited off the river mouth, where the radioactive cesium concentrations in sediment were relatively high (217-2440 Bq kg(-1)). Radioactive cesium that was discharged to the sea was transported southward by currents driven by the density distribution.

  8. Biomimetic gas sensors for large-scale drying of wood particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paczkowski, Sebastian; Sauerwald, Tilman; Weiß, Alexander; Bauer, Marco; Kohl, Dieter; Schütz, Stefan

    2011-04-01

    The sensitivity and selectivity of insect antennae are evolutionary tuned to specific needs of the insect. The Australian pyrophilic beetle Merimna atrata needs freshly heated wood to bring up its offspring and, consequently, shows a very high sensitivity to volatiles specific for wood-fires and heated wood. Volatile organic compounds released by wood particles heated at different temperatures were collected. Parallel trace analytical examination and antennal responses of the pyrophilic beetles to volatiles released by the wood reveal a highly differentiated detection system of these insects for early and late products of wood fires. This enabled a selection of marker compounds used by insects since several million years for the discrimination of different stages of wood fires. In the industrial production of engineered wood such as particle boards, wooden particles are dried in large-scale high temperature dryers. Air temperatures between 150-600°C are essential for the required material flow in the particle board production. Despite the resulting energy-efficiency of high temperature drying, high temperatures are avoided because of the increased risk of spontaneous combustion. Losses in productivity caused by fire have a strong impact on the whole production system. In order to raise the drying temperature without risking a fire, it is important to develop a monitoring system that will reliably detect early fire stages by their characteristic volatile pattern. Thus, perception filters and evaluation algorithms of pyrophilic insects can provide blue prints for biomimetic gas sensors for large-scale drying of wood particles. Especially tungsten oxide sensor elements exhibit a high sensitivity to some of the key substances. Their high sensitivity and selectivity to terpenes and aldehydes in combination with high sensitivity and selectivity of tin oxide sensor elements to hydroxylated and phenolic compounds, both showing low cross-reactivity with water and carbon

  9. IMPACT OF PARTICLE SIZE AND AGGLOMERATION ON SETTLING OF SOLIDS IN CONTINUOUS MELTERS PROCESSING RADIOACTIVE WASTE GLASS

    SciTech Connect

    HRMA PR

    2008-12-18

    The major factor limiting waste loading for many waste compositions in continuous waste glass melters is the settling of crystalline materials. The currently used constraints, i.e., the minimum liquidus temperature or the maximum fraction of equilibrium crystallinity at a given temperature, are based on thennodynamic equilibria. Because of the rapid circular convection in the melter, these constraints are probably irrelevant and cannot prevent large crystals from settling. The main factor that detennines the rate of settling ofindividual crystals, such as those ofspinel, is their size. The tiny crystals of RU02 are too small to settle, but they readily fonn large agglomerates that accelerate their rate ofsettling by severalorders ofmagnitude. The RU02 agglomerates originate early in the melting process and then grow by the shear-flocculation mechanism. It is estimated that these agglomerates must either be ofhundreds micrometers in size or have an elongated shape to match the observed rates ofthe sludge-layer fonnation. PACS: 47.57.ef, 81.05.Kj, 81.10.Fg

  10. Radioactive Wastes.

    PubMed

    Choudri, B S; Baawain, Mahad

    2015-10-01

    Papers reviewed herein present a general overview of radioactive waste activities around the world in 2014. These include safety assessments, decommission and decontamination of nuclear facilities, fusion facilities, transportation and management solutions for the final disposal of low and high level radioactive wastes (LLW and HLW), interim storage and final disposal options for spent fuel (SF), and tritiated wastes, with a focus on environmental impacts due to the mobility of radionuclides in water, soil and ecosystem alongwith other progress made in the management of radioactive wastes.

  11. Radioactive Wastes.

    PubMed

    Choudri, B S; Baawain, Mahad

    2016-10-01

    Papers reviewed herein present a general overview of radioactive waste activities around the world in 2015. These include safety assessments, decommission and decontamination of nuclear facilities, fusion facilities, transportation and management solutions for the final disposal of low and high level radioactive wastes (LLW and HLW), interim storage and final disposal options for spent fuel (SF), and tritiated wastes, with a focus on environmental impacts due to the mobility of radionuclides in water, soil and ecosystem alongwith other progress made in the management of radioactive wastes.

  12. Measurements of Ultra-fine and Fine Aerosol Particles over Siberia: Large-scale Airborne Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshinov, Mikhail; Paris, Jean-Daniel; Stohl, Andreas; Belan, Boris; Ciais, Philippe; Nédélec, Philippe

    2010-05-01

    In this paper we discuss the results of in-situ measurements of ultra-fine and fine aerosol particles carried out in the troposphere from 500 to 7000 m in the framework of several International and Russian State Projects. Number concentrations of ultra-fine and fine aerosol particles measured during intensive airborne campaigns are presented. Measurements carried over a great part of Siberia were focused on particles with diameters from 3 to 21 nm to study new particle formation in the free/upper troposphere over middle and high latitudes of Asia, which is the most unexplored region of the Northern Hemisphere. Joint International airborne surveys were performed along the following routes: Novosibirsk-Salekhard-Khatanga-Chokurdakh-Pevek-Yakutsk-Mirny-Novosibirsk (YAK-AEROSIB/PLARCAT2008 Project) and Novosibirsk-Mirny-Yakutsk-Lensk-Bratsk-Novosibirsk (YAK-AEROSIB Project). The flights over Lake Baikal was conducted under Russian State contract. Concentrations of ultra-fine and fine particles were measured with automated diffusion battery (ADB, designed by ICKC SB RAS, Novosibirsk, Russia) modified for airborne applications. The airborne ADB coupled with CPC has an additional aspiration unit to compensate ambient pressure and changing flow rate. It enabled to classify nanoparticles in three size ranges: 3-6 nm, 6-21 nm, and 21-200 nm. To identify new particle formation events we used similar specific criteria as Young et al. (2007): (1) N3-6nm >10 cm-3, (2) R1=N3-6/N621 >1 and R2=N321/N21200 >0.5. So when one of the ratios R1 or R2 tends to decrease to the above limits the new particle formation is weakened. It is very important to notice that space scale where new particle formation was observed is rather large. All the events revealed in the FT occurred under clean air conditions (low CO mixing ratios). Measurements carried out in the atmospheric boundary layer over Baikal Lake did not reveal any event of new particle formation. Concentrations of ultra

  13. Deep ocean nutrients imply large latitudinal variation in particle transfer efficiency.

    PubMed

    Weber, Thomas; Cram, Jacob A; Leung, Shirley W; DeVries, Timothy; Deutsch, Curtis

    2016-08-02

    The "transfer efficiency" of sinking organic particles through the mesopelagic zone and into the deep ocean is a critical determinant of the atmosphere-ocean partition of carbon dioxide (CO2). Our ability to detect large-scale spatial variations in transfer efficiency is limited by the scarcity and uncertainties of particle flux data. Here we reconstruct deep ocean particle fluxes by diagnosing the rate of nutrient accumulation along transport pathways in a data-constrained ocean circulation model. Combined with estimates of organic matter export from the surface, these diagnosed fluxes reveal a global pattern of transfer efficiency to 1,000 m that is high (∼25%) at high latitudes and low (∼5%) in subtropical gyres, with intermediate values in the tropics. This pattern is well correlated with spatial variations in phytoplankton community structure and the export of ballast minerals, which control the size and density of sinking particles. These findings accentuate the importance of high-latitude oceans in sequestering carbon over long timescales, and highlight potential impacts on remineralization depth as phytoplankton communities respond to a warming climate.

  14. Deep ocean nutrients imply large latitudinal variation in particle transfer efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Thomas; Cram, Jacob A.; Leung, Shirley W.; DeVries, Timothy; Deutsch, Curtis

    2016-08-01

    The “transfer efficiency” of sinking organic particles through the mesopelagic zone and into the deep ocean is a critical determinant of the atmosphere-ocean partition of carbon dioxide (CO2). Our ability to detect large-scale spatial variations in transfer efficiency is limited by the scarcity and uncertainties of particle flux data. Here we reconstruct deep ocean particle fluxes by diagnosing the rate of nutrient accumulation along transport pathways in a data-constrained ocean circulation model. Combined with estimates of organic matter export from the surface, these diagnosed fluxes reveal a global pattern of transfer efficiency to 1,000 m that is high (˜25%) at high latitudes and low (˜5%) in subtropical gyres, with intermediate values in the tropics. This pattern is well correlated with spatial variations in phytoplankton community structure and the export of ballast minerals, which control the size and density of sinking particles. These findings accentuate the importance of high-latitude oceans in sequestering carbon over long timescales, and highlight potential impacts on remineralization depth as phytoplankton communities respond to a warming climate.

  15. Large-Timestep Mover for Particle Simulations of Arbitrarily Magnetized Species

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R H; Friedman, A; Grote, D P; Vay, J

    2006-06-16

    For self-consistent ion-beam simulations including electron motion, it is desirable to be able to follow electron dynamics accurately without being constrained by the electron cyclotron timescale. To this end, we have developed a particle-advance that interpolates between full particle dynamics and drift motion. By making a proper choice of interpolation parameter, simulation particles experience physically correct parallel dynamics, drift motion, and gyroradius when the timestep is large compared to the cyclotron period, though the effective gyro frequency is artificially low; in the opposite timestep limit, the method approaches a conventional Boris particle push. By combining this scheme with a Poisson solver that includes an interpolated form of the polarization drift in the dielectric response, the movers utility can be extended to higher-density problems where the plasma frequency of the species being advanced exceeds its cyclotron frequency. We describe a series of tests of the mover and its application to simulation of electron clouds in heavy-ion accelerators.

  16. Molecular understanding of atmospheric particle formation from sulfuric acid and large oxidized organic molecules

    PubMed Central

    Schobesberger, Siegfried; Junninen, Heikki; Bianchi, Federico; Lönn, Gustaf; Ehn, Mikael; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Dommen, Josef; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Ortega, Ismael K.; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Hutterli, Manuel; Duplissy, Jonathan; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Breitenlechner, Martin; Downard, Andrew J.; Dunne, Eimear M.; Flagan, Richard C.; Kajos, Maija; Keskinen, Helmi; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kürten, Andreas; Kurtén, Theo; Laaksonen, Ari; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Praplan, Arnaud P.; Rondo, Linda; Santos, Filipe D.; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Sipilä, Mikko; Tomé, António; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Wimmer, Daniela; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Curtius, Joachim; Hansel, Armin; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku; Donahue, Neil M.; Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols formed by nucleation of vapors affect radiative forcing and therefore climate. However, the underlying mechanisms of nucleation remain unclear, particularly the involvement of organic compounds. Here, we present high-resolution mass spectra of ion clusters observed during new particle formation experiments performed at the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research. The experiments involved sulfuric acid vapor and different stabilizing species, including ammonia and dimethylamine, as well as oxidation products of pinanediol, a surrogate for organic vapors formed from monoterpenes. A striking resemblance is revealed between the mass spectra from the chamber experiments with oxidized organics and ambient data obtained during new particle formation events at the Hyytiälä boreal forest research station. We observe that large oxidized organic compounds, arising from the oxidation of monoterpenes, cluster directly with single sulfuric acid molecules and then form growing clusters of one to three sulfuric acid molecules plus one to four oxidized organics. Most of these organic compounds retain 10 carbon atoms, and some of them are remarkably highly oxidized (oxygen-to-carbon ratios up to 1.2). The average degree of oxygenation of the organic compounds decreases while the clusters are growing. Our measurements therefore connect oxidized organics directly, and in detail, with the very first steps of new particle formation and their growth between 1 and 2 nm in a controlled environment. Thus, they confirm that oxidized organics are involved in both the formation and growth of particles under ambient conditions. PMID:24101502

  17. Molecular understanding of atmospheric particle formation from sulfuric acid and large oxidized organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Schobesberger, Siegfried; Junninen, Heikki; Bianchi, Federico; Lönn, Gustaf; Ehn, Mikael; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Dommen, Josef; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Ortega, Ismael K; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Hutterli, Manuel; Duplissy, Jonathan; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Breitenlechner, Martin; Downard, Andrew J; Dunne, Eimear M; Flagan, Richard C; Kajos, Maija; Keskinen, Helmi; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kürten, Andreas; Kurtén, Theo; Laaksonen, Ari; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Praplan, Arnaud P; Rondo, Linda; Santos, Filipe D; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Sipilä, Mikko; Tomé, António; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Wimmer, Daniela; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Curtius, Joachim; Hansel, Armin; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku; Donahue, Neil M; Worsnop, Douglas R

    2013-10-22

    Atmospheric aerosols formed by nucleation of vapors affect radiative forcing and therefore climate. However, the underlying mechanisms of nucleation remain unclear, particularly the involvement of organic compounds. Here, we present high-resolution mass spectra of ion clusters observed during new particle formation experiments performed at the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research. The experiments involved sulfuric acid vapor and different stabilizing species, including ammonia and dimethylamine, as well as oxidation products of pinanediol, a surrogate for organic vapors formed from monoterpenes. A striking resemblance is revealed between the mass spectra from the chamber experiments with oxidized organics and ambient data obtained during new particle formation events at the Hyytiälä boreal forest research station. We observe that large oxidized organic compounds, arising from the oxidation of monoterpenes, cluster directly with single sulfuric acid molecules and then form growing clusters of one to three sulfuric acid molecules plus one to four oxidized organics. Most of these organic compounds retain 10 carbon atoms, and some of them are remarkably highly oxidized (oxygen-to-carbon ratios up to 1.2). The average degree of oxygenation of the organic compounds decreases while the clusters are growing. Our measurements therefore connect oxidized organics directly, and in detail, with the very first steps of new particle formation and their growth between 1 and 2 nm in a controlled environment. Thus, they confirm that oxidized organics are involved in both the formation and growth of particles under ambient conditions.

  18. Analysis of Alfven Eigenmodes destabilization by fast particles in Large Helical Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela, Jacobo; Spong, Donald; Garcia, Luis

    2016-10-01

    Fast particle populations in nuclear fusion experiments can destabilize Alfven Eigenmodes through inverse Landau damping and couplings with gap modes in the shear Alfven continua. We use the reduced MHD equations to describe the linear evolution of the poloidal flux and the toroidal component of the vorticity in a full 3D system, coupled with equations of density and parallel velocity moments for the energetic particles. We add the Landau damping and resonant destabilization effects by a closure relation. We apply this model to study the Alfven modes stability in Large Helical Device (LHD) equilibria for inward configurations, performing a parametric analysis along a range of realistic values of fast particle β (βfp), ratios of thermal/Alfven velocities (Vth/Vao), magnetic Lundquist numbers (S) and dominant toroidal (n) modes families. The n = 1 and n =2 toroidal families show the largest growth rates for parameters closer to a real LHD scenario (S = 5E6, βfp = 0.02 and Vth/Vao = 0.5), particularly the modes n/m = 1/2 and 2/4 located the inner and middle plasma (ρ = 0.25 - 0.5 with ρ the normalized minor radius). The n = 3 and n = 4 toroidal families are weakly perturbed by fast particles.

  19. Large eddy simulation of particle-laden flow in a duct with a 90° bend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Njobuenwu, D. O.; Fairweather, M.

    2011-12-01

    Large eddy simulation (LES) of particle-laden turbulent flow is studied for a square duct with a 90° bend and a radius of curvature of 1.5 times the duct width, and for a Reynolds number based on the bulk flow velocity of 100,000. A Lagrangian particle tracking technique is used to study the motion of particles experiencing drag, shear lift, buoyancy and gravitational forces in the flow. LES predictions capture important physical aspects of these flows known to occur in practice, unlike alternative Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) approaches, such as flow separation in the boundary layers around the bend entrance on the concave wall of the bend, and around the bend exit on the convex wall. The LES predicted flow and particle statistics are generally in good agreement with both experimental data used for validation purposes and RANS solutions, with r.m.s. fluctuating velocity predictions from the LES in particular being superior to values derived using the RANS technique.

  20. Making large, flowable particles of protein or disaccharide in a mini-scale spray dryer.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Joachim; Lee, Geoffrey

    2016-11-01

    A mini-scale spray dryer, the ProCept 4M8, with a 1.4 m or 2.1 m drying chamber length has been used to prepare large, flowable particles of catalase, trehalose or lactose. A 25 kHz ultrasonic nozzle or a Rayleigh breakup mono-disperse droplet generator was used for atomization. The ultrasonic nozzle produced dried particles of average diameter ≥30 µm that show incipient flow behavior when measured with the vibrating spatula method. A high solute concentration of 69% w/w in the liquid feed was required, which is readily achievable with trehalose but not with the viscous catalase solution. At lower solute concentrations, e.g. 20% w/w, the mono-disperse droplet generator was able to produce well flowable particles of approximately 50 µm diameter, although with a low yield. This is a result of collisions between the droplets falling through the drying chamber when then coalesce. It is possible to produce dried, flowable particles in milligram quantities on a mini-scale spray dryer such as the ProCept using the 25 kHz ultrasonic nozzle. With the mono-disperse droplet generator the long drying chamber ensures a residence time of a number of seconds, but this also allows droplet coalescence at fall heights >40 cm.

  1. Deep ocean nutrients imply large latitudinal variation in particle transfer efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Thomas; Cram, Jacob A.; Leung, Shirley W.; DeVries, Timothy; Deutsch, Curtis

    2016-01-01

    The “transfer efficiency” of sinking organic particles through the mesopelagic zone and into the deep ocean is a critical determinant of the atmosphere−ocean partition of carbon dioxide (CO2). Our ability to detect large-scale spatial variations in transfer efficiency is limited by the scarcity and uncertainties of particle flux data. Here we reconstruct deep ocean particle fluxes by diagnosing the rate of nutrient accumulation along transport pathways in a data-constrained ocean circulation model. Combined with estimates of organic matter export from the surface, these diagnosed fluxes reveal a global pattern of transfer efficiency to 1,000 m that is high (∼25%) at high latitudes and low (∼5%) in subtropical gyres, with intermediate values in the tropics. This pattern is well correlated with spatial variations in phytoplankton community structure and the export of ballast minerals, which control the size and density of sinking particles. These findings accentuate the importance of high-latitude oceans in sequestering carbon over long timescales, and highlight potential impacts on remineralization depth as phytoplankton communities respond to a warming climate. PMID:27457946

  2. Characteristics of large three-dimensional heaps of particles produced by ballistic deposition from extended sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topic, Nikola; Gallas, Jason A. C.; Pöschel, Thorsten

    2013-11-01

    This paper reports a detailed numerical investigation of the geometrical and structural properties of three-dimensional heaps of particles. Our goal is the characterization of very large heaps produced by ballistic deposition from extended circular dropping areas. First, we provide an in-depth study of the formation of monodisperse heaps of particles. We find very large heaps to contain three new geometrical characteristics: they may display two external angles of repose, one internal angle of repose, and four distinct packing fraction (density) regions. Such features are found to be directly connected with the size of the dropping zone. We derive a differential equation describing the boundary of an unexpected triangular packing fraction zone formed under the dropping area. We investigate the impact that noise during the deposition has on the final heap structure. In addition, we perform two complementary experiments designed to test the robustness of the novel features found. The first experiment considers changes due to polydispersity. The second checks what happens when letting the extended dropping zone to become a point-like source of particles, the more common type of source.

  3. Radioactivity Calculations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onega, Ronald J.

    1969-01-01

    Three problems in radioactive buildup and decay are presented and solved. Matrix algebra is used to solve the second problem. The third problem deals with flux depression and is solved by the use of differential equations. (LC)

  4. Concentrating Radioactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrmann, Richard A.

    1974-01-01

    By concentrating radioactivity contained on luminous dials, a teacher can make a high reading source for classroom experiments on radiation. The preparation of the source and its uses are described. (DT)

  5. Simulated Radioactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boettler, James L.

    1972-01-01

    Describes the errors in the sugar-cube experiment related to radioactivity as described in Project Physics course. The discussion considers some of the steps overlooked in the experiment and generalizes the theory beyond the sugar-cube stage. (PS)

  6. A first principle particle mesh method for solution SAXS of large bio-molecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchi, Massimo

    2016-07-01

    This paper will show that the solution small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) intensity of globular and membrane proteins can be efficiently and accurately computed from molecular dynamics trajectories using 3D fast Fourier transforms (FFTs). A suitable particle meshing interpolation, similar to the one used in smooth particle mesh Ewald for electrostatic energies and forces, was combined with a uniform solvent density FFT padding scheme to obtain a convenient SAXS spectral resolution. The CPU time scaling of the method, as a function of system size, is highly favorable and its application to large systems such as solutions of solvated membrane proteins is computationally undemanding. Differently from other approaches, all contributions from the simulation cell are included. This means that the subtraction of the buffer from the solution scattering intensity is straightforward and devoid of artifact due to ad hoc definitions of proximal and distal solvent intensity contributions.

  7. Wind tunnel study of twelve dust samples by large particle size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannak, B.; Corsmeier, U.; Kottmeier, Ch.; Al-azab, T.

    2014-12-01

    Due to the lack of data by large dust and sand particle, the fluid dynamics characteristics, hence the collection efficiencies of different twelve dust samplers have been experimentally investigated. Wind tunnel tests were carried out at wind velocities ranging from 1 up to 5.5 ms-1. As a large solid particle of 0.5 and 1 mm in diameter, Polystyrene pellets called STYRO Beads or polystyrene sphere were used instead of sand or dust. The results demonstrate that the collection efficiency is relatively acceptable only of eight tested sampler and lie between 60 and 80% depending on the wind velocity and particle size. These samplers are: the Cox Sand Catcher (CSC), the British Standard Directional Dust Gauge (BSD), the Big Spring Number Eight (BSNE), the Suspended Sediment Trap (SUSTRA), the Modified Wilson and Cooke (MWAC), the Wedge Dust Flux Gauge (WDFG), the Model Series Number 680 (SIERRA) and the Pollet Catcher (POLCA). Generally they can be slightly recommended as suitable dust samplers but with collecting error of 20 up to 40%. However the BSNE verify the best performance with a catching error of about 20% and can be with caution selected as a suitable dust sampler. Quite the contrary, the other four tested samplers which are the Marble Dust Collector (MDCO), the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the Inverted Frisbee Sampler (IFS) and the Inverted Frisbee Shaped Collecting Bowl (IFSCB) cannot be recommended due to their very low collection efficiency of 5 up to 40%. In total the efficiency of sampler may be below 0.5, depending on the frictional losses (caused by the sampler geometry) in the fluid and the particle's motion, and on the intensity of airflow acceleration near the sampler inlet. Therefore, the literature data of dust are defective and insufficient. To avoid false collecting data and hence inaccurate mass flux modeling, the geometry of the dust sampler should be considered and furthermore improved.

  8. Large Eddy Simulation of gas-particle kinematic decoupling and turbulent entrainment in volcanic plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerminara, Matteo; Esposti Ongaro, Tomaso; Neri, Augusto

    2016-10-01

    In the framework of the IAVCEI (International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth Interior) intercomparison study on volcanic plume models, we present three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulations carried out with the ASHEE (ASH Equilibrium Eulerian) model. The ASHEE model solves the compressible balance equations of mass, momentum, and enthalpy of a gas-particle mixture and is able to describe the kinematic decoupling for particles characterized by Stokes number (i.e., the ratio between the particle equilibrium time and the flow characteristic time) lower than 0.2 (or particles smaller than about 1 mm). The computational fluid dynamic model is designed to accurately simulate a turbulent flow field using a Large Eddy Simulation approach, and is thus suited to analyze the role of particle non-equilibrium in the dynamics of turbulent volcanic plumes. The two reference scenarios analyzed correspond to a weak (mass eruption rate = 1.5 * 106 kg/s) and a strong volcanic plume (mass eruption rate = 1.5 * 109 kg/s) in absence of wind. For each scenario, we compare the 3D results, averaged in space and time, with theoretical results obtained from integral plume models. Such an approach enables quantitative evaluation of the effects of grid resolution and the subgrid-scale turbulence model, and the influence of gas-particle non-equilibrium processes on the large-scale plume dynamics. We thus demonstrate that the uncertainty on the numerical solution associated with such effects can be significant (of the order of 20%), but still lower than that typically associated with input data and integral model approximations. In the Weak Plume case, 3D results are consistent with the predictions of integral models in the jet and plume regions, with an entrainment coefficient around 0.10 in the plume region. In the Strong Plume case, the self-similarity assumption is less appropriate and the entrainment coefficient in the plume region is more unstable, with an average

  9. Seed Population in Large Solar Energetic Particle Events and the Twin-CME Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Liu-Guan; Li, Gang; Le, Gui-Ming; Gu, Bin; Cao, Xin-Xin

    2015-10-01

    It has recently been suggested that large solar energetic particle (SEP) events are often caused by twin coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In the twin-CME scenario, the preceding CME provides both an enhanced turbulence level and enhanced seed population at the main CME-driven shock. In this work, we study the effect of the preceding CMEs on the seed population. We examine event-integrated abundance of iron to oxygen ratio (Fe/O) at energies above 25 MeV/nuc for large SEP events in solar cycle 23. We find that the Fe/O ratio (normalized to the reference coronal value of 0.134) ≤2.0 for almost all single-CME events and these events tend to have smaller peak intensities. In comparison, the Fe/O ratio of twin-CME events scatters in a larger range, reaching as high as 8, suggesting the presence of flare material from perhaps preceding flares. For extremely large SEP events with peak intensities above 1000 pfu, the Fe/O ratios drop below 2, indicating that the seed particles are dominated by coronal material rather than flare material in these extreme events. The Fe/O ratios of ground level enhancement (GLE) events, which are all twin-CME events, scatter in a broad range. For a given Fe/O ratio, GLE events tend to have larger peak intensities than non-GLE events. Using velocity dispersion analysis, we find that GLE events have lower solar particle release heights than non-GLE events, agreeing with earlier results by Reames.

  10. Electromagnetic Weibel Instability in Intense Charged Particle Beams with Large Energy Anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Edward A. Startsev; Ronald C. Davidson

    2003-10-20

    In plasmas with strongly anisotropic distribution functions, collective instabilities may develop if there is sufficient coupling between the transverse and longitudinal degrees of freedom. Our previous numerical and theoretical studies of intense charged particle beams with large temperature anisotropy [E. A. Startsev, R. C. Davidson and H. Qin, PRSTAB, 6, 084401 (2003); Phys. Plasmas 9, 3138 (2002)] demonstrated that a fast, electrostatic, Harris-like instability develops, and saturates nonlinearly, for sufficiently large temperature anisotropy (T{sub {perpendicular}b}/T{sub {parallel}b} >> 1). The total distribution function after saturation, however, is still far from equipartitioned. In this paper the linearized Vlasov-Maxwell equations are used to investigate detailed properties of the transverse electromagnetic Weibel-type instability for a long charge bunch propagating through a cylindrical pipe of radius r{sub w}. The kinetic stability analysis is carried out for azimuthally symmetric perturbations about a two-temperature thermal equilibrium distribution in the smooth-focusing approximation. The most unstable modes are identified, and their eigenfrequencies, radial mode structure and instability thresholds are determined. The stability analysis shows that, although there is free energy available to drive the electromagnetic Weibel instability, the finite transverse geometry of the charged particle beam introduces a large threshold value for the temperature anisotropy ((T{sub {perpendicular}b}/T{sub {parallel}b}){sup Weibel} >> (T{sub {perpendicular}b}/T{sub {parallel}b}){sup Harris}) below which the instability is absent. Hence, unlike the case of an electrically neutral plasma, the Weibel instability is not expected to play as significant a role in the process of energy isotropization of intense unneutralized charged particle beams as the electrostatic Harris-type instability.

  11. Particle Physics after the Higgs-Boson Discovery: Opportunities for the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris

    2015-08-24

    The first run of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN brought the discovery of the Higgs boson, an apparently elementary scalar particle with a mass of 125 GeV, the avatar of the mechanism that hides the electroweak symmetry. Then, a new round of experimentation is beginning, with the energy of the proton–proton colliding beams raised to 6.5 TeV per beam, from 4 TeV at the end of the first run. I summarize what we have learned about the Higgs boson, and calls attention to some issues that will be among our central concerns in the near future.

  12. Preparation of large-particle-size monodisperse polystyrene latexes in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderhoff, J. W.; El-Aasser, M. S.; Micale, F. J.; Sudol, E. D.; Tseng, C. M.; Silwanowicz, A.; Kornfeld, D. M.; Vicente, F. A.

    1982-01-01

    Three large-particle-size monodisperse latexes (3.44, 4.08, and 4.98 micron diameter) were prepared in an automated four-reactor apparatus on the third orbital mission of the 'Columbia' begun on March 22. Comparison with ground-based controls showed that the 4.98 micron-size flight sample was the more uniform; the uniformity at the other two sizes was about the same. The rates of polymerization in microgravity and on earth were the same within experimental error, demonstrating that radical-initiated vinyl addition polymerizations are unaffected by the weightless environment.

  13. Large Proton Anisotropies in the 18 August 2010 Solar Particle Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leske, R. A.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Christian, Eric R.; Cummings, A. C.; Labrador, A. W.; Stone, E. C.; Wiedenbeck, Mark E.; Rosenvinge, Tycho T Von

    2012-01-01

    The solar particle event observed at STEREO Ahead on 18 August 2010 displayeda rich variety of behavior in the particle anisotropies. Sectored rates measured by theLow Energy Telescope (LET) on STEREO showed very large bidirectional anisotropies in4 6 MeV protons for the first 17 hours of the event while inside a magnetic cloud, withintensities along the field direction several hundred to nearly 1000 times greater than thoseperpendicular to the field. At the trailing end of the cloud, the protons became isotropic andtheir spectrum hardened slightly, while the HeH abundance ratio plunged by a factor of approximatelyfour for about four hours. Associated with the arrival of a shock on 20 Augustwas a series of brief (10 minute duration) intensity increases (commonly called shockspikes) with relatively narrow angular distributions (45 FWHM), followed by an abruptdecrease in particle intensities at the shock itself and a reversal of the proton flow to a directiontoward the Sun and away from the receding shock. We discuss the STEREOLETobservations of this interesting event in the context of other observations reported in theliterature

  14. Large Proton Anisotropies in the 18 August 2010 Solar Particle Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leske, R. A.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Christian, E. R.; Cummings, A. C.; Labrador, A. W.; Stone, E. C.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    2012-11-01

    The solar particle event observed at STEREO Ahead on 18 August 2010 displayed a rich variety of behavior in the particle anisotropies. Sectored rates measured by the Low Energy Telescope (LET) on STEREO showed very large bidirectional anisotropies in 4 - 6 MeV protons for the first ˜ 17 hours of the event while inside a magnetic cloud, with intensities along the field direction several hundred to nearly 1000 times greater than those perpendicular to the field. At the trailing end of the cloud, the protons became isotropic and their spectrum hardened slightly, while the He/H abundance ratio plunged by a factor of approximately four for about four hours. Associated with the arrival of a shock on 20 August was a series of brief (< 10 minute duration) intensity increases (commonly called "shock spikes") with relatively narrow angular distributions (˜ 45∘ FWHM), followed by an abrupt decrease in particle intensities at the shock itself and a reversal of the proton flow to a direction toward the Sun and away from the receding shock. We discuss the STEREO/LET observations of this interesting event in the context of other observations reported in the literature.

  15. INTERACTION BETWEEN TWO CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS IN THE 2013 MAY 22 LARGE SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENT

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Liu-Guan; Xu, Fei; Gu, Bin; Zhang, Ya-Nan; Li, Gang; Jiang, Yong; Le, Gui-Ming; Shen, Cheng-Long; Wang, Yu-Ming; Chen, Yao

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the eruption and interaction of two coronal mass ejections (CMEs) during the large 2013 May 22 solar energetic particle event using multiple spacecraft observations. Two CMEs, having similar propagation directions, were found to erupt from two nearby active regions (ARs), AR11748 and AR11745, at ∼08:48 UT and ∼13:25 UT, respectively. The second CME was faster than the first CME. Using the graduated cylindrical shell model, we reconstructed the propagation of these two CMEs and found that the leading edge of the second CME caught up with the trailing edge of the first CME at a height of ∼6 solar radii. After about two hours, the leading edges of the two CMEs merged at a height of ∼20 solar radii. Type II solar radio bursts showed strong enhancement during this two hour period. Using the velocity dispersion method, we obtained the solar particle release (SPR) time and the path length for energetic electrons. Further assuming that energetic protons propagated along the same interplanetary magnetic field, we also obtained the SPR time for energetic protons, which were close to that of electrons. These release times agreed with the time when the second CME caught up with the trailing edge of the first CME, indicating that the CME-CME interaction (and shock-CME interaction) plays an important role in the process of particle acceleration in this event.

  16. Scattering Properties of Large Irregular Cosmic Dust Particles at Visible Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar-Cerezo, J.; Palmer, C.; Muñoz, O.; Moreno, F.; Penttilä, A.; Muinonen, K.

    2017-03-01

    The effect of internal inhomogeneities and surface roughness on the scattering behavior of large cosmic dust particles is studied by comparing model simulations with laboratory measurements. The present work shows the results of an attempt to model a dust sample measured in the laboratory with simulations performed by a ray-optics model code. We consider this dust sample as a good analogue for interplanetary and interstellar dust as it shares its refractive index with known materials in these media. Several sensitivity tests have been performed for both structural cases (internal inclusions and surface roughness). Three different samples have been selected to mimic inclusion/coating inhomogeneities: two measured scattering matrices of hematite and white clay, and a simulated matrix for water ice. These three matrices are selected to cover a wide range of imaginary refractive indices. The selection of these materials also seeks to study astrophysical environments of interest such as Mars, where hematite and clays have been detected, and comets. Based on the results of the sensitivity tests shown in this work, we perform calculations for a size distribution of a silicate-type host particle model with inclusions and surface roughness to reproduce the experimental measurements of a dust sample. The model fits the measurements quite well, proving that surface roughness and internal structure play a role in the scattering pattern of irregular cosmic dust particles.

  17. Significant contribution of large particles to optical backscattering in the open ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall'Olmo, G.; Westberry, T. K.; Behrenfeld, M. J.; Boss, E.; Slade, W. H.

    2009-06-01

    The light scattering properties of oceanic particles have been suggested as an alternative index of phytoplankton biomass than chlorophyll-a concentration (chl-a), with the benefit of being less sensitive to physiological forcings (e.g., light and nutrients) that alter the intracellular pigment concentrations. The drawback of particulate scattering is that it is not unique to phytoplankton. Nevertheless, field studies have demonstrated that, to first order, the particulate beam-attenuation coefficient (cp) can track phytoplankton biomass. The relationship between cp and the particulate backscattering coefficient (bbp), a property retrievable from space, has not been fully evaluated, largely due to a lack of open-ocean field observations. Here, we present extensive data on inherent optical properties from the Equatorial Pacific surface waters and demonstrate a remarkable coherence in bbp and cp. Coincident measurements of particle size distributions (PSDs) and optical properties of size-fractionated samples indicate that this covariance is due to both the conserved nature of the PSD and a greater contribution of phytoplankton-sized particles to bbp than theoretically predicted. These findings suggest that satellite-derived bbpcould provide similar information on phytoplankton biomass in the open ocean as cp.

  18. Large scale production of a mammalian cell derived quadrivalent hepatitis C virus like particle vaccine.

    PubMed

    Earnest-Silveira, L; Christiansen, D; Herrmann, S; Ralph, S A; Das, S; Gowans, E J; Torresi, J

    2016-10-01

    A method for the large-scale production of a quadrivalent mammalian cell derived hepatitis C virus-like particles (HCV VLPs) is described. The HCV core E1 and E2 coding sequences of genotype 1a, 1b, 2a or 3a were co-expressed in Huh7 cell factories using a recombinant adenoviral expression system. The structural proteins self-assembled into VLPs that were purified from Huh7 cell lysates by iodixanol ultracentrifugation and Stirred cell ultrafiltration. Electron microscopy, revealed VLPs of the different genotypes that are morphologically similar. Our results show that it is possible to produce large quantities of individual HCV genotype VLPs with relative ease thus making this approach an alternative for the manufacture of a quadrivalent mammalian cell derived HCV VLP vaccine.

  19. Hospital-based study of dental pathology and faecal particle size distribution in horses with large colon impaction.

    PubMed

    Gunnarsdottir, Helga; Van der Stede, Yves; De Vlamynck, Caroline; Muurling, Floor; De Clercq, Dominique; van Loon, Gunther; Vlaminck, Lieven

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the study was to determine if horses with large colon impaction were more severely affected by oral pathology than control cases and to relate faecal particle size distribution to dental pathology in both study groups. A prospective study included 39 horses with large colon impaction and 72 control horses from a hospital-based population. An oral pathology score (OPscore) and periodontal disease index (PDI) were assigned to all horses and faecal samples were collected for estimating faecal particle size and analysis of particle size distribution. Horses with large colon impactions were not more severely affected by oral pathology than control horses for both OPscore (P = 0.2) and PDI (P = 0.3). Faecal particle size estimates were significantly higher in control animals (P <0.001). No significant association was found between faecal particle size estimates and OPscores in horses with large colon impaction or control horses. In horses with large colon impaction, faecal particle size estimates increased with increasing PDI (P = 0.05). No associations were found between dental pathology and faecal particle size estimates. Horses developing large colon impaction did not have worse dentition than control horses.

  20. RADIOACTIVE BATTERY

    DOEpatents

    Birden, J.H.; Jordan, K.C.

    1959-11-17

    A radioactive battery which includes a capsule containing the active material and a thermopile associated therewith is presented. The capsule is both a shield to stop the radiations and thereby make the battery safe to use, and an energy conventer. The intense radioactive decay taking place inside is converted to useful heat at the capsule surface. The heat is conducted to the hot thermojunctions of a thermopile. The cold junctions of the thermopile are thermally insulated from the heat source, so that a temperature difference occurs between the hot and cold junctions, causing an electrical current of a constant magnitude to flow.

  1. Tracking reactive pollutants in large groundwater systems by particle-based simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalbacher, T.; Sun, Y.; He, W.; Jang, E.; Delfs, J.; Shao, H.; Park, C.; Kolditz, O.

    2013-12-01

    Worldwide, great amounts of human and financial resources are being invested to protect and secure clean water resources. Especially in arid and semi-arid regions civilization depends on the availability of freshwater from the underlying aquifer systems where water quality and quantity are often dramatically deteriorating. Main reasons for the mitigation of water quality are extensive fertilizer use in agriculture and waste water from cities and various industries. It may be assumed that climate and demographic changes will add further stress to this situation in the future. One way to assess water quality is to model the coupled groundwater and chemical system, e.g.to assess the impact of possible contaminant precipitation, absorption and migration in subsurface media. Currently, simulating such scenarios at large scales is a challenging task due to the extreme computational load, numerical stability issues, scale-dependencies and spatially and temporally infrequently distributed or missing data, which can lead e.g. to in appropriate model simplifications and additionally uncertainties in the results. The simulation of advective-dispersive mass transport is usually solved by standard finite differences, finite element or finite volume methods. Particle tracking is an alternative method and commonly used e.g. to delineate contaminant travel times, with the advantage of being numerically more stable and computational less expensive. Since particle tracking is used to evaluate groundwater residence times, it seems natural and straightforward to include reactive processes to track geochemical changes as well. The main focus of the study is the evaluation of reactive transport processes at large scales. Therefore, a number of new methods have been developed and implemented into the OpenGeoSys project, which is a scientific, FEM-based, open source code for numerical simulation of thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical processes in porous and fractured media (www

  2. Virtually distortion-free imaging system for large field, high resolution lithography using electrons, ions or other particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Hawryluk, Andrew M.; Ceglio, Natale M.

    1993-01-01

    Virtually distortion free large field high resolution imaging is performed using an imaging system which contains large field distortion or field curvature. A reticle is imaged in one direction through the optical system to form an encoded mask. The encoded mask is then imaged back through the imaging system onto a wafer positioned at the reticle position. Particle beams, including electrons, ions and neutral particles, may be used as well as electromagnetic radiation.

  3. Virtually distortion-free imaging system for large field, high resolution lithography using electrons, ions or other particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Hawryluk, A.M.; Ceglio, N.M.

    1993-01-12

    Virtually distortion free large field high resolution imaging is performed using an imaging system which contains large field distortion or field curvature. A reticle is imaged in one direction through the optical system to form an encoded mask. The encoded mask is then imaged back through the imaging system onto a wafer positioned at the reticle position. Particle beams, including electrons, ions and neutral particles, may be used as well as electromagnetic radiation.

  4. Radioactive Waste.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaylock, B. G.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of radioactive waste disposal, covering publications of 1976-77. Some of the studies included are: (1) high-level and long-lived wastes, and (2) release and burial of low-level wastes. A list of 42 references is also presented. (HM)

  5. LARGE SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS ASSOCIATED WITH FILAMENT ERUPTIONS OUTSIDE ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalswamy, N.; Mäkelä, P.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.; Xie, H.; Thakur, N.; Kahler, S. W.

    2015-06-10

    We report on four large filament eruptions (FEs) from solar cycles 23 and 24 that were associated with large solar energetic particle (SEP) events and interplanetary type II radio bursts. The post-eruption arcades corresponded mostly to C-class soft X-ray enhancements, but an M1.0 flare was associated with one event. However, the associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) were fast (speeds ∼ 1000 km s{sup −1}) and appeared as halo CMEs in the coronagraph field of view. The interplanetary type II radio bursts occurred over a wide wavelength range, indicating the existence of strong shocks throughout the inner heliosphere. No metric type II bursts were present in three events, indicating that the shocks formed beyond 2–3 Rs. In one case, there was a metric type II burst with low starting frequency, indicating a shock formation height of ∼2 Rs. The FE-associated SEP events did have softer spectra (spectral index >4) in the 10–100 MeV range, but there were other low-intensity SEP events with spectral indices ≥4. Some of these events are likely FE-SEP events, but were not classified as such in the literature because they occurred close to active regions. Some were definitely associated with large active region flares, but the shock formation height was large. We definitely find a diminished role for flares and complex type III burst durations in these large SEP events. Fast CMEs and shock formation at larger distances from the Sun seem to be the primary characteristics of the FE-associated SEP events.

  6. Large Solar Energetic Particle Events Associated With Filament Eruptions Outside Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Makela, P.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.; Xie, H.; Thakur, N.; Kahler, S. W.

    2015-01-01

    We report on four large filament eruptions (FEs) from solar cycles 23 and 24 that were associated with large solar energetic particle (SEP) events and interplanetary type II radio bursts. The post-eruption arcades corresponded mostly to C-class soft X-ray enhancements, but an M1.0 flare was associated with one event. However, the associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) were fast (speeds approx. 1000 km/s) and appeared as halo CMEs in the coronagraph field of view. The interplanetary type II radio bursts occurred over a wide wavelength range, indicating the existence of strong shocks throughout the inner heliosphere. No metric type II bursts were present in three events, indicating that the shocks formed beyond 2-3 Rs. In one case, there was a metric type II burst with low starting frequency, indicating a shock formation height of approx.2 Rs. The FE-associated SEP events did have softer spectra (spectral index >4) in the 10-100 MeV range, but there were other low-intensity SEP events with spectral indices ?4. Some of these events are likely FE-SEP events, but were not classified as such in the literature because they occurred close to active regions. Some were definitely associated with large active region flares, but the shock formation height was large. We definitely find a diminished role for flares and complex type III burst durations in these large SEP events. Fast CMEs and shock formation at larger distances from the Sun seem to be the primary characteristics of the FE-associated SEP events.

  7. Large-scale pattern formation in active particles suspensions: from interacting microtubules to swimming bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranson, Igor

    2006-03-01

    We consider two biological systems of active particles exhibiting large-scale collective behavior: microtubules interacting with molecular motors and hydrodynamically entrained swimming bacteria. Starting from a generic stochastic microscopic model of inelastically colliding polar rods with an anisotropic interaction kernel, we derive set of equations for the local rods concentration and orientation. Above certain critical density of rods the model exhibits orientational instability and onset of large-scale coherence. For the microtubules and molecular motors system we demonstrate that the orientational instability leads to the formation of vortices and asters seen in recent experiments. Similar approach is applied to colonies of swimming bacteria Bacillus subtilis confined in thin fluid film. The model is formulated in term of two-dimensional equations for local density and orientation of bacteria coupled to the low Reynolds number Navier-Stokes equation for the fluid flow velocity. The collective swimming of bacteria is represented by additional source term in the Navier-Stokes equation. We demonstrate that this system exhibits formation of dynamic large-scale patterns with the typical scale determined by the density of bacteria.

  8. Further Discussion: Parametric Study of Wind Generated Supermicron Particle Effects in Large Fires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, O. B.; Ackerman, T. P.

    1987-01-01

    In their reply (Porch et al., 1987) to our comments (Turco et al., 1987) on their smoke-scavenging-by-dust paper, Porch et al. attempt to justify a number of parameter assumptions in their original article, again revealing the extreme nature of those assumptions, particularly in the situation where all are taken simultaneously. In critiquing Porch et al.'s calculations, have not applied "opinion", but rather physical reality and common sense expressed through basic experimental results and logical physical bounds. A few examples of the unrealistic conditions required by the Porch et al. scavenging scheme, as described in their paper and comments, should suffice here. ) Porch et al. have fabricated a "fetch" region for dust particles in large fire plumes that logically must extend over an area up to 50 times greater than the fire area itself. Alternatively, they have invoked significant "necking down' of the fire plume, so that its cross-sectional area is at most a few percent of the fire area. Such severe constriction is seen only in very small fires with strong, organized vorticity, and then only over a limited plume rise region. No "fetch" has ever been noted in any large-scale fires we have observed, or for which accounts are available. Indeed, as we deduced in our original comments, complete dust scavenging even within the fire zone would probably occur less than 10% of the time for large urban fires.

  9. Flare vs. Shock Acceleration of >100 MeV Protons in Large Solar Particle Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cliver, Edward W.

    2016-05-01

    Recently several studies have presented correlative evidence for a significant-to-dominant role for a flare-resident process in the acceleration of high-energy protons in large solar particle events. In one of these investigations, a high correlation between >100 MeV proton fluence and 35 GHz radio fluence is obtained by omitting large proton events associated with relatively weak flares; these outlying events are attributed to proton acceleration by shock waves driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We argue that the strong CMEs and associated shocks observed for proton events on the main sequence of the scatter plot are equally likely to accelerate high-energy protons. In addition, we examine ratios of 0.5 MeV electron to >100 MeV proton intensities in large SEP events, associated with both well-connected and poorly-connected solar eruptions, to show that scaled-up versions of the small flares associated with classical impulsive SEP events are not significant accelerators of >100 MeV protons.

  10. Carinal and tubular airway particle concentrations in the large airways of non-smokers in the general population: evidence for high particle concentration at airway carinas.

    PubMed Central

    Churg, A; Vedal, S

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the extent to which human airway carinas accumulate ambient atmospheric particles, a newly developed technique was used to micro-dissect and analyse particle concentration in tubular segments and carinas of the large airways of 10 necropsy lungs from non-smokers from the general population of Vancouver. METHODS: Ratios of the particle concentrations on the carinas to the tubular segment immediately preceding it were measured with analytical electron microscopy for the mainstem bronchus, upper and lower lobe bronchi, and four different segmental or subsegmental bronchi--that is, Weibel generations 1 to about 5. A total of 119 carinal-tubular pairs was evaluated. RESULTS: Over all cases, both carinal and tubular particle concentrations increased with increasing airway generation; the median ratio of carinal to tubular particle concentration was 9:1 and did not show any trend with airway generation. The ratio was > 5 in 71% of carinal-tubular pairs, > 10 in 42% of pairs, > 20 in 31% of pairs, and > 100 in 9% of pairs. Some subjects showed a notable tendency to high ratios, with many ratios > 100, and other subjects had a tendency toward low ratios. The predominant mineral species in both carinas and tubular airway segments was crystalline silica and the relative proportion was similar in both sites; however, mean particle diameter was consistently less in the carinal tissues. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that the ratio of carinal to tubular retained particles in the large airways in non-smokers is higher than might be supposed from data generated in airway casts, and that there is considerable variation in this ratio between subjects. This finding is of potential interest in models of carcinogen, toxin, and dose of fibrogenic agent to the large airways as it suggests high and sometimes extreme concentrations of toxic particles at carinas, and thus reinforces the notion that carinas may be sites of initiation of disease. PMID:8983467

  11. A new statistical model for subgrid dispersion in large eddy simulations of particle-laden flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muela, Jordi; Lehmkuhl, Oriol; Pérez-Segarra, Carles David; Oliva, Asensi

    2016-09-01

    Dispersed multiphase turbulent flows are present in many industrial and commercial applications like internal combustion engines, turbofans, dispersion of contaminants, steam turbines, etc. Therefore, there is a clear interest in the development of models and numerical tools capable of performing detailed and reliable simulations about these kind of flows. Large Eddy Simulations offer good accuracy and reliable results together with reasonable computational requirements, making it a really interesting method to develop numerical tools for particle-laden turbulent flows. Nonetheless, in multiphase dispersed flows additional difficulties arises in LES, since the effect of the unresolved scales of the continuous phase over the dispersed phase is lost due to the filtering procedure. In order to solve this issue a model able to reconstruct the subgrid velocity seen by the particles is required. In this work a new model for the reconstruction of the subgrid scale effects over the dispersed phase is presented and assessed. This innovative methodology is based in the reconstruction of statistics via Probability Density Functions (PDFs).

  12. Particle-in-cell simulation of large amplitude ion-acoustic solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Sarveshwar Sengupta, Sudip; Sen, Abhijit

    2015-02-15

    The propagation of large amplitude ion-acoustic solitons is studied in the laboratory frame (x, t) using a 1-D particle-in-cell code that evolves the ion dynamics by treating them as particles but assumes the electrons to follow the usual Boltzmann distribution. It is observed that for very low Mach numbers the simulation results closely match the Korteweg-de Vries soliton solutions, obtained in the wave frame, and which propagate without distortion. The collision of two such profiles is observed to exhibit the usual solitonic behaviour. As the Mach number is increased, the given profile initially evolves and then settles down to the exact solution of the full non-linear Poisson equation, which then subsequently propagates without distortion. The fractional change in amplitude is found to increase linearly with Mach number. It is further observed that initial profiles satisfying k{sup 2}λ{sub de}{sup 2}<1 break up into a series of solitons.

  13. Constraints on axions and axionlike particles from Fermi Large Area Telescope observations of neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berenji, B.; Gaskins, J.; Meyer, M.

    2016-02-01

    We present constraints on the nature of axions and axionlike particles (ALPs) by analyzing gamma-ray data from neutron stars using the Fermi Large Area Telescope. In addition to axions solving the strong C P problem of particle physics, axions and ALPs are also possible dark matter candidates. We investigate axions and ALPs produced by nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung within neutron stars. We derive a phenomenological model for the gamma-ray spectrum arising from subsequent axion decays. By analyzing five years of gamma-ray data (between 60 and 200 MeV) for a sample of four nearby neutron stars, we do not find evidence for an axion or ALP signal; thus we obtain a combined 95% confidence level upper limit on the axion mass of 7.9 ×10-2 eV , which corresponds to a lower limit for the Peccei-Quinn scale fa of 7.6 ×107 GeV . Our constraints are more stringent than previous results probing the same physical process, and are competitive with results probing axions and ALPs by different mechanisms.

  14. Tri-track: free software for large-scale particle tracking.

    PubMed

    Vallotton, Pascal; Olivier, Sandra

    2013-04-01

    The ability to correctly track objects in time-lapse sequences is important in many applications of microscopy. Individual object motions typically display a level of dynamic regularity reflecting the existence of an underlying physics or biology. Best results are obtained when this local information is exploited. Additionally, if the particle number is known to be approximately constant, a large number of tracking scenarios may be rejected on the basis that they are not compatible with a known maximum particle velocity. This represents information of a global nature, which should ideally be exploited too. Some time ago, we devised an efficient algorithm that exploited both types of information. The tracking task was reduced to a max-flow min-cost problem instance through a novel graph structure that comprised vertices representing objects from three consecutive image frames. The algorithm is explained here for the first time. A user-friendly implementation is provided, and the specific relaxation mechanism responsible for the method's effectiveness is uncovered. The software is particularly competitive for complex dynamics such as dense antiparallel flows, or in situations where object displacements are considerable. As an application, we characterize a remarkable vortex structure formed by bacteria engaged in interstitial motility.

  15. Verification and large deformation analysis using the reproducing kernel particle method

    SciTech Connect

    Beckwith, Frank

    2015-09-01

    The reproducing kernel particle method (RKPM) is a meshless method used to solve general boundary value problems using the principle of virtual work. RKPM corrects the kernel approximation by introducing reproducing conditions which force the method to be complete to arbritrary order polynomials selected by the user. Effort in recent years has led to the implementation of RKPM within the Sierra/SM physics software framework. The purpose of this report is to investigate convergence of RKPM for verification and validation purposes as well as to demonstrate the large deformation capability of RKPM in problems where the finite element method is known to experience difficulty. Results from analyses using RKPM are compared against finite element analysis. A host of issues associated with RKPM are identified and a number of potential improvements are discussed for future work.

  16. The complex aerodynamic footprint of desert locusts revealed by large-volume tomographic particle image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Henningsson, Per; Michaelis, Dirk; Nakata, Toshiyuki; Schanz, Daniel; Geisler, Reinhard; Schröder, Andreas; Bomphrey, Richard J

    2015-07-06

    Particle image velocimetry has been the preferred experimental technique with which to study the aerodynamics of animal flight for over a decade. In that time, hardware has become more accessible and the software has progressed from the acquisition of planes through the flow field to the reconstruction of small volumetric measurements. Until now, it has not been possible to capture large volumes that incorporate the full wavelength of the aerodynamic track left behind during a complete wingbeat cycle. Here, we use a unique apparatus to acquire the first instantaneous wake volume of a flying animal's entire wingbeat. We confirm the presence of wake deformation behind desert locusts and quantify the effect of that deformation on estimates of aerodynamic force and the efficiency of lift generation. We present previously undescribed vortex wake phenomena, including entrainment around the wing-tip vortices of a set of secondary vortices borne of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in the shear layer behind the flapping wings.

  17. Numerical studies of the Weibel Instability in Intense Charged Particle Beams with Large Energy Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wei-Li; Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2004-11-01

    In intense charged particle beams with large temperature anisotropy free energy is available to drive a transverse electromagnetic Weibel-type instability. The finite transverse geometry of the confined beam makes a detailed theoretical investigation difficult. In this paper the newly developed bEASt (beam eigenmode and spectra) code which solves the linearized Vlasov-Maxwell equations is used to investigate the detailed properties of the Weibel instability for a long charge bunch propagating through a cylindrical pipe of radius r_w. The stability analysis is carried out for azimuthally symmetric perturbations about a two-temperature thermal equilibrium distribution in the smooth-focusing approximation. To study the nonlinear stage of the instability, the Darwin model is being developed and incorporated into the Beam Equilibrium Stability and Transport(BEST) code.

  18. Deposition of Coatings from Live Yeast Cells and Large Particles by “Convective-Sedimentation” Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Jerrim, Lindsey B.; Velev, Orlin D.

    2009-01-01

    Convective assembly at high volume fraction was used for the rapid deposition of uniform, close-packed coatings of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells onto glass slides. A computational model was developed to calculate the thickness profiles of such coatings for different set of conditions. Both the experiments and the numerical simulations demonstrated that the deposition process is strongly affected by the presence of sedimentation. The deposition device was inclined to increase the uniformity of the coatings by causing the cells to sediment toward the three-phase contact line. In accordance with the simulation, the experiments showed that both increasing the angle of the device and decreasing the angle between the slides increased the uniformity of the deposited coatings. Finally, the “convective-sedimentation” assembly method was used to deposit mixed layers of live cells and large latex particles as an example of immobilized biologically active composite coatings. PMID:19366200

  19. The complex aerodynamic footprint of desert locusts revealed by large-volume tomographic particle image velocimetry

    PubMed Central

    Henningsson, Per; Michaelis, Dirk; Nakata, Toshiyuki; Schanz, Daniel; Geisler, Reinhard; Schröder, Andreas; Bomphrey, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Particle image velocimetry has been the preferred experimental technique with which to study the aerodynamics of animal flight for over a decade. In that time, hardware has become more accessible and the software has progressed from the acquisition of planes through the flow field to the reconstruction of small volumetric measurements. Until now, it has not been possible to capture large volumes that incorporate the full wavelength of the aerodynamic track left behind during a complete wingbeat cycle. Here, we use a unique apparatus to acquire the first instantaneous wake volume of a flying animal's entire wingbeat. We confirm the presence of wake deformation behind desert locusts and quantify the effect of that deformation on estimates of aerodynamic force and the efficiency of lift generation. We present previously undescribed vortex wake phenomena, including entrainment around the wing-tip vortices of a set of secondary vortices borne of Kelvin–Helmholtz instability in the shear layer behind the flapping wings. PMID:26040598

  20. Aerosol pH buffering in the southeastern US: Fine particles remain highly acidic despite large reductions in sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, R. J.; Guo, H.; Russell, A. G.; Nenes, A.

    2015-12-01

    pH is a critical aerosol property that impacts many atmospheric processes, including biogenic secondary organic aerosol formation, gas-particle phase partitioning, and mineral dust or redox metal mobilization. Particle pH has also been linked to adverse health effects. Using a comprehensive data set from the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) as the basis for thermodynamic modeling, we have shown that particles are currently highly acidic in the southeastern US, with pH between 0 and 2. Sulfate and ammonium are the main acid-base components that determine particle pH in this region, however they have different sources and their concentrations are changing. Over 15 years of network data show that sulfur dioxide emission reductions have resulted in a roughly 70 percent decrease in sulfate, whereas ammonia emissions, mainly link to agricultural activities, have been largely steady, as have gas phase ammonia concentrations. This has led to the view that particles are becoming more neutralized. However, sensitivity analysis, based on thermodynamic modeling, to changing sulfate concentrations indicates that particles have remained highly acidic over the past decade, despite the large reductions in sulfate. Furthermore, anticipated continued reductions of sulfate and relatively constant ammonia emissions into the future will not significantly change particle pH until sulfate drops to clean continental background levels. The result reshapes our expectation of future particle pH and implies that atmospheric processes and adverse health effects linked to particle acidity will remain unchanged for some time into the future.

  1. A particle consistent with the Higgs boson observed with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    2012-12-21

    Nearly 50 years ago, theoretical physicists proposed that a field permeates the universe and gives energy to the vacuum. This field was required to explain why some, but not all, fundamental particles have mass. Numerous precision measurements during recent decades have provided indirect support for the existence of this field, but one crucial prediction of this theory has remained unconfirmed despite 30 years of experimental searches: the existence of a massive particle, the standard model Higgs boson. The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN has now observed the production of a new particle with a mass of 126 giga-electron volts and decay signatures consistent with those expected for the Higgs particle. This result is strong support for the standard model of particle physics, including the presence of this vacuum field. The existence and properties of the newly discovered particle may also have consequences beyond the standard model itself.

  2. Computation of scattering matrix elements of large and complex shaped absorbing particles with multilevel fast multipole algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yueqian; Yang, Minglin; Sheng, Xinqing; Ren, Kuan Fang

    2015-05-01

    Light scattering properties of absorbing particles, such as the mineral dusts, attract a wide attention due to its importance in geophysical and environment researches. Due to the absorbing effect, light scattering properties of particles with absorption differ from those without absorption. Simple shaped absorbing particles such as spheres and spheroids have been well studied with different methods but little work on large complex shaped particles has been reported. In this paper, the surface Integral Equation (SIE) with Multilevel Fast Multipole Algorithm (MLFMA) is applied to study scattering properties of large non-spherical absorbing particles. SIEs are carefully discretized with piecewise linear basis functions on triangle patches to model whole surface of the particle, hence computation resource needs increase much more slowly with the particle size parameter than the volume discretized methods. To improve further its capability, MLFMA is well parallelized with Message Passing Interface (MPI) on distributed memory computer platform. Without loss of generality, we choose the computation of scattering matrix elements of absorbing dust particles as an example. The comparison of the scattering matrix elements computed by our method and the discrete dipole approximation method (DDA) for an ellipsoid dust particle shows that the precision of our method is very good. The scattering matrix elements of large ellipsoid dusts with different aspect ratios and size parameters are computed. To show the capability of the presented algorithm for complex shaped particles, scattering by asymmetry Chebyshev particle with size parameter larger than 600 of complex refractive index m = 1.555 + 0.004 i and different orientations are studied.

  3. Opportunities using gamma-ray arrays with radioactive beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catford, Wilton N.

    1998-08-01

    The design of a gamma-ray array suitable for use with radioactive beams must take into account criteria additional to those which have previously defined large arrays, which were developed for fusion-evaporation high-spin experiments with stable beams. The radioactive decay of beam particles imposes a new set of constraints, and the relatively low intensity demands an exceptionally high efficiency. Beyond this the kinematics of, for example, nucleon transfer reactions performed in inverse kinematics can require coincident gamma-ray detection in order to achieve good energy resolution and hence Doppler broadening imposes extra constraints. A wide variety of physics is made available with radioactive beams, including fusion-evaporation studies along the N = Z line, Coulomb excitation on both sides of stability, transfer reactions on light nuclei on both sides of stability, deep inelastic studies of heavier neutron-rich nuclei and scattering experiments with isomeric beams.

  4. Mie scattering by ensembles of particles with very large size parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, S.; Voshchinnikov, N. V.

    2004-09-01

    We present a computer program for the simulation of Mie scattering in case of arbitrarily large size parameters. The elements of the scattering matrix, efficiency factors as well as the corresponding cross-sections, the albedo and the scattering asymmetry parameter are calculated. Single particles as well as particle ensembles consisting of several components and particle size distributions can be considered. Program summary Title of program: miex Catalogue identifier: ADUD Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADUD Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer for which the program is designed and others on which it has been tested: Computers: Any machine running standard FORTRAN 90; miex has been tested on an Intel Celeron processor (Redhat Linux 9.0, Intel Fortran Compiler 7.1), an Intel XEON processor (SuSE Linux 9.0, Intel Fortran Compiler 8.0), and a Sun-Blade-1000 (OS 8.5, Sun Workshop Compiler Fortran 90 2.0). Installations: standard Operating systems or monitors under which the program has been tested: Redhat Linux 9.0, SuSE Linux 9.0, Sun OS 8.5 Programming language used: Fortran 90 Memory required to execute with typical data: 1 MByte - several 100 MByte (see Appendix A for examples) No. of bits in a word: 8 No. of processors used: 1 Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: No No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 78238 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1015805 Distributed format: tar.gz Nature of the physical problem: Among a variety of applications, Mie scattering is of essential importance for the continuum radiative transfer in cosmic dust configurations. In this particular case, Mie theory describes the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with spherical dust grains on the basis of their complex refractive index and size parameter. Both, broad grain size distributions (radii a: nanometers-millimeters) and a very wide

  5. Experimental determination of the steady-state charging probabilities and particle size conservation in non-radioactive and radioactive bipolar aerosol chargers in the size range of 5-40 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallinger, Peter; Szymanski, Wladyslaw W.

    2015-04-01

    Three bipolar aerosol chargers, an AC-corona (Electrical Ionizer 1090, MSP Corp.), a soft X-ray (Advanced Aerosol Neutralizer 3087, TSI Inc.), and an α-radiation-based 241Am charger (tapcon & analysesysteme), were investigated on their charging performance of airborne nanoparticles. The charging probabilities for negatively and positively charged particles and the particle size conservation were measured in the diameter range of 5-40 nm using sucrose nanoparticles. Chargers were operated under various flow conditions in the range of 0.6-5.0 liters per minute. For particular experimental conditions, some deviations from the chosen theoretical model were found for all chargers. For very small particle sizes, the AC-corona charger showed particle losses at low flow rates and did not reach steady-state charge equilibrium at high flow rates. However, for all chargers, operating conditions were identified where the bipolar charge equilibrium was achieved. Practically, excellent particle size conservation was found for all three chargers.

  6. Particle Events as a Possible Source of Large Ozone Loss during Magnetic Polarity Transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vonKoenig, M.; Burrows, J. P.; Chipperfield, M. P.; Jackman, C. H.; Kallenrode, M.-B.; Kuenzi, K. F.; Quack, M.

    2002-01-01

    The energy deposition in the mesosphere and stratosphere during large extraterrestrial charged particle precipitation events has been known for some time to contribute to ozone losses due to the formation of potential ozone destroying species like NO(sub x), and HO(sub x). These impacts have been measured and can be reproduced with chemistry models fairly well. In the recent past, however, even the impact of the largest solar proton events on the total amount of ozone has been small compared to the dynamical variability of ozone, and to the anthropogenic induced impacts like the Antarctic 'ozone hole'. This is due to the shielding effect of the magnetic field. However, there is evidence that the earth's magnetic field may approach a reversal. This could lead to a decrease of magnetic field strength to less than 25% of its usual value over a period of several centuries . We show that with realistic estimates of very large solar proton events, scenarios similar to the Antarctic ozone hole of the 1990s may occur during a magnetic polarity transition.

  7. Collimated light reflection and transmission of a surface partially covered by large and tenuous particles.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Estrada, Omar; García-Valenzuela, Augusto

    2016-11-01

    We derive simple approximate expressions for the reflectivity and transmissivity of light from disordered monolayers of tenuous particles of dimensions larger than the wavelength and supported by a flat interface. The expressions derived can be used for different particle shapes and for moderate angles of incidence. We then investigate the effects of particle shape and orientation on reflectivity and transmissivity spectra of a monolayer of tenuous particles containing an optical chromophore in a solution in their interior. We also simulate the effects of a particle's shape and orientation on the angle dependence of the optical reflectivity and transmissivity. In our examples, we consider disordered monolayers of particles analogous to some biological cells.

  8. Radioactive ion detector

    DOEpatents

    Bower, K.E.; Weeks, D.R.

    1997-08-12

    Apparatus for detecting the presence, in aqueous media, of substances which emit alpha and/or beta radiation and determining the oxidation state of these radioactive substances, that is, whether they are in cationic or anionic form. In one embodiment, a sensor assembly has two elements, one comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds cations and the other comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds anions. Each ion-exchange element is further comprised of a scintillation plastic and a photocurrent generator. When a radioactive substance to which the sensor is exposed binds to either element and emits alpha or beta particles, photons produced in the scintillation plastic illuminate the photocurrent generator of that element. Sensing apparatus senses generator output and thereby indicates whether cationic species or anionic species or both are present and also provides an indication of species quantity. 2 figs.

  9. Radioactive ion detector

    DOEpatents

    Bower, Kenneth E.; Weeks, Donald R.

    1997-01-01

    Apparatus for detecting the presence, in aqueous media, of substances which emit alpha and/or beta radiation and determining the oxidation state of these radioactive substances, that is, whether they are in cationic or anionic form. In one embodiment, a sensor assembly has two elements, one comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds cations and the other comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds anions. Each ion-exchange element is further comprised of a scintillation plastic and a photocurrent generator. When a radioactive substance to which the sensor is exposed binds to either element and emits alpha or beta particles, photons produced in the scintillation plastic illuminate the photocurrent generator of that element. Sensing apparatus senses generator output and thereby indicates whether cationic species or anionic species or both are present and also provides an indication of species quantity.

  10. THE PHYSICS OF PROTOPLANETESIMAL DUST AGGLOMERATES. VI. EROSION OF LARGE AGGREGATES AS A SOURCE OF MICROMETER-SIZED PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Schraepler, Rainer; Blum, Juergen

    2011-06-20

    Observed protoplanetary disks consist of a large amount of micrometer-sized particles. Dullemond and Dominik pointed out for the first time the difficulty in explaining the strong mid-infrared excess of classical T Tauri stars without any dust-retention mechanisms. Because high relative velocities in between micrometer-sized and macroscopic particles exist in protoplanetary disks, we present experimental results on the erosion of macroscopic agglomerates consisting of micrometer-sized spherical particles via the impact of micrometer-sized particles. We find that after an initial phase, in which an impacting particle erodes up to 10 particles of an agglomerate, the impacting particles compress the agglomerate's surface, which partly passivates the agglomerates against erosion. Due to this effect, the erosion halts for impact velocities up to {approx}30 m s{sup -1} within our error bars. For higher velocities, the erosion is reduced by an order of magnitude. This outcome is explained and confirmed by a numerical model. In a next step, we build an analytical disk model and implement the experimentally found erosive effect. The model shows that erosion is a strong source of micrometer-sized particles in a protoplanetary disk. Finally, we use the stationary solution of this model to explain the amount of micrometer-sized particles in the observational infrared data of Furlan et al.

  11. Development and Testing of Techniques for In-Ground Stabilization, Size Reduction and Safe Removal of Radioactive Wastes Stored in Large Containments in Burial Grounds - 13591

    SciTech Connect

    Halliwell, Stephen

    2013-07-01

    Radioactive waste materials, including Transuranic (TRU) wastes from laboratories have been stored below ground in large containments at a number of sites in the US DOE Complex, and at nuclear sites in Europe. These containments are generally referred to as caissons or shafts. The containments are in a range of sizes and depths below grade. The caissons at the DOE's Hanford site are cylindrical, of the order of 2,500 mm in diameter, 3,050 mm in height and are buried about 6,000 mm below grade. One type of caisson is made out of corrugated pipe, whereas others are made of concrete with standard re-bar. However, the larger shafts in the UK are of the order of 4,600 mm in diameter, 53,500 mm deep, and 12,000 below grade. This paper describes the R and D work and testing activities performed to date to evaluate the concept of in-ground size reduction and stabilization of the contents of large containments similar to those at Hanford. In practice, the height of the Test Facility provided for a test cell that was approximately 22' deep. That prevented a 'full scale mockup' test in the sense that the Hanford Caisson configuration would be an identical replication. Therefore, the project was conducted in two phases. The first phase tested a simulated Caisson with surrogate contents, and part of a Chute section, and the second phase tested a full chute section. These tests were performed at VJ Technologies Test Facility located in East Haven, CT, as part of the Proof of Design Concept program for studying the feasibility of an in-situ grout/grind/mix/stabilize technology for the remediation of four caissons at the 618-11 Burial Ground at US Department of Energy Hanford Site. The test site was constructed such that multiple testing areas were provided for the evaluation of various tools, equipment and procedures under conditions that simulated the Hanford site, with representative soils and layout dimensions. (authors)

  12. Proton enhancement at large pT at the CERN large hadron collider without structure in associated-particle distribution.

    PubMed

    Hwa, Rudolph C; Yang, C B

    2006-07-28

    The production of pions and protons in the pT range between 10 and 20 GeV/c for Pb+Pb collisions at CERN LHC is studied in the recombination model. It is shown that the dominant mechanism for hadronization is the recombination of shower partons from neighboring jets when the jet density is high. Protons are more copiously produced than pions in that pT range because the coalescing partons can have lower momentum fractions, but no thermal partons are involved. The proton-to-pion ratio can be as high as 20. When such high pT hadrons are used as trigger particles, there will not be any associated particles that are not in the background.

  13. Large-scale Particle Simulations for Debris Flows using Dynamic Load Balance on a GPU-rich Supercomputer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuzuki, Satori; Aoki, Takayuki

    2016-04-01

    Numerical simulations for debris flows including a countless of objects is one of important topics in fluid dynamics and many engineering applications. Particle-based method is a promising approach to carry out the simulations for flows interacting with objects. In this paper, we propose an efficient method to realize a large-scale simulation for fluid-structure interaction by combining SPH (Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics) method for fluid with DEM (Discrete Element Method) for objects on a multi-GPU system. By applying space filling curves to decomposition of the computational domain, we are able to contain the same number of particles in each decomposed domain. In our implementation, several techniques for particle counting and data movement have been introduced. Fragmentation of the memory used for particles happens during the time-integration and the frequency of de-fragmentation is examined by taking account for computational load balance and the communication cost between CPU and GPU. A link-list technique of the particle interaction is introduced to save the memory drastically. It is found that the sorting of particle data for the neighboring particle list using linked-list method improves the memory access greatly with a certain interval. The weak and strong scalabilities for a SPH simulation using 111 Million particles was measured from 4 GPUs to 512 GPUs for three types of space filling curves. A large-scale debris flow simulation of tsunami with 10,368 floating rubbles using 117 Million particles were successfully carried out with 256 GPUs on the TSUBAME 2.5 supercomputer at Tokyo Institute of Technology.

  14. Association of 3He-Rich Solar Energetic Particles with Large-scale Coronal Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bučík, Radoslav; Innes, Davina E.; Mason, Glenn M.; Wiedenbeck, Mark E.

    2016-12-01

    Small, 3He-rich solar energetic particle (SEP) events have been commonly associated with extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) jets and narrow coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that are believed to be the signatures of magnetic reconnection, involving field lines open to interplanetary space. The elemental and isotopic fractionation in these events are thought to be caused by processes confined to the flare sites. In this study, we identify 32 3He-rich SEP events observed by the Advanced Composition Explorer, near the Earth, during the solar minimum period 2007-2010, and we examine their solar sources with the high resolution Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) EUV images. Leading the Earth, STEREO-A has provided, for the first time, a direct view on 3He-rich flares, which are generally located on the Sun’s western hemisphere. Surprisingly, we find that about half of the 3He-rich SEP events in this survey are associated with large-scale EUV coronal waves. An examination of the wave front propagation, the source-flare distribution, and the coronal magnetic field connections suggests that the EUV waves may affect the injection of 3He-rich SEPs into interplanetary space.

  15. Ion Anisotropy and High-Energy Variability of Large Solar Particle Events: A Comparative Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, Lun C.; Reames, Donald V.; Ng, Chee K.

    2008-01-01

    We have made comparative studies of ion anisotropy and high-energy variability of solar energetic particle (SEP) events previously examined by the Solar, Heliospheric, and Interplanetary Environment (SHINE) Workshop campaign. We have found distinctly different characteristics of SEPs between two large "gradual" events having very similar solar progenitors (the 2002 April 21 and August 24 events). Since the scattering centers of SEPs are approximately frozen in the solar wind, we emphasize work in the solar-wind frame where SEPs tend to be isotropized, and small anisotropies are easier to detect. While in the August event no streaming reversal occurred, in the April event the field-aligned anisotropy of all heavy ions showed sign of streaming reversal. The difference in streaming reversal was consistent with the difference in the presence of the outer reflecting boundary. In the April event the magnetic mirror, which was located behind the interplanetary shock driven by the preceding coronal mass ejection (CME), could block the stream of SEPs, while in the August event SEPs escaped freely because of the absence of nearby boundary. The magnetic mirror was formed at the bottleneck of magnetic field lines draped around a flank of the preceding CME. In the previous SHINE event analysis the contrasting event durations and Fe/O ratios of the both events were explained as the interplay between shock geometry and seed population. Our new findings, however, indicate that event duration and time as well as spectral variation are also affected by the presence of a nearby reflecting boundary.

  16. Modelling large floating bodies in urban area flash-floods via a Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albano, Raffaele; Sole, Aurelia; Mirauda, Domenica; Adamowski, Jan

    2016-10-01

    Large debris, including vehicles parked along floodplains, can cause severe damage and significant loss of life during urban area flash-floods. In this study, the authors validated and applied the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) model, developed in Amicarelli et al. (2015), which reproduces in 3D the dynamics of rigid bodies driven by free surface flows, to the design of flood mitigation measures. To validate the model, the authors compared the model's predictions to the results of an experimental setup, involving a dam breach that strikes two fixed obstacles and three transportable floating bodies. Given the accuracy of the results, in terms of water depth over time and the time history of the bodies' movements, the SPH model explored in this study was used to analyse the mitigation efficiency of a proposed structural intervention - the use of small barriers (groynes) to prevent the transport of floating bodies. Different groynes configurations were examined to identify the most appropriate design and layout for urban area flash-flood damage mitigation. The authors found that groynes positioned upstream and downstream of each floating body can be effective as a risk mitigation measure for damage resulting from their movement.

  17. Radiation issues in a radioactive ion decay ring.

    PubMed

    Magistris, M; Silari, M

    2005-01-01

    In a beta-beam facility, a pure beam of electron neutrinos, or their antiparticles, are produced by the decay of fully stripped radioactive ions (6He and 18Ne) circulating in a storage ring. Since the beam is not extracted from the ring, all the particles will eventually be lost somewhere in the machine and thus activate the accelerator components and the surrounding concrete and rock. In particular, as nuclei change their charge in beta-decay, a large part of the particles will be lost in the arcs of the decay ring and mainly irradiate the magnets. The density of inelastic interactions of hadrons in the magnets, concrete and rock and the track-length distribution of secondary hadrons were calculated by means of the FLUKA Monte Carlo code. These values were used to estimate the induced radioactivity in the facility, the dose rates expected in the decay ring and the consequences for the environment.

  18. Influence of radioactivity on surface interaction forces.

    PubMed

    Walker, M E; McFarlane, J; Glasgow, D C; Chung, E; Taboada-Serrano, P; Yiacoumi, S; Tsouris, C

    2010-10-15

    Although some differences have been observed, the transport behavior of radioactive aerosol particles has often been assumed to be analogous to the behavior of nonradioactive aerosols in dispersion models. However, radioactive particles can become electrostatically charged as a result of the decay process. Theories have been proposed to describe this self-charging phenomenon, which may have a significant effect on how these particles interact with one another and with charged surfaces in the environment. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) was employed to quantify surface forces between a particle and a planar surface and to compare measurements with and without the involvement of radioactivity. The main objective of this work is to assess directly the effects of radioactivity on the surface interactions of radioactive aerosols via the measurement of the adhesion force. The adhesion force between a silicon nitride AFM tip and an activated gold substrate was measured so that any possible effects due to radioactivity could be observed. The adhesion force between the tip and the gold surface increased significantly when the gold substrate (25 mm(2) surface area) was activated to a level of approximately 0.6 mCi. The results of this investigation will prompt further work into the effects of radioactivity in particle-surface interactions.

  19. Large-scale confinement and small-scale clustering of floating particles in stratified turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sozza, A.; De Lillo, F.; Musacchio, S.; Boffetta, G.

    2016-09-01

    We derive a simple model, valid within the Boussinesq approximation, for the dynamics of small buoyant particles in stratified turbulence, in the presence of a mean linear density profile. By means of extensive direct numerical simulations, we investigate the statistical distribution of particles as a function of the two dimensionless parameters of the problem. We find that vertical confinement of particles is mainly ruled by the degree of stratification, with a weak dependence on the particle properties. In contrast, small-scale fractal clustering is found to depend on the particles relaxation time and is only slightly dependent on the flow stratification. The implications of our findings for the formation of thin phytoplankton layers are discussed.

  20. Large monolithic particle pixel-detector in high-voltage CMOS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perić, I.; Takacs, C.

    2010-12-01

    A large monolithic particle pixel-detector implemented as system on a chip in a high-voltage 0.35 μm CMOS technology will be presented. The detector uses high-voltage n-well/p-substrate diodes as pixel-sensors. The diodes can be reversely biased with more than 60 V. In this way, depleted zones of about 10 μm thickness are formed, where the signal charges can be collected by drift. Due to fast charge collection in the strong electric-field zones, a higher radiation tolerance of the sensor is expected than in the case of the standard MAPS detectors. Simple pixel-readout electronics are implemented inside the n-wells. The readout is based on a source follower with one select- and two reset-transistors. Due to embedding of the pixel-readout electronics inside the collecting electrodes (n-wells) there are no insensitive zones within the pixel matrix. The detector chip contains a 128×128 matrix consisting of pixels of 21×21 μm2 -size. The diode voltages of one selected pixel-row are received at the bottom of the matrix by 128 eight-bit single-slope ADCs. All ADCs operate in parallel. The ADC codes are read out using eight LVDS 500 MBit/s output links. The readout electronics are designed to allow the readout of the whole pixel matrix in less than 50 μs. The total DC power consumption of the chip is 50 mW. All analog parts of the chip are implemented using radiation-hard layout techniques. Experimental results will be presented.

  1. Trace gas and particle emissions from fires in large diameter and belowground biomass fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertschi, Isaac; Yokelson, Robert J.; Ward, Darold E.; Babbitt, Ron E.; Susott, Ronald A.; Goode, Jon G.; Hao, Wei Min

    2003-07-01

    We adopt a working definition of residual smoldering combustion (RSC) as biomass combustion that produces emissions that are not lofted by strong fire-induced convection. RSC emissions can be produced for up to several weeks after the passage of a flame front and they are mostly unaffected by flames. Fuels prone to RSC include downed logs, duff, and organic soils. Limited observations in the tropics and the boreal forest suggest that RSC is a globally significant source of emissions to the troposphere. This source was previously uncharacterized. We measured the first emission factors (EF) for RSC in a series of laboratory fires and in a wooded savanna in Zambia, Africa. We report EFRSC for both particles with diameter <2.5 μm (PM2.5) and the major trace gases as measured by open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR) spectroscopy. The major trace gases include carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, ethane, ethene, acetylene, propene, formaldehyde, methanol, acetic acid, formic acid, glycolaldehyde, phenol, furan, ammonia, and hydrogen cyanide. We show that a model used to predict trace gas EF for fires in a wide variety of aboveground fine fuels fails to predict EF for RSC. For many compounds, our EF for RSC-prone fuels from the boreal forest and wooded savanna are very different from the EF for the same compounds measured in fire convection columns above these ecosystems. We couple our newly measured EFRSC with estimates of fuel consumption by RSC to refine emission estimates for fires in the boreal forest and wooded savanna. We find some large changes in estimates of biomass fire emissions with the inclusion of RSC. For instance, the wooded savanna methane EF increases by a factor of 2.5 even when RSC accounts for only 10% of fuel consumption. This shows that many more measurements of fuel consumption and EF for RSC are needed to improve estimates of biomass burning emissions.

  2. Modeling Acute Health Effects of Astronauts from Exposure to Large Solar Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Shaowen; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    In space exploration outside the Earth s geomagnetic field, radiation exposure from solar particle events (SPE) presents a health concern for astronauts, that could impair their performance and result in possible failure of the mission. Acute risks are of special concern during extra-vehicular activities because of the rapid onset of SPE. However, most SPEs will not lead to acute risks but can lead to mission disruption if accurate projection methods are not available. Acute Radiation Sickness (ARS) is a group of clinical syndromes developing acutely (within several seconds to 3 days) after high dose whole-body or significant partial-body ionizing radiation exposures. The manifestation of these syndromes reflects the disturbance of physiological processes of various cellular groups damaged by radiation. Hematopoietic cells, skin, epithelium, intestine, and vascular endothelium are among the most sensitive tissues of human body to ionizing radiation. Most ARS symptoms are directly related to these tissues and other systems (nervous, endocrine, and cardiovascular, etc.) with coupled regulations. Here we report the progress in bio-mathematical models to describe the dose and time-dependent early human responses to ionizing radiation. The responses include lymphocyte depression, granulocyte modulation, fatigue and weakness syndrome, and upper gastrointestinal distress. The modest dose and dose-rates of SPEs are predicted to lead to large sparing of ARS, however detailed experimental data on a range of proton dose-rates for organ doses from 0.5 to 2 Gy is needed to validate the models. We also report on the ARRBOD code that integrates the BRYNTRN and SUMDOSE codes, which are used to estimate the SPE organ doses for astronauts under various space travel scenarios, with our models of ARS. The more recent effort is to provide easy web access to space radiation risk assessment using the ARRBOD code.

  3. Modeling the acute health effects of astronauts from exposure to large solar particle events.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shaowen; Kim, Myung-Hee Y; McClellan, Gene E; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2009-04-01

    Radiation exposure from Solar Particle Events (SPE) presents a significant health concern for astronauts for exploration missions outside the protection of the Earth's magnetic field, which could impair their performance and result in the possibility of failure of the mission. Assessing the potential for early radiation effects under such adverse conditions is of prime importance. Here we apply a biologically based mathematical model that describes the dose- and time-dependent early human responses that constitute the prodromal syndromes to consider acute risks from SPEs. We examine the possible early effects on crews from exposure to some historically large solar events on lunar and/or Mars missions. The doses and dose rates of specific organs were calculated using the Baryon radiation transport (BRYNTRN) code and a computerized anatomical man model, while the hazard of the early radiation effects and performance reduction were calculated using the Radiation-Induced Performance Decrement (RIPD) code. Based on model assumptions we show that exposure to these historical events would cause moderate early health effects to crew members inside a typical spacecraft or during extra-vehicular activities, if effective shielding and medical countermeasure tactics were not provided. We also calculate possible even worse cases (double intensity, multiple occurrences in a short period of time, etc.) to estimate the severity, onset and duration of various types of early illness. Uncertainties in the calculation due to limited data on relative biological effectiveness and dose-rate modifying factors for protons and secondary radiation, and the identification of sensitive sites in critical organs are discussed.

  4. Large microplastic particles in sediments of tributaries of the River Thames, UK - Abundance, sources and methods for effective quantification.

    PubMed

    Horton, Alice A; Svendsen, Claus; Williams, Richard J; Spurgeon, David J; Lahive, Elma

    2017-01-15

    Sewage effluent input and population were chosen as predictors of microplastic presence in sediments at four sites in the River Thames basin (UK). Large microplastic particles (1mm-4mm) were extracted using a stepwise approach to include visual extraction, flotation and identification using Raman spectroscopy. Microplastics were found at all four sites. One site had significantly higher numbers of microplastics than other sites, average 66 particles 100g(-1), 91% of which were fragments. This site was downstream of a storm drain outfall receiving urban runoff; many of the fragments at this site were determined to be derived of thermoplastic road-surface marking paints. At the remaining three sites, fibres were the dominant particle type. The most common polymers identified included polypropylene, polyester and polyarylsulphone. This study describes two major new findings: presence of microplastic particles in a UK freshwater system and identification of road marking paints as a source of microplastics.

  5. An innovative experimental setup for Large Scale Particle Image Velocimetry measurements in riverine environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauro, Flavia; Olivieri, Giorgio; Porfiri, Maurizio; Grimaldi, Salvatore

    2014-05-01

    Large Scale Particle Image Velocimetry (LSPIV) is a powerful methodology to nonintrusively monitor surface flows. Its use has been beneficial to the development of rating curves in riverine environments and to map geomorphic features in natural waterways. Typical LSPIV experimental setups rely on the use of mast-mounted cameras for the acquisition of natural stream reaches. Such cameras are installed on stream banks and are angled with respect to the water surface to capture large scale fields of view. Despite its promise and the simplicity of the setup, the practical implementation of LSPIV is affected by several challenges, including the acquisition of ground reference points for image calibration and time-consuming and highly user-assisted procedures to orthorectify images. In this work, we perform LSPIV studies on stream sections in the Aniene and Tiber basins, Italy. To alleviate the limitations of traditional LSPIV implementations, we propose an improved video acquisition setup comprising a telescopic, an inexpensive GoPro Hero 3 video camera, and a system of two lasers. The setup allows for maintaining the camera axis perpendicular to the water surface, thus mitigating uncertainties related to image orthorectification. Further, the mast encases a laser system for remote image calibration, thus allowing for nonintrusively calibrating videos without acquiring ground reference points. We conduct measurements on two different water bodies to outline the performance of the methodology in case of varying flow regimes, illumination conditions, and distribution of surface tracers. Specifically, the Aniene river is characterized by high surface flow velocity, the presence of abundant, homogeneously distributed ripples and water reflections, and a meagre number of buoyant tracers. On the other hand, the Tiber river presents lower surface flows, isolated reflections, and several floating objects. Videos are processed through image-based analyses to correct for lens

  6. Modeling the Prodromal Effects and Performance Reduction of Astronauts from Exposure to Large Solar Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, S.; Kim, M. Y.; McClellan, G. E.; Nikjoo, H.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2007-01-01

    In space exploration outside the Earth's geomagnetic field, radiation exposure from solar particle events (SPE) presents a health concern for astronauts, that could impair their performance and result in possibility of failure of the mission. Acute risks are especially of concern during spacewalks on the lunar surface because of the rapid onset of SPE's and science goals that involve long distances to crew habitats. Thus assessing the potential of early radiation effect under such adverse conditions is of prime importance. Here we present a biologic based mathematical model which describes the dose and time-dependent early human responses to ionizing radiation. We examine the possible early effects on crew behind various shielding materials from exposure to some historical large SPEs on the lunar and Mars surfaces. The doses and dose rates were calculated using the BRYNTRN code (Kim, M.Y, Hu, X, and Cucinotta, F.A, Effect of Shielding Materials from SPEs on the Lunar and Mars Surface, AIAA Space 2005, paper number AIAA-2005-6653, Long Beach, CA, August 30-September 1, 2005) and the hazard of the early radiation effects and performance reduction were calculated using the RIPD code (Anno, G.H, McClellan, G.E., Dore, M.A, Protracted Radiation-Induced Performance Decrement, Volume 1 Model Development,1996, Defense Nuclear Agency: Alexandria VA). Based on model assumptions we show that exposure to these historical SPEs do cause early effects to crew members and impair their performance if effective shielding and medical countermeasure tactics are not provided. The calculations show multiple occurrence of large SPEs in a short period of time significantly increase the severity of early illness, however early death from failure of the hematopoietic system is very unlikely because of the dose-rate and dose heterogeneity of SPEs. Results from these types of calculations will be a guide in design of protection systems and medical response strategy for astronauts in case of

  7. Large-eddy simulation of particle-laden flow over a backward-facing step using a spectral multidomain method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Kaustav; Jacobs, Gustaaf; Mashayek, Farzad

    2008-11-01

    We present an investigation into the particle-laden flow in a dump-combustor configuration. An accurate prediction of particle dispersion within the combustors is necessary for improved design of spray combustion. The instantaneous local particle concentration and turbulent mixing provide insights into the physio-chemical processes that would be encountered in a reacting scenario. The principal difficulty in prediction of particle transport in the dilute flow regime, lies in the accurate description of the underlying complex, turbulent gas flow field featuring reattaching shear layers. Here, we present large-eddy simulations (LESs) of a particle-laden flow over an unconfined and confined backward-facing step at Reynolds numbers of 5000 and 28,000, respectively, using a spectral multidomain LES methodology. The LES captures the carrier flow accurately, while being computationally affordable. One-way coupled equations are considered and particles with different Stokes numbers are studied. The inlet turbulence is modeled using a novel stochastic model that reproduces the second order moments of the fully developed flow upstream of the step. The effects of the turbulent recirculating flow behind the step on particle dispersion are investigated in detail.

  8. Large-displacement statistics of the rightmost particle of the one-dimensional branching Brownian motion.

    PubMed

    Derrida, Bernard; Meerson, Baruch; Sasorov, Pavel V

    2016-04-01

    Consider a one-dimensional branching Brownian motion and rescale the coordinate and time so that the rates of branching and diffusion are both equal to 1. If X_{1}(t) is the position of the rightmost particle of the branching Brownian motion at time t, the empirical velocity c of this rightmost particle is defined as c=X_{1}(t)/t. Using the Fisher-Kolmogorov-Petrovsky-Piscounov equation, we evaluate the probability distribution P(c,t) of this empirical velocity c in the long-time t limit for c>2. It is already known that, for a single seed particle, P(c,t)∼exp[-(c^{2}/4-1)t] up to a prefactor that can depend on c and t. Here we show how to determine this prefactor. The result can be easily generalized to the case of multiple seed particles and to branching random walks associated with other traveling-wave equations.

  9. Large-displacement statistics of the rightmost particle of the one-dimensional branching Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derrida, Bernard; Meerson, Baruch; Sasorov, Pavel V.

    2016-04-01

    Consider a one-dimensional branching Brownian motion and rescale the coordinate and time so that the rates of branching and diffusion are both equal to 1. If X1(t ) is the position of the rightmost particle of the branching Brownian motion at time t , the empirical velocity c of this rightmost particle is defined as c =X1(t ) /t . Using the Fisher-Kolmogorov-Petrovsky-Piscounov equation, we evaluate the probability distribution P (c ,t ) of this empirical velocity c in the long-time t limit for c >2 . It is already known that, for a single seed particle, P (c ,t ) ˜exp[-(c2/4 -1 ) t ] up to a prefactor that can depend on c and t . Here we show how to determine this prefactor. The result can be easily generalized to the case of multiple seed particles and to branching random walks associated with other traveling-wave equations.

  10. Trapped Particles by Large-Amplitude Waves in 2D Yukawa Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Hou Lujing; Piel, Alexander

    2008-09-07

    In an ordinary plasma, trapping of a particle of velocity {nu} occurs when its kinetic energy in the wave frame is smaller than the wave potential, i.e., when q{phi}{sub pp}>(1/2)m({nu}-{nu}{sub {phi}}){sup 2}. However, simulation with Brownian Dynamics method shows that the situation is quite different in a strongly-coupled complex plasma (SCCP), where trapping of a particle requires additional energy to overcome the potential barrier formed by all the other particles (the ''cage''), and the trapping condition then reads: q{phi}{sub pp}>(1/2)m({nu}-{nu}{sub {phi}}){sup 2}+{phi}{sub c}. It is found that, because of strong-coupling effect, the particle trapping has no direct connection with so-called ''resonant'' particles. Meanwhile, detrapping process becomes significant in SCCP, and all trapped particles have a finite trapping lifetime decaying exponentially with a rate related to its mean free path.

  11. Large-scale parallel alignment of platelet-shaped particles through gravitational sedimentation

    PubMed Central

    Behr, Sebastian; Vainio, Ulla; Müller, Martin; Schreyer, Andreas; Schneider, Gerold A.

    2015-01-01

    Parallel and concentric alignment of microscopic building blocks into several orders of magnitude larger structures is commonly observed in nature. However, if similarly aligned structures are artificially produced their thickness is generally limited to just about one or two orders of magnitude more than the dimensions of the smallest element. We show that sedimentation provides a promising approach to manufacture solid materials consisting of well-aligned platelet-shaped particles while being more than 30 000 times thicker than the individual particle. Such sediments contain up to 28 vol% of particles without any further treatment and can be densified to 67 vol% particle fraction by subsequent unidirectional pressing. The degree of orientation of the platelet-shaped particles within the sediments was tracked by high-energy X-ray diffraction measurements. The Hermans orientation parameter, a statistical measure of the quality of alignment, was determined to be 0.63 ± 0.03 already for as-sedimented samples while the standard deviation of the orientation distribution of particles, another measure of average misalignment, was found to be (21.5 ± 1.4)°. After pressing, these values further improved to (0.81 ± 0.01) and (14.6 ± 0.4)°, respectively. Such quality of alignment competes with, if not even exceeds, values reported in the literature. PMID:25984813

  12. Global risk of radioactive fallout after nuclear reactor accidents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunkel, D.; Lelieveld, J.; Lawrence, M. G.

    2012-04-01

    Reactor core meltdowns of nuclear power plants are rare, yet the consequences are catastrophic. But what is meant by "rare"? And what can be learned from the Chernobyl and Fukushima incidents? Here we assess the risk of exposure to radioactivity due to atmospheric dispersion of gases and particles following severe nuclear accidents, using particulate 137Cs and gaseous 131I as proxies for the fallout. It appears that previously the occurrence of major accidents and the risks of radioactive contamination have been underestimated. Using a global model of the atmosphere we compute that on average, in the event of a core melt of any nuclear power plant worldwide, more than 90 % of emitted 137Cs would be transported beyond 50 km and about 50 % beyond 1000 km distance. This corroborates that such accidents have large-scale and trans-boundary impacts. Although the emission strengths and atmospheric removal processes of 137Cs and 131I are quite different, the radioactive contamination patterns over land and the human deposition exposure are computed to be similar. High human exposure risks occur around reactors in densely populated regions, notably in southern Asia where a core melt can subject 55 million people to radioactive contamination. The recent decision by Germany to phase out its nuclear reactors will reduce the national risk, though a large risk will still remain from the reactors in neighbouring countries.

  13. Global risk of radioactive fallout after nuclear reactor accidents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelieveld, J.; Kunkel, D.; Lawrence, M. G.

    2011-11-01

    Reactor core meltdowns of nuclear power plants are rare, yet the consequences are catastrophic. But what is meant by "rare"? And what can be learned from the Chernobyl and Fukushima incidents? Here we assess the risk of exposure to radioactivity due to atmospheric dispersion of gases and particles following severe nuclear accidents, using particulate 137Cs and gaseous 131I as proxies for the fallout. It appears that previously the occurrence of major accidents and the risks of radioactive contamination have been underestimated. Using a global model of the atmosphere we compute that on average, in the event of a core melt of any nuclear power plant worldwide, more than 90% of emitted 137Cs would be transported beyond 50km and about 50% beyond 1000 km distance. This corroborates that such accidents have large-scale and trans-boundary impacts. Although the emission strengths and atmospheric removal processes of 137Cs and 131I are quite different, the radioactive contamination patterns over land and the human deposition exposure are computed to be similar. High human exposure risks occur around reactors in densely populated regions, notably in southern Asia where a core melt can subject 55 million people to radioactive contamination. The recent decision by Germany to phase out its nuclear reactors will reduce the national risk, though a large risk will still remain from the reactors in neighbouring countries.

  14. Stream Discharge Measurement Using A Large-Scale Particle Image Velocimetry Prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harpold, A. A.; Mostaghimi, S.

    2004-12-01

    Good water management is founded on accurate open-channel flow measurements. New technology for measuring discharge in streams and rivers has been pursued due to concerns about safety, accuracy, and costs of traditional methods. Large-Scale Particle Image Velocimetry (LSPIV) is an emerging technology for measuring discharge in streams and rivers. LSPIV is a system capable of measuring velocity fields by collecting and analyzing recorded images of the flow field. The LSPIV system tracks the movement of `tracers' through successive images using statistical correspondence. Cross-correlation algorithms divide the image into small interrogation areas; each producing one displacement vector. The surface velocity field can be used to estimate discharge based on the channel bathymetry. Use of LSPIV for flow measurements in low-order streams has several advantages. LSPIV is not as labor intensive and does not present the safety concerns of the conventional methods during high flow events. Another promise for LSPIV is remote monitoring applications, which could also reduce labor and data management costs. The scheme used in this study for the development of LSPIV follows a logical progression: assimilate current knowledge, develop methods and acquire equipment, conduct laboratory and field experiments for `proof-of-concept', and refine the methods to decrease costs and increase usability. A laboratory prototype was developed and tested in a flume, with good results. The experiment evaluated the LSPIV prototype and a Marsh-McBirney flow meter against the flume manometer. Several conclusions were made from the statistical analysis. The Froude number affects the accuracy of the Marsh-McBirney flow meter and the LSPIV prototype. Therefore, future applications may wish to use an adaptive method to determine input parameters based on flow conditions. The LSPIV prototype produced poor flow measurements at camera angles above a 30 degree oblique angle. Therefore, field applications

  15. Heat transfer from a horizontal finned tube bundle in bubbling fluidized beds of small and large particles

    SciTech Connect

    Devaru, C.B.; Kolar, A.K.

    1995-12-31

    Steady state average heat transfer coefficient measurements were made by the local thermal simulation technique in a cold, square, bubbling air-fluidized bed (0.305 m x 0.305 m) with immersed horizontal finned tube bundles (in-line and staggered) with integral 60{degree} V-thread. Studies were conducted using beds of small (average particle diameter less than 1 mm) sand particles and of large (average particle diameter greater thin 1 mm) particles (raagi, mustard, millet and coriander). The fin pitch varied from 0.8 to 5.0 mm and the fin height varied from 0.69 to 4.4 mm. The tube pitch ratios used were 1.75 and 3.5. The influence of bed particle diameter, fluidizing velocity, fin pitch, and tube pitch ratio on average heat transfer coefficient was studied. Fin pitch and bed particle diameter are the most significant parameters affecting heat transfer coefficient within the range of experimental conditions. Bed pressure drop depends only on static bed height. New direct correlations, incorporating easily measurable quantities, for average heat transfer coefficient for finned tube bundles (in-line and staggered) are proposed.

  16. Large-Scale Single Particle and Cell Trapping based on Rotating Electric Field Induced-Charge Electroosmosis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yupan; Ren, Yukun; Tao, Ye; Hou, Likai; Jiang, Hongyuan

    2016-12-06

    We propose a simple, inexpensive microfluidic chip for large-scale trapping of single particles and cells based on induced-charge electroosmosis in a rotating electric field (ROT-ICEO). A central floating electrode array, was placed in the center of the gap between four driving electrodes with a quadrature configuration and used to immobilize single particles or cells. Cells were trapped on the electrode array by the interaction between ROT-ICEO flow and buoyancy flow. We experimentally optimized the efficiency of trapping single particles by investigating important parameters like particle or cell density and electric potential. Experimental and numerical results showed good agreement. The operation of the chip was verified by trapping single polystyrene (PS) microspheres with diameters of 5 and 20 μm and single yeast cells. The highest single particle occupancy of 73% was obtained using a floating electrode array with a diameter of 20 μm with an amplitude voltage of 5 V and frequency of 10 kHz for PS microbeads with a 5-μm diameter and density of 800 particles/μL. The ROT-ICEO flow could hold cells against fluid flows with a rate of less than 0.45 μL/min. This novel, simple, robust method to trap single cells has enormous potential in genetic and metabolic engineering.

  17. Motions of charged particles in the magnetosphere under the influence of a time-varying large scale convection electric field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. H.; Hoffman, R. A.; Bewtra, N. K.

    1979-01-01

    The motions of charged particles under the influence of the geomagnetic and electric fields are quite complex in the region of the inner magnetosphere. The Volland-Stern type large-scale convection electric field with gamma = 2 has been used successfully to predict both the plasmapause location and particle enhancements determined from Explorer 45 (S3-A) measurements. Recently introduced into the trajectory calculations of Ejiri et al. (1978) is a time dependence in this electric field based on the variation in Kp for actual magnetic storm conditions. The particle trajectories are computed as they change in this time-varying electric field. Several storm fronts of particles of different magnetic moments are allowed to be injected into the inner magnetosphere from L = 10 in the equatorial plane. The motions of these fronts are presented in a movie format. The local time of injection, the particle magnetic moments and the subsequent temporal history of the magnetospheric electric field play important roles in determining whether the injected particles are trapped within the ring current region or whether they are convected to regions outside the inner magnetosphere.

  18. Assessment of large-eddy simulation in capturing preferential concentration of heavy particles in isotropic turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Guodong; Zhang, Jian; He, Guo-Wei; Wang, Lian-Ping

    2010-12-01

    Particle-laden turbulent flow is a typical non-equilibrium process characterized by particle relaxation time τp and the characteristic timescale of the flows τf, in which the turbulent mixing of heavy particles is related to different scales of fluid motions. The preferential concentration (PC) of heavy particles could be strongly affected by fluid motion at dissipation-range scales, which presents a major challenge to the large-eddy simulation (LES) approach. The errors in simulated PC by LES are due to both filtering and the subgrid scale (SGS) eddy viscosity model. The former leads to the removal of the SGS motion and the latter usually results in a more spatiotemporally correlated vorticity field. The dependence of these two factors on the flow Reynolds number is assessed using a priori and a posteriori tests, respectively. The results suggest that filtering is the dominant factor for the under-prediction of the PC for Stokes numbers less than 1, while the SGS eddy viscosity model is the dominant factor for the over-prediction of the PC for Stokes numbers between 1 and 10. The effects of the SGS eddy viscosity model on the PC decrease as the Reynolds number and Stokes number increase. LES can well predict the PC for particle Stokes numbers larger than 10. An SGS model for particles with small and intermediate Stokes numbers is needed to account for the effects of the removed SGS turbulent motion on the PC.

  19. Asymptotic Solutions for Optical Properties of Large Particles with Strong Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Ping; Gao, Bo-Cai; Baum, Bryan A.; Hu, Yong X.; Wiscombe, Warren J.; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Winker, Dave M.; Nasiri, Shaima L.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    For scattering calculations involving nonspherical particles such as ice crystals, we show that the transverse wave condition is not applicable to the refracted electromagnetic wave in the context of geometric optics when absorption is involved. Either the TM wave condition (i.e., where the magnetic field of the refracted wave is transverse with respect to the wave direction) or the TE wave condition (i.e., where the electric field is transverse with respect to the propagating direction of the wave) may be assumed for the refracted wave in an absorbing medium to locally satisfy the electromagnetic boundary condition in the ray tracing calculation. The wave mode assumed for the refracted wave affects both the reflection and refraction coefficients. As a result, a nonunique solution for these coefficients is derived from the electromagnetic boundary condition. In this study we have identified the appropriate solution for the Fresnel reflection/refraction coefficients in light scattering calculation based on the ray tracing technique. We present the 3 x 2 refraction or transmission matrix that completely accounts for the inhomogeneity of the refracted wave in an absorbing medium. Using the Fresnel coefficients for an absorbing medium, we derive an asymptotic solution in an analytical format for the scattering properties of a general polyhedral particle. Numerical results are presented for hexagonal plates and columns with both preferred and random orientations. The asymptotic theory can produce reasonable accuracy in the phase function calculations in the infrared window region (wavelengths near 10 micron) if the particle size (in diameter) is on the order of 40 micron or larger. However, since strong absorption is assumed in the computation of the single-scattering albedo in the asymptotic theory, the single scattering albedo does not change with variation of the particle size. As a result, the asymptotic theory can lead to substantial errors in the computation of

  20. Radioactive decay.

    PubMed

    Groch, M W

    1998-01-01

    When a parent radionuclide decays to its daughter radionuclide by means of alpha, beta, or isomeric transition, the decay follows an exponential form, which is characterized by the decay constant lambda. The decay constant represents the probability per unit time that a single radioatom will decay. The decay equation can be used to provide a useful expression for radionuclide decay, the half-life, the time when 50% of the radioatoms present will have decayed. Radiotracer half-life has direct implications in nuclear imaging, radiation therapy, and radiation safety because radionuclide half-life affects the ability to evaluate tracer kinetics and create appropriate nuclear images and also affects organ, tumor, and whole-body radiation dose. The number of radioatoms present in a sample is equal to the activity, defined as the number of transitions per unit time, divided by the decay constant; the mass of radioatoms present in a sample can be calculated to determine the specific activity (activity per unit mass). The dynamic relationship between the number of parent and daughter atoms present over time may lead to radioactive equilibrium, which takes two forms--secular and transient--and has direct relevance to generator-produced radionuclides.

  1. Volcanic ash ingestion by a large gas turbine aeroengine: fan-particle interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Andreas; Clarkson, Rory; Durant, Adam; Cassiani, Massimo; Stohl, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Airborne particles from explosive volcanic eruptions are a major safety threat for aviation operations. The fine fraction of the emitted particles (<63 microns diameter) may remain in the atmosphere for days, or even weeks, and can affect commercial air traffic routes. Over the past century, there have been a considerable number of aircraft encounters with drifting volcanic ash clouds. Particles ingested into the engine cause erosion of upstream surfaces of compressor fan blades and rotor-path components, and can also cause contamination or blockage of electrical systems and the fuel system such as fuel nozzles and air bleed filters. Ash particles that enter the hot-section of the engine (combustor and turbine stages; temperature between 1400-1800°C) are rapidly heated above the glass transition temperature (about 650-1000°C) and become soft (or form a melt) and can stick as re-solidified deposits on nozzle guide vanes. The glass deposits change the internal aerodynamic airflow in the engine and can affect the cooling capability of the different components by clogging the cooling inlets/outlets, which can lead to a loss of power or flame-out. The nature of volcanic ash ingestion is primarily influenced by the fan at the front of the engine which produces the thrust that drives the aircraft. The ingested air is split between the core (compressor/combustor/turbine) and bypass (thrust) at a ratio of typically between, 1:5-10 on modern engines. Consequently, the ash particles are fractionated between the core and bypass by the geometry and dynamics of the fan blades. This study uses computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of particle-laden airflows into a turbofan engine under different atmospheric and engine operation conditions. The main aim was to investigate the possible centrifugal effect of the fan blades as a function of particle size, and to relate this to the core intake concentration. We generated a generic 3D axial high-bypass turbofan engine using

  2. The flow structure of pyroclastic density currents: evidence from particle models and large-scale experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellino, Pierfrancesco; Büttner, Ralf; Dioguardi, Fabio; Doronzo, Domenico Maria; La Volpe, Luigi; Mele, Daniela; Sonder, Ingo; Sulpizio, Roberto; Zimanowski, Bernd

    2010-05-01

    Pyroclastic flows are ground hugging, hot, gas-particle flows. They represent the most hazardous events of explosive volcanism, one striking example being the famous historical eruption of Pompeii (AD 79) at Vesuvius. Much of our knowledge on the mechanics of pyroclastic flows comes from theoretical models and numerical simulations. Valuable data are also stored in the geological record of past eruptions, i.e. the particles contained in pyroclastic deposits, but they are rarely used for quantifying the destructive potential of pyroclastic flows. In this paper, by means of experiments, we validate a model that is based on data from pyroclastic deposits. It allows the reconstruction of the current's fluid-dynamic behaviour. We show that our model results in likely values of dynamic pressure and particle volumetric concentration, and allows quantifying the hazard potential of pyroclastic flows.

  3. Nonadiabaticity and large fluctuations in a many-particle Landau-Zener problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altland, Alexander; Gurarie, V.; Kriecherbauer, T.; Polkovnikov, A.

    2009-04-01

    We consider the behavior of an interacting many-particle system under slow external driving—a many-body generalization of the Landau-Zener paradigm. We find that a conspiracy of interactions and driving leads to physics profoundly different from that of the single-particle limit: for practically all values of the driving rate the particle distributions in Hilbert space are very broad, a phenomenon caused by a strong amplification of quantum fluctuations in the driving process. These fluctuations are “nonadiabatic” in that even at very slow driving it is exceedingly difficult to push the center of the distribution toward the limit of full ground-state occupancy. We obtain these results by a number of complementary theoretical approaches, including diagrammatic perturbation theory, semiclassical analysis, and exact diagonalization.

  4. Brush-like Discharge Extending from a Grounded Electrode toward a Large-scale Charged Particle Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toki, Kenji; Migita, Shin-Ichi; Higashiyama, Yoshio

    Electrostatic discharge occurring between a large-scale charged particle cloud and a grounded spherical electrode was investigated. The charged particle cloud was formed by the cloud generators consisting of a blower and a corona charger. To cause electrostatic discharges between the cloud and a grounded electrode with reproducibility, the grounded spherical electrode with 100 or 125 mm in diameter was set at the outside of the cloud. The charge quantity in a charged particle cloud affected the number of discharges, discharge current and charge quantity. Under the condition of applied voltage to the corona charger of 19 kV, peak value of discharge current for the electrode of 100 and 125 mm diameter was 3.0 and 4.8 A and the charge quantities neutralized in a single discharge was 1.9 and 2.4 μC, respectively. The peak current depends strongly on the diameter of the spherical electrode.

  5. Graphene-enhanced visible-light photocatalysis of large-sized CdS particles for wastewater treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Wei; Chen, Jie; Wu, Yao; Duan, Lianfeng; Yang, Yue; Ge, Xin

    2014-03-01

    The hybrid composites of graphene decorated by large-sized CdS particles (G/M-CdS) were prepared by a one-pot solvothermal route in which the reduction of graphite oxide into graphene was accompanied by the generation of microsized CdS particles. The structure and composition of the obtained nanocomposites were studied by means of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The CdS particles with the average sizes of approximately 640 nm were formed on graphene sheets. The as-prepared composite was used as adsorbent to remove dye from wastewater using the organic dye Rhodamine B as the adsorbate. The G/M-CdS composite reveals a high photodegradation rate under visible light irradiation. Our results demonstrate that the G/M-CdS is very promising for removing organic dyes from wastewater.

  6. Graphene-enhanced visible-light photocatalysis of large-sized CdS particles for wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Lü, Wei; Chen, Jie; Wu, Yao; Duan, Lianfeng; Yang, Yue; Ge, Xin

    2014-03-26

    The hybrid composites of graphene decorated by large-sized CdS particles (G/M-CdS) were prepared by a one-pot solvothermal route in which the reduction of graphite oxide into graphene was accompanied by the generation of microsized CdS particles. The structure and composition of the obtained nanocomposites were studied by means of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The CdS particles with the average sizes of approximately 640 nm were formed on graphene sheets. The as-prepared composite was used as adsorbent to remove dye from wastewater using the organic dye Rhodamine B as the adsorbate. The G/M-CdS composite reveals a high photodegradation rate under visible light irradiation. Our results demonstrate that the G/M-CdS is very promising for removing organic dyes from wastewater.

  7. Graphene-enhanced visible-light photocatalysis of large-sized CdS particles for wastewater treatment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The hybrid composites of graphene decorated by large-sized CdS particles (G/M-CdS) were prepared by a one-pot solvothermal route in which the reduction of graphite oxide into graphene was accompanied by the generation of microsized CdS particles. The structure and composition of the obtained nanocomposites were studied by means of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The CdS particles with the average sizes of approximately 640 nm were formed on graphene sheets. The as-prepared composite was used as adsorbent to remove dye from wastewater using the organic dye Rhodamine B as the adsorbate. The G/M-CdS composite reveals a high photodegradation rate under visible light irradiation. Our results demonstrate that the G/M-CdS is very promising for removing organic dyes from wastewater. PMID:24666436

  8. Some Progress in Large-Eddy Simulation using the 3-D Vortex Particle Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winckelmans, G. S.

    1995-01-01

    This two-month visit at CTR was devoted to investigating possibilities in LES modeling in the context of the 3-D vortex particle method (=vortex element method, VEM) for unbounded flows. A dedicated code was developed for that purpose. Although O(N(sup 2)) and thus slow, it offers the advantage that it can easily be modified to try out many ideas on problems involving up to N approx. 10(exp 4) particles. Energy spectrums (which require O(N(sup 2)) operations per wavenumber) are also computed. Progress was realized in the following areas: particle redistribution schemes, relaxation schemes to maintain the solenoidal condition on the particle vorticity field, simple LES models and their VEM extension, possible new avenues in LES. Model problems that involve strong interaction between vortex tubes were computed, together with diagnostics: total vorticity, linear and angular impulse, energy and energy spectrum, enstrophy. More work is needed, however, especially regarding relaxation schemes and further validation and development of LES models for VEM. Finally, what works well will eventually have to be incorporated into the fast parallel tree code.

  9. Shear resuspension and rheology of dense particles at moderate and large Re

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linares-Guerrero, Esperanza; Hunt, Melany; Zenit, Roberto

    2016-11-01

    We experimentally investigate the resuspension behavior of dense particles subjected to lateral shear in a Couette device for particle Reynolds numbers from 15 to 500. Before the shear is applied, the particles sediment and form a compact bed that sits in the bottom of an annular ring of the apparatus. At sufficiently high shear rate, applied by rotating the inner cylinder, the particles re-suspend and the bed expands reaching a steady state. The mean volume fraction of the bed is determined from the initial bed height, the Archimedes number, and the Stokes number. The measurements are compared with a model that predicts the bed expansion by considering a balance between the rate of settling and a shear induced Fickian flux for moderate to high Reynolds numbers. Good agreement was found between experiments and predictions, considering values of the diffusion coefficient found in the literature. Once the column has resuspended, a measurement of the effective viscosity is performed. We discuss the implications of the sedimenting granular phase on the rheology of the suspension.

  10. Sensitivity study of large-scale particle image velocimetry measurement of river discharge using numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauet, Alexandre; Creutin, Jean-Dominique; Belleudy, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    SummaryThis study deals with the uncertainty of large-scale particle image velocimetry (LSPIV) measurements in rivers. LSPIV belongs to the methods of local remote sensing of rivers, like Radar- and Lidar-based techniques. These methods have many potential advantages, in comparison with classical river gauging, but they have a fundamental drawback: they are indirect measurements. As such they need to be assessed in reference to direct measurements. A first validation method consists in the comparison of LSPIV measurements with classic gauging results, in field and laboratory experiments. Unfortunately, in both cases, it is impossible in practice to control all the parameters and to distinguish the impact of the various error sources. In the present study we propose a more theoretical assessment of LSPIV potential through numerical simulation. The idea is simply to mathematically formulate the present state of knowledge of the measurement including both the physics of the phenomenon (the illuminated river) and the physics of the sensor (the camera and the PIV tracking). The dilemma about when to start this type of simulation is the following: The simulation is satisfactory if we can validate it which means to be able to compare simulations and observations over a wide range of conditions. The simulation is useful to get preliminary insights about the most important measurement conditions to organize validation studies. Our simulator is composed of three blocks: The river block represents the unidirectional river flow by the association of the EDM model and a theoretical vertical velocity profile giving a 3D velocity distribution. This hydraulic model is complemented by features representing free surface tracers, the illumination of the free-surface (shadows and sun reflection) and the effect of the wind. The camera block transforms the river state parameters into raster images according to the intrinsic and extrinsic parameters of the camera. The LSPIV analysis

  11. Radioactivity of drinking-water in the vicinity of nuclear power plants in China based on a large-scale monitoring study.

    PubMed

    Miao, Xiao-Xiang; Ji, Yan-Qin; Shao, Xian-Zhang; Wang, Huan; Sun, Quan-Fu; Su, Xu

    2013-12-06

    The public concern for radioactivity of drinking-water has been increasing in recent years after the rapid development of nuclear power plants, and especially after the Fukushima nuclear accident. In this study, the radioactivity of water samples collected in the vicinity of nuclear facilities from seven provinces in China was measured and an average annual equivalent effective dose derived from drinking-water ingestion was calculated. The results showed that, in winter and spring, the activities of gross α and β ranged from 0.009 Bq/L to 0.200 Bq/L and from 0.067 Bq/L to 0.320 Bq/L, respectively. While, in summer and autumn, the activities of gross a and β varied from 0.002 Bq/L to 0.175 Bq/L and from 0.060 Bq/L to 0.334 Bq/L. Our results indicated that the gross a and β activities in these measured water samples were below the WHO recommended values (0.5 Bq/L for gross α and 1.0 Bq/L for gross β) and the annual equivalent effective dose derived from drinking-water ingestion was at a safe level.

  12. Radioactivity of Drinking-Water in the Vicinity of Nuclear Power Plants in China Based on a Large-Scale Monitoring Study

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Xiao-Xiang; Ji, Yan-Qin; Shao, Xian-Zhang; Wang, Huan; Sun, Quan-Fu; Su, Xu

    2013-01-01

    The public concern for radioactivity of drinking-water has been increasing in recent years after the rapid development of nuclear power plants, and especially after the Fukushima nuclear accident. In this study, the radioactivity of water samples collected in the vicinity of nuclear facilities from seven provinces in China was measured and an average annual equivalent effective dose derived from drinking-water ingestion was calculated. The results showed that, in winter and spring, the activities of gross α and β ranged from 0.009 Bq/L to 0.200 Bq/L and from 0.067 Bq/L to 0.320 Bq/L, respectively. While, in summer and autumn, the activities of gross α and β varied from 0.002 Bq/L to 0.175 Bq/L and from 0.060 Bq/L to 0.334 Bq/L. Our results indicated that the gross α and β activities in these measured water samples were below the WHO recommended values (0.5 Bq/L for gross α and 1.0 Bq/L for gross β) and the annual equivalent effective dose derived from drinking-water ingestion was at a safe level. PMID:24322395

  13. Simulation of large particle transport near the surface under stable conditions: comparison with the Hanford tracer experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eugene; Larson, Timothy

    A plume model is presented describing the downwind transport of large particles (1-100 μm) under stable conditions. The model includes both vertical variations in wind speed and turbulence intensity as well as an algorithm for particle deposition at the surface. Model predictions compare favorably with the Hanford single and dual tracer experiments of crosswind integrated concentration (for particles: relative bias=-0.02 and 0.16, normalized mean square error=0.61 and 0.14, for the single and dual tracer experiments, respectively), whereas the US EPA's fugitive dust model consistently overestimates the observed concentrations at downwind distances beyond several hundred meters (for particles: relative bias=0.31 and 2.26, mean square error=0.42 and 1.71, respectively). For either plume model, the measured ratio of particle to gas concentration is consistently overestimated when using the deposition velocity algorithm of Sehmel and Hodgson (1978. DOE Report PNL-SA-6721, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Richland, WA). In contrast, these same ratios are predicted with relatively little bias when using the algorithm of Kim et al. (2000. Atmospheric Environment 34 (15), 2387-2397).

  14. International Airport Impacts to Air Quality: Size and Related Properties of Large Increases in Ultrafine Particle Number Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Hudda, N; Fruin, S A

    2016-04-05

    We measured particle size distributions and spatial patterns of particle number (PN) and particle surface area concentrations downwind from the Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) where large increases (over local background) in PN concentrations routinely extended 18 km downwind. These elevations were mostly comprised of ultrafine particles smaller than 40 nm. For a given downwind distance, the greatest increases in PN concentrations, along with the smallest mean sizes, were detected at locations under the landing jet trajectories. The smaller size of particles in the impacted area, as compared to the ambient urban aerosol, increased calculated lung deposition fractions to 0.7-0.8 from 0.5-0.7. A diffusion charging instrument (DiSCMini), that simulates alveolar lung deposition, measured a fivefold increase in alveolar-lung deposited surface area concentrations 2-3 km downwind from the airport (over local background), decreasing steadily to a twofold increase 18 km downwind. These ratios (elevated lung-deposited surface area over background) were lower than the corresponding ratios for elevated PN concentrations, which decreased from tenfold to twofold over the same distance, but the spatial patterns of elevated concentrations were similar. It appears that PN concentration can serve as a nonlinear proxy for lung deposited surface area downwind of major airports.

  15. Large-scale negative polarity magnetic fields on the sun and particle-emitting flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bumba, V.

    1972-01-01

    Some observational facts about the large-scale patterns formed by solar negative polarity magnetic fields during the 19th and 20th cycles of solar activity are presented. The close relation of the position of occurrence of very large flares accompanied by cosmic ray and PCA events as well as other phenomena of solar activity during the declining part of the 19th cycle of the regularities in the internal structure of large scale negative polarity features are demonstrated.

  16. COPASutils: an R package for reading, processing, and visualizing data from COPAS large-particle flow cytometers.

    PubMed

    Shimko, Tyler C; Andersen, Erik C

    2014-01-01

    The R package COPASutils provides a logical workflow for the reading, processing, and visualization of data obtained from the Union Biometrica Complex Object Parametric Analyzer and Sorter (COPAS) or the BioSorter large-particle flow cytometers. Data obtained from these powerful experimental platforms can be unwieldy, leading to difficulties in the ability to process and visualize the data using existing tools. Researchers studying small organisms, such as Caenorhabditis elegans, Anopheles gambiae, and Danio rerio, and using these devices will benefit from this streamlined and extensible R package. COPASutils offers a powerful suite of functions for the rapid processing and analysis of large high-throughput screening data sets.

  17. Transfer reaction experiments with radioactive beams: from halos to the r-process

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K. L.

    2013-01-01

    Transfer reactions are a powerful probe of the properties of atomic nuclei. When used in inverse kinematics with radioactive ion beams they can provide detailed information on the structure of exotic nuclei and can inform nucleosynthesis calculations. There are a number of groups around the world who use these reactions, usually with particle detection in large silicon arrays. Sometimes these arrays are coupled to gamma-ray detectors, and occasionally smaller arrays of silicon detectors are mounted within a solenoid magnet. Modern techniques using transfer reactions in inverse kinematics are covered, with specific examples, many from measurements made with beams from the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  18. Preparation of large-particle-size monodisperse latexes in space - Polymerization kinetics and process development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderhoff, J. W.; El-Aasser, M. S.; Micale, F. J.; Sudol, E. D.; Tseng, C. M.; Silwanowicz, A.; Kornfeld, D. M.

    1984-01-01

    Monodisperse polystyrene latexes are prepared by seeded emulsion polymerization; however, sizes larger than 2 microns are difficult to prepare because of the creaming and settling of the particles and their sensitivity to mechanical shear. Preparation in space would obviate the creaming and settling, and allow agitation just sufficient for good heat transfer and mixing. Three polymerizations yielding 3-5 micron size particles were carried out successfully on the third flight of the 'Columbia' launched Mar. 22, 1982; however, four polymerizations yielding sizes up to 10 microns on the fourth flight launched June 27, 1982 were incomplete owing to apparatus malfunction. The results of these polymerizations and the prospects of developing a preparative space process are reviewed.

  19. Mean free paths of energetic particles at very large heliodistances (Pioneer 11 at 20 AU)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moussas, X.; Quenby, J. J.; Theodossiou-Ekaterinidi, Z.; Valdes-Galicia, J. F.; Drillia, A. G.; Roulias, D.; Smith, E. J.

    1992-01-01

    The parallel mean free path and the diffusion coefficient parallel to the magnetic field line are derived from magnetic field data at 20 AU to characterize heliospheric modulation and energetic-particle/magnetic-field interaction. The computational method of Moussas et al. (1975, 1982) is employed, and the values of the parallel mean free path are shown to be significantly larger than the values estimated in studies of up to 6 AU. The distance dependence of the parallel diffusion mean free path is found to follow a power law, and the diffusion coefficient dependence upon energy is determined by a constant mean free path and the velocity of the particle. The contribution of the diffusion coefficient perpendicular to the magnetic field is expected to dominate the radial diffusion coefficient of cosmic rays, although the contribution of the diffusion parallel to the field is important with respect to the small-scale structure of intensity gradients.

  20. Mode particle resonances during near-tangential neutral beam injection in large tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Kaita, R.; White, R.B.; Morris, A.W.; Fredrickson, E.D.; McGuire, K.M.; Medley, S.S.; Scott, S.D.

    1988-01-01

    Coherent magnetohydrodynamic modes have been observed during neutral beam injection in TFTR and JET. Periodic bursts of oscillations were detected with several plasma diagnostics, and Fokker-Planck calculations show that the populations of trapped particles in both tokamaks are sufficient to account for fishbone destabilization. Estimates of mode parameters are in reasonable agreement with the experiments, and they indicate that the fishbone mode may continue to affect the performance of intensely heated tokamaks. 13 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  1. Reduced Activity and Large Particles from the Disintegrating Planet Candidate KIC 12557548b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlawin, E.; Herter, T.; Zhao, M.; Teske, J. K.; Chen, H.

    2016-08-01

    The intriguing exoplanet candidate KIC 12557548b is believed to have a comet-like tail of dusty debris trailing a small rocky planet. The tail of debris scatters up to 1.3% of the stellar light in the Kepler observatory’s bandpass (0.42-0.9 μm). Observing the tail’s transit depth at multiple wavelengths can reveal the composition and particle size of the debris, constraining the makeup and lifetime of the sub-Mercury planet. Early dust particle size predictions from the scattering of the comet-like tail pointed toward a dust size of ˜0.1 μm for silicate compositions. These small particles would produce a much deeper optical transit depth than near-infrared transit depth. We measure a transmission spectrum for KIC 12557548b using the SpeX spectrograph (covering 0.8-2.4 μm) simultaneously with the MORIS imager taking r‧ (0.63 μm) photometry on the Infrared Telescope Facility for eight nights and one night in H band (1.63 μm) using the Wide-field IR Camera at the Palomar 200 inch telescope. The infrared spectra are plagued by systematic errors, but we argue that sufficient precision is obtained when using differential spectroscopic calibration when combining multiple nights. The average differential transmission spectrum is flat, supporting findings that KIC 12557548b’s debris is likely composed of larger particles ≳0.5 μm for pyroxene and olivine and ≳0.2 μm for iron and corundum. The r‧ photometric transit depths are all below the average Kepler value, suggesting that the observations occurred during a weak period or that the mechanisms producing optical broadband transit depths are suppressed.

  2. Method of conditioning fireside fouling deposits using super large particle size magnesium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Merrell, G.A.; Sujdak, R.J.

    1989-01-10

    This patent describes a method for minimizing the deleterious effects of combustion residues on structures normally contacted thereby. It consists of burning coal in a furnace combustion zone and adding to the furnace an effective amount of a magnesium oxide material, comprising particles the major mass fraction of which is about 150 microns in diameter or greater so as to increase the friability of the residues which may normally adhere to the structures.

  3. Radioactive waste shredding: Preliminary evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Soelberg, N.R.; Reimann, G.A.

    1994-07-01

    The critical constraints for sizing solid radioactive and mixed wastes for subsequent thermal treatment were identified via a literature review and a survey of shredding equipment vendors. The types and amounts of DOE radioactive wastes that will require treatment to reduce the waste volume, destroy hazardous organics, or immobilize radionuclides and/or hazardous metals were considered. The preliminary steps of waste receipt, inspection, and separation were included because many potential waste treatment technologies have limits on feedstream chemical content, physical composition, and particle size. Most treatment processes and shredding operations require at least some degree of feed material characterization. Preliminary cost estimates show that pretreatment costs per unit of waste can be high and can vary significantly, depending on the processing rate and desired output particle size.

  4. Interaction between living bone particles and rhBMP-2 in large segmental defect healing in the rat femur.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fangjun; Wells, James W; Porter, Ryan M; Glatt, Vaida; Shen, Zhenxin; Schinhan, Martina; Ivkovic, Alan; Vrahas, Mark S; Evans, Christopher H; Ferreira, Elisabeth

    2016-12-01

    Orthopedic surgeons sometimes combine recombinant, human BMP-2 with autograft bone when dealing with problematic osseous fractures. Although some case reports indicate success with this off-label strategy, there have been no randomized controlled trials. Moreover, a literature search revealed only one pre-clinical study and this was in a cranial defect model. The present project examined the consequences of combining BMP-2 with particles of living bone in a rat femoral defect model. Human bone particles were recovered with a reamer-irrigator-aspirator (RIA). To allow acceptance of the xenograft as surrogate autograft, rats were administered an immunosuppressive cocktail that does not interfere with bone healing. Implantation of 200 µg living bone particles generated a small amount of new bone and defects did not heal. Graded amounts of BMP-2 that alone provoked no healing (1.1 µg), borderline healing (5.5 µg), or full healing (11 µg) were added to this amount of bone particles. Addition of BMP-2 (1.1 µg) increased osteogenesis, and produced bridging in 2 of 7 defects. The combination of BMP-2 (5.5 µg) and bone particles made healing more reliable and advanced the maturation of the regenerate. Bone formation with BMP-2 (11 µg) and bone particles showed improved maturation. Thus, the combination of autograft and BMP-2 may be helpful clinically under conditions where the healing response is suboptimal. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:2137-2145, 2016. Clinical significance These data support the clinical use of recombinant, human BMP-2 with autograft bone when treating large segmental osseous defects. The combination leads to greater bone formation and accelerates the maturation of the regenerate.

  5. Radioactivity measurements using storage phosphor technology

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Y.T.; Hwang, J.; Hutchinson, M.R.

    1995-10-01

    We propose to apply a recently developed charged particle radiation imaging concept in bio-medical research for fast, cost-effective characterization of radionuclides in contaminated sites and environmental samples. This concept utilizes sensors with storage photostimulable phosphor (SPP) technology as radiation detectors. They exhibit high sensitivity for all types of radiation and the response is linear over a wide dynamic range (>10{sup 5}), essential for quantitative analysis. These new sensors have an Active area of up to 35 cm x 43 cm in size and a spatial resolution as fine as 50 {mu}m. They offer considerable promise as large area detectors for fast characterization of radionuclides with an added ability to locate and identify hot spots. Tests with SPP sensors have found that a single alpha particle effect can be observed and an alpha field of 100 dpm/100 cm{sup 2} or a beta activity of 0.1 dpm/mm{sup 2} or gamma radiation of few {mu}R/hr can all be measured in minutes. Radioactive isotopes can further be identified by energy discrimination which is accomplished by placing different thicknesses of filter material in front of the sensor plate. For areas with possible neutron contamination, the sensors can be coupled to a neutron to charged particle converter screen, such as dysprosium foil to detect neutrons. Our study has shown that this approach can detect a neutron flux of 1 n/cm{sup 2}s or lower, again with only minutes of exposure time. The utilization of these new sensors can significantly reduce the time and cost required for many site characterization and environmental monitoring tasks. The {open_quotes}exposure{close_quotes} time for mapping radioactivity in an environmental sample may be in terms of minutes and offer a positional resolution not obtainable with presently used counting equipment. The resultant digital image will lend itself to ready analysis.

  6. Reactor radioactive emission monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Jester, W.A.; Mc Master, I.B.; Baratta, A.J.

    1987-05-05

    This patent describes a means for measuring quantities of a selected radioactive component in a stream of radioactive fluid. The means comprise: a first fluid path with a first means for retaining the selected radioactive component mounted in the fluid path for retaining the radioactive component while passing the remainder of the stream of radioactive fluid; a second fluid path with a second means for retaining the selected radioactive component mounted in the second fluid path for retaining the radioactive component while passing the remainder of the stream of the radioactive fluid; first and second detectors for detecting the level of radioactivity emitted by the retained radioactive component in the first and second retaining means; a means for integrating the output of one or more of the detectors as a function of time to measure any increase in the radioactivity emitted by the radioactive component retained by the retaining means, and the increase being representative of the amount of selected radioactive component present in the stream of radioactive fluid.

  7. Angularly-resolved elastic scatter from single particles collected over a large solid angle and with high resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aptowicz, Kevin B.; Chang, Richard K.

    2005-01-01

    Elastic light scattering from a single non-spherical particle of various morphologies has been measured simultaneously with a large angular range (90° < θ < 165° and 0° < phi < 360°) and with high angular resolution (1024 pixels in θ and 512 pixels in phi). Because the single-shot laser pulse is short (pulse duration of 70 ns), the tumbling and flowing particle can be treated as frozen in space. The large angle two-dimensional angular optical scattering (hereafter referred to as LA TAOS) intensity pattern, I(θ,phi), has been measured for a variety of particle morphology, such as the following: (1) single polystyrene latex (PSL) sphere; (2) cluster of PSL spheres; (3) single Bacillus subtilis (BG) spore; (4) cluster of BG spores; (5) dried aggregates of bio-aerosols as well as background clutter aerosols. All these measurements were made using the second harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser (0.532 μm). Islands structures in the LA TAOS patterns seem to be the prominent feature. Efforts are being made to extract metrics from these islands and compare them to theoretical results based on the T-matrix method.

  8. Ultrabright fluorescent silica particles with a large number of complex spectra excited with a single wavelength for multiplex applications.

    PubMed

    Palantavida, S; Peng, B; Sokolov, I

    2017-02-08

    We report on a novel approach to synthesize ultrabright fluorescent silica particles capable of producing a large number of complex spectra. The spectra can be excited using a single wavelength which is paramount in quantitative fluorescence imaging, flow cytometry and sensing applications. The approach employs the physical encapsulation of organic fluorescent molecules inside a nanoporous silica matrix with no dye leakage. As was recently demonstrated, such an encapsulation allowed for the encapsulation of very high concentrations of organic dyes without quenching their fluorescent efficiency. As a result, dye molecules are distanced within ∼5 nm from each other; it theoretically allows for efficient exchange of excitation energy via Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). Here we present the first experimental demonstration of the encapsulation of fluorescent dyes in the FRET sequence. Attaining a FRET sequence of up to five different dyes is presented. The number of distinguishable spectra can be further increased by using different relative concentrations of encapsulated dyes. Combining these approaches allows for creating a large number of ultrabright fluorescent particles with substantially different fluorescence spectra. We also demonstrate the utilization of these particles for potential multiplexing applications. Though fluorescence spectra of the obtained multiplex probes are typically overlapping, they can be distinguished by using standard linear decomposition algorithms.

  9. Large scale water entry simulation with smoothed particle hydrodynamics on single- and multi-GPU systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Zhe; Xu, Fei; Takahashi, Akiyuki; Sun, Yu

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, a Weakly Compressible Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (WCSPH) framework is presented utilizing the parallel architecture of single- and multi-GPU (Graphic Processing Unit) platforms. The program is developed for water entry simulations where an efficient potential based contact force is introduced to tackle the interaction between fluid and solid particles. The single-GPU SPH scheme is implemented with a series of optimization to achieve high performance. To go beyond the memory limitation of single GPU, the scheme is further extended to multi-GPU platform basing on an improved 3D domain decomposition and inter-node data communication strategy. A typical benchmark test of wedge entry is investigated in varied dimensions and scales to validate the accuracy and efficiency of the program. The results of 2D and 3D benchmark tests manifest great consistency with the experiment and better accuracy than other numerical models. The performance of the single-GPU code is assessed by comparing with serial and parallel CPU codes. The improvement of the domain decomposition strategy is verified, and a study on the scalability and efficiency of the multi-GPU code is carried out as well by simulating tests with varied scales in different amount of GPUs. Lastly, the single- and multi-GPU codes are further compared with existing state-of-the-art SPH parallel frameworks for a comprehensive assessment.

  10. Uptake of HNO3 to deliquescent sea-salt particles: a study using the short-lived radioactive isotope tracer 13N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimbaud, C.; Arens, F.; Gutzwiller, L.; Gäggeler, H. W.; Ammann, M.

    2002-10-01

    The uptake of HNO3 to deliquescent airborne sea-salt particles (RH = 55%, P = 760 torr, T = 300 K) at concentrations from 2 to 575 ppbv is measured in an aerosol flow tube using 13N as a tracer. Small particles ( 70 nm diameter) are used in order to minimize the effect of diffusion in the gas phase on the mass transfer. Below 100 ppbv, an uptake coefficient (gupt) of 0.50 ± 0.20 is derived. At higher concentrations, the uptake coefficient decreases along with the consumption of aerosol chloride. Data interpretation is further supported by using the North American Aerosol Inorganics Model (AIM), which predicts the aqueous phase activities of ions and the gas-phase partial pressures of H2O, HNO3, and HCl at equilibrium for the NaCl/HNO3/H2O system. These simulations show that the low concentration data are obtained far from equilibrium, which implies that the uptake coefficient derived is equal to the mass accommodation coefficient under these conditions. The observed uptake coefficient can serve as input to modeling studies of atmospheric sea-salt aerosol chemistry. The main sea-salt aerosol burden in the marine atmosphere is represented by coarse mode particles (> 1 µm diameter). This implies that diffusion in the gas-phase is the limiting step to HNO3 uptake until the sea-salt has been completely processed.

  11. Wood dust sampling: field evaluation of personal samplers when large particles are present.

    PubMed

    Lee, Taekhee; Harper, Martin; Slaven, James E; Lee, Kiyoung; Rando, Roy J; Maples, Elizabeth H

    2011-03-01

    Recent recommendations for wood dust sampling include sampling according to the inhalable convention of International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 7708 (1995) Air quality--particle size fraction definitions for health-related sampling. However, a specific sampling device is not mandated, and while several samplers have laboratory performance approaching theoretical for an 'inhalable' sampler, the best choice of sampler for wood dust is not clear. A side-by-side field study was considered the most practical test of samplers as laboratory performance tests consider overall performance based on a wider range of particle sizes than are commonly encountered in the wood products industry. Seven companies in the wood products industry of the Southeast USA (MS, KY, AL, and WV) participated in this study. The products included hardwood flooring, engineered hardwood flooring, door skins, shutter blinds, kitchen cabinets, plywood, and veneer. The samplers selected were 37-mm closed-face cassette with ACCU-CAP™, Button, CIP10-I, GSP, and Institute of Occupational Medicine. Approximately 30 of each possible pairwise combination of samplers were collected as personal sample sets. Paired samplers of the same type were used to calculate environmental variance that was then used to determine the number of pairs of samples necessary to detect any difference at a specified level of confidence. Total valid sample number was 888 (444 valid pairs). The mass concentration of wood dust ranged from 0.02 to 195 mg m(-3). Geometric mean (geometric standard deviation) and arithmetic mean (standard deviation) of wood dust were 0.98 mg m(-3) (3.06) and 2.12 mg m(-3) (7.74), respectively. One percent of the samples exceeded 15 mg m(-3), 6% exceeded 5 mg m(-3), and 48% exceeded 1 mg m(-3). The number of collected pairs is generally appropriate to detect a 35% difference when outliers (negative mass loadings) are removed. Statistical evaluation of the nonsimilar sampler pair results

  12. A hybrid binary particle swarm optimization for large capacitated multi item multi level lot sizing (CMIMLLS) problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S. K.; Sahithi, V. V. D.; Rao, C. S. P.

    2016-09-01

    The lot sizing problem deals with finding optimal order quantities which minimizes the ordering and holding cost of product mix. when multiple items at multiple levels with all capacity restrictions are considered, the lot sizing problem become NP hard. Many heuristics were developed in the past have inevitably failed due to size, computational complexity and time. However the authors were successful in the development of PSO based technique namely iterative improvement binary particles swarm technique to address very large capacitated multi-item multi level lot sizing (CMIMLLS) problem. First binary particle Swarm Optimization algorithm is used to find a solution in a reasonable time and iterative improvement local search mechanism is employed to improvise the solution obtained by BPSO algorithm. This hybrid mechanism of using local search on the global solution is found to improve the quality of solutions with respect to time thus IIBPSO method is found best and show excellent results.

  13. Induced radioactivity in LDEF components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, B. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Parnell, T. A.; Laird, C. E.

    1992-01-01

    A systematic study of the induced radioactivity of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) is being carried out in order to gather information about the low earth orbit radiation environment and its effects on materials. The large mass of the LDEF spacecraft, its stabilized configuration, and long mission duration have presented an opportunity to determine space radiation-induced radioactivities with a precision not possible before. Data presented include preliminary activities for steel and aluminum structural samples, and activation subexperiment foils. Effects seen in the data show a clear indication of the trapped proton anisotropy in the South Atlantic Anomaly and suggest contributions from different sources of external radiation fluxes.

  14. [Radioactive labeling of Blatella germanica].

    PubMed

    Metzger, R; Hanisch, J; Regenstein, W

    1979-06-01

    For ecological investigations in natural populations of Blatella germanica a new method of dry incorporation of a porcelain tracer is developed. The quality of this method in contrast with other non radioactive and at present radioactive methods depends on the stable position of the tracer and the possibility of taking different marking substances for individually marking a large number of experimental animals. The identification bases on the previously investigated half-life values. The new method in combination with the recaptivate method is a good possibility to analyse a population of cockroaches.

  15. The ribonucleoprotein nature of large particles in the meiosporangia of Allomyces.

    PubMed

    ROREM, E S; MACHLIS, L

    1957-11-25

    Particles averaging 3 to 4 micro in diameter, which are called chromospheres and fill the immature meiosporangia of the watermold Allomyces, were isolated and analyzed. The preparations were obtained by repeated centrifugations or by passage of the homogenate into a column of sand saturated with oleic acid, followed by selective elution of the chromospheres with alternate layers of oleic acid and an aqueous solution. The chromospheres contain approximately 12 per cent RNA, no DNA, and 60 per cent protein. It was concluded that they are pure or nearly pure ribonucleoprotein. Analysis of meiosporangia with chromospheres and after the chromospheres have disappeared showed no significant change in RNA or free amino acids. It was concluded that chromosphere disappearance is a fragmentation into small granules. The relation of chromospheres to postmeiotic chromospheres and nuclear caps is discussed. Speculation as to the function of these bodies is presented.

  16. Towards the preparative and large-scale precision manufacture of virus-like particles.

    PubMed

    Pattenden, Leonard K; Middelberg, Anton P J; Niebert, Marcus; Lipin, Daniel I

    2005-10-01

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) are of interest in vaccination, gene therapy and drug delivery, but their potential has yet to be fully realized. This is because existing laboratory processes, when scaled, do not easily give a compositionally and architecturally consistent product. Research suggests that new process routes might ultimately be based on chemical processing by self-assembly, involving the precision manufacture of precursor capsomeres followed by in vitro VLP self-assembly and scale-up to required levels. A synergistic interaction of biomolecular design and bioprocess engineering (i.e. biomolecular engineering) is required if these alternative process routes and, thus, the promise of new VLP products, are to be realized.

  17. Free-Living and Particle-Associated Bacterioplankton in Large Rivers of the Mississippi River Basin Demonstrate Biogeographic Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Millar, Justin J.; Payne, Jason T.; Ochs, Clifford A.

    2014-01-01

    The different drainage basins of large rivers such as the Mississippi River represent interesting systems in which to study patterns in freshwater microbial biogeography. Spatial variability in bacterioplankton communities in six major rivers (the Upper Mississippi, Missouri, Illinois, Ohio, Tennessee, and Arkansas) of the Mississippi River Basin was characterized using Ion Torrent 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing. When all systems were combined, particle-associated (>3 μm) bacterial assemblages were found to be different from free-living bacterioplankton in terms of overall community structure, partly because of differences in the proportional abundance of sequences affiliated with major bacterial lineages (Alphaproteobacteria, Cyanobacteria, and Planctomycetes). Both particle-associated and free-living communities ordinated by river system, a pattern that was apparent even after rare sequences or those affiliated with Cyanobacteria were removed from the analyses. Ordination of samples by river system correlated with environmental characteristics of each river, such as nutrient status and turbidity. Communities in the Upper Mississippi and the Missouri and in the Ohio and the Tennessee, pairs of rivers that join each other, contained similar taxa in terms of presence-absence data but differed in the proportional abundance of major lineages. The most common sequence types detected in particle-associated communities were picocyanobacteria in the Synechococcus/Prochlorococcus/Cyanobium (Syn/Pro) clade, while free-living communities also contained a high proportion of LD12 (SAR11/Pelagibacter)-like Alphaproteobacteria. This research shows that while different tributaries of large river systems such as the Mississippi River harbor distinct bacterioplankton communities, there is also microhabitat variation such as that between free-living and particle-associated assemblages. PMID:25217018

  18. Free-Living and Particle-Associated Bacterioplankton in Large Rivers of the Mississippi River Basin Demonstrate Biogeographic Patterns.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Colin R; Millar, Justin J; Payne, Jason T; Ochs, Clifford A

    2014-12-01

    The different drainage basins of large rivers such as the Mississippi River represent interesting systems in which to study patterns in freshwater microbial biogeography. Spatial variability in bacterioplankton communities in six major rivers (the Upper Mississippi, Missouri, Illinois, Ohio, Tennessee, and Arkansas) of the Mississippi River Basin was characterized using Ion Torrent 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing. When all systems were combined, particle-associated (>3 μm) bacterial assemblages were found to be different from free-living bacterioplankton in terms of overall community structure, partly because of differences in the proportional abundance of sequences affiliated with major bacterial lineages (Alphaproteobacteria, Cyanobacteria, and Planctomycetes). Both particle-associated and free-living communities ordinated by river system, a pattern that was apparent even after rare sequences or those affiliated with Cyanobacteria were removed from the analyses. Ordination of samples by river system correlated with environmental characteristics of each river, such as nutrient status and turbidity. Communities in the Upper Mississippi and the Missouri and in the Ohio and the Tennessee, pairs of rivers that join each other, contained similar taxa in terms of presence-absence data but differed in the proportional abundance of major lineages. The most common sequence types detected in particle-associated communities were picocyanobacteria in the Synechococcus/Prochlorococcus/Cyanobium (Syn/Pro) clade, while free-living communities also contained a high proportion of LD12 (SAR11/Pelagibacter)-like Alphaproteobacteria. This research shows that while different tributaries of large river systems such as the Mississippi River harbor distinct bacterioplankton communities, there is also microhabitat variation such as that between free-living and particle-associated assemblages.

  19. Surface passivity largely governs the bioaccessibility of nickel-based powder particles at human exposure conditions.

    PubMed

    Hedberg, Yolanda S; Herting, Gunilla; Latvala, Siiri; Elihn, Karine; Karlsson, Hanna L; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger

    2016-11-01

    The European chemical framework REACH requires that hazards and risks posed by chemicals, including alloys and metals, are identified and proven safe for humans and the environment. Therefore, differences in bioaccessibility in terms of released metals in synthetic biological fluids (different pH (1.5-7.4) and composition) that are relevant for different human exposure routes (inhalation, ingestion, and dermal contact) have been assessed for powder particles of an alloy containing high levels of nickel (Inconel 718, 57 wt% nickel). This powder is compared with the bioaccessibility of two nickel-containing stainless steel powders (AISI 316L, 10-12% nickel) and with powders representing their main pure alloy constituents: two nickel metal powders (100% nickel), two iron metal powders and two chromium metal powders. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, microscopy, light scattering, and nitrogen absorption were employed for the particle and surface oxide characterization. Atomic absorption spectroscopy was used to quantify released amounts of metals in solution. Cytotoxicity (Alamar blue assay) and DNA damage (comet assay) of the Inconel powder were assessed following exposure of the human lung cell line A549, as well as its ability to generate reactive oxygen species (DCFH-DA assay). Despite its high nickel content, the Inconel alloy powder did not release any significant amounts of metals and did not induce any toxic response. It is concluded, that this is related to the high surface passivity of the Inconel powder governed by its chromium-rich surface oxide. Read-across from the pure metal constituents is hence not recommended either for this or any other passive alloy.

  20. Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of Particle-Laden Temporal Mixing Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Radhakrishnan, Senthilkumaran

    2012-01-01

    High-fidelity models of plume-regolith interaction are difficult to develop because of the widely disparate flow conditions that exist in this process. The gas in the core of a rocket plume can often be modeled as a time-dependent, high-temperature, turbulent, reacting continuum flow. However, due to the vacuum conditions on the lunar surface, the mean molecular path in the outer parts of the plume is too long for the continuum assumption to remain valid. Molecular methods are better suited to model this region of the flow. Finally, granular and multiphase flow models must be employed to describe the dust and debris that are displaced from the surface, as well as how a crater is formed in the regolith. At present, standard commercial CFD (computational fluid dynamics) software is not capable of coupling each of these flow regimes to provide an accurate representation of this flow process, necessitating the development of custom software. This software solves the fluid-flow-governing equations in an Eulerian framework, coupled with the particle transport equations that are solved in a Lagrangian framework. It uses a fourth-order explicit Runge-Kutta scheme for temporal integration, an eighth-order central finite differencing scheme for spatial discretization. The non-linear terms in the governing equations are recast in cubic skew symmetric form to reduce aliasing error. The second derivative viscous terms are computed using eighth-order narrow stencils that provide better diffusion for the highest resolved wave numbers. A fourth-order Lagrange interpolation procedure is used to obtain gas-phase variable values at the particle locations.

  1. Spectroscopic evidence of large aspherical β-NAT particles involved in denitrification in the December 2011 Arctic stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woiwode, Wolfgang; Höpfner, Michael; Bi, Lei; Pitts, Michael C.; Poole, Lamont R.; Oelhaf, Hermann; Molleker, Sergej; Borrmann, Stephan; Klingebiel, Marcus; Belyaev, Gennady; Ebersoldt, Andreas; Griessbach, Sabine; Grooß, Jens-Uwe; Gulde, Thomas; Krämer, Martina; Maucher, Guido; Piesch, Christof; Rolf, Christian; Sartorius, Christian; Spang, Reinhold; Orphal, Johannes

    2016-07-01

    We analyze polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) signatures in airborne MIPAS-STR (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding - STRatospheric aircraft) observations in the spectral regions from 725 to 990 and 1150 to 1350 cm-1 under conditions suitable for the existence of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) above northern Scandinavia on 11 December 2011. The high-resolution infrared limb emission spectra of MIPAS-STR show a characteristic "shoulder-like" signature in the spectral region around 820 cm-1, which is attributed to the ν2 symmetric deformation mode of NO3- in β-NAT. Using radiative transfer calculations involving Mie and T-Matrix methods, the spectral signatures of spherical and aspherical particles are simulated. The simulations are constrained using collocated in situ particle measurements. Simulations assuming highly aspherical spheroids with aspect ratios (AR) of 0.1 or 10.0 and a lognormal particle mode with a mode radius of 4.8 µm reproduce the observed spectra to a high degree. A smaller lognormal mode with a mode radius of 2.0 µm, which is also taken into account, plays only a minor role. Within the scenarios analyzed, the best overall agreement is found for elongated spheroids with AR = 0.1. Simulations of spherical particles and spheroids with AR = 0.5 and 2.0 return results very similar to each other and do not allow us to reproduce the signature around 820 cm-1. The observed "shoulder-like" signature is explained by the combination of the absorption/emission and scattering characteristics of large highly aspherical β-NAT particles. The size distribution supported by our results corresponds to ˜ 9 ppbv of gas-phase equivalent HNO3 at the flight altitude of ˜ 18.5 km. The results are compared with the size distributions derived from the in situ observations, a corresponding Chemical Lagrangian Model of the Stratosphere (CLaMS) simulation, and excess gas-phase HNO3 observed in a nitrification layer directly below the observed PSC. The

  2. Radioactive diagnostic agent

    SciTech Connect

    Shigematsu, A.; Aihara, M.; Matsuda, M.; Suzuki, A.; Tsuya, A.

    1984-02-07

    A radioactive diagnostic agent for renal cortex, adrenal cortex, myocardium, brain stem, spinal nerve, etc., which comprises as an essential component monoiodoacetic acid wherein the iodine atom is radioactive.

  3. Radioactive Iodine (Radioiodine) Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Stage Thyroid Cancer Treating Thyroid Cancer Radioactive Iodine (Radioiodine) Therapy for Thyroid Cancer Your thyroid gland absorbs nearly all of the iodine in your body. When radioactive iodine (RAI), also ...

  4. Large particle flux of 239+240Pu on the continental margin of the East China Sea.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Masatoshi; Aono, Tatsuo

    2002-03-15

    Settling particles were collected from three locations in the East China Sea continental margin and analyzed for 239+240Pu. Two types of sediment traps were used, cylindrical traps and conical time-series traps. Surface sediment samples collected from five locations were also analyzed for 239+240Pu. Data from cylindrical traps showed there was a clear tendency for total mass fluxes to increase with depth at all three stations, and there was an especially large increase near the bottom. 239+240Pu concentrations in settling particles increased with depth from 1.76 mBq/g at 97-m depth to 3.0 mBq/g at 120-m depth and ranged from approximately 3 to 4 mBq/g at depths greater than 120 m. 239+240Pu concentrations collected in the near-bottom traps were approximately two times higher than those in the underlying surface sediments. Like total mass fluxes there was a clear tendency for 239+240Pu fluxes to increase with depth at every station, and the highest 239+240Pu fluxes were observed near the bottom. 239+240Pu concentrations in the time-series traps had little variation throughout the sampling period, though the total mass fluxes showed a large variation. A high variability of 239+240Pu fluxes occurred in very short period of time (1/2 day). The large fluxes of 239+240Pu might be attributed to episodic lateral transport of particles that flow down the continental slope with the nepheloid layer which was considered to be significant for 239+240Pu transport on the continental slope in the East China Sea.

  5. [Superficial femoral vein thrombosis due to large psoas bursitis secondary to particle disease in total hip arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Lax-Pérez, R; Salinas-Gilabert, J E; Lajara-Marco, F; Lax-Pérez, A; Corraliza-Zamorano, A; García-Gálvez, A; Izquierdo-Plazas, L

    2012-01-01

    Male, 76 year-old patient with a history of total hip arthroplasty who presents with a mass in the iliac fossa with swelling of the thigh and hip pain upon flexion and extension. Complementary ultrasound and computed tomography scan studies show a giant lobulated cystic mass in the left iliac fossa, 7 cm in diameter, near the prosthesis. Cyst formation caused by polyethylene disease after total hip arthroplasty is infrequent. We present a case of large psoas bursitis secondary to the release of polyethylene particles which caused superficial femoral vein compression and thrombosis.

  6. Asymptotic Solutions for Optical Properties of Large Particles with Strong Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Ping; Gao, Bo-Cai; Baum, Bryan A.; Hu, Yong X.; Wiscombe, Warren J.; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Winker, Dave M.; Nasiri, Shaima L.

    2001-01-01

    The transverse wave condition is not applicable to the refracted electromagnetic wave within the context of geometrical optics when absorption is involved. Either the transverse magnetic (TM) or the transverse electric (TE) wave condition can be assumed for the wave to locally satisfy the electromagnetic boundary condition in a ray-tracing calculation. The assumed wave mode affects both the reflection and the refraction coefficients. As a result, nonunique solutions for these coefficients are inevitable. In this study the appropriate solutions for the Fresnel reflection-refraction coefficients are identified in light-scattering calculations based on the ray-tracing technique. In particular, a 3x2 refraction or transmission matrix is derived to account for the inhomogeneity of the refracted wave in an absorbing medium. An asymptotic solution that completely includes the effect of medium absorption on Fresnel coefficients is obtained for the scattering properties of a general polyhedral particle. Numerical results are presented for hexagonal plates and columns with both preferred and random orientations.

  7. Large accumulation of micro-sized synthetic polymer particles in the sea surface microlayer.

    PubMed

    Song, Young Kyoung; Hong, Sang Hee; Jang, Mi; Kang, Jung-Hoon; Kwon, Oh Youn; Han, Gi Myung; Shim, Won Joon

    2014-08-19

    Determining the exact abundance of microplastics on the sea surface can be susceptible to the sampling method used. The sea surface microlayer (SML) can accumulate light plastic particles, but this has not yet been sampled. The abundance of microplastics in the SML was evaluated off the southern coast of Korea. The SML sampling method was then compared to bulk surface water filtering, a hand net (50 μm mesh), and a Manta trawl net (330 μm mesh). The mean abundances were in the order of SML water > hand net > bulk water > Manta trawl net. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) identified that alkyds and poly(acrylate/styrene) accounted for 81 and 11%, respectively, of the total polymer content of the SML samples. These polymers originated from paints and the fiber-reinforced plastic (FRP) matrix used on ships. Synthetic polymers from ship coatings should be considered to be a source of microplastics. Selecting a suitable sampling method is crucial for evaluating microplastic pollution.

  8. Tilted foil polarization of radioactive beam nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldring, Gvirol

    1992-11-01

    Tilted foil polarization has up to now been mostly applied to nuclear reaction products recoiling out of a target traversed by a primary particle beam. Being a universal phenomenon it can be applied equally well to beams of particles, primary or secondary, radioactive or other. There are however some technical considerations arising from the nature of the beam particles. Radioactive beams are associated with ground state nuclei. They usually have low nuclear spin and as a consequence-as will be shown later-low polarization. Secondary beams are usually low in intensity and do not impose any constraints on the foils they traverse; unlike intense primary heavy ion beams which, if they traverse the foils, essentially limit the foil material to carbon. We review here briefly the tilted foil polarization process and then discuss an experiment with an isomer beam. Finally we review experiments with radioactive beams, past, present and planned for the future.

  9. NEW APPROACHES: Radioactive balloons: experiments on radon concentration in schools or homes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austen, David; Brouwer, Wytze

    1997-03-01

    Balloons that have been rubbed to create a charge will attract radioactive dust particles in an ordinary laboratory in sufficient numbers to allow students to measure the radioactivity and also the effective half-life.

  10. The evolution of particles in the plume from a large coal-fired boiler with flue gas desulfurization.

    PubMed

    Imhoff, R E; Tanner, R L; Valente, R J; Luria, M

    2000-07-01

    Airborne measurements were made of gaseous and particulate species in the plume of a large coal-fired power plant after flue gas desulfurization (FGD) controls were installed. These measurements were compared with measurements made before the controls were installed. The light scattering and number and volume distributions of plume excess particles were determined by nephelometry and optical particle counting techniques. The plume impact based on optical techniques was much lower than that observed in earlier measurements. Indeed, plume excess volumes as a function of particle size were of the same magnitude as the variability of the background volume distribution. In situ excess plume scattering actually decreased with distance from the source, in contrast to pre-FGD conditions. The upper limit for the dry rate of SO2-to-SO4(2-) conversion was estimated from plume excess volume measurements to be about 4% hr-1. This is slightly greater than the upper limit, 3.5% hr-1, estimated by earlier researchers, but the same as that estimated using the present technique with the earlier data. The cross-plume profile of volume suggests SO2-to-SO4(2-) conversion is highest at the plume edges. The greatest benefit of SO2 reduction on plume excess volume and visibility appears to occur far down-wind of the source.

  11. Performance of a large size triple GEM detector at high particle rate for the CBM Experiment at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adak, Rama Prasad; Kumar, Ajit; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Das, Supriya; Raha, Sibaji; Samanta, Subhasis; Saini, Jogender

    2017-02-01

    In CBM Experiment at FAIR, dimuons will be detected by a Muon Chamber (MUCH) consisting of segmented absorbers of varying widths and tracking chambers sandwiched between the absorber-pairs. In this fixed target heavy-ion collision experiment, operating at highest interaction rate of 10 MHz for Au+Au collision, the inner region of the 1st detector will face a particle rate of 1 MHz/cm2. To operate at such a high particle density, GEM technology based detectors have been selected for the first two stations of MUCH. We have reported earlier the performance of several small-size GEM detector prototypes built at VECC for use in MUCH. In this work, we report on a large GEM prototype tested with proton beam of momentum 2.36 GeV/c at COSY-Jülich Germany. The detector was read out using nXYTER operated in self-triggering mode. An efficiency higher than 96% at ΔVGEM = 375.2 V was achieved. The variation of efficiency with the rate of incoming protons has been found to vary within 2% when tested up to a maximum rate of 2.8 MHz/cm2. The gain was found to be stable at high particle rate with a maximum variation of ∼9%.

  12. Exposure of rhesus monkeys to cowpox virus Brighton Red by large-particle aerosol droplets results in an upper respiratory tract disease.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Reed F; Hammoud, Dima A; Perry, Donna L; Solomon, Jeffrey; Moore, Ian N; Lackemeyer, Matthew G; Bohannon, Jordan K; Sayre, Philip J; Minai, Mahnaz; Papaneri, Amy B; Hagen, Katie R; Janosko, Krisztina B; Jett, Catherine; Cooper, Kurt; Blaney, Joseph E; Jahrling, Peter B

    2016-08-01

    We previously demonstrated that small-particle (0.5-3.0 µm) aerosol infection of rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) with cowpox virus (CPXV)-Brighton Red (BR) results in fulminant respiratory tract disease characterized by severe lung parenchymal pathology but only limited systemic virus dissemination and limited classic epidermal pox-like lesion development (Johnson et al., 2015). Based on these results, and to further develop CPXV as an improved model of human smallpox, we evaluated a novel large-particle aerosol (7.0-9.0 µm) exposure of rhesus monkeys to CPXV-BR and monitored for respiratory tract disease by serial computed tomography (CT). As expected, the upper respiratory tract and large airways were the major sites of virus-induced pathology following large-particle aerosol exposure. Large-particle aerosol CPXV exposure of rhesus macaques resulted in severe upper airway and large airway pathology with limited systemic dissemination.

  13. DROPOUT OF DIRECTIONAL ELECTRON INTENSITIES IN LARGE SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Lun C.; Reames, Donald V.

    2016-01-10

    In the “gradual” solar energetic particle (SEP) event during solar cycle 23 we have observed the dispersionless modulation (“dropout”) in directional intensities of nonrelativistic electrons. The average duration of dropout periods is ∼0.8 hr, which is consistent with the correlation scale of solar wind turbulence. During the dropout period electrons could display scatter-free transport in an intermittent way. Also, we have observed a decrease in the anisotropic index of incident electrons with increasing electron energy (E{sub e}), while the index of scattered/reflected electrons is nearly independent of E{sub e}. We hence perform an observational examination of the correlation between the anisotropic index of low-energy scattered/reflected electrons and the signature of the locally measured solar wind turbulence in the dissipation range, which is responsible for resonant scattering of nonrelativistic electrons. Since during the dropout period the slab turbulence fraction is dominant (0.8 ± 0.1), we pay close attention to the effect of slab fraction on the correlation examined. Our observation is consistent with the simulation result that in the dominance of the slab turbulence component there should exist a dispatched structure of magnetic flux tubes, along which electrons could be transported in a scatter-free manner. Since a similar phenomenon is exhibited in the “impulsive” SEP event, electron dropout should be a transport effect. Therefore, being different from most ion dropout events, which are due to a compact flare source, the dropout of directional electron intensities should be caused by the change of turbulence status in the solar wind.

  14. Dropout of Directional Electron Intensities in Large Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Lun C.; Reames, Donald V.

    2016-01-01

    In the “gradual” solar energetic particle (SEP) event during solar cycle 23 we have observed the dispersionless modulation (“dropout”) in directional intensities of nonrelativistic electrons. The average duration of dropout periods is ∼0.8 hr, which is consistent with the correlation scale of solar wind turbulence. During the dropout period electrons could display scatter-free transport in an intermittent way. Also, we have observed a decrease in the anisotropic index of incident electrons with increasing electron energy (Ee), while the index of scattered/reflected electrons is nearly independent of Ee. We hence perform an observational examination of the correlation between the anisotropic index of low-energy scattered/reflected electrons and the signature of the locally measured solar wind turbulence in the dissipation range, which is responsible for resonant scattering of nonrelativistic electrons. Since during the dropout period the slab turbulence fraction is dominant (0.8 ± 0.1), we pay close attention to the effect of slab fraction on the correlation examined. Our observation is consistent with the simulation result that in the dominance of the slab turbulence component there should exist a dispatched structure of magnetic flux tubes, along which electrons could be transported in a scatter-free manner. Since a similar phenomenon is exhibited in the “impulsive” SEP event, electron dropout should be a transport effect. Therefore, being different from most ion dropout events, which are due to a compact flare source, the dropout of directional electron intensities should be caused by the change of turbulence status in the solar wind.

  15. The isotropic condition of energetic particles emitted from a large solar flare. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalding, J.

    1983-01-01

    Isotope abundance ratios for 5 to 50 MeV/nuc nuclei from a large solar flare were measured. The measurements were made by the heavy isotope spectrometer telescope (HIST) on the ISEE-3 satellite orbiting the Sun near an Earth-Sun liberation point approximately one million miles sunward of the Earth. Finite values for the isotope abundance ratios C-13/C-12, N-15/N-14, O-18/O-16, Ne-22/Ne-20, Mg-25/Mg-24, and Mg-26/Mg-24, and upper limits for the isotope abundance ratios He-3/He-4, C-14/C-12, O-17/O-16 and Ne-21/Ne-20 were reported. Element abundances and spectra were measured to compare the flare with other reported flares. The flare is a typical large flare with low Fe/O abundance or = to 0.1). For C-13/C-12, N-15/N-14, O-18/O-16, Mg-25/Mg-24 and Mg-26/Mg-24 isotope abundance ratios agree with the solar system abundance ratios. Measurement for Ne-22/Ne-20 agree with the isotopic composition of the meteoritic component neon-A.

  16. Proteome analysis of the large and the small rubber particles of Hevea brasiliensis using 2D-DIGE.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Qiulan; Xia, Kecan; Dai, Longjun; Kang, Guijuan; Li, Yu; Nie, Zhiyi; Duan, Cuifang; Zeng, Rizhong

    2012-11-01

    The rubber particle is a specialized organelle in which natural rubber is synthesised and stored in the laticifers of Hevea brasiliensis (para rubber tree). It has been demonstrated that the small rubber particles (SRPs) has higher rubber biosynthesis ratio than the large rubber particles (LRPs), but the underlying molecular mechanism still remains unknown. In this study, LRPs and SRPs were firstly separated from the fresh latex using differential centrifugation, and two-dimensional difference in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) combined with MALDI-TOF/TOF was then applied to investigate the proteomic alterations associated with the changed rubber biosynthesis capacity between LRPs and SRPs. A total of 53 spots corresponding to 22 gene products, were significantly altered with the |ratio|≥2.0 and T value ≤0.05, among which 15 proteins were up-regulated and 7 were down-regulated in the SRPs compared with the LRPs. The 15 up-regulated proteins in the SRPs included small rubber particle protein (SRPP), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase (HMGCS), phospholipase D alpha (PLD α), ethylene response factor 2, eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A isoform IV (eIF 5A-4), 70-kDa heat shock cognate protein (HSC 70), several unknown proteins, etc., whereas the 7 up-regulated proteins in the LRPs were rubber elongation factor (REF, 19.6kDa), ASR-like protein 1, REF-like stress-related protein 1, a putative phosphoglyceride transfer family protein, β-1,3-glucanase, a putative retroelement, and a hypothetical protein. Since several proteins related to rubber biosynthesis were differentially expressed between LRPs and SRPs, the comparative proteome data may provide useful insights into understanding the mechanism involved in rubber biosynthesis and latex coagulation in H. brasiliensis.

  17. Correlated particle and magnetic field observations of a large-scale magnetic loop structure behind an interplanetary shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanderson, T. R.; Marsden, R. G.; Reinhard, R.; Wenzel, K.-P.; Smith, E. J.

    1983-01-01

    From a survey of observations on ISEE-3, an example of correlated particle and magnetic field observations of a large-scale magnetic loop structure is presented. Bidirectional proton fluxes were observed for a period of 40 hours in the energy range 35-1600 keV approximately 12 hours after the passage of the interplanetary shock of December 11, 1980, and directly after the passage of a discontinuity. For each of the eight logarithmically spaced energy channels, a three-dimensional anisotropy analysis reveals streaming along both directions of the magnetic field. The magnetic field rotated slowly but steadily through approximately 180 deg during this same 40-hour period; this is consistent with the existence of a large-scale loop with extent greater than 0.5 AU. The observations suggest that the particles are being injected into the loop sunward of the spacecraft; they appear as bidirectional fluxes in the outermost regions of the loop arising from a combination of focusing and near scatter-free transport.

  18. The large-scale production of an artificial influenza virus-like particle vaccine in silkworm pupae.

    PubMed

    Nerome, Kuniaki; Sugita, Shigeo; Kuroda, Kazumichi; Hirose, Toshiharu; Matsuda, Sayaka; Majima, Kei; Kawasaki, Kazunori; Shibata, Toshikatsu; Poetri, Okti Nadia; Soejoedono, Retno D; Mayasari, Ni L P Ika; Agungpriyono, Srihadi; Nerome, Reiko

    2015-01-01

    We successfully established a mass production system for an influenza virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine using a synthetic H5 hemagglutinin (HA) gene codon-optimized for the silkworm. A recombinant baculovirus containing the synthetic gene was inoculated into silkworm pupae. Four days after inoculation, the hemagglutination titer in homogenates from infected pupae reached a mean value of 0.8 million hemagglutination units (HAU), approximately 2,000 μg HA protein per pupa, more than 50-fold higher than that produced with an embryonated chicken egg. VLPs ranging from 30 nm to 300 nm in diameter and covered with a large number of spikes were detected in the homogenates. The spikes were approximately 14 nm long, similar to an authentic influenza HA spike. Detailed electron micrographs indicated that the VLP spike density was similar to that of authentic influenza virus particles. The results clearly show that the expression of a single HA gene can efficiently produce VLPs in silkworm pupae. When chickens were immunized with the pupae homogenate, the hemagglutination inhibition titer in their sera reached values of 2,048-8,192 after approximately 1 month. This is the first report demonstrating that a large amount of VLP vaccine could be produced by single synthetic HA gene in silkworm pupae. Our system might be useful for future vaccine development against other viral diseases.

  19. Potential of mean force of association of large hydrophobic particles: toward the nanoscale limit.

    PubMed

    Makowski, Mariusz; Czaplewski, Cezary; Liwo, Adam; Scheraga, Harold A

    2010-01-21

    neopentane or a spherical model of adamantane. In the second hydration shell, the average number of hydrogen bonds is greater compared to that in bulk water only for neopentane and a spherical model of adamantane but not for the all-atom model. The strength of the hydrophobic interactions shows a linear dependence on the number of carbon atoms both in water and in vacuo. Smaller nonpolar particles interact more strongly in water than in vacuo. For larger molecules, such as bicyclooctane, adamantane and fullerene, the reversed tendency is observed.

  20. SPECTRAL PROPERTIES OF LARGE GRADUAL SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS. I. FE, O, AND SEED MATERIAL

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, M. I.; Dayeh, M. A.; Ebert, R. W.; Mccomas, D. J.; Schwadron, N. A.; Mason, G. M.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Smith, C. W.

    2016-01-10

    We have surveyed ∼0.1–100 MeV nucleon{sup −1} O and Fe fluence spectra during 46 isolated, large gradual SEP events observed at ACE during solar cycles 23 and 24. Most SEP spectra are well represented by the four-parameter Band function with a normalization constant, low-energy spectral slope, high-energy spectral slope, and break energy. The O and Fe spectral slopes are similar and most spectra steepen above the break energy, probably due to common acceleration and transport processes affecting different ion species. SEP spectra above the break energies depend on the origin of the seed population; larger contributions of suprathermal flare material result in higher Fe/O ratios and flatter spectra at higher energies. SEP events with steeper O spectra at low energies and higher break energies are associated with slower coronal mass ejections (CMEs), while those associated with fast (>2000 km s{sup −1}) CMEs and ground level enhancements have harder or flatter spectra at low and high energies, and O break energies between ∼1 and 10 MeV nucleon{sup −1}. The latter events are enriched in {sup 3}He and higher-energy Fe, and have Fe spectra that rollover at significantly lower energies compared with O, probably because Fe ions with smaller Q/M ratios can escape from the distant shock more easily than O ions with larger Q/M ratios. We conclude that SEP spectral properties result from many complex and competing effects, namely Q/M-dependent scattering, shock properties, and the origin of the seed populations, all of which must be taken into account to develop a comprehensive picture of CME-driven shock acceleration of large gradual SEP events.

  1. Shielding experiments by the JASMIN Collaboration at Fermilab (II) - radioactivity measurement induced by secondary particles from the anti-proton production target

    SciTech Connect

    Hiroshi, Yashima; Norihiro, Matsuda; Yoshimi, Kasugai; Hiroshi, Nakashima; Yukio, Sakamoto; Hiroshi, Matsumura; Hiroshi, Iwase; Norikazu, Kinoshita; David, Boehnlein; Gary, Lautenschlager; Anthony, Leveling; Nikolai, Mokhov; Kamran, Vaziri; Koji, Oishi

    2011-08-01

    The JASMIN Collaboration has performed an experiment to conduct measurements of nuclear reaction rates around the anti-proton production (Pbar) target at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL). At the Pbar target station, the target, consisting of an Inconel 600 cylinder, was irradiated by a 120 GeV/c proton beam from the FNAL Main Injector. The beam intensity was 3.6 x 1012 protons per second. The samples of Al, Nb, Cu, and Au were placed near the target to investigate the spatial and energy distribution of secondary particles emitted from it. After irradiation, the induced activities of the samples were measured by studying their gamma ray spectra using HPGe detectors. The production rates of 30 nuclides induced in Al, Nb, Cu, Au samples were obtained. These rates increase for samples placed in a forward (small angle) position relative to the target. The angular dependence of these reaction rates becomes larger for increasing threshold energy. These experimental results are compared with Monte Carlo calculations. The calculated results generally agree with the experimental results to within a factor of 2 to 3.

  2. Shielding experiments by the JASMIN collaboration at Fermilab (II) - Radioactivity measurement induced by secondary particles from the anti-proton production target

    SciTech Connect

    Yashima, Hiroshi; Matsuda, Norihiro; Kasugai, Yoshimi; Matsumura, Hiroshi; Iwase, Hiroshi; Kinoshita, Norikazu; Boehnlein, David; Lauten, Gary; Leveling, Anthony; Mokhov, Nikolai; Vaziri, Kamran; /Fermilab /Shimizu, Tokyo /JAEA, Ibaraki

    2011-01-01

    The JASMIN Collaboration has performed an experiment to conduct measurements of nuclear reaction rates around the anti-proton production (Pbar) target at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL). At the Pbar target station, the target, consisting an Inconel 600 cylinder, was irradiated by a 120 GeV/c proton beam from the FNAL Main Injector. The beam intensity was 3.6 x 10{sub 12} protons per second. Samples of Al, Nb, Cu, and Au were placed near the target to investigate the spatial and energy distribution of secondary particles emitted from it. After irradiation, the induced activities of the samples were measured by studying their gamma ray spectra using HPGe detectors. The production rates of 30 nuclides induced in Al, Nb, Cu, Au samples were obtained. These rates increase for samples placed in a forward (small angle) position relative to the target. The angular dependence of these reaction rates becomes larger for increasing threshold energy. These experimental results are compared with Monte Carlo calculations. The calculated results generally agree with the experimental results to within a factor of 2 to 3.

  3. Shielding experiments by the JASMIN Collaboration at Fermilab (II) - radioactivity measurement induced by secondary particles from the anti-proton production target

    DOE PAGES

    Hiroshi, Yashima; Norihiro, Matsuda; Yoshimi, Kasugai; ...

    2011-08-01

    The JASMIN Collaboration has performed an experiment to conduct measurements of nuclear reaction rates around the anti-proton production (Pbar) target at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL). At the Pbar target station, the target, consisting of an Inconel 600 cylinder, was irradiated by a 120 GeV/c proton beam from the FNAL Main Injector. The beam intensity was 3.6 x 1012 protons per second. The samples of Al, Nb, Cu, and Au were placed near the target to investigate the spatial and energy distribution of secondary particles emitted from it. After irradiation, the induced activities of the samples were measured bymore » studying their gamma ray spectra using HPGe detectors. The production rates of 30 nuclides induced in Al, Nb, Cu, Au samples were obtained. These rates increase for samples placed in a forward (small angle) position relative to the target. The angular dependence of these reaction rates becomes larger for increasing threshold energy. These experimental results are compared with Monte Carlo calculations. The calculated results generally agree with the experimental results to within a factor of 2 to 3.« less

  4. Monte Carlo predictions of DNA fragment-size distributions for large sizes after HZE particle irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, A. L.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Sachs, R. K.; Brenner, D. J.

    2001-01-01

    DSBs (double-strand breaks) produced by densely ionizing space radiation are not located randomly in the genome: recent data indicate DSB clustering along chromosomes. DSB clustering at large scales, from >100 Mbp down to approximately 2 kbp, is modeled using a Monte-Carlo algorithm. A random-walk model of chromatin is combined with a track model, that predicts the radial distribution of energy from an ion, and the RLC (randomly-located-clusters) formalism, in software called DNAbreak. This model generalizes the random-breakage model, whose broken-stick fragment-size distribution is applicable to low-LET radiation. DSB induction due to track interaction with the DNA volume depends on the radiation quality parameter Q. This dose-independent parameter depends only weakly on LET. Multi-track, high-dose effects depend on the cluster intensity parameter lambda, proportional to fluence as defined by the RLC formalism. After lambda is determined by a numerical experiment, the model reduces to one adjustable parameter Q. The best numerical fits to the experimental data, determining Q, are obtained. The knowledge of lambda and Q allows us to give biophysically based extrapolations of high-dose DNA fragment-size data to low doses or to high LETs.

  5. Process for the Production of Radioactive Substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fermi, Enrico; Amaldi, Edoardo; Pontecorvo, Bruno; Rasetti, Franco; Segré, Emilio

    In this Patent, a very detailed description of the experimental results, obtained by studying the radioactivity induced in a number of chemical elements by irradiation with slow neutrons, is reported, along with a corresponding theoretical interpretation. It is here emphasized, in order to achieve better efficiencies, the use of neutrons instead of charged particles, as considered in previous works on nuclear reactions. Moreover, since neutrons produced by bombardment of atomic nuclei with artificially accelerated particles have high average energies, a method for slowing down fast neutrons is described, by passing the neutrons through a screen of hydrogenous materials, like water or paraffin. The reduction of the energy of the neutrons is interpreted as due to their collisions against the nuclei or the entire atoms of energy reducing materials. An interpretation is provided for the experimental observations: in the case of a strong induced radio-activity following the absorption of the slow neutrons, the formation of an unstable isotope is assumed, while the formation of a stable nucleus is assumed in case no activation or, at least, no strong activation follows an anomalously large absorption. Particularly interesting is the mention of the possible discovery of "transuranic" elements given in the present Patent. Even here, some caution was adopted about its interpretation, as well as the theoretical interpretation of the effects induced by slow neutrons considered in the paper: "The theoretical statements and explanations are, of course, not conclusive and our invention is in no way dependent upon their correctness. We have found them helpful and give them for the aid of others, but our invention will be equally useful if it should prove that our theoretical conclusions are not altogether correct."1 The original Patent application, Metodo per accrescere il rendimento dei procedimenti per la produzione di radioattività artificiali mediante il bombardamento con

  6. A Large-Particle Monte Carlo Code for Simulating Non-Linear High-Energy Processes Near Compact Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Boris E.; Svensson, Roland; Begelman, Mitchell C.; Sikora, Marek

    1995-01-01

    High-energy radiation processes in compact cosmic objects are often expected to have a strongly non-linear behavior. Such behavior is shown, for example, by electron-positron pair cascades and the time evolution of relativistic proton distributions in dense radiation fields. Three independent techniques have been developed to simulate these non-linear problems: the kinetic equation approach; the phase-space density (PSD) Monte Carlo method; and the large-particle (LP) Monte Carlo method. In this paper, we present the latest version of the LP method and compare it with the other methods. The efficiency of the method in treating geometrically complex problems is illustrated by showing results of simulations of 1D, 2D and 3D systems. The method is shown to be powerful enough to treat non-spherical geometries, including such effects as bulk motion of the background plasma, reflection of radiation from cold matter, and anisotropic distributions of radiating particles. It can therefore be applied to simulate high-energy processes in such astrophysical systems as accretion discs with coronae, relativistic jets, pulsar magnetospheres and gamma-ray bursts.

  7. Particle-associated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons near power plants as determined by large volume injection--GC/MS.

    PubMed

    Evagelopoulos, V; Albanis, T A; Kodona, El; Zoras, S

    2010-06-01

    PM(10) and PM(2.5) samples were collected at two locations in the heavy industrialized prefecture of Kozani, in North-western Greece; in the open-cast mines of Klitos area and in the urban area of city of Kozani. The samples were collected by the use of low volume samplers, for a period of 1 year every 6 d. An analytical method has been adapted for determining 16 particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in PM(10) and PM(2.5). Samples were collected on poly-tetra-fluorinated-ethylene (PTFE) filters using low volume samplers, considered to be ideal for trapping various organic pollutants including PAHs. The extraction has been made in two stages. Firstly, by reflux and then by using ultrasound bath. Chromatographic analysis has been carried out by GC/MS with programmable temperature vaporizers (PTV) injector and large volume injection (LVI) technique. Mean daily concentrations of B[a]Py in PM(10)-bound particles were 0.57 ng m(-3) in Kozani and 0.58 ng m(-3) at Klitos, while in PM(2.5)-bound PAHs were 0.35 ng m(-3) and 0.30 ng m(-3) respectively. We were able to verify the sources of PAHs by the use of diagnostic ratios, which indicate oil or/and coal burning as the, possible, major PAHs pollutant source(s).

  8. Global risk of radioactive fallout after major nuclear reactor accidents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelieveld, J.; Kunkel, D.; Lawrence, M. G.

    2012-05-01

    Major reactor accidents of nuclear power plants are rare, yet the consequences are catastrophic. But what is meant by "rare"? And what can be learned from the Chernobyl and Fukushima incidents? Here we assess the cumulative, global risk of exposure to radioactivity due to atmospheric dispersion of gases and particles following severe nuclear accidents (the most severe ones on the International Nuclear Event Scale, INES 7), using particulate 137Cs and gaseous 131I as proxies for the fallout. Our results indicate that previously the occurrence of INES 7 major accidents and the risks of radioactive contamination have been underestimated. Using a global model of the atmosphere we compute that on average, in the event of a major reactor accident of any nuclear power plant worldwide, more than 90% of emitted 137Cs would be transported beyond 50 km and about 50% beyond 1000 km distance before being deposited. This corroborates that such accidents have large-scale and trans-boundary impacts. Although the emission strengths and atmospheric removal processes of 137Cs and 131I are quite different, the radioactive contamination patterns over land and the human exposure due to deposition are computed to be similar. High human exposure risks occur around reactors in densely populated regions, notably in West Europe and South Asia, where a major reactor accident can subject around 30 million people to radioactive contamination. The recent decision by Germany to phase out its nuclear reactors will reduce the national risk, though a large risk will still remain from the reactors in neighbouring countries.

  9. Boundary layer development over a large array of porous-disk-modeled wind turbines via stereo particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camp, Elizabeth; Vuppuluri, Vasant; Cal, Raúl

    2014-11-01

    The increasing size of wind turbine arrays in service highlights the importance of understanding the flow physics within such large turbine arrays. Thus, the development of a wind turbine array boundary layer (WTBL) was investigated experimentally for an 8 × 5 array of model wind turbines. Model wind turbines were on a 1:2000 scale and turbine rotors were represented by porous disks. Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (SPIV) measurements were done along the centerline of the wind turbine array at several streamwise positions both within and above the canopy. Measurements and analysis of the mean and streamwise-averaged statistics of the SPIV fields focus on the rotors in the furthest downstream positions. Statistics will be used to determine if a fully developed WTBL has been achieved.

  10. A Novel Consensus-Based Particle Swarm Optimization-Assisted Trust-Tech Methodology for Large-Scale Global Optimization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Feng; Chiang, Hsiao-Dong

    2016-06-20

    A novel three-stage methodology, termed the "consensus-based particle swarm optimization (PSO)-assisted Trust-Tech methodology," to find global optimal solutions for nonlinear optimization problems is presented. It is composed of Trust-Tech methods, consensus-based PSO, and local optimization methods that are integrated to compute a set of high-quality local optimal solutions that can contain the global optimal solution. The proposed methodology compares very favorably with several recently developed PSO algorithms based on a set of small-dimension benchmark optimization problems and 20 large-dimension test functions from the CEC 2010 competition. The analytical basis for the proposed methodology is also provided. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed methodology can rapidly obtain high-quality optimal solutions that can contain the global optimal solution. The scalability of the proposed methodology is promising.

  11. Scratching vulnerability of conventional vs highly cross-linked polyethylene liners because of large embedded third-body particles.

    PubMed

    Heiner, Anneliese D; Galvin, Alison L; Fisher, John; Callaghan, John J; Brown, Thomas D

    2012-05-01

    The hypothesis of this study was that acetabular liner vulnerability to scratching from femoral heads, roughened by third bodies embedded in the liner, is not significantly lower for highly cross-linked polyethylene (HXPE) than for conventional polyethylene (CPE). Six CPE and 6 HXPE acetabular liners were each reproducibly embedded with 5 cobalt-chromium-molybdenum (CoCrMo) beads then run for 10,000 cycles in a joint simulator. By visual rank ordering, there was low association between liner scratch severity and polyethylene type. The CPE and HXPE liner scratches were not significantly different in scratch peak-valley height or width or in liner roughness in the vicinity of the embedded beads. This model indicated that high cross-linking of polyethylene does not offer appreciable protection against severe scratching induced by large embedded third-body particles.

  12. Radioactivity and food

    SciTech Connect

    Olszyna-Marzys, A.E. )

    1990-03-01

    Two topics relating to radioactivity and food are discussed: food irradiation for preservation purposes, and food contamination from radioactive substances. Food irradiation involves the use of electromagnetic energy (x and gamma rays) emitted by radioactive substances or produced by machine in order to destroy the insects and microorganisms present and prevent germination. The sanitary and economic advantages of treating food in this way are discussed. Numerous studies have confirmed that under strictly controlled conditions no undesirable changes take place in food that has been irradiated nor is radioactivity induced. Reference is made to the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power station, which aroused public concern about irradiated food. The events surrounding the accident are reviewed, and its consequences with regard to contamination of different foods with radioactive substances, particularly iodine-131 and cesium-137, are described. Also discussed are the steps that have been taken by different international organizations to set limits on acceptable radioactivity in food.15 references.

  13. Emission of spherical cesium-bearing particles from an early stage of the Fukushima nuclear accident

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Kouji; Kajino, Mizuo; Zaizen, Yuji; Igarashi, Yasuhito

    2013-01-01

    The Fukushima nuclear accident released radioactive materials into the environment over the entire Northern Hemisphere in March 2011, and the Japanese government is spending large amounts of money to clean up the contaminated residential areas and agricultural fields. However, we still do not know the exact physical and chemical properties of the radioactive materials. This study directly observed spherical Cs-bearing particles emitted during a relatively early stage (March 14–15) of the accident. In contrast to the Cs-bearing radioactive materials that are currently assumed, these particles are larger, contain Fe, Zn, and Cs, and are water insoluble. Our simulation indicates that the spherical Cs-bearing particles mainly fell onto the ground by dry deposition. The finding of the spherical Cs particles will be a key to understand the processes of the accident and to accurately evaluate the health impacts and the residence time in the environment. PMID:23989894

  14. Emission of spherical cesium-bearing particles from an early stage of the Fukushima nuclear accident.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Kouji; Kajino, Mizuo; Zaizen, Yuji; Igarashi, Yasuhito

    2013-01-01

    The Fukushima nuclear accident released radioactive materials into the environment over the entire Northern Hemisphere in March 2011, and the Japanese government is spending large amounts of money to clean up the contaminated residential areas and agricultural fields. However, we still do not know the exact physical and chemical properties of the radioactive materials. This study directly observed spherical Cs-bearing particles emitted during a relatively early stage (March 14-15) of the accident. In contrast to the Cs-bearing radioactive materials that are currently assumed, these particles are larger, contain Fe, Zn, and Cs, and are water insoluble. Our simulation indicates that the spherical Cs-bearing particles mainly fell onto the ground by dry deposition. The finding of the spherical Cs particles will be a key to understand the processes of the accident and to accurately evaluate the health impacts and the residence time in the environment.

  15. MIRO Observations of Millimeter-wave Emission from Large Dust Particles in the Coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schloerb, F. Peter; Gulkis, Samuel; Biver, Nicolas; von Allmen, Paul; Beaudin, Gerard; Bockelee-Morvan, Dominique; Choukroun, Mathieu; Crovisier, Jacques; Davidsson, Bjorn; Encrenaz, Pierre; Encrenaz, Therese A.; Frerking, Margaret; Hartogh, Paul; Ip, Wing-Huen; Janssen, Michael A.; Jarchow, Christopher; Kareta, Teddy; Lellouch, Emmanuel; Leyrat, Cedric; Rezac, Ladislav; Spilker, Thomas R.

    2016-10-01

    exponents between -1.6 and -2.0 would require the large particles observed by MIRO to disappear on time scales of 20,000-80,000 seconds.

  16. Three-dimensional analysis of the effect of the ergodic magnetic field line structure on particle fueling in the large helical device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, M.; Yamazaki, K.; Komori, A.; Yamada, H.; Miyazawa, J.; LHD Experimental Group

    2003-03-01

    The particle fueling via the ergodic magnetic field line structure formed around the core plasma is investigated by using a CCD camera with an H α interference filter and a fully three-dimensional neutral particle transport simulation. The measurements of the plasma density profile and the calculations of the radial profile of the particle fueling rate in additional gas fueling experiments show inward plasma transport from around the last closed magnetic surface (LCMS) into the core plasma. The analyses of the particle fueling rate in various plasma density cases prove that the dependence of the particle fueling inside of the LCMS on the line averaged plasma density agrees with that of the measured increments of the plasma content due to the gas fueling, which indicates that particle fueling just inside of the LCMS can effectively contribute to the core plasma density by the effect of the inward plasma transport in large helical device plasmas.

  17. Radioactive Waste Management Basis

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, B K

    2009-06-03

    The purpose of this Radioactive Waste Management Basis is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

  18. Regional deposition of particles in an image-based airway model: large-eddy simulation and left-right lung ventilation asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Andrew R; O'Shaughnessy, Patrick; Tawhai, Merryn H; Hoffman, Eric A; Lin, Ching-Long

    2011-01-01

    Regional deposition and ventilation of particles by generation, lobe and lung during steady inhalation in a computed tomography (CT) based human airway model are investigated numerically. The airway model consists of a seven-generation human airway tree, with oral cavity, pharynx and larynx. The turbulent flow in the upper respiratory tract is simulated by large-eddy simulation. The flow boundary conditions at the peripheral airways are derived from CT images at two lung volumes to produce physiologically-realistic regional ventilation. Particles with diameter equal to or greater than 2.5 microns are selected for study because smaller particles tend to penetrate to the more distal parts of the lung. The current generational particle deposition efficiencies agree well with existing measurement data. Generational deposition efficiencies exhibit similar dependence on particle Stokes number regardless of generation, whereas deposition and ventilation efficiencies vary by lobe and lung, depending on airway morphology and airflow ventilation. In particular, regardless of particle size, the left lung receives a greater proportion of the particle bolus as compared to the right lung in spite of greater flow ventilation to the right lung. This observation is supported by the left-right lung asymmetry of particle ventilation observed in medical imaging. It is found that the particle-laden turbulent laryngeal jet flow, coupled with the unique geometrical features of the airway, causes a disproportionate amount of particles to enter the left lung.

  19. Virus-mimetic polyplex particles for systemic and inflammation-specific targeted delivery of large genetic contents.

    PubMed

    Kang, S; Lu, K; Leelawattanachai, J; Hu, X; Park, S; Park, T; Min, I M; Jin, M M

    2013-11-01

    Systemic and target-specific delivery of large genetic contents has been difficult to achieve. Although viruses effortlessly deliver kilobase-long genome into cells, its clinical use has been hindered by serious safety concerns and the mismatch between native tropisms and desired targets. Nonviral vectors, in contrast, are limited by low gene transfer efficiency and inherent cytotoxicity. Here we devised virus-mimetic polyplex particles (VMPs) based on electrostatic self-assembly among polyanionic peptide (PAP), cationic polymer polyethyleneimine (PEI) and nucleic acids. We fused PAP to the engineered ligand-binding domain of integrin αLβ2 to target intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), an inducible marker of inflammation. Fully assembled VMPs packaged large genetic contents, bound specifically to target molecules, elicited receptor-mediated endocytosis and escaped endosomal pathway, resembling intracellular delivery processes of viruses. Unlike conventional PEI-mediated transfection, molecular interaction-dependent gene delivery of VMPs was unaffected by the presence of serum and achieved higher efficiency without toxicity. By targeting overexpressed ICAM-1, VMPs delivered genes specifically to inflamed endothelial cells and macrophages both in vitro and in vivo. Simplicity and versatility of the platform and inflammation-specific delivery may open up opportunities for multifaceted gene therapy that can be translated into the clinic and treat a broad range of debilitating immune and inflammatory diseases.

  20. Combined MIPAS (airborne/satellite), CALIPSO and in situ study on large potential NAT particles observed in early Arctic winter stratosphere in December 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woiwode, Wolfgang; Höpfner, Michael; Pitts, Michael; Poole, Lamont; Oelhaf, Hermann; Molleker, Sergej; Borrmann, Stephan; Ebersoldt, Andreas; Frey, Wiebke; Gulde, Thomas; Maucher, Guido; Piesch, Christof; Sartorius, Christian; Orphal, Johannes

    2015-04-01

    The understanding of the characteristics of large HNO3-containing particles (potential 'NAT-rocks') involved in vertical redistribution of HNO3 in the polar winter stratosphere is limited due to the difficult accessibility of these particles by observations. While robust polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) classification schemes exist for observations by the space-borne lidar aboard CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) as well as for the passive mid-infrared limb observations by MIPAS (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding), these observations are hardly exploited for the detection of large (diameter >10 μm) NAT particles. This is due to the facts that these particles have low overall number densities, resulting in weak detectable signatures, and that the physical characteristics of these particles (i.e. shape, morphology, HNO3-content and optical characteristics) are uncertain. We investigate collocated and complementary observations of a low-density potential large NAT particle field by the space-borne instruments CALIPSO and MIPAS-ENVISAT as well as the airborne observations by the limb-sounder MIPAS-STR and the in situ particle probe FSSP-100 (Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe 100) aboard the high-altitude aircraft Geophysica. The observations aboard the Geophysica on 11 December 2011 associated to ESSenCe (ESa Sounder Campaign 2011) provided us the unique opportunity to study in detail the lower boundary region of a PSC where large potential NAT particles (>20 μm in diameter) were detected in situ. We analyse the ambient temperatures and gas-phase composition (HNO3 and H2O), the signatures of the observed particles in the CALIPSO and MIPAS observations, the HNO3-content of these particles suggested by the FSSP-100 and MIPAS-STR observations, and focus on the spectral fingerprint of these particles in the MIPAS-STR observations. While the spectral characterisation of the observed particles is subject

  1. Numerical studies of the effects of neutrally buoyant large particles on turbulent channel flow at the friction Reynolds number up to 395

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhaosheng; Wang, Yu; Shao, Xueming

    2012-11-01

    A direct-forcing fictitious domain method was employed to perform fully-resolved numerical simulations of turbulent channel flow laden with large neutrally buoyant particles at constant pressure gradients. The effects of the particles on the turbulence (including the fluid-phase average velocity, the root-mean-square (rms) of the velocity fluctuation, the probability density function of the velocity and the vortex structures) at the friction Reynolds number of 180 and 395 were investigated. The results show that the drag-reduction effect caused by the spherical particle at low particle volumes is very small. The presence of particles decreases the maximum rms of streamwise velocity fluctuation near wall via weakening the large-scale streamwise vortices, and on the other hand increases the rms of transverse and spanwise fluctuating velocities in vicinity of the wall via inducing smaller-scale vortices. The effects of the particles on the fluid velocity PDF (probability density function) normalized with the rms velocity are small, irrespective of the particle size, particle volume fraction and Reynolds number. The work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11072217 and 11132008), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, and the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University.

  2. Video monitoring in the Gadria debris flow catchment: preliminary results of large scale particle image velocimetry (LSPIV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theule, Joshua; Crema, Stefano; Comiti, Francesco; Cavalli, Marco; Marchi, Lorenzo

    2015-04-01

    Large scale particle image velocimetry (LSPIV) is a technique mostly used in rivers to measure two dimensional velocities from high resolution images at high frame rates. This technique still needs to be thoroughly explored in the field of debris flow studies. The Gadria debris flow monitoring catchment in Val Venosta (Italian Alps) has been equipped with four MOBOTIX M12 video cameras. Two cameras are located in a sediment trap located close to the alluvial fan apex, one looking upstream and the other looking down and more perpendicular to the flow. The third camera is in the next reach upstream from the sediment trap at a closer proximity to the flow. These three cameras are connected to a field shelter equipped with power supply and a server collecting all the monitoring data. The fourth camera is located in an active gully, the camera is activated by a rain gauge when there is one minute of rainfall. Before LSPIV can be used, the highly distorted images need to be corrected and accurate reference points need to be made. We decided to use IMGRAFT (an opensource image georectification toolbox) which can correct distorted images using reference points and camera location, and then finally rectifies the batch of images onto a DEM grid (or the DEM grid onto the image coordinates). With the orthorectified images, we used the freeware Fudaa-LSPIV (developed by EDF, IRSTEA, and DeltaCAD Company) to generate the LSPIV calculations of the flow events. Calculated velocities can easily be checked manually because of the already orthorectified images. During the monitoring program (since 2011) we recorded three debris flow events at the sediment trap area (each with very different surge dynamics). The camera in the gully was in operation in 2014 which managed to record granular flows and rockfalls, which particle tracking may be more appropriate for velocity measurements. The four cameras allows us to explore the limitations of camera distance, angle, frame rate, and image

  3. Uptake by mouse peritoneal macrophages of large cholesteryl ester-rich particles isolated from human atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed

    Hoff, H F; Clevidence, B A

    1987-06-01

    We have previously shown that a lipoprotein fraction consisting of large cholesteryl ester-rich particles can be isolated from homogenates of human aortic plaques by gel exclusion chromatography. This fraction was recognized by a high-affinity binding site on mouse peritoneal macrophages (MPM) resulting in unregulated uptake, stimulation of cholesterol esterification, and massive accumulation of cholesteryl esters. In this report we have further characterized such a fraction, designated lipid-protein complex (LP), which can be isolated from the void volume fraction of a Bio-Gel A-150m column following chromatography of plaque extracts. LP possessed a mean cholesterol-to-protein ratio of 2.3; it was heterogeneous in size and structure as observed by electron microscopy after negative staining, and it stimulated cholesterol esterification in MPM in a linear fashion over a 48-hr time interval, suggesting that the binding site on MPM recognizing LP was not down-regulated by intracellular cholesterol content. This uptake resulted in the presence of oil red O-positive intracellular droplets and numerous vacuoles containing electron-dense structures, whereas MPM incubated without lipoprotein showed few vacuoles or lipid droplets. Using SDS-PAGE and immunoblot and dot-blot techniques, we found that the major proteins associated with LP were albumin and fibronectin, whereas apoB and apoE were present in lower amounts. These proteins may be responsible for opsonization of LP, making it recognizable to receptors on MPM and facilitating LP uptake by MPM. LP isolated from tissue extracts without homogenization had the same structural and functional characteristics, suggesting that homogenization per se was not responsible for creating a particle that was recognized by MPM. However, homogenization yielded two to three times more LP. MPM uptake of LP derived from lysed foam cells may represent one of the mechanisms by which fatty streak lesions may grow to larger atherosclerotic

  4. The improvement of large High-Density Lipoprotein (HDL) particle levels, and presumably HDL metabolism, depend on effects of low-carbohydrate diet and weight loss.

    PubMed

    Finelli, C; Crispino, P; Gioia, S; La Sala, N; D'amico, L; La Grotta, M; Miro, O; Colarusso, D

    2016-01-01

    Depressed levels of atheroprotective large HDL particles are common in obesity and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Increases in large HDL particles are favourably associated with reduced CVD event risk and coronary plaque burden. The objective of the study is to compare the effectiveness of low-carbohydrate diets and weight loss for increasing blood levels of large HDL particles at 1 year. This study was performed by screening for body mass index (BMI) and metabolic syndrome in 160 consecutive subjects referred to our out-patient Metabolic Unit in South Italy. We administered dietary advice to four small groups rather than individually. A single team comprised of a dietitian and physician administered diet-specific advice to each group. Large HDL particles at baseline and 1 year were measured using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Dietary intake was assessed via 3-day diet records. Although 1-year weight loss did not differ between diet groups (mean 4.4 %), increases in large HDL particles paralleled the degree of carbohydrate restriction across the four diets (p<0.001 for trend). Regression analysis indicated that magnitude of carbohydrate restriction (percentage of calories as carbohydrate at 1 year) and weight loss were each independent predictors of 1-year increases in large HDL concentration. Changes in HDL cholesterol concentration were modestly correlated with changes in large HDL particle concentration (r=0.47, p=.001). In conclusion, reduction of excess dietary carbohydrate and body weight improved large HDL levels. Comparison trials with cardiovascular outcomes are needed to more fully evaluate these findings.

  5. The improvement of large High-Density Lipoprotein (HDL) particle levels, and presumably HDL metabolism, depend on effects of low-carbohydrate diet and weight loss

    PubMed Central

    Finelli, C.; Crispino, P.; Gioia, S.; La Sala, N.; D'amico, L.; La Grotta, M.; Miro, O.; Colarusso, D.

    2016-01-01

    Depressed levels of atheroprotective large HDL particles are common in obesity and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Increases in large HDL particles are favourably associated with reduced CVD event risk and coronary plaque burden. The objective of the study is to compare the effectiveness of low-carbohydrate diets and weight loss for increasing blood levels of large HDL particles at 1 year. This study was performed by screening for body mass index (BMI) and metabolic syndrome in 160 consecutive subjects referred to our out-patient Metabolic Unit in South Italy. We administered dietary advice to four small groups rather than individually. A single team comprised of a dietitian and physician administered diet-specific advice to each group. Large HDL particles at baseline and 1 year were measured using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Dietary intake was assessed via 3-day diet records. Although 1-year weight loss did not differ between diet groups (mean 4.4 %), increases in large HDL particles paralleled the degree of carbohydrate restriction across the four diets (p<0.001 for trend). Regression analysis indicated that magnitude of carbohydrate restriction (percentage of calories as carbohydrate at 1 year) and weight loss were each independent predictors of 1-year increases in large HDL concentration. Changes in HDL cholesterol concentration were modestly correlated with changes in large HDL particle concentration (r=0.47, p=.001). In conclusion, reduction of excess dietary carbohydrate and body weight improved large HDL levels. Comparison trials with cardiovascular outcomes are needed to more fully evaluate these findings. PMID:27103896

  6. Radioactive Wastes. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Charles H.

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by the United States Atomic Energy Commission. This booklet deals with the handling, processing and disposal of radioactive wastes. Among the topics discussed are: The Nature of Radioactive Wastes; Waste Management; and Research and Development. There are…

  7. Radioactive waste disposal package

    DOEpatents

    Lampe, Robert F.

    1986-11-04

    A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

  8. Temporary Personal Radioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Fred

    2012-11-01

    As part of a bone scan procedure to look for the spread of prostate cancer, I was injected with radioactive technetium. In an effort to occupy/distract my mind, I used a Geiger counter to determine if the radioactive count obeyed the inverse-square law as a sensor was moved away from my bladder by incremental distances.

  9. Radioactive waste disposal package

    DOEpatents

    Lampe, Robert F.

    1986-01-01

    A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

  10. A Remote Radioactivity Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jona, Kemi; Vondracek, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Imagine a high school with very few experimental resources and limited budgets that prevent the purchase of even basic laboratory equipment. For example, many high schools do not have the means of experimentally studying radioactivity because they lack Geiger counters and/or good radioactive sources. This was the case at the first high school one…

  11. Radioactive Iodine Treatment for Hyperthyroidism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Balance › Radioactive Iodine for Hyperthyroidism Fact Sheet Radioactive Iodine for Hyperthyroidism April, 2012 Download PDFs English Zulu ... prepare for RAI or surgery. How does radioactive iodine treatment work? Iodine is important for making thyroid ...

  12. The combustion of large particles of char in bubbling fluidized beds: The dependence of Sherwood number and the rate of burning on particle diameter

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, J.S.; Hayhurst, A.N.; Scott, S.A.

    2006-11-15

    Particles of char derived from a variety of fuels (e.g., biomass, sewage sludge, coal, or graphite), with diameters in excess of {approx}1.5mm, burn in fluidized bed combustors containing smaller particles of, e.g., sand, such that the rate is controlled by the diffusion both of O{sub 2} to the burning solid and of the products CO and CO{sub 2} away from it into the particulate phase. It is therefore important to characterize these mass transfer processes accurately. Measurements of the burning rate of char particles made from sewage sludge suggest that the Sherwood number, Sh, increases linearly with the diameter of the fuel particle, d{sub char} (for d{sub char}>{approx}1.5mm). This linear dependence of Sh on d{sub char} is expected from the basic equation Sh=2{epsilon}{sub mf}(1+d{sub char}/2{delta}{sub diff})/{tau}, provided the thickness of the boundary layer for mass transfer, {delta}{sub diff}, is constant in the region of interest (d{sub char}>{approx}1.5mm). Such a dependence is not seen in the empirical equations currently used and based on the Frossling expression. It is found here that for chars made from sewage sludge (for d{sub char}>{approx}1.5mm), the thickness of the boundary layer for mass transfer in a fluidized bed, {delta}{sub diff}, is less than that predicted by empirical correlations based on the Frossling expression. In fact, {delta}{sub diff} is not more than the diameter of the fluidized sand particles. Finally, the experiments in this study indicate that models based on surface renewal theory should be rejected for a fluidized bed, because they give unrealistically short contact times for packets of fluidized particles at the surface of a burning sphere. The result is the new correlation Sh = 2{epsilon}{sub mf}/{tau} + (A{sub cush}/A{sub char})(d{sub char}/ {delta}{sub diff}) for the dependence of Sh on d{sub char}, the diameter of a burning char particle. This equation is based on there being a gas-cushion of fluidizing gas underneath a

  13. Radioactive deposits in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, George W.; Lovering, Tom G.

    1954-01-01

    Reconnaissance examination by Government geologists of many areas, mine properties, and prospects in California during the period between 1948 and 1953 has confirmed the presence of radioactive materials in place at more than 40 localities. Abnormal radioactivity at these localities is due to concentrations of primary and secondary uranium minerals, to radon gas, radium (?), and to thorium minerals. Of the known occurrences only three were thought to contain uranium oxide (uranitite or pitchblende), 4 contained uranium-bearing columbate, tantalate, or titanate minerals, 12 contained secondary uranium minerals, such as autunite, carnotite, and torbernite, one contained radon gas, 7 contained thorium minerals, and, at the remaining 16 localities, the source of the anomalous radiation was not positively determined. The occurrences in which uranium oxide has been tentatively identified include the Rathgeb mine (Calaveras County), the Yerih group of claims (San Bernardino County), and the Rainbow claim (Madera County). Occurrences of secondary uranium minerals are largely confined to the arid desert regions of south-eastern California including deposits in San Bernardino, Kern, Inyo, and Imperial Counties. Uranium-bearing columbate, tantalate, or titanate minerals have been reported from pegmatite and granitic rock in southeastern and eastern California. Thorium minerals have been found in vein deposits in eastern San Bernardino County and from pegmatites and granitic rocks in various parts of southeastern California; placer concentrations of thorium minerals are known from nearly all areas in the State that are underlain, in part, by plutonic crystalline rocks. The primary uranium minerals occur principally as minute accessory crystals in pegmatite or granitic rock, or with base-metal sulfide minerals in veins. Thorium minerals also occur as accessory crystals in pegmatite or granitic rock, in placer deposits derived from such rock, and, at Mountain Pass, in veins

  14. Pump station for radioactive waste water

    SciTech Connect

    Whitton, John P.; Klos, Dean M.; Carrara, Danny T.; Minno, John J.

    2003-11-18

    A pump station for transferring radioactive particle containing waste water, includes: (a.) an enclosed sump having a vertically elongated right frusto conical wall surface and a bottom surface and (b.) a submersible volute centrifugal pump having a horizontally rotating impeller and a volute exterior surface. The sump interior surface, the bottom surface and the volute exterior surface are made of stainless steel having a 30 Ra or finer surface finish. A 15 Ra finish has been found to be most cost effective. The pump station is used for transferring waste water, without accumulation of radioactive fines.

  15. Joint Ne/O and Fe/O Analysis to Diagnose Large Solar Energetic Particle Events during Solar Cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Lun C.; Malandraki, Olga E.; Shao, Xi

    2017-02-01

    We have examined 29 large solar energetic particle (SEP) events with the peak proton intensity Jpp(>60 MeV) > 1 pfu during solar cycle 23. The emphasis of our examination is put on a joint analysis of Ne/O and Fe/O data in the energy range (3–40 MeV nucleon‑1) covered by Wind/Low-Energy Matrix Telescope and ACE/Solar Isotope Spectrometer sensors in order to differentiate between the Fe-poor and Fe-rich events that emerged from the coronal mass ejection driven shock acceleration process. An improved ion ratio calculation is carried out by rebinning ion intensity data into the form of equal bin widths in the logarithmic energy scale. Through the analysis we find that the variability of Ne/O and Fe/O ratios can be used to investigate the accelerating shock properties. In particular, the high-energy Ne/O ratio is well correlated with the source plasma temperature of SEPs.

  16. The ExaVolt Antenna: A large-aperture, balloon-embedded antenna for ultra-high energy particle detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorham, P. W.; Baginski, F. E.; Allison, P.; Liewer, K. M.; Miki, C.; Hill, B.; Varner, G. S.

    2011-12-01

    We describe the scientific motivation, experimental basis, design methodology, and simulated performance of the ExaVolt Antenna (EVA) mission, and planned ultra-high energy (UHE) particle observatory under development for NASA's suborbital super-pressure balloon program in Antarctica. EVA will improve over ANITA's integrated totals - the current state-of-the-art in UHE suborbital payloads - by 1-2 orders of magnitude in a single flight. The design is based on a novel application of toroidal reflector optics which utilizes a super-pressure balloon surface, along with a feed-array mounted on an inner membrane, to create an ultra-large radio antenna system with a synoptic view of the Antarctic ice sheet below it. Radio impulses arise via the Askaryan effect when UHE neutrinos interact within the ice, or via geosynchrotron emission when UHE cosmic rays interact in the atmosphere above the continent. EVA's instantaneous antenna aperture is estimated to be several hundred m 2 for detection of these events within a 150-600 MHz band. For standard cosmogenic UHE neutrino models, EVA should detect of order 30 events per flight in the EeV energy regime. For UHE cosmic rays, of order 15,000 geosynchrotron events would be detected in total, several hundred above 10 EeV, and of order 60 above the GZK cutoff energy.

  17. Detailed Analysis of Criteria and Particle Emissions from a Very Large Crude Carrier Using a Novel ECA Fuel.

    PubMed

    Gysel, Nicholas R; Welch, William A; Johnson, Kent; Miller, Wayne; Cocker, David R

    2017-02-07

    Ocean going vessels (OGVs) operating within emission control areas (ECA) are required to use fuels with ≤0.1 wt % sulfur. Up to now only distillate fuels could meet the sulfur limits. Recently refiners created a novel low-sulfur heavy-fuel oil (LSHFO) meeting the sulfur limits so questions were posed whether nitric oxide (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions were the same for the two fuels. This project characterized criteria pollutants and undertook a detailed analysis of PM emissions from a very large crude oil carrier (VLCC) using a distillate ECA fuel (MGO) and novel LSHFO. Results showed emission factors of NOx were ∼5% higher with MGO than LSHFO. PM2.5 emission factors were ∼3 times higher with LSHFO than MGO, while both were below values reported by Lloyds, U.S. EPA and CARB. A detailed analysis of PM revealed it was >90% organic carbon (OC) for both fuels. Elemental carbon (EC) and soot measured with an AVL microsoot sensor (MSS) reflected black carbon. PM size distributions showed unimodal peaks for both MGO (20-30 nm) and LSHFO (30-50 nm). Particle number (PN) emissions were 28% and 17% higher with the PPS-M compared to the SMPS for LSHFO and MGO, respectively.

  18. Experimental results and numerical modeling of a high-performance large-scale cryopump. I. Test particle Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Xueli; Day, Christian; Haas, Horst; Varoutis, Stylianos

    2011-07-15

    For the torus of the nuclear fusion project ITER (originally the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, but also Latin: the way), eight high-performance large-scale customized cryopumps must be designed and manufactured to accommodate the very high pumping speeds and throughputs of the fusion exhaust gas needed to maintain the plasma under stable vacuum conditions and comply with other criteria which cannot be met by standard commercial vacuum pumps. Under an earlier research and development program, a model pump of reduced scale based on active cryosorption on charcoal-coated panels at 4.5 K was manufactured and tested systematically. The present article focuses on the simulation of the true three-dimensional complex geometry of the model pump by the newly developed ProVac3D Monte Carlo code. It is shown for gas throughputs of up to 1000 sccm ({approx}1.69 Pa m{sup 3}/s at T = 0 deg. C) in the free molecular regime that the numerical simulation results are in good agreement with the pumping speeds measured. Meanwhile, the capture coefficient associated with the virtual region around the cryogenic panels and shields which holds for higher throughputs is calculated using this generic approach. This means that the test particle Monte Carlo simulations in free molecular flow can be used not only for the optimization of the pumping system but also for the supply of the input parameters necessary for the future direct simulation Monte Carlo in the full flow regime.

  19. Effects of fluvial processes in different order river valleys on redistribution and storage of particle-bound radioactive caesium-137 in area of significant Chernobyl fallout and impact on linked rivers with lower contamination levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, Vladimir; Golosov, Valentin; Shamshurina, Evgeniya; Ivanov, Maxim; Ivanova, Nadezhda; Bezukhov, Dmitry; Onda, Yuichi; Wakiyama, Yoshifumi; Evrard, Olivier

    2015-04-01

    Detailed investigations of the post-fallout fate of radionuclide contamination represent an important task in terms of environmental quality assessment. In addition, particle-bound radionuclides such as the most widespread anthropogenic isotope caesium-137 can be used as tracers for quantitative assessment of different sediment redistribution processes. In landscapes of humid plains with agriculture-dominated land use the post-fallout redistribution of caesium-137 is primarily associated with fluvial activity of various scales in cascade systems starting from soil erosion on cultivated hillslopes through gully and small dry valley network into different order perennial streams and rivers. Our investigations in the so-called Plavsk hotspot (area of very high Chernobyl caesium-137 contamination within the Plava River basin, Tula Region, Central European Russia) has been continuing for more than 15 years by now, while the time passed since the Chernobyl disaster and associated radioactive fallout (1986) is almost 29 years. Detailed information on the fluvial sediment and associated caesium-137 redistribution has been obtained for case study sites of different size from individual cultivated slopes and small catchments of different size (2-180 km2) to the entire Plava River basin scale (1856 km2). It has been shown that most of the contaminated sediment over the time passed since the fallout has remained stored within the small dry valleys of the 1-4 Hortonian order and local reservoirs (>70%), while only about 5% reached the 5-6 order valleys (main tributaries of the Plava River) and storage of the Plava floodplain itself represents as low as 0.3% of the basin-scale total sediment production from eroded cultivated hillslopes. Nevertheless, it has been shown that contaminated sediment yield from the Plava River basin exerts significant influence on less polluted downstream-linked river system. Recent progress of the investigations involved sampling of 7 detailed depth

  20. A Remote Radioactivity Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jona, Kemi; Vondracek, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Imagine a high school with very few experimental resources and limited budgets that prevent the purchase of even basic laboratory equipment. For example, many high schools do not have the means of experimentally studying radioactivity because they lack Geiger counters and/or good radioactive sources. This was the case at the first high school one of us (MV) worked at, and after talking with numerous colleagues we know this is still the case at many schools. What options are there then for physics teachers to allow their students to experimentally investigate certain characteristics of radioactivity, such as how distance affects the intensity of radiation coming from a radioactive source? There are computer simulations that can be run, or perhaps the teacher has a light sensor and tries to make an analogy between the intensity of light from a light bulb and the intensity of radiation from a radioactive source based on geometric arguments to get an inverse-square law. But for many there is no direct experimental option if one does not possess a Geiger counter and good radioactive sample. It is for that teacher and class of students that an online, remote radioactivity experiment was created.

  1. Radioactive decay data tables

    SciTech Connect

    Kocher, D.C.

    1981-01-01

    The estimation of radiation dose to man from either external or internal exposure to radionuclides requires a knowledge of the energies and intensities of the atomic and nuclear radiations emitted during the radioactive decay process. The availability of evaluated decay data for the large number of radionuclides of interest is thus of fundamental importance for radiation dosimetry. This handbook contains a compilation of decay data for approximately 500 radionuclides. These data constitute an evaluated data file constructed for use in the radiological assessment activities of the Technology Assessments Section of the Health and Safety Research Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The radionuclides selected for this handbook include those occurring naturally in the environment, those of potential importance in routine or accidental releases from the nuclear fuel cycle, those of current interest in nuclear medicine and fusion reactor technology, and some of those of interest to Committee 2 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection for the estimation of annual limits on intake via inhalation and ingestion for occupationally exposed individuals.

  2. Serum Apolipoprotein A-I and Large High-Density Lipoprotein Particles Are Positively Correlated with FEV1 in Atopic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Kaler, Maryann; Cuento, Rosemarie A.; Gordon, Elizabeth M.; Weir, Nargues A.; Sampson, Maureen; Fontana, Joseph R.; MacDonald, Sandra; Moss, Joel; Manganiello, Vincent; Remaley, Alan T.; Levine, Stewart J.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Although lipids, apolipoproteins, and lipoprotein particles are important modulators of inflammation, varying relationships exist between these parameters and asthma. Objectives: To determine whether serum lipids and apolipoproteins correlate with the severity of airflow obstruction in subjects with atopy and asthma. Methods: Serum samples were obtained from 154 atopic and nonatopic subjects without asthma, and 159 subjects with atopy and asthma. Serum lipid and lipoprotein levels were quantified using standard diagnostic assays and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Airflow obstruction was assessed by FEV1% predicted. Measurements and Main Results: Serum lipid levels correlated with FEV1 only in the subjects with atopy and asthma. Serum levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) were positively correlated with FEV1 in subjects with atopy and asthma, whereas a negative correlation existed between FEV1 and serum levels of triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, apolipoprotein B (apoB), and the apoB/apoA-I ratio. NMR spectroscopy identified a positive correlation between FEV1 and HDLNMR particle size, as well as the concentrations of large HDLNMR particles and total IDLNMR (intermediate-density lipoprotein) particles in subjects with atopy and asthma. In contrast, LDLNMR particle size and concentrations of LDLNMR and VLDLNMR (very-low-density lipoprotein) particles were negatively correlated with FEV1 in subjects with atopy and asthma. Conclusions: In subjects with atopy and asthma, serum levels of apoA-I and large HDLNMR particles are positively correlated with FEV1, whereas serum triglycerides, LDL cholesterol, and apoB are associated with more severe airflow obstruction. These results may facilitate future studies to assess whether apoA-I and large HDLNMR particles can reduce airflow obstruction and disease severity in asthma. PMID:25692941

  3. Metal-bearing Aerosols of Industrial Origin from Multiple Sources in South Phoenix, Arizona: Separating Similar Particle Types with Minor Element Differences Using Automated SEM Analysis of Large Populations of Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J.; Hua, X.

    2009-12-01

    Particulate pollution, especially PM10, in the Greater Phoenix (Maricopa County) airshed is a long-standing problem. While much of the PM10 can be ascribed to soil dust entrained by human activity (e.g., sand and gravel mining and other construction-support activities both directly and indirectly), south-central and southwest Phoenix have a significant number of industrial sources of metal-bearing particles. Many of these particles are dominated compositionally by Fe but have minor elements such as Cu, Ba, Mn, Cr, Ni and others which can be statistically mutually exclusive when large populations are looked at with automated Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Bulk aerosol chemical analysis of high-volume samples shows the presence of these elements, including the dominance of Fe at times, but there are far more potential sources than can ever by deduced by principal component analysis of the bulk sample data. Because of the potential toxic nature of these industrial particles, about which there is considerable community concern, identifying the multiple sources is a key step in mitigating the pollution. Also present in these industrial aerosols are mostly submicron particles containing Sr, Sb, V, Cd, and other elements in various combinations. While analyzing the minor element content of submicron particles, some of which are beam-sensitive, pushes the limits of automated SEM techniques, this is the only way to examine large, statistically significant particle populations in many samples on an individual-particle basis. The elemental associations in these unusual metal-bearing particles tend to be the key to source identification. Particle morphology is also important in separating particle types from different sources in these populations. For instance, one of major sources of Fe-dominant particles in southwest Phoenix is a scrap metal operation that uses a “mega-shredder”. This mega-shredder generates enough heat to melt some of the metal and produce roughly

  4. Membrane technologies for liquid radioactive waste treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmielewski, A. G.; Harasimowicz, M.; Zakrzewska-Trznadel, G.

    1999-01-01

    The paper deals with some problems concerning reduction of radioactivity of liquid low-level nuclear waste streams (LLLW). The membrane processes as ultrafiltration (UF), seeded ultrafiltration (SUF), reverse osmosis (RO) and membrane distillation (MD) were examined. Ultrafiltration enables the removal of particles with molecular weight above cut-off of UF membranes and can be only used as a pre-treatment stage. The improvement of removal is achieved by SUF, employing macromolecular ligands binding radioactive ions. The reduction of radioactivity in LLLW to very low level were achieved with RO membranes. The results of experiments led the authors to the design and construction of UF+2RO pilot plant. The development of membrane distillation improve the selectivity of membrane process in some cases. The possibility of utilisation of waste heat from cooling system of nuclear reactors as a preferable energy source can significantly reduce the cost of operation.

  5. Understanding radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, R.L.

    1981-12-01

    This document contains information on all aspects of radioactive wastes. Facts are presented about radioactive wastes simply, clearly and in an unbiased manner which makes the information readily accessible to the interested public. The contents are as follows: questions and concerns about wastes; atoms and chemistry; radioactivity; kinds of radiation; biological effects of radiation; radiation standards and protection; fission and fission products; the Manhattan Project; defense and development; uses of isotopes and radiation; classification of wastes; spent fuels from nuclear reactors; storage of spent fuel; reprocessing, recycling, and resources; uranium mill tailings; low-level wastes; transportation; methods of handling high-level nuclear wastes; project salt vault; multiple barrier approach; research on waste isolation; legal requiremnts; the national waste management program; societal aspects of radioactive wastes; perspectives; glossary; appendix A (scientific American articles); appendix B (reference material on wastes). (ATT)

  6. Radioactive substances in tap water.

    PubMed

    Atsuumi, Ryo; Endo, Yoshihiko; Suzuki, Akihiko; Kannotou, Yasumitu; Nakada, Masahiro; Yabuuchi, Reiko

    2014-01-01

    A 9.0 magnitude (M) earthquake with an epicenter off the Sanriku coast occurred at 14: 46 on March 11, 2011. TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (F-1 NPP) was struck by the earthquake and its resulting tsunami. Consequently a critical nuclear disaster developed, as a large quantity of radioactive materials was released due to a hydrogen blast. On March 16(th), 2011, radioiodine and radioactive cesium were detected at levels of 177 Bq/kg and 58 Bq/kg, respectively, in tap water in Fukushima city (about 62km northwest of TEPCO F-1 NPP). On March 20th, radioiodine was detected in tap water at a level of 965 Bq/kg, which is over the value-index of restrictions on food and drink intake (radioiodine 300 Bq/kg (infant intake 100 Bq/kg)) designated by the Nuclear Safety Commission. Therefore, intake restriction measures were taken regarding drinking water. After that, although the all intake restrictions were lifted, in order to confirm the safety of tap water, an inspection system was established to monitor all tap water in the prefecture. This system has confirmed that there has been no detection of radioiodine or radioactive cesium in tap water in the prefecture since May 5(th), 2011. Furthermore, radioactive strontium ((89) Sr, (90)Sr) and plutonium ((238)Pu, (239)Pu+(240)Pu) in tap water and the raw water supply were measured. As a result, (89) Sr, (238)Pu, (239)Pu+(240)Pu were undetectable and although (90)Sr was detected, its committed effective dose of 0.00017 mSv was much lower than the yearly 0.1 mSv of the World Health Organization guidelines for drinking water quality. In addition, the results did not show any deviations from past inspection results.

  7. Search for metastable heavy charged particles with large ionisation energy loss in pp collisions at [Formula: see text] TeV using the ATLAS experiment.

    PubMed

    Aad, G; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Abdinov, O; Aben, R; Abolins, M; AbouZeid, O S; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Abreu, R; Abulaiti, Y; Acharya, B S; Adamczyk, L; Adams, D L; Adelman, J; Adomeit, S; Adye, T; Affolder, A A; Agatonovic-Jovin, T; Agricola, J; Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Ahlen, S P; Ahmadov, F; Aielli, G; Akerstedt, H; Åkesson, T P A; Akimov, A V; Alberghi, G L; Albert, J; Albrand, S; Alconada Verzini, M J; Aleksa, M; Aleksandrov, I N; Alexa, C; Alexander, G; Alexopoulos, T; Alhroob, M; Alimonti, G; Alio, L; Alison, J; Alkire, S P; Allbrooke, B M M; Allport, P P; Aloisio, A; Alonso, A; Alonso, F; Alpigiani, C; Altheimer, A; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Álvarez Piqueras, D; Alviggi, M G; Amadio, B T; Amako, K; Amaral Coutinho, Y; Amelung, C; Amidei, D; Amor Dos Santos, S P; Amorim, A; Amoroso, S; Amram, N; Amundsen, G; Anastopoulos, C; Ancu, L S; Andari, N; Andeen, T; Anders, C F; Anders, G; Anders, J K; Anderson, K J; Andreazza, A; Andrei, V; Angelidakis, S; Angelozzi, I; Anger, P; Angerami, A; 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Vallecorsa, S; Valls Ferrer, J A; Van Den Wollenberg, W; Van Der Deijl, P C; van der Geer, R; van der Graaf, H; Van Der Leeuw, R; van Eldik, N; van Gemmeren, P; Van Nieuwkoop, J; van Vulpen, I; van Woerden, M C; Vanadia, M; Vandelli, W; Vanguri, R; Vaniachine, A; Vannucci, F; Vardanyan, G; Vari, R; Varnes, E W; Varol, T; Varouchas, D; Vartapetian, A; Varvell, K E; Vazeille, F; Vazquez Schroeder, T; Veatch, J; Veloce, L M; Veloso, F; Velz, T; Veneziano, S; Ventura, A; Ventura, D; Venturi, M; Venturi, N; Venturini, A; Vercesi, V; Verducci, M; Verkerke, W; Vermeulen, J C; Vest, A; Vetterli, M C; Viazlo, O; Vichou, I; Vickey, T; Vickey Boeriu, O E; Viehhauser, G H A; Viel, S; Vigne, R; Villa, M; Villaplana Perez, M; Vilucchi, E; Vincter, M G; Vinogradov, V B; Vivarelli, I; Vives Vaque, F; Vlachos, S; Vladoiu, D; Vlasak, M; Vogel, M; Vokac, P; Volpi, G; Volpi, M; von der Schmitt, H; von Radziewski, H; von Toerne, E; Vorobel, V; Vorobev, K; Vos, M; Voss, R; Vossebeld, J H; Vranjes, N; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M; Vrba, V; Vreeswijk, M; Vuillermet, R; Vukotic, I; Vykydal, Z; Wagner, P; Wagner, W; Wahlberg, H; Wahrmund, S; Wakabayashi, J; Walder, J; Walker, R; Walkowiak, W; Wang, C; Wang, F; Wang, H; Wang, H; Wang, J; Wang, J; Wang, K; Wang, R; Wang, S M; Wang, T; Wang, X; Wanotayaroj, C; Warburton, A; Ward, C P; Wardrope, D R; Washbrook, A; Wasicki, C; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, I J; Watson, M F; Watts, G; Watts, S; Waugh, B M; Webb, S; Weber, M S; Weber, S W; Webster, J S; Weidberg, A R; Weinert, B; Weingarten, J; Weiser, C; Weits, H; Wells, P S; Wenaus, T; Wengler, T; Wenig, S; Wermes, N; Werner, M; Werner, P; Wessels, M; Wetter, J; Whalen, K; Wharton, A M; White, A; White, M J; White, R; White, S; Whiteson, D; Wickens, F J; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Wienemann, P; Wiglesworth, C; Wiik-Fuchs, L A M; Wildauer, A; Wilkens, H G; Williams, H H; Williams, S; Willis, C; Willocq, S; Wilson, A; Wilson, J A; Wingerter-Seez, I; Winklmeier, F; Winter, B T; Wittgen, M; Wittkowski, J; Wollstadt, S J; Wolter, M W; Wolters, H; Wosiek, B K; Wotschack, J; Woudstra, M J; Wozniak, K W; Wu, M; Wu, M; Wu, S L; Wu, X; Wu, Y; Wyatt, T R; Wynne, B M; Xella, S; Xu, D; Xu, L; Yabsley, B; Yacoob, S; Yakabe, R; Yamada, M; Yamaguchi, Y; Yamamoto, A; Yamamoto, S; Yamanaka, T; Yamauchi, K; Yamazaki, Y; Yan, Z; Yang, H; Yang, H; Yang, Y; Yao, W-M; Yasu, Y; Yatsenko, E; Yau Wong, K H; Ye, J; Ye, S; Yeletskikh, I; Yen, A L; Yildirim, E; Yorita, K; Yoshida, R; Yoshihara, K; Young, C; Young, C J S; Youssef, S; Yu, D R; Yu, J; Yu, J M; Yu, J; Yuan, L; Yuen, S P Y; Yurkewicz, A; Yusuff, I; Zabinski, B; Zaidan, R; Zaitsev, A M; Zalieckas, J; Zaman, A; Zambito, S; Zanello, L; Zanzi, D; Zeitnitz, C; Zeman, M; Zemla, A; Zengel, K; Zenin, O; Ženiš, T; Zerwas, D; Zhang, D; Zhang, F; Zhang, H; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhang, R; Zhang, X; Zhang, Z; Zhao, X; Zhao, Y; Zhao, Z; Zhemchugov, A; Zhong, J; Zhou, B; Zhou, C; Zhou, L; Zhou, L; Zhou, N; Zhu, C G; Zhu, H; Zhu, J; Zhu, Y; Zhuang, X; Zhukov, K; Zibell, A; Zieminska, D; Zimine, N I; Zimmermann, C; Zimmermann, S; Zinonos, Z; Zinser, M; Ziolkowski, M; Živković, L; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; Zur Nedden, M; Zurzolo, G; Zwalinski, L

    Many extensions of the Standard Model predict the existence of charged heavy long-lived particles, such as R-hadrons or charginos. These particles, if produced at the Large Hadron Collider, should be moving non-relativistically and are therefore identifiable through the measurement of an anomalously large specific energy loss in the ATLAS pixel detector. Measuring heavy long-lived particles through their track parameters in the vicinity of the interaction vertex provides sensitivity to metastable particles with lifetimes from 0.6 ns to 30 ns. A search for such particles with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider is presented, based on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of [Formula: see text] fb[Formula: see text] of pp collisions at [Formula: see text] TeV. No significant deviation from the Standard Model background expectation is observed, and lifetime-dependent upper limits on R-hadrons and chargino production are set. Gluino R-hadrons with 10 ns lifetime and masses up to 1185 GeV are excluded at 95 [Formula: see text] confidence level, and so are charginos with 15 ns lifetime and masses up to 482 GeV.

  8. Search for metastable heavy charged particles with large ionisation energy loss in pp collisions at ${\\sqrt{s} = 8}$ s = 8 TeV using the ATLAS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.

    2015-09-03

    Many extensions of the Standard Model predict the existence of charged heavy long-lived particles, such as R-hadrons or charginos. These particles, if produced at the Large Hadron Collider, should be moving non-relativistically and are therefore identifiable through the measurement of an anomalously large specific energy loss in the ATLAS pixel detector. Measuring heavy long-lived particles through their track parameters in the vicinity of the interaction vertex provides sensitivity to metastable particles with lifetimes from 0.6 ns to 30 ns. A search for such particles with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider is presented, based on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of \\(18.4\\) fb\\(^{-1}\\) of pp collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s} = 8\\) TeV. No significant deviation from the Standard Model background expectation is observed, and lifetime-dependent upper limits on R-hadrons and chargino production are set. Gluino R-hadrons with 10 ns lifetime and masses up to 1185 GeV are excluded at 95 \\(\\%\\) confidence level, and so are charginos with 15 ns lifetime and masses up to 482 GeV.

  9. Search for metastable heavy charged particles with large ionisation energy loss in pp collisions at $${\\sqrt{s} = 8}$$ s = 8 TeV using the ATLAS experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.

    2015-09-03

    Many extensions of the Standard Model predict the existence of charged heavy long-lived particles, such as R-hadrons or charginos. These particles, if produced at the Large Hadron Collider, should be moving non-relativistically and are therefore identifiable through the measurement of an anomalously large specific energy loss in the ATLAS pixel detector. Measuring heavy long-lived particles through their track parameters in the vicinity of the interaction vertex provides sensitivity to metastable particles with lifetimes from 0.6 ns to 30 ns. A search for such particles with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider is presented, based on a data samplemore » corresponding to an integrated luminosity of \\(18.4\\) fb\\(^{-1}\\) of pp collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s} = 8\\) TeV. No significant deviation from the Standard Model background expectation is observed, and lifetime-dependent upper limits on R-hadrons and chargino production are set. Gluino R-hadrons with 10 ns lifetime and masses up to 1185 GeV are excluded at 95 \\(\\%\\) confidence level, and so are charginos with 15 ns lifetime and masses up to 482 GeV.« less

  10. Novel Optical Diagnostic Techniques for Studying Particle Contact and Deposition Upon a Large Cylinder in a Sheared Suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashidnia, Nasser (Technical Monitor); Yoda, Minami

    2004-01-01

    The objectives of this research project were: 1) To study the fluid dynamics of sheared particle-liquid suspensions and the impact of differential particle-fluid inertia; 2) To develop new techniques for observing suspension particle contact and deposition upon solid surfaces. Dr. Yoda was supported by the NASA Office of Biological and Physical Research on a four-year grant from March 2000 through November 2004 for a ground-based study on the fluid dynamics of sheared particle-liquid suspensions and the impact of differential particle-fluid inertia on such flows. Such inertial effects can only be observed in reduced-gravity environments since they are overwhelmed by buoyancy effects on Earth. Moreover, these inertial effects will have a significant impact upon suspension flows in microgravity. Suspension dynamics are of importance in a wide variety of advanced life systems applications, including water reclamation and dust mitigation in confined habitats.

  11. A Mobile System for Measuring Water Surface Velocities Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicle and Large-Scale Particle Image Velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. L.

    2015-12-01

    Measurement technologies for velocity of river flow are divided into intrusive and nonintrusive methods. Intrusive method requires infield operations. The measuring process of intrusive methods are time consuming, and likely to cause damages of operator and instrument. Nonintrusive methods require fewer operators and can reduce instrument damages from directly attaching to the flow. Nonintrusive measurements may use radar or image velocimetry to measure the velocities at the surface of water flow. The image velocimetry, such as large scale particle image velocimetry (LSPIV) accesses not only the point velocity but the flow velocities in an area simultaneously. Flow properties of an area hold the promise of providing spatially information of flow fields. This study attempts to construct a mobile system UAV-LSPIV by using an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) with LSPIV to measure flows in fields. The mobile system consists of a six-rotor UAV helicopter, a Sony nex5T camera, a gimbal, an image transfer device, a ground station and a remote control device. The activate gimbal helps maintain the camera lens orthogonal to the water surface and reduce the extent of images being distorted. The image transfer device can monitor the captured image instantly. The operator controls the UAV by remote control device through ground station and can achieve the flying data such as flying height and GPS coordinate of UAV. The mobile system was then applied to field experiments. The deviation of velocities measured by UAV-LSPIV of field experiments and handhold Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) is under 8%. The results of the field experiments suggests that the application of UAV-LSPIV can be effectively applied to surface flow studies.

  12. Effects of Two Large Solar Energetic Particle Events on Middle Atmosphere Nighttime Odd Hydrogen and Ozone Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkhoglyadova, O. P.; Butala, M.; Wang, S.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Hunt, L. A.; Zank, G. P.

    2014-12-01

    We analyze global middle atmospheric (~60 to 90 km) effects at local nighttime for two large Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events that occurred during intervals of 7-17 November 2004 and 20-30 August 2005. Properties of the SEP events and concomitant geomagnetic storms are discussed using in situ measurements at 1 AU. Temporal dynamics and latitudinal distribution of odd hydrogen and ozone densities inferred from measurements by the AURA/MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder) instrument are analyzed. We show statistically significant increases of nightime hydroxyl (OH) density in the middle atmosphere up to 5•106 cm-3 in the latitude range from 70° down to 50° latitude in both northern and southern hemispheres in connection with peaks in proton fluxes of >10 MeV energy range measured by the GOES spacecraft. During storm main phases the nighttime hydroxyl density increases were observed at ±50° and above. The altitude range where these effects are observed (65-80 km) is consistent with precipitating protons of >4 MeV energy range. There is a correspondence between averaged nighttime OH density in the polar latitudes and 65-85 km altitude range, and energetic proton (>10 MeV) fluxes. Corresponding statistically significant nighttime ozone depletions up to 40% relative to the background values are observed from 70° down to 60° latitude in northern and southern hemispheres. Simultaneous measurements of ozone density by TIMED/SABER (Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry) instrument independently confirm that major nighttime ozone density depletions occurred in the altitude range of 65-75 km and down to ±50° latitude during strong geomagnetic storms. The SEP impulsive phases on November 8-9th 2004 and August 23rd -25th 2005 correspond to onsets of ozone density depletions. Larger relative ozone depletions are observed in the northern hemisphere in November and in the southern hemisphere in August.

  13. Container for radioactive materials

    DOEpatents

    Fields, Stanley R.

    1985-01-01

    A container for housing a plurality of canister assemblies containing radioactive material and disposed in a longitudinally spaced relation within a carrier to form a payload package concentrically mounted within the container. The payload package includes a spacer for each canister assembly, said spacer comprising a base member longitudinally spacing adjacent canister assemblies from each other and a sleeve surrounding the associated canister assembly for centering the same and conducting heat from the radioactive material in a desired flow path.

  14. Temporary Personal Radioactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Fred

    2012-01-01

    As part of a bone scan procedure to look for the spread of prostate cancer, I was injected with radioactive technetium. In an effort to occupy/distract my mind, I used a Geiger counter to determine if the radioactive count obeyed the inverse-square law as a sensor was moved away from my bladder by incremental distances. (Contains 1 table and 2…

  15. Radioactive gold ring dermatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.A.; Aldrich, J.E. )

    1990-08-01

    A superficial squamous cell carcinoma developed in a woman who wore a radioactive gold ring for more than 30 years. Only part of the ring was radioactive. Radiation dose measurements indicated that the dose to basal skin layer was 2.4 Gy (240 rad) per week. If it is assumed that the woman continually wore her wedding ring for 37 years since purchase, she would have received a maximum dose of approximately 4600 Gy.

  16. Hot particle dosimetry and radiobiology--past and present.

    PubMed

    Charles, M W; Harrison, J D

    2007-09-01

    Small high-activity radioactive particles of nominal diameter ranging from approximately 1 mm down to several microm have been a radiological concern over the last 30 years in and around European and American nuclear reactor facilities. These particles have often been referred to as 'hot particles'. The 'hot particle problem' came into prominent concern in the late 1960s. The potential carcinogenic effects in lungs as the result of irradiation by discrete small particles containing alpha-emitting radionuclides, particularly (239)Pu, were claimed by some to be several orders of magnitude greater than those produced by uniform irradiation to the same mean dose. The phrase 'hot particle problem' was subsequently used to refer to the difficulty of predicting health effects for all microscopic radioactive sources. The difficulty arose because of the paucity of comparative human, animal or cell studies using radioactive particles, and the lack of validated measurement or calculational techniques for dose estimation for non-uniform exposures. Experience was largely restricted to uniform, large-area/volume exposures. The concern regarding cancer induction was extended to deterministic effects when the ICRP in 1977 failed to give adequate dose limits for dealing with 'hot particle' exposures of the skin. Since 1980, considerable efforts have been made to clarify and solve the dosimetric and radiobiological issues related to the health effects of 'hot particle' exposures. The general recommendations of the ICRP in 1991 used the latest radiobiological data to provide skin dose limits which are applicable to 'hot particle' exposures. More recently the NCRP has extended considerations to other organs. This progress is reviewed and applied to the specific case of the recent evaluation of potential health effects of Dounreay fuel fragments commissioned by the Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA). Analyses of possible doses and risks in this case indicate that the

  17. Isocratic and gradient impedance plot analysis and comparison of some recently introduced large size core-shell and fully porous particles.

    PubMed

    Vanderheyden, Yoachim; Cabooter, Deirdre; Desmet, Gert; Broeckhoven, Ken

    2013-10-18

    The intrinsic kinetic performance of three recently commercialized large size (≥4μm) core-shell particles packed in columns with different lengths has been measured and compared with that of standard fully porous particles of similar and smaller size (5 and 3.5μm, respectively). The kinetic performance is compared in both absolute (plot of t0 versus the plate count N or the peak capacity np for isocratic and gradient elution, respectively) and dimensionless units. The latter is realized by switching to so-called impedance plots, a format which has been previously introduced (as a plot of t0/N(2) or E0 versus Nopt/N) and has in the present study been extended from isocratic to gradient elution (where the impedance plot corresponds to a plot of t0/np(4) versus np,opt(2)/np(2)). Both the isocratic and gradient impedance plot yielded a very similar picture: the clustered impedance plot curves divide into two distinct groups, one for the core-shell particles (lowest values, i.e. best performance) and one for the fully porous particles (highest values), confirming the clear intrinsic kinetic advantage of core-shell particles. If used around their optimal flow rate, the core-shell particles displayed a minimal separation impedance that is about 40% lower than the fully porous particles. Even larger gains in separation speed can be achieved in the C-term regime.

  18. Reconnaissance of radioactive rocks of Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, John M.; Narten, Perry F.

    1951-01-01

    The state of Maine was traversed with car-mounted Geiger-Mueller equipment in the late summer of 1948 and the radioactivity of approximately 4,600 miles of road was logged. All samples were analyzed, both in the field by comparing the radioactivity of each sample to the radioactivity of a stranded measured with a simple scaling modification of a portable counter, and in the Geological Survey’s Trace Elements Section Washington Laboratory. Differences between both types of analyses were negligible. The maximum equivalent uranium content of the most radioactive rocks thus analyzed was 0.008 percent. A 1,400-square-mile abnormally radioactive province in southwestern Maine was outlined. The outcrop data obtained from car traversing are evaluated statistically. Cumulative frequency distribution curves are drawn to show the distribution of outcrops at various levels of radioactivity, and straight-line extensions are made to show to maximum probable grade for various rock types and areas in Maine. A maximum grade of 0.055 percent equivalent uranium is thus predicted for the entire state. This prediction necessarily is a broad generalization because large areas of Main are inaccessible for car traversing. A concept of evaluation of an area for possible mineral deposits is proposed on the basis of lithology, and observed and indicated ranges in grade.

  19. Adsorption of Small Cationic Nanoparticles onto Large Anionic Particles from Aqueous Solution: A Model System for Understanding Pigment Dispersion and the Problem of Effective Particle Density

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The present study focuses on the use of copolymer nanoparticles as a dispersant for a model pigment (silica). Reversible addition–fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) alcoholic dispersion polymerization was used to synthesize sterically stabilized diblock copolymer nanoparticles. The steric stabilizer block was poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMA) and the core-forming block was poly(benzyl methacrylate) (PBzMA). The mean degrees of polymerization for the PDMA and PBzMA blocks were 71 and 100, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies confirmed a near-monodisperse spherical morphology, while dynamic light scattering (DLS) studies indicated an intensity-average diameter of 30 nm. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) reported a volume-average diameter of 29 ± 0.5 nm and a mean aggregation number of 154. Aqueous electrophoresis measurements confirmed that these PDMA71–PBzMA100 nanoparticles acquired cationic character when transferred from ethanol to water as a result of protonation of the weakly basic PDMA chains. Electrostatic adsorption of these nanoparticles from aqueous solution onto 470 nm silica particles led to either flocculation at submonolayer coverage or steric stabilization at or above monolayer coverage, as judged by DLS. This technique indicated that saturation coverage was achieved on addition of approximately 465 copolymer nanoparticles per silica particle, which corresponds to a fractional surface coverage of around 0.42. These adsorption data were corroborated using thermogravimetry, UV spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. TEM studies indicated that the cationic nanoparticles remained intact on the silica surface after electrostatic adsorption, while aqueous electrophoresis confirmed that surface charge reversal occurred below pH 7. The relatively thick layer of adsorbed nanoparticles led to a significant reduction in the effective particle density of the silica particles from 1.99 g cm–3 to

  20. Incorporating a trend analysis of large flow perturbations into stochastic modeling of particle transport in open channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Christina W.; Lin, Emily Y.; Hung, Serena Y.

    2016-10-01

    In extreme flow conditions, both the flow carrying capacity and movement of particles may abruptly change from those associated with regular flows. This study investigates movement of sediment particles in response to extreme flow events using a Lagrangian stochastic jump diffusion particle tracking model (SJD-PTM). The study attempts to investigate the frequency change of extreme flow event occurrences and its impact on suspended sediment particle movement. Using the concept of logistic regression, the trend magnitude of extreme flow events can be used as an input of the proposed stochastic jump diffusion particle tracking model with Logistic regression (SJ-PTM_LR) to account for the potential effects of environmental change. The predicted frequency change of extreme flows from available data in the Chijiawan region in central Taiwan is illustrated in this study. Both ensemble mean and variance of particle trajectory can be quantified under such predicted frequency trend change of extreme flow occurrences via simulations of SJ-PTM_LR. Results show that particle movement uncertainty may undergo a significant increase by taking the effect of the predicted flow frequency trend into consideration. Such probabilistic outcome provides a valuable means for assessing the probability of failure (i.e., risk) resulting from sedimentation processes.

  1. SHIPPING CONTAINER FOR RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL

    DOEpatents

    Nachbar, H.D.; Biggs, B.B.; Tariello, P.J.; George, K.O.

    1963-01-15

    A shipping container is described for transponting a large number of radioactive nuclear fuel element modules which produce a substantial amount of heat. The container comprises a primary pressure vessel and shield, and a rotatable head having an access port that can be indexed with module holders in the container. In order to remove heat generated in the fuel eleme nts, a heat exchanger is arranged within the container and in contact with a heat exchange fluid therein. The heat exchanger communicates with additional external heat exchangers, which dissipate heat to the atmosphere. (AEC)

  2. Generation of a large volume of clinically relevant nanometre-sized ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene wear particles for cell culture studies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Aiqin; Ingham, Eileen; Fisher, John; Tipper, Joanne L

    2014-04-01

    It has recently been shown that the wear of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene in hip and knee prostheses leads to the generation of nanometre-sized particles, in addition to micron-sized particles. The biological activity of nanometre-sized ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene wear particles has not, however, previously been studied due to difficulties in generating sufficient volumes of nanometre-sized ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene wear particles suitable for cell culture studies. In this study, wear simulation methods were investigated to generate a large volume of endotoxin-free clinically relevant nanometre-sized ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene wear particles. Both single-station and six-station multidirectional pin-on-plate wear simulators were used to generate ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene wear particles under sterile and non-sterile conditions. Microbial contamination and endotoxin levels in the lubricants were determined. The results indicated that microbial contamination was absent and endotoxin levels were low and within acceptable limits for the pharmaceutical industry, when a six-station pin-on-plate wear simulator was used to generate ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene wear particles in a non-sterile environment. Different pore-sized polycarbonate filters were investigated to isolate nanometre-sized ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene wear particles from the wear test lubricants. The use of the filter sequence of 10, 1, 0.1, 0.1 and 0.015 µm pore sizes allowed successful isolation of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene wear particles with a size range of < 100 nm, which was suitable for cell culture studies.

  3. THE MORTALITY OF BACTERIOPHAGE CONTAINING ASSIMILATED RADIOACTIVE PHOSPHORUS

    PubMed Central

    Hershey, A. D.; Kamen, M. D.; Kennedy, J. W.; Gest, H.

    1951-01-01

    The bacteriophage T4 containing assimilated radioactive phosphorus is inactivated at a rate proportional to the specific radioactivity of the constituent phosphorus. The beta radiation from the phosphorus makes a negligible contribution to this effect. The inactivation is therefore a direct consequence of the nuclear reaction, which kills the phage with an efficiency of about 1/12. Several phages related to T4 behave similarly. When radioactive phage is grown from a seed of non-radioactive phage, all of the phage progeny are subject to killing by radioactive decay. The phage is killed by beta radiation from P32 with an efficiency of about 1/100 per ionization within the particle volume. Bacteriophage T4 and its relatives contain about 500,000 atoms of phosphorus per infective particle. Virtually all this phosphorus is adsorbed to bacteria with the specificity characteristic of the infective particles, and none of it can be removed from the particles by the enzyme desoxyribonuclease. The phosphorus content per particle, together with the published data on analytical composition, indicates a particle diameter close to 110 mµ for the varieties of phage studied. PMID:14824499

  4. Monte Carlo study of radial energy deposition from primary and secondary particles for narrow and large proton beamlet source models.

    PubMed

    Peeler, Christopher R; Titt, Uwe

    2012-06-21

    In spot-scanning intensity-modulated proton therapy, numerous unmodulated proton beam spots are delivered over a target volume to produce a prescribed dose distribution. To accurately model field size-dependent output factors for beam spots, the energy deposition at positions radial to the central axis of the beam must be characterized. In this study, we determined the difference in the central axis dose for spot-scanned fields that results from secondary particle doses by investigating energy deposition radial to the proton beam central axis resulting from primary protons and secondary particles for mathematical point source and distributed source models. The largest difference in the central axis dose from secondary particles resulting from the use of a mathematical point source and a distributed source model was approximately 0.43%. Thus, we conclude that the central axis dose for a spot-scanned field is effectively independent of the source model used to calculate the secondary particle dose.

  5. Induced radioactivity in LDEF components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, B. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Parnell, T. A.; Laird, C. E.

    1991-01-01

    The systematics of induced radioactivity on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) were studied in a wide range of materials using low level background facilities for detection of gamma rays. Approx. 400 samples of materials processed from structural parts of the spacecraft, as well as materials from onboard experiments, were analyzed at national facilities. These measurements show the variety of radioisotopes that are produced with half-lives greater than 2 wks, most of which are characteristic of proton induced reactions above 20 MeV. For the higher activity, long lived isotopes, it was possible to map the depth and directional dependences of the activity. Due to the stabilized configuration of the LDEF, the induced radioactivity data clearly show contributions from the anisotropic trapped proton flux in the South Atlantic Anomaly. This effect is discussed, along with evidence for activation by galactic protons and thermal neutrons. The discovery of Be-7 was made on leading side parts of the spacecraft, although this was though not to be related to the in situ production of radioisotopes from external particle fluxes.

  6. A Simplified Model for the Behavior of Large Biomass Particles in the Splashing Zone of a Bubbling Bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brink, Anders; Karlström, Oskar; Hupa, Mikko

    A model for the behavior of biomass particles in the splashing zone of a bubbling bed has been developed. The model is intended for use in CFD studies of bubbling beds, where it provides a way of modeling particle dispersion in the splashing zone. In the model, particles landing on the bed surface are assumed to reenter the splashing zone. Two initial velocities are used for the reentering particles: one represents particles landing on bursting bubbles and one for the emulsion phase. The fraction of the bed consisting of bubbles is calculated using standard expressions from the literature. The re-entering velocity of fuel particles from the bubbles is set such that the flight trajectory reaches the typical height of the splashing zone. The velocity from the emulsion phase is assumed to be of the order of the fluidization velocity. In both cases the initial direction of the trajectory is allowed to take random values. Using these simple assumptions an approximation of the logarithmic material distribution in the splashing zone is achieved.

  7. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase enables phagocytosis of large particles by terminating actin assembly through Rac/Cdc42 GTPase-activating proteins

    PubMed Central

    Schlam, Daniel; Bagshaw, Richard D.; Freeman, Spencer A.; Collins, Richard F.; Pawson, Tony; Fairn, Gregory D.; Grinstein, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Phagocytosis is responsible for the elimination of particles of widely disparate sizes, from large fungi or effete cells to small bacteria. Though superficially similar, the molecular mechanisms involved differ: engulfment of large targets requires phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), while that of small ones does not. Here, we report that inactivation of Rac and Cdc42 at phagocytic cups is essential to complete internalization of large particles. Through a screen of 62 RhoGAP-family members, we demonstrate that ARHGAP12, ARHGAP25 and SH3BP1 are responsible for GTPase inactivation. Silencing these RhoGAPs impairs phagocytosis of large targets. The GAPs are recruited to large—but not small—phagocytic cups by products of PI3K, where they synergistically inactivate Rac and Cdc42. Remarkably, the prominent accumulation of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate characteristic of large-phagosome formation is less evident during phagocytosis of small targets, accounting for the contrasting RhoGAP distribution and the differential requirement for PI3K during phagocytosis of dissimilarly sized particles. PMID:26465210

  8. Spectral Properties of Large Gradual Solar Energetic Particle Events. II. Systematic Q/M Dependence of Heavy Ion Spectral Breaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, M. I.; Mason, G. M.; Dayeh, M. A.; Ebert, R. W.; McComas, D. J.; Li, G.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Schwadron, N. A.; Smith, C. W.

    2016-09-01

    We fit ˜0.1-500 MeV nucleon-1 H-Fe spectra in 46 large solar energetic particle (SEP) events with the double power-law Band function to obtain a normalization constant, low- and high-energy parameters γ a and γ b, and break energy E B, and derive the low-energy spectral slope γ 1. We find that: (1) γ a, γ 1, and γ b are species-independent and the spectra steepen with increasing energy; (2) E B decreases systematically with decreasing Q/M scaling as (Q/M) α ; (3) α varies between ˜0.2-3 and is well correlated with the ˜0.16-0.23 MeV nucleon-1 Fe/O; (4) in most events, α < 1.4, γ b-γ a > 3, and O E B increases with γ b-γ a; and (5) in many extreme events (associated with faster coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and GLEs), Fe/O and 3He/4He ratios are enriched, α ≥ 1.4, γ b-γ a < 3, and E B decreases with γ b-γ a. The species-independence of γ a, γ 1, and γ b and the Q/M dependence of E B within an event and the α values suggest that double power-law SEP spectra occur due to diffusive acceleration by near-Sun CME shocks rather than scattering in interplanetary turbulence. Using γ 1, we infer that the average compression ratio for 33 near-Sun CME shocks is 2.49 ± 0.08. In most events, the Q/M dependence of E B is consistent with the equal diffusion coefficient condition and the variability in α is driven by differences in the near-shock wave intensity spectra, which are flatter than the Kolmogorov turbulence spectrum but weaker than the spectra for extreme events. In contrast, in extreme events, enhanced wave power enables faster CME shocks to accelerate impulsive suprathermal ions more efficiently than ambient coronal ions.

  9. Thermal emission from large solid particles in the coma of comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) around perihelion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keane, J.; Milam, S.; Coulson, I.; Gicquel, A.; Meech, K.; Yang, B.; Riesen, T.; Remijan, A.; Villanueva, G.; Corrinder, M.; Charnley, S.; Mumma, M.

    2014-07-01

    We report submillimeter dust-continuum observations for comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) obtained during the time period immediately before perihelion on 2013 November 28 (r = 0.0125 au). The variability and time resolution obtained in these images has revealed significant dust outbursts and have likely captured the onset of the final disruption event of comet ISON. The measured 450-μ m and 850-μ m submillimeter continuua are the strongest yet detected from a comet. Data were obtained with the SCUBA-2 submillimetre camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) located at the 4000-m level of Mauna Kea, Hawaii during a week of scheduled day-time observing. Imaging is achieved simultaneously at wavelengths of 850 μ m and 450 μ m. Conditions necessary to obtain valuable results at 450 μ m occur relatively infrequently, and while atmospheric zenith opacities on the days involved were good (low), ranging between 0.08 (nepers at 225 GHz on the first day) and 0.05 (on the day of perihelion), the relatively low elevations of the observations (30--45 degrees), and consequent high line-of-sight opacities, limit the impact of the 450-μ m data. Each of the focal planes of SCUBA-2 is populated with 5000 bolometers, and provides an instantaneous Field of View of almost 10 arc minutes. In order to account effectively for the rapidly varying sky transmissions, the observational strategies adopted at JCMT involve scanning the telescope rapidly around the target in a daisy pattern, which produces fairly uniform coverage in exposure time of an area of diameter 3 arc minutes around the target centre. When comet ISON was first detected at 850 μ m, the 1-mm-sized dust particles were tightly bound to the comet nucleus until at least November 23. Three days later the dust was less tightly bound and became elongated and diffuse, spread out over as much as 120 arc seconds (80,000 km) in the anti-solar direction. Preliminary analyses of these observations suggest the detection of either a

  10. Efficient Implementation of the Invariant Imbedding T-Matrix Method and the Separation of Variables Method Applied to Large Nonspherical Inhomogeneous Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bi, Lei; Yang, Ping; Kattawar, George W.; Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2012-01-01

    Three terms, ''Waterman's T-matrix method'', ''extended boundary condition method (EBCM)'', and ''null field method'', have been interchangeable in the literature to indicate a method based on surface integral equations to calculate the T-matrix. Unlike the previous method, the invariant imbedding method (IIM) calculates the T-matrix by the use of a volume integral equation. In addition, the standard separation of variables method (SOV) can be applied to compute the T-matrix of a sphere centered at the origin of the coordinate system and having a maximal radius such that the sphere remains inscribed within a nonspherical particle. This study explores the feasibility of a numerical combination of the IIM and the SOV, hereafter referred to as the IIMþSOV method, for computing the single-scattering properties of nonspherical dielectric particles, which are, in general, inhomogeneous. The IIMþSOV method is shown to be capable of solving light-scattering problems for large nonspherical particles where the standard EBCM fails to converge. The IIMþSOV method is flexible and applicable to inhomogeneous particles and aggregated nonspherical particles (overlapped circumscribed spheres) representing a challenge to the standard superposition T-matrix method. The IIMþSOV computational program, developed in this study, is validated against EBCM simulated spheroid and cylinder cases with excellent numerical agreement (up to four decimal places). In addition, solutions for cylinders with large aspect ratios, inhomogeneous particles, and two-particle systems are compared with results from discrete dipole approximation (DDA) computations, and comparisons with the improved geometric-optics method (IGOM) are found to be quite encouraging.

  11. Surface charge accumulation of particles containing radionuclides in open air.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-ha; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas

    2015-05-01

    Radioactivity can induce charge accumulation on radioactive particles. However, electrostatic interactions caused by radioactivity are typically neglected in transport modeling of radioactive plumes because it is assumed that ionizing radiation leads to charge neutralization. The assumption that electrostatic interactions caused by radioactivity are negligible is evaluated here by examining charge accumulation and neutralization on particles containing radionuclides in open air. A charge-balance model is employed to predict charge accumulation on radioactive particles. It is shown that particles containing short-lived radionuclides can be charged with multiple elementary charges through radioactive decay. The presence of radioactive particles can significantly modify the particle charge distribution in open air and yield an asymmetric bimodal charge distribution, suggesting that strong electrostatic particle interactions may occur during short- and long-range transport of radioactive particles. Possible effects of transported radioactive particles on electrical properties of the local atmosphere are reported. The study offers insight into transport characteristics of airborne radionuclides. Results are useful in atmospheric transport modeling of radioactive plumes.

  12. Surface charge accumulation of particles containing radionuclides in open air

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yong-ha; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas

    2015-05-01

    Radioactivity can induce charge accumulation on radioactive particles. But, electrostatic interactions caused by radioactivity are typically neglected in transport modeling of radioactive plumes because it is assumed that ionizing radiation leads to charge neutralization. The assumption that electrostatic interactions caused by radioactivity are negligible is evaluated here by examining charge accumulation and neutralization on particles containing radionuclides in open air. Moreover, a charge-balance model is employed to predict charge accumulation on radioactive particles. It is shown that particles containing short-lived radionuclides can be charged with multiple elementary charges through radioactive decay. The presence of radioactive particles can significantly modify the particle charge distribution in open air and yield an asymmetric bimodal charge distribution, suggesting that strong electrostatic particle interactions may occur during short- and long-range transport of radioactive particles. Possible effects of transported radioactive particles on electrical properties of the local atmosphere are reported. Our study offers insight into transport characteristics of airborne radionuclides. Results are useful in atmospheric transport modeling of radioactive plumes.

  13. Surface charge accumulation of particles containing radionuclides in open air

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Yong-ha; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas

    2015-05-01

    Radioactivity can induce charge accumulation on radioactive particles. But, electrostatic interactions caused by radioactivity are typically neglected in transport modeling of radioactive plumes because it is assumed that ionizing radiation leads to charge neutralization. The assumption that electrostatic interactions caused by radioactivity are negligible is evaluated here by examining charge accumulation and neutralization on particles containing radionuclides in open air. Moreover, a charge-balance model is employed to predict charge accumulation on radioactive particles. It is shown that particles containing short-lived radionuclides can be charged with multiple elementary charges through radioactive decay. The presence of radioactive particles can significantly modify themore » particle charge distribution in open air and yield an asymmetric bimodal charge distribution, suggesting that strong electrostatic particle interactions may occur during short- and long-range transport of radioactive particles. Possible effects of transported radioactive particles on electrical properties of the local atmosphere are reported. Our study offers insight into transport characteristics of airborne radionuclides. Results are useful in atmospheric transport modeling of radioactive plumes.« less

  14. Radioactivity in the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, D.J.; Edson, R.

    1995-12-01

    Natural and man-made radioactivities in the environment have been extensively researched in the second half of this century. Recently, increased attention has been given to (1) radioactive waste willfully placed in the environment by discharges from nuclear reprocessing plants or by dumping at sea, and (2) radioactive materials lost due to accidents in terrestrial (civilian power) or marine (submarine propulsion) reactors. Increasing field measurements, and disclosures of dumping and accidents in the former Soviet Union, are adding greatly to the knowledge of environmental radioactivity. New, more powerful computers are having a double impact. They make possible Geographical Information Systems for geo-referencing and correlating multi-variable datasets. Furthermore, supercomputers enable global atmospheric, oceanographic and terrestrial circulation and transport models, which include physical, chemical and biological processes. We will review exemplary work on the sources, transport, disposition and impact of anthropogenic environmental radioactivity. Such work both provides new knowledge of environmental processes and furnishes the basis for deciding on potential remediation actions.

  15. Radioactivity in food crops

    SciTech Connect

    Drury, J.S.; Baldauf, M.F.; Daniel, E.W.; Fore, C.S.; Uziel, M.S.

    1983-05-01

    Published levels of radioactivity in food crops from 21 countries and 4 island chains of Oceania are listed. The tabulation includes more than 3000 examples of 100 different crops. Data are arranged alphabetically by food crop and geographical origin. The sampling date, nuclide measured, mean radioactivity, range of radioactivities, sample basis, number of samples analyzed, and bibliographic citation are given for each entry, when available. Analyses were reported most frequently for /sup 137/Cs, /sup 40/K, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 226/Ra, /sup 228/Ra, plutonium, uranium, total alpha, and total beta, but a few authors also reported data for /sup 241/Am, /sup 7/Be, /sup 60/Co, /sup 55/Fe, /sup 3/H, /sup 131/I, /sup 54/Mn, /sup 95/Nb, /sup 210/Pb, /sup 210/Po, /sup 106/Ru, /sup 125/Sb, /sup 228/Th, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 95/Zr. Based on the reported data it appears that radioactivity from alpha emitters in food crops is usually low, on the order of 0.1 Bq.g/sup -1/ (wet weight) or less. Reported values of beta radiation in a given crop generally appear to be several orders of magnitude greater than those of alpha emitters. The most striking aspect of the data is the great range of radioactivity reported for a given nuclide in similar food crops with different geographical origins.

  16. Radioactive mixed waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Jasen, W.G.; Erpenbeck, E.G.

    1993-02-01

    Various types of waste have been generated during the 50-year history of the Hanford Site. Regulatory changes in the last 20 years have provided the emphasis for better management of these wastes. Interpretations of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (AEA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA), and the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) have led to the definition of radioactive mixed wastes (RMW). The radioactive and hazardous properties of these wastes have resulted in the initiation of special projects for the management of these wastes. Other solid wastes at the Hanford Site include low-level wastes, transuranic (TRU), and nonradioactive hazardous wastes. This paper describes a system for the treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) of solid radioactive waste.

  17. Radioactivity of Consumer Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, David; Jokisch, Derek; Fulmer, Philip

    2006-11-01

    A variety of consumer products and household items contain varying amounts of radioactivity. Examples of these items include: FiestaWare and similar glazed china, salt substitute, bananas, brazil nuts, lantern mantles, smoke detectors and depression glass. Many of these items contain natural sources of radioactivity such as Uranium, Thorium, Radium and Potassium. A few contain man-made sources like Americium. This presentation will detail the sources and relative radioactivity of these items (including demonstrations). Further, measurements of the isotopic ratios of Uranium-235 and Uranium-238 in several pieces of china will be compared to historical uses of natural and depleted Uranium. Finally, the presenters will discuss radiation safety as it pertains to the use of these items.

  18. Radioactivity in the galactic plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walraven, G. D.; Haymes, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    The paper reports the detection of a large concentration of interstellar radioactivity during balloon-altitude measurements of gamma-ray energy spectra in the band between 0.02 and 12.27 MeV from galactic and extragalactic sources. Enhanced counting rates were observed in three directions towards the plane of the Galaxy; a power-law energy spectrum is computed for one of these directions (designated B 10). A large statistical deviation from the power law in a 1.0-FWHM interval centered near 1.16 MeV is discussed, and the existence of a nuclear gamma-ray line at 1.15 MeV in B 10 is postulated. It is suggested that Ca-44, which emits gamma radiation at 1.156 MeV following the decay of radioactive Sc-44, is a likely candidate for this line, noting that Sc-44 arises from Ti-44 according to explosive models of supernova nucleosynthesis. The 1.16-MeV line flux inferred from the present data is shown to equal the predicted flux for a supernova at a distance of approximately 3 kpc and an age not exceeding about 100 years.

  19. Annual radioactive waste tank inspection program: 1995

    SciTech Connect

    McNatt, F.G. Sr.

    1996-04-01

    Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site (SRS) separations processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 1995 to evaluate these vessels and evaluations based on data accrued by inspections performed since the tanks were constructed are the subject of this report

  20. Annual radioactive waste tank inspection program - 1992

    SciTech Connect

    McNatt, F.G.

    1992-12-31

    Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site (SRS) separations processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 1992 to evaluate these vessels and evaluations based on data accrued by inspections made since the tanks were constructed are the subject of this report.

  1. ANNUAL RADIOACTIVE WASTE TANK INSPECTION PROGRAM 2008

    SciTech Connect

    West, B.; Waltz, R.

    2009-06-11

    Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site (SRS) separations and vitrification processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 2008 to evaluate these vessels and other waste handling facilities along with evaluations based on data from previous inspections are the subject of this report.

  2. Annual Radioactive Waste Tank Inspection Program - 2000

    SciTech Connect

    West, W.R.

    2001-04-17

    Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site (SRS) separations and vitrification processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 2000 to evaluate these vessels and other waste handling facilities along with evaluations based on data from previous inspections are the subject of this report.

  3. Annual Radioactive Waste Tank Inspection Program - 1998

    SciTech Connect

    McNatt, F.G.

    1999-10-27

    Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site separations processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 1998 to evaluate these vessels and auxiliary appurtenances, along with evaluations based on data accrued by inspections performed since the tanks were constructed, are the subject of this report.

  4. Radioactive Fallout From Nuclear Weapons Testing ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    2016-05-16

    Detonating nuclear weapons above ground sends radioactive materials into the atmosphere from the ground level up to very high elevations. Overtime, these materials settle out of the atmosphere and fall to the ground. Fallout typically contains hundreds of different radionuclides. Since the end of aboveground nuclear weapons testing, radionuclides have largely decayed away.

  5. Container for radioactive materials

    DOEpatents

    Fields, S.R.

    1984-05-30

    A container is claimed for housing a plurality of canister assemblies containing radioactive material. The several canister assemblies are stacked in a longitudinally spaced relation within a carrier to form a payload concentrically mounted within the container. The payload package includes a spacer for each canister assembly, said spacer comprising a base member longitudinally spacing adjacent canister assemblies from each other and sleeve surrounding the associated canister assembly for centering the same and conducting heat from the radioactive material in a desired flow path. 7 figures.

  6. Background X-ray Spectrum of Radioactive Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon Yee; Dawn E. Janney

    2008-02-01

    An energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) is commonly used with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to analyze the elemental compositions and microstructures of a variety of samples. For example, the microstructures of nuclear fuels are commonly investigated with this technique. However, the radioactivity of some materials introduces additional X-rays that contribute to the EDS background spectrum. These X-rays are generally not accounted for in spectral analysis software, and can cause misleading results. X-rays from internal conversion [1], Bremsstrahlung [2] radiation associated with alpha ionizations and beta particle interactions [3], and gamma rays from radioactive decay can all elevate the background of radioactive materials.

  7. Postprandial lipemia enhances the capacity of large HDL2 particles to mediate free cholesterol efflux via SR-BI and ABCG1 pathways in type IIB hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Julia, Zélie; Duchene, Emilie; Fournier, Natalie; Bellanger, Natacha; Chapman, M John; Le Goff, Wilfried; Guerin, Maryse

    2010-11-01

    Lipid and cholesterol metabolism in the postprandial phase is associated with both quantitative and qualitative remodeling of HDL particle subspecies that may influence their anti-atherogenic functions in the reverse cholesterol transport pathway. We evaluated the capacity of whole plasma or isolated HDL particles to mediate cellular free cholesterol (FC) efflux, cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP)-mediated cholesteryl ester (CE) transfer, and selective hepatic CE uptake during the postprandial phase in subjects displaying type IIB hyperlipidemia (n = 16). Postprandial, large HDL2 displayed an enhanced capacity to mediate FC efflux via both scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI)-dependent (+12%; P < 0.02) and ATP binding cassette transporter G1 (ABCG1)-dependent (+31%; P < 0.008) pathways in in vitro cell systems. In addition, the capacity of whole postprandial plasma (4 h and 8 h postprandially) to mediate cellular FC efflux via the ABCA1-dependent pathway was significantly increased (+19%; P < 0.0003). Concomitantly, postprandial lipemia was associated with elevated endogenous CE transfer rates from HDL2 to apoB lipoproteins and with attenuated capacity (-17%; P < 0.02) of total HDL to deliver CE to hepatic cells. Postprandial lipemia enhanced SR-BI and ABCG1-dependent efflux to large HDL2 particles. However, postprandial lipemia is equally associated with deleterious features by enhancing formation of CE-enriched, triglyceride-rich lipoprotein particles through the action of CETP and by reducing the direct return of HDL-CE to the liver.

  8. Metallic cobalt and iron particles in large and medium pore zeolites. Methods of generation and ferromagnetic resonance characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Iton, L.E.; Beal, R.B.; Hamot, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    Spectroscopic studies utilizing photoacoustic electronic spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance, and ferromagnetic resonance have been made on the formation of (1) Co metal particles from CO(NH/sub 3/)/sub 6//sup 3 +/ exchanged into Y zeolite and (2) Fe metal particles from nonframework Fe/sup 3 +/ ions in an aluminoferrisilicate analogue of ZSM-5 zeolite. Decomposition of the Co(NH/sub 3/)/sub 6//sup 3 +/ complex is accompanied by autoreduction to the Co/sup 2 +/ state, observed by EPR at 7/sup 0/K, but no Co metal is formed. The Co/sup 2 +/ ions migrate from the supercage locations of the parent complexes into the hexagonal prisms and are subsequently very difficult to reduce, even with H/sub 2/ at 823/sup 0/K. High-temperature FMR data suggest that the small amount of Co metal particles which are formed exist with the fcc crystal structure yielding g = 2.17 at 508/sup 0/K, consistent with an empirically calculated value for fcc Co. Hexagonal close packed Co particles are expected to exhibit much larger magnetic anisotropy than was observed. The Fe/sup 3 +/ ions in the medium pore pentasil aluminoferrisilicate zeolite can be reduced to the metallic state following either (a) precipitation of the inclusion compound, Fe/sup III/(Fe/sup II/(CN)/sub 5/(NO)), in the zeolite, or (b) generation of superparamagnetic oxidic ferric ion clusters. High-temperature FMR data establish that smaller Fe particles can be obtained by the latter method.

  9. Determining organic carbon distributions in soil particle size fractions as a precondition of lateral carbon transport modeling at large scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindewolf, Marcus; Seher, Wiebke; Pfeffer, Eduard; Schultze, Nico; Amorim, Ricardo S. S.; Schmidt, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    The erosional transport of organic carbon has an effect on the global carbon budget, however, it is uncertain, whether erosion is a sink or a source for carbon in the atmosphere. Continuous erosion leads to a massive loss of top soils including the loss of organic carbon historically accumulated in the soil humus fraction. The colluvial organic carbon could be protected from further degradation depending on the depth of the colluvial cover and local decomposing conditions. Another part of eroded soils and organic carbon will enter surface water bodies and might be transported over long distances. The selective nature of soil erosion results in a preferential transport of fine particles while less carbonic larger particles remain on site. Consequently organic carbon is enriched in the eroded sediment compared to the origin soil. As a precondition of process based lateral carbon flux modeling, carbon distribution on soil particle size fractions has to be known. In this regard the present study refers to the determination of organic carbon contents on soil particle size separates by a combined sieve-sedimentation method for different tropical and temperate soils Our results suggest high influences of parent material and climatic conditions on carbon distribution on soil particle separates. By applying these results in erosion modeling a test slope was simulated with the EROSION 2D simulation software covering certain land use and soil management scenarios referring to different rainfall events. These simulations allow first insights on carbon loss and depletion on sediment delivery areas as well as carbon gains and enrichments on deposition areas on the landscape scale and could be used as a step forward in landscape scaled carbon redistribution modeling.

  10. The properties of large particles in the zodiacal cloud and in the interstellar medium, and their relation to recent IRAS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, F.; Wickramasinghe, N. C.

    1984-12-01

    To explain the scattering of sunlight observed from the F-corona and from the zodiac, the scattering particles must have radii of order 15 microns, and must have an imaginary component of the refractive index that requires the presence of from 5 to 10 percent of free carbon. The particles, therefore, have a composition very like the material of C 1-carbonaceous chondrites and like extraterrestrial particles which have been recovered from the high atmosphere. Such particles absorb sunlight, the absorbed solar energy being reradiated in the infrared with a close approximation to black-body emission, even a far into the infrared as 100 microns, a deduction in good agreement with observations by Hauser et al., (1984) from the IRAS satellite. The IRAS observations at high-ecliptic latitudes require similar particles to be present in large quantity in the interstellar medium, about 10 to the 6th solar masses or more of them. The presence of such a quantity of material with properties very like the material of the C 1-carbonaceous chondrites is a remarkable outcome of the IRAS observations and is likely to have profound implications in many directions.

  11. Wide range radioactive gas concentration detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.

    1984-01-01

    A wide range radioactive gas concentration detector and monitor which is capable of measuring radioactive gas concentrations over a range of eight orders of magnitude. The device of the present invention is designed to have an ionization chamber which is sufficiently small to give a fast response time for measuring radioactive gases but sufficiently large to provide accurate readings at low concentration levels. Closely spaced parallel plate grids provide a uniform electric field in the active region to improve the accuracy of measurements and reduce ion migration time so as to virtually eliminate errors due to ion recombination. The parallel plate grids are fabricated with a minimal surface area to reduce the effects of contamination resulting from absorption of contaminating materials on the surface of the grids. Additionally, the ionization chamber wall is spaced a sufficient distance from the active region of the ionization chamber to minimize contamination effects.

  12. Radioactive Decay - An Analog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGeachy, Frank

    1988-01-01

    Presents an analog of radioactive decay that allows the student to grasp the concept of half life and the exponential nature of the decay process. The analog is devised to use small, colored, plastic poker chips or counters. Provides the typical data and a graph which supports the analog. (YP)

  13. Detecting Illicit Radioactive Sources

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Joseph C.; Coursey, Bert; Carter, Michael

    2004-11-01

    Specialized instruments have been developed to detect the presence of illicit radioactive sources that may be used by terrorists in radiation dispersal devices, so-called ''dirty bombs'' or improvised nuclear devices. This article discusses developments in devices to detect and measure radiation.

  14. TABLE OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS.

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN,N.E.

    2001-06-29

    For those chemical elements which have no stable nuclides with a terrestrial isotopic composition, the data on radioactive half-lives and relative atomic masses for the nuclides of interest and importance have been evaluated and the recommended values and uncertainties are listed.

  15. AIR RADIOACTIVITY MONITOR

    DOEpatents

    Bradshaw, R.L.; Thomas, J.W.

    1961-04-11

    The monitor is designed to minimize undesirable background buildup. It consists of an elongated column containing peripheral electrodes in a central portion of the column, and conduits directing an axial flow of radioactively contaminated air through the center of the column and pure air through the annular portion of the column about the electrodes. (AEC)

  16. Radioactivity: A Natural Phenomenon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronneau, C.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is misinformation people have on the subject of radiation. The importance of comparing artificial source levels of radiation to natural levels is emphasized. Measurements of radioactivity, its consequences, and comparisons between the risks induced by radiation in the environment and from artificial sources are included. (KR)

  17. Viewer Makes Radioactivity "Visible"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yin, L. I.

    1983-01-01

    Battery operated viewer demonstrates feasibility of generating threedimensional visible light simulations of objects that emit X-ray or gamma rays. Ray paths are traced for two pinhold positions to show location of reconstructed image. Images formed by pinholes are converted to intensified visible-light images. Applications range from radioactivity contamination surveys to monitoring radioisotope absorption in tumors.

  18. Radioactivity and foods

    SciTech Connect

    Olszyna-Marzys, A.E. )

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe and contrast two relationships between radiation and food--on the one hand, beneficial preservation of food by controlled exposure to ionizing radiation; and, on the other, contamination of food by accidental incorporation of radioactive nuclides within the food itself. In food irradiation, electrons or electromagnetic radiation is used to destroy microorganisms and insects or prevent seed germination. The economic advantages and health benefits of sterilizing food in this manner are clear, and numerous studies have confirmed that under strictly controlled conditions no undersirable changes or induced radioactivity is produced in the irradiated food. An altogether different situation is presented by exposure of food animals and farming areas to radioactive materials, as occurred after the major Soviet nuclear reactor accident at Chenobyl. This article furnishes the basic information needed to understand the nature of food contamination associated with that event and describes the work of international organizations seeking to establish appropriate safe limits for levels of radioactivity in foods.

  19. Laser decontamination of the radioactive lightning rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potiens, A. J.; Dellamano, J. C.; Vicente, R.; Raele, M. P.; Wetter, N. U.; Landulfo, E.

    2014-02-01

    Between 1970 and 1980 Brazil experienced a significant market for radioactive lightning rods (RLR). The device consists of an air terminal with one or more sources of americium-241 attached to it. The sources were used to ionize the air around them and to increase the attraction of atmospheric discharges. Because of their ineffectiveness, the nuclear regulatory authority in Brazil suspended the license for manufacturing, commerce and installation of RLR in 1989, and determined that the replaced RLR were to be collected to a centralized radioactive waste management facility for treatment. The first step for RLR treatment is to remove the radioactive sources. Though they can be easily removed, some contaminations are found all over the remaining metal scrap that must decontaminated for release, otherwise it must be treated as radioactive waste. Decontamination using various chemicals has proven to be inefficient and generates large amounts of secondary wastes. This work shows the preliminary results of the decontamination of 241Am-contaminated metal scrap generated in the treatment of radioactive lightning rods applying laser ablation. A Nd:YAG nanoseconds laser was used with 300 mJ energy leaving only a small amount of secondary waste to be treated.

  20. Environmental Radioactivity, Temperature, and Precipitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riland, Carson A.

    1996-01-01

    Reports that environmental radioactivity levels vary with temperature and precipitation and these effects are due to radon. Discusses the measurement of this environmental radioactivity and the theory behind it. (JRH)

  1. Robust technique using an imaging plate to detect environmental radioactivity.

    PubMed

    Isobe, Tomonori; Mori, Yutaro; Takada, Kenta; Sato, Eisuke; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Sakae, Takeji

    2013-04-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant was severely damaged by the Great East Japan Earthquake on 11 March 2011. Consequently, a large amount of radioactive material was accidentally released. Recently, the focus has been on quantification of environmental radioactive material. However, conventional techniques require complicated and expensive measurement equipment. In this research, the authors developed a simple method to detect environmental radioactive material with an imaging plate (IP). Two specific measurement subjects were targeted: measurements for the depth distribution of radioactive material in soil and surface contamination of a building roof. For the measurement of depth distribution of radioactive material in soil, the authors ascertained that the concentration of environmental radioactivity was highest at 5 cm below the surface, and it decreased with depth. For the measurement of surface contamination of the building roof, the authors created a contamination map of the building roof. The detector developed could contact the ground directly, and unlike other survey meters, it was not influenced by peripheral radioactivity. In this study, the authors verified the feasibility of measurement of environmental radioactivity with an IP. Although the measured values of the IP were relative, further work is planned to perform evaluations of absolute quantities of radioactive material.

  2. Particle multiplicities in lead-lead collisions at the CERN large hadron collider from nonlinear evolution with running coupling corrections.

    PubMed

    Albacete, Javier L

    2007-12-31

    We present predictions for the pseudorapidity density of charged particles produced in central Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC. Particle production in such collisions is calculated in the framework of k(t) factorization. The nuclear unintegrated gluon distributions at LHC energies are determined from numerical solutions of the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation including recently calculated running coupling corrections. The initial conditions for the evolution are fixed by fitting Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider data at collision energies square root[sNN]=130 and 200 GeV per nucleon. We obtain dNch(Pb-Pb)/deta(square root[sNN]=5.5 TeV)/eta=0 approximately 1290-1480.

  3. Method for calcining radioactive wastes

    DOEpatents

    Bjorklund, William J.; McElroy, Jack L.; Mendel, John E.

    1979-01-01

    This invention relates to a method for the preparation of radioactive wastes in a low leachability form by calcining the radioactive waste on a fluidized bed of glass frit, removing the calcined waste to melter to form a homogeneous melt of the glass and the calcined waste, and then solidifying the melt to encapsulate the radioactive calcine in a glass matrix.

  4. The Discovery of Artificial Radioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Francesco; Leone, Matteo; Robotti, Nadia

    2012-03-01

    We reconstruct Frédéric Joliot and Irène Curie's discovery of artificial radioactivity in January 1934 based in part on documents preserved in the Joliot-Curie Archives in Paris, France. We argue that their discovery followed from the convergence of two parallel lines of research, on the neutron and on the positron, that were focused on a well-defined experimental problem, the nuclear transmutation of aluminum and other light elements. We suggest that a key role was played by a suggestion that Francis Perrin made at the seventh Solvay Conference at the end of October 1933, that the alpha-particle bombardment of aluminum produces an intermediate unstable isotope of phosphorus, which then decays by positron emission. We also suggest that a further idea that Perrin published in December 1933, and the pioneering theory of beta decay that Enrico Fermi also first published in December 1933, established a new theoretical framework that stimulated Joliot to resume the researches that he and Curie had interrupted after the Solvay Conference, now for the first time using a Geiger-Müller counter to detect the positrons emitted when he bombarded aluminum with polonium alpha particles.

  5. Analysis of Alfvén eigenmode destabilization by energetic particles in Large Helical Device using a Landau-closure model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela, J.; Spong, D. A.; Garcia, L.

    2017-04-01

    Energetic particle populations in nuclear fusion experiments can destabilize the Alfvén Eigenmodes through inverse Landau damping and couplings with gap modes in the shear Alfvén continua. We use the reduced MHD equations to describe the linear evolution of the poloidal flux and the toroidal component of the vorticity in a full 3D system, coupled with equations of density and parallel velocity moments for the energetic particles. We add the Landau damping and resonant destabilization effects using a closure relation. We apply the model to study the Alfvén mode stability in the inward-shifted configurations of the Large Helical Device (LHD), performing a parametric analysis of the energetic particle β ({βf} ) in a range of realistic values, the ratios of the energetic particle thermal/Alfvén velocities ({{V}\\text{th}}/{{V}A0} ), the magnetic Lundquist numbers (S) and the toroidal modes (n). The n  =  1 and n  =  2 TAEs are destabilized, although the n  =  3 and n  =  4 TAEs are weakly perturbed. The most unstable configurations are associated with the density gradients of energetic particles in the plasma core: the TAEs are destabilized, even for small energetic particle populations, if their thermal velocity is lower than 0.4 times the Alfvén velocity. The frequency range of MHD bursts measured in the LHD are 50–70 kHz for the n  =  1 and 60–80 kHz for the n  =  2 TAE, which is consistent with the model predictions. ).

  6. Incorporation of photosenzitizer hypericin into synthetic lipid-based nano-particles for drug delivery and large unilamellar vesicles with different content of cholesterol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joniova, Jaroslava; Blascakova, Ludmila; Jancura, Daniel; Nadova, Zuzana; Sureau, Franck; Miskovsky, Pavol

    2014-08-01

    Low-density lipoproteins (LDL) and high-density lipoproteins (HDL) are attractive natural occurring vehicles for drug delivery and targeting to cancer tissues. The capacity of both types of the lipoproteins to bind hydrophobic drugs and their functionality as drug carriers have been examined in several studies and it has been also shown that mixing of anticancer drugs with LDL or HDL before administration led to an increase of cytotoxic effects of the drugs in the comparison when the drugs were administered alone. However, a difficult isolation of the lipoproteins in large quantity from a biological organism as well as a variability of the composition and size of these molecules makes practical application of LDL and HDL as drug delivery systems quite complicated. Synthetic LDL and HDL and large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) are potentially suitable candidates to substitute the native lipoproteins for targeted and effective drug delivery. In this work, we have studied process of an association of potent photosensitizer hypericin (Hyp) with synthetic lipid-based nano-particles (sLNP) and large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) containing various amount of cholesterol. Cholesterol is one of the main components of both LDL and HDL particles and its presence in biological membranes is known to be a determining factor for membrane properties. It was found that the behavior of Hyp incorporation into sLNP particles with diameter ca ~ 90 nm is qualitatively very similar to that of Hyp incorporation into LDL (diameter ca. 22 nm) and these particles are able to enter U-87 MG cells by endocytosis. The presence of cholesterol in LUV influences the capacity of these vesicles to incorporate Hyp into their structure.

  7. International radioactive material recycling challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Greeves, John T.; Lieberman, James

    2007-07-01

    The paper explores current examples of successful International radioactive recycling programs and also explores operational regulatory and political challenges that need to be considered for expanding international recycling world-wide. Most countries regulations are fully consistent with the International Atomic Agency (IAEA) Code of Practice on the International Transboundary Movement of Radioactive Material and the IAEA Code of Conduct on the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources. IAEA member States reported on the status of their efforts to control transboundary movement of radioactive material recently during the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management meeting in May 2006. (authors)

  8. Towards the optimization of a gyrokinetic Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code on large-scale hybrid architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohana, N.; Jocksch, A.; Lanti, E.; Tran, T. M.; Brunner, S.; Gheller, C.; Hariri, F.; Villard, L.

    2016-11-01

    With the aim of enabling state-of-the-art gyrokinetic PIC codes to benefit from the performance of recent multithreaded devices, we developed an application from a platform called the “PIC-engine” [1, 2, 3] embedding simplified basic features of the PIC method. The application solves the gyrokinetic equations in a sheared plasma slab using B-spline finite elements up to fourth order to represent the self-consistent electrostatic field. Preliminary studies of the so-called Particle-In-Fourier (PIF) approach, which uses Fourier modes as basis functions in the periodic dimensions of the system instead of the real-space grid, show that this method can be faster than PIC for simulations with a small number of Fourier modes. Similarly to the PIC-engine, multiple levels of parallelism have been implemented using MPI+OpenMP [2] and MPI+OpenACC [1], the latter exploiting the computational power of GPUs without requiring complete code rewriting. It is shown that sorting particles [3] can lead to performance improvement by increasing data locality and vectorizing grid memory access. Weak scalability tests have been successfully run on the GPU-equipped Cray XC30 Piz Daint (at CSCS) up to 4,096 nodes. The reduced time-to-solution will enable more realistic and thus more computationally intensive simulations of turbulent transport in magnetic fusion devices.

  9. PROCESSING OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, B.M. Jr.; Barton, G.B.

    1961-11-14

    A process for treating radioactive waste solutions prior to disposal is described. A water-soluble phosphate, borate, and/or silicate is added. The solution is sprayed with steam into a space heated from 325 to 400 deg C whereby a powder is formed. The powder is melted and calcined at from 800 to 1000 deg C. Water vapor and gaseous products are separated from the glass formed. (AEC)

  10. Table of radioactive elements

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N.E.

    1985-01-01

    As has been the custom in the past, the Commission publishes a table of relative atomic masses and halflives of selected radionuclides. The information contained in this table will enable the user to calculate the atomic weight for radioactive materials with a variety of isotopic compositions. The atomic masses have been taken from the 1984 Atomic Mass Table. Some of the halflives have already been documented.

  11. MARE: Mars Radioactivity Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Lellis, A. M.; Capria, M. T.; Espinasse, S.; Magni, G.; Orosei, R.; Piccioni, G.; Federico, C.; Minelli, G.; Pauselli, C.; Scarpa, G.

    1999-09-01

    MARE is an experiment for the measurement of the beta and gamma radioactivity in space and in the Martian soil, both at the surface and in the subsurface. This will be accomplished by means of a dosimeter and a spectrometer. The radiation dose rate to which crews will be exposed is one of the hazards that has to be quantified before the human exploration of Mars may begin. Data for evaluating radioactivity levels at Martian surface are of great interest for environmental studies related to life in general. The dosimeter will be able to measure the beta and gamma radiation dose received, with a responsivity which is very close to that of a living organism. The dosimeter is based on thermo-luminescence pills which emit an optical signal proportional to the absorbed dose when heated. Radioactive elements ((40) K, (235) U, (238) U and (232) Th) can be used as a mean of tracing the evolution of a terrestrial planet. These radioactive elements are the source of the internal heat, which drives convection in the mantle. They have been redistributed in this process and they are now concentrated in the crust where they are accessible for study. Their different behavior during the fractionation process can be used as a mean to investigate the geochemical characteristic of Mars. The spectrometer, a scintillation radiation absorber system for single event counting, is capable of detecting gamma photons with energies between 200 KeV and 10 MeV. The detected events will be processed in such a way to allow the recognition of the spectral signature of different decay processes, and thus the identification and the measurement of the concentrations of different radionuclides in the Martian soil.

  12. Method of handling radioactive alkali metal waste

    DOEpatents

    Wolson, R.D.; McPheeters, C.C.

    Radioactive alkali metal is mixed with particulate silica in a rotary drum reactor in which the alkali metal is converted to the monoxide during rotation of the reactor to produce particulate silica coated with the alkali metal monoxide suitable as a feed material to make a glass for storing radioactive material. Silica particles, the majority of which pass through a 95 mesh screen or preferably through a 200 mesh screen, are employed in this process, and the preferred weight ratio of silica to alkali metal is 7 to 1 in order to produce a feed material for the final glass product having a silica to alkali metal monoxide ratio of about 5 to 1.

  13. Method of handling radioactive alkali metal waste

    DOEpatents

    Wolson, Raymond D.; McPheeters, Charles C.

    1980-01-01

    Radioactive alkali metal is mixed with particulate silica in a rotary drum reactor in which the alkali metal is converted to the monoxide during rotation of the reactor to produce particulate silica coated with the alkali metal monoxide suitable as a feed material to make a glass for storing radioactive material. Silica particles, the majority of which pass through a 95 mesh screen or preferably through a 200 mesh screen, are employed in this process, and the preferred weight ratio of silica to alkali metal is 7 to 1 in order to produce a feed material for the final glass product having a silica to alkali metal monoxide ratio of about 5 to 1.

  14. Radioactive waste storage issues

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, Daniel E.

    1994-08-15

    In the United States we generate greater than 500 million tons of toxic waste per year which pose a threat to human health and the environment. Some of the most toxic of these wastes are those that are radioactively contaminated. This thesis explores the need for permanent disposal facilities to isolate radioactive waste materials that are being stored temporarily, and therefore potentially unsafely, at generating facilities. Because of current controversies involving the interstate transfer of toxic waste, more states are restricting the flow of wastes into - their borders with the resultant outcome of requiring the management (storage and disposal) of wastes generated solely within a state`s boundary to remain there. The purpose of this project is to study nuclear waste storage issues and public perceptions of this important matter. Temporary storage at generating facilities is a cause for safety concerns and underscores, the need for the opening of permanent disposal sites. Political controversies and public concern are forcing states to look within their own borders to find solutions to this difficult problem. Permanent disposal or retrievable storage for radioactive waste may become a necessity in the near future in Colorado. Suitable areas that could support - a nuclear storage/disposal site need to be explored to make certain the health, safety and environment of our citizens now, and that of future generations, will be protected.

  15. Radioactive deposits of Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovering, T.G.

    1954-01-01

    Thirty-five occurrences of radioactive rocks had been reported from Nevada prior to 1952. Twenty-five of these had been investigated by personnel of the U. S. Geological Surveyor of the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission. Of those investigated, uranium minerals were identified at 13 sites; two sites contained a thorium mineral (monazite); the source of radioactivity on nine properties was not ascertained, and one showed no abnormal radioactivity. Of the other reported occurrences, one is said to contain uraniferous hydrocarbons and nine are placers containing thorian monazite. Pitchblende occurs at two localities, the East Walker River area, and the Stalin's Present prospect, where it is sparsely disseminated in tabular bodies cutting granitic rocks. Other uranium minerals found in the state include: carnotite, tyuyamunite, autunite, torbernite, gummite, uranophane, kasolite, and an unidentified mineral which may be dumontite. Monazite is the only thorium mineral of possible economic importance that has been reported. From an economic standpoint, only four of the properties examined showed reserves of uranium ore in 1952; these are: the Green Monster mine, which shipped 5 tons of ore to Marysvale, Utah, during 1951; the Majuba Hill mine; the Stalin's Present prospect; and the West Willys claim in the Washington district. No estimate has been made of thorium reserves and no commercial deposits of thorium are known.

  16. Radioactive deposits of Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovering, T.G.

    1953-01-01

    Thirty-five occurrences of radioactive rocks had been reported from Nevada prior to 1952. Twenty-five of these had been investigated by the U. S. Geological Survey and the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission. Of those investigated, uranium minerals were identified in 13; two contained a thorium mineral (monazite); the source of radioactivity on 7 properties was not ascertained; and one showed no abnormal radioactivity. Of the other reported occurrences, one is said to contain uraniferous hydrocarbons and 9 are placers containing thorian monazite. Pitchblende occurs at two localities; the East Walker River area, and the Stalin's Present prospect, where it is sparsely disseminated in tabular bodies cutting granitic rocks. Other uranium minerals found in the state include: carnotite, tyuyamunite, autunite, torbernite, gummite, uranophane, kasolite, and an unidentified mineral which may be dumontit. Monazite is the only thorium mineral of possible economic importance that has been reported. From an economic standpoint 9 only 4 of the properties examined showed reserves of uranium ore in 1952; these are: the Green Monster mine, which shipped 5 tons of ore to Marysvale, Utah, during 1951, the Majuba Hill mine, the Stalin's Present prospect, and the West Willys claim in the Washington district. Reserves of ore grade are small on all of these properties and probably cannot be developed commercially unless an ore-buying station is set up nearby. No estimate has been made of thorium reserves and no commercial deposits of thorium are known.

  17. System for measuring radioactivity of labelled biopolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, V.

    1980-07-08

    A system is described for measuring radioactivity of labelled biopolymers, comprising: a set of containers adapted for receiving aqueous solutions of biological samples containing biopolymers which are subsequently precipitated in said containers on particles of diatomite in the presence of a coprecipitator, then filtered, dissolved, and mixed with a scintillator; radioactivity measuring means including a detection chamber to which is fed the mixture produced in said set of containers; an electric drive for moving said set of containers in a stepwise manner; means for proportional feeding of said coprecipitator and a suspension of diatomite in an acid solution to said containers which contain the biological sample for forming an acid precipitation of biopolymers; means for the removal of precipitated samples from said containers; precipitated biopolymer filtering means for successively filtering the precipitate, suspending the precipitate, dissolving the biopolymers mixed with said scintillator for feeding of the mixture to said detection chamber; a system of pipelines interconnecting said above-recited means; and said means for measuring radioactivity of labelled biopolymers including, a measuring cell arranged in a detection chamber and communicating with said means for filtering precipitated biopolymers through one pipeline of said system of pipelines; a program unit electrically connected to said electric drive, said means for acid precipatation of biopolymers, said means for the removal of precipitated samples from said containers, said filtering means, and said radioactivity measuring device; said program unit adapted to periodically switch on and off the above-recited means and check the sequence of the radioactivity measuring operations; and a control unit for controlling the initiation of the system and for selecting programs.

  18. Microfabricated particle focusing device

    DOEpatents

    Ravula, Surendra K.; Arrington, Christian L.; Sigman, Jennifer K.; Branch, Darren W.; Brener, Igal; Clem, Paul G.; James, Conrad D.; Hill, Martyn; Boltryk, Rosemary June

    2013-04-23

    A microfabricated particle focusing device comprises an acoustic portion to preconcentrate particles over large spatial dimensions into particle streams and a dielectrophoretic portion for finer particle focusing into single-file columns. The device can be used for high throughput assays for which it is necessary to isolate and investigate small bundles of particles and single particles.

  19. The development of radioactive sample surrogates for training and exercises

    SciTech Connect

    Martha Finck; Bevin Brush; Dick Jansen; David Chamberlain; Don Dry; George Brooks; Margaret Goldberg

    2012-03-01

    The development of radioactive sample surrogates for training and exercises Source term information is required for to reconstruct a device used in a dispersed radiological dispersal device. Simulating a radioactive environment to train and exercise sampling and sample characterization methods with suitable sample materials is a continued challenge. The Idaho National Laboratory has developed and permitted a Radioactive Response Training Range (RRTR), an 800 acre test range that is approved for open air dispersal of activated KBr, for training first responders in the entry and exit from radioactively contaminated areas, and testing protocols for environmental sampling and field characterization. Members from the Department of Defense, Law Enforcement, and the Department of Energy participated in the first contamination exercise that was conducted at the RRTR in the July 2011. The range was contaminated using a short lived radioactive Br-82 isotope (activated KBr). Soil samples contaminated with KBr (dispersed as a solution) and glass particles containing activated potassium bromide that emulated dispersed radioactive materials (such as ceramic-based sealed source materials) were collected to assess environmental sampling and characterization techniques. This presentation summarizes the performance of a radioactive materials surrogate for use as a training aide for nuclear forensics.

  20. Modelling the role of marine particle on large scale 231Pa, 230Th, Iron and Aluminium distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutay, J.-C.; Tagliabue, A.; Kriest, I.; van Hulten, M. M. P.

    2015-04-01

    The distribution of trace elements in the ocean is governed by the combined effects of various processes, and by exchanges with external sources. Modelling these represents an opportunity to better understand and quantify the mechanisms that regulate the oceanic tracer cycles. Observations collected during the GEOTRACES program provide an opportunity to improve our knowledge regarding processes that should be considered in biogeochemical models to adequately represent the distributions of trace elements in the ocean. Here we present a synthesis about the state of the art for simulating selected trace elements in biogeochemical models: Protactinium, Thorium, Iron and Aluminium. In this contribution we pay particular attention on the role of particles in the cycling of these tracers and how they may provide additional constraints on the transfer of matter in the ocean.

  1. ASSESSMENT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON-RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINANTS FOUND IN LOW LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE STREAMS

    SciTech Connect

    R.H. Little, P.R. Maul, J.S.S. Penfoldag

    2003-02-27

    This paper describes and presents the findings from two studies undertaken for the European Commission to assess the long-term impact upon the environment and human health of non-radioactive contaminants found in various low level radioactive waste streams. The initial study investigated the application of safety assessment approaches developed for radioactive contaminants to the assessment of nonradioactive contaminants in low level radioactive waste. It demonstrated how disposal limits could be derived for a range of non-radioactive contaminants and generic disposal facilities. The follow-up study used the same approach but undertook more detailed, disposal system specific calculations, assessing the impacts of both the non-radioactive and radioactive contaminants. The calculations undertaken indicated that it is prudent to consider non-radioactive, as well as radioactive contaminants, when assessing the impacts of low level radioactive waste disposal. For some waste streams with relatively low concentrations of radionuclides, the potential post-closure disposal impacts from non-radioactive contaminants can be comparable with the potential radiological impacts. For such waste streams there is therefore an added incentive to explore options for recycling the materials involved wherever possible.

  2. A Parallel Distributed-Memory Particle Method Enables Acquisition-Rate Segmentation of Large Fluorescence Microscopy Images

    PubMed Central

    Afshar, Yaser; Sbalzarini, Ivo F.

    2016-01-01

    Modern fluorescence microscopy modalities, such as light-sheet microscopy, are capable of acquiring large three-dimensional images at high data rate. This creates a bottleneck in computational processing and analysis of the acquired images, as the rate of acquisition outpaces the speed of processing. Moreover, images can be so large that they do not fit the main memory of a single computer. We address both issues by developing a distributed parallel algorithm for segmentation of large fluorescence microscopy images. The method is based on the versatile Discrete Region Competition algorithm, which has previously proven useful in microscopy image segmentation. The present distributed implementation decomposes the input image into smaller sub-images that are distributed across multiple computers. Using network communication, the computers orchestrate the collectively solving of the global segmentation problem. This not only enables segmentation of large images (we test images of up to 1010 pixels), but also accelerates segmentation to match the time scale of image acquisition. Such acquisition-rate image segmentation is a prerequisite for the smart microscopes of the future and enables online data compression and interactive experiments. PMID:27046144

  3. Room air monitor for radioactive aerosols

    DOEpatents

    Balmer, David K.; Tyree, William H.

    1989-04-11

    A housing assembly for use with a room air monitor for simultaneous collection and counting of suspended particles includes a casing containing a combination detector-preamplifier system at one end, a filter system at the other end, and an air flow system consisting of an air inlet formed in the casing between the detector-preamplifier system and the filter system and an air passageway extending from the air inlet through the casing and out the end opposite the detector-preamplifier combination. The filter system collects suspended particles transported directly through the housing by means of the air flow system, and these particles are detected and examined for radioactivity by the detector-pre The U.S. Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC04-76DP03533 between the Department of Energy and Rockwell International Corporation.

  4. Room air monitor for radioactive aerosols

    DOEpatents

    Balmer, D.K.; Tyree, W.H.

    1987-03-23

    A housing assembly for use with a room air monitor for simultaneous collection and counting of suspended particles includes a casing containing a combination detector-preamplifier system at one end, a filter system at the other end, and an air flow system consisting of an air inlet formed in the casing between the detector-preamplifier system and the filter system and an air passageway extending from the air inlet through the casing and out the end opposite the detector-preamplifier combination. The filter system collects suspended particles transported directly through the housing by means of the air flow system, and these particles are detected and examined for radioactivity by the detector-preamplifier combination. 2 figs.

  5. E-Alerts: Nuclear science and technology (radioactive wastes and radioactivity). E-mail newsletter

    SciTech Connect

    1999-05-01

    The newsletter discusses the following: Separation, processing, handling, storage, disposal, and reuse of radioactive wastes; Radioactive fallout; Fission products; Man-made or natural radioactivity; and Decommissioning.

  6. Uncovering Nature’s 100 TeV Particle Accelerators in the Large-Scale Jets of Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georganopoulos, Markos; Meyer, Eileen; Sparks, William B.; Perlman, Eric S.; Van Der Marel, Roeland P.; Anderson, Jay; Sohn, S. Tony; Biretta, John A.; Norman, Colin Arthur; Chiaberge, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Since the first jet X-ray detections sixteen years ago the adopted paradigm for the X-ray emission has been the IC/CMB model that requires highly relativistic (Lorentz factors of 10-20), extremely powerful (sometimes super-Eddington) kpc scale jets. R I will discuss recently obtained strong evidence, from two different avenues, IR to optical polarimetry for PKS 1136-135 and gamma-ray observations for 3C 273 and PKS 0637-752, ruling out the EC/CMB model. Our work constrains the jet Lorentz factors to less than ~few, and leaves as the only reasonable alternative synchrotron emission from ~100 TeV jet electrons, accelerated hundreds of kpc away from the central engine. This refutes over a decade of work on the jet X-ray emission mechanism and overall energetics and, if confirmed in more sources, it will constitute a paradigm shift in our understanding of powerful large scale jets and their role in the universe. Two important findings emerging from our work will also discussed be: (i) the solid angle-integrated luminosity of the large scale jet is comparable to that of the jet core, contrary to the current belief that the core is the dominant jet radiative outlet and (ii) the large scale jets are the main source of TeV photon in the universe, something potentially important, as TeV photons have been suggested to heat up the intergalactic medium and reduce the number of dwarf galaxies formed.

  7. ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT): Straw tubes for tracking and particle identification at the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mindur, Bartosz

    2017-02-01

    The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three inner detector tracking subsystems and consists of ∼300,000 thin-walled drift tubes (;straw tubes;) that are 4 mm in diameter. The TRT system provides ∼ 30 space points with ∼130 micron resolution for charged tracks with | η | < 2 and pT > 0.5 GeV / c . The TRT also provides electron identification capability by detecting transition radiation (TR) X-ray photons in an Xe-based working gas mixture. Compared to Run 1, the LHC beams now provide a higher centre of mass energy (13 TeV), more bunches with a reduced spacing (25 ns), and more particles in each bunch leading to very challenging, higher occupancies in the TRT. Significant modifications of the TRT detector have been made for LHC Run 2 mainly to improve response to the expected much higher rate of hits and to mitigate leaks of the Xe-based active gas mixture. The higher rates required changes to the data acquisition system and introduction of validity gate to reject out-of-time hits. Many gas leaks were repaired and the gas system was modified to use a cheaper Ar-based gas mixture in some channels. A likelihood method was introduced to optimise the TRT electron identification.

  8. Synthetic biology design to display an 18 kDa rotavirus large antigen on a modular virus-like particle.

    PubMed

    Lua, Linda H L; Fan, Yuanyuan; Chang, Cindy; Connors, Natalie K; Middelberg, Anton P J

    2015-11-04

    Virus-like particles are an established class of commercial vaccine possessing excellent function and proven stability. Exciting developments made possible by modern tools of synthetic biology has stimulated emergence of modular VLPs, whereby parts of one pathogen are by design integrated into a less harmful VLP which has preferential physical and manufacturing character. This strategy allows the immunologically protective parts of a pathogen to be displayed on the most-suitable VLP. However, the field of modular VLP design is immature, and robust design principles are yet to emerge, particularly for larger antigenic structures. Here we use a combination of molecular dynamic simulation and experiment to reveal two key design principles for VLPs. First, the linkers connecting the integrated antigenic module with the VLP-forming protein must be well designed to ensure structural separation and independence. Second, the number of antigenic domains on the VLP surface must be sufficiently below the maximum such that a "steric barrier" to VLP formation cannot exist. This second principle leads to designs whereby co-expression of modular protein with unmodified VLP-forming protein can titrate down the amount of antigen on the surface of the VLP, to the point where assembly can proceed. In this work we elucidate these principles by displaying the 18.1 kDa VP8* domain from rotavirus on the murine polyomavirus VLP, and show functional presentation of the antigenic structure.

  9. Bonded carbon or ceramic fiber composite filter vent for radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Brassell, Gilbert W.; Brugger, Ronald P.

    1985-02-19

    Carbon bonded carbon fiber composites as well as ceramic or carbon bonded ceramic fiber composites are very useful as filters which can separate particulate matter from gas streams entraining the same. These filters have particular application to the filtering of radioactive particles, e.g., they can act as vents for containers of radioactive waste material.

  10. Study of proton radioactivities

    SciTech Connect

    Davids, C.N.; Back, B.B.; Henderson, D.J.

    1995-08-01

    About a dozen nuclei are currently known to accomplish their radioactive decay by emitting a proton. These nuclei are situated far from the valley of stability, and mark the very limits of existence for proton-rich nuclei: the proton drip line. A new 39-ms proton radioactivity was observed following the bombardment of a {sup 96}Ru target by a beam of 420-MeV {sup 78}Kr. Using the double-sided Si strip detector implantation system at the FMA, a proton group having an energy of 1.05 MeV was observed, correlated with the implantation of ions having mass 167. The subsequent daughter decay was identified as {sup 166}Os by its characteristic alpha decay, and therefore the proton emitter is assigned to the {sup 167}Ir nucleus. Further analysis showed that a second weak proton group from the same nucleus is present, indicating an isomeric state. Two other proton emitters were discovered recently at the FMA: {sup 171}Au and {sup 185}Bi, which is the heaviest known proton radioactivity. The measured decay energies and half-lives will enable the angular momentum of the emitted protons to be determined, thus providing spectroscopic information on nuclei that are beyond the proton drip line. In addition, the decay energy yields the mass of the nucleus, providing a sensitive test of mass models in this extremely proton-rich region of the chart of the nuclides. Additional searches for proton emitters will be conducted in the future, in order to extend our knowledge of the location of the proton drip line.

  11. Radioactive and magnetic investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heye, D.; Beiersdorf, H.

    1979-01-01

    Age and growth pattern determination of manganese nodules were explored. Two methods are discussed: (1) measurement of the presence of radioactive iodine isotopes; which is effective only up to 3.105 years, and (2) measurements of magnetism. The growth rates of three nodules were determined. The surface of the nodule was recent, and the overall age of the nodule could be determined with accuracy of better than 30%. Measurement of paleomagnetic effect was attempted to determine wider age ranges, however, the measured sign changes could not be interpreted as paleomagnetic reversals.

  12. Material for radioactive protection

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, R.S.; Boyer, N.W.

    A boron containing burn resistant, low-level radiation protection material useful, for example, as a liner for radioactive waste disposal and storage, a component for neutron absorber, and a shield for a neutron source is described. The material is basically composed of borax in the range of 25 to 50%, coal tar in the range of 25 to 37.5%, with the remainder being an epoxy resin mix. A preferred composition is 50% borax, 25% coal tar and 25% epoxy resin. The material is not susceptible to burning and is about 1/5 the cost of existing radiation protection material utilized in similar applications.

  13. Radioactive waste material disposal

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, Charles W.; Beahm, Edward C.; Parker, George W.

    1995-01-01

    The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide.

  14. Radioactive waste material disposal

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

    1995-10-24

    The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide. 3 figs.

  15. Rapid identification of high particle number emitting on-road vehicles and its application to a large fleet of diesel buses.

    PubMed

    Jayaratne, E R; Morawska, L; Ristovski, Z D; He, C

    2007-07-15

    Pollutant concentrations measured in the exhaust plume of a vehicle may be related to the pollutant emission factor using the CO2 concentration as a measure of the dilution factor. We have used this method for the rapid identification of high particle number (PN) emitting on-road vehicles. The method was validated for PN using a medium-duty vehicle and successfully applied to measurements of PN emissions from a large fleet of on-road diesel buses. The ratio of PN concentration to CO2 concentration, Z, in the exhaust plume was estimated for individual buses. On the average, a bus emitted about 1.5 x 10(9) particles per mg of CO2 emitted. A histogram of the number of buses as a function of Z showed, for the first time, that the PN emissions from diesel buses followed a gamma distribution, with most of the values within a narrow range and a few buses exhibiting relatively large values. It was estimated that roughly 10% and 50% of the PN emissions came from just 2% and 25% of the buses, respectively. A regression analysis showed that there was a positive correlation between Z and age of buses, with the slope of the best line being significantly different from zero. The mean Z value for the pre-Euro buses was significantly greater than each of the values for the Euro I and II buses.

  16. Hygroscopic properties of large aerosol particles using the example of aged Saharan mineral dust - a semi-automated electron microscopy approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Markus; Heim, Lars-Oliver; Ebert, Martin; Weinbruch, Stephan; Kandler, Konrad

    2015-04-01

    Hygroscopic properties of large aerosol particles using the example of aged Saharan mineral dust - a semi-automated electron microscopy approach Markus Hartmann(1), Lars-Oliver Heim(2), Martin Ebert(1), Stephan Weinbruch(1), Konrad Kandler(1) The Saharan Aerosol Long-range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud-Interaction Experiment (SALTRACE) took place at Barbados from June 10 to July 15 2013. During this period, dust was frequently transported from Africa across the Atlantic Ocean toward the Caribbean. In this study, we investigate the atmospheric aging of the dust aerosol based on its hygroscopicity. Aerosol samples were collected ground-based at Ragged Point (13°9'54.4"N, 59°25'55.7"W) with a single round jet cascade impactor on nickel-substrates. The particles from the stage with a 50% efficiency cutoff size of 1 µm were analyzed with an Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (ESEM) equipped with an energy-dispersive X-ray detector (EDX) and a cooling stage. In an initial automated run, information on particle size and chemical composition for elements heavier than carbon were gathered. Afterwards, electron microscope images of the same sample areas as before were taken during a stepwise increase of relative humidities (between 50 % and 92%), so that the hygroscopic growth of the droplets could be directly observed. The observed hygroscopic growth can be correlated to the chemical composition of the respective particles. For the automated analysis of several hundred images of droplets an image processing algorithm in Python was developed. The algorithm is based on histogram equalization and watershed segmentation. Since SEM images can only deliver two-dimensional information, but the hygroscopic growth factor usually refers to the volume of a drop, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to derive an empirical function for the drop volume depending on the apparent drop diameter in the electron images. Aside from the mineral dust, composed of mostly silicates and

  17. Treatment of arthritis, including rheumatoid arthritis, with radioactive isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, E.; Bordoni, M.E.; Thornton, A.K.

    1988-06-21

    A radioactive composition is described for the treatment of arthritis comprising, in combination, a ferric hydroxide or aluminum hydroxide aggregate suspension having a particle size of 3 to 20 microns, wherein a radionuclide is entrapped, the radionuclide being /sup 166/Holmium.

  18. The treatment of radioactive wastewater by ultrasonic standing wave method.

    PubMed

    Su-Xia, Hou; Ji-Jun, Luo; Bin, He; Ru-Song, Li; Tao, Shen

    2014-06-15

    The radiation hazards of radionuclide arising from the storage of nuclear weapons cannot be ignored to the operators. Ultrasonic standing wave methods can be considered as the green cleaning separation techniques with high efficiency. The application of ultrasonic standing wave methods for liquid radioactive wastes treatment requires solving many problems connected with the proper selection of the frequency and power of ultrasonic transducers, and the processing time, etc. Based on the model of one single suspended radioactive particle subjected to in the field of ultrasonic standing wave, the principle of the treatment of low-level radioactive wastewater by ultrasound was analyzed. The theoretical and simulation results show that under the action of ultrasonic standing wave, the particle will move toward the wave node plane, and the time of particle reaching the plane become shorter when the radius of particle and the frequency and power of ultrasound was enlarged. The experimental results show that the radioactive concentration of wastewater could be reduced from 400 Bq L(-1) to 9.3 Bq L(-1) and the decontamination efficiency was 97.68%. The decontamination efficiency could not be obviously improved by further increasing the treating time.

  19. An explicit large time step particle-in-cell scheme for nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations in the electromagnetic regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleiber, R.; Hatzky, R.; Könies, A.; Mishchenko, A.; Sonnendrücker, E.

    2016-03-01

    A new algorithm for electromagnetic gyrokinetic simulations, the so called "pullback transformation scheme" proposed by Mishchenko et al. [Phys. Plasmas 21, 092110 (2014)] is motivated as an explicit time integrator reset after each full timestep and investigated in detail. Using a numerical dispersion relation valid in slab geometry, it is shown that the linear properties of the scheme are comparable to those of an implicit v∥ -scheme. A nonlinear extension of the mixed variable formulation, derived consistently from a field Lagrangian, is proposed. The scheme shows excellent numerical properties with a low statistical noise level and a large time step especially for MHD modes. The example of a nonlinear slab tearing mode simulation is used to illustrate the properties of different formulations of the physical model equations.

  20. Radioactive waste processing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Robert E.; Ziegler, Anton A.; Serino, David F.; Basnar, Paul J.

    1987-01-01

    Apparatus for use in processing radioactive waste materials for shipment and storage in solid form in a container is disclosed. The container includes a top, and an opening in the top which is smaller than the outer circumference of the container. The apparatus includes an enclosure into which the container is placed, solution feed apparatus for adding a solution containing radioactive waste materials into the container through the container opening, and at least one rotatable blade for blending the solution with a fixing agent such as cement or the like as the solution is added into the container. The blade is constructed so that it can pass through the opening in the top of the container. The rotational axis of the blade is displaced from the center of the blade so that after the blade passes through the opening, the blade and container can be adjusted so that one edge of the blade is adjacent the cylindrical wall of the container, to insure thorough mixing. When the blade is inside the container, a substantially sealed chamber is formed to contain vapors created by the chemical action of the waste solution and fixant, and vapors emanating through the opening in the container.

  1. Method for fabricating thin californium-containing radioactive source wires

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Ian G; Pierce, Larry A

    2006-08-22

    A method for reducing the cross-sectional diameter of a radioactive californium-containing cermet wire while simultaneously improving the wire diameter to a more nearly circular cross section. A collet fixture is used to reduce the wire diameter by controlled pressurization pulses while simultaneously improving the wire cross-sectional diameter. The method is especially suitable for use in hot cells for the production of optimized cermet brachytherapy sources that contain large amounts of radioactive californium-252.

  2. Challenging developments in three decades of accelerator mass spectrometry at ETH: from large particle accelerators to table size instruments.

    PubMed

    Suter, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) was invented for the detection of radiocarbon at natural isotopic concentrations (10(-12) to 10(-15)) more than 30 years ago. Meanwhile this method has also been applied for the analysis of many other long-lived radioisotopes, which are found at very low concentrations. The first investigations were made at large tandem accelerators originally built for nuclear physics research and operating at voltages of 6-12 MV. Today dedicated instruments are mostly used for AMS, which are optimized for associated applications. In the past 15 years, a new generation of much smaller instruments has been developed. For many years it was believed that accelerators with voltages of 2 MV or higher are needed to eliminate the molecular interferences. At these energies the ions are predominantly stripped to charge state 3+, thereby removing the binding electrons of the molecules. In contrast, the new compact facilities use 1+ or 2+ ions. In this case the molecular destruction process is based on molecule-atom collisions in the gas cell. The cross sections for this destruction are sufficiently large that the intensity of molecular components such as (12)CH(2) and (13)CH can be reduced by 10 orders of magnitude. These new facilities can be built much smaller due to the lower energies. Universal instruments providing analysis for many isotopes over the whole range of periodic table have a space requirement of about 4 x 6 m(2); dedicated radiocarbon facilities based on a 200 kV accelerator have a footprint of about 2.5 x 3 m(2). This smallest category of instruments use special technologies: The high voltage terminal with the gas stripper canal is vacuum insulated and the gas is pumped to ground potential through a ceramic pipe. A conventional 200 kV power supply provides the terminal voltage from outside. A review of this new generation of compact AMS facilities is given. Design considerations and performance of these new instruments will be presented

  3. Role of particle stock and phytoplankton community structure in regulating particulate organic carbon export in a large marginal sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Pinghe; Zhao, Daochen; Wang, Lei; Huang, Bangqin; Dai, Minhan

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we utilize 234Th/238U disequilibrium to determine particulate organic carbon (POC) export from the euphotic zone in the South China Sea. Depth profiles of 234Th, total chlorophyll, pigments, and POC were collected during four cruises from August 2009 to May 2011, covering an entire seasonal cycle of spring, summer, autumn, and winter. The extensive data set that was acquired allows for an evaluation of the seasonal variability of upper ocean POC export and its controls in a large marginal sea. The results show that 234Th fluxes from the euphotic zone fall in the range of 528-1550, 340-2694, and 302-2647 dpm m-2 d-1 for the coastal, shelf, and basin regimes, respectively. In these regimes, POC/234Th ratios at the base of the euphotic zone fall in the range of 5.7-58.2, 4.6-44.0, and 2.5-15.5 μmol dpm-1, respectively. Accordingly, for the coastal, shelf, and basin regimes, the mean POC export fluxes from the euphotic zone are 24.3, 18.3, and 6.3 mmolC m-2 d-1, respectively. Seasonal variations in POC export flux are remarkable in the study area, and POC export peaks were generally observed in autumn. We use a simple linear regression (LLS) method to examine the correlation of POC export versus POC stock and versus plankton community structure. We found a strong correlation (R2 = 0.73, p < 0.005) between POC export flux and the fraction of diatom in the coastal area, indicating that POC export flux in this province is driven by large phytoplankton, in particular, diatoms. In the shelf area, a relatively strong correlation (R2 = 0.54, p < 0.0001) was noted for POC export flux and POC stock in the euphotic zone. This indicates that POC export flux in the South China Sea shelf is primarily controlled by POC stock. In contrast, in the South China Sea basin, we identified a weak but intriguing correlation (R2 = 0.26, p < 0.0001) between POC export flux and the fraction of haptophytes and prasinophytes that are typically < 5 μm in size. This suggests that

  4. Radiation Safety of Sealed Radioactive Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, Kathryn H.

    2015-01-01

    Sealed radioactive sources are used in a wide variety of occupational settings and under differing regulatory/licensing structures. The definition of a sealed radioactive source varies between US regulatory authorities and standard-setting organizations. Potential problems with sealed sources cover a range of risks and impacts. The loss of control of high activity sealed sources can result in very high or even fatal doses to members of the public who come in contact with them. Sources that are not adequately sealed, and that fail, can cause spread of contamination and potential intake of radioactive material. There is also the possibility that sealed sources may be (or threatened to be) used for terrorist purposes and disruptive opportunities. Until fairly recently, generally-licensed sealed sources and devices received little, if any, regulatory oversight, and were often forgotten, lost or unaccounted for. Nonetheless, generally licensed devices can contain fairly significant quantities of radioactive material and there is some potential for exposure if a device is treated in a way that it was never designed. Industrial radiographers use and handle high activity and/or high-dose rate sealed sources in the field with a high degree of independence and minimal regulatory oversight. Failure to follow operational procedures and properly handle radiography sources can and has resulted in serious injuries and death. Industrial radiographers have experienced a disproportionately large fraction of incidents that result in unintended exposure to radiation. Sources do not have to contain significant quantities of radioactive material to cause problems in the event of their failure. A loss of integrity can cause the spread of contamination and potential exposure to workers and members of the public. The NCRP has previously provided recommendations on select aspects of sealed source programs. Future efforts to provide recommendations for sealed source programs are discussed.

  5. Radioactive Waste Management in Central Asia - 12034

    SciTech Connect

    Zhunussova, Tamara; Sneve, Malgorzata; Liland, Astrid

    2012-07-01

    After the collapse of the Soviet Union the newly independent states in Central Asia (CA) whose regulatory bodies were set up recently are facing problems with the proper management of radioactive waste and so called 'nuclear legacy' inherited from the past activities. During the former Soviet Union (SU) period, various aspects of nuclear energy use took place in CA republics of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan. Activities range from peaceful use of energy to nuclear testing for example at the former Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site (SNTS) in Kazakhstan, and uranium mining and milling industries in all four countries. Large amounts of radioactive waste (RW) have been accumulated in Central Asia and are waiting for its safe disposal. In 2008 the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA), with the support of the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, has developed bilateral projects that aim to assist the regulatory bodies in Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan (from 2010) to identify and draft relevant regulatory requirements to ensure the protection of the personnel, population and environment during the planning and execution of remedial actions for past practices and radioactive waste management in the CA countries. The participating regulatory authorities included: Kazakhstan Atomic Energy Agency, Kyrgyzstan State Agency on Environmental Protection and Forestry, Nuclear Safety Agency of Tajikistan, and State Inspectorate on Safety in Industry and Mining of Uzbekistan. The scope of the projects is to ensure that activities related to radioactive waste management in both planned and existing exposure situations in CA will be carried out in accordance with the international guidance and recommendations, taking into account the relevant regulatory practice from other countries in this area. In order to understand the problems in the field of radioactive waste management we have analysed the existing regulations through the so

  6. Cryogenic Design of a Large Superconducting Magnet for Astro-particle Shielding on Deep Space Travel Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, Romain; Baudouy, Bertrand

    The Space Radiation Superconducting Shield (SR2S) European project aims at studying a large superconducting toroid magnet to protect the human habitat from the ionizing radiations coming from Galactic Cosmic Ray during long term missions in deep space. Titanium clad MgB2 conductor is used to afford a bending power greater than 5 T.m at 10 K. A specific cryogenic design is needed to cool down this 10 m long and 12.8 m in diameter magnet. A passive cooling system, using a V-groove sunshield, is considered to reduce the heat flux coming from the Sun or Mars. An active configuration, using pulse tube cryocoolers, will be linked to the 80 K thermal screen intercepting most of the heat fluxes coming from the human habitat. The toroid magnet will be connected also to cryocoolers to absorb the few watts reaching its surface. Two kinds of thermal link are being considered to absorb the heat on the 80 K thermal screen. The first one is active, with a pump circulating helium gas in a network of exchange tubes. The second one is passive using long cryogenic pulse heat pipe (PHP) with the evaporator on the surface of the thermal screen and the condenser attached to the pulse tube.

  7. Particle separator

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Charles D.

    1990-01-01

    Method and apparatus (10) are provided for separating and classifying particles (48,50,56) by dispersing the particles within a fluid (52) that is upwardly flowing within a cone-shaped pipe (12) that has its large end (20) above its small end (18). Particles of similar size and shape (48,50) migrate to individual levels (A,B) within the flowing fluid. As the fluid is deflected by a plate (42) at the top end of the pipe (12), the smallest particles are collected on a shelf-like flange (40). Ever larger particles are collected as the flow rate of the fluid is increased. To prevent particle sticking on the walls (14) of the pipe (12), additional fluid is caused to flow into the pipe (12) through holes (68) that are specifically provided for that purpose. Sticking is further prevented by high frequency vibrators (70) that are positioned on the apparatus (10).

  8. Gelation of large hard particles with short-range attraction induced by bridging of small soft microgels.

    PubMed

    Luo, Junhua; Yuan, Guangcui; Zhao, Chuanzhuang; Han, Charles C; Chen, Jie; Liu, Yun

    2015-03-28

    In this study, mixed suspensions of large hard polystyrene microspheres and small soft poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) microgels are used as model systems to investigate the static and viscoelastic properties of suspensions which go through liquid to gel transitions. The microgels cause short-range attraction between microspheres through the bridging and depletion mechanism whose strength can be tuned by the microgel concentration. Rheological measurements are performed on suspensions with the volume fraction (Φ) of microspheres ranging from 0.02 to 0.15, and the transitions from liquid-like to solid-like behaviors triggered by the concentration of microgels are carefully identified. Two gel lines due to bridging attraction under unsaturated conditions are obtained. Ultra-small angle neutron scattering is used to probe the thermodynamic properties of suspensions approaching the liquid-solid transition boundaries. Baxter's sticky hard-sphere model is used to extract the effective inter-microsphere interaction introduced by the small soft microgels. It is found that the strength of attraction (characterized by a single stickiness parameter τ) on two gel lines formed by bridging is very close to the theoretical value for the spinodal line in the τ-Φ phase diagram predicted by Baxter's model. This indicates that the nature of the gel state may have the same thermodynamic origins, independent of the detailed mechanism of the short-range attraction. The relationship between the rheological criterion for the liquid-solid transition and the thermodynamic criterion for the equilibrium-nonequilibrium transition is also discussed.

  9. Radioactive elements in stellar atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Gopka, Vira; Yushchenko, Alexander; Goriely, Stephane; Shavrina, Angelina; Kang, Young Woon

    2006-07-12

    The identification of lines of radioactive elements (Tc, Pm and elements with 83radioactive decay of Th and U in the upper levels of stellar atmospheres, contamination of stellar atmosphere by recent SN explosion, and spallation reactions.

  10. Charge-to-mass dependence of heavy ion spectral breaks in large gradual solar energetic particle events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, M. I.; Mason, G. M.; Dayeh, M. A.; Ebert, R. W.; McComas, D. J.; Li, G.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Schwadron, N. A.; Smith, C. W.

    2016-11-01

    We fit the ∼0.1-500 MeV/nucleon H-Fe spectra in 46 large SEP events surveyed by [1] with the double power-law Band function to obtain a normalization constant, low- and high-energy parameters γa and γb ; and break energy EB . We also calculate the low-energy power-law spectral slope γ1. We find that: 1) γa , γ1, and γb are species-independent within a given SEP event, and the spectra steepen with increasing energy; 2) EB ’s are well ordered by Q/M ratio, and decrease systematically with decreasing Q/M, scaling as (Q/M)α with α varying between ∼0.2-3 3) α is well correlated with Fe/O at ∼0.16-0.23 MeV/nucleon and CME speed; 4) In most events: α <1.4 and the spectra steepen significantly at higher energy with γb -γa >3 and 5) Seven out of nine extreme SEP events (associated with faster CMEs and GLEs) are Fe-rich and have α >1.4 with flat spectra at low and high energies yielding γb -γa <3. The species-independence of γa , γ1, and γb and the systematic Q/M dependence of EB within an event, as well as the range of values for α suggest that the formation of double power-laws in SEP events occurs primarily due to diffusive acceleration at near-Sun CME shocks and not due to scattering in the interplanetary turbulence. In most events, the Q/M-dependence of EB is consistent with the equal diffusion coefficient condition while the event-to-event variations in a are probably driven by differences in the near-shock wave intensity spectra, which are flatter than the Kolmogorov turbulence spectrum but still weaker compared to that inferred for the extreme events. The weaker turbulence allows SEPs to escape more easily, resulting in weaker Q/M-dependence of EB , (lower a values) and spectral steepening at higher energies. In extreme events, the flatter spectra at high- and low-energy and stronger Q/M-dependence of EB (larger α values) occur due to enhanced wave power, which also enables the faster CME shocks to accelerate flare suprathermals more

  11. PERSPECTIVE: Fireworks and radioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitenecker, Katharina

    2009-09-01

    both reaction products and unburnt constituents of a pyrotechnic mixture. One major environmental concern in pyrotechnics focuses on the emission of heavy metals. This is the topic discussed in the article by Georg Steinhauser and Andreas Musilek in this issue [4]. A possible interrelationship between respiratory effects and fireworks emissions of barium-rich aerosols was also raised last year [5]. In recent years the potential hazard of naturally occurring radioactive material has become of importance to the scientific community. Naturally occurring radionuclides can be of terrestrial or cosmological origin. Terrestrial radionuclides were present in the presolar cloud that later contracted in order to build our solar system. These radionuclides—mainly heavy metals—and their non-radioactive isotopes are nowadays fixed in the matrix of the Earth's structure. Usually, their percentage is quite small compared to their respective stable isotopes—though there are exceptions like in the case of radium. The problem with environmental pollution due to naturally occurring radioactive material begins when this material is concentrated due to mining and milling, and later further processed [6]. Environmental pollution due to radioactive material goes back as far as the Copper and Iron Ages, when the first mines were erected in order to mine ores (gold, silver, copper, iron, etc), resulting in naturally occurring radioactive material being set free with other dusts into the atmosphere. So where is the link between pyrotechnics and radioactivity? In this article presented by Georg Steinhauser and Andreas Musilek [4], the pyrotechnic ingredients barium nitrate and strontium nitrate are explored with respect to their chemical similarities to radium. The fundamental question, therefore, was whether radium can be processed together with barium and strontium. If so, the production and ignition of these pyrotechnic ingredients could cause atmospheric pollution with radium aerosols

  12. Radioactive waste processing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, R.E.; Ziegler, A.A.; Serino, D.F.; Basnar, P.J.

    1985-08-30

    Apparatus for use in processing radioactive waste materials for shipment and storage in solid form in a container is disclosed. The container includes a top, and an opening in the top which is smaller than the outer circumference of the container. The apparatus includes an enclosure into which the container is placed, solution feed apparatus for adding a solution containing radioactive waste materials into the container through the container opening, and at least one rotatable blade for blending the solution with a fixing agent such as cement or the like as the solution is added into the container. The blade is constructed so that it can pass through the opening in the top of the container. The rotational axis of the blade is displaced from the center of the blade so that after the blade passes through the opening, the blade and container can be adjusted so that one edge of the blade is adjacent the cylindrical wall of the container, to insure thorough mixing. When the blade is inside the container, a substantially sealed chamber is formed to contain vapors created by the chemical action of the waste solution and fixant, and vapors emanating through the opening in the container. The chamber may be formed by placing a removable extension over the top of the container. The extension communicates with the apparatus so that such vapors are contained within the container, extension and solution feed apparatus. A portion of the chamber includes coolant which condenses the vapors. The resulting condensate is returned to the container by the force of gravity.

  13. Application of ultrafiltration and complexation to the treatment of low-level radioactive effluents

    SciTech Connect

    Chmielewski, A.G.; Harasimowicz, M.

    1995-04-01

    This paper addresses certain aspects of the design and development process aiming at reducing the radioactivity of liquid low-level waste streams (LLLW) to a very low level. Two types of membrane processes are being examined: ultrafiltration (UF) and seeded ultrafiltration (SUF). The UF membrane enables the removal of very fine particles of solid material from liquid radioactive waste. Only the particles with molecular weight above the cut-off of the UF membrane are retained. Much greater radioactivity removal may be achieved if the effluent is treated with high-molecular-molecules. This paper presents results of experiments consisting of decontamination of model radioactive effluents, simulated waste, and original LLLW by using several ligands for binding the radioactive ions of Cr, Co and Cs.

  14. Radioactive hot cell access hole decontamination machine

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, William E.

    1982-01-01

    Radioactive hot cell access hole decontamination machine. A mobile housing has an opening large enough to encircle the access hole and has a shielding door, with a door opening and closing mechanism, for uncovering and covering the opening. The housing contains a shaft which has an apparatus for rotating the shaft and a device for independently translating the shaft from the housing through the opening and access hole into the hot cell chamber. A properly sized cylindrical pig containing wire brushes and cloth or other disks, with an arrangement for releasably attaching it to the end of the shaft, circumferentially cleans the access hole wall of radioactive contamination and thereafter detaches from the shaft to fall into the hot cell chamber.

  15. State estimation in large-scale open channel networks using sequential Monte Carlo methods: Optimal sampling importance resampling and implicit particle filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiee, Mohammad; Barrau, Axel; Bayen, Alexandre M.

    2013-06-01

    This article investigates the performance of Monte Carlo-based estimation methods for estimation of flow state in large-scale open channel networks. After constructing a state space model of the flow based on the Saint-Venant equations, we implement the optimal sampling importance resampling filter to perform state estimation in a case in which measurements are available at every time step. Considering a case in which measurements become available intermittently, a random-map implementation of the implicit particle filter is applied to estimate the state trajectory in the interval between the measurements. Finally, some heuristics are proposed, which are shown to improve the estimation results and lower the computational cost. In the first heuristics, considering the case in which measurements are available at every time step, we apply the implicit particle filter over time intervals of a desired size while incorporating all the available measurements over the corresponding time interval. As a second heuristic method, we introduce a maximum a posteriori (MAP) method, which does not require sampling. It will be seen, through implementation, that the MAP method provides more accurate results in the case of our application while having a smaller computational cost. All estimation methods are tested on a network of 19 tidally forced subchannels and 1 reservoir, Clifton Court Forebay, in Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta in California, and numerical results are presented.

  16. Large pore volume mesoporous copper particles and scaffold microporous carbon material obtained from an inorganic-organic nanohybrid material, copper-succinate-layered hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Ghotbi, Mohammad Yeganeh; Bagheri, Narjes; Sadrnezhaad, S K

    2011-10-01

    Copper-succinate-layered hydroxide (CSLH), a new nanohybrid material, was synthesized as an inorganic-organic nanohybrid, in which organic moiety was intercalated between the layers of a single cation layered material, copper hydroxide nitrate. Microporous scaffold carbon material was obtained by thermal decomposition of the nanohybrid at 500 °C under argon atmosphere followed by acid washing process. Furthermore, the heat-treated product of the nanohybrid at 600 °C was ultrafine mesoporous metallic copper particles. The results of this study confirmed the great potential of CSLH to produce the carbon material with large surface area (580 m(2)/g) and high pore volume copper powder (2.04 cm(3)/g).

  17. Canonical symplectic particle-in-cell method for long-term large-scale simulations of the Vlasov–Maxwell equations

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Hong; Liu, Jian; Xiao, Jianyuan; Zhang, Ruili; He, Yang; Wang, Yulei; Sun, Yajuan; Burby, Joshua W.; Ellison, Leland; Zhou, Yao

    2015-12-14

    Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation is the most important numerical tool in plasma physics. However, its long-term accuracy has not been established. To overcome this difficulty, we developed a canonical symplectic PIC method for the Vlasov-Maxwell system by discretising its canonical Poisson bracket. A fast local algorithm to solve the symplectic implicit time advance is discovered without root searching or global matrix inversion, enabling applications of the proposed method to very large-scale plasma simulations with many, e.g. 10(9), degrees of freedom. The long-term accuracy and fidelity of the algorithm enables us to numerically confirm Mouhot and Villani's theory and conjecture on nonlinear Landau damping over several orders of magnitude using the PIC method, and to calculate the nonlinear evolution of the reflectivity during the mode conversion process from extraordinary waves to Bernstein waves.

  18. Canonical symplectic particle-in-cell method for long-term large-scale simulations of the Vlasov-Maxwell equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Hong; Liu, Jian; Xiao, Jianyuan; Zhang, Ruili; He, Yang; Wang, Yulei; Sun, Yajuan; Burby, Joshua W.; Ellison, Leland; Zhou, Yao

    2016-01-01

    Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation is the most important numerical tool in plasma physics. However, its long-term accuracy has not been established. To overcome this difficulty, we developed a canonical symplectic PIC method for the Vlasov-Maxwell system by discretising its canonical Poisson bracket. A fast local algorithm to solve the symplectic implicit time advance is discovered without root searching or global matrix inversion, enabling applications of the proposed method to very large-scale plasma simulations with many, e.g. 109, degrees of freedom. The long-term accuracy and fidelity of the algorithm enables us to numerically confirm Mouhot and Villani’s theory and conjecture on nonlinear Landau damping over several orders of magnitude using the PIC method, and to calculate the nonlinear evolution of the reflectivity during the mode conversion process from extraordinary waves to Bernstein waves.

  19. Environmental radioactive intercomparison program and radioactive standards program

    SciTech Connect

    Dilbeck, G.

    1993-12-31

    The Environmental Radioactivity Intercomparison Program described herein provides quality assurance support for laboratories involved in analyzing public drinking water under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) Regulations, and to the environmental radiation monitoring activities of various agencies. More than 300 federal and state nuclear facilities and private laboratories participate in some phase of the program. This presentation describes the Intercomparison Program studies and matrices involved, summarizes the precision and accuracy requirements of various radioactive analytes, and describes the traceability determinations involved with radioactive calibration standards distributed to the participants. A summary of program participants, sample and report distributions, and additional responsibilities of this program are discussed.

  20. Tools for modeling radioactive contaminants in chip materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrobel, F.; Kaouache, A.; Saigné, F.; Touboul, A. D.; Schrimpf, R. D.; Warot, G.; Bruguier, O.

    2017-03-01

    Radioactive pollutants are naturally present in microelectronic device materials and can be an issue for the reliability of devices. The main concern is alpha emitters that produce high-energy particles (a few MeV) that ionize the semiconductor and then trigger soft errors. The question is to know what kinds of radionuclides are present in the device, their location in the device and the abundance of each species. In this paper we describe tools that are required to address the issue of radioactive pollutants in electronic devices.

  1. Automatic Searching Radioactive Sources by Airborne Radioactive Survey Using Multicopter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rim, H.; Eun, S. B.; Kim, K.; Park, S.; Jung, H. K.

    2015-12-01

    In order to prepare emergency situation lost a dangerous radioelement source in advance and to search a radioactive source automatically, we develop airborne radioelement survey system by multicopter. This multicopter radioelement survey system consists of a small portable customized BGO (Bismuth Germanate Oxide) detector, video recording part, wireless connecting part to ground pilot, GPS, and several equipments for automatic flight. This system is possible to search flight by preprogramed lines. This radioactive detecting system are tested to find intentional hidden source, The performance of detecting a source is well proved with very low flight altitude in spite of depending on the magnitude of radioelement sources. The advantage of multicopter system, one of UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle), is to avoid the potential of close access to a dangerous radioactive source by using fully automatic searching capability. In this paper, we introduce our multicopter system for detecting radioactive source and synthetic case history for demonstrating this system.

  2. Teaching Elementary Particle Physics, Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobson, Art

    2011-01-01

    In order to explain certain features of radioactive beta decay, Wolfgang Pauli suggested in 1930 that the nucleus emitted, in addition to a beta particle, another particle of an entirely new type. The hypothesized particle, dubbed the neutrino, would not be discovered experimentally for another 25 years. It's not easy to detect neutrinos, because…

  3. SELF SINTERING OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES

    DOEpatents

    McVay, T.N.; Johnson, J.R.; Struxness, E.G.; Morgan, K.Z.

    1959-12-29

    A method is described for disposal of radioactive liquid waste materials. The wastes are mixed with clays and fluxes to form a ceramic slip and disposed in a thermally insulated container in a layer. The temperature of the layer rises due to conversion of the energy of radioactivity to heat boillng off the liquid to fomn a dry mass. The dry mass is then covered with thermal insulation, and the mass is self-sintered into a leach-resistant ceramic cake by further conversion of the energy of radioactivity to heat.

  4. Star formation and extinct radioactivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, A. G. W.

    1984-01-01

    An assessment is made of the evidence for the existence of now-extinct radioactivities in primitive solar system material, giving attention to implications for the early stages of sun and solar system formation. The characteristics of possible disturbances in dense molecular clouds which can initiate the formation of cloud cores is discussed, with emphasis on these disturbances able to generate fresh radioactivities. A one-solar mass red giant star on the asymptotic giant branch appears to have been the best candidate to account for the short-lived extinct radioactivities in the early solar system.

  5. RADIOACTIVE CONCENTRATOR AND RADIATION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Hatch, L.P.

    1959-12-29

    A method is presented for forming a permeable ion exchange bed using Montmorillonite clay to absorb and adsorb radioactive ions from liquid radioactive wastes. A paste is formed of clay, water, and a material that fomns with clay a stable aggregate in the presence of water. The mixture is extruded into a volume of water to form clay rods. The rods may then be used to remove radioactive cations from liquid waste solutions. After use, the rods are removed from the solution and heated to a temperature of 750 to 1000 deg C to fix the ratioactive cations in the clay.

  6. Natural inflation: Particle physics models, power-law spectra for large-scale structure, and constraints from the Cosmic Background Explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Fred C.; Bond, J. Richard; Freese, Katherine; Frieman, Joshua A.; Olinto, Angela V.

    1993-01-01

    We discuss the particle physics basis for models of natural inflation with pseudo Nambu-Goldstone bosons and study the consequences for large-scale structure of the nonscale-invariant density fluctuation spectra that arise in natural inflation and other models. A pseudo Nambu-Goldstone boson, with a potential of the form V(φ)=Λ4[1+/-cos(φ/f)], can naturally give rise to an epoch of inflation in the early Universe, if f~MPl and Λ~MGUT. Such mass scales arise in particle physics models with a gauge group that becomes strongly interacting at the grand unified theory scale. We work out a specific particle physics example based on the multiple gaugino condensation scenario in superstring theory. We then study the cosmological evolution of and constraints upon these inflation models numerically and analytically. To obtain sufficient inflation with a probability of order 1 and a high enough post-inflation reheat temperature for baryogenesis, we require f>~0.3MPl. The primordial density fluctuation spectrum generated by quantum fluctuations in φ is a non-scale-invariant power law P(k)~kns, with ns~=1-(M2Pl/8πf2) leading to more power on large length scales than the ns=1 Harrison-Zeldovich spectrum. (For the reader primarily interested in large-scale structure, the discussion of this topic is presented in Sec. IV and is intended to be nearly self-contained.) We pay special attention to the prospects of using the enhanced power to explain the otherwise puzzling large-scale clustering of galaxies and clusters and their flows. We find that the standard cold dark matter (CDM) model with 0<~ns<~0.6 could in principle explain these data. However, the microwave background anisotropies recently detected by the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) imply such low primordial amplitudes for these CDM models (that is, bias factors b8>~2 for ns<~0.6) that galaxy formation would occur too late to be viable and the large-scale galaxy velocities would be too small. In fact, combining the

  7. Self-consistent long-time simulation of chirping energetic particle modes and abrupt large events in beam-driven JT-60U tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierwage, A.; Shinohara, K.; Todo, Y.; Aiba, N.; Ishikawa, M.; Matsunaga, G.; Takechi, M.; Yagi, M.

    2016-10-01

    Recurring bursts of chirping Alfvén modes as well as so-called Abrupt Large Events (ALE) that were observed in JT-60U tokamak plasmas driven by negative-ion-based neutral beams (N-NB) are reproduced in first-principle simulations performed with an extended version of the hybrid code MEGA. This code simulates the interactions between gyrokinetic fast ions and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes in the presence of a realistic fast ion source and collisions, so that it self-consistently captures dynamics across a wide range of time scales (0.01-100 ms). Detailed comparisons with experimental measurements are performed. On the long time scale (10-100 ms) the simulation reproduces ALEs with the associated avalanche-like transport of fast ions. ALEs are shown to occur when multiple modes with toroidal mode numbers n = 1 , 2 , 3 are excited to large amplitudes. On the meso time scale (1-10 ms), bursts of chirping modes are reproduced, which are shown to be n = 1 energetic particle modes (EPM). On the short time scale (0.01-0.1 ms), pulsations and phase jumps are reproduced, which we interpret as the result of beating between multiple resonant wave packets. JSPS Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (No. 25820443, 16K18341). NIFS Collaborative Research Program (NIFS12KNTT016).

  8. Large-amplitude quantum mechanics in polyatomic hydrides. II. A particle-on-a-sphere model for XH(n) (n=4,5).

    PubMed

    Deskevich, Michael P; McCoy, Anne B; Hutson, Jeremy M; Nesbitt, David J

    2008-03-07

    This paper describes the application of a relatively simple, but computationally tractable, "particle-on-a-sphere" (POS) model for quantum-mechanical calculation of large-amplitude, H atom dynamics in polyatomic hydrides (XH(n)), based on radially relaxed, two-dimensional angular motion of H atoms on the surface of a sphere. This work focuses on systems with many degrees of freedom, i.e., XH(4) (eight dimensional) and XH(5) (ten dimensional), with corresponding molecular analogs of CH(4) and CH(5) (+) and is applicable to rovibrationally excited states with J> or =0. A pairwise-additive potential fit for CH(5) (+), which yields remarkable agreement with geometries, energies, and barrier heights on the full-dimensional surface of Brown et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 121, 4105 (2004)] is presented. Comparisons with experimental data and diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) methods test convergence for the POS model and provide insight into multidimensional quantum rovibrational dynamics. In particular, POS energy-level patterns for a series of scaled CH(5) (+) potentials indicate an absence of strong tunneling behavior, consistent with the highly delocalized wave functions, large zero-point energies, and small interconversion barriers noted in previous DMC studies of Brown et al.

  9. (Immobilization of radioactive wastes)

    SciTech Connect

    Dole, L.R.

    1986-12-18

    The traveler participated as the co-chairman of the France/US Workshop in Cadarache, France, on the immobilization of radioactive wastes in cement-based materials. These meetings and site visits were conducted under the bilateral exchange agreement between the US-DOE and the Commissariate a l'Energie Atomique (CEA-France). Visits in France included the Cadarache, Valduc, Saclay, and Fontenay-aux-Roses Nuclear Research Centers. As a result of these discussions, an exchange of scientists between Saclay and ORNL was proposed. The traveler continued on to the FRG to visit a hazardous waste site remedial action project in Sprendlingen and the nuclear research and production facilities at the Karlsruhe Kernforschungszentrum (KfK) and the Alkem/Nukem/Transnuklear facilities at Hanau. Visits in the FRG were under the bilateral exchange agreement between the US-DOE and the Bundes Ministerium fur Forschung und Technologie (BMFT). The FRG supplied the traveler data on studies of super-compaction volume reduction efficiencies by KfK and Nukem. Also, Transnuklear is considering contributing two of their larger Konrad-certified packages to the MDU studies at ORNL. 1 tab.

  10. Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM)

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, P.

    1997-02-01

    This paper discusses the broad problems presented by Naturally Occuring Radioactive Materials (NORM). Technologically Enhanced naturally occuring radioactive material includes any radionuclides whose physical, chemical, radiological properties or radionuclide concentration have been altered from their natural state. With regard to NORM in particular, radioactive contamination is radioactive material in an undesired location. This is a concern in a range of industries: petroleum; uranium mining; phosphorus and phosphates; fertilizers; fossil fuels; forestry products; water treatment; metal mining and processing; geothermal energy. The author discusses in more detail the problem in the petroleum industry, including the isotopes of concern, the hazards they present, the contamination which they cause, ways to dispose of contaminated materials, and regulatory issues. He points out there are three key programs to reduce legal exposure and problems due to these contaminants: waste minimization; NORM assesment (surveys); NORM compliance (training).

  11. Radioactive waste material melter apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Newman, D.F.; Ross, W.A.

    1990-04-24

    An apparatus for preparing metallic radioactive waste material for storage is disclosed. The radioactive waste material is placed in a radiation shielded enclosure. The waste material is then melted with a plasma torch and cast into a plurality of successive horizontal layers in a mold to form a radioactive ingot in the shape of a spent nuclear fuel rod storage canister. The apparatus comprises a radiation shielded enclosure having an opening adapted for receiving a conventional transfer cask within which radioactive waste material is transferred to the apparatus. A plasma torch is mounted within the enclosure. A mold is also received within the enclosure for receiving the melted waste material and cooling it to form an ingot. The enclosure is preferably constructed in at least two parts to enable easy transport of the apparatus from one nuclear site to another. 8 figs.

  12. Radioactive waste material melter apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Newman, Darrell F.; Ross, Wayne A.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus for preparing metallic radioactive waste material for storage is disclosed. The radioactive waste material is placed in a radiation shielded enclosure. The waste material is then melted with a plasma torch and cast into a plurality of successive horizontal layers in a mold to form a radioactive ingot in the shape of a spent nuclear fuel rod storage canister. The apparatus comprises a radiation shielded enclosure having an opening adapted for receiving a conventional transfer cask within which radioactive waste material is transferred to the apparatus. A plasma torch is mounted within the enclosure. A mold is also received within the enclosure for receiving the melted waste material and cooling it to form an ingot. The enclosure is preferably constructed in at least two parts to enable easy transport of the apparatus from one nuclear site to another.